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The Guardian G2 May 3 2018

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?I miss the old Kanye?
What has happened to
rap?s most complex star?
Thursday 03/05/18
Zoe Williams
Trump?s doctor is a
warning to all his people
page 3
Secrets of resilience
What we can learn from
one woman?s trauma
page 4
The faddy eater
Anyone for avolato?
page 7
?
Pass notes
? 3,802
Shortcuts
Time, gentlemen, please!
The Robot
Age: About a month.
Found in: The new Netflix remake of Lost
in Space.
Played by: Brian Steele. (You may remember
him as the sasquatch in the Harry and the
Hendersons TV series.)
Appearance: Swee-eet.
Excuse me? I?m just saying that the robot ?
known only as ?the Robot? ? looks really good.
Well, I suppose when Netflix makes a big new
sci-fi series it doesn?t skimp on the design
budget. Yes, everyone agrees that the series is
very sleek. But I didn?t mean the robot looked
good in that way.
In what way did you mean it, then? You know.
There?s a certain sinuousness about the curves
in the machinery that ?
Oh my God! Do you fancy a robot? He has
many admirable qualities! Yes, he?s big and
strong, and his rear end sticks out pleasingly
when he pushes heavy things, but he is also
gentle and protective. I don?t look at him
as an object.
But he literally is an object. We don?t know
exactly what he is. He is an alien machine or
life form of some kind, who becomes attached
to the young boy of the family, Will Robinson,
whom he looks after.
So he?s like a space au pair? A sexy au pair, yes.
Stop that! Look, I?m not the only one. The
series had OK reviews after it launched in
mid-April, but the shapeliness of the robot
has been almost universally acclaimed.
Call me repressed, but I think I?ll stick to
humans. Feel free. This kind of thing is hardly
new, however. I think it?s fair to say that
Maria, the robot in the early sci-fi classic
Metropolis (1922), was rather noticeably,
er, busty. Even C-3P0 was more bootylicious
than required.
People, including you, are weird. Hey, the
heart knows what it wants.
The heart has a limited role in this, by the
sound of it. I thought they had already remade
Lost in Space, anyway? You must be thinking
of the big-budget flop, starring Gary Oldman
and Matt LeBlanc, in 1998.
I?m trying not to. And, of course, the original
1960s TV series was already a remake, in a way,
of the 1812 novel The Swiss Family Robinson.
They were shipwrecked on a desert island, you
may remember.
Did they find a strangely attractive robot?
They found a monkey.
This conversation ends now. Good idea.
Do say: ?Danger, Will Robinson!?
Don?t say: ?Danger of mechanophilia!?
2
The Guardian
Thursday
sday 3 May 2018
69.5%
of professionals
reported having
drunk alcohol in
the past week
51.2%
of people in
manual jobs
drank over the
same period
Can adults
ever become
bilingual?
Learning a foreign language in
adulthood can feel like an exercise
in futility. Your woes may be
compounded by a paper published
in the journal Cognition, which
suggests that those who start
learning a language after the age
of 10 are doomed to never achieve
fluency ? and that even basic
learning abilities fade by 17 or 18.
But, peer-reviewed journals
be damned, I?m determined to
prove the doubters wrong. And so,
every morning for a little more than
eight months, I have done the same
thing: opened the Duolingo app and
spent 40 minutes learning French
and Japanese.
The service, which asks you to
finish 10 minutes of simple sentence
construction and vocabularylearning exercises each lesson, has
become a fixture in my life.
The basic principle of Duolingo
is that language learning is best
achieved by doing a little bit of work,
frequently, and over a long period
of time.
At the heart of it all is the concept
of the streak: logging on and
fulfilling your stated goal of 10, 20,
30 or 50 minutes of lessons a day.
Each day you meet your goal, you?re
rewarded with a happy chime.
By 6.30am every day, I?m sitting
at my kitchen table with coffee and
breakfast. I spend 20 minutes doing
two French courses, 20 minutes
doing two Japanese courses, and
then I leave for work.
But how much of the language do
you actually learn? According to the
app, I have 56 ?crowns? in French,
and 49 in Japanese. I don?t know
what that means, and I?m not certain
Duolingo does either. It certainly
doesn?t give me the ability to follow
along with francophone films. Yet
I am noticeably more confident
speaking and reading French, and as
for Japanese ? well, I?ve gone from
zero ability to a tiny, yet appreciably
higher than zero, ability.
The academics are probably right:
even with the help of smart new
technology, I?ll never be fluent in a
foreign language if I started learning
in my late 20s. But that?s no reason
not to try ? fluency is overrated
anyway. Why not aim for a simpler
goal, such as reading the signs on
doors? After all, pushing a door
marked ?pull? looks stupid in any
language.
Alex Hern
A study released by the Office for
National Statistics has found that
the most regular drinkers are those
in professional jobs, with 69.5% of
professionals reporting having drunk
in the past week, compared with
51.2% of people in routine or manual
occupations. When looking at
income, 78.9% of those earning more
than �,000 reported having drunk
in the past week, as opposed to 46.5%
of those earning less than �,000.
The figures are not surprising to
Katherine Brown of the Institute of
Alcohol Studies. ?Data has shown
for a number of years that people in
professional positions are more likely
to drink alcohol, and they?re more
likely to drink more heavily,? she
says. Nobody, she adds, is able to give
?concrete answers for why this is?.
It may be a hangover from student
drinking; those in professional
careers are more likely to have gone
to university, though the ONS study
showed younger people are drinking
less. ?If they adopted heavy drinking
practices, and associated their social
life with alcohol it could be that this
carries on in later life,? says Brown.
The professional cultures are
also an issue: ?In some, such as
finance and the legal profession, we
have seen recent shifts: drinking at
lunchtime is less acceptable than it
was.? Last year, Lloyds of London
banned drinking during working
hours. ?However we haven?t
necessarily seen a similar reduction
in out-of-office-hours drinking
cultures; client entertainment often
revolves around alcohol.?
Are people in stressful jobs
relaxing with alcohol? ?We don?t
have very strong evidence but it?s
a plausible theory,? says Brown.
?Alcohol seems to be the nation?s
favourite drug when it comes to
self-medicating stress.?
The relationship between
alcohol consumption and
socioeconomic status is complex
? it is also the case that alcoholour!
Bonj pelle
related mortality is higher in
?ap
deprived areas ? but Brown
Je m ex
says stereotypes ?around who
Al
are problem drinkers need
to be dismantled. People are
harming themselves, their
families and colleagues [by
drinking] at what are deemed
socially acceptable levels.?
Emine Saner
?
Cold shoulder ?
failing to take
a爏ickie drags
down the
economy
Presenteeism
is not to be
sni?ed at
Say
what?
COVER: KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY
New Zealand
PM Jacinda
Ardern is
starring in a
new tourism
ad alongside
comedy actor
Rhys Darby,
who declares:
?New Zealand,
where the
bloody hell
are ya?? The
tongue-incheek promo
addresses
the issue of
New Zealand
continually
finding itself
left off maps.
Now they?re
campaigning
to fix this
cartographic
error. Bloody
hell!
?However much my shoulder
burned and stung and ached, the
pleasure at being able to lie in total
peace was greater.? This is how Karl
Ove Knausgaard felt after he broke
his collarbone at football practice.
The Norwegian writer had spent
the爌ast four years taking care of
a young family while also trying
to work on his first book. Now his
injury had lifted the obligation to
constantly be busy. He was free to
lie there on the couch and watch an
Italian football game.
While Knausgaard was able to
enjoy his incapacity (and later write
about it), most of us cannot. A new
report by the Chartered Institute of
Personnel and Development found
that 86% of 1,000 organisations
surveyed had noticed employees
coming into work when they were
ill. This was up from 26% in 2010.
Coming to work ill ? presenteeism
? is disastrous for individuals. It
means their illnesses last longer
and they feel miserable. It is also
terrible for businesses. Sick workers
spread their lurgies and drag down
productivity. The economy also
suffers. One estimate puts the
annual cost of presenteeism at
�.1bn a year ? and that is just for
mental health-related illnesses.
That?s �5 for every employee.
Our willingness to suffer at work
may be ruining our companies, our
economy and our lives. One step
towards solving the nation?s
woeful爌roductivity is putting a
stop爐o such爌resenteeism.
Employers need to ensure their
workers are encouraged to stay away
when they are ill. This means
allowing people time off for both
physical and mental health issues.
Bosses also need to ensure that
working conditions are not making
people sick. After all, according to
the book Dying for a Paycheck by
Stanford professor Jeffrey Pfeffer,
the workplace is the fifth leading
cause of death in the US.
Workers need to take
responsibility, too. They should
stop themselves heading into work
when they are ill and simply enjoy
the pleasures of a sick day. If you
can?t function because you are
blocked up with flu, then just stay
at home. Maybe the first step is to
train爕ourself in the art of taking
time off work by joining the one
in爁ive Britons who claim to pull
a爏ickie each year.
Andr� Spicer
Zoe
Williams
The tale of Trump?s doctor is a
warning to loyal foot soldiers
In local爀lections, no
one wins ? not least
the local electorate
Two years ago, give or take, the US election seemed to hang on the health of the
candidates. A video surfaced of Hillary Clinton, seeming to almost faint as she
got into a car. Your head said: this is trivial, it?s probably one of those diseases
like labyrinthitis or flu that you don?t believe exists until you get it yourself.
Your gut said: this is bad, voting is primal; no one lines up behind anyone who
looks like they?re about to fall over. Trump, meanwhile, was in rude health,
which was plain from his overall rudeness, and also, a letter from his physician,
Dr Harold Bornstein. It was like a note you
forge from your mum, in reverse: Donald
can go swimming, because he is in the best
health ever, his level of wellbeing is unlike
any you may have encountered in a swimeligible child. It turns out there was a reason.
?He dictated the whole thing,? Borstein told
CNN on Tuesday. ?I just made it up as I went
along,? he unclarified, but I think we can
call this an idiomatic US/UK difference: over
there, the phrase clearly means: ?I wrote
down what that other person was saying.?
Dig into the text, and this much is
obvious: his strength and stamina were
?extraordinary?. ?If elected,? Bornstein made
up as he went along, ?Mr Trump ? will be
the healthiest individual ever elected to the
presidency.? Healthier than Obama, who
could shoot hoops while smoking; healthier
than Kennedy, who could fry eggs just by looking at them with his vigorous
eyes. The dead giveaway was the ?astonishingly excellent?. There can never
have been any real doubt that, as Bornstein now admits, ?Trump dictated
the letter and I?d tell him what he couldn?t put in there.? Ah history, you
tantalising discipline. I would give all the ancient pots of Mesopotamia to know
what Trump said that couldn?t go in. ?He is so healthy that my medical mind
struggles to believe he is human, and not of the gods.? It?s given us all a laugh,
except the doctor; he may just be struck off for making false statements.
In what should ? given his astonishing good health ? become his band
name when he remakes himself as a rock star, Ye Shall Know Trump By His
Trail of Indictments. In the investigation into Russian links, Robert Mueller
has already secured a series of guilty pleas: Michael Flynn (former national
security adviser), George Papadopoulos (former campaign adviser), Richard
Pinedo (a ?private citizen?, which I think is code for ?all-purpose rich
person?) and Dutch attorney, Alex van der Zwaan. It must, from the inside,
look like a game of musical chairs, again in reverse; if you can get out of the
one that situates you anywhere near Donald Trump in time, you?ll be OK.
This is not how the law sees it. Painstaking and a little pedantic, it will go
after anyone who has ever been implicated in anything, starting with the
low-hanging fruit. By the time it gets to the high-hanging fruit, its appetite
is爋ften sated. After Watergate, 69 government officials were charged,
and 48爋f them found guilty. President Nixon was not among them. Their
sentences (some as high as 40 years) were a lot longer than the prison time
they served (mostly a couple of months), but that?s not the point; the point
?爁or foot soldiers, collaborators, loyal colluders ? is that you?re all going
down. If you got out today, it wouldn?t be soon enough, but it would be
sooner than tomorrow.
Ah, local elections: the world?s
most unwinnable contest. If you
are the party of government, you?re
expected to do badly, but there?s
always a psephologist who?ll come
out of the woodwork to say you
shouldn?t have done as badly as this.
If you are the party of opposition,
you?re expected to do well, but there
will always be a decade in someone?s
memory when you did better and
still didn?t win the general election,
and somehow polite opinion will
immediately congregate around the
truism that you should wipe that
smile off your face because you won?t
win where it counts. If you?re neither
of those parties, everyone will ask
why you?re standing, unless you
don?t, in which case they?ll ask why
you?ve given up.
As if that weren?t dispiriting
enough, you are competing for
offices of state in which the only
real power vested is to enact the
will爋f the government which ? if
the爂overnment?s will is to strip
local燼reas of any cash they may
have had the power to allocate ? is
a thankless task for which ?lack of
thanks? will probably be the bestcase scenario once your period of
office grinds to an end.
And when it?s all over, everyone
always claims to divine some
message from it, which this year
will燽e more vexing than ever.
Whatever the ?triumph?, leavers
and爎emainers will both fashion
it into an amorphous victory for
themselves, a fundamentally
inconsequential one, unless the
consequence is simply to annoy
each爋ther, as we?re all already
managing quite well.
Yet, if these are the elections in
which to send a message, what a
mountain of messages there are:
a message against the Windrush
scandal, against voter ID, against
standing in a stupid way with your
legs apart. It?s worth it for that.
Even爄f it is raining.
Size of climate problem is brought close to home
The Thwaites glacier in west Antarctica will melt, over the coming
generation, unless urgent action is identi?ed in time to save it.
Being the size of Britain, that could push the sea level up a metre
and a half. There was a time when bad things were the size of
football pitches. Then they were the size of Wales. This is the ?rst
time I can think of that the anything untoward has been as large as
our whole land mass. What is it going to take for us to start calling it
a climate crisis, rather than a change?
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
3
?
Carmen Tarleton was so badly
beaten and burned by her
ex-husband that she needed 38
operations and a face transplant.
Yet she found a path back
to爃appiness. What helps
people爏uch as her survive?
The secrets
of爎esilience
? Words Rowan Hooper
O
n 10 June 2007,
Carmen Tarleton,
then 38, was at
home爓ith her
young燿aughters in
Thetford, Vermont in
the US, when her estranged husband
broke into the house. Herbert Rogers
was looking for a man he supposed
she was seeing, but finding no man
there, he attacked Carmen. ?I just
lost it,? he told police later. He beat
Carmen with a baseball bat so
violently that he broke her arm and
eye socket. Then he doused her in
industrial-strength lye ? a sodium
hydroxide solution used in cleaning.
One ear, her eyelids and much of her
face was burned away. She suffered
burns on 80% of her body.
I met Bohdan Pomoha?, one of her
surgeons, at Boston?s Brigham and
Women?s hospital. ?In terms of
injuries inflicted by another human
being, it?s certainly one of the worst
I?ve ever seen,? he told me. Her face
was almost completely destroyed;
her family were able to recognise it
was Carmen only by her teeth.
