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The Times - 21 November 2017

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November 21 | 2017
You’re looking at
the next Mugabe
The day I met him, by Martin Fletcher
Emmerson
Mnangagwa and
his wife Auxilia
in January
2
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Tuesday November 21 2017 | the times
times2
My encounter
These old buffers know
a thing or two about
keeping women happy
Robert Crampton
I
am no fan of the royal family,
and yet it would have been
churlish not to have offered a
nod of respect to the Duke of
Edinburgh yesterday — partly
on the occasion of his platinum
wedding anniversary, partly
because he’s so damned old,
but mostly because he has reportedly
been bringing Elizabeth a bunch
of flowers each week these seven
decades gone by.
I can’t deny that offering your wife
such a regular and frequent floral
tribute is pretty damned cool. Not
to mention shrewd. Well done, Phil!
I wish I’d done the same. Maybe it’s
not too late to start.
Obviously it helps if you have access
to several massive gardens to source
your bouquet. And a legion of flunkeys
to harvest the blooms on your behalf.
But hey, let’s not quibble, let’s rather
take a moment to salute this exemplar
of uxorious devotion.
It has been a good couple of
days for old buffers in general, as
it happens. And I don’t just mean,
charming as they are, the procession
of delightful gents who have been
turning up on the telly, having also
managed to stay alive and married
for 70 years. On the other side of
the world, out in the not-at-all-fake
Australian jungle, Stanley Johnson, 77,
who is starring in the new series of I’m
Caution!
Man with
tree ahead
Vaguely Recognisable, Reasonably
Cheap and Most Importantly, Available,
Get Me Out of Here!, has also been
playing his part.
Yes indeed. Stanley (ex-MEP, father
to Boris) has been wowing social
media with his old-school chivalry.
Showing rather more political acumen
than that demonstrated by his
celebrated son of late, Stanley has
proved himself a model of good
manners. Clearly desperate to win
(and conveniently packing a fair few
personal pounds in reserve), Stan the
Man decided to donate his meagre
food rations to a female competitor.
“If women are happy,” Johnson père
intoned, “then men are happy too.”
The phrase caught my attention.
Whatever Stanley’s crowd-pleasing
motives might be, he’s not wrong.
In fact, he’s bang on the money. Not
only in the context of knowing that a
majority of his viewers (and therefore
voters) are female.
Because it’s true, chaps, isn’t it?
If the women — mums, partners,
daughters, teachers, bosses — in our
lives are tickety-boo, then we pretty
much are too, right? Whether their
contentment results from getting a
bunch of flowers, or some extra scoff
on reality TV or, more likely, total
agreement with everything they say,
their good mood tends to engender
similar wellbeing in our souls. That’s
certainly my experience.
Watching Ted, the ninetysomething
bloke on breakfast telly yesterday
morning, agreeing with everything
that his darling wife of seven decades
had to say, I didn’t doubt that
capitulation is the best recipe
for a successful marriage.
Conversely, when men are unhappy,
women tend to be unhappy too. Often
desperately so.
As for whether when men are
happy, women are too, I’m not so sure.
I was watching the rugby with my son
on Saturday, the two of us side by side
on the sofa, curtains drawn, drinking
beer and eating crisps, just about as
close to heaven as any chaps can be.
I couldn’t help but notice that my
wife (and his mother) interrupted
us 14 times, each time scowling more
thunderously than the last, asking
when it was going to finish.
Ah well. I guess it’s all a matter
of priorities.
I can’t help but giggle
at the tale of the chap
in Germany who,
having treated himself
to a massive Christmas
tree, then caused a trail
of destruction carting it
away. The oversized
branches, sticking
every which way from
this guy’s car, merrily
smacked into road
signs, festively terrified
oncoming motorists
and joyously took a
chunk out of a bridge
as the blithely unaware
driver convivially drove
his trophy home.
Still, you’ve got to
admire his style, nein?
Mind you, he’s gone
a bit early. Let’s hope
he opted for non-drop
The most feared man in the country,
Emmerson Mnangagwa, is set to become
the next Zimbabwean president. He gave
a rare interview to Martin Fletcher
Black
Friday is a
big swizz
I’ve always suspected
that Black Friday,
which is almost upon
us, is a bit of a swizz.
It being the day when,
post-Thanksgiving
and pre-Christmas,
retailers start to punt
so-called bargains at
crazy low, low prices to
get us all in the mood.
According to research,
it turns out that six
out of every ten deals
offered on Black Friday
in 2016 were available
more cheaply at other
periods of the year.
Well knock me
down with a feather.
I’m shocked that
early 21st-century
capitalism should
attempt to deceive
potential customers
in such a way.
It wasn’t cynicism
that first alerted me
to Black Friday,
however, it was its
confusing, crappy,
utterly misleading
name, the colour black
followed by a day of
the week having
traditionally been used
to denote disaster,
usually of a financial
nature. Not a good
selling point. Alarm
bells started to ring.
I know blue has
connotations (despair),
as does yellow
(cowardice), red
(indebtedness) and
green (naivety), but
even so, black is a
poor choice. I’d have
gone for purple.
needles. I reckon a
fortnight before the big
day is the optimum
time to ship in the tree.
Once, succumbing
to intolerable juvenile
pressure, my wife
and I agreed to three
weeks. Poor call!
Damned thing was
stone-cold dead with
several days still to go.
I
am in the ante-room of
Emmerson Mnangagwa’s office
on the sixth floor of the Justice
Ministry in central Harare. I am
about to interview the vicepresident of Zimbabwe — Robert
Mugabe’s brutal chief enforcer
for the past 36 years and the
most feared man in the country. I am
acutely conscious of the warning I was
recently given by a source who knows
Mnangagwa well: “They don’t call him
‘the crocodile’ for nothing. He never
says a word, but suddenly he bites.
He’s very dangerous.”
I am already apprehensive, but one
of Mnangagwa’s aides then makes
matters a whole lot worse. He asks
whether I have got the accreditation
that foreign journalists must have to
work in Zimbabwe. I do not, and I
know that in years past many of my
colleagues have been locked up in
filthy Zimbabwean prisons for
breaching that regulation.
Salvation comes from an unlikely
source. Mnangagwa chooses that very
moment to open his office door and
summon me in. I am rescued — at
least for now.
One year on, I find that I am sitting
on something of a scoop. Today
Mnangagwa looks all but certain to
become Zimbabwe’s next president,
and I am one of the very few western
journalists to have interviewed him.
Mnangagwa has been yoked to
Mugabe since the early 1960s, when
the future president came to teach in
his village in central Zimbabwe and
persuaded the teenager to join the war
against white minority rule.
He trained as a guerilla in Egypt and
China, was arrested for blowing up a
locomotive near the Victoria Falls and
escaped execution only because he
was under 21. He instead served ten
years in prison, three of them in
solitary confinement. He was
electrocuted, hung upside down from
meat hooks, and beaten so badly that
he was rendered deaf in his left ear.
Mugabe, who is 18 years his senior,
was in the same prison. He helped
Mnangagwa to pass his O and A
levels. After his release Mnangagwa
trained as a lawyer in Zambia. After
independence he served as security
minister in Mugabe’s first government.
He was accused of involvement in
the worst excesses of Mugabe’s
increasingly dictatorial rule from
that point on.
He is widely suspected of
orchestrating the Gukurahundi
massacre of 20,000 Ndebele civilians
in the early 1980s. A UN report
accused him of plundering diamonds
from the Democratic Republic of
Congo when Zimbabwean troops
intervened in that country’s civil war
in the 1990s. He supported the violent
seizure of white-owned farms in the
early 2000s and is believed to have
masterminded Mugabe’s savage theft
of the 2008 presidential election,
during which hundreds of opposition
supporters were killed.
When Mnangagwa stood for
parliament in the town of Kwekwe in
2000 thugs poured petrol over his
opponent, Blessing Chebundo, who
saved himself from immolation only
by clinging to one of his assailants;
Chebundo’s home was torched instead.
In 2002 Mnangagwa seized a farm
near Kwekwe, forcing the owner, Koos
Burger, to seek asylum in America.
Today Mnangagwa is said to control
the lucrative gold trade in his home
region, the Midlands, where he is
known as “the godfather”. Mnangagwa
denies such accusations.
I had visited Zimbabwe several times
as Mugabe’s repression increased, and
Zimbabwe’s economy collapsed, during
the 2000s, but I never thought of
seeking an interview with the
shadowy, sinister Mnangagwa. In
I was not serving
to be president.
I was serving
my country
those days western journalists slipped
into the country incognito and worked
clandestinely, fearful of arrest.
However, by the time of my last
visit, this time last year, the situation
had begun to change. A vicious battle
to succeed Mugabe had erupted within
Zanu-PF, the ruling party.
Mnangagwa’s “Lacoste” faction, which
was named after the clothing
company’s crocodile emblem and
consisted of senior party members
who had fought in the liberation
struggle, was at war with the “young
Turks” of the so-called G40
(Generation 40) faction, which was
aligned with Mugabe’s intensely
ambitious and avaricious wife, Grace.
I was given a secret nine-page
document that revealed just how
savage that internecine contest had
become. Emanating from
Mnangagwa’s camp, it accused G40 of
seeking to commit “political
euthanasia” against the party’s
founders and set out a plan to defeat it
through “brutal character
assassination” and fomenting “fights
and chaos” within its ranks.
That bitter generational split
presented a rare opportunity for
journalists such as myself. It offered
the possibility of playing one side off
against the other, of gaining access
to senior members of what had been
one of the world’s most secretive
political parties. The ultimate prize,
of course, would be an interview
with Mnangagwa, who had rarely
spoken to the western media.
Sources in Harare had told me that
Mnangagwa was more pragmatic and
the times | Tuesday November 21 2017
3
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times2
with Zimbabwe’s brutal enforcer
COVER: JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/GETTY. BELOW: REUTERS; EPA
“I don’t know what a reformer is. I
do what is correct for my country,”
he replies.
He defends the farm seizures, but
acknowledges that they could have
been handled better: “There was no
textbook on how to distribute land.”
He insists in the face of abundant
evidence to the contrary that
Zimbabwe holds free and fair elections
every five years; those who say
otherwise “are fed by a media that’s
against us, a media which is intended
to change the system here”. He sees no
need for political reform because “we
have done what we wanted. The
British denied us one man, one vote.
They denied us human rights.”
It is only when I allude to the dire
state of Zimbabwe’s economy that
Mnangagwa begins to deviate from
the official line. He admits that it is
“shrunken”. He talks of the need for
foreign investment, to tackle the
“scourge of corruption”, to restore
Zimbabwe’s agricultural base and bring
back the professionals — black and
white — who have fled the country.
Finally he utters the words I am
hoping for. He tells me: “Capital goes
where it feels comfortable and warm,
and if it’s cold it runs to a country
which gives it better weather.”
Mugabe, an avowed Marxist, would
never have said such a thing. It is a
tacit acknowledgement of the need to
restore the rule of law so that investors
and financial institutions return.
The rest of the interview is more
personal. I ask about Mnangagwa’s
imprisonment, and he tells me: “My
torture was so bad that if I talk about
less ideological than Mugabe and
understood the need for economic
reform if only so he could pay the
security forces on which Zanu-PF’s
survival depended.
“Mnangagwa is a brutal man,” said
one. “He’s been involved in butchery
and pillaging. But there’s no question
in my mind that he’s pushing to
reform Zimbabwe’s economy and
fighting against the inertia of Robert
Mugabe, who believes any change is
dangerous.”
I put out feelers during a meeting
with Christopher Mutsvangwa,
Mnangagwa’s unofficial mouthpiece
and leader of the “war veterans” who
had seized those white-owned farms
in the 2000s. A few days later I
was summoned to a meeting with
a member of Mnangagwa’s
family in an elegant house in
central Harare, owned by a
white businessman with
close ties to the regime.
The purpose was to size
me up. I explained that I was
writing an article for the New
Statesman magazine on what would
happen when Mugabe died. I argued
that the president was old and frail,
that sooner or later Mnangagwa would
probably succeed him, and that this
was a chance for the international
community to learn more about him,
his political views and how Zimbabwe
might change under his leadership. I
suggested that he would need
financial support from the
international community when he
took over so this was a chance for him
to send a discreet message to the world.
Grace Mugabe and
Emmerson Mnangagwa
in February last year.
Below: Robert Mugabe
at a rally in November
The relative engaged in a little spin
of his own. In an apparent attempt to
soften Mnangagwa’s image he claimed
that he was one of the government’s
poorest ministers because he was not
corrupt. He said Mnangagwa never
took holidays and relaxed only by
spending time on his farm, where he
delighted in breaking crop-production
records. He was a Methodist, a
Chelsea fan who loved watching
football on television and a father of
nine children by two wives, the first of
whom died of cancer. One of his sons
was a popular Harare disc jockey
known as St Emmo; another was a
second lieutenant in Mugabe’s
presidential guard.
I heard nothing more for several
days. Finally, Mnangagwa’s relative
summoned me back to the
businessman’s office. From there we
drove in a shiny, black four-wheeldrive to the justice ministry
(Mnangagwa was at that stage justice
minister as well as vice-president).
Before I knew it I was sitting in
a deep leather armchair in a light
and spacious office, facing “the
crocodile” across a table.
Smartly dressed in a light grey
suit and mauve tie, at 75
Mnangagwa is still powerfully built.
He has slightly hooded eyes. He
speaks softly, but does not smile
and exudes a faint air of menace.
“I will give you 15 minutes,” he says.
Mnangagwa will say nothing that
hints at his ambition to succeed
Mugabe because that would be
political suicide. He denies any
involvement in a succession battle,
calling it a media myth and insisting:
“I have no issue with G40. You have
never found me talking against them.”
When I suggest that his long record
of loyal service would make him
Mugabe’s natural successor he replies:
“I don’t see myself doing that. I was
not serving to be president. I was
serving my country.” He refuses even
to contemplate Mugabe’s death,
saying: “Under British constitutional
law you don’t conceive or desire the
demise of Your Majesty. Why would
you conceive or desire the demise of
my president?”
I ask if he has a political idol. “My
president,” he dutifully replies.
My limbs are still intact, so I pluck
up courage and ask about his portrayal
as the president’s henchman in the
west. “I have nothing to do with the
west. I am a Zimbabwean,” he retorts.
What about the Gukurahundi
massacre, I persist. He denies any
responsibility. “Our cabinet is about
36 ministers,” he snaps. “How do I
become the enforcer? During
Gukurahundi we had a president. We
had a minister of defence. We had a
commander of the army and I was
none of that. My enemies are
attacking me left and right and that’s
what you are buying.”
I try again. Why is he called “the
crocodile”? It is the name of a gang
he led during the liberation war, he
explains. Does he mind the moniker?
“This ‘crocodile’ thing has been
so used by the media that I don’t
even fight it.”
I adopt a new tack. I ask if he is a
reformer. He continues to stonewall.
Mnangagwa is a
brutal man. He’s
been involved
in butchery
it I relive it, and my tears come down.”
I ask about Chelsea, and he explains:
“There was a guy called [Didier]
Drogba. That’s why I support Chelsea.
Now that he’s left I don’t know what to
do. He was just my idol.”
As he poses rather stiffly for some
photographs — he is not a “media
person”, he protests — I find myself
thinking that with Morgan Tsvangirai,
the leader of the opposition Movement
for Democratic Change, afflicted by
cancer, Mnangagwa may for now be
the best that Zimbabwe can hope for.
He is sharp, savvy and economically
literate, and while he will not restore
true democracy, or loosen Zanu-PF’s
steely grip on power, he may restore a
measure of economic sanity to his
starving, jobless, broken land.
After 50 minutes I escape from the
crocodile’s tank. I hurry through the
ante-room before any of Mnangagwa’s
aides can stop me. Back at my car, I
conceal my tape recorder in case I’m
stopped. I drive directly to the airport,
checking my rear-view mirror. Only as
my plane takes off three hours later do
I begin to relax.
Martin Fletcher’s assignment in
Zimbabwe was financed by the
Pulitzer Centre on Crisis Reporting
4
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Tuesday November 21 2017 | the times
body&soul
Is owning a dog
really that good
for your health?
Dr Mark Porter
The right way
GETTY IMAGES
I
f, like me, you are a dog owner
then you are likely to be pleased
by new research suggesting that
your pet may help to protect
against an early heart attack
or a stroke. If you live alone
then the benefits are even more
pronounced. So are dogs really
that good for our health?
The Swedish study, published
in the online journal Scientific
Reports, compared the incidence of
cardiovascular disease in 3.5 million
middle-aged and elderly people over
a 12-year period and found that it was
significantly lower in households who
owned a dog. It is not the first study
suggesting that owning a pet (not just
a dog) is good for us.
A 2005 review of available evidence
in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)
pointed to a lower use of GP services
by pet owners as well as a reduced
risk of asthma and better physical and
psychological wellbeing among the
elderly. Like the Swedish study, it
found an apparent protective effect
against cardiovascular disease, and
surprisingly this extended to better
survival rates among owners who did
have a heart attack.
Nothing stands still in medicine and,
unfortunately, over the past ten years
more recent research — with the
notable exception of this latest study
— has failed to confirm these benefits,
although it has turned up others,
Which parts of the country
are going to the dogs?
0 The RSPCA estimates that there
are about 8.5 million dogs and
8 million cats in the UK.
0 Surveys suggest that the
proportion of the population
with a dog is highest in Northern
Ireland (40 per cent) and the East
Midlands (34 per cent). It is lowest
in London (10 per cent) and the east
of England (14 per cent).
0 Cat ownership is highest in the
southwest (21 per cent) and lowest
in the northeast (12 per cent) and
Scotland (15 per cent).
including less absenteeism from school
in children with pets.
When evidence conflicts like this
I generally assume that if there is an
effect in the real world then it is small
and unlikely to be that significant.
I am also uncomfortable with the leap
that appears to have been made from
association to causation.
While I am happy to believe the
Swedish data (it is the largest study of
its kind that I am aware of), even the
team behind it is quick to point out
that its work stops short of proving
that dogs exert beneficial physiological
changes that may explain the reduced
risk. Or, as an old professor of mine
was fond of saying, umbrella sales may
be closely correlated to bad weather,
but buying one won’t increase the
chances of it raining.
While researchers always try to
adjust for confounding factors that
could skew results, it is impossible
to adjust for everything. Could it be,
for example, that there is something
different about people who own
dogs and that it is this difference that
accounts for their lower rates of heart
attack and stroke? The authors of the
BMJ review seemed content that there
was no significant social difference
between the 50 per cent of households
who owned a pet and the other half
who did not. However, that doesn’t fit
with my experience as a GP.
Patients of mine who live in
bedsits and flats in towns, sheltered
accommodation or care homes
are much less likely to have a dog
— or any pet for that matter — than
those living in more affluent and/or
rural locations. And, dog or no
dog, that strikes me as a big
enough demographic difference
to have significant implications
for long-term health.
Let’s assume, though, a causal
relationship and that dogs really are
good for your health — how might
they exert this protective effect?
Well, theories vary depending on
whom you ask. Heart specialists
point to extra exercise. Psychologists
favour happiness, reduced stress
and companionship (combatting
loneliness), while some microbiologists
think that it might be to do with
altering the friendly bacteria — the
microbiome — that live in our guts.
Who knows? It may well be a
combination of all these mechanisms,
to which I would add: responsibility.
In the absence of our children (who
have left home to forge their own
lives) our three-year-old golden
retriever, Sid, has become the apple of
my paternalistic eye and, as happens
to most of us when we become
parents, he makes me behave more
responsibly. Indeed, being a parent
is in itself associated with increased
longevity (parents tend to live longer
than childless couples). Perhaps pet
ownership works in a similar way.
You can read more about the
Swedish research, and form your
own opinion, at nature.com/articles/
s41598-017-16118-6.epdf
QA
I have just
turned 55 and
have been
invited to have
a camera test
for bowel cancer
screening.
While I am keen
to take up the
offer for medical
reasons I am
put off by the
idea. What
can I expect?
You and me both;
I am waiting for
my invite too. You
should have received
literature outlining the
procedure, but here is
what you need to know.
Preliminary results
suggest that this new
“bowel scope” test
(which is being rolled
out across England)
will prevent one case
of cancer of the colon
for every 150 people
screened, and prevent
one death from the
disease for every
300 screened.
Neither the test nor
the enema that you will
require beforehand is
particularly pleasant,
but the thought is
generally worse than
the reality. Most people
sail through the test,
with 80 per cent saying
that they felt no pain,
or just mild discomfort.
Perhaps more
worrying is that the test
is not foolproof, so if
you have been screened
it does not mean that
you can afford to ignore
worrying symptoms
such as a prolonged
change in bowel habit
or rectal bleeding.
There is also a very
small chance of the
scope perforating the
bowel, although this
happened in only 1 in
30,000 cases during
the pilot studies.
If you have a health
problem, email
drmarkporter@
thetimes.co.uk
Get down and
A scientific study has revealed that the
best exercise you can do for health is
the standard press-up. Peta Bee on the
easy way to build up to one — or two
W
hat is the
ultimate
barometer
of fitness?
Researchers
set out to
answer that
question
nearly a decade ago, when they began
tracking more than 80,000 adults in
England and Scotland, calculating
their life expectancy according to their
choice of strength-boosting exercise
and how often they performed it.
Emmanuel Stamatakis, an associate
professor at the University of Sydney
and the lead author of the study,
compared various workouts, from gym
circuits using machines to simpler
exercises people did at home. The
results, published in the American
Journal of Epidemiology, reveal that
those participants who worked out at
home twice a week for a total of 50
minutes had a 23 per cent reduction in
their risk of premature death by any
means and a 31 per cent reduction in
cancer-related death — the same as
exercisers who spent 60 minutes a
week heaving weights. The humble
press-up, it found, was as effective as
the most high-tech gym workout.
Fads such as kettlebells and
vibrating platforms come and go, but
because of the press-up’s remarkable
muscle-boosting capabilities, it remains
a stalwart of the workout world. “Its
appeal is that it can be challenging
whatever your level of fitness,” says
Lara Milward, a personal trainer who
has worked with Sam and Holly
Branson and Natalie Imbruglia.
“Lifting and lowering your entire
weight is hard work, even for the very
fit,” she adds.
It’s easy to think of the press-up as
solely a chest and arm-toning exercise,
but there is no single exercise that
challenges the body in the same way,
engaging muscles in the trunk, chest,
arms, hips and legs.
“The pectoralis major muscles in
your chest, the anterior deltoids in
your back and the triceps in your arms
all engage to create the push part of
it,” says Rachel Glew, a strength
trainer for Life Fitness. “But the rectus
abdominis, obliques and erector spinae
muscles of your core, your glutes and
the quadriceps at the front of your
thighs all play a stabilising role too.”
A test of mental and physical
strength, it’s a brute of an exercise that
requires your body to maintain the
tautness of a plank as your arms
buckle through the strain of lowering
and lifting your body. Do it often
enough and it will prolong your life.
It’s because press-ups are so hard
that the number you can do and how
the times | Tuesday November 21 2017
5
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body&soul
GETTY IMAGES
The hard way
How to do
the perfect
press-up
If this press-up, left, is too difficult for you, then try one of the easier “progressions”,
below. If you want to really test yourself, however, then try feet-elevated push-ups, above
1
Lie on the floor face down
with palms beneath your
shoulders and balls of your
feet touching the ground, legs
extended and body straight.
Place a shoe or slipper
beneath your chest.
2
Grip the floor with your
hands, driving the flat palms
downwards as you push up.
As you rise, your elbows
should rotate so that they are
perpendicular to your body.
Squeeze your armpits to keep
your arms in position.
3
At this point, your head and
neck should form a straight
diagonal line with your body
and legs. Squeeze your
buttocks together as hard as
possible to remove the stress
from your spine.
4
Pressing your ankles together
means that the muscles in
your legs will be fully
activated.
5
Resist tucking in your chin or
looking up and ahead of you.
Think about pulling your
shoulders down and away
from your ears.
6
Begin to lower your torso
back down by bending your
elbows. Do not lead with your
nose, but with your chest, and
descend until you feel your
chest touch the shoe or
slipper. Imagine pulling
yourself to the floor, using
your upper back muscles to
control the movement.
7
8
Inhale deeply as you lower,
exhale powerfully as you rise
back up.
The easy way
give us ten for a longer life
you perform them are something to
boast about. There’s an upward curve
of push-up accomplishment; at the top
are the show-offs who can do them
clapping at the climax of every push
or with their legs raised off the floor.
At the bottom are those — the
majority — who can’t manage one,
their arms buckling under the strain
of their body weight. Glew says it’s not
unusual for people to collapse after a
single repetition. “If you aren’t strong
enough, the lower part of your body
can become disconnected, resulting
in the back, hips and core dropping,”
she says. Before you know it, you are
face to the floor.
Still, if the regular press-up proves
too difficult, there are what trainers
kindly term “progressions” — easy
options to you and me. Start by
leaning against the kitchen worktop at
45 degrees and press up and down. Or,
says Richard Blagrove, a researcher at
Birmingham City University’s school
of health sciences, “you can reduce the
proportion of your body weight you
are trying to move by placing your
knees on the ground. Moving your
knees even closer to your chest
shortens the lever, so makes it even
easier.” You can also build up by doing
them at the bottom of the stairs —
keep your feet on the floor and put
your hands on gradually lower steps
before finally moving to the floor and
testing yourself with the full version.
Never cheat. It won’t do your
muscles or your reputation any good.
“People often lower their head, not
their chest, to the ground, which is not
how you should do it,” Blagrove says.
“Look at a spot on the ground about a
metre in front of you to eliminate a
nosedive as you lower yourself
Lifting and
lowering
your entire
weight is
hard work,
even for
the fit
towards the floor.” He suggests placing
a shoe or slipper beneath your chest
and descending until you feel your
chest touch it to stop yourself
skimping on the range of movement.
To keep your core and gluteal muscles
contracted Glew recommends visual
cues such as “imagining there’s a £10
note between your buttocks and you
need to ensure it won’t drop out”.
How many press-ups you should do
depends on how much of a seasoned
press-upper you are. Fitness industry
guidelines suggest the number of reps
(see panel right), but start small.
Dr BJ Fogg, a psychologist and
researcher at Stanford University in
California, advocates tiny adjustments
to add exercise into existing habits. It
worked for him — he built up to more
than 100 daily press-ups by starting
with a commitment to perform two
full press-ups every time he went to
the toilet. Glew suggests choosing a
trigger, such as one press-up every
time your phone rings or three
between each advert break on TV, to
help to integrate the exercise into your
everyday routine.
Press-ups can become addictive —
if you google the exercise, you’ll
discover a world of inspiration, from
the 21-day push-up to 100 push-ups
challenges, all promising to transform
your body. Some can’t resist
employing increasingly elaborate
techniques. You’ve probably seen the
buff brigade performing one-legged
press-ups (said to engage the core
more effectively), wide-arm press-ups
(to work the shoulders) and Superman
press-ups (alternating knee out to
elbow as you lower your chest towards
the floor), but even they have not
reached the press-up pinnacle.
In 2015 Spanish researchers asked
subjects to perform press-ups on the
floor, a wobbleboard, a stability or
Bosu disk (a half-dome with a flat
surface) or a fitness ball, or with a
TRX suspension trainer that suspends
your feet in straps a few inches off the
floor. While there were no differences
in activation of the shoulder muscles
whether the press-up was performed
on the floor or with one of the
instability devices, the activation of
muscles in the core, lower back and
leg muscles was significantly higher
when the equipment was used. And
press-ups on the TRX outperformed
all others when it came to leg and
lower-back strengthening.
Meanwhile, another study, in The
Journal of Strength & Conditioning
Research, showed that using a
resistance band across your arms
during press-ups replicated the
muscle-building effect of performing
bench-presses with weights.
Yet given the results of the
University of Sydney study, it’s just as
good for your long-term health if you
keep things simple. “The majority of
us don’t need to do them daily,”
Milward says. “Including some pressups with other body-weight strength
exercises such as squats and lunges
two to four times a week is sufficient.”
Keep them up, though. “One of the
earliest motor-development patterns
we learn as babies is to push ourselves
up from the ground,” Glew says. “And
the exercise is dubbed ‘a functional
movement’ because pushing in either
a horizontal or vertical direction is a
skill we should be able to perform at
any age across a broad range of our
activities of everyday life. There’s no
age limit to the press-up.”
Stay controlled at the bottom
of the movement. Don’t allow
your muscles to relax — think
of your body as a strong, solid
unit and prepare to push
again.
How many
should you do?
The YMCA’s guidelines for how
many press-ups you should be able
to do in one go:
Ages
Men
Women
17-19
19 to 34
11 to 20
20-29
17 to 29
12 to 22
30-39
13 to 24
10 to 21
40-49
11 to 20
8 to 17
50-59
9 to 17
7 to 14
60-65
6 to 16
5 to 12
6
Tuesday November 21 2017 | the times
1G T
times2
Help! Can anyone
solve our mystery
rodent problem?
It was supposed to be the dream home — then one
night Gemma Evans woke to the sound of scratching
I
have a clean house. It’s
important that you know this
because over the next few
minutes you’re going to make
judgments about my home —
starting from the moment I tell
you that we share it with rodents
and maggots. It hasn’t always
been like this. We’ve lived in our house
for nearly a year — the rodents for
about half that time.
As with many newlyweds, the
possibility of the pitter-patter of tiny
feet entered our thoughts when we
returned from our honeymoon in the
summer. Except in our case the tiny
feet were furry. We would regularly be
woken in the early hours by loud
scampering and knocking coming
from the inside of our bedroom walls
and ceiling. Our house is detached,
connected to the others only by the
garages, so we knew that the racket
was not coming from our neighbours.
I asked Twitter whether the sounds
might have been a poltergeist and got
some more sensible suggestions: birds,
squirrels, rats and mice all made the
list. I googled furiously for solutions
and ended up buying six ultrasonic
electronic pest-repellent devices to
plug into sockets all over the house.
Nothing changed with our creepy
night-time disturbances, except the
constant flashing lights on the new
plug-in devices were keeping us awake
too. We called a local pest-control
service. That’s when we met Colin.
I pictured
furry pests
nestled in
our new
crockery
Colin wears khaki fatigues and
drives a small van full of chemicals
and traps. He shoots squirrels — and
eats the meat. “You should try it,” he
later told me.
Colin’s early estimate of our
predicament was that we had rats or
mice breeding inside our wall cavity.
“The thing about rats is they mate like
crazy,” he said, while scanning the
walls. “I can’t find where they’re
getting in, though,” he said, sharing
our frustration.
Without an identifiable entry point,
the only way to deal with the rats or
mice, in Colin’s expert view, was to lay
some poison outside, but I felt sorry
for the little furry pests. “What if we
just leave them be?” I asked.
“That’s what Trevor in Staines did,”
Colin said. “Two weeks later, mice had
taken over his home. They were even
inside his dishwasher.”
I pictured little furry faces looking
up at me, nestled between the new
crockery set we had been given as a
wedding gift. We reluctantly decided
to go ahead with the poisoning.
The noises stopped for a few weeks,
but soon came back. This time they
were noisier, so loud in fact that I
recorded them on my phone as proof.
“It must be a new family,” Colin said,
now believing it was mice, not rats.
Colin began drilling holes into our
ceiling and inserting poisonous foam
through tubes and squirting devices
into our wall cavity. “Won’t that just
Gemma Evans
leave dead bodies in our walls?” my
husband asked.
Colin said: “Mice don’t smell when
they die.” Apparently, it’s to do with
the small amount of moisture in their
bodies. The saga made me sad for all
involved, especially the poor mice.
I continued researching other ways
to manage the problem, but some
pest-control companies told us that
because we hadn’t seen a mouse or rat
in our home and it was just a constant
noise disturbance they wouldn’t help
us. It felt as if we were forever being
told we had a “tricky” case. I decided
to talk to the neighbours about it —
perhaps they could tell us if our
previous owners had rodent problems.
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the times | Tuesday November 21 2017
7
1G T
times2
CIRCE HAMILTON FOR THE TIMES
maggots in the bathroom. They’re
falling from the ceiling.”
We quickly rang our new pest team,
but they couldn’t get to us. We tried
Colin, but he was away (shooting
squirrels, I imagined). We tried several
“emergency” pest-control operatives,
but not one could come out to help.
It seemed we had a dead rodent in
our walls and its corpse was slowly
being consumed by maggots that were
boldly venturing out, covering our
toothbrushes and washbasin.
The next week the sixth pest-control
technician to enter our house-ofhorrors arrived to check the squirrel
traps in our loft and on the roof.
Simon told me he was a senior
technician who tended to get sent to
the cases that other technicians have
struggled to deal with.
He climbed into the attic and paced
around the house, the garage and
along the side alley. The traps were
empty. I followed him, recounting the
story of the past five months, playing
him the noise recordings from my
phone and nervously asking him what
his assessment was. “I think you’ve got
rats and they’re coming in from the
sewer. They’ve been in the loft —
there’s rat poo up there.”
So it wasn’t squirrels, after all?
“Squirrels are territorial, they won’t
share the space with rats.”
What about mice? “You’re not dirty
enough for mice. They need to be
close to food.”
I asked him if the rats would ever
come through the walls and start
running wild inside our house. “I’m
not going to lie to you,” he said. I
We’ve spent
£1,000 and still
don’t know what
is plaguing us
Approaching the ethical Buddhists
over the road wasn’t the best start to
my ground-level investigations. They
told me that our former owner once
had a squirrel in the attic and that
they were very disapproving of his
methods to get rid of it. My
understanding was that the ethical
Buddhist couple had rescued a baby
squirrel caught up in the drama and
reared it in their home.
A couple of days later we knocked at
the house next door and discovered
they had a rodent problem too. “We
think it’s squirrels,” Tom said. It turned
out that they had been dealing with
similar noises to ours.
We joined forces and called in a new
pest-control team that, to judge from
its website, had specialist experience
with squirrels. Traps were fitted to our
roofs, guttering and fencing. The pest
controllers told us that squirrels have
to be caught before any holes are
closed, or they realise they are trapped
and “go crazy”, destroying anything
and everything in their path.
With our newly formed neighbourly
friendships and a pest-control team
that seemed to have a confident plan I
started to feel as if we would finally
crack this. Then things got grim. One
Sunday morning I was woken up by
the sound of gushing tap water.
Walking out to the hallway I saw my
husband hurrying out of the
bathroom. He looked at me as though
he were about to tell me something he
really didn’t want to. “We’ve got
gulped. “If they want to get through
your 12mm plasterboard walls, they
will. But it’s unlikely they’d want to.”
He said that the best way to deal with
a rat is to walk behind it and guide it
out of the front door.
It sounded very civilised. “I’ve only
ever been attacked by rats twice. And
one of those was because it saw me kill
its buddy,” Simon said. He talked me
through his plan to put bait in the
drains outside and see if the rats took
it — if they did, we would know that
the sewer system was their entry point.
Simon returned ten days later to
find the bait in our drains untouched
and the traps in our attic still empty.
He scratched his head and began
discussing the prospect of a “smoke
test” to find out how the rodents are
getting in. It involves flooding our
inner networks with smoke and
watching where it escapes, but he
warned me it would be expensive.
Until this point, the saga had cost us
more than £1,000 in pest-control fees
and we still didn’t know which type of
rodent has been plaguing us or where
their entry hole might be.
The rodent crisis has at least served
as a great way to get to know our
neighbours. I wondered if we should
invite them all over for Christmas
drinks, if all the pest talk doesn’t put
them off their mince pies.
Even as I type this, I can hear our
furry lodgers scurrying around with
only thin plasterboard between us.
Their little ears must be burning.
All Gwyneth wants for
Christmas is a £6,000 canoe
By Hilary Rose
N
ot yet December and
already we bring you
glad tidings of great
joy. Nothing to do
with baby Jesus,
I’m afraid, but the
annual festival of
shooting fish in
a barrel that is Gwyneth Paltrow’s
Goop gift guide. Goodness, what a
lot of fish there are to shoot. Showing
unsuspected levels of self-awareness,
Paltrow — the woman who brought
us conscious uncoupling and vaginal
steaming — has this year called her
guide The Ridiculous, But Awesome
Gift Guide.
She isn’t wrong about the ridiculous
bit. How else to describe a $16,500
(£12,500) spa-at-home floatation tank?
This will, they promise, bestow on you
all the benefits of flotation therapy in
the privacy of your home, presumably
in much the same way as a bath. Not
convinced that you need one? How
about an old canoe then? You’re
bound to need one of those (who
doesn’t?) and it’s the ideal way of
filling huge areas of empty floor space
that we all have in our vast homes. It
is true that Paltrow describes it not as
an old boat, but as an “antique French
canoe and oars”, but whatever you
call it, it’ll cost you $7,995 (£6,000).
Many of us have already put
a private tropical island on our
Christmas lists, but for slackers it’s
Gwynnie to the rescue with an island
in Belize for $6 million. This is, she
writes, “the gift of complete and total
solitude”. The AP Collection stuffedanimal flamingo chair defies any
description except “silly”. Covered in
flamingos, it appears to the untutored
eye — mine — to be a very expensive
chair that you can’t actually sit in,
unless you want a flamingo’s beak
somewhere it has no business going.
The personal yellow submarine should
surely have “must buy!” stamped on it,
ditto the chocolate-cutting machine,
although cynics, and those of us
possessed of hands, may question the
need for a chocolate-cutting machine.
For the fashionistas in your life
there’s a sparkly novelty clutch in the
£12,500
£6,000
A flamingo
chair, a
canoe and
a floatation
tank from
Gwyneth
Paltrow’s
gift guide
shape of a packet of takeaway French
fries. It’s guaranteed to raise a laugh —
So witty! So chic! — among those of
your friends with $5,695 to spend
on such a thing. They are probably
the same people who want Father
Christmas to bring them a $14,000
Pilates reformer machine, or
something called a “rose gold
champagne tumbler”. In spite of the
description, I’m not entirely sure what
this might be. The thing it most closely
resembles is a lampshade. If
it’s designed for drinking champagne,
then it’s definitely everything you
don’t want in a champagne glass:
squat, opaque and made of metal.
All I can do is take them at their
word and assume that Paltrow
is recommending we drink
champagne out of a tumbler
made of rose
gold that costs $2,590.
Then again, she is also
recommending we
clean our teeth with a
tortoiseshell toothbrush
that
has silk bristles.
t
Happily, elsewhere
in her guide Paltrow
diversifies her suggestions
beyond the preposterous
and stupid — sorry, slip
of the tongue, ridiculous
and awesome. There are
matcha-tasting workshops, for
example, a comparative bargain
at $70. Or you could give the gift
of a blueberry subscription box.
Subscribing to blueberries
is blowing my mind so
comprehensively that you’ll have
to give me a moment to compose
myself. For $500 a year, a
blueberry
farmer in Maine will
b
send you a 5lb box of blueberries
every month. Yes, if you wanted
some blueberries you could go to
the supermarket and buy them, but
ask yourself this: would that
be an awesome gift? Would it be
ridiculous? It would not.
8
1G T
Tuesday November 21 2017 | the times
arts
‘When people forgot I was a star . .
At the age of 57
Royal Ballet legend
Irek Mukhamedov
is returning to
the stage, he tells
Sarah Crompton
A
t the end of the day
there are two men
in a rehearsal studio
at the top of the
Royal Opera House.
Outside the
corridors are dark.
Inside, under bright
fluorescent light, they move across the
space, arms sweeping and carving the
air, legs flicking. One is tall like a
beanpole. The other is not.
They are the choreographer Arthur
Pita and the dancer Irek
Mukhamedov, who is
returning to the
stage at the age of
57, in a new tragicomic solo that
will form part of
the Men in Motion
programme at the
Above: Irek Mukhamedov in the Bolshoi Ballet’s Raymonda in 1985 and,
right, with Viviana Durante in Sylvia in 1994. Below: Mukhamedov in 2013
Coliseum this week. In his prime
Mukhamedov was unquestionably one
of the greatest dancers of the
20th century, with a powerful,
attacking jump and an unparalleled
presence. Yet he hasn’t danced
regularly since 2004 and the years
have changed his shape from that of a
svelte prince to rounded middle age.
“I live my life,” he says with a huge,
all-embracing laugh. “When you stop
dancing the body is relaxed, the mind
is relaxed. There’s no more pressure
to be all the time ready for action. I
enjoy a glass of wine and cheese. I’ve
always enjoyed life.”
On the other hand, as
Pita points out while they
shape the solo,
Mukhamedov has the
virtuoso’s
instinct to show
v
off. From the moment he
came
to fame with the
c
Bolshoi
Ballet, soaring
B
through
the air as the
t
youngest
Spartacus to date,
y
to
t his performances in the
work
of Kenneth MacMillan
w
at the Royal Ballet,
Mukhamedov
was always able
M
to
t send an electric jolt of power
and passion from the stage to
the
t audience. He was, and is,
the most communicative of performers.
Even now, in early rehearsals, when
the steps are little more than a draft in
his mind, he can suddenly weave
magic, becoming “an old crazy
Russian” remembering his triumphs,
just as the part demands. His pleasure
in making the new piece is as obvious
as the struggle to compel his body to
do exactly what he wants.
The challenge
is too much.
I think I am
getting too old
“I’ve always said I don’t mind dying
on stage dancing,” he says, with
another huge laugh. “When it comes
to the suggestion of new
choreography, I am always for it. I
look forward to challenges, but this
time I have to say the challenge is too
much. I think I am getting too old.
The body is slowly wearing.” He grins
again, the smile spreading across his
expressive face, with its dark eyebrows.
“But everything is interesting.”
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the times | Tuesday November 21 2017
9
1G T
arts
. . that’s when I had a little tantrum’
ROBBIE JACK/GETTY IMAGES; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; MAX MUKHAMEDOV
He is fitting the creation of the new
piece alongside his day job as guest
principal ballet master at English
National Ballet, where he is putting
the dancers through their paces in
Romeo and Juliet and The Nutcracker.
He is much in demand around the
world as a teacher and coach and has
just finished helping to revive The
Judas Tree at the Royal Ballet, a work
created for him by MacMillan. “I love
teaching,” Mukhamedov says. “I prefer
it to anything else. I never wanted
to take everything that I know with
me. I would rather share it. I see
the mistakes and how I can help
particular dancers.”
He has plenty to communicate.
Born in Kazan, of Tatar origin, he
trained at the Moscow Choreographic
Institute and danced with the
Moscow Classical company
before coming to the Bolshoi’s
attention when he won the
Moscow International Ballet
Competition in 1981. His talent and
his willingness to work made him
the favourite of Yuri Grigorovich,
who was the Bolshoi’s director at
the time. “He gave me my name. He
was very important in my life and
career. He was a completely different
man to Kenneth MacMillan. Where
Kenneth was quiet, he can shout and
be strong. He used our bodies. He
never used our minds. If he said, ‘I
need here a jump,’ we jump. ‘I need
here a lift,’ we do that too.”
Mukhamedov still speaks with a
heavy accent, but he has not returned
to his homeland since 2002, when he
went back with the Royal Ballet.
Because he has had a British passport
since his defection in 1990, he wasn’t
even able to get a visa to attend the
funerals of his parents. “I don’t have
nostalgia. Nothing. Sometimes I
wonder why I haven’t been back to
coach at the Bolshoi, but I think I
know the answer. I defected.
When Rudolf Nureyev defected we
all said he was a traitor, so if they
think I am a traitor, of course no one
will invite me back.”
With Michael Nunn
and Durante in The
Judas Tree in 1992
Men in Motion, a
celebration of the
male dancer, is at the
London Coliseum on
November 22 and 23
(londoncoliseum.org,
020 7845 9300)
The reason for his departure was
pragmatic, not political or artistic. The
Soviet Union was collapsing and
Mukhamedov’s wife, Masha, was
pregnant. “We thought that it was
better for the child to be somewhere
else.” That the somewhere else was
London was a stroke of pure luck. He
hadn’t even seen the Royal Ballet
perform when he joined, but the
repertory suited and changed him, and
his bond with MacMillan was instant.
“It was like a revelation,”
Mukhamedov says. “I didn’t mind
what he asked. I was open as a book,
willing for anything, not being afraid
at all.” In the two years they worked
together before MacMillan’s death in
1992, they created two pieces —
Winter Dreams and The Judas Tree —
and Mukhamedov became a famous
interpreter of roles such as Romeo and
Rudolf in Mayerling.
MacMillan taught him that dancing
comes from within. “Eventually I
understood that you had to work from
your psychology, not from your body.
It is you who are Romeo. You are not
playing the role, you become it. Thank
God I met him. He gave me that thirst
to portray real people on stage. That
gives me another challenge — to
understand another person, not just to
be me on stage. That is what
performance is.
“Just to do the steps is not enough.
That’s the difference between dancers
and great dancers, painters
and great painters. You
can see something else
happening. Ballet is an
aart form, not a circus
or a sport. It is better
than sport. But in
an art form
Tamara Rojo
and Mukhamedov
in She Said, 2016
the people need to be involved with
you. If you manage to grab them and
bring them with you and then lead
them to be absolutely shocked or
gobsmacked or go away with a smile
— that’s the talent.”
His ability to do exactly that made
Mukhamedov a popular favourite in
his years with the Royal Ballet, but his
time there was not uncontroversial. He
had a reputation in some quarters for
being temperamental. “I can easily
bring trouble. That’s for sure,” he says,
laughing. “But without talking myself
up, I am quite famous in the ballet
world. Sometimes people forgot that.
