close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Times Times 2 1 March 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
March 1 | 2018
Don?t
stereotype
me
Actress, dancer,
Harry?s ex . . .
What Cressida Bonas
did next
Plus
The great
burger
taste test
2
1G T
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
times2
People think I
Struggling to write
racist literature?
Here?s my guide
Deborah Ross
M
ax Mosley,
the privacy
campaigner,
has been
accused of
publishing a
by-election
campaign
leaflet that linked immigrants
with housing and job shortages
and also stated: ?Protect your
health. There is no medical check
on immigration. Tuberculosis, VD
and other terrible diseases like
leprosy are on the increase.
Coloured immigration threatens
your children?s health.?
The pamphlet, supporting a
candidate for his father Oswald
Mosley?s Union Movement in a
1961 parliamentary contest, has
?published by Max Mosley?
running along the bottom, yet,
when quizzed by Channel 4 News
this week he said he did not recall
it, then said it may not be
?genuine?, then added: ?But if it is
genuine, it doesn?t reflect my
views today.? Asked when he
?stopped endorsing racist views?
he was quite clear: ?1963.?
Whether Mosley was or wasn?t
the publisher, it does turn our
attention to ?the racist leaflet?,
which is a bit of a lost art, like
quilting. But I believe you may be
able to write such a leaflet, given
the skills and the right kind of
support from, for instance, your
Uncle Bob, who is only saying
what everyone else is too scared
to say, and Chris from the Three
Bells, who knows everything that?s
wrong with the world and is also
only saying what everyone else is
too scared to say. So I give you:
How to Write a Racist Leaflet.
Facing a blank page is always
intimidating, and the hardest
part is getting started. Don?t
Clone my
dog? It?s
tempting
An interview with
Barbra Streisand in
Variety has revealed
that her two dogs, Miss
Scarlett and Miss
Violet, were cloned
from her 14-year-old
beloved Coton de
Tul閍r, Samantha, who
died last year.
(Apparently, Streisand
wanted Variety to take
a portrait of them on
her Malibu estate and
caption it: ?Send in the
over-worry about making your
first version any good. Write the
shit version first, including
whatever ignorant rubbish comes
to mind, and, who knows, you
may be so thrilled you?ll let it
stand. It may even have been a
classic day for including whatever
ignorant rubbish comes to mind
and writing shit. It is genuinely
this simple. So simple, in fact, that
you?ll wonder why every moron
isn?t having a go.
It isn?t necessary to consult
history, facts or have any true or
proper knowledge. Chris from the
Three Bells will provide you with
all the information you need
when it comes to immigrants
taking our jobs and our housing
and spreading disease and so on.
You may not recall half of what
was said the night before ? it was
a long night of beer
and scapegoating ?
but you may
remember how
Chris said all our
Max Mosley
clones.? That Variety
didn?t is inexplicable.)
I can identify with
Streisand?s grief when
Samantha died. I
remember that when
my childhood dog
passed, as they say, I
was so beside myself
that I didn?t speak for
weeks (oh, Trixie).
Or as the New York
poet Mark Doty writes
in his wonderful doggy
memoir, Dog Years:
?One of the unspoken
truths of American
life is how deeply
people grieve over
animals who live and
die with them, how real
the emptiness is, how
profound the silence is
Cressida Bonas is carving out a career
as an actress while living in a rented
flat-share. She?s tired of being known as
Prince Harry?s ex, she tells Nick Curtis
schools are being ?swamped?, so
that?s a good one for the shit
version right there. (Once you get
started, your pen will fly.)
Meanwhile, one person who did
look something up while writing a
racist leaflet has come to regret it:
?It wasn?t helpful. Complete waste
of the time.?
Maybe you think that writing is
only for people with coherent
arguments and open minds, but
you?re never going to get your
hateful bigotry down on the page
if you think like that. And if
you?re poorly educated or have
only the most rudimentary grasp
of spelling or grammar,
remember: this is what stops a lot
of crackpots typing up their vile,
ill-informed rants and delivering
them door to door in Barking.
Don?t let it happen to you.
Do not be discouraged or
alarmed if the mainstream liberal
media comes down on you like a
ton of bricks. It?s just those Jews,
up to their tricks again (the banks,
Hollywood, the media ? this
shadowy, big-nosed cabal controls
them all).
Always blame someone else
for your problems. You?re
never going to have the
requisite fire in your belly
if you take personal
responsibility. ?I once took
personal responsibility
and my leaflets were
crap,? says one source,
?but once I?d ditched it
the leaflets practically
wrote themselves.?
Two years after the
publication of your
leaflet you may stop
being racist, if it suits,
and then, also if it suits,
you can forget that you
ever were.
these creatures leave
in their wake. Our
culture expects us not
only to bear these
losses alone, but to be
ashamed of how deeply
we feel them.?
If dogs could get this
short-lived thing
sorted, they would be
nigh on perfect, but
I don?t know. Cloning?
So in effect you keep
having the same dog?
(That is, the same dog,
looks-wise, since
there?s no saying about
personality.)
Instinctively, I want
to be against it and
know the arguments.
There are millions of
unwanted, abused and
abandoned dogs
needing homes. Cloning
has a high failure rate
and is not humane, says
the animal protection
organisation Peta. But
given the money
involved ? $50,000 a
pop ? surely it?s never
going to be as big a
problem as those
puppy mills churning
out sick dogs left, right
and centre?
Plus I?ve seen the
pictures of Miss
Scarlett and Miss Violet
and I will say this: as it
turns out, the terrifying
world of the future is, in
fact, small, soft, white,
button-nosed and
mightily, mightily cute.
I
have met the blonde, aristocratic,
delicately beautiful Cressida
Bonas to talk about her new show
in which, somewhat improbably,
she plays a dog, but we both know
there is a big, ginger elephant in
the room. The 29-year-old is
carving out an acting career in
unglamorous London fringe theatre.
However, four years after their twoyear relationship ended, she remains
best known as Prince Harry?s ex.
Bonas has let it be known, and
repeats it before our interview, that
she doesn?t want to talk about soon-tobe-married Harry, but I suspect she
knows that I?m compelled to ask.
Problem is, she can?t say much about
the new play she?s in, The Dog Beneath
the Skin, either.
?It?s written by WH Auden and
Christopher Isherwood and at its heart
it?s an anti-fascist play,? she says. ?Alan
and his dog go on a search for Francis,
who is missing, and it?s absurdist and
quite bonkers and also quite beautiful
at the same time. It?s not been done
since 1936, but I think it is really
relevant and will say a lot of things to
an audience about today.?
And you play the dog, I say. ?It?s not
like the dog in Peter Pan, it?s a very
physical part,? she replies. Is it a
speaking part? ?Um, I can?t say, because
there is a twist to the dog.? Are you
playing it on all fours? ?No, well, a
mixture actually. It?s sort of DV8, or
Frantic Assembly-style, or Punchdrunk.
For me, mine and Alan?s relationship is
a very human relationship.?
OK. You?ve got form playing fourlegged roles, haven?t you? ?Yuh, I was
a cockney wolf in [There?s a] Monster
in the Lake, my first professional play,
at Hay-on Wye and the Waterloo
Vaults. That was quite bonkers as well,
but I loved it.? How was your cockney
accent? ?It was OK, it was quite
funny.? Are you worried about all this
canine/lupine typecasting? ?I did other
stuff after the wolf, so not at all.?
And at least you?re not just playing
the pretty blonde, I say. ?I really don?t
want to be typecast as a pretty
blonde,? she says. ?That?s why this is
great, to show people I want to do
different things, that I don?t want to go
down that standard route, which I
think could be very easy to do.?
Bonas is the daughter of the 1960s
It girl Lady Mary-Gaye Curzon, whose
father was the 6th Earl Howe, and
Curzon?s third husband (of four),
Jeffrey Bonas. Her half-siblings include
Pandora Cooper-Key, who worked as
an accessories designer with Vivienne
Westwood, plus three AnstrutherGough-Calthorpes: the party organiser
Jacobi and the actresses Isabella (a
rumoured former pash of Prince
William?s, now married to Richard
Branson?s son Sam) and Gabriella
(who goes by the stage name Wilde).
Bonas was a junior artist at the
Royal Ballet School from the age of
nine, ?so dance was my base, my
roots?. However, she got the acting bug
at Stowe School ? ?I realised I
wanted to speak? ? and studied
performing arts at Leeds University
and contemporary dance at the Trinity
Laban Conservatoire in south London.
She has had minor screen roles in
Julian Fellowes?s TV series Doctor
Thorne and in the much-delayed
movie adaptation of Deborah
Moggach?s Tulip Fever. During filming
of the latter, the producer Harvey
Weinstein sang her praises in a way
that sounds chilling in hindsight,
although she was not one of his
victims. ?I have never been sexually
harassed,? she says decisively. ?But I
went to the Baftas and everyone wore
black and I think out of a lot of
nastiness has come a shift in attitude
in the industry, and I hope that going
forward there will be a change.?
Anyway, she says, the more
collegiate world of theatre is her
natural home. This is her second
production with the director Jimmy
Walters, after the fringe hit Mrs
Orwell, although Bonas says that she
still had to audition for the part of the
dog. Is she competitive with Isabella
and Gabriella, who had more visible
(if not exactly stellar) screen careers
before marrying and starting families?
?No, not at all,? she says. ?We have
I really don?t
want to be
typecast as a
pretty blonde
always been so close since . . . well,
birth, so there has never been a
question of competitiveness or rivalry.
We are sisters, but we are also very,
very good friends. We used to put on
plays together when we were younger,
performed them and dressed up. A bit
like Little Women.?
The Anstruther-etc-etc girls went to
Heathfield School in Ascot, but Bonas
wanted to go to a co-educational
establishment. What did you get from
Stowe? ?Not being scared of men,? she
says. ?I think maybe if you are at a
single-sex school, you suddenly meet a
guy and he?s an alien. I never had that.
Guys weren?t scary. Guys were just my
friends and equals. I?d definitely send
my children to a co-ed.?
Not that Isabella or Gabriella, who is
married to the singer-songwriter Alan
Pownall, seem to have done too badly.
But Stowe clearly also taught Bonas
impeccable manners, because she asks
with polite reciprocity where I went to
school. When I say it was a London
comprehensive she says: ?Nice!?
Fringe theatre pays poorly if at all,
and Bonas apparently doesn?t take
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
3
1G T
times2
live on Sloane Square. I don?t
COVER AND BELOW: CHRIS MCANDREW FOR THE TIMES. HAIR & MAKE-UP: NEUSA NEVES
The lowdown
Serena?s
billboards
b
You?ve had a baby and you?re
returning to work. How would you
like your partner to mark this
special occasion?
Diamonds should cover it.
Incorrect answer. Try again.
Aquamarines? I?ve always fancied
some aquamarines. Or emeralds.
Tough. You?re getting a billboard,
like Serena Williams.
Come again?
Cressida Bonas and,
left, with the cast of
The Dog Beneath the
Skin. Below: with her
boyfriend, Harry
Wentworth-Stanley.
Above right: with
Prince Harry in 2014
handouts from her parents. Her
father runs the textiles company
MacCulloch & Wallis, so when
she?s between acting jobs she
works in its shop on Poland
Street in Soho. She has also
done a bit of modelling,
appearing in a promo for
Mulberry, dancing barefoot
down a grassy staircase, and
was an ambassador for the
brand until it changed
creative directors.
She did stints as a ski
instructor too, and working
behind ?a really scruffy bar in
Bondi called the Wreck, which
I think has been closed now.
You got beer in jugs there and
one guy just got his jug of beer
and chucked it in my face. He
didn?t have anything against me,
he was just really drunk, but it
was my first week, and I thought, ?Oh
my goodness.? ? Also in Sydney she
took acting classes in the Meisner
technique, where she first learnt to act
like an animal. ?I guess I move quite
like a cat,? she says. ?Sometimes, when
I am rehearsing, being the dog, I tell
myself, ?Don?t be catlike.? ?
Her parents are supportive of her
career, she says, but kind of wish she
would do something else. ?Especially
my dad, as he is an academic; he was a
history don at Oxford, at Oriel, but
not any more. He always wanted me
to be a teacher and if I wasn?t acting
that?s what I would be doing. And my
mum would rather I was doing
something more secure and stable.
They get very nervous coming to
watch me on stage, as I imagine I
would be as a parent, because it is
very exposing. It?s such a brutal
industry and they don?t want to
see you get hurt.?
Her mother never acted, but
did pose for the book Birds of
Britain topless and smeared in
engine oil, and was quite racy in her
day. ?She is a mother of five and an
amazing mum and very cosy,? Bonas
says, nonplussed, ?so I don?t really
see her as . . . she?s just, like, a mum.
She?s our mum.?
Bonas spends quite a few weekends
at her father?s home in Norfolk, but
for the past ten years has shared
rented flats in Leeds, Australia and
now lives in a not entirely gentrified
area of northwest London with her
best friend, Georgia,
i who
h works
orks for the
photographic studio Spring. ?I think
maybe some people who don?t know
me think, because of my background,
that I live on Sloane Square,? she says.
?And I don?t. I am very different. I?m
just not like that.?
She says that she would prefer to go
to a play or spend time with her friends
in Leeds or her family (?I have three,
four, five, six, seven nieces and
nephews,? she says, totting them up, ?so
I see them a lot?) than get caught up in
London?s social whirl. Of course,
between 2012 and 2014, her every
move, mood and fashion choice were
documented by the paparazzi. It?s when
I ask if her position as Harry?s girlfriend
made it easier or harder to get acting
jobs that the shutters come down.
?I have to be really careful what I
say because . . . well, you know . . . I don?t
want to be . . . I think I?ve said this
before anyway, but people love putting
people into boxes and into stereotypes,
especially in this country, and no, I
don?t think that helps,? she says. ?I
think you want to be a blank canvas
[as an actress]. But I would rather not
say anything, actually, if you don?t
mind, because it is kind of in my past
and I am so focused on the acting.?
I understand, I say, but I can?t not
mention Harry in my article, and I?d
rather ask you about him directly than
rehash old stuff. Can I at least ask if
you wish him and Meghan well? In an
agony of warring politeness and
discretion, she demurs. Later that day
it is rumoured that she and another of
Harry?s exes, Chelsy Davy, are to be
invited to the wedding, as are the
Obamas, but not Donald Trump.
Anyway, Bonas is now in a
relationship ?with another Harry, yes?,
having reconnected with Harry
Wentworth-Stanley, the startlingly tall
Old Harrovian son of the Marchioness
of Milford Haven who works for
Savills, the estate agency. ?We went
out for four years at university and
now we are back together,? Bonas says.
?It?s going very well.? Have all those
nephews and nieces made her want to
start a family? ?Well, not yet, but
definitely one day, yes.?
As we part company she apologises
again for not answering ?that question
about personal stuff. I hope you
understand. I get it all the time. I?d just
rather not go into it.? I tell her I
understand entirely and wish her well
with the play and her other Harry, and
I mean it.
The Dog Beneath the Skin is at
Jermyn Street Theatre, London SW1,
March 7-31, jermynstreettheatre.co.uk
She?s getting a billboard. Or, to be
specific, four billboards next to a
motorway in Florida near where
she lives. Her husband, Alexis
Ohanian, the co-founder of Reddit,
has bought them to commemorate
her return to the tennis circuit.
I am overwhelmed, for all the wrong
reasons. I gave birth and I?m about to
combine motherhood with a job, and
I?m getting a billboard?
Yes.
Why four? I can?t honestly say that
four billboards feels any more special
than one.
Because he wanted to emblazon
them with pictures of his beloved
and their baby girl, Alexis,
alongside the words ?Serena
Williams GMOAT.?
GMOAT? Is that an anagram? A
spelling mistake? A terrible pet name
that should never have been said in
public, let alone be emblazoned
across four billboards in Florida?
No. It stands for greatest mother
of all time.
Look, I realise Americans can be
overexcitable, but even by their
standards buying four billboards and
proclaiming your wife to be the
greatest mother of all time seems a
little de trop.
How else does a man who has
everything celebrate the
achievements of a woman who
has everything?
By saying: ?Well done, darling,
I?m so proud of you, have fun at
work today??
Oh, come on. This is Serena
Williams we?re talking about.
By saying: ?Well done, darling, I?m
so proud
ud of you, have fun
at work
k and here
are some
me
absolutely
tely
humongous
ngous
diamond
nd
earrings,
gs, so big
they block
lock out
the light
ht from
the sun??
n??
You are
re so
shallow.
w.
Hilaryy
Rose
4
1G T
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
the table
Byron is our
family ?safe space?.
Could another
gourmet burger
joint replace it?
Meat Liquor
Dad rating {{{{{
Daughter rating {{{{(
Tony Turnbull and his daughter went in search of the
perfect burger ? they didn?t exactly see eye to eye
D
eath, taxes and trips
to Byron. For the past
dozen years these
have been the three
certainties of middleclass existence, but it
turns out one of them
is under threat ? and
sadly, no, we?re not all relocating to the
Cayman Islands. For 20 of the burger
company?s 67 restaurants may close, it
was announced in January, as the chain
hits the triple buffers of rising food
costs, rising rents and oversaturation.
Byron is not alone. The Handmade
Burger Company had to be bought out
of administration last summer; Jamie
Oliver is closing 12 of the 37 Jamie?s
Italian branches, Strada has shut a
third of its restaurants and Prezzo is
closing 100 of its 300 sites.
It?s the Byron news that has hit the
hardest. Since it opened it has been
our family?s safe space, where adults
and teenagers alike were guaranteed
a good enough time: quality meat,
obsessively sourced buns and the
Americana tamed by its Old Etonian
founder?s British sense of fun. Not
even that tweet of George Osborne
tucking into a Byron burger during a
late-night budget session put us off.
However, when I suggested a visit
recently, I had a mini-revolution on
my hands. ?I?d much rather go to
Nando?s,? said my 17-year-old, Isabella.
Fair enough, teenagers always want to
go to Nando?s. ?But if it has to be a
burger, can?t we go to Five Guys??
Five Guys? That I couldn?t accept,
and not just because on my first visit I
had a senior moment and failed to
understand how to order. I?d asked for
a hamburger, you see, and that?s
precisely what had arrived: a bun with
two patties. No lettuce, no tomato, no
garnish, no sauce. Isabella had to hide
as I went back up to the counter and,
pleading stupidity, asked for a more
interesting replacement. ?Dad, that?s
the whole point of it,? she said, rolling
her eyes. ?You can personalise it as
much as you want. You tell them
exactly what you want in it.?
There?s a
different
?authentic?
American
fast-food
experience
for every
generation
Tony Turnbull is
the Food Editor
of The Times
It?s weird how much young people
seem to love Five Guys. Even once I?d
perfected the order, I still found the
burgers lacking: a flattened, gummy,
squidgy mess, like a Burger King that?s
spent the day in your back pocket. No
amount of free monkey nuts were
going to encourage me to linger in its
neon-bright booths, and yet here it
was, absolutely rammed.
I?m not judging. My parents were
appalled when I wanted to go to
McDonald?s, just as their parents
probably thought the Wimpy Bar
was a tenth circle of hell. There?s a
different ?authentic? American fastfood experience for every generation.
Somewhere we had to find a middle
ground, so Isabella and I trawled some
of the bigger burger chains.
We both liked the burgers at
Gourmet Burger Kitchen, which is
apparently inspired by a New Zealand
take on the burger, not that you?d
notice after so many years of
cross-hybridisation. The space,
though, was a bit too family-friendly,
with two children?s birthday parties
in full swing. The Wembley branch
of the Handmade Burger Co on a
matchless night was so empty that
not even the best burger in the world
would have made up for it, and the
one I was served didn?t come close.
Honest Burgers could take on
Byron?s mantle as a family favourite ?
the quality of meat was superb and the
chain is small enough for the passion
to shine through ? but we wanted to
find somewhere a little more edgy that
a teenager might feel happy going with
her friends. And, yes, we found it in the
King?s Cross branch of Meat Liquor.
With its warehouse feel and kitchen in
a graffiti-covered New York subway
carriage, it hit the spot, as did the
?animal-style? mustard-fried Dead
Hippie. The dirtiest of dirty burgers,
it dripped on to the table as we ate it.
?That?s actually pretty good,?
Isabella conceded, which we all know
is teen speak for great. I think we may
just have cracked it. Now, if they?d
turn down the music a bit . . .
Dad versus daughter:
the top chains rated
Five Guys
Dad {((((
Daughter {{{{{
Cheeseburger, �50
A squishy, pappy sesame bun
sandwiching a pair of greasy,
flattened patties cooked fairgroundstyle over a hotplate rather than on a
chargrill. Sweet and gummy, but
inexplicably popular with the young.
Handmade Burger Company
Dad {{(((
Daughter {((((
Cheeseburger, �95
Dull bun and too much of it, and
it is soggy from the juices that
leached out. The patty has a decent
whack of flavour, but is the most
gristly of all the restaurant
offerings we try.
Byron
Dad {{{((
Daughter {{(((
Cheeseburger, �The glazed bun is a delight ? all
milky sweetness and not too doughy
? but the burger is charred to dry
oblivion and only partially redeemed
by a decently chewy texture.
Disappointing.
GBK
Dad {{{{(
Daughter {{{{(
Cheeseburger, �15
A great burger: thicker than most,
dribblingly succulent and full of
smoke from the grill. Topped with
proper cheddar cheese, to boot. Fifth
burger of the day, but I finished it.
Honest burgers
Dad {{{{(
Daughter {{{((
Cheeseburger, �75
A firmer patty with a pronounced
beef flavour and satisfying chew, not
unlike a Sunday roast. The only one
to include chips in the price, but I
could have done without the
oversweet caramelised onions, below.
Meat Liquor
Dad {{{{{
Daughter {{{{(
Cheeseburger, �75
The much-revered Dead Hippie with
two mustard-fried patties that are
loosely textured, well seasoned and
juicy as you like. Guiltily addictive ?
the kind of burger Five Guys fans
would do well to graduate on to.
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
5
1G T
the table
Five Guys
Dad rating {((((
Daughter rating {{{{
{
Just time for
J
a ?bleeding?
v
vegan burger
I
Tony Turnbull
T
bull and
his daughter Isabella
The taste test home-cooked burgers
Meat
Farmison (farmison.com)
4 Hand-pressed steak and bonemarrow burgers, 700g, �.95
{{{{{
Supplier to Michelin-starred chefs
and you can see why. Rich rubyred, mottled with herbs and
marrow to produce an insanely
flavoursome, juicy burger. As close
to perfection as the home cook
will get.
Farmdrop (farmdrop.com)
2 Story Organic dry-aged beef
burgers, 226g, �25
{{{{(
Adele?s favourite, apparently, from
which we can judge that she
enjoys a well-seasoned, very loosetextured burger that caramelises
beautifully, but rather collapses in
the pan.
Sainsbury?s
2 Taste the Difference 30-dayaged beef burgers, 340g, �50
{{{((
Leached a lot of water during
cooking, so one to grill rather than
fry, but there was enough texture
for your teeth to work on and
plenty of decent beefy oomph.
Ocado (ocado.com)
4 Edwards of Conwy Welsh beef
quarter-pounders, 454g, �{{(((
Looks the part with its nice
marbling, but with only 80 per
cent beef, it shrinks on cooking
and ends up tasting like a
misshapen beef sausage. A bit
gristly too.
Tesco
4 Tesco Finest British beef-steak
burgers, 454g, �{{(((
Highly compressed and not much beef
flavour, so it?s like eating a puck of
sausagemeat. Nothing a fried egg and
a rasher of bacon wouldn?t sort.
Aldi
2 Specially selected Aberdeen Angus
beef burgers, 340g, �19
{{(((
A more open texture, which is good,
but the lingering flavour is not of
beef, but of a starchy oiliness that
coats the mouth.
Waitrose
4 chicken and chorizo burgers, 454g, �{{(((
I was looking forward to a break
from beef, and these smelt deliciously
sweet and smoky in the pan, but they
were disappointingly bland and
mealy in the mouth.
Morrisons
2 The Best chuck-steak burgers, 340g,
�50 (two packs for �
{((((
A bit shiny going into the pan and so
thick they took an age to cook, by
which time the outside was burnt.
Gummy and tasteless, so hardly
worth the wait.
Iceland
2 Ultimate miso steak burgers, 284g, �{((((
Very pink and processed-looking, like
discs of luncheon meat. I can see what
they are trying to do by adding miso,
but alongside the salty tang it gives the
burger an unwelcome seaweediness.
Finishing
touches
Best bun
Iceland luxury
sliced brioche rolls
(Iceland, 220g, �
Most luxury buns were
too rich to work with a
burger, but Iceland
showed that less is
sometimes more, with
its less bready, less
buttery, less sweet
brioche rolls.
Best relish
Stokes burger relish
(Ocado, 225g, �05)
A red pepper, onion
and tomato salsa that?s
fresh, subtly sweet and
not overly hot.
Best special
ingredient
Granny?s Secret Ajvar
Hot Roasted Red
Pepper Spread
(Ocado, 200g, �65)
A blend of roasted red
peppers, oil and
vinegar which makes
a nice alternative to
ubiquitous ketchup
or oversweet
barbecue sauce.
Vegetarian
Waitrose
2 Waitrose vegetarian aubergine and
feta burgers, 210g, �50
{{{{(
A nice crunch to the outside
and the filling is quite tasty, although
I?d be hard pushed to identify any
single flavour. Wait a second, was
that chickpea?
Aldi
2 Great Food beetroot burgers,
230g, �49
{{{((
A deep red and chewy exterior gives
way to a mushy inside, which tastes
mainly of cumin. Inoffensive.
Waitrose
6 Strong Roots kale and quinoa
burgers, 450g, �99
{{(((
Not a bad attempt to make kale
and quinoa exciting, but it was
always going to be an uphill struggle.
I liked the crunch of sesame seeds
on the outside.
Ocado
4 GoodLife sweet carrot and
nut burger, frozen, 320g, �down from �49 until
March 20
{{(((
An old-school patty
aglow with shredded
carrot. The
parsnips are a bit
stringy,
but the crunch
of cashews is a
nice surprise. A bit
worthy, though.
t doesn?t look much like the
future, if I?m honest. Sitting in
a vegetarian restaurant in east
London, I?ve been presented with
a burger that I?m promised will
revolutionise the way we eat.
Two and a half years in
development, the country?s first ?raw
bleeding plant-based meat burger?
costs �. It is made from oyster
mushroom, onion, tomato, peas,
potatoes, wheat and soy protein and
beetroot juice, and is said to ?look,
smell and taste as indulgent as a
regular burger?. It?s the cholesterolfree, cruelty-free, sustainable meat
substitute that will tempt the
carnivore into adopting a vegan diet.
If your regular burger is the kind of
cheap, industrial-looking patty you
may be served in a school canteen,
then they?ve certainly nailed the
look. ?Yes, we wanted to go as plain
as possible,? says Simeon van der
Molen, whose company Moving
Mountains makes the B12 burger, as
he watches me tackle one at Mildreds
caf� in Dalston, the ground zero of
modern veganism.
As for the promised succulence, it
is moist more than juicy and doesn?t
exactly bleed as you cut into it, but
there?s a definite meaty pinkness to
it. And a bounce. More bounce than
you may want in your burger. As to
the flavour, it tastes of beef in the
same way that beef and onion crisps
do. It?s a facsimile of a flavour; not
unpleasant, but I?m not convinced
you?d eat it for taste alone.
But it?s the texture that gives it the
edge over other meat substitutes.
There?s a fibrousness to it, something
for your molars to go to work on, just
as with an open-textured burger
made with freshly chopped steak.
?That?s probably from the fibres we
extract from the mushrooms,? Van
der Molen says. Eaten as intended, in
a bun with lettuce, tomato, mayo and
relish, it?s quite a revelation. You
could easily convince yourself you
were eating meat.
Why would you want to, you may
ask. Why go to the trouble to create
a vegan product and then disguise it
as a beef burger? Because, Van der
Molen says, it?s not really designed
for the country?s 550,000 vegans
anyway. He?s after a much bigger
market: the 22 million flexitarians
who like meat but feel they should
eat less of it. ?More and more people
have embarked on this plant-based
route,? he says. ?Our goal is to help
them to make this transition.?
mildreds.co.uk/dalston
The Moving
Mountains
B12 burger
6
1G T
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
times2
?Cancer felt like being
hit by a train ? now
I want my life back?
From cannabis oil
to oxygen therapy:
author Kate Figes
will try anything
to stay alive, she
tells Andrew Billen
H
er friends were
urging her to write it
anyway, but for the
author Kate Figes a
book about midlife
was an obvious next
project. For more
than two decades the
journalist and novelist had written
highly successful non-fiction books
that navigated the course of women?s
lives, about equality in the workplace,
new motherhood, later motherhood
(The Terrible Teens), adultery and,
conversely, how to get love to last
(Couples). Now, as she approached
60, she felt she had found a more
personal subject, yet one with a wide
potential audience: how in late middle
age to make sense of the past to face
the future.
Then, suddenly, On Smaller Dogs and
Larger Life Questions, which is
published this week, became about
something else: not midlife, but, very
likely, the end of life. Just before her
59th birthday in September 2016, Figes
was diagnosed with triple negative
breast cancer. Her oncologist ?
charming and charismatic, but
nothing if not direct ? told her it was
?treatable, not curable?.
Her descent to ?Planet Cancer?
began with the arrival of a miniature
wire-haired dachshund called Zeus.
He was the family?s new pet, a
squealing bundle, but not, for her, of
joy. Instead he brought anxiety and
exhaustion. Perhaps there had been an
omen, a hint, of something wrong a
year earlier, when as a family mediator
she was suddenly overwhelmed by
At first I thought,
?If this is what it?s
going to be like I
would rather die?
memories of her parents? break-up and
her powerlessness as a child to heal it.
She realised, in an oncological
metaphor, that ?divorce had entered
every cell of my being?. She needed an
urgent break from the work she had
always enjoyed as complementary to
her journalism.
Her physical symptoms, when they
arrived, were muscle pains round
her ribs and back. Although she had
had regular mammograms, none
of them indicating a lump or any
changes in the breast tissue, a bonemarrow test eventually revealed that
she had triple negative breast cancer,
its most aggressive variation.
Triple negative cancer is so called
because the three most common
engines of cancer growth are not
present in the tumour. That sounds
good, but it means that common
treatments such as hormone therapy
and drugs are useless. The good news
was that there would be no need for
surgery and the cancer was not in any
of the five vital organs. The bad was
that it had entered her bones, the best
she could hope for was to keep it there
and there was no cure.
?I was in a lot of pain because I had
three fractured ribs from the cancer,?
she says as we talk in the sitting room
of her terraced family house in north
London. She is small and, despite all
the treatment, a young 60 with hair,
familiar from book jackets, that?s dark
and shoulder-length.
?It had gone straight to the bones
and was just eating away at them. The
oncologist said I lit up like a Christmas
tree when I was first scanned: cancer
all over my ribs and back. So at the
beginning it was the combination of
the pain, the chemo and the shock. I
kept thinking, ?If I could just not have
the pain I might be able to cope with
the chemo and with the shock. Or if I
didn?t have the chemo, I might be able
to . . .? All three was overwhelming, like
being hit by a train.?
It was not only chemotherapy ? ten
capecitabine pills every day ? that
she endured. Every three weeks a
nurse came to administer a 30-minute
drip of Avastin to prevent the cancer
South Africa
adventure
16 DAYS FROM
�199*
TOUR
PER PERSON
I N C LU D E S S E RVI C E S
O F A N E XPE R I E N C E D
TO U R MANAG E R
Staying in excellent quality
three and four-star hotels
Return flights from
London Heathrow
Full-day guided safari in
Kruger National Park, tour
of the Zulu War battlefields
Stay three nights in
cosmopolitan Cape Town
outh
h Africans
Af i
call
ll their
h i h
homeland
l d ??a
world in one country?. It covers an area
equivalent to ?ve times the size of Britain,
w ith a climate ranging from temperate,
Mediterranean and sub-tropical to desert;
it offers spectacular scenery with arguably
the ? nest wildlife on earth and no less than
eleven of?cial languages. South Africa is truly
a world-class destination.
S
Discover a land of bold and beautiful
contrasts during this incredible South Africa
holiday. Visit golden beaches, sophisticated
cities and world-class wineries and see
bushland teeming with fascinating wildlife.
Selected departures up to November,
2018 and January to November, 2019.
Call now to book, quoting KL894
0330 160 8576
thetimes.co.uk/s-africa
*On selected dates, join Rovos Rail for one of the world?s most luxurious train journeys 18 days from �099pp. ?Depending on season. Prices based on two people sharing a twin room. Single rooms available at a supplement. Additional entrance costs may apply. Travel insurance is not included but is strongly recommended. This holiday is operated by and
subject to booking conditions of Riviera Travel, ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected, a company independent of Times Newspapers Ltd. Subject to availability. Images used in conjunction with Riviera Travel. For further information please write to Riviera Travel, New Manor, 328 Wetmore Road, Burton upon Trent, Staffs, DE14 1SP quoting The Times. KL894.
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
7
1G T
times2
JOONEY WOODWARD FOR THE TIMES
She refers me to a book by an
American surgeon called Bernie Siegel
called Love, Medicine and Miracles in
which he divides cancer patients into
three groups. One group, between 10
and 15 per cent, have lives so unhappy
that they give up. A large chunk in the
middle, 60 to 70 per cent, just follow
doctors? orders. ?And then there?s the
10 to 15 per cent he calls exceptional
patients, who do their research, who
ask questions. He says they?re the ones
who do better on the treatments and
tend to live the longest.?
Figes, firmly of the exceptional gang,
made cancer her new journalistic
assignment. A health journalist friend
advised her to contact Patricia Peat, a
former chemo nurse who believed that
chemotherapy and radiotherapy
patients who used complimentary
methods tended to cope better and live
longer. Peat recommended that as
soon as she was mobile again Figes
should seek out oxygen therapy.
So a year ago her husband,
Christopher Wyld, a former BBC
journalist and director of the Foreign
Press Association, who retired to
spend more time with Figes when she
became ill, began driving her to outer
London where, between a Screwfix
and a Photomart, the multiple
sclerosis charity MS Action runs an
oxygen centre. Here Figes regularly
Anything that is
said to kill cancer
cells I do as much
as possible
The writer Kate Figes at home in
north London
from creating its own blood supply.
Initially, it sent her blood pressure
spiralling, so she took another drug to
bring it down. Before the nurse left she
jabbed Figes?s stomach with a bonestrengthening drug, Denosumab.
Meanwhile, every day she took eight
tramadol and eight paracetamol to
contain the pain sufficiently so that
she could move.
The pharmaceutical onslaught left
her curled up on the sofa nursing a
death wish not quite strong enough for
her to act on (although she had
sufficient morphine in the house).
?I was always determined to fight it.
I remember thinking, ?I just want my
life back. I don?t need anything else.? I
mean there was a moment with the
first cycle with the chemotherapy . . .
They tend to give you the highest dose
they think you can cope with because
you need to really whack the cancer
hard to begin with. That first cycle,
with the pain, I did think, ?If this is
what it?s going to be like, then actually
I would rather die.? ?
sits in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber, a
large metal dome that, complete
with portholes, simulates a deep-sea
dive. The theory is that with reduced
pressure, blood vessels expand and
oxygen is more easily absorbed into
the body. Her health began to
improve. Christoph, as she calls
her husband, has become a
volunteer at the centre.
The oxygenation was only part of
her self-medication. There was heat
therapy, giving up sugar and taking up
vitamin supplements. Her oncologist
was uncensorious, but cautious. ?B12 is
good for neuropathy too,? he told her,
but under his breath added: ?But it
won?t do any good.?
She was caught between extremists.
Those who thought chemotherapy a
scam promoted by Big Pharma, and a
medical establishment that refused to
recommend anything not based on
peer-reviewed trials. Peat told her that
if she stayed off the sugar and kept
pummelling her cells with oxygen and
heat, the cancer would not come back.
The oncologist said it would,
eventually. Just once, he conceded to
her face that for some people it did not
? but no one knew why.
Now a third of Figes?s day is taken
up with ?anti-cancer activity?,
beginning with a 90-minute morning
regimen of yoga, meditation, body oils,
supplements and juicing. And then it?s
dope last thing in the evening? I ask
this because I have seen in her kitchen
the paraphernalia that (illegally ? as
if she cares) extracts cannabis oil.
?You may laugh, Andrew, but it
is a really powerful medicine. A couple
of drops and you?re out. I mean,
basically, the policy I?m pursuing is
anything that is said to kill cancer
cells I do as much as possible. Green
tea, broccoli sprouts, heat and oxygen.
You see, nobody knows.?
Is it a bit like advertising: 50 per cent
of it is useless, but you never know
which 50 per cent? ?Exactly. What do
you give up? So rather than give up,
don?t change it.?
And something is working. She has
just had her fourth clear scan in a row.
She looks well. She is no longer on
painkillers, although her ribs and back
ache when she does too much. Since
the diagnosis she has shrunk from size
14 to size 8, not from the cancer, but
because the chemo prevents the gut
from absorbing nutrition.
Yet within this tough account of her
cancer ? reading it made me feel as if
I were ill myself ? is the book she
originally wanted to write, the one
about coming to peace with her
childhood. Until later in life Kate had
a fractured relationship with her
mother, Eva Figes, a leading feminist
novelist who died six years ago. Eva?s
marriage had ended when Kate was
five. Kate left the family home when
she was 17, after a ?blazing row?.
Eva was a German-Jewish refugee
who lost her grandparents in the
Holocaust. ?Holocaust damage ran
through my family,? she writes and
you can almost discern, in invisible
ink, the words ?like cancer?.
?As I began to get better, I looked
back at what I?d written and I realised
it was still about midlife because what
cancer does is crystallise all the same
anxieties and losses and griefs.? I say it
seemed to give her an insight into her
mother?s unhappiness. ?She did a lot
of good with her life, but I think she
was very unhappy. I do think the
Holocaust runs through families and
perverts and distorts relationships.?
A year ago she and her brother, the
historian Orlando Figes, became
German citizens in a ceremony at the
German embassy. For Orlando it was
because he did not want to be a
?Brexit Brit?. For Kate it was another
way of ?drawing a line under the past?.
She has no praise high enough for
Christoph, to whom she has been
married for 30 years, nor for her two
grown-up daughters, although one,
forgivably, broke down just before the
first post-diagnosis Christmas, fearing
that it might be her mother?s last. Figes
wrote the book, she says, mainly
because she wanted them to know
who their mother really was. Friends
have been incredible, but they too
needed to weather the shock. One
burst into tears before her. ?I wanted
to tell her to get a grip. ?I don?t need
to see you upset, I need you to be
loving and kind.? ?
She makes only short-term plans,
regards every two months free from
chemotherapy as a bonus and works
on the assumption that it is unlikely
to matter much that her pension is
weedy. Whereas for years she saw
her job as helping others, she is
unashamedly putting herself first.
What she has learnt, she says, is the
power of love. ?I never knew I was this
loved by so many people around me.
It was a very wonderful feeling.?
A gift then, but a costly one, I
suggest soapily. She turns on me.
?Not a gift! I don?t know why people
call cancer a gift. A box of chocolates
is a gift. It?s not a gift. It?s more that
whatever happens, you have always to
go to the good. Only by going to the
good, seeing the positive stuff in what
has happened to you, can you then
cope with the negative.?
On Smaller Dogs and Larger Life
Questions (Virago, �.99)
Dressing for snow ?
which tribe are you?
FASHIONISTA
Snow is no match for the breadth and
depths of a fashion editor?s wardrobe,
so yes, that stylish, glossy woman you
see catwalking to the station every
day will look just as put-together
during a blizzard. Sorry ? it is the
natural order of things.
Snow style Fine-knit merino rollneck
with Frame velvet dungarees, a
statement oversized knit (preferably
with balloon sleeves ? see Ganni?s
Julliard mohair in lilac, �5) and
a herringbone blazer. Shoe-wise,
only Montelliana mountain boots
will do. Oversized C閘ine sunglasses
also likely.
Looks Surprisingly warm and dry.
And smug.
YUMMY MUMMY
She probably couldn?t see the school
gate for all the coyote fur enveloping
her face, but who cares? Any yummy
mummy worth her salt knows that she
is only as good as her parka. Even
better, her little darlings have
matching ones. Snow snobbery for all!
Snow style Lululemon yoga leggings, a
Woolrich parka (Canada Goose is so
teenage these days) or ? for the
Knightsbridge set ? a Moncler puffer
jacket. A cashmere pom-pom hat and
Sorel snow boots are also a must.
Looks Rich. And concerned that a
school snow day may get in the way of
the Pilates plans.
SNOW REFUSENIK
You know the type: wet, cold, shuffling
tentatively along in her suede blockheel ankle boots from Topshop, yet
head still held high. The snow
refusenik is not so much a hater
of snow as a touch arrogant
about it. She?s probably
under 30 and still retains the
invincibility of youth. Fear
not: it will fade by the time
her toes turn blue.
Snow style Whatever she
usually wears, with
added naivety. Probably
from Zara. Definitely
with unsuitable shoes.
Looks Cold. But
is really trying
not to.
Yummy
mummy
Sienna
Miller
COMMUTER
She may be
striding around
the office in
stilettos, but don?t be
too impressed ? a
few minutes earlier
she was stuffing her
wellies under her desk,
hiding any evidence of the
get-up she wore between
her front door and desk.
Evasive? Perhaps, but also quite
sensible. Kudos.
Snow style Knee-high Hunter
wellies, knee-length duvet coat,
covering up her pencil skirt
and thermal tights ? and a
selection of heels in a drawer
to change into.
Looks Prepared, accomplished
and a little tired from living a
double life.
Hannah Rogers
8
1G T
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
arts
An American in London: the ball
David Hallberg talks to Debra Craine
about dancing with Natalia Osipova
and surviving a life-changing injury
T
en years ago Natalia
Osipova found the
right man and she has
waited years for him to
come back into her
life. No, this isn?t some
gossip item about the
Russian ballerina ?
it?s not even real life we are talking
about. This is all about the perfect
dancing partnership.
Markova and Dolin, Fonteyn and
Nureyev, Sibley and Dowell ? names
inextricably linked by the magic they
produced together on stage. That?s
what Osipova believes she shares with
David Hallberg, the American Ballet
Theatre star who is one of the greatest
classicists in the world. Tonight he
makes his Royal Ballet debut,
partnering her in Giselle. She has been
trying for years to lure him to Covent
Garden as a guest artist, but her
hopes were dashed when he suffered
a severe foot injury that kept him off
stage for two and a half years and
almost ended his career. So tonight?s
debut, with Hallberg savouring every
moment of an unexpected comeback,
is doubly sweet.
?As defeated as I felt by my injury,
as much as I felt my career was over,
I wasn?t done expressing myself as an
artist,? Hallberg says. ?That?s what
caused me to fight when all hope had
seemingly been lost. And for me,
climbing that mountain of getting
back to dance, the peak was dancing
with Natalia Osipova again, and it?s
amazing that it?s happening here at
the Royal.?
I meet Hallberg on the day that he
and Osipova are reunited after their
long separation. ?It?s been ten years
since we first danced together and we
are older and more mature now,? says
the softly spoken dancer, carefully
weighing each thought. ?Yet that
inexplicable connection and deep
understanding which we had for each
other is still there. What we
experience on stage is beyond any sort
of analysis or comprehension. It has
changed us as artists and we recognise
the fact that it?s unique. I don?t
presume to think the audience will feel
the same way; our partnership may be
interpreted differently by them, but to
us it?s unbelievable, it?s special.?
His home for the next seven weeks
is a tiny one-bedroom flat round the
corner from the Royal Opera House,
and it?s here that we meet. After his
two scheduled performances of
Giselle with Osipova there is his debut
as Des Grieux, the lovesick poet in
Kenneth MacMillan?s Manon, which
he will dance with her in April. Now
that they are back together, he says,
they are making every minute count.
Hallberg and Osipova are such an
unlikely pairing: he is a pale and
poetic presence on stage, his
technique beautifully, even
rapturously, refined; she is dark
and dramatic, and moves as if
her whole body is in flames.
Even he thought they were
the ultimate mismatch the
first time he saw her perform.
?She was dancing with
Ivan Vasiliev at a gala
in New York and
I remember she
had this almost
uncontrollable
energy; she
took the
theatre by
storm. I never
in my wildest
dreams
thought
this would
Above: David
Hallberg
and Natalia
Osipova in
Romeo and
Juliet. Below:
Sleeping
Beauty
be the partner I connected to the
most.? Then they danced Giselle
together ?and the fire and the water
met. She has a different way of
dancing and she pushes me to go there
with her. And me? I calm her down.?
Whatever it is, it certainly works and
Hallberg is keen to take full advantage.
Audiences in London will see him
again in September, when he joins
Osipova in her self-curated season at
Sadler?s Wells (the repertoire has yet
to be decided). ?We have had such
memorable, powerful performances
that I want to create as many
opportunities to continue to dance
together. Time is ticking away and I
want us to be conscious of how we
plan things so that we don?t miss out.?
Although he is a superstar in the US,
Hallberg is little known in the UK,
although he did perform here with the
Bolshoi and Mariinsky on their visits
to London; YouTube has copious clips
of him in action. My favourite of these
is also the most unusual ? it?s his
audition tape for the Paris Opera
Ballet School. It shows an astonishing
16-year-old Hallberg going through
the compulsory figures of a ballet class
with perfect placement, extreme
flexibility and the kind of inherent
elegance that the French adore.
He has recently published his
memoir, A Body of Work: Dancing to
the Edge and Back, which details his
unusual life story and his herculean
struggle to reclaim his career after that
devastating injury. He was born 35
years ago ? bizarrely, he and Osipova
share the same birthday, May 18 (she is
four years younger) ? and grew up in
Phoenix, Arizona, where he discovered
a passion for dance after seeing a Fred
Astaire film on the family television.
At first it was jazz and tap classes,
?but once I found ballet I became
enthralled and obsessed?. Not
surprisingly, in a day school full of
hostile boys, that also meant he was
frequently bullied.
In a rare move for an American
student he decided to go abroad for his
final year of training and auditioned
for the Paris Opera Ballet School, the
world?s oldest. ?I set my sights as high
as I thought they could be. I made a
quick audition video and two weeks
later I got a letter of acceptance. I
went eager to absorb everything. I was
one of two foreigners in the entire
school and I didn?t speak a word of
French when I arrived. It was a very
hard and solitary year. My classmates
were horrible to me. I went as a very
naive American and I thought I could
make best friends in a week, but they
ignored me, they made fun of me. Yet
I never once wanted to go home
because I really wanted to succeed.?
In 2001 he joined American Ballet
Theatre (ABT) in New York, where he
quickly discovered that his cultivated
European aesthetics weren?t
automatically popular with audiences
raised on showmanship. ?At times I
felt I didn?t fit into the fabric of the
company. I knew what audiences
wanted, what excited them, and it was
Jos� Manuel Carre駉, 羘gel Corella. I
didn?t have their pyrotechnics ? I was
the antidote to that.? Obviously they
learnt to appreciate Hallberg?s more
subtle genius because five years later
he was promoted to principal.
CURRENCY SERVICES
Sending money
to family abroad?
Trust us to take care of your transfer.
No transfer fees for private clients
Lock in a rate for the future
International money transfer from
The Times and The Sunday Times
0207 294 7971
timescurrencyservices.co.uk
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
9
1G T
arts
leet star who makes Osipova fly
OLIVIA BEASLEY FOR THE TIMES; GETTY IMAGES; NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX/EYEVINE
Wee are
W
are ffire
ire a
and
nd
water.
pushes
w
ater. She
She p
ushes
mee tto
go
m
og
o tthere
here
w
ith h
er. And
And I
with
her.
her
down
ccalm
alm h
er d
own
David Hallberg and, above right, with Natalia Osipova in Giselle at the Metropolitan Opera House in 2009
In 2011 his career took an
extraordinary leap when Sergei Filin,
who at the time was the director of
the Bolshoi Ballet (and later the target
of that infamous acid attack), invited
him to join the Moscow company.
?I realised I was at a point where I
needed to be challenged even more
than I had been as a principal at ABT
for five years. So even though Moscow
scared me to death ? the city, the
company, the pressure ? that?s what
made me do it. It took me completely
out of my comfort zone. Because I
have a light physical build, it took me
a while to learn how to use my entire
physicality to its fullest, but that?s what
the Bolshoi taught me. That and how
to take command of the stage.?
His experience in Russia was the
opposite from his time as a teenager in
France. ?Inside the walls of
the Bolshoi Theatree
everyone was eagerr to
practise their English
ish
with me. It was
very endearing to
hear everyone
welcoming me.
Outside the
theatre?s walls,
however, it was a
challenge; even
going to a grocery
store was difficult.
The majority of thee
population doesn?t
speak English and I was
trying to manage my way
through a culture I knew nothing
about without being able to
communicate.?
We hear so often about a rising tide
of homophobia in Russia, but
Hallberg, who is gay, says it?s not
something he encountered in Moscow.
?I didn?t experience anything like that.
I had a group of friends outside the
company, a community that opened
their arms to me and showed me the
beauty of Moscow, of Russia. Although
there are obviously controversial
legislative decisions and ways of life
now, I didn?t really feel any of those
things while on the ground there. I
didn?t feel discriminated against, I
didn?t feel unsafe.?
Meanwhile, Hallberg kept up his
commitment to ABT and for four
years commuted between Moscow
and New York. Then disaster struck.
?I was experiencing too much pain in
my foot and I went into an operation
to fix torn ligaments and that?s really
when it all came unravelling. The
first surgery was a failure. A year
later, more or less, I was having an
operation to fix the first surgery with
another doctor. It just all went wrong.
The recovery, the complications, the
surgeries; it wasn?t one thing that was
a failure, it became a snowball effect.
?I was in my early thirties, in the
prime of my career, and I thought I
would never get back on stage. But I
had heard how good the Australian
Ballet rehabilitation team were, so I
bought a one-way ticket to Melbourne
and in November 2015 I left my entire
life behind. It was a huge risk, but
really I had nothing to lose as I had
already lost everything.?
Australia changed his life, he says,
?as a person, as an artist, as an athlete,
mentally, physically and emotionally.
Five days a week I was in treatment,
seven hours a day. It was gruelling,
completely
p
y rebooting my
entire tech
technique, my
muscular
muscul structure.
It made
ma me a
better
bett dancer.?
One
O of the
casualties
of his
ca
injury
had been
in
his
h planned
debut
as Des
d
Grieux
at La
G
Scala.
So Milan?s
Sc
loss
los is London?s
gain.
gain ?I am very
eager to experience
a ballet that the
company here knows
like
like the back of
o their hand
and I?m curious to abso
absorb how the
Royal does it, how Manon is taught
and coached, how other dancers here
interpret it.?
He has wanted to dance with the
Royal Ballet ?for a long time?, he says.
?This company has such an extreme
amount of history and texture in its
fabric and I?m totally open to learning
from the experience.?
Albrecht in Giselle may feel like
second nature to Hallberg, but even
that role is being rethought for Covent
Garden. ?Albrecht has changed for me
since I came back from the injury,? he
says. ?My portrayal is a lot more
grounded than it used to be. There?s a
sense of an arrogance in Albrecht, but
also a sense of not realising how
powerful his connection with Giselle
is. Not until it?s too late does he realise
the weight of how he actually feels.
And with Natalia Osipova as Giselle,
that connection rings even more true.?
David Hallberg dances Giselle at
the Royal Opera House tonight and
on March 9
Entertainments
Theatres
HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
Book your advertisement or
announcement now at:
thetimes.co.uk/ advertise
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MIS蒖ABLES
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
St Martin's
020 7836 1443
66th year of Agatha Christie's
THE MOUSETRAP
Mon-Sat 7.30, Tues & Thu 3, Sat 4
www.the-mousetrap.co.uk
Vaudeville Theatre 0330 333 4814
Oscar Wilde's LADY
WINDERMERE'S
FAN
Mon-Sat 7.30pm, Thu & Sat 2.30
Classicspring.co.uk
%
Please be advised that
calls to 084 numbers
can cost up to 7p per
minute plus your network
provider?s costs.
10
1G T
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
television & radio
Eye-bleeding wealth versus camp charisma
FOX FAST/BBC
Carol
Midgley
TV review
The Assassination
of Gianni Versace
BBC Two
{{{{(
Save Me
Sky Atlantic
{{{{{
D
onatella Versace is said
to have been ?happy?
that Pen閘ope Cruz was
chosen to play her in The
Assassination of Gianni
Versace. I bet she was. Who wouldn?t
be? But Cruz, let?s face it, isn?t the most
obvious lookalike for a woman who
these days is cruelly likened to Janice
the Muppet. So it is a testament to
Cruz that she is compelling in the role,
a woman grieving after her brother?s
murder, but flint-like in her resolve to
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
The World in 3D
Radio 4, 11.30am
Why make a radio
programme about a statue?
Surely it misses the point of
the medium: radio has no
sight and a statue has no
sound. This programme
makes a case for the
defence. It?s about K鋞he
Kollwitz?s sculpture, Mother
with her Dead Son, in Neue
Wache memorial in Berlin.
For three chilly days last
year the radio producer
Lucy Lunt sat there too,
asking people why they had
come to see it. It?s a simple
idea, simply done, with
snatches of conversation
and a few details about
Kollwitz, who lost her son
in the First World War. It?s
a striking place ? and a
striking programme.
The Essay
Radio 3, 10.45pm
As anyone who has handled
a rosary realises, the Church
knows a thing or two about
how to focus the mind.
The French writer Simone
Weil said: ?The habit of
attention . . . is the substance
of prayer.?? The habit of
inattention is too, surely ?
just ask anyone who has
sat in church and felt their
mind wander. The journalist
Madeleine Bunting looks
at how the Church has kept
our minds on track.
keep the company and his name alive.
?I will not allow that man, that nobody,
to kill my brother twice,? she said
through her blond wig and plumpedup lips, which ? was this just me? ?
gave her words something of a whistle.
This is the second offering from
American Crime Story and, like The
People v OJ Simpson, it brims with class.
蒬gar Ram韗ez looked eerily like the
real Versace in his ridiculously opulent
Miami villa, where it took six members
of staff to give him one glass of orange
juice. But it is Darren Criss as Andrew
Cunanan, the fantasist serial killer
who shot Versace in 1997, who is the
show?s tour de force. Criss manages
just the right blend of camp charisma
and obsessive weirdo mendacity as the
contrast is made between the f阾ed
designer?s eye-bleeding wealth and the
sociopath?s empty life and wardrobe.
The opening eight minutes were
terrific, set to Albinoni?s Adagio in
G minor and culminating in Versace?s
death, his blood dripping down the
steps. The chronology switched after
that and the story was told in reverse,
which was slightly discombobulating.
But the stage is set to reflect a society
that was still judgmental about gay
lifestyles and to chart Cunanan?s
descent into deranged violence. The
Versace company has distanced itself
from the drama, saying it is based on
?gossip and speculation?, even though
Donatella reportedly sent Cruz
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
& Adele Roberts 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg
James & Adele Roberts 7.00 Annie Mac
9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00 BBC
Radio 1?s Residency: TQD 12.00 BBC Radio
1?s Residency: Jubilee 1.00am Toddla T
3.00 Radio 1?s Greatest Hits 4.00 Early
Breakfast with Jordan North
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Bob Harris Country. The
American four-piece country out?t Little Big
Town bring their signature brand of vocal
harmony to the studio, as they join Bob as
his guests 8.00 Jo Whiley. A mix of new
music and classic tracks, with guests
dropping in to the studio to chat 10.00 The
Radio 2 Arts Show with Anneka Rice. A lively
look at the latest ?lms, plays, dance events,
books and exhibitions, alongside an eclectic
selection of music 12.00 The Craig Charles
House Party (r) 2.00am Radio 2?s Tracks Of
My Years Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Have
A Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Feelgood Friday 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3?s
classical breakfast show, featuring listener
requests. Including 7.00, 8.00 News
7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
Ian Skelly presents a selection of classical
music 9.30 Listeners? ideas for companion
pieces on the Essential Classics playlist
10.10 Time Traveller: A quirky slice of
cultural history 10.50 A guest talks about
the things that have inspired them
throughout their life and career
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Richard Strauss (1864-1949)
Donald Macleod introduces music written by
Strauss during the Third Reich and looks at
the repercussions of his close association
with the Nazi regime. Strauss (Das B鋍hlein,
Op 88 No 1; Schlagobers Waltz ? extract;
Arabella ? excerpt; Die G鰐tin im
Putzzimmer; and Daphne ? excerpt)
1.00pm News
蒬gar Ram韗ez stars in The Assassination of Gianni Versace
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Mark Padmore and the Belcea Quartet at the
Aldeburgh Festival in Suffolk. Faur� (La
Bonne Chanson, Op 61); and Shostakovich
(String Quartet No 3 in F, Op 73)
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Auber?s three-act comic opera Fra Diavolo.
John Osborn heads the cast as impoverished,
lovelorn soldier Lorenzo, in pursuit of
notorious bandit Fra Diavolo in this
performance of this three-act comic opera.
More than mere justice is at stake, as
Diavolo steals the dowry of Lorenzo?s
?anc閑 Zerline, who is then destined to
marry old Francesco against her will.
Presented by Tom McKinney. Auber
(Fra Diavolo); Ibert (Flute Concerto); and
Carpenter (Krazy Kat ? jazz pantomime)
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty?s guests include musicians
from the West End dance show Tango After
Dark, along with the choreographer and
director Germ醤 Cornejo. The conductor
Dominic Wheeler joins singers from Guildhall
Opera, who perform live in the studio ahead
of their production of Poulenc?s Dialogues
des Carm閘ites. Including 5.00, 6.00 News
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
A mix of music, featuring old favourites
together with lesser-known gems, and a
few surprises thrown in for good measure.
The perfect way to usher in the evening
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
The BBC National Orchestra and Chorus of
Wales celebrate St David?s Day with the
harpist Catrin Finch, the tenor Gwyn Hughes
Jones, and the conductor Grant Llewellyn.
Broadcast from St David?s Hall, Cardiff.
Nicola Heywood Thomas presents. Alun
Hoddinott (Quodlibet on Welsh Nursery
Tunes); and Grace Williams
(Penillion: IV ? Allegro Agitato)
10.00 Free Thinking
Mary Newbould and Duncan Large join Se醤
Williams to discuss the in?uence of Laurence
Sterne?s 1768 travel book A Sentimental
Journey. The novelist Philip Hensher talks
about his work The Friendly Ones and the
Bangladesh Liberation War
10.45 The Essay:
Are You Paying Attention?
Madeleine Bunting explores key moments
in the history of how people have paid
attention ? or failed to do so, focusing on
how church and other rituals have helped to
focus the mind. See Radio Choice
11.00 Late Junction
Plundering the BBC vinyl archive to discover
the rarest LPs that have never been played
12.30am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With John Humphrys and Justin Webb
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 In Our Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ancient
Chinese work on military strategy
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week:
The Line Becomes a River
Francisco Cantu?s memoir about working for
the US-Mexican Border Patrol (4/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Discussion and interviews presented by Jenni
Murray. Including at 10.45 the 15 Minute
Drama: The Good Terrorist (9/10)
11.00 From Our Own Correspondent
Presented by Kate Adie
11.30 The World in 3D
The emotions evoked when viewing a
powerful sculpture. See Radio Choice
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 The Curious Cases
of Rutherford & Fry
What makes things sharp (4/5)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 British Socialism: The Grand Tour
Exploring the impact of the Women?s
Liberation Movement on British socialism
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: A Pact of Silence
A woman living through the dictatorship in
late-1970s Argentina has her life turned
upside down when she is confronted with the
shocking truth about her origins (r)
3.00 Ramblings
Clare Balding explores the beaches of
Aberlady Bay with local school pupils (3/7)
3.27 Radio 4 Appeal(r)
3.30 Open Book
The short story writer Jessie Greengrass
discusses her debut novel Sight (r)
4.00 The Film Programme
The director Sebastian Lelio discusses his
drama A Fantastic Woman, with the
transgender star Daniel Vega in the lead
4.30 BBC Inside Science
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 State of the Nations
The comedian Elis James performs in his
home town of Carmarthen (1/4) (r)
flowers. Call me cynical, but this stuff
can only ramp up the ratings.
I?m trying to think of a weak scene
or a ropey line in Lennie James?s Save
Me. If there was one I didn?t notice.
It?s a long time since I saw a drama
so pitch-perfect, or heard dialogue
so authentic. This is how real people
speak: not just the words, but the
cadence, the energy, the silences.
Why aren?t more dramas like this?
Set in a run-down London tower
block, it couldn?t be farther from the
lavishness of the Versace production,
but the attention to background detail
was just as loving. The Staffie dog
clamped to a stick being swung round
by its mouth, the old man shopping in
his striped pyjamas, the lone old lady
supping a pint in the corner.
That bar scene was almost faultless
in its realism, with everyone talking
over each other. Apparently it
was James, who plays Nelson, a
womanising chancer framed for
abducting his estranged daughter
(the mother is Suranne Jones), who
argued for the long, one-take police
interview scenes in Line of Duty when
he starred as DCI Tony Gates. There
is a similar realism to Save Me. It won?t
be to everyone?s taste, but, as you?ll
have noticed, I found this episode
outstanding. And it?s refreshing for
once not to have a thriller set in
middle-class Poggenpohl kitchens.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
7.00 The Archers
Will loses his temper and Ruth
offers a compromise
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Riot Girls: The Good Terrorist
By Doris Lessing (9/10) (r)
8.00 Law in Action
The crisis in collapsing prosecutions because
of failures to disclose evidence (1/4) (r)
8.30 The Bottom Line
An overview of the business world (5)
9.00 BBC Inside Science
The latest scienti?c research (r)
9.30 In Our Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ancient
Chinese work on military strategy (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime: A Portrait of
the Artist as a Young Man
By James Joyce. Stephen is thinking
about EC, the girl who has long been the
object of his affection. And his intellectual
universe is expanding (9/10)
11.00 Sarah Kendall: Australian Trilogy
The storyteller examines why stories are so
important to her (3/3) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Presented by Susan Hulme
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
The Line Becomes a River (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am Marriage Lines 8.30 The Goon Show
9.00 It?s Your Round 9.30 The Inimitable
Jeeves 10.00 Home Front Omnibus 11.00
The Interview 11.15 Outline Permission
12.00 Marriage Lines 12.30pm The Goon
Show 1.00 Burnt 1.30 Revolutionary Radio
2.00 Short Stories by Oscar Wilde 2.15 A
History of the Future 2.30 Tales of the City:
The Days of Anna Madrigal 2.45 A
Confession 3.00 Home Front Omnibus 4.00
It?s Your Round 4.30 The Inimitable Jeeves
5.00 Double Income, No Kids Yet 5.30 Foiled
6.00 Orbiter X 6.30 Great Lives. The
satirical cartoonist Gerald Scarfe explores
the life and career of Walt Disney with
Matthew Paris, exploring the in?uence of the
complex ?gure 7.00 Marriage Lines. New
parents George and Kate attempt to have a
night out 7.30 The Goon Show. Comedy 8.00
Burnt. By Nigel Baldwin 8.30 Revolutionary
Radio. Fi Glover explores radio?s role in
political revolutions over the past 90 years
9.00 The Interview. Sing for Your Supper by
Nick Brooks. First aired in 2006 9.15 Outline
Permission. By Dermot Bolger 10.00 Comedy
Club: Foiled. Comedy starring Beth Granville
10.30 Newsjack. Comedy sketches 11.00
Rhod Gilbert?s Leaving Llanbobl. Sitcom
written by and starring Rhod Gilbert 11.30
Spoon, Jar, Jar, Spoon: The Two Sides of
Tommy Cooper. The performer?s credibility as
a stage magician. First aired in 2009
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Anna Foster 1.00pm
Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
Live Sport. Build-up to Arsenal v Manchester
City in the Premier League 7.45 5 Live Sport:
Premier League Football 2017-18 10.00
Question Time Extra Time 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Max Rushden and Darren Campbell
10.00 Jim White 1.00pm Hawksbee and
Delaney 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Nemone 10.00 Lauren Laverne
1.00pm Mark Radcliffe 4.00 Steve Lamacq
6.00 Steve Lamacq?s Roundtable 7.00 Marc
Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Steve Lamacq 1.00am
The First Time with Flea 2.00 Classic Singles
2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6 Music?s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics. John
Brunning presents soothing sounds 8.00 The
Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott charts the
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra?s journey with
some of its most distinguished conductors,
beginning with Herbert von Karajan. Suppe
(Light Cavalry ? Overture); Mozart (Piano
Concerto No 21 in C major K.467);
Rimsky-Korsakov (Scheherazade Opus 35);
and Brahms (Variations on a Theme of Haydn
Opus 56a) 10.00 Smooth Classics. With
Margherita Taylor 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
11
1G T
artsfirst night
SHEILA BURNETT
presence, but here the emphasis is less
on plot mechanics than on the twisted
psychology of an obsessive, erotic
relationship. In the wrong hands the
play could seem lightweight, even silly,
with Vosper?s clipped dialogue
creaking as resoundingly as a corpse
swinging from the gallows. Instead,
delivered with texture and conviction,
it is gripping entertainment.
Bailey updates the action to 1958,
with louche jazz saxophone and the
ominous ticking of a clock sinuously
threaded between scenes by the
composer Richard Hammarton. Cecily
Harrington (cool, willowy Helen
Bradbury) is engaged to sweet, solid
Michael (Justin Avoth), but she is
more in the mood for adventure than
matrimony. ?It?s such a very tepid
Comedy
Shappi Khorsandi
Soho Theatre, W1
T
{{{((
here are two shows
intertwined here. One
allows Shappi Khorsandi
to be herself, musing on
motherhood, racial
stereotypes and mooching around in
the jungle on I?m a Celebrity . . . Get Me
Out of Here! The other is a scrappy but
engaging sketch of the life of Horatio
Nelson?s great passion, Emma
Hamilton. Why choose a character
from such a distant era? Part of the
reason lies in the Iranian-born comic?s
desire to escape from the pigeonhole
marked ?multicultural?. Some of the
most stimulating segments in this
evening show her wrestling with the
question of how she is perceived: as
a stand-up, a woman or a woman with
a brown face?
Last year, as a newly published
novelist, she caused a stir when she
withdrew from the longlist of a literary
prize for writers of colour because she
felt the nomination smacked of
tokenism. She returns to the question
here. Given that Khorsandi has made
her outsider status part of her stage
act, she leaves herself open to
accusations of hypocrisy, yet she is
such an unassuming, self-mocking
presence that you are willing to give
her the benefit of the doubt.
Her account of Hamilton?s life
gallops through the basic elements,
from early prostitution and subsequent
fame as a model. Khorsandi risks
turning this into a predicable feminist
tract, but the more she draws parallels
between Hamilton?s experiences and
those of the Me Too generation, the
more you sense the ambiguities.
When Khorsandi recalls how, in her
youth, she slept with a wealthy
American in exchange for a good time
in Amsterdam, she reminds us that
power relations have not changed all
that much since Hamilton?s day. More
interesting is the sequence devoted to
the way women were treated at the
Presidents Club. Khorsandi recalled
that she had performed at the same
function a couple of years earlier.
Despite finding the atmosphere
unsettling, she had not blown any
whistles. Why? She doesn?t fully
explain. Is it that comedians in search
of a bob or two are parachuted into all
sorts of corporate events? Money
talks; it can have the last laugh too.
Clive Davis
Box office: 020 7478 0100, to Sat; then
touring, shappi.co.uk
Dance
Macbeth
Wilton?s Music Hall, E1
S
{{(((
hakespeare?s great tragedy
is rich pickings for any artist
interested in exploring the
horrors of humanity, and the
choreographer and director
Mark Bruce, in his new dance-theatre
staging, takes them literally. This
is, indeed, a horror show, a gory
nightmare of murder, intrigue
and deadly ambition.
It?s styled like a contemporary crime
drama, with the nine-strong cast in
modern dress (black, for the most
I was reminded
of Hitchcock?s
Suspicion and
Rear Window
Helen Bradbury and Sam Frenchum star in this domestic thriller
How to sex up
Agatha Christie
A play inspired
by one of her
short stories
is dark, sadistic
and erotic good
fun, says
Sam Marlowe
Theatre
Love from
a Stranger
Royal,
Northampton
{{{{(
S
ex, sadism and dark, deranged
laughter ? not qualities
normally associated with the
traditional teacups-and-vicars
view of Agatha Christie.
Yet the director Lucy Bailey turns
Christie?s short story Philomel Cottage,
dramatised in 1936 by Frank Vosper,
into a prickly, perverse treat. It isn?t
so much a murder mystery as a
domestic thriller with a slow
accumulation of terror.
Bailey, whose production of
Christie?s Witness for the Prosecution
is a London hit, cites the compellingly
nasty, voyeuristic 1960 film Peeping
Tom as an influence; I was equally
reminded of Alfred Hitchcock?s
Suspicion and Rear Window. The
threat of violence is a constant, malign
part) and various malevolent figures
wielding knives like some East End
gang. The smoky stage is dark, so
dark that it?s sometimes hard to make
out who?s who or what?s what. The
three witches look like drugged-up
zombies and they howl like banshees;
a storm is afoot ? there?s lightning
and thunder. There are decapitated
heads on spikes, and it won?t be long
before the killing starts.
Bruce sees the Macbeths as victims
of the evil they unleash the moment
they decide to assassinate King
Duncan in a bid to seize the Scottish
throne. Yet although Bruce lands
a few theatrical punches ? the
burning of Duncan?s corpse, Macduff?s
bloody triumph ? he fails to expand
on his theme or offer any new
romance,? she complains to her
envious flatmate, Mavis (Alice Haig).
Cue Bruce Lovell (Sam Frenchum,
splendidly creepy with a dash of
Patricia Highsmith?s Tom Ripley),
a boyishly charismatic American
photographer who is interested in
subletting their Bayswater apartment.
Oblivious to the danger signs ? he
keeps snapping her picture and
surreptitiously sniffs her nightie ?
Cecily is smitten. Bruce whisks her
off to a remote rural idyll to play
house and other deadlier games.
Mike Britton?s elegantly
claustrophobic sets, with translucent
sliding walls, cleverly enhance the
staging?s filmic flavour, shifting our
focus like the roving, rapacious eye
of a camera. The devouring sensuality
between Bruce and Cecily is tinged
with brutality: there?s a startling
moment when Frenchum shoves
Bradbury on to the kitchen table
and forces his hand into her crotch,
hastily wiping his fingers on his
trousers when they?re interrupted
by the gardener.
The tension builds to a terrific twist,
and sharp detail abounds along the
way. Nicola Sanderson is a particular
comic pleasure as Cecily?s snobbish,
interfering Aunt LouLou, myopically
incapable of seeing what?s directly
under her long nose. But in this
delicious danse macabre, no one
puts a foot wrong. Huge sinister fun.
Box office: 01604 624811, to March 17,
then touring to July 17
insight into such a familiar plot.
t. A
word of advice: if you don?t know
ow
the story all that well, bone up
beforehand ? it helps.
Bruce?s chosen score, a
patchwork mostly involving
the music of Arvo P鋜t, but
spiced with Sonic Youth, is
tense and troubling, as it
should be. His choreography,
by turns tough and tender,
takes a back seat to the
drama, and the show is
all the weaker for that.
It?s a waste of such an
outstanding talent as Jonathan
Goddard not to give him more
opportunity to mine Macbeth?s
character. Gaunt and haunted, a
h
h
bewildered Goddard wanders through
The Three Witches
Concert
Britten Sinfonia/Denk
Milton Court, EC2
W
{{{{(
ith the wooziest wail
of a clarinet glissando,
Gershwin fades out
the old world and
ushers in the new.
That was in 1924, when the American
composer?s Rhapsody in Blue was
premiered in New York. Like a
memorable first line of a classic novel,
this inspired opening ? actually
conceived by the original clarinettist
? instantly conjures up a specific era,
when jazz and classical music met for
the first time. Yet, in snowy London in
2018, the Britten Sinfonia and Jeremy
Denk made the conversation sound
as fresh and lively as ever.
This jazz rhapsody was in fact the
highlight of their concert programme
together, curated by the ever-droll
American pianist. With Denk also
conducting from the piano, there were
issues of co-ordination. Yet for the
most part players relished the original
24-piece jazz-band orchestration and
Denk was a nimble soloist.
There was a chance too to hear that
rarer beast, Milhaud?s La Cr閍tion du
Monde. After visiting Harlem the
French composer had also been
inspired by jazz; this short ballet from
1923, written for a slimline orchestra
of 17 musicians, was the result. And if
here the two violins had to work hard
to balance with wind and brass, the
burnished saxophone solos and the joy
of the music-making made up for it.
All quite different from Stravinsky?s
Concerto for Piano and Wind
Instruments, although it too was first
heard in 1924. Peppery reeds, flutes
and brass replace scraping strings for
this neoclassical, rhythmically
intricate work. The soundworld was
alluring, but the performance didn?t
come into focus until the final flourish.
A motley collection of arrangements
of Byrd, Du Fay, Mozart, Monteverdi
and JS Bach prefaced it (special
mention for the flautist Thomas
Hancox?s exquisite Bach) and we also
heard some tricksy Nancarrow,
nonchalantly dispatched by Denk.
Rebecca Franks
Touring to March 5
Ann Treneman sees
Curtains in Kingston
First Night in the main paper
the story lo
looking like a man in search
character, though when he
of a char
does gget to dance his total control
the stage is exciting.
of th
Eleanor Duval, impressive
E
as his creepy partner in
crime, is sexy and glamorous,
cr
but also a real piece of work.
b
Her finest moment comes
H
in the second half, when
Lady M is finally felled by
L
the guilt-driven madness
th
that rots her from the inside.
tha
That?s the kind of non-verbal
Tha
storytelling that works best in
storyt
otherwise disappointing piece.
this oth
Debra
Craine
D
ebra Cr
Box office: 020 7702 2789, to March 17,
touring to May 18. Tour details:
then tourin
markbrucecompany.com
kb
12
1G T
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Civilisations
BBC Two, 9pm
Widely
credited with
forming the
tastes of a
generation when it
was shown on BBC Two
in 1969, Civilisation,
Kenneth Clark?s
13-part ?personal view?
Early
Top
pick
of culture, has since
been criticised for
focusing only on the
West. Nearly 50 years
later the BBC is having
another go, but this
time there is not just
one civilisation being
illuminated and not just
one personal view, but
three. The presenters
are Simon Schama,
Mary Beard and David
Olusoga, with the BBC
insistent that this isn?t a
remake or a riposte.
Schama presents five
episodes and Beard and
Olusoga two each.
Critics of Clark?s series
could quibble that more
than half of the new
programmes are from
another white, male
scholar; the BBC says
the split is down to
?availability?. It is an
illuminating essay from
Schama that starts the
ball rolling, and he
offers an endorsement
of the creative spirit in
humanity. Schama?s
journey stretches from
marks made in South
African caves 80,000
years ago to the lost
civilisations of Petra
and Mesoamerica,
and emphasises the
connection between art
and the environment.
He considers the fate of
Khaled al-Asaad, the
head of antiquities for
the ancient city of
Palmyra, who was
beheaded by Isis in 2015
for refusing to reveal
the whereabouts of
the city?s treasures.
?We can spend a lot
of time debating what
civilisation is or isn?t,?
he says. ?But when its
opposite shows up, in
all its brutality and
intolerance and lust for
destruction, we know
what civilisation is.?
Weinstein: The
Inside Story
BBC One, 9pm
Working with Weinstein,
last week?s Channel 4
documentary, focused
on Harvey Weinstein?s
British connections.
A feature-length BBC
Two documentary,
which is being billed as
?the definitive take on
the Weinstein scandal?
is coming soon, but first
is this documentary,
co-produced by
PBS?s Frontline. The
Hollywood mogul is
alleged to have sexually
abused dozens of
women over four
decades, but how did he
keep his accusers quiet
for so long? This film
examines the web of
lawyers, journalists and
private detectives he
deployed to keep his
secrets hidden.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Murder, Mystery and My Family.
Jeremy Dein and Sasha Wass scrutinise the case of John
Dickman (AD) 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer.
Properties in Sandgate, Bolton and En?eld (AD) 11.00
Wanted Down Under Revisited. Nicki Chapman catches up
with the McGuinness family 11.45 Caught Red Handed.
A robber gets a shock when a shopkeeper turns out to be
a martial arts expert 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From the
Quayside Antiques centre in Topsham, near Exeter (r)
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Ayesha tries to convince
Valerie to not get involved with Ashley (AD) 2.15
Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators. A woman
dies in a magic trick gone gruesomely wrong (AD) 3.00
Escape to the Country. Alistair Appleton helps returning
expats ?nd a home in rural Gloucestershire (AD) 3.45 Get
Away for Winter. A woman hoping to rent a property in
Goa, India (AD) 4.30 Antiques Road Trip. Paul Laidlaw
and Natasha Raskin search for items in Norfolk and
Suffolk (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show hosted by
Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at Six; Weather
6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Caught Red Handed (r) 6.30 Get Away for
Winter (r) (AD) 7.15 Wanted Down Under Revisited (r)
8.00 Sign Zone: Earth?s Natural Wonders (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm Perfection (r) 1.45 Plan It,
Build It (r) (AD) 2.15 Yes Chef. The chef Nathan Outlaw
puts four amateur home cooks through a series of
culinary challenges, including how to ?llet a ?sh (r) 3.00
A Place to Call Home. Regina is in her element making
?nal preparations on the day of the prime minister?s visit,
and George is happy to make a speech to the supporters
gathered at the gates (r) 3.50 More Creatures Great and
Small. Saving a horse?s sight (r) 4.20 Greece with Simon
Reeve. The presenter takes a tour of Greece, travelling
from the islands of the Aegean to Athens and learning
how the Greek people are coping with their country?s
crises (r) (AD) 5.20 Flog It! Paul Martin is joined by the
antiques experts Anita Manning and James Lewis at
Blackpool Tower Circus and later explores the story of the
Pendle witch trial (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted
by Jeremy Vine (r) 6.30 Great British Railway Journeys.
Michael Portillo travels from Gainsborough to Ely (r) (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs
and fashion news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and
gossip 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show
10.30 This Morning. Phillip Scho?eld and Holly
Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features, including
a look at the stories making the newspaper headlines and
a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose Women. The
ladies put the world to rights once more and invite a
guest to chat about what they are up to 1.30 ITV News;
Weather 2.00 James Martin?s American Adventure.
James heads to Louisiana and Avery Island, a large salt
mound that is the home of the chilli peppers used to
make Tabasco sauce (AD) 3.00 Tenable. Five members of
an operatic society from Shef?eld calling themselves the
5 Tenors answer questions 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben
Shephard presents another edition of the arcade-themed
quiz show 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as
four contestants pit their wits against the Chaser, adding
money to the jackpot for the ?nal chase 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.30 Frasier (r)
(AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 11.00
Undercover Boss USA (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary
12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Contestants from
south-east Essex compete (r) 1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers. In
Shef?eld, Dan examines a vintage arcade boxing machine
(r) 2.10 Countdown. With Myleene Klass in Dictionary
Corner 3.00 A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun. A Suffolk
couple look for a holiday home in Mijas, southern Spain
(r) 4.00 A New Life in the Sun. Two British vineyard
owners try to beat the French during a boules tournament
5.00 Four in a Bed. The ?nal visit is to Greylands Guest
House in Powys 5.30 Extreme Cake Makers. A cake
designed to be the same shape and size as a Shetland
pony (r) 6.00 The Simpsons. Marge experiences mixed
emotions when she is forced to replace the family car, and
Bart tries to ?nd out why Lisa is attending covert
meetings in town (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Mandy
becomes jealous of Darren and Nancy?s relationship,
and she is left feeling heartbroken when the pair decide
to go on a romantic break together (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can?t
Pay? We?ll Take It Away. The agents chase up a �000
deposit owed by a landlord to his tenant, and of?cers try
to recover �,000 from a nightclub owner for unpaid
solicitor fees (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors. Two third-year medical students
gain a valuable hands-on experience of working in a GP?s
surgery, including leading a consultation and the ?ner
points of administering injections (r) (AD) 1.15 Home
and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS:
Conspiracy to Murder. As Christmas approaches, the team
works overtime to solve a robbery ? a case made doubly
dif?cult by the fact that the prime suspect has
supposedly been dead for 17 years (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM:
My Family?s Secret (12, 2010) A woman?s
investigation into her suicidal husband?s dark past leads
her to his brother, who has a dangerous split personality.
Thriller starring Nicholle Tom and Philip Riccio 5.00 5
News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Paige suggests to Jack that
they resume their relationship (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and
Away. Kat and Ash?s investigation reveals the truth about
Robbo?s real identity (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
Save
Subscribe and get seven days
of papers for just �a week
35%
on the
cover price
7PM
UK residents only, aged 18 or over. This offer is subject to availability. New subscribers only. Visit store.thetimes.co.uk for full T&Cs.
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker presents
the live magazine, featuring chat
and stories of interest
7.00 Emmerdale Jimmy accidentally
reverses into Laurel with his car (AD)
8.00 MasterChef The amateurs aim to
book a place in the quarter-?nal,
beginning with an invention challenge
with ingredients including lamb neck,
lamb mince, chicken, clams and brown
shrimp. Continues tomorrow (AD)
7.00 Live Athletics: The World Indoor
Championships Coverage of the
opening day of the competition, which
takes place at Arena Birmingham, and
features just three events in this
evening session ? the ?nals of the
women?s and men?s high jump, as well
as the ?nal of the women?s 3,000m.
Morgan Lake and Robbie Grabarz are
Great Britain?s representatives in the
respective high jumps, with their
compatriots Laura Muir and Eilish
McColgan set to compete on the
track, and all four of them will expect
to be in contention for a medal
9.00 Weinstein: The Inside Story
Panorama special investigating the
Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein?s
fall from grace and the extraordinary
efforts he made to silence his accusers
and keep his secrets hidden.
See Viewing Guide
9.00 Civilisations New series. Simon
Schama presents the ?rst in a series
of ?lms on the history of art, which
focuses on the oldest signs of
creativity found in South African cave
paintings, which date back 80,000
years. See Viewing Guide (1/9) (AD)
9.00 Serial Killer with Piers Morgan
An interview with Lorenzo Gilyard,
who was convicted of killing six people
in and around Missouri between
1977 and 1993, and suspected of
murdering a further seven more.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
Late
8.00 Emmerdale Priya loses her temper
when looking after the girls ? only for
Rishi to witness her outburst (AD)
8.30 The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska
New series. The crew of Star Princess
voyage to Alaska, cruising between
Vancouver and Anchorage (1/3) (AD)
10.00 Mock the Week With James Acaster,
Ed Byrne, Gary Delaney, Ivo Graham
and Zoe Lyons (9/13) (r)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.45 Question Time David Dimbleby chairs
the debate from Blackpool, with a
panel of politicians and guests facing
topical questions from the audience
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Kirsty Wark
10.30 Regional News
10.45 100 Years Younger in 21 Days
Eight famous faces, including June
Brown, Claire King, Sid Owen and
Sherrie Hewson, are subjected to
scienti?c testing to discover how well,
or badly, they are ageing (1/4) (r) (AD)
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days? political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Top Gear Matt LeBlanc, Chris Harris
and Rory Reid take a motorsports road
trip across the Wild West. Back on the
track, Rob Brydon is the Star in a
Reasonably Fast Car (r)
12.20am Sign Zone: Nigel Slater?s Middle East The
writer embarks on a Middle Eastern food adventure,
starting in Lebanon, which exempli?es Levantine cuisine
but is also in?uenced by its position on the
Mediterranean (r) (AD, SL) 1.20-2.05 Royal Recipes.
With Michael Buerk and chef Paul Ainsworth (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 The Wonderful World of Puppies
An insight into how very young pups
begin to develop complex emotional
responses to everything from
relationships with litter-mates to
their bond with humans (2/6) (r)
8.00 George Clarke?s Amazing Spaces
Featuring a London tailor who hopes
to fashion a work studio in his garden
and an enterprising team in Bristol
who are building a cabin 150 feet
off the ground (8/8) (AD)
8.00 Bargain-Loving Brits in the Sun
Geoff, who has become the very
?rst Mr Whippy of Benidorm, having
bought a van and ?tted it out with
a soft ice cream machine, faces a
potentially terminal problem when
his generator blows up (5/8)
9.00 Married at First Sight Finance
director Harriet and police sergeant
Richard honeymoon in Lisbon, where
they wait to see if the initial spark
they both felt will develop into
something stronger (3/4) (AD)
9.00 Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline
Emergency New series. Exploring
what happens when ?ights lose
control, including a packed passenger
jet that burst into ?ames just
moments from take-off (1/3)
10.00 The Job Interview Hilton Hotels
interview for a conference and
banqueting supervisor and the fashion
label Chi Chi London look for a junior
designer who is brimming with
creativity. See Viewing Guide (3/6)
10.00 Concorde: Designing the Dream
Documentary in which aircraft
designers, pilots and passengers tell
the story of how the Anglo-French
Concorde saw off competition from
the Americans and Soviets to
become the world?s ?rst supersonic
passenger airliner (1/2) (r)
11.05 Gogglebox Britain?s most avid,
opinionated and sharp-tongued
television viewers return
contemplating shows including Troy:
Fall of a City and Theresa May?s
appearance on This Morning (r) (AD)
11.05 Concorde: Triumph & Tragedy A
look at British Airways?s attempts in
the early 1980s to make the aircraft
pro?table after ?nding out Concorde
was losing tens of millions a year,
sacking those in charge and replacing
them with two pilots (2/2) (r)
12.05am 24 Hours in Police Custody (r) (AD) 1.05
The Great British Skinny Dip (r) (AD) 1.55 One Born
Every Minute (r) (AD) 2.50 How to Get Fit Fast (r) 3.45
Britain?s University Spending Scandal: Channel 4
Dispatches (r) (AD, SL) 4.15 Coast vs Country (r) (AD)
5.05-6.00 Four Rooms with Sarah Beeny (r) (AD)
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am Cowboy Builders. John
Russell and Alison Cork help a couple in Calderdale,
Halifax (r) 4.00 My Mum?s Hotter Than Me! A soon-to-be
grandma who keeps up her looks with Botox (r) (SL) 4.45
House Doctor. Creating the illusion of space (r) (SL) 5.10
Divine Designs (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
7.30 Snowstorm: Britain?s Big Chill
? Tonight
10.00 BBC News at Ten
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7.30 EastEnders Aidan pressures Mick to
take a large amount of cash and Hunter
is keen to help Mel get ready for the
re-opening of the club (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
11.45 Lethal Weapon
Riggs and Murtaugh investigate the
death of a surfer (r) (AD)
12.30am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 Snowstorm: Britain?s Big Chill ? Tonight.
Topical investigative reports exploring the stories behind
the headlines (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The
Jeremy Kyle Show. Guests air their differences (r) (SL)
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Serial Killer with
Piers Morgan
ITV, 9pm
Piers Morgan is back in
the US for a head-tohead with Lorenzo
Gilyard ? the ?Kansas
City Strangler?. The
former waste company
supervisor is alleged
to have raped and
murdered 13 women
and girls from 1977 to
1993. All were found
dumped in secluded
spots around the city.
Gilyard was convicted
of six counts of murder
in 2007. In typically
bullish style, Morgan
lays out the horrors of
Gilyard?s crimes, but
the softly spoken killer
appears to have an
answer to everything.
However, Morgan will
not be denied, and
Gilyard soon reveals
his true nature.
From Ice to Fire
BBC Four, 9pm
Dr Helen Czerski?s
fascinating series
concludes with an
episode that focuses on
the upper end of the
temperature scale. She
begins shovelling coal
into a steam engine,
illustrating our ability
to build machines that
could harness the
power of heat. The
discovery of fire was
one of the key moments
in human history,
?a flood of heat and
light conjured up at
will?. You don?t need
an understanding of
physics to appreciate
fire, but it was useful
when it came to
unlocking its potential
and Czerski makes
the story of how that
took place accessible
and engrossing.
The Job Interview
Channel 4, 10pm
The hotel chain
Hilton is recruiting a
conference supervisor
for the St George?s Park
Hotel in Burton upon
Trent. According to the
recruitment boss, the
company?s vision is to
?fill the world with the
light and warmth of
hospitality?. Will the
?natural entertainer?
Leon, a waiter with
a transient past, have
what it takes? Or what
about the fashion
graduate Lauren?
Perhaps she would be
better suited to the
second job ? the
womenswear brand
Chi Chi London is
looking for a junior
fashion designer. Just
make sure you don?t
put ?a passion for
fashion? on your CV.
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7pm
There is no respite
for Arsenal. Five days
after losing 3-0 to
Manchester City in the
League Cup final, the
Gunners welcome the
runaway league leaders
to the Emirates
(kick-off 7.45pm). Can
Ars鑞e Wenger?s men
take revenge or will
City keep marching on?
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 7.00 RSPCA
Animal Rescue (r) 8.00 Send in the Dogs (r)
9.00 Road Wars (r) 10.00 Warehouse 13 (r)
11.00 Forever (r) (AD) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. Oliver, Felicity and Diggle prepare
to face Cayden James
9.00 My Wonderful Life. A woman diagnosed
with a terminal illness leaves messages, gifts
and surprises to be delivered posthumously
10.00 Jamestown. Jocelyn has mixed feelings
at the arrival of Read?s new wife (r)
11.05 The Force: Essex (r)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD)
1.00am Brit Cops: Frontline Crime UK (r)
2.00 Most Shocking (r) 3.00 The Blacklist:
Redemption (r) (AD) 4.00 It?s Me or the Dog.
Double bill (r) 5.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00am Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
7.00 Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 The Guest Wing (r)
(AD) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House.
Double bill (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing.
Double bill (r) 5.00 House (r) (AD)
6.00 House (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A naked
corpse is found in the desert (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. The Reagan family?s
neighbours are found stabbed to death (r) (AD)
9.00 Britannia. Cait and her father seek shelter
in the ruins of their old home (7/9) (AD)
10.00 Our Cartoon President
10.35 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (r)
11.10 Divorce. Comedy (r)
11.45 Active Shooter: America Under Fire.
An examination of a white supremacist?s attack
on a Sikh temple in 2012 (r)
12.55am Britannia (r) (AD) 1.55 Blue Bloods
(r) 2.55 Billions (r) (AD) 4.05 The West Wing.
Double bill of the political drama (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 Children?s
Hospital (r) (AD) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00
Cold Case (r) 11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia
12.15 Children?s Accident & Emergency (r)
1.00pm The Chef?s Line 2.00 Nothing to Declare
(r) (AD) 4.00 Border Security: America?s Front
Line (r) 5.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 Children?s Hospital (r) (AD)
7.30 Children?s Hospital (1/12) (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Holmes learns a secret about
Gregson?s girlfriend (r)
9.00 Conviction. A kidnap victim who was
presumed dead 10 years ago reappears,
triggering a re-examination of the case (r) (AD)
10.00 Scandal (AD)
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 Elementary. Double
bill (r) (AD) 4.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
4.55 The Biggest Loser: Australia (r)
6.00am Claudio Abbado?s Inaugural Concert
7.00 Katherine Jenkins Live at the O2 9.00
Tales of the Unexpected 9.30 Master of
Photography (AD) 10.30 Video Killed the Radio
Star 11.00 The Sixties (AD) 12.00 Trailblazers:
Gothic Rock 1.00pm Discovering: Barbara
Stanwyck (AD) 2.00 Tales of the Unexpected
2.30 Master of Photography (AD) 3.30 Video
Killed the Radio Star 4.00 The Sixties (AD)
5.00 Trailblazers: Pop Videos
6.00 Discovering: Gregory Peck (AD)
7.00 Inside the Actors Studio: Steve Carell (AD)
8.00 The Eighties (AD)
9.00 The Lot of Fun: Where the Movies Learned
to Laugh. Documentary about the producer and
director Hal Roach
10.00 Harold Lloyd: Hollywood?s Timeless
Comedy Genius. Documentary
11.00 Portrait Artist of the Year 2018
12.00 National Treasures: The Art of Collecting
1.00am Classic Artists: The Moody Blues 4.00
Dag 4.30 Tales of the Unexpected 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans. Including
news and views on today?s early stories and a
look at the back pages 8.00 Live Test Cricket:
South Africa v Australia. Coverage of day one of
the First Test in the four-match series, taking
place at Kingsmead in Durban 3.30pm Live ATP
Tennis: The Dubai Duty Free Tennis
Championships. Coverage of the fourth day?s
play of the tournament from Aviation Club
Tennis Centre in Dubai
6.30 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Live Premier League: Arsenal v
Manchester City (Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of
he top-?ight clash, which takes place at the
Emirates Stadium. See Viewing Guide
10.15 The Debate. The latest football news
11.15 Live ATP Tennis: The Abierto Mexicano
Telcel. Day four of the ATP 500 tournament
from the Acapulco Princess Mundo Imperial
5.30am ATP Tour Classic Matches.
Roger Federer v Rafael Nadal in the Miami
Masters ?nal of 2005 (AD)
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View 11.15
Question Time. Topical debate from Blackpool
chaired by David Dimbleby 12.15am This
Week. With Andrew Neil 1.00-6.00 BBC News
Subscribe now to start saving immediately.
Call 0800 028 5355 or visit thetimes.co.uk/offer
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 The Arts
Show. Tim McGarry investigates the story of
the Ulster Museum?s most stolen painting
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00midday-1.00pm
First Minister?s Questions 10.00-10.30
Timeline. Presented by Glenn Campbell and
Shereen Nanjiani 11.15 Mock the Week. With
James Acaster, Ed Byrne, Gary Delaney, Ivo
Graham and Zoe Lyons (r) 11.45-12.50am
Top Gear. The team takes a motorsports road
trip across the Wild West (r)
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm Live Snooker: The
Welsh Open. Coverage of the afternoon session
on day four in Cardiff 4.25-5.20 A Place to Call
Home. Ash Park prepares for a visit from the
Prime Minister and his wife (r) 7.00 Live
Snooker: The Welsh Open. Coverage of the
evening session on day four in Cardiff
8.00-9.00 Live Athletics: The World Indoor
Championships. Coverage of the opening day of
the competition, which takes place at Arena
Birmingham 11.15 Snooker: The Welsh Open.
Ian Hunt presents highlights of day four in
Cardiff 12.05am-12.20 Coast (r)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.30pm-9.00 Wales This Week
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1985. With Kim Wilde,
Duran Duran, Jimmy Nail and Divine (r)
8.00 The Brain: A Secret History. Michael
Mosley tries to further his understanding of the
human mind by tracing the history of mankind?s
efforts to manipulate the brain (1/3) (r)
9.00 From Ice to Fire: The Incredible Science
of Temperature. Helen Czerski explores the
science of heat, and how the ability to harness
it has led to some of humanity?s greatest
innovations, from steam engines to plasmas.
See Viewing Guide (3/3) (AD)
10.00 Wild Weather with Richard Hammond.
The host reveals how the weather is affected by
temperature. Last in the series (r) (AD)
11.00 Storm Troupers: The Fight to Forecast the
Weather. Alok Jha charts the history of
meteorology (r) (AD)
12.00 Top of the Pops: 1985. With Kim Wilde
and Bryan Ferry (r) 12.35am Elvis Costello:
Mystery Dance (r) 2.05 From Ice to Fire: The
Incredible Science of Temperature (r) (AD)
3.05-3.35 Handmade on the Silk Road (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Coach Trip:
Road to Tenerife (r) (AD) 7.30 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 8.00 Baby Daddy (r) 9.00
Melissa & Joey (r) 10.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r)
(AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The
Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 Melissa & Joey
(r) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r) 4.00 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Tenerife (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
8.30 Young Sheldon (AD)
9.00 Celebs Go Dating: The Finale (AD)
10.00 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
10.35 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
11.10 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 First Dates (r) (AD) 1.10am Celebs Go
Dating: The Finale (r) (AD) 2.15 The
Inbetweeners (r) (AD, SL) 3.10 Young Sheldon
(r) (AD) 3.30 Timeless (r) 4.15 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 4.35 Rude(ish) Tube (r)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) 9.30 A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 11.30 Four in a Bed (r)
2.10pm Come Dine with Me (r) 4.50 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
6.55 The Supervet. A Newfoundland dog needs
surgery for its bent front legs (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Londoner Chris Ostwald
decides to build a New England-style water mill
retreat in the Chilterns, on a hill far from water,
but a complaint from a neighbour jeopardises
the project (2/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 WWII?s Great Escapes: The Freedom Trails.
Monty Halls reveals how British soldier Len
Harley escaped from a POW camp in
Nazi-occupied Italy, and eluded German forces as
he crossed the Majella mountains (r) (AD)
10.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? The
documentary about emergency services in
Wiltshire focuses on crimes involving women
being targeted by predatory males (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 999: What?s Your Emergency? Documentary
(r) (AD) 2.10 The Good Fight (r) (AD)
3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am The Turning Point (PG, 1952) Film
noir starring William Holden (b/w) 12.40pm
Jubal (PG, 1956) Western starring Glenn Ford
and Ernest Borgnine (AD) 2.45 Gideon of
Scotland Yard (PG, 1958) Police drama
starring Jack Hawkins 4.35 The Furies (PG,
1950) Western starring Barbara Stanwyck and
Walter Huston (b/w)
6.45 The Three Musketeers (12, 2011)
Adventure starring Logan Lerman (AD)
9.00 Pitch Perfect (12, 2012) A new student
joins an a cappella singing group made up of
social mis?ts to compete in campus music
competitions. Comedy starring Anna Kendrick,
Rebel Wilson and Elizabeth Banks
11.10 Aliens: Special Edition (18, 1986)
Lone survivor Ripley joins a military force that
encounters hordes of deadly alien creatures.
Extended cut of the sci-? thriller sequel with
Sigourney Weaver and Michael Biehn
2.10am-4.00 Dreams of a Life (12, 2011)
Drama-documentary examining the life of Joyce
Vincent, who died at home in 2003, but whose
body was not discovered until three years later.
Starring Zawe Ashton and Neelam Bakshi (AD)
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals (r) 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Dress to Impress (r) 7.55 Emmerdale (r) (AD)
8.20 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 10.15 Who?s Doing the
Dishes? (r) (AD) 11.10 Dress to Impress (r)
12.15pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 Coronation
Street. Double bill (r) (AD) 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show.
Triple bill (r) 5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Survival of the Fittest. The battle of the
sexes continues
10.00 CelebAbility. Entertainment game show
hosted by Iain Stirling (r)
10.50 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.20 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.45 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.15am American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.40 Two
and a Half Men (r) 1.05 Ibiza Weekender (r)
2.10 Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r)
2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) 8.00 The Royal (r) (AD) 9.00
Judge Judy (r) 10.25 Love Your Garden (r)
12.30pm The Royal (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat (r)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.45 On the
Buses (r) 4.50 You?re Only Young Twice (r)
5.25 Rising Damp (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica?s British MI6
agent friend visits Sicily to check up on the
wealthy widow of a powerful gangster who has
recently announced her engagement (r) (AD)
8.00 Agatha Christie?s Marple. A message in the
personal column of a local newspaper reveals
accurate details of a forthcoming murder (r)
10.00 Unforgotten. Cassie and Sunny dig deeper
into the lives of two of the people mentioned in
the diary (3/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 Unforgotten. The marks on the victim?s
body turn out to be consistent with gangland
torture methods, so Cassie and Sunny question
Sir Phillip about his involvement with an East
End crime family (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am DCI Banks (r) (AD) 2.00 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Pawn Stars (r) 7.30
Ironside (r) 8.30 Quincy ME (r) 9.30 Minder (r)
(AD) 10.35 The Sweeney (r) 11.40 The
Avengers (r) 12.50pm Ironside (r) 1.50 Quincy
ME (r) 2.55 Minder (r) (AD) 4.00 The Sweeney.
A business tycoon is blackmailed (r) 5.05 The
Avengers. An invisibility formula goes astray (r)
6.10 Storage Wars: Texas. Victor seeks an ally in
his bidding war (r)
6.40 Storage Wars. Jarrod and Brandi plan an
anniversary party for their shop (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. Chumlee investigates a pirate
ship parade ?oat (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. Corey and Chumlee are offered
a signed Bugs Bunny poster (r)
8.00 River Monsters. Jeremy Wade continues to
investigate the fate of RMS Laconia (r)
9.00 FILM: The Outlaw Josey Wales (18,
1976) Western directed by and starring Clint
Eastwood. With Sondra Locke (AD)
11.50 FILM: The Keeper (15, 2009)
Action thriller starring Steven Seagal (AD)
1.45 Fifth Gear. Tiff Needell presents (r)
2.40 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm
Top Gear (AD) 3.00 The Hurting 4.00 Road Cops
5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear (AD)
7.00 Road Cops. Of?cers investigate a drowning
incident at the powerful Waikato River
7.30 Road Cops. Reality series
8.00 Dara O Briain?s Go 8 Bit. The comedians
Matt Forde and Jessica Knappett play a series of
video games, including The Sims
9.00 QI XL. With Sandi Toksvig, Lee Mack and
Jimmy Carr. Stephen Fry presents
10.00 Josh. Josh is invited to the event of the
summer ? a pool party (AD)
10.40 Josh. Josh dates a woman who used to be
the ?hottest girl in school? (AD)
11.20 QI. With Vic Reeves, Roger McGough and
Mark Steel. Presented by Stephen Fry
12.00 QI 12.40am Would I Lie to You?: The
Unseen Bits 1.20 Mock the Week 2.00 QI
2.40 Would I Lie to You?: The Unseen Bits
3.20 Mock the Week 3.55 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The Bill 12.00
New Tricks (AD) 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine (AD) 1.40 Bread 2.20 Birds of a Feather
3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 New Tricks (AD)
5.00 Bergerac
6.00 Steptoe and Son
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Howard?s bicycle
starts acting very strangely (AD)
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. Billy seems to
have gained a stalker, but soon realises he has
greater worries after discovering he promised to
demonstrate archery at the vicar?s garden party
? while riding a horse
8.00 A Place to Call Home. Elizabeth is rushed
to hospital after suffering a heart attack,
and is looked after tenderly by Jack
9.00 Miss Marple. The sleuth investigates a
friend?s claim to have witnessed a murder being
committed on a passing train (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Sharon and Tracey?s
school reunion brings back a few memories
12.00 The Bill 1.00am Life on Mars 2.00 The
White Queen 3.00 Crusoe 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 The Day When De
Gaulle Chose War 11.00 Medieval Dead 12.00
Time Team 1.00pm Africa (AD) 2.00 The Life of
Mammals 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Medieval Dead
5.00 Murder Maps. The case of George Smith,
who married a succession of women and
murdered them so he could inherit their wealth
6.00 Auschwitz: The Nazis and the Final
Solution. The history of the concentration camp
7.00 The Day When De Gaulle Chose War.
Charles De Gaulle?s refusal to surrender to the
German invasion of France in 1940, and his
subsequent escape to London and establishment
of a French government in exile
8.00 Nazi Victory: The Post-War Plan. Hitler?s
plans to invade the US using battleships,
long-range bombers and secret in?ltrators.
Plus, a look at support for the Nazi movement in
America during the 1940s (3/6)
9.00 The Two Ronnies. Triple bill
11.20 The Black Adder (AD)
12.00 Blackadder II (AD) 1.20am Black Ops
2.15 Pointless 3.00 Home Shopping
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Stuck on You: The Football Sticker Story.
Documentary about the founding of a
multi-billion pound industry (r) 12.05am
Lethal Weapon (r) (AD) 12.50 Teleshopping
1.50 After Midnight 3.20 Pets: The True Cost
? Tonight (r) 3.45-5.05 ITV Nightscreen
UTV
As ITV except: 12.30am Teleshopping
2.00-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Pincidh
Dincidh D� (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.35 Na
Floogals (r) 5.45 Srath Sona (Happy Valley) (r)
5.55 Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.05 Sealgairean Sp騬sail
(History Hunters) (r) 6.30 D� a-nis? (What
Now?) (r) 7.00 Turas a? Bhradain (The Salmon?s
Journey) (r) 7.30 Speaking Our Language (r)
7.55 Binneas: Na Trads (r) 8.00 An L� (News)
8.30 E騬pa (European Current Affairs) 9.00
DIY le Donnie 9.50 Belladrum 2017: The James
Hunter Six 10.30 Fleasgaich an Iasgaich (King
Fishers) 11.15 Hebridean Celtic Music Festival:
Suil air Ais (r) 11.30-12.00midnight Air an
Rathad (On the Road) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Dona Direidi (r) 6.15 Tili a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 6.25 Halibalw (r) 6.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 6.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 7.00 Meic y
Marchog (r) 7.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 7.30
Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 7.40
Peppa (r) 7.45 Cacamwnci 8.00 Holi Hana (r)
8.10 Amser Stori 8.15 Boj (r) 8.30 Abadas (r)
8.40 Bla Bla Blewog (r) 8.55 Ben a Mali a?u
Byd Bach O Hud (r) 9.05 Sbridiri (r) 9.25
Meripwsan (r) 9.30 Straeon Ty Pen (r) 9.45 Cei
Bach (r) 10.00 Dona Direidi (r) 10.15 Tili a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 10.25 Halibalw (r) 10.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 10.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 11.00 Meic
y Marchog (r) 11.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 11.30
Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 11.40
Peppa (r) 11.45 Cacamwnci (r) 12.00 News
S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Darn Bach o Hanes
(r) (AD) 12.30 Noson Lawen (r) 1.30 Sion a
Si鈔 (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05
Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05
Yr Ynys (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil
5.05 Stwnsh: Chwarter Call 5.20 Stwnsh: Kung
Fu Panda (r) 5.45 Stwnsh: Rygbi Pawb 6.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Ar Werth (r) 6.30
Rownd a Rownd. Carys is on a mission to ?nd
out the truth (AD) 7.00 Heno 7.30 Pobol y
Cwm (AD) 8.00 C鈔 i Gymru 2018 10.00 Dim
Byd Fel C鈔 i Gymru (r) (AD) 10.30 Hansh
11.00-11.35 Mwy o Sgorio (r)
14
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7588
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3272
5
6
8
7
8
26
26
9
20
26
6
11
2
12
22
4
19
26
9
22
13
14
15
25
22
25
11
22
6
9
25
10
26
Train Tracks No 344
15
26
17
23
10
11
26
19
5
13
23
26
20
20
14
8
7
2
23
16
23
9
20
25
24
7
23
6
26
5
3
2
4
4
4
3
9
4
26
2
26
6
9
26
19
1
2
22
26
14
4
26
25
18
2
26
3
4
2
16
14
18
19
23
4
6
26
13
22
26
7
9
7
23
20
6
13
26
12
26
16
23
13
A
10
21
25
22
18
7
6
1
13
23
21
26
22
9
A
23
R
13
6
2
25
4
1
26
B
L
14
20
26
12
18
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
24
2
1 Citrus drink (6,5)
8 Slow-moving mollusc (5)
9 New staging of an old
play (7)
10 Neat, ordered (4)
11 Partners, companions (8)
13 Craving for food (6)
14 Strained, unnatural (6)
17 Cruel and oppressive (8)
Solution to Crossword 7587
MUS I C
A P R
L E I CE S
T N M
AND E L
R D
HOY L E
Y
M
PR I CE L
E D N
DRY
T A
U
L
H
P E L L E T
HO
I
T E
M
A B
N
T
O
R
T
O
I
S
B E
E S S
I
H
NGE
G L
S
L
S POT
L O
A L L
Z U
RA T E
N
URGE
U
SUN
S
I
R I NE
A C
ANCE
19 Terrible fate (4)
22 Broke out suddenly (7)
23 Foreign (5)
24 Pompous,
self-important (11)
6
2
6
25
3
4
18
18
26
18
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
8
9
21
22
L
Down
1 Beginning;
military attack (5)
2 Give up; leave behind (7)
3 Very strong wind (4)
4 Start of 1936 march (6)
5 Unwelcome intrusion (8)
6 Young eel (5)
7 Shut (6)
12 Expelled immigrant (8)
13 Concealed (6)
15 Spicy Spanish sausage (7)
16 Central (6)
18 Fall heavily and limply (5)
20 Lacking (5)
21 Barley product used in
brewing (4)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
10
11
12
13
23
24
25
26
R
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
A
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 4157
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
84901 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 4158
C
A
R
L
C
E
I
I
U
N
S
I
P
A
U
H
C
M
P
L
O
S
A
O
A
E
P
I
S
A
E
D
R
I
C
K
T
O
M
C
Y
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
G
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4264
Futoshiki No 3119
Kakuro No 2078
6
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
>
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
?
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
?
7
31
4
7
3
22
24
9
7
8
23
21
10
8
?
19
24
5
7
15
29
23
?
?
16
13
1
3
?
6
6
34
11
12
13
9
7
5
7
?
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
11
28
23
10
15
16
7
15
4
12
17
3
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it. The
same number may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
� PUZZLER MEDIA
17
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Magnus Carlsen
Black: Hikaru Nakamura
Fischer Random (Game 13),
Baerum 2018
This game started from the following position.
________
醨D D 4kg]
�D 0 Dp]
� DphbDp1]
轉 DpH D ]
軳D )p) )]
蹹 D ) ) ]
跴)PDQD D]
�$ IRG D ]
谅媚牌侨
Chess960 games often do not
look like standard chess at all, at
least in the early stages of play.
However, sometimes they can
adopt familiar patterns later, as in
today?s game. Apart from the
quirky situation of some of the
pieces, the structure very much
resembles positions where White
has played the Stonewall Attack.
In the Stonewall, White often
bases play around an outpost at
e5 and a general advance on the
kingside, which is exactly what
Carlsen does here.
15 g4 Nf7 16 Nc5 Bc8 17 a4
A far-sighted move, designed to
energise his dormant a1-rook.
17 ... Nxe5 18 dxe5 b6 19 Nb3 g5
Nakamura fights well, countering on the kingside before he is
swamped in that sector.
20 hxg5 Qh3 21 f5 Bxe5 22 Nd4
Bxd4 23 exd4 e6
A blunder after which Black?s
queen is quickly trapped. Essential was the clever 23 ... a5! 24 Ra3
Ba6 with complex play.
24 Ra3 Qh1 25 Bb4 Qh4 26 Bxf8
Qxg5+ 27 Qd2 Qxd2+ 28 Kxd2
Kxf8 29 Rh1 Kg7 30 Rah3 exf5 31
Rxh7+ Kg6 32 Ke3 Black resigns
________
醨hk4n1bg]
�0p0p0p]
� D D d D]
轉 D d D ]
� D D D D]
蹹 D D D ]
跴)P)P)P)]
�$NIRHQGB]
谅媚牌侨
________
� DqDnDkD] Winning Move
郉 D DpDp]
� hND DpD] White to play. This position is from
German Bundesliga
轉 gPD D ] Bacrot-Ostrovskiy,
2018.
� D H D D] Here White found a clever move that
蹹QD D ) ] exploited the precarious nature of Black?s
� D D )B)] pieces. How did he continue?
贒 D D I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
24
+6
MEDIUM
18
x4
HARDER
13 SQUARE
IT
?K 4
?A 8 5
?KQ 7
?A K J 10 4
W
N(Byrne)
2NT
3? (1)
5?(2)
2/3
x 7 ? 75
OF IT
OF IT
TREBLE HALF OF
IT
IT
x 6 + 562 + 3/4
OF IT
1/3
OF IT
HALF OF
IT
� 5 + 25 DOUBLE ? 16
IT
+ 221 � 4
? 623
5/6
OF IT
TREBLE
IT
+ 148
� 14 x 9
2
4
Killer Gentle No 5889
12
17
3
4
7
23
6min
5
10
10
15
3
6
22
11
16
3
17
15
15
8
19
17
3
7
8
3
16
12
6
12
14
17
8
8
E
Pass
Pass
Pass
3?(1) Pass
4?
Pass
6?(3) End
(1) Transfer to hearts, duly completed.
(2) Ace-showing cue bid.
(3) Loving his spade void and offering a
choice of red-suit slams with perhaps a
preference for diamonds (5NT pick a slam
with less of a preference).
Killer Tough No 5890
21
7
19
6
24min
22
11
12
8
9
11
7
14
17
9
20
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
20
7
3
1
4
2
5
7
8
9
6
6
5
8
9
4
1
2
7
3
9
7
2
8
3
6
5
4
1
2
4
7
3
1
5
9
6
8
8
=
14
�
=
38
=
1
8
9
2
3
7
4
6
5
1
1
5
6
9
2
8
3
7
4
3
7
4
6
5
1
9
8
2
9
8
7
2
3
5
4
1
6
P T I E
H
N
O T S
T
T
O L A T
N
F E C T
I
E
RA Z E
N
I
Z
J
S E I Z UR
K
N G
S I GN S
Train Tracks 343
S
K E B
Q
I
R
UN L OA
I
L
V
R Y WA
M A
D
ARBO
D
C
I GH T C
G A
H
E
I MA
S
S
F
T EMP E
Sudoku 9696
8
6
3
7
2
9
4
1
5
1
3
5
4
9
8
6
2
7
7
8
9
1
6
2
3
5
4
4
2
6
5
7
3
1
8
9
4
6
3
1
9
7
5
2
8
5
2
1
4
8
6
7
9
3
2
4
5
8
6
9
1
3
7
7
1
8
5
4
3
2
6
9
6
3
9
7
1
2
8
4
5
7
6
4
3
2
8
5
1
9
2
1
8
4
5
9
3
7
6
3
5
9
7
1
6
2
8
4
6
7
2
8
3
4
1
9
5
7
1
8
9
3
6
2
5
4
9
4
1
5
6
2
7
3
8
1
8
3
2
4
5
9
6
7
4
2
7
6
9
3
8
5
1
5
9
6
1
8
7
4
2
3
2
6
9
4
7
5
8
1
3
5
2
1
7
8
4
3
9
6
4
8
6
2
9
3
1
7
5
9
3
7
5
6
1
4
8
2
1
9
2
3
5
8
6
4
7
8
7
3
6
4
9
5
2
1
6
4
5
1
2
7
9
3
8
1
2 < 4
7
3
4 < 5
?
5
1
?
1
3
?
3
2 >
3 4 4
4
2
�
+
9
5
1
?
4 > 3
?
5
2
1
5
1
x
x
+
x
4
6
4
3
x
+
+
1
4
3
5
6
3
4
4
2
A
6
5
1
3
UR
A
A P
P
GO
R
S T
1
B
Suko No 2173
6
5
2
4
3
8
1
9
7
1
8
3
6
9
7
4
2
5
9
4
7
1
5
2
6
3
8
7
1
9
8
4
3
2
5
6
4
3
5
2
1
6
8
7
9
8
2
6
5
7
9
3
4
1
2
9
1
3
6
5
7
8
4
5
6
8
7
2
4
9
1
3
3
7
4
9
8
1
5
6
2
D
U
C
M
O
K
R
N
K
U
L
C
E
Y
A
I
S
D
T
E
Lexica 4156
3
?
2
Set Square 2080
2
3
Lexica 4155
Futoshiki 3118
5
8
3
5
4
8
1
2
7
6
9
1
AB
U
D S
B
X Y
Sudoku 9697
8
3
5
9
7
1
6
4
2
Killer 5888
KenKen 4263
3
6
EM
N
T R
W
I D
N
E F
8 3 1
4 7 1 2
8 9 6 4
6
5 3
1 2
1 2
3 5 9 8
7 9
7 9 8
9 8 6
5
9
1
6
8
4
7
3
2
13
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
�
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so that
the six sums
work. We?ve
= 5 placed two
numbers to get
you started.
Each sum
be
= 18 should
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
Codeword 3271
2 1 3
4 2 1 3
2 1
5 7
1 3 5 7 8 9
8 9 6
3 1
4
7 9
1 4 2
1 2 8 3 6 5
2 4 9 5
6
3 1 6
4 4
20
-
x
Kakuro 2077
8
21
+
+
2
13
= 35 the numbers
Solutions
Cell Blocks 3154
13
Enter each of
x
+
4
12
3
3
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
17
Contract: 6?, Opening Lead: ? 10
had Dyke discard a club from
dummy on the fourth diamond.
BBO then showed no more cards
and the slam claimed. With the fifth
club winner gone, I wondered how.
I presumed Dyke had succeeded
in elegant fashion by finessing the
ten of clubs, ruffing the king of
spades (removing West?s last spade),
finessing the jack of clubs, cashing
the ace-king then, in the three-card
ending (dummy ?A85, declarer
?Q107, West ?KJ9), leading a
heart to the ten to endplay West.
Lovely but Dyke?s more prosaic line
of keeping winners (dummy?s fifth
club) and throwing losers (the third
heart) was clearly superior.
4
+
19
23
9
3
x
2
Killer 5887
14
4 6
-
Sudoku 9695
13
4
3
x
Yesterday?s answers
eruv, ever, every, resurvey, reuse,
revers, revue, ruse, seer, sere, serve,
server, servery, sever, severy, suer,
sure, surrey, survey, user, veer, veery,
verse, very
10
6
2
4
4
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
Set Square No 2081
Advanced
? 10 9 8 7 3 2 N
? AQ J 6 5
?K J 9
?4 2
W E
??J 9 4 3
S
?Q 9 8 6 ? ?5 3
?Q 10 7 6 3
?A 10 8 6 5 2
?7 2
S(Dyke)
x5
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 12 words, average;
16, good; 23, very good; 30, excellent
Dealer: North, Vulnerability: North-South
Teams
1/3
Polygon
10
Bridge Andrew Robson
Ten selected pairs assembled at
the Young Chelsea Bridge Club in
west London in early January to
compete for two places in the
England team in the European
Team Championships in Ostend
this summer. The top two pairs
after the four-day trials would join
the pre-selected pair of Tony
Forrester and his (tall) partner.
Leading for much of the event
before slipping to finish third were
Michael Byrne of Manchester and
Kieran Dyke, an Australian living
in London. They were the only
pair to bid and make slam on our
featured deal. The other pairs
either failed in 6?, losing two
unavoidable heart tricks, or
stopped out of slam. Indeed, one
East-West found a way into the
auction and bid all the way to 5?
? just one down (doubled).
In the top spot of 6?, declarer
ruffed West?s spade lead and led a
diamond to the king, West discarding a spade to reveal the four-nil
split. Declarer cashed the queen of
diamonds, led a third diamond to
the ten and cashed the ace, picking
up East?s diamonds as West threw
three more spades.
With West having no diamonds,
he rated to hold club length and so
the queen. Declarer staked everything on the club finesse. He discarded a heart from dummy on
the fourth diamond and led a club
to the ten. He ruffed the king of
spades and led a club to the jack.
The ace-king and four of clubs, followed by the ace of hearts, brought
his trick tally to 12. Slam made.
The Bridge Base Online vugraph
operator (I was watching online)
EASY
� PUZZLER MEDIA
My personal reservations about
the increasingly popular chess
variant, chess960, are compounded by some statistics once
presented to me by the late Professor Nathan Divinsky of the
University of British Columbia.
Professor Divinsky explained to
me that if one wished to write
down all possible games of chess
that could be described as miniatures (25 moves or less by both
sides) in the size and format of
the old London telephone directory, one would need a colossal
space in which to store such volumes. In fact one would need to
fill up a space equal, in all directions, to that of the earth to the
farthest known galaxy, not once
20
but 10 times. Given such quasiinfinite complexity, I sometimes
question the necessity for introducing a relatively new variant of
our traditional game.
After 14 moves, this was the
position on the board.
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Infinity and beyond
Cell Blocks No 3155
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
8
x
x
7
Quiz 1 Gross national product 2 Giraffes
3 Frankenstein 4 Pluto 5 Likud 6 Debbie Harry
7 Dimension. Tardis is derived from the acronym
for Time And Relative Dimension In Space
8 Bill & Ted?s Excellent Adventure 9 Time travel
10 Fredrik Backman 11 Lost in Translation
12 The Ballad of Reading Gaol 13 Alexander III
14 Fiji 15 Guernsey
G
W
U
S
T
Y
N
Y
H
P
V
O
I
O
O
K
E
F
U
Y
L
E
Word watch
Saxony (c) A fine woollen
fabric used for coats
Spae (a) To foretell or
divine the future
Spaetzle (b) A German
noodle dish
Brain Trainer
Easy 64; Medium 379;
Harder 405
Chess The subtle 1 Qb5!
creates insoluble
problems for the black
bishop. It must guard e7 to
prevent Ne7+ and also
must guard the b6-knight.
It cannot move while
maintaining both these
duties and 1 ... Nd7 leaves
White a piece up after
2 Qxc5! Nxc5 3 Ne7+ Kf8
4 Nxc8
01.03.18
MindGames
Sudoku
Mild No 9698
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Fiendish No 9699
1 7 8
3
6
7
Spae
a To foretell
b Loquacious
c Brightly-dressed
Spaetzle
a To outshine
b A dish
c A shawl
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
8
6
2 Which are the tallest
of all land animals?
12 Jacques Ibert
composed a
symphonic poem
based on which 1898
Oscar Wilde poem?
2
15
by which Blondie
frontwoman?
7 What does the ?d? of
Tardis stand for in the
TV series Doctor Who?
8 Wyld Stallyns is
the name of the band
formed by the title duo
in which 1989 film?
9 Igor Novikov
intended his self-
3
4
5
8
9
10
11
12
13
consistency principle
to solve the paradox
problem in which
form of travel?
10 Which Swedish
novelist wrote A
Man Called Ove (2012)
and Britt-Marie Was
Here (2014)?
11 Which 2003 Sofia
Coppola movie
shares its title with a
16
17
21
19
7
3
13 In 1263, which
king of Scotland
repulsed an invasion
by the Norwegian
king, Haakon IV?
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Yesterday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 1037
14 Which Pacific
country issued a $7
banknote to celebrate
its rugby sevens win at
the 2016 Rio Olympics?
15 Which dairy cattle
breed from the Channel
Islands is pictured?
Answers on page 15
6
20
22
B A RC E
E
L
U
OP T I M
R
Y
WE DD
A
I
D E T E S
H
O
WA RMO
A
O N
GA B L E
I
S
E
T
RUN
L O
N
A L
I
I N
E
T
E
NG
R
E
S
E S
N A
L
T
I
GM
E
S T
E
E R
H OW
O
E
EMP I
E
G
A RCH
T
I C K Y
O
I NG
F
V
N TW I N E
E
N
N
T AME N T
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Hurley
7
14
15
18
7
2 5
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1038
1
4
3 5
1
9
2 5
8 6
7
9
3 4
6
9
1 5
8
8
9
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
narrative poem by
James Merrill?
6 KooKoo (1981) is
the debut solo album
4
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 In economics, what
does GNP stand for?
5 The Israeli prime
minister, Binyamin
Netanyahu, is the
leader of which party?
7 5
7
6
8
GETTY IMAGES
4 Which dwarf
planet is named
after the Roman god
of the underworld?
3
6
8
1 3 5
4 5 3 8
2 9
2
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 Which novel
by Mary Shelley
was adapted by
Liam Scarlett into
a 2016 Royal
Ballet production?
2
4
2
9
PUZZLER MEDIA
Saxony
a An axe
b Blonde-haired
c A cloth
3
6
3
2
5
7
8 2 7
1 4 5
9
1
5
8
6
3 6
4 1
1
8
2 8
9 7
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Super fiendish No 9700
Across
1 Insensitive Charlie, right fool!
(5)
4 Worrier ?red up seeing
initially awkward situation (7)
8 Be enthusiastic about account,
one saying little about island
(7)
9 Long twelvemonth at end of
campaign (5)
10 Soothing word with the head
of News, immediately (5,3,4)
12 A trial ? faulty lasso (6)
13 Finish repair work Monsieur?s
left (6)
16 Central European with job ?
good place to start (4,8)
18 Vain attempt you keep hidden
(5)
20 Go in advance of gym
class, crossing playground with
journalist (7)
21 He makes long journey ?nally
short ? about kilometre
forward and back? (7)
22 Son nervous describing grasses
(5)
Down
1 By sea, kiln for drying in
California (7)
2 Metro ride chap arranged to
see Paris monument (3,2,8)
3 Identity assumed for men,
woman and me (5,4)
4 Foster often wrong, grabbing
maiden (6)
5 Beastly home in West
Yorkshire (3)
6 Newly evidenced, paid? This at
con?ict?s end? (5,8)
7 Colour that is not trendy at
?rst (4)
11 Pungency of a new drink girl
imbibes (9)
14 Lively good popular gallery, all
going (7)
15 Barrel-maker in company
work, retro, off and on (6)
17 Done, and fast, extremely
skilful (4)
19 Animal talk (3)
DIGITAL RADIO ? APP
VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Nemone 10.00 Lauren Laverne
1.00pm Mark Radcliffe 4.00 Steve Lamacq
6.00 Steve Lamacq?s Roundtable 7.00 Marc
Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Steve Lamacq 1.00am
The First Time with Flea 2.00 Classic Singles
2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6 Music?s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics. John
Brunning presents soothing sounds 8.00 The
Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott charts the
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra?s journey with
some of its most distinguished conductors,
beginning with Herbert von Karajan. Suppe
(Light Cavalry ? Overture); Mozart (Piano
Concerto No 21 in C major K.467);
Rimsky-Korsakov (Scheherazade Opus 35);
and Brahms (Variations on a Theme of Haydn
Opus 56a) 10.00 Smooth Classics. With
Margherita Taylor 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
11
1G T
artsfirst night
SHEILA BURNETT
presence, but here the emphasis is less
on plot mechanics than on the twisted
psychology of an obsessive, erotic
relationship. In the wrong hands the
play could seem lightweight, even silly,
with Vosper?s clipped dialogue
creaking as resoundingly as a corpse
swinging from the gallows. Instead,
delivered with texture and conviction,
it is gripping entertainment.
Bailey updates the action to 1958,
with louche jazz saxophone and the
ominous ticking of a clock sinuously
threaded between scenes by the
composer Richard Hammarton. Cecily
Harrington (cool, willowy Helen
Bradbury) is engaged to sweet, solid
Michael (Justin Avoth), but she is
more in the mood for adventure than
matrimony. ?It?s such a very tepid
Comedy
Shappi Khorsandi
Soho Theatre, W1
T
{{{((
here are two shows
intertwined here. One
allows Shappi Khorsandi
to be herself, musing on
motherhood, racial
stereotypes and mooching around in
the jungle on I?m a Celebrity . . . Get Me
Out of Here! The other is a scrappy but
engaging sketch of the life of Horatio
Nelson?s great passion, Emma
Hamilton. Why choose a character
from such a distant era? Part of the
reason lies in the Iranian-born comic?s
desire to escape from the pigeonhole
marked ?multicultural?. Some of the
most stimulating segments in this
evening show her wrestling with the
question of how she is perceived: as
a stand-up, a woman or a woman with
a brown face?
Last year, as a newly published
novelist, she caused a stir when she
withdrew from the longlist of a literary
prize for writers of colour because she
felt the nomination smacked of
tokenism. She returns to the question
here. Given that Khorsandi has made
her outsider status part of her stage
act, she leaves herself open to
accusations of hypocrisy, yet she is
such an unassuming, self-mocking
presence that you are willing to give
her the benefit of the doubt.
Her account of Hamilton?s life
gallops through the basic elements,
from early prostitution and subsequent
fame as a model. Khorsandi risks
turning this into a predicable feminist
tract, but the more she draws parallels
between Hamilton?s experiences and
those of the Me Too generation, the
more you sense the ambiguities.
When Khorsandi recalls how, in her
youth, she slept with a wealthy
American in exchange for a good time
in Amsterdam, she reminds us that
power relations have not changed all
that much since Hamilton?s day. More
interesting is the sequence devoted to
the way women were treated at the
Presidents Club. Khorsandi recalled
that she had performed at the same
function a couple of years earlier.
Despite finding the atmosphere
unsettling, she had not blown any
whistles. Why? She doesn?t fully
explain. Is it that comedians in search
of a bob or two are parachuted into all
sorts of corporate events? Money
talks; it can have the last laugh too.
Clive Davis
Box office: 020 7478 0100, to Sat; then
touring, shappi.co.uk
Dance
Macbeth
Wilton?s Music Hall, E1
S
{{(((
hakespeare?s great tragedy
is rich pickings for any artist
interested in exploring the
horrors of humanity, and the
choreographer and director
Mark Bruce, in his new dance-theatre
staging, takes them literally. This
is, indeed, a horror show, a gory
nightmare of murder, intrigue
and deadly ambition.
It?s styled like a contemporary crime
drama, with the nine-strong cast in
modern dress (black, for the most
I was reminded
of Hitchcock?s
Suspicion and
Rear Window
Helen Bradbury and Sam Frenchum star in this domestic thriller
How to sex up
Agatha Christie
A play inspired
by one of her
short stories
is dark, sadistic
and erotic good
fun, says
Sam Marlowe
Theatre
Love from
a Stranger
Royal,
Northampton
{{{{(
S
ex, sadism and dark, deranged
laughter ? not qualities
normally associated with the
traditional teacups-and-vicars
view of Agatha Christie.
Yet the director Lucy Bailey turns
Christie?s short story Philomel Cottage,
dramatised in 1936 by Frank Vosper,
into a prickly, perverse treat. It isn?t
so much a murder mystery as a
domestic thriller with a slow
accumulation of terror.
Bailey, whose production of
Christie?s Witness for the Prosecution
is a London hit, cites the compellingly
nasty, voyeuristic 1960 film Peeping
Tom as an influence; I was equally
reminded of Alfred Hitchcock?s
Suspicion and Rear Window. The
threat of violence is a constant, malign
part) and various malevolent figures
wielding knives like some East End
gang. The smoky stage is dark, so
dark that it?s sometimes hard to make
out who?s who or what?s what. The
three witches look like drugged-up
zombies and they howl like banshees;
a storm is afoot ? there?s lightning
and thunder. There are decapitated
heads on spikes, and it won?t be long
before the killing starts.
Bruce sees the Macbeths as victims
of the evil they unleash the moment
they decide to assassinate King
Duncan in a bid to seize the Scottish
throne. Yet although Bruce lands
a few theatrical punches ? the
burning of Duncan?s corpse, Macduff?s
bloody triumph ? he fails to expand
on his theme or offer any new
romance,? she complains to her
envious flatmate, Mavis (Alice Haig).
Cue Bruce Lovell (Sam Frenchum,
splendidly creepy with a dash of
Patricia Highsmith?s Tom Ripley),
a boyishly charismatic American
photographer who is interested in
subletting their Bayswater apartment.
Oblivious to the danger signs ? he
keeps snapping her picture and
surreptitiously sniffs her nightie ?
Cecily is smitten. Bruce whisks her
off to a remote rural idyll to play
house and other deadlier games.
Mike Britton?s elegantly
claustrophobic sets, with translucent
sliding walls, cleverly enhance the
staging?s filmic flavour, shifting our
focus like the roving, rapacious eye
of a camera. The devouring sensuality
between Bruce and Cecily is tinged
with brutality: there?s a startling
moment when Frenchum shoves
Bradbury on to the kitchen table
and forces his hand into her crotch,
hastily wiping his fingers on his
trousers when they?re interrupted
by the gardener.
The tension builds to a terrific twist,
and sharp detail abounds along the
way. Nicola Sanderson is a particular
comic pleasure as Cecily?s snobbish,
interfering Aunt LouLou, myopically
incapable of seeing what?s directly
under her long nose. But in this
delicious danse macabre, no one
puts a foot wrong. Huge sinister fun.
Box office: 01604 624811, to March 17,
then touring to July 17
insight into such a familiar plot.
t. A
word of advice: if you don?t know
ow
the story all that well, bone up
beforehand ? it helps.
Bruce?s chosen score, a
patchwork mostly involving
the music of Arvo P鋜t, but
spiced with Sonic Youth, is
tense and troubling, as it
should be. His choreography,
by turns tough and tender,
takes a back seat to the
drama, and the show is
all the weaker for that.
It?s a waste of such an
outstanding talent as Jonathan
Goddard not to give him more
opportunity to mine Macbeth?s
character. Gaunt and haunted, a
h
h
bewildered Goddard wanders through
The Three Witches
Concert
Britten Sinfonia/Denk
Milton Court, EC2
W
{{{{(
ith the wooziest wail
of a clarinet glissando,
Gershwin fades out
the old world and
ushers in the new.
That was in 1924, when the American
composer?s Rhapsody in Blue was
premiered in New York. Like a
memorable first line of a classic novel,
this inspired opening ? actually
conceived by the original clarinettist
? instantly conjures up a specific era,
when jazz and classical music met for
the first time. Yet, in snowy London in
2018, the Britten Sinfonia and Jeremy
Denk made the conversation sound
as fresh and lively as ever.
This jazz rhapsody was in fact the
highlight of their concert programme
together, curated by the ever-droll
American pianist. With Denk also
conducting from the piano, there were
issues of co-ordination. Yet for the
most part players relished the original
24-piece jazz-band orchestration and
Denk was a nimble soloist.
There was a chance too to hear that
rarer beast, Milhaud?s La Cr閍tion du
Monde. After visiting Harlem the
French composer had also been
inspired by jazz; this short ballet from
1923, written for a slimline orchestra
of 17 musicians, was the result. And if
here the two violins had to work hard
to balance with wind and brass, the
burnished saxophone solos and the joy
of the music-making made up for it.
All quite different from Stravinsky?s
Concerto for Piano and Wind
Instruments, although it too was first
heard in 1924. Peppery reeds, flutes
and brass replace scraping strings for
this neoclassical, rhythmically
intricate work. The soundworld was
alluring, but the performance didn?t
come into focus until the final flourish.
A motley collection of arrangements
of Byrd, Du Fay, Mozart, Monteverdi
and JS Bach prefaced it (special
mention for the flautist Thomas
Hancox?s exquisite Bach) and we also
heard some tricksy Nancarrow,
nonchalantly dispatched by Denk.
Rebecca Franks
Touring to March 5
Ann Treneman sees
Curtains in Kingston
First Night in the main paper
the story lo
looking like a man in search
character, though when he
of a char
does gget to dance his total control
the stage is exciting.
of th
Eleanor Duval, impressive
E
as his creepy partner in
crime, is sexy and glamorous,
cr
but also a real piece of work.
b
Her finest moment comes
H
in the second half, when
Lady M is finally felled by
L
the guilt-driven madness
th
that rots her from the inside.
tha
That?s the kind of non-verbal
Tha
storytelling that works best in
storyt
otherwise disappointing piece.
this oth
Debra
Craine
D
ebra Cr
Box office: 020 7702 2789, to March 17,
touring to May 18. Tour details:
then tourin
markbrucecompany.com
kb
12
1G T
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Civilisations
BBC Two, 9pm
Widely
credited with
forming the
tastes of a
generation when it
was shown on BBC Two
in 1969, Civilisation,
Kenneth Clark?s
13-part ?personal view?
Early
Top
pick
of culture, has since
been criticised for
focusing only on the
West. Nearly 50 years
later the BBC is having
another go, but this
time there is not just
one civilisation being
illuminated and not just
one personal view, but
three. The presenters
are Simon Schama,
Mary Beard and David
Olusoga, with the BBC
insistent that this isn?t a
remake or a riposte.
Schama presents five
episodes and Beard and
Olusoga two each.
Critics of Clark?s series
could quibble that more
than half of the new
programmes are from
another white, male
scholar; the BBC says
the split is down to
?availability?. It is an
illuminating essay from
Schama that starts the
ball rolling, and he
offers an endorsement
of the creative spirit in
humanity. Schama?s
journey stretches from
marks made in South
African caves 80,000
years ago to the lost
civilisations of Petra
and Mesoamerica,
and emphasises the
connection between art
and the environment.
He considers the fate of
Khaled al-Asaad, the
head of antiquities for
the ancient city of
Palmyra, who was
beheaded by Isis in 2015
for refusing to reveal
the whereabouts of
the city?s treasures.
?We can spend a lot
of time debating what
civilisation is or isn?t,?
he says. ?But when its
opposite shows up, in
all its brutality and
intolerance and lust for
destruction, we know
what civilisation is.?
Weinstein: The
Inside Story
BBC One, 9pm
Working with Weinstein,
last week?s Channel 4
documentary, focused
on Harvey Weinstein?s
British connections.
A feature-length BBC
Two documentary,
which is being billed as
?the definitive take on
the Weinstein scandal?
is coming soon, but first
is this documentary,
co-produced by
PBS?s Frontline. The
Hollywood mogul is
alleged to have sexually
abused dozens of
women over four
decades, but how did he
keep his accusers quiet
for so long? This film
examines the web of
lawyers, journalists and
private detectives he
deployed to keep his
secrets hidden.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Murder, Mystery and My Family.
Jeremy Dein and Sasha Wass scrutinise the case of John
Dickman (AD) 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer.
Properties in Sandgate, Bolton and En?eld (AD) 11.00
Wanted Down Under Revisited. Nicki Chapman catches up
with the McGuinness family 11.45 Caught Red Handed.
A robber gets a shock when a shopkeeper turns out to be
a martial arts expert 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From the
Quayside Antiques centre in Topsham, near Exeter (r)
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Ayesha tries to convince
Valerie to not get involved with Ashley (AD) 2.15
Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators. A woman
dies in a magic trick gone gruesomely wrong (AD) 3.00
Escape to the Country. Alistair Appleton helps returning
expats ?nd a home in rural Gloucestershire (AD) 3.45 Get
Away for Winter. A woman hoping to rent a property in
Goa, India (AD) 4.30 Antiques Road Trip. Paul Laidlaw
and Natasha Raskin search for items in Norfolk and
Suffolk (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show hosted by
Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at Six; Weather
6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Caught Red Handed (r) 6.30 Get Away for
Winter (r) (AD) 7.15 Wanted Down Under Revisited (r)
8.00 Sign Zone: Earth?s Natural Wonders (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm Perfection (r) 1.45 Plan It,
Build It (r) (AD) 2.15 Yes Chef. The chef Nathan Outlaw
puts four amateur home cooks through a series of
culinary challenges, including how to ?llet a ?sh (r) 3.00
A Place to Call Home. Regina is in her element making
?nal preparations on the day of the prime minister?s visit,
and George is happy to make a speech to the supporters
gathered at the gates (r) 3.50 More Creatures Great and
Small. Saving a horse?s sight (r) 4.20 Greece with Simon
Reeve. The presenter takes a tour of Greece, travelling
from the islands of the Aegean to Athens and learning
how the Greek people are coping with their country?s
crises (r) (AD) 5.20 Flog It! Paul Martin is joined by the
antiques experts Anita Manning and James Lewis at
Blackpool Tower Circus and later explores the story of the
Pendle witch trial (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted
by Jeremy Vine (r) 6.30 Great British Railway Journeys.
Michael Portillo travels from Gainsborough to Ely (r) (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs
and fashion news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and
gossip 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show
10.30 This Morning. Phillip Scho?eld and Holly
Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features, including
a look at the stories making the newspaper headlines and
a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose Women. The
ladies put the world to rights once more and invite a
guest to chat about what they are up to 1.30 ITV News;
Weather 2.00 James Martin?s American Adventure.
James heads to Louisiana and Avery Island, a large salt
mound that is the home of the chilli peppers used to
make Tabasco sauce (AD) 3.00 Tenable. Five members of
an operatic society from Shef?eld calling themselves the
5 Tenors answer questions 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben
Shephard presents another edition of the arcade-themed
quiz show 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as
four contestants pit their wits against the Chaser, adding
money to the jackpot for the ?nal chase 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.30 Frasier (r)
(AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 11.00
Undercover Boss USA (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary
12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Contestants from
south-east Essex compete (r) 1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers. In
Shef?eld, Dan examines a vintage arcade boxing machine
(r) 2.10 Countdown. With Myleene Klass in Dictionary
Corner 3.00 A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun. A Suffolk
couple look for a holiday home in Mijas, southern Spain
(r) 4.00 A New Life in the Sun. Two British vineyard
owners try to beat the French during a boules tournament
5.00 Four in a Bed. The ?nal visit is to Greylands Guest
House in Powys 5.30 Extreme Cake Makers. A cake
designed to be the same shape and size as a Shetland
pony (r) 6.00 The Simpsons. Marge experiences mixed
emotions when she is forced to replace the family car, and
Bart tries to ?nd out why Lisa is attending covert
meetings in town (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Mandy
becomes jealous of Darren and Nancy?s relationship,
and she is left feeling heartbroken when the pair decide
to go on a romantic break together (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can?t
Pay? We?ll Take It Away. The agents chase up a �000
deposit owed by a landlord to his tenant, and of?cers try
to recover �,000 from a nightclub owner for unpaid
solicitor fees (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors. Two third-year medical students
gain a valuable hands-on experience of working in a GP?s
surgery, including leading a consultation and the ?ner
points of administering injections (r) (AD) 1.15 Home
and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS:
Conspiracy to Murder. As Christmas approaches, the team
works overtime to solve a robbery ? a case made doubly
dif?cult by the fact that the prime suspect has
supposedly been dead for 17 years (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM:
My Family?s Secret (12, 2010) A woman?s
investigation into her suicidal husband?s dark past leads
her to his brother, who has a dangerous split personality.
Thriller starring Nicholle Tom and Philip Riccio 5.00 5
News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Paige suggests to Jack that
they resume their relationship (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and
Away. Kat and Ash?s investigation reveals the truth about
Robbo?s real identity (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
Save
Subscribe and get seven days
of papers for just �a week
35%
on the
cover price
7PM
UK residents only, aged 18 or over. This offer is subject to availability. New subscribers only. Visit store.thetimes.co.uk for full T&Cs.
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker presents
the live magazine, featuring chat
and stories of interest
7.00 Emmerdale Jimmy accidentally
reverses into Laurel with his car (AD)
8.00 MasterChef The amateurs aim to
book a place in the quarter-?nal,
beginning with an invention challenge
with ingredients including lamb neck,
lamb mince, chicken, clams and brown
shrimp. Continues tomorrow (AD)
7.00 Live Athletics: The World Indoor
Championships Coverage of the
opening day of the competition, which
takes place at Arena Birmingham, and
features just three events in this
evening session ? the ?nals of the
women?s and men?s high jump, as well
as the ?nal of the women?s 3,000m.
Morgan Lake and Robbie Grabarz are
Great Britain?s representatives in the
respective high jumps, with their
compatriots Laura Muir and Eilish
McColgan set to compete on the
track, and all four of them will expect
to be in contention for a medal
9.00 Weinstein: The Inside Story
Panorama special investigating the
Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein?s
fall from grace and the extraordinary
efforts he made to silence his accusers
and keep his secrets hidden.
See Viewing Guide
9.00 Civilisations New series. Simon
Schama presents the ?rst in a series
of ?lms on the history of art, which
focuses on the oldest signs of
creativity found in South African cave
paintings, which date back 80,000
years. See Viewing Guide (1/9) (AD)
9.00 Serial Killer with Piers Morgan
An interview with Lorenzo Gilyard,
who was convicted of killing six people
in and around Missouri between
1977 and 1993, and suspected of
murdering a further seven more.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
Late
8.00 Emmerdale Priya loses her temper
when looking after the girls ? only for
Rishi to witness her outburst (AD)
8.30 The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska
New series. The crew of Star Princess
voyage to Alaska, cruising between
Vancouver and Anchorage (1/3) (AD)
10.00 Mock the Week With James Acaster,
Ed Byrne, Gary Delaney, Ivo Graham
and Zoe Lyons (9/13) (r)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.45 Question Time David Dimbleby chairs
the debate from Blackpool, with a
panel of politicians and guests facing
topical questions from the audience
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Kirsty Wark
10.30 Regional News
10.45 100 Years Younger in 21 Days
Eight famous faces, including June
Brown, Claire King, Sid Owen and
Sherrie Hewson, are subjected to
scienti?c testing to discover how well,
or badly, they are ageing (1/4) (r) (AD)
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days? political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Top Gear Matt LeBlanc, Chris Harris
and Rory Reid take a motorsports road
trip across the Wild West. Back on the
track, Rob Brydon is the Star in a
Reasonably Fast Car (r)
12.20am Sign Zone: Nigel Slater?s Middle East The
writer embarks on a Middle Eastern food adventure,
starting in Lebanon, which exempli?es Levantine cuisine
but is also in?uenced by its position on the
Mediterranean (r) (AD, SL) 1.20-2.05 Royal Recipes.
With Michael Buerk and chef Paul Ainsworth (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 The Wonderful World of Puppies
An insight into how very young pups
begin to develop complex emotional
responses to everything from
relationships with litter-mates to
their bond with humans (2/6) (r)
8.00 George Clarke?s Amazing Spaces
Featuring a London tailor who hopes
to fashion a work studio in his garden
and an enterprising team in Bristol
who are building a cabin 150 feet
off the ground (8/8) (AD)
8.00 Bargain-Loving Brits in the Sun
Geoff, who has become the very
?rst Mr Whippy of Benidorm, having
bought a van and ?tted it out with
a soft ice cream machine, faces a
potentially terminal problem when
his generator blows up (5/8)
9.00 Married at First Sight Finance
director Harriet and police sergeant
Richard honeymoon in Lisbon, where
they wait to see if the initial spark
they both felt will develop into
something stronger (3/4) (AD)
9.00 Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline
Emergency New series. Exploring
what happens when ?ights lose
control, including a packed passenger
jet that burst into ?ames just
moments from take-off (1/3)
10.00 The Job Interview Hilton Hotels
interview for a conference and
banqueting supervisor and the fashion
label Chi Chi London look for a junior
designer who is brimming with
creativity. See Viewing Guide (3/6)
10.00 Concorde: Designing the Dream
Documentary in which aircraft
designers, pilots and passengers tell
the story of how the Anglo-French
Concorde saw off competition from
the Americans and Soviets to
become the world?s ?rst supersonic
passenger airliner (1/2) (r)
11.05 Gogglebox Britain?s most avid,
opinionated and sharp-tongued
television viewers return
contemplating shows including Troy:
Fall of a City and Theresa May?s
appearance on This Morning (r) (AD)
11.05 Concorde: Triumph & Tragedy A
look at British Airways?s attempts in
the early 1980s to make the aircraft
pro?table after ?nding out Concorde
was losing tens of millions a year,
sacking those in charge and replacing
them with two pilots (2/2) (r)
12.05am 24 Hours in Police Custody (r) (AD) 1.05
The Great British Skinny Dip (r) (AD) 1.55 One Born
Every Minute (r) (AD) 2.50 How to Get Fit Fast (r) 3.45
Britain?s University Spending Scandal: Channel 4
Dispatches (r) (AD, SL) 4.15 Coast vs Country (r) (AD)
5.05-6.00 Four Rooms with Sarah Beeny (r) (AD)
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am Cowboy Builders. John
Russell and Alison Cork help a couple in Calderdale,
Halifax (r) 4.00 My Mum?s Hotter Than Me! A soon-to-be
grandma who keeps up her looks with Botox (r) (SL) 4.45
House Doctor. Creating the illusion of space (r) (SL) 5.10
Divine Designs (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
7.30 Snowstorm: Britain?s Big Chill
? Tonight
10.00 BBC News at Ten
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7.30 EastEnders Aidan pressures Mick to
take a large amount of cash and Hunter
is keen to help Mel get ready for the
re-opening of the club (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
11.45 Lethal Weapon
Riggs and Murtaugh investigate the
death of a surfer (r) (AD)
12.30am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 Snowstorm: Britain?s Big Chill ? Tonight.
Topical investigative reports exploring the stories behind
the headlines (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The
Jeremy Kyle Show. Guests air their differences (r) (SL)
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Serial Killer with
Piers Morgan
ITV, 9pm
Piers Morgan is back in
the US for a head-tohead with Lorenzo
Gilyard ? the ?Kansas
City Strangler?. The
former waste company
supervisor is alleged
to have raped and
murdered 13 women
and girls from 1977 to
1993. All were found
dumped in secluded
spots around the city.
Gilyard was convicted
of six counts of murder
in 2007. In typically
bullish style, Morgan
lays out the horrors of
Gilyard?s crimes, but
the softly spoken killer
appears to have an
answer to everything.
However, Morgan will
not be denied, and
Gilyard soon reveals
his true nature.
From Ice to Fire
BBC Four, 9pm
Dr Helen Czerski?s
fascinating series
concludes with an
episode that focuses on
the upper end of the
temperature scale. She
begins shovelling coal
into a steam engine,
illustrating our ability
to build machines that
could harness the
power of heat. The
discovery of fire was
one of the key moments
in human history,
?a flood of heat and
light conjured up at
will?. You don?t need
an understanding of
physics to appreciate
fire, but it was useful
when it came to
unlocking its potential
and Czerski makes
the story of how that
took place accessible
and engrossing.
The Job Interview
Channel 4, 10pm
The hotel chain
Hilton is recruiting a
conference supervisor
for the St George?s Park
Hotel in Burton upon
Trent. According to the
recruitment boss, the
company?s vision is to
?fill the world with the
light and warmth of
hospitality?. Will the
?natural entertainer?
Leon, a waiter with
a transient past, have
what it takes? Or what
about the fashion
graduate Lauren?
Perhaps she would be
better suited to the
second job ? the
womenswear brand
Chi Chi London is
looking for a junior
fashion designer. Just
make sure you don?t
put ?a passion for
fashion? on your CV.
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7pm
There is no respite
for Arsenal. Five days
after losing 3-0 to
Manchester City in the
League Cup final, the
Gunners welcome the
runaway league leaders
to the Emirates
(kick-off 7.45pm). Can
Ars鑞e Wenger?s men
take revenge or will
City keep marching on?
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 7.00 RSPCA
Animal Rescue (r) 8.00 Send in the Dogs (r)
9.00 Road Wars (r) 10.00 Warehouse 13 (r)
11.00 Forever (r) (AD) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. Oliver, Felicity and Diggle prepare
to face Cayden James
9.00 My Wonderful Life. A woman diagnosed
with a terminal illness leaves messages, gifts
and surprises to be delivered posthumously
10.00 Jamestown. Jocelyn has mixed feelings
at the arrival of Read?s new wife (r)
11.05 The Force: Essex (r)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD)
1.00am Brit Cops: Frontline Crime UK (r)
2.00 Most Shocking (r) 3.00 The Blacklist:
Redemption (r) (AD) 4.00 It?s Me or the Dog.
Double bill (r) 5.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00am Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
7.00 Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 The Guest Wing (r)
(AD) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House.
Double bill (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing.
Double bill (r) 5.00 House (r) (AD)
6.00 House (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A naked
corpse is found in the desert (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. The Reagan family?s
neighbours are found stabbed to death (r) (AD)
9.00 Britannia. Cait and her father seek shelter
in the ruins of their old home (7/9) (AD)
10.00 Our Cartoon President
10.35 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (r)
11.10 Divorce. Comedy (r)
11.45 Active Shooter: America Under Fire.
An examination of a white supremacist?s attack
on a Sikh temple in 2012 (r)
12.55am Britannia (r) (AD) 1.55 Blue Bloods
(r) 2.55 Billions (r) (AD) 4.05 The West Wing.
Double bill of the political drama (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 Children?s
Hospital (r) (AD) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00
Cold Case (r) 11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia
12.15 Children?s Accident & Emergency (r)
1.00pm The Chef?s Line 2.00 Nothing to Declare
(r) (AD) 4.00 Border Security: America?s Front
Line (r) 5.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 Children?s Hospital (r) (AD)
7.30 Children?s Hospital (1/12) (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Holmes learns a secret about
Gregson?s girlfriend (r)
9.00 Conviction. A kidnap victim who was
presumed dead 10 years ago reappears,
triggering a re-examination of the case (r) (AD)
10.00 Scandal (AD)
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 Elementary. Double
bill (r) (AD) 4.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
4.55 The Biggest Loser: Australia (r)
6.00am Claudio Abbado?s Inaugural Concert
7.00 Katherine Jenkins Live at the O2 9.00
Tales of the Unexpected 9.30 Master of
Photography (AD) 10.30 Video Killed the Radio
Star 11.00 The Sixties (AD) 12.00 Trailblazers:
Gothic Rock 1.00pm Discovering: Barbara
Stanwyck (AD) 2.00 Tales of the Unexpected
2.30 Master of Photography (AD) 3.30 Video
Killed the Radio Star 4.00 The Sixties (AD)
5.00 Trailblazers: Pop Videos
6.00 Discovering: Gregory Peck (AD)
7.00 Inside the Actors Studio: Steve Carell (AD)
8.00 The Eighties (AD)
9.00 The Lot of Fun: Where the Movies Learned
to Laugh. Documentary about the producer and
director Hal Roach
10.00 Harold Lloyd: Hollywood?s Timeless
Comedy Genius. Documentary
11.00 Portrait Artist of the Year 2018
12.00 National Treasures: The Art of Collecting
1.00am Classic Artists: The Moody Blues 4.00
Dag 4.30 Tales of the Unexpected 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans. Including
news and views on today?s early stories and a
look at the back pages 8.00 Live Test Cricket:
South Africa v Australia. Coverage of day one of
the First Test in the four-match series, taking
place at Kingsmead in Durban 3.30pm Live ATP
Tennis: The Dubai Duty Free Tennis
Championships. Coverage of the fourth day?s
play of the tournament from Aviation Club
Tennis Centre in Dubai
6.30 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Live Premier League: Arsenal v
Manchester City (Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of
he top-?ight clash, which takes place at the
Emirates Stadium. See Viewing Guide
10.15 The Debate. The latest football news
11.15 Live ATP Tennis: The Abierto Mexicano
Telcel. Day four of the ATP 500 tournament
from the Acapulco Princess Mundo Imperial
5.30am ATP Tour Classic Matches.
Roger Federer v Rafael Nadal in the Miami
Masters ?nal of 2005 (AD)
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View 11.15
Question Time. Topical debate from Blackpool
chaired by David Dimbleby 12.15am This
Week. With Andrew Neil 1.00-6.00 BBC News
Subscribe now to start saving immediately.
Call 0800 028 5355 or visit thetimes.co.uk/offer
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 The Arts
Show. Tim McGarry investigates the story of
the Ulster Museum?s most stolen painting
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00midday-1.00pm
First Minister?s Questions 10.00-10.30
Timeline. Presented by Glenn Campbell and
Shereen Nanjiani 11.15 Mock the Week. With
James Acaster, Ed Byrne, Gary Delaney, Ivo
Graham and Zoe Lyons (r) 11.45-12.50am
Top Gear. The team takes a motorsports road
trip across the Wild West (r)
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm Live Snooker: The
Welsh Open. Coverage of the afternoon session
on day four in Cardiff 4.25-5.20 A Place to Call
Home. Ash Park prepares for a visit from the
Prime Minister and his wife (r) 7.00 Live
Snooker: The Welsh Open. Coverage of the
evening session on day four in Cardiff
8.00-9.00 Live Athletics: The World Indoor
Championships. Coverage of the opening day of
the competition, which takes place at Arena
Birmingham 11.15 Snooker: The Welsh Open.
Ian Hunt presents highlights of day four in
Cardiff 12.05am-12.20 Coast (r)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.30pm-9.00 Wales This Week
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1985. With Kim Wilde,
Duran Duran, Jimmy Nail and Divine (r)
8.00 The Brain: A Secret History. Michael
Mosley tries to further his understanding of the
human mind by tracing the history of mankind?s
efforts to manipulate the brain (1/3) (r)
9.00 From Ice to Fire: The Incredible Science
of Temperature. Helen Czerski explores the
science of heat, and how the ability to harness
it has led to some of humanity?s greatest
innovations, from steam engines to plasmas.
See Viewing Guide (3/3) (AD)
10.00 Wild Weather with Richard Hammond.
The host reveals how the weather is affected by
temperature. Last in the series (r) (AD)
11.00 Storm Troupers: The Fight to Forecast the
Weather. Alok Jha charts the history of
meteorology (r) (AD)
12.00 Top of the Pops: 1985. With Kim Wilde
and Bryan Ferry (r) 12.35am Elvis Costello:
Mystery Dance (r) 2.05 From Ice to Fire: The
Incredible Science of Temperature (r) (AD)
3.05-3.35 Handmade on the Silk Road (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Coach Trip:
Road to Tenerife (r) (AD) 7.30 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 8.00 Baby Daddy (r) 9.00
Melissa & Joey (r) 10.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r)
(AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The
Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 Melissa & Joey
(r) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r) 4.00 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Tenerife (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
8.30 Young Sheldon (AD)
9.00 Celebs Go Dating: The Finale (AD)
10.00 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
10.35 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
11.10 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 First Dates (r) (AD) 1.10am Celebs Go
Dating: The Finale (r) (AD) 2.15 The
Inbetweeners (r) (AD, SL) 3.10 Young Sheldon
(r) (AD) 3.30 Timeless (r) 4.15 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 4.35 Rude(ish) Tube (r)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) 9.30 A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 11.30 Four in a Bed (r)
2.10pm Come Dine with Me (r) 4.50 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
6.55 The Supervet. A Newfoundland dog needs
surgery for its bent front legs (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Londoner Chris Ostwald
decides to build a New England-style water mill
retreat in the Chilterns, on a hill far from water,
but a complaint from a neighbour jeopardises
the project (2/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 WWII?s Great Escapes: The Freedom Trails.
Monty Halls reveals how British soldier Len
Harley escaped from a POW camp in
Nazi-occupied Italy, and eluded German forces as
he crossed the Majella mountains (r) (AD)
10.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? The
documentary about emergency services in
Wiltshire focuses on crimes involving women
being targeted by predatory males (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 999: What?s Your Emergency? Documentary
(r) (AD) 2.10 The Good Fight (r) (AD)
3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am The Turning Point (PG, 1952) Film
noir starring William Holden (b/w) 12.40pm
Jubal (PG, 1956) Western starring Glenn Ford
and Ernest Borgnine (AD) 2.45 Gideon of
Scotland Yard (PG, 1958) Police drama
starring Jack Hawkins 4.35 The Furies (PG,
1950) Western starring Barbara Stanwyck and
Walter Huston (b/w)
6.45 The Three Musketeers (12, 2011)
Adventure starring Logan Lerman (AD)
9.00 Pitch Perfect (12, 2012) A new student
joins an a cappella singing group made up of
social mis?ts to compete in campus music
competitions. Comedy starring Anna Kendrick,
Rebel Wilson and Elizabeth Banks
11.10 Aliens: Special Edition (18, 1986)
Lone survivor Ripley joins a military force that
encounters hordes of deadly alien creatures.
Extended cut of the sci-? thriller sequel with
Sigourney Weaver and Michael Biehn
2.10am-4.00 Dreams of a Life (12, 2011)
Drama-documentary examining the life of Joyce
Vincent, who died at home in 2003, but whose
body was not discovered until three years later.
Starring Zawe Ashton and Neelam Bakshi (AD)
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals (r) 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Dress to Impress (r) 7.55 Emmerdale (r) (AD)
8.20 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 10.15 Who?s Doing the
Dishes? (r) (AD) 11.10 Dress to Impress (r)
12.15pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 Coronation
Street. Double bill (r) (AD) 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show.
Triple bill (r) 5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Survival of the Fittest. The battle of the
sexes continues
10.00 CelebAbility. Entertainment game show
hosted by Iain Stirling (r)
10.50 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.20 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.45 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.15am American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.40 Two
and a Half Men (r) 1.05 Ibiza Weekender (r)
2.10 Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r)
2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) 8.00 The Royal (r) (AD) 9.00
Judge Judy (r) 10.25 Love Your Garden (r)
12.30pm The Royal (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat (r)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.45 On the
Buses (r) 4.50 You?re Only Young Twice (r)
5.25 Rising Damp (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica?s British MI6
agent friend visits Sicily to check up on the
wealthy widow of a powerful gangster who has
recently announced her engagement (r) (AD)
8.00 Agatha Christie?s Marple. A message in the
personal column of a local newspaper reveals
accurate details of a forthcoming murder (r)
10.00 Unforgotten. Cassie and Sunny dig deeper
into the lives of two of the people mentioned in
the diary (3/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 Unforgotten. The marks on the victim?s
body turn out to be consistent with gangland
torture methods, so Cassie and Sunny question
Sir Phillip about his involvement with an East
End crime family (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am DCI Banks (r) (AD) 2.00 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Pawn Stars (r) 7.30
Ironside (r) 8.30 Quincy ME (r) 9.30 Minder (r)
(AD) 10.35 The Sweeney (r) 11.40 The
Avengers (r) 12.50pm Ironside (r) 1.50 Quincy
ME (r) 2.55 Minder (r) (AD) 4.00 The Sweeney.
A business tycoon is blackmailed (r) 5.05 The
Avengers. An invisibility formula goes astray (r)
6.10 Storage Wars: Texas. Victor seeks an ally in
his bidding war (r)
6.40 Storage Wars. Jarrod and Brandi plan an
anniversary party for their shop (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. Chumlee investigates a pirate
ship parade ?oat (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. Corey and Chumlee are offered
a signed Bugs Bunny poster (r)
8.00 River Monsters. Jeremy Wade continues to
investigate the fate of RMS Laconia (r)
9.00 FILM: The Outlaw Josey Wales (18,
1976) Western directed by and starring Clint
Eastwood. With Sondra Locke (AD)
11.50 FILM: The Keeper (15, 2009)
Action thriller starring Steven Seagal (AD)
1.45 Fifth Gear. Tiff Needell presents (r)
2.40 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm
Top Gear (AD) 3.00 The Hurting 4.00 Road Cops
5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear (AD)
7.00 Road Cops. Of?cers investigate a drowning
incident at the powerful Waikato River
7.30 Road Cops. Reality series
8.00 Dara O Briain?s Go 8 Bit. The comedians
Matt Forde and Jessica Knappett play a series of
video games, including The Sims
9.00 QI XL. With Sandi Toksvig, Lee Mack and
Jimmy Carr. Stephen Fry presents
10.00 Josh. Josh is invited to the event of the
summer ? a pool party (AD)
10.40 Josh. Josh dates a woman who used to be
the ?hottest girl in school? (AD)
11.20 QI. With Vic Reeves, Roger McGough and
Mark Steel. Presented by Stephen Fry
12.00 QI 12.40am Would I Lie to You?: The
Unseen Bits 1.20 Mock the Week 2.00 QI
2.40 Would I Lie to You?: The Unseen Bits
3.20 Mock the Week 3.55 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The Bill 12.00
New Tricks (AD) 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine (AD) 1.40 Bread 2.20 Birds of a Feather
3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 New Tricks (AD)
5.00 Bergerac
6.00 Steptoe and Son
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Howard?s bicycle
starts acting very strangely (AD)
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. Billy seems to
have gained a stalker, but soon realises he has
greater worries after discovering he promised to
demonstrate archery at the vicar?s garden party
? while riding a horse
8.00 A Place to Call Home. Elizabeth is rushed
to hospital after suffering a heart attack,
and is looked after tenderly by Jack
9.00 Miss Marple. The sleuth investigates a
friend?s claim to have witnessed a murder being
committed on a passing train (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Sharon and Tracey?s
school reunion brings back a few memories
12.00 The Bill 1.00am Life on Mars 2.00 The
White Queen 3.00 Crusoe 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 The Day When De
Gaulle Chose War 11.00 Medieval Dead 12.00
Time Team 1.00pm Africa (AD) 2.00 The Life of
Mammals 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Medieval Dead
5.00 Murder Maps. The case of George Smith,
who married a succession of women and
murdered them so he could inherit their wealth
6.00 Auschwitz: The Nazis and the Final
Solution. The history of the concentration camp
7.00 The Day When De Gaulle Chose War.
Charles De Gaulle?s refusal to surrender to the
German invasion of France in 1940, and his
subsequent escape to London and establishment
of a French government in exile
8.00 Nazi Victory: The Post-War Plan. Hitler?s
plans to invade the US using battleships,
long-range bombers and secret in?ltrators.
Plus, a look at support for the Nazi movement in
America during the 1940s (3/6)
9.00 The Two Ronnies. Triple bill
11.20 The Black Adder (AD)
12.00 Blackadder II (AD) 1.20am Black Ops
2.15 Pointless 3.00 Home Shopping
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Stuck on You: The Football Sticker Story.
Documentary about the founding of a
multi-billion pound industry (r) 12.05am
Lethal Weapon (r) (AD) 12.50 Teleshopping
1.50 After Midnight 3.20 Pets: The True Cost
? Tonight (r) 3.45-5.05 ITV Nightscreen
UTV
As ITV except: 12.30am Teleshopping
2.00-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Pincidh
Dincidh D� (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.35 Na
Floogals (r) 5.45 Srath Sona (Happy Valley) (r)
5.55 Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.05 Sealgairean Sp騬sail
(History Hunters) (r) 6.30 D� a-nis? (What
Now?) (r) 7.00 Turas a? Bhradain (The Salmon?s
Journey) (r) 7.30 Speaking Our Language (r)
7.55 Binneas: Na Trads (r) 8.00 An L� (News)
8.30 E騬pa (European Current Affairs) 9.00
DIY le Donnie 9.50 Belladrum 2017: The James
Hunter Six 10.30 Fleasgaich an Iasgaich (King
Fishers) 11.15 Hebridean Celtic Music Festival:
Suil air Ais (r) 11.30-12.00midnight Air an
Rathad (On the Road) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Dona Direidi (r) 6.15 Tili a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 6.25 Halibalw (r) 6.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 6.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 7.00 Meic y
Marchog (r) 7.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 7.30
Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 7.40
Peppa (r) 7.45 Cacamwnci 8.00 Holi Hana (r)
8.10 Amser Stori 8.15 Boj (r) 8.30 Abadas (r)
8.40 Bla Bla Blewog (r) 8.55 Ben a Mali a?u
Byd Bach O Hud (r) 9.05 Sbridiri (r) 9.25
Meripwsan (r) 9.30 Straeon Ty Pen (r) 9.45 Cei
Bach (r) 10.00 Dona Direidi (r) 10.15 Tili a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 10.25 Halibalw (r) 10.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 10.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 11.00 Meic
y Marchog (r) 11.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 11.30
Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 11.40
Peppa (r) 11.45 Cacamwnci (r) 12.00 News
S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Darn Bach o Hanes
(r) (AD) 12.30 Noson Lawen (r) 1.30 Sion a
Si鈔 (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05
Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05
Yr Ynys (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil
5.05 Stwnsh: Chwarter Call 5.20 Stwnsh: Kung
Fu Panda (r) 5.45 Stwnsh: Rygbi Pawb 6.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Ar Werth (r) 6.30
Rownd a Rownd. Carys is on a mission to ?nd
out the truth (AD) 7.00 Heno 7.30 Pobol y
Cwm (AD) 8.00 C鈔 i Gymru 2018 10.00 Dim
Byd Fel C鈔 i Gymru (r) (AD) 10.30 Hansh
11.00-11.35 Mwy o Sgorio (r)
14
Thursday March 1 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7588
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3272
5
6
8
7
8
26
26
9
20
26
6
11
2
12
22
4
19
26
9
22
13
14
15
25
22
25
11
22
6
9
25
10
26
Train Tracks No 344
15
26
17
23
10
11
26
19
5
13
23
26
20
20
14
8
7
2
23
16
23
9
20
25
24
7
23
6
26
5
3
2
4
4
4
3
9
4
26
2
26
6
9
26
19
1
2
22
26
14
4
26
25
18
2
26
3
4
2
16
14
18
19
23
4
6
26
13
22
26
7
9
7
23
20
6
13
26
12
26
16
23
13
A
10
21
25
22
18
7
6
1
13
23
21
26
22
9
A
23
R
13
6
2
25
4
1
26
B
L
14
20
26
12
18
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
24
2
1 Citrus drink (6,5)
8 Slow-moving mollusc (5)
9 New staging of an old
play (7)
10 Neat, ordered (4)
11 Partners, companions (8)
13 Craving for food (6)
14 Strained, unnatural (6)
17 Cruel and oppressive (8)
Solution to Crossword 7587
MUS I C
A P R
L E I CE S
T N M
AND E L
R D
HOY L E
Y
M
PR I CE L
E D N
DRY
T A
U
L
H
P E L L E T
HO
I
T E
M
A B
N
T
O
R
T
O
I
S
B E
E S S
I
H
NGE
G L
S
L
S POT
L O
A L L
Z U
RA T E
N
URGE
U
SUN
S
I
R I NE
A C
ANCE
19 Terrible fate (4)
22 Broke out suddenly (7)
23 Foreign (5)
24 Pompous,
self-important (11)
6
2
6
25
3
4
18
18
26
18
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
8
9
21
22
L
Down
1 Beginning;
military attack (5)
2 Give up; leave behind (7)
3 Very strong wind (4)
4 Start of 1936 march (6)
5 Unwelcome intrusion (8)
6 Young eel (5)
7 Shut (6)
12 Expelled immigrant (8)
13 Concealed (6)
15 Spicy Spanish sausage (7)
16 Central (6)
18 Fall heavily and limply (5)
20 Lacking (5)
21 Barley product used in
brewing (4)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
10
11
12
13
23
24
25
26
R
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
A
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 4157
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
84901 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 4158
C
A
R
L
C
E
I
I
U
N
S
I
P
A
U
H
C
M
P
L
O
S
A
O
A
E
P
I
S
A
E
D
R
I
C
K
T
O
M
C
Y
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
G
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4264
Futoshiki No 3119
Kakuro No 2078
6
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
>
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
?
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
?
7
31
4
7
3
22
24
9
7
8
23
21
10
8
?
19
24
5
7
15
29
23
?
?
16
13
1
3
?
6
6
34
11
12
13
9
7
5
7
?
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
11
28
23
10
15
16
7
15
4
12
17
3
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it. The
same number may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
� PUZZLER MEDIA
17
the times | Thursday March 1 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Magnus Carlsen
Black: Hikaru Nakamura
Fischer Random (Game 13),
Baerum 2018
This game started from the following position.
________
醨D D 4kg]
�D 0 Dp]
� DphbDp1]
轉 DpH D ]
軳D )p) )]
蹹 D ) ) ]
跴)PDQD D]
�$ IRG D ]
谅媚牌侨
Chess960 games often do not
look like standard chess at all, at
least in the early stages of play.
However, sometimes they can
adopt familiar patterns later, as in
today?s game. Apart from the
quirky situation of some of the
pieces, the structure very much
resembles positions where White
has played the Stonewall Attack.
In the Stonewall, White often
bases play around an outpost at
e5 and a general advance on the
kingside, which is exactly what
Carlsen does here.
15 g4 Nf7 16 Nc5 Bc8 17 a4
A far-sighted move, designed to
energise his dormant a1-rook.
17 ... Nxe5 18 dxe5 b6 19 Nb3 g5
Nakamura fights well, countering on the kingside before he is
swamped in that sector.
20 hxg5 Qh3 21 f5 Bxe5 22 Nd4
Bxd4 23 exd4 e6
A blunder after which Black?s
queen is quickly trapped. Essential was the clever 23 ... a5! 24 Ra3
Ba6 with complex play.
24 Ra3 Qh1 25 Bb4 Qh4 26 Bxf8
Qxg5+ 27 Qd2 Qxd2+ 28 Kxd2
Kxf8 29 Rh1 Kg7 30 Rah3 exf5 31
Rxh7+ Kg6 32 Ke3 Black resigns
________
醨hk4n1bg]
�0p0p0p]
� D D d D]
轉 D d D ]
� D D D D]
蹹 D D D ]
跴)P)P)P)]
�$NIRHQGB]
谅媚牌侨
________
� DqDnDkD] Winning Move
郉 D DpDp]
� hND DpD] White to play. This position is from
German Bundesliga
轉 gPD D ] Bacrot-Ostrovskiy,
2018.
� D H D D] Here White found a clever move that
蹹QD D ) ] exploited the precarious nature of Black?s
� D D )B)] pieces. How did he continue?
贒 D D I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
24
+6
MEDIUM
18
x4
HARDER
13 SQUARE
IT
?K 4
?A 8 5
?KQ 7
?A K J 10 4
W
N(Byrne)
2NT
3? (1)
5?(2)
2/3
x 7 ? 75
OF IT
OF IT
TREBLE HALF OF
IT
IT
x 6 + 562 + 3/4
OF IT
1/3
OF IT
HALF OF
IT
� 5 + 25 DOUBLE ? 16
IT
+ 221 � 4
? 623
5/6
OF IT
TREBLE
IT
+ 148
� 14 x 9
2
4
Killer Gentle No 5889
12
17
3
4
7
23
6min
5
10
10
15
3
6
22
11
16
3
17
15
15
8
19
17
3
7
8
3
16
12
6
12
14
17
8
8
E
Pass
Pass
Pass
3?(1) Pass
4?
Pass
6?(3) End
(1) Transfer to hearts, duly completed.
(2) Ace-showing cue bid.
(3) Loving his spade void and offering a
choice of red-suit slams with perhaps a
preference for diamonds (5NT pick a slam
with less of a preference).
Killer Tough No 5890
21
7
19
6
24min
22
11
12
8
9
11
7
14
17
9
20
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
20
7
3
1
4
2
5
7
8
9
6
6
5
8
9
4
1
2
7
3
9
7
2
8
3
6
5
4
1
2
4
7
3
1
5
9
6
8
8
=
14
�
=
38
=
1
8
9
2
3
7
4
6
5
1
1
5
6
9
2
8
3
7
4
3
7
4
6
5
1
9
8
2
9
8
7
2
3
5
4
1
6
P T I E
H
N
O T S
T
T
O L A T
N
F E C T
I
E
RA Z E
N
I
Z
J
S E I Z UR
K
N G
S I GN S
Train Tracks 343
S
K E B
Q
I
R
UN L OA
I
L
V
R Y WA
M A
D
ARBO
D
C
I GH T C
G A
H
E
I MA
S
S
F
T EMP E
Sudoku 9696
8
6
3
7
2
9
4
1
5
1
3
5
4
9
8
6
2
7
7
8
9
1
6
2
3
5
4
4
2
6
5
7
3
1
8
9
4
6
3
1
9
7
5
2
8
5
2
1
4
8
6
7
9
3
2
4
5
8
6
9
1
3
7
7
1
8
5
4
3
2
6
9
6
3
9
7
1
2
8
4
5
7
6
4
3
2
8
5
1
9
2
1
8
4
5
9
3
7
6
3
5
9
7
1
6
2
8
4
6
7
2
8
3
4
1
9
5
7
1
8
9
3
6
2
5
4
9
4
1
5
6
2
7
3
8
1
8
3
2
4
5
9
6
7
4
2
7
6
9
3
8
5
1
5
9
6
1
8
7
4
2
3
2
6
9
4
7
5
8
1
3
5
2
1
7
8
4
3
9
6
4
8
6
2
9
3
1
7
5
9
3
7
5
6
1
4
8
2
1
9
2
3
5
8
6
4
7
8
7
3
6
4
9
5
2
1
6
4
5
1
2
7
9
3
8
1
2 < 4
7
3
4 < 5
?
5
1
?
1
3
?
3
2 >
3 4 4
4
2
�
+
9
5
1
?
4 > 3
?
5
2
1
5
1
x
x
+
x
4
6
4
3
x
+
+
1
4
3
5
6
3
4
4
2
A
6
5
1
3
UR
A
A P
P
GO
R
S T
1
B
Suko No 2173
6
5
2
4
3
8
1
9
7
1
8
3
6
9
7
4
2
5
9
4
7
1
5
2
6
3
8
7
1
9
8
4
3
2
5
6
4
3
5
2
1
6
8
7
9
8
2
6
5
7
9
3
4
1
2
9
1
3
6
5
7
8
4
5
6
8
7
2
4
9
1
3
3
7
4
9
8
1
5
6
2
D
U
C
M
O
K
R
N
K
U
L
C
E
Y
A
I
S
D
T
E
Lexica 4156
3
?
2
Set Square 2080
2
3
Lexica 4155
Futoshiki 3118
5
8
3
5
4
8
1
2
7
6
9
1
AB
U
D S
B
X Y
Sudoku 9697
8
3
5
9
7
1
6
4
2
Killer 5888
KenKen 4263
3
6
EM
N
T R
W
I D
N
E F
8 3 1
4 7 1 2
8 9 6 4
6
5 3
1 2
1 2
3 5 9 8
7 9
7 9 8
9 8 6
5
9
1
6
8
4
7
3
2
13
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
�
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so that
the six sums
work. We?ve
= 5 placed two
numbers to get
you started.
Each sum
be
= 18 should
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
Codeword 3271
2 1 3
4 2 1 3
2 1
5 7
1 3 5 7 8 9
8 9 6
3 1
4
7 9
1 4 2
1 2 8 3 6 5
2 4 9 5
6
3 1 6
4 4
20
-
x
Kakuro 2077
8
21
+
+
2
13
= 35 the numbers
Solutions
Cell Blocks 3154
13
Enter each of
x
+
4
12
3
3
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
17
Contract: 6?, Opening Lead: ? 10
had Dyke discard a club from
dummy on the fourth diamond.
BBO then showed no more cards
and the slam claimed. With the fifth
club winner gone, I wondered how.
I presumed Dyke had succeeded
in elegant fashion by finessing the
ten of clubs, ruffing the king of
spades (removing West?s last spade),
finessing the jack of clubs, cashing
the ace-king then, in the three-card
ending (dummy ?A85, declarer
?Q107, West ?KJ9), leading a
heart to the ten to endplay West.
Lovely but Dyke?s more prosaic line
of keeping winners (dummy?s fifth
club) and throwing losers (the third
heart) was clearly superior.
4
+
19
23
9
3
x
2
Killer 5887
14
4 6
-
Sudoku 9695
13
4
3
x
Yesterday?s answers
eruv, ever, every, resurvey, reuse,
revers, revue, ruse, seer, sere, serve,
server, servery, sever, severy, suer,
sure, surrey, survey, user, veer, veery,
verse, very
10
6
2
4
4
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
Set Square No 2081
Advanced
? 10 9 8 7 3 2 N
? AQ J 6 5
?K J 9
?4 2
W E
??J 9 4 3
S
?Q 9 8 6 ? ?5 3
?Q 10 7 6 3
?A 10 8 6 5 2
?7 2
S(Dyke)
x5
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 12 words, average;
16, good; 23, very good; 30, excellent
Dealer: North, Vulnerability: North-South
Teams
1/3
Polygon
10
Bridge Andrew Robson
Ten selected pairs assembled at
the Young Chelsea Bridge Club in
west London in early January to
compete for two places in the
England team in the European
Team Championships in Ostend
this summer. The top two pairs
after the four-day trials would join
the pre-selected pair of Tony
Forrester and his (tall) partner.
Leading for much of the event
before slipping to finish third were
Michael Byrne of Manchester and
Kieran Dyke, an Australian living
in London. They were the only
pair to bid and make slam on our
featured deal. The other pairs
either failed in 6?, losing two
unavoidable heart tricks, or
stopped out of slam. Indeed, one
East-West found a way into the
auction and bid all the way to 5?
? just one down (doubled).
In the top spot of 6?, declarer
ruffed West?s spade lead and led a
diamond to the king, West discarding a spade to reveal the four-nil
split. Declarer cashed the queen of
diamonds, led a third diamond to
the ten and cashed the ace, picking
up East?s diamonds as West threw
three more spades.
With West having no diamonds,
he rated to hold club length and so
the queen. Declarer staked everything on the club finesse. He discarded a heart from dummy on
the fourth diamond and led a club
to the ten. He ruffed the king of
spades and led a club to the jack.
The ace-king and four of clubs, followed by the ace of hearts, brought
his trick tally to 12. Slam made.
The Bridge Base Online vugraph
operator (I was watching online)
EASY
� PUZZLER MEDIA
My personal reservations about
the increasingly popular chess
variant, chess960, are compounded by some statistics once
presented to me by the late Professor Nathan Divinsky of the
University of British Columbia.
Professor Divinsky explained to
me that if one wished to write
down all possible games of chess
that could be described as miniatures (25 moves or less by both
sides) in the size and format of
the old London telephone directory, on
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
1
Размер файла
3 593 Кб
Теги
The Times, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа