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The Times Times 2 - 7 December 2017

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December 7 | 2017
The Russian spy who seduced
Christine Keeler
By Ben Macintyre
2
1G T
Thursday December 7 2017 | the times
times2
Carbs are back!
Whenever I see a
bottle of water in a
fridge I feel fury
Deborah Ross
W
hen I
was a
child
I recall
going
on
holiday
to
France, possibly in the late Sixties
or early Seventies, where we all
laughed at the French because
they sometimes drank bottled
water (Perrier, Evian, Vichy). My
siblings and I thought it was
hilarious that anyone would pay
for something that you could
otherwise get for nothing, and
wondered what else they might
fall for. What if we charged them
to look at a tree, say? But spool
forward, and now we are all
paying to look at a tree, in effect,
while destroying that tree in the
process. Because this is what
bottled water is.
Plastic is destroying our oceans.
We?ve all seen the photographs:
the whale with a bucket wedged
in its mouth; the poor entangled
turtles; sea beds that are basically
plastic-bottle graveyards. It was
Martin Amis who coined the term
?species shame? and looking at
these photos or reading the
statistics ? it is predicted that by
2050 the ocean will contain more
plastic by weight than fish ? this
is what you have to feel, surely.
We are such a shit species. We
are the pits. But we could stop
drinking bottled water, couldn?t
we? Could stop destroying water
with water? I know, I know,
Coca-Cola?s latest water, Glac閍u,
has been ?inspired by the clouds?
with a ?pure, crisp taste? that is
?vapour-distilled?, but even so.
We could try?
There is species shame but also,
I would suggest, ?species fury?,
which is what I experience
Christmas
alone with
my dog
whenever anyone opens their
fridge and I see bottled water
lined up, or I see people sitting at
their desks with a big bottle
beside them. And while you can?t
My parents?
generation
didn?t slug
water all day
blame people for buying water
on the go, given the scarcity of
public drinking fountains, I kind
of do. If we hadn?t been so stupid
and had held out against bottled
water, then the fountains wouldn?t
have fallen out of use and
wouldn?t have been ripped out.
Plus you don?t need to be always
?hydrating? anyway.
They will tell you that you do,
of course. Indeed, in the beauty
hall of a department store the
Since my beloved dog is
about to have cruciate
ligament surgery ? to
those in the know, he?s
having the TPLO
operation ? and since,
post-operatively, he
has to be kept almost
wholly immobile for
the first few weeks, and
since he won?t be crated
(he howls the place
down and tries to battle
his way out), it looks as
if the two of us will be
spending Christmas
imprisoned in a single
room, with occasional
trips to the garden,
where he will have to
be carried for a pee. Or
that other thing.
From posh carbonara to Christmas
sarnies: comfort food is in demand
again, says Tony Turnbull. Why did I
ever stop eating it, asks Esther Walker
other day the woman behind the
counter took it upon herself
(somewhat impertinently, in my
opinion) to interrogate me not
just about my water intake ? was
I drinking two litres a day to
optimally hydrate my skin? ? but
also my output. Was my pee pale
and hay-coloured, would I say?
Did it smell? I offered to provide
a sample ? ?Give me a little pot
and I?ll do it right here? ? which
gave her the hump and led to her
concluding darkly: ?Remember,
dehydration is your greatest
enemy.? As it happens, the VAT
man is my greatest enemy, but
I opted to let that ride.
It?s true, we do need about
two litres of water a day, but we
mostly get it from food ? a jacket
potato is 70 per cent water;
chicken is 70 per cent water;
cucumber is basically water
shaped into a baton ? and
other drinks. The mineral water
companies would like us to
believe that tea, for instance,
just isn?t up to the job, whereas,
according to the European Journal
of Clinical Nutrition, ?it hydrates
just as effectively?.
Plus, we have a mechanism for
alerting us to when we need fluids
and it?s called ?thirst?. Heard of it?
It?s all part of the homeostasis
process and it?s ever so good. And
finally, my parents? generation
didn?t slug water all day every day
and, as far as I am aware, they did
not collapse in the street suffering
from fatigue, headaches, dizziness
or impairment of cognitive
function, and neither were they
ever mistaken for a shrivelled
raisin and baked in a bun. So less
of the bottled water, even
Glac閍u, as inspired by clouds,
although the shape of the exact
inspirational cloud is never
specified. Was it a dollar sign?
Now, in all the
coverage I have read,
I?ve encountered
no advice on how
to spend Christmas
imprisoned in one room.
I keep hoping that,
amid the gift guides
and recipes and the
party dresses, I?ll come
across ?How to enjoy
the festive season with
a sick dog lying across
your chest? and I would
settle for that, even
though it does not
mention imprisonment
specifically or that we
will be living on a
mattress to avoid the
danger of him jumping
on or off a bed.
Ideally, I am looking
for a how-to-have-agreat-Christmas-on-amattress-type thing,
with lots of tips. Should
I buy crackers to pull
with myself? Would
that be fun? Shall I play
charades with myself ?
Could anyone advise on
how that might work?
I do like charades.
So please point out to
me any guides that you
may have seen, and I
may have missed,
because I?d like to get
this sorted. And not top
myself. Which is the
other alternative, and
which is seeming quite
attractive at present.
I
t is not much of a pun ? a letter
?e? in the middle would have
helped ? but when the Eat
sandwich chain started
emblazoning its packaging
with #CarbDiem earlier this
year, you just knew that
something was in the air.
Then last month Instagram lit up
with images of Raviolo, the rave new
hangout in Manhattan ? its neon
pink sign on the wall says it all:
?Life is a combination of magic and
pasta.? Yes, it?s official: carbohydrate is
back on the menu.
Don?t believe me? Sandwich sales at
Marks & Spencer are up by 35 per cent
on the same period last year, largely
because of a rush on the company?s
new Christmas range. At Bread Ahead,
the artisan bread-maker in Borough
Market, London, they have gone from
giving bread-making classes to 24
people a week to 300 a week, with
places booked up to a year in advance.
Meanwhile, from Al Dente Pasta
Bar in Norwich to the Pasta Hut in
Plymouth, every other new restaurant
that has opened over the past month
seems to have pasta at its core. At
Passo, a new all-day Italian in Old
Street in London, you can load up on
orecchiette with octopus ragu, and
pappardelle with wild boar and port
sauce; at Flour & Grape pasta and
wine bar in Bermondsey they have
eight pasta dishes on the menu and
precious little else.
And have you seen the queues
outside Pastaio, Stevie Parle?s new
Italian diner in Soho? People
are happy to wait up to three hours ?
yes, three hours ? for a plate of
handmade rigatoni in tomato
sauce or Genoese-style pesto, which
comes with pasta and potatoes.
Truly this is the age of the carb.
And not before time. For years carbs
have been public enemy No 1. Cleaneaters, Paleos, Atkins-ites, ?glutenintolerants? (as opposed to coeliacs),
the you-name-its have brainwashed a
generation into waging war on an
entire food group in the belief that if
you eat enough ?bun-free? burgers,
tofu chips and courgette noodles
your skin will glow, your hair will
shine and you will live for ever.
Except that if they were honest
it was never really about health,
but about weight loss. And like all
restrictive diets, it only ever had a
certain shelf life. Sooner or later the
willpower cracks and you realise that
a bowl of pasta carbonara is delicious
and life-affirming in a way that a
spiralised butternut squash never can
be. So you slip back into your old ways
until the next fad comes along.
We never gave up carbs in our
house ? what kind of middle-class
hell would it be without pesto pasta
come children?s teatime? ? but we
did introduce a rule of favouring
less processed brown carbs over
white to get the benefit of the
wholegrain. Out and about, though,
all rules are off. Padella in Borough
Market?s fettuccine with smoked eel,
cream and lemon, or Pastaio?s bucatini
cacio e pepe?
You?d be
a fool
to deny
yourself
the
pleasure
of that.
I wish I hadn?t
avoided pasta
for 15 years
I
left university two stone heavier
than when I arrived. The link
between refined carbohydrates
and obesity had not yet been
repopularised and I just ate white
carbs and drank sugary cocktails and
wondered why I was always hungry.
Then along came the Atkins diet. I
looked at pictures of Jennifer Aniston
? a fan of the diet ? with her slim,
toned arms and glowing skin, and
from then on treated carbs as if they
were poison. I ran screaming in
fright from chips and turned
white at the mere mention of
pasta. For 15 years I did this.
Don?t get me wrong, cutting out
carbohydrate for weight loss works.
And it suits anyone without the time
or energy to think about ?balance?, or
the times | Thursday December 7 2017
3
1G T
times2
Why pasta is on the menu again
CAMERA PRESS/MADAME FIGARO/GRAHAM SHEARER; KATIE WILSON FOR THE TIMES; INSTAGRAM/PASTA EVANGELISTS
to prepare for themselves a rainbow
plate with a palm-sized portion of this
and a fist-sized portion of that.
It?s so binary. Protein: yes. Carbs: no.
Stuck at a service station with only
sandwiches for a snack? Buy a packet
of ham and eat the whole thing.
Brazils have the highest fat content of
all nuts ? eat three and you won?t
want to eat again for a week.
Even the cast of The Only Way Is
Essex could understand it. Preparing
for their annual jaunt to Marbella they
worked out in hoodies bearing the
legend: ?No Carbs Before Marbs.?
The message spread and in 2010,
for the first time, sales of white bread
? which have historically tracked
population growth ? fell by 1 per cent,
while sales of brown bread increased
by 6 per cent and seeded products by
9 per cent.
For years I denied myself anything
approaching ?comfort food? and never
ate the kids? leftover fries. Very
occasionally I would eat a single thin
slice of sourdough toast for breakfast.
I sometimes missed spaghetti
bolognese so much I would eat the
sauce with spiralised courgette.
Then one day my husband, Giles,
who also rarely eats carbs, came home
and said: ?There?s this new pasta
delivery company, Pasta Evangelists,
who want to know if I?m interested
in working with them.?
?Pasta delivery?? I shrieked.
?I know!? he said. We fell about
laughing for a bit at the idea that
anyone would order pasta, but we
tried it anyway.
?There?s not very much of it,? I said,
peering into my small bowlful of fresh,
handmade tagliatelli, dressed with
a walnut pesto sauce and scattered
with parmesan.
?Well,? Giles said, shrugging, ?this is
how much pasta an Italian would eat,
not a stoned English student with the
munchies. This won?t make you fat.?
Then I took the first mouthful of
pasta I had eaten since 2005 and
looked at my husband and said: ?Oh
my God. This is delicious.? I ate the
whole lot at a nice, relaxed Italian
pace. In the old days I would have
piled the whole lot on to one forkful.
Once it was finished I felt a bit sad
that there was no more, which is often
the problem with pasta, but I thought
Left: Esther Walker
I treated
carbs like
they were
poison, ran
screaming
in fright
from chips
about it and decided that, no, that was
probably enough dinner. The next
morning I didn?t weigh 400 stone. We
had it again the next week, and the
next. I did not put on weight.
That will sound absurd to anyone
with a normal approach to food, but
true carb-phobics will understand.
Pasta had become to me the Devil?s
doing. I believed that, once eaten, one
strand would metabolise directly into
neat sugar and turn me into the Stay
Puft Marshmallow Man.
Alessandro Savelli, one of the
founders of Pasta Evangelists, explains
that the Italians who are slim eat
carbohydrate ? just not very much of
it. ?Italian women will probably eat
pasta every day,? he says, ?but in Italy
pasta is usually eaten as a primo, it?s
only a modest amount. And I would
say that in the UK there is usually
about 50 per cent too much sauce
added. In Italy you would never, ever
just have pasta for your dinner.?
Perhaps, I thought, the problem had
never been with the carbs. Perhaps it
had just been how much of them I had
been eating ? and with what.
Ayela Spiro, a nutrition science
manager at the British Nutrition
Foundation, sets me straight on a few
things. ?Weight gain typically results
from eating more calories than your
body uses,? she says. ?Carbohydrate,
like protein, contains around 4kcal
per gram compared with fat, which
contains 9kcal per gram. Provided
starchy foods are not cooked or served
with a lot of fat or sugars, and portion
sizes are kept moderate, they are
relatively low in calories.?
The problems come when you
combine too much carbohydrate with
fat and protein, she says. This, as we
professional dieters will know,
is the principle of the
Hay diet, where you
eat protein or
carbohydrate, but
never combine
the two.
Another key
point about
carbohydrates is
where you get
them from.
Processed
carbohydrate, for
example a bowl of Coco
Pops, is catastrophic in the
way that a handful of wholewheat
pasta just isn?t. In his book How to
Lose Weight Well, the TV medic
Xand van Tulleken points out that
some foods are designed to be
addictive so that you go on eating
beyond the point where you are full.
?Studies show that ice cream affects
the brain?s reward system in almost
the same way as cocaine,? he says.
?Most processed foods are almost
impossible to stop eating.?
Nutritionist Jo Saunders thinks that
making carbohydrate the bad guy is
too simplistic. ?There are so many
other things going on in a diet other
than just how much carbohydrate is
taken on,? says Saunders, who works
for cookingthemhealthy.com, which
specialises in women?s health.
?There?s what sort you are eating
and at what time,? she explains. ?I?d
always advise ?clever? carbohydrate
such as parsnip, squash and other
root veg, and also to front-load your
eating, ie eating a lot early in the day
and tailing off towards bedtime.
?For example, if you find at around
kids? teatime you can?t stay off the
children?s food, just eat with them
and make that your evening meal.
That would give you a long fast until
breakfast the next day and there
are some important biochemical
processes that can?t happen unless
you?re in a fasting state.
?I also think the whole debate
about carbohydrate has moved on
and it?s gut bacteria we need to focus
on. If you?re just cutting out carbs you
will mess around with your gut health
and that in turn will upset your
digestion and hormones.?
And that in turn, says Georgia
Lennard, a naturopathic nutritionist
from beyondbalance.co.uk, will have
Processed food
and sugar are
still the number
one enemy
the opposite effect from the one you
intended. ?A very low-carb diet is doable for about two to three years,
depending on the type of person you
are, but it?s not sustainable in terms
of losing or maintaining weight.
Without some good carbohydrate you
won?t digest effectively.? In other
words, the eat-all-you-want protein
diet will work for so long, then it will
start to work against you.
I certainly found that up until about
the age of 30 (I am now 37),
as long as my diet was
high-fat, high-meat and
low-sugar I was doing
OK. Then, past 35,
I realised that I
could no longer
chow down on
endless stews and
roasts and bacon
and eggs and still
be within my ideal
weight range.
Age definitely has
got a lot to do with it,
Saunders says. ?For women,
as they enter the pre- or perimenopausal stage of life, their
metabolism goes down and thyroid
function is affected ? a certain level
of good carbohydrate is required to
make the thyroid hormone.?
Let?s not get carried away: processed
food and sugar are still the No 1
enemy. Yes to wholewheat pasta and
jacket potatoes; no to an entire pizza.
?Processed sugar sends blood sugar
and insulin through the roof,? says
Lennard. ?It screams to your body to
store fat and pushes fat into the cells
at a rapid rate. Nobody can get away
with it and there is no excuse for
eating that stuff.?
But above all else, not getting fat is
about not eating too much, whether
it is steak and eggs or a huge pile of
spaghetti. Once you realise that, you
may as well be having a small bowlful
of delicious pasta as anything else.
And amen to that.
4
1G T
Thursday December 7 2017 | the times
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the times | Thursday December 7 2017
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1G T
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6
Thursday December 7 2017 | the times
1G T
times2
The Profumo scandal
wasn?t about sex ?
it was about spying
It?s seen as a morality tale with Christine Keeler at its heart, but the really
interesting person is the largely forgotten KGB agent, says Ben Macintyre
O
n June 14, 1963, nine
days after John
Profumo resigned
in a welter of
scandal over
his affair with
Christine Keeler,
a spy deep inside
the KGB sent a sensational report
to his American handler.
The KGB spy, who has never been
identified, reported that ?the Russians
had in fact received a lot of useful
information from Profumo from [sic]
Christine Keeler, with whom Ivanov
had established contact, and in whose
apartment Ivanov had even been able
to lay on eavesdropping operations at
appropriate times?.
The ?Ivanov? in question was
Yevgeni Mikhailovitch Ivanov, a Soviet
intelligence officer posing as assistant
naval attach� in the Soviet embassy in
London, who had also had an affair
with Keeler. It was the fact that a
British cabinet minister had been
sharing the favours of a call girl with
a Soviet agent and lying about it that
precipitated Profumo?s resignation.
Yet Ivanov is often treated as a bitplayer in the drama. It was assumed
that Keeler was simply too dim to
have passed on important secrets as
pillow-talk, and that British national
security was never compromised. The
Profumo case is treated as a moral
saga rather than an espionage case.
In fact, Profumo was the target of a
highly sophisticated and successful
Soviet intelligence operation. He was
about to be blackmailed by the
Russian spy. MI5 had got wind of what
was happening, but, as with more
re
modern intelligence failures,
didn?t do anything about it.
And at the centre of the
Profumo saga stands the
shadowy figure of Ivanov:
louche, seductive and
extremely dangerous.
Ivanov arrived in London
in March 1960, ostensibly a
low-level diplomat, but in
reality an officer of the GRU,
the military counterpart of the
KGB. With his broken nose and
d
fractured English, Ivanov was an
n
unlikely lothario, but during an
earlier posting in Norway he had
ad
proved himself a serial womaniser,
ser,
who may have been sent to London
ndon
with the avowed purpose of worming
his way into the confidence, and the
beds, of women in or on the fringes
of high society.
At the Garrick Club, the editor of
The Daily Telegraph, Colin Coote,
introduced Ivanov to Stephen Ward,
a fashionable osteopath, sexual
eccentric, portrait painter and
Cliveden, where in 1961
John Profumo met
Christine Keeler
party-giver, who was also said to
procure women for powerful men.
In 1961 at a party at Lord Astor?s
Cliveden estate, Ward introduced
Profumo, the secretary of state for
Keeler, a 19-year-old
war, to Christine
Christ
and sometime model,
showgirl an
whom he started an affair.
with who
it a ?very, very
She called
cal
well-mannered screw of
well-m
convenience?. It would prove
conv
exceptionally inconvenient
exc
for Profumo and the British
government. During
go
the same weekend,
th
Ivanov and Profumo
Iva
had a swimming race.
ha
Ward
was strongly
W
pro-Soviet
and was used by
proIvanov
Ivano to try to extract
information
from Profumo.
inform
Ward
?practically worked for me
W
ard ?pr
nothing?, Ivanov
aand
nd concealed
concea
llater
ater claimed. Ward also introduced
his glamorous Russian contact to his
powerful and well-born friends,
including Princess Margaret, with
whom Ivanov flirted outrageously: ?He
admired her lovely hair and she was
furious when he pretended he did not
think it was her real colouring.?
MI5, meanwhile, was taking an
interest in Ivanov and may have tried,
unsuccessfully, to recruit him as a
double agent through Ward.
In June 1961, shortly before the
Keeler-Profumo affair started, Ward
was interviewed by the MI5 officer
Keith Wagstaffe (who used the
pseudonym ?Wood?). A complacent
figure in a bowler hat, Wagstaffe
reported: ?Ward, who has an
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the times | Thursday December 7 2017
7
1G T
times2
COVER & BELOW: GETTY IMAGES
KGB spy, knew it. The suggestion that
Ivanov had bugged Keeler?s flat was
probably speculation, but the report
that the Russians had obtained
important information from Profumo
through Keeler was certainly true.
According to declassified FBI
files, the spy working for the US was
based in one of the KGB?s overseas
residencies (or stations); he overheard
the description of Ivanov?s espionage
in Britain from a colonel in the Soviet
mission to the UN, and in June
The scandal
exploded before
the plot could be
put into action
attractive personality and talks well,
was completely open about his
association with Ivanov. Despite the
fact that some of his political ideas are
certainly peculiar and exploitable by
the Russians, I do not think he is of
security interest.?
The Russians
got important
information
through Keeler
The Foreign Office even used Ward
to pass messages to and from the
Russians. At the height of the Cuban
Missile Crisis Ivanov passed a message
to the British permanent undersecretary Harold Caccia, stating
?that the Soviet government looked
to the United Kingdom as their one
hope of conciliation?.
Ivanov, meanwhile, was trying to get
his hooks into Profumo. Keeler later
revealed that at the end of 1962 or the
beginning of 1963, ?she had been asked
by Mr Ward to try to obtain secret
information from Mr Profumo?.
According to the historian Jonathan
Haslam, Keeler handed over love
letters written to her by Profumo. The
Russian spy also claimed to have used
a hidden camera to take photographs
of Keeler and Profumo
making love in Ward?s
home at 17 Wimpole
Mews, with a view
to blackmail.
As a member of the
cabinet defence
committee, Profumo
was privy to vital Cold
War secrets. He knew
about details of
negotiations with
America to give West
Germany access to
nuclear weapons, plans to
hand over control of
Scottish naval facilities to America
merica
in exchange for Polaris-firing
submarines, and Britain?s chronic
lack of preparation for chemical
or biological attack.
Ivanov claimed that he had twice
been left alone in Profumo?s study, in
Nash House on Chester Terrace, by
Valerie Hobson, Profumo?s actress
wife, and had taken the opportunity to
photograph secret documents using a
miniature Minox camera. Among the
information that Ivanov passed back
to Moscow were details of the topsecret X-15 experimental high-altitude
hypersonic aircraft and ?plan M-70?,
for the deployment of tactical nuclear
weapons in Europe.
Ivanov wrote an account of his
espionage in the 1990s, entitled The
Naked Spy, but the British translation
omitted the details of his clandestine
K
Keeler, right, with
Stephen Ward and her
friend Penny Marshall,
front. Top left: Keeler
in 1963. Top right:
Yevgeni Ivanov in 1963
ph
photography
for fear that
Hobson
might sue for libel.
H
Haslam
studied the full
H
Russian
version and revealed
R
the
th details of Ivanov?s
espionage
in his 2015 book
es
Near
and Distant Neighbors.
N
The GRU undoubtedly
planned
to go farther and
pl
force
Profumo into revealing
fo
everything
he knew. At the
ev
end
en of 1961 Ivanov flew back
to Moscow to be briefed by
the
th head of the GRU?s
British
department, one
B
Captain
Ievlev, who
C
outlined
a classic blackmail
ou
operation:
?The idea
op
was
w to confront Profumo
with
w evidence of his
indiscretions,
including
in
photocopies
of the
ph
documents,
in order to
do
press
pr him into service.?
The scandal exploded
before
the plot could be
be
put
pu into operation. The
disintegration
of Keeler?s
di
private
into the open
privat life
lif brought
b
the fact that she had been sleeping
with a cabinet minister and a Russian
spy. Profumo first denied any
impropriety, but later admitted
the affair and resigned.
The British public and press
responded with what Macaulay called
?one of its periodic fits of morality?, but
in reality this was a highly complex
and extremely significant case of Cold
War espionage: the Russians were
attempting to blackmail a British
minister; the government was using a
dodgy osteopath to pass messages to
an even dodgier Russian spy; MI5 had
interviewed a key figure in the case
and missed the danger signals.
The Profumo story was more than
a mere sex scandal. It was a significant
security breach and a direct threat to
western military secrecy ? and the
Americans, through their unnamed
informed his American handler. The
agent?s report was hand-delivered to
Robert Kennedy, who was then the
US attorney general, to pass to his
brother, the president, who was due
to meet the British prime minister,
Harold Macmillan, the next month.
A secret cablegram, sent by the head
of the FBI, J Edgar Hoover, to the
FBI in London, read: ?President
reportedly concerned lest there are
hidden ramifications which might
affect his forthcoming conference
with Macmillan.?
According to Christopher Andrew,
the authorised historian of MI5,
Hoover did not inform MI5 of the
report for several years, probably
because he believed that ?the British
leak like a sieve?.
Profumo was disgraced. Keeler was
found guilty of perjury charges and
sentenced to nine months in prison.
Ward was charged with immorality
offences, abandoned by his society
friends and convicted of living off
immoral earnings. He took an
overdose of sleeping pills and died
three days later. The Macmillan
government was fatally undermined.
A joint MI5-MI6 working party, set
up immediately after the scandal,
investigated whether the ?Russian
intelligence service had a hand in
staging the Profumo affair in order to
discredit Her Majesty?s Government?
and concluded that it had not.
However, in reality the affair was not
a scandal manufactured for Soviet
propaganda purposes, but a very
successful espionage operation
that burrowed into the heart of
the British government and
extracted secret military plans
of the highest importance.
?Had a conflict between Nato and
the Warsaw Pact broken out at the
moment, Soviet knowledge of these
plans would have enabled them to
inflict severe damage on western
conventional forces,? Haslam writes.
Keeler and Profumo became
household names, bywords for 1960s
sexual scandal and hypocrisy, but the
Russian agent who set the whole
extraordinary story in train remains
mysterious and largely forgotten. He
was recalled to Moscow as the
Profumo scandal broke. Despite his
earlier success, when Ivanov?s
involvement as Keeler?s sometime
lover became public it embarrassed
the GRU and led to his demotion.
?Christine Keeler was my biggest
mistake,? he later said. ?She wrecked
my career.?
Ivanov drank himself to death in
1994, at the age of 68.
8
1G T
Thursday December 7 2017 | the times
arts
We?ve got no strings to hold us d
John Tiffany and Martin Lowe tell Alex O?Connell
how they brought the puppet boy to the National
To my
mind there
are too
many
songs in
musicals
?S
o, what shall I do first??
says John Tiffany, the
exuberant theatre
director who can
do no wrong since
reinventing West End
theatre with Harry
Potter and the Cursed
Child; directing the award-winning
musical Once; and taking Black Watch,
the hit play set during the Iraq war,
on a mission from Edinburgh to
Broadway. ?Do you want my Kate
Bush, then my Madonna?? he says,
opening his lungs.
We are in a rehearsal room at the
National Theatre in London. I?m here
to talk to Tiffany and Martin Lowe, his
regular music adapter and orchestral
supervisor, about their latest
collaboration. Pinocchio, the theatre?s
Christmas mega-show about the
wooden puppet who becomes a real
boy, opens next Wednesday. It?s the
first time that Disney has lent
the rights to the music and
songs of the classic 1940
aanimated film. Yet the
pair are distracted by the
grand piano and the
karaoke possibilities.
Tiffany, 46, was the
literary director of the
Traverse Theatre in
Edinburgh for several
E
yyears, but now spends
much of his life taking his
productions around the
p
world. He is probably our
w
best theatre director and
b
ccalls Lowe (War Horse,
Mamma Mia!, Once, The
M
Light Princess), 49, ?the
L
greatest arranger in the
world?. But today, together,
w
David Langham as
the Fox and Joe IdrisRoberts as Pinocchio
they are less theatrical titans, more
enthusiastic schoolboys ? the music
and drama teachers? favourites ? who
have drunk too much Lucozade and are
fizzing off each other. Lowe is tinkling
on the keys and Tiffany is joshing.
They?re a lot of fun, which is, after all,
the best criterion for putting on a
family show. ?You don?t have to ask any
questions, we will just do Desert Island
Discs for you,? Tiffany says.
I can think of little I?d like more
(and no, my nose isn?t extending),
except perhaps to hear about
Pinocchio and the story of how Tiffany,
the boy-man from Huddersfield, and
Lowe, the musical whizz from Stoke,
convinced the people at Disney to
hand over the songs and score of the
animated fantasy based on The
Adventures of Pinocchio, the 1883
novel by Carlo Collodi.
Their Pinocchio story began in 2013,
after the success of the musical Once
on Broadway. Tiffany was
as invited
to meet Thomas Schumacher,
acher,
the president of Disney
Theatrical Group ? the
theatrical arm of The
Walt Disney Company
? in his glass office in
the New Amsterdam
Theatre in New York,
the one-time home
of the Follies girls. ?I
found out that Tom
trained as a marionette
puppeteer,? Tiffany says.
Then Schumacher asked
ked
Tiffany which bit of the
canon he was most interested
rested
in and Tiffany said Pinocchio.
cchio.
?I didn?t think he would give up
something that was so close
lose to his
heart,? Tiffany says. ?But Tom said,
?What would you do with it?? and I
said, ?Give me a year to think about it.?
Then I told him my idea, which I can?t
tell you,? he says, making a sad face.
Japan: land of
Fantastic
break to
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rising sun
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??It
It would
sspoil
poil it for you.?
Lowe says: ??John
staffed
ssaid,
aid, ?I want a staffe
workshop for a week in New York and
we will show you everything we have
talked about, and then we can decide if
it?s good or bad.? ? Schumacher agreed.
That gave them six months from
that pitch meeting, and crucially,
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Return flights from
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accommodation in a
four-star hotel with breakfast
and three meals
during that time Tiffany and Lowe
were neighbours in next-door
apartments in Melbourne, Australia,
where they were taking Once. That
show was already up and running, so
they had ample time to think about
the story of the woodcarver Geppetto,
who builds a puppet, Pinocchio, to be
a substitute son; and how, in a quest
to be truly alive, Pinocchio leaves
apan offers an ancient culture of
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the times | Thursday December 7 2017
9
1G T
arts
d
down:
how Pinocchio went live
MANUEL HARLAN; ALAMY
Pinocchio and Geppetto in a scene from the classic 1940 Disney film
Geppetto?s workshop with Jiminy
Cricket and goes on an adventure.
Pinocchio copes by lying, but when
he does so his nose grows.
Lowe worked on the music every
day. They knew they wanted Dennis
Kelly (Matilda the Musical) to write the
script and that they wanted to root it
in a European theatre tradition. Rufus
Norris had taken over at the National;
Tiffany was a fan of his. ?I had done
The Glass Menagerie and Macbeth on
Broadway, then Once in Melbourne,?
Tiffany says. ?I wanted to be at home
in my bed and sit in my garden. I said
to Tom, ?America will be confused by
it if it?s presented there, it needs a
different lubrication.? ?
Musically, Pinocchio held a challenge
because although Leigh Harline, Ned
Washington and Paul J Smith wrote
the score and those iconic songs such
as When You Wish Upon a Star, Give a
Little Whistle, I?ve Got No Strings and
Hi-Diddle-Dee-Dee (An Actor?s Life for
Me), there are only five songs in total;
not enough to power a modern musical.
Lowe was not fazed. He nicked
another from Fun and Fancy Free, the
1947 Disney curiosity also starring
Jiminy Cricket. For the rest he looked
to the folk tradition, scouring the
British Library and beyond. He had
already discovered the joys of Irish
folk through Once, and while working
at the Salzburg Festival in 2013 had
had his ears opened to Balkan and
Austrian music. ?So I was researching
Italian folk music in Australia and had
a table of folk tunes and a table of
Disney songs,? he says.
To get the right feel, they decided to
focus on I?ve Got No Strings, do it in
lots of different styles and ?Sellotape
Idris-Roberts as
Pinocchio and, far left,
John Tiffany and
Martin Lowe in
rehearsals
them together? with a folk tune. ?It
was a ten-minute mash-up, which
extended the dramaturgy of that
number,? says Lowe, who, sweetly,
keeps apologising for being ?muso?.
That became the concentration of
the five-day workshop; then they did
it for the Disney guys. ?They were like,
?Yes! Do more of that!? Lowe says,
?and we thought, ?We?ve got it.? Their
permission to go was just the most
liberating thing.? They were given the
rights to use the five songs, the outcuts
from the original film and the score.
With that green light, Tiffany
reunited the Once team of Bob
Crowley, the set and costume designer
and puppet co-designer (with War
Horse?s Toby Olie), Steven Hoggett,
movement director, and Lowe, who
stuck his neck out and asked for
15 musicians and a conductor.
Tiffany and Lowe complement
each other. ?My background is only
in musicals and John, yours is only not
in musicals, so you aren?t bound by a
lot of rules,? Lowe considers. Tiffany
agrees: ?I think young audiences don?t
give a flying f*** about the traditional
structure of musicals. To my mind
there are too many songs in musicals.?
The cast are certainly young and fresh:
Joe Idris-Roberts plays Pinocchio,
Audrey Brisson is Jiminy Cricket
and Mark Hadfield Geppetto.
So why did Tiffany choose Pinocchio
and not another work? He doesn?t
remember a moment when he first
saw the Disney film or read the book,
but he acknowledges that a career
pattern is emerging. ?Very tentatively
I have realised that with Peter Pan, Let
the Right One In [a vampire story
involving a bullied 12-year-old boy]
and Pinocchio I am exploring the same
story ? characters who are frozen or
on the cusp of something. I found out
recently that Collodi was the oldest
of ten children, only two of whom
survived to adulthood. When I did
Peter Pan I became interested in
JM Barrie and his relationship to
the Llewelyn Davies boys [two of
whom died in their twenties; a third
committed suicide aged 63]. The only
way to not be dead is to be frozen . . . I
have no desire not to grow up myself,
but the idea obviously thrills me.?
There are excellent baddies in
the story: Honest John, the fox;
Stromboli, the puppet master; and
Monstro, the whale. The age advisory
for the audience is ?for brave eightyear-olds?. The Cursed Child?s was ?9�,
for obvious reasons. ?We don?t have
the very scary things like in Cursed
Child,? Tiffany says. ?Middle-class
parents always do two years below
anyway,? he laughs, then adopts a
posh voice. ?My Jasper is fine for this!?
And what of that extending nose?
I see that Jamie Harrison, the illusion
director (is there a better job title?) on
The Cursed Child, is back. What can we
expect? ?How to get a nose to grow is
usually a mechanical affair and I knew
we could go deeper than that,? Tiffany
says, carefully. How much deeper?
?You can?t do that,? he scolds me.
?You?ll spoil it for the kids.? Sure, I say,
but in truth I doubt anything could.
Pinocchio is in previews and will run
at the Lyttelton, National Theatre,
London SE1 (020 7452 3000), to April 7
Entertainments
Theatres
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CAMBRIDGE
020 7087 7745
MATILDA THE
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Please be advised that
calls to 084 numbers
can cost up to 7p per
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HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
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Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MIS蒖ABLES
Theatre Royal Drury Lane
42nd STREET
020 7087 7760
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
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or announcement now at:
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10
1G T
Thursday December 7 2017 | the times
television & radio
A quest to preserve lives that ended in murder
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Dian Fossey:
Secrets in the Mist
National Geographic
{{{{(
Peaky Blinders
BBC Two
{{{{(
M
uch tosh is talked about
the ?look of love?, the
dreamy gaze said to fall
across smitten people?s
eyes when often they?re
probably just drunk or wondering: ?Am
I going to get my leg over tonight??
But what we saw in Dian Fossey?s
eyes last night seemed to me to be
love in its most uncomplicated form.
In glorious footage from the 1970s and
1980s, in which she interacted with
Rwandan mountain gorillas, her eyes
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Crossing Continents
Radio 4, 11am
Zahed was a ?lion cub of the
Caliphate?. He was captured
by Islamic State and trained
as a child soldier; taught
about the Koran and that
?we were right; and that if
we died in the front line, we
would go to heaven . . . and
everyone else was wrong?.
This programme seeks out
the lost children of Isis and
talks to them. Their struggle
isn?t over. These children
may finally be physically
free, but can their minds
ever escape what has
happened to them?
Tracks: Strata
Radio 4, 2.15pm
Last year?s award-winning
blockbuster radio drama
has returned. This time it is
without Romola Garai, alas,
but it still has many of the
distinctive elements of the
first series: the same Welsh
setting; the same awesome
soundscape. This episode
opens in January 1980. A
scientist, Rachel Turner, is
out for the day in Snowdonia
with her four-year-old son,
Joe. They?re digging for
fossils on the mountain.
They find something that
looks like a monster but
isn?t ? it?s just a fossil. Then
something very monstrous
indeed happens. Very tense
? at first, at any rate.
shone with what was surely an
expression of pure human happiness.
But not for long. Fossey?s life evolved
like a film and it ended like one. Just
after Christmas 1985 the primatologist
was macheted to death in the cabin
where she worked saving gorillas from
poachers. The murderer was never
brought to justice, although a PhD
research student, Wayne McGuire,
was found guilty in absentia by
Rwandan courts on flimsy evidence.
Dian Fossey: Secrets of the Mist
was the first of three gripping
documentaries, made with forensic
restraint but obvious affection, that
celebrate her life and retrace her
murder, its poor investigation and
the enemies she made. Much of it
inevitably covered old ground, but the
interwoven fresh interviews ?
including with McGuire, who protests
his innocence from America ? and
extracts from Fossey?s letters revealed
this was a woman who had riled many.
I sensed that we were supposed to
disapprove that she punished poachers
by whipping them with stinging
nettles or wore masks to convince
them she was a witch, but I could not
oblige. However, this, and what she
discovered about poachers? possible
links to gold smuggling, might have
been what really cost her her life.
The photos of Fossey?s body under a
sheet, six machete wounds to her head,
were a reminder that this extraordinary
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00
BBC Radio 1?s Residency 12.00 BBC Radio 1?s
Residency: Will Atkinson 1.00am Toddla T
3.00 Radio 1?s Artist Takeover with 4.00
Early Breakfast Show with Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Bob Harris Country. With a
session by Laura Oakes 8.00 Jo Whiley. Live
music by Noel Gallagher and his High Flying
Birds 10.00 The Radio 2 Arts Show with
Jonathan Ross. David Baddiel shares his
Buried Treasures 12.00 The Craig Charles
House Party (r) 2.00am Radio 2 Tracks
of My Years Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Have A Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Feelgood Friday 5.00 Suzi Perry
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
9.00 Essential Classics
With the conductor Antonio Pappano
12.00 Composer of the Week:
21st Century Opera
Donald Macleod and Paul Grif?ths consider
works by Philippe Boesmans, Brian
Ferneyhough and Gerald Barry that to
varying degrees fall within the tradition of
comic opera. Gerald Barry (The Importance of
Being Earnest, Act 2, conclusion ? ?And this
is what you call Bunburying!??); Philippe
Boesmans (Yvonne, princesse de Bourgogne;
Act 4 scene 2); Brian Ferneyhough
(Shadowtime, Scene 5: Pools of Darkness
? 11 Interrogations); and Gerald Barry (The
Importance of Being Earnest; Act 2, extract)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Performances by Jennifer Johnston and
Gavan Ring from the Northern Ireland Opera
Festival of Voice 2017 at Glenarm, Co Antrim.
Britten (5 songs ? At the Mid Hour of Night;
Ca? the Yowes; O Can Ye Sew Cushions; Down
by the Salley Gardens; and The Last Rose of
Summer); John Larchet (3 songs ? Padraic
the Fiddler; The Cormorant; and The
Philosophy of Love); Elgar (Sea Pictures,
Op 37); and Britten (I Wonder as I Wander)
Dian Fossey was killed while working to help gorillas in Rwanda
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Tom Redmond presents Giordano?s three-act
opera Siberia from the Radio France and
Montpellier Festival, recorded in July this
year. The plot involves a doomed courtesan,
her lover and her jealous pimp all together in
a Russian prison camp set in the Siberian
wilderness. Then more from this week?s
featured orchestra, the BBC Philharmonic.
Giordano (Siberia); Ligeti (Rami?cations);
Haydn (Cello Concerto in C); Kodaly (Dances
of Galanta); and Smetana (Vysehrad)
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty?s guests include Angela
Gheorghiu and the Heath Quartet
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
In Tune?s specially curated playlist:
an imaginative, eclectic mix of music,
featuring favourites together with
lesser-known gems, with a few surprises
thrown in for good measure. The
perfect way to usher in the evening
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
The BBC NOW, Steven Isserlis (cello), and
the conductor laureate Tadaaki Otaka, who is
celebrating his 30th year with the orchestra
perform. Nicola Heywood-Thomas presents,
from St David?s Hall, Cardiff. Takemitsu
(Twill by Twilight); Elgar (Cello Concerto
in E minor, Op 85); and Rachmaninov
(Symphony No 2 in E minor Op 27)
10.00 Free Thinking
Catherine Fletcher talks to Stephen
Greenblatt about the Adam and Eve story, to
Islam Issa, who studies the ?gure of Eve in
the Arab-Muslim world, and Jennifer Evans,
who looks at changing attitudes towards
female sexuality and pregnancy
10.45 Between the Essays
Five radio producers from around the world
hijack The Essay to offer a series of Radio 3?s
innovative Between the Ears features in
miniature, exploring the theme of
borderlands. In this fourth episode,
Brit Pliestik Jensen and Martin Ozvold
trace the borders crossed by a wooden
toy bought in Hamleys, Prague
11.00 Late Junction
Max Reinhardt remembers the French
composer Pierre Henry ahead of his 90th
birthday with a commission by Langham
Research Centre. Plus, a guitar duet
by Bill Mackay and Ryley Walker
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
8.30 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 In Our Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss one of
the ideas sent in by listeners this autumn
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: Over and Out
Henry Blofeld reads his autobiography (4/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Lively discussion and interviews,
presented by Jenni Murray. Including
at 10.45 the 15 Minute Drama: Lucy
Catherine?s Viking epic Gudrun (4/5)
11.00 Crossing Continents
Searching for the captive children still
lost after the retreat of Islamic State.
See Radio Choice
11.30 Howzat for Hollywood
Jim Carter explores the history of the
Hollywood Cricket Club (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Caroline Horton
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 This Old Heart of Mine
Giles Fraser ?nds out how landmark
moments in the story of heart surgery relate
to the heart as a poetic symbol (4/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Tracks: Strata
By Matthew Broughton. A woman embarks
on a desperate search for her son in the
mountains of Snowdonia. Thriller, the
prequel to 2016 thriller Tracks. Concludes
tomorrow. See Radio Choice (1/2)
3.00 Open Country
Efforts to preserve red squirrel populations
in Formby, Merseyside (7/16)
3.27 Radio 4 Appeal
The Rev Dr Sam Wells with the Christmas
Appeal for St Martin-in-the-Fields (r)
3.30 Bookclub
Jennifer Egan is interviewed about her novel
A Visit from the Goon Squad (r)
4.00 The Film Programme
Francine Stock talks to Ai Weiwei about his
documentary Human Flow
4.30 BBC Inside Science
The latest scienti?c research to make the
news headlines and how science is evolving
to transform culture and affect lives
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 Keep Calman Carry On
Susan Calman learns about gardening
from the writer Val McDermid (1/4)
woman was butchered as pitilessly as
some of the gorillas she was trying to
save. And have you ever seen more
clues at a crime scene? Footprints, the
weapon, a fistful of hair in her hand.
Yet, gobsmackingly, the hair was never
tested against McGuire?s. This is a story
still seeking its ending.
Tom Hardy was in last night?s Peaky
Blinders for just seven minutes, but it
was a masterclass in how seven minutes
can steal a show. Returning as Alfie
Solomons, the Jewish gangster with the
crazed eyes, Hardy made each word
he spoke so potent it was as if they had
been fortified with rum. He manages
to play Solomons as simultaneously
menacing and jovial, making him
infinitely more entertaining than Luca
Changretta and his Mafiosi drawl.
In a mesmeric scene with Tommy
and Aberama Gold, a violent Romany
gypsy hired by Tommy for protection,
we saw that Solomons doesn?t really
do PC. ?Tommy, when a pikey walks in
with hair like that,? he said pointing at
Gold?s long locks, ?you have to arsk
yourself: ?Have I made a mistake?? ?
At least Gold didn?t seem to hate him
as much as Lizzie hates May Carleton,
her rival for Tommy?s cursory shags.
Mad Polly read Lizzie?s tea leaves and
decreed her to be pregnant. ?Stop
drinking whisky. Switch to stout,?
advised nurse Pol. They don?t do
maternity advice like that any more.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
9.00 Rose Tremain Short Stories. The Stack.
Read by Jim Norton. Originally broadcast
in 1997 9.15 Feather. By Rachel Joyce.
Drama starring Maisie Cowell. Originally
broadcast in 2007 10.00 Comedy Club: Alexei
Sayle?s Imaginary Sandwich Bar. Stand-up,
memoir and philosophy 10.30 Sean Lock: 15
Storeys High. Comedy by Sean Lock and
Martin Trenaman 11.00 Sarah Millican?s
Support Group. Comedy with Simon Day
11.30 The Masterson Inheritance.
Improvised comedy with Paul Merton
7.00 The Archers
Lexi offers a shoulder to cry on
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Gudrun
By Lucy Catherine (4/5)
8.00 The Brie?ng Room
David Aaronovitch is joined by a number of
guests to discuss big issues in the news
8.30 In Business
Why many US workers are forced into job
contracts that make it hard to leave (2/9)
9.00 BBC Inside Science
The latest scienti?c research (r)
9.30 In Our Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss one of
the ideas sent in by listeners (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Rabbit Redux
By John Updike. Read by Toby Jones (9/10)
11.00 Welcome to Wherever You Are
Stand-up performances from Johannesburg,
Singapore and Reykjavik (2/4)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Presented by Susan Hulme
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Over and Out (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ally McCoist 10.00 Jim White, Ray
Parlour and Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee
and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Andy
Townsend 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
Radio 4 Extra
6 Music
Digital only
8.00am Not in Front of the Children 8.30
The Goon Show 9.00 Counterpoint 9.30 HR
10.00 Phoebe Junior 11.00 Rose Tremain
Short Stories 11.15 Feather 12.00 Not in
Front of the Children 12.30pm The Goon
Show 1.00 Unof?cial Rosie 1.30 Femme
Fatale: The Story of Nico 2.00 Dangerous
Visions: Never Let Me Go 2.15 Cosmic Quest
2.30 Dombey and Son 2.45 Shakespeare?s
Local: Six Centuries of History Seen Through
One Extraordinary Pub 3.00 Phoebe Junior
4.00 Counterpoint 4.30 HR 5.00 Double
Income, No Kids Yet 5.30 Alexei Sayle?s
Imaginary Sandwich Bar 6.00 The Testament
of Jessie Lamb 6.15 A Collection of Bones
6.30 Great Lives. The life of Victorian
businesswoman Charlotte Guest 7.00 Not in
Front of the Children. Jennifer and Harry
become resentful after seeing some old
photos 7.30 The Goon Show. Comedy with
Spike Milligan 8.00 Unof?cial Rosie. Mystery
by Alan McDonald. Originally broadcast in
1993 8.30 Femme Fatale: The Story of Nico.
The story of Christa Paffgen, better known
as Nico of the Velvet Underground
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
The day?s sports news 10.00 Question Time
Extra Time 1.00am Up All Night 5.00
Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and
Stuart Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 6.00
Steve Lamacq?s Roundtable 7.00 Marc Riley
9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Steve Lamacq 1.00am
The First Time with Brian Wilson 2.00 Joe
Strummer?s London Calling 2.30 6 Music Live
Hour 3.30 Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Jane Jones 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Catherine Bott marks 175
years of The New York Philharmonic
Orchestra. Proko?ev (Peter and the Wolf);
Anon (The Twelve Days of Christmas);
Beethoven (Symphony No.5 in C minor);
Vaughan Williams (Fantasia on a Theme by
Thomas Tallis); Redner (O Little Town of
Bethlehem); Brahms (Variations on a Theme
of Haydn); and Gruber (Stille Nacht) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Emma Nelson
the times | Thursday December 7 2017
11
1G T
KAROLINA KURAS
artsfirst night
Theatre
Beauty and the Beast
Tobacco Factory, Bristol
Theatre
The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe
West Yorkshire Playhouse,
Leeds
S
{{{{(
pooky, touching, uproariously
funny, this is a real treat of a
family show. Created by the
pan-European company New
International Encounter and
performed by an agile six-strong cast
of actor-musicians, it conjures
enchantment from playful simplicity.
Alex Byrne?s production takes the
classic bones of the traditional French
fairytale of love, transformation and
inner beauty and adds lush melodies,
ingeniously economic visuals and a
tingling, spellbinding atmosphere to
turn the familiar story into something
truly handsome. It?s wonderfully
theatrical and entirely irresistible.
Candlelight, autumn leaves, a few
sticks of rustic furniture and a couple
of stone garden ornaments whisk us to
rural France, which in Stefanie
Mueller?s design has a vaguely 1920s
elegance. In a remote castle lurks the
Beast, once a wealthy, devastatingly
attractive but vain bachelor, given to
throwing lavish Gatsby-esque parties.
Now he?s horribly hirsute with claws,
horns and a tail after being cursed by
a furious witch whom he insulted.
Meanwhile, Maurice, a ruined
shipowner, relocates with his three
daughters to a new, tumbledown home
in the forest ? Le G顃e Terrible. The
family?s reduced circumstances are
dreadful for the spoilt flapper twins
Anastasia and Latrice, but it?s sister
Isabella who has to face real fear after
dopey Daddy trespasses in the Beast?s
garden and is forced to sacrifice her to
the mysterious creature.
The music is richly textured and
laced with jaunty Gallic flair. As the
two ghastly girls, Samantha
Sutherland and Elliot Davis sulk and
strop hilariously, while Sara Lessore?s
bright-eyed Isabella is a tough-talking
match for Martin Bonger?s Beast. His
air of desolate dejection soon gives
way to debonair charm as he loses his
heart to her, climaxing in a tabletop
dance as he pleads in song: ?Isabella!
Might I be your hairy fella??
It?s lovely, quirkily romantic stuff,
and its well-worn moral about prizing
substance over appearance feels
particularly welcome in these
selfie-obsessed days. Gorgeous.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 0117 902 0344, to Jan 14
Theatre
Barnum
Menier Chocolate
Factory, SE1
{{(((
{{{{(
Y
Steven McRae and Sarah Lamb led the opening night performance, relayed live to 500 cinemas
They cracked this nut
P
First Night, main paper
eter Wright?s Nutcracker for
the Royal Ballet is one of the
most successful productions
in the company?s history.
It?s beautiful, heartfelt,
dramatically coherent, highly
classical and wildly popular ? this
performance, opening the present
run for Christmas at the Royal Opera
House, was its 455th. And on Tuesday
night, not for the first time, his
Nutcracker was broadcast live to
500 cinemas around the world.
The first of many treats greets
us as the curtain rises on Julia
Trevelyan Oman?s gorgeous period
designs, a homage to the fashions of
19th-century Germany. In Act I they
speak of prosperity and happiness for
the Stahlbaum family as they gather to
celebrate Christmas; in Act II?s
Kingdom of Sweets the designs
reference the elaborate confectionery
of Nuremberg, where our story is set.
Wright matches Oman?s sumptuous
vision with vibrant choreography, from
the sparkle of the dancing Snowflakes
(a glittering blizzard if ever there was
one) and the loveliness of the Waltz of
the Flowers to the energy of the
national dances. Even Drosselmeyer?s
low-tech magic tricks have a charm all
their own, while the high-spirited
children (students of the Royal Ballet
School) bring a delightful dose of
naturalism to the festivities. Yes, the
Christmas tree grows spectacularly ?
magnificent and magical.
And then the icing on this heavenly
Yuletide cake ? the Sugar Plum Fairy
and her Prince. On opening night we
had Sarah Lamb and Steven McRae.
Lamb is a supremely elegant mover,
radiant, glamorous and commanding,
fascinating to behold; McRae was
her admirable partner, bringing flair
and excitement to match such a
captivating ballerina.
As Clara, Francesca Hayward darted
through the action, a luminous
presence, a darling of a dancer. Her
light-as-air performance was fuelled
by girlish enthusiasm and a thrilling
undercurrent of budding romance.
And that smile! It lights up a big stage
like no other.
Her Nutcracker sweetie was
Alexander Campbell, who harnesses
his power as a dancer seamlessly
and is an ardent partner. Gary Avis,
a benevolent and charismatic
Drosselmeyer, orchestrated Clara?s
fantastical midnight journey with
masterful ease. Barry Wordsworth
conducted the ROH Orchestra with
a jolly affection for Tchaikovsky?s
splendid score.
My only caveat? The ending is too
rushed. This ballet has the happiest of
outcomes ? why not give us more
time to savour it?
Box office: 020 7304 4000, to Jan 10
oll up! Roll up! Hear all about
PT Barnum and the greatest
show on Earth. Come see the
mermaid! Don?t miss the
160-year-old woman who
was nursemaid to George Washington,
the first American president! Then
there?s the world?s smallest man,
General Tom Thumb! And, while
you?re at it, why not take in the
four-headed frog?
Oh it?s a spectacle, this show. But
Barnum, the great American hustler
and showman born in 1810, always
thought big. It?s only natural that we
think of this 1980 musical, with music
by Cy Coleman and lyrics by Michael
Stewart, as razzmatazz central, a
three-ring circus of song and dance.
The director, Gordon Greenberg, says
when he took the job he had to ask
himself: ?What does it mean to take
the greatest show on Earth and stuff
it into the smallest theatre on Earth??
It?s a bit of a squish, but he?s done
that. Never mind that the acrobats?
heads almost graze the ceiling at
times. The three-ring circus has been
reduced to one (and a small one at
that), but the choreography (by
Rebecca Howell) is clever, making it
all look bigger and better. The scene
where General Tom Thumb twirls
around the room is stunning.
The problem has nothing to do with
size and everything to do with the star.
Marcus Brigstocke is simply not PT
Barnum in any way, shape or form. I?m
not expecting him to be Michael
Crawford, but he?s got to bring to the
role some chutzpah, razzle-dazzle ?
showmanship. The tightrope walk that
he has to do at the end of the first act
is painful for us to watch and although
he did his best to laugh it off as he fell,
painful for him as well.
Brigstocke, who is best known as a
comedian and satirist, is also lacking
in other basics. His singing is not
up to the task, but, crucially, he simply
never looks comfortable in the role.
This is made all the more obvious
because Laura Pitt-Pulford, left with
Brigstocke, positively sparkles as his
wife, Charity. Others, such as Harry
Francis as Tom Thumb, seem to be
born for the circus.
The set, by Paul Farnsworth, is
also really rather special. The stage
is in the centre with vintage circus
paraphernalia filling every corner.
But you can?t stage Barnum and not
have the man himself smack dab in
the middle, lighting up the place,
selling us the moon, not to mention
the mermaid. ?There?s a sucker born
every minute,? was one of Barnum?s
catchphrases. He was right about that.
Ann Treneman
Box office: 020 7378 1713, to March 3.
This review ran in late editions
yesterday
R
The Royal
Ballet?s sweet
Christmas
treat was a gift
to the whole
world, says
Debra Craine
Dance
The Nutcracker
Covent Garden
{{{{{
A first look at
Spielberg?s new
film The Post
ou?ve never seen a White
Witch quite like her. Sure,
Carla Mendon鏰 as the evil
dictator of Narnia is glacial
and spooky and you really
shouldn?t eat the Turkish delight she
conjures from out of the floor. So far,
so stage adaptations of CS Lewis?s 1950
children?s novel as we know them. Yet
then, ranting away, she suddenly rises
high into the air, her dress extending
down to cover the whole stage. A
second later, she whooshes down into
a hole in the ground.
It?s a theatrical miracle from the
designer Rae Smith (of War Horse
fame), and it?s a turning point for this
engaging and invigorating, but uneven
adaptation by the director Sally
Cookson. It?s uneven largely because,
for all the strong set pieces, jokes and
songs that Cookson has dreamt up in
the ten weeks of rehearsals in which
she, the composer Benji Bower and the
writer Adam Peck devised the show
with the cast, she is operating on
such a grand scale.
As we meet the Leeds-accented,
blessedly un-twee Pevensey children
on their way to wartime evacuation in
Scotland, the show?s biggest enemy
isn?t the White Witch. It?s the dodgy
acoustics in this huge room, which has
been converted to an in-the-round
staging for the first time. Even with
actors miked up, you strain to hear it
all. Oi, Aslan, got any egg boxes we
could stick to the walls?
Yet as we go deeper into Narnia,
there are fewer things competing for
our attention and the sound stops
being an issue. We are free to enjoy
gorgeous ideas and strong turns in a
show that summons up the allure and
the nastiness of Narnia. White sheets
and tickertape snow whisk us into
another dimension the moment that
Lucy (Cora Kirk) steps through the
wardrobe. Aslan is both a giant puppet
hoisted by seven people and a stern
Scotsman in fur (Iain Johnstone).
Woodland creatures communicate
through tin cans and string. Father
Christmas does some clog dancing.
The second half is scary, propulsive
and delightful.
When Mr Tumnus (Peter Caulfield,
above) jams on a wooden flute as a
woodland sprite hangs in mid-air, it?s
all a bit Cirque du Soleil. Yet the
outsized otherworldliness ends up
being far more of a blessing than a
curse, as the children ride on giant
swings. It ends on happy jigs that take
us back into the real winter world
glowing with an optimism that?s
not very 2017 at all.
Dominic Maxwell
Box office: 0113 213 7700, to Jan 27
12
1G T
Thursday December 7 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
When Rock
Arrived in
North Korea
BBC Four, 11pm
When Kim
Jong-un
decided to
allow the first
western rock group to
play in North Korea in
August 2015, who got
Early
Top
pick
the gig? The Rolling
Stones? U2? Coldplay?
How about the
Slovenian industrial
art-rockers Laibach?
The idea for the
concert came from a
Norwegian artist and
activist named Morten
Traavik, who had
organised cultural
exchanges with North
Korea. Laibach played
before a seated
audience of 2,500
diplomats and creative
professionals, but Kim
Jong-un sadly wasn?t
in attendance. The
45-minute set included
versions of Edelweiss
and Do-Re-Mi from
The Sound of Music
and they also sang
the Korean folk song
Arirang. ?They clapped
after every song and at
the end they gave us a
standing ovation,? Ivan
Novak, Laibach?s chief
spokesman, told
The Times last year.
Traavik, the man who
made it all possible,
is the co-director of
this unconventional
documentary that
follows the week
leading up to the event.
The thrust of his film
seems to be that the
band ? who have been
repeatedly criticised for
their use of overt
neo-fascist iconography
? are, like North
Korea and its
?Supreme Leader?,
?misunderstood?.
It is precisely the
controversial and
militaristic elements
of their act that make
Laibach seem familiar
to a North Korean
audience and made
Traavik?s ?blindest of
blind dates? a success.
A singular glimpse of
an unfamiliar country.
Great Canal
Journeys
Channel 4, 8pm
Fair play to Timothy
West and Prunella
Scales, still up for an
adventure in their
dotage. However, it
may be time to allow
them to enjoy their
water-based jaunts in
peace, for a while at
least, because this
series is starting to run
out of steam. Tonight
the couple are winding
their way along the
Monmouthshire and
Brecon Canal, where
they visit a ?haunted?
castle and help with
some lock-restoration
work. ?I hope that we
go on having canal
journeys for the rest
of our lives,? Scales
says. Fans of this benign
series will no doubt be
happy to hear that.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Island Medics. A mum-to-be is
?own to the mainland for special birthing assistance
10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. From Surrey, Cornwall
and the West Midlands (AD) 11.00 Claimed and Shamed.
Secret ?lming catches out a woman who claims she is
too injured to work (r) 11.45 The Sheriffs Are Coming.
Alan Pennington enforces a writ at a recruitment agency
12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Two teams compete in
Leominster, Herefordshire (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at
One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Zara makes a dif?cult decision for the good of
her family, although it could jeopardise her safety (AD)
2.15 Armchair Detectives. Three amateur sleuths try to
piece together the clues and solve the mystery when the
body of a writer is found in a library 3.00 Escape to the
Country. A couple search for a home in Suffolk (r) (AD)
3.45 The Hairy Bikers Home for Christmas. Creating a trio
of canap閟, porcetta pork loin and a prawn and salmon
terrine (AD) 4.30 Money for Nothing. Upgrading a Second
World War ?eld telephone (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show
hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at
Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am An Island Parish: Falklands (r) (AD) 6.30 Island
Medics (r) 7.15 The Hairy Bikers Home for Christmas (r)
(AD) 8.00 Sign Zone: MasterChef: The Professionals (r)
(AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom
Live 12.00 Daily Politics. Parliamentary proceedings
interspersed with discussions, interviews and ?lmed
reports from around the country. Presented by Jo Coburn
1.00pm Live Snooker: UK Championship. Jason
Mohammad presents coverage of the ninth day at the
Barbican Centre in York, as the fourth round of the
prestigious ranking tournament heads towards a
conclusion 2.45 Live Rugby Union: Varsity Match ?
Oxford University v Cambridge University (Kick-off 3.00).
Coverage of the 136th staging of the annual contest,
which takes place at Twickenham 5.00 Live Snooker: UK
Championship. Jason Mohammad presents further
coverage of the ninth day at the Barbican Centre in York,
as the fourth round of the prestigious ranking tournament
continues 6.00 Celebrity Eggheads. A team of sports
commentators competes 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It
Takes Two. Zoe Ball dishes up more backstage gossip,
and Vicky Gill previews some of the costumes
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Ann Summers boss Jacqueline
Gold talks about her secret battle with breast cancer, and
Su Pollard chats about getting into the festive spirit and
her appearance in panto this year 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning. Sir David
Jason chats about his career and Steve Wilson looks at
some of the magic-inspired gifts available to purchase
this Christmas 12.30pm Loose Women. The ladies put
the world to rights once more and are joined by the
television judge Robert Rinder 1.30 ITV News; Weather
2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras follow the criminal barrister
Robert Rinder as he takes on real-life cases in a studio
courtroom 3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. David Dickinson
and his team are in Duxford, Cambridgeshire, where the
dealers try to get their hands on some toby jugs, a punch
bowl and a classic car 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard
hosts the arcade-themed quiz show in which contestants
drop tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a �,000 jackpot (r) 5.00 The Chase 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am 3rd Rock from the Sun (r) (AD) 7.35 Everybody
Loves Raymond (r) 9.00 Frasier (r) 10.05 Ramsay?s
Kitchen Nightmares USA. Arizona bistro owners who have
a contempt for customer feedback (r) 11.00 Jamie and
Jimmy?s Friday Night Feast. With Jack Whitehall (r) (AD)
12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Kirstie?s
Handmade Christmas. The host offers tips on Christmas
trees (r) 12.25 FILM: 12 Wishes of Christmas (PG,
TVM, 2011) A woman makes 12 wishes to improve her
life, but when they come true, she is unprepared for the
consequences. Festive fantasy starring Elisa Donovan
2.10 Countdown. With Richard Madeley in Dictionary
Corner 3.00 Lost and Found. A dog runs off the clifftop at
Beachy Head 4.00 A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun.
A couple search for a retirement home on the Caribbean
island of St Lucia 5.00 Four in a Bed. The contestants
stay at the White Hart Hotel in Wells (r) 5.30 Come
Dine with Me. A bodybuilder hopes his Thai-themed menu
will impress the guests in Swansea 6.00 The Simpsons.
Lisa?s guinea pig destroys a painting in the family?s
living room (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Glenn starts his
plan to get Maxine and Adam back together (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. The day?s
news comes under scrutiny from Matthew Wright and the
panel, with viewers and the studio audience invited to
share their opinions 11.45 FILM: The Christmas
Spirit (PG, TVM, 2013) The spirit of a comatose
reporter leaves her body, and tries to prevent a real
estate development in a small town. Fantasy starring
Nicollette Sheridan, Bart Johnson and Olympia Dukakis
1.25pm 5 News at Lunchtime 1.30 Neighbours (AD)
2.00 FILM: The Flight Before Christmas (U, 2008)
A reindeer suffering from a fear of heights turns to a
squirrel for help in learning to ?y. Animated adventure
with the voices of Andrew McMahon and Emma Roberts
3.40 FILM: A Star Crossed Christmas (PG, TVM,
2017) The son and daughter of rival families are forced to
keep their romance a secret from their feuding relatives.
Romantic drama starring Nick Ballard, Jonna Walsh and
Ken Cheeseman 5.30 5 News at 5.30 6.00 Neighbours.
Paige and Piper discover some shocking new evidence
about Hamish?s death. Karl is angry about losing out
to Susan over the Liveability prize, but Paul has an
intriguing idea (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine show
featuring a mixture of chat with
famous faces and stories of interest
7.30 EastEnders Jack encourages Max to
build bridges with his family. But it
seems Lauren and Abi may not be so
keen to put the past behind them (AD)
7.00 Live Snooker: UK Championship
Hazel Irvine presents further coverage
of the ninth day at the Barbican Centre
in York, featuring the concluding
session of the fourth round. The
line-up for the quarter-?nals will be
con?rmed at the end of this session
7.00 Emmerdale The Dingles are occupied
with the protest, so Pollard seizes
the opportunity to take matters
into his own hands (AD)
7.30 Christmas Cons Revealed: Tonight
Dan Clark-Neal investigates what
people can do to keep their cash safe
7.00 Channel 4 News
8.00 Holby City It remains to be seen
how the staff will cope when a
face from the past arrives with
a chilling vendetta (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
In the last programme of knockout
week, the second group work together
to cook a ?ne dining menu at the
Institution of Civil Engineers, then
produce their own showstopper dish
in just 90 minutes (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Pollard faces the music,
Paddy is thrown by an admission,
and Lisa is con?icted (AD)
8.00 Great Canal Journeys Timothy West
and Prunella Scales return to Wales to
explore a canal that has eluded them
for more than half a century ? the
Monmouthshire and Brecon canal.
See Viewing Guide (6/6) (AD)
8.00 Traf?c Cops at Christmas An
insight into the working life of of?cers
patrolling the nation?s roads, using
modern technology and old-fashioned
methods to bring criminals to justice
9.00 Love, Lies & Records Kate is
horri?ed to discover that spiteful
colleague Judy has sent Rob a ?ash
drive containing the incriminating
footage. The registrars prepare for
the raid on Kristina and Amir?s sham
wedding ? a case that takes on
increased urgency (4/6) (AD)
9.00 Blitz: The Bombs That Changed
Britain The story of a bomb that fell
on Jellicoe Street in the Scottish town
of Clydebank, a community of ship
builders and factory workers who
worked in dif?cult conditions.
See Viewing Guide (3/4) (AD)
9.00 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of
Here! Ant and Dec present highlights
from the past 24 hours, including
another Bushtucker Trial, before
announcing the latest evictee and
chatting to them about jungle life
9.00 Catching a Killer: A Bullet
Through the Window Documentary
following the investigation by Thames
Valley Police into a fatal shooting
through an open window, in the early
hours of the morning in a Milton
Keynes street. See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 Brick Mansions (15, 2014)
A ghetto of Detroit is walled off from
the rest of the city to contain its
criminal population. A cop out for
revenge and an ex-convict trying to
save his kidnapped girlfriend are forced
to team up to stop a drug kingpin
carrying out a plan that could destroy
the entire city. US remake of French
action adventure District 13, starring
Paul Walker, David Belle and RZA
10.00 BBC News at Ten
Late
11PM
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.45 Question Time David Dimbleby chairs
the debate from Swansea, where a
panel of politicians and other guests
face topical questions from the
audience. They include Welsh First
Minister Carwyn Jones and television
and radio host Richard Bacon
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days? political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
8.30 Paul O?Grady: For the Love of
Dogs An English bulldog has surgery
to help it breathe, and Paul meets an
unusual looking Staf?e cross (7/8)
7.55 The Political Slot Andrew Percy MP
with the Conservative Party?s view on
the opportunities Brexit will bring
7.00 UK?s Strongest Man 2017 Further
action from the ?nal, staged in Belfast,
featuring events such as the Truck Pull,
Giant Log, Stones of Strength, Giant
Tyre Flip and Flag Hoist (4/5)
10.00 Live at the Apollo Nish Kumar
presents stand-up comedy, with Luisa
Omielan and David O?Doherty (2/7)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Evan Davis
10.35 Regional News
11.15 Snooker: UK Championship
Hazel Irvine presents action from
the concluding matches in the fourth
round at the Barbican Centre in York,
where the contests were played
over the best of 11 frames
11.15 Uefa Europa League Highlights
A round-up of the matchday six
?xtures, which included Apollon
Limassol v Everton at GSP Stadium
in Nicosia, Cyprus, Arsenal v BATE
Borisov at Emirates Stadium
11.25 Born to Be Free: Saving Russia?s
Whales A group of female Russian
journalists investigate the global
trade in wild sea mammals
10.45 Takers (12, 2010) Five bank robbers
are reunited with an old partner in
crime just out of prison, who presents
them with a plan for a lucrative
armoured car robbery. As the crooks
arrange what will be their ?nal heist,
a determined police of?cer is closing in
on them. Crime thriller starring Paul
Walker, Matt Dillon, Idris Elba, Hayden
Christensen and Zoe Saldana
12.05am Snooker: UK Championship Extra Jason
Mohammad presents extended highlights from one
of today?s matches at the Barbican Centre in York
2.05 Sign Zone: Exodus ? Our Journey Continues. Nazifa
and her family make a ?nal attempt to reach Germany
(r) (AD, SL) 3.05-4.05 This Farming Life (r) (SL)
12.25am Jackpot247 Interactive gaming 3.00
Christmas Cons Revealed: Tonight. Last Christmas, British
consumers were cheated out of � million by fraudulent
online sellers. Dan Clark-Neal investigates what people
can do to keep their cash safe (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
1.00am Extraordinary Teens: My Gay Life
Documentary following a young gay boy growing up in the
21st century (r) 1.55 Finding Me a Family. Cameras
follow adoption activity days (r) (AD) 2.50 How to Build
a Robot (r) 3.45 Grand Designs Australia (r) 4.40 Phil
Spencer: Secret Agent (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.45am Sinkholes: Sucked to Death Documentary
examining the underlying forces behind sinkholes. Last in
the series (r) 1.35 SuperCasino 3.10 Top 20 Funniest.
More comical video clips from America (r) 4.00 My Mum?s
Hotter Than Me! (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
Great Artists (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
10.45 Regional Programme
10.25 999: What?s Your Emergency?
This edition looks at how rising
levels of stress and anxiety in the
workplace are creating problems that
Wiltshire?s emergency services
have to deal with (r) (AD)
the times | Thursday December 7 2017
13
1G T
television & radio
Ross Noble:
Off Road
Dave, 8pm
The whimsical comic
is an accomplished
motorcyclist. Now he is
taking on the gruelling
Scottish Six Days Trial,
one of the most
technically difficult
motorcycle challenges.
Participants ride for
eight hours a day for six
days through extreme
terrain. Oh yes ? and
the bike has no seat.
As well as skill, a sense
of humour is essential,
and Noble is blessed
in both departments.
Assisted by a crack
team, he practises on
ice rinks, riding up
and downstairs and in
an ?extreme rockery?
he has built in his
garden, but nothing
can fully prepare him
for the challenge.
The Bombs That
Changed Britain
BBC Two, 9pm
On March 13, 1941
200 Luftwaffe bombers
headed for Clydebank
to rain hell on the
industrial town. One of
the thousands of bombs
they were carrying hit
78 Jellicoe Street, part
of a tenement block
close to John Brown?s
Shipyard. Of those still
in the block at the
moment of impact,
31 died. As Tim Kirby?s
powerful series
continues, some of the
survivors recall the
moment the bomb
hit and its aftermath
with incredible clarity,
evoking the full horror
of the dreadful event.
But that wasn?t it for
Clydebank because
the bombers returned
the next night.
Catching a Killer
Channel 4, 9pm
Crimewatch may no
longer be part of the
television landscape,
but there is no doubting
the grim fascination
in watching a real-life
murder investigation
unfold. On a quiet
suburban street in
Milton Keynes, a single
bullet is shot through
an open window, killing
a 19-year-old man. The
only witness makes a
frantic 999 call, heard
in the harrowing
opening scenes of this
documentary following
the Thames Valley
Police. With the
suspect at large, time
is of the essence for the
force and they must act
quickly to track down
the killer. But is there
more to the case than
meets the eye?
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 8.30am
The Joburg Open
begins today at the
Royal Johannesburg &
Kensington Golf Club.
The field includes
240 professionals,
including 30 Asian
Tour members, four
amateur invites and the
remainder to be shared
between the European
Tour and Sunshine Tour.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 8.00 It?s Me or
the Dog (r) 9.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) 10.00
Meerkat Manor (r) 11.00 Modern Family (r)
12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00
Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r)
5.30 Futurama. Leela makes a stand (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry goes undercover (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 A League of Their Own. James Corden
introduces out-takes and pranks from the latest
series of the sports-based comedy quiz (r)
9.00 Living the Dream. Mal and Jen discover
they have to pay $50,000. Last in the series
10.00 The Russell Howard Hour.
Topical comedy and entertainment show
11.00 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own. James Corden
presents the quiz (r) (AD) 1.00am The Force:
Essex (r) 2.00 Night Cops (r) 3.00 Brit Cops:
Rapid Response (r) (AD) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am The British (r) (AD) 7.00 Fish Town (r)
8.00 The Guest Wing (r) (AD) 9.00 The West
Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) (AD) 1.00pm
Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD)
3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House (r)
6.00 House. A man has a severe rash (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
The team investigates an electrocution (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny and Baez are caught
in the middle of of?ce politics (r) (AD)
9.00 Olive Kitteridge. Olive visits Christopher,
and she receives some bad news (4/4) (r)
10.15 Room 104. Two female MMA ?ghters
decide to work together to secure a big pay
out in an upcoming bout (11/12)
10.45 Room 104. An octogenarian couple return
to Room 104. Last in the series
11.20 Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry David
attempts to talk himself out of a situation (r)
12.15am TJ Miller: Meticulously Ridiculous (r)
1.30 The Tunnel (r) (AD) 3.25 Californication
(r) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Gold Coast Medical (r) 12.00 Border
Security: America?s Front Line (r) (AD) 1.00pm
Stop, Search, Seize (r) 2.00 Nothing to Declare
(r) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
5.00 Criminal Minds. A spate of suicides (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds. FBI drama (r)
7.00 My Kitchen Rules New Zealand.
Two teams ?ght it out in the semi-?nal
8.00 Elementary. Mycroft faces charges
of murder and treason (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. Reid?s mystery love
interest Maeve is kidnapped (r)
10.00 Madam Secretary. Elizabeth tries to help
fund an electrical grid in a Syrian refugee camp
11.00 Criminal Minds. A bloodthirsty killer (r)
12.00 Blindspot. Jane struggles to cope (r)
1.00am Bones (r) (AD) 2.00 The Good Doctor
(r) 3.00 Motorway Patrol (r) 4.00 My Kitchen
Rules New Zealand 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Classical Destinations 6.10 2Cellos at
Sydney Opera House 8.10 Andrea Bocelli:
Cinema 10.00 The Art Show (AD) 11.00 Too
Young to Die (AD) 12.00 Discovering: Ginger
Rogers 1.00pm Tales of the Unexpected (AD)
2.00 Painting: Fabrice Muamba (AD) 3.00 Fake!
The Great Masterpiece Challenge 4.00
The Music of Buddy Holly and the Crickets
6.00 Discovering: Ava Gardner. A pro?le
7.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017.
The ?nalists battle it out for the title
8.00 Discovering: Terence Stamp.
A look at the life and career of the English actor
9.00 John Le Carre: An Evening with George
Smiley. In a special event at London?s Royal
Festival Hall, the author John le Carr� re?ects
on his most famous creation, George Smiley
11.00 Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge
12.00 Toots & the Maytals: From the Roots
1.30am Tales of the Unexpected 2.30
Palmyra: Rising from the Ashes (AD) 3.30
Les Patineurs 4.00 Nureyev & Friends
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans
8.30 Live European Tour Golf: The Joburg Open.
Coverage of the opening day?s play from the
Royal Johannesburg & Kensington Golf Club in
South Africa, won last time out by home
favourite Darren Fichardt. See Viewing Guide
10.30 Live Ladies European Tour Golf: The
Omega Dubai Ladies Classic. Coverage of the
second day of the tournament from Emirates
Gold Club in Dubai 12.30pm Live European Tour
Golf. The Joburg Open 2.00 Sky Sports News
5.00 Sky Sports News at 5 6.00 Sky Sports
News at 6 7.00 Live Mosconi Cup Pool. The
fourth and ?nal day of nine-ball pool?s version
of the Ryder Cup at Mandalay Bay Resort and
Casino in Las Vegas 10.00 The Debate.
Discussion 11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00 Sporting Greats (AD) 12.30am Live NFL:
Atlanta Falcons v New Orleans Saints (Kick-off
1.25). Coverage of the NFC South clash at
Mercedes-Benz Stadium 4.45 Great Sporting
Moments 5.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View.
News, comment and analysis 11.15 Question
Time. Topical debate from Swansea 12.15am
This Week 1.00-6.00 BBC News
ITV Anglia
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 Anglia Late
Edition. Political issues affecting the region
ITV Border
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 Around the
House. Political discussion with Paul Brand
ITV Central
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 Central Lobby
ITV Granada
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 The Granada
Debate. Political debate with Dan Hewitt
Or cross your fingers at the Box Office.
ITV London
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 The Late
Debate. News and events at Westminster
ITV Meridian
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 The Last Word
What do you
subscribe to?
Subscribers save 33% on the cover price.
Call 0800 158 2816 or visit thetimes.co.uk/savemore
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00-1.00pm First
Minister?s Questions. Nicola Sturgeon answers
questions in the Scottish Parliament 7.00
Dad?s Army. Mainwaring puts Frazer in charge
(r) 7.30-8.00 Timeline. Stories and analysis
ITV Tyne Tees
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 Around the
House. Political discussion with Paul Brand
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Christmas University Challenge 2015.
The second semi-?nal (r)
8.00 The Secrets of Quantum Physics. Professor
Jim Al-Khalili investigates quantum physics,
beginning with Einstein?s work which questioned
the validity of the subject (r) (AD)
9.00 Inside Chernobyl?s Mega Tomb.
Documentary following a team of international
engineers as they build a steel structure to
entomb the ruins of the nuclear power plant,
destroyed in the 1986 disaster (r) (AD)
10.00 Inside Porton Down: Britain?s Secret
Weapons Research Facility. Investigating the
UK?s most secretive military base (r) (AD)
11.00 When Rock Arrived in North Korea:
Liberation Day ? Storyville. The Slovenian rock
group Laibach?s invitation to perform in
North Korea. See Viewing Guide
12.00 Empire of the Seas: How the Navy Forged
the Modern World (r) (AD) 1.00am Pappano?s
Classical Voices (r) (AD) 2.00 Inside Chernobyl?s
Mega Tomb (r) (AD, SL) 3.00-4.00 Gaga for
Dada: The Original Art Rebels (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 Kevin Can Wait (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Misbah puts her foot down (AD)
7.30 First Dates Abroad (r) (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory. An old video reveals
a secret about Leonard and Penny (AD)
9.00 2 Broke Girls. Max and Caroline?s business
booms after they hire a popular bartender (AD)
9.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
10.00 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
10.30 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Rude Tube (r) 1.10 Gogglebox (r)
2.05 2 Broke Girls (r) (AD) 2.30 First Dates
Hotel (r) (AD) 3.25 Rude Tube (r) 3.50
Black-ish (r) (AD) 4.40 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 2.45 Come Dine with Me (r)
3.50 Time Team (r) 5.55 The Secret Life of the
Zoo. A rare okapi has mating problems (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. A papillon dog undergoes a
double knee replacement (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows
Matt and Sophie White from Sussex as they
build a giant family house of fun (2/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Coastal Railways with Julie Walters.
The actress travels from Newcastle to Edinburgh
by train, stopping off at the coastal town of
Alnmouth and the world?s biggest gannet colony,
and meeting a lobster breeder (r)
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. An actor with a
suspected broken shoulder receives a more
worrying diagnosis (3/8) (r) (AD)
11.05 The Handmaid?s Tale. Offred and her
fellow Handmaids are faced with an unthinkable
choice. Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.20am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares
USA (r) 1.15 Coastal Railways with Julie
Walters (r) 2.15 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD)
3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am Thunder Bay (U, 1953) Action
adventure with James Stewart 1.10pm Shane
(PG, 1953) Western starring Alan Ladd 3.30
Thoroughly Modern Millie (PG, 1967)
Musical comedy with Julie Andrews
6.15 The Karate Kid (PG, 2010) An American
boy living in China falls foul of bullies, until a
kindly kung fu master teaches him the skills to
defend himself. Martial arts drama starring
Jaden Smith and Jackie Chan (AD)
9.00 Black Sea (15, 2014) Tension rises
among the members of a salvage submarine
crew as they search the ocean depths for a
rumoured lost treasure. Thriller starring
Jude Law and Jodie Whittaker
11.10 Oldboy (18, 2013) A man who was
kept prisoner for 20 years seeks revenge on the
people who captured him. Spike Lee?s thriller
remake starring Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Olsen
and Samuel L Jackson
1.15am All This Panic (15, 2016)
Documentary about seven teenage friends from
New York, showing them at a pivotal time in
their lives as they enter adulthood 2.50-3.25
FilmFear Interview Special (r)
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 6.20 Planet?s Got Talent (r) 6.45
Dinner Date (r) 7.35 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.00
Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.00 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 9.50 Dinner Date (r) 10.50
I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of Here! (r) 11.50
Planet?s Got Talent (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r)
(AD) 12.50 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.50 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Guests air their differences (r)
6.00 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of Here!
Survival challenge (r) (AD)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold At Christmas.
Comical clips narrated by Harry Hill (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 I?m a Celebrity: Extra Camp.
Companion programme to the reality show
11.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! (r) (AD) 1.00am
Two and a Half Men (r) 1.30 Release
the Hounds (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 8.00 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
9.00 Judge Judy (r) 10.20 A Touch of Frost (r)
12.30pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat
(r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.50
A Touch of Frost (r) 5.50 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
6.55 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica investigates
whether a curse on a stolen Indian
pendant could be responsible for the death of
Seth?s brother (r) (AD)
8.00 Doc Martin. Louisa?s ex-boyfriend Danny
brings seven children from London to camp on
Ruth?s farm and Martin uncovers a health scare
at James?s ?rst birthday party (6/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Foyle?s War. The detective is drawn into
the world of corrupt Nazi businessmen when a
university professor is found murdered after
working in Nuremberg (1/3) (r) (AD)
11.05 Blue Murder. (1/2) Shap?s behaviour
becomes erratic when the team investigates the
death of a private detective. Meanwhile, Janine
deals with her son?s truancy (5/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am Blue Murder (r) (AD) 1.05 Judge Judy
(r) 2.00 ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 7.35 Cash Cowboys (r)
8.35 Pawn Stars (r) 9.30 Ironside (r) 10.35
Quincy ME (r) 11.40 The Sweeney (r) 12.40pm
The Avengers (r) 1.50 Ironside (r) 2.50 Quincy
ME (r) 3.55 The Sweeney (r) 4.55 The Avengers
(r) 6.00 Cash Cowboys. Dinosaur fossils
7.00 Pawn Stars. Chumlee and Olivia must work
out if a sculpture is real or a fake (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. The guys are offered sketches
supposedly drawn by Stan Lee (r)
8.00 Steve McQueen: Motorcycle Movie Star.
The often surprising life of the actor (2/2) (r)
9.00 FILM: Moonraker (PG, 1979) James
Bond?s search for a missing space shuttle leads
to an industrialist bent on genocide ? and a
rematch with old foe Jaws. Spy adventure
starring Roger Moore and Lois Chiles (AD)
11.35 FILM: 16 Blocks (12, 2006)
A detective escorts a witness to a trial ? but
the crooked cops he is testifying against want
him dead before he makes it to the courthouse.
Thriller with Bruce Willis and Mos Def
1.40 The Professionals (r) (AD, SL) 2.30 The
Protectors (r) 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm The
Hurting 2.00 Top Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City
Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice Road Truckers 5.00
Timber Kings 6.00 Top Gear (AD)
7.00 The Hurting. Double bill. Clip show
8.00 Ross Noble: Off Road. New series.
The comedian prepares for the biggest
challenge of his career, the Scottish Six
Days Trial. See Viewing Guide
9.00 Not Going Out. Seven years into their
marriage, Lee and Lucy are bringing up three
children and trying to keep the romance alive
9.40 Not Going Out. Lucy criticises Frank over
his abilities as a babysitter
10.20 QI. Stephen Fry quizzes Alan Davies,
Sean Lock, Rich Hall and Bill Bailey
11.00 QI XL. With guests Jack Dee, David
Mitchell, Bill Bailey and Alan Davies
12.00 Room 101 (AD) 12.40am Mock the Week
1.20 QI 2.00 Crackanory 2.40 8 Out of 10 Cats
3.10 Parks and Recreation 3.35 The
Indestructibles 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Campion (AD) 11.00 The Bill
1.00pm Last of the Summer Wine (AD) 1.40
Steptoe and Son (b/w) 2.20 Birds of a Feather
3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 Casualty 5.00
Campion. The detective goes undercover (AD)
6.00 Steptoe and Son. Albert sets about
transforming himself into a suave man (b/w)
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Foggy decides
to go trekking across the moors (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. Lionel ?nds himself
surrounded by females when Sandy moves in
8.00 Miss Marple. The sleuth investigates the
case of a businessman whose death echoes
the lines of a nursery rhyme (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The detectives investigate
the murder of an East German immigrant, but all
they have to go on are his ?nal words, which
translate as ?blue ?ower?. (8/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Sharon tries to climb
the social ladder ? but ends up meeting a snake
12.00 The Bill. Boulton investigates an arsonist
1.00am London?s Burning 2.05 PD James: The
Murder Room 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 Battleplan 8.00
Time Team 10.00 Napoleon (AD) 11.00 Castles:
Britain?s Forti?ed History (AD) 12.00 Time
Team 2.00pm South Paci?c (AD) 3.00 Coast
(AD) 4.00 Porridge 4.40 Steptoe and Son
5.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
6.00 The World at War. The longest retreat
in British military history, in 1942
7.00 The Churchills. David Starkey pro?les two
of Britain?s greatest wartime leaders, beginning
by revealing how Winston Churchill came to
write a biography of his ancestor John (AD)
8.00 Private Lives of the Monarchs. The life of
Louis XIV, revealing the unpleasant truth behind
the grandeur of the Palace of Versailles (AD)
9.00 Castles: Britain?s Forti?ed History. Sam
Willis charts the stories of Britain?s castles and
their roles in the country?s history, beginning by
looking at the building?s ?rst appearance (AD)
10.00 Porridge. Fletcher yearns for quiet
10.40 Steptoe and Son
11.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
12.00 Murder Maps 1.00am The Churchills
(AD) 2.00 Secrets of War 3.00 Home Shopping
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 Gino?s Italian
Coastal Escape. A visit to the bay of Naples
ITV West
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15
The Westcountry Debate. With David Wood
ITV Westcountry
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 The
Westcountry Debate. Political stories
ITV Yorkshire
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 Last Orders
STV
As ITV except: 10.35pm-11.15 Scotland
Tonight 12.25am Teleshopping 1.25 After
Midnight 2.55 Christmas Cons Revealed:
Tonight (r) 3.20 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.15 Australian
Wilderness with Ray Mears 12.25am
Teleshopping 1.25-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Saoghal Bodach na Nollaig (r) 5.20 Na
Bleigeardan (Little Monsters) (r) 5.25 Pincidh
Dincidh D� (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.40 Bl鄏ag a?
Bh� (Connie the Cow) (r) 5.45 Treud na
Dluth-choille ? Grad-Naidheachd (Jungle
Bunch) 5.50 Srath Sona (Happy Valley) (r)
5.55 Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.20 Ceistean Lara (r)
6.35 D� a-nis? (What Now?) (r) 7.05 Tathadh
(r) 7.30 Speaking Our Language (r) 7.55
Earrann Eachdraidh (History Shorts) (r) 8.00
An L� (News) 8.30 E騬pa (European Current
Affairs) 9.00 Bho Mhinistear gu Modaratair
(From Minister to Moderator) (r) 10.00 Feis
Chiuil Thiriodh (Tiree Music Festival) (r) 10.30
Reagan & Gorbachev 11.30-12.00midnight
Fonn Fonn Fonn (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 12.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd
12.05pm Heno (r) 1.00 Parti Bwyd Beca (r)
1.30 Taith Fawr y Dyn Bach (r) (AD) 2.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05 Gwlad Moc (r) 4.00
Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Chwarter
Call 5.20 Kung Fu Panda (r) 5.45 Rygbi Pawb
6.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Dawel Nos (r)
6.30 Y Salon (r) 7.00 Heno 7.30 Rownd a
Rownd (AD) 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25
Cythrel Canu 9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30 Codi
Pac 10.00 Hansh 10.30 Lle Aeth Pawb? (r)
11.00-11.35 Doctoriaid Yfory (r)
14
Thursday December 7 2017 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7516
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3200
5
6
6
7
8
9
15
4
21
25
18
7
12
10
11
5
1
9
14
15
6
18
25
26
7
4
6
3
20
4
19
8
18
22
15
6
4
18
20
1
10
4
13
6
15
3
24
12
10
Train Tracks No 275
3
14
9
6
4
17
15
1
18
15
26
1
4
6
3
4
4
15
4
3
2
5
4
14
26
3
15
3
4
1
3
23
3
18
21
6
20
24
18
3
A
9
16
6
17
18
19
7
7
11
15
1
1
4
14
21
1
19
9
4
18
2
21
3
7
1
20
6
21
7
2
4
18
17
4
21
13
7
14
23
4
8
20
24
4
16
5
4
4
13
6
4
17
4
B
4
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
24
14
1
8
9
10
11
13
14
17
Islamic monarchy (5,6)
Concur (5)
Soccer player (7)
Outside limit (4)
In moral decline (8)
Foolish person (6)
Meet specified standards (6)
Roman Empire invader (8)
Solution to Crossword 7515
T E T RA
A R S
T HOUS A
E O A
R I P S P
E S
F ARS I
E
N
R I T UA L
V R T
OWE
I R
U A O
RE T I NU
D OO RWA Y
E Y O A
NDS RUN
I
T D K
ARE T YRE
L
R
E
COCK S
F
A H
I S T ODD
N C C O
I S H S T EW
T
E A R
E R OWD Y
21
O
9
N
8
12
24
4
6
4
21
3
Y
19 Prohibited practice (4)
22 Loud confused noise (7)
23 African carnivore (5)
24 Law-making body (11)
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Down
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
10
11
12
13
23
24
25
26
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
Y
1
2
3
4
Work excessively hard (5)
Erect (7)
Roman calendar day (4)
More fortunate or hopeful
(6)
5 Caribbean island state (8)
6 Leg joint (5)
7 Fairly; attractive (6)
12 Table tennis (4-4)
13 Inexperienced learner (6)
15 Tableland (7)
16 Supplies; shops (6)
18 Young; insignificant (5)
20 Customary practice (5)
21 Flightless bird (4)
O
N
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 4038
R
G
U
R
A
S
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
T
B
D
Y
F
O
B
L
U
W
R
O
S
O
G
E
T
B
L
E
A
A
D
E
N
A
E
O
R
S
S
C
Y
U
H
E
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4192
Futoshiki No 3059
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
?
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
<
?
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2018
>
3
?
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
No 4037
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
30
24
16
17
22
25
19
2
16
11
10
30
24
19
16
28
6
16
16
10
6
7
10
24
12
7
>
16
?
4
16
4
29
?
?
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
28
30
16
21
16
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
16
13
24
16
17
35
25
30
19
16
16
� PUZZLER MEDIA
22
the times | Thursday December 7 2017
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Marie Sebag
Black: Anatoly Karpov
Cap d?Agde 2014
Centre Counter Defence
1 e4 d5 2 exd5 Qxd5 3 Nc3 Qd6
This is an ultra-solid move. The
traditional 3 ... Qa5 was seen in
yesterday?s game.
4 d4 c6 5 Bc4 Nf6 6 Nf3 Bg4 7 h3
White offers a pawn for the
bishop pair and development lead.
7 ... Bxf3 8 Qxf3 Qxd4
Karpov takes up the challenge.
Such pawn grabs are very doubleedged. White gets the bishop pair
and a big lead in development.
However, Black has no weaknesses and an extra pawn.
9 Bb3 e6 10 Be3 Qd8
This retrograde move prevents
White from castling long, which
was undoubtedly her plan.
11 Ne4 Be7 12 Rd1 Qa5+ 13 c3
Nbd7 14 0-0 Nxe4 15 Qxe4 Nf6
Karpov avoids the tempting 15
... Nc5? 16 Qe5! 0-0 17 Bc2, when
Black is in deep trouble, with b2b4 and Bd4 both in the air.
16 Qh4 0-0 17 Bc2 h6 18 Rd3
________
醨D 4 DkD]
�D gp0 ]
� DpDph 0]
轉 D D D ]
� D G D !]
蹹 ) D $P]
踧)BD )PD]
贒 D DRI ]
谅媚牌侨
________
醨D D D D] Winning Move
郉k0 D D ]
� 0 D D 0] Black to play. This position is from
London 1980.
轉Q$ 0 D ] Gheorghiu-Speelman,
White has just captured on c5, apparently
� D D DPD] winning a piece due to the pin along the
�D D G ] b-file. However, Speelman has prepared an
跴D 4 DP)] ingenious counter. How did he reply?
贒 $ D I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Gary Diamond of London found a
clever way of making this tricky
Six Hearts ? see if you can too.
Placing dummy with a void
spade for his non-ace-ask, West
brightly led a heart to cut down
ruffing. You win trick one with
dummy?s nine of hearts and start
on diamonds. However, when you
cash the ace, West drops the
queen; and when you ruff a low
diamond (with the queen), West
discards (a club).
Diamonds splitting five-one is
distinctly unpromising but all is
not lost. At trick four, you ruff a
spade. You return to your hand by
leading a heart to your ace, both
opponents following with low
hearts. At trick six, you ruff a second spade ? with dummy?s last
heart. You now cross to the king of
clubs to reach this ending:
???K 10 6 5
?AQ
?A K J
N
?J
W E
?S
?8 4 ? Q 9 8 7
?K
??6
x 2 ? 12 � 2
75%
OF IT
MEDIUM
112
x 4 + 76
HARDER
135
x 3 + 975 + 1/4
OF IT
+9
? 94 x 3 + 77
50%
OF IT
? 57
90%
OF IT
x 2 ? 866
50%
OF IT
? 198
x3
80%
OF IT
W
N
E
1?
Pass
2?
Pass
2?
Pass
5? (1) Pass
6?
End
(1) Bid Six with good trumps. Note there
was little point in North bidding 4NT; how
many aces South held was not the key (as
the ace of spades was largely immaterial
facing a void). The quality of South?s hearts
was what mattered.
12
Killer Gentle No 5757
8
12
15
8
24
15
3
18
6min
7
23
15
12
7
12
18
7
12
14
22
17
26
4
17
13
3
7
4
Killer Tough No 5758
29
24min
27
26
24
19
17
24
15
11
1 5
3 6 5
3 1
9 8
6 1 3
8 2 1
7
6 7 9
5 9
9 8
4
2
1
9
6
8
5
7
3
8
6
3
5
4
7
1
9
2
5
7
9
3
1
2
8
6
4
3
1
8
4
2
9
6
5
7
You cash the king of hearts, discarding a diamond from dummy,
and East has no good discard.
(a) East discards a diamond. You
cross to the queen of clubs and
play the king and another diamond. East wins the jack but his
forced club return is won in
dummy and the last trick taken by
dummy?s long diamond.
(b) East discards a club (more
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
=
11
7
5
4
6
8
1
9
3
2
9
4
6
7
5
1
2
3
8
1
9
5
2
7
4
3
8
6
6
8
4
1
3
5
7
2
9
2
3
7
8
9
6
4
1
5
3
8
1
4
2
9
6
5
7
6
2
9
3
7
5
1
4
8
1
9
3
8
5
6
7
2
4
2
6
7
9
4
3
5
8
1
8
4
5
2
1
7
3
9
6
4
7
6
5
3
8
2
1
9
9
3
8
1
6
2
4
7
5
5
1
2
7
9
4
8
6
3
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
M
I
S
L
A
I
D
5 9
9 8
6 7
6
1
3
8
4
9
8
2
1
B
A
G
E
L
22
11
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
2
4
3
8
Train Tracks 274
T
BR E
R
U
X
OCC I P
O K
L
P E
J O
S
S
D
S CR E
B O
A P R I C
L
C
A
S
HOS
A
E
T
MAR V E
7
3
6
9
8
4
2
1
5
9
5
2
1
3
6
4
8
7
4
8
1
5
7
2
6
9
3
6
1
4
3
9
7
8
5
2
8
2
5
1
6
3
4
7
9
3
7
1
4
5
9
8
2
6
3
9
8
2
1
5
7
6
4
1
7
5
8
2
3
9
4
6
2
4
9
6
5
1
3
7
8
8
6
3
7
4
9
5
2
1
6
9
4
7
2
8
5
3
1
4
5
6
8
3
1
7
9
2
2
3
9
6
7
5
1
8
4
7
1
8
2
9
4
6
5
3
5
6
7
3
4
2
9
1
8
1
4
2
9
8
7
3
6
5
9
8
3
5
1
6
2
4
7
4
1 < 3
?
3
4
4
5
1
5
?
3
2
?
1
1
3
2
?
4
2
4
5
7
+
+
5
1
+
+
�
-
5
2
?
1
3
8
4
�
+
+
+
7
4
5
2
9
8
1
3
6
2
1
6
5
3
7
4
8
9
8
9
3
4
6
1
7
2
5
4
5
1
6
2
3
9
7
8
3
2
8
7
1
9
5
6
4
9
6
7
8
5
4
2
1
3
6
8
4
1
7
5
3
9
2
1
3
2
9
4
6
8
5
7
5
7
9
3
8
2
6
4
1
B
R
O
K
I
P
F
E
R
X
L
O
P
A
I
V
R
A
T
E
V
E
Lexica 4036
Set Square 2020
2 2
Suko 2101
Lexica 4035
2
9
4
AM
I
E S
S
T A
L
L S
Sudoku 9505
5
2
7
4
6
8
1
3
9
Futoshiki 3058
2 2 2 4
4
AK
I
U T
T
E Y
6
8
3
6
U S KRA
Q U
CU F F
A
F
N T E L O
I
E F E ND
R G
L EW C
E
I
A Z UMP
E
P
I S P S
Killer 5756
14
13
7
=
19
Sudoku 9504
7
5
2
6
8
3
9
4
1
18
28
likely in practice). You cross to the
ace-queen of clubs, stripping East
of his clubs, and at trick 11 exit
with a low diamond. East wins the
eight but must now lead from the
jack-nine of diamonds round to
dummy?s king-ten.
Either way, 12 tricks and slam
made.
The key was to realise that once
diamonds were revealed to be fiveone, you could not succeed unless
spades were five-two and you
could remove both of East?s
spades.
+
All the digits
from 1-9 are
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
out their
= 162 work
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
= 20 works? We?ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
=8
Codeword 3199
Cell Blocks 3082
???J 9 8
?J 9 7
x
+
=
1
8 9
9 7 8 4
7
9 2 8
4 3 7 1 5
1 3
9
2 1
3
1 5 2 8
2 8
9 6
3 9 8 7 5
9 5
KenKen 4191
16
6
+
4
?
5
Contract: 6? , Opening Lead: ? 6
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Solutions
10
7
x
+
8
21
4
x
+
Killer 5755
23
3 4
2
2
2
2
x
x
Sudoku 9503
15
3
-
Kakuro 2017
7
9
5
3
6
x
Yesterday?s answers aloud, alum,
amour, arum, auld, dolour, doula, dour,
drum, dual, duomo, dural, laud, loud,
lour, ludo, luma, malodour, maul,
modular, modulo, morula, mould,
mudra, mural, odour, ormolu, udal
15
4
2
4
3
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 12 words, average;
16, good; 20, very good; 25, excellent
11
Advanced
??10 9 4 2
?A K 10 6 5 3
?AQ 10
? A K J 10 5 N
?4 2
?J 8 6
?5 3
W E
?Q
?J 9 8 7 4
S
?8 4 3 2 ? Q 9 8 7 6 3 ?J 9 7 5
?A KQ 7
?2
?K 6
S
OF IT
?8
Set Square No 2021
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
Pairs
2/3
x3
?8
Polygon
12
Bridge Andrew Robson
37
EASY
20 ... Kf8
The f8-square is the right location for the black king. Instead, 20
... Kh8? leads to 21 Be3 Ng8 22
Bd4! Rxd4 23 Qxd4 Nf6 24 Rb1
Rd8 25 Qf4 and Black, with two
pawns for the exchange, is fine
but is clearly no longer on top.
21 Bxf6 Bxf6 22 Qb4+ Kg8 23
Qxb7 Rab8 24 Qxc6 Rxb2
Black remains up a clean pawn
and now seizes the initiative.
25 Be4 Rbd2 26 Bf3 Qa5 27 Bg4
h5 28 Bf3
If 28 Bxe6 fxe6 29 Qxe6+ Kh7
30 Qe4+ Kh8 and White?s attack
is at a dead end.
28 ... Bh4 29 Rb1 Bxg3 30 fxg3
Qe5 31 c4 g6 32 Qa6 R8d7 33
Qc8+ Kg7 34 Qa8 Qxg3 35 c5
Qf2+ 36 Kh1 Qxc5 White resigns
Today is a rest day in the London Chess Classic. Games can be
followed in real time via the
2seeitlive link on the header of The
Times Twitter feed @times_chess.
+5
� PUZZLER MEDIA
The Centre Counter with 3 ... Qd6
is a rara avis but could receive no
higher accolade regarding its respectability than its employment,
as in today?s game, by Anatoly
Karpov. Karpov himself once lost
as White in the Centre Counter
against Bent Larsen (Montreal
1979), which may have encouraged
Karpov to try the defence for
himself. Notes to the following
game are based on those by Cyrus
Lakdawala in First Steps: The
Scandinavian (Everyman Chess).
White doesn?t have time to swing
the rook to g3. 18 Qg3 is best.
18 ... Rfd8 19 Bd4 Qxa2
Good judgment but you have to
be very confident in your defensive
ability to play such a move.
20 Rg3
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Highest accolade
Cell Blocks No 3083
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
2
+
-
6
Quiz 1 David Bowie 2 Adrien Brody 3 Albrecht
Fleckenstein 4 The daily � T-Charge 5 Jack
Nicholson ? in A Few Good Men; Chinatown and The
Two Jakes; Five Easy Pieces 6 The Castle or Das Schloss
7 Victoria, Princess Royal 8 Selfridges 9 The First
World War, specifically the Sinai and Palestine
Campaign 10 Hodgkin?s lymphoma ? named after
Thomas Hodgkin 11 Black Sea, Red Sea, White Sea,
Yellow Sea 12 William Penhaligon ? the founder of
Penhaligon?s 13 Figaro ? in operas both titled Figaro
Gets a Divorce 14 Armin Hary 15 Louis Pasteur
S
I
U
L
E
M
G
E
T
V
A
R
Y
R
M
I
L
U
E
G
Word watch
Perdendo (c) Of a piece
of music, getting quieter
Pirog (a) A large pie filled
with meat and vegetables
Percutient (b) Anything
that strikes against
something else
Brain Trainer
Easy 54; Medium 387;
Harder 3,509
Chess 1 ... Qe3+! 2 Kh1
Qxc5! leads to a decisive
material gain as 3 Rxc5
Rd1+ mates
07.12.17
MindGames
Mild No 9506
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
1
3
1
9
5
2
Perdendo
a A cape
b Ruined
c Becoming quieter
Pirog
a A pie
b A mammal
c A roof tile
Percutient
a Of the nails
b Something that
strikes
c Cutting
Answers on page 15
Fiendish No 9507
8
7 1 2 8
9 5
5
1
2
6
8
3
1 7
5
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2
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For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
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Super fiendish No 9508
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1
5
7
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PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
4 9
8
5 4
3 4
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9 1
8
2 Season four of Peaky
Blinders has introduced
which actor as Luca
Changretta?
12 Which London
parfumier concocted his
first perfume, Hammam
Bouquet, in 1872?
8
2
15
and classical pianist
Robert Eroica Dupea?
6 In which Kafka novel
is the titular place run
by the official Klamm?
7 Which daughter of
Queen Victoria was
the mother of Kaiser
Wilhelm II?
8 In 2006, Jayne Wallace
and the Psychic Sisters
3
4
7
opened a concession
in which London
department store?
13 Giselher Klebe and
Elena Langer both
composed operas about
which title character
getting a divorce?
9 Which conflict is the
setting for the 1987
Australian film The
Lighthorsemen?
14 In 1960, which
German won the
men?s Olympic 100m?
10 Which form of
lymphoma is named
after the physician
who first described the
condition in 1832?
15 Which French
chemist and
microbiologist is
pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times MindGames: Word
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Yesterday?s
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Cryptic
solution
No 977
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15
21
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S H E E P I S
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H A NGOV E
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P W
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C A L E
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G R
D
OR P H A N
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MO T I ON L
O
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R O
A V
UN I T
N
E
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E DG E WR
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C
DO
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E S
T
I A
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DR A
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S C A
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N I A
V
H E N
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T I O
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CH E
B
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Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Teazel
8
9
6
8
5 9
The Times Quick Cryptic No 978
1
7
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
11 Which four seas
have English names
that come from
common colour terms?
14
Across
7 Demolishing wings, smash
large masonry (6)
8 Think about a child (6)
9 Worker at ?rst refuses drink
(4)
10 As horse move quickly round
one?s box (8)
11 Material giving ?rm centre
when poured (8)
13 Long hold-up after the start (4)
15 I make large statue to worship
(4)
16 Get crazier puzzle (8)
18 Made a fuss after coat
wrinkled (8)
20 Plan to put pound in kitty (4)
21 Pay no attention to region on
travels (6)
22 Parrots and one rook escaping
from HGVs (6)
Down
1 For exercise, rides to a distant
rock (8)
2 Some mistyping by the vicar?
(8,5)
3
4
5
6
12
14
16
17
19
4
2
8
9
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 The Thin White
Duke was a persona of
which music star, who
died in 2016?
5 Who played colonel
Nathan R Jessup,
private eye Jake Gittes
1 8 5
2
4 3
5 2
4
1 4
6
GETTY IMAGES
4 Recently introduced
in London for polluting
vehicles, the Emissions
Surcharge is the
official name of what?
7 4
6
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 Calcium channel
blockers were first
identified in the lab of
which pharmacologist
(1917-92)?
7
Old group of people around
back of small shrine (6)
Get a tan in old age (6)
Book chap?s meadow to leave
car (9,4)
European found at the end of
the earth? (4)
Draw in cup game (3)
Romantic hero keen to hide
American (8)
One taking over hat (6)
Become confused, following
women?s swaying walk (6)
Press crumpled rug with
energy (4)
3 8
5
4
2 9 8
9
5 2
1
y of Nico.
The story of Christa Paffgen, better known
as Nico of the Velvet Underground
Radio 5 Live
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Smooth Classics 1.00am Emma Nelson
the times | Thursday December 7 2017
11
1G T
KAROLINA KURAS
artsfirst night
Theatre
Beauty and the Beast
Tobacco Factory, Bristol
Theatre
The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe
West Yorkshire Playhouse,
Leeds
S
{{{{(
pooky, touching, uproariously
funny, this is a real treat of a
family show. Created by the
pan-European company New
International Encounter and
performed by an agile six-strong cast
of actor-musicians, it conjures
enchantment from playful simplicity.
Alex Byrne?s production takes the
classic bones of the traditional French
fairytale of love, transformation and
inner beauty and adds lush melodies,
ingeniously economic visuals and a
tingling, spellbinding atmosphere to
turn the familiar story into something
truly handsome. It?s wonderfully
theatrical and entirely irresistible.
Candlelight, autumn leaves, a few
sticks of rustic furniture and a couple
of stone garden ornaments whisk us to
rural France, which in Stefanie
Mueller?s design has a vaguely 1920s
elegance. In a remote castle lurks the
Beast, once a wealthy, devastatingly
attractive but vain bachelor, given to
throwing lavish Gatsby-esque parties.
Now he?s horribly hirsute with claws,
horns and a tail after being cursed by
a furious witch whom he insulted.
Meanwhile, Maurice, a ruined
shipowner, relocates with his three
daughters to a new, tumbledown home
in the forest ? Le G顃e Terrible. The
family?s reduced circumstances are
dreadful for the spoilt flapper twins
Anastasia and Latrice, but it?s sister
Isabella who has to face real fear after
dopey Daddy trespasses in the Beast?s
garden and is forced to sacrifice her to
the mysterious creature.
The music is richly textured and
laced with jaunty Gallic flair. As the
two ghastly girls, Samantha
Sutherland and Elliot Davis sulk and
strop hilariously, while Sara Lessore?s
bright-eyed Isabella is a tough-talking
match for Martin Bonger?s Beast. His
air of desolate dejection soon gives
way to debonair charm as he loses his
heart to her, climaxing in a tabletop
dance as he pleads in song: ?Isabella!
Might I be your hairy fella??
It?s lovely, quirkily romantic stuff,
and its well-worn moral about prizing
substance over appearance feels
particularly welcome in these
selfie-obsessed days. Gorgeous.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 0117 902 0344, to Jan 14
Theatre
Barnum
Menier Chocolate
Factory, SE1
{{(((
{{{{(
Y
Steven McRae and Sarah Lamb led the opening night performance, relayed live to 500 cinemas
They cracked this nut
P
First Night, main paper
eter Wright?s Nutcracker for
the Royal Ballet is one of the
most successful productions
in the company?s history.
It?s beautiful, heartfelt,
dramatically coherent, highly
classical and wildly popular ? this
performance, opening the present
run for Christmas at the Royal Opera
House, was its 455th. And on Tuesday
night, not for the first time, his
Nutcracker was broadcast live to
500 cinemas around the world.
The first of many treats greets
us as the curtain rises on Julia
Trevelyan Oman?s gorgeous period
designs, a homage to the fashions of
19th-century Germany. In Act I they
speak of prosperity and happiness for
the Stahlbaum family as they gather to
celebrate Christmas; in Act II?s
Kingdom of Sweets the designs
reference the elaborate confectionery
of Nuremberg, where our story is set.
Wright matches Oman?s sumptuous
vision with vibrant choreography, from
the sparkle of the dancing Snowflakes
(a glittering blizzard if ever there was
one) and the loveliness of the Waltz of
the Flowers to the energy of the
national dances. Even Drosselmeyer?s
low-tech magic tricks have a charm all
their own, while the high-spirited
children (students of the Royal Ballet
School) bring a delightful dose of
naturalism to the festivities. Yes, the
Christmas tree grows spectacularly ?
magnificent and magical.
And then the icing on this heavenly
Yuletide cake ? the Sugar Plum Fairy
and her Prince. On opening night we
had Sarah Lamb and Steven McRae.
Lamb is a supremely elegant mover,
radiant, glamorous and commanding,
fascinating to behold; McRae was
her admirable partner, bringing flair
and excitement to match such a
captivating ballerina.
As Clara, Francesca Hayward darted
through the action, a luminous
presence, a darling of a dancer. Her
light-as-air performance was fuelled
by girlish enthusiasm and a thrilling
undercurrent of budding romance.
And that smile! It lights up a big stage
like no other.
Her Nutcracker sweetie was
Alexander Campbell, who harnesses
his power as a dancer seamlessly
and is an ardent partner. Gary Avis,
a benevolent and charismatic
Drosselmeyer, orchestrated Clara?s
fantastical midnight journey with
masterful ease. Barry Wordsworth
conducted the ROH Orchestra with
a jolly affection for Tchaikovsky?s
splendid score.
My only caveat? The ending is too
rushed. This ballet has the happiest of
outcomes ? why not give us more
time to savour it?
Box office: 020 7304 4000, to Jan 10
oll up! Roll up! Hear all about
PT Barnum and the greatest
show on Earth. Come see the
mermaid! Don?t miss the
160-year-old woman who
was nursemaid to George Washington,
the first American president! Then
there?s the world?s smallest man,
General Tom Thumb! And, while
you?re at it, why not take in the
four-headed frog?
Oh it?s a spectacle, this show. But
Barnum, the great American hustler
and showman born in 1810, always
thought big. It?s only natural that we
think of this 1980 musical, with music
by Cy Coleman and lyrics by Michael
Stewart, as razzmatazz central, a
three-ring circus of song and dance.
The director, Gordon Greenberg, says
when he took the job he had to ask
himself: ?What does it mean to take
the greatest show on Earth and stuff
it into the smallest theatre on Earth??
It?s a bit of a squish, but he?s done
that. Never mind that the acrobats?
heads almost graze the ceiling at
times. The three-ring circus has been
reduced to one (and a small one at
that), but the choreography (by
Rebecca Howell) is clever, making it
all look bigger and better. The scene
where General Tom Thumb twirls
around the room is stunning.
The problem has nothing to do with
size and everything to do with the star.
Marcus Brigstocke is simply not PT
Barnum in any way, shape or form. I?m
not expecting him to be Michael
Crawford, but he?s got to bring to the
role some chutzpah, razzle-dazzle ?
showmanship. The tightrope walk that
he has to do at the end of the first act
is painful for us to watch and although
he did his best to laugh it off as he fell,
painful for him as well.
Brigstocke, who is best known as a
comedian and satirist, is also lacking
in other basics. His singing is not
up to the task, but, crucially, he simply
never looks comfortable in the role.
This is made all the more obvious
because Laura Pitt-Pulford, left with
Brigstocke, positively sparkles as his
wife, Charity. Others, such as Harry
Francis as Tom Thumb, seem to be
born for the circus.
The set, by Paul Farnsworth, is
also really rather special. The stage
is in the centre with vintage circus
paraphernalia filling every corner.
But you can?t stage Barnum and not
have the man himself smack dab in
the middle, lighting up the place,
selling us the moon, not to mention
the mermaid. ?There?s a sucker born
every minute,? was one of Barnum?s
catchphrases. He was right about that.
Ann Treneman
Box office: 020 7378 1713, to March 3.
This review ran in late editions
yesterday
R
The Royal
Ballet?s sweet
Christmas
treat was a gift
to the whole
world, says
Debra Craine
Dance
The Nutcracker
Covent Garden
{{{{{
A first look at
Spielberg?s new
film The Post
ou?ve never seen a White
Witch quite like her. Sure,
Carla Mendon鏰 as the evil
dictator of Narnia is glacial
and spooky and you really
shouldn?t eat the Turkish delight she
conjures from out of the floor. So far,
so stage adaptations of CS Lewis?s 1950
children?s novel as we know them. Yet
then, ranting away, she suddenly rises
high into the air, her dress extending
down to cover the whole stage. A
second later, she whooshes down into
a hole in the ground.
It?s a theatrical miracle from the
designer Rae Smith (of War Horse
fame), and it?s a turning point for this
engaging and invigorating, but uneven
adaptation by the director Sally
Cookson. It?s uneven largely because,
for all the strong set pieces, jokes and
songs that Cookson has dreamt up in
the ten weeks of rehearsals in which
she, the composer Benji Bower and the
writer Adam Peck devised the show
with the cast, she is operating on
such a grand scale.
As we meet the Leeds-accented,
blessedly un-twee Pevensey children
on their way to wartime evacuation in
Scotland, the show?s biggest enemy
isn?t the White Witch. It?s the dodgy
acoustics in this huge room, which has
been converted to an in-the-round
staging for the first time. Even with
actors miked up, you strain to hear it
all. Oi, Aslan, got any egg boxes we
could stick to the walls?
Yet as we go deeper into Narnia,
there are fewer things competing for
our attention and the sound stops
being an issue. We are free to enjoy
gorgeous ideas and strong turns in a
show that summons up the allure and
the nastiness of Narnia. White sheets
and tickertape snow whisk us into
another dimension the moment that
Lucy (Cora Kirk) steps through the
wardrobe. Aslan is both a giant puppet
hoisted by seven people and a stern
Scotsman in fur (Iain Johnstone).
Woodland creatures communicate
through tin cans and string. Father
Christmas does some clog dancing.
The second half is scary, propulsive
and delightful.
When Mr Tumnus (Peter Caulfield,
above) jams on a wooden flute as a
woodland sprite hangs in mid-air, it?s
all a bit Cirque du Soleil. Yet the
outsized otherworldliness ends up
being far more of a blessing than a
curse, as the children ride on giant
swings. It ends on happy jigs that take
us back into the real winter world
glowing with an optimism that?s
not very 2017 at all.
Dominic Maxwell
Box office: 0113 213 7700, to Jan 27
12
1G T
Thursday December 7 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
When Rock
Arrived in
North Korea
BBC Four, 11pm
W
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