If you compare me to Sylvie Guillem
[who was a guest principal at the Royal
Ballet at the same time], right from the
beginning she behaved like a very
enormous star. I know I am a star, but
I did not behave that way. When I felt
that people had forgotten, that’s when
I can bring a little tantrum.”
Mukhamedov didn’t make a fuss
when the number of his performances
fell from eighty a year to seven.
“I had my family, I was happy,” he
says with a shrug. In 2001, when
Ross Stretton took over the company,
Mukhamedov’s contract wasn’t
renewed. It was only when Monica
Mason took over that Mukhamedov
was invited back, for his swansong in
Russia and three final guest
appearances in Mayerling in 2004.
“I have already forgiven everything,”
he says. “I have no regrets and I am
very grateful to the Royal Ballet
for all I learnt.”
Mukhamedov and Masha, who
teaches ballet, live in France. Both
their children, daughter Sasha
and son Maxim, are dancers
— Sasha is a principal with
the Dutch National Ballet.
“If you ask any ballet family
they will say, ‘No, we don’t
want our children to dance.’
But it happens. It’s in the
genes. It is really difficult
to avoid.”
For all Mukhamedov’s
love of life outside the
dance studio, the lure
of
o the stage is strong.
“I don’t miss
i dancing,” he says,
“but performing is one of the
things
that will never disappear
t
out of your blood, out of your
body, your mind and feeling. If
when I am walking around
with a stick someone comes
and asks me if we can create
something new I probably
would say yes.”
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10
1G T
Tuesday November 21 2017 | the times
television & radio
As good at marriage as she is at being monarch
MATT HOLYOAK/CAMERAPRESS
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Elizabeth & Philip
BBC One
{{{((
Labour: The Summer
That Changed Everything
BBC Two
{{{{(
T
he marriage of the Queen
and Prince Philip, said a
more effusive than usual
Kirsty Young, has survived in
spite of challenges few others
have had to face. True, very true.
Although in fairness there are plenty
of challenges it hasn’t had to face too,
as the Queen would probably be the
first to agree. Worrying how you are
going to pay the mortgage, or feed the
kids. Or keep romance alive when one
of you is full-time carer to the other.
Radio Choice
Joe Clay
In the Studio
World Service, 11.30am
The lyricist Alain Boublil is
behind some of the world’s
most popular musicals,
including Les Misérables
and Miss Saigon, all of
which were written with his
long-time collaborator, the
composer Claude-Michel
Schönberg. The BBC’s
Andrea Kidd follows Boublil
as he knocks his latest
show, Manhattan Parisienne,
into shape. It uses music
from the Great American
and French Songbooks to
tell the story of a meeting
of minds between two
struggling artists.
The Glasgow Boys
Radio 4, 8pm
The Violence Reduction
Unit (VRU) in Glasgow was
set up to try to turn young
men away from lives of
violence and chaos. Byron
Vincent, who discussed his
troubled youth in an edition
of Four Thought in 2014,
was invited to speak at the
VRU and has returned many
times. For this revealing
programme, Vincent spent
two weeks embedded in two
of the unit’s programmes,
from watching the scheme’s
participants working in food
trucks in the West End of
Glasgow to joining the
cast at the Royal Military
Tattoo in Edinburgh.
But the Queen hasn’t put a foot
wrong as monarch, and since she and
Philip celebrated their 70th
anniversary yesterday she is probably
pretty good at marriage too. Elizabeth
& Philip: Love and Duty featured
photos of the couple’s first meeting,
Philip aged 18 and Elizabeth 13, but, in
an effort to contextualise, also
interviewed other couples who got
hitched in 1947 during a postwar
marriage boom. The usual talking
heads were rolled out: Gyles
Brandreth informed us that the
couple’s relationship “evolved over a
period of time” (hold the front page!).
Young went all dreamy when she met
Keith Evans, who was a naval
colleague of Philip’s when the prince
proposed to Elizabeth. This is the chap
who this year said that Philip had been
“randy”. Mysteriously, the BBC found
no space for that soundbite.
There was nice, classic footage of
their world tours and “not extravagant”
wedding, although given that this was
the rationing era it would have looked
extravagant to couples who made do
with cardboard wedding cakes. It didn’t
mention that women countrywide sent
Elizabeth their clothing coupons for
the wedding. They were returned
because it was illegal to pass them on.
A poll from 1946 asked people what
they thought of the engagement.
It was 64 per cent for, 32 per cent
against, with one lamenting that
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00
Huw Stephens 1.00am Annie Nightingale
3.00 BBC Radio 1 & 1Xtra’s Stories: Music By
Numbers — Ed Sheeran 4.00 Jordan North
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Jamie Cullum. The pianist
and songwriter interviews Anoushka Lucas,
the emerging jazz and soul singer-songwriter
who has also taken to the musical theatre
stage 8.00 Jo Whiley 10.00 Bill Kenwright’s
Golden Years. The theatre producer and
Everton chairman shares his passion for the
hits of the late 1950s and early 1960s,
playing a selection of the songs that were
the soundtrack to his youth 11.00
Nigel Ogden: The Organist Entertains.
Performances of Bucalossi’s famous
Grasshopper’s Dance, and Leroy Anderson’s
Bugler’s Holiday 11.30 Listen to the Band
12.00 Sounds of the 80s (r) 2.00am
Radio 2’s Folk Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
90s Hits 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Wednesday
Workout 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Radio 3’s classical breakfast show,
featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Rob Cowan explores potential companion
pieces for a well-known piece of music.
Today, one of the great glories of choral
music — Bach’s Mass in B minor. Plus, the
children’s author Dame Jacqueline Wilson
talks about the ideas that have inspired
and shaped her throughout her life
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Monk (1917-1982)
Donald Macleod and guest Brian Priestley
continue their celebration of the centenary of
jazz legend Thelonious Monk. Today the focus
is on how Monk’s work and career evolved
during the 1950s and ’60s. Thelonious Monk
(Criss Cross; Blue Monk; Bye-Ya; Friday the
13th; Hackensack; Skippy; and Monk’s Mood);
Jerome Kern (Smoke Gets in Your Eyes); and
Vincent Youmans/Irving Caesar (Tea for Two)
The Queen and Prince Philip marking their platinum anniversary
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
The Hebrides Ensemble perform Schubert’s
Octet at the Lammermuir Festival
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Ian Skelly presents two concerts given by
the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra,
including Respighi’s Pines of Rome and works
by Kalevi Aho and Christian Lindberg. Mozart
(Symphony No 31 in D, K297 — Paris); Haydn
(Trumpet Concerto); Beethoven (Overture
— Coriolan, Op 62); Schubert (Symphony No
4 in C minor, D417 — Tragic); Wagner
(Overture — Die Meistersinger von
Nürnberg); Kalevi Aho (Trombone Concerto);
Respighi (Pines of Rome); and Christian
Lindberg (The Waves of Wollongong)
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty with a lively mix of
chat, arts news and live performances.
His guests include Christophe Coin,
Ruby Hughes and Maggie Cole
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An imaginative, eclectic mix of music,
featuring favourites together with
lesser-known gems, with a few surprises
thrown in for good measure
7.31 Radio 3 in Concert
A concert given last Friday afternoon at the
Bath Mozartfest in Bath Guildhall by three
current and recent members of BBC Radio 3’s
New Generation Artists scheme. Bruch
(Pieces for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, Op 83
Nos 2, 5 and 6); Chopin (Impromptu No 1 in
A flat, Op 29; Fantaisie-Impromptu in C sharp
minor, Op 66); Brahms (Sonata in E flat for
viola and piano, Op 120 No 2); Schumann
(Märchenerzählungen for clarinet, viola and
piano, Op 132); and Mozart (Marche funebre
del Sigr Maestro Contrapunto for piano,
K453a; Two Minuets arranged for piano —
11 Minuets, K176; Fantasia in D minor, K397;
and Trio in E flat for clarinet, viola and piano,
K498 — Kegelstatt)
10.00 Free Thinking
Shahidha Bari and Laurence Scott consider
how archives come to life with klezmer
music, stories from conflict in Northern
Ireland and voices from communities
10.45 The Essay:
Desperately Seeking Eternity
Transhumanist Anders Sandberg argues
that ageing and mortality may be
transformed by future technology, with
major effects on society (r)
11.00 Late Junction
Fiona Talkington marks “No Music Day” in
the spaces where sound,
silence and music meet
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
8.30 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 The Long View
Jonathan Freedland examines Theresa May’s
minority government (1/4)
9.30 One to One
Samantha Simmonds explores sibling
competition with Professor Alison Pike.
Last in the series
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor focuses on societies and
faiths with a single god
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Presented by Jane Garvey. Including
at 10.45 the Drama: Part two of series 10
of The Pillow Book by Robert Forrest
11.00 Natural Histories
Brett Westwood explores the human
relationship with reindeer. Last in the series
11.30 A Call to Art
Exploring the graffiti art of Columbia
and Mexico (2/3)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Sebastian Baczkiewicz (7/40)
12.15 Call You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week:
The Vanity Fair Diaries
Tina Brown reads from her account of her
time as editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair
magazine, here addressing a 1985 issue
involving President Reagan (2/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Kempton and the Duke
Comedy drama starring Kevin Whately
3.00 Short Cuts
Josie Long hears stories spell craft, poetry
and art coming to life (2/6)
3.30 Costing the Earth
The loss of five of the Solomon Islands (r)
4.00 Law in Action
Legal developments. Last in the series
4.30 A Good Read
Alexei Sayle and Meg Rosoff trade favourite
books with Harriett Gilbert (8/9)
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 Ed Reardon’s Week
Ed discovers a new world of employment
opportunities (5/6)
Philip wasn’t of “good British stock”.
The sweetest bits came when we saw
Philip praising his wife for having “the
quality of tolerance in abundance”.
She said of him that he had been “my
strength and my stay all these years”.
Do you reckon they watched the
programme? No, me neither.
It’s probably safe to say that
Labour: The Summer That Changed
Everything didn’t turn out quite as
David Modell expected when he began
filming four Labour MPs in the run-up
to the general election in June. There
was Theresa May, bouncy as a spring
lamb, Labour MPs saying that Jeremy
Corbyn’s position was “untenable”
and Stephen Kinnock declaring that on
June 9 Corbyn would need to take “a
long look in the mirror”.
Cut to the exit poll on June 8 and
the faces were a picture, a curious
potpourri of delight at the Tories’ own
goal mixed with a penny-dropping “oh
shit” that Corbyn was going nowhere.
Modell should be congratulated for this
access, although other MPs may see it
as a lesson that no good can come of
speaking to camera before a result is
known. And, from his son, we learnt
the truth about Neil Kinnock’s famous
fall into the sea on Brighton beach in
1983. It was his wife Glenys’s fault that
he tripped because she was trying to
save her new boots. Fair enough,
Glenys: perfectly understandable.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
7.00 The Archers
Lexi proves a source of inspiration
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor focuses on societies and
faiths with a single god (r)
8.00 The Glasgow Boys:
Chaos and Calm
Byron Vincent joins a scheme turning young
men away from violence. See Radio Choice
8.40 In Touch
9.00 All in the Mind
The winners of this year’s Brain Prize
discuss their work on reward (4/8)
9.30 The Long View
Jonathan Freedland examines Theresa May’s
minority government (1/4) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With James Coomarasamy
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Exit West
By Mohsin Hamid (2/5)
11.00 Fred at the Stand
Featuring Paul Tonkinson, Vladimir McTavish,
Athena Kugblenu and Mick Ferry (6/6)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Presented by Susan Hulme
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
The Vanity Fair Diaries
By Tina Brown (2/5) (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Ken Dodd Show 8.30 The Men
from the Ministry 9.00 The Now Show 9.30
The Adventures of John and Tony 10.00 For
Whom the Bell Tolls 11.00 No One Belongs
Here More Than You 11.15 Tony and Rose
12.00 The Ken Dodd Show 12.30pm The
Men from the Ministry 1.00 Rogue Male
1.30 The Brontes’ Piano 2.00 Gilead 2.15
Cosmic Quest 2.30 An Expert in Murder 2.45
The Black Count 3.00 For Whom the Bell
Tolls 4.00 Wordaholics 4.30 The Adventures
of John and Tony 5.00 1834 5.30 Ed
Reardon’s Week 6.00 The Voice of God 6.30
That Reminds Me 7.00 The Ken Dodd Show.
Down Your Way is in the village of Knotty
Ash and Doddy croons a ditty 7.30 The Men
from the Ministry. Reputations are tarnished
when the Crown Jewels go for cleaning 8.00
Rogue Male. Thriller by Geoffrey Household.
First aired in 2004 8.30 The Brontës’ Piano.
Catherine Bott and Jonathan Cohen examine
the sisters’ music collection 9.00 No One
Belongs Here More Than You. By Miranda
July 9.15 Tony and Rose. By Nicola Baldwin
10.00 Comedy Club: Ed Reardon’s Week. Ed
is persuaded to enter the world of local
politics 10.30 In and Out of the Kitchen.
Damien is asked to fill in at a literary event
10.55 The Comedy Club Interview. A chat
with a guest from the world of comedy
11.00 Revolting People 11.30 Vent.
Comedy with Neil Pearson
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Adrian Chiles 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 6.30 5 Live Sport.
Build-up to the night’s Champions League
football coverage 7.45 5 Live Sport:
Champions League Football 2017-18.
Coverage of the night’s UEFA Champions
League football 10.00 The Ashes
10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports
Breakfast with Ray Parlour 10.00 Jim White
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off
10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am Extra Time
with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and
Stuart Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00
Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Tom Ravenscroft 1.00am
The First Time with Andrew Weatherall
2.00 The Look of Love: The Story of the New
Romantics 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones continues
Classic FM’s showcase of this autumn’s best
new classical releases. Mozart (Divertimento
in D); Faure (Requiem); JS Bach (Keyboard
Concerto in A); Olafur Arnalds (Near Light);
Wagner (Concert Overture No.1 in D minor);
Chopin (Rondo in C major); CPE Bach (Cello
Concerto in A major); and Richter (The
Leftovers — Departure — Lullaby) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Tuesday November 21 2017
11
1G T
MARILYN KINGWILL
artsfirst night
Theatre
Riot Days
Islington Assembly Hall, N1
Concert
RSNO/Sondergard
Usher Hall, Edinburgh
‘A
I
{{{((
nger is an energy,” as John
Lydon said, and it powers
this swaggering, throbbing
gig by Pussy Riot Theatre.
A ragged mix of poetry,
performance art and trash-can tunes,
it’s based on Riot Days, the memoir by
Maria Alyokhina, a leading member of
the Russian political-protest collective.
Directed by Yury Muravitsky, it’s
cartoonish, poundingly emphatic,
blackly funny and furious. At times
it’s so bludgeoning that it’s tempting
to disengage. Yet there’s no denying
its hectic, brutal force.
The mood is set by the support
act Pink Kink, a Liverpudlian
female-led five-piece whose larky
bubblegum punk nicely presages the
vein of absurd humour within Pussy
Riot’s philosophy. Riot Days is
performed by Alyokhina, the actor
Kiryl Masheka and two members of
the Russian punk band Asian Women
on the Telephone.