When people experience terrible
head injuries, doctors can put them
into a barbiturate coma in order to
shut down brain function. This
prevents the brain from damaging
itself further by trying to keep going
without an adequate blood supply.
Carmen remained in a coma for
three months while Pomoha? and
his team performed 38 separate
surgical operations. She was left
covered in a patchwork of skin
grafts, and these, together with all
the blood transfusions she had
received over the months, meant
that doctors determined she wouldn?t
match 98% of potential donors for a
face transplant. She was blind,
severely disfigured, and lacked
many normal facial functions. She
was in a lot of pain. But she was alive,
and somehow, somewhere, the爂erm
of something remained within her.
?Even when I first woke up from
the coma I just knew it was such a
big event, and it was so strange, that
it had other meanings for me,? she
says. ?I could help a lot of people.?
Carmen started doing inspirational
speaking. ?I looked terrible and people
felt so sorry for me, but I wanted to
show people it didn?t matter what I
looked like,? she says. Photos of
Carmen from that time are shocking;
with all the grafts, she didn?t have
proper eyelids, and her eyeballs
looked out through small circular holes
cut into the skin. She had synthetic
corneas and couldn?t blink, and the
edges of the skin were red raw.
?It forced me to look at the big
picture of what life is really about,?
she says. ?And that?s where I?ve had to
go, because this horrific event occurred
and I found a way through it. And
not because I?m different or special,
but because that?s what was meant
to be: to show people you can be
involved in these incredible events and
you can forgive, totally, and move on.?
She says she has forgiven her
now-ex husband for what he did.
(In爎eturn for pleading guilty to
maiming, he accepted a sentence of
30 to 70 years in prison. He died in
prison in December 2017.) ?I was
never religious,? she says. ?I took
responsibility for my life. I was not
responsible for what happened, for
4
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
what he chose to do, but I certainly was
responsible from that day forward.?
Even after leaving hospital, Carmen
was still in a lot of pain. The injuries to
her skin and the multiple grafts caused
tightness when they healed, and this
led to all sorts of secondary problems
with the mobility of her neck and
spine. Still she kept going.
Then, on Valentine?s Day 2013,
Carmen?s life changed again. She
became only the seventh American
to undergo a complete face
transplant. The operation was
performed by Pomoha?.
Pomoha? says that for a long time he
didn?t think of Carmen as a candidate
for face transplant, because she was
so immunologically challenged. All
those grafts and transfusions had
primed her body to attack almost
any donated tissue. But there were
several pressing reasons why she
needed a new face. The pain and the
narcotics, yes, but as well as that, the
opening on to her eyeball was getting
bigger, and this was threatening the
integrity of the synthetic cornea.
Then there was the drooling, and the
problems with speaking and eating.
The operation was a technical
success, but then there was the
immune system to deal with. Carmen?s
body mounted a massive rejection of
the face and, for a period of four
weeks after the operation, she was
pumped up on immunosuppressants.
By then there was only one more
drug left to use. A full dose would
help suppress the rejection, but
would also completely wipe out her
immune system, to such an extent
that any trivial infection would kill
her. In the end, with Carmen?s consent,
they gave her a little of that final drug;
it was enough to tame her immune
system. She got better. Carmen says
she felt she had made a choice to live.
?It?s possible there is a psychological
force that carries people through,
but my official answer has to be that
the statistics were still a little bit in
our favour,? says Pomoha?. ?Sometimes
people can surprise you with their
resilience.?
Carmen suffered physical injuries
that could easily have killed her.
That she survived is remarkable in
itself, but what seems even more
incredible is how she has not just
survived mentally, but developed
into someone else ? someone who,
by her own account, is better.
Before, she was a registered nurse
and was raising children, and, until
her incident, she had not thought
about the big questions of life:
?I爓asn?t going to sit around and
complain and cry.? Carmen now says
she wouldn?t go back and change
what happened: she has grown too
much. It is a pattern seen in others
who have suffered an incredible
trauma, and found a way through it.
How do they do it? For physical
trauma, it is not so mysterious that
some people survive. As Pomoha?
says, statistically, some people will
just make it through. When they do,
we are so surprised that we fixate on
it, and may even call it miraculous.
We remember these people, the
extraordinary survivors such as the
US politician Gabrielle Giffords, and
we don?t just shrug and say, ?Well, it?s
not impossible to survive even being
shot in the head.? Statistics aside,
medical care is good and the body is
capable of amazing repair ? perhaps
better than we might give it credit for.
But it is the mental resilience that
is sometimes more impressive.
Carmen tells me that we get too
caught up in negativity. You?ve got
to爐ake control, and make your own
choices. ?I don?t live like the typical
person on the inside at all,? she says.
?I have different beliefs that help me
go when I?m going.?
Some people can ride out trauma
and even prosper, when others suffer
lingering physiological stress and
fear ? the hallmarks of post-traumatic
stress disorder. Psychiatrist David
Wolfe is head of outpatient services
at the evocatively named Building of
Transformative Medicine at Brigham
and Women?s hospital. The funny
thing, he tells me, is that the people
who suffer trauma but actually come
out better aren?t the people who are
studied. If someone is coping well,
they are sent home. Psychiatrists
see爐he people who struggle. But
perhaps, he says, people don?t suffer
as much as we think.
?Psychiatry has been as guilty of
this as anyone. You assume that, if
something bad happens to someone,
they?re going to have some mental
problem. It happens when we see
patients in hospital with very serious
diseases. We think: ?They must be
depressed ? wouldn?t you be?? But,
actually, they?re not.?
That is not to say, of course, that
people don?t suffer and don?t need
treatment. According to the United
States National Center for PTSD,
seven or eight out of every 100 people
will experience PTSD at some point
in their lives. What Wolfe is saying is
?
Reply all
Carmen Tarleton
today and (inset,
on right) with
her sister before
the 2007 attack
chart that nobody knew what to say
to her. ?I cried at my sister?s and my
mother?s and bitched a little, and
after a year and a half I thought,
that?s not going to help me.?
Optimism, not surprisingly, is
one爋f the character traits shared by
people who respond well to trauma.
?The opposite is hopelessness,
which is a feature of depression,?
says Wolfe. ?Engagement, taking it
on, taking on responsibility, and
being active in the process ? these
things go a long way.?
When you ask people what keeps
them going, Wolfe says, the number
one answer is family and kids. People
who are resilient look to the future.
Carmen had a clear goal: ?I needed
to find a way through this, because
I爓asn?t going to go anywhere. I was
raising children, there were things I
wanted to do. My biggest motivation
was that I wanted to be a role model
to my daughters.?
PHOTOGRAPHS: LESLYE DAVIS/NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX/EYEVINE
W
that it is wrong to assume a traumatic
event will be the same for everyone.
More often than not it?s more
impressive how well people cope with
trauma, which makes sense from an
evolutionary point of view: it is
advantageous to have hidden
powers of resilience. ?The ability to
power through adverse conditions
should be there in our DNA,? Wolfe
says. ?It?s more of a puzzle why, from
an evolutionary standpoint, we have
problems with that sometimes.?
No one does things like this alone,
without the friends and family who
rally round. Your social network is
key to how you deal with trauma.
?People who respond well tend to
have positive relationships in their
life and that translates into positive
relationships with their treatment
teams,? says Wolfe.
One of Carmen?s sisters moved
to燘oston so she could see her every
day while she recovered, even before
she came out of the coma. When
Carmen left hospital, years before
the face transplant, she went to her
family. She saw a therapist for a
while after she was attacked, but she
says her experience was so far off the
?I needed to ?nd a
way through this. My
biggest motivation
was that I wanted
to be a role model
to爉y daughters?
hat about the
genetics of
resilience? Even
when we find
genes related to
disease, it rarely
works on the basis that ?you have the
gene, you?ll get the disease?. Sure,
there are instances, such as familial
Alzheimer?s or cystic fibrosis, where
this is almost always the case, but
most diseases, and almost all traits,
are far more complex, and are
influenced by many genes. Resilience
is one such complex trait.
Ann Masten, a psychologist at
the燙enter for Neurobehavioral
Development at the University of
Minnesota, Minneapolis, calls the
power of resilience ?ordinary magic?.
It is magic that anyone can use. Nimmi
Hutnik, the author of Becoming
Resilient: Cognitive Behaviour
Therapy to Transform Your Life, says
resilience ? although a complex mix
of biology, psychology and
environment ? has the potential to be
taught. Pharmaceutical interventions
to extend healthspan are being
developed, but until then, it is worth
noting that exercises in mental
resilience can be learned, and can be
used to promote health and wellbeing.
The capacity to be super-resilient
may be there even in normal people,
but we need guidance and support to
find it, maybe from psychotherapy,
maybe from friends. We need help to
be optimistic, encouragement to take
control, and empowerment to be
responsible. We need a certain amount
of self-love. A touch of narcissism is
good. We need to stand up for
ourselves so we are not mistreated at
work or in relationships, we need to
be assertive without devaluing
others and have a self-image that is
positive without being conceited.
This mixture of personality traits
will drive you forward. And, if you
do not have them naturally, some of
them can燽e constructed.
Extracted from Superhuman: Life at
the Extremes of Mental and Physical
Ability by Rowan Hooper, published
by Little, Brown today, RRP �.99.
To order a copy for �.74, go to
guardianbookshop.com. Free UK
p&p爋n orders over �.
Ask
Hadley
My partner only wears navy T-shirts and爅eans on
weekdays. Is his fashion monogamy a good sign
for us, or is he going to爃ave a midlife crisis and buy
a爌air of燾erise jorts? Helen, London
I?ll be honest, Helen, I hadn?t
previously considered the
correlation between fashion and
relationship fidelity, but I do think
you have a point here. After all,
in my experience, contrary to all
those women?s magazine/Daily
Mail headlines of the ?What every
woman should know to keep their
man!!!? variety, most males are
deeply monogamous in nature.
Buckle up, everyone, while we
enter the galaxy of ? Sweeping
Gender Generalisations!
From my vantage point, at the
coalface of gender observations,
the majority of men, once they?re
in a relationship for the long haul,
just want to bed in. By which I
mean: they don?t want to have to
make the kinds of efforts they once
made when they were single. They
get a bit fat, they go a bit bald, and
that?s just fine with them because
they?ve had enough of the hassle
that they think goes into impressing
prospective paramours. They?ve
got their partner so can they just get
some takeaway, watch Netflix and
let their bellies flop over their jeans
with secret elasticated waist, please?
This explains why, over the age of
35, men tend to settle into a daily
uniform, whether that?s suits, (bad)
jeans, (worse) khakis and neutral
? meaning blue, white or tartan
? shirts (men, for some reason,
consider tartan to be neutral on a
button-down shirt, similar to the
way women think of leopard print as
a neutral when it?s on anything).
This also explains why often the
most untrustworthy men are the
ones with the most inconsistent
dress sense. I mean, look at Gavin
Rossdale: one day a sexually
ambiguous goth, the next a grunge
rocker, the next a trendy Silverlake
dad. Anyone could see which way
this was going and, allegedly, it
was going straight to shagging the
nanny. Or Ben Affleck, who for
years couldn?t figure out if he was a
hunky leading man or an edgy indie
director, and his oscillating clothing
choices reflected that. He is now
nicely settled into a T-shirt-wearing,
fortysomething-dad groove but,
alas, it allegedly took dating the
nanny to find it. True, Donald Trump
has been wearing suits since he was
three and has probably grabbed the
pussy of every pussy-possessing
person who crossed his path. But
then, there?s a consistency to that,
as爉uch as there is in his wardrobe.
So what I?m saying, Helen, is I see
nothing but promise in a partner
who settles into a work uniform
pretty much two minutes after
getting married. He?s found his
thing and he?s sticking with it; and
I?m afraid that by ?thing?, in this
instance, I mean both the navy
T-shirts and you. But, as we?ve
already discussed, blue T-shirts
are pretty much man?s greatest
invention in many men?s eyes, so
take it as a compliment.
I think there are a lot of
advantages to being with a man who
wears the same thing every day,
beyond the reassurance of fidelity.
The primary one is with the time he
saves in the morning by not having
to decide what to wear, he can bring
you tea in bed. But I would suggest
he reassure his colleagues he?s not
wearing the actual same clothes
every day. Perhaps you could get
some cards printed up for him to
hand round the office?
As for your fear of cerise jorts,
I爑nderstand the concern, but I think
it is misplaced. For a start, I strongly
suspect a man who wears navy every
day doesn?t even know what cerise
is, let alone jorts, so this would be
like worrying about him running
off with Dua Lipa. He would need
to燝oogle just to get started.
At most, he might dally with what
I call ?man ?fashion??. These are
fashion twists that conservative
men allow themselves to indulge
in because they think they are fun
and they convince themselves they
don?t threaten their masculinity.
Absurd shoes are very much man
fashion, as are watches, oddly
patterned button-down shirts and
waistcoats. Do not worry: this is
just the sartorial equivalent of your
partner getting a harmless little
hobby, like fly fishing, or Dungeons
& Dragons. At heart, he?s still your
navy T-shirted guy.
Need style
counsel?
Post your
questions
to Hadley
Freeman, Ask
Hadley, The
Guardian, Kings
Place, 90 York
Way, London
N1 9GU. Email
ask.hadley@
theguardian.
com
Don?t worry
about爐he
jorts. Like
running o?
with Dua
Lipa, he?d
need to
Google to
get爏tarted
In the navy ?
a燽oring T-shirt
might at least
mean tea in bed
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
5
?
Food
Rich pickings:
the app
?ghting food
waste
We waste �bn worth of food each year in the UK. At
the same time, use of food banks has boomed.
Sam Wolfson asks if Olio could be the answer
Fast food
I
Super spring
green salad
By Mercedes
Sie?
This salad is my go-to dish
whenever I need a boost of energy
and green goodness. It?s impossible
not to feel in better spirits after
eating so many good-for-you
ingredients. With the nutritional
powerhouse of spinach as its base,
this is a simple, healthy recipe
that is easily adaptable to any
ingredients you may have to hand.
For those with nut allergies, you can
replace the almonds with a lovely
handful of toasted sesame seeds
or, my personal favourite, toasted
sunflower seeds.
Add all dressing ingredients except
the tahini into a blender and blend at
high speed until smooth. Then add
in the tahini and blend at low speed
until well mixed.
Bring a large pot of water to a boil
and blanch the asparagus for 2-4
minutes, depending on thickness.
With a slotted spoon, transfer the
spears to a bowl of ice-cold water.
Add the green beans to the same
boiling water, blanch for 3 minutes
and transfer to the same bowl as the
asparagus.
Then, blanch the sprouting
broccoli in the same water for two
minutes, take out and place in the
cold water bowl for just a minute.
Remove all greens from the bowl,
then dry them well.
Transfer all the greens to a large
bowl and add all the remaining salad
ingredients.
Mix well and add half a teaspoon
of sea salt and a dash of extra virgin
olive oil.
Add the tahini dressing, stir gently,
taste and add more salt if you like.
Prep
10 mins
Cooking
15 mins
Serves
2
Ingredients
For the dressing:
500ml water
1 tsp salt
2 cloves garlic
1 lemon
juiced
25g dill
1g spirulina powder
250g tahini
For the salad:
90g green
asparagus
cut into 1 inch
chunks
180g purple
sprouting broccoli
destalked
180g green beans
chopped at an angle
60g mangetout
beans
ends chopped off
180g fennel or
white cabbage
thinly sliced
60g young spinach
15g cup sorrel
2 tbsp mint leaves
2 tbsp pomegranate seeds
30g almonds
toasted
� tsp sea salt
Extra virgin olive oil
Mercedes Sieff is the co-owner of
Yeotown Kitchen in Marylebone,
London, and Yeotown retreat
in Devon
6
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
am walking with a woman
named Kerry, whom I have
just met, to her car. She is in
her mid-30s and has a tinge
of attitude. When we reach
her car, she opens the boot.
Inside are hundreds of industrialsized tubs of hummus, enough to
power Brighton for a week.
I met Kerry online, not via some
kind of hummus-appreciation
society messageboard, but on Olio,
an app that is attempting to end food
waste at home by letting people
upload details of the food they
would otherwise chuck out, so that
others living nearby can take it off
their hands. I am trying out the app
for a few weeks.
For members willing to take
things to the next level, like Kerry,
they also have a ?food waste heroes?
programme, where volunteers offer
to pick things up from cafes and
shops and list this food on the site.
After picking up these hummus
tubs from a supplier that had no use
for them, Kerry is now spending
one of the hottest days of the year
shepherding people to and from her
car boot.
Most hot-button environmental
issues have to go on a journey, from
being pipe dreams discussed in the
furthest reaches of the Glastonbury
green fields to a central plank of
government policy. Climate change,
non-GM food, plastic pollution ?
they were all once dismissed as
fringe politics, until the government
and industry suddenly got on board.
For food waste, it seems as though
that moment is now. In the past six
months, Tesco has reduced all edible
food waste to zero, Co-op is trialling
the sale of products that have passed
their best before date and the EU has
announced that, for the first time, it
is forcing member states to report on
how much food is wasted each year,
with the goal to halve waste by 2030.
Launched in 2015, Olio feels part
of this sea-change in our attitude
to waste. The app was started by
Tessa Cook and Saasha Celestial-One
(the latter?s names come from her
Iowa-hippy parents ? although she
rebelled by becoming an investment
banker). Cook was previously
managing director at Wonga, the
controversial payday loans firm.
She grew up on a farm in North
Yorkshire, and says she got the idea
after being left with a few sweet
potatoes and a cabbage on the day
she was moving back to the UK from
Switzerland. It was not feasible to
take them with her, but knowing
how much work had gone into
growing fresh produce she couldn?t
bring herself to chuck them out.
It is clear, however, she wasn?t the
only one facing this problem. Each
year, the UK wastes about �bn
worth of food, in doing so creating
19m tonnes of needless greenhouse
gases. At the same time, according
to Oxfam, more than 2 million
people in the UK are malnourished
and a further 3 million are at risk of
becoming so. The amount of food
given out by Trussell Trust food
banks has increased 318% in the
past five years. And while EU and
government diktats are a step in
the right direction, the problem is
that, unlike most environmental
issues ? where there really need
to be changes in the law at the
supranational level ? the worst food
waste occurs in our homes. Tesco?s
policies are all well and good, but
retail waste only accounts for about
2% of all food waste, compared with
71% at home and a further 9% in the
hospitality sector.
I have to admit I was part of the
problem. When I first moved out of
home, I chucked out food even if
it seemed fine, because I couldn?t
remember how long ago I bought it.
Retail waste
accounts for only
about 2% of all food
waste, compared
with 71% at home
and 9% in hospitality
I would get lots of ingredients for a
complicated recipe, use a teaspoon
of each and then leave them in
the fridge till they went off ? not
knowing what else to do with the
remainder.
When my partner, who works
in food, first moved in, she was
horrified. I was instructed that the
kitchen had to change: uneaten
bananas would be chopped up in
the freezer for smoothies, leftover
milk gets turned into labneh; even
the rind of the parmesan will be
frozen to later be chucked into a
minestrone. The kitchen became
entirely refocused. The first
question when cooking is not ?what
do you want to eat?? but ?what have
we got to use up??.
Now I?m a paid-up member of
the anti-food-waste brigade, Olio
was an obvious thing to try. After
downloading the app, I find plenty of
listings, although a lot are more than
2km away, which seems a schlep to
pick up a few carrots. There are a few
single pastries, a half-eaten birthday
cake and five leftover pieces of fried
chicken. Mostly though, there?s just
lots of white bread ? packets and
packets of half-eaten Kingsmill.
Inspired by my early score, I try
to find some things to list myself,
although our waste-not-want-not
regime doesn?t leave much going
spare. Eventually I find a packet of
unwanted Weetabix. I put it on the
site and await a response.
One came within minutes. The
man who arrived told me that he had
been using the app nearly everyday:
he has a big family, and Olio can
be a lifesaver. He says these days
he doesn?t really leave the house
unless it is to pick something up
from Olio or go shopping. We talk
about his struggles finding work, his
depression, run-ins with the police
and issues among his family. After
80 minutes of chatting, he asked if I
had any other food I could give him ?
I said I would have a look around and
let him know. It?s an odd feeling: was
I helping? Is it patronising?
Olio?s online spiel is similar to
a lot of companies that believe
technology can change the world. Its
positioning feels aspirational, with
neighbours working together.
The initial trial for the app took
place among 12 people in Crouch
End; the first item to be shared
was half a bag of shallots. But what
quickly becomes apparent is that
many of the people on Olio are using
it as an alternative or supplementary
food bank.
I put it to Cook that the app exists
on two different levels: one for a
well-meaning middle class, with
food leftover from fashion shoots or
Sunday dinner, and then people who
are travelling a long way to pick up
not very much food at all.
?What has been quite shocking for
us to discover on this journey, is how
many hungry people there are in this
country,? Cook says. ?Since working
on Olio, I have learnt that 8.4 million
people are living in food insecurity.
We have found that around a third
of our regular requestors are living
in poverty. What I?ve heard from a
lot of those people is that what they
love about the app is that there is no
?
The faddy eater
Morwenna
Ferrier
?The avolato ?
part avocado,
part gelato, all
privilege?
stigma when they collect food.?
Isn?t there something a little
uncomfortable, though, about
those with too much giving their
scraps to those with too little? ?We
don?t like to think of it as the haves
giving to the have-nots. Actually
this is just part of modern everyday
communities, it?s absolute madness
that people are throwing away
perfectly delicious food on the one
hand, while living nearby are people
who would like that food or perhaps
even need that food.?
Over the next few weeks, I
continue to use the app, mostly
for non-food items. I give away a
lampshade and some toiletries. I also
pick up an old milk-bottle collector
that I have repurposed into a shower
caddy. But most of the time I look
on Olio, the pickings are relatively
slim. Desirable items go very quickly
and most are far away. I also decide
that it is not right to pick up readyto-eat food such as sandwiches and
pastries, which make up a lot of the
listings, when there are people using
the app in serious need.
Olio claims to be the biggest
food-sharing network in the world.
More than 500,000 items have been
shared in more than 40 countries. It
is a pretty good start for an app that
has only been going for a few years,
but it feels like a drop in the ocean
considering how much is wasted
each day.
?You?re absolutely right,? says
Cook. ?But our ambition is an
unashamedly bold one. We are doing
0.0001% of our full potential. We?re
on 400,000 users today, we want
to have at least 400 million users.
That?s the goal.?
It is a bold ambition and they are a
PHOTOGRAPHS: GUY HARROP;
The man who
arrived told me that
he had been using
the app nearly
every day: Olio can
be a lifesaver
long way off, especially considering
that they are far from the only
organisation aiming to tackle this
problem. FareShare, Wrap, Freegle,
Food Cycle and The Felix Project
are just some of the groups trying to
help ease the food waste problem.
Still, Olio can provide food that some
charities wouldn?t bother with ? lots
of listings on the site are for a couple
of potatoes or half a sandwich.
In recent weeks, plastics have
been top of the agenda when it
comes to new environmental
policy, with the biggest food
companies agreeing to end the use
of non-recyclable packaging. This
move should be taken as a sign of
willingness to change ? but food
waste is arguably a more critical
concern, because it is connected to
so many modern afflictions: hunger,
greenhouse gases, waste disposal
and escalating food prices.
And this is where there is an
opportunity. It is not really the
interface that matters: it can be a
charity, an app or just a WhatsApp
group between five people in a
village, but if people are able to
shake off the stigma about passing
on the food they don?t want, they
might help to fix a bunch of the
world?s problems at the same time.
What will it take to cleave the avocado from its role as
byword for generational privilege? Probably not this,
the avolato, a brand new seasonal treat that is part
avocado, part dairy-free vegan gelato, and at �50 per
serving, here to bankrupt you long into the summer.
The avolato was dreamed up by Snowflake, a posh
gelateria with branches in London and Manchester.
Made of 60% hass avocado and padded out with water,
grape sugar, pectin and fibre, it comes inside an avocado
shell and is served with a small ball of beige nut-butter
ice-cream. Staff at Snowflake recommend that you
eat this sitting down in their cafe rather than walking
around, because of the size and 200g weight, but
mainly, I would argue, to save face.
The avolato launched late last month, a good 11
months after everyone stopped talking about avocados
in a normal way. In our hearts they were delicious,
but by 2018 it was too late for them. They had already
internalised the weight of a generation struggling
to fi nd work and affordable housing, becoming stale
metaphors on panel shows and a cheap and easy way to
elucidate hipster culture if you weren?t quite sure what
it was.
Mostly though ? and this is where the avolato comes
in ? they were an essential component of a well-trod
formula that pairs the avocado with a ?thing?, gives it
a name, watches it trend briefly on social media before
it becomes shorthand for the end of humanity. See
the avolatte (coffee served inside an avocado shell),
the avocado toast cocktail (a vodka-based avocado
cocktail) and the avocado proposal box, which merged
an avocado with lifelong commitment. If the avocado
is so done, so basic, so dead ? and given the number of
bastardisations it has endured, it surely is ? then the
avolato has come back to haunt it.
From a distance, this ghost looks like an avocado.
Up close, it resembles one of those meta desserts (a
pineapple fi lled with pineapple ice-cream) you get
in run-down resort restaurants. It also comes with a
bamboo spoon, along with the nutty ice-cream ball,
the only component of the avolato not hewn from an
avocado, but even this is biodegradable. In short, the
avolato is the avocado?s attempt at tackling the
eco-conscious food market, even if it comes a little
too avolate.
It tastes exactly as you imagine. Like a frozen
avocado, impressively similar to gelato given it
contains no dairy or egg, with the slight gumminess
of pectin. Good, textural, sickly sweet fun, as it should
be for �50.
The avolato,
yours for just
�50
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
7
?
Way
out
West
His suggestion that black people have been complicit in
their own slavery has prompted widespread outrage.
What lies behind Kanye West?s recent provocations?
? Words Ben Beaumont-Thomas
I
n a video viewed more
than 6m times on Twitter,
21-year-old Chika Oranika
summed up the current
feelings of many black
Americans about Kanye
West. She delivered her own lyrics
over the beat of the rap star?s Jesus
Walks. ?How you say you Yeezus
but do nothing to restore us? You
support the people up in power that
abort us,? she raps into the camera.
?It don?t matter how much money
you got or you lack, when that
cheque clear don?t forget that your
children are still black.?
Why the opprobrium, which has
come from activists, Hollywood
stars and fellow musicians, as well
as withering online freestyles?
West, one of the most significant,
complex and celebrated rappers
in the US, has used a 350-tweet
stream of consciousness over the
past fortnight to throw his support
firmly behind Donald Trump. But on
Tuesday, he went way beyond party
politics in an interview with TMZ:
?You hear about slavery for 400
years,? he said. ?For 400 years? That
sounds like a choice.?
Host Van Lathan tore back at him:
?While you are making music and
being an artist and living the life that
you?ve earned by being a genius, the
rest of us in society have to deal with
these threats to our lives.? Roxane
Gay reacted on Twitter by calling his
comments ?dangerous? and ?trite,
shallow ? he is not a free thinker. He
is a free moron.?
Black America?s dismay at West
has been brewing for some time. He
puzzled many when he posed for
photos with Trump in December
2016, making him one of the first
celebrities to apparently endorse the
new president. But his recent tweets
left no room for doubt. He posted
a picture of himself wearing the
Trump campaign?s Make America
Great Again cap, and tweeted: ?You
don?t have to agree with Trump but
the mob can?t make me not love
him. We are both dragon energy. He
is my brother.? After an intervention
by a presumably somewhat weary
Kim Kardashian, West wrote: ?My
wife just called me and she wanted
me to make this clear to everyone. I
don?t agree with everything Trump
does. I don?t agree 100% with
anyone but myself.?
In response, R&B singer Frank
Ocean emerged from hibernation
with a sarcastic screengrab of the
time West went off-script during a
2005 Hurricane Katrina appeal to
say ?George Bush doesn?t care about
black people?, the intimation being
that it is now West who doesn?t care.
Samuel L Jackson suggested West
was courting an audience in ?the
sunken place? ? the psychic interzone
in the horror film Get Out into which
black people are hypnotised and
silenced (the film?s director, Jordan
Peele, has previously linked it to
Trump?s America).
?So many people who love you
feel so betrayed right now because
they know the harm that Trump?s
policies cause, especially to people
of colour,? West?s friend John Legend
wrote in a text message that West
posted on Twitter. The rap star wrote
back: ?You bringing up my fans or
my legacy is a tactic based on fear
used to manipulate my free thought.?
Among ordinary Americans,
meanwhile, there was seething anger
at West supporting Trump, who has
reportedly said ?laziness is a trait in
blacks?; who campaigned for the
death penalty for the black teenagers,
later proven innocent, in the Central
Park Five case; and who thought
there were some ?very fine people?
marching alongside neo-Nazis and
white supremacists in Charlottesville.
Reacting to ? or having perhaps
anticipated ? all this, West released a
new track, Ye Vs the People, the first
music from two new albums being
released in June. In a dialogue with
the American people (vocalised by
rapper T.I.), Kanye tries to detoxify
the Trump brand and reclaim his
Make America Great Again slogan:
?Wearin? the hat?ll show people
8
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
West with
his wife Kim
Kardashian in
the video for
Famous, 2016:
(above) with
Donald Trump,
December 2016
Onstage in
California,
June 2016
that we equal,? he raps, arguing for
a why-can?t-we-all-just-get-along
humanism. He ultimately distils the
debate thus: ?You on some choosin?
side shit, I?m on some unified shit.?
For Kanye, this chapter is
just the latest incident in an
uncompromising career. At the
turn of the century, as a beatmaker
for Jay-Z and others, he really did
seem to be on ?some unified shit?,
taking the chopped-up soul samples
of ?backpack? hip-hop and pairing
them with the blockbuster tropes
of mainstream rap production; he
then successfully segued into being
a unified producer-rapper. His first
two albums charmed the whole
spectrum of rap fans with their
diversity and humour: he riffed on
black cultural reference points ?
slow-jam love songs, social climbers
? like a standup comedian.
His albums became more
ambitious with each new release,
unifying diverse cultural reference
points ? Graduation sampled Daft
Punk and explored a more electronic
sound; 808s & Heartbreak used AutoTune to reflect and enact emotional
dissonance, to brilliant effect; My
?So many people
feel so betrayed
because they
know the harm of
Trump?s policies?
Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy
was as operatic as the title suggests.
His interest in visual art grew, with
artists from Takashi Murakami
to George Condo commissioned
for his album covers; he designed
his own fashion collections and
collaborated with Adidas. In 2013,
he said: ?Creative genius, that?s
my title. My title is not rapper any
more.? West positioned himself as
a rounded aesthete, obsessed with
form and how art impacts society ?
his Twitter feed has recently featured
everything from tech solutions for
water desalination to artists Joseph
Beuys and David Hammons. Part of
his attraction to Kardashian seemed
to be her very iconography: ?My girl
a superstar all from a home movie,?
he wondered admiringly on 2012
track Clique.
?
?I see it as being
contrarian and a
bit arrogant, not
a cosigning of
Trump?s ideas?
PHOTOGRAPHS: SMALLZ & RASKIND/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGE;
LEANDRO JUSTEN/BFANYC.COM/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
that he is beginning to see the
world purely through the prism of
Kanye, rather than the eyes of black
America. That?s harmful not just
to himself, but to an ongoing civil
rights struggle in a still-racist US; his
provocations have the potential to
embolden the alt-right and others
who would diminish the standing of
African Americans.
Like Steve Jobs and Elon Musk,
both figures he admires, it?s hard to
place Kanye on a left-right political
binary. His personal political
philosophy doesn?t neatly dovetail
with existing belief systems ?
witness how the alt-right embraced
him after his championing of
Trump, and then deserted him
when he also championed Parkland
shooting survivor and activist Emma
Gonzalez last weekend.
His embrace of Trump ? as with
his embrace of black conservative
commentator Candace Owens,
whom he met with after tweeting
?I love the way [she] thinks? ? is, to
him, apolitical. ?I see it as simply
He also continued his analysis of
black America. On the same track he
raps: ?You know white people get
money, don?t spend it / Or maybe
they get money, buy a business /
I?d rather buy 80 gold chains and
go ig?nant.? West sees himself as
celebrating the economic freedom
black Americans were denied for
decades, and to which they still have
much less access than whites.
On New Slaves, meanwhile, from
2013 album Yeezus, he expressed a
more nuanced version of his slavery
comments this week: that black
Americans were subject to a new kind
of slavery, the rabid consumerism for
Maybach cars and Alexander Wang
clothes that traps them in economic
bondage. Julius Bailey, a philosophy
professor at Ohio?s Wittenberg
University, who has edited a book of
essays called The Cultural Impact of
Kanye West, argues that West should
be criticised for his TMZ interview,
but ?on the basis that he didn?t speak
to the material implications of postchattel slavery,? as he has done on
New Slaves and Clique. ?Kanye?s
heartfelt apology [to Van Lathan on
TMZ after his comments] was a way
of realising that his words, when not
qualified or contextualised, do more
damage than the emancipating good
he seeks.? Some of West?s other
lyrics have been similarly clumsy,
even offensive. He sampled Billie
Holiday?s Strange Fruit, a song about
lynching, for Blood on the Leaves,
a song about the destructive power
of fame in which he also compared
a man having his wife and mistress
separated at a basketball game to
apartheid.
And since Yeezus, his selfobsession has become stifling. His
2016 album The Life of Pablo has a
great skit called I Love Kanye, where
he imagines: ?What if Kanye made
a song about Kanye called I Miss the
Old Kanye? Man, that?d be so Kanye!?
In the wake of his slavery
comments, the skit stops being
funny: people really do miss the old,
outward-looking Kanye. Rapper
Meek Mill summed up the thoughts
of many when he posted an
Kanye West x
image of Kanye to Instagram
Adidas show,
on Tuesday, surrounded by the
autumn/winter
words ?RIP Old Kanye? and
New York, 2015
quoting Kanye?s lyrics back at
him: ?I feel the pressure, under
more scrutiny / And what I do?
Act more stupidly.?
The problem is that Kanye?s selfscrutiny has become so advanced
being contrarian and a bit arrogant,
not an actual cosigning of the
ideas espoused by Trump relative
to immigration, urban policy or
militarism,? Bailey says. ?He?s being
a fan of wealth.? Kanye champions
Trump?s ?energy? and sees in him
the same self-creation that he
wants for himself, and, perhaps,
for black America ? but like other
successful, moneyed libertarians,
he has become cut off from reality,
and assumes that all you need to
make it is willpower, perhaps helped
along by his inspirational bromides
on Twitter (yesterday?s being ?Most
fear is learned?). Insulated by his
money and cultural clout, West is
arguably immune to the draining
power of Trump?s energy and the
legacies of slavery, and is far freer
to celebrate or question them. The
racism he has experienced ? being
ostracised by pop radio and high
fashion ? is real and clearly painful,
and he returned to the subject in
another interview this week with
radio host Charlamagne tha God. Yet
having eventually been given access
to fashion at least, West seems to
believe that all black people can
have that kind of agency ? that
self-belief alone can set you free.
It?s the kind of illusion that makes
Trumpism so seductive.
Any analysis is complicated by
West?s hospitalisation for two weeks
in 2016 after a mental breakdown,
following intense touring and an
incident where Kardashian was
robbed in Paris. He has recast the
episode as a ?breakthrough? and says
he is using medication that ?helps
calm me down?; Kardashian has
expressed frustration at how Kanye
is framed as mentally ill when he
is ?just being himself when he has
always been expressive?. And of
course, there is a long history of black
people being dismissed as ?crazy?.
A more generous reading is that
Kanye still cares a lot about black
America, and in some ways he is a
victim of an increasingly dogmatic,
polarised culture ? one created, in part,
by his and Trump?s mouthpiece of
choice, Twitter. Kanye is frustrated by
the social homogeneity he perceives:
?See that?s the problem with this
damn nation / All blacks gotta be
Democrats, man, we ain?t made it off
the plantation,? he raps in Ye Vs the
People, suggesting that supporting
Republicans is an expression of black
freedom. ?I vehemently hate the
?sunken place? reference, for Kanye
has proven his bona fides in black
emancipation and black love,? says
Bailey. ?We know, via his own words
on his albums and interviews, that he
stands against racism in all its forms.
Kanye may be arrogant, mentally
unstable, narcissistic and insensitive
but, for him, he is free.?
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
9
?
Arts
?This is real
abuse ? not a
simulation?
Jordan Wolfson?s puppet boy is violently smashed to the
?oor ? then ?ghts back. But is the controversial US artist
just yanking our chain? Stuart Je?ries meets him
I
n a room at Tate Modern,
a boy is getting beaten up.
He has a chain fixed to the
top of his head, another
attached to an arm, a
third to a leg. As I watch,
computer operatives sitting next
to me press buttons, activating
cranes that pull the chains taut.
He spins into the air, limbs fly out,
the torso swivels upside down.
The chains loosen, he smacks
into the ground. Then music
kicks in over loudspeakers. Percy
Sledge is ardently, if grotesquely
inappropriately, singing When a Man
Loves a Woman.
The boy is an animatronic puppet,
slightly larger than life, with glossy
red hair and loose limbs like the
1950s American TV cowboy puppet
Howdy Doody. His gap teeth and
leering eyes reference Mad
magazine?s Alfred E Neuman, his
ragged trousers Huckleberry Finn.
It is as if I?m looking at an artist?s
meditation on Abu Ghraib or child
abuse ? a simulation of suffering.
The artist, not for the last time in this
interview, demurs. ?This is real
violence,? Jordan Wolfson tells me as
the body gets dragged again across
the floor, grazing his face. ?It?s real
abuse, not a simulation.?
How is beating up a puppet real
violence? ?Because I?m applying real
10
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
physical violence to a figure even
though it?s made of animated parts.?
Tate Modern has just acquired
this artwork, entitled Colored
Sculpture, for its collection and
opens it to the public today. Neither
Wolfson nor the Tate will tell me
how much it cost, only that it was
bought with funds from Irish art
collectors Marie and Joe Donnelly.
Is your piece to do with exploring
childhood trauma? ?I?m drawing on
the figures from when I was a kid,
but this isn?t autobiographical. I?m
like a sponge, sucking up all those
things I see on TV and in the world
and putting them in my art. I do it
intuitively, not intellectually, and
definitely not with an agenda.?
nt
As he speaks, I notice replacement
heads and torsos for the puppet
c
lying in readiness. The animatronic
boy takes such a thrashing that he
has to have new body parts
transplanted regularly. The retro
vibe of the source material is
undercut by the puppet?s state-ofthe-art facial recognition software.
Sensors inside the puppet?s head
y
scan for human faces in the vicinity
e
and, once found, the puppet?s gaze
turns uncannily in their direction.
This is costly art: Wolfson?s
or
animatronic sculptures are made for
at least half a million dollars at a
s.
special effects studio in Los Angeles.
It?s also vengeful art. The art object
n
has come to life and is staring down
Ready for a
thrashing
? Jordan Wolfson
at Tate Modern;
below, his alarming
Female Figure
the spectator, plotting its revenge
after millennia of objectification. As
I look at the puppet?s head lying
abjectly on the floor, his sinister blue
eyes fix sidelong on mine. And then
he gets yanked into the air once
more, hovering above me like an
imperious angel of death. It?s then
that Wolfson?s recorded voice lists 18
things the puppet apparently wants
to do to me. ?Five: To touch you ?
13:營爇illed you. 14: You?re blind ?
16:燭o lift you ? 18: To weigh you.?
Next the boy says: ?Spit. Earth.?
y disappear
pp
His eyes
from their
sockets and those two words replace
them. Does this puppet want to spit
on my grave? Because that?s what
I?m hearing. Victim has
become燼ggressor.
It might seem a propitious
moment for Wolfson to export what
he calls real violence to London.
After all, his home city of New York
has just been overtaken by London
as a murder capital. Perhaps we need
American insight into how
violence爓orks.
Are you a moralist, I ask Wolfson
over green tea in the Tate?s cafe. ?I
hope not,? he replies. In profile, the
handsome 37-year-old reminds me
of a young John Cassavetes, a nearpermanent hint of a smile by turns
making him look knowing, shy and
rueful. ?I would really hate it if my
sculpture is taken as a morality
lesson. I?m no moralist trying to
shock people into behaving better.?
But he is readily taken for one. I
quote him a recent review: ?Wolfson
makes you feel like we?re all
moments away from staggering
violence and moral decrepitude ?
morality is a veil that can drop any
second.? That?s how Wolfson?s work
is regularly decoded ? as stripping
away the superego and leaving the id
in its unbearable nakedness. That?s
why his work so often involves sex
and violence. It may also be relevant
th
that his mother is a psychoanalyst.
Over the last decade and a half,
W
Wolfson has yanked our chains as he
d
does his puppet boy?s. He has
d
dragged us, often horrified, into
w
witnessing things we?d rather not.
H
He has used animation, digital
im
imaging, animatronic sculpture,
p
performance and photography to
p
project humanity?s basest impulses
in
into constructed selves.
Consider his most notorious
w
work, a virtual reality video called
R
Real Violence that caused a furore
w
when it was seen at the Whitney
B
Biennial in New York last year.
S
Spectators put on virtual reality
g
goggles to witness an iPhone video
o
of Wolfson apparently smashing a
b
baseball bat into another man?s face,
th
then stamping on his head.
PHOTOGRAPHS: MARTIN GODWIN FOR THE GUARDIAN; SADIE COLES
HQ DAVID ZWIRNER GALLERY
Victim becomes
aggressor ?
Colored
Sculpture
?
My best shot
?I?m not making
this art ? to make
people happy.
Really, I don?t
care about your
interpretation?
When the spectators removed
their VR headsets, they returned to
a爎eality transfigured by his art ? but
not in a good way. Some critics were
exasperated at Wolfson?s failure to
take a political or moral stance on
the violence in his work. ?His
formalist approach indulges our
culture?s fascination with gore and
death while ignoring its causes and
consequences in the real world,?
wrote Mengna Da on the website
Hyperallergic.
I ask him if he evades
responsibility for the violence in his
art? Wolfson cites the great
Frankfurt School Marxist
philosopher Theodor Adorno. ?I had
this idea from Adorno that to see the
world you need to look at it through
a cracked glass. If you imagined your
day is a piece of string extending
over 24 hours, so it includes your
dreams, that string would be
punctuated if you witnessed sex or
violence, or dreamed about them.
The rest of life is kind of flat. And so
to see life through that kind of
cracked lens is artistically what I
want to do.?
No wonder Wolfson is drawn so
much to cartoons. He has spoken of
cartoons as constituting ?a dream
world where anything is possible,
but everything is subject to
distortion and mutation?, and his art
is like that. His 2017 video Riverboat
Song, for instance, features cartoon
cut-outs including a crocodile in the
bath and a pair of sleek, animated
horses taking breakfast, in a
psychodrama in which his recurring
Huckleberry Finn-like protagonist
dances sexily, then grows huge
breasts that ultimately fall off.
Or consider his 2014 piece Female
Figure, an animatronic sculpture of a
woman in a scanty dress and thighhigh boots. She dances before a
mirror on the wall with her back to
Stream of
consciousness ?
his provocative
video piece, The
Riverboat Song
the spectator, sporting a ghoulish
green half witch mask. A metal pole
runs horizontally from the mirror
into her torso, as if she?s been
skewered by the tool of her trade.
The sculpture is fitted with motion
sensors that are activated when the
spectator comes near and with facial
recognition software, so if you stand
close to the automaton she looks
deep into your eyes.
Just as the boy puppet mutates
from victim to aggressor, so the
Female Figure mutates from sex
object to scary monster. One critic
even feared the Female Figure
looked poised to free herself from
her skewer and kill him.
But Wolfson resists my suggestion
that his work addresses the violence
of objectification. Instead, he cites
Georges Bataille?s 1928 novella,
Story of the Eye, as inspiring his
approach to art. That work, without
any apparent moral, dramatised the
sexual perversions of two teenage
lovers, and included an orgy,
broken爂lass, blood, suicide and
necrophilia. ?When I read it I wasn?t
titillated. I爓as excited by its
freedom,? he爏ays.
?I want to be free in just the same
way. I know that if I didn?t do as I felt
and I policed myself I would be
living a lie. Can?t I talk about
violence without being violent?
There?s nothing off limits to me,
nor爏hould anything be.?
Why do you make art? ?Being an
artist is a selfish thing. I?m not
making this art for a journalist, or
anyone else. I?m making this for
myself. This isn?t about making
people happy or making people like
me. Growing up, I wasn?t taught to
be liberated, I was taught to be selfconscious. Now I?m grownup I?m
just going for it.? He giggles. ?Put
that in the headline.?
Wolfson seems keen to return to
finesse Colored Sculpture for its Tate
Modern premiere, so we wander
back to the gallery. Before I leave
him to it, I ask him what he wants
from people who come to see his art.
?I don?t want to come across as
egocentric,? he says, ?but really I
don?t care about your interpretation.
I want you to see what I?m seeing.?
Maybe we will, but we probably
won?t like it.
Colored Sculpture is at Tate Modern,
London, from today to 31 August.
John Duncan
?The chairs look out on to the only park with a peace line
through it. Eyes on the wall are looking back. There?s tension
there. I?m not sure if it?s hopeful or not?
I?ve lived in Belfast almost all my life. When
I took this, I had recently moved to the north
of the city, to Limestone Road, in search of
cheaper rent. I didn?t know until after I moved
in, but it was at the border between a Catholic
and a Protestant area. For the first time in my
life, I witnessed sectarian violence right on
my doorstep: regular riots, brick and bottle
throwing.
I took it just off Limestone Road, a few
minutes from where I lived and still close to
where I am now. As a photographer, you get a
sort of sixth sense for places that might prove
interesting and that?s what drew me here. The
place was abandoned, ruined. I?ve no idea who
put the chairs there, or whether they were
the same people who sprayed the graffiti and
smashed the wall. At first glance, the hole looks
like it?s been broken through, but if you look
closer you can see intact bricks jutting out,
almost as if it was taken apart brick by brick.
The chairs look out on to the green space, but
then there?s a pair of eyes on the wall looking
back. I?m interested in the tension between
those views. I?m not sure if it?s hopeful or not.
Then there?s the evidence of activity, perhaps
by different people at different times who?ve
long since disappeared. It?s an aftermath, but an
aftermath of small, local events ? not of a major
battle or anything like that.
It was taken some time ago, in 2002, but I?ve
been making photographs of Belfast since the
late 1980s. I?ve traversed it back and forth on
foot. That?s the thing about living in a relatively
small city for decades: you can observe small
changes as they happen, while keeping a
sense of the place as a whole. It all adds up to a
portrait of Belfast through the decades.
After the ceasefire, things started to
change and I wanted
to capture the new
The CV
cityscape that was
Born Belfast, 1968.
being put in place,
Training Newport
which was at times
(documentary);
reminiscent of a
Glasgow (fine art).
theatre set. One day, I
Influences Rebecca
saw giant trees being
Solnit, Tom Paulin.
carted around the
High point ?Getting
city on lorries. It was
my series Bonfires
all part of the wave
printed by Steidl.?
of redevelopment
Low point ?Printing
surrounding the
holiday photos at
peace process,
Quik Snaps for seven
with murals of new
years to get access to
buildings against
a dark room.?
blue skies ? in lieu of
Top tip ?Keep your
murals of gunmen.
negatives in order.?
The developments
were called things
like Meridian Plaza
or Horizon Building. It was a kind of anodyne
future being plotted out for Belfast. But the
reality of the city was always different.
I?ve been back to this spot since. The
building has been knocked down and replaced
with an old people?s home. The residents
probably have that same view out over
Alexandra Park. It?s the only park in Belfast
with a wall running through it ? one of the
so-called peace lines. There are miles of these
walls criss-crossing the city. It?s still a very
divided place. There?s a long way to go.
I once showed this in a gallery in London and
it was stolen. Somebody must?ve liked it enough
to take it ? and it was quite a posh gallery, too.
John Duncan?s work is on show at EVA
International, Limerick, 14 April to 8 July.
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
11
?
Live reviews
Scene-stealer ?
Cecilia Noble, right,
in Nine Night
Theatre
Nine Night
?????
Dorfman, London
Until 26 May
Box office: 020-7452 3000
Classical
Pavel
Kolesnikov
?????
PHOTOGRAPHS: HELEN MURRAY; PETER DIBDIN
Wigmore Hall, London
T
here?s a key moment
in Natasha Gordon?s
highly impressive
debut play when Aunt
Maggie leaves the
nine-night funeral
wake that is part of her Jamaican
heritage to go home and watch
EastEnders. ?Big tings are gawn
in the Queen Vic tonight,? she
announces. For me, that neatly sums
up Gordon?s theme ? which is the
ability to inhabit two cultures and
to acknowledge one?s ancestral past
while living fully in the present.
Gordon?s play acquires extra
resonance in the light of the
Windrush scandal: Aunt Maggie
gets a big laugh when she says
that her Freedom Pass is ?the only
decent ting me get from this teefing
government?. But the play is less
about living in a hostile environment
than about the tensions that erupt in
the wake of loss.
The dead woman, Gloria, came
to Britain from Jamaica as a young
woman, leaving behind a daughter,
Trudy. She then had two children by
another man and their differences
drive the action forward. Lorraine,
who gave up her job to look after
her dying mum, is the eternal coper
supplying the food that is part of the
traditional nine-night celebration.
Robert, married to a 45-year-old
white teacher, is an entrepreneurial
go-getter impatient with the
claims爋f the past.
Gordon deals very well with the
different layers of grief: one of the
sharpest scenes shows the family
arguing over the practical problems
of the funeral. But the joy of the
play爄s that it is exuberantly funny
while arguing that it is possible to
dwell in seemingly antithetical
worlds. Even Anita, Lorraine?s
graduate daughter, who initially
views the whole wake with a
rational爏cepticism, is sufficiently
moved by爃er gran?s funeral to
momentarily believe in God.
Aunt Maggie, who steals every
T
here was no doubt that
a lot of thought went
into the planning of
Pavel Kolesnikov?s
latest Wigmore
recital programme,
a carefully arranged sequence of
miniatures in the first half, followed
by something more substantial after
the interval. In a disembodied (prerecorded?) spoken introduction,
Kolesnikov described the pieces in
his sequence as dramatic characters
brought on to the stage in turn.
Those ?characters? were the
movements of Debussy?s suite
Children?s Corner, interleaved with
pieces from Helmut Lachenmann?s
Ein Kinderspiel. There was some
Chopin (a mazurka and a study),
Liszt?s La Campanella and the C sharp
minor Prelude from the second book
of Bach?s Well-Tempered Clavier in
the mix, before it all ended with Feux
d?Artifice from Debussy?s Pr閘udes.
Some of the performances were
striking ? La Campanella was
delicate and dazzling, without a hint
Immensely
talented ?
Pavel Kolesnikov
of empty bravura, Children?s Corner
was delicately shaded, Feux
d?Artifice almost angrily explosive.
But if these were characters who
were meant to relate to each other,
they didn?t do so in any meaningful
way, and even the rationale for the
order of the sequence remained
entirely elusive.
Why, for instance, did Kolesnikov
play Lachenmann?s Schattentanz, in
which only the rattle of fingers
scene she is in, and the newly
returned Trudy also carry out a
climactic ritual that supposedly
releases the spirit of the dead
woman. Whether we believe in its
efficacy is irrelevant: Gordon?s point
is that you don?t ? nor should you ?
abandon inherited customs simply
because you inhabit a materialistic,
metropolitan
Gordon?s story culture.
The family
of a grieving
history takes
Jamaican
a bit of sorting
family
out and I wish
gains extra
Gordon had told
resonance in
us more about
light of the
Anita?s selfWindrush
empowerment.
scandal
But Roy
Alexander
Weise?s
production has
real momentum
and underscores Gordon?s gift for
raising big issues through laughter.
The magnificent Cecilia Noble
is inescapably dominant as the
dogmatic Aunt Maggie, who has
a belief in the equally restorative
powers of chicken and Jesus and
who, reacting with horror to the idea
of Gloria being cremated, roundly
declares ?We don?t cook our people.?
Franc Ashman as Lorraine captures
perfectly the sadness of the dutiful
daughter who was never wholly
loved and, without shouting it from
the rooftops, makes the point that
England never really wanted the
immigrants who have for so long
sustained it economically.
Oliver Alvin-Wilson as Robert and
Hattie Ladbury as his wife, Sophie,
also make a plausible couple. It?s a
sign of the play?s subtlety that while
she is embraced by her inherited
Jamaican family, he is angry at his
rejection by Sophie?s mother. This
is a play, dealing with Jamaican
life but easily applicable to others,
that says a lot in 105 minutes. It
also demonstrates the National?s
belief in its mission to portray the
multicultural Britain we live in.
Michael Billington
hitting the piano keys is heard,
twice? And why was there a break for
applause in the otherwise seamless
sequence before the final two pieces
? the naggingly repeated clusters of
Lachenmann?s Filter-Schaukel and
Feux d?Artifice?
If such questions eventually
became a distraction, then
Kolesnikov began the second half
with another teasing juxtaposition,
prefacing Schumann?s C major
Fantasy with a piece by Louis
Couperin, Le Tombeau de M
de燘lancrocher. Their connection
proved to be the plodding way in
which he approached both pieces, so
that sections in the Couperin became
totally detached from each other, and
one of Schumann?s most daringly
original formal designs lost most of
its coherence and poetic power.
There were still flashes of the
immensely talented pianist
Kolesnikov certainly is, but here
the燾leverness of his programme
almost entirely negated them.
Andrew Clements
Odd angles ?
Edward Franklin
and Adura
Onashile
Theatre
Creditors
?????
Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh
Until 12 May
Box office: 0131-248 4848
I
f the men?s rights
movement is looking for
a spokesman, it could
do worse than Gustav in
August Strindberg?s threehander, adapted in 2008 by
David Greig and given a scintillating
revival by Stewart Laing. He is the
spurned lover who wheedles his
way into his ex-wife?s new marriage
while pushing a doctrine of male
superiority and female deference.
It?s not exactly that the arguments
are persuasive (in the age of #MeToo,
they raise the occasional laugh), but
Stuart McQuarrie?s Gustav is slimily
plausible. Looking like the playwright
himself, with quiff and buttoned-up
jacket, he remains moderate, as if to
suggest his views about emasculation
and the dangers of free-thinking
women are the consequence of
reasoning not vested interest. He is
creepy and charismatic.
Certainly, Gustav impresses
Adolph (Edward Franklin), all boyish
optimism and dark mood swings,
whose easy conversational manner is
offset by McQuarrie?s restraint. His
real match is Tekla (Adura Onashile),
her sharpness of mind and emotional
intelligence as powerful as her erotic
desire. Performed straight through,
with nobody entirely right or wrong,
the play anticipates the irreconcilable
conflict of David Mamet?s Oleanna.
Laing pushes the archetypal
nature of the conflict further by
setting it in a symbolist landscape, his
summer house set full of distorted
perspectives and odd angles. Scene
divisions are marked by a procession
of four Girl Guides, mechanically
waving semaphore flags and making
fires, seeming familiar yet strange.
Likewise, the final scene, played
out爋n film, has the twin effects of
being emotionally revealing and
theatrically distancing. For all of
the爉isogyny, the arguments about
passion and possession, partnership
and dependency, rage on.
Mark Fisher
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
13
?
TV and radio
Watch this
Sara Cox: bants
and a lot of
alliteration
Syria: The World?s War
9pm, BBC Two
Review
Love in the Countryside
In March 2011, Syrian security forces opened
?re on a demonstration in Daraa. Seven years
later, what began as protests associated with the
Arab spring have escalated into a war that has
destroyed a country, sucked in the militaries of
dozens of others and shows little sign of ending.
This tremendous two-part series presented by
Lyse Doucet, concluding tomorrow, skilfully tells
the whole hideous story, speaking to people on
all sides who made the decisions, and people on
all sides who were a?ected by them.
BBC Two
Sam Wollaston
Sara Cox helping farmers ?nd
romance is sometimes awkward and
old-fashioned, but very charming
?????
S
ara Cox is busy. She has barely finished going
Back in Time For Tea, now she is helping
lonely farmers find love. As well as her Radio
2 stuff. I don?t mind, there?s no such thing as
too much Sara Cox.
So eight farmers uploaded video profiles,
and prospective partners were invited to write them
letters. Letters! What is this, the past? Do they not have
Tinder and Grindr in the countryside?
Whatever, Sara delivers them their letters from which
they have to whittle down a shortlist. Thirty-two-yearold Christine (sheep and cattle, Dumfries and Galloway,
took over the farm when her dad died, runs it by herself)
doesn?t have much whittling to do, there aren?t many
letters in her box ? Oh God, already I can?t bear this.
She?s lovely, what?s wrong with you idiots?
Ed (dairy, Lancashire) has loads of letters, he needs an
extra box. That?s because Ed?s 25, gorgeous, charming,
attentive, has perfect teeth ? yawn. Likewise Heather
(vet, North Yorkshire) ? 28, tall, blond, horsey, she?ll be
fighting them off.
Peter (52, also North Yorks) is good news, though.
I mean from a TV perspective rather than to move in
with. Divorcee (can?t imagine what went wrong) Peter
is what you want in a farmer on a show like this. Mucky
hands, old-fashioned shirt and matching views. ?Cows
are probably better behaved than women, aren?t they??
he says.
Peter soon finds a letter from someone he likes the
sound of ? well, the look of first, it?s the photo that
catches his attention. ?Ay up, this is a right corker this,?
he says. ?An absolute cracker!?
I wonder what he sees in Francesca, who is 16
years younger than he is and who writes that she was
immediately attracted to his round masculine features,
then apologises that her perfumed, kiss-sealed letter is
a bit crumpled but she was dripping wet, fresh from the
shower when she wrote it.
The others roll their eyes. Back at home, Peter?s family
roll theirs. ?She looks maybe a little bit too glamorous.
I don?t think she?s maybe the country sort,? says Peter?s
nephew. His two teenage sons like the look of Christina,
who isn?t just attractive, and of a similar age to their dad,
14
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
but she also worked on a dairy farm for several years.
It?s almost as if they suspect Francesca?s motives might
have more to do with a primetime TV appearance than
actually looking for a new rural life ? and love ? on the
farm. Guess what? Francesca goes on the definite pile
? as she was always going to the moment Peter saw her ?
and it doesn?t matter what anybody else thinks.
There?s an interview process ? not the most successful
part of this; it?s awkward and old school. There?s
something of Blind Date about it, with our farmers
asking the same questions to their
prospective partners in order to
whittle down further. ?What are
you looking for in a relationship??
Peter asks each potential Mrs Peter.
(The best answer is ?a man?, from a
Geordie lorry driver named Mo). It
has none of the natural, date-reality
?Cows are
of Channel 4?s First Dates.
probably
Coxy does her best to keep it
better
moving along, with bants and a lot of
behaved
alliteration. And I imagine most of the
than women,
fun is yet to come, when our potential
farmers? partners go back to the farm,
aren?t they??
to get up at dawn in order to shovel
cowpats.
