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The Times Times 2 - 4 May 2018

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May 4 | 2018
Swanning about
Liam Scarlett on remaking
Swan Lake for the Royal Ballet
Liam Scarlett with
Lauren Cuthbertson,
who leads one of the
six Swan Lake casts
2
1G T
Friday May 4 2018 | the times
times2
Caitlin
Moran
Celebrity Watch
10
UP
Bob Dylan
As CW?s primary
understanding of the
world is ?bitch gotta
make rent?, it was not
surprised to note that
Bob Dylan, the 76-year-old Nobel
prizewinner, has joined the ?liquor
entrepreneur? Marc Bushala to create
the Heaven?s Door spirit range.
?Dylan has qualities that actually
work well for a whiskey,? Bushala said.
?He has great authenticity. He is
a quintessential American. I think
these are good attributes for a
super-premium whiskey as well.?
Resisting the urge to reply, ?Of
course you, Marc Bushala, liquor
entrepreneur, believe that. If you were
a sofa entrepreneur you would think
Dylan?s attributes of ?someone with
legs who likes to sit down regularly?
screamed out ?super-premium sofas?.?
Yet CW has to acknowledge that he
has a point. After all, Dylan ? like
whiskey ? is something you tend to
get into as you get older; and ? like
whiskey ? listening to his voice is
often something that people try for the
first time before pulling a face, wincing
and going: ?Man, that?s abrasive.?
On this basis CW thinks that the
co-branding works very well. It just
hopes that the labelling on the bottles
reminds everyone to drink responsibly
? or else consumers will be knock,
knock, knockin? on toilet?s door,
crying: ?Let me in! I?m doing a sick!?
9
UP
Alan Sugar
CW has long thought that one of the
biggest problems with the internet,
and especially social media, is that
there is no order. It?s just billions of
people screaming at each other
with no hierarchy that might
civilise the discourse. Put simply,
there are no tribal elders on
Twitter tempering the mad
energy of the younger folks.
CW hails, then, the recent
Twitter-work of the ageing
tiny millionaire Alan Sugar.
Retweeting a story from the
satirical website The Onion ?
which amusingly and fallaciously
claimed that Taylor Swift had a
swastika tattooed on her face ?
Sugar wrote: ?Eh? I don?t get this.
Can someone explain ? is she
making a statement, or what??
7
Of course, thousands of youths then
tweeted Sugar to explain to him the
nature of The Onion, the concept of
humour, the small likelihood of a pop
star getting a Nazi facial tattoo etc.
What CW enjoyed about this was
the establishing of Sugar as the
internet?s confused
grandpa ? someone
confident enough in
his seniority to go,
?Eh?? ? rather than:
a) start a furious
Twitter mob; b)
pretend he gets it; or c)
also get a Nazi tattoo,
and write about it
on his blog to get
clicks. Frankly,
the internet needs
more old men
going: ?Eh? I don?t
get this.? It?s
an important
social function.
8
UP
Eurovision
Song Contest
Odd news from the Eurovision Song
Contest, as its organisers release a list
of things that are banned at the event
on May 12. CW didn?t know anything
was banned from Eurovision ? except
perhaps Katie Price, below, who once
attempted to become the UK?s entry
with a song called Not Just Anybody,
to which Britain?s reply appeared to
be: ?Actually, just anybody else would
be better.?
As the list shows, though, Eurovision
has a pretty apocalyptic vision of the
kinds of things that people might be
toting since the banned items include:
animals, drugs, helmets, lasers, ropes,
crowbars, explosives, golf balls,
ladders, handcuffs and pyrotechnics.
Some of these seem so random that
CW can?t help but suspect that
their suppression stems from
specific incidents ? ?No golf
balls after the Austrian
Golf Ball Incident of
1999, guys,? and,
?Well I think we all
learnt
the hard way
l
about ladders and the
Swiss.? If the organisers
want to forgo the usual VTs
introducing each country ?
?Here comes the Dutch entry,
illustrated by footage of
sea-reclamation projects and
windmills!? ? and replace
them with documentaries on
the backstory to each of these
prohibitions, CW is very, very
ready to see them.
5
DOWN
Bella Hadid
UP
Prince Louis
CW has always been keen to
dispel the notion that models
are, how shall we put it, not
big in the brain area.
Pleasingly intellectually
uncomplex. A bit dim. After all,
they earn millions of pounds
walking up and down what is
basically a souped-up trestle
table. How dim is
that?
However, CW?s
beliefs were
shaken a little
by a quote
from the
supermodel
Bella Hadid
about her
sister,
Gigi. ?At
least
once a
day I
think
and
wonder
how I got
a sister
like you,?
she posted
to Gigi?s
Instagram
account.
Does Bella
really not know
this? Did no one
tell her about
when mummies
and daddies love
each other
very much?
As royal baby fever continues
unabated ? for which, CW believes,
use of royal baby Calpol is advised,
should the symptoms become severe
? it was revealed that the prince is an
economic force to be reckoned with.
?Prince William and Kate?s new baby
boy to bring � MILLION to UK
economy before first birthday,? the
Express headline screamed.
Having had two children, CW can
confirm that � million is what it
feels like you spend in that first year.
6
4
DOWN
The Rolling
Stones
Last week we learnt that the manager
of Momo restaurant in the Mayfair
area of London had been asked by
aides of the band to facilitate the
removal of parking bollards outside
the establishment because they ?don?t
want to have to walk down the street?.
This is the great thing about ageing
rock?n?roll superstars ? as they go
around making their ageing-superstar
demands, they incrementally improve
disabled access everywhere they go.
Admittedly most of this access is to
expensive places where young models
hang out, but, small steps! Very small,
shaky steps! While complaining about
how your knees are going! They are
Mild Horses! They don?t want to be
Tumbling Thrice! They need Mother?s
Little Helper (a ramp ? mother is 96)!
3
UP
The Rock
UP
Brigitte Macron
Dwayne ?The Rock? Johnson
has a new child ? CW isn?t
sure what the technical term is
for the offspring of The Rock.
Perhaps it?s The Pebble, or
The Heart-Warming Gravel.
Anyway, as is the modern
mode, The Rock announced
this happy event on his
Instagram page: ?Tiana Gia
Johnson came into this world
like a force of nature, and Mama
ma
@laurenhashianoffical laboured and
delivered like a true rock star.?
When CW thinks about it,
?delivering like a true rock
star? is how all women give
birth: surrounded by people
going, ?Are you OK??,
medicated off your chanks,
half-naked, effing and jeffing
and frequently dropping to your
knees and screaming like Robert
Plant doing Dazed & Confused.
And the delivery of the placenta
is, like, the encore. This analogy
works very well. Well done, The
Rock! You done good wording!
At a symbolic tree-planting last week,
the presidents of France and the US
back-filled the hole with the kind of
gusto usually associated with mobsters
burying an informant outside the city
limits, and Melania seemingly curtsied
at the tree. Perhaps she is a pagan who
worships birch. Or maybe she was
worried there was something thinner,
whiter and younger than her ? the
tree ? and that her husband would
grab it by the pussy willow.
No one seemed to notice
Brigitte
Macron in what is now
B
known
as the Conservative
k
Party
power stance, a pose that
P
would
lend itself to training
w
sun-loving
climbers ? perhaps
su
the
th clematis ?Nelly Moser?, and
a complementary rose, such as
?The
?T Generous Gardener?. Of
course,
she?d have to stay there
co
until
they died back, in late
u
September,
thus missing a
S
host
h of state dinners and
small
sm talk with Melania.
Frankly,
CW her, it would have
Frankly were
w
already started mulching its feet.
the times | Friday May 4 2018
3
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times2
2
UP
Helen
Mirren
This week Helen
Mirren revealed a
secret about her
success. ?I have a
listening face,? she
told Town & Country
magazine, ?where it
looks like I?m listening to
what a person is saying,
but actually I?m not even
hearing it.?
CW is intrigued that
Mirren separates her
?pretending to listen? face
UP
Kim Kardashian
For a while CW thought that the big
story this week was the sub-editor on
Hello! who had subversively used the
sub-headline ?Double Plus Good? on
an interview with the heiress
Nicky Hilton ? thus marking the
first recorded instance of George
Orwell?s Newspeak from
Nineteen Eighty-Four being
deployed in a frothy piece
on someone?s fabulous New
York apartment and, perhaps,
signalling the coded triggering for
the Uprising.
Then CW thought that the
biggest story might be the
news that Taylor Swift has
27 stalkers ? an emotional
nightmare for her, obviously,
but also, presumably, a logistical
nightmare for the stalkers. With
that number of obsessive weirdos
they must have a rota for hiding
in her bushes. And if you have
27 people following you, at
what point does that stop
being ?stalking? and just
turn into . . . a parade?
Ultimately, however,
CW feels that the biggest
story of the week was
the launch of Kim
Kardashian?s new
perfume, KKW Body.
The perfume is neither
here nor there; on
fragrantica.com, one
customer reviewed it
thus: ?It hasn?t choked me
or given me a headache.?
The kind of review that,
CW is sure, makes us all
want to rush out and buy
a flacon. No, the real USP
of KKW Body is that it?s
sold in a bottle modelled
on Kardashian?s famous body,
meaning, presumably, that
the atomiser pipe in the
bottle represents her
spinal column and the
spritz pump is a little
metal version of her
head, sneezing smells
on to us. Or perhaps
coughing. CW doesn?t
know quite which
bodily function
it is most intended to mimic.
Maybe vomiting? Mmmm, the
romance of perfume!
?Sculpture was my inspiration,?
Kardashian said of the design,
presumably because she didn?t want
to say the truth: ?I thought it would
be funny if millions of people were
pumping up smells stored in my bum
and spraying them on their wrists.
At $60 a pop.?
The design has caused controversy,
of course. Of course! First, it?s in the
shape of a woman?s body, and literally
everything to do with women?s bodies
is controversial; and, second,
?causing controversy? is exactly
what it was intended to do.
Piers Morgan, with the
reliability of an atomic clock,
tweeted,
?DESPERATE.COM?,
t
while others pointed out that the
design very closely resembles
that of the John Paul Gaultier
perfume from 1993. Many
seemed to think this made
Gaultier the creative and
moral victor, but CW can?t
see the inherent nobility in a
man modelling a perfume bottle
on an anonymous woman rather
than a woman modelling a
bottle on herself. CW always
believes that the
mathematical formula against
inequality is ?person who is
getting exploited = person
who is getting the money? and
proceeds to make all further
judgments from there.
Personally, CW loves the
idea of a perfume bottle
modelled on the female
body. The world is full
of phallic symbols ?
sports cars, the
Gherkin, the giant
spray-painted willy
on the A12 flyover
at Boreham ? and
it?s nice to see some
lovely, friendly muff
on the shelves in
Boots instead. And,
presumably, in
future, if Kardashian
does a handbagsized version, it
would be in the
shape of just one
bum-cheek, or a
single knocker,
which would
be an amazing
thing to wield
on the bus.
The hot list
What to do this weekend
Film
Tully
Charlize Theron, right, stars in a
courageous film that?s full of
genuine surprises, the greatest of
which is how it understands the
mind-dulling yet
soul-stirring ecstasy
of parenting.
On general release.
See review, page 7
Theatre
Nine Night
Natasha Gordon?s debut
play about a traditional
Jamaican funeral and wake is
hilarious and heartbreaking.
Spirits, and not just rum,
are present. Dorfman
Theatre, London SE1 (020 7452
3000), tonight and tomorrow
㏑OSE WYLIE/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND DAVID ZWIRNER, LONDON
1
from ?doing some actual
acting where I?m pretending
to listen?. Presumably her
?pretending to listen? face
is of a lower quality
than her ?actual
acting? face
because she?s not
being paid to
ignore someone
wanging on about
their ?vision?.
CW is glad that
she has kept her
business sense,
even here. There?s
no point in
pumping out the
Oscar-winning face
stuff for some muggle
asshole who wouldn?t
know his Strasberg
from his Stanislavski.
Rock on.
Exhibition
Rose Wylie: Lolita?s House
These huge paintings are
inspired by mass media ?
films, TV, newspaper photos
? anything that catches Rose
Wylie?s magpie eye. With their
energy, boldness and who-givesa-damn scale, they look like the
work of the brightest of young
things. She?s 84.
David Zwirner, London W1 (020
3538 3165), today and tomorrow
Pop
Manic Street Preachers
By staring their irrelevance
in the face with Resistance
is Futile, the Welsh stadium
rockers, led by James Dean
Bradfield, left, have made
Opera
4.48 Psychosis
Philip Venables won a British
composer award for his
adaptation of Sarah Kane?s
last and bleakest play ?
quite deserved, because he
their best album in years.
SSE Arena Wembley, London
HA9 (0844 8244824),
tonight; Motorpoint
Arena, Cardiff (029 2022
4488), tomorrow
makes Kane?s rage and
despair musically eloquent
and emotionally fulfilling.
Lyric Hammersmith,
London W6 (020 8741
6850), tonight
Dance
Breakin? Convention
Jonzi D hosts the 2018 edition of
a three-day event celebrating
hip-hop culture. Dance crews
from all over the world keep
the joint jumping throughout
the bank holiday weekend.
Sadler?s Wells, London
EC1 (020 7863 8000),
tomorrow, Sun
Comedy
Count Arthur Strong
is Alive and Unplugged
Steve Delaney takes his
dyspeptic, dilapidated old thesp
out on tour again to talk us
through the highlights of his
(fictional) television career.
Touring to June 24.
City Varieties, Leeds (0113
243 0808), tonight; Palace,
Southend (01702 351135),
tomorrow; Theatre
Royal, Brighton (0844
8717615), Sun
In Saturday Review tomorrow
Rake, rascal, addict: how Patrick
Melrose was adapted for the screen
Saturday May 5 2018
7-DAY
TV & RADIO
GUIDE
page 23
Dorothy Bohm
My escape from the
Nazis ? and why it
inspired my art
Rake, rascal, addict
How Patrick Melrose was
adapted for the screen
Benedict
Cumberbatch
as Patrick
Melrose in
the new Sky
Atlantic
series
art books theatre film music
television what?s on puzzles
4
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Friday May 4 2018 | the times
cover story
It?s a fairytale
come true for
the man who
is recreating
Swan Lake
Liam Scarlett tells Debra Craine what to expect of the
Royal Ballet?s first new take on the classic for 30 years
S
I?m a
ballet
geek.
I find
those old
big ballets
fascinating
wan Lake may be the
world?s favourite ballet, but
it had a difficult birth. Its
premiere in Moscow in
1877 (choreographed by
Reisinger, one of history?s
also-rans) was deemed a
failure and Tchaikovsky
didn?t live long enough to see his ballet
given the reverence it was due. That
only came in 1895 with the definitive
St Petersburg staging by Petipa and
Ivanov. By the end of the 20th century
there was scarcely a ballet company in
the world that didn?t have a Swan Lake
in its repertoire.
And then there were the rebels who
put their own spin on the classic. Mats
Ek gave the prince an Oedipal
complex; John Neumeier recast him as
the mad king Ludwig of Bavaria;
Christopher Gable turned Von
Rothbart into a fascist dictator; and
Matthew Bourne gave the corps de
ballet of swans a cheeky sex change.
Of one thing you can be sure: Liam
Scarlett, in his new production of
Swan Lake for the Royal Ballet, won?t
be messing around with tradition.
Why would he? Covent Garden?s
32-year-old artist in residence is
the first to admit that ?I?m the
biggest ballet geek. I find those old big
ballets fascinating and I?m certainly
not tempted to knock classical ballet
off its perch.?
Still, when it was announced that
the Royal?s feathery blockbuster was
being entrusted to Scarlett, eyebrows
were raised. It wasn?t his talent that
was in question, it was his artistic
unpredictability. He exploded on the
scene in 2010, when, still a junior
dancer, he created Asphodel Meadows,
a beautiful one-act work that
proclaimed his classical credentials.
Yet he went on to wrong-foot
audiences with dark and disturbing
works such as Sweet Violets (2012), a
gothic sex-and-death thriller about a
Jack the Ripper serial killer, and
Hansel and Gretel (2013), reimagined
as a grotesque paedophile nightmare.
But hey, he says, it?s only
make-believe. ?I was just trying
to tell a good story. You don?t have
to worry about me.?
It?s easy talking to Scarlett ? he?s
smart and instantly likeable. Despite
his frantic rehearsal schedule, he?s
calm and collected when we meet at
the Royal Opera House one morning.
With his hipster beard and Buddy
Holly glasses, he?s incredibly stylish,
not something you can say about
most British choreographers. His
Swan Lake, which has its premiere
on May 17 (with designs by John
Macfarlane), is the first new one at
Covent Garden in 30 years. It
replaces the 1987 version by Anthony
Dowell that was laid to rest three
years ago by Kevin O?Hare, the
director of the Royal Ballet.
The company has been dancing
Swan Lake, in one form or
another, since the 1930s,
notching up more than 1,000
performances at the Royal
Opera House. It?s
popularity
never
p
seems to pall.
What is the allure of this
ll W
supernatural love story? Is it the
sumptuous display of classical ballet at
its most commanding and poetic? Or
the drama of Tchaikovsky?s thrilling
symphonic score?
Scarlett, who was born in Ipswich,
was nine when he first saw Swan
Lake at Covent Garden and that
sealed the deal for him. ?It was with
Leanne Benjamin; I was completely
spellbound.? Fast-forward 23 years
and, after training at the Royal Ballet
School and dancing with the Royal
Ballet (he joined the corps in 2005 and
reached the level of first artist), here
he is in charge of the ballet. No one is
more astounded than him. ?It?s a huge
responsibility and I think it will be the
biggest thing in my career, but also the
most exciting thing too. I was
gobsmacked when Kevin asked me to
do it and incredibly honoured.?
O?Hare has a habit of surprising the
young choreographer. In 2012, just
weeks after Scarlett, 26 at the time,
resigned as a dancer, the director
appointed him artist in residence of
the Royal Ballet. So Scarlett joined a
Covent Garden team that included
resident choreographer Wayne
McGregor and artistic associate
Christopher Wheeldon. Since then he
has produced a string of work for the
Royal, as well as pieces for English
National Ballet, San Francisco Ballet,
New York City Ballet, American Ballet
Theatre and the national companies of
the times | Friday May 4 2018
5
1G T
cover story
COVER: CHRIS MCANDREW FOR THE TIMES. BELOW: MARILYN KINGWILL; JOHN MACFARLANE; BILL COOPER
Vadim Muntagirov
and Marianela Nu馿z.
Left: Liam Scarlett
Norway, New Zealand and Denmark.
In 2016, with Frankenstein, he created
his first full-length work for the ROH
main stage, while last year, with
Symphonic Dances, he gave the retiring
ballerina Zenaida Yanowsky a
captivating leaving present.
His Swan Lake began in London?s
royal parks, where he spent hours
watching the swans on the Round
Pond in Kensington Gardens or in
St James?s Park. ?I would usually stop
by on the way home from work,?
Scarlett says. ?I prefer to walk back
from Covent Garden as it gives me
time to get out of the hustle and bustle
of the city, weaving my way through
the greener side of London.
?I have always seen swans as
incredibly majestic creatures. Their
monochromatic elegance gives them a
sense of assured nobility, yet simplicity
at the same time. They are beautiful
birds who seem to be effortlessly
gliding above the water, but below the
surface their legs are working
powerfully. I like the idea that beneath
the grace on top there is power below.?
He could, of course, be describing any
ballerina dancing Odette, the iconic
white tutued swan queen whose
serenely lyrical choreography belies
the lower body strength required to
perform it.
Tutus are key to Swan Lake, and
one of the complaints about Dowell?s
finely crafted production (with its
much-admired authentic text) was
the designer Yolanda Sonnabend?s
decision to dress the corps de ballet of
swans in hideous feathered skirts, thus
masking the lines of Ivanov?s lustrous
choreography. Now, happily, in
Macfarlane?s romantic makeover the
traditional tutus are back ? the Opera
House costume department is busy
making 86 of them.
How will Scarlett put his stamp
on Swan Lake? The choreography, he
says, will embrace the Petipa and
Ivanov standard, while also paying
homage to it. ?The intricacy of
Petipa?s steps, for example, they are
ridiculously hard and so inventive
in the way they use the classical
technique. Classical ballet is incredibly
difficult to choreograph without
making it look like classroom steps,
but I?m revelling in the challenge.?
He has rechoreographed the
national dances (although he has left
Ashton?s Neapolitan Dance alone) and
the waltz, but all very much in the
style of Petipa. ?I?ve been taking
classes in Polish, Hungarian and
Spanish dances to get them back into
my body. I want them to feel
authentic.? And he?s restructuring and
reimagining Act IV, where he has
reintroduced sections of the score that
were cut in Dowell?s production.
?Tchaikovsky builds up suspense with
his music and as soon as you cut a few
bars it?s like taking out the middle of a
sentence ? it doesn?t punctuate well.
?It?s my favourite score in terms of
balletic composition, an absolute
masterpiece that never fails to move
me. With this, his first ballet,
Tchaikovsky turned the Minkus
stereotypical ballet on its head and
everyone said that it was impossible
to dance to. Yet it?s perfection, and
even more relevant today than some
of the contemporary composers we
are using.?
Scarlett is trying to make
sense of the evil magician Rothbart,
hbart,
who orchestrates the action
(?why did he change Princess
Odette into a swan in the first
place??), and asking why the
mortal Siegfried is searching
for a love that is immortal.
?The king has just died,
the queen is in severe
mourning and the prince
has just lost a parent.
?Our perception of the
ballet is through Siegfried?s
eyes, but you have to make
sure there is a substantial
emotional value to his
character. I?m trying to find
those deeper meanings.? With
two dozen performances in
May and June, and a live
cinema broadcast on June 12
(when Marianela Nu馿z and
Vadim Muntagirov are scheduled
led
to head the cast), Scarlett will be
hoping that his Swan Lake will prove
itself as durable as its predecessor.
ssor.
Meanwhile, next season he will
ll
be showcased again when the
company revives two of his most
significant works: Asphodel
Meadows and Frankenstein.
The haunting and sophisticated
Asphodel Meadows (music, Poulenc)
was rapturously received, won a
Critics? Circle National Dance award
and put Scarlett on the choreographic
map. Six years later the sprawling
and hugely ambitious Frankenstein
faced a more critical reception. ?I?m
pleased Asphodel Meadows is coming
back, but it?s like opening up a journal
from years ago and saying, ?My God,
what was I thinking.? I created
Asphodel because I wanted people ?
critics, audiences ? to know what
I could do, but that doesn?t mean it
was what I wanted to do. Still the
piece will always hold a special place
in my heart.?
The Royal Ballet in
Swan Lake in 2015.
Below: one of the
costume sketches for
the new production
I think it
will be the
biggest
thing in
my career
With Frankenstein, a co-production
with San Francisco Ballet, Scarlett
admits that he was on a learning
curve. ?I was immensely proud of it
and the audience reaction was
positive, which means something.
Here?s a chance for me to work on it,
it?s clear to me what doesn?t work ?
blinkered by my own ego.
II?m
m not bl
staged it in San Francisco I
When I st
quite a lot. Musically, things
changed q
cut and the story was finessed.?
were cu
Like Wheeldon and McGregor,
Scarlett is in demand around the
Scarl
world. As if his commitment to
worl
the Royal Ballet wasn?t enough,
he has an affiliation with
Queensland Ballet in Australia,
Q
where he is contracted to
w
make one work a year. His
m
next big project, however,
n
marks a real departure. He?s
m
choreographing the dance
ch
sequences in The Nutcracker
se
and the Four Realms, Disney?s
an
live-action film based on ETA
liv
Hoffmann?s tale The Nutcracker
Ho
and the Mouse King and
Tchaikovsky?s ballet. The film,
Tcha
directed by Lasse Hallstr鰉, stars
direc
Mackenzie
Foy, Keira Knightley,
M
acke
Helen
Mirren, and Morgan Freeman
H
elen M
Drosselmeyer. Scarlett is working
as Drosse
dancers Sergei Polunin and
with the d
Copeland, a star at American
Misty Cop
Ballet.
Theatre B
film, shot at Pinewood Studios,
The film
will be released in November. Scarlett
says: ?Although I spent seven months
on the choreography and the
movement direction, we are now
doing some reshoots and a separate
dance piece for the end credits. It?s a
live-action movie, but with quite a lot
of dance, including a ballroom scene
and a big set piece.?
Be it on stage or film, the profession
of choreography, Scarlett says, ?is
fiendishly hard. There are moments
of ecstasy, moments of exhilaration
and wonder, and moments of
self-doubt, apprehension and
vulnerability. You need to have
a certain amount of insanity, a
certain amount of naivety and a
little talent every now and again.?
Swan Lake opens at the
Royal Opera House, London WC2
(020 7304 4000), on May 17
6
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Friday May 4 2018 | the times
Richard Morrison the arts column
Britain?s footpaths are a 140,000-mile national glory ? use them
I
t?s only May, but I suspect I?ve
just read the most inspirational
book of this year. And I?ve
read it in a day too ? which
is about how long it took for
its author?s life to be turned
upside down, twice.
She is Raynor Winn, and
her book, The Salt Path (Penguin),
opens in 2013 with this double
catastrophe. First an ill-advised
business investment by her and her
husband, Moth, leads to bailiffs seizing
their farm and possessions. The very
next day Moth?s mysterious illness is
diagnosed as a terminal brain disease.
The doctor can do nothing except to
tell him to take it easy.
Moth and Raynor do the opposite.
Living on � a week, and packing all
their worldly goods into two
rucksacks, these two shattered
fiftysomethings embark on one of
Britain?s greatest walks: the 630-mile
South West Coast Path. They climb
the equivalent of Mount Everest four
times. They live rough, drinking from
streams, eking out fudge to feed
themselves for days at a time and
pitching their tent on heaths and
headlands, beaches and car parks. The
book recounts all of this and the rich
array of characters they meet as they
painfully inch down the rugged north
coasts of Somerset, Devon and
Cornwall to Land?s End, then
eastwards along the south coast.
In some ways The Salt Path reads
like the ultimate drop-out odyssey,
except that this journey isn?t a life
choice. The book?s most powerful
passages come when the author
describes how people they encounter
on the path react when they discover
that the couple are actually destitute,
not just middle-class people living the
hippy dream. There are small acts of
charity, but also quite large gestures
of callousness and even hostility.
What the book chiefly conveys,
however, is the human capacity for
endurance ? and the regenerative
power of nature. Moth does survive,
and grows stronger. The indomitable
couple finish their epic walk a year
after starting it. And fate finally smiles.
A kindly stranger offers them a new
home in Cornwall.
For me, though, The Salt Path also
serves as a reminder that Britain is a
land criss-crossed by footpaths and
that we take this 140,000-mile
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
national glory for granted at our peril.
The South West Coast Path will
always be well trodden and well
maintained ? local politicians know
that it is vital to the region?s tourist
economy. Elsewhere, however, many
hard-pressed local authorities are
cutting footpath budgets. Although
volunteer groups do their best,
thousands of miles of ancient byways
could disappear for ever under
weeds and bushes.
The irony is that this crisis comes as
central government tries to assemble
To really discover
the countryside,
amble through
it at 2mph
The Lizard
Peninsula
in Cornwall
A piano loud enough for Ludwig
An imminent
anniversary reminds
us of a rather esoteric
reason for being proud
to be British. It was
our craftsmanship that
inspired Beethoven?s
magnificent final three
piano sonatas.
The English
piano-maker Thomas
Broadwood met the
composer in 1817 and
realised that if the
increasingly deaf
Beethoven were to
hear himself tickling
the ivories again, he
needed an instrument
far sturdier and louder
than those of Viennese
manufacturers.
So Broadwood built
such an instrument
and had it transported
to Beethoven ? a
seven-month journey
to Trieste, then horse
and cart over the Alps
to Vienna. Beethoven
received it 200 years
ago this month.
The bicentenary will
be marked by lectures
and recitals in
London, Vienna and
Beethoven?s birthplace
in Bonn (for details
see broadwoods.com),
but if you want to see
EXC LU S IVE
R E WA R D S F O R
SUBSCRIBERS
the instrument you
will have to go to the
Hungarian National
Museum in Budapest.
Franz Liszt got it after
Beethoven?s death and
then donated it to his
government.
Of course, as the
most famous musical
instrument made in
Britain, it should be in
the V&A. Unless we
repatriate practically
the entire contents of
the British Museum,
however, we are
hardly in a position to
demand the return of
our grandest piano.
a comprehensive, legally binding
register of footpaths, a vast, complex
undertaking supposed to be completed
by 2025, having been started in 2000.
Yet if hundreds of paths become so
overgrown as to be impassable, the
register becomes pointless.
That?s a possibility. Three years
ago the Ramblers (formerly the
Ramblers Association) set up their
Big Pathwatch, an app on which
walkers could report problems with
footpaths. Last year 3,704 were
reported as being unusable and a
further 4,618 deemed in poor repair.
Local authorities aren?t the only
culprits. Many public footpaths run
across private land, especially
farmland. Some farmers are model
stewards; others neglectful or
downright obstructive. The Ramblers
are lobbying government to ensure
that the big post-Brexit agriculture
bill going through parliament this
summer compels farmers to maintain
paths or lose subsidy. That seems a
good way forward.
Just as important, however, is
spreading the word about the visual
delights and health benefits of
walking. If you really want to discover
the countryside, amble through it at
2mph. The Salt Path has reminded me
to scrape last year?s mud from my
walking boots and get rambling again.
I hope it has the same impact on
millions of others.
Having become a
?new? father again,
29 years after the
last time, I?m still
reeling from
discovering how
much baby-rearing
has changed since
the 1980s. Back
then we taught our
tiny tots nursery
rhymes by crooning
the ditties ourselves.
Now Netflix is full
of lavishly animated
cartoon versions,
sung by someone
who actually
has a voice.
Wonderful,
except that the
cartoons are made
by Americans. I
could just about
accept London
Bridge is Falling
Down being
illustrated by an
animated drama
played out entirely
on Westminster
Bridge, if it didn?t
climax in the
aforesaid bridge
being saved
(in a hitherto
unknown final
verse) by a caped
flying hog called
Superhero Pig.
If I wanted
my new daughter
to believe that
pigs could fly,
I would have
taken her down
to Paddy Power
to watch Daddy
putting ten quid on
England winning
the World Cup.
An evening at Grange Park
Opera: Oklahoma!
Join us for a VIP evening at Grange Park Opera in Surrey on Friday, June 29 for
a performance of Oklahoma! with the BBC Concert Orchestra. Enjoy a welcome
introduction, champagne, a three-course dinner and the opportunity to meet the
cast the end of the performance.
Book tickets today at mytimesplus.co.uk
Image: Richard Lewisohn. This Times+ event is open to UK subscribers only. For full terms and conditions, visit mytimesplus.co.uk
Pig over
troubled
water
the times | Friday May 4 2018
7
1G T
THE
CRITICS
Ed Potton
is charmed by a bunch of dames p10
Will Hodgkinson
is happily on the Rebound p11
Dominic Maxwell
marvels at a gender-bending Othello p13
I don?t know how she?s done it (but she has)
words, there will be no scene here,
set in a Manhattan boardroom,
where Marlo has a comedy attack of
nits because, you know, having kids
can be so wacky (see Sarah Jessica
Parker in 2011?s execrable I Don?t Know
How She Does It for that winner).
At her lowest ebb and still in
the first act, Marlo is seemingly
saved by the arrival of a night
nanny. Her name is Tully (Mackenzie
Davis, otherworldly) and she is
an indispensable accessory for
upper-class New Yorkers. She is
hired by Marlo?s rich brother, Craig
(Mark Duplass), to provide his
middle-income sister with the
baseline simplicity of a comfortable
night?s sleep.
Tully helps Marlo feed in the small
hours. She changes Mia?s nappies and
soothes her to sleep. She also cleans
the house, bakes cupcakes and slowly
fans into life the dying embers of
Marlo?s spirit. And that?s just for
starters (girlie nights at home, boozy
evenings in bars and Marlo?s faded
sex life are all on the menu).
The film is funny and witty, as you
would expect from Cody. There?s
none of Juno?s Joycean wordplay, but
instead Marlo?s forthright cynicism
is expressed in acerbic one-liners.
She calls her pregnancy bump ?my
own personal hug buffer? and later
dismisses Tully?s earnest observations
about microscopic cell life with:
?You?re like a book of fun facts for
unpopular fourth graders.?
Theron plays the role with 50 extra
pounds in weight (?Mommy, what?s
wrong with your body?? asks elder
daughter Sarah, played by Lia
Frankland, when Marlo removes her
spill-sodden T-shirt) and the kind of
restless bravado that is fast becoming
her screen trademark. She also,
however, does empathetic self-doubt
and fragility, which is vital for Marlo
and for a film that lives almost
entirely in Marlo?s head.
Reitman has some directorial fun
too, with eerie underwater dream
sequences and a breathtaking
musical montage that captures,
with stunning clarity, the brutalising
routine of early days baby-care
(nappies, wipes, feeding, rocking,
bed, feeding, rocking, bed, nappies,
wipes, feeding, rocking, bed,
nappies, wipes, feeding etc).
However, really this is Cody?s film.
It?s a writer?s film. It layers itself with
structural nods that look forwards,
then reflect cleverly backwards, even
as the film progresses, with apparent
clarity, through its New Age New
York Mary Poppins template. The
underwater dreams are initially simple
mood setters that nudge us towards
womb-life and amniotic fluid. Yet
slowly they acquire an ominous
narrative significance of their own.
To say more would be to say too
much about a film that?s full of
surprises, the greatest being how it
understands, absorbs and expresses
the mind-dulling, soul-stirring
ecstasy of parenting.
just because its cache of Rat Pack cool
remains intact ? Frank Sinatra, Dean
Martin, Sammy Davis Jr et al drink,
smoke and strut their way through a
Vegas-set plot about multiple casino
robberies on New Year?s Eve.
Instead the intrigue is in the details
that initially passed you by. The men,
for instance, are all army veterans.
They address each other by rank and
their booze-fuelled camaraderie
seems to be an expression of their
status as frustrated, unemployable,
battle-hardened soldiers (?Why waste
all those little tricks the army taught
us,? sneers Sinatra?s Danny Ocean).
The mother-fixation of Peter
Lawford?s Jimmy Foster is also
fascinating (he calls her for cash and
moral support). Yet the biggest
surprise of all is the orange mohair
jumper that Sinatra wears in his
opening scene. It?s a showstopper.
Kevin Maher
Ocean?s 11 is released on Blu-ray
on Monday
the big film
Charlize Theron
is at her brilliant
best in this funny,
courageous film,
says Kevin Maher
T
he screenwriter
Diablo Cody made a
big splash in 2007 with
the coming-of-age
comedy Juno. The film,
Cody?s first attempt
at a screenplay after
a nascent career as
a blogger and journalist, was about
puppy love and teenage pregnancy. It
had a light meandering tone and an
eclectic tap-along soundtrack (the
Kinks, Sonic Youth, Mott the Hoople),
but was mostly defined by a rhythmic
approach to dialogue that was, at
times, almost Joycean, such as:
?That?s one doodle that can?t be
undid home skillet.? Nope. Me
neither. But isn?t it great?
Cody, real name Brook BuseyMaurio, won an Oscar, rightly, for
Juno. In the time since then she has
written, among other things, a horror
film (Jennifer?s Body), a TV series
(United States of Tara), a brilliant
thirtysomething social satire
(Young Adult) and a slightly
mushy musical melodrama (Ricki
and the Flash).
More importantly, she has become a
mother to three children. And it is this
experience, particularly the birth of
her third child (?I was not prepared
for the exhaustion this time,? she said
recently. ?It hit me like a garbage
truck?) that informs her latest work,
the quasi-autobiographical Tully, a
complex and courageous film that
rewrites the traditional rules for
motherhood at the movies.
Tully features an unforgettable
scene, mere moments after the birth
of baby No 3 for the careworn mother,
classic
film
of the
week
Charlize Theron as Marlo, whose life after baby No 3 is seemingly saved by Tully, a night nanny
Tully
15, 96min
{{{{{
English graduate and truly heroic
protagonist Marlo (Charlize Theron,
never better). We?re in the delivery
room, baby Mia is safely swaddled,
hospital staff shuffle to
and fro, her husband, Drew (Ron
Livingston), dotes, then the roaming
camera of the director and regular
Cody collaborator Jason Reitman
(he did Juno and Young Adult) fixes
on the sweaty postpartum face of
Marlo. And she is empty. The eyes
are dead. The soul is hollow.
It?s chilling and brilliant and
beautiful and sad and funny and
truthful and everything that marks
this out as statement cinema of the
most empowering kind. In other
Ocean?s 11 (1960)
PG, 127min
{{{{(
A
s we prepare for
the latest big
screen Ocean?s
instalment (next
month?s Ocean?s 8
aka Ocean?s 115) it?s fascinating
to return to the eminently
entertaining original. And not
8
1G T
Friday May 4 2018 | the times
film reviews
The incredible
journey of a boy
and his horse
Andrew Haigh?s emotional Homeric
epic is a masterpiece, says Kevin Maher
Lean on Pete
15, 122min
{{{{{
I
s Andrew Haigh the most exciting
new voice in British movies?
Probably. Andrea Arnold
(American Honey) and Lynne
Ramsay (We Need to Talk About
Kevin) would certainly give him
a run for his money. All three emerged
with startling, home-grown efforts
(Haigh made Weekend and the
Oscar-nominated 45 Years). And all
three have graduated to provocative
American-set fables that have tested
the limits of genre film-making
(Ramsay?s You Were Never Really Here
was a revenge movie as hallucinogenic
fever dream). Except that Haigh?s new
film has the substance and emotional
heft to be considered a masterpiece.
Lean on Pete features wide American
vistas, an ambitious Homeric journey
and a hugely sympathetic
The Strangers:
Prey at Night
15, 85min
(((((
Yeah, pray at night that you don?t ever
have to sit through this utter drivel,
because it will be the longest 85
minutes of your life. A horror movie in
aspiration only, it?s a four-person
slaughter flick ?based on true events?
(in the same way that Star Wars is
based on, you know, space) that
follows a super-bland middleAmerican family as they take a roadtrip detour into a deserted decrepit
holiday park in the middle of nowhere.
Unfortunately for the family (led by
mum Christina Hendricks, sadly eons
away from the security of Mad Men),
the holiday park also contains three
mask-wearing serial killers and a dry
ice machine. Which means that
everyone?s going to get stabbed, sliced,
impaled and gutted until finally one of
the serial killers is asked: ?Why are you
doing this?? To which the reply comes:
?Why not?? No tension, no drama, no
scares, no emotional involvement and
no motive. No chance.
The Times Film Show
Watch Kevin Maher and
Ed Potton discuss Tully
thetimes.co.uk/arts
performance from the 18-year-old
newcomer Charlie Plummer.
He plays Charley Thompson, a
poverty-row scamp who has moved
to a plywood bungalow in Portland,
Oregon, with his beer-drinking,
womanising, but essentially caring
father, Ray (Travis Fimmel). One of
the many joys in the movie is its
refusal to entertain character clich閟.
The boozing, bruising and penniless
single dad Ray is no threat to Charley.
Instead they share breakfast banter
during which the overwhelming
love between them, shown only in
glances and sweetly stolen smiles,
is almost indecent to behold.
However, a savage midnight brawl
sends Ray to hospital and forces
Charley out on to a breadwinning
odyssey that begins at the local
racetrack. There he meets
cantankerous
trainer Del
(Steve Buscemi,
introduced
in true Buscemi style with the words:
?You motherf***ing c***-sucking
f***!?) and, more importantly, the
eponymous racehorse. Lean on Pete is
on his last legs and due to be turned
into mincemeat in Mexico, but as the
film progresses he becomes everything
for Charley ? a substitute father, the
confidant he never had and the
inspiration for a reckless and dangerous
thousand-mile road trip to Laramie,
Wyoming, to the home and security of
his beloved Aunt Mary (Alison Elliott).
Chlo� Sevigny and
Charlie Plummer
I Feel Pretty
New Town Utopia
12A, 110min
15, 81min
{{(((
Yikes, this is messy. An
interesting comedy premise,
about the superficiality of
contemporary metropolitan life,
is turned on its head by some
shaky plotting and even shakier
directorial choices.
The vivacious, whip-smart
Amy Schumer is dowdy web
manager Renee, a woman so
ugly that babies cry the
moment they see her
(Seriously? ?The? Amy
Schumer?). Her best
friend is the grossly
plain Jane, played by
the profoundly gorgeous
Busy Philipps (yes, but we just
have to imagine that she?s ugly
because nobody really wants to
see that, right?).
Renee suffers a magical
movie concussion during a
keep-fit class, which means that
she subsequently thinks that she
is gorgeous when in fact she
looks like Amy Schumer! Ah.
Ha. Ha. Admittedly, Schumer
is too smart to waste all this, and
indeed delivers some nice routines
with whistling builders and beach
bikini contests. Yet too often the
jokes fall flat or curdle into the
mean-spirited fat-bashing that lives
just around the edges of a comedy that
wants to be a Working Girl for the
modern era, but is really just a
Shallow Hal reboot.
Amy Schumer in I Feel Pretty
{{{{(
Consistently fascinating, timely and
only slightly repetitive, this
comprehensive documentary about
postwar town planning unfolds like a
warning from history for a Brexit-era
audience about the pitfalls of sweeping
social and economic changes.
Taking Basildon in Essex as his test
case, the director Christopher Ian
Smith assembles a wealth of personal
testimonies from residents, artists and
poets, who explain the darker reality
of the new-town story: how the
Modern Life is Rubbish
15, 101min
{((((
This meandering and
aggressively slight
rom-com features two
London-based lovers,
Natalie (Freya Mavor,
right) and Liam (Josh
Whitehouse), who
are initially bound by
their love of Britpop.
Which is lucky
because there?s preciouss
little else to explain what
at
exactly is keeping thesee two
nitwits together.
Liam is a nightmare and a work-shy,
mansplaining bore who plays lead
guitar in a Blur-lite band and hates
?corporate whores? and ?people who
can?t create? and likes hanging out in
record shops and haranguing
So, yes, it?s like Disney?s The
Incredible Journey, but with a horse
instead of two dogs and a cat, and a
brief appearance by a jockey played
by Chlo� Sevigny.
And with poverty as a theme
(Charley is frequently hungry). And,
crucially, with a British film-maker?s
unsentimental ability to look directly
at the underbelly of the American
economic project and still produce a
final act that?s hopeful, soothing and
delivered with emotional power.
modernist architecture created
alleyways and hiding places for
criminals and drug dealers, and how
the attempts to forcibly create a
community only left residents feeling
more alienated than before.
Fun is had, briefly, from accounts of
the early-Eighties electro-pop music
scene and the emergence of local boys
Depeche Mode. But mostly this is
powerful material regularly overlaid
with the voice of the actor Jim
Broadbent, quoting from the speeches
of Lewis Silkin, the minister of town
and country planning from 1945 to
1950, promising us the creation of ?a
new type of citizen? and ?a social
utopia.? As if.
uninterested women about the
difference between CDs and vinyl.
Natalie, meanwhile, is a woman and
thus soon becomes obsessively
focused on settling down, getting
married aand having babies.
Much to
t Liam?s chagrin.
He?s a lad, after all.
We?re
stuck with this
W
pair for 101 minutes
pai
and
an what appears to
be roughly 20 years
(from
early Britpop to
(fr
the latest iPhone) as
they bicker, fall apart
and slowly
realise that
s
love
means never having
love m
to
to say, ?Oh
?O my God, who
wrote this? And
A have they ever
even been in a real relationship??
It?s like a strange and enervating
cross between High Fidelity and
One Day where everyone on screen
makes you want to thump yourself
in the face.
10
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Friday May 4 2018 | the times
film reviews
H
as Roger Michell had
an easier gig than
this? All the director
of Notting Hill had to
do was point a
camera at his
subjects, sit back and
watch them go.
That?s because those subjects are four
thespian dames ? Judi Dench,
Maggie Smith, Eileen Atkins and Joan
Plowright ? who breathe killer
anecdotes like the rest of us breathe
air. Friends for decades and with
Oscars and Oliviers coming out of
their octogenarian ears (Plowright, of
course, was married to the man who
gave the Oliviers their name), this
trove of national treasures provide a
torrent of mischief, gossip, swearing,
recitations, singing and reminiscence.
Crucially, there?s very little ?You were
wonderful, darling? luvviness.
Michell shoots them in the beautiful,
airy house in rural Sussex that
Plowright bought with Laurence
Olivier, but he could have taken them
to a service station on the M6 and still
got golden footage. I suspect that the
choice of venue was out of deference
to Plowright?s age ? at 88 she is the
most senior of the four ? and because
she is blind. Retired, she is led
carefully around by helpers. Dench,
who has also had problems with her
sight, asks at one point: ?Have we got
three eyes between us all??
They sip champagne, smirk at the
ridiculousness of it all and hold forth
on the perils of reviews (?Don?t read
?em,? says Smith); their wild years,
which pre-dated the Swinging Sixties
(?Perhaps we swung a bit early,? says
Dench); and the terror of playing
Cleopatra. ?I didn?t have the courage,?
Atkins says. ?Neither did I, that?s why I
did it in Canada,? Smith says. ?Are you
sure you want a menopausal dwarf??
Dench asked her director. Plowright
recalls her mother?s words when she
told her she was going into acting:
?You?re no oil painting, but you?ve got
the spark and thank God you have my
legs and not your father?s.?
There?s some excellent joshing
between women who clearly know
each other well. Plowright says that
her agent once advised her to ?look
around for a nice little cameo that Judi
Dench hasn?t got her paws on?. They
also take palpable pleasure in teasing
Mary and the
Witch?s Flower
U, 106min
{{{{(
Maggie Smith,
Joan Plowright,
Eileen Atkins
and Judi Dench
Take four acting icons
and stand well back
Harry Potter meets Spirited Away
in this unreasonably inventive
Japanese animation about an English
girl (voiced in this UK version by
Ruby Barnhill, aka Sophie in The
BFG) who unwittingly enrols in
an academy for witches.
It would be unfair to claim that
the film was ripping off JK Rowling,
given that the book it?s based on,
The Little Broomstick, was written by
the British author Mary Stewart in
1971. Dickens, however, might have
had something to say about the name
of the headmistress, Madame
Mumblechook, who?s voiced
imperiously by Kate Winslet.
The director, Hiromasa Yonebayashi,
is a veteran of Studio Ghibli and
much of the pleasure comes from the
contrast between the surreality of
anime (flying dolphins, a flower that
confers magical abilities, a mad
scientist, voiced by Jim Broadbent,
who trundles around on a weird little
trolley) and a Japanese impression of
the English countryside (thatched
cottages, a mysterious great-aunt).
As with all good fairytales,
there?s an air of danger and
possibility throughout.
Judi Dench and friends provide gossip and mischief
galore in this hoot of a documentary, says Ed Potton
Nothing Like
a Dame
12A, 84min
{{{{(
Screen Times
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the crew, who are often seen on
camera or overheard on the mike.
When a photographer takes a bit too
long over a shot, Smith sniggers and
says: ?Is it your first day?? When
Michell asks them to talk about ageing
he is met with a crisp, ?F*** off,
Roger,? from Dench.
Smith remembers Dench, the first to
be made a dame, congratulating her
on her damehood. ?It doesn?t make
any difference,? she told Smith. ?You
can still swear.? Swearing, in fact, is
one of Dench?s favourite things, and
fair enough because she?s very good at
it. A patronising young man get short
shrift in one story (F*** off!? she roars.
?I?ve just done eight weeks in The
Winter?s Tale?) and there?s even
footage of a vintage diatribe: a young
Dench shrieking, ?Filthy stinking
coppers!? and spitting in a policeman?s
face in Z-Cars.
If Dench is the most profane, Smith
is the most playful. When Michell
asks them to talk about their
husbands, she replies: ?Which one??
She hasn?t seen Downton Abbey, she
admits, and probably won?t ?last long
enough to watch the damn thing?.
Dench is less morbid, saying that she
hasn?t planned her funeral ?because
I?m not going to die?. I hope none of
them does, to be honest.
40 best country hotels
This weekend we reveal the perfect places in the UK for
a romantic break ? with delicious food, stunning walks
and easy bike trails.
Pick up your copy of The Times tomorrow.
the times | Friday May 4 2018
11
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music reviews
No furnace ? but she?s on fire
CHRIS ECKERT
pop
Daniel Blumberg
Minus
The former
Fiery Furnaces
singer intrigues
Will Hodgkinson
Mute
{{{{{
Eleanor
Friedberger
Rebound
F
Frenchkiss
{{{{(
or a brief, noisy moment
in the early 2000s a
handful of American
bands brought raucous
guitar rock back into the
spotlight. The leading
lights of the movement
were the Strokes, the
White Stripes and the Fiery Furnaces,
and while the first two became huge,
the Furnaces, featuring brother and
sister Matthew and Eleanor
Friedberger, went up in smoke. When
you consider that after a superb
debut of quirky but listenable pop the
sibling duo made an album featuring
their grandmother on lead vocals
followed by a 72-minute epic of
impenetrable prog-rock abstraction ?
some of it sung backwards ? perhaps
it isn?t surprising.
Since then Eleanor Friedberger, no
doubt having fallen victim to such
bourgeois concerns as needing to buy
food and pay the rent, has made a
series of far more accessible solo
pieces and she has hit a sweet spot
with Rebound. Putting her restrained,
somewhat vulnerable vocals against
simple keyboard melodies and a drum
machine, this is an electro-pop album
of low-key charm suffused with an
appealing sense of uncertainty.
After coming off tour in December
2016 Friedberger travelled to Athens
to visit her mother?s relatives and
ended up staying for a month.
Before leaving she visited a nightclub
called Rebound that sounds as if it
was stuck in a 1980s goth time warp,
with people defying the Greek heat
and the smoking ban by wearing
black, puffing on cigarettes and
Plan B
Heaven Before
All Hell
Breaks
Loose
Atlantic
{{(((
Nice little urn: Eleanor Friedberger was inspired by a Greek nightclub
dancing to Joy Division and Siouxsie
and the Banshees.
?It?s like ?82 or ?83, it?s hard to tell . . .
arms swing in time to a tune I don?t
know, it sounds familiar but it?s sure
not the Cure,? Friedberger reports on
It?s Hard. That visit set the album in
motion, although it?s a long way from
gothic rock. Rebound does have a
detached, melancholic quality, but it is
filled with bright tunes that are as
sunny as they are intriguing.
The lyrics are hard to decode, but
they seem to be about loneliness.
?What are you going to do when it?s all
over and you?ve got nothing to show
for it?? Friedberger asks on Showy
Early Spring, while on Rule of Action,
a beautiful glide through ambient
keyboard hums not a million miles
from the soundtrack to Twin Peaks,
she sings about ?days with no
structure and nights with bad dreams?.
The upbeat In Between Stars sounds
like a romantic love song, but the
accompanying video featuring
Friedberger dancing on her own tells
a different story. It all adds up to a
gently emotional collection of happy
songs with sad words that, unlike the
Fiery Furnaces? most outr� moments,
wears its eccentricity lightly.
Daniel Blumberg was only 15 when
he formed the chirpy guitar band
Cajun Dance Party. Then he went
through a series of projects (Yuck,
Daniel in the Lion?s Den, Hebronix)
before arriving, at the grand age
of 27, with this remarkable debut in
his own name.
Blumberg has been through it
recently: he split with his girlfriend,
the actress Stacy Martin, lost a
childhood friend, and was
hospitalised for mental illness a week
before recording the album with
experimental musicians in a
remote studio in Wales. He?s open
about his turmoil. On the improvised
Madder he sings about ?full-on
madness?, while the track Minus finds
him reflecting on the desolation of
a bad year. ?I have been thinking that
I think too much,? he concludes.
Blumberg finds the balance between
discordant avant-garde and sweet
melody, which, combined with his
impassioned vocals, makes this
something of a modern classic, to
be filed alongside similarly
tormented albums by Syd Barrett
and Scott Walker.
Ben Drew broke through in 2006 with
a superb rap debut, went towards
besuited crooning for a 2010 concept
album, and captured inner-city strife
on the soundtrack to his 2012 crime
drama, Ill Manors. Now the east
Londoner has headed for the safe
waters of adult-orientated pop,
with disappointing results.
w
Drew?s strong voice is on
full display, but the earnest
words and the Sam
Smith-style wine-bar
soul
let him down. He
s
sings
about following his own
s
path
on Heartbeat, which would
p
be
b more convincing if the song
didn?t
sound like the path already
d
beaten by the Radio 2 playlist.
There is slick professionalism
throughout, but this
electronically enhanced
evocation of feeling is
just too bland to
make real
emotional
impact.
First Night, p14
Plan B for bland
Trip to the Tower? Nein, I?ll write a symphony
classical
Ian Page
Mozart in
London
Signum Classics
{{{{(
Edward
Higginbottom
Pelham
Humfrey
Pan Classics
{{{{(
Y
ou?re a nine-year old boy.
The day lies ahead. How to
fill it? Kicking a ball around
maybe, or, more likely,
computer games. It was very
different for Mozart, right, on a family
visit to London during 1764-65. He
would write a symphony in E flat,
perform in front of George III and
Queen Charlotte, visit London?s
theatres and be generally admired.
His life and world is captured at length
in Mozart in London, a very rewarding
offshoot of the Classical Opera
company?s Mozart 250 project, drawn
from live concerts given in 2015.
One of its pleasures is the young
British performers? sheer gusto. Ian
Page?s musicians, the Mozartists,
bounce along on their period
instruments with an alert
lert
attack, succulent toness and
no signs of strain. Ana
Maria Labin, Helen
Sherman, Rebecca
Bottone and other
singers take spinetingling leaps into
the stratosphere and
come up smiling.
And the music itself??
Delicious. Mozart?s
ingratiating pieces (three
ree
early symphonies, a concert
oncert
aria) play a relatively small
mall role. The
bulk of the 22 items reflect
the restt off
fl t th
London?s music-making during his
stay, including vigorous vocal music by
Arne, a harpsichord
Thomas Arn
concerto from JC Bach, and
Carl Friedrich Abel
a rich C
symphony.
symp
Among the set?s 13
A
world premieres, I?ll
wor
single out two: Arne?s
sin
cheerfully naive duet
che
I part,
O Dolly,
D
deliberately
poised on
d
elib
tthe
he eedge of parody, and
Italianate opera
aan
n Ital
overture
o
verture by one George
Rush,
charmingly unassuming
R
ush, charm
and direct. Mozart was a genius, yes,
butt we should
b
h ld never forget his context.
Pelham Humfrey sounds like the
name of a West Country village, or
one of David Cameron?s Eton
schoolmates. Music historians know
differently, although the works of this
17th-century composer have never
spread far into general consciousness.
Edward Higginbottom, the Oxford
Consort of Voices and the ensemble
Instruments of Time & Truth show us
what we?re missing with seven
achingly expressive verse anthems,
leavened with string interludes and
stirring harmonic clashes. The
Consort?s singing style may be a tad
precious, but that never stops the
music from catching fire.
Geoff Brown
12
1G T
exhibition
Friday May 4 2018 | the times
PAUL KINGSTON/NNP; GETTY IMAGES
The new
Lindisfarne
Castle ?
it?s a wrap
The artist Anya Gallaccio?s
installation will swaddle the
refurbished Holy Island house
in blankets, says Mike Wade
DIGITAL RADIO ? APP
VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
A
Anya Gallaccio has arranged more than 50 coloured blankets around the rooms of Lindisfarne Castle, below
nya Gallaccio, shod
in luminous yellow
sandals, is picking
her way through the
shadows, along a
narrow, winding
staircase. ?The
house is a bit batty,?
she shouts over her shoulder, ?all
medieval and Arts-and-Crafty.?
The artist is leading me through
Lindisfarne Castle on Holy Island,
Northumberland. Built as a gun
emplacement by Henry VIII to deter
invaders from the north, it owes its
grandeur to Sir Edwin Lutyens, who
enlarged and converted it into a
luxury holiday home from 1903.
Now, as a two-year, �3 million
renovation project draws to an end,
Gallaccio, 54, has been handed an
extraordinary opportunity. With most
of the furniture still in storage, she has
been asked to develop an inspiring
artwork that compels visitors to think
again about the character of the castle.
Paisley-born, educated at
Goldsmiths in London and resident
in California, Gallaccio has won world
renown over the past three decades
for grandiose works based on natural
materials. One of the earliest, a
32-tonne block of ice, was deployed in
a London waterworks in 1996; more
recently, she filled a room at Jupiter
Artland near Edinburgh with 10,000
red roses and let them rot.
Her work reflects her demeanour ?
cheerful, funny, optimistic ? although
she concedes that this project has
proved ?very challenging?.
She has, she says, been conscious of
the building all her life. Aged five, she
moved with her parents to London
and often travelled north by train for
holidays in Brechin, where her
grandparents had an ice-cream parlour.
Lindisfarne Castle is one of the great
landmarks on the journey and often
caught her eye. The island is famous
as one of Britain?s earliest and most
important Christian sites, a place of
pilgrimage. Yet the castle tells a
different story.
It saw some action during the 1715
Jacobite rebellion, but over the
centuries it has been largely idle as a
military base. The important
structural work came at the turn of
the 20th century, when Edward
Hudson, the founder of Country Life
magazine, bought it and employed the
young Lutyens to create his faux
castle, now a National Trust property.
Gallaccio?s response is to arrange
more than 50 coloured blankets
around the castle, as if to protect the
building. Using only vegetable dyes ?
blues, yellows, reds ? her work is
entitled Dreamed about the flowers
that hide from the light. It draws
Her first ideas
were stymied by
scaffolding and
trip hazards
inspiration from the castle?s small
walled garden, designed by the
horticulturist Gertrude Jekyll and
finished at about the same
time as the house.
e.
?Jekyll, I think,,
came to gardening
ng
from a painting
and colour point
of view rather
than as a plants
person,?
Gallaccio says.
?She uses colour
for contrast.
I thought about
the relationship
between the garden
den
and the house and
nd the
idea of bringing the
outside world inside.?
side.?
Her first ideas ? wrapping the
exterior in blankets
them
t or spreading
di th
over the floors to create a ?colour
field? ? were stymied by scaffolding
and trip hazards.
The idea coming to fruition for this
weekend?s opening involves combining
all the blankets with ten three-sided
oak frames, positioned in seven rooms
and designed by Gallaccio to mimic
the crenellations of a castle.
By now, we have reached a tiny
bedroom, where one of these frames is
positioned with blankets strewn over.
Here, the Edwardian architectural
details delight Gallaccio, particularly
four small studs high on the wall
marking the position of fake beams.
?Look at the way Lutyens has made
a play on the idea of a beam,? she
enthuses. ?Lots of things about the
house are like a game. He plays with
the scale, it goes big and little.?
If the point is to emphasise these
details, however, she acknowledges
that the piece may require revision.
The frame makes it a tight squeeze in
the room; the light levels are low; the
colours on the blankets are dull.
?My ideas are conceptually very
strong,? Gallaccio says. ?It?s whether
they are visually making sense yet. I
need to pull something together.? She
laughs uproariously. ?I keep making
traps for myself, don?t I? I should keep
my mouth shut.?
In a downstairs kitchen, a few
batches of tulips and ranunculus have
been piled up, suggesting that
colourful additions are imminent.
These flowers ?will
w dry like
paper?, Galla
Gallaccio says; she
might add some purple
mascari,
mascar some
branches
branch of blossom
and foxgloves.
f
She still hasn?t
decided.
?What?s
dec
the worst that can
happen??
she
hap
says.
says ?If they [the
visitors]
don?t get
visit
it, they?ll
the look at
the castle.?
ca
On the
th landing
beyond,
frame
beyond, another
an
has
and
has been installed
inst
covered in yellow blankets, dyed
broom. Gallaccio
with weld or dyer?s broo
scuttles
behind
the structure.
Look,
ttl b
hi d th
t
she says, it?s like a four-poster bed, or
the kind of castle a child might make,
to play a game.
?I always thought it would be more
fun to be a princess than a king, there?s
much less responsibility,? Gallaccio
says. ?And who didn?t want to play in
a castle??
Anya Gallaccio, Dreamed about the
flowers that hide from the light,
Lindisfarne Castle, from tomorrow
the times | Friday May 4 2018
13
1G T
JONATHAN KEENAN
Jazz
Kamasi Washington
Roundhouse, NW1
Concert
LPO/Borowicz
Royal Festival Hall
?W
K
{{{{(
e?re going to go
on a journey
tonight,? crooned
Kamasi Washington
at the beginning of
his packed-to-the-rafters set in
London, with all the beaming warmth
of the Cheshire Cat?s grin. The
37-year-old Californian has become
something of a sensation, taking his
brand of unapologetically untamed
jazz, with a few cues from the West
Coast hip-hop scene, to a level of
popularity that is extraordinary for
the genre. The crowd weren?t just
music nerds ? they were far more
diverse. The performance was, as
promised, transporting.
The trigger for this success
was Kendrick Lamar?s bona fide
contemporary cornerstone To Pimp
a Butterfly, on which Washington
played a key role with his tenor
saxophone. A new wave of
culture-defining jazz was born, in part
thanks to the movement?s political
underpinnings and close connections
to Black Lives Matter. Two record
releases, including Heaven and Earth
this month, and several million Spotify
listens later, Washington is at the start
of a 57-date world tour.
Virtuoso talent, droll showmanship
and hugely ambitious songs ? six of
them stretched across the night ?
helped to explain his breakout success.
The rip-roaring, wah-wah double bass
solo during Change of the Guard,
a fizzing love letter to John Coltrane,
was a sign of things to come;
The Space Travelers Lullaby showed
some of Washington?s cosmic leanings.
The highlight came with Fists of Fury,
an interpretation of the theme from
the 1972 Bruce Lee film, on which
Washington was joined by his dad,
Ricky, on flute for a powerful,
cascading duet and a wonderfully
defiant chorus from the singer
Patrice Quinn.
The tension flagged slightly during
The Psalmnist, on which experimental
instrumental solos lasted a bit too
long. Entirely full-on, there weren?t
enough moments of calm, yet that
didn?t detract much from what was a
thrillingly modern incarnation of jazz.
Peter Yeung
Albert Hall, Manchester, tonight;
Queen Margaret Union, Glasgow,
Sat; Cheltenham Jazz Festival, Sun
Concert
Los Angeles
Philharmonic/
Dudamel
Barbican
{{{((
{{{{(
Golda Rosheuvel as Othello and Emily Hughes as Desdemona in Gemma Bodinetz?s production
Othello?s not a fellow
H
{{{{(
ow much does having
a woman play Othello
change Shakespeare?s play?
One of the great virtues of
Gemma Bodinetz?s uneven
but finally triumphant production is
that it makes so little fuss about the
sex of its title character. And that it
changes so little as it depicts a great
warrior undone by her insecurities.
Stalking around the army camp
in fatigue trousers and white vest,
Golda Rosheuvel spends the first
half emitting the quiet authority
of a woman born to take command,
the second unravelling into jealous
despair. She convinces and compels.
Is Iago?s sustained and inventive
campaign of hatred motivated by her
being a woman, and a lesbian at that,
as well as being black? You can?t rule
it out, but then nor is the motivation
of Iago any easier to read than usual,
even as Patrick Brennan confides in
us at length with a fruity bellow
reminiscent of Gyles Brandreth.
The final hour is where this show
lifts off. Having had few props or
scenery to contend with, give or take
a breakfast bar or a 3D battle model,
Othello here paces around a white
muslin tent that lowers over the
in-the-round set (credited jointly to
Molly Lacey Davies, Natalie Johnson
and Jocelyn Meall). Emily Hughes?s
fresh-faced Desdemona lies prone
inside the bedchamber, stalked by her
partner (still referred to as ?husband?
here). And the murder, as Othello
hugs and kisses, then strangles her
young wife, manages to be tender and
horrible. We see Othello?s love fighting
a losing battle with her paranoia, her
insecurity, her need to be decisive. I?m
not sure I?ve seen the closing scenes of
this great play done better.
So it?s a show that amply rewards
any patience you may need during the
over-bright first half. It?s good that the
cast speak their lines at a lick, but
some moments are rushed rather than
relished. Brennan, in particular, has a
terrific command of the language, yet
conveys too many of his lines at the
same canter. His partnership with
foolish Roderigo is pitched like a
pantomime double act.
Thankfully, in his more intimate
dialogues with Othello, his nastiness
gets more life-sized, more insinuating.
As the setting goes from day to night,
the eight-person ensemble strains less
for effect and finds its focus, which is
particularly true with Emma Bispham
as Emilia, the play?s moral heart, and
Cerith Flinn as a sinewy, eminently
foolable Cassio. It?s Rosheuvel?s
evening, though, and she pulls it off
with unshowy aplomb.
Box office: 0151 709 4776, to July 10
t?s always a little weird and
dispiriting when music written
nearly 100 years ago sounds far
more avant-garde than a piece
premiered this year. Have we really
regressed so much? Will we soon be
reverting to steam trains and
telephones with wires?
So my humble advice to Esa-Pekka
Salonen is to make sure that nobody
follows his polite, well-crafted, but
numbingly anodyne new orchestral
work Pollux with Edgard Var鑣e?s
magnificently fierce, chaotic and still
shocking 1920s masterpiece Am閞iques.
Unfortunately the Los Angeles
Philharmonic and Gustavo Dudamel,
right, did just that in the first concert
of a three-day Barbican residency.
In Salonen?s defence, he did point
out ? in a programme note that was
considerably more fascinating than
the music itself ? that Pollux will
be followed in time by a companion
piece called Castor (as all admirers
of Greco-Roman mythology would
expect) and that we can expect
something faster and more extrovert
from that. Well, shame he didn?t
present both twins together, then,
because the impression from Pollux
was of a once-sparky musical
mind bogged down in a world
of lugubrious modal tunes and
static string clusters.
True, some of the percussion-tinged
textures were beguiling, but when
Salonen writes that his music was
partly inspired by a ?post-grunge
band? he heard playing in a French
restaurant, you have to hope that
he opts for a hot curry next time.
Anything that will give his music
a little more snap, crackle and pop.
And the Los Angeles Philharmonic?
The predominant impression left by
Am閞iques and Shostakovich?s Fifth
Symphony was of very fine players
being encouraged to play much too
loudly, especially for the Barbican.
The Var鑣e was often ear-splitting,
but even in the Shostakovich ? the
composer?s brilliantly ambiguous
response to Stalin?s criticism ?
Dudamel seemed content to
offer beefed-up string lines and
strident brass rather than any
sense of inner turmoil
or drama. Pity. It?s
not as if the young
Venezuelan lacks
experience of what
it?s like to keep out of
trouble in a corrupt
totalitarian regime.
Richard Morrison
I
first night
It?s a triumph
for Golda
Rosheuvel?s
star turn as
a female Moor,
says Dominic
Maxwell
Theatre
Othello
Everyman,
Liverpool
nown for her daunting
technique, unflappable
poise, serene discipline and
some impressively muscular
upper arms, perhaps the
best top-level performer you could
compare Anne-Sophie Mutter to
would be her compatriot Steffi
Graf. The tennis star has long
since stopped playing, but Mutter?s
40-year career shows no signs of
flagging; most nights the violinist
serves up a storm.
With support from the ministry
of culture of Poland, this London
Philharmonic season-closer reunited
Mutter with a piece she introduced in
1995: Penderecki?s Violin Concerto
No 2. Sparer and plainer than the
composer?s first concerto, it?s still
a daunting listen, cast in one huge
movement in which the soloist bears
the brunt of forging a path through
a slithery ensemble, the skittering
orchestra offering fragmentary strings
and jangling brass alongside tinkling
bells and celeste. Glimpses of
consolation come and go, swallowed
up in a disorientating tide.
Mutter was completely absorbed in
her fiendish part, however, providing
balm in silken pianissimos and bravura
flourishes in a restless cadenza and
carefully passing the work?s elusive
melodies to the orchestra before
snatching them back. After a brief
exchange with an awestruck fan in the
choir stalls, she satisfied him (and us)
with a Bach encore, the Courante from
the D Minor Violin Partita No 2. The
84-year-old Penderecki received
an ovation alongside her.
A strange symmetry connected
the two outer works, powerfully
conducted by Lukasz Borowicz.
Andrzej Panufnik?s unheroic Heroic
Overture, first sketched out during the
Nazi occupation of Warsaw and later
proscribed by the Soviet authorities
after their brutal takeover, is a snarling
anti-anthem almost entirely subverted
by scrunchy dissonances. While the
Red Army was on its way to ?liberate?
Poland, meanwhile, Prokofiev was
writing his Fifth Symphony, at least in
theory billed as a victory ode. I?ve
heard more incisively played
performances, but this one cast out
triumphalism for a kind of gleeful,
capering anarchy, and it hit the spot.
Neil Fisher
14
first night
Pop
Plan B
Colston Hall, Bristol
R
{{(((
eturning to the limelight
after six years away,
Ben Drew, alias Plan B,
looked like a new man when
he bounded on stage in
Bristol. The moon-faced cockney
bruiser of old has slimmed down and
smartened up, curtailing his boozy
bad habits and becoming a father in
the process. On a nationwide tour to
promote the launch of his fourth
album, Heaven Before All Hell Breaks
Loose (see review, page 11), the
34-year-old arrived in Bristol sporting
a slicked-back plume of silver-blond
hair and a bizarre chin-strap of white
face paint, which appears to be part
of his latest visual makeover.
Much of Drew?s new material
revisits the polished retro-soul sound
that surfaced on his ambitious
2010 album-plus-film project,
The Defamation of Strickland Banks,
which rebranded the sometime
rapper as a male Amy Winehouse.
Backed by a nine-piece band, he
opened his high-energy show with the
Memphis-style R&B stomper Grateful,
straining hoarsely for Otis Redding
levels of explosive emotional exorcism
that he could not quite deliver.
New album highlights included
the bouncy tropical ska number Wait
So Long and the rousing rave-pop
belter Mercy. The nadir was It?s a
War, a platitudinous polemic about
Brexit-battered Britain couched in
a charmless, stilted reggae-rock
arrangement. It sounded perilously
close to Equality Street, one of the
satirical spoof songs penned by Ricky
Gervais for his David Brent character.
The stark acoustic guitar reworking
of Kidz, an angry sermon inspired by
the murder of Damilola Taylor, and
the remorselessly bleak inner-city
opera Ill Manors were powerful,
depressingly timely reminders
that Drew began his
career as a kind of
British Eminem.
He may have left
that nihilistic world
behind for new-found
mellow maturity, but even his softer
songs still had an off-putting edge
of boorish, hectoring aggression.
Plan B has mastered the forceful
emotions of soul music, but has
not yet absorbed its warmth,
grace or exaltation. Between the
testosterone-fuelled tirades he
needs to try a little tenderness.
Stephen Dalton
Touring to Aug 18.
Details: time4planb.co.uk
1G T
Still gorgeously grumpy
This latest tour
breathes new
life into some
much-loved
menopausal
jokes, says
Clive Davis
T
Comedy
Grumpy Old
Women
Beck Theatre,
Hayes
{{{{(
he franchise is well into
late middle age now ?
13 years have passed since
Jenny Eclair and friends
first went on the road
with their catalogue of menopausal
woes ? but the concept is still in
pretty good health.
Yes, the script of the latest
incarnation, To the Rescue, carries
a bit of padding around the middle.
Yet Eclair and her team instinctively
know how to bond with their
audience, and the return of one of
the original members of the Grumpy
ensemble, Dillie Keane, adds a layer
of louche sophistication to the jokes
about flatulence, condiments and the
mysteries of internet dating.
As anyone who has seen Fascinating
A飀a will know, Keane is one of our
finest yet most under-rated comic
talents. That plummy voice can
convey the squeak of authentic,
four-in-the-morning distress, as well
as the booming sound of the most
self-satisfied of ageing alpha males.
It?s a shame we don?t get to hear one
of her many wonderfully acute songs.
Never mind. Instead, Owen Lewis?s
direction keeps things
hustling along in panto
mode as Keane, Eclair
and the new recruit, Lizzie Roper, are
summoned back to set the world to
rights after settling into uneasy
retirement on a DayGlo desert
island. Dressed up in cod superhero
costumes for the first part of the
evening, they declare war on many
a modern scourge, from Spanx to
IBS to Piers Morgan.
There?s a neat contrast between
Eclair?s manic frustration and Keane?s
world-weary cynicism. Eclair nips and
darts all over the stage; Keane battles
with creaking knees and seats that are
too damned low. Roper, the youngest
of the trio, has to contend with a role
that is less well defined, but she still
hits each punchline with gusto.
Eclair and her co-writer, Judith
Holder, display their usual sharp eye
for detail. You have to be of a certain
age, of course, to savour the references
to gonks and Austin Maxis. And if
your ears perk up to the sound of
the theme of the TV show Doctor
in the House, you can be absolutely
sure you are a core part of the
show?s demographic.
grumpyoldwomen
live.com
Jenny Eclair,
Dillie Keane
and Lizzie
Roper
I
{{{((
f a couple of hours in the company
of five talented, likeable Australian
male entertainers who sing, joke
around and could probably tap
till dawn sounds appealing, this
well-packaged, middle-of-the-road
percussive dance show might be
just the ticket.
The format is loosely modelled on
the Rat Pack, although minus the
same degree of back-slapping,
liquor-happy camaraderie indulged
in by Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin
and Sammy Davis Jr. Unable to rely
on our familiarity with them, the
members of the Tap Pack are nothing
like as laid-back. They have to work to
win our affection.
Sometimes they work too hard.
Act I seems especially pushy and bitty,
as if the cast are so eager to get us on
side, they can?t afford to relax. Still, the
opening ensemble routine, staged on
a set featuring a freestanding bar that
can in a jiffy be converted into a short
flight of stairs, is quick and energetic.
Ditto the follow-up. Gradually these
eager, wholesome-seeming lounge
lizards, nattily clad in suits,
emerge as individuals. That
includes the show?s
co-creators, Jesse
Rasmussen and Thomas
J Egan. A compact fellow
with a fast, effortless sense
of rhythm, Rasmussen has
a style that?s more Gene Kelly than
Fred Astaire. As for Egan, in the
second half he parks his penchant for
playing the agreeable goof and lets
rip with a sustained and dazzling
improvised solo that proves to be
the evening?s highlight.
Sean Mulligan, a smooth operator
with a toothsome smile, shares the
main vocal duties with the lean,
limber Ben Brown.
Their songs range
from Sinatra-era
standards to
Ed Sheeran. They?re
all right too, backed by a fine
four-piece band, although the
Peacock?s somewhat muddying,
cacophonous sound system does
no one any favours. Max Patterson,
whose origins as a street entertainer
serve him well, rounds out the cast.
There are brief, jazzy bits of juggling
with pool cues and cocktail shakers,
and a clever trio in which only the
dancers? polished shoes are visible.
The show climaxes, as it should, in
a volley of fleet-footed unison steps.
Donald Hutera
Box office: 020 7863 82222, to May 19
Entertainment
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Oscar Wilde's
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Tue-Sat 19.30, Tue, Thur & Sat 14.30
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Friday May 4 2018 | the times
Dance
The Tap Pack
Peacock Theatre, WC2
Entertainments
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the times | Friday May 4 2018
15
1G T
television & radio
MasterChef with a sprinkling of Apprentice
RAY BURMISTON/BBC/KEO
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Britain?s Best Home Cook
BBC One
{{{((
Syria: the World?s War
BBC Two
{{{{(
C
ookery shows ? why aren?t
there more of them, eh? I
swear I can go a full ten
minutes some days without
seeing a celebrity or chef or
random punter chopping food or
chomping food or chatting about
chomping food. ?Will no one bang on
about how they adore cooking for
family and friends, just once?? I often
cry. But, phew, we have a new show to
fill that sliver of food-free airtime.
Britain?s Best Home Cook won?t win
any prizes for originality, being the
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
CrowdScience: Why
Don?t We All Like
the Same Food?
World Service, 8.30pm
If you have looked at
your Ocado shop and felt
ashamed that, despite
having the world?s food at
your fingertips, you still buy
only apples and digestive
biscuits, then listen to this.
It turns out that this
tendency to eat what you
know is a product of the
human condition. Humans
have the potential to eat
pretty much anything, yet
across the world we rarely
do. We concentrate on the
wheat and the fruit at the
expense of all those tasty
caterpillars. Datshiane
Navanayagam looks at how
global cuisines evolved.
Watch Me While
I?m Sleeping
Radio 4, 2.15pm
Mo snores. His partner,
Eddie, has had enough.
?I wake up knackered. I go
to work knackered.? Now
the two have decided to talk
their relationship through,
in this play from Christopher
William Hill. Cue an
awkward meal and fun lines
about modern cuisine.
Eddie has a habit of fancy
cooking, and once served
what Mo calls ?scallops in
sputum?. ?It was,? says
Eddie furiously, ?a foam?.
bastard child of MasterChef and The
Apprentice, but it does have the quality
presence of Mary Berry and Claudia
Winkleman, so it should be OK.
The contestants are not ghastly,
show-off sociopaths, as in The
Apprentice, even though they all have
to share a house for no obvious
reason. It might be more interesting if
they were sociopaths. It?s not that
there?s anything wrong with the show,
it?s just that there are only so many
ways that telly can keep serving the
same offering while calling it
something slightly different. A few
narcissistic meltdowns would spice
things up. There?s the usual cook-off
against the clock, the usual tears and
the usual loser being sent home.
Berry, who was wearing swish velvet
trews, declared that one woman?s chips
were ?man-sized?. Mary! You just can?t
say that kind of stuff any more. I?m so
offended I may complain to Ofcom.
The two male judges were perfectly
nice, but were kind of eclipsed by the
two female presenters. Like I said, not
much new to see here, but it?s jolly and
will probably do well.
Lyse Doucet?s excellent
documentary about the Syrian war
comes at a dismal juncture; it has by
now lasted longer than the Second
World War. In the first of two parts,
Syria: The World?s War started in 2011
with footage of the peaceful marches
calling for reform, then showed how
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 The Of?cial
Chart with MistaJam 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
Radio 1?s Dance Anthems with MistaJam
7.00 Danny Howard. The DJ is in for Annie
Mac with Radio 1?s of?cial start to the
weekend 9.00 Pete Tong. The hottest new
dance tracks, plus interviews with leading
DJs 11.00 Eats Everything 1.00am B.Traits
4.00 Radio 1?s Essential Mix
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans. With Louise Minchin,
Danny Baker, James Martin and Reef 9.30
Ken Bruce 12.00 Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve
Wright 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Tony
Blackburn?s Golden Hour. A selection of
popular tracks from the past 50 years 8.00
Friday Night Is Music Night. The BBC Concert
Orchestra and the Guy Barker Big Band
perform a concert live from Cheltenham
Jazz Festival 10.00 Sounds of the 80s. Sara
hosts an 80?s tropical party 12.00 Anneka
Rice: The Happening 2.00am Radio 2?s Funky
Soul Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: New to 2
4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: 21st
Century Songs 5.00 Huey on Saturday
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Music, news and the occasional surprise,
with Petroc Trelawny. Including 7.00, 8.00
News. 7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
Ian Skelly presents a selection of classical
music. 9.30 Listeners? ideas for companion
pieces on the Essential Classics playlist.
10.10 Time Traveller. A quirky slice of
cultural history. 10.50 Ian is once again
joined by the author Bernard MacLaverty,
who talks about the cultural in?uences that
have inspired and shaped his life and career
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Copland (1900-1990)
Donald Macleod explores Aaron Copland?s
last years and his retirement from
composition to concentrate on a new
endeavour ? conducting. Copland (Music for
a Great City ? IV, Towards the Bridge;
Connotations; Piano Concerto; Three
Latin-American Sketches ? I. Estrobilio; and
At the River)
1.00pm News
Claudia Winkleman and Mary Berry judge the home cooking
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
The Verbier Festival, featuring the Russian
pianist Nikolai Lugansky. Presented by Sarah
Walker. Tchaikovsky (The Seasons, Op 37b);
and Rachmaninov (10 Preludes, Op 23)
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Penny Gore ends her week featuring the BBC
Symphony Orchestra with a concert from
their recent trip to Switzerland with Chief
Conductor Sakari Oramo. The venue is
Geneva?s beautiful Victoria Hall, named after
the English Queen Victoria. Anna Clyne (This
Midnight Hour); Beethoven (Symphony No 6
in F ? Pastoral); Richard Strauss (Suite in B
?at for 13 wind instruments, Op 4); and
Florent Schmitt (Symphony No 2)
4.30 BBC Young Musician 2018
Penny Gore hosts highlights from this year?s
BBC Young Musician keyboard ?nalists,
ahead of the keyboard category ?nals
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty presents a selection of music
and news from the arts world.
Including 5.00, 6.00 News
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
In Tune?s specially curated playlist: an
eclectic mix of music, featuring favourites,
lesser-known gems, and a few surprises.
Tracks by Offenbach, Beethoven and Vivaldi
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
The BBC Singers, under the conductor So?
Jeannin, at Milton Court Concert Hall in
London?s Barbican. Three of Handel?s
Coronation Anthems and his Dixit Dominus
give the BBC Singers and St James? Baroque
the chance to shine in much-loved music.
Handel (Zadok the Priest; Organ Concerto in
F ? Cuckoo and the Nightingale; My Heart Is
Inditing; The King Shall Rejoice; and Dixit
Dominus, HWV232)
10.00 The Verb
Examining autism, poetry, language and
writing, with James McGrath on the
language used to describe autism and Kate
Fox on coming out as an autistic poet.
Presented by Ian McMillan
10.45 The Essay: My Life in Music
The composer and viola player Sally Beamish
talks about her violinist mother?s fascination
with Shostakovich ? and explores the
Second Piano Trio, looking at the in?uence it
had on her own work. She describes her
mother?s gradual decline into dementia, and
their complex and intense relationship
11.00 Music Planet
The Moroccan singer Aicha Redouane is in
session. Plus, a road trip to Greece, and a
mixtape from the Afrobeat star Seun Kuti.
Presented by Lopa Kothari
1.00am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day (r)
6.00 Today
With Martha Kearney and Nick Robinson
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 The Reunion
Sue MacGregor reunites cast and crew of The
Young Ones, including stars Nigel Planer,
Alexei Sayle, Chris Ryan and Stephen Frost,
and the writer Lise Mayer (5/5) (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: The Life and
Rhymes of Benjamin Zephaniah
The poet?s autobiography (5/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Discussion and interviews, presented by Jane
Garvey. Including at 10.45 the 15 Minute
Drama: The Wings of the Dove (5/10)
11.00 The Remittance
The prejudices, politics and pride of the
multi-billion pound world of migrant money
11.30 When the Dog Dies
By Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent (6/6) (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Four Thought
Discussion of diagnoses, with child and
adolescent psychiatrist Ann York (r)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Chinese Characters
Rana Mitter explores the life of Deng
Xiaoping. Last in the series
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Watch Me
While I?m Sleeping
By Christopher William Hill. A couple fail to
?nd time to address their problems and
tensions begin to mount. With Joseph Kloska
and Mark Edel-Hunt. See Radio Choice
3.00 Gardeners? Question Time
Peter Gibbs presents the programme from
the new Temperate House at Kew Gardens,
with James Wong and Anne Swithinbank
answering listeners? queries
3.45 Short Works
Craters by Chris Power
4.00 Last Word
Obituaries, presented by Matthew Bannister
4.30 More or Less
Investigating numbers (2/7)
4.55 The Listening Project
A theologian father and a daughter who has
let go of her religious roots converse
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
events spiralled, as Doucet explained,
into unspeakable savagery.
There is no shortage of horrific
footage from Syria to fill an hour?s TV
? we see it frequently on the news ?
but Doucet?s skilful film used it
relatively sparingly and thus to greater
effect. Doucet, the BBC?s chief
international correspondent, devoted a
lot of time to exploring Syrian politics
and the propaganda war that is raging,
and aired the opposing points of view
through a series of interviews. These
included a young woman imprisoned
by Assad?s regime for six months; an
official who claimed, poker-faced,
that the rebels had poisoned children
with sarin so they could blame it on
the government; a middle-aged,
middle-class pro-government woman
who had seen family, friends and
neighbours killed and was surprised
to find herself spitting on the corpse
of a rebel; and a photographer who
had been imprisoned and beaten and
in 2013 saw those children gassed in
their pyjamas.
Doucet has covered this conflict
since the beginning, so there was
footage of her stumbling on appalling
scenes of murder in real time.
Tomorrow she will bring us up to the
present, wretched day. If you want a
thoughtful, intelligent and, naturally,
thoroughly depressing recent history
of Syria, you have it here.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 The News Quiz
Topical comedy panel game (4/8)
7.00 The Archers
Brian comes clean. Meanwhile,
Kenton considers his actions
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Love Henry James:
The Wings of the Dove (5/10) (r)
8.00 Any Questions?
From Lady Margaret School in Putney,
south-west London
8.50 A Point of View
Stella Tillyard re?ects on a topical issue
9.00 Chinese Characters Omnibus
Parts 1-5. The history of China through ?ve
key personalities (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Valley at
the Centre of the World
By Malachy Tallack. Alice works through
Maggie?s old correspondence, while Sandy
struggles with his attraction to Jo (5/10)
11.00 Great Lives
Tej Lalvani nominates the theoretical
physicist Richard Feynman (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Mark D?Arcy reports from Westminster
11.55 The Listening Project
A father and daughter re?ect on their mutual
attitude of positively (r)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week: The Life
and Rhymes of Benjamin Zephaniah (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am I?m Sorry I?ll Read That Again 8.30
Brothers in Law 9.00 It?s Your Round 9.30
After Henry 10.00 The Master of Ballantrae
11.00 Podcast Radio Hour 12.00 I?m Sorry
I?ll Read That Again 12.30pm Brothers in
Law 1.00 John Mortimer Presents The Trials
of Marshall Hall 1.30 Mr Pollock?s Theatres
2.00 The Secret History 2.15 Shakespeare?s
Restless World 2.30 The Enchanted April
2.45 Sissinghurst: An Un?nished History
3.00 The Master of Ballantrae 4.00 It?s Your
Round 4.30 After Henry 5.00 Minor
Adjustment 5.30 Lucy Porter in the Family
Way 6.00 Duel 6.30 Mastertapes 7.00 I?m
Sorry I?ll Read That Again. Comedy with John
Cleese 7.30 Brothers in Law. Comedy 8.00
John Mortimer Presents The Trials of
Marshall Hall. A woman cyclist is shot dead
8.30 Mr Pollock?s Theatres. The world of toy
theatre 9.00 Podcast Radio Hour. Discussion
on global podcasts 10.00 Comedy Club: Lucy
Porter in the Family Way. The comedian
examines the ups and downs of family life
10.30 Sketchorama. Casual Violence, Croft
and Pearce & Beats perform 10.55 The
Comedy Club Interview. Arthur Smith talks
to Tom Neenan 11.00 Adolf Hitler: My Part
in His Downfall. Spike Milligan reads from
his wartime memoirs. First aired in 2008
11.30 Chain Reaction. Catherine Tate talks
to David Tennant. From 2008
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Chiles on
Friday 1.00pm The Friday Sports Panel
2.00 Kermode and Mayo?s Film Review 4.00
5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport: The Friday
Football Social. Darren Fletcher and Jermaine
Jenas look ahead to the weekend?s football
action 10.00 Adrian Goldberg 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 5 Live Boxing with Costello &
Bunce 5.30 Under the Weather
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Jim White, Perry Groves and Bob Mills
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off
10.00 The Two Mikes 1.00am Extra Time
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Nemone 10.00 Lauren Laverne
1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart Maconie
4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 David Holmes 9.00
Tom Ravenscroft 12.00 Nemone?s Electric
Ladyland 2.00am 6 Music Classic Concert
3.00 6 Music Live Hour 4.00 From Mento to
Lovers Rock 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Nicholas Owen 5.00 Classic
FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Catherine Bott presents a
concert recorded live at Cadogan Hall in
London, featuring the pianist Yeol Eum Son
and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.
Haydn (L?Isola Disabitata ? Overture);
Mozart (Piano Concerto No 21 in C); Haydn
(Symphony No 86 in D); and Mozart (Piano
Concerto No 8 in C) 10.00 Smooth Classics
1.00am Katie Breathwick 4.00 Jane Jones
16
1G T
Friday May 4 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
James Jackson
The Jazz
Ambassadors
BBC Four, 9pm
Here is a film
that, unless
you heard the
Radio 4
programme on the
same subject a while
ago, offers a fresh view
of Cold War tactics. In
Early
Top
pick
1955, when America
was having problems
with its image, the
African-American
congressman Adam
Clayton Powell Jr had
an idea: send America?s
jazz musicians and
their racially integrated
bands on high-profile
tours around the world.
In doing so they would
counter the negative
propaganda from the
Soviet Union about
racism in the US. It
may have had the
Bolshoi, but the
Americans could
show that they had
something progressive
? and, luckily for
Powell, his plan
coincided with a
golden era for jazz.
Instrumental to
Powell?s scheme was
the trumpeter Dizzy
Gillespie ? one great
photo from 1956 shows
him charming a snake
with his trumpet in
Karachi ? and over the
next decade Louis
Armstrong, Duke
Ellington and Dave
Brubeck would tour the
world in service of US
Cold War interests.
However, in the 1960s
this jazz diplomacy
became complicated.
The civil rights
movement in the
US was forcing the
musicians into a moral
bind ? how could they
promote a tolerant
image abroad when
at home black children
on their way to newly
integrated schools were
being spat on by white
mobs? Tonight?s film
shows how the US
State Department
unwittingly gave the
civil rights movement
a global stage just when
it needed one most.
Unreported World
Channel 4, 7.30pm
If things weren?t bad
enough in Kabul,
what with the years of
bombs and gunfights,
the locals face a new
danger: criminal gangs
who roam the Afghan
capital kidnapping
middle-class residents.
Most appallingly, the
thugs? victims are
often children. The
kidnappers have
become a more
worrying threat to
decent citizens than
the Taliban. The
reporter Rania
Abouzeid and the
director Karim Shah
travel to the city to
join the lead detective
of the police antikidnap squad as it
does its best to reunite
those kidnapped
with their families.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Rip Off Britain: Food. The team
puts online takeaway services to the test. Last in the
series 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in
Goudhurst, Smallthorne and Cardiff (r) (AD) 11.00 A1:
Britain?s Longest Road. A pedestrian goes walkabout on
the carriageway putting lives in danger (AD) 11.45 The
Housing Enforcers. Matt Allwright visits east London on
the trail of suspected tenancy fraud 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. From the Royal Welsh Showground in Builth Wells
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Jimmi seems set to give
Amanda the bene?t of the doubt, despite the reservations
of his friends and colleagues. Following her pyjama party,
Valerie decides to do some volunteering (AD) 2.15 800
Words. George and Fiona go away for a romantic weekend
(AD) 3.00 Escape to the Country. Alistair Appleton helps
a couple search for a family home in West Sussex (r) (AD)
3.45 Flipping Pro?t. Gavin Claxton, Melissa Downhill and
Zoe Pocock search for bargains in Gloucestershire (AD)
4.30 Flog It! From Crowcombe Court in Somerset 5.15
Pointless. Quiz, hosted by Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 A1: Britain?s
Longest Road (r) (AD) 7.15 Rip Off Britain: Food (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: Antiques Roadshow (r) (SL) 9.00 BBC
Newsroom Live: Election Special 10.00 Live Snooker: The
World Championship. Jason Mohammad presents
coverage of the second session of the opening semi-?nal
at the Crucible Theatre in Shef?eld 12.00 Election 2018.
Huw Edwards presents as the votes are counted in this
year?s council elections in England. Contributors include
the Professor John Curtice and Jo Coburn 1.00pm Live
Snooker: The World Championship. Hazel Irvine presents
further coverage from the Crucible Theatre, as the second
semi-?nal continues with the second of four scheduled
sessions 3.00 Election 2018. Huw Edwards presents as
the votes are counted in this year?s council elections in
England. Contributors include the Professor John Curtice
and Jo Coburn 4.30 Live Snooker: The World
Championship. Hazel Irvine presents coverage from
the Crucible Theatre, as the second semi-?nal continues
with the second of four scheduled sessions 6.00
Eggheads (r) 6.30 Britain in Bloom. Chris Bavin heads to
Immingham in northern Lincolnshire. Last in the series
6.00am Good Morning Britain 8.30 Lorraine.
Entertainment, current affairs and fashion news 9.25 The
Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30 This Morning. Chat and lifestyle
features, including a look at the stories making the
newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen.
Presented by Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford
12.30pm Loose Women. The members of the boy band
5ive join the panellists as they participate in debate from
a female perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge
Rinder. Paul claims a refund for a caravan that he bought
off his de-facto brother, but never received, while Annie
believes she is entitled to a share of their late father?s
estate 3.00 Tenable. A team of British Army colleagues
attempts to topple the Tenable Tower of 10 to win a big
cash prize. Quiz show hosted by Warwick Davis 4.00
Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the arcade-themed
quiz show in which contestants drop tokens down a choice
of four chutes in the hope of winning a �,000 jackpot
5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as four
contestants pit their wits against the Chaser, adding
money to the jackpot for the ?nal chase 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.35 Frasier (r)
10.05 Ramsay?s Hotel Hell (r) (AD) 11.00 Undercover
Boss USA (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm
Coast vs Country. Kirsty Duffy and David Bull advise a
couple who are seeking a fresh start and willing to invest
�0,000 on a home somewhere in Devon (r) (AD) 1.05
Posh Pawnbrokers. Dan and his team consider a
houseboat (r) 2.10 Countdown. With Dr Phil Hammond
3.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away. A property in the
Cotswolds or the Dordogne region of France (r) 4.00
Escape to the Chateau: DIY. Stephanie?s big singles night
arrives. Last in the series (AD) 5.00 Four in a Bed. The
B&B owners meet for the last time (r) 5.30 Buy It Now.
Paola and Ziggy have a fun new product with a positive
message, while siblings Nathalie and Alec hope to have
the shoppers all sewn up with their nifty kitchen garment
6.00 The Simpsons. An episode set 30 years in the future,
when divorcee Bart is locked in a custody battle (r) (AD)
6.30 Hollyoaks. Marnie worries about Al?e?s behaviour,
Farrah ?nds herself in a scary situation, and Damon gets
the wrong end of the stick about Zack and Holly (r) (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and his guests talk about the issues of the day,
with viewers calling in to offer their opinions 11.15 The
Nightmare Neighbour Next Door. A dispute with a
neighbour descends into violence, while an elderly couple
who feel they are the victims of noise from next door
receive a visit from the police (r) (AD) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. The doctors
treat a young man whose life has begun to spiral due to a
crack cocaine addiction, and the mother of a young boy
suffering with ADHD seeks advice in the surgery (r) (AD)
1.10 Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours
(AD) 2.20 NCIS. Tony is reunited with his journalist
ex-?anc閑 Wendy Miller while investigating the murder
of a Navy captain leading a double life as a masked
vigilante (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: Presumed Dead in
Paradise (12, TVM, 2013) A teenager survives a brush
with death while on holiday, only to discover she has been
the victim of a sinister conspiracy. Thriller with Malese
Jow 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Clive offers
Toadie a job (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Alf has a very
surprising visitor (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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7.00 The One Show Presented by Alex
Jones and Radio 1?s Dev Grif?n
8PM
7.30 Sounds Like Friday Night
Kylie Minogue performs two tracks
from her recent album (5/5)
8.00 EastEnders Halfway is embarrassed
by the attention he is getting from
Whitney and the Carters (AD)
7.00 Live Snooker: The World
Championship Jason Mohammad
presents coverage of the third and
penultimate session of the opening
semi-?nal at the Crucible Theatre in
Shef?eld. Mark Selby and John Higgins
were the victorious players at this
stage last year, defeating Ding Junhui
and Barry Hawkins respectively
9PM
8.30 The Button Five UK families compete
to win challenges in the comfort of
their living rooms (3/8)
9.00 Have I Got News for You Satirical
quiz hosted by Rhod Gilbert (5/9)
Late
11PM
10PM
9.30 Home from Home Neil is despondent
about his lack of popularity so throws a
party to make amends (3/6) (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.25 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.35 The Graham Norton Show
Amy Schumer talks about her new ?lm
I Feel Pretty and Stephen Mangan
discusses new television show Hang
Ups. Plus, Jess Glynne performs her
new single I?ll Be There (5/13)
11.25 Wannabe Maxine readies herself for
the performance of a lifetime (4/4)
11.50 No Strings Attached (15, 2011)
Two friends try to have a purely sexual
relationship, but ?nd themselves
falling in love nonetheless. Romantic
comedy starring Natalie Portman
and Ashton Kutcher (AD)
1.35am-6.00 BBC News
7.00 Emmerdale Priya sees an act of
destruction, and Lachlan faces a
shocking realisation (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.30 Coronation Street Toyah introduces
Peter to their baby daughter and
David ?elds unsolicited feedback
on his new relationship (AD)
7.30 Unreported World Rania Abouzeid
travels to Kabul, Afghanistan, where
criminal gangs are kidnapping for
ransom. See Viewing Guide (3/6) (AD)
8.00 Love Your Garden The team visits
Canterbury to help a Gurkha (3/6) (AD)
8.00 Our Wildest Dreams
Cameras follow Lyndon and his wife
Ruth as they give up their careers in
the UK to plough their savings into
starting a new business running a
safari lodge in the Zambian outback.
See Viewing Guide (2/4) (AD)
8.00 Britain?s Great Cathedrals
with Tony Robinson Exploring
the history of Liverpool Cathedral,
which was designed in the Gothic
style by Giles Gilbert Scott. It took 74
years to build and was paid for by the
people of the city (5/6)
9.00 Gogglebox Capturing the households?
instant reactions to what they are
watching on television from the
comfort of their own sofas (AD)
9.00 Portillo?s Hidden History of
Britain Michael Portillo explores
Shepton Mallet prison, which over its
400-year history has seen thousands off
prisoners, numerous executions and
countless escape attempts (3/4)
8.30 Coronation Street Simon alerts
Leanne to Toyah?s lies, and Jenny
marks an emotional anniversary (AD)
9.00 Syria: The World?s War How a
peaceful uprising against the president
of Syria seven years ago has turned
into a full-scale civil war, resulting in
the deaths of 350,000 people (2/2)
9.00 Lethal Weapon Murtaugh and Riggs
investigate a local jewellery heist.
Plus, Riggs battles with his drinking
habit, while Murtaugh is plagued
by his insecurities (AD)
10.00 Episodes Sean and Beverly ?nd
themselves at odds with Matt (6/7)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.00 Friday Night Dinner New series.
Jim dates a woman with an annoying
laugh. See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
10.45 The Keith & Paddy Picture Show
Keith Lemon and Paddy McGuinness
remake Pretty Woman (3/5) (r) (AD)
10.30 High & Dry New series. Sitcom
about a group of plane crash victims
stranded on a tropical island.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
11.05 Front Row Late Mary Beard and her
guests discuss museums (5/8)
11.35 Snooker: The World Championship
Jason Mohammad introduces
highlights of day 14 at the Crucible
Theatre in Shef?eld
12.25am FILM: Easy Money (15, 2010) Thriller with
Joel Kinnaman and Matias Varela 2.20 Sign Zone: Getting
a Fair Trial? ? Panorama. A report on cases in which
evidence has been withheld or not investigated (r) (SL)
2.50 Civilisations (r) (SL) 3.50-4.45 The Assassination
of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story (r) (AD, SL)
11.10 Through the Keyhole Keith Lemon
visits mystery homes and challenges
this week?s panel ? Joe Swash,
Gabby Logan and Paddy McGuinness
? to guess the identities of the
famous owners (2/8) (r)
12.10am Jackpot247 Viewers can participate in live
interactive gaming from their sofas 3.00 Take on the
Twisters. Julia Bradbury presents the quiz show where
contestants compete to take on the eight giant
sandtimers, with the more they keep in play, the more
money they can win (r) 3.50-6.00 ITV Nightscreen
7.00 The Gadget Show Jon Bentley gets
an earful of the latest advance in home
cinema audio, while the G Team rustles
up a sampling menu featuring three
different styles of barbecue (8/12)
10.00 Inside Strangeways A revealing look
behind the bars of Strangeways prison
in Manchester, examining stories of
gang culture, riots and penal
punishment (4/6) (r)
11.05 First Dates Reiki healer Jayne is set
up on a date with 44-year-old children?s
entertainer Stuart, while student
James, who has a prosthetic leg, meets
fellow student Emilie (r) (AD)
11.05 Meet Mick Philpott: Psychopath
Professor Tony Maden looks into the
case of Mick Philpott, whose arson
attack on his family home in Derby in
May 2012 resulted in the death of six
of his children (3/3) (r)
12.05am FILM: The Grey (15, 2011) Wilderness
adventure starring Liam Neeson, Frank Grillo and Dermot
Mulroney (AD) 2.10 True Horror (r) (AD, SL) 3.05 Kiss
Me First (r) (AD, SL) 4.00 Come Dine Champion of
Champions (r) 4.55 Steph and Dom?s One Star to Five
Star (r) 5.25-6.15 Fifteen to One (r)
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
The doctors treat a man with a crack cocaine addiction (r)
(AD) 4.00 Rich House, Poor House: The Big Surprise. Two
families from the Newquay area swap homes and budgets
for a week (r) 4.50 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.15 Wildlife
SOS (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest (r) (SL)
the times | Friday May 4 2018
17
1G T
television & radio
Our Wildest
Dreams
Channel 4, 8pm
In tonight?s episode
of the series that
follows British families
upping sticks for life
in remote places, an
English couple ?
Lyndon and his
pregnant wife, Ruth ?
are ditching the day
jobs to set up and run
a safari lodge in the
Zambian outback.
Inspiring or foolish?
With four months to
complete lodge
construction before
the money runs dry,
they face ballooning
costs and safety
concerns, but also,
more immediately,
holes in the ground for
toilets and marauding
lions and crocodiles.
Then there?s the matter
of Ruth giving birth.
Friday Night
Dinner
Channel 4, 10pm
A fifth series for Robert
Popper?s long-running
comedy, and it has lost
none of its impish glee
as the family gather
for more weekly
get-togethers. The lines
are sharp ? when they
decide to order a
Chinese takeaway
online, Dad (Paul
Ritter) says, ?I don?t
eat internet food,? to
which son Jonny (Tom
Rosenthal) explains:
?Dad, they don?t make
the food inside the
internet.? Yet what
really glues the show
is the chemistry of the
cast, which also
includes Mark Heap
(tonight on an awful
date) and Tamsin
Greig?s forthright
Jewish mum.
High & Dry
Channel 4, 10.30pm
The idea of a desertisland sitcom is so
simple that it?s a
surprise we haven?t had
one before. Here, a
plane crashes in the
Indian Ocean leaving
survivors to endure
sand, coconuts and one
another. They include
uptight Harriet (Vicki
Pepperdine) and
zombie-mad Arnab
(Asim Chaudhry of
People Just Do
Nothing). Presiding
over all is Marc
Wootton?s camp Aussie
flight attendant Brett,
who, being anything
but the admirable
Crichton, sabotages any
hope of escape. How
much you laugh will
come down to your
tolerance of Wootton?s
high-volume approach.
Sport Choice
Eurosport 2, 11.30am
Coverage of the first
stage of the Giro
d?Italia, a 10.1km
individual time-trial in
Jerusalem, following
a technical route that
finishes close to the
Old City. Last year?s
race was won by
Tom Dumoulin,
who became the first
Dutch male winner.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Animal 999 (r) 7.00 Meerkat Manor (r)
8.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD) 9.00 Motorway
Patrol (r) 10.00 Road Wars (r) 11.00
Warehouse 13 (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Three episodes (r)
8.00 The Simpsons. Grampa makes a confession
8.30 Modern Family
9.00 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life. The
impact of waste on our planet (5/6) (r) (AD)
10.00 The Late Late Show with James Corden:
Best of the Week. Highlights (r)
11.00 FILM: Scream (18, 1996) Wes Craven?s
horror which satirises the genre?s cliches,
starring Neve Campbell and David Arquette
1.05am A League of Their Own (r) (AD) 2.00
Most Shocking (r) (AD) 3.00 Duck Quacks Don?t
Echo (r) (AD) 4.00 Motorway Patrol. Double bill
(r) 5.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r)
6.00am The British (r) (AD) 7.00 Storm City (r)
(AD) 8.00 Fish Town (r) 9.00 The West Wing (r)
11.00 House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace
(r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West
Wing (r) 5.00 House (r)
6.00 House. The doctor treats a man convinced
he has diabetes (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A taxi
driver is beaten to death by an angry mob (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny and Baez try to prevent
an outbreak of violence in a high school (r)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Queen Margaery spends
time with her new husband, and fugitive Tyrion
walks the Long Bridge of Volantis (r) (AD)
10.10 Game of Thrones. The military arm of the
Faith of the Seven grows more aggressive, Jaime
and Bronn head south and Ellaria and the Sand
Snakes vow vengeance (r) (AD)
11.10 Game of Thrones (r) (AD)
12.15am The Sopranos (r) 2.25 House of Lies
(r) 3.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r) 4.00
The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00am Motorway Patrol (r) (AD) 7.00
Highway Patrol (r) 7.30 Border Patrol (r) 8.00
Border Security: Canada?s Front Line (r) (AD)
9.00 Elementary (r) (AD) 10.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 11.00 Cold Case (r)
12.00 Children?s Hospital (r) (AD) 1.00pm
Medical Emergency (r) (AD) 2.00 Send in the
Dogs (r) (AD) 3.00 Nothing to Declare 5.00
Border Security: Canada?s Front Line (r)
6.00 Medical Emergency (r) (AD)
6.30 Medical Emergency (r) (AD)
7.00 Children?s Hospital (12/12) (r) (AD)
7.30 Children?s Hospital (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Golden State Killer: Unmasked
10.00 Golden State Killer: Unmasked
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Murders That Shocked the Nation (r)
(AD) 2.00 Blindspot (r) 3.00 Nothing to
Declare. Four episodes (r) (AD) 5.00 Border
Security: Canada?s Front Line (r)
6.00am Proko?ev: Piano Concertos 6.45 Jonas
Kaufmann: An Evening With Puccini 9.00
Watercolour Challenge 9.30 The Art Show (AD)
10.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 11.00
Classic Albums (AD) 12.00 The Eighties (AD)
1.00pm Discovering: Charlie Chaplin (AD) 2.00
Watercolour Challenge 2.30 The Art Show (AD)
3.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 4.00 Classic
Albums (AD) 5.00 The Eighties (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Greta Garbo
7.00 Johnny Cash: Song by Song (AD)
7.30 Dolly Parton: Song by Song (AD)
8.00 Video Killed the Radio Star
8.30 Discovering: Coldplay (AD)
9.00 The Nineties
10.00 Coldplay: Austin City Limits
11.15 Brian Johnson?s A Life on the Road
12.15am Def Leppard: Viva! Hysteria 2.00
Johnny Cash: Behind Prison Walls. From the
Tennessee State Prison 3.00 Rock and Roll (AD)
4.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 5.00
Auction: Jackie Kennedy Special 5.30 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 8.30 Live Super
Rugby: Chiefs v Jaguares (Kick-off 8.35) 10.30
Rugby Greatest Games 10.40 Live Super Rugby:
Rebels v Crusaders (Kick-off 10.45). Coverage of
the match at AAMI Park in Melbourne 12.30pm
Sky Sports News 1.00 Bellew v Haye 2:
Weigh-In Live. The ?ghters are weighed ahead
of tomorrow?s bout 2.00 Live PGA Tour Golf: The
Wells Fargo Championship. Coverage of the
featured groups on day two at the Quail Hollow
Club in Charlotte, North Carolina 3.00 Live
Indian Premier League: Kings XI Punjab v
Mumbai Indians. All the action from the match
at the Holkar Cricket Stadium, Indore
7.30 Live FNF: Brighton & Hove Albion v
Manchester United (Kick-off 8.00). Coverage of
the Premier League match from AMEX Stadium
10.15 JD Ringside. Both ?ghters weigh-in
10.45 PL Greatest Games
11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00midnight Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.35pm The Blame
Game. The comedian Zoe Lyons joins the
regulars 11.05 The Graham Norton Show.
With guests Amy Schumer, Stephen Mangan
and Jess Glynne 11.55 Wannabe. Maxine
readies herself for the performance of a
lifetime. Last in the series 12.20am FILM: No
Strings Attached. Romantic comedy with
Natalie Portman and Ashton Kutcher (2011)
(AD) 2.00-6.00 BBC News
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Coast & Country.
Ruth Wignall meets a paddleboarder on an
epic journey around Wales, highlighting the
problem with plastic. Plus, Andrew Price joins
climbers keeping the cliffs litter free
ITV West
As ITV except: 10.30pm-10.45 ITV News
West Country. The latest headlines
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Peter &
Roughie?s Friday Football Show. Peter Martin
and Alan Rough round up the latest action
12.10am Teleshopping 2.10 After Midnight
3.40 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
To subscribe visit tlssubs.imbmsubs.com/SPRINGCW
Or call 01293 312178 and quote code SPRINGCW
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 UTV Life. Pamela
Ballantine presents 12.10am Teleshopping
1.40-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 BBC Young Musician 2018. The pianist Lucy
Parham, herself a former Young Musician
?nalist, joins Josie d?Arby as the competition
continues with the instrumentalists in the
keyboard category ?nal
9.00 The Jazz Ambassadors. The role of
America?s iconic jazz musicians in the Cold War,
and how the US Department gave the Civil
Rights movement a voice on the world stage
when it needed one most. See Viewing Guide
10.30 Latin Music USA. Documentary tracing
the in?uence of Mexican music in America. The
programme explores the mass immigration of
people into the US, and how it led to the
evolution of a new musical culture in the
borderlands, a 2,000-mile stretch of country
between Texas and California (3/4)
11.30 Kings of Rock ?n? Roll. Celebration of the
musical icons of the 1950s, including Bill Haley
and the Comets, Little Richard, Chuck Berry,
Buddy Holly, Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley
12.30am Stunning Soloists at the BBC
1.30 Latin Music USA. Documentary
2.30-3.30 Kings of Rock ?n? Roll
6.00am Hollyoaks (AD) 7.00 Couples Come
Dine with Me 8.00 How I Met Your Mother (AD)
9.00 New Girl (AD) 10.00 2 Broke Girls (AD)
11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD) 12.00 The
Goldbergs (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory
(AD) 2.00 How I Met Your Mother (AD) 3.00
New Girl (AD) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Sally tells Misbah that Imran
has been skipping school (AD)
7.30 Extreme Cake Makers. Rosie creates a
bulldog seated on a sugar-crafted throne
8.00 The Big Bang Theory. Sheldon asks the
gang to make life more dif?cult for him (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
9.00 FILM: Magic Mike (15, 2012) Comedy
drama starring Channing Tatum (AD)
11.15 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
11.40 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
12.10am Tattoo Fixers (AD) 1.15 Gogglebox
(SL) 2.20 First Dates (AD) 3.15 Rude Tube 4.10
2 Broke Girls. Double bill of the comedy (AD)
4.55 Couples Come Dine with Me
8.55am Food Unwrapped (AD) 9.30 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun 11.35 Four in a Bed (AD)
2.10pm Come Dine with Me (AD) 4.50 A Place
in the Sun: Winter Sun 5.55 Ugly House to
Lovely House with George Clarke (AD)
6.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo. An outbreak of
disease in the penguin colony leaves one chick
?ghting for its life (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows a
project near Newbury to construct a modern
farmhouse that combines an open-plan party
pad with functional spaces below (9/11)
9.00 Rough Justice. An elderly antiques dealer
is found stabbed on the ?oor of his shop.
Meanwhile, Liese avoids Fabian, and Michel has
a ?tness exam. In Flemish
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. Medics treat a diabetic
with an infected leg wound, a boy who has
swollen eyes after squirting detergent in them,
and a woman with knee pain (8/8) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. An 89-year-old man is
admitted with acute abdominal pain (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA
1.05 24 Hours in A&E. Double bill (AD)
3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats
11.00am Broken Arrow (PG, 1950) Western
starring James Stewart 12.50pm Rage at
Dawn (U, 1955) Western starring Randolph
Scott (AD) 2.40 Track of the Cat (U, 1954)
Western melodrama starring Robert Mitchum
4.45 Thunderbirds Are Go! (U, 1966) Puppet
adventure with the voice of Shane Rimmer
6.40 The Day After Tomorrow (12, 2004)
Disaster thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Dennis
Quaid and Emmy Rossum (AD)
9.00 Non-Stop (12, 2014) An air marshal on
a transatlantic ?ight searches for a terrorist
threatening to kill the passengers one by one.
Action thriller starring Liam Neeson, Julianne
Moore and Lupita Nyong?o (AD)
11.05 AVP: Alien vs Predator (15, 2004)
Scientists are caught up in a battle between two
races of deadly extraterrestrial creatures in a
mysterious pyramid. Sci-? thriller starring
Sanaa Lathan and Lance Henriksen (AD)
12.50am-3.55 Pulp Fiction (18, 1994)
A series of interlinked stories about the Los
Angeles underworld. Quentin Tarantino?s crime
drama starring John Travolta, Samuel L Jackson,
Uma Thurman and Bruce Willis (AD)
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records 7.10
Who?s Doing the Dishes? 7.55 Emmerdale (AD)
8.55 You?ve Been Framed! Gold 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 10.20 The Bachelorette
12.15pm Emmerdale (AD) 1.15 You?ve Been
Framed! Gold 1.45 The Ellen De Generes Show
2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show 5.50 Take Me Out
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Harry Hill
presents videos featuring youngsters
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Alan?s affair with
Lyndsey is jeopardised
8.30 Superstore. A dead body is found in the
drywall at Cloud 9 (AD)
9.00 FILM: Hercules (12, 2014) Mythological
adventure starring Dwayne Johnson, Ian
McShane and John Hurt (AD)
11.00 Family Guy (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (AD)
11.55 American Dad! Stan sets up a date for
Deputy Director Bullock (AD)
12.30am American Dad! Stan meets George W
Bush (AD) 12.55 The Cleveland Show (AD)
1.25 Two and a Half Men 1.50 Superstore (AD)
2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street 6.55
Heartbeat (AD) 8.00 The Royal 9.00 Judge Judy
10.25 Agatha Christie?s Marple (AD) 12.30pm
The Royal 1.35 Heartbeat (AD) 2.40 Classic
Coronation Street 3.45 On the Buses 4.50
You?re Only Young Twice 5.20 George and
Mildred 5.55 Heartbeat (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. An army friend of
Seth?s becomes a murder suspect (AD)
8.00 Agatha Christie?s Marple. A stranger
provides an alibi that proves the innocence of an
executed man, throwing suspicion on all
members of the Argyle family
10.00 The Syndicate. The past comes back to
haunt Jamie when the local drug boss pays him
a visit. Stuart is torn between Leanne and Amy,
while Bob says goodbye to those he loves (5/5)
11.05 Les Dawson: An Audience With That
Never Was. The comedian entertains an
audience as a hologram
12.05am Vera (AD) 1.55 FILM: The Constant
Gardener (15, 2005) Political thriller with
Ralph Fiennes (AD, SL) 4.00 Love Your Garden
4.55 Judge Judy 5.35 ITV3 Nightscreen
6.00am Football?s Greatest: Johan Cruyff 6.15
The Chase 7.50 Cycling: Tour de Yorkshire 8.55
Live Cycling: Tour de Yorkshire. The second and
?nal stage of the women?s race 12.45pm Cash
Cowboys 1.45 Pawn Stars 2.15 Live Cycling:
Tour de Yorkshire. The second stage of the men?s
race from Barnsley to Ilkley
6.30 World Cup Top Goalscorers. Some of the
best strikers in the history of the World Cup
6.45 Live Uefa European U17 Championship:
England v Israel (Kick-off 7.00)
9.00 Cycling: Tour de Yorkshire. The second
stage of the men?s and women?s races, both of
which travel from Barnsley to Ilkley, with the
women?s event reaching a conclusion
10.00 FILM: The Bourne Identity (12,
2002) An amnesiac man pulled from the sea by
the crew of a ?shing boat is targeted by
assassins as he tries to discover who he is.
Thriller starring Matt Damon, Franka Potente,
Chris Cooper, Clive Owen and Brian Cox (AD)
12.25am The Americans. Period drama 1.25 Ax
Men (SL) 2.20 The Protectors (SL) 2.50 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Top Gear (AD)
8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage Hunters
10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top Gear (AD)
3.00 Sin City Motors 4.00 Steve Austin?s
Broken Skull Challenge 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Room 101
6.40 Would I Lie to You?
7.20 Would I Lie to You?: The Unseen Bits.
A compilation of unseen material
8.00 Into the Fire. An unexploded bomb brings
Birmingham?s motorway network to a halt (r)
9.00 Red Dwarf. Kryten falls head over heels in
love with a female mechanoid (AD)
9.40 Red Dwarf. The crew discovers a
miraculous machine (AD)
10.20 Red Dwarf. The crew lands on a
crime-free planet (AD)
11.00 Have I Got a Bit More News for You.
Presented by Kirsty Young, with funnyman Ross
Noble and the poet John Cooper Clarke
12.00 QI 12.40am Would I Lie to You?: The
Unseen Bits 1.20 Mock the Week 2.00 QI
2.40 Would I Lie to You?: The Unseen Bits 3.20
Parks and Recreation 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Juliet Bravo 11.00
The Bill 12.00 Lovejoy 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Hi-de-Hi! 2.20 Are You
Being Served? 3.00 London?s Burning (AD) 4.00
You Rang, M?Lord? 5.00 Lovejoy
6.00 Hi-de-Hi! Gladys is demoted
6.40 Are You Being Served? A glamorous
saleswoman arrives
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. Howard
suspects Pearl is cheating on him
8.00 Miss Fisher?s Murder Mysteries. An
investigation ensues when the lead actor in a
new movie Bride of Babylon, is murdered on set.
Australian crime drama starring Essie Davis
9.00 WPC 56. Gloria is accused of a crime (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The death of a teenage tennis
star occupies the team when it is suggested her
suicide jump two years earlier was anything but,
and people with motives for murder soon
emerge (6/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London?s Burning (AD)
2.15 The Pinkertons (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Surviving Alcatraz:
Escaping the Rock (AD) 11.00 Abandoned
Engineering (AD) 12.00 Time Team 1.00pm
Planet Earth (AD) 2.00 The Blue Planet 3.00
Coast (AD) 4.00 Surviving Alcatraz: Escaping
the Rock. A 1962 escape from the island prison
(AD) 5.00 Abandoned Engineering (AD)
6.00 The World at War
7.00 Abandoned Engineering. Ruined
engineering projects that have been put to
alternative use (1/6) (AD)
8.00 UFOs Declassi?ed. Reports of silvery
objects above Los Angeles in 1942
9.00 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
Bob ?outs tradition
9.40 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
10.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
11.00 Surviving Alcatraz: Escaping the Rock.
Documentary investigating a 1962 escape
from the island prison (AD)
12.00 Abandoned Engineering (AD) 1.00am
The World at War. Documentary 2.00 Mummies
Alive 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm P郿raig Post: SDS (Postman Pat: SDS)
5.15 Zack & Quack (r) 5.35 Su Shiusaidh
(Little Suzy?s Zoo) (r) 5.40 Charlie is Lola
(Charlie and Lola) (r) 5.50 Seonaidh (Shaun the
Sheep) (r) 6.00 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks (r)
6.10 Fior Bhall-coise (Extreme Football) (r)
6.35 Machair (r) 7.00 An L� (News) 7.25
Binneas: Na Trads (r) 7.30 Alba: 1973 (r)
8.00 Air an Urlar (On the Stage) (r) 8.30
Dealbhan Fraoich (r) 9.00 Call air Cladach Ile
(The Loss on Islay?s Shore) (r) 10.00 Seirm.
Musical performances by Jarlath Henderson
and Lau (r) 11.00 Pairc Yellowstone (Wild
Yellowstone) (r) 11.50-12midnight Dhan
Uisge (Loch Lomond) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Hafod Haul (r) 6.15 Bobi Jac (r)
6.25 Guto Gwningen (r) 6.40 Tomos a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 6.50 Ty Mel (r) 7.00 Boj (r)
7.15 Gwdihw (r) 7.30 Peppa (r) 7.35 Teulu Ni
(r) 7.45 Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 8.00
Cymylaubychain (r) 8.10 Oli Wyn 8.20 Nico
N鬵 (r) 8.30 Cled (r) 8.40 Meic y Marchog (r)
8.55 Bach a Mawr (r) 9.10 Stiw (r) 9.20
Enwog o Fri, Ardal Ni! (r) 9.35 Nodi (r) 9.45
Ben Dant (r) 10.00 Hafod Haul (r) 10.15 Bobi
Jac (r) 10.25 Guto Gwningen (r) 10.40 Tomos
a?i Ffrindiau (r) 10.50 Ty Mel (r) 11.00 Boj (r)
11.15 Gwdihw (r) 11.30 Peppa (r) 11.35 Teulu
Ni (r) 11.45 Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 12.00 News
S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Ysgol Ddawns Anti
Karen (r) 12.30 Priodas Pum Mil (r) 1.30
Margaret: Ddoe a Heddiw (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 3.05 Pengelli (r) 3.30 Dei a Tom (r)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05
Stwnsh: Crwbanod Ninja (r) 5.30 Stwnsh: Larfa
(r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Y Gemau Gwyllt. Contestants
from the south east compete (r) 6.00 News
S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad. Na Parry
inspects the wardrobe of a royal harpist (r)
6.30 Garddio a Mwy. Iwan Edwards gets
creative in the kitchen with rhubarb (r) 7.00
Heno. Magazine programme, featuring stories
from all over Wales 8.00 Pobol y Cwm. Sheryl
asks Gethin to leave her alone, but whether he
will adhere to her request remains to be seen.
Meanwhile, Tyler tries to build bridges with his
mother (AD) 8.25 Llanifeiliaid. New series. Life
in Wales?s most unusual village (AD)
9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30 Codi Pac. Geraint
Hardy explores interesting activities, places to
stay, places to eat and things to see in the
market town of Machynlleth in Powys
10.00 Deuawdau Rhys Meirion. Daniel Lloyd
invites Rhys Meirion to his home town
of Rhosllannerchrugog and shows him the
bright lights of London as they visit various
places from Daniel?s past (r)
11.00-11.35 Y Stiwdio Gefn (r)
18
Friday May 4 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3327
5
6
24
7
22
25
18
8
12
9
11
8
15
8
20
26
10
1
11
13
8
12
14
1
8
15
16
25
17
12
7
7
15
Train Tracks No 399
25
20
22
26
15
15
4
4
15
26
23
26
25
13
20
22
5
26
20
8
5
18
14
15
18
23
15
13
11
23
12
18
15
15
7
4
5
18
25
5
15
24
21
� PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7643
8
25
1
3
1
7
5
4
2
4
3
6
5
A
25
3
24
5
3
1
17
6
18
19
12
23
15
1
6
25
1
10
23
1
13
25
7
3
16
P
22
25
2
12
25
1
19
I
23
5
9
1
15
25
8
24
15
23
16
1
B
C
24
18
18
8
26
15
21
26
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
25
12
Across
1
7
8
9
10
11
13
15
Pulsate (5)
With breasts uncovered (7)
Suitor; devotee (7)
Unfavourable (7)
Dye plant (5)
Send away (7)
One (unspecified) (3)
By what means (3)
Solution to Crossword 7642
CHAMP
W
I
O
MOR E L
S
I
PHOT
I
B
CY PRU
A
R
RE PRO
D R
I MAGO
F N F
F I GH T
S T E A L T H
P
L
A A
L O F ARS I
N
C R
OGRA PH I C
E D
U
S GUS S E T
R
L
H
DUC T I ON
B H R
BOOS T ER
E O E U
ER DENS E
17 Uncertain; indistinct (7)
19 Gather together (5)
21 Sportsperson (7)
23 Not the one or the other (7)
24 Sincere and very serious (7)
25 Rising and falling with the
sea (5)
Down
1 Windpipe (7)
2 (Of type) upright (5)
3 Caribbean country (8)
4 Flashy black-marketeer (4)
5 Give new strength to (7)
6 Valuable possession (5)
7 Semi-transparent (11)
12 Utopian (8)
14 Dairy product (7)
16 Worthless person (7)
18 Ring-shaped bread roll (5)
20 Garden pest (5)
22 Level; regular (4)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
Correction In the solution to times2 Crossword No 7641 printed
yesterday, 18 Across should have been given as GUNG HO and
15 Down as FUTURE. We apologise for the errors.
18
20
5
15
11
18
8
5
26
23
21
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
P
C
I
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or
text TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network
access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution
call 0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica No 4249
T
E
F
I
L
A
E
E
Y
O
E
U
O
V
I
P
P
R
L
I
E
L
W
M
I
E
U
F
E
M
R
R
I
S
I
T
Winners will receive a Collins English Dictionary & Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle and text in the numbers in the three
shaded boxes. Text TIMES followed by a space, then your
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What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
N
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce
a completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4319
Futoshiki No 3165
Kakuro No 2124
1
4
3
30
4
29
12
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
>
>
7
?
4
?
29
14
>
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
11
4
3
4
4
24
16
30
10
?
10
6
29
38
19
3
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
7
16
31
21
3
3
7
<
4
4
10
11
10
11
8
6
22
3
4
7
4
4
8
6
3
� PUZZLER MEDIA
21
1
20
the times | Friday May 4 2018
19
1G T
MindGames
The Dutch Defence, based on an
early ... f5, has a somewhat dubious reputation as it already weakens the black king?s field. Nevertheless, by staking an early claim
to the centre in a kind of kingside
mirror-image of the Sicilian Defence, Black sets up various aggressive opportunities. The Dutch
has been a favourite of former
world champion Mikhail Botvinnik while Savielly Tartakower,
Alexander Alekhine and Vasily
Smyslov also wheeled it out on
occasion.
Today?s game from the US
Chess Championship proves that
White cannot continue against
the Dutch in an overly cavalier
fashion. When he played his
eighth move White must have
been confident that Black would
maintain his triangle of pawns on
d5, e6 and f5. However, he was in
for a rude shock.
White: Alexander Onischuk
Black: Varuzhan Akobian
US Championship, St Louis 2018
Dutch Defence
1 d4 e6 2 c4 f5 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 g3 d5
5 Bg2 c6 6 Nh3 Bd6 7 0-0 0-0 8
Qc2
8 b3 instead maintains the integrity of White?s central pawns.
8 ... dxc4 9 e4 e5 10 exf5 exd4 11
Ne2 c5
In De Jong-Ulibin, Alghero 2011
Black tried 11 ... b5.
12 Qxc4+ Kh8 13 Ng5 Nc6 14 Bf4
Also possible is the immediate
14 Nf7+ Rxf7 15 Qxf7 Ne5 16 Qb3
d3 with unclear play.
14 ... Bxf5 15 Nf7+ Rxf7 16 Qxf7
Rb8 17 Bxc6 bxc6 18 Rfe1 d3
________
� 4 1 D i]
�D DQ0p]
� Dpg h D]
轉 0 DbD ]
� D D G D]
蹹 DpD ) ]
跴) DN) )]
�$ D $ I ]
谅媚牌侨
19 Bxd6
This is inaccurate. White should
play 19 Rad1 Rxb2 20 Bxd6 Qxd6
21 Nf4 Rb8 22 Re3, when White
stands slightly better but Black is
well in the game.
19 ... Qxd6 20 Nc3 d2 21 Re7 Rg8
22 Rxa7 Bg4 23 Qe7 Qxe7
Even more ambitious is 23 ...
Qd4.
24 Rxe7 Nd5 25 Re2
An absolute blunder. The only
way to fight is 25 f3 to deflect the
black bishop from covering d7.
After 25 ... Bxf3 26 Rd7 g5, Black
stands well but White can fight.
________
� D D Dri]
郉 D D 0p]
� DpD D D]
轉 0nD D ]
� D D DbD]
蹹 H D ) ]
跴) 0R) )]
�$ D D I ]
谅媚牌侨
25 ... d1Q+ White resigns
After 26 Nxd1 Bxe2 Black wins
a piece. 26 Rxd1 Nxc3 leads to a
similar catastrophe.
________
醨h DRD D] Winning Move
郉b! D Dp]
� D D 1k0] White to play. This position is from
Bundesliga 2018.
轉B0pD 4 ] Rasmussen-Bredemeier,
The black king is horribly exposed and
軵D 0 D D] White has various ways to finish off.
蹹 D D D ] However, he now found a clever sequence
� ) D )P)] leading to checkmate. Can you see it?
贒 D DRI ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
EASY
46 +14
70%
OF IT
+9
MEDIUM
72 x 7 +82
HARDER
2/
3
x3
?9
�
+ 8 � 13
+1/2
OF IT
? 74
+1/5
OF IT
+ 38
3/
4
? 66
166 + 975 x 3 ? 654
+1/3
OF IT
you lead. The ditty is, ?If you?re
leading a suit you like, lead low for
like; if you?re leading a suit you
hate, lead high for hate.? Lead ?9.
Good leads are ace from ace-king Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
and, in descending order of appeal,
?9 7 5
king from king-queen down to the
?K 3
lowest sequence ten from ten-nine.
?8 6 4
A singleton lead can work bril?AQ J 10 6
liantly; overall, I?d put it about on a
? AQ 4
? J 10 3 2
N
par with king from king-queen.
?9 7 4
?8 5
W E
However, frequently you are not
?9 3 2
?A J 10 7
S
dealt a good lead. What do you do?
?9 7 4 3 ? K 8 6 ?8 5 2
First, eliminate really dangerous
?AQ J 10 6 2
leads, such as from a lone honour
?KQ 5
or broken honours eg ? K952,
?K
?AQ92 or ?KJ72. Here?s why:
S
W
N
E
Dummy
1?
Pass
2?
Pass
West ?8753
East
3? (1) Pass
4?
End
?AQ92
---?J104
(1) Repeating the six-card suit with a jump
Declarer
bid to show 16+ points.
?K6
Lead ?2 and declarer wins ?K.
Contract: 4? , Opening Lead: ?9
Left to his own devices, he cannot
West eliminated spades from the
win ?K ? he?ll try a finesse,
leading ?3 to ?K, but it will lose. broken ? AQ holding, clubs ?
Dummy
dummy?s bid suit and hearts ?
West ?8653
trumps. That left diamonds.
East
West carefully selected ?9,
?KJ72
---?1094
Declarer
leading high for hate. East won
?AQ
?A and knew not to return a diaLead ?2 and declarer wins ?Q. mond. Instead (looking at
Left to his own devices, he?ll try a dummy?s weakness), he switched
finesse, ?3 to ?Q, but it will lose. to ? J (top of a sequence).
Say you have this hand, on lead
If declarer ducked, ? J would
after the auction 1?-4?.
win, followed swiftly by ? 2 to ? Q,
then ? A. At the table, declarer
? AQ 9 2
covered ? J with ? K. No good ?
?Q 4 2
?K J 2
West won ? A, cashed ? Q and led
?932
? 4 to ? 10. Down one.
On a diamond return at trick
You eliminate spades, hearts and
diamonds from your broken hon- two, declarer makes 12 tricks,
drawing trumps and overtaking
ours. That leaves clubs.
Here comes the clever bit. You ?K with ?A to enjoy ?QJ106.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
can send a message with the card
? 776
5/
6
OF IT
OF IT
? 496
+1/2
OF IT
+1/3
OF IT
+ 827
3
3
2
6
2
5
4
6
Polygon
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
6
4
5
3
Set Square No 2127
� PUZZLER MEDIA
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 11 words, average;
15, good; 20, very good; 26, excellent
Yesterday?s answers
animist, anti, intima, isatin, main,
mantis, matins, mavis, mini, mint, mist,
nativism, nisi, saint, santim, sati, satin,
savin, simian, snit, stain, tian, vain,
vina, visa, visit, vista, vitamin
Killer Moderate No 5990
11
3
5
17
15
21
11
11
13
11min
12
13
16
12
6
11
11
8
8
14
14
21
3
14
8
4
13
3
13
22
13
6
11
16
22
4
x
�
x
23
9
19
19
7
21
12
34
16
24
8
10
7
14
12
16
11
9
24
15
17
-
20
11
13
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
3
=
31
=5
=
42
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
S A P P E
S
O R
CH E E S
I
C
A
AM I T Y
O
L
P UDD
S
S
E
L AME N
E
A
A
P A T E R
U
A
I
P E L V I
R
1
7
3
4
2
5
8
6
9
5
8
4
7
9
6
3
1
2
9
6
2
8
3
1
7
4
5
3
4
1
6
8
2
9
5
7
E B
E
R
I
I N
G
A
T S
E
S
F AM I
D
S ME
7
2
9
3
5
4
1
8
6
R B
R
GE
A
OK
I
A N
G
MP
O
L I
N
R T
E R
E
R S
I
E D
E
E
P
L E
R
A S
O
ON
M I S HA
A
T
X
RU E
E
V
P
D
E ACH
L
H
A
I N F
D
L
F
I NDU L
T
I
HOP S C
E
U
T
ROBU S
P
X T
U
CR
B
L U
L
GE
N
O T
T
Set Square 2126
8
5
6
9
1
7
2
3
4
2
1
8
5
4
9
6
7
3
6
4
2
3
8
1
7
9
5
7
8
1
2
9
5
3
6
4
9
3
5
4
6
7
1
8
2
2
9
6
1
7
4
5
3
8
3
7
4
8
5
9
2
1
6
2
9
1
3
8
6
7
5
4
3
6
5
4
7
9
2
1
8
7
4
8
5
2
1
9
6
3
1
8
9
2
6
7
4
3
5
5
9
3
7
6
2
1
4
8
8
7
1
3
4
9
2
5
6
2
6
4
5
1
8
9
3
7
6
5
9
2
7
3
8
1
4
4
9
7
1
6
3
5
2
8
6
3
5
2
7
8
4
9
1
4
+
3
+
x
x
6
+
+
5
�
x
x
1
x
9
8
3
5
1
6
9
4
7
8
2
2
9
8
3
7
1
6
5
4
8
2
5
7
4
9
3
6
1
QU
P
OR
I
OS
I
E N
G
S
S
CH
A
S H
E S T S
K
I
T I ON
E
S B OW
L
S
Z A
C
C
OKRA
J
N
AN Y
C O
AK E N
1
5
8
6
2
3
4
7
9
5
1
9
7
4
8
6
2
3
4
6
7
9
3
2
8
5
1
8
2
3
5
1
6
9
4
7
6
3
2
8
5
4
1
9
7
4
2
6
1
3
5
8
7
9
9
5
7
6
4
8
3
2
1
8
1
3
7
9
2
5
4
6
3
2
8
1
5
4
6
7
9
4
1
7
8
9
6
5
2
3
1
8
6
4
3
5
7
9
2
9
3
5
6
2
7
4
8
1
7
4
2
9
8
1
3
6
5
7
4
6
2
1
3
8
9
5
1
3
9
8
5
6
2
4
7
5
1
3
9
8
2
4
7
6
6
7
2
4
3
5
9
1
8
9
8
4
1
6
7
5
2
3
4
7
9
8 7
9
7
3 1
7
5
3
7
5 2 3
3 4 1
9
3 4 8
1 2
9 8
9 3 1
8 1 2
6
7
9
1
2
8
6
6
4
9
Train Tracks 398
1
5
5
2
4
3
2
4
4
A
6
3
3
4
1
+
7
-
4
1
2
B
F
O
X
B
M
R
A
L
O
B
N
T
S
O
E
N
Cell Blocks 3209
Lexica 4248
D
E
M
2
1
2
?
3
5
4
1
4
3
5
T
T
4
O
P
E
L
L
M
A
U
Y
L
E
T
Suko 2228
1
4
?
5
4
?
3 > 2
?
2
1
3
7
B
F
A
L
1 < 2 < 4 < 5
KenKen 4318
O
A
R
G
Futoshiki 3164
3 < 5
5
7
4
9
1
3
6
8
2
1 3
6
2 1 3 9
4 2 1 8
9 7
2 1
8 9 4 3
1 3
4 2 5 9
2 1 3 8
9 7
Quintagram
1 Mayor
2 Speed
3 Polish
4 Limpet
5 Holy Island
T
Brain Trainer
Easy 3
Medium 916
Harder 3,728
3
7
7
5
2
3
3
4
4
Word watch
Orphrey (a)
A richly
embroidered
band or border on
an ecclesiastical
vestment
Oropesa (c)
A float used in
minesweeping
Orpharion (b)
A large lute used
in the 16th and
17th centuries
Chess
Killer 5989
4
6
7
5
2
8
1
3
9
Kakuro 2123
Codeword 3326
B A
R
UR
I
E V
A
G L
Killer 5988
7
=3
x
+
Quick Cryptic 1083
Sudoku 9844
27
5
+
=
4
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
We?ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
+
-
Lexica 4247
56min
= 39 the numbers
x
x
Sudoku 9843
Killer Deadly No 5991
Enter each of
-
Solutions
Sudoku 9842
Bridge Andrew Robson
Beginner Corner 54
No good lead ?
leading high for hate
OF IT
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Double Dutch
Cell Blocks No 3210
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
1 Rg8+! Kh5
(1 ... Kf5 2 Bd3+
mates) 2 Be2+
Kh4 sets up
3 Qg3+! Rxg3
4 fxg3 mate
Quiz
1 Alter ego 2 Iceland 3 Macbeth 4 Taste 5 Bottom
6 Virginia Bottomley, now Baroness Bottomley of
Nettlestone 7 Nottinghamshire 8 Mona Lisa
9 [Apollo] 17 10 Methane 11 Sir John Franklin?s lost
expedition of HMS Erebus and HMS Terror to locate
the Northwest Passage 12 Kea (Nestor notabilis)
13 Bolivia 14 Lance Armstrong. He won the 1995
edition 15 George Ezra
04.05.18
MindGames
Mild No 9845
Fill the grid so that every
column, every row and
every 3x3 box contains
the digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
Josephine
Balmer
Orphrey
a An embroidered band
b Musicianship
c Skill at writing
Oropesa
a Travel by the most
direct route
b Bone-setting
c A float
Orpharion
a The path to the
Underworld
b A lute
c A foundling
Answers on page 19
Difficult No 9846
3
9
6
6
Fiendish No 9847
1
4
2
4
3 8
1
2
7 6
5 6
7 9
7
1
8 3
7
6
8
6
5
2
8 6
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
1 9 3
5 6 2
1 4
5
5 2
3 4 8
9 1 4
2
6
9 3
8
4
7
5 9
7
7
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight to receive four clues for any of today?s
puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
The Times Daily Quiz Olav Bjortomt
Suko No 2228
1 Which term for a
person?s secondary
personality is derived
from the Latin for
?other I??
11 Dan Simmons?s 2007
horror novel The
Terror is a fictionalised
account of which 1840s
Arctic expedition?
2 Snaefellsjokull is a
700,000-year-old glaciercapped stratovolcano in
which island country?
12 Found on New
Zealand?s South Island,
what is the world?s only
truly alpine parrot?
15
3 Which Shakespeare
play is named after the
first reigning Scottish
king to make a
pilgrimage to Rome?
6 Which female
Conservative MP for
South West Surrey
was appointed health
secretary in 1992?
4 The medical term
gustatory relates to a
human?s sense of what?
5 Which 1990s
sitcom starred Adrian
Edmondson as Eddie
Hitler and Rik Mayall as
Richie Richard?
7 Lord Byron?s family
seat of Newstead
Abbey is in which East
Midlands county?
8 Which 1915 opera
by Max von Schillings
is named after a
portrait by Leonardo
da Vinci?
13 Performed in a
mask and devil suit, the
diablada is a dance from
the region of Oruro in
which country?
9 What was the number
of the last Apollo
mission to land men on
the moon?
14 Who remains the
only American cyclist to
have won the Cl醩ica de
San Sebasti醤?
10 In 1776, Alessandro
Volta discovered
which flammable gas
at Lake Maggiore?
15 Which English
singer-songwriter
(b 1993) is pictured?
Answers on page 19
Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the
spaces so that the number in each
circle is equal to the sum of the four
surrounding spaces, and each colour
total is correct
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1084 by Wurm
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
12
14
15
17
18
20
22
16
19
21
23
Across
1 Master lost for words (8)
5 Complaint from bishop
returning payment (4)
9 Elizabeth?s favourite duke:
dissolute fellow (5)
10 The short-term view? (7)
11 One looking for attention (3)
12 Tories out now! (5,4)
13 Saw middle of ?re must spread
(6)
15 Flutter involving one sport
generates capital (6)
17 Stale lamb minced for
seasoned dish (9)
19 Proper contest shortened (3)
20 Saint Oswald somehow creates
facetious precept (4,3)
21 Surrealist in modern style (5)
22 Mysterious character takes
ecstasy after work (4)
23 Be longer wandering in French
city (8)
Down
1 Piece in good books about
divine chaps (7)
2
3
4
6
7
8
14
16
17
18
19
Delete article in Irish Gaelic
(5)
All cables are deciphered and
readily understood (5,2,1,4)
Maiden very interested in
giant (5)
Allow MP over in vessel (7)
Passionate knight leaves
showy clothing (5)
Philosopher showing sense
isn?t upset with Genet (12)
Refugees? centre with an
African (7)
That place accommodating a
tragedy, initially? (7)
Tightwad ? or man giving
tons away? (5)
Ox perhaps to appear
menacing (5)
Bend up to hug English star (5)
Yesterday?s solution on page 19
3 8
6
1
7 3 6
1
9
5 8
4 5
9
9 4
2 4
7
8
8
7
9 4 5
t
documentary about the Syrian war
comes at a dismal juncture; it has by
now lasted longer than the Second
World War. In the first of two parts,
Syria: The World?s War started in 2011
with footage of the peaceful marches
calling for reform, then showed how
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 The Of?cial
Chart with MistaJam 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
Radio 1?s Dance Anthems with MistaJam
7.00 Danny Howard. The DJ is in for Annie
Mac with Radio 1?s of?cial start to the
weekend 9.00 Pete Tong. The hottest new
dance tracks, plus interviews with leading
DJs 11.00 Eats Everything 1.00am B.Traits
4.00 Radio 1?s Essential Mix
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans. With Louise Minchin,
Danny Baker, James Martin and Reef 9.30
Ken Bruce 12.00 Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve
Wright 5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Tony
Blackburn?s Golden Hour. A selection of
popular tracks from the past 50 years 8.00
Friday Night Is Music Night. The BBC Concert
Orchestra and the Guy Barker Big Band
perform a concert live from Cheltenham
Jazz Festival 10.00 Sounds of the 80s. Sara
hosts an 80?s tropical party 12.00 Anneka
Rice: The Happening 2.00am Radio 2?s Funky
Soul Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: New to 2
4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: 21st
Century Songs 5.00 Huey on Saturday
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Music, news and the occasional surprise,
with Petroc Trelawny. Including 7.00, 8.00
News. 7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
Ian Skelly presents a selection of classical
music. 9.30 Listeners? ideas for companion
pieces on the Essential Classics playlist.
10.10 Time Traveller. A quirky slice of
cultural history. 10.50 Ian is once again
joined by the author Bernard MacLaverty,
who talks about the cultural in?uences that
have inspired and shaped his life and career
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Copland (1900-1990)
Donald Macleod explores Aaron Copland?s
last years and his retirement from
composition to concentrate on a new
endeavour ? conducting. Copland (Music for
a Great City ? IV, Towards the Bridge;
Connotations; Piano Concerto; Three
Latin-American Sketches ? I. Estrobilio; and
At the River)
1.00pm News
Claudia Winkleman and Mary Berry judge the home cooking
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
The Verbier Festival, featuring the Russian
pianist Nikolai Lugansky. Presented by Sarah
Walker. Tchaikovsky (The Seasons, Op 37b);
and Rachmaninov (10 Preludes, Op 23)
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Penny Gore ends her week featuring the BBC
Symphony Orchestra with a concert from
their recent trip to Switzerland with Chief
Conductor Sakari Oramo. The venue is
Geneva?s beautiful Victoria Hall, named after
the English Queen Victoria. Anna Clyne (This
Midnight Hour); Beethoven (Symphony No 6
in F ? Pastoral); Richard Strauss (Suite in B
?at for 13 wind instruments, Op 4); and
Florent Schmitt (Symphony No 2)
4.30 BBC Young Musician 2018
Penny Gore hosts highlights from this year?s
BBC Young Musician keyboard ?nalists,
ahead of the keyboard category ?nals
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty presents a selection of music
and news from the arts world.
Including 5.00, 6.00 News
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
In Tune?s specially curated playlist: an
eclectic mix of music, featuring favourites,
lesser-known gems, and a few surprises.
Tracks by Offenbach, Beethoven and Vivaldi
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
The BBC Singers, under the conductor So?
Jeannin, at Milton Court Concert Hall in
London?s Barbican. Three of Handel?s
Coronation Anthems and his Dixit Dominus
give the BBC Singers and St James? Baroque
the chance to shine in much-loved music.
Handel (Zadok the Priest; Organ Concerto in
F ? Cuckoo and the Nightingale; My Heart Is
Inditing; The King Shall Rejoice; and Dixit
Dominus, HWV232)
10.00 The Verb
Examining autism, poetry, language and
writing, with James McGrath on the
language used to describe autism and Kate
Fox on coming out as an autistic poet.
Presented by Ian McMillan
10.45 The Essay: My Life in Music
The composer and viola player Sally Beamish
talks about her violinist mother?s fascination
with Shostakovich ? and explores the
Second Piano Trio, looking at the in?uence it
had on her own work. She describes her
mother?s gradual decline into dementia, and
their complex and intense relationship
11.00 Music Planet
The Moroccan singer Aicha Redouane is in
session. Plus, a road trip to Greece, and a
mixtape from the Afrobeat star Seun Kuti.
Presented by Lopa Kothari
1.00am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day (r)
6.00 Today
With Martha Kearney and Nick Robinson
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 The Reunion
Sue MacGregor reunites cast and crew of The
Young Ones, including stars Nigel Planer,
Alexei Sayle, Chris Ryan and Stephen Frost,
and the writer Lise Mayer (5/5) (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: The Life and
Rhymes of Benjamin Zephaniah
The poet?s autobiography (5/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Discussion and interviews, presented by Jane
Garvey. Including at 10.45 the 15 Minute
Drama: The Wings of the Dove (5/10)
11.00 The Remittance
The prejudices, politics and pride of the
multi-billion pound world of migrant money
11.30 When the Dog Dies
By Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent (6/6) (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Four Thought
Discussion of diagnoses, with child and
adolescent psychiatrist Ann York (r)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Chinese Characters
Rana Mitter explores the life of Deng
Xiaoping. Last in the series
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Watch Me
While I?m Sleeping
By Christopher William Hill. A couple fail to
?nd time to address their problems and
tensions begin to mount. With Joseph Kloska
and Mark Edel-Hunt. See Radio Choice
3.00 Gardeners? Question Time
Peter Gibbs presents the programme from
the new Temperate House at Kew Gardens,
with James Wong and Anne Swithinbank
answering listeners? queries
3.45 Short Works
Craters by Chris Power
4.00 Last Word
Obituaries, presented by Matthew Bannister
4.30 More or Less
Investigating numbers (2/7)
4.55 The Listening Project
A theologian father and a daughter who has
let go of her religious roots converse
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
events spiralled, as Doucet explained,
into unspeakable savagery.
There is no shortage of horrific
footage from Syria to fill an hour?s TV
? we see it frequently on the news ?
but Doucet?s skilful film used it
relatively sparingly and thus to greater
effect. Doucet, the BBC?s chief
international correspondent, devoted a
lot of time to exploring Syrian politics
and the propaganda war that is raging,
and aired the opposing points of view
through a series of interviews. These
included a young woman imprisoned
by Assad?s regime for six months; an
official who claimed, poker-faced,
that the rebels had poisoned children
with sarin so they could blame it on
the government; a middle-aged,
middle-class pro-government woman
who had seen family, friends and
neighbours killed and was surprised
to find herself spitting on the corpse
of a rebel; and a photographer who
had been imprisoned and beaten and
in 2013 saw those children gassed in
their pyjamas.
Doucet has covered this conflict
since the beginning, so there was
footage of her stumbling on appalling
scenes of murder in real time.
Tomorrow she will bring us up to the
present, wretched day. If you want a
thoughtful, intelligent and, naturally,
thoroughly depressing recent history
of Syria, you have it here.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 The News Quiz
Topical comedy panel game (4/8)
7.00 The Archers
Brian comes clean. Meanwhile,
Kenton considers his actions
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Love Henry James:
The Wings of the Dove (5/10) (r)
8.00 Any Questions?
From Lady Margaret School in Putney,
south-west London
8.50 A Point of View
Stella Tillyard re?ects on a topical issue
9.00 Chinese Characters Omnibus
Parts 1-5. The history of China through ?ve
key personalities (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Valley at
the Centre of the World
By Malachy Tallack. Alice works through
Maggie?s old correspondence, while Sandy
struggles with his attraction to Jo (5/10)
11.00 Great Lives
Tej Lalvani nominates the theoretical
physicist Richard Feynman (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Mark D?Arcy reports from Westminster
11.55 The Listening Project
A father and daughter re?ect on their mutual
attitude of positively (r)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week: The Life
and Rhymes of Benjamin Zephaniah (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am I?m Sorry I?ll Read That Again 8.30
Brothers in Law 9.00 It?s Your Round 9.30
After Henry 10.00 The Master of Ballantrae
11.00 Podcast Radio Hour 12.00 I?m Sorry
I?ll Read That Again 12.30pm Brothers in
Law 1.00 John Mortimer Presents The Trials
of Marshall Hall 1.30 Mr Pollock?s Theatres
2.00 The Secret History 2.15 Shakespeare?s
Restless World 2.30 The Enchanted April
2.45 Sissinghurst: An Un?nished History
3.00 The Master of Ballantrae 4.00 It?s Your
Round 4.30 After Henry 5.00 Minor
Adjustment 5.30 Lucy Porter in the Family
Way 6.00 Duel 6.30 Mastertapes 7.00 I?m
Sorry I?ll Read That Again. Comedy with John
Cleese 7.30 Brothers in Law. Comedy 8.00
John Mortimer Presents The Trials of
Marshall Hall. A woman cyclist is shot dead
8.30 Mr Pollock?s Theatres. The world of toy
theatre 9.00 Podcast Radio Hour. Discussion
on global podcasts 10.00 Comedy Club: Lucy
Porter in the Family Way. The comedian
examines the ups and downs of family life
10.30 Sketchorama. Casual Violence, Croft
and Pearce & Beats perform 10.55 The
Comedy Club Interview. Arthur Smith talks
to Tom Neenan 11.00 Adolf Hitler: My Part
in His Downfall. Spike Milligan reads from
his wartime memoirs. First aired in 2008
11.30 Chain Reaction. Catherine Tate talks
to David Tennant. From 2008
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Chiles on
Friday 1.00pm The Friday Sports Panel
2.00 Kermode and Mayo?s Film Review 4.00
5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport: The Friday
Football Social. Darren Fletcher and Jermaine
Jenas look ahead to the weekend?s football
action 10.00 Adrian Goldberg 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 5 Live Boxing with Costello &
Bunce 5.30 Under the Weather
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Jim White, Perry Groves and Bob Mills
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off
10.00 The Two Mikes 1.00am Extra Time
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Nemone 10.00 Lauren Laverne
1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart Maconie
4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 David Holmes 9.00
Tom Ravenscroft 12.00 Nemone?s Electric
Ladyland 2.00am 6 Music Classic Concert
3.00 6 Music Live Hour 4.00 From Mento to
Lovers Rock 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Nicholas Owen 5.00 Classic
FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Catherine Bott presents a
concert recorded live at Cadogan Hall in
London, featuring the pianist Yeol Eum Son
and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.
Haydn (L?Isola Disabitata ? Overture);
Mozart (Piano Concerto No 21 in C); Haydn
(Symphony No 86 in D); and Mozart (Piano
Concerto No 8 in C) 10.00 Smooth Classics
1.00am Katie Breathwick 4.00 Jane Jones
16
1G T
Friday May 4 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
James Jackson
The Jazz
Ambassadors
BBC Four, 9pm
Here is a film
that, unless
you heard the
Radio 4
programme on the
same subject a while
ago, offers a fresh view
of Cold War tactics. In
Early
Top
pick
1955, when America
was having problems
with its image, the
African-American
congressman Adam
Clayton Powell Jr had
an idea: send America?s
jazz musicians and
their racially integrated
bands on high-profile
tours around the world.
In doing so they would
counter the negative
propaganda from the
Soviet Union about
racism in the US. It
may have had the
Bolshoi, but the
Americans could
show that they had
something progressive
? and, luckily for
Powell, his plan
coincided with a
golden era for jazz.
Instrumental to
Powell?s scheme was
the trumpeter Dizzy
Gillespie ? one great
photo from 1956 shows
him charming a snake
with his trumpet in
Karachi ? and over the
next decade Louis
Armstrong, Duke
Ellington and Dave
Brubeck would tour the
world in service of US
Cold War interests.
However, in the 1960s
this jazz diplomacy
became complicated.
The civil rights
movement in the
US was forcing the
musicians into a moral
bind ? how could they
promote a tolerant
image abroad when
at home black children
on their way to newly
integrated schools were
being spat on by white
mobs? Tonight?s film
shows how the US
State Department
unwittingly gave the
civil rights movement
a global stage just when
it needed one most.
Unreported World
Channel 4, 7.30pm
If things weren?t bad
enough in Kabul,
what with the years of
bombs and gunfights,
the locals face a new
danger: criminal gangs
who roam the Afghan
capital kidnapping
middle-class residents.
Most appallingly, the
thugs? victims are
often children. The
kidnappers have
become a more
worrying threat to
decent citizens than
the Taliban. The
reporter Rania
Abouzeid and the
director Karim Shah
travel to the city to
join the lead detective
of the police antikidnap squad as it
does its best to reunite
those kidnapped
with their families.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Rip Off Britain: Food. The team
puts online takeaway services to the test. Last in the
series 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in
Goudhurst, Smallthorne and Cardiff (r) (AD) 11.00 A1:
Britain?s Longest Road. A pedestrian goes walkabout on
the carriageway putting lives in danger (AD) 11.45 The
Housing Enforcers. Matt Allwright visits east London on
the trail of suspected tenancy fraud 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. From the Royal Welsh Showground in Builth Wells
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Jimmi seems set to give
Amanda the bene?t of the doubt, despite the reservations
of his friends and colleagues. Following her pyjama party,
Valerie decides to do some volunteering (AD) 2.15 800
Words. George and Fiona go away for a romantic weekend
(AD) 3.00 Escape to the Country. Alistair Appleton helps
a couple search for a family home in West Sussex (r) (AD)
3.45 Flipping Pro?t. Gavin Claxton, Melissa Downhill and
Zoe Pocock search for bargains in Gloucestershire (AD)
4.30 Flog It! From Crowcombe Court in Somerset 5.15
Pointless. Quiz, hosted by Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 A1: Britain?s
Longest Road (r) (AD) 7.15 Rip Off Britain: Food (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: Antiques Roadshow (r) (SL) 9.00 BBC
Newsroom Live: Election Special 10.00 Live Snooker: The
World Championship. Jason Mohammad presents
coverage of the second session of the opening semi-?nal
at the Crucible Theatre in Shef?eld 12.00 Election 2018.
Huw Edwards presents as the votes are counted in this
year?s council elections in England. Contributors include
the Professor John Curtice and Jo Coburn 1.00pm Live
Snooker: The World Championship. Hazel Irvine presents
further coverage from the Crucible Theatre, as the second
semi-?nal continues with the second of four scheduled
sessions 3.00 Election 2018. Huw Edwards presents as
the votes are counted in this year?s council elections in
England. Contributors include the Professor John Curtice
and Jo Coburn 4.30 Live Snooker: The World
Championship. Hazel Irvine presents coverage from
the Crucible Theatre, as the second semi-?nal continues
with the second of four scheduled sessions 6.00
Eggheads (r) 6.30 Britain in Bloom. Chris Bavin heads to
Immingham in northern Lincolnshire. Last in the series
6.00am Good Morning Britain 8.30 Lorraine.
Entertainment, current affairs and fashion news 9.25 The
Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30 This Morning. Chat and lifestyle
features, including a look at the stories making the
newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen.
Presented by Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford
12.30pm Loose Women. The members of the boy band
5ive join the panellists as they participate in debate from
a female perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge
Rinder. Paul claims a refund for a caravan that he bought
off his de-facto brother, but never received, while Annie
believes she is entitled to a share of their late father?s
estate 3.00 Tenable. A team of British Army colleagues
attempts to topple the Tenable Tower of 10 to win a big
cash prize. Quiz show hosted by Warwick Davis 4.00
Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the arcade-themed
quiz show in which contestants drop tokens down a choice
of four chutes in the hope of winning a �,000 jackpot
5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as four
contestants pit their wits against the Chaser, adding
money to the jackpot for the ?nal chase 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.35 Frasier (r)
10.05 Ramsay?s Hotel Hell (r) (AD) 11.00 Undercover
Boss USA (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm
Coast vs Country. Kirsty Duffy and David Bull advise a
couple who are seeking a fresh start and willing to invest
�0,000 on a home somewhere in Devon (r) (AD) 1.05
Posh Pawnbrokers. Dan and his team consider a
houseboat (r) 2.10 Countdown. With Dr Phil Hammond
3.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away. A property in the
Cotswolds or the Dordogne region of France (r) 4.00
Escape to the Chateau: DIY. Stephanie?s big singles night
arrives. Last in the series (AD) 5.00 Four in a Bed. The
B&B owners meet for the last time (r) 5.30 Buy It Now.
Paola and Ziggy have a fun new product with a positive
message, while siblings Nathalie and Alec hope to have
the shoppers all sewn up with their nifty kitchen garment
6.00 The Simpsons. An episode set 30 years in the future,
when divorcee Bart is locked in a custody battle (r) (AD)
6.30 Hollyoaks. Marnie worries about Al?e?s behaviour,
Farrah ?nds herself in a scary situation, and Damon gets
the wrong end of the stick about Zack and Holly (r) (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and his guests talk about the issues of the day,
with viewers calling in to offer their opinions 11.15 The
Nightmare Neighbour Next Door. A dispute with a
neighbour descends into violence, while an elderly couple
who feel they are the victims of noise from next door
receive a visit from the police (r) (AD) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. The doctors
treat a young man whose life has begun to spiral due to a
crack cocaine addiction, and the mother of a young boy
suffering with ADHD seeks advice in the surgery (r) (AD)
1.10 Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours
(AD) 2.20 NCIS. Tony is reunited with his journalist
ex-?anc閑 Wendy Miller while investigating the murder
of a Navy captain leading a double life as a masked
vigilante (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: Presumed Dead in
Paradise (12, TVM, 2013) A teenager survives a brush
with death while on holiday, only to discover she has been
the victim of a sinister conspiracy. Thriller with Malese
Jow 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Clive offers
Toadie a job (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Alf has a very
surprising visitor (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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7.00 The One Show Presented by Alex
Jones and Radio 1?s Dev Grif?n
8PM
7.30 Sounds Like Friday Night
Kylie Minogue performs two tracks
from her recent album (5/5)
8.00 EastEnders Halfway is embarrassed
by the attention he is getting from
Whitney and the Carters (AD)
7.00 Live Snooker: The World
Championship Jason Mohammad
presents coverage of the third and
penultimate session of the opening
semi-?nal at the Crucible Theatre in
Shef?eld. Mark Selby and John Higgins
were the victorious players at this
stage last year, defeating Ding Junhui
and Barry Hawkins respectively
9PM
8.30 The Button Five UK families compete
to win challenges in the comfort of
their living rooms (3/8)
9.00 Have I Got News for You Satirical
quiz hosted by Rhod Gilbert (5/9)
Late
11PM
10PM
9.30 Home from Home Neil is despondent
about his lack of popularity so throws a
party to make amends (3/6) (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.25 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.35 The Graham Norton Show
Amy Schumer talks about her new ?lm
I Feel Pretty and Stephen Mangan
discusses new television show Hang
Ups. Plus, Jess Glynne performs her
new single I?ll Be There (5/13)
11.25 Wannabe Maxine readies herself for
the performance of a lifetime (4/4)
11.50 No Strings Attached (15, 2011)
Two friends try to have a purely sexual
relationship, but ?nd themselves
falling in love nonetheless. Romantic
comedy starring Natalie Portman
and Ashton Kutcher (AD)
1.35am-6.00 BBC News
7.00 Emmerdale Priya sees an act of
destruction, and Lachlan faces a
shocking realisation (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.30 Coronation Street Toyah introduces
Peter to their baby daughter and
David ?elds unsolicited feedback
on his new relationship (AD)
7.30 Unreported World Rania Abouzeid
travels to Kabul, Afghanistan, where
criminal gangs are kidnapping for
ransom. See Viewing Guide (3/6) (AD)
8.00 Love Your Garden The team visits
Canterbury to help a Gurkha (3/6) (AD)
8.00 Our Wildest Dreams
Cameras follow Lyndon and his wife
Ruth as they give up their careers in
the UK to plough their savings into
starting a new business running a
safari lodge in the Zambian outback.
See Viewing Guide (2/4) (AD)
8.00 Britain?s Great Cathedrals
with Tony Robinson Exploring
the history of Liverpool Cathedral,
which was designed in the Gothic
style by Giles Gilbert Scott. It took 74
years to build and was paid for by the
people of the city (5/6)
9.00 Gogglebox Capturing the households?
instant reactions to what they are
watching on television from the
comfort of their own sofas (AD)
9.00 Portillo?s Hidden History of
Britain Michael Portillo explores
Shepton Mallet prison, which over its
400-year history has seen thousands off
prisoners, numerous executions and
countless escape attempts (3/4)
8.30 Coronation Street Simon alerts
Leanne to Toyah?s lies, and Jenny
marks an emotional anniversary (AD)
9.00 Syria: The World?s War How a
peaceful uprising against the president
of Syria seven years ago has turned
into a full-scale civil war, resulting in
the deaths of 350,000 people (2/2)
9.00 Lethal Weapon Murtaugh and Riggs
investigate a local jewellery heist.
Plus, Riggs battles with his drinking
habit, while Murtaugh is plagued
by his insecurities (AD)
10.00 Episodes Sean and Beverly ?nd
themselves at odds with Matt (6/7)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.00 Friday Night Dinner New series.
Jim dates a woman with an annoying
laugh. See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
10.45 The Keith & Paddy Picture Show
Keith Lemon and Paddy McGuinness
remake Pretty Woman (3/5) (r) (AD)
10.30 High & Dry New series. Sitcom
about a group of plane crash victims
stranded on a tropical island.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
11.05 Front Row Late Mary Beard and her
guests discuss museums (5/8)
11.35 Snooker: The World Championship
Jason Mohammad introduces
highlights of day 14 at the Crucible
Theatre in Shef?eld
12.25am FILM: Easy Money (15, 2010) Thriller with
Joel Kinnaman and Matias Varela 2.20 Sign Zone: Getting
a Fair Trial? ? Panorama. A report on cases in which
evidence has been withheld or not investigated (r) (SL)
2.50 Civilisations (r) (SL) 3.50-4.45 The Assassination
of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story (r) (AD, SL)
11.10 Through the Keyhole Keith Lemon
visits mystery homes and challenges
this week?s panel ? Joe Swash,
Gabby Logan and Paddy McGuinness
? to guess the identities of the
famous owners (2/8) (r)
12.10am Jackpot247 Viewers can participate in live
interactive gaming from their sofas 3.00 Take on the
Twisters. Julia Bradbury presents the quiz show where
contestants compete to take on the eight giant
sandtimers, with the more they keep in play, the more
money they can win (r) 3.50-6.00 ITV Nightscreen
7.00 The Gadget Show Jon Bentley gets
an earful of the latest advance in home
cinema audio, while the G Team rustles
up a sampling menu featuring three
different styles of barbecue (8/12)
10.00 Inside Strangeways A revealing look
behind the bars of Strangeways prison
in Manchester, examining stories of
gang culture, riots and penal
punishment (4/6) (r)
11.05 First Dates Reiki healer Jayne is set
up on a date with 44-year-old children?s
entertainer Stuart, while student
James, who has a prosthetic leg, meets
fellow student Emilie (r) (AD)
11.05 Meet Mick Philpott: Psychopath
Professor Tony Maden looks into the
case of Mick Philpott, whose arson
attack on his family home in Derby in
May 2012 resulted in the death of six
of his children (3/3) (r)
12.05am FILM: The Grey (15, 2011) Wilderness
adventure starring Liam Neeson, Frank Grillo and Dermot
Mulroney (AD) 2.10 True Horror (r) (AD, SL) 3.05 Kiss
Me First (r) (AD, SL) 4.00 Come Dine Champion of
Champions (r) 4.55 Steph and Dom?s One Star to Five
Star (r) 5.25-6.15 Fifteen to One (r)
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
The doctors treat a man with a crack cocaine addiction (r)
(AD) 4.00 Rich House, Poor House: The Big Surprise. Two
families from the Newquay area swap homes and budgets
for a week (r) 4.50 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.15 Wildlife
SOS (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest (r) (SL)
the times | Friday May 4 2018
17
1G T
television & radio
Our Wildest
Dreams
Channel 4, 8pm
In tonight?s episode
of the series that
follows British families
upping sticks for life
in remote places, an
English couple ?
Lyndon and his
pregnant wife, Ruth ?
are ditching the day
jobs to set up and run
a safari lodge in the
Zambian outback.
Inspiring or foolish?
With four months to
complete lodge
construction before
the money runs dry,
they face ballooning
costs and safety
concerns, but also,
more immediately,
holes in the ground for
toilets and marauding
lions and crocodiles.
Then there?s the matter
of Ruth giving birth.
Friday Night
Dinner
Channel 4, 10pm
A fifth series for Robert
Popper?s long-running
comedy, and it has lost
none of its impish glee
as the family gather
for more weekly
get-togethers. The lines
are sharp ? when they
decide to order a
Chinese takeaway
online, Dad (Paul
Ritter) says, ?I don?t
eat internet food,? to
which son Jonny (Tom
Rosenthal) explains:
?Dad, they don?t make
the food inside the
internet.? Yet what
really glues the show
is the chemistry of the
cast, which also
includes Mark Heap
(tonight on an awful
date) and Tamsin
Greig?s forthright
Jewish mum.
High & Dry
Channel 4, 10.30pm
The idea of a desertisland sitcom is so
simple that it?s a
surprise we haven?t had
one before. Here, a
plane crashes in the
Indian Ocean leaving
survivors to endure
sand, coconuts and one
another. They include
uptight Harriet (Vicki
Pepperdine) and
zombie-mad Arnab
(Asim Chaudhry of
People Just Do
Nothing). Presiding
over all is Marc
Wootton?s camp Aussie
flight attendant Brett,
who, being anything
but the admirable
Crichton, sabotages any
hope of escape. How
much you laugh will
come down to your
tolerance of Wootton?s
high-volume approach.
Sport Choice
Eurosport 2, 11.30am
Coverage of the first
stage of the Giro
d?Italia, a 10.1km
individual time-trial in
Jerusalem, following
a technical route that
finishes close to the
Old City. Last year?s
race was won by
Tom Dumoulin,
who became the first
Dutch male winner.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Animal 999 (r) 7.00 Meerkat Manor (r)
8.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD) 9.00 Motorway
Patrol (r) 10.00 Road Wars (r) 11.00
Warehouse 13 (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Three episodes (r)
8.00 The Simpsons. Grampa makes a confession
8.30 Modern Family
9.00 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life. The
impact of waste on our planet (5/6) (r) (AD)
10.00 The Late Late Show with James Corden:
Best of the Week. Highlights (r)
11.00 FILM: Scream (18, 1996) Wes Craven?s
horror which satirises the genre?s cliches,
starring Neve Campbell and David Arquette
1.05am A League of Their Own (r) (AD) 2.00
Most Shocking (r) (AD) 3.00 Duck Quacks Don?t
Echo (r) (AD) 4.00 Motorway Patrol. Double bill
(r) 5.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r)
6.00am The British (r) (AD) 7.00 Storm City (r)
(AD) 8.00 Fish Town (r) 9.00 The West Wing (r)
11.00 House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace
(r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West
Wing (r) 5.00 House (r)
6.00 House. The doctor treats a man convinced
he has diabetes (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A taxi
driver is beaten to death by an angry mob (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny and Baez try to prevent
an outbreak of violence in a high school (r)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Queen Margaery spends
time with her new husband, and fugitive Tyrion
walks the Long Bridge of Volantis (r) (AD)
10.10 Game of Thrones. The military arm of the
Faith of the Seven grows more aggressive, Jaime
and Bronn head south and Ellaria and the Sand
Snakes vow vengeance (r) (AD)
11.10 Game of Thrones (r) (AD)
12.15am The Sopranos (r) 2.25 House of Lies
(r) 3.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r) 4.00
The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00am Motorway Patrol (r) (AD) 7.00
Highway Patrol (r) 7.30 Border Patrol (r) 8.00
Border Security: Canada?s Front Line (r) (AD)
9.00 Elementary (r) (AD) 10.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 11.00 Cold Case (r)
12.00 Children?s Hospital (r) (AD) 1.00pm
Medical Emergency (r) (AD) 2.00 Send in the
Dogs (r) (AD) 3.00 Nothing to Declare 5.00
Border Security: Canada?s Front Line (r)
6.00 Medical Emergency (r) (AD)
6.30 Medical Emergency (r) (AD)
7.00 Children?s Hospital (12/12) (r) (AD)
7.30 Children?s Hospital (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Golden State Killer: Unmasked
10.00 Golden State Killer: Unmasked
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Murders That Shocked the Nation (r)
(AD) 2.00 Blindspot (r) 3.00 Nothing to
Declare. Four episodes (r) (AD) 5.00 Border
Security: Canada?s Front Line (r)
6.00am Proko?ev: Piano Concertos 6.45 Jonas
Kaufmann: An Evening With Puccini 9.00
Watercolour Challenge 9.30 The Art Show (AD)
10.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 11.00
Classic Albums (AD) 12.00 The Eighties (AD)
1.00pm Discovering: Charlie Chaplin (AD) 2.00
Watercolour Challenge 2.30 The Art Show (AD)
3.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 4.00 Classic
Albums (AD) 5.00 The Eighties (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Greta Garbo
7.00 Johnny Cash: Song by Song (AD)
7.30 Dolly Parton: Song by Song (AD)
8.00 Video Killed the Radio Star
8.30 Discovering: Coldplay (AD)
9.00 The Nineties
10.00 Coldplay: Austin City Limits
11.15 Brian Johnson?s A Life on the Road
12.15am Def Leppard: Viva! Hysteria 2.00
Johnny Cash: Behind Prison Walls. From the
Tennessee State Prison 3.00 Rock and Roll (AD)
4.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 5.00
Auction: Jackie Kennedy Special 5.30 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 8.30 Live Super
Rugby: Chiefs v Jaguares (Kick-off 8.35) 10.30
Rugby Greatest Games 10.40 Live Super Rugby:
Rebels v Crusaders (Kick-off 10.45). Coverage of
the match at AAMI Park in Melbourne 12.30pm
Sky Sports News 1.00 Bellew v Haye 2:
Weigh-In Live. The ?ghters are weighed ahead
of tomorrow?s bout 2.00 Live PGA Tour Golf: The
Wells Fargo Championship. Coverage of the
featured groups on day two at the Quail Hollow
Club in Charlotte, North Carolina 3.00 Live
Indian Premier League: Kings XI Punjab v
Mumbai Indians. All the action from the match
at the Holkar Cricket Stadium, Indore
7.30 Live FNF: Brighton & Hove Albion v
Manchester United (Kick-off 8.00). Coverage of
the Premier League match from AMEX Stadium
10.15 JD Ringside. Both ?ghters weigh-in
10.45 PL Greatest Games
11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00midnight Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.35pm The Blame
Game. The comedian Zoe Lyons joins the
regulars 11.05 The Graham Norton Show.
With guests Amy Schumer, Stephen Mangan
and Jess Glynne 11.55 Wannabe. Maxine
readies herself for the performance of a
lifetime. Last in the series 12.20am FILM: No
Strings Attached. Romantic comedy with
Natalie Portman and Ashton Kutcher (2011)
(AD) 2.00-6.00 BBC News
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Coast & Country.
Ruth Wignall meets a paddleboarder on an
epic journey around Wales, highlighting the
problem with plastic. Plus, Andrew Price joins
climbers keeping the cliffs litter free
ITV West
As ITV except: 10.30pm-10.45 ITV News
West Country. The latest headlines
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Peter &
Roughie?s Friday Football Show. Peter Martin
and Alan Rough round up the latest action
12.10am Teleshopping 2.10 After Midnight
3.40 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
To subscribe visit tlssubs.imbmsubs.com/SPRINGCW
Or call 01293 312178 and quote code SPRINGCW
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 UTV Life. Pamela
Ballantine presents 12.10am Teleshopping
1.40-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 BBC Young Musician 2018. The pianist Lucy
Parham, herself a former Young Musician
?nalist, joins Josie d?Arby as the competition
continues with the instrumentalists in the
keyboard category ?nal
9.00 The Jazz Ambassadors. The role of
America?s iconic jazz musicians in the Cold War,
and how the US Department gave the Civil
Rights movement a voice on the world stage
when it needed one most. See Viewing Guide
10.30 Latin Music USA. Documentary tracing
the in?uence of Mexican music in America. The
programme explores the mass immigration of
people into the US, and how it led to the
evolution of a new musical culture in the
borderlands, a 2,000-mile stretch of country
between Texas and California (3/4)
11.30 Kings of Rock ?n? Roll. Celebration of the
musical icons of the 1950s, including Bill Haley
and the Comets, Little Richard, Chuck Berry,
Buddy Holly, Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley
12.30am Stunning Soloists at the BBC
1.30 Latin Music USA. Documentary
2.30-3.30 Kings of Rock ?n? Roll
6.00am Hollyoaks (AD) 7.00 Couples Come
Dine with Me 8.00 How I Met Your Mother (AD)
9.00 New Girl (AD) 10.00 2 Broke Girls (AD)
11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD) 12.00 The
Goldbergs (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory
(AD) 2.00 How I Met Your Mother (AD) 3.00
New Girl (AD) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Sally tells Misbah that Imran
has been skipping school (AD)
7.30 Extreme Cake Makers. Rosie creates a
bulldog seated on a sugar-crafted throne
8.00 The Big Bang Theory. Sheldon asks the
gang to make life more dif?cult for him (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
9.00 FILM: Magic Mike (15, 2012) Comedy
drama starring Channing Tatum (AD)
11.15 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
11.40 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
12.10am Tattoo Fixers (AD) 1.15 Gogglebox
(SL) 2.20 First Dates (AD) 3.15 Rude Tube 4.10
2 Broke Girls. Double bill of the comedy (AD)
4.55 Couples Come Dine with Me
8.55am Food Unwrapped (AD) 9.30 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun 11.35 Four in a Bed (AD)
2.10pm Come Dine with Me (AD) 4.50 A Place
in the Sun: Winter Sun 5.55 Ugly House to
Lovely House with George Clarke (AD)
6.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo. An outbreak of
disease in the penguin colony leaves one chick
?ghting for its life (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows a
project near Newbury to construct a modern
farmhouse that combines an open-plan party
pad with functional spaces below (9/11)
9.00 Rough Justice. An elderly antiques dealer
is found stabbed on the ?oor of his shop.
Meanwhile, Liese avoids Fabian, and Michel has
a ?tness exam. In Flemish
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. Medics treat a diabetic
with an infected leg wound, a boy who has
swollen eyes after squirting detergent in them,
and a woman with knee pain (8/8) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. An 89-year-old man is
admitted with acute abdominal pain (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA
1.05 24 Hours in A&E. Double bill (AD)
3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats
11.00am Broken Arrow (PG, 1950) Western
starring James Stewart 12.50pm Rage at
Dawn (U, 1955) Western starring Randolph
Scott (AD) 2.40 Track of the Cat (U, 1954)
Western melodrama starring Robert Mitchum
4.45 Thunderbirds Are Go! (U, 1966) Puppet
adventure with the voice of Shane Rimmer
6.40 The Day After Tomorrow (12, 2004)
Disaster thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Dennis
Quaid and Emmy Rossum (AD)
9.00 Non-Stop (12, 2014) An air marshal on
a transatlantic ?ight searches for a terrorist
threatening to kill the passengers one by one.
Action thriller starring Liam Neeson, Julianne
Moore and Lupita Nyong?o (AD)
11.05 AVP: Alien vs Predator (15, 2004)
Scientists are caught up in a battle between two
races of deadly extraterrestrial creatures in a
mysterious pyramid. Sci-? thriller starring
Sanaa Lathan and Lance Henriksen (AD)
12.50am-3.55 Pulp Fiction (18, 1994)
A series of interlinked stories about the Los
Angeles underworld. Quentin Tarantino?s crime
drama starring John Travolta, Samuel L Jackson,
Uma Thurman and Bruce Willis (AD)
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records 7.10
Who?s Doing the Dishes? 7.55 Emmerdale (AD)
8.55 You?ve Been Framed! Gold 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 10.20 The Bachelorette
12.15pm Emmerdale (AD) 1.15 You?ve Been
Framed! Gold 1.45 The Ellen De Generes Show
2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show 5.50 Take Me Out
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Harry Hill
presents videos featuring youngsters
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Alan?s affair with
Lyndsey is jeopardised
8.30 Superstore. A dead body is found in the
drywall at Cloud 9 (AD)
9.00 FILM: Hercules (12, 2014) Mythological
adventure starring Dwayne Johnson, Ian
McShane and John Hurt (AD)
11.00 Family Guy (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (AD)
11.55 American Dad! Stan sets up a date for
Deputy Director Bullock (AD)
12.30am American Dad! Stan meets George W
Bush (AD) 12.55 The Cleveland Show (AD)
1.25 Two and a Half Men 1.50 Superstore (AD)
2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street 6.55
Heartbeat (AD) 8.00 The Royal 9.00 Judge Judy
10.25 Agatha Christie?s Marple (AD) 12.30pm
The Royal 1.35 Heartbeat (AD) 2.40 Classic
Coronation Street 3.45 On the Buses 4.50
You?re Only Young Twice 5.20 George and
Mildred 5.55 Heartbeat (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. An army friend of
Seth?s becomes a murder suspect (AD)
8.00 Agatha Christie?s Marple. A stranger
provides an alibi that proves the innocence of an
executed man, throwing suspicion on all
members of the Argyle family
10.00 The Syndicate. The past comes back to
haunt Jamie when the local drug boss pays him
a visit. Stuart is torn between Leanne and Amy,
while Bob says goodbye to those he loves (5/5)
11.05 Les Dawson: An Audience With That
Never Was. The comedian entertains an
audience as a hologram
12.05am Vera (AD) 1.55 FILM: The Constant
Gardener (15, 2005) Political thriller with
Ralph Fiennes (AD, SL) 4.00 Love Your Garden
4.55 Judge Judy 5.35 ITV3 Nightscreen
6.00am Football?s Greatest: Johan Cruyff 6.15
The Chase 7.50 Cycling: Tour de Yorkshire 8.55
Live Cycling: Tour de Yorkshire. The second and
?nal stage of the women?s race 12.45pm Cash
Cowboys 1.45 Pawn Stars 2.15 Live Cycling:
Tour de Yorkshire. The second stage of the men?s
race from Barnsley to Ilkley
6.30 World Cup Top Goalscorers. Some of the
best strikers in the history of the World Cup
6.45 Live Uefa European U17 Championship:
England v Israel (Kick-off 7.00)
9.00 Cycling: Tour de Yorkshire. The second
stage of the men?s and women?s races, both of
which travel from Barnsley to Ilkley, with the
women?s event reaching a conclusion
10.00 FILM: The Bourne Identity (12,
2002) An amnesiac man pulled from the sea by
the crew of a ?shing boat is targeted by
assassins as he tries to discover who he is.
Thriller starring Matt Damon, Franka Potente,
Chris Cooper, Clive Owen and Brian Cox (AD)
12.25am The Americans. Period drama 1.25 Ax
Men (SL) 2.20 The Protectors (SL) 2.50 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Top Gear (AD)
8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage Hunters
10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top Gear (AD)
3.00 Sin City Motors 4.00 Steve Austin?s
Broken Skull Challenge 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Room 101
6.40 Would I Lie to You?
7.20 Would I Lie to You?: The Unseen Bits.
A compilation of unseen material
8.00 Into the Fire. An unexploded bomb brings
Birmingham?s motorway network to a halt (r)
9.00 Red Dwarf. Kryten falls head over heels in
love with a female mechanoid (AD)
9.40 Red Dwarf. The crew discovers a
miraculous machine (AD)
10.20 Red Dwarf. The crew lands on a
crime-free planet (AD)
11.00 Have I Got a Bit More News for You.
Presented by Kirsty Young, with funnyman Ross
Noble and the poet John Cooper Clarke
12.00 QI 12.40am Would I Lie to You?: The
Unseen Bits 1.20 Mock the Week 2.00 QI
2.40 Would I Lie to You?: The Unseen Bits 3.20
Parks and Recreation 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Juliet Bravo 11.00
The Bill 12.00 Lovejoy 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Hi-de-Hi! 2.20 Are You
Being Served? 3.00 London?s Burning (AD) 4.00
You Rang, M?Lord? 5.00 Lovejoy
6.00 Hi-de-Hi! Gladys is demoted
6.40 Are You Being Served? A glamorous
saleswoman arrives
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. Howard
suspects Pearl is cheating on him
8.00 Miss Fisher?s Murder Mysteries. An
investigation ensues when the lead actor in a
new movie Bride of Babylon, is murdered on set.
Australian crime drama starring Essie Davis
9.00 WPC 56. Gloria is accused of a crime (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The death of a teenage tennis
star occupies the team when it is suggested her
suicide jump two years earlier was anything but,
and people with motives for murder soon
emerge (6/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London?s Burning (AD)
2.15 The Pinkertons (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Surviving Alcatraz:
Escaping the Rock (AD) 11.00 Abandoned
Engineering (AD) 12.00 Time Team 1.00pm
Planet Earth (AD) 2.00 The Blue Planet 3.00
Coast (AD) 4.00 Surviving Alcatraz: Escaping
the Rock. A 1962 escape from the island prison
(AD) 5.00 Abandoned Engineering (AD)
6.00 The World at War
7.00 Abandoned Engineering. Ruined
engineering projects that have been put to
alternative use (1/6) (AD)
8.00 UFOs Declassi?ed. Reports of silvery
objects above Los Angeles in 1942
9.00 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
Bob ?outs tradition
9.40 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
10.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
11.00 Surviving Alcatraz: Escaping the Rock.
Documentary investigating a 1962 escape
from the island prison (AD)
12.00 Abandoned Engineering (AD) 1.00am
The World at War. Documentary 2.00 Mummies
Alive 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm P郿raig Post: SDS (Postman Pat: SDS)
5.15 Zack & Quack (r) 5.35 Su Shiusaidh
(Little Suzy?s Zoo) (r) 5.40 Charlie is Lola
(Charlie and Lola) (r) 5.50 Seonaidh (Shaun the
Sheep) (r) 6.00 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks (r)
6.10 Fior Bhall-coise (Extreme Football) (r)
6.35 Machair (r) 7.00 An L� (News) 7.25
Binneas: Na Trads (r) 7.30 Alba: 1973 (r)
8.00 Air an Urlar (On the Stage) (r) 8.30
Dealbhan Fraoich (r) 9.00 Call air Cladach Ile
(The Loss on Islay?s Shore) (r) 10.00 Seirm.
Musical performances by Jarlath Henderson
and Lau (r) 11.00 Pairc Yellowstone (Wild
Yellowstone) (r) 11.50-12midnight Dhan
Uisge (Loch Lomond) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Hafod Haul (r) 6.15 Bobi Jac (r)
6.25 Guto Gwningen (r) 6.40 Tomos a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 6.50 Ty Mel (r) 7.00 Boj (r)
7.15 Gwdihw (r) 7.30 Peppa (r) 7.35 Teulu Ni
(r) 7.45 Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 8.00
Cymylaubychain (r) 8.10 Oli Wyn 8.20 Nico
N鬵 (r) 8.30 Cled (r) 8.40 Meic y Marchog (r)
8.55 Bach a Mawr (r) 9.10 Stiw (r) 9.20
Enwog o Fri, Ardal Ni! (r) 9.35 Nodi (r) 9.45
Ben Dant (r) 10.00 Hafod Haul (r) 10.15 Bobi
Jac (r) 10.25 Guto Gwningen (r) 10.40 Tomos
a?i Ffrindiau (r) 10.50 Ty Mel (r) 11.00 Boj (r)
11.15 Gwdihw (r) 11.30 Peppa (r) 11.35 Teulu
Ni (r) 11.45 Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 12.00 News
S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Ysgol Ddawns Anti
Karen (r) 12.30 Priodas Pum Mil (r) 1.30
Margaret: Ddoe a Heddiw (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 3.05 Pengelli (r) 3.30 Dei a Tom (r)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05
Stwnsh: Crwbanod Ninja (r) 5.30 Stwnsh: Larfa
(r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Y Gemau Gwyllt. Contestants
from the south east compete (r) 6.00 News
S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad. Na Parry
inspects the wardrobe of a royal harpist (r)
6.30 Garddio a Mwy. Iwan Edwards gets
creative in the kitchen with rhubarb (r) 7.00
Heno. Magazine programme, featuring stories
from all over Wales 8.00 Pobol y Cwm. Sheryl
asks Gethin to leave her alone, but whether he
will adhere to her request remains to be seen.
Meanwhile, Tyler tries to build bridges with his
mother (AD) 8.25 Llanifeiliaid. New series. Life
in Wales?s most unusual village (AD)
9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30 Codi Pac. Geraint
Hardy explores interesting activities, places to
stay, places to eat and things to see in the
market town of Machynlleth in Powys
10.00 Deuawdau Rhys Meirion. Daniel Lloyd
invites Rhys Meirion to his home town
of Rhosllannerchrugog and shows him the
bright lights of London as they visit various
places from Daniel?s past (r)
11.00-11.35 Y Stiwdio Gefn (r)
18
Friday May 4 2018 | the times
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MindGames
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