close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Times Times 2 - 7 March 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
March 7 | 2018
I should Coco
From Chanel to Valentino,
the best of the Paris shows
Chanel autumn/winter 2018
2
1G T
Wednesday March 7 2018 | the times
times2
The dark arts
What?s worse ? a robin
redbreast or grooming?
A fun quiz for Facebook
Carol Midgley
F
GETTY IMAGES
acebook has a question
for you. Do take your
time before answering
because it?s a really
tricky one. Should it
allow an adult man to
ask a 14-year-old girl for
sexual pictures? I know,
I know ? didn?t I say it was a right old
stumper? But don?t worry, Facebook?s
survey has four possible answers from
which to choose. Would you tick
a) This content should be allowed
on Facebook and I would not mind
seeing it; b) This content should be
allowed on Facebook, but I don?t
want to see it; c) This content
shouldn?t be allowed on Facebook
and no one should be able to see it;
or d) I have no preference on this
topic. And, no, this was not a spoof,
it was a genuine survey.
Just to refresh our memories, this
is the same Facebook that recently
blocked the sale of Christmas cards
featuring a robin redbreast because
the word ?breast? flagged up a risk of
?sexual? and ?adult? content. It?s the
same Facebook that suspended a pub?s
account because it was called the
Blackcock Inn. Yet it apparently
needed to canvass public opinion over
whether some disgusting stickyfingered old pervert should get a
platform from which to groom
children. Which last time I looked was
illegal anyway. A Facebook spokesman
has said that this kind of activity ?will
always be completely unacceptable
on FB? and that the question was a
?mistake? that shouldn?t have been
included in the survey.
Oh, don?t say that. I?m sure we?d all
like to help with other tricky moral
dilemmas by means of our own
questionnaire. With posers such as:
1. If you?re in a car and you see a
little old lady slowly crossing the
road, would running her over for a
laugh be acceptable? a) Why not?
In Grand Theft Auto it would get
you ten extra points; b) No, that
would be sadistic and a criminal
offence; or c) Who cares? She?s old
and will probably die soon.
2. Should detailed guides on how
to make nail bombs, ricin poison and
other terrorist devices be available
on Facebook and YouTube? a) Yes,
because it discriminates against
terrorists not to do so and they have,
like, rights, yeah?; b) No, you morons,
this is abetting terrorism; or c) Don?t
Watson?s
apostrophe
catastrophe
Were Sergei Skripal and his daughter
poisoned by Putin?s operatives? The
former Russian special forces officer
Boris Volodarsky assesses the evidence
Upskirting
and some
very odd
complaints
care. It?s those disgusting pictures of
mothers breastfeeding babies that
really offend me. Well done, Facebook,
for banning them all those times!
3. If an injured or disabled person
on crutches was holding you up on the
pavement, would you be justified in
kicking their crutches out from under
them and, for example, throwing said
person over the nearest wall? a) Well,
we?re all busy people; b) Are you ill?;
or c) Yes, and I also hear crutches
make a mint on eBay.
4. Should a company worth
$500 billion globally be paying more
than �1 million in corporation tax in
the UK when its revenues were more
than �0 million? a) If they?re
allowed to, then why not?; b) Is that
a serious question?; or c) I don?t care
about boring tax stuff as long as my
posts get lots of ?likes?.
5. What?s the best way to stop
revenge porn? a) Send all your nude
pics to Facebook Messenger so it can
block them being posted elsewhere
(a genuine experiment); b) Don?t take
any naked pictures of yourself in the
first place, you idiot; or c) What?s
wrong with revenge porn? It?s those
shameless breastfeeding mothers you
should be after who are, and I?ll say it
again, disgusting.
6. Is taking candy from a baby cruel?
a) Not if you?re hungry; b) Obviously;
or c) No. They?re all obese little
bastards now anyway.
That concludes our fun quiz, which
we hope shows that making the right
choice isn?t always easy. If you picked
mainly a?s and c?s, incidentally, please
give our building a very wide berth.
Spare a thought for the
actress and English
literature graduate
Emma Watson who, in
her haste to support the
Time?s Up movement,
which is helping to
fight sexual harassment
in the film industry,
dropped a clanger.
A temporary arm
tattoo that she unveiled
at the Vanity Fair
Oscar party read
?Times Up?, which
means nothing at all.
When the world fell
about laughing she
tweeted a mea culpa:
?Fake tattoo
Emily Maitlis has
admitted that she is
worried about ?upskirt
camera shots? on
Newsnight and often
spreads an A4 piece of
paper over her knees to
protect her modesty.
I don?t blame her.
Some Newsnight
viewers can be very
strange indeed. I have
never forgotten the
one who wrote to
the BBC complaining
that Kirsty Wark
was presenting the
show ?naked from
the waist down?.
Knickerless on
Newsnight? The ratings
would have soared.
However, a check
revealed that she
had done no such
thing. She had merely
worn a black dress
an inch or two above
the knee, meaning
someone out there has
much to learn about
the female anatomy
or is living in 1873.
Maitlis was also once
accused of dressing in
an ?inappropriate?
manner. Her crime? To
wear a calf-length skirt.
Calf. Length.
Even trousers don?t
appease some people.
When Terry Wogan
once presented Points
of View in moleskin
trousers the BBC
was flooded with
complaints about
the ?bulge? therein.
?I didn?t know where
to look,? wrote one
appalled woman. Oh,
we know where you
looked all right.
proofreading position
available. Experience
with apostrophes a
must.? Could such a
tattoo be termed
?virtew signalling??
And is there any truth
in the rumour that she
has another tatt
reading ?MeTo??
T
welve years ago the
former Russian spy
Alexander Litvinenko
? or Sasha, as I knew
him ? died a horrible
death from poisoning
in a London hospital.
The world?s media
had two questions for me. Who had
killed him? And why? At the time
my best guesses were ?a Nato
politician whom Sasha had crossed?
and to ?shut him up?.
According to the UK public inquiry
into Litvinenko?s death, the assassins
were Russian. Among the main
suspects the CPS names Andrei
Lugovoi, a member of the Russian
parliament, and Dmitri Kovtun, a
former Russian army officer and
businessman. A British inquiry in 2016
concluded that there was the ?strong
probability? that the FSB, the Russian
intelligence service, had ordered the
killing and that it had ?probably? been
agreed by Vladimir Putin and Nikolai
Patrushev, the FSB head at the time.
By then I had long since come to
believe that Sasha had been killed
by a joint operation between the FSB,
the SVR (Russia?s foreign intelligence
service) and the FSO (the federal
protection service that guards the
Russian president). The plot was
discovered because the radioactive
poison, polonium-210, had, by chance,
been found in Sasha?s body.
Tragically, I am being asked the
same two questions about Sergei
Skripal, a colonel in Russian
intelligence who was recruited by MI6
when he was still in service. He was
not, I should add, spying for either
side, he was selling the names of GRU
(Russian military intelligence) officers
who operated in the West. He was
imprisoned in Russia for this, but
as a result of a ?spy swap? in 2010
came to live in Britain. As I write, he
and his daughter are lying gravely
ill in a Salisbury hospital having
been discovered slumped in a
shopping centre on Sunday afternoon.
So who did this to them? If we
concede that this is a crime and
exclude other crazy and unlikely
possibilities, it is most likely the work
of the SVR?s Directorate S ?
although, theoretically, it could
possibly be the GRU, since we have
learnt recently that it has in its arsenal
some dramatic new weapons. I do
not want to speculate on this. The
investigators should, obviously,
check all of Skripal?s recent foreign
contacts. What will concern them
is that there is no doubt that he
had been a consultant to MI6
and the military.
As for the method ? the how ?
it will certainly not be polonium-210
that poisoned Skripal; the Russians
never repeat a method or its delivery.
Besides, radioactive poisoning
would have been unsuitable, not
only because of the notoriety of
the Litvinenko scandal, but because
there were two victims.
The question why may seem the
most perplexing. Skripal was of no
value to the Russians, true, but he was
on Putin?s ?list?, like all other enemies
of Russia who have settled in the
West. In consequence, he was
expendable. Whenever the Kremlin
wants to say to the West, ?We pay no
attention to your sanctions; we can
do what we want, when we want,?
or whenever it needs to test a new
method of killing its enemies or
a new murder weapon it will use
someone like Skripal.
If attempted murder is proved,
Skripal will not, I believe, have been
the Kremlin?s only recent victim. I am
very suspicious of the death in March
2013 of the exiled Russian billionaire
Boris Berezovsky, whom I knew. The
Skripal was of
no value to Putin,
but he was on his
?list? of enemies
coroner may have recorded an open
verdict, but I believe 100 per cent that
it was murder and that the Kremlin
lay behind it.
A year before, the Russian
businessman Alexander Perepilichny
died of a heart attack while jogging in
Surrey. He was said to be about to
blow the whistle on associates of
Putin. I see very clear motives why
he could have been murdered. Indeed,
when his death was announced,
I immediately offered my advice
to the Surrey police, some officers
of which I met during the
Litvinenko investigation.
Other rumours on BuzzFeed and
elsewhere are just nonsense. One
borderline case is the suicides in
Glasgow of a former GRU officer
and his wife and child, who all jumped
out of a window, but we know too
little about it.
People will no doubt still wonder
whether it makes sense to suspect
Putin this time. Was not the
Litvinenko killing a fantastic (and
expensive) headache for him? I
believe not. What is important in
an assassination such as his is quite
simply that the designated victim
is dead. And remember that both
Perepilichny and Berezovsky were,
in my belief, assassinated after
Litvinenko. Putin?s cronies really
do not care.
Similarly, although you may think
that being accused of trying to kill an
elderly man and his daughter in a
Salisbury shopping precinct is not
a good look even for this Russian
president, I can assure you that this
will not worry Putin. He wants his
the times | Wednesday March 7 2018
3
1G T
times2
of the Russian poisoners
EPA; OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS; GETTY
IMAGES
In the Fifties and Sixties the
products of the Special Laboratory,
now called Lab X in internal
documents, began to be used against
?enemies of the people? who lived in
Europe in exile. Wolfgang Salus, who
years before had worked as Trotsky?s
secretary, was assassinated in Munich
in 1953 by means of a ?special
substance? that killed a person within
ten to twelve days. Doctors concluded
that he had died from pneumonia.
This was a double success: an enemy
was dead, but the cause of his death
was undetectable.
In 1954 an agent called Nikolai
Khoklov was sent to Frankfurt am
Main to shoot an anti-Soviet activist
with a poison bullet from a gun
concealed in a cigarette packet. Three
years later he turned himself in, began
working for the CIA and was himself
poisoned while attending a conference
in Frankfurt.
In 1978 Georgi Markov, a healthy
30-year-old Bulgarian dissident, was
killed by a pellet containing resin
released by a special umbrella that had
been thrust into his right thigh as he
approached a bus stop at the south
end of Waterloo Bridge in London.
We cannot yet know for certain
who is responsible for Sergei Skripal?s
ssudden illness. We must pray that he
aand his daughter win their fight for
llife. If they do not, perhaps Putin will
be quaking at Boris Johnson?s threat in
b
parliament yesterday that the British
government will respond
?appropriately and robustly?. I don?t
think so. Sanctions would harm British
companies and investment in Russia.
Declarations, however forceful, will be
forgotten in a few days.
Perhaps then the Kremlin will recall
the message that Sasha left for his
killer, a message composed two days
It will not be
Polonium 2-10 ?
Russians never
repeat a method
nation and
natio
d the world to know that all
traitors should be punished, that
Russia is strong and can deliver its
promises. The moral is that all
?traitors to the motherland? finish
badly. Litvinenko suffered for three
weeks before dying. Berezovsky
awkwardly hanged himself in the
bathroom. Next somebody else will
drown in the gents.
Nor, as you may think, does killing
swapped spies unbalance the
mathematics of such exchanges. Why
would anyone agree to swap in future?
Because all spies want to be swapped,
that is why.
Russian rulers have ordered the
killing of their enemies abroad
countless times since the 1917
revolution, so much so that one might
call it an identifying trait of many of
those who have held power in
Moscow; a signature. Yet the tradition
was established with an attempted
murder ? not of a president?s enemy,
but of Lenin in 1918.
Fanya Kaplan, the would-be
assassin, fired three bullets allegedly
poisoned with curare ? a resin used
by some South American Indians on
the tips of their arrows ? as Lenin
was on his way back from a meeting.
He was wounded, but survived. Kaplan
was shot without trial four days later.
That assassination attempt prompted
the ?Red Terror?, a calculated response
to ?counter-revolutionary activity?.
After that early attempt on his life,
however, Lenin became fascinated by
the art of poisoning. Three years later,
in 1921, the Soviet Union?s first poison
laboratory was established, its
products to be used against the
?enemies of the people?.
By 1939 it had become known as the
Kamera, a name with sinister Russian
associations with a prison cell or
torture chamber. It consisted of two
divisions: a chemical laboratory and a
bacteriological laboratory. It was led
for a time by Grigory Mairanovsky,
better known as Doctor Death. He was
a biochemist whose sadism far
surpassed that of his Nazi counterparts.
Top: Sergei Skripal
i l att a
hearing at the Moscow
District Military Court
in 2006. Above, from
left: Alexander
Litvinenko in hospital
in London in 2006;
Boris Volodarsky
The KGB?s Poison
Factory: From Lenin to
Litvinenko by Boris
Volodarsky is published
by Frontline Books,
�.99
before he died. ?You may succeed in
silencing one man,? he wrote, ?but a
howl of protest from around the world
will reverberate, Mr Putin, in your ears
for the rest of your life.?
Sadly, I do not believe Russia?s habit
of killing opponents on foreign soil will
ever end. Indeed, a law was adapted by
the Russian parliament in July 2006
legalising such assassinations. It gave
the president sole responsibility for
approving them. To ask whether Putin
was informed about an assassination
attempt in London ? or for that
matter, Salisbury ? is like asking
whether President Bush was informed
about plans to invade Iraq. You simply
need to compare Putin to Stalin. They
are very much alike.
Boris Volodarsky is a former
captain of the GRU Spetsnaz
(Russian special operations service)
and an independent intelligence
analyst. He is the author of The
KGB?s Poison Factory and Assassins,
to be published this August.
He was talking to Andrew Billen
The lowdown
Suits
Who was Meghan Markle before
she became our new national
sweetheart (sorry, Kate)?
Oh, come on. We can?t be at that
point already. There is more to her
than just who she is marrying.
I?m sorry, I?ve been so caught up in
her new royal life that I simply can?t
remember what she looked like
without Prince Harry next to her.
Give me strength ? she was
an actress.
Oh, yes. What was she in again?
Suits.
I remember! The show with the
dishy lawyers. Anything else?
Mostly just Suits, in which she played
the main character?s girlfriend and
never got to be anything other than a
hot paralegal in a pencil skirt.
Hold that snarky tone ? we
like Meghan.
We do. And we like Suits. So it?s good
news that the trailer for the last
season ? and Markle?s last go at
acting before joining the firm for
good ? has been released. And there
is romance, a proposal and snogging!
Lordy ? is it a re-enactment of
her and Harry?s safari trip?
Again, she had a life before Prince
Harry. Until last year most of the
world knew her as the on-screen
other half to Mike Ross. And
the creator of a lifestyle website
called the Tig.
So back to the snogging. What
do we think Harry will say?
Forget Harry ? what will
Queenie think?
Do we really think HM QEII
watches Suits? Surely she just
watches The Crown?
I don?t see why she wouldn?t have
as much of a penchant for Harvey
Specter as anyone else. Speaking of
The Crown, that?s a good point.
What is?
Who would Meghan Markle,
the former actress, choose to
play herself? It would be quite
odd to watch actors playing
herself and Harry on TV, watching
Meghan on TV . . .
Practically Inception.