In trademark balaclavas they stand
before a huge screen across which
text, graffiti and real-life video footage
play. The narrative — fast, fractured,
yelled in Russian — takes us from
the collective’s 2012 protest in the
Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in
Moscow to the conviction of three
members for “hooliganism motivated
by religious hatred” and Alyokhina’s
imprisonment for nearly two years.
English surtitles and slogans compete
with shaky reportage of clandestine
meetings, icons, monuments and street
clashes. The bassline thumps and
voices declaim, growl or howl.
There are fascinating details,
although they are hard to grasp amid
the raging sensory torrent. Alyokhina
has a defiant charisma and Masheka
struts with ludicrous braggadocio,
bare-chested, perhaps a reference to
Putin’s penchant for shirtless pictures
of himself. It’s an eye-catching
spectacle, and that makes an impact.
Sam Marlowe
Òran Mór, Glasgow, tonight
Concert
Hallé/Elder
Bridgewater Hall,
Manchester
{{{{(
P
erhaps this concert should
have been sponsored by
Viagra, because it included
almost an hour of the most
indecently erotic music yet
composed, played to an audience with
an average age, I would guess, well
north of 60. Mind you, that was just
the first half. To calm us down before
we hit the trams the second half
comprised Verdi’s Four Sacred Pieces,
written by the avowedly atheist
composer shortly before he died,
presumably to hedge his bets.
More of that later; sex first. Of
course, the Venusberg music from
Wagner’s Tannhäuser isn’t quite as
lascivious when played, fully clothed
and seated, by the Hallé Orchestra
under Mark Elder as when this scene
of wanton abandon is enacted on stage
by leaping semi-naked dancers. Yet
what the eye lost, the ear gained. Elder
{{{{(
Bananarama’s Keren Woodward, Sara Dallin and Siobhan Fahey are on tour together for the first time
It’s love in the first degree
This was a
truly stonking
comeback for
the Eighties
girl group, says
Ed Potton
Pop
Bananarama
Eventim Apollo,
W6
{{{{(
Semiramide
at the Royal
Opera House
First Night, News
O
ne song into Bananarama’s
raucous and moving
London comeback Keren
Woodward did a piece of
important housekeeping.
“Before we go any further let’s
welcome Siobhan back into the fold,”
she said, to thunderous cheers.
Siobhan Fahey left the group
in 1988 to make artier pop with
Shakespears Sister. Years of rancour
followed with her former bandmates,
Woodward and Sara Dallin. Now,
after rebuilding their friendship,
this is the original trio’s first tour.
“I’m having a really crap time,” Fahey
grinned. It was like George Michael
returning to Wham!, a poignant
comparison given that Woodward
recently split from Wham!’s Andrew
Ridgeley after 25 years.
Like many Eighties pop groups,
Bananarama emerged from the ashes
of punk, prizing attitude over aptitude.
They were never amazing singers,
but they had a shambolic hedonism —
once drinking the heavy-metal band
Def Leppard under the table — and a
frisky set of influences that swung
from ska to hi-NRG disco and even a
song in Swahili (Aie A Mwana,
performed with gusto here). They
remain the girl group with the most
charting singles; this was proper girl
power, a decade before the Spice Girls.
is a master of aural delineation, and
without any visual distraction one
could more easily appreciate how
Wagner piles instrumental detail on
detail, like petticoats, then whirls the
whole into a kind of Teutonic can-can.
The Hallé played well here, and the
piece that followed — Strauss’s Don
Juan — was sumptuous, particularly
when the horns rolled out their priapic
fanfare at the climax. And how well
Elder judged the depiction of the great
philanderer’s decline and death.
The Hallé Choir made a brief
contribution to Venusberg, but the
singers were more thoroughly
tested in the Verdi. Good and
bad news here. Their tuning
was impeccable in the chromatic
harmonies that Verdi twists round
the perverse “scala enigmatica” of the
Ave Maria — a testament to solid
coaching by Matthew Hamilton,
the choir’s director. However, in the
melodramatic eruptions of the Stabat
Mater and Te Deum the top-heavy
choral sound betrayed the fact that
fewer than 50 tenors and basses can’t
balance more than 100 sopranos and
altos. Serious recruiting needed.
Richard Morrison
Pop
Amanda Palmer
Union Chapel, N1
{{{((
The trio, all now in their fifties, have
clearly worked hard in the rehearsal
room — and the gym. They looked
fabulous, in tight black trousers and
sparkly silver. There were formation
twirls, wiggles and catwalk turns; on
I Heard a Rumour, from their
uber-camp Stock Aitken Waterman
phase, they replicated the steps from
the 1987 video, which was on the
screen behind them. Not for
Bananarama the grandstanding
harmonies of modern girl groups.
They tend to sing the same vocal
parts in unison, which lent an
unpretentious vim to classics such as
Na Na Hey Hey, Venus and Robert
De Niro’s Waiting (which, they claimed
recently, is about date rape).
But they never got too slick, thank
heavens: the odd missed cue and
inflatable banana lobbed from the
crowd assured that. All were greeted
with giggles.
Then came the emotional high
point: a cover of Shakespears Sister’s
Stay. Woodward and Dallin sang the
Marcella Detroit part before Fahey
made a grand entrance to deliver her
growling verses. Fahey was in tears
afterwards and who can blame her? As
olive branches go, this was a doozy.
Colston Hall, Bristol, Wed; Arena
Birmingham, Thur; and touring to
December 9
T
he cult around Amanda
Palmer is a curiously modern
phenomenon. Buoyed by her
sizeable online following, the
41-year-old Massachusettsraised singer-songwriter filled the
800-capacity Union Chapel on a wet
November night with minimal
publicity and no record label. The
internet has allowed Palmer, left, to
carve a DIY career, crowdfunded by
her fans. It also punishes her with
karma on occasion, notably when she
raised more than $1 million through
Kickstarter, then asked guests to play
with her without payment.
Yet Palmer’s devoted disciples
forgive her precious, narcissistic
excesses. The mood at this show was
warm, communal and interactive. The
singer even invited four fans on stage
to squeeze a squeaky toy pig during
Missed Me, a superb blast of neoBrechtian cabaret-pop dating back to
her early band the Dresden Dolls.
Palmer’s piano-pummelling solo
numbers were largely graceless and
verbose affairs. Thankfully she was
backed for most of this two-hour show
by a string quartet and her frequent
collaborator, the neo-classical
t’s always heartening when a player
comes out of the orchestral ranks
with the new costume of soloist
and wears it well. Witness the
Belarusian Aleksei Kiseliov, the
principal cellist with the Royal Scottish
National Orchestra since 2011, spotlit
for Saint-Saëns’s First Cello Concerto.
The piece is a quirky combination
of free-formed romantic inspiration
and a look back to baroque forms.
Deploying an attractively dark Slavic
tone, Kiseliov drew full measure from
the more languid themes, and was
charming and combative in the
skittish cadenzas. The concerto may
not be soul-stirring stuff, but it was
certainly soulful here. Kiseliov’s
encore was — what else? — SaintSaëns’s Swan, stylishly delivered.
The RSNO was conducted by its
music-director designate, Thomas
Sondergard. The Dane opened with
Poulenc’s suite from Les Biches,
another French work looking forward
and back, with razzy depictions of
Twenties’ flappers elaborated in styles
that extend to tango and, in the other
direction, peck at French rococo.
Sondergard had a tight grip of the
slippery rhythms, giving individual
players room to make nice cameos,
although I thought wistfully of the
extra smear of greasepaint that the
RSNO’s sometime gaffer, the French
conductor Stéphane Denève, would
have brought to Poulenc’s ballet.
Scheherazade is a piece that we
return to again and again, not for its
rigour, but for Rimsky-Korsakov’s
colouristic freedom and sheer sweep.
Sinbad’s ship may teeter on the edge of
destruction on the waves of the Indian
Ocean, but Sondergard kept a firm
hand on the wheel, adeptly picking out
Rimsky-Korsakov’s counter-melodies
and the orchestra’s inner voices without
skimping on surging climaxes. A
massive box of Turkish delight should
have gone to the guest leader, Gordan
Trajkovic, for his luscious solos.
Neil Fisher
composer Jherek Bischoff, on bass
guitar. These fuller arrangements
brought more sonic richness and
emotional force to the music.
The fantasy author Neil Gaiman,
Palmer’s husband, joined her for one
of their regular live collaborations,
Leon Payne’s murder ballad Psycho.
Halfway through the song Palmer
paid inspired homage to Bernard
Herrmann’s immortal score to Alfred
Hitchcock’s Psycho on her kazoo.
Palmer struck a few jarring notes by
repeatedly plugging her crowdfunding
platform, Patreon. She also introduced
a rambling new song called The Ride
by quoting a famous routine by the
comedian Bill Hicks, mistaking his
adolescent stoner conspiracy theories
for profound philosophy. Oh dear.
This set was overstuffed with weak
cover versions, including a ponderous,
breathy take on Pink Floyd’s Mother.
Intended as an anti-Trump statement,
it achieved the rare feat of sounding
even more po-faced than the original.
That said, her sparkly What a
Wonderful World provided a lovely
finale to an evening that was two
thirds charming, one third grating.
Stephen Dalton
12
1G T
Tuesday November 21 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Passions
Sky Arts, 9pm
As with all
the episodes
of Sky Arts’s
Passions, this
documentary about the
Weimar art that was
crushed under Hitler
is as much about its
presenter as its subject.
Early
Top
pick
“I thought perhaps
I don’t come from this
world of gladioli, cakes
and niceness,” says
Barry Humphries, aka
Dame Edna Everage.
“Perhaps I come from
somewhere darker,
older, riper . . .” While
growing up in the fusty
Melbourne suburbs,
Humphries developed
a lifelong fascination
with the exotic music
and art of interwar
Germany and Austria.
The birthplace of much
of this “degenerate art”
was Vienna. Humphries
travels to the city
where Kurt Weill,
EW Korngold and
Ernst Krenek wrote
their most famous
works to explore these
“overlooked, persecuted,
submerged” composers
whom the Nazi Party
succeeded so well in
silencing. Humphries’s
film is rather more
sprawling than most in
the series, but the
passion for his subject
shines through. In one
rather lovely moment
two Austrian musicians
perform songs written
by Weill and Korngold,
the sheet music for
which Humphries
bought in a Melbourne
bookshop when he
was 12. He takes delight
in the rude, often
grotesque sensibilities
of Weimar art, from
the risqué cabaret
scene to the erotic
drawings of George
Grosz and Jeanne
Mammen. “The Nazis
were right,” he says,
“this art was
degenerate. And
regenerate.” A vivid
reminder that the
influence of the Nazis’
cultural cleansing
remains to this day.
The A Word
BBC One, 9pm
“You don’t understand
women, do you?” says
Ralph to Christopher
Eccleston’s bluff
brewer. But Maurice
isn’t the only one
struggling in that
department. Rebecca’s
boyfriend, James, is still
desperate to skedaddle
from the Lake District,
Eddie’s attempts at
making a fresh start in
Manchester prove
trickier than he
imagined, and Paul,
frustrated at being
separated from Alison,
has a much better night
out than he expected
with Sophie. And then
there’s Maurice, trying,
and failing, to support
Louise as she begins
her chemotherapy. He
doesn’t understand
women, that Maurice.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Claimed and Shamed.
Investigating a motorist with a genuine claim who is
left out of pocket 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer.
Properties up for auction in Wolverhampton, Kent and
Mountain Ash in Wales (AD) 11.00 The Housing
Enforcers. Matt Allwright helps a housing officer assist
a tenant with a hoarding habit (r) 11.45 The Sheriffs
Are Coming. The team is sent to a dealer who sold a
potentially lethal second hand car 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. A married couple take on a mother and son
team (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC
Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Sid is visited by a
journalist (AD) 2.15 Armchair Detectives. Sleuths try to
identify an inventor’s killer 3.00 Escape to the Country.
Nicki Chapman help a Croydon-based couple find a
Cornish home (AD) 3.45 Royal Recipes. Recreating the
pudding served to the 2012 Olympic Committee (AD)
4.30 Flog It! From Hopetoun House, near Edinburgh (r)
5.15 Pointless. Quiz show in which contestants try to
score the fewest points possible by giving the least
obvious correct answers to questions (r) 6.00 BBC News
at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Island Parish Sark Winter (r) (AD) 6.30 Claimed
and Shamed (r) 7.15 Royal Recipes (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign
Zone: Great British Menu — The Finals (r) (SL) 9.00
Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00
Daily Politics 1.00pm The Link (r) 1.45 Terry and
Mason’s Great Food Trip (r) 2.15 Going Back, Giving Back.
In Oxfordshire, Aled Jones sees the dogs that have been
trained to help children with disabilities (r) 3.00 WPC 56.
Gina risks her career to prove Donald is innocent when a
woman is attacked in Victoria Park, while Jack uncovers
information in connection with the case of the missing
boys (r) (AD) 3.45 Oxford Street Revealed (r) 4.15
Wartime Farm. Ruth Goodman, Alex Langlands and Peter
Ginn experience conditions faced by British farmers in
1940, as rationing took hold and Nazi bombing raids
intensified (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your Money Where Your
Mouth Is. Antiques experts Mark Franks and Philip Serrell
vie to make the greater profit for charity as they peruse
items on display at the Bonzer Bootsale in Romford,
north-east London (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted
by Jeremy Vine 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two.
With the winners of Sunday night’s dance-off
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Emma Stone and Billie
Jean King promote new film Battle of the Sexes, and the
Kiss frontman Gene Simmons talks about his 50 years in
the music business 8.30 Lorraine 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip Schofield and Holly
Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features 12.30pm
Loose Women. Chesney Hawkes joins the team to chat
about his career and the latest issues of the day 1.30
ITV News; Weather 2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal. David
Dickinson presents the show from Edinburgh, where
items brought in by members of the public include a jade
bangle, a duck clock and a set of bronze bulldogs (r) 3.00
Tenable. Quiz hosted by Warwick Davis in which a team of
five answers questions about top 10 lists, then tries to
score a perfect 10 in the final round 4.00 Tipping Point.
Arcade-themed quiz show in which contestants drop
tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a £10,000 jackpot (r) 5.00 The Chase. Bradley
Walsh presents as four more contestants answer general
knowledge questions and work as a team to take on
ruthless quiz genius the Chaser and secure a cash prize
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay’s Hotel
Hell (r) (AD) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA (r) 12.00
Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Come Dine with Me.
Four dinner parties in Lowestoft, Suffolk (r) 1.05 Kirstie’s
Handmade Christmas. Kirstie heads to the Waddesdon
Manor Christmas Fair in Buckinghamshire (r) (AD) 2.10
Countdown. Words-and-numbers game, with Gyles
Brandreth in Dictionary Corner 3.00 A Place in the Sun:
Winter Sun. Ben Hillman tries to find a perfect home in
Spain’s Mar Menor for a Kent family 4.00 Coast vs
Country. A London couple seek a home in South Wales,
either in the country or by the sea 5.00 Four in a Bed.
The second visit is to Darwin Lake Holiday Village in
Matlock, Derbyshire 5.30 Come Dine with Me. In Devon,
Essex contestant Rob is pinning his hopes on an
Italian-themed menu 6.00 The Simpsons. Another trio of
Hallowe’en stories, including Homer given a
Dr Seuss-style makeover (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Mandy
and Luke put their troubles aside to visit Ella, while Scott
is discharged from hospital and he, Diane, Damon and
Brody are stunned when Maggie shows up (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and guests talk about the issues of the day, with
viewers calling in to offer their opinions 11.15 Access.
Showbiz news and gossip 11.25 FILM: Christmas in
Conway (U, TVM, 2013) A man reputed to be grumpy
marks his wife’s return from hospital with a gift, but his
gesture causes problems with the law. Festive romantic
drama starring Andy Garcia 1.10pm 5 News Lunchtime
1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD)
2.15 NCIS: New Orleans. The team investigates when a
Navy Seal candidate is killed weeks before his graduation,
and LaSalle tries to avoid an old flame (r) 3.15 FILM:
Dear Secret Santa (PG, TVM, 2013) A woman
receives a series of anonymous Christmas cards which
appear to be from an old friend of hers who recently
died. Drama starring Tatyana Ali and Bill Cobbs 5.00
5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Terese is hurt that Gary
went to Paul for help instead of her, but decides to
forgive him. Paul suggests to Courtney that they elope,
while Mishti is invited to rejoin the police (r) (AD) 6.00
Home and Away. The cabin bomber is identified as a
professional hitman (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
Get a
Armistead Maupin – How I wrote Tales of the City
The Perfect
Christmas Gift
Paula Byrne Celebrated houses of fiction
Edward Allen Marianne Moore, and more
Nabeelah Jaffer Islam and Britishness
Libby Purves Tinder of the 1940s
SEPTEMBER 15 2017 No. 5972
972
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the-tls.co.
THE TIMES
ES LITERARY SUPPLEM
SU
ENT
Patrick J. Murray Montaigne’s social network
Jamie Fisher Angry like Mailer
Charlotte Shane Provocations of feminism
Samuel Earle Never getting bored of Barthes
SEPTEMBER 29 2017 No. 5974
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THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
SEPTEMBER 22 2017 No. 5973
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THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
Tales of addiction
Inspirations of Dante
Rowan Williams
Ian Thomson
Wandering, wondering
£20
Laura Freeman Dress like a writer
Colin Grant Lost voices of immigration
Anne McElvoy The passion of Merkel
Krishan Kumar On statues and Nazis
UK £3.50 USA $8.99
UK £3
Eric J. Iannelli
Terri Apter
UK £3.50 USA $8.99
Waterstones
Gift Card when
you subscribe
to the TLS
Annette Kobak on women and the Grand Tour
Jan Marsh on Ruskin in Europe
7.00 Emmerdale Robert’s lies may be
exposed, while Debbie conceals
the truth, and Moira confides her
deepest fears (AD)
7.30 Save Money: Good Food New series.
Money-saving tricks, with Susanna
Reid and chef Matt Tebbutt (1/5)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Yorkshire: A Year in the Wild
Unseasonably cold summer weather
causes difficulties for several animals
in the Yorkshire Dales and North York
Moors, including an injured roe deer
and her twins (2/4) (r) (AD)
8PM
8.00 Holby City With the merger decision
hanging over the hospital, Fredrik has
his own future at Holby firmly on his
mind, and Donna’s friendship with Ric
takes an unexpected turn (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
Marcus Wareing gives six chefs
20 minutes to make a fruit-based
dessert featuring Italian meringue
before they take part in the Signature
Dish challenge (AD)
8.00 The Martin Lewis Money Show
Live New series. With credit card
lending, energy prices and inflation all
on the up, Martin Lewis and new
co-presenter Angellica Bell
explain where to buy the cheapest
Christmas gifts (1/12)
8.00 The Secret Life of 5 Year Olds
Cameras reveal how five-year-olds
such as Miylah and Jack experiment
with different identities as part
of their search to find out who they
really are (3/4) (AD)
8.00 Jo Brand’s Cats & Kittens
Animal welfare officer Matt finds an
injured young male cat with a missing
tail. Meanwhile, a concerned member
of the public calls Inspector Anthony
about a cat in her shed (2/6)
9.00 The A Word Paul makes an
unexpected connection with Mark’s
mum, and Louise and Maurice come to
blows as she starts her treatment.
See Viewing Guide (3/6) (AD)
9.00 Rick Stein’s Road to Mexico
The chef heads from San Diego to
Tijuana for the start of his Mexican
adventures, sampling flour tortilla
burritos and fresh fish along the way.
See Viewing Guide (3/7) (AD)
9.00 I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of
Here! Ant and Dec present the survival
challenge, as the famous faces
continue their ordeal in the Australian
jungle, and there are highlights from
the past 24 hours in camp
9.00 Grand Designs: House of the Year
Kevin McCloud, Damion Burrows and
Michelle Ogundehin review RIBAworthy homes in the country,
including a luxurious tree house in
Dorset that shows off the wonder
of wood (3/4) (AD)
9.00 Ben Fogle: New Lives in the Wild
The presenter discovers why Mike
Merrill, a former sound engineer
from Texas, decided to build a
backpackers’ hostel deep in the
Guatemalan jungle (6/8)
10.00 The Truth About Muslim Marriage
Myriam Francois presents the results
of a survey regarding the rights of
Muslim wives in Britain, and also looks
at why some women may prefer not
to have a civil marriage ceremony.
See Viewing Guide
10.00 The 80s: Most Shocking Celebrity
Moments The most infamous
television moments of the 1980s,
including the disastrous Brit awards
hosted by Samantha Fox and Mick
Fleetwood, Simon Le Bon’s nautical
misadventures and the concert where
Ozzy Osbourne famously bit the head
off a bat. With contributions from
Anthea Turner, Linda Lusardi, Rick
Wakeman, Jennie Bond, Nathan Moore,
Su Pollard and Paul Burrell (r)
7PM
7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip
Cliff Parisi and Judy Parfitt team
up with regulars Catherine Southon
and Phillip Serrell. Headed for an
auction in Norfolk, they start their
antiques hunt in Kent
9PM
Waterstones Gift Cards may be redeemed in any Waterstones store in the UK towards the purchase of all eligible Waterstones products available. Gift Cards cannot be redeemed for cash. Waterstones Gift Cards will be sent within 28 days of purchasing a TLS subscription.
7.00 The One Show Live chat and topical
reports, presented by Matt Baker
and Alex Jones
Late
11PM
10PM
7.30 EastEnders Karen tries to deal with
the loan shark, and things come to a
head between Woody and Moose (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 Motherland A pool party ruins Julia’s
plans before an important event at
work. See Viewing Guide (3/6) (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 Drugsland New series.
Cameras follow the consumption and
policing of illegal drugs in Bristol,
including the work of Sgt Green and
PC Spence, whose remit is to protect
vulnerable users (1/4)
10.30 Newsnight With Emily Maitlis
10.35 Regional News
11.45 Life and Death Row Following the
work of law students at the University
of Houston as they fight for the lives
of two of the youngest prisoners facing
execution in the US (3/3) (r) (AD)
12.50am-6.00 BBC News
10.45 On Assignment Stories include the
science behind the great blazes of the
American west (8/10)
11.15 NFL This Week Action from the
11th round of fixtures, which included
Chicago Bears v Detroit Lions,
Minnesota Vikings v Los Angeles
Rams, and Dallas Cowboys v
Philadelphia Eagles
11.20 Lethal Weapon Murtaugh
experiences chest pains after he and
Riggs become embroiled in a notorious
car theft ring (r) (AD)
12.05am Extreme Wives with Kate Humble
In Jerusalem, Kate accesses the intensely private
ultra-orthodox Haredim (r) (AD) 1.05 Sign Zone: The
Apprentice. Candidates have to create advertising
campaigns for a new car (r) (SL) 2.05-3.05 Trust Me,
I’m a Doctor: Mental Health Special (r) (AD, SL)
12.15am Gone to Pot: American Road Trip The
famous faces explore a legalised marijuana farm in
Colorado. Last in the series (r) (AD) 1.05 Jackpot247.
Viewers get the chance to participate in live interactive
gaming 3.00 Loose Women (r) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
11.05 Mr Avila New series. A middle-class
insurance salesman, husband and
father leads a double life as a
hitman-for-hire. Mexican crime drama
starring Tony Dalton. In Spanish (1/13)
12.10am Music on 4: The Great Songwriters 1.10
Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 1.55 One Born
Every Minute (r) (AD) 2.50 Trump: An American Dream
(r) (AD, SL) 3.45 Channel 4 Dispatches (r) 4.15
Unreported World (r) (AD) 4.40 Phil Spencer: Secret
Agent (r) (AD, SL) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
1.00am SuperCasino Viewers get the chance to take
part in live interactive gaming 3.10 Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit. The detectives apprehend a sexual predator
(r) (AD) 4.00 Witch Hunt: A Century of Murder (r) (SL)
4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Divine Designs (r) (SL)
5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Tuesday November 21 2017
13
1G T
television & radio
Road to Mexico
BBC Two, 9pm
With a heavy heart,
Rick Stein says goodbye
to his Mustang
convertible, climbs
aboard the crew bus in
San Diego and crosses
the border into Mexico
(finally!). Now, at last,
he can get his chops
around some proper
Mexican cuisine, such
as . . . a salad? Yes, it
was in Tijuana where
the Caesar salad was
invented, so Stein visits
the Hotel Caesars
for its speciality dish.
He also tries some
“Mexipop” fish tacos in
Ensenada (“Yummo!”
he says), samples the
much-maligned
Mexican wine of Baja
California and rustles
up some divine-looking
chicken burritos and
crab adobadas. Yummo.
Motherland
BBC Two, 10pm
Having eviscerated
children’s birthday
parties and school
fundraisers, the
merciless parenting
sitcom trains its sights
on the “pool party”. As
always it is a minor
disaster for Julia (Anna
Maxwell Martin), as
well as a vivid reminder
of how grim swimming
pool changing rooms
can be — the hair, the
plasters, the puddles
of brown water of
uncertain origin.
Delightfully, beta-male
dad Kevin (Paul Ready)
has his nose put out of
joint by a new SAHD
(stay-at-home dad) on
the scene. James is
handsome, popular and
he can swim. Poor
Kevin. Brilliant, cackleinducing and peerless.
The Truth About
Muslim Marriage
Channel 4, 10pm
Myriam François fronts
an investigation into
Muslim marriages in
the UK, revealing that
a large proportion of
women are not legally
married and, most
importantly, are not
aware of it. The nikah
ceremony, unless
accompanied by civil
registration, is not
recognised under
British law and the
fallout from this is
depressingly
predictable. “Children
suffer, women suffer,”
says one imam. “Men
get away scot-free.”
Britain, it seems, lags
behind most of the rest
of the world on this
matter: “The situation
here, with all due
respect, is a mess.”
Sport Choice
BT Sport 3, 7pm
Tottenham Hotspur
have already qualified
for the knockout
phase of the Champions
League after beating
Real Madrid in their
previous match. Spurs
take on the German
side Borussia Dortmund
at the Westfalenstadion
tonight (kick-off
7.45pm).
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) 7.00 Animal 999 (r)
8.00 Send in the Dogs Australia (r) 9.00 The
Dog Whisperer (r) 10.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD)
11.00 Modern Family (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r)
5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 The Flash. A meta who can bring objects
to life hatches a disturbing plan
9.00 Strike Back. Mac is taken to Magyar
Ultra’s survivalist camp
10.00 Sick Note. Comedy
10.30 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
11.30 A League of Their Own.
With Robbie Keane, Romesh Ranganathan
and Jessica Ennis-Hill (r) (AD)
12.30am Road Wars (r) 1.00 The Force: North
East (r) 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD)
5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Richard E Grant’s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
7.00 Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 Fish Town (r)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) (AD)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House.
The team treat a drug dealer (r) (AD)
6.00 House. Medical drama (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A horse
trainer dies in mysterious circumstances (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. The son of Frank’s most
outspoken critic is killed (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: Going Clear Scientology and
the Prison of Belief (15, 2015)
Documentary exploring the history and actions
of the Church of Scientology’s leaders (r)
11.15 Curb Your Enthusiasm (r)
11.55 Whitney Cummings: I’m Your Girlfriend.
Whitney Cummings performs audacious
adult humour in Santa Monica
1.05am The Wire. Crime thriller (r) 2.20
Californication (r) 3.30 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 4.20 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Gold Coast Cops (r) (AD) 12.00 Road
Wars (r) 1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD)
2.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 CSI:
Crime Scene Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal
Minds. The team hunts a serial bomber (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 My Kitchen Rules: US. The teams create
dishes for the LA Rams and their fans
8.00 Elementary. Sherlock tries to help Randy
avoid a relapse (r) (AD)
9.00 Chicago Fire. Casey goes all out to help an
old friend, and Dawson and Brett have to think
on their feet to save a young girl
10.00 World’s Most Evil Killers
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 Elementary (r) (AD) 1.00am Bones (r)
(AD) 2.00 Criminal Minds (r) 3.00 My Kitchen
Rules: US (r) 4.00 Border Security: America’s
Front Line (r) (AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Daniel Barenboim: The Warsaw Recital
7.35 Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No 1 8.00
Auction 8.30 Watercolour Challenge 9.00 Tales
of the Unexpected 10.00 Talks Music (AD)
11.00 Trailblazers: Heavy Metal 12.00
Discovering: Robert Shaw (AD) 1.00pm Tales of
the Unexpected 2.00 Watercolour Challenge
2.30 Auction 3.00 Simply Red: Live at Sydney
Opera House 4.00 Landscape Artist of the Year
2017 5.00 Discovering: Coldplay (AD) 5.30
Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: Rex Harrison (AD)
7.00 The Seventies (AD)
8.00 Too Young to Die (AD)
9.00 Passions. See Viewing Guide
10.00 The History of Comedy. (AD)
11.00 Harold Lloyd: Hollywood’s Timeless
Comedy Genius. Documentary
12.00 A Young Doctor’s Notebook (AD) 1.00am
Passions 2.00 Tales of the Unexpected 3.00
Auction 3.30 Master of Photography (AD) 4.30
Les Patineurs 5.00 South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00
Premier League Daily 11.00 Sky Sports Daily
11.30 Sportswomen 12.00 Sky Sports News
5.00pm Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Gillette Soccer Special Pre-Match. A look
ahead to this evening’s football
7.30 Live Women’s International Rugby Union:
England v Canada (Kick-off 7.45).
All the action from the second Test in the
three-game Old Mutual Wealth series, which
takes place at Twickenham Stoop
10.00 The Debate. Premier League news
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the day’s
talking points and a look ahead to the events
that are likely to make the news tomorrow,
featuring previews and interviews
12.00 Sky Sports News 1.00am Live WWE Late
Night Smackdown. Wrestling action with the
over-the-top stars of the States, profiling
fighters causing a stir and following feuds as
they spill out of the ring 3.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Spotlight
11.10 Pop Goes Northern Ireland (r) 11.40
Drugsland 12.40am Life and Death Row (r)
(AD) 1.40-6.00 BBC News
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BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 8.00pm-9.00 River City.
Caitlin tracks down someone from the past in a
bid to save Maggie 10.45 Holby City (AD)
11.45 Drugsland 12.45am Life and Death
Row (r) (AD) 1.40 Weather for the Week
Ahead 1.45-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30
True North: Raphoe to Red Square. Three
Ulster-Scots women perform at the Kremlin (r)
11.15 Exodus: Our Journey Continues (r) (AD)
12.15am-1.05 NFL This Week
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 1.45pm First Minister’s
Questions 2.35 Going Back, Giving Back (r)
3.20 WPC 56 (r) (AD) 4.05 Wartime Farm (r)
(AD) 5.05 Welsh Women of World War One.
How Welsh women helped Britain to win the
First World War (r) 5.35-6.00 Coast (r)
STV
As ITV except: 10.35pm Scotland Tonight
11.10 On Assignment 11.45 Lethal Weapon
(r) (AD) 12.35am Teleshopping 1.35 After
Midnight 3.05 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
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BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
Part two of two. The galvanising effects of an
earthquake in Ljubljana (4/10) (r)
8.00 Border Country: The Story of Britain’s Lost
Middleland. Rory Stewart examines how the
borderlands became a zone of anarchy after
Britain split into England and Scotland a
thousand years after the Romans left (r) (AD)
9.00 Operation Grand Canyon with Dan Snow.
The historian and his team conclude their
re-creation of the 280-mile expedition through
the natural wonder that was led by the explorer
John Wesley Powell in 1869 (2/2) (r) (AD)
10.00 Timeshift: Roof Racks and Hatchbacks
— The Family Car (1/5) (r)
11.00 Maps: Power, Plunder and Possession.
How maps have reflected politics (2/3) (r) (AD)
12.00 Kew’s Forgotten Queen (r) (AD)
1.00am Border Country: The Story of Britain’s
Lost Middleland (r) (AD) 2.00 Operation
Grand Canyon with Dan Snow (r) (AD)
3.00-3.55 Timeshift: Roof Racks and
Hatchbacks — The Family Car (r) (SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00
New Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Darren is furious to find out
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7.30 First Dates Abroad. An experienced dater is
paired with a retail manager (r) (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Tattoo Fixers. Glen assists a grandfather by
removing his chat-up line leg art (AD)
10.00 Rude Tube. Alex Zane’s internet clips
include the worst wedding intro ever (r)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 Celebrity First Dates. With well-known
faces (r) (AD) 1.05am Gogglebox (r) (SL) 2.10
Tattoo Fixers (r) 3.05 Rude Tube (r) 4.00
Black-ish (r) (AD) 4.45 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.45pm A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun (r) 2.50 Come Dine with
Me (r) 3.50 Time Team. Double bill (r) 5.55
The Secret Life of the Zoo (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. A 10-month-old golden
retriever undergoes treatment (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud meets
a couple planning to construct a black-clad
private hideaway in an Essex woodland, but
torrential rain and a dangerous gas leak stall
progress on the build (4/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 The Royal House of Windsor.
An insight into the turbulent love-life of the
Prince of Wales (4/6) (r) (AD)
10.00 The Queen’s Lost Cousin. The life and
tragic death of Prince William of Gloucester, who
was the Queen’s cousin and pageboy at her
wedding, but who died in a plane crash in 1972
at the age of just 30 (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD)
12.10am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
Cooking series (r) 1.10 8 Out of 10 Cats Does
Countdown (r) 2.15 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD)
3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am The Stranger Wore a Gun
(U, 1953) Western starring Randolph Scott
12.40pm The Charge of the Light Brigade
(PG, 1968) Historical drama starring David
Hemmings 3.15 The Duel at Silver Creek
(PG, 1952) Western starring Audie Murphy
4.50 Crash Dive (PG, 1943) Romantic
wartime drama starring Tyrone Power
7.00 The Phantom (12, 1996)
A jungle-dwelling masked adventurer heads to
New York to stop a power-crazed tycoon
obtaining a magical weapon. Superhero
adventure starring Billy Zane
9.00 Kingsman: The Secret Service
(15, 2015) A streetwise teenager is given the
opportunity to work with a super-secret spy
organisation. Action comedy based on a comic
book starring Colin Firth and Taron Egerton (AD)
11.35 Skyline (15, 2010) A couple try to
escape when alien spacecraft descend from the
sky, mesmerising the humans below with
mysterious lights. Sci-fi thriller starring
Eric Balfour and Scottie Thompson
1.20am-3.35 Arbitrage (15, 2012)
Thriller starring Richard Gere
6.00am The Cube (r) 6.45 Dinner Date (r) 7.35
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.00 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 9.00 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 9.50
Dinner Date (r) 10.50 I’m a Celebrity… Get Me
Out of Here! (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.50 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.50 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! (r)
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold. A selection of
camcorder calamities, including a boy who
demonstrates a unique way to extract teeth (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Alan helps Walden
prepare for a date with Bridget (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Alan tries to
reconnect with Lyndsey (r)
9.00 Family Guy. Peter and Lois go into business
together, opening a cookie store (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy. Cleveland returns (r) (AD)
10.00 I’m a Celebrity: Extra Camp. Jungle news
and views with Scarlett Moffatt and the team
11.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! Double bill (r) (AD)
1.00am Plebs (r) (AD) 2.00 The Keith Lemon
Sketch Show (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r)
6.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 8.00 Wild at Heart (r)
(AD) 9.00 Judge Judy (r) 10.20 A Touch of Frost
(r) 12.35pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.40
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 3.45 A Touch of Frost (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. A spate of vandalism appears
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7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica
investigates an old murder case involving
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town of Cabot Cove (r) (AD)
8.00 Doc Martin. The GP is left holding the baby
after upsetting the new childminder, and hosts
a disastrous party with Louisa (2/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Endeavour. The murder of a museum
specialist leads Morse to a girls’ boarding
school with a dark history, where a note reading
“Save Me” is mysteriously slipped into his
coat pocket (2/4) (r) (AD)
11.05 Blue Murder. Janine’s professional future
looks bleak, while her domestic situation
continues to deteriorate (2/2) (r)
12.35am A Touch of Frost (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am World Cup Rivalries: England v
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10.45 Quincy ME (r) 11.50 The Sweeney (r)
12.55pm The Avengers (r) 2.00 Ironside (r)
3.00 Quincy ME (r) 4.00 The Sweeney (r)
5.00 The Avengers (r)
6.05 Storage Wars (r)
6.35 Storage Wars (r)
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7.30 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 Stuck On You: The Football Sticker Story.
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multi-billion pound industry (r)
9.00 River Monsters. Jeremy Wade tracks down
a creature that maimed a young man (r)
10.05 FILM: Full Metal Jacket (15, 1987)
Raw recruits undergo harsh training under a
domineering Marine drill sergeant before their
first clash with enemy forces. Vietnam War
drama starring Matthew Modine (AD)
12.30am The Classic Car Show. A James Bond
special (r) 1.30 The Sweeney (r) (SL) 2.30
The Protectors (r) 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 12.00 Don’t
Say It, Bring It. Double bill 1.00pm Top Gear
(AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice Road
Truckers 5.00 Timber Kings
6.00 Top Gear. Motoring magazine (AD)
7.00 Don’t Say It, Bring It. Game show
presented by Jason Byrne
7.30 Don’t Say It, Bring It. Game show
presented by Jason Byrne
8.00 Taskmaster. Greg Davies sets tasks to a
series of famous guests
9.00 Live at the Apollo. The Mock the Week
host Dara O Briain joins Frankie Boyle
10.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.
Dave asks what the term generation really
means and why his mum uses emojis
11.00 Alan Davies: As Yet Untitled.
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Parkinson and Harry Shearer
12.00 Room 101 12.40am Mock the Week
1.20 QI 2.00 Live at the Apollo 3.00 Suits (AD)
4.00 Home Shopping. Armchair buys
7.00am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine (AD) 1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London’s Burning 4.00 Pie in the
Sky 5.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
6.00 A Fine Romance. Laura meets an
Englishman abroad
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine.
Foggy comes up with a crazy idea (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. Jean calls on Alistair’s
help to do a spot of match-making
8.00 Death in Paradise. Humphrey investigates
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9.00 New Tricks. The publication of a biography
reopens an old case (2/8) (AD)
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arts and antiques squad asks old flame Sandra
to look into the murder of an antiques dealer,
who was not quite as legitimate as everyone
thought (6/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London’s Burning
2.00 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 Secrets of War
8.00 Time Team 10.00 Private Lives of the
Monarchs (AD) 11.00 Galapagos 12.00 Time
Team 2.00pm Galapagos 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00
Steptoe and Son 5.00 The Green Green Grass
6.00 The World at War. The blackouts in Britain
7.00 Time Team. Exploring the south London
district of Shooters Hill for evidence of the
secret bunkers that once formed the city’s
defence against a possible Nazi invasion
8.00 Impossible Engineering. The world’s tallest
roller coaster in Los Angeles’ Six Flags
Amusement Park, which was inspired by scenic
railways and steam catapults (AD)
9.00 Armada: 12 Days to Save England.
The sinking of the Spanish Armada (1/3)
10.00 One Foot in the Grave.
The Meldrews’ domestic harmony is thrown into
turmoil by a scowling snowman
11.00 The Green Green Grass. Marlene falls
under the spell of a former GI
12.00 Impossible Engineering. The world’s
tallest roller coaster (AD) 1.00am Time Team
2.00 Secrets of War 3.00 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 10.45pm View from Stormont.
Featuring young people from the north west
and a panel of politicians 11.45 On Assignment
12.20am The Harbour (AD) 12.45 Gone to
Pot: American Road Trip (r) (AD) 1.35
Teleshopping 2.35-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Su Shiusaidh
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Dluth-choille: Grad-Naidheachd (Jungle Bunch)
(r) 5.40 Bruno (r) 5.45 Na Floogals (r) 5.55
Tree Fu Tom 6.20 Ceistean Lara (r) 6.35
Sealgairean Spòrsail (History Hunters) (r) 7.00
Tathadh (r) 7.25 Binneas: Na Trads (r) 7.30
Speaking Our Language (r) 7.55 Earrann
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Alleluia! (Spiritual Music & Verse) (r)
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6.00am Cyw: Do Re Mi Dona (r) 6.15 Patrôl
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7.15 Sbarc (r) 7.30 Boj (r) 7.40 Teulu Ni (r)
7.50 Igam Ogam (r) 8.00 Octonots (r) 8.15
Pan Dwi’n Fawr 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r)
8.35 Tili a’i Ffrindiau (r) 8.45 Twt (r) 9.00
Nodi (r) 9.10 Sbridiri (r) 9.30 Pingu (r) 9.35
Bobi Jac (r) 9.45 Pentre Bach (r) 10.00 Do Re
Mi Dona (r) 10.15 Patrôl Pawennau (r) 10.30
Halibalw (r) 10.40 Sam Tân (r) 10.50 Bing (r)
11.00 Patrôl Pawennau (r) 11.15 Sbarc (r)
11.30 Boj (r) 11.40 Teulu Ni (r) 11.50
Igam Ogam (r) 12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
12.05pm Heno (r) 1.00 Llwybr yr Arfordir (r)
1.30 Pobl A’u Gerddi (r) 2.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 3.05 Iolo ac Indiaid America (r) (AD)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05
Stwnsh: Tag 5.35 Stwnsh: Mabinogi-Ogi 6.00
News S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05 04 Wal (r) 6.30
Parti Bwyd Beca (r) 7.00 Heno. Magazine
programme 7.30 Rownd a Rownd. While Iolo
and Cathryn prepare for their night away in
Warrington (AD) 7.55 Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm. Chester insists on pretending to Hannah
he is still a vegan, and worrying about the court
case starts to take its toll on Ed (AD) 8.25
Doctoriaid Yfory. The students reach the
half-way point of their year-long placements
9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30 Y Byd ar Bedwar.
International current affairs reports 10.00
O’r Senedd. Political stories from all corners of
Wales, the Senedd in Cardiff Bay and
Westminster 10.30 Cythrel Canu (r)
11.00-11.35 999: Y Glas (r)
14
Tuesday November 21 2017 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7502
1
2
3
Codeword No 3186
4
5
6
7
25
15
25
26
Train Tracks No 261
24
17
21
9
25
1
21
H
7
14
3
3
8
19
25
22
5
3
2
4
3
6
2
1
4
18
5
U
8
20
2
21
9
24
11
19
11
10
14
13
22
12
9
14
21
1
1
25
13
14
15
1
16
11
3
2
17
18
20
2
21
15
M
9
10
3
19
3
4
15
17
3
2
20
19
14
12
14
14
17
23
11
11
24
11
2
3
17
25
21
21
5
20
2
16
20
22
15
21
10
3
A
14
1
25
16
18
5
21
16
18
5
20
1
21
3
9
3
22
19
9
9
26
10
21
19
16
17
14
B
23
14
25
4
14
21
15
19
14
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
24
4
1
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
17
Yearly anniversary (8)
Steam bath (5)
Make very angry (9)
Greek letter F (3)
Fruit; appointment (4)
The Dogstar (6)
Central (6)
Lengthy fight (6)
Sound of a mouse (6)
CO
U
I N
C
ME
NSOR DRU
C O E N
T I
OB ED I
F
F
P C
V I L L Y MO
I
A R
I NAND TON
E E
T
UGH T E AR
L
B S U
T ERE S T N
C A E N
N TOR DRY
9
19
11
6
1
21
20
4
21
15
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
12
13
25
26
M
H
U
Down
DGE
E
EN T
R
S E S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
12
I C
H
GA S
R
E A T
D
DEN
13
15
16
17
19
21
Solution to Crossword 7501
CE
N
A S
U
C I
N
G
18 Starve; quick (4)
20 Chopper (3)
22 Small sausage (9)
23 Bar (someone) from their
native country (5)
24 Dawn (8)
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
Unseeing (5)
Proved wrong (7)
Unyielding (4)
Slow movement (6)
Viral disease (5)
Extreme tiredness (7)
Discussion meeting (7)
Exaggerated move of
impatience or anger (7)
Sports team controller (7)
Fruit bun (7)
Yacht harbour (6)
Reddish-brown colour (5)
Rough path or road (5)
Cock's crest (4)
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
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No 4014
R
U
E
H
E
S
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
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SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
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L
W
A
T
S
F
H
L
P
F
A
U
A
S
U
A
S
D
B
T
I
I
X
E
O
O
F
R
Y
B
O
S
T
Y
G
N
A
R
A
Y
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4178
Futoshiki No 3047
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
∧
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
<
∧
3
∧
3
∨
4
30
3
29
12
16
27
29
8
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
10
11
3
4
4
4
19
<
17
24
28
38
19
3
16
16
12
5
6
>
5
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2006
21
∧
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
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0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
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No 4013
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
16
29
30
4
10
29
19
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
8
5
8
28
3
4
6
14
4
12
6
4
© PUZZLER MEDIA
22
the times | Tuesday November 21 2017
15
1G T
MindGames
White: David Navara
Black: Sune Berg Hansen
European Team Championship,
Reykjavik 2015
Queen’s Gambit Declined
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 d5 4 Nc3
Nbd7 5 cxd5 exd5 6 Bg5 Be7 7 e3
c6 8 Qc2 0-0 9 Bd3 Re8 10 0-0
Nf8 11 h3 g6
A number of very strong players, including Garry Kasparov,
have tried this in their games.
12 Rab1
This is standard preparation for
the traditional minority attack
with b2-b4-b5.
12 ... Ne6 13 Bh4 Ng7 14 b4 a6 15
a4 Bf5 16 b5 axb5 17 axb5 Bxd3
18 Qxd3 Nf5
Besides attacking the bishop on
h4 this knight has another goal: it
is aiming for the d6-square from
where it can establish itself on the
outpost on c4.
19 Bxf6 Bxf6 20 Qc2 Nd6 21 Nd2
Black’s position is going to be
unpleasant unless he finds a way
to gain counterplay. Hansen now
goes about obtaining this counterplay in a highly creative way.
21 ... Nf5 22 bxc6 bxc6 23 Na4
Bxd4!
A real bolt from the blue. Black
gets a very strong initiative for the
sacrificed piece.
24 exd4 Nxd4 25 Qd1 Qa5 26
Ra1 Qb4 27 Nf3
No doubt rather shell-shocked
by Black’s 23rd move, Navara
doesn’t find the best defence.
White can hang on with the careful retreat 27 Nb1. That’s not to
say that his position is at all
pleasant after 27 ... Ne2+ 28 Kh2
d4, because none of his pieces are
particularly well placed.
27 ... Nxf3+ 28 gxf3 Re5 29 f4
Qxf4 30 Kh1
After 30 Re1 Rxe1+ 31 Qxe1
Rxa4, Black regains the piece with
three extra pawns.
30 ... Qe4+ 31 Kh2 Qf4+ 32 Kh1
d4 33 Rg1 Qxf2 34 Rf1 Qe3 35
Rf3 Qe4 36 Raa3 Rb8 37 Ra1 c5
38 Kh2 c4 39 Qf1 Qd5 40 Ra2
Rbe8 41 Rf6 d3 42 Nc3 Qd4 43
Rxf7 Qxc3 44 Raa7
If 44 Raf2 then 44 ... Re2 would
snuff out White’s counterplay.
44 ... Re2+ 45 Kg3 d2+ 46 Qf3
Qxf3+ 47 Kxf3 R2e7 White resigns
HARDER
♠♥5
♦J 10
♣Q J 10
♠♥Q J
♦7
♣5
N
W
E
S
♠4
♥6
♦K 6
♣-
♠♥A 9 8
♦♣8
If declarer had led dummy’s
queen of hearts, East could have
won the ace, exited with a club and
waited for West to win a diamond
— down one. Instead, declarer
made the key play of ruffing a club
(you see why he needed to keep a
third club in dummy) to remove
East’s club exit. He cashed the king
of diamonds (in case East held a
heart fewer and a diamond more)
and only then led his second heart.
Dummy’s last two cards were
the minors. Perhaps West should not intervene and tip off his shape, given how
unlikely he is to end up declaring.
(3) North can see his hand may be worthless,
unless hearts are trumps. After all, KQJ10x
is a six-card suit.
(4) Unselfish but South can also see that
6♥ will be best facing ♥ KQJxxx “and out”.
(5) Lightner double, asking for an unusual
opening lead. West was to regret his
decision. If he had passed 6♥ , East would
have led a diamond, declarer winning and
leading a heart. East would have won, given
his partner a spade ruff and received a diamond ruff in return. Down two.
(6) Understandable but unwise.
(7) I like it. The odds favour redoubling when
you know you won’t go down more than one.
Contract: 6♠ redbled, Opening Lead: ♦Q
the queen-jack of hearts while
East’s were the ace-nine. East won
the ace but had to give dummy the
last trick, as declarer shed his losing diamond. Redoubled slam
made. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
÷4
132
+ 41 x 2 + 66
118
x8
50%
OF IT
–7
x 2 – 14
50%
OF IT
1/2
x 3 + 57
4/5
OF IT
x 3 + 612
75%
OF IT
OF IT
–6
SQUARE
IT
+ 74 + 1/2
+ 558 x 2 + 786
OF IT
50%
OF IT
6
4
Killer Moderate No 5731
13
4
7
17
17
6min
21
17
8
17
8
18
16
13
17
7
7
7
3
15
11
10
17
8
15
17
12
5
3
15
Killer Tough No 5732
20
12
24
21
13
14
20
5
3
28min
21
11
11
30
12
11
8
1 3
5 2 1
1 3
1 5
3 4 1
2
9 8 5
7 9
8 6 7
5 9
10
4
3
8
2
7
6
5
1
9
2
7
5
8
1
9
4
6
3
5
2
1
7
3
8
9
4
6
8
4
7
6
1
9
3
5
2
3
6
9
2
5
4
7
1
8
8
5
6
1
3
7
2
9
4
2
3
5
4
8
7
6
9
1
4
2 2
6
18
4
2
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
3
x
x
5
x
x
-
=
315
5
2
8 9
1
9 7 5
7 1 2 4
1 3
1
1
3 1 4 2
5 3 2 1 7
5 1 3 9
3 5
=
8
=
12
7
2
4
6
9
8
3
5
1
6
8
7
9
2
4
1
3
5
3
4
1
7
6
5
9
2
8
5
9
2
3
8
1
6
4
7
9
1
6
3
2
5
8
7
4
7
8
4
1
9
6
2
3
5
1
7
2
8
4
3
5
6
9
6
9
8
5
7
1
4
2
3
4
5
3
9
6
2
1
8
7
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 18 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
We’ve
= 39 works?
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
5
3
4
2
1
Train Tracks 260
S
E URO
D
E
X
O
O
E M P OWE
U
I
E
E
B
N
NUDG
T
G
S
UMP
S E N S E
J
A
S
I
O F F E R
HOR I Z O
K
L
Q
Y
E
Z
E V ACU E E
L I L A
D
R
I
S
A
E
L E N S
T U X E DO
2
1
A T U
W
V E
A
P K I
8
3
6
7
2
4
1
5
9
4
1
5
8
9
3
2
6
7
9
7
2
5
1
6
4
3
8
2
8
1
9
3
7
6
4
5
5
8
7
6
3
9
4
1
2
9
2
4
5
7
1
3
6
8
5
4
7
6
8
2
3
9
1
6
9
8
4
7
1
5
2
3
7
2
4
3
5
8
9
1
6
1
5
3
2
6
9
7
8
4
6
3
1
4
2
8
9
7
5
7
4
9
3
8
5
1
2
6
1
5
8
2
9
6
7
3
4
2
6
3
7
1
4
5
8
9
4
1
5
8
6
7
2
9
3
8
7
2
9
4
3
6
5
1
3
9
6
1
5
2
8
4
7
3
2
∨
1 < 4
1
5
∨
4
4 > 3
1
8
2
5 > 3
+
÷
1
∧
4
4
5
∨
5 > 3
2
3
7
x
x
x
2
1
1
2
5
+
+
+
x
6
9
8
3
7
2
5
1
4
2
7
4
5
8
1
6
9
3
5
3
1
9
4
6
8
7
2
9
1
3
7
5
8
2
4
6
4
2
7
6
3
9
1
8
5
8
5
6
1
2
4
7
3
9
1
8
9
4
6
5
3
2
7
3
4
5
2
1
7
9
6
8
7
6
2
8
9
3
4
5
1
B
E
A
C
H
D
U
G
A
A
C
P
O
X
G
N
L
A
I
D
E
Lexica 4012
5
Set Square 2008
3
Suko 2087
Lexica 4011
2 < 3
4
2
K
N
O
C
K
Sudoku 9467
3
6
9
1
4
5
8
7
2
Futoshiki 3046
12
O
R
D
E
R
4
3
Killer 5730
2
6 2
3
3
S T
R
L I
M
UM
E
F R
1
3 6
7 9
5 8
Sudoku 9466
9
1
3
4
5
2
8
7
6
17
3
x
Codeword 3185
7
6
8
9
KenKen 4177
10
-
Kakuro 2005
13
18
All the digits
= 14 from 1-9 are
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Cell Blocks 3068
17
25
6
÷
x
11
7
4
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Solutions
1
6
9
5
4
3
7
8
2
8
12
10
6
÷
Killer 5729
6
3
10
x
Sudoku 9465
22
2
x
Yesterday’s answers
arroyo, oar, oat, oaty, orator, oratory,
orra, roar, roo, root, rooty, rort, rorty,
rot, rota, rotary, rotor, ryot, taro, too,
tor, toro, torr, toy, troy, tyro
18
4 2
2
Set Square No 2009
From these letters, make words of
three or more letters, always
including the central letter. Answers
must be in the Concise Oxford
Dictionary, excluding capitalised
words, plurals, conjugated verbs (past
tense etc), adverbs ending in LY,
comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 10 words, average;
14, good; 19, very good; 25, excellent
Bridge Andrew Robson
Redoubled slams are always excit- Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
ing and today’s deal was one of the
Rubber
♠6 5
best.
♥KQ J 1 0 2
Declarer won West’s queen of
♦7 5 2
diamonds lead with the ace and
♣5 4 2
♠9 8 7 3 2
♠drew trumps in five rounds, careN
♥A 9 8 4
♥7 5
fully discarding a diamond and
W
E
♦3
♦Q J 10 9 8 4 S
two hearts from dummy but cru♣8 7 3
♣
Q J 10 9 6
cially retaining all three small
♠ A KQ J 10 4
clubs. At tricks seven and eight, he
♥6 3
cashed the ace-king of clubs, more
♦A K 6
key plays. At trick nine, declarer
♣A K
led a heart to dummy’s king.
S
W
N
E
If East had won the ace, declarer
2♣(1) 2NT(2) 3♥
Pass
would have had an easy ride, ruff3♠
Pass
4♥ (3) Pass
ing East’s club return and leading
6♥ (4) Dbl(5)
Pass
Pass
over to dummy’s queen-jack of
6♠
Pass
Pass
Dbl(6)
hearts, shedding his losing diaRedbl(7) End
mond. However, East naturally let
(1) Any hand with 23 or more points.
the king of hearts win.
(2) Unusual, showing five-five (or more) in
We have reached this ending:
x2
Polygon
The Queen’s Gambit Declined
Move by Move is published by
Everyman Chess.
________
á D D D D] Winning Move
àD DRD g ]
ß 0pD DBi] White to play. This position is from
Perez, St Louis 2017.
ÞD D D Dp] So-Dominguez
Both kings are in some trouble in this
Ý D D D )] endgame. How did White now wrap up
ÜD D D D ] with a combination that quickly led to a
Ûr)KD DRD] decisive gain of material?
ÚD D DrD ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
37
EASY
MEDIUM
+9
© PUZZLER MEDIA
In the run-up to Christmas, I
focus today on the new book by
grandmaster Nigel Davies on the
Queen’s Gambit Declined, a
mainstay of numerous solid exponents with Black, such as Geza
Maroczy, Emanuel Lasker, José
Capablanca and our own Nigel
Short. I was pleased to see that
the author includes a chapter on
the newly fashionable Catalan.
________
árD 1rDkD]
àD D DpDp]
ß DpD dpD]
ÞD DpDnD ]
ÝND g D D]
ÜD D ) DP]
Û DQH )PD]
ÚDRD DRI ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Gambit Declined
Cell Blocks No 3069
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
6
-
x
Quiz 1 Priti Patel 2 E 3 Chris De Burgh
4 Much Ado About Nothing 5 Muscles
6 New Zealand 7 Central hypoventilation
syndrome (CHS) — it can cause respiratory
arrest during sleep 8 Lester Young
9 Laplace transform — named after PierreSimon, marquis de Laplace 10 Adolphe Adam
11 Elmer Gantry 12 Road traffic accident
13 Tros 14 Monica Seles 15 The Arno
9
P
L
A
O
C
U
S
K
W
E
R
I
T
A
R
I
U
B
M
I
B
O
E
Word watch
Cephalaria (b) A plant, a
giant scabious
Aprication (c) The act of
sunbathing or basking in
the sun
Cephalagra (b) A headache
Brain Trainer
Easy 9; Medium 921;
Harder 2,472
Chess 1 Rxg7! Kxg7 2 Bd3+
Kf6 3 Bxf1 wins a piece
21.11.17
MindGames
Mild No 9468
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9469
5 8
8
6 9
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
7
Aprication
a The act of rubbing
b The drying of fruit
c Sunbathing
3
3 8
7
2
8 1
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
8
4
4 5
1
4
8 1
3 9
Cephalagra
a Overcautiousness
b A headache
c Eastern dance music
Super fiendish No 9470
6
7
5 4
Cephalaria
a Fluid on the brain
b A plant
c Resoluteness
2 1
9 4
9
6
1
7 4
8
3 9
3
12 To what sort of
incident do police
officers refer when
they mention an RTA?
15
Islands include the
easternmost point of
which Commonwealth
country?
7 “Ondine’s curse”
is the historical
term for which
respiratory disorder?
8 Charles Mingus
dedicated the song
Goodbye Pork Pie Hat to
which jazz saxophonist?
6 The Forty-Fours
in the Chatham
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
9 Named after a
French scientist, which
integral transform
converts a function
from its time domain
into the s-domain?
10 The opera Si j’étais
roi (1852) is a work
by which French
composer?
11 In a Sinclair Lewis
novel, which title
13 In Greek mythology,
the beautiful youth
Ganymede was the son
of which Trojan king?
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 965
14 In 1993, which tennis
player was stabbed
while playing
Magdalena Maleeva in
Hamburg’s Citizen Cup?
15 Which river
flowing through Pisa
is pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 966
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
16
18
19
20
21
22
24
23
25
H
O
U
S
E
H
U
S
B
A
N
D
D
F
C
P
S
P I N E
AGA I N S
S
T
M N O
T OW E
O T H E R E
A
R
H
F E
A ND S H A K E
C
A
O O
F OR T N I GH
U E
E
E
G
V E R S I O
MA S S
C
E
O O
E
T A S E
E NMA R K
E
T
E
E
T
T
E
R
C
E
N
T
E
N
A
R
Y
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Tracy
8
9
9
5 7
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
character becomes
a Methodist minister
in the fictional city
of Zenith?
5 Which parts of
the body are studied
in myology?
8
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 Which MP resigned
as secretary of state
for international
development over
unofficial meetings
in Israel?
4 The Sicilian portcity of Messina is
the setting for which
Shakespeare comedy?
9
6
2
9
9
6 2 5
2
9
8
7
3 4 9
3
1
5
5
4
6
9
3
6
1
5
1
7 5
GETTY IMAGES
3 Who had a 1986 No 1
with The Lady in Red?
2
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
2 What is the most
frequently used letter in
the English language?
7 3
5
4
6 1
2
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
Across
1 Uninspiring team beaten (4)
3 Identify granny in street,
standing still (8)
9 Illustrations in the office
capturing queen (7)
10 A Greek starter (5)
11 Was likely to produce second
skin (5)
12 Blunt, married couple on
island (6)
14 Premier to brief clergyman
(5,8)
17 Man in the dark, reportedly (6)
19 Firm keeping old stock (5)
22 Orange bream at sea (5)
23 In a poor state, ladder put
away (3-4)
24 Precious stone may make
them stay (8)
25 Not wanting to work in
Madrid, lecturing (4)
Down
1 Intricate patterns in section of
church (8)
2 Joint initially twisted in boggy
ground (5)
4 Rank institute badly, as
alternate (4,2,2,5)
5 Hold both ends of garter snake
(5)
6 Choose a soft tip (7)
7 Vehicle in trading area
overturned (4)
8 A drink from one may give
you courage? (6)
13 Caution girl (8)
15 US soldier set up impressive
base (7)
16 At home pointer is receiving
attention (2,4)
18 Saddle strap fixed right (5)
20 Steer clear of a chasm? (5)
21 Epic decline, first in ages (4)
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