Decision time for Peter. Oh,
Christina ? his sons? favourite, with
cow experience ? doesn?t make the final cut. Nor Mo.
Francesca? She does, as it happens. More eye-rolling.
And possibly a little thumbs up, under the table, from
the programme-makers. Get them wellies on, girl.
Something to look forward to next week.
I?m also looking forward to finding out how 39-yearold Richard, who is looking for a man, gets on. The
gay scene in the Scottish sheep-farming community
isn?t brilliant, apparently. And then there?s 52-year-old
Norfolk farrier Mark. ?One thing I haven?t told anybody
yet, is I ain?t got any central heating,? he chuckles. How
are you going to resist that ladies, an icy east wind
blowing through your Norfolk farmhouse? Now I expect
Mark will need an extra box, for all his letters. And will
end up with a 27-year-old model called Anastasia.
Andrew Mueller
Britain?s Best Home
Cook
8pm, BBC One
And
another
thing
Check out The
Rain, Netflix?s
Danish postapocalyptic
thriller (from
Friday). You
won?t forget
your umbrella
again
For the Bake Off and
MasterChef crowds, this
new series sees Mary
Berry爅udge amateur
chefs.燬he is joined by
?produce expert? Chris
Bavin and chef Dan
Doherty, while Claudia
Winkleman hosts. And,
of燾ourse, there are their
10 contestants, among
them a retired shopkeeper
and a 999 operator.
Hannah J Davies
Paul O?Grady: For the
Love of Dogs ? India
8.30pm, ITV
Delhi may be a long way
from his usual Battersea
patch but O?Grady seems
to have acclimatised to
its bustle, offering TLC
to some of the city?s
estimated 400,000
street燿ogs. Among his
patients tonight: a pup
with earache, a rowdy
labrador and a hefty
hound with tick fever.
Graeme Virtue
Ambulance
9pm, BBC One
A weekend nightshift
with the West Midlands
ambulance service tests
the paramedics, call
centre and trauma team
this week. They deal
with a range of incidents,
from the stabbing of a
teenager to a machete
attack, and two shootings.
Meanwhile, Ozzie and
Matt treat a baby who
has爏topped breathing.
Candice Carty-Williams
Prince Harry?s Story:
Four Royal Weddings ?
9pm, ITV
Not long now until
Harry and Meghan get
hitched. Meantime,
here?s燼nother爐ie-in doc
(pretty sure it?s unofficial),
this time looking at
Harry?s life through the
prism of royal nuptials ?
and Diana?s funeral, just
in case you missed the
significance of that oh-sotasteful ellipsis.
Jonathan Wright
True Horror
10pm, Channel 4
Ten years ago, prankloving teens Stephen
Foster and Todd Bevis
were terrorised by the
ghost of a screaming
girl while camping in
an apparently haunted
wood爊ear Horsham. And
then something followed
Foster back home ? A
cracking spine-chiller
from Gareth Tunley, the
director of the cult festival
hit The Ghoul.
Ali Catterall
?
BBC One
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ultimate burger.
Ambulance (T) Specialist
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Ian燼ttend a stabbing.
8.0
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(T)燩iers Taylor and
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Syria: The World?s War
(T) Lyse Doucet presents
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into a full-scale civil war.
8.0
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with爁irst-time buyers
Charlie燼nd Hayley, who
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999: What?s Your
Emergency? (T) A family
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11.45 Election 2018 (T) Huw
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and燡ohn Curtice.
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10.0 MOTD: The Premier League
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10.30 Newsnight (T) Weather
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12.05 Secret Agent Selection:
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MasterChef:燭he Final (R)
3.05 The Secret Helpers (R)
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(T)�30 Lorraine (T) 9.25
Jeremy Kyle (T) 10.30 This
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Judge Rinder (T) 3.0 Tenable
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? What They Know (T) Adam
Shaw looks at the gathering
of personal information
by燽ig tech companies, and
how that data has been
used燼nd sometimes shared.
Emmerdale (T) A villager
battles for survival.
8.30 Paul O?Grady: For the Love
of Dogs ? India (T) The
comedian meets a pup
whose爀ars are infected.
9.0 Prince Harry?s Story:
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Documentary about Prince
Harry, from爃is childhood
to爃is upcoming marriage.
8.0
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10.30 Local News (T)
10.45 Uefa Europa League
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Madrid v Arsenal and FC Red
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11.45 Lethal Weapon (T) (R)
12.40 Give It a Year (T) (R) 1.05
Jackpot247 3.0 Tonight
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5.05燡eremy Kyle (T) (R)
10.0 True Horror (T) Two
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night爄n燼 haunted wood.
11.05 Gogglebox (T) (R)
12.0 The Real Football Fan Show
12.35 The Island With Bear
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Island? (R) 2.25 Class of Mum
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the Restaurant Trade (R) 3.45
Come Dine Champion of? (R)
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Dave
6.0am Home Shopping
7.10 Top Gear 8.10
American Pickers 9.010.0 Storage Hunters
10.0-1.0 American
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3.0 Sin City Motors 4.0
Steve Austin?s Broken
Skull Challenge 5.0 Top
Gear 6.0 Room 101
6.40-8.0 Would I Lie
to燳ou? 8.0 Have I Got
a Bit More News for You
9.0 Live at the Apollo
10.0 Room 101 10.4012.0 Mock the Week
12.0 QI 12.40 Would I
Lie to You? 1.20 Mock
the Week 2.0 QI 2.40
Would I Lie to You? 3.20
Parks and Recreation
4.0燞ome Shopping
E4
All programmes from 8am
to 7pm are double bills
6.0am-7.0 Hollyoaks
7.0 Couples Come Dine
With Me 8.0 How I Met
Your Mother 9.0 New
Girl 10.0 2 Broke Girls
11.0 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
12.0 The Goldbergs 1.0
The Big Bang Theory 2.0
How I Met Your Mother
3.0 New Girl 4.0
Brooklyn Nine-Nine 5.0
The Goldbergs 6.0 The
Big Bang Theory 7.0
Hollyoaks 7.30 Extreme
Cake Makers 8.0 The Big
Bang Theory 8.30 Young
Sheldon 9.0 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine 9.30 Let?s
Get Physical 10.0 The
Inbetweeners 10.35 The
Windsors 11.10-12.05
The Big Bang Theory
12.05 First Dates 1.10
Tattoo Fixers 2.10 The
Inbetweeners 2.40 The
Windsors 3.05 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine 3.30 Let?s
Get Physical 3.50-4.35
2 Broke Girls 4.35 The
Goldbergs 5.0 Couples
Come Dine With Me
Film4
11.0am Moonrise
(1948) 12.50 Retreat, Hell! (1952) 2.45
Man in the Saddle
(1951) 4.30 True
Grit (1969) 7.10 Chronicle (2012) 9.0
Iron Man 2 (2010)
11.25 Project
Almanac (2015) 1.35
Theeb (2014)
ITV2
6.0am The Planet?s
Funniest Animals
6.20 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records
6.45 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records
7.10 Who?s Doing the
Dishes? 7.55 Emmerdale
8.25 Coronation
Street 8.55 Coronation
Street 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 10.20
The Bachelorette 12.15
Emmerdale 12.45
Coronation Street 1.15
Coronation Street 1.45
The Ellen DeGeneres
9.0
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Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright
Stuff 11.15 The Yorkshire
Vet (T) (R) 12.10 News (T)
12.15 GPs: Behind Closed
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1.45 Neighbours (T) 2.15
NCIS (T) (R) Life Before His
Eyes 3.15 Murder She
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(Kristoffer Tabori, 2016) (T)
A Minnesota baker turns
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Alison Sweeney. 5.0 News (T)
5.30 Neighbours (T) (R) 6.0
Home and Away (T) (R) 6.30
News (T) 7.0 The Nightmare
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Bad Tenants, Rogue
Landlords (T) A doctor calls
in an eviction lawyer when
his tenant refuses to leave.
Includes news update.
Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It
Away! (T) Gary and Cona
seek �500 plus owed for
an unpaid loan, and Matt
and Gary try to recover over
�000 due in nursery fees.
10.0 Undercover: Nailing the
Fraudsters (T) Paul Connolly
on fake slimming pills.
11.05 Burned Alive: Countdown
to燤urder (T) (R)
12.0 SuperCasino 3.10 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors (T)�(R)
4.0 My Mum?s Hotter Than
Me! (T) (R) 4.45 House Doctor
(T) (R) 5.10 Wildlife SOS (T)
(R) 5.35 House Doctor (T) (R)
7.0
Beyond 100 Days (T) 7.30
Top of the Pops: 1985 (T)
Mike Read and Steve Wright
present the 12 September
edition, featuring Amii
Stewart, Huey Lewis and the
News, Maria Vidal, Marillion,
Mai Tai, and David Bowie
and燤ick Jagger.
8.0
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Elements (T) Prof Mark
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super爀lements that underpin our hi-tech world.
Jumbo: The Plane That
Changed the World (T) The
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in the 1970s.
9.0
10.0 The Celts: Blood, Iron
and Sacrifice With Alice
Roberts燼nd Neil Oliver (T)
(3/3) The revolt against the
Romans led by Boudicca.
11.0 Law and Order (T) (4/4) A
focus on the prison system.
12.25 Top of the Pops: 1985 (T)
12.55 The Somme: Secret
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(T) 2.55 Secrets of? (T)
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Show 2.35 Jeremy
Kyle 3.40 Jeremy Kyle
4.50 Jeremy Kyle
5.50 Take Me Out 7.0
You?ve Been Framed!
Gold 7.30 You?ve Been
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and a Half Men 8.30
Superstore 9.0 Family
Guy 9.30 Family Guy
10.0 Celebrity Juice
10.50 Family Guy
11.15 Family Guy 11.40
American Dad! 12.10
American Dad! 12.35
Plebs 1.10 Two and a
Half Men 1.35 Superstore
2.05 Totally Bonkers
Guinness燱orld Records
2.30 Teleshopping
More4
8.55am Best of Food
Unwrapped 9.30-11.35 A
Place in the Sun: Winter
Sun 11.35-2.10 Four in a
Bed 2.10-4.50 Come Dine
With Me 4.50 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun 5.55
Ugly House to Lovely
House 6.55 The Secret
Life of the Zoo 7.55 Grand
Designs 9.0 The Good
Fight 10.05 Emergency
Helicopter Medics 11.05
24 Hours in A&E 12.15
Kitchen Nightmares USA
1.10 The Good Fight 2.15
24 Hours in A&E 3.15
8燨ut of 10 Cats Uncut
Sky1
6.0am Animal 999 6.30
Animal 999 7.0 Meerkat
Manor 7.30 Meerkat
Manor 8.0 Monkey
Life 8.30 Monkey Life
9.0 Motorway Patrol
9.30 Motorway Patrol
10.0 Road Wars 11.0
Warehouse 13 12.0 NCIS:
LA 1.0 Hawaii Five-0
2.0 Hawaii Five-0 3.0
NCIS: LA 4.0 Stargate
SG-1 5.0 The Simpsons
5.30 Futurama 6.0
Futurama 6.30-8.0 The
Simpsons 8.0 Arrow 9.0
SEAL Team 10.0 Rugby?s
Funniest Moments 11.0
The Force: Manchester
12.0 Bellew v Haye: The
Gloves Are Off 2 12.30
Road Wars 1.0 Ross
Kemp: Extreme World
2.0 Most Shocking 3.0
Duck Quacks Don?t Echo
4.0 The Real A&E 4.30
Motorway Patrol 5.0 It?s
Me or the Dog
Sky Arts
6.0am The Lady in
No 6: Music Saved My
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Watercolour Challenge
9.30 The Art Show
10.30 Tales of the
Unexpected 11.0 Classic
Albums 12.0 The Eighties
1.0 Discovering: Henry
Fonda 2.0 Watercolour
Challenge 2.30 The Art
Show 3.30 Tales of the
Unexpected 4.0 Classic
Albums 5.0 The Eighties
6.0 Discovering: Charlie
Chaplin 7.0 Mystery of
the Lost Paintings 8.0
The Nineties 9.0 Urban
Myths: Alice Cooper
and Salvador Dali 9.30
Super Duper Alice Cooper
11.30 Urban Myths: Alice
Cooper and Salvador
Dal� 12.0 Artists in Love
1.0 Inside the Mind of
Leonardo 2.40 The Mona
Lisa燤yth 4.30 Tales
of the Unexpected 5.0
Auction 5.30 Auction
Sky Atlantic
6.0am The British 7.0
Storm City 8.0 Fish
Town 9.0-11.0 The West
Wing 11.0-1.0 House 1.0
Without a Trace 2.0 Blue
Bloods 3.0-5.0 The West
Wing 5.0-7.0 House 7.0
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 8.0 Blue Bloods
9.0 Billions 10.10 Silicon
Valley 10.45 Barry 11.20
Mike Judge Presents?
11.55 Blue Bloods 12.55
The Sopranos 2.10 Togetherness 2.50 House
of Lies 3.25 Happyish
4.0-6.0 The West Wing
Theeb, Film4
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6.30 Breakfast 9.0
Essential Classics 12.0
Composer of the Week
(4/5) 1.0 News 1.02
Lunchtime Concert:
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Opera Matinee: Weber ?
Oberon. Julian Pr間ardien
(tenor: Oberon), Alyona
Abramowa (mezzo:
Titania, Puck), Brenden
Gunnell (tenor: Huon
of Bordeaux), other
principals, Bavarian
State燨pera, Ivor Bolton.
4.30 BBC Young Musician
2018 5.0 In Tune 7.0
In Tune Mixtape 7.30
In Concert. Live from
Philharmonic Hall,
Liverpool. Iain Ballamy
(saxophone), Julian
Joseph (piano), Julian
Joseph Trio (Mark
Mondesir, drums and
Mark Hodgson, acoustic
bass), RLPO, Clark
Rundell. Ellington: Night
Creature. Gary Carpenter:
Set for Saxophone and
Orchestra. Gershwin:
Rhapsody in Blue. Julian
Joseph: Symphonic
Stories. 10.0 Free
Thinking 10.45 The
Essay: My Life in Music
? The Silver Swan. With
George Caird. (4/5) 11.0
Late Junction 12.30
Through the Night
Radio 4
6.0 Today 8.30 (LW)
Yesterday in Parliament
9.0 In Our Time 9.45
(LW) Daily Service 9.45
(FM) Book of the Week:
The Life and Rhymes
of Benjamin Zephaniah
(4/5) 10.0 Woman?s
Hour. Includes at 10.45
Drama: The Wings of
the Dove. (4/10) 11.0
Crossing Continents: The
Belarus Tractor Factory.
With Lucy Ash in Minsk.
