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The Times Times 2 - 1 November 2017

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November 1 | 2017
Put a ring on it (and a tiara)
The crazy beautiful world of Dolce & Gabbana
Exclusive interview by Anna Murphy
2
1GT
Wednesday November 1 2017 | the times
times2
The man who
Pregnant at 49? Pain-free
childbirth? Oh come on,
who believes this stuff?
Carol Midgley
G
isele Bündchen once
where to get pregnant the beautiful
shared something
actress must be injected in the arse.
that didn’t endear
Good heavens, no. Realism isn’t part
her to many new
of the deal when you hand over your £2.
mothers who, after
I hear what experts say — that it
childbirth, will have
may make some women fall prey to
been stitched, sore
the notion of “flexible fertility” and
and sporting a very
delay motherhood until it’s too late,
large sani pad. The supermodel gave
which would be sad. But, genuinely,
an interview in which she said that her how many people look at another
eight-hour labour “didn’t hurt in the
celebrity pregnant at 47, 48, 49, 50 —
slightest”. Not one bit! With the help
maybe even with twins — and think:
of yoga and meditation she breezed
“Yes, I know she’s in her late forties
through as if it were little more than
and twins are 13 times more likely with
a bikini wax, no doubt freshening up
IVF treatment, but I believe this was
afterwards with a single wet wipe.
an entirely natural conception helped
Next day she was up, making
only by her amazing goji berry diet
pancakes, and within six weeks she
and Indian head massages”?
In some cases the pregnancy might
was modelling swimwear. So there it is.
be natural, of course (look at Cherie
Celebrity women are superior and
Blair, who many a middle-aged
their lives are perfect. Get over it.
woman seized upon as a beacon of
You would certainly think that
hope when she conceived naturally
if you took at face value every
at 44 with her fourth child), but you’d
sycophantic celebrity magazine
have to be pretty dim to not even
interview in which every home is
entertain the possibility that test
sumptuous, every husband attentive
tubes may have featured.
and every new mother baby-weight
We are walking a very strange and
free and plumping her silk scatter
creepy road if every famous woman
cushions. But surely no one with a
is expected to open up her ovaries for
working brain unquestioningly
public consumption. Besides, if she
believes this cack? These magazines
did use a donor egg, wouldn’t
sell airbrushed fantasy, glossy
the child deserve to know
escapism for ten minutes before
that before the popcornyou finish your Twix and trudge
chewing masses? What
back to your desk.
about its privacy? What
Which is why I’m sceptical of
about hers? This is
suggestions that older celebrity
intimate medical data.
mothers have a “duty” to reveal
If you want to point the
whether they had IVF, either
finger for fanning false
using their own eggs or a
hopes, try certain parts
donor’s. This week a report from
of the fertility industry.
New York University said that a
I have spoken to women
study of glossy-mag interviews
who have endured
found that celebrity mothers
several failed rounds of
routinely “glamourised”
IVF with their own eggs when
pregnancy at advanced ages,
there was never any more than a
downplaying how long it had
fractional hope, which should have
taken them to get pregnant
been made clear from the start.
and presenting a distorted
Celebrity interviews, like gushy
notion of female fecundity.
rom-coms, are not about hard
Nor were the increased
truths but fluffy illusion. Petri
risks associated with
dishes and intracytoplasmic
later motherhood
sperm injections are not sexy.
— pre-eclampsia,
Infertility, like the menopause,
haemorrhage, ectopic
isn’t sexy. No wonder actresses
pregnancy, stillbirth —
want to keep this stuff quiet.
spelt out in such magazines.
If you want to keep getting
Well, of course they
the gigs in Hollywood, it helps
weren’t. Glossy mags don’t
Gisele
to appear lush of both lips
inhabit a world where such
Bündchen
and ovaries.
unfragrant things exist, or
An offer
women
can refuse
Talking of sani pads, a
bar in Israel is offering
happy hour for
menstruating women.
The Anna Loulou bar
in Jaffa said females
deserved a perk when
afflicted by Lady
Business, so it launched
“Bloody Hour . . . for
those with the flow”,
offering 25 per cent off.
That’s very kind, but
have they thought it
through? It’s not as
though they can ask
women to prove it, so it
will be accepted on
trust. There’s a risk that
the bar will become
like the PE changing
rooms at our school,
when girls would say
en masse: “But, Mi-i-i-ss,
Being a high-flyer in the City was not
enough for Sandy Chen. He intends to
harness the power of storms to create
cheap energy. By Katherine Griffiths
It’s all over
for Frank.
I’m glad
Netflix has said that the
sixth series of House of
Cards will be the last,
adding that it is “deeply
troubled” after Kevin
Spacey apologised
over allegations that
in 1986 he tried to
sexually assault a
14-year-old boy.
I wonder if it is also
secretly relieved to be
shot of it. I’ve been a
diehard House of Cards
fan, but even I must
concede that series five
was a tedious turkey:
dull, meandering, full of
nonentity characters.
As for drippy Tom
Yates, Claire’s lover,
who she later murdered
— newsflash — no
one cared. Spacey’s
brilliant, almost
Shakespearean
performance as Frank
Underwood is what
made that series, no
matter how talented
Robin Wright or how
sharp her pencil skirts.
There’s talk of Netflix
making a spin-off
without Spacey. Oh
dear. Remember how
Joey, the spin-off from
Friends, went down?
I’ve long been
surprised, incidentally,
that Spacey didn’t
try to sue the comedy
Family Guy for
featuring a scene in
which baby Stewie ran
naked though a mall
shrieking: “Help! I’ve
escaped from Kevin
Spacey’s basement.”
I’m slightly less
surprised now.
I’ve got my period”
to avoid a) a shower,
or b) a cross-country
run, and they will be
handing out discounted
mojitos willy nilly.
But having to stand at
the bar and announce,
“Hey, it’s my time of the
month!” will ensure the
number of takers stays
pretty damn low.
A
fter nearly 30 years
in finance — during
which time he
earned a reputation
for incisive and
tough analysis of
banks and a strong
following among
investors — Sandy Chen had a big idea
that had nothing to do with banking.
This in itself isn’t unusual. Bankers
have often started business ventures
— such as Will Shu, the New York
banker who co-founded Deliveroo,
or the trio from Goldman Sachs who
set up the online supermarket Ocado.
Chen’s ambition, though, was a
delivery service on a vastly different
scale. His big idea was to harvest
lightning and distribute it to the world.
Such power could neutralise the
angst of most western countries about
fossil fuels, and give poor countries
that have substantial rainfall, such as
Bangladesh, an almost free source of
power that could transform their
economies. If successful, he says softly,
“this can potentially meet all of the
world’s electricity demands”.
It’s the sort of ambitious plan that
you might imagine being the brainchild
of Elon Musk, the online banker who
used his PayPal fortune to create the
electric car manufacturer Tesla and the
rocket-maker SpaceX. In fact, Chen
says, “the original idea was a space
elevator popularised by the writer
Arthur C Clarke’’.
In Clarke’s 1979 science-fiction story,
The Fountains of Paradise, scientists in
the 22nd century have learnt how to
build a huge lift from Earth into space.
Rather than using rockets, it can
transport people and goods into space.
“I was lying awake one night and
thinking the problem is going to be
that it would be the world’s biggest
lightning rod,” Chen says. “Then
I thought, ‘Hang on, it will be the
world’s biggest lightning rod.’ Then
I started to look up how much energy
is in a typical thunderstorm. There is
more energy than was released in the
first atomic bomb.”
Of course, harnessing the power
of an H-bomb is easier said than done,
and scientists have been scratching
their heads for decades over how to
capture and store the five billion joules
of energy that a bolt can transmit to
Earth in a matter of microseconds.
Chen admits that the science “is really
farfetched, but if we can develop it,
that would just be pretty cool”.
His decision to speak about his
vision is at odds with the way he used
to work. The banking environment in
the early 2000s could be brutal, and
for Chen — who was then a highflying banker in London for Credit
Suisse First Boston — it was a
personal nadir. “I was a classic banker.
I was an analyst running emerging
European banks. We were recovering
from Russia’s default [in 1998]. I was
bitter and untrustful.”
Chen enjoyed the trappings of
working in finance — big bonuses that
paid for partying and a lavish house —
but his life was a mess. Already
married and divorced by the time he
hit his early thirties, he was engaged
again to a glamorous young woman.
“My fiancée was pregnant, and
suddenly she announced that she
wanted me out. I was in bits.”
His life changed after he moved out
of their seven-bedroom house in
Crouch End, north London, and into
a flat in Camberwell Grove, south of
the river, where Emma Thompson and
Kenneth Branagh had lived when they
were young actors. He began a new
relationship, and his girlfriend
suggested he attend the Landmark
Forum, a three-day self-help course.
Such seminars, run by the San
Francisco-based Landmark
organisation, have a near cult following
among some, while others have
criticised their excoriating approach.
Fans include Chip Wilson, the founder
of the sports clothes maker Lululemon,
and the comedian Simon Amstell.
“The promise of the course is that
anything you want for your life is
possible,” says Chen, who claims that
— as was the case for Amstell — it
helped him to repair his relationship
with his father. He later did another
There is more
energy in a
storm than an
atomic bomb
Landmark course, where his
neighbours in Camberwell opened
their homes to offer tea to others to
overcome fear and prejudice. “One
of the punchlines was: you give it
away. It became not about you.’’
And that is why Chen, now 50 and
trim from his regular running, wants
to talk publicly about Graphene
Composites Limited (GCL), the
company he created last year to
develop new products from the world’s
strongest material, including that giant
cable to reach into the clouds and
convey electricity to the world.
A super-efficient conductor of heat
and electricity, graphene was
discovered at Manchester University
in 2004 by the professors Andre Geim
and Konstantin Novoselov, who won
the Nobel prize in physics for their
discovery in 2010. There has
subsequently been much hope, then
much disappointment about the
carbon allotrope, which has yet to
deliver on its promise to revolutionise
everything from electronics to
medicine. Still, research continues into
its practical applications — Richard
Branson has suggested that it is likely
to become crucial to the aerospace
the times | Wednesday November 1 2017
3
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times2
wants to harvest lightning
The lowdown
Nigella’s mixer
JAMES CLARKE FOR THE TIMES; GETTY IMAGES
industry, while Musk has been looking
at how it can make batteries much
more powerful in Tesla’s electric cars.
Chen’s challenge is to create
enormously strong cables capable of
reaching thunderclouds that are five to
eight miles away, attaching them to a
giant balloon to keep them in place,
then directing the electricity into the
power grid without causing a massive
explosion. It sounds like the stuff of
fantasy, but in 2003 the Nasa Institute
for Advanced Concepts said that
creating a cable to reach into space
was theoretically possible, despite
being a significant scientific challenge.
Chen hasn’t studied science formally
since he was at school in America in
the 1980s, but he grew up surrounded
by it. He was born in New England in
1967 to Taiwanese parents who had
emigrated to the US in the 1960s. His
mother ran a large business called
Sandy Chen with his
sons, Lewis and Kai,
and his wife, Carol
Taiwan Hi-Tech, which was a
T
supplier of semi-conductors to
su
companies such as Texas
co
Instruments. His father was an
In
electrical engineer. He recalls
el
when he was about six years old
w
his dad came home from IBM
h
“with silicone wafers and we
“w
made a solar cell. Stuff like that.”
m
The young Chen chose not
to follow a scientific path at
university, instead turning his
u
attention to international
at
studies and business. He did
st
two degrees, in economics
tw
and international relations
an
with a business focus, at the
w
Ivy League school Brown,
Iv
and was awarded the rare
an
accolade
of magna cum laude
ac
et cum honoribus when he
graduated
at the top of his
gr
class. He was also admitted
cl
to the prestigious Phi Beta
Kappa
society for America’s
K
brightest graduates.
br
Having spent the 1990s
working in the Czech Republic —
where he met his first wife — and
Indonesia, Chen joined the big, brash
bank Credit Suisse in London. Having
lived here for about 30 years, he speaks
with a mid-Atlantic accent, which
makes familiar English words such as
“mate” and “kip” sound strange.
During that time he met his future
wife, Carol, who works in digital
marketing, on a boat party in
Docklands, east London. He was
instantly attracted and asked her
straight out if she fancied him. She
answered yes. They are now married
and have two boys, Kai, 13, and Lewis,
10, as well as a daughter, Ella, 23,
whom Carol had before she met him.
He may be an amateur scientist, but
Chen’s career gave him something rare
in the world of invention. “I’ve helped
loads of companies raise funding. And
that is something scientists in general
don’t have.” His role model, he says,
is James Dyson. The British industrial
designer, he says, stands out for his
“scientific ingenuity and business
nous, and knowing how creativity and
science work together”.
Chen still works in the City at a firm
called Cenkos Securities, but he holds
a weekly conference call with his
colleagues from GCL. “From 5.30am
to 1.30pm I am an analyst. Then I
completely change.” He travels home
to work on his business in the house
he and his wife built in West Sussex.
Occasionally he also visits the Centre
for Process Innovation in Co Durham.
Set up in 2003 by Tony Blair in his
Sedgefield constituency, the CPI later
became part of George Osborne’s pet
project, the Northern Powerhouse,
into which he fed millions of pounds
of investment. If ever the former
chancellor is feeling sensitive about
the idea, he should visit the CPI.
What looks like a smattering of drab
buildings in a nondescript business
park actually houses scientific ideas
that could change the world.
Although Chen raised £500,000
from crowd-funding websites to get
his business started, he relies heavily
on the CPI, whose machines for
experimenting with graphene are
world-leading. Without CPI’s scientists
and equipment, he estimates, he would
have needed £5 million to £7 million in
capital expenditure, “which I couldn’t
have raised as it was just an idea”.
During a recent trip to CPI Chen
spoke to a packed room of academics
and a few other entrepreneurs. He said
that he was on track to take his project
from an idea to being able to sell
something within a year and a half.
It is not the lightning harvester,
I was a classic
banker. I was
bitter and
untrustful
however, but graphene body armour.
He hopes to produce a commercial
prototype by the end of the year. “We
have been in touch with customers
who are very interested,” he says.
Chen believes the ultra-strong,
flexible material could also be used for
motorcycle or ski wear and could be
adapted to cover aircraft (another
British company, Haydale, recently
received funding to research using
graphene to protect airliners from
lightning strikes). His dream, though,
is the lightning harvester, for which he
has filed a patent. If granted, it will take
years, if not decades to develop, but
Chen says one company has already
registered an interest in it, although
talks are at a very early stage.
Will it ever work, though? “Bits of
it have been done at the nano scale —
millionths of a metre,” he says.
“Super-conductive graphene wires
have been printed. The big challenge
is: can we extend that to five miles
long? The potential is so compelling
that if you actually got enough people
working on it, it might actually
happen. If my company can be at
the forefront of it, that’s great. But
actually, it is far, far bigger.”
November 1 — you know what
that means?
The fashion team are going to
start wearing tights?
Er, no. It means we can start
talking about . . .
Don’t say it.
CHRISTMAS!
Groans
Come on. Don’t be a Grinch.
There must be at least a few
things already on your list.
Actually, no, because I’m not a
small child.
You do not have to be a small child
to have a Net-a-Porter wish list.
Just a grown one? I dread to think
about the poor person in your life
who receives that.
Why? It’s not too outlandish.
Go on then. What’s on it?
Clothes. Make-up. Jewellery.
Scented candles. And, as of Monday
night, a £739 rose-gold mixer
from KitchenAid.
Spits out coffee. £739?! For a mixer?!
It’s not just any mixer.
Stop there. You cannot justify the
price by the fact that it matches your
jewellery, you ridiculous creature.
First of all, yes I can. And second
of all, far more importantly, it is
Nigella’s mixer. Or at least the one
she used during her new show
that aired on Monday night.
So it’s the “Nigella effect”, then?
Yes. And look, it’s not just me.
Hundreds have taken to Twitter
to express their #excitement
about the mixer.
Does it literally just mix things?
Obvs not. It also spiralises, as
Nigella demonstrated on Monday.
If you buy the £100 attachment . . .
Which would make it an £839 mixer.
Well, if you’re counting, then
I suppose it would.
Hardly a stocking filler. Anyway, for
that money I’d rather have Gucci.
Not sure they make mixers.
Hannah Rogers
4
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Wednesday November 1 2017 | the times
fashion
‘England is more
extravagant than Italy.
And for us fashion is
about extravagance’
Dolce and Gabbana are the kings of glamour. As they bring their latest show
to London they tell Anna Murphy why they believe more is always more
I
t’s Monday morning. I’m in the
waiting area in a nondescript
building on a nondescript street
in west London. Sitting next to
me, nonchalantly drinking coffee
out of paper cups, are a young
woman in a rose-appliquéd
cream princess dress and red fur
cape, plus a Caravaggio-esque
headdress of flowers and fruit; another
in a black bustier dress that can’t quite
decide if it is in fact underwear, plus a
tiara; and a third who looks nothing
less than coronation-ready in an epic
agglomeration of blush tulle, plus a
crown of Tower of London proportions.
Dolce & Gabbana is in town. Of
course. What other fashion house
remains such a determined believer in
the notion that more really is more?
If you spend any time in the world of
Dolce — as it’s known to its friends —
you quickly realise that for these
Italian designers it’s not so much a
case of putting a ring on it, but,
wherever possible, a crown. In Dolce
land even babies wear tiaras. I know
because I’ve seen it.
Tomorrow night Domenico Dolce
and Stefano Gabbana unleash their
latest fashion bacchanalia at Harrods
with the opening of their Christmas
market — selling everything from
D&G baby shoes to phone cases,
as well as limited-edition clothes
and accessories — and the lighting
of their Christmas tree. (Yep,
you-know-what comes very early
indeed at Harrods.) The pièce de
résistance will be a catwalk show
in the suitably blinged-up
surroundings of the Food Hall.
“There is the Queen, and then there
is Harrods,” exclaims 54-year-old
Gabbana excitedly as I join him in the
fitting room, where the line-up of
non-models are being primped and
preened by 59-year-old Dolce, who
is pink-cheeked with delight at it all.
“Bellissima,” Dolce exclaims as he
dismisses each personification of
a particular axis of modern celebrity,
from a Mountbatten to a Le Bon. (The
brand increasingly eschews models in
favour of so-called influencers and the
more photogenic variety of customer.)
You can’t get a more quintessentially
Italian brand than Dolce & Gabbana,
which was built on a reinvention, a
sexing up, of the Sicilian aesthetic
of Dolce’s childhood. Think black lace,
sharp tailoring and Catholic
iconography. Add in cleavage, cling
and, well, sex. That’s how a
mega-brand was built. And mega
it certainly is. It’s tough in luxury at
the moment, unless you know what
you are doing, and Dolce’s turnover
for the financial year ending March
2017, which was up by 9 per cent to
€1.296 billion (£1.14 billion), shows it
does. (Charges of tax evasion
relating to a holding company in
Luxembourg, denied vehemently
by the designers, were dismissed
in their entirety in 2014.)
Gabbana tells me that Britain has
always played a big part in the Dolce
story, not least because a London
store, Harvey Nichols, was the first in
the world to stock the label after its
launch in 1985. “The British got what
we were doing before anyone else. We
are more British than Italian in some
ways. England is more extravagant
Stefano Gabbana,
Kylie Minogue and
Domenico Dolce.
Below: Dolce &
Gabbana keyring,
£295, harrods.com
than Italy. And for us fashion is about
extravagance. In Italy it is all about
good taste. We like the mix, the
craziness. We take Italian taste and
we make it crazy. We find a lot of
inspiration in London.”
In tomorrow’s show — which will
include one-off Alta Moda, or couture,
pieces of quite stupendous beauty —
that inspiration is more literal than
usual. There are queenly capes, rocker
biker jackets, brocade suits that look to
have been made out of the dining
room curtains in a stately home and
— did I mention this already? —
crowns galore. Yet beneath all the frills
and furbelows there are, as always
with the label, feminine, flattering,
wearable clothes.
Yes, Dolce & Gabbana makes
clothes, which may seem a statement
of the obvious, but which — in a
luxury arena largely populated by
accessories brands that make not
very wearable attire on the side —
is anything but. “We are fashion
designers,” is how Gabbana puts it.
“In the last 20 years a lot of companies
have confused luxury with accessories.
This is a problem. You don’t change
the history of fashion with a bag, you
change it with clothing. But it’s harder
to make money with clothing. With a
dress you have to develop different
sizes. With a bag, no.”
These are designers who think about
women’s bodies, who understand
the mechanics of dressing them,
whatever their size. Dolce, the son
of a tailor, made his first pair of
trousers at the age of seven. There
is no one better at orchestrating the
female form, whether it’s poured into
one of the brand’s signature little black
dresses or whittled away by its
signature killer suiting.
Again, it should be obvious that
designers for women design, well, for
women. Alas, it isn’t. “Many other
designers have a closed mind,” says
Gabbana. “They want to dress a
particular body. They want to
dream only a particular
dream. We want to dream a
dream too, but we want it to be
a real dream — to dress
regular women, skinny women,
curvy women.”
There’s one Dolce woman in
particular who has been getting
the brand some heat: Melania Trump.
Today Dolce is wearing a T-shirt with
the legend “#boycottDolceGabbana”,
a typically nose-thumbing response
to criticism this year that the label
dresses her. “Melania was a Dolce &
Gabbana customer long before she
became wife of the president of the
United States,” says Gabbana. “When I
found out she was going to be wearing
our clothes on public engagements,
I knew it was going to be a big deal.
But I don’t want to talk about politics.
I want to talk about beauty. I take
pleasure in dressing a beautiful
woman. I am not helping Trump.
I can’t help Trump. I am Italian.”
Gabbana in particular has never
been afraid to speak his mind, and if
anything he seems to relish the spats
that ensue. The most notable was
IVF-gate, when the pair described
babies born from IVF as “synthetic”
and celebrities such as Elton John
called for a boycott. (Spot the theme.)
the times | Wednesday November 1 2017
5
1GT
COVER AND BELOW: LUCA AND ALESSANDRO MORELLI
fashion
Dolce got Gabbana a job, taught him
how to sketch, and five years later —
having become lovers en route — they
launched their own label. Cut to 1992
and they found themselves with
supermodels happy to walk their shows
in return for clothes and, a year later,
with a commission from Madonna to
dress her for her Girlie Show tour.
Because they have retained control of
their business they can continue to, as
Gabbana puts it, “tell our own story”.
They are judged by their customers, not
shareholders, and they channel their
own highly recognisable aesthetic, not
someone else’s. “That is unusual in
modern fashion. If you look at Paris
Fashion Week, it is like the fashion
week of the dead. Saint Laurent,
Balenciaga, Dior . . .”
Dolce & Gabbana is indeed one of
the few leading brands still helmed by
its founders. “We didn’t start out to
make money or be famous,” says
Gabbana. “You can’t start in fashion
because you want to be rich. It has
to be because it’s what you believe
in. Fashion is not business. You can
make it into a business, but it doesn’t
start that way. The customer decides
what is good.”
Unlike many of their peers, the
designers have a direct line to that
customer. They travel the world like
fashion’s own Phileas Foggs, putting
on shows and events for the people
Domenico and
I disagree all
the time. I
don’t club him
“Freedom means that people should
be able to say what they want,” is all
Gabbana will say now. “You don’t have
to agree with what I say. I don’t judge
other people for making different
choices. Domenico and I disagree
about things all the time. I don’t club
him. [He laughs.] I don’t boycott him.”
Theirs is a remarkable love story,
which is no longer a love story, except
that, in another sense, it is. The
two were romantic partners for two
decades, until 2001, then they broke
up, but remained in business
together. They told no one what
had happened until four years
later. “There was a lot of pain
when we split,” says Gabbana.
“We broke our romantic
relationship, but we continued to
work together. Even now we can’t
explain how we did it. But the end
of a love affair is not a reason to plant
a bomb and explode everything. I
think we have always had a lot of
The Dolce & Gabbana
collection is worn
by Pixie Lott, above,
and the Moncrieffe
sisters, above right.
Right: actress Phoebe
Torrance. Below: Dolce
& Gabbana baby shoes,
£175, harrods.com
respect for each other. Before we
shared everything, we shared sex.
Now it is platonic, and in some
ways it is more sophisticated.”
Their first meeting was at a
club in Milan. Gabbana, who was
19 at the time and was trying to get
into fashion — “I didn’t know
anything about it, but I was crazy
about Fiorucci” — had got the number
of a now-forgotten Milanese label and
spoken to the first assistant there. That
assistant told him to come along to a
party he was arranging. “I said to him,
to Domenico, ‘How will I recognise
you?’ He said, ‘I am tiny and I dress
like a priest. I buy all my clothes at a
shop for priests.’ I thought, ‘This is
crazy.’ Then when I arrived at the
party I saw him immediately, all in
black except for a dark grey shirt with
a dog collar.” And what was Gabbana
wearing? “A Benetton jumper and
jeans. I was not very fashion.”
they call #dgfamily. The Harrods
fiesta comes straight off the back
of another happening in Tokyo. And
the highlight of many an oligarch’s
wife’s annual calendar is the Dolce &
Gabbana summer Alta Moda
shindig at a different venue in Italy
each year — Palermo most recently —
where dresses that cost well into six
figures are bought and shown off.
There’s none of the hoity-toityness
of Parisian couture here, so it’s no
wonder the new money loves them,
and no surprise that next week they
will open a permanent Alta Moda
outpost — along with the male
equivalent, Alta Sartoria — atop their
new London boutique. It’s designed to
service the many clients who have
houses in the capital, most of them not
British, and is the only location
outside Milan.
What would the fashion world be
like without Dolce & Gabbana? Rather
less jolly, certainly. Here are two
designers who make the rest of the
business look positively po-faced. And
where would Gabbana be? “I was very
lucky to meet Domenico,” he says.
“We are so different, but we often have
the same point of arrival. I will walk
down a street and I will see a beautiful
lamp and then I will meet with him
and I will start to say, ‘I was walking
down the street . . .’ And he will say,
‘Stop! The lamp!’
“I don’t know what it is, but we have
it. We fight all the time, but after the
fight what we are working on becomes
Dolce & Gabbana, not just him, not
just me.”
And for that, women’s curves the
world over — not to mention the men
who love them — give thanks.
Instagram: @annagmurphy
the times | Wednesday November 1 2017
7
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ffashion
ashion
GETTY IMAGES
Coat, £235,
ganni.com
Left:
entrepreneur
Miroslava
Duma. Right:
dress, £180,
thecords.co.uk
Left:
fashion editor
Giovanna
Battaglia. Right:
trousers, £139,
meandem.com
How corduroy
got its groove back
The geography
teacher’s favourite
has moved on, says
Hattie Crisell
I
owe my dad an apology. I’ve
spent years being cheerfully
rude about a couple of pairs of
corduroy trousers that he has
been hanging on to for decades.
I pointed out that they had lost
their shape long ago and were
too big for him; I roundly
mocked them on aesthetic grounds;
I questioned whether, at their age,
it was conceivable that they might
contain asbestos. Finally, last year he
gave in and sent them to the recycling
bin — and now, after all that, corduroy
is back in fashion.
Who would have thought that a
fabric associated with geography
teachers, unworldly academics and
those in possession of leaky ballpoint
pens would be dazzling us on the
catwalks of Prada, Mulberry and Marc
Jacobs? Yet this season’s collections are
full of cord, in lovely shades from
powder blue to plum.
Tactile and soft, it’s the perfect
fabric for a time of year when we
want to be warm and cosy. Corduroy
is, of course, a ridged version of velvet,
which is also everywhere in fashion
at the moment — both have 1970s
connotations, but where the latter is
more sophisticated, the former has a
workaday hardiness.
“Velvet and cord do a similar job,
but cord is more relaxed for the day,”
as Natalie Kingham, the buying
director at matchesfashion.com, puts
it. “I’d say it probably works best in
corduroy jackets, which look great
with denim.” With that in mind, let’s
start with outerwear.
I’m fond of Ganni’s turtleneck
Ridgewood coat (£235, ganni.com),
with its cheerful pumpkin hue and
enormous pockets (don’t put loose
change in there; you’ll never see it
again). Mango has several corduroy
jackets, including a casual pink
version, in store only (£59.99), a
rust-hued blazer from the brand’s
sustainable collection (£99.99), and an
oversized green jacket (£89.99, both
mango.com) that bears similarities to
Acne Studios’ pricier burgundy one
Jacket,
£59.99,
mango.com
(£800, matchesfashion.com). If you’re
looking for something longer and
more eye-catching, wearing Art
School’s bright pink cord trench is like
donning a sweetie wrapper (£975,
matchesfashion.com).
Corduroy has a wholesome
quality that plays off pleasingly
against a risqué hemline and so,
with opaque-tights season upon
us, it’s a good time to buy a cord
miniskirt. Asos has jewel-like
versions in marigold and
emerald (£28, asos.com), Cos is
selling a simple navy one (£55,
cosstores.com), and Whistles
has an A-line black skirt with
poppers down one side (£99,
whistles.com). If you want to go
longer, try Toast’s wrap skirt with an
asymmetric hem that falls below the
knee (£125, toa.st). Tuck in a T-shirt
or a fine knit and wear it with boots.
Due to some deep-seated
association between cord and
schooldays, the fabric lends itself
to pinafores — and the best of
the bunch might be Eve
Denim’s Marianne dress (£318,
matchesfashion.com) in maroon,
which you could wear all winter with
a poloneck jumper. (Topshop has a
similar one for £39, topshop.com, but
without a nipped-in waist.) If I had a
more generous overdraft I’d be buying
Prada’s olive-green scoop-neck dress
(£990, matchesfashion.com); the shape
says “ballerina”, while the fabric says
“mucking out the stables”. I don’t
know why that combination is so
winning, but it is. The sartorially
playful might also like Asos’s
berry-coloured jumpsuit, which ties
at the shoulders (£45, asos.com).
And now to trousers, on which
I suggest you go straight to the
specialists. The Cords & Co is a brand
that launched in August with a focus
on corduroy; its trouser selection is
hard to beat, with five shapes (flare,
slim fit, loose, bootcut and straight)
and a rainbow of colours (£125 to
£170, thecords.co.uk).
Otherwise, J Crew has high-waisted
skinny cords in dusty pink, pale blue
and black (and three lengths; £98,
jcrew.com), while Cos has the perfect
wide-legged pair in navy (£79,
cosstores.com). A pair of navy cords
makes a change from jeans and looks
chic and relatively smart. Actually, I’m
probably going to get a pair myself.
For goodness sake, don’t tell my dad.
Instagram: @hattiecrisell
8
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Wednesday November 1 2017 | the times
arts
I don’t rate my writing highly.
This is literature, not rock’n’roll
The Norwegian superstar writer Karl Ove Knausgaard tells Melissa Katsoulis why he is plagued
with doubt and how he came to write his new book, a series of letters to his unborn child
I
t’s a grey day in London, but
the Southbank Centre is full of
colour and cheer, with its festival
of Nordic culture in full swing.
Felt-hatted trolls hang in the
gift-shop window, giggling
children gather round to hear
Scandinavian folk tales and
the walls are alive with bold murals
about the life of Norway’s Sami
people. In the midst of it sits Karl
Ove Knausgaard, the cult
Norwegian author whose series of
autobiographical novels, My Struggle,
has brought him the kind of
international celebrity that rarely
touches the literary world.
I’m feeling the hygge, but realise
just in time that Knausgaard is no
I’m not a physical
man. I hardly
shake hands
with people
hugger. “I’m not a physical man,” he
half-whispers. “I hardly shake hands.”
He sits stock-still, a tall and perfectly
proportioned symphony in grey. He is
unsmiling and furrowed of brow. His
grizzled beard and shaggy mop of
salt-and-pepper hair complement his
gunmetal blazer and dark jeans as
artfully as one of the Lars Lerin
watercolours that illustrate his new
series of essays, grouped around the
seasons. He’s in London to publicise
Winter, the latest, and he looks kind of
pained to meet me.
We go outside so he can smoke. We
sit side by side, looking over the
Thames in all its dishwater glory. His
various greys are now enveloped in
the miasma from the first of many
Chesterfields to go with his coffee
(black, of course). He stares straight
ahead, not making small talk. It must
be unbearable for someone so shy to
be famous enough to get stopped in
the street. And since his books are
about his personal life — fatherhood,
marriage, work — people must assume
he’s as open in person as he is in print.
“It was very problematic at the
beginning,” he says, “because it
was so overnight. In Norway there
was a lot of media; TV stuff. And
I just withdrew from it. I thought that
was that, but it happened again, not on
the same scale, but in other countries.
It’s a blessing, but it’s also a corruption.
So I try to not think about it. And
when I’m home [in rural Sweden] it
doesn’t exist.”
Surely it affects his status as
a scribe of everyday life, in the way
that a rock star who used to sing about
being poor suddenly has to find new
material? The answer is typically
self-deprecating: “That’s very easy
for me because I don’t rate my writing
very highly. So it’s easy for me to
start again at point zero, which I do
every time. But it’s literature. It’s not
rock’n’roll.”
But it sort of is. Here’s a man who
can sell out massive venues just to
stand up and read about doing the
school run. Not to mention the many
adoring females who lust after him.
From top: Karl Ove
Knausgaard and his
latest book, Winter
Doesn’t he find these big events —
such as the one he’s going to do later
that evening to a packed Royal Festival
Hall — nerve-racking?
“In the beginning I was absolutely
terrified. On the verge of vomiting.
The thing is, I published a book in
1998 and I went to libraries and maybe
20 or 30 people came. Next level was
maybe 60. Then I was travelling in
Europe and 10 or 20 could come.
Then it’s a thousand or 1,500, but
it’s still the same format. The most
terrifying thing I’ve ever done was in
Germany recently. Book six of My
Struggle was coming out and a big part
is about their history, about Hitler and
Nazism. It was really terrible. In Berlin
that first night there were 1,200 people
and I had to talk about Hitler. Then I
was scared.”
He pauses, lights another cigarette,
stares out across the river.
“One out of three events go really
badly. And I never know why.” Badly
how? “Sometimes . . . I talk myself into
a place where I go darker and darker.
One time in Zurich someone said it
was like being in a coffin for an hour.”
There’s certainly a lot of darkness in
My Struggle, from his father’s
alcoholism to the problems in his
marriage to his then wife, the Swedish
poet Linda Bostrom, whose severe
mental-health problems dogged their
family life. Although a chunky silver
ring on his fourth finger perhaps
implies their bond endures as more
than just co-parents.
In Winter he addresses his unborn
daughter and tells her that some
mental anguish will be part of her life.
I gently probe further. I am bizarrely
afraid to ask anything too personal of
this obsessively revelatory writer, such
is his permanent look of unease, but
Knausgaard seems no more
uncomfortable discussing this than
anything else. Which is to say, very
uncomfortable. He reveals that the
next instalment of the seasons quartet,
Spring, will face mental-health issues
head-on.
“The third book in the series is a day
in the life of the baby, who is three
months then, and me. There is a
chapter that is a flashback that has to
deal with mental illness, and the baby,
and the . . . whole situation. It was very
hard to write because I knew it was
going to be public. I want to tell my
child that it is part of life. And life is
hard, but it is also very good. It ends
by telling her: it’s going to be part of
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the times | Wednesday November 1 2017
9
1GT
ROBERTO RICCIUTI/GETTY IMAGES
arts
your life. And I think that’s very, very
important. It’s threatening life, and
threatening everything, but you have
to deal with it. I can’t think of one
single family that doesn’t deal with
something like this. And why should
it be hidden?”
I tell him about our young royals’
Heads Together campaign and say
that Prince Harry would be proud of
him, but he maintains he’s not a writer
concerned with touting social issues.
“Not at all. I’m writing about life and
it’s just part of life.”
The biggest part of Knausgaard’s life
is still his four children, and as well as
rocking the sexy-dad look better than
any man alive (or at least on the South
Bank on this half-term Monday), he
takes parenting seriously. And he
revels in it, his face almost coming
alive when he talks about his
daughters and son.
“Children have taken over my
existence and that’s very good. I
can’t imagine how meaningless
things would have become if we
didn’t have children. If we were
the last generation, the value of
everything would be removed.” I’m
Children have
taken over my
existence and
that’s very good
tempted to challenge his thinking on
this, but he seems almost happy now,
so I bite my tongue.
He says that after having your first
baby, “it takes some time, but your
own importance becomes less and less.
And that’s what it is to be an adult.”
And the culture of your children
suddenly becomes the mainstream
culture, right? “Right. I have one
teenager and one that’s 12. I’m a man
from the Stone Age! They think
reading is old-fashioned. They read on
their phones a bit, but it’s more
YouTube that they’re into.” How do
you handle that as a writer? “I don’t
handle it as a writer, I handle it as a
parent. It’s very much in opposition to
how I think about the world, but they
are a new generation. They’re happy.”
He seems almost skittish now, the
furrows smoothed and occasional
moments of rather delightful eye
contact, so I try my luck at a silly
question. Does he ever use his fame to
bag a good table at a restaurant? He
looks at me as though I’m insane.
“Never done that. I live in the
countryside. There are 400 people
there. Tables in restaurants? No.”
When Knausgaard clams up it’s like
storm clouds gathering. He’s never
grumpy or rude, just frozen and dark.
Cigarettes are sucked hard. The voice
goes squeaky. It’s as if his big frame
and handsome face are a bad fit for
him or have grown too quickly, like
with a gawky teenager.
We discuss his favourite writers. His
hero is Proust, that shy boy who wrote
life instead of living it. When he starts
talking about his favourite modern
novel, Never Let Me Go, Kazuo
Ishiguro’s dystopian tale of genetic
engineering, I can’t help imagining
him as a genetic mash-up of Proust
and Harry Enfield’s Kevin the
teenager: all shoulders and hair and
desperate embarrassment.
To try to bring him back into the
light, I mention that we have a friend
in common, the neurosurgeon and
writer Henry Marsh. The clouds part
and a lovely smile transforms his
craggy face. Knausgaard adores the
author of Do No Harm, and says it was
quite nice when The New York Times
asked him who in the world he would
like to meet and interview and he
chose Marsh.
“I cried when I read that book
because it’s so deep. I thought he was a
great writer. He really is. Then I met
him. Then I saw him operate. It
affected me in an existential way . . . I
really can’t explain how, but it has to
do with materiality of existence. It was
shocking to realise that physical lump
that is biology. And then we have this
fantastic world.” He flaps his long
fingers around his smoke-wreathed
head to evoke the inner universe
of consciousness.
“I have this feeling of materiality in
the world and I want to write about it
in all these books, but I don’t get there.
Someday maybe I will get closer, you
know . . .” And he’s gone again, staring
out over the concrete and the grey sky.
He may be European literature’s
biggest star, but it seems he never
outgrew that adolescent conflict
between wanting to be seen but
not looked at. Hiding behind your
fringe but bearing your soul in the
words scribbled on your rucksack.
He takes Nordic gloom to epic levels,
but it’s not an affectation. His looks
and books might seem a little
pretentious, but after spending an
afternoon in his company I am
convinced he’s the real deal.
As I walk back through the foyer
of the Southbank Centre, those jolly
trolls and tokens of Scandi culture
look rather flat and fake compared
to the genuine, complex, truthful
artist that is Karl Ove Knausgaard.
I leave thinking he probably hated
talking to me, and was counting the
seconds until our time together was
over. No doubt he was thinking the
same about me.
Winter is published tomorrow by
Harvill Secker, £16.99
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Wednesday November 1 2017 | the times
television & radio
Bobby Sands, from hunger striker to folk hero
James
Jackson
TV review
66 Days
BBC Four
{{{{(
Modern Life is Goodish
Dave
{{{((
T
hirty-six years ago, ten
inmates in Northern
Ireland’s Maze prison fasted
themselves to death in
protest at not being given
political-prisoner status by the British
government. Last night’s BBC
screening of the Bobby Sands
documentary 66 Days, previously
given a film release, proved in stark
fashion how time has not faded one
iota the sheer bleak awfulness of it all:
the morbid shock at Sands and his
fellow strikers’ actions; the threat of
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
George Michael
Radio 2, 10pm
Quite a coup for Radio 2:
George Michael’s last
interview, done with Kirsty
Young. It was recorded just
before Christmas last year
for a film that Michael was
making, then he died on
Christmas Day. Radio 2
is broadcasting it over
two weeks. In the first
programme he talks about
Wham!, how he eventually
pursued a solo career and
about putting his work
before his personal life.
The Meaning of
Flowers
Radio 3, 10.45pm
It’s one of those lost skills
that feels as though it has
been completely forgotten
in the modern age. Once
upon a time you could
chronicle a love affair in
blooms alone, but who now
even knows what a rose
means? Fiona Stafford,
an English don at Oxford,
reminds us of their
meaning. Today the topic
is daffodils, which, it turns
out, the Romans completely
misunderstood. Their
Narcissus was famous
for lying down and gazing
at his reflection in a pool.
Isolated, alone. However, as
Wordsworth later pointed
out, daffodils rarely appear
alone, but in profusion.
murder under which the prison guards
operated; the fundamental abhorrence
of the “dirty protests”, the descriptions
of which made you physically recoil.
Trying to set the hunger strikers’
actions in their complex context in a
mere 90 minutes is a task loaded with
pitfalls, and Brendan J Byrne’s film
was attentive to the dangers of bias
even as it showed Sands as some kind
of poet-idealist. “I am standing on the
threshold of another trembling world.
May God have mercy on my soul,”
was one entry from Sands’s diary.
Indeed, the sober use of readings
from this prison journal gave the film
a distinctly haunting aspect, as well as
an insight into the thoughts of a rather
unknowable figure — down even to
how he felt about the prison food
offered to him, the “beans near falling
off the plate”. A guard who served the
strikers their meals each day recalled
bluntly, “It was their choice [not to
eat]. If they chose to commit suicide,
that was their choice,” summing up
another prevailing view at the time.
Little being known about Sands was
crucial to his elevation to folk hero,
and there was a cogent explanation
of how the image of a smiling Sands
followed in the tradition of the Che
Guevara poster in how a heroic
martyrdom was projected upon it.
The film also reminded us that
Sands’s form of protest — or blackmail,
depending on your view — was nothing
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 The Matt Edmondson Show
4.00 Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg
James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 The Surgery
with Katie & Dr Oscar 10.00 Huw Stephens
1.00am Toddla T 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce
12.00 Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright
5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 The Folk Show with
Mark Radcliffe 8.00 Jo Whiley
10.00 George Michael: Red Line. Kirsty
Young has a discussion with the pop singer,
who discusses his successes and devastating
losses, in the last interview he recorded
before his death. See Radio Choice
11.00 Marcus Mumford. The Mumford &
Sons lead singer charts the development of
his own musical tastes, beginning with his
earliest influences (r) 12.00 Pick of the Pops
(r) 2.00am Radio 2 Playlists: Country
Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Easy
4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Radio 2 Rocks
5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein takes us through the morning
with the best in classical music. She explores
potential companion pieces for Morten
Lauridsen’s O Magnum Mysterium — one of
the best loved pieces of choral music ever
written. Plus, the writer, satirist and
classical music fan Armando Iannucci talks
about the ideas that have inspired and
shaped him throughout his life
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Elgar (1857–1934)
Donald Macleod explores the life and career
of Edward Elgar through the lens of his
muses — his family, his love interests, and
some of his greatest friends. In today’s
programme, Donald focuses on some of
Elgar’s male companions and the friends
pictured within his ever-popular Enigma
Variations. Elgar (Pomp and Circumstance
March No 1; Sospiri; Deep in My Soul, Op 53
No 2; and Enigma Variations)
1.00pm News
new. Hunger strikes had been used as a
tool of nationalism for decades, indeed
centuries. Margaret Thatcher actually
did yield to the demands, three days
after the strikes were called off. It was
argued that the crisis was the turning
point in opening negotiations with
Sinn Fein, which would lead to the
Good Friday Agreement, a bold and
rather neat case that would have
benefited from further examination.
The irony that a soldier of the IRA
opened a door for peace was made
clear, but didn’t stop this close-tooutstanding film from ending up
feeling like a tribute to him — and
that’s inescapably uneasy ground.
On a lighter note, the stand-up show
Dave Gorman’s Modern Life is
Goodish returned with more affable
analysis of our cultural ephemera. I
particularly enjoyed Gorman’s “found
poem” repeating moronic below-theline reactions to The Great British Bake
Off being on Channel 4. “Yet another
programme showing people how to
catch obesity” was one; “Why blame
the BBC? It’s ITV’s show now, so
blame them if you don’t like Neil
Fielding” was another. You can only be
glad the poem was created before Prue
Leith’s Twitter blunder. Poor old Prue!
james.jackson@thetimes.co.uk
The IRA member Bobby Sands when he was in Maze prison
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Music from the Leeds Lieder Festival,
featuring some of Mahler’s Ruckert Lieder
and three of his Knaben Wunderhorn
settings, alongside five songs by Charles
Ives. Mahler (Es sungen drei Engel einen
süssen Gesang; Wo die schönen Trompeten
blasen; Die irdische Leben — Des Knaben
Wunderhorn); Ives (The Housatonic at
Stockbridge; Memories — Very
Pleasant; Rather Sad; Songs My Mother
Taught Me; Serenity; and From the
Swimmers); and Mahler (Fünf Lieder nach
Texten von Rückert) (r)
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Tom McKinney showcases some of the Ulster
Orchestra’s most recent recordings. Mahler
(Totenfeier); Tubin (Double Bass Concerto);
and Strauss (Tod und Verklärung, Op 24)
3.30 Live Choral Evensong
Introit: Give Us the Wings of Faith (Bullock).
Responses: Clucas. Psalms 148, 149, 150
(Willcocks, Buck, Goodenough). First Lesson:
Isaiah 65 vv 17-25. Office Hymn: For All the
Saints (Sine Nomine). Canticles: Walmisley
in D minor. Second Lesson: Hebrews 11 v 32
- 12 v 2. Anthem: O How Glorious Is the
Kingdom (Harwood). Te Deum: Collegium
Regale (Howells). Organ Voluntary: Pièce
Héroïque (Franck)
4.30 New Generation Artists
Tom McKinney introduces the Amatis
Piano Trio from Holland
5.00 In Tune
A performance by members of the
Australian Chamber Orchestra
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An imaginative, eclectic mix of music
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
The BBC Concert Orchestra and the conductor
Andrew Gourlay perform. Vaughan Williams
(Incidental Music to The Mayor of
Casterbridge); Britten (Piano Concerto,
Op 13; Recitative and Aria for Piano and
Orchestra); Copland (Quiet City); Britten arr
Paul Hindmarsh (King Arthur — Suite for
Orchestra — Overture; Scherzo — Dance of
Death; Variations — Galagad and the Holy
Grail; and Finale — Battle and Apotheosis)
10.00 Free Thinking
Exploring Britten’s relationship with radio
in Britain and in America
10.45 The Essay:
The Meaning of Flowers
Professor Fiona Stafford explores the
nationally loved daffodil. See Radio Choice
11.00 Late Junction
Three musicians spend the day trying to
create magical music
12.30am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 The Gamble
Featuring Bryony Kimmings, Scottee and
Sophie Calle. Last in the series
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Rites of passage (8/30)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Presented by Jenni Murray Including at
10.41 the 15 Minute Drama: Part three
of Christopher Reason’s dramatisation of
AJ Cronin’s novel The Citadel
10.55 The Listening Project
A conversation between two friends who
have known each other since primary school
11.00 The Confidence Trick
The part confidence plays in life (1/3) (r)
11.30 Mae Martin’s Guide to 21st
Century Addiction
The award-winning stand-up Mae Martin
presents a new, personal two part series
exploring the nature of addiction (1/2)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Five Green Bottles
Rebecca Gibb travels to the Tuscan coast to
profile the Italian red wine Sassicaia (3/5)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week: Anthony Powell
— Dancing to the Music of Time
By Hilary Spurling. Depression looms as
Powell returns from an unsuccessful sojourn
as a scriptwriter for Warner Bros, with no
inspiration for a fifth novel (3/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Pilgrim
By Sebastian Baczkiewicz. William
investigates a girl’s disappearance, meeting
a gang of immortal children in the process.
Paul Hilton stars (3/4) (r)
3.00 Money Box Live
Financial questions
3.30 All in the Mind
Claudia Hammond investigates sleep
paralysis (1/8) (r)
4.00 Thinking Allowed
4.30 The Media Show
5.00 PM
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 Andy Hamilton Sort
of Remembers
Attitude towards the human body (3/4)
For a review of The Great British
Bake Off final, see News
7.00 The Archers
Pip makes a controversial decision
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor focuses on rites of passage
and marking the transition from childhood to
adulthood, including a look at a hair-binding
ritual from Vanuatu (8/30)
8.00 The Moral Maze
Presented by Michael Buerk (4/9)
8.45 Why I Changed My Mind
With Dominic Lawson (3/4)
9.00 Costing the Earth (r)
9.30 The Gamble (3/3) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Book of
Dust, Part One — La Belle Sauvage
By Philip Pullman. Malcolm and Alice
discover that Bonneville is not the only
one hunting them (8/10) (r)
11.00 Little Lifetimes
A cleaner discovers a secret (3/4)
11.15 Yours Truly, Pierre Stone
Pierre’s mother is dying but he has more
important things on his mind (2/4)
11.30 Today in Parliament
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week: Anthony
Powell — Dancing to the Music of Time
By Hilary Spurling (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
10.55 The Comedy Club Interview. Diane
Morgan chats to ghost hunters Glen Hunt
and Yvette Fielding 11.00 Bridget Christie
Minds the Gap. The presenter discusses how
adverts have ruined her sex life 11.30 Radio
9. Urban fox hunting and reckless parenting
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 1.00pm Stuart Maconie 4.00
Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon
Coe 12.00 6 Music Recommends with Mary
Anne Hobbs 1.00am The First Time with
Yusuf/Cat Stevens. Matt Everitt chats to the
singer-songwriter 2.00 The Fats Domino
Story 2.30 6 Music Live Hour. Northside
and Driver Drive Faster 3.30 6 Music’s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Digital only
8.00am The Navy Lark 8.30 Hancock’s Half
Hour 9.00 Say the Word 9.30 The Sit Crom
10.00 Home Front Omnibus 11.00 New Irish
Writing 11.15 Tommies 12.00 The Navy
Lark 12.30pm Hancock’s Half Hour 1.00
Murder on the Orient Express 1.30 Every
Day in Every Way 2.00 Jane Eyre 2.15
Cosmic Quest 2.30 A Kind of Loving 2.45 On
Wheels 3.00 Home Front Omnibus 4.00 Say
the Word 4.30 The Sit Crom 5.00 Electric Ink
5.30 Andy Hamilton Sort of Remembers
6.00 The Canterville Ghost 6.30 Musical
Genes 7.00 The Navy Lark. Comedy with
Leslie Phillips. From 1959 7.30 Hancock’s
Half Hour. Comedy with Tony Hancock 8.00
Murder on the Orient Express. By Agatha
Christie 8.30 Every Day in Every Way. The
life and work of pharmacist and psychologist
Emile Coue 9.00 New Irish Writing
9.15 Tommies 10.00 Comedy Club: Andy
Hamilton Sort of Remembers. The writer and
comedian reflects on his relationship with
politics during his life 10.30 The Harpoon. A
special American issue of the spoof magazine
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett. Coverage of Prime
Minister’s Questions at Westminster
1.00pm Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive
6.30 5 Live Sport. Build-up to the night’s
UEFA Champions League football 7.45 5 Live
Sport: Champions League Football 2017-18.
Coverage of the night’s Champions League
ties 10.30 Sam Walker 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with David Ginola 10.00 Max Rushden, Tony
Cascarino and Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee
and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Micky
Gray 7.00 Kick-off: Napoli v Manchester City
(Kick-off 7.45). The UEFA Champions League
group F encounter 10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am
Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
8.00 The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones
presents a final helping of musical advice.
Tchaikovsky (Eugene Onegin — Polonaise);
Mozart (Piano Concerto No.24 in C minor);
Pergolesi (Flute Concerto in G); Tchaikovsky
(Serenade Melancolique); Schumann
(Konzertstuck for 4 Horns and Orchestra);
and Lalo (Cello Concerto in D minor) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday November 1 2017
11
1GT
artsfirst night
PAMELA RAITH
et’s start as we mean to
continue. SCREAM, please.
No, really, let loose. Like
you’ve just seen the Devil,
or at least a version of him
speaking through the mouth of a little
girl named Regan. Every part of
her (and especially her wig) is in
convulsions. “I AM THE DEVIL!” his
voice booms out, somehow, from a
small, girlish face.
This devil is called Pazuzu, a demon
who’s posh, clever and cultured,
though also ghastly to the core. But he
knows Latin and, er, English spoken
backwards. So, what can I say but,
sometimes this Exorcist is a scream,
or if you’re the Devil, a maercs. There
are also crashes, flashing lights, door
slams, rats, blackouts, hallucinations,
fog and musky, dusky smells.
The playwright John Pielmeier says
that this new stage version is based on
the book, written in 1971 by William
Peter Blatty, and not on the famed
1973 film, arguably the scariest yet.
Still, it is impossible not to compare
it to that movie. The themes of faith
and disbelief, love and evil, are there,
not to mention a strong thread about
child abuse.
Shock horror? Try schlock instead.
Indeed, I was so intrigued by Regan,
played by Clare Louise Connolly with
almost uncanny lip-synching, that
I lost interest in the plot. Much of
the dialogue feels cumbersome and
almost as dated as the multitiered
creaky spooky-house set by Anna
Fleischle, which she seems to have
recycled from an Agatha Christie
murder-mystery weekend event.
Sean Mathias directs a strong cast,
who often look a bit lost as the action
switches, jerkily, between themes.
Peter Bowles is Father Merrin, our
favourite exorcist priest; his early
scenes when he appears in a turban
and pondering some unknown object
(dead chicken, antique find, weird
statue?) are mystifying if you don’t
know the plot. Jenny Seagrove is
believable as the frantic mum,
though not as the diva movie star.
Adam Garcia makes for a strong
Father Damien.
This production certainly has its
head-turning moments (those got
a gasp), but on the whole it feels like
a Hallowe’en whodunnit with a bit
of Catholic hocus pocus thrown in.
Horror is fiendishly hard to stage
because it’s all about sustained tension,
but this can’t decide if it’s a parody
or the real deal. It may be fun — but
that’s not really enough.
Box office: 0844 8717629, to March 10
émigré, Miss Kugelmann, who licks
her lips at the sight of Miss Roach’s
beau, Lieutenant Pike, a charismatic
black GI who likes a drink.
The glory of Nicholas Wright’s play,
adapted from the 1947 novel by
Patrick Hamilton, is that you can have
fun with the allegorical resonances,
but you will probably be too busy
getting caught up in the witty,
evocative, gnarly human drama of it
all to bother. Tim Hatley’s set is a
miracle, sliding us improbably fast
from the suffocating civility of the
dining area to a local pub, so warming
that you half-fancy popping on stage
to order yourself a pink gin, then to a
bench by the river where Roach and
Pike canoodle.
This vivid sense of place and time
is matched by note-perfect
characterisation as each inhabitant
announces their attitude from their
separate tables. We’re drawn at first
to the seductive energy of Lucy Cohu’s
drawling Kugelmann, before worrying
about her insensitivity, before later
glimpsing the neediness behind the
mask. We are supposed to hate Mr
Thwaites and, good heavens, Clive
Francis makes that a pleasure to do as
he steps over the line from outspoken
to malicious, decorating his speech
with the kind of cod-Elizabethan
flourish — “The damsel does not
offend the orbs of optical vision,” he
says of Kugelmann — that suggests he
sees himself as the star of the show.
It’s a magnificent turn, but matched
by Fenella Woolgar as Miss Roach. She
holds the evening together with her
sharp looks, uncomfortable silences,
defeated tears and transformation into
a woman who knows better when to
stand firm and when to bend.
The director, Jonathan Kent, gets
fully fleshed performances from
everyone. Daon Broni’s American
accent can fade, but he lets us see
there is more to the twice-married
Pike than Southern charm. Gwen
Taylor excels in two roles: as a retired
GP returning to work because of the
war, and her almost identical, almost
as forthright sister. The home front is
a hotbed here, as people who look like
heroes or villains reveal themselves to
be more complex while they make
their small but crucial claims for
territory. Wonderful.
Dominic Maxwell
Box office: 020 7722 9301, to Nov 25
Concert
LSO/Noseda
Barbican
I
{{{{(
t is hard to say who is more of a
speed merchant, the pianist Khatia
Buniatishvili or the conductor
Gianandrea Noseda. Either way,
they are kindred hotheads. Luckily,
they both have the knack of pushing
tempos to their limit and, just at the
point of no return, managing to keep
the music from free-fall. The London
Symphony Orchestra wasn’t fazed by
their demands and, in Rachmaninov’s
Second Piano Concerto paired with
Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony, the
results were exciting and satisfying.
No overture, so we were straight
into those potent opening piano
chords, signalling a return to self-belief
after Rachmaninov’s post-First
Symphony crisis of confidence.
Buniatishvili began at the marked
Moderato, but soon took flight, before
pulling up for an unusually expansive
return to the opening theme. The
ensemble wobbled slightly, but the
true “maestoso” character shone
through. True, Buniatishvili at times
sacrificed definition for dazzle, but
elsewhere, the Adagio sostenuto above
all, she weighed and balanced each
note with warmth and care.
This serene reverie was beautifully
judged, Andrew Marriner’s pure
clarinet floating above the piano’s
tracery particularly so. And yes,
Buniatishvili indulged in a trademark
toss of her hair in the playful and fiery
Allegro scherzando.
Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony
was equally bold, a performance of hot
blood and obsessive thoughts. Written
during a period of terrible mental and
emotional turmoil for the composer,
the symphony draws us into that inner
struggle and then sends us back out
again into the world.
Noseda made the most of the
movements’ various characters, the
fateful brass calls of the first and last
movements sandwiching the undiluted
nostalgia of the Andantino and the
tipsy pizzicato patter of the Scherzo.
Rebecca Franks
Clare Louise Connolly as Regan in Sean Mathias’s production
A very rocky
horror show
This new stage adaptation has its spooky
moments, but doesn’t know if it’s a parody
or a real ghost story, says Ann Treneman
Theatre
The Exorcist
Phoenix, WC2
{{(((
Daon Broni and Fenella Woolgar in The Slaves of Solitude
Theatre
The Slaves
of Solitude
Hampstead
Theatre, NW3
{{{{(
I
t’s 1943 and in a genteel boarding
house in Henley-on-Thames, it’s
war. You can find all sorts of
political parallels in the residents
of this establishment: is our
heroine, the stiff but decent Miss
Roach, England itself? Is her
antagonist from the other end of the
dining room, the bullying Little
Englander Mr Thwaites, some sort
of emblem of fascism? Even so, the
conflict doesn’t turn truly toxic until
the arrival of a flamboyant German
L
Opera
Lucia di Lammermoor
Covent Garden
T
{{{{(
he image of the bride of the
Lammermoor after she has
murdered her new husband
has a special resonance at
Covent Garden: you think
Joan Sutherland; white dress;
Hallowe’en blood spatters; a faraway
look in her eyes.
Katie Mitchell knew the rubric
when she took on Donizetti’s tragedy
for the Royal Opera House last year.
So she subverts it. The fresh
bloodstains are caked into Lucia’s
white underwear — but it’s not her
husband’s blood. This Lucia
murdered him in calculated fury
rather than the grip of mania, then
miscarried her lover’s baby in shock.
Thwarted to the last by the men who
have forced her every move, she ends
her life at least knowing she has
gained some agency over it.
When so much tragic bel canto
opera is about watching women suffer
abominably, then applauding them
for it, Mitchell’s desire to go against
the grain is refreshing (and timely).
Despite the Victoriana of Vicki
Mortimer’s gothic designs, beautifully
lit by Jon Clark, the resonances here
are clear: there are no safe spaces for
the heroine, who is chased into
bedroom and bathroom by both her
brother and her priest. It’s harder to
resolve the contradiction between a
Lucia who sees ghosts (two tiresome
phantoms who creak across the stage
far too often) and one who defiantly
swigs her champagne at her wedding
breakfast and raunchily seduces her
hubbie to his doom. As the audience’s
giggles testify, it doesn’t add up.
Still, you’ll forgive the cracks in
the staging for so much seamless
performing. As Lucia, Lisette Oropesa,
below, makes an exciting house
debut. It’s not the largest voice, but
the Cuban-American makes every
phrase felt and sings with piercing
vulnerability, whether in fragile
trills or heart-searing high notes.
Her “mad scene” is so sincerely done
that it feels wrong to applaud —
that’s a tribute. At least one man is
supporting her: Michele Mariotti’s
conducting is flexible and attentive,
the epitome of good bel canto, and
he draws wonderfully stirring playing
from the orchestra.
Charles Castronovo returns as
Lucia’s illicit lover, Edgardo, in
persuasive, warm voice. Michele
Pertusi growls handsomely as the
conflicted Raimondo, and Konu
Kim cuts a dash as Arturo (until
he’s bumped off). There are no
qualms about the sheer nastiness
of Christopher
Maltman’s Enrico,
Lucia’s manipulative
brother. Maltman’s
voice now sounds
worryingly
raw, but he
always does
good villain.
Neil Fisher
Box office:
020 7304
4000, in
repertory
to Nov 27
12
1GT
Wednesday November 1 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Trust Me,
I’m a Doctor
BBC Two, 9pm
Dr Michael
Mosley
and his
team of
fellow healthcare
professionals return
to cut through the
clamour of conflicting
Early
Top
pick
information by
addressing a number
of “what is the truth
about . . ?”-type
questions. Tonight’s
edition is dedicated
to mental health. The
team conducted a
survey of more than
2,000 people to find
out what mental-health
issues the public are
concerned about. Most
of us will experience
ups and downs with our
mental health, but for
one in six people every
year these problems
develop into more
serious disorders, such
as depression and
anxiety. This invaluable
programme reveals
what we can do to look
after our mental
wellbeing. The main
question that the
people surveyed wanted
answered was: “How
can I best cope with
stress?” It’s well
established that stress
has a negative impact
on our mental health
and heightens our risk
of conditions such
as depression. Not
surprisingly, the old
“pull yourself together”,
stiff-upper-lip approach
doesn’t work, but
Mosley has some useful
tips for techniques that
really can help to
banish stress. Other
queries tackled tonight
include: “Can you
eat yourself happy?”
and “Is taking
antidepressant pills
dangerous?” Most
important of all, the
surgeon Gabriel
Weston investigates a
radical new treatment
that could cure
schizophrenia in many
patients and holds new
hope for more common
mental illnesses.
Hidden Cardiff
BBC Two, 8pm
The adventurer and
writer Will Millard was
the winner of the 2013
Royal Geographical
Society Journey of a
Lifetime award for his
adventure navigating
the Mano and Moro
rivers with only a tiny
inflatable pack-raft.
In 2015 he presented a
BBC series on the life
of the tribes of the
Coral Triangle in the
western Pacific Ocean.
Here Millard, who
was born and raised
in the Fens, is closer
to home, investigating
the hidden history
of the Welsh capital.
He explores concealed
tunnels and nuclear
bunkers to reveal how
Cardiff went from
a tiny town to the
thriving city it is today.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Countryfile Autumn Diaries.
Keeley Donovan explores the hidden dangers of hill
walking 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in
Yorkshire, Cornwall and London (r) (AD) 11.00 Getting
the Builders In. In Epsom, Surrey, Amy and Chris want
their bathroom redone 11.45 Fugitives. The National
Crime Agency seizes its largest-ever haul of cocaine (r)
12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Eric Knowles presents from
Ardingly, West Sussex (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Zara wonders if she is being threatened (AD)
2.15 Impossible. Rick Edwards hosts the game show in
which contestants compete for the chance to win £10,000,
with a single “impossible” answer knocking them out for
the day 3.00 Escape to the Country. Margherita Taylor
helps a couple search for a home full of character in Devon
(AD) 3.45 Money for Nothing. A green enamel light
shade and a 1970s sideboard are among the rescued items
(r) 4.30 Antiques Road Trip. The next stop for Christina
Trevanion and Mark Stacey is Cheshire (r) 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Hairy Builder (r) (AD) 6.30 Countryfile
Autumn Diaries (r) 7.15 Getting the Builders In (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: See Hear on Tour — Berlin (SL) 8.30 Caught
Red Handed (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00
BBC Newsroom Live 11.30 Daily Politics 1.00pm The
Code (r) 1.45 The Planners. Rochdale residents clash with
developers over plans for three new houses in their
cul-de-sac (r) 2.45 Family Finders. Two sisters who were
adopted as young children meet after 70 years apart
3.15 Locomotion: Dan Snow’s History of Railways. The
historian examines how the expansion of the railways
influenced working conditions, proved a valuable global
export and even changed the way war was waged. Last in
the series (r) (AD) 4.15 Back in Time for Dinner. The
Robshaws are transported to the 1970s and stock up their
new chest freezer, and discover that milking a goat is not
as simple as it looks when they try out self-sufficiency (r)
(AD) 5.15 Flog It! Paul Martin and the team value
antiques in Sheffield, including a set of watercolour
paintings and a Victorian automaton (r) 6.00 Eggheads.
Quiz show 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two.
How the contestants are shaping up for Saturday
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Hugh Bonneville talks
about his latest film Paddington 2 and the novelist
Jeffrey Archer chats about his book Tell Tale 8.30
Lorraine. Ross King catches up with Mila Kunis, Kristen
Bell and Kathryn Hahn about their new film A Bad Mom’s
Christmas 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30 This
Morning. Chat and lifestyle features 12.30pm Loose
Women 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Dickinson’s Real
Deal. David Dickinson and his dealers are in
Buckinghamshire, where he and Stewart Hofgartner
enthuse over a radiogram, and “angels” visit Helen
Gardiner (r) 3.00 Tenable. Quiz hosted by Warwick Davis
in which a team of five friends from Herefordshire
answers questions about top 10 lists, then tries to score
a perfect 10 in the final round 4.00 Tipping Point. The
arcade-themed quiz show in which contestants drop
tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a £10,000 jackpot 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh
presents as contestants John, Andrea, Carol and Harry
answer general knowledge questions and take on ruthless
quiz genius the Chaser and secure a cash prize 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) (AD) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay’s
Hotel Hell (r) (AD) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA (r) 12.00
Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Come Dine with Me.
Four contestants host dinner parties in East Yorkshire (r)
1.05 My Kitchen Rules. Friends Tosin and Genevieve
prepare a fragrant Thai crab curry 2.10 Countdown. With
John Challis joining Susie Dent in Dictionary Corner 3.00
A Place in the Sun. A Leeds couple plan to buy a villa on
the Algarve (r) 4.00 Coast vs Country. Retired Doctor
Dilip and wife Jyotsna search for a family home in
Hampshire 5.00 Four in a Bed. The third visit of the week
is to the Guesthouse East in Eastbourne 5.30 Steph and
Dom’s One Star to Five Star. Steph and Dom challenge the
owners to put on a crab and ale evening, 6.00 The
Simpsons. Homer is forced to drive Bart to a brat camp in
another state, meaning he has to miss a trip to Las Vegas
with Moe. While they are away, Marge manages to get
herself arrested (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Darren, Jack and
Luke are in peril as paramedics come to the rescue.
Elsewhere, Frankie is still oblivious to the danger her
family are in after the explosion (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and his guests talk about the issues of the day,
with viewers calling in to offer their opinions 11.15 Can’t
Pay? We’ll Take It Away. The agents chase up a £3,000
deposit owed by a landlord to his tenant, and officers try
to recover £25,000 from a nightclub owner for unpaid
solicitor fees (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.15 The
Hotel Inspector Returns. Alex Polizzi returns to First In
Last Out in Winchester, Hampshire. On her previous visit,
low standards of cleanliness led to her refusing to stay
overnight at the B&B (r) 1.10 Access 1.15 Home and
Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS. A marine
dies while saving the life of a foreign defence secretary,
and the team is asked to protect the politician’s daughter
while she studies in America (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: Mr
Miracle (12, TVM, 2014) A trainee guardian angel
makes a bumbling attempt to help a woman turn her life
around following the death of her father. Fantasy comedy,
with Rob Morrow and Britt Irvin (AD) 5.00 5 News at 5
5.30 Neighbours. Tyler falls victim to Hamish’s plan (r)
(AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Justin invites Raffy to move
back in with her family (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 Emmerdale Rhona feels
frustrated when problems arise at
the school (AD)
8PM
8.00 Eat Well for Less?
Gregg Wallace and Chris Bavin help
a single mother from Amersham,
Buckinghamshire change her excessive
shopping habits in an attempt to lower
her food bills (7/8) (AD)
8.00 Hidden Cardiff with Will Millard
Adventurer Will Millard investigates
Cardiff’s hidden history in an urban
exploration of the Welsh capital,
finding out how Cardiff went from
a tiny town to a thriving city.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
8.00 Gino’s Italian Coastal Escape
New series. The chef returns to
his homeland of Italy.
See Viewing Guide (1/8)
8.30 Coronation Street David gets wind
of Gary’s big secret (AD)
8.00 Ugly House to Lovely House with
George Clarke George challenges
innovative architect Greg Blee with
transforming an impractical, upside
down house with a mishmash of living
spaces for Martyn and Sally (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors In this
episode the doctors treat patients
suffering from chronic pain, including a
man who is HIV positive and a woman
struggling to sit due to excruciating
boils around her groin (AD)
9.00 The Apprentice As Lord Sugar
celebrates his 70th birthday, the
contestants are tasked to a shopping
spree across London to purchase items
that mark milestones in his life and
career. See Viewing Guide
9.00 Trust Me I’m a Doctor: Mental
Health Special A special programme
dedicated to mental health, with
experts answering questions
surrounding the impact that lack
of sleep, stress and laughter can
have on our mental wellbeing.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 Doc Martin It is the annual Portwenn
versus Port Carran gig race,
and Morwenna needs to find a
replacement rower when Eric
dislocates his finger (7/8) (AD)
9.00 Grand Designs Following the work
of Ed and Rowena Waghorn as they
continue to build a handcrafted,
five-bedroom house in Herefordshire,
10 years in the making (AD)
9.00 Big Family Values: More Kids
Than Cash New series. Documentary
exploring the struggles faced by
parents at the head of big families,
beginning with an introduction to a
single mum of seven who works six
days a week (1/4)
Late
11PM
10PM
7PM
7.00 The Super-Rich and Us Jacques
Peretti looks at why Britain has
more billionaires per capita than any
other country on Earth, and the effects
they are having on the nation’s
economy (1/2) (r) (AD)
9PM
IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MUSIC
7.00 The One Show Alex Jones and Amol
Rajan present the live magazine show
featuring topical reports from around
the UK and big-name studio guests
7.30 Coronation Street Gary returns
home to worrying news of Nicola (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.55 Robbie’s Story: Stand
Up to Cancer
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 The Apprentice: You’re Fired
Interview with the show’s freshly
rejected candidate (5/12)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.00 Man Down Dan embarks on a journey
to rediscover a truth about a
misremembered friendship (2/6) (AD)
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 A Question of Sport
Guests include Jimmy Floyd
Hasselbaink and Alun Wyn Jones
10.30 Newsnight Presented by
Evan Davis and Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
11.15 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat
and Tears New series.
The experiences of seven newly
qualified doctors at Wolverhampton’s
New Cross Hospital (1/8) (AD)
11.45 The Ganges with Sue Perkins
Halfway down the river, Sue stops
off in the ancient city of Varanasi,
and discovers the spiritual significance
of the place for India’s 950 million
Hindus (2/3) (r) (AD)
11.15 Army: Behind the New Frontlines
Following the British Army as they are
deployed on a UN peacekeeping
operation to protect thousands of
civilians escaping South Sudan’s civil
war. Last in the series (AD)
11.15 Uefa Champions League
Highlights A round-up of the
matchday four fixtures, which included
Liverpool v NK Maribor, Napoli v
Manchester City and Tottenham
Hotspur v Real Madrid from tonight
10.30 999: What’s Your Emergency? The
return of the programme following the
emergency services in Wiltshire, with
the first edition focusing crimes
involving women being targeted by
predatory males (r)
12.15am Peaky Blinders Thomas Shelby’s wedding day
arrives (1/6) (r) (AD) 1.10 Sign Zone: See Hear. Weekly
magazine for the deaf and hard of hearing (r) (SL) 1.40
Russia with Simon Reeve. Simon’s final leg takes him
from Crimea to St Petersburg (3/3) (r) (AD, SL)
2.40-3.40 Eat Well for Less? (r) (AD, SL)
12.35am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 May the Best House Win. Homeowners
in the Derbyshire countryside compete (r) (SL) 3.50 ITV
Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. The host
invites guests to air their differences (r) (SL)
12.50am-6.00 BBC News
10.45 After the News With Johnny Mercer
and Shami Chakrabarti
11.30 Feral Families Documentary
following children whose parents are
rebelling against orthodoxy by raising
them with no rules (r) (AD)
12.30am Pokerstars Championship Highlights of the
event from Monte Carlo 1.25 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA. A failing restaurant in Fremont,
California (r) 2.15 FILM: Red Lights (15, 2012)
Thriller starring Cillian Murphy 4.15 Escape (r) (AD)
5.10 Draw It! (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
7.00 Traffic Cops: On the Edge
A high-speed chase in Bradford is
ended when CS gas is used to bring a
determined speeder to justice, while
teams track two cars thought to be
connected with firearms offences (r)
10.00 Shannon Matthews: What
Happened Next Documentary
examining Shannon Matthews’
kidnapping, and why people close to
the case believe the police should
reopen their investigation (r)
11.00 The Murder of April Jones: 5
Years On Documentary examining
the events surrounding the murder of
the 5-year-old in 2012 and looking at
how those closest to her are
fighting to prevent such a tragedy
happening again (r)
12.30am Criminals: Caught on Camera How CCTV is
used to enforce a drinking ban on a park (r) 1.00
SuperCasino. Live interactive gaming 3.10 Law & Order:
Special Victims Unit (r) (AD) 4.00 Tribal Teens (r) (SL)
4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 House Busters (r) (SL)
5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Wednesday November 1 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
Gino’s Italian
Coastal Escape
ITV, 8pm
Foodies are spoilt this
week, with Nigella
Lawson back on
Monday nights and,
tonight, the return
of Gino D’Acampo.
The telegenic chef
is travelling around
the west coast of his
homeland, starting in
the beautiful town of
Positano where he sips
chilled prosecco and
knocks up a caprese
salad on a sailing
boat. He then takes
a moped to Solano,
the birthplace of fresh
pasta, while in the
picturesque fishing
village of Chitarra he
enjoys an evening of
anchovy fishing. You’ll
be booking your holiday
on the Amalfi coast
before the credits roll.
The Apprentice
BBC One, 9pm
Alan Sugar sets the
candidates a fiendishly
tricky challenge to
mark his 70th birthday.
Each team must source
nine items, all of which
have a connection
to the silver-bearded
business titan,
including an Amstrad
computer, a Tottenham
Hotspur scarf, some
rugelach (a type of
Jewish pastry) and
something made in
1947. This is Sugar’s
favourite task because
it’s all about him
— sorry, I mean,
negotiating. However,
because the fines for
missing items are hefty,
it actually boils down to
which team manages to
get everything on the
list, rather than
negotiating skills.
Bounty Hunters
Sky One, 10pm
Jack Whitehall and
Freddy Syborn’s
comedy-action-thriller
hybrid is rattling along
nicely. The odd couple
of buttoned-up Barnaby
(Whitehall) and
Brooklyn bounty
hunter Nina (Rosie
Perez) continue trying
to dig his family out of
the mess left behind by
Barnaby’s roguish
antiques-dealer father,
Nigel (Robert Lindsay).
Some may find
moments of slapstick
and hilarity (the
car chase involving
Barnaby’s tiny vehicle
and the elevator slide in
Tate Modern) rubbing
up against the serious
plot (the trade in looted
Syrian antiquities)
jarring, but it just
about gets away with it.
Sport Choice
BT Sport 2, 7pm
Tottenham Hotspur
welcome Real Madrid
to Wembley Stadium
(kick-off 7.45pm), with
two of Europe’s most
swashbuckling sides
slugging it out for the
top spot in Champions
League group H. In
Naples, Manchester
City face Napoli
(BT Sport 3, 7pm).
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am The Flash (r) 7.00 Modern Family (r)
8.00 It’s Me or the Dog (r) (AD) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) 10.00 Dogs: An Amazing Animal
Family (r) 11.00 Modern Family (r) 12.00 NCIS:
Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r)
5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 DC’s Legends of Tomorrow. The team has
to go to the future to capture a time traveller
9.00 Marvel’s Inhumans. Maximus
sends an Inhuman to find Medusa
10.00 Bounty Hunters. Barnaby learns more
of his dad’s secrets. See Viewing Guide
10.45 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
11.45 A League of Their Own. With John
McEnroe, Jimmy Carr and Alesha Dixon (r) (AD)
12.45am PL Greatest Games (r) 1.00 The
Force: North East. A burglar is arrested twice
within days (r) 2.00 Living the Dream (r) 3.00
Brit Cops: War on Crime (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 Urban Secrets (r)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) (AD)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r)
5.00 House. Double bill (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
The team investigates the murders of the
owners of a mansion that is up for sale, while
Sara looks into what appears to be a case of
cannibalism at a high school (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Jamie and Danny argue about
how to deal with a reckless NYPD rookie (r)
9.00 Ray Donovan. In the final episode,
Ray goes to New York to arrange a surgery that
may save Smitty. Last in the series
10.15 Spielberg. Acclaimed documentarian
Susan Lacy pulls back the curtain on the
remarkable career of one of the most illustrious
filmmakers in the world, Steven Spielberg (r)
12.55am The Sopranos (r) 3.10 Tin Star (r)
4.05 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Highway Patrol (r) (AD) 12.00 Road
Wars 1.00pm UK Border Force (r) 2.00 Nothing
to Declare (r) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 The Real A&E (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E. The team assists when a
13-year-old cyclist is hit by a car (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. A civil contractor disappears
after leaking top-secret information (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. The team travels to
Houston to search for a serial rapist (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds. The team investigates a
series of murders in Atlantic City (r)
11.00 Stalker. Janice questions Perry about the
disturbing pictures he drew of Beth (r)
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 1.00am Criminal Minds
(r) 2.00 Cold Case (r) 3.00 Road Wars. Police
officers combat vehicle crime (r) 4.00 UK Border
Force (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am From Berlin to New York 7.45 South
Bank Masterclasses: Joan Armatrading
8.00 Auction (AD) 8.30 Watercolour Challenge
9.00 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 10.00
Master of Photography (AD) 11.00 Landscape
Artist of the Year 2017 12.00 Discovering: Olivia
de Havilland (AD) 1.00pm Tales of the
Unexpected 2.00 Watercolour Challenge 2.30
Auction (AD) 3.00 The Art Show (AD) 4.00 Too
Young to Die (AD) 5.00 Discovering: Genesis
5.30 Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: William Holden (AD)
7.00 Casanova Undressed
8.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
9.00 Passions (AD)
10.00 The First Monday in May
11.40 FILM: Cops (U, 1922) (b/w)
12.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
1.00am Tales of the Unexpected 2.00 Auction
(AD) 2.30 Eric Clapton Plays Baloise Session
4.00 Beethoven, Brahms & Chopin
5.00 The South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Total Goals 9.00 Live Ladies European
Tour Golf: The Fatima Bint Mubarak Ladies Open.
Coverage of the opening day of the tournament
at Saadiyat Beach Golf Club in Abu Dhabi, which
was won last year by America’s Beth Allen
1.00pm Live On the Range: Turkish Airlines
Open. From the Carya Golf Club in Antalya,
Turkey 2.00 Live International T20 Cricket: India
v New Zealand. Coverage of the opening fixture
in the three-match series, staged at Feroz Shah
Kotla in Delhi 5.00 Live ATP Masters Tennis:
The Paris Masters. Coverage of the third day at
the AccorHotels Arena in Paris, featuring the
conclusion of the second round
7.30 Live EFL: Preston North End v Aston Villa
(Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of the Championship
fixture, which takes place at Deepdale
10.00 The Debate. Premier League news
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the day’s
talking points and a look ahead to the events
that are likely to make the news tomorrow
12.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Nolan Live
11.40 A Question of Sport 12.10am Junior
Doctors: Blood, Sweat and Tears (AD) 12.40
The Ganges with Sue Perkins (r) (AD)
1.40-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 8.00pm Rip Off Britain:
Live. The week of live programmes from
Glasgow concludes. Last in the series
8.30-9.00 Children’s Ward
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm Family Finders
1.30 Locomotion: Dan Snow’s History of
Railways (r) (AD) 2.30 Politics Scotland
3.30-4.15 The Code (r)
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm Hidden
Cardiff with Will Millard (r) (AD)
8.00-9.00 Eat Well for Less? (AD)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Crime Files.
New series. Andrea Byrne investigates how
police solved some of Wales’ worst crimes
DIGITAL RADIO • APP • VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
Michael Portillo travels through Spain and
Portugal, on the pilgrims’ trail to Santiago
de Compostela in Galicia (7/10) (r) (AD)
8.00 Queen Victoria’s Letters: A Monarch
Unveiled. Biographer AN Wilson uses Queen
Victoria’s journals and letters to explore her
personal life in the four decades following
Prince Albert’s death (1/2) (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: Mrs Brown (PG, 1997) An
outspoken Scottish manservant helps the
bereaved Queen Victoria overcome her grief
following the death of her husband. Period
drama starring Judi Dench and Billy Connolly
10.40 Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime. A
programme celebrating the life and career of
Billy Connolly, as three Scottish artists each
create a new portrait of the comedian (r) (AD)
11.40 The Toilet: An Unspoken History. Ifor ap
Glyn examines the social history of the toilet (r)
12.40am Timewatch: Young Victoria (r) (AD)
1.30 Birth of the British Novel (r)
2.30-3.40 I Know Who You Are (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r)
(AD) 12.00 New Girl. Double bill. (r) (AD)
1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00
The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 3.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 5.00
The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 5.30 Stage School
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Streetmate (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Don’t Tell the Bride. Bride-to-be Maria
dreams of a traditional church wedding
10.00 First Dates Abroad. Ciaran fills up on
Dutch courage for his date with Bami (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 Rude Tube (r) 1.05am Don’t Tell the
Bride (r) 2.10 First Dates Abroad (r) (AD)
3.00 First Dates (r) (AD) 4.00 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 4.25 Black-ish (r) (AD)
4.50 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) 9.30 FILM:
Harvey (U, 1950) Comedy starring James
Stewart (b/w) 11.35 Kirstie’s Vintage Gems (r)
11.55 Time Team (r) 2.00pm Four in a Bed (r)
4.50 A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
6.55 The Supervet. A Staffordshire bull terrier
suffers paralysis in its back legs (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows a
project to transform a classic 1920s cinema in
South Yorkshire into a family home, complete
with a hydraulic glass wall that opens up one
side of the house (1/11) (r) (AD)
9.00 999: On the Frontline. A man falls
from a horse in Warwickshire (8/10)
10.00 Obsessive Compulsive Country
House Cleaners. The cleaners Sandra
and Richard head to the Poundisford Lodge in
Somerset, home to Josephine, an
acclaimed writer of ghost stories (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A cyclist is brought to
A&E after crashing face first into a car (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 999: On the Frontline (r) 2.05 Obsessive
Compulsive Country House Cleaners (r) (AD)
3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am Down to the Sea in Ships (PG,
1949) Seafaring adventure starring Lionel
Barrymore 1.25pm Imitation of Life (12,
1959) Drama starring Lana Turner 4.00 Von
Ryan’s Express (PG, 1965) Second World War
action adventure starring Frank Sinatra
6.20 Anna Karenina (12, 2012) The wife of a
government official becomes infatuated with a
married cavalry officer, leading to a scandalous
affair. Period drama starring Keira Knightley
8.50 The Killing of a Sacred Deer Interview
Special A behind-the-scenes look at the thriller
9.00 American Ultra (15, 2015) A store clerk
who is unaware he is a government sleeper
agent is targeted for assassination. Action
comedy starring Jesse Eisenberg
10.50 Wanderlust (15, 2012) A couple
looking for a fresh start stumble on a commune
of hippies and decide to turn their backs on the
modern world. Comedy starring Jennifer Aniston
12.45am-3.35 The Place Beyond the Pines
(15, 2012) A former motorcycle stunt rider
turns to crime to support his family, leading to a
conflict with a troubled, ambitious cop. Crime
drama starring Ryan Gosling (AD)
6.00am The Cube (r) 6.50 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records (r) 7.15 Dinner Date (r)
8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30 The Cube:
Celebrity Special (r) 9.30 The Ellen DeGeneres
Show (r) 10.20 Dinner Date (r) 11.20 Dress to
Impress (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.50 You’ve Been Framed! Gold Top 100
Weddings (r) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show
2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Melissa believes Alan
is not appreciated by members of his family (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Charlie agrees to
accompany Chelsea to couples counselling (r)
9.00 Celebrity Showmance. Lady Victoria Hervey
writes all over Jamie’s car
10.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.30am The
Cleveland Show (r) 1.30 Timewasters (r) (AD)
2.00 Ghosted (r) (AD) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r)
6.50 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 Wild at Heart (r)
(AD) 8.55 Judge Judy (r) 10.20 Inspector
Morse (r) 12.35pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.35
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 3.45 Inspector Morse (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. Rosie is attacked when
attending a broken-down vehicle stranded on the
moors, and the investigation leads Rob and
Rachel to make a chilling discovery (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Death mars the
opening night of a theatrical comedy
bound for Broadway (r) (AD)
8.00 Foyle’s War. When an RAF officer is
found hanged in a wood, the new chief
superintendent is quick to dismiss it as a
straightforward suicide (1/3) (r) (AD)
10.10 Lewis. Feature-length episode.
The detective investigates a possible link
between the disappearance of a senior police
officer and the discovery of a recently
embalmed body (3 & 4/6) (r) (AD)
12.00 Inspector Morse (r) 2.05am ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am Football’s Greatest: David Beckham (r)
6.15 The Chase (r) 7.55 Counting Cars (r) 8.40
Pawn Stars (r) 9.40 Ironside (r) 10.45 Quincy
ME (r) 11.50 The Sweeney (r) 12.50pm The
Avengers (r) 1.55 Ironside (r) 3.00 Quincy ME
(r) 4.00 The Sweeney (r) 5.00 The Avengers (r)
6.05 Storage Wars (r)
6.35 Storage Wars (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars (r)
7.35 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 Parking Wars (3/3) (r)
9.00 FILM: Transporter 3 (15, 2008)
Underworld courier Frank Martin transports the
kidnapped daughter of a crooked government
minister across Europe. Action thriller sequel
with Jason Statham and Natalya Rudakova (AD)
11.10 FILM: Dawn of the Dead (18, 2004)
A plague leaves the world overrun by zombies,
forcing the survivors to retreat to a shopping
mall — which is soon surrounded. Horror remake
starring Ving Rhames and Sarah Polley
1.15am The Sweeney. Carter’s wife is targeted
by a hit-and-run driver (r) 2.10 Ax Men (r) (SL)
3.00 Teleshopping. Buying goods
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice
Road Truckers 5.00 Impossible Engineering (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. The team learns about vans (AD)
7.00 Motorway Cops. Documentary series
following traffic police as they try to enforce the
law on some of Britain’s busiest highways
8.00 Top Gear. Motoring magazine (AD)
9.00 Taskmaster. Aisling Bea leaps cushions,
while Bob Mortimer educates us on Dumfries
and Galloway. Last in the series
10.00 Zapped. Brian heads to a trendy
new bar trying to make friends (AD)
10.40 Greg Davies: Firing Cheeseballs at a Dog.
The sell-out debut solo show by comedian
Greg Davies, in which he sets out to chronicle
the significant issues surrounding modern
life in his own irreverent style
12.00 Would I Lie to You? 12.40am Mock the
Week. 1.20 QI 2.00 Would I Lie to You? 2.40
Taskmaster. Aisling Bea leaps cushions 3.35 The
Indestructibles 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine 1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London’s Burning 4.00 Pie in the
Sky 5.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
6.00 A Fine Romance. Mike is having financial
trouble, so Laura decides to help out
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine.
Compo tries to serenade Nora Batty
7.20 As Time Goes By
8.00 Inspector George Gently.
A schoolgirl’s killing brings Gently into the
alien world of pop and media celebrity when it
turns out the victim’s best friend is a rising
television presenter (1/2) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. Brian and the team
investigate the death of a professor who
perished after falling off the roof of his college,
and learn he was involved in a feud over
teaching methods (2/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London’s Burning
2.00 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Dickinson’s Real Deal 6.45 Britain in
Motion 7.10 Impossible Engineering (AD) 8.00
The Real Knights of the Round Table: A Time
Team Special 9.00 Walking Through History
10.00 The Russian Revolution in Colour
11.00 Impossible Engineering (AD) 12.00 The
Lost Dock of Liverpool: A Time Team Special
1.00pm Walking Through History 2.00 Bahama
Blue 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Porridge 4.45
Blackadder the Third (AD) 5.20 Whatever
Happened to the Likely Lads?
6.00 WW2 Air Crash Detectives
7.00 WW2 Air Crash Detectives. The last flight
of General Sikorski in 1943 (6/6)
8.00 The Russian Revolution in Colour.
The rise of Lenin’s totalitarian state (2/2)
9.00 The Great War in Numbers. The use of
forced labour to equip the German army (AD)
10.00 Porridge. Fletch tries to shirk his duties
10.40 Blackadder the Third. Edmund tries to
find a rich bride for Prince George (AD)
11.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
12.00 The Russian Revolution in Colour 1.00am
WW2 Air Crash Detectives 3.00 Home Shopping
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm-11.15 Scotland
Tonight 12.35am Teleshopping 1.35 After
Midnight 2.35 Storage Hoarders (r) 3.25 ITV
Nightscreen 4.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 12.35am Teleshopping
1.35-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puffin Rock) (r) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san
Rioghachd Bhig (Ben & Holly’s Little Kingdom)
(r) 5.50 Su Shiusaidh (Little Suzy’s Zoo) (r)
5.55 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse) 6.05
Dragonan: Reis chun an iomaill (Dragons: Race
to the Edge) 6.30 Dè a-nis? (What Now?) 7.00
Turas a’ Bhradain (The Salmon’s Journey) (r)
7.30 Speaking Our Language (r) 7.55 Earrann
Eachdraidh (History Shorts) (r) 8.00 An Là
(News) 8.30 Prosbaig 9.00 Bruadar a’ Bhàis (A
Dream of Death) (r) 10.00 Fonn Fonn Fonn (r)
10.30 Horo Gheallaidh (Celtic Music Sessions)
(r) 11.00-12midnight Struileag (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Yr Ysgol (r) 6.15 Teulu Mewn
Bacpac (r) 6.25 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 6.40
Sam Tân (r) 6.50 Nico Nôg 7.00 Deian a Loli
7.15 Olobobs 7.20 Digbi Draig (r) 7.35
Gwdihw (r) 7.50 Mwnci’n Dweud Mwnci’n
Gwneud (r) 8.00 Octonots (r) 8.10 Wmff (r)
8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r) 8.35 Y Teulu Mawr
(r) 8.45 Yn yr Ardd (r) 9.00 Popi’r Gath (r)
9.10 Stiw (r) 9.20 Ben a Mali a’u Byd Bach O
Hud (r) 9.35 Tomos a’i Ffrindiau (r) 9.45
Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 10.00 Yr Ysgol (r) 10.15
Teulu Mewn Bacpac (r) 10.25 Blero yn Mynd i
Ocido (r) 10.40 Sam Tân (r) 10.50 Nico Nôg
(r) 11.00 Deian a Loli (r) 11.15 Olobobs (r)
11.20 Digbi Draig (r) 11.35 Gwdihw (r) 11.50
Mwnci’n Dweud Mwnci’n Gwneud (r) 12.00
News S4C a’r Tywydd 12.05pm Heno (r) 12.30
Cefn Gwlad (r) (AD) 1.00 Antur Caradoc (r)
1.30 Portmeirion (r) 2.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
3.05 Ar y Lein (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh:
Bernard (r) 5.05 Stwnsh: Y Dyfnfor 5.25
Stwnsh: Ni Di Ni (r) 5.30 Stwnsh: Rhyfel Mawr
Trwy Lygaid Ifanc (r) 6.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad (r) 6.30 Celwydd Noeth.
Quiz show hosted by Nia Roberts (r) 7.00 Heno
7.35 Beddgelert. Short film based on the 13th
century Welsh myth of Gelert. Tragedy strikes
in a most unexpected way for Llywelyn, his
newborn son and his faithful hound, Gelert
7.55 Chwedloni: Stori Anwen 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm. Kelly realises Sioned is trying to frame
her. Meanwhile, Vicky sees a chance to steal
some jumpers from Awyr Iach (AD) 8.25 Mike
Phillips a’r Senghenydd Sirens. Mike and the
Senghenydd Sirens turn their attention towards
the league, and the team learn a different way
of preparing their bodies for the big game
ahead 9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30 FILM:
Solomon a Gaenor (1999) (AD) 11.2512.30am Dylan ar Daith (r)
14
Wednesday November 1 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7485
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3169
5
6
18
2
11
10
Scrabble ® Challenge No 1992
6
13
26
12
15
7
13
8
7
22
W P
7
25
14
5
2
14
10
13
24
9
10
3W
14
11 12
13
14 15
2L
3W
w 2W
2L
i
2L
2W
u l
r l
nuance 3L
e 2L
d
2L
t
B
3L
8
9
2
10
23
11
15
13
25
16
17
1
6
2
8
9
12
6
6
11
22
25
21
4
17
14
21
26
3
14
15
12
4
15
12
4
2
8
26
26
2
10
7
2L
14
25
10
7
17
25
13
14
26
10
2L
17
18
15
13
7
2
3
4
1
2L
15
2L
A
C
2L
D
E
F
G
3W
H
I
2L
19
17
6
23
19
2
6
6
16
6
21
12
17
21
What’s the highest score using
the Q with this rack?
15
22
1
14
26
21
7
23
2
11
21
7
2
11
6
18
21
7
15
aeghsuz
23
14
11
6
6
What’s the highest score using
the Z with this rack?
24
4
1 Spoil the appearance of (6)
7 Light cotton fabric (6)
8 Fatiguing; boring (8)
10 Noble, lofty (7)
11 Killer whale (7)
12 Dwelling (5)
14 Musical entertainment (5)
15 Of sovereigns (5)
Solution to Crossword 7484
MUC
I
H
L OR
K
I
M I S
A
T
NUM
A
RA S
E R
C L O
A S
P A E
US NAM I
U A A
DPR I V Y S
P
L
A
NOME R
I
S D R
B ER TOD
D E O
P MN EMO
M
I
M
Y I NG AG
E M T
AN AGE L
B
R
E
C
C
I
A
N
U
R
S
E
I A
L
A L
A
K Y
T E
X
I C
E
E E
D
S S
19 Visual symbolism (7)
20 Disbursements of money
as, eg, compensation (7)
22 Army waking signal (8)
23 Give (to charity) (6)
24 Ceased arguing (4,2)
Down
1 Old and weak time of life (6)
2 According to the rules (8)
3 Underground waste tank (8)
4 Highest point (4)
5 Greek sun god (6)
6 Several; frogmen (6)
9 Transfix (9)
12 Cuban dance (8)
13 Be the basis of (8)
16 Public speaker (6)
17 Ignoring right and wrong (6)
18 Heraldic form of dragon (6)
21 Long arduous walk (4)
17
6
7
20
6
11
6
25
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
W
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
P
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 3985
B
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3986
T
G
Z
E
E
S
R
A
R
E
U
S
O
W
A
U
U
A
T
N
V
I
A
T
H
P
C
E
R
R
R
A
E
R
F
T
I
O
O
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
L
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4161
Futoshiki No 3033
∨
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE® is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ©Mattel 2017
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
B
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
21
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
Kakuro No 1992
<
21
8
25
33
27
27
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
4
17
17
3
28
8
31
∨
>
29
∨
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
16
16
17
20
17
19
12
29
6
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
11
16
38
16
23
38
7
>
13
16
16
16
3
∧
20
16
33
5
29
17
7
3
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
beiqnuy
21
23
14
36
29
© PUZZLER MEDIA
6
20
the times | Wednesday November 1 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Merben Roque
Black: Nigel Short
Negros Open, Philippines 2017
London System
1 d4 Nf6 2 Bf4 d5 3 e3 c5 4 c3
Nc6 5 Nd2 Bf5 6 Ngf3
This is a little too passive. White
should play 6 Qb3 if he wishes to
test Black’s opening choice of the
early development of the bishop
to f5.
6 ... e6 7 h3 a6
Eliminating any thought that
White might have had of developing a bishop to b5 and seeking to
combine this with Ne5.
8 Be2 Bd6
The opening has not been conducted with any great vigour or
energy by White and the position
is now completely equal.
9 Bxd6 Qxd6 10 0-0 0-0 11 Nh4
Rfe8
A courageous decision, permitting his pawns to be split in order
to generate piece activity. Ever
since his world championship
match in 1993 against Garry Kasparov, Short has been known as
________
árD DrDkD]
àDpD DpD ]
ßp1nD hpD]
ÞD DpDpDp]
Ý D D D D]
ÜDN) ) DP]
ÛP)QDB)PD]
ÚD DRDRI ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
17 Rd2
A rather clumsy placing of his
rook though any kind of disaster
for White remains hard to foresee. In any case, 17 Nd4 is both
safe and solid.
17 ... Rad8 18 Rfd1 f4
An important tactical strike,
exploiting the weakness of f2.
19 exf4 Ne4 20 Bf3 Nxd2 21
Qxd2 a5 22 Qc1
This is far too passive. By striking back in similar vein with 22 f5,
White could easily hold the balance.
22 ... a4 23 Nd4 Kg7 24 f5 Nxd4 25
Rxd4 a3 26 bxa3 Re5 27 fxg6 fxg6
28 Qd2 Qc7 29 Bxd5 b6 30 Bb3
Rxd4 31 cxd4 Re4 32 d5 Qe5 33
g3 Re1+ 34 Kh2 Re2 35 Qf4 Qxf4
36 gxf4 Rxf2+ 37 Kg3 Rd2 38 Kf3
Kf6 39 a4 Rd3+ 40 Ke4 Rxh3 41
d6 h4 42 Kd4 White resigns
________
á D D 4kD] Winning Move
àD D DqDp]
ß DpD Dp!] White to play. This position is from
Antalya 2017.
ÞDpDpDrD ] Guseinov-Gantner,
The key to this position is that the white
ÝpDbG DRD] bishop on d4 is generating intolerable
ÜD ) D DP] pressure against the weak black kingside.
Û ) D )PD] Can you spot White’s finish?
ÚD D $ I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
30 - Avoiding the guess –
Elimination & Throw-in
Take this suit:
Dummy
♣KJ2
West
East
Declarer
♣A103
It’s a classic two-way finesse
position. As we’ve been learning,
you should delay deciding which
opponent to play for ♣Q. Play on
other suits to learn more about the
opposing hands. You are likely to
get clues but no certainty.
The one certain way of picking up
♣Q — without even needing to
know who has it — is to get the
opponents to lead the suit. Naturally,
they’ll be reluctant to do so.
Therefore you must remove their
safe options (“Elimination”) before
putting them on lead (“Throw-in”).
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
Deal A
♠ Q 10 8 5
♠A 4 2
♥K J 5 3
♦6 3
♣K J 7 3
N
♠J 9 7 3
♥10 8
♥9
W E
♦K 10 7 4
S
♦Q J 9 5 2
♣Q 8 2
♣9 6 5
♠K 6
Contract: 6♥ ♥ AQ 7 6 4 2
♦A 8
Lead: ♦Q
♣A 10 4
S
W
N
E
Pass
2NT(1)
Pass
1♥
6♥
End
(1) Jacoby — game-forcing heart raise.
On Deal A, you win ♦Q with
♦A, draw trumps and eliminate
33
OF IT
MEDIUM
72
x 3 – 46
HARDER
109 + 978
spades by playing ♠K, ♠6 to ♠A
and ruffing ♠4. Now comes the
throw-in. You exit with the second
diamond and do not mind which
defender wins. If they lead a diamond or a spade, you have a “ruff
and discard”, and can ruff in
dummy and discard ♣4 from hand.
Now you do not have to worry
about ♣Q. If they lead a club, ♣Q
is picked up. Slam made.
+7
x 2 + 12
70%
OF IT
x 3 – 776
25%
OF IT
–8
SQUARE
IT
x 3 + 78 + 1/5 + 98
OF IT
80%
OF IT
+ 987
13/25
OF IT
– 851
+4
25%
OF IT
90%
OF IT
+ 58
2/3
+ 976
OF IT
Killer Tricky No 5700
11
23
15min
23
13
3
9
11
18
♠ Q 10 8
N
20
20
♥10 8
♥9
W E
♦7 6
♦KQ 10 9 5 4 2 S
♣Q 10 5 2
♣9 6
♠K 6
Contract: 6♥ ♥ AQ 7 6 4 2
♦A 8
Lead: ♦K
♣A 8 4
S
6♥
W
3♦
End
N
Dbl
E
Pass
You win ♦K with ♦A, draw
trumps (West with one) and eliminate
spades, ♠K, over to ♠A and ruff ♠4
(West following to all three).
Count West’s shape. He
advertised seven diamonds with his
3♦ bid, and has one heart and (at
least) three spades. Ergo — he has
(at most) two clubs. Do not exit
with a diamond — yet — or West
has a safe club exit and you’ll still
lose the third club. Cash ♣AK,
stripping West of his clubs, before
exiting with ♦J, knowing West will
win ♦Q and have to give ruff and
discard — you’ll ruff in dummy,
shed ♣8 from hand and claim your
slam. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
1
6
8
9
7
5
17
21
12
7
5
13
10
39
55min
12
24
15
15
16
7
20
12
5
2
8
6
8
1
3
2
9
7
6
5
4
9
4
2
8
6
5
3
1
7
7
5
6
3
4
1
2
9
8
5
6
7
9
2
4
1
8
3
4
2
8
1
3
6
9
7
5
1
8
9
4
5
3
7
6
2
6
3
5
7
1
2
8
4
9
2
7
4
6
8
9
5
3
1
5
6
2
1
3
9
4
8
7
8
3
9
4
7
6
5
2
1
1
4
7
2
8
5
3
6
9
3
8
5
7
6
2
9
1
4
2
7
1
8
9
4
6
5
3
4
9
6
3
5
1
8
7
2
6
2
3
9
1
8
7
4
5
7
5
4
6
2
3
1
9
8
9
1
8
5
4
7
2
3
6
=
1
14
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
=
84
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 9 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
We’ve
= 24 works?
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
2 3
3
6
2
3
2
4
12
B
B
QUORU
R
A
AGOG
L
S A XOP
R
V
R E J
S
R
TW I L I
E
O
BABOO
T
K
2
4
1
1
2
7
9
I
M
P
I M
S
HO
D
C
E
E X HUM
E
A
P
P UR I T
E
I
Y
N I S T
M
Z
U V E NA T E
R
N
A
GH T
T I L
E
R
U O
N
AR T F U
T
P
U
S
3
9
2
1
8
6
4
5
7
6
7
1
5
4
3
2
8
9
8
4
5
9
7
2
3
1
6
5
3
9
8
2
1
6
7
4
7
1
8
5
3
9
2
4
6
3
5
2
4
6
1
9
8
7
4
6
9
7
2
8
3
1
5
6
3
5
1
8
4
7
2
9
1
6
8
4
3
7
9
2
5
9
1
7
2
6
8
5
4
3
2
5
6
3
1
4
7
9
8
4
8
3
7
9
5
1
6
2
9
2
4
3
7
6
1
5
8
1
8
7
9
5
2
4
6
3
2
7
3
8
4
5
6
9
1
5
4
1
6
9
3
8
7
2
8
9
6
2
1
7
5
3
4
2
2 < 3
5
2
3
5
∨
2 > 1
1
∧
4 < 5
1
2 < 3
2
4
4
+
8
4
1
4
x
x
x
÷
3
7
1
∧
4
2
6
x
-
+
x
Y
Suko 2070
D
L
L
4
7
2
8
6
3
9
1
5
1
8
9
5
7
4
2
3
6
3
5
6
1
2
9
4
8
7
2
9
1
7
3
6
8
5
4
8
3
4
2
9
5
7
6
1
5
6
7
4
8
1
3
9
2
6
4
8
3
5
2
1
7
9
9
2
3
6
1
7
5
4
8
7
1
5
9
4
8
6
2
3
S
G
T
A
G
R
R
A
I
I
L
N
D
U
L
L
E
C
A
I
D
E
Lexica 3984
4
+
E
Lexica 3983
1
4 > 3
5
Set Square 1994
2
Scrabble 1991
TOPIARY
A7 down (27)
FOGBOUND
A15 down (135)
Sudoku 9422
7
2
4
6
5
9
8
3
1
Futoshiki 3032
Cell Blocks 3051
19
x
=
60
3
∧
5
21
x
Killer 5699
23
19
-
Sudoku 9421
3
9
1
5
7
8
4
2
6
9
20
+
+
4 3 1
3 9 1 2
1
3
9 7
9 5 6 3
8 7
5
1 2 4
5 3 1 2
1
3 1
9 7
KenKen 4160
20
= 38 from 1-9 are
x
÷
x
8
22
All the digits
-
x
3
Killer 5698
Killer Deadly No 5701
9
x
Sudoku 9420
28
4
Codeword 3168
6
8
9 6
7 8
7
3 9
1 5
7 9
4
8 6 9 7 3
9 8 7 5
3
32
♠J 9 7 5 3
9
7
3
1
5
22
16
2
2 2
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Solutions
21
26
♠A 4 2
♥K J 5 3
♦J 3
♣K J 7 3
x
Kakuro 1991
10
30
22
2 4
2 2 2
Yesterday’s answers
biro, bort, brio, bro, orb, orbit, port,
pro, prob, probit, probity, pry, rib, riot,
rip, rob, ropy, rot, roti, ryot, tiro, tor,
trio, trip, troy, try, tyro
7
8
12
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 7 words, average;
10, good; 14, very good; 18, excellent
8
3
Set Square No 1995
Dealer: West, Vulnerability: Neither
Deal B
4
Polygon
9
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
1/3
EASY
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Both Nigel Short and the world
champion Magnus Carlsen have
recently been employing queenside opening lines that omit or
defer c2-c4 in favour of an early
Bg5 (Short’s preference) or an
early Bf4, the London System, as
favoured by Carlsen. Tomorrow
and Friday I shall be reviewing
recent books on the London System. In today’s game Short faces
the world champion’s current
favourite and gives an object
lesson in how to respond as Black.
an advocate of this type of situation where piece activity compensates for shattered pawns.
12 Nxf5 exf5 13 dxc5 Qxc5 14
Nb3 Qb6
Chances remain equal. Black’s
pawn structure is suspect but
within a short space of time all of
his pieces will stand on active
squares.
15 Qc2 g6 16 Rad1 h5
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Flip side
Cell Blocks No 3052
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
5
-
x
9
Quiz 1 Mohandas K Gandhi or Mahatma Gandhi
2 Julius Caesar 3 SS Great Eastern 4 Unknown
subject or unidentified subject (of an investigation)
5 Baku 6 The Aristocrats 7 The Aristocats
8 Sampha (Sisay) 9 Ukulele 10 A Suitable Boy
11 Stuart Davis 12 Aye-aye (Daubentonia
madagascariensis) 13 A sour soup from Vietnam
14 Livio Berruti — who won in 1960 15 Édith
Piaf — born Édith Giovanna Gassion
C
W
R
O
F
E
O
V
R
O
M
B
I
D
L
T
T
S
A
P
A
I
T
E
Word watch
Blatherskite (c) Nonsense
or foolish talk
Blate (a) Exhibiting
corpse-like qualities, eg, a
pallid tone or insensibility
Blad (b) A blotting-pad
Brain Trainer
Easy 5; Medium 616;
Harder 1,440
Chess 1 Re7! Qxe7 2
Rxg6+! Kf7 (2 ... hxg6 3
Qxg6+ mates) 3 Rg7+ Ke8
4 Qxc6+ is overwhelming
01.11.17
MindGames
Sudoku
Difficult No 9423
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Fiendish No 9424
3
7
3 4
8 7
1
6
1
5
5
9
7
8
4
8
7 9
8
4 5
8 3
6 5
Blatherskite
a Slippery
b A fop
c Nonsense
Blate
a Corpse-like
b To belittle
c A fish
Blad
a To blog on a
new craze
b A blotting-pad
c A Siberian warrior
Answers on page 15
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
3
7
8
7
5
9
3
2
6
2
2
4
9
3
5
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
1 Which Indian leader
wrote, in Gujarati, the
autobiography The
Story of My Experiments
with Truth?
11 Which American
modernist painted
Odol (1924), Egg Beater,
V (1930) and The
Mellow Pad (1945-51)?
2 Casca is the first
assassin to stab the
title character of which
Shakespeare play?
12 Which lemur is
the world’s largest
nocturnal primate?
15
Absheron Peninsula’s
southern shore?
6 Which 2005 film,
directed by Penn Jillette
and Paul Provenza, is
about the famous dirty
joke of the same name?
7 Duchess and her
kittens live with
madame Adelaide
Bonfamille in which
1970 Disney film?
5 Which capital, the
largest city on the
Caspian Sea, is
located on the
8 Which singer won the
2017 Mercury Prize for
his album Process?
9 The Hawaiian
name of which fourstringed guitar means
“jumping flea”?
10 Which Vikram Seth
novel centres on Mrs
Rupa Mehra’s efforts to
arrange the marriage
of her daughter Lata?
13 Typically made
with fish from the
Mekong River Delta,
what is canh chua?
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 951
14 Which Italian
athlete was the first
male 200m Olympic
champion who was not
from North America?
15 Which French singer
(1915-63) is pictured?
Answers on page 15
2
3
7
4
5
6
9
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
19
21
23
22
24
AMP
U
O
U T OCU
E
O
E T E RG
P
A T I ON
R
R
A N A E
C
T
U T S I
O O
E R A NG
S E DC A
T
E
T
A R I
E
E
D
S
R I ME S
S
A
U
GR E E
A
C
S T H E T
P
E
R
I N S HO
R
L
P L
E D
R S
O
E S
O
T
N E
A
I C
H
R E
S
O T
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Joker
8
10
C
H
A
M
P
E
R
S
S
T
U
D
The Times Quick Cryptic No 952
1
9 5 1
5
4
9
Across
1 Self-assertive dog biting part of
leg (7)
5 Stop circulating mail (4)
7 What’s ruled in true metres (5)
8 Former newspaper, say (7)
10 One parliamentarian is a devil
(3)
11 Take down girl’s garment (9)
13 Outcry where university rower
embraces priest (6)
14 Decoration of lavish ceremony
leading to Order of Merit (6)
17 Mentioned earlier as help
about a vocal number? (9)
19 Self-importance displayed by
the gods (3)
20 Ban is to operate on worked
amber (7)
22 Herb is a man’s name (5)
23 Support Remain (4)
24 Slim profits ultimately got by
loan provider (7)
Down
1 Quiet and well-spoken —
having gone to pieces? (11)
4 8
2
3
4
5
6
9
12
15
16
18
21
Soldier’s eating new fish (7)
I am to act as a go-between
next (9)
Like a fry-up — grand, right
and simple (6)
Something in orange piping —
not fashionable or good (3)
Son cried and did some
housework (5)
What makes flat bread in a
cooker (5,6)
Like something one won’t
catch a video lab processing (9)
Very glad purchaser initially
rented (7)
Islands, distant ones with no
name (6)
Death notice about king in
revolution (5)
Take power from appeal to
God for some light (3)
7 6
3
6 7
9 7
5 4
1
2
9
GETTY IMAGES
4 In police procedural
TV shows, who or
what is an “unsub”?
9
1
5
6
7 4
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 Robert Howlett took
an 1857 photograph
of Isambard Kingdom
Brunel by the launching
chains of which ship?
3 1
4
9
6
5
8
3 5
PUZZLER MEDIA
5
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Super fiendish No 9425
8
7
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