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Flight International - 8 May 2018

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Super shrink
Why downsized
SSJ75 could be
regional player
as Russia’s S7
backs Sukhoi
derivative 18
8-14 May 2018 No patrol
Japan cheers
performance of
its maritime P-1:
the surveillance
ace that money
cannot buy 20
High flyers
Can airports
match step with
global demand
while passenger
numbers move
ever higher? 26
flightglobal.com
PRODUCTION
Narrowbodies
keep climbing
Soaring Neo backlog pushes Airbus to
consider flying through 70 per month
ISSN 0 0 1 5 - 3 7 1 0
£3.80
1 9
9
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embraercommercialaviation.com
CONTENTS
Volume 193 Number 5635
8-14 MAY 2018
NEWS
Why downsized
SSJ75 could be
regional player
as Russia’s S7
backs Sukhoi
derivative 18
No patrol
Japan cheers
performance of
its maritime P-1:
the surveillance
ace that money
cannot buy 20
8-14 May 2018
THIS WEEK
8 US Senators aim to down Turkish F-35
9 CSeries sale prompts return to regionals for
Bombardier.
R-R breaks back of urgent checks on 787 engines
10 FAA widens scope of CFM56 directive
11 Leaner P-8 ready to locate fresh orders
High flyers
Can airports
match step with
global demand
while passenger
numbers move
ever higher? 26
flightglobal.com
PRODUCTION
Narrowbodies
keep climbing
AirTeamImages
Soaring Neo backlog pushes Airbus to
consider flying through 70 per month
ISSN 0 0 1 5 - 3 7 1 0
£3.80
1 9
9
770015 371303
FIN_080518_301.indd 1
03/05/2018 09:38
COVER IMAGE
After its chief financial
officer alluded to further
increases in production at
Airbus, we chose this
Matthieu Douhaire shot
of an A321neo at last
year’s Paris air show P17
XPONENTIAL SHOW REPORT
13 UAVs learn how to defend themselves
14 Commercial need driving ScanEagle3.
DroneBase pact brings Airbus Aerial to ground.
VTOL plan gives partners Edge
15 Bell sees military use for POD transport.
Textron takes tilt at market with X5-55 testbed
AIR TRANSPORT
16 Air Canada reschedules Max deliveries.
West Wind crash probe highlights de-icing
failure
18 Signs of recovery at Zodiac, but Airbus
demands quality
19 GEnx bug could slow 787-10 approval
DEFENCE
20 Tokyo not fixed on P-1 export path.
GAO exposes F-35B’s sustainment woes
21 Policy shift could ease armed UAV sales.
Australian MRO facility to boost Taipan
support
22 Light-attack demonstration on target.
King Air pushes for second chance
BUSINESS AVIATION
24 Gulfstream bullish despite delivery dip.
Revenue decrease fails to dent Embraer
optimism
25 Bell ‘cautious’ of oversupply as it readies 525
for market.
King Air 350 propeller update a sweeping
success.
Dorval set to begin Global 7000 outfitting
Japan mulls further potential of Kawasaki P-1 P20
COVER STORY
17 Airbus produces its rate expectations
Airframer studies lifting A320 output to 70 per
month by 2020 – even as engine supply affects
current delivery schedule
FEATURES
26 AIRPORTS Space constrained European hubs
are struggling to keep pace with growing
demand for travel as short-term solutions fail to
overcome the limits imposed by runway and air
traffic control capacity
30 Global traffic rankings in focus Preliminary
figures point to ongoing growth in 2017, with
the Asia-Pacific region a major contributor
32 Creating capacity Passenger numbers across
the 100 biggest airports rose almost 5.6% in
2017, which is slightly less than the near-6%
increase registered by the largest hubs in 2016
REGULARS
7Comment
34 Straight & Level
35Letters
37Classified
39Jobs
43 Working Week
NEXT WEEK DIGITAL
Be sure to access our latest
digital-only edition, with an
in-depth analysis of the
A380’s current operations
Gulfstream, Airbus
All Nippon Airways
BEHIND THE HEADLINES
Garrett Reim (pictured)
caught up with the latest
unmanned air vehicle news
at the AUVSI Xponential
gathering in Denver (P13).
In Seattle, Stephen Trimble
got a Boeing P-8 Poseidon
production update (P11)
Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force
Super shrink
Gulfstream confident new models will lift revenue P24. Zodiac gets a grip on Airbus supply issues P18
Download the 2017 Commercial Engines Report
now with updated enhanced data and in-depth market analysis
flightglobal.com/commengines
CFM 2017 strip ad.indd 1
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15/06/2017 08:52
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 3
19/07/2012 17:51
CONTENTS
Image of
the week
Pictured against a stunning
mountainous backdrop
near Bagram airfield in
Afghanistan, this US Army
CH-47F is shown during a
joint personnel recovery
exercise. Flight Fleets
Analyzer shows the service
has an inventory of more
than 480 Chinook-family
rotorcraft in active service
View more great aviation
shots online and in our
weekly tablet edition:
US Air Force
flightglobal.com/
flight-international
The week in numbers
8%
Question of the week
Last week, we asked: Future Airbus/Dassault fighter?
You said:
Flight Dashboard
Total votes:
United Airlines has upped its stake in Brazilian carrier Azul
from 3.7%, buying 4.3% from Hainan, which maintains 17%
$540m
Expensive flop
852 votes
42%
L3 Technologies
41%
Cash to be paid by private equity investor AIP for L3’s Vertex,
Crestview and TCS logistics and components businesses
7,189
2,008
Airbus
Airbus closed Q1 with a growing order backlog, up year-onyear by 7%, or 445 aircraft; net orders in the period were 45
17%
Decent compromise
812 votes
Guaranteed ace
344 votes
This week, we ask: P-8 Poseidon sales prospects?
❑ Boeing unsinkable ❑ Only for leading nations
❑ Beware cheaper rivals
Vote at flightglobal.com
FlightGlobal’s premium news and data service delivers breaking air transport stories with
profiles, schedules, and fleet, financial and traffic information flightglobal.com/dashboard
Download the Military
Simulator Census online now.
CAE – Your worldwide training partner of choice
4 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
www.flightglobal.com/milisim
flightglobal.com
More uptime,
less downtime.
More flights, more revenue. That’s great for business.
Utilization defined.
www.cfmaeroengines.com
CFM International is a 50/50 joint company between GE and Safran Aircraft Engines
Aerospace Big Data Series
Sept 2018 - Miami • Nov 2018 - London • Mar 2019 - Singapore
Join the conversation
#AeroBigData
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Airlines are faced with a
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COMMENT
Splashing out
Boeing appears to have the large maritime patrol aircraft market all to itself – but the rapid
production transition to its 737 Max poses a major cost challenge for the NG-derived P-8
or many nations, the ability to perform effective
maritime surveillance from the air is an essential
requirement, and one that is likely to become even
more critical where territorial disputes risk flaring up,
such as in parts of the Asia-Pacific region.
As the newest kid on the block, Boeing’s 737-800Abased P-8 Poseidon is today’s gold-standard product,
with the US Navy relying on the type, along with
­export buyers Australia and India, who will soon be
followed by European customers Norway and the UK.
Optimised for the anti-submarine warfare role, the
P-8 is a potent symbol of defensive might and benefits
significantly from being a derivative of one of the
world’s two dominant narrowbody airliner families,
orders for which are at record levels.
Airbus has the skills to develop a
rival based on the A320neo, but
has no programme or customers
But as its 100th production example advances through
a completion hangar near the fast-moving commercial
final assembly lines in Renton, Washington, Boeing finds
itself with an increasingly nagging headache. With its
Max-family twinjets now flying off the line, how can it
maintain efficiency on the Poseidon programme as the
number of NG-series aircraft slows to a trickle, before ending entirely for airlines in late 2019, leaving just 1.5 P-8As
heading for completion per month?
The company is now wrestling with this issue, having tasked staff with finding design and production
system improvements on the Poseidon. But it remains
bullish about future sales prospects with the product,
US Navy
F
Torpedoed by own success?
which should at least double its current deliveries.
With next to no viable competition in the large
­maritime patrol aircraft sector, the company has every
reason to be positive. BAE Systems’ Nimrod MRA4
was scrapped long ago, Japan’s striking – and highly
capable – Kawasaki P-1 is not available to export
­buyers, and Saab has yet to find a taker for its business
jet-based Swordfish system. And while Airbus has the
skills and capabilities required to develop a rival based
on the re-engined A320neo family, it has no current
programme to do so, as the current fleets of its most
likely customers – France, Germany and Spain – are
due to fly on for many more years.
With more than a dozen nations continuing to use
combined fleets of more than 250 aged Lockheed
­Martin P-3 Orions, Boeing’s P-8 should have a very
bright future on the international market: just so long as
the company can manage to keep its costs under
­control as the NG era ramps down. ■
See This Week P11
As good as it gets
O
For more news and analysis
from the global defence sector
each week, go online at:
flightglobal.com/defence
flightglobal.com
ne way to summarise aviation history is to trace
two eras of development. Era 1 was about invention and technology; flight itself, all-metal structures,
pressurisation and jets made for useful range, payload
and speed. Era 2 has been marked by politics; starting
with deregulation in the 1970s, rising wealth and the
post-Cold War flourishing of international trade transformed air travel from luxury to commodity.
Era 2 has seen technological innovations, but these
have been incremental, not revolutionary. It is by commerce, not gadgets, that we come to the dawn of Era 3.
This is characterised not by new opportunities, but
by a daunting new challenge. In short, runways are
full, airspace is full and yet, all forecasts predict an
endlessly rising call for more seats on more flights.
One approach to Era 3 is economic: raise flight taxes
sharply to dampen demand. This could be effective –
environmentalists would add “necessary” – but seems
unlikely in today’s political environment.
A second leans on technology. Sophisticated air
­traffic control and novel solutions such as an inter-­
airport Hyperloop link proposed in the Netherlands
might keep the system flowing a little longer. Alas, such
schemes recall the standard – but obviously flawed – response to road traffic congestion: adding another lane.
The smart money will be on a third approach. Carry
on tinkering at the edges and learn to live with it. ■
See Feature P26
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 7
THIS WEEK
For insight and analysis of the latest
developments in the defence sector, visit:
flightglobal.com/defence
BRIEFING
AMERICAN ADDS REGIONAL JETS
Lockheed Martin
DEALS American Airlines has ordered 15 Bombardier CRJ900s
and 15 Embraer 175s, both with 76-seat configurations, worth a
combined $1.4 billion at list prices. The CRJ900s will feature
Bombardier’s new Atmosphere cabin. Deliveries of both regional types are scheduled to begin in 2019.
ETHIOPIAN TAKES 10 MORE Q400S
ORDER Ethiopian Airlines will purchase 10 Bombardier Q400s,
valued at $332 million at list prices. The agreement – which also
includes purchase rights for five additional examples – calls for
deliveries to begin in the second quarter of 2019. The Addis
Ababa-based airline currently operates 17 Q400s, and now has
outstanding orders, including the latest, for another 12.
NEW CHIEF FOR AIRBUS TECHNOLOGY POST
APPOINTMENT Airbus has named its defence engineering
chief, Grazia Vittadini, as the company’s new chief technology
officer, succeeding Paul Eremenko. In her new role, Vittadini
joined the Airbus executive committee from the beginning of
May. She previously served as executive vice-president of engineering within the Airbus Defence & Space division.
BAHRAIN GETS AH-1Z APPROVAL
ROTORCRAFT The US Department of State has approved a
potentially $911 million sale of 12 Bell AH-1Z attack helicopters
to Bahrain. Also including training and support services, the
deal is being concluded via Washington’s Foreign Military Sales
process. Pakistan is the only previous export customer for the
US Marine Corps-operated type.
BOEING GROWS SERVICES UNIT WITH KLX DEAL
ACQUISITION Boeing is to buy aviation parts and services
provider KLX for $4.25 billion. It will be merged with Boeing’s
Aviall operation within the Boeing Global Services portfolio.
Expected to close by the third quarter, the deal is conditional
on Miami-based KLX divesting its energy services business.
Boeing will also assume around $1 billion of debt from KLX.
LAHAV EXPANDS INDIAN DHRUV UPGRADE
MODERNISATION Israel Aerospace Industries’ Lahav division
has received a follow-on contract to upgrade avionics on the
Indian armed forces’ Hindustan Aeronautics Dhruv advanced
light helicopters. An earlier award covered 50 of the rotorcraft,
with the new deal concerning a further 150 flown by the Indian
army and navy. The work, which includes installing a full glass
cockpit with a moving map display, is already under way.
MACHINE LEARNING BOOST FOR EA-18G
DEVELOPMENT Northrop Grumman will develop machine
learning algorithms to help the Boeing EA-18G Growler’s electronic warfare system pin down and jam fast-changing enemy
radar signals. Work will conclude in December 2019 under a
$7.3 million contract announced by the US Navy on 25 April.
WIZZ AIR UK BEGINS OPERATIONS
AIRLINE Budget carrier Wizz Air’s new UK division has secured
its air operator certificate, and conducted its first flight on 3 May
with a service from London Luton to Bucharest in Romania.
8 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
Nation is also to set up regional overhaul facility for F135 engines
CAPABILITY GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES
US senators aim to
down Turkish F-35
Bi-partisan legislation proposes blocking Ankara’s purchase
of strike aircraft following actions by Erdoğan government
A
bi-partisan group of US
senators introduced a bill
­
on 26 April to prevent the transfer of the Lockheed Martin
F-35A to Turkey.
The legislation would also
block Turkey’s role as a maintenance centre for the aircraft, a
press release issued by the senators shows.
Introduced in late April by Sen
James Lankford, a Republican
from Oklahoma, Sen Jeanne
Shaheen, a Democrat from New
Hampshire, and Sen Thom Tillis,
a ­Republican from North Carolina, the bill is in response to the
actions of Turkish president
­
Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.
Ankara, a NATO ally and partner in fighting ISIS, plans to acquire 100 conventional take-off
and landing F-35As. The first
batch of 14 are already on order,
with deliveries scheduled to
begin later this year. A total of 30
F-35As are scheduled for delivery to the Turkish air force by the
end of 2022.
Lankford says that Erdoğan’s
disregard for the rule of law, diminishment of individual freedoms, consolidation of power
and “strategic decisions” are at
odds with US interests.
He also cites the imprisonment of American pastor Andrew Brunson, who is accused of
helping the Kurdistan Workers’
Party in a failed coup attempt
against Erdoğan; Brunson denies
the allegations.
“These factors make the transfer of sensitive F-35 technology
and cutting-edge capabilities to
Erdoğan’s regime increasingly
risky,” says Lankford.
“Furthermore, the Turkish
government continues to move
­
closer and closer to Russia, as
they hold an innocent American
pastor, Andrew Brunson, in prison to use him as a pawn in political negotiations. The United
States does not reward hostagetaking of American citizens; such
action instead will be met with
the kind of punitive measures
this bill would enact.”
Shaheen says Erdoğan must
make changes in Turkey, including abiding by the rule of law, for
her to abandon the legislation.
The move came one week after
a senior US diplomat threatened
to use the F-35 programme as a
retaliatory tool against Turkey for
acquiring a sophisticated air-defence system from Russia: the
Almaz-Antey S-400.
Under its participation in the
F-35 programme, Turkey will set
up a European regional overhaul
centre for the aircraft’s Pratt &
Whitney F135 engine. ■
See Defence P20
flightglobal.com
THIS WEEK
Design phase
begins for CR929
This Week P10
STRATEGY JON HEMMERDINGER BOSTON
PROPULSION
DAVID KAMINSKI-­MORROW
LONDON
CSeries sale prompts return
to regionals for Bombardier
R-R breaks back
of urgent checks
on 787 engines
Canadian airframer refocuses energies on CRJ and Q400 turboprop following acquisition
S
AirTeamImages
B
ombardier will centre its commercial aircraft unit primarily
around its CRJ and Q400 regional
aircraft after closing the sale of a
majority stake in the CSeries programme to Airbus.
The plan marks a major strategic shift for a company that for
years has focused on developing
and selling its advanced-technology CSeries family.
“The first step is to close the
deal with Airbus. As we do that,
we are refocusing our efforts on
our regional aircraft,” said chief
executive Alain Bellemare, on a 3
May first-quarter earnings call.
The two airframers informed
employees on 2 May that an Airbus executive – its chief of performance management Philippe
Balducchi – will become CSeries
chief executive officer once the
deal closes. A team of 12 other
executives drawn equally from
the pair will support Balducchi,
including Bombardier’s current
A320 and CS100 will benefit from common marketing approach
CSeries programme vice-president Rob Dewar, who will become chief of customer support
and chief engineering officer.
Airbus is acquiring 50.01% of
the CSeries Aircraft Limited
Partnership, the entity that
­
­manages the programme, in exchange for marketing, sales, customer service and support, but no
cash. At the end of March, Bom-
bardier held 343 unfilled CSeries
orders in its backlog.
Fred Cromer, the Canadian
manufacturer’s president of commercial aircraft, will continue to
lead the regional aircraft business.
Bombardier expects airlines
worldwide will need some 2,500
new turboprops and 3,000 new
regional jets in the period to
2036, says Bellemare. ■
PROGRAMME DAVID KAMINSKI-­MORROW LONDON
Closure of deal accelerating as Airbus prepares ‘day one’ push
Airbus is confident that its acquisition of a majority stake in the
CSeries programme will be concluded before mid-year, a closure
it expects to occur much earlier
than originally expected.
Chief financial officer Harald
Wilhelm, speaking on 27 April,
said progress on the acquisition,
including the regulatory side, has
been “great”.
“It should allow us to close
flightglobal.com
much faster than assumed,” he
says, stating that the two airframers could “potentially accelerate”
the closing towards mid-year.
While the European airframer
cannot engage in commercial
action or address the supply
chain, Wilhelm says it is working
in collaboration with Bombardier
“to prepare for day one.”
Wilhelm adds that Airbus will
leverage its sales force and use its
influence on the supply chain and
procurement side to bring recurring costs of the aircraft down.
Meanwhile, Embraer indicates
that negotiations with Boeing
over a potential business combination in the commercial aviation
segment – possibly “a new jointly
owned entity” – are going “very
well”. ■
Additional reporting by GhimLay Yeo in Washington DC
ome two-thirds of an initial
batch of accelerated inspections on Rolls-Royce powerplants for Boeing 787s has been
completed, the engine manufacturer told shareholders on 3 May.
The intensified inspections
cover the Package C model of the
engine and are directed at addressing blade durability.
R-R chief executive Warren East,
speaking at the manufacturer’s annual general meeting, said that
“roughly two-thirds of the initial
programme of accelerated inspections has now been completed”.
He says that the remainder of
initial inspections are scheduled
to take place within the next six
weeks, in line with regulatory
guidance.
R-R says it “sincerely regrets”
the disruption to 787 operations
and will “continue to work closely” with Boeing and its customers
to reduce the impact.
“In addition to mobilising specialist teams to support these inspections across the globe we
have also made significant progress in identifying and developing additional [maintenance] capacity,” says East.
This will allow R-R to return
engines in need of servicing to
customers more quickly.
Meanwhile, investigators in
New Zealand have concluded
that the in-flight shutdowns of
two Trent 1000s powering Air
New Zealand 787-9s, experienced on 5 and 6 December 2017,
were caused by the same issue
with intermediate-pressure turbine blade durability. ■
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 9
THIS WEEK
For up-to-the-minute air transport news,
network and fleet information sign up at:
flightglobal.com/dashboard
PROGRAMME MAVIS TOH SINGAPORE
FLEET ELLIS TAYLOR PERTH
Design phase begins for CR929
Qantas culls 747s early
as -9 Dreamliners deliver
Majority composite fuselage and tail will be assembled in Shanghai
C
omac has started working
with suppliers on the concept definition phase for the fuselage and tail section of the SinoRussian CR929 widebody.
The focus will be on the design
requirements and optimising technical solutions, says Guo Bozhi,
general manager of the aircraft’s
developer, China-Russia Commercial Aircraft Corporation (CRAIC),
a joint venture between Comac
and United Aircraft (UAC).
In total, 29 potential local and
foreign suppliers attended a kickoff meeting held in Shanghai on
27 April, the Chinese manufacturer says.
Teams from both countries are
stepping up efforts to formulate the
overall technical plan for the widebody, which will make extensive
use of composites in its structure.
In March, UAC announced
that CRAIC will begin working
with suppliers on defining the requirements for the major aircraft
systems, including the landing
gear and avionics.
GE Aviation and Rolls-Royce
are expected to submit bids by
May for the 75,000lb-thrust
(333kN) turbofans planned for
the twin-engined widebody.
The aircraft’s wings, centre
section and fairings will be manufactured in Russia, while construction of the fuselage and final
assembly will be performed in
Shanghai. ■
antas has firmed options on
six more Boeing 787-9s, taking to 14 its commitments for the
Dreamliner, and says it will now
retire its 747 fleet by 2020.
The new 787s will feature the
same 236-seat configuration as its
existing examples and will be
powered by GE Aviation GEnx-1B
engines. Qantas has four 787s in
service, with four more due for delivery by the end of the year.
The new batch will arrive from
late-2019 to end-2020, facilitating
the early retirement of its remaining 747-400s, the youngest of
which will be 17 years old by the
end of the decade.
Flight Fleets Analyzer shows
the carrier has four 747-400s and
six -400ERs in service; it had previously planned to phase them
out in 2022-2023.
“Each new version of the 747
allowed Qantas to fly further and
improve what we offered passengers. The Dreamliners are
now doing the same thing,” says
chief executive Alan Joyce, citing the twinjet’s better economics and longer range.
Qantas took delivery of its first
747 – a -200, registered VH-EBA
– in 1971, Fleets Analyzer records, and has also operated the
-300 and SP variants. ■
Qantas
BillyPix
Q
Carrier will phase out jumbos ahead of original 2022-2023 schedule
PROPULSION JON HEMMERDINGER BOSTON
FAA widens scope of CFM56 directive
Fresh safety requirement brings US regulator into line with manufacturer’s recommendations, as fleet checks continue
U
S regulators have broadened
inspections on CFM International CFM56-7B engines, in addition to those already undergoing ultrasonic examinations as
part of an earlier safety directive.
The new regulation issued by
the US Federal Aviation Administration, which is closer to the
text of a service bulletin issued by
CFM, applies to engines not already subject to an emergency
airworthiness directive (EAD)
from the agency on 20 April.
It is the latest response by the
FAA to a fatal in-flight failure of a
CFM56-7B on a Southwest Air-
lines Boeing 737-700 on 17 April.
Taking effect on 10 May, the
new directive requires airlines to
inspect “concave and convex
sides” of some CFM56-7B fan
blades before the components accumulate 20,000 cycles, or within 113 days. Operators must then
repeat the inspections every
3,000 cycles.
The directive applies to 3,716
engines installed on US-registered aircraft.
The FAA’s 20 April EAD requires airlines to inspect within
20 days blades on some CFM567Bs with at least 30,000 cycles.
10 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
A related CFM service bulletin
issued on the same date went further, recommending that airlines
inspect engines with more than
20,000 cycles, and repeat that effort every 3,000 cycles.
Investigators traced the 17 April
incident to separation of a fan
blade caused by fatigue cracking,
which ruptured the engine’s inlet
cowl and sent shrapnel into the fuselage, shattering a window and
causing the death of one passenger.
Southwest says its accelerated
fleet-wide examinations, which
should conclude on 17 May, have
not revealed any other cracks on
CFM56-7B powerplants.
However, chief operating officer Mike Van de Ven says Southwest is also working with CFM to
understand how the powerplant’s inlet cowl could have
been damaged so extensively by
the released fan blade.
“That’s what we are talking
about, whether there are opportunities for the inlet cowl to improve its durability so it can minimise the kind of energy that
comes out from the fan blade release,” says Van de Ven. ■
Additional reporting by GhimLay Yeo in Washington DC
flightglobal.com
THIS WEEK
Xponential 2018
Show Report P13
SURVEILLANCE STEPHEN TRIMBLE SEATTLE
Leaner P-8 ready to locate fresh orders
Boeing targets costs of Poseidon programme as it scans export market for sales as 737NG production ramps down
A
P-8 orders and deliveries
Nation
Active Ordered Pending
Australia
7
4
India
8
4
Norway
12
5
UK
5
4
USA
74
24
10
Totals
89
37
31
Source: Flight Fleets Analyzer
tary initiative on the narrowbody.
In Renton, Boeing’s challenge
to keep the P-8 competitive is only
getting harder. The company expects to deliver the last member of
the 737NG family to an airline
customer by the end of 2019, leaving the USN as the type’s only remaining customer as the factory
transitions to the re-engined and
heavily updated 737 Max. But although the NG line is phasing out,
Boeing has committed to supporting the P-8 programme.
BillyPix
s Boeing assembles the
100th P-8 Poseidon in
­Renton, Washington, the company is laying the groundwork to
secure dozens of new orders by
revamping its design and production process to reduce costs.
“We think we’ll build another
100 of them,” says Carl Lang,
Boeing’s deputy programme
manager for the 737-800A, which
is modified for the anti-submarine warfare mission as the P-8.
So far, Boeing has delivered
eight test aircraft and 84 operational P-8As to the US Navy, plus
eight P-8Is for the Indian navy
and seven P-8As for the Royal
Australian Air Force. The governments of Norway and the UK
have also committed to buy the
aircraft, with the Royal Air
Force’s first examples to enter use
in 2020. The USN’s programme
of record includes funding to buy
at least 111 examples, although
US Navy’s anti-submarine warfare fleet will climb to at least 111 jets
the service’s approved requirement calls for a total of 117.
Boeing expects continued demand from the international
­market. If it delivers a total of 200
P-8s, at least 75 of the orders
should come from customers outside the USA, Lang says.
The international market,
however, is getting crowded.
­Militaries around the world operate scores of anti-submarine
­warfare and maritime patrol aircraft, including Dassault ATL-2
Atlantiques, Ilyushin Il-38s and
Lockheed Martin P-3Cs.
Fourteen years after Boeing
started developing the P-8 Poseidon, a number of competitors
have appeared on the global
market. Kawasaki Heavy Industries has developed the four-engined P-1, an indigenous cleansheet design now operational
with the Japan Maritime
­Self-Defence Force, but not yet
available for international buyers. Saab has flown the Bombardier Global 6000-based GlobalEye for the United Arab
Emirates, and is promoting a
maritime patrol-optimised version named the Swordfish.
Airbus has previously indicated that it is considering the development of an a­nti-submarine
warfare version of the A320neo
family, as part of a broader mili-
PRODUCTION SYSTEM
The cost efficiencies gained by
leveraging a production system
scaled up to once deliver more
than 40 737s per month will be
lost, as output dwindles to only
1.5 P-8s per month.
To keep the P-8 competitive,
Boeing has launched a push to improve the aircraft’s affordability.
Inside the type’s assembly hangar
a sign reveals the existence of staff
working on creating a “future production system” for the twinjet.
Those employees are working on
design and production system improvements to lower the cost of
producing the P-8 in absolute
terms, as well as preventing potential cost growth as 737NG assembly is phased out, Lang says. ■
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8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 11
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SHOW
REPORT
XPONENTIAL 2018
For insight and analysis of the latest
developments in the defence sector, visit:
flightglobal.com/defence
Garrett Reim/FlightGlobal
The annual AUVSI Xponential show – staged in Denver,
Colorado – heavily featured unmanned air vehicles
with autonomous flight capabilities and several new
fixed-wing drones with hybrid vertical take-off and
landing features. Finding new ways to down an
adversary’s UAV using other drones or electronic
warfare was also a prevalent theme, as the US military
and civilian agencies look for ways to thwart drone
attacks. Leading companies announced new teaming
arrangements, and Insitu unveiled its latest ScanEagle
development. Show report by Garrett Reim
DEVELOPMENT
UAVs learn how to defend themselves
Autonomous unmanned air vehicles could adopt “fighter-like”combat manoeuvres to counter swarms of adversaries
he US Air Force Academy is
attempting to teach autonomous unmanned air vehicles
when to perform combat manoeuvres used by fighter pilots to
counter potential swarms of
­adversarial UAVs.
The activity builds on a US
Defense Advanced Research
­
Projects Agency-sponsored un­
manned air systems swarm competition staged last year between
the US Military Academy, Naval
Academy and Air Force Academy, says Del Christman, assistant
professor at the USAF Academy,
who leads research on the project.
During that competition, students’ fixed-wing and quadcopter
drones autonomously shot a virtual weapon to hit a sensor on an
opponent’s UAV in flight.
The USAF Academy believes
it can improve the combat effectiveness of UAVs by teaching the
aircraft when to make certain air
combat manoeuvres – such as the
Split S, Immelmann, Scissors,
High and Low Yo-Yo, and Lag
Displacement Roll – Christman
said during a conference presentation at the show.
“We are trying to do full-up 3D
fighter-like combat movements,”
he says. “All of those things
you’d see when two fighters are
mixing it up.”
Most UAV autopilot proflightglobal.com
grammes cannot perform these
manoeuvres, so the academy is
working on developing supplemental a­ utonomous capabilities
on-board drones.
AUTONOMOUS FLIGHT
“You have to go into some sort of
rate mode or acro mode in the
­autopilot,” Christman says. “Or,
we’ve been looking into ways to
let the autonomy itself fly the airplane, say: ‘Hey, I’ve got the stick.
Let me handle this real quick.’”
The academy is also working
to teach drones how to fly in
pairs as wingmen, utilising the
same offensive and defensive tactics that aircraft pilots use when
they support each other in com-
bat. Eventually, such autonomous capabilities might be useful
in downing an adversary’s
drones, Christman believes.
“As we progress year by year
we may be able to come up with
a drone that can counter another
small UAS with some kind of
kill mechanism – either it’s electronic, or capture, or kinetic,”
says Christman.
The academy is programming
individual drones to make decisions autonomously, while the
larger fleet has its mission objectives set by a swarm commander.
“All of these decisions are made
on board with very basic consensus algorithms,” Christman says.
“We have a number of different
“We may be able
to come up with a
drone that can counter
another UAS with a
kill mechanism”
Del Christman
Assistant professor, US Air Force Academy
factors. All are weighted in some
way. These weights can be
changed in real time by the swarm
itself, or they can be changed by
the swarm commander.”
VIRTUAL REALITY
US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
T
Work builds on results of cross-service flight trials conducted in 2017
For instance, a swarm commander might want to reduce the importance that an individual UAV
gives to self-preservation in
c­ertain situations to help accomplish an overall mission.
The USAF Academy is also
looking at different ways for
swarm commanders to oversee
the flights of dozens of autonomous drones at once – and has
found that the most effective
way is via virtual reality, he
says.
“We are finding in 3D – because that’s how we normally interact with the natural world –
we can track 30 or 50 [objects]
and pretty much have a sense
where everyone is.” ■
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 13
SHOW
REPORT
For insight and analysis of the latest
developments in the defence sector, visit:
flightglobal.com/defence
DEVELOPMENT
Commercial need driving ScanEagle3
Insitu promotes medium-sized aircraft’s exemption from ITAR as making it ideally suited for industrial surveying duties
oeing-owned Insitu used the
annual Xponential gathering
to unveil its ScanEagle3 unmanned air vehicle.
The manufacturer is touting
the UAV as a primarily commercial product that is free of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) that govern its
other aircraft, such as the ScanEagle2 and Integrator. The company
believes lighter regulations will
speed up the sales process of the
new product.
“It enables us, as a commercial
business, to access the global market more easily,” says Mark Bauman, vice-president of Insitu
Commercial. “In order for us to
remain relevant – remain effective
– in the commercial space, we’ve
got to be able to deliver a timely
solution to our customers.”
Insitu
B
New product is capable of carrying three payloads simultaneously
much as the original ScanEagle –
and up to three payloads simultaneously, which Insitu says enables it to collect and analyse more
data in a single flight. It has a
170W onboard power capacity
for onboard sensors.
Insitu believes the ScanEagle3
could also sell well with foreign
militaries, but is focused first on
marketing the design commercially, Bauman adds.
The new UAV can carry up to
9.1kg (20lb) – more than twice as
TECHNOLOGY
AGREEMENT
DroneBase pact brings
Airbus Aerial to ground
VTOL plan gives partners Edge
FlightWave
A
FlightWave’s hybrid tri-copter may influence AeroVironment models
A
eroVironment has joined
forces with FlightWave to
add vertical take-off and landing
(VTOL) capabilities to its future
unmanned aircraft, the companies announced on 1 May.
Most of AeroVironment’s current unmanned air vehicle products, such as the Puma AE and
Raven AE, are fixed-wing drones
that are hand- or catapultlaunched, and are used for surveillance. The company only recently began manufacturing
VTOL systems, including its
Snipe small quadcopter and
Quantix tail-sitter.
FlightWave’s VTOL technology comes from its Edge product –
a hybrid tri-copter fixed-wing
UAV, which transitions to forward flight by tilting its two forward rotors and disengaging its
aft propeller. The company’s
technology will allow AeroVironment’s future UAVs to be
stripped down and flown as
purely VTOL aircraft as well,
says Edmund Cronin, FlightWave’s chief marketing officer. ■
14 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
Insitu notes that the new product is also compatible with prior
ScanEagle command-and-control
systems. It can also be used with
the company’s existing launch
and recovery equipment.
The ScanEagle3 has a 4m
(13.1ft) wingspan and a gross
take-off weight of 36.3kg. Insitu is
marketing the aircraft as a medium-sized UAV, between the dimensions of the smaller ScanEagle2 and the larger Integrator. It is
designed to survey industrial
properties such as oil, gas and
mining facilities, as well as inspect disaster areas for the insurance industry.
Insitu plans to begin using the
ScanEagle3 for its commercial
services by the end of this year,
and to sell the aircraft by the second quarter of 2019. ■
irbus Aerial has signed an
agreement with commercial
services marketplace DroneBase
to provide low-altitude aerial imagery on demand.
In addition to the satellite imagery services Airbus Aerial furnishes, the company’s customers
will now be able to request –
within 48-72h – low-altitude images from third-party drone operators hired via the DroneBase
platform.
“Insurers looking to quickly respond to natural disasters will be
able to leverage satellites [from
Airbus Aerial] to view entire cities at high resolution and analyse
the damage levels within to better
support their customers, while
drones can view specific areas
where more attention is needed,”
says DroneBase. “This also has
applications in utility, rail and
energy companies with vast net-
works of infrastructure.”
Based in Atlanta, Georgia, Airbus Aerial was launched last
year. The company’s online platform helps customers find and
analyse the most suitable imagery
for their needs.
“Insurers looking to
quickly respond to
natural disasters will
be able to… view
entire cities”
DroneBase
Santa Monica, Californiabased DroneBase is a four-yearold start-up backed by Chinese
drone manufacturer DJI and venture capitalists. It has a network
of tens of thousands of professional drone pilots for hire. ■
flightglobal.com
Air Canada
reschedules Max
deliveries
Air Transport P16
XPONENTIAL 2018
Show report
DEMONSTRATOR
T
extron Systems used the
show to unveil its X5-55 vertical take-off and landing (VTOL)
engineering testbed.
The company developed the
aircraft to meet demands from
military customers for an unmanned air vehicle that is able to
nimbly take off and land vertically from tight spots, while retaining the ability to fly efficiently
over long distances.
“There is more focus on manoeuvrability,” says Sean Baity,
technical director of advanced
product initiatives at Textron.
“There is more focus on independent operation in complex
terrain.”
The aircraft uses four independent electric-powered rotors
for vertical and horizontal flight,
as compared with Textron’s Aerosonde hybrid quad UAV, which
uses four fixed electric-powered
rotors for vertical take-off and
landing and a piston engine-powered propeller for horizontal
flight.
“There are multiple ways to
get out of a confined space, but
with a separated lift and thrust
system, like [the Aerosonde], you
have a bigger footprint to transition to fixed-wing flight,” says
Baity.
“With the vector thrust technology in the tilting rotors I can
deliver my energy that keeps me
in VTOL into transition quicker.
So, I can get more aggressively
out, to the point where the operator can only know that he can see
blue sky, and press a button and
the aircraft will transition out.”
The experimental aircraft –
which was flown for the first time
in July 2017 – has a gross take-off
Textron Systems
​Textron takes tilt at market with X5-55 testbed
Quadrotor type could perform roles including communications relay
weight of 34kg (75lb), Baity says.
The UAV is capable of carrying
a payload of almost 2.3kg and has
an electrical power capacity of
50W. Its range depends on the
payload, but is around a 108nm
(200km), the company says.
The X5-55 has been developed
to capture full-motion video for
intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance purposes, and also
to operate as a communications
relay and electronic warfare platform. ■
LOGISTICS
Bell sees military use for POD transport
Airframer prepares demonstration of tail-sitting vehicle that could act as short-hop cargo carrier for armed forces units
SA-based Bell plans to demonstrate its Autonomous
POD Transport (APT), a tail-sitting vertical take-off and landing
(VTOL) unmanned air vehicle, to
several branches of the US military, including the Marine Corps,
in the “late summer or early fall”.
The company has been testflying an APT that can carry a
9.1kg (20lb) payload, and plans to
show it to the military, says programme manager Eldon Metzger.
A larger version of the design that
can carry a 31.8kg payload is
under construction, he adds.
Bell’s APT concept takes off
and lands vertically, but transitions and flies horizontally on
wings. The VTOL capabilities of
the aircraft allow it to take off and
land in tight spaces, while its horizontal flight abilities allow it to fly
more efficiently.
“It is really quite surprising
how fast you can be coming in
flightglobal.com
Bell
U
Initial version can carry a 9.1kg payload, with target range of 10.8nm
and then just basically stand that
thing up on its end and bring it to
a hover, set it down. That’s where
high power is required, in the
pure VTOL mode, so we try to
minimise that,” says Bell chief innovation engineer Carey Cannon.
“It’s probably close to 40% power
reduction once you get it on its
wing, which gives it its range.”
The 9.1kg payload APT, which
is powered by four electric motors, has a target range of 10.8nm
(20km). The company has plans
for several versions of the VTOL
vehicle, up to a variant that can
carry 454kg.
Bell sees the APT concept as a
potential solution for providing
short-hop cargo transportation
for logistics companies or the
military.
The UAV could be used to resupply ground troops with small
items such as goggles, body armour or batteries, instead of having to dispatch vehicles to carry
such equipment, Metzger says.
Much of the APT’s flight will
be handled autonomously, including take-off, landing and
transition to horizontal flight,
Cannon says.
Bell is also examining ways for
the APT to operate without GPS,
in case of electronic interference
from adversaries.
“There’s a number of ways [of
doing that],” Cannon says. “You
could put an inertial system on
board... meaning essentially you
know where you left, you know
where you are headed and
through some software you can
kind of map where you are without GPS.” ■
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 15
AIR TRANSPORT
For the full analysis of airline safety
and losses in 2017, go to:
flightglobal.com/safety2017
OPERATIONS JON HEMMERDINGER BOSTON
Air Canada reschedules Max deliveries
Carrier argues E190 divestments and CSeries performance evaluation necessitate flexibility over 737 handover timing
ir Canada has reshuffled the
delivery schedule for its onorder Boeing 737 Max aircraft,
delaying some deliveries by up to
three years as it evaluates other
aspects of its fleet, including the
performance of the incoming
Bombardier CSeries.
But while it will push back 11
737 deliveries, the Montrealbased carrier has also moved the
handover of five Max narrowbodies forward one year, to 2020,
executives said during Air Canada’s first-quarter earnings call on
30 April.
“We concluded an amendment
to [our] Boeing 737 purchase
agreement where certain aircraft
Air Canada
A
Twelve examples of re-engined narrowbody are already in service
are accelerated and others are deferred,” says Air Canada chief financial officer Michael Rousseau.
The airline does not indicate if
the changes affect orders for the
737 Max 8 or Max 9, and it does
not disclose a specific timeline.
The company in 2014 ordered
CABIN
A330 fleet increase complemented by interior upgrade plan
Montreal-based Air Canada plans
to acquire four more Airbus
A330s and begin reconfiguring
the cabins of its existing eight
A330-300s next year.
The effort will cost C$275 million ($214 million) and ensure that
the Airbus widebodies continue
flying in Air Canada’s colours for
years to come, says the carrier.
It will acquire the four new
A330s in 2019, using them to replace Boeing 767s, which are being retired, executives say.
Between late 2019 and the first
half of 2020, Air Canada plans to
reconfigure the cabins of the A330s
currently in its fleet, says chief executive Calin Rovinescu.
The carrier will equip the aircraft with new interiors and inflight entertainment systems to
align the cabins on its A330s with
those of its 777 and 787 fleets. ■
61 737 Max: 50 737-8s and 11 -9s,
with deliveries initially scheduled to run from 2017 to 2021.
Twelve of the former are already
in service, while the -9s were not
due to arrive until 2020-2021, according to Flight Fleets Analyzer.
Air Canada’s most recent fleet
plan leaves unchanged an expectation that the airline will have 36
737 Max aircraft in the fleet by
the end of 2019.
Chief executive Calin Rovinescu says the move ensures the carrier is bringing the re-engined
737s on board only when it needs
the capacity.
“These changes give us maximum flexibility to bring the 737
Max in at a time when we can use
them most effectively,” he says.
“We don’t want to be inundated
with aircraft at times when we
can’t use them, and we don’t
want to be short of aircraft.”
But he cites other “moving
parts”, including Air Canada’s
fleet of 25 Embraer 190s and an
order for 45 CS300s. It will begin
divesting E190s this year, and intends to take the CS300s between
late 2019 and 2022. ■
ACCIDENT DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW LONDON
C
anadian investigators have
disclosed that an ATR 42300 which crashed shortly after
take-off from Fond-du-Lac airport had not been de-iced before
departure.
The turboprop came down less
than 1nm (1.85km) from the end
of runway 28 on 13 December
last year.
While all 25 occupants survived the initial impact, nine were
seriously injured and one passenger subsequently succumbed.
The Transportation Safety
Board of Canada states that the
West Wind Aviation ATR had arrived at Fond-du-Lac about
45min before the accident.
It had descended through icing
conditions on its approach and
the inquiry says the aircraft’s deicing and anti-icing systems were
engaged.
But residual ice remained on
parts of the airframe after these
systems were subsequently
switched off.
West Wind had access to deicing equipment at the airport including ladders, hand-held spray
bottles, de-icing fluid and electric
blankets.
“However, the aircraft was not
de-iced before take-off,” says the
inquiry. “The take-off was com-
16 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
Transportation Board of Canada
West Wind crash probe highlights de-icing failure
Turboprop came down shortly after take-off from Fond-du-Lac airport
menced with ice contamination
on the aircraft.”
It crashed into a wooded region after departing Fond-du-Lac
on a regional service to Stony
Rapids in Saskatchewan.
Meteorological conditions for
the departure airport indicated
“patchy moderate rime icing” in
cloud from 3,000-7,000ft. ■
flightglobal.com
COVER STORY
Signs of recovery at
Zodiac, but Airbus
demands quality
Air Transport P18
Airbus
First of four leased A330-900s for Wow Air
was recently rolled out of paint facility
MANUFACTURING DAVID KAMINSKI-­MORROW LONDON
Airbus produces its rate expectations
Airframer studies lifting A320 output to 70 per month by 2020 – even as engine supply affects current delivery schedule
P
roduction rates were the big
topic of conversation even
­before Airbus released its firstquarter results on 27 April.
The industry was already digesting conflicting views on further single-aisle output increases.
Safran chief executive Philippe
Petitcolin said that the company
– one half of the CFM International narrowbody engine joint
venture – would not currently
consider further output increases
beyond those already agreed.
However, Boeing chief executive
Dennis Muilenburg said it continued to see “upward pressure”
on 737 production.
Unsurprisingly, given the
enormous narrowbody backlogs
at both airframers, Airbus takes
the same view as its arch-rival –
that single-aisle output will only
rise further.
It has therefore launched a
study to examine the feasibility
of implementing a monthly production rate on the A320 family
of 70 aircraft, or possibly higher,
by around 2022.
The airframer already intends
to increase output to 60 per
month by mid-2019, with suppliers in 2015 having promised the
flexibility to achieve a rate of 63.
Airbus chief financial officer
Harald Wilhelm says this gives
Airbus a “surge capacity” – and
he states that the company
would potentially be able to hike
the rate to 63 for part of 2019 and
into 2020.
flightglobal.com
“Based on commercial demand, we see a case to go higher
than 60-63 for the future,” he
says. “This is a non-brainer.”
If a rise to 70 aircraft or more is
agreed, says Wilhelm, the airframer would “shoot for as early
as possible”, with a potential intermediate rate in 2021 before the
full increase in 2022.
“Based on commercial
demand, we see a
case to go higher than
60-63 for the future”
Harald Wilhelm
Chief financial officer, Airbus
While engine supply would be
a central part of the study, he says
that the entire supply chain needs
to be considered – as well as Airbus’s own capacity. Part of the additional production could be implemented at the A320 US final
assembly line in Mobile, Alabama.
But as he notes, engine supply
is key: CFM is already running six
weeks behind schedule on deliveries of Leap engines to Airbus
and Boeing, while Pratt & Whitney is still attempting to get back
on track following a series of technical issues with its PW1100G
­engine for the A320neo.
Airbus has only recently resumed deliveries of PW1100Gpowered jets – thought to be an
A321neo for Volaris via AerCap
on 25 April – putting pressure
on its target of 800 total deliveries in 2018.
While it remains “committed”
to that goal, the manufacturer admits that the situation leaves it
with “a lot to do in the second
half”.
But with Airbus still churning
out completed airframes, notably
from its Hamburg and Toulouse
final assembly lines, one consequence of the engine shortage is
the accumulation of parked and
undelivered A320neos.
Wilhelm says he is “pretty
sure” that more than 60 aircraft
are parked and awaiting engines
and he sees that number “increasing a bit, all in all, in the second
quarter”. He adds that the airframer also needs to “manage a
pile of aircraft” as a “buffer” on
top of its target figure, to account
for last-minute technical or commercial issues.
While there is pressure to take
A320-family output higher, progress is also being made on the
ramp-up of the A350. Wilhelm
says that the programme has
achieved a monthly production
rate of 10 aircraft at an industrial
level; a matching delivery pace is
to be attained by year-end.
However, on the A330, it is a
different story, with Airbus instead planning to cut annual
­output to 50 aircraft next year,
from 60 in 2018. “There is no
point in ­keeping the rate going at
too high a level, with too many
bookings open, and go over a
cliff,” says Wilhelm.
But he stresses that the lower
rate “shouldn’t necessarily be
representative of the future” and
the A330 has “good prospects”
for addressing fleet-replacement
requirements from 2021.
“We’re working on a number of
campaigns,” he says. “Given the
strength of the A330 and particularly the A330neo, we feel wellpositioned with the product.”
CAPITAL COST
The re-engined version of the aircraft, he insists, is efficient and its
capital cost is relatively low, but
the sector remains tough.
Wilhelm says Airbus wants to
“protect margins”, regarding A330
pricing, but it is nevertheless
“ready to be competitive” and
“commercial efforts” might be
needed. He adds that the airframer
will look at strategies to cut fixed
costs from the A330 line, similar
to those it adopted when slowing
the A380 production rate.
Airbus is expecting more than
half of its A330 deliveries next
year will be Neos; entry into
service is scheduled to take
­
place around mid-2018 with the
initial delivery of an A330-900
to TAP Portugal.
Icelandic budget carrier Wow
Air is also taking its first of four
leased -900s this year, with the
twinjet recently unveiled ahead
of installation of its Rolls-Royce
Trent 7000 engines. ■
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 17
AIR TRANSPORT
S7 anticipating
SSJ75 designs
before year-end
R
ussia’s S7 Airlines is expecting a first iteration of Sukhoi’s
Superjet 75 to emerge before the
end of this year.
S7 has reached a preliminary
agreement to acquire 50 of the proposed 75-seat aircraft, also known
as the SSJ75, and is acting as a technical adviser for the project.
It says that, once the “draft” of
the new aircraft is submitted, a decision on further co-operation will
be made within three months.
“The Russian market needs an
efficient aircraft that meets flight,
technical, environmental and
economic requirements,” says S7
Group chief Anton Eremin.
He wants Sukhoi’s civil aircraft
division to present a “modern and
competitive” jet to the market.
“If the project is successfully
completed, we will be happy to
become the initial customer of
the SSJ75,” adds Eremin.
S7 is not a Superjet operator,
but it has moved into the 75-seat
sector with the introduction of
Embraer 170s to enhance its regional network.
It says the development of the
SSJ75 will involve a “comprehensive upgrade” of the current
Superjet 100. ■
RESULTS DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW LONDON
Signs of recovery at Zodiac,
but Airbus demands quality
New Safran business sees improving picture for seating operation, despite sales slump
Z
odiac Aerospace’s troubled
seating business is showing
signs of recovery despite sales
over the first half – the six months
ended 28 February – deteriorating
by more than a quarter.
The company says sales for its
seats branch – part of its aircraft
interiors division – were down
by 26% to €449 million ($548
million). This included an organic decline of 21.8%.
Zodiac says it had been expecting the slump, because the figures
were affected by commercial impact from “previous design and
execution issues”.
The company had been forced
to take action after serious production problems emerged in 2015.
But Zodiac, which was taken
over by French aerospace firm
Safran on 1 March, says the seats
branch “contributed positively”
to the first-half operating income
of the interiors division.
It says operational changes led
to a “better performance”, particularly at its Seats UK and Seat
Shells arms.
Problems at Zodiac, with both
seats and galleys, have been
blamed for knock-on delays and
Airbus
PROGRAMME
DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW
LONDON
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network and fleet information sign up at:
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Delays to A350 ramp-up have been blamed on interiors suppliers
operational in-service issues with
the Airbus A350. Although the
airframer says that supply chain
rates for the widebody twin are
now where they should be, further improvements are required.
Speaking on a first-quarter results call on 27 April, Airbus chief
financial officer Harald Wilhelm
said: “Interiors [for the A350] still
remains an area of focus and emphasis as regards to quality.”
Although Wilhelm says that
he does not want to use the topic
as a “blame point” with suppliers, he insists “quality needs to
step up further”.
While Zodiac’s interiors division turned in an operating loss of
€97.3 million, this amounted to a
€31.6 million improvement over
the same period a year earlier.
Zodiac says the result is partly
due to cost-reduction initiatives
on programmes, although the division was affected by lower volumes and “persistent” delays to
VIP and business jet programmes.
Overall aircraft interiors sales
were down by nearly 20%, to
€1.13 billion, of which almost
14% was organic. ■
Additional reporting by
Dominic Perry
SAFETY AARON CHONG & MAVIS TOH SINGAPORE
Fresh incidents prompt renewed Lion Air scrutiny
Xinhua/REX/Shutterstock
T
Malindo 737-900 slid off runway after aborted take-off on 19 April
18 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
he safety record of Lion Air
Group carriers is likely to come
under fresh scrutiny following a 29
April landing incident at Gorontalo’s Jalaluddin airport in Indonesia,
which took place just 10 days after
an aborted take-off caused a runway overrun in Nepal.
In the latest incident, a 2014built Boeing 737-800 (PK-LOO)
skidded off the runway and came
to a stop in soft ground after landing in rainy conditions. No injuries were reported to the 174 pas-
sengers and seven crew on board.
This followed a 19 April runway excursion at Kathmandu
Tribhuvan International airport
which involved a 737-900 (9MLNJ), operated by Lion Air Group
subsidiary Malindo Air.
Malindo says the aborted takeoff was caused by a technical
issue. Flight Fleets Analzyer records that since 2000, aircraft operated by Lion Air and Malindo
have been involved in a combined 14 accidents. ■
flightglobal.com
AIR TRANSPORT
Tokyo not fixed on
P-1 export path
Defence P20
PROPULSION STEPHEN TRIMBLE WASHINGTON DC
GEnx bug could slow 787-10 approval
Boeing asks FAA for exemption from safety requirement, arguing it needs more time to implement software update
A
software bug that shut down
one engine on a GE Aviationpowered 787 last July has
prompted Boeing to ask the US
Federal Aviation Administration
to temporarily exempt the 787-10
from a safety requirement.
Boeing plans to certificate the
GEnx-1B-powered version of the
787-10 in September, but the fix
for the software issue will not be
ready until 20 December 2019,
Boeing says in the filing.
Unless the FAA approves Boeing’s exemption request, the delivery schedule for the GEnx-powered version of the 787-10 could
be delayed, the airframer says.
Boeing handed over the first
Rolls-Royce Trent 1000-TENpowered 787-10 in March, but
the first GEnx-1B-engined version will not be received by United Airlines until September.
GE plans to address the bug that
caused the shutdown in a package
of updates it calls the “B200” software version, Boeing says. It could
deliver the fix earlier, but the airframer prefers to keep it packaged
with several other updates.
The software bug is related to
another safety problem with the
GEnx-1B. In certain rare conditions, tiny ice crystals blown into
the stratosphere by atmospheric
convection can form on blades
and vanes within the powerplant.
Those accumulations in the GEnx
engine can shed suddenly, causing in-flight shutdowns.
Two years ago, GE solved that
problem by introducing a software modification. If ice crystal
icing (ICI) conditions are detected,
the software commands the variable inlet guide vanes to open and
eject the ice before it can enter the
core of the engine. That fix appears to be working, but Boeing
has found a new bug in the software underpinning that process.
Last July, a 787 crew encountered ICI conditions at 40,000ft,
so commanded the engines to
provide power for two climbs to
42,000ft. During that manoeuvre,
the left-hand engine flamed out.
The turbofan’s electronic controls recognised the problem and
automatically relit the GEnx’s
combustor within 2s, fully restoring thrust within 18s.
GE’s software update will
change the logic, extending ICI
protections at engine power levels up to climb at altitudes over
35,000ft, Boeing says.
Although GE-powered versions
of the 787-8 and -9 can continue
flying under existing airworthiness certificates, certification testing on the -10 is not yet complete,
so the non-compliance presented
by the software bug requires Boeing to request an exemption. ■
FLEET
Bahrain-based Gulf Air has received the first of an eventual 10
Boeing 787-9s. The delivery of the 282-seater on 26 April furthers a
strategy to “maintain one of the youngest fleets in the region”, says
Gulf Air chief executive Krešimir Kucko. The airline plans to introduce the Rolls-Royce Trent 1000-powered 787-9 on 15 June on a
twice-daily service between Bahrain and London Heathrow. Leased
from Dubai Aerospace Enterprise (DAE) – one of five Dreamliners
Gulf Air is taking from the lessor – the twinjet (A9C-FA) is also the
first of the type to join DAE’s portfolio. Although the widebody was
handed over in late April, it had made an appearance earlier that
month, in a fly-past at the Bahrain Formula 1 Grand Prix.
flightglobal.com
Andy Hone/LAT Images/REX/Shutterstock
First delivery fulfils Gulf Air’s dreams
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 19
DEFENCE
Manila reopens
Bell 412EPI talks
after order axed
B
ell appears hopeful that it can
revive an order from the Philippines for 412EPI medium-twin
transport helicopters that was
cancelled almost as soon as it was
announced earlier this year.
Unveiled at the Singapore air
show on 6 February, the 16-unit
commitment for the nation’s air
force was revoked just seven days
later, on the orders of Philippine
President Rodrigo Duterte.
Patrick Moulay, Bell senior vicepresident commercial business –
international, speaking on 27
April, specifically referenced the
Asia-Pacific country as a potential
future customer for the 412EPI. Citing “commercial in-confidence information”, he indicates talks with
Manila are ongoing. “We are still
discussing to see how we can address the missions and operational
needs of our customers,” he adds.
Bell has sealed an order with
Montenegro for two of the Pratt &
Whitney Canada PT6T-9-powered
type, and Moulay indicates more
deals could be announced at July’s
Farnborough air show. ■
STRATEGY CRAIG HOYLE BERLIN
Tokyo not fixed on P-1 export path
Maritime patrol aircraft shines in domestic service, but international sales beyond horizon
J
apan has yet to decide on the
future size of its Kawasaki
Heavy Industries P-1 maritime
patrol aircraft fleet, or determine
whether the surveillance asset
could be exported to international buyers.
Developed as an indigenous
replacement for the Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force’s Lockheed Martin P-3C Orions, the
four-engined type was first flown
in 2007, and entered operational
use in 2016.
“As a maritime patrol aircraft,
it outperforms the P-3C in all
areas,” says Capt Ryota Ishida,
P-1 programme manager for Japan’s defence ministry. “In the
future, more of these airplanes
will be flying in the skies around
the world.”
Japan’s navy has so far taken
delivery of 15 P-1s, and Kawasaki
has no further examples currently on contract. Tokyo has yet to
define its long-term spending
plans, but Flight Fleets Analyzer
records it as having previously
shown an intent to acquire up to
a further 58, to fully replace its
P-3C inventory. Ishida notes that
the service is considering some
Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force
FLEET
DOMINIC PERRY
LONDON
For insight and analysis of the latest developments in the defence sector, visit:
flightglobal.com/defence
Kawasaki has delivered 15 examples, completing current orders
updates for its future examples,
but says it has “no specific plans
at the moment”.
Tokyo sent two P-1s to Germany in late April for a debut
appearance at the ILA Berlin air
show, with one participating in
the flying display and the other
parked in the static area. The
deployment marked the latest
in a string of European visits by
the type, also including attending the UK’s Royal International
Air Tattoo in 2015 and last
year’s Paris air show. However,
defence ministry officials stress
that these visits have not been
linked to sales campaigns.
“We have brought the aircraft
here to promote Japan’s very high
level of technology to the world,”
Ishida says.
“We have never made any sort
of calculation on what it would
cost for foreign customers,” he
adds, noting that the defence
ministry currently has no intention of pursuing exports.
“The current objective is to
deliver the P-1 and make it a
strategic capability for Japan,”
the defence ministry’s Acquisition, Technology & Logistics
Agency says. ■
DEPLOYMENT GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES
GAO report exposes F-35B’s sustainment woes
US Marine Corps
T
Issues have affected US Marine Corps’ activities in Iwakuni, Japan
20 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
he US Marine Corps’ use of
Lockheed Martin F-35Bs
from MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, has
encountered a raft of sustainment
problems since January 2017.
Many of the issues plaguing the
first overseas deployment of the
F-35 have been logistical and relate to the aircraft’s distance from
maintenance and parts manufacturing facilities in the USA, according to a US Government Accountability Office (GAO) report.
Issues with the F-35B’s supply
chain have included lengthy
transport times for parts, inaccurate estimated delivery dates, delays at customs and difficulty
with shipping autonomic logistics information system (ALIS)
equipment in support of VMFA-121’s 16-aircraft deployment.
The GAO says the USMC
learned that it needs to take “into
consideration weather concerns
when shipping ALIS equipment.
While the aircraft were transferred to Japan through Alaska,
ALIS was moved through Hawaii
because of concerns about how
the freezing temperature would
affect the logistics system.”
Other issues have included
long repair times, shortages and
poor reliability of certain aircraft
parts. ■
flightglobal.com
DEFENCE
King Air pushes for
second chance
Defence P22
ROTORCRAFT DOMINIC PERRY LONDON
L
eonardo and Australia’s Department of Defence are to
jointly establish a transmission
repair and overhaul operation for
the NH Industries NH90 and certain civil helicopter types in Melbourne, Victoria.
Currently, main gearbox overhauls for the Australian army’s
fleet of MRH90 Taipan troop transport helicopters are performed at
Leonardo’s facilities in Italy. To be
located at an existing Leonardo
Australia site, the new capability
will be operational by mid-2020,
the Italian company states.
In addition to supporting
Canberra’s 47-strong fleet, the
­
centre will also be capable of servicing transmissions on the
NH90s of other operators. The
Royal New Zealand Air Force is
the only other customer for the
type in the region.
Leonardo says some operators
of civil AW139 intermediatetwins will also be able to access
the new operation. ■
Commonwealth of Australia
Australian MRO facility to boost Taipan support
Nation’s army has a fleet of 47 locally-designated MRH90 transports
UNMANNED SYSTEMS GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES
Policy shift could ease armed UAV sales
New export rules mean US companies can sell direct to allies, circumventing slow-moving Department of State approvals
S manufacturers of armed
unmanned air vehicles could
benefit from a decision by the
Trump administration to ease restrictions on their international
marketing and sale.
Under new export rules, US
companies will be allowed to
promote armed UAVs to allied
and partner nations under a direct commercial sales process,
eliminating the need to go
through the Department of State
via Washington’s Foreign Military Sales (FMS) system. This is
intended to quicken an approvals
and delivery process that has in
some cases driven potential buyers to select less capable equipment produced by other nations.
“Providing our allies and partners with greater access to American arms will reduce their reliance
not just on Chinese ‘knock-offs’,
but also on Russian systems, consistent with the Countering Ameri-
General Atomics Aeronautical Systems
U
General Atomics has reported international interest in its Avenger
ca’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act,” says Peter Navarro,
assistant to the president for trade
and manufacturing policy.
The updated policy will also
eliminate the need for manufacturers selling unarmed UAVs
equipped with laser target designators to use the FMS process.
However, the Department of State
notes that exports will still be subject to review by the US government and Department of Defense.
The Department of State has
not changed its policy with regard to the international Missile
Technology Control Regime
(MTCR), but is looking to update
this so that US companies can
export equipment directly to foreign customers. General Atomics
Aeronautical Systems disclosed
the pursuit of a potential sale of
90 jet-powered Predator C
Avengers to an undisclosed international customer in August
Download the 2018
Wo r l d A i r Fo r c e s R e p o r t
2017, but said it faced hurdles
due to MTCR restrictions.
While the goal of the policy
shift is to support the Trump administration’s “buy American,
hire American” strategy, the Department of State says it will also
allow companies to negotiate
deals with certain foreign countries – such as India and states in
the Middle East – to potentially
include co-production and outsourced manufacturing.
Meanwhile, Israeli defence
contractors are eyeing the new US
policy with interest, as it could
ease Washington’s efforts to restrict their sale of advanced UAVs
to international customers. However, one Israeli source notes that
while the new regulations will
“open a door” for the nation’s industry, “this door will be blocked
by many who want to get in”. ■
Additional reporting by Arie
Egozi in Tel Aviv
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
w w w. f l i g h t g l o b a l . c o m / w a f
Ruag 2017 strip ad.indd 1
flightglobal.com
06/12/2017 11:25
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 21
DEFENCE
For insight and analysis of the latest
developments in the defence sector, visit:
flightglobal.com/defence
PROGRAMME GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES
Light-attack demonstration on target
US Air Force evaluation of rival turboprop pair moves on to examine sustainment costs and multinational networking
A
fter deciding to forgo a combat demonstration, the US
Air Force is moving forward with
the second phase of its light-­
attack aircraft experiment, which
will examine sustainment requirements, networking with allies’ platforms and operating
costs of the Sierra Nevada/Embraer A-29 Super Tucano and
Textron Aviation’s Beechcraft
AT-6 Wolverine.
USAF chief of staff Gen David
Goldfein on 24 April told the
Senate Armed Services Committee that the experiments being
conducted at Holloman AFB in
New Mexico between May and
July will deliver “a better outcome” than a combat demonstration, and could enable it to accelerate the programme.
The air force is interested in
buying turboprop-powered aircraft for use during surveillance
and light-attack missions, instead
of employing more expensive assets such as the Boeing F-15, Fairchild Republic A-10 and Lockheed Martin F-35.
“We are taking a really deep
dive on this one on the sustainment aspects: how many maintainers we need; how are we sustainable at home and forward?”
Goldfein says. “How do we inte-
grate this particular weapons system in ways that allow us to get to
a price point in the $2,000 per flying hour range over time, as opposed to the $20,000, $30,000,
$40,000 range?”
The light-attack experiment
will also focus on the rival aircraft’s abilities to network and
operate in co-ordination with foreign militaries.
“We are looking at this through
the lenses of allies and partners,
because a big part of the light-attack experiment is a common architecture, information [and] intelligence network,” Goldfein
says.
The USAF plans to experiment with “building and operating an exportable, shareable, affordable network to enable air
platforms to communicate with
joint and multinational forces
and
command-and-control
nodes,” the service adds.
Secretary of the air force
Heather Wilson in March said
that she may ask Congress to reallocate funds to the light-attack
aircraft programme this year, accelerating purchase plans by one
fiscal year, to 2019. The USAF
has allocated around $2.5 billion
to the activity over a five-year period starting in FY2020. ■
Israeli Air Force
PROCUREMENT GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES
King Air pushes for second chance
S
according to the US Government
Accountability Office (GAO). The
service cancelled the solicitation
because it had not received any
other offers, and an appeal
lodged by Sierra Nevada to the
GAO was rejected in December.
In January, the army relaunched the programme, with
the hope that more manufacturers will submit bids.
“SNC and Textron Aviation
will provide a solution that exceeds whatever requirements are
established by the government,”
says Sierra Nevada, which expects the army to issue a final solicitation this month. ■
UPGRADE
Israeli Hercules face transformation
Beechcraft
ierra Nevada (SNC) and Textron Aviation have reaffirmed
their commitment to jointly bid
on the US Army’s fixed-wing utility aircraft programme using a
new variant of the Beechcraft
King Air 350, even though the
twin-turboprop was rejected by
the service in September 2017.
The pair submitted the only
bid in pursuit of the opportunity
last year, but were rejected because the variant of the King Air
350 they submitted could not
meet the army’s payload requirements without having weight and
balance issues beyond the limits
established by Textron Aviation,
Israel is to perform a major avionics modernisation on its
10-strong fleet of Lockheed Martin C-130H tactical transports.
Although a number of partial upgrades have previously been
implemented, the Israeli air force says the latest effort will be “a
complete revolution”. The enhancements will see engine
­management and navigation systems replaced with newer
­digital versions, an improved autopilot, and the installation of
an up-to-date radar. No details of the systems suppliers have
been revealed, however, or the timeline for completion. In
­addition, the air force has ordered a new simulator for the type,
due for delivery in 2021, to reflect the changes to the aircraft.
Flight Fleets Analyzer records the service’s H-model Hercules
as being between 41 and 46 years old.
Payload weight and balance concerns brought end to previous bid
22 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
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BUSINESS AVIATION
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aviation news and analysis at:
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RESULTS KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
Gulfstream bullish despite delivery dip
Fall in large-cabin business jet output hits first-quarter earnings, but company predicts new models will boost 2018 sales
eneral Dynamics’ aerospace
division recorded a 12%
slide in first-quarter revenues,
due to lower-than-predicted delivery output at Gulfstream.
The unit – which also includes
completions and fixed-base operation provider Jet Aviation – saw
revenues tumble from $2.07 billion in the three months ended 31
March 2017 to $1.82 billion in the
same period this year. Earnings
slipped by 21%, to $346 million,
from $439 million in the same period a year earlier.
Gulfstream delivered 26 jets
during the quarter: 19 large-cabin
G550s and G650ERs – four fewer
than the same period in 2017 –
while G280 shipments remained
unchanged at seven.
During a 25 April earnings
call, General Dynamics chief executive Phebe Novakovic played
down the Gulfstream blip, calling
it “consistent with our guidance,
and pretty much as anticipated”.
She notes that Gulfstream had
planned to hand over a G280 and a
special mission G550 in the first
quarter. However, their respective
deliveries were delayed to April
and May “for the convenience of
the customers”.
“If we had managed those deliveries as planned, we would
have been consistent with, or
slightly ahead of revenue expectations,” Novakovic says.
Gulfstream’s order backlog fell
by more than $400 million in the
first quarter, to $12.5 billion, and
the book-to-bill ratio – or the number of orders against deliveries –
stood at 0.8:1, slightly higher than
the 0.7:1 figure that it has recorded
year-on-year since 2013.
New orders between January
and March totalled $1.4 billion –
also on a par with the previous
five years, and what Novakovic
describes as “part of the normal
cycle after a very strong fourth
quarter”. She says activity picked
up in April, with “strong interest”
in North America and Europe.
The outlook for Gulfstream in
2018 is positive, she says, with
scheduled service entry of the new
super-large-cabin G500 in the third
quarter helping to “back-load” revenues to the latter half of the year.
Gulfstream has secured “well
over 50 orders” for the 5,200nm
Gulfstream
G
G500’s service entry is due this year, with G600 to follow in 2019
(9,630km)-range twin, says Novakovic, adding that it will “come
pretty quickly off the line”, once
certification has been secured.
The G500 is now in the final
phase of its flight-test campaign,
and is earmarked to gain US and
European validation by July.
“The 300h function and reliability testing will complete the flying
portion of the programme,” says
Novakovic, with the five-strong
flight-test fleet having logged over
4,000h to date. “[We] will then
shift to final document approval
by the [Federal Aviation Administration],” she adds.
Certification of the larger and
faster G600 – for which Gulfstream has an order backlog of
“close to 50 units” – will be
wrapped up in the second half of
2018, Novakovic notes, with deliveries set to begin in 2019. ■
PROGRAMME KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
Revenue decrease fails to dent Embraer optimism
E
ance for the year as sales activity
gathers pace.
For the three months ended 31
March, the Brazilian airframer
shipped 11 aircraft. This com-
Embraer
mbraer Executive Jets recorded
a 27% fall in revenues in the
first quarter of 2018 as aircraft output fell, but the airframer is confident it will reach its delivery guid-
Initial example of the upgraded Phenom 300E was delivered in March
24 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
prised eight light jets: five Phenom
300s – including the first example
of the upgraded E variant – and
three Phenom 100s. A pair of Legacy 450s and a single Legacy 500
made up the large-jet deliveries.
This performance compares
with 11 light jets and four large
jets shipped during the first quarter of 2017: eight Phenom 300s
and three Phenom 100s, and one
each of the Legacy 450, 500, 650
and Lineage 1000E.
The dip contributed to a $47
million year-on-year fall in quarterly revenues, to $128 million.
Speaking on a 27 April earnings
call, Embraer chief executive Paulo
Cesar de Souza e Silva said customer rescheduling pushed backed
delivery of five business aircraft
from the first to the second quarter,
which had a “major impact” on the
performance of the division.
Despite the “soft deliveries”, he
is confident the unit will hit its
2018 guidance of 105-125 aircraft.
Souza e Silva points to a stabilisation of new aircraft prices, a fall in
pre-owned inventory and an increase in sales activity – particularly in the US and European markets – as reasons for his optimism.
“We are more positive this year,”
he says. “I think we are coming
out of the woods finally.” ■
flightglobal.com
BUSINESS AVIATION
Space constrained
Special Report P25
PRODUCTION DOMINIC PERRY LONDON
COMPLETIONS
KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
Bell ‘cautious’ of oversupply
as it readies 525 for market
Dorval prepares
to begin Global
7000 outfitting
B
Airframer says large idle fleet of rotorcraft demands “soft launch” with delayed Relentless
ell plans a “soft” service
debut in 2019 for its supermedium 525 Relentless helicopter, as it continues to eye an oil
and gas market that is still dealing with a significant oversupply
of rotorcraft.
First delivery of the fly-by-wire
Relentless is due in late 2019, but
Bell estimates it will take “a couple of years” before the industry
fully absorbs the “many secondhand aircraft that are standing
idle”, says Patrick Moulay, Bell
senior vice-president commercial
business – international.
That figure of “over 100” aircraft includes Airbus Helicopters
H225s and AS332 L2s, Sikorsky
S-92s and “the [Leonardo]
AW139 as well”, says Moulay.
The large, idle fleet is a “significant issue for the industry”, he
adds, with companies much more
likely to select the “easy, ready-togo option” over new orders.
Moulay stresses that Bell has
already “made a decision to adjust” initial output on the laterunning 525 “to make sure we
Bell
B
Medium-twin will initially enter use serving VIP and offshore sectors
had a soft launch” and that production “ramps up gently”.
“We have been extremely cautious on that,” he says. “We don’t
want by any means to participate
in this oversupply. We need to
make sure the industry absorbs
those [parked] aircraft first.”
Deliveries of the 525 in 2019 –
initially in the VIP and offshore
segments – “will be a very low
number”, with output ramping
up in 2020-2021.
Certification of the 9.3t Relentless is due next year, around four
years later than planned, but approval of the helicopter’s full ice
protection system – crucial for
some offshore and search and rescue (SAR) applications – is not
expected until 2021, says Moulay.
Approval for SAR or military
mission equipment will take a
similar timeframe to obtain.
To date, the programme has accumulated 270h, with the two remaining 525 prototypes both back
in the air; the initial aircraft was
destroyed in a 2016 crash which
killed two pilots and brought
flight tests to a halt for 12 months.
Two further examples of the
GE Aviation CT7-powered twin
are in various stages of assembly,
ahead of first flights due later
this year. ■
ombardier is preparing its
completion centre in Dorval,
Montreal, for the arrival of the first
customer-owned Global 7000, as
the ultra-long-range business jet
moves closer to certification and
first delivery – scheduled for the
second half of 2018.
Bombardier says there are
“multiple” Global 7000s on the
production line at its manufacturing plant in Downsview, Toronto,
but will not disclose the exact figure “for competitive reasons”.
To free up capacity for the
7,700nm (14,200km)-range Global 7000 in Dorval, Bombardier
will transfer completions activity
for the super-large Global 5000 in
the second half of this year to its
US facility in Wichita, Kansas.
Wichita already houses manufacturing, final assembly and completion facilities for the Learjet
70/75 light business jet family.
The site is also home to Bombardier’s flight-test centre, where the
Global 7000 certification campaign is in full swing. Bombardier
says the five-strong, GE Aviation
Passport-powered flight-test fleet
has amassed more than 1,800h. ■
APPROVAL KATE SARSFIELD LONDON
H
artzell Propeller and Raisbeck
Engineering have secured a
supplemental type certificate
(STC) from Brazil for a sweptblade turbofan propeller on the
Beechcraft King Air 350 series.
The approval comes less than
eight months after the US Federal
Aviation Administration became
the first civil aviation authority to
approve the $150,000 system for
the twin-engined turboprop.
Since then, six shipsets have
been delivered and installed for
US owners, says Raisbeck.
Approval is expected imminently from Canada and Europe,
flightglobal.com
“where a number of potential
customers are waiting for the upgrade”, adds the Seattle, Washington-based company.
While owner-flyers and commercial operators account for the
bulk of the sales and demand to
date, Raisbeck says it is receiving
“some interest” in the modification from government agencies.
The composite, five-blade,
106in (265cm) propeller has an
advanced swept-blade design,
and offers improved take-off acceleration, better time-to-climb,
and reduced sound levels in the
cabin and cockpit, Raisbeck notes.
Raisbeck Engineering
King Air 350 propeller update a sweeping success
Composite, five-blade design improves acceleration and climb rate
Flight Fleets Analyzer records
a global fleet of more than 1,100
King Air 350s. The USA has the
largest installed base, with
around 670 examples, followed
by Canada with 45, and Brazil
with 33. The European inventory
of King Air 350s totals 90 units. ■
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 25
AIRPORTS
Hollandse-Hoogte/REX/Shutterstock
Special report
Movements at Amsterdam Schiphol airport are restricted by an agreement that addresses local environmental and noise concerns
Space constrained
European hubs are struggling to keep pace with growing demand for travel as short-term
solutions fail to overcome the limits imposed by runway and air traffic control capacity
OLIVER CLARK, LEWIS HARPER & DAVID
KAMINSKI-MORROW LONDON
T
he rapid growth in air traffic across
western Europe is increasing capacity pressure on infrastructure, creating expectations that the region risks
reaching bursting point in a few years.
Ryanair chief executive Michael O’Leary
recently said, for example, that the Irish carrier
was being hamstrung in its efforts to boost services in Germany by the “huge pressure” on
26 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
airport capacity at peak times. He also accused
Lufthansa Group airlines of “bed-blocking”
slots at attractive times during the daily cycle.
Piecemeal solutions to capacity constraints
have relieved the situation to an extent, but
projects that would make a significant difference – specifically new airports and expansion
works – are tending to expose the glacial pace
of government and regulator action. In some
cases, this means new facilities are in danger of
being insufficient before they even open.
Further complicating the picture are the
intransigent agendas of entrenched network
carriers versus other operators as they grapple
over who gets the rights to the best slots.
Stakeholders are also having to plan infrastructure at a time when governments and
regulators are more mindful than ever about
the environmental impact of aviation, leading
to the imposition of restrictions on available
slots and night flying, for example.
While such headaches are not unique to
Europe, figures from IATA, released in February, show the region accounts for more than
flightglobal.com
AIRPORTS
Special report
half of the world’s slot-co-ordinated airports,
where slots are agreed and arranged in
advance of travel seasons in a bid to match
demand to capacity and satisfy airline preferences for timing – to make connections, for
example. For the summer 2018 season, 104
airports in Europe are level-three slot co-ordinated – applied to the busiest airports with
high demand throughout the day – while 76
operate under level-two control, which suggests they are near capacity at some points
during the day.
That strategy, though, is not enough. “To
say [slot] co-ordination is a short-term solution to a lack of infrastructure is no longer
realistic,” IATA’s head of worldwide airport
slots, Lara Maughan, said at the end of last
year. “Slot co-ordination is more and more a
staple in an industry where capacity is not
keeping pace with demand.”
Amsterdam Schiphol airport offers an
example of the multifaceted challenges at
Europe’s busiest airports – in this case exacerbated by the limits placed on traffic by strict
noise and environmental requirements.
GROWTH AMBITIONS
KLM chief executive Pieter Elbers earlier this
year bemoaned the proportion of slots given to
low-cost carriers at Schiphol, claiming this
was hindering his carrier’s growth ambitions.
Elbers will be hoping that the opening of
Lelystad airport as a second facility in
Amsterdam – scheduled in two years – will
help relieve that pressure.
Plans to open Lelystad to commercial traffic
were recently pushed back a year to 2020, in
order to assuage residents’ concerns.
The decision follows a consultation
period with residents, administrators and
users of the airspace. “The design routes
were unexpected for many people before the
summer, and errors in the noise calculations
damaged confidence,” the infrastructure
ministry says.
Royal Schiphol Group chief executive Jos
Nijhuis expresses his disappointment: “The
Dutch aviation sector now has to wait even
longer for a political and social decision made
10 years ago to be implemented. I find that
[situation] disappointing.” It remains to be
seen how keen carriers will be to relinquish
slots at Schiphol in favour of Lelystad when
the latter finally opens.
Elsewhere in Europe, plans to tackle infrastructure constraints are moving at a snail’s
pace – London Heathrow’s proposed third
runway being a case in point.
While the UK government continues to
favour Heathrow as the location for its capital
city’s new capacity, there is still a long way to
go before ground is broken. Indeed, IAG chief
executive Willie Walsh recently put the odds
of the project actually happening at 50:50.
flightglobal.com
Europe’s category three slot-co-ordinated airports – summer 2018 season
Country
Airports
Austria
Vienna
Belgium
Brussels
Czech Republic
Prague
Denmark
Billund, Copenhagen
Finland
Helsinki
France
Lyon, Nice, Paris CDG, Paris Orly
Germany
Berlin Schoenefeld, Berlin Tegel, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich, Stuttgart
Greece
Chania, Chios, Corfu, Heraklion, Kalamata, Karpathos, Kavala, Kefalonia, Kithira, Kos,
Mikonos, Mytilene, Patras, Preveza, Rhodes, Samos, Siteia, Skiathos, Thessalonika, Thira,
Volos, Zakinthos
Iceland
Keflavik
Ireland
Dublin
Israel
Tel Aviv
Italy
Cagliari, Catania, Florence, Genova Cristoforo Colombo, Lampedusa, Milan Linate, Milan
Malpensa, Milan Orio al Serio, Naples, Olbia Costa Smeralda, Palermo, Pantelleria, Rome
Ciampino, Rome Fiumicino, Treviso, Turin, Venice
Netherlands
Amsterdam Schiphol, Eindhoven, Rotterdam
Norway
Bergen, Oslo Gardermoen, Stavanger, Trondheim
Poland
Warsaw Chopin, Poznan
Portugal
Faro, Funchal, Lisbon, Porto
Russia
Moscow Sheremetyevo, Moscow Vnukovo
Spain
Alicante, Barcelona, Bilbao, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, Ibiza, Lanzarote, Madrid
Barajas, Malaga, Menorca, Palma Mallorca, Tenerife-Sur, Valencia
Sweden
Gothenburg, Stockholm-Arlanda, Stockholm-Bromma
Switzerland
Geneva, Zurich
Turkey
Antalya, Istanbul Ataturk, Istanbul Sabiha Gokcen
Ukraine
Kiev
UK
Birmingham, Bristol, London City, London Gatwick, London Heathrow, London Luton,
Manchester, Stansted
Source: IATA
The desperate need for slots in London led
Walsh to highlight the possibility that Gatwick airport could use its emergency runway
to boost its capacity.
Speaking before the UK parliamentary
transport select committee in February,
Walsh noted that the UK airport had “talked
about extending their capacity by using their
emergency runway” and added: “I certainly
wouldn’t rule that out.”
“To say slot co-ordination is
a short-term solution to a
lack of infrastructure is no
longer realistic”
Lara Maughan
Head of worldwide airport slots, IATA
Gatwick has one operational runway, but
also has a second parallel runway that is used
as a taxiway.
A parliamentary committee report warned
in March, meanwhile, that the government
must make a number of changes to the policy
framework it intends to use to approve the
expansion of Heathrow in order to “minimise
any chance of a successful legal challenge”
against the project.
The report by the transport select committee urges UK parliamentarians to approve
the government’s Airports National Policy
Statement when it comes up for vote, but
only once a number of concerns have been
addressed.
The Civil Aviation Authority should test at
an “appropriately early stage” whether the
expansion of Heathrow is “affordable and
financeable”, the report recommends.
“Such a test should offer an opportunity to
halt the planning process if it is evident that
the proposed scheme has no realistic prospect
of being built,” it states.
Should the project go ahead, the sheer
demand for future slots is already a cause for
concern among incumbent operators.
Virgin Atlantic chief executive Craig Kreeger
recently urged the UK government to establish a
new “independent process” to distribute slots at
an expanded Heathrow, in order to create a “viable, vibrant marketplace”.
Speaking in mid-March, Kreeger said applying the current IATA slot regime in force at the
airport to an expanded Heathrow would create
a “bias” in favour of new entrants. Airlines that
are not already flying to the London hub
would be given “priority for new slots, relative
to existing providers”, he suggests.
Kreeger argues that, as slots not taken up by ❯❯
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 27
AIRPORTS
Special report
❯❯ newcomers would be allocated to incumbents based on their current shares of capacity
at the airport, the process would “effectively
limit” most airlines to obtaining around 4% of
new slots each. The exception to this would be
the “group of carriers” that controls 55% of slot
capacity at Heathrow, he says, alluding to IAG.
Meanwhile, even when a new facility has
been built, there is no guarantee that it will
come into service, as demonstrated by Berlin’s recent woes.
After reviewing progress on the long-delayed
Berlin Brandenburg airport, its operator said
at the end of last year that it had approved a
management report commissioning the
opening of the facility for October 2020.
“There is consensus that a responsible and
valid assessment is now available, which provides a realistic basis for further work until
commissioning,” it says.
Brandenburg was developed to replace the
city’s Tegel and Schönefeld airports, but the
project has been plagued by delays. Many
stakeholders now suggest the new facility
might not be fit for purpose.
According to the Irish Times, Thorsten
Dirks, a Lufthansa board member and head of
its Eurowings budget subsidiary, told a
closed-door event in Bavaria recently: “My
prognosis: [Brandenburg airport] will be torn
down and built anew.”
For now, the German capital continues to
be served by two ageing facilities.
At Frankfurt Main at least, the country is
seeing some progress towards infrastructure
improvements, with a new Terminal 3 slated
for opening in 2023.
Ben Cawthra/REX/Shutterstock
BEGINNING AGAIN
Slots are scarce at London’s Heathrow and Gatwick as talks continue on raising capacity
Elsewhere in western Europe, Vienna airport’s operator is analysing a March legal ruling giving the go-ahead to construct a third
runway, after tighter environmental conditions were imposed.
While Flughafen Wien says the ruling is
“positive”, it will only commit to construction
when it has “legal certainty” over the scheme.
Meanwhile, Portugal’s government has outlined plans to turn Montijo air base into a second international airport serving the capital,
Lisbon. The government has entered into a
memorandum of understanding with Portu-
guese airports operator ANA and its owner
Vinci Airports to develop the facility, which
lies to the southeast of the city.
Environmental studies are due to be completed by mid-2018. The government says
Montijo needs to be developed to ease pressure on Lisbon’s existing Portela airport.
Whatever the success or otherwise of several projects under way in western Europe,
the pressure for action is growing greater by
the day as more and more aircraft join the
region’s fleet. As recent experience shows,
there are unlikely to be any quick wins. ■
REGULATION LEWIS HARPER BRUSSELS
Eurocontrol pushes for airspace reform to cope with burgeoning traffic demand
The director general of Eurocontrol has warned
that Europe’s airspace will not be able to cope
with “unstoppable demand” for flights by 2030
without “a lot of reform”.
Speaking at a conference in Brussels in midMarch, Eamonn Brennan called on the
European Parliament to support reform, saying:
“If we keep doing things the same as we’re doing them now, we will not be able to meet the
air traffic demand in 12 years’ time. There is
actually a level where you can’t take any more.”
But progress will only be possible, Brennan
believes, if “we all work together in Europe.
Policymakers in Europe need to look at systemwide stuff more, and less at national stuff.”
Eurocontrol – which, as an intergovernmental air traffic management organisation, works
on the EU’s Single European Sky (SESAR) programme, among other initiatives – believes
problems will be exacerbated by lack of in-
28 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
vestment in runway capacity, meaning “everybody wants to fly to the same place, at the
same time, every day, to the same points”,
says Brennan.
He cites figures showing that on a typical day
in 1999, there were 27,100 flights within
Europe’s airspace. Last year, there were 37,200
flights in a single day, and Eurocontrol predicts
some 58,000 flights per day by 2030. He notes
that several stakeholders – including IATA – believe this forecast to be conservative.
Heat maps show how capacity pressure his
risen in the region. In 1999, Europe’s airspace
was busy in the early morning and around the
middle of the day, but was “relatively okay”.
However, Brennan points out that in 2017 “we
see something much different happening... You
see the system hotter for much of the day.”
The consequence of a failure to improve the
ability of Europe’s airspace to cope with rising
traffic would be widespread disruption to
flights, Brennan suggests.
“What you’d be facing would be very considerable delays at airports because airport runways are not being built. Nobody is putting
new capacity on the ground,” he says.
While steps towards SESAR are important to
improving the situation, “what actually happens
is [that] the airlines... pile in more demand, pile
in more aircraft” when efficiencies are achieved,
quickly offsetting progress made.
Brennan suggests that the solution is “to
have a good system of safety-assurance, safety
promotion, performance-based regulations”.
Performance-based navigation has been
promoted by Eurocontrol for some time – including initiatives allowing for strategic de-confliction in the vertical and horizontal planes, and
capacity improvements achieved by closerspaced routes and increased predictability. ■
flightglobal.com
AIRPORTS
Special report
TECHNOLOGY KERRY REALS GENEVA
Virgin Hyperloop One
Dutch plan for high-speed airport interconnector is more than just a pipe dream
Hyperloop One, a California company that is
seeking to make the concept of aircraft-speed
ground transportation a commercial reality, is
hopeful that talks with the Dutch government
to build a hyperloop track linking Amsterdam’s
Schiphol and Lelystad airports could result in
the two facilities effectively b
­ ecoming one integrated aerodrome within five years.
Speaking at the Air Transport Action Group
(ATAG) Global Sustainable Aviation Summit in
Geneva in October 2017, Hyperloop One senior v­ ice-president global field operations Nick
Earle said the company was in “significant
­discussions with the Dutch government
around the concept of creating extra capacity
at Schiphol” by building a high-speed hyperloop link to Lelystad.
Southwest of Amsterdam, Lelystad is the
biggest general aviation airport in the
Netherlands, and is currently being enhanced
to accommodate commercial jetliners. With a
longer runway planned to open in 2020, Airbus
A320s and Boeing 737s will be able to use
Lelystad; larger jets such as A350s or 787s will
have access, but not at maximum weight.
Royal Schiphol Group, which owns both the
­airports, wants Lelystad to operate as a reliever
­facility for low-cost and holiday traffic that uses
Schiphol.
If the hyperloop concept becomes a reality,
Earle says the 50km (31 mile) journey between
Schiphol and Lelystad would take just 4min,
creating what he describes as “a single, integrated airport” at a “fraction of the cost” of
flightglobal.com
building an additional runway.
“I’m hopeful there will be announcements
on that going forward,” says Earle.
Hyperloop One has built a 500m (1,640ft)
test track in Nevada for its version of the hyperloop technology that was originally conceived
by Tesla founder Elon Musk. Other firms are
also attempting to commercialise the concept.
The idea is to build a ground transportation
system in which passengers and cargo are loaded into pods that accelerate gradually through
a low-pressure tube – to minimise air resistance
– using electric propulsion. The pods are then
lifted off the track by magnetic levitation, the
aim being for them to glide at speeds of up to
650mph (1,046km/h).
RAPID TRANSPORT
Virgin Group founder Richard Branson is an enthusiast. A partnership with Hyperloop One announced last October will see his company
invest an undisclosed sum in the firm. Branson
will join the board of directors and the company
is being rebranded as Virgin Hyperloop One.
On announcing the investment, Branson
said: “After visiting Hyperloop One’s test site
in Nevada and meeting its leadership team, I
am convinced this g
­ round-breaking technology will change transportation as we know it
and dramatically cut journey times.”
The potential Netherlands project is one of a
number of possible routes under consideration
at various locations around the world. Earle says
the company plans to build three sites for regu-
latory approval by 2021, with a full commercial
operation expected in 2023.
“We’re getting closer – we’ve got the plane
to lift off the beach,” he told delegates at the
ATAG Summit.
“We think the technology is there. Of all the
industries I could talk to, you know from your
roots [not to give up] when something comes
along that was deemed impossible.”
The Netherlands’ former minister for infrastructure and environment Melanie Henriette
Schultz van Haegen announced in October
2017 that her department had commissioned a
hyperloop feasibility study. The report,
Hyperloop in the Netherlands, was carried out
in August by Arup, BCI, TNO and VINU.
It examined six scenarios for test tracks from
two hyperloop companies – Hyperloop One
and Hardt – and concluded that a link between Schiphol and Lelystad airports would
be a favourable option, noting that the two
facilities “have the ambition to become an
integrated airport”.
“Our advice to the government is to build a
partly publicly-financed, full-scale, 3m-diameter test track in the Netherlands,” says the report. “Once this test track has been proven
successful, it could be extended to a longer
one and possibly even become part of a commercial track.”
The report continues: “The most likely option would be to extend the test track in order
to connect Lelystad airport to Schiphol. This
would require a double tube system of 57km
without stops.”
The decision on whether to go ahead with a
hyperloop system in the Netherlands now lies
with the Dutch government.
Hyperloop’s passenger-carrying ambitions
may be a world-first, but Musk is not the first
entrepreneur to dream of making money from
pneumatic tube transport.
The concept dates to the early 1800s in
London and eventually found financial backing
to make it reality.
For about 11 years from 1863 the London
Pneumatic Despatch Company shuttled mail
and light freight through tubes underneath the
city. Using steam-driven air pumps and rail carriages with air-tight rubber seals, the system
resembled a large version of the pneumatic
tubes used to whizz cash and receipts around
department stores before the days of computerised tills.
Speeds may have reached some 60mph, but
the Post Office apparently did not realise sufficient time savings to justify use of the system.
Contemporary reports also indicate technical
troubles – rail cars getting stuck in the tubes. ■
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 29
AIRPORTS
Special report
Global traffic rankings in focus
Preliminary figures point to ongoing growth in 2017, with Asia-Pacific a major contributor
SILVA ISHAK FLIGHTGLOBAL DATA RESEARCH TEAM
Top 100 airports – preliminary passenger ranking 2017 (1-49)
2017 passengers
Rank
2017
Rank
2016
1
2
3
4
5
1
Seat share of two leading carriers (marketing airline)
City
Airport
Code
Country
Hartsfield Int'l
ATL
USA
103,903
-0.3
Delta Air Lines 78%
Southwest Airlines
10%
Capital
PEK
China
95,786
1.5
Air China 40%
China Southern
14%
International
DXB
UAE
88,242
5.5
Emirates Airline 64%
Flydubai
14%
Haneda Int'l
HND
Japan
85,263
6.4
All Nippon Airways 45%
Japan Airlines
30%
4
Atlanta
Beijing
Dubai
Tokyo
Los Angeles
International
LAX
USA
84,558
4.5
American Airlines 18%
Delta Air Lines
16%
6
6
Chicago
O'Hare International
ORD
USA
79,828
2.4
United Airlines 44%
American Airlines
35%
7
8
9
10
7
Heathrow
LHR
UK
77,988
3.1
British Airways 48%
Virgin Atlantic
4%
International
HKG
Hong Kong
72,867
3.4
Cathay Pacific 30%
Cathay Dragon
15%
Pudong International
PVG
China
70,001
6.1
China Eastern Airlines 27%
Shanghai Airlines
9%
10
London
Hong Kong
Shanghai
Paris
Charles de Gaulle
CDG
France
69,471
5.4
Air France 51%
EasyJet
7%
11
12
Amsterdam
Schiphol
AMS
Netherlands
68,400
7.5
KLM 50%
EasyJet
8%
12
11
Dallas/Fort Worth
International
DFW
USA
67,092
2.3
Spirit Airlines
4%
13
15
Guangzhou
Baiyun International
CAN
China
65,807
10.2
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
13
Frankfurt
Istanbul
Delhi
Jakarta
Singapore
Seoul
Denver
New York
Bangkok
Kuala Lumpur
San Francisco
Madrid
Chengdu
Las Vegas
Barcelona
Mumbai
Toronto
Seattle
Charlotte
Shenzhen
London
Taipei
Mexico City
Kunming
Orlando
Munich
Miami
Phoenix
Newark
Sydney
Manila EST
Shanghai
Xian
Rome
Houston
Tokyo
International
FRA
Germany
64,500
6.1
American Airlines 84%
China Southern
47%
Airlines
Lufthansa 64%
Ataturk International
IST
Turkey
63,727
5.5
Turkish Airlines 79%
Atlasglobal
6%
Indira Gandhi Int'l
DEL
India
63,452
14.1
Indigo 26%
Jet Airways
18%
Soekarno Hatta Int'l
CGK
Indonesia
63,016
8.3
Garuda Indonesia 28%
Lion Airlines
25%
Changi
SIN
Singapore
62,220
6.0
Singapore Airlines 29%
Scoot
8%
Incheon International
ICN
South Korea
62,082
7.5
Korean Air Lines 27%
Asiana Airlines
19%
International
DEN
USA
61,379
5.3
United Airlines 42%
Southwest Airlines
30%
JFK
JFK
USA
59,345
0.7
Delta Air Lines 26%
JetBlue Airways
21%
Suvarnabhumi
BKK
Thailand
59,080
6.5
Thai Airways 32%
Bangkok Airways
9%
International
KUL
Malaysia
58,517
11.2
AirAsia 35%
Malaysia Airlines
22%
International
SFO
USA
55,833
5.1
United Airlines 42%
Virgin America
9%
Barajas
MAD
Spain
53,403
5.9
Iberia 37%
Air Europa
13%
Shuangliu Int'l
CTU
China
49,802
8.2
Air China 28%
Sichuan Airlines
20%
McCarran Int'l
LAS
USA
48,500
2.2
Southwest Airlines 39%
Delta Air Lines
9%
El Prat
BCN
Spain
47,285
7.1
Vueling Airlines 37%
Ryanair
15%
International
BOM
2
3
5
8
9
14
20
21
17
19
18
16
22
24
23
25
27
26
33
29
32
28
31
39
35
36
43
38
40
37
30
34
46
41
47
45
51
42
44
48
Number (’000) Change %
Carrier 1
Carrier 2
Air China
7%
Ryanair
4%
India
47,204
5.6
Jet Airways 27%
Indigo
22%
Pearson International YYZ
Canada
47,130
6.3
Air Canada 55%
WestJet
15%
Tacoma International
SEA
USA
46,934
2.6
Alaska Airlines 49%
Delta Air Lines
22%
Douglas
CLT
USA
45,910
3.3
American Airlines 91%
Delta Air Lines
4%
Baoan International
SZX
China
45,611
8.7
Shenzhen Airlines 28%
China Southern
26%
Gatwick
LGW
UK
45,562
5.2
EasyJet 42%
British Airways
16%
Taoyuan International TPE
Taiwan
44,879
6.1
China Airlines 27%
EVA Air
24%
Benito Juarez Int'l
MEX
Mexico
44,732
7.2
Aeromexico 40%
InterJet
23%
Changshui Int'l
KMG
China
44,728
6.5
China Eastern Airlines 38%
Lucky Air
14%
International
MCO
USA
44,611
6.4
Southwest Airlines 25%
JetBlue Airways
13%
International
MUC
Germany
44,595
5.5
Lufthansa 59%
Eurowings
6%
International
MIA
USA
44,071
-1.2
American Airlines 68%
Delta Air Lines
6%
Sky Harbor
PHX
USA
43,922
1.2
American Airlines 47%
Southwest Airlines
34%
Liberty International
EWR
USA
43,393
7.5
United Airlines 64%
JetBlue Airways
6%
Kingsford Smith Int'l
SYD
Australia
43,324
3.6
Qantas Airways 32%
Virgin Australia
20%
Ninoy Aquino Int'l
MNL
Philippines
42,000
6.3
Cebu Pacific Air 35%
Philippine Airlines
32%
Hongqiao Int'l
SHA
China
41,884
3.5
China Eastern Airlines 30%
Shanghai Airlines
19%
Xianyang Int'l
XIY
China
41,857
13.1
China Eastern Airlines 23%
Hainan Airlines
12%
Fiumicino
FCO
Italy
40,972
-1.9
Alitalia 39%
Vueling Airlines
8%
George Bush
IAH
USA
40,696
-2.4
United Airlines 75%
American Airlines
6%
Narita International
NRT
Japan
40,687
4.2
All Nippon Airways 19%
Japan Airlines
14%
30 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
flightglobal.com
AIRPORTS
Special report
Top 100 airports – preliminary passenger ranking 2017 (50-100)
2017 passengers
Seat share of two leading carriers (marketing airline)
Number (’000)
Change
%
Russia
39,641
17.8
Aeroflot 89%
Air France
1%
China
38,715
7.9
Sichuan Airlines 14%
Air China
13%
BOS
USA
38,412
5.9
JetBlue 28%
Delta Air Lines
17%
MSP
USA
38,034
1.4
Delta Air Lines 71%
Sun Country
7%
Guarulhos Int'l
GRU
Brazil
37,750
3.2
LATAM Airlines Brazil 34%
Gol
23%
Don Mueang Int'l
DMK
Thailand
37,184
7.2
Thai AirAsia 43%
Thai Lion Air
23%
Tullamarine
MEL
Australia
36,492
3.7
Qantas Airways 29%
Virgin Australia
23%
Xiaoshan Int'l
HGH
China
35,570
12.6
Air China 20%
China Southern
14%
International
DOH
Qatar
35,500
-4.8
Qatar Airways 90%
Indigo
2%
Wayne County
DTW
34,701
0.9
Delta Air Lines 72%
Spirit
9%
Jeddah
King Abdulaziz Int'l
JED
Fort Lauderdale
Hollywood Int'l
FLL
USA
Saudi
Arabia
USA
Orly
ORY
Sabiha Gokcen Int'l
SAW
El Dorado Int'l
92
Paris
Istanbul
Bogota
Moscow
Jeju
Dublin
Philadelphia
New York
Zurich
Copenhagen
Osaka
Palma de Mallorca
Manchester
Oslo
Lisbon
Stockholm
Baltimore EST
Antalya
London
Nanjing
Seoul
Bengaluru
84
81
Riyadh
85
86
87
88
94
Rank
2017
Rank
2016
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
58
City
Airport
Code
Country
Sheremetyevo Int'l
SVO
Jiangbei Int'l
CKG
Logan International
International
57
Moscow
Chongqing
Boston
Minneapolis-St Paul
Sao Paulo
Bangkok
Melbourne
Hangzhou
Doha EST
Detroit
60
62
61
67
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
60
54
53
49
52
55
56
59
50
Carrier 1
Carrier 2
34,070
9.4
Saudia 42%
Flynas
8%
32,500
11.3
JetBlue 24%
Southwest Airlines
21%
France
32,042
2.6
Air France 31%
Transavia France
15%
Turkey
31,316
5.6
Pegasus 65%
Turkish Airlines
31%
BOG
Colombia
30,990
-0.2
Avianca 64%
LATAM Paraguay
14%
Domodedovo Int'l
DME
Russia
30,658
7.6
S7 Airlines 44%
Ural Airlines
16%
International
CJU
South Korea
29,600
-0.4
Korean Air Lines 21%
Asiana Airlines
20%
International
DUB
Ireland
29,600
6.1
Ryanair 40%
Aer Lingus
35%
International
PHL
USA
29,586
-1.9
American Airlines 71%
Southwest Airlines
7%
LaGuardia
LGA
USA
29,502
-1.0
Delta Air Lines 42%
American Airlines
27%
Zurich
ZRH
Switzerland
29,400
6.3
Swiss 55%
Edelweiss
7%
Kastrup
CPH
Denmark
29,200
0.5
SAS 38%
Norwegian
16%
Kansai Int'l
KIX
Japan
27,983
10.9
All Nippon Airways 55%
Japan Airlines
41%
Palma de Mallorca
PMI
Spain
27,971
6.5
Ryanair 22%
Vueling Airlines
12%
International
MAN
UK
27,800
8.5
Ryanair 18%
EasyJet
14%
Gardermoen
OSL
Norway
27,500
6.6
SAS 39%
Norwegian
36%
Lisbon
LIS
Portugal
26,670
18.8
TAP Portugal 61%
Ryanair
9%
Arlanda
ARN
Sweden
26,600
7.7
SAS 44%
Norwegian
18%
Washington Int'l
BWI
USA
26,390
5.0
Southwest Airlines 68%
Spirit
9%
International
AYT
Turkey
26,346
38.5
SunExpress 29%
Turkish Airlines
25%
Stansted
STN
UK
25,900
6.5
Ryanair 78%
EasyJet
10%
Lukou Int'l
NKG
China
25,823
15.5
China Eastern Airlines 15%
Shenzhen Airlines
14%
Gimpo International
GMP
South Korea
25,100
0.2
Korean Air Lines 26%
Asiana Airlines
23%
Kempegowda Int'l
BLR
India
25,047
12.9
Indigo 42%
Jet Airways
11%
King Khalid Int'l
RUH
Saudi
Arabia
25,000
5.4
Saudia 57%
Flynas
15%
National
BRU
Belgium
24,800
13.7
Brussels Airlines 41%
Ryanair
8%
International
DUS
Germany
24,641
4.8
Eurowings 40%
Lufthansa
9%
Gaoqi International
XMN
China
24,485
7.7
Xiamen Airlines 39%
Shangdong Airlines
14%
84
Brussels
Dusseldorf
Xiamen
Vienna
Vienna
VIE
Austria
24,400
4.5
Eurowings
11%
89
101
Zhengzhou
Xinzheng Int'l
CGO
China
24,299
17.0
90
91
92
85
International
SLC
USA
24,199
5.0
International
YVR
Canada
24,166
8.4
82
Salt Lake City
Vancouver
Washington
Austrian 52%
China Southern
15%
Airlines
Delta Air Lines 70%
Reagan National
DCA
USA
23,928
1.4
93
98
Changsha
Huanghua Int'l
CSX
China
23,765
11.6
94
95
79
Abu Dhabi
Okinawa EST
International
AUH
UAE
23,500
Jet Airways
3%
107
Naha
OKA
Japan
23,400
15%
96
104
Qingdao
Liuting International
TAO
China
23,211
13.2
Shangdong Airlines 28%
97
87
Brisbane
Brisbane
BNE
Australia
23,206
2.3
98
100
Wuhan
Tianhe International
WUH
China
23,129
11.4
99
96
Cancun
International
CUN
Mexico
23,000
7.4
Qantas Airways 35%
China Southern
32%
Airlines
Volaris 10%
Japan Airlines
China Eastern
Airlines
Virgin Australia
China Eastern
Airlines
American Airlines
100
93
Washington
Dulles Int'l
IAD
USA
22,893
4.1
United Airlines 61%
American Airlines
5%
4,291,666
5.6
66
61
69
65
70
63
64
71
68
75
72
74
73
89
78
76
111
80
90
77
83
86
91
EST
EST
Total
Hainan Airlines
9%
Southwest Airlines
11%
Air Canada 46%
WestJet
23%
Southwest Airlines
14%
Hainan Airlines
13%
-4.0
American Airlines 51%
China Southern
22%
Airlines
Etihad Airways 83%
19.0
All Nippon Airways 36%
18%
31%
32%
10%
Notes: EST FlightGlobal estimates used where full traffic figures unavailable for indicative purposes; Source: FlightGlobal research based on preliminary traffic figures published by airports, which are in many cases reported
on a “Terminal Passenger” basis and exclude a small portion of transit passengers; airline capacity shares based on FlightGlobal schedules data for April 2018 based on seats offered by marketing airline
flightglobal.com
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 31
AIRPORTS
Special report
Creating capacity
Denver International Airport
Passenger numbers across the 100 biggest
airports rose almost 5.6% in 2017, according
to data collated by FlightGlobal, based on
preliminary annual traffic figures. While still
representative of strong growth overall, this
is slightly less than the near-6% increase
registered by the largest hubs in 2016
Denver International
recorded over 5% growth
Passenger traffic at top 100 airports in 2017 by region
1.10bn
1.24bn
+6.8%
+2.9%
Europe
North America
206m
+3.0%
136m
+4.4%
STEADY AT THE TOP
Total
4.29bn
+5.6%
Middle East
Asia-Pacific
South
America
1.65bn
+7.4%
Note: No African airports featured in the top 100. Change versus 2016
Top 10 airports in 2017 by passenger traffic
1 Atlanta
Hartsfield
International
104m
2 Beijing
Capital
96m
32 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
3 Dubai
International
88m
4 Tokyo Haneda
International
85m
Growth among the 10 biggest hubs was just
over 3.5%, the slower rate in part reflecting the
maturity – and in some cases growth constraints – at these facilities. There was little
movement among the top 10 airports, the only
change being Tokyo Haneda moving above Los
Angeles to rank as the fourth-biggest airport
with more than 85 million passengers in 2017.
Atlanta Hartsfield remains the biggest airport in the world by passenger numbers. Just
under 104 million passengers went through
its doors in 2017, marking a fractional fall on
2016. Flight activity was hit by several factors, notably the disruption from storms in
September and a power outage in December.
Beijing Capital closed the gap slightly behind Atlanta, with just over 94 million passengers. But its growth was impacted by
maintenance work, which took one of its runways out of operation for most of April. Work
meanwhile is continuing on a second airport
for Beijing. Located in Daxing, the facility is
due for completion in 2019.
5 Los Angeles
International
84m
6 Chicago O’Hare
International
80m
flightglobal.com
AIRPORTS
Special report
Fastest growth in passenger traffic among top 100 airports in 2017
Survey ranking: 79
38.5 %
Antalya
International
(Antalya)
Survey ranking: 81
Survey ranking: 95
19.0 %
18.8 %
Naha
(Okinawa)
Lisbon
(Lisbon)
Survey ranking: 16
14.1 %
15.5 %
Lukou
International
(Nanjing)
Survey ranking: 76
17.8 %
Survey ranking: 85
13.7 %
Indira Gandhi
International
(Delhi)
Survey ranking: 50
Survey ranking: 89
17.0 %
Sheremetyevo
International
(Moscow)
Xinzheng
International
(Zhengzhou)
Survey ranking: 96
Survey ranking: 46
13.2 %
Brussels
National
(Brussels)
STRONG DEMAND
Liuting
International
(Qingdao)
13.1 %
Xianyang
International
(Xian)
Note: Ranking based on year-on-year change in passenger traffic from the top 100 airports
Airports in the Asia-Pacific region accounted
for 38% of passenger numbers among the 100
largest airports last year, growing at a rate of
7.4% – the fastest of all the regions.
Tokyo Haneda and Shanghai Pudong enjoyed the largest rises in passenger levels
among the 10 biggest airports, while Delhi,
Guangzhou, Kuala Lumpur and Xian all reported double-digit rises and were the biggest
climbers within the top 50 airports.
Strong travel demand was at the heart of
improved profitability for Europe’s airlines,
and several airports in the region reported
solid growth. There was double-digit growth
at Lisbon and Brussels during the year, while
traffic rose sharply among Russian and Turkish airports as fortunes improved in both markets. Notably, passengers jumped more than a
third at Antalya airport, as Turkish tourism
recovered, making it the biggest climber
among the 100 largest airports.
Hans Blossey/ImageBroker/REX/Shutterstock
10-year trend: passenger traffic at top 100 airports
Düsseldorf handled over 24 million passengers
2007
2.92bn
2008
2.89bn
2009
2.82bn
2010
3.00bn
2011
3.16bn
2012
3.30bn
2013
3.45bn
2014
3.63bn
2015
3.86bn
2016
4.07bn
2017
4.29bn
Imaginechina/REX/Shutterstock
GULF SQUEEZE
Beijing Capital strengthened second-place ranking
7 London
Heathrow
78m
flightglobal.com
8 Hong Kong
International
73m
There were challenges in one of the major
growth regions, the Middle East. Traffic
among the five biggest airports in the region
had grown by almost 9% in 2016, continuing
recent years of strong increases. But more
challenging market conditions were compounded by travel restrictions – notably to
the USA – along with the closure of airspace
to Qatar and suspsension of services to that
emirate by some states in the region. Those
factors mean passenger growth in 2017 across
the same airports is likely to be around 3%.
The precise growth rate is unclear, as nei-
9 Shanghai
Pudong
International
70m
10 Paris Charles
de Gaulle
69m
ther Abu Dhabi nor Doha Hamad have yet
disclosed their full-year data. But after several
years of rapid growth, passenger levels would
appear to have declined in 2017.
Abu Dhabi airport handled 24.5 million
passengers in 2016, but numbers were down
by 3.7% after 11 months of 2017.
Unsurprisingly, the severing of airlinks by
several states hit traffic at Doha Hamad. Passenger numbers climbed in the first half of the
year, but were hit sharply by airspace closures
in June. The airport, however, says numbers
have been recovering since then. ■
Top 100 airports total
4.29bn passengers
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 33
STRAIGHT&LEVEL
From yuckspeak to tales of yore, send your offcuts to murdo.morrison@flightglobal.com
Wow factor
Talking of monikers, Skúli
Mogensen, founder and owner
of Icelandic low-cost carrier
Wow Air, recalled in a speech to
the Aviation Club how his
airline brand came about.
After rejecting various
Nordic-themed ideas – Arctic
Airlines, IceJet and such – his
exasperated agency threw in
“Wow”. It was, declares the
former IT entrepreneur, “love at
first sound”.
However, establishing the
name threw up complications.
RIP, Red Baron
We have had a tirade of
abuse in connection with
the honour
we gave to a
clean fighter
exemplified by
the late Baron Richthofen,
leaving us cold with
contempt that this can be
evoked from the treatment
of a respected foe.
Mosquito’s bite
From this swinging sixties icon to 21st century innovative
narrowbody, the 210 designation may be set to fly again
Although the brand was
registered only by a paintbrush
firm in Germany – little chance
of confusion there – typing
“Wow” into Google did throw
up something very different. We
did a search and “World of
Warcraft” came tops, but we are
assured by Mogensen that his
enquiries resulted in something
a lot more... er... adult.
Wow Air
If, as widely reported, Airbus
scraps the CSeries brand once it
takes over the struggling
programme from Bombardier –
by renaming the 110-seat variant
the A210, and its big sister the
A230 – it will be departing from
the “A300” nomenclature used
since it developed its original
twinjet in the early 1970s. The
A300 was followed, of course,
by the A310, A320 family,
A340, A330, A380 and A350.
However, the 210 designation
does have some history for
Toulouse, among those with
long memories.
The pioneering Caravelle
twinjet – produced by Airbus
predecessor Sud Aviation – was
the SE 210. SE stood for Sud Est,
the original entity that developed
the first jet airliner for the shortand medium-haul market.
Plus ça change...
FlightGlobal
Legend returns,
in name at least
Be careful what you search for
Moretti, resigned after being
sentenced to seven years in jail
over a fatal rail accident during
his tenure at Italian railways –
he is appealing. His predecessor
but one, Giuseppe Orsi, left after
two years in charge in 2013,
following accusations that he
paid bribes to win an Indian
helicopter contract – charges
later quashed.
However, even if Leonardo
switches chief executives yet
again, it will still not beat
hometown soccer club AS
Roma. Eusebio di Francesco is
its seventh boss since 2011.
Italian jobs
After five chief executives in
seven years, could Leonardo be
about to maintain its reputation
for football-manager-level
tenures in the top job?
Although still in situ, boss
Alessandro Profumo has been
told he must stand trial on
charges of market-rigging and
false accounting relating to his
time as chairman of Italian bank
Monte dei Paschi. The man he
replaced in 2017, Mauro
Rolf Schulten/ImageBroker/REX/Shutterstock
Berlin stall
Brandenburg: plenty of gates, but nowhere to go – before 2020
34 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
“Head of construction at Berlin
Brandenburg to depart”, reads a
headline on our Dashboard
news service.
There’s little immediate
prospect of passengers doing the
same. The gateway to Germany’s
capital was originally due to
open in 2007, but the new
airport will not now replace the
ageing, unpopular, and
overcrowded Shönefeld and
Tegel until at least October 2020.
Details of the twin-engined
Mosquito, claimed to be
the fastest
aircraft in
operation in the
world, are
unfolded to the public today. Its achievements on
active service have aroused
admiration, and it is in
service in several versions.
The nuclear age
One of the first signs of
nuclear technology yet to
be displayed in
any European air
display was
exhibited in
model form by ERNO. This
organisation, formed by
VFW and HFB, has been
investigating certain
aspects of an isotope decay
reactor for use as a source
of electrical energy with
long-lifetime satellites.
Fight for the right
US defence secretary
Les Aspin will allow women
to fly combat
aircraft,
including
fighters and
attack helicopters. The
US Congress repealed
a law prohibiting women
from combat aviation
jobs in 1991.
100-YEAR ARCHIVE
Every issue of Flight
from 1909 onwards
can be viewed online at
flightglobal.com/archive
flightglobal.com
LETTERS
flight.international@flightglobal.com
AIRWORTHINESS
We welcome your letters on any
aspect of the aerospace industry.
Please write to:
The Editor, Flight International,
Quadrant House, The Quadrant,
Sutton, Surrey, SM2 5AS, UK
Or email:
flight.international@flightglobal.com
The opinions on this page do not
necessarily represent those of the editor.
Letters without a full postal address supplied may not be published. Letters may
also be published on flightglobal.com
and must be no longer than 250 words.
Holding firm on
twin concerns
I would like to thank Colin Starkey for his reply to my concerns
over long-haul flights operated
by twin-engined aircraft (Flight
International, 17-23 April).
I do know that passenger
­service and comfort have nothing to do with twin-engined operations – although not every airline has premium economy, and
one has to shop around, or pay a
high fee for business class.
However, what I do find
­disturbing is stretched singleaisle aircraft on long-haul flights.
If not already in operation, they
soon will be.
The extra space on these
­aircraft is designed to attract
more passengers, not to increase
leg room.
Yes, the obvious answer to
deep vein thrombosis is to get up
and move about, but this is not
quite as easy in practice: especially when 200 other passengers
are trying to do the same thing,
while having to negotiate cabin
crew with their catering and
­duty-free trolleys.
Additionally, I would like to
commend the pilot of the tragic
With reference to your
article “Checks missed
ERJ-145’s hard-landing
damage” (Flight
International, 24-30
April), I was interested to
read that after landing,
the first officer carried
out a transit check of the A transit check identified damage
aircraft to ensure its
­airworthiness.
This check followed a landing impact of more than 4.2g,
producing several cracks in a wing, separation of the wing skin,
deformed ribs and a spar fracture of 810mm (32in). The aircraft
remained in passenger-carrying service until the operator’s
maintenance engineers identified the damage during a
­scheduled night stop.
You report that the first officer performed the post-incident
transit check in an inappropriate and ineffective manner. I
­wonder if the first officer knew he was formally ensuring the
airworthiness of the aircraft, and against what standard?
This is not the first such incident to feature in Flight
International, and we must all marvel at the structural integrity
and serviceability of today’s airframes. But I cannot help but
wonder if the first officer understood his responsibilities?
Stephen Payne
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, UK
Southwest Airlines Boeing 737700 for her actions on 17 April.
Fortunately, the incident
­happened over land and near a
diversion airport. The outcome
could have been so different if it
had been long-haul and trans-­
oceanic.
Peter Carey
Portchester, Hampshire, UK
Failing to recruit
Regarding your feature: “Skills
generation” (Flight
International, 10-16 April), we
have got to ask why the industry,
particularly in Europe, struggles
to recruit talented young people.
First, a lot of traditional
Deen Nas/Wikimedia Commons
Responsible job for first officer
“white-collar” career professions, such as aerodynamicist,
stress engineer and designer,
have been undermined by outshoring of short-term work packages to developing countries.
Because of pay differences,
and an abundance of engineers
from overseas, such key and secure jobs – and the know-how
that goes with them – may never
return.
Second, today’s millennials,
with their social media and IT aptitude, have a completely different skill set from those offered 30
years ago, and are equally in demand in industries such as banking and accounting: careers that
pay more, with better benefits.
Those that run the aerospace
industry today have a different
background to their predecessors and often fail to understand
technology.
Those that have mastered the
technology do not understand
how to manage and face the
­prospect of a flat career.
So, we have to wonder, given
the expectations of industry and
the rewards, why would anyone
in their right mind aim for a
­career in aerospace – especially
in Europe, where there are no
new projects?
Peter Bishop
Hamburg, Germany
Fond memories
Your comment: “Fly with us:
please” (Flight International,
10-16 April), gave room for otherwise forgotten memories.
In the mid-1970s, I was travelling with my family to Rome in
a McDonnell Douglas DC-9-41.
My eight-year-old son was invited by the crew to visit the flightdeck – a very common practice
in those days.
After a nice chat with the
­pilots, he came back with eyes
sparkling.
Although my last words to
him before going had been:
“Don’t touch anything,” he told
me how the captain had taken
his hand and, together with his
own, put it on the autopilot turn
knob, and turned the aircraft.
The rest is history. After much
economic hardship, he is now
working as a pilot for EasyJet,
and has over 10,000h of flying
experience.
If the industry wants pilots, it
must set up good cadet programmes, employ them when
they graduate and pay them a
­decent salary.
Frank Kristensen
via email
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8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 35
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36 | Flight International | 8-14 May 2018
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WORKING WEEK
WORK EXPERIENCE JOHANNE GALLANT
Passion, energy and determination
How did you get into the
aviation industry?
I began my career in tourism,
where I discovered a passion for
growing international markets
and developing air service. That
led to a full-time career in air service development, and from there
to my current role as chief executive of Fredericton International
airport, in Lincoln, New Brunswick, Canada. I consider myself
lucky to have had great mentors
along my journey who invested
time and energy in helping me to
develop my business and interpersonal skills. This encouraged
me to make the change into the
airport world, and to take on
leadership positions. I try to do
the same, and act as a mentor for
­others who are developing their
careers. The aviation world is an
exciting one, and it is wonderful
to see the next generation bringing fresh energy to the sector.
How has your career progressed?
I have been blessed with an interesting career – I have had the opportunity to work in sales and
business development in both
tourism and aviation and from
there to take on the chief executive role. The airport world is fascinating and ever changing,
which presents constant opportunities to learn while developing partnerships, opening new
markets, and increasing sales
and revenues. This career has
been rewarding on so many levels: working with intelligent and
dynamic people, learning the airport and airline business, and
leading a successful airport.
Fredericton airport
Johanne Gallant is bringing a fresh approach to Canada’s Fredericton International airport, in Lincoln,
New Brunswick, where her role as chief executive embraces planning, safety and opening new markets
Gallant views developing new talent as an important part of her role
I personally think this is only the
beginning of a great career – and
no matter what we do or take on,
is it important to do it with passion, energy and determination.
What have been the highlights?
Opening new markets for a region and seeing the direct economic impact is incredibly rewarding. Also, the first landing of
a new service is always a high
point for me. I still remember vividly that first Corsair Boeing 747
landing in New Brunswick. It
was an overwhelming feeling of
achievement to bring a new airline to our province, and to open
a new connection for business
and tourism ­between New Brunswick and France. I had the same
feeling with Continental when it
started its first service to New
Brunswick. Bringing that service
to our province was a team effort
with the business community
and the tourism department. It
took ­tremendous effort to convince this airline to open a new
market – but it was well worth it.
What does your job entail?
As chief executive, my role includes strategic planning, budget
and board management, business
development, stakeholder relations, lobbying, human resources, ensuring the safety of our
travellers and employees, and
environmental stewardship. In
the airport world no two days are
ever the same, especially if you
live in a country with harsh winters. I have a tremendous team at
Fredericton, and their expertise,
planning, and work ethic help
keep us as prepared as possible
for any unexpected events.
What challenges do you face?
Managing growth is our biggest
challenge right now – it is a great
challenge to have. But during exponential growth, maintaining
and increasing customer service
is just as important – and challenging – as leading your employees through the changes that
growth inevitably brings. As a
leader, my personal challenge is
to continue to improve, grow,
and give back to others, by
­helping and coaching young
­potential leaders.
What do you enjoy most about
your job?
The diversity of the business.
Whether it is leadership, safety,
airline negotiations, business development, human resources, or
wildlife control – as a president
and chief executive, every day is
an adventure.
What are the plans for the
airport?
Continued airline and passenger
growth, completion of a terminal
expansion project and ongoing
improvement of services. We
should start construction of the
terminal expansion this summer
and it is expected to take about
three years to complete. It is an
exciting time. n
Looking for a job in aerospace?
Check out our listings online at
flightglobal.com/jobs
If you would like to feature in
Working Week, or you know
someone who does, email
your pitch to kate.sarsfield@
flightglobal.com
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09/02/2017 12:28
8-14 May 2018 | Flight International | 43
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