Hannah Rogers
4
1G T
Wednesday March 7 2018 | the times
fashion
Platforms, pleats and ?flousers?:
Paris was all about
power dressing
this season, say
Anna Murphy and
Hattie Crisell
I
t?s probably not surprising that,
at a time when a new path is
being negotiated in the
workplace for women ? and,
relatedly, men ? the catwalks
should attempt another sally at
what power dressing looks like.
Which is why tailoring was one
focus at the autumn/winter shows in
Paris this week. After all, that was the
way in which we first chose to armour
ourselves for a man?s world in the
1980s, the decade when we entered
offices on equal(ish) terms.
At Valentino trouser suits had been
THE VERY LITTLE
freshly feminised, softened with an
BLACK DRESS
inter-layer of more girlish garb.
Balenciaga
Pierpaolo Piccioli, Valentino?s designer,
said: ?It?s a strength today if you are
able to be assertive, but not aggressive.?
And his clothes were just that.
Elsewhere the power dressing looked
pretty much like it did in the 1980s.
What?s more, it was of the glamazonian
variety equipped to serve you on the
dance floor rather than at that weekly
meeting with the boss or, better still,
that meeting at which you are the boss.
But British designer Clare Waight
Keller?s collection for
PLATFORMS
Givenchy was the perfect
ect Andreas Kronthaler for
confluence of right-hereeVivienne Westwood
right-now and 40 years
Sain
S
Saint Laurent.
ago. Hard lines with
Ba
Balenciaga served
soft edges. Clothes
up hot-hued
that were tough and
ru
ruching and
feminine, smart and
pl
pleating, the
cool. Wear Givenchy
likes of which
lik
next season and you?ll
haven?t been seen
ha
look like serious stuff;
outside Denver
out
like an individual, not a
since the former
conformist; like a woman
Carrington hooked
an
Mrs C
who enjoys being a woman
Dex. At Balmain
man
up with D
and is empowered by it.. ?It?s the
Laurent the
and Saint Lau
start of a journey,? said Waight Keller
through butter
shoulders could cut th
after the show. Isn?t it just? AM
and the body-con cut off your blood
supply. Yet the decade was entirely
? beauteously ? reinvented at
The flouser suit
Givenchy, complete with a giant
The flouser suit probably needs some
Alexis-style bow on top. Any
explanation. Think mannish tailoring
coincidence that this was a woman?s
with an added veneer of floatiness;
what?s known in the ateliers of Paris as take on that decade and that the other
three were men?s? Discuss, if you really
?flou?. At Valentino the trouser suits
think you need to. AM
were offset with a matchy-matchy
peplum tunic or a longer pleated dress.
At Alexander McQueen a black
Earth tones
tuxedo suit was sexed up with lace
You may not consider brown the most
corsetry or softened with a printed
inspiring colour on the spectrum, but a
underskirt that came tasselled in best
flock of designers disagree: it sat
evening scarf-style, a modernising
everywhere, alongside olive greens,
sand shades and khakis that gave the
flourish also at Givenchy. Skirt suits
week the same palette as an episode of
worn with long, leg-covering boots, as
seen at Dior and others, delivered a
version of the same, with a Richard III
edge. Balenciaga even attached floral
chiffon overskirts to mannish crombie
coats. Good luck explaining that one
to your gran. AM
1980s
The decade of Margaret Thatcher,
Alexis Carrington, very big shoulders
and very small waists, was channelled
at Balenciaga, Balmain and
The decade of
Alexis Carrington
was channelled
at Balenciaga
and Balmain
THERMALS
Herm鑣
21ST-CENTURY
FLORALS
Dior
THE FLOUSER SUIT
Valentino
Countryfile. At Chanel it
turned those signature
tu
tweeds autumnal. At Rochas dusty
brown was used in nipped-in check
dresses and suits alongside toffee-hued
leather and satin. At the chic Lemaire
show there were coffee-coloured
blazers and wrap-around frocks,
while Loewe dressed models in
oatmeal gowns, safari-esque suits
and a stand-out check coat with a tan
leather collar. HC
Bustiers
Brassieres, bustiers and all things
bosom-related were the theme of the
week (although sizeable chests
remained disappointingly few on the
catwalk). At Loewe bra-like panels
were stitched on to dresses, their back
straps hanging free, while at Nina
Ricci bodice frocks were worn over
jumpers. Stella McCartney created
lace blouses with corset-like structure
and Giambattista Valli layered knitted
bra tops over dresses (probably a
styling tip best left to the experts).
Alexander McQueen presented
laser-sharp leather bodices in postbox
red and black, but Saint Laurent?s
version was the most memorable:
sleek black evening gowns with
necklines scooped in a W shape.
They were an ode to the bosom. HC
Thermals
Was it that the
sub-zero
temperatures in
the first half of
Paris Fashion
Week were
clouding our
judgment or
did the collectionss reall
really
have a lot of useful pieces for
chilly weather? At Lacoste
and Chlo� that meant luxe
long johns ? knitted pedal
pushers at the former, woolly
leggings and stockings at the
latter. At Maison Margiela and
Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne
Westwood dresses were worn
with comforting leg warmers,
while at Herm鑣 cosy
wrist-warmers enveloped the hands
that peeped out of leather coats. It was
an encouraging sight for those of us
who were chilled to the bone. HC
the times | Wednesday March 7 2018
5
1G T
fashion
how to mean business in 2018
ACCESSORIES
Givenchy
LEATHER
Lanvin
PLEATS
Balmain
EARTH TONES
Chanel
Pleats
BUSTIERS
Alexander McQueen
The very little black dress
T
1980s
Saint Laurent
with the addition of a semi-detached
sash of black chiffon. Probably not one
for that summer garden party. AM
21st-century florals
COVER: JASON LLOYD-EVANS. THESE PAGES: GETTY IMAGES; REX FEATURES
There are florals out there for next
season that would absolutely not be
at home in a Jane Austen novel. Sprig
muslins they ain?t. At Dior pretty
prints were patchworked, 1960s-style,
over separates and a lovely
white-collared day dress. At Valentino
blown-up blooms were intarsia-ed
on to floor-sweeper gowns, knits,
capes, you name it. Dries Van Noten
showed clash-matched abstracted
florals as beautiful as they were
peculiar, which the designer said had
been inspired by outsider art.
Demna Gvasalia was the man who
re-made the floral dress at Vetements
? spliced prints; new-gen hippy
cuts. He continued with more of
the same at Balenciaga, this time
Leather
The message was clear this week.
Leather is back with a vengeance
and it doesn?t have to be black
(although it can be) and it doesn?t
have to be a biker jacket or trousers
(although it can be). Dior and
Givenchy showed noir bikers and
trews, but the former dialled things up
with a space-age silver, the latter with
sophisticated bottle green. At
McQueen the biker was cropped and
worn over tailoring. Herm鑣 offered
yet more black, plus trenches in red
and (how very French) chartreuse.
However, Lanvin took
the prize for the loudest leathers.
Tango orange, anyone? Get ahead
of the game ? more subtly ?
with Finery?s burnt sienna jacket
(�5, finerylondon.com). AM
How to give a rock-chick edge to
a frock usually considered the
epitome of chic? By making it
much, much smaller. The only
things
big about Saint Laurent?s
t
iterations were the shoulders, while
Balenciaga?s, in besleeved crushed
velvet or sleeveless wool, were so short
as to require a trip to your local
waxing establishment. Givenchy?s were
marginally more modest, courtesy of
additional centimetres of fringing. AM
If you have not yet bought one of the
rash of pleated skirts, give in and get
on board. They will still be everywhere
come autumn/winter. There they were
in the collections of Balmain (discotastic varieties that look like glittering
plastic) and Altuzarra (a sheer black
version). Sacai presented a collection
in which clothes were cleverly
patchworked together, with pleating
on one side and draping on another.
Issey Miyake remains the pleat
specialist; folds were used to
concertina the garments in weird and
wonderful ways. Right now, admire
Mango?s blue, asymmetric pleated
dress (�.99, mango.com). HC
Platforms
The Dries Van Noten woman is always
relaxed, so what to make of her
platformed, peep-toe shoes this
The other Clare?s accessories
season? They may not be the easiest to
Clare Waight Keller, accessories
walk in, but platforms have a certain
magician that she is, conjured up
presence and they?re very much back
It bags like white rabbits out of hats
on the agenda. The examples at Dries
in her old gig at Chlo�. Her debut
were sophisticated, but they took a
collection at her new gaff is only just
kinkier turn elsewhere; see the
in the shops, but the delectable GV3
chain-bag was already all over the front interpretations at Saint Laurent (black
glossy boots) and
row (�490, givenchy.com).
CLARE?S ACCESSORIES
Andreas
For autumn/winter it will be
GV3, �490, givenchy.com Kronthaler
about an oversized quilted
for Vivienne
clutch called the Gem. Oh
Westwood
yes, and what the world?s
(spike-heeled
most glamorous Brummie
lace-ups). Health
called ?police boots?: a
warning: at the
mid-heel with a diagonal
latter show, one
zip. Nothing I?ve seen on
model tumbled
a bobby on the beat, it?s
over. Fashion is
true, but that?s the only
not without its risks. HC
fault I can find. AM
6
Wednesday March 7 2018 | the times
1G T
fashion
Athleisure for women who don?t do trousers
Hope and War Child. Materials and
manufacturing are sourced only from
best-practice suppliers across the
world, and 79 per cent of the collection
is made from sustainable fibres. ?We
want to challenge an industry marred
by poor working conditions and
negative environmental impact,? says
the co-founder Shafiq Hasaan.
There is more on the jersey-dress
front, from the slightly more slinky
navy drawcord style, still long, but
with a split at one side (�0), to the
yet more forgiving black V-neck
maxidress (�0).
This dress will make any
Friday night on the sofa
better, says Anna Murphy
I
t is a truth universally
acknowledged that athleisure
tends to mean trousers. Track
pants. Cargo pants. Perhaps jeans
with added hoodie. Perhaps, if
you really have savoir faire,
trouser suit with added hoodie (a
fine under-layer, such as Uniqlo?s
cotton one, �.90, uniqlo.com).
Athleisure has never been an option
for women who don?t like trousers, who
avoid them like the plague. I know
there are far fewer of you than there
used to be. I meet far fewer of you.
And my grandmothers? generation,
avowed skirt-wearers if my two were
anything to go by, are no more.
But I know that you trouser
refuseniks still exist because
occasionally we meet, and you want to
talk to me about your trouser phobia,
and how impossible trousers are, but
also about dresses and skirts, and how
they can be pretty tricky too.
(Honestly, there is a pair of trews out
there to make every woman look
amazing, but that?s for another day.)
So here is some athleisure for you
lot. Even though I imagine you haven?t
been looking, and indeed may belong
to that caucus that considers the
a-word to be one of the worst things
to happen to fashion, if not, more than
that, a threat to fashion?s very existence.
But this jersey dress, also available
in black, is really rather nice, isn?t it?
From the new British brand Ninety
Percent (ninetypercent.com), it costs
� and ticks all the best athleisure
boxes (comfy, adjustable, forgiving)
and none of the worst (bulky,
unflattering, too yoof). It?s not a
million miles away from a nightie, yet
it is most definitely a dress. Which is
important I think. I am all for lovely
night attire, but I am also all for
getting out of it the second you rise.
Perhaps this is because I am someone
for whom bed always beckons, and
I don?t want to make it easy for myself
to go back there. I would argue that
it behoves all of us to get up and get
dressed. I have never met a daytime
nightie or jimjam wearer who isn?t
also a depressive. (Fashion pyjamas
are another matter, although I posit
that most people who wear satin
two-pieces out and about, myself
included, are not without their
psychological frailties.)
This dress is here to make a Friday
night in better. Not that I happen to
consider this deliciously antisocial
concept in need of improvement. You
haven?t lived until you have lounged,
and you haven?t lounged until you
have given athleisure a whirl. Or
rather, the very opposite of a whirl.
A long, slow box set-watching slouch.
A box set-related aside here. Might
I suggest Derry Girls on Channel 4?
It?s the latest comedy series written by
a woman with women ? or rather
girls ? at its heart. It?s a joy in itself.
And it?s a joy more broadly that finally
female-written sitcoms are not the
exception that proves the rule. Be it
Derry Girls, or Chewing Gum, also on
Channel 4, or The Marvelous Mrs
Maisel on Amazon Prime, there are
subtle yet wonderful differences in
watching something that is by us and
therefore, in a more fully realised way,
about us. It?s life-improving stuff.
Back to the matter in hand. Also
life-improving is Ninety Percent,
Brora plethora
Ninety Percent jersey
dress and, right, Brora?s
limited-edition scarf
Instagram:
@annagmurphy
which offers women the
opportunity to ?dress
better?, with the T-shirt
to prove it, those two
words being stitched in
cursive over one breast
(�). An impressive
percentage of profits,
which I imagine doesn?t need spelling
out to you, will be shared between a
range of charities, including Children?s
SAVE UP
TO 47%
Another brand you can feel good
about supporting is Brora, which is 25
years old this month. ?The anniversary
makes me feel pretty ancient,? says its
founder, Victoria Stapleton. But also,
I imagine, pretty pleased with herself.
Why? Because Brora?s support is in
part responsible for transforming the
fortunes of the two cashmere mills it
uses, in Hawick in the Scottish
Borders and Elgin in Moray. When the
brand started out, the mills had an
annual turnover of � million and
employed 250 people. Now its
turnover is � million and it
employs 789 people. ?All at a
time when manufacturing has
been leaving these shores,?
Stapleton says.
The Hawick mill?s
manager, James Sugden,
died suddenly at the end
of last year and his
funeral was attended by
650 people. ?James got
me obsessed about
Scottish cashmere and
British manufacturing,?
she says. To mark the
anniversary Stapleton
has launched this
cashmere stole,
available in a limited edition of 100
(�8, brora.co.uk). It?s a fitting way to
mark Sugden?s career too. ?I want to
try to continue his legacy,? she says.
Luxury stay in a
historic Cotswolds inn
Sitting in picturesque Broadway, The Lygon Arms is a characterful
16th-century inn with plenty of charm. It?s effortlessly stylish,
with a superb spa and elegant swimming pool, two intimate
restaurants and the stunning Cotswolds on its doorstep.
Price includes
l A two-night stay in a
deluxe room
l A three-course dinner
l A complimentary bottle
of prosecco
Old beams, gnarly wooden doors
and sloping floorboards help to
create the inn?s frozen-in-time
atmosphere.
l Full
spa access
off pre-booked spa
treatments
l 10%
Exclusively with
TomChesshyre?
CoolHotelReviewer,TheTimes
TWONIGHTSFROM TOBOOKCALL
03333 310 026
�9* per person
QUOTECODETIMES
thetimes.co.uk/lygon
*Based on two people sharing. Subject to availability. Weekend supplements apply. Valid until June 30, 2018.
the times | Wednesday March 7 2018
7
1G T
GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES
fashion
A guest at London
Fashion Week wearing
a Ienki Ienki jacket
Burberry spring/
summer 2018
Caroline Issa at Paris
Fashion Week
wearing Lu Mei
A blogger wearing
3.1 Phillip Lim
Are you wearing
a power puffer?
Gigi Hadid wearing
Christina Ledang
�5, sweatybetty.com
They came triple-layered on the catwalk and blanketed the
front rows. Rachael Dove on where you should buy yours
W
hile we have
all been
hunkering
under layers
of clothes
like walking
laundry
piles, the
world?s best dressed have spent the
snowy spell swanning around Paris at
the fashion shows. What was the one
garment that they all clad themselves
in to keep out the cold? A padded coat,
or the ?power puffer?, if you will.
Yes, the humble padded coat, usually
reserved for dog walking and watching
Jimmy play football on a Sunday, has
made it to the glittering heights
of the front row. Caroline Issa, the
ever-stylish publisher of Tank
magazine, wore a gold knee-length
number over a cream boilersuit and
a string of pearls to perch front row at
the Rick Owens show. At Dior, Camila
Coutinho, an Instagram influencer
with two million followers, wore a cosy
cobalt satin style with a Dior pink
jumper and chequerboard handbag.
Even the Duchess of Cambridge has
a power puffer (hers is the �5 Mini
Duvet II style in red from Perfect
Moment, perfectmoment.com) ?
Rihanna, Julianne Moore and
Emmanuelle Alt do too. Beyonc�s
sister Solange Knowles has worn
one on the red carpet.
This may sound more like common
sense than groundbreaking news, but
practical clothing is rarely high on the
fashion pack?s shopping list. These are
women who travel from catwalk to
catwalk, coffee dates to cocktails in
chauffeur-driven cars. Drab workaday
problems such as snowfall cause them
little concern, so when they wear a
padded coat, they wear it to be seen.
Right now the one to be seen in is
Balenciaga?s duvet-style knee-length
coat. It comes stuffed with two types of
duck down, with a deliberately
skew-whiff fastening and a price
tag that would make light work
of your next pay packet (�995,
net-a-porter.com).
Also vying for space on the front
row are the Michelin Man-style coats
with XL hoods by the Ukrainian
outerwear specialist Ienki Ienki. Eva
Chen, the much-followed fashion
director of Instagram, has one in lilac;
Julianne Moore?s is black, but the top
choice in Paris is the brand?s purple
style, made from a mirror shine fabric
that looks a bit like a Quality Street
wrapper (�125 and almost sold out at
brownsfashion.com).
Just because the worst of the cold
weather is over doesn?t mean that it?s
too late to stock up. The trend is likely
to run deep into next winter and
beyond: on Sunday Balenciaga, the
brand that fuelled this toasty fire in
the first place, sent models down its
autumn/winter 2018 catwalk wearing
three or four puffers layered over each
other. Karl Lagerfeld raised the jacket
to new levels of chic at Chanel,
presenting a version in white
with interlocking C logo
buttons fit for the
denizens of the Left Bank
of Paris. There were
pillowy down coats at
Burberry, Sacai and
Maison Margiela too.
Frankly, once you?ve felt
the warmth of one you
won?t want to take it off.
Where to buy yours?
Uniqlo has the high
street market cornered
with its range of Ultra
Light Down jackets, which
start at the real-world
price of �.90 for a gilet.
My picks are the Stretch
Hooded coat, which is
the same thigh-grazing
length that is all the rage
with Arsenal players
and front-rowers alike
(�.90), and the
collarless Compact
jacket, which is
thin enough to
slip underneath a
blazer or leather
jacket for
extra warmth
(�.90, both
uniqlo.com).
On the technical
side of the spectrum
is Finisterre?s
Caption
Ca
C
Camila
ap
pttiio
on Coutinho
wearing Rocio Canvas
Nimbus style, which contains
recycled PrimaLoft synthetic
filling that, unlike down, will
keep you cosy even when it is
wet ? and it packs away to
become a pillow (�0,
finisterre.com).
Meanwhile, Perfect
Moment?s striped
Queenie jacket, with
its
i Polartec wool-blend
filling
and high collar, is
fi
designed
for the slopes, but
d
would
also earn you style
w
points
at the school gates
p
(�5,
perfectmoment.com).
(
Ignore the front row?s styling
technique
of wearing their puffers
t
off both shoulders, but follow their
lead in trying bright colours, which
gives the look a sporty athleisure
feel (and is just more fun). Sweaty
Betty?s Reggie style is petal pink
(�5, sweatybetty.com); Lu Mei?s
Shadwell jacket is patterned
with chevrons of pink and
blue and filled with ethically
sourced goose down (�5,
lumeilondon.com), while
Reserved?s hooded number
is
i tomato red (�.99,
reserved.com).
Finally, avoid the inflatablewoman
look by choosing slimw
fitting
pieces for the bottom half.
f
Cigarette
jeans or a pleated skirt
C
with
w a pair of 100 deniers should
do the trick. Snow? Bring it on.
8
1G T
Wednesday March 7 2018 | the times
arts
The missing link in the
Nick Drake story: his mum
Gabrielle Drake,
actress and sisterr
of the lauded
singer, talks
to Ed Potton
about her brother?
her??s
death, as an album
by their musical mother,
Molly, is released
G
abrielle Drake calls
it ?Nickery?, the
canonisation of her
brother Nick Drake,
the hugely
influential folk
musician whose
fragile genius was
only fully appreciated years after his
death in 1974, at the age of 26. He has
since joined the pantheon, with all
three of his albums in Rolling Stone
magazine?s Top 100 ?greatest albums
of all time?. And Gabrielle is the
world?s leading Nickerist, a role she
has performed with considerable
devotion, including writing an
evocative biography, Remembered
for a While, in 2014.
It?s a freezing, sunlit lunchtime in
Shrewsbury, a few miles from Wenlock
Abbey, the 12th-century monastery
where Gabrielle lives with her husband
of 40 years, the South African artist
Louis de Wet. We?ve met at a buzzy
branch of Carluccio?s, which seems like
the kind of place that her introverted
little brother would have hated.
Not so Gabrielle. A successful, Radatrained actress (Crossroads, Coronation
Street, The Brothers and a string of
Seventies sex comedies with Peter
Sellers, Goldie Hawn, Roger Moore
and the like), she describes herself in
her youth as ?a terrible exhibitionist?.
Now 73, she?s tremendous company,
charming, erudite and chic in trilby
and silk neckerchief.
?There used to be a time when Nick
was known as my brother,? she says in
her cut-glass RP. ?I wasn?t very big, but
I was bigger than him!? Indeed, the
Drakes were a talented family. We?re
actually here to talk about the work of
their late mother, Molly, whose songs
and poems ? described by Joe Boyd,
Nick?s producer, as ?the missing link in
the Nick Drake story? ? have been
collected in a limited-edition book and
double album, The Tide?s Magnificence.
Molly?s songs certainly have
much in common with Nick?s:
a serene yet brittle voice, spare
piano arrangements and
melancholic reflections on
the natural world and our
place in it. In Do You Ever
Remember? she muses
movingly on time (?Time can
steal away happiness/ But
time can take away grief?),
while Poor Mum is a response
to Nick?s Poor Boy, making the
point that children don?t
have a monopoly on angst.
Some of the poems, too,
have flashes of familiarity:
wry humour, gentle
observation and traces of
the depression from
which mother and son
both suffered. Other
poems and extracts
from diaries chart
Molly?s daring
wartime escape
from Burma on foot to
India, with Japanese
bombs raining overhead.
Much of Molly?s work was written
and recorded on a basic tape recorder
(you can hear her turning the pages of
the manuscripts) at Far Leys, the
Drake family home in rural
Warwickshire. ?I don?t ever remember
a time when we didn?t hear Mummy
singing or sing her songs. We grew up
with them,? Gabrielle says. ?We knew
when Mummy was composing a song
because she?d disappear off and be
tinkering around on the piano.? Molly
would play the finished songs to her
children and her husband, Rodney, in
the living room. ?Then we?d learn the
words and sing it.?
Gabrielle can still quote whole
chunks of her mother and brother?s
songs and sang on several of Nick?s.
?They?re absolutely woven into my
being. I find myself singing them all
the time.? She?s not sure if any of her
mother?s songs were directly about
Nick?s death, but thinks that one, A
Sound, may have been. ?She told me
about a time when she was in the
street and she was absolutely sure she
saw Nick.? Gabrielle recites a line from
the song: ?I dare not turn around/ And
yet I know I know I know.?
Molly?s music must in turn have
influenced Nick?s, Gabrielle
says, but probably
subconsciously. ?He?d
have been horrified forr
people to think that hee
was influenced by his
mother.? The height of
uncool? ?Very much so,
yes. He once said to her
about her songs, ?Oh,
they?re so naive.? And shee
said, ?Yes, but they are my
own.? ? She laughs.
Had Nick lived longer he
might have changed his
opinion, she thinks. ?He
died at an age where you?re
re
not really interested in your
ur
parents. You think you?re
much, much better than they are and
that you?ve done stuff that they?ve
never contemplated. He died
before he became aware of
what she was, and she
died before I was truly
aware of what she was.
It?s a necessary part of
growing up; you really
have to underestimate
your parents in order to
push forward.?
Even so, they were a
?very close? family,
and anything but
gloomy. Molly
had met Rodney,
an engineer, in
Burma, and the
couple moved to
India, where
Gabrielle was born,
and back to Burma,
where Nick was born,
before settling in
England in 1950.
Rodney had ?a
wonderful sense of
humour,? Gabrielle
says. ?We laughed a lot.? She would
share a room with Nick on holidays in
Spain, the Netherlands, Ireland and
France: ?Lots of swimming; we had
wonderful fun.? As keen amateur
musicians and actors, their parents
were ?incredibly supportive? of her
and her brother?s careers. ?They had
enough talent themselves to see it in
others.?
Slim and fine-featured, Nick looked
like a star as well as sounding like one.
Gabrielle, who was herself a looker,
remembers walking with him in the
late Sixties down Haymarket in
London, ?thinking how absolutely
beautiful he was. He was wearing
this lovely high-waisted Sixties jacket
of duck blue-grey tweed.? Yet his sex
life was mysterious. Sophia Ryde has
been described as the closest thing he
had to a girlfriend, but the nature of
their relationship is ambiguous. Some
say he died a virgin. ?I really do not
have any idea of Nick?s sexuality,?
Gabrielle says.
Their mother was something of
an enigma too, not in terms of her
the times | Wednesday March 7 2018
9
1G T
arts
ESTATE OF KEITH MORRIS/REDFERNS/GETTY IMAGES; FRANCESCO GUIDICINI
interviewed for a radio documentary
by the British producer David Barber.
In 1993 Barber sent Gabrielle the tape
of the interviews. ?He said, ?I?m
sending this back because nobody?s
taking an interest in Nick Drake.? ?
Molly died three weeks later from
cancer. ?I never told my mother,?
Gabrielle says, ?and I was right not to.?
In 2004 the footage was re-edited, a
narration was added by Brad Pitt, a
?huge admirer? of Nick?s music, and
broadcast on Radio 2, burgeoning
Nick?s reputation even further.
What would Nick have made of his
posthumous success, which began in
earnest in the Eighties when he was
eulogised by the likes of Peter Buck of
REM and Robert Smith of the Cure?
?I think he?d have been amused,
possibly not entirely surprised,? says
Gabrielle. ?He was quite arrogant.?
She often wonders what Nick
would have ended up doing. ?I don?t
think fame would have interested
him that much. I think he?d have
turned towards early instruments
or eastern music, which was in his
blood to some extent.?
Nick is often filed as a doomed
English romantic, like Keats and
Byron, whom he doubtless studied at
Cambridge for his English literature
degree. ?I don?t think that?s entirely
accurate,? Gabrielle says of the
comparison. ?If you look at his songs,
and I think they share this with my
mother?s, they?re not really doomed,
they?re ironic comments on the world.
Some of them are full of great joy ?
look at Northern Sky.? Nor was Nick a
Nick Drake, the songwriter, in 1970. He died from an overdose in 1974
sexuality, but in the way she guarded
her feelings. ?It?s made me quite happy
to live with mystery,? Gabrielle says.
?The core of many great works
of art is that there?s a mystery that?s
not analysable.?
Molly never pursued music as a
career. ?She came from a generation
when women were mostly mothers and
Molly Drake with
her son Nick, circa
1958, and, left, at the
piano. Far left:
Gabrielle Drake. Top
left: Nick, Molly and
Gabrielle Drake
wives,? Gabrielle says. Songs were sent
to publishers, ?but nothing ever came
of it?. Was Molly disappointed? ?Quite
possibly, but she never showed it. Nick
was much more disappointed [by his
lack of recognition]; he had made music
his mission in life.?
Nick died on November 25, 1974 at
Far Leys, from an overdose of drugs
prescribed to treat his depression. The
coroner ruled it as a suicide, and
Gabrielle prefers to think of it as such.
?I have no idea whether I?m right, but
I mostly believe that the life force is so
great, it takes a very strong will to get
rid of it. Accidents are usually
discovered in time. He may have been
coming out of a depression and
couldn?t bear to go back into it.?
On the day of Nick?s death Gabrielle
was appearing in the opening night of
Terence Rattigan?s French Without
Tears at the Bristol Old Vic. ?I rang my
parents afterwards, as I always did on
opening nights, and the phone was
engaged. They?d left it off the hook
because they knew I?d ring. They
drove down the next day and told me.?
The following months were as dark
as you?d expect, although there was
the odd surreal moment. The night
before Nick?s funeral, Gabrielle was
haunted by a line, ?I?m in a dancing
mood?, from one of the numbers
in the Rattigan play. ?This totally
inappropriate song, and I could not
get it out of my head.? After the
funeral she returned to the play and
saw performing as ?a carapace,
something you have to do. You?ve got
to have a tough outer skin,? she says.
?If your inner vulnerability goes,
you?ve had it.? It?s something that
Nick, sadly, was lacking.
What helped her parents deal with
his death? ?I think each other. They?d
have thought that they had to try and
make sense of it all. When fans turned
up on the doorstep, then they had a
mission. Very often they were young
people in a bit of trouble. Mummy was
hopeless at people turning up
impromptu ? she liked to have weeks
to prepare ? but she knuckled down,
got out the eggs and let them spend
the night.? Rodney would make tapes
of Nick?s home recordings for the
visitors to take away.
A few years after Rodney died, in
1988, Molly and Gabrielle were
Molly?s songs
were sent to
publishers, but
nothing came of it
delicate flower. ?Not at all. My God he
was obstinate. We had terrible rows.?
Gabrielle doesn?t know how long
she will be the keeper of the Nick
Drake flame (?I can?t go on doing
a lot more Nickery?), yet she remains
palpably proud of him and their
mother. ?I?m delighted for him, and
I?ve always wanted him to be famous
more than me to be famous ? I think
I?m honest in saying that ? but I
knew her for longer. Until recently her
influence has not been appreciated in
any way at all.?
How would Molly feel about her
modest, belated fame? Gabrielle
smiles. ?She wrote a song called It?s the
Laugh of the Year. I think she?d really
have felt like that.?
The Tide?s Magnificence is available
on Fledg?ling
Ektertaikmekts
Theatres
HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
Book your advertisement or
announcement now at: thetimes.co.uk/ advertise
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MIS蒖ABLES
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
St Martin's
020 7836 1443
66th year of Agatha Christie's
THE MOUSETRAP
Mon-Sat 7.30, Tues & Thu 3, Sat 4
www.the-mousetrap.co.uk
Vaudeville Theatre 0330 333 4814
Oscar Wilde's LADY
WINDERMERE'S
FAN
Mon-Sat 7.30pm, Thu & Sat 2.30
Classicspring.co.uk
%
Please be advised that
calls to the numbers
can cost up to im mer
mikute plus your network
provider?s costs.
10
1G T
Wednesday March 7 2018 | the times
television & radio
Could you fix your marriage by wife-swapping?
James
Jackson
TV review
Seven Year Switch
Channel 4
{{(((
The Great Celebrity
Bake Off
Channel 4
{{{{(
T
o be a Channel 4 TV
executive is to be perpetually
haunted by the concept of
?audience share?. There are
hours and hours of evening
TV and ad breaks to fill, 365 days a
year, and, unlike BBC One and ITV,
the channel doesn?t have the luxury of
soaps to hoover up ratings. Instead it
has ?factual entertainment?, which
is why it was happy to pay � million
for The Great British Bake Off and
will run Gogglebox, First Dates and
Radio Choice
Joe Clay
Boswell?s Lives
Radio 4, 11.30am
Miles Jupp returns as James
Boswell, the ?immortal
biographer? of Dr Johnson,
and for the purposes of
Jon Canter?s high-concept
but clever and amusing
series, a traveller of ?lands
and times?. The first
episode in this new series
(the third) is Boswell?s Life
of Byron, with the romantic
poet played by Freddie Fox.
The pair meet at Trinity
College, Cambridge, where
the 19-year-old Lord Byron
is an angst-ridden student
with a pet bear (fact) and
a club foot (also true).
Carla Bruni?s
C?est la Vie
Radio 2, 10pm
Carla Bruni, the model,
singer-songwriter and
former first lady of France,
returns to Radio 2, playing
her favourite songs (in
French and English) on
the subjects of love, sadness
and joy. She recalls falling
in love with her husband,
Nicolas Sarkozy, meeting
Bob Dylan in Paris and
performing intimate solo
concerts on Instagram.
Her record company
will also be delighted
to know that Bruni is
featuring tracks from
her 2017 album of cover
versions, French Touch.
?fixed-rig? shows such as 24 Hours in
A&E until Netflix freezes over.
But new formats are needed all the
time, the latest of which is the cutely
titled Seven Year Switch, although
it isn?t really new because it?s already
big in the US, and it turned out to be
a less tawdry version of Channel 5?s
gruesome Love Island knock-off, Make
or Break. It?ll probably do well.
The high concept is that four
couples in struggling marriages get to
imagine their life if they had married a
person potentially more suited to them
? by living with that partner for two
weeks in a fancy tropical villa. You can
imagine the ad: ?Having relationship
problems?! Then come and be filmed
in Koh Samui for primetime TV being
pressured into adultery while your
every glance and comment is pulled
to pieces on social media (NB: your
toddlers will watch this one day).?
The couples were at least
well-intentioned in their hopes that
absence would make the heart grow
fonder. One of them, Nikki, seemed
genuinely fragile about the prospect
of breaking up, explaining: ?I just want
to do anything to make things better.?
You really must be desperate
in your relationship to think going
on a wife-swap TV show will work.
But why were they all so outraged
on arriving at their respective villas
over the ?surprise? twist that there
was only one bed? If they?d googled
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00
Annie Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth
11.00 Huw Stephens 1.00am Benji B
3.00 Radio 1 Comedy ? Niki and Sammy?s
Peachy Podcast 4.00 Radio 1?s Early
Breakfast Show with Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright
5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 The Folk Show
with Mark Radcliffe 8.00 Jo Whiley
10.00 Carla Bruni?s C?est La Vie. The former
First Lady of France revisits her favourite
songs, beginning with tunes on the
subjject of love. See Radio Choice
11.00 Old Grey Whistle Test 40 (r) 12.00
Pick of the Pops (r) 2.00am Radio 2
Playlists: Country Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Easy 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Radio 2 Rocks 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Georgia Mann presents
9.00 Essential Classics
Ian Skelly with the best in classical music,
with the conductor Mirga Gra?inyte-Tyla
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Rachel Portman
Donald Macleod joins the Oscar winning ?lm
composer Rachel Portman in her studio to
discuss her opera, The Little Prince. Rachel
Portman (Augie?s Photos ? Smoke; The Cider
House Rules ? excerpts; Junuh Sees the
Field ? The Legend of Bagger Vance; Final
Salute ? Hart?s War; Opening Credits ?
The Human Stain; The Businessman;
The Lamplighter; We Light Our Lamps ?
The Little Prince; and What If All This
Is a Dream? ? The Manchurian Candidate)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Sarah Walker presents highlights from the
12th CLASSIX Kempten, a festival devoted
to chamber music written by female
composers. So?a Gubaidulina (Sounds of
the Forest for ?ute and piano); Ellen Taaffe
Zwilich (Double Quartet for string octet);
and Johanna Senfter (Trio for clarinet,
horn and piano, Op 103)
Simon and Nikki, one of the couples in Seven Year Switch
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Jonathan Swain introduces a concert of
music from Hungary given by the BBC
Scottish Symphony Orchestra. Kod醠y
(Summer Evening); and Bart髃 (Violin
Concerto No 1; Rhapsody No 2 arr for violin
and orchestra; and The Miraculous Mandarin)
3.30 Choral Evensong
An archive recording from Chichester
Cathedral (?rst broadcast 7 June 1972).
Responses: Ayleward. Psalm 37. First
Lessons: 1 Samuel 17 vv 1-30. Canticles:
Watson in E. Second Lesson: Luke 4 vv 1-13.
Anthem: Why Rage Fiercely the Heathen?
(Mendelssohn). Organist and Master
of the Choristers: John Birch. Assistant
Organist: Nicholas Cleobury
4.30 New Generation Artists
New Generation Artists celebrate the music
of female composers in a programme
dedicated to International Women?s Day
2018, featuring the violinist Elena Urioste,
and the Signum Quartet. Cecile Chaminade
(Th鑝e vari� for piano); Elizabeth Maconchy
(String Quartet No 3); Amy Beach
(Romance for violin and piano, Op 23);
and Ilse Weber (Ich wandre durch
Theresienstadt; and Wiegala)
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty is joined by Florilegium
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
A specially-selected playlist with music by
Bach, John Cage, and Richard Strauss
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
Andrew McGregor introduces a recording
of a performance by the BBC Symphony
Orchestra, conducted by Sakari Oramo.
Performing in Hiroshima at the Ueno Gakuen
Hall. Britten (Four Sea Interludes and
Passacaglia ? Peter Grimes); Tchaikovsky
(Violin Concerto in D, Op 35); and Sibelius
(Symphony No 5 in E ?at, Op 82)
10.00 Free Thinking
Lara Feigel, David Aaronovitch, Melissa Benn
and Xiaolu Guo join Matthew Sweet to seek
answers to the question of how much licence
a writer has to be frank in their work. They
explore the life of Doris Lessing, and the
contents of her 1962 novel that explores
dif?cult love life, war, politics and dreams
10.45 The Essay: Minds at War
The poet and translator Sasha Dugdale
explores the impact that the First World War
had on the work of Anna Akhmatova (r)
11.00 Late Junction
Verity Sharp introduces a programme of
music to celebrate the work of Picasso, on
the eve of the ?rst ever solo Pablo Picasso
exhibition opening at Tate Modern in London
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With Mishal Husain and Nick Robinson
8.30 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Only Artists
With Alice Lowe and Toyah Wilcox (2/5)
9.30 You?re Doing it Wrong
What it means to be a good parent (2/5)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 An Alternative History of Art
Hans Ulrich Obrist pro?les the overlooked
artist and architect Karl-Heinz Adler (3/10)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Discussion and interviews, presented by
Jenni Murray. Including at 10.41 the 15
Minute Drama: Part three of The Citadel
10.56 The Listening Project
Two friends who are druids re?ect on life
and death. Presented by Fi Glover
11.00 The Silence of the Liberals
The journalist Nick Cohen argues the
liberal left is failing Muslims ?ghting
inequality in their community (r)
11.30 Boswell?s Lives
Comedy series, written by Jon Canter. The
time-travelling biographer James Boswell
returns to pursue more legends, beginning
with Lord Byron. See Radio Choice (1/4)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Sarah Daniels (3/40)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Political Thinking
with Nick Robinson (3/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: The Unforgiven
By Barbara Machin. The team desperately
need Frankie Wharton?s forensic analysis to
try to ?nd the kidnapper, and save a life.
Starring Holly Aird and Sue Johnston (3/5)
3.00 Money Box Live
3.30 Inside Health (r)
4.00 Thinking Allowed
4.30 The Media Show
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 It?s Not What You Know
Comedy panel show with Joe Lycett (1/4)
7.00 The Archers
Joe turns detective and Toby hatches a plan
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
the show beforehand, they?d have
found out that very fact.
?I am scared I?ll have a connection
with someone else,? said Rachel, with
a slight air of nervous excitement.
Goofy Tom looked on glowingly at
his ?switch wife?, Michelle. ?She?s fun,
tanned, blond hair, nails!? In other
words, the teary, touchy-feely sincerity
is but a fig leaf to the usual ?will they
won?t they? merry-go-round of reality
TV ? with added ?will they won?t
they divorce? at the end of it.
Even if Seven Year Switch doesn?t do
the numbers, Channel 4 always has
its bakery juggernaut, a show built
purely on good cheer rather than
cattle-prodded conflict. The Great
Celebrity Bake Off for Stand Up to
Cancer didn?t just provide a public
service in raising money, it also offered
the funniest hour of the week.
Since it mattered not a jot who
won, it went simply for clowning ?
and for all Roisin Conaty?s amusingly
incinerated crepes, this was Harry
Hill?s show. Adding nuttiness to the
mix during a biscuit-diorama task, he
offered a flight of fancy about a holiday
he once shared with Camilla Parker
Bowles and a turtle. ?Obviously I was
wary of her, given her background. But
we had a few drinks, lay on the beach
and she told me tales of her life.? It was
such fun you were tempted to think that
Hill should be on the show every week.
james.jackson@thetimes.co.uk
7.45 The Citadel
By AJ Cronin (3/5)
8.00 The Moral Maze
Combative, provocative and engaging debate
chaired by Michael Buerk (5/8)
8.45 Lent Talks
The artist and songwriter Ben Ofakor
remembers Jesus? agony in Gethsemane,
and his own childhood trauma (3/6)
9.00 Costing the Earth
Why Australia has failed to arrest the
decline of the Great Barrier Reef (r)
9.30 Only Artists (2/5) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Ritula Shah
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Long Drop
By Denise Mina. Read by Liam Brennan.
As Peter Manuel?s trial continues, Dowdall
struggles under cross-examination (3/10)
11.00 Domestic Science
A combination of maths, science and comedy
with Festival of the Spoken Nerd (3/4)
11.15 John Kearns
John has a fantasy day off doing absolutely
nothing, but he struggles to enjoy it (4/4) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Analysis of the day?s developments
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am An Alternative History of Art
Curator Hans Ulrich Obrist pro?les the
overlooked artist and architect Karl-Heinz
Adler (3/10)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Navy Lark 8.30 Round the
Horne 9.00 Many a Slip 9.30 The Right Time
10.00 April in Paris 11.00 Winston Graham
Short Stories 11.15 Chopin in Manchester
12.00 The Navy Lark 12.30pm Round the
Horne 1.00 Sherlock Holmes with Carleton
Hobbs 1.30 Her Story Made History 2.00 A
Delicate Truth 2.15 Grimm Thoughts 2.30
The Old Curiosity Shop 2.45 A Confession
3.00 April in Paris 4.00 Many a Slip 4.30
The Right Time 5.00 The Architects 5.30
Bridget Christie?s Utopia 6.00 The
Interplanetary Notes of Ambassador B 6.15
Five Ghost Stories 6.30 The Tingle Factor
7.00 The Navy Lark. Comedy with Jon
Pertwee 7.30 Round the Horne. Comedy with
Kenneth Horne. First aired in 1965 8.00
Sherlock Holmes with Carleton Hobbs. The
sleuth attempts to help a man who?s received
a rather curious offer 8.30 Her Story Made
History. Lyse Doucet meets Iceland?s ?rst
female head of state, Vigdis Finnbogadottir
9.00 Winston Graham Short Stories. The
Cornish Farm. By Winston Graham 9.15
Chopin in Manchester. By Jim Poyser 10.00
Comedy Club: Bridget Christie?s Utopia.
A new comedy series with the awardwinning stand-up, Bridget Christie 10.30
The Secret World. Impression show
examining the private lives of public people
11.00 Danny Robins Music Therapy 11.30
The Remains of Foley and McColl
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Anna Foster 1.00pm
Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 6.30
5 Live Sport 7.45 5 Live Sport: Champions
League Football 2017-18: Tottenham Hotspur
v Juventus (Kick-off 7.45) 10.00 5 Live
Sport: 5 Live Football Social 10.30 Adrian
Goldberg 1.00am Up All Night 5.00
Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Lynsey Hipgrave, Tony Cascarino and
Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee and Baker 4.00
Adrian Durham and Darren Gough 7.00
Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am Extra
Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne. With Tracey Thorn 1.00pm Mark
Radcliffe. With members of indie-pop group
Superorganism 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Vic
Galloway. With a session by Lylo 9.00
Gideon Coe. Including archive sessions by
Gallon Drunk, Art Brut and Slapp Happy
12.00 6 Music Recommends with Mary Anne
Hobbs 1.00am The First Time with Yoko Ono
2.00 Wise Women 2.30 6 Music Live Hour
3.30 6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Highlights the work
of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.
JS Bach (Brandenburg Concerto No.5 in D
BWV.1050); Mozart (Piano Concerto No.25
in C K.503); Warlock (Capriol Suite); and
Brahms (Violin Concerto in D Op 77) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday March 7 2018
11
1G T
artsfirst night
MARILYN KINGWILL
Pop
Elbow
SSE Hydro, Glasgow
L
{{{{(
ooking, as ever, like a sad owl
crossed with a sadder bear,
Guy Garvey offered a wry
apology ? ?Sorry we?re late?
? acknowledging the fact
that this concert had been postponed
because of the snow. What should
have been a Friday night in Glasgow
was a Monday, and felt like it;
tentative, sober and slow to get going.
As part of what is essentially a
greatest-hits tour, the show leant
heavily on The Seldom Seen Kid,
Elbow?s bestselling LP, a decade old.
The opener, Starlings, all staccato pulse
and sudden brass, provided a stirring
overture and Grounds For Divorce had
lost none of its Led Zep punch, but
much of this material is overexposed
and bleached of intensity. During
Mirrorball Garvey?s voice strained on
the line ?We kissed like we invented
it? and the song was the better for this
sudden rip in the wallpaper.
Elbow are going through an
awkward phase; their pop moment has
passed, but they are not quite elder
statesmen. They always seemed an
accidental arena band, their music too
delicate, nuanced and melancholy to
suit these huge spaces, with their fans
having become more respectful than
euphoric, this is harder to disguise.
There were terrific passages ?
notably the climactic sections of Little
Fictions and The Birds ? but long
stretches strained for effect.
At their best, however, Elbow make
the creation of beauty appear
effortless. Lippy Kids, the evening?s
best song, was somehow grandly
elegiac and hands-in-pockets
insouciant, a perfect demonstration of
the band?s ability to weaponise
tenderness. There was more of the
same with Kindling, during which
Garvey duetted with John Grant, the
American singer-songwriter whose
stunning support slot had made the
arena feel intimate. It is a measure of
Garvey?s confidence that he risked an
opening act whose talents might be
considered superior to his own.
Elbow concluded with One Day Like
This, an anthem that has come to
belong more to the people than the
band, and seemed pleased to let the
crowd sing it. The curtains, having
been thrown wide, closed on a
moment of perfect communion
between musicians and audience.
Peter Ross
The O2, London SE10, tonight
Honeysuckle Weeks, Maureen Lipman and Glynis Barber get some killer lines as they lead an outstanding cast in The Best Man
A precursor to The West Wing
Gore Vidal?s
1960 play is an
entertaining
look at farcical
American
politics, says
Ann Treneman
Theatre
The Best Man
Playhouse, WC2
{{{((
T
he year is 1960, the place
Philadelphia during the
Democratic Convention,
and the task is to choose
the presidential candidate.
On one hand there is William
Russell (?Hustle for Russell?), an
intellectual who is the secretary of
state. His main opponent is a rough
and ready Southern populist named
Joseph Cantwell.
Sound familiar? Gore Vidal, the
brilliant American writer who died in
2012, could never have known how
prescient this play would be. It feels,
in the banter, the jokes, the dirty
tricks and the moralistic storyline,
like a precursor to The West Wing,
not to mention the battle that led to
the real-life West Wing of today.
Martin Shaw is perfectly cast as
William Russell, the thinking woman?s
candidate who likes to drop asides
about the philosopher Bertrand
Russell into his press conferences
(oh, to be a sketchwriter in this play).
But he is also a philanderer and vain
with it. His wife, Alice (Glynis Barber),
is estranged but loyal, still in love with
him, a study in reserved class.
Vidal is a pro when it comes to
balancing characters, but it is clear
whom the director, Simon Evans,
favours. Cantwell is portrayed as a
brutal populist and played by Jeff
Fahey with nuclear levels of bombast.
The play does take time to settle in
and, at times, it feels dated, but it
keeps the attention and the second
act goes by in a flash.
It is the ensemble cast who make
this play. Jack Shepherd is superb
as President Hockstader, wily but
ill, dispensing earthy home truths
as he decides whom to endorse.
He likes Russell (who doesn?t?),
CRAXTON ESTATE/DACS LONDON, 2018
Exhibition
Charmed Lives
in Greece
British Museum
{{{{(
SUCCESSION PICASSO/DACS LONDON, 2017
John Craxton?s Reclining Figure with Asphodels 1 (1983-84), a highlight
A
Five stars for the Picasso
show at Tate Modern
First Night in the main paper
but would Cantwell be the more
effective candidate?
The women get some killer lines
(and heels). Honeysuckle Weeks, as
Mabel Cantwell, downs martinis with
the best, but Maureen Lipman almost
steals the show as the Democratic
grande dame Mrs Gamadge. ?Don?t
take too much interest like Mrs
Roosevelt,? she advises the wives,
mouth twisting, eyes darting, hands
flapping. ?But don?t take too little
interest like Mrs Eisenhower.? Ah,
yes, it was ever thus.
The set, by Michael Taylor, is
a grand hotel room that switches
between candidates via the ruse of
changing paintings and posters. Doors
slam with abandon until you wonder
if you?ve wandered into a farce. But,
then, that?s politics, isn?t it?
Box office: 0844 8717631; the
production runs to May 26
nyone who has read the
writings of Patrick Leigh
Fermor, who lived from
1964 in Kardamyli on
Greece?s Mani Peninsula,
will know his knack for description.
?The stone flags of the water?s edge,
where Joan and Xan Fielding and I sat
down to dinner, flung back the heat
like a casserole with the lid off,? he
writes in Mani: Travels in the South
Peloponnese, reproduced in a short
passage in this sun-drenched free
exhibition, Charmed Lives in Greece:
Ghika, Craxton, Leigh Fermor. With the
help of paintings and sketches by the
artists Nikos Hadjikyriakos-Ghika and
John Craxton and a wealth of letters,
books and photographs of people
having a lovely time, it tells the story
of a friendship between the three men
that lasted more than 50 years,
cemented by a shared love of Greece.
It?s a slightly odd exhibition for the
British Museum, since it includes no
ancient artefacts, but the institution
does have a number of Craxton works
in its print collection and it?s not short
of Greek stuff, so when the exhibition
was offered by the AG Leventis
Foundation it clearly thought, ?Why
not?? Most of the works have been
lent by the Benaki Museum in Greece,
to which Ghika bequeathed his house
and works. There are Ghika?s graphic
paintings of Hydra, where he lived
with his wife in the 18th-century
family home until it burnt down in
1961 (they moved to Corfu), and of
Crete, where Craxton lived. They
radiate heat and capture the unique
gnarliness of the Greek landscape.
Craxton?s style is not dissimilar to
Ghika?s, but is more ordered. His work
is most vivid when depicting cats and
goats (he loved both) and the young
men of the island; sailors, fishermen
and shepherds. His Reclining Figure
with Asphodels I (1983-4) shows
a languid sailor lying amid the flowers
with which Persephone was garlanded
as she returned from the underworld
and is heavy with sensuality. It?s one of
many joys in this charming show.
Nancy Durrant
Tomorrow to July 15
12
1G T
Wednesday March 7 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Alexi Duggins
Fireworks for
a Tudor Queen
BBC Four, 9pm
Lucy Worsley
claims that
this jaunt into
fireworks of
the past is an attempt to
?get a better
understanding of the
Elizabethan mind?, but
Early
Top
pick
it is really an exercise
in making history
interesting to
pyromaniacs. Over
90 minutes Worsley
painstakingly attempts
to recreate the exact
1575 firework display
given for Elizabeth I
at Kenilworth Castle,
featuring illuminated
dragons, shooting stars
and enough unexpected
explosions to provoke
a panic attack in the
BBC?s health and safety
team. Plenty of
impressive factoids
are unearthed: the
explosive saltpetre
content for Tudor
fireworks required
a household?s worth
of urine and it was
Shakespeare?s obsession
with using fireworks as
theatrical effects that
led to the Globe being
burnt down in the
1600s. However, the
most fun comes from
the adventures of
Worsley?s sidekick, the
materials scientist Zoe
Laughlin, who goes
to a factory to recreate
fireworks of bygone
years. The long-gone
creations she tinkers
with vary between
those that are a loss
(the gerb, a fountain
of pretty red-orange
sparks) and those
whose extinction is
more explicable, such
as the girandola ? a
horizontal Catherine
wheel with the potential
to convert its audience
into a mass of flaming
skin. Rockets detonate
on launch pads, smokefilled laboratories are
vacated and nervy
technicians are seen
taking cover. This is
history at its most
frivolous, but all the
more enjoyable for it.
Crufts 2018
Channel 4, 3pm
It?s a dog?s life on
Channel 4 as Clare
Balding begins three
days of coverage of
the annual canine
competition by teaming
up with Alan Carr for
a preview. Along with
plenty of pooches
battling to be top dog
in categories such as
heelwork to music
(essentially dancing
with their owner)
and agility (obstacle
courses), attractions
include Noel
Fitzpatrick (The
Supervet) on doggie
health, dog-care tips
and Peter Purves?s
40th year of presenting.
The event starts
tomorrow and More4
has live coverage from
6.30pm, with an hour
on Channel 4 at 8pm.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Murder, Mystery and My Family.
Jeremy Dein and Sasha Wass examine a violent burglary
and murder in 1931 (AD) 10.00 Homes Under the
Hammer. Three semi-detached properties that were sold
at auction (r) 11.00 Wanted Down Under Revisited. Nicki
Chapman catches up with Matthew Royle-Evatt and
Phillipa Rowley, who decided to spend a trial week living
in Perth, Australia 12 months earlier 11.45 Caught Red
Handed. A thief attempts to steal an unattended bicycle
12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From the Westpoint Arena in
Exeter (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30
BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. The Mill is
sent into crisis after a power cut (AD) 2.15 Shakespeare
& Hathaway: Private Investigators. Frank and Lu struggle
to protect a troubled teenager (AD) 3.00 Escape to the
Country. A couple search for a property in the Hampshire
countryside (r) (AD) 3.45 Coast and Country Auctions. A
visit to Exeter Livestock Market, the biggest agricultural
auction in the region 4.30 Antiques Road Trip. James
Braxton and Raj Bisram head to an auction in Woking (r)
5.15 Pointless. Quiz show (r) 6.00 BBC News at Six;
Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Caught Red Handed (r) 6.30 Coast and Country
Auctions (r) 7.15 Wanted Down Under Revisited (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: See Hear (SL) 8.30 Great British Railway
Journeys (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC
Newsroom Live 11.30 Daily Politics 1.00pm Perfection
(r) 1.45 Plan It, Build It (r) (AD) 2.15 Yes Chef. With the
Michelin-starred chef Matt Gillan (r) 3.00 A Place to Call
Home. Carolyn and Jack visit Douglas on their honeymoon,
and learn that Sir Richard is up to his dirty tricks in
persuading donors to cease funding the refuge for retired
servicemen (r) 3.55 Pilgrimage with Simon Reeve. Simon
travels to the holy city of Jerusalem, where he takes part
in the ancient ritual of following the route taken by Jesus
as He carried His cross. Last in the series (r) (AD) 4.55
More Creatures Great and Small. Vet Rosie treats a
concussed tawny owl (r) 5.25 Flog It! Paul Martin visits
Stockport, Greater Manchester, with antiques experts
Mark Stacey and Philip Serrell, who value an unusual
inkwell and a hand-painted Japanese vase (r) 6.00
Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine (r) 6.30
Great British Railway Journeys Goes to Ireland. Michael
Portillo travels from Navan to Mullingar (r) (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs
and fashion news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and
gossip 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show
10.30 This Morning. Phillip Scho?eld and Holly
Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features, including
a look at the stories making the newspaper headlines and
a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose Women. Another
helping of topical studio discussion from a female
perspective, and are joined in conversation by Kerry
Needham 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 James Martin?s
American Adventure. This time, the chef?s culinary
journey takes him to The Hamptons, where he learns
about the area?s rich farming history and samples a
chowder at a seafood restaurant (AD) 3.00 Tenable. Five
friends from Hertfordshire answer questions based on top
10 lists, then try to score a perfect 10 in the ?nal round.
Quiz hosted by Warwick Davis 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben
Shephard hosts the arcade-themed quiz show 5.00
The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents the quiz 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.30 Frasier (r)
(AD) 10.00 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA. From
Babylon, New York (r) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA. The
co-owner of a custom signs company goes undercover (r)
12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Come Dine
with Me. Contestants try to host the best dinner party
in Newcastle and Northumberland (r) 1.05 Posh
Pawnbrokers. Charlie and Patrick look at an antique
grandfather clock (r) 2.10 Countdown. With Liz Bonnin
3.00 Crufts Extra with Alan and Clare. New series.
A look ahead to this year?s world famous dog show,
which starts tomorrow. See Viewing Guide
4.00 A New Life in the Sun. A holiday home business in
France struggles with expensive maintenance costs
5.00 Four in a Bed. The contest arrives at The Pug and
Greyhound in Leicestershire (r) 5.30 Extreme Cake
Makers. Chocolatier Tracey Kindred creates a two-foot tall
wedding cake paying tribute to all things gothic (r) 6.00
The Simpsons. Homer befriends his cool new neighbours
(r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Sally and Myra ?nally decide
to tell Nana they are more than friends (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and his guests talk about the issues of the day
11.15 Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It Away. Sheriffs try to
recover almost �400 from a company director for unpaid
invoices in Manchester (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime
12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. Dr Chris Pearce is
consulted by Abigail, whose injury does not show much
sign of improvement after she suffered an accident on the
London Underground (r) (AD) 1.05 Access 1.15 Home
and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS: Hit &
Run. An admiral is found executed by the side of a road,
but the agents have trouble ascertaining a motive for his
murder (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: Love You to Death
(PG, TVM, 2016) An attorney?s mistake in court allows
a murderer to go free, and vowing retribution he takes
steps to track her down. Thriller starring Bree Williamson
and Emilija Baranac 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours.
Holly learns that Izzy has stolen Karl?s sperm sample and
used it to try to get pregnant, and Ben bonds with his
uncle (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Brody is stumped
when Felicity doubles the price of Salt, until Willow looks
into the accounts (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
Save
Subscribe and get seven days
of papers for just �a week
35%
on the
cover price
7PM
UK residents only, aged 18 or over. This offer is subject to availability. New subscribers only. Visit store.thetimes.co.uk for full T&Cs.
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the magazine show
8PM
9.00 Earth?s Natural Wonders Shedding
light on spirit-pleasing rituals among
the Kamayura People of Brazil, the
daunting climb made by worshippers in
Tigray, Ethiopia, and an insight into
why millions of hikers, climbers and
skiers visit the Swiss Alps every year.
See Viewing Guide (3/3) (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
8.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build
Nick Knowles and the DIY SOS team
transform the home of a police of?cer
who was a victim of the Westminster
Bridge terrorist attack in March 2017,
suffering horri?c injuries which left
him wheelchair bound (4/8) (AD)
9PM
7.30 Immigration: Who Should
We Let In? ? Panorama
Nick Robinson investigates public
concerns about immigration
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 A Question of Sport Sue Barker
hosts the quiz, with guests Elizabeth
Clegg, Ryan Sidebottom, Iwan
Thomas and Clinton Morrison
11.15 Film 2018 Antonia Quirke, Ellen
E Jones and Chris Hewitt review
psychological thriller You Were Never
Really Here, starring Joaquin Phoenix
11.45 Memento (15, 2000) A man
searches for his wife?s killer in spite
of the short-term memory loss he
sustained during the same attack.
Christopher Nolan?s thriller starring
Guy Pearce, Carrie-Anne Moss,
Joe Pantoliano and Mark Boone Jr
1.40am-6.00 BBC News
7.00 Saving Lives at Sea A kayaker goes
missing for an hour off the coast of
Bridlington, East Yorkshire, and a crew
member on his ?rst call-out races to a
capsized dinghy to ?nd a man losing
consciousness in the water. Plus, a
?shing trawler sinks off the coast of
the Shetland Islands (2/12) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Cain takes matters into
his own hands, Tracy faces up to her
past, and Priya feels the strain (AD)
8.00 The World?s Most Extraordinary
Homes Piers Taylor and Caroline
Quentin travel to Switzerland in search
of four extraordinary homes. They
begin their journey in Jeurs and visit a
four-bedroom house, before travelling
to Brissago to see a property with
views across Lake Maggiore (2/8) (AD)
9.00 The Assassination of Gianni
Versace: American Crime Story
Andrew Cunanan, already a wanted
man for four murders, arrives in
Miami to stalk Gianni Versace.
See Viewing Guide (2/9) (AD)
9.50 Live at the Apollo Direct from the
stage at London?s Hammersmith
Apollo, Channel 4?ss Chatty Man host
Alan Carr is joined by comedy circuit
stars Francesca Martinez and Nish
Kumar for another celebration
of stand-up comedy (1/7) (r)
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
11.15 Nature?s Weirdest Events
Chris Packham ?nds out what poisoned
a scientist on a jungle expedition,
reveals why chimps take part in rituals
and investigates strange prehistoric
handprints in Egypt (2/8) (r)
12.00 Live Women?s International Football: USA v
England (Kick-off 12.00). Coverage of both teams? third
and ?nal game in this year?s SheBelieves Cup, which takes
place at Orlando City Stadium in Florida 2.05am
Sign Zone: See Hear (r) (SL) 2.35 Flatpack Empire
(r) (AD, SL) 3.35-4.20 Royal Recipes (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Extreme Winter Road Rescue The
emergency services are stretched to
the limit as Storms Doris and Eleanor
hit the UK, with 90mph winds putting
Highways England traf?c of?cers
under pressure. Meanwhile, the
Stornoway Coastguard?s helicopter
scrambles to rescue a climber (2/4) (r)
8.00 Britain?s Brightest Family Families
from Lancashire and Hertfordshire
battle for a place in the quarter-?nals.
Hosted by Anne Hegerty (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street While Eileen
considers telling her neighbours about
Phelan?s deception, Tyrone is touched
by Gemma?s sympathy (AD)
8.00 The Supervet An overweight boxer
needs an operation on his knees, but
?rst Noel and the team must ?x his
breathing defect. Elsewhere, a pug
requires emergency spinal surgery to
remove a cyst, and a rescue dog with
hip dysplasia may have to be let go
while under anaesthetic (2/6) (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors A patient
with a history of heart problems visits
the surgery, and doctors treat a man
suffering from whiplash. Other cases
include a teenager who has trouble
sleeping at night, and a woman
frightened about painful lumps
in her armpits and breasts (AD)
9.00 Benidorm The wedding party return
after spending a night under the stars,
but Kenneth is nowhere to be found.
Jacqueline?s dread soon turns to joy
when he arrives back safe and sound
after being rescued at sea. Meanwhile,
Rob checks in with his much
anticipated friend (2/9) (AD)
9.00 One Born Every Minute New series.
The award-winning documentary series
moves to Birmingham Women?s
Hospital. In the ?rst episode, a
25-year-old and her partner, who
struggled for years to conceive,
return to the ward after losing their
?rst child at 25 weeks (1/10) (AD)
9.00 Violent Child, Desperate Parents
The child psychologist Laverne
Antrobus meets 29-year-old mother
Lisa, who is bearing the brunt of
extremely violent outbursts from her
six-year-old daughter, Demi (2/4)
11.45 Play to the Whistle With Ashley
Cole, Ore Oduba and Kevin Bridges.
Holly Willoughby hosts (4/6) (r)
10.00 Damned Nat suspects Mimi may be
behind the disappearance of some ?les,
and Ingrid brings her foster child
Limahl into this maelstrom (4/6) (AD)
10.35 24 Hours in Police Custody A man
lies dead in a park in Peterborough and
the positioning of his body raises
intense suspicions, but rigor mortis
has already set in and the trail of
evidence is going cold. Cameras follow
as detectives are called in to
investigate the case (r) (AD)
11.35 999: On the Frontline New series.
An hour in the life of ambulance crews,
starting with paramedic Chelsie
Kennedy and technician Simon Lees
rushing to save a baby (1/10)
10.00 Most Shocking Celebrity Moments
2017 Memorable moments featuring
famous faces from the past year,
including David Beckham?s leaked
e-mails, Wayne Rooney?s drink-driving,
the wrong ?lm being announced as
Best Picture at the Oscars, and Taylor
Swift?s controversial music video for
Look What You Made Me Do. Plus,
highlights from the year?s reality
TV shows, including Prue Leith
accidentally spoiling the result of
The Great British Bake Off ?nale.
Featuring contributions from Louis
Walsh, Len Goodman, Sinitta,
Amelia Lily, Eamonn Holmes, Marcel
Somerville and Brian Harvey (r)
12.35am Jackpot247 Interactive gaming 3.00 Tenable.
Five friends from Birmingham answer top 10 list
questions on subjects including the Olympic Games,
West End Musicals and National Parks (r) (SL)
3.50 ITV Nightscreen. Text-based information service
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r) (SL)
12.30am Pokerstars Championship Cash Challenge
1.25 FILM: The East (15, 2013) A private security
agent in?ltrates an anarchist group, but becomes
sympathetic to their cause. Thriller starring Brit Marling
(SL) 3.20 The Question Jury (r) 4.15 Coast vs Country (r)
(AD) 5.05-6.00 Location, Location, Location (r) (SL)
12.55am SuperCasino Live interactive gaming 3.10
Cowboy Builders. A Birmingham accountant whose old
decor had been putting off her clients (r) 4.00 Now That?s
Funny! Internet-sourced videos with an amusing family
friendly hook (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
Nick?s Quest (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
7.30 Coronation Street After the Mill
accident, Tim ?nds out the truth about
Phelan?s part in the scam, while Carla
and Michelle wind up Sally (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.45 Uefa Champions League
Highlights Action from the ?rst
batch of last-16 second legs,
featuring Manchester City v FC Basel,
Tottenham Hotspur v Juventus,
Liverpool v FC Porto and Paris
Saint-Germain v Real Madrid
the times | Wednesday March 7 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Earth?s Natural
Wonders
BBC One, 9pm
Footage ranges from
the humbling to the
maddening in the finale
of this series about the
extraordinary lifestyles
that are required when
living near spectacular
natural phenomena.
Ethiopian mothers risk
their lives by scaling
400m-high cliff faces to
carry their babies to
baptism, and workers in
Laos clear unexploded
US bombs from the
Vietnam War, blithely
stating: ?Boss, I?ve
found a bomb.? Yet
even when the lifestyles
are dubious ? such as
the abseiling Faroe
Islanders who rob birds?
nests and turn their
offspring into a snack
? their feats make
for gripping viewing.
The Assassination
of Gianni Versace
BBC Two, 9pm
We are two episodes
into this true-crime
drama about the 1997
shooting of Gianni
Versace, and the show
is being stolen by
Darren Criss?s portrayal
of the killer Andrew
Cunanan. As we follow
him around Miami ?
weirdly gaffer-taping
his face and carrying
out reconnaissance on
Versace ? Criss
switches seamlessly
between mania,
terrifyingly emotionless
psychopathy and
gleeful campness. The
show deftly treads the
line between thoughtful
drama and the soapy
froth that it could
have been, overcast
by only the slightest
waft of spuriousness.
Save Me
Sky Atlantic, 9pm
Aside from the daft
cutaways to supposed
life on a London estate
? a skateboardclutching woman in a
burka, a jigging East
End granny at a bus
stop ? Save Me is
shaping up to be an
intriguing thriller. Its
lead is also becoming
increasingly likeable:
Nelly (Lennie James)
is on the road to
redemption, moving
past his philandering
ways to find his
abducted daughter.
If nothing else,
there?s something
very tantalising about
the prospect of the
Met?s finest being
out-investigated by a
booze-fuelled ne?er-dowell who doesn?t even
have an email address.
Sport Choice
BT Sport 2, 7pm
After a stirring first-leg
comeback in Turin
where Tottenham
Hotspur pegged
Juventus back to 2-2,
Wembley hosts what
could be a famous night
in Europe for Spurs.
Also playing are
Manchester City,
who host Basle
(BT Sport 3, 7pm).
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 7.00 RSPCA
Animal Rescue (r) 8.00 Send in the Dogs
Australia (r) (AD) 9.00 Road Wars (r) 10.00
Warehouse 13 (r) 11.00 Forever (r) (AD) 12.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r)
3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1
(r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama. Kif gets pregnant (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 DC?s Legends of Tomorrow.
Zari gets caught in a time loop
9.00 A League of Their Own. With Judy Murray,
Frank Lampard and Kevin Bridges (r) (AD)
10.00 Bliss. Andrew?s long absences are
starting to take a toll on his partners
10.30 A League of Their Own: Unseen (r) (AD)
11.00 The Force: Essex. Of?cers help women
who have been robbed at machete-point (r)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD)
1.00am Brit Cops: Rapid Response (r) (AD)
2.00 Most Shocking (r) 3.00 The Force: Essex
(r) 4.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r) 5.00 Futurama (r)
6.00am Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
8.00 The British (r) (AD) 9.00 The West Wing
(r) 11.00 House (r) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 David Attenborough?s Conquest of the
Skies (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House.
The medic treats a CIA employee (r) 6.00
House. A teenager suffers a heart attack (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
A battered body is found on a mountainside (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Frank is asked to downplay
the signi?cance of a murder (r) (AD)
9.00 Save Me. Claire and Barry stage a press
conference to appeal for help in the search
for Jody. See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
10.00 Gomorrah. Genny is forced to put
a plan into action. In Italian (11/12)
11.00 Gomorrah. Ciro, Genny and Enzo
agree a treaty with the Confederati,
obtaining part of their territories (12/12)
12.00 Save Me (r) (AD) 1.00am Here and
Now (r) 2.10 Britannia (r) (AD) 3.10
Billions (r) (AD) 4.20 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 Children?s
Hospital (r) (AD) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00
Cold Case (r) 11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia
12.00 Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 Border
Security: Canada?s Front Line (r) (AD)
5.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 Children?s Hospital (8/12) (r) (AD)
7.30 Children?s Hospital (9/12) (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. A man is poisoned (r) (AD)
9.00 Grey?s Anatomy. The hospital launches
a surgical innovation contest
10.00 The Good Doctor. Shaun is put in a
dif?cult position by a patient?s family (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. Kate Jackson guests (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
3.00 Criminal Minds (r) 4.00 Nothing to Declare
(r) (AD) 5.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia (r)
6.00am The Movie Music of Spike Lee 7.00
Celtic Woman: Destiny ? Live in Concert 9.00
Tales of the Unexpected 9.30 Master of
Photography (AD) 10.30 Video Killed the
Radio Star (AD) 11.00 The Sixties (AD)
12.00 Trailblazers: New Romantics 1.00pm
Discovering: Shirley MacLaine (AD) 2.00 Tales
of the Unexpected 2.30 Master of Photography
(AD) 3.30 Video Killed the Radio Star (AD) 4.00
The Sixties (AD) 5.00 Trailblazers: Pop Radio
6.00 Discovering: Charles Bronson (AD)
7.00 Portrait Artist of the Year 2018
8.00 National Treasures: The Art of Collecting
9.00 Discovering: Robert Redford. New series.
The life of the actor, director and producer
10.00 Dennis Hopper: Uneasy Rider
11.15 The Movie Music of Spike Lee
12.15am Frank Sinatra: The Voice of America
(AD) 2.15 Dean Martin: A Legend in Concert
3.15 The Doors: Feast of Friends (AD) 4.00
Dag 4.30 Tales of the Unexpected 5.00 Auction
5.30 Auction: Jackie Kennedy Special
6.00am Total Goals 9.00 Good Morning Sports
Fans 10.00 Premier League Daily 11.00
Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Sky Sports News
5.00pm Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Sky Sports Tonight
7.30 Live EFL: Leeds United v Wolverhampton
Wanderers (Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of the
Championship match, which takes place at Elland
Road. The visitors have dominated the league
table for most of the season, and Nuno Espirito
Santo will be looking to gain a victory here that
would move his side a step closer to their ?rst
season in the Premier League since 2011/12
10.00 The Debate
11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00 Sky Sports News 5.00am Great Sporting
Moments 5.30 Live European Tour Golf: The
Hero Indian Open. Coverage of the opening
session of the ?rst day at the DLF Golf & County
Club near New Delhi, where Shiv Chawrasia
has won in each of the last two years
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Nolan Live
11.40 A Question of Sport 12.10am Film 2018
12.40 FILM: Memento (2000)
2.30-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 10.30pm BBC Wales Live
11.05 A Question of Sport 11.35 Film 2018
12.10am FILM: Memento (2000) 2.00
Weather for the Week Ahead
2.05-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 9.50pm The
Archiveologists 10.00-10.30 Spotlight (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except:
1.45pm Yes Chef (r) 2.30 Politics Scotland
3.30 A Place to Call Home (r) 4.25-5.25
Pilgrimage with Simon Reeve (r) (AD) 11.15
Scottish Questions (r) 11.40-12.00midnight
Grand Tours of Scotland (r)
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 2.15pm A Place to Call
Home (r) 3.05 A Place to Call Home (r) 4.00
More Creatures Great and Small (r) 4.30
Pilgrimage with Simon Reeve (r) (AD)
5.30-6.00 Flog It! (r) 6.30-7.00 Great British
Railway Journeys Goes to Ireland (r) (AD)
Subscribe now to start saving immediately.
Call 0800 028 5355 or visit thetimes.co.uk/offer
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Uefa Champions League Highlights
12.05am Teleshopping 1.05 After Midnight
2.35 ITV Nightscreen 4.35 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
7.30 Sea City. Workers try to unload a record
number of containers during a 12-hour shift and
the health team is on the lookout for suspect
food coming into Britain (3/3) (r)
8.00 The Secret History of Our Streets. The
programme looks at how a group of pioneering
residents took on Glasgow?s council in a battle to
save the Victorian tenement blocks at the
southern end of Duke Street (2/3) (r) (AD)
9.00 Lucy Worsley?s Fireworks for a Tudor
Queen. An ambitious attempt to recreate one
of the earliest and most spectacular ?rework
displays in Britain. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.30 Clarissa and the King?s Cookbook. Clarissa
Dickson Wright tracks down Britain?s oldest
cookbook, The Forme of Cury, a 700-year-old
scroll written from recipes created by
King Richard II?s master chefs (r)
11.00 The Man Who Shot Tutankhamun.
Margaret Mountford investigates the story of
the British photographer Harry Burton (r) (AD)
12.00 Sings Stevie Wonder (r) 1.00am Top of
the Pops: 1982 (r) 2.00-3.30 Lucy Worsley?s
Fireworks for a Tudor Queen (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Rude(ish) Tube
(r) 7.30 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 8.00
Baby Daddy (r) 9.00 Melissa & Joey (r) 10.00
How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 11.00 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r)
(AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
2.00 Melissa & Joey (r) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r)
4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 5.00 The
Goldbergs. Marvin asks for money (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Adam makes a big change (AD)
7.30 My Hotter Half. Twins want to ?nd out
which one of them is considered better looking
8.00 The Goldbergs. Geoff?s romantic
gestures begin to annoy Erica (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Don?t Tell the Bride. A groom plans
a Wild West-themed wedding (3/6)
10.00 Celebrity First Dates (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 11.35 The
Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 12.05am First Dates
(r) (AD) 1.10 Don?t Tell the Bride (r) 2.10 The
Inbetweeners (r) (AD, SL) 3.05 The Goldbergs
(r) (AD) 3.25 Timeless (r) 4.10 The Goldbergs
(r) 4.30 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) 9.30 A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 11.30 Four in a Bed (r)
2.10pm Come Dine with Me (r) 4.50 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun (r) 5.55 Walks with My
Dog. The Rev Richard Coles and his dachsund
explore the Galloway coast (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick sets out to
mend a dog?s squashed spinal cord (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud returns to
see how Ben Law?s Sussex cottage has changed.
He ?nds that during the past 18 months the
upstairs has been completed and the outside
has been landscaped (4/7) (r) (AD)
9.00 Vet on the Hill. New series. In the opening
episode, Dr Scott Miller tries to save the
damaged tail of a cocker spaniel pup, and
a Staffy needs a high-tech eye operation
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. Medics treat three
women who have been stabbed in a Surrey
supermarket car park (r) (AD)
11.05 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown.
With guests Miles Jupp and Aisling Bea (r)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 Vet on the Hill (r) 2.10 The Good Fight (r)
(AD) 3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats: Best Bits (r)
11.00am Salome (PG, 1953) Biblical epic
starring Rita Hayworth and Charles Laughton
1.10pm Shane (PG, 1953) Western starring
Alan Ladd (AD) 3.40 The Flight of the
Phoenix (PG, 1965) Robert Aldrich?s
adventure starring James Stewart
6.30 Charlotte Gray (15, 2001) A woman
becomes a spy for Britain during the Second
World War and in?ltrates occupied France,
where she tries to ?nd her lover. Drama starring
Cate Blanchett and Billy Crudup (AD)
8.50 Suffragette Interview Special
9.00 Gladiator (15, 2000) A Roman general
is forced to ?ght as a gladiator and uses his
position to seek revenge for the murder of
his family. Historical drama starring
Russell Crowe and Joaquin Phoenix (AD)
12.00 Buffalo Soldiers (15, 2001) A cunning
American soldier stationed in Cold War Germany
?nds his black marketeering threatened by a
tough new sergeant. Black comedy drama with
Joaquin Phoenix and Ed Harris 2.00am-4.00
Cameraperson (15, 2016) Kirsten Johnson?s
?lm exploring the relationships between
?lm-makers and their subjects
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals (r) 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Dress to Impress (r) 7.55 Emmerdale (r) (AD)
8.20 The Cube (r) 9.25 The Ellen DeGeneres
Show (r) 10.15 Who?s Doing the Dishes? (r)
(AD) 11.10 Dress to Impress (r) 12.15pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.40 You?ve Been Framed!
Gold (r) 1.45 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.35
The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 4.50 Judge Rinder (r)
5.50 Take Me Out. Dating show (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Walden tells Zoey he
is going into business with his ex-wife (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Zoey and her
daughter move in with Walden (r)
9.00 Hell?s Kitchen USA. New series. Gordon
Ramsay invites 16 All-Stars back to the kitchen
10.00 Hell?s Kitchen USA. The 16 All-Stars
compete in a bar menu challenge
10.55 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.25 Family Guy (r) (AD) 11.50 American Dad!
(r) (AD) 12.20am American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.45 Two and a Half Men (r) 1.40 Ibiza
Weekender (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) 7.55 The Royal (r) (AD) 8.55
Judge Judy (r) 10.20 Inspector Morse (r)
12.35pm The Royal (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat (r)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.45 On the
Buses (r) 4.55 You?re Only Young Twice (r)
5.25 Rising Damp (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica tries to
?nish a dead journalist?s book (r) (AD)
8.00 Endeavour. The detective is suspended
from duty, but when a body is found near his
home, he conducts a secret investigation, and
uncovers dark secrets in Oxford?s social elite.
Shaun Evans stars (1/4) (r) (AD)
10.00 Law & Order: UK. An elderly woman is
found dead in her ?at and her live-in carer is
arrested. However, she blames the victim?s
grand-daughter (5/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 Law & Order: UK. Following the brutal
murder of a gay man, Sam and Ronnie try to
track down the victim?s adoptive son,
who has gone missing (6/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am Unforgotten (r) (AD, SL) 1.55
ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.45 Pawn Stars (r) 7.30
Ironside (r) 8.25 Quincy ME (r) 9.30 Minder (r)
(AD) 10.35 The Sweeney (r) 11.45 The
Avengers (r) 12.50pm Ironside (r) 1.50
Quincy ME (r) 2.55 Minder (r) (AD) 4.00 The
Sweeney (r) 5.05 The Avengers (r)
6.10 Storage Wars. Darrell plays pranks (r)
6.40 Storage Wars. Darrell is under pressure (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. A ?ghter jet (r)
7.35 Pawn Stars. A 1940s mandolin (r)
8.00 Britain?s Busiest Motorway.
A pile-up in bank holiday traf?c (3/6) (r)
8.35 Britain?s Busiest Motorway. A collision
between a truck and car (4/6) (r)
9.00 FILM: Falling Down (18, 1993)
A stressed motorist cracks under the pressures
of everyday life and goes on a violent journey
across LA. Thriller with Michael Douglas (AD)
11.20 Lethal Weapon. Riggs and Murtaugh
investigate a murder in a hospital (r) (AD)
12.15am FILM: Nacho Libre (12, 2006)
A Mexican friar becomes a masked wrestler.
Comedy with Jack Black and Ana de la Reguera
2.05 The Avengers (r) (SL) 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm
Top Gear (AD) 3.00 Abandoned Engineering
(AD) 4.00 Road Cops 5.00 Best of Top Gear.
Another high-octane highlights show (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. Gillian Anderson is the
Star in the Reasonably Priced Car (AD)
7.00 Road Cops. A motormouth motorist
tries to sweet-talk of?cers (5/10)
7.30 Road Cops. Police help a community
tackle a troublesome boy racer (6/10)
8.00 Yianni: Supercar Customiser. A chrome blue
wrap for a 17-year-old?s A Class Mercedes (AD)
8.30 Yianni: Supercar Customiser. Jack Duncan
wants his McLaren to be a true one-off (AD)
9.00 QI XL. Extended episode, with Jo Brand,
Alan Davies, Clive Anderson and Jimmy Carr
10.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.
Asking what the term generation really means
11.00 Unspun XL with Matt Forde. Chat show
12.00 QI XL. Stephen Fry hosts 1.00am QI
1.40 Would I Lie to You? 2.20 Mock the Week
3.00 Suits (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Bergerac 11.00
The Bill 12.00 New Tricks (AD) 1.00pm Last of
the Summer Wine 1.40 Bread 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London?s Burning (AD)
4.00 New Tricks (AD) 5.00 Bergerac
6.00 Steptoe and Son. Local gangsters start
running a protection racket in Shepherd?s Bush
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. The trio help a
broken-hearted man they ?nd in the woods
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. A hang-gliding
enthusiast crashes down in the village
8.00 Dalziel & Pascoe. The detectives
investigate a series of apparently accidental
deaths, and their inquiries lead them to a rosegrower who might be a serial killer (5&6/8) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. Jack and Strickland form an
unlikely alliance that sees them break the rules
to ?nd out why a British soldier died (8/8) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Sharon and Tracey
discover Garth could be a father
12.00 The Bill. Smith gets involved with a racist
1.00am Ashes to Ashes 2.15 The White Queen
3.20 Garden Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Who Do You Think
You Are? (AD) 11.00 Medieval Dead 12.00 Time
Team 1.00pm Africa (AD) 2.00 The Life of
Mammals 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Medieval Dead
5.00 Murder Maps. The case of John Christie
6.00 Auschwitz: The Nazis and the Final
Solution. The Allies face a dif?cult decision
7.00 Flying Scotsman with Robson Green.
The remarkable story of the famous train
8.00 The Day When Roosevelt Chose War. The
United States? entry into the Second World War
9.00 Open All Hours. Arkwright forces a
reluctant Granville to masquerade as a burglar,
so he can come to Nurse Gladys?s rescue
9.40 Open All Hours. Tight-?sted shopkeeper
Arkwright purchases ?re-damaged stock,
only to ?nd all the tins have lost their labels
10.20 Open All Hours. Arkwright buys a van
11.00 The Two Ronnies. With Barbara Dickson
11.55 The Two Ronnies. Vintage comedy
12.50am Black Ops. The assassination of
Palestinian leade r Khalil al-Wazir (AD)
1.50 Pointless 2.50 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Rare Breed:
A Farming Year 11.45 Love Your Garden (AD)
12.15am Britain?s Brightest Family (AD)
12.35 Teleshopping 2.05-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puf?n Rock) (r) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san
Rioghachd Bhig (Ben & Holly?s Little Kingdom)
(r) 5.45 Seonaidh (Shaun the Sheep) 5.55
Sr鄆d nan Sgread (Scream Street) (r) 6.10
Dragonan: Reis chun an iomaill (Dragons: Race
to the Edge) 6.35 D� a-nis? (What Now?) 7.05
Caistealan Alba (r) 7.30 Speaking Our
Language (r) 7.55 Binneas: Na Trads (r) 8.00
An L� (News) 8.30 North Coast 500: Le Anne
Lundon (r) 9.00 Port (r) 9.25 Mach a Seo!
9.55-12.25am Scottish Premiership Football
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Hafod Haul (r) 6.15 Y
Dywysoges Fach (r) 6.25 Guto Gwningen (r)
6.40 Tomos a?i Ffrindiau (r) 6.50 Ty Mel (r)
7.00 Meic y Marchog (r) 7.15 Heini (r) 7.30
Digbi Draig 7.40 Sam T鈔 7.50 Sblij a Sbloj
8.00 Cymylaubychain (r) 8.15 Cegin Cyw 8.20
Cwpwrdd Cadi (r) 8.30 Cled (r) 8.45 Marcaroni
(r) 9.00 Dwylo?r Enfys (r) 9.15 Stiw?n
Gwersylla (r) 9.25 Oli Dan y Don (r) 9.35 Nodi
(r) 9.45 Tecwyn y Tractor (r) 10.00 Hafod Haul
(r) 10.15 Y Dywysoges Fach (r) 10.25 Guto
Gwningen (r) 10.40 Tomos a?i Ffrindiau (r)
10.50 Ty Mel (r) 11.00 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Ti Fi a
Cyw (r) 11.05 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: F?ic a F?ac (r)
11.15 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: 123 (r) 11.30 Dysgu
Gyda Cyw: ABC (r) 11.45 Dysgu Gyda Cyw:
Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 12.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 12.05pm Crwydro (r) 12.30 Cefn
Gwlad (r) (AD) 1.30 Mamwlad gyda F?on
Hague (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05
Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd
3.05 Pengelli (r) 3.30 Pobol y Glannau (r) (AD)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05
Stwnsh: Boom! 5.15 Stwnsh: Dennis a Dannedd
(r) 5.25 Stwnsh: Dewi a?r Ditectifs Gwyllt (r)
5.35 Stwnsh: Fi yw?r Bos (r) 6.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 6.05 Her yr Hinsawdd (r) (AD)
6.30 Mwy o Sgorio 7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm. Eileen warns Sioned not to play with ?re,
and two people try to hide their blossoming
romance (AD) 8.25 Celwydd Noeth.
Quiz show, hosted by Nia Roberts
9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30 Ar Werth 10.00
Codi Hwyl. Dilwyn Morgan and John Pierce
Jones make plans to sail to Scotland (r) 10.30
Y Ditectif (r) (AD) 11.00-11.35 999:
Ambiwlans Awyr Cymru (r) (AD)
14
Wednesday March 7 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
1
2
3
Codeword No 3277
4
7
5
6
10
8
9
10
25
4
10
13
18
15
1
1
17
12
10
24
10
7
26
8
26
24
18
25
17
1
13
12
6
3
16
13
6
3
14
15
13
25
22
12
7
25
2
9
11
15
Train Tracks No 349
2
14
18
15
18
5
20
8
6
21
24
9
18
9
16
8
� PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7593
1
4
4
4
4
3
7
2
10
17
6
7
6
2
6
18
7
7
5
17
17
15
6
20
1
3
13
7
10
9
25
2
6
18
19
5
13
7
24
3
7
18
3
9
A
18
21
24
24
7
2
13
9
22
17
18
19
4
1
10
T
12
25
3
26
18
2
Across
African carnivore (5)
Emotional resolution (7)
Navy doctor (7)
Book of maps (5)
Blackthorn fruit (4)
Unconcerned; casual (8)
Imitate, reproduce (8)
Past participle of lie (4)
Solution to Crossword 7592
O
V I
E
RE
S
HE
A
DE
O
WA
E
DE
P ECCAD I L L O
U T
A O Y V
N T N E R WH I N E
F
A B N N R
AD DOGF I GH T
I
F N A
H
RB A L
B L OWE R
N C
L
I
O
L E T I ON B L EW
I
A R C
L
I
L E S P L A TOON
A
I
U
L W G
C L A S S I F Y
19
21
22
23
24
Automatic machine (5)
Avoiding commitment (7)
Cruel, insensitive (7)
Perfect (5)
10
1
23
1
13
13
11
17
15
1
B
1
24
17
8
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
18
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
8
9
10
11
12
13
21
22
23
24
25
26
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
T
Down
B
1 Dissertation (6)
2 Family treasure (8)
3 Military trainee (5)
4 Sea or space traveller (7)
5 Knitting stitch type (4)
6 Population count (6)
8 Aid to vision (7,4)
13 Academic tester (8)
14 Greedy eater (7)
15 Observing exact rules (6)
17 Pine leaf; annoy (6)
18 Aromatic herb (5)
20 Indonesian island (4)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
Try our new word puzzle
If you enjoy the times2 Crossword, you?ll
love Quintagram, our new and exclusive
clue-solving challenge
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or
text TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network
access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution
call 0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica No 4165
Y
A
N
F
E
E
A
W
F
O
A
S
S
O
C
B
W
E
D
O
I
E
O
A
S
T
I
L
L
H
U
S
H
Winners will receive a Collins English Dictionary & Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle and text in the numbers in the three
shaded boxes. Text TIMES followed by a space, then your
three numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your name, address
and postcode to 84901 (UK only), by midnight. Or enter
by phone. Call 09012 925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three answer numbers (in any
order) and your contact details.
No 4166
B
A
See today?s News section
H
H
L
K
D
E
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard
network charge. Winners will be picked at random from all
correct answers received. One draw per week. Lines close at
midnight tonight. If you call or text after this time you will not
be entered but will still be charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390
(Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
H
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce
a completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4269
Futoshiki No 3123
Kakuro No 2082
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
>
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
5
B
2
7
8
9
10
11
12
15
16
25
23
> 3
34
3
14
16
23
16
16
4
12
11
23
10
12
8
20
18
?
7
15
13
13
10
17
4
?
34
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
23
26
3
8
4
16
?
12
4
35
<
?
24
19
29
7
12
16
3
>
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
10
13
23
13
8
11
35
23
16
7
� PUZZLER MEDIA
22
the times | Wednesday March 7 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
The World Chess Hall of Fame
has finally seen fit to induct those
two doyens of hypermodern chess,
Richard R閠i and Aron Nimzowitsch, into their hallowed company. Their press release states:
?Richard R閠i was one of the
fathers of hypermodern chess,
which he promoted through his
play and writing.? It goes on to
mention his publications such as
Modern Ideas in Chess and Masters of the Chess Board, which saw
print posthumously. It also cites
his victory over Jos� Capablanca
at New York 1924 as an example
of his credentials as a world-class
player and mentions the opening
characterised by the fianchetto of
both bishops and the move c4,
which bears his name.
Here is a fine win by R閠i
against the great Alexander Alekhine. Notes are based on those in
R閠i Move by Move by Thomas
Engqvist (Everyman Chess).
White: Richard R閠i
Black: Alexander Alekhine
New York 1924
London System
1 Nf3
R閠i starts with his trademark
opening move but the game soon
transposes into a London System.
1 ... g6 2 d4 Nf6 3 Bf4 Bg7 4 h3
c5 5 e3 b6 6 Nbd2 Bb7 7 Bd3 0-0
8 0-0 d6 9 c3 Nbd7 10 Qe2 Rc8
11 a4 Re8 12 Ba6 Qc7 13 a5 cxd4
14 exd4 e5 15 dxe5 dxe5 16 Be3
Inaccurate. 16 Bh2 is correct,
keeping an eye on the centre.
Then 16 ... Bxa6 17 Qxa6 Nc5 18
axb6 axb6 19 Qb5 is about equal.
16 ... Nd5 17 axb6 axb6 18 Bxb7
Qxb7 19 Rfd1 e4 20 Nd4 f5
An incredible mistake from
Alekhine. Correct is 20 ... Nxe3 21
Qxe3 and only then 21 ... f5.
________
� DrDrDkD]
郉qDnD gp]
� 0 D DpD]
轉 DnDpD ]
� D HpD D]
蹹 ) G DP]
� ) HQ)PD]
�$ DRD I ]
谅媚牌侨
21 Nb5
White threatens a family fork
with Nd6, while positional threats
of Ra7 and Nc4 also have to be
considered. If Black had exchanged on e3 first, he could have
answered Nb5 with ... Qd5, but
here the knight is still in the way.
21 ... f4
Trying to save the exchange
leads to other material losses.
Possible lines are 21 ... Bf8 22 Ra7
Qc6 23 Nd4 Qd6 24 Nc4 Qe7 25
Nxf5 winning an important pawn,
or 21 ... Be5 22 Nc4 Qc6 23 Nxe5
Rxe5 24 Bh6 and White completely dominates the position.
22 Nd6 Qc6 23 Nxe8 Rxe8 24 Qc4
Ahead in material, R閠i plays
for the exchange of queens in
order to remove all the tactical
chances from his opponent.
24 ... Ne5 25 Qxc6 Nxc6 26 Nc4
Nxc3 27 bxc3 fxe3 28 Nxe3 Bxc3
29 Rac1 Nd4 30 Kf1
White avoids 30 Rxc3?? Ne2+
and secures the capture of at least
one minor piece.
30 ... Nb5 31 Rd5 Black resigns
________
� D D D i] Winning Move
郉 $ D 0p]
� h D D D] White to play. This position is from
Foreest, Bundesliga 2018.
轉 D D D ] Vrolijk-Van
Black is desperately attempting to gain
軵D ) ) D] counterplay by getting his major pieces on
蹽 D DQ) ] White?s back rank. However, his own king
跴D D )K)] is now vulnerable. Can you see why?
贒qD 4 D ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
MEDIUM
23 x 7 + 47
85 x 3 + 427
HARDER
3/
4
+ 15
25%
OF IT
+ 13 x 3
20%
OF IT
+9
+ 1/4
OF IT
+ 45
60%
OF IT
+ 59 x 2 + 98
+ 1/3
OF IT
OF IT
+ 1/2
OF IT
x 4 ? 882
+ 821
90%
OF IT
70%
OF IT
?J 9
?KQ J 3 2
?Q 6 5 3
?K 8
Contract: 4?
Lead: ? K
S
W
E
S
? 10 7 6 5 3
Killer Tricky No 5898
9
25
5
10
20
13
12min
10
8
10
24
15
8
19
8
13
8
17
23
23
8
4
21
16
9
19
24
19
14
3
51min
3
8
22
8
23
31
17
20
30
25
7
6
8
23
21
19
20
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
= 14 the numbers
+
-
x
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
We?ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
x
x
= 13
x
x
+
=8
=
51
=
20
Solutions
P A S T OR
K
K
V
T
O
MA Y F A I R
L
L
U
P
I S L
OH I O
T
M N O
Y E L L OW B
O
D O
F I S H F A RM
H
L
T
F
HO
E L I Z A
N
M
Y
N
U
DR Y D E N
9
1
5
3
8
4
7
2
6
7
6
8
2
9
1
5
4
3
4
3
2
7
6
5
1
8
9
1
8
3
6
7
9
2
5
4
6
2
9
4
5
8
3
7
1
H
E
N
S
E E L S
L
A
E CUR
I
T
ND E R
E
L L Y
I
H
I F F Y
T
M
D OWN
F
A
E F U L
BACK P A
E
O A
NAME D
C
B
S
HOUR
A
S
I
VO T I NG
I
C
V I RG I N
I
E
S
D O GWO O
L
A
R
Y E L L
Q
Set Square 2084
5
4
7
1
3
2
6
9
8
3
5
6
9
4
7
8
1
2
1
2
7
3
6
9
4
5
8
9
6
4
2
5
8
7
3
1
8
5
3
1
4
7
2
6
9
6
7
2
5
9
4
1
8
3
4
8
1
6
3
2
5
9
7
2
7
4
8
1
3
9
6
5
8
9
1
5
2
6
4
3
7
4
x
3
�
x
x
2
x
x
x
7
x
8
+
1
x
5
7
3
8
4
2
5
9
1
6
2
4
9
8
1
6
3
7
5
5
1
6
9
7
3
8
2
4
2
9
4
8
1
6
3
7
5
6
5
8
9
7
3
4
2
1
3
1
7
2
5
4
8
6
9
4
2
6
3
9
8
1
5
7
H
9
8
1
7
2
5
6
4
3
7
6
9
1
8
2
5
3
4
8
4
2
5
3
9
7
1
6
1
3
5
4
6
7
9
8
2
2
9
7
6
1
4
8
3
5
8
6
1
3
5
7
2
4
9
5
3
4
2
9
8
7
1
6
1
8
9
4
3
2
5
6
7
3
7
2
5
6
9
1
8
4
6
4
5
8
7
1
3
9
2
4
1
8
9
2
5
6
7
3
7
5
6
1
4
3
9
2
8
9
2
3
7
8
6
4
5
1
5
9
6
2
8
4
1
3
7
1
8
2
5
7
3
9
4
6
8
6
4
3
2
7
5
1
9
9
1
5
8
4
6
7
2
3
3
2
7
9
1
5
4
6
8
6
4
1
7
3
8
2
9
5
2
3
8
1
5
9
6
7
4
7
5
9
4
6
2
3
8
1
9
8
1
5
2
1
1 9
3 8
3
7
9
8 9
1 2
6 7 1 8 9
5 9
2 9 7
8 9 7 6
3 1
5 7
9 3 5
6 8 9
2 4 3
2
8 5 1 2 9
7 2
9 4
8
9 1 7 6
5 6
1
9 8
9 7
+
3
1
5
7
9
8
Train Tracks 348
1
Quintagram
1 Thaw
2 Harsh
3 Psyche
4 Norfolk
5 Quadriceps
5
1
3
5
4
5
2
5
4
6
3
3
A
1
3
6
1
P
C
R
E
S
H
U
L
O
E
R
E
K
S
T
R
F
C
B
K
4
3
1
?
1 < 2 < 3
?
2
4
5
?
?
5
1
4 >
KenKen 4268
E
E
R
R
U
A
A
G
M
A
S
K
L
E
Futoshiki 3122
2
I
E
N
N
A
Y
5
Cell Blocks 3159
Lexica 4164
E
E
D
Suko 2178
4
1
2
5
5
?
4
1
?
3
3
?
2
4
8
2 3
2
8
2
3
3
2
2
3
3 4
Word watch
Pelon (c) Hairless
Pelology (a) The
study of the
therapeutic uses
of mud
Pelma (b) The
sole of the foot
Brain Trainer
Easy 24
Medium 776
Harder 1,602
Chess
Killer 5897
4
7
3
6
9
1
8
5
2
5
2
1
3
+
9
O
3
5
7
3
6
4
1
2
9
8
CK
ACR E
I
I
A
X
GE N E R I C
A
J
O
E
RGUAB L E
S
R
D
B E R T H S
L
S
E
A L
CRAB
N
S M E
D
P R I Z E
A
U
N
F
UAN T I T Y
B
S
3
9
5
7
8
1
6
4
2
Kakuro 2081
Codeword 3276
N
A
R
R
A
T
E
D
Killer 5896
18
Enter each of
�
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Sudoku 9710
E
option of playing very low from
dummy, playing West for ?Q and
East for ?A. Which way to go?
Reconstruct West?s hand. Does he
have ?Jx, ?KQJxx, ?Qxxx, ?Kx
or ?Jx, ?KQJxx, ?Axxx, ?Kx?
Hmm, he could have either. Now
turn to East ? as so often reconstructing the weaker defender?s hand
can give the crucial clue. Does East
hold ?xx, ?xxx, ?Qxxxx, ?xxx or
?xx, ?xxx, ?Axxxx, ?xxx? Clearly
the second ? he?d hardly bid 2?
with only a queen.
Play dummy?s ?8. Correct ?
East has to win ?A. ?K is promoted and ten tricks are made. As
played by US expert Mark Dahl.
I hope you have enjoyed this ?
and the previous ? Wednesday
series (adapted from my Bridge
Lessons ? see andrewrobson.co.uk).
Next Wednesday, we start something
new.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
-
Lexica 4163
9
11
8
=
28
Sudoku 9708
5
+
Quick Cryptic 1041
22
26
4
6
-
Yesterday?s answers
aeon, alone, along, angel, angle, anole,
elan, eon, galleon, gallon, gean, gen,
genoa, glean, glen, gone, lane, lean,
leno, llano, loan, lone, long, longe, nag,
neg, nog, one
Killer Deadly No 5899
1NT
2? (1)
1?
2?
Pass
4? (2)
End
(1) Marginal but East-West were playing
Five-card Majors.
(2) 2? was not invitational but nor could it
be nothing (being a free bid). North?s
trumps and overall hand look so good.
2
4
4 4
6
3
Sudoku 9709
?6 5 4
?A 10 9 7 4
?4 3 2
N
4
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 12 words, average;
17, good; 22, very good; 27, excellent
?9 8
?J 2
?A J 10 9
W
3
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
Set Square No 2085
12
?4 2
N
6
3
3
� PUZZLER MEDIA
? A KQ 8
?A 10 7
?K 8
?Q 7 6 5
? 995
4
Polygon
Dealer: West, Vulnerability: Neither
48-CompleteHandReconstruction(4)
Winning declarer play seldom
involves complex squeeze endings
or other very technical plays. A
logical brain and a good nose are
far more important.
West leads ?K v your 4? and
you duck ? perhaps West will
switch to a club. No ? West
perseveres with ?Q and you win
dummy?s ?A. At trick three, you
ruff dummy?s ?10 to eliminate the
suit ? an innocuous but crucial
move. You cross to the ?AK,
noting the 2-2 split (West with ?J)
and must now negotiate clubs.
You lead dummy?s ?Q. Because
dummy has no other meaningful
club, it will be very hard for East
not to cover ?Q if he holds ?K,
for he could be promoting lower
clubs for his partner by doing so.
East plays a smooth low card.
Remember Zia Mahmood?s adage:
?If they don?t cover, they don?t have
it.? You rise with ?A. West?s
presumed ?K does not drop singleton ? you did not really expect it to
? West may well have bid on 3? if
he had a 2?5?5?1? shape.
However, when you next continue
with ?9 to West?s now bare king, he
finds himself endplayed.
Note, if you?d not ruffed dummy?s
third heart, West would have had a
safe ?J exit. If you?d taken a firstround club finesse, he?d have had a
safe second club exit. As it was, he
was forced to open up diamonds.
Left to your own devices, you?d
have no choice but to lead towards
?K, hoping West holds ?A. West?s
(low) diamond lead gives you the
18 x 2 + 8
10
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
EASY
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Hall of Fame
Cell Blocks No 3160
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
1 Qa8+! Nxa8 2
Rc8+ Re8 3 Rxe8
is mate
Quiz
1 21 2 Don Quixote 3 Acupuncture 4 Evita 5 Duchy of
Lancaster 6 Mount Fuji 7 White. It is also known as
the square-lipped rhinoceros 8 Edward 9 Linus
Pauling 10 Marriage A-la-Mode 11 Michael B Jordan
12 The C関ennes ? which is a subrange of the Massif
Central 13 Gregory XI ? born Pierre-Roger de
Beaufort 14 Martin Johnson 15 Roger McGough
07.03.18
MindGames
Difficult No 9711
Fill the grid so that every
column, every row and
every 3x3 box contains
the digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
Josephine
Balmer
Pelon
a A group of cyclists
b A seabird
c Hairless
Pelology
a The study of mud
b The study of balls
c The study of
peninsulas
Pelma
a A helmet
b Part of the foot
c Curtain rails
Answers on page 15
Fiendish No 9712
5
7
8
3 4
4
7
2 9
6
2 3
1
9
8
1
9 5
3
3 7
8
4
1 9
3
4
2
Super fiendish No 9713
8
7
2
6
5
2
9
6
9
4
8
5 1
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
8
3 7
3 5 2
8
4
8
5
9
4 3
1
6
5 3 4
7 9
5 6
5
9
1 2
5
7
4
2
8
5 3
2
6
8
5
7 9
8 4
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight to receive four clues for any of today?s
puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
The Times Daily Quiz Olav Bjortomt
Suko No 2178
ALAMY
11 Which Black Panther
star played Wallace in
The Wire and Vince
Howard in Friday
Night Lights?
1 How many consonants
does the English
alphabet contain?
2 In a 17th-century
novel by Cervantes,
Alonso Quixano
is better known by
what name?
12 Mont Loz鑢e is
the highest peak
in which French
mountain range?
3 Which form of
alternative medicine
involves the insertion
of thin needles into
the body?
15
6 Which mountain
features in Hokusai?s
woodblock print The
Great Wave off Kanagawa?
4 Which Andrew Lloyd
Webber musical is
about the second wife
of Argentine president
Juan Per髇?
7 Which colour describes
the largest extant
species of rhinoceros?
5 In 1362, through his
first wife Blanche, John
of Gaunt acquired
which duchy?
8 What is the actual first
name of the survival
expert Bear Grylls?
9 Which winner of two
unshared Nobel prizes
wrote the 1970 book
Vitamin C and the
Common Cold?
10 Which cycle of
six paintings by
William Hogarth
features The Toilette,
The Bagnio and The
Lady?s Death?
13 In 1377, which
Frenchman ? the
last Avignon pope ?
returned the papacy
to Rome?
14 Which Leicester
Tigers player captained
England?s 2003
Rugby WorldCupwinning team?
15 Which Litherlandborn poet is pictured?
Answers on page 15
Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the
spaces so that the number in each
circle is equal to the sum of the four
surrounding spaces, and each colour
total is correct
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1042 by Izetti
1
6
2
3
4
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
5
Across
1 Meat dish: second thing you
see in Chinese restaurant (9)
6 Think about love as a timid
person (5)
8 Sports of?cial not totally nice,
not one to get testimonial (9)
9 Some dramatic attempt
back?ring, it?s understood (5)
10 Green team working in
harmony (9)
12 Mad home ? son starts to
annoy nearly everyone (6)
13 Novelist supporting
environmentalism in speech
(6)
16 Criticised innocent youngster
when meeting old rocker (9)
18 Dance beat given energy (5)
19 Has funny new girl changed a
blissful situation? (7-2)
21 Out-of-date permit
unacceptable ultimately (5)
22 Cup of tea missed in state of
confusion (9)
Down
1 Iran etc. in turmoil for sure (7)
2 One gathers wood for burning
(2,4)
3 Wait for action on tennis court
(5)
4 Wild animal beheaded? One is
charged (3)
5 Was informed and could tell
you the state of the game?
(4,3,5)
6 After meandering, limited
areas came into view (12)
7 Just the fellow for US! (5,3)
11 He is one of them in a
chemistry set (8)
14 Looking embarrassed,
volunteers given exercise in
bureaucracy (3,4)
15 Steps laid down by good
person with self-importance
(6)
17 Horrible giants, one departing
in state of anxiety (5)
20 Member in a ?ghting force (3)
22
Yesterday?s solution on page 15
DIGITAL RADIO ? APP
VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
m. By Winston Graham 9.15
Chopin in Manchester. By Jim Poyser 10.00
Comedy Club: Bridget Christie?s Utopia.
A new comedy series with the awardwinning stand-up, Bridget Christie 10.30
The Secret World. Impression show
examining the private lives of public people
11.00 Danny Robins Music Therapy 11.30
The Remains of Foley and McColl
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Anna Foster 1.00pm
Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 6.30
5 Live Sport 7.45 5 Live Sport: Champions
League Football 2017-18: Tottenham Hotspur
v Juventus (Kick-off 7.45) 10.00 5 Live
Sport: 5 Live Football Social 10.30 Adrian
Goldberg 1.00am Up All Night 5.00
Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Lynsey Hipgrave, Tony Cascarino and
Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee and Baker 4.00
Adrian Durham and Darren Gough 7.00
Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am Extra
Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne. With Tracey Thorn 1.00pm Mark
Radcliffe. With members of indie-pop group
Superorganism 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Vic
Galloway. With a session by Lylo 9.00
Gideon Coe. Including archive sessions by
Gallon Drunk, Art Brut and Slapp Happy
12.00 6 Music Recommends with Mary Anne
Hobbs 1.00am The First Time with Yoko Ono
2.00 Wise Women 2.30 6 Music Live Hour
3.30 6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Highlights the work
of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.
JS Bach (Brandenburg Concerto No.5 in D
BWV.1050); Mozart (Piano Concerto No.25
in C K.503); Warlock (Capriol Suite); and
Brahms (Violin Concerto in D Op 77) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday March 7 2018
11
1G T
artsfirst night
MARILYN KINGWILL
Pop
Elbow
SSE Hydro, Glasgow
L
{{{{(
ooking, as ever, like a sad owl
crossed with a sadder bear,
Guy Garvey offered a wry
apology ? ?Sorry we?re late?
? acknowledging the fact
that this concert had been postponed
because of the snow. What should
have been a Friday night in Glasgow
was a Monday, and felt like it;
tentative, sober and slow to get going.
As part of what is essentially a
greatest-hits tour, the show leant
heavily on The Seldom Seen Kid,
Elbow?s bestselling LP, a decade old.
The opener, Starlings, all staccato pulse
and sudden brass, provided a stirring
overture and Grounds For Divorce had
lost none of its Led Zep punch, but
much of this material is overexposed
and bleached of intensity. During
Mirrorball Garvey?s voice strained on
the line ?We kissed like we invented
it? and the song was the better for this
sudden rip in the wallpaper.
Elbow are going through an
awkward phase; their pop moment has
passed, but they are not quite elder
statesmen. They always seemed an
accidental arena band, their music too
delicate, nuanced and melancholy to
suit these huge spaces, with their fans
having become more respectful than
euphoric, this is harder to disguise.
There were terrific passages ?
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
10
Размер файла
5 322 Кб
Теги
The Times, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа