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The Times Times 2 - 7 November 2017

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November 7 | 2017
Dad, I’ve got the keys to the kingdom
— and I’m locking everyone up!
2
1GT
Tuesday November 7 2017 | the times
times2
The man who
Live in the woods, huntin’,
shootin’ and fishin’? What
man doesn’t dream of it?
Robert Crampton
I
ALAMY
am intrigued by a fascinating
article online (Buzzfeed, worth
a look) about so-called freemen,
a term applied to a movement
in Britain and North America.
It describes chaps who don’t
accept that the laws of the land
apply to them. Any laws. Ever.
They reckon they should be left alone
to do what they want.
I’ll bet a fair few men will read that
sentence and think, how cool is that?
I know a part of me did when I wrote
it. These freemen characters have
even cooked up a vaguely plausible
yet on examination utterly bogus
legal justification to back up their
desires. It’s all to do with Magna Carta
and the US Constitution and how
contract law is superior to statute law.
Or something.
Never mind that. We’re dealing with
life in emotional rather than rational
(let alone legalistic) terms here. At
which level my contention is that you’ll
rarely encounter a better example
of the difference between men and
women than in their response to
this freeman ideology. Near enough
100 per cent of women will, I submit,
think that a licence to do whatever
you want is bonkers, a recipe for
catastrophic societal breakdown. And
while 95 per cent of men will think the
same, a significant number of that
95 per cent will also think, hmm, yeah,
mind you . . . if only . . . sounds like fun.
Which brings me to Dean Mitchell,
39, the hero of the Buzzfeed piece.
A while back Mitchell bought a
slice of woodland in East Sussex, on
which he built himself a Hobbit-style
home/cave/burrow. Mitchell, however,
neglected to secure planning
permission. The local council has thus
ruled that the structure, unobtrusively
vernacular as it is, must be destroyed.
Mitchell is playing the freeman card
in response.
Obviously I’m all for the planning
laws being upheld. That said, I’m yet
to meet the man who doesn’t
occasionally dream about chucking
it all in (wife, kids, job, house, car,
while preserving a swift, secure
internet connection) to live a simple
life in the woods, huntin’, shootin’
and fishin’, faithful hound at heel.
(Mitchell is pictured outside his
home stroking a rather fetching dog.)
Atavistic yearnings die hard.
My front
door must
be worth
a fortune
Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman
spent the weekend arresting a string of
the kingdom’s most powerful men.
What is he up to, asks Richard Spencer
I’m cool
about eggs
in fridges
It’s a staple mythological tradition,
this male desire to return to rural
authenticity, well documented from
the Spartans to King Alfred burning
his cakes right up to Hugh Fearnleyblinking-Whittingstall in the present
day. And the truth is, even in the 21st
century, many of us chaps remain
suckers for this sort of thing. I’m not
proud to count myself among that
number, but I can’t deny that the urge
flares up once in a while.
It doesn’t help Wealden district
council that Mitchell’s homemade
home is aesthetically rather charming,
the sort of throwback sylvan idyll
regularly celebrated on TV property
shows. Then again, it doesn’t help
him that he is keen on marijuana
and magic mushrooms. Or that he
ended up in the woods after an
acrimonious divorce. Any more than
it helps other committed freemen
across the Atlantic that they also
arrived at their present take on life
after a similarly bitter marital split.
While also being fond of guns and
wacky conspiracy theories.
As I say, most men are in no danger
of buying the freeman fantasy. It
doesn’t stop us indulging in it though.
Alan Bennett’s former
home in north London
is up for sale. The
big news — leaving
the eye-watering
£3 million price aside
— is that the property
is being marketed
partly on the strength
of the writer’s book
The Lady in the Van
having been filmed
outside. I wonder if this
ploy will succeed.
I hope it does.
Because while I have
no plans to move, if
and when I do I intend
to make great play
of the fact that our
front door once
appeared, albeit briefly,
in the first series of
Catastrophe, the cult
You must on no
account, says some
scientist or other,
keep your eggs in the
fridge; they stay
fresher for longer in
a cupboard. I hadn’t
realised that the
eggs in or out of the
fridge argument is a
long-running thing.
While many husbands
and wives apparently
fall out over it, optimal
egg storage has never
caused a moment’s
distress in the
Crampton household.
No discussion, no
debate, no domestic
disunity whatsoever.
Goodness me no.
Returning from
Waitrose, we simply
decant our newly
purchased medium
free-range (I refuse
to stretch to organic
— the mark-up is
criminal) ovoids into
the relevant section
of the fridge door.
Why else would
Zanussi and Bosch
put those cute little
compartments there
in the first place?
Perhaps our solidarity
on this issue provides
a clue to the longevity
of our marriage.
Or, looked at another
way, perhaps the fact
that my wife is firmly
of the opinion that
eggs (and ketchup,
and jam, and tomatoes)
live in the fridge,
while I have never
given the matter a
second of thought,
provides an equally
valid explanation.
Channel 4 sitcom.
They shot a couple of
scenes outside a café
just down the road
as well. Also, years
ago, an episode of
London’s Burning
featured a burnt-out
building round the
corner. That must
all be worth a few
extra quid, no?
T
o western audiences
Gulf leaders are hard
to differentiate, with
their identical robes
and head-dresses and
shared preference for
absolute monarchy. In
modern American
parlance, though, Crown Prince
Mohammed bin Salman, the man
shaking up Saudi Arabia, is a “bro”.
Think of his new best mate: Jared
Kushner, the son-in-law of President
Trump. The two thirtysomething
power-brokers, who are said to throw
all-nighters in Riyadh chewing over
the state of their fiefdoms, have a lot
in common. Brash, cocksure and
moneyed, they may not on the surface
appear much different in their world
view from their fathers’ generation,
which passed them their wealth and
power, but there are subtle differences.
These younger men have grown up,
studied at universities and do business
in an era where there are new social
norms that have to be followed, even if
not fully absorbed, and where privilege
can survive only by doing deals with a
certain amount of political
correctness, even in Saudi Arabia.
No one, I suspect, would hold out
Kushner as an opinion leader on
sexual harassment, but you cannot
imagine Ivanka Trump letting her
husband get away with her father’s
remark about “pussy-grabbing”.
Likewise, Crown Prince Mohammed
bin Salman makes all the right noises
about opening up opportunities for his
country’s men and women, rich and
poor, through education and economic
investment. Behind closed doors you
may suspect he is a bit of a loudmouth
frat-boy, but you can’t prove it.
The crown prince has spent this
year shocking the world, most recently
with his astonishing weekend coup de
théâtre, arresting a string of the
kingdom’s princes, ministers and
business moguls. They included the
Arab world’s richest man and a
number of former royal advisers and
middlemen. Many were well known
not only in the Gulf but in western
business capitals. Indeed, inasmuch as
Saudi Arabia has household names,
such as Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, the
billionaire friend of the Prince of
Wales, they were on the list.
At 32, the crown prince has
unmatched power in one of the world’s
most disliked but influential states,
and has shown exactly the extent to
which he is prepared to use it. No one
knows what it means. Will he really, as
he claims, turn the land of Wahhabi
Islam, of niqabs and pampered royals
trawling Paris boutiques for jewellery,
into a modern state, with high-tech
industries and beach clubs? Or will it
all collapse around him, with the
clerics and potentates on whom he has
turned hitting back amid a welter of
failed wars and empty, sand-blown
business zones?
He says that he wants Saudi Arabia
to be a new Dubai, only larger.
Imagining that is a “tough ask”, as the
western business advisers brought in
by the prince might put it. Dubai is
baffling enough, with its mixture of
religion and alcohol-fuelled nightclub
excess. It is even harder to imagine in
Saudi Arabia, whose identity is already
fixed in our minds, and very different.
It will also be a military Dubai: the
prince is not afraid to use the
weaponry his predecessors bought by
the handful from their western allies,
as the crippling war against Yemeni
rebels attests.
What makes the crown prince’s new
Saudi Arabia so hard for westerners to
unpick is the mix of old school and
new style. From the moment he was
thrust into the limelight by the
He has abolished
the powers of
arrest of the
religious police
accession to the throne in 2015 of his
father, the ageing King Salman, he has
made it clear that he wants things to
be different. He knew Saudi Arabia’s
image in the West: a sclerotic bunch of
princes, allied with a hardline clerical
establishment in the world’s biggest
“dodgy deal”. The clerics would back
the absolute monarchy in return for its
implementing their Wahhabist vision
of a gender-segregated, compulsorily
observant, entertainment-free state.
That absolutism gave the ruling
Saudi family not only total power, but
total control of the country’s wealth,
which they could spend on creature
comforts and, indeed, travelling
abroad to indulge in all the vices and
luxuries that they so rigorously
controlled at home. The country’s
western allies provided security and
diplomatic cover in return for oil and
contracts to supply arms and cars and
banking services.
Few can quibble with the need for
change, and the prince decided he was
the man to offer it — up to a point,
and that is where the “old school”
mixes with the new style. He has
reined in the clerics by abolishing the
powers of arrest of the religious police
and has insisted that allowing women
to drive, study and work without the
permission of “guardians” such as
fathers and husbands is something
they will just have to live with. Pop
concerts, cinemas and mixed beach
clubs are all in the offing.
However, the way that these
developments have been announced,
by royal decrees, often issued late at
night, with no warning and little
public debate beyond Twitter, seems
uncannily similar to how Saudi Arabia
the times | Tuesday November 7 2017
3
1GT
times2
is shaking up Saudi Arabia
COVER & BELOW; GETTY IMAGES
The lowdown
Millie Bobby
Brown
Do you remember the good old
days of child stars? You know, Judy
Garland and Macaulay Culkin?
Yup. Cute when young, but then
struggled in adulthood after “living
out childhood in front of millions”
turned out to be not such a great idea.
Yes, but weren’t they darling? And
that new one, just like them, so
small, so elfin, you want to take
her home with you.
Are you talking about Millie Bobby
Brown, the 13-year-old British child
star of Stranger Things?
That’s the one. She’s the new face of
Calvin Klein and she’s said to have
earned £3.7 million from a deal
with Converse. Teen Vogue said
“the future is Millie”; adult Vogue
said she’s changed red-carpet
dressing for ever. In just one year
d
sshe’s become one of Hollywood’s
most bankable stars.
m
Good job we now know so much
G
more about how to protect child stars.
m
Above: Mohammed
Ab
bin Salman with his
cousin Mohammed bin
Nayef, whom he
replaced as crown
prince. Left: Prince
Alwaleed bin Talal and
his then wife Princess
Ameerah at the
wedding of the Duke
and Duchess of
Cambridge. Cover:
Crown Prince
Mohammed and
King Salman
has always conducted its affairs. The
metaphor of new wine in old skins
would spring to mind, were it not that
the ban on alcohol is firmly in place.
He achieved his power, like any
prince, by being a favoured son. His
older brothers were better known in
Saudi Arabia and elsewhere. Prince
Sultan, for example, who is head of the
Saudi tourist board, worked for Nasa
and was the Muslim world’s first
astronaut, aboard the space shuttle
Discovery. But it was Mohammed, just
29 at the time, who was chosen by
King Salman to spearhead his
administration, becoming in
succession defence minister, head of
the economic council and, finally,
crown prince. There was no attempt to
justify his swift rise by virtue of his
experience, education or intellect,
though no one doubts that he is sharp.
He was not educated abroad, like
many of his generation, but at a Saudi
university. Nor did he study for PhDs
in management or economics. He did
not train in the army, or business, or
law. He was, it seems, just the son the
king trusted and that was that.
As such, he raises — once again, in
these politically confusing times — the
question of what it means to be a
“liberal”
l” and
d a “reformist”.
“ f mist” He has
been called both, in western accounts
that understandably perhaps see any
change in Saudi Arabia as a good
thing. Socially he is relatively liberal in
that he wants his generation of Saudis
to have similar personal freedoms at
home to their peers across the region,
if not the world. Politically, though,
this has meant being (even) less liberal
than his predecessors, for he knows all
too well that such radical changes can
trigger two types of opposition: a
backlash from conservatives, and a
“why stop there?” demand for more,
not just from genuine liberals, who
want democracy, but from those who
have different approaches to reform.
In a previous swish of arrests this
summer, which included a number of
well-known clerics, the targets were
not the Wahhabis who objected to
concerts and mixed parties, but
“moderate Islamists” associated with
the Muslim Brotherhood.
The prince seems popular, but
isolated. The enthusiasm for his
individual reforms among the young
people of Saudi Arabia cannot be
ignored. Fears of an angry response
from young would-be patriarchs
to their wives, sisters and mothers
He bought
a 440ft
yacht in
a $550m
impulse
buy
being allowed to drive fizzled out so
promptly that even at a distance of a
couple of months they seem absurd.
One Saudi friend described the men
under arrest, some of whom had been
publicly and openly accused of taking
kickbacks for years with impunity, as
being his country’s “biggest obstacles”.
On the other hand, they were also the
people whom the West knew. The
prince may be doing a lot of things
that western investors had been asking
for over the decades, but western
investors are by definition fickle. They
will want to know that the ground is
secure before they venture back in,
and just as the new prince is so new
that he felt he owed the old guard
nothing, he is also new enough for
investors not to know him either.
Prince Alwaleed has seen the
foundations of his business empire
questioned before. But he has never
been regarded as more corrupt than
any other international businessman.
How Bill Gates, for example, with
whom he owned the Four Seasons
hotel chain and compared notes on
billion-dollar philanthropy, will now
feel about the kingdom remains an
open question.
Two years ago, according to a story
in The New York Times that has never
been denied, Crown Prince
Mohammed was holidaying in the
south of France, as his family like to
do, when he spotted a 440ft megayacht moored off the coast. It
belonged to a Russian oligarch, and
the prince sent an underling to find
him and buy it on the spot, a $550million impulse buy.
The prince may be a moderniser, but
he is not a hair-shirt egalitarian. Nor is
he going to be burning the midnight
oil over spreadsheets. Details will be
left to others. But he is not alone in
that. The modern age is full of Trumps
and Putins, who smash the old world
order while assuring their own place in
the new one is comfortable. Whether
it is going to be comfortable for the
prince’s subjects is another matter.
Well, let me tell you about her first
kiss. Anyone watching when you
had your first kiss?
Of course not. That would have
been embarrassing.
It was slightly different for Millie,
whose parents and three siblings
moved to Los Angeles when she
was 11 so she could pursue her
acting ambitions. It didn’t work
out and they returned penniless to
Bournemouth. Then she was cast as
Eleven, a mute shaven-headed freak
in the cult TV show. Her first kiss
was on set, filmed in front of
250 crew and the watchful eye of
her dad. Then broadcast to millions.
I admit, that’s not totally normal.
Millie said it was “kind of weird”.
I expect she keeps her feet firmly
on the ground. Attends
normal school and
nd
all that.
She has given up
p
school and her
parents gave up
their jobs to do
travel and
promotional
duties. Her two
adult siblings
run her Twitter
and Instagram
accounts —
the latter has
6.3 million
followers. She now
ow
hangs out with
Cindy Crawford’s
’s
daughter at
Chateau Marmont.
ont.