11.30 American Art: From
the Outside In. Alvin Hall
considers the work of
African-American selftaught artists. 12.0 News
12.01 (LW) Shipping
Forecast 12.04 Four
Thought: Joe Dunthorne
(R) 12.15 You and Yours
1.0 The World at One
1.45 Chinese Characters:
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by Philip Palmer. (R)
(1/2) 3.0 Open Country
3.30 Open Book (R) 4.0
The Film Programme
4.30 Inside Science.
The latest scientific
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PM 5.54 (LW) Shipping
Forecast 6.0 News 6.30
Alone: Not Listening But
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(2/6) 7.0 The Archers.
Shula lets her hair down.
7.15 Front Row 7.45 The
Wings of the Dove (R)
(4/10) 8.0 The Briefing
Room. David Aaronovitch
and guests discuss the big
issues. 8.30 In Business:
Out of Office ? The Rise
of the Digital Nomad.
With Jonty Bloom. (5/8)
9.0 Inside Science (R)
9.30 In Our Time (R)
10.0 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime:
The Valley at the Centre
of the World, by Malachy
Tallack. (4/10) 11.0 John
Finnemore?s Double Acts.
Celia Imrie and Charles
Edwards star in the first
of a series of comic
two-handers. (R) (1/6)
11.30 Today in Parliament
12.0 News 12.30 Book
of the Week (4/5) 12.48
Shipping Forecast 1.0
As World Service 5.20
Shipping Forecast 5.30
News 5.43 Prayer for
the燚ay 5.45 Farming
Today 5.58 Tweet of
the燚ay (R)
Radio 4 Extra
6.0 John Mortimer
Presents The Trials of
Marshall Hall (4/5) 6.30
Non Stop Party People
7.0 Hopes and Desires
(3/4) 7.30 Alone (1/6)
8.0 J Kingston Platt?s
Showbiz Handbook
8.30燭he Goon Show
9.0燣istomania (5/6)
9.30 HR (6/6) 10.0
The Master of Ballantrae
(1/2) 11.0 Figs 11.15
Galbraith and the King
of Diamonds (4/6) 12.0
J Kingston Platt? 12.30
The Goon Show 1.0 John
Mortimer Presents?
(4/5) 1.30 Non Stop
Party People 2.0 The
Secret History (4/15)
2.15 Shakespeare?s
Restless World (14/20)
2.30 The Enchanted April
(4/5) 2.45 Sissinghurst:
An Unfinished History
(4/5) 3.0 The Master
of Ballantrae (1/2) 4.0
Listomania (5/6) 4.30
HR (6/6) 5.0 Hopes and
Desires (3/4) 5.30 Alone
(1/6) 6.0 Duel (1/2)
6.30 Great Lives (1)
7.0 J Kingston Platt?
7.30 The Goon Show
8.0 John Mortimer
Presents? (4/5) 8.30
Non Stop Party People
9.0 Figs 9.15 Galbraith
and? (4/6) 10.0 Alone
(1/6) 10.30 Ross Noble
Goes Global (1/4) 11.0
Wondermentalist Cabaret
(4/4) 11.30 The燨dd
Half Hour (1/4)�.0
Duel (1/2) 12.30 Great
Lives (1) 1.0 John
Mortimer Presents?
(4/5) 1.30 Non Stop
Party People 2.0 The
Secret History (4/15)
2.15 Shakespeare?s
Restless World (14/20)
2.30 The燛nchanted
April�(4/5) 2.45 Sissinghurst? (4/5) 3.0 The
Master of Ballantrae
(1/2) 4.0 Listomania
(5/6) 4.30 HR (6/6)
5.0燞opes and Desires
(3/4) 5.30 Alone (1/6)
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
15
?
no 14,972
Yesterday?s
solutions
Quick crossword
Wordsearch
Across
1 Beat about the bush (10)
7 Capital of Ontario (7)
8 European capital ? Trojan prince
(5)
10 Fastened (4)
11 Joni __ , Canadian singersongwriter, b. 1943 (8)
13 Happens (6)
15 Butt of a comedian?s jokes (6)
17 In fact (8)
18 Avian symbols of wisdom (4)
21 Talks incessantly (5)
22 Gland in the neck (7)
23 ?Uncertainty principle?
mathematical physicist, d. 1976
? begins here (anag) (10)
Solution no 14,971
G E T AMO
R O O
P E N N A N T
E
I
K
N I G H C
H C
WA T E R C
I
O
F L EM I N G
L
A
Y
HOO T
I M
W E
S
B R AM S
1
Down
1 Strange and disturbing (5)
2 Vases (4)
3 Menuhin?s instrument (6)
4 Maximum amount that can be
contained (8)
5 Underwater projectile (7)
6 Still (10)
9 Cut of beef (10)
12 Little Rock?s state (8)
14 Dead skin on a fingernail (7)
16 Famous Five author, d. 1968 (6)
19 Incorrect (5)
20 Kind (4)
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V E ON
A U
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P R O V E D
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T O K E R
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Stuck? For help call 0906 200 83 83. Calls cost �10 per minute, plus your phone company?s access charge.
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Sudoku no 4,049
Sudoku
no 4,050
Hard. Fill the grid so that each row, column and 3x3
box contains the numbers 1-9. Printable version at
theguardian.com/sudoku
Word wheel
SQUEAKING
Word wheel
Suguru
Wordsearch
Find as many words as
possible using the letters
in the wheel. Each must
use the central letter and
at least two others. Letters
may be used only once. You
may not use plurals, foreign
words or proper nouns.
There is at least one nineletter word to be found.
TARGET: Excellent-41.
Good-37. Average-29.
Fill the grid so that each square
in an outlined block contains a
digit. A block of 2 squares contains
the digits 1 and 2, a block of three
squares contains the digits 1, 2 and
3, and so on. No same digit appears
in neighbouring squares, not even
diagonally.
Can you find 12 items of vegan food
in the grid? Words can run forwards,
backwards, vertically or diagonally,
but always in a straight, unbroken
line.
Suguru
Steve Bell
If?
Pet
corner
Which actor had
a vulture called
Moloney?
a. Douglas
Fairbanks
b. Lon Chaney
c. John Barrymore
d. James Cagney
Answer
swer
top
p rightt
16
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
TODAY?S PET CORNER ANSWER JOHN BARRYMORE
Puzzles
uneaten
bananas would be chopped up in
the freezer for smoothies, leftover
milk gets turned into labneh; even
the rind of the parmesan will be
frozen to later be chucked into a
minestrone. The kitchen became
entirely refocused. The first
question when cooking is not ?what
do you want to eat?? but ?what have
we got to use up??.
Now I?m a paid-up member of
the anti-food-waste brigade, Olio
was an obvious thing to try. After
downloading the app, I find plenty of
listings, although a lot are more than
2km away, which seems a schlep to
pick up a few carrots. There are a few
single pastries, a half-eaten birthday
cake and five leftover pieces of fried
chicken. Mostly though, there?s just
lots of white bread ? packets and
packets of half-eaten Kingsmill.
Inspired by my early score, I try
to find some things to list myself,
although our waste-not-want-not
regime doesn?t leave much going
spare. Eventually I find a packet of
unwanted Weetabix. I put it on the
site and await a response.
One came within minutes. The
man who arrived told me that he had
been using the app nearly everyday:
he has a big family, and Olio can
be a lifesaver. He says these days
he doesn?t really leave the house
unless it is to pick something up
from Olio or go shopping. We talk
about his struggles finding work, his
depression, run-ins with the police
and issues among his family. After
80 minutes of chatting, he asked if I
had any other food I could give him ?
I said I would have a look around and
let him know. It?s an odd feeling: was
I helping? Is it patronising?
Olio?s online spiel is similar to
a lot of companies that believe
technology can change the world. Its
positioning feels aspirational, with
neighbours working together.
The initial trial for the app took
place among 12 people in Crouch
End; the first item to be shared
was half a bag of shallots. But what
quickly becomes apparent is that
many of the people on Olio are using
it as an alternative or supplementary
food bank.
I put it to Cook that the app exists
on two different levels: one for a
well-meaning middle class, with
food leftover from fashion shoots or
Sunday dinner, and then people who
are travelling a long way to pick up
not very much food at all.
?What has been quite shocking for
us to discover on this journey, is how
many hungry people there are in this
country,? Cook says. ?Since working
on Olio, I have learnt that 8.4 million
people are living in food insecurity.
We have found that around a third
of our regular requestors are living
in poverty. What I?ve heard from a
lot of those people is that what they
love about the app is that there is no
?
The faddy eater
Morwenna
Ferrier
?The avolato ?
part avocado,
part gelato, all
privilege?
stigma when they collect food.?
Isn?t there something a little
uncomfortable, though, about
those with too much giving their
scraps to those with too little? ?We
don?t like to think of it as the haves
giving to the have-nots. Actually
this is just part of modern everyday
communities, it?s absolute madness
that people are throwing away
perfectly delicious food on the one
hand, while living nearby are people
who would like that food or perhaps
even need that food.?
Over the next few weeks, I
continue to use the app, mostly
for non-food items. I give away a
lampshade and some toiletries. I also
pick up an old milk-bottle collector
that I have repurposed into a shower
caddy. But most of the time I look
on Olio, the pickings are relatively
slim. Desirable items go very quickly
and most are far away. I also decide
that it is not right to pick up readyto-eat food such as sandwiches and
pastries, which make up a lot of the
listings, when there are people using
the app in serious need.
Olio claims to be the biggest
food-sharing network in the world.
More than 500,000 items have been
shared in more than 40 countries. It
is a pretty good start for an app that
has only been going for a few years,
but it feels like a drop in the ocean
considering how much is wasted
each day.
?You?re absolutely right,? says
Cook. ?But our ambition is an
unashamedly bold one. We are doing
0.0001% of our full potential. We?re
on 400,000 users today, we want
to have at least 400 million users.
That?s the goal.?
It is a bold ambition and they are a
PHOTOGRAPHS: GUY HARROP;
The man who
arrived told me that
he had been using
the app nearly
every day: Olio can
be a lifesaver
long way off, especially considering
that they are far from the only
organisation aiming to tackle this
problem. FareShare, Wrap, Freegle,
Food Cycle and The Felix Project
are just some of the groups trying to
help ease the food waste problem.
Still, Olio can provide food that some
charities wouldn?t bother with ? lots
of listings on the site are for a couple
of potatoes or half a sandwich.
In recent weeks, plastics have
been top of the agenda when it
comes to new environmental
policy, with the biggest food
companies agreeing to end the use
of non-recyclable packaging. This
move should be taken as a sign of
willingness to change ? but food
waste is arguably a more critical
concern, because it is connected to
so many modern afflictions: hunger,
greenhouse gases, waste disposal
and escalating food prices.
And this is where there is an
opportunity. It is not really the
interface that matters: it can be a
charity, an app or just a WhatsApp
group between five people in a
village, but if people are able to
shake off the stigma about passing
on the food they don?t want, they
might help to fix a bunch of the
world?s problems at the same time.
What will it take to cleave the avocado from its role as
byword for generational privilege? Probably not this,
the avolato, a brand new seasonal treat that is part
avocado, part dairy-free vegan gelato, and at �50 per
serving, here to bankrupt you long into the summer.
The avolato was dreamed up by Snowflake, a posh
gelateria with branches in London and Manchester.
Made of 60% hass avocado and padded out with water,
grape sugar, pectin and fibre, it comes inside an avocado
shell and is served with a small ball of beige nut-butter
ice-cream. Staff at Snowflake recommend that you
eat this sitting down in their cafe rather than walking
around, because of the size and 200g weight, but
mainly, I would argue, to save face.
The avolato launched late last month, a good 11
months after everyone stopped talking about avocados
in a normal way. In our hearts they were delicious,
but by 2018 it was too late for them. They had already
internalised the weight of a generation struggling
to fi nd work and affordable housing, becoming stale
metaphors on panel shows and a cheap and easy way to
elucidate hipster culture if you weren?t quite sure what
it was.
Mostly though ? and this is where the avolato comes
in ? they were an essential component of a well-trod
formula that pairs the avocado with a ?thing?, gives it
a name, watches it trend briefly on social media before
it becomes shorthand for the end of humanity. See
the avolatte (coffee served inside an avocado shell),
the avocado toast cocktail (a vodka-based avocado
cocktail) and the avocado proposal box, which merged
an avocado with lifelong commitment. If the avocado
is so done, so basic, so dead ? and given the number of
bastardisations it has endured, it surely is ? then the
avolato has come back to haunt it.
From a distance, this ghost looks like an avocado.
Up close, it resembles one of those meta desserts (a
pineapple fi lled with pineapple ice-cream) you get
in run-down resort restaurants. It also comes with a
bamboo spoon, along with the nutty ice-cream ball,
the only component of the avolato not hewn from an
avocado, but even this is biodegradable. In short, the
avolato is the avocado?s attempt at tackling the
eco-conscious food market, even if it comes a little
too avolate.
It tastes exactly as you imagine. Like a frozen
avocado, impressively similar to gelato given it
contains no dairy or egg, with the slight gumminess
of pectin. Good, textural, sickly sweet fun, as it should
be for �50.
The avolato,
yours for just
�50
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
7
?
Way
out
West
His suggestion that black people have been complicit in
their own slavery has prompted widespread outrage.
What lies behind Kanye West?s recent provocations?
? Words Ben Beaumont-Thomas
I
n a video viewed more
than 6m times on Twitter,
21-year-old Chika Oranika
summed up the current
feelings of many black
Americans about Kanye
West. She delivered her own lyrics
over the beat of the rap star?s Jesus
Walks. ?How you say you Yeezus
but do nothing to restore us? You
support the people up in power that
abort us,? she raps into the camera.
?It don?t matter how much money
you got or you lack, when that
cheque clear don?t forget that your
children are still black.?
Why the opprobrium, which has
come from activists, Hollywood
stars and fellow musicians, as well
as withering online freestyles?
West, one of the most significant,
complex and celebrated rappers
in the US, has used a 350-tweet
stream of consciousness over the
past fortnight to throw his support
firmly behind Donald Trump. But on
Tuesday, he went way beyond party
politics in an interview with TMZ:
?You hear about slavery for 400
years,? he said. ?For 400 years? That
sounds like a choice.?
Host Van Lathan tore back at him:
?While you are making music and
being an artist and living the life that
you?ve earned by being a genius, the
rest of us in society have to deal with
these threats to our lives.? Roxane
Gay reacted on Twitter by calling his
comments ?dangerous? and ?trite,
shallow ? he is not a free thinker. He
is a free moron.?
Black America?s dismay at West
has been brewing for some time. He
puzzled many when he posed for
photos with Trump in December
2016, making him one of the first
celebrities to apparently endorse the
new president. But his recent tweets
left no room for doubt. He posted
a picture of himself wearing the
Trump campaign?s Make America
Great Again cap, and tweeted: ?You
don?t have to agree with Trump but
the mob can?t make me not love
him. We are both dragon energy. He
is my brother.? After an intervention
by a presumably somewhat weary
Kim Kardashian, West wrote: ?My
wife just called me and she wanted
me to make this clear to everyone. I
don?t agree with everything Trump
does. I don?t agree 100% with
anyone but myself.?
In response, R&B singer Frank
Ocean emerged from hibernation
with a sarcastic screengrab of the
time West went off-script during a
2005 Hurricane Katrina appeal to
say ?George Bush doesn?t care about
black people?, the intimation being
that it is now West who doesn?t care.
Samuel L Jackson suggested West
was courting an audience in ?the
sunken place? ? the psychic interzone
in the horror film Get Out into which
black people are hypnotised and
silenced (the film?s director, Jordan
Peele, has previously linked it to
Trump?s America).
?So many people who love you
feel so betrayed right now because
they know the harm that Trump?s
policies cause, especially to people
of colour,? West?s friend John Legend
wrote in a text message that West
posted on Twitter. The rap star wrote
back: ?You bringing up my fans or
my legacy is a tactic based on fear
used to manipulate my free thought.?
Among ordinary Americans,
meanwhile, there was seething anger
at West supporting Trump, who has
reportedly said ?laziness is a trait in
blacks?; who campaigned for the
death penalty for the black teenagers,
later proven innocent, in the Central
Park Five case; and who thought
there were some ?very fine people?
marching alongside neo-Nazis and
white supremacists in Charlottesville.
Reacting to ? or having perhaps
anticipated ? all this, West released a
new track, Ye Vs the People, the first
music from two new albums being
released in June. In a dialogue with
the American people (vocalised by
rapper T.I.), Kanye tries to detoxify
the Trump brand and reclaim his
Make America Great Again slogan:
?Wearin? the hat?ll show people
8
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
West with
his wife Kim
Kardashian in
the video for
Famous, 2016:
(above) with
Donald Trump,
December 2016
Onstage in
California,
June 2016
that we equal,? he raps, arguing for
a why-can?t-we-all-just-get-along
humanism. He ultimately distils the
debate thus: ?You on some choosin?
side shit, I?m on some unified shit.?
For Kanye, this chapter is
just the latest incident in an
uncompromising career. At the
turn of the century, as a beatmaker
for Jay-Z and others, he really did
seem to be on ?some unified shit?,
taking the chopped-up soul samples
of ?backpack? hip-hop and pairing
them with the blockbuster tropes
of mainstream rap production; he
then successfully segued into being
a unified producer-rapper. His first
two albums charmed the whole
spectrum of rap fans with their
diversity and humour: he riffed on
black cultural reference points ?
slow-jam love songs, social climbers
? like a standup comedian.
His albums became more
ambitious with each new release,
unifying diverse cultural reference
points ? Graduation sampled Daft
Punk and explored a more electronic
sound; 808s & Heartbreak used AutoTune to reflect and enact emotional
dissonance, to brilliant effect; My
?So many people
feel so betrayed
because they
know the harm of
Trump?s policies?
Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy
was as operatic as the title suggests.
His interest in visual art grew, with
artists from Takashi Murakami
to George Condo commissioned
for his album covers; he designed
his own fashion collections and
collaborated with Adidas. In 2013,
he said: ?Creative genius, that?s
my title. My title is not rapper any
more.? West positioned himself as
a rounded aesthete, obsessed with
form and how art impacts society ?
his Twitter feed has recently featured
everything from tech solutions for
water desalination to artists Joseph
Beuys and David Hammons. Part of
his attraction to Kardashian seemed
to be her very iconography: ?My girl
a superstar all from a home movie,?
he wondered admiringly on 2012
track Clique.
?
?I see it as being
contrarian and a
bit arrogant, not
a cosigning of
Trump?s ideas?
PHOTOGRAPHS: SMALLZ & RASKIND/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGE;
LEANDRO JUSTEN/BFANYC.COM/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
that he is beginning to see the
world purely through the prism of
Kanye, rather than the eyes of black
America. That?s harmful not just
to himself, but to an ongoing civil
rights struggle in a still-racist US; his
provocations have the potential to
embolden the alt-right and others
who would diminish the standing of
African Americans.
Like Steve Jobs and Elon Musk,
both figures he admires, it?s hard to
place Kanye on a left-right political
binary. His personal political
philosophy doesn?t neatly dovetail
with existing belief systems ?
witness how the alt-right embraced
him after his championing of
Trump, and then deserted him
when he also championed Parkland
shooting survivor and activist Emma
Gonzalez last weekend.
His embrace of Trump ? as with
his embrace of black conservative
commentator Candace Owens,
whom he met with after tweeting
?I love the way [she] thinks? ? is, to
him, apolitical. ?I see it as simply
He also continued his analysis of
black America. On the same track he
raps: ?You know white people get
money, don?t spend it / Or maybe
they get money, buy a business /
I?d rather buy 80 gold chains and
go ig?nant.? West sees himself as
celebrating the economic freedom
black Americans were denied for
decades, and to which they still have
much less access than whites.
On New Slaves, meanwhile, from
2013 album Yeezus, he expressed a
more nuanced version of his slavery
comments this week: that black
Americans were subject to a new kind
of slavery, the rabid consumerism for
Maybach cars and Alexander Wang
clothes that traps them in economic
bondage. Julius Bailey, a philosophy
professor at Ohio?s Wittenberg
University, who has edited a book of
essays called The Cultural Impact of
Kanye West, argues that West should
be criticised for his TMZ interview,
but ?on the basis that he didn?t speak
to the material implications of postchattel slavery,? as he has done on
New Slaves and Clique. ?Kanye?s
heartfelt apology [to Van Lathan on
TMZ after his comments] was a way
of realising that his words, when not
qualified or contextualised, do more
damage than the emancipating good
he seeks.? Some of West?s other
lyrics have been similarly clumsy,
even offensive. He sampled Billie
Holiday?s Strange Fruit, a song about
lynching, for Blood on the Leaves,
a song about the destructive power
of fame in which he also compared
a man having his wife and mistress
separated at a basketball game to
apartheid.
And since Yeezus, his selfobsession has become stifling. His
2016 album The Life of Pablo has a
great skit called I Love Kanye, where
he imagines: ?What if Kanye made
a song about Kanye called I Miss the
Old Kanye? Man, that?d be so Kanye!?
In the wake of his slavery
comments, the skit stops being
funny: people really do miss the old,
outward-looking Kanye. Rapper
Meek Mill summed up the thoughts
of many when he posted an
Kanye West x
image of Kanye to Instagram
Adidas show,
on Tuesday, surrounded by the
autumn/winter
words ?RIP Old Kanye? and
New York, 2015
quoting Kanye?s lyrics back at
him: ?I feel the pressure, under
more scrutiny / And what I do?
Act more stupidly.?
The problem is that Kanye?s selfscrutiny has become so advanced
being contrarian and a bit arrogant,
not an actual cosigning of the
ideas espoused by Trump relative
to immigration, urban policy or
militarism,? Bailey says. ?He?s being
a fan of wealth.? Kanye champions
Trump?s ?energy? and sees in him
the same self-creation that he
wants for himself, and, perhaps,
for black America ? but like other
successful, moneyed libertarians,
he has become cut off from reality,
and assumes that all you need to
make it is willpower, perhaps helped
along by his inspirational bromides
on Twitter (yesterday?s being ?Most
fear is learned?). Insulated by his
money and cultural clout, West is
arguably immune to the draining
power of Trump?s energy and the
legacies of slavery, and is far freer
to celebrate or question them. The
racism he has experienced ? being
ostracised by pop radio and high
fashion ? is real and clearly painful,
and he returned to the subject in
another interview this week with
radio host Charlamagne tha God. Yet
having eventually been given access
to fashion at least, West seems to
believe that all black people can
have that kind of agency ? that
self-belief alone can set you free.
It?s the kind of illusion that makes
Trumpism so seductive.
Any analysis is complicated by
West?s hospitalisation for two weeks
in 2016 after a mental breakdown,
following intense touring and an
incident where Kardashian was
robbed in Paris. He has recast the
episode as a ?breakthrough? and says
he is using medication that ?helps
calm me down?; Kardashian has
expressed frustration at how Kanye
is framed as mentally ill when he
is ?just being himself when he has
always been expressive?. And of
course, there is a long history of black
people being dismissed as ?crazy?.
A more generous reading is that
Kanye still cares a lot about black
America, and in some ways he is a
victim of an increasingly dogmatic,
polarised culture ? one created, in part,
by his and Trump?s mouthpiece of
choice, Twitter. Kanye is frustrated by
the social homogeneity he perceives:
?See that?s the problem with this
damn nation / All blacks gotta be
Democrats, man, we ain?t made it off
the plantation,? he raps in Ye Vs the
People, suggesting that supporting
Republicans is an expression of black
freedom. ?I vehemently hate the
?sunken place? reference, for Kanye
has proven his bona fides in black
emancipation and black love,? says
Bailey. ?We know, via his own words
on his albums and interviews, that he
stands against racism in all its forms.
Kanye may be arrogant, mentally
unstable, narcissistic and insensitive
but, for him, he is free.?
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
9
?
Arts
?This is real
abuse ? not a
simulation?
Jordan Wolfson?s puppet boy is violently smashed to the
?oor ? then ?ghts back. But is the controversial US artist
just yanking our chain? Stuart Je?ries meets him
I
n a room at Tate Modern,
a boy is getting beaten up.
He has a chain fixed to the
top of his head, another
attached to an arm, a
third to a leg. As I watch,
computer operatives sitting next
to me press buttons, activating
cranes that pull the chains taut.
He spins into the air, limbs fly out,
the torso swivels upside down.
The chains loosen, he smacks
into the ground. Then music
kicks in over loudspeakers. Percy
Sledge is ardently, if grotesquely
inappropriately, singing When a Man
Loves a Woman.
The boy is an animatronic puppet,
slightly larger than life, with glossy
red hair and loose limbs like the
1950s American TV cowboy puppet
Howdy Doody. His gap teeth and
leering eyes reference Mad
magazine?s Alfred E Neuman, his
ragged trousers Huckleberry Finn.
It is as if I?m looking at an artist?s
meditation on Abu Ghraib or child
abuse ? a simulation of suffering.
The artist, not for the last time in this
interview, demurs. ?This is real
violence,? Jordan Wolfson tells me as
the body gets dragged again across
the floor, grazing his face. ?It?s real
abuse, not a simulation.?
How is beating up a puppet real
violence? ?Because I?m applying real
10
The Guardian
Thursday 3 May 2018
physical violence to a figure even
though it?s made of animated parts.?
Tate Modern has just acquired
this artwork, entitled Colored
Sculpture, for its collection and
opens it to the public today. Neither
Wolfson nor the Tate will tell me
how much it cost, only that it was
bought with funds from Irish art
collectors Marie and Joe Donnelly.
Is your piece to do with exploring
childhood trauma? ?I?m drawing on
the figures from when I was a kid,
but this isn?t autobiographical. I?m
like a sponge, sucking up all those
things I see on TV and in the world
and putting them in my art. I do it
intuitively, not intellectually, and
definitely not with an agenda.?
nt
As he speaks, I notice replacement
heads and torsos for the puppet
c
lying in readiness. The animatronic
boy takes such a thrashing that he
has to have new body parts
transplanted regularly. The retro
vibe of the source material is
undercut by the puppet?s state-ofthe-art facial recognition software.
Sensors inside the puppet?s head
y
scan for human faces in the vicinity
e
and, once found, the puppet?s gaze
turns uncannily in their direction.
This is costly art: Wolfson?s
or
animatronic sculptures are made for
at least half a million dollars at a
s.
special effects studio in Los Angeles.
It?s also vengeful art. The art object
n
has come to life and is staring down
Ready for a
thrashing
? Jordan Wolfson
at Tate Modern;
below, his alarming
Female Figure
the spectator, plotting its revenge
after millennia of objectification. As
I look at the puppet?s head lying
abjectly on the floor, his sinister blue
eyes fix sidelong on mine. And then
he gets yanked into the air once
more, hovering above me like an
imperious angel of death. It?s then
that Wolfson?s recorded voice lists 18
things the puppet apparently wants
to do to me. ?Five: To touch you ?
13:營爇illed you. 14: You?re blind ?
16:燭o lift you ? 18: To weigh you.?
Next the boy says: ?Spit. Earth.?
y disappear
pp
His eyes
from their
sockets and those two words replace
them. Does this puppet want to spit
on my grave? Because that?s what
I?m hearing. Victim has
become燼ggressor.
It might seem a propitious
moment for Wolfson to export what
he calls real violence to London.
After all, his home city of New York
has just been overtaken by London
as a murder capital. Perhaps we need
American insight into how
violence爓orks.
Are you a moralist, I ask Wolfson
over green tea in the Tate?s cafe. ?I
hope not,? he replies. In profile, the
handsome 37-year-old reminds me
of a young John Cassavetes, a nearpermanent hint of a smile by turns
making him look knowing, shy and
rueful. ?I would really hate it if my
sculpture is taken as a morality
lesson. I?m no moralist trying to
shock people into behaving better.?
But he is readily taken for one. I
quote him a recent review: ?Wolfson
makes you feel like we?re all
moments away from staggering
violence and moral decrepitude ?
morality is a veil that can drop any
second.? That?s how Wolfson?s work
is regularly decoded ? as stripping
away the superego and leaving the id
in its unbearable nakedness. That?s
why his work so often involves sex
and violence. It may also be relevant
th
that his mother is a psychoanalyst.
Over the last decade and a half,
W
Wolfson has yanked our chains as he
d
does his puppet boy?s. He has
d
dragged us, often horrified, into
w
witnessing things we?d rather not.
H
He has used animation, digital
im
imaging, animatronic sculpture,
p
performance and photography to
p
project humanity?s basest impulses
in
into constructed selves.
Consider his most notorious
w
work, a virtual reality video called
R
Real Violence that caused a furore
w
when it was seen at the Whitney
B
Biennial in New York last year.
S
Spectators put on virtual reality
g
goggles to witness an iPhone video
o
of Wolfson apparently smashing a
b
baseball bat into another man?s face,
th
then stamping on his head.
PHOTOGRAPHS: MARTIN GODWIN FOR THE GUARDIAN; SADIE COLES
HQ DAVID ZWIRNER GALLERY
Victim becomes
aggressor ?
Colored
Sculpture
?
My best shot
?I?m not making
this art ? to make
people happy.
Really, I don?t
care about your
interpretation?
When the spectators removed
their VR headsets, they returned to
a爎eality transfigured by his art ? but
not in a good way. Some critics were
exasperated at Wolfson?s failure to
take a political or moral stance on
the violence in his work. ?His
formalist approach indulges our
culture?s fascination with gore and
death while ignoring its causes and
consequences in the real world,?
wrote Mengna Da on the website
Hyperallergic.
I ask him if he evades
responsibility for the violence in his
art? Wolfson cites the great
Frankfurt School Marxist
philosopher Theodor Adorno. ?I had
this idea from Adorno that to see the
world you need to look at it through
a cracked glass. If you imagined your
day is a piece of string extendin
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