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The Times Times 2 - 6 November 2017

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On Monday
November 6 | 2017
What’s eating
Generation Snowflake?
Anxiety, ambition and growing up on social media
— what it’s really like to be 20 now
Emily Mulenga, Berta
Lozano, Ben Phillips and
Anna Hunter Funnell
2
1GT
Monday November 6 2017 | the times
times2
Gunpowder
Joyriders, stay away
from my car. Or you’ll
get covered in dog hair
Kevin Maher
R
GETTY IMAGES
emember Ferris
Bueller’s Day Off?
The 1986 comedy with
Matthew Broderick, a
big parade and some
life-altering high jinks
in and around Chicago?
Remember the bit in
the middle, when the mild-mannered
best friend (Alan Ruck) hands over his
father’s precious 1961 Ferrari 250 GT
California Spyder to a pair of parking
attendants, who, once our heroes leave
the premises, drive the Spyder on a
breakneck jaunt across the city?
Well, much to the horror of car
lovers everywhere, we now know that
this actually happens! Yes, thanks to
the dashcam footage from a brand
new Audi S3 belonging to one furious
Buckinghamshire petrolhead, it was
revealed that an attendant from
Gatwick airport’s meet-and-greet
service took the car on an intense
five-minute joyride, reaching speeds
of up to 131mph in a 50mph zone. All
that was missing was the airborne
jump with the Star Wars fanfare
(that’s a Ferris Bueller reference).
Naturally, the parking employee has
been dismissed, there is talk of police
involvement and, crucially, it’s only
a matter of time before a well-judged
social media campaign rattles even
more offenders from the trees
(#MeetAndGreetDoesNotMeanTake
MyCarForAJoyride).
And me? Well, I’m not so sure.
It’s true that whenever I hear the
words “meet and greet” I get the chills
(and not just because it’s often more
expensive than the flight itself). I use
the service on rare occasions, and
when I do I’m not worried that some
jumped-up speed freak might race
twice round the M25 in my car.
No, quite the opposite. I own an
ancient Golf and I feel profoundly
embarrassed that the aforementioned
jalopy is somehow bringing down the
tone of the entire meet-and-greet
experience. Really. Look around at any
meet-and-greet parking slots — Audis,
Beemers, Jags and Mercs. If you see an
ancient blue Golf with a massive dent
above the back wheel, and dog hair
everywhere, that’s mine.
Such is the level of my meet-andgreet anxiety that I have been known
to bring out the vacuum cleaner the
day before the trip and vigorously
cleanse the car interior and make it,
That’s
your
funeral
The BBC series was explosive but not
entirely accurate, says Leanda de Lisle.
The historical writer separates the
grisly facts from the fanciful fiction
My answer
to revenge
porn
you know, presentable for the meetand-greeters. As if airport parking
hires exclusively from the ranks of
Downton Abbey’s Crawley family.
The problem here is that I am not a
petrolhead. If I took better care of my
car I would not have meet-and-greet
anxiety. But I don’t care for cars. I like
them to work, but I don’t believe in
having a relationship with them.
I have friends with nice cars, and I
sometimes hire a nice car in foreign
countries. But even then the novelty
wears off almost immediately.
Before I’ve even done four or five
miles I find myself thinking: “Oh dear.
It’s just leather, metal and glass. And
not a babe magnet, a head-turner, or
some vague metaphysical expression
of my masculinity. I’m so glad I didn’t
blow 60 grand on this!”
When I see other men cleaning their
cars on a Saturday, I don’t get it. When
I hear them talking about the sound
an engine makes (“Listen to that
purr!”), I’m baffled. And if I’m ever
unlucky enough to witness someone
refer to their car as “her” or “she”
(“Oooh, she’s a wild one! Be gentle
with her!”) I’ll know that I’ve died and
gone to hillbilly hell. I am, to repeat,
not a car guy. They leave me cold.
Yet, here’s the rub: I’m a motorbike
guy. I have a nice bike. I clean and
polish it, religiously, every weekend.
When I ride, it looks as if I’ve driven
directly out of a magazine or a bike
brochure. I adore it. I love the sound
of the rev. And if someone were to
suggest that I hand it over to airport
parking for a weekend I’d say: “Oh no,
she’s a wild one. No one touches my
lady but me!”
Yay! Four Weddings and
a Funeral is back! And
this time it’s going to be
longer! The 1994 classic
is being remade into a
TV series, with original
screenwriter Richard
Curtis on board as the
executive producer.
Obviously the first
excited, and entirely
appropriate given
Hugh Grant’s opening
line in the film,
response to that news
has to be, “Oh f***ity
f***!”
However, once the
giddy prospect of even
more hilariously poor
best-man speeches
fades away, there arises
You’ve got to love the
backroom nerds at
Facebook. They’ve
never met a problem
that couldn’t be
solved with some
good old-fashioned
encryption technology
(“Help! Murder!”
“Hang on, I think we’ve
got some encryption
technology for that”).
In this latest case the
tech is part of a new
digital photo-matching
strategy, while the
problem is revenge
porn. Apparently, if
you send a nude picture
of yourself or your
partner via Facebook’s
Messenger service, it
will pass through
sophisticated software
(a sweaty guy at a
desk?) that will
recognise it as a nude
picture and tag it
(with the encrypted
code PHWO4R?).
Then, when your
relationship inevitably
breaks up (because
you’re the kind of
doofus who sends out
nude pictures via
Facebook), the software
will recognise the same
picture “tag’’ whenever
your ex tries to post it
back on Facebook as
revenge porn.
Brilliant, right? Or,
and stay with me here,
you could just resist
the urge to take, and
post, nude pictures in
the first place? Crazy,
I know.
the fundamental
question of how they
can drag out the
escapades of our
favourite socially
awkward buffoon and
his fabulous friends
over an entire series or
even multiple seasons.
Fourteen Weddings and
Five Funerals? Anyone?
T
he day before
Elizabeth I’s funeral
a gunpowder mill
exploded at Redriffe on
the Thames. Thirteen
people were killed.
This lingered in the
mind of the Catholic
malcontent Robert Catesby. And in
the BBC’s drama Gunpowder, which
finished on Saturday, the story that
followed still had the power to shock.
Catesby wanted to create a year
zero: plotting to kill the new King
James along with the entire political
establishment as they gathered for
the opening of parliament in 1605.
The plot’s ambition can hardly be
overstated, but was the cruelty and
campery of Gunpowder overblown, and
how much of the story it told was true?
Was it only Catholics who were
plotting against James I?
No. The series begins shortly after
King James of Scotland has inherited
the throne of England. There have
already been plots on his life. A dead
man is shown hanging from a rope,
clutching a rosary. But in 1603 plots
against James had involved Protestant
Puritans and the Elizabethan hero Sir
Walter Raleigh, as well as Catholics.
James had also faced treason from
Protestants in Scotland, some with
religious motives.
manner for refusing to plead. Priests
were hanged, drawn and quartered as
depicted, but also castrated.
Were fines levied for people who
failed to attend Protestant religious
services — and was it Catesby who
came up with the gunpowder plot?
Yes and yes. Catesby was quoted
accurately in the last scene of episode
one. It was here, in parliament, he
said, that the establishment had “done
us all the mischief [in introducing
anti-Catholic laws] and perchance
God has destined that place for their
punishment”. This provided the spur
for the plot.
Was Robert Cecil hunchbacked?
And was James quite so openly gay?
Up to a point, and yes. In episode one
we saw the king flirting with young
Lord Herbert, but he seemed to find
the ingratiating secretary of state,
Robert Cecil, less appealing — not
surprisingly. Cecil bears a close
resemblance to Shakespeare’s Richard
Guy Fawkes
was caught
standing over
the gunpowder
Was there really so much
gunpowder and did Guy Fawkes
prepare a nail bomb?
Yes and no. In the finale, 6,000lb of
gunpowder were placed underneath the
House of Lords, with a chest of nails to
make the explosion more deadly. In fact,
Fawkes had 36 barrels of gunpowder,
almost a tonne (2,200lb), but no nails.
They appear to have been added to bring
to mind modern terrorist bombs. The
terror is made real,l, not quaint.
III. The actor who plays him, Mark
Gatiss, is tall, whereas Cecil was short,
but Gatiss gives the right impression
of Cecil’s “full mind in an imperfect
body”. Known as Robert the Devil,
Cecil was a ruthless anti-Papist, but
James was anxious to moderate the
persecution. Gunpowder underplayed
his flirting with young Herbert. James
had kissed him in the middle of the
coronation ceremony.
cere
Were priests
hunted down
and executed?
Yes and yes.
Gunpowder
showed Catesby
(played by Kit
Harington,
right), one of the
key architects of
the Gunpowder
Plot, attending
Mass in a private
house when a brutal
tal
priest hunter, William
liam
Wade, arrives. Thee central act
of Catholic worship
ip is the Mass and
it cannot be performed
d without
ith t a
priest, so covert clergymen came as
missionaries from Europe. Since, under
an Elizabethan law, it was treason to be
a priest in England, they were kept
hidden. The woman crushed to death
in Gunpowder had existed a generation
earlier and was executed in this
Did Catesby
go to
Cate
Spain to
t get help
for his
hi plan to
overthrow
James,
over
and did he see
the Spanish
burn
bu heretics?
No but yes.
Catesby
didn’t go
Cat
to Spain
— the
S
scene
scen of him
witnessing
a
witne
burning
burning at the stake
is
is invented
invente to remind
us that it wasn’t
only
wa
Protestants
Protestants who persecuted
those of other faiths. Th
The Spanish had
considered
block James’s
id d helping
h l i tto bl
accession in 1603, and Catesby wanted
their help. But James’s reign was now
a fait accompli. Catesby hoped the
Spanish might make freedom of
worship for Catholics in England a
condition of the peace treaty of 1604
between England and Spain. The very
the times | Monday November 6 2017
3
1GT
times2
— did it lose the plot?
The lowdown
Mariah Carey
ROBERT VIGLASKI/BBC
Christmas is here!
But it’s only the start of November . . .
Sure, but its arrival has been
formally announced.
By what? The Coca-Cola lorry? The
M&S brie and cranberry wrap?
By Mariah.
Carey? The multimillion-dollar
superstar?
Yes. All I Want for Christmas is You
slammed in at No 58 in the iTunes
chart and I’ve ordered my turkey.
We’ve only just got over Hallowe’en.
Oh, get on board, will you? Mariah’s
song is the Christmas equinox and
it has spoken.
It’s not even a good song. Those
tinkly bells at the start give me
flashbacks of being in a hot John
Lewis with claw-fingers from heavy
bags, and the video is terrible.
OK, you’re being crazy about the
video: a) she’s having a great time
on Santa’s knee, and b) only half of
it is filmed as if we’re all stalking
her from between the trees.
I’m not on board. With the song or
with the season. I won’t have a mince
pie until at least mid-December.
warned him to stay away from
Parliament. He took it to Cecil, who
was sitting at supper in Westminster
with other members of the Privy
Council. A search revealed nothing, but
when James was told that the Catholic
Thomas Percy had rented a vault, he
ordered a second search. Fawkes was
caught standing over the gunpowder.
negative portrayal of the Spanish in
not doing so may be designed to prick
our consciences. We have treaties
today with religious persecutors.
Did the real Guy Fawkes resemble
Tom Cullen’s shaven-headed thug?
And were there many Catholics
ready to join Catesby’s rebellion?
No and no. In episode two we saw a
shaven-headed Fawkes recruited in
Flanders as a military expert who can
help to blow up Parliament. After the
explosion Catesby plans to lead a
rebellion in the Midlands, capture
James’s nine-year-old daughter from
Coombe Abbey and place her on the
throne. In reality Fawkes was “highly
skilled in matters of war”, but was also
better known for avoiding quarrels
than for knifing spies in dark
alleyways, as he does in Gunpowder.
Aside from Fawkes, Catesby’s fellow
travellers were largely neighbours
from the Midlands, cousins and a few
other friends. Most Catholics wanted
to keep their heads down and hoped
that proof of loyalty would eventually
earn them freedom from persecution.
Was William Wade a torturer and
did a Catholic priest escape from the
Tower with Catesby’s help?
Yes and no. Gunpowder included a
scene in which Wade catches the
priest John Gerard and tortures him
for information. Catesby and company
then help Gerard to escape from the
Tower. In the Middle Ages torture was
illegal and was rarely carried out. Its
increasing use against Catholics was
a feature of the Elizabethan regime.
It was during Elizabeth I’s reign that
Gerard was hung from a bar in the
Tower and asked the whereabouts of
his fellow priest Henry Garnet. “I
thought the blood was oozing out of
my fingers and the pores of my skin,”
he recalled. When he wouldn’t break,
Wade told him: “Then hang there until
you rot off the pillar.” Wade did not
stand on scaffolds pulling hearts out of
executed priests, but he did organise
their capture and he was the English
version of the Spanish inquisitor.
Gerard did escape the Tower, shinning
down a rope, in 1597. The event was
unconnected to the Gunpowder Plot
and did not involve Catesby.
Were there any black Englishmen
during this period? Did Lord
Monteagle receive the pivotal letter
exposing the plot and did it lead to
the discovery of the explosives?
Yes, yes and yes. In a pivotal scene we
saw a black servant bringing a letter to
the Catholic peer Lord Monteagle.
The anonymous tip-off warned him
to keep away from Parliament, which
will “receive a terrible blow” at the
opening and MPs will “not see who
hurts them”. There were indeed black
Tudors and Stuarts in many walks of
life. Monteagle could have employed
one. The letter Monteagle was brought
From top: King James
(Derek Riddell, centre)
and his men, and Tom
Cullen as Guy Fawkes
in Gunpowder
Was there a shoot-out between the
conspirators and the authorities?
Yes. On the morning of November 8
a rump of the remaining rebels went
out into the courtyard at Holbeach
House, swords and pistols in hand,
much as Gunpowder depicts. “Stand by
me, Tom, and we will die together,”
Catesby said. Tom (Thomas Wintour)
survived, wounded. He would have
been better killed. His execution
spared him nothing: he was hanged,
drawn and quartered.
Would King James have sat on
his own lav?
Yes. This is an allusion to Sir John
Harington, Kit Harington’s ancestor,
who invented the flushing toilet, which
h
was installed at his manor in Kelston.
He was also a humane Protestant who
o
opposed the torture and persecution
of Catholics. “Men’s minds remain
less satisfied of the up-rightness of a
cause, where racks serve for reasons,”
he told King James. The message of
Gunpowder was much the same.
Leanda de Lisle’s book
White King: Charles I,
Traitor, Murderer,
Martyr will be
published in January
So Gunpowder played with timelines
and was inaccurate in its description of
some historical figures. It also put the
words of one person into the mouth of
another and invented details. Yet it
gave a true picture of the suffering of
English Catholics, the audacity of the
plot, and of the charismatic would-be
mass murderer behind it.
You’re heartless. It’s a global
anthem. How would Liam Neeson’s
son ever have wooed his girl in
Love Actually otherwise?
I don’t like Christmas films either.
Well, you’re not going to like this . . .
Stop.
Yes! All I Want for Christmas is You
the movie! Narrated by Mariah, it’s
a gripping tale of pre-Christmas
adventure. I watched the trailer
and I can’t stop wondering how it’s
going to end.
I’ll be listening to hymns from
King’s College Choir on the day,
eating a few mince pies and that
will be it. Understated. Classic.
But the blurb says there will be
“shenanigans”!
Next thing you’re going to tell
me you like Slade.
Emilyy Sargent
g
4
Monday November 6 2017 | the times
1GT
times2
We know what
you’re thinking:
vain, anxious and
selfie-obsessed
Maisie Buck
I can’t imagine having
to go to a friend’s
house to see them
The ‘snowflake’ stereotype does today’s early
twentysomethings a disservice, says Helen Rumbelow
T
here’s a strange thing
that happens when you
start to talk to people
just entering adulthood.
You go in with all the
stereotypes. Young
people, eh? Bunch of
snowflakes. Bunch of
vain, selfie-addicted, never-had-it-sogood whiners. All of that. And after
chatting to half a dozen people aged 20
or so, you are left with an odd feeling
of discomfort. Could it be guilt?
The things they are worried about —
and this new generation are really, really
worried — are things for which you
and your ilk are kind of responsible.
“We are living in a world with a lot
of crap going on,” says Anna Hunter
Funnell, 19, a student in Manchester.
“We see that, and know we are the
ones who will be picking up the pieces
of what’s happening now, with the
adults right now chucking the
problems down to the next generation.”
Your twenties should be an age of
crazy regrettable haircuts, hangovers
and a feeling that you could put the
world to rights, given the chance. This
lot, not so much. They’re a unique
Adults are
chucking
problems
down to
the next
generation
experiment in human history. They
have all the problems of their older
millennial cousins: they can fairly freak
themselves out about never buying a
house or getting a fair crack at social
mobility. Yet they are also the first
generation to grow up on social media,
which takes whatever worries they had
and turns them into a fairground hall
of mirrors. They feel connected, for
sure, but very, very small.
“I remember when I first got access
to social media,” says Thomas
Payton-Greene, 25. “I was 13, and it
was the first time I broke out of the
immediate bubble of my family and
what they thought of me. It was as if
the world held up a mirror. Seeing that
reflected back was terrifying.”
Playback is a project, set up by Arts
Council England and Channel 4, that
asked 200 young people aged between
16 and 24 (some of whom are now
older) to make three-minute films that
reflect their take on the world, video
being the lingua franca of their age.
They are often funny and sharp, but
taken together, and viewers of the
exhibition are encouraged to watch
them in bulk, you feel this deep unease.
Berta Lozano
People try to portray
perfection online
What struck me in the films and my
conversations was the lack of ego that
normally comes with youth. If
anything they worry about not being
up to the task. Repeatedly they say: “I
don’t want to sound ungrateful . . .”
They know their situation is complex:
See us at the Independent Schools Show
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on the one hand they are affluent
beyond the imagination of a postwar
Britain, and on the other burdened by
opportunity in a way that is hard for
older people to understand without
sneering. So, just for a moment, watch
and listen to your youngers.
Find the right school
for your child
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the times | Monday November 6 2017
5
1GT
COVER AND BELOW: MICHAEL LECKIE AND DUNCAN ELLIOTT
Zara Sands
Our age group is a lot more
reserved. We’re quieter
Emily Mulenga
We’ll never be able to live
how our parents lived
Gabriella Ditton
I’m on Instagram
three hours a day
Thomas Payton-Greene
No matter what you
achieve someone else is
two steps ahead
Alexander Rowland
Finding somewhere to
live is impossible
“From the beginning you are
competing with the world, not just
your city or your neighbourhood,”
Ben Phillips, 21, from Bath tells me.
“That’s pressure.”
People make a lot of millennials,
those now in their twenties or thirties,
as the first digital natives. However,
this new generation are different
again. They didn’t just grow up with
mobile phones, their formative years
were governed by social media. It
shaped them, and they shaped it. So
many of them I talk to mark their
entry into social media at the age of 12
or so as the beginning of their true self
— “a totally different stage of my life”,
says Phillips — and can’t recall any
other way of doing things.
They took it beyond the written
word into moving images. They
communicate mostly by video,
Snapchat, Instagram, Whatsapp,
scribbled-upon photos or gyrating
digital collages. It is not just words: it
is a shift greater than maybe anyone
understands. The relatively brief era
of human text communication may
be on the wane.
Going post-text is not a
simplification: this age of visual
information is an age of anxiety. The
camera is always panning around for
the better-looking and the better-liked,
like a roving eye at a party. If everyone
can be your friend, why are you so
lonely? If there is every opportunity in
the world, why aren’t you doing better
than your parents? Every day is a
battle to be worthy of a point of view,
literal or metaphorical.
“I can’t remember a world without
social media,” says Zara Sands, 20,
whose film is about toxic female
friendship, “but I imagine meeting
people would be more special, instead
of pretending you don’t already know
about them.”
Sands says she notices that her
mother’s generation are comfortable
talking to strangers in real life: when
they were young they had to, to ask
directions or do the shopping. “Older
people are so comfortable with it,” says
Sands, “but I think our age group is a
lot more reserved. We’re quieter.” In
real life, I remind her. “Oh yeah, in
real life. Online it’s different.”
Maisie Buck, 20, from Norwich, has
made a punchy video telling the men
who intimidate and harass her on the
street exactly what she thinks of them.
She ponders wistfully, as if of the
Victorians: “I wonder what it would be
like if you had to go around to your
friend’s house if you wanted to see
them. Things have changed so rapidly,
but just before my time.” I feel so old.
Thrumming through all these films,
wild and goofy as some are, is this
contradiction. There are worries about
housing, the environment and jobs,
but more than that it’s this “pressure
to be amazing”. As kids they were
given the keys to the digital kingdom
and feel lost inside.
Payton-Greene made a black
comedy about young people at the job
centre. He does the “I hate to sound
ungrateful” preface — really they are
so self-conscious about that
accusation. He doesn’t want pity, but
to explain why it is hard to be content.
“My parents and grandparents had
limited options. Their baseline started
a lot lower and their ability to exceed
it was higher. Their lives were like
funnels that started narrow and ended
wide. Now ours starts wide, and we
have to narrow it down, find a reason
and a purpose.”
He dates his generalised anxiety
from his first contact with social media.
“No matter what you achieve, you
open up your phone and find someone
two or three steps ahead of you. You’re
never as good as you could be.”
The older folk calling them
snowflakes, I realise, could be taken as
sheer gall, but they chafed under the
label with weary resignation, some
“annoyed” or “demeaned” by it, some
saying, “I’m really proud to be a
snowflake if that means I am sensitive
and want to change the right things,”
and some thinking it downright
“damaging”. Most just acknowledge
how hard it is for older people to
understand it since they dabble in
social media rather than live in it. It
is a divide deeper than digital.
Gabriella Ditton, 23, made her film
Hiveminds on exactly this subject. It’s a
nightmarish animation where everyone
A lot of
people now
have a
good job,
but they
all live at
home
times2
taps their screens all the time, choking
on the “same regurgitated cud” that
churns around the internet (this video
about digital dependence is too hard to
explain — just google it). “Me and my
co-creators are the biggest hypocrites,”
she says. “I’m on Instagram about two
or three hours a day.” Even though she
knows her best times have been in real
life, she is dependent on her phone.
“We’re an anxious generation,” she
says. “Terrified of failure.”
With so many options, says Ditton,
“you end up feeling a bit lost”. They
wouldn’t swap it for the past, though.
As Sands says, she loves the
information era and the possibilities
summoned by the taps of her fingertips.
Emily Mulenga, 26, from Burton
upon Trent, made Taking Up Space,
a joyous fantasy of being heard as a
woman from an ethnic minority.
In this imagined world she who is
ignored so often in real life grows to
an Alice in Wonderland giant online.
Mulenga loves the excitement of the
internet, but thinks it amplifies young
people’s feelings of instability.
“Definitely there is a sense of
anxiety: most of us are resigned to the
fact we are not going to live up to how
our parents lived: jobs, mortgage paid
off, disposable cash. There is anxiety
underpinning such an unstable
existence; we know we are not going
to be settled for a long time.”
For Phillips, social media at a young
age is “knackering”. You see the effects
in Berta Lozano’s video, a visceral
depiction of anxiety, scraping away at
the throat, stomach and knees. Now
22, she sees anxiety in so many people
around her, although there is still a
stigma in talking about it. “People try
to portray perfection online. This is a
big thing getting worse.”
Hunter Funnell’s video is about
teenage abortion. She decided,
bravely, to base it on her experience.
“It felt important not to perpetuate
the idea of it as a taboo subject.”
She sees in her peers a “hunger for
social change” feeding from
campaigns online, whether it’s the
rise of veganism or the search for an
alternative politics.
For Alexander Rowland, 26, it felt
important to show how his part of east
London was changing, a requiem for
a neighbourhood glued together by
community now becoming extinct.
He lives at home, under the usual
financial pressures. “A lot of people
now have a good job, but they all live
at home as well. For most young
people it is an issue, but for a lot of
young people it is a problem as finding
somewhere to live is impossible.”
This group are at university or just
emerging from it, but not with the “I’ll
conquer the world” arrogance of their
forebears. They have diligently jumped
more educational hoops than ever,
then hit the job market and
floundered. Payton-Greene says their
parents had “a much smaller pool of
people to reference themselves against.
It’s a definite generational difference.
“I speak to a lot of people who have
no idea how they ended up where
they are or how they can get to
where they want to be. That’s a huge
gap: how to use all these limitless
options in a way that is fulfilling
instead of just being confused and
floating around.”
Playback is a touring exhibition
supported by Arts Council England,
Channel 4 Random Acts touring
nationally until March 2018, at
venues including the York Explore,
Birmingham mac and ICA, London
6
1GT
Monday November 6 2017 | the times
life
Meet
Professor Tanya Byron
My husband’s hostile behaviour
is destroying our family
N
After 20 years and
three lovely children,
the past two years of
marriage have been
a challenge. For much
of our relationship
we have enjoyed a good standard of
living, with money coming in steadily
from the various businesses that my
husband has established.
We used our house as security for
a bank loan, which was used to build
the business, but none of the income
was put away for a rainy day. At the
beginning my husband had another
income. By the end this business was
the sole provider of the house, cars
and the children’s private education.
I stayed at home and looked after
the house and the children. When
the first business failed my husband
and I jointly agreed a way forward,
but the next one failed too, leaving
us with substantial debt. My husband
was keen to set up a third business,
which made me uneasy, and when
things started to go wrong I pleaded
to take the children out of private
school. My husband was adamant
that they should remain. We finally
did remove them, but it was during
the school year, so we were given a
harsh financial penalty.
I now work part-time, run a car
and pay for the food and clothes for
the children.
We had counselling when our
problems began, but last year the
bank foreclosed on the loan, serving
28 days’ notice. My husband refused
to seek paid work, so his parents paid
the settlement fee. He doesn’t believe
that we need to pay them back in
full, and cannot secure a mortgage
based on his employment history.
Our home life was unbearable
and a few months ago I sought to
begin divorce proceedings. My eldest
became the sounding board for my
husband, which has led to a terrible
breakdown in my relationship with
my child. My husband also refuses
to move out of the house and I have
nowhere else to go.
He is very unreasonable and has
become very aggressive towards me.
I have contacted the children’s school
to secure counselling for them,
which has left him furious for
“telling outsiders our business”.
He keeps telling me that I’m
having a midlife crisis, but I simply
can’t stay with someone who has
such a different outlook on life.
Hannah
Q
A
N
It is terribly sad to
read of 20 years of
marriage deteriorating
so significantly in two
years. Your marriage,
family and indeed life
must feel as if they are in free-fall, and
I hope that you have good support
from your friends at this difficult time.
Before looking at the issue of
divorce, I want to begin by asking
whether you feel that all has been
attempted to try to find a different way
forward. If those 20 years were good
and for the most part solid, I wonder
if the past two years reflect a crisis for
your husband, who has come out of
it feeling as though he has failed. It
sounds as if you feel that he has let the
family down, in terms of his financial
mismanagement and his cavalier
attitude towards his parents repaying
his debt, but is there a way to look at
this that enables understanding and
forgiveness rather than resentment
and the end of a marriage?
You also describe a husband
who has become aggressive, and
also manipulative towards the
children, pulling them into your crisis.
It is therefore of critical importance
to address the issue of your
husband’s aggression.
As much as it is important to try to
understand a person’s behaviour, if
that behaviour becomes threatening
and aggressive no one should be the
recipient of that. Understanding
someone’s behaviour is a way to
resolve challenging issues, but not
to condone that behaviour. When it
crosses a line and becomes abusive,
clear boundaries need to be set and
appropriate action taken.
What is the nature of your
husband’s aggression? The priority
would be to keep yourself and
your children safe physically,
psychologically and emotionally.
The term “domestic violence” is
used to describe behaviour that is
controlling, coercive, threatening,
violent or abusive in a manner that
is psychological, physical, sexual,
financial or emotional. As you are
trying to weather the storms of
the divorce you need to assess the
collateral damage — especially with
h
regard to your children.
Victims of an abusive relationship
p
can make a report to the police (who
o
can caution or charge) and take legal
al
action to get the abusive person to
leave — for example, getting an
injunction to protect yourself from
more violent behaviour (known as a
non-molestation order) or a court
order to sort out who can stay in thee
family home (an occupation order).
See the Rights of Women website,
rightsofwomen.org.uk, and also
bit.ly/2hAYsfF at Citizens Advice.
I agree that counselling would be
very important for your children, but
ut
this will not be effective for them if
the context of their confusion and
despair (the home situation) remains
ns
aggressive, hostile and unhappy. In
my work with children and families
I often see the pain and trauma thatt
children and young people suffer
as their parents continue to play
out their animosity, and it is well
understood that children suffer more
re
in households with two unhappy and
nd
battling parents than when raised byy
separated but happy parents.
For your children the home
situation is toxic. To be pulled into
a position where they have to take
sides is damaging. Why should
children be made to feel responsiblee
for mediating between parents at
loggerheads, or deciding who they
For your
children
the home
situation
is toxic
think is right? The legacy of this for
them could be long-term emotional
and psychological damage, including
depression, anxiety, substance misuse
and anger issues.
If you have come to the conclusion
that your marriage is over, you
and your husband have to be able to
acknowledge your joint, fundamental
responsibility to the wellbeing of your
children — even if you have lost
respect for each other. Of course,
this is easier said than done, so my
advice is that you get the support to
put the children front and centre of
both your thinking.
There are many ways to think about
this, and I suggest that you speak to
your GP for advice. In addition you
could consider family therapy
(psychotherapy.org.uk), mediation
(familymediationcouncil.org.uk) or
counselling to enable you to separate
without hostility (relate.org.uk). In
such settings you and your husband
(with or without your children) can
be supported to have a civilised
discussion and consider how to
either live together with some level
of cordiality or live separately so that
the atmosphere of conflict
divorce
is broken while the divorc
is going through.
I wish you well.
If you have a problem
and would like
Professor Tanya
Byron’s help, email
proftanyabyron
@thetimes.co.uk
Why are Pakistani
women obsessed
with Jane Austen,
asks Melissa
van der Klugt
O
n a Friday night
in Lahore a group of
young Muslim
women aged from
mid-twenties to
mid-forties are
converging at a
discreet country
club. They are gathering to sip from
cocktail glasses, swap their salwaars
for little black dresses and stilettos,
and gossip about the men in their life.
Outspoken, affluent and as well-heeled
as they are well-read, these women are
not the typical face of Pakistan.
This couldn’t be farther from the
quiet parsonages of 18th-century
England depicted in Jane Austen’s
novels, yet the names that come up
in conversation are straight out of her
most famous works: Darcy, Knightley,
Wickham. Meet Pakistan’s first Jane
Austen Society (JASP).
The society is the idea of Laaleen
Sukhera, 40, a journalist and writer.
As eloquent as Lizzie Bennet, Sukhera
grew up in a literary household in
Lahore with her older sister Mahlia,
also a JASP member. Like most JASP
recruits, the sisters were brought up
on a diet of English literature at
British-style private schools in the
country — although Emma is so
popular in Pakistan that it has been
translated locally into Urdu.
Sleeveless tops were banned before
marriage, as were any boyfriends, but
their father, a journalist who lived in
political exile for several years, was
“sweeter even than Mr Bennet” and
encouraged Laaleen to study for a
degree in film in America, where her
thesis was on early Austen adaptations.
Several years later she returned to
her favourite passages of Pride and
Prejudice and a land of comforting
drawing-room exchanges and
satisfactory endings as a way of
escaping her unhappy marriage,
which was arranged when she was 28.
She began blogging about her
favourite quotes and suggested that
some of her girlfriends get together
for a Regency dress-up book club.
“I remember standing in my dining
room feeling a little foolish and
eccentric with my fan and white
gloves, like I was off to Netherfield
Ball,’’ she says. “I was thinking, ‘Are
people even going to show up?’ ’’
But they did. “The club became
like a ray of sunshine to me in a dark
time.” Soon she was getting calls
begging her to host Austen book
clubs around the country.
Now, JASP members in Lahore,
Karachi and Islamabad number 1,600
and the society has been welcomed
as the newest chapter of a worldwide
network of Austen societies.
There is a reason why Austen —
who travelled little farther than Bath
and Brighton — appeals to this new
the times | Monday November 6 2017
7
1GT
life
the Lizzie Bennets of Lahore
SAAD SARFRAZ SHEIKH
sisterhood thousands of miles away, in
one of the world’s largest Muslim
countries known for its poor record
on women’s rights and violent politics.
“Austen doesn’t feel like she’s from
another country,” explains Sukhera.
“Pakistan society, especially the
middle and upper classes, is like
England was 200 years ago.
“Lahore or Islamabad are like
Regency London. There are a few
powerful families. Everybody knows
each other. And when it comes to
marriage it’s still about what your
father does and where you come
from, your pedigree, your looks, how
much baggage you have. Even highly
educated women here still don’t exist
legally if we are not the daughter or
wife of someone.
“I feel we relate to Austen more than
her descendants in England now.”
It is still a truth universally
acknowledged in Pakistan, argues
Sukhera, that a single man in
possession of a good fortune must be
in want of a wife. And that his wife will
be selected, vetted and approved by
his mother or sister.
“We have more than our fair share
of Lady Catherine de Bourghs,” she
says. “They’re more powerful than the
army and judiciary. There’s no dower
house, so we have to live with our
in-laws. It can be a restrictive lifestyle.”
The marriage market is a winter
social season of weddings, charity
galas and brunches from Karachi to
Islamabad that would have left Mrs
Bennet breathless. “Every wealthy
expat living in New York, Dubai and
London jets back to enter the fray,”
says Sukhera. “Girls order their
wardrobes from designers months
in advance and spend thousands
of pounds on a single piece.”
For the most privileged the
matchmaking picks up again in
Knightsbridge, in London, over the
summer season. “It’s our equivalent of
going to take the air in Regency Bath,”
says Sukhera. “You’ll find anyone
who’s anyone from Pakistan there —
you can’t turn a corner near Harrods
without meeting someone you know.”
To bait a husband, in the style of
a Mrs Elton, the most ambitious girls
and their mothers don’t think twice
Upper-class
Pakistan society
is like England
200 years ago
about hiring their own paparazzi. “The
society pages of magazines get looked
at by Pakistanis all over the world,”
says Sukhera. “If you aren’t married
in two seasons you’re on the shelf.”
And the most eligible bachelors for
a mother in search of a son-in-law?
“He’s got to be loaded, preferably
have property abroad and been on
the equivalent of the Grand Tour —
a few years spent working or studying
in the States,” says the JASP member
Izza Farrakh, 37. She’s a divorced
mother of one who studied a degree
abroad and works for an NGO.
“We have too many Mr Collinses
these days,” says Sukhera, grimacing.
“The pseudo-religious guy who wants
a beautiful, brainy girl who’s been to
college, but preaches endlessly and
ends up controlling her.”
Next month the JASP publishes
Austenistan: The World’s Favourite
Author Goes to Pakistan, which is
edited by Sukhera. It skewers the
country’s conservative social elites by
transporting the Bennets, Dashwoods
Mina Malik-Hussain
and Mehr Husain.
Top: Laaleen Sukhera
and Afshan Shafi
Austenistan: The
World’s Favourite
Author Goes to
Pakistan is published
by Bloomsbury in
December in Pakistan
and in 2018 in the UK
and Woodhouses to ten-day weddings
at seaside mansions in the mega-city
of Karachi, and parties in guarded
apartment blocks in Islamabad.
In one story the heroine meets a
dashing man at a wedding abroad and
knows the minute she tells him she’s
from Pakistan that he’ll say, “Do you
know Malala?” or “Is it dangerous?”
“She just wants to be invited on a
date,” says Sukhera. “But those are
the first things we usually get asked.
“We wanted to show a domestic side
of Pakistan that few get to glimpse,”
she adds. “It’s not just Islamic
militants, Af-Pak, Homeland and bomb
blasts. Life is tough here, especially for
women, but we’ve tried to depict our
world with humour and observations
of daily life — just like Austen.”
JASP members argue that, as Austen
reflected some of the political turmoil
of the French Revolution in the lives
and careers of her characters, so their
“Austenistan” is set against a backdrop
of political and social reality.
The women’s phones regularly buzz
with messages telling them not to go
to a certain street after a security alert.
Lahore has had half a dozen bomb
attacks this year carried out by radical
Islamic groups. Their stories touch,
too, on domestic abuse, a fact of many
marriages at all levels of society. “We
hope that speaking up will encourage
other women,” Sukhera says.
JASP women are determined to
fight the patriarchy. One member,
Mehr Husain, 33, runs all-female
comedy nights in Lahore. “They can’t
be filmed yet because
becau they could
still get us killed,”
she says.
kil
Sonya R
Rehman, 35,
organises
organise TED talks
and, proudly
p
unmarried,
lives
unm
with her family.
“It’s often still too
dangerous
for
dan
single
sing women
to live
li alone. You
get the
t wrong
attention.”
She
atten
regularly
regula sees friends
make compromises
co
for a household
of their
hous
own. “Just like Charlotte
Lucas,” she says. Yet there are a
growing number of divorces
among
divo
their friends too.
Austen has played such a big role
in Sukhera’s life that the author is
cited in her divorce proceedings in
a court in Islamabad. With her three
daughters she left her husband a year
ago and he now accuses her of being
led astray. “He blames Jane Austen
for the way I changed from his timid
young bride and suddenly got a voice.”
Since creating JASP, Sukhera has
been invited to Jane Austen Society
annual meetings in the US and has
walked the cobbled streets of Bath.
Her drawing room is crammed with
fan fiction and painted porcelain
plates and figurines.
“I didn’t plan it,” she insists, but
admits that it has more than a whiff
of Beau Brummell — the arbiter of
Regency taste — than most houses
in Lahore. She has also acquired
a wardrobe of bonnets, ribbons,
brooches and fans — “very useful
in the hot summer”.
Sukhera says that dressing up as a
Regency lady in 21st-century Pakistan
is easier than one might expect:
fashions in Austen’s England
included patterned muslin from
the sub-continent and embroidered
Kashmiri shawls. Even the small
traditional embroidered pouch that
women wear to weddings in Pakistan
looks remarkably similar to a reticule.
“Austen had an interest in the
colonies,” says Sukhera. “I think she
would have been fascinated that her
work is so relatable two centuries later
on the other side of the world.”
8
1GT
Monday November 6 2017 | the times
arts
Saved from the Nazis,
hidden by a recluse —
and finally on show
As Cornelius Gurlitt’s art collection goes on display in Bonn and Berne,
David Aaronovitch discovers a rich story and some breathtaking works
I
n 1964 a woman called Benita
Gurlitt wrote to her brother
Cornelius about their father’s
estate. Hildebrand Gurlitt had
died eight years earlier in a car
accident on the autobahn as he
drove westward from Berlin to
the Ruhr. In addition to the
money he had left his family, he had
also bequeathed a magnificent, tainted
collection of paintings, watercolours,
drawings and sculptures.
“I sometimes think,” wrote Benita,
“that his most valuable legacy has
turned into the darkest burden. What
we have is locked away in the graphics
cabinet or kept behind pinned-up
curtains — no one sees it, no one
enjoys it. I tremble with fear every
time I even think about it.”
Fifty years after the letter was
written, Christoph Edel, a lawyer
appointed by a court in Munich as a
guardian for Cornelius Gurlitt, became
the first non-family member to enter
the now elderly man’s second
residence. This was a cottage in a
suburb of the Austrian city of Salzburg;
a scruffy, mildewed, detached 1960s
house with drawn curtains and a
crude device rigged to stop people
looking through the letterbox.
Together with an art appraiser the
lawyer began to search through
mounds of old newspapers, books and
cans of food looking for treasures.
Behind some bookshelves he found
a painting whose style he recognised.
“Is this a Monet,” Edel asked the art
appraiser. “No,” came the reply, “it’s a
Manet.” On the floor was a picture of
a city bridge on a misty day. “Now
that,” said the appraiser, “is a Monet.”
In all, in his fifth-floor apartment in
Munich and in the Salzburg house,
Cornelius Gurlitt had been keeping
some 1,500 works of art amassed by
megalomania. And then, the war over,
his evolution back into respected art
dealer and connoisseur. The show
follows the Gurlitt timeline,
illustrating his progress with some of
the most significant works discovered
in his collection, from Rodin to Dürer.
The history here is as important, if
not more important than the art. The
web of art dealings in occupied Europe
was complex, not least because Gurlitt
The first thing
I saw was the
Macke, like it was
painted yesterday
his father. For the world the
significance of the find, quite apart
from its artistic value, was that
Hildebrand Gurlitt had been one of
the most important art dealers
working for Hitler and thus part of a
machine that between 1933 and 1945
had (according to US government
estimates) seized or coerced one fifth
of the movable artworks on the
European continent.
Last week I went to see the openings
of two remarkable and linked
exhibitions in the German city of
Bonn and the Swiss city of Berne,
which between them tell the Gurlitt
story and exhibit some of the wonders
found in the Gurlitt trove.
Under the shared heading of Gurlitt:
Status Report, the Bonn exhibition,
subtitled Nazi Art Theft and its
Consequences, is an exploration of
Hildebrand Gurlitt’s evolution from
interwar art lover and gallery curator
to agent for the Führer’s aesthetic
Couple by Hans
Christoph, 1924, part of
the exhibition in Bonn
was probably cheating everyone
along the way, including his Nazi
bosses. Would-be thriller writers
short of a plot could find a dozen in
this exhibition alone. Just follow
the Monet.
And Hildebrand Gurlitt as a
character amazes Nina Zimmer, the
director of the Berne art museum. In
the 1920s he had “started out as a
super progressive, energetic man”, a
supporter of German Expressionist
art, a friend of the artists themselves
and a curator of some talent. “And
then,” Zimmer says, “how can a guy
like that cross over to the dark side
and become first a collaborator of the
regime and then an actual Hitler
helper, one of the bad Nazi crooks,
buying and selling in occupied Paris,
making enormous amounts of money
in those years?”
Indeed, Gurlitt, travelling around on
special commission from the Führer to
buy arts for the mad mega-museum
the Nazi leader planned in his home
city of Linz, could act with almost
complete impunity. “He’s in occupied
Paris,” Zimmer says, “being so full of
himself, buying lots of fakes, drinking
champagne, and having his mistress,
going back and forth, it’s like a scene
from Inglourious Basterds.”
And then, after the war, he uses his
part-Jewish ancestry (one Jewish
grandmother) to convince the new
authorities that he wasn’t a Nazi and
to let him have his art collection back.
“He got people to lie for him,” Zimmer
says, “and sure, there were worse
people around than him, but that’s no
excuse! He was a crook.”
Among the 250 exhibits in the Bonn
exhibition are pieces by Maillol,
Daumier, Cranach and Dürer. Yet the
unique thing about the exhibition is
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9
1GT
arts
COLLECTION OF DAVID FRIEDMANN OF BRESLAU; KUNSTMUSEUM BERNE
In the Palace Garden at Oberhofen by August Macke, 1914, on show in Berne
the labelling. So far, six of the works in
the Gurlitt collection (and thus not
exhibited), including the magnificent
Max Liebermann painting, Two Riders
on the Beach, have been deemed to be
“looted art” — art taken or forcibly
purchased — and have been
“restituted” to the successors of the
original owners. This set in train a
significant effort by the German and
Swiss governments and academics to
trace the full provenance of the Gurlitt
works. So, beside each picture and
object, as well as the title and name of
the artist, is a timeline of what is
known about its ownership — who
had it when, and how it got to be in
the flat in Munich or the house in
Salzburg. It is an exemplary piece of
detective work and fans of the BBC’s
Fake or Fortune? programme, for all
that these stories represent human
tragedy and loss, should find it
fascinating. Often there is a gap
in the provenance that might just
betoken a crime.
Yet the Monuments Men aspect
of the Gurlitt story is only one part
of it. Because in Berne, where the
subtitle on the Kunstmuseum’s
exhibition is Degenerate Art —
Confiscated and Sold, there is
another tale, less familiar but just as
compelling. When the enemies of free
expression march, they march first
against art. So it wasn’t only people
they disliked that the Nazis tried to
eradicate, but culture.
As a young curator Hildebrand
Gurlitt had experienced the German
nationalist distaste for almost anything
that wasn’t “beautiful” in the classical
sense. After the Nazis came to
power in 1933, disdain turned to
destruction. Works by abstract,
modernist, impressionist or
expressionist artists were declared
“degenerate”, to be regarded as being
as undesirable as physical deformities
or mental illness. In 1937 the Nazis
held the first of a series of “degenerate
art” exhibitions mocking modern
works. This was followed by the
confiscation of tens of thousands
of works of degenerate art from
German museums and galleries.
Some were destroyed, most were
stockpiled with an eye to being sold
abroad for foreign currency.
The art being produced by
Germany in the first third of
the 20th century — pre, postt
and during the First World
War — was arguably the
most thrilling and challenging
of any country in the world.
There was the searing pain of
Käthe Kollwitz, the sombre
brilliance of the sculptor Ernst
Barlach, the savage humour of
George Grosz and Otto Dix, the
lyrical watercolours of Franz Marc
and August Macke, the sexiness of
Otto Mueller — these are just a few.
And the young Hildebrand had
known and supported the work
of many of these artists.
When their works were in
effect made illegal in Germany,
Hildebrand metamorphosed into
Two Riders on the
Beach, by Max
Liebermann, 1901
one of the main dealers buying them
at a discount or swapping them for
classical works, and then selling them
aboard. Or keeping them. Perhaps he
even regarded himself as a saviour of
the artists he loved, as the Oskar
Schindler of expressionism.
When Cornelius, Hildebrand’s heir,
died weeks after the Salzburg trove
was discovered, he left his entire estate
to the Kunstmuseum in Berne, a
museum he had visited a few times
when he had been to see the SwissJewish dealer Eberhard Kornfeld. Most
of the pieces and pictures the museum
inherited appear not to have been
looted art and most were “degenerate”
works. A large sample of them form
the new exhibition.
The work — much of it watercolour
— is just wonderful. And, ironically, all
the more wonderful for having been
sequestered for all those years.
Zimmer, then new to her job in Berne,
recalls going to where the pictures
were being stored. “One of the first
works I saw was
the Macke, and
th
they opened it
th
and I saw the
an
blue that didn’t
bl
see a day of
se
light and it
lig
Left: Crouching
Woman by Auguste
Rodin, 1882. The
sculpture was found
in Cornelius Gurlitt’s
flat in Munich, above
looked so fresh, like it was painted
yesterday.” Zimmer continues, “and
this web of history that comes at you.
You can’t help but be touched by the
quality of these works and the way
they were kept prisoners by not
being exhibited, not being loaned,
not being published.”
Among the works are several black
and white drawings and lithographs by
a previously more-or-less unknown
female artist, who committed suicide
in 1919, aged 29. She was Cornelia
Gurlitt, Hildebrand’s sister.
Nearly a century later her nephew
and namesake, and keeper of her
artistic legacy, died confused and
unhappy, baffled by the intrusion
of a world he had largely shunned.
So what these extraordinary twin
exhibitions also show is that after
great crime, corruption and tragedy
comes a constellation of minor
crimes and corruptions, and smaller
tragedies. And then, every now and
again, from a cupboard or a cabinet,
emerges something of wonder.
Kunstmuseum Berne, Gurlitt: Status
Report — Degenerate Art –
Confiscated and Sold, to March 4;
Bundeskunsthalle Bonn, Gurlitt:
Status Report — Nazi Art Theft and
its Consequences, to March 11
10
1GT
Monday November 6 2017 | the times
television & radio
The anti-Doctor Foster approach to family crisis
LAURA RADFORD/CHANNEL 4
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Unspeakable
Channel 4
{{{{(
The Last Post
BBC One
{{(((
W
omenfolk, here’s a
cheery question for
a Monday morning.
If you received an
anonymous text
message suggesting that your hot new
boyfriend was abusing your 11-year-old
daughter, what would you do? I’m
pretty sure I’d go straight to the child to
ask if it were true. But what if she was
staying with her father that weekend
and it wasn’t immediately practical?
Meanwhile, the hot boyfriend was
at work, unable to take calls?
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Composer of the
Week: Soviet Russia
Radio 3, noon
It’s not often that you get
such a conceptual topic on
Donald Macleod’s Composer
of the Week. Obviously it’s
for the anniversary of the
Russian Revolution, and
Macleod can handle this
abstraction. He’s one of
those presenters who you
wish Radio 3 would make
a bit more of. With his
tweedy jackets and beard
he’s not going to pop up on
Strictly, but he’s brilliant.
Quietly knowledgeable, he
presents the material rather
than muscling in front of it.
First Person
Radio 4, 10.45pm
You can see why so many
writers are tempted by the
topic of ghost writing. The
sheer drama of it: the
relationship between
“writer”and writer creates
an automatic tension. In this
novel by the Booker-winning
Richard Flanagan, the
tension runs even deeper.
Ziggy Heidl is Australia’s
most notorious con man,
accused of defrauding the
banks of $700 million. He’s
due to go on trial in six
weeks, but before he goes
he wants his story told.
And so the author Kif
Kehlmann gets a phone
call in the night . . .
It’s likely that many women would
do exactly what Indira Varma’s
character, Jo, did in Unspeakable,
which is to gradually spiral into a state
of paranoia and frozen disgust, its grip
tightening as she reads significance
into every photograph, social-media
posting and remembered remark.
What made this one-hour drama,
its action elapsing over a couple of
days, convincing was its restraint.
No shouty melodrama here (let’s call
it the anti-Doctor Foster approach to
family crisis), though I doubt I’d have
pressed ahead with that awkward
dinner party, making small talk about
water parks while thinking: “BUT IS
MY PARTNER A PAEDOPHILE?”
What we got was paralysed silences,
suspicious stares and dialogue so lean
that we studied the facial expressions
of Danny (Luke Treadaway) and Jo’s
daughter, Katie (who looked more like
17, which was confusing), for clues.
It was a cogent exploration of how
one fairly vague text, reading: “Your
boyfriend and Katie — something’s
going on. It’s not right,” can capsize
your entire world. Asking your partner
toxifies the relationship either way, as
Jo found; even if he’s innocent you’ve
shown that you think him capable of
child sex abuse. This being a one-off
drama, we got our denouement.
A man’s guilt was proved (spoiler
alert), but it was not the man we
thought, and not the crime we
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 The Matt Edmondson Show
4.00 Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
Greg James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 The 8th
with Charlie Sloth 11.00 Huw Stephens
1.00am Radio 1’s Drum & Bass Show
with Rene LaVice 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Sara Cox 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Ore Oduba 5.00 Simon
Mayo. With the actress Lesley Sharp 7.00
The Blues Show with Paul Jones. New and
classic blues tracks 8.00 Jo Whiley. The best
of the past year’s Vinyl Revivals 10.00 How
The Light Gets In: Jeremy Paxman on
Leonard Cohen. Paxman and company pay
tribute to Leonard Cohen 11.00 Jools
Holland. With guests JP Cooper and Aubrie
Sellers 12.00 Johnnie Walker’s Sounds of
the 70s (r) 2.00am Radio 2’s Jazz Playlists
3.00 Radio 2 Playlists: Great British
Songbook 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Hidden
Treasures 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Music, listener requests and the occasional
surprise, presented by Georgia Mann
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein explores potential companion
pieces for a well-known piece of music and
Bridget Kendall talks about the ideas that
have inspired her throughout her life
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Soviet Russia (1917-1953)
Donald Macleod explores the lives and music
of composers associated with the USSR,
beginning by looking at how Scriabin and
Prokofiev influenced early Soviet music.
Prokofiev (Tempestuoso — Sarcasms, Op 19;
Largamente; Con eleganza; Allegretto
tranquillo; Feroce — Visions Fugitives; and
Violin Concerto No 1 — 3rd mvt); and
Scriabin (Prometheus: The Poem of Fire;
and Piano Sonata No 7, Op 64, White Mass).
See Radio Choice
1.00pm News
1.02 Live Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Clemency Burton-Hill introduces a recital
from London’s Wigmore Hall, with the violist
Eivind Holtsmark Ringstad performing,
accompanied by the pianist David Meier.
Luke Treadaway as Danny and Indira Varma as Jo in Unspeakable
Schumann (Märchenbilder, Op 113);
Hindemith (Sonata for viola and piano in F,
Op 11 No 4); Vieuxtemps (Elégie Op 30); and
Paganini arr Primrose (La campanella, from
Violin Concerto No 2 in B minor, Op 7)
2.00 Afternoon on 3
Semyon Bychkov conducts the BBC
Symphony Orchestra in music by Tchaikovsky
and Taneyev as part of Radio 3’s season
Breaking Free: A Century of Russian Culture.
Penny Gore presents. Tchaikovsky
(Serenade in C for string orchestra, Op 48;
and Piano Concerto No 3 in E flat, Op 75);
Taneyev (The Oresteia — concert overture,
Op 6); Tchaikovsky (Francesca da Rimini —
symphonic fantasia after Dante, Op 32);
Elgar (Introduction and Allegro for string
orchestra, Op 47); and Shostakovich
(Symphony No 11 in G minor —
The Year 1905, Op 103)
5.00 In Tune
Live music by the pianist Omar Sosa and the
kora player Seckou Keita, and the pianist
Boris Giltburg performs as part of Breaking
Free: A Century of Russian Culture
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An imaginative, eclectic mix of music,
featuring favourites with lesser-known gems
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
The London Philharmonic perform, with
Istvan Vardai. Presented from the Royal
Festival Hall in London by Martin Handley as
part of Radio 3’s season Breaking Free: A
Century of Russian Culture. Shostakovich
(Cello Concerto No 1); Peteris Vasks (Dona
nobis pacem); Gregorian Chant (Dies irae);
and Rachmaninov (Symphonic Dances)
10.00 Music Matters
Sara Mohr-Pietsch hears from the
neuroscientist David Eagleman and the
composer Anthony Brandt, who discuss
their book The Runaway Species, which
explores creativity in art and the brain (r)
10.45 The Essay: Ten Artists
That Shook the World
Ten contemporary cultural specialists look
back at the impact of the Russian Revolution
of 1917 on artists of the time — in film,
theatre, poetry, dance and beyond. The
journalist and writer Martin Sixsmith opens
the series with a consideration of the
choices, good and bad, open to artists during
and after the Revolution. Part of Breaking
Free: A Century of Russian Culture
11.00 Jazz Now
Soweto Kinch presents a concert from this
year’s Cheltenham Jazz Festival by Swiss trio
Schnellertollermeier, and there is an
interview with Django Bates
12.30am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With Sarah Montague and John Humphrys
9.00 Start the Week
Andrew Marr discusses colonialism and
post-colonialism with Maya Jasan,
Robert Colls and Ishion Hutchinson
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor focuses on the creation
of sacred spaces (11/30)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
With Jane Garvey. Including at 10.45 the 15
Minute Drama: Part one of the third series of
Gregory Evans’ Blood and Milk (1/5)
11.00 The Untold
A care home manager sacked for posting a
photo of a resident on Facebook (1/16)
11.30 A Month of Maureen
Three Journeys by Gary Brown. A woman
tries to persuade her son it is time to
strike out on his own. Comedy drama
starring Maureen Lipman (1/4)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed
The impact of the UK leaving the EU (1/5)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week:
Life in the Garden
Stephanie Cole reads from Penelope Lively’s
meditation on gardening, literature and
creativity, beginning by considering
metaphorical gardens (1/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Undercover Mumbai
By Ayeesha Menon. Disgraced cop Alia Khan
is released from prison, and seeks work as a
receptionist at a run-down Mumbai hotel,
but murder follows her to her new place
of work (1/2) (r)
3.00 Quote — Unquote
With Sally Phillips, Matthew Parris,
Kate Williams and Frog Stone (6/6)
3.30 The Food Programme
With Dan Saladino (r)
4.00 Hull 2017: Flight
Four dance schools bring the Royal Ballet’s
Take Flight to streets of Hull (3/3)
4.30 The Digital Human
Aleks Krotoski explores whether technology
is changing people’s experience and
relationship with shame (6/6)
5.00 PM
suspected. In fact, Jo’s envious
ex-husband had sent the text, fearing
that his father role was being stolen by
the handsome usurper. I didn’t much
like the end, which closed like a play
rather than a TV drama, with Jo and
Danny staring out to the audience.
Yet it was a gripping hour that treated
a hideous scenario with integrity.
I have enjoyed much of The Last
Post as something in which to lose
oneself on a dreary Sunday night. In
the final episode, however, it was the
show that seemed lost, lapsing from
being a Royal Military Police drama
based in 1960s Aden, featuring
terrorists, child kidnap and a
beheading, into more of a schmaltzy
romance-cum-couples’ therapy hour.
That’s not to say that it wasn’t
entertaining in a middle-of-the-road
kind of way, if you didn’t mind Jessie
Buckley having to say such clichéd
lines as, “My husband is a good man,”
at the court martial. It was almost a
relief when poor Yusra was murdered
after falling in love with a British
soldier, serving as a realistic correction
to all the sentimentality. At the
end gin-soaked, abortion-seeking
Alison (Jessica Raine) even seemed
to have fire in her loins again for her
long-suffering husband (Stephen
Campbell Moore), but alas we were
left on tenterhooks. Was that a pitch
for a second series? I think so.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 The Unbelievable Truth
With Mark Steel, Holly Walsh, Tony Hawks
and Fred MacAulay (6/6)
7.00 The Archers
Lilian tries to prevent a disaster
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor focuses on the creation
of sacred spaces (11/30) (r)
8.00 The Confidence Trick
The role of school and background in
determining confidence (2/3)
8.30 Analysis
Primate Politics A look at how chimpanzee
power struggles mirror human politics
9.00 Natural Histories
The reintroduction of beavers to the UK (r)
9.30 Start the Week (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime: First Person
By Richard Flanagan. Read by Luke Mullins.
See Radio Choice (1/10)
11.00 Power Lines
Sabrina Mahfouz and Inua Ellams explore the
rising popularity of spoken word poetry (1/3)
11.30 Today in Parliament
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Life in the Garden (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
10.00 Comedy Club: The Unbelievable Truth.
With Mark Steel, Holly Walsh, Tony Hawks
and Fred MacAulay 10.30 Steven Appleby’s
Normal Life. Comedy with Paul McCrink and
Rachel Atkins 10.45 Earls of the Court.
Johnno’s hangover gets out of hand 10.55
The Comedy Club Interview. (1/2) Iain Lee
chats to Maddy Anholt 11.00 The Now
Show. A satirical look through the week’s
news 11.30 The Problem with Adam Bloom.
Comedy with Rob Rouse. First aired in 2004
11.45 Brian Appleton’s History of Rock ‘n’
Roll. Comedy starring Graham Fellows
Radio 4 Extra
6 Music
Digital only
8.00am Hello Cheeky 8.30 Dad’s Army
9.00 Just a Minute 9.30 Tomorrow, Today!
10.00 Home Front Omnibus 11.00 Infinite
Possibilities and Unlikely Probabilities 11.15
Tommies 12.00 Hello Cheeky 12.30pm
Dad’s Army 1.00 Murder on the Orient
Express 1.30 Mysteries from the Past 2.00
Regeneration 2.15 Cosmic Quest 2.30 A
Kind of Loving 2.45 The Horologicon 3.00
Home Front Omnibus 4.00 Just a Minute
4.30 Tomorrow, Today! 5.00 Millport 5.30
The Unbelievable Truth 6.00 Earthsearch I
6.30 A Good Read 7.00 Hello Cheeky.
Comedy with Tim Brooke-Taylor, Barry Cryer
and John Junkin 7.30 Dad’s Army. Comedy
with Arthur Lowe 8.00 Murder on the Orient
Express. By Agatha Christie 8.30 Mysteries
from the Past. A look back at modern
performances of York’s Medieval Mystery
Plays 9.00 Infinite Possibilities and Unlikely
Probabilities. By Anita Sullivan
9.15 Tommies. By Jonathan Ruffle
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Adrian Chiles 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport:
The Monday Night Club. With Kelly Cates and
Ian Wright 9.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Cricket
10.00 Flintoff, Savage and the Ping Pong
Guy 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Joey Barton 10.00 Jim White 1.00pm
Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham
and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off. With
Mark Saggers 10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am
Extra Time with Adam Catterall
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc
Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Lauren Laverne 1.00am
The First Time with Ian Brown 2.00 The
Casbah 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Bill Turnbull 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Jane Jones celebrates
recordings from master conductors.
Mendelssohn (Hebrides Overture — “Fingal’s
Cave”); Dvorák (Serenade for Strings);
Rachmaninov (Piano Concerto No.4 in G
minor); Mozart (Symphony No.14 in A); and
Vaughan Williams (Norfolk Rhapsody No.1)
10.00 Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday November 6 2017
11
1GT
BILL COOPER
Pop
Starcrawler
Sebright Arms, E2
Concert
Natalie Clein
Kings Place, N1
I
W
{{{{(
t has been a while since we have
had a rock’n’roll band this raw,
untamed and, well, silly. Arrow
de Wilde may be only 18, but
the leader of Los Angeles’s
charmingly monickered Starcrawler
channelled the spirit of Alice Cooper,
Ozzy Osbourne and every wild
rocker into a performance that
was as goofy and vaudevillian as it
was unsettling.
She jumped into the crowd. She
rolled about on the floor. And
she did it in a straitjacket and
rhinestone-studded jock strap.
Given that de Wilde is 6ft 3in, it
was quite a sight to behold.
Arrow is the daughter of the
rock/fashion photographer Autumn
de Wilde and already a veteran of
fashion campaigns, so it could have
been a case of style over substance if
the band weren’t so tight, and so
clearly imbued with a love of trashy
music. Ants, a minute-long ode to
the horror of ants crawling over
your body, was straight out of the
Ramones’s comic book. Let Her Be
found the hitherto undiscovered
sweet spot between the New York
Dolls and the Runaways.
Near the end of the short, sweaty
set, the guitarist Henri Cash pulled a
reluctant young woman up from the
audience and made her play his guitar.
He had spent the past 40 minutes
knocking out some sharp licks, but
the suggestion here was that anyone
could do what Starcrawler were doing
if they were brave enough.
With de Wilde ending the show
by smearing her face in fake blood
and gurning at the crowd as if to
suggest something was really wrong,
these four teens showed just how
much you can transform yourself
with a few amped-up Chuck Berry
riffs and a bit of attitude. On the
strength of this hilariously chaotic
show, they won’t be playing basement
dives for long.
Will Hodgkinson
Opera
La Tragédie de Carmen
Wilton’s Music Hall, E1
C
{{(((
onsidering the bloodshed,
knives and screeching graffiti
featured in director Gerard
Jones’s previous visit to
Wilton’s Music Hall (it was a
production of Handel’s Oreste), we get
off extraordinarily lightly here. No
props except a chair; no setting except
whatever the mind conjures from
changing spotlights or the black steps
leading to the small orchestra, housed
at the stage rear. Clothing could be
characterised as “modern-day louche”,
and a little knifing does go on — but
nothing compared to the gory Oreste.
In principle, restraint should be
perfect for La Tragédie de Carmen,
Peter Brook’s miniaturised, bare-boned
version of Bizet’s opera, with a reduced
character list and a narrative tilted
more towards the original Prosper
Mérimée novel. It should also help to
amplify the production’s chief function
— showcasing the talents in the Royal
artsfirst night
{{{{(
Powerful finale:
Baiser de la fée
A fairytale performance
This revival
of Michael
Corder’s Le
Baiser de la fée
was a season
highlight, says
Debra Craine
Dance
Birmingham
Royal Ballet
Sadler’s Wells
{{{((
S
travinsky’s Le Baiser de la fée
ballet score, first performed in
Paris in 1928, has attracted
many choreographers. Michael
Corder added his name to the
list in 2008 when he created his
version for Birmingham Royal Ballet.
Its current revival was a highlight of
the company’s London season.
It’s a tough score to choreograph,
for despite being inspired by the great
Tchaikovsky it doesn’t tell its story
very well, so Corder has to work hard
to detail drama at every opportunity.
Based on Hans Christian Andersen’s
tale The Ice Maiden, the ballet sees a
young man seduced and kidnapped by
a malevolent Fairy on his wedding day
— his fate sealed by her ice-cold kiss.
Corder’s choreography is
wonderfully comfortable in its classical
skin, with the elegance and intricacy
of his writing making everything on
stage move beautifully. The duets for
the Young Man — with his Bride and
with the Fairy — are pleasing studies
in contrast: touching and tender in the
first case, dark and disturbing in the
next. Corder’s compelling ending, in
“a land beyond time and place”,
illustrates the victory of supernatural
power over human desire.
Opera’s Jette Parker Young Artists’
Programme. Theory, however, is one
thing, reality another. Notes keep
flowing from Aigul Akhmetshina’s
man-eating demon Carmen
(prominent sneakers, skimpy dresses).
Yet her tone is of the bottled-up brand,
with little sign of raging fire until the
climactic scenes with Don José.
Barrelling forward with his tight tenor
voice, Thomas Atkins seems a happier
fit for Brook’s version of Don José, an
increasingly unhinged obsessive rather
than the plaything of fate, while Gyula
Nagy swaggers as Escamillo. The most
heartfelt singing comes from the
Micaëla of Francesca Chiejina, giving
her all to the plot’s flimsiest character.
Instrumentally, things are firmer,
with James Hendry and the Southbank
Sinfonia bouncing along through
Marius Constant’s quirky arrangement
of Bizet, but it would take more than a
surprising drum roll to overcome this
show’s biggest drawback, emotional
distance. The puppet characters totter
on and off like cabaret turns under
lurid lights. And when Don José killed
Carmen I didn’t feel a thing.
Geoff Brown
Box office: 0207 304 4000, to Nov 14
Theatre
Heather
Bush, W12
{{{{(
Tate Liverpool
Join us on November
23 at Tate Liverpool for
an exclusive private
view of John Piper.
To book visit
mytimesplus.co.uk
Lachlan Monaghan was openhearted and convincing as the Young
Man; Momoko Hirata was dainty and
loving as a Bride who believed in
happy endings; and Jenna Roberts
exuded icy hauteur as the predatory
Fairy, though she might have pushed
that a bit more. The Sprites were fun
and John F Macfarlane’s designs set
the scene most effectively.
Also on the same bill was David
Bintley’s ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café
(1988), always a crowdpleaser, and
Ruth Brill’s new Arcadia. The latter
turns the spotlight on Greek
mythology in the form of Pan. It isn’t
clear what Brill is getting at — you had
to read the programme to know that
her ballet is about Pan undergoing a
personality change — and after a
strong opening the dance seemed to
lose its way. As did John Harle’s jazz
score, at first exotic and romantic, but
quickly sliding into something quite
bland. Still, Arcadia was worth it for the
powerhouse performance of Brandon
Lawrence as Pan — he’s a fiercely
graceful mover with a dynamic stage
presence. Céline Gittens also
impressed as Selene, the goddess of the
Moon, whose limpid duet with Pan
seemed to soften his ill temper.
H
arry is a publisher who can’t
believe his luck. He’s been
sent a manuscript by a new
children’s writer named
Heather Eames that he
thinks is dynamite. Her book’s heroine
is a girl named Greta, who fights evil
in the world with her weapon of
choice, a magic pen. It’s like Harry
Potter but, er, inkier.
“Oh Heather,” he gushes via email,
“what a star you are!” Heather, a bit of
a recluse, seems thrilled with him
praising everything, especially the
book’s cover, which features (not
making this up) motes of magic dust
that come out of Greta’s pen. “It’s
everything I wanted,” she cries.
This 55-minute play by Thomas
Eccleshare divides neatly into three
parts but, like the magical children’s
story that it revolves around, it
shapeshifts more than once. In the
first part, the all too chummy emails,
increasingly littered with emoticons
and xx sign-offs, are read out by Harry
(Ashley Gerlach) and Heather
(Charlotte Melia) on the strippeddown set, speaking into microphones.
This is followed by a face-to-face
meeting between the two. The Greta
e came for Bach.
I came away thinking
about Bloch. The
cellist Natalie Clein
has been a great
advocate for the Swiss-American
composer, particularly championing
his demanding Schelomo for cello and
orchestra. This concert, Clein solo, was
part of Kings Place’s year-long “Cello
Unwrapped” strand, but also a miniseries of Bach. Sandwiching Bloch’s
Suite No 1 around two Bach cello
suites and amuse-bouches by Kurtag,
Clein introduced the Bloch by saying it
showed the influence of Bach “but
with a Jewish soul at heart”.
This was exactly as it sounded: the
compression and directness of the
Lutheran composer, fattened with
heart-tugging, folkish snatches of
melody, the passing ghost of klezmer;
and, at the suite’s centre, a lamenting
canzona of fierce dignity. Bloch wrote
the suite in the 1950s: it’s hard not to
think he was alluding, at least in part,
to the shadows of the Holocaust.
This was a clever programme.
Kurtag’s enigmatic miniatures (three
pieces from his Signs, Games and
Messages) are tantalisingly spare, but
somehow leave you satisfied; perhaps
it’s something to do with the balance
of sound, reverberation off the bow
and then silence. Just as this music
needs to be carefully weighed and
measured, so Clein applied the same
balance to the mesmeric sarabande of
Bach’s Suite No 5, in so doing deftly
cutting across the centuries between
the German baroque icon and a
Hungarian modernist master.
Earlier Clein’s rich tone and
generous legato had slightly
smothered the lighter Suite No 4, with
its chirpy pair of bourrés. Yet she
didn’t put a foot wrong in the Fifth,
grandly unwinding the twisty prélude,
supplying two meaty gavottes, and,
with understated elegance, coming to
a halt in a spry, genteel gigue.
Neil Fisher
book(s) have been a hit and there’s a
movie deal in the making plus talk of a
(cringe) theme park. Yet you won’t be
surprised to discover that there’s a
dark secret. The director, Valentina
Ceschi, has done a brilliant job of
building tension and creating mystery.
Gerlach and Melia are almost
mesmerising as they circle each other,
trying to find out where they stand.
The final part of this dramatic triptych
is a bit of magical thinking come to
life. We see Greta, not to mention that
pen, in action against the forces of
darkness. Now Lily Arnold’s bare set
becomes something else, helped in its
transformation by an almost filmic
soundscape from Iain Armstrong.
This is a small, almost perfectly
formed look at identity, greed,
publishing and, yes, pens. All three
parts are not equal, though, and in
some ways the structure is too simple.
I wanted more, in terms of drama and
depth. The fact that it centres on this
area of publishing makes it even more
intriguing: you don’t need to be Enid
Blyton to know that not all children’s
writers live in a fairytale.
Ann Treneman
Box office: 020 8743 5050, to Nov 18
12
1GT
Monday November 6 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Revolution:
New Art for
a New World
BBC Four, 9pm
This is a
visual
feast of a
documentary
that describes how
artists from Chagall to
Kandinsky rose in
Early
Top
pick
tandem with the
Russian Revolution in
1917. It also unearths
long-hidden or banned
work by painters whose
legacy disappeared
under Stalin. The
avant-garde paintings
and Soviet realist
posters are splashed
gloriously across the
screen and you can
imagine their impact
on a semi-literate
nation in flux. Leading
the revolution, Lenin
believed that “art is the
most powerful means
of political propaganda
for the triumph of
the socialist cause”.
The British director
Margy Kinmonth gets
extraordinary access to
closed collections. The
documentary is filmed
among the streets and
monuments of modern
Saint Petersburg and
Moscow, but also uses
news footage from the
revolution. Extracts
from Sergei Eisenstein’s
film October show
hundreds of Bolsheviks
storming the Winter
Palace — mostly
propaganda because
the reality, says one
interviewee, featured
only a few armed men.
Kinmonth also looks
at the work of Dziga
Vertov, whose 1929
documentary Man
with a Movie Camera
changed cinema with
its industrial and
human scale. The
stories of each artist
are fascinating,
ranging from Chagall,
a Jew for whom
the revolution
opened many doors,
to Varvara Stepanova,
the cubo-futurist who
married the artist
Alexander Rodchenko.
Kate Muir
Dispatches
Channel 4, 8pm
While bigotry on the
terraces has not been
eradicated in the UK,
we pride ourselves
on having a tolerant
football culture.
However, as a group of
knuckleheaded Chelsea
fans on the Paris Metro
showed the world in
2015, it is a different
picture on the railways.
Dispatches goes
undercover with the
British Transport Police
to expose shocking
racism, homophobia
and antisemitism
perpetrated by football
fans travelling to and
from matches. The
reporter Morland
Sanders asks why
behaviour that would
result in a lifetime ban
inside football stadiums
is so tolerated on trains.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Women at War: 100 Years of
Service. New series. Five famous faces find out about the
changing role of women in the armed forces in the past
100 years, beginning with the EastEnders star June
Brown (AD) 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties
in Maidstone, Salford and Stoke-on-Trent (r) 11.00
Getting the Builders In. Transforming a playroom in
Oxted, Surrey 11.45 Fugitives. Officers search for a
Polish man convicted of a series of increasingly violent
robberies 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From the National
Botanic Garden of Wales (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Mrs Tembe worries about Sid being exploited,
while Zara finds something in Joe’s school bag that could
be a warning (AD) 2.15 Impossible. Game show hosted by
Rick Edwards 3.00 Escape to the Country. Jonnie Irwin
helps a couple looking for a property in south Wales (r)
(AD) 3.45 Money for Nothing. Sarah Moore reclaims
three items from a Walsall recycling centre (r) 4.30 Flog
It! From Herstmonceux Castle in East Sussex 5.15
Pointless. Quiz show (r) 6.00 BBC News at Six; Weather
6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Hairy Builder (r) (AD) 6.30 Countryfile
Autumn Diaries (r) 7.15 Getting the Builders In (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: The Big Family Cooking Showdown (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm The Code (r) 1.45 The
Planners (r) 2.45 Family Finders. A Liverpool man
searching for his mother who abandoned him when he
was eight 3.15 Operation Gold Rush with Dan Snow. The
historian follows in the footsteps of 19th-century gold
prospectors, in the company of the explorer Felicity Aston
and the physiologist Dr Kevin Fong (r) (AD) 4.15 Back in
Time for Dinner. Giles Coren and Polly Russell introduce
the Robshaws to potential tastes of the future and
predict how people will shop, cook and dine over the next
50 years. Last in the series (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your Money
Where Your Mouth Is. David Harper takes on Philip Serrell
at an antiques market in Maastricht in the Netherlands,
where Philip struggles to find a bargain and David
discovers a Victorian museum piece (r) 6.00 Eggheads.
Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine 6.30 Strictly Come
Dancing: It Takes Two. Zoe Ball is joined by the latest
couple to be voted out by the judges after the dance-off
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Katie Price chats about
her new novel Playing with Fire. Plus, the usual mix of
news and current affairs, plus health, entertainment and
lifestyle features 8.30 Lorraine. Michelle Pfeiffer and
Derek Jacobi chat about their roles in the new all-star
movie adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the
Orient Express 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat
show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip Schofield and Holly
Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features, including
a look at the stories making the newspaper headlines and
a recipe in the kitchen. Including Local Weather 12.30pm
Loose Women. With guest Peter Andre 1.30 ITV News;
Weather 2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal. David Dickinson and
the team are in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, where items
of interest include a French clock set, Robert “Mouseman”
Thompson tables and an arts and crafts pendant (r)
3.00 Tenable. Five old schoolmates from Dover answer
questions about top 10 lists, then try to score a perfect
10 in the final round. Warwick Davis hosts 4.00 Tipping
Point. Ben Shephard hosts the arcade-themed game show
5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents the quiz show
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) (AD) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay’s
Hotel Hell. A failing hotel in Starkville, Mississippi (r)
(AD) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA. The boss of a luxury
transportation firm poses as a contestant in a reality
show (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm
Come Dine with Me. The dinner party challenge arrives in
Northampton, where the first host hopes to win over
guests by serving camel meatballs (r) 1.05 My Kitchen
Rules. Sian and Rob are first to cook in the final week of
the mansion rounds 2.10 Countdown. With Alison
Steadman in Dictionary Corner 3.00 A Place in the Sun:
Winter Sun. Scarlette Douglas helps a mother and
daughter find a holiday home on Spain’s Orihuela Costa on
a budget of £65,000 (r) 4.00 Coast vs Country. A couple
moving back to the UK from France 5.00 Four in a Bed.
The competition gets underway at the Castellor B&B on
Anglesey 5.30 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star.
The Parkers head to the Baytrees Hotel in Southport,
Merseyside 6.00 The Simpsons. Bart is kidnapped by
a chimpanzee (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Kim and Farrah
make a discovery, while Cleo comes up with a plan (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can’t
Pay? We’ll Take It Away. In Coventry, the sheriffs chase
£10,000 owed by a publican to a contractor, while agents
in central London try to recover almost £8,000 owed to
a firm of accountants (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime
12.15 The Gadget Show. Jon Bentley assesses some
hi-tech electric toothbrushes, the G Team gets up to
speed with e-bikes, and Ortis Deley sees what the future
holds at the Virtual Reality Show in London (r) 1.10
Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD)
2.15 NCIS: New Orleans. The naval crime drama spin-off
returns, as Pride and company co-ordinate with other
federal agencies to track down a sniper targeting special
events across New Orleans (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM:
Defending Santa (PG, 2013) A man claiming to be
Santa Claus is found sleeping in a forest, resulting in
a court case to prove his real identity. Festive drama
starring Dean Cain, Bill Lewis and Jodie Sweetin 5.00
5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Piper finds herself on the
open sea — with Louise at the helm (r) (AD) 6.00 Home
and Away. Caleb and Scarlett reminisce over dinner, and
Ash takes drastic action (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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7.00 The One Show The first visit of
the week to the One Show studio,
where Matt Baker and Alex Jones
present topical stories and chat
7.30 Inside Out Documentary series
focusing on regional stories of interest
7.00 MOTD: FA Cup 2nd Round Draw
Mark Chapman presents coverage
of the draw
8.00 EastEnders Kathy is stunned when
she comes face-to-face with a ghost
from the past, and a guilty Tina helps
Billy when Honey kicks him out (AD)
8.30 Would I Lie to You? Comedy panel
show with guests Bob Mortimer,
Gabby Logan, Katherine Parkinson
and Steve Backshall (2/10) (r)
8.00 University Challenge The second of
the highest-scoring loser matches
9.00 Panorama In-depth current
affairs report covering a story
behind the headlines
9.00 Elizabeth I’s Secret Agents
Robert Cecil learns of a Catholic
conspiracy to blow-up Parliament and
must negotiate warring factions to
prevent what would become known
as the Gunpowder Plot (3/3) (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
11PM
10.45 Have I Got a Bit More News for
You Jo Brand hosts an extended
edition of the satirical quiz, with Miles
Jupp and Quentin Letts joining team
captains Ian Hislop and Paul Merton to
poke fun at the week’s news (5/10)
Late
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
11.30 The Graham Norton Show The host
welcomes Kenneth Branagh, who
directs the new movie version of
Murder on the Orient Express as well
as starring as Hercule Poirot, and
several of his co-stars — Michelle
Pfeiffer, Judi Dench and Josh Gad.
Plus, St Vincent performs (r)
12.25am-6.00 BBC News
7.30 Coastal Path Paul Rose visits the
Jurassic Coast, where he walks through
some two hundred million years
of the earth’s history (5/5) (r)
8.30 Nigella: At My Table Including a
recipe for beef and aubergine fatteh,
and a toasted brie, Parma ham
and fig sandwich (2/6) (AD)
10.00 Live at the Apollo Sarah Millican
presents stand-up comedy from
London’s Hammersmith Apollo, with
Tom Allen and Arj Barker (1/6) (r)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day’s
events presented by Kirsty Wark
11.15 Exodus: Our Journey Continues
A follow-up to the 2016 documentary
Exodus: Our Journey to Europe, finding
out what happened to some of the one
million migrants and refugees who
came to Europe in 2015 (1/3) (r) (AD)
12.15am Sign Zone: The Countryfile Ramble for
Children in Need A report on fundraising walks across
the UK, meeting children and their families supported by
the money raised (r) (SL) 1.25-2.25 The 21st Century
Race for Space. Brian Cox explores what is really
happening in privately financed space flight (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 Emmerdale Adam makes a shocking
revelation to Victoria, and Pollard lies
to Faith so he can go and play a round
of golf with an old friend (AD)
7.30 Coronation Street Adam and Rosie
embark on a mission of mercy, and
Sally comes clean to Seb (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Car Crash TV Chelsea tractors are
placed under scrutiny in 4x4 Fails,
and more chaotic road-based clips
are highlighted in All By Myself,
Rubbish Reversers, Hit or Miss
and Thrills and Boon (6/10)
8.00 The Harbour The crowds arrive for
the Easter weekend and Whitsun
holidays, and artist Naomi goes
out to sea to sketch (2/4) (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Johnny’s
announcement incenses Aidan, Mary
hosts a dinner party, and Adam plays
his trump card with Colin (AD)
8.00 Trouble on the Trains: Channel 4
Dispatches Morland Sanders
investigates abuse by football fans on
Britain’s trains. See Viewing Guide
8.30 Tricks of the Restaurant Trade
Curry fans give their verdict on a new
wave of restaurants offering a genuine
taste of the regions of India (4/6) (AD)
8.00 All New Traffic Cops An insight into
the working life of officers patrolling
the nation’s roads, using modern
technology and old-fashioned methods
to bring criminals to justice
9.00 Prince Harry and Meghan: Truly,
Madly, Deeply Documentary charting
the history of the couple’s romance
amid rumours of an imminent
engagement, as well as looking at
the life of Meghan Markle, from her
childhood to her role as a human rights
ambassador. See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 999: What’s Your Emergency?
Following the emergency services as
they deal with incidents related to the
large military population in Wiltshire,
including a 24-year-old in basic training
is brought into custody on suspicion
of carrying out a totally unprovoked
attack on a 76-year-old widower (AD)
9.00 Chris Tarrant: Extreme Railway
Journeys New series. The broadcaster
returns for more train journeys,
beginning by travelling across Morocco
and the Sahara to find out whether a
railway line once led to Timbuktu,
Mali. See Viewing Guide (1/4)
10.00 First Dates An Old Etonian and a
blogger bond over a shared respect of
Michelle Obama, while a property
developer and a sales executive
have the distinct feeling that
they may have met before (AD)
10.00 The Last Days of Steve McQueen
Forensic pathologist Dr Jason PayneJames examines the cause of the
movie star’s death in 1980. McQueen’s
death has been the subject of
conspiracy theories over subsequent
years, but the truth behind the stories
may lie in detailed medical records
11.40 The Jonathan Ross Show With
Jodie Foster, David Walliams, Roisin
Conaty and Blondie (10/12) (r)
11.05 Celebrity Hunted The fugitives try to
avoid dogs, drones and helicopters, and
evade capture for the final time and
make it to the extraction point. Jamie
Laing and Spencer Matthews have
relied on their fame to blag places to
stay, but their fame could prove
to be their downfall (4/4) (r) (AD)
11.05 The One (15, 2001) An evil genius
journeys through parallel universes to
become all-powerful by killing other
versions of himself. Futuristic martial
arts adventure starring Jet Li in
multiple roles alongside Carla Gugino,
Jason Statham and Delroy Lindo
12.40am Jackpot247 Interactive gaming 3.00 The
Jeremy Kyle Show. The host invites guests to air their
differences over family and relationship issues, and
provides them with his own brand of no-nonsense advice
(r) (SL) 3.55 ITV Nightscreen. Text-based information
service 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
12.10am How’d You Get So Rich? (r) (AD) 12.55 The
Secret Life of the Zoo (r) (AD) 1.50 FILM: Mommy (15,
2014) A widow struggles to cope with her violent son
after taking him out of an institution. Drama with Anne
Dorval and Antoine-Olivier Pilon 4.10 Grand Designs
Australia (r) 5.10 Draw It! (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.40am Car Crash TV Incidents involving public
transport 1.10 SuperCasino 3.10 Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit. A woman’s body is found at an industrial
laundry (r) (AD) 4.00 Get Your Tatts Out: Kavos Ink
(SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 House Busters
(r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.40 Ross Kemp Behind Bars: Inside
Barlinnie Ross Kemp spends 10 days
visiting HMP Barlinnie in Glasgow,
immersing himself in prison life and
speaking to inmates and staff about
life in one of the oldest and toughest
jails in the world (r) (AD)
the times | Monday November 6 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
Prince Harry and
Meghan: Truly,
Madly, Deeply
ITV, 9pm
Since Prince Harry
and Meghan Markle
made their first
official appearance as
a couple at the Invictus
Games in September,
speculation has been
rife about an imminent
engagement. Channel 4
struck the first blow
last week, with
an embarrassing
hagiography about the
Suits actress. Let’s hope
that this effort from
ITV will be a little
better (it can hardly
be worse). This film
will trace the life and
career of Markle as
well as asking what her
arrival will do for (and
presumably to) the
royal family. Welcome
to Britain, Meg.
Extreme Railway
Journeys
Channel 5, 9pm
Chris Tarrant returns
for a fourth series
of riding the rails in
far-flung destinations
(you won’t find many
of these journeys in
a George Bradshaw
guide). Tonight Tarrant
begins in Marrakesh on
the hunt for the one of
least likely railways
imaginable — a route
that may have stretched
from Morocco, across
the Sahara Desert, to
Timbuktu. Beforehand
he experiences a hastily
built First World War
route out of Marrakesh,
discovers how
locomotives were
designed to withstand
temperatures above
50C and rides the
supreme “train du
désert” into the Sahara.
The Secrets in
My Family
W, 9pm
Long Lost Family meets
The Jeremy Kyle Show
as Alex Jones fronts a
new genealogy series
that hinges on DNA
tests. Thankfully, it has
all the warmth of the
former and none of the
shrill exploitation of
the latter. Tonight
Kirsty hopes to find her
father so that he can
walk her down the
aisle. However, the
story of Andrew
(whom you may
recognise as the
M People drummer,
Shovell) is astonishing.
In a reversal of the
usual scenario, Andrew,
at the age of 35,
discovered that the
adoptive mother who
raised him was in fact
his birth mother.
Sport Choice
BT Sport 1, 7pm
The first round of the
FA Cup has thrown up
a Lancashire derby
between Chorley, of the
National League North,
and the League One
side Fleetwood Town at
Victory Park (kick-off
7.45pm). It is the first
time in 27 years that
Chorley have reached
the first round.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Modern Family (r) 7.00 Monkey Life (r)
(AD) 8.00 It’s Me or the Dog (r) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) 10.00 Zoo Tales (r) (AD) 11.00
Modern Family (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama. Leela gets a second eye (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Supergirl. Kara investigates a secretive
new group and J’onn confesses to an old secret
9.00 A League of Their Own. Guests include
Harry Redknapp and Johanna Konta (r) (AD)
10.00 Bounty Hunters. Barnaby is in for a shock
when he learns more of his dad’s secrets (r)
10.45 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
11.45 A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
12.45am The Force: North East. The dog unit
deals with a man (r) 1.45 Ross Kemp: Extreme
World (r) (AD) 2.45 Brit Cops: War on Crime (r)
3.45 PL Greatest Games (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am The Guest Wing (r) (AD) 7.00 Richard
E Grant’s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 Urban
Secrets (r) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00
House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing
(r) 5.00 House. A special-needs teacher (r) (AD)
6.00 House. Thirteen reacts badly (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A triple
murder case haunts Catherine (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. A serial killer leaves a
message that taunts Danny (r) (AD)
9.00 The Trip to Spain. Steve and Rob tread the
boards at the Corral de Comedias (r) (AD)
9.35 The Trip to Spain. The duo leave
Granada and reach Malaga (r) (AD)
10.10 Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry
upsets Funkhouser’s new girlfriend
10.50 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
11.25 Real Time with Bill Maher (r)
12.35am Vice Principals (r) 1.10 The Deuce (r)
(AD) 2.20 The Wire (r) 3.35 Californication.
Hank faces Stacy (r) 4.10 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Highway Patrol (r) 12.00 Road Wars
1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds. The agents go on the trail
of a female serial killer driven by grief (r)
7.00 The Real A&E. A broken heel (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E. A woman crushed (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Sherlock and Joan stumble
across the body of a former assassin (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. The BAU investigates
a fatal drone shooting in Silicon Valley
10.00 Blindspot. New series. The FBI team
reunites to deal with a new crisis
11.00 Criminal Minds. A stalker begins killing
students in a variety of gruesome ways (r)
12.00 Criminal Minds (r) 3.00am Law & Order
True Crime: The Menéndez Murders 4.00 Cold
Case (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am André Rieu: Love Songs 7.15 Prokofiev:
Alexander Nevsky 8.00 Auction 8.30
Watercolour Challenge 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 10.00 My Shakespeare 11.00
Treasures of the British Library (AD) 12.00
Discovering: Gregory Peck (AD) 1.00pm Tales of
the Unexpected 2.00 Watercolour Challenge
2.30 Auction 3.00 Talks Music (AD) 4.00
Trailblazers: Pop Videos 5.00 Discovering: Phil
Collins (AD) 5.30 Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: Claudia Cardinale (AD)
7.00 Agatha Christie: Murder Beyond the Orient
Express. Examining the classic mystery
8.00 Katherine Jenkins Live at the O2
10.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017.
A new batch of artists must paint Rhossili Bay
11.00 Master of Photography (AD)
12.00 Discovering: Omar Sharif. A profile of the
Egyptian actor 1.00am Tales of the Unexpected.
Double bill 2.00 Auction 2.30 La Traviata on
Sydney Harbour 4.45 Classical Destinations
5.00 The South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00
Premier League Daily. Updates from the top
flight 11.00 Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Sky
Sports News 5.00pm Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Sky Sports Tonight. Leading sports stories
7.30 La Liga Greatest Games. Real Madrid v
Barcelona from the 2015/16 season
7.40 Live Irish Football: Glentoran v Ballymena
United (Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of the Irish
Premiership clash at The Oval, Belfast
9.45 My Icon: Thierry Henry. The former
Arsenal forward speaks about the individuals
that have been an inspiration to him
10.00 The Debate. The latest PL news
11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00 Sky Sports News 1.00am My Icon:
Rachel Yankey 1.15 Live NFL: Green Bay Packers
v Detroit Lions (Kick-off 1.30). Coverage
of the clash between the NFC North sides at
Lambeau Field 4.45 My Icon:
Heather Watson 5.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 Christine &
Adrian’s Friendship Test. New series. Christine
Lampard attempts to prove Northern Ireland’s
friendliness to Adrian Chiles 10.40 True North:
Under the Bridge. Navigating boats into the
open water 11.10 Have I Got a Bit More News
for You. Jo Brand hosts 11.55 The Graham
Norton Show (r) 12.40am-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 Landward.
A search for city sparrowhawks 10.45 The
Ganges with Sue Perkins (AD) 11.45 Have I
Got a Bit More News for You 12.30am
The Graham Norton Show (r) 1.20 Weather
for the Week Ahead 1.25-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 X-Ray.
A plumber who has left a trail of unpaid debts
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 I Lár an
Aonaigh. New series. With guest Dara Devaney
Find a lifelong companion in the Times Literary Supplement,
the world’s leading international literary journal
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm-6.00 Live Bowls:
Scottish International Open. Coverage of day
three from the Dewars Centre in Perth 11.15
Bowls: Scottish International Open. Action
from day three 12.15am Exodus: Our Journey
Continues (r) (AD) 1.15-2.25 Sign Zone: The
Countryfile Ramble for Children in Need (r)
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ITV Wales
As ITV except: 6.00pm-6.30 ITV News Wales
at Six 10.40 Sharp End. Political discussion
11.10-11.40 Gino’s Italian Coastal Escape. The
chef explores the Mediterranean coastline (r)
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E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
Michael Portillo continues his journey through
Spain and Portugal, learning about Britain’s
alliance with the Portuguese (8/10) (r)
8.00 The Art of Scandinavia. Andrew
Graham-Dixon examines how Denmark
emerged from modest beginnings to
become one of the greatest powers and
arbiters of taste in northern Europe (r) (AD)
9.00 Revolution: New Art for a New World.
Documentary about the artists of the Russian
avant-garde, telling the stories of Chagall,
Kandinsky, Malevich and others who flourished
in response to the 1917 revolution.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.20 FILM: Leviathan (15, 2014)
A mechanic turns to a lawyer for help in keeping
his home, unaware of the repercussions this
choice will have. Drama starring Aleksey
Serebryakov and Elena Lyadova
12.35am Lost Kingdoms of Central America.
Last in the series (r) (AD) 1.35 The Art of
Scandinavia (r) (AD, SL) 2.35-3.55 Revolution:
New Art for a New World (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Cleo bumps into Joel and
panics him with what she knows (AD)
7.30 Streetmate. Scarlett Moffatt
heads to Cardiff and Bristol (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Made in Chelsea. Francis sets Fredrik
up on a date with Sophie, and Olivia has
her eye on a model at her photoshoot
10.00 Tattoo Fixers: Top Tatts (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 Rude Tube. Clips featuring animal antics
(r) 1.05am Made in Chelsea (r) 2.10 Tattoo
Fixers: Top Tatts (r) (AD) 3.05 First Dates (r)
(AD) 4.00 Black-ish (r) (AD) 4.50 Charmed (r)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 FILM: The Hound of the Baskervilles
(PG, 1959) Sherlock Holmes mystery starring
Peter Cushing 11.45 Food Unwrapped (r) 11.55
Time Team (r) (AD) 2.00pm Four in a Bed (r)
4.50 A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
6.55 The Supervet. A five-year-old Great Dane
is rushed to Fitzpatrick Referrals (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. A Royal Marine who was
seriously injured in Afghanistan begins a project
to build a specially adapted home (4/11) (r)
9.00 Vet on the Hill. A springer spaniel needs
an operation, while a Hungarian vizsla dog
with a paralysed larynx (AD)
10.00 The Supervet. A German pointer
struggling to walk must undergo spinal surgery,
while a Leonberger undergoes an operation
to remove a cancerous tumour (r) (AD)
11.05 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown.
With Claudia Winkleman, Johnny Vegas,
Reginald D Hunter and Sara Pascoe (r)
12.05am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
The chef visits a Danish restaurant in Florida (r)
1.05 Vet on the Hill (r) (AD) 2.05 The Supervet
(r) (AD) 3.15-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am The Violent Men (PG, 1955)
Western starring Edward G Robinson 12.55pm
Posse from Hell (PG, 1961) Western starring
Audie Murphy and Lee Van Cleef 2.40 Down to
the Sea in Ships (PG, 1949) Seafaring
adventure starring Lionel Barrymore 5.05 Carry
On Regardless (U, 1961) Slapstick comedy
with Sid James and Charles Hawtrey (b/w) (AD)
6.50 Small Soldiers (PG, 1998) A computer
chip brings a squad of toy soldiers to life,
causing mayhem for their owner. Children’s
adventure with Kirsten Dunst and Gregory Smith
9.00 The World’s End (15, 2013) Five
childhood friends reunite for a pub crawl in their
home town, only to stumble on a threat to the
entire human race. Sci-fi comedy with Simon
Pegg, Nick Frost and Martin Freeman (AD)
11.10 Killing Them Softly (18, 2012) A Mob
hitman is sent to kill two petty crooks, but
jeopardises the job by involving a washed-up old
friend. Crime thriller starring Brad Pitt, James
Gandolfini, Ray Liotta and Scoot McNairy
1.05am-3.15 The Angels’ Share (15, 2012)
Ken Loach’s comedy drama starring Paul
Brannigan, John Henshaw and Gary Maitland
6.00am The Cube: Celebrity Special (r) 6.45
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Dinner Date (r) 8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30
Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.30 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20 Dinner Date (r)
11.20 Dress to Impress (r) 12.20pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 Coronation Street
(r) (AD) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show
2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy (AD)
9.30 Ghosted. Leroy and Max take
Jermaine trick-or-treating (AD)
10.00 Timewasters. Last in the series
10.30 American Dad! (AD)
11.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.25 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.55 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.25am Celebrity Juice (r) 1.10
Scorpion (AD) 2.05 Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.50 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
8.50 Judge Judy (r) 10.10 Inspector Morse (r)
(AD) 12.25pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.30
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 3.45 Inspector Morse (r) (AD)
6.00 Heartbeat. Bernie becomes the
target of a predatory widow and Carol struggles
to control her feelings of guilt when a newborn
baby dies in her care (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A bedridden Jessica
accidentally overhears a murder plot on the
telephone — but is unable to convince
anyone that the threat is real (r) (AD)
8.00 Agatha Christie’s Marple. A weekend
party at a country house is marred by the
discovery of a body in a secret passageway
within its walls (r) (AD)
10.00 Lewis. When a student’s body is hauled
from the canal with stab wounds, suspicion falls
on her lover — a young astrophysics professor
— and his jealous wife (3 & 4/6) (r) (AD)
12.00 Inspector Morse (r) (AD) 2.05am
ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 8.00 Storage Wars (r)
8.30 Cash Cowboys (r) 9.30 Ironside (r) 10.35
Quincy ME (r) 11.35 The Sweeney (r) 12.45pm
Live Snooker: Champion of Champions. Jill
Douglas introduces coverage of the opening
session on day one from Ricoh Arena in
Coventry, featuring two group-stage semi-finals
5.15 The Avengers. An old enemy plots to
kill a hospitalised Steed (r)
6.20 Storage Wars: Best of the Feuds. A look
at some of the biggest conflicts in the show,
when the bidders’ rivalries got personal (r)
6.45 Live Snooker: Champion of Champions.
Jill Douglas introduces coverage of the evening
session on day one from Ricoh Arena in
Coventry, featuring a group-stage final, as
the players contest a place in the last four
11.15 FILM: A Dangerous Man (18, 2010)
An ex-convict protects a kidnap victim from
gangsters, corrupt cops and Chinese special
agents. Action thriller starring Steven Seagal
and Jeanettea Antonio (AD)
1.10am Motorsport UK 2.15 The Protectors (r)
2.50 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.00 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors 4.00 Ice Road
Truckers 5.00 Impossible Engineering
6.00 Top Gear. James May drives a Toyota Hilux
up an active Icelandic volcano (AD)
7.00 Motorway Cops. A burglar’s excuses
leave two officers dumbfounded
8.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.
Dave Gorman returns for another series of witty
stand-up and wry observations
9.00 QI XL. Extended edition. With Jo Brand,
John Sessions and Dara O Briain
10.00 Red Dwarf. All the machines on-board
Red Dwarf go on strike (AD)
10.40 Zapped. Brian lands a job guarding
Munty’s sacred Albino Pear Tree (AD)
11.20 Live at the Apollo. With Alistair
McGowan, Kevin Bridges and Reginald D Hunter
12.20am Mock the Week. With Rob Beckett,
Miles Jupp, Romesh Ranganathan and Tiff
Stevenson 1.00 QI XL 2.00 Room 101 2.40 8
Out of 10 Cats 3.10 Suits 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am Call the Midwife (AD) 8.00
London’s Burning 9.00 Casualty 10.00 Hetty
Wainthropp Investigates 11.00 The Bill
1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a Feather
3.00 London’s Burning 4.00 Pie in the Sky
5.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates.
Hetty tracks down a stalker
6.00 A Fine Romance. Laura’s efforts to find
new customers for Mike are too successful
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine.
Compo accuses Foggy of lying (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. Jean and Lionel
spend a weekend in the country
8.00 Ashes to Ashes. An alleged sexual assault
requires delicate handling (3/8)
9.00 Death in Paradise. Humphrey and the team
investigate the shooting of Fidel’s old school
friend. Kris Marshall stars (3/8) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The case of a murdered
graffiti artist is reopened (5/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. As the bills pile up,
Tracey considers selling Darryl’s car
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London’s Burning
2.20 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 Surviving the
Holocaust: Freddie Knoller’s War 8.00 Codename
Ainsbrook: A Time Team Special 9.00 Walking
Through History 10.00 Secrets of War 11.00
The Blue Planet (AD) 12.00 Britain’s Lost
Roman Circus: A Time Team Special 1.00pm
Walking Through History 2.00 Wonders of the
Monsoon 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.10 The Interviews
5.10 Blackadder Goes Forth (AD)
6.00 Great War Diaries. People whose lives
were affected by the First World War
7.00 Games on the Battlefield. An insight into
the role of sport in the First World War
8.00 Unearthing World War I. David O’Keefe and
Wayne Abbott examine First World War battles
9.00 WWI Aces Falling. The story of two
First World War fighter pilots (/7)
10.00 Blackadder Goes Forth. Captain
Blackadder faces a firing squad (AD)
10.40 The Monocled Mutineer. First World
War drama starring Paul McGann (1/4)
12.20am Unearthing World War I 1.20
WWI Aces Falling 2.20 Raiders of the
Lost Art (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
ITV Westcountry
As ITV except: 10.30pm-10.40
ITV News West Country
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 The People’s
History Show. A look at the lives of four
remarkable women 10.40 Scotland Tonight
11.05 Ross Kemp Behind Bars: Inside Barlinnie
(r) (AD) 12.05am Teleshopping 1.05 After
Midnight 2.35 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Lesser Spotted
Journeys. Joe Mahon visits Killala, Co Mayo
10.40 View from Stormont. Current affairs and
political analysis 11.40 Ross Kemp Behind
Bars: Inside Barlinnie (r) (AD) 12.40am
Teleshopping 1.40-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15
Rathad an Sutha (64 Zoo Lane) (r) 5.25 Calum
Clachair: Gleann na Grèine (Bob the Builder:
Project Build It) (r) 5.35 Bruno (r) 5.40 Ceitidh
Morag (Katie Morag) (r) 5.55 Seonaidh (Shaun
the Sheep) (r) 6.00 Donnie Murdo (Danger
Mouse) (r) 6.15 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks (r)
6.35 Ard-Sgoil a’ Chnuic Annasaich (Strange
Hill High) (r) 7.00 Turas a’ Bhradain (The
Salmon’s Journey) (r) 7.30 Speaking Our
Language (r) 7.55 Earrann Eachdraidh (History
Shorts) (r) 8.00 An Là (News) 8.30
Puirt-adhair (Highland Airports). Offshore
helicopter pilots fly crew to oil platforms in the
North Sea 9.00 Trusadh: Balaich a’ Bruidhinn
(Cancer Club) (r) 10.00 Horo Gheallaidh
(Celtic Music Sessions) (r) 10.30 Bruadar a’
Bhàis (A Dream of Death) (r) 11.30 Belladrum
2016: Cridhe Tartan — Main Street Blues
11.50-12.00 Dhan Uisge (Sanna) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
12.05pm Heno (r) 1.00 Straeon Tafarn (r)
2.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da
3.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 3.05 Cerdded y
Llinell (r) 3.30 Olion: Palu am Hanes (r) (AD)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05
Stwnsh: Boom! 5.15 Stwnsh: Fideo Fi (r) 5.35
Stwnsh: Sgorio 6.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05
Cwpwrdd Dillad (r) 6.30 Ralïo+ 7.00 Heno 7.55
Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25 Cefn
Gwlad (AD) 9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30
Ffermio 10.00 Mike Phillips a’r Senghenydd
Sirens (r) 10.30-1.00am Clwb Rygbi
14
Monday November 6 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7489
1
2
3
6
Codeword No 3173
4
7
5
22
8
3
10
9
4
26
Scrabble ® Challenge No 1995
8
9
5
9
9
22
25
21
20
9
20
2
12
14
5
4
23
26
6
7
9
10
11 12
2L
2W
21
8
2W
2W
9
10
24
2
26
16
7
21
26
25
21
20
8
19
L
14
15
6
weir
2L
i 2L
g
2L
h 2L
mutt 3L
2L
12
O
11
9
13
6
21
13
9
25
12
1
2
8
12
Y
14
12
13
25
14
2W
14
7
2
14
7
15
16
5
3
9
26
14
14
18
3
19
14
16
26
18
21
9
8
2
19
25
17
8
8
9
12
25
18
9
19
21
8
What seven-letter word can you
play with this rack?
16
7
25
Across
6
11
2
3
8
2
9
7
What eight-letter word can you
play with this rack?
HIBARUS
7
8 Like, eg, volcanic dust (4)
9 Play light-heartedly (6)
10 Seductive women (5)
11 Eg, car plant set-up (8,4)
12 Difference of opinion (12)
Solution to Crossword 7488
A T
E F F
H
U
C I F I C
S
H
T RE S P
L
I
NE S A B
T
E
L L OWO N
I
M
E
N ARK A
E C
T
NGHY H
OR T
P
I
EDDY
R E
A S S
U A
ACUS
C S
ERA
S S
NS A S
O
I
ERON
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
18 Dandies (4)
1
2
3
4
5
6
Y
19 Unique; remarkable (8)
14
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
O
15
16
17
18
19
L
Down
1 Wild pig (4)
2 Walks at a leisurely pace (6)
3 Bourses (5,7)
4 Warm-blooded animal (6)
5 Reddish-brown colour (8)
7 Government employee (5,7)
17 Toothed wheel (4)
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 3991
A
I
K
R
R
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
T
H
H
A
R
U
E
B
C
E
A
E
O
A
T
I
C
E
O
H
T
O
L
S
I
S
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3992
F
O
R
M
R
D
E
A
L
R
E
L
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
S
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4165
Futoshiki No 3036
>
5
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE® is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ©Mattel 2017
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
13 Disinclined; reluctant (6)
Kakuro No 1995
4
∨
∧
19
33
16
21
26
26
3
13
26
16
19
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
9
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
16
15
∧
∨
<
∨
3
>
L
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday’s solution, right
11 Form of propaganda (8)
14 Prolonged reprimand (6)
K
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
© PUZZLER MEDIA
incontrovertibly true (8)
16 Domineering woman (6)
J
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
6
15 Portion; component (5)
6 Asserting things as
UC
R
P E
S
RC
E
AN
D
FO
J
J O I
R
D I
16
H
I
2W
1
19
26
2L
hoydipt
10
G
2L
2W
2W
1
17
4
D
I
S
T
A
N
C
E
3
F
3L
3
6
19
4
7
3
26
∨
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
33
16
4
23
4
3
19
16
23
21
10
3
23
4
24
16
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
19
16
4
13
26
16
16
16
© PUZZLER MEDIA
2
D
E
2W
the times | Monday November 6 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Baadur Jobava
Black: David Navara
European Teams, Crete 2017
Sicilian Defence
1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 c3 Nf6
White can set a trap with 4 Be2
when 4 ... Nxe4 fails to 5 Qa4+.
4 Bd3
White plans to retreat his bishop
to c2 and then follow with central
occupation by d2-d4.
4 ... Nc6 5 Bc2 Bg4
Naturally, using this pin Black
fights against the white strategy
of playing d2-d4.
6 d3 e6
I once reached the same position as Black and chose the alternative 6 ... g6. The game Maninang-Keene, Surakarta 1982 con-
1/3
x4
÷8
2/3
x5
TREBLE
IT
4/5
– 1126 x 8
EASY
11
+7
MEDIUM
19
+ 32
HARDER
87
+ 568 TREBLE
OF IT
OF IT
IT
OF IT
TREBLE
IT
________
á D 4 DkD] Winning Move
àD D Dp0 ]
ß D DpD 0] Black to play. This position is from
Crete 2017.
ÞD D D D ] Kelires-Bluebaum,
White is a pawn down but may have been
Ý 0NDnD )] hoping to create complication thanks to
ÜD DnH ) ] the pin along the d-file. However, he has
Ûq) DQ) D] missed a trick. How did Black continue?
ÚD DRD I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
– 7 ÷ 11
DOUBLE
IT
– 157 x 4 + 236 + 3/4
HALF OF
IT
OF IT
HALF OF 3/4
IT
OF IT
÷6
TREBLE
IT
10
Killer Gentle No 5707
14
4
7
23
x
4min
17
7
I’m enjoying a pleasing run of success of late, and have just (with my
brilliant
partner
Alexander
Allfrey) retained the title of
English Player of the Year.
However, I’ve recently made a
couple of declarer-play howlers.
Real shockers. Here’s the worst, in
our first look at the 2017 English
Premier League in London.
The contract was 4♠ at all eight
tables. Four Wests led top-of-adoubleton club, playing for the ruff
looking attractive, holding the ace
of trumps. At those four tables, the
game was defeated before it started.
East won the queen of clubs,
cashed the ace and gave his partner a third-round ruff. With the
ace of spades to come, that was a
swift down one.
At the other four tables, West
led a red card (a diamond or the
jack of hearts — it didn’t make a
material difference which). Three
declarers played perfectly. They
won the (say) diamond lead with
the king and played the ace of
hearts and ruffed a heart. They
cashed the ace of diamonds and
discarded a club from hand (key
play). They then ruffed a third diamond, ruffed a third heart and
only now led the queen of spades.
They had to score five spade tricks,
losing just two clubs and the ace of
spades. Ten tricks and game made.
It was (virtually) a 100 per cent
line.
The fourth declarer, a tall chap,
won the king of diamonds and,
with thoughts of an overtrick and
overlooking the danger lurking,
led a spade at trick two. West, the
young and very promising player
Dealer: East Vulnerability: Neither
Teams
♠Q 8 6
♥8
♦A 6 4 3
♣K 10 9 8 6
♠A 3
♠5 4
N
♥J 10 9 4 3 W E ♥KQ 7 6
♦Q 9 8 5
♦J 10 7 2
S
♣7 2 ♠ K J 10 9 7 2♣AQ 5
♥A 5 2
♦K
♣J 4 3
16
13
11
10
3
20
10
6
6
9
12
9
4
7
17
S
W
N
E
19
9
x
1♦(1)
2♥
1♠
Dbl(2)
2♦(3)
4♠ (4) End
(1) Playing Strong Notrump and Five-card
majors.
(2) Negative, showing hearts.
(3) Good spade raise — North is clearly
worth it given his singleton.
(4) South loves the ninth trump. Further,
with E-W having effectively bid and supported hearts, he knows his partner has at
most two hearts — there’s a ruffing value
coming down in dummy.
Contract: 4♠ , Opening Lead: ♦5
Tom Paske, rose sharply with the
ace and put the seven of clubs on
the table. Queen, ace and a club
ruff followed from his partner
Simon Gillis.
Down one and a red-faced
declarer. Fortunately, we did
rather well on the other boards to
win the match 16-4; but it was
embarrassing to make such a
schoolboy error. The key was to
think of the third club as a potential loser — because it could get
ruffed. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
15
11
8
14min
16
5
18
4 3 1
2 1 4
6
7 9
7 9 8
9 8
1 5 9
6 8
1 2
3 1
2
9 7
8 9
5
8
1
7 6
9
8 3
4 2
+
11
2
3
12
16
28
24
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
8
Suko 2074
1
5 > 4
3 > 2
3
4
1 < 2
5
4
∨
2
∧
5
2
3 < 5
3
5
1
1
2
4
1
∧
4
∨
3
9
8
1
2
8
6
3
7
9
3
1
2
1
6
4
5
8
9 4 6
7 9 8
x
÷
+
12
8
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
2
8
x
9
3
2
12
2
1
9
3
8
2
6
4
5
7
7
8
5
3
4
9
1
6
2
KenKen 4164
6
4
2
7
5
1
8
3
9
5
2
1
6
8
3
7
9
4
8
6
7
9
1
4
5
2
3
4
3
9
5
7
2
6
8
1
Lexica 3990
T
U
E
W
A
N
L
K
L
A
A
F
D
E
D
Z
6
3
4
1
8
5
6
7
2
9
3
5
3
2
1
9
8
6
7
4
7
9
6
4
3
2
5
1
8
9
8
5
6
4
3
1
2
7
O
R
I
P
T
V
E
A
N
X
O
N
R
M
E
A
Killer 5706
4
3 3
S
+
7
4
9
7
6
1
3
8
2
4
5
1
+
2
2
5
8
4
9
7
3
1
6
-
3
+
3
1
4
2
6
5
9
7
8
Lexica 3989
4
x
23
3
=
14
Sudoku 9432
1 4
6 8
7
7 9
9
2
8
6 9
5 7
1
Cell Blocks 3055
4
=
4
Futoshiki 3035
x
5
21
1
Chess 1 ... Nc3! is a winning fork as 2 bxc3 is
impossible on account of 2 ... Qxe2. White tried
2 Qxd3 Rxd3 3 Rxd3 but this proved hopeless after
3 ... Qb1+
÷
26
13
=
42
Tredoku 1498
6
9
÷
Solutions
Set Square 1997
19
10
19
+
x
13
12
20
14
+
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 40 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
= 42 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Scrabble 1994
EMBARGO E5 across (48)
EGGCUP G4 down (28)
17
Killer Tricky No 5708
6
x
3
6
= 15 from 1-9 are
+
x
16
12
All the digits
-
-
14
8
26
3
-
Kakuro 1994
Bridge Andrew Robson
3
12
16
3
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 1998
Saturday’s answers defer, defier,
defile, defiler, feed, feel, felid, fiddle,
fiddler, field, fielder, file, filer, film, filmi,
fire, firm, flee, fleer, flier, free, fried,
lief, life, lifer, midfield, midfielder,
midlife, reef, relief, rife, rifle, rifled
17
12
4
2
From these letters, make words of
three or more letters, always
including the central letter. Answers
must be in the Concise Oxford
Dictionary, excluding capitalised
words, plurals, conjugated verbs (past
tense etc), adverbs ending in LY,
comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 13 words, average;
18, good; 23, very good; 28, excellent
6
4
2 2
7
Polygon
________
árD 1kD 4]
à0 gnDp0p]
ß DnDpD D]
ÞDpDp) D ]
Ý Dp) GPD]
ÜD ) DNDP]
ÛP)KHQ) D]
ÚD DRD DR]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
Were White’s king on g2, his
position might be playable. As it
is, the white monarch finds itself at
the epicentre of the coming storm.
16 b3 b4
A pawn sacrifice that leaves the
white king utterly exposed.
17 bxc4 bxc3 18 Kxc3 Rb8 19
Nb3 Nb6 20 c5 Nc4 21 Bc1 Qc8
22 a3 Qa6 23 Qa2 0-0 24 Nfd2
Ba5+ 25 Kc2 Bxd2 26 Bxd2 Qa4
27 Kc3 Nxd2 28 Nxd2 Qxd4+ 29
Kc2 Nxe5 30 Nb3 Qc4+ 31 Kb2
a5 32 Rhe1 a4 White resigns
+ 22
© PUZZLER MEDIA
On previous occasions I have
written at length concerning the
instructive situations that can
occur after players castle on opposite wings. The following game
from the European Team Chess
Championship, which concludes
tomorrow in Crete, is a classic
example of the genre. White
commits his king to the queenside
while Black retains the option of
castling. With the white king
pinned down, Black organises an
attack more or less at his leisure
and determines the destination of
his own monarch only as late as
move 23. Determining the optimal moment to establish the
location of one’s own king is a
lesson that could already be derived from the teachings and games
of Wilhelm Steinitz in the 19th
century.
tinued 7 Nbd2 Bg7 8 0-0 0-0 9 h3
Bd7, and was approximately equal.
7 h3 Bh5 8 Bf4 d5 9 g4
This unnecessary weakening of
his kingside renders future kingside castling problematic.
9 ... Bg6 10 Nbd2 Bd6 11 e5
An apparently decisive fork.
11 ... Bc7
A well-prepared riposte for if
now 12 exf6 Bxf4 13 fxg7 Rg8,
when Black easily regains the lost
pawn and has far greater command of the central zone.
12 Qe2 Nd7 13 0-0-0
White’s experimental opening
has backfired. Now, by castling
queenside, White invites a major
onslaught against his own king.
13 ... b5 14 d4 Bxc2 15 Kxc2 c4
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Opposite castling
Cell Blocks No 3056
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
E
T
B
P
E
R
A
I
A
I
N
Codeword 3172
2
4
7
8
1
9
3
5
6
3
6
1
7
2
5
4
8
9
6
2
4
9
7
1
8
3
5
8
7
3
2
5
6
9
4
1
1
5
9
3
8
4
7
6
2
Quiz 1 Lazarus [of Bethany] 2 Balmoral Castle
3 William Howard Taft 4 The music video for
Taylor Swift’s song Bad Blood 5 Martha Graham.
She danced the lead role when it premiered
6 Dry ice 7 Croydon 8 Proper names, especially
personal names 9 The Sphinx 10 Shappi
Khorsandi 11 Greece 12 Tweety Bird and
Sylvester the Cat 13 Friedrich Nietzsche
14 Renate Stecher — who represented East
Germany 15 Charlie Brooker
WR
H
OU
O
P R
O
U
T
S
I
Z
QU E
U
A L K
S
H
H E A
E
K
D R I
NG F
R
DO
W
G C
R
U E D
C
A L I
A
R I N
M
P
J
U L
A R I A
N
D
U
N
F L UMMO X
O R
B
I
L E A V AGE
D
B
T
C L OUD Y
E
E
N
N E
I D E A
I
F
E
U
G
L U R I D
M A G
I
AC K BOO T
Word Watch
Osculate (c) To kiss
Osculation (a) In
mathematics, the point of
contact between curves
Osculum (b) The hole in
a sponge out of which
water flows
Brain Trainer
Easy 5; Medium 1,442;
Harder 669
06.11.17
MindGames
Easy No 9433
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9434
9 5
2
9
5 6
5
8 3
6
1 3
5 7
3 8 2
9 1
4 5
9
4 9
6 8
3
6
8
2 5
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Osculate
a To hesitate
b Plump
c To kiss
Osculation
a A mathematical
contact
b A river feature
c A bone replacement
Osculum
a An earthenware
container
b A sponge hole
c A scalpel
Answers on page 15
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
Fiendish No 9435
5 9 7
3
1
7
9 2
6
5 4 7
5
1
3 4
5
8
6 8 1
12 The 1948 cartoon
I Taw a Putty Tat
stars which two
characters, both
voiced by Mel Blanc?
15
compose Appalachian
Spring (1944) by which
US choreographer?
8 Concerned with
etymology, onomastics
is the study of what?
6 Sometimes called
Cardice, which
cooling agent was
first produced in
1835 by Adrien-JeanPierre Thilorier?
9 In an 1864 painting,
Gustave Moreau
depicted Oedipus with
which mythical creature?
7 Selsdon Wood Nature
Reserve is in which
London borough?
10 Which Tehran-born
comedian is president
of Humanists UK,
formerly the British
Humanist Association?
13 Erland Josephson
played which German
philosopher in the 1977
Liliana Cavani film
Beyond Good and Evil?
Friday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 954
14 Which German
was the first woman
to run 100m under
11 seconds?
15 Which Emmy
award-winning satirist
is pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 955
1
2
8
3
4
5
9
6
7
10
12
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
22
2
7 1 3 8
2
6
8 9
7 6
9
2
2
21
23
B R
A
SW
I
SW
C
H
A
M
F
E
R
R
C
R
I
E
V
A
S
I
V
E
A
C
T
I
O
N
A D T H
S C
R
A
H
N E EWH I S
A
K
N
GU
ND L E
R
L
R EG
A S E
P
B
R A
R EGR
N
I
E
NGE B E N E
L
E
U
D E S K
S E
O
N
T
H
E
F
A
C
E
O
F
I
T
T S
W
L E
A
S T
E
RD
S S
I
I T
U
OP
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Oran
11
13
2
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
11 The flaky cheese
xynotyro comes from
which EU country?
5 Aaron Copland
was commissioned to
6
4
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
1 In the Gospel of
John, which brother of
Martha and Mary was
resurrected by Jesus?
4 Which 2015 video
features Knockout
(Karlie Kloss), Welvin
Da Great (Kendrick
Lamar) and Lucky
Fiori (Lena Dunham)?
9
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
GETTY IMAGES
3 Which “dollar
diplomacy” advocate is
the only person to have
been both US president
and chief justice?
8 1 3
4 2
7
3
7 9
7 8
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
2 Which residence of
Queen Elizabeth II
is in Royal Deeside,
Aberdeenshire?
7
4
6
Across
1 The Speaker’s feeble for a few
days (4)
3 Rapidly get large cocktail (8)
8 Bishop among peers getting
bribes, perhaps (7)
10 Wheels: posh ones! (5)
11 Warn old dear, raving about
crime prevention (3-3-5)
13 Small item baby wears,
fashionable (6)
15 Oddly ignored ulna: x-rays
next part of windpipe (6)
17 Reaction to serious setback
with rent? (5,4,2)
20 Country dacha: it impresses on
the inside (5)
21 Hotel, so dilapidated, in
African state (7)
22 Having several marriage
partners from old college and
high (8)
23 Hero having nothing to do on
radio? (4)
Down
1 What waiter brings perhaps is
left in wet, dissolving (4,4)
2 Joint dismissal? (5)
4 One failing to turn up — boy
turned up, by the way (2-4)
5 Old forum was surprisingly
very well-known (5-6)
6 Partner touring work unit gets
bad reaction (7)
7 Girl seen in mirror, topless (4)
9 Desire to take in drama — and
like some records? (4-7)
12 Way-out method of predicting
elections? (4,4)
14 Section of coelacanth,
illogically, found in insect
colony (7)
16 Fantastic sum lay in a safe
place (6)
18 Observed absence of small
boy? (5)
19 Hack Charlie’s first dance (4)
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