Millie will be thee one
that turns out just
st
fine. Stranger things
ings
have happened.
Yes, Stranger Things
hings
has happened.
Helen Rumbelow
w
4
1GT
Tuesday November 7 2017 | the times
times2
Don’t mess with
Mariana, the world’s
scariest economist
Admired by Bill Gates, consulted by governments, Mariana Mazzucato is
the expert others argue with at their peril. Helen Rumbelow meets her
M
ariana Mazzucato
is a name to
strike fear in the
heart of anyone
slightly shaky in
their grasp of the
figures. You are
snoozing through
Newsnight as usual, then wham! This
economics professor comes on to a
panel debate and casually argues to
the death with Evan Davis and any
other hapless economist.
Britain does not build women like
Mazzucato. She looks like Sandra
Bernhard, with a tinge of Katharine
Hepburn. Her American-accented
voice is deep and loud, her speech
rapid-fire. But her pugilistic streak
probably comes from her Italian
heritage. As soon as Mazzucato begins
to rip pinstripe from pinstripe, social
media lights up. It’s a prize fight. In
the red corner Mazzucato, scourge of
austerity; in the blue corner esteemed
policy wonks spluttering about tax
cuts. “Mariana is killing again!” we
say bloodthirstily. “Get popcorn!”
She is, in economics terms, a
superstar. Her 2013 book, The
Entrepreneurial State, was on the
bedside tables of leaders around the
world. Now aged 49, she is garlanded
in prizes. Her thinking is an exciting
new hybrid of left and right. In a
nutshell, she believes the state should
become more like a venture capitalist,
buying shares in the companies of the
future. Think, as she says in her TED
talk, of how the government-funded
space race jump-started so much of
what we know of today’s technology.
Or how the iPhone is but a baby
born of the innovations of multiple
government-funded labs (the internet,
GPS, touchscreens, Siri, microchips
etc). Every significant technological
change of recent years, from medical
breakthroughs to Google, she argues,
traces its roots back to the state. Yet we
still idolise the lone entrepreneurs and
want the state to “get out of the way”.
To spend time with Mazzucato is
to be made to think differently. When
I meet her she’s in a friendly mood,
but still I feel like she is slapping
me awake rather forcefully. The
Financial Times reported this of
her smackdown of an anti-state
business leader at an economic
conference: “It was electrifying . . .
if you appreciate intellectual
blood sports.” She has advised
Jeremy Corbyn and Nicola
Sturgeon, but also meets
“regularly with both sides
of government”. She has a
lot of time for Greg Clark,
the business secretary, after
their work together.
“Bill Gates brought me out
to Seattle to speak to him,”
Bill Gates
brought
me out to
Seattle to
speak
to him
Mazzucato says to me in her London
office. “Because he had read my book
and he was very interested in the
implications of it for the green
revolution. He and Mark Zuckerberg
and others are trying to finance some
green investments. Gates said, ‘It’s
absolutely true: the public led, we
followed.’ He completely got it — that
it’s not about public v private, but
when the public takes the lead and is
ambitious, not just facilitating or being
meek, it can push the frontier.”
We meet at University College
London (UCL). She was lured here
from a prestigious professorship at the
University of Sussex by the offer of
setting up her own institute. She is
now the founder and director of the
UCL Institute for Innovation and
Public Purpose, which will soon have
a permanent home above the bright
lights of Tottenham Court Road.
Transcribed, her speech stretches to
pages before she pauses, leaping from
her frustration that unions never push
for technological change and “how
defensive they are” to her vision for
the BBC, the British Library, the Open
University and the Government
Digital Service (four of her favourite
institutions) to work together “in
really cool ways, revolutionising
communities”. She ends on why there
are so few women in economics.
“Arrogance” is at the root of it.
If you’re an
innovator
you will
make
mistakes
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the times | Tuesday November 7 2017
5
1GT
JOONEY WOODWARD FOR THE TIMES
She is by birth Italian and spent
her first five years in Rome. Her father
is a nuclear fusion scientist (“he’s one
of the best fusion guys — of course
I say that, he’s my dad”) and was
headhunted by Princeton University
in the US. She spent her girlhood
running about the Princeton lawns
barefoot, being “naughty”; the fictional
character she most identifies with is
the lateral thinker Pippi Longstocking.
Her intellectual fearlessness may come
from spending her formative years in
an Ivy League setting — her mother,
also an academic, taught Italian to
John Nash, the Nobel prizewinning
mathematician. I tell her she has a fan
base who love to see her duelling on
TV. “Do I?” she says in alarm.
Then: “I think maybe because I
really care. I think there’s a battle
for the story. And I see too much
timidness by people when they’re told
these stories that I would argue are
wrong economically. Once I was on
Newsnight and I said to the guy from
the Adam Smith Institute, ‘Do you
realise that Adam Smith would not
agree with you? Because what Adam
Smith meant by free market was free
Mariana Mazzucato
and, left, Bill Gates
from rent, not free from the state?’
I enjoy dismantling the assumptions
upon which arguments are made.”
She does not do TV as much as she
would like; she sometimes prefers to
put her children to bed. She has four,
ranging in age from 11 to 17.
“It wasn’t on purpose,” she says.
“You’d have to be crazy to have four
children. So we had two, a perfectly
good family, and then the third child
that was unexpected was twins. When
we found out we almost had a heart
attack, but actually it’s been fantastic
because it means it’s impossible to take
yourself too seriously. And one of the
things that happens in academia is you
definitely take yourself too seriously.”
Her Italian husband, Carlo
Cresto-Dina, is a film producer in Italy
(he won the Grand Prix at Cannes in
2014). He is away for two or three days
of the week; “the secret to a healthy
marriage — no, I’m kidding”. She feels
fairly Italian and speaks only Italian
to their children at their London
home, but Mazzucato wasn’t about to
submit herself to the Italian working
environment, where advancement is
based on who “you’re kissing up to”.
times2
In fact, she often uses Italy in
particular and Europe in general as
examples of economic stagnation
compared with America. When she
travels the world, working with the
European Union and China alike, she
says the big question by policymakers
is: “Where are the European
Googles?” They look to the growth of
Silicon Valley and believe that it is the
product of America’s famously anti-big
government approach. That we in
Europe are smothered by the state.
She could not disagree more. Her
book goes into great detail, listing
all the ways in which American
government was the revolutionary.
It went way beyond its European
counterparts to fund entrepreneurs
and so created the Silicon Valley
miracle, right down to a $500,000
loan to Apple before it went public.
Her critics mock this line of thought,
saying things such as: “Steve Jobs even
drove to work on government-funded
roads.” But few survive if they do so to
her face. She finds even more galling
the lengths to which some big
companies go to avoid taxes.
“My hero is Warren Buffett, who is
not a communist. He often says, ‘Why
do you keep reducing my tax?’ ”
If governments acted more like
venture capitalists, not just investing,
but retaining shares in companies, she
says, they could fire up excitement in
the two industries she predicts are ripe
for innovation, “green” and care of the
elderly. She says that Gates told her: “I
don’t see the public leading today in
green as it did in IT.”
The state should be investing in
green innovation, even at the risk
of failing. They should adopt Jobs’s
mantra to business leaders to “stay
foolish”, and keep on taking risks. But
wait, I say, “stay foolish” is hardly an
election slogan, is it? Aren’t the public
rightly resistant to wasting taxpayers’
money on companies that fail?
“This issue of risks is one of the key
things I want the institute to look at
because we really worry when the
public sector messes up. But if you’re
an innovator you will make mistakes.”
Mazzucato is a rare breed in
economics: a woman at the top of
the tree. While the UK has had two
female prime ministers, we have never
had a female chancellor. Why is it
such a male-dominated discipline?
She remembers as a young woman
attending economics job fairs held in
hotels where she was interviewed by
countless men, “literally on the bed . . .
It’s kind of a funny scene.”
“There are more women in other
sciences and part of it is there’s a lot
of arrogance in economics,” she says.
“Whether it was the economists
talking to the policymakers or to the
average Joe on the street it’s, like, ‘This
is right and you don’t understand, so
you’re just going to have to trust us.’
This is going to sound a bit simplistic,
but perhaps it’s a bit more on the
alpha male character spectrum. Maybe
that’s something. But also I’m sure
there were certain types of prejudices,
because it also is a question of role
models — we know they matter.”
They do and she does. I say
goodbye, leaving her among the
cardboard boxes ready to unpack for
her institute and already knowing
I will fail to convey a fraction of the
ideas she rattled out in our hour. If
you were some kind of intellectual
venture capitalist, or even someone
betting on the outcome of a TV
showdown, you would feel safe
investing big in Mazzucato.
The rise of
the flash knit
By Hattie Crisell
With every change of weather comes
a wardrobe crisis — I’m in the midst
of one now. I’ve spent the past month
or two wafting around London in
thin coats, bare legs, boots and a
beret, fancying myself to be Meryl
Streep in Kramer vs Kramer.
However, after an hour of waiting for
fireworks on Sunday night, my toes
freezing in my inadequate cotton
socks, I was forced to admit that the
jig is up. It’s actually cold now.
It’s all very well to say, “Put on a
jumper,” but if you work in fashion
you need something extra, and a
plain navy crewneck isn’t it. The
answer, I conclude, is an ostentatious
knit, the cold-weather equivalent of a
going-out top: bung it on with jeans
and a bit of lipstick and you have not
just an outfit, but a “look”.
Alessandro Michele of Gucci leads
the way on flamboyant jumpers. One
version (£975, net-a-porter.com)
features rainbow stripes and a
roaring Bengal tiger rendered in
sequins. An even more sensational
number has a parrot knitted into
each arm and the legend “Blind for
Love” in the middle. It’s extremely
expensive at £1,850, but then it is the
West End rock musical of jumpers,
and that level of razzle-dazzle doesn’t
come cheap. Act fast — it has almost
sold out (matchesfashion.com).
On a tighter budget? Essential
Antwerp has a wool-cashmere piece
featuring a sparkling octopus and
the words “Embrace Me” (£175,
essentiel-antwerp.com). Markus
Lupfer’s black sweater has a
twinkling red-lip motif on the breast
(£225, net-a-porter.com). Perhaps the
most inexpensive yet comprehensive
selection can be found at Zara, which
has several spangly sweatshirts at
under £30 (zara.com) — although
they are not wool, which rather
misses the point.
So my final
recommendation
is Mint Velvet’s black
knit with sequinned
bell sleeves (£89,
mintvelvet.co.uk).
It’s not quite as
flashy as a tiger,
but at least it
might save you
from frostbite.
Gucci jumper, £1,850,
matchesfashion.com
Sweatshirt,
£25.99, zara.com
6
Tuesday November 7 2017 | the times
1GT
body&soul
Stomach cancer is just one of the
risks of taking ‘anti-acid’ drugs
Dr Mark Porter
P
roton pump inhibitors
(PPIs) — the “anti-acid”
family of drugs that
include omeprazole and
lansoprazole — are
among the most widely
prescribed medicines in
the UK, so it should
come as no surprise that new research
linking them to cancer of the stomach
has caused concern. I work in a small
practice with 6,000 patients and took
three calls from worried patients about
it in just one afternoon.
Since their introduction nearly three
decades ago, PPIs have become the
drug of choice for treating acid-related
problems ranging from heartburn to
stomach ulcers. And although initially
designed to be taken only for weeks or
months, millions of people have been
on them for years.
As their use has become more
widespread, a number of worrying
associations have come to light and
the research suggesting a link with
stomach cancer is just the latest in a
long line of concerns. Over the years
PPIs have been linked to kidney and
heart disease, osteoporosis, food
poisoning, the hospital “superbug”
Clostridium difficile, and vitamin and
mineral deficiencies.
Much of the research falls short of a
causal relationship — ie it is not clear
that the PPI is causing the problem —
and it may just be that there are other
factors about people who need to take
PPIs that put them more at risk of the
various diseases. But the links are
strong enough to fuel a growing sense
of unease among doctors prescribing
them. And that includes me, not least
because I take one daily.
The relative risk of long-term
complications is small: the gastric
cancer study published in the journal
Gut concluded that long-term use of
PPIs was associated with only four
additional cases a year for every 10,000
people taking them. Yet it makes sense
to take these drugs in as low a dose,
and for as short a time, as possible.
Herein lies another problem. PPIs
are so effective at symptom control
that people who have been prone to
indigestion or heartburn are loath to
go without them. The problem is
compounded because when people do
stop taking them there is often a
temporary rebound increase in
stomach acid production that can
aggravate symptoms, prompting them
to reach for the pills again. If you do
decide to reduce the dose of your PPI
and/or stop it, then you need to do it
gradually (see panel, right).
Also, many people are on much
higher doses than they need because
of when they take their PPI. Taking a
drug such as omeprazole or
lansoprazole is like throwing a spanner
into the cogs of a working machine.
They work by jamming the
mechanism responsible for producing
stomach acid, but timing is critical: if
the machine isn’t working the spanner
simply bounces off the stationary cogs.
To work properly a PPI needs to be
Low deposits
– just £49
per person*
taken at least 30-60 minutes before the
first meal of the day so that it can be in
place for when the act of eating your
breakfast switches on the acid pump. If
you take it after the meal, then it is too
late. And if you don’t eat within an
hour or two of taking the tablet, blood
levels plummet and there aren’t
enough spanners to jam all the pumps.
Assuming you are taking your PPI
properly, the next step if you are
symptom-free is to try to reduce the
dose and/or wean yourself off it.
Some manage this easily, but others
struggle and for them the day-to-day
benefits are likely to outweigh longterm risks. Indeed, some groups need
to take them indefinitely, such as those
with pre-cancerous change to their
lower gullet (Barrett’s oesophagus).
I am one of the unlucky ones. I do
not have Barrett’s disease, but do have
a weak valve at the top of my stomach
that gives me constant heartburn if I
don’t take a daily PPI. I am, however,
on the lowest dose available.
The facts about PPIs
0 If you are symptom-free it is
worth trying to stop or reduce the
dose of your PPI
0 Talk to your GP about dose
reduction if you are above the daily
minimum (15mg for lansoprazole,
10mg for omeprazole)
0 If you are already on the minimum
dose, try taking it every other day for
two weeks, then seeing if you can
manage without (unless told by your
GP that you should remain on
therapy). Or use only as required,
eg the morning of Christmas Day or
before a big night out
0 Your GP or pharmacist will
be able to recommend other
antacids to cover any temporary
rebound symptoms
How to
QA
How accurate is the
blood test for deep
vein thrombosis? My
calf swelled up after
a knee replacement.
My GP took a test
that suggests I have
a clot — pending a
scan, I am taking
an anticoagulant.
Deep vein thrombosis
— a blood clot typically
in the lower leg — is a
common complication
of major orthopaedic
surgery. Bits can break
off, circulate the body
and become lodged in
the lungs, a potentially
fatal condition called
pulmonary embolus.
The classic symptoms,
swelling and pain, can
be hard to diagnose
after an operation. Also
the blood test (D-dimer)
may come back raised
for those with healthy
clots around a wound.
When a D-dimer test
suggests a clot, it’s
standard practice to
start treatment pending
a scan — the sooner
anticoagulants are
started the better. And
scans are not foolproof
— you may need two a
week or so apart.
If you have a health
problem, email
drmarkporter
@thetimes.co.uk
Whatever your
skin complaint,
from psoriasis to
eczema, these are
the treatments to
try. By Peta Bee
T
he ice that frosted
windscreens across the
UK yesterday was a
chilly reminder of what
the cold can do to our
cars. Yet the bad
weather also plays
havoc with our skin.
According to the British Skin
Foundation (BSF), a quarter of GP
appointments are about skin problems
— figures show that 60 per cent of
Britons will have a skin condition at
some point — and numbers peak at
this time of year. “Autumn and winter
can be especially problematic for those
with existing conditions like eczema or
psoriasis,” says Dr Bav Shergill, a
consultant dermatologist at Brighton
General Hospital and spokesman for
the BSF. “The body is exposed to
harsh changes, leading the blood
vessels in the skin to change rapidly,
leaving it looking weatherbeaten.”
What, though, can be done? Here
are the new rules for skin protection.
Eczema
Atopic eczema has reportedly become
as much as three times more common
in recent decades. Other than weather,
triggers include cosmetics, detergents
and stress. “At this time of year people
find their eczema is often worse,” says
Shergill. “Central heating causes a
decrease in the skin’s moisture and an
increase in house dust mites, which
can cause havoc for people with the
condition. The glue that holds the skin
together is just weaker in eczema.”
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the times | Tuesday November 7 2017
7
1GT
body&soul
protect your skin during winter
GETTY IMAGES
Moisturisers and emollients will
reduce the dryness, scaling, cracking
and soreness, and the key is “to find
one that works for you”, Shergill says.
Your GP may prescribe vitamin Dbased gels that encourage a normal
rate of skin-cell growth and, in the
short term, topical creams containing
steroids. Over time these can damage
the skin and may cause side-effects
such as changes in blood pressure and
decreased growth in children.
A newly launched non-steroidal
treatment called Soratinex is being
hailed as a breakthrough by some
experts. Professor Anthony Chu, a
former senior consultant at Imperial
Healthcare Trust and Hammersmith
and Ealing hospitals in London, found
that 60 per cent of patients
experienced improvements in their
symptoms after only eight weeks.
“Nearly all the patients in our trial
experienced some benefit, but 60 per
cent of them experienced significant
improvements of between 50 and 100
per cent,” Chu says.
A three-step treatment, it involves a
gel that removes flaky deposits, a
cream that reduces inflammation and
an oil that moisturises and creates a
protective layer. It was developed in
Australia and contains natural oils,
herbal ingredients and minerals. It
went on sale in the UK last week and
can be bought online with no
prescription (£76.50 for small, £121.05
for large from franklpharma.co.uk).
Acne
What to try Well, first try not to
scratch as this simply provides bacteria
with more ammunition to disrupt the
skin’s barrier function and make the
area more inflamed. Avoid triggers
when possible, and be careful not to
overapply moisturiser or emollients.
“You mustn’t apply it too thickly or it
can cause an environment in which
bacteria will thrive,” Shergill says.
“Make it a sheen that gives you a glow.”
You should avoid aqueous cream BP,
which was once commonly prescribed
for eczema, but was shown in a study
by the University of Bath a few years
ago to reduce the thickness of healthy
skin in volunteers by more than
10 per cent in only four weeks and to
increase water loss, which would make
eczema worse.
This month a new oral treatment for
eczema will be launched. It has been
developed by a spin-off company from
the University of Manchester’s
renowned dermatology unit. During
studies that he conducted at
Manchester, Dr Neil Gibbs, a
dermatologist, discovered that people
with eczema and other dry skin
conditions have trouble producing
fillagrin, a protein that strengthens the
skin barrier. “A fillagrin deficiency has
been linked to more severe atopic
eczema and to its persistence into
adulthood,” Gibbs says. His company,
Curapel, has developed a supplement,
Pellamex, containing amino acids
derived from sources including soya
beans. It has been shown in clinical
trials to bolster fillagrin production to
strengthen the skin barrier and reduce
eczema-like symptoms. It’s available
online (and without prescription) from
November 20 from curapella.com.
Rosacea
The NHS estimates that one in ten
people suffer from this condition,
which leaves the cheeks and other
areas of the skin flushed and sore and
can cause acne-like breakouts. Amy
Schumer, Cameron Diaz and Renée
Zellweger have suffered from it.
Common triggers for flare-ups
include the sun, alcohol, hot drinks,
exercise, cosmetics and some skincare
products. Another possible cause is an
overreaction to a common skin
bacterium, Bacillus oleronius, or to a
mite called demodex that lives on our
skin. Shergill suffers from it and says
the run-up to the festive season is hard
to endure. “At this time of year you are
constantly heading from extremely
cold to very warm environments,
which aggravates the flushing of skin.
It’s also exacerbated by stress and late
nights of partying.”
What to try Avoid any fragranced
products. Opt instead for a medicalgrade barrier cream to lock moisture
in and keep irritation out and also help
to control redness. Try Epionce
Medical Barrier Cream (£29.50,
epionce.co.uk). GPs may prescribe
topical creams or gels as well as drugs
that target the flushing and redness.
Dr Stefanie Williams, a cosmetic
dermatologist and the founder of the
Eudelo clinic in Harley Street, London,
often prescribes low-dose antibiotics
that have an anti-inflammatory effect
on the blood vessels and papules.
Taking a probiotic insures against
the depletion of beneficial gut bacteria
that occurs with antibiotics, but you
should also eat as many gut-friendly
foods as possible: yoghurt, kefir,
tempeh and miso are good. “There’s a
general issue with inflammation in the
body with many skin conditions,
including rosacea, and so a diet that
combats that is helpful,” Shergill says.
Psoriasis
In normal skin, cells are made and
replaced every three to four weeks, but
for psoriasis sufferers the turnover is
every three to seven days. The buildup of cells that results causes the
fissures or cracks in the skin that
cause so much angst. About 2 per cent
of the population are affected.
“People with psoriasis often have
other complications, including
arthritis and joint stiffness,” Shergill
says. “It’s a lot more complex than just
unsightly and patchy skin.”
What to try Many find their condition
improves with exposure to sunlight,
and some dermatologists use UV light
therapy. Hospital treatment is tightly
tailored to an individual, so it’s no use
sitting under a sun lamp or making
another DIY attempt at home.
The rise of adult acne has been
described by some dermatologists as
an epidemic. It’s estimated that
women are five times more likely than
men to be affected, with the hormonal
swings of the menstrual cycle,
pregnancy and the menopause to
blame. “Around one quarter of women
over the age of 30 still have acne or
have it for the first time,” Shergill says.
What to try First, don’t over-wash
your skin as that can make matters
worse because “your skin responds by
producing more oil to restore the
balance”, Shergill says. Use a gentle,
non-comedogenic cleanser. Many
dermatologists I know recommend La
Roche-Posay’s Effaclar 3-Step AntiBlemish System (£32.50 from Boots).
Popular over-the-counter spot
creams containing benzoyl peroxide
can be so harsh they make matters
worse for many who use them. I
suffered severe acne in my teens
and later as an adult. I tried
everything, including antibiotics
and topical steroids, until I was
eventually prescribed the
controversial drug Roaccutane
by my dermatology consultant.
The vitamin-A derivative has
notoriously been linked to causing
depression and other side-effects in
some patients. It’s certainly not for
everyone and is not suitable for
women thinking about having children
because it has been shown to cause
foetal damage. Yet prescribed and used
appropriately under careful medical
supervision, it can be a wonder drug.
Shergill describes it as “still the best
treatment around for acne”. And I
have not had a single blemish since
completing my course of the drug
almost 20 years ago.
8
1GT
Tuesday November 7 2017 | the times
arts
‘Australia has
embraced some
very evil acts’
Booker prizewinner Richard Flanagan tells Robbie Millen
about the real-life conman who inspired his new novel
‘I
never thought people could
be called evil until I met
him,” says Richard Flanagan.
“Each day I had to teeter on
this abyss and not fall in. He
was terrifying to be with.”
“The Evil One” was a
conman called John
Friedrich. In 1991, 23 years before he
won the Man Booker prize, Flanagan
ghost-wrote Friedrich’s autobiography
in six weeks. His experience inspired
his new novel, First Person, about a
would-be novelist called Kif Kehlmann
who is pushed to the abyss as he
ghost-writes the memoirs of a fabulist,
liar and crook called Siegfried Heidl.
“He really liked having power over
people,” Flanagan says of Friedrich.
“Once he had power over people it
intrigued him to see what he could
make them do. His method of gaining
power was to discover everything
about your private life.” In First Person
Flanagan gives a sense of how
oppressive it was to be in Friedrich/
Heidl’s presence as the mini-Satan,
father of lies, tries to manipulate and
worm his way into the writer’s life.
Friedrich can lay claim to be
Australia’s most infamous fraudster. In
the 1980s he took over an innocuous
charity, the National Safety Council of
Australia, and turned it into a
swashbuckling search-and-rescue
operation, with ships, helicopters,
aircraft, even a submarine. Odd
rumours soon circulated that he was
running a paramilitary force with CIA
backing. And then there were the
whispers of financial skulduggery.
Soon enough it went bust — and
Friedrich was charged with defrauding
nearly $300 million.
While Friedrich waited for his trial
Flanagan was commissioned to write
his memoir. A tricky task. This man
with “no birth certificate, no passport”
was not on speaking terms with the
truth. Just as in the novel, it is
impossible for the ghost writer to find
the truth. Separating truth from lies
became even harder for Flanagan
when, three weeks into the project,
Friedrich blew his brains out.
The autobiography, Codename Iago,
did appear. It is “currently unavailable”
on Amazon. It’s a “crappy paperback
with even crappier content”, Flanagan
says. It is a “terrible book. I was never
ashamed of it, though I should have
been. It’s not much of a book. It’s as
much as one could be by someone
who has never written a book and had
to do it in six weeks about someone
who shot himself in the middle of it.
“The publisher was saying to
everyone they had a tell-all memoir.
Which was big news because there
were many unanswered questions
about whether this was a CIA-funded
secret army in the heartland of
Australia, where had all the money
gone, and who he was. And there I
was in Hobart desperately trying to
make up the answers.” As Flanagan
says, it taught him how to construct a
book and inhabit the mind of another
person. Three years later the first of
his seven novels appeared.
Flanagan’s interest in evil is a
recurrent theme. He won the Man
Booker prize in 2014 for his novel
The Narrow Road to the Deep North,
about the PoWs who worked on the
Burma Death Railway and the
Japanese soldiers who terrorised
them. His father, Archie (“prisoner
No 335”), a teacher, was one such slave
labourer. That novel, so personal, is
a study of evil.
“I was brought up in an era
where evil [supposedly] did not
exist — it was a product of
environment. There was a
psychological or environmental
or historical explanation. After I
met Friedrich I did not believe
in that at all. Unless you view
the possibility of evil as real, you
can go to a dark place yourself or,
worse, society can. You have to
admit, it’s a possibility that it existss
within us. I think by not admittingg it
for some decades evil has returned.
d.
Friedrich’s
method of
gaining
power was
to discover
everything
about your
private life
“Australia . . . has embraced some
very evil acts,” he says, in particular
the “treatment of refugees. With the
Pacific Solution [where asylum seekers
are transported to Papua New Guinea
and other Pacific islands] we now pay
vast sums for asylum seekers to be
raped, murdered, children sexually
abused. Politicians trade on whose
policies will be the cruellest. That is evil.”
There is a timeliness to the novel.
“Something happened to me and I was
haunted by it, but I didn’t want to
write about my own experience,” he
says, “As the years and decades passed
it seems to me that it spoke to the
strange new world that was coming
into being.” When the book came out
in Australia this year some saw it as a
parable for the Trump era, but
Flanagan started writing the book well
before last year’s US election. “There
were a couple of references [in it] to
Trump when he was a joke. I then had
to take them out because I wasn’t
trying tto write a zeitgeisty book.”
He rregards truth as being under
sustained assault. “The hinge that
susta
holds freedom together is truth —
hol
and it is very rusty,” he says.
an
Truth’s enemies are “lying so
T
outrageously, they are
o
destroying the sense that any
d
truth matters. They just shout
tr
another outrageous opinion.
an
Whether it is Putin or climateW
change deniers or Trumpean-style
cha
politicians, if they can denigrate the
polit
truth they
th have won.”
So if ffacts matter, why write this
story as fiction? The answer lies in the
the times | Tuesday November 7 2017
9
1GT
ULF ANDERSEN/GETTY IMAGES
novel, which makes the case for
fiction. “The novel is a high point
of our capacity to understand
ourselves through story,” says
Flanagan. He is a great believer in
the power of the novel to tell truths.
“There’s this nonsense abroad that
reality has outstripped fiction, that
the novel ceases to have a purpose.
Reality has not outstripped fiction,
untruth has outstripped the truth.
You need the power of invented stories
to seek to ask what that means and
where this leads us to. That’s what
the book is about.”
Flanagan goes on to dismiss “the
cult of memoir”, and in First Person
Kif takes aim at Karl Ove Knausgaard,
Ben Lerner and Rachel Cusk, novelists
who write autobiography. The rise of
the literary memoir is part of a
solipsistic, internet-powered culture in
Richard Flanagan and,
below left, the conman
John Friedrich. Right:
the actress Shailene
Woodley at the Emmys
which “people are really encouraged
to be the first person in all their
presentation on social media”, he
thinks. He finds it deeply disturbing
that Mark Zuckerberg believes privacy
is an outdated social norm.
Flanagan makes a strong case for
the novel: “If there is one defence of
a novel, it reminds us that we are not
alone. Reading is a private act, but it is
not solipsistic because it connects you
to everyone else.” And amid Facebook,
Twitter and state surveillance, in a
world where the private sphere has
shrunk, “reading becomes much more
powerful; books become subversive.
“It sounds hyperbolic, but a few
weeks ago an actress, Shailene
Woodley [the American star of
Divergent, The Fault in Our Stars and
Big Little Lies], walking down the red
carpet at the Emmys, was asked what
times2
were her favourite TV shows and she
said, ‘I don’t have a TV. I prefer to read
books.’ What I thought was an entirely
innocent remark was condemned. She
was given a pasting in the media.”
Woodley was attacked as being
arrogant and snobbish. “Books are the
new counterculture,” he says.
Flanagan, 55, and with a bullet head,
looks as pugnacious as he can sound.
No mincy novelist, he has the build of
someone who could geld a kangaroo
with ease, and he has views to match
the strength of his “Strine” accent.
Anzac Day — Oz’s Remembrance
Sunday — is a “nationalistic festival
which has become like a death cult . . .
It commemorates the idiocy of
Australians who go across to the other
side of the world and invade another
empire, the Ottoman, for the sake of
another empire, the English. All these
young men are massacred — and we
lose. What good is there in that story?
“And what’s worse, for the next one
hundred years we have fought other
empires’ wars. We have fought for the
Americans in every war since World
War Two — it has never been in our
own national defence. So we learnt
nothing from Anzac Day.”
He doesn’t hold much truck with the
rise of creative writing courses. “The
fundamental problem [is that] once
you have tenure in creative writing
you can make far more money as an
academic than as a writer. It is very
difficult to keep your relationship with
the reader at the forefront of your
mind. Malcolm Lowry said a writer is
someone with readers. The moment
you forget that you cease to be a
writer and become an academic.
“Then the next step is you to have
carve a niche in academia. Find
an identity as a Puerto Rican
novelist or a transgender
novelist.” That rather defeats
the promise of literature,
where “we go to discover the
possibility of being an
infinity of things, to discover
we can be anything”.
Flanagan has little time for
literature’s new guard in
America, the product of the
creative writing industry.
“You see the rise of the
Brooklyn class. They have
nothing to say.”
Flanagan was born in
Tasmania in 1961 to
descendants of Irish convicts,
a family who have been on
the island for 170 years. And
he has stayed in the Aussie
boondocks. “I existed like
a foreign writer in my own
country for years. My first
novel had no reviews.
The Sydney Morning
Herald refused to review
it, saying that it did not
fit into any recognisable school of
Australian writing.”
Other than passing a few terms
as a Rhodes scholar at Oxford, he was
never tempted to follow Clive James,
Barry Humphries and Germaine
Greer and settle in Britain. “I have
always seen those people as part of
the old empire. I feel they were
beholden to imperial myths. They felt
there was a centre and the centre was
London. And they had to go there or
they were nothing.
“Australia was until the 1970s a
colony of the mind. They were
prisoners of that colony and they felt
that their liberation came in coming
to the great centre.”
The father of three adult daughters,
Flanagan lives in Hobart with his wife,
Shailene Woodley
got a pasting for
preferring books
to television
Magda, who comes from a Slovenian
immigrant family, worked for a Labor
politician and is now an assistant to a
federal court judge in Hobart.
Flanagan is a walking book of
quotations: “Homer writes in Book 8
of The Odyssey that the gods gave us
misfortune to give later generations
something to sing about”;
“Emerson said, ‘In every work
of genius we recognise our own
rejected thoughts,’ ” and such
like. It could be annoying, but I
rather like the mix of Australian
directness and intellectual
seriousness.
He also throws in some
of his own sayings: “Writers
are beggars on the public
highway”; the teaching of
creative writing is the
“rising damp in the house
of American letters, rotting
it from within”; and “I’ve
never much liked the world
of TV and movies because
it is a tyranny, and the
tyranny is money, whereas
books is a broken-down,
sometimes mediocre republic,
but it is a republic of letters.”
He’s pretty damn eloquent
about his belief in the moral
power of novels. Maybe the
truth is so precious that it
should always be attended
by a bodyguard of
fiction writers.
First Person by
Richard Flanagan is
out now, published by
Chatto & Windus
C
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1GT
Tuesday November 7 2017 | the times
television & radio
Snails on the line — now there’s a new excuse
James
Jackson
TV review
Extreme Railway Journeys
Channel 5
{{{((
New Art for a New World
BBC Four
{{{{(
O
f all the reviewing nights in
all the year and Tarrant
walks into mine. Tiswas’s
finest was in a Casablanca
gin joint, dressed to kill in
an immaculate white tux, sipping a
champagne cocktail and charming an
American diplomat named Cathy, who
owned the place. “You’re lovely,” he
cooed at her. “Of all the gin joints in
all the towns, I’m just so pleased you
walked into mine.” “No, it’s mine,” she
quickly corrected him, which rather
killed his attempt at suaveness.
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
The Invisible Hand
of Donald Trump
Radio 4, 9am
Such a clever title to this
programme. Something
about combining the
lightness of that Adam
Smith phrase with the more
fleshly reality of Trump’s
(allegedly tiny) hand that
lends a certain comedy.
However, there is actually,
so far, not much that is
comical about Trump
economically speaking.
Because, as the journalist
Martin Wolf reminds us
here, so far the effects seem
to be good. The “Trump
Bump” has resulted in Wall
Street rising to record
highs. Was it his doing?
The Documentary
World Service, 8.06pm
As this programme opens,
the mission statement of
Japan’s kamikaze fighters
is read out. “This is your
mission: transcend life and
death. When you eliminate
all thoughts about life and
death you’ll be able to totally
disregard all thoughts of
earthly life . . . and thus pave
the road for our people’s
victory.” Words that are
difficult to listen to today
without hearing other, more
modern echoes — echoes
that the very fine presenter
Mariko Oi makes the most
of without labouring them.
He’s no Bogart, that Tarrant, and he
knows it, but he can be quite Alan
Partridge at moments like these. Once
you start watching Chris Tarrant:
Extreme Railway Journeys with that
comparison in mind it becomes a
whole other show and far funnier. In
fairness, the locals he meets seem
amused enough to indulge his matey
Englishman abroad style, even if — as
he did in last night’s tear through
Morocco — he was nicking their fez to
do a Tommy Cooper impersonation.
What’s so extreme about Morocco,
you may ask. That’d be the heat. Not
five minutes would go by without
Tarrant gasping about the
temperature, and given that the soles
of his shoes were melting, fair enough.
A couple of times he also gave the
impression of being simply amazed
that the country’s trains are really
rather good, being particularly
impressed by the fact that Marrakesh’s
station is large, clean and safe.
In fact, Morocco’s rail ambitions
make Britain’s look as parochial as
Thomas the Tank Engine. Its
government is spending billions on a
state-of-the-art, high-speed railway
system across the desert, helped by the
lucrative export of phosphates, while
its rail engineers could teach the
British a few tricks too. One showed
Tarrant how they use a simple sanddispensing device by the train’s wheels
to tackle snails on the line — an
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 The Matt Edmondson Show
4.00 Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
Greg James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 The
8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00 Huw Stephens
1.00am Annie Nightingale 3.00 BBC
Radio 1 & 1Xtra’s Stories: Music By Numbers
— Drake 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Ore Oduba 5.00 Simon
Mayo 7.00 Jamie Cullum. The world of jazz
8.00 Jo Whiley. Music and chat 10.00 Bill
Kenwright’s Golden Years. Personal
favourites from the late 1950s and early
1960s 11.00 Nigel Ogden: The Organist
Entertains. Nigel marks the 200th birthday
of the French organ composer Lefébure-Wély
11.30 Listen to the Band. Highlights from
Grimethorpe Colliery Band’s Centenary
concert 12.00 Sounds of the 80s (r)
2.00am Radio 2’s Folk Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: 90s Hits 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Wednesday Workout 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Live Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s classical
breakfast show, live from the historic
Mariinsky Theatre in St Petersburg
9.00 Essential Classics
Bridget Kendall talks about the ideas that
have inspired her throughout her life
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Soviet Russia (1917-1953)
Today, Donald Macleod and the Russian
music expert Marina Frolova-Walker tell the
story of two composers whose brilliant,
daring music fell tragically foul of the
authorities. Mosolov (Zavod — The Iron
Foundry); Roslavets (Three Compositions
for Piano; and Piano Trio No 3);
and Mosolov (Piano Concerto, Op 14)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Fiona Talkington presents the Georgian
pianist Elisabeth Leonskaja. She plays
Russian music from before and after the
Revolutions of 1917 in a concert from LSO
St Luke’s in London. Shostakovich (Piano
Sonata No 2 in B minor, Op 61); and
Tchaikovsky (Grand Sonata in G, Op 37) (r)
Chris Tarrant rode the rails from Marrakesh into the Sahara
2.00 Live Afternoon Concert
Tom Service hosts a panel of distinguished
guests, including Dr Marina Frolova-Walker,
Orlando Figes and Victoria Donovan, to play
and discuss music and culture across the past
100 years in Russia, live from Lenin’s London
Office, in what is now the Marx Memorial
Library. Mosolov (Symphonic Poem)
5.00 In Tune
A special Russian-themed programme,
including an interview with the conductor
Semyon Bychkov and a live performance by
the theremin player Lydia Kavina
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An imaginative, eclectic mix of music,
featuring favourites together with
lesser-known gems
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra,
conducted by Carlos Miguel Prieto, performs
music from pre- and post-revolutionary
Russia and contemporary Mexico, including
Rachmaninov’s Third Piano Concerto,
Shostakovich’s Sixth Symphony and a UK
premiere by Gabriela Ortiz. Gabriela Ortiz
(Suite: Hominum — first UK performance);
Rachmaninov (Piano Concerto No 3); and
Shostakovich (Symphony No 6)
10.00 Free Thinking
The composer Michael Nyman, the film
historian Ian Christie, the critic Larushka
Ivan-Zadeh and the director Alexei
Popogrebsky join Matthew Sweet to discuss
the impact of Dziga Vertov’s 1929 film —
Man with a Movie Camera, which gives an
impression of city life in the Soviet Union
which was voted top of a poll conducted by
Sight and Sound Magazine
10.45 The Essay: Ten Artists
That Shook the World
Ten contemporary cultural specialists look
back at the impact of the Russian Revolution
of 1917 on artists of the time — in film,
theatre, poetry, dance and beyond. One
hundred years to the day since the American
journalist John Reed witnessed first-hand
the momentous events in revolutionary
Petrograd, the writer and historian Helen
Rappaport reappraises his classic account,
Ten Days that Shook the World
11.00 Late Junction
To mark the centenary of the October
Revolution, which began on 7th November
1917, Nick Luscombe digs into 100 years of
Russian experimentalism. Tonight, Late
Junction celebrates the underground, avantgarde, suppressed, suspect and subversive
music that emerged from tumultuous
times in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia
12.30am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With Justin Webb and John Humphrys
8.30 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 The Invisible
Hand of Donald Trump
Martin Wolf of the Financial Times
examines the economic impact of President
Donald Trump. See Radio Choice
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor focuses on offerings (12/30)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Presented by Jane Garvey. Including at
10.45 the 15 Minute Drama: Part two of
the third series of Blood and Milk (2/5)
11.00 Natural Histories
Brett Westwood examines the place
of the giraffe in human culture
11.30 Jim: We Love You Because
Nigeria’s enduring love of the American
country music star Jim Reeves
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed
Chris Morris looks at the key deals to be
done when the UK leaves the EU (2/5)
12.15 Call You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week:
Life in the Garden
Penelope Lively’s intimate meditation
on gardening, literature and creativity
continues as she turns her attention to the
garden in fiction (2/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Undercover Mumbai
By Ayeesha Menon. Alia is enlisted to
help the bumbling Inspector Ratna Shinde
catch the serial killer, who appears
to have discovered a grisly way to
communicate with the police (2/2) (r)
3.00 The Kitchen Cabinet
The culinary panel show arrives in Lancaster.
Jay Rayner presents (6/6) (r)
3.30 Costing the Earth
Roger Harrabin travels to the USA to meet
America’s climate resistance
4.00 Law in Action
Legal developments
4.30 A Good Read
The presenters Rick Edwards and
George Lamb join Harriett Gilbert to talk
favourite books (6/9)
5.00 PM
excuse I can’t believe our railway
operators haven’t used before.
This is the fourth series of this
Portillo-esque Channel 5 staple and as
I sat down to watch it I was all fired up
to get into some diatribe about the
homogeneity of programming, about a
lack of imagination in our channels’
output. Instead I felt I learnt rather a
lot about a country’s past and its sense
of optimism in its future. What can I
say? Here’s looking at you, Chris.
Margy Kinmonth’s feature-length
film Revolution: New Art for a New
World felt like a one-off in being an
art documentary entirely free of a
presenter waving their arms or
waggling their eyebrows to denote
flair. Instead, it placed its panache in
camerawork and directorial flourishes.
This was a visual delight, as Russian
Revolution-era black squares and
rabble-rousing cut-and-paste montages
filled the screen (you know, those
Rodchenko ones still ripped off today
by hip magazines wanting to look cool).
Kinmonth allowed Russian voices to
tell the story too: descendants of the
artists detailed how their forebears fell
foul of Stalin’s state propaganda. There
were some terrible stories, including
Gustav Klutsis’s execution on phony
charges (his wife never found out her
husband’s actual fate). The film was
also, however, a vivid lesson in how art
will outlive even the worst of politics.
james.jackson@thetimes.co.uk
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 Ed Reardon’s Week
Ed may be in line for an inheritance (3/6)
7.00 The Archers
Lilian’s suspicions rise
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Living with the Gods
Focusing on offerings to the gods (12/30)
8.00 File on 4
Issues of major concern
8.40 In Touch
9.00 All in the Mind
Mental health issues (2/8)
9.30 The Invisible
Hand of Donald Trump
Martin Wolf examines the economic
impact of President Donald Trump (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Ritula Shah
10.45 Book at Bedtime: First Person
By Richard Flanagan (2/10)
11.00 Fred at the Stand
With Dave Johns, Ashley Storrie,
Jen Brister and Boothby Graffoe (4/6)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Presented by Susan Hulme
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Life in the Garden (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am Listen to Les 8.30 The Men from
the Ministry 9.00 The Now Show 9.30 The
Adventures of John and Tony 10.00 Home
Front Omnibus 11.00 Infinite Possibilities
and Unlikely Probabilities 11.15 Tommies
12.00 Listen to Les 12.30pm The Men from
the Ministry 1.00 The Blackburn Files 1.30
The Oldest Bible 2.00 Regeneration 2.15
Cosmic Quest 2.30 A Kind of Loving 2.45
The Horologicon 3.00 Home Front Omnibus
4.00 It’s Not What You Know 4.30 The
Adventures of John and Tony 5.00 1834 5.30
Ed Reardon’s Week 6.00 Earthsearch I 6.30
That Reminds Me 7.00 Listen to Les. The
comedian’s life as a spy and a rare interview
with the boxer Sugar Albert Ackroyd 7.30
The Men from the Ministry. Comedy with
Richard Murdoch 8.00 The Blackburn Files.
A Case of Frinks and Moores. Comedy drama
with Fine Time Fontayne 8.30 The Oldest
Bible. The story of the Codex Sinaiticus Bible
9.00 Infinite Possibilities and Unlikely
Probabilities. Balance by Anita Sullivan
9.15 Tommies. By Avin Shah. An ill-matched
pair of signallers arrive at a fort under siege
and try to guarantee the safety of those
inside 10.00 Comedy Club: Ed Reardon’s
Week. Ed goes to hospital for his annual
health check 10.30 In and Out of the
Kitchen. Damien and Anthony throw a dinner
party at short notice. From 2013 11.00
Revolting People. Comedy with Andy
Hamilton. First aired in 2006 11.30 Vent.
Comedy with Neil Pearson
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Adrian Chiles 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
Mark Pougatch looks back at historic Ashes
moments 10.30 Phil Williams. Live news
and sport 1.00am Up All Night 5.00
Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ray Parlour 10.00 Jim White 1.00pm
Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham
and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off. With
Mark Saggers 10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am
Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc
Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Tom Ravenscroft 1.00am
The First Time with Goldfrapp 2.00 The
Casbah 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Bill Turnbull 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Jane Jones celebrates
classical musicians set to take the industry
by storm. Arturo Márquez (Danzon No.2);
Chopin (Rondo a la Krakowiak); Handel
(Ombra mai fu); Bellini — arranged by
Jean-Baptiste Arban (Variations on “Casta
Diva” from Norma); Rebecca Dale (When
Music Sounds — Out of the Water) Hummel
(Bassoon Concerto in F); and Beethoven
(Violin Sonata No.9 “Kreutzer”) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Tuesday November 7 2017
11
1GT
artsfirst night
HUGO GLENDINNING
Concert
ACO/Tognetti
Royal Festival Hall
N
{{{{(
otes are teased, struck,
smoothed and scorched.
Now dry as dust, now thick
and sweet as juice. To listen
to the Australian Chamber
Orchestra is to experience sensory
overload: a dynamic range far greater
than one might expect from a
maximum of 25 players. Phrases are
extended and elided or broken into
urgent stage whispers. Carefully
prepared, yet nothing seems routine.
Led by the violinist Richard
Tognetti, and secured by the stunning
musicianship of the principal cellist,
Timo-Veikko Valve, the ensemble is
startlingly bold in tone and virtuosity.
This was a quirky programme with no
obvious thematic connection beyond
the rhythmic swing brought to each
piece, from Tognetti’s idiosyncratic
arrangement of four movements from
Bach’s The Art of Fugue to the string
orchestra version of Tchaikovsky’s
Souvenir de Florence.
The Bach illustrated precisely the
delight and perplexity in the ACO’s
playing. The aphoristic phrasing and
spare, dark timbres of Contrapunctus 1,
the delicately swung rhythms of
Contrapunctus 2, and the frosty
inversions and cantata-like solemnity
of Contrapunctus 3 convinced, while
the pizzicato and Swingle-ese singing
(“Ba-da-ba!”) of Contrapunctus 4
seemed less like an experiment in
textures than a party trick.
Immaculate octaves from the oboes
and bassoons and popping-candy
semiquavers from the strings framed
Pierre-Laurent Aimard’s crisp reading
of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No 15 in
B flat major, a smart and witty
dialogue in which the slow movement
had the simplicity of a motet. The
Tchaikovsky was pleasingly feverish in
its giddy waltz and swooning duet, and
bracingly folk-like in its wildfire finale,
yet the ensemble’s most exciting work
was in the spectral abstractions and
garish burlesque of Shostakovich’s
Two Pieces for String Octet, small of
scale and immense in ambition.
Anna Picard
Double act: Mike Melody and his daughter Victoria
Funeral that’s a
barrel of laughs
A former TV antiques expert attends
his own send-off — the result is poignant
and agreeably bonkers, says Sam Marlowe
Theatre
Ugly Chief
BAC, SW11
{{{{(
A
funeral is like a really sad
theatre show, declares the
performance artist Victoria
Melody — and in her new
piece she revisits the
funeral she arranged for her dad,
the former TV antiques expert Mike
Melody. Except he’s not dead.
In 2012 Mike — who says he was
fired by ITV for yawning in David
Dickinson’s perma-tanned face — was
Pop
Chk Chk Chk
Electric Ballroom, NW1
C
{{{{{
hk Chk Chk sometimes style
their name as !!!, which is apt
because they’re a rather
excitable bunch. The New
York-based collective play
a volcanically fun mishmash of punk,
funk, hip-hop, house and disco and in
Nic Offer they have a shaggy-haired
frontman of unfeasible energy.
Singing, semi-rapping, hollering and
prone to manic, aerobic-style dancing,
he was equal parts Freddie Mercury,
Mick Jagger and Jennifer Beals in
Flashdance. An Offer you couldn’t
refuse.
There are subdued moments among
the seven albums that Chk Chk Chk
have released over the past 16 years.
None of them was on show here.
Right from the first song, NRGQ,
the six-piece radiated the kind of
uninhibited ebullience that most
bands only achieve in an encore. Some
of that stems from their time in New
York’s DIY post-punk scene, where the
accent is on experimentation and
improvisation. Some of it stems from
the fact that they’re all hedonistic
loons. It was all peak and no trough
and it worked triumphantly.
Half of the songs were from the
band’s excellent recent album, Shake
Lea Lea
and Nic
Offer
told he had motor neurone disease
and given five years to live. It was a
misdiagnosis and, apart from a limp
and partial paralysis affecting one
arm, he’s still in the rudest of health.
Ugly Chief, in which he performs
alongside his daughter, puts him in the
unique position of attending his own
funeral. Yet his vision of that last
hurrah clashes revealingly with hers,
and the messy, moving, funny results
expose not only our euphemismshrouded discomfort with death, but
the fractures in families that we often
avoid addressing while we’re alive.
They make an oddball double act,
she eager and exasperated, he irascible
and wilful. A New Orleans jazz
band (one of Mike’s less eccentric
funeral requests) supplies jaunty
accompaniment. The name Melody
is, Mike claims, Gaelic for “ugly chief”,
and throughout John Gordillo’s
artfully chaotic production, they
compete to be boss.
In preparation, Victoria trained at
a funeral director’s, and there are
fascinating insights into the banalities
of the expiration industry: the
cremator “like a big pizza oven”, the
ashes collected in a bucket. She learns
to stitch lips and dress a corpse in an
ill-fitting suit. But Mike wants a
bourbon barrel, not a coffin, and
cremation in a barbecue pit. As for the
eulogy, how much truth to tell? That
dad was a bully when drunk? That he
drove her to leave home at 16?
People, the show contends, are like
antiques: to value them truly, you need
to know their history. It’s at once
poignant and agreeably bonkers, with
Victoria, at Mike’s behest, togged out
in the tangerine kit of his beloved
Blackpool FC, or as a giant pumpkin
— a character she created at art
school to send up the pretensions of
the faculty and students. Northern
and working-class, she was made to
feel an impostor there, and her
“Pissed-off Pumpkin” was prompted
by her dad’s succinct advice to “just
tell them all to f*** off”.
That shared, strangely tender
memory is emblematic of the love
beneath the bickering, and there’s
quiet courage in the gentle
confronting of past hurts. This is a
tatty, saggy piece, like a treasured old
stuffed toy — and it’s curiously lovely.
Box office: 020 7223 2223, to Nov 18
the Shudder, including Throttle Service,
which is all surging hooks and rubbery
riffs, and Dancing is the Best Revenge,
a Blondie-meets-Sugarhill Gang blend
of imperious vocals, lascivious bass
and rump-wiggling drums.
Trading verses with Lea Lea, his
braid-wearing British co-singer, Offer
was dressed, ridiculously, in a pair of
tight denim shorts. Under severe
stress, these split midway through the
show. That would have knocked many
singers off their stride. Not Offer, who
if anything became more enthusiastic,
attacking Freedom! ’15 with a liberated
vim and indulging in some splendid
formation dancing with Lea Lea.
They somehow managed to find
another gear for the encore, finishing
with the protean glam stomp of Yadnus
and the roaring grooves and highstepping African guitars of Heart of
Hearts. Then they departed, after an
incendiary hour, with Offer blowing
extravagant kisses. Which was sad,
but probably just as well — you would
have feared for their health if they had
carried on at that lick for longer.
Ed Potton
Pop
Mount Kimbie
Roundhouse, NW1
M
{{(((
uch has been made
of Mount Kimbie’s
transatlantic split —
Dominic Maker left for
Los Angeles in 2016 as
Kai Campos remained in London —
and although the electronic duo
have played down the move, their
transformation in recent years is
undeniable. Projections of giant
glowing suns on stage, for one, hint at
the impact of Maker replacing the
capital’s frowning commuter greys
with California’s saffron rays, as does
his recent production credit on a Jay-Z
song. Unfortunately, this is no iconic
Stateside period in the mould of the
Beatles’ or David Hockney’s.
As relaxed as Mount Kimbie are,
lounging about the stage, they have lost
their edge. An extended Four Years and
One Day, with its languid motorik drum
beat and shimmering feedback, opened
the set, but ghosted by tamely. Perhaps
not helped by jarringly low sound
levels, the band lacked intensity. There
was no space for the jittery, visceral
house-party anthems Blind Night
Errand and Carbonated from the 2010
album Crooks & Lovers, but there was
for an indulgent wig-out solo straight
from 1982.
Live performances feature the
French singer Andrea Balency and
the drummer Marc Pell, mirroring
Bonobo’s shift from club-based EDM
to being a more conventional band
playing large venues. And it is
understandable that Mount Kimbie
want to move on from the London
post-dubstep scene that also spawned
James Blake and the xx. Their third
record, Love What Survives, alludes to
this maturation.
Yet in the grand surroundings of the
Roundhouse, which resembled a
Kubrickian spaceship in vast plumes of
smoke, Mount Kimbie underwhelmed.
Without King Krule’s wild vocals, Blue
Train Lines was routine. The Krautrockindebted Delta and fan favourite Made
to Stray were the closest to highlights,
but tantalisingly off the mark.
Peter Yeung
12
1GT
Tuesday November 7 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Gabriel Tate
The A Word
BBC One, 9pm
The second
series of
Peter
Bowker’s
funny, affecting drama
begins with a blast
of post-punk through
the earphones of the
young autistic boy Joe
Early
Top
pick
Hughes (the excellent
Max Vento) as he goes
on a stroll through the
Lake District. Yet the
irony of Buzzcocks’
Everybody’s Happy
Nowadays hangs heavy
over this Cumbrian
family: while the shock
of Joe’s diagnosis of
autism has abated, in
many ways the hardest
yards remain for the
extended Hughes clan
because they must now
learn how to live with it.
Two years on, mother
Alison and father
Paul (Morven Christie
and Lee Ingleby) are
seemingly back on the
same page, although
they are forced to
reconsider their
priorities as Joe
struggles at school.
Elsewhere Joe’s
syndrome acts as the
catalyst for the sort of
dysfunctional family
dynamics in which
everybody will surely
find something
familiar. Joe’s
grandfather Maurice
(Christopher Eccleston)
blunders back into the
orbit of Louise. Joe’s
sister, Rebecca, returns
from her gap year
with a boyfriend and
an uncertain future.
Eddie, Alison’s brother,
and Nicola, who are
divorced but awkwardly
cohabiting, receive
an unwelcome visit
from Nicola’s parents,
bearing revelations that
fracture their uneasy
truce. What could
teeter into melodrama
is kept on the level by
the wit of the script and
the essential decency of
each of the characters,
who may be barely
coping, but are doing
so with stoicism and
quiet courage.
Rick Stein’s
Road to Mexico
BBC Two, 9pm
Stirred by memories
of a Mamas and
Papas-inspired visit to
San Francisco in 1968,
the chef returns to
California before
heading due south.
Stein’s cookery series
set an enjoyably
leisurely pace, and this
is no exception as he
finds time to rhapsodise
about cocktail sauce,
the correct stir-frying
technique and the
author John Steinbeck.
The occasional
Partridgeism raises
a smile (one involving
Steve McQueen and
Cliff Richard is a
corker), but Stein’s lack
of self-consciousness
ensures that it all slips
down as easily as
a shucked oyster.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Women at War: 100 Years of
Service. Nicky Campbell finds out about his mother’s role
in the D-Day landings (AD) 10.00 Homes Under the
Hammer. Properties in Erdington, Birmingham, and
Llanfynydd, Carmarthenshire (AD) 11.00 Getting the
Builders In. Two Epsom homeowners task the teams with
creating an en suite bathroom 11.45 Fugitives. The
Spanish National Police’s Extradition team search for a
man on the run 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From Kedleston
Hall in Derbyshire (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Sid returns from holiday to find his PR exercise
has backfired, Zara and Daniel discover Joe has gone
missing, and Heston has problems with an impulsive
patient (AD) 2.15 Impossible. Game show hosted by Rick
Edwards 3.00 Escape to the Country. A military couple
seek a Shropshire house for their £500,000 budget (AD)
3.45 Money for Nothing. A vintage radio and a set of
microphone stands are among the items rescued (r) 4.30
Flog It! Valuing antiques in Newcastle (r) 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Hairy Builder (r) (AD) 6.30 Women at War:
100 Years of Service (r) (AD) 7.15 Getting the Builders In
(r) 8.00 Sign Zone: Great British Menu — The Finals (r)
(SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm Coast (r) (AD) 1.45
Permission Impossible: Britain’s Planners (r) 2.45 Family
Finders. An adopted retired musician seeks out biological
relatives 3.15 Operation Gold Rush with Dan Snow. The
team builds a wooden boat using original designs from
the Gold Rush to traverse hundreds of miles of
treacherous lakes and rivers, including an infamous
stretch of rapids (r) (AD) 4.15 Hebrides: Islands on the
Edge. Ewan McGregor narrates a documentary about
animals struggling to survive on the archipelago,
beginning as otters and grey seals face tough conditions
in autumn (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your Money Where Your
Mouth Is. David Harper takes on Philip Serrell at a car
boot sale in Chesterfield, where David finds an unusual
antique record player, while Philip takes a trip to the Dean
Forest Railway (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by
Jeremy Vine 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two.
With the winners of Sunday night’s dance-off
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Guest Peter Andre
discusses his physique and how his life has changed since
the death of his brother five years ago. Plus, the usual
mix of news, current affairs, health, entertainment and
lifestyle features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current
affairs and fashion news 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show.
Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip Schofield
and Holly Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features,
including a look at the stories making the newspaper
headlines and a recipe in the kitchen. Including Local
Weather 12.30pm Loose Women. More interviews and
topical debate from a female perspective 1.30 ITV News;
Weather 2.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal. In Milton Keynes,
Alys Dobbie falls in love with a 1970s watch, Henry
Nicholls admires some gold sovereigns and David Ford has
more erotic items than he can handle (r) 3.00 Tenable.
Quiz hosted by Warwick Davis in which a bridal party of
five university friends answers questions about top 10
lists, then tries to score a perfect 10 in the final round
4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the game show
5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents the quiz show
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay’s Hotel
Hell. Gordon Ramsay visits a dog-friendly hotel in urgent
need of help (r) (AD) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA. With
the president of a soft drink and sweet shop franchise (r)
12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Come Dine
with Me. Four amateur Swindon chefs hope their dishes
will win the prize (r) 1.05 My Kitchen Rules. Lancashire
lads Bill and Graham face the ultimate challenge from
Michelin starred chef Nigel Haworth 2.10 Countdown.
Alison Steadman is in Dictionary Corner 3.00 A Place in
the Sun: Summer Sun. A music therapist looks for a
holiday home in Crete, on a budget of £150,000 (r) 4.00
Coast vs Country. Sara Damergi and Kerr Drummond
advise newlyweds who are seeking a home in East
Sussex 5.00 Four in a Bed. The second visit is to Marlow
Lodge in Blackpool 5.30 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five
Star. Day two at The Baytrees in Southport, and the
Parkers set three challenges 6.00 The Simpsons. Homer
signs up for a wife-swapping show (r) (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Cleo bumps into Joel at the garage and panics
him with what she knows (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and guests talk about the issues of the day 11.15
Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away. Sheriffs try to recover
almost £2,400 from a company director for unpaid
invoices in Manchester, while agents in Kent chase nearly
£4,000 owed by a couple for unpaid rent (r) 12.10pm 5
News Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel Inspector Returns. Alex
Polizzi heads to Cornwall to revisit The Fieldhead Hotel in
Looe, where the owners were facing plunging occupancy
rates (r) 1.10 Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45
Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS: New Orleans. The FBI gets
involved in an investigation into the murder of a US Navy
officer, in which Pride’s friend Elvis Bertrand, a US Navy
intelligence analyst, is the prime suspect (r) (AD) 3.15
FILM: I’m Not Ready for Christmas (PG, TVM,
2015) A compulsive fibber’s world is turned upside down
when her niece makes a wish that renders her incapable
of lying. Festive comedy starring Alicia Witt and George
Stults 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Hamish’s
corpse is found floating in the spa (r) (AD) 6.00
Home and Away. Mason is hopeful of Beth getting
a heart transplant (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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Northanger Abbey
7.00 Copacabana Palace Documentary
following the lives of the staff and
guests at Rio de Janeiro’s Copacabana
Palace over the course of three
months, revealing how the hotel’s
story reflects the fortunes of Brazil.
David Morrissey narrates (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Pollard faces a moral
dilemma, and Gerry hatches a plan to
land himself a new place to stay (AD)
8PM
8.00 Holby City Hanssen finds an
unexpected ally in Sacha as he battles
against Keller to ensure Holby’s
survival. Meanwhile, an unwanted
visitor compounds Donna’s problems
as she returns to work, and a
frustrated Matteo tries to find a way
to help Oliver get over Zosia (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
New series. The first six chefs
compete, and tests include making a
duck dish in 20 minutes flat. Next, the
contestants cook their own signature
dish for judges Monica Galetti, Gregg
Wallace and Marcus Wareing (AD)
9.00 The A Word New series. Return of
the drama about an autistic child and
his family. When Joe says the A word,
Paul and Alison know they need to help
him. Drama starring Morven Christie,
Lee Ingleby and Christopher Eccleston.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 Rick Stein’s Road to Mexico
New series. Almost 50 years on,
the chef re-traces his steps from
Northern California to Mexico,
beginning in San Francisco, a region
famous for dishes like Cioppino Stew.
See Viewing Guide (1/7) (AD)
8.00 The Pride of Britain Awards
Carol Vorderman hosts the annual
star-studded ceremony from Grosvenor
House in London’s Park Lane. With the
aid of the reporter Ashley Banjo, she’ll
be paying tribute to people for their
extraordinary acts and achievements.
In a year blighted by terror attacks,
and the Grenfell Tower inferno, the
focus will be on the heroism of the
emergency services and the NHS,
as well as a quick-thinking four-yearold who saved her mum’s life
10.00 Motherland New series. Comedy
starring Anna Maxwell Martin and Lucy
Punch. See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 Hotel for Refugees Cameras follow
events at Ballaghaderreen, a remote
town in the west of Ireland as locals
deal with the arrival of hundreds
of Syrian war-torn refugees (AD)
11.25 Generation Screwed? George Lamb
travels up and down the country to
hear from people who have been left
out of the mainstream media debates.
Contributors include a young mum
in Milton Keynes, and a nuclear
protester in a Scottish peace camp
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day’s
events presented by Evan Davis
10.35 Regional News
12.10am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 NFL This Week Action from the week
nine fixtures, including Philadelphia
Eagles v Denver Broncos at Lincoln
Financial Field, Jacksonville Jaguars v
Cincinnati Bengals at EverBank Field,
and Dallas Cowboys v Kansas City
Chiefs at AT&T Stadium
12.05am Elizabeth I’s Secret Agents Robert Cecil
learns of a plot to blow-up Parliament. Last in the series
(r) (AD) 1.05 Sign Zone: The Apprentice. The contestants
must purchase items that mark milestones in Lord
Sugar’s life and career (r) (SL) 2.05-3.05 The Ganges
with Sue Perkins. Sue visits Varanasi (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Yorkshire: A Year in the Wild
Cameras follow each season in the
lives of wildlife in the Yorkshire Dales
and on the North York Moors National
Parks, beginning with spring. Life is
starting to return to the region at a
time when the local animals must find
food, as well as raise a family (1/4) (r)
8.00 The Secret Life of 4 Year Olds
New series. Return of the documentary
series exploring the social interactions
of children. It begins with a look at
how they experience happiness,
sadness, jealousy and rage, and
how they learn to control these
powerful emotions (1/4)
8.00 The Yorkshire Vet Peter Wright
braves the elements and heads out to
pregnancy test a small herd of young
cows. At Skeldale, Julian Norton tries
to help sick dog Mitzi who was
featured in series four (7/8) (AD)
9.00 Grand Designs: House of the Year
New series. Kevin McCloud visits
homes up for the 2017 Royal Institute
of British Architects House of the Year,
beginning with five properties which
draw on local materials and traditions,
including a 21st-century shepherd’s
hut in Scotland (1/4) (AD)
9.00 Ben Fogle: New Lives in the Wild
In New Zealand, the host meets former
academic Ben, to hear why he gave up
his promising scientific career to
embrace a rugged life in a 76-acre
forest in the bush (4/8)
10.00 The Fight for Mosul Documentary
following the experiences of five young
soldiers tackling Isis in northern Iraq,
including a college graduate seeking
revenge after his father was the
victim of a suicide attack.
See Viewing Guide
10.00 Most Shocking Reality Moments
A celebration of the nation’s
long-running love affair with reality
television, showcasing the 50 most
memorable moments from some of
the best-loved shows such as TOWIE,
Jersey Shore and Made in Chelsea. The
bumper countdown includes the time
George Galloway came over all feline
on Celebrity Big Brother, Gillian
McKeith’s dramatic fainting episodes
on I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here!,
and Bobby Davro’s belly flop on The
Games. Featuring contributions by
Calum Best, Charlotte Crosby, Amy
Childs, Paul Danan, Janice Dickinson,
Dane Bowers and Vanessa Feltz (r)
7.30 Countrywise: Guide to Britain
Ben Fogle helps with the renovation
work at Castle Howard in North
Yorkshire. Last in the series (r)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
Late
11PM
10PM
7PM
7.00 The One Show Another mix
of nationwide reports and live
studio-based chat, hosted by
Matt Baker and Alex Jones
7.30 EastEnders The guilt proves too much
for Tina, who finally tells Billy the
truth about Janet’s accident and
decides to confess to the police (AD)
9PM
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10.45 On Assignment James Mates
travels to the Spanish region of
Catalonia, where a disputed
independence referendum has
sparked months of protests (6/10)
11.20 Lethal Weapon The slaying of a
Texas ranger leads Murtaugh and
Riggs to believe a possible misuse
of power is at play in the LA
Sheriff’s department (r) (AD)
12.15am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 Loose Women. More interviews with
famous faces and topical debate (r) 3.45 ITV Nightscreen.
Text-based information service 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy
Kyle Show. Guests air their differences (r) (SL)
11.05 How to Get a Council House
A Hounslow mum falls behind with her
rent and faces eviction along with her
21-year-old son, who has epilepsy, and
a father-of-three wants to move out
his mother’s house (1/4) (r) (AD)
12.10am Music on 4: The Great Songwriters
1.05 The Supervet (r) (AD) 2.00 FILM: You’re Next
(18, 2011) Horror starring Sharni Vinson and Nicholas
Tucci (SL) 3.35 The Secret Life of the Zoo (r) (AD)
4.30 Phil Spencer: Secret Agent (r) (AD, SL) 5.25
Kirstie’s Vintage Gems (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.55am SuperCasino 3.10 Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit. An FBI agent claims she has been raped
while working undercover (r) (AD) 4.00 Get Your Tatts
Out: Kavos Ink. Lovebirds Ross and Claire ask for
matching designs (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
House Busters (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Tuesday November 7 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
The Real Doctor
Zhivago
BBC Four, 9pm
Sixty years after
publication Doctor
Zhivago has lost none
of its potency, thanks
in no small part to
David Lean’s beautiful
1965 film adaptation
starring Omar Sharif
and Julie Christie. The
Newsnight presenter
Stephen Smith tells the
story behind
Boris Pasternak’s
masterpiece set in the
years of the Russian
Revolution, which has
a similar number of
outlandish twists and
brushes with danger.
Pasternak was targeted
by the Soviet Union
several times before
his death in 1960, while
the book was deployed
as a propaganda tool
by the CIA.
Motherland
BBC Two, 10pm
With a creative team
including Sharon
Horgan and Graham
Linehan, it would have
been a shock had
Motherland proved
anything less than
great — and it doesn’t
disappoint. After a pilot
last year, we rejoin the
hassled career mum
Julia (Anna Maxwell
Martin), the drippy dad
Kevin (Paul Ready)
and the laconic Liz
(Diane Morgan) as they
negotiate north London
motherhood and the
clique led by the brittle,
passive-aggressive
Amanda (Lucy Punch).
In this opener Julia’s
party plans for her
daughter fall foul of
inept entertainers,
baking calamities
and absent partners.
The Fight
for Mosul
Channel 4, 10pm
This extraordinary
documentary
demonstrates what life
is like for Iraqi special
forces soldiers and
traumatised civilians
who are hoping not
only to reclaim Mosul
from Isis, but to live
there afterwards. The
toll is unflinchingly
depicted through the
combat sequences and
moments of calm —
such as making a quick
call home, camaraderie
that is reminiscent of
Band of Brothers and
surveying refugees for
potential suicide
bombers. The bravery,
fortitude and insight
of the film-makers
are admirable; that
of their subjects
even more so.
Sport choice
Sky Main Event, 1.30pm
Coverage of the final
T20 international
between India and New
Zealand at Greenfield
International Stadium,
Thiruvananthapuram.
India won the first
match by 53 runs, but
New Zealand levelled
it up in match two, with
Colin Munro smashing
106 from 58 balls.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Modern Family (r) 7.00 Monkey Life (r)
(AD) 8.00 It’s Me or the Dog (r) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) 10.00 Zoo Tales (r) (AD) 11.00
Modern Family (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00
The Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry acquires a campervan (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 The Flash. Gypsy’s father Breacher shows
up on Earth-1
9.00 Strike Back. The team attempts to
extract an arms dealer from Libya
10.00 Sick Note. New series about a man
pretending that he’s terminally ill. Black comedy
starring Rupert Grint and Nick Frost
11.00 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own. Comedy quiz (r)
(AD) 1.00am The Force: North East (r) 2.00
Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD) 3.00 Brit
Cops: War on Crime (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am The Guest Wing (r) (AD) 7.00 Richard
E Grant’s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 Urban
Secrets (r) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00
House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing
(r) 5.00 House. A priest is admitted (r) (AD)
6.00 House. The team treats a teenager (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
A boxing champion dies in the ring (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Erin and Anthony try to
convince a key eyewitness to testify (r) (AD)
9.00 Hard-Wire: Law of the Gun. Fatalities
resulting from police shootings (r)
10.00 The Deuce. CC, Larry and Rodney
worry about becoming obsolete (7/8)
11.10 Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry upsets
Funkhouser’s new girlfriend (r)
11.50 Ray Donovan. Ray arranges a surgery
that may save Smitty (12/12) (r)
1.05am The Deuce. Candy eyes a new role (r)
2.15 Californication (r) 3.25 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 4.15 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Highway Patrol (r) 12.00 Road Wars
1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds. An arsonist strikes (r)
7.00 The Real A&E. A charity rock climb (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E. A woman’s ear (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Captain Gregson’s home
is invaded by a gunman (r) (AD)
9.00 Chicago Fire. A rookie firefighter causes
problems for Dawson and Brett
10.00 World’s Most Evil Killers. The crimes
of the German serial killer Fritz Honka
11.00 Criminal Minds. The BAU investigates
a string of suburban murders (r)
12.00 Bones. A special 200th episode (r) (AD)
1.00am Criminal Minds (r) 2.00 Stalker (r)
3.00 Cold Case (r) 4.00 UK Border Force (r)
5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No 2
6.45 Prokofiev: Ivan The Terrible 8.00 Auction
8.30 Watercolour Challenge 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 10.00 Talks Music (AD) 11.00
Trailblazers: Pop Videos 12.00 Discovering:
Claudia Cardinale (AD) 1.00pm Tales of the
Unexpected 2.00 Watercolour Challenge 2.30
Auction 3.00 Alexander Armstrong: Fine Tuned
4.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017 5.00
Discovering: Pulp (AD) 5.30 Watercolour
Challenge 6.00 Discovering: Walter Matthau
(AD) 7.00 The Seventies (AD)
8.00 Too Young to Die. Sharon Tate (AD)
9.00 Passions. New series. Exploring
the life and legacy of Richard Pryor
10.00 The History of Comedy (AD)
11.00 Urban Myths: Cary Grant and Timothy
Leary 11.30 Rock and Roll (AD) 1.00am
Passions 2.00 FILM: Leonard Cohen:
I’m Your Man (12, 2005) Documentary
4.00 Master of Photography (AD)
5.00 The South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00
Premier League Daily 11.00 Sky Sports Daily
11.30 Sportswomen 12.00 Sky Sports News
1.30pm Live International T20 Cricket: India v
New Zealand. Coverage of the third and final T20
international 5.00 Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6.
The latest sports news and updates
6.30 Live ATP Next Gen Finals. Further coverage
of the opening day of the tennis event for
young players, held at Fiera Milano in Italy
10.00 The Debate. Discussion on
the latest Premier League news
11.00 Sky Sports News.
A round-up of the day’s talking points
12.00 Sky Sports News 1.00am Live WWE Late
Night Smackdown. Spectacular wrestling action
with the over-the-top stars of the States,
profiling fighters causing a stir and following
feuds as they spill out of the ring 3.00 Sky
Sports News. A round-up of the day’s talking
points 4.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Spotlight. The
impact of the Personal Independence Payment
in Northern Ireland 11.10 Hotel for Refugees.
Documentary about the arrival of war-torn
Syrian refugees in an Irish town (AD) 11.50
Generation Screwed? George Lamb hears from
people who have been left out of mainstream
media debates 12.30am-6.00 BBC News
Find a lifelong companion in the Times Literary Supplement,
the world’s leading international literary journal
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 7.00pm-7.30 A Special
BBC Scotland Investigation 8.00-9.00 River
City. Annie resorts to desperate measures to
save her livelihood 10.45 Holby City. Sacha
joins forces with Hanssen to fend off a threat
to the hospital (AD) 11.45 Hotel for Refugees
(AD) 12.25am Generation Screwed? 1.05
Weather for the Week Ahead 1.10-6.00 News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 10.45pm James and Jupp.
Elis James and Miles Jupp visit Swansea Bay
(r) 11.15 Hotel for Refugees (AD) 11.55
Generation Screwed? 12.35am Weather for
the Week Ahead 12.40-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 True
North: Under the Bridge. Navigating boats into
the open water (r) 11.15 Motherland. New
series. Comedy starring Anna Maxwell Martin.
See Viewing Guide (AD) 11.45 Mock the Week.
With James Acaster, Tom Allen, Ed Byrne, Rhys
James and Ellie Taylor (r) 12.15am-1.05 NFL
This Week. Action from the week nine fixtures
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BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
Michael Portillo travels along the Mediterranean
coast from Lyon to Marseille (9/10) (r)
8.00 Empire of the Tsars: Romanov Russia with
Lucy Worsley. The dynasty that ruled Russia for
more than three centuries, including figures such
as Peter the Great and Catherine the Great (r)
9.00 The Real Doctor Zhivago. Stephen Smith
traces the revolutionary beginnings of Boris
Pasternak’s Dr Zhivago bestseller, and the time
it was a pawn of the CIA at the height of
the Cold War. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.00 Timewatch: Who Killed Rasputin? An
exploration of history’s greatest conundrums,
beginning by reopening the investigation into
who killed Rasputin, suggesting the man who
confessed may not have been responsible (r)
10.45 Masterspy of Moscow: George Blake —
Storyville. Charting the life of Soviet agent
George Blake, who was sentenced to 42 years
in jail but escaped fled to the USSR (r) (AD)
12.15am Natural World (r) 1.15 British Art
at War: Bomberg, Sickert and Nash (r) (AD)
2.15-3.15 The Real Doctor Zhivago (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Milo causes problems (AD)
7.30 Streetmate. Lovelorn daters in Leeds (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory. Raj tries to date
Lucy and Emily at the same time (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory. Raj discovers Howard
once embarrassed himself on a date (r) (AD)
9.00 Tattoo Fixers at Hallowe’en. New series.
Sketch assists an actor with a tattoo (AD)
10.00 Walk of Shame Shuttle. Reality show in
which party goers are offered a free taxi ride
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 Rude Tube (r) 1.05am Tattoo Fixers
at Hallowe’en (r) (AD) 2.10 Walk of Shame
Shuttle (r) 3.05 First Dates (r) (AD) 4.00
Black-ish (r) (AD) 4.45 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.45pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 2.50 Come Dine with Me
3.50 Time Team (r) (AD) 5.55 The Secret Life of
the Zoo (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick tends to a
Newfoundland and a Yorkshire terrier (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. GP Peter Berkin and his
wife Chard, an alternative medicine practitioner,
have decided to build a new home at the bottom
of their garden, but cannot agree on any part of
the design (3/10) (r) (AD)
9.00 The Royal House of Windsor. How
Elizabeth and George VI kept up appearances
while crises loomed on every front (r) (AD)
10.00 How to Be Queen: 63 Years and Counting.
A panel of leading royal watchers assesses how
the Queen has retained her place in the nation’s
affections, after 63 years on the throne (r)
11.35 Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
A Japanese restaurant in California (r)
12.35am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.35 The Royal House of Windsor. Documentary
(r) (AD) 2.35-3.30 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (r)
11.00am Cover Girl (U, 1944) Musical
comedy starring Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly
(b/w) 1.10pm Edge of Eternity (U, 1959)
Thriller starring Cornel Wilde 2.45 First Men
in the Moon (U, 1964) Sci-fi adventure with
Lionel Jeffries 4.50 Holiday Inn (U, 1941)
Musical, featuring the classic song White
Christmas, starring Bing Crosby (b/w)
6.50 The Secret Life of Bees (12, 2008)
A runaway teenager tormented by memories
of her mother’s death finds solace with three
sisters who run a bee-keeping business. Drama
starring Dakota Fanning and Queen Latifah
9.00 The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (12,
2013) The victor in a televised battle to the
death returns to the arena to face other past
champions. Sci-fi adventure sequel starring
Jennifer Lawrence and Liam Hemsworth (AD)
11.45 The Paperboy (15, 2012) A reporter
returns to his home town, and enlists his
younger brother’s help in proving a man on death
row is innocent. Drama set in the 1960s starring
Matthew McConaughey and Zac Efron
1.55am-3.55 Dogtooth (18, 2009) Greek
satirical drama with Christos Stergioglou
6.00am The Cube: Celebrity Special (r) 6.45
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Dinner Date (r) 8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30
Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.30 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20 Dinner Date (r)
11.20 Dress to Impress (r) 12.20pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.45
The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress (r)
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7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Charlie
lets Chelsea move into his home (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Charlie takes
advantage of Chelsea and Alan’s friendship (r)
9.00 FILM: Bridesmaids (15, 2011)
A disorganised woman takes charge of her best
friend’s bridal party, but the wife of the groom’s
boss causes problems. Comedy starring Kristen
Wiig, Rose Byrne and Melissa McCarthy (AD)
11.35 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.05am Family Guy (r) (AD) 12.30 American
Dad! (r) (AD) 1.30 Celebrity Showmance (r)
2.25 Teleshopping 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
8.55 Judge Judy (r) 10.15 Inspector Morse (r)
(AD) 12.35pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.35
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Street (r) 3.45 Inspector Morse (r) (AD)
6.00 Heartbeat. Phil and Geoff keep watch on an
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evidence to close the establishment (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Three college
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8.00 Midsomer Murders. Barnaby and
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owner is hit on the head and dropped to his
death from a plane (r) (AD)
10.05 Lewis. A man incarcerated in a secure
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evidence is called into question — and then
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12.00 Inspector Morse (r) (AD) 2.00am
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Jill Douglas introduces further coverage
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11.15 World Superbike Championship
Highlights. Action from round 13 at Losail
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two races were scheduled to take place
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extensive interview with the former footballing
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Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
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Sally Phillips brilliantly bewildering tasks,
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Kevin Bridges and Reginald D Hunter
10.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.
The comedian provides his take on fatherhood
11.00 Taskmaster. Aisling Bea leaps cushions
12.00 Room 101. With Terry Wogan, Phil Tufnell
and Victoria Coren Mitchell 12.40am Mock the
Week 1.20 QI 2.00 Room 101 2.40 Live at the
Apollo 3.10 Suits (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am Ashes to Ashes 8.00 London’s Burning
9.00 Casualty 10.00 Hetty Wainthropp
Investigates 11.00 The Bill 1.40pm A Fine
Romance 2.20 Birds of a Feather 3.00 London’s
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Wainthropp Investigates
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6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Marina enlists
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7.20 As Time Goes By. Lionel and Jean return to
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climb track ends in disaster (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The detectives reinvestigate
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fashion designer (6/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Tracey builds her own
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12.00 The Bill. Santini begs Fox’s forgiveness
1.00am London’s Burning 2.00 In Deep
4.00 Home Shopping. Buying goods
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 Secrets of War
8.00 Britain’s Lost Roman Circus: A Time Team
Special 9.00 Walking Through History 10.00
Unearthing World War I 11.00 Coast (AD)
12.00 Buried by the Blitz: A Time Team Special
1.00pm Pugin: The God of Gothic — A Time
Team Special 2.00 Wonders of the Monsoon
3.00 Coast (AD) 4.20 The Monocled Mutineer
6.00 Great War Diaries. A German soldier
witnesses the horrors of the Somme
7.00 WWI Aces Falling. The story of two
First World War fighter pilots (/7)
8.00 Unearthing World War I. A focus
on the Battle of the Somme in 1916
9.00 The Last Day of WW1. An account of how
soldiers continued to be killed in battle hours
after the armistice was signed in 1918 (AD)
10.00 Blackadder Goes Forth. Captain
Blackadder organises a stage show (AD)
10.40 The Monocled Mutineer. Toplis arrives
at the training camp in France (2/4)
12.20am Unearthing World War I 1.20
The Last Day of WW1 (AD) 2.20 Raiders of
the Lost Art (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm-6.00 Live Bowls:
Scottish International Open. Coverage of day
four from the Dewars Centre in Perth 11.15
Bowls: Scottish International Open. Action
from day four at the Dewars Centre in Perth
12.15am-1.05 NFL This Week
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 1.45pm First Minister’s
Questions 2.35-2.45 Wild Week Revisited:
Bats and Starlings. Local famous faces explore
the natural world (r) 5.15 Flog It! Paul Martin
learns about some of Britain’s traditional rural
crafts (r) 5.30-6.00 X-Ray. Rachel Treadaway
Williams investigates a plumber who has left a
trail of unpaid debts (r)
STV
As ITV except: 10.35pm Scotland Tonight
11.10 On Assignmen. Featuring reports from
Catalonia and New York 11.45 Lethal Weapon.
A man wrecks a jewellery store and puts a
security guard in hospital (r) (AD) 12.35am
Teleshopping 1.35 After Midnight. News and
conversation 3.05 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 12.15am Teleshopping
1.15-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Pincidh
Dincidh Dù (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.35 Srath
Sona (Happy Valley) (r) 5.40 Oran le Fiona (r)
5.45 Na Floogals (r) 6.00 Tree Fu Tom 6.20
Ceistean Lara (r) 6.35 Sealgairean Spòrsail
(History Hunters) (r) 7.00 An Ataireachd
Bhuan 7.30 Speaking Our Language (r)
8.00 An Là (News) 8.30 Fuine (Home Baking)
(r) 9.00 Bho Stalag Gu Gulag (From Stalag
to Gulag) (r) 10.00 Trusadh: Balaich a’
Bruidhinn (Cancer Club) (r) 11.00 Na Ceiltich
(Celtic History) (r) 11.25-12.00 Alleluia!
(Spiritual Music & Verse) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
12.05pm Heno (r) 1.00 Llwybr yr Arfordir (r)
1.30 Pobl A’u Gerddi (r) 2.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 3.05 Iolo ac Indiaid America (r) (AD)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Tag
5.35 Mabinogi-Ogi 6.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
6.05 04 Wal (r) 6.30 Cewri Cwmderi (r) 7.00
Heno 7.30 Rownd a Rownd (AD) 7.55
Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25
Doctoriaid Yfory 9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd
9.30 Y Byd ar Bedwar 10.00 O’r Senedd
10.30-11.35 Deuawdau Rhys Meirion (r)
14
MindGames
1
2
5
3
Codeword No 3174
14
4
6
7
8
12
25
1
9
4
8
12
13
14
15
2
21
14
2
4
6
11
15
22
11
25
9
14
11
20
4
22
8
3
7
15
20
13
8
4
7
3
6
6
23
16
8
19
25
13
15
19
20
11
14
Scrabble ® Challenge No 1996
11
15
25
1
14
8
1
7
8
13
15
6
24
8
6
18
7
15
1
6
10
20
15
2L
14
18
10
2L
8
8
4
18
17
18
14
18
1
26
24
23
20
18
6
15
24
24
4
15
4
3
15
1
23
7
14
6
16
5
14
11
danger (4,4)
7 To (archaic) (4)
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
18 Row of converted stables
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
L
14
19 On the outside (8)
13 Simple garment (6)
Solution to Crossword 7489
B A S
DOGMA T
A B O
F RO L I C
E K
A S S EM
G
A
D I S AGR
T
V K
P I ECE
R R T
FOP S S
P E
I C
I
V
I
B L
S
E E
R
V
A
I N
T
M C
A SHY
M E
AMP S
A
T
Y L I NE
U
MEN T
A
I RAGO
F
E
GU L AR
L
R
12
13
25
26
U
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
F
10 Fruit (6)
12 Make certain (6)
19
16 Not struck or touched (11)
(4)
9 Pretentious display (11)
15
Down
1 Extinct bird (4)
3 Formal discussion (6)
4 Roman dictator (6,6)
6 Celestial phenomenon (5,7)
8 Climbing plant's support (7)
No 3993
T
P
I
S
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
T
N
I
H
O
O
P
O
A
B
S
A
E
B
R
G
W
O
L
A
R
D
U
I
R
T
Y
P
D
R
A
I
O
N
O
A
I
X
L
L
Futoshiki No 3037
17
16
21
17
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
>
3
4
13
28
7
23
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE® is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ©Mattel 2017
Kakuro No 1996
>
24
10
6
23
37
13
34
6
29
∧
>
4
∨
<
∨
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
7
8
36
24
<
H
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
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charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
E
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4166
F
G
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
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by midnight. Leave your three
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and your contact details.
No 3994
O
E
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
17 June 6, 1944 (1-3)
D
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
11 Plentiful, abundant (7)
15 Confectionery items (6)
C
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
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14 Bird of prey (6)
B
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
2 Limitations; leaps (6)
A
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
What play covers two triple-word
squares using this rack?
© PUZZLER MEDIA
5 Place of escape from
4
14 15
I
2L
PINEDOM
17
U
15 Firmly fixed (6)
2L
18
L
Across
13
What play uses six of the letters
from this rack?
4
F
19
11 12
KOOLRAP
17
7
10
3W
ug
3L
no 2W
2L
are
2L
teeth
o lea
3L
3L
r
n
ante 2L
3W
w
d 2L
2L
17
19
9
3W
25
3
11
8
7
2
17
6
7
16
6
4
8
3
12
15
9
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
11
15
6
10
21
15
3
28
4
23
6
3
7
© PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7490
10
Tuesday November 7 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
the times | Tuesday November 7 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Radoslaw Wojtaszek
Black: Michael Adams
European Teams, Crete 2017
Catalan Opening
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 g3 d5 4 Bg2
Be7 5 Nf3 0-0 6 0-0 dxc4 7 Qc2
a6 8 a4 Bd7 9 Qxc4 Bc6
A standard Catalan position
that has been seen hundreds of
times at grandmaster level.
10 Bf4 Bd6 11 Qc1 Nbd7 12 Nc3
Qe7 13 a5
New but logical. This introduces
a possible future clamp against
Black’s queenside pawns while
simultaneously freeing the a4square for White’s knight. In BuOnischuk, Tsaghkadzor 2015 White
instead played 13 Rd1 Rfe8 and
only now 14 a5. The game continued 14 ... Rab8 15 Bd2 e5 and Black
easily achieved equality.
13 ... h6 14 Re1
EASY
MEDIUM
HARDER
3
CUBE
IT
+ 15
÷7
12
SQUARE
IT
+ 162
1/9
14 SQUARE
IT
+ 5/7
OF IT
OF IT
2/3
OF IT
x9
________
árD D D i] Winning Move
àD DqD 0 ]
ßpD Dp4 0] White to play. This position is from
Crete 2017.
Þ) Dn$pD ] Giri-Eljanov,
White has useful pressure along the e-file
Ý Dp) D )] against the weak pawn on e6. How did he
ÜD ) DQ) ] make the most of this with a fine sequence
Û DBD ) I] that generated a winning endgame?
ÚD D $ D ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Bridge Andrew Robson
Today’s deal from the English Dealer: West, Vulnerability: East-West
Premier League in London fea♠tures a courageous and wonderful Teams
♥J 8 2
Chinese (or pseudo) finesse. Here’s
♦K 9 7
the Chinese finesse at its simplest:
♣Q 10 8 7 6 5 2
♠K 9 8 7 6 4 2
♠ J 10 5 3
Dummy
N
♥K
♥6
W E
West
♥A2
East
♦A 10 5
S
♦Q 8 4 2
♥K864 --♥J1097
♣J 3
♣
A
K
9
4
♠
AQ
Declarer
♥AQ 10 9 7 5 4 3
♥Q53
♦J 6 3
Needing to avoid a loser, declarer
♣leads the queen. Clearly West should
S(Bell) W
N
E
cover with the king but West may be
Pass
3♣
3♠
worried declarer holds ♥QJ10, in
4♥
4♠
5♥
Pass
which case covering gives him a
Pass
5♠
Pass
Pass
third trick. Note, if declarer needs
6♥
Dbl
End
two tricks and can afford to lose one,
he should lead towards the queen. Contract: 6♥ dbled, Opening Lead: ♥6/♠ J
Leading the queen is a desperate
spades. He ruffed a club, cashed the
attempt to win two quick tricks.
The bidding was identical at both ace of spades, discarding a diamond
tables. The hero was Mike Bell, who and led the jack of diamonds, West
made 6♥ doubled on West’s best lead playing low (covering with the queen
of the six of hearts. We’ll come to that. would have worked rather better but
The villain (so to speak) was West didn’t want to resolve declarer’s
West at the other table, who looked guess if he held ♦J10).
The legitimate chance in diano further than his partner’s
spades. Declarer gratefully ran the monds is to lead to the king, hopjack of spades to his queen and ing West has the ace. Leading the
cashed the ace. Away went two dia- jack, intending to run it, theoretimonds from dummy. Declarer gave cally cannot work because West
up a diamond and could ruff two can cover with the queen.
Declarer knew West had good
diamonds. With the king of hearts
falling under the ace in a 1-1 split, clubs (given his trump lead and
East not rising with a high club on
that was doubled slam made.
West at Bell’s table reasoned that dummy’s club lead). As a passed
with clubs covered, there was no hand, he thought there was barely
need to lead a spade. First, leading room for the ace of diamonds.
a spade may cost (as here); second, After much soul-searching, Bell
leading a trump may be important backed his judgement and boldly
to cut down ruffing. Well reasoned ran the jack of diamonds.
Correct. The jack drew East’s ace,
and it appears declarer must now
promoting king. Declarer’s third
lose two diamond tricks.
Declarer beat East’s king of hearts diamond could be ruffed — slam
with the ace and ruffed the queen of made. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
x3 –9
HALF OF
IT
x 7 – 76 + 1/3 + 178 HALF OF – 89
IT
OF IT
x 7 – 294 HALF OF + 2/3
IT
OF IT
x4
1/5
OF IT
+ 423
6
6
Killer Moderate No 5709
3
23
12
3
13
4
6min
6
23
28
4
13
14
14
7
8
7
17
16
4
10
17
15
5
8
5
13
8
9
Killer Tough No 5710
16
14
19
17
20
8
24
21
25min
8
9
16
9
8
3 6 8
1 2 6
7 9
9 3 7
6 1 2
1
2 1
1 3
2 7
4 9
8
9
2 3
4 1
3
9
8 6
9 8
3
1
9
6
7
2
9
5
1
4
3
8
2
4
8
9
3
5
6
1
7
8
x
-
x
+
=
2
4
3
9
7
1
2
2 7
1 2
3
1
1
2 1
7 3
9 7
3 8 6
1 6 2
8
1
4
2
7
3
9
5
6
3
5
9
8
6
4
1
2
7
1
4
8
6
3
5
7
9
2
=
32
=
2
7
6
3
8
4
1
9
5
2
1
9
5
2
6
7
3
4
8
6
8
9
7
5
3
1
2
4
M
F
S EQU E
N
N
BURG L
A
E VO L V
A
GNA S H
G
E
QUA I N
A
Z
URGE
D
D
1
2
7
9
5
6
7
1
2
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4
3
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8
1
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2
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2
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5
1
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3
7
4
3
1
4
6
8
2
5
7
9
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2
7
4
1
9
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6
3
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7
1
5
2
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4
3
6
8
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6
3
7
4
2
9
1
4
3
2
1
9
6
7
8
5
6
2
1
3
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7
4
9
5
8
7
2
4
9
1
3
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9
3
4
1
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6
2
5
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7
5
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8
2
4
3
6
1
4
6
8
7
1
3
5
9
2
2
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3
4
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1
8
7
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8
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5
9
3
2
6
1
4
1
4
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9
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3
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3
2
1
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2
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1
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7
5
1
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4
8
2
3
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6
1
2
3
5
4
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9
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4
7
8
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6
2
1
5
3
5
3
9
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8
1
6
2
4
3
8
4
1
9
5
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6
2
1
2
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8
3
6
9
4
5
9
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5
4
2
7
3
8
1
Futoshiki 3036
8
9
14
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
2 2
7
4
2
3
3
T
Suko 2075
C
Y
Y
G
5
4 > 1
3
1
8
12
2
x
5
3
∨
2
2
∧
4
4
∨
1
1
5
3
7
3
-
x
x
5
5
6
9
+
x
+
x
3
2
6
5
9
7
1
4
8
4
7
5
8
1
2
3
6
9
7
5
3
4
6
9
8
1
2
1
6
4
3
2
8
5
9
7
9
8
2
1
7
5
4
3
6
2
1
9
7
8
4
6
5
3
6
3
7
9
5
1
2
8
4
5
4
8
2
3
6
9
7
1
S
H
A
O
F
O
R
K
I
R
M
E
R
C
I
H
T
S
I
R
C
U
E
Lexica 3992
Set Square 1998
4
8
9
1
6
4
3
7
2
5
Lexica 3991
5
3
∨
3 > 2
∨
1 < 2
4
10
L
Sudoku 9435
3
1
2
6
9
5
4
8
7
Killer 5708
12
Scrabble 1995
TYPHOID
K5 across (140)
AIRBRUSH
D4 down (74)
9
7
2
∧
4
8
I
H
E
J
NC E MAU
D
L
P
D
E
P U L P I
X
O C
E D
C Y N I
D
S
A
S T ARK L
U
E
T
D E F T L
I
I
I
O
C R OWN I N
K
S
E
G
Sudoku 9434
9
2
3
4
8
7
6
1
5
KenKen 4165
22
24
-
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 4 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
= 62 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
9
7
1
2
3
4
Cell Blocks 3056
13
x
All the digits
= 1 from 1-9 are
Codeword 3173
9
7
19
10
7
3
Solutions
21
13
4
+
÷
Killer 5707
19
2
-
-
Sudoku 9433
8
1
+
Kakuro 1995
16
14
17
10
2
6
÷
Yesterday’s answers
eth, ethyl, gel, gelt, gen, gent, get, gey,
glen, hen, hey, leg, length, lengthy,
let, ley, lye, neg, net, teg, ten, the,
thegn, then, they, yeh, yen, yet
9
4
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 1999
From these letters, make words of
three or more letters, always
including the central letter. Answers
must be in the Concise Oxford
Dictionary, excluding capitalised
words, plurals, conjugated verbs (past
tense etc), adverbs ending in LY,
comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 15 words, average;
20, good; 25, very good; 30, excellent
22
6 2
3
4
2
3
Polygon
________
á D 4 DkD]
àDpD 1p0 ]
ßNDpD h 0]
Þ)nD D D ]
Ý ! D D D]
ÜD D ) ) ]
Û ) D )B)]
ÚD $ D I ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
The retribution for Black’s inaccuracy on move 29. This geometric
capture completes the destruction
of Black’s queenside that White
had envisaged with his 13th move.
31 ... Qxb4 32 Nxb4 Rd2 33 Rc2
Rd1+ 34 Bf1 Nd5 35 Nxd5 Rxd5
36 a6 bxa6 37 Rxc6 a5 38 Rc8+
Kh7 39 Bc4 Rd1+ 40 Kg2 Nd6 41
Rd8 f5 42 Be2 Rd2 43 Kf1 Ne4
44 Rxd2 Nxd2+ 45 Ke1 Nb3 46
Bd3 g6 47 Bc2 Nc5 48 Kd2 Nd7
49 Kc3 Ne5 50 Bd1 Kg7 51 f4
Nc6 52 Kc4 Nb4 53 Kb5 Nd5 54
Kxa5 Nxe3 55 Bf3 Black resigns
–8
© PUZZLER MEDIA
England’s number one, Michael
Adams, got off to a somewhat
shaky start in the European Team
Chess Championship, which concludes today in Crete, when he lost
as Black in the match against Poland. The game featured the Catalan Opening, a variation that is
problematic for both sides. The
advantages and disadvantages are
so subtly nuanced that the slightest
inaccuracy by White can lead to
the instant dissolution of White’s
natural advantage from the opening phase, resulting in sterile equality. Conversely, any almost imperceptible slip by Black can convert a
slight inferiority into a nagging
permanent disadvantage, as happens in today’s game.
Threatening to advance with
e2-e4. This provokes Black into a
general exchange of pieces.
14 ... Bxf3 15 Bxf3 Bxf4 16 Qxf4
c6 17 Red1 Rfe8 18 Qe3 Rad8 19
Bg2 Nd5 20 Qc1 N7f6 21 Na4 e5
22 e3 exd4 23 Rxd4 Nc7
Now we can see the fruits of
White’s decision on move 13. The
combined action of a white knight
coming to c5 with the fianchettoed bishop on g2 places Black’s
queenside pawns under threat.
24 Rxd8 Rxd8 25 Qc5 Qd7 26
Qb4 Nb5 27 Nc5 Qc7 28 Qf4 Qe7
29 Rc1 Nc7
This allows a diabolical tactical
sequence. Better is 29 ... Kf8.
30 Qb4 Nb5 31 Nxa6
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Catalan problems
Cell Blocks No 3057
Brain Trainer
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Chess Raymond Keene
4
+
÷
1
Quiz 1 Sicily 2 Dorothy L Sayers 3 Julianne
Moore 4 He’s The Greatest Dancer 5 Henry IX
6 John Keegan 7 Carlsberg — named after Carl
Jacobsen 8 Das Rheingold 9 Los Angeles
10 Kenwood House 11 Uranus 12 Vicki Baum
13 Fabiano Caruana. Only Magnus Carlsen and
Garry Kasparov have had higher ratings
14 Bob Gibson — playing against the Detroit
Tigers 15 Kakapo (Strigops habroptila)
A
B
A
E
T
H
R
R
O
L
E
A
E
O
L
S
A
T
E
L
D
Word watch
Middenstead (a) A site of
a midden or dunghill
Hiddenite (b) A green
transparent gemstone,
named after mineralogist
WE Hidden
Epidendrum (a) An orchid
Brain Trainer
Easy 33; Medium 108;
Harder 1,795
Chess 1 Rxe6! Rxe6 2
Qxf5 g6 (there is nothing
better) 3 Qxe6 Qxe6 4
Rxe6 with two extra
pawns and an easy win
07.11.17
MindGames
Mild No 9436
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
8 3
6
9
9
7
6 2 3
8
4
3
1
6
7
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Middenstead
a A dunghill site
b A terraced house
c Seeing both sides
Hiddenite
a A religious sect
member
b A gemstone
c A treasure hunter
4
Epidendrum
a An orchid
b Ivy
c Part of the skin
Answers on page 15
Difficult No 9437
Super fiendish No 9438
2
8
5
3
7 1
1
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
5
2
5
9
7
8
2
4
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
4 3 2
9
1
4
12 Which Austrian’s
1929 novel Menschen im
Hotel was published in
English as Grand Hotel?
15
d’Or-winning sitcom
on Gold?
6 Which English
military historian and
lecturer at Sandhurst
wrote The Face of
Battle (1976)?
7 In 1847, which
Danish brewery
was founded by JC
Jacobsen, who named
it after his son?
2
3
4
8 “Entrance of the Gods
to Valhalla” is Scene IV
of which Wagner opera?
9 What did Alexander
Woollcott describe as
“seven suburbs in
search of a city”?
10 Which Georgian villa
on Hampstead Heath is
home to Rembrandt’s
Self-Portrait with
Two Circles?
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
16
18
19
20
21
22
24
6
1
2 9 8 6
4
3
3 7
1
3 2 9
6
7 4
1
8
5
13 In 2014, which
chess grandmaster
achieved an Elo rating
of 2844 — the third
highest in history?
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 955
14 Which St Louis
Cardinals pitcher
recorded 17 strikeouts
during Game 1 of the
1968 World Series?
15 Which flightless
parrot is pictured?
Answers on page 15
23
25
WE E
L
I
NOB
O
E
L AW
I
S N A
N
T
T
H
C
H A I
L
O
PO L
K
B L
O
A N
G
P P
L
H A
Y
T I
N
YG
S N OW B
O O
RO
E S
H
L
DORD E
W F
L A R
Y
A M
T S T OR
Y
U
L E SO
U
I
AMY
A L L
L
A
L L S
E
S
R
G
E
Y N X
I
N I T
O
P
T HO
E
L
DO L
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Pedro
8
9
2
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
The Times Quick Cryptic No 956
1
2
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
11 Trinculo, Caliban,
Francisco and Prospero
are irregular moons of
which planet?
5 Charles Edwards
plays the regal title
role in which Rose
1
8 7
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 Palermo is the capital
of which autonomous
region of Italy?
4 Sister Sledge namechecked the labels
Halston, Gucci and
Fiorucci in which
1978 song?
5
8 4
7 6 3
8
6 7 5
8
3
8
8
2
1 5
GETTY IMAGES
3 Which US actress
links the films Safe,
Short Cuts, Boogie
Nights and Far
From Heaven?
5
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
2 Who wrote the crime
novels Strong Poison
(1930), Murder Must
Advertise (1933) and
Gaudy Night (1935)?
4
Across
1 Stupid turning over black wet
soil (4)
3 Curtailed bid to trap deer out
of view (3-5)
9 Be only partially successful in
looking attractive (7)
10 Gather old woman’s blocking a
school’s opening (5)
11 Disorder is nothing with
Charles around (5)
12 Group of twelve things, one
dozen recalled by Bill (6)
14 Railway employee adapted to
steam-trains (7,6)
17 Conclude what to do with
parcel (4,2)
19 Runs into holiday site
exhibiting muscle pain (5)
22 Source of wool a lot of shops
rejected (5)
23 Reporter’s claim to look good
(7)
24 College and school subject
mostly for brainy type (8)
25 Force everybody to stumble (4)
Down
1 Unhappy actors covered by
feathers (8)
2 End up suppressing an
example of mental illness (5)
4 Fingertip zone roughly
identifying when ice forms (85)
5 Audibly remained calm (5)
6 Determined a soldier should
get round blockage (7)
7 Presenting no problems,
occupying house as yet (4)
8 A snooty person picked up one
small plant (6)
13 Suggestion to support
development of Laos (8)
15 Beneficiary a man we
hear making long-distance
communication (3-4)
16 Do not oppose legislation
limiting Church power (6)
18 Friend leading Mass including
second devotional song (5)
20 Region to receive new sporting
venue (5)
21 Strike starts to seriously limit
actual production (4)
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