close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Times Times 2 - 4 January 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
January 4 | 2018
How true is McMafia?
What it’s really like to live in Londongrad
2
1G T
Thursday January 4 2018 | the times
times2
I was just five
Celeb Big Brother
is feminist? Who
are you kidding?
Deborah Ross
I
t’s still early January, but
already my resolution to
read The Economist more
— or even once — and
watch crap TV less has
tragically foundered.
I have no one to blame
but myself and my weak
nature. There I was the other
evening, and although I could
have been reaching for The
Economist, had a copy been to
hand — would it help if a
purchase was actually made?
— I watched the launch of
Celebrity Big Brother instead.
This is on a channel
called Channel 5, which, for
the purposes of walking
away from all this with some
dignity, I will pretend is
largely unknown to me, as
is World’s Scariest Animal
Attacks 2, Nazi Quest for the
Holy Grail and Eddie Stobart:
Trucks & Trailers, in which
all the tension, which can be
considerable, is in whether
Jim will get those cream
cakes delivered on time and,
if so, in what condition. Even
if I had known about it, this is
not a programme I’d have
ever watched.
So I just happened to be in
front of Celebrity Big Brother,
sponsored by Pink Casino
Bingo and presented by Emma
Willis, whose first words were:
“Welcome to year of the
woman! I think it’s about time
women were in charge, don’t you?
We are celebrating 100 years
since women won the vote, and
no boys allowed. I bloody love it.
Women are in charge. We have
the power.”
Of course, any show that
salutes women’s suffrage is to be
applauded, and I felt ashamed
that Channel 5 had been largely
Train
ticket
horrors
The increase in rail
ticket prices is not just
a blow, but may even be
a double blow, given
that so many of us are
probably paying over
the odds anyhow.
How do you even
negotiate your way to
the best-value ticket?
Without giving up and
thinking: “Sod it, I’ll go
for this one and if it’s
more expensive than it
Having grown up in poverty, model
Noëlla Coursaris Musunka wants girls
in her native Congo to get the chances
she didn’t have. By Natasha Poliszczuk
unknown to me for so long, but
already I was wondering: power
to do what exactly? The power
to ask Pink Casino Bingo why it
has to be pink? Would that be
a good start?
Willis then introduced an
all-female line-up including Ann
Widdecombe, Rachel Johnson,
below, Maggie Oliver (bizarrely,
since she’s the police officer who
alerted us to the Rotherham
scandal), someone called Malika,
who describes herself as Khloe
Kardashian’s “professional best
friend” (does this mean she gets
to eat at the table, unlike the
“unprofessional best friends”, who
are chained up outside and
thrown scraps?), Ashley James
(Made in Chelsea), India
Willoughby (transgender
newsreader), Amanda Barrie
(actress) and Jess Impiazzi
(glamour model).
They all said, more or less,
that they wouldn’t do CBB in
needs to be, I don’t care
because, frankly, I
JUST CAN’T TAKE IT
ANY MORE AND I
HAVE A LIFE AND
I’VE JUST SPENT AN
ENTIRE MORNING
GOING THROUGH
ALL THE OPTIONS
AND THIS TICKET,
IT LOOKS LIKE
A NICE TICKET . . .
I’LL HAVE IT!”
It’s the array of ticket
types on offer that just
does your head in:
single (anytime); single
(not anytime); single
(anytime but these
times); single (anytime,
in your dreams, pal);
single (any train); single
normal circs, but were doing it
for women and feminism. “I get
an offer to do this show quite
often,” said Johnson, adding that
she opted not to turn it down
this time because it’s “about
celebrating women and
female empowerment”.
Impiazzi, meanwhile, defended
her career choice, as is her right.
She said: “I think you can be a
feminist and a glamour model
because it’s your body and you’re
in control of it.” And all the while
I was still wondering: power to do
what exactly? Power to say to
Impiazzi: “Being a glamour
model is your ‘choice’,
absolutely, but please think
about the pressures that led
you to make such a ‘choice’ in
a world still largely run by
men”? No, it wasn’t that
power. As was plain.
The fact is, I owe thanks to
Channel 5 for being so
educational since I now know
for sure that “feminism” as a
word has been so traduced it
may not mean anything any
more. Or it’s just a marketing
term that lets corporations
and in some instances
individuals eat their cake
and have it: we acknowledge
that feminism exists, and
now that we have, it’s
business as usual, OK?
Later this week, I’ve just
learnt, male celebrities will
be “sporadically introduced”
anyway. Is this why Emily
Davison threw herself under a
horse? So Sporadic Man could
ultimately truck up and take over?
It has all made me quite furious.
More furious, even, than when
Tesco refused to accept Jim’s
cream cake delivery, even though
they looked perfectly fine. Or
so I heard.
(only this train); single
(all trains but this
train); day return (with
railcard); day return
(no railcard); day
return (railcard
somewhere, where
did you last see it?).
And on and on it
goes: returning next
week (super peak);
returning last week
(super off-peak);
returning when I can
be bothered (slightly
peaky); returning with
a skip in my step (not at
all peaky, have 10 per
cent off). And there’s
more: advance
(refundable); advance
(non-refundable);
advance (refundable if
we feel like it); advance
with cheese (stilton or
edam, depending on
availability).
I once even witnessed
an onboard row
between a ticket
inspector and a woman
who was travelling peak
on an off-peak ticket,
but the peak train had
left late, so she was
actually off-peak
time-wise, but couldn’t
travel on it because it
was still a peak train
even when off-peak.
So it does your head
in. And if paying over
the odds is what it takes,
you will. And you do.
N
oëlla Coursaris
Musunka is talking
about her earliest
memory. “It’s a
blank before the day
I went to wake my
father from his nap,
but he wouldn’t
wake up. I remember him in the bed,
that’s it. Not long after, I lost my
mother when she had to give me away.
The shock was so intense that I lost
everything that happened before then
— even my language.
“It’s life. I left the Congo with holes
in my shoes. But it’s OK; now I am
very happy. And I have always been
very strong.”
Musunka’s story reads like a film
script. She was born in Lubumbashi in
what is now the Democratic Republic
of Congo (DRC), sent to live with
relatives after her father died and
scouted as a model in London while
studying for a degree in business
management. Then she embarked on
an international modelling career.
This became a platform to launch
her non-profit organisation, Malaika,
which empowers Congolese girls
through education. Its projects include
a school for 280 girls, a community
centre and nine wells in Kalebuka,
near Lubumbashi, and there are
plans for a clinic. It has established
its founder as one of the leading voices
in education for girls in Africa and an
ambassador for the Global Fund to
Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria.
“In a way, Malaika is the story of
me,” says Musunka, who lives in
Cheltenham. “The problem in Africa is
that women’s education is not a
priority. So when my father died my
mother didn’t have enough education
to earn money, so she couldn’t take
care of me. She gave me away because
she wanted to give me a chance.”
Aged five, Musunka boarded a plane
alone. She spent her childhood being
shuttled between relatives, first in
Belgium, then in Switzerland. “When
I say I was educated in Switzerland,
people think of boarding schools and
rich families. It was not like that at all,”
she says. Musunka was brought over
to work as a maid and cleaner. There
was no email, and over the course of
13 years she spoke to her mother on
the phone only two or three times
and they exchanged just a few letters.
There were no presents at Christmas
and no one celebrated her birthday.
However, there was school, where
Musunka excelled. “When you have
nothing, you know that if you fall
there’s no one to pick you up. So
you have to stand. I resolved very
early on that I would study and
work and be independent.”
Her mother, who still lives in
Lubumbashi, is “so, so proud” of her
daughter and has celebrity status when
she visits the school. Musunka also has
children, JJ, seven, and Cara, three,
with her husband, James Masters,
a manager of an American software
company. Being a mother has put
a new perspective on her own
childhood. “If I lost everything
tomorrow I don’t know if I could give
away my kids. I freak out when I’m
on a plane because I’m terrified of
something happening to me because
nobody loves you like your parents. So
I was disappointed when my mother
remarried and had four more children.
I thought, ‘Why are you having more
kids when you couldn’t keep me?’ But
she went through such hard times. She
lost everything.”
Musunka took a break from
modelling “to give my children what I
didn’t have”. This didn’t mean taking a
break from her “third child”, Malaika.
From the beginning her name was
on every paper and every email
concerning the organisation. Nothing
escapes her notice, she says, from
every dollar spent to the absence of a
single pupil. She wakes early to liaise
with people in the DRC and logs back
on after her children’s bedtime to
speak to New York, where the charity
is based. Between her early and late
calls her phone lights up with
Whatsapp messages — on the day we
meet, she receives photos of pupils
having a dressing-up day.
Even if I lost
everything I
couldn’t give
away my kids
She gives short shrift to celebrities
who come to the DRC for photo
opportunities, but she’s full of praise for
her team, all but one of whom are
volunteers, and for the rapper Eve, who
said she wanted to help and promptly
booked a flight to the DRC, and her
fellow Global Fund ambassador, the
actress Charlize Theron.
Musunka founded Malaika in 2007,
when the organisation sponsored the
education and living expenses of a
group of girls. She talks fondly of
Deborah, the first she sponsored, who
still calls her regularly. Yet she knows
that she faces an uphill task. “That a
country can be as rich as the Congo
and have seven million children out of
school . . .” She shakes her head in
wonder. “When parents do have
money they educate the boys, but if
you educate girls there’s less
pregnancy, less HIV infection, less
poverty. We need to elevate the
education of women. It empowers
them. It moves the country forward.”
Even with the donors in a deeply
traditional country such as the DRC
you cannot simply build a school
without the support of the community.
the times | Thursday January 4 2018
3
1G T
times2
when Mum gave me away
BARTEK SZMIGULSKI
Right: Noëlla Coursaris Musunka
and, above, at the school she founded
in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Political instability and a problematic
infrastructure present extra
challenges. Before they laid a stone in
Kalebuka, Musunka sat down with the
village chief. By all means build a
school, he said, but build it for girls
and boys. Did he want his daughters
to get married and not work,
Musunka asked. Or did he want
something more for them? “I told
him I wanted to see the day when
a woman was the village chief.”
(She’s still waiting for that.)
Plus, there was no electricity, no
water and no road. Musunka
lobbied for electricity for the region
and, with the help of the Voss
Foundation, the philanthropic arm off
the bottled water company, built a
well. Hundreds of people came to
collect clean water every day, so they
built another well.
Every solution they came up with
exposed another problem. In the DRC
life expectancy is about 36. One of the
school’s pupils died from malaria
during a Christmas break. When
another girl was absent her teacher
went to visit her at home to find
her in a critical condition after
being run over by a motorbike.
Her parents couldn’t afford
medical treatment, so
Malaika paid.
After another bout
of building work
there will be 340
pupils at the
school. Girls
can enter a
ballot for a
place when
they are
five if they livee
within the
catchment area.
Students are
provided with
everything from shoes to
underwear and two meals a
day, in a region where a family
would struggle to provide that.
Pupils’ health deteriorated during thee
vacations, so they started holiday
camps. The curriculum encompasses
everything from the most basic skills,
including how to use a toilet (most
homes don’t have one), to recycling,
IT and yoga. Students achieve recordbreaking national exam results.
There is also a community centre,
built in partnership with football’s
governing body, Fifa, offering
education, health and
ssports programmes to the
wider community. Fifa was
w
sso impressed that it plans to
rroll out community centres
in other areas. Musunka’s
focus is widening. This may
fo
or may not be related to her
o
sseven-year-old son’s
insistence that she has “done
in
eenough for girls” and should
focus on the boys.
fo
“I feel a little
uncomfortable talking about
u
ggirls’ education and
eempowerment as it’s such a
trend now,” she says, “but in
tr
Africa we need more women
A
in power and in politics. Even
now, when I receive teachers’
n
CVs, 70 to 80 per cent of the
applicants are men, and I’m
like, ‘I want a woman.’ ”
Being in a minority
because of her sex is
b
something she is familiar
with. “Philanthropy is
w
predominantly a man’s
p
world.” Yet she seems
w
unfazed by pretty much
anything, including
delivering a TED talk
when eight months
w
pregnant and appearing
p
alongside Bill Clinton on his
gglobal initiative panel in
22012. “They give you a script,
but President Clinton never
b
ffollows the script. He asked
me about the Congolese
m
ggovernment. I told him, ‘I am a
daughter of that country. If I have
d
aanything to say to them it will be said
behind closed doors, not on stage.’
In Africa we
need more
women in power
and in politics
Afterwards,” she breaks out into a
huge chuckle, “Clinton told me I was
very diplomatic.”
Musunka marked Malaika’s tenth
anniversary last year with a global
conference tour. She has since
spoken at most conferences bar
Davos, which she will “probably”
ttick off this year.
Despite regular speaking
iinvitations she tries to stay at
home, strategising in between
h
tthe school runs, homework and
ccooking dinner. For the moment
tthat means writing a manual of
operation for Malaika, her “gift” to
o
tthose keen to know the secrets of the
project’s success (there’s talk of similar
institutions in Kenya and Liberia).
There is one proviso: they cannot
call it Malaika, for the same reason
she refused to name the project after
herself. “It belongs to everyone. I’m
someone who can facilitate and make
things happen, but the children —
they are the real heroes, not me. They
grab this chance. They believe they
will become someone.”
Remind you of anyone?
malaika.org
The lowdown
Booze-bots
Pack a suitcase and grab your
passport — we’re going for a drink.
This isn’t part of your new year’s
resolution to be more spontaneous,
is it?
Maybe. But if we’re taking the
mickey out of trying to better
ourselves, don’t protest about how
you’re doing dry January. You will
never have a drier drink than
where we’re going.
You’re going to have to explain.
In Las Vegas two bars have
replaced their bartenders with
robots.
So the drinks are fast but the
conversation is non-existent?
Exactly. One of the bars, which is
imaginatively called Tipsy Robot,
opened last week and claims to be
the first to get a robot to mix your
drinks. The booze-bots look like
enormous cranes with elbows, with
their arms reaching up and around
to measure out the right amount of
drink. They can fill up to 120
glasses an hour, and will — it is
claimed — never make a mistake.
Hmmm.
Don’t roll your eyes like that. And
the best news for you is that
Dorothy Parker’s line, “One more
drink and I’ll be under the host”,
can’t apply. You don’t even order
with a human, you use tablets to
choose what you want to drink,
even if it’s just a vodka tonic.
But what about the personal touch?
What will happen to offloading your
problems to the barmaid, or
watching those wallies in waistcoats
try to juggle bottles of rum, or the
cheesy largesse of “and get one for
yourself” after you’ve ordered?
Some people might say those
are good things, but if you’re
desperate for human face time,
at the end you can pay in cash
to a human employee.
I suppose it’s kind of the robots
to invite us to their soirée.
Helen Nianias
4
1G T
Thursday January 4 2018 | the times
times2
Harrods, caviar
and bodyguards —
inside Londongrad
Russia’s billionaire expats live in luxury — and fear — in the
capital’s most exclusive postcodes, says Julia Llewellyn Smith
I
t was a balmy summer evening
and at a high-powered corporate
event in a London gallery off
Bond Street two guests — Darya
and Iveta — stood out from the
shabby-chic British crowd. Their
make-up was better applied,
their clothes notably more
expensive, their stilettos higher and
their hair glossier and blonder.
Both were frowning as much as
their Botox allowed as they tried to
understand an eminent British
historian discoursing interminably
about some prints on the wall of
colonial India. “Yes, yes,” they said,
nodding, at intervals as he spluttered
canapé crumbs over their shoulder
pads. “Very interesting.”
Later they were introduced briefly to
another genial man. “Who is he?” they
asked me when the small talk fizzled
out and — to the relief of both sides
— he moved on. “That was the prime
minister’s husband,” I explained. Darya
was aghast. “That little man? But why
he smiled so much? This is not how a
person of power behaves. Never I will
understand this country.”
Both fortysomething wives of
Russian “biznizmen”, Darya and Iveta
moved from Moscow to Chelsea seven
years ago. They are trying to integrate
into new and baffling London, a city
where — along with another 150,000odd compatriots — they are living not
so much as expats as exiles, often
banished from their homeland, having
fallen foul of the Putin government
or business enemies. They live in
fortressed apartments — ludicrously
rich, yet often lonely and afraid that
one night their enemies will come
knocking at the door.
“I want to make friends,” Darya told
me sadly at the end of the evening,
“but my English is not so good, so it is
hard. And my husband never comes
out with me. He prefers to mix only
with Russians. Maybe you and I can
go to Le Gavroche soon?”
Darya’s glamorous but often isolated
world was one I became familiar with
over the past year when my husband,
James Watkins, was co-creating and
directing McMafia, the BBC’s drama
starring James Norton as Alex
Godman, the son of a Russian mobster,
born and educated in England and
trying, with little success, to distance
himself from his family’s dodgy
millions. Initially I wondered if this
depiction of Russians abroad as at best
vulgarians, at worst gangsters, wasn’t a
terrible slur on these people with their
heritage of Chekhov, Gogol and
Tchaikovsky. Yet to my bemusement
virtually every exiled Russian I met
agreed in some way or other that their
shady reputation was deserved.
“My husband and many of us made
our money in extraordinary times,”
Iveta said, shrugging. “If we didn’t take
chances someone else would have.
And we enjoy this money because we
grew up with almost nothing and
know tomorrow it could all be taken
from us again.”
“These Russians stole from their
country, stripping it of its assets when
communism fell, and then they
flaunted their new wealth. No wonder
they’re hated in their homeland and
had to flee here,” said another Russian,
who has lived here for 38 years after
marrying a British academic for whom
she translated during the Brezhnev era.
London has plenty of Russianspeaking Lithuanian plumbers and
Estonian nannies who emigrated here
when their countries joined the EU.
Yet the only way for the citizens of
Putin’s Russian Federation to settle
here is via a “golden visa” scheme
introduced in 1994, which granted
British residency to foreigners who
invested £1 million in the country. In
2014 the sum was raised to £2 million.
“Obviously, only the extremely rich
could afford that and very few of them
have made their money by what we
would consider to be innocent means,”
says Misha Glenny, the author of the
2008 nonfiction book McMafia, which
inspired the TV drama.
The Home Office, however, seemed
not to care how these visas were
funded. “An officer from the Serious
Organised Crime Agency, as it was
then called, told me pressure had been
put on him not to look into Russian
money. The hope was the wealth
would trickle down,” Glenny says.
Once here, even the most notorious
criminal could feel secure. To date,
every extradition request by Russia for
a wanted businessman has been
rejected on the grounds of political
asylum. Nor did they have to worry
too much about assassination
attempts, a constant threat in Moscow,
where feuds between the super-rich
run deep (there was the odd exception,
as evinced by the grisly fate of Alex
Godman’s Uncle Boris).
Even so, most Russian newcomers
keep contact with the outside world to
a minimum. They are chauffeured
everywhere in armour-plated Bentleys
and live behind electric gates with
basement pools, cinemas, golfsimulation rooms and climbing walls.
Initially, Russian expats are
notoriously unadventurous in their
choice of haunts, preferring — like the
Godman family — to live as close to
Harrods as possible, with other
favoured areas being Belgravia,
Kensington and The Bishops Avenue,
the “billionaires’ row” in Highgate.
“The Russian rich all know each
other, even if many have fallen out,”
the photographer Valerie Manokhina,
a former friend of the Chelsea Football
Club owner Roman Abramovich, told
Mark Hollingsworth, the author of the
book Londongrad: From Russia With
Cash. “They are not especially
confident in London. They don’t speak
other languages and they are not
familiar with Britain, its history and
culture. So they stick together for
security. The wives in particular like
being near each other.”
Like McMafia’s patriarch Dimitri
Godman, who grumpily nicknames his
daughter’s black boyfriend “Michael
Jackson”, they are unimpressed
by London’s diversity. “There is
no way they’d even dream of living
somewhere that Londoners consider
hip, like Hackney,” one relocation
agent says. “They are from a country
that is racially homogeneous and
when your parents or grandparents
were peasants you don’t find
slumming it charming in any way.”
Similarly, they are fixated on eating
only in Michelin-starred restaurants
(“Sometimes as a joke I suggest we
go to a new pop-up Ethiopian in
somewhere like Peckham, just to see
their faces,” says one art dealer with a
large roster of Russian clients) and
shopping at the big-name stores.
“There’s a joke I love,” says Hossein
Amini, McMafia’s co-creator. “Why do
Russian men want to be buried in
Harrods, not Moscow? Because they
know at least there their wives will
visit their grave once a week.”
Deprived of their aristocratic
traditions since the 1917 revolution,
they adore events such as Henley and
Ascot. “The Russian idea of London is
incredibly out of date, rooted in the
mythical posh Britain of the past, and
many opportunist Brits take advantage
of that, reconstructing ridiculous deb
dances for their daughters to attend,”
says the social commentator Peter
York. He wrote about the Sloane
Ranger tribe, but in the past two
decades has seen them priced out of
their Chelsea and Kensington homes
by Slavs offering suitcases of cash.
Their biggest obsession, however, is
education. Russians have been brought
Maria Shukshina
and James Norton
in McMafia, which
continues on BBC One
on Sunday
There is
no way
they’d live
somewhere
hip, like
Hackney
up to believe that the British system
is the best in the world. “Russian
parents are very ambitious for their
children, value education and will do
anything they can, including intensive
tutoring, to get their children into
good schools,” says Irina Shumovitch,
who runs School Placement Service,
which advises Russian parents on
how to obtain a British education
for their children.
“Parents often get in touch and ask
for the ‘best school’, by which they
mean Eton, because they have a
hierarchical thinking which is the
consequence of growing up under
Soviet rule, where pluralism was an
unknown value.”
Like Alex Godman, who enjoyed
the dream Russian education of
boarding school and Harvard, many
of these second-generation Russians
are embarrassed by their Soviet-bred
parents. “There’s a social ease and
sophistication to young Russians that
completely goes against the clichés,”
Amini says. “They are much more
discreet about how they spend their
money, tending to keep it behind
closed doors.”
Shumovitch sees a vast gulf between
the two generations. “This is a country
where people smile at each other in
the street. You never see this in Russia.
But when children grow up here they
absorb this tolerance, respect for
others, openness. Sometimes their
parents say to me, ‘I don’t understand
them any more.’ ”
As McMafia viewers are learning,
when those parents are threatened the
young fall back into line. After all, as
the ebullient Uncle Boris counselled
Alex: “It is embarrassing to be Russian
these days, but don’t ever be ashamed
of who you are.”
the times | Thursday January 4 2018
5
1G T
times2
BBC, REUTERS
McMafia: fact or fiction?
What’s true to life in the TV drama by James Marriott
M
cMafia, starring James
Norton as the son of a
former Russian gangster
living in exile in London, is
a fictional drama series adapted from
the nonfiction book McMafia: Seriously
Organised Crime by the journalist
Misha Glenny. The writers of the TV
show, Hossein Amini and James
Watkins, came up with the storyline in
which banker Alex Godman is drawn
into the world of organised crime to
protect his family. However, they took
the details of the workings of modern
organised crime from Glenny’s book.
So what’s fact and what’s fiction in the
first two episodes?
People trafficking
In episode two we follow a young
woman named Lyudmilla, who is lured
to Egypt under false pretences and
then sold into the hands of gangsters.
This story is based very closely on a
section of Glenny’s book about a reallife Lyudmilla. After arriving in the
country “she was bundled into a Jeep
and driven for several hours” to a
Bedouin camp. Just like in the show,
she watched a young woman make a
break for freedom, only to be shot in
the knees (“one of the most painful
punishments that can be inflicted”)
and left to die in the desert. The real
Lyudmilla’s fate was even more
appalling than the show lets on. She
was forced to work seven day weeks in
an Israeli brothel and was raped about
twenty times every night.
Suicide, murder or
natural causes?
Boris Berezovsky
Once thought to be Russia’s second
richest man, Berezovsky, below, died
in 2013 after financial troubles. He
was found hanged at his home in
Berkshire. A coroner recorded an
open verdict, saying it couldn’t be
confirmed he took his own life.
Alexander Litvinenko
Former Russian spy Litvinenko was
assassinated in London in 2006. He
was administered polonium in tea in
a central London hotel. His widow
says that as he lay dying, he blamed
the Kremlin for his death.
Scot Young
The 52-year-old bankrupt property
tycoon was found impaled on
railings under his Montagu Square
flat in 2014. He’d told friends he was
being targeted by Russian mobsters.
Alexander Perepilichnyy
The commodity dealer was jogging
near his home in a gated community
in Surrey when he collapsed and
died in 2012. A witness said he
vomited a “greeny-yellow” bile.
Perepilichnyy had been helping an
investigation into a Russian money
laundering operation. In
2017 Buzzfeed
reported that US spy
agencies gave the
British government
evidence that he’d
likely
been
killed on
the orders
of the
Kremlin.
The Moscow gangster, Vadim
Merciless Vadim Kalyagin is the
Godman family’s ultimate nemesis.
He is probably based on Semyon
Mogilevich (known as “Papa”),
“probably the most powerful Russian
mobster alive” and “one of the most
dangerous men in the world”,
according to Glenny. Mogilevich
is a man who is “always two steps
ahead of everyone else in the game.
Effortlessly.’’ Though Mogilevich
has appeared on the FBI’s ten most
wanted list and is widely believed to
be responsible for numerous contract
killings, running prostitution rings and
massive fraud, he is still free in Russia.
Russian gangsters love caviar
In episode one of McMafia the show’s
gangsters scarf plates of caviar while
cutting their shady deals (poor old
Uncle Boris is stabbed to death with
a caviar knife). In his book, Glenny
describes how caviar is not only the
ultimate alimentary status symbol for
the Russian nouveau riche, it has a
criminal backstory all its own. As the
Soviet Union collapsed, a dedicated
“caviar mafia” sprang up to exploit the
foodstuff’s enormous potential profits.
“The New Rich in Moscow gorged
themselves on black pearls, selling on
the excess to the West for huge
profits,” he explains. Serve caviar to
acquire some mobster glamour . . . just
be careful what you do with that knife.
Extravagant parties
Compared with most mobster bashes,
the party Alex Godman (Norton)
attends in episode one (all posh
vodka and slinky ladies) is a
rremarkably classy affair. Glenny
any particular individual in Glenny’s
book. But he is representative of an
older generation of gangsters who
have fallen foul of the Kremlin and are
forced to live in melancholy exile.
Alex Godman’s Uncle Boris
Before he meets an untimely end at
the sharp end of a caviar knife, jovial
Uncle Boris is one of the show’s most
loveable villains. He has no exact
counterpart in Glenny’s book, but he
has more than a little in common with
“chubby Armenian charmer” and
“consummate chancer” Gacic TerOganisyan, who got mixed up in a
“whirlwind of death, imperialism, civil
war, oil, gangsterism and nationalist
struggle”. He’s now serving life in
prison for murder.
describes a “Soviet Union Nostalgia
Party” thrown by a Russian oil baron
in 2004 that cost “several hundred
thousand dollars” and featured
“fountains of champagne and lines of
coke (carefully chopped and ready for
use)” and “women with miniskirts split
to reveal their buttocks [who] would
writhe occasionally to the marching
beat of Defenders of Leningrad or
some such”.
Corrupt cops
The TV show takes a
pessimistic view of the bendy
morals of police officers. In
episode two we meet Karel
Benes, an embittered Czech
ex-cop working for meathead
mobster Reznik. Benes has a lot in
common with the real-life
disenchanted Czech bobby Tomas
Machacek. Where the fictional Benes
joins the dark side, the heroic
Machacek landed in jail thanks to
government corruption after he
masterminded a raid on a gangster
knees-up in a Prague restaurant.
Machacek was freed from prison
and offered any job he wanted. He
turned down the offer. By contrast,
at the end of episode two we see bad
Benes take another step down the
path of corruption.
Melancholy mobsters
Dimitri, the moody Godman
paterfamilias, ends episode two by
throwing himself off a tall building.
Dimitri doesn’t seem to be based on
Sofia Lebedeva as
Lyudmilla Nikolayeva
David Strathairn as
Semiyon Kleiman.
Below: Norton and
Merab Ninidze as
Vadim Kalyagin
Israel
A lot of the show’s dealings take place
in Israel. So much so that the
organisation UK Lawyers for Israel
has accused the BBC of “gratuitous
slurs” against the nation’s character.
Glenny’s book details the ways in
which “oligarchs and organised crime
bosses” colonised Israel, finding it an
“ideal place to invest or launder
money”. Israeli police estimate
that Russians laundered
$5-$10 billion through Israeli
banks in the 15 years after
the fall of communism.
Semiyon Kleiman
In the show Semiyon Kleiman
is an exceedingly dodgy
member of Israel’s parliament
(sample quote, as he meets Alex
Godman in a basement while
sirens go off: “Don’t worry about
the bombs, my friends at the IDF
[Israeli Defence Forces] warned me”).
He’s also keen to launder £100 million
through Alex Godman’s firm.
Kleiman is probably based on
Ze’ev Rosenstein, an Israeli gangster
with political connections: he and
his wife were members of Ariel
Sharon’s Likud Party. Under pressure
from the US, Rosenstein was arrested
in 2004 for the sale of more than
700,000 Ecstasy tablets.
Benny Chopra
Mumbai kingpin Benny Chopra,
whom we meet in episode one, is
based on Dawood Ibrahim, a Mumbai
mafioso whose crime network has
bases in London, Nepal, Pakistan and
Sudan. Born (ironically enough) the
son of a poor Mumbai police officer,
Chopra worked his way up from petty
crime to become master of an
international criminal empire.
Alex Godman
The goody-goody Godman scion Alex
has no real-life counterpart. However,
he is a crucial representative of the
slick nature of modern international
organised crime, which is often mixed
up with more legitimate (well,
legitimate-seeming) business. The
show’s director Watkins has called
it a “state-of-the-nation treatise on
globalisation masquerading as a slick
thriller”. Alex, with his power to
transfer vast sums into dodgy offshore
funds at the click of the button, is the
embodiment of that.
6
1G T
Thursday January 4 2018 | the times
the table
Dumplings and vegan double
Are you infusing yoghurt with jasmine
yet — and is your new tipple mezcal?
If not, then you’ve already got some
catching up to do, says William Sitwell
Y
ou’ve ignored all the
advice on what to eat
and drink. Food fashion
fads and trends have
passed you by as you
sipped and slurped,
gorged and glugged
your way through the
Christmas season. But now, when you
are almost frozen to the spot (alcohol
and congealed animal fat rendering
you like a teetering oversized Russian
doll), comes sage wisdom. The only
eatie/drinkie advice you need pay
attention to. Ignore it at your arterybursting peril (unless you’re a nondrinking, chickpea residue-drenched,
personalised diet-loving vegan — in
which case you should look away now).
Books
They say that print is dying. Well not
in food-book publishing it’s not. Paper
factories continue to churn out
cookbooks like woodchippers spew
out, er, woodchip as chefs and cooks
clamour to “do a book”. Fans wait
eagerly to get their hands on one
(before taking them home and never
looking at them again).
Straight out of the traps in 2018 and
startlingly without beard and not
cooking in east London is Tommy
Banks. His family-owned restaurant,
the Black Swan at Oldstead in North
Yorkshire, was last year voted best
fine-dining restaurant in the whole
wide world and the universe and the
solar system and Milky Way and
everywhere ever by Trip Advisor. (OK,
so that wasn’t quite the title, but the
people on Trip Advisor can’t write like
grown-ups). The place has since been
crammed and impossible to get into.
So, since you will never get a table,
here comes Banks’s book with recipes
for such dishes as crapaudine beetroot
cooked slowly in beef fat and
Jerusalem artichoke fudge (no, I’m not
being juvenile, these are actual dishes
from his menu). Think of it as the
Tommy Banks fad diet. A restaurant
you will never eat in and a book you
will never cook from.
Then, like an avalanche of Tory
ministerial resignations, came the
vegan snowball. It had slow beginnings
among shampoo-averse hippies in the
1970s, but now vegans are parking
their tanks on all of our lawns. And
their instruction manuals are coming
like propaganda pamphlets dropping
from the sky. The publisher Quadrille
is pumping out Gaz Oakley’s Vegan 100
and Katy Beskow’s 15-Minute Vegan
Comfort Food (presumably you gnaw
on celery for 15 minutes, then have a
dinner of roast chicken and apple
crumble). Octopus is churning out
Vegan Cookbook, Vegan Soup and
Vegan Salad from the London
restaurant Mildreds and Áine Carlin’s
Cook Share Eat Vegan.
And vegans now come in pairs.
There is the beardy, black-shirted,
plant-munching duo Bosh! (expect
a book). And the Irish brothers the
Happy Pear (beards and mainly doing
handstands), who come with an entire
food range.
Restaurants
The fashion for dim sum/dumpling
restaurants (darkened rooms, cattlelike churn of tables, surly — no call
that furious — service) is over. Now
comes a new wave of places from the
East offering noodles, soup and
dumplings, more often than not with
all three sloshing about in the same
bowl. There’s Din Thai Fung, which
originates in Taiwan and is set to open
in the redeveloped Centre Point on
Tottenham Court Road in London.
The new tequila
is mezcal, made
from more than
30 agave species
Also Duddell’s, at a converted church
near the Shard. This is a new transfer
from Hong Kong and heralds an
interest in all things foodie from the
Chinese city (two books about the
food of Hong Kong from Jeremy Pang
and Tony Tan are heading our way).
Also coming from China, via the
West Village of New York City, is
Red Farm, opening soon in Covent
Garden. A favourite dish on its menu
is Pac-Man shrimp dumplings, in
which dumplings are dyed and given
little eyes to resemble ghosts (trad
ones in white sheets, not headless
ladies or poltergeists).
Drink
Drink? Who drinks these days? You
non-millennial, meat-eating, Maybotloving, Brexiteering, TV-watching,
house-owning, so-last-century freak!
Vegan millennials, having parked on
our lawns and invaded our homes, are
Confessions of a posh girl
Sophia Money-Coutts spent five years attending the grandest parties,
mixing with the gentry - and trying to bag a duke.
Read her diaries exclusively in The Times this Saturday.
the times | Thursday January 4 2018
7
1G T
the table
acts: the foodie trends of 2018
GETTY IMAGES; DANIELLE WOOD
Above, from top: a
Cantonese dim sum
symphony at Duddell’s
in London; reishi
mushrooms. Left: from
Áine Carlin’s Cook
Share Eat Vegan.
Above right: Ian
Theasby and Henry
Firth, aka Bosh! Below
right: Nigella Lawson
into non-alcohol, meditation and
mindfulness. We’ve all witnessed the
— very sobering — rise of Seedlip, the
first non-alcoholic spirit, which
enables you to spend a fortune all
night on distilled spirits with tonic, or
whatever, and not get remotely squiffy,
get a hangover or do anything stupid
(except drink Seedlip).
More such emperor’s-new-clothes
spirits will follow and here also is
aquafaba. It’s made from the residue
of such things as chickpeas, and
vegans use it to replace egg whites so
they can drink sours (alcohol-free, of
course), make meringues and have
mayonnaise. Now listen: only a nonmillennial, meat-eating fascist would
stoop so low as to diss it. Which is why
I can tell you it’s tragic and tasteless.
Drink
I thought we had dealt with drink. Yes,
but get this. There’s nowt so toothless
as a booze-free, this-century vegan.
Which is why mezcal is the new
tequila. East London bars are serving
it (under the counter to vegans).
Unlike tequila, which is made from
just the blue agave plant, mezcal is
made from more than 30 agave
species. Which means there’s lots
more to it. Take a shot now to help
you to cope with the non-alcoholic
in your life.
Ingredient
Bought some mushrooms? Thinking
of peeling the mushrooms? STEP
AWAY FROM THE MUSHROOMS!
Mushrooms, which are a species of
endless scientific wonder, store
vitamin D in their skin. So, you pale
fool, don’t peel them. Especially do not
peel reishi mushrooms. These are
viewed as the latest “superfood”
(which is meaningless, by the way,
since there is no such thing) and if you
open a trendy café you can whizz
them up and make lattes from them.
(I’m not making this up. This stuff is
happening. It’s a sort of balance to
Donald Trump.) And while we’re at it,
if in said café you infuse jasmine into
yoghurt and make Mexican margaritas
with hibiscus, you’ll clean up.
Chef to watch
Clean
eating is so
last year.
Now, it’s
all about
gut health
Anything the amazing Stevie Parle
does will glimmer and shimmer and
sparkle and make you happy. As his
empire grows (this ex-River Café boy
from Birmingham runs Craft, Sardine,
Rotorino, Palatino and Pastaio), so
must you follow him and bring your
friends. We are living in the Parle era.
Observe and eat it and think of the
day when you’re old and shaky and
your great-grandkids will say: “Really,
Grandpa? You once met Stevie Parle?”
“That’s right, kid. It was at Palatino. A
place named after a Roman hill and a
typographic font.”
Clean eating
Clean eating is dead. Buried. It’s so last
year there’s not even a hint of rotting
corpse (which itself could be a vegan
rebound trend for 2019). Now it’s all
about gut health. There are, and will
be, almost as many books about your
gut as there are vegan. Except, as one
gut-obsessive food nut told me: “This
is not a fad. This is real shit.” It’s all the
rage among qualified nutritionists.
Basically, you need good bacteria in
your gut, so get eating fermented food
(learn to love kimchi) and sipping
apple cider vinegar. And hire a private
gut coach. And don’t talk about it to
anyone. Eurgh.
Diets
No diet is right for all, of course. So
here come boffins from Imperial
College and what’s that they’re
brandishing? Ah yes, little swabs to
dab in your mouth. They will then
analyse what’s going on inside you
(not your head, you need to keep
paying someone else for that) and
come up with a personalised
diet; an eating plan just for you.
And along with this new
thinking is Fodmap. Fodmap
is complicated, but pay
attention and I’ll quickly
say that Fodmaps are
fermentable, oligo-, di-,
mono-saccharides
and polyols. And
basically you
need to eat a
low-Fodmap diet.
A specialist will
help you with this
and it is very effective.
Once you get going on
the long list of stuff to have
and stuff to avoid, your life will
change. You will sleep like a baby and
glow with health and vitality. Yet
because this food road map is so
exclusive and excluding, you will not
be able to go to any restaurant, café,
pub or friend’s house. So, you healthy
little beauty, you might as well die.
The new Nigella
Yes, it’s that time again when I name
the forthcoming year’s new Nigella.
The new Nigella then produces a book
and on the cover it says “The new
Nigella — The Times” and they forget
to ask me to the launch party. Past
new Nigellas include Georgina
Hayden (2017), Olia Hercules (2016),
Anna Jones (2015), Ella Woodward
(2014), and the Hemsley Sisters (2013).
The track record is impeccable, but
now the pressure to name the new
Nigella (and for the sake of millennialstyle fairness it can be boy, girl, or
non-binary) is becoming almost
too immense. Walking down the
street, going to the theatre,
entering a restaurant or
shopping at Waitrose has
for me become almost
impossible, such is the
clamour. “Tell us, tell us,”
implore the people tugging at
my coat-tails. “Who is it
this year?” And so I will
reveal it. The new Nigella
is . . . the old Nigella.
Nigella herself. Not old, of
course, just perfect and
poised, coquettish as she
looks left to the camera.
Back on TV, back with a
book, back and fabulous
as she scatters old new
Nigellas in her wake.
8
1G T
Thursday January 4 2018 | the times
arts
‘The Booker is good for the
novel but bad for novelists’
As he publishes his second volume of memoirs, the writer David Lodge talks to Robbie Millen
about the perils of prize culture, permissiveness and protecting students from themselves
‘T
he Booker prize
has created a huge
long line of losers,
as Mr Trump
would probably call
them, and there are
enough chances to
fail in the literary
world without going through that.”
David Lodge is one of the prize’s
most notable unwinners. At the age of
82 this former professor of English
literature, with 15 novels to his name,
is probably the most distinguished
novelist of his generation not to win it.
Not that failure ought to bother him.
It has been a nice little earner. He has
mined the great seams of frustrated
ambition, bungled relationships and
sexual disappointment to create
superb social comedy in novels such as
Changing Places (1975), Small World
(1984) and Nice Work (1988).
Lodge is reassuringly
unprepossessing when I meet him at
his home in Edgbaston, just round the
corner from Birmingham University,
where he taught. He puts one in mind
of his mild-mannered, naive creation
Philip Swallow, the English professor
at Rummidge University who is put in
the shade by the noisier, brasher
American super-don Morris Zapp.
Actually, to be less fancy, he also put
me in mind of those meek little men
who play henpecked husbands in Last
of the Summer Wine. It’s the cardigan.
Still, he has dramatic, bushy eyebrows
— they look owlish, perhaps he can
flash them to show rage or alarm —
and a matching moustache, a sort of
junior Tom Selleck lip adornment,
newly grown to disguise a surgical
scar (cancer, nose).
Lodge describes the prize as being
“good for ‘the novel’ but bad for
novelists”. Does it annoy him that the
prize has overlooked him? “No, it
doesn’t bother me. What I have rather
resented or regretted is I have not ever
been longlisted or shortlisted since
Nice Work. That does seem like a snub
— though it is silly to see it like that. It
is what prizes do to novelists.
“I have no complaints about my
career,” he adds. “What rather irritates
me is that the general public gives an
authority to these prizes that they
simply don’t deserve because their
results are largely produced by the
chemistry of the judges. It is inevitably
going to be a matter of chance, whereas
Birmingham is
a great place to
feel the pulse
of England
in the old days a reputation was built
by a general kind of vague consensus,
produced by the reviews they received
and what people said to one another.”
The reason we’re talking about the
Man Booker is because Lodge’s new
volume of memoir, Writer’s Luck, has
caused a mini-conniption in the
literary world. In it he recounts an
example of literary Stalinism when
he was chairing the prize. In 1989
two of the other judges successfully
co-ordinated to have Martin Amis’s
London Fields excluded from the
shortlist. As Lodge describes it, one of
Haydn Gwynne
and Warren Clarke
in a 1989 TV adaptation
of Nice Work by
David Lodge, right
Elvis Presley’s Memphis,
Fantastic
break
to
New
Orleans
and Nashville
Rome and Bologna
the judges, a long forgotten university
professor, “listed her criteria for a good
novel, and the last of them was, ‘It
must be ideologically correct.’ ” Amis
had earned the ire of the monstrous
regiment of feminist critics.
“I thought it was worth
memorialising,” Lodge tells me. “It
pins a moment. It was just before
politically correct became a term in
colloquial English. I was shocked, so
shocked that I didn’t immediately
challenge it. Which I regret. I’m
basically not an assertive kind of
person. I probably just mumbled
NINE DAYS FROM
£1449
TOUR
LOW D E P O S IT S – J U ST £ 4 9 PER PER S O N *
SAVE £100 PER PERSON UNTIL 14TH FEBRUARY – QUOTE CODE: JANLH8**
CITY
I N C LU D E S TR AI N B E T W E E N C ITI E S
PER PERSON
Seven nights’ roomonly accommodation in
Montgomery (one night),
New Orleans (two), Memphis
(two) and Nashville (two)
something or other. The more I
thought about it the more outrageous
it seemed.” Well, this memorialising is
a “smear” according to another judge.
Though a “lukewarm” Labour man,
Lodge has little time for political
correctness. He gave up university
teaching in 1987, but finds “this
business about not upsetting students
is deplorable. It is a curious reaction to
the permissiveness of discourse that
universities used to have in the days of
the Sixties and Seventies. Now it is
about protecting students from
anything that might question the
C
elebrate the sights and sounds of the
South as we step into the world of Robert
Johnson, Chuck Berry, Johnny Cash, Dolly
Parton and, of course, Elvis Presley. Cross
the Mississippi Delta where the blues began,
to the birthplace of jazz in New Orleans,
and follow the river to the hometown of The
King and rock ‘n’ roll before heading west, to
Nashville - the world capital of country music.
Return flights to Atlanta from
your chosen UK airport
Comfortable, air-conditioned
coach travel and transfers
The services of a friendly,
experienced tour manager
Departures May 2018 to November 2019.
Call now to book, quoting TIM
0330 160 8467
thetimes.co.uk/deals
*Book by December 22, 2017. **Save £100 per person when you book by 14th February quoting promotional code JANLH8. Offer may be withdrawn at anytime. These holidays are organised and operated by Newmarket Holidays Ltd. ABTA V7812. ATOL protected 2325.
Subject to availability. Single supplements apply. Standard landline charges apply. KL722.
the times | Thursday January 4 2018
9
1G T
BBC; ROBERTO RICCIUTI/GETTY IMAGES
arts
pieties
i ti of political correctness or
whatever . . . They [universities] should
be places where free speech reigns.”
Lodge has his own pieties — pieties
that he has questioned over the
decades. In reviews of his first volume
of memoirs, Quite a Good Time to Be
Born, some made much of his unsex
life. He was a virgin until he married
Mary in 1959; they met as students at
University College London and spent
seven long years of chaste dating. The
greatest physical intimacy he had
during the Fifties were bedbaths given
to him by a comely nurse while in
hospital for an ingrown toenail.
He chuckles at this. “It does seem
extraordinary looking back on it, [but]
I don’t think it was totally unusual.”
He was intellectually committed, as
was Mary, to the Catholic faith. “It
almost seems unbelievable that we
were going around as a couple for
seven years before we got married and
experienced sex. On the other hand
the marriage lasted very well; the
sexual side of it has always been very
satisfactory. If we had burnt up all our
lust early on I’m not sure we would
have taken the same course.”
He used the Catholic obsession with
birth control and sex to good effect in
novels such as How Far Can You Go?
(1980), a satire about young Catholics
in the Fifties and Sixties. But, he says,
though “we gradually freed ourselves
from that puritanical ethos and lost a
lot of the superstitious side of Catholic
religion”, old beliefs never quite went
away. “I don’t really envy young
people’s permissive behaviour now. It
is dangerous, this casual sex. On the
whole women and girls suffered from
permissiveness more than boys and
men did,” he says.
He now calls himself a “Catholic
agnostic”. Mary is still a believer, but
“now we’re in our old age she has
come to terms with that [his unbelief].
She probably regrets it, but there is
nothing I can do about it.” The new
atheists have no attraction for him. He
says there was “nothing sillier than the
atheist bus which said, ‘There probably
isn’t a God, so stop worrying and enjoy
your life.’ It’s statistically established
that people who have a faith are
happier than those who don’t.”
In this volume of memoir what
brought me up short was not sex, but
I didn’t
grieve
properly
for my
mother
at all
Writer’s Luck: A
Memoir 1976-91 is
published on January 11
by Harvill Secke
death. He describes going to see his
dead mother’s body in a hospital
basement in 1981. He kisses her
forehead and concludes by saying: “I
did not weep. I never do.” As well as a
sex refusenik, he’s an emotional
refusenik, out of kilter with our
blubbing age. “It was a visit to the first
dead person that I had seen,” he says.
“I couldn’t, I guess, summon up
adequate feelings. I thought I could
best express how I reacted by being
very economical. She looked like an
effigy on her own tomb. That’s it. I
couldn’t claim huge waves of sadness
and emotion. I didn’t really grieve for
her death properly at all.”
He says there is “no point in writing
a memoir and pretending to have
emotions you didn’t have. It might
appear to readers that my response
to my mother’s death was chilly.
That, I’m afraid, was how it was.”
(For that matter, he does not expend
much emotion writing about the
travails of raising a son — the
youngest of his three children —
with Down’s syndrome.)
Does he ever cry? “I don’t cry as far
as I know. The nearest I have come to
crying in recent times was when I was
working on my HG Wells novel [A
Man of Parts]. I had a scene where he
reads the end of E Nesbit’s The
Railway Children. I found when I came
to the scene I choked.”
The parents maketh the man. Lodge
was born in 1935. His father was a
musician in a jazz band, his mother a
housewife. “I owe my artistic genes to
[my father]. He had a wonderful,
natural gift for language, and
considering he had such a limited
education he was a cultivated man. He
put me on to Evelyn Waugh and
Dickens and other humorous writers.
He encouraged that streak in my work.
“There is also the rather dark,
lugubrious, repressive streak. I would
attribute these two elements in my
make-up to the genes of the two
families. My mother’s family, the
Murphys, were pretty neurotic. They
all had nervous breakdowns, but they
were also manic depressives, so they
could be very funny, exuberant and
exhibitionist almost.”
He grew up in the southeast London
suburb of Brockley (“Brockley is now a
bit swinging, a bit trendy — it was a
dreary place when I was there”), which
he has reimagined as Brickley in his
novels, and went to a rather ropey
grammar school. He is a selfidentifying member of the lower
middle class, the social class nobody
admits to coming from.
It is intriguing that, so far into his
anecdotage, Oxford still bothers him.
“I have an ambivalent attitude towards
Oxbridge, envy and admiration, but I
never thought of going to Oxbridge. I
don’t think I would have got on — too
young, too undernourished culturally.”
As an academic, he says, “there were
two occasions when I flirted with
going to Cambridge first, then Oxford.
And in both cases I didn’t go — and
was glad that I didn’t. I don’t think I
could have led the double life that I
have led as a novelist and an
academic. I would have been too
obliged to make my mark in this very
competitive Oxbridge atmosphere,
whereas in Birmingham I was pretty
free to do what I wanted.”
So off he went to Birmingham — “a
great place to feel the pulse of England.
London novels are ten a penny. There
aren’t many who write about
Birmingham. It has been a good place
for me in terms of giving me material.”
But has he run out of material? It
would be forgiveable; he has been
around for a long time. His debut, The
Picturegoers, was published in 1960; his
second, Ginger, You’re Barmy in 1962,
recalled his National Service years. He
has slowed down in terms of producing
fiction. His 2004 novel about Henry
James, Author, Author, was scooped
by Colm Tóibín’s Henry James novel
The Master, which appeared at the
same time. In 2011 he tried the same
trick by writing a fictional biography
of HG Wells, A Man of Parts, which is
a fascinating read.
Better still is his 2008 novel Deaf
Sentence, a sharp and funny look at
deafness. Like its main character, a
professor of linguistics, Lodge is deaf.
He has first-class hearing aids, though;
you would not think him particularly
deaf, though he does study my face
intently while I talk.
So will he write another novel? “As
you get older it is harder to make up
stories that have real conviction to
them. You find yourself borrowing
existing stories and making something
out of them. The nonfiction novel, the
biographical novel, which I would
never have thought about writing
20 or 30 years ago, is now a common
form for people to take up, especially
late on in a career when people have
used up their experience.”
Lodge has popped out two memoirs
while waiting for the muse of fiction. “I
have a number of ideas and would like
to see whether I’ve got one more novel
in me.” One more novel, one more
shot of not winning the Man Booker.
Entertainments
Entertainment
HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
Book your advertisement or
announcement now at:
thetimes.co.uk/ advertise
St Martin's
020 7836 1443
66th year of Agatha Christie's
THE MOUSETRAP
Today 7.30pm, Tomorrow 7.30pm,
Saturday 4pm & 7.30pm
www.the-mousetrap.co.uk
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MISÉRABLES
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
Theatre Royal Drury Lane
42nd STREET
020 7087 7760
%
Please be advised that
calls to 084 numbers
can cost up to 7p per
minute plus your network
provider’s costs.
10
1G T
Thursday January 4 2018 | the times
television & radio
A menopausal drama that comes from the heart
BEN BLACKALL /ITV
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Girlfriends
ITV
{{{{(
Miriam’s Big American
Adventure
BBC One
{{{((
G
irlfriends is a heart-sinking
name for a television drama.
Especially one about three
women pushing 60, a TV
event so rare it was reported
on News at Ten. But the title undersells
what is actually a bit of a cracker. I
didn’t expect to write that. Though it’s
welcome that a primetime drama puts
menopausal women centre stage, I
cannot lie: I expected a carousel of
middle-age clichés: anti-wrinkle
treatments, divorces, hot flushes. And,
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
The Film Programme
Radio 4, 4pm
The film critic Anthony
Lane put it so well. If you
are a distinguished actor,
“naturally blessed with
a mien like a full moon,
it seems inevitable that,
once you have attained
the requisite age and girth,
you will be asked to play
Winston Churchill”. It is a
rite of passage he says, “not
unlike marrying Elizabeth
Taylor in the 1950s”. As the
Darkest Hour offers yet
another august actor (Gary
Oldman this time) doing
his Churchill, Francine
Stock talks to its director,
Joe Wright, about our
continuing fascination with
Britain’s wartime leader.
John Finnemore’s
Souvenir Programme
Radio 4, 6.30pm
The seventh series of
John Finnemore’s sketch
show confirms what it is
that makes him special: it
is that he is very, very funny.
His comedy is wonderful
— surreal, slightly Spike
Milliganish and very
original. Last year he did a
sketch in which he evaluated
God’s creation of the snake.
In this show he has a sketch
about being reincarnated
and another about the
death of Nelson. Hard to
describe. But very funny.
actually, Girlfriends delivers all of these
things. But it is not awful or depressing.
In fact, I enjoyed it so much I
immediately watched episode two.
It helps that the cast is quality.
Miranda Richardson, Zoë Wanamaker,
Phyllis Logan and Anthony Head
are all on form, especially Richardson
as Sue, whom the writer Kay Mellor
manages to make a vain drama queen,
but also sympathetic. Sue, a wedding
magazine journalist, is a victim of
age discrimination at the hands of her
pig of a boss, who has also been her
married lover for 30 years, never
getting round to leaving his wife, and
says she is “no longer relevant” even
though she’s younger than him.
Age discrimination is hard to pull
off in a TV drama and TV rarely gets
journalism right. But I was absorbed
by this scenario, over-egged though it
occasionally was.
The main storyline in which Linda’s
(Logan) seemingly devoted husband
appears to disappear over the side
of a cruise ship, but, we discover, was
seeing another woman, is strong. And
while it would be wrong to say that
there aren’t moments of cliché, the
characters ring true. Unlike Mellor’s
previous offering, Love, Lies and
Records, which played out like a list of
modern “issues” contrived into a story,
this feels as if it came from the heart.
I expect it will appeal to women
more than men, given Mellor’s keen
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Scott and Chris 10.00 Jordan North
12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Cel and Katie 4.00
Dev 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Dev 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00
BBC Radio 1’s Residency: TQD 12.00 BBC
Radio 1’s Residency: Jubilee 1.00am Toddla
T 3.00 Radio 1’s Artist Takeover
with James Arthur 4.00 Early Breakfast
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Mark Goodier 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Bob Harris Country.
Americana, country and roots music 8.00
Ana Matronic. A selection of classics and
new tracks 10.00 The Radio 2 Arts Show
with Jonathan Ross. Another dose of cultural
commentary 12.00 The Craig Charles House
Party (r) 2.00am Radio 2’s Tracks of My
Years Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Have
A Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Feelgood Friday 5.00 Nicki Chapman
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests.
Including 7.00, 8.00 News.
7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
The composer Harrison Birtwistle talks about
more of the things that have inspired and
influenced him throughout his life and career
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Colin Matthews
Donald Macleod explores the influence of
Debussy and Beethoven upon contemporary
composer Colin Matthews. Colin Matthews
(Crossing the Alps; and Broken Symmetry);
Debussy arr Colin Matthews (Ce qu’a vu le
vent d’Ouest — Preludes Book 1
No 7); and Colin Matthews (Postlude:
Monsieur Croche; and Grand Barcarolle)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Ian Skelly presents highlights of the
Schubertiade, recorded at the Angelika
Kauffmann Sall, which since 1976 has been
held in Schwarzenberg and has become
one of Europe’s great festivals of chamber
music. Paul Lewis (piano) plays Schubert
(Quartet in G, D887; Pavel Haas Quartet;
and Moment musical D780/6)
Miranda Richardson played an insecure journalist in Girlfriends
2.00 Afternoon Concert
The conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen introduces
extracts from Ligeti’s opera Le Grand
Macabre, followed by the world premiere
performance of Aulis Sallinen’s
opera Castle in the Water
5.00 In Tune
Katie Derham presents a selection of
music, plus news from the arts world.
Including 5.00, 6.00 News
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
A specially curated mixtape with music
by Bach, Britten, Satie and arrangements
of Scarlatti and Vivaldi
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
Sara Mohr-Pietsch presents cutting-edge
new music recorded in the round at LSO St
Luke’s, London. Clara Iannotta (The people
here go mad; and They blame the wind); Alex
Mills (Suspensions and Solutions); Charles
Mitchener (Duet 1 & Duet 2); Michelle Lou
(Telegrams); Chaya Czernowin (Ayre —
Towed through plumes, thicket, asphalt,
sawdust and hazardous air I shall not forget
the sound of); Thierry Tidrow (Clarintabile);
Lorenzo da Firenze (A poste messe); Valgeir
Sigurðsson (Hatching); and Mirela Ivicevic
(Baby Magnify/Lilith’s New Toy)
10.00 Free Thinking
Rana Mitter talks to Jennifer Egan about
how the research for her latest novel,
Manhattan Beach, was the inspiration for its
predecessor, The Goon Squad. He hears from
the historian Miranda Kaufmann about the
existence of a black population of skilled
workers in Tudor England, one of whom
dived salvage on the wreck of the Mary Rose
after she sank on her way to wage war
against the French. And he’s joined by the
marine biologist, Alex Rogers, the writer and
whale lover Philip Hoare, and Jason de Caires
Taylor, creator of the world’s first underwater
sculpture parks to discuss why decades after
we first saw our blue and watery planet
hanging in space, we still find it easier to
ignore our oceans than explore them
10.45 The Essay:
Brick, Stone, Steel, Glass
The travel writer Phoebe Smith talks about
Hafod Eryri — the visitor centre on Mount
Snowdon’s summit — and the self-confidence
it must take to build on mountains
11.00 Late Junction
Max Reinhardt digs deep into his record bag
to find sonic inspiration. The show also
shines a light on London’s “Baroque at the
Edge” festival, featuring performances from
recorder virtuoso Tabea Debus and the
pianist Joanna MacGregor
12.30am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am-7.30 (LW) Test Match Special
Australia v England
Commentary on the opening day of the fifth
Ashes Test at the Sydney Cricket Ground
5.30 News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
7.30 (LW) Today
9.00 Her Story Made History
Interviews with remarkable women
9.30 One to One
Broadcaster Primrose Granville talks to
Jamaican chef Henroy Brown (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: The Vital Spark
— Appointment in Arezzo
By Alan Taylor (4/5)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Discussion and interviews with Jenni Murray.
Including at 10.45 the 15 Minute Drama:
Part four of Shardlake — Heartstone, the
fifth series of CJ Sansom’s Tudor mysteries
11.00 Crossing Continents
David Baker reports on how black Brazilians
are asserting their identity thanks to
a controversial education law (7/9)
11.30 Why the Moon, Luke?
The contemporary artist Luke Jerram
discusses his obsession with the moon (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Conflict and Co-operation:
A History of Trade
Exploring the evolution of global trade
in goods, people and ideas (4/10)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Elsinore
By Sebastian Baczkiewicz. The traitor Lord
Anders has been found in Sweden and
Claudius is dispatched to bring him back
to Denmark. Stars John Heffernan (4/4)
3.00 Open Country
Helen Mark uncovers fairy stories and
football legends around Bradford (11/16)
3.27 Radio 4 Appeal (r)
3.30 Open Book
Luke Kennard, Abi Curtis and Gregory Claeys
discuss dystopian fiction (r)
4.00 The Film Programme
Movies about Churchill. See Radio Choice
4.30 BBC Inside Science
Presented by Adam Rutherford
5.00 PM
observations of female behaviour: for
example, the kneejerk self-deprecation.
“You look amazing,” is rebutted with:
“Oh, I look a mess.” “You look great,”
is shot down with: “No, I’ve put on
half a stone.” So true. It might be
something only women appreciate,
but what can I say? I’ll watch it.
Miriam Margolyes kicked off
Miriam’s Big American Adventure
in her trademark fashion: with a
resounding fart. Sigh. Miriam, you add
to the gaiety of life, but this letting-rip
thing is starting to stale, as I’m sure
the poor camera crew agree. Anyway,
on to America and her investigation
into the state of the nation.
I don’t get TV’s obsession with
perpetually sending celebrities abroad
and thought the Real Marigold on Tour
was dull, but at least Margolyes earns
her keep on these jaunts by never
being boring, though she can be
brusque. I enjoyed it when she took
on people boasting that America is
the most generous place on earth. No,
it isn’t, she said. It’s Northern Ireland.
“You don’t have the monopoly on
generosity.” It was gratifying when
she refused to pay $1,195 for a hideous
flimsy jacket. “I don’t get it;
it’s hardly there,” she said. Spot on.
Still, I think we learnt as much
about Margolyes as we did the
American Dream. Incidentally, I
wonder if she’s heard of Wind-Eze?
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 John Finnemore’s
Souvenir Programme
Sketch show. See Radio Choice (1/6)
7.00 The Archers
Ian has a lot on his mind
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Shardlake: Heartstone
By CJ Sansom (4/10) (r)
8.00 The Briefing Room
David Aaronovitch discusses big issues
in the news with his guests
8.30 In Business
Russia’s attempts to diversify its economy
beyond the energy sector (6/9)
9.00 BBC Inside Science
Presented by Adam Rutherford (r)
9.30 Her Story Made History (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime:
How to Stop Time
By Matt Haig. Abridged by Jeremy Osbourne
and read by Tom Hollander (9/10)
11.00-5.20 (LW) Test Match Special:
Australia v England
Commentary on the second day of the fifth
Ashes Test at the Sydney Cricket Ground
11.00 The Brig Society
Marcus Brigstocke decides to cross the
gender gap and become a woman (2/6) (r)
11.30 A Life of Dental Losses
The writer Vitali Vitaliev contemplates
having all his teeth removed (r)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week: The Vital
Spark — Appointment in Arezzo (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am Not in Front of the Children 8.30
The Goon Show 9.00 The Unbelievable Truth
9.30 King Street Junior 10.00 Far From the
Madding Crowd 11.00 Writing Lives 11.15
Take Me to Hafod Owen 12.00 Not in Front
of the Children 12.30pm The Goon Show
1.00 Dr Finlay: The Adventures of a Black
Bag 1.30 I Have Heard the Mermaids Singing
2.00 Animal Farm 2.15 Five Hundred Years
of Friendship 2.30 Tales of the City 2.45 The
Examined Life 3.00 Far From the Madding
Crowd 4.00 The Unbelievable Truth 4.30
King Street Junior 5.00 Fat Chance 5.30
Keep Calman Carry On 6.00 I Am Legend
6.30 Great Lives. A profile of John Lennon
7.00 Not in Front of the Children. Jen’s
scheme to make money comes unstuck 7.30
The Goon Show. Comedy with Spike Milligan
8.00 Dr Finlay: The Adventures of a Black
Bag. Wee Robertson. By AJ Cronin 8.30
I Have Heard the Mermaids Singing. Janet
Ellis explores the seductive power of the
fantasy creatures 9.00 Writing Lives. Treats.
By Natalie Smith 9.15 Take Me to Hafod
Owen. By Meic Povey 10.00 Comedy Club:
Keep Calman Carry On. Susan Calman goes
birdwatching 10.30 Sean Lock: 15 Storeys
High. Comedy 11.00 Sarah Millican’s Support
Group. Bullying in the workplace 11.30 The
Show What You Wrote. Themed sketch show
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Chris Warburton 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport
10.00 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Max Rushden 1.00pm Hawksbee
and Jacobs 4.00 Danny Kelly and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off. With Mark Saggers
10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am Extra Time
with Tom Latchem
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Mary Anne
Hobbs 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe 4.00 Steve
Lamacq 6.00 Steve Lamacq’s Roundtable
7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00
6 Music Recommends with Steve Lamacq
1.00am The First Time with Rod Stewart
2.00 Golden Years: The David Bowie
Story 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
8.00 The Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott
pays tribute to the work of Claude Debussy.
Claude Debussy (Prelude a l’apres-midi
d’un faune; Arabesque No.1 in E; Suite
Bergamasque; Preludes Book 1 —
arranged for orchestra; Danse Profane;
Sarabande et Danse; and Jeux) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday January 4 2018
11
1G T
MANUEL HARLAN; GRAEME BRAIDWOOD
artsfirst night
Jazz
Beats & Pieces Big Band
Ronnie Scott’s, W1
Concert
Miklós Perényi
Wigmore Hall
F
C
{{{{(
or a while it seemed that
this would be one of those
journeyman gigs that are all
about proficiency rather than
compelling ideas. Then in
the second half it began to click. By
the time the director Ben Cottrell
and the rest of the musicians had set
about rewriting David Bowie’s Let’s
Dance — not exactly the sort of
piece you normally hear in a jazz
club — the music had stepped up
to another level.
A loose-limbed band from
Manchester, Beats & Pieces have
become regular post-Christmas
visitors to Soho. Most of the band
members look too young to be
celebrating their tenth anniversary,
yet there is a rare sense of cohesion
to their playing. A new album is
due this year and this was a chance
to catch glimpses of freshly composed
material alongside older fare such as
Rocky and Rain. They have started
selling their own T-shirts as well. As
Cottrell wryly noted, the medium
male sizes have already sold out,
which may be a clue to the band’s
core demographic.
Beats & Pieces are anything but
a regular big band. True, the brass
section can sound like a conventional
studio session line-up when it wants
to; one item in the early part of the
performance had the glossy aura
of a chase sequence from some
long-forgotten Sixties thriller. Yet
more often the players broke into
units — as if three or four small
groups had been squeezed into one
large ensemble — all held together
by the impeccable, high-energy
drumming of Finlay Panter.
What was missing in the earlier part
of the evening were distinctive themes:
for all its rhythmic energy, too much
of the material was functional at best.
But Three evoked memories of Gil
Evans in his more frenzied Eighties
guise and the Bowie cover, which
cleverly unveiled the melody inch by
tantalising inch, appealed to head and
heart. More, please.
Clive Davis
Theatre
The Singing
Mermaid
Derngate
Underground,
Northampton
{{{{(
Royal Opera
Subscribers can enjoy
2-for-1 tickets to the
Royal Opera House
Live Cinema season
at more than 400
cinemas in the UK. To
redeem tickets, visit
mytimesplus.co.uk
{{{{{
Preston Nyman mixes it up as the bibliophilic title character in George’s Marvellous Medicine
A recipe for success
Roald Dahl’s
children’s story
is just as zany
and anarchic
on stage, says
Ann Treneman
Theatre
George’s
Marvellous
Medicine
Curve, Leicester
{{{{(
T
here are many reasons to
like this phizz-whizzing —
to use a Roald Dahl word —
production of a tale that he
wrote in 1981. The story isn’t
very nice, for starters. And I mean that
in the nicest possible way. In a season
awash with sentimentality George and
his ingenious plans to make his
grandmother less ghastly provide a
blast of fresh air.
George lives on a farm with his
parents, who have no names other
than Mum and Dad. He’s off school
and all he wants to do is read a book.
“I’m back, in my favourite place,” he
says dreamily, flipping through the
pages, “in my imagination.” Soon,
George, played with heartwarming
affability by Preston Nyman, has
no time for reading because Grandma
is coming to stay. That’s not a good
thing. Battleaxe. Harridan. Moaner.
Harsh. That’s his gran.
“Where’s my cup of tea!” she
screeches. When George brings it,
she’s worse than Goldilocks. The tea
is too warm, too cold, too sweet, not
sweet enough. Lisa Howard, wearing
what can only be called rainbow
colours, plays her with an impressive
level of sustained screechiness.
Other than gran, it’s loads of fun
down on this farm. Actually, make
that anarchy. George decides that the
time has come to “cure” his grumpy
gran by concocting a potion to replace
her medicine. “In or out?” he asks the
audience — full of children and
parents — as he holds up a bottle of
bleach. (Later, he does explain that
this experiment is not to be tried at
home. By the way, the age guidance
is for six and up.)
He experiments on a chicken,
played with cluck-cluck pluckiness
by Chandni Mistry. Catherine Morris
as Mum and Justin Wilman as Dad
are also believable if a little zany,
a word that sums up this David
Wood adaptation.
Julia Thomas directs and although
it could be a little tighter — it ran
over the stated 90 minutes — it
held my interest. The set is pure
Dahl, designed by Morgan Large,
and it is a joy to look at, with tilting
shelves and secret cubby-holes. At
least now we know why the chicken
crossed the road. To drink some of
George’s marvellous medicine, of
course. Squawk!
Box office: 0116 242 3595, to Jan 20
then touring to April 21
H
ere’s a lovely little show
that makes a big splash.
Based on the 2013
children’s book by Julia
“The Gruffalo” Donaldson
and the illustrator Lydia Monks, it
thrills and charms, effortlessly
transporting its audience from the
depths of the ocean to dizzying
high-wire feats in a circus big top.
Samantha Lane and Barb Jungr’s
adaptation is nimble and involving,
with Lane’s bijou production
elegantly enhanced by Jungr’s
lilting, cabaret-style songs. Best of all,
though, are the puppets, created by
Lyndie Wright of Little Angel Theatre
in London. Exquisitely designed and
manipulated with captivating skill,
they make this sweet story utterly
entrancing, not just for the
under-sevens, but for grown-ups too.
Laura McEwen’s design turns the
diminutive studio space into a
gleaming jewel box, strung with
twinkling lights and bunting. A
scalloped proscenium and tiny
shell-shaped footlights frame the
The Singing Mermaid thrills and charms children and adults alike
action, and the three busy performers
bustle about in Edwardian bloomers
and waistcoats. The mermaid — a
wonderfully expressive rod puppet
with golden hair and a glittering blue
tail, wreathed in a garland of seaweed
— frolics in the waves with rippling
fish, scuttling crabs, a chorus of
singing oysters and drifting jellyfish.
And she loves to perch on a rock
learly some music lovers
have heard of Miklós
Perényi, because the
Wigmore Hall was well
filled for a wet Tuesday in
January, but this recital came as a
joyous surprise to me. The Hungarian
cellist turns 70 tomorrow, and I’m
not so many years behind, yet I
confess to my shame that I hadn’t
heard him play before.
Well, I intend to search out his
recordings, even if I have to ransack
every record store in Budapest for
dusty Hungaroton LPs. From Bach
(the sixth and most stratospherically
challenging Cello Suite) to Britten (his
Second Cello Suite, fiendishly crafted
to stretch even Rostropovich), Perényi
gave a masterclass. His technique is
rock-solid, undiminished by age, his
tone superbly full-bodied and his
interpretations gutsy, but refreshingly
free from artifice or affectation.
I didn’t like the heavy elongation of
the arpeggio chords in the sarabande
of the Bach, which in effect added
extra beats and thus skewed the dance
metre, but that’s just a matter of taste.
Anyway, balancing that was the
glorious improvisatory feeling that
Perényi brought to the allemande
and the rustic charm he found in the
drone passages of the second gavotte.
He showed another side of his
artistry in works by Ligeti and
Kurtág, two significant 20th-century
composers who studied together at the
Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest,
where Perényi has been a professor
for nearly 40 years. Ligeti’s Sonata
starts with a melody saturated in
Hungarian melancholy, then turns
phantasmagorical and frenzied, as if
the composer is shaking off history.
Kurtág’s Signs, Games and Messages,
by contrast, is the musical equivalent
of a haiku collection: fragments that
evoke a mood or person (usually dead)
with a few microtonal flecks or
suddenly angry discords. Like a haiku
too, Kurtág’s messages take some
decoding, but in Perényi’s expert
hands they were gripping.
Richard Morrison
and sing with her devoted best chum,
a sharp-eyed seagull.
Her trilling attracts the attention
of the avaricious circus owner Sam
Sly (the only character portrayed
by a human — Gilbert Taylor —
rather than a puppet, and all the
more menacingly imposing for that).
Having lured her into his employ, he
threatens to cook and eat her with
chips if she doesn’t sing for her supper,
and imprisons her in a fish tank.
But he reckons without the ingenuity
of the mermaid’s new friends, in
particular Annie the acrobat, who
teaches our piscine heroine that if you
can learn how to walk on your hands,
you don’t need feet to run away.
Jungr’s melodies and lyrics are
pleasingly sophisticated, yet still
accessible for the littlest audience
members, who at the performance
I saw danced with delight. And the
narrative balance of laughter, peril
and excitement is beautifully judged.
A real treat.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 01604 624811, to Jan 13
12
1G T
Thursday January 4 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Death in Paradise
BBC One, 9pm
Like
clockwork,
this
Caribbeanset murder-mystery
returns for a seventh
series to deliver a
much-needed dose of
winter sun to our living
Early
Top
pick
rooms. However, things
aren’t quite the same;
you may remember
that for the last two
episodes of series six
Ardal O’Hanlon’s
DI Jack Mooney
took the reins from
Kris Marshall’s DI
Humphrey Goodman.
The transition was
fairly seamless, with
O’Hanlon’s bumbling
Irish charm a nice
deviation without being
too revolutionary. For
continuity, Joséphine
Jobert returns as
DS Florence Cassel,
Mooney’s right-hand
woman, with Danny
John-Jules as Dwayne
Myers and Tobi Bakare
as JP Hooper making
up the island of Saint
Marie’s crime-fighting
team. And they are
very much in demand
because Saint Marie
has a disproportionate
number of murders for
such a seemingly idyllic
sliver of paradise. The
first killing in the
new series involves
the hotel billionaire
Philip Marston (Denis
Lawson), who is on
the island with his
fiancée, Diane
(Elizabeth Berrington),
for their lavish wedding
at one of his hotels.
As well as various
well-wishers, the
wedding party includes
Marston’s offspring,
an oleaginous son
and two daughters.
When someone dies in
a suspicious balcony
fall, Mooney must
tear himself away
from learning the
ingredients for a melon
curry (really) to prove
that it wasn’t suicide.
And guess what? He’s
sharper than he seems.
Plus ça change.
Wartime Crime
Yesterday, 8pm
Most of the stories from
the home front during
the Second World War
are of bravery and stoic
resistance, but there
were criminals willing
to take advantage of
the situation. This
six-part series reveals
how crime flourished
in bombed-out London,
occupied France and
Nazi Germany. William
Charles Hill was a
postwar gangster, a
mentor to the Krays
and the mastermind
behind a series of heists
in the 1950s and 1960s.
However, his empire
was built on foundations
laid during the Second
World War as he
exploited the chaos
of the Blitz to amass
a fortune through
the black market.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Rip Off Britain: Holidays. The
investigation into a terrifying accident around a hotel
pool 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in
Prestatyn, Darley Dale and Folkestone 11.00 Wanted
Down Under. A couple sample life in New Zealand 11.45
Close Calls: On Camera. A cyclist who survived two heart
attacks in one week 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From the
Royal Welsh Showground in Builth Wells (r) (AD) 1.00
BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News;
Weather 1.45 Doctors. Ruhma tells one lie too many, and
Al reveals why he has been volunteering for evening
shifts (AD) 2.15 Father Brown. Mrs McCarthy’s friend is
the latest villager to die in her sleep, and Father Brown
soon senses something sinister is afoot (AD) 3.00 I
Escaped to the Country. Nicki Chapman revisits house
buyers in Devon and Somerset 3.45 The Farmers’ Country
Showdown. A vegetable grower and a beekeeper show
their wares at an Islington farmers’ market 4.30
Antiques Road Trip. Charlie Ross and James Braxton
travel from Buckinghamshire to the Cotswolds 5.15
Pointless. Quiz show with Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 The Farmers’
Country Showdown (r) 7.15 Antiques Road Trip (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: MasterChef — The Professionals (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 BBC News 11.00 Westminster Abbey (r) (AD)
12.00 Coast (r) 12.10pm FILM: Lucky Jim (U, 1957)
A hard-drinking junior lecturer frustrated by his stuffy
university tries to impress a professor, but his efforts
only end in disaster. Comedy with Ian Carmichael and
Terry-Thomas (b/w) 1.45 The Wonder of Animals (r)
(AD) 2.15 Operation Wild (r) (AD) 3.15 Penguins: Spy in
the Huddle. Having grown up and become independent, all
the penguins leave for the sea. David Tennant narrates.
Last in the series (r) (AD) 4.15 Planet Earth II. Animals
that live in jungles, including creatures that glow in the
dark which have never been captured on film before, as
well as freshwater dolphins and the largest living lemur
(r) (AD) 5.15 Flog It! Paul Martin is joined by Claire
Rawle and James Lewis at St Albans Cathedral, where
items include some historic coins and a 1970s robot (r)
6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine 6.30
Great British Railway Journeys. The presenter visits
places of interest in West Sussex and Hampshire (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Britain. The Hairy Bikers Si King
and Dave Myers chat about their new television series in
which they embark on a Mediterranean adventure. Plus,
current affairs, health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs
and fashion news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and
gossip. Presented by Lorraine Kelly 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning. Chat and
lifestyle features, including a look at the stories making
the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen
12.30pm Loose Women. The ladies put the world to
rights once more and invite a famous guest to chat about
what they are up to 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00
Midsomer Murders. Barnaby and Jones race to find a
connection between a stolen antiques racket and two
couples who disappeared in a village rumoured to have
haunted woods. Anton Lesser guest stars (r) (AD) 4.00
Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the arcade-themed
quiz show in which contestants drop tokens down a choice
of four chutes in the hope of winning a £10,000 jackpot
(r) 5.00 The Chase. Quiz show hosted by Bradley Walsh
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am 3rd Rock from the Sun (r) (AD) 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (r) (AD) 8.30 Frasier (r) 10.05 Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares USA. Charlie’s Italian bistro in La
Verne, southern California (r) 11.00 Sun, Sea and Selling
Houses. A retired teacher seeks a dog-friendly villa in
southern Spain, while a Rochdale family hopes to find a
new beginning in Alicante (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News
Summary 12.05pm Couples Come Dine with Me. Three
couples from in and around Bristol compete (r) 1.05 Posh
Pawn. A couple want to sell their unique house boat, and
a gastro pub owner wants to take a loan out against a
£250,000 Bentley (r) 2.10 Countdown. With Richard
Arnold in Dictionary Corner 3.00 The Secret Life of the
Zoo. A new female chimp arrives at Chester Zoo, the runt
of the otter litter goes missing, and a cheetah mum is on
the operating table (r) (AD) 4.00 A Place in the Sun:
Winter Sun. Searching for a holiday home in and around
Marina Almeria, Spain 5.00 Come Dine with Me. Four
people host dinner parties in Sheffield 6.00 The
Simpsons. Homer and the family win a once-in-a-lifetime
safari trip to Africa (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Diane
reveals that Tony is sleeping in the spare room (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
9.45 FILM: The Unbeatables (U, 2013) The players
on a table football game come to life and help their owner
to save his village. Animated adventure with the voices of
Rupert Grint and Anthony Head 11.25 Access 11.30 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors. Doctors treat a man who woke up
to discover a red rash covering his entire body (r) (AD)
12.30pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.35 The Hotel Inspector.
Alex Polizzi visits the Madonna Halley Hotel in north
London (r) 1.35 FILM: The 19th Wife (12, TVM,
2010) The wife of a member of a polygamous cult is
accused of killing her husband, leaving it up to her
excommunicated son to prove her innocence. Drama
starring Matt Czuchry 3.20 FILM: Deadly Stage Fright
(PG, TVM, 2017) A soprano agrees to a comeback event
years after a violent attack sent her into retirement, but
new dangers come to the fore. Thriller starring Jordan
Ladd and Brody Hutzler 5.00 5 News at 5 5.35 Barging
Loving Celebs. Nigel Havers, Debbie McGee, Lorraine
Chase and Simon Callow go antique shopping, explore
an ice-age peat bog and learn about prominent canal
architect Thomas Telford (r) 6.30 5 News Tonight
It’s going to be another busy year.
New
year
offer
Stay well informed with a subscription from just £2 a week.
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7PM
Offer ends February 5, 2018.UK residents aged 18 or over only. Offer open to new and existing subscribers. Existing subscribers will need to recontract. Offer is for access to our Classic 5 day pack only. Subject to availability.12 month minimum term. Discount over 3 months, followed by standard pricing of £26 per month. Terms and conditions
7.00 Celebrity Mastermind With
Laurence Rickard, Martin HughesGames, Vogue Williams and John
Pienaar. John Humphrys hosts (7/10)
7.30 EastEnders As the dust settles on
another series of eventful celebrations,
pressure is at an all-time high for
the members of Aidan’s gang (AD)
7.00 Kate Humble: Off the Beaten
Track The disparity between what
farmers get for their sheep and
what consumers pay (3/4)
7.30 Christmas University Challenge
2017 Jeremy Paxman asks the
questions in the second semi-final
of the Christmas contest (9/10)
7.00 Emmerdale Tom is hopeful, Charity
discovers a secret, and Alex plans
a surprise for Aaron (AD)
8.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build New series.
Nick Knowles meets a West Sussex
wife and mother-of-four who was
paralysed in a bicycle accident in the
summer of 2015, and needs her home
adapting for her wheelchair (1/8) (AD)
8.00 The Hairy Bikers’ Mediterranean
Adventure New series. Si King and
Dave Myers search for the flavours
of several Mediterranean countries,
beginning in Italy, where they taste
simple local ingredients and spicy
nduja pate (1/6) (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Debbie is angry,
Doug tries to cheer Bob up,
while Cain talks to Moira (AD)
9.00 Death in Paradise New series.
DI Jack Mooney is tested when a hotel
billionaire’s fiancée falls from a balcony
the day before her lavish wedding.
It looks like suicide — except for just
one thing. Ardal O’Hanlon, Josephine
Jobert and Danny John-Jules star.
See Viewing Guide (1/8) (AD)
9.00 A House Through Time
New series. David Olusoga presents
this documentary charting 180 years
of British history as lived through
by the successive inhabitants of a
terraced house in Liverpool, from
the 1840s to the present day.
See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
9.00 Piers Morgan’s Life Stories Piers
meets Caitlyn Jenner, who opens up
about her feud with her ex-wife and
stepchildren, and reflects on winning
gold while battling gender issues (2/4)
8.30 Coronation Street Faye offers a
homeless Seb a place to sleep, and
Steve assures Tracy that he no longer
has feelings for Michelle (AD)
10.00 Live at the Apollo Dane Baptiste
hosts, introducing sets by Desiree
Burch and Chris McCausland (6/7)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day’s
events presented by Evan Davis
10.35 Regional News
12.20am-6.00 BBC News
7.00 Baby Ballroom New series. Behind
the scenes at the Zig Zag Dance
Factory in Wolverhampton, run by
coaches Warren and Jane Bullock.
Pre-teen couple Max and Olivia are
setting the floor alight with their
dazzling routines, but they
keep falling out (1/8) (AD)
8.00 Food Unwrapped Diet Special
Jimmy Doherty, Kate Quilton, Matt
Tebbutt and Dr Helen Lawal investigate
healthy eating products and plans,
and offer surprising tips for staying
healthy in the new year (AD)
8.00 Big Family Values: More Kids
Than Cash A Derbyshire couple with
10 children cannot decide whether they
should have another baby. A family
from Southampton with eight kids
struggle to make ends meet after
dad is made redundant (4/4)
9.00 Hunted New series. Following a
dramatic launch and helicopter chase in
Manchester, nine British fugitives are
pursued across the UK by a team of
hunters. See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 Celebrity Big Brother Highlights of
the housemates’ first full day at the
mercy of Big Brother, where it remains
to be seen who is playing up for the
benefit of the viewing public
10.00 Derry Girls New series. Comedy set
against the Troubles in Northern
Ireland. Saoirse Jackson stars.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
10.30 20 Kids and Counting Documentary
following Britain’s biggest family, the
Radfords, as Sue and Noel prepare for
the arrival of baby number 20, and plan
a surprise trip to Florida, a well-needed
break for all from the relentless noise
and chaos in their household (r) (AD)
10.00 Celebrity 100 Per Cent Hotter New
series. As the all star version of the
make over series returns, the reality
star Chanelle McCleary and The X
Factor finalist and rapper Honey G
receive expert style assistance (1/4)
7.30 Diets: New Year, New You?
Tonight Helen Skelton investigates
fad diets and super slimming products
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.45 Mrs Brown’s Boys New Year
Special Agnes tries to sort out Cathy’s
love life. Winnie and Agnes join Father
Damien’s neighbourhood patrol (r)
11.15 New Tricks After Sandra’s departure,
the detectives are anxious to meet
their new boss, and DCI Sasha Miller
wastes no time getting cracking with
her first Ucos case, the murder of an
Italian immigrant on a west London
allotment 25 years earlier. The
ritualistic style of the killing puts
one of the other gardeners in the
frame when it’s revealed he is a
practising druid (9/10) (r) (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
11.15 Robot Wars Special 2017: The
World Series Dara O Briain and
Angela Scanlon present the first
of two special episodes in which
champion robots from past series
battle it out against a team of rivals
from other countries (1/2) (r)
10.45 Great Art New series. Tim Marlow
charts the life and work of the world’s
most celebrated artists, with insights
into their private lives and where they
lived, plus he explores their formative
relationships through private letters.
He begins by focusing on the work
of Venice’s Canaletto (1/5) (AD)
11.45 Joanna Lumley’s Postcards
The actress recalls her journey across
the Greek islands (4/6) (r) (AD)
11.35 24 Hours in A&E An unknown
patient arrives after collapsing in the
street, a man comes in following an
accident at the gym, and a young girl
has signs of a chest infection (r) (AD)
12.15am Sign Zone: Blue Planet II — Oceans of
Wonder Footage of marine life in different environments
around the world (r) (AD, SL) 1.45-2.45 Employable Me.
The psychologist Nancy Doyle invites a man with autism
and a woman with Asperger’s to her training centre where
they learn the rules of the office environment (r) (AD, SL)
12.10am Jackpot247 Interactive gaming 3.00 Diets:
New Year, New You? Tonight. At this time of year, many
overweight Brits will be paying out on quick fixes, from
fad diets to super slimming products. Helen Skelton
investigates if they are worth it (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r) (SL)
12.40am The Supervet Noel treats a puppy using
groundbreaking cell treatment (r) (AD) 1.35 The Secret
Life of the Zoo (r) (AD) 2.30 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (r) 3.20 Word of the Year 2017
(r) (SL) 4.15 Location, Location, Location (r) 5.05
Come Dine with Me (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
11.05 Celebrity Big Brother’s Bit on the
Side Rylan Clark-Neal presents the
CBB companion show, including guests’
thoughts on the latest developments
and behind-the-scenes insights
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
The doctors are faced with depression and alcohol abuse
(r) (AD) 4.00 My Mum’s Hotter Than Me! (r) (SL)
4.45 House Doctor. Ann Maurice revamps a student’s
flat in Leeds (r) (SL) 5.10 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL) 5.35
Chinese Food in Minutes (r) (SL) 5.50-6.00 Access
the times | Thursday January 4 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
A House
Through Time
BBC Two, 9pm
An ordinary terraced
house in Liverpool
is the prism through
which the historian
David Olusoga explores
180 years of British
history. Olusoga
starts in the 1840s
with a remarkable
piece of detective work,
scouring city archives
to reveal how the house
came to be built as a
merchant’s residence
by a property developer
at a time when
Liverpool was one of
the great trading ports
of the British Empire.
He also uncovers the
story of the first tenant
— a customs clerk with
a taste for the high
life. It’s Who Do You
Think You Are? with
bricks and mortar.
Hunted
Channel 4, 9pm
Another nine British
citizens turn fugitive
as they try to evade
capture by the former
Scotland Yard detective
Peter Bleksley and
his formidable squad
of hunters. Sadly this
is the non-celebrity
version, so it’s lacking
a certain something
because nobody tries
to hole up in the house
of the former bass
player of Dire Straits.
However, it launches
with a thrilling
helicopter chase in
Manchester as the
escapees, who include a
former police firearms
officer and a retired
college tutor, try to
slip the net. If they can
remain undetected for
25 days they could win
a share of £100,000.
Derry Girls
Channel 4, 10pm
The Northern Irish
writer Lisa McGee
(Being Human, London
Irish) is mining her
childhood for a
family-centred sitcom
set in the early-1990s
against the spectre of
the Troubles. It reflects
how, amid army
checkpoints and bombs
going off, life went on
for the people of
Londonderry, with
the focus on teenage
Murder She Wrote fan
Erin (Saoirse Jackson)
and her friends and
family. The setting
makes it unique in the
world of sitcoms (and
1990s references make
a nice change from the
usual 1980s nostalgia),
while Ian McElhinney
is wonderfully spiky
as Granda Joe.
Sport Choice
Sky Sports Golf, 11pm
The Sentry Tournament
of Champions, played
in Maui, Hawaii, is the
opening event of the
PGA Tour. The field is
restricted to the golfers
who won a tournament
on the tour during the
previous calendar year,
so an all-star field will
include Jordan Spieth
and Henrik Stenson.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Futurama (r) (AD) 7.00 The Simpsons
(r) 8.00 Micro Monsters with David
Attenborough (r) 9.00 Dogs: An Amazing
Animal Family (r) (AD) 10.00 Modern Family (r)
12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00
Modern Family (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30
Futurama. Fry tries to win Leela’s affections (r)
6.00 Futurama. Dr Farnsworth makes a robotic
version of Leela for a heartbroken Fry (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Duck Quacks Don’t Echo. With guests
Martin Clunes, Jimmy Carr and Aisling Bea (r)
9.00 A League of Their Own. With guests Andy
Carroll, David Walliams and Melanie C (r) (AD)
10.00 Delicious. Return of the drama starring
Dawn French and Emilia Fox (1/4) (r)
11.00 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
12.00 The Force: North East. A man wanted for
domestic violence (r) 1.00am Air Ambulance ER
(r) (AD) 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (r) 4.00 Stop,
Search, Seize (r) 5.00 Highway Patrol (r)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 The Guest Wing (r)
(AD) 8.00 Richard E Grant’s Hotel Secrets (r)
(AD) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r)
(AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue
Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00
House. The team treats a prosecutor (r) (AD)
6.00 House. House confronts his boss (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
A mob of criminals terrorises Las Vegas (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Frank faces backlash after
disciplining a disrespectful cop (r) (AD)
9.00 The Tunnel: Vengeance. A new
development threatens to tear Karl and
Elise’s partnership apart (4/6)
10.05 Game of Thrones. Cersei finds herself
seeking forgiveness in King’s Landing (r) (AD)
11.15 Game of Thrones. The fate of Jon Snow is
revealed, and Ellaria makes her move (r) (AD)
12.15am The Tunnel: Vengeance (r) 1.15
Dexter. The Ice Truck Killer taunts Dexter (r)
2.25 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r) 3.20
Banshee (r) (AD) 4.20 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life (AD) 8.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 11.00
The Biggest Loser: Australia 12.00 UK Border
Force (r) 1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD)
2.00 Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds. Garcia travels to Alaska (r)
7.00 Children’s Hospital. Matthew Curley has
surgery for a cleft lip and palate (9/12) (r) (AD)
7.30 Children’s Hospital. A girl prepares for
surgery to correct her hearing (10/12) (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Sherlock and Watson
investigate a cryopreservation company (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. A sniper strikes just days
before the anniversary of JFK’s death (r)
10.00 Madam Secretary. Elizabeth works
to contain a smallpox outbreak
11.00 Criminal Minds. The agents track down
a child abductor. Joe Mantegna stars
12.00 Criminal Minds 3.00am Scandal (r) 4.00
Elementary (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Mariinsky Ballet: Cinderella 8.00
Portrait Artist of the Year 2017 9.00 Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 9.30 California Dreamin’:
The Songs of the Mamas and the Papas (AD)
10.45 Carole King: Tapestry Live from Hyde Park
12.00 Hollywood Censored (AD) 1.00pm
Discovering: Charlton Heston (AD) 2.00 Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 2.30 The Beach Boys: Live
at Knebworth 4.00 Blondie: Song by Song (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Judy Garland. Profile (AD)
7.00 Dean Martin: A Legend in Concert.
Performances by the singer and actor
8.00 Pulp Live. From Brixton Academy
9.00 Manic Street Preachers: Escape from
History. The story of the band’s acclaimed
1996 album Everything Must Go
10.40 Blur: New World Towers. The making of
the band’s comeback album The Magic Whip
12.30am The Beach Boys: Live at Knebworth.
A festival performance from 1980 2.00 The
History of Comedy (AD) 3.00 John Le Carre: An
Evening with George Smiley (AD) 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00
Premier League Daily 11.00 Transfer Centre
11.30 Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Sky Sports News
3.00pm Transfer Centre 3.30 Sky Sports News
5.00 Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6.
The latest sports news and updates
7.00 Transfer Centre. The latest football
transfer developments
7.30 Live Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur v
West Ham United (Kick-off 8.00). Coverage of
the top-flight encounter between the London
rivals, which takes place at Wembley Stadium
10.30 Harry Kane’s 2017. The Tottenham
Hotspur striker’s year
11.00 Live PGA Tour Golf:
The Sentry Tournament of Champions.
Coverage of the first day’s play of the tour’s
opening event of 2018, held at the Plantation
Course at Kapalua in Hawaii
3.00am Sky Sports News
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 10.45pm The Real
Marigold on Tour. Rosemary Shrager, Sheila
Ferguson, Paul Nicholas and Dennis Taylor
explore Thailand, where they try their hands
at tai chi and take part in a Ladyboys show.
Last in the series (AD) 11.45-12.15am Mrs
Brown’s Boys New Year Special. Winnie and
Agnes join Father Damien’s neighbourhood
patrol, but it quickly becomes clear they are not
cut out for crimebusting. Mrs Brown also tries
to sort out Cathy’s love life once and for all (r)
Save up to 78% on the cover price.
What do you
subscribe to?
STV
As ITV except: 12.10am Teleshopping 1.10
After Midnight. News and conversation. Plus,
classic clips from the archive 2.40 Diets: New
Year, New You? Tonight. At this time of year,
many overweight Brits will be paying out on
quick fixes, from fad diets to super slimming
products. Helen Skelton investigates if they are
worth it (r) 3.05 ITV Nightscreen. Text-based
information service 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Guests air their differences (r)
UTV
As ITV except: 12.10am Teleshopping.
A chance to buy goods from the comfort
of home 1.40-3.00 ITV Nightscreen.
Text-based information service
thetimes.co.uk/offer
0800 056 7536
apply. Visit store.thetimes.co.uk for full T&Cs.
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
Michael Portillo travels through Spain as
he once again ventures onto the European rail
network, visiting Madrid, Cordoba, Seville,
Algeciras and Gibraltar (r) (AD)
8.00 Walt Disney. Documentary exploring the
life and legacy of Walt Disney, including his early
animated work, the success of Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs, and his dream project —
Disneyland (1 & 2/2) (r) (AD)
10.00 The Secret Life of Sue Townsend (Aged 68
3/4). Julie Walters narrates a profile of the
creator of Adrian Mole, with contributions from
comedians and writers she inspired, as well as
entries from her own diary, documenting her
struggles with ill health (r) (AD)
11.00 Iceland: Land of Ice and Fire — Natural
World. The people and animals who inhabit the
Nordic island, including an Arctic fox family
eking out a living and Viking horsemen taking to
the saddle for the autumn round-up (r) (AD)
12.00 Great Barrier Reef (r) (AD) 1.00am Walt
Disney (r) (AD) 3.00-4.00 Peaky Blinders (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Streetmate (r)
7.00 Charmed (r) 9.00 FILM: Animals United
(U, 2010) Animated comedy with the voices
of James Corden and Stephen Fry 11.00 The
Goldbergs (r) (AD) 12.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory
(r) (AD) 2.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD) 3.00 Baby
Daddy (r) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory. Two shows (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. James is thrilled (AD)
7.30 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 2 Broke Girls. Max and Caroline are
cast as extras in a zombie movie (AD)
9.30 2 Broke Girls. Caroline falls for the building
contractor who renovated the dessert bar (AD)
10.00 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
10.30 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Gogglebox (r) (SL) 12.55 Rude Tube
(r) 2.00 2 Broke Girls (r) (AD) 2.50 First Dates
(r) (AD) 3.45 First Dates Abroad (r) (AD) 4.10
Rude(ish) Tube (r) 4.35 Charmed (r)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r) 9.55
Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 10.30 How to Lose
Weight Well (r) (AD) 11.30 A Place in the Sun:
Winter Sun (r) 12.35pm A Place in the Sun:
Home or Away (r) 1.40 Come Dine with Me (r)
4.20 Four in a Bed. Back-to-back editions (r)
6.55 The Supervet. A Staffie puppy whose legs
are growing in the wrong direction (r)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows the
progress of two architects who are planning to
build an eco-friendly subterranean house
underneath a barn in the Cotswolds (r) (AD)
9.00 The World’s Best Diet. Jimmy Doherty and
Kate Quilton examine the eating habits of
different countries, tribes and communities,
ranking 50 diets from worst to best (r)
10.40 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. Jimmy
Carr hosts the hybrid panel quiz show, with
guest team captain David Walliams (r)
11.45 Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
Gordon Ramsay revisits some of the restaurants
he set out to save, including The Mixing Bowl,
The Olde Stone Mill, Peter’s and Campania (r)
1.40am Grand Designs. From Cambridgeshire
(r) (AD) 2.45-3.30 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am Coneheads (PG, 1993) Comedy
starring Dan Aykroyd and Jane Curtin (AD)
12.45pm Rango (PG, 2011) Animated
comedy with the voice of Johnny Depp
2.55 Robots (U, 2005) Animated adventure
with the voice of Ewan McGregor 4.40
Multiplicity (12, 1996) Comedy starring
Michael Keaton and Andie MacDowell
6.55 Men in Black 3 (PG, 2012) A secret
agent goes back in time and teams up with a
young version of his mentor to stop an alien
changing history. Sci-fi comedy sequel with Will
Smith, Josh Brolin and Tommy Lee Jones (AD)
9.00 Dumb and Dumber To (15, 2014) The
dim-witted friends are reunited after 20 years,
and set off on a road trip to find Harry’s
estranged daughter. Comedy sequel starring
Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels and Rob Riggle
11.10 Stoker (18, 2013) A teenager becomes
infatuated with her mysterious uncle in the
aftermath of her father’s death. Thriller starring
Mia Wasikowska and Nicole Kidman (AD)
1.10am-3.50 Basic Instinct (18, 1992)
Thriller from the director Paul Verhoeven, with
Sharon Stone and Michael Douglas
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 6.55 Dress to Impress (r) 7.45
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.20 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 9.25 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.10
Who’s Doing the Dishes? (r) 11.10 Dress to
Impress (r) 12.10pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.45 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show
(r) 5.50 Take Me Out. Dating game (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Berta injures her back
8.30 Superstore. Jonah is tasked with giving
out flu shots in the pharmacy (AD)
9.00 FILM: 22 Jump Street (15, 2014)
Two cops are sent undercover at a university,
but their friendship is threatened as they
join different student cliques. Crime comedy
starring Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum (AD)
11.15 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.45 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.15am American Dad! Double bill (r) (AD)
1.10 Two and a Half Men. Berta injures her back
(r) 1.35 Superstore (r) (AD) 2.05 The Keith
Lemon Sketch Show (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Judge Judy (r) 7.15 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 8.15
The Royal (r) 9.20 Judge Judy (r) 10.40 FILM:
The Pure Hell of St Trinian’s (U, 1960) The
girls burn their school to the ground, prompting
a mysterious Middle Eastern gentleman to offer
new premises. Comedy starring Cecil Parker and
Joyce Grenfell (b/w) (AD) 12.40pm The Royal
(r) 1.40 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic
Coronation Street (r) 3.50 Agatha Christie’s
Marple (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
6.55 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica helps
a friend arrested for murder (r) (AD)
8.00 Agatha Christie’s Marple. The sleuth
confronts dark magic while investigating the
death of a fellow holiday-maker in the
Caribbean. Julia McKenzie stars (r) (AD)
10.00 Foyle’s War. The death of a conscientious
objector while in police custody prompts an
investigation — and Foyle soon sees a link to an
attempt on the life of the judge who ordered his
arrest. Michael Kitchen stars (2/3) (r) (AD)
12.00 Inspector Morse (r) 2.05am ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.45 Pawn Stars (r) 7.30
Ironside (r) 8.30 Quincy ME (r) 9.35 Minder (r)
(AD) 10.40 The Sweeney (r) 11.45 The
Professionals (r) (AD, SL) 12.50pm Ironside (r)
1.50 Quincy ME (r) 3.00 Minder (r) (AD) 4.00
The Sweeney (r) 5.05 The Professionals (r) (AD)
6.05 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
6.35 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 The Chase: Celebrity Special (r)
9.00 FILM: Dr No (PG, 1962) James Bond
investigates a criminal mastermind in the
Caribbean who is plotting to sabotage the US
space programme. Spy thriller with Sean
Connery and Ursula Andress (AD)
11.15 FILM: Sudden Death (18, 1995)
A former fireman battles to stop terrorists
holding the US vice president hostage during an
ice-hockey match. Action thriller with JeanClaude Van Damme and Powers Boothe (AD)
1.30am Minder. Guest starring Saeed Jaffrey
(r) (AD, SL) 2.25 Tommy Cooper (r) (AD, SL)
2.50 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear USA Special (AD) 2.00 Top Gear (AD) 3.00
Deadly 60 on a Mission 4.00 Ice Road Truckers
5.00 Top Gear. With Lionel Richie (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. Highlights of the greatest
challenges the team had to overcome (AD)
7.00 Cops UK: Bodycam Squad. Following the
work of the Staffordshire Police force as officers
respond to all manner of emergency calls
8.00 QI XL. With Ronni Ancona, Alan Davies,
Dave Gorman and Lee Mack. Stephen Fry hosts
9.00 Live at the Apollo. Sean Lock hosts the
stand-up show, featuring Jason Manford
10.00 Taskmaster. A group of comedians
completes a series of tasks
11.00 QI. With David Mitchell, Alan Davies,
Dara O Briain and Phill Jupitus
11.40 QI. With Alan Davies, Jeremy Clarkson,
Vic Reeves and Clive Anderson
12.20am Mock the Week 1.00 QI 2.20 Mock
the Week 3.00 Parks and Recreation 3.25
8 Out of 10 Cats 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The Bill 12.00
The Duchess of Duke Street 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Steptoe and Son (b/w) 2.20
Birds of a Feather 3.00 London’s Burning 4.00
New Tricks (AD) 5.00 The Duchess of Duke
Street. Louisa builds up her business
6.00 One Foot in the Grave. The Meldrew
household is disrupted by a pesky plumber
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine.
Foggy keeps an old tradition alive
7.20 Goodnight Sweetheart. Ron asks to go back
in time, and Phoebe finds herself homeless
8.00 Dalziel & Pascoe. Feature-length episode.
The trial of a child murderer Pascoe investigated
collapses, and the detective becomes embroiled
in the lives of a victim’s family (5 & 6/6) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. (2/2) Gerry fights to clear
his name (2/10) (AD)
11.20 Taggart. Jim investigates the murder of
an undertaker found in a burnt-out car (1/3)
1.00am Birds of a Feather 1.40 The Bill.
Meadows is accused of corruption 2.40 Bergerac
3.25 Garden Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Hunting Down the
Nazis (AD) 11.00 Locomotion: Dan Snow’s
History of Railways (AD) 12.00 Time Team
1.00pm Human Planet (AD) 2.00 Alaska:
Earth’s Frozen Kingdom (AD) 3.00 Coast (AD)
4.00 Locomotion: Dan Snow’s History of
Railways (AD) 5.00 The Nazis:
A Warning from History (AD)
6.00 Battleplan. Deception in warfare
7.00 Hunting Down the Nazis. Documentary
about Simon Wiesenthal (1/2) (AD)
8.00 Wartime Crime. New series. Documentary
about criminals in Britain during the Second
World War, beginning with the London gangster
William Charles Hill. See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 The Two Ronnies. Madeline Smith guests
10.00 The Two Ronnies. Vintage sketches
11.00 Men Behaving Badly. Tony regrets
joining Deborah’s keep-fit class
11.40 Men Behaving Badly.
The housemates have a sleepless night
12.15am Blackadder II (AD) 12.50 Diamond
Decades 1.50 Pointless 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.25 Air Chall’s Air
Lorg (Lost and Found) (r) 5.50 Am Prionnsa
Beag (The Little Prince) (r) 7.00 Eileanan
Fraoich: Scalpay (r) 7.30 Druthag na Hearadh
(A Little Drop of Harris) (r) 8.00 An Là (News)
8.15 Ceòl bho Perthshire Amber. Music and
song from Dougie MacLean (r) 8.30 Balaich a’
Bhiobaill (Bible Boys). Following new students
training for Ministry in the Free Church of
Scotland (r) 9.00 DIY le Donnie. Donnie
MacLeod fits a sink (r) 9.45 Torcuil’s Guide to
Being a Gael (r) 10.00 Sulaisgeir. The last guga
hunt for one of Ness’ men as they make their
annual trip to collect their harvest of seabirds
(r) 11.00 Fleasgaich an Iasgaich (King Fishers)
11.45 Fraochy Bay 11.50-12midnight Dhan
Uisge (River Douchary) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Dona Direidi (r) 6.15 Abadas (r)
6.30 Halibalw (r) 6.40 Syrcas Deithiol Dewi (r)
6.50 Bing (r) 7.00 Meic y Marchog (r) 7.10 Y
Diwrnod Mawr (r) 7.25 Ynys Broc Môr Lili (r)
7.35 Tipini 7.50 Peppa (r) 8.00 Octonots (r)
8.15 Byd Begw Bwt (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach
(r) 8.30 Tili a’i Ffrindiau (r) 8.45 Twt (r) 8.55
Nodi (r) 9.05 Sbridiri (r) 9.25 Pingu (r) 9.30
Bobi Jac (r) 9.45 Cei Bach (r) 10.00 Do Re Mi
Dona (r) 10.15 Abadas (r) 10.30 Halibalw (r)
10.40 Sam Tân (r) 10.50 Bing (r) 11.00 Meic
y Marchog (r) 11.15 Tipini (r) 11.30 Boj (r)
11.45 Y Crads Bach (r) 11.50 Igam Ogam (r)
12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 12.05pm Perthyn
(r) (AD) 12.30 Noson Lawen (r) 1.30 3 Lle (r)
2.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da
3.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 3.05 Boddi Dolwyn
(r) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Larfa (r) 5.05
Stwnsh: Chwarter Call 5.20 Stwnsh: Kung Fu
Panda (r) 5.45 Stwnsh: Dim Byd (r) 6.00 News
S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05 04 Wal. Aled Samuel looks
round Plas Penglais in Aberystwyth, temporary
home of Derec Llwyd Morgan, and views an
unusual terraced house in Cardiff (r) 6.30
Rownd a Rownd. It seems everyone is angry
with everyone else as news of Siân’s pregnancy
spreads. Erin pleads her father’s forgiveness,
and Philip struggles to get rid of his new friend
(AD) 7.00 Heno. Magazine , featuring stories
from all over Wales 7.30 Pobol y Cwm. Kelly
makes a big decision after seeing Ed. Siôn faces
leaving the village behind go on holiday (AD)
8.00 Iolo: Deifio yn y Barrier Reef. New series.
Iolo Williams examines the health of wildlife in
the waters of the Great Barrier Reef in
Australia. He begins by diving down to swim
with barracudas and green turtles 9.00 News 9
a’r Tywydd 9.30 Stand Yp. Swansea comedian
Dan Thomas regales the audience with family
stories and tales of unexpected connections
with the Free Wales Army. Recorded in Cardiff.
Last in the series 10.30-12.15am Tudur Owen
Steddfod Môn #Hunabedio. Tudur Owen and his
friends Manon Rogers and Dyl Mei are joined by
comedy guests and musical performers as they
present their Radio Cymru show to an audience
at the Anglesey National Eisteddfod 2017 (r)
14
Thursday January 4 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7540
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3224
5
6
7
26
6
12
8
Train Tracks No 298
4
2
13
4
18
6
1
23
B
4
8
20
25
6
2
6
12
18
8
26
16
19
8
5
14
14
11
10
22
22
19
24
17
6
2
22
5
3
4
2
5
4
16
9
8
16
2
8
19
3
D
10
13
9
3
O
9
11
18
3
15
11
22
8
10
13
21
4
4
13
8
6
2
24
4
24
2
16
8
10
4
14
11
8
17
8
10
10
8
17
19
18
19
7
23
14
16
11
4
8
1
22
23
8
16
14
10
15
2
8
24
6
3
14
A
8
11
6
1
11
22
23
22
14
24
Unconventional artist (8)
Speedy (4)
Ecstatic piece (8)
Nutrition (4)
Doctor (5)
Army rank (7)
Trivial criticism (6)
Short of money (4,2)
Solution to Crossword 7539
SMA SHUP
P
L
A S
RE B E L
AQ
Y A
L
L
ONEUPMA
I
C S
T RAG I C S
W
N A
I L L CONCE
N A G C
S U P R EMO
E U N R
T Y PO
DE
T
U
N
N
E
L
V
I
S
I
O
N
WH O A
I
C
A T I C
C E
SH I P
T
OP E S
R
V ED
S C
T A L Y
G S
S E S T
18 Fluctuation in pitch (7)
19 Clergyman (5)
21 Very; deep shaft (4)
22 Force per unit area (8)
23 Thoroughly cooked (4)
24 Slope (8)
10
15
4
Across
6
16
13
6
11
8
10
19
16
22
24
18
10
3
24
13
18
B
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
13
24
8
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
14
15
16
4
5
6
17
18
19
O
Down
1 Ingmar —, Swedish
director (7)
2 Valuable store (5)
3 Tune-playing container (7,3)
4 Take (someone) by force (6)
6 Decorated (7)
7 Flowing and ebbing (5)
10 Imprudent (3-7)
14 Mischievous sprite (7)
16 Faultless (7)
17 Intense fear (6)
18 Pulled along (5)
20 Give rise to (5)
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
D
B
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
B
A
U
L
H
H
T
R
N
E
Y
C
R
N
S
H
C
O
R
G
P
A
O
H
O
E
T
G
K
W
I
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
84901 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 4078
B
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
No 4077
I
U
Y
T
O
E
O
O
K
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
T
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4216
Futoshiki No 3079
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
<
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
<
∨
Kakuro No 2038
∧
∨
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
> 2
10
4
35
7
8
4
15
38
4
6
3
16
3
4
23
4 >
<
3
28
6
4
12
31
3
12
4
4
22
7
19
16
27
31
9
12
16
3
11
4
4
7
3
4
4
11
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
4
10
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
17
4
16
24
9
22
© PUZZLER MEDIA
5
1
5
8
9
11
12
13
15
11
© PUZZLER MEDIA
21
6
20
the times | Thursday January 4 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Garry Kasparov
Black: Anatoly Karpov
World Championship (Game 8),
London 1986
Queen’s Gambit Declined
1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Be7 4 cxd5
exd5 5 Bf4 Nf6 6 e3 0-0 7 Bd3 c5
8 Nf3 Nc6 9 0-0 Bg4 10 dxc5
Bxc5 11 h3 Bxf3 12 Qxf3 d4 13
Ne4 Be7 14 Rad1 Qa5
The attack on the queenside
pawns forms the basis of Black’s
counterplay.
15 Ng3
White removes a piece from
the centre but prepares an attack
on the kingside, in which the rook
at f1 will come in useful.
15 ... dxe3 16 fxe3 Qxa2
A highly practical decision and
one typical of Karpov. It is not
only a matter of the a2-pawn, but
the choice by Black of the shortest path to e6, where the queen
will cement the defence and control the important e5-point.
17 Nf5 Qe6 18 Bh6
A spectacular move, the main
point being 18 ... gxh6 19 Qg3+.
18 ... Ne8 19 Qh5 g6
A sensible decision. Black sacrifices the exchange but retains a
defensible position. He would have
lost after 19 ... Nf6 20 Qh4! Nd5 21
Nxe7+ Ndxe7 22 Bxg7.
21 Qg3
White’s striving to decide the
game by a direct attack on the
king diverts him from the correct
path. After 21 Nxe7+ Qxe7 22 Bxf8
Kxf8 23 Qf4, White should be able
to exploit his extra material.
21 ... Bf6 22 Bb5 Ng7 23 Bxg7
Bxg7 24 Rd6 Qb3 25 Nxg7 Qxb5
26 Nf5 Rad8
Karpov used nearly all of his
already little remaining time on
this move, leaving himself with
just one minute for the next 14
moves.
27 Rf6 Rd2 28 Qg5
A simple way to maintain the
balance was 28 b4 but Kasparov
was gambling on Karpov’s time
shortage.
28 ... Qxb2 29 Kh1 Kh8
Karpov blunders. 29 ... Rd7 kept
Black in the game.
30 Nd4
Cutting off the black queen
from the defence of the knight.
30 ... Rxd4 31 Qxe5 Black lost on
time
After 31 ... Rd2 White continues 32 Qe7 Rdd8 33 Rxf7 Rxf7 34
Rxf7 Kg8 and now the subtle 35
Kh2! leaves Black with no defence
to the plan of e4 and e5.
________
á D 1 4 4] Winning Move
àDbD gpi ]
ß D 0 DpD] White to play. This position is from
London 2017.
Þ0PD 0 Hn] Hector-Jackson,
It would appear that White is manoeuvring
Ý DPDPD D] slowly to exploit the weakness of the black
Ü$ DBG DP] a5-pawn. However, he strikes from a
Û D D DPD] different direction. Can you see how?
ÚD D !RDK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
I love unusual end-positions. Take Dealer: East, Vulnerability: Both
this one, kindly shown to me by
Advanced
♠ A 10 8 7 2
Alan Brown from Yately and Pairs
♥K J 10 9 6
Hawley Bridge Club in Hampshire.
♦
As declarer, you ruff West’s dia♣A 10 5
mond lead in dummy and cash the
♠3
♠J 9 5 4
N
king of hearts, expecting to make
♥8 7 5 3 W E ♥an overtrick (invaluable at Pairs).
♦Q 8 7 4
♦K J 9 6 5 3
S
♣K 8 7 6 ♠ KQ 6 ♣Q 9 4
However, East discards and now
Six is in danger.
♥AQ 4 2
You cash the jack of hearts,
♦A 10 2
cross to the queen and ruff your
♣J 3 2
other losing diamond with
S
W
N
E
dummy’s last heart. You cross to
2♦(1)
the king of spades and, in the fol2NT(2) 4♦(3)
6♦(4) Pass
lowing position, cash the ace of
6♥
End
hearts, discarding dummy’s five of
clubs. What can East throw?
(1) Weak Two, 5-10 points and a good six-
♠J 9 5
♥♦K J
♣Q 9
Clearly East cannot discard a
spade — then the whole suit runs.
If East discards his penultimate
diamond, you can cash the ace of
diamonds, discarding dummy’s ten
of clubs, then play queen of spades,
a spade to the ace and give up the
fourth spade. East wins his jack but
his last two cards are clubs. You
win dummy’s ace and enjoy the
fifth spade. Slam made.
East’s best discard is the nine of
clubs. You cash the queen of
spades, discovering the bad news,
and now need to utilise the ten
card diamond suit.
(2) 15-19 balanced with a diamond stopper.
(3) Raising pre-emptively to the (ten-card)
level of the diamond fit.
(4) Exotic (but effective) pick-a-major bid.
Contract: 6♥ , Opening Lead: ♦4
and jack of clubs. You’ve a perfect
count of East’s hand and know
you’ve squeezed him down to one
club, likely the queen or king given
his nine of clubs discard.
Leaving your ace of diamonds
stranded, at trick nine you cross to
the ace of clubs, felling East’s
queen. You then lead dummy’s ten
of clubs. It does West no good to
duck (it’s your 12th trick) but after
winning his king, he must lead a
club/diamond, giving you access
back to hand. The jack of clubs,
ace of diamonds and dummy’s ace
of spades score the last three tricks
— slam made.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
70%
OF IT
+ 9 ÷ 12
SQUARE 3/4
OF IT
IT
61 x 8 + 88 ÷ 4 + 58 x 3 + 96
MEDIUM
82 + 681 x 5 – 951
HARDER
3/4
OF IT
– 873
4/5
OF IT
–7
90%
OF IT
50%
OF IT
x 3 – 44
+ 778
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 697
3
Killer Gentle No 5801
11
10
13
11
16
7
8
17
13
6min
16
17
3
9
12
10
6
14
9
8
15
3
13
23
13
4
4
3
15
7
7
16
18
Killer Tough No 5802
21
11
21
17
25
24min
21
13
10
8
23
11
17
2
13
11
2 1 4
1 3 2
3
1 2
8 9 3
9 7 1
3 1
5
2 1 4
1 3 2
5
7
8 7
9 5
9
4
8 3
9 1
6
7
8
1
5
2
7
9
6
3
4
3
7
9
8
4
6
5
2
1
6
2
4
3
5
1
7
9
8
1
5
7
4
2
8
3
6
9
-
-
x
-
=4
=
4
=
4
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
2
7
3
6
4
9
5
1
8
4
6
8
5
1
2
3
9
7
1
9
5
3
7
8
4
6
2
9
2
7
8
5
6
1
3
4
Z
E
S
T
F
U
L
8 7 9
6 9 8
5
1 3
1 4 2
3 2 1
3 5
3
2 1 3
4 2 1
C
R
E
P
E
4
8
3
6
9
7
1
5
2
7
9
1
5
6
4
2
8
3
5
3
8
9
1
2
4
7
6
2
4
6
7
8
3
9
1
5
3
4
6
1
2
7
9
8
5
5
8
1
4
9
3
2
7
6
6
1
2
7
3
4
8
5
9
8
3
9
2
6
5
7
4
1
7
5
4
9
8
1
6
2
3
5
1
4
2
3
7
8
9
6
3
7
6
9
8
4
2
1
5
3
4 2 2
8
4
6 2
2
8
9
2
5
1
6
4
7
3
9
4
5
1
7
3
6
8
2
2
3
4
8
1
7
6
5
9
8
7
9
6
5
3
2
4
1
5
1
6
9
4
2
7
8
3
9
6
5
2
8
1
3
7
4
7
6
1
8
2
5
9
3
4
6
2
7
3
9
1
5
4
8
4
5
3
7
6
8
1
2
9
1
8
9
4
5
2
3
6
7
7
8
3
4
6
9
5
1
2
1
4
2
7
3
5
9
6
8
6
2
7
1
9
8
4
3
5
4
5
8
3
2
6
1
9
7
3
9
1
5
7
4
8
2
6
2
5
3
∨
2
2
1
4 < 5
∨
1
4
5
3 < 4
∨
∧
1
5
2
x
x
3
2
3
4
+
4
8
7
+
3
1
6
x
+
x
4
5
5
3
4
2
4
2
7
2
A
5
1
B
Suko 2125
1
9
4
5
6
8
2
7
3
3
2
5
7
1
4
6
9
8
8
6
7
3
9
2
1
5
4
7
4
1
8
3
9
5
6
2
6
8
9
2
7
5
4
3
1
5
3
2
1
4
6
7
8
9
4
7
8
6
2
3
9
1
5
2
1
3
9
5
7
8
4
6
9
5
6
4
8
1
3
2
7
B
H
O
B
S
S
T
M
A
C
L
S
H
O
2
x
x
S
C
O
K
R
L
9
Quiz 1 Jennifer Lopez 2 David Fincher 3 Blue
4 Penelope Lively 5 North American Free Trade
Agreement 6 Guanaco (Lama guanicoe)
7 George Weah 8 South Tyrol 9 Gulf Cartel
10 Kappa 11 Dsquared2 12 The Rat Pack
13 Archbasilica of St John Lateran 14 Rob Cross
15 James Doohan. He played Scotty
O
U
T
D
A
1
3 > 2
+
+
5
L
O
E
D
Lexica 4076
4
5
1
Lexica 4075
Set Square 2040
3
3
Sudoku 9569
2
3
8
6
4
9
7
5
1
1
5
1
BA S I C
A Q A
ABOUR S
Y
I
K
R ORB S
N
E
NAU S E A
R
V
S CR E T E
I
X
N
S U I NG
S
S
E
R I N T E D
Futoshiki 3078
KenKen 4215
7
Train Tracks 297
OO L OGY
R
X
E
P I C Y
L
E M
L
O L L OWE
R
D
E S I ON
K
N
F
O I L
D I
T
B
L
N T HRA L
L
A
I
J E C T
P
Killer 5800
4
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
=4
Sudoku 9568
9
6
2
1
3
5
8
4
7
21
8
-
=
2
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Codeword 3223
7
9
9 6
7 8
6
3
1 9
2 7
8
5
6
23
= 45 from 1-9 are
+
+
Kakuro 2037
20
21
All the digits
x
Solutions
Cell Blocks 3106
21
6
÷
15
19
14
11
4
x
7
Killer 5799
4
3
-
Sudoku 9567
11
4
+
Yesterday’s answers
adios, also, diol, dipso, disposal, dopa,
dosa, doss, dossal, idol, lasso, lido,
load, loss, oasis, opal, plod, polis,
psoas, silo, slop, soap, soda, soil, sola,
solid, spod, spoil
14
4 2
9
2
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 2041
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 15 words, average;
21, good; 25, very good; 30, excellent
12
3
5 6
Polygon
17
Bridge Andrew Robson
♠N
♥8
W E
♦Q 8
S
♣K 8 7 6 ♠ Q 6
♥A (led)
♦A
♣J 3 2
49 – 4 x 2
EASY
© PUZZLER MEDIA
One of the most exciting clashes
from the 1986 FIDE World Chess
Championship in London was the
following battle where Anatoly
Karpov’s time shortage prevented
him from being able to defend
accurately against Garry Kasparov’s kingside attack.
________
árD Dn4kD]
à0pD gpDp]
ß D DqDpG]
ÞD D hND ]
Ý D D DQD]
ÜD DB) DP]
Û ) D DPD]
ÚD DRDRI ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
2
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
20 Qg4 Ne5
Knife edge
♠ A 10 8 7
♥♦♣A 10 5
Cell Blocks No 3107
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
T
C
U
V
V
E
X
F
I
M
E
E
Y
Word watch
Socle (b) A plinth
Socman (a) A tenant
holding land by socage, in
return for services
Socko (c) Excellent or
brilliant (US slang)
Brain Trainer
Easy 18; Medium 1,009;
Harder 3,394
Chess 1 Rxf7+! plans 1 ...
Rxf7+ 2 Ne6+ forking king
and queen. Black tried 1 ...
Kg8 but after 2 Ne6 Qe8
3 Rxf8+ Bxf8 4 Nxf8 Qxf8
5 Rxa5 White won easily
04.01.18
MindGames
Mild No 9570
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
6 9 3
8
2
3 7
6
8
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Socle
a A small piece of
footwear
b A plinth
c A bruise
Socko
a Drunk
b Pow!
c Excellent
Answers on page 15
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
7
6
2
3
7
2 9 8
1
1 4 6
1
2 6
3
1
6 5 2
Super fiendish No 9572
1
8
9
7 5
1 6
7 4
6 9
5
4
Socman
a A tenant
b A superhero
c A fraternity member
Fiendish No 9571
7
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
3
6
9
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
12 Sergeants 3 (1962)
was the last film
to feature all five
members of which
group of entertainers?
15
6 The young of which
camelid, native to
South America, is
called a chulengo?
9 Los Zetas began
as the enforcement
arm of which
Mexican drug cartel?
7 Which former
footballer has been
elected president
of Liberia?
10 Which letter
comes between iota
and lambda in the
Greek alphabet?
8 Bolzano is the
capital of which
autonomous
province in Italy?
11 Identical twins,
Dean and Dan
Caten are the
Canadian founders
13 Since Henry IV,
France’s heads of state
have held the title
“honorary canon” of
which Rome basilica?
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 997
14 Which English
player has won the
2018 PDC world darts
championship on his
first attempt?
15 Which late Star
Trek actor is pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 998
1
2
3
4
5
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
13
15
16
17
20
18
21
22
23
24
S
P
E
L
L
B
I
N
D
I
N
G
F L OW E R
O U
R
I R A T E S
U
A
A
AM I N A T E
D
Z
O T T OM N
E
U
A
T I NO
A N
S
I
R I S H MA
O
E
A
E N E R A L I
I N E S
S
X
MOCH
E
R E
S
L
P
EWT O
E
P E N E
L
O
E S T R
S
E
S E D
S
T
A
N
D
I
N
G
R
O
O
M
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Howzat
6
19
Across
1 Hanging back as arranged,
partly (5)
8 Orchestra playing in one of
the shires? (9)
9 Rice that’s soft I praise
endlessly (5)
10 Women’s jumper is unusually
large one (7)
11 Ban Asti cocktail — don’t
drink! (7)
12 One doesn’t appreciate where
the ashes are left (7)
16 Developed new part for
European city (7)
17 Appearing in musical, perhaps
men only in first number (2,5)
20 Dog biting middle of leg —
Iodine needed (4,3)
22 Join military division close to
home (5)
23 Cross set in a church floor
covering (9)
24 Tube in street next to hospital
department (5)
1
4 9
3 5
6
Down
1 First-class letter from Athens
(5)
2 Big car not allowed in
launches (5,3)
3 Diving gear coming from
South Caribbean island (5)
4 Chocolate cake features
getting good marks (7,6)
5 Over an hour stuck in Channel
(7)
6 Support for parking (4)
7 Student left one receiving a
wage (7)
13 Mobile airbase housing very
rough (8)
14 High-ranking officer damages
Henry (7)
15 Locum work is attractive? Not
a second time (7)
18 Soccer club incentives (5)
19 European opening competition
(5)
21 Girl taken in by general
manager (4)
6
3 5
3
8
9
6 8
4
of which fashion
company?
5 Coming into force
in 1994, what does
the name of the
agreement Nafta
stand for?
4
6 2
7
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 Which US actress
has had UK No 1
singles with Love
Don’t Cost a Thing
and Get Right?
4 Who won the
1987 Booker Prize
for her novel
Moon Tiger?
5
5
REX
3 Azul is the
Spanish word for
which colour?
2 8
2
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
2 Who directed the
films The Game,
Fight Club and The
Social Network?
5 9
4
6
1
7
6
3 8
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
3 776 Кб
Теги
The Times, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа