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The Times 29 August 2017

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daily newspaper of the year
Tuesday August 29 2017 | thetimes.co.uk | No 72314
Only �to subscribers �60
2G
How hot is your waiter?
Why looks matter in restaurants
Henry Winter
Arsenal rotten
A
ffrom the top
Sport
Page 55
Times2
2
Council under fire for fostering Christian girl with Muslims
Andrew Norfolk
Chief Investigative Reporter
A council that placed a child with a
foster family whose use of Arabic confused and upset her is to be forced by
the children?s commissioner to explain
its decision.
The Times revealed yesterday that
the five-year-old girl, a native English
speaker from a Christian family, has
spent six months with Muslim foster
carers who allegedly removed her
necklace, which had a cross, and refused to allow her to eat bacon.
A social services supervisor for
Tower Hamlets in east London described the child sobbing and begging
not to be returned to the foster family
because ?she doesn?t understand the
Arabic?. The girl is also understood to
have said that she was regularly expected to eat meals on the floor.
Anne Longfield, the children?s commissioner for England, said that her
office would contact the director of
children?s services at Tower Hamlets to
establish more about the facts of the
case. ?I am concerned at these reports.
A child?s religious, racial and cultural
background should be taken into consideration when they are placed with
foster carers,? she said.
Local authorities in England making
a foster placement are required to give
due consideration to the child?s ?religious persuasion, racial origin and cultural and linguistic background?.
Robert Halfon, chairman of the
Commons education committee, said
the situation was ?incredibly concerning? and that it was vital to establish
whether the case was a one-off. ?I?d be
equally concerned if a Muslim child
who didn?t speak English was placed
with a Christian foster carer whose
family didn?t speak the child?s language
and at times appeared to show little respect for his cultural heritage,? he said.
Family offered a place to stay, page 7
GRAHAM HUNT/ALAMY LIVE NEWS
Why you?re
never too
old to start
keeping fit
Chris Smyth Health Editor, Barcelona
negotiations by the end of the year
would trigger a damaging business exodus as companies begin to implement
contingency plans for a hard Brexit.
Ministers are determined not to give
away valuable negotiating cards ? on
either money or the Irish border ?
without concessions from the EU on a
transition deal and a future customs
agreement.
In his statement, Mr Barnier said he
was ready to intensify the pace of
negotiations if the UK came forward
The sight of a middle-age spread being
hauled along in box-fresh trainers
might attract mocking smiles, but its
owner is likely to have the last laugh.
Getting fit in your 40s and 50s could
halve your long-term risk of a stroke, a
study has found. Even couch potatoes
who got in shape were less likely to
suffer a stroke over the next three
decades than those who had been fit but
had stopped working out, according to
results that suggest it is never too late to
start exercising.
Researchers said that their findings
offered encouragement to those whose
youthful fitness had faded, while also
serving as a warning to people not to let
themselves go in middle age.
Although previous studies have suggested that improving fitness in midlife can protect the heart, scientists had
never linked this to stroke risk. About
100,000 people a year in Britain suffer a
stroke, either through disruption of
blood supply to the brain or bleeding
within it.
Erik Prestgaard, of the University of
Oslo, looked at data on 1,400 men who
were recruited in the 1970s and had
their fitness tested every seven years,
with their breathing monitored while
they cycled. Accounting for age, about a
third had become fitter while the rest
had declined. During the 28 years of the
study, 199 suffered a stroke.
The quarter of men who increased
their fitness most were 56 per cent less
likely to be stroke victims than the
quarter whose fitness declined the
most, after adjusting for known risks
such as blood pressure, weight and
smoking.
?It?s a really big risk reduction,? said
Dr Prestgaard, who presented the
results at the European Society of
Cardiology Congress in Barcelona.
He said that the improvements were
often in unfit men who were ?just getting themselves together?, rather than
aiming to become extremely fit.
?They weren?t marathon runners, or
anything like that, they weren?t in any
Continued on page 2, col 3
Continued on page 8, col 1
Hot stuff The sun rising over Colmer?s Hill, Dorset, yesterday as mist shrouds the fields around Bridport. It was the warmest August bank holiday on record. Page 5
It?s time to get serious,
Brussels tells Britain
EU?s Barnier raises tensions in latest round of Brexit talks
Oliver Wright Policy Editor
Francis Elliott, Sarah Collins
The European Union?s chief negotiator
has warned Britain to start ?negotiating
seriously? as the stand-off over the
Brexit divorce bill intensified.
Speaking before the latest round of
talks began in Brussels today, Michel
Barnier voiced frustration at the government?s ?ambiguity? and the failure
of ministers to publish a position paper
on the UK?s potential financial
liabilities. As the rhetoric on both sides
escalated, a senior government source
described Mr Barnier?s attack as ?illconsidered and unhelpful?, while David
Davis, the Brexit secretary, pointedly
called on the European Commission to
show ?flexibility and imagination? in
this week?s discussions.
British sources made clear that the
lack of a position paper was entirely deliberate and that the government was
not prepared to commit to a financial
settlement without the EU agreeing to
discuss a transition package.
They added that the policy docu-
ments issued in the past fortnight on
future customs arrangements, Northern Ireland and judicial co-operation
were designed to illustrate how intertwined all the Brexit issues are.
The caustic exchanges are leading to
concerns that the issue will not be resolved before a meeting of EU leaders
in October that will decide whether to
authorise the start of future trade talks
with the UK.
Philip Hammond, the chancellor, has
warned the prime minister that failure
to make significant progress in the
2
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
News
T O D AY ? S E D I T I O N
More offenders
released early
Border checks
double delays
Prosecco can
damage teeth
The justice ministry is
pressing ahead with
plans for more halfway
houses to allow sexual
and violent prisoners
to be released from jail,
despite staff concerns
about security. Page 4
Stricter border
controls at airports
across Europe have
almost doubled the
number of delayed
flights, according to
airlines and airport
operators. Page 5
Drinking prosecco is a
?double whammy? for
your teeth, dentists
have warned, with the
sparkling wine?s acidity
causing erosion and its
sweetness encouraging
decay. Page 11
COMMENT
As foreign secretary Boris Johnson has
shrivelled under the spotlight of scrutiny
RACHEL SYLVESTER, PAGE 23
Storm dumps
Housebuilders
11 trillion gallons under scrutiny
England on top
at Headingley
Tens of thousands of
Houston residents
were stranded in
flooding caused by
Hurricane Harvey?s
11 trillion gallon
downpour, US officials
said. Page 28
Developers are being
given payments worth
millions of pounds by
the organisation that
provides warranties for
new-build homes,
raising fears over
transparency. Page 35
Moeen Ali sensed the
chance to ?bury? West
Indies after his innings
of 84 put England in
position to complete a
remarkable comeback
in the second Test at
Headingley. Page 60
THUNDERER 24
LETTERS 26
LEADING ARTICLES 27
WORLD 28
BUSINESS 35
REGISTER 45
SPORT 50
CROSSWORD 60
TV & RADIO TIMES2
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thetimes
timesandsundaytimes
DINNER
TONIGHT
Chicken, leek and
tarragon gratin
A huge tarragon plant
swaying in the breeze
of a Tarragona garden
in Catalonia prompted
this. The aniseed tang
haunts leeks and
chicken held in a
creamy, white wine
sauce all hidden under
a sliced potato
topping. It emerges
from the oven with a
crisp carapace of
potato. Serve with
green beans, peas,
mixed leaves or
tomato halves roasted
at the same time.
Serves 2 Prep 30 min
Cook 30 min
Ingredients: 400g
medium-size potatoes;
400g trimmed leeks;
1 tbsp butter; 2 tbsp
olive oil; 2 tsp flour;
100ml white wine;
200ml milk; 200g,
approx, roast chicken;
bunch tarragon.
Boil the potatoes, drain
and cool. Quarter the
leeks lengthways. Slice
across into small
scraps. Melt the butter
in 1 tbsp oil in a
spacious frying pan,
stir in the leeks and
cook over a medium
heat until soft. Dust
thetimes
flour over the top,
stirring until
disappeared. Add the
wine, stirring until
thick, then add the
milk. Reduce the heat
and simmer, stirring,
for a few minutes.
Meanwhile, tear the
chicken into bite-size
pieces and season.
Strip the tarragon
leaves from stalks and
chop coarsely. Scatter
chicken and tarragon
over the leeks, stir
then tip into a 1� litre
capacity gratin-style
dish. Remove potato
skin and slice thinly.
Cover the surface with
overlapping slices.
Paint with remaining
oil. Heat the oven to
200C/gas mark 6. Bake
for 30-40 minutes.
Lindsey Bareham
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available only in the United Kingdom and Ireland
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29
14
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16
16
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17
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Very warm and humid in southeast,
fresher with heavy showers in
Scotland. Full forecast, page 49
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syndication@thetimes.co.uk
Amazon signals grocery
war by slashing prices
Martin Strydom
Amazon has raised the prospect of
cheaper groceries in Britain after it cut
prices substantially on its first day in
charge of the organic supermarket
chain Whole Foods.
The giant online retailer knocked as
much as a third off popular items at its
460 shops in Britain and North America. The move, which Amazon has said
is just the beginning, raised fears among
supermarkets of a war that would drive
down prices on both sides of the Atlantic, but it would offer some welcome relief to squeezed British households.
?We?re determined to make healthy
and organic food affordable for everyone,? Jeff Wilke, chief executive of
Amazon?s consumer division, said.
The $13.7 billion (�.6 billion) deal
means a dramatic change for the grocery sector and is further evidence that
the ecommerce giant intends to take on
British supermarkets. Jeff Bezos, Amazon?s chief executive, who once de-
scribed his approach to the publishing
industry as a ?cheetah pursuing a sickly
gazelle?, has made it clear that there is
no sector of retail, including online
food delivery, that Amazon does not
want to dominate.
In anticipation, shares in UK food retailers slipped last Friday, with Tesco,
Marks & Spencer, Sainsbury?s and Morrisons all closing lower. The move could
weigh on shares this week.
The price of bananas at Whole
Foods? nine UK shops dropped from
�79 a kilogramme to �20, while organic tomatoes on the vine fell 31 per
cent to �40 from �49.
More established rivals in the UK are
worried about increased competition
as they fight rising wage costs, incursions by German discount chains and
increasingly wary consumers who have
seen the price of food jump due to the
weak pound.
Fraser McKevitt, head of retail and
consumer insight at the retail analyst
Kantar Worldpanel, said: ?Amazon is
committed to cracking the grocery
market, and a business like Whole
Foods brings with it many of the crucial
ingredients the ecommerce giant has
been missing in its other forays into
food and drink: the power of a physical
presence on the high street.?
Since the online giant launched Amazon Fresh, its grocery delivery service,
in the UK last year it has aggressively
expanded from 69 postcodes to more
than 300 areas in London and the
South East. The rapid growth has
meant its range of products increasing
from 100,000 at launch to 180,000
within a year, including groceries from
speciality suppliers.
A range of Whole Foods products
will soon be available on Amazon?s website and through its Fresh delivery
service.
Charlie O?Shea, an analyst at
Moody?s, said that it was not only food
retailers who would ?have to look over
their shoulders at the Amazon train
coming down the tracks?.
Teachers always cheat, says Ofqual
Jerome Starkey
There are always some teachers who
cheat, the exams watchdog said yesterday after two of the country?s most expensive private schools were embroiled
in a scandal over leaked exams.
The Office of Qualifications and
Examination Regulation (Ofqual)
promised to review rules that let teachers set their pupils? papers after two
senior members of staff at Eton and
Winchester colleges were accused of
impropriety. The watchdog said that
some cheating was inevitable. ?In any
given year there are unfortunately a
very small number of incidents, such as
these at Winchester and Eton,? a
spokesman said.
Winchester College said that it had
suspended Laurence Wolff, 56, the
continued from page 1
Brexit talks
with clear positions on all of the bloc?s
three priority issues ? citizens, money
and Ireland.
?To be honest, I?m concerned. Time
passes quickly,? Mr Barnier said. ?We
need UK positions on all separation
issues. This is necessary to make sufficient progress. We must start negotiating seriously.
?We need UK papers that are clear in
order to have constructive negotiations, and the sooner we remove the
ambiguity, the sooner we will be in a
position to discuss the future relationship and a transitional period.?
Mr Davis said the talks would be
about ?driving forward the technical
discussions across all the issues?.
?We want to lock in the points where
we agree, unpick the areas where we
disagree, and make further progress on
the whole range of issues,? he said. ?But
in order to do that we require flexibility
and imagination from both sides, like
the European Council asked for on
some subjects,? he added, referring to
EU leaders? political guidelines on Irish
issues.
Under one proposal mooted within
the Brexit department, the UK would
agree to continue payments into the
EU budget for two years after leaving in
return for preferential access to the
single market and customs union. Yes-
head of its art history department, over
allegations that he gave details of two
exam papers to 13 of his pupils.
Days earlier Eton College confirmed
that it had dismissed its head of economics, Mo Tanweer, for giving confidential information in the form of practice questions before an exam. Mr
Tanweer had been due to take over as
deputy headmaster. Both men had
worked with the exam board Cambridge International Examinations to
help to set their respective papers. The
board declined to comment.
Simon Henderson, Eton?s headmaster, wrote to pupils this month saying
that ?candidates at Eton were inadvertent recipients of confidential information?, which had forced the exam board
to annul the boys? results.
Timothy Hands, headmaster at
Winchester, said that it had taken the
matter ?very seriously? and co-operated with the exam board. ?No boy was to
blame and the board used standard
procedures to award final grades,? he
told The Daily Telegraph.
The incident came to light after
pupils at Charterhouse, a private school
in Surrey, heard what had happened at
Winchester and told their teachers. Mr
Wolff has since retired, the school said.
Fees at all three schools exceed
�,000 a year.
The Department for Education said
that it was up to the exam board to inform Ofqual and investigate.
A government report on teacher
malpractice, published in December,
showed a six-fold increase in incidents
involving teachers and college staff
from 2006 to 2012.
terday the French government denied
that it would be prepared to sign up to
such a deal and start talks as early as
October. Unusually, it issued a statement describing the reports as ?founded on absolutely nothing?.
British and EU diplomats privately
acknowledge that a solution to Britain?s
exit bill must come in part from a
transitional arrangement, which would
effectively continue the UK?s budget
contributions. This would cover the gap
in the EU?s budget for the two years
after Brexit, while allowing Britain to
portray the payments as the cost of an
implementation period to benefit business, rather than as debts.
Britain pays about �billion a year to
the EU. Brussels is expected to demand
a total net Brexit divorce payment in
the region of � billion.
In internal government discussions,
Mr Hammond has relayed the concern
of business chiefs that key decisions
cannot be delayed much longer.
?Hammond?s point is that you?ve got
company X about to make this critical
decision, you can?t just say, ?Trust us,
we?ll get there in the end?,? a Downing
Street source said. Among those likely
to move areas of their operation outside
the UK are pharmaceutical, chemical
and financial companies who rely on
the EU?s regulatory framework for
access to European markets.
Tug-of-love
children ?face
Brexit limbo?
Justin Webb, page 24
Leading article, page 27
Frances Gibb Legal Editor
Abducted children taken abroad and
caught up in divorce cases could be put
at greater risk after Brexit, politicians
and lawyers have said.
The warnings come in response to the
government?s policy paper on a framework under Brexit for ?civil judicial
co-operation? on cross-border commerce, trade and family relationships.
Delays on a deal, or no deal at all,
could put British children into legal
limbo, said Wes Streeting, Labour MP
and supporter of Open Britain, which
campaigns against a hard Brexit.
Tom Brake, the Liberal Democrat
Brexit spokesman, said the policy paper
?exposes the reality of a no-deal Brexit
? abducted children at greater risk and
families plunged into uncertainty?.
Daniel Eames, chairman of the international committee of Resolution, the
association of family lawyers, said that
close co-operation with the EU on
family law matters was vital. Without
reciprocal rules on EU-UK cases, there
could be no legal certainty, he said.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
3
2GM
News
Family rescued from reef shipwreck
MICHAEL RUNKEL/ROBERT HARDING/GETTY IMAGES
Bernard Lagan, Callum Adams
It was supposed to have been the
adventure of a lifetime. A couple set sail
from Spain last year to travel across the
Atlantic and the South Pacific and show
their two children the most exotic
climes the world had to offer.
But in the early hours yesterday the
British family?s voyage of discovery
took a terrifying turn. Their 50ft catamaran ran aground in the darkness as
they battled wild seas near an uninhabited reef in the South Pacific Ocean.
Since their trip began in April last year,
Avanti, their vessel, had carried Bobby
Cooper, his partner, Cheryl Kerr, and
their two children, Lauren, believed to
be 13, and Robbie, 11, from Europe to
Venezuela and on to French Polynesia.
At 2.30am yesterday Mr Cooper, an
experienced sailor from Stirling, made an emergency distress signal to the New Zealand
rescue co-ordination centre,
more than 1,500 miles away.
The distress signal, conveyed
by satellite, gave the catamaran?s exact location on Beveridge Reef and the New Zealand authorities immediately
sent out an emergency radio
alert to ships that it was
hoped would be near by.
It was by pure luck, the
New Zealand maritime
authorities said, that a large
boat registered in New Zeaoon inside
land was sheltering in a lagoon
the atoll?s reef when the family?s catamaran ran aground.
The crew of the Dona Catharina, a
60ft sailing boat with two masts, had
been monitoring the emergency marine radio frequency when the distress
signal came through. It was extremely
close to the stricken vessel.
Martin Vogel, captain of the Dona
Catharina, was able to locate the family
by radio 20 minutes later in the darkness. Once daylight broke, Mr Vogel
reached them with a liferaft. By then
the catamaran was a wreck, he said.
?They were pretty distressed but
they?re all sleeping now,? Mr Vogel said
via satellite phone from the Dona
Catharina. ?Honestly, they?re coping
remarkably well.?
The family appeared to have started
their adventure in Palma, Majorca,
before setting sail on the Avanti. By late
October they had reached the Grenadines off the coast of Venezuela and
carried on to the isolated French Polynesian Marquesas Islands in the midPacific by early June.
Lauren documented their journey on
Facebook, posting images of idyllic
Bobby Cooper,
Cheryl Kerr and
their children,
Lauren and Robbie,
ran aground on a
South Pacific reef.
Lauren had posted
updates on
Facebook of their
travels on the Avanti
Life on the high seas
1 Apr 2016 Leaves Palma
in Majorca, Spain
2 Oct-Dec 2016
Family spend time in
Grenada, Mayreau,
Martinique and Antigua
50 miles
Niue
North Atlantic
Ocean
5 Beveridge
Reef
3 May 8, 2017 Daughter
posts picture from
Galapagos islands
4
4 Jun-Aug, 2017
Family spend time on various islands of
French Polynesia, including Bora Bora
1
2
3
Panama
Canal
South Pacific
Ocean
5 Aug 28, 2017
Catamaran crashes on Beveridge Reef,
150 miles from the island of Niue
2,000 miles
beaches, sharks and stingrays, and her father?s fishing exploits.
The family encountered
n
heavy seas and began to run
m
into trouble 248 miles from
the island state of Niue.
The Dona Catharina, which
and for
had sailed from New Zealand
Niue to support a study of humpback
helter close
whales, unwittingly took shelter
to the stricken craft. Mr Vogel had
h
already put down his anchor when the
Avanti ran aground, according to New
Zealand?s rescue co-ordination centre.
Travis Wizniuk, who sailed on his
own boat alongside the family for part
of their journey, told The Times: ?I know
them very well as we cruised with them
for seven months. Bobby Cooper was
one of the best sailors I have ever met.?
Geoff Lunt, a senior search and rescue officer at the co-ordination centre,
said that the family?s catamaran remained grounded on the reef and
would probably break up.
Mr Vogel said his seven crew on
board the Dona Catharina had been intent on completing the rescue and had
not yet spoken to the family in detail
about what happened before their craft
hit the reef. He said he was unsure if
they were hoping to shelter at the reef
or were simply unaware of it.
He said that the lagoon inside the
reef can provide calm water for boats
but the Avanti had run aground on the
opposite side from the lagoon?s narrow
entrance. In
an interview
ith th
with
the New Zealand Herald Mr Vogel
said that the family had been able to
gather clothes, passports and a few
treasured items before being rescued.
Friends of the family launched an
appeal for funds on the website Just
Giving. It said: ?We?re raising $20,000
to help Bobby Cooper and his family
who have just lost their boat Avanti and
all their belongings on Beveridge Reef
in the South Pacific.?
It added: ?Bobby, Cheryl, Lauren &
Robbie Cooper have been crossing the
Pacific on their boat Avanti. Not only
has the trip already thrown up some
challenges, they have now had the misfortune to be grounded on Beveridge
reef with the total loss of the boat. They
are all safe and have been picked up by
another yacht.?
Last night the site had raised more
than $15,000.
Mr Vogel said that the weather was
still poor and that he planned to complete his journey to Niue with the
family on board.
You?ll need to sit down for this one . . . Wind chimes can fool your
A mother who thought that the sound
of her grandmother?s voice had been
lost forever was shocked after hearing
her talking through speakers on a
bench.
Sarah Weald, 45, from Chelmsford in
Essex, was sitting waiting for her
daughter when she pressed a button on
the seat and heard her grandmother,
Muriel Lee, describing her childhood in
a 45-second interview for a Chelmsford
archive. It was the first time that she had
heard her grandmother?s voice in 15
years. Muriel, who played an important
role in bringing up Ms Weald and her
two siblings, Simon and Sue, passed
away in 2002, six years after being recorded. The family believed that no
recordings had been made of her.
?I walk past the bench on the way to
work every day and I knew that it talked, but I had no idea what the voices
Sarah Weald found her grandmother?s
voice playing from speakers on a bench
were saying,? Ms Weald said. ?I had often wondered about it. It was only when
I had a few minutes to spare before
meeting my daughter that I sat down
and pressed the button.
?I still couldn?t believe it would be her,
but then it gave her address and she
spoke and I knew it was her. It was a
special moment.?
Muriel, who lived in Chelmsford for
her entire life, was interviewed by local
archivists in 1996 about her experience
of growing up in the city. In the recording she spoke about the street games
she used to play as a child and a carnival
she had helped to organise.
Her granddaughter said: ?She would
tell us stories about living through the
war and not having much. She and my
grandad weren?t materialistic at all.?
Ms Weald, who has been back to the
bench several times, has since been
given the full 45-minute interview by
the Essex Record Office and her siblings and children, aged 16 and 12, have
listened to it. She said: ?I made my
children listen to it to make them realise
how lucky they are.
?I look at that bench very differently
now every time I walk past. It?s great to
know my nan is so close.?
toddlers into eating greens
Tom Whipple Science Editor
If your children won?t eat their greens,
let them play with them instead. Possibly while listening to wind chimes.
That is the advice of an Oxford
University food psychologist, who
argues that rules against playing with
your food may be restricting the palates
of children who need to become
accustomed to vegetables.
Charles Spence, a professor of cognitive psychology, also suggested that
listening to high-pitched and chirpy
music, such as wind chimes, would trick
the brain into making bitter vegetables
such as broccoli taste better.
Instead of bribing or cajoling children into eating vegetables, Professor
Spence said that it was better if they
grew to like them on their own. Touching, smelling and looking at the disliked
food without having to eat it has been
shown to increase the chances of them
liking it.
?In fact, kids should be encouraged to
play with their food even if they don?t
eat it,? he said. This could even extend
to taking the food away from the dining
table and using it in games.
He was speaking after research
showed that half of children may not be
eating a single portion of vegetables
every day. A separate survey by Innocent smoothies found that two thirds of
adults admitted to disliking vegetables
as children, with peas, cabbage and
sprouts rated the most unpleasant.
4
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
News
STEPHEN CHUNG/LNP
No. 2015
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Suko�
Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the
spaces so that the number in each
circle is equal to the sum of the four
surrounding spaces, and each colour
total is correct
Solution and more puzzles
MindGames in Times2
Boy, 17, dies at festival
Police are investigating the death
of a 17-year-old boy whose body
was found in a tent at Reading
festival. Emergency services
were called at 2am but he was
pronounced dead at the scene.
Thames Valley police are treating
the death as unexplained. His
next of kin have been informed
but formal identification had not
yet taken place. In an unrelated
incident, an 18-year-old male was
stabbed during a fight at the
festival on Friday. He has since
been discharged from hospital.
London games The Britannia re-enactment group held a gladiatorial contest on the site of a Roman amphitheatre at Guildhall Yard in London over the bank holiday
More sex offenders and violent
criminals could be released early
Richard Ford Home Correspondent
Plans to provide more accommodation
in hostels for serious sexual and violent
offenders leaving jail are being drawn
up by the justice ministry, despite staff
concerns about security.
New probation hostels, or extensions
to existing premises, would allow more
prisoners to be released earlier from
long sentences to live in the community
under supervision.
Any plans for new hostels or increasing the number of spaces in existing
premises are likely to be controversial
as most people living in them are prisoners who have served sentences for
violent or sexual offences. Most also
pose a high or very high risk of causing
serious harm to the public but experts
say that the number of beds needs to be
increased by 25 per cent to cater for offenders who need help in making the
transition from jail to resettlement in
the community.
Even penal reformers admit that
many people do not want a probation
hostel in their area and that getting
planning permission would be difficult.
?You cannot get planning permission
for them because nobody wants them
near them,? Frances Crook, chief executive of the Howard League for Penal
Reform, said.
An alleged murder at a probation
hostel in the East Midlands has raised
concerns about the safety of staff working in the current network of 101 hostels
in England and Wales. Martin McDermott, 60, who was living at Burdett
House hostel in Derby, is accused of the
murder of Leslie Salmon, 44, a fellow
resident, this month.
There are about 2,200 beds in hostels, but there are not enough in the
right places and there are only six available for female offenders. The so-called
halfway houses are staffed with probation officers and provide structured
support for ex-prisoners.
Pressure to expand hostel accommodation, officially known as approved
premises, has come from the probation
inspectorate, which has urged the Ministry of Justice to focus on the ?capacity,
type and distribution? of the hostel estate. The annual report of the National
Offender Management Service disclosed that officials in the prisons and
probation service had begun work on
expansion plans.
The current budget for the estate is
� million a year and the average cost
of a hostel is about �0,000 annually.
A recent probation inspectorate report said that the hostels provided a halfway house during which prisoners with
complex needs could be given a structured re-entry into the community.
They are staffed 24 hours a day and residents? freedoms can be controlled by
curfews, regular drug and alcohol testing and room searches. Anyone breaking the terms of their release or conditions imposed on them while living in
a hostel can be recalled to prison.
The inspectorate report recommended looking at new hostels being pro-
vided by independent providers, creating more bed spaces in existing hostels
or using land attached to existing premises. The report also recommended that
the ministry look at using existing prison service buildings as hostels.
Dame Glenys Stacey, chief inspector
of probation, said: ?I have been given
assurances that extra beds will be provided in probation hostels and that this
work is in hand.
?I am now expecting an action plan
from the National Probation Service to
confirm this and other actions arising
from our report.?
Ian Lawrence, general secretary of
the National Association of Probation
Officers, said: ?There is a shortage of
places to cope with a growing high-risk
client population.
?We have serious reservations about
the quality of some parts of the current
hostel estate. We also have concerns
about security in the hostel estate and
would not want to see fewer staff on
duty if expansion takes place.?
Jurors seek counselling after trial lasting 20 months
Marc Horne
Jurors who sat on the longest-running
criminal trial in British legal history
have revealed their struggle to return to
normal life.
After spending 20 months on a complex fraud case four jurors have claimed
that the experience had left them in
need of counselling. Named only as Julie, Anne-Marie, Paul and Emma to
protect their identities, the group said
that the case had taken a toll on their
careers and personal wellbeing. Jurors
are barred from discussing anything
that happened in the deliberation
room.
For 320 days they sat in the High
Court in Glasgow and heard how Edwin McLaren, 52, ran a �6 million
property fraud scheme that duped vulnerable victims into handing over their
homes.
The �5 million trial, which was originally due to last for six months, began
in September 2015, and by the time
McLaren was found guilty and jailed for
11 years in May this year only 12 of the
original 15 jurors remained, the minimum required on a Scottish jury. They
knew that if one of them dropped out,
the case would collapse.
Since the trial finished, Julie, 37, has
only managed to get back to her job at
a travel agency for a total of four days
and has sought medical help.
?There should be more psychological
support made available for jurors who
sit through long trials. You were sitting
in a room listening to evidence but you
didn?t communicate. I?m really struggling with communication now.?
Paul, 51, has had to go through retraining in his job as a civil servant.
?I think I was always talking before
this trial and now I am just sitting at my
seat not really saying much.?
Another civil servant, 57, Anne Marie, said that her workplace of 40 years
now seemed alien after so long being on
a jury. ?Nobody realises the impact it
has on everybody?s lives.?
Sex doll conviction
The NSPCC called for the trade in
child sex dolls to be outlawed
after a man was convicted of
importing a doll, in one of the first
cases of its kind. Andrew Larkins,
37, of Norwich, admitted making
indecent images of children and
the importation of indecent or
obscene articles. He was given a
two-year suspended sentence. It is
illegal to import the dolls but not
to own, make or distribute them.
Police victim?s legal bill
A woman who was deceived into
having a relationship with a
police spy is being pursued for the
legal bill she incurred uncovering
the truth. Helen Steel, a green
campaigner, fought a four-year
battle with the Metropolitan
Police, which was compelled to
apologise. She incurred a �000
bill for the police?s legal costs in
trying to make the Met disclose
her lover?s identity.
Rowling beats Victoria
Strike: The Cuckoo?s Calling, BBC
One?s adaptation of JK Rowling?s
book, had 6.2 million viewers on
Sunday, beating ITV?s Victoria by
more than 2 million when they
went head to head at 9.05pm.
Diana, 7 Days, the BBC One
documentary about Princess
Diana, which included interviews
with her sons William and Harry,
attracted a peak audience of
6.9 million viewers at 7.30pm.
115mph driver jailed
A banned driver was caught on
police cameras reaching speeds of
115mph in 30mph zones in
Birmingham and Solihull. Kamar
Farooq, 30, crashed the �,000
BMW M3 into a car at a petrol
station, then jumped into the
back seat and denied he was the
driver. He was jailed for two and
a half years at Birmingham crown
court for dangerous driving and
driving while disqualified.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
5
2GM
News
Delayed flights double amid airport chaos
Richard Ford Home Correspondent
Stricter border controls at airports
across Europe have almost doubled the
number of delayed flights, according to
airlines and airport operators.
At some airports, one in twenty
people a day is missing a connecting
flight because of the delays.
British Airways, Ryanair and Easyjet
have joined a protest over the ?chaotic?
implementation of enhanced passport
checks. They are demanding action
from EU member states to tackle the
?havoc? with more border staff at
passport desks and extra automatic
gates at airports to minimise the
inconvenience to passengers. The protest by the International Air Transport
Association (Iata) comes after passengers endured waits of up to four hours
over the summer following the imposition of more stringent checks on people
entering and leaving the EU?s Schengen area ? the border-free travel zone
made up of 26 countries ? in the wake
of recent terrorist attacks and the migrant crisis.
The implementation of the measures
resulted in the number of delayed
flights jumping by 97 per cent between
April and June this year compared with
last year.
The tighter checks have increased
waiting times at border control at Paris
Orly airport by up to an hour, the Iata
said. It estimates that the new system
means that on average an extra hour is
necessary to process every flight.
In a letter to the EU council of ministers, the airline industry criticised EU
governments for their ?chaotic? implementation of the enhanced checks.
?With the traffic increase due to the
holiday season, and in the absence of
appropriate measures put in place by
member states, the implementation of
enhanced border controls for EU citizens has caused havoc at a number of
EU hub airports,? the letter said.
The industry said that understaffing
of border control at several airports
across Europe meant the extra checks
had made the present situation ?unsustainable?.
It said that the delays were now making European hub airports less attractive to travellers from the rest of the
world.
Rafael Schvartzman, the vice president for Europe within the Iata, said:
?We support additional border checks if
governments believe this improves the
security of Europe?s citizens. But we
warned this needed more resources to
prevent delays, and governments have
failed to heed those warnings.
?The number of delayed flights due
to border control issues is up 97 per cent
? this is totally unacceptable. The answer is for more border control officers
to be deployed, and more automatic
gates to be operational.?
The UK and Ireland are not members of the Schengen area so their citizens face the checks on leaving or entering the zone.
A new EU regulation that came into
effect in April requires every passport
to be checked when leaving or entering
the Schengen area. Passengers? details
are to be checked against European databases to see if they pose a threat.
The European Commission has said
the delays are ?the price of security?.
SWNS; NICK HARRISON VIA REUTERS; GRAHAM STONE/BARCROFT MEDIA
Holiday was
the hottest
(after a
recount)
B
ritain enjoyed
its warmest
August bank
holiday yet
yesterday, as
temperatures in
Lincolnshire hit 28.2C
(Tom Whipple writes).
The Met Office?s
Holbeach weather
station took the record
after a decision to
disallow a ?suspect?
1990 high of 28.3C.
That meant that
yesterday was
comfortably the hottest
day in the 50 years of
the late August bank
holiday. It also meant
that people basked in
weather more
commonly found in the
Mediterranean, while
many there were
cowering under
umbrellas as storms hit
st.
Spain?s southern coast.
Tourists returned to
Beachy Head less
than a day after a
toxic gas cloud
caused an
evacuation. Last
night police said
that they were still
searching for the
source of the gas
that caused itchy
n
eyes and vomiting on
T sun drew punters
The
to Cambridge, the
toxic
to cloud at Beachy
Head,
top right, had
H
gone
go and surfers took
to tthe sea in Newquay
i rained in Spain
but it
Sunday. However, they
said that it was not as
serious as had been
feared. They also ruled
out reports that it had
come across the
Channel, saying that the
wind had been blowing
the wrong way. France
did give us record
temperatures, which are
linked to a heatwave on
mainland Europe.
Chris Page, of the Met
Office, said that
confirmation of the
record came only after
checking the 1990 data,
when one weather
station apparently hit
28.3C. ?Our team got
back to us late this
afternoon. They called it
a suspect value, because
the temperatures
surrounding it were all
around 26C,? he said.
Today?s forecast, page 49
August moment makes
Man flew abroad on girlfriend?s passport
the Zuckerbergs? summer
Tariq Tahir
Tom Whipple
Mark Zuckerberg?s social network just
got a bit bigger. The Facebook chief
executive has announced that his wife
Priscilla Chan has given birth to the
couple?s second daughter, August.
In a post on his Facebook page, they
welcomed her into the family and talked about their hopes for her future.
?Priscilla and I are so happy to welcome
our daughter August! We wrote her a
letter about the world we hope she
grows up in, and also hoping she doesn?t
grow up too fast.?
After the birth of Max, their first
daughter, in 2015, Ms Chan and Mrs
Zuckerberg had written about the
world they wanted her to grow up in.
This time they wanted to be less serious.
?Rather than write about growing up,
we want to talk about childhood. The
world can be a serious place. That?s why
it?s important to make time to go outside and play.
?Childhood is magical. You only get
to be a child once, so don?t spend it
worrying too much about the future.
You?ve got us for that, and we?ll do
everything we possibly can to make
sure the world is a better place for you
and all children in your generation,?
they wrote.
Mr Zuckerberg has said previously
that he will take advantage of Facebook?s generous parental leave option
to spend two months off work with his
family.
A man with dark hair managed to fly to
Germany using his blonde girlfriend?s
passport after he picked it up by mistake
while rushing to make his early morning flight.
Michael Randall, 23, passed security
checks at Gatwick and boarded an
Easyjet flight to Berlin before he realised that he had Charlotte Bull?s passport.
It was only when he got off the plane
that he realised his mistake and told immigration officials, who questioned
him for 90 minutes.
Mr Randall, a technician with the
McLaren Formula One team, called for
an inquiry and said that it was ?outrageous I got that far?.
?Easyjet are meant to check the
name against the boarding pass but
they obviously didn?t. It?s very worrying
as I don?t even look like Charlotte,? he
told The People.
He said that he had rushed from the
home he shares with Ms Bull, 34, in
Staines, Middlesex, to catch a flight to
watch a motorbike race.
?The first I knew something was
wrong was when I arrived at Berlin airport. I thought honesty was the
best policy so I went and told
security,? he said. ?They pulled
me aside and made me
wait for the whole plane
to disembark. At first I
thought they were going
to confiscate Charlotte?s passport.?
Michael Randall picked
up Charlotte Bull?s
passport in a rush
Mr Randall was issued a one-day
travel pass and allowed to continue his
journey. A colleague who was going to
the same event later collected Mr Randall?s passport from Staines.
Ms Bull said that the passports became mixed up when they unpacked
after returning from a holiday in
France, but said that ?there has
been a massive error by the airline. It was a terrible breach of
security, even more so considering how scary current
times are?.
Easyjet said that all the
correct passport details
were entered online
but it was ?investigating how the passenger was able to travel
from Gatwick with the incorrect documentation?.
6
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
News
Two thirds of Tory MPs fail the ?local? test
Oliver Wright Policy Editor
Less than a third of all Conservative
MPs had any previous connection to
the constituencies they were elected to
serve before entering parliament,
research has shown.
A study by the think tank Demos
found that about half of all MPs had
either been born, educated or lived
within 20km (12.5 miles) of the constituencies they have represented in the
past five years.
The figures show huge regional and
party variation. Although 64 per cent of
Labour MPs had ties to the areas they
now serve, only 32 per cent of Con-
servative MPs had local roots. Seven
out of ten Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish MPs had local links and only
28 out of 102 in the southeast of
England had such connections.
The report also suggests that voters
are starting to become less forgiving of
political ?blow-ins?, rejecting them in
favour of more local candidates.
Demos looked at statistics from the
general election in June this year and
found that Labour performed significantly better in areas where they chose
a candidate with local connections.
Of the 28 seats that switched from
the Conservatives to Labour, all but two
of them were won by local candidates.
Close to home
Number of MPs
with roots in their
constituencies
104 MPs
of 318
32.7%
C
Percentage who
come from their
local region
London
Scotland
168/262
N Ireland
64.1%
Wales
Northeast
Northwest
26/35 Midlands
74.3%
Southwest
Southeast
East
Lab SNP
86%
75%
72%
70%
60%
54%
45%
41%
28%
26%
In the six seats that went from Labour
to the Conservatives, every successful
candidate was local.
In all, of the 70 seats that changed
hands in the general election this year,
60 seats, representing 86 per cent, were
won by local candidates ? 31 percentage points higher than the UK average
as a whole.
The report is likely to be read with
interest by local Conservative associations, many of which were angry at
the role Tory HQ played in selecting
candidates in the run-up to the election.
Associations can normally choose
between any candidate who has been
vetted by the party and put on the official candidate list. However, because
Theresa May called a snap election,
Conservative campaign headquarters
selected a shortlist of up to three candidates for local Tories to choose from.
Some of these contained no local
contenders.
The Demos report concluded: ?It is
clear that there is a profound chasm
between the parties in terms of their
local credentials, and the data indicates
that the efforts by those within the
Conservative Party to examine its longterm future and renew its modernisation strategy would also benefit from
exploring opportunities to emphasise
stronger local representation in constituency shortlists.
?This is made particularly clear in the
fact that such a large proportion of the
seats that turned from the Conservatives
to Labour during the election were won
by those with strong local connections
? indicating that localism may have also
become a powerful electoral strategy.?
Sophie Gaston, deputy director of
Demos, said the think tank was interested in looking at the question of localism in the whole of British politics.
The report cited research showing
that 72 per cent of Britons trusted their
councillors to make decisions about
local services, compared with only
12 per cent who trusted MPs.
?The EU referendum really opened
up the question of proximity to power,?
Ms Gaston said. ?The result really
showed up the significance of local
credentials in the election. It is something that the Conservatives in particular are going to have to grapple with
as part of their renewal project.?
Jacob Rees-Mogg, the Conservative
MP for North East Somerset, whose
family comes from the area that he now
represents, said that local connections
were helpful to a small degree when it
came to election campaigns.
?It is certainly easier being an MP
with local links because you have an
embedded knowledge of the area and
you want to be there rather than in
London,? he said. ?And I think it does
make a difference in the way you are
perceived. People think that if you?re
local you?re more likely to go in to bat
for them on a planning issue or the closure of a local hospital.?
Mr Rees-Mogg was sceptical of how
much difference a local candidate
made in the overall picture of a national
campaign, but criticised his party for
not allowing local associations more
autonomy in selecting candidates. He
said: ?The Conservative Party preaches
localism as a national policy but the
candidates department is run more like
a socialist collective and wants all the
decision-making power for itself.?
May accused of watering
down corporate reforms
Oliver Wright
Theresa May was accused yesterday of
reneging on her pledge to ?change the
way big business is governed? as the
government unveiled limited corporate governance reforms.
In a package of measures to be published today, all listed companies will
have to reveal the pay ratio between the
chief executive and the average worker
while shareholder opposition to excessive remuneration packages will be
published for the first time.
However, the government will officially drop Mrs May?s plan to force
companies to put employee representatives on boards. Companies will instead be able to appoint a non-executive director to represent employees or
create an employee advisory council.
The plans were denounced as feeble
by union leaders but also drew a lukewarm response from business groups.
?This is a far cry from Theresa May?s
promise to crack down on corporate excess,? said Frances O?Grady, the TUC?s
general secretary. ?It?s a feeble proposal, spelling business as usual for
boardrooms across Britain.
?The prime minister?s pledge to
put workers on company boards
has been watered down beyond all
recognition.?
Sir Vince Cable, the
leader of the Liberal Democrats and a former business secretary, said:
?There is no mention of
making
shareholder
votes on executive pay
more regular, as the Conservatives promised.
?The new corporate
governance code for large
private companies ? such
as BHS ? is voluntary and therefore
likely to have little effect.?
Paul Drechsler, the president of the
CBI, said that publishing pay ratios
would only be useful if they included
?meaningful context?.
Mrs May made corporate reform a
key part of her campaign to become
Conservative leader, pledging to
?change the system?. However, her
plans met widespread opposition from
companies and business groups.
The Financial Reporting Council
(FRC), which runs the UK corporate
governance code, will introduce a requirement for firms to assign a non-executive director to represent employees,
set up an employee advisory council or
nominate a director from the workforce.
If they choose not to, they will have to
?explain? their decision to the FRC.
Greg Clark, the business secretary,
said: ?Today?s reforms will build on our
strong reputation and ensure our largest companies are more transparent
and accountable to their employees
and shareholders.?
Stephen Martin, director general of
the Institute of Directors, said:
?Companies will have to prepare
themselves to explain how pay as a
whole in their business operates,
and why executives are worth their
packages.?
The
highest-earning
chief executive of a listed
company is Sir Martin Sorrell, of the advertising giant
WPP. He earned �.1 million in 2016, down from
� million in 2015.
Thunderer, page 24
Sir Martin Sorrell earned
�.1 million in 2016 as
chief executive of WPP
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
7
2GM
News
BEN STEVENS/I-IMAGES
Oxford don
steps down
over donor?s
Trump link
Tariq Tahir
Carnival
marred by
acid attack
A
?mild acid?
was thrown
into the
crowd at
Notting Hill
carnival yesterday but
fears of disorder and a
public outpouring of
anger over the
Grenfell Tower
disaster failed to
materialise (Elizabeth
Burden writes).
By 10pm yesterday
police had arrested 191
people, compared with
122 on Sunday and 656
proactive arrests in
the build up to the
carnival. Fifty of the
arrests yesterday were
for possession of an
offensive weapon.
Festival workers
were given training in
the event of an acid
attack after a spate of
incidents in the capital
and elsewhere in the
past year. Yesterday?s
incident, at about 8pm
in St Charles Square,
near Ladbroke Grove,
left two people in need
of treatment.
Parents begged council to let child in
Muslim care stay with grandmother
Andrew Norfolk
Chief Investigative Reporter
A council that forced a Christian child
to live with conservative Muslim foster
carers has blocked a number of attempts to move her to families where
she would feel more at home.
Inquiries by The Times have established that the girl?s family has spent the
past six months begging the London
borough of Tower Hamlets to allow the
five-year-old to be released into the
care of close family friends or relatives.
The east London council has most
recently opposed attempts to place the
child into the temporary care of her
grandmother. Instead, she initially
spent four months with a carer whose
family often spoke Arabic when she was
with them, leading the girl to complain
that she was unable to understand what
they were saying.
A Tower Hamlets employee who
supervised regular meetings between
the child and her family recorded the
child?s distress, at the conclusion of
each meeting, when she was handed
over to the carer. In a written report of
one meeting, the contact supervisor described the girl as ?very emotional and
tearful?.
?She said they don?t speak English at
the home, she doesn?t understand the
Arabic words where she is. [The girl]
said she wants to go back home to her
[mother].?
The social services employee heard
the child whispering Arabic words to
her mother that she was allegedly told
must be said aloud to ensure that ?when
you die you go to heaven?. Her reports
also describe the child?s account of her
necklace, which carried a Christian
cross, having been removed, and not
returned, by the first foster carer.
How The Times reported the plight of
the girl, 5, placed with Muslim carers
After another supervised meeting,
the council worker heard the child
explaining to her mother that the foster
carer ?said she needs to ask [her social
worker] if she can learn Arabic?.
At the end of the meeting, the girl
?started crying and saying that she
doesn?t want to go back?.
For the past two months, the child?s
care has been entrusted by the council
to a second foster carer. Both women
concealed their faces when they were
with the girl in public, the first by wearing a niqab and the second with a burka.
It is understood that the five-year-old
has also spoken of the first foster carer
having refused to let her eat a meal of
carbonara because it had bacon in it.
Friends of the family said she had also told her mother that ?Christmas and
Easter are stupid?.
The United Nations Convention on
the Rights of the Child says that any
state agency considering a foster placement must pay due regard to ?the desirability of continuity in a child?s upbringing and to the child?s ethnic, religious,
cultural and linguistic background?.
Tower Hamlets has refused to respond
to requests from The Times to explain
why it has twice chosen to place the girl
in an environment that is wholly alien
to her heritage and upbringing.
A council spokesman said yesterday
that its fostering service ?provides a
loving, stable home for hundreds of
children every year?. All its foster carers
received training and support to ensure
they were ?fully qualified to meet the
needs of the children in their care?.
?In every case, we give absolute
consideration to our children?s background and their cultural identity.?
A national shortage of foster carers
from minority ethnic backgrounds,
particularly in rural areas, often leads
to a non-white child being placed with
white British foster carers. It is far more
unusual for a white child to be placed in
a non-white foster home.
According to published fostering
statistics for England in 2016, 84 per
cent of approved foster carers were
white, as were 77 per cent of fostered
children.
Leading article, page 27
Met seeks killer of cartoonist 30 years on
John Simpson Crime Correspondent
A killer who shot a Palestinian political
cartoonist in London 30 years ago is
still at large, the police said in a new
appeal for information.
Naji al-Ali, 51, was shot in the neck
outside the Knightsbridge offices of AlQabas, a Kuwaiti newspaper, in July
1987 and died a month later.
His cartoons were critical of the Pal-
estinian regime and he had received
death threats in the years before his
murder, the police said yesterday.
Counterterrorism detectives have released an updated artist?s impression of
the killer, who was described by witnesses as being of Middle-Eastern
appearance and aged about 25, with
collar-length thick wavy black hair. He
was wearing a stonewashed denim
jacket and dark trousers. After the
murder it emerged that the Israeli spy
agency Mossad had known of the plot
and had been monitoring the prime
suspect using a double agent within the
Palestine Liberation Organisation
(PLO).
The intrigue was heightened by the
testimony of Ishmail Hassan Sowan, a
member of the PLO, at his trial for
hoarding weapons and explosives at a
house in Hull. An Israeli diplomat was
expelled from London after Sowan
confessed to being a double agent
working with Mossad to track Abdul
Rahim Mustapha, a PLO operative who
was questioned about the murder.
Commander Dean Haydon, of Scotland Yard, said: ?A lot can change in 30
years: allegiances shift and people who
were not willing to speak at the time . . .
may now be prepared to come forward
with crucial information.?
A leading Oxford academic has
resigned in protest after it emerged that
one of the university?s donors is a
financial backer of President Trump.
Bo Rothstein was professor of
government and public policy at the
Blavatnik School of Government,
which is named after Sir Leonard
Blavatnik, who gave the university
� million to set up the school.
The Ukraine-born tycoon, who is
also an associate of Vladimir Putin, is
reported to have given $1 million to Mr
Trump?s inauguration committee as
well as millions to his campaign.
In his resignation letter, Professor
Rothstein, an expert on political governance and corruption, who joined
the school in January last year, said that
Mr Trump?s policies were ?antithetical?
to its goals. These aims were ?to improve the quality of government and
public policymaking worldwide, so that
citizens can enjoy more secure and
more fulfilled lives?, he said.
?I therefore find Mr Blavatnik?s decision to support Donald Trump both incomprehensible and irresponsible,? he
wrote. ?It makes it impossible for me to
continue at the Blavatnik School of
Government.?
Professor Rothstein added that he
?cannot give legitimacy and credibility
to a person who is supporting Donald
Trump. There is simply no way I can
defend this in front of students or colleagues.?
He told The Guardian: ?It feels very
sad, it was very fun to be in Oxford. On
the other hand, I can not defend giving
legitimacy or credibility to a person
Bo Rothstein is an
expert on political
corruption
who gives big donations to a government that stands for the opposite of
what I work for.?
Sir Leonard, 60, who was knighted in
this year?s Queen?s birthday honours, is
worth �.1 billion. He made his fortune
in the Russian aluminium industry in
the early 1990s.
He emigrated to the US in 1978, and
is now a British and American citizen.
He donated � million to an extension
of Tate Modern, which also bears his
name. Sir Leonard owns Warner Music,
one of the three biggest record labels in
the world, and has a house in Kensington Palace Gardens.
Reports of his donations to US politicians emerged in the Dallas News,
which said he also contributed
$6.35 million to Republican candidates
and senators during the 2015-16 election campaign.
Oxford University was criticised
when it first accepted Sir Leonard?s
donation in 2015, with academics
claiming it failed to investigate his ties
to the Kremlin.
A university spokesman said: ?Professor Rothstein is a distinguished
researcher and scholar. The school is
sorry to have received his resignation.
However, we are unclear why he has
resigned over political donations made
by Sir Leonard Blavatnik, which are
completely unconnected to the
Blavatnik School of Government.?
Trump gives police army weapons, page 30
8
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Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
News
Trauma of divorce may
increase heart attack risk
Chris Smyth Health Editor, Barcelona
Divorced people are 16 per cent more
likely to die if they have a heart attack
than those who stay married, scientists
have found.
People with high blood pressure are
also 9 per cent more likely to die if they
get divorced, according to one of the
largest studies to look at the effect of relationships on health.
Marriage has long been known to
have a protective effect, particularly on
men, and scientists believe that spouses
encourage each other to stay healthy,
take medicine and see a doctor when
they are ill. Now scientists say that the
trauma of splitting up could damage
the heart directly, as well as making
people stop taking care of themselves.
Earlier this year a British study of a
million people found that those with
high cholesterol were 16 per cent less
likely to die early if they were married.
Married people with high blood pressure were 10 per cent less likely to die
early than single people.
The same researchers have now used
extra data to find that divorced people
who suffer a heart attack or angina are
7 per cent more likely than other single
people to die as a result.
The gap widens when divorced
people are compared with those who
stayed married, with a 16 per cent
higher risk of dying if they have a heart
attack, according to data presented at
the European Society of Cardiology
congress in Barcelona.
Rahul Potluri, of Aston Medical
School in Birmingham, senior author of
the research, said: ?Single people do
worse than married people and divorcees do worst of all. One of the questions we are asking is why do divorced
patients do so much worse? And that?s
DAVID FISHER/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
where psycho-social factors come in:
the acute stress of divorce in particular.
?What happens with divorce is that
someone who may have been compliant with their medication while they
were married is suddenly under a lot of
stress as well as being on their own.
They may find it difficult to look after
themselves, they lose control of what?s
going on. It?s a double hit.?
Medication is crucial to reduce risk
after a heart attack and Dr Potluri said
that not only did spouses make sure
that their partner was sticking to doctors? orders, but people often stopped
taking tablets during the throes of a
break-up.
?During that phase they may find it
difficult to look after themselves,? he
said. ?Going through a divorce is not a
one-day thing. With heart medication,
even if you stop it for a couple of days
the impact can be really bad.?
It?s never too late to get fit, say doctors
Continued from page 1
kind of fitness programme, so we can
safely say that as a normal person you
are able to improve your fitness . . . and
that will protect you.?
Dr Prestgaard found no significant
difference between those men who
shaped up in middle age and those who
maintained their fitness. ?If you become fit or remain fit, there?s no differ-
ence ? that?s a good message. If you?re
50 and not fit, over the next few years
you can become fit and lower your risk.
It?s never too late.? He added, however:
?You can?t let yourself go because you
lose the protection.? Although the
study looked at men, Dr Prestgaard
believes it would also apply to women.
The NHS spends about �billion a
year treating strokes, and it is estimated
that the total cost to Britain rises to
about �billion once informal care and
other economic effects are included.
Jeremy Pearson, of the British Heart
Foundation, said: ?Doing 150 minutes
of moderate-intensity activity a week is
recommended but most aren?t reaching
this target. We would encourage people
to take part in exercise that they enjoy
to achieve this.?
Shake a tail feather Mollie King, from The Saturdays girl band, moves herself
into the favourites at the launch of the BBC?s latest Strictly Come Dancing series
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
9
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News
Hollywood calls for wartime boy hero
GAMMA-KEYSTONE VIA GETTY IMAGES; AMAZON PUBLISHING
Matthew Moore Media Correspondent
Aged only 17 he risked his life to smuggle Jews out of Mussolini?s Italy, before
spying on the Nazis while employed as
a driver for a German general. So it is
little surprise perhaps that Pino Lella?s
life is going to be made into a Hollywood film.
What is more remarkable is that his
heroic deeds might have been forgotten
to history, if not for an e-book published
by a US thriller writer that has become
one of the word-of-mouth hits of the
summer.
Beneath a Scarlet Sky, which was released only for Kindle devices before
being rushed out as a paperback, has
been downloaded 250,000 times, even
though it has been ignored by most
mainstream reviewers.
The novel by Mark Sullivan reached
No 6 in the Amazon fiction bestsellers?
chart. The film rights have been bought
by Pascal Pictures, a Hollywood production company, which last week
announced that Tom Holland, 21, the
British star of the latest Spider-Man
film, would play the role of Mr Lella as
a teenager.
The glowing Amazon reviews do not
simply spur sales; they also lift the spirits of Mr Lella himself. Now aged 91, he
still lives just north of Milan.
His son, Michael, occasionally reads
him comments left by readers humbled
by his bravery.
?He?s a little embarrassed?
to hear the praise from strangers, Sullivan said recently.
?At the same time, he?d like
to hug every single one.?
Beneath a Scarlet Sky is
based on more than a
decade of research including
weeks of interviews with Mr
Lella, although it was ultimately written as a
novel because Sullivan
struggled to corroborate certain details
when so many of the
relevant historical
records had been destroyed.
Sullivan,
59,
whose work includes the bestselling
Private
series, which he
writes
with
James Patterson, first heard
about Mr Lella?s
story at a dinner
party in 2006, through
an acquaintance who
had happened to strike
Hitler Youth recruits in Rome. The Spider-Man actor Tom Holland will play Pino Lella, who was 17 when he joined Italy?s underground, in a film of his fictionalised biography
up a conversation with the
retired Italian while on
holiday.
Like many Italians of
his generation, Mr
Lella was reluctant to
discuss his Second World War experiences, and had never spoken to a historian.
?The first time I called him from the
States, he said he didn?t understand
why I?d be interested in him,? Sullivan
told an interviewer this year. ?I told him
that from what I knew of his story he
was an uncommon hero. His voice
changed, and he told me he was more a
coward than a hero. That only intrigued
me more.
?When I first went to see him, I stayed
for three weeks. He was 79, and living in
a decaying old villa in the beautiful
town of Lesa on Lake
Maggiore north of
Milan.
?We talked for hours
in his drawing room,
which was filled with
old tapestries and
paintings, a grand piano and the mementos
of a long, fascinating
life. Hours, days and
then weeks went by
as I listened to him
summon up the past.?
The book tells how
in 1943 the teenage
Lella joined an underground network to
help spirit Jewish
families away from
Nazi persecution and across the Alps to
the safety of Switzerland.
Subsequently, he fed information to
the Allies ? including the locations of
tanks, mines and fortifications ? while
working as a driver for Hans Leyers, a
general who commanded a Nazi engineering group. Mr Lella?s parents had
pressed him to volunteer for the job to
avoid being cons
scripted
by the Germ
mans
and sent to the
fr
front
line.
After the war, Mr
L
Lella
worked as a car
s
salesman
in Californ for a time. Even
nia
h family never knew
his
th full story of his
the
w
wartime
bravery. Sulli
livan
reckons that
9 per cent of his
90
n
novel
is fact.
Amazon claims the
b
book
is a coup for its
s
scheme
of releasing
ti
titles
as e-books before
th
they
are published
e
elsewhere.
Crowdfunding couple take on energy giants Why medieval London was
the place to get a kicking
A couple who are taking on the Big Six
energy firms with a consumer-owned
company have pre-registered more
than 4,500 customers.
New users will begin to receive gas
and electricity from People?s Energy
across the UK as the company begins
trading.
David Pike, 53, and Karin Sode, 47,
were so fed up with existing energy
firms that they decided to raise
�0,000 to do something about it.
Over the past year they have raised
money through crowdfunding, secured
an Ofgem licence, won an entrepreneurial and innovation award and
built a team from their base in Musselburgh, near Edinburgh.
They are now open for business and
keen to sign up new customers for their
ethical energy supplies. Their promise
is to put one million people in charge of
their own energy by 2024 and provide
an alternative for those who have lost
trust in the traditional energy suppliers.
People?s Energy gives 75 per cent of
profits back to its customers, who are
represented on the board of directors.
The company says that it will share
salaries, decisions, accounts and prices
with customers, which they say makes
the firm the first completely transparent and customer-focused energy company in the UK, with one simple tariff
and 100 per cent renewable electricity.
Mr Pike said: ?We want to create not
just a different kind of energy company
but an entirely different approach to
services that put people squarely at the
centre. Energy belongs to no one, we all
need this resource and all should
benefit from it, not just a few greedy
shareholders. We?ve had a fantastic
response from customers and industry
players pre-launch and now that we
have the foundations in place we?re
ready to go.?
Ms Sode added: ?We offer customers
a genuine opportunity to shape the direction of the company.?
Ofgem data compiled by the energy
provider Bulb found that customers of
the Big Six energy companies have paid
an extra �3 billion in the past five
years, when the rates they paid were
compared with the best tariffs available.
Bills for customers using British Gas,
SSE, E.on, Npower, EDF and Scottish
Power were on average �3 higher
over that period.
Hayden Wood, the Bulb co-founder,
said: ?Loyalty towards a brand is often
rewarded, yet households who?ve put
their trust for years in a single energy
company are being forced to subsidise
others who switch every 12 months.?
Tom Whipple Science Editor
In 14th-century London you did not
want to walk down Shoe Lane at night.
A ?common malefactor? called William Taylor used to hang around there
and, the courts noted, ?it was in his
nature to beat people?.
For a long time London was a deeply
unpleasant place to be. Just how unpleasant is demonstrated by a study of
the skulls of men buried in the city
between the 11th and 16th centuries. Of
399 skulls examined 7 per cent had
some kind of trauma.
The research, published in the journal Physical Anthropology, involved
skulls taken from six medieval graveyards. It showed that rates of violence in
London were probably higher than in
more rural areas or smaller cities. The
levels of violence were not dissimilar,
however, from those found in comparable cities across Europe at the time.
One of the more interesting findings
was that those buried in the monastic
cemeteries, where people had to pay to
be buried, suffered lower rates of head
injury.
Kathryn Krakowka, from Oxford
University, said that this may be
because those with higher social status
were able to resolve their disputes
through legal means. The working
classes, however, could not.
There were also a disproportionate
number of homicides on Sunday nights,
then the main drinking night.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
11
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Bubble bursts for prosecco with teeth warning
Tom Whipple Science Editor
This was the summer when Theresa
May faced the ?Prosecco Plotters?, disgruntled Tories planning her toppling
at garden parties. But Mrs May looks
likely to have the last laugh: it turns out
that prosecco may be ruining their
teeth, and the rest of the nation?s too.
Britain has rapidly become one of the
world?s biggest markets for sparkling
wine, largely on the back of a boom in
sales of prosecco. So important are
sales of the drink that Boris Johnson
invoked them in Brexit negotiations,
arguing that Italy could not impose
trade restrictions because it would be
loath to ?sell less prosecco?.
While many view it as merely a cheap
alternative to champagne, dentists
have warned it is anything but ? and is
leading to a telltale ?prosecco smile?.
Like champagne, prosecco is acidic.
With a pH of around 3, it has the same
ability to erode enamel as fizzy drinks.
It also has a slightly higher sugar
content.
?Prosecco is the double whammy ?
the acidity causes erosion but because
it?s so sweet, it also contributes to tooth
decay,? said Richard Coates, from Newcastle and Sunderland?s Riveredge Cosmetic Dentistry. ?It is much worse than
champagne because that isn?t so sweet.?
He had a solution that could blunt at
least one prong of the drink?s double
attack, even if it seems unlikely that
most drinkers would be prepared to
take it up. ?It may not look very cool but
drinking it through a straw rather than
a glass can protect teeth,? he said.
Sales of prosecco have risen by 72 per
cent since 2012, making the UK the
fastest-growing market for Italian
sparkling wines.
Last weekend, Glasgow and other
cities hosted ?prosecco festivals? in
honour of Britain?s favourite sparkling
wine.
In Lidl a special ?six bottles for �?
offer led to queues outside stores across
the country. However, the supermarket
chain had to apologise to customers
after underestimating demand. In
many shops the drink sold out in minutes, leaving buyers angry and even
TMS
diary@thetimes.co.uk | @timesdiary
A Boris for
all seasons
An item in this space on Friday
about Boris Johnson breezing in
late to deliver a speech at a
function with no idea of who he
was speaking to resonated with
several readers who have seen our
foreign secretary?s chaotic charm
in action. Patrick Arbuthnot sent in
a story about Johnson arriving late
for a dinner a few years ago. As he
sat down next to the chairman,
puffing and apologising, Johnson
asked what he should talk about,
reeling off half a dozen topics on
which he had a well-rehearsed list
of anecdotes. ?How about Europe??
the chairman suggested. ?Right-o,?
Boris replied. ?Do you want me to
speak for or against??
The comedian Adam Kay performed
the works of Tom Lehrer at the
Edinburgh Fringe, a routine that
involved him firing a gun in The
Hunting Song and throwing
condoms into the crowd at the end
of Be Prepared. It caused a raised
eyebrow when he went to buy his
props. ?Well,? the cashier said, as she
scanned a fake rifle and 480 Durex,
?I hope you enjoy your evening.?
fool rushes in
Here?s more tales of Hollywood
eccentricity from Storytelling,
Andrew Sinclair?s latest book.
Sinclair once wrote a biography of
John Ford, the director, whose
treatment of producers was
legendary. When one lectured
him for falling behind the
shooting schedule Ford, right,
tore ten pages from the script
and snapped at him: ?Now
we are three days ahead.?
He never shot the
missing scenes. On
another occasion, a
producer told Ford
that the previous
day?s rushes were
great. This did not
please him either. Ford
shot the scenes again at an extra
cost of $25,000, reasoning that if
the producer liked them they must
be rubbish.
murder most soggy
In 1996, Sinclair attended the royal
opening of the faculty of law in
Cambridge, a glass-fronted
Norman Foster building that
Prince Philip compared to a
greenhouse (though surely they
grow advocates in it, not avocados).
There he met a professor who
insisted that the Queen never
listened carefully to people she met
on such occasions. To prove it, this
fellow had told HM at a previous
event that he had murdered his
mother-in-law at breakfast over
the Rice Krispies. ?What a good
idea,? the Queen replied.
Alan Johnson?s dream job as a
teenager was to be an author, a role
that the former home secretary
achieved late in life with his
bestselling autobiography. ?I became
a postman instead,? he says. ?At
least it made me a man of letters.?
guide to the bongless
The Politico?s Guide to the New
House of Commons, out next week
when our MPs slope back to their
bong-free offices, reveals that
almost half of the latest intake
have worked in the private sector,
including 22 of the 32 Tories. This
is not really surprising. ?Of course
we have lots of lawyers, lobbyists
and professionals,? a cabinet
minister exclaims. ?What did
everyone expect? Astronauts??
The bank holiday must have
put me in a Two Ronnies
mood, for, after reading an
item in this paper about
thieves stealing 12,000 pieces of
luxury underwear, probably in
the news in briefs, I
found myself wondering
wether the culprits would be
charged with criminal
negligee. That is, unless
they give police the slip.
patrick kidd
reportedly causing a fight at an outlet in
Huddersfield. Some resorted to stronger measures. Jessica Hughes, from
Hereford, complained on Twitter: ?Dad
just got so annoyed with Lidl that they
had no prosecco he?s put all his shopping back and has gone to Aldi.?
Lidl said in a statement: ?We have experienced unprecedented demand and
apologise to anyone that hasn?t been
able to take advantage of the offer.?
While at least some lucky Lidl drinkers enjoyed a sunny bank holiday with
the fizz, Mervyn Druian, from the
London Centre for Cosmetic Dentistry,
said that he was beginning to see the
less enjoyable consequences of
this new national obsession.
?The signs of prosecco smile
are where the teeth come out of
the gum. It starts with a white
line just below the gum, which
if you probe it is a little bit soft,
and that is the beginning of
tooth decay which can lead to
fillings and dental work,? he
said.
If that makes Glaswegian
A glass of prosecco is
worse for your teeth
than champagne
revellers and Tory malcontents alike reach for the
toothbrush, then beware
? it is often better to
wait a couple of hours.
Like other acidic
drinks, prosecco softens the enamel. This
means that brushing
immediately can rub it
off, whereas waiting
gives the teeth time to
harden,
preventing
decay in the mouth, if
not in the Conservative Party.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
13
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Vet?s nurse poisoned her
own dog ?for attention?
A veterinary nurse described as an attention-seeker deliberately poisoned
her pet dog in a bizarre case of animal
cruelty.
Georgina Bretman injected her black
and white cocker spaniel Florence with
a drug that made her collapse with convulsions and seizures. The damage was
so severe that the two-year-old dog
could have ended up in a coma or died.
The case is thought to be the first to
involve an owner harming their dog in
such a way.
Colleagues at the practice where
Bretman worked became suspicious
after Florence was brought in for emergency treatment on several occasions
and always with the same mysterious
symptoms.
After a trial at Glasgow sheriff court
Bretman was convicted of causing the
animal unnecessary suffering.
Although no explanation was offered
as to why the 28-year-old had harmed
her pet, the court was told that she had
a tendency to seek attention.
On one occasion Bretman?s employer allowed her the evening off and then
predicted that within a few hours the
dog would suddenly become ill and be
brought back to the surgery for emergency treatment.
Sheriff Joan Kerr found Bretman, of
Giffnock, Glasgow, guilty of injecting
Florence with insulin resulting in her
requiring immediate treatment to
?avoid coma or death?.
The dog was given a new home
after the allegations against
Bretman came to light, and the
court was told that she had returned to good health.
Bretman started working as
a veterinary nurse in 2011 for
Pet A&E in Glasgow, which provided care for animals outside
normal working hours.
Lesley Herd, her
employer, became
suspicious when the
dog needed emergency treatment on
several occasions after collapsing,
twitching and vomiting. Every time
tests showed that the animal had a low
glucose level.
During Bretman?s trial Mrs Herd
said: ?The dog was fine between episodes so I really didn?t know what was
going on with the dog at all. We couldn?t
understand why she was having these
episodes.?
Mrs Herd said that on one occasion
she took blood samples from Florence
to send to the University of Glasgow?s
school of veterinary medicine for tests.
Bretman volunteered to deliver the
samples, but they never arrived.
Mrs Herd told the court: ?Because of
the pattern of collapse and low blood
glucose on each occasion and the fact
that the dog was normal between episodes, I was suspicious insulin had been
administered to the dog.?
The court was told that on an evening
that Bretman was given off in June
2013, Florence collapsed and the dog
and owner came in for treatment.
She described Bretman as ?quite attention-seeking? and added: ?I had said
to my partner, ?She will find an excuse
to come in to the clinic because she?s not
happy about having the night off? and I
said ?I bet Flo collapses tonight?, and it
did happen.?
Bretman was later suspended and
sacked from her job. Mrs Herd contacted the Scottish SPCA because of her
concerns. Bretman was charged under
the Animal Health and Welfare
Scotland Act. The charge
alleged that on June 23, 2013,
Bretman caused an animal
unnecessary suffering by
injecting a poisonous drug
namely insulin to Florence causing her to suffer
from hypoglycemia, collapse, convulsions and
seizures which required
immediate veterinary
treatment to avoid coma or death.
Pets on the
rise as world
grows richer
Owl takes out
police force?s
999 system
Tariq Tahir
Tariq Tahir
Pet ownership is rising rapidly in developing countries, mirroring the growth
of a more prosperous middle class with
changing lifestyles and attitudes.
There has been a 51 per cent increase
since 2003 in the number of dogs kept
as pets in the developing world, up to
243 million, according to research by
Euromonitor into 54 countries.
That figure compares to a rise of just
5 per cent in the developed world,
where there are now 137 million dogs.
Cat ownership has increased by 49
per cent, to 126 million in the developing world, outstripping the rise of 5 per
cent to 155 million in richer countries.
Euromonitor?s Paula Flores said the
rise in disposable income, particularly
in Asia, had been significant because ?if
people are struggling to buy food for
themselves, they will not buy it for a
pet?. She added: ?Cat and dog caf閟 have
been expanding exponentially across
Asia.?
She also said that people in the developing world having children later saw a
pet as a child substitute, and there had
also been a rise in people living alone.
A police force told the public not to call
999 unless they had a genuine emergency after an owl brought down its
phone and computer systems by flying
into power cables.
Avon and Somerset police also asked
people to avoid ringing the 101 nonemergency line if possible, as neighbouring forces were drafted in to help.
Engineers spent the bank holiday
working to rectify the problem, which
happened at 3.30am yesterday when
the owl flew into a sub-station and took
out most of the power at the force?s
headquarters in Portishead.
Becky Tipper, centre manager for
communications at Avon and Somerset
police, told the BBC that staff were
coming in on their day off to ensure
calls could still get through. The force
usually receives about 3,000 calls on a
bank holiday Monday, she said, and was
?extra busy? yesterday. The problem
was rectified at 4.15pm.
A police spokesman said the force
had received many enquiries about the
owl but ?we don?t know for sure? if it
was hurt or not.
Gurpreet Narwan
In evidence Bretman denied the
charge and said that she was not responsible and only ever wanted to find
out what was wrong with Florence.
Dale Hughes, for the defence, said to
her: ?It might be suggested you took a
dislike to the dog, that?s why you
harmed her.?
Bretman said: ?Not at all, I put a lot of
energy in. She was my companion.?
Sheriff Kerr deferred sentence until
next month for reports.
MIKE GIBBONS/SPINDRIFT
Florence suffered frequent convulsions and vomiting. Below, Georgina Bretman
14
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Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
News
Ugly new homes breed nimbys, builders told
Jerome Starkey
Countryside Correspondent
The biggest housebuilders are creating
growing numbers of nimbys by trampling over communities and building
ugly, unaffordable homes, the head of a
homelessness charity has warned.
Polly Neate, the chief executive of
Shelter, said that developers were putting profits before people and ignoring
concerns about the quality and price of
new homes.
She blamed the builders for ?a huge
loss of public faith in our housebuilding
system? and called for reforms to planning laws to put people?s needs before
corporate profits. ?Even when communities create detailed plans for housing
developments, these developers brush
them aside and build unattractive, unaffordable homes,? she said. ?This
means many [people] choose to oppose
new homes rather than go through a
long planning process, only to be
ignored in the end.?
The three biggest housebuilders, Persimmon, Taylor Wimpey and Barratt
Developments, completed more than
46,000 homes last year and shared revenues of more than � billion. They
made profits of �2 billion.
?The government needs to bring in a
new way of building homes which lis-
tens to local people to build the high
quality and genuinely affordable
homes they need, along with schools,
parks and other amenities,? Ms Neate
said. ?We once had a proud tradition of
housebuilding in this country, as seen
in our popular postwar new towns and
garden cities, and it is now critical this
is revived for the 21st century.?
Her comments came after a survey of
more than 3,500 people found that only
13 per cent felt that developers listened
to them. Almost 60 per cent said that
they would be more inclined to support
the building of new homes if they were
listened to more keenly. The southeast
had the highest proportion of nimbys,
at 38 per cent, while the West Midlands
had the lowest at 23 per cent.
The Times revealed last month that a
consortium of housebuilders behind a
new garden town in Devon had watered down its strict design code. The
Sherford development on the outskirts
of Plymouth was designed by the
Prince of Wales?s architects to prove
that his model village of Poundbury in
Dorset could work on a larger scale.
The Prince?s Foundation for Building
Community said that the builders, Bovis Homes, Linden Homes and Taylor
Wimpey, used arcane planning laws to
renege on their commitments to quality. Ben Bolgar, the foundation?s direct-
or, said they were determined to build a
?normal, rubbish housing estate? instead. The consortium said the quality
of the homes would not be affected.
Stewart Baseley, chairman of the
Home Builders Federation, an industry
body, insisted that his members ?work
closely with councils and residents to
ensure the homes being built are what
communities need?.
?Housebuilders have dramatically
increased output to provide desperately needed homes,? he added. ?Constructive debate is needed to develop
policies that allow more homes to be
built as opposed to baseless claims.?
Payments to housebuilders, page 35
STRUTT & PARKER/DEADLINE NEWS
Playing for keeps The last fortified house in Scotland is on sale for �0,000. The
17th-century Leslie Castle in Aberdeenshire comes with an optional baronetcy
Driver accused over fatal
M1 collision sobs in court
John Simpson Crime Correspondent
A lorry driver accused of causing the
deaths of eight people on the M1 while
over the drink-drive limit broke down
in tears in court yesterday.
Ryszard Masierak was over the legal
limit and had at one point stopped in
the slow lane of the motorway, the
court was told. It is believed that he was
stationary for about 12 minutes.
Mr Masierak, 31, who is Polish, cried
in the dock at High Wycombe magistrates? court as details were read out of
how his Scania lorry allegedly came to
a halt on the southbound M1 in Buckinghamshire before the accident early
on Saturday.
Cyriac Joseph, who was driving a
minibus carrying a party of Indian
tourists to London, is believed to have
collided with a second lorry as he
attempted to avoid Mr Masierak?s
vehicle. He died along with five other
men and two women.
Mr Masierak listened intently to proceedings via a Polish interpreter.
He faces eight charges of causing
death by dangerous driving, four of
causing serious injury by dangerous
driving and eight charges of causing
death by careless driving while over the
prescribed alcohol limit.
Three of the passengers in the minibus, including a five-year-old girl, were
fighting for their lives, and a fourth suffered minor injuries in the crash near
Newport Pagnell.
Mr Masierak, of Evesham, Worcestershire, is accused of having 55mcg of
alcohol per 100ml of breath. The legal
driving limit is 35mcg. He made no application for bail and did not indicate
how he would plead. He was remanded
in custody to appear at Aylesbury
crown court on September 26.
Speaking outside court Chief Inspector Henry Parsons, from Thames Valley police, said: ?Four people who were
injured remain in a serious condition in
hospital. We have had full co-operation
from the two freight companies involved and they are fully supporting us
with our investigation.?
The other lorry driver, David Wagstaff, 53, from Stoke-on-Trent, is accused of eight counts of causing death
by dangerous driving and four counts of
causing serious injury by dangerous
driving.
He is due to appear at Milton Keynes
magistrates? court on September 11.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
15
2GM
News
Turing files reveal
his loathing for
US codebreakers
Tom Whipple Science Editor
When Alan Turing was sent to America
as a high-level scientific liaison officer
in 1942 he did not exactly build bonds of
common friendship. The US immigration authorities, the mathematician
complained, ?were very snooty? and he
considered his opposite numbers incompetent and untrustworthy.
Just how long this view of the US persisted has been revealed in a newly discovered cache of letters from a decade
later. When asked in 1953 if he would
attend a conference across the Atlantic
Turing replied: ?I would not like the
journey, and I detest America.?
The comment was a rare flash of Turing?s personal views, amid 150 items of
professional correspondence found in
an old filing cabinet at Manchester
University. They cover the last
five years of his life, before his
suicide in 1954, and were spotted
by an academic clearing out a
storeroom.
Although Turing is most famous today for his work with the
codebreakers of Bletchley Park,
helping to crack the German
Enigma transmissions,
that was kept top
secret at the time.
Turing
also
continued his prewar research, workAlan Turing was
sent to the US in
1942 to inspect their
top-secret facilities
ing on early computers at the university. Much of the correspondence relates
to highly technical papers in mathematics and computer science and there
is one exchange in which he is asked
about a proposed chess match between
his university?s computer and its opposite number in Princeton. He declined.
The correspondence gives no hints
about his state of mind as he struggled
with his homosexuality, for which he
was convicted of gross indecency in
1952 and put on hormone treatment.
That conviction led to his exile from
contacts at GCHQ, the successor to
Bletchley, and his withdrawal from the
intelligence community, in which he
had once been a shining star.
It was a long way to fall for a man
who, in November 1942, had been
sent as an official delegation to
visit the US?s top-secret codebreaking facilities. He declared himself unimpressed.
?I am persuaded that one
cannot very well trust these
people where a matter of
judgment in cryptography is
concerned,? he wrote in a report on the visit.
He added, however, that the
American codebreakers were
not without
their uses. ?I
think we can
make quite a
lot of use of
their machinery.?
Titanic score White actor
sinks classical quits role as
competition Asian character
The Oscar-winning score of Titanic has
come top in a list of the best-selling
?classical? albums of the past 25 years.
The soundtrack of the film, composed by James Horner, sold more than
a million copies in the UK, ranking No 1
on the Ultimate Classic FM Chart,
which claims to be the biggest countdown of classical music album sales.
Russell Watson?s albums The Voice
and Encore came second and third.
Sarah Horner, the widow of the composer, who was killed in a plane crash in
2015, told the radio station: ?He [James]
was a very individualistic thinker, so I
don?t know if he would feel like that was
his best work. Certainly, the public
loved it.?
The album was one of 26 film soundtracks on the list.
Katherine Jenkins, the mezzo-soprano, was named the top classical music
artist of the past 25 years, selling more
than 2.7 million albums on the Classic
FM chart. Her record Second Nature
was the most popular classical album
released in 2004, while Living A Dream
was the most popular of 2005.
Both feature in the top 10 albums,
while another seven of her albums are
on the list of the top 300 records released since September 7, 1992 ? which
has been compiled by the Official
Charts Company to mark the radio station?s 25th birthday next month.
Tariq Tahir
The British actor Ed Skrein has left the
latest version of the Hellboy films after
his casting as an Asian character led to
claims of ?whitewashing?.
An announcement last week that
Skrein had been cast as Major Ben
Daimio prompted critics to accuse the
film?s producers of casting a white actor
in a role that should have gone to an
Asian one. The character in the comic
Ed Skrein said he
did not know that
the character he
was to play was of
Asian heritage
book originals is of Asian heritage.
Skrein, 34, said that he did not realise
the character?s ethnicity and was now
stepping down. He said on social media:
?It is clear that representing this character in culturally accurate way holds
significance for people and to neglect
this responsibility would continue a
worrying tendency to obscure ethnic
minority stories and voices in the arts.?
Tilda Swinton was caught in a whitewashing row last year when she was
cast as the Ancient One, a male Tibetan
monk in Doctor Strange.
DANNY LAWSON/PA
Field games Lepton Highlanders try not to be distracted by the views at Marsden?s picturesque ground in Huddersfield
16
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
News
GLEN MINIKIN
Thousands back orphan?s fight to take up Oxford place
A petition to prevent a talented
mathematician who has been offered
a place at Oxford being deported to
Zimbabwe has attracted almost
65,000 signatures.
Last year Brian White, 21, who lives
in Wolverhampton, got three A*s and
an A in his A levels and was offered a
place at Oxford but because he was
given only temporary leave to remain
in the country when he arrived with
his adoptive parents six years ago, he
was treated as an overseas student
and cannot get student finance.
Oxford deferred his place for a year
and Mr White has been working at
his old school while the Home Office
considers his latest application to stay.
?My current issue started when I
entered the country. When my
parents applied for a visa there was an
issue with the paperwork regarding
the Home Office saying I hadn?t been
legally adopted,? said Mr White, who
was in a Zimbabwean orphanage until
the age of six. ?That got cleared as I
was legally adopted but when they
gave me my visa all my paperwork
suggested indefinite leave, but they
actually granted me temporary leave
to remain. We didn?t realise that until
much later on and thought
everything was fine . . . Around Year 11
[my parents] tried to naturalise me
and that didn?t pan out. We tried to
appeal and that also failed.?
Oxford wants him to start his
course this term but the Home Office
will not announce its decision until
the end of next month.
Dyed in the wool A knitting group in Steeton, West Yorkshire, have recreated their whole village in this 24 sq ft scale model
Seabirds follow their nose
to find the way home
Statins found to cut
breast cancer deaths
Seabirds? sense of smell is a key factor
in how they navigate the oceans,
scientists have found. Zoologists have
debated how the birds navigate for
decades, with theories including
reliance on the Earth?s magnetic field.
In a recent experiment scientists from
Oxford, Barcelona and Pisa
universities tracked 32 Scopoli?s
shearwaters in the Mediterranean.
One set had its sense of smell
removed temporarily, another carried
small magnets and a control group
was left alone. The birds with the
affected sense of smell made poorly
orientated flights home. The research
is published in the journal Scientific
Reports.
Statins used to fight cholesterol have
been found to cut the chance of dying
from breast cancer. A study of
1.2 million women found that those
with high cholesterol and taking
statins were 45 per cent less likely to
develop breast cancer, with the
mortality rate in those who did
improving by 40 per cent. Paul Carter,
of Aston University, Birmingham, the
lead author, said: ?This gives a strong
indication that statins produce this
protective effect in breast cancer.?
The results were presented at the
European Society of Cardiology
conference in Barcelona. Clinical trials
will now begin to determine whether
all women should be given statins.
Shattered wine bottle slices shopper?s achilles tendon
A shopper says that
supermarkets should
provide stronger carrier
bags after hers split on
the way home leading
to a serious injury.
A bottle of wine fell
out, smashed on the
pavement and a shard of
glass severed her achilles
tendon.
outh,
Eve Weller, 26, of Plymouth,
tal and
spent four nights in hospital
doctors say that her injury could take
a year to heal. Ms Weller, who has
two children and lives in a third-floor
flat w
with no lift, had put the
�b
bottle of Lambrini in a
Te
Tesco
carrier bag on its
ow but after she got
own,
o a bus she said the
off
b broke. ?At first I
bag
d
didn?t
even feel it as I
ju thought ?oh no I?ve
just
dro
dropped
the wine?,? she
said ?I went to move my
said.
an I just couldn?t
foot and
move. I lo
looked down and there
was this river of blood.? Ms Weller,
whose leg is in plaster, says that bags
?should last more than 20 minutes?.
Tesco is investigating.
I N T H E T I M E S T O M O R ROW
BUSINESS
DAVID
SMITH
How Britain
could go from
boom to bust
MAIN PAPER
SPORT
LIFE AND TIMES OF A DRUGS BARON
Inside the new series of Narcos
MATTHEW
SYED
Is racism at the
heart of the
England women?s
football team?
TIMES2
MAIN PAPER
ARTS
COMMENT
British socialism is only able to define
itself by what it hates
DANIEL FINKELSTEIN
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
17
2GM
News
Middle-class cocaine users funding slavery and murder
John Simpson Crime Correspondent
City bankers, middle-class students and
middle-aged professionals must admit
that their cocaine use is supporting
slavery and murder, the former head of
UK drug strategy has said.
Wealthy takers of the drug were directly funding organised crime in the
UK and abroad and failed or refused to
see the connection to violence, extortion and servitude, Tony Saggers,
former head of drugs threat at the
National Crime Agency, said in his first
interview since leaving the post.
?These are middle-aged, middleclass people at dinner parties,? Mr
Saggers told The Times. ?They will find
sweatshops abhorrent, slave labour a
brutal, terrible thing to be happening in
their neighbourhood, and the news that
a 16-year-old has been knifed to death
in London will shock them. Their children at university will be protesting
similar causes.
?Each time those people snort that
line of cocaine they have just funded far
worse. Because they can?t see it on their
doorstep they think it?s OK.?
He added: ?When you fund organised crime you fund the exploitation
of women for the sex industry, slavery
and gun violence. The consequences of
buying cocaine are more abhorrent
than most of what the people using it
find abhorrent.?
Britons are among the highest consumers of cocaine in Europe. Last year
a report by the European Commission
and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development found that
the rate of cocaine use among young
adults in the UK was 4.2 per cent, more
than double the European average.
A Home Office report in 2015 said
that nearly one in ten 16 to 59-year-olds
had taken the drug. Last year the number of deaths involving cocaine rose by
16 per cent to 371, according to the
Office for National Statistics.
Mr Saggers stressed that although
many users developed psychological
dependencies, cocaine was not physically addictive. ?They [frequent users]
would be able to get up and go to work
or go out without cocaine. They are not
addicted, they are reliant upon it. It?s a
lifestyle choice for many users.?
Mr Saggers added that the prevalence and acceptance of cocaine in
some industries, particularly in the
City, had to be tackled, not just through
legislation but through corporate social
responsibility schemes. Companies
should be educating their staff about
the impact of cocaine abuse on their
health and wider society.
?I think one thing that doesn?t exist is
corporate action around the moral and
ethical responsibility for an industry?s
relationship to the cocaine market,? he
said.
Organised crime groups targeting
the UK could be stopped, Mr Saggers
said, but more resources would be
needed to end, rather than disrupt,
their activities.
?I have never liked the phrase ?war on
drugs?. If it was a war [here] we would
adopt a more hostile approach. Any war
would fail if every now and again you
have a snipe at your enemy and run
away for a while. We have limited
resources to face a wide range of
threats.?
ALAMY
?Trojan cows?
lure malaria
mosquitoes
to their doom
Kate Wright
The former owner of Pensthorpe Natural Park in Norfolk insists that the RSPB is trying to block his old practice of releasing the endangered doves to boost numbers
RSPB won?t let turtle dove revival
scheme fly, conservationist claims
Jerome Starkey
Countryside Correspondent
The founder and former owner of a
private nature reserve that has hosted
the BBC programme Springwatch has
accused the RSPB of obstructing efforts
to boost numbers of critically endangered turtle doves.
Bill Makins, 85, said that Pensthorpe
Natural Park should release its captive
doves to help the species recover in the
wild. The migrant birds, which are a
symbol of love, are on a red list of endangered British birds because their
populations have fallen by more than
90 per cent since 1995.
The British Trust for Ornithology
(BTO) warned that they would be
?close to extinction in the UK within
the next two decades?, unless the trend
is reversed.
Mr Makins said that the 700-acre
park near Fakenham, in Norfolk, had
proved that it could breed large numbers of doves that were suitable for re-
populating the surrounding area. However, he said that the RSPB, which is
Britain?s largest conservation charity,
had urged the park?s rangers to keep the
birds in captivity. ?The problem is the
RSPB really don?t want them released
from the captive population,? he said.
The RSPB said that the decision was
not its own but was for the Pention Trust,
sthorpe Conservation
eserve.
which runs the reserve.
man
An RSPB spokesman
ed
said that it supported
the decision of thee
trust.
Chrissie Kelley, head of species
management at Pensthorpe,
said
that the trust had
never
released
Wild populations
of turtle doves
y
have fallen sharply
any of its captive-bred turtle doves and
had no plans to do so in future.
The organisations work together as
part of Operation Turtle Dove, alongside English Nature, which encourages
landowners to make grain, water and
nesting sites available to help the birds
recover. Mr Makins sold Pensthorpe in
2003 to Bill Jordan, of the Jordans
cereals busine
business, and his wife
Deb. Mr M
Makins said that
us
he used
to release
doves every year and
that it was inevitable some of the
bi would die in
birds
th
the
wild, but
o
others
survived
a
and
returned
y
year
after year.
?T
?They
say we
ne to improve
need
the habitat. That?s
rubb
rubbish.
There?s no
proble
problem with the
a all. There?s a
habitat at
shortage of food,? he said. The BTO said
the doves had declined because increased use of herbicides and other
modern farming practices meant there
was less food available.
Ms Kelley insisted that it would be
unethical to release captive birds into
the wild. ?We do believe that a release
programme should be seriously considered in the future before it is too late,
but this would require significant investment,? she added.
The park has 22 captive doves, three
of which are on show to the public. For
a captive breeding scheme to succeed,
Ms Kelley said they would have to capture ?wild-sourced breeding stock?.
?Years of work and millions of
pounds of funding are paramount to a
successful release of any vulnerable
species where the habitat loss has been
a major factor in the original decline,?
she said. ?If the habitat is not suitable
the birds have very little chance of survival and will die.?
Letters, page 26
A ?Trojan cow? could be the next weapon deployed to defeat malaria.
A biotech company is going further
than a net or an insecticide to thwart
the mosquitoes that carry malaria from
person to person and are using livestock, doused in human scent, to lure
mosquitoes to their deaths.
In rural communities in sub-Saharan
Africa, the region hardest hit by malaria, livestock such as cows and goats often live alongside people. ?You see
goats everywhere,? said Agenor MafraNeto, the founder of Isca Technologies,
based in California. ?We thought,
?wouldn?t it be great if the mosquitoes
were attracted to the cows and goats??
Cows and goats don?t get malaria.?
Normally mosquitoes in Africa prefer humans. In the hope of tricking
them into biting animals instead, a
potent cocktail of four or five human
odour compounds was developed that
could be sprayed onto animals, enveloping them in an alluring ?eau de
human?.
The concept was tested on a small
scale in Tanzania, where researchers
conducted experiments in which they
shut a goat and a human in a greenhouse and then released mosquitoes
and analysed where they landed.
Dr Mafra-Neto and his colleagues
found that mosquitoes were attracted
to the human 75 per cent of the time,
and to the goat 25 per cent of the time.
But when the goat was sprayed with
human perfume, the mosquitoes made
a beeline for it 50 per cent of the time.
They could not tell the difference
between a human and a goat that
smelled like a human.
The initial results were so promising
that Dr Mafra-Neto hopes to conduct
the experiments in a whole village,
treating the livestock in some villages
but not others, and counting how many
mosquitoes end up inside people?s
houses.
Once drawn in to suck the blood of
cows or goats, the mosquitoes are
doomed, if the animals have been treated with a common worming medication that also kills mosquitoes.
Dr Mafra-Neto envisaged that in
future, the spray could be incorporated
into livestock deworming programmes
in Africa, to trick the mosquitoes into
biting cows that will kill them and prevent them from spreading malaria.
In 2015 almost 300,000 children
under five died of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the World
Health Organisation.
18
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
News
CHARLOTTE GRAHAM/GUZELIAN
Pensions chief sitting
on �8m personal pot
Oliver Wright Policy Editor
Chute out A Handley Page Victor, the bomber developed as part of Britain?s nuclear deterrent, deploys its parachute
during a powered ground run at the Yorkshire Air Museum in Elvington near York. ?Lusty Lindy? made its last flight in 1993
The government official in charge of
increasing the UK?s state retirement
age has built up a personal pension pot
worth �8 million, figures show.
Sir Robert Devereux, permanent
secretary at the Department for Work
and Pensions, is one of dozens of civil
servants to have amassed pension
packages of more than �million. The
disclosure comes less than a month
after the new work and pensions secretary, David Gauke, announced plans to
bring forward the increase of the state
retirement age to 68.
Pension experts say that the move
would affect more than six million
people and anyone under the age of 47
would have to work for an extra 12
months before they could claim their
state pension. Civil service pensions are
still some of the most generous of any
employer despite reforms under the
coalition government designed to cut
the public sector pension bill.
Research by the Daily Mail found 30
civil servants with pension pots worth
more than �million. Sir Robert?s package means that he will get �,000 a
year and a lump sum of �5,000 when
he retires. He is 60.
The official with the next highest
pension is Sir Simon McDonald, 56,
permanent secretary of the Foreign
Office, whose pot is worth �7 million.
Sir Martin Donnelly, former permanent secretary at the Department
for International Trade, left government in March with a �2 million pot,
worth �,000 a year and a �0,000
lump sum. The highest-placed woman
is Sue Owen, 62, permanent secretary
of the Department for Culture, Media
and Sport. She is in sixth position with
a pot of almost �6 million, which
would amount to �,000 a year and a
�0,000 lump sum.
The country?s top civil servant, Sir
Jeremy Heywood, 55, the cabinet secretary, comes after her with a pot of about
�5 million, according to the Cabinet
Office?s annual report from 2015-16.
This is worth �,000 a year and a lump
sum of �5,000. The Cabinet Office
has not yet published its 2016-17 report.
If military figures were included the
Sir Robert Devereux
is one of 30 civil
servants with a
pension pot of more
than �million
table would be topped by General Sir
Nick Houghton, 62, the recently departed chief of the defence staff. His pot
is �4 million, which would entitle him
to almost �0,000 a year and a lump
sum of �5,000, according to the 201617 report of the Ministry of Defence.
?Eyebrows might be raised at the fact
that the man in charge of the department for pensions comes so high up the
public sector list when it comes to his
own pension,? the former pensions
minister Baroness Altmann said. ?Taxpayers will be very interested to see
they are funding these generous pension schemes.?
Shortage of police pursuit drivers
John Simpson
Only about 5 per cent of drivers trained
by Scotland Yard in the past few years
are at a high enough level to force a
suspect to stop during a pursuit.
The Metropolitan Police has 32,000
officers but a freedom of information
request showed that only 5,050 had
been trained to be able to carry out pursuits since 2012. Of these, 315 had
reached the ?tactical pursuit and containment? level since 2014. They are the
only officers authorised to force sus-
inside today
Dr Mark
Porter
An online
depression
questionnaire
could be a
lifeline for
many Times2
pects off the road. The other drivers depend on the suspect coming to a halt.
Last year 28 people were killed in
police pursuits. Nick Hurd, the policing
minister, has been criticised for failing
to commit to new regulations that
would protect officers from complaints
and prosecutions as a result of chases.
Louise Haigh, the shadow policing
minister, said: ?Moped-enabled crime
is through the roof and ministers are
sitting on their hands failing to resource the police and give them the
protections they need to tackle it.?
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
19
2GM
News
?My fianc� and I never talk of the past?
PRESS PEOPLE
John Simpson Crime Correspondent
When she was nine Josie Russell saw
her sister and mother bludgeoned to
death with a hammer.
Miss Russell, now 30, suffered head
injuries from the attack in which Lin,
45, and Megan, 6, were murdered as
they returned home from a school
swimming gala in July 1996.
On Sunday she announced her engagement to her boyfriend of 12 years,
Iwan Griffith, 31, and plans to start a
family of her own.
?It was on Christmas morning, Iwan
gave me chocolates and said, ?Sorry, I
didn?t get you much,? ? she said. ?Then
he produced the ring, a diamond solitaire, and said, ?Happy Christmas?.
?He did offer to get down on one knee
and propose but I told him he didn?t
have to. It was a wonderful moment
because Iwan is not only a wonderful
man, he?s my best friend.
?I think we are both quite strongwilled, which sometimes makes for
conflict, but apart from that we get on
well. We?re happiest when we?re walking on the beach together or in the
mountains biking.?
Miss Russell had been walking home
with her mother, sister and their dog,
Lucy, in Chillenden, Kent, when Michael Stone set upon them with a claw
hammer. The jurors at Stone?s trial wept
as they heard details of the attack, during which Josie ran for her life on her
mother?s orders but was dragged back
to the copse where her family and the
dog were murdered.
All three were blindfolded with strips
of Josie?s swimming towel and she and
Megan were tied to trees. The two girls
were each struck seven times with a
hammer. Her mother, a geologist, suffered 15 blows to the head, almost severing her brain at the stem. Josie
needed intensive neurological treatment for a year before she could speak
again. Stone, 57, is serving three life sentences with a minimum of 25 years in
prison.
She said that she had not initially told
Mr Griffith of her ordeal and that she
had enjoyed the fact that he was
unaware of what had happened to her
family. ?It meant things were just nice
and normal from the start,? she said.
?He asked about my mum once and I
just told him she had died. Later his
parents told him the full story but we
never talk about the past. It is better for
Iwan Griffith,
Josie Russell?s
fianc�, did not
initially know
that Michael
Stone had killed
her mother, Lin,
and sister Megan.
Josie still has
Rosie, Lin?s horse
me to just get on with the present.? She
paid tribute to her mother and said that
she hoped to emulate her in bringing up
her own children the right way. ?Before
now I?ve never really been interested in
babies, but I?m getting to know my
friends? children and enjoy being with
them,? she said.
?I only had my mum for nine years.
She was strict but loving. She did so
much stuff with us. We made puppets,
paper lanterns and doll?s house furniture. I?ve still got the peg bag she
stitched by hand.
?She wasn?t the sort of mum who sat
us down in front of the TV while she did
something else.?
Miss Russell also said that her
mother?s horse, Rosie, a Welsh cob, had
been crucial to her rehabilitation and
was the last link to her mother and sister. ?She was my mother?s and now she?s
mine. She?s a little piece of mum that?s
still here. We?ve been through a lot together and she knows me so well. She?s
26 now. I can?t bear to think of Rosie not
being here one day.?
Miss Russell, who moved to
Gwynedd with her father, Shaun, after
the attack, works as a textile artist and
sells works based on local landscapes
and animals in the countryside of
North Wales. Her works sells for upwards of �0 per piece and she has regular exhibitions. She is also writing an
autobiography in the hope of ?figuring
it all out?.
?There is one thing I?m sure of. I don?t
want to be known as Josie the victim
or Josie the survivor. I?m just Josie,?
she said.
Microsoft plays host to TV pirates Google News hijacked by
Mark Bridge Technology Correspondent
Microsoft has been criticised for hosting piracy apps on its Windows Store,
allowing people to watch television series and films without paying.
The TorrentFreak blog found dozens
of illegal streaming apps on the site,
with names such as ?Free Movies
HD?. They work on multiple platforms including PCs, phones and
Xbox. The apps were still live
on the site days after Microsoft was notified. Some piracy apps are even promoted
on the Windows Store?s
home page as ?trending
apps?. This is despite Microsoft having made a commitment to anti-piracy initiatives and screening all apps
that can appear in the online shop.
Piracy of film and TV
content that is only legally
available via paid services
such as Amazon Prime and
Netflix has increased in
recent years. Anti-piracy efforts have
mostly focused on streaming websites
and add-ons for set-top Kodi boxes.
The Times found a smaller number of
illegal apps on Google?s Play Store.
Some of the content on the apps
appears in high-definition but some
film footage is crudely shot on phone
cameras in cinemas.
The apps make money through
advertising. In some cases TorrentFreak said that this appeared to be
through Microsoft?s own Ad
Monetisation platform, meaning that the company received
a cut.
The blog?s report concluded: ?It?s clear that Microsoft?s
?trusted? Windows Store is
[riddled] with unauthorised
content. Thus far we have only mentioned video, but the
issue also applies to pirated
music.
The illegal streaming
apps offer programmes
such as Game of Thrones
?Earlier this year Microsoft signed a
landmark anti-piracy agreement . . . to
address pirate search results in the Bing
search engine. [It is] clear that search
results in the Microsoft Store may
require some attention too.?
According to the Intellectual Property Office one quarter of over-12s who
are active online in Britain are involved
in piracy and the proportion of TV
viewers who stream illegally increased
from 20 per cent to 22 per cent last year.
TV programmes, such as Game of
Thrones, account for the most infringements, with 8 per cent of over-12s
admitting accessing pirated content
compared with 7 per cent for music and
6 per cent for film.
Microsoft said: ?We take reports that
there is intellectual property infringement or inappropriate content in our
store seriously and will review this
recent report to its fullest.? Google indicated that it would review the apps
found by The Times in its Play Store. A
spokesman said: ?We review and remove any apps that break our policies
once we?re made aware of them.?
hackers selling fake Viagra
Taneth Evans, Mark Bridge
Spammers have hijacked Google News
to display advertisements for phoney
Viagra as headline stories.
Experts said it was worrying that
Google?s systems could be so easily subverted to sell erectile dysfunction drugs
after the company promised to crack
down on fake stories and overhauled its
news platform.
Hackers appear to have compromised the sites of smaller news sources
including The Santa Clara, the student
newspaper of Santa Clara University,
California, and The Filipino Express, a
newspaper for the Filipino American
community. The hackers created pages
on these sites that have been listed
prominently on Google News in Britain.
The headlines, such as ?Canada
cheap viagra?, which have appeared
high in the health headlines section of
Google News, are clearly not for legitimate stories and click through to order
forms for bulk quantities of pills.
Google was made aware of the issue
when Search Engine Land, a specialist
website, reported the appearance of
large numbers of pharmacy advertisements on the platform two months ago.
Nevertheless, the advertisements have
continued to appear since then.
Unregulated pharmacy sites may be
used for outright scams and to ?phish?
for people?s bank details.
Experts have questioned how
Google?s algorithms could enable
spammers to game the system, warning
that people intending to spread misinformation could use the same tactics.
A Google spokesman said: ?The team
is looking into the problem but can confirm that Google News was not hacked.?
Dr Zhewei Zhang, a technology expert at Warwick Business School, said
small local news websites that don?t
have IT security professionals were
?extremely vulnerable? but that Google
?should take more responsibility?.
22
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
News
The x-ray brought out fine
details of the woman?s
expression that had been
obscured by ash and salt
in the original, far left
Scientists unearth
hidden beauty of
Vesuvius painting
S
cientists have
used new x-ray
techniques to
reveal the beauty
of a woman
depicted in a previously
overlooked wall painting
that was obscured by ash
and salt after Vesuvius
erupted in AD79 (Mark
Bridge writes).
Experts believe that
the portrait, found in
Herculaneum, could be
a likeness of a
ly
member of the family
ide
who owned the seaside
villa, painted in the 50s
or 60s of the first
hat it
century. They say that
is one of the most
important images
preserved by the
eruption to be
uncovered since a
painting of a girl with a
stylus, now in the
National Archaeological
Museum in Naples, was
f
d in Pompeii. Th
found
They
believe that the portable
scanners that revealed
the image by detecting
elements in the original
pigments could lead to
the discovery of many
Invasion by bee-killing
Asian hornets ?inevitable?
Georgie Keate
Britain?s honeybee population will be
decimated as a result of the ?inevitable?
arrival of Asian hornets by the summer?s end, conservationists warn.
The predatory species, which can
wipe out 50 bees a day, is thought to
have been introduced to Europe when
several arrived in Bordeaux in boxes of
pottery from China in 2004. Despite
efforts to eradicate them, the hornets
spread into Spain and Portugal.
Asian hornets were not sighted in
Britain until last September in Gloucestershire, prompting the Department for
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(Defra) to set up a three-mile surveillance zone.
Although that nest was believed to
have been contained, the Scottish
government confirmed the discovThe invasive species,
pictured in life size, have
been filmed attacking bees
other ?lost? artworks.
Eleonora del Federico,
of the Pratt Institute,
New York, who led the
research, said: ?The
impact goes beyond
bringing this woman
back to life because at
archaeological sites like
Herculaneum or
Pompeii you have
paintings that are
considered lost, and
with this new technique
you can go beyond the
layer of salt or ash or
ery of a hornet in March before a
second nest was found on Jersey in July.
Islanders filmed the hornets attacking
honeybees this month.
Conservationists now believe that
nothing can stop the spread and said
the government must act swiftly.
?It is going to be pretty disastrous for
our honeybees,? Dave Goulson, professor of biology at the University of Sussex, said. ?The concern about the Asian
hornet is that its preferred prey is the
honeybee. They actively seek out hives.
When they?ve found one, they gather
with other hornets and attack en
masse.?
Professor Goulson said that the
hornets? arrival was ?inevitable? towards the end of the summer. He said
that a third of all
crop pollination in the UK
was done by
honeybees.
?They are essential to crop production in this country
and the result could be fairly catastrophic.?
A quarter of all crops, including corn
and barley, are pollinated by wind, but
bees pollinate the rest, including fruit
and vegetables. ?Without bees we?d be
on a diet of solid bread and porridge,?
Professor Goulson said.
Defra classed the discovery of Asian
hornets in Gloucester last year as a civil
emergency that posed ?a serious threat
to UK native bee colonies?.
The insects are slightly smaller than
native hornets and pose no risk to
humans beyond their sting.
Paul de Zylva, a Friends of the Earth
campaigner, said: ?Our wild bumble
and solitary bees and colonies of managed honeybees are already under
pressure from the loss of habitats and
exposure to pesticides. The last thing
they need is to be preyed on by an invasive species.?
A Defra spokesman said the department had staff ?ready to go? and encouraged people to report sightings of
any hornet they believed to be Asian.
degradation to see all
the amazing details.?
The researchers used
a device called Elio,
which can produce maps
of the elements in the
painting, such as iron,
lead and copper. It has
been used in museums
to analyse paintings by
Rembrandt and Van
Gogh, but this is the first
time it has been used to
investigate historic wall
paintings in their
original settings.
The analysis showed
that the artist had
sketched her with an
iron-based pigment and
highlighted her eyes
with a lead pigment.
Muslim anti-terror camp
counters lure of extremism
Michael Binyon
More than 500 British Muslims, mainly
university students and youth leaders,
have taken part in an ?anti-terrorism?
training camp, learning to combat extremist literature and identify people in
danger of becoming radicalised.
The residential camp was hosted by
Minhaj-ul-Quran International, a
leading moderate British Muslim organisation, and focused on the threat
posed by Islamic State propaganda.
Workshops and lectures, broadcast live
on YouTube, Facebook and social media, looked at identifying extremists by
their talk of ?us and them? and their use
of false terminology in citing the Koran.
The three-day conference at Keele
University in Staffordshire, which ended yesterday, was intended to give British Muslims ideological confidence to
counter Isis propaganda.
MPs, academics and religious leaders
were invited to the camp, seen as particularly important after the attacks in
Manchester and London and the
bloodshed in Barcelona.
The keynote speaker was Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri, the founder of
Minhaj-ul-Quran and author of a 600page fatwa on terrorism and suicide
bombings. He condemned the perpetrators of extremist violence and dealt
with misconstrued theological ideas
about jihad, the misinterpretation of
Koranic verses to justify violence and
the establishing of a global caliphate.
Those attending ranged in age from
15 to 40, drawn from across Britain and
especially from Sufi groups inspired by
Dr Tahir-ul-Qadri. They paid for their
food and accommodation.
Dr Tahir-ul-Qadri, a Sufi originally
from Pakistan but now living in Canada, issued his fatwa against extremism
in 2011 and launched a counter-terrorism curriculum in June 2015, which he
hopes will be taught in British mosques.
?I have announced an intellectual
and spiritual war against extremism
and terrorism,? he said last week. ?It is
vital to train young people how Isis and
other terrorist groups are giving the
wrong impression of Islamic concepts
such as jihad.?
The government has repeatedly
called on Muslim leaders to build resilience in young British Muslims against
the lure of extremism.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
23
1GM
More people doesn?t have
to mean more chaos
Hugo Rifkind
Page 25
Comment
Our foreign secretary is an international joke
Boris Johnson has made enemies and alienated allies at a time when Britain needs a strong and respected voice abroad
RICK RYCROFT/AP
Rachel
Sylvester
@rsylvestertimes
B
oris Johnson is becoming
the Where?s Wally? of
international diplomacy.
All over the world the
geopolitical tectonic plates
are shifting yet at this time of huge
global significance the foreign
secretary is all but invisible on the
international stage. On the nuclear
threat posed by North Korea, the
crisis over Saudi Arabia and Qatar
or the clash between the US and
China, he is irrelevant. On Syria,
Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Russia,
Venezuela, Turkey and Yemen, he is
incoherent. Occasionally he surfaces
briefly, like a hostage paraded before
the television cameras to prove he is
still alive, as he did after a visit to
Libya last week, but even then he is
ineffective because he has ceded all
influence to others.
As the US enters an extraordinary
culture war under Donald Trump,
Mr Johnson remains morally
ambiguous, flip-flopping between
dismissing criticisms of the president
as a ?whinge-o-rama? and claiming
he got it ?totally wrong? in his
response to the recent racial violence
in Charlottesville. He made a serious
strategic error in aligning himself so
quickly with a divisive populist
across the Atlantic who no longer
even has the support of his own
Republican Party.
In this country, Labour has finally
joined the argument about the
implementation of Brexit, but the
foreign secretary is nowhere to be
seen in that debate. Having fooled
the United Kingdom into voting to
leave the European Union, by
promising that it would mean an
additional �0 million a week for
the NHS, he has no realistic idea
of what Brexit should entail. He
suggests the policy should be to
have our cake and eat it and that
other EU countries can ?go whistle?
for UK payments, as if this were
some kind of public school game
rather than a negotiation on which
the future of the nation depends.
Again, there is an inability or an
unwillingness to think through the
long-term consequences of his
position.
Increasingly semi-detached,
Mr Johnson is simultaneously
condemning the UK to irrelevance
by proxy. It is an extraordinary
abdication of responsibility by the
man whose role is to promote his
country abroad. As Lord Kerr of
Kinlochard, the former head of the
diplomatic service, wrote in a
damning assessment for George
Osborne?s Evening Standard last
Staff at the Foreign
Office are horrified by
his lack of discipline
week: ?Keeping our heads down isn?t
always wrong. But a policy of always
doing so risks seeming ignominious
. . . Callaghan, Carrington, Howe,
Hurd: foreign secretaries used to cut
ice abroad, particularly in Europe
and America, but maybe that?s not
Boris? game.?
Some MPs believe Mr Johnson is
pursuing a deliberate strategy of
what Henry Kissinger liked to call
?constructive ambiguity? ? keeping
his options open for the sake of
personal ambition ? but the truth is
that he is rapidly becoming a
national embarrassment. I?ve just
spent a fortnight in America and was
shocked by the number of tech
entrepreneurs, hedge fund managers
and political strategists I met who
asked: ?Why has your prime minister
appointed a fool as foreign
secretary?? According to diplomatic
sources, even officials at the Trump
White House ?don?t want to go
anywhere near Boris because they
think he?s a joke?. If that seems
ironic, one minister says: ?It?s worse
in Europe. There is not a single
foreign minister there who takes him
seriously. They think he?s a clown
who can never resist a gag.?
Although the foreign secretary?s
job is to win friends and influence
people, he seems intent on making
enemies and alienating allies all over
the world. In diplomacy, every word
matters. Mr Johnson will sacrifice
months of careful negotiation by his
officials to get a quick headline.
There have been the jibes about
falling prosecco sales and
comparisons between EU leaders
and prisoner of war camp guards.
Last month he infuriated the French
by revealing Emmanuel Macron?s
plans for Libyan peace talks, having
been briefed about the initiative on
condition that he told no one about
it. Senior Conservatives blame
?vanity? for his inability to remain
on message or keep a secret. ?The
French think Boris is totally
unreliable, the Germans think he?s a
liar and the Italians think he?s
dangerous,? says one well-travelled
Tory MP. ?He is undermining our
ability to negotiate internationally
and degrading our position abroad.
The foreign secretary is supposed to
enhance Britain?s reputation but all
over the world Boris is making
matters worse.?
The civil servants in the Foreign
Office are horrified by their boss?s
than because she genuinely thought
he was the best person for the job.
Since then, she has taken every
opportunity to undermine him, once
even comparing him to a dog that
would be put down when it had
served its purpose. Fearing him as a
leadership rival, No 10 does all it
can to keep the foreign secretary
from appearing in the media or
expressing an opinion to prevent him
Given one of the best
cabinet positions, he?s
shrivelled in the glare
Boris Johnson?s suitability for his high
office is questioned around the world
lack of discipline and have taken to
slipping in to see his deputy Sir Alan
Duncan, the Europe minister, when
they need a decision. At the
intelligence agencies, there is a
nervousness about giving sensitive
material to a politician who treats
every public outing like an
after-dinner speech. ?It?s all about
managing Boris, not respecting him,?
says one Whitehall source. ?He?s got
no concentration span so it?s difficult
to have a detailed discussion with
him. The whole thing is completely
ramshackle for someone who is
supposed to be so clever. He doesn?t
know what he thinks so he flies by
the seat of his pants.?
Theresa May is partly to blame. A
Remainer, who needed to dip the
Brexiteers? hands in the blood of an
EU deal, she appointed Mr Johnson
to his post for political reasons rather
building an independent powerbase.
Mr Johnson has, however, done a far
better job of undermining his own
reputation than Downing Street
ever could. Having been given one
of the best positions in the cabinet,
he has shrivelled under the spotlight.
Jacob Rees-Mogg has overtaken him
as the grass roots? favourite Bertie
Wooster caricature and Tom
Tugendhat, the new chairman of the
Commons foreign affairs select
committee, has emerged to have a
better grasp of international affairs.
Mr Johnson was never much liked
by his parliamentary colleagues but
he was respected by them as a
politician who had Heineken appeal:
an ability to reach the parts others
could not. At the Foreign Office, he
has lost that touch and with it his
leadership chances. Boris has been
found out but he has left Britain still
searching for a foreign policy role.
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24
1GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Comment
Welcome to America, land of the regulated
Those hoping to do business in the US should beware its weird fusion of rapacity and red tape
Justin
Webb
@justinonweb
R
ejoice: it is no longer illegal
to braid hair without a
licence in the American
state of Arkansas. The
owner of a salon called
Twistykinks had been told that she
needed to attend cosmetology
school and spend more than a
thousand dollars before being
legally qualified. The school didn?t
even teach hair braiding.
With the help of a libertarian
pressure group, the Institute for
Justice, she took the state to court
and won. But the institute says there
are hundreds of similar regulations
in other states, and often in those
that proudly trumpet their freedom.
Want to be an interior designer in
Houston, Texas, where business
could be brisk when the floods
subside? You?ll need to register and
take exams set by the state
government. Or shampoo folks in
hair salons in Tennessee? In 2014 a
manicurist was fined $1,000 for
washing hair without being licensed
as a ?shampoo technician?.
The libertarians squeal but here
is the dirty truth: Americans like
regulation. From the law mandating
teeth cleaning for kids at day care in
Massachusetts to the city rules that
forced me to park my car facing the
direction of travel outside my home
in suburban Washington DC,
America is anything but the land of
the free.
When we talk of trade deals
with the United States, whether
we are enthusiastic or hostile, we
should be thinking outside the box
labelled ?chlorinated chickens?. Our
business leaders and our trade
negotiators will need to take heed of
what many successful Britons with
US experience already know about
America: it is not always the
nation we assume it to be. Indeed, it
is not the nation it assumes itself to
be. George W Bush?s speechwriter
David Frum said once that his
boss was both less nice and less
dumb than people thought. America
is both less liberated and less
vapid than its international
reputation recognises.
And less entrepreneurial. In this
year?s World Bank Ease of Doing
Part of the problem
is the complexity of
modern government
Business survey the overall winner is
New Zealand. America comes a
respectable eighth. And the UK?
Well how about that: we are seventh.
According to the bank, it?s easier to
do business in Britain than the land
of opportunity.
Americans seem to notice this.
The Kauffman Foundation, an
organisation that seeks to boost
innovation, is among those
suggesting that America?s start-up
gusto is no longer world-beating,
arguing in a report last year that the
recession had ?dealt a permanent
blow to millennials? entrepreneurial
potential?. Kauffman researchers
found that the rate of business
formation by Americans aged 20 to
34 had fallen sharply since 2010, and
millennials were not starting nearly
as many enterprises as baby boomers
did at the same age.
Part of the problem is the
eye-watering complexity of
modern American government,
described by the political scientist
Steven Teles as a ?kludgeocracy?.
A ?kludge? is defined by the
Oxford English Dictionary as
?an ill-assorted collection of parts
assembled to fulfil a particular
purpose?. It kind of works. But
nobody can quite get a handle on
which levers to pull to make it work
better. Even when it works well
people do not have a full grasp of it.
As Professor Teles puts it: ?The
complexity and incoherence of our
government often make it difficult
for us to understand just what that
government is doing.?
The US is more prone to
regulation and less dynamic than its
worldwide reputation allows. But
when they get themselves going are
they not unbeatable? And horrible at
the same time. Does not the
American desire for wealth subsume
everyone and everything? Here the
answer is yes, but not for the reason
we think. Yes, America can be
rapacious and vulgar. However, it is
driven by so much more than money.
We underestimate American
business if we assume, with a sniff,
that it?s all about the dollars. The US
author David Brooks asks a simple
question: ?If middle America is so
stupid, self-absorbed and
materialistic, which it often is, then
how can America itself be so great??
The answer, he says, is that the
wealth is a by-product, not an end,
in the American project: ?The race
for riches is just a manifestation of
There are tribes in the
Amazon rainforest to
whom we are closer
I
returned from three weeks of
writing about the drama-rama of
the Edinburgh Fringe to a very
sunny Derbyshire, words not
often seen together in August,
and immediately plunged into that
most English of activities, snooping.
It was Bakewell Secret Gardens day,
in which 16 houses had opened up
their back gardens, all for charity.
Oh, how delicious to find yourself
being led up the garden path and
into that most revealing of spaces.
For once, the great nimby rallying
cry of the middle classes simply did
not apply. Truly I feel that, if she
could, Miss Marple herself would
have joined us as we examined laden
plum trees (how dare they be so
plentiful when ours is so sparse?)
and borders filled with spiky, bright
red lobelias, which must be the plant
of the summer.
I seem to recall that there was
once a newspaper supplement
feature called Me and My
Mantelpiece, in which people were
photographed with said shelf
crammed with mementoes. I have
always thought that Me and My
Fridge (cue open fridge door)
would be far more entertaining.
But now, surely, it has to be Me and
My Back Garden.
Bearing arms
A
few weeks ago I wrote about
the much-loved statue of
Greyfriars Bobby, the Skye
terrier who waited so loyally by
his master?s grave for 14 years,
and received a poignant message
from reader Michael Jones. He
said it reminded him of
Cher Ami, the homing
pigeon donated by the
pigeon fanciers of
Great Britain to the
US Army Signal
Corps in France
during the First
World War.
Can birds be
brave? This one
was: saving
the ?Lost
Battalion??
of some
500 men commanded
by Charles White
Whittlesey by delivering a
crucial message, a feat accomplished
despite the fact that she was shot
through the breast and leg in flight. I
thought of both again when, walking
in Princes Street Gardens, I came
across a statue of Wojtek, the bear
adopted by Polish II Corps soldiers in
1942. In order to provide for his
rations and transport, they enlisted
him as a soldier. After
serving in Italy,
including in the Battle
of Monte Cassino,
Wojtek lived out the
rest of his life at
Edinburgh Zoo.
T things you
The
l
learn
during a walk
in the park, eh?
Fowl play
T
he moment I
see anyone
wearing a
chicken
costume, I
c
start
st to smile. Does
everyone?
I suspect
e
not.
n Last week I went to
a show called Real Magic,
w
which,
as it was 90 minutes
long and featured the
same thing over and
over again, mostly
required real patience.
Thank God, then,
for the chicken
costumes that the
people
on stage
tthree
th
h
p
donned
occasionally. I loved
d
o
them! How it took me back to my
T
e all need to make up
more words. In this spirit,
my friend Lynette
contributes ?shrinkle?, invented by
her daughter when young to describe
what happens to your skin when
you?ve been in the water too long.
Love it.
heresa May has been
channelling her inner
head prefect. Most British
companies, she wrote in
an article this weekend, are
behaving perfectly well. But a small
minority ? it?s always a few who let
the side down for everyone, isn?t it?
? are ?falling short of the high
standards we expect?.
These bosses are mistreating their
workers, said Mrs May. They?re
giving themselves excessive pay
rises. They are, in short, the
?unacceptable? face of capitalism.
So what fearsome disciplinary
procedures will the prime minister
bring to bear? ?The names of those
firms that have faced a shareholder
revolt over salaries and bonuses will
be published on a new public
register.? A new public register! And
?if we do not see sufficient progress,
we reserve the right to take further
steps?. Further steps! That sound you
hear is Mike Ashley falling to his
knees in terror and stupefaction.
This is, in many ways, the May
premiership in a nutshell. As with
her first speech in Downing Street,
she offers a scathing critique of the
country?s problems and, implicitly, of
her own party?s traditional approach.
Yet the solutions she puts forward
are either piffling, inadequate or
filched from the Miliband playbook.
On executive pay, for example, it is
hard to imagine a single voter who is
preoccupied with the topic, yet will
be content with Mrs May?s remedies.
It is easy, however, to imagine many
paying more attention to Jeremy
Corbyn when the Labour leader
fulminates about the same issue,
because the prime minister herself
has explicitly endorsed his concerns.
It may be that Mrs May hoped to
do more but lost the battle within
her own party. In that case, why
draw attention to it? If you are going
to depict runaway executive pay as
one of the great challenges of our
age, you need solutions that are the
equal of it. Capping the boss?s salary
at a multiple of the lowest-paid
worker?s may be a horrible idea.
But at least it comes over like a cure
rather than a placebo.
There are ways to talk about
executive pay, and possible solutions,
that are constructive rather than
confrontational. Mrs May?s approach
is, as the Tory MP George Freeman
has warned, doubly damaging. It
legitimises Mr Corbyn?s anticapitalist critiques and it alienates
those who believe in enterprise,
opportunity and wealth-creation.
As it is, Mrs May seems blind to
both political reality and economic
necessity. Whatever form of Brexit
we end up with, it can only succeed
if Britain becomes a place that
attracts, generates and celebrates
business, rather than subjecting it
to finger-wagging lectures.
@anntreneman
Robert Colvile edits CapX, a website
reporting on politics and economics
a deeper metaphysical striving
that?s in the midst of realising its
glorious destiny.?
He?s right. The America I knew,
and the America you know if you
do business there, is driven by a
deep-seated desire to seize things
and change them. This is what gives
American businesses and American
businesspeople their edge. This is
where British competitors are at a
potential disadvantage: we just don?t
care so much and so deeply as they
do about anything. ?It?s just widgets,?
we may think, but they are
hyperventilating: ?Widgets! We
could retool them, make them out
of gold, eat them!?
Hair braiders from Cleethorpes
hoping for post-Brexit
opportunities in Arkansas should
beware. When it comes to business
culture there are tribes in Amazon
rainforests to whom we are closer.
That?s the promise, and the
challenge, of America.
Justin Webb presents the Today
programme on BBC Radio 4
Melanie Phillips is away
Ann Treneman Notebook
The joys of
being led up
a stranger?s
garden path
Enough of May?s
sabre-rattling
on executive pay
Robert Colvile
parliamentary sketchwriting days
when many a turgid event was
enlivened by someone dressing up as
a chicken and squawking near one
politician or another, a ploy that I
am sure has been used by both the
Tories and Labour. In these Brexit
days, we need more chickens out
there, peck peck pecking away.
Lavatory humour
L
oos and who uses which was a
theme of this year?s festival and
I saw the best sign of the lot at a
funky little place called the Shrub
Swap and Reuse Hub. Its loo was
adorned by a drawing that showed
only the top of a head and the feet
underneath, in between left as a
blank space for the words ?Don?t
Worry About It?. The tagline
elaborated: ?Free the Toilets ?
Break the Gender Binary!? I?m not
sure what this means but I know I?m
in favour of it.
Final word
W
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
25
1GM
Comment
Buy prints or signed copies of Times cartoons from our Print Gallery at timescartoons.co.uk or call 020 7711 7826
More people doesn?t have to mean more chaos
Earth?s population is set to hit 11.2 billion by the end of the century but there is room for everybody if we plan properly
Hugo
Rifkind
@hugorifkind
T
he flooding in Houston
looks apocalyptic and so
did King?s Cross ticket hall
in London. Honestly, that?s
how it felt. After two weeks
in Nova Scotia, where the roads are
clear and the sky is huge, and even
the smallest house seems to have a
bijou primeval forest out the back, I
stumbled off the Tube from
Heathrow in time for the evening
rush hour home from the Notting
Hill carnival. ?This city is bursting,?
I told myself, as I fought my way
through drunken, happy people in
facepaints and hotpants. ?It is
broken. It cannot go on.?
Give it a week, or maybe less, and
I?ll be back in love with my city,
chaos and all. When I visited London
as a teenager, I couldn?t get enough
of it; the wildness, the anonymity,
the endless potential of a place
where almost everybody has made
an active choice not to be
somewhere else. Today, somehow,
these same streets have at least two
million more people on them. I have
grown as London has grown, so I
cannot pretend I?ve really noticed it
happening. I am the frog who boils.
Texas, over the same period of
time, has grown even faster. Most
recent statistics suggest that
29 million people now live in the
Lone Star state, which is a whole ten
million more than in the mid-1990s.
Houston, centre of this weekend?s
floods, added 150,000 people last
week alone. We cannot know, yet,
what post-flood lessons any pending
civic autopsy will throw up, but you
can bet that rocketing, unmanaged
growth will be at the heart of all of
them. Houston is a sprawling city,
and recently it has started to sprawl
We needn?t end up
doing unpleasant
things to each other
far more. If it also floods far more,
this will be at least partly because
there is much more of it to flood.
Here, there, almost everywhere,
there are more people than there
used to be. In the future, there will
be more than there are now. Sane
politicians have a horror of
discussing this, which means the
only people who ever do are either
the insane ones or science fiction
writers. The latter, with remarkable
consistency, tend to predict
megacities. The Tom Cruise film
Minority Report (based on a story by
Philip K Dick) has a brilliant,
understated scene in which we see
families relaxing in an urban
swimming pool. Everything is exactly
as you would expect it to be today,
except for the sheer number of
people. There are hundreds of them
in there.
Probably, that?s fanciful. Many
scientists agree that the planet?s
population is likely to level out at
about 10-11 billion, which doesn?t
sound too terrifying provided they
aren?t all with Tom Cruise in a
swimming pool. This is where global
birth rates are likely to rest once the
developing world matches western
access to things such as
contraception and female
emancipation, which tend to gel
together to dissuade parents from
seeking to emulate the old woman
who lived in a shoe. It is also, happily
enough, the sort of population this
planet can support, without us all
having to do terribly unpleasant
things, such as eating each other.
Have you seen the 1973 megacity
dystopia Soylent Green? Make it your
next TV dinner. Don?t eat sausages.
Barring some sort of sudden,
imminent extinction event, which I?d
be against, we?ll hit that global limit
fairly soon. The United Nations, for
example, predicts a global population
of 11.2 billion by 2100. Given that this
is not only desirable (at least
compared with any of the
alternatives) but also probably
inevitable, it is strange how little of
our politics concerns itself with
trying to make the journey, and the
destination, as painless as possible.
The reason why politicians are
wary of discussing population
UK population growth
used to mean small
towns and new towns
growth is that the topic is hopelessly
and negatively bound up with
immigration. This is senseless. For
one thing, a major component of the
growing populations is growing life
expectancy, for the simple reason
that fewer dead people means more
alive people, and in order to afford
more older, retired people you need
more younger, working people, too.
For another, the Mediterranean
migrant crisis is a reminder that, in
the longer term, desperate, hungry
people will get to where they need to
go. The more the world?s population
grows, the more people will want to
be in the world?s nicer bits. The only
way we can really change that is by
no longer being one of them. I?d be
against that, too.
Population growth doesn?t need to
be unmanaged chaos, and it doesn?t
need to be sci-fi megacities, either.
The UK?s population has gone only
upwards for two centuries, even
through two world wars. The
population of London has not. It was
almost as big as it is now in 1939,
before declining until 1988. For half a
century, British population growth
meant small towns and new towns;
Stevenage, Crawley, Peterborough,
Milton Keynes. Even today, less
than 8 per cent of Britain is built
upon. Of course there is room.
There will always be room.
Environmentalists like to claim
that you could fit everybody on
Earth into Texas, leaving the rest of
the planet spare. You couldn?t own
much stuff, alas, and you?d need a lot
of air conditioning. Plus you?d have a
massive trek to your allotment,
which would need to be out
somewhere like Papua New Guinea.
Certainly, though, you could fit
everybody in Texas into Texas. What
is more, you could do it far better
than they?ve actually done it, and in
a manner which gave some thought
as to where their fair share of the
next three billion humans were
going to go, too. We?re not doing
that, either. Obviously, we should be.
Shall we start?
26
1GM
Letters to the Editor should be sent to
letters@thetimes.co.uk or by post to
1 London Bridge Street, London SE1 9GF
Letters to the Editor
Choosing technical colleges over university
Election of a
Tory leader
Sir, Exactly 40 years after we first
met, Matthew Parris invites me to
find fault with his summary of the
procedures under which Tory leaders
have been elected since 1965
(Comment, Aug 26).
He falters at just one point. No
recent leader has been given
significant added protection by the
changes introduced over the years.
The leader enjoyed protection under
the initial formulation of the rules
which provided that an election could
only take place on the death or
resignation of the incumbent.
A leader in whom confidence had
fallen could not be challenged.
Subsequent revisions enabled
backbench MPs to force elections in
circumstances where dissatisfaction
with the existing leader had reached
significant levels.
For more than 30 years the election
procedures rested on a clear principle:
?The predominant voice in the
selection must be that of the House of
Commons since the leader?s position
ultimately depends more on his or
her ability to command the support of
the party in the Commons than on
any other single factor.?
Foolishly, the party equipped itself
with a written constitution in 1998
that handed the decision to the party
at large. That makes it harder to
establish a new electoral college in
which the founding principle can be
reasserted. It must, however, be done.
lord lexden
House of Lords
Saving turtle doves
Sir, It seems that those lucky enough
to have heard the purring call of the
turtle dove may not for much longer.
Even in East Anglia, once their
stronghold, their numbers have fallen
by 96 per cent since the early 1970s.
The turtle doves arrive in May, but
due to the remorseless economics of
modern farming there is little food to
be found for such opportunistic
feeders. Small weeds have been
sprayed out, access to grain stores
barred and there are no village
chicken pens.
A serious programme of releasing
birds from a captive flock at
Pensthorpe Natural Park in Norfolk
has been successful in the past but is
now being prevented by the RSPB. It
should be made again, otherwise
these birds will follow the passenger
pigeon into extinction, as happened
in the US.
bill makins
Dereham, Norfolk
Corrections and
clarifications
The Times takes complaints about
editorial content seriously. We are
committed to abiding by the
Independent Press Standards
Organisation (?IPSO?) rules and
regulations and the Editors? Code of
Practice that IPSO enforces.
Requests for corrections or
clarifications should be sent by email to
feedback@thetimes.co.uk or by post to
Feedback, The Times, 1 London Bridge
Street, London SE1 9GF
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Sir, I praise The Times in its coverage
of the increase in respect, and
recognition, for vocational courses.
The fact that a leading independent
school, Brighton College, is pursuing
this through offering Btec exams is
encouraging (leading article, Aug 26).
The government should watch this
with interest as a new template for
the education system in our country
could be taking shape ? one where
grammar schools offer academic
qualifications, and technical colleges
serve those who would benefit from
vocational courses.
All students would not be measured
in the uniform academic way as they
are at present. This would remove the
?prestige? of grammar schools and
?feeling of failure? associated with
failing to achieve a place, which many
who object to their expansion use as a
strong line of argument.
james smith
Teacher of English, Liverpool
Sir, I agree with the valid reasons
expressed by Libby Purves in support
of those independent schools that are
encouraging an increasing number of
leavers to embark on vocational and
technical courses (Comment, Aug 28).
Another benefit will surely be the
Charles Darwin?s
debt to others
Sir, AN Wilson has accused Charles
Darwin of concealing his debt to
other thinkers, specifically on
evolution and those who contributed
to establishing natural selection
(?Darwin?s greatness is founded on a
myth?, Aug 26).
Mr Wilson also wonders ?how
many Darwinians have actually read
[Descent of Man] to the end?. Well, I
just have and in my copy Darwin was
particularly clear in emphasising the
contributions of others. The book
merely shows its age and should be
judged in the light of what its author
had to do and the tools he had
available.
To understand evolution, we
needed to know the mechanisms by
which descendants inherit any
features from their parents, the
mechanisms of natural variation and
how variant features become
established in a population.
on this day august 29, 1917
?JOY RIDING?
IN
WALES
Fines amounting to � were
imposed at Newmarket Police Court
for using petrol for travelling to and
from the recent race meeting.
The first defendant was Mr
Herbert De La Rue, a Justice of the
Peace for Cambridgeshire. A
constable stated that he saw the
defendant alight from his motor-car
and walk towards the race-course.
When interrogated, he said, ? Yes,
that is right, I shall continue to do
need for a reform of the publishing of
league tables, with the aim of
developing a more complete and
relevant picture of a school?s
achievements than focusing just on
the A-star grades at A level
or 8s and 9s at GCSE.
graham davies
Lancing, W Sussex
Sir, Your leader (Aug 26) raised a
topic that is not new. There is a long
and unsuccessful history of attempts
to provide vocational awards for
young people for whom A levels are
unsuitable.
I worked on the General National
Vocational Qualification (GNVQ)
programme some 20 years ago, but
these awards were withdrawn in 2007.
After I left the National Council for
Vocational Qualifications I followed
with interest Sir Mike Tomlinson?s
work on the 14-19 diploma, much of
which looked good, but this award
was withdrawn in 2013.
One of the differences between
then and now is that we failed to
engage the higher education and
employer communities. Let?s hope for
better luck this time.
richard larcombe
Farnham Royal, Bucks
Darwin got the last one right. He
could not know about the first two
because even the basic organic
chemistry had not been done, and
indeed it took another hundred years
to make a real beginning on
disentangling genomes.
Other points: Mendelian genetics in
its simplest form is of no help in
understanding evolution and anyway
applies only to diploid organisms:
evolution has operated at different
rates in different circumstances, and
Darwin was not always perfect.
emeritus professor tom boyde
University of Hong Kong
Sir, Mr Wilson repeats the error of
claiming Georges Cuvier was an
evolutionist. Cuvier, like his British
counterpart Richard Owen, was well
aware of the issue of transformism
(gradual transformation of one
species into another), taking part in a
widely reported debate with Geoffroy
Saint-Hilaire in 1830. However, he
adamantly maintained that there
were four distinct, separately created
phyla in the animal kingdom, and
so.? The defendant denied this,
calling the statement ?a stretch of
the constable?s imagination?. He
admitted motoring from a business
trip, alighting near the races and
walking thither. He protested against
the difficulty the Order caused.
The justices declined to advise on
hypothetical cases put by the
defendant, advising him to forward
protests and inquiries to the Board
of Trade. They reminded him that
the Order had appeared in
newspapers and the defendant
retorted, ?I don?t read all the papers.
I should read a nice lot of rubbish if I
did.? A penalty of �was imposed.
Other defendants were fined
similar amounts. Pleas were raised of
ignorance of the Order, difficulty in
understanding it, and the
impossibility of keeping up with
orders ?as numerous as leaves in
Vallambrosa.?
Extensive inquiries into the misuse
of petrol in South Wales have been
made by the Western Mail. It is
obvious that ?joy-riding? has been
revived to a regrettable degree
during the summer. Motor-cycles
Sir, Libby Purves is spot on in her
article regarding the ?cult? of
university education. I would take
exception, however, when she
ponders whether quitting university
may lead to ?shattered confidence,
depression and resentment?.
In my experience the opposite
appears to be the case, with the
possible exception of resentment ?
that students had fallen for the myth
that a university education is the only
path to a fulfilling career.
giles edwards
Langford, Oxon
Sir, Our son chose not to go to
university. He was errantly informed
by his independent boarding school:
?You?re letting yourselves down, your
parents down, and the school down.?
He has gone on to do well, gaining
a wealth of experience that augured
well with prospective employers. At
35 he earns more than the majority of
his school-year contemporaries, is
debt free, owns his house, contributes
to a pension and has never felt he had
let us down. In fact, we applauded his
strength of character to plough his
own furrow.
lesley russell
Kingston upon Thames
that fossils of extinct species had been
formed by the Flood (or floods).
hugh dower
Wensleydale, N Yorks
Sir, AN Wilson surprisingly omits
mention of the Scottish naturalist and
fruit breeder, Patrick Matthew. Yet
Darwin himself, his wife and
?Darwin?s bulldog?, TH Huxley,
readily admitted that Matthew beat
Darwin to the idea.
How long is it going to take before
historians take note of what Darwin
himself openly and publicly accepted
? namely that he did not originate
the theory of natural selection?
professor milton wainwright
Sheffield
Sir, Darwin a fraud? I doubt that
many people are more intellectually
honest than was Darwin, whatever
one?s views of his conclusions. His
science was of its time. He departed
from his upbringing in the light of the
facts as he observed them.
harvey gritzman
Chalfont St Peter, Bucks
and motor-cars of all kinds have
swarmed over the countryside in
recent weeks. Those who oppose the
needless use of petrol argue that,
with the struggle for air supremacy,
the need of petrol will certainly
become more urgent, and the
situation may become serious unless
economy is rigidly enforced.
At Porthcawl 500 pleasure cars
were counted during one Sunday.
On another day 112 cars were seen
near the golf club house. It is a
modest estimate to say that 1,000
gallons of petrol were wasted in one
day by cars visiting that one small
resort. It is pointed out, however,
that Government employees are the
chief offenders. Military and naval
officers use high-power cars to take
them to and from their offices
several times during the day when
tramcars could be used with almost
equal facility.
sign up for a weekly email
with extracts from
the times history of the war
ww1.thetimes.co.uk
Student migration
Sir, Your leader (?Migrants on the
move?, Aug 25) suggests that the
entire student inflow of 114,000 can
simply be subtracted from the overall
net migration estimate of 246,000.
This is not so. Only the net flow of
students could be taken out if there
were a decision to omit them.
The Home Office analysis of its
new exit checks has confirmed the
size of the overall outflow, so its net
migration estimate is unchanged.
However, it has found that the
outflow of those who came as
students has been underestimated in
the recent past. This reduces, but does
not eliminate, their contribution to
net migration since a number stay on
legally in a category such as work or
marriage. In the past six years these
have averaged about 27,000 a year,
roughly 10 per cent of net migration.
It would be wrong in principle to
omit such students from net
migration. Nor would it have an effect
on policy as there is no limit on the
number of genuine students who can
come to the UK.
lord green of deddington
Chairman, Migration Watch UK
Afghanistan today
Sir, Bravo Ben Macintyre! (Comment,
Aug 26). We need to acknowledge
what has been achieved in
Afghanistan in the past decade. The
scale of killings is appalling, but there
has been democratic progress.
The majority of children now
attend school; university graduation is
at an all-time high; new graduates
have been appointed to the
independent administrative reform
and civil service commission;
29 donor countries have praised the
central bank?s progress in combating
corruption; new businesses emerge
daily and an all-women TV station
has been launched.
Above all, Afghans have had 16
years of democratic exposure and,
despite the murderous threats from
the Taliban and Isis, people will
continue to demonstrate their rights
and demand their freedom. Our job is
to continue to enable them to do that.
baroness d?souza; lord stevenson
House of Lords
Two wheels good
Sir, Many cyclists, like me, do make a
contribution to the upkeep of roads
(letter, Aug 26) because we are also
car owners. Perhaps I should get a
discount for leaving my car at home?
A minority of irresponsible cyclists
should not be allowed to obscure the
fact that the nation would be fitter
and its environment cleaner if more
people took to two wheels.
tim gibbons
London SW15
Driverless lorries
Sir, Multiple-freight carriers travelling
a fixed distance apart under the
control of one driver (News, Aug 25)?
Isn?t this called a train?
david mcpheat
Rothley, Leicester
A break code
Sir, As a student nurse in the early
1970s, I longed to hear the words,
?Nurse, Mrs Brown is ready for you
now? (letter, Aug 28). Mrs Brown was
the code word for the teapot, with the
joy of a ?fly cup? in the ward kitchen.
elizabeth kidd
Nairn, Inverness
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
27
2GM
Leading articles
Daily Universal Register
Belgium: Michel Barnier, the EU?s chief
negotiator, and David Davis, the Brexit
secretary, continue talks regarding Britain?s
withdrawal from the European Union.
Japan: Missile interceptor drills take place
amid heightened tensions on the Korean
peninsula.
Nature notes
There is a month to
go before
Michaelmas Day,
which is on
September 29, yet
Michaelmas daisies
are already in
flower and spreading freely across the
countryside. They are now practically a
wildflower, although they are not yet
generally included in flower guides. Their
soft mauve flowers with their splash of
yellow at the centre seem to catch the mood
of early autumnal days. Sometimes they take
over a neglected field, where they look like
giant heather. They were brought to gardens
here from America in the 17th century. In
Germany and farther east there is a wild
European Michaelmas daisy, but in Britain
their closest relative is sea aster, which is
very similar but has paler, more lilac flowers.
This is now rampaging over salt marshes,
and is also found on the verges of
motorways that have had a lot of salt
thrown down on them on frosty days in
winter. derwent may
Birthdays today
Sir Lenny Henry,
pictured, comedian and
actor, Broadchurch (2017),
co-founder of Comic
Relief, 59; Harry
Aikines-Aryeetey,
sprinter, 29; Dame Susan
Bailey, president, Royal
College of Psychiatrists (2011-14), 67; Bob
Beamon, athlete, best known for his long
jump world record (Mexico Olympics, 1968),
71; Jan Berry, chairwoman, Care of Police
Survivors, Police Federation (2002-08), 63;
Michael Clarke, director, National Gallery
of Scotland (2001-16), 65; Rebecca De
Mornay, actress, The Hand That Rocks the
Cradle (1992), 58; Viscount Devonport,
architect and landowner, 73; Elizabeth
Fraser, singer, Cocteau Twins, 54; William
Friedkin, film director, The French
Connection (1971), The Exorcist (1973), 82;
Elliott Gould, actor, M*A*S*H (1970), 79;
Chris Hadfield, astronaut, first Canadian to
walk in space, 58; Angela Huth, author, Land
Girls (1994), 79; Martin Ivens, editor, The
Sunday Times, 59; John McCain, senator, US
Republican presidential candidate (2008), 81;
Lady (Nicola) Mendelsohn, vice-president
of Facebook, Europe, Middle East and
Africa, 46; Daryll Neita, sprinter, silver
medallist, world championships (2017), 21;
Liam Payne, singer, One Direction
(2010-15), 24; Eddi Reader, singer,
Fairground Attraction, 58; Matthew Reed,
chief executive, Children?s Society, 49;
Prof Sir Adam Roberts, president, British
Academy (2009-13), 77; Sir Evelyn de
Rothschild, chairman, NM Rothschild &
Sons (1976-2003), 86; Chris Salmon,
executive director for markets, Bank of
England, 49; Joel Schumacher, film director,
The Lost Boys (1987), 78.
On this day
In 1831 Michael Faraday demonstrated the
first electrical transformer; in 2005
Hurricane Katrina struck the US gulf coast,
killing nearly 2,000 people.
The last word
?I am patient with stupidity but not with those
who are proud of it.? Edith Sitwell, poet and
critic, The Last Years of a Rebel (1967).
Fostering Failures
Tower Hamlets was wrong to place a Christian girl in the care of a Muslim
family who did not speak English at home and could not meet her needs
Fostering is an act of great selflessness. Any carer
who opens their home is to be commended for
offering refuge to vulnerable children. Yet when
the process is bungled, children suffer. That is what
The Times has exposed in the London borough of
Tower Hamlets. A Christian girl was taken from
her family and made to live with Muslims who
often did not speak English at home. The child
begged through tears not to return, but she was
ignored. As we reveal today, her grandmother
offered to take her in, to no avail. Tower Hamlets
urgently needs to revisit this case and admit its
failures. They ought not to be repeated.
The five-year-old, whom The Times has chosen
not to identify, has spent the past six months in the
care of two Muslim households. Local authority
documents report that she was ?very distressed?
about returning to her carer?s home. One carer is
said to have removed her necklace, which bore a
crucifix, and encouraged her to learn Arabic.
When the girl took home a favourite dish
containing pork, she was not allowed to eat it. The
girl has since told her mother that ?European
women are stupid?.
This child?s carers could have provided a fine
home to children from a background more similar
to their own. However, their faith and language at
home did not permit them to meet this child?s
needs. Those placed in foster care are often
frightened and need an environment in which
they can feel safe. That means they need to have
their identity affirmed and preserved, even if it is
not shared by their carers.
It also means, at the very least, providing an
environment in which they can understand the
language carers speak with one another and with
their own children, particularly at such a young
age. Experts have expressed shock that a fiveyear-old child should have been encouraged to
learn Arabic just in order to avoid feeling like a
foreigner in her own foster home. The local
authority clearly did not pay sufficient regard to its
legal obligation to consider the child?s ?religious
persuasion, racial origin and cultural and
linguistic background?.
Tower Hamlets has in the past struggled to
recruit white families as foster carers. That need
not have been an issue here. The council could
surely have found an appropriate foster home
outside its own boundary if necessary. An
estimated 42 per cent of foster carers in London
are white, compared with 39 per cent of fostered
children. It is common enough for local
authorities to look to neighbouring boroughs. Last
year 38 per cent of fostered children in England
were in a home outside their own local authority.
The council?s decisions are made all the more
bewildering by revelations today that the child
had offers of sanctuary from extended family
members and friends, which the council rejected.
It is no wonder that an Ofsted inspection in April
found ?widespread and serious failures? in Tower
Hamlets? children?s services, including an
?entrenched culture of non-compliance with basic
social work standards?.
There is always a balance to be struck in adoption and fostering between the imperative to get a
child out of institutional care at maximum speed,
and the desire to find the perfect family pairing.
This newspaper has campaigned for reforms to
the adoption system, arguing that where local
authorities place too high a value on finding an
ethnic match between parent and child, a child?s
wait for a family can go on too long. Council
officials need to exercise judgment, however.
In this case, differences in religion and background have undermined the child?s own identity
and alienated her from her own family. This
cannot have been in her best interests. Tower
Hamlets should revisit her case, and review their
practices to ensure there is never a similar one.
Building Bridges
The priority for this week?s Brexit negotiations should be talk of a transition
?To be honest I am concerned,? Michel Barnier,
the EU?s chief Brexit negotiator, said as talks
resumed yesterday. He is not the only one. The
Times reports today that Philip Hammond, the
chancellor, has warned the prime minister of a
damaging business exodus if the government does
not make significant progress in negotiations,
particularly on transitional arrangements. The
idea of a transition now has the rare distinction of
uniting the government, Labour and the business
community. Everyone is for it. That does not mean
anyone is ready or equipped to negotiate it.
Earlier this week Sir Keir Starmer, Labour?s
shadow Brexit secretary, finally committed his
party to a position on what should happen in
March 2019, when the formal two-year window
for Brexit negotiations closes. Labour, he said,
?would seek to remain in a customs union with the
EU and within the single market? for a limited
time. Jeremy Corbyn?s office has said that he is
behind this position, though the Labour leader has
yet to voice his full-throated support for singlemarket membership in public, resorting to
familiar platitudes about ?protecting jobs?. If Mr
Corbyn can afford to equivocate, the government
cannot. With every week that an agreement on
transitional agreements is postponed, its value is
diminished. City insiders say that they cannot
delay their post-Brexit investment and contract
decisions for more than another two or three
months. According to a partner at one law firm,
companies are already implementing their Brexit
contingency plans. The further they travel down
that road, the harder it will be to turn back.
There are two major obstacles to an agreement
on transition. The first is that the government has
still not worked out exactly what shape it should
take. In the realm of customs, ministers have been
relatively clear. The government is seeking a
temporary customs union agreement with the EU,
which would oblige Britain to levy the same tariffs
as the EU, and stop UK ministers from signing new
trade deals.
On its own, however, that would not achieve
the ?frictionless trade? that Britain is after. The
more pressing question is how the UK will keep
participating in the single market from March
2019. If Britain were to keep single-market rules
through temporary membership of the European
Economic Area (EEA), it would probably have to
apply to rejoin the European Free Trade
Association, and give effect to this through an act
of parliament. The government would also have
to work out what to do about fish and food, which
are not covered by the EEA agreement. If, on the
other hand, ministers want to bypass the EEA and
agree with Brussels to prolong the rule of EU law
in the UK for a while, they need to start readying
Brexiteers. The accusations of backsliding will be
hard to weather.
The second obstacle is that the EU refuses to talk
about a transition until there has been ?sufficient
progress? on separation issues, such as the socalled divorce bill. Despite the recent eruption of
Brexit position papers from Whitehall, there has
been none on the financial settlement. Thanks to
the hole that the UK?s departure will leave in the
EU budget, Brexit secretary David Davis reckons
that the money is the ace in his hand. Understandably he does not want to play it too soon. Business
is getting impatient, however. If talk of transition
comes in three months? time, it could be too late.
Houston Under Water
Hurricane Harvey offers President Trump a chance not only to lead but also to learn
Natural disasters bring out the strengths and
weaknesses of America?s federal government.
When Hurricane Katrina struck with devastating
force in 2005, it became clear that Washington
was woefully unprepared. Late to recognise the
scope of the suffering, George W Bush?s
presidency was blighted by the curse of Katrina.
Now President Trump faces Hurricane Harvey,
and as he travels to Texas today he must persuade
Americans that federal authorities are not
doomed to repeat the same mistakes. As the storm
turns into an urban deluge so the president?s true
executive skills will be put to the test. In the White
House he has surrounded himself with generals
and Americans expect a relief operation of
military efficiency. Whether this is sufficient to
build faith in the management skills of the Trump
administration will become clear only in the
coming months. Some 450,000 people are likely
to need help. More than 5,000 federal employees
are already on the spot. It may not be enough.
Mr Trump would be right to identify this as a
moment that demands compassionate leadership.
It also requires what might be termed followership.
He should honour the local heroes who have been
dealing with the unfolding crisis. One young,
untrained man organised food, generators and
medicine for the inhabitants of an unstocked shelter
and then commandeered an abandoned boat to
scoop up those in distress in the Houston streets
that have become muddy canals. Volunteers of a
similar ilk have been hurrying to the flood areas.
Many Americans despair about the direction
that the country has been taking but the sight of
ordinary people stepping up to help neighbours
sends a more reassuring signal about the power of
community in a polarised society. Mr Trump has a
chance to show that he can lead and unite, but also
learn from this outpouring of national solidarity.
28
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Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
World
Survivors? escape routes cut off
Thousands are at risk in
the hurricane disaster
zone, reports
Jacqui Goddard
from Houston
At least eight people have died and tens
of thousands more remain stranded as
floodwaters continue to rise in Houston, with officials admitting that they
have been overwhelmed by Hurricane
Harvey?s 11 trillion-gallon downpour.
Army engineers, concerned that two
big dams might fail, opened the floodgates to relieve the pressure, potentially
sacrificing thousands of homes to save
the city?s business district. The entire
Texas Army National Guard, totalling
12,000 personnel, was mobilised.
?The word catastrophic does not describe what we?re facing. We just don?t
know when it?s going to end,? said Sheila Jackson Lee, one of Houston?s congressional representatives.
Six members of one family were
feared dead last night after their van was
swept away by the floodwaters. The
driver of the vehicle, the children?s
great-uncle, reportedly escaped before
the van was submerged and grabbed on
to a tree limb as the van sunk. He told
the children inside to try to escape
through the back door but they were
unable to get out.
Around Texas 13 million people were
put under flood watches or warnings,
with many communities hemmed in by
overflowing rivers and bayous. Houston?s main thoroughfares were mostly
impassable and escape routes out of the
city were beginning to flood. Residents
drove from one petrol station to the
next, desperate to fill up their vehicles
before trying to find a way out of the city.
?We?re just praying at this point,? said
Judy Pevehouse, 56, as floodwater
washed up the road towards her neighbourhood of Cypresswood, in northeast Houston, blocking the route and
submerging the woodland on both
sides. ?I live about five streets that way,?
she said, pointing behind her. ?My
daughter lives in Dallas and she?s calling me saying ?please leave?. It?s scary
because the water?s supposed to keep
rising. How much longer can it go?
How much deeper? Can I even get out
of here? I think the roads are probably
all blocked by now.?
The ferocious 130mph winds of Hurricane Harvey, which came ashore
y of
over the fishing community
n FriRockport, Texas, on
ped
day night, have dropped
nts
off but the remnants
m
of the tropical storm
stalled over the region for much of the
weekend and yesterday, dumping
record levels of
rainfall. It will continue until at least
Friday, also spreadring into neighbouring Louisiana. The
icane
National
Hurricane
rvey was
Centre said that Harvey
drifting erratically back towards
ld hit Texas
T
the Gulf Coast and could
a
second time later this week.
About 50 Texas counties have declared a state of emergency. ?When the
The worst is
yet to come
ARKANSAS
UNITED
IT
S TATES
T
H
SOUTH
CAROLINA
MISSISSIPPI
Analysis
arvey is a
turbocharged
rain machine
without
precedent in
US records, with rainfall
so huge it is being
measured in feet instead
of inches ? and the worst
is still to come (Paul
Simons writes).
This is a very unusual
storm. It has hugged the
coastline of Texas,
sucking in humid air
from the warm waters of
the Gulf of Mexico and
turning it into astonishing
amounts of rain.
Harvey hit Texas as a
Category 4 storm, with
130mph winds, but it has
been meandering around
at no more than walking
speed. That allowed the
rain to fall relentlessly on
areas such as Houston.
Big storm surges have
piled up the sea along the
coastline as inland
floodwaters have
tried to drain
d
away iinto the
ocea
ocean ?
NORTH
CAROLINA
TENNESSEE
Dallas
Da
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Path off sto
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FLORIDA
Rainfall
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20
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day
MEX
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Gulf of Mexico
200 miles
e
es
so, like a bath with the
plug in, Houston and
other places have filled
up with water. This is
low-lying land, with
Houston especially prone
to flooding, so the
conditions were already
set for a calamity. There
are uncomfortable
parallels with Hurricane
Katrina in 2005, when
New Orleans was caught
woefully unprepared for
catastrophic flooding.
Added to the tempest,
some 24 tornados were
reported from Friday
through to late Saturday.
When a tropical storm
makes landfall and then
weakens, small regions
can start to spin and
develop into tornados.
Harvey has had unusually
high tornado activity.
In the days ahead the
storm is expected to pick
up more moisture from
the sea and pour even
more rain into Houston,
and spread east into
Louisiana before heading
northwards, inland, again
on Wednesday. By then
Houston may have been
pummelled with a total of
3ft of rain and some
places more than 4ft.
Even when the storm has
finally departed, it will
take days or weeks for the
floods to subside
completely.
Added to this
nightmare, the peak of
the hurricane season
usually comes around
September 10 ? and
already a new tropical
storm appears to be
forming near the coasts
of Georgia and South
Carolina.
The town of Rockport, home to 10,000
su comes up, get
sun
o
out,?
Jeff Lindner,
a meteorologist for
th Harris county
the
fl
flood
control distr
trict, told residents
on Sunday night.
In the George R
Brown
Convention
Centre, Houston, 2,600
people we
were given shelter.
h
US coastguard helicopters
airliftd residents
id t in
i remote communities
ed
A resident posted a selfie on Twitter
with her National Guard rescuer
from their roofs while boats were sent
to cut-off neighbourhoods and rural
areas from which residents had no way
out. Volunteer rescuers travelled from
all across the US to help. Jason Abney
took a day off from his job as a physiotherapist in Dallas to drive his pick-up
truck 280 miles to Houston, towing his
12ft airboat behind him. ?They were
saying people with boats could be of use
and I just didn?t feel right staying at
home doing nothing,? he said, standing
in the water with his dog, Jackson.
?The problem is all the roads are
blocked and I can?t get where I?m
needed the most, because I don?t know
where that is. It?s kind of chaos. On
Facebook there was a single mother
with three kids in need of help and this
was my chance of getting to them but I
went as far as I could down the road in
my little boat. I wasn?t going to make it.
I could feel the current pick up around
me. I?m just really sad I couldn?t do
more.?
One family who stayed in their Texas
home called a radio station saying they
were catching fish that were swimming
around their living room. Photographs
emerged from a care home of elderly
residents still sitting in their wheelchairs and armchairs as the water
swirled chest-high around them. All
were rescued.
Outside Houston a television reporter was filmed by her crew hailing
help for a man trapped in the cab of a
waterlogged lorry. Minutes later an airboat arrived, the driver was rescued and
he was able to describe the ordeal in an
interview to the same reporter.
Rockport, a community of about
10,000 people, was a ghost town after
the authorities ordered everybody to
leave on buses owing to the lack of
power, fresh water and sewage disposal
facilities. Much of the town is in ruins.
More than 2,000 Houston residents
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
29
2GM
Macron finds Nemo, his
new best friend
Page 31
Winnie Mandela backs
Zuma?s ex-wife for leader
Page 33
as Harvey leaves trail of havoc
ZUMA/EYEVINE; ZUMA/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
President has given
us all we need, says
governor of Texas
Rhys Blakely Washington
Officials in Texas praised President
Trump?s initial handling of Hurricane
Harvey but as the crisis worsens it promises to test the White House and a bitterly divided Congress.
Mr Trump is due to visit the state today as his administration grapples with
its first large disaster, a once-in-a-lifetime deluge that has inundated Houston and is expected to force 30,000
people from their homes.
Yesterday Greg Abbott, the Republican governor, said that the early response from the White House had been
exemplary. ?The engagement . . . by the
president, the White House, by his cabinet, and by the [Federal Emergency
Management Agency] have been actually remarkable,? he told CBS News.
?They provided everything that we
need.?
Last night Mr Trump applauded the
efforts of Texans on the ground. ?We
see neighbour helping neighbour,
friend helping friend and stranger helping stranger,? he said. ?We are one
American family.? During a press conference he predicted that Congress
would quickly approve a ?very expensive? disaster relief package.
He refused, however, to back down
from his threat to force a government
shutdown this autumn if Capitol Hill
did not make money available to build a
wall on the Mexican border. Officials
fear that any such show of brinksmanship would risk undermining relief
work in Texas.
Even before Hurricane Harvey made
landfall, Congress and Mr Trump faced
a series of high-stakes challenges. In
the coming week they must also lift the
borrowing limit for the federal government to stave off a potential default on
sovereign debt.
Federal officials extended the storm
emergency zone yesterday to Louisiana, where two feet of rain was expected. Roads and airports have been crippled, more rain was forecast in Houston
and petrol prices hit a two-year high
after several refineries were closed.
About 13 million people were affected
by flood warnings.
Elaine Duke, the acting homeland
security secretary, said: ?We are not out
of the woods yet, not by a long shot.?
Mr Trump has told aides that he is
determined not to repeat George W
Bush?s calamitous response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, a storm that
killed more than 1,800 people.
The scale of the disaster is expected
to prompt calls for federal relief worth
tens of billions of dollars. It would have
to be approved by Congress, which has
shown little appetite for co-operation
during Mr Trump?s first seven months
in office and which has argued about
past disaster spending.
On Friday Mr Trump declared a
major disaster, freeing federal money.
An adviser said that he had been ?focused on making sure that the American people in the storm?s path have
what they need?.
Later that night the White House also made a barrage of announcements,
leading foes to accuse it of trying to
bury bad news. Mr Trump was criticised by Republicans, including Paul
Ryan, the House speaker, after he
granted a pardon to a former Arizona
sheriff accused by critics of racism.
He parted company with Sebastian
Gorka, a national security aide, who
then complained that centrist White
House advisers were betraying Mr
Trump?s campaign promises.
The president also formalised restrictions on transgender troops serving in the military, a move that prompted two legal challenges yesterday.
Leading article, page 27
Petrol prices rocket after
refineries take a battering
people before they were evacuated, is counting the cost of Hurricane Harvey which, top, brought winds of up to 130mph
Emily Gosden Energy Editor
have been rescued by emergency crews
but officials said that hundreds more
remained in peril. Art Acevedo, the
police chief, said that there were 185
?critical rescue requests? pending and
that boat crews went out at first light.
He said that four people had been
arrested for looting. ?After these events,
folks move in to loot and create problems. One thing you can be sure, if you
try to take advantage of our citizens
who have been victimised enough by
Mother Nature, you?ll be arrested.?
Sylvester Turner, the Houston
mayor, said: ?Our major focus for the
day is getting people out of their homes
Petrol prices hit a two-year high in the
United States after Hurricane Harvey
battered the Gulf Coast, forcing big refineries to close.
The storm also hit production of oil
and gas, leading to the shutdown of
more than 100 offshore platforms in the
Gulf of Mexico and significant onshore
production from shale oil fields.
Nearly 300,000 homes were without
power in Texas; the US Department of
Energy said that high winds and flooding meant that it would be several days
before electricity was restored.
The area hit by Harvey is the heart of
the US oil industry. Houston is home to
or whatever their stressful situation
may be.?
He said that by yesterday morning
there were 5,500 people in shelters
around the city operated by the Red
Cross and businesses. ?I suspect by the
end of the day that number is going to
rise exponentially,? he said. ?Some
people are just needing to come in from
their homes for the night and get back
to their homes or other places with
their relatives. We?re working to make
sure we have the supplies, the food.
People are needing clothing.
Officials were preparing last night to
evacuate one of the country?s busiest
trauma centres as flooding threatened
the hospital?s supply of medicine and
food. A spokesman at Houston?s Office
of Emergency Management said that
all 350 patients at Ben Taub Hospital
would be moved, hopefully within a
day. Floodwater and sewage got into
the basement and affected pharmacy,
food service and other key operations.
Patients will be sent to other hospitals.
Hugo Rifkind, page 25
gallery
Pictures of the Texas flooding
On mobile, tablet and at thetimes.co.uk
numerous energy companies and more
than a quarter of America?s refining
capacity is on Texas?s Gulf Coast.
Yesterday morning six refineries
were closed and four were shutting
down, taking offline about 2.2 million
barrels per day, or almost 12 per cent of
refining capacity. Benchmark gasoline
futures rose to $1.7799 per gallon, their
highest level since July 2015.
Crude oil prices fell as traders bet on
a drop in demand. Andrew Lipow, an
energy consultant, said that outages
could last as long as a month.
Of 737 offshore manned platforms in
the Gulf of Mexico, 105 had been evacuated by Sunday, shutting down about 22
per cent of the region?s oil production.
30
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
World
MARINA LYSTSEVA/TASS/GETTY IMAGES
Trump supplies
the police with
grenade launchers
United States
Rhys Blakely Washington
Flare for drama A Sukhoi Su-30SM fighter from the Russian Knights aerobatic team on show near Moscow at the weekend
President Trump last night issued an
executive order allowing local police
forces to acquire army surplus equipment, including grenade launchers,
bayonets and armoured vehicles.
The supply of battlefield equipment
to police was ended two years ago after
fierce criticism of its use during race
riots in Missouri. A justice department
report found that armoured cars had
inflamed tensions in the town of
Ferguson. President Obama later prohibited the Pentagon from giving away
kit to police forces.
Mr Obama said at the time: ?We?ve
seen how militarised gear can sometimes give people a feeling like there?s
an occupying force . . . It can alienate
and intimidate local residents and send
the wrong message.?
The White House rescinded those
controls last night. Jeff Sessions, the attorney-general, explained the change
in policy at a police conference in Tennessee. ?We are fighting a multi-front
battle: an increase in violent crime, a
rise in vicious gangs, an opioid epidemic, threats from terrorism,
combined with a culture in which
family and discipline seem to be eroding further and a disturbing disrespect
for the rule of law,? he said.
The decision was criticised by civil
rights groups and applauded by police.
Military equipment worth $5.4 billion
has been transferred to police forces in
the US over three decades.
Chuck Canterbury, president of the
Fraternal Order of Police, said: ?The
previous administration was more concerned about the image of law enforcement being too ?militarised? than they
were about our safety.?
As debate raged over the policy shift,
investigations into Mr Trump?s
relationship with Russia took a twist. It
emerged that while he was running for
president, Mr Trump?s company had
pursued a plan to build a skyscraper in
Moscow.
The New York Times reported that a
business associate of Mr Trump had
boasted in an email that a business deal
in Russia could help him to win the
presidency. Felix Sater wrote to Mr
Trump?s lawyer, Michael Cohen: ?Our
boy can become president of the USA
and we can engineer it. I will get all of
Putin?s team to buy in on this, I will
manage this process.?
Mr Trump has denied having any active commercial interests in Russia,
tweeting last July that he had ?ZERO
investments? in the country.
However, reports suggest that investors and a company controlled by Mr
Trump signed a letter of intent to build
a Trump Tower in Moscow as part of a
project that was only abandoned at the
end of last year ? about six months
after he announced that he was running for the White House.
Emails in which the deal was discussed are expected to be handed to
congressional committees investigating Mr Trump?s ties to Moscow, according to the Washington Post.
Mr Trump and the Kremlin have
each denied that they worked with each
other in the run-up to last year?s US
election. Investigations into the matter
promise to grind on for months, with
inquiries under way by Congress, the
FBI and by Robert Mueller, a former
FBI director, who is leading a special
counsel investigation.
Mr Trump last night expressed a desire for ?great? relations with Moscow
but also warned that the US would not
stand for aggression from the Kremlin
on Nato?s eastern fringe. Asked if Russia
posed a threat, he said that the same
was true of ?many countries?.
Putin uses judo tournament
to boost ties with Hungary
Hungary
Tom Parfitt Moscow
President Putin flew to Hungary yesterday for a judo tournament as he
sought to boost relations with one of
the few EU leaders who supports him.
He attended the opening ceremony
of the World Judo Championship in
Budapest before holding talks with
Viktor Orban, 54, the prime minister,
who has criticised European sanctions
on Russia over the Ukraine crisis. Mr
Putin, 64, is an eighth-dan black belt in
judo and honorary president of the
International Judo Federation. He was
also due to receive an honorary citizen
award in recognition of Russia?s role in
developing the Paks nuclear plant,
Hungary?s atomic energy facility.
The two men signed a ?10 billion deal
to expand the plant in 2014. Their meeting yesterday was their eighth in total,
and the second this year.
The right-wing Hungarian leader
wants to make his country an ?illiberal
democracy? and has clashed with Brussels over his anti-immigrant views and
his attempts to shut down a university
in Budapest funded by George Soros,
the American-Hungarian billionaire.
In June Mr Orban was criticised when
parliament approved tough legislation
restricting the work of foreign-funded
NGOs, in an echo of Russian laws.
He is looking to ensure supplies of
cheap gas from Russia. Last month
Hungary signed a deal with the Russian
energy giant Gazprom to receive gas via
the Turkish Stream pipeline by the end
of 2019. President Trump is promoting
shipments of US liquefied natural gas
as a potential alternative to Russian
energy dominance in eastern Europe.
In February Mr Orban expressed the
hope that Mr Trump?s inauguration
would give ?the western world the
chance to free itself from the captivity
of ideologies, of political correctness?.
However, plans for a rapprochement
between Moscow and Washington
have petered out, with Hungary caught
in the middle of the continuing divide.
Mr Putin is credited as the co-author
of a book called The Art of Judo: From
Game to Mastery, which was published
last year and distributed to Russian
schools. He began sparring as a teenager in his home town of Leningrad,
now called St Petersburg.
Several of his early judo partners
have become top officials or billionaire
businessmen who regularly win state
contracts.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
31
2GM
World
THIBAULT CAMUS/AP PHOTO
An unsinkable
canoe, thanks to
Captain Coward
Italy
Tom Kington Rome
Macron finds Nemo,
his new best friend
H
is approval
rating is
the lowest
of any new
French
leader for two decades,
so President Macron
needs all the friends
he can get (Charles
Bremner writes).
His newest pal is a
black dog named
Nemo who made his
first public appearance
wandering among
ministers at the first
cabinet meeting after
the summer holidays,
in the 蒷ys閑 palace.
The Macrons chose
Nemo, a cross
between a labrador
and a pointing griffon,
from an animal shelter
at the weekend. All
French presidents
since Georges
Pompidou in the late
1960s have kept
labradors. The most
famous was Baltique,
the black labrador of
the late Fran鏾is
Mitterrand who spent
the final decade of his
presidency with him.
President Hollande
still has his black
labrador, called
Philae, and Nicolas
Sarkozy still has Clara,
the labrador he shares
with Carla Bruni.
The Macrons picked
a name beginning
with N, in line with
the century-old system
of French canine
ctates
registry which dictates
which letter mustt be
used in a
particular year.
Mr Macron is a
fan of Jules
Verne and
particularly of
his adventure
20,000
Leagues under
the Sea, in
which the hero iss
Captain Nemo,
the palace said.
The Macrons had
previously been seen
in the company of
Figaro, a hefty
Argentine mastiff
which now appears to
live with Tiphaine
Auzi鑢e, Mrs Macron?s
daughter from her
President Macron with
Nemo at the 蒷ys閑.
Above: Mitterrand with
Baltique. Top: Angela
Merkel was unnerved by
President Putin?s dog
fi marriage.
first
Angela
M
Merkel,
who is
s
said
to be
fr
frightened
of
do was in the
dogs,
蒷y
蒷ys閑
palace for
sum
a summit
yesterd afternoon.
yesterday
no known if
It was not
w kept out of
Nemo was
Th German
sight. The
chancellor was said to
have been unsettled
when President Putin
brought his large
black labrador, named
Koni, to a meeting
with her in 2007,
although he later
denied trying to scare
her. Mrs Merkel?s fear
of dogs is thought to
date from 1995 when
one attacked her.
The choice of
labrador is less
original than the
Portuguese water dog
named Bo that the
Obama family chose
during their time in
the White House.
President Hollande?s
labrador, which gave
birth to her first litter
recently, was named
Philae in honour of
the ESA spacecraft
that landed on a
comet in 2014.
Curiously, the first
蒷ys閑 labrador,
owned by President
Pompidou in 1969, was
named Jupiter ? the
same nickname given
to Mr Macron when
he declared on the
campaign trail that he
would run a lofty,
Olympian-style
presidency that he
called ?Jupiterian?.
?Full to the brim?: Greece rejects
Merkel call to take back migrants
Greece
Anthee Carassava Athens
Charles Bremner Paris
The Greek government said yesterday
that it could not accept a German decision to start sending back asylum seekers who had passed through its borders
because it was overwhelmed by the tens
of thousands already on its territory.
The statement, from a senior migration official, suggests that there will be
tension between Athens and Berlin
before German elections next month.
The far-right Alternative for Germany
party is trying to revive migration as a
political issue.
?It would be tragic if not hugely nonsensical for Greece to take back refugees from Germany and other European countries as it battles to manage
60,000 refugees and migrants already
stranded here,? the Greek official said.
?It?s not an issue of Greece not wanting,
rather of it not being able, to take back
refugees because it simply does not
have the space.
?Accommodation
facilities
are
already up to the brim with refugees.
They are at breaking point.?
He was speaking on condition of
anonymity because of his closeness to
talks with the EU on the migrant
returns, which are expected to begin
next month.
In Paris yesterday Angela Merkel
joined a French-led attempt to manage
the flow of migrants from Africa
through action against people smugglers along the migrant routes and aid
to help to improve conditions there.
The leaders of Chad, Niger and Libya,
all transit countries for migrants, were
at a meeting in the 蒷ys閑 Palace along
with President Macron, Paolo Gentiloni, the Italian prime minister, and
Mariano Rajoy, his Spanish counterpart. Mr Macron and the African
leaders agreed on a system for filtering
Europe-bound migrants in their home
countries.
Mr Macron said that Niger and Chad
had agreed to help to establish the
identity of potential asylum seekers
before they left their territory. France
and other states would accept asylum
applications and handle them on the
spot, Mr Macron said.
Under the so-called Dublin rules EU
states are required to return asylum
seekers to their country of entry to the
28-nation bloc. Germany and other
states suspended the returns in 2011
after the European Court of Human
Rights questioned Greece?s ability to
take back migrants because of its
economic crisis, harsh conditions and
poor treatment of refugees by local
authorities.
The Greek official said that Berlin
and Athens were in continuous contact
about the plan but Greece was not prepared to accept more than 50 asylum
seekers in special shelters in the capital
and in the historic city of Thebes. ?It
will just be a symbolic gesture,? the official said. ?We want to show that Greece
is upholding its side of its commitments
in this migration crisis.?
The remarks echo the government?s
call for a revision of the Dublin regulations. They also mark a fresh jab at
Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic for refusing to take in thousands
of migrants and refugees in line with an
agreement to help to ease an unprecedented build-up of asylum seekers in
Greece and Italy. Fewer than 20,000 of
an estimated 160,000 relocations have
been completed since the agreement
was reached two years ago.
The EU?s executive branch has
launched infringement procedures
against the three states, giving them
until the end of the month to reconsider
their refusal to resettle even a single
refugee as part of the EU-wide scheme.
This month Ioannis Mouzalas, the
Greek migration minister, told the German public service broadcaster ARD
that Berlin?s demand for the refugee returns was part of Mrs Merkel?s election
strategy. ?There was pressure from
several EU countries to resume returns,? Mr Mouzalas said. ?I understand
that governments want to show some
results to their voters.?
The French-led initiative is aimed at
staunching the flow across the Mediterranean through a combination of
incentives to remain in Africa and
action against the traffickers.
Having been ridiculed for his cowardice
and jailed for 16 years after smashing
the Costa Concordia into rocks, the disgraced cruise ship captain Francesco
Schettino has bounced back by inspiring the design of a supposedly unsinkable canoe.
The Italian captain, who was at the
helm of the Costa Concordia in 2012
when it crashed into the island of Giglio, has helped to inspire the Surfcruise,
designed by his 21-year-old daughter.
?Schettino is passionate about canoeing and expressed opinions and ideas
to his daughter during the design,? said
Maura Paruzzo, an industrialist who
has partnered Schettino?s daughter,
Rossella, in the venture. ?His passion,
transmitted to his daughter, gave a result,? she added. The captain may also
have taken the canoe out for a test
before he was jailed in May, she said.
The Costa Concordia hit the rocks as
Schettino was showing off to a Moldovan dancer with whom he was
having an affair. As 32 passengers and
crew drowned he fled the vessel on a
lifeboat, earning him a rebuke from a
coastguard officer who shouted: ?Get
back on board, idiot!?
At his trial, where he was dubbed
?Captain Coward?, his lawyers claimed
that he had slipped and fallen into the
lifeboat and Schettino broke down in
tears protesting his innocence.
The Surfcruise is a kayak in which the
rower sits in a depression on top of the
hull rather than inside. Lids on the deck
open to reveal internal waterproof compartments to hold food or a tent.
Four years in
jail if you flout
plastic bag ban
Kenya
Foreign Staff
Kenya introduced the world?s most
draconian plastic bag ban yesterday,
threatening to fine offenders a minimum of �,000 and to jail them for up
to four years.
The ban applies to the use, manufacture and import of plastic shopping
bags. Industrial packaging and bin liners are exempted. Hours after it took
effect, there was confusion at supermarkets. Many shoppers resorted to
carrying their purchases in boxes or
under their arms.
Plastic bags litter the capital, Nairobi,
and contribute to towering piles at rubbish dumps. The Kenyan government
said that the bags harmed the environment and blocked sewers. Similar,
though less strict, bans have been introduced in other African countries.
The Retail Trade Association of Kenya said that supermarket chains
planned to provide reuseable, environment-friendly bags at a small price.
Some Kenyans took to social media
to complain of police stopping vehicles
in central Nairobi and searching them
for plastic bags and, they alleged, seeking bribes. Boniface Mwangi, an activist, urged the government to reduce the
penalties, saying they would mainly hit
the poor who could not afford to bribe
their way to freedom. ?So if you?re rich
you can get away with anything, but if
you?re poor don?t use plastic bags from
28th August or you will go to jail,? he
said in a Facebook post.
32
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Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
World
In Raqqa civilians eat grass
and no one picks up bodies
REUTERS
Syria
Richard Spencer Beirut
In death everyone is equal. The
decapitated bodies of those murdered
by Islamic State lie next to corpses
of jihadists killed by coalition
airstrikes and people brought down by
sniper fire.
They are strewn in the streets of
Raqqa, the capital of the Isis ?caliphate?,
because as the battle to retake the city
intensifies it is unsafe for anyone to
venture out to retrieve them.
The battle for Raqqa, which Isis is
defending with skill and vigour against
a half-trained and irregular force of
other militants, has become the most
gruesome of this long summer?s series
of urban sieges.
An activist from the early years
of the Syrian uprising who has stayed in
the city, reporting under the
pseudonym Tim Ramadan, said that
bodies were no longer even being
collected.
?The sight of corpses has become
so regular our eyes hardly even
notice it any more,? he said. ?What
really grabs my attention is when I see
a tree or a plant that is still standing in
the street.?
The number of civilians killed in the
aerial bombardment has been high
even by the standard of this war: well
over 700 by the end of last week,
according to Airwars, a monitoring
group based in London.
Mr Ramadan described one reason
for the escalation. As families fled the
shifting front lines more and more
people ended up huddling together. A
single strike takes out ever more people.
Survivors become scavengers. ?We
ran out of medicine 34 days ago and the
food ran out ten days ago,? Mr
Ramadan said. ?We make soup from
the grass that we collect from the
streets, or we boil tree leaves and put
toasted bread inside it to make it
edible.?
Those caught by Isis searching
abandoned kitchens for food have been
punished as looters. ?Isis has its own
food stores,? Mr Ramadan said. ?They
told us on the first day of the battle,
?Don?t expect us to give you anything to
eat because the lives of the mujahidin
who defend the city are more
important than yours. You would give
up the city if you had the chance, while
the mujahid has devoted his life to killing the crusaders.? ?
Leaving aside the bombing that has
destroyed the city, for the estimated
20,000 civilians left there is no water,
no food and no electricity. Half of them
are children, according to Fran Equiza,
the country director for Unicef.
Abu Homam, a teacher who escaped
the city in the past fortnight, told The
Times: ?My two uncles? families were all
China outlaws new
North Korean firms
Beijing China has banned North
Koreans from starting new
businesses in the country and
prohibited existing firms from
expanding. The move is in line
with UN sanctions imposed in
response to Pyongyang?s missile
tests. Beijing has also banned
imports of coal, metal ores and
seafood, which will deprive North
Korea of the foreign currency it
needs. In the first seven months
of the year imports from the
country dropped by more than
16 per cent to about $1 billion, but
at the same time exports from
China rose by 32.5 percent as
Beijing continued to send food,
textiles, fuel and other essential
goods to Pyongyang.
Netanyahu attacks UN
over Lebanon militants
Jerusalem Binyamin Netanyahu,
the Israeli prime minister, used
the beginning of a three-day visit
by Ant髇io Guterres, secretarygeneral of the UN, to claim that
the organisation fails to deal with
Palestinian hate speech; ?absurdly
denies? Jewish connections to
Jerusalem; and is ?soft? on
Hezbollah in Lebanon, where it
fails to prevent arms being
smuggled to militants. (AP)
Killer nurse thought to
have caused 86 deaths
Airstrikes on Raqqa have taken a heavy toll on the civilian population. Those
who manage to flee languish in camps or, if they are lucky, make it to Turkey
killed, all 11 members, who were hiding
in a basement of a six-storey building
when it was blown to the ground by an
airstrike.?
Abu Homan said that he fled after the
wells he had come to rely on for water
were hit by airstrikes. ?We tried to flee
twice before but both times Isis caught
us and sent us to prison where we were
beaten and tortured,? he said. ?This
time we were 60 people in the smuggler?s house just yards away from the
battlefront. We had to crawl for a long
distance to hide from the snipers of
both sides until we reached safety. I felt
like I was born again.?
Those who escape Raqqa are confined to desert camps, with borders
shut, nowhere to go and a hostile
regime retaking control of the country.
?I have nothing, nothing at all,? Abu
Homam said. ?I have neither a bed to
sleep on nor a plate to eat from. I have
no job and no hope. All that I want now
is a tent, shelter for my family.?
The battle for the city is into its third
month, with no immediate sign of an
end. The US and British airstrikes are
not backing up a regular army, as in the
case of Mosul, but a motley collection
of militias, led by the Kurdish YPG, and
including remnants of the Free Syrian
Army (FSA) and tribal battalions.
The YPG is the Syrian branch of the
Marxist PKK guerrilla group, whose
fighting skills were honed in a moun-
tain insurgency in Turkey rather than
hand-to-hand urban combat.
Isis?s carefully planned and so far
successful defence ? the allies have
taken only half the city ? shows the
symbolic importance of Raqqa.
Raqqa has been portrayed as a small
dusty city of little intrinsic worth
beyond the fact that it was the first
major Syrian town Isis seized and so
became its capital.
That is to ignore history, ancient and
modern. In the 8th century Haroun alRashid, the great intellectual caliph of
the Muslim world and hero of Arabian
Nights, moved his own capital here.
This may go some way to explaining
how, before the civil war, it had a
reputation for free-thinking even
though it is at the heart of the northern
Euphrates valley, home to the most
conservative tribes of Iraq and Syria.
After an alliance of FSA and jihadist
forces captured it from the regime in
2013 an environmental activist group
took up residence in Haroun al-Rashid
Park even as Isis was preparing nearby
Clock Tower Square to be its execution
ground.
Before the war Raqqa was at the
heart of Syria?s gravest social crisis, a
drought exacerbated by overuse of the
semi-desert?s aquifers, drained by
decades of regime mismanagement. It
was that drought that sent hundreds of
thousands of farming families into poor
city suburbs, where they became the
heart of the uprising.
Berlin A male nurse who was
convicted of killing two patients
in Germany and attempting to
kill two more with overdoses of
heart medication is now believed
to have killed at least 86 people.
Investigators believe that the true
scale of the killings by Niels
Hoegel, 40, could be even greater
but some possible victims were
cremated and evidence can no
longer be gathered. (AP)
Woman given life for
murder in parrot case
White Cloud A Michigan woman
has been sentenced to life in
prison for the murder of her
husband in a crime apparently
witnessed by his pet parrot.
Martin Duram, 46, was shot five
times in May 2015 by Glenna
Duram, 49. His former wife,
Christina Keller, said that after
the killing the parrot, Bud, had
repeated ?Don?t f***ing shoot? in
the victim?s voice. (AP)
Face it, you never have
to lose your luggage
Syrian regime seizes enclave from embattled Isis
Bel Trew Cairo
Syrian regime forces have captured one
of the last Islamic State enclaves in the
central desert and advanced east into
Deir Ezzor, piling pressure on the militants in their shrinking caliphate.
Regime troops and allies took control
of dozens of hills in the area between
Sukhnah town in Homs and Shaer, near
Palmyra. The territory, known as Badia,
totals around 770 square miles.
Backed by Russian warplanes, the
forces advanced on Sunday eight miles
into Deir Ezzor, according to the Syrian
Observatory for Human Rights.
The province has been held by Isis
since 2014. Jihadists have besieged government forces and civilians in the city
of Deir Ezzor since 2015. Regime forces
are now within 40 miles of the capital.
Isis is on the verge of losing its de facto capital Raqqa, in Syria, and Tal Afar,
one of its final footholds in Iraq.
Yesterday Isis fighters were forced to
relinquish their enclave on the border
Isis control
TURKEY
Raqqa
SYRIA
H
Homs
Deirr
Ezzor
zo
Sukhnah
Palmyra
Damascus
Isis territory
IRAQ
50 miles
with Lebanon after a week-long battle
with the Syrian army and Hezbollah.
The militants will be sent to Albukamal
in east Syria as part of a ceasefire deal
which involves Isis revealing the fate of
nine Lebanese soldiers it captured in
Arsal in Lebanon in 2014.
On Sunday Iraqi forces said that they
had managed to retake almost all of Tal
Afar, 60 miles from the Syrian border,
after eight days of fighting. Two
thousand fighters are holding out in alAyadiya, seven miles north of the city.
A businessman whose luggage
was taken by a fellow passenger
who had identical bags has
designed a suitcase cover that can
be emblazoned with its owner?s
face to avoid misunderstandings
at the carousel. The Head Case,
which stretches over luggage,
was created by Firebox, a
company run by Kristian
Bromley. It costs �.99 each and
comes in three sizes.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
33
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World
Anger in Tokyo as Kim fires ballistic missile over northern Japan
North Korea
Richard Lloyd Parry Tokyo
North Korea fired a ballistic missile
over northern Japan this morning, provoking anger from Tokyo and dashing
tentative efforts by the United States to
engage Kim Jong-un in dialogue.
According to information from the
Japanese and South Korean governments the missile was launched at
about 5.58am Japanese time from Sunan, just north of the North Korean capital Pyongyang, and passed a few minutes later over Hokkaido, the northernmost of Japan?s main islands.
It broke up into three pieces and
landed in the Pacific Ocean, 733 miles
east of Cape Erimo in Hokkaido. The
South Korean military reported that it
flew a total distance of 1,678 miles and
reached a maximum height of 340
miles, suggesting that it was mediumrange weapon and not an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of
reaching the United States.
This is the first time that a North Korean missile has passed through Japanese airspace. In 2012, a rocket, which
North Korea claimed was launching a
satellite, flew over the north of the main
island of Honshu.
Yoshihide Suga, Japan?s chief cabinet
secretary, said: ?From the point of view
of Japan?s security this is a serious and
significant threat. From the point of
200 miles
Path of missile
RUSS
RUS
SIA
C NA
CHI
Hokkaido
JAP
JAPA
JAPAN
APA
A
NOR
RTH
H
KOREA
KOR
EA
EA
Sea of
Japan
Tokyo
Pyo
P
Py
Pyongyang
yongyang
ang
ng
Seou
oul
ul
SOUTH KOREA
A
view of aeroplanes and ships it is a dangerous act. We have lodged the strongest of protests with North Korea.?
Shinzo Abe, the prime minister, said:
?North Korea has launched a ballistic
missile which flew through our country?s airspace. We will collect and analyse the information immediately and
take all possible measures to protect the
lives of the people.?
The Pentagon said: ?We can confirm
that the missile launched by North
Korea flew over Japan. We are still in
the process of assessing this launch.
North American Aerospace Defence
Command determined the missile
launch from North Korea did not pose
a threat to North America.?
Mobile phone users in Japan received
warnings of the missile on the government?s Em-Net emergency information network, but these were sent only
REUTERS
Winnie Mandela
backs Zuma?s
ex-wife in ANC
leadership race
South Africa
Aislinn Laing Johannesburg
The former wife of President Zuma,
who is campaigning to take over from
him as ANC leader in December, claims
to have secured the influential backing
of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.
Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma told reporters that she had been welcomed into
the home of Nelson Mandela?s 80-yearold ex-wife while in Soweto to hold a
rally on Sunday. Mrs Madikizela-Mandela, who is confined to bed with an undisclosed illness, had told her that it was
time for a woman president to lead the
movement, she said.
?Winnie is our hero. We can?t go too
far without touching base with her,?
said Mrs Dlamini-Zuma, 68, who posted pictures of the meeting on social
media. ?She wants to know how we are
doing. We get wisdom from her.?
She said that Mrs MadikizelaMandela, still hailed by many South
Africans as the mother of the nation
despite her chequered past, had in
effect endorsed her campaign to take
the helm of the party. ?She has spoken
about that a long time ago,? she said.
?She believes also that it is time we have
a woman president.?
A source close to Mrs MadikizelaMandela said, however, that the visit by
Mrs Dlamini-Zuma and her supporters
had been, in effect, an ?ambush? and
that they had been given no notice.
?She is the mother of the nation and she
is happy if people want to do good
things for the people,? the source said.
?It doesn?t mean endorsement.?
ANC members are due to vote
in December on a new leader to
replace Mr Zuma. The winning
candidate will in all likelihood
become president of South
Africa after a general election in 2019 that the ANC is
expected to win.
Campaigning is still
banned for several
months, but in recent
Nkosazana
Dlamini-Zuma
aims to succeed
her former
husband
weeks both frontrunners for the party
leadership, Mrs Dlamini-Zuma and
Cyril Ramaphosa, the deputy president,
have filled their schedules with public
appearances aimed at winning over
ANC branches around the country.
Last week Mrs Dlamini-Zuma was
forced to retreat swiftly from the informal settlement of Marikana where
34 striking miners were shot dead by the
police in 2013, with the Zuma government blamed by many. Enraged locals
accused her of a ?publicity stunt?.
In the past politicians beat a path to
Nelson Mandela?s door before electoral
contests in the hope that some ?Mandela magic? would rub off on their campaigns. Mr Zuma was pilloried in 2013
after releasing footage of a visit he and
colleagues paid to the gravely ill Mandela before national elections. He died
in December that year aged 95.
Mrs Madikizela-Mandela has long
been a polarising figure in South Africa,
having been divorced by Mr Mandela
for alleged infidelity and convicted of
kidnapping a young political activist,
later murdered, who had been accused
of spying for the apartheid police. She
remains an ANC MP and a member of
the party?s highest leadership structure
and has largely been rehabilitated in
the eyes of many South Africans,
meaning that her endorsement carries
significant weight.
The political analyst Carien du Plessis said that the two women had not historically been friends, having gone
head-to-head in a battle for leadership
of the ANC Womens? League in 1997.
?They are said to have mended bridges afterwards, but given the way
Dlamini-Zuma?s campaign is
being endorsed by President
Zuma, and Mrs MadikizelaMandela?s recent criticism of
Zuma it?s unlikely she would
have got her blessing,? she said.
Mrs
MadikizelaMandela has repeatedly called for a new
ANC leader, saying in July that
the party had
been ?messed
up? by Mr
Zuma?s
tenure.
after it had passed overhead. Bullet
trains in northern and eastern Japan
were suspended immediately after the
launch but resumed 17 minutes later.
The launch came three days after
North Korea fired three short-range
missiles into the Sea of Japan. The
launches appear to have been timed as
a retort to military exercises being
carried out by the US and its allies.
Later today Japanese and US forces
in the country are due to carry out a
drill practising the deployment of their
shared PAC-3 missile defence system. It
uses a combination of sea and landbased detectors and interceptors, but it
was inactive this morning and unable to
intercept the latest launch.
We do Couples swap vows at a group wedding in Hengyang, Hunan province, China during Qixi (Valentine?s Day) festivities
?Bling guru? accused of dozens more rapes
India
Kai Schultz Delhi
An Indian spiritual leader has been jailed for 20 years for raping two followers.
The sentence was delivered three days
after at least 38 people died in clashes
between his supporters and police.
Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh, known
as the ?guru in bling?, was convicted on
Friday of repeatedly raping two women
in 1999 at the headquarters of his sect
Dera Sacha Sauda, which claims to
have 60 million followers worldwide.
Riots broke out across several states
after the verdict was announced, with
supporters who maintain that he is innocent setting buses and trains on fire.
A lawyer for the victims, Utsav Singh
Bains, said that he planned to file two
appeals with the court: one to increase
the sentence and another to further investigate cases of abuse in the sect.
?We believe there are at least 48 more
victims who were sexually abused and
who may have been killed or are too
scared to come out and testify against
Ram Rahim,? he said. The prosecution
had sought life imprisonment for Singh.
Singh, who is known for his flashy
lifestyle, is understood to have broken
down and asked for forgiveness when
the sentence was read out. His lawyers
intend to appeal against the decision.
Officials in Rohtak, where Singh was
sentenced, suspended mobile phone
services, shut down schools and barricaded roads with barbed wire before
the hearing.
?Those who dare to take the law into
their own hands should be prepared to
face bullets,? the city?s deputy police
commissioner warned.
Singh faces several other open cases
against him, including an inquiry into
whether he had a hand in the murder
of the Indian journalist who initially
broke the story in 2002 that Singh
raped female members of his sect.
Anshul Chhatrapati, the son of the
journalist, told the Indian media: ?The
judgment is satisfactory. We have been
saying for a long time that Ram Rahim
is an enemy of our society.?
34
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Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
World
GETTY IMAGES
Japan?s mysterious
tombs hold secret
to ancient shame
Japan
Richard Lloyd Parry Tokyo
They are among the wonders of Japan:
huge moated burial mounds as central
to its history as Stonehenge is to Britain?s or the pyramids to Egypt?s.
Now a row has broken out between
archaeologists and conservative imperialists over the ?kofun?.
The government is planning to put
forward a number of the mysterious
mounds, where the emperors and
chieftains of early Japan were buried,
for registration as United Nations
world heritage sites. The move is opposed by archaeologists, who are
banned from entering or excavating the
treasure-rich locations.
The controversy over the tombs
raises touchy questions about the
origins of the Japanese people and the
ethnic character of its imperial family.
Some historians suspect that there was
much intermarriage with present day
Korea and China and that the early
rulers of Japan may even have come
from the continent.
In the official version the emperors
form an unbroken line stretching back
to the mythical Emperor Jimmu, the
great-great-grandson of the Shinto
sun goddess, Amaterasu Omikami.
an
There are more than
al
200,000 ancient burial
mounds in Japan, most of
them dating from the
4th to 7th centuries AD,
a period from which
few written records
survive.
Thousands of lesser
tombs belonging to local
chieftains have been dugg
tiup to reveal precious artifacts, including sacred mirs, goldrors, jade jewels, crowns,
O
Opening the
S
Shinto tombs
ccould shed
lig
light on the
or
origins of
Jap
Japan?s rulers,
said to descend
from Emperor
Jimm
Jimmu, left
Sacrifice
pensions,
retired
are urged
Richard Lloyd Parry
Schemes are afoot to stop
paying out old age pensions
as a way of dealing with
Japan?s demographic crisis.
A quarter of Japanese
people are over 65; by 2060
the proportion is expected
to rise to 40 per cent.
Now a politician has
proposed a solution: invite
well-off people to give up
their state pensions to pay
for nurseries so that mothers can return to work.
Shinjiro Koizumi, 36, the
son of a former prime minister, Junichiro Koizumi,
asked businessmen to renounce their pensions for a
?child insurance fund?.
At a meeting of the Japan
Business Federation he
asked the elderly plutocrats how much they received. ?They looked confused,? he said. ?I think
they are so rich there is no
need for them to check.?
The industry ministry issued a report predicting
that medical advances, artificial intelligence and robots would allow people to
work longer. It suggested
that by 2035 people could
routinely work until 69,
and by 2055 to 74. ?Healthy
life continues into the 70s,?
it said. ?Elderly people can
change from being recipients of support to creating
value themselves.?
A report by the cabinet
office proposed allowing
people to defer receiving
their state pensions from
60 to 70 in return for a
42 per cent increase ?
which
assumed
that
enough people would die
for the state to profit.
encrusted swords, exquisite wall paintings and figurines of men and animals,
but the most exciting tombs ? the 896
kofun believed to contain the remains
of members of the imperial family ?
have never been examined.
To the frustration and fury of Japanese archaeologists, the Imperial
Household Agency (IHA) refuses to
allow academics to do more than occasionally view them from outside.
To the IHA, they are places of sacred
Shinto worship, dwelling places of the
souls of the deified emperors. It is as if
the prehistoric sites of Britain were
placed off limits to scientists because of
the objections of druids.
?Academic study [of the kofun] is
essential,? says Noboru Toike, a professor of history at Tokyo?s Seijo University, who opposes the world heritage
application. ?It is wrong to present
them to the world without knowing
their value, such as when they were
built, and for whom.
?If you want to use them as tourist
sites you should do the research first.
This is the wrong way round.?
Many archaeologists suspect that
there is more to the ban than the stated
desire to maintain the ?quiet and
dignity? of the tombs. It is almost certain that several of them are incorrectly
attributed, based on ill-informed
guesses made in the 19th century, and
that some may not contain princes or
emperors at all.
The IHA?s stubbornness may also be
connected to what the tombs might
reveal about the imperial family?s origins. The current emperor, Akihito, has
acknowledged his forebears? Korean
roots but conservative nationalists balk
at the idea that the early emperors were
Korean princes; Japan colonised Korea
until 1945 and still views its people with
prejudice.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
35
2GM
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$
�/$
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7,800
22,400
1,400
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1.350
1.150
7,400
21,800
1,300
54
1.300
1.100
7,000
21,200
1,200
46
1.250
1.050
6,600
20,600
1,100
38
1.200
Jul 29
Aug 8
16
24
Jul 29
Aug 8
16
24
Jul 29
Aug 8
16
24
Jul 29
Aug 8
16
24
ALAMY
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Jul 29
Aug 8
16
24
Banks profit
from scheme
designed to
drive growth
Philip Aldrick Economics Editor
Whisky galore The owner of the Ardbeg distillery on Islay grew pre-tax profits from �.4 million to �.8 million. Macdonald & Muir?s turnover increased by 3.8 per cent
Transparency fears over
housebuilder warranties
Firms making millions from premium refunds
Tom Knowles Property Correspondent
The organisation that provides warranties for most new-build homes has been
criticised by the competition regulator
for a ?lack of transparency? over
payments to leading housebuilders
totalling millions of pounds a year.
The National House Building Council
(NHBC), which provides warranties for
about 80 per cent of new homes, pays
premium refunds to builders who have a
good long-term claims history.
Until now, the amount paid by the
council to individual housebuilders has
never been shown, with refunds only
mentioned in the notes of its financial
accounts.
However, the Competition and
Markets Authority has revealed that
these sums can be significant, with one
housebuilder being paid �7 million in
2012. Last year the largest sum paid
was just under �0,000. On another
occasion, housebuilders were paid
more in refunds than they had paid the
council for its warranties.
In a provisional report looking into
whether the council dominates the
new-build warranty market, the
authority said that it would like to see a
summary of the procedures relating to
the council?s calculation and payments,
adding: ?We consider such increased
transparency highly desirable.?
The revelation that individual housebuilders are paid as much as �million
by the council in a year is likely to
raise questions over whether the body
is on the side of developers rather than
homeowners.
The council says it is ?completely
independent of housebuilders? and is
meant to protect consumers against
poor quality homes, yet housebuilders
pay the council a registration fee,
meaning they effectively fund it.
Paula Higgins, chief executive of the
Homeowners Alliance, described the
council?s dominance in the warranty
market as a monopoly: ?The problem is
that the supposed beneficiary of the
warranties, the homeowners, have no
control over their choice of warranty
provider, which is shocking if the
NHBC is treating the builders as effectively shareholders.?
Neil Jefferson, business development
director of the council, said it was a notfor-profit company and so it was right
that any surplus it made should go to
builders who maintained a high quality.
?At its core, premium refunds
support the aim of NHBC, which is to
raise housebuilding standards,? he said.
?I think that recognising when a builder
performs well through premium refunds is completely normal. The concept of post-even adjustments is widely
used across the industry and the refunds are a relatively small level compared to our overall turnover,? he said.
The council said that it paid �5 million in premium refunds last year, compared with � million in claims paid to
homeowners.
However, while refunds are common
for insurance mutuals, which do not
have shareholders and so issue refunds
as a form of a dividend, the council is a
private company, guaranteed by its
council members who are supposed to
be independent of housebuilders.
News of the payments by the council
is likely to lead to new calls for the government to introduce an independent
ombudsman for housebuilding.
Builders paid millions, page 38
High street lenders are enjoying
windfall gains from a �5 billion Bank
of England funding scheme that was
supposed to boost growth rather than
profits.
Net interest margins for some of the
biggest users of the Bank?s term funding
scheme have risen significantly since it
was launched as part of a post-Brexit
stimulus package in August last year.
At the time the Bank said the scheme
was needed to counter the effect of
cutting interest rates to 0.25 per cent.
When official rates fall close to zero,
banks struggle to make profits on customer deposits because they cannot cut
deposit rates below zero.
As a result, policymakers feared
banks would increase rates on new
loans to compensate for the lost profit
on deposits, which would undermine
policy. The scheme was designed to offset this by providing cheap funding to
preserve a bank?s ?net interest margin?.
Under the terms of the scheme, the
state funding subsidy for the banks
could reach �0 million a year.
In August last year Mark Carney, the
Bank governor, said: ?We have very
carefully calibrated the pricing and the
sizing of the TFS to neutralise this
effect so that in aggregate there is no
reward for the banks and there is no
penalties for the banks.?
However, analysis of the latest results from Barclays and Lloyds Banking
Group, two of the biggest users of TFS,
suggests that the scheme is not just stabilising profitability but boosting it.
Lloyds, which had used the scheme
for �.5 billion by June, has seen its net
interest margin increase from 2.74 per
cent in June 2016 to 2.82 per cent in
June this year. It expects the margin to
improve to 2.85 per cent and said at the
half year: ?The improvement in net
interest margin continues to be driven
by lower deposit and wholesale funding
costs.?
Barclays, which drew � billion of
TFS funding in the six months to June,
saw the net interest margin in its UK
bank improve from 3.59 per cent in
June last year to 3.69 per cent, which it
said reflected ?higher margins on personal banking deposits?.
The scheme has also been blamed for
a sharp rise in consumer credit. Last
August the Bank expected an increase
in ?the stock of loans to households and
companies of only around 2 per cent?. It
is already 3.7 per cent higher after only
ten months. Small businesses appear
not to have seen the benefit. Interest
rates on new loans to small businesses
have risen from 3.1 per cent to 3.12 per
cent since August last year.
36
1GM RM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Business
The week ahead
today
The Nationwide house price
index is due at 07:00. Last month?s
data revealed that the price of a
typical British house increased by
0.3 per cent in July compared
with the previous month and
by 2.9 per cent compared with
July 2016.
Interims: Globaltrans Investment;
Bunzl; Nostrum Oil & Gas;
Polymetal; PPHE Hotel Group
AGM/EGM: Bank Of Cyprus
Holdings; Cadence Minerals;
Findel; Novae Group; Ultra
Electronics Holdings
tomorrow
The US Bureau of Economic
Analysis publishes its revised GDP
data for the second quarter of 2017,
after last month?s advance data
showed that real gross domestic
product increased at an annual
rate of 2.6 per cent in Q2. Final
figures are published next month.
Interims: Petrofac; PureTech
Health; Megafon; Cathay
International Holdings; James
Fisher & Sons; HSS Hire Group;
BATM Advanced
Communications; The Gym
Group; Vimetco
AGM/EGM: New Trend Lifestyle
Group; Aberdeen New Dawn IT;
Exillon Energy
Trading statement: WH Smith;
Diploma
Economics: 09:30 UK: Consumer
Credit Jul; UK: Mortgage
approvals Jul; 13:30 US: GDP Q2,
2nd rel.
thursday
The struggling
owner of
Frankie &
Benny?s, right,
is expected to
report another
fall in profits,
with the chief
executive
Andy McCue
expected to
outline the progress of turnaround
efforts. A consensus of City
analysts forecast that half-year
pre-tax profit at The Restaurant
Group will fall more than 30 per
cent to �.2 million as warm
June weather and poor cinema
attendance look set to have
dented footfall.
Interims: Ladbrokes Coral Group;
The Restaurant Group; Chesnara;
Melrose Industries; Grafton; Gulf
Marine Services; Jimmy Choo;
STV Group; Arrow Global Group;
Alfa Financial Software Holdings;
Alpha Bank
Finals: Hays
AGM/EGM: Berendsen; Numis;
Simian Global; Highlands Natural
Resources
Trading statement: McColl?s
Retail Group
friday
US unemployment figures are due.
Last month?s data revealed that
total non-farm payroll
employment increased by 209,000
in July, while the unemployment
rate was 4.3 per cent.
Interims: EMIS
AGM/EGM: Anglesey Mining
Economics: 09.30 UK: Markit
PMI manufacturing Aug; 13:30 US:
Non-farm payrolls Aug; US:
Unemployment Rate Aug
Win a ticket to ride from
$
capitalism?s
great
networks
$
$
$
$
In the second of a
five-part series on the
companies that have
shaped our corporate
elite, Patrick Hosking
looks at McKinsey
There?s not much that unites David
Davis, the Brexit secretary, Sir Philip
Green, the clothing tycoon, and Gavin
Patterson, the chief executive of BT.
But on one thing they are agreed: when
you?re in a bit of a hole, call in McKinsey
& Co. In the past few months the management consulting firm has been
hired by all three.
McKinsey beat PWC, EY and KPMG
in the beauty parade to advise the Department for Exiting the European
Union. It has been recruited by Sir Philip to try to reverse problems at his Topshop to Miss Selfridge group, where
profits dived by 79 per cent last year.
And it is trying to figure out how to restructure BT to restore Mr Patterson?s
bruised reputation after the Italian
fraud imbroglio.
McKinsey?s phenomenal success in
winning blue-chip mandates ? the
Bank of England, the NHS and the BBC
are other repeat customers ? is
matched only by its extraordinary role
as an incubator and staging post for
tomorrow?s business leaders.
No past employer seems more likely
to appear on the CV of a modern-day
leader than the name of McKinsey. Its
31,000-strong roster of alumni includes
hundreds of familiar names ? from
William Hague, the former foreign secretary, to Vittorio Colao, chief executive of Vodafone.
Carolyn Fairbairn, director-general
of the CBI, is a McKinseyite. So is Sir
Charlie Mayfield, chairman of the John
Lewis Partnership. And Baroness
Harding of Winscombe, former chief
executive of Talktalk. And Tidjane Thiam, the former Prudential boss now attempting to turn around Credit Suisse.
Ian Davis, chairman of Rolls-Royce,
was a 31-year lifer at McKinsey, serving
as chairman and worldwide managing
director from 2003 to 2009.
?A job at McKinsey is a ticket to
almost anywhere in the world,? according to Duff McDonald, author of The
Firm: The Story of McKinsey and its
secret influence on American business.
?The firm is the best finishing school in
business, a launching pad and a matchless resum� line. ?You rarely see an old
McKinsey consultant,? he adds. That?s
partly because the firm favours youth
over experience and operates an ?upor-out? promotion philosophy, but also
because a spell at McKinsey opens the
door to so many other opportunities. ?A
job at McKinsey, regardless of duration,
can serve as an enviable listening post
for plum corporate roles, particularly at
McKinsey?s own clients.?
In some industries the network effect
seems especially strong. Take banking.
The chairmen of Lloyds Banking
Group, Lord Blackwell, and Royal Bank
of Scotland, Sir Howard Davies, were
both schooled at the firm. Peter Sands,
the former Standard Chartered chief
executive, was another alumnus, as was
Charlotte Hogg, the former deputy
governor of the Bank of England. Paul
Pester, chief executive of TSB, is
another, as is Ant髇io Sim鮡s, chief executive of HSBC.
The same rules apply internationally,
especially in America. More Fortune
500 CEOs are alumni of McKinsey
than any other company. Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook, Sundar Pichai of
Google and John Malone of Liberty
Media are all ex-McKinsey. The trend
seems to be spreading to China: Martin
Lau of Tencent is also an alumnus.
The firm was founded in 1926 by
James O McKinsey, a University of
Chicago accounting professor, but it
was his successor Marvin Bower who in
the 1950s transformed strategic consulting into a respectable profession, on
a par with doctors and engineers.
To this day, new recruits are given a
copy of Bower?s privately printed
Perspective on McKinsey. This contains
hard practical advice (Dress like your
client) and also Bower?s famous ?obligation to dissent? dictum. This is the requirement that staff should speak out
when they hear their boss or client say
something they disagree with. Tactful
silence was not good enough, Bower
believed.
It?s hard to pin down the McKinsey
philosophy, but it is certainly partly
about rigorous, unemotional analysis
of the facts. Sir Charlie Mayfield, who
spent four years at McKinsey in his
early thirties after a career in the British
Army, describes how he learnt there to
disaggregate a problem, breaking it
down into pieces and following a logical
sequence.
He remembers learning the hypothesis-based approach to problem solving; in essence to hypothesise that the
answer is X and then to ask what would
have to be in place for X to be true. ?I use
that a lot today.?
Baroness Cavendish of Little Venice,
a former columnist at The Times who
went on to head the Downing Street
policy unit in the David Cameron era,
says she used the intellectual tools absorbed during her two-year McKinsey
spell to grapple with complex problems
in Westminster. She says the sober,
Dido Harding, above far left, rides Duck and Dumplings to victory at Goodwood,
Many aspire, but few are chosen
More than 500,000
people a year apply for
jobs at McKinsey
worldwide, the company
says. It won?t say how
many succeed but it is
thought to be no more
than a few thousand.
The London office
expects to recruit up to
200 people this year, a
fraction of the tens of
thousands expected to
apply in the UK. Almost
half of incoming
consultants have MBAs,
but the firm does hire
people from university.
?We have hundreds of
digital and data roles,?
says John Cheetham, a
McKinsey spokesman.
?We need engineers,
doctors and product
designers. We look for
people with experience
in areas from supply
chain to cybersecurity.?
The emphasis is on
problem solving,
creating thinking and
analytical rigour. ?It?s
not as intimidating as
you might think,? says
the McKinsey website,
not very reassuringly.
?I had 15 interviews,?
recalls one former
consultant in London.
New Libor charges pile pressure on senior bankers
Harry Wilson City Editor
City lawyers have warned that senior
bankers are at greater risk of charges
over Libor after US prosecutors last
week filed the first criminal case against
financiers linked to the so-called ?lowballing? of benchmark borrowing rates.
The US Department of Justice has
indicted two senior managers at Soci閠� G閚閞ale, alleging that the bankers in
Paris told junior staff to post lower dollar Libor to present a false impression of
the French investment bank?s financial
health at the height of the eurozone
debt crisis. The charges mark a significant escalation in the Libor investigation, which has till now focused on
more junior employees and the manipulation of global borrowing rates to
boost trading profits.
?The DoJ?s decision to bring charges
in respect of low-balling will inevitably
put further pressure on the Serious
Fraud Office to follow suit. Though the
SFO has said it is investigating the lowballing allegations, so far no charges
have been brought,? said Emma Brooks
at Byrne and Partners, which has represented City workers in Libor trials.
Charles Kuhn, a partner at Hickman
and Rose and a financial crime barrister, said the US charges were ?surprising and significant?. ?Surprising, as
recent verdicts in relation to Libor in
the UK suggest that it is harder for the
prosecution to show that the British
Bankers? Association definition was
being incorrectly applied, and significant as this is the first prosecution of an
individual for alleged ?lowballing?,? said
Mr Kuhn, who has also represented
bankers prosecuted over Libor.
The DoJ charges accuse Danielle
Sindzingre, 54, global head of treasury
at SocGen, and Muriel Bescond, 49,
head of treasury in Paris at the French
bank, of one count of conspiring to give
false reports to the market and four
counts of making false reports.
Despite there being no previous
prosecutions, banks have admitted in
their settlements with the authorities to
having attempted to give an artificial
impression of their financial health by
submitting rates that were lower than
those they knew they could actually
borrow at.
SocGen said last week that it was cooperating with the US investigation.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
37
1GM RM
Business
business? best finishing school
MAX MUMBY/INDIGO/GETTY
My job taught me to think
robustly . . . and how to write
Profile
A
dair Turner
well
remembers
his first
day at
McKinsey & Co
(Patrick Hosking
writes). He was 26. It
was a Saturday (they
don?t believe in
weekends at
McKinsey).
He was at a training
morning looking at
BT?s Prestel service, a
clunky and primitive
live news feed but
cutting edge at the
time. ?Someone
switched on the set,
and up flashed the
news that Argentina
had just invaded the
Falkland Islands. I
thought, ?Wow?.?
Turner, now Lord
Turner of Ecchinswell,
is for many McKinsey
personified: brainy,
unflappable and ultracomfortable bounding
from one highpowered job to the
next. He went on to
run the CBI, now run
by Carolyn
Fairbairn, and
then was
chairman of the
Financial
Services
Authority
through the
banking crisis
years.
From the start
he mixed with future
business stars. Archie
Norman, a friend from
Cambridge university
and another
McKinseyite, first put
in his head the idea of
becoming a
consultant. As of next
month Norman will be
chairman of Marks &
Spencer.
Turner?s first job
interview at the firm
was conducted by a
youthful Stephen
Green, now Lord
Green, who went on to
become chairman of
HSBC and a former
trade minister.
An early brief was
for Citigroup. Not yet
out of their twenties,
the team on the
project comprised
William Hague, a
future foreign
secretary, and Howard
Davies, a future
chairman of Royal
Bank of Scotland. The
fourth consultant on
the project was Orna
Ni-Chionna, who
became Turner?s wife
(they?re still married
and she?s now the
senior independent
director at Royal
Mail). McKinsey then
had a strict rule that
married couples
couldn?t work for the
company. Rather than
lose either of them, it
dropped the rule.
Turner, 61, says his
time at McKinsey
helped teach him to
think robustly and
analytically. ?It also
helped me learn to
write.?
Turner?s favourite
time was from 1992 to
1995, when he helped
forge McKinsey?s
presence behind the
Iron Curtain, in
Russia, Poland and
other countries. ?It
f
was a fabulous
opportu
opportunity
to start
with a clean sheet of
paper. So often with
consult
consulting
you are
mainly struggling with
leg
legacy
issues.?
Eventually,
T
Turner
left to
w
work
in public
p
policy.
?A lot
of me is
McKinsey, but I
was never
going to be the
guy who spends
3 years there.?
30
as one would expect from a McKinsey alumna. Other successes include the CBI?s Carolyn Fairbairn and Adair Turner, right
unflashy character of McKinsey distinguished it from other consulting firms.
?If McKinsey was a person, they?d be
the Stanford science professor who
doesn?t tell you about their billiondollar start-up business until after the
pudding.?
?It?s been called a cult,? she adds. ?I
don?t think that?s fair. But you work
such long hours that you do end up
socialising with other McKinsey consultants because your friends have all
given up on you.?
McKinseyites also become firm
friends partly because they have been
taught to think the same way. Sometimes the friendships develop further.
Ms Hogg is married to a fellow former
consultant Steve Sacks, who is now
chief customer officer of Burberry, the
fashion group.
There are no financial figures for the
company because of its partnership
status. Forbes magazine estimated its
annual revenues at $8.4 billion in 2015.
That put it well ahead of the other two
big strategic consultants, Boston Consulting Group and Bain & Co, on
$5.6 billion and $2.3 billion respectively.
It seems to have weathered the most
embarrassing episodes of its modern
life. The first was the collapse of Enron
in 2001. The gas giant was exposed as a
gigantic fraud. Its chief executive Jef-
frey Skilling, who was jailed for 24 years
in 2006 (later reduced to 14 years), had
spent 21 years at McKinsey. Enron was
a huge client of the firm, handing it
$10 million in annual fees at the peak,
while McKinsey was an enthusiastic
cheerleader for the company. Enron
was named 127 times in the McKinsey
Quarterly in the six years running up to
its collapse.
The second was a pair of related insider dealing scandals involving Anil
Kumar, a senior partner, and Rajat
Gupta, a former managing director
who had run the firm for 13 years to
2007. Gupta was jailed for two years in
2012 for leaking price-sensitive infor-
mation to a hedge fund manager
gleaned from his time as a non-executive director at Goldman Sachs.
For a company that prided itself on
its fabulously well-connected network
of employees and alumni across the
world, this could have been devastating.
Vivian Hunt, the managing partner
in London, says of the Gupta scandal,
?It was a painful and significant event
for the firm. We?ve reinforced our
checks and balances since then. It was a
moment of truth . . . but I do think we
are stronger as a result.? She says there
is a robust system for preserving client
confidentiality within the firm when
advising competitors, and for declaring
potential conflicts of interest. ?Partners
have to declare everything.? As for the
nurturing of former staff through the
alumni network, she says, ?I agree it?s
highly unusual in business, but we are a
partnership and it?s the way we?ve operated since the beginning. It?s no different to the peer-to-peer networks for
universities and any other professional
group. We?re one firm. We?re one global
partnership. That continues for life.?
tomorrow
James Dean on
Goldman Sachs
Large private companies will be given their first code of ethics
Philip Aldrick Economics Editor
Large private businesses face greater
scrutiny from next year after the government confirmed that it will develop
the UK?s first ever corporate governance code for big unlisted companies.
The idea was floated last autumn in a
green paper on corporate governance
reform but will become official today
when the Department for Business,
Energy and Industrial Strategy sets out
new boardroom standards.
As part of a broad set of measures to
crack down on fatcat excess and bad
practice, the government has asked the
Financial Reporting Council (FRC), the
guardian of corporate ethics, ?to develop a voluntary set of governance principles for large private companies?.
A leading business figure is expected
to lead the review, which will be supported by the FRC, the Institute of Directors, the Institute for Family Business and the British Private Equity and
Venture Capital Association.
The decision to establish the code of
standards for privately owned businesses was taken after last year?s BHS
scandal, when hundreds of staff lost
their jobs and the pensions of retired
workers were jeopardised after the high
street retailer collapsed while the owners initially walked away unscathed.
The code would be voluntary due to
the different ownership structure of
private companies, as management and
shareholders are often one and the
same. A set of standards could strengthen the voice of other stakeholders in the
business, though, from staff to suppliers
to pension trustees.
Stephen Haddrill, chief executive of
the FRC, said: ?Large private companies are integral to the UK economy as
significant employers and supporters of
communities and families. It is right we
develop a set of corporate governance
principles to enhance confidence that
they act in the public interest.?
The green paper suggested defining a
large private company as having more
than 1,000 employees, which would extend the new code to 2,500 private firms
and 90 partnerships, but the final definition will be subject to consultation.
The code is likely to require companies
to produce an annual report detailing
how they meet the standards.
The FRC has been preparing for a
major overhaul of the existing code for
listed companies. It will launch a formal
consultation later this year and the government plans to bring legislative reforms into effect in June 2018.
The government will instruct 900
listed companies to publish the pay ratio between their chief executives and
an average member of staff. Companies
will have to put a worker representative
on the board or explain why they have
not done so, and a public register of listed companies where more than a fifth
of shareholders vote down executive
pay deals will be created.
38
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Business
Builders paid millions by warranty body
SIMON DAWSON/BLOOMBERG/GETTY
Tom Knowles Property Correspondent
Consumer confidence in new-build
homes has been steadily declining,
reaching the lowest level in a decade
last year, after a string of complaints
about quality. The revelation that an
independent body created in 1936 to
improve housebuilding standards is
paying individual developers as much
as �7 million in refunds a year if they
deliver homes without major flaws is
unlikely to help this sentiment.
The National House Building
Council (NHBC), a not-for-profit organisation, claims that the premium refunds are a way of rewarding housebuilders who have maintained a high
quality of building. It says that although
it does reduce the premiums charged to
housebuilders based on their claims
history in the first place, this is still often
too large and so a refund is acceptable.
Neil Jefferson, business development
director at the NHBC, said: ?Of course
we have different premium scales depending on the developer?s previous
claims history, but broadly speaking
there?s not a huge amount of difference
because we don?t know whether that
was the right premium to take accurately until 15 years down the line which is
when we pay out the refunds.?
However, such incentives do not
appear to be working. A customer survey in March by the Home Builders
Federation, which covered every major
housebuilder, found that 98 per cent of
customers reported snags or defects to
their home since moving in a year ago,
up from 93 per cent the previous year.
The survey, which was carried out in
partnership with the NHBC, showed a
number of worsening trends within the
sector. A quarter of customers reported
16 or more problems to their builder, up
from 22 per cent a year ago and 20 per
cent in 2014. One in four customers had
more problems than they expected,
while nearly one in five were dissatisfied with their housebuilder.
Customers of major housebuilders
are often baffled that their homes have
so many issues when the NHBC says all
homes are inspected five times in the
building process and are checked over
before being given a ten-year ?Buildmark? guarantee.
However, an all-party parliamentary
group into housebuilding in July found
that this can be misleading. It said:
?Consumers think (or are even led to
believe) that a warranty is a hallmark of
absolute quality. Often, the warranties
Fracking
case goes to
appeal court
Expedia on slide after Uber
prepares to pick up its boss
Emily Gosden Energy Editor
Emily Gosden
Anti-fracking protesters will make a
last-ditch effort to prevent Cuadrilla
fracking in Lancashire when they bring
a legal challenge to the Court of Appeal
this week.
The case, to be heard tomorrow and
Thursday, seeks to overturn planning
consent that was granted by Sajid Javid,
the communities secretary, last October. Lancashire council had rejected
the plans in 2015 but Mr Javid approved
them after a public inquiry.
Campaigners tried unsuccessfully to
challenge the decision through judicial
review, which was heard in March and
dismissed by a High Court judge in
April, but were given the right to appeal.
Cuadrilla began drilling at its Preston
New Road site this month and says it
expects to frack at the end of the year. It
would be the first fracking in Britain
since 2011. The company said that it
?remains confident that the planning
consent will not be overturned?.
A spokeswoman for the Preston New
Road Action Group said: ?We trust the
secretary of state?s decision to allow
fracking will be found unsound, and
Lancashire county council?s original
decision will be reinstated.?
Uber has asked the boss of Expedia to
become its new chief executive as it
seeks to recover from a string of corporate scandals.
The troubled taxi-hailing company
offered the role to Dara Khosrowshahi,
the 48-year-old who has led the online
travel business since 2005.
Although Mr Khosrowshahi has not
formally accepted the role, shares in
Expedia closed 4.5 per cent down in
New York yesterday after its chairman
told employees that he was expected to
do so.
?Nothing has been finalised, but
having extensively discussed this with
Dara, I believe it is his intention to accept,? Barry Diller told staff. He said Mr
Khosrowshahi had been struggling
with the decision ?out of both his abiding enthusiasm for Expedia?s future as
well as his loyalty to all of us?.
Mr Khosrowshahi is credited with
delivering strong growth at Expedia
and the company?s share price has increased eightfold during his tenure.
The planned appointment to Uber
would conclude a high-profile search
for a successor to Travis Kalanick, who
bowed to pressure from investors and
Customer satisfaction with the trade is at a ten-year low ? yet builders are being rewarded for their ?flawless? work
cover far less than consumers assume;
and neither warranties nor building
control functions provide any sort of
comfort that items such as finishes and
fittings will be defect-free when the
house is handed over.?
If any defect with a property comes to
light in the first two years, the housebuilder is obliged to resolve it, yet from
year three onwards, the homeowner has
to claim this on NHBC insurance, which
resigned in June. Mr Kalanick, who cofounded Uber in 2009, has overseen its
growth from a start-up to a multinational with 15,000 employees but he
was accused of presiding over a culture of sexual harassment following claims by former staff members. He triggered a user boycott
by joining President Trump?s advisory panel, a role he then rescinded, and was at the helm
when Uber faced a legal challenge from Waymo over
alleged theft of trade secrets for driverless cars.
Shareholders with
40 per cent of the
company?s
voting
rights,
including
Benchmark Capital,
one of Uber?s earliest investors, asked
him to step down.
Mr Kalanick
was on a leave of
absence following
the death of his
Expedia?s Dara
Khosrowshahi had
been ?struggling with
the decision?
only covers major structural issues,
such as with walls and external foundations. This means the refunds by NHBC
can still be paid out to housebuilders
even if there are dozens of non-structural flaws with a property they have built.
The NHBC says it never pays back
the full premium and keeps a pool of
money available for any housebuilder
that could go bankrupt and not pay out
on claims. However, in a complex cal-
mother when he announced his resignation. He then took a seat on Uber?s
board as a director, so has been involved in the search for his successor.
Meg Whitman, the chief executive
of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and
Jeff Immelt, the former chief executive of General Electric, had also
been in the running. Mr Immelt
had been seen as the favourite but
said on Sunday that he had ?decided not to pursue a leadership position at Uber?.
Mr Khosrowshahi,
who was born in Iran,
has been an outspoken critic of President Trump, especially on immigration.
He hit the headlines last year when
it was revealed that
he was awarded a
pay package worth
up to $95 million in
2015. The vast majority
of that was in share options based on him remaining at Expedia until 2020, so
may lapse if he accepts the
Uber job.
culation, the organisation then works
out how much to pay by taking into account the number of homes registered
by a developer 15 years ago, the cost of
any claims paid out on those homes
since then, and a slice of the returns the
NHBC has made from its �5 billion
worth of bonds and other assets it holds
at any one time as an insurer.
Only those who have registered 750
homes over the past 20 years and paid
out �0,000 in premiums are eligible
for the refund, meaning larger developers benefit more from the system. In addition, anyone who leaves the NHBC?s
register and joins a rival warranty provider?s register is no longer applicable
for the refunds, meaning larger developers rarely leave the NHBC.
The inclusion of the interest that the
NHBC makes on its bonds also means
developers can sometimes earn more
than they paid in.
Mr Jefferson said: ?It?s quite rare to
pay back more than the premium paid
[but] if a builder has paid us quite a large
amount in premiums and has had virtually no claims, by the time we have
added on investment returns for every
year for 15 years, it can add up to a reasonably large amount.?
On top of these refunds, the NHBC
admitted it also sometimes pays oneoff sums to housebuilders to resolve
disputes. For example, a housebuilder
may decide to fix an issue with a property itself rather than claim it on insurance, but will then ask the NHBC for
money for having done so.
In other cases, a housebuilder may
refuse to fix an issue, leading the NHBC
to step in to fix it and present a bill to the
developer. If the bill is disputed, the
NHBC will often make a ?commercial
negotiation? to resolve the issue.
Mr Jefferson added: ?Sometimes in
certain circumstances, if things haven?t
gone that well for us in terms of carrying out the repair, or maybe we made a
mistake in diagnosing the repair that
was required, sometimes we will take
up a commercial view about how much
we will reclaim from the builder.?
Irish bank
fined by ECB
over liquidity
Philip Aldrick Economics Editor
The European Central Bank has fined
bailed-out Irish bank Permanent TSB
for breaking regulations on liquidity in
2015 and 2016. It was the first fine meted
out by the ECB since it took over banking supervision three years ago.
The ?2.5 million penalty adds to
PTSB?s woes as the mortgage lender
grapples with the legacy of the property
crash that forced the government to
rescue several banks. Regulatory costs
have been more onerous on PTSB than
its rivals and the fine equates to 5 per
cent of the ?53 million profit it made in
the first six months of the year.
The ECB said in a statement that the
two breaches in 2015 and 2016 ?did not
change the liquidity position? of the
bank and have since been fully remedied. PTSB stressed that it was never at
risk. It claimed the breaches related to
the treatment of funding received from
the ECB and were caused by a ?misinterpretation? of European rules, which
the bank itself reported to Frankfurt.
?At no point during this period did
the group?s actual liquidity position
deteriorate,? it said in a statement,
adding it had been fully compliant since
April last year.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
39
1GM
Comment Business
Ian King
Simon French
Central bank generals
must beware an uneasy
peace in the markets
Small is not always beautiful when
defending interests of the economy
??
For some British
politicians, lavishing
praise on small
businesses comes as
naturally as kissing
babies. In their world view, small
companies are the bedrock of the
economy, run by hard-working souls
who devote all their working hours to
supporting jobs in their communities.
They need nurturing because they are
deprived of vital capital by wicked
banks that refuse to lend to them.
By contrast, big business is
demonised by many politicians,
including the prime minister herself.
Large companies are denigrated for
ripping off their customers, exploiting
their workers, paying their bosses too
much and trying to avoid taxes. They
are accused of avoiding investment,
choosing instead to buy back their
shares to flatter earnings and boost
executives? long-term payouts.
The generalisations are nonsense,
of course. Just as there are good small
companies, there are good larger
ones, businesses that invest heavily in
their corporate social responsibility
programmes, that strive to provide
employment opportunities to those
who might otherwise be deprived of
them and to whom pushing through
improvements on sustainability
comes as naturally as seeking to raise
operating efficiencies.
By the same token, just as there are
bad larger companies, there are bad
small businesses too. You can find
plenty of examples in the latest list
from the Department for Business,
published two weeks ago, naming and
shaming 197 employers for failing to
pay their workers the minimum wage.
Apart from Argos, owned by
Sainsbury?s, there weren?t any
FTSE 350 companies on the list, the
largest yet. It largely comprised
hairdressing salons, day care
nurseries, butcher?s shops, restaurants,
care homes and takeaway outlets.
Bedrocks of their local economy,
every one.
It isn?t just politicians that
propagate this nonsense. A research
group in Brussels called the
Corporate Europe Observatory has
just joined forces with Global Justice
Now, a British campaign group, to
publish a list of meetings held by
ministers from the Department for
International Trade and the
Department for Exiting the EU with
representatives from companies and
trade bodies. They have also
published a list of meetings held
between companies and the Brexit
taskforce set up by Michel Barnier,
the EU?s chief negotiator.
The two organisations report, in
shocked tones, that big businesses
have dominated the meetings.
Companies that have met most
frequently with the international
trade department include HSBC,
which had eight meetings; BP, which
had seven; KPMG and Barclays,
which had six apiece; Caterpillar and
Glaxosmithkline, which had five
meetings each and the CityUK, the
lobby group for the financial and
professional services sector, which
has had four meetings. Similarly, the
CityUK is listed as having attended
eight meetings with ministers and
officials from the department for
Brexit, while HSBC attended six and
Goldman Sachs four. The
organisations grumble also that trade
bodies representing food and
agriculture, infrastructure, defence,
tech and the automotive sector
appear to have dominated the 56
roundtables hosted by the Brexit
department between October and
March this year. They add: ?Nongovernmental organisations and trade
unions did not feature heavily in
these roundtables and only six
roundtables were held with civil
society, including sessions on the
environment, zoos and museums.?
The two groups, whose
documentation is peppered with the
For some politicians praising small
businesses is as easy as kissing babies
slogan ?Smaller companies aren?t
getting a look-in?, go on: ?The risk
that the corporate capture of this
process will lead to a Big Business
Brexit is high.?
The response to these revelations
must surely be ? what else do you
expect? The two sectors with most to
lose, if Brexit is mishandled, are the
financial services industry and the
automotive industry. More than
2.2 million Britons work in financial
and related professional services,
getting on for 7 per cent of the entire
labour force, two thirds of whom are
based outside London. The industry
accounts for 11 per cent of Britain?s
GDP. Goldman Sachs alone has
6,000 UK employees. In an era of
mobile capital and mobile labour and
in which Frankfurt and Paris are both
pushing hard to lure international
banks away from the UK, it is not
worrying that Goldman Sachs has
had four meetings with officials from
the Brexit department, it is reassuring.
Similarly, the UK automotive
industry accounts for almost a million
jobs, either directly or indirectly. It
accounts for 13 per cent of UK
exports and, in 2015-16 alone, created
almost 80,000 apprenticeships. Again,
it is difficult to think of a sector more
deserving of access to ministers and
officials involved in Brexit. After
those two, the pharmaceutical
industry is Britain?s biggest export
earner, accounting for nearly �in
every � invested in research and
development globally by the sector. It
is entirely appropriate that GSK, as
the largest drugmaker, has a hotline
to Brexit ministers and officials.
By contrast, according to the
Federation for Small Businesses, just
21 per cent of small businesses
export. So, while the small business
sector is undoubtedly a vital
contributor to the UK economy and
accounts for just under half of all
employment, it is much less exposed
to a Brexit deal that damages Britain?s
ability to trade. That small business
representatives have
attended fewer
meetings hardly
amounts to a
scandal.
??
Ian King is business presenter for Sky
News. Ian King Live is broadcast at
6.30pm from Monday to Thursday.
Patrick Hosking is away
G
enerals often face
criticism for their
tendency to fight the last
war, using the tactics of
the past to achieve victory
in the present. However, this is not a
curse confined to the armed services.
Lessons that are hard won create
disproportionately strong resonance
for most of us. Sadly, however,
fighting the last war is often a losing
strategy. Ten years on from the
financial crisis, central bankers are
fretting. Will they be cast as the
blinkered generals of the world
economy?
Last week some of the world?s most
important central bankers descended
on the small town of Jackson Hole, in
Wyoming, for its annual Economic
Symposium. Now in its fortieth year,
?The tone may have
lacked the hubris that
preceded the crisis but
it has not been replaced
with perfect foresight?
this event has often coincided with
the end of a summer lull in financial
markets. This year, however, it was
not just the Rocky Mountains that
were casting long shadows. Delegates
reminisced on a decade of repair to
the armaments of the global financial
system, but privately speculated
whether the uneasy peace in financial
markets masked new threats.
Janet Yellen?s address reminded
attendees ? and perhaps those
inside the White House ? that
smarter regulation has made the
financial system more resilient to
the events that characterised the
global financial crisis. The extra
capital held by banks, the annual
stress tests of the largest financial
institutions and more rigorous
lending standards have all made the
global economy less likely to
experience the withdrawal of credit
that characterised the last crisis.
The Fed chairwoman, however, did
not linger long in considering the
impact of technology and changes to
regulatory policy over the past
decade. In truth it was a plea to
delegates to undertake more
research before these impacts
generate disorder for households and
businesses reliant on stable financial
markets. The tone may have lacked
the hubris that preceded the global
financial crisis but it has not been
replaced with perfect foresight.
In reality regulators have to make
educated guesses on risks that are
emerging and evolving. There are
three in particular that have
emerged in recent times.
First, there has been a huge move
in recent years from active to
passive investing. The former is
where asset managers take specific
investment decisions in an aim to
achieve a specific goal for their
clients. The latter dispenses with
research and expertise and savers
simply buy a product that duplicates
a particular index such as the FTSE
100. It is estimated that almost half
of invested funds in the US are
passively invested.
Second, there has been a sharp
rise in algorithmic trading, where
the decisions over purchase or sale
of financial assets are determined by
mathematical modelling. Most of
these models have two
characteristics ? they use historic
data to derive optimal approaches
using speed of processing far in
excess of what a human can do.
They also have circuit breakers, or
?off ? switches, when markets
behave in extremely unusual ways.
Models such as these, however
sophisticated, cannot be expected to
deal with events that have no
previous parallel.
The third risk is one no central
banker can control: taxpayer
inclination to ride to the rescue. The
creation of $22 trillion by central
banks since 2007 has driven down
returns available to savers and
driven up wealth inequalities.
Together with the attempts to cut
government spending, this has given
politicians little wriggle room when
the next crisis hits.
As Ms Yellen considers her future
? she is up for reappointment in
February ? she may conclude that
with the financial crisis repair job
complete, regulating new and
uncertain risks can be someone
else?s legacy.
Simon French is chief economist at
Panmure Gordon, the stockbroker.
Philip Aldrick is away
40
1GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Business
GETTY
Manufacturers fear freeze
in recruitment from Brexit
Samsung heir appeals five-year corruption sentence
A lawyer for the billionaire heir to
Samsung has filed an appeal against
the five-year jail term he was given
after being found guilty of corruption
in South Korea?s biggest political and
corporate scandal for decades. Lee
Jae-yong, 49, right, vice-chairman of
the technology manufacturer, was
convicted of bribery, embezzlement,
perjury, hiding assets abroad and
concealing the proceeds of crime. His
main offence was to pay 43 billion won
(� million) to a close friend of the
president, Park Geun-hye, in return for
favours that helped him to strengthen
his control of the electronics group.
The EEF, the manufacturers?
organisation, has warned of a
recruitment crunch if businesses are
denied access to skills from across the
European Union, and urged the
government to clarify reciprocal
rights. A survey by the organisation
showed that applications from EU
nationals had fallen by a quarter, and
16 per cent had seen a rise in EU
nationals leaving their business. It
said a third of companies relied on
EU nationals because skills were not
available in the UK.
Tim Thomas, EEF director of
employment and skills, said that
ministers must also formulate a new
model for immigration to come into
force when the UK leaves the EU.
?Skills shortages are endemic in
manufacturing, and any points basedtype system would choke off the skills
needed by this sector,? he said.
FTSE 350 pensions deficit ?worse? than just after crisis
The aggregate pension deficit of the
UK?s top 350 companies rose by
� billion to � billion last year and
now represents a higher proportion of
pre-tax profit than just after the
financial crisis, according to the
actuarial firm Barnett Waddingham.
Last year?s deficit was equivalent to
70 per cent of total annual pre-tax
profits of �.9 billion from the top
350 companies whereas in 2011 it was
only �.5 billion, or 25 per cent, of
�4 billion in pre-tax profits.
Nick Griggs, partner at Barnett
Weak sterling boosts staff
in UK hospitality sector
Demand for staff in the UK?s
hospitality sector soared last month
as more Britons holidayed at home
because of the weak pound. Adzuna,
the online jobs site, said advertised
hospitality vacancies jumped by more
than a fifth compared with July last
year, to 51,880. Visit England said
there had been a rise in British
holidays as the currency keeps natives
at home and attracts foreign visitors.
Doug Monro, co-founder of Adzuna,
said: ?More of us are swapping the
Mediterranean for Margate and
choosing to holiday closer to home.?
Adzuna?s Jobs Report also found that
average advertised salaries were at
their lowest last month since April
2014, at �,199, indicating that
employers want low-skilled employees.
However, the average graduate salary
bucked the trend, up 3.4 per cent
compared with last year to �,454.
Waddingham, said: ?Comparing the
pension deficit to profits is a
simplification, but it helps to put the
scale of the challenge into context.
Unless companies are profitable over
the long term, they can?t generate
enough cash to meet their liabilities.
?That said . . . if equity returns
continue at the levels seen in the last
few years, long-term interest rates rise
more than expected and longevity
increases do not provide any nasty
surprises, the pension deficit problem
could solve itself.?
Bank of Mum and Dad pays �3bn to help renters
Former-F1 driver Lauda looks to buy Air Berlin?s Niki
Niki Lauda, the former Formula One
driver, has said he is interested in
buying Niki, the Austrian airline he
once owned, from the insolvent Air
Berlin. Mr Lauda told the Austrian
newspaper Kronen-Zeitung that he
had written to Air Berlin?s insolvency
administrator but he has yet to look
at Niki?s books.
?Now let?s see what happens,
whether I?ll be invited to the
negotiations at all,? he said.
Lufthansa is the frontrunner to buy
the bulk of Air Berlin, which filed for
bankruptcy protection earlier this
month, as the German government
pushes for a quick deal.
Mr Lauda started Niki in 2003 after
buying the Austrian arm of the
bankrupt German charter carrier
Aero Lloyd. Air Berlin, Germany?s
second largest airline, acquired a
stake shortly afterwards and has since
gained full control.
Renters will rely on the Bank of Mum
and Dad for �3 billion in payments
this year, according to new research.
About 9 per cent of people renting
in the UK rely on financial help from
their parents, a survey of 1,000 people
by Legal & General and the CEBR
found. That equates to parental help
on rent payments on 460,000
properties. On average they received
�5 towards each month?s rent.
Dan Batterton, fund manager at
Legal and General Investment
Management, said the scale of
financial help was ?concerning?. He
said: ?It is a real challenge for young
people who are reliant on parental
handouts just to make the rent. The
intergenerational inequality that
creates the demand for Bank of Mum
and Dad funding continues to widen
and now it?s affecting renters too.?
Combined with �5 billion in loans
from parents to help their children
buy their first home, that means the
Bank of Mum and Dad will contribute
�8 billion on supporting them in the
property market.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
41
1GM
Business
BHP to make a few dimes from its nickel
Marcus Leroux
BHP Billiton intends to sell its nickel
division despite its decision to invest
$43 million in boosting its capacity to
meet demand created by the boom in
electric vehicles.
In revealing that in the long term it
will probably sell Nickel West, which
operates in Western Australia, BHP is
signalling that it is content to rely on its
copper business for giving exposure to
the increased demand for the materials
that make batteries for green technologies such as electric vehicles.
BHP appears to be taking a more
sober view of the looming battery rush
than many of its rivals.
Nickel West was stranded as an
orphan asset after it was not included in
BHP?s spin-off of South32. However,
the company subsequently committed
to it by boosting its processing capacity
to meet the anticipated demand from
the take-up of electric vehicles.
Peter Beaven, chief financial officer,
said that BHP would continue to invest
in Nickel West, which is among the
group?s top performers from an operational, safety and technical perspective.
?Nickel West is never going to be a
particularly large part of our portfolio
but for now it?s one of those assets
where it?s a good idea to hold and
improve. I think ultimately it?s a sell but
it?s a sell for value.?
Mr Beaven, speaking after BHP?s
annual results were released last week,
insisted that despite not producing key
battery materials like zinc, cobalt or
lithium, BHP was in a good position to
capture the benefit. ?We?re very well
placed. The biggest scale impact for any
commodity is copper and we?ve got to
have scale stuff,? he said.
Cobalt, typically produced as a byproduct with copper particularly in the
Zambian and Congolese copperbelt,
has shot up this year. But BHP has little
appetite for entering the Congolese
market.
?Like all by-product markets it rockets up and then falls back. There?s only
one place to go get it and that?s the way
it is?, Mr Beaven said.
While lithium demand is expected to
explode in the coming years, BHP reck-
ons that new supply could rise far
quicker, particularly if Rio Tinto?s huge
Jadar project in Serbia goes ahead.
By contrast, copper production has
built-in constraints. The average mine
faces a gradual reduction in the grade
of its ore each year, and a combination
of drought, industrial action and political upheaval takes another bite out of
company forecasts, typically more than
5 per cent of projected supply.
?Disruption is a feature of the industry . . . I don?t think it?s ever going to
change,? Mr Beaven said of the copper
industry.
This year has brought persistent
disruptions at Escondida, which is the
world?s largest copper producer and is
operated by BHP, and Grasberg, the
second largest, in which Rio Tinto has a
substantial interest. Prices have risen
by 46 per cent in the past year, hitting
three-year highs last week.
Miners are also looking carefully at
the nickel market because not all of the
metal, typically used in steel, is suitable
for electric vehicles. Nickel found in laterite, a type of metal-rich soil formed
through weathering in tropical environments, can be used in batteries. But
the nickel sulphide deposites that provide most of the world?s nickel cannot
be used in battery materials.
BHP, which mines nickel laterite,
believes that the demands of the burgeoning battery industry means the
market will bifurcate, allowing nickel
laterite to fetch higher prices.
ALAMY
Top recyclers
in Europe
Rubbish policies
bring Britain
to tipping point
B
ritain is facing
a triple waste
whammy of
stalled
recycling rates,
not enough incinerators
being built and landfill
running scarce (Robert
Lea writes).
That is the stark
prognosis of the
country?s busiest bin
clearer, Biffa, which is
calling on the
government to think
again on waste having
followed policies that
have got Britain among
Europe?s better
performers but no
further.
Ian Wakelin, Biffa?s
chief executive, says
ministers need to return
to ?clear and consistent
policy direction? and
that the forthcoming
industrial strategy would
be the appropriate
vehicle to kick-start
waste policy.
In a report entitled
The Reality Gap, Mr
Wakelin states: ?We are
now at a crossroads as to
the future of our
environmental strategy.
?This is made all the
more critical and timely
by the prospect of a postBrexit world in which
the UK will have the
opportunity to shape a
bespoke environmental
direction and policy for
the years ahead.?
The report says the
UK is now recycling
about 45 per cent of
household waste and 59
per cent of commercial
and industrial waste.
Existing policies might
yet improve those
figures but gains are
likely to be only modest.
?Recycling levels have
plateaued in the UK.
Without further
government
intervention . . .
improvements are likely
to be minimal,? Mr
Wakelin said.
On top of that, he says
we are also falling
behind on what we do
with waste that can?t be
recycled. ?The UK needs
to develop more new
Germany 64 per cent
Austria 56
Belgium 55
Switzerland 54
Netherlands 51
Sweden 50
Luxemburg 47
United Kingdom 44
Denmark 44
Norway 42
An extension to landfill needs to be considered, as this island of discarded fridges near Lewes in East Sussex illustrates
energy from waste
facilities. This is vital if
we are to convert
residual waste effectively
into energy from which
we can all benefit.?
The development of
energy-from-waste
projects has got itself a
negative name in recent
months. Last week the
�billion Greater
Manchester waste
disposal authority
private finance initiative
was in crisis with the
local councils moving to
take back control.
Similarly, failings in the
construction of a
�0 million of a
gasification plant on the
delayed Glasgow
Recycling and Renewable
Energy Centre have seen
Interserve booted off the
scheme.
Mr Wakelin says such
local authority projects
will provide long-term
returns but there is a
deficit of commercial
banking money available
for such schemes.
As for waste that can
be neither recycled nor
burnt nor ? like food
waste ? anaerobically
digested, landfill (the
bad boy of the waste
industry) is becoming an
issue. ?Landfill has a
vital, ongoing role in the
waste hierarchy in
dealing with those
wastes which are noncombustible and nonrecyclable,? he says.
?There is no
alternative form of
disposal for such waste. . .
Replacement sites will
need to be developed.?
The report says the
amount of waste going
to landfill has halved in
the past 15 years but the
available subterranean
voids in which to dump
rubbish will have run
out within ten years.
Mr Wakelin says there
are plenty of spent
quarries which the
industry could fill and
then return to the natural
environment but local
authorities, mindful of a
Nimby reaction, are
reluctant. ?Consents for
new landfill schemes are
extremely difficult to
come by,? he said.
Deloitte revenues soar to record high First-time homebuyers up by
Peter Cunliffe
Deloitte, one of the Big Four accounting firms, shrugged off uncertainty
caused by the Brexit vote and elections
on both sides of the Atlantic to push up
annual revenues to a record high.
In the seventh consecutive year of
growth, revenues rose by 11.2 per cent to
�38 billion in the year to the end of May,
results for its UK and Swiss business
showed. It marked a slowdown on the
13.6 per cent growth in the previous year.
Profits distributable to partners were
unchanged at �8 million, which the
company said reflected investment in
its people and the business. Average
profit per partner was �5,000.
David Sproul, senior partner and chief
executive, said: ?This is a good performance in a complex and uncertain market
which has been impacted by Brexit and
the elections in the US and UK.?
Revenues from its consulting arm
grew by 13.6 per cent to �9 million,
lifted by demand for its technology
services to help companies through
business transformation programmes.
The audit and risk advisory business
saw revenues up by 13.1 per cent to
�2 million as it picked up new audit
�38bn
Annual revenues at Deloitte, up 11.2 per
cent in the year to the end of May
Source: Times research
accounts, including BAE Systems, BP,
Centrica and Glaxosmithkline, taking
its share of the FTSE 100 audit market
to 26 per cent. There was also increased
demand for risk advice on issues including cybersecurity and regulation.
Growth in tax services, up 5.7 per
cent to �1 million, was driven by
Brexit, the prospect of US tax reforms
and the ?global tax reset? as the OECD
and other organisations seek to make
companies? international tax affairs
more transparent.
A strong mergers and acquisitions
market helped to lift the financial advisory arm by 1.5 per cent to �9 million.
Deloitte advised on 87 deals worth a
total of �billion and on 38 per cent of
stock market main listings.
Mr Sproul said: ?Our clients are operating in a more globally connected way
than ever before, and are increasingly
turning to us not only for advice, but also
for digital and physical products to solve
their problems. Through these alliances
and acquisitions we will see Deloitte increasing our recruitment in the areas of
digital design and big-data analytics.?
The proportion of female partners in
the UK rose from 14 per cent to 19 per
cent, as it aims for a target of 25 per cent
by 2020.
�,000 in the past five years
Tom Knowles Property Correspondent
Britain?s boom in house prices over the
past five years has meant that first-time
buyers who bought a home in 2012 have
made an average of �,941 from their
property, something that housing experts believe is unlikely to be replicated
for several years, especially in London.
Research by the estate agent Savills
shows that first-time buyers who bought
in 2012 will have a property now worth
an average of �2,866, having paid a
deposit of �,366 and accumulated
�,941 through house price growth.
The 207,600 first-time buyers who
bought in the 12 months to the end of
June 2012 will have made a total of
�.3 billion in equity in the first five
years of ownership through house price
growth. In an example of how much
house prices in Britain have grown, this
sum exceeds the total value of all housing in Norwich by �0 million.
The gains are far from evenly spread
out. More than 50 per cent of that accumulated equity, which is about �7 billion, is spread across the 35,100 firsttime buyers who bought in London. The
77,200 first-time buyers who bought in
Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the
northeast, the northwest and Yorkshire
and Humber will have recorded
�8 million of accumulated equity.
Lucian Cook, director of residential
research at Savills, said: ?The first-time
buyer in London had to find a bigger deposit, an average of �,493 five years
ago.? He said the sharp increase in equity in London was unlikely to be enjoyed
by the next set of first-time buyers, who
needed a deposit averaging �6,054.
42
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
1GM
Business Equity prices
Mkt cap
(million)
Company
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
Banking & finance
41.46
1PMv
15.96
ACHPv
5,502.00
Admiral
49K +
14
1932
?
1
1.0
? 93.3
2.6 24.1
5.77
ADVFNv
775.04
Aldermore Gp
4.24
Ambrianv
4.24
Amedeo Resv
3.37
Amphion Innovsv
1X
42.45
Amryt Pharmav
20W ?
27,251.70
Aon Corpn
201.15
Arbuthnot Bkgv
1351
?
13.85
Arden Partnersv
43
?
7.41
Argo Groupv
15O
2,619.40
Ashmore Gp
370N +
53,696.36
Aus New Z
21,095.00
Aviva
19.16
AXA Property Tr
60N ?
73,859.56
Banco Santander
506K +
4
22K ?
9.1
?
33
1K
?
?
224X ?
4
?
7.5
1X
?
? -0.2
?
? -2.7
13
?
? -0.2
X
? -4.9
Company
556.63
EFG-Hermes Hldg
14.27
EIHv
22V
?
42.33
El Oro
67
?
2.17
Energiser Invv
1O
89.61
EPE Special Oppsv
321K ?
1,169.44
Esure
279O ?
4.67
Fairpointv#
271.63
6.53
FBD
Fiskev
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
194
+
10
783K
17W 12.0
Company
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
13,788.14
Lond Stk Ex Gp? 3976
2,779.61
Man?
5.1
8.42
Manx Finv
?
? -4.3
0.72
Marechale Capv
3
?
30,655.66
Marsh McLn
? -7.3
3.5
1.5
3
2.9 19.7
215.98
Mattioli Woodsv
?
68.0 -0.6
20.44
Metal Tigerv
?
56K +
6.0
Mkt cap
(million)
4
? 12.7
? -7.4
2,805.74
68.36
Metro Bank
Miton Groupv
613
+
3
2.9 10.8
711.23
Primary Hlth?
118O ?
Bellway
3175
+
5
3.4
9.2
128.53
Raven R CNV Pref
118N
837K +
16K 1.4 35.9
5,057.45
Berkeley?
3698
+
13
5.0
8.1
?
1,206.43
Big Yellow Group
764
+
2V
3490
+
40
Nat Aust Bk
NEX Group
677
+
1891K ?
+
311.39
Numisv
276
349.70
Oakley Cap Invsv
170O ?
106.17
Hansard Global
77N +
3N 11.5 13.5
10,357.87
Old Mutual
210
6.8
6,502.91
Hargreaves L
966.03
Onesavings Bank
397W +
15K 4.5 14.5
2,105.73
Hastings Gp
7.17
Origo Partnersv
N
?
?
3.6 12.5
3,674.59
Hiscox?
148,932.38
HSBC?
742O +
6K 5.2 96.4
+
15K
1286
?
14
?
2,570.81
150
+
2
6
1.0 24.1
4.47
Orogenv#
1X
? -7.9
2.36
Ortac Resv
2Y ?
21
1.9 11.0
2.36
Ottoman Fdv
1O
685.72
P2P Glbl Invs?
845
?
415
?
77N ?
?
?
?
1.6 20.8
34.60
401.28
Billington Hldgsv
Boot (Henry)
1,408.57
Bovis Homes
5.6 26.4
1,279.63
Breedon Groupv
3O 2.3 15.0
6,209.76
Br Land
603
13.26
Caledonian Tstv
112K ?
6W 4.2 20.8
2,249.15
Cap & Count Prop
265N ?
6Y 2.6
354.25
Cap & Regnl
20.58
Cardiff Prop
O 2.6
4.8
9.2
? -0.7
297.39
Carador
2102K ?
7K
652.83
IP Group
115K ?
18Y
0.17
IRF Euro Fin Inv
V
?
2,543.03
Jardine Lyd Th?
10K 1.6 19.0
?
54X ?
? -6.6
W 13.6
4.5
56.41
Cenkos Secsv
217.21
Charles Stanley
428X +
33X 1.1 34.7
166.90
Charles Taylor
244
10
4.1 15.5
568.26
Chesnara
379K ?
9
5.0 13.7
1.61
City of Lon Gpv#
4W
?
? -1.3
105.24
City Lon Inv Gp
2.29
Clear Leisurev
99K +
+
391
?
O
2,342.34
Close Bros
414.15
CMC Markets?
143O ?
12,249.05
Commerzbk
978
2,559.28
CYBG
289Y +
26,282.91
Deutsche Bk
5,307.50
Direct Line Ins?
84.57
Downing ONE VCT
1.14
Draganfly Invsv
1544
+
?
1271X ?
386
5K 8.0 21.1
9
6.1 12.9
?
? -4.6
22
3.6 11.8
N 5.8 10.5
29Y 1.7 43.9
1
28
?
+
?
?
?
Y 3.7 16.6
83N
?
X
?
7.2
?
? -2.2
1161
?
9
475
Hill & Smith
1.50
Holders Techv
535K +
4
5.1
8.6
29.76
Styles & Wood Grpv 342K +
? 11.6
9.49
Image Scanv
+
49
?
3,157.65
IMI?
1.12
Inspirit Energyv
K 3.8 10.7
113.14
Judges Scientificv
2.4
16.61
37
+
0.65
PLUS Marketsv
?
?
? -1.1
61.06
Dolphin Capitalv
13.70
Plutus PowerGenv
1Y
?
?
18.18
Dragon-Ukra Propv
16X +
2.7 21.5
11.54
Polo Resourcesv
3X ?
6.92
Eastrn Euro Prpv
44K
?
1821K +
74V ?
? -3.2
37.29
Quadrise Fuels Intlv
263V ?
3.76
Legendary Invsv
V
1,829.36
Liberty Group
639V +
20V 6.6 13.6
2.69
Red Leopardv#
240.73
Liontrust
486
11
486.37
Reddev
4N +
126.72
Randall & Quilterv
145
3K 5.4 10.2
44.02
Rasmala PLCv
140
?
1,421.99
Rathbone Brs
2800
?
8.4
? -8.6
2.6 32.9
+
+
V
160
+
?
?
? -0.4
14.6
6.5
? -0.2
10K 2.1 24.2
1V 4.3
?
EQTECv#
First Propv
57
5.89
Fletcher Kingv
242.09
Foxtons Group
8.6
9,298.07
2,015.12
395.88
1,214.30
2,548.96
39.07
5.44
318.97
1,017.54
279.75
34.32
276.76
13.19
44.13
448.80
85.66
120.32
270.60
309.62
49.76
187.38
107.62
587.01
326.12
672.75
3.90
23.58
828.29
308.53
1,531.52
30.27
42.87
186.73
1,456.58
186.02
73.72
1,392.18
320.00
619.76
141.57
443.35
390.19
320.24
1,192.65
764.61
3,357.66
238.09
123.14
125.51
132.86
253.34
261.43
1,266.64
930.05
169.17
646.37
1,186.06
993.88
939.34
18.67
?
16.65
225.00
223.20
998.28
299.17
247.55
598.36
755.66
640.12
2,877.31
208.99
39.81
516.90
435.92
204.41
174.34
9.22
65.94
5.25
66.95
127.71
Company
Price Wkly Forecast
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
3I Group
951
3i Infrastructure
196
Abrdn Div I&G
120X
Aberforth Smlr
1295
Alliance
724K
20Y
Arc Cap Hldgsv
Athelney Trust
252
Baillie Gifford SN
745O
Bankers?
830
BH Global
1324
BH Global
1027N
BH Macro
1975
BH Macro
1711
BH Macro
1551K
Biotech Growth
794
BLK Com Inc
72
BlckREmEur
335
BlckFroInv
152Y
BLK Grt Euro
326W
BlackRck Inc & Gwth? 199K
BLK Latin Am
476X
BlckRck N Amer Inc? 156V
BLK Smlr
1237
BlckRck Throgmorton 444K
BLK Wld Min?
380O
Blue Plan G&I Uts#
27K
Blue Plan Int Fn
46K
Br Empire Sec
706
Brunner?
723N
Caledonia Inv
2776
Candover
139
Charter European
194
City Merch Hi Yld?
197
City of Lon IT?
427
Crystal Amber Fdv
189K
Dunedin Entp
358K
Edinburgh IT
710
Edin Wwide
649
Electra Pte Eq
1628
EP Global Opp
307N
European Asset?
1310
European Investment 933K
F&C Cap&Inc
324O
F&C Comm Prop?
149
F&C Glbl Smaller
1322
Foreign & Col
613
F&C Priv Eq Ord
326N
F&C UK HIT A
104
F&C UK HIT B
105
F&C UK HIT UNIT
412K
F&C UK Real Estate 105K
Fidlty Asian Val
390
Fidelity China Sp
228O
Fidlty Euro Val
223K
Fidlty Jap Val
125K
Fidlty Spec Val
243Y
Fins Gwth & Inc
755
GCP Infrastructure? 125W
Gen Emer Mkts
697K
Gldn Prosp Prc Mtl
32
Greencoat UK
?
Gresham Housev
317K
Hansa Tst
940
Hansa Tst A
930
Hbrvest Glbl Pt Eq 1250
Hend Euro Foc
1408
Hend High Inc
192N
Hend Smlr
801
Herald
1069
HgCapital Trust
1710
HICL Infra?
160O
Highbridge Multi
211X
Highbridge Multi
102N
ICG Ent Tr
741K
Impax Env Mkts
243N
Invesco Asia Tr
288N
Invesco Inc&Gr
297O
IPST Bal
131Y
IPST Gbl Eq
201
IPST Managed
101N
IPST UK Eq
178O
IP Enhanced Inc
80V
+
?
+
+
+
+
+
?
?
?
?
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
?
?
+
+
?
?
?
?
+
?
+
?
?
+
+
+
?
+
+
?
?
?
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
?
+
+
?
+
+
+
+
+
?
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
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10K
1W
1X
4
6
?
?
10N
7
8
3W
9
?
8Y
14K
1W
9W
Y
7W
?
21X
?
11
2K
19
2
K
3
1N
14
3K
3V
1
3Y
3K
2N
20
?
7
6O
?
11
3O
V
13
4
6N
?
1
4
K
9
5V
2Y
2W
2X
7
?
14K
1V
?
2K
?
12K
5
32
1N
10
14
18
1K
Y
V
6K
3
1
3O
?
O
?
1O
?
2.7
4.0
5.4
2.1
1.8
?
3.4
?
2.0
?
?
?
?
?
?
5.5
1.8
3.3
1.6
3.1
2.6
3.0
1.7
1.8
3.1
?
16.8
1.6
2.2
1.9
?
2.0
5.0
3.9
2.6
5.0
3.5
?
?
1.4
0.2
2.3
3.2
4.0
0.8
1.6
?
4.5
?
3.3
4.7
1.1
1.0
1.8
?
1.5
1.7
6.0
?
?
?
0.7
1.7
1.7
?
1.8
4.8
2.2
?
2.6
4.8
?
?
2.6
0.8
1.5
3.5
?
3.1
?
3.5
6.2
46.2
11.7
-3.3
-11.3
-4.5
472.3
-6.5
4.6
-1.7
-9.6
-9.6
-9.0
-12.4
-8.2
-6.5
-5.2
-7.2
2.4
-4.4
-0.7
-12.9
-7.1
-11.5
-14.1
-11.1
-51.0
-10.2
-9.4
-11.7
-14.8
-20.4
-1.3
1.5
2.6
-3.4
-27.8
-3.7
-4.0
-18.9
-3.8
-1.3
-9.7
3.1
6.8
1.5
-4.9
-10.0
-5.5
-4.5
-6.3
5.3
-4.9
-10.7
-7.0
-13.1
-2.0
1.9
10.2
-13.3
-20.3
?
-29.9
-29.2
-30.0
-16.9
3.7
1.9
-12.7
-16.6
0.2
7.2
-1.7
-4.5
-17.4
-9.7
-9.8
-7.8
-2.1
-1.9
-1.8
-0.8
3.6
Mkt cap
(million)
158.35
1,348.19
901.99
339.28
23.05
199.82
372.23
4.98
251.75
79.14
1,058.94
240.16
157.77
615.75
175.60
382.01
390.92
65.30
27.94
87.86
?
?
792.29
200.69
611.94
253.01
246.25
165.78
146.80
766.52
43.94
154.59
18.27
230.16
718.65
409.88
147.49
141.28
225.19
114.34
1,656.36
526.42
151.14
1,536.26
135.37
528.80
1,636.36
951.71
309.75
917.73
852.52
457.97
1,385.10
29.30
27.80
1,016.65
3,058.86
1,090.64
259.66
743.35
203.52
253.92
267.13
182.48
492.07
676.81
6,001.49
190.19
866.67
2,132.04
1,165.31
228.56
1,147.38
147.64
478.78
78.00
?
858.05
10.93
1,864.12
204.86
791.03
1,181.23
Company
+
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1
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2
14V
1O
11K
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4X
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5K
6X
9K
16K
17N
17
1K
13K
8N
6
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27K
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11
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3O
2K
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11
7K
3K
4
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17
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2W
7O
100
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8K
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5Y
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9
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3N
51
1.5
5.0
1.2
3.8
1.1
0.6
3.6
0.3
1.4
3.7
1.0
2.2
3.0
1.2
4.5
3.8
3.8
7.7
4.3
?
?
?
?
?
0.9
1.9
3.0
1.9
?
0.8
2.1
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3.1
2.8
3.1
3.1
2.0
1.7
6.3
2.3
5.0
1.0
0.1
1.0
4.1
3.8
3.8
1.0
3.5
1.3
4.0
?
6.1
?
5.9
?
?
1.3
1.0
3.6
1.3
3.1
2.2
2.9
2.7
0.7
3.5
3.1
1.0
2.8
3.1
4.1
4.5
3.0
?
?
?
?
1.8
1.4
0.2
0.8
-5.4
11.9
-4.4
-9.5
-15.3
-13.3
-6.8
-1.1
-3.6
-3.3
-11.6
-8.9
-6.0
-9.5
-1.2
-3.5
0.3
?
-3.7
?
?
?
-10.2
-13.9
-10.1
-10.3
-15.1
-18.1
-4.0
-3.9
2.4
-6.8
-36.5
-8.1
-5.1
-5.0
-11.3
-11.1
0.2
-25.9
-9.1
-3.1
1.2
-0.4
-10.7
-6.1
3.5
-3.7
0.5
-6.1
1.2
1.5
-0.5
?
?
8.5
7.4
-16.5
-0.3
-9.5
-3.6
-6.0
-10.0
-15.2
6.4
-7.1
2.2
-5.4
-3.4
-11.4
-2.9
2.0
-1.5
?
-14.5
?
?
-9.5
10.8
-0.5
-12.9
-3.1
1.0
S&U
Schroder REIT?
Schroders?
Schroders N/V?
Secure Trust Bk
Sharev
Sigma Capv
St James Place
Stand Chart
Strd Life Aber
Starvestv
STM Groupv
Sun Life Can
Tau Capitalv
TBC Bank Group
Tiger Res Finv
TISO Blackstar Gpv
TP ICAP
Trading Emissnsv
UltimateSportsv
Virgin Money Plc?
Volverev
WH Irelandv
Walker Crips Grp
Wells Fargo
Westpac
Zoltav Resourcev
Zurich Fincl
1998
62
3376
2450
1675
27
76K
1189
777
441K
2K
48K
3016V
4O
1605
X
54K
465V
2O
12O
265K
705
140K
47K
4035O
1979X
13K
23667
272.28
59.98
82.54
4.17
261.47
Abbeyv
Alumasc
Aseana Props
Ashley Hsev
Asian Grth Propv
1270
166 ?
41K +
7
29K ?
2N 2.6 28.9
186
?
1
?
8.5
Morgan Advanced
300
+
7Y 3.6
34.50
MS Intlv
206
+
1
3.1
?
27.97
Northbrdg Indv
108
+
5K
?
10K 2.3
7.0
590.99
Oxford Inst
1031
?
27
244O ?
12K 1.1
7.9
28,020.52
Philips El nv
2978
+
54O 2.3 26.9
3.8 22.6
? -2.6
137K ?
5
? -6.9
1.6
5
4.0 13.9
?
0.9 6.2
2
3.9 10.8
V ? 5.7
?
? 5.2
1K ? 5.8
345N ?
U+I
?
1.6
?
9
Construction &
property
856.11
Tyman?
10
?
?
11.8
14.0
19.3
14.0
16.4
54.0
19.2
55.8
?
23.7
17.8
12.5
12.1
-6.0
9.0
-6.3
-4.5
29.4
3.7
-5.5
8.1
21.6
?
47.5
12.6
14.6
15.2
13.6
Molinsv
3K
561
4.0
3.0
2.5
3.5
4.3
2.7
?
2.4
?
4.2
?
2.8
3.3
?
?
?
0.3
3.6
272.7
?
1.9
?
?
3.8
3.0
8.2
?
6.0
32.78
5.4 13.3
1W
590K ?
+ 10
+
K
? 4
+ 14
? 157
?
? 1
?
+ 25X
+ 10
?
? 2
+ 7W
?
+ 45
?
+ 1
? 3O
+
N
?
? 7W
? 10
+ 3
+ 3
+ 22Y
? 37K
? 1
+ 40K
135.6 -1.4
1
PhotonStar LEDv
129
+
93
+
Heath (Samuel)v
365
+
Helical Bar
317K ?
3
4.1
?
9.3
K 0.3 26.5
15
3.3
9.2
25K 2.6
9.5
?
2.28
Agriterrav
13.75
Aireav
321.25
Anglo-Eastern
810K +
14K 0.2 11.4
81.71
Animalcarev
385
+
17K 1.6 28.1
25,206.91
AB Foods
3184
+
44
748.49
Barr (AG)
641
+
V
?
? -0.4
33N ?
1
4.5
8.6
1.1 22.9
5K 2.1 20.9
19.93
Pressure Techv
36.06
PV Crystalox Solar
22K ?
3,312.61
Renishaw
118.34
Renold
16,680.87
Rolls-Royce
1.26
Ross Gp
X
1,988.29
Rotork?
228K +
23.10
Scien Dig Imagingv
1,145.43
Senior
Severfield?
?
? -2.4
197.33
83
3.2 19.4
15.13
Six Hundredv
6,495.20
SKF B
4551
+
N
90
52K +
906K +
26
273
+
65Y ?
?
?
? 22.8
1
2.4 29.5
2O 2.5 12.9
1,977.40
Britvic
750
+
7,829.48
Burberry Grp
1786
+
40
2.0 27.5
1.20
Slingsby (HC)v
839.95
C&C Grp
270W ?
6
4.3
6,189.14
Smiths
130.70
Carr's Grp
143
?
2
2.6 13.7
42.27
Solid Statev
101.49
Character Grpv
480
+
10
3.1 11.4
153.82
Somero Enterv
Spectris
2423
?
5670
+
60
127
?
927K +
0.1
2,888.58
46
1.3 32.0
4,169.73
Spirax-Sarco
22K 2.0
101.77
Churchill Chinav
9,472.79
Coca Cola HBC
52.12
Colefaxv
4.06
Conchav
1,497.48
Cranswick?
816.10
388.99
64,648.00
Diageo?
18K 2.3 23.8
18.24
Distil PLCv
3X
?
?
?
9.35
Equat Palm Oilv
2X
?
? -5.4
144.73
Finsbury Foodv
111
?
2
2.5 17.7
541.47
Games Workshop
1685
+
39
2.6 27.6
4,352.90
Glanbia?
1470N ?
1,409.52
Greencore?
199Y ?
21
2.7 28.2
524.62
Headlam
618K +
48
3.6 16.1
0.86
Hidong Estate
?
? 28.9
559.12
Hilton Food
29.60
Hornbyv
35
+
31,081.41
Imperial Brands? 3242
+
Inch Kenneth Kajang
?
2600
+
510
+
5
0.9 22.0
48.49
Stadium Groupv
?
? -1.1
15.13
Surface Trsfmsv
+
21
1.3 23.9
8.42
Dairy Crest Group
578K +
6
3.8 24.7
Devro?
233
?
3O 3.7
2568
+
N
2967
50
755O +
11
?
68V 0.7 21.1
14O 2.0 22.7
1K
? -2.7
1
228Y +
1.9
?
866.60
Jimmy Choo
J Lewis Hfordv
12,690.99
Kerry Gp
0.95
Kin Groupv#
?
?
? -0.1
10.27
LightwaveRFv
26K ?
1N
? -7.2
317.50
McBride
174N ?
4N
? 15.1
611.37
Mulberry Groupv
1019
677.82
Nicholsv?
1833K +
12K 1.6 26.7
102.76
Norcros
167O +
K 4.0 12.5
7206
V
?
+
?
?
? 13.1
19W 3.2 16.1
120
?
15
? -1.8
1565
+
16
2.6 14.4
?
15
2.4 18.3
273K +
2
2.2 13.5
2
2.1
500
K 2.1 27.0
16O
?
Tex Hldgs
132K ?
4
387.51
Thorpe FWv
335
1.87
Torotrak
27.46
TP Groupv
7.48
Transense Techv
78K ?
7.86
Tricornv
23N
1,289.08
Ultra Electrncs
?
?
1.3 32.0
35
? -7.3
6.4
9.9
1.2 27.7
N
?
?
?
6K
?
?
?
1K
? -4.7
?
?
?
1825
?
25
+
33K 2.8 25.0
1,575.75
Vesuvius?
581
441.07
Vitec
985O ?
58.66
Volex
65
2.5 22.0
8N 2.5 49.0
?
?
?
3,956.88
Weir
1813
+
72
2.4 90.6
511.08
XP Power
2656
+
48
2.6 23.8
95.06
Zytronicv
592K +
30
2.4 19.6
72K 4.7 30.5
1.87
1
?
2X 2.2 26.2
+
?
? 25.0
?
BlenheimNtrlv
14K
? -4.8
?
Brit Amer Tob? 4835
1547K +
? -2.2
5K 0.5
3.52
4K 3.2 17.5
?
1.0 32.2
K
90,146.18
W
1.2
? 55.8
?
?
89W 0.6 27.0
47
0.4
?
Health
653.89
AdvancedMedicalv
6.45
Akers Biov
72K ?
7K
170.81
Allergy Therapv
28O ?
K
253.26
Allnce Pharmav
53K +
K 2.1 14.0
356K +
1K 1.4 28.3
81.51
Anpariov
0.92
Aortech Intv
309
?
16K ?
4K 0.2 41.8
3K
58.93
Aqua Bountyv
56,939.63
AstraZeneca?
58.80
Bioquell
261K +
32K
680
+
16
83
?
1091
+
662K
?
? -2.3
?
?
? -3.5
? -8.1
Highcroft Invs
920
13,519.30
HK Land
574K ?
951.60
Ibstock?
234V ?
26.70
Industrial Multi Pro
317K
?
3,315.78
Intu Properties
244X ?
1
952.41
James Halsteadv
458O +
6N 2.6 27.1
1,104.55
John Laing Group
301
?
6K 1.8
9.2
674.12
PureCircle
388V +
1Y
592.97
Keller?
824
?
19K 3.4
8.3
1,489.82
PZ Cussons?
347K +
3
1,771.27
Dechra Pharma
+
52
1,401.34
KennWlsn Eur RE?
1111
+
131.23
REA
325
?
2K
? -8.3
9.27
Deltex Medicalv
3V
?
? -3.4
5,330.53
Kingspan Group
2977K +
7N 0.7 24.6
18.71
Real Gd Fdv
26K ?
O
? -3.1
414.30
Eco Animal Hlthv
637K ?
20
0.9 39.4
7,816.59
Land Sec
988K ?
13K 3.7 69.1
469.50
Stock Spirits
234O +
15.78
Lon & Assoc?
?
0.8 -6.6
5.79
Tandemv
117K ?
7K 3.2
3.2 16.5
3,152.89
Tate & Lyle
678K +
3
1,155.18
LondonMetric
166X ?
261.86
Low & Bonar?
79K ?
50.29
LXB retail Propsv
121.05
Macau Prop Op
4.2 16.5
5.4
? -4.1
47.54
18K
25
?
Consumer goods
44.35
239.33
321.48
7,629.76
1,384.39
309.46
38.79
67.87
6,284.93
25,574.40
8,741.30
1.32
28.81
18,510.15
2.38
845.56
0.97
144.85
2,577.83
6.87
2.88
1,181.32
28.74
39.08
19.78
200,335.23
67,197.58
19.16
35,816.44
162K +
?
2.9 13.4
PipeHawkv
Price Wkly Forecast
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
IP UKSmallerCos?
482
JLaingInFr
136
JPM American
385
JPM Asian
360X
JPM Brazil?
68K
JPM Chinese
274
JPM Claverhs?
682N
JPM Elect Mg C?
101
JPM Elect Mg G?
747
JPM Elect Mg I?
110K
JPM Em Mkts
855K
JPM Eur IT Gth
311V
JPM Eur IT Inc
168N
JPM Euro Smlr
384Y
JPM Gl Conv
98K
JPM GEMI?
129Y
JPM GG&I
316V
JPM Inc&Cap Ord
95N
JPM Inc&Cap Uts
371
JPM Inc&Cap ZDP
188K
JPM Inc&Gth Inc
?
JPM Inc&Gth Cap
?
JPM Indian
752K
JPM Jap Sml Co
366Y
JPM Japan
379K
JPM Mid Cap
1062K
JPM Russian
470K
JPM Smllr Co
971
JPM US Sml
260Y
Jupiter Euro Opps
687
Jupiter Prima
328O
Jupiter US Smlr
822
Juridica Invsv
16K
Keystone IT
1702K
Law Debenture?
607K
Lowland
1511
Majedie
278O
M Currie Pac
394
M Currie Port
241
Marwyn Val In
162O
Mercantile IT
1993
Merchants
483
Mid Wynd
463K
Monks Inv Tst
715K
Montanaro Eur Sml 806K
Murray Income Trust 783K
Murray International 1283
Nb Global Floating
94O
Pacific Assets
257Y
Perpetual In&Gr
380
Personal Assets
41000
Picton Prop?
84N
Polar Cap Tech
1041
Prem Eng & Wtr
162
Prm Eng & Wtr ZDP 115K
Renewables Inf?
108
RIT Cap Ptnr
1957
Riverstone
1283K
Schroder TotRt
335V
Schrd Asia Pac
441K
Schrod Inc Gwth
296K
Schrod Jap Gwth
203
Schrod UK Gwth
172
Schrod UKMid
510O
Scot American?
366
Scot IT
827K
Scot Mtge
429
Secs Tst Scot?
169X
Temple Bar
1286
Tplton Emg Mkt
764K
TR Property
366O
Troy Inc&Gth
78Y
UK Comm Prop Tst?
87O
Utilico Ord
163K
Utilico Emg Mkt?
224Y
Utilico Fin ZDP 2018 156K
UtilFin RdZDP 2016
?
Vietnam Ent Inv
390K
Vietnam Infrav
3
Witan?
1041
Witan Pacific
324
Woodford Patient Cap Tr95O
Ww Health
2510
4O 0.3
3.10
Investment companies
Mkt cap
(million)
9
+
1.16
Hammerson
375.27
+
235
2.4
Gr Portland
2.4 59.4
506
Melrose
?
4,449.96
14
Meggitt
4,563.76
565
1,929.34
666
3,925.29
X
?
Wynnstay Propsv
? -7.8
RSA Ins
6K 1.8 10.5
17.83
2K 6.0 18.9
6,810.49
+
1.9 15.9
?
? -0.6
232.70
135
26
2O 1.7 13.4
N
614.89
LPAv
142K ?
1.4
855
251K ?
9.25
Tritax Big Box REIT
?
?
664
Grainger
? -5.2
Trinity Capv
1,575.61
3.0
? -4.0
1850
Workspace Grp
1,048.64
1X
1.55
7O 3.6 56.4
12
15
? 33.3
3.3 24.1
Urban&Civic plc
2.0 33.2
255O ?
?
?
1.3 -5.1
Unite Group
30
Ryl Bk Scot
+
1471
?
N
1
1,395.37
5K 1.6 19.5
30,378.96
305
Travis Perkins
+
354.69
24K 2.2 14.7
? -2.4
Town Centre
3,693.31
8.5
?
1,490.24
9.8
+
2O
162.14
15
7
1161
2.2 22.5
?
Harworth Gp
141K ?
2.0 22.1
?
5.9
771
Hansteen Hldgs
Titon
0.8 10.9
63
4
640
298.99
15.47
4
?
?
5N 2.7 22.9
34
Grafton Gp Uts
960.21
391O ?
?
+
Gleeson (MJ)
?
196O +
Telford Homesv
7.4
?
3K 3.1 25.3
1,827.00
?
Taylor Wimpey
295.03
37K
36
?
11O 0.8
+
346.37
?
6,439.19
21K
+
?
?
?
? -5.0
?
+
? -1.0
2.6
? 12.3
?
2V ?
?
3
?
Lon Capital Grpv
? -5.7
?
2489O
8.07
?
+
X 1.7 15.1
O
?
88
1384
2670Y
50O ?
? -0.3
O 26.7 -5.1
4025
7.4
K
?
353N +
321
71O 1.2 17.5
64
Galliford Try
Rolinco N/V
LMS Capital
6.1
Taliesin Propv
?
2727V ?
1.5 32.6
2
1,147.16
Robeco N/V
48.94
89
? -0.5
205.27
2.7 14.1
2X
42K ?
X 1.3 -3.1
5
+
? -7.3
1,359.65
1
1O 14.4
1O
?
1X
1N
2,136.72
64Y +
6O
3.01
5.3
48
Lloyds Bkg Gp?
2X ?
66.12
3.9 30.9
Livermore Invsv
46,579.39
+
? 936
?
Qatar Inv Fund
Leeds Groupv
V
916
Prudential?
Legal & Gen?
83.91
1.9 21.3
?
10.12
+
2720
?
15,674.49
1
? 25.6
? 19.0
76.18
7.5
1.4 22.7
1,004.86
1.6 51.6
47,100.81
? -5.9
?
?
4.6
?
8.5
2718
1.6 11.2
8.5
?
10.8 17.1
Derwent London
Leaf Clean Energyv
N
344V ?
3,029.24
44.90
?
St Modwen Prp?
5.8
7
38
761.62
2N 0.9 16.1
7
3K 2.1
?
74V +
Phoenix Gp Hldgs
694K ?
1279
Speymill Macauv
5.2
3,044.67
152K +
5K 2.7 -6.1
50.65
X 1.8
1.5
Lancashire Hdgs?
+
?
? 150
Just Group
50
4K 2.7 -8.5
110K
6100
1,391.97
Hayward Tylerv
172K ?
Smart (J)
? -1.0
CSF Grpv
1,422.78
1.1 32.2
27.69
SIG
49.62
O
1W 4.1 11.0
Daejan
Proxamav
7
1,020.29
+
4.20
Provident
2.6 14.1
+
?
994.02
0.72
37
1105
5K 3.1
987K
? 13.4
1,357.67
1579K +
Halma
527K +
Shaftesbury
0.7 42.0
3.6 18.0
Goodwin
4,189.97
SEGRO?
2,755.19
?
2.7 17.0
113.72
5,266.55
?
8
0.6 42.9
?
0.8 13.8
24N
35
10
6.1
?
34Y
?
1365K ?
?
PCF Groupv
Jarvis Securitiesv?
Gooch Hsegov
55
1625
Phaunos Timber
Jupiter Fund Mgmt? 529K +
GKN?
334.23
Secure Propertyv
51.46
52.03
Flowgrpv
5,512.90
13.73
190.97
2,423.52
2.59
2.8
1.6 16.7
4.5
9.4
Brooks Macv
Fenner?
8V 0.5 91.4
15N
4
12
?
V 4.0
Camp & Nichs Marv
685.31
411N ?
869
?
CRH
289.85
2N
Safestore
Savills
14
22,746.96
12.43
14V ?
Feedbackv
860.88
525
1
+
Elektronv
5.78
?
Stewart & Wight
581K ?
775
26.29
9.5
Steppe Cementv
Paysafe Group
2K 6.3 19.2
Electrolux 'B'
1.6
2K 2.8
8.23
2,819.89
327K ?
? 55.3
8,201.29
14
30.66
6.7
Investment Co
33
2.9
1O 6.2
15.63
769K ?
?
197O +
3.6 22.5
Dialight
8.2 16.9
40O
IPF
?
250.23
?
18
440.78
353O
1.6 12.7
+
Crest Nicholson
Brewin Dolphin
?
?
1,367.56
1,002.35
? 29.3
682K
394
7K 4.7 10.4
18K 3.6 12.2
2
Dewhurstv
138
907K +
161K +
Croma Securityv
22.59
5.0 13.3
Craven Housev
PayPoint
596K +
7.18
1
1,231.88
?
?
135K ?
Countrywide
618.61
Investec
?
?
K 0.7 27.3
377K +
9.85
7
Intl Public Pntshp
53
8K
+
Cobham
328.35
879K ?
3,976.45
601K +
?
178
?
Cohortv?
3.2 10.1
Intermediate Cap
2,181.27
Safelandv?
115
?
2.9 15.5
154.62
3.5 14.1
2,467.35
6.6
Redrow
8.01
4.5 10.2
Y
3,239.82
2
BGEO Group
5.4
2,224.35
4
?
2
1,372.09
?
38Y
5
?
347Y ?
Park Groupv?
1.5
Redefine Intl
+
? 49.7
Countryside Props
Paragon
3K
705.85
?
+
?
1,565.55
141.91
?
57
?
14
463
?
5.5 23.0
1,117.69
15K ?
Real Estate Invsv
480
N
14
1V 1.9 24.5
224
106.26
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
N
?
215W ?
12K 4.6 14.7
BP Marsh&Ptnrsv
46O ?
CLS Hldgs?
107K +
Braveheart Invv
24K ?
137
90.77
679K +
65.39
? 90.0
Chemring Group
? -1.9
Impaxv
4.19
4.8 41.0
Chamberlinv
497.05
?
?
IG Group
? -9.7
8
19K
9.15
?
17N ?
137.33
?
? 28.5
O 4.3 12.5
78
2,493.64
W
3.9 11.6
2N
Castings
Carecapitalv
1K 1.9 14.2
Blue Star Capitalv
45
Cap XX Ldv
202.02
Clarke T
1N 1.5 14.8
5.37
2O 2.3 13.5
Raven Russia Wnts
Caffyns
41.68
13.68
194N ?
2.8 11.8
?
2.2 10.5
Raven Russia
Raven Russia CRP?
12.93
? 10.0
32.63
520K +
9.8
+
90K +
10
318.71
?
? -0.2
W 2.2 17.4
?
135.63
Company
? -0.1
N
Barclays?
2.4
1047
6K 3.4 12.1
Mkt cap
(million)
? -2.4
?
Beazley?
36
303O +
12
33,099.45
+
267K +
37K 8.8 13.2
?
?
?
2,736.30
3479
?
Barratt Devs
50,796.07
Helios Underv
?
8V
3,898.81
16.8 -2.2
Highway Capital#
162K
6,172.85
1K 2.1 32.8
21.91
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
?
?
1.49
385X ?
?
? 11.5
K 4.1 34.5
Polypipe Group?
Company
25K 1.8 21.0
1N
16K 2.9 12.0
43O 7.6 15.2
764.79
?
Mkt cap
(million)
5981N ?
13
?
?
Balfour Beatty
+
521K ?
0.3
1,858.16
14Y
1.7 33.1
4
9.4
52K ?
X 3.0 22.5
269W ?
?
GLI Financev
31
PME African Infrav
?
Frenkel Toppingv
+
3.34
8N
46.42
320W +
Plaza Cent
?
Aukett Fitz Robv
40.42
1371
11.14
3.1
3.72
?
?
3.5 11.2
?
Assura Grp
?
313
?
1
2N
1,085.04
4.2
878
? -7.9
65K +
1.0 46.8
3
Gresh Hse Stratv
K
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
32
H&T Groupv
2.2 41.5
Company
+
32.09
79
Mkt cap
(million)
167O +
115.98
10714O + 114V 0.9 36.3
1828
Mkt cap
(million)
9N 2.6
4.9
Y 2.9 10.6
?
?
5.6 21.8
8
4.3 22.6
2
2K 3.7 14.1
29Y +
N
?
?
158W ?
2X
?
?
852.34
Marshalls
427K +
873.69
McCarthy&S
162K ?
215.76
McKay Secs
230
378.26
MedicX Fund?
88K ?
K 6.7 12.1
80.46
Michelmershv
98O +
17O 1.0 22.6
558.90
Morgan Sindall
3.50
Mountfield Gpv
467.86
Mountview
306.98
Mucklow (A&J)
485
?
3W 4.4 15.3
807.21
NewRiver REIT
345
?
2K 5.7 22.4
43.14
North Midland Cons? 425
?
109.77
Pac All China Landv
178V
?
97.46
Palace Capitalv
387K ?
2K 4.6 10.6
59.01
Panther Securitiesv
332K
?
1.44
Pathfinder Minsv
8,073.62
Persimmon
0.72
Pires Investmentsv
?
1250
?
1W
17K 2.0 21.0
Y
2V
+
Origin Entsv
18.69
Oxford Pharmav
1.37
Paternosterv
12.43
Pittardsv
101.48
Portmeirionv
8.75
Provexisv
64.56
Tax Systemsv
8.12
Ternv
253.12
Treatt
1.64
Ukrproduct Gpv
622N
?
1K
?
?
?
V
?
?
2.6
2,623.04
BTG
2
? -3.1
275.76
Circassia Phm
942K
?
3.2 15.9
536.93
Consort Med
K
?
5,594.87
Convatec Group
18.25
Creighton
80
488
+
78,909.35
Unilever (NV)
4601O +
57,739.71
Unilever?
4510K +
3.8 12.3
554.91
Victoriav
65
2.4 15.3
?
? 10.5
5
1.0 13.7
?
1.8
?
?
?
? -2.0
95
4.2 13.2
?
? -0.4
0.86
Walcom Groupv
Worthington Gp#
?
N
EKF Diagnosticsv
24
10O +
V
40.72
Futura Medicalv
33O ?
14N
1,121.94
Genus
?
1.0
? 59.3
?
6.5
?
?
Amiad Water Systv
119K
8.67
APC Techv
0.72
Ass Br Eng
302.48
Avon Rubber?
975
19,072.07
BAE SYS
599
?
4.5 15.5
+
1
35
?
? 16.2
?
?
?
? -2.1
? -9.2
1.1 24.0
74,726.82
GlaxoSmKline? 1519K +
29K 5.2 38.5
1.58
Gunsyndv
?
?
? -0.7
3,098.22
Hikma Pharms?
1288
+ 169
1.9 24.1
3610
? 160
2,192.54
Hutchison CMv
91.92
Immunodiag Sysv
64.11
ImmuPharmav
2,978.40
Indivior
9.08
IXICOv
24.42
LiDCOv
5,549.64
Mediclinic Int
4.41
5,454.41
312K
?
48W +
413
+
33K
N
2
?
10
+
753
+
N4 Pharmav
6
+
NMC Health
2670
+ 340
6498
+
?
? -3.5
170,045.06
Novartis
?
? -0.7
24.60
Omega Diagsv
?
36
0.9 15.3
270.24
Oxford Biomedica
+
15K 3.5 17.9
0.60
Physiomicsv
Premier Veterinary
6X
35
1835
?
0.9
e-Therapeuticsv
Engineering
27.08
2O
111.42
2.5 25.3
?
30K ?
?
? -1.7
1.8 23.8
W
28.86
4K 2.5 25.8
11K
19
286X +
1901
? 48.4
? 79.0
3K
7.4
? -1.1
57
51K 4.7 19.1
4.1 12.5
10N 0.8 32.7
1N +
87
? 94.0
? -8.1
V
?
2.7 12.5
?
2.3 24.8
?
4V
610
?
25K 2.8 17.0
6O ?
2
12.61
2.9 16.8
89K ?
10
11999K + 174K 2.5 12.9
2616
786.39
4498K +
11.28
Bailey (CH)v
147K
?
? 33.0
16.50
1,794.90
Bodycote
937K +
18
1.6 23.0
11.02
Proteome Sciesv
10.11
Braime A N/Vv
842K
?
1.0 14.2
14.80
Realm Therapeuticsv
4.06
Braime(TF&JH)v
845
?
1.0 14.2
51,884.30
Reckitt Benck?
22X +
K
?
?
0.3 30.6
?
?
2.3 22.0
? -5.0
?
?
32K 1.1 24.2
V
?
?
0.3 43.4
32W 3.2 30.8
1Y
? 32.3
8O
?
1
?
? -0.8
2K
? -5.2
3X +
V
? -4.7
29K ?
1K
107K ?
7381
+ 124
?
?
? -2.4
2.0 24.7
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
43
1GM
Equity prices Business
Mkt cap
(million)
Company
20.50
34,040.28
130.88
149.87
12,170.80
1,339.61
114.53
55.23
6.51
95.18
153.89
129.71
2,015.17
2.62
754.07
85.55
130.06
Sareum Hldgsv
Shire
Silence Therapv
Sinclair Pharmav
Smith & Neph
Spire Hcare
Summit Corpv
Swallowfieldv
Synairgenv
Tissue Regenixv
Tiziana Lifev
Tristelv
UDG Healthcare
ValiRxv
Vectura Grp
Vernalisv
Verona Pharmav
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
O
3750
187
29O
1391
334
185
327K
7V
12K
160
303K
811K
1O
111
16N
124
?
+
+
+
+
?
?
?
?
+
+
+
?
+
?
14K
44
K
23
1W
10
5
1
2K
?
27
8
?
O
O
K
?
0.6
?
?
1.7
1.1
?
0.9
?
?
?
1.1
1.2
?
?
?
?
?
74.9
?
-5.9
18.4
25.1
-5.4
17.6
-2.3
-8.6
?
40.4
33.9
-0.2
?
-4.5
-9.1
Industrials
90.58
69,683.13
83,092.79
5.22
11.39
7.23
22.77
1,122.42
5,264.44
9.86
171.70
1,299.71
406.39
23.79
18.86
4.99
37,651.99
37,656.12
5,436.35
7,697.37
22.47
44.40
20.19
694.77
5,045.85
7,103.55
15.33
33,162.82
1,602.20
33,110.02
3.30
46.54
1,753.91
100.58
144.35
Accsys Tech
BASF
Bayer DM50
Biome Techv
ByotrolvV
Camb Gbl Timberv
Cloudcall Groupv
Coats Grp
Croda
Cronin Gpv
Cropper (James)v
Elementis
Evans (M.P.)v
Hardidev
Inspiration Healthv
Intl Ferro Metals#
Jardine Math
Jardine Strat
Johnson Math
Mondi?
Plant Impactv
Plastics Capitalv
Robinsonv
Scapav
Smith (DS)
Swire Pacific
Symph Environv
Syngenta
Synthomer
Takeda Pharm
TyraTech Incv
Velocysv
Victrex
Wynnstay Groupv
Zotefoams
81X
7586O
10048V
222K
4N
8O
113K
79K
3896
1Y
1815
280N
735N
1K
61K
Y
5207V
3401O
2809
2096
27K
114
121K
456
497N
784X
10V
35821W
471W
4186O
Y
31O
2044
515
325
+
X
+ 82Y
+ 101W
?
?
?
+ 1
+ 5K
+ 88
?
+ 32K
+ 2
? 8O
?
+ 2
?
+ 120N
+
O
+ 28
+ 28
? 1K
? 2
? 8K
+ 3
?
N
+ 5W
? 1V
+ 139N
? 2
? 27X
?
? 4N
? 9
+ 2K
? 2K
?
3.2
2.1
?
?
?
?
0.8
1.8
?
0.5
2.3
1.3
?
?
?
2.2
0.6
2.5
2.4
?
3.8
4.5
0.3
2.6
5.0
?
?
1.8
2.9
?
?
2.2
2.3
1.7
?
18.6
20.8
?
?
?
-5.6
19.6
26.5
?
36.3
23.0
40.7
?
60.2
?
7.0
6.6
13.9
18.5
?
76.0
23.3
41.0
22.6
11.7
?
41.3
14.5
68.9
-1.1
-3.5
20.9
55.4
24.8
Investment
companies
2,509.34
Pershing Square
1045
?
42
?
?
888 Hldgs
246
Accesso Techv
1602K
Best of the Bestv
335
Boxhill Techv
?
Carnival?
5320
Cathay Intl
11W
Celticv
129K
Cineworld?
648
Domino's Pizza?
266
EI Group
141N
Fullr Sm A
1011K
Gaming Realmsv
10W
Goals Socr Cntrv
103K
Greene King?
658K
GVC Holdings
755
Heavitreev
425
Heavitree Av
225
Hermes Pacificv
85
Intercont Htls 3852
Jackpotjoy
744
Ladbrokes Coral
116
Mandarin Orntl
155N
Marston's
112
Merlin Ents?
460K
Millen & Cop?
451
Minoan Gpv
8X
Mitch & Butlers
245W
PP Betfair?
6805
Peel Hotelsv
115
PPHE Hotel Gp
920
Prospexv
W
Rank Grp
224O
Restaurant Gp
322Y
Richoux Grpv
17
61
Rotalav
Specialist Inv Propsv 13N
Sportech
98
SSP Group
537
Tastyv
39K
Thomas Cook
124O
TUI
1306
Webis Holdingsv
1
Wetherspoon JD
1066
Whitbread
3677
William Hill
248O
Young & Co - Av
1398
Young & Co - N/Vv 1060
?
?
+
+
?
?
?
+
?
?
?
+
+
+
?
+
?
?
+
+
?
+
?
?
+
+
?
+
?
+
?
+
+
+
4
40
5
?
30
Y
?
45K
2K
3N
5K
K
2
K
1
?
12K
?
72
6
3N
?
1V
?
4W
?
5X
375
?
17K
?
8K
22
?
K
?
?
5K
2
K
19
?
13
116
8K
17K
20
2.5
?
0.3
?
2.1
?
?
2.7
2.7
?
1.8
?
?
4.9
?
1.7
1.6
?
1.9
?
2.5
2.3
6.5
1.4
1.7
?
3.0
1.9
1.7
2.1
?
2.8
5.3
?
1.3
?
?
1.0
?
0.4
4.1
?
1.1
2.5
5.0
1.2
1.6
21.5
61.8
24.6
?
18.3
-4.4
22.3
21.3
20.6
15.0
17.2
-4.0
25.2
13.4
?
15.0
7.9
?
22.2
-3.5
-6.6
43.8
8.1
22.2
16.4
-7.2
14.6
?
37.1
11.0
0.4
14.3
?
-2.3
11.1
?
14.8
33.7
?
?
19.5
-7.3
23.8
15.9
13.2
22.7
17.2
Media
11.67
2.35
28.27
8.13
1,483.64
127.49
15.46
3.74
130.08
78.05
2,083.92
7digital Gpv
Aeorema Commsv
Altitude Groupv
Arcontech Grpv?
Ascential
Bloomsbury Pub?
Catalyst Mediav
Cellcastv
Cello Groupv
Centaur Media
Daily Mail
Company
6.23
DCD Mediav
42.61
Dods Gpv
85.79
Ebiquityv
8.37
Edenville Energyv
1,031.58
Entertainmnt One?
1,172.73
Euromoney In Inv
117.67
Future
574.83
422.49
6W
26
63
64K
370W
169N
73K
4O
125K
54
618
?
+
+
+
+
?
+
?
?
K
1K
2K
1
4X
5K
?
?
1
1N
1K
?
7.6
?
?
0.4
3.8
?
?
2.4
5.5
3.5
-1.3
9.2
?
20.1
?
17.2
?
6.0
?
?
31.6
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
245
?
?
12K +
V
?
? 27.1
117K
?
0.3 22.6
O
?
? -1.5
240
+
1075
?
3X 0.5 46.7
10
2.1 48.4
321O +
1W
? -5.7
GlobalDatav
562K
?
Gocompare.com
101
?
2
? 26.5
383K +
19
0.9 25.5
0.8
?
240.23
IG Design Grpv?
3.64
Immedia Grpv
25
147.58
Ind News&Med
10K +
5,656.79
Informa?
686K ?
10K 2.8 27.4
454.33
ITE Group
169
12K 2.6
?
+
6,476.88
ITV
30.85
Jaywingv
4,306.79
Just Eat
634
233.59
M&C Saatchiv
306O ?
2.72
MBL Groupv
1.30
Mediazestv
3.19
Milestonev
1.53
Miradav
160Y ?
35K
?
W
?
?
?
3.4
?
5O 4.0 14.5
?
?
1
? 60.3
?
2O 2.4
?
15O +
3Y
?
?
?
?
? -5.2
N
1
?
? -1.0
?
? -2.2
Mkt cap
(million)
Company
1,707.01
Ferrexpo?
103.79
Firestone Dmdsv
11,642.92
Fresnillo?
9.99
Frontera Resv
Price Wkly
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
290
+
+
1580
?
?
? -0.3
9.66
Urals Energyv
4
?
LG Electronics
109N +
1Y
? 72.8
45.07
Lombard Riskv
113.23
Gem Diamonds
81O ?
3O
? -1.0
1O +
N
? -0.9
5,314.82
Micro Focus Intl 2314
283.67
Microgen?
9.77
GETECHv
1K
?
50,784.65
Glencore
4.81
Global Petrolv
2,645.07
Gold Fields
321Y ?
9.42
Goldplatv
5X
?
?
2.12
Goldstone Resv
1W
?
? -1.6
26
?
352O +
?
5.5
9N 0.7 30.5
2W +
W
? -2.9
17Y 1.8 29.8
1N ?
?
5.8
?
17.80
Vast Resv
2,277.71
Vedanta Res
65.29
Victoria Oil&Gasv
W Resourcesv
11.40
Weatherly Intlv
1
West Africa Minsv
2Y ?
6N
2,176.44
Wood Grp (J)
K
?
? -8.0
904.61
Xtract Resourcesv
62K ?
1
?
?
13.13
ZCI
109.87
Griffin Miningv
64K +
1K
?
6.0
265.56
Gulf Keystone
115O +
25O
29.90
Gulfsands Petlmv
5O +
1V
14.38
HaiKe Chemv
37K ?
K
?
K
? -1.8
12.72
Hardy Oil & Gas
17N +
Herencia Resv
?
?
Parallel Media Gpv#
? -0.4
11.76
Hydrodecv
5,112.38
Pearson?
621K +
16K 8.3 -2.1
25.68
Ilikav
600.48
Photo-Me
159K ?
2
4.0 17.2
24.19
Independ Resv
2.98
Primorus Invv
713.60
Indus Gasv
26.07
Quarto
3.20
Infrastratav
2.47
9.27
Ironveldv
1.58
V
?
? -3.3
127K ?
4
9.0 -2.9
Reabold Resourcesv
X
?
?
REACT Grpv
K
?
? -5.7
69.13
ITM Powerv
2X
402
?
1K
? -0.6
21st Cent Techv
482.23
4imprint Grp?
2N 0.8 43.4
1,018.38
?
207.10
?
?
? -0.5
28.99
Anglev
?
? 42.2
7,917.72
Ashtead?
O
?
? -6.5
37.85
AssetCov
2W
?
?
?
25.67
Avisenv
31Y +
4V
?
?
4,059.94
Babcock
RELX PLC?
1667
?
3
1.9 29.8
23.18
JKX Oil & Gas
13K
?
? -0.8
66.75
Begbies Traynorv
4035
?
14
1.1 29.5
43.06
Jubilee Platv
3O
?
?
2,171.66
Berendsen?
3.21
Karel Diamd Resv
K
?
? -8.0
348.11
Tarsus Gp
308
24.96
Totallyv#
48
275.19
Trinity Mirror
?
21st Cent Fox Inc A 2114W ?
16,573.77
21st Cent Fox Inc B 2075K ?
2,672.74
UBM
1.84
Vela Techv
1.45
Vitesse Mediav
209.07
Wilmington
18,314.08
WPP
YouGovv
5.89
Zinc Mediav
ZPG
? -5.6
99N +
22,254.65
285.30
K 2.7 44.6
?
678K ?
K 5.4
4.4
2N 1.3 16.1
4X 1.3 15.8
18
3.2 30.2
N
?
? -6.3
2N
?
? -8.3
239O ?
1437
5K 3.3
? 127
?
3.9 10.5
271K ?
1
0.5 79.8
Y
?
? -0.9
341K ?
7W 1.5 46.7
Natural resources
825.91
Acacia Mining
201W +
48.87
AFC Energyv
12K +
8.28
Alba Mineral Resv
W
?
?
2.08
Alexander Miningv
V
?
? -1.7
N
?
? 12.5
2.23
Altona Engyv
3,817.35
Alumina
132K +
1.8
N
Amec Foster
188.05
Amerisur Resv
142.51
Aminex
64.98
Amur Mins Corpv
2.20
Andalas Energyv
5,588.94
Anglo Amer Plat
1339K +
59K
26N +
N
18,814.70
Ang Am?
Anglo Asian Mngv
10,075.55
Antofagasta
1.62
5.9
? -8.6
?
5K 5.1 24.9
1,625.41
29.57
416O ?
7
3V 1.7
?
15K
?
4
?
?
?
1W
?
?
?
?
? -0.1
2072W +
41
?
10X +
+
1022
? -7.9
?
? 13.4
?
9.1
78K 1.3 40.6
Arian Silverv
K
?
?
?
11.57
Ariana Resv
1W
?
?
0.8
2.92
Armadale Capv
1V
?
? -1.9
32.57
Asa Resourcev#
1Y
?
?
35.33
Asiamet Rsrcsv
4Y ?
200.69
Atalaya Minev
6.91
Avocet
5.16
Bellzonev
1X +
8X +
1W
MX Oilv
3.97
Nautilus Marinev
7.39
New World Res#
11,129.24
Norsk Hydro
1.48
Nostra Terrav
724.50
Nostrum O&G
10.44
385
?
Nu-Oil and Gasv
1
?
0.22
Nyota Mineralsv#
?
49.97
Obtalav
6,528.59
Oil Search
3.71
18
550.85
Ophir Energy
9.57
Ormonde Miningv
108.55
Pantheon Resv
50K +
36.36
Parkmead Grpv
36O ?
22.63
Patagonia Goldv
1W
517.80
Petra Diamonds
97K +
2.62
Petrel Resourcesv
36.33
Petro Matadv
1,480.85
12.55
Petrofac
Petroneft Resv
510
? -4.5
3,579.52
Booker Gp
200O +
5K 2.3 23.4
906.12
Brown (N)
319X ?
60.00
Cambria Autov
1,134.66
Card Factory
332N +
125.62
Carpetright
185
110.21
CPPGroupv
23.45
Crawshaw Groupv
846.21
CVS Groupv
8,243.84
Dairy Farm Intl
500.34
Debenhams
484.41
DFS Furn
229
1,215.14
Dunelm
602K ?
144.36
Findel
167
1.20
Flying Brands
40.91
French Conn
65.35
Game Digital
5N
15
1.4 15.8
?
?
?
? -1.6
12
3.2 13.0
1W 3.5
14
8.7
?
2.5 23.6
?
0.9
4K 1.9
?
26
1.6 29.2
4N 2.6
20
?
5.1
?
Y 36.9
1.9
8
? -4.0
2.0 23.4
1N 9.3
7.5
1.8 13.2
1.4 30.7
144K ?
? -2.3
2,242.72
Saga
200K +
? -6.1
5,169.80
Sainsbury J
2,041.62
Smith WH
18.26
? 33.3
1,850.22
Sothebys
171K +
1X 1.6 19.2
2,159.77
Sports Direct Intl
? -2.8
2,730.30
IWG
298K ?
1X 1.7 20.7
?
Proton Power Sysv
V
? -2.5
46.32
Providence Resv
Y
?
?
15
9O 0.7 26.9
272.82
Lon Securityv
3
? 66.1
231.23
LSL Prop Services?
3
?
? -1.0
7O ?
1
? -1.5
?
? -1.8
75
1.0 31.3
?
?
? 59.2
3.58
Rose Petroleumv
?
?
? -3.8
95,913.20
Ryl Dtch Sh A?
2142K +
?
81,370.70
Ryl Dtch Sh B?
2172K +
156.38
San Leon Energyv#
34O
?
68,557.16
Schlumberger
4951X +
28.82
Serabi Goldv
4V
64.60
Serica Energyv
24K ?
21.13
Shanta Goldv
3X
?
20.74
Shearwater Grpv
3Y
?
1,151.10
Sirius Minerals
404.18
SOCO Intl
392.34
Solo Oilv
?
? -0.1
Chaarat Goldv
16Y ?
1W
Chariot Oil & Gasv
11Y ?
X
?
?
?
?
? -4.8
?
?
W
?
?
?
Coal of Africav
2O
?
? -3.1
Columbus Energyv
2N
?
?
50K ?
1K
? -3.4
2V +
V
? -8.7
N
?
?
N
301.44
EnQuest
6.56
Eurasia Miningv
W
17.33
Europa Oil&Gasv
5O ?
4K
V
4,173.00
Evraz?
291W +
171.20
Exillon Energy
106
309.72
Faroe Petrolv
Sound Energyv
45K +
Spitfire Oilv
6V +
2.03
Stellar Dmndv
4O
32.18
Sterling Energyv
? -1.0
5.96
Stratex Intlv
? -4.5
2.37
?
1.4
1.66
?
8.5
+
151.27
Bangov
75.59
447.98
Mears Group
435
+
5
2.6 20.9
588.93
Menzies (John)
706
+
6
2.1 59.8
6.65
Mi-Pay Gpv
16
+
Total SA
2K
? -8.0
2.47
Tower Resourcesv#
3998K +
2W
4.0
?
6
?
? 12.9
7O
? 18.0
?
43.63
Murgitroydv
1.97
Nakama Gpv
1X
?
?
2.87
Nature Grpv
3X ?
28
6.7 28.4
5.51
Newmark Secv
1V
?
8.5
27
6.6 28.8
13.63
Norishv
45K
?
2.8 30.3
5.00
Norm Broadbentv
12
?
?
34Y 3.2
?
O
15.52
Northern Bearv?
? 16.2
548.78
Northgate?
? 14.8
77.34
? -5.3
1,595.05
NWF Grpv
485
?
+
86K +
411Y ?
159
2K 3.3 16.3
?
+
PageGroup
488W ?
V
1K
1
? -6.7
? -1.3
?
? -2.2
2.3
7.7
1W 3.8
9.0
2K 3.5 14.0
1X 2.4 19.2
?
?
12.78
PCI-PALv
40K ?
2K
?
?
?
10.24
Petardsv
28N +
2
? 15.1
2N 3.7
?
1.69
PHSCv
11K ?
1K 13.0 -2.1
?
?
10.60
Porta Commsv
3N ?
12.19
PowerHouse Egyv
1N
?
12.43
Prime Peoplev
101K +
1
O
?
W
2N
N
N
?
?
?
? -4.9
? -0.2
? -4.6
1.60
Progilityv
99.62
Record
19.25
Redhall Groupv
45.77
45
?
9X +
+
98,120.97
?
3K
58N ?
?
5.2
K
265O ?
7
?
V
V
?
8W ?
N
7X
?
8.0 32.8
4.2 29.2
4N
K 5.4
?
?
? -0.9
Transport
133K +
3N 3.7 25.1
301W ?
1K 3.2 20.7
3.8
303N +
845.00
Clarkson
10N
?
5O
?
6.7
? -1.2
4V
?
7Y
? -3.7
K 3.3 16.3
?
?
?
117.08
Berkeley Resv
46
?
?
BOS Global Ltdv
+
2.2 31.8
1
8V +
Y
? -0.5
57.52
Bradyv
69
?
?
27.67
BSD Crown#
25V
?
? -1.8
3.42
CloudBuyv
?
? -0.8
69.73
CML Micro
1,248.96
Computacenter
2X
415
1018
?
37K 1.6 18.1
+ 132K 2.1 19.4
75K +
10
4K 2.6 19.3
+
1282K ?
3
34.45
CyanConn Hldgsv
61.10
D4t4 Solutionsv
161
10.42
Dillistone Groupv
53
?
131.81
Earthportv
27
+
V
127K +
41O ?
? -1.3
?
? 38.4
?
? -2.7
?
1.2 16.0
2K 7.7 20.2
K
?
?
?
?
Dartv
easyJet
+
516
1216
N 8.5
?
1
2.2 23.5
?
2
0.8 10.0
?
74
4.4 19.4
72.21
FastJetv
21K
?
1,387.89
FirstGroup
114Y ?
2
? 12.4
778.82
Fisher (James)
1552
+
95
1.5 19.7
744.79
Go-Ahead
1729
+
31
12,933.15
Intl Cons Air
616K +
5
969.08
Irish Cont Uts
514K ?
7K 1.8 19.3
1,811.04
Natl Express
353Y ?
8K 3.4 15.3
383.69
? -0.3
5.5 11.1
2.9
8.5
Ocean Wilson
1085
?
20,023.77
Ryanair
1648N ?
66N
982.11
Stagecoach
171N ?
5X 6.8 31.1
1,011.83
Stobart Gp Ord
288
7
25.51
Sutton Harbourv
304.42
Wincanton
1,690.99
Wizz Air Hldgs
+
26K
4.7 10.5
? 16.0
3.4
?
?
? 56.3
246
?
9
2942
+
92
3.4
?
7.4
? 16.1
Utilities
10,826.37
Centrica
197
1,272.22
Drax Group
312X ?
1,346.97
IGas Energyv
52.96
Jersey Electricity
83.27
KSK Power Vent
47K
10.61
Modern Waterv
11V +
33,270.59
Natl Grid
55K ?
455
4K 6.0 19.7
5N 0.8
1O
?
2.9 11.4
?
970V +
?
? -0.2
? -0.8
V
? -4.2
9Y 4.8 18.5
148.51
OPG Powerv
3,379.49
Pennon?
811K +
11
4.2 20.4
2K 0.3 26.0
6.32
Rurelecv
1V
?
? -0.6
1
42N ?
N
?
6.5
1K 7.3 37.7
5,308.94
Severn Trent
2249
+
28
3.6 16.1
45.61
eServGlobalv
?
? -3.3
? -5.3
14,157.98
SSE?
1404
?
33
6.4
985.94
FDM Group?
917
?
4
2.1 33.3
6,225.64
Utd Utilities
913
+
15K 4.2 14.3
809.08
Fidessa Gp?
2093
?
30
2.0 21.0
7.8
? -1.4
26.38
Filtronicv
K 3.6 15.5
697.32
First Derivtsv
V
?
?
11.73
Forbidden Techv
N
? -6.6
+
V
12K 1.3 37.3
765.12
4,830.05
2798
? -1.5
1.7
68
?
7V
12O ?
2782
+
W
7
? 10.2
6K +
0.6 80.8
W
? -3.9
41.54
Frontier Smartv
102K ?
8N 1.8 26.5
583.24
GB Groupv?
383K +
13
0.5 47.9
1
120.42
GreshamTech
179
?
? 45.6
2.66
Imaginatikv
1.1
7.9
1K
?
?
5,409.11
Rentokil Itl?
294W ?
N
? -3.9
554.15
Restorev
491K +
? 11.5
376.93
Ricardo
709
+
2K 2.5 15.2
347.48
Imagination Tc
122N ?
13
?
? -1.8
372.50
Robert Walters
500
+
3
1.7 16.4
18.34
IndigoVisionv
241
+
29
1.2 -7.9
79X 5.1 17.9
3,932.00
Royal Mail
393V +
1
5.7 14.4
29.44
Ingentav
174
?
2
? 29.1
?
3,794.58
RPC?
914K +
32K 1.9 24.8
25.55
Intercedev
51K ?
7
? -6.4
?
3
46
Braemar Ship
4K
?
+
?
219K +
BBA Aviation
6.17
Elec Data Prc
197
1107
Air Partner
?
8.64
? -0.2
91.50
?
eg solutionsv
? -1.9
K
?
3,109.73
N
Elecosoftv
? -2.0
69.71
18O ?
28.92
? -4.9
N
4.2 11.1
BATM Adv Coms
32.24
? -0.6
Y
1.2 26.7
?
Crimson Tidev
41
N
?
2
?
13.94
5N 6.0 20.4
2
16K
Cranewarev
?
98N +
+
+
Concurrent Techv
8.6
?
?
230
Corerov
?
6K 5.7 21.5
83
2
345.78
W
?
201
+
54.90
7O +
724
?
1892
31.56
2N 4.9 18.0
63
? -0.1
178K +
AVEVA Grp
437
2
4.23
? -3.4
Artiliumv
Renew Hldgsv
Y
? 10.4
? -8.8
1,210.43
RedT Energyv
Thor Miningv
11V
N
24.64
273.52
3.36
? 29.8
37K
? -1.6
? -3.7
?
Zamanov
23N
4Y ?
? -0.8
? -5.3
?
Vodafone Gp
117K ?
?
2W
?
32N
Telecom Plus
58,466.15
Allied Minds
Amino Techsv?
?
+
TalkTalk
890.93
Adept4v
125.94
K
3Y ?
1,881.35
2.3 18.7
Access Intellv
2K 3.4 54.7
V
89
4.9 14.3
11.07
+
Tertiary Mineralsv
Tethyan Resourcesv
1
17
13.16
865
Sunrise Resourcesv
Thalassa Hldgsv
SigmaRocv
Technology
2K 2.8 14.1
7V +
MITIE Gp
Uvenco UKv
+
Malvern Intlv
957.06
4.29
Utd Carpetsv
68
? -2.8
6.52
4.1
8.34
275.24
?
19.25
3.6 19.8
2N 4.6
1.1
?
14X ?
5.5 62.1
?
222
1N
? -9.9
?
5
1.59
N 11.8 33.6
?
331.88
118K +
1.6 23.3
?
K
?
27V ?
2225
2
23
Management Cns
+ 231K 3.2 17.7
20
?
2.53
+
Rio Tinto?
Rockhopper Explnv
137O +
1162
36.42
MobilityOnev
91.39
N
Maintel Hldgsv
Morticev
50,438.88
9.5
122.80
3.72
?
4.1
?
Macfarlane
32.17
5K 7.2 50.0
5.3
? -0.6
92.71
+ 229N 4.2 20.0
?
N
42.07
1.9 23.8
19.32
8
2N 3.8 14.3
16
Total Producev
182K ?
1K +
+
Topps Tiles
Dixons Carphone?
MXC Caplv
2490
646.28
2,104.75
52.09
Tesco
163.03
290V ?
7.6
Ted Baker
?
315
BT Group?
4.5
15,081.78
5.3
2K 2.3 27.2
AdEPT Telecomv
28,900.58
4.5 11.7
1,099.89
4.7 -5.5
?
74.66
?
1K 1.8 30.3
?
? 10.3
Telecoms
12
+
14
2W
3
?
1.2 29.2
2.3 21.3
+
6Y ?
610
+ 114
? 37.2
12
+
184V +
5.6
20
3V ?
716
4948
10
403O ?
Zoo Digitalv
Mobile Streamsv
Impellam Grpv
Intertek
132K +
Xaar
14.70
Monitisev
Homeserve
7,985.60
Water Intelv
314.54
Mobile Tornadov
307.09
?
15.90
2.86
2,224.67
10K 12.4
?
?
72.58
?
47
?
?
?
18.66
6N
170K ?
K
?
1.4 30.7
7.0
K 2.4 18.8
31K
9.4
12
17K 2.7
?
?
+
7.5
? 13.0
2K 0.2 31.8
797K +
?
?
2
WANdiscov
236
391
?
?
9K 4.8 21.9
?
1839
3512O ?
?
17X 1.9
W
7W
3.8
1598
482O ?
3661
5Y
Stanley Gbbnsv
Premier Oil
?
7
? 21.3
SuperGroup?
?
O
1Y
14.98
Porvair?
4151
5.8 18.0
1,300.16
?
286.06
Rio Tinto Ltd
32
33
2N 3.4 10.9
K 3.5 10.6
InterQuestv
Richland Resv
300.13
K 0.8 14.4
Interserve
17,608.66
? -7.3
40K ?
17.68
3.08
60K +
UK Oil & Gasv
71
218.90
?
82
Triad Grp?
HRG Hogg Rob
248.44
? 12.1
TRAKm8 Hldgsv
253.20
HML Hldgsv
2.3
O
?
?
9.37
231.16
?
N
26.62
98
417K +
? -3.2
? 17.5
4.0
Range Resourcesv#
Tracsisv
?
?
+
Touchstarv
KCOM
Gordon Dadds Grv
? -5.6
113K ?
507.56
41.36
X
462W ?
EVR Holdingsv
289W +
1.8 20.0
Telit Commsv
Inmarsat
4143
?
Tele. Ericsson
79.18
Ocado Gp
2.0 -9.4
145.04
3,301.71
Next
? 30.2
1
14,207.40
5
1,823.46
2
+
3N ?
7O 2.0 19.4
6,092.55
?
5
251W +
? 24.9
?
33
143
Stilo Intlv
4V 5.9 43.4
2.2 25.5
2N 3.2
Tavistockv
312Y ?
98W ?
?
?
5.69
Marks Spencer
Mothercare
0.3
96
17.86
5,083.78
176W ?
Hays
SRT Marinev
Statprov
?
Pets at Home
2,474.71
42.14
92.54
5.8
Pendragon
?
510K +
Spirent Comms?
K 3.3
882.00
?
Sophos Gp
587.27
1K 0.4
456.54
4K
2,352.77
?
1
7.9
K 2.5 33.0
4W 1.2 21.2
110
+
N 6.3
18O ?
410K +
311N ?
168.09
? -1.9
SimiGonv
116.62
2.6 22.5
N
Softcat
Majestic Winev
+
3V +
9.64
6.18
3
K 2.0 30.6
811.17
Lookers
97
?
Seeing Machinesv
221.71
286
?
1.3 50.3
46.45
436.23
Gattacav
?
10
0.4 16.9
Morrison (W)
12O 0.6
?
2.5 19.6
90.34
?
460
?
8N 3.2 15.7
8W
SDL
32
?
10
2.3 13.3
376.49
295W +
290
336
3.5 16.3
2
310Y ?
G4S
Havelock Eurov
1
+
839
4,499.62
Grafeniav
?
100
Kingfisher
?
Hargeaves Servv
67
SciSysv
JD Sports
40
4.15
Sage Gp
Sanderson Gpv
9.6
14N 8.9 29.4
?
28.88
6.1
?
?
3.6 12.1
7,495.89
Inchcape?
?
3.80
693K ?
? 12.5
36.90
6,494.48
287
107.22
7
3,025.78
4540
7.5
?
3,499.17
FIH Groupv
?
163
2V 2.4 14.3
Ferguson
? -8.0
RM?
421O ?
35.68
W
1N
Howden Join
11,489.76
1K
K
+
2,654.84
Moss Bros
8.0 10.7
3K 2.5 10.8
+
K 8.4
?
? -1.4
38
7K 4.8
26K 4.1 14.0
K
230K ?
4O 5.4 11.1
?
? -0.2
22K 2.6 22.6
8O +
125
317K +
?
N
?
?
K 2.9 15.7
RedstoneConnectv
Greggs
2.1 22.1
31W 0.9 89.8
?
+
QinetiQ?
Halfords?
5,871.88
?
?
?
1K 0.7 30.0
632.20
97.78
12K 3.8
?
83
977
180K ?
1,192.63
5
?
10O
+
6.6
0.2 82.2
?
38N +
1179
?
N 2.2
N
+
1.8 30.4
1N
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the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
45
1GM
Discovering why 35 girls
died in an orphanage fire
Mavis Arnold
Page 46
Register
Obituaries
Thomas Meehan
Writer who had Broadway hits with Annie, Hairspray and The Producers, but insisted that he was not even remotely musical
PAUL COLTAS
When Thomas Meehan was asked in
1972 what he thought about writing a
musical based on the comic strip Little
Orphan Annie his answer was emphatic:
?Ugh! I hate it.? Martin Charnin, the
theatre director, was insistent, persuading Meehan to write the book and
Charles Strouse to compose the score.
Meehan?s skill came in having a good
eye for the arc of a story, removing
clutter from the original concept and
sharpening the focus of the writing.
Two years later Annie was seen at
Goodspeed Opera House in East
Haddam, Connecticut, but the reviews
were mixed and the play?s future
uncertain. Towards the end of that
11-week run Mike Nichols, who had
directed films such as The Graduate and
Carnal Knowledge, was persuaded to
see it and promptly fell in love with this
musical tale of an orphan girl.
Soon came an influx of funds and
enthusiasm, followed by performances
at the Kennedy Center in Washington
DC and, in 1977, on Broadway. Changes
to the script continued up to the wire.
On one occasion Charnin stopped a
technical rehearsal, yelling: ?Meehan, I
need some lines here.? They appeared
within minutes.
Meanwhile, there was great anxiety
about what Clive Barnes, the theatre
critic of The New York Times, would
make of Annie. ?He?s British and this is
a very American play,? said Meehan,
just before opening night. He admitted
to having travel plans for when the
reviews landed. ?I?ll either vacation in
the Bahamas or jump off the George
Washington Bridge,? he said.
He was certainly able to do the
former. During the first five years
Meehan had made barely $1,500 from
Annie; soon he was making 20 per cent
of the box office after costs. The
Broadway production opened at the
Alvin Theatre (now the Neil Simon
Theatre) on April 21, 1977, starring
Andrea McArdle as Annie. It ran for
2,377 performances, a record not broken until Hairspray, for which Meehan
also wrote the book, eclipsed it in 2009.
Meehan recalled that at the West
End opening of Annie, at the Victoria
Palace Theatre in May 1978, he was
When the director called
for more lines, Meehan
delivered within minutes
greeted by the Queen and the Duke of
Edinburgh, who asked Meehan?s
mother if she was a producer. ?Yes, I
produced the author,? she replied. This
production ran for 1,485 performances.
Since then there have been numerous
touring productions and revivals,
including the present one at the
Piccadilly Theatre, London, starring
Miranda Hart as Miss Hannigan.
Over the next four decades Meehan
had ten musicals on Broadway and two
off-Broadway. Annie, Hairspray and
The Producers each ran for more than
2,000 performances. For the latter, on
which he worked with Mel Brooks,
Meehan rewrote the story so that the
character Roger de Bris, the gay director already established in Act One,
played the F黨rer in ?Springtime for
Hitler?. ?When we got the story down
Miranda Hart stars in the revival of Annie that is playing in the West End, London. Meehan, below, ?didn?t even fantasise about the kind of hit it could become?
to its essence, we realised what we had
was a love story between the two men,
Bialystock and Bloom,? he said.
No one was more surprised than
Meehan at the success of Annie, a
musical once described as ?Oliver Twist
in drag?, especially when it was nominated for eleven Tony awards (and received seven). He admitted that since
his initial reaction he had grown to appreciate the story ? as had his bank
manager. ?I wanted my first show to get
to Broadway and get respectable
views,? he told The Journal News in New
York state. ?But I didn?t even fantasise
about the kind of hit it could become.?
Thomas Edward Meehan was born
in Ossining, 30 miles north of Manhattan, in August 1929, and brought up in
Suffern, an area described as ?sub-middle class?. His father died when he was
13 and he began driving an ice-cream
van and working in a drug store. Meanwhile his mother, a nurse, raised Meehan and his younger brothers, Robert
and Jack, alone. Much of his pre-television childhood was spent at the cinema.
?The double-feature programme was
changed three times a week, and my
brother Bob and I indiscriminately
turned up at the box office whenever
there was a new show to be seen,? he
wrote in a piece about his childhood for
The New York Times in 1971.
In the eighth grade (age 14-15) he
starred in a school musical that he had
written, a feat he repeated at Hamilton
College, upstate New York. ?I wrote
stories that were serious, very sombre,
trying to be in the style of William
Faulkner,? he said in 1999. ?They were
very dark and mystical and strange.
They weren?t very good. But then I used
to write class essays and often make
them funny, and if I did that I got better
marks on them. My career has always
been that every time I try something
really serious, it?s no good, but if I try to
be funny, then it works.?
After a spell in the army he moved to
New York, aged 24, finding a cheap
apartment in the East Village that stank
of urine. A tip-off from a friend led to
work as a fact-checker on The New
Yorker magazine, where he turned up
for his first day at 9am only to find to his
delight that writers and editors did not
start work so early. Soon he was writing
short humorous pieces for the magazine?s Talk of the Town section.
One evening he bumped into a friend
in a bar who had just come from a party
attended by the actresses Ina Claire
and Uta Hagen. The friend told him
how everyone had laughed at the
rhythm of their names when they were
introduced (?Ina, Uta?). Five years later
Meehan wrote a piece about a party for
Yma Sumac, the Peruvian soprano.
Ava, Abba, Oona, Ida, Aga, Ira, etc, all
show up and are introduced. It made his
name at The New Yorker; someone
wrote a song about it; comedians ripped
it off; and David Letterman revived it at
the 1995 Oscars, with his ?Oprah, Uma;
Uma, Oprah? routine.
Anne Bancroft, Brooks?s wife, adapted it for a television show directed by
Charnin. He told Meehan: ?The way
you write, you could write the book of a
musical. Here?s my number ? call me
night or day.? Instead, in 1968 Meehan
moved his young family ? he had
married Karen, with whom he had a
son and a daughter, Joseph and Kate ?
to the south of France, where he began
work on a serious novel, The Man Who
Wanted to be Humphrey Bogart. It
remains unpublished.
Then in 1972, with Meehan back in
New York as a jobbing writer and editor,
came Charnin?s call about Annie. Soon
he became one of the go-to writers for
Broadway musicals. By the early 1980s
Meehan was spending his wealth. He
opened a bar and restaurant in New
York called the Gardenia club. ?It?s got
an overhead fan. Every now and then I
fantasise that it?s Rick?s Place,? he said,
referring to Humphrey Bogart?s joint in
the film Casablanca.
Hollywood came calling and a film
version of Annie was released in 1982
starring Albert Finney, but Meehan
was unhappy. ?There was a great deal of
hostility,? he recalled, ?mainly because
they totally shut us out of the movie and
bad-mouthed the Broadway show.?
Meanwhile, his marriage was dissolved
and in 1988 he married Carolyn
Capstick, who survives him with the
children of his first marriage.
He tried a sequel to the musical,
Annie II: Miss Hannigan?s Revenge,
which opened in Washington in 1989,
but closed five weeks later. Another,
Annie Warbucks, was better received in
1992, but still did not reach Broadway.
He also wrote a play called Firecrackers,
which is set in a New York city office
over the fourth of July weekend, but in
2012 admitted that it was missing. ?I?ve
searched and searched and I have no
copy of it anywhere,? he said. ?It might
have been pretty funny.?
In 2012 he joined Andrew Lloyd
Webber, Alan Menken and Tim Rice in
having the rare distinction of three
Broadway musicals running in one
season: Annie, Elf and Chaplin. ?The
shameful fact is that I?m not remotely
musical,? he admitted to Playbill
magazine at the time. ?I don?t sing well.
I don?t play any instrument.?
Meehan, who had an individual
sense of style, refused to retire and at
the time of his death was reworking the
musical adaptation of Young Frankenstein, Brooks?s 1974 comedy-horror
film, for a London revival. ?I love what
I?m doing,? he once said. ?I could go to
Florida and play golf, but I hate Florida
and I don?t play golf.?
Thomas Meehan, writer, was born on
August 14, 1929. He died from cancer
on August 21, 2017, aged 88
46
1GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Register
Mavis Arnold
Journalist and author who revealed the appalling truth about how 35 girls died in a fire at a Catholic orphanage in Ireland
On February 23, 1943, fire broke out at
St Joseph?s, an orphanage run by nuns
in Co Cavan, Ireland. Thirty-five girls
were burnt to death. An inquiry at the
time blamed the slow response of the
emergency services.
Thirty years later Mavis Arnold, a
determined Irish journalist with a natural talent for listening to people, began
to piece together the full story: as the
fire raged, many of the girls had been
locked in their smoke-filled dormitories by the sisters to avoid them being
seen in public in their nightclothes.
Deciding to find out why a closed
order of nuns, the Poor Clares, had
been left in charge of a school, Arnold
was warned at every turn: ?It?ll upset
the good sisters. What?s the point?
Everything?s different now.?
As she unearthed tales of starvation
and beatings she was told that state
files did not exist. She was also refused
interviews with medical and school
inspectors from the era. One insisted:
?The nuns did their best for the
children.? An official from the
education department told her: ?We?d
better not delve into that.?
No one had reckoned on the
indomitable energy of Arnold. With
her friend and fellow journalist Heather Laskey, Arnold spent a decade working on a book that laid bare the scale of
the appalling cruelty and child abuse
During her investigation
she unearthed tales of
starvation and beatings
behind the high walls of Ireland?s
church-run schools. The pair laboured
for six years to find a publisher willing
to print their controversial account.
Entitled The Children of the Poor
Clares and focusing on the school in
Cavan, the book led to such an outpouring from the thousands of children who
had suffered at the hands of the
so-called industrial schools that in 1999
the Irish government apologised.
Arnold had begun her research after
a chance encounter at her own kitchen
table in the house she shared with her
journalist husband, Bruce Arnold,
where she prepared two-course meals
every night in between drafting
chapters.
Years after the fire, Arnold found out
what happened at St Joseph?s, right
In 1970 she had offered to take care of
an unmarried and pregnant 23-yearold woman, who would often sit quietly,
?her shoulders hunched, rocking?.
Over the next ten months the
woman revealed to Arnold how, aged
four, she had been put into St Joseph?s.
The school, which by this time had
closed, stated that its purpose was to
shelter, clothe, feed and morally
instruct its destitute pupils. The girl told
instead how she was virtually incarcerated and suffered punishments so
severe that she still shuddered at
loud noises.
Arnold discovered how religious
orders had often misused adequate
state funds. She heard how even as late
as the 1960s children had fought over
the contents of the hens? bucket and the
scrapings from the nuns? own generously covered table. At one school
children did not possess toothbrushes
and were never seen by a dentist. They
slept on foul bedding and contracted
diseases from vermin. Most had an
education that was so poor they
were equipped only for menial tasks
when they left the schools at 16.
Many girls, like her young ward, soon
became pregnant.
When the book was published in 1985
the reviews were disbelieving. However, Arnold was vindicated in 2009
when the government published the
Ryan report, which found that since the
1940s thousands of children in industrial schools had been subjected to
systematic physical, sexual and
emotional abuse. It also found that the
perpetrators of this violence, such as
the Cavan nuns, had been protected by
their religious superiors.
Ysabel Mavis Cleave was born in 1937
in Mussoorie, a hill station in northern
India. Her mother, Mary, was from
Sligo in Ireland; her father, Major John
Cleave, about 20 years older, was an
Englishman. They met in India and
married there.
Mary and her daughters returned to
Ireland at the outbreak of the Second
World War. Later they were mistakenly
summoned back to India by the
military authorities, who mixed up lists
of wives, and had to be rescued when
their ship was torpedoed. Major Cleave
was reunited with
his family at the end
of the war, but died a
year later.
Mavis grew up
with
her
two
sisters
at
Glen
Lodge, a beautiful
house in Sligo nestled between mountains and the shoreline. Her older sister,
Maureen, also became a journalist,
while her younger
sister, Monica, was a
horsewoman.
Mavis, after a local
education and diploma in social sciences at Trinity College Dublin, became a
social worker and journalist for Irish
newspapers. Her first article, ?Church
and the School?, was published in 1966.
She met her husband at Trinity when
they acted together in William
Saroyan?s Jim Dandy. They married in
1959 in Sligo and spent part of their
honeymoon watching Wagner operas
at Bayreuth in Germany before settling
in a large house called Rosney, near
Dublin. She enjoyed knitting and
weeding the garden. She could conjure
up an excellent picnic in a matter of
seconds ? always with a chilled bottle
of wine.
Taking her children to school, she
began to bake cakes with other mothers
to raise funds for a campaign to create
multi-denominational education. This
paved the way for the Educate Together
charity, which now has 90 schools.
While writing her own book and
articles Arnold became a leading figure
in creating the Women?s Political
Association, which campaigned to get
women elected to the D醝l with the
slogan: ?Why not a woman?? After the
collapse of the Soviet Union she led
workshops in the new republics in
eastern Europe encouraging women to
participate in democracy.
When it emerged in 1982 that the
Irish government had tapped her
husband?s phone, believing his journalism to be a threat to national security,
she joked that they would have to wade
through hours of listening to her
discussing women?s strategy.
While Bruce, who survives her, was
flamboyant in his bow ties and hats,
Mavis had a practical nature that
extended to her clothes. Rarely one to
indulge in lavish purchases, she never
wore heels and could not understand
how anyone could walk in them. Small
and pretty, she was comfortable proofreading her husband?s prose or tending
to one of the family?s multiple pets.
Her greatest sadness was the death of
their first child, Emma, from gastroenteritis as a baby in 1961. She had three
more children: Hugo, a food consultant,
Samuel, who died aged 49 after
suffering a brain tumour, and Polly, a
publisher who runs her own company.
She later took to mountain climbing
with a group who liked to call
themselves the B Team.
Although Arnold had Alzheimer?s
disease for the last years of her life, her
?sisterhood? remained constantly in
touch. Among those at her funeral was
the woman she had first helped at her
kitchen table all those years ago.
Mavis Arnold, journalist and social
worker, was born on June 7, 1937. She
died from complications of Alzheimer?s
disease on July 18, 2017, aged 80
Ken Smith
Early member of the SAS who fought behind enemy lines and after the war sought a quiet life ? but instead had ten children
Simon Wingfield Digby, Conservative
MP for West Dorset, stood up in the
Commons in 1944 and asked: ?Is it true,
prime minister, that there is a body of
men out in the Aegean islands, fighting
under the Union flag, that are nothing
short of being a band of murderous,
renegade cut-throats??
Sir Winston Churchill replied: ?If you
do not take your seat and keep quiet,
I will send you out to join them!?
One of those ?murderous, renegade
cut-throats? was Ken Smith, an early
member of the Special Air Service, a
top-secret unit founded in 1941.
Watching the storming of the Iranian
embassy on television on May 5, 1980,
Smith was shocked to hear talk of the
SAS. ?We?d had secrecy drummed into
us,? he said. ?I couldn?t believe it when
the reporter actually broadcast the
name of the SAS to the world.?
Smith carried out his duties behind
enemy lines with a permanent expectation of death. His first ship, HMS Manchester, was torpedoed during the
Malta convoys and sent for repairs. His
second, HMS Penelope, was known to
Smith, back row, third from left, after
taking the Greek island of Symi, 1944
her crew as HMS Pepperpot because of
the number of holes in her.
On a mission to slow the German
advances across the Greek islands the
ship successfully attacked an enemy
convoy, but on the way back were
dive-bombed by 18 Stukas, sustaining
damage and fatalities. She hobbled to
Alexandria to be patched up. On the
way Smith heard that there was a call
for people to join some kind of special
services group. ?I thought: ?I?ll do any
bloody thing to get off this ship?. ? Evidently, he wasn?t the only one; every
marine on board volunteered.
He found out he had been chosen
when a message arrived: ?Top priority.
Release immediately the following men
for special duties.? Smith, K was one of
only three names on the list.
In Cairo he met a couple of dozen
other men and was put on a train with
a sergeant-major who made them sling
all their possessions out of the window
? helmets, uniforms, everything.
At the Sea of Galilee they were taken
out in canoes before being flung over
the side and told to swim the two miles
back. By night, they were drilled in
German, Croatian, Albanian and Greek.
On the Dodecanese islands Smith
and his comrades would terrorise the
occupying Germans. ?We used to go
out every night, landing on all these
islands, shooting up Germans,? he said.
They would kill them, strip them down
and take anything that was worth
trading with the local people.
In 1944 he was wounded in Yugo-
slavia. One bullet went through his
back and out the other side while
another lodged in his arm ? it was still
there when he died 73 years later. Once
recovered he was sent to Italy to go
behind the lines at Comacchio, where
one of his officers was shot. ?They all
got killed, my officers,? he said.
Kenneth Herbert Smith was born in
Portsmouth in 1922, the son of Henry
Smith, a sailor, and Ellen, his wife. He
was educated at the Portsmouth
Beneficial School before winning a
scholarship to Portsmouth College.
Ken idolised his father, who instilled in
him the importance of education and
fitness, and would boast to his children
that their grandfather could walk
upstairs on his hands.
When war broke out Smith was an
apprentice carpenter. He regularly
cycled from Portsmouth to London and
back in a day. He played football and
cricket and could run like the wind. A
soldier friend home on leave encouraged him to join the Marines because
?you get plenty of football?. On that
recommendation alone he signed up.
As a regular soldier the end of the war
did not mean automatic return to
civilian life. He was sent to Hong Kong,
where he rounded up Japanese soldiers
and took them to Stanley prison.
In 1946, back in Portsmouth, he married a local girl, Joyce Galloway, and
they settled in Bedhampton where he
completed an apprenticeship and
worked for a local building firm and
later for Southern Electricity Board.
?The war is like yesterday to me,? he
would say. ?All I ever wanted when it
was over was peace and quiet.? In that
case, joked his ten children ? Alan,
David, Colin, Barry, Eric, Susan, Geoffrey, Derek, Michael and Keith ? why
did he have such a large family?
In retirement Smith tended his
garden and made decorative bowls and
vases from scrap wood in his shed. A far
quieter life than that expected of those
?murderous, renegade cut-throats?
complained of in the Commons.
Ken Smith, member of the special forces,
was born on April 12, 1922. He died in
his sleep on July 6, 2017, aged 95
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
47
1GM
Register
Gerry Burt
Births, Marriages and Deaths www.newsukadvertising.co.uk
Helping the country?s railways to run on time and on budget
during an era of low morale and limited political support
Gerry Burt was the longest serving and probably most influential chief secretary of British
Rail. It was a bureaucratic,
rather than a managerial post,
but Burt used his enormous
experience of working in all sectors of the nationalised industry
to bring clarity, organisation
and reform to the railways.
The result was that in its final
years as a national network,
British Rail (BR) was the most
efficient and cost-effective railway system in Europe. To Burt?s
regret, much of that efficiency
was lost when, after his retirement, privatisation broke up the
industry into a less coherent
system that, ironically, demanded more taxpayers? money to
keep it going than its predecessor had needed.
The job of chief secretary consisted of co-ordinating the work
of the British Railways board ?
arranging the meetings, deciding the agenda, maintaining
links with politicians and transport department officials, as
well as upholding BR?s legal obligations and ensuring that each
part of the railway empire
worked effectively together.
Burt was dogged in getting
the board to focus on what
needed doing. He preferred
consensus to confrontation, and
his personal modesty helped
to steer headstrong board members and regional managers to
hard-won agreements.
Burt built up a strong
relationship with Sir Peter
Parker, the BR chairman and a
key figure in modernising the
system after the Beeching
report of 1963 that led to the
demise of much of the network.
Burt became chief secretary in
June 1976. Parker arrived three
months later and, knowing little
about the arcane workings of
the nationalised network, relied
heavily on Burt. Morale on the
railways was low. There was little strategic direction, constant
interference from politicians
and a financial short-termism
that was dictated largely by the
election cycle.
The pair decided that a complete revamp was needed: new
rules forced retirement from
the board at 70, experienced
railwaymen were added and
Burt brought the first woman on
to the board ? Prue Leith, the
chef and restaurateur who is cohost of Channel 4?s Great British
Bake Off. She focused on BR?s
stake in hotels and catering
(British Railways inherited 55
ships, 35 hotels, 12 ports and dozens of ferries and properties).
One addition to the board was
Simon Jenkins, later editor of
The Times. In his privately
published autobiography, Burt
recalls that Jenkins ?always
made a note of everything . . .
Peter and I exchanged glances,
because this was not normal
behaviour at a board meeting?.
Key reforms pushed through
by Parker and Burt included a
shake-up of all subsidiary businesses, a move of BR headquarters, new rules to uphold
standards of conduct in public
life and a programme of rebuilding to make the railways better
able to cater for disabled people.
Burt and Parker decided that
Burt brought clarity, organisation and reform to the industry
the railways needed to improve
relations with their political
masters. This meant frequent
meetings with civil servants and
politicians. Harold Macmillan,
then in his eighties and whose
family had once been directors
of the old GWR, came to one
board lunch, appeared to doze
off, but was listening intently
and offered an anachronistic
solution to BR?s challenges:
?Bring back the Great Western.?
A lunch with Margaret
Thatcher, the new Conservative
Party leader, was less successful.
?She swept in, in regal style, and
made it clear that the problem
with the railways was that we
were all incompetent managers,? Burt recalled. ?She
wouldn?t listen to anyone else?s
view; but, at the same time,
maintained that she could listen
to two people at once ? by
which, I think, she meant that
she was not going to listen to
either.? Relations with Thatcher,
who disliked travelling by train,
never recovered and when she
became prime minister she had
little time for the railways or
those who ran them.
Gerald Raymond Burt was
born in Shepherds Bush, west
London, in 1926 into a hardworking but poor family; his
father was a cabinet maker and
his mother a seamstress. Both
parents were deaf and from the
earliest age Gerry and his broth-
Burt considered
privatisation to be
a ?complete mess?
ers learnt sign language as well
as learning to speak. On passing
the 11-plus exam, all three boys
won London council scholarships and Gerry won a place at
Latymer Upper School.
After the war he passed his
school certificate at the age of 16
and, with no money, took his
first job in 1942 as a junior booking clerk at Ealing Broadway
station, with the additional
duties of switching the colour
signals to dim if an air raid was
expected.
He joined the railway
company home guard, learnt
to make and throw petrol
bombs and was called up in 1944
and posted to the Royal
Engineers? movement control
? a job that was largely about
controlling military trains. He
learnt German so that he could
run the railways in Germany
after the war ? but instead was
posted to Egypt, where he was in
charge of logistics. Demobilised
in 1947, he returned to the Great
Western as a clerk at Paddington two months before the
railways were nationalised.
Aged 21 he became engaged
to Edna, a clerk in a solicitor?s
office. They were married a year
later and had two sons: Roger, a
fuel tanker driver; and Michael,
a pilot for British Airways. Edna
died in 2008.
The newly created British
Railways offered Burt a management training course and in
1954 he was sent to Worcester to
oversee the closing of the line,
before taking a job with the British Transport Commission. A
job in Bristol, where he was in
charge of 250 miles of line from
Swindon to Penzance, followed,
before he returned to London,
St Pancras in 1962. Six years
later he was seconded to the
National Freight Corporation to
set up Freightliner, the government?s attempt to win back
freight for the railways.
Lured back to BR headquarters in 1970, Burt became a corporate planning officer. By then,
having demonstrated his skills
in management and logistics, he
was a natural choice for the job
of chief secretary, which he held
for eight years, retiring as Bob
Reid took over as chairman
from Parker.
Burt was scathing about privatisation, calling it a ?complete
mess?. He deeply regretted that
the unified structure, including
BR?s respected research and
development arm, was ?scattered
to the four winds?. He added:
?A great industry has been
sabotaged ? and the people
responsible should be publicly
pilloried?.
One former colleague said:
?There was a little bit of a
Machiavellian streak in him.
But Machiavelli gave useful
advice to the prince.?
Gerry Burt, OBE, chief secretary
of British Railways, 1976-84, was
born on February 15, 1926. He
died on June 4, 2017, aged 91
There is no Court Circular
today
Technical support: 020 7680 6833
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
49
1GM
Weather
Weather Eye
Paul Simons
Today Very warm and humid in the southeast, fresher with heavy showers in Scotland . Max 28C (82F), min 4C (39F)
Around Britain
Five days ahead
Key: b=bright, c=cloud, d=drizzle, pc=partly cloudy
du=dull, f=fair, fg=fog, h=hail, m=mist, r=rain,
sh=showers, sl=sleet, sn=snow, s=sun, t=thunder
*=previous day **=data not available
Turning fresher again
with the chance of
showers, more frequent
in the north and west
Temperature
Tomorrow
Flood alerts and warnings
Temp C
Rain mm Sun hr*
midday yesterday
24 hrs to 5pm yesterday
Aberdeen
Aberporth
Anglesey
Aviemore
Barnstaple
Bedford
Belfast
Birmingham
Bournemouth
Bridlington
Bristol
Camborne
Cardiff
Edinburgh
Eskdalemuir
Glasgow
Guernsey
Hereford
Herstmonceux
Ipswich
Isle of Man
Isle of Wight
Keswick
Kinloss
Leeds
Lerwick
Leuchars
Lincoln
Liverpool
London
Lyneham
Manchester
Margate
Milford Haven
Newcastle
Nottingham
Orkney
Oxford
Plymouth
Portland
Scilly, St Mary?s
Shoreham
Shrewsbury
Skye
Snowdonia
Southend
Stornoway
Tiree
Whitehaven
Wick
Yeovilton
19
18
19
19
21
24
17
22
22
24
21
19
20
19
15
16
24
22
23
23
17
22
18
20
17
16
19
24
19
24
22
19
22
18
19
23
18
24
22
20
18
24
19
16
16
22
15
15
15
18
22
PC
PC
PC
PC
S
S
DU
S
S
S
S
PC
S
DU
R
R
PC
S
S
S
PC
S
DU
PC
DU
DU
PC
PC
DU
S
S
PC
S
DU
PC
S
PC
S
S
S
PC
S
DU
C
DU
S
PC
DU
DU
PC
S
1.4
0.0
0.0
1.0
0.0
0.0
0.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.0
5.2
2.6
**
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.0
2.6
0.0
3.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
7.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
**
0.0
0.0
6.4
6.6
0.0
3.4
0.0
3.6
5.0
3.8
3.3
**
**
0.6
**
12.8
**
12.0
12.9
12.3
3.3
0.0
1.9
**
**
10.0
9.1
1.0
**
**
2.0
**
2.2
5.0
11.6
**
9.3
11.9
5.3
12.3
**
**
9.8
1.4
**
**
**
**
11.7
6.3
**
**
11.0
0.3
0.4
**
**
**
The risk of some rain or thunderstorms
in the southeast. Elsewhere, sunny
spells and feeli
ith the
chance of sc
o rs, some
n
heavy in th
Max 19C, n C
15
Moderate
Rough
28 (degrees C)
15
11
32
Aberdeen
NORTH
SEA
28
Edinburgh
Glasgow
16
12
Londonderry
ATLANTIC
OCEAN
A day of sunshine and scattered
showers for much of the British Isles.
Showers may t n
ith a few
rumbles of t
fternoon,
as.
especially i n h as
Max 21C, in
Belfast
Dublin
20
77
20
68
15
59
10
50
5
41
0
32
-5
23
-10
14
-15
5
Cork
i h
Norwich
14
Birmingham
Swansea
27
8
28
Bristol
Southampton
Exeterr
Plymouth
Brighton
22
CHANNEL
1
Tides
London
19
6
16
General situation: Very warm and
humid in the southeast, fresher with
scattered showers in the northwest.
SE Eng, Channel Is: The chance of a
few isolated showers at ?rst, and
then mainly dry with sunny spells
and hot and humid. Further showers
or thunderstorms are possible later
in the day and overnight. Light and
variable winds. Maximum 28C (82F),
minimum 13C (55F).
London, Cen S Eng, E Anglia, E Mids,
E Eng: A dry start with sunny spells,
Cambridge
Oxford
Cardiff
CELTIC
SEA
Channel Islands
Nottingham
Shrewsbury
16
A dry day with sunny spells in most
places, but a few showers may develop
across eastern
d northern
Scotland du g
e oon.
Max 22C,
9
Sheffield
16
LLlandudno
9
17
25
Hull
17
ooo
Liverpool
IRISH
SEA
16
17
The risk of a few heavy showers in
eastern England, but otherwise many
places staying
. i
ay spread
into Ireland
s estern
Scotland la r
Max 22C, n
86
Yorkk
Manchester
16
Saturday
30
16
16
18
Galway
20
F
95
Carlisle
16
16
17
C
35
Newcastle
Thursday
Friday
13
13
At 17:00 on Monday there were no
?ood alerts or warnings in England,
Wales or Scotland.
For further information and
updates, visit ?ood-warninginformation.service.gov.uk, and for
Scotland www.SEPA.org.uk
19
Shetland
Sh
13
14
21
26 S
Madeira
21 B
Madrid
31 F
Majorca
25 M
M醠aga
33 F
Malta
9
S
Melbourne
Mexico City 21 C
31 B
Miami
30 S
Milan
27 S
Mombasa
20 S
Montreal
11 R
Moscow
26 SH
Mumbai
20 S
Munich
22 B
Nairobi
29 F
Naples
New Orleans 26 S
26 B
New York
27 F
Nice
32 S
Nicosia
17 C
Oslo
27 S
Paris
21 F
Perth
20 B
Prague
11 R
Reykjavik
16 B
Riga
Rio de Janeiro 25 F
43 F
Riyadh
31 F
Rome
San Francisco 25 S
13 B
Santiago
25 F
S鉶 Paulo
26 B
Seoul
28 S
Seychelles
30 B
Singapore
St Petersburg 13 C
18 F
Stockholm
13 C
Sydney
30 S
Tel Aviv
27 S
Tenerife
28 S
Tokyo
22 S
Vancouver
27 F
Venice
23 B
Vienna
18 S
Warsaw
Washington 24 B
27 F
Zurich
8
Slight
17
All readings local midday yesterday
S
S
F
R
S
S
F
S
F
B
F
B
S
F
F
F
F
M
F
S
S
F
S
S
F
B
F
S
S
F
S
F
S
F
B
R
B
F
S
B
B
S
S
S
B
S
F
ney
Orkney
Calm
14
17
28
24
30
18
38
31
31
29
27
30
30
21
27
30
25
30
24
16
32
30
10
26
21
19
32
31
43
19
22
33
25
24
25
25
14
27
28
30
31
19
29
27
25
18
22
21
39
e st te
(mph)
16
The world
Alicante
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Bahrain
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bordeaux
Brussels
Bucharest
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Canberra
Cape Town
Chicago
Copenhagen
Corfu
Delhi
Dubai
Dublin
Faro
Florence
Frankfurt
Geneva
Gibraltar
Harare
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Honolulu
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kuala Lumpur
Lanzarote
Las Palmas
Lima
Lisbon
Los Angeles
Luxor
in s e d
34
and very warm and humid
humid, but turning
cloudier with the chance of some light
patchy rain moving in later. Light
northwesterly winds. Maximum
28C (82F), minimum 9C (48F).
SW Eng, Wales, W Mids, NW Eng,
Cen N Eng, NE Eng, Lake District, IoM:
Patchy rain at ?rst, becoming drier,
brighter and fresher during the day.
Light northwesterly winds. Maximum
20C (68F), minimum 6C (43F).
SW Scotland, Borders, Glasgow,
Aberdeen, Edinburgh & Dundee,
6
Republic of Ireland, N Ireland:
Mainly dry with sunny spells, but a few
isolated showers developing, mainly in
the afternoon. Moderate southwesterly
winds. Maximum 17C (63F),
minimum 5C (41F).
Argyll, Cen Highland, Moray Firth,
N Scotland, N Isles: Sunny intervals,
but rather cloudy with scattered heavy
showers, some perhaps thundery.
Moderate to fresh southwesterly
winds. Maximum 15C (59F),
minimum 4C (39F).
OW
Noon today
Tidal predictions.
Heights in metres
19
21
21
Sunday
A mixture of sunny spells and
scattered showers for many places.
Showers may b h i
nd more
widespread
w
areas with
some longe su
s
he east.
Max 21C, n
16
18
20
19
The Times weather
page is provided
by Weatherquest
Today
Aberdeen
Avonmouth
Belfast
Cardiff
Devonport
Dover
Dublin
Falmouth
Greenock
Harwich
Holyhead
Hull
Leith
Liverpool
London Bridge
Lowestoft
Milford Haven
Morecambe
Newhaven
Newquay
Oban
Penzance
Portsmouth
Shoreham
Southampton
Swansea
Tees
Weymouth
07:17
00:12
04:57
00:00
11:09
04:47
05:31
10:50
05:47
05:15
03:56
11:46
08:42
04:42
07:22
03:12
11:54
04:47
04:30
10:50
11:15
10:23
05:07
04:43
03:56
11:52
09:35
11:57
Ht
3.6
11.0
3.2
10.2
4.6
5.7
3.5
4.3
3.2
3.6
4.7
6.2
4.7
7.9
6.2
2.2
5.5
7.7
5.5
5.6
3.1
4.5
4.0
5.2
3.7
7.6
4.5
1.5
19:49
12:33
17:28
12:18
23:22
17:08
18:02
23:08
18:31
17:37
16:27
--:-21:02
17:08
19:42
15:28
--:-17:18
16:53
23:13
23:21
22:45
17:29
17:09
16:22
--:-22:03
--:--
Ht
3.4
10.5
3.0
9.7
4.5
5.7
3.4
4.2
3.0
3.5
4.5
-4.5
7.6
6.1
2.3
-7.5
5.5
5.4
3.0
4.3
4.1
5.1
3.8
-4.3
--
08
0
Cold front
Warm front
Occluded front
Trough
2
Synoptic situation
A weak cold front will slowly
move southeastwards across
Britain with some patchy rain
along it at ?rst, but it will
becoming drier the further
southeast it moves during the
day. Feeling very warm and
humid in the southeast, but
fresher behind the front in the
north and west with scattered
heavy showers across northern
and western Scotland.
Highs and lows
Hours of darkness
24hrs to 5pm yesterday
Aberdeen
Belfast
Birmingham
Cardiff
Exeter
Glasgow
Liverpool
London
Manchester
Newcastle
Norwich
Penzance
Shef?eld
Warmest: Holbeach,
Lincolnshire, 28.0C
Coldest: Cairngorm, 7.1C
Wettest: Achnagart,
Inverness-shire, 22.2mm
Sunniest: Camborne, 12.9hrs*
Sun and moon
For Greenwich
Sun rises: 06.08
Sun sets: 19.53
Moon rises: 14.30
Moon sets: 23.43
Full Moon: September 6
20:43-05:36
20:53-05:57
20:32-05:45
20:36-05:52
20:36-05:55
20:49-05:48
20:38-05:48
20:23-05:40
20:36-05:45
20:36-05:39
20:20-05:32
20:43-06:04
20:32-05:42
O
n this the day in 1776
American forces under
General George
Washington escaped
near-certain defeat by
the British in New York, thanks
to a change in the weather.
During the opening stages
of the American War of
Independence a British force
of 32,000 soldiers confronted the
general?s army of 19,000 soldiers
at Brooklyn. The British attacked
directly on two fronts, but also
sent a force of 10,000 men through
a narrow pass and outflanked
the Americans, catching them
offguard.
A contingent of 400 soldiers held
off the British assault long enough
for the bulk of Washington?s forces
to retreat to the Brooklyn heights.
The British general, William Howe,
then dug in around the American
army, expecting the Royal Navy to
sail around New York Bay and cut
off the American?s only line of
retreat across the East River to
Manhattan. However, the wind blew
in the wrong direction and kept the
ships at bay.
Seizing his opportunity,
Washington used every boat he
could muster to begin evacuating his
troops across the East River on the
night of August 28. All through the
dark and rainy night the boats
rowed back and forth across the
river, but as dawn broke on August
29 a large part of his army remained
trapped in Brooklyn. In another
stroke of luck for Washington, a
heavy fog descended and hid the
remaining troops from the British,
allowing them to escape across the
river to Manhattan. By the time the
fog lifted the British were astonished
to find that the Americans had
disappeared. In this daring retreat,
not a single American life was lost
and all their supplies were saved.
The British claimed a great
victory by capturing New York and
its strategically important harbour.
However, the Americans had
escaped a crushing defeat that could
possibly have ended the War of
Independence ? many historians
have seen this as the American
?Dunkirk? moment.
550
2GM RM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Sport
GARY HUTCHISON/SNS
?Leicester tried
to change, now
they regret it?
Richard Cockerill tells
Alex Lowe he wishes
he had stuck up for the
club?s traditional values
Nobody recognises better than
Richard Cockerill how the power of a
club?s history can be inspiring but
suffocating. For 23 years as a Leicester
Tigers player and coach, Cockerill
harnessed the pressure of expectation
that exists at Welford Road and used it
to drive standards and win trophies. In
the end, that same pressure did for him.
Leicester won three league titles
under Cockerill, reached five Aviva
Premiership finals and never finished
outside of the top four, but when he was
sacked they had not lifted a trophy since
2013. The club concluded that he was too
old school and the only way to recapture
their glory days was to modernise.
Cockerill sees it as a paradox, but he
had Leicester in his veins and initially
he tried to adapt to the club?s vision. As
director of rugby he accepted the
arrival of Aaron Mauger as head
coach and backed, as far as he could,
Leicester?s desire to play a more open,
offensive style of rugby.
But a Tiger cannot change his
stripes. Cockerill and Mauger were
too different and their coaching
partnership became dysfunctional.
Leicester considered releasing Mauger,
which eventually happened anyway
? but Cockerill was summoned by text
message on New Year?s Day for a
meeting the following day, at which he
was given the boot.
Reflecting on his departure, with the
benefit of lessons learnt during a
fraught, but successful, stint at Toulon,
at the end of last season, Cockerill
has concluded that he should have
defended more resolutely the core
values that epitomised him as a coach
and Leicester as a club, he just did not
have the experience to recognise it at
the time.
In leading Toulon to the Top 14
final, Cockerill rebuilt his damaged
confidence by demonstrating that he
can go into a new environment and be
an effective coach. Edinburgh, where
he is now head coach, are feeling the
full force of his passion, drive and
Willie Duggan
dies at 67
Willie Duggan, one of
Ireland?s greatest forwards,
died yesterday, aged 67,
after a suspected heart
attack at his home near
Kilkenny. He won 45 Test
caps, including four on the
1977 Lions tour to New
Zealand. He and Wales?
Geoff Wheel were the
first players to be sent
off in a Five Nations
match in 1977.
Cockerill has not been impressed by Edinburgh Rugby since joining from Toulon
personality. ?When you get sacked, you
get dented a bit,? he said. ?You?re getting
sacked because they don?t think you?re
good enough. You think, ?f***, I?ve got
to get a job?. You sit down with a
computer and try to think about all the
things you learnt in the last 13 years. I
had only ever coached at Leicester. I
never had to prove myself because I had
come through the system.
?Then I got the opportunity [as
forwards coach] at Toulon. I thought it
would be a great experience and quite
relaxed because Mike Ford was in
charge. When I took over as head
coach, we had to win six games to reach
the final and we did. I needed to get it
right, which pretty much I did.
?They sacked Mike on the
Monday, nobody trained. That
weekend we had to beat Toulouse at
Marseilles in front of 65,000 people.
You have four days to get prepped
with a coach [Matt Giteau] who had
never coached and a scrum coach
[Marc del Maso] who?s got Parkinson?s
disease and has his own issues.
?You need to be a strong personality
in that environment because everyone?s going, ?You need to win?. So you go,
?No problem, I?m used to winning?.
Yesterday?s racing results
Southwell
Going: standard
12.30 (1m 4f 14yd) 1, Go On Gal (Shelley
Birkett, 16-1); 2, Lean On Pete (12-1); 3, Mungo
Madness (33-1). 14 ran. 4Kl, 2l. Miss J Feilden.
1.00 (4f 214yd) 1, Royal Diplomat (J Garritty,
7-2); 2, Jim Rockford (13-8 fav); 3, Skyva (9-1).
8 ran. 6l, 2l. R Fahey.
1.30 (4f 214yd) 1, Jabbarockie (Neil Farley, 3-1);
2, Fortune And Glory (16-1); 3, Bithynia (25-1).
10 ran. NR: Skadi. 1Ol, 1Kl. E Alston.
2.00 (6f 16yd) 1, Tricky Dicky (S H James, 6-4
fav); 2, Interlink (11-2); 3, Treaty Of Rome
(9-2). 10 ran. 1Ol, 1Kl. O Williams.
2.35 (7f 14yd) 1, Monsieur Jimmy (S Donohoe,
5-1 Co fav); 2, Breaking Free (15-2); 3, Fossa
(16-1). 14 ran. 6l, Kl. D Carroll.
3.10 (7f 14yd) 1, Noble Ballad (G Lee, 10-1);
2, Bo Selecta (14-1); 3, Break The Silence (8-1).
13 ran. NR: Orientelle. Kl, Ol. R Beckett.
3.45 (2m 102yd) 1, Shine Baby Shine (P Mathers,
8-1); 2, Tynecastle Park (9-1); 3, Esspeegee
(13-2). 14 ran. 11l, 1Nl. P Kirby.
4.15 (4f 214yd) 1, Lydiate Lady (Neil Farley,
8-1); 2, Men United (5-1 fav); 3, Pearl Noir (8-1).
11 ran. Nk, 1Ol. E Alston.
Placepot: �558.70.
Quadpot: �6.90.
Chepstow
Going: good
12.45 (7f 16yd) 1, Chatoyer (S M Levey, 3-1 fav);
2, Bounty Pursuit (9-2); 3, Wahaab (16-1).
12 ran. Kl, 1Kl. R Hannon.
1.15 (7f 16yd) 1, Corporal Maddox (S Hitchcott,
10-1); 2, Carcharias (6-1); 3, Barista (2-1 fav).
10 ran. NR: King Of Swing. 2l, 1Kl. R Harris.
1.45 (1m 14yd) 1, Show Of Force (Rob Hornby,
11-4); 2, Fusion Central (9-1); 3, Double
Reflection (6-4 fav). 8 ran. Nk, Kl. J Portman.
2.15 (1m 14yd) 1, Regimented (Hollie Doyle,
11-8 fav); 2, Sallab (5-2); 3, Blue Laureate (9-4).
6 ran. Nk, hd. R Hannon.
2.50 (6f 16yd) 1, Baron Bolt (David Egan, 3-1); 2,
Major Valentine (12-1); 3, Letmestopyouthere
(8-1). 7 ran. NR: Bonjour Steve. 1Ol, hd. P Cole.
3.25 (6f 16yd) 1, Tifl (David Egan, 14-1);
2, Dream Farr (Evens fav); 3, Blackadder (80-1).
10 ran. ns, 1Ol. Mrs H Main.
4.00 (2m) 1, Taws (David Egan, 2-1 fav); 2,
Medburn Cutler (9-1); 3, Arty Campbell (7-1).
10 ran. NR: Authorized Too, Plymouth Sound,
Sleep Easy. Hd, 3Ol. B R Millman.
4.35 (1m 4f) 1, Murchison River (Dane O?Neill,
7-2); 2, Casaclare (12-1); 3, Incredible Dream
(3-1 fav). 10 ran. NR: Bohemian Rhapsody,
Dancing Dragon, Eastern Lady. Nk, 1Kl.
H Candy.
Placepot: �.80.
Quadpot: �50.
Epsom
Going: good (good to firm in places)
2.05 (7f 3yd) 1, Deadly Accurate (R Winston,
9-2); 2, Hateya (14-1); 3, Powerful Society
(9-2). 8 ran. Kl, 2Nl. H Morrison.
2.40 (6f 3yd) 1, Seprani (Josephine Gordon,
7-1); 2, Summerghand (3-1); 3, Pastfact (5-1).
7 ran. NR: Kings Academy. Ol, ns. M Botti.
3.15 (5f) 1, Midnight Malibu (J Fanning, 7-2);
2, Love On The Rocks (13-2); 3, Majestic Hero
(10-1). 7 ran. NR: Aleef. 1l, 1l. T Easterby.
3.50 (1m 4f 6yd) 1, C?est No Mour (Mr S Walker,
5-2 fav); 2, Thames Knight (7-2); 3, Hollywood
Road (10-3). 8 ran. NR: King of Dreams,
Tobouggaloo. 1Nl, Kl. P Hedger.
4.20 (1m 2f 17yd) 1, Midterm (R L Moore, 7-4);
2, Mount Logan (11-10 fav); 3, Fierce Impact
(JPN) (16-1). 5 ran. NR: Great Hall. 2Kl, 5l.
Sir Michael Stoute.
4.55 (1m 2f 17yd) 1, High End (Edward
Greatrex, 11-8 fav); 2, Lorelina (8-1); 3, Count
Calabash (3-1). 8 ran. 2Nl, 2Ol. S bin Suroor.
5.25 (1m 113yd) 1, Fujaira Bridge (Andrea
Atzeni, 11-2); 2, Lord Clenaghcastle (5-4 fav);
3, Shifting Star (22-1). 8 ran. 1Kl, ns. R Varian.
Placepot: �1.20.
Quadpot: �60.
Ripon
Going: good
2.10 (6f) 1, Flo?s Melody (P Hanagan, 11-4);
2, Felisa (9-4 fav); 3, Plansina (6-1). 10 ran. 1Nl,
2l. R Fahey.
2.45 (1m 1f 170yd) 1, Bahkit (Joe Doyle, 66-1);
2, Oden (3-1 fav); 3, Dream Machine (4-1).
Don?t miss a
key moment
The Times will be
showing all the tries,
tackles and highlights
from the Aviva
Premiership this
season
On mobile, tablet and at
thetimes.co.uk
?The stadium is awesome and you
have Toulon and Toulouse lining up to
play. Where else would you rather be?
No disrespect to Edinburgh, but that?s
the biggest club arena in world rugby.
?When you get into that company, I
was more than capable of taking that
team by the scruff of its neck and getting
it to a point where it was going to win six
games on the trot. We lost the final by
six points [to Clermont Auvergne],
having not won away from home in six
months. People are going, ?Well, you
went into a dysfunctional place and got
some order and made it work?.
?Have I changed? I think you learn
that coaching?s coaching. Leicester
wanted to change the way they wanted
to play and all they?ve done is find out
that they probably didn?t want to
change. The people who employed me
thought they wanted that.
?So they?ve gone back to what they
used to do. I should have said, ?This is
how we play, this is what I believe in, I
know it works? and been stronger in my
conviction.?
Having had his confidence restored
in the maelstrom of Toulon, Cockerill is
giving Edinburgh ? who finished
ninth in the league last season ? a
seismic shake-up. To say he was
unimpressed by the Guinness Pro14
club would be a stark understatement.
?The club has been around for
140-odd years, but no one can really tell
me what the culture is or what it looks
like,? he said. ?From 1872 until now,
there is a shitload of history and it is
missing somewhere, in a cupboard.
?I don?t know how many internationals or Lions that Edinburgh has produced, but it is a lot. There is not a board
anywhere that says anything. We
should have that and celebrate that.
?That history is important because
when you put the shirt on, it?s not your
shirt is it? So when I put the Leicester
shirt on, that was Peter Wheeler?s shirt.
One of Ed Slater?s first comments when
he played in the No 4 shirt at Leicester
was, ?That?s Martin Johnson?s shirt, so I
have got to do it justice?.
?In ten years? time, when someone
pulls on the No 2 shirt it will be Ross
Ford?s shirt, the most capped Scotsman
of all. That is history. That should be
important, shouldn?t it?
?I have to take this group and help
them realise their potential. I?m trying
to bring the work ethic so they understand how hard you have to work to be
good, because I don?t think some of
them understand that. I asked the team
in pre-season how they think other
teams perceive us and it wasn?t positive;
?They probably expect to come and
beat us?. We have got to change that and
that starts with me.?
Results
10 ran. NR: Akkadian Empire. 1Ol, 1Ol. Sally
Haynes.
3.20 (6f) 1, Hee Haw (D Tudhope, 9-2);
2, Sfumato (11-2); 3, Harome (6-1). 8 ran.
NR: Somewhere Secret. 1l, nk. P Midgley.
3.55 (1m) 1, Brilliant Vanguard (Kevin Stott,
11-4 fav); 2, Home Cummins (9-1); 3, Laidback
Romeo (5-1). 10 ran. 2l, 2Ol. K Ryan.
4.30 (6f) 1, Enjazaat (Jim Crowley, 7-2); 2, Tip
Two Win (16-1); 3, Lake Volta (5-4 fav). 7 ran.
NR: Rebel Assault. 2l, Ol. O Burrows.
5.05 (1m) 1, Musical Terms (Jim Crowley, 4-6
fav); 2, Bombay (9-2); 3, Global Roar (40-1).
6 ran. 1Ol, 1Ol. W Haggas.
5.35 (1m 2f 190yd) 1, Strictly Art (Miss J
Cooley, 9-2); 2, All For Nothing (11-8 fav);
3, Kerry Icon (11-4). 7 ran. NR: Royal Etiquette,
Stonecoldsoba, Sunshineandbubbles. 1Nl, 4Kl.
A Bailey.
Placepot: �.70.
Quadpot: �.00.
Cartmel
Going: good to soft (good in places)
2.20 (2m 6f 31yd hdle) 1, Boy In A Bentley
(R Johnson, 6-5); 2, Mizen Master (11-10 fav);
3, Strong Resemblance (7-1). 5 ran. ns, 2Nl.
N Mulholland.
2.55 (2m 1f 46yd hdle) 1, Glorvina (B Hughes,
11-1); 2, Knight Destroyer (7-4); 3, Jamacho
(7-2). 4 ran. 7l, 10l. C Mann.
3.30 (2m 1f 61yd ch) 1, Wisty (Henry Brooke,
5-2); 2, Nicolas Chauvin (9-1); 3, Oliver?s Gold
(7-1). 6 ran. 17l, 1l. M Todhunter.
4.05 (3m 1f 107yd ch) 1, Fact Of The Matter
(G Sheehan, 3-1 fav); 2, Rebel Rebellion
(6-1); 3, Morning Royalty (9-2). 7 ran. Ol, 16l.
J Snowden.
4.40 (2m 5f 34yd ch) 1, Brave Spartacus
(B Hughes, 5-1); 2, Bon Chic (8-1); 3, Orbasa
(2-1 fav). 7 ran. 10l, 4Kl. G Boanas.
5.10 (3m 1f 83yd hdle) 1, Tawseef (Lorcan
Murtagh, 16-1); 2, Court King (13-8 fav);
3, Matorico (8-1). 6 ran. 3Kl, Kl. D McCain Jnr.
5.45 (2m 6f 31yd hdle) 1, Dotties Dilema (James
Bowen, 6-1); 2, Saucysioux (4-1); 3, Pads (3-1).
10 ran. 1l, 2l. P Bowen.
Placepot: �115.00.
Quadpot: �7.00.
Football
Tennis
Vanarama National League: Boreham Wood 1
Wrexham 0; Bromley 0 Sutton Utd 1; Chester 0
Macclesfield 2; Dover 1 Ebbsfleet 1; Eastleigh 0
Aldershot 0; Gateshead 0 Halifax 0; Guiseley 0
Hartlepool 1; Maidenhead 0 Leyton Orient 1;
Maidstone 0 Dagenham & Red 0; Solihull Moors
0 Tranmere 2; Woking 4 Torquay 1; Fylde 1
Barrow 0.
US Open: Flushing Meadows, New York
First round (seeds in brackets): Singles: Men:
(23) M Zverev (Ger) bt T Kwiatkowski (US) 7-6,
4-6, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3; (16) L Pouille (Fr) bt R
Bemelmans (Bel) 6-3, 6-4, 6-4; P Lorenzi (Ita) bt
J Sousa (Por) 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4), 6-2; (19) G
Muller (Lux) bt B Tomic (Aus) 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4;
Lu Yen-Hsun (Taiwan) bt (25) K Khachanov
(Russ) 4-6, 6-2, 6-3, 6-3; D Shapovalov (Can) bt
D Medvedev (Russ) 7-5, 6-1, 6-2; E Gulbis (Lat)
bt A Giannessi (It) 6-4 6-7(7-3) 6-2 7-5; D Sela
(Isr) bt C Eubanks (US) 6-2, 6-4, 6-2; R Albot
(Mold) bt E Escobedo (US) 7-5, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4;
(10)J Isner (US) bt P-H Herbert (Fr) 6-1, 6-3,
4-6, 6-3; (5) M Cilic (Cro) bt T Sandgren (US)
6-4, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3; (8) J-W Tsonga (Fr) bt M Copil
(Rom) 6-3, 6-3, 6-4; (29) D Schwartzman (Arg)
bt C Berlocq (Arg) 6-2, 6-1, 6-3; M Kukushkin
(Kaz) bt (21) D Ferrer (Sp) 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1; B
Paire (Fr) bt L Lacko (Slovakia) 6-3, 6-2, 7-6 (75); Chung Hyeon (S Korea) bt H Zeballos (Arg)
3-6 7-6 (10-8), 6-4, 6-3; (28) K Anderson (SA) bt
J C Aragone (US) 6-3, 6-3, 6-1; F Mayer (Ger)
beat R Dutra Silva (Br) 7-5, 0-6, 6-3, 6-4; S
Johnson (US) bt N Almagro (Sp) 6-4, 7-6 (7-2),
7-6 (7-5); (12) P Carreno (Sp) bt E King (US) 6-3,
6-2, 7-6 (7-5); K Edmund (GB) bt (32) R Haase
(Neth) 6-3, 7-5, 6-3; C Norrie (GB) bt D Tursunov
(Russ) 7-6 (9-7), 6-1 ret; E Donskoy (Russ) bt A
Haider-Maurer (Austria) 7-6 (7-3), 5-1 ret.
Women: A Barty (Aus) bt A Konjuh (Cro) 4-6,
6-0, 6-1; E Makarova (Russ) bt M Barthel (Ger)
6-2, 6-1; A Sasnovich (Bel) bt J Boserup (US) 62, 6-2; (16) A Sevastova (Lat) bt C Witthoeft
(Ger) 7-5, 6-1; (9) V Williams (US) bt V
Kuzmova (Slovakia) 6-3, 3-6, 6-2; S Stephens
(US) bt R Vinci (It) 7-5, 6-1; A Tomljanovic
(Aus) bt J Larsson (Swe) 7-5, 6-4; D Vekic (Cro)
bt B Haddad Maia (Braz) 6-2, 6-1; Zheng Saisai
(China) bt A Van Uytvanck (Belg) 6-4, 3-6, 6-1;
A Krunic (Serbia) bt (7) J Konta (GB) 4-6, 6-3,
6-4; K Pliskova (Cz) bt M Eguchi (Japan) 6-2,
6-2; (18) C Garc韆 (Fr) bt T Martincova (Cz) 6-0,
6-1; E Alexandrova (Russ) bt A Zaja (Ger) 6-2,
6-3; (31) M Rybarikova (Slovakia) bt C Giorgi
(It) 6-3, 6-4; (3) G Muguruza (Sp) bt V
Lepchenko (US) 6-0, 6-3; (13) P Kvitova (Cz) bt
J Jankovic (Serbia) 7-5, 7-5; A Rodionova (Aus)
bt R Hogenkamp (Neth) 7-5, 7-5; A Cornet (Fr)
bt H Watson (GB) 6-4, 6-4; S Vickery (US) bt N
P W
Sutton United..........7 5
Dag & Red ................ 7 3
Leyton O...................7 4
Wrexham ................. 7 4
Aldershot.................7 3
Gateshead................7 3
Boreham Wood........7 3
Bromley....................7 3
Dover Athletic ......... 7 3
Macclesfld................7 3
Eastleigh..................7 2
AFC Fylde.................7 2
Ebbsfleet United......7 1
Maidenhead United . 7 2
Tranmere ................. 7 2
FC Halifax ................ 7 2
Maidstone United....7 2
Woking.....................7 3
Barrow ..................... 7 1
Chester FC................6 1
Hartlepool................7 1
Guiseley ................... 7 1
Solihull Moors..........6 1
Torquay....................7 0
D
0
4
1
0
2
2
2
2
2
2
4
4
6
3
3
3
3
0
4
3
2
2
1
1
L
2
0
2
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
0
2
2
2
2
4
2
2
4
4
4
6
F
10
16
10
6
14
8
15
11
7
6
7
12
12
10
7
4
7
9
9
6
4
5
7
8
A GD Pts
7 3 15
10 6 13
10 0 13
5 1 12
7 7 11
3 5 11
11 4 11
8 3 11
6 1 11
6 0 11
5 2 10
12 0 10
10 2 9
8 2 9
6 1 9
4 0 9
8 -1 9
12 -3 9
8 1 7
8 -2 6
9 -5 5
14 -9 5
14 -7 4
19 -11 1
National League North: Alfreton 4 Curzon
Ashton 0; Blyth Spartans 0 Harrogate 2; Boston
Utd 1 Nuneaton 1; Brackley 2 Kidderminster 0;
Bradford PA 0 Chorley 0; Darlington 1
Spennymoor 1; Gainsborough Trinity 2 North
Ferriby Utd 0; Leamington 0 Telford Utd 3;
Salford City 2 Southport 1; Tamworth 3
Stockport 1; York 0 FC United of Manchester 2.
South: Bognor Regis 0 Eastbourne Borough 1;
Braintree 1 St Albans 0; Chippenham 3 Oxford
City 2; Concord Rangers 0 Chelmsford 2;
Dartford 0 East Thurrock 1; Gloucester 2 Bath 1;
Havant & Waterlooville 4 Whitehawk 0; Poole 1
Hungerford 2; Truro 2 West-Super-Mare 1;
Wealdstone 1 Hemel Hempstead 1; Welling 0
Hampton & Richmond 1.
Vikhlyantseva (Russ) 4-6, 6-4, 6-1; M Sakkari
(Gr) bt (24) K Bertens (Neth) 6-3, 6-4; S Kenin
(US) bt (32) L Davis (US) 7-5, 7-5; (30) J
Goerges (Ger) bt A Beck (Ger) 6-1, 6-0; M
Sakkari (Gr) bt (24) K Bertens (Neth) 6-3, 6-4;
K Kozlova (Ukr) bt I Begu (Rom) 6-2, 7-6 (9-7);
Duan Yingying (China) bt C Liu (US) 7-6 (10-8),
7-6 (7-3).
Fixtures
Cricket
Second Investec Test: Headingley (final day
of five, 11.0, 90 overs minimum): England v
West Indies.
Specsavers County Championship (second day
of four, 11.0, 96 overs minimum) Division One:
Chelmsford: Essex v Somerset. Emirates Old
Trafford: Lancashire v Warwickshire. Kia Oval:
Surrey v Middlesex. Division Two: Emirates
Riverside: Durham v Derbyshire. Colwyn Bay:
Glamorgan v Sussex. Canterbury: Kent v
Leicestershire. Trent Bridge: Nottinghamshire v
Northamptonshire. Worcester: Worcestershire
v Gloucestershire.
Football
Kick-off 7.45pm unless stated
EFL Checkatrade Trophy: Northern section:
Group A: Fleetwood v Leicester U21;
Morecambe v Carlisle. Group B: Blackpool v
Wigan (7.0). Group C: Blackburn v Stoke U21.
Group D: Crewe v Newcastle U21 (7.30);
Oldham v Port Vale (7.30). Group E: Coventry v
Shrewsbury. Group F: Chesterfield v Bradford
(7.0). Group G: Mansfield v Lincoln. Group H:
Grimsby v Doncaster; Scunthorpe v Sunderland
U21. Southern section: Group A: Crawley v
Charlton. Group B: Colchester v Reading U21
(7.30); Gillingham v Southend. Group C:
Wycombe v Bristol Rovers. Group D: Exeter v
Yeovil. Group E: Forest Green v Newport (7.30).
Group F: Barnet v AFC Wimbledon (8.0). Group
G: MK Dons v Brighton U21; Stevenage v
Oxford. Group H: Northampton v Cambridge;
Peterborough v Southampton U21.
Scottish Challenge Cup: Ayr United v Montrose.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
51
1GM
Racing Sport
Epsom
Thunderer
2.00 Seaella
4.20 Hepplewhite
2.35 Global Style (nap) 4.50 Av A Word
3.10 Reputation
5.20 Dourado
3.45 Coral Sea
Going: good (good to firm in places)
Draw: 5f, high numbers best
Racing UK
2.00
Nursery Handicap
(2-Y-O: �528: 7f 3y) (9)
1 (1) 16363 ANOTHER DAY OF SUN 19 M Channon 9-7 S De Sousa
H Crouch (3)
2 (5) 4054 HARD GRAFT 14 D Brown 9-7
J Hart
3 (2) 01342 SEAELLA 19 (BF) J J Quinn 9-6
D Probert
4 (4) 436 RUYSCH 24 E Dunlop 9-5
5 (8) 035 VICEROY MAC 27 D Loughnane 9-4 Josephine Gordon
S Drowne
6 (3) 340 RAINBOW JAZZ 34 (P) M Usher 9-3
J Egan
7 (7) 45040 DIAMOND PURSUIT J Hughes 9-2
8 (9) 15401 LEXINGTON GRACE 18 (P,D) R Hannon 9-1 T Marquand
A McNamara (3)
9 (6) 6603 PANOPHOBIA 18 R Fahey 8-12
7-2 Panophobia, 5-1 Lexington Grace, Seaella, 6-1 Ruysch, 8-1 others.
Thunderer?s choice: Seaella bumped into a classy filly at
Newcastle last time Dangers: Hard Graft, Diamond Pursuit
2.35
Maiden Stakes
(2-Y-O: �881: 1m 113y) (8)
6 BERKSHIRE SPIRIT 19 A Balding 9-5
R Hornby
1 (7)
P Cosgrave
2 (4) 050 COLORADO DREAM 45 (P) G Baker 9-5
0 GLOBAL STYLE 11 E Dunlop 9-5
S De Sousa
3 (2)
5 I'M A STAR 31 S C Williams 9-5
M Harley
4 (3)
LYNWOOD GOLD M Johnston 9-5
J Fanning
5 (1)
WE KNOW (T) S Crisford 9-5
O Murphy
6 (6)
4 ICONIC CODE 11 M Channon 9-0
C Bishop
7 (8)
04 RAVEN'S SONG 17 H Dunlop 9-0
W A Carson
8 (5)
3-1 Berkshire Spirit, 100-30 I'm A Star, 7-2 Lynwood Gold, 4-1 others.
Thunderer: Global Style is well bred and should improve
for his debut run
Dangers: We Know, Lynwood Gold
3.10
Handicap (�338: 6f 3y) (7)
M Harley
1 (4) -2401 CORONATION DAY 18 (D) J Tate 4-9-10
J Hart
2 (2) 10440 REPUTATION 10 (V,CD) J J Quinn 4-9-9
3 (1) -6023 HUNTSMANS CLOSE 28 (H,D) R Cowell 7-9-9 R Winston
4 (7) 20150 HIGHLAND ACCLAIM 10 (H,CD) D O'Meara 6-9-8 H Bentley
O Murphy
5 (5) 36125 HANDYTALK 22 (BF) B Millman 4-9-6
J Fanning
6 (3) 10056 POET'S SOCIETY 10 (D) M Johnston 3-9-5
62434
SCOFFLAW
16
(D)
R
Fahey
3-8-13
A
McNamara
(3)
7 (6)
3-1 Coronation Day, 4-1 Scofflaw, 6-1 Handytalk, Huntsmans Close, Poet's
Society, Reputation, 7-1 Highland Acclaim.
Thunderer: Reputation drops in class and has a solid
record at this track Dangers: Coronation Day, Scofflaw
3.45
Handicap (�116: 7f 3y) (10)
H Crouch (3)
1 (3) 05465 MUNFALLET 40 D Brown 6-9-12
S De Sousa
2 (8) 56150 THAQAFFA 25 A Murphy 4-9-12
3 (10) 52000 RED TYCOON 11 K Cunningham-Brown 5-9-11
Finley Marsh (5)
A McNamara (3)
4 (1) 03262 FLYBOY 34 (B) R Fahey 4-9-10
H Bentley
5 (9) 01651 CORAL SEA 26 (H,CD) C Hills 3-9-9
6 (7) -3150 CARPE DIEM LADY 45 (V,D) R Beckett 4-9-8 O Murphy
J Egan
7 (4) -5056 TIGERWOLF 4 (D) M Channon 4-9-7
8 (2) 24100 FAVOURITE ROYAL 35 (P) E Houghton 3-9-4 R Winston
9 (6) 14410 SWISS CROSS 25 (T,P,C,D) Phil McEntee 10-9-1
Josephine Gordon
D Sweeney
10 (5) 20133 ANDALUSITE 20 (V,D) J Gallagher 4-8-8
4-1 Flyboy, 5-1 Carpe Diem Lady, Favourite Royal, 6-1 Coral Sea, 8-1 others.
Thunderer: Coral Sea could have more to give at this trip
after winning here last time Dangers: Flyboy, Munfallet
4.20
Handicap (�881: 1m 4f 6y) (7)
P Cosgrave
1 (1) 65354 CORDITE 29 (H) J Boyle 6-10-0
M Dwyer
2 (5) 30232 HEPPLEWHITE 26 (P,D) W Muir 4-9-13
S Donohoe
3 (3) /0-06 SPIN POINT 120J (P) I Williams 5-9-12
J Fanning
4 (2) 50120 GOLD MERLION 18 M Johnston 4-9-11
L Keniry
5 (4) 06335 CHALLOW 21 S Kirk 3-9-1
D Probert
6 (6) 06233 ODE TO GLORY 22 Rae Guest 3-8-13
S W Kelly
7 (7) 62123 LET'S BE HAPPY 22 (P) R Hughes 3-8-13
9-4 Gold Merlion, 11-4 Ode To Glory, 4-1 Let's Be Happy, 13-2 others.
Thunderer: Hepplewhite was second here earlier this
month and that form looks solid Danger: Ode To Glory
4.50
Handicap (�881: 1m 2f 17y) (11)
A Beschizza
1 (3) 24040 SQUIRE 20 (T,D) M Attwater 6-10-2
H Bentley
2 (1) 05065 MARAAKIB 13 (P,D) D O'Meara 5-10-1
3 (6) 62445 THE GAY CAVALIER 2 (T,CD) John Ryan 6-9-12
J Osborn (7)
T Marquand
4 (5) 06150 GALINTHIAS 20 S Dow 5-9-11
M Godwin (5)
5 (9) 02004 PINK RIBBON 18 (P,D) S Kirk 5-9-10
T E Durcan
6 (8) 0-311 OH IT'S SAUCEPOT 19 C Wall 3-9-7
H Crouch (3)
7 (4) 2/605 ROYAL HALL 21 (P) G L Moore 5-9-6
S De Sousa
8 (7) 03161 AV A WORD 18 (P,D) D Kubler 3-9-4
D Muscutt
9 (2) 01536 BAYSTON HILL 22 (D) M Usher 3-9-4
T Queally
10(11) 00-24 RETRIBUTION 28 (BF) D Lanigan 3-9-1
J Egan
11(10) 26210 EPSOM SECRET 34 (D) P Phelan 3-8-10
11-4 Oh It's Saucepot, 5-1 Epsom Secret, Retribution, 11-2 Av A Word,
10-1 Maraakib, The Gay Cavalier, 14-1 others.
Thunderer: Av A Word has won his past three races over
this distance
Dangers: Oh It?s Saucepot, Retribution
5.20
Handicap (3-Y-O: �528: 7f 3y) (6)
D Probert
1 (2) 05-51 DOURADO 26 (CD) P Chamings 9-8
A McNamara (3)
2 (4) 22530 RIGHT ACTION 17 (D) R Fahey 9-7
H Bentley
3 (6) 31244 TRAVELLER 21 (T,D) C Hills 9-6
S De Sousa
4 (1) 25332 LIGHTOLLER 16 (B) M Channon 9-0
5 (3) 61326 DRAGON DREAM 6 (D) R Ingram 8-10 Rhiain Ingram (7)
J Fanning
6 (5) 63001 PRAZERES 11 (D) L Eyre 8-6
11-4 Dourado, 3-1 Traveller, 5-1 Prazeres, Right Action, 11-2 others.
Thunderer: Dourado was five and a half lengths clear of
a subsequent winner last time
Danger: Traveller
Carlisle
Thunderer
4.45 Debawtry
6.45 Redrosezorro
5.15 Yes You
7.15 Penny Pot Lane
5.45 Mable Lee (nb)
7.45 Nepeta
6.15 Kai Tak And Back
Going: good to soft (good in places)
Draw: low numbers best
Racing UK
4.45
Novice Auction Stakes
(2-Y-O: �235: 5f 193y) (10)
31 HAN SOLO BERGER 39 (D) K Dalgleish 9-9 P Mulrennan
1 (8)
4 BONANZA BOWLS 13 B Smart 9-2
C Beasley
2 (2)
0 FAKE NEWS 55 T D Barron 9-2
B A Curtis
3 (4)
T Hamilton
4 (9) 042 LUCKY LUCKY MAN 15 R Fahey 9-2
SE YOU T Easterby 9-2
Rachel Richardson (3)
5 (1)
SIOUX FRONTIER R Fahey 9-2
P P Mathers
6 (3)
2 DEBAWTRY 12 D O'Meara 8-11
P Makin
7 (10)
0 HAVANA MARIPOSA 32 K Burke 8-11
J Haynes
8 (5)
NORTH ANGEL D Brown 8-11
T Eaves
9 (6)
65 OUT LAST 15 K Dalgleish 8-11
R Scott (5)
10 (7)
5-2 Debawtry, 11-4 Han Solo Berger, 7-2 Lucky Lucky Man, 7-1 others.
5.15
Handicap (�235: 5f 193y) (14)
D Tudhope
1 (11) 50341 SHORT WORK 9 (B,D) D O'Meara 4-10-0
2 (8) 60443 MANATEE BAY 41 (V,CD,BF) N Wilson 7-9-10
Natalie Hambling (7)
N Farley
3 (4) 400-0 BARKSTON ASH 20 (P,D) E Alston 9-9-9
4 (1) 66053 MARKET CHOICE 24 (CD) Miss T Waggott 4-9-9
Cal Rodriguez (5)
P Makin
5 (10) 32500 EXTRASOLAR 29 (T,D) G Harker 7-9-9
Faye McManoman (7)
6 (6) 12416 CLIFF 9 (CD) N Tinkler 7-9-9
C Beasley
7 (13) 41561 KI KI 32 (CD) B Smart 5-9-8
B A Curtis
8 (7) 52624 SEMANA SANTA 24 (D) T D Barron 4-9-7
Gemma Tutty (5)
9 (12) 23240 WILLSY 3 (B,D) Mrs K Tutty 4-9-5
J Gormley (7)
10 (9) 31131 YES YOU 6 (CD) I Jardine 3-9-5
Kevin Stott
11(14) 34103 YPRES 14 (P,CD) J Ward 8-9-3
12 (2) 444 MISCHIEF MANAGED 17 (E) T Easterby 3-9-3 D Fentiman
Sean Mooney (7)
13 (5) 40055 LOTARA 17 (P) J Goldie 5-8-8
14 (3) 00000 KEENE'S POINTE 29 (P,D) S Hollinshead 7-8-6 R Ffrench
5-1 Short Work, Yes You, 6-1 Ki Ki, 13-2 Market Choice, 7-1 others.
5.45
Nursery Handicap
(2-Y-O: �881: 5f) (11)
P Mulrennan
1 (7) 532 ROSSALL 24 M Dods 9-10
2 (2) 31203 UNDERCOVER BROTHER 13 (D) D O'Meara 9-7 D Tudhope
C Lee (3)
3 (4) 336 MAGIC MARK 45 K Burke 9-6
R Kingscote
4 (8) 42302 PORCHY PARTY 29 (P) T Dascombe 9-6
J Gormley (7)
5 (10) 5261 MABLE LEE 25 (D) I Jardine 9-5
B Robinson (5)
6 (6) 64251 BROCKEY RISE 14 (V) P D Evans 9-4
7 (3) 6304 BILLIEBROOKEDIT 19 (H) S Hollinshead 9-2 R Ffrench
G Lee
8 (1) 02630 ROCKET MAN DAN 73 K Dalgleish 9-1
B A Curtis
9 (11) 0345 HERMANA SANTA 14 T D Barron 9-0
10 (9) 430 LIFE FOR RENT 19 T Easterby 8-13 Rachel Richardson (3)
P Makin
11 (5) 432 LINA'S STAR 28 R Fahey 8-12
4-1 Lina's Star, 5-1 Brockey Rise, Mable Lee, Rossall, 13-2 others.
6.15
Maiden Stakes (�235: 1m 1f) (6)
BOMBAY D O'Meara 3-9-5
D Tudhope
1 (5)
B McHugh
2 (6) 0632 HAROON 5 (T) Tony Coyle 3-9-5
KAI TAK AND BACK W Muir 3-9-5
P Makin
3 (2)
40 LITTLE JO 9 C Grant 3-9-5
G Lee
4 (3)
54 BIBA 5 (P) K Dalgleish 3-9-0
R Scott (5)
5 (1)
B A Curtis
6 (4) 2-233 SEA TIDE 11 (T,P,BF) H Palmer 3-9-0
6-4 Sea Tide, 2-1 Kai Tak And Back, 100-30 Haroon, 13-2 Bombay, 33-1 others.
6.45
Handicap (�911: 7f 173y) (17)
1 (6) 10555 MR COOL CASH 14 (D,BF) Richard Guest 5-10-2 C Beasley
2 (1) 21204 FULL OF PROMISE 19 (CD) R Fahey 4-10-2
Sebastian Woods (7)
J Haynes
3 (3) 36042 JAY KAY 15 (H,D) K Burke 8-10-1
C Lee (3)
4 (14) 005R0 TELLOVOI 3 (V,D) Richard Guest 9-9-13
J Sullivan
5 (12) 10066 TANAWAR 14 (V,CD) Mrs R Carr 7-9-12
40014
PRETTY
JEWEL
11
(D)
K
Frost
4-9-9
T Eaves
6 (15)
Doubtful
7 (4) -0066 ROBBEN RAINBOW 28 T D Barron 3-9-8
D Tudhope
8 (13) 02220 CATASTROPHE 12 (BF) J J Quinn 4-9-6
T Hamilton
9 (17) 03002 LOZAH 2 (D) R G Fell 4-9-5
R Ffrench
10(10) -2036 SUPREME POWER 6 Miss T Waggott 3-9-4
11 (8) 40605 THORNABY NASH 10 (P,D) Mrs K Tutty 6-9-4
Gemma Tutty (5)
B McHugh
12(11) -0460 LEOPARD 18 Tony Coyle 3-9-1
J Gormley (7)
13 (9) 5-051 EURO MAC 15 (D) N Bycroft 5-9-1
Doubtful
14 (2) 0-020 NEWSPEAK 29 F Watson 5-8-11
N Farley
15 (5) 00302 REDROSEZORRO 21 (H) E Alston 3-8-11
S A Gray
16(16) -3000 PORT MASTER 56 Mrs A Duffield 3-8-8
D Fentiman
17 (7) 0-000 HOT GOSSIP 14 Mrs D Sayer 3-8-3
5-1 Euro Mac, 6-1 Jay Kay, Lozah, 7-1 Full Of Promise, 15-2 Catastrophe,
8-1 Mr Cool Cash, Redrosezorro, 10-1 Pretty Jewel, 12-1 Tanawar, 14-1 others.
7.15
Handicap (�235: 6f 195y) (12)
1 (7) 33243 MAJOR CRISPIES 9 (T,B) D O'Meara 6-9-13 D Tudhope
S A Gray
2 (6) 2-636 LET'S TWIST 10 (B,D) K Stubbs 5-9-12
3 (10) 22060 ROCK WARBLER 11 (H,T,D) O Greenall 4-9-11 Kevin Stott
4 (5) -0202 PENNY POT LANE 9 R Whitaker 4-9-9 L Edmunds (3)
5 (3) 10555 MR COOL CASH 14 (D,BF) Richard Guest 5-9-9 C Beasley
T Hamilton
6 (1) 34522 LADY IN QUESTION 8 (BF) R Fahey 3-9-7
7 (9) 01050 REINFORCED 29 (T,P,CD) M Dods 4-9-6 Cal Rodriguez (5)
N Farley
8 (11) 53533 BUSH BEAUTY 19 E Alston 6-9-5
G Lee
9 (4) 20410 DESTINATION AIM 19 (D) F Watson 10-9-3
J Garritty
10(12) 36460 FORTUITIES 29 (H) Jedd O'Keeffe 3-9-1
T Eaves
11 (8) -0636 CIRCUITOUS 36 (V,C,D) K Dalgleish 9-9-0
12 (2) 06000 MR CONUNDRUM 10 (P) Miss L Siddall 4-8-7 J Sullivan
3-1 Lady In Question, 9-2 Major Crispies, 7-1 Bush Beauty, Destination Aim,
8-1 Penny Pot Lane, 9-1 Mr Cool Cash, 10-1 Rock Warbler, 12-1 others.
7.45
Handicap (�235: 1m 3f 39y) (8)
G Lee
(4) 30560 CHELSEA'S BOY 22 D McCain 4-10-0
(1) 00613 POLAR FOREST 20 (H,E) Richard Guest 7-10-0 C Beasley
(3) 00435 SHERIFF OF NAWTON 22 R G Fell 6-10-0 T Hamilton
(8) 21241 THORNTOUN CARE 18 (P,CD) I Jardine 6-9-13
J Gormley (7)
T Eaves
5 (6) 236-3 LE DELUGE 27 (T,D) M D Hammond 7-9-9
P P Mathers
6 (5) 3520- GHOSTLY ARC 142J N Wilson 5-9-7
P McDonald
7 (7) 424-0 NEPETA 12 M Johnston 3-9-6
8 (2) 45445 PRINCESS NEARCO 14 (P) P Holmes 3-8-11 J Garritty
7-4 Thorntoun Care, 7-2 Sheriff Of Nawton, 7-1 Polar Forest, Princess Nearco,
9-1 Ghostly Arc, Nepeta, 10-1 Chelsea's Boy, 16-1 Le Deluge.
1
2
3
4
Newton Abbot
Thunderer
4.35 Premier Rose
6.35 Aldrin
5.05 Third Act
7.05 Mount Vesuvius
5.35 Watcombe Heights 7.35 Now Voyager
6.05 Alcala
Going: good (good to firm in places) At The Races
4.35
Handicap Hurdle
(�711: 2m 5f 122y) (11)
4-621 BYRON BLUE 35F (T) B Barr 8-12-1
D Crosse
-5550 WOLFTRAP 49 (H,C,D) P Hobbs 8-12-0
L Heard
20F5- MISTER BIG 175 N King 6-11-12
T Whelan
/456- GAMAIN 307 (P,D) N Williams 8-11-11 Mr C Williams (7)
P-540 D'PINESFLYER 88 J Farrelly 5-11-11
N Fehily
34P-3 DALIANCE (B,BF) N Williams 8-11-10 W Featherstone (5)
2-225 EQUITY SWAP 25 Mrs D Hamer 8-11-8 Mr L Williams (7)
2-P00 COUGAR KID 13 John O'Shea 6-11-1 Miss B Hampson (5)
205-5 BACCALAUREATE 42 (P) J Frost 11-10-11 Bryony Frost (5)
4-521 PREMIER ROSE 9 (T) D Skelton 8-10-7
H Skelton
-2050 TOP OF THE ROCKS 6 (H,T,P) Mrs K Stephens 4-10-0
Miss P Fuller (5)
4-6 Premier Rose, 6-1 D'Pinesflyer, 10-1 Byron Blue, 12-1 others.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
5.05
Handicap Chase (�874: 2m 75y) (8)
54P-3 BONOBO 37 (C,D) E Williams 10-11-12
L Gordon (7)
32-52 THIRD ACT 29 (T,P,D) C Tizzard 8-11-11
H Cobden
1-412 GET READY FREDDY 23 (T,D,BF) D Skelton 7-11-8 H Skelton
03502 CHANGING THE GUARD 29 (T,CD) F J Brennan 11-11-8
T Dowling (7)
J Best
5 P4-00 MONEY FOR NOTHING 50 (T,B) J Farrelly 8-11-4
6 2-210 NO NO CARDINAL 29 (P,CD) M Gillard 8-10-11
James Bowen (7)
7 33240 TRIGGYWINKLE 53 (T,P,CD) R Buckler 8-10-4 S Houlihan (7)
8 25403 ACCESSALLAREAS 25 (P,CD) S Davies 12-10-1
C Hammond (7)
2-1 Get Ready Freddy, 5-1 Bonobo, No No Cardinal, 6-1 others.
1
2
3
4
5.35
Maiden Hurdle
2.50
(�711: 2m 2f 110y) (7)
1 (2) 60-30 CALYPSO DELEGATOR 20 (V) M D Hammond 4-9-2
A Mullen
B McHugh
2 (1) 30050 FALSE ID 5 (T,P) Mrs M Fife 4-9-2
40005
PERCY
VERENCE
12
(P)
Miss
T
Waggott
4-9-2
F Norton
3 (4)
P McDonald
4 (3) 40603 ROCKLIFFE 20 (P,D) M D Hammond 4-9-2
G Downing
5 (5) 20500 PERMANENT 8 (B) D Kubler 3-8-9
L Morris
6 (6) 06265 CALIFORNIA CLIFFS 8 Rae Guest 3-8-4
5-2 False Id, 11-4 California Cliffs, 100-30 Permanent, 7-1 others.
B Powell
1 P40-2 AMANTO 28 (T,BF) Ali Stronge 7-11-0
06-4 MIDNIGHT MAGIC 108 (H,T) D Pipe 5-11-0
T Scudamore
2
60 MONTY MASSINI 12 E Williams 6-11-0
C Ring (3)
3
4 /UPU- SHADOW'S BOY 157P B Llewellyn 8-11-0 R Williams (3)
5 53-44 SNOW CASTLE 13 (B) E Williams 5-11-0 S Twiston-Davies
J McGrath
6 10/2 WATCOMBE HEIGHTS 13 (H,C) M Hill 7-11-0
W Hutchinson
7 /5P-6 WILD MURPHY 26 N Williams 6-11-0
6-4 Watcombe Heights, 7-4 Amanto, 5-2 Snow Castle, 20-1 others.
6.05
Novices? Chase
(�280: 2m 4f 216y) (3)
S Twiston-Davies
1 -1111 ALCALA 13 (T,CD) P Nicholls 7-11-8
H Cobden
2 -4222 EXXARO 28 (T,B,D) C Tizzard 7-10-12
J Best
3 0-020 SHEER POETRY 28 (T,C,D) R Woollacott 6-10-5
1-7 Alcala, 5-1 Exxaro, 20-1 Sheer Poetry.
6.35
Handicap Hurdle
(�549: 2m 167y) (7)
31 ALDRIN 13 (T,D) D Pipe 4-11-12
T Scudamore
1
2 4-120 SALTO CHISCO 68 (D) H Whittington 9-11-10 H Bannister
3 6-36F IN ON THE ACT 12 (T,D) E Williams 7-11-10 M Bastyan (7)
4 12145 CILLIAN'S WELL 13 (T,P,C,D) J Flint 7-11-9 James Bowen (7)
S Bowen
5 46-34 KING ALFONSO 26 (D) D Burchell 8-11-5
6 044-1 BERRY DE CARJAC 5 (D) G Harris 6-11-3 Miss C Walton (3)
7 P4-U0 SERVEONTIME 93 (T,P) Mrs H Nelmes 6-10-7 Paul O'Brien (5)
5-2 Berry De Carjac, 4-1 Cillian's Well, In On The Act, 9-2 Aldrin, 5-1 others.
7.05
Handicap Chase
(�899: 3m 1f 170y) (7)
13530 CHARLIE MON 10 (V) M Hammond 8-11-12 C Hammond (7)
F-222 QUICK N' EASY 13 (H) S Gardner 7-11-8
S Houlihan (7)
34-1P MRSROBIN 54 (P,CD) F J Brennan 7-11-7
J Banks
1-1P3 DESERT STING 83 (T,B,BF) O Greenall 8-11-4
I Popham
63533 MOUNT VESUVIUS 12 (T,C) Paul Henderson 9-11-3
N Scholfield
J E Moore
6 45405 BENNYS GIRL 10 Dai Williams 9-10-4
7 6-500 TRIBAL DANCE 13 (B,D) John O'Shea 11-10-0
Miss B Hampson (5)
100-30 Quick N' Easy, 9-2 Mrsrobin, 5-1 Bennys Girl, Charlie Mon, Desert
Sting, Mount Vesuvius, 14-1 Tribal Dance.
1
2
3
4
5
7.35
NH Flat Race (�625: 2m 167y) (13)
5 BELLE BANJO 13 W Reed 6-10-12
H Cobden
1
54 BROKE AWAY 52 A Dunn 5-10-12
R McLernon
2
LILLIPUT LANE J Farrelly 5-10-12
B Powell
3
MISS QUOTED J S Mullins 5-10-12
Kevin Jones (5)
4
PPUSHADOW'S
GIRL
136P
B
Llewellyn
5-10-12
R
Williams
(3)
5
4 TEQUILA SECRET 44 H Oliver 6-10-12
J Davies
6
BOMBAY RASCAL R Walford 4-10-11
J Best
7
DAVID'S PHOEBE T Lacey 4-10-11
R Dunne
8
DONTDILLYDALLY D Skelton 4-10-11
H Skelton
9
F NOW VOYAGER 92P N Williams 4-10-11 Mr C Williams (7)
10
13 TANGOED 44 H Whittington 4-10-11
H Bannister
11
0-0 THELUNARSCHOONER 116 W Greatrex 4-10-11 R Johnson
12
0- YALLA HABIBTI 286 Mrs L Williamson 4-10-11 Lizzie Kelly (3)
13
11-4 Tangoed, 4-1 Broke Away, 5-1 Tequila Secret, 13-2 others.
Ripon
Thunderer
2.15 Enrolment
4.30 Monticello
2.50 California Cliffs
5.00 Whitkirk
3.25 Paramount Love
5.30 Fitzwilly
4.00 Rodaini
Going: good
At The Races
Draw: round course, low numbers best
2.15
Fillies? Novice Stakes
(2-Y-O: �558: 5f) (11)
01 DEVIATE 29 (D) T Dascombe 9-7
P Pilley (5)
1 (11)
0 ALASKAN BAY 43 Rae Guest 9-0
L Morris
2 (10)
5 BEE INA BONNET 12 T Easterby 9-0
P Mulrennan
3 (5)
52 DANGEROUS LADY 15 T Easterby 9-0
D Allan
4 (6)
ENROLMENT R Fahey 9-0
P Hanagan
5 (7)
KAABA STONE D Simcock 9-0
J P Spencer
6 (1)
MACHREE Declan Carroll 9-0
T Eaves
7 (9)
RASTACAP M Johnston 9-0
F Norton
8 (2)
5 REVIVED 27 (H) Michael Bell 9-0
D Tudhope
9 (4)
00 SANDIE GEM 18 R Fahey 9-0
J Garritty
10 (3)
22 TONKOLILI 59 W Muir 9-0
P Makin
11 (8)
5-2 Revived, 9-2 Deviate, 11-2 Enrolment, 6-1 Tonkolili, 7-1 others.
Blinkered first time: Newton Abbot 5.05 Money For
Nothing. 5.35 Snow Castle. Ripon 2.50 Calypso Delegator.
3.25
Selling Stakes (�588: 1m 1f 170y) (6)
Handicap (2-Y-O: �852: 1m) (6)
G Lee
1 (1) 1102 VEEJAY 18 (BF) M Channon 9-7
F Norton
2 (5) 26341 NOBLE MANNERS 32 M Johnston 9-0
P Hanagan
3 (4) 3325 PARAMOUNT LOVE 24 R Fahey 8-11
D Allan
4 (3) 01365 POET'S DAWN 12 T Easterby 8-9
L Morris
5 (6) 044 BIBBIDIBOBBIDIBOO 25 Mrs A Duffield 8-0
C Hardie
6 (2) 640 FASTALONG 32 T Easterby 8-0
2-1 Noble Manners, 9-4 Veejay, 11-2 Paramount Love, 6-1 others.
4.00
Conditions Stakes
(3-Y-O: �561: 1m) (4)
J P Spencer
1 (2) -1341 HUGIN 27 (D) D Simcock 8-12
F Norton
2 (3) 0-250 RODAINI 68 (B) S Crisford 8-12
P McDonald
3 (4) -0063 USED TO BE 32 K Burke 8-12
Hollie Doyle (3)
4 (1) 16600 MITIGATE 76 Jane Chapple-Hyam 8-7
8-11 Rodaini, 11-10 Hugin, 50-1 Mitigate, 66-1 Used To Be.
4.30
Handicap (�561: 1m 1f 170y) (7)
L Morris
1 (6) 41502 SANDS CHORUS 10 (CD) J Given 5-10-1
2 (2) 52144 MULLIGATAWNY 10 (P,CD) R G Fell 4-10-0
B Sanderson (7)
J Sullivan
3 (3) 12/00 MUTAMADED 15 Mrs R Carr 4-9-9
Josh Doyle (3)
4 (4) 10200 JACBEQUICK 5 (P) D O'Meara 6-9-9
F Norton
5 (5) 32200 MONTICELLO 26 M Johnston 3-9-4
6 (1) 41260 RAY'S THE MONEY 10 (V) Michael Bell 3-8-13 L Steward
P McDonald
7 (7) 15131 ALEXANDER M 3 (D) M Johnston 3-8-10
11-10 Alexander M, 4-1 Sands Chorus, 9-2 Mulligatawny, 9-1 others.
5.00
Handicap (�558: 1m) (11)
D Nolan
1 (6) 60002 DANDYLEEKIE 20 (C) D O'Meara 5-9-12
P Hanagan
2 (5) 1-550 VENUTIUS 50 (CD) C Hills 10-9-8
3 (2) 00430 CAPTAIN REVELATION 15 (D) T Dascombe 5-9-8
P Pilley (5)
J Garritty
4 (3) -2413 WHITKIRK 8 Jedd O'Keeffe 4-9-7
5 (8) 32120 HERNANDO TORRES 17 (T,P,D) M W Easterby 9-9-7
R Timby (7)
6 (11) 22322 TOTALLY MAGIC 14 (D,BF) R Whitaker 5-9-5
L Edmunds (3)
7 (4) 33150 RACEMAKER 6 (CD) Andrew Crook 3-9-5 Phil Dennis (3)
Joe Doyle
8 (9) 22110 ROSY RYAN 14 (D) Miss T Jackson 7-9-2
9 (1) 01410 VENTURA SECRET 17 (D,BF) T Easterby 3-8-13 D Allan
C Hardie
10 (7) 04443 DOMINANNIE 14 S Haynes 4-8-9
A Mullen
11(10) 00-60 INDIAN VISION 33 M D Hammond 3-8-1
4-1 Ventura Secret, 5-1 Dandyleekie, 11-2 Whitkirk, 7-1 Totally Magic,
8-1 Venutius, 10-1 Dominannie, Hernando Torres, Racemaker, 11-1 others.
5.30
Handicap (�235: 2m) (12)
David Egan (5)
(6) 32262 FITZWILLY 8 (D) M Channon 7-10-1
A Mullen
(11) 13246 LA FRITILLAIRE 9 (CD) J Given 5-10-0
(9) -0605 RUSSIAN ROYALE 41 M D Hammond 7-9-6 P Hanagan
(4) 43050 JAN SMUTS 21 (T,P,CD) W Storey 9-9-4
Connor Murtagh (7)
D Allan
5 (10) 66610 FIRESTORM 22 R Ford 6-9-3
6 (12) 02232 THEGLASGOWWARRIOR 15 (P) Michael Bell 3-9-1
L Steward
Paula Muir (7)
7 (7) -0004 MAPLE STIRRUP 18 P Holmes 5-8-13
8 (1) 60220 CRAKEHALL LAD 66 (B) Andrew Crook 6-8-9
Phil Dennis (3)
P Aspell
9 (2) 0-000 RAJAPUR 112 (B) P Kirby 4-8-9
10 (8) 0-000 STRIKEMASTER 28 (T,B,D) L James 11-8-9
M Fernandes (7)
C Hardie
11 (5) 50000 THOMAS CROWN 25 (P) R G Fell 3-8-0
J Quinn
12 (3) 00464 SILVER GLEAM 8 C Fairhurst 3-8-0
11-4 Theglasgowwarrior, 4-1 Fitzwilly, 11-2 La Fritillaire, 9-1 Silver Gleam,
10-1 Crakehall Lad, Russian Royale, 12-1 Firestorm, 14-1 others.
1
2
3
4
Course specialists
Epsom: Trainers J Tate, 3 from 11 runners, 27.3%;
G Baker, 9 from 38, 23.7%. Jockeys C Bishop, 12
from 29 rides, 41.4%; R Winston, 3 from 11, 27.3%.
Carlisle: Trainers J Ward, 3 from 8, 37.5%;
K Burke, 17 from 79, 21.5%. Jockeys C Lee, 5 from
19, 26.3%; B A Curtis, 22 from 94, 23.4%.
Newton Abbot: Trainers P Nicholls, 44 from 135,
32.6%; W Greatrex, 7 from 26, 26.9%.
Jockey S Twiston-Davies, 43 from 162, 26.5%.
Ripon: Trainers Michael Bell, 3 from 12, 25.0%;
T Dascombe, 9 from 49, 18.4%. Jockeys D Tudhope,
29 from 137, 21.2%; P Mulrennan, 24 from 156, 15.4%.
552
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Sport US Open
Konta crashes out to world No 78
CLIVE BRUNSKILL/GETTY IMAGES
Stuart Fraser Tennis Writer, New York
Konta made
42 unforced
errors in her
first-round loss
against Krunic
New York may be the concrete jungle
where dreams are made of, but not so
for Great Britain?s No 1 players this year.
Forty-eight hours after Andy Murray
withdrew from the US Open, Johanna
Konta crashed out of the tournament at
the first hurdle last night.
There had been great expectations of
Konta here. Playing on her favoured
hard courts at Flushing Meadows, she
was one of eight players with a chance
of becoming the world No 1 come the
end of the fortnight. She capitulated,
though, in the face of some fierce
hitting from Aleksandra Krunic, the
world No 78 from Serbia, in a miserable
4-6, 6-3, 6-4 defeat.
Konta?s run to the semi-finals last
month at Wimbledon, where she
became the first British female to reach
the last four since Virginia Wade in
1978, was one of her finest achievements, but the 26-year-old has
struggled to back it up in North
America, winning two of five
matches since then. She insists there
has not been any lingering emotional
letdown. ?It?s definitely not an easy loss
to take,? Konta said. ?I would have liked
to have been involved here for much
longer.
?I don?t take anything for granted. I
A year of ups and downs
Konta?s grand-slam highs and
lows in 2017
Australian Open
Reached quarter-finals, losing to
Serena Williams 6-3, 6-3
French Open
Knocked out in first round by
Hsieh Su-wei 1-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4
Wimbledon
Reached semi-finals, losing to
Venus Williams 6-4, 6-4
US Open
Knocked out in first round by
Aleksandra Krunic 4-6, 6-3, 6-4
think it would be quite obnoxious of me
to come in here expecting I have a right
to be in the second week. How I did at
Wimbledon is not something I bring
into every match I play. The tennis
season moves on quickly. I had an
incredible Wimbledon experience, but
I have moved on since then.?
Konta, the seventh seed, had cruised
to a 4-1 lead with a double break in the
early stages, but Krunic showed that
she was no walkover by levelling for 4-4.
Although Konta managed to close out
the first set, her performance went
rapidly downhill from there and Krunic
took full advantage.
Krunic may be ranked in the lower
reaches of the top 100, but the 24-yearold is a tricky competitor when at her
best. Konta looked uncertain and
uncomfortable during the deciding set
and struggled to win any free points on
her serve, posting a disappointing
first-serve percentage of 45 per cent.
The match came to an end with Konta?s
42nd unforced error, a backhand that
landed wide of the court.
Missing out on the vast amount of
ranking points on offer here, she has
much work to do during the forthcoming Asian swing if she wants to
qualify as part of the top eight for the
season-ending WTA Finals in
Singapore in October.
?I don?t think I necessarily played my
best tennis today, but my opponent also
had something to say about that,?
Konta said. ?She played very freely and
she moved incredibly well. She made it
very tough for me to be able to get any
easier points. Overall, I think her level
of tennis was just better today.?
Heather Watson?s enigmatic wait for
a win at Flushing Meadows continues
after she was defeated 6-4, 6-4 by Aliz�
Cornet, the world No 46 of France, in
Three to watch today
Naomi Osaka (Japan) v Angelique
Kerber (Ger) [6] Arthur Ashe,
5.30pm BST
Kerber, the defending champion,
has struggled of late and has a tricky
test against the big-hitting Osaka, 19.
Aljaz Bedene (GB) v Andrey Rublev
(Russ) Court 11, 10pm BST
Bedene is the only British player in
action on day two. He takes on
Rublev, a 19-year-old Russian, who
won his first ATP title last month.
Roger Federer (Switz) [3] v Frances
Tiafoe (US) Arthur Ashe, 1.30am BST
It will be intriguing to see if Federer
has overcome a back issue. Tiafoe,
19, is the rising star of US tennis.
one hour and 36 minutes. Since
winning the girls? US Open
singles title in 2009, Watson has
never won a match at Flushingg
Meadows, losing seven consecutive first-round matches. Asked
afterwards if she felt she was
jinxed here, the 25-year-old
curtly replied: ?No.?
She later added: ?It?s a shame
when you put in loads of hours.
I made sure I was on court a lott
this past week, making sure
that I was as fit as possible,
and it just sucks that it?s over
in an hour and whatever.?
Watson was beaten
by Cornet, making it
her seventh straight
first-round defeat at
Flushing Meadows
Norrie grabs
first win at a
grand-slam
Stuart Fraser
As significant a moment as it was for
Cameron Norrie, the 22-year-old
Briton could not help but feel underwhelmed by his first win in the main
draw of a grand-slam at the US Open
yesterday.
After taking a two-set lead, Norrie
was sitting in his courtside chair when
his progress to the second round was
sealed by the retirement of his injured
opponent, Dmitry Tursunov. ?Looking
back on it, it will be great, but it?s a bit
disappointing not to be able to win the
last point [for the match],? Norrie said.
Norrie?s reluctance to get carried
away is admirable, but he should take
much satisfaction from his run so far at
Flushing Meadows. He did not drop a
set in three qualifying matches last
week and was on top yesterday against
Tursunov ? a former top-20 player
from Russia, who has plunged down the
rankings after multiple injuries ? at
7-6 (9-7), 6-1 up.
The form of Kyle Edmund is also
encouraging, the 22-year-old easing
through to the second round with a
6-3, 7-5, 6-3 win against Robin Haase,
the No 32 seed of the Netherlands.
Coincidentally, Norrie and Edmund
were born in Johannesburg in 1995, and
the former has embarked on quite a
journey around the world since then.
He moved with his Scottish father and
Welsh mother to New Zealand, where
he spent most of his younger
years.
?We moved because
iit was too dangerous in
South Africa,? Norrie
said. ?I know my
parents were sick of
getting robbed, little
tthings like that.?
Norrie took up
B
r
British
citizenship when
he moved to London at
16, before following
tthe college tennis route
b
by studying sociology
at Texas Christian
U
University. He has
p
played full-time on the
p
professional tour since
JJune and his ranking is on
an upward curve ? he will
b
be around No 180 after his
vvictory yesterday.
Not long after Norrie
had come off the court,
Edmund, the world No 42,
sealed his progress with a
strong
performance
against Haase, who
was in form as a
semi-finalist in the
Rogers Cup. Edmund
required some CocaCola to get him
going, taking a few
sips from a can
during the first set.
stuart fraser?s us open diary
no becker in new york
Boris Becker, the six-times
grand-slam champion, was a
notable absentee from the
German Eurosport coverage of
the US Open on the first day of
the tournament. According to
the broadcaster, Becker has not
yet arrived in New York due to
visa issues. The 49-year-old was
declared bankrupt in London in
June over a debt outstanding
since October 2015. He has
recently taken up a job as the
head of men?s tennis for the
German tennis federation.
life after djokovic for team
Two more former members of
Novak Djokovic?s coaching team
have found work recently, too.
Gebhard Gritsch, a fitness
trainer who previously worked
with Thomas Muster, is
accompanying Borna Coric, the
20-year-old Croatian, at Flushing
Meadows. Miljan Amanovic, a
physiotherapist, has been hired
by Milos Raonic, the Canadian
former Wimbledon finalist.
Gritsch and Amanovic parted
with Djokovic in May in what he
described as ?shock therapy?.
kokkinakis plays dress up
Thanasi Kokkinakis, the 21-yearold Australian, posed for a
picture in women?s underwear
after a laundry mix-up in the
locker room. Kokkinakis had left
two bags of clothes for washing
and was shocked to discover
one bag containing fresh items
belonging to a woman in his
locker. ?I think it was a Spanish
girl,? he said to AAP. ?I thought
I?d make a joke of it and put it
[the underwear] on. There was a
little sports bra so I put that on
as well.?
briton out of retirement
Oliver Golding was regarded as
the next big hope of British
tennis when he won the junior
boys? singles here in 2011. He
retired three years later at 21
after becoming disillusioned
with the sport. Golding, 23,
recently made a comeback,
though, and ensured he will
return to the world rankings list
by defeating Yaraslav Shyla, the
world No 375 of Belarus, 6-2, 7-6
(7-4), in the first round of an ITF
Futures tournament in
Piombino, Italy, yesterday.
muguruza breezes through
Garbi馿 Muguruza, the
Wimbledon champion, showed
why she is the favourite in the
women?s singles by taking 57
minutes to defeat Varvara
Lepchenko, the American, 6-0,
6-3 in the opening match of the
tournament on Arthur Ashe
Stadium. The Spanish 23-yearold was keen, though, to play
down her status. ?I don?t feel I?m
a favourite here, because I never
really played very good [in the
past],? she said. ?I?m happy that
I?m in the second round.?
veteran date bows out
One of the most remarkable
careers in tennis will end next
month after Kimiko Date, 46,
said that the Japan Women?s
Open in Tokyo will be her final
tournament. She turned
professional in 1989 and made
the semi-finals of Wimbledon in
1996. She struggled in her
comeback from knee surgery
last year. ?I need to push my
physical potential to the
maximum so that I can compete,
but I find myself unable to do
so,? Date said.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
53
1GM
Football Sport
Why culture
is so crucial
to Southgate
Football
Martyn Ziegler Chief Sports Reporter
Every England player selected by
Gareth Southgate is asked to watch a
seven-minute video that aims to
emphasise exactly what it should mean
to play for their country.
The film starts off with a clip of perhaps Southgate?s most famous moment
on a football pitch: that Euro ?96 shootout when his missed penalty resulted in
Germany going through to the final.
The idea of the video is that it illustrates the kind of character needed to
compete in the most pressurised games
that an England player could face.
Southgate has gone out of his way to
lower expectations in the England
team, but behind the scenes he has been
working hard to build a culture within
the squad that he feels has been
missing, and has been picking the
brains of some of the best in the
sporting business to help him do so.
The England manager has forged a
good relationship with prominent
figures in rugby union. He has exchanged ideas with Eddie Jones, the
England head coach, and spoken to Sir
Clive Woodward, who advised that
players respond best when treated like
adults. One of the biggest forces behind
the new team culture has been Owen
Eastwood, a highly experienced adviser
who has worked in depth with the All
Blacks, among other sporting teams.
Eastwood was not the originator of
the All Blacks? ?no dickheads? rule,
which pulls up people who put themselves before the team, but that rule is
exactly the sort of code that Southgate
wants his England?s players to adopt ?
to take responsibility for their own
behaviour and squad togetherness.
When Wayne Rooney was involved
in a late-night drinking episode while
on international duty in November,
Southgate insisted at the time that he
would not impose a draconian regime,
and instead pointed to the New Zealand
rugby players as an example of the kind
of self-regulation he wants to see.
?Look at top sports teams like the All
Blacks, who are one of the best
examples of teams that have won
consistently over the years,? Southgate
said at the time. ?The players are
involved in that, because you are giving
them ownership and accountability.?
While the All Blacks are not perfect,
with the off-the-field indiscretions of
Aaron Smith and Jerome Kaino gaining attention in recent weeks, the ethos
has been credited with helping them
become, indisputably, the best team in
rugby.
Eastwood?s work for the FA builds on
the experience that he has developed
with several sports, including producing motivational videos and talks.
In November 2014, before a match
against England at Twickenham on the
eve of Remembrance Sunday, Eastwood told the New Zealand squad the
story of Andrew ?Son? White, who survived four of the First World War?s
worst battles, suffered a shellshockinduced breakdown before recovering
to play for the All Blacks. Speaking after
his side?s 24-21 victory, Richie McCaw,
then the All Blacks? captain, said that he
believed the story of White?s deeds had
helped inspire the side.
Southgate has also looked to the
practices used by the England rugby
and cricket teams when it comes to
inducting new players. Those players
preparing for their debut can now
expect to have a small ceremony where
they are handed their first shirt ? as
happened when Michael Keane made
his first England appearance in March.
Glenn Hoddle, who picked Southgate for his World Cup squad in 1998,
was invited into the dressing room at
COLORSPORT/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
continued from back
England turn to All Blacks guru
The Motivator
Owen Eastwood
The Inspiration
Andrew ?Son? White
The Coach
Gareth Southgate
Wembley to present the shirt to Keane.
Hoddle said: ?The idea of having a lowkey ceremony when someone makes
their first appearance is something
England?s rugby and cricket teams do
well. And it?s a welcome addition to the
culture of the football team.?
When, or if, England qualify for next
year?s World Cup in Russia, Southgate
will focus on the culture and
atmosphere within the team base
rather than location.
To that end, the FA has taken advice
from Germany, the world champions,
and will try to make the players more
open and available, rather than shut off,
defensive and secluded. That was the
kind of atmosphere that appeared to be
revealed by Joe Hart during last year?s
disappointing European Championships when the goalkeeper refused even
to discuss the darts competition he had
been organising for his team-mates.
The success of England?s youth
teams has also emphasised the need
for squad togetherness.
Southgate?s ultimate aim is to ensure
that while England may not be the best
squad to travel to Russia, they will be
the best prepared.
means to wear the England shirt, and
emphasising the responsibility each
player should take.
As well as helping the All Blacks,
Eastwood has also advised Chelsea,
Manchester City, the South Africa
cricket team, Stuart Lancaster, the
former England rugby coach, and the
military command group at Nato. A
lawyer by background, Eastwood has
recently joined the board of the New
Zealand Warriors rugby league side.
The move to use the All Blacks
adviser is part of a concerted effort by
Southgate and the FA to try to adapt
practices tried and tested by some of
the best sporting teams in the world.
They have even picked the brains of
the German FA as part of an agreement
struck in March to share ideas on
coaching, youth development and
administration.
Germany have been happy to share
their blueprint for team bases for major
tournaments and making players more
available to the media. The FA has
also noted how the majority of the
senior Germany team gained valuable
experience playing in similar tournaments at youth or under-21 level.
The FA has studied several options
for England?s base for the World Cup
in Russia next year but due to the vast
size of the country there will be no
final decision made until the draw on
December 1, when the location of the
matches are known.
England lead their qualifying group
after six matches and play qualifiers
away to Malta on Friday and at home to
Slovakia on Monday.
the game
daily
Chief Sports Writer
Matt Dickinson on
Oxlade-Chamberlain
and what his exit
says about Arsenal
Read the latest instalment at
noon: thetimes.co.uk/sport
Baking a cake, fighting Mayweather, it?s all the same deal
Giles Smith
Sport on
television
A
fter Floyd Mayweather
had finished fighting
Conor McGregor in Las
Vegas, Johnny Nelson,
who was among a deep
pool of experts assembled for those
watching at the price of �.95 on
Sky Box Office, said: ?We have to
look at it for what it is.? Good idea.
But what was it?
One thing we can clearly say: it
was a foregone conclusion. Every
informed observer had patiently
pointed out in advance that if you
put an untested mixed martial artist
in the ring against arguably the
most accomplished boxer of his
generation, and possibly of all time,
he would have no chance ? and
they were right.
The generous verdict is that the
bout went on longer than expected.
Less gentle critics are suggesting
that the fight went on only as long as
Mayweather wanted it to. But both
conclusions concede that,
ultimately, we saw what we expected
to see ? an outcome that would
possibly feel less like short change if
the build-up, which was long and
loud, had dwelled more on the
pleasures of the familiar.
Still, the event did at least produce
an appreciable clash of opposites:
arguably the sport?s most academic
and cold-eyed tactician against a
hellishly tattooed insurgent whose
cage-bound day job draws the line at
eye-gouging and ?small joint
manipulation? but is otherwise fairly
open-minded. Credit the
arrangement, too, with creating a
panto setting in which boxing, of all
things, could cast itself as the goody
? the high-minded guardian of
tradition and integrity ? against a
rising tide of trash.
Watching Carl Froch, in
particular, among the defenders of
boxing?s faith, wrinkle his nose with
the alacrity of the late Brian Sewell
was one of the night?s incidental
pleasures.
Here, too, was a divide that was
intriguingly generational ? young,
mixed martial arts fans pitched
against the old-fart descendants of
the ninth Marquess of Queensberry.
If you are around teenagers at all,
you may have heard arguments this
past month that McGregor could
prevail, or certainly sensed a strong
desire that he should do so. Perhaps
especially here, at the level of
revolution, the result was a letdown.
Had Mayweather, now 50 fights and
undefeated, got turned over by a
debutant from the dark side,
everything the craft of boxing
thought it knew would have been in
pieces on the floor.
As it was, a 29-year-old fought a
40-year-old who was returning from
a blithe two-year sabbatical, and the
former ran out of puff. If you were
looking for a television event to
reaffirm the status quo and settle
people back into their allotted
places, probably only a royal
wedding would have served as well.
Eventually, even the hype seemed
to contain a strongly audible minor
key. McGregor, surprisingly echoing
Rob Brydon, described it afterwards
as ?a bit of fun?. To concur with the
Irishman entirely, your definition of
?fun? needs to be elastic enough to
include the dumb posturing, the
free-floating racism (?Dance for me,
boy?) and general ugliness of the
build-up. Also, by the time the ?fun?
aspect of the event started to trickle
through to him, McGregor was
$100 million richer, where ?fun? is
perhaps that little bit easier to
discern.
Yet his description was as good
as anyone?s about an event
that was surely
best
understood,
not as sport,
but as
television.
Mayweather
v McGregor will go down as
the point where the gap
between the sports event
McGregor?s idea of ?fun?
landed him $100 million
and the reality show, with its semiscripted melodrama and cajoled
conflict, shrank to the point of
invisibility. Here, familiarly, was the
have-a-go hero, made subject to a
recklessly telescoped, fast-track
learning experience.
Baking a cake, dancing a samba,
fighting Floyd Mayweather ? it?s
essentially the same deal, in the
sense that it places the plucky
contestant out of his
?comfort zone? and
therefore sets him on a
journey in which any
slight gain becomes a
heartening, viewerfriendly victory over
necessarily
lowered
standards.
Win-win, in
other words ?
an outcome that
has much to
commend it as
entertainment,
while being, of
course, the
opposite of sport.
554
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Sport Football
plot
Chelsea chase �5m England trio Swansea
ambitious deal
Paul Joyce, Gary Jacob
Chelsea have agreed a � million fee
with Arsenal for Alex OxladeChamberlain and he will be given
permission to have a medical at the
England training centre, where he is on
international duty.
Chelsea are also close to a deal to
sign
Danny
Drinkwater
from
Leicester City for about � million
and have registered a firm interest in
Ross Barkley, from Everton, as another
midfield option. The arrival of the three
English players in west London would
boost Chelsea?s home-grown numbers
and help to address Antonio Conte?s
frustration about the limited size of his
squad.
However, Liverpool have not ruled
out pursuing their longstanding
interest in Oxlade-Chamberlain, 24,
and believe that they can tempt him to
Anfield instead.
Ars鑞e Wenger has been insistent
that he wanted to keep the midfielder
and described his player as the future of
the club as recently as Friday. But a day
after the player endured a chastening
afternoon as Arsenal were defeated 4-0
at Anfield, the north London club made
it clear they were willing to let him
leave.
The Arsenal manager had said that
he was ?personally highly determined
to keep him and I hope he will commit?,
suggesting that the club?s hierarchy
may have been unwilling to match the
player?s financial demands of about
�0,000 a week. Arsenal have been
willing to pay half that amount.
Oxlade-Chamberlain
rejected
Arsenal?s latest offer last week to extend
his contract beyond next summer. He
has been frustrated at not being played
in his favoured attacking role and not
finding a settled position in six years at
Arsenal. He has also been unhappy
about Arsenal?s delay in offering him
new terms when the club made
contract offers last season to Alexis
S醤chez and Mesut 謟il, who have
also entered the final year of their
deals. Oxlade-Chamberlain wanted to
extend his contract two years ago but
Arsenal told him to wait.
Arsenal are also braced for
Manchester City to bid for S醤chez but
it may take an offer of more than
� million to sell the attacking player.
The attraction for Oxlade-Chamberlain of a move to Liverpool is that the
club would play him in his natural position in the central or advanced role. At
Chelsea, he might have to compete with
for Sanches
Conte?ss homee
targetss
Paul Joyce, Gary Jacob
Alex
OxladeChamberlain
(Arsenal)
�m
Ross
Barkley
(Everton)
�m
Danny
Drinkwater
(Leicester)
�m
Victor Moses as a wing back. He does
not like playing in that role, as he has for
Arsenal recently. Liverpool have been
wary about pursuing the player after
being told by Arsenal that they would
not do business with them this summer,
after the lingering acrimony over
Wenger?s failed attempt to sign Luis
Su醨ez in 2013. In addition, Liverpool
took Wenger at his word when he said
that Oxlade-Chamberlain would not
leave.
Chelsea must also hold off interest
from Tottenham Hotspur to sign
Barkley after having talks with Everton
when the sides met on Sunday. No bid
was submitted. Barkley is recovering
from surgery on a hamstring injury and
will be out until November. He has
entered the final year of his contract
having rejected the offer of an
extension from his boyhood club.
Everton still value him at about
� million, which will serve as a test to
the determination of Tottenham and
Chelsea. Both London clubs know
Barkley?s valuation will drop farther in
January, when he will have just six
months remaining on his contract
before he can leave for nothing.
Liverpool agree to sign �m Ke飔a next summer
Paul Joyce
Northern Football Correspondent
Liverpool have agreed a club-record
deal to sign Naby Ke飔a from RB Leipzig
next summer and will now seek to add
further recruits before the transfer
window closes.
There is the prospect for three days of
frenzied activity, with J黵gen Klopp
primed for any softening in Southampton?s stance that Virgil van Dijk is not
for sale before Thursday?s deadline,
while he is also considering Arsenal?s
Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain and Monaco?s Thomas Lemar.
In addition, Liverpool say any
renewed attempt by Barcelona to sign
Philippe Coutinho will be rejected for a
fourth time.
The feelgood factor around the club
after Sunday?s 4-0 victory over Arsenal
has been enhanced by the capture of
Ke飔a, the midfielder, for an initial fee of
about � million even though he will
not officially become a Liverpool player
until July 1. Ke飔a has a release clause of
about � million that comes into effect
next summer and Liverpool have paid a
premium on top of that now to ensure
that they are not beaten to a player who
was their priority for this window.
Leipzig?s refusal to sell, rejecting
bids of � million and � million,
complicated that pursuit, but Liverpool have been clever in ensuring
that the Guinea international
does not slip through their grasp.
Negotiations have continued
between the Leipzig hierarchy
and
Liverpool
sporting
director Michael Edwards
and the deal means that
the Anfield club cannot be
gazumped if Ke飔a enjoys
another stellar season in the
Bundesliga. Ke飔a, 22,
underwent a medical
yesterday and has signed
what is likely to be a
five-year deal after travKe飔a will not become an Anfield
player until July of next year
elling to England with Leipzig officials,
including chief executive Oliver
Mintzlaff, on a private jet after playing
in Sunday?s 4-1 win over Freiburg. He is
set to be assigned the No 8 shirt, Steven
Gerrard?s old number, when he arrives.
Klopp sees Ke飔a operating as an
attacking midfielder, rather than a No 6
holding player, and while he is now
Liverpool?s
record
signing,
outstripping the �.9 million paid to
Roma for Mohamed Salah in July, the
club
will
not
baulk
at trying to set a new
benchmark.
Liverpool are also
interested in Lemar, who
can play in a variety of
attacking positions and
also in midfield, but the
French club said that
they will not sell after losing a number of key players.
Liverpool could use Divock Origi as a makeweight in
any deal for Lemar with
Monaco having been inter-
ested in the striker earlier in the
summer. The saga over Van Dijk?s
future also rumbles on with relations
between the player and Southampton
having disintegrated as he continues to
look to force a move to Anfield.
Liverpool publicly withdrew their
interest in the player after being
accused of tapping up the centre back,
but
any
encouragement
that
Southampton are ready to deal will be
followed up with a bid that would break
the world-record fee for a defender.
Klopp has identified Van Dijk as the
only player he wants to strengthen his
defence.
Liverpool maintain that a fourth bid
for Coutinho from Barcelona will be
rejected despite the Catalan club?s
sporting director, Roberto Fern醤dez,
claiming that they were hopeful of a
deal.
Leicester City have inquired about
Mamadou Sakho, the Liverpool
defender, who is also wanted by Crystal
Palace, where he has spent time on
loan, and West Bromwich Albion.
Swansea City are attempting to pull off
what would be a surprise loan deal for
Renato Sanches from Bayern Munich.
The Portugal midfielder, 20, has been
told that he can leave the German side
and Paul Clement, the Swansea
manager who worked with Sanches at
Bayern before moving to south Wales,
has registered an interest.
Clement?s relationship with Carlo
Ancelotti, the Bayern coach, gives
Swansea a chance of securing what
would be one of the more eye-catching
deals of the window. Sanches moved
from Benfica to Bayern for �.5 million
last summer, but has failed to establish
himself at the Allianz Arena.
West Bromwich Albion have
rejected a second bid from Leicester
City for Jonny Evans. The improved
offer of � million is thought to be a
significant increase on an earlier bid
this summer and exceeds the � million offer that Manchester City tabled
for the 29-year-old centre back this
month. City are expected to make a
second bid for Evans before the transfer
window closes on Thursday.
Nice have attempted to re-sign
Nampalys Mendy from Leicester after
he appeared bound for Atalanta on
loan. The midfielder cost � million
from the French club last summer, a
Leicester record at the time.
Torino have made an approach for
Giannelli Imbula, the midfielder who
has been told that he can leave Stoke
City. He was signed for � million in
February 2016 but has not established
himself in the team.
The Newcastle United midfielder,
Siem de Jong, has ended an injuryplagued three-year stay at St James?
Park to return to Ajax.
Everton are closing in on an �million deal for Nikola Vlasic, Hajduk
Split?s 19-year-old attacker.
continued from back
Palace may seek Allardyce return
since departing as England manager
after their elimination from Euro 2016,
and Slavisa Jokanovic, of Fulham, are
also being considered by Palace, who
have previously looked at the pair.
Palace appointed De Boer on a threeyear contract worth about �million a
year in June after showing interest in
Sean Dyche, the Burnley manager,
Mark Hughes, the Stoke City manager,
and Mauricio Pellegrino, who joined
Southampton. The 47-year-old has had
tensions with the hierarchy over summer recruitment and other issues to do
with trying to change the style and
system of the team. The manager
stressed in talks yesterday that he was
simply implementing the changes that
he had proposed in his job interview and
should be given the time to make them
work.
Palace have signed only three players
this summer, two ? Ruben LoftusCheek from Chelsea and Manchester
United?s Timothy Fosu-Mensah ? on
loan. De Boer has suggested targets
in addition to Ja飏o Riedewald, the
defender who has not impressed
since his arrival from Ajax for about
�million last month, and is hopeful
that the club could re-sign Mamadou
Sakho, the centre back, from Liverpool.
Palace missed out on signing Oliver
Burke last week when the midfielder
joined West Bromwich Albion. They
need a goalkeeper, centre back and
back-up striker and may seek to offload
Scott Dann, Yohan Cabaye and Patrick
van Aanholt. Andros Townsend?s future
is also in doubt.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
55
2GM
Sport
Henry Winter
Chief Football Writer
Unless Kroenke engages with fans
the Arsenal mess will only get worse
CARL RECINE/REUTERS
W
ell, here?s another nice mess
you?ve gotten them into,
Stanley. Well done, Enos
Stanley Kroenke. What a
wretched mess. Arsenal?s pitiful
plight, lying 16th in the Premier League with
certain stars briefing that they want out, is
rooted in your naive, damaging, alienating
?stewardship? of an English institution. So get a
grip on this great club, please.
TV pundits do not get this, focusing on player
inadequacies, but Arsenal are withering from
the top down, starting with Silent, Soulless Stan
from Denver and Missouri. So rather than adopt
your usual cold distance from warm-hearted
Arsenal diehards, basically 4,600 miles, you
could follow the example of other more
enlightened owners of English clubs and
actually bother to engage with fans.
Not the ghastly Glazers at Manchester
United, nor the appalling owners of Blackburn
Rovers, Venky?s, the Indian poultry firm, or the
offensive Oystons at Blackpool. Their
reputations in the home of football are total dirt,
like that of Kroenke and his son, Josh.
So consider this, family Kroenke and your
clueless advisers and cheerleaders: on the
weekend that Arsenal?s owners were again
missing in action, the executive chairman of
Wolverhampton Wanderers was in a heaving
pub in Brentford getting in London Pride and
J鋑erbombs for travelling fans.
Here was connection and compassion, a
pre-terrace tryst. Laurie Dalrymple, Wolves?
managing director, posted a picture of
himself with Jeff Shi outside The Griffin pub
and tweeted: ?Taking this man for a pint.
Happy to extend that offer to any away fans at
today?s game as a well-earned thank you.
Here for 30 mins.? Plus the obligatory emoji of
a wolf.
Thirsty, rather than hungry, like the wolf,
voyagers from Molineux already at the bar
greeted Dalrymple and Shi with cries of ?get the
beers in!? As Dalrymple stood by the pumps and
optics with his melting credit card, trays of
J鋑erbombs followed, along with many pints of
Fullers? finest. Talk flowed about travel issues
(Euston closed, M1 shut because of that
horrendous accident), the need for a striker,
please, and, yes, thanks, get them in, more
J鋑erbombs please. Shi?s club managed more
shots in 30 minutes in The Griffin than in 90
inside Griffin Park.
This was smart by Dalrymple. Having worked
as commercial director at the Ricoh Arena,
Dalrymple would be well aware about the
danger of disconnect between a club?s owner,
the unpopular Sisu hedge fund, and its fan base,
the long-suffering Coventry City support.
It was a simple gesture in cost and time, yet
inevitably it was jubilantly well received by
Wolves fans present and distant. It might have
been simple PR, tackling fans? concerns about
Fosun, the Chinese conglomerate that owns the
club, and the involvement of Jorge Mendes, the
Portuguese agent, but any familiarity between
boardroom and supporters, whatever the
motive, should be encouraged.
Good owners listen. Tony Bloom travels with
Brighton & Hove Albion fans and was in the
away section at Vicarage Road on Saturday,
sharing the emotions and thoughts of the
faithful. Stoke City?s Peter Coates cares. So does
Crystal Palace?s Steve Parish.
Dean Hoyle goes on long cycle rides to raise
funds and awareness for Huddersfield Town?s
life-changing community initiatives, specifically
local school breakfast clubs. Hoyle?s children
Familiar pose: Arsenal?s 4-0 defeat by Liverpool left Wenger with his head in his hands once again
work in the club shop during holidays.
Huddersfield folk matter to them.
Bracketing Huddersfield, Brighton, Stoke,
Palace or Wolves in the vaunted realm of
Arsenal would be misleading. Not least because
Stoke fans might mention that they have beaten
Arsenal this season or Huddersfield?s advocates
might point out that they reside in the
Champions League positions while Arsenal are
three points off the relegation zone. What is
undeniable is that all of these clubs are run by
smart businessmen ? Hoyle, Bloom, Coates,
Parish, Shi and Kroenke ? but only one is
detached from fans: Kroenke at Arsenal. The
spirit of David Dein, of the late Danny Fiszman,
and assorted Hill-Woods down the decades is so
badly missed at the Emirates.
Kroenke could make amends, possibly
becoming an owner not laughed at, even vilified,
on the Holloway Road. It?s not impossible for
him to assimilate among fans; for all the
perception of Arsenal?s impassioned
congregation as a seething mass at Liverpool
they were models of restraint in the Anfield
Road End. Many stayed until the bitter end,
applauding players who had shamed the shirt.
If Kroenke had been there, he might have
been gently advised that the manager he
foolishly believes in tries to play pretty five-asides in a ferocious 11-a-side world. He might
have been warned that he has just given a twoyear extension to a 67-year-old who has failed
to evolve and is fearful of life after Arsenal. As
well as anxiety about retirement, Ars鑞e
Wenger has eight million other reasons for
staying on. Kroenke should heed the sounds of
old Highbury and hear the heartache.
Kroenke needs to be more hands-on. That
might make him even more money, the only
language he understands. It makes sense, as well
as cents, to communicate, empathise and liaise
with staff and customers, to ?make them like
you . . . and spend quality time learning about
each other?. The Gooner? No. Such counsel
comes from Kroenke?s preferred reading matter,
the Harvard Business Review (December 5, 2014).
Absorb, please.
If Kroenke communed with devotees he
might ask questions about why Arsenal?s
goalkeeping coach was in the smart seats at
Anfield, rather than in the trenches giving
advice as the goals flew past Petr Cech. He
might question the recruitment capabilities of a
manager who spends a club-record � million
on a finisher in Alexandre Lacazette and then
starts him on the bench, who lavishes
� million on a defender in Shkodran Mustafi a
year ago and then considers loaning him out,
who invests � million in Granit Xhaka and
leaves him exposed in midfield. Kroenke needs
to bring Wenger and others into line. He does
not think enough about his club. He might
wonder about the team?s serial vulnerability on
the counter, the defensive flaws, the lack of
effort. He might question Wenger?s failure to
develop Theo Walcott and Alex OxladeChamberlain. He might reflect on why his
manager cannot tolerate confrontation. He
might consider how better the club, and his
investment, would be if he recruited strong
individuals, former players such as Brian
Marwood and Patrick Vieira, individuals who
love the club, to give proper guidance.
At the very least, Kroenke should pay
attention to the fans. Even sanguine
individuals, long-standing supporters of their
beloved Arsenal, are affronted by the club?s
attitude, predicting a near-rebellious response to
the decline under Kroenke, Wenger and the
supine chief executive, Ivan ?The Terrified?
Gazidis.
All the talk among these fans yesterday
revolved around whether they would turn up at
the Emirates on September 9 for the game
against Bournemouth. Vote with their feet?
Congregate around the ground with banners for
the cameras and entreaties for the microphones?
They will turn up. They?re largely loyal. Given
the players? fragile nature, Arsenal need their
fans, need their songs of support. They certainly
don?t need ?Wenger Out? graffiti on the Ken
Friar Bridge at the Emirates. Arsenal fans
should be above that, whatever their frustration.
Anger over Anfield, and countless issues with
Kroenke, Gazidis and Wenger, is better
expressed by boycotting the club shop, and then
voicing concerns at what should be a feisty
AGM in October. ?The only sell-out in the next
few weeks will be the AGM,? one season ticketholder, Geoffrey Silman, says. ?Paying �250 for
a season ticket, I am furious.? The problem?
?Kroenke is where it starts.?
Silman has been following Arsenal for 60
years, and is hardly the type drawn to the
barricades. ?I don?t understand why the board
didn?t see this coming but I guess the money
rolling in and not wishing to upset Ars鑞e
Wenger was all they cared about,? he says. ?The
culture of the club has moved from class to
arrogance with a realisation that the customer
can?t just go to Lidl instead of Tesco.
?I don?t know if you?ve ever been to the AGM
with the smug board revering their manager
and last year Kroenke appearing only to make a
presentation to Ars鑞e Wenger and moving the
regular day for his convenience. I wonder if the
owner or manager will show up this year in
October??
Kroenke is struggling with his sporting
franchises Stateside too, and the general theme
seems to be his failure to foster winners. It?s all
about the money, not the glory, it seems. ?Are
the Kroenkes part of the problem when it comes
to building a winner? the Denver Post asked in a
March poll about Colorado Avalanche,
Kroenke?s NHL franchise. ?Yes? screamed 79.51
per cent (772 votes).
LA Rams, Denver Nuggets and Colorado
Rapids underachieve. Kroenke hardly
precipitates a Klondike. Arsenal, and especially
Wenger, have certainly lost the golden touch
that brought them titles. Under Wenger, Arsenal
was not supposed to be about the money; it was
supposed to be about the fight, camaraderie,
invincibility, discovering and developing gems
? yet it has become about money, about how
much Kroenke takes, about how much the
players want, about how much the tickets cost.
What a mess, Stanley.
556
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Sport Cricket
?I have to show I?m not wounded. You
can be eaten up very quickly in here?
DAVID MUNDEN/POPPERFOTO/GETTY IMAGES
In the final extract from his
book, former England
cricketer Chris Lewis tells of
his life behind bars and how
he survived the prison bullies
Out first ball
in 1992 final
We let them [Pakistan]
get away a bit at the end,
but there were only 250 to
get. I thought we could
chase that target down,
but we slipped to 69 for 4.
Neil Fairbrother and
Allan Lamb started to
turn things around with a
partnership of 72. Allan
was then bowled by a
wonder ball from Wasim
Akram. I took guard and
waited for Wasim. I
watched the ball come
out of his hand. It was
wide. I eased forward to
let the ball go and then,
suddenly, I saw it starting
to tail in. I had just begun
to bring my bat down, but
too late. The ball glanced
the face of my bat and
went into the ground,
before hitting the top of
leg stump.
Shit, I?m out first ball in
a World Cup final.
I
t?s 20 May 2009. I have just been found
guilty of drug smuggling. The judge wraps
up the court proceedings and concludes
with a lecture; the judge said I was
motivated by greed, and as a previously
successful sportsman I was a role model and an
ambassador. I did not hear it. I was in a different
world. The only thing that matters to me now is
how long I will be imprisoned. The words
?thirteen years? ring out around the court and
drown out all other sound.
For five months, I have been dreading this
moment and now here it is, my worst fears
confirmed. All those sleepless nights have been
leading up to this, but I am still unprepared for
the shock of those words. I don?t know how to
feel. ?Wow!? is all I can think. The very thought
of that sentence stretching out before me sends
me dizzy. Think about it . . . thirteen years. I don?t
think I?ve ever planned beyond the next
cricket season.
Something interesting happens over the next
few days. The panic and fear subside and I am
not afraid. Now the sentencing is over and my
immediate future decided, I know that I can do
this. It is going to be a long road and it is going
to be a pain in the arse, and I am not being
flippant in saying that; it is just that I have new
clarity and certainty that I will make it. I don?t
want to serve years in prison ? of course not ?
but I also realise that there is absolutely nothing
I can do about it, so I just have to buckle down
and get on with it. There is already a goal in the
distance, a long way in the distance, but I can
still see it. I begin my life as a Category B
prisoner, due to the length of my sentence.
A show of strength is important and
decisiveness a necessity, as dithering is
considered a weakness. And I have noticed that
the people around me in jail thrive on weakness.
Whatever I say, it has to be forthright, and I
have to show that I am not wounded or affected
by anything they have to say to me. I am here
because I committed a crime, not to be a source
of interest or amusement for other prisoners.
This is a place where you can be eaten up very
quickly, and I am not prepared to feed the needs
of others by chatting about cricket or famous
sportsmen I have met, or the life I have led. I
just want to serve my time, not regale them with
stories and anecdotes.
I get on with most of the staff. If there are any
issues, then it is with the prisoners. I don?t cling
on to the bars screaming; I don?t call the officers
?screws?, like the stuff you have seen on celluloid.
I don?t think it is necessary to fit in. Basically,
Crazy: My Road to
Redemption, is
published by The
History Press on
Friday, �
Porter pegs back Somerset
Essex v Somerset
Chelmsford (first day of four; Essex won toss):
Somerset, with five first innings wickets in hand, are
41 runs behind Essex
Specsavers County Championship
Geoffrey Dean
Essex, who began the day with a
41-point cushion at the top of Division
One, know that victory here will
significantly enhance their chances of a
first title in 25 years. Inspired by their
own desperation in the fight against
relegation, however, Somerset were on
top for much of the day until two late
wickets from the persistent Jamie
Porter redressed the balance. His
figures of four for 27 from 12 overs were
well deserved.
Essex?s dismissal for only 159 was the
result of good Somerset seam bowling
and indifferent batting. The ball did
nip around off a dry, light-coloured
pitch, but not excessively, and Phil
Whitticase, the ECB cricket liaison
officer, said he was happy with the sur-
face. It was hardly a 15-wickets-in-aday-type pitch.
James Hildreth, with a fluent 70-ball
51, and Tom Abell showed what could
be achieved on it with the most convincing stand of the day, 78 in 22 overs. But
both fell to Porter, the pace bowler, in
the last half-hour, Abell edging to slip
and Hildreth miscuing to mid-wicket.
Porter probed away skilfully. He
found Marcus Trescothick?s edge with a
good one, and bowled Ed Byrom with
an even better one that straightened.
Well though Somerset bowled to reduce Essex to 39 for four in the 19th
over, three of those wickets came legbefore when batsmen played across the
line. A fourth, Dan Lawrence, drove
loosely to be caught at first slip.
Nick Browne passed 4,000 first-class
runs before being caught off a top edge
by Paul van Meekeren. The Dutchman,
24, performed capably on his championship debut, hitting the bat hard to
take four wickets. Craig Overton also
claimed four victims, ending a dangerous Ryan ten Doeschate cameo on 35.
when people don?t like you in these
environments, there are two things they say:
either ?you?re a snitch?, or ?you?re a paedophile?.
I am 6ft 3in and I am okay handling myself.
Physical presence helps a lot in here. The people
that many of these guys respect the most are
simply the biggest, the ones who go to the gym
and appear to be the strongest. I am not that,
but nor am I the one going around smiling
trying to please everyone. This seems to work
fine. There are no serious issues, so for most of
my sentence I don?t feel threatened and I am
not scared of any physical repercussions.
They?re funny, some of the rules you find in
prison: ?You can?t snitch, you mustn?t snitch?.
Why not? Who came up with this code of
conduct? Have you bothered to check it out to
see if it serves you? It actually only serves the
people at the top ? in this case, those who
would go around beating others up and then be
shocked if anyone reported them. That isn?t the
done thing. But what would they expect you to
do? This, I understand, is a prison tradition. It
Nottinghamshire v
Northamptonshire
Trent Bridge (first day of four; Nottinghamshire won
toss): Nottinghamshire, with all second-innings
wickets in hand, are 91 runs ahead of
Northamptonshire
Neville Scott
Wickets crashed all over the country
yesterday but nowhere did they fall in
greater numbers than at Trent Bridge.
Northamptonshire faced a follow-on
target of 64 yet surrendered seven men
getting there.
Though the ball jagged off a mottled
surface throughout and bounce was
sometimes variable, true mayhem only
set in after an opening 80 minutes in
which just one wicket fell. Another 19
then followed in 53 overs as the home
quintet of seamers took their lead from
Mohammad Azharullah?s five for 63,
the Punjabi?s best figures for 14 months.
Steven Mullaney reached 58 and Riki
Wessels, sixth in before lunch, 69 for
the home team.
Northamptonshire sank to 84 for
eight before a counterattack from Josh
Cobb and Richard Gleeson added 48.
Cobb was unbeaten on 46 from 49 balls.
just sounds like heaven for a bully. I?m not
interested in any of this. In life generally, I weigh
things up and if I agree with them, I might play
along, but not if that is purely based on the fact
that it has ?always been that way?. If I don?t agree,
then I?ll say that it?s shit and be on my way.
There is a certain amount of interest in me.
The other prisoners have seen me on TV. It?s a
talking point for some people. The general
consensus is that I have fallen from grace. I
suppose that makes the story interesting to
certain kinds of people. Everybody in here is
here for a reason and I am just another prisoner.
As you would expect, the officers treat me the
same as all the other prisoners. There are some
who are cricket fans, and I suppose they?re not
terribly impressed by what I have done. There is
curiosity from officers and inmates alike.
I don?t divulge too much about my career. It?s
fine to be polite and say hello, but to spend my
time answering questions about Brian Lara and
Ian Botham ? always Ian Botham ? it does
become a bit of a bore.
Meaker rattles champions
Surrey v Middlesex
Kia Oval (first day of four; Middlesex won toss):
Surrey, with eight first-innings wickets in hand, are
221 runs behind Middlesex
Mark Baldwin
There have only been four days of
championship cricket since July 6
? and none at all for two counties
? which has left Surrey and
Middlesex with plenty of time
to fret about being drawn
unwillingly into the first-division
relegation struggle.
Middlesex,
the
champions,
wobbled significantly against Stuart
Meaker?s pace and the probing seam
of Rikki Clarke, before John Simpson?s 31 and lower-order runs
from Ollie Rayner and Steven
Finn hauled them to 247 after a
slide from 131 for two to 163 for
seven. Toby Roland-Jones, perhaps
still smarting from his England Test
omission, then removed both Ryan
Patel and Rory Burns cheaply to give
Middlesex further succour as Surrey?s
reply began badly.
A solid 57 from Sam Robson, below,
and 40 from Adam Voges initially
threatened to calm any Middlesex
nerves after the loss of Nick Compton,
smartly held at second slip off
Meaker, and Stevie Eskinazi, legbefore aiming to work Amar
Virdi?s off spin towards
mid-on. Robson, however, was
bowled off stump by a beauty
from Meaker and, next ball,
Paul Stirling also heard the
death rattle when opting
to shoulder arms at a
rapid off-cutter.
Clarke, replacing Meaker at the Vauxhall End,
had Voges leg-before and
James Franklin caught in
the cordon but Simpson,
who soon lost Roland-Jones
to Gareth Batty?s off breaks,
added 47 with Rayner, whose
valuable 38 ended with an
ill-judged sweep at Virdi.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
57
1GM
Second Investec Test Sport
STU FORSTER/GETTY IMAGES
Gutsy Malan
moves closer
to Ashes place
Steve James
Dawid Malan certainly does not lack
for determination, for he played an
innings here that was dripping with the
stuff.
He got stuck in while others took the
more positive roads around him. At
times it was ugly, but it was always
valuable as England gradually built
their lead over West Indies.
He ended with 61 from 186 balls in a
vigil of 291 minutes, his second fifty
in his fourth Test and an effort of
which he should rightly be proud. The
combination of conditions and circumstances was always tricky, and if you
add in the lure of an Ashes place to play
for too, then it was even more so.
The call after England?s first innings
had been for the troubled trio of Mark
Stoneman, Tom Westley and Malan to
stand up, to make an irrefutable case for
their future Test places.
And, in fairness, Stoneman and
Malan have tried hard to answer the
call. Stoneman?s second-innings halfcentury on the third day was impressive. Yes, he was bowled again, probably
making a good ball look exceptionally
good because he became squared up,
but otherwise he played very well,
moving nicely, especially when driving
on the off side, and avoiding the short
balls with ease and time.
Sadly, the less said about Westley?s
innings the better. It was a horror show,
ended with a horror shot. He will hope
that the England selectors and
management see it as a very poor day at
the office rather than a complete
unravelling under the ever-pressing
pressures of Test cricket.
Certainly those in the dressing room
will be looking closely into his eyes to
determine whether the latter is the
case, because, even though everything
points to his deserving another
opportunity in the final Test of the
series at Lord?s next week, if he is
mentally shot then there is little point.
The Test careers of Ian Bell, Ravi
Bopara and Mark Ramprakash all
ended in such a manner. The respective
managements at those times looked
into their eyes and knew that the game
was up. One hopes that is not the case
with Westley, but he will need to
convince everyone that he can come
through this, that the baleful glare of
Test cricket, with its microscopic
analysis both inside and outside the
dressing room, and having to face the
same opposition time after time, has
not done for him and the confidence in
his game.
Stoneman will go to Australia, I
think, so Malan stands somewhere
between him and Westley on the
spectrum that will determine whether
they go down under.
It would be wrong to say that
Malan was wholly convincing here.
Had he been caught on 32 ? and he
should have been when edging Jason
Holder behind, but Shane Dowrich, the
wicketkeeper, sold first slip Kieran
Powell down the river by pulling out of
his attempt late ? then we might
already be talking about a replacement
for him at No 5. He could also have
Malan?s defiant
innings of 61 is
ended by Chase
but he advanced
his Test case
England?s lower order
leads the way
Average sixth, seventh and
eighth-wicket partnerships this year
32.87
England
India
New Zealand
32.71
30.33
Bangladesh
30.06
South Africa
28.16
West Indies
Sri Lanka
Pakistan
Australia
27.81
24.38
24.04
21.53
*Minimum two Tests
gone just before that when chipping
Shannon Gabriel over Roston Chase?s
head at backward square leg.
But luck is a necessity in batting.
Malan?s let-off came at a time when he
was at his most shaky. He really
struggled with Holder?s wobbling
offerings from around the wicket,
missing a drive the ball before the edge,
and then groping like a drunk looking
for a keyhole at the ball afterwards.
Like many players brought up in
South Africa, where the pitches are
hard and the coaches even harder on
their charges, he is rather stiff and
mechanical at the crease, so he can
battle with transferring his weight
through the drive. But he hung in
there. In the first innings he had
played rather similarly, but it did not
suit the circumstances. Here his grit
was perfect. It seems strange to be
talking of Malan?s stodginess, as in
reality he was selected because of his
Twenty20 exploits. He made 78 off 44
balls on his international debut
against South Africa at Cardiff this
summer and Trevor Bayliss, the head
coach, immediately liked what he saw.
Malan had first sprung to notice in
2008 with another T20 innings, a
quarter-final century for Middlesex
against Lancashire, but the intervening
years had not been easy. Apparently
intensity and introspection were
unhelpful friends for him. He was on
the England radar in one-day cricket,
however, playing for the Lions by 2015,
and performances such as his 185 not
out against Sri Lanka A last summer
were hard to ignore.
Luck was again on his side because
he was in the right place at the
right time this season, with so few
batsmen around the shires screaming
to be selected. A first-class average of
40 used to be the bare minimum, but
few fit even that basic criterion these
days.
At 29 years of age Malan does at least
know his game. It did not concern him
that his half-century came in rather
fitting manner, with a scrappy inside
edge for one on the leg side. It had taken
nearly four hours. He duly greeted the
milestone with a glorious cover drive
for four off Kemar Roach.
Malan?s partnership of 91 with Ben
Stokes was critical. Stokes went first,
recklessly, and then Malan departed,
bowled when neither forward nor back
to a decent off break from Chase.
But Malan?s Test career had
definitely taken a stride forward here.
Whether it is far enough to book a plane
ticket to Australia is another matter.
Cricket scoreboards
Bangladesh v Australia, first Test
Mirpur (second day of five): Bangladesh, with
nine second-innings wickets in hand, are 88
runs ahead of Australia
Bangladesh: First Innings 260 (Shakib Al Hasan
84; Tamim Iqbal 71)
Second Innings
Tamim Iqbal not out
30
Soumya Sarkar c Khawaja b Agar
15
Taijul Islam not out
0
Total (1 wkt, 22 overs)
45
Fall of wicket: 1-43.
Bowling: Hazlewood 3-1-3-0; Cummins 2-0-5-0;
Lyon 9-3-11-0; Maxwell 3-0-17-0; Agar 5-0-9-1.
Australia: First Innings (overnight 18-3)
M T Renshaw c Sarkar b Shakib
45
*S P D Smith b Mehedi
8
P S P Handscomb lbw b T Islam
33
G J Maxwell st Rahim b Shakib
23
?M S Wade lbw b Mehedi
5
A C Agar not out
41
P J Cummins b Shakib
25
J R Hazlewood c Kayes b Shakib
5
Extras (b 15, lb 3, w 5)
23
Total (74.5 overs)
217
Fall of wickets: 1-9, 2-14, 3-14, 4-33, 5-102,
6-117, 7-124, 8-144, 9-193.
Bowling: Shafiul Islam 6-0-21-0; Mehedi Hasan
26-6-62-3; Shakib Al Hasan 25.5-7-68-5; Taijul
Islam 8-1-32-1; Mustafizur Rahman 8-3-13-0;
Nasir Hossain 1-0-3-0.
Umpires: A S Dar and N J Llong.
Specsavers County Championship
Division One
Essex v Somerset
Chelmsford (first day of four; Essex won toss):
Somerset, with five first-innings wickets in
hand, are 41 runs behind Essex
Essex: First Innings
V Chopra lbw b van Meekeren
9
N L J Browne c van Meekeren b Overton
44
D W Lawrence c Hildreth b van Meekeren
0
R S Bopara lbw b Overton
1
A J A Wheater lbw b Groenewald
3
*R N Ten Doeschate c Trescothick b Overton 35
?J S Foster c Hildreth b Groenewald
4
P I Walter b van Meekeren
17
S R Harmer c Trescothick b van Meekeren 12
Mohammad Amir not out
22
J A Porter b Overton
10
Extras (lb 1, w 1)
2
Total (50.2 overs)
159
Fall of wickets: 1-19, 2-21, 3-36, 4-39, 5-90,
6-97, 7-98, 8-121, 9-140.
Bowling: Overton 15.2-4-40-4; van Meekeren
14-2-60-4; Groenewald 13-5-25-2; Abell
5-1-15-0; Leach 3-0-18-0.
Somerset: First Innings
M E Trescothick c Foster b Porter
2
E J Byrom b Porter
5
T D Rouse c Harmer b Bopara
4
J C Hildreth c Bopara b Porter
51
*T B Abell c Chopra b Porter
30
?S M Davies not out
7
M J Leach not out
8
Extras (lb 4, w 1, nb 6)
11
Total (5 wkts, 43 overs)
118
C Overton, D M Bess, T D Groenewald and
P A van Meekeren to bat.
Fall of wickets: 1-2, 2-10, 3-20, 4-98, 5-101.
Bowling: Porter 12-4-27-4; Amir 10-3-20-0;
Harmer 13-5-24-0; Bopara 5-0-25-1; Walter
3-0-18-0.
Umpires: N A Mallender and M Burns.
Lancashire v Warwickshire
Emirates Old Trafford (first day of four;
Warwickshire won toss): Lancashire, with
seven first-innings wickets in hand, are 88 runs
behind Warwickshire
Warwickshire: First Innings
A R I Umeed c Davies b Jarvis
44
D P Sibley lbw b McLaren
1
*I J L Trott c Buttler b McLaren
4
I R Bell c Buttler b McLaren
14
M Lamb b Jarvis
23
?T R Ambrose c Davies b Jarvis
8
K H D Barker lbw b Jarvis
0
J S Patel b Jarvis
47
C J C Wright lbw b McLaren
0
O P Stone c Davies b Jarvis
32
R N Sidebottom not out
0
Extras (lb 9nb 18)
27
Total (62.2 overs)
200
Fall of wickets: 1-3, 2-15, 3-41, 4-92, 5-106,
6-106, 7-115, 8-119, 9-195.
Bowling: McLaren 18-5-45-4; Jarvis 18.2-4-67-6;
Clark 8-1-25-0; Parry 14-5-27-0; Parkinson
4-0-27-0.
Lancashire: First Innings
?A L Davies c Umeed b Sidebottom
20
H Hameed c Umeed b Wright
15
L S Livingstone not out
41
D J Vilas b Stone
6
S D Parry not out
15
Extras (b 8, lb 7)
15
Total (3 wkts, 33 overs)
112
S Chanderpaul, J C Buttler, *R McLaren, J Clark,
K M Jarvis and M W Parkinson to bat.
Fall of wickets: 1-32, 2-44, 3-80.
Bowling: Barker 9-3-28-0; Stone 9-3-25-1;
Sidebottom 6-2-19-1; Wright 6-0-11-1; Patel
3-0-14-0.
Umpires: D J Millns and R J Evans.
Surrey v Middlesex
Kia Oval (first day of four; Middlesex won toss):
Surrey, with eight first-innings wickets in hand,
are 221 runs behind Middlesex
Middlesex: First Innings
S D Robson b Meaker
57
N R D Compton c Borthwick b Meaker
20
S S Eskinazi lbw b Virdi
13
A C Voges lbw b Clarke
40
P R Stirling b Meaker
0
?J A Simpson lbw b Batty
31
*J E C Franklin c Borthwick b Clarke
7
T S Roland-Jones lbw b Batty
5
O P Rayner lbw b Virdi
38
S T Finn not out
18
T J Murtagh c Clarke b Curran
5
Extras (b 4, lb 7, nb 2)
13
Total (84.2 overs)
247
Fall of wickets: 1-34, 2-68, 3-131, 4-131, 5-150,
6-158, 7-163, 8-210, 9-224.
Bowling: Curran 15.2-3-50-1; Clarke 16-5-31-2;
Meaker 14-1-55-3; Batty 14-3-40-2; Patel
11-5-22-0; Virdi 14-3-38-2.
Surrey: First Innings
R J Burns c Simpson b Roland-Jones
11
R Patel c Robson b Roland-Jones
11
S C Meaker not out
1
S G Borthwick not out
0
Extras (w 1, nb 2)
3
Total (2 wkts, 9 overs)
26
O J D Pope, J J Roy, ?B T Foakes, S M Curran,
R Clarke, *G J Batty and A Virdi to bat.
Fall of wickets: 1-21, 2-26.
Bowling: Murtagh 3-0-13-0; Roland-Jones
4-1-13-2; Rayner 2-2-0-0.
Umpires: M A Gough and P K Baldwin.
Division Two
Durham v Derbyshire
Emirates Riverside (first day of four; no toss):
Durham have scored 376 runs for seven wickets
against Derbyshire
Durham: First Innings
K K Jennings c Hosein b Viljoen
0
T W M Latham b Palladino
27
C T Steel c Madsen b Reece
72
J T A Burnham b Viljoen
9
*P D Collingwood not out
127
?M J Richardson c Hosein b Viljoen
20
R D Pringle c Podmore b Palladino
19
P Coughlin lbw b Viljoen
68
M J Potts not out
13
Extras (b 1, lb 19, w 1)
21
Total (7 wkts, 96 overs)
376
C Rushworth and G Onions to bat.
Fall of wickets: 1-0, 2-68, 3-94, 4-147, 5-195,
6-217, 7-347.
Bowling: Viljoen 25-6-100-4; Podmore 20-3-73-0;
Palladino 15-1-63-2; Reece 14-3-42-1; Tahir
20-3-68-0; Hughes 2-0-10-0.
Derbyshire: *B A Godleman, B T Slater, L M
Reece, W L Madsen, A L Hughes, M J J Critchley,
?H R Hosein, A P Palladino, G C Viljoen,
M I Tahir, H W Podmore.
Umpires: N L Bainton and R J Bailey.
Glamorgan v Sussex
Colwyn Bay (first day of four; no toss): Sussex,
with seven first-innings wickets in hand, are
215 runs behind Glamorgan
Glamorgan: First Innings
N J Selman b Jordan
58
A O Morgan lbw b Archer
1
J R Murphy c Nash b Archer
0
A H T Donald c Brown b Robinson
5
K S Carlson lbw b Archer
47
A G Salter c Nash b Robinson
13
C A J Meschede b Robinson
87
?T N Cullen lbw b Jordan
42
R A J Smith b Jordan
0
L J Carey c Wells b Robinson
13
*M G Hogan not out
4
Extras (b 4, lb 12, nb 8)
24
Total (75.3 overs)
294
Fall of wickets: 1-15, 2-15, 3-24, 4-96, 5-132,
6-148, 7-256, 8-266, 9-283.
Bowling: Archer 16-4-67-3; Wiese 13-2-49-0;
Robinson 18.3-5-46-4; Jordan 20-2-82-3; van
Zyl 2-1-5-0; Briggs 6-1-29-0.
Sussex: First Innings
A J Robson not out
44
L W P Wells b Carey
21
S van Zyl c Cullen b Meschede
7
D R Briggs lbw b Smith
2
C D Nash not out
4
Extras (w 1)
1
Total (3 wkts, 18 overs)
79
L J Wright, *?B C Brown, C J Jordan, D Wiese,
J C Archer and O E Robinson to bat.
Fall of wickets: 1-50, 2-57, 3-74.
Bowling: Carey 6-0-31-1; Hogan 4-0-24-0;
Meschede 5-2-13-1; Smith 3-0-11-1.
Umpires: R T Robinson and G D Lloyd.
Kent v Leicestershire
Canterbury (first day of four; Leicestershire
won toss): Leicestershire have scored 326 runs
for nine wickets against Kent
Leicestershire: First Innings
M A Carberry lbw b Stevens
18
H E Dearden lbw b Stevens
11
C N Ackermann lbw b Stevens
6
*M J Cosgrove c Northeast b Stevens
40
E J H Eckersley b Stevens
11
N J Dexter b Stevens
40
?L J Hill not out
77
B A Raine c Coles b Stevens
6
M W Pillans c Billings b Milne
11
C J McKay c Milne b Qayyum
32
C F Parkinson not out
59
Extras (b 2, lb 1, nb 12)
15
Total (9 wkts, 96 overs)
326
Fall of wickets: 1-24, 2-35, 3-36, 4-83, 5-88,
6-155, 7-163, 8-174, 9-228.
Bowling: Milne 26-7-95-1; Stevens 23-8-59-7;
Coles 22-4-79-0; Claydon 16-1-69-0; Qayyum
9-0-21-1.
Kent: D J Bell-Drummond, S R Dickson,
J L Denly, *S A Northeast, ?S W Billings,
D I Stevens, Z Crawley, M T Coles, A F Milne,
M E Claydon, I Qayyum.
Umpires: M J Saggers and R J Warren.
Nottinghamshire v Northamptonshire
Trent Bridge (first day of four; Notts won toss):
Nottinghamshire, with ten second-innings
wickets in hand, are 91 runs ahead of
Northamptonshire
Nottinghamshire: First Innings
S J Mullaney b Kleinveldt
58
J D Libby c Levi b Gleeson
14
C A Pujara b Azharullah
18
S R Patel b Azharullah
4
A D Hales c Wakely b Azharullah
4
M H Wessels c Rossington b Gleeson
69
*?C M W Read c Sanderson b Azharullah
8
B A Hutton b Azharullah
5
L Wood lbw b Gleeson
7
J T Ball c Rossington b Gleeson
0
H F Gurney not out
4
Extras (b 12, lb 8, nb 2)
22
Total (50.1 overs)
213
Fall of wickets: 1-35, 2-70, 3-76, 4-88, 5-124,
6-141, 7-167, 8-174, 9-182.
Bowling: Kleinveldt 16-5-61-1; Sanderson
11-3-31-0; Gleeson 9.1-1-38-4; Azharullah
14-2-63-5.
Second Innings
S J Mullaney not out
2
J D Libby not out
1
Extras (b 10, nb 6)
16
Total (no wkt, 5 overs)
19
Bowling: Gleeson 3-0-3-0; Sanderson 2-1-6-0.
Northamptonshire: First Innings
R I Newton c Read b Ball
16
D Murphy c Read b Wood
23
*A G Wakely b Ball
4
R E Levi b Wood
5
R I Keogh lbw b Hutton
5
?A M Rossington lbw b Mullaney
2
J J Cobb not out
46
R K Kleinveldt c Read b Mullaney
2
B W Sanderson lbw b Hutton
9
R J Gleeson lbw b Hutton
25
M Azharullah c Read b Wood
0
Extras (lb 4)
4
Total (37.5 overs)
141
Fall of wickets: 1-28, 2-36, 3-44, 4-49, 5-57,
6-57, 7-59, 8-84, 9-132.
Bowling: Ball 10-2-32-2; Wood 8.5-0-35-3;
Hutton 9-3-25-3; Mullaney 6-2-29-2; Gurney
4-0-16-0.
Umpires: J W Lloyds and S J O?Shaughnessy.
Worcestershire v Gloucestershire
Worcester (first day of four; Worcestershire
won toss): Worcestershire have scored 338
runs for seven wickets against Gloucestershire
Worcestershire: First Innings
D K H Mitchell c Bancroft b Norwell
6
B L D?Oliveira c Hankins b Smith
93
T C Fell lbw b Smith
38
J M Clarke c Dent b Noema-Barnett
32
G H Rhodes c Hankins b Smith
19
R Ashwin c Dent b Norwell
36
?O B Cox not out
56
E G Barnard run out
46
*J Leach not out
0
Extras (b 2, lb 6, w 2, nb 2)
12
Total (7 wkts, 98 overs)
338
J C Tongue and P R Brown to bat.
Fall of wickets: 1-10, 2-82, 3-143, 4-186, 5-206,
6-252, 7-338.
Bowling: Norwell 12.2-2-35-2; Noema-Barnett
20.4-5-80-1; Miles 14-1-75-0; Smith 31-6-82-3;
Taylor 20-3-58-0.
Gloucestershire: C D J Dent, C T Bancroft,
W A Tavare, ?G H Roderick, G T Hankins,
*P Mustard, J M R Taylor, K Noema-Barnett,
C N Miles, T M J Smith, L C Norwell.
Umpires: P J Hartley and A G Wharf.
558
2GM
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
Sport Second Investec Test
Ali swings remarkable
Mike Atherton
Chief Cricket
Correspondent
England v West Indies
Headingley (fourth day of five): West Indies, with all
second-innings wickets in hand, need 317 runs to beat
England
The only thing this splendid, fluctuating Test match has not given us after
four days is a winner. After a three-day
defeat in Birmingham, that in itself is
something of a triumph for this young
West Indies team, but they will need to
bat beyond themselves on the final day
to avoid defeat and stay in the series.
Slowly, initially, but surely and then
with a devastating flourish after tea
from Moeen Ali, England finally began
to take a grip on the game. West Indies?
inability to take their chances (seven
catches have gone down across both
innings, four in the first and three in the
second), some leg-weary bowling with
the second new ball after lunch and
England?s depth of batting were the key
factors.
Test matches are long affairs but it is
an old truism that it only takes a bad
session to lose one. The game was close
to having gone in any case by the time
the last session began, but after holding
England for so long, things finally
unravelled for West Indies either side of
tea, when Ali, in partnership with Chris
Woakes, put some tired bowlers to the
sword, adding 117 in 24 overs, before
finally holing out in the deep for 84.
For a while, we were back in
Birmingham, with some strange
decisions and poor bowling adding to
the general impression of raggedness.
For some reason, Kraigg Brathwaite
started the final session and served up a
high full toss to get things under way;
Shannon Gabriel?s two overs went for
plenty, and Devendra Bishoo was
adjudged to have overstepped the front
line when he had Ali caught behind on
32. That is the terrible and cruel beauty
of Test cricket: there is always time for
flaws to be exposed.
West Indies looked demoralised by
the time the final stages began, and
with England?s lead at more than 300,
the expectation was that Joe Root
would declare immediately once
Woakes went to his third half-century
in Tests. He delayed for a solitary over
but then rightly called a halt with six
overs remaining in the day, having set
West Indies a history-making target
of 322. After all, only Sir Donald
Bradman?s Invincibles have ever made
more in the fourth innings to win here.
At least Brathwaite and Kieran Powell
got through to the close unscathed.
They keep coming these England
batsmen. There cannot be any better
number eights or nines than Ali and
Woakes, or sevens and sixes than Jonny
Bairstow and Ben Stokes. So it was West
Indies who were eventually at sixes and
sevens, because not only do these
all-rounders bat well, but they bat
Scoreboard from Headingley
England: First Innings 258 (B A Stokes
100; S T Gabriel 4 for 51)
Second Innings (overnight 171-3)
*J E Root c S D Hope b Gabriel.............. 72
D J Malan b Chase........................................ 61
B A Stokes c Brathwaite b Chase.........58
J M Bairstow b Chase................................. 18
M M Ali c Brathwaite b Bishoo..............84
C R Woakes not out......................................61
S C J Broad not out.......................................14
Extras (b 13, lb 5, w 9, nb 12)................... 39
Total (8 wkts dec, 141 overs)........... 490
Fall of wickets: 1-58, 2-81, 3-94, 4-212,
5-303, 6-312, 7-327, 8-444.
Bowling: Gabriel 26-3-125-2; Roach
24-8-95-0; Holder 33-10-95-2; Chase
32-5-86-3; Bishoo 25-1-67-1; Brathwaite
1-0-4-0.
West Indies: First Innings 427
(S D Hope 147; K C Brathwaite 134;
J M Anderson 5 for 76)
Second Innings
K C Brathwaite not out................................ 4
K O A Powell not out......................................1
Extras.....................................................................0
Total (no wkt, 6 overs)
5
Bowling: Anderson 3-2-3-0; Broad
2-1-1-0; Ali 1-0-1-0.
Umpires: C B Gaffaney (NZ) and S Ravi
(India).
Third umpire: M Erasmus (SA).
Highest Test totals without a century
524-9dec
India v New Zealand, Kanpur 1976
520-7dec
Australia v West Indies, Perth 2009
517
South Africa v Australia, Adelaide 1998
500-8dec
Pakistan v Australia, Melbourne 1981
490-8dec
England v West Indies, Headingley 2017
Highest successful run chases at
Headingley
404-3..................Australia v England 1948
315-4..................England v Australia, 2001
219-7.....................England v Pakistan 1982
186-5............England v South Africa 1929
180-7..................Pakistan v Australia 2010
aggressively, too, and can quickly
take the game away, a nightmare for a
captain such as Jason Holder, who not
only must lead his troops but do his fair
share of bowling for them as well.
Ali may have felt that he owed his
team a few runs having put down a
simple catch on the third morning
before Jermaine Blackwood had added
to his overnight score, and he more
than made up for it with an array of
silky strokes ? his off-side driving
becomes more Goweresque with every
game ? in the hour after tea. Nor is his
influence on this game likely to end
there: with Roston Chase extracting
appreciable turn and bounce from a
wearing surface, taking three wickets in
the afternoon, Ali will play a key role
with the ball on the final day. He was
given the final over by Root, and
was very close to getting Brathwaite
leg-before with the last ball of the day.
Chase had picked up Stokes ?
driving out of the rough and therefore
unable to control his shot ? at long off,
Bairstow to a malfunctioning reverse
sweep that would have had generations
of batsmen from the Broad Acres
turning in their graves, and Dawid
Malan, who, after a gritty half-century,
missed a ball he shouldn?t have missed.
On the surface, it seemed as though
these wickets kept his team in the hunt,
although West Indies missed their
chance to seize the game well before
that.
Crunch time came just after lunch,
with England?s lead a slender 82 for the
loss of four wickets ? including that of
Root for another half-century, the only
wicket to fall in the morning session ?
and the second new ball available.
The next hour of cricket would likely
determine the match. Holder had used
his new-ball bowlers for an hour each in
the morning, too long for a strike
bowler such as Gabriel in particular,
especially with the second new ball
around the corner: did they have one
more spell left in them?
The answer was no. Gabriel had
bowled superbly throughout the game
but had come into it short of match
practice and, finally, he began to look a
little weary. Kemar Roach was just
wayward, so wayward that neither
Stokes nor Malan had to play at many
deliveries. Holder had to act quickly,
either by persuading Roach to bowl
over the wicket, or by removing him
and bringing himself on. He did neither,
and instead let things drift so that the
moment passed.
It was England?s good fortune to have
at the crease for this hour their most
competitive cricketer, Stokes, a man
unlikely to be daunted by such a
gripping scenario.
While Malan was intent on surviving, Stokes took charge, scoring more
than double his partner?s contribution
to the 50-run partnership that was
eventually extended to 91. He broke a
favourite bat in the process, but went to
his half-century in 92 balls.
Malan?s half-century, his second in
consecutive Tests, was not completely
convincing but it was a vital contribution, given the match situation and the
context of his attempts to nail down a
place in the team. His fifty took four
hours, but four energy-sapping hours
for West Indies? bowlers, and Ali was
right to praise Malan?s contribution
after play, intimating that he, Ali, was
happy to ride on the back of the hard
work of others.
Malan had been dropped on 32,
when the lead was just 44, a bad miss by
Powell at first slip off Holder?s second
ball of the morning, although Powell
will argue that he was put off by Shane
Dowrich, the wicketkeeper, who dived
across him at the crucial moment. That
may be true, but that miss has been the
story of the game for West Indies. It will
catch up with them, in all likelihood, on
the final day.
Bangladesh dominate Australia in Dhaka
Australia are in danger of a first Test
defeat against Bangladesh after Shakib
Al Hasan?s all-round excellence gave
his side the upper hand in Dhaka.
Shakib, who top-scored with 84 on
day one of the first Test, took five for 68
with his left-arm spin to help bowl out
Australia for 217 on day two, giving
Bangladesh a first-innings lead of 43.
They stretched that to 88 by the close
with one wicket down and the dangerous Tamim Iqbal still there on 30.
Australia, having resumed on 18 for
three in reply to Bangladesh?s 260,
found the going tough. Matt Renshaw,
the opener, hit 45, but it required some
strong lower and middle-order
resistance to prevent Bangladesh
claiming a greater advantage. Ashton
Agar held firm with an unbeaten 41,
Peter Handscomb struck 33, while Pat
Cummins, the No 10, ground out a stoic
25 from 90 balls. Mehidy Hasan
finished with three for 62, including the
prized scalp of Steve Smith, the
Australia captain, for eight.
Scoreboard, page 57
No-ball that cost
West Indies dear
1
2
3
4
5
Ali was given a reprieve on 32
that cost West Indies 52 runs and
swung the balance England?s way.
Ali edges a delivery from spinner
Devendra Bishoo to Shane Dowrich (1),
and the wicketkeeper appeals (2) but
umpire S Ravi signals a no-ball (3),
which leaves Dowrich dejected (4).
Bishoo?s front foot was over the line (5). Ali cut loose after tea to wrest control
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
59
2GM
Sport
Test in England?s favour
STU FORSTER/GETTY IMAGES
117
Moeen Ali and Chris Woakes?s
eighth-wicket partnership
equalled England?s best at
Headingley, between Graham
Dilley and Ian Botham in the
famous 1981 Ashes win
Ali celebrates his half-century in the company of Woakes
Dilley, striking a similar pose, is congratulated by Botham
continued from back
?We wanted to bury them?
strength of England?s lower-order
batting again shone through, with halfcenturies from Ben Stokes, Ali and
Woakes.
Although problems remain with
England?s top order with the Ashes only
three months away, few Test teams
boast batsmen of the quality of Stokes,
Jonny Bairstow, Ali and Woakes in the
lower middle-order.
?We felt over the first couple of days
we didn?t play well, so we had to show
some fight and determination to get
back into the game,? Ali said. ?Thankfully today, we tired their bowlers
out, capitalised later on and made
them pay. Over the last couple of years,
we?ve felt with the four of us [in the
lower middle-order] that one of us will
get the opposition. We thrive on that.?
England have ridden their luck, too,
and Ali was reprieved on 32 by a
no-ball call when he had edged
Devendra Bishoo behind, an
umpiring decision shown to be a
close call by television replays.
?I?ve heard it was very tight,
some people have said it wasn?t a
no-ball,? Ali said.
After taking the game
away from West Indies
with the bat, Ali could
play a leading role
with his off spin
today on a wearing
fifth-day pitch. ?It?s
going to be tough,
even though theree
is spin out there,? he
said. ?Hopefully we
can get some
wickets and I can
contribute with
the ball as well.?
West
Indies
had again been
left to rue a series of dropped catches.
A further three chances were squandered in the second innings after four
had been put down during England?s
first innings, including a reprieve for
Malan on 32, which would have seen
England five wickets down and only 44
runs ahead.
?It?s been very frustrating, we work
very hard at it, but we continue to make
mistakes at critical times,? Roddy
Estwick, the West Indies bowling
coach, said. ?You can?t continue to give
good players chances at this level. We
really paid for it.?
In an attempt to lift his beleaguered
side, Estwick evoked memories of a
famous victory over England at Lord?s
in 1984, when a double-century from
Gordon Greenidge helped Clive Lloyd?s
side to reach a target of 342 they had
been set with nine wickets to spare.
?Don?t write us off yet,? Estwick said.
?I remember 1984 when we won that
Test match and Gordon made his
double-hundred. The key thing for
us is that we?ve shown improvement after the Birmingham Test
match, when everybody was
saying we?re the worst team ever
t arrive on these shores. We?ve
to
scrapped and battled and taken it
into the fifth day with a
chance of winning.?
After the fourth day?s
play attracted a Bank
Holiday crowd of 8,073,
tickets are available for
the final day?s play at
� for adults, �for
students, with children admitted free.
Joe Root fell
for 72 but was
one of six
players to
make halfcenturies in the
second innings
john westerby?s headingley diary
baseball?s mixed blessing
Kieran Powell, the West Indies
opening batsman, recently returned
to international cricket after a threeyear absence, during which he
attempted to convert to baseball.
After training with the New York Mets
the move proved short-lived, but
Powell returned feeling that the
experience had benefited his batting,
enhancing his power and hand-eye
co-ordination. And his fielding? After
fluffing two slip chances in this game,
perhaps he is missing fielding in a
baseball mitt? He was due some
sympathy yesterday when he
dropped Dawid Malan as Shane
Dowrich, the wicketkeeper, dived
across to obscure his view.
stokes doesn?t bat an eyelid
When he had made 47 yesterday, Ben
Stokes noticed a crack along the
shoulder of his favourite bat and
summoned a replacement from the
dressing room. At a crucial stage of
his innings, would the new one feel
the same? Would the ball ping off the
middle of the new bat as it had with
the discarded version? The answer
was immediate. His first ball with the
new blade was dispatched through
cover for four, the next clipped off his
legs for another boundary. New bat,
old bat, same result.
coach sees improvement
One Englishman was particularly
pleased by the improved performance
of the game away from a tiring West Indies and give England a good chance of going 2-0 up in the three-match series
of West Indies? batsmen in this Test, in
the first innings at least. Toby Radford,
the former Middlesex and Glamorgan
coach, has been the side?s batting
coach for the past year, following a
short-lived role with Ireland?s
academy. He has been involved with
West Indies cricket for some time,
since becoming the first director of
their high performance centre in
Barbados seven years ago.
no grounds for expecting a draw
A draw seems highly unlikely today, in
keeping with Headingley?s record for
producing decisive Test results. Since
the rain-ruined draw with West Indies
in 1980, a game in which David
Bairstow, Jonny?s father, kept wicket
for England, there have been four
draws in 32 Tests in Leeds and one ?
against South Africa in 2012 ? in the
previous 17 matches, stretching back
to 1996.
hoping for the best
Despite making a brilliant 147 in the
first innings, Shai Hope has been
unable to talk himself out of the most
unenviable role for West Indies ?
fielding at short leg to the bowling of
Devendra Bishoo, who consistently
bowled too short. One long hop
pulled heartily by Malan yesterday
might have made Hope?s life flash
before his eyes, but the blow was
mercifully absorbed by his shin pads.
Later in the day, he was struck again
by a sweep from Stuart Broad.
Tuesday August 29 2017 | the times
2GM
Sport
Konta crashes out of US Open
British No 1 suffers shock first-round
defeat on day one at Flushing Meadows
Tennis, page 52
thetimes.co.uk/sport
?We wanted to bury them?
Palace may go
for Allardyce
Dominant England tried to make West Indies suffer, says Ali
exclusive
STU FORSTER/GETTY IMAGES
John Westerby
Crystal Palace are considering trying to
persuade Sam Allardyce to return as
manager if they part company with
Frank de Boer.
The Dutchman held talks with Steve
Parish, the Palace chairman, yesterday
after his side lost their third successive
Premier League match on Saturday.
Palace are second bottom of the table
having failed to pick up a point or
score a goal in the league since
De Boer took charge and it cannot be
ruled out that he will be sacked during
the international break.
Allardyce stepped down as manager
two days after the end of last season
when he suggested that he wanted to
spend more time with his family. Roy
Hodgson, who has not managed a club
Moeen Ali said that he sensed the
opportunity to ?bury? a demoralised
West Indies team yesterday after his
free-flowing 84 put England into a
position to complete a remarkable
comeback at Headingley today.
Ali?s was the highest score in
England?s second innings of 490 for
eight declared on the fourth day of the
second Investec Test.
A dramatic final day is in store
after six England batsmen made
half-centuries, giving Joe Root the
luxury of declaring shortly before the
close and setting West Indies a target of
322 to win after they had conceded a
first- innings deficit of 169.
Kraigg Brathwaite and Kieran
Powell survived six nervy overs last
night, but West Indies face an uphill
battle to prevent the home side
clinching the series today, with James
Anderson needing three wickets to
become the first England bowler to take
500 Test wickets.
After three days and two sessions of
fluctuating fortunes, England took firm
control of the game in the final session
as West Indies visibly began to flag,
a sign picked up by Ali and Chris
Woakes, who went on to forge a crucial
eighth-wicket partnership of 117.
?We felt like their heads went down
after tea pretty quickly,? Ali said. ?We
were trying to bury them, make them
suffer, keeping them out in the field.
?Their bowlers were getting tired,
there wasn?t much going on, they were
a bit down as a side, so we wanted to
capitalise on that. That was due to the
way the guys had played at the top [of
the order], making them tired. We just
pounced on that.?
Ali conceded that England had
performed poorly on the first two days
of the Test but that they had resolved to
battle their way back into contention.
Once Root and Dawid Malan had
completed fifties earlier in the day, the
Continued on page 54
All Blacks guru
joins Southgate
Martyn Ziegler Chief Sports Reporter
Gareth Southgate has been using a
senior adviser to the All Blacks to help
to develop a team culture around his
England squad.
Owen Eastwood has been a key
figure in developing the New Zealand
rugby union set-up as they have
become the pre-eminent team in world
sport, and he has been working with
Southgate?s squad and the England
women?s team.
Southgate is an admirer of the All
Blacks? set-up and has spoken of the
need for ?self-regulation? and for the
squad to adopt a code, similar to the ?no
dickheads? rule that the Kiwi players
operate, which aims to tackle inflated
egos and ensure the team come first.
The work by Eastwood includes
building a strong core round what it
England plead for Kraigg Brathwaite to be given out off the last ball of the day. They need ten wickets today to win the series
Continued on page 59
Times Crossword 26,816
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Gary Jacob
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across
down
1 Like Canute?s race to secure
popular backing? (6)
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Belgian capital (8)
10 French writer having an impact in
Uzbek city (9)
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12 Place of con?nement debt collector
has no say about (7)
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for monument (5)
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enter valley (6)
24 Appearing in drag: a military
trumpeter (5)
Continued on page 57
Yesterday?s solution 26,815
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y(7HB7E2*OTSMMQ( |||+@!\
Victor Moses as a wing back. He does
not like playing in that role, as he has for
Arsenal recently. Liverpool have been
wary about pursuing the player after
being told by Arsenal that they would
not do business with them this summer,
after the lingering acrimony over
Wenger?s failed attempt to sign Luis
Su醨ez in 2013. In addition, Liverpool
took Wenger at his word when he said
that Oxlade-Chamberlain would not
leave.
Chelsea must also hold off interest
from Tottenham Hotspur to sign
Barkley after having talks with Everton
when the sides met on Sunday. No bid
was submitted. Barkley is recovering
from surgery on a hamstring injury and
will be out until November. He has
entered the final year of his contract
having rejected the offer of an
extension from his boyhood club.
Everton still value him at about
� million, which will serve as a test to
the determination of Tottenham and
Chelsea. Both London clubs know
Barkley?s valuation will drop farther in
January, when he will have just six
months remaining on his contract
before he can leave for nothing.
Liverpool agree to sign �m Ke飔a next summer
Paul Joyce
Northern Football Correspondent
Liverpool have agreed a club-record
deal to sign Naby Ke飔a from RB Leipzig
next summer and will now seek to add
further recruits before the transfer
window closes.
There is the prospect for three days of
frenzied activity, with J黵gen Klopp
primed for any softening in Southampton?s stance that Virgil van Dijk is not
for sale before Thursday?s deadline,
while he is also considering Arsenal?s
Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain and Monaco?s Thomas Lemar.
In addition, Liverpool say any
renewed attempt by Barcelona to sign
Philippe Coutinho will be rejected for a
fourth time.
The feelgood factor around the club
after Sunday?s 4-0 victory over Arsenal
has been enhanced by the capture of
Ke飔a, the midfielder, for an initial fee of
about � million even though he will
not officially become a Liverpool player
until July 1. Ke飔a has a release clause of
about � million that comes into effect
next summer and Liverpool have paid a
premium on top of that now to ensure
that they are not beaten to a player who
was their priority for this window.
Leipzig?s refusal to sell, rejecting
bids of � million and � million,
complicated that pursuit, but Liverpool have been clever in ensuring
that the Guinea international
does not slip through their grasp.
Negotiations have continued
between the Leipzig hierarchy
and
Liverpool
sporting
director Michael Edwards
and the deal means that
the Anfield club cannot be
gazumped if Ke飔a enjoys
another stellar season in the
Bundesliga. Ke飔a, 22,
underwent a medical
yesterday and has signed
what is likely to be a
five-year deal after travKe飔a will not become an Anfield
player until July of next year
elling to England with Leipzig officials,
including chief executive Oliver
Mintzlaff, on a private jet after playing
in Sunday?s 4-1 win over Freiburg. He is
set to be assigned the No 8 shirt, Steven
Gerrard?s old number, when he arrives.
Klopp sees Ke飔a operating as an
attacking midfielder, rather than a No 6
holding player, and while he is now
Liverpool?s
record
signing,
outstripping the �.9 million paid to
Roma for Mohamed Salah in July, the
club
will
not
baulk
at trying to set a new
benchmark.
Liverpool are also
interested in Lemar, who
can play in a variety of
attacking positions and
also in midfield, but the
French club said that
they will not sell after losing a number of key players.
Liverpool could use Divock Origi as a makeweight in
any deal for Lemar with
Monaco having been inter-
ested in the striker earlier in the
summer. The saga over Van Dijk?s
future also rumbles on with relations
between the player and Southampton
having disintegrated as he continues to
look to force a move to Anfield.
Liverpool publicly withdrew their
interest in the player after being
accused of tapping up the centre back,
but
any
encouragement
that
Southampton are ready to deal will be
followed up with a bid that would break
the world-record fee for a defender.
Klopp has identified Van Dijk as the
only player he wants to strengthen his
defence.
Liverpool maintain that a fourth bid
for Coutinho from Barcelona will be
rejected despite the Catalan club?s
sporting director, Roberto Fern醤dez,
claiming that they were hopeful of a
deal.
Leicester City have inquired about
Mamadou Sakho, the Liverpool
defender, who is also wanted by Crystal
Palace, where he has spent time on
loan, and West Bromwich Albion.
Swansea City are attempting to pull off
what would be a surprise loan deal for
Renato Sanches from Bayern Munich.
The Portugal midfielder, 20, has been
told that he can leave the German side
and Paul Clement, the Swansea
manager who worked with Sanches at
Bayern before moving to south Wales,
has registered an interest.
Clement?s relationship with Carlo
Ancelotti, the Bayern coach, gives
Swansea a chance of securing what
would be one of the more eye-catching
deals of the window. Sanches moved
from Benfica to Bayern for �.5 million
last summer, but has failed to establish
himself at the Allianz Arena.
West Bromwich Albion have
rejected a second bid from Leicester
City for Jonny Evans. The improved
offer of � million is thought to be a
significant increase on an earlier bid
this summer and exceeds the � million offer that Manchester City tabled
for the 29-year-old centre back this
month. City are expected to make a
second bid for Evans before the transfer
window closes on Thursday.
Nice have attempted to re-sign
Nampalys Mendy from Leicester after
he appeared bound for Atalanta on
loan. The midfielder cost � million
from the French club last summer, a
Leicester record at the time.
Torino have made an approach for
Giannelli Imbula, the midfielder who
has been told that he can leave Stoke
City. He was signed for � million in
February 2016 but has not established
himself in the team.
The Newcastle United midfielder,
Siem de Jong, has ended an injuryplagued three-year stay at St James?
Park to return to Ajax.
Everton are closing in on an �million deal for Nikola Vlasic, Hajduk
Split?s 19-year-old attacker.
continued from back
Palace may seek Allardyce return
since departing as England manager
after their elimination from Euro 2016,
and Slavisa Jokanovic, of Fulham, are
also being considered by Palace, who
have previously looked at the pair.
Palace appointed De Boer on a threeyear contract worth about �million a
year in June after showing interest in
Sean Dyche, the Burnley manager,
Mark Hughes, the Stoke City manager,
and Mauricio Pellegrino, who joined
Southampton. The 47-year-old has had
tensions with the hierarchy over summer recruitment and other issues to do
with trying to change the style and
system of the team. The manager
stressed in talks yesterday that he was
simply implementing the changes that
he had proposed in his job interview and
should be given the time to make them
work.
Palace have signed only three players
this summer, two ? Ruben LoftusCheek from Chelsea and Manchester
United?s Timothy Fosu-Mensah ? on
loan. De Boer has suggested targets
in addition to Ja飏o Riedewald, the
defender who has not impressed
since his arrival from Ajax for about
�million last month, and is hopeful
that the club could re-sign Mamadou
Sakho, the centre back, from Liverpool.
Palace missed out on signing Oliver
Burke last week when the midfielder
joined West Bromwich Albion. They
need a goalkeeper, centre back and
back-up striker and may seek to offload
Scott Dann, Yohan Cabaye and Patrick
van Aanholt. Andros Townsend?s future
is also in doubt.
the times | Tuesday August 29 2017
55
2GM
Sport
Henry Winter
Chief Football Writer
Unless Kroenke engages with fans
the Arsenal mess will only get worse
CARL RECINE/REUTERS
W
ell, here?s another nice mess
you?ve gotten them into,
Stanley. Well done, Enos
Stanley Kroenke. What a
wretched mess. Arsenal?s pitiful
plight, lying 16th in the Premier League with
certain stars briefing that they want out, is
rooted in your naive, damaging, alienating
?stewardship? of an English institution. So get a
grip on this great club, please.
TV pundits do not get this, focusing on player
inadequacies, but Arsenal are withering from
the top down, starting with Silent, Soulless Stan
from Denver and Missouri. So rather than adopt
your usual cold distance from warm-hearted
Arsenal diehards, basically 4,600 miles, you
could follow the example of other more
enlightened owners of English clubs and
actually bother to engage with fans.
Not the ghastly Glazers at Manchester
United, nor the appalling owners of Blackburn
Rovers, Venky?s, the Indian poultry firm, or the
offensive Oystons at Blackpool. Their
reputations in the home of football are 
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