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The Times Times 2 - 8 November 2017

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November 8 | 2017
Ditch the LBD (little black dress)
It?s all about the LRD (long red dress)
From left: �, freepeople.com;
�5, rixo.co.uk; the model
Cora Emmanuel
2
1GT
Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
times2
How the war
From shopaholism to
nomophobia: enough
of made-up addictions
Carol Midgley
H
ow comforting to
learn that Kevin
Spacey and Harvey
Weinstein are now,
allegedly, in the same
$9,000-a-week
Arizona clinic being
treated for sex
addiction. What were the chances?
Fascinating to read too that the
treatment to help one stop being a
sleazy, gropey creep (sorry, ?addict?,
my bad) is called Gentle Path and
apparently involves counselling and
?expressive arts? such as music and
dance. So simply waltz off your libido,
pirouette away your power fetish. Let?s
pray that Kevin and Harvey can
partner up at some stage for a
therapeutically flaccid foxtrot.
Yet there?s a niggling voice in my
head that says: ?But isn?t sex addiction
an utter crock of bollocks that gives
randy, predatory old goats and worse
a clinical excuse for their pervy
behaviour?? What can I do about this
mantra, which I hear repeatedly and
also from experts who call it things
like ?nonexistent? and ?made up??
An article last month in Psychology
Today also seemed sceptical. ?Take
away opioids from an oxycontin addict
or alcohol from an alcohol addict and
the results are horrific: hallucinations,
insomnia, tearing at their own flesh,?
it said. ?Take away sex from a ?sex
addict?? He gets crabby.? Mmm. It?s
almost as though some men might
want a clinical diagnosis to absolve
themselves of all responsibility for
their actions and even turn them into
the victims. ?It?s not me, luv, it?s my
illness.? Perhaps more helpful therapy
might include, say, writing out a
thousand times: ?I must try not to
flash my cock at strangers.?
And isn?t it odd that you never hear
of, for example, Argos workers or
factory labourers being treated for
sex addiction? It only seems to be
rich, powerful men such as lords or
celebrities or Hollywood stars who
have lots of opportunity to paw and
fondle and can afford $9,000 a week
to be told that they are unwell and
not simply narcissistic or sociopathic
or had years of getting what they
want when they want so never feel
the need to ask.
New Xmas
ads? I can?t
bear them
Some people claim they
have been ?reduced to
tears? by the new M&S
Christmas advert
featuring Paddington
Bear. Oh, me too.
Many people would like to have sex
frequently given half the chance.
A 23-year-old man once told me he
feared that he was a sex addict because
he ?thought about sex constantly and
wanted it every day?. I?m not qualified
in this field, but I diagnosed him as
?being a 23-year-old man?.
Many things are passed off as
?addictions? that once would have been
called ?greed? or ?lacking willpower? or
?being a bit dim?. Such as internet porn
?addiction?, tanning bed ?addiction?
(tanorexia), Netflix and box-set
?addiction?, shopaholism, sexting
?addiction? and ?nomophobia?, the
addiction to one?s mobile phone.
(Could an alternative, simpler diagnosis
in all these cases be: ?You have just
forgotten how to read a book??)
If people such as Weinstein really
do think they are addicted to sex why
not hire a prostitute rather than
frightening young actresses by, say,
emerging naked from a bathroom with
an erection, as Emma de Caunes
alleges he did in 2010. That?s not about
sex, it?s about intimidation.
If such men weren?t millionaires but
office workers I have a feeling that the
opportunities to be a ?sex addict?
would stop as if by magic. Then they
would be, as Harold Steptoe used to
say to his father, just a ?dirty old man?.
Mainly because there
are still 48 days to
sodding Christmas and
there?s no escaping this
sentimental crud.
What?s most
irritating about the
major retailers? festive
ads is the yawning gulf
between message and
motive: it?s all cosy
fireside scenes and
how familial love is
everything, but what
they really mean is:
?GIVE US ALL YOUR
MONEY EVEN IF IT
MEANS DEBT ?
AND KEEP OUR
SHAREHOLDERS
HAPPY.?
Last year?s John
Lewis ad campaign cost
an obscene �million.
At least the new Tesco
festive effort has the
merit of looking so lowbudget it seems to have
Its caliphate was crushed, but Isis exerts
a pernicious influence via the internet.
Damian Whitworth meets the specialist
police unit trying to bring it down
Everybody
wants to
be a cat
A French author
entreats us to live like
our cats in a new book
judiciously entitled
How to Live Like Your
Cat. Felines, says
St閜hane Garnier,
instinctively have the
key to a successful,
happy life by being all
the things a life-coach
would encourage us to
be: assertive, confident,
serene, impervious to
judgment, curious, full
of self-love, unafraid to
say no and seizing every
opportunity to sleep.
Seriously? Well, thank
you ? I?d LOVE to live
like my cat. That would
mean a lie-in every day,
being pampered like a
queen, sitting on
sleeping people?s chests
at 3am and hissing at
them if they dare to
move, randomly
rejecting posh food
I happily ate yesterday,
yet refusing to consider
it again, being told I?m
a ?good girl? for
burying my faeces and
feeling no shame about
lifting my leg to lick my
anus in public.
But if all eight million
cat owners in the UK
behaved like this the
country would sort of
lapse into chaos. We
would all be narcissists
and sociopaths and
furniture wreckers
who jib work to lie
in a shaft of sunlight
for eight hours straight.
Just as well that we
know our place. As
the cats? servants.
been financed by the
loose change down the
back of someone?s sofa.
The theme of the
M&S advert is that
Paddington stumbles
on a burglar stealing
the gifts and, through
kindness, makes him a
better person. Ah, that?s
nice. Of course, a real
burglar would have
probably broken his
nose with a crowbar.
I
n an office at a secret location in
London Ian and Paul spend their
days watching beheadings,
immolations, torture and
terrorist propaganda rants, so the
rest of us don?t have to. They
spare me the horror films, but
play a clip that is just as chilling.
A man whose head is covered by a
black hood holds an automatic weapon
in one hand. Speaking in a British
accent he urges viewers not to worry if
they cannot obtain a gun like his. ?A
knife from your local B&Q will do the
job. So prepare yourself and march
forth with firmness and conviction to
the rewards of martyrdom.?
Islamic State may have been driven
out of most of Iraq and Syria, but
extremists are still regurgitating its
message of hate. ?It?s more nihilistic
now than it ever was before,? Paul says.
?It?s a cry: ?Carry out attacks at home!
Do what you can!? You don?t need
much physical space to create all this
stuff and they continue to pump it out.?
Ian says: ?The actual physical
caliphate shrinking doesn?t mean the
virtual side is going to shrink as well.
Our aim is to keep pushing them back
to the fringes of the internet.?
The two officers are part of the
Counter Terrorism Internet Referral
Unit (CTIRU), a group set up to battle
the continuous onslaught of online
extremist material that aims to spread
terrorist propaganda. The most recent
deadly attack by a suspect who was
apparently inspired by Isis, in New York
last week, shows how hard it is to tackle
this internet-based threat. Sayfullo
Saipov was said by New York?s head of
intelligence and counterterrorism, John
Miller, to have ?followed almost exactly
to a T? instructions that Isis put on its
social media channels when he
allegedly killed eight people by driving
a lorry in a cycle lane. Khuram Butt,
the ringleader of the London Bridge
attack in June, and Salman Abedi,
the Manchester Arena suicide bomber,
are just two terrorists who found
inspiration online.
Based in the Metropolitan Police?s
Counter Terrorism Command (CTC),
the CTIRU is funded by the Home
Office. It was established in 2010 and
has succeeded in removing about
300,000 pieces of material from the
web. An undisclosed number of officers
are involved in the removal of more
than 2,000 items a week, trawling the
internet and responding to tip-offs
from the public before alerting internet
service providers to pages that should
be removed from their sites under the
companies? terms and conditions. More
than 300 companies have agreed to
requests, but most work is still done
with the big three of Facebook, Twitter
and YouTube.
The aim is to protect the public from
the more offensive material, but more
importantly to prevent radicalisation
of those who might be susceptible to
extreme messages. The team also
provides leads in investigations that
result in prosecutions. Prolific
spreaders of Isis propaganda have
been jailed for as long as five years.
?It is broadcast terrorism,? says
Detective Chief Superintendent Clarke
Jarrett of CTC. ?They are trying to
reach the vulnerable, the young. They
push out lots of messages on lots of
platforms and their hope is to radicalise
people who aren?t linked to them and
make them support them, or even
conduct terrorist acts in their name.
?We are seeing quite a significant
shift from large, elaborate plots by
terrorist networks to very small groups
or individuals performing terrorist
acts. Often they are taking their
inspiration from online. For us it is
really important to remove as much
content as we can to stop that
poisonous message getting to as
many people as we can.?
Paul has been in the Metropolitan
Police for 15 years and in the CTIRU
for two years. ?You don?t ever get used
to it and I don?t think you should ever
get used to it. But you do cope with it,?
he says of the content he examines.
He has not seen anything he couldn?t
watch once. ?But I wouldn?t ever watch
them again.?
Ian, who has been with the force
since 2009 and has spent more than
three years tracking extremist
propaganda, says a degree of resilience
to the images is gradually built up.
?The one that I found very difficult was
It?s broadcast
terrorism aimed
at the vulnerable
and the young
probably the ?slaughterhouse? [video]. It
was where Islamic State had a number
of prisoners and they basically treated
them as animals to be slaughtered.
They watched their comrades being
butchered. It was pretty horrific.?
In 2015 a Jordanian pilot was burnt
alive in a cage. ?The immolation was
very tough. I remember that stuck
with me for a while afterwards,? Ian
says. ?Part of the problem with that
was that shorter versions of the video
would be released across social media
showing the worst parts of it. That was
just going round and round. That?s the
stuff we are very keen to get rid of as
quickly as possible because that could
be linked to hashtags that could be
getting out to a wider audience.?
A particular problem has been the
linking of videos to innocuous social
media hashtags. After the Manchester
bombing in May videos celebrating the
attack were linked to hashtags for
Justin Bieber and Ariana Grande.
For operational reasons the number
of officers in the CTIRU cannot be
the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
3
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times2
on terror is raging online
The lowdown
Floating tents
CHRIS MCANDREW FOR THE TIMES; GETTY
disclosed. They are a tight-knit team.
?We do have gallows humour,? Paul
says. ?That in no way diminishes what
we are looking at and what we are
trying to do.?
Ian says: ?Some people find it harder
to deal with videos involving children,
some find it harder to deal with
beheadings, some people don?t want to
deal with immolation. You can come
together as a team. Often if you watch
something together it can minimise
the effect. Or watch it without the
sound first is something we always
recommend. So your brain doesn?t
take in everything at the same time.
You never get used to it; you can deal
with it. The most important thing is
we would like to stop your children
being exposed to it.?
After a hard week online Ian chases
an oval ball around a field. ?Playing
rugby helps a lot,? he says. Paul
immerses himself in drawing. ?Black
pen on a bit of white board is great
therapy. We have systems in place to
monitor signs of stress. We have
regular appointments with counsellors
and quick access to them if we need
them. We have regular breaks. But we
are police, so when there is a big
release we tend to work on it as much
as we can for as long as we can.?
After the Westminster Bridge attack
Paul was on duty for more than 24
hours monitoring social media for
glorification of the incident. A few
dozen tip-offs from the public about
ut
extremist material come in each
week, but after incidents such as
the London Bridge attack they
can soar to 500 a week.
Execution videos and those
showing violence or torture are
only a small portion of those
flagged up. Potentially more
dangerous as recruitment tools
are those showing dead children
alleged to be victims of coalition
bombings. ?They use them to justify
fy
the barbarous acts. They think theyy
have the moral high ground,? Paul says.
Slick representations of the supposed
sed
good life in the caliphate are rare these
days, but are part of a vast library that
officers expect will be recycled.
A growing challenge is the amount
of far-right material on the internet,
including anti-Islamic hate messages
and propaganda. Often this is harder
to get removed because, Paul says,
its creators ?are quite clever in
going up to the threshold of what is
acceptable, but not over. They say
things that are offensive, but not an
offence. The issues with the right wing
are evolving for us.?
The CTIRU is the first unit of its
kind in the world. Europol has a
similar outfit, but there is no
equivalent in the US. The British unit
must apply to each service provider to
have items removed for breaching its
terms and conditions. ?With those that
Above: Detective Chief
Superintendent Clarke
Jarrett of Counter
Terrorism Command.
Top: posed by a model
have a 24-hour abuse team in place it
can take minutes,?? Ian says. ?Other
platforms may just be a one-man
operation, so you may report it and it
comes down straightaway because
they happen to be there receiving their
abuse emails, or they might be away
for a week on holiday.?
It feels like a game of Whac-a-Mole,
where as soon as the online jihadis are
knocked off one platform they pop up
somewhere else. ?That is an issue,?
Jarrett says. ?I am under no illusion
you can still find material out there,
but what we want to do is remove it
from the main social media platforms
where people can find it easily.?
This year the main political parties
took their campaign advertisements
off YouTube after an investigation by
The Times revealed that they were
being promoted next to videos of
Islamic extremists. Guides on how to
make bombs were also found to be
freely available on Facebook and
YouTube. Abedi used videos from
YouTube to help to build the device
that killed 22 people in May.
The big internet companies have said
they are investing heavily in personnel
and artificial intelligence to prevent
extremist material appearing online
and to remove it when it does. At a
meeting with internet companies at the
UN in New York in September, Theresa
May said that terrorist groups were
aware that more of their propaganda
was being removed and so were
disseminating it at a faster rate. She
said that the industry needed to go
?farther and faster? in automating
detection of such content and
developing solutions to stop it being
uploaded. She floated the idea of fining
companies if they failed to remove
material within two hours. The
government also suggested that those
view extremist content
who repeatedly
rep
could face
fa jail terms of up to 15 years.
It is tempting to wonder why the
Met is doing a great deal of the
internet
giants? work for them.
int
Jarrett
says they are keen to stay
Ja
involved.
?We want to help them
in
to do more themselves. Also we
don?t
want to lose the
d
intelligence
dividend of being
in
linked
to them because if they
lin
remove
lots of material we want to
rem
know who is putting that material
up ther
there. We are certainly giving them
advice and
a training and the big ones
are listening
and they are certainly
liste
improving.
improvi We?ve got a long way to go.?
Paul says the tone of Islamic State?s
online output has changed in recent
weeks. ?It?s more a roar of defiance:
?We will not be going anywhere.? ?
The reality is that its last strongholds
have fallen. Nevertheless, it is still
making online threats, including
against next year?s World Cup. One
mocked-up image showed Lionel
Messi apparently decapitated.
?There is a sense of achievement
that comes with getting rid of material
so that we can hopefully prevent
members of the public being subjected
to it,? Ian says. ?As messed up as it is,
I really do enjoy the job. When you are
disrupting this type of material you
know you are getting to them as well,
which is satisfying. It?s a really fulfilling
role, despite its horrific aspects.?
www.gov.uk/report-terrorism
Here?s one for you. You always claim
you just go with the flow.
I detect a tease is coming. What is it?
The chance to camp on water.
Appearing with Julian Clary and
Alan Carr in a cruise ship revue?
No, a tent that floats. The Shoal
Tent is an inflatable raft with a
tented roof. The promotional
blurb says: ?70 per cent of the
Earth is covered in water, now you
camp on it.?
We could be like Huck and Jim
drifting down the Mississippi on their
raft in Adventures of Huckleberry
Finn. I?ve always fancied exploring
the upper stretches of the Thames.
I think in this thing you?d go
to sleep in Gloucestershire and
wake up racing to a watery
Gravesend. There is video of people
paddling about in a Shoal, but it
doesn?t look supremely
manoeuvrable. It isn?t a boat.
It?s a bit like one of those capsules
that astronauts bob around in when
they splash down in the sea.
Yes, but they?ve got Nasa coming
to get them. The manufacturer
suggests you can use it to camp ?on
your favourite farm pond, salt water
flat, creek or river eddy?.
That sounds less intense.
It also explains that the tent, which
is 8ft tall and has a 6in-thick
inflatable base, can comfortably
accommodate people up to 6ft 3in
tall. Two or three of them by the
look of it. It adds that the sides can
easily be detached to get in and out
?if the need suddenly arises?.
If you wake to find you?re sinking,
you mean? Or something has
climbed in while you?re sleeping?
I don?t think it?s one for
crocodile country.
Let?s give it a try.
It costs �140.
Let?s not.
According to the American
company that is making it:
?The world is your waterbed.?
Whatever floats your boat.
4
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Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
fashion
The padded jacket is
the new winter coat
S
It?s cold out there ? so pick up
this season?s statement down
cover-up, says Anna Murphy
o, the down coat is a thing
this season. By which I
mean not just an item of
clothing that keeps you
warm, but one that makes
a statement. At its most
extreme, courtesy of
Balenciaga and an outlay
of �000, that statement is: ?I am so
much cooler than you that I wear a
down coat that looks to have been
buttoned up askew.? There is a
statement I would make right back at
this point, were I to meet anyone
wearing that wonky coat, but it is not
to be printed here.
At the other extreme is the
workhorse down jacket that costs very
little on the high street, strikes no
aesthetic pose whatsoever, and that,
while it does the requisite job of
rendering you cosy, also has the
tendency to trail small feathers across
the rest of your attire.
What lies in between? Some other
posh jackets that are considerably less
outr� and somewhat less expensive,
but are still beyond the means and/or
desires of most of us. It was to offer a
different answer to that question that
the husband-and-wife team Hunter
and Lulu Mei launched their boutique
outerwear brand Lu Mei a couple of
years ago. Down jackets are its
speciality, and this lovely Shadwell
style is my favourite (�5,
lumeilondon.com).
Hunter?s family have two factories in
China that have been producing coats
and jackets for luxury brands such as
Balenciaga and Giorgio Armani for
30 years. ?Outerwear tends to be really
high-end or really low-end,? he says.
?And if it is good quality it comes with
a hefty price tag. We thought there
was a gap for great quality at the right
price. Not everyone wants to spend a
grand on a coat.?
True that. Lu Mei uses the same bits
and pieces as the grandest labels. The
fabrics come from the same factories
in Italy; the filling is ? as per the posh
brands ? 90 per cent goose down,
10 per cent duck. The construction is
carried out by a specialist team from
the family business who normally
work only on new designs. ?These are
the people with the best skills,? Hunter
says. He laughs. ?They?ve also known
me since I was 5.? (He is now 27.)
Hunter understands that many of us
are uneasy about the realities behind
the label ?made in China?, but when
we talk he is at least as enthusiastic
about the Mei clan?s approach to their
workforce as the clothes they produce.
?We treat our employees really well.
We never overwork them, so much so
that our machinists sometimes ask for
more to do.? And that?s not all. ?If
a couple works for us, we get them
their own studio, and we help them
Why it?s time
to risk red
Go on, be bold and break out of that
little black dress rut, says Rachael Dove
Lu Mei Shadwell
jacket. Below: Est閑
Lauder?s Lady of the
Sea compact
to get their children into schools.
Plus securing new-year train tickets
is hard in China, so we book all our
employees? tickets for them.? Shucks.
Of course, a happy workforce makes
financial sense. Courtesy of the
production power at its fingertips,
Lu Mei ? in contrast to most young
labels ? can play with cost margins
to benefit its product and, ultimately,
its consumer. ?It doesn?t cost that
much to produce the best quality.
What a brand charges its customer is
in part about its positioning strategy.
We are happy to have a smaller profit
margin in order to produce a more
affordable product without
compromising on quality.? In short,
Lu Mei isn?t bothered about pricing its
jackets into the status-symbol bracket,
it just wants to get them into our
wardrobes, and it wants to do so
ethically. My kind of brand.
Powder keg
It doesn?t
cost that
much to
produce
the best
quality
Every year since 1963 Est閑 Lauder
has released in time for Christmas
a collection of limited-edition
powder compacts that contain the
brand?s Perfecting Pressed Powder
in beige. This time the designs are
by the jeweller Monica Rich Kosann
(�0, harrods.com). There?s no
more glamorous way to get ready for
your close-up.
Instagram: @annagmurphy
R
ed has always been a
tricky customer. The
colour of football clubs
and Father Christmas,
it?s a shade that most
of us rarely wear.
Instead we tiptoe
around it in shops and
if a red garment does make it to our
homes its airtime is feeble at best. I
speak from experience: I bought a
crimson wrap dress about a year ago
and have not worn it outside my flat.
Red is too bold, too brazen, too Jessica
Rabbit for most of us to pull off
day-to-day. Until now. Meet the LRD.
This winter is all about the long red
dress, categorised by, you?ve guessed
it, a festive colour palette and
calf-tickling hemline. Designers are
pumping the LRD as the new LBD
(that?s ?little black dress?, keep up). The
idea is that the LRD is just as fuss-free,
foolproof and versatile, but its winning
card is that it?s eye-catching and
statement-making too.
Proof, should you need it, of the
LRD?s 2017 status is that the fashion
pack, known as ?the crows? for their
dedication to black, are already
wearing it. Witness Victoria Beckham,
who made her name wearing a
rotation of black dresses, stepping
out in New York last month in a
calf-length oxblood dress with sheer
sleeves and matching red boots.
The front rows were awash with the
hue at the recent round of shows: Erin
O?Connor in a poppy-coloured
floor-sweeper by Emilia Wickstead;
Giovanna Battaglia in red chiffon
Giambattista Valli with matching
feather-trimmed sandals. Meanwhile,
fashion editors were spotted in Preen
Line?s tomato-red maxi (�5,
matchesfashion.com) and Rixo
London?s scarlet star-print number
(�5, rixo.co.uk).
Ellie Pithers, the fashion features
editor of British Vogue, is a
self-confessed LBD-hoarder. ?Black
has always been my go-to evening
hue,? she says, ?but this season it pays
to be bold. I am with Diana Vreeland,
who said that ?red is the great clarifier
? bright, cleansing, revealing?.?
(Vreeland was such a fan of red that
her living room, including lampshades
and sofa cushions, was decorated in it.)
Labels such as Beckham?s, plus Max
Mara, Valentino and Oscar de la Renta
sent out models wearing the colour
head-to-toe, from a swipe of vermilion
lipstick or a ribbon in the hair down
to burgundy booties via red dresses,
jumpers, coats, tights and all. The
hottest shade of the season is primary
red and, although you may raise an
eyebrow, stylists agree that it suits
everyone because it has no hint of
orange or blue. It?s known in the
industry as machine red.
My favourite dress in this shade is
by the Vampire?s Wife. It comes in
strokeable velvet with ruffle sleeves, a
flattering calf-length cut and slim fit,
although I might need a small loan to
pay for it (�0, matchesfashion.com).
the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
5
1GT
fashion
COVER AND BELOW: GETTY IMAGES
Knee-high boots are
back (the kinkier the
better) by Hilary Rose
T
O
On th
the slightly
li htl cheaper
h
end
d off th
the
scale, I rate Finery?s off-the-shoulder
Linnell dress, which would be great for
a Christmas do (�, finery.co.uk).
If the thought of ditching your LBD
for something red results in
withdrawal sweats, consider that
scarlet, particularly worn near your
face, is far more warming than black,
which can make skin look aged and
dull. Christian Dior described it as a
?very energetic and beneficial colour.
Primary red is
the hottest shade
of the season
Red suits almost every complexion. It
is good for any time too.? It?s also
powerful. Jane Boddy, the colour
director at the trend-forecasting
company WGSN, who has been
predicting the rise of red since 2014,
says: ?Red has a strong impact on how
we feel. For example, sports teams that
wear red are more likely to win than
teams that wear blue.?
For those who, like me, are put
off by the bold statement that red
makes, finding the shades that best
match your skin type will help your
LRD look more relaxed. As a loose
rule, cool skin tones (those with blue
hints to the skin, with blue veins on
the wrist) suit rich purple-reds such as
berry, ruby and claret, while warm
skin tones (those with yellow and
peach hints, and green veins) look
best in orange-reds, such as brick,
russet or coral.
Above: dresses,
�5, and �5,
ghost.co.uk. Right,
from top: actress Laura
Bailey and blogger
Evangelie Smyrniotaki.
Below: fashion editor
Giovanna
Battaglia
On that
O
th t basis,
basis if you have a cool skin
tone I?d recommend looking up the
British slow-fashion designer Justine
Tabak?s long-sleeved Redchurch dress
in what she calls Vintage Red, a dark
crimson. It comes with a black velvet
belt, which makes it a good choice for
curvy shapes (�0, justinetabak.com).
Also try Ghost?s Phoebe high-necked
dress, with discreet floral embroidery,
in berry (�0, ghost.co.uk) or
Topshop?s faux-satin midi dress in
deep wine (�, topshop.com).
Marks & Spencer?s asymmetrical
dress in poppy suits warm skin tones
(�, marksandspencer.com), as does
Boden?s Holly dress in coral textured
jersey, which nips in snugly at the
waist and flares out to an A-line skirt
(�, boden.co.uk).
Finally, you?ll love the LRD for its
length, which makes it just as wearable
for the office as it is for the school
gates or a Friday night on the tiles.
Don?t be put off if you are petite.
Simply ensure that the hemline cuts
off high on your calves ? Jaeger?s
burgundy dress is just the ticket (�0,
johnlewis.com).
j
For full impact do as streetstylers do and wear your LRD
with a pair of red boots. No,
this isn?t a fancy-dress joke,
it?s
it a flattering styling trick
because
wearing block colour
b
head-to-toe elongates the body. Extra
points if your boots are long enough
to disappear under the hem, � la
Victoria
Beckham, so that you
V
don?t
see any leg at all. My pick is
d
Dune?s plum block heel knee-highs
(�5, dunelondon.com).
Instagram: @rachael_dove
here isn?t a lot to be
said for November, but
I have a compelling
reason to be cheerful:
boots. You can?t move
for boots this winter.
Ditch your shoes
because you should be
wearing boots everywhere, with
everything ? long skirts, short skirts,
jeans, dresses, trousers, the lot.
If you buy only one new thing this
winter, make it a pair of knee-highs,
with a medium-height chunky heel.
Why? Because they are sexy as hell
without even trying, they are comfy
and they keep your feet dry. This
doesn?t strike me as a combination
that many people could argue with.
They come in soft suede and
slouchy leather, practical black or
less-practical pink. They are a
little bit kinky without being
tarty, and they?re the one item
this winter that will instantly
make your old clothes look
fresh. I?m so obsessed that I was
trying them on in August.
You can break the bank
if you want to, but you
really don?t have to.
Topshop?s scarlet suede
Box style has a low black
pyramid heel and provides
a lot of good cheer for �
(topshop.com). S閦ane?s
pink suede with stacked
tan heels are gorgeous
(�0, sezane.com), but
Duo?s Reflection are
rather more sturdy and
rain-proof than pale
pink suede (�0,
duoboots.com).
Roberto Vianni?s
tan leather Tarrant
style have vaguely
horsey buckles and
are great value (�0
debenhams.com) and
Office?s slouchy black
leather Kola style
(�0, office.co.uk) are
channelling Victoria Beckham?s �250
boots, which come in black or a
seriously fabulous scarlet. If you?re up
for four figures, then Gianvito Rossi?s
in black leather or tan suede are
stunning (�070, net-a-porter.com).
The boot-camp rules are as follows.
They mustn?t be too tight if your
calves are generous. Flesh spilling over
the top is unforgivable. Try another
style or brand, or have a look at
widecalfbootsstore.co.uk.
At the other end of the
calf-width spectrum, boots that flap
like wellies around spindly calves are
equally terrible. Either buy them from
Duo, which does calf-width fittings
(about �0), or find a decent cobbler
who can take them in. Whether they
can will depend on where the zip and
seams are, but I take mine to Kelpis in
Fulham, west London (020 7736 3856).
They are not cheap, but they can work
From top: fashion editor Darja
Barannik in Chanel boots;
blogger Helena Bordon
miracles. If you want knee boots badly
enough ? and I do ? and if your
calves are spindly enough ? and mine
are ? then it?s worth taking the time
and money to get them tailored
because boots are an investment that
you?ll wear for years.
Finally, the arrival of these boots
will be particularly welcome to those
of us who are still going bare-legged,
in a determined, idiotic pretence
that winter is not happening. It is,
but for the next couple of weeks,
until I get a grip and face
reality, boots are what
stand between me and
hypothermia. And if they?re
a little bit kinky, well, so
much the better.
6
1GT
Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
fashion
I wish power dressing could
Deborah Lloyd, the Brit in charge of US
brand Kate Spade, tells Anna Murphy
why women should say it with flowers
H
The Duchess
of Cambridge in
Kate Spade
New York
ow does a company
president with a
global remit and a
multimillion-dollar
pay cheque dress in
2017? Not, usually,
in a butterfly-print
pale pink chiffon
Victoriana frock with tiered ruffle skirt
and black lace detailing on the bodice.
That?s because company presidents
usually are men, and on the rare
occasion that they aren?t, they are
women who dress like men, in
something tailored: a dress or skirt,
sure, yet power-sleek and worn with a
jacket, the lines sharp enough to chisel
away at that glass ceiling.
But Deborah Lloyd is the president
and chief creative officer of Kate
Spade, the American ?affordable
luxury? brand that sees no
contradiction in those two words
or in the idea of dressing girly while
playing with the big boys.
?When we speak to our customer
about why she likes us, the message
that has been loud and clear is
femininity,? says the 53-year-old
Englishwoman in New York. ?She
loves that it?s a feminine brand. What
we bring to her is this confidence.?
Yet the Theresa Mays, the Angela
Merkels, the Sheryl Sandbergs aren?t
dressing this way. Female power does
not ? outside the creative industries
or royalty ? do floaty or floral or
anything pink. ?I find that incredibly
frustrating,? says Lloyd.
?You are a woman. Why not
embrace it? Why do you have to
play the man?s game? Be a woman.
Celebrate it. Be powerful and strong
with it. Michelle Obama was
incredible at that. She embraced
fashion and she didn?t look any the
less powerful for it. I wish female
politicians would do that.?
Should May ever wish to move
beyond the skirt suit, Merkel beyond
the trouser suit, they know where to
go. ?The core of our being as a brand
is about being feminine and being
a strong woman as well,? is how
Lloyd ? the personification of her
theorem ? puts it. Quite simply, Kate
Spade does girliness better than
anyone else. In the market for a dress
covered in roses (�5) or Russian
dolls (�8)? Or a bag with a bow on it
(�5)? This is the brand for you.
Ditto if you like clothes that make
you and other people smile. Kate
Spade, which was founded by the
eponymous designer in 1993 and came
under Lloyd?s purview in 2007, has
always had a sense of humour. How
about a clutch in the shape of a New
York taxi (�8)? Or a bracelet with
the legend ?Find the silver lining?
engraved inside, a bracelet that is,
apparently without irony, made of
rhodium (�)?
However, the brand also offers
what Lloyd calls ?polish?. There?s a
classicism to it, a dressiness, a certain
kind of quaintness, despite the
contemporary edge. The aesthetic
is 21st-century Holly Golightly,
especially when you factor in the nonfashion add-ons, such as the apron with
the legend ?Eat Cake for Breakfast?
(�). ?Our voice is whimsical,? Lloyd
says, ?and it has a twist of cleverness.?
In fact, Kate Spade is in no need of
May, Merkel et al when it comes to
raising its profile. The sisters formerly
known as Middleton are both fans. ?It
travels an awfully long way when the
Duchess of Cambridge wears one of
our dresses. It?s an incredible honour.?
She never gets the heads-up as to
when that honour is about to be
re-bestowed; when Kate or Pippa is
going to channel that aforementioned
floral floatiness that is signature
Deborah Lloyd
Spade. ?We know Kate loves the
brand. But the first I know about her
wearing something is when my phone
starts bouncing off the table. Similarly,
I had no idea that Pippa had bought so
many of her honeymoon outfits from
us. That was lovely. The Americans
are very impressed by royalty.?
The designer is in an interesting
position, a Brit in charge of a
quintessentially American brand, but
she claims that her outsider status, still
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the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
7
1GT
fashion
be more feminine
Left: jacket,
�428, sweater,
�8, bag, �0,
katespade.co.uk;
jacket, �5,
trousers, �5,
top, �0, in
store. Right:
cape, �0, shirt,
�8, bag, �5,
katespade.co.uk
extant after 15 years, puts her
at an advantage. ?Sometimes
when you?re part of a
country you go too granular.
I can float above and think,
?What does this aspect of
America mean to me?? It?s
easier for me to translate it
for the rest of the world.?
Lloyd has always
been in the translation
game. It?s this more
than anything that
has defined her
career. While the most
high-profile route for a
designer is to start his or
her own brand, she has
so far been a gun for hire,
putting her vision to work
for someone else. ?I go into
a brand and sort of put that
hat on, and think, ?Right, how
do I distil this DNA?? ?
She was a sharpshooter from
the start, regularly winning
competitions when she was at
the Royal College of Art. ?There
was a running joke among the
tutors that I made more money
than they did.?
After college she took the
characteristically strategic
decision to move into
menswear ? ?I knew it
would be easier to stand
out? ? but switched to
womenswear, ending up as
vice-president for women?s
design at Burberry in the
late Nineties. Lloyd was
a key figure in the
Coat, �175,
dress, �8,
bag, �5,
katespade.co.uk
retooling of what was at the time a
brand past its best.
?I arrived just before Rose Marie
Bravo,? she says. (Bravo would prove
to be Burberry?s gamechanger chief
executive.) ?There was no sense of
what Burberry was. I said, ?Right, it?s
about the trench coat?, and I took the
check lining and put it on the outside,
which hadn?t been done before. Rose
Marie said, ?You?re the first person I?ve
met who knows what they are doing.? ?
Kate Moss in a Burberry-check
bikini in 2000 was Lloyd?s doing. But
b
tthen so ? indirectly ? was Danniella
Westbrook in Burberry-check
everything two years later. ?You have
to be careful what you wish for,? the
designer says with a laugh, ?because
then it became check patrol.?
Having your cake and eating it ?
for breakfast in the case of Kate Spade
? is the name of the game in modern
fashion. How to garner mass appeal
without becoming too mass-market
was the tightrope that had to be
walked at Burberry. Now Lloyd is
dealing with the similarly oxymoronic
notion of ?affordable luxury?. Proper
luxury these days is expensive. A
high-end designer handbag can
easily set you back more than �000.
While lots of women can ? and
will ? pay those prices, plenty
more can?t, or won?t.
How cheap can luxury become
in terms of its production costs and,
relatedly, its cost to the consumer
and remain, well, luxurious? ?For
me affordable luxury is about buying
something that you really want in
your life and that works well.?
The skill of Lloyd?s helmswomanship
is evidenced by the brand?s sale to
Coach Inc in May for $2.4 billion,
another ?affordable luxury? force to
be reckoned with, but one that skews
cool-girl rather than girly. The group?s
chief executive, Victor Luis, said:
?Given the potential with the
middle class . . . the opportunity for
modern luxury brands ? brands
that are about approachability,
not just exclusivity ? is huge.?
What Kate Spade and its new
owners have cottoned on to is
that luxury with a capital L
tends to come with a capital
P price tag, excluding many
consumers with money to
spend. This is a brand for
now, not for a putative
time when your boat
comes in 10 or 20 years
down the line. You don?t
dream of a Kate Spade
bag and in the
meantime console
yourself with the perfume. (Though
there is one: Walk On Air.) You buy
that bag today. You start out a Kate
Spade girl, and you grow into a Kate
I had no idea
about Pippa?s
honeymoon
outfits
Spade woman, the brand
never leaving your side if
Lloyd has anything to do
with it. ?There are so many
ways we can get into
someone?s life.? Cradle
to grave ? both
be-flowered and
be-frilled
? is the
b
thinking
at Kate
t
Spade. What a lucrative mindset that is.
The designer?s Kate Spadeyness,
her enthusiasm for the label, seems
boundless. Still, there are rumours that
she may be moving on. What might
brand Deborah Lloyd look like?
?There would be a part of Kate Spade
in it, but it would be a British Kate
Spade,? she says. How would she sum
it up? ?Who knows?? Pause. ?You?ll
have to wait!? She laughs. Mmmm. As
always with Lloyd, watch this space.
8
1GT
Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
arts
?James Dean was mostly lovely
? but he was moody too?
Lois Smith was the actor?s romantic
co-star in East of Eden. Now 87, she
talks to Kevin Maher about her latest
title role in sci-fi film Marjorie Prime
I
n a quiet corner of the lounge
bar in a London hotel,
Lois Smith is having a minor
tantrum. ?What is this?? she
says. ?I am not a movie star!?
The 87-year-old actress, who
made her film debut in 1955
opposite James Dean in East
of Eden and has since snagged more
than 100 screen credits (including
last year?s The Nice Guys and the
TV series True Blood), is recalling
the moment when the American
Cinematheque in Los Angeles
announced that it was holding a
film festival devoted to her work.
?I mean, yes, it?s lovely that this is
what they?ve chosen to do, and I?ll try
to work my way round to celebrating
it,? she says, with grim resignation.
?But that?s just not how I feel.?
Smith, you quickly realise, is modest
to a fault. She has delivered six decades
of screen work, frequently being
the best thing in any given scene
(remember her in Minority Report
as the quirky gardening granny who
unexpectedly snogs Tom Cruise?).
Now this low-key Midwesterner
(Kansas-born, but New York-based)
and revered theatre actress (she
was inducted into the American
Theatre Hall of Fame in 2007) is
facing the full glare of the spotlight.
It?s thanks mostly to her starring role in
the new, provocative and heartbreaking
sci-fi movie Marjorie Prime. ?It?s the
darndest thing,? she says, softly,
quietly baffled by it all, in the most
lovely, old-fashioned American way
you can imagine.
She says that several times
throughout our conversation. She
wells up too, twice, when she
remembers the kindness of a fellow
performer in an early stage role
(?Sorry, it makes me cry?) and when
discussing the death in 2016 of her
partner of 43 years, the character actor
David Margulies (they were rarely
apart and the loss was devastating).
Yet she?s not mawkish or sentimental,
but is frequently droll. Of the present
?golden age? of TV, for instance, she
says: ?I believe there is some great
stuff going on in TV, but who has the
time? I always wanted to watch The
Wire, but I just never got round to it.?
For now, though, there?s Marjorie
Prime. Adapted from the Pulitzer
Lois Smith with James
Dean during her screen
test for East of Eden
prize-nominated stage play by Jordan
Harrison, it features Smith in the title
role as an ageing violinist suffering
from an unspecified brain disease.
Encouraged by her grown-up daughter,
Tess (Geena Davis), and son-in-law,
Jon (Tim Robbins), Marjorie invests in
computer software that recreates her
late husband, Walter (Jon Hamm),
in life-size holographic form, as he
appeared at the start of their marriage.
The holographic Walter, however,
is an empty cipher and needs to be
filled daily with the anecdotes and
memories that defined his original, yet
deceased self. Which is where the fun
really begins. Because the fake Walter,
in his own way, has dementia too and
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has to be told his own memories.
And because the film, directed by
Michael Almereyda, seems to
interrogate the essence of what makes
us human in the digital age (it?s like
Blade Runner 2049, but good). Yet
mostly because, when you drop
down farther, Marjorie Prime is a
Cartesian nightmare about the curse
of subjectivity and how we construct
our ideas of the people around us
entirely from our own perspectives.
When I ask Smith about the film
and dazzle her with my multiple
interpretation theory, she smiles
kindly and says: ?Yes, all those
subjects are in it, but it?s about
memory and family too. And although
technology is involved in the story, it?s
not about technology. It?s about how
we live now.? She says that she doesn?t
go online (doesn?t have the time) and
that the greatest pleasure in watching
the film is not found in themes or
subtext, but in thinking: ?How would
I respond in this situation??
Smith says that acting in Marjorie
Prime was not too challenging and
didn?t require incredible amounts
of character work because she had
already done it on stage in Los
Angeles in 2014. Then she was at
the beginning of an intense crush
of work commitments that bounced
her from Prime, to the Ryan Gosling
vehicle The Nice Guys, to a much
adored performance for Chicago?s
Steppenwolf theatre company in Rory
Kinnear?s The Herd, to the role of a
the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
9
1GT
JOONEY WOODWARD FOR THE TIMES
arts
plays and won a drama scholarship
to the University of Washington.
She moved to New York in 1951
and soon landed her first role, in
East of Eden, playing Anne, the
quirky, flirty bar girl who meets
and is instantly beguiled by the
boyish antihero Cal Trask, played
by Dean. Dean was being positioned
by the Warner Bros studio as the
newest, sexiest, pin-up megastar.
Work hasn?t dried
up. I?ve been
getting more
interesting parts
blind best friend in Annie Baker?s John
(off-Broadway), to a supporting role
as a nun in a Catholic school in the
actress Greta Gerwig?s directorial
debut, Lady Bird.
?I know that the common wisdom is
that the parts dry up as you get older,?
she says, half-embarrassed. ?That
hasn?t happened to me. I?ve been
getting more and more interesting
parts. I?m kind of lucky in that way.?
She says that her interest in drama
began with her Kansas childhood (she
was the youngest of six), and with a
father, a telephone company
employee, who had a secret
passion for theatre and took night
classes in acting and directing. ?It was
the darndest thing,? she says again.
?He had a high-school education and
worked for the phone company. And
yet he put on plays at our local church
because it mattered to him. And so
that?s how it started with me. With my
beloved father, doing something that
mattered to him.?
Shy off stage, but an instinctive
performer, she aced her high-school
Smith today and, above
right, with Geena Davis
in Marjorie Prime
?He was mostly lovely,? she says.
?But he was moody too. I remember
thinking that it was like a combination
of the boy on the Indiana porch
where he was from and someone
who was really on the defensive. All
eyes were on him at the studio. So
he was a complicated person in a
complicated situation, but he was
excellent at his work.?
Smith made the cover of Life
magazine in 1955 and she might have
been expected to fly to Hollywood
and become the new Natalie Wood,
Audrey Hepburn or Eva Marie Saint.
Instead she remained in New York,
studied at the Actors Studio and
cultivated a serious theatre career.
?I never wanted to be an actor in LA,?
she admits. ?When you go for a job
there, the first question you get is,
?Who?s your agent?? Like, ?Where are
you in the hierarchy?? Not, ?Who did
you study with, what do you know??
It?s just a business.?
She has, nonetheless, worked
consistently in films and television,
notching up standout roles, including
that of Jack Nicholson?s sensitive
sister in Five Easy Pieces, as Charles
Grodin?s co-conspirator in Midnight
Run, and as that strangely amorous
scientist in Steven Spielberg?s
Minority Report. ?That kiss was
Steven?s idea,? she says. ?He whispered
it in my ear on the spur of the
moment and Tom didn?t know it was
coming. There?s an air between the
two characters. Is she being motherly
to him? Is it flirtatious? It was an
impromptu direction from Steven,
and it?s quite shocking.?
These days it?s remarkable to
observe just how busy Smith has
become. After our conversation she is
racing to the airport and flying to
New York in time for the gala
premiere of Lady Bird, which will be
followed by daily workshops for two
new plays. She also has a recurring
role on the Netflix series Grace and
Frankie (not that she will ever see it).
She lives alone in New York, has
one daughter and three grandchildren
whom she sees regularly, but
otherwise, since the loss of Margulies,
she finds the few rare days without
work ?very lonesome indeed?. But
for a bad back, she is healthy, with
sparkly eyes and a fresh, inquisitive
face (you might, at a push, think late
sixties, but never 87) and long, silver
hair (she?s contemplating chopping it
for her next role).
Of her longevity, she says that she
eats everything, ignores diets and does
little exercise. She says instead: ?It?s
genetic, isn?t it? It?s just good luck.?
And the luck, she adds, as each day
passes, has become part of her career.
?When how old I am comes up I
used to say, ?Oh, please! Is that the
most interesting thing about me??
Recently I?ve been thinking about
how it?s accumulated. The time
passed, the span of work, the
respectful attention I?m getting
from my peers? It?s all in there.
And so, yes, when you think about
it, maybe my age is the most
interesting thing about me.?
And then she laughs and repeats
that she?s lucky, before swishing out
of the door, into a taxi and back to
the airport, an octogenarian legend,
a theatrical heavyweight and, yes,
every inch a movie star.
Marjorie Prime is released on Friday
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1GT
Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
television & radio
It?s not kids who drive mums mad, it?s adults
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Motherland
BBC Two
{{{{(
The A Word
BBC One
{{{{(
M
y friend has a four-letter
word to describe any
adult who professes to
enjoy attending or, worse,
hosting the living hell
that is now a typical children?s birthday
party. That word is ?liar?. ?It?s three
hours of migraine-inducing shouting
and small talk and don?t deny it,? she
says. She?ll find no argument from me.
Judging by Motherland she?ll find
no argument from its writers, Sharon
Horgan, Holly Walsh and Helen and
Graham Linehan, either. Returning for
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
George Michael
Radio 2, 10pm
Radio 2 broadcasts the
second half of this George
Michael interview with
Kirsty Young that was
recorded last winter, just
before Michael?s death. It
was never intended to be
broadcast by itself, but as
the interview went on, and
its scope became wider, it
became clear that it might
work as a stand-alone. The
singer talks about going
back to the studio after
the death of his partner,
Anselmo, and about making
his third solo album, Older.
The Essay
Radio 3, 10.45pm
If only ballet were so
exciting these days. When
the Rite of Spring was
staged in Paris on May 29,
1913, the criticisms began
almost immediately. As
did the catcalls. When a
group of trembling maidens
appeared on stage holding
their cheeks, wags in
the audience called out:
?Call the dentist.? Puccini
called it ?the work of a
madman?. Others said that
Nijinsky?s choreography
was not durable. Yet as
Deborah Bull argues
here, its effects lasted
in other ways because
it ushered in a revolution
in dance.
a six-part series after a bleakly funny
pilot, it takes every rosy idealisation
of motherhood and laughs manically
into its face. Then dumps all over it.
Last night the frazzled working
mother Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin)
was shamed into abandoning her plan
to take a few kids to Pizza Express for
her daughter?s birthday by the queen
bee, yummy-mummy bitch Amanda
(Lucy Punch), who implied that isn?t
a ?proper? party and thus a mum-fail.
So Julia did it at home with no help
from her husband or from her mother,
who in lunch-date retirement refuses
to be the childcare solution.
It descended into a miasma of stress
and humiliation not helped by the
entertainer whose act comprised three
sad cats (he handled them a bit
roughly for my liking) and who was
racist. The other mothers only loitered
to judge Julia?s house. Meanwhile the
husband, pint of beer in hand at the
football, said, ?It?s just a case of
learning how to juggle everything,?
for which he deserves a fat lip.
Crucially the source of anguish is
never the children (they are mostly
non-speaking bit-players) but the
other adults. Amanda?s mean-girls
schoolgate clique may be exaggerated,
but many women know a version of
her, the type who turns motherhood
into a toxic arms race. Aside from
Liz, played by Diane Morgan, who
has a healthy ?sod it? approach to
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 The Matt Edmondson Show
4.00 Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg
James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 The 8th with
Charlie Sloth. Live from the top of BBC HQ
11.00 Huw Stephens 1.00am Benji B 3.00
BBC Radio 1 & 1Xtra?s Stories: Music By
Numbers: Biffy Clyro 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright. Tim Vine
and Steve present live from Nashville,
Tennessee 5.00 Simon Mayo. With Jeff
Lynne of ELO 7.00 The Folk Show with Mark
Radcliffe. A session performance by the
Scottish singer Julie Fowlis 8.00 Jo Whiley
10.00 George Michael: Red Line.
See Radio Choice
11.00 Marcus Mumford. The Mumford &
Sons frontman shares his musical in?uences
(r) 12.00 Pick of the Pops (r) 2.00am
Radio 2 Playlists: Country Playlist
3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Easy 4.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Radio 2 Rocks 5.00 Nicki Chapman
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3?s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein is joined by the journalist Bridget
Kendall, who discusses the ideas that have
inspired and shaped her throughout her life
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Soviet Russia (1917-1953)
Donald Macleod and the Russian music
expert Marina Frolova-Walker discuss the
work of two giants of the Soviet symphony,
Nikolai Myaskovsky and Gavriil Popov.
Myaskovsky (Prelude ? Madrigal, Op 7;
Symphony No 10; and String Quartet No 1 in
A minor, Op 33 No 1 ? third movement); and
Popov (Symphony No 1 ? ?rst movement)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
From LSO St Luke?s, London, the Russian
pianist Alexei Volodin performs. Proko?ev
(Romeo and Juliet Before Parting ? Ten
Pieces from Romeo and Juliet, No 10);
Medtner (Fairy Tale in C sharp minor,
Op 35 No 4); and Rachmaninov
(Fragments; and Piano Sonata No 1) (r)
Anna Maxwell Martin and Diane Morgan in Motherland
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Penny Gore presents a concert given by the
conductor Juanjo Mena at the helm of the
BBC Philharmonic. Vaughan Williams
(Overture: The Wasps ? Aristophanic Suite);
Rachmaninov (Rhapsody on a Theme of
Paganini for piano and orchestra, Op 43); and
Elgar (Symphony No 1 in A ?at, Op 55)
3.30 Choral Evensong
Recorded in the Chapel of Royal Holloway,
University of London as part of Radio 3?s
?Breaking Free: A Century of Russian
Culture? season. Introit: Bogoroditse Devo
(Rachmaninov). Responses: Leighton. Psalms
42, 43 (Lionel Pike). First Lesson: Isaiah 61
vv 4-9. Canticles: From the ?All-night Vigil?
(Rachmaninov). Second Lesson: John 17 vv
18-23. Anthem: Ave, Regina caelorum
(Gabriel Jackson). Organ Voluntary: Toccata
(Mushel). Director of Choral Music: Rupert
Gough. Senior Organ Scholar: James
Furniss-Roe. Ant Law (guitar)
4.30 New Generation Artists
Penny Gore introduces more performances
from Radio 3 New Generation Artists past
and present, including The Van Kuijk Quartet,
Robin Tritschler, and Andrei Ionita. Mozart
(Divertimento in D, K136); Lennox Berkeley
(Lay Your Sleeping Head, My Love); and
Schumann (Phantasiest點ke, Op 73)
5.00 In Tune
The host Katie Derham is joined by the
singers Lauren Fagan and Milan Siljanov,
who perform live
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
Ragtime Verdi, Midsummer Mendelssohn
and Stravinsky Fireworks
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
The pianist C閐ric Tiberghien returns to
Wigmore Hall with a typically rich and
colourful programme. Presented by Martin
Handley, recorded on November 5th, 2017.
Proko?ev (Visions fugitives, Op 22);
Philippe Hersant (In Black); and Mussorgsky
(Pictures from an Exhibition)
10.00 Free Thinking
The Nobel prizewinner Svetlana Alexievich
discusses Soviet oral history
10.45 The Essay: Ten Artists
That Shook the World
Former ballerina Deborah Bull looks at the
impact of Nijinsky?s revolutionary ballet,
The Rite of Spring, which in dance terms,
pre-empted the events of October 1917
by several years. See Radio Choice
11.00 Late Junction
Nick Luscombe is joined by the Russian
musician, label boss and radio presenter Ivan
Zoloto as he shares song suggestions
12.30am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With Nick Robinson and Justin Webb
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Only Artists
Two artists discuss creative questions (1/6)
9.30 Life Drawing
Martin Rowson draws and interviews people,
beginning with George Osborne (1/5) (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
A focus on Aztec human sacri?ces
10.00 Woman?s Hour
With Jane Garvey. Including at 10.41 the 15
Minute Drama: Part three of the third series
of Blood and Milk, by Gregory Evans (3/5)
10.55 The Listening Project
A conversation between mothers of
children with Down?s syndrome
11.00 The Con?dence Trick
The role of school and background in
determining con?dence (2/3) (r)
11.30 Mae Martin?s Guide
to 21st Century Addiction
A looks at why some people may be more
susceptible to addiction than others (2/2)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed
Chris Morris assesses the rami?cations of
the UK leaving Euratom
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week:
Life in the Garden
Stephanie Cole reads from Penelope Lively?s
memoir of her horticultural life (3/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Remote
Romantic comedy written by Mark Watson.
The story of a romance that unfolds over 30
years, as a separated couple realise they are
not as far from each other as they think
3.00 Money Box Live
3.30 All in the Mind
Mental health issues (2/8) (r)
4.00 Thinking Allowed
4.30 The Media Show
5.00 PM
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 Andy Hamilton
Sort of Remembers
A focus on the subject of animals (4/4)
7.00 The Archers
Ian struggles to make a good impression
child-rearing, everybody seems
borderline deranged. This isn?t
belly-laugh comedy, it goes deeper
than that. In an age when motherhood
has been sanctified and rhapsodised it
is refreshing to see it kicked off its
pedestal and bathed in hard truth.
Not having a child with autism I
don?t feel qualified to say whether The
A Word?s portrayal of the disorder and
its impact on the family is accurate.
As a piece of drama, though, it was
compelling and unexpectedly cheering.
It helps of course that seven-year-old
Joe, played by Max Vento, is adorable,
still clamped to his headphones and
obsessed with old indie music, and
answering each question with, ?Let
meee seeee now.? However, he finds
little sympathy from the parents of his
classmates, who claim that his unusual
behaviour ?upsets? their progeny (God
help Joe?s parents if Motherland?s
Amanda had been their ringleader).
The scene in which Joe?s parents
rehearsed the conversation with their
son in which they explain that he is
autistic was beautifully written, his
mother describing him as ?a puzzle
that I love? who is ?half in and half
out of the world?. I?m still slightly
discombobulated by Christopher
Eccleston playing a grandad when it
seems like five minutes ago that he
was a youthful Time Lord in Doctor
Who. It makes me feel quite ancient.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Living with the Gods
A focus on Aztec human sacri?ces
8.00 The Moral Maze
Presented by Michael Buerk (5/9)
8.45 Why I Changed My Mind
A former Scientologist explains why he quit
what some see as a dangerous cult (4/4)
9.00 Costing the Earth
Roger Harrabin travels to the USA to meet
America?s climate resistance (r)
9.30 Only Artists
Discussing creative questions (1/6) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime: First Person
By Richard Flanagan (3/10)
11.00 Little Lifetimes
Beverley Callard stars in Jenny Eclair?s comic
monologue about a 60th Birthday party (4/4)
11.15 Yours Truly, Pierre Stone
Pierre Stone attempts to strike up a
correspondence with Tess Daly (3/4)
11.30 Science Stories
Naomi Alderman tells how William Fox
Talbot captured a moment in time (r)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Life in the Garden (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
3.00-5.20 (LW) Test Match Special:
Australia Women v England Women
Commentary on the opening day of the
only Test in the Ashes series, which takes
place at the North Sydney Oval
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Navy Lark 8.30 Hancock?s Half
Hour 9.00 Say the Word 9.30 The Sit Crom
10.00 Home Front Omnibus 11.00 In?nite
Possibilities and Unlikely Probabilities 11.15
Tommies 12.00 The Navy Lark 12.30pm
Hancock?s Half Hour 1.00 The Blackburn Files
1.30 A Fork in the Road 2.00 Regeneration
2.15 Cosmic Quest 2.30 A Kind of Loving
2.45 The Horologicon 3.00 Home Front
Omnibus 4.00 Say the Word 4.30 The Sit
Crom 5.00 The Cavity Within 5.30 Andy
Hamilton Sort of Remembers 6.00
Earthsearch I 6.30 Musical Genes 7.00 The
Navy Lark. Comedy with Leslie Phillips. From
1959 7.30 Hancock?s Half Hour. Comedy with
Tony Hancock 8.00 The Blackburn Files. A
Case of Hearts and Flowers 8.30 A Fork in
the Road. A farm in the middle of the M62
9.00 In?nite Possibilities and Unlikely
Probabilities. Serving Children by Anita
Sullivan 9.15 Tommies. By Jonathan Ruf?e
10.00 Comedy Club: Andy Hamilton Sort of
Remembers. The comedian and writer Andy
Hamilton examines attitude towards the
human body 10.30 Before They Were
Famous. Spoof documentary exploring the
surprising early careers of celebrated authors
10.45 No Tomatoes. Comedy with Ian Potter
10.55 The Comedy Club Interview. (2/2) Iain
Lee chats to Maddy Anholt 11.00 Bridget
Christie Minds the Gap. The presenter takes
a look at women in politics 11.30 Radio 9.
An unusual travel diary, very dangerous
racing and faking skiing downhill
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
A round-up of the day?s sports news 8.00
5 Live Sport: Get Inspired with Darren
Campbell 9.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Cricket
10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with David Ginola 10.00 Jim White
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off.
With Mark Saggers 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
5.00 Early Breakfast with Geoff Peters
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc
Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Mary Anne Hobbs
1.00am The First Time with David Byrne
2.00 A Year in the Life: The Beatles 1962
2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6 Music?s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Bill Turnbull 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Jane Jones presents a concert
recorded at Sage Gateshead last week.
Mendelssohn (Symphony No.3 in A minor ?
Scottish); Chopin (Piano Concerto No.1 in E
minor); and Glinka (Valse Fantasie) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
11
1GT
artsfirst night
SCOTT RYLANDER
Concert
LSO/Alsop
Barbican
Dance
Andante
The Place, WC1
L
I
{{{((
eonard Bernstein?s birth
centenary arrives on August
25, 2018, but the composer?s
estate, anxious to squeeze
the lemon, has authorised
a worldwide two-year celebration,
?Bernstein at 100?, that is already
under way. The trouble is that since
the worklist to draw from is limited,
you have to wonder what new insights
this generous season could offer into
his music?s energising virtues or flaws.
Marin Alsop?s opening slice with
the London Symphony Orchestra
certainly demonstrated her passionate
commitment and ease with every
stylistic twist, from jazzy fury and
artful simplicity to the loud
grandiloquent gesture. Yet listening
to Bernstein?s vocal and spoken
symphony Kaddish, an argumentative
elaboration of the Jewish prayer for
the dead, all I learnt about this
protean figure was that some of his
music is worse than I thought.
The composer?s conversational,
sometimes cringing texts were a good
part of the problem, not entirely
solved by the gently calibrated
narration from Claire Bloom,
whose amplified voice sounded as
if it were swathed in a thick woollen
sock. Yet it?s the weakness of the
music, struggling too hard to be
strident or drowning in watery
bathos, that really makes Kaddish
hard going. Energy kept springing
from Alsop?s conducting, the sprightly
LSO players and the hard-working
London Symphony Chorus. Sadly, it
wasn?t enough.
Happily, the much less tendentious
Halil, written to honour a young Israeli
flautist killed in the 1973 Yom Kippur
War, offered elegiac beauty, well
served by Adam Walker, the LSO?s
principal flute, who was suave, limpid
and agile. After that, Bernstein?s hero
Mahler arrived, with the adagio from
the unfinished Symphony No 10.
Alsop drew out its anguished melodic
lines with loving care, making its
climactic dissonant outbursts all the
more startling. Great music, finally;
and sterling music-making too.
Geoff Brown
Dance
Royal Ballet
Covent Garden
K
{{{((
evin O?Hare, the director of
the Royal Ballet, isn?t afraid
of the new. And to prove
his commitment to fostering
choreography, he has
programmed a triple bill featuring
two world premieres and the revival
of a piece made for the company two
years ago. It?s an incredibly varied
programme and the dancers lap up
the various challenges, even if the
evening is somewhat hit and miss.
The last time Twyla Tharp made
a work for the Royal was in 1995,
the full-length Mr Worldly Wise.
It wasn?t a success. For her return
one might have hoped for a ballet
wholly tailor-made, but instead,
in The Illustrated ?Farewell?, Tharp
opts for a prequel.
{{(((
This play, which runs for more
than three hours, requires a huge
amount of oomph to work and it
rarely takes off here. This is Brecht at
his grandest, his 1939 antiwar play as
translated, with much extra swearing,
by Tony Kushner in 2006. The
brutality of the language matches the
set and, when coupled with all the
shouting, it?s easy to feel as if we, the
audience, are also under attack.
Hannah Chissick directs and,
although Lawrence often rises to
the challenge, she is the exception.
In general, the staging often feels
wooden, the singing dirge-like and
the action jerky. There is rawness and
then there is amateur and much of
this is the latter. One bright spot is
Laura Checkley who, as the prostitute
Yvette, is a standout, her energy filling
the room. But mostly it?s an ordeal.
The play says war is hell, but theatre
sometimes isn?t far off.
Box office: 020 7407 0234, to Dec 9
gor and Moreno, that plucky
duo, certainly took a risk when
they came up with the idea for
Andante. It is, as they tell us, an
exploration in perception as they
invite us, the audience, to connect
with our senses, including ? and
I?ve never seen this in a dance show
before ? our sense of smell.
The first thing to be explored is
sound, as the four dancers enter at
the side of the stage, walking gingerly
over a floor covered in tiny fire
poppers that burst noisily with each
step. It?s fun. Our quartet of dancers,
Igor Urzelai, Moreno Solinas, Giorgia
Nardin and Eleanor Sikorski, move
very slowly (hence the title) on to the
stage, walking, sometimes in circles,
sometimes swaying from side to side,
but always looking as blank as
zombies. They hum too, which I guess
is meant to ease us into a kind of
pleasurable hypnotic state, and they
sing in rhythm to the movement.
So far, so relaxing. Then everything
gets louder and faster, more
mechanical and harsher. The music is
an annoying drone; at the back of the
stage is what looks to be a giant duvet,
and at one point it inflates (why?). We
are disorientated, but more is to come.
The lights go off and we are sitting in
a whiteout as the theatre fills with
smoke. We can?t see the dancers, only
hear the slap of their feet against the
cushioned floor. Deprived of sight our
sense of smell kicks in big time,
courtesy of Alessandro Gualtieri, the
Italian perfumer, who has designed
scents to keep our noses entertained
(mine discerned a hint of peat,
sandalwood, North African spices).
This state of disconnect between
stage and stalls goes on and on, so
long, in fact, that it soon becomes
boring. Why are we sitting here,
wrapped in a giant cloud, watching
nothing? What is the point of being in
a theatre? Others obviously felt the
same way because, after 70 minutes or
so with no end in sight (as it were),
they walked out. Is that really the
result Igor and Moreno wanted?
Debra Craine
Junction, Cambridge, Nov 14
choreography, are looking back in
time. A nice touch.
Arthur Pita?s The Wind, on the other
hand, is a world premiere, and a highly
original piece of contemporary dance.
A gothic supernatural western, it?s
based on Dorothy Scarborough?s
1925 novel (and subsequent
Lillian Gish film) about a
woman transplanted to the
bleak and dusty isolation of west
Texas, where the relentless wind
drives her to hysteria, a form of
prairie madness exacerbated by
her brutal rape at the hands of a cattle
buyer (Thomas Whitehead, scary). As
Letty, Natalia Osipova delivers terror,
derangement, bewilderment and
revenge with a visceral commitment.
A fine supporting performance too
from Thiago Soares, left, as the
cowpuncher who marries Letty but
isn?t able to protect her.
The storytelling (the narrative is set
in the 1880s) is intensely theatrical and
perhaps too compressed, while the
choreography doesn?t go far enough in
explicating Pita?s theme, although he?s
good at suggesting the harshness and
male aggression of Letty?s cowboy
world and the emotional frenzy that
engulfs her. There?s a new character,
a Native American ghost warrior
(Edward Watson in full-on spooky
mode), who could even be the wind
in physical form, and 35 minutes of
new music by Frank Moon, whose
orchestral score is a ferocious boil of
danger and unease. The set is simple,
suggesting a barren frontier, but
Jeremy Herbert?s three giant wind
machines are too dominant and
overpowering. We don?t need to see
dancers constantly battling
hurricane-force winds to get the idea.
Completing the mixed bill is Hofesh
Shechter?s Untouchable (2015), a boring
and repetitive modern-day tribal dance
? filled with ominous overtones of
alienation and displacement ? whose
only redeeming feature is that it was
made for the corps de ballet.
Debra Craine
Box office: 020 7304 4000, to Nov 17
Josie Lawrence is the only person who rises to the challenge in an otherwise amateurish production
Brecht?s 30 years bore
In the title role Josie Lawrence tries her best, but this Brecht staging
is dire and wooden, and the singing dirge-like, says Ann Treneman
Theatre
Mother Courage
and Her
Children
Southwark
Playhouse, SE1
{((((
Red Star Over
Russia opens at
Tate Modern
First Night, main paper
T
his is a wildly ambitious
undertaking in a relatively
small space and there are
times when this new
production of Bertolt
Brecht?s play about the 30 Years War,
from 1618 to 1648, feels more like 100
years (and counting). Josie Lawrence is
mother (never mum), a woman with a
wagon of goods and three children to
help her to pull it as they chase after
the soldiers, their main customers.
It?s a brutalist set, by Barney George,
all concrete floor (you can almost hear
the knees skid) and soiled tarpaulin
curtains. The ?stage? is a traverse strip,
a catwalk on which Mother Courage
labours with her wagon, every crease
in her face visible as she struggles to
keep her sons out of the war and her
daughter out of trouble. Yet much
action also takes place on a mezzanine
platform behind one side of the stage
which, for half the audience, is a pain
in the neck (literally).
In 1973 she choreographed the final
two movements of Haydn?s Farewell
Symphony in As Time Goes By for the
Joffrey Ballet; for Covent Garden she
tacks on the first two movements in
the form of a duet for Sarah Lamb
and Steven McRae.
They are extraordinary dancers,
virtuosic and very outgoing, qualities
well-suited to the ingenuity,
spontaneity and playful attitude of
Tharp?s highly articulated academic
writing, which she fashions like a
classical ballroom dance or a jazzy
courtship. Still, it?s a long
time to sustain a duet, even
with many dazzling moments, so
it?s with relief that we welcome the
ensemble (led by impressive
performances from Mayara Magri
and Joseph Sissens) to deliver the lush
naturalism of As Time Goes By.
In an attempt to tie the two halves
of The Illustrated ?Farewell? together,
Tharp brings Lamb and McRae back
for the adagio of the final movement
? and it feels as though they, like the
12
1GT
Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Gabriel Tate
Detectorists
BBC Four, 10pm
A slick
exec strides
through
gleaming
offices in the Square
Mile for a rendezvous
with his boss to discuss
a lucrative new
business venture. It?s a
Early
Top
pick
most uncharacteristic
opening for a series
that tends to the
bucolic and gently
paced. Yet for this final
series of Detectorists,
its creator-director and
star, Mackenzie Crook,
is raising the stakes
for a Capraesque clash
of corporation and
community. The
multinational monster
is eyeing up Bishop?s
Farm, the favoured
hunting ground for the
Suffolk metal-detecting
enthusiasts Andy
(Crook) and Lance
(Toby Jones). It wants
a site for huge solar
panels to provide
cheap, clean energy
to the village of
Danebury. There is
a general sense of the
established order being
given a gentle shake:
Andy is chafing at the
restrictions of living
with his mother-in-law
and unhappy with
working under dodgy
archaeological surveyor
Tim (Tim Key); Lance
is struggling with the
idiosyncrasies of his
newly reconciled
daughter. This slightly
unsettling air is
enhanced by one of the
show?s occasional, eerie
interludes, harking
back to the pagan past.
Yet everything else is
as it should be, for now,
in another deceptively
incisive, occasionally
melancholy and utterly
charming portrait of
companionship, rural
tradition and decent
people trying their best.
Through the intimacy
of its observations
and the care of its
character development,
Detectorists reaches
a level of profundity
beyond most sitcoms.
DIY SOS
BBC One, 8pm
When Nick Knowles
calls time on his career
if the tributes are kind,
they won?t focus on
the diabolical covers
albums. Instead, they
will pay justified tribute
to DIY SOS, a format
uniquely suited to
his blokey, can-do
demeanour. In tonight?s
project Knowles and
his assembled experts
return to Veterans
Street in Manchester,
which two years ago
was transformed by the
team ? with a little
help from Harry and
Wills ? from derelict
thoroughfare to vibrant
community. One final
house needs to be
completed, with single
dad, Iraq veteran and
amputee Simon Flores
looking for a home.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Women at War: 100 Years of
Service. Pam Ayres recalls her years in the Women?s Royal
Air Force in the 1960s (AD) 10.00 Homes Under the
Hammer. Properties in southwest London, Kent and the
northeast (r) (AD) 11.00 Getting the Builders In.
A woman wants her kitchen in Wolverhampton refreshing
on a budget of �000 11.45 Fugitives. Of?cers search
for a Hungarian man convicted of burglaries in West
Yorkshire, while a drugs courier is arrested by Dutch
police 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From Hemswell,
Lincolnshire (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather
1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Mrs
Tembe comes up with a new way for Sid to use his voice.
Rob admits to Heston he is struggling to talk about his
feelings (AD) 2.15 Impossible. Game show hosted by Rick
Edwards 3.00 Escape to the Country. A couple hoping to
buy their ?rst home together in Dorset (AD) 3.45 Money
for Nothing. Jay Blades salvages three items bound for
the skip in Walsall (r) 4.30 Flog It! The team visits the
Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich (r) 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Hairy Builder (r) (AD) 6.30 Women at War:
100 Years of Service (r) (AD) 7.15 Getting the Builders In
(r) 8.00 Sign Zone: Britain A?oat (r) (SL) 8.30 Caught
Red Handed (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00
BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 FILM: Easy Virtue (PG,
2008) An Englishman in the 1920s marries a brash
American woman, to the horror of his upper-class family.
Romantic comedy based on Noel Coward?s play, with
Jessica Biel and Ben Barnes (AD) 1.30pm Lifeline (r)
1.40 Grand Tours of Scotland (r) 1.45 Permission
Impossible: Britain?s Planners (r) 2.45 Family Finders
3.15 Operation Gold Rush with Dan Snow. The team
arrives at Dawson City, and sets up a mining camp in the
gold ?elds. Last in the series (r) (AD) 4.15 Hebrides:
Islands on the Edge. Animals including white-tailed
eagles, harbour seals and hares are left struggling to raise
their young after a huge storm (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your
Money Where Your Mouth Is. David Harper and Phil
Serrell go head-to-head at auction in Royal Leamington
Spa (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine
6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two. How the
contestants are shaping up for Saturday
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Daisy Ridley and Josh
Gad discuss their roles in the new ?lm Murder on the
Orient Express 8.30 Lorraine. Christopher Eccleston chats
about the second series of The A Word 9.25 The Jeremy
Kyle Show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip Scho?eld and
Holly Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features,
including a look at the stories making the newspaper
headlines and a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose
Women. More interviews and topical debate from a
female perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00
Dickinson?s Real Deal. David Dickinson and the dealers
are on the hunt for antiques in Stroud, Gloucestershire,
where items of interest include a 1920s chandelier, a
stunning opal ring and some paintings (r) 3.00 Tenable.
Quiz hosted by Warwick Davis in which a team from
Cumbria answers questions about top 10 lists, then
tries to score a perfect 10 in the ?nal round 4.00 Tipping
Point. Ben Shephard hosts the quiz show, in which
contestants drop tokens down a choice of four chutes in
the hope of winning a �,000 jackpot 5.00 The Chase.
Bradley Walsh presents the quiz show 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) (AD) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s
Hotel Hell. Gordon Ramsay checks in to Murphy?s Historic
Hotel near Sacramento in California (r) (AD) 11.00
Undercover Boss USA. The CEO of Forman Mills goes
incognito among his staff (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News
Summary 12.05pm Come Dine with Me. A week of dinner
parties in north Wiltshire (r) 1.05 My Kitchen Rules.
Theo Randall challenges Celia and Dave, a married couple
from Wolverhampton 2.10 Countdown. With Alison
Steadman in Dictionary Corner 3.00 A Place in the Sun:
Summer Sun. A couple who want to move to Ibiza (r)
4.00 Coast vs Country. A retired couple in search of a
quieter life in Devon 5.00 Four in a Bed. The third night
comes from The Black Swan in Horsham St Faith 5.30
Steph and Dom?s One Star to Five Star. Steph and Dom
challenge the owners to create a golfer?s retreat bedroom
6.00 The Simpsons. Mr Burns sends Homer to train new
workers in India, where he is worshipped. Featuring the
guest voice of Richard Dean Anderson (r) (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Milo is causing big problems for Dirk, and
Mandy and Holly pamper Cindy at her hen do (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors. A woman explains how her life is
now back on track after suffering from chronic depression,
while a husband and wife describe how his illness brought
them even closer together (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel Inspector Returns. Alex
Polizzi revisits hoteliers Ben and Emma Irvine, to see
whether their Ramsgate venture, Albion House, is ?ying
or ?ailing, and ?nds she has to roll up her sleeves once
more (r) 1.10 Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45
Neighbours (AD) 2.20 NCIS. Gibbs and DiNozzo
investigate the case of a retired marine colonel found
murdered with an axe, and discover the evidence points
to his drug-addicted son (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: The
Christmas Note (PG, TVM, 2015) After moving back
home before Christmas, a disillusioned woman ?nds a
new purpose when she helps her neighbour look for a
missing sibling. Drama with Jamie-Lynn Sigler, Leah
Gibson and Greg Vaughan 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30
Neighbours. Police question the residents concerning
Hamish?s death (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Coco
collapses in the garden (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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Northanger Abbey
7.00 Meet the Lords Documentary ?lmed
over a year following life at the House
of Lords, going behind the scenes
during a turbulent 12 months that has
seen dramatic changes in the political
landscape and the Lords battling it out
with the Government (1/3) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Pollard is humiliated,
suspicion is rife, and Lawrence
?ghts his emotion (AD)
8PM
8.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build Nick
Knowles and the team return to
Veterans Street in Manchester,
where they build the ?nal home on
the road for a decorated former
soldier and his young family.
See Viewing Guide (6/7) (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
The chefs have to create a perfect
fruit-based souf?� with a garnish of
their choice in the Skills Test set by
Monica Galetti, demonstrating their
working methods and techniques (AD)
9.00 The Apprentice Alan Sugar sends the
candidates off to Bruges to create a
high-quality tour of the beautiful
Belgian city that passengers would be
happy to pay good money for. The
teams also try to ?og souvenirs to
guests to top up their pro?t margins
9.00 Big Life Fix: Children in Need
Special One-off special in which
Simon Reeve follows leading engineers
and designers as they invent
life-changing solutions for three
children with severe disabilities.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
7PM
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine show
featuring topical reports from around
the UK and big-name studio guests
9PM
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10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 A Question of Sport Sue Barker
hosts the quiz with guests Jamie
George, Gordon Reid, Perri ShakesDrayton and Steve Harmison
11.15 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat and
Tears Anna spends her birthday
working a busy shift on the
respiratory ward (2/8) (AD)
11.45 The Ganges with Sue Perkins
Sue meets students in Patna, is
reunited with an old friend in Kolkata
and ?nds out about the endangered
Bengal tiger before reaching the
mouth of the river (3/3) (r) (AD)
12.50am-6.00 BBC News
10.00 The Apprentice: You?re Fired
An interview with the show?s
freshly rejected candidate.
Hosted by Rhod Gilbert (6/12)
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
and Emily Maitlis
11.15 Louis Theroux: My Scientology
Movie (15, 2015) The reporter
investigates the controversial religion,
re-enacting personal experiences of
former members, but ?nding himself
under surveillance by the church (AD)
12.50am Peaky Blinders Tommy outlines his plans for
the most audacious criminal act the gang has ever
undertaken (r) (AD) 1.45 Sign Zone: Anthony Joshua ?
The Fight of My Life (r) (AD, SL) 2.25 Billion Dollar
Deals and How They Changed Your World (r)
(AD, SL) 3.25-4.20 Eat Well for Less? (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Traf?c Cops: Under Attack Thieves
towing a stolen generator on one
wheel along town and country roads
cause chaos, smashing the barriers on
a closed level crossing and coming
close to causing a train crash (r)
8.00 Gino?s Italian Coastal Escape Gino
D?Acampo sails to the island of Capri,
where he unearths the origins of
Italy?s most famous digestivo (2/8)
8.30 Coronation Street Mary?s error of
judgement leaves Angie enraged, Alya
rescues Aidan from humiliation, and
Chesney asserts his authority (AD)
8.00 The Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick
operates on a two-year-old Bengal cat
with a broken back and a dislocated
spine after being hit by a car, and
a rottweiler puppy is treated for a
genetic condition that has destroyed
its cartilage on its ankle bone (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors
Dr Elizabeth Barnard sees Catherine,
a diabetic who has developed a large,
painful blister between two of her
toes, which is a cause of concern in
sufferers with her condition (AD)
9.00 Doc Martin Martin prepares to face
his hearing, but despite having closed
the practice, he ?nds all his patients
are trying to make appointments. A
visitor to Portwenn returns to research
her family tree and seek the doctor?s
advice. Sigourney Weaver guest stars.
See Viewing Guide (8/8) (AD)
9.00 The Truth About Slim People
An experiment following people who
never seem to put on weight. Over the
course of ?ve days, covert cameras
follow them at work, home and play to
assess whether there is something in
their behaviour that is determining
their size. See Viewing Guide
9.00 Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It Away
Max and Steve are in west London on
a bid to recover more than �,000
owed for unpaid court costs after a car
accident, with the debtor denying all
knowledge of the situation
10.00 Shannon Matthews: The Mother?s
Story Documentary aiming to get at
the truth of the woman at the centre
of her own daughter?s kidnapping,
asking what drove her to do it and
whether she is sorry for her actions (r)
11.45 Road Rage Britain: Caught on
Camera Footage of confrontations
and clashes on the roads (r)
10.00 Man Down Dan is frustrated by the
universal lack of respect for his new
status as a father, and decides to
join a local dads? club (3/6) (AD)
10.35 Acquitted New series. A man returns
to his hometown after 20 years,
reminding locals of an unsolved
murder. Norwegian drama, in English
and Norwegian with English subtitles.
The ?rst series is already available,
free to view or download, on All 4,
and the second series will be
available from November 8 (1/10)
11.35 Gogglebox: Celebrity Special for
SU2C Critiques of television shows
with famous guests in support of
Stand Up to Cancer initiative (r) (AD)
12.35am Jackpot247 Interactive gaming 3.00 May the
Best House Win. Homeowners in Cambridgeshire and
Suffolk vie for the �000 prize as they score one
another?s properties, which include a converted Salvation
Army church hall and a pub (r) (SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r) (SL)
12.45am Pokerstars Championship Highlights of the
event from Monte Carlo 1.40 Ramsay?s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (r) (SL) 2.35 FILM: Piku
(PG, 2015) Comedy drama starring Amitabh Bachchan
and Deepika Padukone. In Hindi and Bengali 4.40 Escape
(r) (AD) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.05am Diced to Death: Countdown to Murder The
case of wife killer Ty Medland, who in 2013 stabbed his
wife Samantha to death (r) 1.00 SuperCasino 3.10 Law &
Order: Special Victims Unit (r) (AD) 4.00 Get Your Tatts
Out: Kavos Ink (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
House Busters (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
7.30 Coronation Street Angie con?des
her troubles to Toyah. Meanwhile,
Sinead admires Daniel?s rapport
with Joseph (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.45 Bear?s Mission with Rob Brydon
The adventurer Bear Grylls teaches the
comedian some alternative survival
skills, starting with an open-door
helicopter ride up into the mountains
of Rob?s native Wales (r) (AD)
11.05 When Kids Kill: Cat?sh Killer Leah
Green examines the case of teenage
karate instructor Tony Bushby, who
used social media to ensnare art
student Katie Wynter, before killing
her on Boxing Day of 2011 (4/6) (r)
the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
Big Life Fix
BBC Two, 9pm
Taking a break from
globetrotting and
baiting the Russian
secret service, Simon
Reeve investigates some
of the exceptionally
worthwhile projects
funded by Children in
Need to help children
with severe disabilities.
Eight-year-old Josh
is blind and unable to
play with his friends,
the one blight on his
otherwise humblingly
normal life; Ayala,
also eight, has cerebral
palsy, while her twin is
able-bodied; and Aman,
ten, has memory
problems after a car
crash. Can the experts
rustle up technology to
make their lives easier?
Of course, but eyes will
be opened and tears
jerked along the way.
Doc Martin
ITV, 9pm
Take two of ITV?s
Cornish fever dream,
with Sigourney Weaver
returning as the
American tourist Beth
Traywick to Portwenn,
where research into her
family tree is halted by
a medical emergency.
Unfortunately the
doc is abstaining
from practice while
a complaint against
him is heard, but when
the hearing arrives,
almost the entire
village seems to require
his assistance. Amid
crises of essays and
existentialism, it?s a
rum business as usual;
competently handled,
skirting the line
between self-aware and
self-parodic and ending
rather abruptly, but
never less than amiable.
The Truth About
Slim People
Channel 4, 9pm
An odd title, perhaps,
but this is a pretty
revealing and
instructive explanation
of why some people
stay slim without
apparent exercise or
conscious dieting. The
guinea pigs are Yemi,
with a 32in waist, and
size eight Anne-Marie,
whose habits are filmed
covertly for five days.
Pleasingly, their
?tricks? are nothing
of the sort, proving
logical and relatively
straightforward to
emulate: a balanced but
not rigid diet spread
over a week rather
than monitored by the
day, everyday exercise
such as walking,
regular mealtimes
and good sleep habits.
Sport Choice
BT Sport 1, 7.15pm
Tonight Chester and
Wrexham clash in the
cross-border derby at
the Deva Stadium
(7.45pm). The sides are
at opposite ends of the
table in the National
League, with Chester
languishing near the
bottom, while Wrexham
are in contention for
automatic promotion.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Modern Family (r) 7.00 Monkey Life (r)
(AD) 8.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) 10.00 Zoo Tales (r) (AD) 11.00
Modern Family (r) 12.00 Football?s Funniest
Moments (r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r)
5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry falls for a robot (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 DC?s Legends of Tomorrow
9.00 Marvel?s Inhumans. Black Bolt and
his family hit major problems
10.00 Bounty Hunters. Barnaby and Nina need
�0,000 to save their kidnapped mothers
10.40 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
11.30 PL Greatest Games (r)
11.45 A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
12.45am The Force: North East. A ?ood of 999
calls (r) 1.45 Ross Kemp in Search of Pirates (r)
(AD) 2.45 Brit Cops: War on Crime (r) 3.45
PL Greatest Games (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am The Guest Wing (r) (AD) 7.00 Richard
E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 Urban
Secrets (r) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00
House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing
(r) 5.00 House. Jay Karnes guest stars (r) (AD)
6.00 House. The doctor faces an apparently
supernatural mystery (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A taxi
driver is beaten to death by an angry mob (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. An of?cer involved in a
controversial shooting is acquitted (r) (AD)
9.00 Band of Brothers. A group of volunteers
begins regimental training under the harsh
leadership of Captain Sobel (1/10) (r)
10.35 Band of Brothers. Winters rallies the
troops during the Normandy landings (2/10) (r)
11.45 The Sopranos. Carmela and Meadow hold
a vigil at Tony?s bedside (r) (AD)
12.55am The Sopranos. Tony?s bizarre dream
continues (r) (AD) 2.10 Tin Star (r) 3.10
Californication (r) 4.20 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Highway Patrol (r) 12.00 Road Wars
(AD) 1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 The Real A&E. A postman is bitten (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E. A jockey has a fall (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Mycroft seeks his brother?s
advice. Rhys Ifans guest stars (r) (AD)
9.00 Grey?s Anatomy. New series. Meredith and
the team focus on helping Owen?s sister
10.00 Criminal Minds. The agents investigate a
series of murders in which all the victims are
women. Guest starring Merle Dandridge (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. The team investigates
a series of murders in Seattle (r)
12.00 Bones. Crime drama with Emily Deschanel
(r) (AD) 2.00am Cold Case (r) 3.00 UK Border
Force (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am Music for Mercy 7.00 Proko?ev:
Cantata for the 20th Anniversary of the October
Revolution 7.45 Proko?ev: Seven, They Are
Seven 8.00 Auction 8.30 Watercolour Challenge
9.00 Tales of the Unexpected 10.00 Alexander
Armstrong: Fine Tuned 11.00 Landscape Artist
of the Year 2017 12.00 Discovering: Walter
Matthau (AD) 1.00pm Tales of the Unexpected
2.00 Watercolour Challenge 2.30 Auction 3.00
The Art Show (AD) 4.00 Too Young to Die (AD)
5.00 Discovering: Radiohead (AD) 5.30
Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: Shirley MacLaine (AD)
7.00 Michelangelo?s Pietas
8.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
9.00 War and Peace. New series. Adaptation of
Tolstoy?s epic starring Clemence Poesy
11.00 Passions. The life of Richard Pryor
12.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
1.00am Master of Photography (AD) 2.00 Tales
of the Unexpected 3.00 Auction 4.00 The South
Bank Show Originals 5.00 Chaplin in Bali
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans. Today?s
early stories 10.00 Premier League Daily.
Updates from the top ?ight 11.00 Sky Sports
Daily. Breaking news, talking points and analysis
of the major sporting issues of the day 12.00
Sky Sports News 1.00pm Live ATP Next Gen
Finals. Coverage of the opening session on day
two of the tennis event for young players, which
takes place at Fiera Milano in Italy 5.00 Sky
Sports News at 5. Sports news and updates
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6. The latest
sports news and updates
6.30 Live ATP Next Gen Finals. Further coverage
of the opening day of the tennis event for
young players, which takes place in Italy
10.00 The Debate. Discussion on
the latest Premier League news
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the day?s
talking points and a look ahead to the events
that are likely to make the news tomorrow,
featuring previews and interviews
12.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Nolan Live.
Lively debate on issues affecting Northern
Ireland, with Stephen Nolan 11.40 A Question
of Sport 12.10am Junior Doctors: Blood,
Sweat and Tears (AD) 12.40 The Ganges
with Sue Perkins (r) 1.40-6.00 BBC News
Find a lifelong companion in the Times Literary Supplement,
the world?s leading international literary journal
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 10.30pm Wales Live. New
series. Weekly show featuring hard-hitting
stories and interviews 11.05 A Question of
Sport. Guests include Jamie George and Steve
Harmison 11.35 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat
and Tears (AD) 12.05am The Ganges with
Sue Perkins (r) (AD) 1.05 Weather for
the Week Ahead 1.10-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 11.15pm Spotlight. The
impact of the Personal Independence Payment
in Northern Ireland 11.45 Louis Theroux: Dark
States ? Heroin Town. Louis Theroux reports
on the rise in heroin use in America (r)
12.45am-12.50 Waterworld. Darryl Grimason
dives in Strangford Lough (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00 Permission
Impossible: Britain?s Planners. Residents
protest against a development on a green?eld
site in Cheshire (r) 1.00pm Live Bowls:
Scottish International Open. Coverage of day
?ve from the Dewars Centre in Perth
5.50-6.00 Lifeline (r) 11.15 Bowls: Scottish
International Open 12.10am-1.45 FILM: Louis
Theroux: My Scientology Movie (2015)
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BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
A journey to Marseilles (10/10) (r)
8.00 Empire of the Tsars: Romanov Russia with
Lucy Worsley. The reign of Catherine the Great
and the con?ict with Napoleonic France that
provided the setting for War and Peace (r)
9.00 Cosmonauts: How Russia Won the Space
Race. Documentary examining the Soviet Union?s
pioneering role in space exploration (r)
10.00 Detectorists. New series. The dark cloud
of a solar farm threatens the tranquillity of
the Detectorists. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.30 The League of Gentlemen. An
unsuspecting hiker visits Royston Vasey (r)
11.00 Sleuths, Spies & Sorcerers: Andrew
Marr?s Paperback Heroes. The broadcaster
explores popular genres of ?ction,
beginning with detective novels (r)
12.00 Queen Victoria?s Letters: A Monarch
Unveiled. Documentary (2/2) (r) (AD) 1.00am
Pagans and Pilgrims: Britain?s Holiest Places (r)
1.30 British Art at War: Bomberg, Sickert
and Nash (r) (AD) 2.30-3.30 Cosmonauts:
How Russia Won the Space Race (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Holly has a decision to make
that could ruin Cindy and Dirk?s relationship (AD)
7.30 Streetmate. Scarlett Moffatt helps
a woman in Birmingham ?nd a date (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: The Inbetweeners Movie (15,
2011) Awkward teenagers head to Greece for a
wild holiday. Comedy with Joe Thomas, Simon
Bird, James Buckley and Blake Harrison (AD)
11.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 Rude Tube. Internet videos showcasing
unusual talents (r) 1.00am First Dates (r) (AD)
2.05 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 3.00 Rude Tube (r)
3.55 Black-ish (r) (AD) 4.40 Charmed (r)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.45pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun. Double bill (r) 3.50 Time Team
(r) (AD) 4.55 Time Team (r) (AD)
5.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo
6.55 The Supervet. The vet must decide whether
a hip replacement on a cat is viable (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. A couple build a shed-like
family home and workspace at an old milk yard
in south-east London, but their choice of
unconventional, industrial-style materials
proves challenging (5/10) (r) (AD)
9.00 999: On the Frontline. An 89-year-old
woman refuses to go to hospital, and a war
veteran has sepsis that could kill him (9/10)
10.00 Obsessive Compulsive Country House
Cleaners. Sprucing up country estates
in dire need of attention (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A girl requires extensive
surgery after breaking her leg while scoring
a try in a rugby match (4/11) (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
A restaurant in California (r) 1.05 999: On the
Frontline (r) 2.05 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD)
3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am Guadalcanal Diary (PG, 1943)
Second World War drama starring Preston Foster
(b/w) 1.00pm The Reckless Moment (PG,
1949) Drama starring James Mason (b/w) 2.40
Gideon of Scotland Yard (PG, 1958) John
Ford?s police drama starring Jack Hawkins 4.30
The Last Frontier (PG, 1955) Western
starring Victor Mature and Robert Preston
6.35 Hugo (U, 2011) An orphan living in the
walls of a railway station in 1930s Paris
uncovers a lonely shopkeeper?s past. Martin
Scorsese?s adventure with Asa Butter?eld (AD)
9.00 Night at the Museum: Secret of the
Tomb (PG, 2014) Nightwatchman Larry
searches for a way to repair the magical artefact
that brings museum exhibits to life. Fantasy
comedy sequel starring Ben Stiller (AD)
10.55 A.C.O.D (15, 2013) A man is forced to
persuade his divorced parents to put aside their
differences so they can attend his brother?s
wedding. Comedy starring Adam Scott
12.40am Devil?s Due (15, 2014) Horror
starring Allison Miller and Zach Gilford
2.25-4.00 Of Horses and Men (15, 2013)
Comedy drama starring Ingvar Eggert Sigurdsson
6.00am The Cube: Celebrity Special (r) 6.45
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Dinner Date (r) 8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30
The Cube: Celebrity Special (r) 9.30 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20 Dinner Date (r)
11.20 Dress to Impress (r) 12.20pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 You?ve Been Framed!
Gold Top 100 Holidays (r) 1.50 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold Strikes Back! (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. The gang rushes
Judith to hospital when she goes into labour (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Charlie struggles
with his feelings for ex-?anc閑 Mia (r)
9.00 Celebrity Showmance. The three couples
stage embarrassing break-ups. Last in the series
10.00 Family Guy. Peter loses his job (r) (AD)
10.30 Family Guy. Meg is threatened (r) (AD)
11.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
11.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.00 Timewasters. Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.30am Ghosted (r) 1.00 The Keith Lemon
Sketch Show (r) 2.00 Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
8.55 Judge Judy (r) 10.15 Inspector Morse (r)
(AD) 12.30pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.35
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 3.45 Inspector Morse (r) (AD)
6.00 Heartbeat. Intrigue spreads among
the residents of Aidens?eld as a newcomer
causes havoc with her car and appears to be
hiding something (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica sets
out to clear a friend who has been
arrested in connection with the murder of a
television host (r) (AD)
8.00 Foyle?s War. Foyle is enlisted as the police
representative on the Victory Day Celebrations
Committee, but a murder puts paid to the
preparations (3/3) (r) (AD)
10.05 Lewis. The detective is faced with
a dif?cult case when he investigates the
discovery of a body in a well, and he also
has to contend with a new boss (r) (AD)
12.00 Inspector Morse (r) (AD) 2.05am
ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 8.00 Storage Wars (r)
8.25 The Sweeney (r) 9.30 Minder (r) 10.30
The Avengers (r) 11.40 The Saint (r) 12.45pm
Live Snooker: Champion of Champions. Jill
Douglas introduces coverage of the opening
session on day three from Ricoh Arena in
Coventry, featuring two group-stage semi-?nals
5.15 The Avengers. Steed suspects an
African dignitary of stealing weapons (r)
6.20 Storage Wars. A surprise visitor from
Texas attends the latest auctions (r)
6.45 Live Snooker: Champion of Champions. Jill
Douglas introduces further coverage from Ricoh
Arena, Coventry, featuring a group-stage ?nal,
as the players contest a place in the last four
11.15 FILM: Green Street (18, 2005) An
American journalism student gets kicked out of
Harvard, moves to London and joins a group of
football hooligans. Drama with Elijah Wood,
Charlie Hunnam and Claire Forlani (AD)
1.25am Ax Men. The Rygaard team refuses to
let rivals pass through its territory (r) 2.30
World Cup Top Goalscorers (r) 2.45 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.00 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice
Road Truckers 5.00 Impossible Engineering
6.00 Top Gear. The presenters chart the decline
of the British sports car industry (AD)
7.00 Top Gear. The presenters tackle the traf?c
chaos snowy weather causes in Britain (AD)
8.00 QI XL. Extended edition. Suggs, Claudia
O?Doherty, Jimmy Carr and Alan Davies attempt
to answer host Stephen Fry?s range of ?endish
questions on the theme of long-lost things
9.00 QI XL. Extended edition. With Jo Brand,
Bill Bailey, Alan Davies and James Acaster
10.00 Zapped. Brian lands a job guarding
Munty?s sacred Albino Pear Tree (AD)
10.40 Would I Lie to You? With Rebecca Front,
Jack Whitehall, Nick Hewer and Miranda Hart
11.20 Would I Lie to You? With Robert Webb,
Terry Wogan, Katy Wix and Kevin Bridges
12.00 Room 101 (AD) 12.40am Mock the Week
1.20 QI 2.00 Room 101 (AD) 2.40 8 Out of 10
Cats 3.10 Suits (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine (AD) 1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 Pie in the
Sky 5.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
6.00 A Fine Romance. Laura announces that
she is going to dinner with another man
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine.
Compo reveals a musical talent (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. The couple settle down
for a quiet evening, only to be disturbed by
ominous noises from the empty house next door
8.00 Inspector George Gently. The detective
looks into the suspicious death of an
old friend and informant, leading him to suspect
a police cover-up (2/2) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The team reopens the
case of a criminal who was killed in a ?re at
London?s Union club in 1996 (7/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Tracey and Sharon
witness a robbery committed by an acquaintance
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London?s Burning
2.00 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 Secrets of War
8.00 Buried by the Blitz: A Time Team Special
9.00 Pugin: The God of Gothic ? A Time Team
Special 10.00 Unearthing World War I 11.00
Coast (AD) 12.00 Journey to Stonehenge:
A Time Team Special 1.00pm Time Team
2.00 Wonders of the Monsoon 3.00 Coast
(AD) 4.20 The Monocled Mutineer
6.00 Great War Diaries. A French boy
witnesses the German retreat
7.00 The Last Day of WW1. An account of how
soldiers continued to be killed in battle hours
after the armistice was signed in 1918 (AD)
8.00 Unearthing World War I. David O?Keefe and
Wayne Abbott examine the battle of Vimy Ridge
9.00 The Great War in Numbers. The impact of
Russia pulling out of the war, only for the US to
join soon afterwards. Last in the series (AD)
10.00 Blackadder Goes Forth. Capt Blackadder
joins the Royal Flying Corps (AD)
10.40 The Monocled Mutineer (3/4)
12.20am Unearthing World War I 1.20 The
Great War in Numbers (AD) 2.20 Raiders
of the Lost Art (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00
The Super-Rich and Us. A look at how the
destabilisation of work life in the 1970s
drove a new pro?t culture (2/2) (r) (AD)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Crime Files. The
murder of Ermatati Rodgers 10.45 Australian
Wilderness with Ray Mears. The survivalist
visits Kangaroo Island (r) 11.15-11.45 Gino?s
Italian Coastal Escape. The island of Capri
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Bear?s Mission with Rob Brydon.
An open-door helicopter ride (AD) 12.05am
Teleshopping 1.05 After Midnight 2.35 Storage
Hoarders (r) 3.30 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 UTV Life. Stories
and studio guests 10.45 Gino?s Italian Coastal
Escape. Gino D?Acampo sails to the island of
Capri 11.15-11.45 The Harbour (r) 12.35am
Teleshopping 1.35-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puf?n Rock) (r) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san
Rioghachd Bhig (Ben & Holly?s Little Kingdom)
(r) 5.50 Treud na Dluth-choille: GradNaidheachd (Jungle Bunch) 5.55 Donnie Murdo
(Danger Mouse) 6.05 Dragonan: Reis chun an
iomaill (Dragons: Race to the Edge) 6.30 D�
a-nis? (What Now?) 7.00 Turas a? Bhradain
(The Salmon?s Journey) (r) 7.30 Speaking Our
Language (r) 7.55 Earrann Eachdraidh (History
Shorts) (r) 8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 Prosbaig
9.00 Ceum Air Cheum (First Steps) (r) 10.00
Fonn Fonn Fonn (r) 10.30 Horo Gheallaidh
(Celtic Music Sessions) (r) 11.00-12.00
Air an Rathad: Rally (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 12.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd
12.05pm Heno (r) 12.30 Cefn Gwlad (r) (AD)
1.00 Caeau Cymru (r) 1.30 Portmeirion (r)
2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da
3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05 Ar y Lein (r)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05
Stwnsh: Y Dyfnfor 5.25 Stwnsh: Ni Di Ni (r)
5.30 Stwnsh: Rhyfel Mawr Trwy Lygaid Ifanc
(r) 6.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd
Dillad (r) 6.30 Mabinogi-Ogi (r) 7.00 Heno
7.55 Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25
Mike Phillips a?r Senghenydd Sirens 9.00 News
9 a?r Tywydd 9.30 Parti Bwyd Beca 10.00 Rygbi
Pawb 10.45-11.50 Dylan ar Daith (r)
14
Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7491
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3175
5
6
24
7
17
18
14
1
13
4
Scrabble � Challenge No 1997
25
17
9
6
2
7
3
4
13
13
4
19
5
17
8
7
17
9
10
3W
20
11 12
13
2L
3W
3L
21
9
10
4
14
11
17
17
4
12
3
18
13
18
14
24
13
17
9
4
19
20
16
7
26
11
20
11
20
13
19
24
25
2L
14
25
22
7
8
13
5
17
17
14
15
14
19
13
2L
20
13
25
15
17
23
2
14
2L
7
16
9
4
25
10
2
4
7
16
18
7
13
20
13
14
6
14
13
16
19
19
7
19
19
24
9
10
4
6
2
4
7
14
4
24
17
17
17
12
18
24
1 TV play based on real
events (9)
7 Cut (with an axe) (4)
8 Lending at extortionate
rates (8)
9 Desire for drink (6)
10 Indic language (4)
12 Pig tenders (10)
Solution to Crossword 7490
D
B
BO L T HO
D O U
OS T EN
A D
A P P L E S
R E
PONCHO
F
L
S
UN I MP
S P R
MEWS E
E Y
D
J
L E UN
B
L
T A T I O
T U
ENSU
C
S T A B
W E
RE S S E
E A
X T ERN
S
TO
E
N
D
RE
I
L E
D
D
A L
Y
13
16
17
18
Apposite (2,3,5)
Public garden (4)
Deed (6)
Unfaithful wives' husbands
(8)
20 Present (4)
21 Very demanding (9)
Down
1 Arid region (6)
2 Oxford or Cambridge
college (6,7)
3 Couple, pair (3)
4 Concerned with beauty (9)
5 Liable to mishaps (8-5)
6 Provided with a mount (6)
11 Former coins (9)
14 Tropical flowering plant (6)
15 Acknowledgement; believe
(6)
19 Variety of lettuce (3)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
13
24
7
16
7
20
12
7
24
1
2
3
4
5
6
Q
14
15
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
M
16
17
18
19
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
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charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica
No 3995
N
No 3996
O
G
A
I
H
E
H
L
N
T
S
T
N
R
O
N
W
U
R
V
I
N
I
M
E
C
N
S
T
W
U
E
A
G
M
C
I
F
U
O
A
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4167
Futoshiki No 3038
<
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
?
?
5
3W
H
I
2L
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE� is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ㎝attel 2017
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
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24
?
29
16
4
24
3
15
4
36
4
6
4
36
7
4
?
2L
Kakuro No 1997
>
>
G
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
F
3L
What's the highest score using
the X with this rack?
21
D
E
AEGNOTX
M Q
20
2L
What's the highest score using
the J with this rack?
16
19
C
2W
aeJprtu
17
18
a
2L
m 2W
e 2W
done
i 2L
2L
c
e 2L
2L
A
B
2W
16
6
3
13
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6
22
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
6
15
19
27
15
7
4
4
3
19
3
10
16
20
19
16
4
>
29
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
4
13
6
37
4
16
17
17
8
4
6
� PUZZLER MEDIA
8
14 15
the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Levon Aronian
Black: Ioannis Papaioannou
European Teams, Crete 2017
English Opening
1 c4 e5 2 g3 c6 3 Nf3 e4 4 Nd4 d5
5 cxd5 Qxd5 6 Nc2 Nf6
Also possible is 6 ... e3, when
White is obliged to respond 7 f3.
However, after the further 7 ...
exd2+ 8 Bxd2 followed by Nc3,
Black will lose a lot of time rescuing his queen from attacks by
White?s knights.
7 Nc3 Qh5 8 Ne3 Bc5 9 Qc2 Qe5
10 Bg2 Bxe3
A capture that leaves White
with a rather ugly pawn structure.
In compensation White has the
bishop pair and the open f-file.
11 fxe3 Bf5 12 b4
A new move, designed to motorise his dark-squared bishop on to
________
醨D D 4kD]
�DnDp0p]
� DpDqDbD]
轉PDnD D ]
� D DpD D]
蹹QH ) ) ]
跴G )PDB)]
贒 $ DRI ]
谅媚牌侨
17 ... N7f6
Black immediately goes astray.
He must concentrate his reserves
on the queenside with 17 ... Rfc8.
18 Nxd5 Nxd5
If 18 ... cxd5 19 Rc7 is very
strong. Trading queens with 18 ...
Qxd5 clearly leads to similar, yet
even worse, consequences.
19 Rc5 Rfd8 20 bxc6 bxc6 21
Qc4 Rac8 22 Rc1 h5 23 Rxc6
Rxc6 24 Qxc6 Qg4 25 Qb5 h4 26
gxh4 Qxh4 27 Bd4 Kh7 28 Rf1
Qg4 29 Rf2 Qe6 30 Qb1 Nf6 31
Qb3 Qe7 32 Rf1 Ng4 33 h3 Nh6
34 Rf4 Qg5 35 Bc3 Qg3 36 Qb7
Bf5 37 Qe7 Rb8 38 Rf1 f6 39
Bxf6 Qg6 40 Bc3 Rb5 41 Qh4
Black resigns
________
醨DkD DrD] Winning Move
郉 D D )p]
遬DqD D D] White to play. This position is from
Crete 2017.
轌 gbD ! ] Yilmazyerli-Sadiku,
White has overwhelming pressure for the
� DpD D D] sacrificed piece. He now made excellent
蹹 D D D ] use of all the open lines with a fine
跴DP) DP)] combination. Can you see it?
贒 D $RDK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
31 - Psychology and Table feel
(1) If they don?t cover, they
haven?t got it
Missing just ?K2, the odds very
narrowly favour the drop, playing
?A. But any winning player
knows how to play the suit. Cross
to dummy and lead ?Q. Maybe
East will cover from ?K2 and end
your problems; or flinch and give
the show away. If he plays low in
normal fashion, you?ll rise with
?A. Note, it costs you nothing to
cross to dummy to lead ?Q.
Consider this two-way guess for a
missing queen:
Dummy
?A102
West
East
Declarer
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
?KJ9
You?d much rather the opponents
?Q 6 3
?7 5
led the suit but say this isn?t possi?6 5 3 2
ble. There?s a psychological gambit
?A K 10 3
to improve your chances.
?K 7 2
Lead ?J. It could be right for
?9 8 5 4
N
?Q 10 6 2
?K J 9 4 3
W E
West to cover ?J with ?Q ?
?9 8 7
S
?K 10
should the layout be like this:
?7 6 4
?5 2
Dummy
? A J 10
Contract: 3NT ? A 8
?A102
?AQ J 4
West
East
Lead: ? 4
?Q J 9 8
?Q75 Declarer ?K986
S
W
N
E
?J43
2NT
Pass
3NT
End
So West may cover ?J with ?Q.
Problem solved. Or West may
West leads ?4 to ?Q and you
flinch. But as we know, he who may as well win ?A (confidently).
hesitates is lost. If West pauses, With seven top tricks, you must
which he is not permitted to do guess which finesse to take (spade
with only low cards, you run ?J.
or diamond). Taking a losing
If West plays low on ?J in a rel- finesse will be fatal, for a flurry of
atively bored fashion, play East for hearts will follow.
?Q. Rise with ?A and lead back
Best is to cross to ?A at trick two
to ?9. It?s a good gambit ? but then lead ?Q (key play). May not
you do need ?9 for it to work. The East cover with ?K ? it?ll be hard
great Zia Mahmood summarised it for him not to? If East plays low in
well some years ago: ?If they don?t tempo, rise with ?A and rely on
cover, they haven?t got it?.
diamonds. You cross to ?10 and
Take this suit:
lead ?2 to ?J. If successful, you
Dummy
cross to ?K and lead ?3 to ?Q.
?Q753
Against most Easts (who?ll cover
?Q with ?K), you?ll succeed
Declarer
unless West holds both ?K and
?AJ109864
?K. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
EASY
MEDIUM
HARDER
50
HALF OF
IT
+7
+ 49
83 DOUBLE
IT
45
x5
7/15
OF IT
�
SQUARE
IT
?7
SQUARE 1/3 DOUBLE
IT
IT
OF IT
� 5 + 181 + 1/4
OF IT
+ 516 + 1/3
OF IT
� 8 ? 27
TREBLE
IT
OF IT
5/6
�
+ 21
CUBE
IT
? 135
5/6
x 11
OF IT
2
2
2 5
6
Polygon
Killer Tricky No 5711
3
19
17min
14
19
20
14
23
25
7
21
15
19
21
3
29
17
8
13
Killer Deadly No 5712
9
7
56min
16
5
20
26
8
21
27
8 9
9 7 6
8
8 6 9
9 8
7 9
7 5
2 4 3
1 2
3 1
+
-
1 4
3 2
6
1
2
1
4 2
8 6
5 1
9
7
1
3
8
5
9
2
4
6
8
6
9
2
7
4
1
5
3
3
2
8
7
6
5
4
1
9
=
1
=
45
5
9
1
4
3
8
6
2
7
9
4
7
6
8
2
5
3
1
6
8
5
1
4
3
9
7
2
1
3
2
5
9
7
8
6
4
5
8
1
2
4
6
3
7
9
9
2
7
8
3
1
5
4
6
4
3
6
9
5
7
2
8
1
1
5
3
7
8
2
6
9
4
2
7
4
5
6
9
1
3
8
8
6
9
3
1
4
7
2
5
7
1
5
4
9
3
8
6
2
3
9
8
6
2
5
4
1
7
6
4
2
1
7
8
9
5
3
7
6
4 1
2 3
4
2
1 5
7
3 4
2
1
4
2
B
L
O
C
K
B
U
S
T
E
R
2
1
3
6
8
2
4
5
7
1
3
9
5
7
3
9
1
6
2
4
8
3
2
4
7
6
5
8
1
9
7
6
8
1
3
9
2
4
5
17
6
14
3
8
9
1
4
2
8
3
6
5
7
5
9
1
2
4
8
7
6
3
5
13
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
6
6
3
9
5
6
4
1
7
8
2
7
4
8
5
2
9
3
6
1
1
3
6
7
9
4
8
2
5
8
2
9
1
3
5
4
7
6
4
5
7
8
6
2
9
1
3
4
2
4
7
2
5
1
3
6
9
8
6
8
5
4
9
2
1
3
7
1
3
9
8
7
6
4
5
2
2
5
6
3
8
1
9
7
4
8
1
7
9
5
4
3
2
6
9
4
3
6
2
7
5
8
1
2
2
1
3
2 > 1
5
?
2
4
2
5
�
+
9
4
2
5
?
?
3 < 4
5
3
7
1
-
+
-
�
1
3
8
4
x
-
2
+
6
x
x
4
7
1
5
9
3
8
2
6
9
6
2
1
8
7
3
5
4
1
8
4
9
6
5
2
7
3
5
3
6
2
7
1
9
4
8
7
2
9
3
4
8
5
6
1
2
1
8
7
5
4
6
3
9
3
9
7
6
1
2
4
8
5
6
4
5
8
3
9
7
1
2
S
H
R
I
A
R
L
O
O
T
I
P
U
N
O
I
B
O
N
T
D
Y
Lexica 3994
3 > 1
4
4
8
5
3
4
2
6
1
9
7
Lexica 3993
Set Square 1999
6 2
3
Suko 2076
Sudoku 9438
2
6
1
3
7
8
5
9
4
1 < 3
3
10
Scrabble 1996
WOODLARK
H8 across (55)
IMPUGNED
A8 across (126)
H Y
I
B
P RO
P
O
ON T
L
CR E
G
I NG
N
I
F I N
E
G
RK
6
1
Futoshiki 3037
11
18
E V E R Y
I T C
O
Y
B O
I D
E X E R T
K
A
HAR
CUB
F
A I L
E AR
U Z Z
O
L
A
OU T
OWN
P UR
H AW K
N
J
L F
S CAR F
I
P
R
L
S T E AM QU I
Killer 5710
Cell Blocks 3057
4
=
18
Sudoku 9437
4
7
6
9
2
1
3
8
5
9
22
24
�
5 > 2
15
x
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 32 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
= 3 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Codeword 3174
2
8 1
9 6
7 4
5
3
3
1
2 7
6 8
KenKen 4166
18
+
All the digits
= 36 from 1-9 are
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
8
25
1
+
6
�
4
12
2
x
x
Killer 5709
30
4 2
Solutions
2
5
4
3
1
6
7
9
8
24
8
6 2
+
+
Sudoku 9436
12
4
Kakuro 1996
15
25
4
5
x
Yesterday?s answers
ace, ache, acme, ahem, amice, ape,
came, cape, cep, chape, cheap, chime,
each, epic, haem, heap, hem, hemp,
hep, hie, ice, impeach, mace, mache,
meh, pace, pea, peach, pec, pie
18
3
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 2000
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 15 words, average;
21, good; 25, very good; 29, excellent
17
2
2
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Grandmaster Levon Aronian from
Armenia is a three-times winner
of the gold medal in the World
Chess Olympiad. He is also the
most highly rated competitor in
the European Team Chess Championship, which finished yesterday in Crete. In today?s game
Aronian deftly increases his advantage after an opening in which he
acquires the bishop pair at the
expense of an unusual and somewhat clumsy central pawn structure.
Games and results from Crete
can found via the 2seeitlive link
on the header of The Times Twitter feed @times_chess. For regular updates, direct to your Twitter
account, just click on the ?follow?
button.
its most promising diagonal. This
varies from Anand-Adams, Shamkir 2015, which continued 12 0-0
0-0 13 b3.
12 ... 0-0
The bold 12 ... h5 13 Bb2 h4 fails
to 14 Na4 Qd5 15 Bxf6 gxf6 16
Nc3.
13 Bb2 Nbd7 14 0-0 Qe6 15 b5
Bg6 16 Qb3 Nd5 17 Rac1
White is developing a promising initiative on the queenside.
True, his bishop on g2 is currently
entombed but Black?s bishop on
g6 is similarly obstructed.
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Gold standard
Cell Blocks No 3058
Brain Trainer
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Chess Raymond Keene
-
Quiz 1 Grange Hill 2 Richard III 3 The Snowman
4 Nico Muhly 5 Robert McKee 6 Satsuma
Rebellion 7 Michael Ancram (Marquess of
Lothian) 8 Gazprom 9 John Masefield
10 The modern macaron 11 Villi (singular: villus)
12 Balenciaga 13 The Supremes 14 Sa鷏 羖varez.
Canelo, which means ?cinnamon? in Spanish,
is a nickname for people with red hair
15 Mao Zedong
S
I
X
A
B
P
T
G
L
E
O
W
R
A
A
A
I
R
P
O
O
D
L
E
Word watch
Illecebrous (c) Enticing,
tending to attract
Elflock (b) A lock of hair
tangled as if by an elf
Ichor (a) The liquid that
was said to flow in the
veins of Greek gods
Brain Trainer
Easy 75; Medium 377;
Harder 3,795
Chess 1 Rf8+! Bxf8 2 Qd8+
Kb7 3 Rb1+ is decisive,
eg, 3 ... Ka7 4 Bb6+ Kb7
5 Bd4+ winning
08.11.17
MindGames
Difficult No 9439
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Fiendish No 9440
5
6
4
3
8
1
3
5
Ichor
a Divine blood
b A naval weight
c Scratchy
Answers on page 15
5
7
3 8
4 5
3
2
3
12 Which fashion
house makes the
�5 Triple S trainer?
15
6 The 1877 Battle of
Shiroyama was the
final engagement of
which samurai revolt?
Gas Industry converted
into a corporation?
9 Who wrote the
children?s novels The
Midnight Folk and The
Box of Delights?
7 Which former
Conservative party
deputy leader is the
only marquess in the
House of Lords?
10 The creation of
which meringue-based
confection has been
credited to both Pierre
Desfontaines of Ladur閑
and Claude Gerbet?
8 Which company was
created in 1989 when
the Soviet Ministry of
4
5
8
13 In 1967, Cindy
Birdsong replaced
Florence Ballard as
a member of which
Motown act?
Yesterday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 956
14 Which Mexican
boxer, whose sole
professional defeat
came against Floyd
Mayweather, is
known as ?Canelo??
15 Which 20th-century
leader is pictured?
Answers on page 15
12
21
7
11
13
14
16
19
6
15
17
18
20
22
D
O
W
N
C
A
S
T
UMB
O F F
A
B
R
I N SOME
I
N
E
Z O
H AOS
A
I
T A T I ONM
I
G
WR A P U P
O
S M S
I M
L L AMA
I
L
N
A
PO L YMA T H
S T AGE
T
D
A
AMA S S
I
M Y
D I A C
N
P
A S T E R
C
O
CR AMP
E
R O
P R E S S
T
N
A
F A L L
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Flamande
9
10
8 7
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
11 The inside wall of
the small intestine is
lined with which tiny,
finger-like projections?
The Times Quick Cryptic No 957
1
1
6
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
2 Which 15th-century
king is Benedict
Cumberbatch?s second
cousin 16 times removed?
5 Which creative writing
instructor (b 1941)
wrote the book Story:
Substance, Structure,
Style, and the Principles
of Screenwriting?
6
2 4
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 Tucker?s Luck (198385) was a spin-off from
which BBC drama?
4 Which US
composer?s opera Two
Boys was first staged
by the ENO in 2011?
3 8
6 1 4
1 8
5 2
7
6
2
4
9 7 8
5 1
2
5
2
7
1 5
4
9 8
1
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 Which Jo Nesbo
novel is now a
2017 film starring
Michael Fassbender?
4
5 7
1
5
4
7
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
2
9
4
3 1
5
3 7
9 8
2
6 1 3
Elflock
a A limp grasp
b Tangled hair
c Miniature sheep
Super fiendish No 9441
5
8
9
9
6 2
7
8 4
Illecebrous
a Drunken
b Shining
c Enticing
2
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
Across
1 Jazz piece and a composition
for sitar? (4)
4 Yorkshire terrier cooled off,
with something to drink (8)
8 Fifty savages destroyed US city
(3,5)
9 Talk a lot about eastern guru
(4)
10 Singular honour for Hardy?s
partner (6)
11 Everything carried by wellbuilt helots (3,3)
12 Type of wrestling I do got
me out of shape eventually
(3,2,4,4)
16 Dreads writhing snakes (6)
17 Policeman in centre of Wigan
managing OK (6)
19 Leaders of nations in Northern
Europe ? a smallish number
(4)
20 American relatives and I
wanting a heavenly source of
food (8)
21 Tough king retaining the
monarchy in the end (8)
22 A large number killed (4)
Down
2 A question over sailor reaching
a Middle East port (5)
3 Tradesmen, I?ve gathered,
ultimately want publicity (13)
4 Treasure a northern girl, as
posh people might say (5)
5 Teacher turned up with
German and Italian course (7)
6 Cutlery items busybody
emphasised should be placed
the other way up (13)
7 Comfort zone of the French
newly-wed (7)
10 Meadow?s sheltered part, you
say? (3)
13 Opponent of innovation
diluted rum (7)
14 Get very upset, with health
resort bathed in blood (2,5)
15 Food item eaten by veggies?
(3)
17 Taxi driver around
Westminster, say, losing
direction (5)
18 Innocent one hiding in part of
church (5)
DIGITAL RADIO ? APP
VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
s.
Marin Alsop?s opening slice with
the London Symphony Orchestra
certainly demonstrated her passionate
commitment and ease with every
stylistic twist, from jazzy fury and
artful simplicity to the loud
grandiloquent gesture. Yet listening
to Bernstein?s vocal and spoken
symphony Kaddish, an argumentative
elaboration of the Jewish prayer for
the dead, all I learnt about this
protean figure was that some of his
music is worse than I thought.
The composer?s conversational,
sometimes cringing texts were a good
part of the problem, not entirely
solved by the gently calibrated
narration from Claire Bloom,
whose amplified voice sounded as
if it were swathed in a thick woollen
sock. Yet it?s the weakness of the
music, struggling too hard to be
strident or drowning in watery
bathos, that really makes Kaddish
hard going. Energy kept springing
from Alsop?s conducting, the sprightly
LSO players and the hard-working
London Symphony Chorus. Sadly, it
wasn?t enough.
Happily, the much less tendentious
Halil, written to honour a young Israeli
flautist killed in the 1973 Yom Kippur
War, offered elegiac beauty, well
served by Adam Walker, the LSO?s
principal flute, who was suave, limpid
and agile. After that, Bernstein?s hero
Mahler arrived, with the adagio from
the unfinished Symphony No 10.
Alsop drew out its anguished melodic
lines with loving care, making its
climactic dissonant outbursts all the
more startling. Great music, finally;
and sterling music-making too.
Geoff Brown
Dance
Royal Ballet
Covent Garden
K
{{{((
evin O?Hare, the director of
the Royal Ballet, isn?t afraid
of the new. And to prove
his commitment to fostering
choreography, he has
programmed a triple bill featuring
two world premieres and the revival
of a piece made for the company two
years ago. It?s an incredibly varied
programme and the dancers lap up
the various challenges, even if the
evening is somewhat hit and miss.
The last time Twyla Tharp made
a work for the Royal was in 1995,
the full-length Mr Worldly Wise.
It wasn?t a success. For her return
one might have hoped for a ballet
wholly tailor-made, but instead,
in The Illustrated ?Farewell?, Tharp
opts for a prequel.
{{(((
This play, which runs for more
than three hours, requires a huge
amount of oomph to work and it
rarely takes off here. This is Brecht at
his grandest, his 1939 antiwar play as
translated, with much extra swearing,
by Tony Kushner in 2006. The
brutality of the language matches the
set and, when coupled with all the
shouting, it?s easy to feel as if we, the
audience, are also under attack.
Hannah Chissick directs and,
although Lawrence often rises to
the challenge, she is the exception.
In general, the staging often feels
wooden, the singing dirge-like and
the action jerky. There is rawness and
then there is amateur and much of
this is the latter. One bright spot is
Laura Checkley who, as the prostitute
Yvette, is a standout, her energy filling
the room. But mostly it?s an ordeal.
The play says war is hell, but theatre
sometimes isn?t far off.
Box office: 020 7407 0234, to Dec 9
gor and Moreno, that plucky
duo, certainly took a risk when
they came up with the idea for
Andante. It is, as they tell us, an
exploration in perception as they
invite us, the audience, to connect
with our senses, including ? and
I?ve never seen this in a dance show
before ? our sense of smell.
The first thing to be explored is
sound, as the four dancers enter at
the side of the stage, walking gingerly
over a floor covered in tiny fire
poppers that burst noisily with each
step. It?s fun. Our quartet of dancers,
Igor Urzelai, Moreno Solinas, Giorgia
Nardin and Eleanor Sikorski, move
very slowly (hence the title) on to the
stage, walking, sometimes in circles,
sometimes swaying from side to side,
but always looking as blank as
zombies. They hum too, which I guess
is meant to ease us into a kind of
pleasurable hypnotic state, and they
sing in rhythm to the movement.
So far, so relaxing. Then everything
gets louder and faster, more
mechanical and harsher. The music is
an annoying drone; at the back of the
stage is what looks to be a giant duvet,
and at one point it inflates (why?). We
are disorientated, but more is to come.
The lights go off and we are sitting in
a whiteout as the theatre fills with
smoke. We can?t see the dancers, only
hear the slap of their feet against the
cushioned floor. Deprived of sight our
sense of smell kicks in big time,
courtesy of Alessandro Gualtieri, the
Italian perfumer, who has designed
scents to keep our noses entertained
(mine discerned a hint of peat,
sandalwood, North African spices).
This state of disconnect between
stage and stalls goes on and on, so
long, in fact, that it soon becomes
boring. Why are we sitting here,
wrapped in a giant cloud, watching
nothing? What is the point of being in
a theatre? Others obviously felt the
same way because, after 70 minutes or
so with no end in sight (as it were),
they walked out. Is that really the
result Igor and Moreno wanted?
Debra Craine
Junction, Cambridge, Nov 14
choreography, are looking back in
time. A nice touch.
Arthur Pita?s The Wind, on the other
hand, is a world premiere, and a highly
original piece of contemporary dance.
A gothic supernatural western, it?s
based on Dorothy Scarborough?s
1925 novel (and subsequent
Lillian Gish film) about a
woman transplanted to the
bleak and dusty isolation of west
Texas, where the relentless wind
drives her to hysteria, a form of
prairie madness exacerbated by
her brutal rape at the hands of a cattle
buyer (Thomas Whitehead, scary). As
Letty, Natalia Osipova delivers terror,
derangement, bewilderment and
revenge with a visceral commitment.
A fine supporting performance too
from Thiago Soares, left, as the
cowpuncher who marries Letty but
isn?t able to protect her.
The storytelling (the narrative is set
in the 1880s) is intensely theatrical and
perhaps too compressed, while the
choreography doesn?t go far enough in
explicating Pita?s theme, although he?s
good at suggesting the harshness and
male aggression of Letty?s cowboy
world and the emotional frenzy that
engulfs her. There?s a new character,
a Native American ghost warrior
(Edward Watson in full-on spooky
mode), who could even be the wind
in physical form, and 35 minutes of
new music by Frank Moon, whose
orchestral score is a ferocious boil of
danger and unease. The set is simple,
suggesting a barren frontier, but
Jeremy Herbert?s three giant wind
machines are too dominant and
overpowering. We don?t need to see
dancers constantly battling
hurricane-force winds to get the idea.
Completing the mixed bill is Hofesh
Shechter?s Untouchable (2015), a boring
and repetitive modern-day tribal dance
? filled with ominous overtones of
alienation and displacement ? whose
only redeeming feature is that it was
made for the corps de ballet.
Debra Craine
Box office: 020 7304 4000, to Nov 17
Josie Lawrence is the only person who rises to the challenge in an otherwise amateurish production
Brecht?s 30 years bore
In the title role Josie Lawrence tries her best, but this Brecht staging
is dire and wooden, and the singing dirge-like, says Ann Treneman
Theatre
Mother Courage
and Her
Children
Southwark
Playhouse, SE1
{((((
Red Star Over
Russia opens at
Tate Modern
First Night, main paper
T
his is a wildly ambitious
undertaking in a relatively
small space and there are
times when this new
production of Bertolt
Brecht?s play about the 30 Years War,
from 1618 to 1648, feels more like 100
years (and counting). Josie Lawrence is
mother (never mum), a woman with a
wagon of goods and three children to
help her to pull it as they chase after
the soldiers, their main customers.
It?s a brutalist set, by Barney George,
all concrete floor (you can almost hear
the knees skid) and soiled tarpaulin
curtains. The ?stage? is a traverse strip,
a catwalk on which Mother Courage
labours with her wagon, every crease
in her face visible as she struggles to
keep her sons out of the war and her
daughter out of trouble. Yet much
action also takes place on a mezzanine
platform behind one side of the stage
which, for half the audience, is a pain
in the neck (literally).
In 1973 she choreographed the final
two movements of Haydn?s Farewell
Symphony in As Time Goes By for the
Joffrey Ballet; for Covent Garden she
tacks on the first two movements in
the form of a duet for Sarah Lamb
and Steven McRae.
They are extraordinary dancers,
virtuosic and very outgoing, qualities
well-suited to the ingenuity,
spontaneity and playful attitude of
Tharp?s highly articulated academic
writing, which she fashions like a
classical ballroom dance or a jazzy
courtship. Still, it?s a long
time to sustain a duet, even
with many dazzling moments, so
it?s with relief that we welcome the
ensemble (led by impressive
performances from Mayara Magri
and Joseph Sissens) to deliver the lush
naturalism of As Time Goes By.
In an attempt to tie the two halves
of The Illustrated ?Farewell? together,
Tharp brings Lamb and McRae back
for the adagio of the final movement
? and it feels as though they, like the
12
1GT
Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Gabriel Tate
Detectorists
BBC Four, 10pm
A slick
exec strides
through
gleaming
offices in the Square
Mile for a rendezvous
with his boss to discuss
a lucrative new
business venture. It?s a
Early
Top
pick
most uncharacteristic
opening for a series
that tends to the
bucolic and gently
paced. Yet for this final
series of Detectorists,
its creator-director and
star, Mackenzie Crook,
is raising the stakes
for a Capraesque clash
of corporation and
community. The
multinational monster
is eyeing up Bishop?s
Farm, the favoured
hunting ground for the
Suffolk metal-detecting
enthusiasts Andy
(Crook) and Lance
(Toby Jones). It wants
a site for huge solar
panels to provide
cheap, clean energy
to the village of
Danebury. There is
a general sense of the
established order being
given a gentle shake:
Andy is chafing at the
restrictions of living
with his mother-in-law
and unhappy with
working under dodgy
archaeological surveyor
Tim (Tim Key); Lance
is struggling with the
idiosyncrasies of his
newly reconciled
daughter. This slightly
unsettling air is
enhanced by one of the
show?s occasional, eerie
interludes, harking
back to the pagan past.
Yet everything else is
as it should be, for now,
in another deceptively
incisive, occasionally
melancholy and utterly
charming portrait of
companionship, rural
tradition and decent
people trying their best.
Through the intimacy
of its observations
and the care of its
character development,
Detectorists reaches
a level of profundity
beyond most sitcoms.
DIY SOS
BBC One, 8pm
When Nick Knowles
calls time on his career
if the tributes are kind,
they won?t focus on
the diabolical covers
albums. Instead, they
will pay justified tribute
to DIY SOS, a format
uniquely suited to
his blokey, can-do
demeanour. In tonight?s
project Knowles and
his assembled experts
return to Veterans
Street in Manchester,
which two years ago
was transformed by the
team ? with a little
help from Harry and
Wills ? from derelict
thoroughfare to vibrant
community. One final
house needs to be
completed, with single
dad, Iraq veteran and
amputee Simon Flores
looking for a home.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Women at War: 100 Years of
Service. Pam Ayres recalls her years in the Women?s Royal
Air Force in the 1960s (AD) 10.00 Homes Under the
Hammer. Properties in southwest London, Kent and the
northeast (r) (AD) 11.00 Getting the Builders In.
A woman wants her kitchen in Wolverhampton refreshing
on a budget of �000 11.45 Fugitives. Of?cers search
for a Hungarian man convicted of burglaries in West
Yorkshire, while a drugs courier is arrested by Dutch
police 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From Hemswell,
Lincolnshire (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather
1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Mrs
Tembe comes up with a new way for Sid to use his voice.
Rob admits to Heston he is struggling to talk about his
feelings (AD) 2.15 Impossible. Game show hosted by Rick
Edwards 3.00 Escape to the Country. A couple hoping to
buy their ?rst home together in Dorset (AD) 3.45 Money
for Nothing. Jay Blades salvages three items bound for
the skip in Walsall (r) 4.30 Flog It! The team visits the
Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich (r) 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Hairy Builder (r) (AD) 6.30 Women at War:
100 Years of Service (r) (AD) 7.15 Getting the Builders In
(r) 8.00 Sign Zone: Britain A?oat (r) (SL) 8.30 Caught
Red Handed (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00
BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 FILM: Easy Virtue (PG,
2008) An Englishman in the 1920s marries a brash
American woman, to the horror of his upper-class family.
Romantic comedy based on Noel Coward?s play, with
Jessica Biel and Ben Barnes (AD) 1.30pm Lifeline (r)
1.40 Grand Tours of Scotland (r) 1.45 Permission
Impossible: Britain?s Planners (r) 2.45 Family Finders
3.15 Operation Gold Rush with Dan Snow. The team
arrives at Dawson City, and sets up a mining camp in the
gold ?elds. Last in the series (r) (AD) 4.15 Hebrides:
Islands on the Edge. Animals including white-tailed
eagles, harbour seals and hares are left struggling to raise
their young after a huge storm (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your
Money Where Your Mouth Is. David Harper and Phil
Serrell go head-to-head at auction in Royal Leamington
Spa (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine
6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two. How the
contestants are shaping up for Saturday
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Daisy Ridley and Josh
Gad discuss their roles in the new ?lm Murder on the
Orient Express 8.30 Lorraine. Christopher Eccleston chats
about the second series of The A Word 9.25 The Jeremy
Kyle Show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip Scho?eld and
Holly Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features,
including a look at the stories making the newspaper
headlines and a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose
Women. More interviews and topical debate from a
female perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00
Dickinson?s Real Deal. David Dickinson and the dealers
are on the hunt for antiques in Stroud, Gloucestershire,
where items of interest include a 1920s chandelier, a
stunning opal ring and some paintings (r) 3.00 Tenable.
Quiz hosted by Warwick Davis in which a team from
Cumbria answers questions about top 10 lists, then
tries to score a perfect 10 in the ?nal round 4.00 Tipping
Point. Ben Shephard hosts the quiz show, in which
contestants drop tokens down a choice of four chutes in
the hope of winning a �,000 jackpot 5.00 The Chase.
Bradley Walsh presents the quiz show 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) (AD) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s
Hotel Hell. Gordon Ramsay checks in to Murphy?s Historic
Hotel near Sacramento in California (r) (AD) 11.00
Undercover Boss USA. The CEO of Forman Mills goes
incognito among his staff (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News
Summary 12.05pm Come Dine with Me. A week of dinner
parties in north Wiltshire (r) 1.05 My Kitchen Rules.
Theo Randall challenges Celia and Dave, a married couple
from Wolverhampton 2.10 Countdown. With Alison
Steadman in Dictionary Corner 3.00 A Place in the Sun:
Summer Sun. A couple who want to move to Ibiza (r)
4.00 Coast vs Country. A retired couple in search of a
quieter life in Devon 5.00 Four in a Bed. The third night
comes from The Black Swan in Horsham St Faith 5.30
Steph and Dom?s One Star to Five Star. Steph and Dom
challenge the owners to create a golfer?s retreat bedroom
6.00 The Simpsons. Mr Burns sends Homer to train new
workers in India, where he is worshipped. Featuring the
guest voice of Richard Dean Anderson (r) (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Milo is causing big problems for Dirk, and
Mandy and Holly pamper Cindy at her hen do (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 GPs:
Behind Closed Doors. A woman explains how her life is
now back on track after suffering from chronic depression,
while a husband and wife describe how his illness brought
them even closer together (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel Inspector Returns. Alex
Polizzi revisits hoteliers Ben and Emma Irvine, to see
whether their Ramsgate venture, Albion House, is ?ying
or ?ailing, and ?nds she has to roll up her sleeves once
more (r) 1.10 Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45
Neighbours (AD) 2.20 NCIS. Gibbs and DiNozzo
investigate the case of a retired marine colonel found
murdered with an axe, and discover the evidence points
to his drug-addicted son (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: The
Christmas Note (PG, TVM, 2015) After moving back
home before Christmas, a disillusioned woman ?nds a
new purpose when she helps her neighbour look for a
missing sibling. Drama with Jamie-Lynn Sigler, Leah
Gibson and Greg Vaughan 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30
Neighbours. Police question the residents concerning
Hamish?s death (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Coco
collapses in the garden (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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Northanger Abbey
7.00 Meet the Lords Documentary ?lmed
over a year following life at the House
of Lords, going behind the scenes
during a turbulent 12 months that has
seen dramatic changes in the political
landscape and the Lords battling it out
with the Government (1/3) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Pollard is humiliated,
suspicion is rife, and Lawrence
?ghts his emotion (AD)
8PM
8.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build Nick
Knowles and the team return to
Veterans Street in Manchester,
where they build the ?nal home on
the road for a decorated former
soldier and his young family.
See Viewing Guide (6/7) (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
The chefs have to create a perfect
fruit-based souf?� with a garnish of
their choice in the Skills Test set by
Monica Galetti, demonstrating their
working methods and techniques (AD)
9.00 The Apprentice Alan Sugar sends the
candidates off to Bruges to create a
high-quality tour of the beautiful
Belgian city that passengers would be
happy to pay good money for. The
teams also try to ?og souvenirs to
guests to top up their pro?t margins
9.00 Big Life Fix: Children in Need
Special One-off special in which
Simon Reeve follows leading engineers
and designers as they invent
life-changing solutions for three
children with severe disabilities.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
7PM
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine show
featuring topical reports from around
the UK and big-name studio guests
9PM
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10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 A Question of Sport Sue Barker
hosts the quiz with guests Jamie
George, Gordon Reid, Perri ShakesDrayton and Steve Harmison
11.15 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat and
Tears Anna spends her birthday
working a busy shift on the
respiratory ward (2/8) (AD)
11.45 The Ganges with Sue Perkins
Sue meets students in Patna, is
reunited with an old friend in Kolkata
and ?nds out about the endangered
Bengal tiger before reaching the
mouth of the river (3/3) (r) (AD)
12.50am-6.00 BBC News
10.00 The Apprentice: You?re Fired
An interview with the show?s
freshly rejected candidate.
Hosted by Rhod Gilbert (6/12)
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
and Emily Maitlis
11.15 Louis Theroux: My Scientology
Movie (15, 2015) The reporter
investigates the controversial religion,
re-enacting personal experiences of
former members, but ?nding himself
under surveillance by the church (AD)
12.50am Peaky Blinders Tommy outlines his plans for
the most audacious criminal act the gang has ever
undertaken (r) (AD) 1.45 Sign Zone: Anthony Joshua ?
The Fight of My Life (r) (AD, SL) 2.25 Billion Dollar
Deals and How They Changed Your World (r)
(AD, SL) 3.25-4.20 Eat Well for Less? (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Traf?c Cops: Under Attack Thieves
towing a stolen generator on one
wheel along town and country roads
cause chaos, smashing the barriers on
a closed level crossing and coming
close to causing a train crash (r)
8.00 Gino?s Italian Coastal Escape Gino
D?Acampo sails to the island of Capri,
where he unearths the origins of
Italy?s most famous digestivo (2/8)
8.30 Coronation Street Mary?s error of
judgement leaves Angie enraged, Alya
rescues Aidan from humiliation, and
Chesney asserts his authority (AD)
8.00 The Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick
operates on a two-year-old Bengal cat
with a broken back and a dislocated
spine after being hit by a car, and
a rottweiler puppy is treated for a
genetic condition that has destroyed
its cartilage on its ankle bone (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors
Dr Elizabeth Barnard sees Catherine,
a diabetic who has developed a large,
painful blister between two of her
toes, which is a cause of concern in
sufferers with her condition (AD)
9.00 Doc Martin Martin prepares to face
his hearing, but despite having closed
the practice, he ?nds all his patients
are trying to make appointments. A
visitor to Portwenn returns to research
her family tree and seek the doctor?s
advice. Sigourney Weaver guest stars.
See Viewing Guide (8/8) (AD)
9.00 The Truth About Slim People
An experiment following people who
never seem to put on weight. Over the
course of ?ve days, covert cameras
follow them at work, home and play to
assess whether there is something in
their behaviour that is determining
their size. See Viewing Guide
9.00 Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It Away
Max and Steve are in west London on
a bid to recover more than �,000
owed for unpaid court costs after a car
accident, with the debtor denying all
knowledge of the situation
10.00 Shannon Matthews: The Mother?s
Story Documentary aiming to get at
the truth of the woman at the centre
of her own daughter?s kidnapping,
asking what drove her to do it and
whether she is sorry for her actions (r)
11.45 Road Rage Britain: Caught on
Camera Footage of confrontations
and clashes on the roads (r)
10.00 Man Down Dan is frustrated by the
universal lack of respect for his new
status as a father, and decides to
join a local dads? club (3/6) (AD)
10.35 Acquitted New series. A man returns
to his hometown after 20 years,
reminding locals of an unsolved
murder. Norwegian drama, in English
and Norwegian with English subtitles.
The ?rst series is already available,
free to view or download, on All 4,
and the second series will be
available from November 8 (1/10)
11.35 Gogglebox: Celebrity Special for
SU2C Critiques of television shows
with famous guests in support of
Stand Up to Cancer initiative (r) (AD)
12.35am Jackpot247 Interactive gaming 3.00 May the
Best House Win. Homeowners in Cambridgeshire and
Suffolk vie for the �000 prize as they score one
another?s properties, which include a converted Salvation
Army church hall and a pub (r) (SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r) (SL)
12.45am Pokerstars Championship Highlights of the
event from Monte Carlo 1.40 Ramsay?s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (r) (SL) 2.35 FILM: Piku
(PG, 2015) Comedy drama starring Amitabh Bachchan
and Deepika Padukone. In Hindi and Bengali 4.40 Escape
(r) (AD) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.05am Diced to Death: Countdown to Murder The
case of wife killer Ty Medland, who in 2013 stabbed his
wife Samantha to death (r) 1.00 SuperCasino 3.10 Law &
Order: Special Victims Unit (r) (AD) 4.00 Get Your Tatts
Out: Kavos Ink (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
House Busters (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
7.30 Coronation Street Angie con?des
her troubles to Toyah. Meanwhile,
Sinead admires Daniel?s rapport
with Joseph (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.45 Bear?s Mission with Rob Brydon
The adventurer Bear Grylls teaches the
comedian some alternative survival
skills, starting with an open-door
helicopter ride up into the mountains
of Rob?s native Wales (r) (AD)
11.05 When Kids Kill: Cat?sh Killer Leah
Green examines the case of teenage
karate instructor Tony Bushby, who
used social media to ensnare art
student Katie Wynter, before killing
her on Boxing Day of 2011 (4/6) (r)
the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
Big Life Fix
BBC Two, 9pm
Taking a break from
globetrotting and
baiting the Russian
secret service, Simon
Reeve investigates some
of the exceptionally
worthwhile projects
funded by Children in
Need to help children
with severe disabilities.
Eight-year-old Josh
is blind and unable to
play with his friends,
the one blight on his
otherwise humblingly
normal life; Ayala,
also eight, has cerebral
palsy, while her twin is
able-bodied; and Aman,
ten, has memory
problems after a car
crash. Can the experts
rustle up technology to
make their lives easier?
Of course, but eyes will
be opened and tears
jerked along the way.
Doc Martin
ITV, 9pm
Take two of ITV?s
Cornish fever dream,
with Sigourney Weaver
returning as the
American tourist Beth
Traywick to Portwenn,
where research into her
family tree is halted by
a medical emergency.
Unfortunately the
doc is abstaining
from practice while
a complaint against
him is heard, but when
the hearing arrives,
almost the entire
village seems to require
his assistance. Amid
crises of essays and
existentialism, it?s a
rum business as usual;
competently handled,
skirting the line
between self-aware and
self-parodic and ending
rather abruptly, but
never less than amiable.
The Truth About
Slim People
Channel 4, 9pm
An odd title, perhaps,
but this is a pretty
revealing and
instructive explanation
of why some people
stay slim without
apparent exercise or
conscious dieting. The
guinea pigs are Yemi,
with a 32in waist, and
size eight Anne-Marie,
whose habits are filmed
covertly for five days.
Pleasingly, their
?tricks? are nothing
of the sort, proving
logical and relatively
straightforward to
emulate: a balanced but
not rigid diet spread
over a week rather
than monitored by the
day, everyday exercise
such as walking,
regular mealtimes
and good sleep habits.
Sport Choice
BT Sport 1, 7.15pm
Tonight Chester and
Wrexham clash in the
cross-border derby at
the Deva Stadium
(7.45pm). The sides are
at opposite ends of the
table in the National
League, with Chester
languishing near the
bottom, while Wrexham
are in contention for
automatic promotion.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Modern Family (r) 7.00 Monkey Life (r)
(AD) 8.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) 10.00 Zoo Tales (r) (AD) 11.00
Modern Family (r) 12.00 Football?s Funniest
Moments (r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r)
5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry falls for a robot (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 DC?s Legends of Tomorrow
9.00 Marvel?s Inhumans. Black Bolt and
his family hit major problems
10.00 Bounty Hunters. Barnaby and Nina need
�0,000 to save their kidnapped mothers
10.40 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
11.30 PL Greatest Games (r)
11.45 A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
12.45am The Force: North East. A ?ood of 999
calls (r) 1.45 Ross Kemp in Search of Pirates (r)
(AD) 2.45 Brit Cops: War on Crime (r) 3.45
PL Greatest Games (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am The Guest Wing (r) (AD) 7.00 Richard
E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 Urban
Secrets (r) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00
House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing
(r) 5.00 House. Jay Karnes guest stars (r) (AD)
6.00 House. The doctor faces an apparently
supernatural mystery (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A taxi
driver is beaten to death by an angry mob (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. An of?cer involved in a
controversial shooting is acquitted (r) (AD)
9.00 Band of Brothers. A group of volunteers
begins regimental training under the harsh
leadership of Captain Sobel (1/10) (r)
10.35 Band of Brothers. Winters rallies the
troops during the Normandy landings (2/10) (r)
11.45 The Sopranos. Carmela and Meadow hold
a vigil at Tony?s bedside (r) (AD)
12.55am The Sopranos. Tony?s bizarre dream
continues (r) (AD) 2.10 Tin Star (r) 3.10
Californication (r) 4.20 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Highway Patrol (r) 12.00 Road Wars
(AD) 1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 The Real A&E. A postman is bitten (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E. A jockey has a fall (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Mycroft seeks his brother?s
advice. Rhys Ifans guest stars (r) (AD)
9.00 Grey?s Anatomy. New series. Meredith and
the team focus on helping Owen?s sister
10.00 Criminal Minds. The agents investigate a
series of murders in which all the victims are
women. Guest starring Merle Dandridge (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. The team investigates
a series of murders in Seattle (r)
12.00 Bones. Crime drama with Emily Deschanel
(r) (AD) 2.00am Cold Case (r) 3.00 UK Border
Force (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am Music for Mercy 7.00 Proko?ev:
Cantata for the 20th Anniversary of the October
Revolution 7.45 Proko?ev: Seven, They Are
Seven 8.00 Auction 8.30 Watercolour Challenge
9.00 Tales of the Unexpected 10.00 Alexander
Armstrong: Fine Tuned 11.00 Landscape Artist
of the Year 2017 12.00 Discovering: Walter
Matthau (AD) 1.00pm Tales of the Unexpected
2.00 Watercolour Challenge 2.30 Auction 3.00
The Art Show (AD) 4.00 Too Young to Die (AD)
5.00 Discovering: Radiohead (AD) 5.30
Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: Shirley MacLaine (AD)
7.00 Michelangelo?s Pietas
8.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
9.00 War and Peace. New series. Adaptation of
Tolstoy?s epic starring Clemence Poesy
11.00 Passions. The life of Richard Pryor
12.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
1.00am Master of Photography (AD) 2.00 Tales
of the Unexpected 3.00 Auction 4.00 The South
Bank Show Originals 5.00 Chaplin in Bali
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans. Today?s
early stories 10.00 Premier League Daily.
Updates from the top ?ight 11.00 Sky Sports
Daily. Breaking news, talking points and analysis
of the major sporting issues of the day 12.00
Sky Sports News 1.00pm Live ATP Next Gen
Finals. Coverage of the opening session on day
two of the tennis event for young players, which
takes place at Fiera Milano in Italy 5.00 Sky
Sports News at 5. Sports news and updates
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6. The latest
sports news and updates
6.30 Live ATP Next Gen Finals. Further coverage
of the opening day of the tennis event for
young players, which takes place in Italy
10.00 The Debate. Discussion on
the latest Premier League news
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the day?s
talking points and a look ahead to the events
that are likely to make the news tomorrow,
featuring previews and interviews
12.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Nolan Live.
Lively debate on issues affecting Northern
Ireland, with Stephen Nolan 11.40 A Question
of Sport 12.10am Junior Doctors: Blood,
Sweat and Tears (AD) 12.40 The Ganges
with Sue Perkins (r) 1.40-6.00 BBC News
Find a lifelong companion in the Times Literary Supplement,
the world?s leading international literary journal
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 10.30pm Wales Live. New
series. Weekly show featuring hard-hitting
stories and interviews 11.05 A Question of
Sport. Guests include Jamie George and Steve
Harmison 11.35 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat
and Tears (AD) 12.05am The Ganges with
Sue Perkins (r) (AD) 1.05 Weather for
the Week Ahead 1.10-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 11.15pm Spotlight. The
impact of the Personal Independence Payment
in Northern Ireland 11.45 Louis Theroux: Dark
States ? Heroin Town. Louis Theroux reports
on the rise in heroin use in America (r)
12.45am-12.50 Waterworld. Darryl Grimason
dives in Strangford Lough (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00 Permission
Impossible: Britain?s Planners. Residents
protest against a development on a green?eld
site in Cheshire (r) 1.00pm Live Bowls:
Scottish International Open. Coverage of day
?ve from the Dewars Centre in Perth
5.50-6.00 Lifeline (r) 11.15 Bowls: Scottish
International Open 12.10am-1.45 FILM: Louis
Theroux: My Scientology Movie (2015)
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BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
A journey to Marseilles (10/10) (r)
8.00 Empire of the Tsars: Romanov Russia with
Lucy Worsley. The reign of Catherine the Great
and the con?ict with Napoleonic France that
provided the setting for War and Peace (r)
9.00 Cosmonauts: How Russia Won the Space
Race. Documentary examining the Soviet Union?s
pioneering role in space exploration (r)
10.00 Detectorists. New series. The dark cloud
of a solar farm threatens the tranquillity of
the Detectorists. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.30 The League of Gentlemen. An
unsuspecting hiker visits Royston Vasey (r)
11.00 Sleuths, Spies & Sorcerers: Andrew
Marr?s Paperback Heroes. The broadcaster
explores popular genres of ?ction,
beginning with detective novels (r)
12.00 Queen Victoria?s Letters: A Monarch
Unveiled. Documentary (2/2) (r) (AD) 1.00am
Pagans and Pilgrims: Britain?s Holiest Places (r)
1.30 British Art at War: Bomberg, Sickert
and Nash (r) (AD) 2.30-3.30 Cosmonauts:
How Russia Won the Space Race (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Holly has a decision to make
that could ruin Cindy and Dirk?s relationship (AD)
7.30 Streetmate. Scarlett Moffatt helps
a woman in Birmingham ?nd a date (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: The Inbetweeners Movie (15,
2011) Awkward teenagers head to Greece for a
wild holiday. Comedy with Joe Thomas, Simon
Bird, James Buckley and Blake Harrison (AD)
11.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 Rude Tube. Internet videos showcasing
unusual talents (r) 1.00am First Dates (r) (AD)
2.05 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 3.00 Rude Tube (r)
3.55 Black-ish (r) (AD) 4.40 Charmed (r)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.45pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun. Double bill (r) 3.50 Time Team
(r) (AD) 4.55 Time Team (r) (AD)
5.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo
6.55 The Supervet. The vet must decide whether
a hip replacement on a cat is viable (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. A couple build a shed-like
family home and workspace at an old milk yard
in south-east London, but their choice of
unconventional, industrial-style materials
proves challenging (5/10) (r) (AD)
9.00 999: On the Frontline. An 89-year-old
woman refuses to go to hospital, and a war
veteran has sepsis that could kill him (9/10)
10.00 Obsessive Compulsive Country House
Cleaners. Sprucing up country estates
in dire need of attention (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A girl requires extensive
surgery after breaking her leg while scoring
a try in a rugby match (4/11) (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
A restaurant in California (r) 1.05 999: On the
Frontline (r) 2.05 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD)
3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am Guadalcanal Diary (PG, 1943)
Second World War drama starring Preston Foster
(b/w) 1.00pm The Reckless Moment (PG,
1949) Drama starring James Mason (b/w) 2.40
Gideon of Scotland Yard (PG, 1958) John
Ford?s police drama starring Jack Hawkins 4.30
The Last Frontier (PG, 1955) Western
starring Victor Mature and Robert Preston
6.35 Hugo (U, 2011) An orphan living in the
walls of a railway station in 1930s Paris
uncovers a lonely shopkeeper?s past. Martin
Scorsese?s adventure with Asa Butter?eld (AD)
9.00 Night at the Museum: Secret of the
Tomb (PG, 2014) Nightwatchman Larry
searches for a way to repair the magical artefact
that brings museum exhibits to life. Fantasy
comedy sequel starring Ben Stiller (AD)
10.55 A.C.O.D (15, 2013) A man is forced to
persuade his divorced parents to put aside their
differences so they can attend his brother?s
wedding. Comedy starring Adam Scott
12.40am Devil?s Due (15, 2014) Horror
starring Allison Miller and Zach Gilford
2.25-4.00 Of Horses and Men (15, 2013)
Comedy drama starring Ingvar Eggert Sigurdsson
6.00am The Cube: Celebrity Special (r) 6.45
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Dinner Date (r) 8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30
The Cube: Celebrity Special (r) 9.30 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20 Dinner Date (r)
11.20 Dress to Impress (r) 12.20pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 You?ve Been Framed!
Gold Top 100 Holidays (r) 1.50 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold Strikes Back! (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. The gang rushes
Judith to hospital when she goes into labour (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Charlie struggles
with his feelings for ex-?anc閑 Mia (r)
9.00 Celebrity Showmance. The three couples
stage embarrassing break-ups. Last in the series
10.00 Family Guy. Peter loses his job (r) (AD)
10.30 Family Guy. Meg is threatened (r) (AD)
11.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
11.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.00 Timewasters. Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.30am Ghosted (r) 1.00 The Keith Lemon
Sketch Show (r) 2.00 Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
8.55 Judge Judy (r) 10.15 Inspector Morse (r)
(AD) 12.30pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.35
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 3.45 Inspector Morse (r) (AD)
6.00 Heartbeat. Intrigue spreads among
the residents of Aidens?eld as a newcomer
causes havoc with her car and appears to be
hiding something (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica sets
out to clear a friend who has been
arrested in connection with the murder of a
television host (r) (AD)
8.00 Foyle?s War. Foyle is enlisted as the police
representative on the Victory Day Celebrations
Committee, but a murder puts paid to the
preparations (3/3) (r) (AD)
10.05 Lewis. The detective is faced with
a dif?cult case when he investigates the
discovery of a body in a well, and he also
has to contend with a new boss (r) (AD)
12.00 Inspector Morse (r) (AD) 2.05am
ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 8.00 Storage Wars (r)
8.25 The Sweeney (r) 9.30 Minder (r) 10.30
The Avengers (r) 11.40 The Saint (r) 12.45pm
Live Snooker: Champion of Champions. Jill
Douglas introduces coverage of the opening
session on day three from Ricoh Arena in
Coventry, featuring two group-stage semi-?nals
5.15 The Avengers. Steed suspects an
African dignitary of stealing weapons (r)
6.20 Storage Wars. A surprise visitor from
Texas attends the latest auctions (r)
6.45 Live Snooker: Champion of Champions. Jill
Douglas introduces further coverage from Ricoh
Arena, Coventry, featuring a group-stage ?nal,
as the players contest a place in the last four
11.15 FILM: Green Street (18, 2005) An
American journalism student gets kicked out of
Harvard, moves to London and joins a group of
football hooligans. Drama with Elijah Wood,
Charlie Hunnam and Claire Forlani (AD)
1.25am Ax Men. The Rygaard team refuses to
let rivals pass through its territory (r) 2.30
World Cup Top Goalscorers (r) 2.45 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.00 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice
Road Truckers 5.00 Impossible Engineering
6.00 Top Gear. The presenters chart the decline
of the British sports car industry (AD)
7.00 Top Gear. The presenters tackle the traf?c
chaos snowy weather causes in Britain (AD)
8.00 QI XL. Extended edition. Suggs, Claudia
O?Doherty, Jimmy Carr and Alan Davies attempt
to answer host Stephen Fry?s range of ?endish
questions on the theme of long-lost things
9.00 QI XL. Extended edition. With Jo Brand,
Bill Bailey, Alan Davies and James Acaster
10.00 Zapped. Brian lands a job guarding
Munty?s sacred Albino Pear Tree (AD)
10.40 Would I Lie to You? With Rebecca Front,
Jack Whitehall, Nick Hewer and Miranda Hart
11.20 Would I Lie to You? With Robert Webb,
Terry Wogan, Katy Wix and Kevin Bridges
12.00 Room 101 (AD) 12.40am Mock the Week
1.20 QI 2.00 Room 101 (AD) 2.40 8 Out of 10
Cats 3.10 Suits (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine (AD) 1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 Pie in the
Sky 5.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
6.00 A Fine Romance. Laura announces that
she is going to dinner with another man
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine.
Compo reveals a musical talent (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. The couple settle down
for a quiet evening, only to be disturbed by
ominous noises from the empty house next door
8.00 Inspector George Gently. The detective
looks into the suspicious death of an
old friend and informant, leading him to suspect
a police cover-up (2/2) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The team reopens the
case of a criminal who was killed in a ?re at
London?s Union club in 1996 (7/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Tracey and Sharon
witness a robbery committed by an acquaintance
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London?s Burning
2.00 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 Secrets of War
8.00 Buried by the Blitz: A Time Team Special
9.00 Pugin: The God of Gothic ? A Time Team
Special 10.00 Unearthing World War I 11.00
Coast (AD) 12.00 Journey to Stonehenge:
A Time Team Special 1.00pm Time Team
2.00 Wonders of the Monsoon 3.00 Coast
(AD) 4.20 The Monocled Mutineer
6.00 Great War Diaries. A French boy
witnesses the German retreat
7.00 The Last Day of WW1. An account of how
soldiers continued to be killed in battle hours
after the armistice was signed in 1918 (AD)
8.00 Unearthing World War I. David O?Keefe and
Wayne Abbott examine the battle of Vimy Ridge
9.00 The Great War in Numbers. The impact of
Russia pulling out of the war, only for the US to
join soon afterwards. Last in the series (AD)
10.00 Blackadder Goes Forth. Capt Blackadder
joins the Royal Flying Corps (AD)
10.40 The Monocled Mutineer (3/4)
12.20am Unearthing World War I 1.20 The
Great War in Numbers (AD) 2.20 Raiders
of the Lost Art (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00
The Super-Rich and Us. A look at how the
destabilisation of work life in the 1970s
drove a new pro?t culture (2/2) (r) (AD)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Crime Files. The
murder of Ermatati Rodgers 10.45 Australian
Wilderness with Ray Mears. The survivalist
visits Kangaroo Island (r) 11.15-11.45 Gino?s
Italian Coastal Escape. The island of Capri
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Bear?s Mission with Rob Brydon.
An open-door helicopter ride (AD) 12.05am
Teleshopping 1.05 After Midnight 2.35 Storage
Hoarders (r) 3.30 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 UTV Life. Stories
and studio guests 10.45 Gino?s Italian Coastal
Escape. Gino D?Acampo sails to the island of
Capri 11.15-11.45 The Harbour (r) 12.35am
Teleshopping 1.35-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puf?n Rock) (r) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san
Rioghachd Bhig (Ben & Holly?s Little Kingdom)
(r) 5.50 Treud na Dluth-choille: GradNaidheachd (Jungle Bunch) 5.55 Donnie Murdo
(Danger Mouse) 6.05 Dragonan: Reis chun an
iomaill (Dragons: Race to the Edge) 6.30 D�
a-nis? (What Now?) 7.00 Turas a? Bhradain
(The Salmon?s Journey) (r) 7.30 Speaking Our
Language (r) 7.55 Earrann Eachdraidh (History
Shorts) (r) 8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 Prosbaig
9.00 Ceum Air Cheum (First Steps) (r) 10.00
Fonn Fonn Fonn (r) 10.30 Horo Gheallaidh
(Celtic Music Sessions) (r) 11.00-12.00
Air an Rathad: Rally (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 12.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd
12.05pm Heno (r) 12.30 Cefn Gwlad (r) (AD)
1.00 Caeau Cymru (r) 1.30 Portmeirion (r)
2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da
3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05 Ar y Lein (r)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05
Stwnsh: Y Dyfnfor 5.25 Stwnsh: Ni Di Ni (r)
5.30 Stwnsh: Rhyfel Mawr Trwy Lygaid Ifanc
(r) 6.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd
Dillad (r) 6.30 Mabinogi-Ogi (r) 7.00 Heno
7.55 Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25
Mike Phillips a?r Senghenydd Sirens 9.00 News
9 a?r Tywydd 9.30 Parti Bwyd Beca 10.00 Rygbi
Pawb 10.45-11.50 Dylan ar Daith (r)
14
Wednesday November 8 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7491
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3175
5
6
24
7
17
18
14
1
13
4
Scrabble � Challenge No 1997
25
17
9
6
2
7
3
4
13
13
4
19
5
17
8
7
17
9
10
3W
20
11 12
13
2L
3W
3L
21
9
10
4
14
11
17
17
4
12
3
18
13
18
14
24
13
17
9
4
19
20
16
7
26
11
20
11
20
13
19
24
25
2L
14
25
22
7
8
13
5
17
17
14
15
14
19
13
2L
20
13
25
15
17
23
2
14
2L
7
16
9
4
25
10
2
4
7
16
18
7
13
20
13
14
6
14
13
16
19
19
7
19
19
24
9
10
4
6
2
4
7
14
4
24
17
17
17
12
18
24
1 TV play based on real
events (9)
7 Cut (with an axe) (4)
8 Lending at extortionate
rates (8)
9 Desire for drink (6)
10 Indic language (4)
12 Pig tenders (10)
Solution to Crossword 7490
D
B
BO L T HO
D O U
OS T EN
A D
A P P L E S
R E
PONCHO
F
L
S
UN I MP
S P R
MEWS E
E Y
D
J
L E UN
B
L
T A T I O
T U
ENSU
C
S T A B
W E
RE S S E
E A
X T ERN
S
TO
E
N
D
RE
I
L E
D
D
A L
Y
13
16
17
18
Apposite (2,3,5)
Public garden (4)
Deed (6)
Unfaithful wives' husbands
(8)
20 Present (4)
21 Very demanding (9)
Down
1 Arid region (6)
2 Oxford or Cambridge
college (6,7)
3 Couple, pair (3)
4 Concerned with beauty (9)
5 Liable to mishaps (8-5)
6 Provided with a mount (6)
11 Former coins (9)
14 Tropical flowering plant (6)
15 Acknowledgement; believe
(6)
19 Variety of lettuce (3)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
13
24
7
16
7
20
12
7
24
1
2
3
4
5
6
Q
14
15
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
M
16
17
18
19
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica
No 3995
N
No 3996
O
G
A
I
H
E
H
L
N
T
S
T
N
R
O
N
W
U
R
V
I
N
I
M
E
C
N
S
T
W
U
E
A
G
M
C
I
F
U
O
A
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4167
Futoshiki No 3038
<
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
?
?
5
3W
H
I
2L
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE� is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ㎝attel 2017
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
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Or enter by phone. Call 09012
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by midnight. Leave your three
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24
?
29
16
4
24
3
15
4
36
4
6
4
36
7
4
?
2L
Kakuro No 1997
>
>
G
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
F
3L
What's the highest score using
the X with this rack?
21
D
E
AEGNOTX
M Q
20
2L
What's the highest score using
the J with this rack?
16
19
C
2W
aeJprtu
17
18
a
2L
m 2W
e 2W
done
i 2L
2L
c
e 2L
2L
A
B
2W
16
6
3
13
<
6
22
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
6
15
19
27
15
7
4
4
3
19
3
10
16
20
19
16
4
>
29
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
4
13
6
37
4
16
17
17
8
4
6
� PUZZLER MEDIA
8
14 15
the times | Wednesday November 8 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Levon Aronian
Black: Ioannis Papaioannou
European Teams, Crete 2017
English Opening
1 c4 e5 2 g3 c6 3 Nf3 e4 4 Nd4 d5
5 cxd5 Qxd5 6 Nc2 Nf6
Also possible is 6 ... e3, when
White is obliged to respond 7 f3.
However, after the further 7 ...
exd2+ 8 Bxd2 followed by Nc3,
Black will lose a lot of time rescuing his queen from attacks by
White?s knights.
7 Nc3 Qh5 8 Ne3 Bc5 9 Qc2 Qe5
10 Bg2 Bxe3
A capture that leaves White
with a rather ugly pawn structure.
In compensation White has the
bishop pair and the open f-file.
11 fxe3 Bf5 12 b4
A new move, designed to motorise his dark-squared bishop on to
________
醨D D 4kD]
�DnDp0p]
� DpDqDbD]
轉PDnD D ]
� D DpD D]
蹹QH ) ) ]
跴G )PDB)]
贒 $ DRI ]
谅媚牌侨
17 ... N7f6
Black immediately goes astray.
He must concentrate his reserves
on the queenside with 17 ... Rfc8.
18 Nxd5 Nxd5
If 18 ... cxd5 19 Rc7 is very
strong. Trading queens with 18 ...
Qxd5 clearly leads to similar, yet
even worse, consequences.
19 Rc5 Rfd8 20 bxc6 bxc6 21
Qc4 Rac8 22 Rc1 h5 23 Rxc6
Rxc6 24 Qxc6 Qg4 25 Qb5 h4 26
gxh4 Qxh4 27 Bd4 Kh7 28 Rf1
Qg4 29 Rf2 Qe6 30 Qb1 Nf6 31
Qb3 Qe7 32 Rf1 Ng4 33 h3 Nh6
34 Rf4 Qg5 35 Bc3 Qg3 36 Qb7
Bf5 37 Qe7 Rb8 38 Rf1 f6 39
Bxf6 Qg6 40 Bc3 Rb5 41 Qh4
Black resigns
________
醨DkD DrD] Winning Move
郉 D D )p]
遬DqD D D] White to play. This position is from
Crete 2017.
轌 gbD ! ] Yilmazyerli-Sadiku,
White has overwhelming pressure for the
� DpD D D] sacrificed piece. He now made excellent
蹹 D D D ] use of all the open lines with a fine
跴DP) DP)] combination. Can you see it?
贒 D $RDK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
31 - Psychology and Table feel
(1) If they don?t cover, they
haven?t got it
Missing just ?K2, the odds very
narrowly favour the drop, playing
?A. But any winning player
knows how to play the suit. Cross
to dummy and lead ?Q. Maybe
East will cover from ?K2 and end
your problems; or flinch and give
the show away. If he plays low in
normal fashion, you?ll rise with
?A. Note, it costs you nothing to
cross to dummy to lead ?Q.
Consider this two-way guess for a
missing queen:
Dummy
?A102
West
East
Declarer
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
?KJ9
You?d much rather the opponents
?Q 6 3
?7 5
led the suit but say this isn?t possi?6 5 3 2
ble. There?s a psychological gambit
?A K 10 3
to improve your chances.
?K 7 2
Lead ?J. It could be right for
?9 8 5 4
N
?Q 10 6 2
?K J 9 4 3
W E
West to cover ?J with ?Q ?
?9 8 7
S
?K 10
should the layout be like this:
?7 6 4
?5 2
Dummy
? A J 10
Contract: 3NT ? A 8
?A102
?AQ J 4
West
East
Lead: ? 4
?Q J 9 8
?Q75 Declarer ?K986
S
W
N
E
?J43
2NT
Pass
3NT
End
So West may cover ?J with ?Q.
Problem solved. Or West may
West leads ?4 to ?Q and you
flinch. But as we know, he who may as well win ?A (confidently).
hesitates is lost. If West pauses, With seven top tricks, you must
which he is not permitted to do guess which finesse to take (spade
with only low cards, you run ?J.
or diamond). Taking a losing
If West plays low on ?J in a rel- finesse will be fatal, for a flurry of
atively bored fashion, play East for hearts will follow.
?Q. Rise with ?A and lead back
Best is to cross to ?A at trick two
to ?9. It?s a good gambit ? but then lead ?Q (key play). May not
you do need ?9 for it to work. The East cover with ?K ? it?ll be hard
great Zia Mahmood summarised it for him not to? If East plays low in
well some years ago: ?If they don?t tempo, rise with ?A and rely on
cover, they haven?t got it?.
diamonds. You cross to ?10 and
Take this suit:
lead ?2 to ?J. If successful, you
Dummy
cross to ?K and lead ?3 to ?Q.
?Q753
Against most Easts (who?ll cover
?Q with ?K), you?ll succeed
Declarer
unless West holds both ?K and
?AJ109864
?K. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
EASY
MEDIUM
HARDER
50
HALF OF
IT
+7
+ 49
83 DOUBLE
IT
45
x5
7/15
OF IT
�
SQUARE
IT
?7
SQUARE 1/3 DOUBLE
IT
IT
OF IT
� 5 + 181 + 1/4
OF IT
+ 516 + 1/3
OF IT
� 8 ? 27
TREBLE
IT
OF IT
5/6
�
+ 21
CUBE
IT
? 135
5/6
x 11
OF IT
2
2
2 5
6
Polygon
Killer Tricky No 5711
3
19
17min
14
19
20
14
23
25
7
21
15
19
21
3
29
17
8
13
Killer Deadly No 5712
9
7
56min
16
5
20
26
8
21
27
8 9
9 7 6
8
8 6 9
9 8
7 9
7 5
2 4 3
1 2
3 1
+
-
1 4
3 2
6
1
2
1
4 2
8 6
5 1
9
7
1
3
8
5
9
2
4
6
8
6
9
2
7
4
1
5
3
3
2
8
7
6
5
4
1
9
=
1
=
45
5
9
1
4
3
8
6
2
7
9
4
7
6
8
2
5
3
1
6
8
5
1
4
3
9
7
2
1
3
2
5
9
7
8
6
4
5
8
1
2
4
6
3
7
9
9
2
7
8
3
1
5
4
6
4
3
6
9
5
7
2
8
1
1
5
3
7
8
2
6
9
4
2
7
4
5
6
9
1
3
8
8
6
9
3
1
4
7
2
5
7
1
5
4
9
3
8
6
2
3
9
8
6
2
5
4
1
7
6
4
2
1
7
8
9
5
3
7
6
4 1
2 3
4
2
1 5
7
3 4
2
1
4
2
B
L
O
C
K
B
U
S
T
E
R
2
1
3
6
8
2
4
5
7
1
3
9
5
7
3
9
1
6
2
4
8
3
2
4
7
6
5
8
1
9
7
6
8
1
3
9
2
4
5
17
6
14
3
8
9
1
4
2
8
3
6
5
7
5
9
1
2
4
8
7
6
3
5
13
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
6
6
3
9
5
6
4
1
7
8
2
7
4
8
5
2
9
3
6
1
1
3
6
7
9
4
8
2
5
8
2
9
1
3
5
4
7
6
4
5
7
8
6
2
9
1
3
4
2
4
7
2
5
1
3
6
9
8
6
8
5
4
9
2
1
3
7
1
3
9
8
7
6
4
5
2
2
5
6
3
8
1
9
7
4
8
1
7
9
5
4
3
2
6
9
4
3
6
2
7
5
8
1
2
2
1
3
2 > 1
5
?
2
4
2
5
�
+
9
4
2
5
?
?
3 < 4
5
3
7
1
-
+
-
�
1
3
8
4
x
-
2
+
6
x
x
4
7
1
5
9
3
8
2
6
9
6
2
1
8
7
3
5
4
1
8
4
9
6
5
2
7
3
5
3
6
2
7
1
9
4
8
7
2
9
3
4
8
5
6
1
2
1
8
7
5
4
6
3
9
3
9
7
6
1
2
4
8
5
6
4
5
8
3
9
7
1
2
S
H
R
I
A
R
L
O
O
T
I
P
U
N
O
I
B
O
N
T
D
Y
Lexica 3994
3 > 1
4
4
8
5
3
4
2
6
1
9
7
Lexica 3993
Set Square 1999
6 2
3
Suko 2076
Sudoku 9438
2
6
1
3
7
8
5
9
4
1 < 3
3
10
Scrabble 1996
WOODLARK
H8 across (55)
IMPUGNED
A8 across (126)
H Y
I
B
P RO
P
O
ON T
L
CR E
G
I NG
N
I
F I N
E
G
RK
6
1
Futoshiki 3037
11
18
E V E R Y
I T C
O
Y
B O
I D
E X E R T
K
A
HAR
CUB
F
A I L
E AR
U Z Z
O
L
A
OU T
OWN
P UR
H AW K
N
J
L F
S CAR F
I
P
R
L
S T E AM QU I
Killer 5710
Cell Blocks 3057
4
=
18
Sudoku 9437
4
7
6
9
2
1
3
8
5
9
22
24
�
5 > 2
15
x
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 32 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
= 3 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Codeword 3174
2
8 1
9 6
7 4
5
3
3
1
2 7
6 8
KenKen 4166
18
+
All the digits
= 36 from 1-9 are
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
8
25
1
+
6
�
4
12
2
x
x
Killer 5709
30
4 2
Solutions
2
5
4
3
1
6
7
9
8
24
8
6 2
+
+
Sudoku 9436
12
4
Kakuro 1996
15
25
4
5
x
Yesterday?s answers
ace, ache, acme, ahem, amice, ape,
came, cape, cep, chape, cheap, chime,
each, epic, haem, heap, hem, hemp,
hep, hie, ice, impeach, mace, mache,
meh, pace, pea, peach, pec, pie
18
3
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 2000
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 15 words, average;
21, good; 25, very good; 29, excellent
17
2
2
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Grandmaster Levon Aronian from
Armenia is a three-times winner
of the gold medal in the World
Chess Olympiad. He is also the
most highly rated competitor in
the European Team Chess Championship, which finished yesterday in Crete. In today?s game
Aronian deftly increases his advantage after an opening in which he
acquires the bishop pair at the
expense of an unusual and somewhat clumsy central pawn structure.
Games and results from Crete
can found via the 2seeitlive link
on the header of The Times Twitter feed @times_chess. For regular updates, direct to your Twitter
account, just click on the ?follow?
button.
its most promising diagonal. This
varies from Anand-Adams, Shamkir 2015, which continued 12 0-0
0-0 13 b3.
12 ... 0-0
The bold 12 ... h5 13 Bb2 h4 fails
to 14 Na4 Qd5 15 Bxf6 gxf6 16
Nc3.
13 Bb2 Nbd7 14 0-0 Qe6 15 b5
Bg6 16 Qb3 Nd5 17 Rac1
White is developing a promising initiative on the queenside.
True, his bishop on g2 is currently
entombed but Black?s bishop on
g6 is similarly obstructed.
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Gold standard
Cell Blocks No 3058
Brain Trainer
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Chess Raymond Keene
-
Quiz 1 Grange Hill 2 Richard III 3 The Snowman
4 Nico Muhly 5 Robert McKee 6 Satsuma
Rebellion 7 Michael Ancram (Marquess of
Lothian) 8 Gazprom 9 John Masefield
10 The modern macaron 11 Villi (singular: villus)
12 Balenciaga 13 The Supremes 14 Sa鷏 羖varez.
Canelo, which means ?cinnamon? in Spanish,
is a nickname for people with red hair
15 Mao Zedong
S
I
X
A
B
P
T
G
L
E
O
W
R
A
A
A
I
R
P
O
O
D
L
E
Word watch
Illecebrous (c) Enticing,
tending to attract
Elflock (b) A lock of hair
tangled as if by an elf
Ichor (a) The liquid that
was said to flow in the
veins of Greek gods
Brain Trainer
Easy 75; Medium 377;
Harder 3,795
Chess 1 Rf8+! Bxf8 2 Qd8+
Kb7 3 Rb1+ is decisive,
eg, 3 ... Ka7 4 Bb6+ Kb7
5 Bd4+ winning
08.11.17
MindGames
Difficult No 9439
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Fiendish No 9440
5
6
4
3
8
1
3
5
Ichor
a Divine blood
b A naval weight
c Scratchy
Answers on page 15
5
7
3 8
4 5
3
2
3
12 Which fashion
house makes the
�5 Triple S trainer?
15
6 The 1877 Battle of
Shiroyama was the
final engagement of
which samurai revolt?
Gas Industry converted
into a corporation?
9 Who wrote the
children?s novels The
Midnight Folk and The
Box of Delights?
7 Which former
Conservative party
deputy leader is the
only marquess in the
House of Lords?
10 The creation of
which meringue-based
confection has been
credited to both Pierre
Desfontaines of Ladur閑
and Claude Gerbet?
8 Which company was
created in 1989 when
the Soviet Ministry of
4
5
8
13 In 1967, Cindy
Birdsong replaced
Florence Ballard as
a member of which
Motown act?
Yesterday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 956
14 Which Mexican
boxer, whose sole
professional defeat
came against Floyd
Mayweather, is
known as ?Canelo??
15 Which 20th-century
leader is pictured?
Answers on page 15
12
21
7
11
13
14
16
19
6
15
17
18
20
22
D
O
W
N
C
A
S
T
UMB
O F F
A
B
R
I N SOME
I
N
E
Z O
H AOS
A
I
T A T I ONM
I
G
WR A P U P
O
S M S
I M
L L AMA
I
L
N
A
PO L YMA T H
S T AGE
T
D
A
AMA S S
I
M Y
D I A C
N
P
A S T E R
C
O
CR AMP
E
R O
P R E S S
T
N
A
F A L L
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Flamande
9
10
8 7
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
11 The inside wall of
the small intestine is
lined with which tiny,
finger-like projections?
The Times Quick Cryptic No 957
1
1
6
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
2 Which 15th-century
king is Benedict
Cumberbatch?s second
cousin 16 times removed?
5 Which creative writing
instructor (b 1941)
wrote the book Story:
Substance, Structure,
Style, and the Principles
of Screenwriting?
6
2 4
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone
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