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The Times Times 2 - 2 November 2017

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November 2 | 2017
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your coffee?
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2
1GT
Thursday November 2 2017 | the times
times2
‘You’ll never be
My ode to the MPs
who just can’t stop
being handsy, handsy
Deborah Ross
A
document
drawn up by
staff who
work with
Conservative
MPs accuses
40 Tories
of sexual
misconduct and harassment.
Widely disseminated, and known
as “the spreadsheet of shame’’, it
feels like a moment. That is, the
moment when the toxically male
culture at Westminster is blown
wide open. To memorialise such
an event it seems only right to
turn the document — also known
as “the dirty dossier” — into a
poem, which, in an ideal world,
one would write as a haiku:
Please keep your handsies
Entirely to yourselfies
It is not that hard
But since a haiku won’t get us
to the bottom of the page, here
is a longer poem, which, alas, I
can only base on the redacted
document, even though the
un-redacted document is
available online, should you be
interested in discovering who the
handsiest of the handsy gropers
might actually be. Now, the poem:
It would not surprise me.
“Tell the whip to wait. Tell my
constituents I’m done.
It’s the ‘handsy hour’ so come to
Daddy, hon!”
(Also, in some cases, “handsy
with men”,
When not otherwise
Being “urinated” on by them.)
“Inappropriate.” Yes, that over
and over too
“Inappropriate” with
journalists, “inappropriate” and
“a drunk”
“Inappropriate” with assistant,
“inappropriate” with staff
(And when dissent was
registered . . .
. . . Be a sport. It’s just a laugh.)
PAs “asked to buy sex toys”.
And the like.
Plus explicit texts, not safe
in lifts.
(Don’t mind me while I brush
against your tits . . .)
Olivier Sarbil filmed the battle for Mosul
up close while embedded with the
Iraqi special forces. By Richard Godwin
And always directed downward
To those junior in the chain.
So I think we can all agree
This is about . . . what, what?
Power. Fundamentally.
“Handsy”, “handsy”,
“inappropriate” and “handsy”.
This is the refrain from the
spreadsheet of shame,
But also there’s “affair”, “Ashley
Madison”, “NDA”
(That’s paying someone to keep
quiet, always a happy day).
And “odd sexual penchants”,
“prostitutes”. . .
. . . On and on it goes
Including “made her have an
abortion”,
Which made me want to throw.
This dossier, some are saying
Is a witch hunt, no career
should be destroyed.
But I am saying this:
It’s game over, boys.
GETTY
Handsy
“Handsy”, “handsy”, and yet
more “handsy”
“Handsy with women”, “handsy
with females”
“Handsy at parties”, “handsy
in taxis”.
Handsy to the thigh, handsy
to the knee.
. . . If there were even a
Westminster “handsy hour”
I once
ridiculed
Debbie
McGee.
Now I
love her
Is everyone else rooting
for Debbie McGee on
Strictly as much I am?
Does everyone else
even record it and then
watch only Debbie
McGee because they
just don’t care about
anyone else?
She’s an amazing
and wonderful dancer.
(Those standing splits!)
But, more than that,
she just touches me
so. I’m trying to work
out why. Perhaps it
has something to do
with her being subject
to ridicule for much
of her life.
Mrs Merton ridiculed
her. Louis Theroux
ridiculed her. And, just
to prove that I don’t
have anything against
ridicule per se, I also
ridiculed her when,
once, I went to
interview her and her
husband, the magician
Paul Daniels, at home.
In my defence, they
did have a toilet seat
that, when your bottom
hit it, emitted loud
mechanical laughter,
which did not endear
me to anyone in the
household. And also,
when Debbie told Paul
that we were both
named “Deborah
Anne”, he did say to
her: “Oh good. I could
have an affair with her,
call out her name in the
night, and you would
never know.”* This also
did not endear me to
the household.
As much as McGee
always laughed
everything off, it must
have hurt — it doesn’t
ever not hurt, at some
level — and it’s just so
wonderful to see her
being accorded the
utmost respect.
Yes, she has been
a professional
dancer, and does
have more experience
than many of the
other contestants,
but it doesn’t matter
because we just didn’t
expect her to be
this good.
I fair bust with
pride on her behalf
every week. I am
#TeamDebbie. And the
rest can go hang.
(*This was never tested,
just so we can be
completely clear.)
T
here’s a moment
in The Fight for Mosul,
a new Channel 4
documentary about
the battle to liberate
Iraq’s second city from
Isis insurgents,
that will melt your
cynical little heart.
Anmar Al-Shamry, 26, the calm,
decisive first lieutenant of Alpha
company, 1st battalion, Iraqi special
forces, is experiencing urban warfare
at its most intense and paranoid.
Every car could be a suicide bomb,
every building could contain a sniper,
every civilian could be a murderous
zealot in disguise. And when he is
not dealing with these threats, he is
calling his wife back in Baghdad and
speaking to her with such poetry,
such tenderness, it puts us civilian
romantics to shame. “Good morning,
my darling, love of my life, my
precious woman,” he says between
drags on a shisha pipe. “Your body’s
still aching? Shall I leave you to sleep
for an extra half an hour?”
“I think we can all learn from the
romanticism of the Iraqis,” says Olivier
Sarbil, 47, the French film-maker who
captured this moment of sweetness in
hell. “They’re very poetic. When we
came to translate it everyone was
surprised at how loving he was. Even
my wife said, ‘C’mon, when you call
me from Mosul, you’re never like this.’
But Anmar called his wife every day.”
Sarbil’s film is full of such insights
into the young Muslim men who fight
Isis as its perverted caliphate reaches
its endgame. Mosul, a city of one
million people, was finally liberated in
July; the capital, Raqqa (in Syria), fell
to Kurdish and Arab forces last month;
the last active Isis fighters have
withdrawn to the desert.
The six weeks that Sarbil spent
embedded with Alpha company are
about as close as a journalist can get
to war — but it’s also an intimate and
humane portrait. He insists that he
didn’t want to make a “bang bang”
film. “I was with them 24 hours a day.
I was sleeping with them, eating with
them, and I was able to get that
intimacy. There is a cliché about what
Arabic fighters are, but they’re pretty
similar to us at the end of the day.”
We meet in the urban idyll of
Victoria Park in Hackney, east
London, where Sarbil recently
moved with his English partner,
Kate Parkinson, also a foreign
correspondent. We’re surrounded by
geese, toddlers and early autumn frost
— in short, a long way from Iraq.
Sarbil proves warm and engaging.
He was born in Corsica, studied
human sciences in Nice, and spent
three years as a Marine paratrooper in
Rwanda after he graduated in 1991 —
an experience he is not keen to relive.
He began working as a cameraman
in war zones in the mid-2000s, mostly
for Al Jazeera, and he bears the literal
scars. He is missing his little finger on
his right hand and the skin puckers a
little under the stubble on his right
cheek, the result of a rocket-propelled
grenade that hit him in Libya in 2011.
He spent eight months recovering in
a military hospital, an experience
that disabused him of any remaining
notion that there’s any glamour in war.
“Among war reporters, especially
young ones, they attach this ridiculous
glamour to war — they try to
romanticise it,” he says. “That’s
something I hate. They don’t think
about what it would be like to be
wounded in bed for eight months,
living with scars for the rest of your
life. It helped me to gain a new
perspective on the suffering. I feel
it a lot more now.”
He apologises that his English isn’t
great, even though it’s absolutely fine.
At any rate it’s better than his Arabic,
of which he admits he speaks “zero”.
“Well, the soldiers taught me a couple
of words because I didn’t have a
translator or a fixer with me.”
Anmar was the only member of the
squad who spoke decent English, and
when he wasn’t fighting he was usually
on the phone to his wife. But it’s the
lack of a mediator between film-maker
and subject that gives the film its
special quality — a connection
that transcends language.
It was partly a practical decision. “I
knew I was going to be following the
He is calling his
wife in Baghdad
and speaking
with such poetry
guys on the battlefield. I can do that
risk assessment for myself, but I
couldn’t take someone with me.” Yet
it was also “experimental”. “I really
wanted to build a relationship with
the guys. I wanted them to know me,
and for me to win their trust. Because
I didn’t understand what they were
saying it became truly observational.
It’s a very basic human connection.”
Sarbil met Anmar while he was
covering the Battle for Fallujah last
year and stayed in touch after he left
Iraq. He wanted to make a film about
the Iraqi special forces, the elite troops
who were created after the invasion of
Iraq, trained by the West and supplied
by the Americans.
Anmar is an engineering student
who lost his father to a car bomb in
Fallujah; he has been fighting Isis for
years. And as with the rest of his squad
his whole life has been shaped by war.
“They were 12 years old when the US
declared war on Iraq and they are the
first special forces created after the
invasion,” Sarbil says. “They depend
on the prime minister rather than the
Ministry of Defence. They’re not only
trained to fight, but also how to deal
with civilians. And they’re not
sectarian: Anmar is a Sunni. Most
the times | Thursday November 2 2017
3
1GT
times2
the same again after war’
The lowdown
EastEnders
ALVARO CANOVAS
(“He was the one who made us
laugh”). “Jamal has said that he still
has nightmares,” Sarbil says. “He’s
pretty reserved. He’s probably the guy
who it affected most. And he was
wounded, so will carry the scars of
war for longer.”
Above all, what struck Sarbil most
was how close they were to western
soldiers. “I showed the film to a lot of
veterans from the US and Britain and
they all felt touched at how similar
they were. There’s that moment on the
roof where they’re smiling. They’re
high on the adrenaline. Any British
soldier will have experienced this.
There isn’t a message in the film, but
what I did want to show was how
these young Muslim fighters are
fighting a battle that affects us all in
the West.”
For his part Sarbil had to keep
close to the fighters, remain incredibly
disciplined and ration his filming
time so as not to waste batteries or
energy for when he might need it.
“While you are there, you had to be
very disciplined and just follow the
soldiers. I know that Daesh [Isis]
would have no mercy for a journalist.”
A nervous smile creeps on to his lips.
“I just followed my instincts. I listened
to my gut. When the time was right
I left the battlefield.”
However, there were moments when
he couldn’t. At one point the squad
were surrounded by Isis and running
low on ammunition; Sarbil asked
about back-up and was brusquely
informed there was no back-up. At
another point, Anmar’s commander
asked the squad to emerge into an
of them are Shia, but there are also
Yazidis and Kurds.”
Sarbil joined them before the
offensive started last October, and
entered Mosul in a Humvee with
Alpha company. And at this point it
wasn’t at all obvious what the outcome
would be. “You never know what you
are walking into. I knew it was going
to be tough. But none of the soldiers
were prepared for the resistance they
met: car bombs, daily suicide attacks,
snipers, 24-hour-a-day combat.”
The suicide car bomb was Isis’s most
potent weapon; it’s particularly hard to
fight an enemy so happy to die. On
one occasion Isis managed to drop a
hand grenade into the gun turret of a
Humvee in the same convoy, using an
iPad-controlled drone of the sort that
anyone can buy from Amazon. “All the
troops were killed. So that made it
very stressful. There was no moment
where you could relax.”
Still, Sarbil captured moments of
surprising uplift. At one point Staff
Sergeant Hussein Al-Salem, the
company’s sniper, is firing rounds from
the roof and evidently having some
success. As he turns to a comrade, he
can’t stop himself from smiling —
laughing even. “He takes his job very
seriously and when he’s successful it
makes him happy. He’d say, ‘What’s the
point of going to war if I don’t do my
job properly?’ ”
Later we see him scrolling through
images on his smartphone of the Isis
fighters he has killed: 45 of them at the
time. Apparently he has notched up
another 30 or 40 since. “He’s the only
one who still has his energy when the
I know that
Isis would have
no mercy for
a journalist
Top: film-maker
Olivier Sarbil and,
above, sergeant
Amjad Al-Rakabi in
the documentary
The Fight for Mosul
The Fight for Mosul
is on Channel 4 on
Tuesday, November 7
at 10pm
others are losing it,” says Sarbil. And
lose it they inevitably do. “At the start,
they were full of enthusiasm: ‘We’re
going to get rid of Isis once and for all.’
They’ve been fighting them for two
years in Ramadi and Fallujah and this is
the last big stronghold in the caliphate
in Iraq. So they were highly motivated,
but you could see that slowly the
morale was draining.”
In one of the most distressing scenes
the squad forces a civilian to look out
for a sniper in the street at gunpoint;
many civilians in Mosul fear the Iraqi
special forces as much as Isis and the
film captures these tensions. “I hope
people understand that this is war.
This is one of the shades of grey. One
day you see the best of humanity, the
next day the worst. This happens in
war. You’re stressed. Sometimes you
do the wrong thing.”
Many of the soldiers speak openly
about suffering from post-traumatic
stress disorder. And when Sergeant
Amjad Al-Rakabi is killed we see the
effect on his best friend, Jamal Al-Zain
open square during a fierce firefight.
“You could hear bullets flying
everywhere. Anmar turned to me and
said, ‘Get ready.’ I said, ‘This time . . .
maybe . . . I don’t really feel it.’ He said,
‘You have no choice. You’re part of the
squad now. You have to come with us.’
That was probably the most difficult
moment I had. My entire gut lurched.
But I had to follow them. I was
embedded with them. There was
nowhere I could wait.”
He insists that it was hardest for his
friends and family back home. “This is
a selfish job to do. It was very difficult
for Kate. More difficult than it was for
me because being there was my
choice. It was not easy after Mosul.
The soldiers would send me pictures
of guys who had been killed and
wounded. Of course that affects you.”
For all this, he insists that he is not
a “war junkie”. He was in Rwanda
during the genocide and he has spent
eight months in a military hospital.
“If you go to war, it changes you.
You will never be the same again.
War journalists do suffer from PTSD.
It’s less taboo now — journalists are
starting to talk about it. I’ve been
wounded once, but it’s still a hard
thing to talk about.”
Spoiler alert!
Oh, not now. Prue’s Bake Off balls-up
was enough for one week.
No, better than that.
Impossible.
Well, long story, but some joker
who claimed to be working for
the BBC (yet only had a visitor’s
badge) tried to sell the script for the
EastEnders Christmas special to a
reporter from MailOnline, but . . .
Let me guess. Even those at
MailOnline don’t have it in them
to ruin Christmas so in some rare,
groundbreaking undercover
journalism they exposed the
miscreant.
Pretty much. Except let’s not kid
ourselves. It has nothing to do with
ruining anything or upsetting the
Beeb. They couldn’t possibly reveal
such a huge spoiler because it
would send their loyal flock of
sidebar-of-shame readers into a
frenzy. Imagine the comments!
I’d rather not. Anyway, how did
this chap happen to come about the
script? Don’t tell me, he found it on
a USB stick down a drain or subtly
discarded by a photocopier?
Almost. He says he found it
“just lying on the kerb outside”
the studios.
Riiight.
It gets better. Old Clouseau, piecing
together the evidence, goes on:
“It was as if someone had been
sitting there reading it and had left
it, or as if it had been dropped out
of someone’s bag.”
And how much does he want for
his treasure?
Four grand.
Four grand! So he’s dumb and
delusional. I don’t even need the
script to tell you what happens.
Oh yes?
Spoiler alert: there’s a lot of drunken
shouting, a huge family feud and
then . . . someone dies. Or, if the
budgets are in rude health, some
old-timer who died years ago, and
who was written out, pops back up
and [cue drums]: da da da da-da-da . . .
Ben Clatworthy
worthy
Linda (Kellie
Bright) and
Mick (Danny
Dyer)
4
1GT
Thursday November 2 2017 | the times
times2
Could these men convince you
to stop shopping? By Barbara McMahon
O
n their tour of the
United States,
Joshua Fields
Millburn and Ryan
Nicodemus are
fêted like rock stars
by adoring crowds.
Audiences are
spellbound as they describe how they
had the trappings of success — big
salaries, houses and cars — but felt
adrift and unhappy. Then came an
epiphany, allowing them to find
happiness, fulfilment and freedom.
The childhood friends are advocates
of minimalism, the less-is-more
lifestyle. They were trapped on a
materialist treadmill and found more
meaningful lives when they pushed
the stop button. Now their mission is
to help others to do the same. “It’s not
about giving away all of your things
and living with just a loincloth,”
Millburn says. “The problem is not
consumption. It’s compulsory
consumption, feeling like we have to
keep up with the Joneses.”
Since Marie Kondo published The
Life-Changing Magic of Tidying in
2014, getting rid of stuff has been
popular. But Millburn and Nicodemus
take decluttering to a whole new
Billy Graham-style level. Collectively
known as the Minimalists, the
36-year-olds estimate that they reach
more than 20 million people a year,
with TED talks, their website, books,
podcasts and a documentary.
Remarkably, in the country that is
the cradle of consumerism, the duo
inspire shopping-addicted Americans
to have evangelical moments, and rush
home to cut up their credit cards and
start chucking things out.
On a pause during their Less Is Now
tour across the US I ask Millburn what
exactly it is that they have tapped into.
“A lot of people talk about the how —
67 ways to declutter your closet, that
kind of stuff,” he says. “These things
are more helpful if you know why
you’re doing what you’re doing. Ryan
and I try to tap into the why.”
Millburn says they have been
guilty of superfluous spending, have
mistaken ephemeral moments of
pleasure for lasting happiness and
know how hard it is to resist the lure
of shiny new things. Born in Dayton,
Ohio, both men say they come from
dysfunctional families.
As youngsters they thought they
were unhappy because they did not
have money, so by the time they were
in their twenties and working in
telecoms they had six-figure salaries,
mortgages and credit to buy whatever
gadgets they desired. However, they
felt generally dissatisfied.
In 2009 Millburn’s mother died and
his marriage ended, in the same
month. Both events forced him to look
at his life. “I realised I was focused on
the wrong things,” he says. “I was
focused on the accumulation of stuff.
“I was spending money I didn’t have.
I was overweight. I’d forsaken the
people closest to me — I didn’t spend
enough time with my mother until she
was dying. I wasn’t contributing to the
world in any meaningful way.”
Millburn shed 90 per cent of his
possessions in his quest for a simpler
life. Intrigued, Nicodemus followed
suit. The pair launched a website,
moved to a cabin in Montana to write
a book and hone their ideas about
minimalism, then settled in nearby
Missoula, a town of 70,000 people.
On their wildly popular tour, the
pair stand on stage and roll off
impressive statistics. The average
household contains 300,000 items.
We are bombarded with up to
5,000 advertisements a day, telling us
we’d be happier if we owned whatever
it is that a company is selling.
“The worst thing about
consumerism is that it’s seductive. You
see an ad for a car or a shirt or a piece
of furniture, then you start thinking
you need more and more,” Millburn
says. “We make impulsive decisions
and that leads to a habit and those
bad habits trap us.
“The truth is that once our basic
needs are met, the acquisition of new
items does little for our lifelong
wellbeing.”
The pair give practical suggestions
about how to declutter, such as only
buying things that serve a purpose or
give us joy. I am intrigued enough to
give their suggestions a try.
Millburn’s first tip is to ask yourself
how your life might be better with less.
I’d stop daydreaming about things I
can’t afford, that’s for sure, and maybe
I’d have more downtime if I were not
working constantly.
His second tip is to start small. Most
people cannot change their lives
overnight. We can build momentum
with a 30-day minimalism game,
where you compete with a partner or
friend to jettison items every day. One
item the first day, two items the
second, and so on.
The first few days are easy. My
husband and I each throw out books,
a failed DIY project, old mobile
Joshua Fields Millburn
and Ryan Nicodemus
This is not
about just
giving
away all
of your
things
phones, old sunglasses cases and an
embarrassing number of ornaments.
On day seven, with seven items to
discard, I jettison my sister Clare’s
leather purse, which has been sitting
in my bedside drawer since she died
ten years ago. I don’t know why I kept
it. I don’t need it to remind me of her.
It feels OK to let it go.
On day ten my husband jokes in his
home office: “Do ten rubber bands
count?” No. We raid the kitchen and
discard coffee mugs and kitchen
canisters. I’m shocked to discover we
have five sieves, three cheese graters
and a ridiculous amount of cutlery,
given there are only two of us.
“Give yourself permission to let go
of things you are holding on to ‘just in
case’,” Millburn says. These are small
items that, if you absolutely had to
replace them, you could do so in
20 minutes and for £20 or less.
The just-in-case rule seems to
have been written for me, since this
is my weakness. I’m holding on to a
shocking amount of stuff that I could
replace tomorrow if I really needed to.
Scissors, mirrors, hair clips, gym gear,
pens and shopping bags among them.
On day 11, my husband tackles boxes
of computer leads and electronic stuff
while I sift through costume jewellery
that I haven’t worn for years. There is
a definite feeling of being in control
when you let things go.
I have been avoiding discarding
clothes and turn to the 90/90 rule:
have I used this item in the past
90 days or will I use it in the next 90
days? If not, give yourself permission
to throw it out. I still can’t bring myself
to do it — I’ll leave this for day 25.
I have yet to try the Minimalists’
10/10 material possessions exercise.
Write down the ten most expensive
material possessions you have
collected in the past decade, such
as a car, a house or other big-ticket
items. Make another list of the ten
things that have added the most value
to your life. “Quite often you find
that zero things overlap on those two
lists,” Millburn says.
We are on day 13 and no longer
throwing out things with abandon. We
think harder before we put stuff in a
charity bag. That’s no bad thing since
we are more appreciative of the things
we decide to keep. It has made me
think about how many impulse
purchases I make.
Wouldn’t the economy come
crashing down if everyone stopped
spending? “I don’t sidestep commerce,”
Millburn says. “Minimalism is
predicated on intentionality, I will
spend my money more deliberately.
We spend money on experiences over
possessions. I consider things carefully
before committing to buy.”
Millburn and Nicodemus are about
to tour Australia and hope to visit the
UK to spread the minimalist message.
It resonates because they know
what it’s like to be on the consumer
treadmill. “We’ve seen both sides,”
Milburn says. “We’ve been from poor
to wealthy and everything in between
and we realised we were just playing
the wrong game the whole time.”
It’s that
Prince Harry
and the Obamas
can’t seem to get
enough of each
other, says Damian
Whitworth
T
heir relationship is a
source of much
speculation, and every
time we see them
together it only gets
more intriguing. There
they are, laughing
together on a highspirited school visit. We read reports
of cosy palace suppers, of social media
jokes. Then it emerges that there have
been introductions to each other’s
families. This is clearly a very special
relationship, and we hope it will last.
I write, of course, of Prince Harry
and his friendship with Michelle
Obama. Harry was in Chicago this
week to attend the inaugural Obama
Foundation summit, and he and Mrs
Obama visited a school together.
“Thanks to my friend Prince Harry for
joining me today to surprise these
remarkable students at Hyde Park
Academy on the South Side,” she said
the times | Thursday November 2 2017
5
1GT
times2
KENSINGTON PALACE; PRESS ASSOCIATION; GETTY IMAGES ; REUTERS
So glad you dropped by for
tea
The White House, May 2013 .
Oh, Harry, you kill
me! Chicago,
October 31, 2017
Got the ring yet, buddy? Invictus
Games, Toronto, October 2017
special relationship all over again
on Instagram. “We were blown away
by their passion, ambition and talent!”
Prince Harry’s trip to Chicago was
payback for the support that the
Obamas have given him for the
Invictus Games for wounded
armed-services people. (And yes,
it also happens to be a handily short
hop from Toronto, where Meghan
Markle, Harry’s girlfriend, lives). The
sometimes teasing relationship he
has with Michelle is matched by
a bromance with Barack.
At the foundation event the prince
spoke of the duty of royals to bring
people together “to make change”.
The former president also used the
“c-word” at the event, which was
intended to inspire future leaders and
which he called “a big brainstorming
session, it’s a big hackathon”. (No, not
that sort of hackathon, you pesky
Russian intelligence services).
This might all seem a throwback to
what Sarah Palin mocked as Barack
Obama’s “hopey, changey stuff”. And
why do we need to groom future
leaders anyway when we know
that they are minted by reality TV
programmes (The Apprentice, say)?
Yet, if you find the level of anger
steaming from the Oval Office
disquieting and the chaos of the
British political situation depressing,
you may find the alternative US-UK
diplomacy relationship between the
prince and the former president and
his wife quite calming. It’s a bit like
The Obamas meet
Prince Harry and the
Duke and Duchess of
Cambridge at
Kensington Palace,
April 2016
when George W Bush was in office
and everyone escaped into the
alternative West Wing presidency
of Jed Bartlet.
In September Harry and Barry
watched the wheelchair basketball
together at the Invictus Games in
Toronto. Another spectator, who
wangled a selfie with the two men,
reported that Barack asked about
Meghan and the prince asked about
Michelle. Just two buddies catching
up while watching the game.
In May the two dined at Kensington
Palace. Afterwards Barack tweeted:
“Good to see my friend Prince Harry
in London to discuss the work of our
foundations.” This came a little more
than a year after the Obamas had
dinner at Kensington Palace while he
was still the president. The occasion,
also attended by the Duke and
Duchess of Cambridge was an
unusually high-level piece of domestic
hosting by younger-generation
royals. It featured a breakthrough in
dressing-gown diplomacy by Prince
George, who was allowed to stay
up late especially. (No sign of
President Trump getting the
George-in-dressing-gown moment.)
Last year Harry managed to
persuade the Queen and the Obamas
to appear with him in a video to
promote the Invictus Games. In the
clip the prince and his grandmother
are sitting on the sofa when he
apparently receives a video message
from “Flotus”. Michelle reminds Harry
that he has challenged them to “bring
it” at the games, and Barack adds:
“Careful what you wish for.” “Oh
really, please,” the Queen responds.
Prince Harry and Barack bonded
during a meeting at the Oval Office
in 2015, but the prince and the former
first lady, who shares Harry’s informal
approach to official events, got to
know each other long before. They hit
it off when he went to Washington DC
in 2013 and was the surprise guest at a
White House tea party that she hosted
for military families. Afterwards she
gave him a leather flying jacket.
In the summer of 2015, when
Michelle came to London to launch
her Let Girls Learn initiative at a girls’
comprehensive school in Tower
Hamlets, she and her daughters, Malia
and Sasha, had tea with Harry at
Kensington Palace, where they
discussed their shared interest in
supporting veterans. Later that year,
Harry and Michelle launched the 2016
Invictus Games at an event at Fort
Belvoir in Virginia, where she made
him blush by telling the audience: “All
right, ladies, Prince Harry is here.”
They were together again in
Orlando last year for the opening
of the games, where Michelle called
him “truly our Prince Charming”,
said he should be proud of his work
and thanked him “for his
outstanding leadership”.
Harry is never going to turn down
the chance of meeting a first lady and
he also met Melania Trump at the
Toronto Invictus Games, although
the body language wasn’t described
as relaxed. Perhaps the Trumps will
end up developing friendships with
the Windsors but it may take the very
serious threat of a rift between the two
countries, or the need to seal a trade
deal, for Harry to be fully deployed.
We are much more likely to see an
Obama or two joshing with Harry at
the Invictus Games in Sydney next
year. Or maybe earlier than that in
London. Perhaps at St Paul’s Cathedral
or St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle.
If anyone knows if/when/where Harry
and Meghan are to marry, then surely
it will be Michelle Obama.
6
1GT
Thursday November 2 2017 | the times
times2
Wake up and smell the single
According to Costa, we’re a nation of
coffee snobs — but is the posh stuff we
buy really any good, asks Harry Wallop
W
hen Chris
Ammermann
takes his
six-year-old
son to rugby
training on
a Sunday
morning he
always takes a flask of coffee along for
his fellow dads to have a cup. As the
co-owner of Caravan, one of London’s
biggest coffee businesses, it’s what’s
expected. Each week it’s a different
brew from a particular Guatemalan
or Burma estate, and Ammermann
tries to enthuse the other dads with the
details. “They always say, ‘Nice coffee’,
but then take the mickey out of me and
call me a twat. It’s totally justified,” he
says in his light Kiwi accent.
“But this week, when I explained
what it was they were all
interested. Some said it
was the best coffee
they’d ever tasted.
For the first time they
actually whipped out
their phones and
took notes.” He
looks triumphant.
It was, for the
record, an Isaac
Luna coffee from
El Salvador, made using
the “honey-processed”
technique, an increasingly
fashionable method of separating
the coffee pulp from the bean.
Rather than being washed off in
a high-pressure machine, it’s allowed
to mostly rot off in the sun.
For Ammermann, the rugby dads
interest in the honey process was
proof that Britain is surfing the
latest wave of the coffee revolution.
A honey process
makes the coffee
a little bit funky
“Are we on the third or the fourth
wave?” he asks.
No one can quite agree what the
first wave was. It’s either the arrival
of the London coffee houses of the
17th century or Italian immigrants
after the war persuading us that
freeze-dried coffee granules were
worse than gravy browning. Miles
Kirby, fellow Kiwi and Caravan
co-founder, admits that the occasional
instant coffee is his guilty pleasure.
“It’s what I grew up on and it brings
back childhood memories, but it’s very
important to put your sugar and milk
in with the coffee, and then stir in the
water,” he says, laughing.
The second wave, most agree, is
Starbucks, Coffee Republic and Caffè
Nero setting up shop in the 1990s
and introducing mainstream UK
consumers to espresso-based, but very
milky coffees. And the third started
around the time that Caravan arrived
in London in 2010. Set up by the trio
of New Zealanders Ammermann
Kirby and Laura Harper-Hinton
(Ammermann’s partner in business
and in life), it was one of a number of
independent coffee shops to roast its
beans on site. It not only pushed the
flat white (a stronger, less milky
coffee), but also rehabilitated filter
coffee as a premium option — coffee
without the milk. “With milk you
lose the full-flavour characteristics,”
Ammermann says. Caravan supplies
a number of other coffee shops
and restaurants — notably Heston
Blumenthal’s the Fat Duck in Bray,
Berkshire — and has just opened its
fourth large site at the new Bloomberg
Arcade in the City of London.
The third wave coincides with last
week’s announcement by Whitbread,
the parent company of Costa,
that the growth in coffee
sales at Britain’s largest
chain of coffee shops
(with an astonishing
2,326 outlets) is
grinding to a halt.
Whitbread’s chief
executive, Alison
Brittain, said the
“third wave of coffee”
was similar to one
that took place in the
wine market, where UK
consumers once drank “Black
Tower and Blue Nun”, but could “now
probably tell the difference between
a chardonnay and a sauvignon blanc”.
Many coffee fans will think it’s no
tragedy that people are choosing
something more authentic over the
Piat d’Or coffee that Costa serves.
If the third wave was independent,
hipster coffee shops — with their
single-origin beans and Chemex
brewing pots — the fourth is this style
of coffee now being served in people’s
homes. According to Mintel, the
market research company, instant
coffee is still the most popular in the
UK, but we are drinking two million
kilos less this year than in 2012.
Meanwhile, sales of ground coffee and
coffee beans grew 8 per cent over the
same five-year period to 15 million kilos.
It’s not only the big-boy London
roasters such as Caravan and the
Monmouth Coffee Company that are
driving a resurgence in filter coffee.
A profusion of small boutique coffee
roasters have been springing up across
Britain in recent years. A roaster
requires little capital and not that much
space. One of the more interesting is
Coaltown, set up in the former mining
town of Ammanford, Carmarthenshire,
by Gordon James, 52, and his son Scott,
24. The latter says: “Around here you
either do well at school, go to university
and leave Ammanford, or you go on
the dole. I wanted to bring some jobs
back to the area.”
So far Coaltown, which is stocked in
Selfridges, employs five people, but it
is about to expand and open a couple
of cafés, bringing the number of
employees up to 15. “It’s a bit like craft
beer,” Scott explains. “With your
own roastery you roast high-quality
beans in small batches and you are
in control from start to finish.”
A lot of these roasters have
subscription services, where customers
can sign up for a different bag to be
sent to their home every week or
month. “That journey to find the
perfect cup is part of what makes
coffee so exciting,” says Scott, whose
favourite brew at the moment is from
the Rocko Mountain in Ethiopia. “It
smells like sweet strawberries.”
Even the giants are branching out.
Taylors of Harrogate is the biggest
filter-coffee brand in Britain and
sells more than three million packs
of its Italian roast each year. This
year it introduced a selection of
single-origin coffee, including
Rare Blossom Ethiopia and Cacao
Superior Colombia. The Ethiopian is
honey-processed. “This pushes the
boundaries a little for us,” says Ben
Newbury, Taylors of Harrogate’s
brand manager. “The honey
processing makes the coffee just
a little bit funky. I really like it.”
Natural or unfiltered wines have
become all the rage, despite many of
them being cloudy wines that stink of a
farmyard. But honey processing tends
to lend an almost gamey sweetness to
the coffees. “Many of our most
aspirational drinkers are embracing
this sort of stuff,” Newbury says.
But are any of these coffees — from
the speciality subscription blends to
mainstream supermarket brews —
that good? To find out we enlisted the
help of Caravan’s two resident experts,
Freda Yuan and Sam Langdon.
Langdon looks a little wired. “I drink
coffee all day long. Probably too
much,” he says. He’s the head of coffee
at Caravan and in charge of roasting.
The Jura A1 bean-to-cup Yuan, originally from Taiwan, won the
UK Cup Tasters Championship — the
machine, £645,
FA Cup of coffee tasting — and slurps
uk.jura.com
her coffee with a loud inhale, like a
roosting parakeet. It’s impressive. She
spits religiously after noon. “Otherwise
I just can’t cope.”
The two carefully weigh out 11g of
coffee into a tumbler, pour in 190ml of
water, let it brew for four minutes, and
get slurping. “We’re looking for clarity,
aroma, taste, colour,” Yuan says.
Harper-Hinton has one final piece
Cafflano Klassic portable
of advice. For all the blends, single
coffee maker, £79.99,
estates and honey processing on
thefowndry.com
the market, nothing is so crucial
as investing in a £10 or £20 coffee
grinder. “The most important thing
you can do to improve your coffee
is grind it fresh. The flavour gets
lost so quickly. It makes such a big
difference. I grind every morning —
even when camping.” And, yes,
before rugby training.
Caravan Coffee Roasters is opening a
new roastery in King’s Cross in 2018;
La Cafetière stove top,
£50, farrar-tanner.co.uk www.caravancoffeeroasters.co.uk
Coffee makers
the times | Thursday November 2 2017
7
1GT
times2
origin, honey-processed coffee
COVER: SIMON SONGHURST/LICKERISH
BELOW: KATIE WILSON FOR THE TIMES
The posh coffee taste test
Ground coffee
Origin Kenya Gicherori AA
£9.25, 250g, ground, origincoffee.co.uk
“This is nice, fresh and fruity. It’s just
a delicious coffee,” says Sam Langdon,
who correctly names the variety of
bourbon beans used
(SL-28 and SL-34 as
you’re asking) by
Tom Sobey’s roastery
in Helston, Cornwall.
“I like Origin,” says
Freda Yuan. “This is
juicy — quite peachy,
lots of stone fruit.”
{{{{{
Freda Yuan, one of
Caravan’s resident
coffee experts and
winner of the UK Cup
Tasters Championship
* All the pods reviewed
are compatible with
Nespresso machines
Sumatra is
one of my
favourite
origins
right now
Union Hand-Roasted Coffee
El Topacio Microlot, El Salvador
£8, 200g, ground, unionroasted.com
The packet lists not only the producer,
but the bean variety, the altitude it
grew at (1,500m) and
the processing
method. El Topacio
uses the honey
process. “When it’s
done well, it adds
lovely flavour notes,”
says Langdon. “It’s
clean, it’s sweet, it’s
juicy.” {{{{{
Pods*
Allegro Coffee Sumatra
£4.79, 227g, ground, from Amazon Fresh
Allegro is the own-brand of Amazon’s
Whole Foods grocery
chain. It is roasted in its
Kensington High Street
shop in London. “I think
this is my favourite of the
non-speciality coffees,
says Yuan. “It’s been
unfashionable for a while,
but Sumatra is one of my
favourite origins at the
moment,” Langdon adds.
{{{{{
Climpson & Sons The Fields
Ecuador — producer Rosa Abad
3 Bridges Coffee Co Ebb and Flow
single-origin Ethiopian Yirgacheffe
The Big Issue Tom’s Blend
£9.50, 250g, beans, from Harvey Nichols
Rosa Abad is “one of
the few female farmers
working in a maledominated industry”, the
Hackney company says.
“It’s got a good nutty
finish — there’s apricot,
citrus going on here,”
says Yuan. “It’d be ideal
to brew in a Chemex,”
Langdon adds.
{{{{
£6.50, 200g, beans, thefoodmarket.com
This Scottish roaster is a newcomer.
“Yirgacheffe often has a floral, almost
lavender taste,” says Langdon. “If
someone has it on their
menu it’s usually a sign
they know what they’re
on about.” “This is
good,” says Yuan. “It’s
got that blueberry taste.
It’s quite complex with a
lovely smell of bergamot.”
{{{{
£4.50, 200g, ground, from Sainsbury’s
This coffee, launched by the charity
behind The Big Issue magazine, was
initially available only
from mobile coffee carts
in London, staffed by
homeless people. “Really
plummy,” says Yuan. “It
tastes like it comes
from Tanzania or
Rwanda,” says Langdon.
“It’s got that nice fruity
acidity. I’d buy this.”
{{{{
Coaltown Pit Prop No 1
Lidl Deluxe Colombian Supremo
Cafédirect Kilimanjaro Tanzania
£8.99, 227g, beans, from Selfridges
The new black gold for post-industrial
Wales is a fruity blend of Nicaraguan,
Guatemalan and Sumatran beans from
this Ammanford-based
company. “That’s a
classic espresso blend,”
says Langdon. Yuan is
not wild on the scent. “It
smells quite woody —
that’s usually a negative.
But it has got a nice
sweet flavour. I like it.”
{{{{
£2.39, 227g, ground, from Lidl
“This is Lidl?” Yuan is blown away that
the German supermarket has
produced a decent coffee
for about a third of the
price of most of the others
that we have tasted.
“Colombia is a candy
shop of a country, it’s got
every style going on,” she
says. “This is really not
bad, quite juicy and sweet.
A good morning coffee.”
{{{
£3.25, 227g, ground, from Waitrose,
Sainsbury’s, Ocado and Tesco
Cafédirect pioneered the Fairtrade
certification scheme in
the UK. “A good, light
breakfast coffee,” says
Yuan. “Tanzania has got
some infrastructure
problems, so consistency
is sometimes lacking,”
says Langdon, “but
there’s a nice pink
grapefruit thing going
on here.” {{{
Taylors of Harrogate Lazy Sunday
Extract Coffee Dr Strangelove
Partridges Mr Shepherd’s Organic
All Day Blend
£3.75, 227g, ground, from Tesco and
Sainsbury’s
More than two million packs of this
are sold every year by Britain’s biggest
filter-coffee brand. “It’s
not bad, but quite bland:
it’s a bit chocolatey and
it
nutty, and suits a splash
nutt
milk,” says Yuan. “It’s
of m
easy drinking,” says
ea
Langdon. “I just wish my
L
mother served this rather
than her Rombouts.”
{{{
£6.90, 250g, beans, extractcoffee.co.uk
Extract is based in Bristol. This is a
50:50 blend of Fazenda Rodomunho,
from the Cerrado region of Minas
Gerais in Brazil, and
Finca San Francisco,
from Nueva Segovia
in Nicaragua. “Hm,
peanutty. I like it,”
says Langdon. “It’s
quite sweet,” Yuan
adds. “A touch of
marzipan and apple.”
{{{
Marley Coffee Buffalo Soldier
Lavazza single-origin Selva Alta
from Peru
Waitrose 1 Monsooned Malabar
AA
£3.89, 200g, ground, from Tesco
The fourth-generation
family firm from Turin is
No 2 in the filter-coffee
market. “Oh, smell it! It’s
cigarettes,” says Yuan.
“It’s too much. I can’t
handle it. It’s ashy.”
Langdon adds: “I’m a fan
of Peru, but it’s such a
dark roast, which is
masking all the flavours.”
{
£3.50, 227g, ground, from Waitrose
“It’s really mouldy,” says Yuan. The
beans have been
exposed to monsoon
winds, explains
Langdon. “It’s an
acquired taste. Indian
coffee usually gives
lovely cedar and clean
nutmeggy flavours.
I’m not sure this is
the best example.”
{
£4.36, 227g, ground, from Planet Organic
Created by Bob Marley’s son Rohan.
There’s a bit of Jamaica in the blend,
but mostly it’s Ethiopia.
It is roasted using the
torrefacto method,
“a style of roasting
where sugar is added
to the drum to make
it sweeter,” says
Langdon. “There’s dark
chocolate there, but it’s
a bit over-roasted.”
{{
£4.99, 250g, from Partridges London
store; partridges.co.uk
Partridges is a relic of
an era when countesses
in Belgravia needed
somewhere to send
their housekeepers for
Gentleman’s Relish.
“It’s all right, but a
bit cardboardy,” judges
Langdon. “It’s just not
very dynamic.”
{{
Roastworks Kigutha Kenya
£37.50 for 100 pods, roastworks.co.uk
Roastworks, based in Devon, is sold
in Waitrose, but this is one of the
speciality pods you
need to order online.
It uses beans from
a single estate on the
slopes of the Aberdare
Mountains, just north
of Nairobi. “This has
an amaretto, almondy
finish,” says Langdon.
“It’s sweet,” adds Yuan.
{{{{
Sainsbury’s Taste the
Difference Colombian pods
£2.50 for 10 pods, from Sainsbury’s
This produces a great crema (the
creamy topping good espressos
should have), but, says Yuan, you
shouldn’t get fixated
on this. “Crema is
the CO2 from the
coffee after you’ve
broken it. Think of
it as fart of a coffee.”
“It is a bit nutty,”
says Langdon.
{{{
Nespresso Explorations 2
Colombia Aguadas
£10 for 10 capsules, nespresso.com
This is one of Nespresso’s
limited-edition capsule coffees. Yuan,
who is a fan of Colombian coffee, says:
“I don’t think you should be a snob
about Nespresso. This is better than
the Nespresso Ethiopia Yirgacheffe
[which we also tried],
which was ashy and
over-roasted.” “The
packaging is gorgeous,”
says Langdon.
{{
Starbucks House Blend Lungo
£3 for 10 capsules, from Tesco or
Sainsbury’s
This, Starbucks claims, is the
original roast that the coffee
chain has been using
since 1971. “It’s just ashy.
The coating on my
mouth is now all
woody,” says Yuan.
Langdon is even less
impressed: “That’s not
nice. That’s grimy,” he
says as he spits it out.
{
Novell organic coffee Intenso
£3.30 for 10 pods, novellcoffee.co.uk
The Spanish company claims
that its pods will
fully compost
within 12 weeks,
solving the great
bugbear of the
capsule market.
“Very bitter,”
Langdon says.
“Just too much.
I can’t evaluate
it,” says Yuan.
{
8
1GT
Thursday November 2 2017 | the times
arts
Babylon Berlin:
it’s time to party
like it’s 1929
A £36 million German TV drama recreates the thrill
of the 1920s Weimar Republic. Gabriel Tate reports
A
nti-establishment
sentiment is
spreading.
Once-peripheral
ultra-nationalist
movements gain
popularity at the
polls through lies
and scaremongering, while opposition
parties flounder. An internationalist
project is in peril and an influx of
refugees stretch a stagnating economy
to breaking point.
These are the events underpinning
Babylon Berlin, Sky Atlantic’s new series,
directed by the powerhouse German
director Tom Tykwer and based on
Volker Kutscher’s bestselling Gereon
Rath crime novels. They may date
back to 1929, but they feel chillingly
prescient. For the National Socialists,
read Alternative for Germany; for the
League of Nations, the European
Union; and for the Weimar Republic,
the Federal Republic of Germany.
Here, on a bitterly cold December
day, it’s 1929 again. Twenties Berlin
has been recreated on a studio
backlot in Potsdam, the historic city
bordering the German capital. It’s a
staggering logistical achievement
recreating three interlocking districts
— Friedrichstrasse, Charlottenburg
and Kreuzberg-Neukölln. It offers
access to all strata of Berlin society,
and just walking around it is an
evocative experience: a sprawling
townhouse stands opposite an
alleyway plastered with flyposters and
piled with rotting fruit and empty
sacks of grain. Dominating one corner
is the art deco façade of Moka Efti, a
legendary Berlin nightspot and the
centrepiece for an extraordinary
song-and-dance sequence.
Babylon Berlin is a striking statement
of intent. Between this, the Cold War
thriller Deutschland 83 and Netflix’s
family chiller Dark, German TV drama
is displaying a creative ambition not
seen since Heimat, Das Boot and
Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Berlin
Alexanderplatz in the early 1980s. It is
also the country’s most expensive
series yet, made for £36 million.
Kutscher tells me that he wanted to
explore this era in Germany’s history
ever since reading Erich Kästner’s
children’s classic Emil and the
Detectives, but only after watching
The Sopranos and The Wire did he
perceive how apparent genre pieces
could embrace depth and complexity.
Blending the tones of Sam Mendes’s
gangster film Road to Perdition and
Fritz Lang’s nightmarish noir M, the
first book in the series, Der nasse Fisch
(The Wet Fish) was published in 2007.
“For me,” says Kutscher, “it was
important to show how Germany
changes from republic to dictatorship.
I learnt history like ‘the Nazis were
always going to take over’, but there
were many other ways events could
have gone. The question was always:
how could this happen?”
It was the opportunity Tykwer had
been waiting for. The director of Cloud
Atlas and Run Lola Run had, along
with his fellow writer-directors Henk
Handloegten and Achim von Borries,
yearned to tell the story of interwar
Berlin, but lacked the vehicle to do so.
“We were full of historical events
and peculiar characters that could all
have made a movie or a TV show, but
didn’t have the structure,” Tykwer
says. “The books gave us a genre to
work in, something people can relate
to. Police can go anywhere and knock
on any doors, from high finance to
industry to the slums. Something that
smells a bit of pulp, but with so many
complicated levels of storytelling? It’s
a perfect match.”
Gereon Rath, the protagonist, is a
laconic, troubled, but fundamentally
decent detective, beholden only to his
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the times | Thursday November 2 2017
9
1GT
FREDERIC BATIER/X FILME
moral code, tormented by his past and
seeking solace in psychoanalysis and
illegally procured drugs. Arriving from
Cologne to crack a vice and extortion
ring, he is dragged into a wider
conspiracy involving the police, the
mafia and the Black Reichswehr, an
illegal paramilitary organisation
planning a right-wing putsch.
With internecine warfare between
Stalinists and Trotskyites wrecking
the far left, and the centre ground
crumbling, Germany’s first functioning
democracy is under unprecedented
stress. Rath remains stubbornly
apolitical regardless, and is played
with an appealing vulnerability and
livewire edge by Volker Bruch.
“When Rath’s investigations annoy
the authorities, someone says, ‘You
work against your own people?’ ”
Bruch says. “He says, ‘No, I work for
the police.’ That’s the line he walks.”
Every noir antihero needs a femme
fatale. Police stenotypist by day,
nightclub prostitute by night,
Charlotte Ritter provides Rath with
crucial connections to the criminal
underworld through her efforts to
support her impoverished family.
“She’s just trying to survive,” says Liv
Lisa Fries, who plays her. “She’s very
curious, but bruised and scarred by
her life. They’re both searching for
something without quite knowing
what it is.”
Babylon Berlin’s triumvirate of
creators were given a free hand by
Kutscher and, unusually for a
page-to-screen adaptation, have
forged an expanded rather than
abridged version that lasts 16 episodes.
This is history made to feel immediate,
chaotic and far from inevitable.
Away from the politics, the cultural
explosion brings colour and
excitement. Weimar Berlin harboured
Fritz Lang, Kurt Weill, Christopher
Isherwood and the art movements of
expressionism and new objectivity.
Above and above
right: scenes from
Sky Atlantic’s Babylon
Berlin. Far left: its
director, Tom Tykwer
My job
is to tell
history as
it happens.
I’m not
Tarantino.
I can’t blow
up Hitler
arts
Anything seemed possible. How
could such a thrilling, important
crucible have, with the honourable
exception of Cabaret, gone so
neglected on screen?
Tykwer, Handloegten and Von
Borries have their own theories.
Germany has long had a complicated
relationship with its recent past, and
Babylon Berlin represents something of
reconciliation, an acknowledgement
that history can be contradictory. The
neglect “was due to trauma”, reckons
Tykwer. “And guilt.”
Von Borries adds: “The monstrosity
of the Nazi period meant generations
of German storytellers were obliged to
focus on that. No one wanted to hear
about the good times we had before
Hitler, but we need to understand that
period in order to understand what
happened with the Nazis.”
The other reason was purely
practical, Handloegten says. “Cabaret
shows the atmosphere of the late
Weimar Republic in a wonderful way,
but it’s mostly interiors. Twenties
Berlin vanished in the Second World
War, so recreating it has been difficult
and expensive. We wanted to go
outside and pretend that Berlin in
1929 was still there.”
As on most of his films, Tykwer
and his regular musical collaborator
Johnny Klimek created the score and
soundtrack, blending cabaret,
electronica and orchestral music, even
squeezing in a version of Roxy Music’s
Dance Away at quickstep tempo. Not
historically accurate, then, but Tykwer
cites the team’s maxim of “plausibility
over authenticity”.
Such irreverence could only stretch
so far, of course. “To see the dreams
of my characters being broken by real
events is hard,” says Kutscher, who has
written six books and plans three
more, concluding his series in 1938
with Germany and the world on the
brink. “But my job is to tell history as
it happens and to see what that does
to my characters. I’m not Tarantino,
I can’t blow up Hitler.”
“You don’t make a period piece if
you don’t feel the story is worth telling
right now,” says Tykwer. “Otherwise
it’s dusty and you wonder why you’re
watching it. Democracy is something
we can’t imagine not living in now, but
the last five years have made me
reconsider. It feels like populist
movements that we laughed about are
getting close to taking over. They
failed in France and the Netherlands,
but you would hope that Germany,
with its particular history, has more
of a specific view on the situation.”
Those evident parallels are not
over-egged in Babylon Berlin. “These
people lived three and a half years away
from the Nazi takeover and they didn’t
have a clue [what was coming],” Tykwer
says. “People were planning to change
society, sure, but not the way it turned
out. The Nazis were sidekicks to society
in 1929 and not taken that seriously,
especially in Berlin. Hitler was one of
100 guys screaming about things.”
Kutscher is dismayed, but not
surprised by the increasing currency
of the issues his stories have raised
since he began writing them. “I hope
people realise you have to fight to
defend democracy, because it’s very
fragile. I always thought we had a very
stable system, but I’m afraid we
haven’t learnt from history,” he says.
Bruch, unlike his character, tempers
cynicism with hope. “People did not
know what would happen next, which
makes these characters so innocent at
first glance. Politics is what happens in
the background of normal life. It’s not
something people focus on and the
same is true now, for better or worse.
We never learn anything from
anything, and that’s the real tragedy,
but things don’t repeat in exactly the
same way. I refuse to not be optimistic
because it’s our only chance.”
Babylon Berlin begins on Sky
Atlantic on Sunday at 9pm
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1GT
Thursday November 2 2017 | the times
television & radio
Forget winter, I’m chilling prosecco with Gino
ITV
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Gino’s Italian Escape
ITV
{{(((
The Frankenstein
Chronicles
ITV Encore
{{{((
T
wice in one day this week
Gino D’Acampo, everyone’s
favourite cheeky-chappie
Italian chef, made tabloid
headlines for being risqué
live on air. On This Morning he
repeatedly pronounced “sheet” as
“shit”, practically drawing tears of
mirth from Phillip Schofield. On Loose
Women he discussed his wife’s pubic
topiary arrangements, prompting the
host to apologise. Oh, Gino, what are
you like? Anyone would think you had
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Afternoon Concert
Radio 3, 2pm
Lucy Worsley, thrown
into the operatic deep
end for the BBC’s opera
season, recently shed some
interesting light on why
Salome was such a popular
topic in the arts. It is not,
it turns out, because it
was such a cracking tale
(although it is), but because
it allows a nice respectable
striptease on stage. If it’s in
the Bible, it’s got to be OK.
Tom McKinney presents
a recording of Strauss’s
Salome from the Royal
Opera House. Andrew
Staples sings Narraboth,
Salome is sung by Angela
Denoke and Hartmut
Haenchen conducts.
Radio 2 in Concert
Radio 2, 8pm
This episode of Radio 2
in Concert feels like the
rock’n’roll equivalent of
seeing an old racehorse put
out to pasture, for its star is
the former hellraiser Liam
Gallagher. And now here he
is, meek as a lamb, booked
in to do a nice 8pm concert
live from the radio theatre
at Broadcasting House.
The evening is hosted by
Jo Whiley, with Gallagher
playing some of the songs
from his debut solo album,
As You Were, as well as
some Oasis classics.
a new TV series to plug. Oh look, you
have! What were the chances?
I like D’Acampo, an upbeat,
puppyish force of nature, but I doubt
his TV show will win any prizes for
culinary envelope-pushing. In Gino’s
Italian Coastal Escape he took us to
the Amalfi coast (again) and talked us
through, basically, a caprese salad and
pasta with vegetable sauce. Even I can
make that. Actually I tell a lie: there
was also some kind of bruschetta
involving raw tuna and (ugh, ugh)
anchovy dripping, but I think I’ve
blocked it out. It matters not.
D’Acampo’s shows are as much
about visuals as dietary feasting: the
beautiful coastline, the rustic villages,
the blue sea and, crucially, D’Acampo’s
fetching range of shorts and V-neck
T-shirts. We saw our telegenic action
man on a jet-ski, a yacht, a moped and
on horseback, cowboy-style. He chilled
his prosecco in the sea by tying the
bottle to a rope and hanging it off the
side of a boat, like James Bond.
I suspect people watch as much
for this kind of caper as the food,
especially now the clocks have gone
back and we’re plunged into darkness.
It’s cheery and light as candyfloss.
Maybe they should distil D’Acampo
into winter Prozac capsules.
Many viewers will recall seeing Sean
Bean’s head stuck on a spike in Game
of Thrones, like a furious toffee apple.
In The Frankenstein Chronicles Bean
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 The Matt Edmondson Show
4.00 Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg
James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 Radio 1’s
Takeover with Anne-Marie 10.00 BBC
Radio 1’s Residency: Deadmau5 12.00
BBC Radio 1’s Residency: Will Atkinson
1.00am Toddla T 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright. With
guests Paul O’Grady, Charlie Puth and Eddie
Hall 5.00 Simon Mayo. With guest Liam
Gallagher 7.00 Bob Harris Country.
Another preview of the CMA Awards
8.00 Radio 2 in Concert. A performance
by Liam Gallagher, marking Radio 2’s
50th anniversary. See Radio Choice
10.00 The Radio 2 Arts Show with Jonathan
Ross 12.00 The Craig Charles House Party
(r) 2.00am Radio 2’s Tracks of My Years
Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Have
A Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Feelgood Friday 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
With writer and satirist Armando Iannucci
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Elgar (1857-1934)
Donald Macleod explores the relationship
between Elgar and the daughter of
the painter Sir John Milais. Elgar
(The Shower; and Violin Concerto)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
From the Clothworkers’ Centenary Concert
Hall, as part of the 2016-17 Leeds Lieder
Festival curated by the pianist Joseph
Middleton. Presented by Hannah French.
Alma Mahler (Die stille Stadt; Sommernacht;
and Lobgesang); Mahler (Trost im Unglück;
Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt; Wer
hat dies Liedlein erdacht?; and Verlorene
Müh’ “Des Knaben Wunderhorn”); Liszt
(Der du von dem Himmel bist; Vergiftet sind
meine Lieder; Es war ein König in Thule;
and Über allen Gipfeln ist Ruh’); and
Mahler (Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen)
Chef Gino D’Acampo went to the Amalfi coast for his new series
2.00 Affternoon Concert
Tom McKinney introduces the 2010
production of Richard Strauss’s Salome from
the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden —
part of Opera Cities Season. Based on a short
biblical reference to a girl dancing for King
Herod, and the immortal line: “Bring me the
head of John the Baptist”, Oscar Wilde’s play
told a lurid tale of power and corruption,
depravity and obsession — and Strauss set it
to music without holding back in any way.
Angela Denoke takes the title role, with Irina
Mishura as Herodias and Gerhard Siegel as
Herod. Strauss (Salome); Brahms (Symphony
No 1 in C minor); and Rachmaninov (Caprice
Bohemian, Op 12). See Radio Choice (r)
5.00 In Tune
The conductor Simone Young chats from
Salford where she is rehearsing with the
BBC Philharmonic, and the folk group
Trio Dhoore perform live in the studio
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An imaginative, eclectic mix of music
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
Richard Egarr directs the Academy of Ancient
Music and the soprano Carolyn Sampson in
music by English masters. Presented by Ian
Skelly, live from Milton Court Concert Hall.
Dowland (Lachrimae Pavan; and In darkness
let me dwell); Lawes (Fantasy in six parts in
C); Blow (Lovely Selina; Philander, do not
think of arms; Clarona, lay aside your lute;
and Boasting fops); Purcell (Chacony in G
minor, Z.730; When first Amintas; Man is for
the woman made; and From silent shades);
Purcell (Suite of Instrumental Music from
The Fairy Queen, Z.629); Handel (Semele —
‘O sleep why dost thou leave me?; and
“No, no, I’ll take no less”); Handel
(Concerto for Organ, No. 13 in F “Cuckoo
and Nightingale”, HWV 295); and Arne
(“Young I am” from Love in a Village;
When daisies pied; and Rule Britannia)
10.00 Free Thinking
Matthew Sweet explores the art of bad
language and the creativity of anger, to
coincide with the publication of Emma
Byrne’s new book Swearing Is Good for You
10.45 The Essay:
The Meaning of Flowers
Fiona Stafford explores lavender, which has
been used medicinally in Britain for more
than 2,000 years, and is now more popular
than ever with the industry booming
11.00 Late Junction
Music by performers known for their
improvisational style, including Irreversible
Entanglements, the Borborygma Ensemble,
Caroline Kraabel and Makaya McCraven
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With Mishal Husain and Nick Robinson
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 In Our Time
The impact of Picasso’s 1937 work Guernica
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor focuses on prayer (9/30)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
With Jenni Murray. Including at 10.45 the
15 Minute Drama: Part four of Christopher
Reason’s dramatisation of AJ Cronin’s novel
The Citadel, with Richard Fleeshman
11.00 From Our Own Correspondent
Reports from across the globe (6/8)
11.30 A Portrait Of
Fiona Graham-Mackay paints a portrait of
the soprano Danielle de Niese (2/)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Five Green Bottles
Tim Atkin profiles Klein Constantia Vin de
Constance, made on an estate that was
created by Simon Van der Stel (4/5)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week: Anthony Powell
— Dancing to the Music of Time
Hattie Morahan reads Hilary Spurling’s
biography of the English novelist. War
distracts Powell from his career as a writer,
and though depression looms constantly,
his life at this time provides inspiration
for the great works to come (4/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Pilgrim
By Sebastian Baczkiewicz. The negotiations
with the King take a nasty turn when Pilgrim
is asked to sacrifice a man he has kept safe
for centuries. First aired in 2012 (4/4) (r)
3.00 Open Country
Chris Bonington takes Helen Mark to his
favourite view in the Lake District (2/16)
3.27 Radio 4 Appeal
On behalf of the Myotubular Trust (r)
3.30 Open Book
Alex Clark talks to Graeme Macrae Burnet (r)
4.00 The Film Programme
Antonia Quirke presents a special edition on
the thriller genre, hearing tricks of the trade
from the screenwriter Ronan Bennett
4.30 BBC Inside Science
Presented by Adam Rutherford
5.00 PM
manages to keep his head, but it
appears to have been stitched to
another man’s body by a mad scientist.
But may I be picky? I’ve seen better
fake suture scars at an eight-year-old’s
Hallowe’en party. Bean barely needed
a cravat to cover them. On the plus
side, a new body does rid him of the
syphilis that plagued him in the
previous series, so he may be a freak,
but at least he’s no longer riddled with
the clap. Swings and roundabouts.
If you hadn’t seen the previous
series, much of this opening episode
must have been about as clear as the
mud at Hackney marshes. I expected
it to be lame partly because it has been
shoved, like an embarrassing aunt, on
to ITV Encore, ensuring hardly anyone
will see it. Why is this? I know this
reimagining of Mary Shelley’s gothic
novel is melodramatic and hammy at
times, but it is highly entertaining, has
a good cast and Bean, as the grizzled
former policeman John Marlott, is
entirely watchable, whether chained
to a wall in Bedlam, having flashbacks
or gurning darkly at the shore with a
face like corrugated cardboard.
Yes, Bean is always like this (and
always seems to die on telly, come to
that), but he is a mighty, crenellated
screen presence. This is better than
much of ITV’s primetime stuff.
Although now I’ve typed that sentence
I realise it’s not saying an awful lot.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 Lemn Sissay’s Origin Stories
The poet considers Darth Vader’s character
arc in the Star Wars movies (4/4) (r)
7.00 The Archers
Harrison hits a brick wall and gossip spreads
about the night of the Hunt Ball
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor focuses on prayer (9/30)
8.00 Law in Action
Legal developments (1/4) (r)
8.30 The Bottom Line
Business issues that matter
9.00 BBC Inside Science
Presented by Adam Rutherford (r)
9.30 In Our Time
Picasso’s Guernica (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
International news round-up
presented by James Coomarasamy
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Book of
Dust, Part One — La Belle Sauvage
By Philip Pullman (9/10)
11.00 The Absolutely Radio Show
Comedy sketch show (1/4) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Political news presented by Sean Curran
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Anthony Powell:
Dancing to the Music of Time
By Hilary Spurling (4/5) (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am Not in Front of the Children 8.30
The Goon Show 9.00 Counterpoint 9.30 HR
10.00 Home Front Omnibus 11.00 New Irish
Writing 11.15 Tommies 12.00 Not in Front
of the Children 12.30pm The Goon Show
1.00 Murder on the Orient Express 1.30
Erin’s Model World 2.00 Jane Eyre 2.15
Cosmic Quest 2.30 A Kind of Loving 2.45 On
Wheels 3.00 Home Front Omnibus 4.00
Counterpoint 4.30 HR 5.00 A Certain Age
5.30 Lemn Sissay’s Origin Stories 6.00 The
Canterville Ghost 6.30 Great Lives 7.00 Not
in Front of the Children. Family comedy. First
aired in 1969 7.30 The Goon Show. Comedy
with Spike Milligan. First aired in 1955 8.00
Murder on the Orient Express. By Agatha
Christie. From 1992 8.30 Erin’s Model World.
Insight into London Fashion Week 9.00
New Irish Writing. Jigsaw by Martin
Meenan 9.15 Tommies. By Avin Shah
10.00 Comedy Club: Lemn Sissay’s Origin
Stories. The poet finds common ground with
Superman 10.30 Recorded for Training
Purposes. Fast-paced sketch show about
modern communication. Ben Willbond stars
11.00 And Now in Colour. Comedy sketches
with Tim Firth. From 1991 11.30 The
Masterson Inheritance. Improvised
comedy with Paul Merton. From 1993
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
A round-up of the day’s sports news 8.00 5
Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby. Matt Dawson meets
British & Irish Lions coach Warren Gatland
9.00 5 Live Cricket: How to Win in Australia.
Simon Mann meets England cricket captains
who have won the Ashes in Australia 10.00
Question Time Extra Time 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Micky Quinn 10.00 Jim White
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00
Adrian Durham and Joey Barton 6.00
Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am
Extra Time with Geoff Peters
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 1.00pm Stuart Maconie. With
Andrew Hodson of Warm Digits 4.00 Steve
Lamacq 6.00 Steve Lamacq’s Roundtable
7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe. Archive
live tracks and sessions 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Steve Lamacq 1.00am
The First Time with Richard Hawley 2.00 The
Fats Domino Story 2.30 6 Music Live Hour
3.30 6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott
presents an exclusive concert recorded at the
Stratford Arts House last month. Rossini
(The Barber of Seville — Overture); Weber
(Clarinet Concerto No.2 in E-flat); and
Beethoven (Symphony No.8 in F) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday November 2 2017
11
1GT
artsfirst night
Dance
Under Glass
Hackney Showroom, E8
Concert
Emerson String Quartet
St John’s Smith Square, SW1
T
S
{{{((
here are strikingly dramatic,
wonderfully subtle moments
in this movement-based
performance installation
by the British company Clod
Ensemble. Commissioned by Sadler’s
Wells in 2008 for presentation off site,
and now touring, the 45-minute
production has an intriguingly
unconventional set-up and a
collage-style structure.
An audience limited to 50 enters
a dimly lit space where the options
are to sit on a cushion or to stand.
What ensues is an act of communal
voyeurism centred on a cast of eight,
everything heightened because the
performers are only ever visible
behind, beneath or inside transparent
surfaces or containers. They are like
a living cabinet of curiosities or a
marvellously lit collection of misfit
specimens who seem unaware of how
closely, clinically, we observe them.
Most are female, including an
anxious woman (Maëva Berthelot) in
Doc Martens who clings to the wall
behind her; an inexplicably distressed
sensualist (Elisabeth Schilling) in a
slinky long dress; and a lost piece
of human origami (Sachi Kimura)
confined in a giant jar. There’s also
a male office worker (Sam Coren)
crammed behind a desk, and a woman
(Silvia Mercuriali) twisting inside
a grass-lined, see-through coffin.
An apron-wearing Scot (Sarah
Cameron) is the lone speaker, a sort of
philosophical town gossip spouting
Alice Oswald’s obliquely poetic text
into an old-fashioned telephone. In a
smaller, quieter room we briefly watch
two people (Hayley Carmichael and
Riccardo T) half-slumbering on a
mattress, their shifting, foetal-like
moves charged with tentative yet
tender intimacy. Directed by Suzy
Willson, Under Glass is beautifully
designed, but lacking in humour. Still,
as a stylised study of confinement and
isolation it lodges in the memory.
Donald Hutera
Theatre
Joy
Theatre Royal, E15
G
{{{((
irl Almighty, reads the
slogan on Joy’s sweatshirt,
and she’s out to conquer the
world. She wants to travel,
create art, have her own
home and a baby. Yet she’s constantly
stopped and silenced by a single word:
“no”. Joy has Down’s syndrome. Mum
walked out when she was little. Dad is
overprotective, yet her big sister Mary
knows Joy needs her freedom. And Joy
has made up her mind: she’s not taking
“no” for an answer.
Stephanie Martin’s play is
boundary-busting, inclusive theatre.
A coming-of-age tale laced with
courage, anger and salty humour, it’s
lively and engaging, despite threadbare
plotting and soapy dialogue. Melanie
Fullbrook’s production, performed by
actors with and without learning
disabilities, is stylish and affecting.
Imogen Roberts plays Joy with
vibrancy and a smidgin of sarky
{{{{(
Caoilfhionn Dunne gives an engrossing performance as Suzy, the title character of Magali Mougel’s play
Mother of all miseries
This French
play about
postnatal
depression
wallows in its
subject, says
Ann Treneman
Theatre
Suzy Storck
Gate, W11
{{(((
F
irst, a warning: sleep-deprived
new parents may find this
hazardous to their health.
Wannabe parents may want
to be cautious too. There’s
throwing the baby out with the
bathwater and then there’s hiring a skip
and throwing in the entire bathroom.
If warnings are heeded, the audience
may be quite small by now (and in
the brace position) but, then, the Gate
is a bit petite itself and likes to take
a few risks. This play by the French
playwright Magali Mougel, directed
by Jean-Pierre Baro, has been
translated so well by Chris Campbell
that it feels universal. Suzy Storck is a
woman who woke up one morning
and thought, wait, how did
I end up with three kids and a snarky
husband named Hans and a mother
who may not be on my side?
“You are such a looovely couple
and you have such looovely children,”
her mother gushes as she surveys a
room almost entirely inhabited by
plastic-toy trip hazards. In the middle
of the madness sits Suzy, perhaps
overplaying the Bridget Jones card
with three wine bottles and the radio
playing what sounds like Morrissey.
teenage attitude. She and Mary
(Rachael Bright) are adept at winding
up their harassed, hard-working
father. Joy’s getting serious with her
boyfriend, an earnest spoken-word
poet, and she has made a new friend at
the library — unhappily married Sue,
who finds in Joy a sensitive confidante
whose vim lends her a fresh appetite
for life. Joy is also working on a college
project about a Victorian woman
labelled “a simpleton”, and her devoted
older sister. Compellingly, in her
fecund imagination, she journeys with
them through cold, pitiless London,
all the way to John Langdon Down’s
pioneering Normansfield Hospital.
Carla Goodman’s design features
a chalk-line mural, which is filled in
by the cast as Joy’s story develops. It’s
a clever backdrop for a drama that’s
often very touching, particularly in its
portrayal of the bond between Joy and
Mary. The writing needs sharpening;
it’s too reliant on awkward monologues
for exposition and emotional
revelation. Fullbrook’s staging, though,
has an irrepressible, swaggering
spirit that sweeps you along.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 020 8543 0310, to Sat
Dance
Aladdin
Sadler’s Wells
{{(((
Mathias Dingman
and Momoko Hirata
The play has a good starting point.
The problem is that we don’t travel
very far from it. It doesn’t take long
(two minutes?) to gather that Suzy
may not have made the best choices in
life. But there are still 73 more minutes
to go in which we wallow with her
in her postnatal depression.
How I longed for that radio to
start playing something helpful and
not all that emo twaddle. Where’s
Dolly shouting out D.I.V.O.R.C.E? Or
Gloria Gaynor on how to survive?
Doesn’t she have a girlfriend who
knows the ropes?
The cast, led by Caoilfhionn Dunne
as Suzy and Jonah Russell as Hans, are
engrossed in their parts, the emotions
and pain as raw as uncooked steak.
Thank goodness for the set, by Cécile
Trémolières, who has created a room
with a view, with much to distract us.
The play also has a few nice structural
surprises, with moments of poetry
and changes of pace.
This is an accomplished production
but we are still left with the fact that it
feels like a writing exercise that strikes
the same note, repeatedly, until Suzy’s
not the only one who’s depressed.
Box office: 020 7229 0706, to Nov 18
T
here is much to like in David
Bintley’s three-act Arabian
Nights adaptation. The
wonderful sets by Dick Bird
fill the stage with a sense of
magic and faraway lands, from a “souk
in old Arabia” to a mysterious desert
cave filled with treasure and the royal
palace where Aladdin marries his
beloved Princess. Sue Blane’s costumes
— an exuberant display of orientalism
— are a knockout; Mark Jonathan’s
lighting positively glows. And Bintley
wisely eschews the temptation to go
all pantomime with his tale. Instead
he gives us a full-blown classical ballet,
with Sleeping Beauty-type vision scene
and a grand divertissement.
The performances on opening night
were
another plus, led by Mathias
w
Dingman’s likeable Aladdin, the poor
boy made good. Dingman’s dancing
was exciting and his personality
utterly winning — just what you need
in a hero. Momoko Hirata’s Princess
was light of touch in her dancing and
sweetly romantic in her acting.
Valentin Olovyannikov’s Mahgrib, the
villain
of the piece, was a powerful
v
presence in his zealous pursuit of the
magic lamp, and Tzu-Chao Chou,
econds before proceedings
began, the faint buzz of
a helicopter sparked a
frightening question in
my mind. Were America’s
esteemed and serious Emerson String
Quartet, famous promoters of core
repertoire, about to take leave of their
senses, board, ascend into the sky and
perform Stockhausen’s infamous
Helicopter String Quartet?
Formed 41 years ago, this is a group
whose only customary brush with risk
comes from the sometimes queasy
intonations of one of its violinists,
Eugene Drucker. Otherwise, Tuesday’s
concert (the first of two devoted to the
holy of holies, Beethoven’s last string
quartets) rested on solid ground.
Solid, but never hard. Much of the
night’s heated emotions derived from
the heartfelt cello playing of our own
Paul Watkins. A member since 2013,
crisp in attack, tone wonderfully
warm, he gave us his all, yet didn’t
overplay his hand. Other strong
colouring came from Lawrence
Dutton’s viola; so much for that
instrument being shy. Philip Setzer,
first violinist for Op 131 and Op 135,
was always a fount of silvery strength
and a valuable foil for Drucker’s
febrile but wispier sounds.
Fugal moments in these quartets
brought out the best of the Emersons’
rainbow hues, while the scrambled
vivace of Op 135 and the visionary,
constantly mutating Op 131 specially
displayed their precious knack for
grading dynamics and turning tight
corners in the dark. Equally impressive
playing came when textures grew
lyrical and homogenous, as in the
slow movement of Op 135, caressingly
lovely. Quality just occasionally
dipped in Op 127; tension too, during
the excessive pauses between
movements. Yet everything worked
effortlessly well in the folksy fun of the
finale, topped off with a beautifully
placed, witty final chord.
Geoff Brown
every inch of him covered in blue
paint, was thrilling as the Djinn of
said lamp. Standout performances
in the Cave of Riches jewel-themed
divertissement (Jenna Roberts in
Sapphire, Brandon Lawrence in
Emeralds, Nao Sakuma and Tyrone
Singleton in Rubies and Céline Gittens
in Diamond) were a bonus, while
the Birmingham Royal Ballet
ensemble offered crisp dancing
and engaging humour.
And yet. Over the course of almost
three hours three things work against
Aladdin. The first is Carl Davis’s soggy,
anodyne score, a kitsch concoction
more suited to Hollywood melodrama
than proper ballet. The second is
Bintley’s storytelling, which lacks
clarity (he skirts over key plot points)
and sufficient impetus to drive the
drama, such as it is. Finally, the
choreography, lovely though it may be
in parts, rarely rises above the merely
predictable, while duets for Aladdin
and the Princess feel underpowered,
as if emotion is deliberately being held
in check. For a full-length love story
ballet, that’s a pretty serious flaw.
Debra Craine
Box office: 020 7863 8000, tonight
12
1GT
Thursday November 2 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Inside Barlinnie
ITV, 9pm
The
notorious
HM Prison
Barlinnie
is located in the
residential suburb
of Riddrie, northeast
Glasgow. The
1,250 inmates, of all
Early
Top
pick
categories from
short-term sentences
to murderers, are
separated from the
outside world by
imposing metal doors,
crumbling stone walls
and barbed wire.
Ross Kemp dons his
most serious face and
volunteers to spend
some time in “the big
hoose” to experience
what life is like in a
British prison. Kemp
is advised to keep his
head down and do as
he is told and all will be
well. It’s not that simple
for the prisoners. “This
yard can kick off in
two minutes,” says
one inmate. “People
getting slashed and
that. People punch
you right out of your
trainers in here. This
is Barlinnie, mate.” In
2016 violence in prisons
across Britain hit
record levels. Kemp
meets a prison officer,
Stevie, who shows him
some of the weapons
retrieved from searches
carried out inside the
prison. Drugs are also
a serious problem. “It’s
hard to wrap your head
around a life sentence,”
says one inmate. “Just
take heroin and it
blanks everything.” The
most uncomfortable
moment is Kemp’s
meeting with a repeat
sex offender serving
four years for his third
offence of downloading
indecent images of
children. The prisoner
believes he will never
be cured of his feelings
towards children, but
is also adamant that
he poses no danger
to society. Like
Louis Theroux’s
recent documentaries,
this is a tough watch.
Harry Styles
at the BBC
BBC One, 8pm
The former boy band
member’s speedy
transformation from
pop moppet to serious
artiste is given another
shot in the arm with
this BBC special —
although the choice
of the Radio 1 DJ
Nick Grimshaw as host
shows where Styles’s
appeal still lies.
Filmed in front of
a live audience at BBC
Studios, Styles performs
tracks from his
self-titled No 1 debut
solo album, including
Sign of the Times and
Two Ghosts, and chats
to his pal Grimmy
about One Direction,
being a solo artist and
his acting debut in
the Christopher
Nolan film Dunkirk.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Countryfile Autumn Diaries.
Keeley Donovan finds out what the warmer weather
means for the countryside 10.00 Homes Under the
Hammer. Properties sold at auction in Chesterton,
Netherton and Berkhamsted (AD) 11.00 Getting the
Builders In. A couple need their downstairs cloakroom
updating 11.45 Fugitives. Officers in Redditch attempt to
track down a Polish drug dealer (r) 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. From Newark, Nottinghamshire (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC
News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
1.45 Doctors. The police make a significant breakthrough
thanks to Zara, and Jimmi has a mystery to solve when a
bipolar student turns up with an abandoned baby (AD)
2.15 Impossible. Game show hosted by Rick Edwards
3.00 Escape to the Country. A couple search for a home
they could use for a holiday-let business (r) (AD) 3.45
Money for Nothing. Sarah Moore looks for items at Witley
Recycling Centre in Surrey (r) 4.30 Antiques Road Trip.
Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey’s antique hunt takes
them to Birmingham (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show
hosted by Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC News at Six;
Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Hairy Builder (r) (AD) 6.30 Countryfile
Autumn Diaries (r) 7.15 Getting the Builders In (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: See Hear on Tour — Helsinki (SL) 8.30 Caught
Red Handed (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00
BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm The
Code (r) 1.45 The Planners. Chester Zoo proposes a
£30million development, and a man wants to turn a
former school into flats (r) 2.45 Family Finders. Two
adopted brothers’ quest to find two further siblings given
up for adoption 3.15 The Railway: Keeping Britain on
Track. Documentary going behind the scenes of the UK’s
rail network, with the first episode following the work of
staff at London’s King’s Cross station (r) (AD) 4.15 Back
in Time for Dinner. The Robshaws get to grips with the
home life and food of the 1980s as they learn about the
culinary treats and trends of the decade, including the
arrival of nouvelle cuisine (r) (AD) 5.15 Flog It! Will Axon
meets his match when he comes across a First World War
bayonet, and Mark Stacey demonstrates his knowledge of
Royal Doulton (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by
Jeremy Vine 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two.
Ian Waite examines more of the couples’ training footage
6.00am Good Morning Britain. The choirmaster Gareth
Malone talks about taking his show out on the road for a
UK tour. A lively mix of news and current affairs, plus
health, entertainment and lifestyle features 8.30
Lorraine. Including a chat with Kenneth Branagh, talking
about the movie adaptation of Murder on the Orient
Express 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show
10.30 This Morning. Chat and lifestyle features, including
a look at the stories making the newspaper headlines and
a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose Women. The
ladies put the world to rights once more and chat to the
Benidorm actress Sheila Reid 1.30 ITV News; Weather
2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal. In Stoke-on-Trent, Jan Keyne
hopes to get lucky with a charm bracelet, Jon O’Marah has
a brush with a D’oyly John painting, and Corrie Jeffery
performs DIY with some miniature tools (r) 3.00 Tenable.
Quiz hosted by Warwick Davis in which friends from East
Sussex answer questions about top 10 lists, then try to
score a perfect 10 in the final round 4.00 Tipping Point.
Ben Shephard hosts the arcade-themed game show 5.00
The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents the quiz show 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) (AD) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay’s
Hotel Hell. Gordon Ramsay checks in at the Monticello
Hotel in Longview, Washington, where shocking
newspaper allegations about the owner make saving the
business difficult (r) (AD) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA.
The president of a motor care franchise goes undercover
(r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Come Dine
with Me. Four contestants in York battle it out (r) 1.05
My Kitchen Rules. Scottish friends Annette and Rebecca
cook up a traditional paella 2.10 Countdown. With the
actress Alison Steadman in Dictionary Corner 3.00
A Place in the Sun. A couple plan to buy a home on
Kefalonia to get back in touch with their Greek roots (r)
4.00 Coast vs Country. Kieran and Maryna look for their
perfect home in Kent on a budget of £1.1million 5.00 Four
in a Bed. Jorge Mesquita plays host at his Bournemouth
B&B 5.30 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star. The
couple challenge the owners to rebrand their exterior
6.00 The Simpsons. Groundskeeper Willie is forced to
move in with the family (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. The
Osborne family are left reeling after the explosion (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can’t
Pay? We’ll Take It Away. Officers chase £4,500 in court
fees in north Wales after a property deal turned sour, and
in Birmingham the agents try to collect over £3,500 from
a single mum (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.15 The
Hotel Inspector Returns. Alex Polizzi revisits Who’d a
Thought It in Grafty Green, Kent, where the manager’s
taste for erotic art and four-man hot tubs did not hit the
right note with some guests (r) 1.10 Access. Showbiz
news and gossip 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45
Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS. A Marine’s teeth and
fingertips are found in a pickpocket’s stolen purse, but
the team discovers the real target may have been his
ex-girlfriend, a skilled player of computer games (r) (AD)
3.15 FILM: The Christmas Heart (PG, TVM, 2012)
A community rallies round when a local boy needs a heart
transplant, but a sudden storm jeopardises the delivery of
the donor organ by plane. Drama starring Teri Polo and
Ty Wood 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Gary tells
Terese he is willing to give their relationship another try
(r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Irene discovers Olivia has
raided her trust fund (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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7.00 The One Show Alex Jones and Amol
Rajan present the live magazine,
featuring chat and stories of interest
7.00 The Super-Rich and Us Jacques
Peretti looks at how the destabilisation
of work life in the 1970s drove a new
profit culture in the following decade,
and how acceptance of huge executive
bonuses was created (2/2) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Paddy feels under
pressure to fulfil his responsibilities
and arranges a meeting with
the headmistress (AD)
7.30 Fast Food: The Big Fat Truth
— Tonight Ranvir Singh investigates
claims that fast-food outlets are
fuelling obesity and poor health
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.55 Annalesha’s Story:
Stand Up to Cancer
7.00 All New Traffic Cops North
Yorkshire is considered a soft touch by
criminals, who using the county’s rural
back roads to operate under cover of
darkness. In this edition, the team’s
elite officers hunt down and arrest
burglars, drug dealers and thieves.
Jamie Theakston narrates (r)
8.00 Harry Styles at the BBC A one-off
special in which the One Direction star
performs tracks from his self-titled
debut album, including the song that
launched his solo career, Sign of the
Times. In between numbers, he talks
to the Radio 1 DJ Nick Grimshaw about
his career to date. See Viewing Guide
8.00 The Big Family Cooking
Showdown The three most successful
families return for the final, in which
they prepare food for a big family
get-together, including nibbles, main
courses and desserts. Hosted by Zoe
Ball and Nadiya Hussain (12/12) (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Rhona confronts her
feelings, Laurel’s anxiety grows,
while Gerry bonds with Doug (AD)
8.00 The Supervet A Great Dane comes to
the clinic needing an operation on its
spine, but when Noel Fitzpatrick
discovers the dog has laryngeal
paralysis, the prospect of surgery
suddenly becomes much more
complicated. There are also two
Labradors in for treatment (AD)
8.00 Bargain-Loving Brits in Blackpool
B&B owner Chris gets ready to
welcome a hen party, Ian tries to
attract punters to his donkey ride
business, Sharon dreams of running
a Caribbean restaurant, and Sandra
organises a posthumous birthday
party for her late husband (2/6)
9.00 The Ganges with Sue Perkins
Sue meets students in Patna, is
reunited with an old friend in Kolkata
and finds out about the endangered
Bengal tiger before reaching Saga
Island in the mouth of the river.
See Viewing Guide (3/3) (AD)
9.00 Exodus: Our Journey Continues
New series. A follow-up to the 2016
documentary Exodus: Our Journey to
Europe, finding out what happened to
some of the one million migrants and
refugees who came to Europe in 2015.
See Viewing Guide (1/3) (AD)
9.00 Ross Kemp Behind Bars: Inside
Barlinnie Ross Kemp spends 10 days
visiting HMP Barlinnie in Glasgow,
immersing himself in prison life and
speaking to inmates and staff about
life in one of the oldest and toughest
jails in the world. See Viewing Guide
9.00 First Dates: Celebrity Special for
SU2C An edition in aid of Stand Up
to Cancer in which the singer and TV
personality Sinitta, Conservative MP
Michael Fabricant, DJ Roman Kemp and
the former newsreader Jan Leeming
go on blind dates with unsuspecting
members of the public (AD)
9.00 Rich House, Poor House Families
from Orpington and Bromley swap
homes, lifestyles and budgets for
a week to see how the other half
lives — and find out if money
really can buy happiness (3/4)
10.00 The Great British Bake Off: An
Extra Slice Jo Brand looks back at
this year’s final, chatting to the winner
and presenting unseen footage from
the show. Plus, viewers’ bakes,
both good and bad (10/10) (AD)
10.00 Bad Habits, Holy Orders The
women leave the convent to spend
time with three other, very different,
Catholic orders, working with the
young homeless, meeting the elderly
residents of a care home and
attempting a 24-hour silence (3/4)
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7.30 EastEnders A shaken Tina returns to
the Vic, Jack searches for the missing
children, while Abi has a final
bombshell for Lauren (AD)
8.30 Paul O’Grady: For the Love of
Dogs Paul meets a pair of old
labradors who cannot bear to be
apart for one second (3/8)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 MOTD: The Premier League Show
Gabby Logan presents the magazine
featuring news and highlights
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day’s
events presented by Mark Urban
10.30 Regional News
10.45 Question Time David Dimbleby
chairs the topical debate from
Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, where
former Scottish Labour leader Kezia
Dugdale and the Stagecoach founder
Brian Souter are among the panellists
facing questions from the audience
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days’ political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Louis Theroux: Talking to
Anorexia The reporter meets patients
at two of London’s largest eating
disorder facilities, following them
through a daily routine of scheduled
eating, weigh-ins and group therapy
both on and off the wards (AD)
12.15am Peaky Blinders Tommy discovers the extreme
lengths his new paymasters are willing to go (r) (AD)
1.15 Sign Zone: See Hear on Tour — Helsinki. Rosie Benn
meets a British deaf man who moved to Finland (r) (SL)
1.45 The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed (r)
(AD, SL) 2.45-3.45 This Farming Life (r) (SL)
10.40 After the News Nick Ferrari is joined
by Labour MP Jonathan Ashworth,
presenter Rachel Johnson and
journalist Sarah Vine
11.15 Uefa Europa League Highlights
Mark Pougatch presents a round-up
of the matchday four fixtures, which
included Lyon v Everton at the
Groupama Stadium and Arsenal v Red
Star Belgrade at the Emirates Stadium
12.20am Jackpot247 Interactive gaming 3.00 Fast
Food: The Big Fat Truth — Tonight. Ranvir Singh
investigates claims that fast-food outlets are fuelling
obesity and poor health (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen.
Text-based information service 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy
Kyle Show. Guests air their differences (r) (SL)
10.50 A Summer to Save My Life
Documentary following a small group
of cancer patients over one summer
as they undergo immunotherapy,
a pioneering treatment that
aims to boost the body’s natural
defences to fight the disease
11.05 Borderline Two bodies are repatriated
through Northend, only for a coffin
mix-up to cause chaos (3/6)
11.55 Gogglebox The armchair critics share
their opinions on shows (r) (AD)
11.35 Borderline A woman travelling on her
pre-transition passport and a plumbing
problem in the ladies’ toilet cause
a headache for Proctor (4/6)
12.55am The Secret Life of the Zoo A giant anteater
is about to be reunited with long-term mate Bliss (r)
(AD) 1.50 Is Britain Full?: Channel 4 Dispatches (r) 2.20
Unreported World (r) 2.50 Grand Designs Australia (r)
3.45 Phil Spencer: Secret Agent (r) (AD) 4.40 Best of
Both Worlds (r) (SL) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.00 SuperCasino Live interactive gaming 3.10am
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. A businessman is
found tied up, stripped and branded (r) (AD) 4.00 Tribal
Teens. Two British teenagers are sent to live with Kenya’s
Samburu tribe (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
House Busters (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Thursday November 2 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
The Ganges
BBC One, 9pm
On the final leg of
her journey down
the mighty river,
Sue Perkins larks
about with a group
of female students
at a technology
college in Patna. In
the countryside of
Bihar state she meets
a record-breaking
potato farmer, but
has a heartbreaking
encounter when she
reaches Kolkata to be
reunited with a young
girl she met there two
years previously.
Finding the once
exuberant child now
subdued is upsetting for
Perkins, but she’s back
to her jovial best when
she joins six million
Hindus for a gathering
in honour of Mother
Ganga on Sagar Island.
Exodus: Our
Journey Continues
BBC Two, 9pm
Last year Exodus
followed the story of
some of the 1.5 million
refugees joining the
biggest mass migration
since the Second World
War. This three-part
series continues telling
these desperate stories.
We watch Dame, who
left Ethiopia, scaling a
barbed wire fence at
Calais to make it to
London, where he is
refused asylum. “I am
a ghost in a prison,” he
says. His experience is
echoed by many others
featured here. They
flee life-threatening
situations to find
that Europe isn’t
the promised land.
But still they come
because the alternative
is worse.
Living the Dream
Sky One, 9pm
Philip Glenister and
Lesley Sharp star in
this fish-out-of-water
comedy drama as Mal
and Jen Pemberton, a
married couple who up
sticks from Yorkshire
to Florida with their
two teenage children
in search of a better
life (do they watch
the news?). They have
a palatial house
with a pool in a nice
neighbourhood, and
if that seems too good
to be true, well,
obviously it is. Mal has
invested in a rundown
adults-only caravan
park populated
by trailer trash,
including hulking park
bully Troy, who is
determined to keep
it kids-free. Then there
are the alligators . . .
Sport choice
Sky Main Event, 9am
The cream of European
Tour golf are teeing
off at the Carya Golf
Club, Belek, for the
Turkish Airlines Open.
Last year’s winner,
Thorbjorn Olesen,
is defending his title,
and he’ll be joined by
a strong contingent
from England,
including Justin Rose.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) 8.00 It’s Me or the Dog
(r) 9.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) 10.00 Dogs: An
Amazing Animal Family (r) (AD) 11.00 Modern
Family (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm
Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r)
5.30 Futurama. Bender works at a factory (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry tries to save Earth (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. A rogue black ops team breaks into
Kord Industries and steals something lethal
9.00 Living the Dream. New series. A family
swap Yorkshire for a new life in Florida.
Comedy drama starring Philip Glenister
and Lesley Sharp. See Viewing Guide
10.00 The Russell Howard Hour. Topical comedy
11.00 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own. Comedy quiz (r)
(AD) 1.00am The Force: North East (r) 2.00
Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD) 3.00 Brit
Cops: War on Crime (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 Urban Secrets (r)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) (AD)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House.
The miserable medic is taken hostage (r) (AD)
6.00 House. A personal trainer collapses
while filming an exercise DVD (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
A womanising dwarf is found dead (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. A rehabilitated criminal is
implicated in a new investigation (r) (AD)
9.00 Tin Star. The truth about Jack Devlin’s
past is revealed (9/10)
10.00 Vice Principals. Russell’s birthday
bash is marred by a revelation
10.35 Room 104. Drama anthology (6/12)
11.10 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (r)
11.55 Curb Your Enthusiasm (r)
12.35am Dice (r) 1.05 Tin Star (r) 2.05
Ray Donovan. Last in the series (r) 3.15
Californication (r) 4.25 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Highway Patrol (r) 12.00 Road Wars
1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds. An autistic child is
discovered splattered with blood (r)
7.00 The Real A&E. A motorbike crash (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E. A 20ft fall (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. A nanny is suspected
of poisoning her boss (r) (AD)
9.00 Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez
Murders. Drama about the 1996 US murder case
10.00 Criminal Minds. Several bodies are
discovered in lifeguard towers (r)
11.00 Stalker. Jack and Beth investigate a
break-in at a television presenter’s home (r)
12.00 Cold Case (r) 1.00am Criminal Minds (r)
2.00 Road Wars (r) 3.00 UK Border Force (r)
5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am Sarah Brightman: Symphony in Vienna
7.40 South Bank Masterclasses: Evelyn Glennie
8.00 Auction (AD) 8.30 Watercolour Challenge
9.00 Tales of the Unexpected 10.00 The Art
Show (AD) 11.00 Too Young to Die (AD) 12.00
Discovering: William Holden (AD) 1.00pm Tales
of the Unexpected 2.00 Watercolour Challenge
2.30 Auction 3.00 Fake! The Great Masterpiece
Challenge 4.00 Casanova Undressed 5.00
Discovering: George Michael (AD) 5.30
Watercolour Challenge 6.00 Discovering:
Barbara Stanwyck (AD) 7.00 Landscape Artist
of the Year 2017 8.00 Discovering: Omar Sharif
9.00 The History of Comedy. A look at parody
and satire in the world of comedy 10.00 Urban
Myths: Cary Grant and Timothy Leary 10.30
Horror Comedy Shorts 11.00 Discovering: Abba
12.00 The History of Comedy 1.00am Tales of
the Unexpected 2.00 Auction 2.30 The First
Monday in May 4.15 Love Bite: Laurie Lipton
and Her Disturbing Black & White Drawings
5.00 The South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans
9.00 Live European Tour Golf: The Turkish
Airlines Open. Coverage of the opening day of
the tournament at the Carya Golf Club in
Antalya, Turkey, an event won last year by
Denmark’s Thorbjorn Olesen. See Viewing Guide
2.00pm Live ATP Masters Tennis. Coverage
of the fourth day at the AccorHotels Arena in
Paris, featuring matches in the third round.
Britain’s Andy Murray is the current champion,
having defeated American John Isner in last
year’s final to pick up his first win at this event
9.30 Live PGA Tour Golf: The Shriners Hospitals
for Children Open. Coverage of day one of
the tournament at the TPC Summerlin in
Las Vegas, Nevada, where Australia’s
Rod Pampling was the winner last year
12.30am Live NFL: New York Jets v Buffalo
Bills. Coverage of the AFC East clash at MetLife
Stadium, joining in progress five minutes after
the kick-off 3.45 NFL Jay Ajayi Running Back
Masterclass 4.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View.
News, comment and analysis from Stormont
and Westminster 11.15 Question Time.
David Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in
Kilmarnock 12.15am This Week. The past
seven days in politics 1.00-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 9.00pm-10.00 The
Country Council. The council workers
going above-and-beyond to improve
local lives, including the Learning
Disability team in Lochgilphead (3/3)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00-1.00pm First
Minister’s Questions. Nicola Sturgeon answers
questions in the Scottish Parliament 7.00
Britain Afloat. The history of river boats in
Britain, such as the ancient coracle (r)
7.30-8.00 Timeline. Thought-provoking stories
and analysis from across the country
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00 The
Super-Rich and Us. The effects billionaires are
having on Britain’s economy (1/2) (r) (AD)
Find a lifelong companion in the Times Literary Supplement,
the world’s leading international literary journal
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm-11.15 Scotland
Tonight. Analysis of the day’s main news
stories 12.20am Teleshopping 1.20 After
Midnight. News and conversation 2.50 Fast
Food: The Big Fat Truth — Tonight. Claims that
fast-food outlets are fuelling obesity and poor
health (r) 3.15 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
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BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1984. Featuring Limahl,
Status Quo, Billy Ocean and Chaka Khan (r)
8.00 Jim Clark: The Quiet Champion. Profile of
the two-time Formula One champion, who was
killed at the height of his career. Featuring rare
archive footage, interviews with the driver
and comments from close friends (r)
9.00 The Most Courageous Raid of WWII.
Paddy Ashdown tells the story of the
“Cockleshell Heroes”, the Royal Marine
commandos who in 1942 launched an attack on
enemy shipping in Bordeaux harbour (r) (AD)
10.00 The Somme: Secret Tunnel Wars.
Documentary following Peter Barton and a team
of archaeologists as they navigate a network of
tunnels constructed beneath the Somme
battlefield during the First World War (r)
11.00 Empire of the Seas: How the Navy Forged
the Modern World. The role of the Royal Navy in
the development of Britain (1/4) (r) (AD)
12.00 Top of the Pops: 1984. Featuring Status
Quo (r) 12.40am The Man Who Discovered
Egypt (r) 1.40 Jim Clark: The Quiet Champion
(r) (SL) 2.40-4.00 I Know Who You Are (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00
New Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
5.30 Stage School. Alex gets good news
6.00 The Big Bang Theory. Two shows (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Streetmate. Helping a party girl (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory. Leonard’s mother
finds a new best friend in Penny (AD)
9.00 2 Broke Girls. Max and Caroline plan to
attract a more sophisticated clientele (AD)
9.30 GameFace. Marcella needs to tell her
family about Billy’s drug problem (AD)
10.00 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
11.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 Rude Tube: Love Bytes (r) 1.05am The
Inbetweeners (r) (AD) 2.10 GameFace (r) (AD)
2.40 2 Broke Girls (r) (AD) 3.05 First Dates (r)
(AD) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 4.25
Black-ish (r) (AD) 4.50 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) 9.30 FILM:
Sherlock Holmes: Terror By Night (PG,
1946) Mystery with Basil Rathbone and Nigel
Bruce (b/w) 10.50 A Place in the Sun: Winter
Sun (r) 11.55 Time Team (r) 2.00pm Four in a
Bed (r) 4.50 A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel treats a puppy using
groundbreaking cell treatment (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows a
project near Newbury to construct a modern
farmhouse that combines an open-plan party
pad with functional spaces below (9/11) (r)
9.00 The Three Day Nanny. A two-year-old in
Luton who bangs his head against the
wall in frustration (2/3) (AD)
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. An 11-year-old is
rushed to A&E after being hit by a motorbike
on his way to secondary school (9/11) (r)
11.05 The Handmaid’s Tale. Offred receives a
proposition from Serena Joy that brings back
memories of her marriage (5/10) (r) (AD)
12.15am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA. A
restaurateur from New Jersey gets help (r) 1.15
The Three Day Nanny (r) (AD) 2.15 24 Hours in
A&E (r) 3.20-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am The China Syndrome (PG, 1979)
Thriller starring Michael Douglas and Jane Fonda
(AD) 1.25pm The Quick Gun (PG, 1964)
Western starring Audie Murphy and Merry
Anders 3.15 The Last Frontier (PG, 1955)
Western starring Victor Mature 5.15 First Men
in the Moon (U, 1964) Sci-fi adventure
starring Lionel Jeffries and Edward Judd
7.20 Airplane II: The Sequel (15, 1982)
A computer malfunction sends a passenger
space shuttle hurtling toward the sun, while a
mad bomber is also on board. Disaster movie
spoof sequel with Robert Hays and Julie Hagerty
9.00 Red 2 (12, 2013) An ex-CIA agent
reassembles his team of retired operatives to
recover an advanced weapon that has gone
missing. Action thriller sequel with Bruce Willis,
Helen Mirren and John Malkovich (AD)
11.15 Joe (15, 2013) An ex-convict develops a
paternal bond with a teenager working for him
and seeks to protect him from his violent father.
Drama starring Nicolas Cage and Tye Sheridan
1.35am-3.35 Suzanne (12, 2013) Katell
Quillevere’s romantic drama starring Sara
Forestier and Paul Hamy. In French
6.00am The Cube (r) 6.50 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records (r) 7.15 Dinner Date (r)
8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30 Coronation
Street (r) (AD) 9.30 The Ellen DeGeneres Show
(r) 10.20 Dinner Date (r) 11.20 Dress to
Impress (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.50 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.50 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress. Three singletons try
to impress dental nurse Cece in Cardiff (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Top 100 Talent (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Charlie lands
himself in a difficult situation (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Charlie reveals his
true feelings to Chelsea (r)
9.00 Bromans. The remaining men compete in
the Emperor’s Games. Last in the series
10.00 Celebrity Juice. With Ed Sheeran, Louis
Walsh, Chris Kamara and Chris Ramsey
10.50 Family Guy. Meg is threatened (r) (AD)
11.15 Family Guy. Brian wins tickets (r) (AD)
11.40 American Dad! Stan stays awake (r) (AD)
12.10am American Dad! (r) (AD) 1.10 Celebrity
Showmance (r) 2.05 Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
8.55 Judge Judy (r) 10.15 Inspector Morse (r)
12.35pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.40 Heartbeat
(r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.45
Inspector Morse. Tragedy strikes Morse’s family.
Guest starring Sorcha Cusack (r) (AD)
6.00 Heartbeat. Reverend Jacob Thwaite returns
home to find his wife murdered (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. An old friend of
Jessica’s becomes the prime suspect in
a murder investigation (r) (AD)
8.00 Foyle’s War. When an unpopular employee
at a military psychiatric hospital is found
murdered, there is no shortage of suspects,
but information regarding a missing boy
becomes Foyle’s top priority (2/3) (r) (AD)
10.05 Lewis. Feature-length episode. An elderly
don is killed on the night of his release from
prison, and Lewis embarks on a relationship with
Hobson while investigating the case. Kevin
Whately stars (5&6/6) (r) (AD)
12.00 Inspector Morse (r) (AD) 2.10am ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Protectors (r) 6.25 The Chase (r)
8.00 Storage Wars (r) 8.45 Pawn Stars (r) 9.40
Ironside (r) 10.40 Quincy ME (r) 11.45 The
Sweeney (r) 12.45pm The Avengers (r) 1.55
Ironside (r) 2.55 Quincy ME (r) 3.55 The
Sweeney (r) 4.55 The Avengers (r)
6.00 Storage Wars. Casey bids (r)
6.30 Storage Wars: Best of the Finds. The most
unusual objects found in the series (r)
6.55 Pawn Stars. The guys examine
the work of the artist Denny Dent (r)
7.25 Pawn Stars. The guys try to buy a silver
brick that is worth $35,000 (r)
7.50 Hornblower. The lieutenant turns the
attack on the Spanish-held fortress into a
famous victory, but Buckland’s treachery means
his troubles are just beginning (2/2) (r)
10.00 FILM: Reservoir Dogs (18, 1992)
A failed robbery ends in a bloodbath, and as the
criminals lie low they try to work out whether
someone betrayed them. Quentin Tarantino’s
thriller starring Harvey Keitel and Tim Roth
12.05am The Sweeney (r) (SL) 1.05 The Classic
Car Show (r) 2.05 Ax Men (r) 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice
Road Truckers 5.00 Impossible Engineering (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. With Kristin Scott Thomas (AD)
7.00 Top Gear. Jeremy Clarkson gets to grips
with the smallest car to go into production (AD)
8.00 QI XL. Extended episode, with guests
Miles Jupp, Deirdre O’Kane and Phill Jupitus
9.00 Red Dwarf. All the machines on-board
Red Dwarf go on strike (AD)
9.40 Zapped. Brian lands a job guarding
Munty’s sacred Albino Pear Tree (AD)
10.20 Red Dwarf. Lister and Rimmer
finally arrive back on Earth (AD)
11.00 Red Dwarf. Lister and Rimmer
are marooned on an icy planet (AD)
11.40 Would I Lie to You? Comedy panel
show with Keeley Hawes, Stephen Mangan,
Kevin Bridges and Professor Brian Cox
12.20am Mock the Week 1.00 QI 1.40 Would I
Lie to You? 2.20 Red Dwarf 3.00 Zapped 3.35
The Indestructibles 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine 1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London’s Burning 4.00 Pie in the
Sky 5.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
6.00 A Fine Romance. Mike’s van interferes in
the development of his relationship with Laura
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. The trio
prepare to attend a friend’s funeral
7.20 As Time Goes By. Jean ponders handing
the company over to Judith and Sandy
8.00 Rizzoli & Isles. The duo investigate the
shooting of an undercover cop (10/10) (AD)
9.00 New Tricks. The team reinvestigates the
15-year-old murder of a boxer (9/10) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. After being released from jail,
a paedophile admits to the abduction and murder
of a child 25 years previously (3/10) (AD)
11.15 Birds of a Feather. Christmas special from
1989. The Essex girls prepare for a lonely
Christmas away from their husbands
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London’s Burning
2.00 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 6.45 Britain in Motion
7.10 The Russian Revolution in Colour 8.00 The
Lost Dock of Liverpool: A Time Team Special
9.00 Walking Through History 10.00 Secrets of
Britain 11.00 The Great War in Numbers (AD)
12.00 Swords, Skulls and Strongholds: A Time
Team Special 1.00pm Walking Through History
2.00 Wonders of the Monsoon 3.00 Coast (AD)
4.00 Porridge 4.40 Blackadder the Third (AD)
5.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
6.00 World War II: The Price of Empire. Events
of 1943, including the Allied invasion of Sicily
7.00 World War II: The Price of Empire.
Examining the Normandy landings
8.00 Secrets of Britain. Documentary uncovering
the history of the department store Selfridges
9.00 Murder Maps. Investigating the murder
committed by Ruth Ellis. Last in the series
10.00 Porridge. Fletcher becomes an agony aunt
10.40 Blackadder the Third (AD)
11.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
12.00 Secrets of Britain. Documentary
1.00am World War II: The Price of Empire
2.00 Cash in the Attic 3.00 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 12.20am Teleshopping
1.20-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda 5.20 Peppa (r)
5.25 Pincidh Dincidh Dù (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r)
5.40 Blàrag a’ Bhò (Connie the Cow) (r)
5.45 Srath Sona (Happy Valley) (r) 5.50 Treud
na Dluth-choille: Grad-Naidheachd (Jungle
Bunch) (r) 5.55 Tree Fu Tom 6.15 Ceistean
Lara (r) 6.30 Dè a-nis? (What Now?) (r)
7.00 An Ataireachd Bhuan 7.30 Speaking
Our Language (r) 8.00 An Là (News) 8.30
Eòrpa (European Current Affairs) 9.00 Air an
Rathad: Rally 10.00 Breabach Beo (r) 10.25 An
Deidh Hitler (After Hitler) 11.15 Belladrum
2016: Cridhe Tartan — Bwani Junction
11.30-12.00 Fonn Fonn Fonn (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Do Re Mi Dona (r) 6.15 Patrôl
Pawennau (r) 6.30 Halibalw (r) 6.40 Sam Tân
(r) 6.50 Bing (r) 7.00 Patrôl Pawennau (r)
7.15 Tipini 7.30 Boj (r) 7.45 Y Crads Bach (r)
7.50 Igam Ogam (r) 8.00 Octonots (r) 8.15
Byd Begw Bwt (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r)
8.35 Tili a’i Ffrindiau (r) 8.45 Twt (r) 9.00
Nodi (r) 9.10 Sbridiri (r) 9.30 Pingu (r) 9.35
Bobi Jac (r) 9.45 Cei Bach (r) 10.00 Do Re Mi
Dona (r) 10.15 Patrôl Pawennau (r) 10.30
Halibalw (r) 10.40 Sam Tân (r) 10.50 Bing (r)
11.00 Patrôl Pawennau (r) 11.15 Tipini (r)
11.30 Boj (r) 11.45 Y Crads Bach (r) 11.50
Igam Ogam (r) 12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
12.05pm Heno (r) 12.40 Beddgelert (r) 1.00
Deuawdau Rhys Meirion (r) 2.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 3.05 Gwlad Moc (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr
5.00 Stwnsh: Bernard (r) 5.05 Stwnsh: Pigo Dy
Drwyn 5.35 Stwnsh: Dennis a Dannedd (r)
5.45 Stwnsh: Rygbi Pawb 6.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 6.05 04 Wal (r) 6.30 Codi Pac (r) 7.00
Heno 7.30 Rownd a Rownd. Erin relives the
traumatic events of Hallowe’en night (AD) 7.55
Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm. Britt needs to
prevent Colin from finding out she has lost all
his money (AD) 8.25 Cewri Cwmderi.
Countdown of the top 10 most popular Pobol y
Cwm characters 9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30
Nigel Owens: Wyt Ti’n Gêm? Owain Gwynedd
has a tongue-twisting voiceover session (8/8)
10.00 Hansh. Tunes, comedy and fresh faces
10.30 ’Sgota gyda Julian Lewis Jones. Julian
Lewis Jones and Rhys Llewellyn fish for salmon
(r) (AD) 11.00 Doctoriaid Yfory. Ffion worries
about inserting cannulas without spilling her
patients’ blood (r) 11.30-12.05am Low Box.
The team pits Manitou against Merlo (r) (AD)
14
Thursday November 2 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3170
5
6
1
7
17
7
20
15
13
1
1
1
9
10
11
15
16
16
12
12
16
23
6
9
16
25
18
26
8
16
4
6
18
16
7
20
17
19
16
25
8
1
1
15
2L
12
1
4
25
24
2L
17
15
23
18
5
15
9
6
1
16
8
2
14
6
20
15
1
16
5
14
5
4
4
4
22
4
5
1
17
5
20
25
23
2
25
1
7
24
Solution to Crossword 7485
A D
P L I N
O V
L T ED
L
R
OUS E
N
D W
GERY
R V
I L L E
I
R
V E I N
Down
1 Aid for the visually impaired
(5,3)
2 Very eager to see (4)
3 Like atomic weapons (13)
4 Large transporter (9,4)
5 Rate, evaluate (6)
6 Photos taken from a film (6)
7 Attractor (6)
11 Delay; block progress of (6)
12 Excited and pleased (8)
15 Apportions (6)
16 Die (6)
18 Hostelries (4)
2
1
24
5
21
12
1
2
3
4
5
O
14
15
16
17
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
N
18
V
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica
No 3987
No 3988
E
E
O
B
T
O
N
H
C
V
C
S
C
U
E
A
D
X
K
G
E
T
E
U
L
E
L
E
N
O
R
A
C
O
N
G
A
E
I
E
R
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4162
Futoshiki No 3034
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
∧
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
<
4
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
2L
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE® is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ©Mattel 2017
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 1993
6
∧
A
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
T
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
24
2L
Can you score exactly 45 points
with this rack?
© PUZZLER MEDIA
1 Of very great size (8)
5 In addition (4)
7 Non-traditional; with new
ideas (11)
8 Pull along roughly (4)
9 Electrical generator (6)
10 Take no refusal (6)
13 Religious female (3)
14 Rich cake (6)
17 One running off to marry (6)
18 Worshipped image (4)
19 Personal communicator
(6,5)
20 Eg, eyot or inch (4)
21 Source of cooking oil (8)
14 15
t
3L
aloe
2L
n 2W n
2L
r
g
abide
no 3L
r 3L
2L
go
2L
3W
em
2L
ofvocal
4
21
Across
DE F ACE A
O O E
PO
T I R E S OME
A M S E X A
GRAMPUS
E
L O M H
L OP ERA
ROY A L
R B
R M
I MA
P A YOU T S N
T R RE V E
DONA T E
R
R
L
K GA
1
13
4
V
20
11 12
What is the elusive triple word
play with this rack?
3
N
20
10
dayhopt
O
19
9
2L
26
4
18
8
3W
1
19
23
6
7
15
11
10
16
9
14
6
16
20
14
1
6
20
6
23
4
18
16
13
14
16
16
4
8
1
Scrabble ® Challenge No 1993
∨
>
<
<
∨
33
4
19
12
13
16
8
16
29
32
15
22
7
23
17
16
32
27
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
4
4
31
23
28
8
16
35
16
26
16
10
23
23
28
∨
11
7
17
∨
∧
3
6
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
3
16
16
30
21
© PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7486
the times | Thursday November 2 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Antoaneta Stefanova
Black: Rafael Rodriguez
Mondariz 1999
London System
1 d4 e6 2 Nf3 c5 3 c3 d5 4 Bf4
Nc6 5 e3 Nf6 6 Nbd2 Be7 7 Bd3
0-0 8 0-0 b6
Black might do better to play 8
... Nh5 to target the bishop on f4.
________
árDqDrDkD]
à0 D g Dp]
ßb0 DphpG]
ÞD DpD D ]
Ý D ) DPD]
ÜD )BDND ]
ÛP) D D )]
Ú$QD DRI ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
________
árDb1 4kD]
à0 D gp0p]
ß 0nDph D]
ÞD 0pD D ]
Ý D ) G D]
ÜD )B)ND ]
ÛP) H )P)]
21 Bxg6 Bxf1 22 Bxh7+ Kh8
Ú$ DQDRI ]
22 ... Nxh7 23 Qg6+ mates.
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
23 Ne5 Black resigns
________
á DRD D 4] Winning Move
àDrD Dpiq]
ß D DpDpD] White to play. This position is from
St Louis 2017.
Þ0pD D D ] Liang-Jacobson,
The situation of the black queen on h7
Ý D ) $ D] and the rook on h8 are far from ideal for
Ü) D D ! ] dealing with White’s attack. How did he
Û )PD ) D] now power through?
ÚDKD D D ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
EASY
7
MEDIUM
47
x 7 + 88 x 2 – 68
89
x 6 + 942 + 1/2
HARDER
+ 11
30%
OF IT
OF IT
+6
x 2 – 12 ÷ 4 + 16 ÷ 5
50%
OF IT
+ 99
1/2
OF IT
+ 78 x 2
+ 1/2 – 885
x 3 – 748 OF
IT
3/4
OF IT
– 658
2
4
2
6
2
4
4 2
Polygon
2
4
5
3
3
4
2
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 1996
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 14 words, average;
19, good; 23, very good; 28, excellent
÷
x
-
4
x
-
+
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
=4
+
+
-
+
=
8
All the digits
= 12 from 1-9 are
x
÷
Yesterday’s answers
less, loess, lose, loss, louse, lues, ousel,
sell, sess, sloe, slue, sole, soleus, solus,
soul, soulless, souse, suss
7
=
11
=4
=
15
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Killer Gentle No 5702
9
8
16
16
4
6
10
8
17
14
12
5min
8
13
17
12
16
13
4
10
13
12
17
10
Codeword 3169
Kakuro 1992
6
2 8
1 4
4 9
8
3 5
9 7
8 9
14
9
Solutions
5 6 7 9
1 2 9 8 7
6
8 6 9
2
1 3
7 8
7 1
9 7
2
9
1 5
7 9 6 8
7 8 9 6
9 7 8
Sudoku 9423
15
Bridge Andrew Robson
My friend Marshall Lewis from Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
Zagreb showed me this intriguing
Advanced
♠ A 10 6 3
6♦ slam. If West leads, say, the ace Teams
♥A K 10 9 8 5
of clubs (or his singleton heart, or
♦
J82
a trump), you (as declarer) have an
♣easy ride.
♠Q 9 7 4
♠J 5
N
You ruff the club and lead the
♥Q 4 3 2
♥J
W E
jack of diamonds (ducked) and a
♦S
♦A 6 5
second diamond to the king. West
♣A J 9 8 7 5 4 ♠ K 8 2 ♣KQ 10 6 3
can win the ace and switch to the
♥7 6
jack of spades (best) but you win in
♦KQ 10 9 7 4 3
hand with the king and draw
♣2
West’s last trump. You cross to the
S
(Lewis)
W
N
E
(jack and) ace of hearts, cash the
3♦
Pass
6♦(1)
End
king (West discarding) and run the
ten through East. You ruff out his (1) Paying off to ♦AKxxxxx and a grand slam.
queen, cross to the ace of spades
and cash a winning heart, throwContract: 6♦, Opening Lead: ♠ J
ing your spade loser. Slam made
with little heavy breathing.
However, West reasoned as locks you in dummy (indeed, you’ll
follows. “To jump to 6♦ without go two down).
Go back to trick one. Our
asking for aces, dummy must have
a void club. He probably has a Croatian hero Lewis found the
trick-source in one of the majors, antithetical brilliancy of winning
more likely hearts given my single- the jack of spades lead with
ton. I should attack the other dummy’s ace, envisaging the danmajor, either to set up a trick for ger of being locked in dummy. At
partner, or to knock out a crucial trick two, he led a diamond to the
entry.” West led the jack of spades queen, West ducking. He ruffed a
and making 6♦ was now far from club then overtook the jack of diamonds with the king. West won
trivial.
Say you make the kneejerk play the ace and led his second spade.
Because of his care at trick one,
of winning the jack of spades in
hand with the king. You ruff a club declarer could win this second
(which could be the wrong thing to spade in hand, where he needed to
do — removing an entry, but is the be. He drew West’s last diamond
only winning move here) and lead and played out all his remaining
a diamond to the queen, East diamonds. On the last, East was
discarding. To make 6♦ from here, squeezed, forced to throw the
you must guess to cross to the ace queen of spades, promoting
of spades and cash precisely one declarer’s third spade, or a heart
top heart before leading a second from queen-four-three, promoting
diamond. Fail to do so and West dummy’s ace-king-ten. Slam made.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
wins the second diamond and
SQUARE
IT
© PUZZLER MEDIA
In recent games Nigel Short has
been opting for the Torre Attack,
based on 1 d4 and an early Bg5.
Meanwhile, world champion
Magnus Carlsen has been favouring a related system based on 1
d4, combined with Bf4. In both
cases, White avoids or defers the
move c4, which is the hallmark of
the traditional Queen’s Gambit.
Recent books on the increasingly fashionable Bf4, known as
the London System, include The
Agile London System by Alfonso
Romero Holmes and Oscar de
Prado Rodriguez (New in Chess)
and Cyrus Lakdawala’s Play the
London System (Everyman Chess).
Today’s game is taken from the
former with notes based on those
from the book and in British Chess
Magazine.
9 Qb1
A typical idea for such positions. White puts pressure on h7
and also controls e4.
9 ... Bb7 10 Ne5 Qc8
The idea behind this rather
strange move is to play ... Ba6 in
the future.
11 Bg3 g6 12 f4 Nh5 13 Be1 cxd4
14 exd4 Nxe5 15 fxe5
White stands better. She has
the half-open f-file and the possibility of attacking on the kingside,
while the bishop on b7 and the
queen on c8 are both passive.
15 ... Ba6 16 g4
Now the black pieces are forced to very awkward squares on
the kingside.
16 ... Ng7 17 Nf3 Ne8
This doesn’t help Black’s cause.
17 ... Bc4 or the immediate 17 ... f5
were both better.
18 Bd2 f5
Now this is too weakening. Sitting tight with 18 ... Bc4 was preferable but White stands very well.
19 exf6 Nxf6 20 Bh6 Re8
This loses but 20 ... Bxd3 21
Qxd3 Re8 22 Ne5 was also hopeless as Nxg6 is coming soon.
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Height of fashion
Cell Blocks No 3053
Brain Trainer
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Chess Raymond Keene
11
22
6
9
5
8
1
3
4
7
2
6
14
6
9
8
10
16
1
2
3
7
4
5
6
9
8
7
8
4
9
2
6
5
1
3
4
5
2
1
6
9
3
8
7
Killer Tough No 5703
12
18
23
27min
10
21
18
8
19
6
15
8
20
10
3
6
9
2
8
7
1
4
5
2
3
6
4
7
1
8
5
9
9
7
1
5
3
8
2
6
4
5
4
8
6
9
2
7
3
1
7
17
3
7
9
6
5
2
8
1
4
7
4
2
1
6
3
9
5
8
8
6
3
5
9
4
2
7
1
5
9
1
2
7
8
6
4
3
9
2
7
3
4
5
1
8
6
1
3
4
8
2
6
7
9
5
6
8
5
9
1
7
4
3
2
Cell Blocks 3052
4
11
18
8
6
3
2 4
12
10
24
2 2 2
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
3
9
5
4
7
8
2
1
6
1
6
8
3
5
2
4
9
7
4
8
7
1
6
5
9
3
2
5
9
6
1
8
4
3
7
2
3
2
8
7
5
9
6
4
1
1
4
7
6
3
2
8
9
5
9
3
5
8
7
1
4
2
6
6
2
3
8
9
7
1
5
4
2
3
4
6
8
9
5
7
1
5
1
6
7
2
3
8
4
9
8
7
9
5
4
1
6
2
3
7
1
4
2
6
5
9
3
8
8
6
2
9
4
3
5
1
7
2
5
1
3
9
6
7
8
4
4
7
9
5
2
8
1
6
3
6
8
3
4
1
7
2
5
9
4
1
5
3
3
5
1
4
4
2
8
5
x
x
2
2 2
3
4
9
-
x
÷
x
1
8
7
x
+
+
3
6
9
2
1
4
8
7
5
7
4
5
6
9
8
2
1
3
1
8
2
7
3
5
6
4
9
6
9
8
4
5
1
7
3
2
4
5
7
9
2
3
1
6
8
2
1
3
8
7
6
5
9
4
9
3
1
5
6
2
4
8
7
5
7
4
1
8
9
3
2
6
8
2
6
3
4
7
9
5
1
T
U
B
E
R
B
A
G
U
N
C
R
O
T
R
A
Z
E
E
R
Lexica 3986
3 < 5
2
Suko 2071
Lexica 3985
4
∨
2
1
Scrabble 1992
UNIQUELY D7
across (42)
GAUZES A8
across (62)
T H
I
E D
I
AN
G
N
P
Z E
P
A P
E
E R
Sudoku 9425
9
5
1
2
3
4
7
6
8
3
5
1
4 > 2
∧
∨
∨
5
4 > 3
2
1
Set Square 1995
13
4
7
4
2
9
1
6
3
8
5
Futoshiki 3033
KenKen 4161
21
20
1 6
2 8
6 9
4
Killer 5701
11
22
14
11
4
5
6
7
8
1
3
2
9
3
1
8
2
5
OWP A
I
C
TWE
H
ORG
U
R
A T I O
V
QU E E
N
L
UD F L
U
E
E L D
Sudoku 9424
8
1
7
3
5
4
9
2
6
Killer 5700
2
1
8
4
3
9
5
6
7
F UDGE
T
R
I
X
U
U P SW I NG
M S
L
P ROV E RB
Y
L
O
S UB J UG
P
T
A
U
E N EMY
S
L
W
V I O L A M
I
D
L
A
S N E AK E D
9 8
7 9
7 5 3
9 8
6
x
x
2
Quiz 1 George V, Edward VIII, George VI
2 Charles Rosen 3 Valentino 4 Lemurs —
although they are not true lemurs 5 The Walking
Dead 6 Up Helly Aa 7 Rhodopsin 8 Nicholas
Parsons 9 Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain 10 Henri
Laurens 11 Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love
12 David Hume 13 Loco moco 14 Green Bay
Packers 15 Derwent Valley Mills
S
T
F
W
A
V
A
R
O
U
I
E
R
I
T
S
H
L
E
A
O
P
Word watch
Lilly-pilly (c) An
Australian myrtle tree
Lulu (a) A fixed allowance
given in lieu of a single
payment (US)
Lum (c) A chimney
Brain Trainer
Easy 5; Medium 638;
Harder 5,309
Chess 1 Rxf7+! Rxf7 (1 ...
Kxf7 2 Qf3+ and Qxb7+
wins) 2 Qe5+ Rf6 3 Rc7+
is decisive
02.11.17
MindGames
Sudoku
Mild No 9426
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Fiendish No 9427
Super fiendish No 9428
8
6
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Lilly-pilly
a Malleable
b A soft bed
c A tree
Lulu
a An allowance
b To sway
c A young horse
Lum
a To keep tune
b Lugubrious
c A chimney
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
6
4
3 8
9
1 6
2
6
11 Who are the subjects
of Nick Broomfield’s
documentary Kurt
& Courtney?
2 Which American
pianist wrote The
Classical Style (1971)
and The Romantic
Generation (1995)?
12 Which Scottish
philosopher wrote
Dialogues Concerning
Natural Religion (1779)?
2
15
favourite role of Daryl
Dixon on which US
TV drama?
8 Who chairs the BBC
Radio 4 panel game
Just a Minute?
6 Which festival,
involving the burning
of a Viking longship, is
held every January in
Lerwick, Shetland?
9 Which 1994 album
by Pavement features
the songs Cut Your
Hair and Gold Soundz?
7 Together with
retinene, the protein
opsin forms which
purple visual pigment?
3
4
8
10 Which French
sculptor (1885-1954)
created L’Amphion for
the Central University
of Venezuela?
11
5
6
7
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
22
20
23
3
7 5
7
9 5
6
1
9
3 2
4
1
8
4
2 9 5
6
3 1 8 6 5
13 Which Hawaiian
dish features white
rice topped with a
hamburger, a fried egg
and brown gravy?
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 952
14 In 2008, Aaron
Rodgers became
which NFL team’s
starting quarterback?
15 Which Unesco
world heritage site in
Derbyshire is pictured?
Answers on page 15
P
A
R
T
I
C
U
L
A
T
E
U S H I NG
N M R
E A L M E X
P
E
A
D I SM
MP
E
I
Y
P
P ROA R
T
F
F OR E S A I
R
R
MB A RGO
I
A
E
S T A Y
S L
POS T
I
W
P R E S
P
A N T L
V
OMPO
I
L
EG
D
A
A
B A S I
L
E
E ND E
S
T
E
A
M
R
O
L
L
E
R
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Mara
9
10
2
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
The Times Quick Cryptic No 953
1
8
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
1 Stanley Baldwin
served as prime
minister under which
three kings?
5 Norman Reedus
plays the fan-
8
4
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
ALAMY
4 With two species
forming the family
Cynocephalidae,
colugos are also known
as flying… what?
7
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 Julia Roberts wore
a black-and-white
dress by which Italian
designer when she
won her 2001 Oscar?
7
3 4
8
2
3
6
7 4
9
PUZZLER MEDIA
3 7 4
9 1
8 6
6 8
3
9
3
5
2
4
2
6 3
3 5
9 8
9 7 8
3
9
5 7
21
Across
1 Sly cat in shop finding source
of money (9)
6 One about to display passion
(3)
8 Dandy holding glittering light
(3,4)
9 A boring thing, looking back,
for Irish police (5)
10 Lead compound heals (5)
12 Rat, something in compost
heap, perhaps? (6)
14 Never vandalised loo ninetyfour! (3,2,4,4)
16 Composition offering some
jingles on a tambourine (6)
17 Fraud misleading dupes (5)
19 Feature a nation (5)
20 Suffering bird, did you say?
That’s unlawful (7)
22 Test cricket for today ends (3)
23 Endlessly repeated thus,
commercial has rebranded a
US name (2,7)
Down
1 Fastener locking posh couple
of females in prison (4,4)
2
3
4
5
6
7
11
13
15
17
18
21
Drop into abyss, a goner (3)
Fruit — penny for every one
(5)
Act of taking someone off to
prison, mean I fancy (13)
Grind the grit, so more dense
(7)
One translation of earliest
ancient Hebrew (9)
Welsh boy church body upset
(4)
Power — a youth desperate to
grab it after start of revolution
(9)
Old-time swinger? (8)
A newspaper article, in rising,
falls (7)
Sauce lifted over golden rice
dish (5)
Small, small bed for
Highlander? (4)
Letter read out — gosh! (3)
X
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