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The Times Times 2 - 9 January 2018

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January 9 | 2018
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Should you f
?
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b
a
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By Polly Vernon
Angelina Jolie,
Kate Beckinsale
and Margot Robbie
2
1G T
Tuesday January 9 2018 | the times
times2
#TimesUp and
Bosses are using more
swear words. Frankly, I
don’t give a **** about it
Hannah Betts
F
riends, I bring you
breaking business news:
the world’s top execs are
using more profanity in
their working lives. In an
analysis of conference
calls between chief
executives and sharemarket analysts — occasions not
famed for their rhetorical bravura —
shits, f***s and pisses are on the up,
according to the news website Quartz.
Where once bosses would drone on
about quarterly-earnings performance,
now they pepper their conversation
with expletives, designed to add colour
and build empathy, almost as if they
were in possession of personalities.
Well, it’s a thumbs-up from me, boys
and insufficient numbers of girls. I
f***ing love swearing in all its ancient,
anarchic, utterly joyous configurations,
such that a friend who shuns
expletives will occasionally allow
himself a “Hannah word”. In my
previous life as a junior academic, I
gave a lecture to the august American
body, the Modern Languages
Association, home of the boffier type
of boffin. At its close, a dazed listener
announced: “You are to the c-word
what Tarantino is to the f-word.”
There’s something peculiarly British
about a passion for profanity. We like
to tell ourselves we’re being robustly
Anglo-Saxon. We’re not. Nothing that
survives from that era could seriously
be considered a swear word, merely
the pallid “arse”, “fart,” “shit,” “turd”
and “bollock”. The f-word appeared in
the 13th century and was considered
so outrageous it wasn’t written down
until 1475, and then only in cipher.
Still, swearing fits our notion of a
plain-speaking, mead-swigging people
running about thwacking things.
Ask citizens of other countries
whether their nations curse and they
will say: “Yes, but not like you.” They
do it, of course, but not with the
peculiar flourish that makes it
Blighty’s adult idiolect: ambient,
percussive, like some collective glottal
stop. Swearing has been found to
foster solidarity, make life’s hurts less
painful and improve communication.
It has certainly gained me work.
I was once brought on to a project
to give advice to the head of a
company who liked to have it
delivered through a podcast while
on his morning jog. “Get that f-word
woman,” he demanded. “She really
means it. Plus she makes me run.”
Periodically, a reader will write and
ask whether I will ever write an article
without using profanity, and the truth
is that I can’t. In an article I recently
wrote for another publication, a feeble
“bloody” was changed to “flipping”.
Really? Still, it’s the people who fear
swearing who give the activity its
power — without their fetishisation
these totems would lack magic.
Often no other word will suffice.
As Billy Connolly remarked: “A lot of
people say that it’s a lack of vocabulary
that makes you swear. Rubbish. I know
thousands of words, but I still prefer
‘f***’.” The c-word is a fairy godmother
of a term, instantly transforming
any given situation. Besides, I’m a
journalist. I don’t have shorthand, I no
longer drink. Swearing is all I have.
Gwyneth
consciously
couples
Obviously the world’s
most pressing news is
the engagement of
the actress, spokesflake
and arbiter of all
nonsense Gwyneth
Paltrow to her partner,
Brad Falchuk.
Yesterday the golden
one announced her
news with the words,
“We feel incredibly
lucky to have come
together at this
juncture in our lives
when our collective
successes and failures
can serve as building
blocks for a healthy and
happy relationship” —
at which point the
watching world became
overwhelmed with
How sexy can you go while engaging
in a mass protest? The Golden Globes
delivered an answer, says Polly Vernon
We beat
the French
on fashion
In a reversal of
stereotypes, the British
have been found to
spend more on dressing
à la mode than their
friends across the
Channel. Les rosbifs
blow more than £1,000
on new clobber every
year, Frogs a mere
£600. Overall,
expenditure on clothing
and shoes accounted
for only 3.7 per cent of
the household budget
in France, compared
with a fashion-forward
5.6 per cent over here.
Gallic types would
maintain that this is
because the French
are buying better —
investment dressing
rather than the slavish
following of fashion.
Anyone who has been
to France will tell you
that it’s because the
French dress incredibly
conservatively, their
aim not to look like
style gurus such as
Lou Doillon, but their
own mothers.
One may unearth
a few fashion mavens
within a three-mile
radius of the Rue
Saint-Honoré.
Otherwise, French
dressing is dominated
by a bon chic, bon
genre-emulating
tyranny of sensible
shoes and padded
jackets. Radical they
are not.
Robert Crampton
is away
nausea and couldn’t
continue. The
declaration coincided
with the unveiling of
Paltrow’s first cover for
Goop magazine, with
the pair looking
preppily amorous
in a commercially
convenient fashion.
Only, imagine the
bridal prep! Coffee
enemas, jade eggs
where the sun don’t
shine, and that’s just
the groom.
There’s also talk
of Paltrow’s former
spouse, Chris Martin,
walking his ex down
the aisle. Because one
husband passing on his
property to another —
that’s totally liberating.
T
he desire to be cynical
about “Hollywood
people” is strong. What
do they know, those
gilded, preening,
professional narcissists,
with their teeth, their
per diems, their
divorces and demands? What can
they tell us about life?
So it was that in mid-December,
when plans were mooted to “black
out” the 2018 Golden Globes
ceremony by inviting all attendees to
wear black as a show of support for
victims of sexual abuse and
harassment, an extension of the
#MeToo campaign that erupted
online after allegations against the
producer Harvey Weinstein,
coordinated under the umbrella of a
new hashtag (#TimesUp) people
griped. Snarked. Bitched and moaned.
They called it lazy, they called it
“slacktivism”. They pointed out that
black frocks are easily come by and
famously slimming.
At the rawer end of the critical
spectrum Rose McGowan, one of a
number of actresses alleging that they
were raped by Weinstein, tweeted
(then deleted the tweet) at Meryl
Streep, conflating the proposed
blackout with an erasing. “Your silence
is the problem,” McGowan told Streep.
(Streep later responded: “I wasn’t
deliberately silent. I didn’t know.”)
Meanwhile — as the New York
designer Naeem Khan remade in black
a gold dress intended for Christina
Hendricks — Robin Givhan, the
fashion critic on The Washington Post,
expressed her discomfort over the
proposed dress code. “Taking the fizz
out of fashion is . . . regressive. It
smacks of sexism to say, even
indirectly, that fashion — the
quintessential realm of women —
must be shunned in order for women
to be taken seriously . . . mostly it reads
like the proper response to sexual
harassment is to change one’s attire.”
In the event it turned out that
Hollywood’s women were right.
McGowan and Givhan’s (legitimate)
concerns were unfounded, and those
of us who consider ourselves too clever
to be moved by the machinations of
movie stars were in fact greatly moved
by the machinations of movie stars.
The Golden Globes 2018 blackout
read like a show of strength. A
demonstration of unity. A co-opting
of an environment and a game that
has for a very long time told women
what they should do and how they
should look while they’re doing it —
in that it was the women, finally, who
made those decisions (while male
attendees seemed to be a support act
to the greater point).
While the blackout ensured — as
was intended — that no one woman
stole the show aesthetically, Oprah
Winfrey stole it spiritually, accepting
her Cecil B DeMille award with a
speech that heralded “a new day . . . on
the horizon”. This sentiment might
have seemed hollow, hammy or
clichéd had it not been delivered to
a roomful of applauding black-clad
megastars who had spontaneously
taken to their feet.
The Golden Globes blackout
worked, first and foremost, because it
looked right. Of course it did. This is
Hollywood. Knowing what’s going to
work visually is its core skill. In other
hands mass black would have looked
funereal. A deadening down, a giving
up and hiding away. Yet the desire to
be glamorous, to perpetuate a fantasy
of glamour for the delectation of the
outside world, is so deeply embedded
in the Hollywood psyche that no
participant in this blackout could be
anything but glamorous.
That urge to glamour — which is
often presumed to dilute credibility —
is the single factor that made this
blackout, lending it potency and
defiance when it could have seemed
drab and meek. Angelina Jolie did it
with feather-trimmed black tulle
Versace. Kendall Jenner with sweeping
Giambattista Valli couture. Jessica Biel
with strapless tulle and velvet and the
cast of Big Little Lies with satin,
sequins and sheer panels. Sharon
Stone went with geometric cut-outs,
The urge to be
glamorous gave
this blackout
its potency
Margot Robbie tested the limits on
“blackout” with silver-embossed, but
otherwise black Gucci. Claire Foy
wore a tuxedo suit matching that worn
by her Crown co-star Matt Smith, a
symbol of cross-gender unity — which
also looked fantastically sexy.
Ah, but how sexy can one
reasonably go while participating
in a mass protest against the sexual
exploitation of women? Catherine
Zeta-Jones (in sequin-embedded black
lace by Zuhair Murad) said on the
night, “The dress code didn’t say
anything about not looking our best,”
which is true, and yet . . . isn’t it the case
that Hollywood ideals on “looking
your best” were established by men? If
you choose to sexualise yourself in the
same way that powerful men had been
forcing you to sexualise yourself in the
past, how useful is that to your cause?
Aren’t you reiterating a visual
originally conceived to titillate rapey
male producers? Or does the fact of
your choosing alone constitute a
reappropriation of the aesthetic? In
short, how much flesh can you flash
in a blackout?
This debate was played out
via a schism on the red carpet. A
pronounced (if highly coutured)
modesty prevailed in some quarters.
Shailene Woodley wore a turtlenecked, houndstooth-check full-length
the times | Tuesday January 9 2018
3
1G T
times2
the power of a black dress code
COVER AND BELOW: GETTY IMAGES
Kerry
Washington
Claire
Foy
Penélope
Cruz
Salma
Hayek
Shailene
Woodley
Catherine
Zeta-Jones
Nicole
Kidman
ball gown from Ralph Lauren.
Alicia Vikander wore longsleeved, high-necked Louis Vuitton
with minimal make-up and little
jewellery (hair scraped back,
expression serious). Neither showed
an inch of flesh anywhere other
than on their hands and face.
Others (Kate Beckinsale, Sharon
Stone, Mariah Carey, Kate Hudson)
unleashed quantities of cleavage that
can only be described as epic — a
gesture that could signal defiance,
although it’s not entirely clear who,
or what, was being defied. The most
popular way to flash skin, to deliver an
on-message sort of sexiness, was with
exposed shoulders, shoulders being the
most grown-up of the available
erogenous zones. Kerry Washington,
Jessica Biel, Alison Brie and Emilia
Clarke bared theirs. Reese Witherspoon
of Big Little Lies — who walked the red
carpet with a pregnant Eva Longoria
— got her left shoulder out, while
Tarana Burke — the activist Michelle
Williams invited as her plus-one —
exposed her right. Saoirse Ronan
faked a shoulder flash with an
The
unknowns
who didn’t
get the
memo
Meher
Tatna
Blanca
Blanco
Barbara
Meier
angular silver shoulder pad. Winfrey
and Streep got theirs out for real.
How did the men cope? While the
blackout had less impact on their dress
(black tuxes being the order of this
night as any other), they necessarily
looked as if they were doing their bit.
They certainly knew that the evening
wasn’t really about them — even if
they won. They wore #TimesUp
pins. They hung back, kept quiet. They
sucked it up when Natalie Portman
took to the stage to reveal the shortlist
for best director, which, she paused to
note, featured “all male nominees”. In
their shifting awkwardness, their
tentative posturing, in the joke
presenter Seth Meyers cracked
(“For the male nominees in the room
tonight, this is the first time in three
months that it won’t be terrifying to
hear your name being read out
loud”) there was a faint promise of
behaviours newly checked, of past
incidents re-evaluated.
Who won? Who cares?
The Golden Globes 2018
was a protest event first,
an awards ceremony second.
Hollywood has more fights on
its hands than it does reasons to
celebrate. If awards events are relevant
any more, they are relevant as glitzy,
high-profile expressions of shifting
power dynamics and altering values.
What, then, will the consequences
of the Golden Globes blackout be? If
it doesn’t symbolise the end of sexual
harassment in the workplace, or the
immediate correcting of the gender
pay gap, it probably does signify the
death of worst-dressed lists, of WHAT
WAS SHE THINKING-style
commentary. It challenges the
assumption that women coexist in a
constant state of competition with
each other — sexual, fashionable,
professional — if just a little.
It sets up a terrifying precedent for
the Oscars and the Baftas, both of
which must find ways of building
on the blackout triumph without
seeming as though they’re trying to
outdo it. And it does mean that the
fallback position of eyebrow-arched,
eye-rolling cynicism regarding
anything Hollywood does, or says, or
thinks, or feels, is no longer tenable.
4
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Tuesday January 9 2018 | the times
times2
Why I believe
Darkest Hour
is good history
Gary Oldman
as Winston
Churchill in
Darkest Hour
So what if it’s not
all accurate? The
Churchill film is a
convincing picture
of the times, says
Lawrence James
D
arkest Hour has the
panache, pace, wit
and authenticity of
its place and time.
London’s public
buildings were tinged
with grime, cars were
a uniform black and
people in the streets wore subdued
colours and looked shabby. People
smoked cigarettes often and everywhere.
Above all Darkest Hour is a concise
and convincing distillation of the
events of May 1940. It reveals how
Churchill was propelled to power after
a fiery Commons debate that slashed
the majority of the Conservative prime
minister, Neville Chamberlain. He
immediately resigned. In the teeth of
hostility from his predecessor, King
George VI and a knot of Tory MPs,
Churchill became prime minister at
the head of a coalition with the
Labour Party. Labour’s leader, Clement
Attlee, insisted that its members would
serve only if Churchill headed the
government. Churchill’s enemies
continued to conspire against him.
The new prime minister faced a
sequence of crises that placed Britain
in peril. Within three weeks German
forces scythed through the
Netherlands and Belgium, the French
army buckled and 300,000 Allied
soldiers were stranded and encircled at
Dunkirk. Meanwhile, Churchill was
fending off political enemies at home
in the shape of Chamberlain and the
former foreign secretary Lord Halifax,
who wanted a compromise peace with
Hitler. Both were backed by Tory
backbenchers. At the same time, the
new prime minister had to enkindle
the fighting spirit of the people and
prepare them for what he predicted
would be a harrowing struggle. Victory
would be achieved in time, but for the
foreseeable future he and Britain, in
his own words (in life and on the
screen), would just have to “keep
buggering on”.
This is the stuff of Shakespearean
epic history. The playwright would
have identified the Churchill of
1940 as such a man, the servant of
his and his nation’s destiny, bound by
providence to fulfil the former and
rescue the other.
The screen Churchill — brilliantly
created by the director Joe Wright and
the leading actor, Gary Oldman —
resembles Shakespeare’s Henry V.
Both were men with wayward pasts
and reputations for unreliability:
Darkest Hour has Churchill’s critics
recalling his defection from the Tories
Churchill
in 1945
to the Liberals, the Gallipoli debacle
and his quixotic support for King
Edward VIII during the abdication
crisis. Like Henry, Churchill redeems
himself through his gift of a stirring
rhetoric laced with appeals to past
triumphs and evocations of the native
stamina and courage of the people.
Future generations would honour
them, as Churchill acknowledged in
his “finest hour” speech.
Heroic leadership demanded the
making of hard judgments. The
medieval king and the modern prime
minister steel themselves to make
brutal decisions. Henry V ordered the
massacre of French prisoners during
a crucial moment at Agincourt.
Oldman’s Churchill orders the
garrison at Calais to sacrifice
themselves in a suicidal defence to
relieve pressure on the troops at the
Dunkirk beaches. Ministers and
generals are appalled, but an
imperious Churchill overrides them.
In vividly chilling sequences, the
Lawrence James is the
author of Churchill and
Empire: Portrait of an
Imperialist (Phoenix)
Calais defenders are blown to pieces
by Luftwaffe bombs.
As leaders in war, both had to win
hearts and minds. Henry V wanders
incognito among his soldiers to hear
what they feel about his war and their
predicament — that “little touch of
Harry in the night”. In Darkest Hour,
Churchill follows his example. He
takes the Tube to Westminster on the
day when he must outface his political
enemies. He is a patrician, so this is
his first journey on the Underground.
He is recognised, chats to his fellow
passengers and listens to their views as
to why the country is at war and what
its aims should be.
His fellow passengers are working
and lower middle-class men, women
and children. They will not be bullied
by the loathsome braggart Hitler and
are keen to get stuck in with Churchill
and save their country.
A little touch of Winston on the
Circle Line works. His confidence
reinforced, he returns to the political
fray to rally wobbling Tory MPs with
resolute words and to scotch the
intrigues of Chamberlain and Halifax.
This incident, like Henry V’s
nocturnal conversations, did not
occur. It is a theatrical device by which
the forces of history are presented in a
dramatic form. We know that in May
1940 an uncertain and fearful nation
had to be steeled for what Churchill
secretly knew would be a long and
corrosive ordeal. He discovers that
the British have the necessary grit
and guts, and that his oratory can
the times | Tuesday January 9 2018
5
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times2
THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES
‘Clementine threw a
bowl of spinach at him’
By Nicholas Soames
T
Churchill and his
wife, Clementine,
in 1947
Kristin Scott Thomas
as Clementine and
Oldman as Churchill
in Darkest Hour,
released this Friday
rouse them to shed the “blood, toil,
tears and sweat” that he had already
demanded of them. His famous
speeches are central to Darkest Hour
and add verisimilitude.
Cinema has inherited the ability of
theatre to transform dramatic history
into high drama. The process involves
a degree of distortion: continuity and
momentum require the editing of
events and the invention of scenes.
like that of Churchill on the Tube.
Characters must be written out since
they may confuse or impede the plot.
Among those excluded from Darkest
Hour are the former prime minister
David Lloyd George, influential
newspaper owners such as Lord
Beaverbrook and Churchill’s faithful
courtier, Brendan Bracken. The vital
role of Attlee and the Labour Party
in strengthening Churchill’s coalition
is underplayed.
Others are brought out of the
shadows. Darkest Hour shows how
much Churchill owed to his wife,
Clementine, played with imaginative
flair by Kristin Scott Thomas.
Thanks in large part to the actress’s
suggestions, the script portrays her as
a lady with an independent spirit,
devoted to her husband, equal to his
tantrums and bluster and sympathetic
to his misgivings and lapses of
confidence. Oldman creates a
credible Churchill, a mercurial figure,
alternately hectoring and consoling
his staff, and a host to doubts about his
fitness for a task that he believes he
was born to undertake. Cigars and
Gary
Oldman
creates a
credible
Churchill,
a mercurial
figure
tumblers of whisky sustain him, which
may astonish a generation that
expects its leaders to be abstemious.
Is Darkest Hour good history? Yes,
in so far as it conveys the atmosphere
of the period and delivers the essence
of a complex story in a clear and
exciting way. Unlike its written
counterpart, cinema history is a work
of art designed to enthral with words.
We watch the turbulent Commons
debates and imagine that we are there,
and rightly so, for they reproduce the
fuzzy photographs illicitly taken by the
Tory MP John Moore-Brabazon.
Like many other films in the
historical genre, such as David Lean’s
Lawrence of Arabia, Darkest Hour is
about men and events that have
mutated into legends that have
entered into our collective memory.
These legends may not be a wholly
truthful record of the past, but they
are history as it ought to have been,
an attractive array of dazzling
tableaux of great men and women
and their inspirational deeds.
Churchill was one of these titans.
Few would challenge the judgment
of the historian AJP Taylor, who
called him the saviour of his country.
Yet as Darkest Hour reminds us,
Churchill achieved this through his
faith in ordinary people, whom he
asked to follow him into a frightening
unknown. He understood the fortitude
and plain bloody-mindedness of the
British people and harnessed it. It
worked: the darkest hour was followed
by the finest hour.
here have been some very
good depictions of my
grandfather on film — and
also some appalling ones.
One was so bad that I
walked out halfway through. This
film, however, is a triumph. Gary
Oldman’s performance is nothing
short of a masterpiece and Kristin
Scott Thomas is remarkable. At one
moment in the film I closed my eyes
and I thought it was my grandmother
speaking. It is also extremely moving
— what my mother used to call a
“two-handkerchief film”.
I knew Churchill as an affectionate
grandfather. My grandmother was
my grandmother, rather than
Clementine Churchill. I never heard
her speak about the war.
By the time I was old enough to
have a proper, adult conversation
with my grandfather he was in great
old age and frail. I never discussed
the war with him, because I was a
child, nor did I even realise until I got
older that he was the person he was:
my parents were very careful in not
allowing us to see the great adulation
surrounding him. One of the few
moments when it broke through was
when I arrived at one of my siblings’
christenings holding my grandfather’s
hand, and saw thousands of people
lining the street to greet him.
As I grew older I developed a sense
of what they were both like. Theirs
was a remarkable marriage, based on
two remarkable people. Winston is
the one we all know about, but my
grandmother was in every way his
equal, an exceptional woman. We
were in awe of her.
Although nobody could be married
to Winston Churchill for that long
without the odd passage of arms.
Theirs was a fiery relationship. There
is a mark on the wall at Chartwell
where Clementine threw a bowl of
spinach at him. One of her most
remarkable qualities was that she
was without fear — she was probably
the only person prepared to tell my
grandfather where to get off.
The rows were political as well as
domestic. Theirs was a large family,
my grandfather was away a lot
and Clementine worried about
his spending — he could
be profligate. So, yes,
their marriage was
fiery, but it was also
based on a bedrock
of respect and
understanding.
Clementine played
a huge role in
my grandfather’s
life, the most
important of all.
The central
performances in
this film capture all
of this. The stars’
preparation was
extraordinary. Oldman
Nicholas Soames with
Winston Churchill, his
grandfather, in 1954
locked himself in a shed and went
over Churchill’s speeches until he got
them right. Scott Thomas spent an
immense amount of time reading
about Clementine, visiting Chartwell
and speaking to my sisters, Charlotte
and Emma. She doesn’t look like
Clementine, but she gets my
grandmother to a T.
One of the nice details is the way in
which Scott Thomas wears her hair:
it is in a sort of handkerchief done up
behind, which was what Clementine
did. Clementine was worried that if
she appeared in public in all her
finery that this might look snooty, so
she adopted the headgear worn by
the girls and women in the munitions
factories. When she and Churchill
went to visit women whose homes
had been bombed she could thus be
seen wearing the same headgear as
they were.
The title of the film is Darkest
Hour and I think it was indeed
Churchill’s. The whole of the British
Expeditionary Force had to be got
out of France — and it was, which
was an extraordinary feat, yet they
had to leave their equipment behind.
My grandfather made his speech
about Dunkirk in which he also
made the point that you can’t
describe a deliverance as a victory.
At the same time as he was dealing
with this, Churchill also had to deal
with parliament. I think people
assume that Churchill walked into
parliament and people said:
“Winston, you are marvellous, we’re
following you.” It wasn’t like that.
Until a certain date the House of
Commons hadn’t wholly fallen in
behind him. There was a terrific ebb
and flow of debate in the cabinet and
in parliament, and all these rows
going on as the military were trying
to evacuate from Dunkirk.
This was a country truly fighting
for survival. What the nation faced
then does bring some sense of
proportion into our public
debates now. It wasn’t until
the “Fight them on the
beaches” speech, done
so brilliantly by
Oldman at the end
of this film, that
parliament truly
came round.
Britain really
did deserve to
win her laurels
for determination
and pluck, and this
film captures all of
that. No one could
come out of it and
not have their head
held a little higher
and their shoulders
a little farther back.
A screening was put
on for my family and
at the end of it there
was absolute silence
from us all, followed
by huge applause.
As told to Catherine
Nixey
6
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Tuesday January 9 2018 | the times
body&soul
Donald Trump is about to
undergo a medical. He should
read this before he does
Dr Mark Porter
T
his week Donald
Trump undergoes his
first formal medical
as president, no doubt
expecting confirmation
of his belief that he
is in great shape,
physically and
mentally. For his sake — and ours —
I hope he is right, but experience has
taught me that screening medicals
aren’t all they are cracked up to be.
Like most GPs, I regularly see
patients who have been unnecessarily
worried or falsely reassured by
screening tests that they didn’t need,
and sometimes wish they had never
had. It may seem counterintuitive, but
although looking for trouble in
otherwise healthy people can save
lives, it can be harmful too. It pays to
pick your medical checks carefully, and
there are plenty to choose from in the
burgeoning world of private screening.
As a rule, if a screening test is not
available on the NHS you should ask
yourself why. It may be that it is
simply too expensive, but often it’s
because there is a dearth of evidence
that it does more good than harm.
Analysis of your DNA, top-to-toe CT
scans, ultrasound assessment of the
carotid arteries in your neck and
exercise ECGs (treadmill tests) are
cases in point. Yes, they sometimes
find silent diseases and allow early
intervention, but they also miss things,
and often turn up others that you
either can’t do anything about or
which were never going to do you
much harm and were best left alone.
And it’s not just the NHS that is
concerned. Authorities in America
are also worried about the overuse
of screening tests, with the US
Preventive Services Task Force
advising against using exercise ECGs
and carotid ultrasound.
So what should you consider? The
first and easiest step is to avail yourself
of everything the NHS offers.
Assuming that you are registered with
a GP, you should automatically receive
invitations for everything from smear
tests and breast screening to GP-based
health checks for people over 40
(varies in different parts of the UK)
and the bowel scope check for cancer
Screening versus diagnosis
0 It is important to differentiate
clever tests, such as CT scans, when
used to help diagnosis in people with
symptoms, from the same technology
employed to look for problems in
otherwise healthy people.
0 Just because a test is a great
diagnostic aid does not mean it
is a useful screening tool.
0 Sometimes we just don’t know what
to do with lumps (incidentalomas)
turned up using the latest technology.
Paradoxically, our efforts to help can
do more harm than good.
QA
I had a flu
vaccine last
October. Does
that mean I can’t
catch Aussie flu?
(the latest addition offered at 55).
However, even some of these are
controversial and I know of some
eminent colleagues — from GPs to
professors — who eschew smears and
mammograms because they remain
unconvinced of the benefits.
I also think everyone should know
a few numbers. The NHS health
checks will pick most of these up, but
if you’re middle-aged or older you
should know your blood pressure. I’d
recommend having at least one
cholesterol test during your life.
Although, unless the latter is very high
(eg over 7.5), raised cholesterol levels
are generally not that worrying.
Family history is vital. If you have a
history of heart disease, stroke or
cancer — bowel, prostate, ovary, breast
or melanoma — in close relatives
under the age of 60, then you should
mention this to your GP because it
will influence what screening tests you
may be offered. Type 2 diabetes is
another problem that often runs in
families. With an insidious onset, it
can be missed for years if it is not
actively considered and tested for.
The PSA blood test (for prostate
cancer) is probably the most
controversial of all. There is a good
reason why routine PSA screening is
not offered to British men. It’s useful
within controlled parameters but it’s
simply not accurate enough to use as
a general screening tool.
Just because we can doesn’t mean
we should. My late father paid
handsomely for a private CT scan and
a mole check (we have a family history
of melanoma) in his mid-sixties and
was relieved to be given the all-clear.
Three months later his GP diagnosed
a melanoma and, within three years,
he had inoperable cancer of the
pancreas. His relief was short-lived
and ill-founded.
This season’s vaccine
is designed to protect
against the H3N2 strain
that caused so many
problems in Australia
(Aussie flu), but while
the jab remains your
best protection, having
it doesn’t mean you
are immune.
There are three
factors to consider.
First, the H3N2 strain
is a slippery opponent
and it’s difficult to
produce an effective
vaccine. Second, it is
not the only strain
circulating (there is a B
strain, for instance, that
is not included in the
standard jab given to
most adults). And, last,
we know that vaccines
don’t work that well in
older people because
their immune systems
are not so responsive.
Indeed, last year, while
the various vaccines
offered good protection
in children, they were
only effective in about
half of 18 to 64-yearolds and hardly worked
in the over-65s.
Since children are the
main spreaders of the
virus, and so many have
been immunised this
year, it is to be hoped
that this will reduce
spread and protect the
rest of us.
If you have a health
problem, email
drmarkporter
@thetimes.co.uk
Are the
Dr Michael Mosley
tests the superfood
credentials of the
trendy fat, which
the NHS claims is
bad for your heart
M
any years ago,
when I was a
medical student,
I spent a few
months working
in a hospital in
Sri Lanka. While
I was there I got
the chance to see and treat a range of
extraordinary diseases that you would
never encounter in the UK, such as
elephantiasis of the scrotum. I also
acquired a taste for the local cuisine,
much of it based around the coconut.
In Sri Lanka the coconut palm is
called the kalpavriksha, or the tree of
heaven, and is also known as “the tree
that provides all the necessities of life”.
That’s because every part of it is put to
use, from the shells, which are used to
make jewellery, to the meat, milk and
oil, which feature heavily in cooking.
I came back from Sri Lanka with a
good tan and a deep love of coconut
oil. However, this was the 1980s, when
fat was evil and saturated fat the most
evil of all. Coconut oil is incredibly
high in saturated fat, so it seems I had
been dicing with dietary death.
Fats are complicated. They are made
up of fatty acids that in turn consist of
long chains of carbon atoms, some of
which are bonded to (saturated with)
hydrogen atoms. The more hydrogen
atoms, the more saturated the fat.
Those fats that nature produces are
not pure. They contain a mix of
saturated, monounsaturated and
polyunsaturated fatty acids. Fats such
as coconut oil, which are rich in
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the times | Tuesday January 9 2018
7
1G T
body&soul
experts wrong about coconut oil?
GETTY
tu
t
ra
ed
(%
Coconut oil
2
6
86
Butter
3
21
51
Lard
11
45
39
Olive oil
10
76
14
Rapeseed oil
28
63
7
Corn oil
54
27
12
Sunflower
65
20
10
the big surprise was the coconut oil.
Not only was there no rise in LDL
levels, but there was a large rise in
HDL, the “good” cholesterol, by
15 per cent. On the face of it that
would suggest that coconut oil is the
most heart-friendly of the lot.
I asked Khaw, who was clearly
surprised by these results, why she
thought it had happened. “I have no
real idea,” she candidly replied.
“Perhaps it is because the main
saturated fat in coconut oil is lauric
acid and lauric acid may have
different biological impacts on blood
lipids to other fatty acids. The
evidence for that comes mainly from
animals, so it was fascinating to see
this effect in free living humans.”
So should we be hailing coconut
oil as a health food? “I think
decisions to eat particular
oils depend on more than
just the health effects,” she
says. “This is just one study
and it would be irresponsible
to suggest changing dietary
advice based on one study,
however well conducted.”
Compared with olive oil,
research on coconut oil is
at a very early stage.
So I’m not going
to start glugging
it by the litre.
However, I have
gone back to using
it far more in my
cooking, as much
for the flavour as
for any potential
health benefits.
Dr Michael Mosley’s
Trust Me, I’m a Doctor
is on BBC Two on
Wednesdays at 8.30pm
)
e
6 When
polyunsaturated fats
are eaten in foods such
as nuts, seeds, fish and
leafy greens they have
clear health benefits.
When eaten as
margarine or sunflower
oil the benefits are
much less clear.
6 Monounsaturated
oils are found in
avocados, olives,
olive oil, almonds and
hazelnuts, and also
in lard and goose fat.
Olive oil, more than
70 per cent of which is
monounsaturated, is a
key component in the
Mediterranean diet.
6 Saturated fats are
what make coconut oil
and butter solid at
room temperature.
ed
Fat facts
t
ra
tu
thought we should do one. The team
contacted professor Kay-Tee Khaw
and professor Nita Forouhi, eminent
Cambridge academics, to help. We
recruited 94 volunteers aged 50 to 75
and with no history of diabetes or
heart disease to test what effect
eating different fats would have on
their cholesterol levels.
We began by randomly allocating
our volunteers to one of three groups.
Every day for four weeks, group A
were asked to eat 50g of extra-virgin
coconut oil (about three tablespoons).
Group B were asked to consume
the same amount of extra-virgin
olive oil, a key component of the
Mediterranean diet and widely seen
as being heart-friendly.
Group C were asked to eat 50g of
unsalted butter a day.
Before our volunteers started their
oily regimen we took blood samples
to get baseline measurements, mainly
focusing on their levels of LDL
(low-density lipoprotein, or “bad”
cholesterol) and HDL (high-density
lipoprotein, or “good” cholesterol).
Your heart-attack risk is best
calculated, not by looking at your
total cholesterol score, but your total
cholesterol divided by your HDL. This
is the basis of the Qrisk calculator,
qrisk.org/2017, which is used by GPs to
estimate your heart attack and stroke
risk. In other words, high levels of
HDL are seen as generally protective.
So what happened? As expected the
butter eaters saw an average rise in
their LDL levels of about 10 per cent,
which was almost matched by a 5 per
cent rise in their HDL levels.
Those guzzling olive oil saw a small,
non-significant reduction in LDL
cholesterol and a 5 per cent rise in
HDL. So olive oil lived up to its
heart-friendly reputation. However,
t
ra
tu
a
ns
yu
saturated fatty acids, are solid at room
temperature. Vegetable oils, which
contain higher levels of mono and
polyunsaturated fatty acids, are not.
Because coconut oil has such a high
saturated fat content it should, in
theory, be even more of a heartstopper than butter (51 per cent
saturated fat), or lard (a mere 39 per
cent saturated fat). So, along with
butter and cheese I gave it up, and
took to using skimmed milk, vegetable
oils, margarine and zero-fat yoghurts
instead. They tasted terrible, but at
least I knew they were doing my heart
good. Or were they?
The World Health Organization, the
American Heart Association, the
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics,
the NHS and the British Nutrition
Foundation still recommend shunning
foods rich in saturated fats. They
specifically say that coconut oil should
be limited or avoided because it will
increase your risk of heart disease.
The public, however, are clearly not
listening. Coconut oil has become a
trendy “superfood”, so much so that
we’re spending about £16 million a
year on it — a 70-fold increase since
2012. Enthusiasts claim that it will
cure everything from bad breath to
digestive disorders. They even say it
can cut your risk of heart disease by
reducing your cholesterol levels.
My initial reaction was to dismiss
this as the latest foolish food hype.
Yet there is evidence that populations
who have a diet high in coconut have
surprisingly low rates of heart disease.
And although most nutritionists
believe that eating coconut oil is
bad for us, when I looked into it
I discovered that there have been
surprisingly few human studies carried
out to test these claims. So for the BBC
Two series Trust Me, I’m a Doctor, we
Sa
a
ns
ou
on
M
l
Po
Type of oil or fat
The oil you should fry with
When you’re frying or cooking at a
high temperature (at or close to 180C
or 356F), fats undergo oxidation. That
means they react with oxygen in the
air to form aldehydes and lipid
peroxides. Eating or inhaling
aldehydes, even in small amounts, has
been linked to increased risk of heart
disease and cancer.
So which are the best fats to cook
with? We sent samples of different
fats and oils to Professor Martin
Grootveld, an expert based at
De Montfort University in Leicester.
After some tests he came down firmly
against corn oil and sunflower oil. “We
found that the oils that were richest in
polyunsaturates — the corn oil and
sunflower oil — generated very high
levels of aldehydes,” he says.
“Sunflower and corn oil are fine
as long as you don’t subject them
to heat. It’s a simple chemical
fact that something which is
thought to be healthy for us is
converted into something that
is very unhealthy at standard
frying temperatures.”
Grootveld recommends
cooking with oils that
are richer in
monounsaturated
and saturated fatty
acids, such as olive
oil or coconut oil,
because they are
more stable
when heated
and produce
less aldehydes.
He also
recommends
keeping oils in
dark glass or in
the cupboard to
reduce oxidation.
8
1G T
Tuesday January 9 2018 | the times
arts
Sam’s the man — how
playing a racist cop won
him a Golden Globe
Sam Rockwell won an award for his role in Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri. Next up? George W Bush, he tells Roderick Stanley
S
am Rockwell sits down,
wearing a skin-tight white
T-shirt with a duotone
image of Dennis Hopper,
and runs his fingers
through his artfully
unkempt hair. At 49 he
looks lean and fit, and he
chats easily in a laid-back, retro
manner that echoes Hopper’s era of
counterculture cool. “Yeah, yeah, it’s
all good, man,” he says as we look at
the lunch menu. “Get a cocktail.”
We’re in a bustling Moroccan café
in Manhattan’s East Village, the
neighbourhood where Rockwell shares
a loft apartment with his long-time
partner, the actress Leslie Bibb. No
one pays any particular mind to the
actor in their midst (celebrated for his
roles in films such as Confessions of a
Dangerous Mind, Matchstick Men and
Moon), and he looks relaxed as we
tuck into plates of Mediterranean
eggs and discuss his role in one of the
finest films of the year, the Martin
McDonagh-directed Three Billboards
Outside Ebbing, Missouri.
Dancing nimbly between
episodes of dark hilarity,
heartbreaking loss and brutal
violence, the film features
superb performances from
Rockwell, Frances
McDormand and Woody
Harrelson, all making the
most of an incendiary
script by McDonagh. It
Sam Rockwell at the
Golden Globes on
Sunday night
won four Golden Globes, including
Best Supporting Actor for Rockwell on
his first significant nomination, and
was nominated for two more. On
Sunday night he thanked McDonagh,
saying: “You’re such an actor-friendly
director. Thanks for not being a dick.”
He made a point about kindness: “This
movie is about compassion and I think
we need some of that these days,” and
thanked McDormand, who won Best
Actress, calling her a “badass” and a
“force of nature”.
I wonder if he lets himself get
excited by awards talk and
ceremonies. “It’s fun,” says Rockwell.
“It’s nice to get props, but you can take
the piss out of it all at the same time.
There are moments of enjoyment
when you’re rubbing shoulders with a
mentor like Gary Oldman. That’s a
kick. Tom Hanks, who I’ve worked
with. Meryl Streep. Judi Dench . . . Oh,
I got to talk about dancing with Justin
Timberlake.” Rockwell is a nifty mover
himself and has shown off his steps so
many times that fans have cut their
own compilations. “Yeah, I’m pretty
good. Not as good as Justin.”
Did he get any tips from the man
who brought sexy back? “Well, we
were talking about Bob Fosse [the
dancer and choreographer who
directed Cabaret], who I might
play,” he says. “He knows a lot
about it. I showed him a move and
he showed me a cooler way to do
it — because he’s Justin f***ing
Six Nations 2019 break
toFantastic
Dublin break to
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Timberlake.” The music in the café
switches to jazz and he snaps his
fingers. “Ooh, Chet Baker.”
Three Billboards is not the first time
Rockwell and the British-Irish
playwright-turned-director McDonagh
have worked together. The actor
starred in 2012’s Seven Psychopaths,
which McDonagh wrote and directed,
and in the play A Behanding in
Spokane, which opened on Broadway
in 2010. “I put him up there with
David Mamet, Quentin Tarantino,
Harold Pinter, Sam Shepard, Kenny
Lonergan,” says Rockwell. “His writing
is astounding. And now he’s this
amazing film director. He’s made three
pretty f***ing good movies, and this is
probably his best. I’m not embarrassed
to tell you I’ve seen it more than once.
I’m so proud to be in it.”
The film’s lead, played by the Oscar,
Tony and Emmy-winner McDormand,
is Mildred Hayes, a tough, divorced
mother who is frustrated by the lack of
progress in the investigation into the
rape and murder of her daughter. She
embarks on a campaign to shame the
small town’s police chief, Bill
Willoughby (Woody Harrelson), into
action. “It’s the first female protagonist
[Martin] has had since I think The
Beauty Queen of Leenane [1996]. She’s a
great actor. There are these actors like
Phil Hoffman, Hilary Swank, John
Malkovich . . . It’s what my teacher used
to call ‘emotional power’. And
vulnerability. Frances has that.”
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Rockwell plays Jason Dixon, a
drunk, violent, racist cop with anger
issues. He’s a repellent character who,
in a deft piece of characterisation,
somehow manages to command
sympathy. “It’s easy, working with
Martin,” he says. “I’ll be nervous to
read in front of him for the first time.
I work with coaches and do my
homework, so I’m usually pretty
prepared. Then he’ll make little
adjustments, like the hair. But it’s
never, like, ‘You’re way off the mark.’
He casts the right people, ultimately.”
As preparation Rockwell went to
Missouri and did “ride-alongs” with
officers, asking them to read his lines.
E
njoy a city break in Dublin and the
opportunity to take in first-hand the fierce
rivalry of Ireland v England at the Aviva
Stadium. Last year, Ireland famously overcame
England, preventing them winning a Grand
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9
1G T
ASSOCIATED PRESS, GETTY IMAGES
“I’ve talked to navy Seals, FBI agents,”
he says. “When I played a basketball
coach in The Winning Season I talked
to so many. But nobody saw that.
Some parts don’t require so much
research, though. For Iron Man 2 I had
one conversation with a guy who
knew an arms dealer and that was it.”
You need to play
the guy with the
spear before you
play Hamlet
Rockwell is also an accomplished
stage actor, which he thinks stands him
in good stead. “People who haven’t done
theatre have a hard time doing take
after take,” he says. “On Conviction,
with Hilary Swank, the film went
through airport security and x-ray
destroyed it. It was a really important
day of shooting — heavy, emotional
stuff in a prison. Of course, we were
devastated. But Hilary’s trained. And
director Tony Goldwyn is also theatre
trained. So we just did it all again. Not
everybody can do that. You need to
play the guy with the sword and spear
before you play Hamlet, you know.”
One of the central themes of Three
Billboards is the confrontation of
deep-seated misogyny in society,
which feels extremely relevant right
now. “It does,” he agrees. “Though he
[McDonagh] wrote this eight years
ago, so it’s partly coincidental. I think
great writers are a little touched —
ahead of the eight ball, you know?”
The film also highlights the
institutional racism at the heart of
American society at a time when
white supremacists are again
emboldened to march in the streets
— although it has attracted some
controversy in the US over the way his
character’s racism is handled. In a
forthcoming movie, Rockwell will play
CP Ellis, the Ku Klux Klan leader who
went on to renounce his past and
arts
Francisco. “I’m a city kid, but I play
rednecks and cowboys a lot.”
Speaking of which, he is playing
president George W Bush in Adam
McKay’s forthcoming Dick Cheney
biopic Backseat. “Well, there you go,”
he says with a laugh. “That was
daunting. Ultimately, I think he
was a rich kid who was in over his
head. He had the charm that Dick
Cheney did not. It’s a kind of Cyrano
de Bergerac story.”
Is Rockwell a political person?
“No.” But surely it’s hard not to be in
these times. “Well, I watch Bill Maher
[the late-night talk show host]. But . . .
no, it’s just depressing.”
His name is attached to Mute, a
forthcoming film by Duncan Jones,
with whom he filmed the surprise
sci-fi hit Moon, although he says it’s
just a cameo. “With Moon we were
terrified. We didn’t know what the
f*** we were getting into,” he says,
then laughs. “Though now it’s
considered one of the better sci-fi
movies of the last 20 years.”
Rockwell was also in Galaxy
Quest, a 1999 cult sci-fi spoof. “And
Hitchhiker’s,” he adds proudly, referring
to the 2005 adaptation of The
Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, in
which he plays two-headed president of
the galaxy and all-round hoopy frood
Zaphod Beeblebrox. These roles are
light years from the oddballs, racists,
alcoholics and psychopaths he’s often
tapped to portray — perhaps he’d like
to
t do more comedy or sci-fi, to balance
the darkness? “I’ve always wanted to
do darker stuff, but I like to be silly
too,” he says. “Though comedy also
takes it out of you. I mean, it’s not
digging ditches, but mentally. You
do 16-hour days, with a deadline.
Working with Adam McKay and
playing
George W Bush, with
p
Christian
Bale as Dick
C
Cheney . . . that’s responsibility,
you
y know? You gotta have a beer
at
a the end of the week.”
What are his hopes for this
year?
“Apart from the obvious, I
y
just
j want to do good work. I’m
too
t old to play Hamlet, but maybe
I can still play Mercutio. Though
I’m probably too old for that too.
“That’s all you can do, man,” he
continues. “There’s a lot of horrible
shit going on. I’m not really good at
fundraisers and charity, but I can
take a KKK guy and try to illuminate
that. And maybe if you make a good
enough movie — like Three Billboards,
or One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s
Nest, Midnight Cowboy — maybe
it makes people think about things
differently. You know, I don’t have
control over anything else. That’s
all I know how to do.”
Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri is released
on Friday
o
Above: with Frances
McDormand in Three
Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri.
Right: in Moon
become a civil rights
activist, an experience
which, he says, “got a little
dark at times”. He pulls out his phone
ne
and shows me an email from Christian
Picciolini. “Apparently, the Ed Norton
character in American History X was
based on him. He was a white
supremacist, but he now pulls people
out of hate groups. I talked to him
before I played Ellis.
“He told me, ‘It’s not that you
hate brown or black people, or
you’re homophobic — you hate
yourself.’ Ultimately, that’s what’s
going on with Dixon. Everyone’s
had a bad day, so you can relate to
that. But I can’t relate to being racist,
because I didn’t grow up like that —
I had a black girlfriend, I just
hung with a different crowd,” he
says, referring to his youth in San
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Tuesday January 9 2018 | the times
television & radio
Cutting it fine: the bravery of our great surgeons
BBC
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Surgeons
BBC Two
{{{{(
Next of Kin
ITV
{{{{(
‘O
h f***,” are two words
that you really don’t
want to hear from a
surgeon midway through
a 12-hour operation to
cut out half of your face. Teresa, a care
worker, was having a facial tumour
removed, which meant losing her right
eye and upper jaw, but a hole had been
found in the side of an artery. Or
something. I wasn’t entirely focusing,
because minutes earlier in Surgeons:
At the Edge of Life the camera had
shown the mind-blowingly deep crater
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Eva Perón
World Service, 9am
Eva Perón was an unlikely
inspiration for a stage
musical. She was born a
“bastard” child into a family
whose main distinction was
being undistinguished. Eva,
however, had no interest in
dying in obscurity and ran
away to Buenos Aires where
she soon caught the eye of
the general Juan Perón.
They married and, during
a trip to Europe, she
embarked on her finest role
to date: herself. As someone
puts it here: “Eva is the one
to go to Europe, but the one
who will come back is
Evita.” The rest is history.
The Dawn of
British Jihad
Radio 4, 8pm
Surely there is a Whitehall
phrase for the sort of thing
discussed here? For multiple
administrative blunders
leading to very serious
problems? Before 9/11
British Muslims who went
on jihadi holidays in
countries such as
Afghanistan and Bosnia
were allowed to return
home, unquestioned.
Meanwhile, renowned
Islamic militants freely
toured British mosques,
encouraging Muslims to take
part in holy war. This series
looks at what went wrong.
in her face, which was like something
from a horror movie.
I wonder how Teresa felt watching
that back, seeing herself with half
a face, the other side just a crimson
abyss? Or learning of that dicey artery
moment (it turned out OK in the end).
Maybe she can’t bear to — it made me
lightheaded and it wasn’t even my face.
Which reinforces how extraordinary
these strong-stomached surgeons
are and how lucky we are to have
them, although I fear we take them for
granted. Tim Martin and Sat Parmar,
the maxillofacial surgeons at the
Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham
charged with excavating and rebuilding
Teresa’s face, did so with modesty,
dedication and brilliance. (“Sometimes
you look at the hole and you do think,
‘Flipping heck’,” said Martin with
splendid doctorish understatement.)
Ditto the consultant plastic surgeon
Ruth Waters, who removed and
reconstructed Donna’s breasts with
the tenderness of a mother ministering
to her child. Such superb operations
happen every day, but remain invisible
because they are successful. It’s the
rare errors that grab the headlines.
It’s good that factual television
occasionally reminds us of this.
Had Next of Kin been scheduled
for 2017 I suspect it would have had to
be pulled, several times, so numerous
were UK terror attacks last year. The
explosion that brought London to
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00
Huw Stephens 1.00am Annie Nightingale
4.00 Early Breakfast with Jordan North
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Sara Cox 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Amol Rajan 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo. With the actor David Morrissey
7.00 Jamie Cullum. An interview with singer,
songwriter and musician Julia Biel 8.00 Ana
Matronic 10.00 Barry Humphries: Barry’s
Forgotten Musical Masterpieces 11.00 Nigel
Ogden: The Organist Entertains. Featuring
some of the UK’s finest concert organs in
performance 11.30 Listen to the Band.
Highlights from last November’s Brass in
Concert contest 12.00 Sounds of the 80s (r)
2.00am Radio 2’s Folk Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: 90s Hits 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Wednesday Workout 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein presents a selection of classical
music, with guest Sue MacGregor
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Schubert (1797-1828)
Donald Macleod explores Schubert’s life as a
19 year old, an era when he made his first
money from composing after his friends
encouraged him to leave teaching. We hear
one of the songs he gifted to his first love,
part of an early setting of the Mass,
settings of poems by Goethe, and
his eleventh String Quartet
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Schubert lieder performed by Carolyn
Sampson, and piano works by played by
Barry Douglas, recorded at two South West
Festivals. Presented by Nicola Heywood
Thomas. Tchaikovsky (The Seasons, Op 37b
— May — Bright Nights; June — Barcarolle;
and August — Harvest); Schubert
(Gretchen am Spinnrade, D118; Gretchens
Bitte, D564; and Der Konig in Thule,
D367); and Beethoven (Sonata No 21
in C, Op 53 — Waldstein)
The consultant maxillofacial surgeon Sat Parmar in Surgeons
2.00 Live Afternoon Concert
The BBC Philharmonic from MediaCityUK,
Salford. Rossini (Overture: The Barber of
Seville); Mozart (Piano Concerto No 9 in E
flat, K271); Stravinsky (Song of the
Nightingale); Roussel (Le festin d’araignée:
symphonic fragments); Claude Vivier (London
Child); George Walker (Lyric for Strings);
Saint-Saëns (Piano Concerto No 1 in D); and
Beethoven (Symphony No 5 in C minor)
5.00 In Tune
The pianist Anna Tsybuleva performs
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
Some sprightly strings from Rossini, a
soothing oboe from Albinoni and a dramatic
cello from Mendelssohn
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
The National Youth Orchestra of Great
Britain, Robert Hayward (bass-baritone),
and Claudia Mahnke (mezzo), under the
conductor Sir Mark Elder, in a performance
recorded at the Royal Concert Hall in
Nottingham on 6th January. Ian Skelly
presents as the National Youth Orchestra of
Great Britain takes listeners on a musical
journey into the mystical, the magical and
the weird. Liadov (The Enchanted Lake);
Dukas (The Sorcerer’s Apprentice); and
Bartók (Duke Bluebeard’s Castle)
10.00 Free Thinking
Amit Chaudhuri, Karen McCarthy Woolf,
Daniel Mendelsohn and Emily Wilson
join Philip Dodd to explore translating,
rewriting and using Homer’s epic work
The Odyssey to frame a memoir
10.45 The Essay: Cornerstones
The writer Sara Maitland conjures with a
rock of ages, Lewisian gneiss. Two thirds the
age of the earth itself, and the oldest stone
in the UK, it makes up parts of the North
West Highlands and the Western Isles. Sara
reflects on how it began its journey where
Antarctica is today, and is still moving
northwards. “Gneiss” comes from the
German word meaning to sparkle, and Sara
wonders if it’s this quality that convinced
Neolithic builders to construct the Callanish
stone circle on Lewis from this stone
11.00 Late Junction
Broadcasting live from Oslo, Norway, Anne
Hilde Neset welcomes local musicians to
the studio to preview All Ears Festival for
Improvised Music. The event begins on
Thursday, running for four days. Tonight, the
best of the line-up drop in to perform live.
Also on the programme tonight: shimmery
folk-pop songwriting from Circuit des Yeux,
deep and funky disco from Golden Teacher,
and performance poetry from Belinda Zhawi
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With John Humphrys and Nick Robinson
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Black Music in Europe:
A Hidden History
Clarke Peters explores the sound
of Zonophone records (3/3)
9.30 One to One
Helen Glover speaks to Kelly Holmes, who
reveals how she rebuilt her life and her
identity after retiring from sport (1/8)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: Auntie’s War
By Edward Stourton (2/5)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Discussion and interviews, including at
10.45 the 15 Minute Drama: Shardlake:
Heartstone, the fifth series of CJ Sansom’s
Tudor mysteries (7/10)
11.00 Too Much Medicine?
The Problem of Over-treatment
A report on whether too many healthy
people are being told they are ill (r)
11.30 Tales from the Stave
Frances Fyfield examines Delius’ On hearing
the First Cuckoo in Spring (3/3)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 The Curious Cases
of Rutherford & Fry
Digging into the science of taste (2/5)
12.15 Call You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Conflict and Co-operation:
A History of Trade
An exploration of the UK’s trading past,
with presenter Paul Seabright (7/10)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Stone
The team investigates the homeless charity
and also the background of the victim, trying
to figure out who would want to do him
harm. Hugo Speer stars (2/10)
3.00 The Kitchen Cabinet
The touring culinary panel show sets up
shop in Worcester (3/7) (r)
3.30 Making History
Hester Cant digs into the past of acid attacks
on the streets of London (3/7)
4.00 The Arts of Life
What art can do for people and communities
facing life’s great challenges (r)
4.30 Great Lives
A profile of Joseph Chamberlain (6/9)
gridlock, the bleak TV news reports of
the fatalities (with an appearance from
ITN’s Alastair Stewart), the online
footage of a charity doctor’s murder in
Lahore were all starkly real and near
the knuckle. But equally well-observed
was the way the Harcourt family, like
millions of others, merrily continued
their preparations for the charity
doctor Kareem’s welcome-home party
as smoke billowed from the exploded
car, seemingly habituated to terror
on their doorstep (they didn’t know
at this point that Kareem was dead).
Archie Panjabi (The Good Wife)
and Jack Davenport gave beautifully
understated performances as Mona
and Guy, a couple whose nice family
is starting to rupture, not over Mona’s
brother’s murder, but because his son,
Danish, is missing from university and
is secretly in Pakistan, possibly, it
seems, having been radicalised online.
This is a credible, thoughtful and
timely thriller that thus far isn’t
thumpingly clichéd. My only niggle is
that the university that Danish hadn’t
appeared at for six weeks hadn’t
contacted his family when he dropped
off the radar. Wouldn’t some kind of
pastoral call have been made? Maybe
it wouldn’t, which itself is worrying.
The series may go off the boil over six
episodes, but so far there are plenty of
good reasons to keep watching, Panjabi
and Davenport being two of them.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 Mark Steel’s in Town
Mark Steel visits Ventnor on the Isle of
Wight and performs for the locals (6/6)
7.00 The Archers
Lexi considers her options
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Shardlake: Heartstone
By CJ Sansom (7/10) (r)
8.00 The Dawn of British Jihad
People involved in the early wave of
British jihadis. See Radio Choice
8.40 In Touch
News for people who are blind or partially
sighted, presented by Peter White
9.00 Inside Health
9.30 Black Music in Europe:
A Hidden History (3/3) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Ritula Shah
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Vital
Spark: A Far Cry from Kensington
By Muriel Spark. Mrs Hawkins’ future looks
uncertain as the Ullswater Press falters.
Read by Maggie Service (2/10)
11.00 The Infinite Monkey Cage
Professor Brian Cox and Robin Ince present
a discussion on last year’ discovery
of gravitational waves (1/6) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Auntie’s War (2/5) (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Ken Dodd Show 8.30 The Men
from the Ministry 9.00 The News Quiz Extra
9.45 Hearing with Hegley 10.00 To the Ends
of the Earth: Journey to the Centre of the
Earth 11.00 Behind the Screen 11.15
Devonia 12.00 The Ken Dodd Show
12.30pm The Men from the Ministry 1.00
Secret Agent: X9 1.30 Phil Collins: King of
the Wild Frontier 2.00 In Siberia 2.15 Five
Hundred Years of Friendship 2.30 More Tales
of the City 2.45 Speaking for Themselves
3.00 To the Ends of the Earth: Journey to the
Centre of the Earth 4.00 The Food Quiz
4.30 Semi Circles 5.00 Guests Are Like Fish
5.30 Mark Steel’s in Town 6.00 I Am Legend
6.30 Dad Made Me Laugh 7.00 The Ken
Dodd Show. Sir Doddy attempts to rescue a
damsel in distress 7.30 The Men from the
Ministry. Comedy with Richard Murdoch
8.00 Secret Agent: X9. Thriller by Dashiell
Hammett. Originally broadcast in 1994 8.30
Phil Collins: King of the Wild Frontier. The
musician’s collection of Alamo memorabilia
9.00 Behind the Screen. Remake of a
collaborative detective serial created in 1930
9.15 Devonia. Day Trip by Andy Rashleigh
10.00 Comedy Club: Mark Steel’s in Town.
The comedian visits Hull 10.30 Lionel
Nimrod’s Inexplicable World. Comedy with
Richard Herring 11.00 ElvenQuest. Sam has
to make a difficult decision 11.30 The
Consultants. Comedy sketches with Neil
Edmond 11.45 Where Did it All Go Wrong?
One of England’s forgotten folk heroes
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show 1.00pm Afternoon Edition
4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
A round-up of the day’s sports news
10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Max Rushden 1.00pm Hawksbee and
Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie. With the Go! Team 4.00 Steve
Lamacq 7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe
12.00 6 Music Recommends with Tom
Ravenscroft 1.00am The First Time with
David Lynch 2.00 Golden Years — The David
Bowie Story 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
8.00 The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones
pays tribute to the work of Frederic Chopin.
Chopin (Polonaise in A Op 40 No.1; Piano
Concerto No.1 in F minor Op 21; Les
Sylphides; Nocturne in E-flat Op 9 No.2;
Cello Sonata in G minor Op 65; and Nocturne
in C-sharp minor Op posth) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Tuesday January 9 2018
11
1G T
ROBERT WORKMAN
Concert
Helsinki Baroque
Orchestra
Wigmore Hall
Concert
Jörg Widmann
Wigmore Hall
T
{{{{(
T
{{{((
hree and a half minutes
of bliss. It’s not much, yet it
is everything. At the end of
a concert that never quite
took flight, the soprano
Carolyn Sampson and the trumpeter
Nicholas Emmerson breathed into
the long, radiant phrases of Handel’s
Eternal Source of Light Divine, gliding
effortlessly over the summer meadow
haze of the strings of the Helsinki
Baroque Orchestra. Offered as an
encore, this Purcellian idyll had a
rhythmic ease and fluency that was
heard only fleetingly in the pieces
that preceded it.
Sampson’s unforced agility, smiling
tone and exquisitely spun phrasing
in Bach’s cantata Jauchzet Gott in allen
Landen (BWV51) gave brilliance and
pep to a bass-heavy performance.
Two cellos, a double bass and
a bassoon make quite an impact
in this acoustic. More problematic
was the florid encrustation of
continuo playing from the organist
Anna-Maaria Oramo and the
harpsichordist and music director
Aapo Häkkinen.
Helsinki Baroque Orchestra has
a thrillingly rich dynamic range, but
wears its tempos like a straitjacket.
When the forces are reduced to single
strings — in the bright trio sonata
textures of the cantata’s chorale,
Sei Lob und Preis mit Ehren and in
a few precious stanzas of the final aria
of Telemann’s Trauer-Music eines
kunsterfahrenen Canarien-Vogels —
there is more freshness and flexibility.
However, Telemann’s obsequy for
a canary seemed longer in this telling
than the lifespan of the bird.
The violinist Cecilia Bernardini
led with style and spirit, tapping into
a mood more elevated than that
offered by Häkkinen in Bach’s
D major Harpsichord Concerto
(BWV1054). Cheeky details
from the violas cut through the
knitting-machine regularity of the
keyboard part, while the velvet tones
of the muted strings soothed a jarring
change of registration in the slow
movement. Telemann’s Ouverture
burlesque in B flat was handsomely
articulated, with a powerful tang to
the Mezzetin en Turc, although the
punchlines landed heavily.
Anna Picard
Dance
Holiday on Ice:
Time
Brighton Centre
{{{((
artsfirst night
ature or nurture? In
this gripping monologue
by Sam Potter, we get
a different angle on
parenthood as a young
mum, Hanna, finds out that her threeyear-old daughter is not actually hers.
How can that happen? Potter’s
research suggested that as many as
19,000 babies are accidentally swapped
at birth around the world each year.
This story provides a plausible enough
reason for the mix-up: one alcoholic
midwife, one new mother in a coma,
another new mother too tired to
follow everything that’s going on.
Potter sells us on the error, sells
us also on why it takes until Hanna’s
estranged husband Pete demands
a DNA test — he thinks Ellie is too
dark-skinned to be his — for it all
to come out. For social services to
get involved; for the two mothers
and the two daughters to meet up.
George Turvey’s stealthy, unshowy
production starts slowly but surely
with the details of being an 18-year-old
mum, living in an “ordinary” home in
Hertfordshire, the way kids behave.
The real action is after the big reveal,
but the story wisely keeps clinging to
the details as Hanna strikes up an
uneasy friendship with the older,
richer other mum. Play dates.
Sleepovers. Pizza and cherry tomatoes
for tea. Who looks like who. Who
acts like who. No confrontations,
no meltdowns. And just when you
wonder why Hanna isn’t wondering
where this is leading — her youth and
inferiority complex makes plausible
her naivety — there’s a crisis that
takes this into thriller territory
and makes something vivid and
provocative out of the question of
who belongs to whom.
You can see the beginnings of a TV
drama in this. Yet it’s hard to imagine
the issues and individuals coming to
brighter life in another format than
they do here through the performance
of Sophie Khan Levy.
Keeping the mood upbeat, she keeps
this compellingly conversational as she
announces her ordinariness and the
extraordinariness of her story. Now
and then we see the bones of research
in the writing, but Khan Levy is
always engaged, unforced, persuasive.
It’s an outstanding performance of
a memorable and moving look at
what family really means.
Box office: 020 7503 1646, to Jan 20.
Touring to Feb 22; papatango.co.uk
he audience who attended
the first in a series of
Wigmore concerts featuring
Jörg Widmann as composer
or clarinettist, or both, will
have ticked off a sizeable chunk of
the works written for the dinky
combination of piano, viola and
clarinet. And a neat chain of
associations connected the three such
works performed. It was Mozart’s
breezy Kegelstatt Trio that probably
inspired Schumann to write
Märchenerzählungen (Fairy Stories),
and the shadow of this work, in turn,
hovers behind Widmann’s 2015 Es war
einmal (Once Upon a Time).
Widmann’s engrossing piece,
receiving its UK premiere with the
viola player Tabea Zimmermann and
pianist Dénes Várjon, was so cleverly
constructed that it made you reassess
Schumann’s uneven piece too. The
Romantic composer was already
slipping into mental instability when
he wrote Märchenerzählungen; at least
that’s the impression left by music
that’s full of strange non-endings and
abrupt transitions. It seems to capture
the composer riffling through a toy
box, picking up yet quickly discarding
what he finds, like a curious toddler.
Es war einmal takes up this ragged
thread and runs with it. At first the
three players sound as if they are
performing a kind of parody of
Biedermeier salon music before the
picture blurs and Widmann stamps his
own modernist mark in five urgently
theatrical vignettes. It’s a messy piece,
but in a good way, and the trio
authoritatively delivered its fiddly
effects and strenuous solos; the most
haunting section is the last, with its
nocturnal glimmers fading to silence.
The theme of fantasy returned when
Widmann played his Fantasie for solo
clarinet, an excitable monologue with
a hint of wild goose chase. It was
Zimmermann and Várjon’s soulful
performance of Schumann’s
Marchenbilder that got under the skin,
however. This was crowned by an
elegiac, tear-jerking last movement,
beautifully done by Zimmermann.
Finally we returned to the source with
the Kegelstatt, almost too breezy to sit
happily in this company, yet delivered
with the questing intelligence that the
musicians had shown all evening.
Neil Fisher
The cast display impressive skills
in the director-choreographer David
Liu’s take on the topic. What the show
has got going for it, however, is slick
and stylish design combined with the
impressive skills of an attractive cast.
It’s set to an eclectic yet fairly
engaging soundtrack of pre-existing
music, from Beethoven to Michael
Bublé, with an emphasis on upbeat
pop or contemporary ballads by
Christina Aguilera, Ellie Goulding,
Britney Spears and the like. An
episodic first half flip-flops between
relatively low-key solos and duets
and harder-to-sell ensemble routines.
Annette Dytrt, effortlessly lithe, gets
things off to a smooth start, but her
enticingly elegant solo to The Very
Thought of You ends too soon. Later
Mauro Bruni demonstrates his musical
flair as the lead in an appealing
response to Come Fly With Me.
Another bonus is a mesmerising act
by the Cuban gymnast Donet Collazo
Valdes, who balances handsomely
off a cantilevered pole connected
to a circular platform at centre stage.
Although Time doesn’t entirely
avoid middle-of-the-road blandness,
it looks spectacular, thanks to Jeffrey
Goes’s flashy lighting (abetted by
a series of highly effective digital
backdrops) and Michael Sharpe’s
fashionably flamboyant costumes.
However, that’s window dressing;
the real draw is the live talent,
including Dytrt’s thrilling partnership
with the strapping Yannick Bonheur
(the adroit way he tosses her around
makes physical risk look easy) and
a seamless string of second-act group
numbers that deliver the goods.
Donald Hutera
Box office: 0844 8471538, to Sun
Sophie Khan Levy is engaged and persuasive as Hanna, who discovers that her daughter isn’t really hers
Powerful home truths
A remarkable
performance
caps this
gripping tale
of motherhood,
says Dominic
Maxwell
Theatre
Hanna
Arcola, E8
{{{{(
N
L
ike clockwork, each January
a show by Holiday On Ice
arrives on our shores, with
Brighton serving as the
regular port of call for the
international entertainment franchise.
The latest production marks the 38th
time that the company — founded in
America nearly 75 years ago and now
based in Europe — has exported one
of its sparkling, frozen-floored
extravaganzas to the Brighton Centre.
Time turns out to be satisfying family
fare, even if it takes an entire first act
before it strikes the right balance
between commercialism and artistry.
Once again the work hangs loosely
on a central conceptual hook. Time
purports to address how we spend that
precious commodity, whether through
work, play or, inevitably, romance.
There’s nothing startling or profound
12
1G T
Tuesday January 9 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
House of Saud:
A Family at War
BBC Two, 9pm
If you
have been
watching
McMafia and
marvelling at how the
tendrils of modern
organised crime reach
around the globe, you’ll
Early
Top
pick
be fascinated by this
three-part documentary
on the Saudi royal
family. After decades
of authoritarian rule
under King Salman,
Saudi Arabia is
beginning to tackle
extremism at home
and abroad under the
new power behind the
throne, Mohammed bin
Salman. The 32-yearold crown prince has
promised to take
whatever steps are
necessary to curb
radical Islamism
around the world.
The irony, as this first
instalment shows us,
is that these problems
— from Bosnia and
Syria, to India and the
World Trade Center —
are home-grown. For
decades it has been
alleged that Saudi
Arabia has armed
“freedom fighters”
across the world to
support the spread of
Islam. More worryingly,
perhaps, is the export
of ideology. “The
variant of Islam that
Saudi Arabia supports,
Wahhabism, is the petri
dish in which more
extreme versions of
Islam flourish,” says the
former CIA man Bruce
Riedel, one of several
superb contributors
here. Can Saudi Arabia’s
young moderniser
make the difference? At
home, perhaps, but it is
the kingdom’s foreign
policy that may prove
the tougher nut to
crack. “Saudi Arabia is
engaged now in the
most intense proxy
conflict that we have
seen in modern Middle
Eastern history,” Riedel
says. “The Arab world
has begun walking into
an abyss of hell.”
England’s
Forgotten Queen
BBC Four, 9pm
Over three nights the
historian Helen Castor
is telling the story of
Lady Jane Grey, the
Queen who sat on the
throne for a shorter
length of time than the
average Premier League
manager’s tenure. What
is the truth behind our
“Nine-Day Queen”?
Using first-hand
documents and the
help of a few historian
chums, Castor explains
how Jane became
Edward VI’s chosen heir
(despite his extreme
reluctance — the first
eight heirs to the throne
were female and she
was the most palatable)
and why the Duke of
Northumberland was
so keen to see Jane
on the throne.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Rip Off Britain: Holidays. Why
lost luggage could be close to becoming a thing of the
past, and tips on visiting Shanghai 10.00 Homes Under
the Hammer. Properties about to be auctioned on
Merseyside, in south Wales and Derbyshire (AD) 11.00
Wanted Down Under. A Bradford family considers a move
to Perth, Australia 11.45 Close Calls: On Camera. The
story of two girls who phoned 999 after their mother fell
out of the loft 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Two teams seek
out bargains in Berkshire (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Ruhma is feeling the pressure as an anxious
Karen and Ayesha fear for their jobs (AD) 2.15 Father
Brown. A contestant is murdered at a ballroom dancing
competition (AD) 3.00 I Escaped to the Country.
House-hunters who planned to run a holiday letting
business in Herefordshire 3.45 The Farmers’ Country
Showdown. Two breeders showcase their best goats 4.30
Antiques Road Trip. Anita Manning and Charles Hanson
search for antiques to sell in Dumfries 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 The Farmers’
Country Showdown (r) 7.15 Antiques Road Trip (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: Celebrity Antiques Road Trip (r) (SL) 9.00
Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00
Daily Politics. Presented by Jo Coburn 1.00pm Coast. The
team explores Ireland’s Atlantic coast (r) 1.15 Brazil with
Michael Palin. The Monty Python star travels from the
northern border to Brasilia (r) (AD) 2.15 Himalaya with
Michael Palin. The adventurer travels from K2 in Pakistan
to Ladakh in India (r) 3.15 The Great British Winter. Ellie
Harrison visits the Lake District to explore how Britain’s
changeable weather affects the area’s landscape and
wildlife (r) 4.15 Planet Earth II. Footage of wild animals
that live in cities, including leopards in Mumbai,
macaques in Jaipur, peregrine falcons in New York and
langurs in Jodhpur. Last in the series (r) (AD) 5.15 Flog
It! Paul Martin presents the show from Grimsby Minster
in Lincolnshire, where finds include a ship’s wheel and a
siver claret jug. Paul also explores the walls of Lincoln
Castle (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy
Vine 6.30 Great British Railway Journeys. Michael
Portillo travels from Pontyclun to Ebbw Vale (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs
and fashion news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and
gossip 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show
10.30 This Morning. Phillip Schofield and Holly
Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features, including
a look at the stories making the newspaper headlines and
a recipe in the kitchen. Including Local Weather 12.30pm
Loose Women. More interviews with famous faces and
topical debate from a female perspective 1.30 ITV News;
Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras follow criminal
barrister Robert Rinder as he takes on real-life cases
in a studio courtroom 3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal. David
Dickinson presents highlights from the show, including
a magic collection that makes Mark Stevens’ cash
disappear, and Cheryl Hakeney bids for Shelley china 4.00
Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the arcade-themed
quiz show, in which contestants drop tokens down a
choice of four chutes in the hope of winning a £10,000
jackpot 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents the quiz
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.10am Kirstie’s Fill Your House for Free (r) 6.20 3rd
Rock from the Sun (r) (AD) 7.10 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) 8.35 Frasier (r) 10.05 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA. Gordon Ramsay revisits three previous
restaurants he tried to save, finding out whether they
have stayed on the road to recovery (r) 11.00 Sun, Sea
and Selling Houses. Michelle and Adrian Bohanna are
looking to upsize to a villa with a pool, and have tasked
Casas Manuel with finding them their dream home from
home (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Live
Darts: BDO Lakeside World Professional Championships.
Rob Walker presents coverage of the afternoon session
on the fourth day of the tournament staged at Lakeside
Country Club in Frimley Green, featuring matches in the
first round of the men’s and ladies’ competitions 5.00
Come Dine with Me. Dinner-party challenge from southeast Essex (r) 6.00 The Simpsons. Marge accidentally
slices off Homer’s thumb. Featuring the voices of Frankie
Muniz and Joe Mantegna (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Misbah
realises that she has been too harsh on Yasmine and
plans a family cricket match like old times, but disaster
strikes on the drive home from the game (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and guests talk about the issues of the day 11.15
GPs: Behind Closed Doors. A mother-of-two returns to
the surgery since she is still experiencing chronic back
pain after emergency back surgery, while another patient
comes back in a distressed state (r) (AD) 12.10pm
5 News Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel Inspector. Alex Polizzi
visits a Blackpool hotelier who has grand plans for his
establishment — although a lack of star rating and a
string of bad reviews have led to dwindling bookings (r)
1.10 Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours
(AD) 2.15 NCIS. The team investigates the death of a
marine off the coast of Tanzania — a case complicated by
the discovery that he had a link to Ziva (r) (AD) 3.15
FILM: Eyewitness (PG, 2017) A woman is held captive
in her own home when the man who murdered her father
and fiancé escapes from prison to confront her. Thriller
starring Lindy Booth, Craig Olejnik and Jon McLaren 5.00
5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Despite Jack’s disapproval,
Mark agrees to Louise’s demands for cash and a passport
(r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Irene collapses while
paying Mick a visit (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
SAVE
71%
7.00 Emmerdale Robert suspects the
Whites are hiding something from
him and hires a private investigator
to help him find out what (AD)
7.30 Save Money: Good Food Susanna
Reid and Matt Tebbutt help an Essex
family save cash with their meals,
and Susanna compares colas (6/6)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Secrets of the National Trust with
Alan Titchmarsh The host reveals
some surprising facts about Beatrix
Potter, Joan Bakewell investigates a
small island in Grasmere and its role in
the National Trust’s creation, and Oz
Clarke visits a nursery housing some
of our rarest plants (2/6) (r) (AD)
8PM
8.00 Holby City Sacha finds his allegiances
tested as he struggles to judge
whether his patient can be trusted
or not, and Jac is keen to prove
she is back on form (AD)
8.00 Inside the Factory Gregg Wallace
investigates the production of sauces
in the Netherlands. Meanwhile,
Cherry Healey lends a hand with
making the glass jars needed for
mayonnaise, and Ruth Goodman
discovers how Brits first fell in love
with mayo in the 1960s (5/6) (AD)
8.00 The Martin Lewis Money Show
Live The financial journalist and
Angellica Bell present a January “bill
busting” special, answering viewers’
questions live and revealing the best
phone, broadband, bank account,
breakdown cover and digital TV deals
currently on the market (5/12)
8.00 The Secret Life of the Zoo Golden
poison frog Pablo has lost interest in
his partner Maria, so “bad boy” El Loco
is brought in to shake things up. In the
chimpanzee habitat, there is a power
struggle for the role of dominant
female, and baby porcupine Marion
fends off the meerkat mob (AD)
8.00 Diet Secrets & How to Lose
Weight Experts reveal the benefits of
superfoods, nutrient-rich stars of the
culinary world that are said to have all
sorts of weight loss and health-giving
properties. Bianca Gascoigne swaps
chardonnay for chia seeds to see what
effect they have on her health (2/4)
9.00 Silent Witness (1/2) Nikki’s
suspicions about David Cannon are
roused when she discovers blood in his
car. Meanwhile, the uncovering of the
body from the 16-year-old murder
shines the spotlight on three people
who went to the same school.
Continues tomorrow (2/10) (AD)
9.00 House of Saud: A Family at War
New series. Documentary following
Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince
Mohammed bin Salman, who has
pledged to transform the country.
Cameras examine the new leader’s
commitment to return to moderate
Islam. See Viewing Guide (1/3)
9.00 School for Stammerers
Documentary following the emotional
journeys of six people as they attempt
to gain control of their stammers. A
lorry driver, a teacher, a pharmacist, a
professional photographer and two
schoolboys have all agreed to undergo
a course that claims it can transform a
stammerer ’ss speech in just four days.
The McGuire Programme uses physical
and psychological techniques, which
can lead to life-changing results — but
is not for the faint-hearted (AD)
10.30 ITV News
9.00 24 Hours in A&E Cameras follow
Marie, 31, who arrives at St George’s
A&E in southwest London after
collapsing at home with an unexplained
headache, Eileen, 87, who comes in
with shortness of breath and a high
heart rate, and 10-month-old Erin,
who has a build-up of wax in her ears
9.00 Celebrity Big Brother: Live
Eviction A chance to catch up with
the latest action as the contestants
continue to get to know each other,
and a famous face leaves the house
7PM
7.00 Rick Stein’s Road to Mexico Almost
50 years on, the chef retraces his
steps from northern California to
Mexico, beginning in San Francisco,
a region famous for dishes like
cioppino stew (1/7) (r) (AD)
9PM
Get 6 issues of the TLS for just £6
7.00 The One Show Presented by
Matt Baker and Alex Jones
Late
11PM
10PM
7.30 EastEnders Tiffany is back in the
Square and immediately up to mischief,
and Karen’s launderette interview
gets off to a shaky start (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 Inside No 9 An estranged double
act reunite for one last gig.
See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 Canvey: The Promised Island
Following members of a Hasidic Jewish
community moving to Canvey Island,
Essex. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day’s
events presented by Evan Davis
11.25 Boots: Pharmacists Under
Pressure? An Inside Out Special
Concerns about workload pressure and
patient safety at the high-street
chain’s pharmacies (r)
11.55 Meth and Madness in Mexico:
Stacey Dooley Investigates New
series. The journalist meets those
involved in the drugs trade. Previously
shown on BBC3 (1/3) (AD)
1.00am-6.00 BBC News
10.00 Working Class White Men
Professor Green follows three
working-class men over a period of six
months to understand what life in
modern Britain is like for them.
See Viewing Guide (1/2) (AD)
11.15 NFL This Week Mark Chapman is
joined by Osi Umenyiora and Jason Bell
to present highlights of the wildcard
play-off fixtures, which included
Jacksonville Jaguars v Buffalo Bills
11.00 Regional News
11.15 Girlfriends Drama following three
lifelong friends, as they support each
other through a series of difficult
moments in their lives. Phyllis Logan,
Zoe Wanamaker and Miranda
Richardson star (1/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 Naked Attraction Anna Richardson
invites two singletons to each select
their dates from a line-up of naked
potential partners (r) (AD)
12.05am Surgeons: At the Edge of Life The work of
the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s surgical unit
(r) (AD) 1.05 Sign Zone: The Real Marigold on Tour.
Miriam Margolyes, Wayne Sleep, Bobby George and
Jan Leeming head to Cuba (r) (AD, SL) 2.05-3.05
Miriam’s Big American Adventure (r) (AD, SL)
12.15am Tonight at the London Palladium Bradley
Walsh welcomes Craig David, Caro Emerald, and the West
End casts of The Comedy About a Bank Robbery and
Matilda to the world-famous stage (r) 1.05 Jackpot247
3.00 Loose Women (r) 3.45 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
12.05am How to Lose Weight Well More people
attempt the most written about diets on the market (r)
(AD) 1.05 Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 1.55
Warship (r) 2.55 Rivers with Jeremy Paxman (r) 3.50
Grand Designs Australia (r) 4.45 Location, Location,
Location (r) (SL) 5.40-6.10 Four in a Bed (r)
10.35 One Night with My Ex Suspicions of
cheating destroyed the trust between
Kenya and Saed, and they have not
seen each other for two years. They are
reunited to talk about what went
wrong. Cameras also follow Lizzie and
Olivia who split up but still have strong
feelings for each other (2/6)
11.35 Celebrity Big Brother’s Bit on the
Side Rylan Clark-Neal and his
guests discuss the first eviction
12.35am Celebrity Big Brother: Live from the
House Coverage of the housemates’ every move 1.05
SuperCasino 3.10 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. Two recent
patients return to the surgery (r) (AD) 4.00 Now That’s
Funny! (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor. A 200-year-old
cottage (r) (SL) 5.10-6.00 Nick’s Quest (r) (SL)
the times | Tuesday January 9 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Inside No 9
BBC Two, 10pm
There have been some
truly superb episodes
of Reece Shearsmith
and Steve Pemberton’s
Inside No 9 — A Quiet
Night In, Séance Time,
The 12 Days of Christine
— but this may just
be their masterpiece.
In Bernie Clifton’s
Dressing Room, Tommy
(Shearsmith) and Len
(Pemberton), a faded
and agonisingly oldfashioned variety act
from the 1980s called
Cheese & Crackers,
reunite for one last gig.
Except Tommy, now
“Thomas”, has moved
on and Len — his face
that certain shade of
drinker’s purple —
hasn’t. Thirty years have
passed since Tommy
walked out on the act.
Beautiful. A hymn.
Working Class
White Men
Channel 4, 10pm
The rapper Professor
Green believes that
white, working-class
British men are facing
a crisis: “They’re losing
their way. Many feel
demonised, forgotten
and angry.” In this
two-part documentary
Green spends six
months with six white
working-class men in
an attempt to get to the
root of the problem.
Tonight he meets
Denzil, who wants to
hustle his way out of
poverty, and Lewis,
who favours education.
It is 20-year-old David,
however, who catches
the eye. Orphaned,
out of work and out of
luck, David is finding
comfort in a dangerous
place — the far right.
Canvey: The
Promised Island
BBC One, 10.45pm
The Stamford Hill area
of north London has
traditionally been
home to a large
ultra-Orthodox Hasidic
Jewish community.
However, soaring house
prices (which this
otherwise entertaining
documentary puts,
somewhat weirdly,
down to “hipsters”)
are forcing them to
relocate. Canvey Island,
“the Promised Land at
the end of the A13”, is
the chosen spot. The
film follows Hasidic
families as they settle
into life on Canvey,
the heartland of Brexit
and “the most English
place in Britain”, and
relays the community’s
stumbling efforts to
welcome them.
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7.30pm
Bristol City’s reward for
knocking Manchester
United out of the
Carabao Cup last
month was a two-leg
semi-final against that
other Manchester club,
Pep Guardiola’s City.
The first leg takes
place tonight at the
Etihad Stadium
(kick-off 7.45pm).
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Futurama (r) 7.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD)
8.00 Meerkat Manor (r) 9.00 Road Wars (r)
(AD) 10.00 Stargate Atlantis (r) 11.00
MacGyver (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS:
Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r)
5.00 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
6.00 Futurama. The crew visits the future (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Four episodes (r)
8.30 Harry Hill’s Tea-Time. Gregg Wallace guests
9.00 The Blacklist. Red sets his sights on a
billionaire who is also a high-end art thief
10.00 Trollied. Gavin struggles to hire a night
manager as Valco gets set to open 24 hours
10.30 A League of Their Own. The second
of two compilations of out-takes (r) (AD)
11.00 The Force: North East. Featuring a man
who barricaded himself in his house (r)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World. Investigating
sex trafficking in India (r) 1.00am Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.00 The Blacklist (r) (AD) 4.00 Stop,
Search, Seize (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 The Guest Wing (r)
(AD) 8.00 Richard E Grant’s Hotel Secrets (r)
(AD) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r)
(AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue
Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00
House. Guest starring Billy Connolly (r) (AD)
6.00 House. The team treats an army
veteran charged with treason (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
An elderly cancer patient is murdered (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Erin and Anthony try to
prevent the deportation of a community
activist. Bridget Moynahan stars (r) (AD)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Daenerys fights back,
Jaime faces an unexpected situation
and Arya returns home (4/7) (r) (AD)
10.00 Game of Thrones. Daenerys makes an
offer to the Lords of Westeros (8/7) (r) (AD)
11.10 Spielberg. A look at the career of the
acclaimed filmmaker, Steven Spielberg (r) (AD)
1.50am Dexter. Debra is abducted (r) 3.00
Banshee (r) (AD) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life (AD) 8.00 Chicago Fire
(r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00 Cold Case (r)
11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia 12.00 House
Hunters International (r) 1.00pm To Catch a
Smuggler: JFK Airport (r) 2.00 Nothing to
Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 Chicago Fire (r)
5.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 The Chef’s Line. Australian culinary contest
6.30 The Real A&E (3/10) (r) (AD)
7.00 Criminal Minds (r)
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Chicago Fire. Casey and Severide find
themselves at odds after a disagreement
10.00 How to Get Away with Murder.
New series. Legal drama starring Viola Davis
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. Grissom
investigates an apparent suicide (r) 1.00am
Cold Case (r) 2.00 Bones (r) (AD) 3.00 Scandal
(r) (AD) 4.00 The Chef’s Line (r) 4.30 The Real
A&E (r) (AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am Dvorák: The Complete Symphonies 7.00
Brahms: Piano Concertos No 1 & No 2 9.00 Tales
of the Unexpected (AD) 9.30 Hollywood: Singing
and Dancing (AD) 10.45 Monty Python’s
Personal Best 12.00 Too Young to Die (AD)
1.00pm Discovering: Gary Cooper (AD) 2.00
Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 2.30 Hollywood:
Singing and Dancing (AD) 3.45 Monty Python’s
Personal Best 5.00 Too Young to Die (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Natalie Wood. A portrait (AD)
7.00 Katherine Jenkins Live at the O2.
A 2010 concert by the mezzo
9.00 Michael Ball: Both Sides Now.
A concert by the singer and West End star
at London’s Hammersmith Apollo
11.45 Spielberg and Williams: The Adventure
Continues. The collaboration between
Steven Spielberg and John Williams
12.15am Troublemakers: The Story of Land
Art 1.45 Heimat 4.00 Frank Sinatra:
In Concert at the Royal Festival Hall 5.00
Auction: Jackie Kennedy Special 5.30 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 8.30 Live Test
Cricket: South Africa v India. Day five in the first
Test of the three-match series 3.45pm Best of
Sky Cricket 4.00 Sky Sports News
7.00 Transfer Centre. The latest developments
7.30 Live Carabao Cup: Manchester City v Bristol
City (Kick-off 7.45). All the action from the
semi-final first-leg encounter at the Etihad
Stadium. The Robins claimed a shock 2-1 victory
at home to Manchester United in the
quarter-finals, but face an even tougher task
this evening, though the Citizens were taken to
penalty shootouts in their previous two matches
in the competition against Wolverhampton
Wanderers and Leicester City. See Viewing Guide
10.15 The Debate. The latest news
11.15 Revista De La Liga
11.45 My Icon: Thierry Henry
12.00 Sky Sports News 1.00am Live WWE Late
Night Smackdown. Wrestling action with the
over-the-top stars 3.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Survivors.
New series. The voices of civilians injured or
bereaved as a result of the Troubles, featuring
powerful personal testimonies 11.10 Canvey:
The Promised Island. Following members of a
Hasidic Jewish community moving to Canvey
Island. See Viewing Guide (AD) 11.50 Boots:
Pharmacists Under Pressure? Workload
pressure and patient safety at the high-street
chain’s pharmacies (r) 12.20am Meth and
Madness in Mexico: Stacey Dooley Investigates.
New series. The journalist meets people
involved in the global drugs trade (AD)
1.20-6.00 BBC News
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BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys. (1/2)
Michael Portillo learns about an Edwardian
fitness craze in Dresden (5/10) (r) (AD)
8.00 Andrew Marr’s The Making of Modern
Britain. The journalist continues his examination
of Edwardian Britain, focusing on the tensions
caused by the suffragettes and the start
of the First World War (2/6) (r) (AD)
9.00 England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and
Death of Lady Jane Grey. New series. Docudrama
presented by the historian Helen Castor.
See Viewing Guide (1/3) (AD)
10.00 Fit to Rule: How Royal Illness Changed
History. How the physical and mental health of
Britain’s monarchs shaped its history (r) (AD)
11.00 Catching History’s Criminals: The
Forensics Story. The surgeon and writer
Gabriel Weston charts the history of forensic
science to catch murderers (r) (AD)
12.00 Top of the Pops: 1981. Double bill (r)
1.20am England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life
and Death of Lady Jane Grey. Docudrama
(r) (AD) 2.20-3.20 Andrew Marr’s The
Making of Modern Britain (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Coach Trip:
Road to Tenerife (r) (AD) 7.30 Streetmate (r)
8.00 Charmed (r) 9.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD)
10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(r) (AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm
The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 Melissa &
Joey (r) (AD) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r) 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 5.00 The
Goldbergs. Comedy starring Jeff Garlin (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Misbah has to act fast (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Tenerife (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Tattoo Fixers. Two ladettes who need help
with their foul-mouthed foot tattoos (AD)
10.00 8 Out of 10 Cats. Comedy panel show (r)
10.55 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.25 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.55 Gogglebox. Viewers’ thoughts (r)
1.00am Tattoo Fixers. Foot tattoos (r) (AD)
2.00 Rude Tube: Rude Zoo (r) 2.55 Rude Tube
(r) 3.20 Celebs Go Dating (r) (AD) 4.15
Rude(ish) Tube (r) 4.40 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.30 A Place
in the Sun: Home or Away (r) 10.30 Four in a
Bed (r) 1.05pm Come Dine with Me (r)
3.50 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away (r)
5.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. A dachshund is brought in
with a deformed foot, a Labrador needs a hip
replacement, and the owners of a shih-tzu
agonise over an extremely risky operation (r)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows
the conversion of a large, Grade II-listed
timber-framed barn in Essex into a family
home and artists’ workspace with a minimal
number of interior walls (4/12) (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: The Lincoln Lawyer (15, 2011)
A cynical lawyer realises the rich man he is
defending on a rape charge may have escaped
justice for another attack in the past. Thriller
with Matthew McConaughey and Marisa Tomei
11.20 Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
Gordon Ramsay travels to Queens in New York
to help the owners of a steakhouse (r)
12.20am A Very British Brothel. Documentary
(r) 1.20 Grand Designs (r) (AD) 2.30-3.30
8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown (r)
11.00am Pillow Talk (PG, 1959) Romantic
comedy starring Rock Hudson and Doris Day
1.10pm Tulsa (U, 1949) Drama starring Susan
Hayward 2.55 Fixed Bayonets! (PG, 1951)
Korean War drama starring Richard Basehart
(b/w) 4.45 The War Wagon (U, 1967)
Western starring John Wayne and Kirk Douglas
6.50 Ride Along (12, 2014) A tough cop takes
his sister’s boyfriend with him on duty, leading
to a dangerous encounter with the city’s most
wanted criminal. Comedy starring Ice Cube,
Kevin Hart and Laurence Fishburne (AD)
9.00 The Fault in Our Stars (12, 2014) Two
American teenagers bond at a cancer support
group and go on a literary pilgrimage to
Amsterdam. Romantic drama based on the
bestselling novel by John Green, starring
Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort (AD)
11.30 Remembrance (15, 1982) Royal Navy
sailors spend their last 24 hours ashore before
their ship sets sail for a six-month Nato
exercise. Drama starring Gary Oldman, Timothy
Spall, John Altman and Sheila Ballantine
1.45am-3.50 Wild Bill (15, 2011) Crime
drama with Charlie Creed-Miles and Will Poulter
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 6.55 Dress to Impress (r) 7.45
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.20 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 9.25 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.10
Who’s Doing the Dishes? (r) 11.10 Dress to
Impress (r) 12.10pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.45 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
5.50 Take Me Out. Dating show (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Walden invites
the actress Lynda Carter over for dinner
8.30 Superstore. Jonah becomes competitive
when he passes his employee training test (AD)
9.00 FILM: Sherlock Holmes: A Game of
Shadows (12, 2011) The detective meets his
match in the elusive mastermind behind an
international network of crime. Detective thriller
sequel starring Robert Downey Jr (AD)
11.40 Family Guy. Lois becomes a gambling
addict at a Native American casino (r) (AD)
12.10am Family Guy (r) (AD) 12.40 American
Dad! (r) (AD) 1.35 Two and a Half Men (r)
2.05 Superstore (r) (AD) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) 7.55 The Royal (r) 9.00 Judge
Judy (r) 10.20 The Darling Buds of May (r)
12.35pm The Royal (r) 1.40 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 4.20 On the
Buses (r) 4.55 Rising Damp (r) 5.25 George
and Mildred (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica visits a friend’s
Arizona ranch — but as soon as she arrives, the
community is plunged into disarray by a local
psychic’s sinister predictions (r) (AD)
8.00 Midsomer Murders. The bell-ringers of
Midsomer Wellow are mysteriously murdered
one by one — and it seems an ancient rhyme
may hold the key to the killer’s motive (r) (AD)
10.00 Foyle’s War. Sam and Foyle are shot at
and almost run over by a speeding vehicle — and
an undercover investigation reveals the
detective’s son Andrew to be involved. Wartime
drama starring Michael Kitchen (2/4) (r) (AD)
12.15am Inspector Morse. The badly beaten
body of 18-year-old clerk Sylvia Kane is found
in a pub car park by her boyfriend (r) (SL)
2.10 ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Pawn Stars (r) 7.35
Ironside (r) (AD) 8.30 Quincy ME (r) 9.35
Minder (r) (AD) 10.40 The Sweeney (r) 11.50
The Professionals (r) (AD) 12.50pm Ironside (r)
1.55 Quincy ME (r) 2.55 Minder (r) (AD) 4.00
The Sweeney (r) 5.05 The Professionals (r) (AD)
6.05 The Car Chasers. A visit to Hollywood (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars. A Mercedes golf cart (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. A toy rocket (r)
8.00 The Chase: Celebrity Special (r)
9.00 Britain’s Busiest Airport: Heathrow.
Behind the scenes of the airport (1/3) (r) (AD)
10.00 FILM: Inside Man (15, 2006)
A negotiator deals with a hostage crisis at a
bank, but a political fixer is sent to make sure
secrets in the vault stay hidden. Thriller starring
Denzel Washington and Clive Owen (AD)
12.40am FILM: Dawn of the Dead (18,
2004) A plague leaves the world overrun by
zombies, forcing the survivors to retreat to a
shopping mall — which is soon surrounded.
Horror remake with Ving Rhames and Sarah
Polley (AD) 2.40 Football Rivalries (r)
2.50 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Deadly 60 on a Mission 4.00 Ice
Road Truckers 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. A game of car darts (AD)
7.00 Cops UK: Bodycam Squad. Following the
work of the Staffordshire Police force, featuring
a mixture of body and observational footage
8.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.
Dave investigates whether the queue’s days are
numbered, and sees how the audience react
when someone pushes into a queue
9.00 Live at the Apollo. Russell Howard
and Jo Brand perform stand-up comedy
10.00 Taskmaster. The famous contestants
fell rubber ducks and destroy a cake
11.00 QI. With guests Doon Mackichan, Alan
Davies, Jimmy Carr and Dara O Briain
11.40 QI. Stephen Fry hosts, with Sean Lock,
Alan Davies. Bill Bailey and Jo Brand
12.20am Mock the Week. Highlights from
the quiz 1.00 QI 2.20 Mock the Week 3.00
Live at the Apollo 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The Bill 12.00
The Duchess of Duke Street 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Steptoe and Son (b/w) 2.20
Birds of a Feather 3.00 London’s Burning 4.00
New Tricks 5.00 The Duchess of Duke Street
6.00 One Foot in the Grave. Victor quarrels with
an unhelpful electricity board representative
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine.
Smiler decides to become a lollipop man
7.20 Goodnight Sweetheart. Gary is summoned
to court to answer drink-driving charges
8.00 Death in Paradise. A plantation owner
ends up dead during a seance (1/8) (AD)
9.00 New Tricks. UCOS investigates the death
of a talented cricket prodigy (5/10) (AD)
10.20 New Tricks. The team investigates
a lookalike agency (6/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Tracey agrees
to give Sharon driving lessons
12.00 The Bill 1.00am Bergerac 2.15 FILM:
Happy Hour (15, 2003) Drama starring
Anthony LaPaglia and Eric Stoltz 3.35
Garden Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time Team
9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Machines of War (AD)
11.00 Abandoned Engineering (AD) 12.00 Time
Team 1.00pm Human Planet (AD) 2.00
Atlantic: The Wildest Ocean on Earth 3.00 Coast
(AD) 4.00 Slow Train Through Africa with Griff
Rhys Jones 5.00 The Nazis: A Warning from
History. Why the Germans fought on despite
disastrous military defeats (AD)
6.00 Battleplan. Attempts to blockade Britain
7.00 Machines of War. The history of tanks (AD)
8.00 Abandoned Engineering. Deserted projects
of the space age, including the HARP gun in
Barbados and the mountainside Barcroft
Observatory in California (2/6) (AD)
9.00 Porridge. The inmates face a day of hard
labour digging drains on a stretch of moorland
9.40 Porridge. Fletch tries to shirk his duties
10.20 Porridge. Fletcher becomes an agony aunt
11.00 Open All Hours. Following a break-in,
grumpy grocer Arkwright buys a guard dog
11.40 Open All Hours. Granville is left in charge
12.20am Open All Hours 1.00 Diamond
Decades 2.00 Pointless 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 8.00pm-9.00 River City.
Rick’s threats finally come home to roost for
Alex and Lenny 10.45 Holby City. Sacha finds
his allegiances tested (AD) 11.45 Canvey:
The Promised Island. Following members of a
Hasidic Jewish community moving to Canvey
Island. See Viewing Guide (AD) 12.25am Meth
and Madness in Mexico: Stacey Dooley
Investigates. New series. The journalist meets
people involved in the global drugs trade,
beginning in Mexico (AD) 1.25 Weather for the
Week Ahead 1.30-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm Coast. The team
examines stories connected to explorers (r)
1.45 First Minister’s Questions. Full coverage
of AMs’ questions to the First Minister 2.35
Brazil with Michael Palin. The Monty Python
star travels from the northern border to
Brasilia (r) (AD) 3.35 Himalaya with Michael
Palin. From K2 in Pakistan to Ladakh in India (r)
4.35 Planet Earth II. Wildlife living in cities.
Last in the series (r) (AD) 5.35-6.00 Flog It!
The team heads to Tatton Park in Cheshire (r)
STV
As ITV except: 11.00pm Scotland Tonight
11.40 Girlfriends. Drama with Phyllis Logan,
Zoe Wanamaker and Miranda Richardson (r)
(AD) 12.35am Teleshopping 1.35 After
Midnight 3.05-5.05 ITV Nightscreen
UTV
As ITV except: 12.15am River Monsters. An
ancient fishing community being terrorised (r)
12.40 Teleshopping 2.10-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda 5.20 Na Bleigeardan
(Little Monsters) (r) 5.25 Pincidh Dincidh Dù
(Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.40 Na Floogals (r)
5.50 Srath Sona (Happy Valley) (r) 6.00
Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.15 Am Prionnsa Beag (The
Little Prince) (r) 6.35 Sealgairean Spòrsail
(History Hunters) (r) 7.00 Eileanan Fraoich:
Scalpay (r) 7.30 Speaking Our Language (r)
8.00 An Là (News) 8.30 Leugh Mi (Book
Show) 9.00 Farpaisean Chon-Chaorach
(Sheepdog Trials) 10.00 Sulaisgeir (r) 11.00
Togaidh Sinn Fonn (Join in the Music) (r) 11.25
Binneas: Na Trads (r) 11.30-12.00 Alleluia!
(Spiritual Music & Verse) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Do Re Mi Dona (r) 6.15 Abadas
(r) 6.30 Halibalw (r) 6.40 Syrcas Deithiol Dewi
(r) 6.50 Bing (r) 7.00 Meic y Marchog (r) 7.10
Sbarc (r) 7.25 Ynys Broc Môr Lili (r) 7.35 Ahoi
7.50 Peppa (r) 8.00 Octonots (r) 8.15 Chwilio
am Cyw 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r) 8.30 Tili a’i
Ffrindiau (r) 8.45 Twt (r) 8.55 Nodi (r) 9.05
Sbridiri (r) 9.25 Pingu (r) 9.30 Bobi Jac (r)
9.45 Pentre Bach (r) 10.00 Dona Direidi (r)
10.15 Abadas (r) 10.30 Halibalw (r) 10.40
Syrcas Deithiol Dewi (r) 10.50 Bing (r) 11.00
Meic y Marchog (r) 11.10 Sbarc (r) 11.25 Ynys
Broc Môr Lili (r) 11.35 Ahoi (r) 11.50 Peppa
(r) 12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 12.05pm
Dudley: O’r Gat i’r Plat (r) (AD) 12.30 Cynefin
(r) 1.30 Ward Plant (r) 2.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 3.05 Pen Llyn Harri Parri (r) (AD)
3.30 Canu’r Cymoedd (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr
5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Dreigiau: Marchogion
Berc (r) 5.25 Pat a Stan (r) 5.35 Prosiect Z
6.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05 Ar y Dibyn (r)
6.30 Rownd a Rownd (AD) 7.00 Heno 7.30
Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.00 Priodas Pum Mil
9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30 FILM: Dim
Ond Rhif 10.30-11.35 Noson Lawen (r)
14
1G T
Tuesday January 9 2018 | the times
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7544
1
2
5
Codeword No 3228
3
6
4
7
8
4
8
18
4
9
10
10
25
16
2
18
4
22
14
17
10
4
14
23
3
25
14
22
3
5
11
5
9
14
24
S
10
24
5
24
10
17
2
5
3
20
1
4
6
3
2
5
8
A
21
2
5
5
4
14
5
22
21
18
26
11
22
18
21
1
21
13
16
5
5
8
4
22
1
21
25
25
4
20
12
25
22
25
23
2
21
22
25
2
22
15
4
21
20
18
Solution to Crossword 7543
SO L EC
K O O
I NCAR
P A R
A L TO
S
D
HARDE
E
I
I GN I T
K G R
D I SHE
O U E
MOP E
I SM Z
K B
CERA T
T
S
CRE A
H
N N I A
O N
E S K I
P W
AR T EN
E
L
S Y L L A
I
D
I
O
T
I
C
NC
O
ON
F
OR
O
I N
T
CK
L O
I NG
M L
B L E
B
1
2
3
4
6
8
10
14
16
18
19
21
Go about after plunder (6)
Former Indian coin (4)
German emperor (6)
Gain by labour (4)
Plan for a future event (11)
Sceptical, unbelieving (11)
Part of an armour
helmet (5)
Heavenly body (5)
Expedition to see
animals (6)
Neglect, abandonment (6)
Sodium chloride (4)
Peaceful; tranquil (4)
9
14
23
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
15
16
17
18
19
20
S
4
11
25
24
5
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
14
8
9
10
11
12
13
21
22
23
24
25
26
M
L
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 4083
L
O
A
E
A
V
F
M
E
I
N
T
C
T
H
O
P
L
S
E
D
L
S
L
W
R
V
A
Y
A
E
R
B
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
84901 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 4084
X
I
E
O
P
T
R
P
W
L
G
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
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E
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4220
Futoshiki No 3082
Kakuro No 2041
4
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
∨
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
E
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
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SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
24
5
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
14
Down
22
5
© PUZZLER MEDIA
19 Discard; small building (4)
20 Ready to quarrel (8)
22 Rubbish left in public (6)
23 Failures of memory (6)
14
∨
>
24
41
7
16
16
28
3
22
3
13
3
>
>
∧
20
17
3
3
6
17
31
3
14
12
3
18
6
3
>
<
21
17
>
16
11
∨
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
32
3
9
3
3
14
6
4
7
3
6
4
10
17
22
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
11
12
34
3
28
© PUZZLER MEDIA
5
Stop sleeping (6)
Continent (6)
Part of airport terminal (8)
Devotional painting (4)
Sand hills (5)
Arrow shooter (6)
Funeral vehicle (6)
Small hill (5)
3
4
23
Across
5
8
10
2
21
3
7
L
17
2
1
5
5
20
14
21
13
5
7
9
11
12
13
15
17
22
6
2
17
22
20
18
22
20
25
19
3
19
14
6
6
1
15
7
20
21
13
14
M
11
12
4
Train Tracks No 301
the times | Tuesday January 9 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Magnus Carlsen
Black: Viswanathan Anand
World Rapid Championship,
Riyadh 2017
Nimzo-Indian Defence
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3
0-0 5 Bd3 d5 6 a3 Bxc3+ 7 bxc3
dxc4 8 Bxc4 c5 9 Nf3 Qc7 10 Be2
b6 11 Bb2 Bb7
The opening has been a solid
variation of the Nimzo-Indian
Defence. White’s prospects reside
in the possibility of advancing his
central pawns, while Black relies
on putting pressure on White’s
centre with his active pieces.
12 0-0 Nbd7 13 c4 Rac8 14 Rc1
Rfd8 15 Qb3 Ng4
In order to meet the threat of
16 ... Bxf3, White is obliged to
slightly weaken his defences along
the h1-a8 diagonal. This later
proves to be crucial.
16 g3 Ngf6 17 Rfd1 Ne4 18 Ne1
Nd6 19 d5
Carlsen decides to play to his
strengths, these being the central
pawns and the bishop pair.
19 ... exd5 20 cxd5 c4 21 Qc2 b5
22 Ng2 Nc5 23 Nf4 Qe7 24 Bg4
Rc7 25 Qc3 f5 26 Bf3 Rcd7 27
Qb4 Nb3 28 Ne6
In the following play, both
players show a willingness to offer
rooks for minor pieces.
28 ... Nxc1 29 Rxc1 Nc8 30 Qxb5
Rxd5 31 Bxd5 Rxd5 32 Qb4 Nd6
33 Nc5
A blunder. Correct is 33 Nf4,
when 33 ... Rb5 keeps the position
complicated. Instead Black can
head for a draw with 33 Nf4 Qe4
34 Nxd5 Qxd5 35 Kf1 f4! 36 exf4
(36 gxf4 loses to 36 ... Qd3+ 37 Ke1
c3!, when ... Ba6 will win) 36 ...
Qg2+ 37 Ke1 Qe4+ with a draw by
perpetual check.
33 ... Rxc5 34 Qxc5 Qe4 White
resigns
After 35 Kf1 Qh1+ 36 Ke2 Bf3+
37 Kd2 Ne4+ wins.
The World Rapid Championship was won by Viswanathan
Anand. Anand, Ian Nepomniachtchi and Vladimir Fedoseev all
scored 10½/15 but Anand went on
to win the tie-break. Magnus
Carlsen was in a large group who
scored 10. In the parallel women’s
event Ju Wenjun won with 11½/15
ahead of Lei Tingjie on 11.
The leading rapid players on
the latest rating list are Magnus
Carlsen 2880, Lenier DominguezPerez 2826, Hikaru Nakamura
2823, Vladimir Fedoseev 2810 and
Viswanathan Anand 2805. Top
English players are Michael Adams
2739, Luke McShane 2698 and
Matthew Sadler 2659.
________
á D 4 DkD] Winning Move
à0 0 Dp0p]
ß 0 D D 1] Black to play. This position is from
Riyadh 2017.
ÞD D gQD ] Li-Wang,
In this position both sides are, somewhat
ÝPDPD Dn)] unusually, trying to attack on the kingside.
ÜDPH Db) ] White’s weakened pawn cover in that
Û G D ) D] sector proves fatal. Can you see why?
ÚDBD DRI ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
HARDER
–9
81 + 16 x 4
+ 1/2
♠ AQ 8 4
♥K J 9 6
♦J 8 5
♣K 5
♠ J 10 9 6 N
♥A 7 4 W E
♦AQ
S
♣AQ J 10♠ 5
♥Q 10 3
♦K 10 4 3
♣7 6 4 3 2
S(Crouch)
W
OF IT
OF IT
+ 78
103 x 4 + 149 x 5 + 477
–7
÷9
SQUARE
IT
90%
OF IT
+ 33
2/3
+ 1/2
OF IT
OF IT
x 2 – 762
x2
–7
– 24
+ 1/2
3/4
OF IT
6
OF IT
– 449
4
4
Killer Moderate No 5808
18
8
5
20
14
4
10
14
8
6min
6
17
29
16
5
14
12
11
6
10
15
8
22
3
13
10
8
16
Killer Tough No 5809
12
18
18
N
E
1♦(1)
Dbl(2) Pass
2♣
Pass
Pass
Dbl(3)
Pass
Pass(4) Redbl(5) Pass
2♥
Dbl
End
(1) Some experts play a 1♦ opener as
either natural or any 18-19 balanced. One
upside is they can rebid 1NT to show 18-19
and not go overboard when partner is very
weak.
(2) Would prefer to hold a club more and a
diamond fewer but double is surely the percentage action, finding a 4-4 major fit most
of the time.
(3) Take-out. East has skimpy values but
partner rates to be 18-19 balanced so it’s
worth competing.
(4) Delighted to convert the double into
penalties, given his 100 for honours in
trumps (they do not count at Teams, though).
(5) For rescue. “Yikes, partner, try something else. I’m really sorry I got you into
this mess.”
Contract: 2♥ Dbled, Opening Lead: ♥ 4
and dummy’s ace. Declarer scored
the last trick with the promoted
eight of spades, beating East’s
seven. Eight tricks and doubled
contract made — into game.
Crouch became a grandfather
the following day.
andrew.robson@theatines.co.UK
16
3
18
8
17
23min
7
15
12
8
13
17
9
10
= 10 from 1-9 are
-
+
+
+
+
x
=
3
=
9
=
3
10
16
Solutions
Codeword 3227
9 7
7 8 9
5 6 8 9
5 7
1 2 6 8
3 1
4
5 6
6 1 8
9 4 7 8
8 2 9 6
4 3 1
6 9 7 3
7
7
5 9
9 5 7
1 2 6 8
9 7
7 8 9
5 6
5
7
3
3
4
1
6
5
7
9
2
8
9
7
2
4
8
3
1
5
6
5
6
8
9
2
1
7
4
3
1
5
3
8
9
2
6
7
4
1
3
9
7
8
2
4
6
5
7
2
4
5
6
1
3
8
9
6
5
8
9
4
3
2
7
1
8
9
5
2
7
4
1
3
6
MO I S
I
C L I M
L
M
I MP R
F
E
F E L L
M
J UG
O U
K
S H
E A T
R OU
6 2
8 1
9 4
8 9
9 7
3 5
2 1
1
Train Tracks 300
T
O
ARC
B
C
U
OMP
V
Y
E D
R O
E X P
X
E
E E N
R
E
T E R
8
9
7
3
6
4
5
1
2
6
1
5
2
3
8
4
9
7
7
3
9
5
4
6
2
8
1
2
8
4
1
7
9
3
6
5
2
4
7
3
1
6
5
9
8
3
6
1
8
9
5
7
4
2
5
7
2
6
3
9
8
1
4
9
1
3
4
5
8
6
2
7
4
8
6
1
2
7
9
5
3
4
5
1
2
9
8
3
6
7
9
3
6
4
7
1
5
8
2
7
2
8
5
6
3
4
1
9
1
4
7
3
5
9
8
2
6
4
7
9
6
5
3
1
8
2
2
3
1
8
7
4
9
6
5
7
9
8
1
4
6
2
5
3
2
4
5
1
3
2
2
9
5
6
8
7
1
3
4
6
1
4
9
3
2
7
5
8
3
7
2
8
4
5
6
9
1
5
8
9
7
1
6
2
4
3
5
6
2
9
3
8
7
4
1
3
1
4
7
2
5
6
9
8
9
4
7
3
8
2
5
1
6
6
2
3
5
9
1
8
7
4
1
8
5
4
6
7
3
2
9
9
13
17
22
10
4 2
2
13
4
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
14
5
2
x
6 5
2
2
2
2
2
9
÷
+
7
5
∨
3
4
3
1
2
4
∧
5
1
1
+
8
6
4
x
-
+
x
6
2
3
2
3
5
4
4
4
2
3
A
3
1
B
Suko 2129
1
8
7
5
2
6
3
4
9
9
2
5
3
4
8
7
1
6
4
3
6
7
1
9
2
8
5
2
9
4
8
3
1
5
6
7
6
7
1
2
9
5
4
3
8
8
5
3
6
7
4
1
9
2
7
6
8
4
5
3
9
2
1
3
1
2
9
6
7
8
5
4
5
4
9
1
8
2
6
7
3
G
A
N
D
U
I
T
C
H
E
R
A
O
Y
G
E
R
H
T
U
E
I
M
O
B
R
Lexica 4082
+
-
2
Lexica 4081
1
5
2
∨
∧
1
5 > 2
4 > 3
Set Square 2043
Cell Blocks 3110
7
Sudoku 9579
8
6
3
1
2
4
9
7
5
Futoshiki 3081
KenKen 4219
12
9
AN
D
ADO
CK
Z
E
E
DON
W
RO L L
N
A
S S L Y
E
E
VO T E R
V E
G
T ANGY
Killer 5807
8
5
6
2
1
9
4
3
7
1
C E
T
H I
Q
T U
E
S T
T
R E
Sudoku 9578
4
2
6
7
1
5
8
3
9
22
17
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 5 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
= 28 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
4 > 3
14
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
All the digits
+
+
÷
7
25
3
-
Killer 5806
♠K 7 3 2
♥8 5 2
♦9 7 6 2
♣9 8
3 6
3
x
Sudoku 9577
4
4
÷
Kakuro 2040
10
11
16
11
2
3
9
Yesterday’s answers
ache, ahem, arch, cha, chafe, chafer,
chamfer, char, charm, chef, each, fah,
haem, ham, hare, harem, harm, hear,
hem, her, herm, mache, macher,
march, meh, rah, reach, rhea
19
2
Set Square No 2044
From these letters, make words of
three or more letters, always
including the central letter. Answers
must be in the Concise Oxford
Dictionary, excluding capitalised
words, plurals, conjugated verbs (past
tense etc), adverbs ending in LY,
comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 9 words, average;
13, good; 16, very good; 20, excellent
Dealer: West, Vulnerability: North-South
Teams
OF IT
1/2
Polygon
12
Bridge Andrew Robson
My international friend Peter
Crouch was the star of today’s deal
from the English Premier League
at the West Midlands Bridge Club
in Solihull. As South, he declared
the unsavoury contract of 2♥ doubled with West having implied 1819 balanced and shown good clubs
(for his penalty pass of partner’s
take-out double of 2♣).
West led the inevitable trump
(normally best versus a doubled
part-score). Declarer won in hand
with the ten and wisely resisted
the temptation to finesse dummy’s
queen of spades at trick two, planning (if successful) to ruff a spade
while he still held a heart. He’d
have gone for 800 (three down
doubled, vulnerable) if he had.
Instead, he led back a (low) heart.
West won the ace of hearts and
promptly returned a third heart (a
spade switch would have worked
better but West could not know his
partner held the king). Declarer
won in hand with the queen and
led up a diamond. West won the
queen and led ace-then-queen of
clubs to dummy’s king.
Declarer led dummy’s jack of
diamonds, West winning the ace
and leading the jack of clubs,
dummy ruffing with the 13th heart.
Declarer crossed to his king-ten of
diamonds and West was squeezed
down to the jack-ten of spades (the
crucial nine of spades having to
go) and ten of clubs, dummy holding the ace-queen-eight of spades
and East the king-seven-three.
At trick 11, declarer led his singleton spade to the ten and queen.
East won the king but his forced
spade return went to West’s jack
MEDIUM
1/3
x5
57
EASY
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Today’s game was the needle
clash between the reigning and
former world champions that
decided the outcome of the King
Salman World Rapid Chess Championship in Riyadh.
________
á D D DkD]
à0bD 1 0p]
ß D hND D]
ÞD DrDpD ]
Ý !pD D D]
Ü) D ) ) ]
Û G D ) )]
ÚD $ D I ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
World Rapid
Cell Blocks No 3111
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
2
x
x
Quiz 1 The Sound of Silence 2 Ngo Dinh Diem
3 Andy Dalziel and Peter Pascoe 4 A Man for
All Seasons 5 Henry Kissinger 6 Minnesota
7 Hector Berlioz 8 Hannah Cowley 9 Croatia
10 Alex Graham 11 Ignite spontaneously on
exposure to air 12 Mexico City 13 Doncaster
14 Harlequins 15 Clarinet
3
L
L
B
A
M
N
E
E
E
A
A
D
P
O
I
G
E
Y
Word watch
Paperwhite (a) A type
of narcissus
Passementerie (c) A
decorative trim of cloth
fringe, cords or beads
Plandid (b) A “planned
candid” photograph
on Instagram
Brain Trainer
Easy 25; Medium 591;
Harder 6,364
Chess 1 ... Qxh4! wins at
once as 2 gxh4 Bh2 is mate
09.01.18
MindGames
Mild No 9580
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Paperwhite
a A plant
b Extremely virtuous
c A trademark
Passementerie
a A grocer’s store
b A bird cemetery
c Trimmings
Plandid
a Efficient
b A photo opportunity
c Melodic
Answers on page 15
Difficult No 9581
7
1 8
7 2
4 5
6
5
9
7 3
2
9
5 4
5
6
9
1 2
1 5
2 8
5
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Super fiendish No 9582
8
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
3 6
7
2 7
8 5
3 6 9
1
2 9
1
7 8 6
6 4
7
5
8
1 9
7 6
9
3
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
12 Inaugurated in
1945, the movie
studio, Estudios
Churubusco, is in
which capital city?
1 Which Simon and
Garfunkel song begins:
“Hello darkness, my
old friend”?
2 Which president
of South Vietnam
was assassinated in
November 1963?
15
3 Reginald Hill
introduced which
pair of detectives
in the novel A
Clubbable Woman?
6 The actress
Winona Ryder was
born near Winona
in which US state?
4 Robert Shaw
played Henry VIII
in the 1966 film
adaptation of
which play?
7 The Irish actress
Harriet Smithson
was the first wife
and muse of which
French composer?
5 Which US secretary
of state was born in
Fürth, Bavaria?
8 The Belle’s
Stratagem (1780)
was which English
dramatist’s most
successful work?
9 Klenovnik Castle is
the largest castle in
which EU country?
10 Which Scottish
cartoonist created the
comic strip Fred Basset?
11 In chemistry, what
does a pyrophoric
substance tend to do?
13 Which South
Yorkshire racecourse
is sometimes
called the Town
Moor course?
14 The English
rugby players
Danny Care, Joe
Gray and Will
Collier play for
which London club?
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 1000
15 Which musical
instrument is
pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1001
3
4
5
6
11
13
14
7
15
10
12
16
17
19
20
21
22
S UN S H A D
U O O O
N
N A N A S
E
A
E
D
A N T E NN A
N
N
E
DOS A ND
U
N
S
D
OU
NU T S
O
E
S
S
H E A D S E T
S
A
E
O
UND
DO T
E S
E
A N
T
E
H
DO
U
T S
E
S
A
U T
H
O
E T
S
S H
O
N T
HO
U
A T
D
EO
OD
U
T E
N
UN
A
S
H
N E
N
A N
A
U S
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Orpheus
8
9
4 5
8 2
1
7 3 4
6 9 8
2
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
GETTY
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Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
1
3
18
Across
1 Well-made chair finally
installed in workplace (6)
5 Moral code that could be his,
etc (6)
8 Potential customer looking
through lights? (6-7)
9 Ancient Greek portico some
confess to admiring (4)
10 Etiquette image promoter
introduces to senior officer (8)
11 One searching for a specially
bred horse (6)
13 Popular ship’s officer — one
serving porridge, perhaps? (6)
15 How one garrulous speaker
may talk to the dozen! (8)
17 Inferior supporter backing
Fulham at first (4)
19 Trick a woman into wrongly
identifying stars (13)
21 French physicist’s bilingual
declaration of fatherhood? (6)
22 Theme Republican found in
the publicity (6)
Down
2 Twerp consuming second roll
(5)
3 Glowing girl initially ashamed
during harangue (7)
4 Tree the solver talked of? (3)
5 The piano I played for an
African (9)
6 Thick-skinned animal, one
very quietly entering house (5)
7 Revolutionary source for a
cigar (7)
10 Keep going, intrinsically
gripping always (9)
12 Unvarying higher education
class? (7)
14 Cleric abandoning island
church (7)
16 Follow girl with English name
(5)
18 Girl originally from Hebridean
island (5)
20 One may be knocked down —
its fate! (3)
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