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The Times Times 2 - 10 January 2018

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January 10 | 2018
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The new rules for workout gear
Left: top, �, Under
Armour; leggings,
�, Monreal
(thesportsedit.com).
Centre: quilted gilet,
�.99, mango.com.
Right: top, �.90;
leggings, �2, Alo Yoga
(thesportsedit.com)
2
1G T
Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
times2
Why it?s tricky
How do men get any
work done when they
watch this much porn?
Carol Midgley
G
ood news ? at last
? from the Houses
of Parliament. Only
24,473 attempts have
been made to access
porn via computers
and devices
connected to the
parliamentary network since the
general election. That is a mere 160
times a day. Rejoice, rejoice, rejoice.
Wait, you don?t think this is good
news, do you? You think that?s quite
a lot. On the contrary, this is progress.
In 2016 the parliamentary filtering
system had to block 113,208 attempts
to download pornography, a fall from
213,020 the previous year.
How did those people ever get any
work done in 2015? Answer any
phones? (Sympathy here for the
Houses of Parliament cleaners.) It
does raise the aching question: why do
so many people want to ?relax? this
way at work, when this is the place
where they eat from a polystyrene
tray, borrow colleagues? staplers and
can see photos of other people?s
children 2ft away? A survey found that
about 1.5 million Britons had watched
porn on a work phone, tablet or
laptop, which may require us to
urgently rethink the term ?pop-ups?.
It?s hardly the ideal ambience for
that most special kind of me-time, is
it? Especially if someone looms behind
your chair and finds you stuck into
Pornrabbit ten minutes before your
appraisal. I recently asked a male
friend who happily admits to firing up
Pornhub on his work laptop why he
does it. ?Boredom, mainly,? he said
with a shrug. ?And possibly the risk.?
Plus, he said, men think about sex all
the time, but previously they wouldn?t
have risked sneaking a dirty mag to
work in their bag. Now there?s one
permanently in their phone. He is
unapologetic about this, especially
when ?women shop for clothes on their
work computers, which, by the way,
takes a lot more time than a . . . ? Yes,
thank you. We?ve all got the picture.
If boredom is the culprit, then I
dread to think how many people in
the Palace of Westminster furtively
switched screens during the flaccid
anticlimax that was Theresa May?s
reshuffle on Monday to seek out Good
How to
marry like
Meghan
Here?s a claim that I
will respectfully tidy
away in the file marked
?crock of horseshit?. It
is that the ?Meghan
phenomenon? has
Even after writing seven bestsellers
Jane Fallon is resigned to being known
as the other half of that bloke from
The Office, she tells Helen Rumbelow
A sense of
humour
gap in W1A
Will Humping instead. Data released
after a freedom of information request
by the Press Association showed a
spike in attempts to visit porn sites
in September last year, with 9,467
requests from the House of Lords
and Commons. Why September?
Post-holiday blues? Celebrating the
new Jane Austen � note? These are
overcrowded buildings where lots of
handshakes happen, so do think on
that (although I?m trying not to).
Public and private boundaries have
blurred so much that people openly
watch porn on the bus or in hospital
wards and see it as akin to ?aahing?
over a cat video. The difference is
that you probably won?t be sacked for
gross misconduct for staring at the
Emergency Kittens Twitter feed.
However, I have another theory:
porn binges may be the new smoking
breaks. Years ago people had natural
pauses in the day where they would
leave their desk intermittently to stand
elsewhere, indulge in pleasure and
bond with other human beings. Now
the number of smokers is at a record
low, that?s mostly gone, but people?s
desire to get into a different headspace
every now and then hasn?t.
So less lung cancer, but more ogling
at Twin Cheeks at 11am. It?s progress of
sorts, I suppose.
seized the wedding
industry, with
bridezillas demanding
?copycat? weddings to
emulate Meghan
Markle and Prince
Harry. The evidence?
There has been, says
the industry, an
increase in the number
of online searches for
?castle venues?,
?bespoke engagement
rings? and ?London
proposal ideas?. Ah
yes, of course. Because
no bride or groom has
ever before thought
of booking a castle,
getting a pricey ring
or proposing in that
little-known city,
London. Case proven.
I suppose we can
expect much more
of this crud as May
approaches and the
PRs? frenzy reaches
Anyone who watched
W1A ? the BBC
comedy that satirised
BBC management as
humourless jobsworths,
thus showing that they
must be, like, totally
cool dudes really for
waving it through ?
will know that it was
running out of steam in
the final series.
But what?s that they
say about ?God will
provide?? The Carrie
Gracie equal-pay farce
is a whole new series,
right there on a plate.
Not simply the
deliciously W1A
moment when Gracie,
presenting Today, had
to sit mute while John
Humphrys interviewed
Mariella Frostrup
about Gracie because
impartiality rules
forbade him to
interview Gracie about
Gracie, even though
Gracie was the story.
Got that?
Some BBC journalists
were told that
impartiality meant that
they couldn?t report on
gender pay if they had
tweeted support for
Gracie. Given that most
of those were women, it
means men will be the
ones left talking about
equal pay for women.
Call the ?head of
empowerment?.
If there?s one result
the BBC could salvage
from this, it would be to
resurrect W1A. May as
well, guys. The script?s
practically written.
its zenith. I?ll get in
first with my exclusive
?Meghan phenomenon?
predictions.
These are that there
will be some brides
who, shamelessly
copying Meghan, will
say ?I will? at the altar,
order flowers via a
?florist? and wear a
long dress, possibly
whiteish in colour.
You heard it here first.
B
ack in the early 1980s
there was a skinny
young couple who were
broke and desperate
enough to rent a bedsit
above a brothel in what
was then London?s
sleaziest, druggiest
neighbourhood, King?s Cross. Jane
Fallon was the fifth child of a
newsagent, who grew up above her
parents? shop. Her boyfriend, whom she
met at university, was Ricky Gervais,
the fourth child of a labourer, who
grew up on a Reading council estate.
The odds seemed to be against them.
She dreamt of writing paperbacks like
the ones in the shop below her
childhood bedroom, but felt debilitated
by shyness and that her secret, burning
ambition could never be realised.
?Because I thought people would
laugh,? she tells me. ?This is going to
sound pathetic, but I thought it was not
the sort of thing people like me do.?
Gervais was unambitious and felt
strongly that for people from his
background it was better ?to never
try than risk failing?. They would both
be in their forties before they made
their names ? she as a novelist with
seven Top Ten bestsellers and he as,
well, Ricky Gervais.
If, I ask Fallon when we sit down
over a coffee, I were able to show you
then, in your King?s Cross hovel, your
life now, after 35 years, what would
you think? Not just about the riches,
the red carpets, the � million pad in
Hampstead, the Manhattan apartment
and so on, but the respect that you
have earned for your work? However,
she slightly swerves my point about
celebrity and massive wealth. It seems
to make her uncomfortable.
?If you?re in a place like that and you
have no way of getting out, then I
can?t imagine how horrendous that is,
but I always had probably a misguided
and blind faith: ?We?re going to get
ourselves out of this.? ?
There is something about Gervais in
his TV comedies since The Office ?
featuring variously dwarfs or men with
learning difficulties ? that leaves a bit
of a question mark. Does he go too far
and use his comic creations as a
licence for bigotry rather than satire?
Meeting Fallon (and everyone I know
who meets her says the same)
somehow puts those doubts to rest.
Her latest novel, Faking Friends, shares
the same qualities as all her books. It
feels like a conversation with a friend
? although not just any friend, but a
previously normal friend sent
deranged by their cheating partner
and plotting a truly bonkers revenge.
Fallon?s stories examine what it
takes to meet the test of a close
relationship: loyalty, humour and
decency. If, through The Office,
Gervais exposed the despair of
everyday life, then Fallon shows its
drama ? but in their own unexpected
ways both can be tenderly moral.
At 57 she?s lean and kind of punky.
She likes jeans and scraped-back hair,
and her watchful eyes are black-lined.
I can?t get enough of her description
of the brothel bedsit. There was a bed
from which they could touch the
cooker and that was it for luxury. The
skanky toilet was shared by others in
the building up the stairs. All night
men would pitch up on the street
below, ringing both doorbells in their
urgency. ?Drunk, horny men ringing
my doorbell all night. Grim.?
Was it unsafe? Photos from the time
show Gervais in his androgynous, eye
make-up phase while in a newromantic pop band ? not, perhaps,
bodyguard material.
?Coming home late at night I would
feel creeped out,? says Fallon. ?It was
a rough area and the flat was just
disgusting. But the worst thing about
it, apart from being a bit insect-y,
was that the landlord had done
something to the meter; it somehow
ate all this money. I was earning �
a week; 50p for an hour of a bar fire
was a lot of money. So we went
through three winters with icicles on
the inside of the windows.
?We worked out that it would be
cheaper to go to the pub, have one
pint each and make it last than sit at
home. This pub was full of local
gangsters, but for some reason they
adopted us. So we?d go along with our
money for one pint and they?d buy us
drinks all evening. We started going
there all the time. It was these
amazing people who took us under
their wing.?
She was a grafter, though. There was
drive beneath her shyness. ?I think it?s
part of coming from a big family. You
feel you?ve got to make sure you get
somewhere to stand out from the
crowd. Even as a kid I was much more
interested in trying to find a career
than in getting married or having
babies. I think also that when you?re
shy it?s especially important. You want
something that says, ?Actually I?m not
just this socially awkward wallflower,
I?m really quite good at stuff.? ?
Gervais is exponentially more
famous than Fallon. Yet for most
couples what would stand out would
be her career ? as a successful
producer of television shows such as
EastEnders, This Life and Teachers,
then a prolific and popular novelist,
each book optioned for either
television or film, including one by
Jennifer Aniston. The pair are
impressive and fortunate in that
they have achieved their dreams
If I die the news
will be, ?Partner
of Ricky Gervais
and novelist dies?
the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
3
1G T
times2
being the partner of Ricky
The lowdown
Volocopter
GETTY IMAGES
in separate fields. This was done
their way; although their decision
not to marry or have children is
always interrogated. How does she
negotiate the fame of her partner?
?Sometimes we?ll go somewhere and
people will be looking at him and I?ll
think, ?Why are they looking at my
boyfriend?? It?s actually easy to forget.
And that?s all right. We made a
decision very early on that we were
going to not do those couply things,
the spreads in the magazines and stuff
like that. It is a mental-health choice
as much as anything else. With my ?I
want to do something with my own
life? obsession I didn?t want to be
known as the partner of a celebrity
before anything else.?
But that must be what is hard? ?It
can get a bit frustrating. If I die I know
the news item would be, ?Partner of
Ricky Gervais and novelist dies.? That
would come first. But I?ve come to
terms with it. As long as they do still
add the ?and novelist? that will be fine.?
To be clear, Fallon doesn?t really
want to talk about him, and it sounds
as though they have separate working
lives. Gervais has never read any of
her books. He doesn?t like fiction and
has only read one novel, Catcher in the
Rye. Fallon says she didn?t want her
writing to be the second thing he read
after that. ?I?ve always tried really hard
not to have it look like I?m trying to
piggyback off anything. It?s important
for me and my state of mind that I
know that I am where I am because
I?ve done it myself.?
She works at a rate of a book a year,
rising at 5am to write. This echoes the
timetable of her newsagent-childhood
home. Her father got up at 4.30am
every day to ?get the papers in?, she
says. ?I think I must have got that
from my dad, his need to put the
hours in. Those years of people being
up at that time. Actually he was an
insomniac, so it suited him quite well.
I?m an insomniac. My worst nightmare
is if someone said to me, ?I?m going to
make you have a lie-in.? ?
She grew up in commuter-belt
Buckinghamshire, ?quite cramped?
above the newsagents in Bourne End,
but to her it was ?idyllic? to have
her parents constantly available
Jane Fallon with her
partner, Ricky Gervais
downstairs. ?I?d get to read all the
books in the paperback stand.? As a
n
girl she would make and write her own
paperback books and insert them on
the shelves, hoping for a sale before
her father plucked them out.
She had a primetime TV producing
career. Then one night when she was
45 she was using her time lying awakee
to dream up TV show formats when
the killer plot of a novel arrived fully
formed in her head. ?It has never
happened to me again.?
She gave up her job the next day.
Her books are not ?chick lit? in that
they are about revenge rather than
infatuation. No man comes along to
make it all right; women ruin and save
themselves. ?I want to write women
who I would want to spend time with,?
she says. She doesn?t have to approve
of them to find them interesting.
?I?ve never enjoyed that whole spate
of books about women that were,
?I?m going to be 30, oh my God, I?m
not married!? And then it was, ?I?m
going to be 30? ? it?s always ?I?m going
to be 30? ? ?and I haven?t got a baby!?
I would find those women really
boring in real life.?
She cares little for marriage. ?I?ve
nothing against it, it?s more a question
of why bother than why not. ?If it ain?t
broke don?t fix it? kind of thing.? To
organise a wedding would be a
?massive headache? and she and
Gervais are contented homebodies.
Fallon?s books are unusual in that
the lead is often childless and it?s no
big deal ? common in real life, but
rare in fiction. She and Gervais
separately concluded that they were
not parenting material, and it was a
relief when they realised that this
feeling was mutual. Fallon has written
about her regret that she will not be a
grandmother, but says that she
decided against motherhood because
?I?d be such an anxious mother that
I?d make them anxious?.
But, I say, doesn?t all parenthood
pass on flaws as well as strengths?
?That?s true. I just feel that if you?re
going to have kids you need to believe
that emotionally you can give them a
really good life. It doesn?t matter how
much money you?ve got. I felt quite
strongly that that?s important. I think
going into it knowing that you?re going
to be rubbish and maybe bringing up
these anxious, nervous children
looking over their shoulder and too
scared to do anything in life . . .?
I say I think this seems harsh on
herself, but admirably moral in its way.
?I don?t know if it?s as noble as moral.
It?s just a personal thing really.?
I take that as a hint to butt out. I
can?t help but feel impressed by her
success ? impeded as much as helped
by being with the man from The
Office. She has done it by creating
unconventional heroines whom you
want to spend time with because of
their streak of darkness, not despite it.
We talk about the view of the giant
skyscraper beyond our window and
she casually says that if it blows up she
would be glad to die quickly. ?Much
better to be the first to go. Get it out
the way. It?s my philosophy in life.
When the apocalypse happens I just
want to be right in the middle of it.?
Faking Friends by Jane Fallon is
published by Penguin, �99
Would you like to be driven to work
in a remote-controlled child?s toy?
Well, no, of course not.
What if I said to you it was ?way
cool? and totally something out of
every sci-fi movie you?ve ever seen?
That changes everything! How do
I buy a season ticket?
Hmm, you are pretty much the
target of the Volocopter, the flying
taxi drone that was unveiled during
a keynote presentation by Intel in
America last weekend.
Wow, it even has a cool name. Let
me say it in a deep, ?cool? voice.
Vol-o-copter. Let?s fly off in the
Volocopter. This is so cool.
Precisely. It is basically a bigger
version of the toy drone that always
bashes into the light fixtures then
dribbles broken to the floor, but
that doesn?t bother you, does it?
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang! Herbie!
The Jetsons! No, wait ? Luke
Skywalker?s Landspeeder!
This is the problem. You are
the problem. This is why all the
cutting-edge Californian companies
are getting into air transportation.
This is why Uber has promised
flying cars and Google has
promised hoverbikes. Not because
they make any sense. They
are battery-powered. Heavy,
short-lived batteries that are
quickly drained by holding up
humans in hovering vehicles.
Oh, I got it ? Bruce Willis?s flying
taxi in The Fifth Element!
And the wobbles; remember how
your nephew?s drone wobbled so
hard that it bashed into Grandpa?
Imagine that amplified
exponentially. I?m starting to find
your enthusiasm a little immature.
No! I?m Michael J Fox in the
DeLorean in Back to the Future!
Drones can?t land very well either.
If something goes wrong they can?t
glide down, they just sort of drop
out of the sky. Saw it happen on
Boxing Day.
Can we zoom through skyscrapers?
Chased by a baddie?
Do you actually want to die?
Die in a flying taxi? Will there
be a big explosion? Will the other
flying cars circle around me in
the sky looking awesome? Cool!
Way, way, cool.
Helen Rumbelow
4
1G T
Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
fashion
Behold, I have found the perfect trousers
Dress them up or
dress them down
? they work, says
Anna Murphy
I
hesitate to big myself up, but
precisely ten days into 2018 can I
present to you the perfect trousers?
They are satin cargo pants. Which
may sound like a contradiction in
terms. Which may be a contradiction
in terms. But what a contradiction.
And what terms. They come in black
or khaki and cost �9 from the
boutique British label Me+Em
(meandem.com).
What?s so great about them? Well,
this picture, right, speaks a thousand
words, I hope. Chic yet
cool. Classic yet
youthful. But I have got
at least another
thousand words to add.
So here goes. These
are the ultimate goeverywhere trousers. I
know because, having
bought some the week
before Christmas, I
have worn them
everywhere. To work
(with a tailored
jacket). On my sofa
(with an oversized
jumper). On a date
(with the same
jumper. What can I
say? I had a cold). On
New Year?s Eve (with
a party top. Not that,
it being January and
all, any of us will be
wearing a party top
again for a good
while yet. But when
we do it?s good to
know that these
trews are up to the
task of wing man).
Here are trousers
that look great with
trainers, look great
with heels. I am
sure that in
summer they will
look great with
sandals too. But
that is just the
beginning of their adaptability.
daptability These
truly are the ultimate flexible friends,
courtesy of two sports toggles that
render the waistline fully adjustable.
They can be tweaked to sit on the
waist, on the hips, or anywhere within
the band of flesh in between. On the
subject of flesh, it being the second
week of January, those toggles also
facilitate the accommodation of any
remaining Christmas pudding, literal
or metaphorical.
I am, as you can probably tell,
delighted by the genius of these
trousers. But I am not surprised.
Because they are the brainchild ? yes,
really, this is not a word I use lightly
? of one of the biggest trouser geeks
in fashion, Clare Hornby, the founder
and creative director of Me+Em.
When I ask her about this style she
draws my attention to a couple of
other details I hadn?t thought about,
but had unknowingly delighted in.
Like how the gathering at the
waist ?means the satin
doesn?t cling, which
makes it flattering?.
And the cut of the
legs ? ?It took us
a long time to
finesse the shape.
I wanted to
achieve a slouchy
look without
making them too
baggy. I also wanted
to elongate the leg
and to maintain the gap
between the legs to the top
[told you
Hornby was a geek]. As always
we used three different-fit models
with contrasting figures in order to
ensure they looked good on as many
people as possible.?
The ultimate sign
that
th she had nailed
it,
it Hornby says,
?was
?w when both my
70-year-old mum
70
and
a my 13-year-old
daughter
asked for
d
them
for Christmas?.
th
And
A then there?s
me,
m somewhere
in the middle. Job
definitively
done.
d
Striking oil
S
I love body oils. So
much
easier to apply
m
than
th lotion; so much
more
nourishing for
m
the
th skin. But I don?t
love
lo the prices. Fifty
quid
for a bottle that
q
will
w only last a handful
of
o times? I would like to
be
b the woman who can
afford
that, but I am not.
a
Which
is why I am
W
excited
by the British
e
family
business Aqua
fa
Oleum,
which is in its
O
third
th generation of
selling
essential oils.
se
Aqua Oleum?s readymixed
oils ? such as the
m
camomile
and lavenderc
scented
Tranquility and
sc
the
th bay and black-pepper
fuelled
Vitality ? are
fu
�.76
for a long-lasting
�
500ml
(aqua-oleum.co.uk).
5
But
B I prefer to buy one of
its so-called carrier oils ? I like the
sweet almond oil for �.60 for 500ml
? and make it bespoke with a few
drops of an essential oil of my choice
each time I use it. Cheaper and more
fun (just mix in a mini measure glass,
�29, robertdyas.co.uk).
I am scrolling between the heady
exoticism of frankincense and the
uplifting freshness of bergamot (�.35
and �86 respectively for 10ml). Aqua
Oleum?s recently launched blending
notebook ? which combines guidance
and formula ideas with journal space
? is a great way to learn more and
keep track of your experiments (�).
Top of the line
The London-based illustrator
Alexandria Coe says her work is about
?exploring the female body via line?.
Her lovely Matisse-like drawings, all
signed A3 originals, cost from
�5 (alexandriacoe.com).
In a collaboration
with the small British
brand Charli she
has extended her
exploration of
matters corporeal
into realms sartorial,
this, left, being
one of a quartet of
cashmere knits
(�0, charli.com). ?I
like to play with the idea
of the gaze, whether that?s
male or female, or the fine line
between,? Coe says. What happens to
that line when a woman wears one of
her nudes? Object becomes subject.
Subject becomes object. Interesting.
And, more to the point, cosy.
Instagram: @annagmurphy
the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
5
1G T
fashion
The only four coat styles
to wear this winter
January is the
time to ramp up
your outerwear
with faux fur and
great lengths, says
Natalie Hammond
I
t?s officially the bleak midwinter,
which means the only clothingrelated question on your mind is
probably: ?Which of my coats
most resembles a duvet?? If
you?re drawing a blank, now is
the time to treat yourself to a
proper winter coat in the sales.
The thought of scouring the high
street for discounts may make you
want to lie down in a dark room, but
that would mean missing out on the
second round of markdowns and the
opportunity to score a coat that you
can wear for many Januaries to come.
Let?s face it ? something smart,
sweeping and, most importantly, warm
will make you feel a whole lot more
motivated about leaving the house.
Besides, what else are you planning
to buy with all that money you?re
going to save by doing a dry January?
To help you in your search, here are
the four coat styles on the fashion
pack?s radar for this winter.
There is no chance that it can double
as a coronation day robe like the floorsweeper, but a belted wool coat is by
far the best investment of the bunch.
Truffle one out in a block colour and
the right length ? anywhere between
the knee and the mid-calf ? and
you?ll still be wearing it five winters
from now. Boden?s Suki wrap coat
comes in an optimistic pink and will
look just as at home over officeappropriate dresses as silk track pants
when off-duty (reduced from �0 to
�5, boden.co.uk).
Jigsaw?s belted double-face coat has
a detachable faux-fur collar (reduced
from �0 to �6, jigsaw-online.com),
while Hobbs?s Odelia wool-blend coat
is a sunny shade of orange (reduced
from �9 to �9, hobbs.co.uk). Maje?s
double-sided coat has a whiff of
military chic thanks to metal hardware
and its khaki colour (reduced from
�5 to �3.50, maje.com).
3. Faux fur
1. LONG-LINE
�2.50,
sandro-paris.com
2. BELTED WOO
�5, boden.co.ukL
1. Long-line
When Meghan Markle stepped out in
an ankle-length coat by the Canadian
label Mackage, it confirmed the
suspicion among fashion editors
that coats long enough to pass as
cloaks are officially a thing.
Gigi Hadid, the American
model, tipped them off with her
Zaid Affas coat that doubles as a
street-sweeper, and Chanel soon
cemented it with a doublebreasted grey coat that could
polish the tops of your shoes.
Both prove the theory that
floor-length outerwear can
make any outfit look sharp,
even if what lies beneath is a
tracksuit. Unfortunately this is
one trend that works only if you
are blessed in the height
department. A hem dragging along
the ground may be acceptable for the
Hadids of this world, but in real life
it will look as if you?re wearing your
dad?s clothes.
Joseph?s Mercer coat is the same
navy shade as Markle?s, and is everso-slightly tailored so as not to
swamp its wearer (reduced from
�5 to �0, joseph-fashion.com).
Mango?s take isn?t quite floorlength, but has the same effect and
comes with long lapels that can double
as a scarf (reduced from �9.99 to
�.99, mango.com). Sandro?s feltedeffect coat reaches the mid-calf so is
ideal if you want to dip your toe into
the elongated outerwear pond
(reduced from �5 to �2.50,
uk.sandro-paris.com).
2. Belted wool
There has never been a better time to
go for faux, with designers such as
Michael Kors and Gucci recently
announcing that they are turning
fur-free. The fun factor you get with
faux fur will also make the drudgery of
winter dressing a little easier to bear.
Just remember to stick to shades that
you won?t be sick of in two months
and avoid overly shaggy textures,
unless you want to look like the
Cookie Monster?s cousin.
Having said that, DVF?s turquoise
coat is a lightning bolt of colour and
perfect for taking the edge off a
sombre work outfit (reduced from
�0 to �0, net-a-porter.com).
Shrimps, the faux fur label that the
fashion pack swears by, has slashed
many of its cuddly coats by up to 40
per cent. My money is on the kneelength Patrick in moss green (reduced
from �5 to �7) and the cow-print
Alba (reduced from �5 to �7, both
shrimps.co.uk). Mango has plenty of
affordable faux options that are doubly
delicious for being in the sale ? my
favourite is the forest-green number
for �.99, reduced from �.99, and
the dusky pink chubby (reduced from
�.99 to �.99, both mango.com).
4. Padded
3. FAUX FUR
�.99,
mango.com
4. PADDED
�.99,
zara.com
There is no better way to hide a bit
of festive padding than with a
padded coat. They are also
surprisingly on-trend ? Stella
McCartney and Balenciaga both
sent khaki-coloured quilted coats
down their autumn catwalks that
looked fit for the Queen?s
Christmas stay at Sandringham.
Zara?s navy duvet-style looks
remarkably similar to Marques?
Almeida?s �5 version and
comes with a detachable scarf
(reduced from �.99 to �.99,
zara.com). & Other Stories?s
tangerine-coloured coat
practically emanates vitamin C
(reduced from �5 to �),
and its violet take is welcomely
oversized (reduced from � to
�, both stories.com). Wear
both with wide-leg trousers
and trainers with some grip on
their soles, until the
temperature thaws.
Uniqlo?s knee-length down
coat in navy will work equally
well for apr鑣-ski or a staycation
in a Soho Farmhouse cabin
(reduced from �.90 to �.90,
uniqlo.com). LK Bennett?s Catia
navy coat looks elegant enough for
the Duchess of Cambridge?s weekend
wardrobe (reduced from �5 to �2,
lkbennett.com).
Instagram: @timesfashiondesk
6
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Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
fashion
Get your (new) kit on ? and
The best workout
gear will hold you
up in all the right
places and give you
the will to exercise,
says Hattie Crisell
Bra, �; leggings, �,
sweatybetty.com
T
he fitness industry has
done a fine PR job for
itself. It has succeeded
in making the gym
look aspirational and
glamorous, filling our
minds with images of
women in bra tops
with flat stomachs and impossibly
round bottoms and men with
triangular torsos and strong jawlines.
At the gym, the adverts and Instagram
posts imply, everyone is ?smashing
goals?, high-fiving each other and
gleaming with photogenic sweat. It?s
all a simmering cauldron of happy
sexual tension.
To judge from the success of the
wellness industry, this approach is
luring us in by the thousand ?
although I don?t know how because it
makes me want to press my face into a
cheesecake. If gyms were really like
this I wouldn?t go to them ? far too
soul-crushing. The reality, of course, is
quite different. Most gyms and jogging
routes in January are full of imperfect
people with varying degrees of wobbly
flesh, all plugging away, trying to stay
motivated in the hope of getting fitter.
And fashion, I am absolutely
convinced, can help with this.
Activewear, as your gym kit is
officially known, doesn?t need to make
us look sexy (although sometimes it
does). It needs to be fit for purpose ?
designed to stretch and move with
you, but not ride up, stay dry so your
skin is comfortable, and survive
frequent 40-degree washes ? and
flattering. The latter is important
because putting on nice clothes that
make you feel a bit more fabulous is
effective in shoring up motivation, and
the stats show that we tend to run out
of that in mid-February.
So where to start with finding the kit
that will not only encourage you to
keep going, but help you to be as
effective as possible while you?re
there? At the beginning, with a good
sports bra. ?There seems to be a
commonly held myth that only
women with large breasts need to
worry about support during exercise
? not so,? says Victoria Joy, the
deputy editor of Women?s Health
magazine. ?It?s incredibly important to
have adequate support specific to the
workout you?re doing. Flimsy bralets
aren?t the answer to avoid irreparable
damage. You?re better off going to
brands who have a background in
designing bra support, like Freya,
Triumph and Victoria?s Secret.?
I?m a repeat customer of Shock
Absorber. The brand has a high-impact
range for running and a mediumimpact range for other sports. Figleaves
has a good selection and several of the
Top, �8; gilet, �0;
leggings, �8, Aeance
(matchesfashion.com)
bras will pass as tops rather than
looking too underwear-y, in case you
feel inclined to strip down during a
fierce Zumba class (no, me neither). I
like the look of the moisture-wicking
Ultimate Fly Bra (discounted from �
to �.25, figleaves.com).
Joy recommends Lululemon?s Enlite
bra (�, lululemon.co.uk) ? ?It?s
fantastic for larger breasts during highintensity workouts.? Meanwhile, a
friend with a GG bust swears by
Panache?s wired sports bra, which
comes in more than a dozen prints and
colours (�, bravissimo.com). Nike is
about to launch the Motion Adapt Bra,
which contains a foam and polymer
blend that?s supposed to stretch gently
with you, but lock you in place during
vigorous movement.
I always wear full-length leggings to
work out; anything looser is
distracting, and calf-length isn?t hugelyy
flattering (although this may be more
about my calves than yours). Either
way, look for something that?s high in
the waist. As one friend puts it: ?Nike
Dri-Fit are longer in the gusset than
others, which means your mince pies
aren?t wobbling about on show when
you?re running.? The sleek Nike Speed
running tights in moisture-resistant
fabric (�.95, nike.com) are designed
with an optional turn-over at the
; leggings,
Bra, �, lucashugh.com
February
m
fro
com
�0, harrods.
waistband, so the decision whether or
not to show off your mince pies or
whatever else you?re storing around
your midriff is entirely yours.
My favourites are Sweaty Betty?s
printed Power Leggings (�,
sweatybetty.com), which claim to be
?bum-sculpting?. I haven?t noticed an
astonishing difference in the bum
department, but they feel substantial
and pleasingly supportive, and they
stay put during yoga and Pilates.
As for tops, for these kinds of
classes, fitted is best. ?It?s important
for me to find tops that won?t get in
the way of my movement,? says Joy.
?I like ILU Fitwear?s Steffi Studio
Vest and Varley?s Technical Vest
V
[[�.99, ilufitwear.com and �,
vvarley.com]?. I?d add to that list
Stella McCartney x Adidas?s green
S
yoga tank (reduced from � to �,
stellamccartney.com), the long-sleeved
grey sports top at Whistles (�,
whistles.com) and Lucas Hugh?s
Technical Knit Tank in bright violet
(�, lucashugh.com).
An important footnote: get the right
shoes to support your ankles and your
instep. ?Your first thought on choosing
a pair of sneakers should be what
you?ll be using them for,? says Joy. ?I
wear Nike Free RN Flyknit for jogging
and Reebok Crossfit Nano for weights
the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
7
1G T
fashion
get moving
Bra, �; leggings,
�.50,
marksandspencer.com
Botox for hands?
It?s the beauty
editors?
best-kept
secret (until now)
By Rosie Green
A
,
Sweatshirt, �0; shorts
�5, vaara.com
training.? Go in store at JD Sports or
Nike for advice and fitting. The Times
fashion director, Anna Murphy,
favours APL, which makes
streamlined, stretchy trainers in a
palette of chic, one-colour designs.
Find them at activeinstyle.com, with
prices starting at �5 a pair.
Sometimes the look of what you
wear can be as motivating as the
function, which is why if you are the
kind of person who gets a kick out of
If you get a kick
out of dressing
up for the gym,
I salute you
dressing up for the gym, I do not
judge, I only salute you. A friend of
mine approaches activewear as a
morale booster. ?I have a very specific
workout aesthetic, which is retro
Eighties sportswear,? she says. ?It?s not
performance fabrics, it just looks like
I?m an extra in Stranger Things, which
cheers me up when I?m dying halfway
through boxing.?
For my aesthetic pleasure I?d buy
the Perform Tank with sheer
racerback straps from the very sleek
couture-inspired brand Ernest Leoty
(�, ernestleoty.com), the Upside?s
black sleeveless T-shirt with a garden
design (�, matchesfashion.com) and
Pepper & Mayne?s star-print leggings
(�, matchesfashion.com). My pal?s
signature look also involves ?mid-size
gold hoop earrings and a red lip?. I
can?t wholeheartedly recommend the
former because I have nightmarish
visions of torn earlobes. But lipstick?
Surely a risk-free cheerer-upper.
A couple of years ago an Australian
comedy group called Skit Box
recorded a sketch about activewear
(you can find it on YouTube). It?s a
catchy song outlining some of the
activities that modern women carry
out in their gym clothes. ?Activewear,
activewear, going to the movies in my
activewear,? goes one line, for
example. ?Being hungover in my
activewear? and ?Never exercising in
my activewear? are among other
strong lyrics. While obviously none of
these pastimes will help you to smash
a fitness goal, I do believe that if you
like your gym kit so much you want to
wear it all day long, you have probably
made a very wise purchase indeed.
Instagram: @hattiecrisell
nti-ageing. The term that
has sold billions of products
is facing a beauty backlash.
A revolt against the
deification of youth, and
subsequent insecurities, means the
word has been banned from US
magazines such as Allure and is fast
disappearing from the labels on your
dressing table.
In this environment the old adage of
?hands giving away your age? and the
constant sniping by gossip sites about
Madonna and Angelina Jolie?s
?youthful faces? being betrayed by
witchy ?claws? seem anti-sisterhood.
Yet the truth is my hands have been
making me feel a bit depressed lately.
I used to love how they were
immune to weight gain, work stress,
or a night involving multiple tequila
shots. However, now that I?ve hit my
forties they are looking bony, deflated
and pigmented. Lest I thought I was
imagining such developments, my
cousin kindly pointed out that they
were looking like our grandmother?s.
You can romanticise facial wrinkles.
As a beauty journalist I?ve interviewed
many A-listers who said they were
proud of their wrinkles and saw them
as a sign they had led a full life (they
all had perfectly smooth skin). Great.
But scraggy hands tell the tale not of
great parties and joyous offspring but
of domestic drudge.
This is how I end up in the chair
of Dr Stefanie Williams, a leading
dermatologist and founder of the
Eudelo clinic, explaining that I?m fed
up with my scrawny hands. She says
she sees many women like me ?
midlifers, often runners, with low(ish)
body fat. She says hands ?are very
satisfying to treat. Most patients are so
pleased with the results they can?t stop
looking at them.? And now that her
clinic can offer more natural, effective
ways to rejuvenate the face, she says
?congruence? with the rest of the body
is vital. ?The hands need to look as
good as the face. Otherwise it makes
the brain of the observer trip and
think, ?That woman somehow looks
weird ? not sure what it is.? ? Right.
To regain my hands? elusive volume
she recommends injectable hyaluronic
acid skin boosters (filler-lite to you and
me). I am terrified of injecting my face
with fillers, but for some reason I?m
more gung-ho with my hands. After
an internal debate (sub ten seconds) I
agree to twenty or so injections in
each hand. My hands are smothered
in numbing cream, then wrapped in
clingfilm. The injections are not
entirely pain free, but God, the effects
Injecting
my face
terrifies
me, but
I?m gungho with
my hands
Rosie Green, 43,
beauty editor at
large of Red
magazine
are worth it. Within days my hands
return to their plump, pre-kids state.
The effects last for a good year
because the treatment also kick-starts
the body?s collagen production.
I?ve tried thousands of anti-ageing
and pro-ageing treatments and this is
hands down one of the most effective.
Oh yes, others work. Botox nixes
wrinkles, but there?s the quid pro quo
of a dead-behind-the-eyes smile.
Lasers are good too, but sometimes
the effects are so subtle as to be
indiscernible. Nope, for return on
investment hand fillers are it. They?re
a stealth beautifier, like getting your
teeth straightened or making your
brows fuller.
If all this sounds too ruinously
expensive (I hear you ? at �5 per
session of hyaluronic acid skin
boosters with two or three needed, it
is), Williams says using sunscreen
daily and diligently applying hand
cream will have a visible rejuvenating
effect. If you lack motivation, Chanel?s
super-chic pebble-shaped La Cr鑝e
Main, �, launched last year, will turn
the mundane task into pure pleasure.
I meet my cousin. He doesn?t notice.
Of course he doesn?t. Beauty subtleties
are wasted on him. (This is the man
who on his last stay used my Clinique
facial soap to give himself a thorough
all-over body wash.) But I?m loving my
Benjamin Button hands.
Only thing is, I think they may now
be showing up my face.
eudelo.com
8
Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
1G T
arts
Gary v Danny: it?s the
best actor smackdown
Gary Oldman?s elderly Churchill or Daniel Day-Lewis?s prissy designer?
As the nominations come out Kevin Maher predicts who will win Baftas
Best supporting actress
Best actress
Traditionally the juiciest of categories,
the supporting actress is a cinematic
space where women really get to play
on screen, to flex their muscles, to
attack a role. Often more so than in
the frequently limiting confines of the
lead actress slot ? it?s basically Tilda
Swinton raising hell in Michael Clayton
versus Marion Cotillard weeping her
saintly way through La Vie en Rose.
This year, however, the lead and
supporting actress categories have
riches aplenty and will doubtlessly
give the new host, Joanna Lumley (a
Bafta fellowship recipient), much to
admire and parody.
Of the five supporting actress
nominees, Allison Janney gives the
showiest turn in I, Tonya. Playing the
figure skater Tonya Harding?s chainsmoking, potty-mouthed mother, her
incessant stream of f***-filled vitriol
would make Tarantino flinch. Kristin
Scott Thomas is ballsy and appealing
as Clementine Churchill in Darkest
Hour. Octavia Spencer delivers a lowkey and slyly comedic performance in
The Shape of Water, while Laurie
Metcalf, alas, has no chance at all for
her combative mum in Lady Bird.
The winner, however, has to be
Lesley Manville for Phantom Thread.
Cruelly overlooked by the Golden
Globes, she earns her rightful place
here (and, it is hoped, on the Oscar list)
with a genuinely terrifying turn as the
controlling older sister of Daniel DayLewis?s eccentric dress designer. Hers is
the most Nurse Ratched-like character
since, well, Louise Fletcher?s Nurse
Ratched in 1975?s One Flew Over the
Cuckoo?s Nest. And that worked out well
for Fletcher (she won an Oscar and a
Bafta). It is Manville?s prize to lose.
This is the strongest best actress Bafta
category in years, making a mockery
out of last year?s contenders. (Meryl
Streep?s cartoon antics in Florence
Foster Jenkins up against Emily Blunt
in the B-list thriller The Girl on the
Train. What was going on there?)
This year?s contenders include the
veteran actress Annette Bening?s
towering turn as Gloria Grahame in
Film Stars Don?t Die in Liverpool,
Margot Robbie?s explosively
entertaining Tonya Harding
(you really have to see it to
comprehend just how close to the
edge she pushes it) in I, Tonya, and
Saoirse Ronan?s ebullient yet
self-tortured Sacramento teenager
in Lady Bird. Sally Hawkins?s mute
cleaner who falls for an aquatic alien
in The Shape of Water is perhaps a tad
familiar (like The Piano meets Cocoon).
The leader of the pack, by a
Missouri mile, is Frances McDormand,
who gives the best performance of
any actress this year in Three
Billboards. Her grieving mother,
Mildred Hayes, is a mesmerising
creation. In many scenes she doesn?t
even speak. Just moves an eyebrow, or
snarls a lip. And it?s devastating. It?s
untouchable work. The award is hers.
playing the racist cop Jason Dixon, up
against Woody Harrelson, playing the
kindly cop Bill Willoughby, in Three
Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.
Professional awards-watchers will tell
you that this is not good ? and that
the Three Billboards Bafta fans will
split their votes between Harrelson
and Rockwell, meaning that neither
will win and the path will be clear for
an outsider such as Hugh Grant, who
gave a defiantly entertaining if hardly
depth-plumbing turn as a faded thesp
in Paddington 2.
However, the inclusion of Harrelson
(overlooked by the Globes) is
interesting in itself and suggests that
Bafta voters were taken with his
masterfully nuanced turn (it really
is a thing of beauty) as well as by
Rockwell?s fireworks. When it comes
to the final round, if they vote with
their hearts then Harrelson should be
the winner. Rockwell is a respectable
alternative. Grant, however, would
be unforgivable.
Saoirse Ronan in
Lady Bird. Below:
Paddington
Best actor
This is the
strongest
best
actress
category
in years
Best supporting actor
This is a surprisingly difficult category,
given that it features two of the
greatest supporting performances of
the year, but they just happen to be in
the same film. It?s Sam Rockwell,
Get your money out and put it on
the table, because the gloves are
coming off. It?s the great British
method actor smackdown we?ve all
been waiting for: Daniel Day-Lewis
versus Gary Oldman (aka Bill the
Butcher v Sid Vicious). Timoth閑
Chalamet from Call Me by Your Name,
Daniel Kaluuya from Get Out and
Jamie Bell from Film Stars Don?t Die in
Liverpool have all been nominated too.
But, well. As if!
Back to the main event. Oldman
plays Winston Churchill from
underneath a pile of latex in Joe
Wright?s Darkest Hour, and yet
somehow his strength of character is
so specific, the accent so perfect and
the physicality so controlling that you
completely believe this incarnation
and, better still, you empathise and
you care. It?s close to a screen miracle.
Day-Lewis is very, well, Day-Lewis
as the dress-designing genius
Reynolds Woodcock in Phantom
Thread. He?s tortured, he?s riven with
anxiety and doubt, he?s brittle,
irritable, irascible and petulant and
he loves his dead mum, and doesn?t
like it when women eat toast at the
breakfast table. In short, he?s a hugely
annoying protagonist and this is why
Day-Lewis won?t win the award.
Woodcock is not bad enough to
be a fascinating villain. Not good
enough to be a complex protagonist.
He?s just, by anyone?s definition,
a jerk. Step forward Oldman, as you
did at the Globes. Best actor is yours.
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the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
9
1G T
GETTY IMAGES
arts
?Frances McDormand is
the secret, to be honest?
Martin McDonagh talks to Kevin Maher about the
real reason Three Billboards scored nine nominations
T
hree Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri, the new
film from the playwright
turned film-maker Martin
McDonagh, has received
nine Bafta nominations. Yes, nine
nominations. ?Nine nominations!?
McDonagh repeats, still seemingly
gobsmacked, a full hour after the
news has been announced.
?Nine! I?ve never gotten nine of
anything. That?s fantastic!? The
47-year-old London-born writer who
holds dual Irish-British citizenship
(his parents are from the west of
Ireland, where his early plays were
set) is caught in the middle of an
awards season cyclone. He has just
emerged from Sunday night?s Golden
Globes ceremony, where the violent
but profoundly compassionate Three
Billboards was the biggest winner
(taking home four awards, including
best screenplay for McDonagh) and
has thus set itself up as the film to
beat this awards season. Right?
?I don?t think there?s anything
inevitable about it,? he says. ?The
Globes was very surprising and
shocking to me. I?d have been a lot
less nervous on stage if I had
expected it.? McDonagh adds that
the night was a blast, and that, yes,
Oprah Winfrey should be president,
that he liked her speech, but that he
also loved the speech of his best
actress winner, Frances McDormand,
which was ?amazing, strong and
inspiring? as she spoke of a
?tectonic shift? in the
industry and how it
approaches female talent.
McDonagh?s film is
notable, indeed, for
n
ffeaturing the greatest female
character of the year in
McDormand?s Mildred
Hayes. She plays a
grieving mother
seeking justice after
the rape and murder
of her daughter. She
provokes the police
(led by good cop
Woody Harrelson
and racist cop Sam
a
Rockwell), she beats
R
up a dentist, physically
u
assaults schoolchildren
and upsets everyone
around her.
Yet she remains
sympathetic and her
dilemma moving. She is,
McDonagh says, the
reason this film, after his
ttwo previous efforts (In
Bruges and Seven
Psychopaths), is
connecting with
audiences. ?Frances is the
secret, to be honest,? he
says. ?My other two films
didn?t have a woman at
d
Martin
tthe centre. But it?s not just
McDonagh
that it?s a female lead, it?s
and Phoebe
Waller-Bridge tthat it?s such a strong one,
and with such sadness to
Winning
four Globe
awards was
shocking
to me
Gary Oldman and Daniel Day-Lewis.
Left: Sally Hawkins and Octavia
Spencer in The Shape of Water
Best film
The biggie, and the hardest to call. It?s
where films such as Dunkirk ? which
have been rightly locked out of
categories such as acting and writing
? finally have a chance to be seen.
And, given that this is a year where
the ?awards sweep? (one film taking
everything) is highly unlikely, it might
be the right spot for Christopher
Nolan?s blockbuster to pick up an
award. Ditto for The Shape of Water
and the critically adored romance
Call Me By Your Name.
And yet. And yet. If we?re talking
about the year?s best film, which,
by implication, is a movie that works
on every level ? performance,
production values, screenplay and
direction ? then the only film to hit
all those marks is Three Billboards.
(The Shape of Water is lovely, but it?s
(T
also a bit whimsical. Dunkirk is a
als
spectacle, but ? as I said in my
sp
two-star review on its release
tw
? it is entirely devoid of
Martin
ccharacter.)
h
McDonagh?s film is
M
gorgeous to look at, is
go
technically impeccable,
tec
immaculately written,
im
deftly directed and
de
perfectly performed.
pe
It is, essentially,
unarguably, the
un
year?s best movie
ye
and this category
an
will be its biggest
test yet.
The Bafta awards take
place on February 18
Meet The Times
chief art critics
Subscribers can join
us on Wednesday,
January 31 for an
exclusive evening with
The Times arts critics
at the Royal Society
of Arts. To book
tickets, simply visit
mytimesplus.co.uk
her backstory.? And is there
something contradictory about the
year?s best female role being written
by a man? ?I don?t think so. But I do
think that you have to think outside
of your male brain when you?re
trying to write a really strong female
character. If you?ve got empathy and
humanity and some kind of skill
then, hopefully, you?ll be able to
come up with someone like Mildred.?
Speaking of controversies, the film
has been criticised on social media
for featuring a racist cop, Rockwell?s
Dixon, who has some likeable
personality traits. The backlash is
from people apparently uncomfortable
with the film?s seemingly flippant
approach to race hate, even though
the movie?s message is one of
tolerance, compassion and hope.
?I understand what the backlash is
about, the minor backlash that it?s
having in certain places,? McDonagh
says. ?But I just feel that it doesn?t
really see the nuance of the story.
This isn?t your typical Hollywood
story about heroes and villains. It?s
something a bit more messy and,
hopefully, more interesting.?
Indeed, McDonagh adds that part
of the central appeal of the film is its
optimism, and the way it offers the
chance of hope for all the characters,
not just the heroes. ?There?s such a
degree of hope in the film, and the
possibility of change and decency for
everyone, that somehow maybe that?s
what connects with people.?
The question of whether the
backlash will affect the awards
season progress of Three Billboards
will be answered at the Baftas on
February 18 and at the Oscars on
March 4, although it clearly didn?t
matter to Golden Globes voters.
For his part, McDonagh is going to
try to ignore the media noise and
simply enjoy the experience. His
guest at Sunday?s ceremony was the
Fleabag writer-creator-star Phoebe
Waller-Bridge (she?s up next in Solo:
A Star Wars Story). The pair have
recently been declared a romantic
item and a cultural ?power couple?.
?Mmmmmm. I think I have no
comment on that,? he says. And the
season itself ? ?I?d be a liar and a
phoney if I said that the Golden
Globes wasn?t cool and fun, and that
getting nine nominations wasn?t cool
and fun,? he says.
However, he worries that his
acceptance speech, in which he
joked about his mother preferring
Lady Bird and then quickly said his
thanks and left the stage, is not quite
up to the grandstanding levels of his
fellow winners (no tears, no rousing
calls for global political solutions).
?My speech was really shit,
apparently,? he says. And so, will he
revamp it for the big night(s) and go
for a proper barnstormer? Of course
not. ?I?m not really there to solve the
problems of the world,? he says. ?I?m
just there to tell a joke, thank some
friends, and get the f*** off.?
10
1G T
Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
television & radio
Making sense of Saudi Arabia?s shifting sands
BERND VON JUTRCZENKA/DPA/ALAMY
James
Jackson
TV review
House of Saud
BBC Two
{{{{(
Inside No 9
BBC Two
{{{{{
T
he success of a current
affairs documentary can be
measured by how well it
interrogates and explains the
world in which we live. And,
boy, does our world need explaining
right now, not least the Arab world
on its march into an abyss of conflict.
House of Saud: A Family at War is
already going some way to doing that
by examining the opaque tendrils of
Saudi influence on the Muslim world
? and not good tendrils. Saudi money
has, it seems, funded a global jihad
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
My Perfect Country
World Service, 1.30pm
If you were suddenly given
God-like powers and told to
create a country by taking
the best bits from all the
other countries in the
world, what would it look
like? That is the premise of
this series. It?s a gimmick,
says the presenter, Fi Glover,
but it?s a fun gimmick.
This week the feature
being considered is the
gender-equality gap. Which
country is closing it fastest?
Surprisingly, one of them is
Rwanda: in a recent World
Economic Forum report it
ranked fifth in the world.
Britain came twentieth.
Angstrom
Radio 4, 6.30pm
It has such a good pedigree,
this comedy series. It?s by
Joel Morris and Jason
Hazeley, the creators
of Ladybird Books for
Grown-Ups, the publishing
sensation of the past few
years. Here they?re doing
a similar thing: taking a
well-known literary form
and parodying it. But this
time it?s Nordic noir. Knut
Angstrom is a Swedish
maverick detective (is there
any other kind?). It?s chilly.
You can imagine how the
rest will go. Much like the
tiresome Ladybird books,
this joke already feels old.
taking in everything from, it was
claimed, the 9/11 hijackers to Islamic
State. You were left thinking that you
half-understood a knot of global murk
stretching back years.
The first episode wasn?t quite what
I expected, perhaps because the title
conjured up images of Dynasty in
the desert. It started instead in wintry
Bosnia. By then hopping from New
York to India to Afghanistan, the
discursive overview started to stack up
evidence for Saudi money bankrolling
extremism, all cagily qualified. ?One
needs to be careful and not accuse the
kingdom of being the patron state
sponsor of terrorist groups,? said one
ex-CIA expert when the programme
looked as if it might do just that.
Most damning was an interview with
Sean Carter, a lawyer in a case against
the Saudi government that alleges that
9/11 was facilitated by Saudi agents
and funding, something, he says, the
US government doesn?t want to hear
about the world?s leading oil exporter.
Yet, as usual with a programme on
the Middle East, the hour raised as
many questions as answers ? not
least the billion-dollar question: is
the new crown prince, Mohammed
bin Salman, the liberal, white-knight
moderniser the world has been waiting
for or just a blingy hotshot full of
counterproductive impulsiveness? And
how does daddy feel about his boy?s
aim to kibosh ultra-conservatism?
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo
12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills
4.00 Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg
James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 Charlie Sloth
11.00 Rob Adcock 1.00am Benji B
4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Sara Cox 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Amol Rajan 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 The Folk Show with Mark
Radcliffe 8.00 Ana Matronic 10.00 Nile
Rodgers? Good Times 11.00 David Bowie?s
Heroes 40th Anniversary 12.00 Pick of
the Pops (r) 2.00am Radio 2 Playlists
5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3?s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein with the best in classical music,
and we hear Sue MacGregor?s
cultural inspirations
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Schubert (1797-1828)
This week of programmes about Franz
Schubert focus on ?ve years through his
short life, and feature one of his string
quartets every day. Today the focus is on
the year 1820, when Schubert was aged 23.
Donald Macleod looks into Schubert?s
friendships, people who rallied round helping
him out, including paying his rent whilst he
worked on establishing himself as a
freelance composer. Music featured includes
an extract from two un?nished works,
his oratorio Lazarus and the Quartet
Movement in C minor
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
From All Saint?s Church in Dulverton, at the
Two Moors Festival, the pianist Barry
Douglas performs Britten雜 Notturno and
Schubert?s Sonata in C minor. Recorded at
the Great Hall in Dartington, the soprano
Carolyn Sampson performs Schubert Mignon
Lieder, accompanied by Joseph Middleton.
Schubert (Heiss mich nicht reden, D877 No 2;
Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt, D877 No 4; So
lasst mich scheinen, D877 No 3; Kennst du
das Land, D321; and Sonata in C minor,
D958); and Britten (Notturno)
Saudi?s crown prince Mohammed bin Salman: is he the real deal?
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Tom Redmond presents more performances
from the BBC Philharmonic, including tone
poems by Marx and Dukas; part of Afternoon
Concert?s tone poem theme, and music by
Schoenberg, Webern and Berg. Schoenberg
(Notturno); Webern (Passacaglia, Op 1); Berg
(Wozzeck ? three fragments); Dukas (The
Sorcerer?s Apprentice); and Coleridge-Taylor
(Two Novelletes, Op 52 Nos 1 and 4)
3.30 Live Choral Evensong
From Hereford Cathedral. Introit: Jesus richte
mein Beginnen (Bach). Responses: Sumsion.
Psalms 53, 54, 55 (Martin, Rimbault,
Hervey). First Lesson: Amos 3. Of?ce Hymn:
The Race That Long in Darkness Pined
(Dundee). Canticles: Brewer in D. Second
Lesson: 1 Corinthians 2. Anthem: Reges
Tharsis (Sheppard). Organ Voluntary: Dieu
parmi nous (La nativit� du Seigneur ?
Messiaen). Director of Music: Geraint Bowen.
Assistant Director of Music: Peter Dyke
4.30 New Generation Artists
The former New Generation Artists
Zhang Zuo and Louis Schwizgebel play
Rachmaninov?s 6 Piano Duets, Op 11,
in a studio recording from 2014
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty presents a lively mix of music,
chat and arts news. His guests include
choreographer Frank Andersen, who chats
about the production of La Sylphide with
English National Ballet, and pianist Samson
Tsoy performs live in the studio
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
In Tune?s specially curated playlist: with
dreams from Higdon, Hermann, Britten and
Debussy. Then take Ellington?s ?A? Train and
Steal Away home with Tippett
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
Verity Sharp presents Peter Bellamy?s ballad
opera The Transports, recorded at the Radio
Theatre in Broadcasting House, featuring
many of Britain?s ?nest young folk musicians
10.00 Free Thinking
Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough explores how
our minds react to liminal spaces, with the
neuroscientist Dean Burnett, the poet Vahni
Capildeo, and the artist Alexandra Carr
10.45 The Essay: Cornerstones
The writer Esther Woolfson contrasts
the solidity of Aberdeen, known as the
Granite City, with the decline of the North
Sea oil and gas industry, on which its
economy has relied since the 1970s
11.00 Late Junction
The Norwegian polymath Jenny Hval is the
latest compiler of the Late Junction mixtape.
Plus, a selection of David Toop?s Dirty Songs
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
News headlines and analysis with Carrie
Gracie and Nick Robinson
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Soul Music
Pieces that elicit an emotional response
9.30 The Ideas That Make Us
Bettany Hughes considers changing ideas
about character (1/5)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: Auntie?s War
General de Gaulle rallies the French
from London (3/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Discussion and interviews. Including at
10.41 the 15 Minute Drama: Shardlake ?
Heartstone, the ?fth series of
CJ Sansom?s Tudor mysteries (8/10)
10.56 The Listening Project
Two 10-year-old friends get to grips with
priorities at school
11.00 The Cameron Years
Steve Richards looks back on David
Cameron?s years in power (1/3) (r)
11.30 Chain Reaction
The comedian Al Murray interviews the
satirist Ian Hislop (2/6) (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 The Curious Cases of
Rutherford & Fry
Rutherford and Fry approach the cosmic
speed limit (3/5)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Con?ict and Co-operation:
A History of Trade
Why the shipping container was such a
revolutionary invention (8/10)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Stone
DCI John Stone investigates the death of a
man in a ?re at a homeless hostel, and has
to track down the victim?s next of kin (3/10)
3.00 Money Box Live
With Ben Broadbent
3.30 Inside Health
Dr Mark Porter separates medical fact from
?ction, and clarifying health issues (r)
4.00 Thinking Allowed
Thought-provoking issues
4.30 The Media Show
Key players within the industry help to
shed light on the issues of the day
?The car is driving at 100mph
toward its objective. It may run over
a few people, but it?s in the right
direction,? said one talking head. That
was right after a distressing sequence
showing the human cost of the war
ravaging Yemen, a campaign launched
by the crown prince that has left
10,000 dead and seven million near
starvation. We?d all like to believe in
Salman?s reforming zeal, but so far the
series isn?t offering any convincing
reason to believe in a rosier future.
You never quite know what you?re
going to get with that lucky dip of
serials Inside No 9, but the latest run
is proving to be just the thing to keep
you sane through January. Last night?s
study in pathos was a beauty as it
followed a northern comedy double
act reuniting alone in a hall for the
first time in 30 years. The air was alive
with regret and rancour, but this was
slyly funny too, full of pass� routines
and lines that sent up and paid tribute
to the lost art of music-hall humour.
I didn?t see the twist coming, but it
explained the tension between the pair
as something else entirely, leaving the
pair?s closing song of bad jokes (?I?ve
spent the last four years looking for
my mother-in-law?s killer . . . but no
one will do it!?) the very definition of
bittersweet. Even more impressively,
it almost made me miss the days of
Bernie Clifton and the Krankies.
james.jackson@thetimes.co.uk
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 Angstrom
Spoof Scandinavian detective stories
following the work of Knut Angstrom, an
alcoholic, Swedish detective from the tough
streets of Oslo. See Radio Choice (1/4)
7.00 The Archers
Susan?s hopes are dashed
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Shardlake: Heartstone
By CJ Sansom (8/10) (r)
8.00 Across the Red Line (2/4)
8.45 Four Thought
A thought-provoking talk
9.00 A Little Lateral Thinking
How lateral thinking has become
a by-word for creativity (r)
9.30 Soul Music
Pieces that elicit an emotional response (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Ritula Shah
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Vital Spark
? A Far Cry from Kensington
By Muriel Spark. As problems at the
publishing house multiply, Mrs Hawkins
is about to meet her nemesis (3/10)
11.00 Life on Egg
Peter is sent to the mainland for some
urgent training (3/4)
11.15 Lazy Susan: East Coast
Listening Post
Jenna and Dana meet self-made business
woman. Last in the series
11.30 Today in Parliament
Presented by Susan Hulme
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Auntie?s War (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Navy Lark 8.30 Round the
Horne 9.00 The Write Stuff 9.30 Change at
Oglethorpe 10.00 Lost Horizon 11.00
Behind the Screen 11.15 Devonia 12.00 The
Navy Lark 12.30pm Round the Horne 1.00
Secret Agent: X9 1.30 Lifeboats on the
Thames 2.00 In Siberia 2.15 Five Hundred
Years of Friendship 2.30 More Tales of the
City 2.45 Speaking for Themselves 3.00 Lost
Horizon 4.00 The Write Stuff 4.30 Change
at Oglethorpe 5.00 Like They?ve Never Been
Gone 5.30 Jeremy Hardy Feels It 6.00 I Am
Legend 6.30 Musical Legends 7.00 The Navy
Lark. Comedy with Leslie Phillips. From 1960
7.30 Round the Horne. Comedy with Kenneth
Horne 8.00 Secret Agent: X9. Thriller by
Dashiell Hammett 8.30 Lifeboats on the
Thames. The stories of some of Britain?s
busiest lifeboats. From 2008 9.00 Behind
the Screen. Agatha Christie and Dorothy L
Sayers contribute to the 1930s whodunit
9.15 Devonia. By Andy Rashleigh 10.00
Comedy Club: Jeremy Hardy Feels It. Jeremy
not only seconds an emotion, but explains it
too 10.30 The Secret World. Comedy with
Jon Culshaw 10.55 The Comedy Club
Interview. Jake Yapp chats to Carly Smallman
11.00 Mr and Mrs Smith. Will talks about
accompanying Annabelle to a music festival.
From 2012 11.30 Children?s Hour with
Armstrong and Miller
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show 1.00pm Afternoon Edition
4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport. A
round-up of the day?s sports news 10.30 Phil
Williams 1.00am Up All Night 5.00 Reports
5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Max Rushden 1.00pm Hawksbee
and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc Riley
9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Mary Anne Hobbs
1.00am The First Time with Terry Hall
2.00 One Nation Under a Groove: The Story
of George Clinton and P-Funk 2.30 6 Music
Live Hour 3.30 6 Music?s Jukebox
5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall
5.00 Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
8.00 The Full Works Concert. Celebrating the
work of Joseph Haydn, playing tracks
including Symphony No.101 in D, and
Cello Concerto No.1 in C 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
11
1G T
artsfirst night
CLIVE BARDA/ROH
Comedy
Angus Gordon
and Aaron Chen
Soho Theatre, W1
M
{{(((
aking his London debut
with Aaron Chen, the
comic with whom he
jointly won the best
newcomer award at
the Melbourne Comedy Festival last
year, Angus Gordon astutely pins
down the problem of this double bill.
?We?re three variations on Australian
awkwardness,? he says, the third
variation being Chen?s taciturn
sidekick-cum-support act, Jon Lo.
Mind you, there is no shortage of
talent among these uncomfortable
young Australians. Gordon, appearing
in the second half, has an enjoyably
angular comic brain. He makes play
of his unpleasantness, but there is a
palpable sweetness behind his rather
doomy material about floods, foetuses,
loneliness and euthanasia, as well as
his overextended metaphors and his
low-energy delivery. He makes play
of that oomphlessness too. ?I really
appreciate you putting up with this,?
Gordon says at the end of a 50-minute
set that, after a bright start, had
started to pall. ?I know what I?m like.?
As with Chen, who plays an entirely
separate set, there are some great
ideas in here, just not enough of
them to fill the time. It?s fine to toy
with the conventions of stand-up
comedy, but you had better have
enough happening to stop us getting
to the joke faster than you do. Chen
has an affable way about him, the
beginnings of a neat rapport with Lo,
who sits quietly to one side at a table
with a laptop and a bottle of Listerine.
Chen gives us the kernels of good
ideas, plying a knowing naivety that is
belied by the ready wit he sometimes
throws into the mix. ?Reviewers,?
he chides, ?think of one thing you can
do better.? For better and for worse,
there is the kind of please-yourselves
looseness of a millennial Vic and Bob
about Chen and Lo, even if they
render in a kind of shy-boy fidgetiness.
Yet their anti-comedy is too fond of
coasting. It needs a tolerant crowd.
Both of these acts have the mindsets
to come up with something really
exciting, but they don?t, as yet, have
the editing or the ease.
Dominic Maxwell
Box office: 020 7478 0100, to Sat
Theatre
Imaginationship
Finborough,
SW10
{{(((
Royal Opera
Subscribers can enjoy
2-for-1 tickets to the
Royal Opera House
Live Cinema season
at more than 400
cinemas in the UK. To
redeem tickets, visit
mytimesplus.co.uk
T
Malin Bystr鰉?s heroine becomes more deranged and compelling
Excess rears
its head again
Although it needs more emotional heat,
this gory Strauss revival has mesmerising
moments, writes Richard Morrison
Opera
Salome
Covent Garden
{{{((
his new play by Sue Healy is
a Norfolk version of Shirley
Valentine without the nice
weather. It?s set in 2016, at
a nostalgia disco in Great
Yarmouth that aims to recreate the
glory days of the Glitter Ballroom in
1976. It feels dated from the start, and
that?s not just the outfits.
Our hostess, Ginnie, is wearing
too-tight pleather trousers and a pink
boa. She has invited her oldest friend,
Brenda. In their youth they were
known as Virginia the Vagina and
Brenda Joy. Ginnie wants to relive
their brief lesbian fling when they
were 19. Brenda wants to get laid
by a young Hungarian man in red
trousers who actually fancies her
daughter, Melody (Joanna Bending).
Yes, it?s complicated. That, really, is
the problem here. I haven?t even begun
to lay out the various scenarios that
feature. Among (many) others, there
G
o to the Royal Opera?s
Salome and you experience
not a single show, but
a global franchise. Its
director, David McVicar,
also has his Rigoletto running at
Covent Garden. In New York the Met
is doing three of his productions in as
are the two cleaners of the Glitter
Ballroom who, after the nostalgia
night in question, are having their
own bromance involving appalling
jokes and vodka.
It is a case of stop the disco ball, I
want to get off. This is two hours, if
you include a 15-minute interval,
but it often feels much longer.
We never get to know anyone
long enough to care. It is an
ambitious sprawl of a play that
wants to be a psychological
thriller, a Brexit barometer
and an incisive guide to the
menopausal libido. Other
issues include creepy older
teachers, loneliness, rape,
trauma, immigration and, oh
yes, priapism. And did I
mention ancient Greece?
Joanna Bending and Rupert
Wickham in Sue Healy?s play
many months. And McVicar stagings
will be seen in 15 other opera houses
around the world this season, from
Vienna to Beijing. The Scot is a
one-man export drive.
Of course, many of those stagings
aren?t new. This Salome dates from
2008 and is on its third revival. That,
however, is the point. McVicar is the
most successful opera director of our
age because his lavish productions are
not only watchable, but durable.
His style could be described as
Franco Zeffirelli with a 21st-century
twist ? the twist being his penchant
for flooding the stage with nudes and
making raunchily explicit any sexual
perversities latent in the libretto. And
God knows there are enough of those
in Strauss?s steamy 1905 masterpiece,
what with the necrophilia, paedophilia
and probably several other philias that
I?m far too innocent to recognise.
Along the way ? and also in
quintessential McVicar style ? you
get mesmerising sequences. There?s
the depraved Pasolini-style opening
tableau, for instance, with a naked
girl groped in a basement abattoir
while Herod?s guests dine above; or
the theatrically cumbersome but
psychologically incisive conversion
of the Dance of the Seven Veils
into flashbacks of Herod abusing
the prepubescent Salome; or the
shocking moment when the naked
executioner appears, covered in blood
and wielding Jokanaan?s severed head.
The trouble is that those
unforgettable images are just that ?
cherished moments for which you
wait, impatiently, during the remaining
90-odd minutes. And I really was
getting impatient.
This revival is competently
conducted by Henrik N醤醩i and
adequately sung, especially by
Malin Bystr鰉?s gradually more
deranged and compelling Salome
and Michael Volle?s hairy, hefty
and heroic Jokanaan. Yet the
emotional temperature is tepid
when it should be scalding, and
some characterisations ? notably
John Daszak?s Herod and Michaela
Schuster?s Herodias ? seem more
attuned to a TV sitcom than a lurid,
Freudian psychodrama.
Perhaps the problem is that,
although McVicar?s production is
back, the man isn?t. You feel that these
are good singers slotting efficiently
into a well-oiled machine without
being infused with the insights and
passions of its creator.
Box office: 020 7304 4000, to Jan 30
Imaginationship, which is truly
a terrible title, was first heard as a
rehearsed reading as part of the
Finborough festival of playwriting in
October. It intrigued
and was developed into
Pop
Decosta Boyce
Pizza Express Live, WC1
I
{{{{(
s that a Commodores riff? And
a hint of Sam & Dave too? Part
of the pleasure of this energised
gig was trying to spot the different
influences. Cool and charismatic,
Decosta Boyce is a British R&B singer
who was raised on his mother?s record
collection. His album Electrick Soul ?
one of the funkiest releases of last
year ? is laced with references to
illustrious names. James Brown,
Prince and Otis Redding are just
some of the artists in his bloodstream.
If that makes him sound like
a wannabe from Stars in their Eyes,
his personality and songwriting skills
mark him out as much more than
a retro act. He is, in any case, a little
old to be described as an absolute
beginner. If that face and impressive
afro look vaguely familiar it is because
Boyce previously released a disc when
he was making his way in the world as
He is a natural
storyteller and a
relaxed showman
Nathan Watson. (His full name is ?
deep breath ? Nathan Daniel
Decosta Boyce Watson.)
He is a natural storyteller and a
relaxed showman. By the time his
band had finished their second set he
had encouraged his audience to dance
amid the tables of this recent addition
to the West End music circuit. His
sleek band, you sensed, could work up
an even more imposing head of steam
at an all-standing venue.
Boyce?s vocals were impeccable,
his light timbre occasionally
morphing into an Al Green-style
falsetto. The equally assured vocalist
Izzy Warner added her own gospel
embellishments. Original numbers
including No Holding Back and
I Can Already Tell were crisp and
authoritative. Good Music may
have been a slightly preachy anthem
about our computer-driven playlist
culture, but Boyce delivered it with
authentic passion.
Clive Davis
this production, with Tricia Thorns
directing. The set, by Leigh Malone,
is quite basic, but it has had to be
adapted around that of the other show,
Into the Numbers, that is on stage here.
The acting is good. Jilly Bond is
touching as the brazen if desperate
Ginnie and Patience Tomlinson is
particularly believable as Brenda
the nympho.
Yet it feels as if Healy is
ttrying to do too much.
Towards the end there is a
sub-thriller twist that would
dismay even Columbo. The
strongest theme is sex and
the middle-aged woman,
but it gets smothered by
the rest of the flotsam
on this Yarmouth beach.
Still, disco anyone?
Ann Treneman
Box office: 0844 8471652,
to Jan 23
12
1G T
Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Kiri
Channel 4, 9pm
Anything
scripted by
Jack Thorne
(National
Treasure) and with
Sarah Lancashire
(Happy Valley) as the
lead character was
always likely to register
Early
Top
pick
highly on the Bafta
scale and Kiri does not
disappoint. Lancashire
is Miriam, a social
worker who loves her
job and believes in it.
She?s equal parts kind,
ballsy and no-nonsense
? attributes that in a
lesser actress?s hands
could feel hackneyed,
but Lancashire makes
Miriam a believable
human being. She has a
dog with gout, arthritis,
testicular cancer
and lockjaw and who
?farts like a trooper?.
?According to the
vet he?s got low-level
depression,? she tells
a fellow dog walker.
?I said to the vet,
?Low-level? With
all that it?s a miracle
he?s not suicidal.? ?
The tone at the outset
is fairly jocular, with
Lancashire doing her
peerless salt-of-the-
earth shtick. Then it
goes dark ? pitch
black ? as Miriam
becomes caught up
in an abduction plot
when a young girl
called Kiri goes missing.
Kiri disappears during
a supervised visit
overseen by Miriam,
and the social worker
is soon blamed.
Thorne told Radio
Times: ?My mum spent
most of her life in the
caring professions
and I?ve always
wanted to find a
way of examining
the pressures they
are put under.? A
drama exploring just
this would have been
interesting enough,
but Thorne is a skilled
writer and the thriller
element ? the
abduction and events
thereafter ? is just
as compelling.
The Truth About
Looking Good
BBC One, 8pm
The cosmetics market
in the UK is worth a
staggering �billion a
year, with many of us
happy to spend vast
sums of money on
products that promise
to improve and
transform the way we
look. But do they work?
Cherry Healey, whose
bathroom cabinet is
overflowing with beauty
products, is teaming up
with scientists from the
University of Sheffield
and a group of
25 volunteers to put
some of these everyday
cosmetics, including
moisturisers, through
a series of tests. The
beauty journalist Sali
Hughes also has some
tips on how to save
money on make-up.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Rip Off Britain: Holidays. A coach
trip company that failed to deliver to passengers 10.00
Homes Under the Hammer (r) (AD) 11.00 Wanted Down
Under. A couple and their two children sample life in
Australia for a week 11.45 Close Calls: On Camera.
A ?shing trawler sinks off the Shetland Isles 12.15pm
Bargain Hunt. Two teams of ?re-?ghters compete (r)
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Ruhma fears for the safety
of Besa and baby Tamanna (AD) 2.15 Father Brown.
A girl is left for dead at a school fete (AD) 3.00 I Escaped
to the Country. Jonnie Irwin is reunited with house
hunters in Suffolk 3.45 The Farmers? Country Showdown.
Poultry farmer Rebecca Tonks hopes to attract attention
to her new egg products 4.30 Antiques Road Trip.
Charles Hanson and Anita Manning travel through the
Lake District on their search for pro?t-making
collectibles, with items including a human skeleton and a
King Charles spaniel 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show hosted by
Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC News at Six; Weather
6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 6.55 Party Political
Broadcast. By the Conservative Party
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 The Farmers?
Country Showdown (r) 7.15 Antiques Road Trip (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: Fern Britton Meets Stefanie Reid (r) (SL) 9.00
Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 11.30
Daily Politics 1.00pm Coast (r) 1.15 Brazil with Michael
Palin (r) (AD) 2.15 Himalaya with Michael Palin. In the
village of Lekhani in Nepal, Michael watches potential
Gurkha recruits being put through their paces. He then
commences the 4,200m ascent to Annapurna Base Camp
(r) 3.15 The Great British Winter. Ellie Harrison
continues her exploration of Britain?s most extreme
winter landscapes, searching for beauty behind the
bleakness within forest environments (r) 4.15 Great
Barrier Reef with David Attenborough. Following his visit
to the Great Barrier Reef in 1957, the broadcaster returns
and uses the latest ?lming techniques to unlock the
secrets of the natural wonder (r) (AD) 5.15 Flog It! Paul
Martin is joined by Claire Rawle and James Lewis at St
Albans Cathedral, where items include a pipe shaped like
a polar explorer (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by
Jeremy Vine 6.30 Great British Railway Journeys.
Michael Portillo travels from Newport to Clevedon (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30
This Morning. Chat and lifestyle features, including a look
at the stories making the newspaper headlines and a
recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose Women. Another
helping of topical studio discussion from a female
perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder.
Cameras follow the criminal barrister Robert Rinder as
he takes on real-life cases in a studio courtroom 3.00
Dickinson?s Real Deal. This compilation edition includes
railway tickets and a bracelet bought for just 50p from a
charity shop, with Tim Hogarth and Tracy Thackray-Howitt
among the experts 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard
hosts the arcade-themed quiz show in which contestants
drop tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a �,000 jackpot 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh
presents as contestants David, India, Ged and Sam
answer general knowledge questions and take on ruthless
quiz genius the Chaser and secure a cash prize (r) 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.25 Party Political Broadcast.
By the Conservative Party 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.10am Jamie?s Comfort Food. Gennaro Contaldo helps
Jamie Oliver make bolognese ravioli (r) 6.20 3rd Rock
from the Sun (r) (AD) 7.10 Everybody Loves Raymond (r)
8.35 Frasier (r) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares
USA. Gordon Ramsay revisits four restaurants he earlier
tried to save (r) 11.00 Sun, Sea and Selling Houses.
A family from West Sussex search for a home in Almeria,
Spain (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Live
Darts: BDO Lakeside World Professional Championships.
Rob Walker presents coverage of the afternoon session on
the ?fth day of the tournament staged at Lakeside
Country Club in Frimley Green 5.00 Come Dine with Me.
Haslemere mayor Sahran kicks off the competition in the
Sussex and Surrey borders, before train driver Ralph,
lingerie ?tter Kim and proud northerner Lindsey take
their turns (r) 6.00 The Simpsons. Homer, Marge and
the kids hitch a ride on a train, where they are
entertained by a tramp who tells them a series of
colourful yarns based on American folklore (r) (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Tony and Diane are caught up in the tunnel
devastation after the car crash, and Misbah has to act
fast to save her children from an approaching lorry (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and his guests talk about the issues of the day
11.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. A man who needs
regular medication for epilepsy is unwilling to break
Ramadan fast to take tablets (r) (AD) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel Inspector. Alex Polizzi
heads to Gloucestershire to breathe new life into a
two-star, 11-bedroom hotel, and reverse the
establishment?s dwindling occupancy rates (r)
1.10 Access. Showbiz news and gossip 1.15 Home and
Away (r) (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS.
The agents investigate the murder of a prank-loving
Marine on Halloween, and discover his death may be
linked to his fondness for practical jokes (r) (AD) 3.15
FILM: The Wrong Babysitter (15, TVM, 2017)
A mother worries about leaving her daughter for an
out-of-town trip, until her neighbour offers to babysit
? only for the girl to go missing. Thriller starring Daphne
Zuniga 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Mark probes
Louise for information when the police arrive and arrest
her (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Irene is rushed to
hospital (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
Sale.
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7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine show
featuring topical reports from around
the UK and big-name studio guests
7.00 Rick Stein?s Road to Mexico The
chef continues down the Californian
coastline immortalised by John
Steinbeck, through LA and into San
Diego where a local ?shmonger cooks
him a ?sh chilli (2/7) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Chrissie tells Belle about
all Lachlan?s problems, in the hope that
she will end their relationship (AD)
8.00 The Truth About Looking Good
Cherry Healey and a team of
independent scientists conduct an
experiment that puts everyday
cosmetic and beauty products to
the test. See Viewing Guide (AD)
8.00 Tom Kerridge?s Lose Weight For
Good Tom shows the group of dieters
quick and easy recipes they can make
at home (2/6) (AD)
8.30 Trust Me, I?m a Doctor Zoe
Williams learns more about a
sleeping disorder that causes
thousands of road accidents each year
8.00 Britain?s Brightest Family New
series. Families take part in a
knock-out tournament
9.00 Miriam?s Big American Adventure
Miriam Margolyes travels to Indiana to
visit a summer camp, where she joins
hundreds of young campers as they
begin their days pledging allegiance
to God and the US ?ag (2/3) (AD)
9.00 Fighting for Air Dr Xand van Tulleken
conducts the ?rst ever large-scale
experiment using people to try and
bring about a quanti?able
improvement in air quality for a single
day. See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 Girlfriends Sue reluctantly faces the
arrival of her birthday, and tensions
rise when her son Andrew confesses a
big secret at her birthday celebrations.
See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Starting Up, Starting Over Julie
and Trevor desire to leave their
successful businesses behind to follow
their dream of a quieter life, and decide
to open their own haberdashery in a
village in the Cotswolds (5/6) (r)
8.00 Kirstie and Phil?s Love It or List It
Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer meet
the Tuck family in Long Eaton,
Derbyshire, who have grown weary of
their cramped, three bedroom
semi-detached home (2/8) (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors
A former prisoner visits the surgery
with a long list of health concerns,
and a young patient with a painful
rash around his mouth and chin is
treated by Dr David Jewell (AD)
9.00 Kiri New series. Four-part drama
starring Sarah Lancashire. Social
worker Miriam is caught up in a police
investigation when a young girl goes
missing on one of her supervised
visits. See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
9.00 Celebrity Big Brother Highlights of
the housemates? past 24 hours under
the all-seeing eye of Big Brother as the
famous faces cope with living under
constant surveillance, with all the
arguments and alliances, as well as
the revelations in the diary room
10.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? The
return of the programme following the
emergency services, this time focusing
on the work of the police, paramedics
and ?re service in Wiltshire (r)
10.05 Celebrity Big Brother?s Bit on the
Side Rylan Clark-Neal presents the
CBB companion show, including famous
guests? thoughts on developments
and behind-the-scenes insights
7.30 Coronation Street Rana is quick to
put Sophie off when she expresses her
interest in Kate, and Tyrone has bad
news for Chesney (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Seb tells
Eileen that Phelan is not who she
thinks he is (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 Mock the Week With James Acaster,
Ed Gamble, Rhys James, Nish Kumar
and Zoe Lyons (2/13) (r)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 A Question of Sport With Emily
Diamond, Mark Foster, James Horwill
and Mark Stoneman
10.30 Newsnight With Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
11.15 And They?re Off for Sport Relief
Ore Oduba hosts a sporting challenge
in which famous faces compete in a
series of bizarre races, while members
of the public try to predict which star
will win (1/6) (r)
11.15 Inside the Factory
Gregg Wallace investigates the
production of sauces in the
Netherlands, and Cherry Healey lends
a hand with making the glass jars
needed for mayonnaise (5/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am-6.00 BBC News
12.15am Sign Zone: DIY SOS ? The Big Build
Adapting the home of a West Sussex woman who was
paralysed in a bicycle accident (r) (AD, SL)
1.15-2.15 The Real T. Rex with Chris Packham.
The naturalist uses new research to create a CGI
representation of the dinosaur (r) (AD, SL)
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7PM
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10.45 Heathrow: Britain?s Busiest
Airport Focusing on the connecting
passengers travelling through
Heathrow, and the challenges of
transferring in the ?ve-square-mile
airport, with 200 gates and four
terminals (2/3) (r)
11.40 Holiday Horrors: Caught on
Camera Series looking at what can go
wrong on holiday (1/4) (r)
12.35am Jackpot247 3.00 Tenable. A team of tram
workers from Shef?eld answer questions about top 10
lists, then try to score a perfect 10 in the ?nal round (r)
(SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. The host invites guests to air their differences
over family and relationship issues (r) (SL)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E Cameras follow
Marie, 31, who arrives at St George?s
A&E, in southwest London,
after collapsing at home with an
unexplained headache (r) (AD)
12.05am Pokerstars Championship Cash Challenge
1.10 FILM: The Social Network (12, 2010)
Fact-based drama starring Jesse Eisenberg (AD, SL) 3.15
Grand Designs Australia (r) 4.10 Location, Location,
Location (r) (SL) 5.00 Coast vs Country (r) (AD)
5.50-6.20 Four in a Bed (r)
10.50 Football on 5: The Carabao Cup
Colin Murray presents highlights of
the semi-?nal ?rst-leg matches,
in which the teams tried to secure an
advantage ahead of the second leg in
two weeks time
12.10am Police Interceptors An arrest snowballs into
a ?rearms stand-off for Damo (r) 1.10 SuperCasino.
Viewers get the chance to take part in live interactive
gaming 3.10 GPs: Behind Closed Doors (r) (AD) 4.00 Now
That?s Funny! (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
Wildlife SOS (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest (r) (SL)
the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Fighting for Air
BBC Two, 9pm
Is it possible to improve
the quality of the air
that we breathe in
just one day? The man
with a plan is Dr Xand
van Tulleken, who is
enlisting the help of
the good folk of Kings
Heath in Birmingham
to stage the first
large-scale experiment
of its kind: using people
power to try to bring
about a quantifiable
improvement in air
quality. With pollution
levels on the high
street on the edge of
legal limits, the odds
are stacked against the
doctor and his team,
which include some
of the best experts
in pollution science.
Can they succeed
where governments
have failed?
Girlfriends
ITV, 9pm
The twist at the end of
last week?s episode of
the drama about
women of a certain
age wasn?t necessary ?
the cherry on top of a
cake that was already
overstuffed with plots.
Ageism, divorce, gay
sons, criminal sons,
infidelity, secrets, lies . . .
it?s all here. So did
Linda (Phyllis Logan)
push Micky overboard,
as his ?mistress? has
claimed? It?s the least
interesting thing about
Girlfriends, with the
bits rooted more in
reality the reasons to
stay with it. These
include Gail (Zo�
Wanamaker) caring
for her mother and Sue
(Miranda Richardson)
struggling with a
landmark birthday.
Hansa Studios
Sky Arts, 9pm
Hansa Studios in Berlin
is where David Bowie
recorded his classic
albums ?Heroes? and
Low during an exile
in the city from 1977
to 1979. Located in a
wasteland in what was
West Berlin, just a few
hundred yards from the
remains of the Wall,
the studio has a global
mystique, up there
with Abbey Road. It
has also hosted U2,
Depeche Mode, Nick
Cave and REM. This
meticulous, featurelength documentary
traces the history of the
studio and the music
recorded there, with
contributions from
Bowie (in archive
footage), his producer
Tony Visconti and
REM?s Michael Stipe.
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7.30pm
Chelsea and Arsenal
clash at Stamford
Bridge in the first leg
of the Carabao Cup
semi-final (kick-off
8pm). Having fielded
a weakened side in
their FA Cup defeat
to Nottingham Forest,
Ars鑞e Wenger is
under pressure to play
a strong XI tonight.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Futurama (r) (AD) 7.00 Monkey Life
(r) (AD) 8.00 Meerkat Manor (r) 9.00 Road
Wars (r) 10.00 Stargate Atlantis (r) 11.00
MacGyver (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons. Double bill (r) 6.00 Futurama (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 A League of Their Own. With Anthony
Joshua, Mo Farah and Emma Bunton (r) (AD)
9.00 A League of Their Own: US Road Trip 2.0.
James, Jamie, Jack and Andrew perform with
the LA Rams cheerleaders (r) (AD)
10.00 The Russell Howard Hour. Labour MP
and shadow home secretary Diane Abbott (r)
11.00 The Force: North East. A man high on
drink and drugs launches a tirade of abuse,
and a domestic ?ght leads to an arrest (r)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r)
1.00am Hawaii Five-0. Double bill (r) 3.00 The
Blacklist (r) (AD) 4.00 Stop, Search, Seize
(r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 The British (r) (AD)
8.00 Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) (AD)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House.
The team treats an ice-hockey player (r) (AD)
6.00 House. The team treats a boy whose
choking nightmares become a reality (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A doctor?s
wife and a newspaper editor are found dead (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Frank contends with a
whistleblower within the NYPD (r) (AD)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Jon Snow goes beyond
the wall to capture a white walker (r) (AD)
10.20 Game of Thrones. Tyrion tries to save
Westeros from itself as everyone meets in Kings
Landing to discuss the fate of the realm (r) (AD)
11.50 The Sopranos. AJ is prescribed tablets
after his split from Blanca (r) (AD)
1.00am The Tunnel: Vengeance (r) 2.05 Dexter.
A suspicious Doakes has Dexter followed (r)
3.10 Banshee (r) (AD) 4.20 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life (AD) 8.00 Chicago Fire (r)
9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00 Cold Case (r)
11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia 12.00 House
Hunters International (r) 1.00pm To Catch a
Smuggler: JFK Airport (r) 2.00 Nothing to
Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 Chicago Fire (r) 5.00 CSI:
Crime Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 The Chef?s Line
7.30 The Real A&E (4/10) (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Holmes and Watson join
the hunt for a ruthless criminal who killed two
paramedics and abducted a woman (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 Bones (r) (AD)
3.00 Scandal (r) (AD) 4.00 The Chef?s Line (r)
4.30 The Real A&E (r) (AD) 5.00 The Best of
Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Andr� Rieu 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected (AD) 9.30 Hollywood: Singing and
Dancing (AD) 10.45 Monty Python?s Personal
Best 12.00 Too Young to Die (AD) 1.00pm
Discovering: Natalie Wood (AD) 2.00 Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 2.30 Hollywood: Singing
and Dancing (AD) 3.45 Monty Python?s Personal
Best 5.00 Too Young to Die (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Spencer Tracy (AD)
7.00 Tina Turner: Live in Rio. A 1988 concert at
the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro
8.30 Video Killed the Radio Star.
The challenges and visions behind
David Bowie?s music videos (AD)
9.00 Hansa Studios: By the Wall 1976-90.
Documentary. See Viewing Guide
10.30 FILM: Scott Walker ? 30 Century
Man (12, 2006) Documentary about the
musician, exploring his pop stardom in the 1950s
and 60s, to his more experimental work
12.30am Depeche Mode: Live in Berlin
1.55 Heimat 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 8.30 Live Tie
Break Tens: Melbourne. Coverage of the
invitational tournament 11.00 Transfer Centre
11.30 Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Sky Sports News
3.00pm Transfer Centre 3.30 Sky Sports News
7.00 Transfer Centre. The latest developments
7.30 Live Carabao Cup: Chelsea v Arsenal
(Kick-off 8.00). Coverage of the semi-?nal
?rst-leg encounter at Stamford Bridge, as the
London rivals look to gain an advantage ahead
of the second leg at Emirates Stadium in two
weeks. The Blues have won this tournament on
?ve occasions, most recently in 2015, and their
fourth triumph saw them defeat the Gunners at
Millennium Stadium in 2007. Arsenal have lifted
the trophy twice in their history, while that loss
to Chelsea was one of ?ve times they have
?nished as runners-up. See Viewing Guide
10.00 The Debate. The latest developments
11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 9.00pm-10.00 The Storm
That Saved a City. The storm of 1968 10.45
Miriam?s Big American Adventure (AD)
11.45 A Question of Sport 12.15am And
They?re Off for Sport Relief 1.00 Weather for
the Week Ahead 1.05-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 6.55pm-7.00
Party Political Broadcast. By the
Welsh Conservative Party
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30
Survivors. The voices from the Troubles (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm Brazil with
Michael Palin (r) (AD) 2.00 Flog It! (r) 2.40
Politics Scotland 3.45 Coast (r) 4.00 The Great
British Winter (r) 5.00-6.00 Great Barrier Reef
with David Attenborough (r) (AD)
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 3.15pm-4.15 The Great
British Winter. Ellie Harrison explores
winter in the Lake District (r)
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As ITV except: 6.25pm-6.30 Party Political
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STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Heathrow: Britain?s Busiest Airport.
Documentary (r) 12.05am Teleshopping
1.05 After Midnight 2.35 Storage Hoarders (r)
3.25-5.05 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
(2/2) Michael Portillo concludes his travels
through Germany (6/10) (r) (AD)
8.00 Handmade: By Royal Appointment. Objects
made under the royal warrant (r) (AD)
8.30 A Stitch in Time. Exploring the lives of
historical ?gures through their clothes (AD)
9.00 England?s Forgotten Queen: The Life and
Death of Lady Jane Grey. Three days into her
reign, the clock is already ticking for Jane as
Mary Tudor, determined to seize power of the
throne, raises an army (2/3) (AD)
10.00 Fit to Rule: How Royal Illness Changed
History. The medical histories of the later
Stuarts and the Hanoverians (r) (AD)
11.00 The Wonderful World of Blood: with
Michael Mosley. Michael Mosley takes an
in-depth look at blood (r) (AD)
12.00 Top of the Pops: 1981. Double bill (r)
1.20am England?s Forgotten Queen: The Life
and Death of Lady Jane Grey (r) (AD)
2.20-3.20 Workers or Shirkers? Ian Hislop?s
Victorian Bene?ts (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Coach Trip:
Road to Tenerife (r) (AD) 7.30 Streetmate (r)
8.00 Charmed (r) 9.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD)
10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(r) (AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
2.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD) 3.00 Baby Daddy
(r) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Tenerife (AD)
8.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
8.30 The Goldbergs (AD)
9.00 Don?t Tell the Bride. Groom-to-be Daniel
plans a Caribbean-carnival style wedding
10.00 Body Fixers. Helping a distraught
bride-to-be who has lost all her hair (r)
11.10 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Gogglebox (r) 1.10 The Goldbergs (r)
(AD) 1.45 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD, SL) 2.40
Don?t Tell the Bride (r) 3.35 Celebs Go Dating (r)
(AD) 4.25 Rude(ish) Tube (r) 4.50 Charmed (r)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.30 A Place
in the Sun: Home or Away (r) 10.30 Four in a
Bed (r) 1.05pm Come Dine with Me (r)
3.50 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away (r)
5.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick and the
team deal with two emergency cases (r)
7.55 Grand Designs. Adam Purchase and his
partner Nicola Brennan try to restore a Grade
II-listed silver-mine engine-house in Cornwall
on a budget of �0,000 (6/12) (r) (AD)
9.00 Location, Location, Location. Kirstie
Allsopp and Phil Spencer visit the seaside in
pricey Kent to help two sets of buyers, including
a family of six, search for a new home (r)
10.00 Grand Designs. After a four year stint
living in New Zealand, an intrepid pair want to
build a Kiwi-style hill house on the slopes of the
Malvern hills in Worcestershire (r) (AD)
11.05 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. With
David Walliams, Jessica Hynes and Rhod Gilbert.
Plus, Sam Simmons in Dictionary Corner (r)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 Location, Location, Location (r) 2.05 Grand
Designs (r) (AD) 3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am Four Guns to the Border (U,
1954) Western starring Rory Calhoun 12.40pm
Pimpernel Smith (U, 1941) An unassuming
English professor smuggles enemies of the state
out of Nazi Germany. Second World War
adventure starring Leslie Howard and Francis L
Sullivan (b/w) 3.10 Last Train from Gun Hill
(12, 1959) Western starring Kirk Douglas,
Carolyn Jones and Anthony Quin 5.05 Master
of the World (PG, 1961) Sci-? adventure
starring Vincent Price and Charles Bronson
7.10 Chronicle (12, 2012) Three teenagers
develop superhuman abilities, but one of them is
corrupted by his new-found power. Sci-? thriller
starring Dane DeHaan and Alex Russell (AD)
9.00 Exodus: Gods and Kings (12, 2014)
The adoptive brother of the pharaoh of Egypt
tries to free the country?s slaves during a
series of plagues. Action adventure starring
Christian Bale and Joel Edgerton (AD)
11.55-3.45 JFK (15, 1991) New Orleans
district attorney Jim Garrison opens his own
investigation into the 1963 assassination of
President John F Kennedy. Drama starring
Kevin Costner and Gary Oldman
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 6.55 Dress to Impress (r) 7.45
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.20 The Cube (r) 9.25 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.10 Who?s Doing
the Dishes? (r) 11.10 Dress to Impress (r)
12.10pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.40 The Big
Soap Quiz: Coronation Street v Emmerdale (r)
1.45 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.35 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men
8.30 Superstore. The employees are given a
chance to win a cash bonus (AD)
9.00 FILM: 22 Jump Street (15, 2014)
Two cops are sent undercover at a university,
but their friendship is threatened as they join
different student cliques. Crime comedy with
Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum (AD)
11.15 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.45 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.15am American Dad! Double bill (r) (AD)
1.10 Two and a Half Men (r) 1.40 Superstore
(r) (AD) 2.05 Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 The Royal (r)
9.00 Judge Judy (r) 10.15 The Darling Buds
of May (r) 12.35pm The Royal (r) 1.40
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 4.20 On the Buses (r) 4.55 Rising
Damp (r) 5.25 George and Mildred (r)
6.00 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Grady?s wedding is
marred by an untimely death ? but with Jessica
among the guests, it is not long before the
culprit is taken into custody (r) (AD)
8.00 Endeavour. Morse meets his
intellectual match when a serial killer haunting
the streets of Oxford keeps himself one step
ahead of the law and leaves cryptic messages to
goad the police (2/4) (r) (AD)
10.00 Foyle?s War. Foyle investigates a
burglary at the headquarters of a multinational
company, and a murder soon leads him to
believe the ?rm are conducting covert business
with the Nazis (3/4) (r) (AD)
12.15am Inspector Morse (r) 2.10 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Pawn Stars (r) 7.30
Ironside (r) 8.35 Quincy ME (r) 9.35 Minder (r)
(AD) 10.40 The Sweeney (r) 11.45 The
Professionals (r) (AD) 12.50pm Ironside (r)
1.50 Quincy ME (r) 2.55 Minder (r) (AD) 4.00
The Sweeney (r) 5.00 The Professionals (r) (AD)
6.05 The Car Chasers (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars. The guys are offered a Second
World War code-breaking machine (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. Chumlee designs a new
uniform for the team, while the guys examine a
guitar that appeared in a James Bond movie (r)
7.55 River Monsters. A mystery sea monster
washes up on a UK beach (r)
9.00 FILM: The Enforcer (18, 1976)
Maverick cop ?Dirty? Harry Callahan is
unwillingly teamed up with a female partner as
he takes on a terrorist group. Crime thriller
sequel starring Clint Eastwood (AD)
11.00 FILM: Hard Target (18, 1993)
Action thriller starring Jean-Claude Van Damme,
Yancy Butler and Lance Henriksen (AD)
12.55am The Americans (r) 2.00 The Sweeney
(r) 2.50 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Deadly 60 on a Mission 4.00 Ice
Road Truckers 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Best of Top Gear. A look back at some of
the best ever bits of Top Gear (AD)
7.00 Cops UK: Bodycam Squad. Following the
work of the Staffordshire Police force, re?ecting
the daily challenges of combating crime and
revealing fresh insights into modern policing
8.00 Yianni: Supercar Customiser. New series.
Following the work of Yianni Charalambous,
car customiser for the rich and famous
8.30 Yianni: Supercar Customiser. Yianni works
on a vehicle owned by DJ Charlie Sloth (AD)
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With guests Jason
Manford and Michael McIntyre
10.00 Taskmaster. Lolly Adefope tries painting,
and Hugh Dennis is befuddled by an egg (r)
11.00 QI. Double bill
12.20am Mock the Week 1.00 QI. Double bill
2.20 Mock the Week 3.00 Live at the Apollo
4.00 Home Shopping. Buying goods
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The Bill 12.00
The Duchess of Duke Street 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Steptoe and Son (b/w) 2.20
Birds of a Feather 3.00 London?s Burning 4.00
New Tricks (AD) 5.00 The Duchess of Duke
Street. George Duggan wins a landslide victory
6.00 One Foot in the Grave. Victor and Margaret
return from holiday to a shock
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. The pensioners
encounter a prophet of doom
7.20 Goodnight Sweetheart. Yvonne and Phoebe
invite Gary to dinner on the same evening
8.00 Inspector George Gently. A young woman?s
body is washed up beside a pier, leading Gently
and Bacchus to question the staff and guests of
the holiday camp where she worked (2/4) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. UCOS looks into the murder
of a private investigator (7/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. The squabbling sisters
are suspected of burglary in Chigwell
12.00 The Bill 1.00am Bergerac 2.15 Crocodile
Shoes 3.10 A Fine Romance 3.25 Garden
Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Abandoned
Engineering (AD) 11.00 Slow Train Through
Africa with Griff Rhys Jones 12.00 Time
Team 1.00pm Human Planet (AD) 2.00
Yellowstone 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Slow Train
Through Africa with Griff Rhys Jones 5.00
The World?s Weirdest Weapons (AD)
6.00 Battleplan. Documentary
7.00 Abandoned Engineering. Abandoned
projects of the space age (2/6) (AD)
8.00 Hunting Down the Nazis. Documentary
about Simon Wiesenthal, who dedicated his life
to tracking down Nazi war criminals (2/2) (AD)
9.00 Open All Hours. Grumpy grocer
Arkwright buys a guard dog
9.40 Open All Hours. Arkwright attends a
funeral, leaving Granville in charge of the shop
10.20 Open All Hours. Arkwright organises a
sales drive in a bid to boost pro?ts
11.00 The Two Ronnies. Featuring an
instalment of Hampton Wick
12.00 The Two Ronnies 1.00am Museum
Secrets 2.00 Pointless 3.00 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Rare Breed:
A Farming Year 10.45 Eamonn Mallie:
Face to Face With 11.10-11.40 Britain?s
Brightest Family 12.35am Teleshopping
2.05-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puf?n Rock) (r) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san
Rioghachd Bhig (Ben & Holly?s Little Kingdom)
(r) 5.50 Seonaidh (Shaun the Sheep)
6.00 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse) 6.10
Dragonan: Reis chun an iomaill (Dragons:
Race to the Edge) 6.35 Te Bheag a? Ghruffalo
(The Gruffalo?s Child) (r) 7.00 An Lot (The
Croft) (r) 7.35 Speaking Our Language (r)
8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 Turas a? Bhradain
(The Salmon?s Journey) 9.00 Air Toir
Manachainn Dheir (The Lost Monastery of
Deer) 10.00 Air an Rathad (On the Road) (r)
10.30 Port (r) 11.00 DIY le Donnie (r)
11.45-12.00 Torcuil?s Guide to Being a Gael (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Yr Ysgol (r) 6.15 Cwpwrdd Cadi
(r) 6.25 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 6.40 Tomos
a?i Ffrindiau (r) 6.50 Nico N鬵 7.00 Gwdihw (r)
7.15 Digbi Draig (r) 7.30 Dipdap 7.35 Sam T鈔
7.45 Deian a Loli a?r Lori Ledrith 8.00 Octonots
(r) 8.15 Ty Mel (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r)
8.30 Guto Gwningen (r) 8.45 Yn yr Ardd (r)
9.00 Popi?r Gath (r) 9.10 Stiw (r) 9.25 Ben a
Mali a?u Byd Bach O Hud (r) 9.35 Holi Hana (r)
9.45 Tecwyn y Tractor (r) 10.00 Deian a Loli a
Thylwyth Teg y Dannedd (r) 10.15 Cwpwrdd
Cadi (r) 10.25 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 10.40
Tomos a?i Ffrindiau (r) 10.50 Nico N鬵 (r)
11.00 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: F?ic a F?ac (r) 11.10
Dysgu Gyda Cyw: 123 (r) 11.25 Dysgu Gyda
Cyw: Cwm Teg (r) 11.30 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Do
Re Mi Dona (r) 11.45 Dysgu Gyda Cyw:
Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 12.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 12.05pm Crwydro (r) 12.30 Priodas
Pum Mil (r) 1.30 Cerys Matthews a?r Goeden
Faled (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05
Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05
Pengelli (r) 3.30 Cledrau Coll (r) 4.00 Awr
Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Y
Dyfnfor 5.25 Stwnsh: Dewi a?r Ditectifs Gwyllt
(r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Ffrindiau am Byth (r) 6.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad (r)
6.30 Mwy o Sgorio 7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm (AD) 8.25 Darren Drws Nesa 8.55
Darllediad Gwleidyddol gan y Ceidwadwyr
Cymreig 9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30
Chwaraeon y Dyn Bach (AD) 10.00 Rygbi Pawb
10.45-12.20am Carwyn (r) (AD)
14
Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7545
1
2
3
Codeword No 3229
4
5
6
1
9
19
24
Train Tracks No 302
26
1
12
24
26
1
16
I
7
12
1
7
9
1
20
19
10
17
12
14
1
6
16
4
6
1
19
6
5
5
1
13
20
19
15
6
21
15
1
24
6
13
17
25
3
1
3
7
3
4
4
18
4
12
2
G
8
11
2
1
20
23
19
20
14
12
24
19
15
19
18
1
18
1
A
6
5
6
11
5
24
3
4
3
16
18
19
16
19
6
11
6
21
1
16
21
26
21
20
1
16
3
9
1
17
16
14
7
16
1
25
22
15
16
18
1
19
20
19
7
19
25
20
24
7
1
26
2
16
B
20
2
5
16
25
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
21
9
3
7
8
9
10
11
13
15
17 Short pleasure trip (6)
18 High-pitched neigh (6)
19 Deer's horn (6)
20 Park keeper (6)
21 Possessing aptitude (8)
Last offers (8)
Vast dark space (6)
Baltic state (6)
Antelope (6)
Bad stroke in snooker (6)
Betting stake (4)
Bike (5)
Oil of rose petals (4)
A
K EN
N
I V A
I
E S
O
ARS
A
D F
A
T ER
I
K
A F R I C
I
N
L S
I CO
E
R
ARCHER
O D
E MOU N
E
L
AC T I OU
A
U
L A P S E
M
20
8
6
3
24
21
25
16
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
14
15
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
G
I
Down
Solution to Crossword 7544
M
AWA
R R
ARR
U A
DUN
G
HE
M
SHE
A N
L I T
T
24
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
E
A
R
N
D
I
S
U
S
E
1
2
3
4
5
6
11
12
13
14
15
16
Cured ham (6)
Formal discussion (6)
Unfortunate (7)
Form a mental image of (7)
Liqueur made with eggs (8)
Almond liqueur (8)
Self-important (8)
Abstaining from alcohol (8)
Worry; business (7)
On the sheltered side (7)
The East (6)
Gentle; offer (6)
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica
No 4085
No 4086
R
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
D
O
L
A
A
I
R
R
U
E
T
C
I
O
L
E
H
B
R
A
T
Y
E
D
O
E
A
T
B
W
I
S
I
V
F
S
L
G
T
C
W
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4221
Futoshiki No 3083
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
84901 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2042
20
?
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
24
27
14
?
3
17
16
34
22
23
17
7
4
17
3
9
13
38
21
4
>
?
?
<
?
3
6
32
27
17
10
7
3
4
17
16
6
7
5
15
18
23
30
24
19
10
<
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
24
26
16
16
19
14
17
15
17
� PUZZLER MEDIA
10
the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
White: AlphaZero (computer)
Black: Stockfish (computer)
AlphaZero v Stockfish Match,
London 2017
Queen?s Indian Defence
1 Nf3 Nf6 2 d4 e6 3 c4 b6 4 g3
Bb7 5 Bg2 Be7 6 0-0 0-0 7 d5
exd5 8 Nh4 c6 9 cxd5 Nxd5 10
Nf5 Nc7 11 e4 d5 12 exd5 Nxd5 13
Nc3 Nxc3 14 Qg4 g6 15 Nh6+
Kg7 16 bxc3 Bc8
Black?s coming manoeuvres are
designed to drive the white queen
away from the vicinity of the
black king.
17 Qf4 Qd6 18 Qa4 g5
Isolating and winning White?s
far-flung knight. However, White
gains compensation in terms of
open lines and the exposure of
Black?s king.
19 Re1 Kxh6 20 h4 f6 21 Be3 Bf5
22 Rad1 Qa3 23 Qc4 b5
A piece and a pawn in arrears
and with his queen being har-
________
醨h D 4 D]
�D g Dp]
� DpD DkD]
轉pD Db0 ]
� D D D D]
�) G ) ]
跴D D )BD]
贒 DR$ IQ]
谅媚牌侨
Utterly astounding. AlphaZero
retreats the queen to one of the
worst squares on the board simply
to overload the black defences by
trading off the important lightsquared bishops. Even now it is
not immediately apparent that
the white attack is worth such a
huge investment in material.
26 ... Kg7 27 Be4 Bg6 28 Bxg6
hxg6 29 Qh3 Bf6 30 Kg2
It is a hallmark of AlphaZero?s
attacking play that it garnishes
vicious onslaughts with quiet
moves that improve its prospects
in many different directions.
30 ... Qxa2 31 Rh1 Qg8 32 c4
Re8 33 Bd4 Bxd4 34 Rxd4 Rd8
35 Rxd8 Qxd8 36 Qe6 Nd7 37
Rd1 Nc5 38 Rxd8 Nxe6 39 Rxa8
Kf6 40 cxb5 cxb5 41 Kf3 Nd4+ 42
Ke4 Nc6 43 Rc8 Ne7 44 Rb8 Nf5
45 g4 Nh6 46 f3 Nf7 47 Ra8
Nd6+ 48 Kd5 Nc4 49 Rxa7 Ne3+
50 Ke4 Nc4 51 Ra6+ Kg7 52 Rc6
Kf7 53 Rc5 Ke6 54 Rxg5 Kf6 55
Rc5 g5 56 Kd4 Black resigns
________
� DqD DkD] Winning Move
郉p0 0pgp]
� hnD DpD] Black to play. This position is from
Riyadh 2017.
轉 HrD D ] Carlsen-Artemiev,
Here Black exchanged rooks and Carlsen
� D ) DPD] went on to win. Instead Black could have
蹹PD )NDP] gained a crucial material advantage. What
踨G DQ)KD] should he have played?
�$ DRD D ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
40 - Counting in Defence: start
during the bidding
and promote declarer?s slightly
higher cards (eg ?KJ97). A good
diamond lead would be ?A1086;
?A432 would make a poor lead.
So that leaves hearts. You know
for sure partner has at least four
hearts ? otherwise N-S would be
playing in 4?. Partner?s hearts are
sitting over dummy?s; you have a
nice sequential holding. Lead ?J.
You led your shortest suit.
When the opponents bid, they do
so to describe their hand to their
partner. This is at the cost of giving
away information to you. So listen.
Try to count their shapes ?
sometimes they?ve painted such a
pretty picture that you know their
shape before you?ve even led. Then Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
you can be more effective with that
?A 3
all-important opening card.
?A J 3
Take this auction:
?J 7 4
S
2?
2NT
3NT
W
Pass
Pass
End
N
1?
2?
3?
E
Pass
Pass
Pass
?9 5 4 2
?8 7 6
?A 8 3
?Q 9 5
?K 8 6 4 2
N
W
E
S
64 ? 12
EASY
? K J 10 7 6
?J 9 2
Contract: 3NT ? K 10 4 2
As West, your hand is: ?J 10
?KQ 2
Try to decide on your ?A 4 3 2
Lead: ?Q
?J
lead before reading on. ? J 9 6 2
S
W
N
E
It is almost certain that North
Pass
2?
Pass
1?
(ie dummy) is 5?4?1?3?. South?s
2?
Pass
3?(1) Pass
shape is less certain but he won?t
3NT
End
have three spades or four hearts
(giving a fit); and his diamonds will (1) Fourth Suit Forcing ? more info, please.
As West, let?s reflect on declarer?s
be really good, for he has bid 3NT
facing a partner who has adver- shape. He has advertised 5?4? with
tised a singleton. He is probably a diamond stop, likely three cards. He
2?3? 4?4?, 2?2? 4?5? or probably has just one club in a
5?4?3?1? shape. Given West?s
perhaps 1?3?4?5?.
Nothing stands out but you can rubbish hand with declarer?s missing
eliminate clearly bad suits. Your honours looking favourably placed,
partner has at most two clubs. something dynamic is needed.
Hoping to pin declarer?s
Leading from ?J9xx would be folly.
Dummy has five spades, declarer singleton ?10/?J, West led ?Q.
probably has two. Leading from Bingo! Trick one went ?Q, ?2, ?3,
?J. Next came ?9, covered by ?K
?J9x would also be folly.
Diamonds may appear superfi- and ?A. East switched to ?10 and
cially attractive. However, your pips West won ?A then led ?5 through
are so lousy that you figure to squash ?864 to East?s ?107. Down one.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
partner?s intermediates (eg ?Q1086)
3/4
5/12
x2
x2
?6
+ 1/2
? 89 � 2 + 78
OF IT
251 + 521 x 4 + 228
+1/2
OF IT
OF IT
? 878
?9
OF IT
5/16
OF IT
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 476
�
? 68 x 5
80%
OF IT
? 997
2
5
3
Polygon
3
2 2
7
3 2
6
2 6
2
4
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 2045
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 15 words, average;
21, good; 25, very good; 30, excellent
x
All the digits
x
x
= 42 from 1-9 are
-
+
=9
+
x
+
-
=
70
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
+
4
x
Yesterday?s answers
air, airy, ani, any, naris, nary, nay, rai,
rain, rainy, raisin, raisiny, rani, ray,
ria, san, sari, sarin, say, yarn
3
=
11
=8
=
27
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Killer Tricky No 5810
16
13
13
12min
14
11
7
21
8
16
13
14
21
19
14
11
7
17
10
Solutions
Codeword 3228
Kakuro 2041
19
19
11
3 9 8
1 4 6
7 9
9 3 5
8 1 2
7
5 4
1 3
2 1 3
2 1
1 7
2 9
4
2
2 1
3 4
9
2
2 1
2 1
4
6
5
17
10
12
12
10
8
13
17
12
6
1
9
4
7
5
8
3
2
5
8
2
1
3
9
4
7
6
4
3
7
2
6
8
9
1
5
1
9
4
3
2
6
7
5
8
Killer Deadly No 5811
18
3
12
24
20
16
26
10
21
8
7
3
5
9
1
2
6
4
7
2
6
8
1
3
5
4
9
9
4
8
6
5
7
3
2
1
3
5
1
9
4
2
6
8
7
5
9
6
2
7
4
1
3
8
9
4
1
6
3
2
7
8
5
2
6
5
7
9
8
3
1
4
8
3
7
4
5
1
6
2
9
6
8
2
1
4
7
5
9
3
7
1
9
5
2
3
8
4
6
3
5
4
8
6
9
2
7
1
20
16
20
4
8
30
21
7
6
2
5
8
3
1
4
9
6
4
8
9
4
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
3
2
4
8
6
9
3
7
5
4
1
2
7
4
8
6
1
3
2
9
5
1
9
3
5
2
8
7
4
6
2
5
4
1
9
6
8
7
3
9
7
1
8
3
2
5
6
4
3
8
6
7
5
4
9
2
1
9
3
8
6
7
2
4
5
1
6
5
4
1
3
9
7
8
2
1
2
7
8
4
5
9
3
6
2
9
3
4
6
8
5
1
7
4
1
6
3
5
7
2
9
8
8
7
5
9
2
1
3
6
4
2
2
1
5 > 2
5
?
4
3
1
?
4 > 3 > 2
1
4 > 3 > 2
?
3 < 5
1
3 6
�
x
2
9
6
3
+
+
-
�
5
4
5
1
7
-
+
+
+
1
4
6
3
5
3
4
2
A
5
4
5
1
4
1
B
Suko 2130
8
5
6
9
3
7
1
4
2
1
7
2
6
4
8
9
5
3
4
3
9
1
5
2
7
6
8
7
4
8
2
6
1
3
9
5
2
9
1
3
7
5
4
8
6
5
6
3
4
8
9
2
7
1
9
8
5
7
1
3
6
2
4
6
1
7
5
2
4
8
3
9
3
2
4
8
9
6
5
1
7
V
F
I
A
X
P
R
E
L
E
B
P
O
O
E
L
W
L
D
R
A
Y
Lexica 4084
1
9
3
Lexica 4083
Set Square 2044
3
3
3
8
1
2
9
4
6
7
5
1
Sudoku 9582
6
2
5
9
4
7
1
3
8
5
2
Cell Blocks 3111
21
5
4
9
7
1
6
8
2
3
4
?
3
7
13
4
3
7
2
8
1
6
5
9
Futoshiki 3082
18
20
5
1
2
4
6
9
3
8
7
Killer 5809
KenKen 4220
21
19
51min
4
7
8
3
1
5
9
6
2
Train Tracks 301
MS
AB L E
O
E
E
X
GYMS L I P
U
I
C
I
L E T CH E R
S
T
E
T EMP T S
B
D
R
RK
J E E P
U G
T
A
T
RA Z OR
A
U
E
E
L OBU L E S
Sudoku 9581
2
6
5
7
8
4
1
9
3
Killer 5808
1
2
3
9
8
6
4
5
7
OPOS S U
D
X
A
OM I T S
U
D
H
ROAN
F
N
N
W I T H E R
H
R
AARD V A
C
U O
KUMQUA
E M S
DA Y S
G
9 8
2 7 3 1
1
1 2
5 9
2 4
1 3 7 9
1 5 8
1 2 3
4 7 9 8
2 9 8 4
Sudoku 9580
?Q 8
?Q 9 5
?10 9 6 5
?A 10 7 3
OF IT
83 x 7 + 57
MEDIUM
HARDER
3/4
� PUZZLER MEDIA
In the new year?s honours list the
UK artificial intelligence genius
Demis Hassabis was awarded a
richly deserved CBE. Hassabis has
driven artificial intelligence to
new heights, first by orchestrating
the creation of a program that has
mastered the fiendishly difficult
Oriental game of go. Second, he
has transferred the learning techniques to chess. In a 100-game
match against the renowned Stockfish program, Hassabis?s AlphaZero scored an overwhelming
victory, winning 28 games, losing
none and producing in the process a number of games that defy
all human logic.
assed, it is not at all clear that
White has sufficient compensation for the lost material. The way
in which White now reintroduces
the queen into the attack is little
short of miraculous.
24 hxg5+ fxg5 25 Qh4+ Kg6 26 Qh1
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Demis Hassabis CBE
Cell Blocks No 3112
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
8
+
x
4
Quiz 1 Tagalog 2 Walk on the moon ? during
the Apollo 12 mission 3 Vietnam 4 Revolver
5 The Executioner?s Song 6 Shin Bet or Shabak ?
the Israeli organisation 7 Addison?s disease. It is
named after Thomas Addison 8 Newcastle upon
Tyne 9 Edmund the Martyr 10 Mellotron
11 Allied invasion of Sicily 12 Chile 13 Triage
14 Vegard Ulvang 15 James Callaghan
C
H
T
O
A
S
L
E
P
T
E
W
L
S
I
V
M
E
N
T
A
R
G
E
Word watch
Kilonova (a) A star
collision
Kinkajou (c) A small,
long-tailed mammal from
the Americas
Kermis (b) A festival or
fair, often to collect
charitable funds
Brain Trainer
Easy 9; Medium 460;
Harder 4,299
Chess 1 ... Rxb2! 2 Qxb2
Rxc5 leaves Black with
the clear material
advantage of two minor
pieces against a rook
10.01.18
MindGames
Sudoku
Difficult No 9583
Fiendish No 9584
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
7
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
1
3
9 4
Kilonova
a An astronomical
event
b A small republic
c A ballet move
6
Kinkajou
a A fetish
b A board game
c An animal
Kermis
a Spiralled
b A fair
c Bright green
Answers on page 15
5 7
3 8 4 2
8
6
7 6
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
9
6 5 2
2
8
3 1
6
4
5
3
9
7
6 7
7
3
9
2
8
4 8
3
6 1
3
6 1
8 4
9
4
8
1
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
1 The standardised
form of which language
is often called Filipino?
15
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
intended to cover
which 1943 invasion?
12 The Loa and the B韔
B韔 are the two longest
rivers in which South
American country?
2 In November 1969,
Pete Conrad became the
third person to do what?
about six former heads
of which internal
security service?
7 Named after an
English physician,
which disease is also
known as primary
adrenal insufficiency
and hypoadrenalism?
5 The US criminal Gary
Gilmore is the subject of
which non-fiction novel
by Norman Mailer?
8 In 1976, Eldon Square
shopping centre opened
in which English city?
6 The Gatekeepers
(2012) is a documentary
9 By tradition, Ivar
the Boneless and his
brother Ubba killed
which 9th-century
king of East Anglia?
10 In 1962, variety
pianist Geoff Unwin
was hired to promote
the use of which
keyboard instrument?
11 Operation Mincemeat
was a deception
13 Which process
of determining the
priority of patients?
treatments derives its
name from the French
for ?to separate??
2
8
3
4
5
9
6
HU
N
N I
F
CO
R
AM
14 Which Norwegian
cross-country skier
won three golds
and one silver at
the 1992 Albertville
Winter Olympics?
15 Which prime
minister is pictured?
Answers on page 15
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
22
21
23
N
E
P
N T E R
I N
S
A
N E T E E N
N
V
N S T E L L A
U
R O
P E R E
T H
M
I
N
S
T
E
R
Johnny Morris, Travel writer, Times Expert Traveller
O
A T E
A F F
I
I ON
N
E A D
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Teazel
7
This country house hotel is a living
artwork created by chef patron, and
adopted national treasure, Raymond Blanc OBE
Yesterday?s S T U R D Y E T H I C S
Quick
W A
E
T
I
H
Cryptic
W I N D OW S H O P P E R
S
I
I
P
R
solution
S T OA
P RO T OCO L
No 1001
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1002
1
2 9 6
9 8 2
5
3
4
2
1
2
6
4
6
8 3 7
7 8
1
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GETTY
4 Tomorrow Never
Knows is the closing
track on which studio
album by the Beatles?
5
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 The figure-hugging
ao dai tunic is worn
by women of which
Asian country?
4
5
9
2 8
PUZZLER MEDIA
2
3
7
Super fiendish No 9585
Across
1 Barrister that?s soft and
smooth (4)
3 Sheriff?s of?cer to leave money
for waiters (8)
8 Chap gets older but copes (7)
10 Proposer is Shaker?s
companion? (5)
11 Tricky problem, brewing
artisan beer (5-6)
13 Everyone in short dash for US
city (6)
15 Pictures came in for
restoration (6)
17 Appear, as moths tend to?
(4,2,5)
20 Present of francs given to
monarch (5)
21 I won?t itemise the rest, even
quickly (3,2,2)
22 Smear pan to cook cheese (8)
23 Very dark in Kentucky (4)
Down
1 A corpse: important one? (8)
2 In Berlin, dainty girl (5)
4 Going along with others, one?s
on foot (2,4)
5
6
7
9
12
14
16
18
19
Like some workers, needing
houses destroyed (4-7)
Unfavourable notice on poem
(7)
Reasonable-sounding food (4)
Police force, green, admire
criminal (11)
Need just showing selfindulgence (8)
Match the Devil (7)
A pastry?s built up in layers (6)
Express dismay as relative has
nothing to eat (5)
Deck going up and down (4)
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the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
11
1G T
artsfirst night
CLIVE BARDA/ROH
Comedy
Angus Gordon
and Aaron Chen
Soho Theatre, W1
M
{{(((
aking his London debut
with Aaron Chen, the
comic with whom he
jointly won the best
newcomer award at
the Melbourne Comedy Festival last
year, Angus Gordon astutely pins
down the problem of this double bill.
?We?re three variations on Australian
awkwardness,? he says, the third
variation being Chen?s taciturn
sidekick-cum-support act, Jon Lo.
Mind you, there is no shortage of
talent among these uncomfortable
young Australians. Gordon, appearing
in the second half, has an enjoyably
angular comic brain. He makes play
of his unpleasantness, but there is a
palpable sweetness behind his rather
doomy material about floods, foetuses,
loneliness and euthanasia, as well as
his overextended metaphors and his
low-energy delivery. He makes play
of that oomphlessness too. ?I really
appreciate you putting up with this,?
Gordon says at the end of a 50-minute
set that, after a bright start, had
started to pall. ?I know what I?m like.?
As with Chen, who plays an entirely
separate set, there are some great
ideas in here, just not enough of
them to fill the time. It?s fine to toy
with the conventions of stand-up
comedy, but you had better have
enough happening to stop us getting
to the joke faster than you do. Chen
has an affable way about him, the
beginnings of a neat rapport with Lo,
who sits quietly to one side at a table
with a laptop and a bottle of Listerine.
Chen gives us the kernels of good
ideas, plying a knowing naivety that is
belied by the ready wit he sometimes
throws into the mix. ?Reviewers,?
he chides, ?think of one thing you can
do better.? For better and for worse,
there is the kind of please-yourselves
looseness of a millennial Vic and Bob
about Chen and Lo, even if they
render in a kind of shy-boy fidgetiness.
Yet their anti-comedy is too fond of
coasting. It needs a tolerant crowd.
Both of these acts have the mindsets
to come up with something really
exciting, but they don?t, as yet, have
the editing or the ease.
Dominic Maxwell
Box office: 020 7478 0100, to Sat
Theatre
Imaginationship
Finborough,
SW10
{{(((
Royal Opera
Subscribers can enjoy
2-for-1 tickets to the
Royal Opera House
Live Cinema season
at more than 400
cinemas in the UK. To
redeem tickets, visit
mytimesplus.co.uk
T
Malin Bystr鰉?s heroine becomes more deranged and compelling
Excess rears
its head again
Although it needs more emotional heat,
this gory Strauss revival has mesmerising
moments, writes Richard Morrison
Opera
Salome
Covent Garden
{{{((
his new play by Sue Healy is
a Norfolk version of Shirley
Valentine without the nice
weather. It?s set in 2016, at
a nostalgia disco in Great
Yarmouth that aims to recreate the
glory days of the Glitter Ballroom in
1976. It feels dated from the start, and
that?s not just the outfits.
Our hostess, Ginnie, is wearing
too-tight pleather trousers and a pink
boa. She has invited her oldest friend,
Brenda. In their youth they were
known as Virginia the Vagina and
Brenda Joy. Ginnie wants to relive
their brief lesbian fling when they
were 19. Brenda wants to get laid
by a young Hungarian man in red
trousers who actually fancies her
daughter, Melody (Joanna Bending).
Yes, it?s complicated. That, really, is
the problem here. I haven?t even begun
to lay out the various scenarios that
feature. Among (many) others, there
G
o to the Royal Opera?s
Salome and you experience
not a single show, but
a global franchise. Its
director, David McVicar,
also has his Rigoletto running at
Covent Garden. In New York the Met
is doing three of his productions in as
are the two cleaners of the Glitter
Ballroom who, after the nostalgia
night in question, are having their
own bromance involving appalling
jokes and vodka.
It is a case of stop the disco ball, I
want to get off. This is two hours, if
you include a 15-minute interval,
but it often feels much longer.
We never get to know anyone
long enough to care. It is an
ambitious sprawl of a play that
wants to be a psychological
thriller, a Brexit barometer
and an incisive guide to the
menopausal libido. Other
issues include creepy older
teachers, loneliness, rape,
trauma, immigration and, oh
yes, priapism. And did I
mention ancient Greece?
Joanna Bending and Rupert
Wickham in Sue Healy?s play
many months. And McVicar stagings
will be seen in 15 other opera houses
around the world this season, from
Vienna to Beijing. The Scot is a
one-man export drive.
Of course, many of those stagings
aren?t new. This Salome dates from
2008 and is on its third revival. That,
however, is the point. McVicar is the
most successful opera director of our
age because his lavish productions are
not only watchable, but durable.
His style could be described as
Franco Zeffirelli with a 21st-century
twist ? the twist being his penchant
for flooding the stage with nudes and
making raunchily explicit any sexual
perversities latent in the libretto. And
God knows there are enough of those
in Strauss?s steamy 1905 masterpiece,
what with the necrophilia, paedophilia
and probably several other philias that
I?m far too innocent to recognise.
Along the way ? and also in
quintessential McVicar style ? you
get mesmerising sequences. There?s
the depraved Pasolini-style opening
tableau, for instance, with a naked
girl groped in a basement abattoir
while Herod?s guests dine above; or
the theatrically cumbersome but
psychologically incisive conversion
of the Dance of the Seven Veils
into flashbacks of Herod abusing
the prepubescent Salome; or the
shocking moment when the naked
executioner appears, covered in blood
and wielding Jokanaan?s severed head.
The trouble is that those
unforgettable images are just that ?
cherished moments for which you
wait, impatiently, during the remaining
90-odd minutes. And I really was
getting impatient.
This revival is competently
conducted by Henrik N醤醩i and
adequately sung, especially by
Malin Bystr鰉?s gradually more
deranged and compelling Salome
and Michael Volle?s hairy, hefty
and heroic Jokanaan. Yet the
emotional temperature is tepid
when it should be scalding, and
some characterisations ? notably
John Daszak?s Herod and Michaela
Schuster?s Herodias ? seem more
attuned to a TV sitcom than a lurid,
Freudian psychodrama.
Perhaps the problem is that,
although McVicar?s production is
back, the man isn?t. You feel that these
are good singers slotting efficiently
into a well-oiled machine without
being infused with the insights and
passions of its creator.
Box office: 020 7304 4000, to Jan 30
Imaginationship, which is truly
a terrible title, was first heard as a
rehearsed reading as part of the
Finborough festival of playwriting in
October. It intrigued
and was developed into
Pop
Decosta Boyce
Pizza Express Live, WC1
I
{{{{(
s that a Commodores riff? And
a hint of Sam & Dave too? Part
of the pleasure of this energised
gig was trying to spot the different
influences. Cool and charismatic,
Decosta Boyce is a British R&B singer
who was raised on his mother?s record
collection. His album Electrick Soul ?
one of the funkiest releases of last
year ? is laced with references to
illustrious names. James Brown,
Prince and Otis Redding are just
some of the artists in his bloodstream.
If that makes him sound like
a wannabe from Stars in their Eyes,
his personality and songwriting skills
mark him out as much more than
a retro act. He is, in any case, a little
old to be described as an absolute
beginner. If that face and impressive
afro look vaguely familiar it is because
Boyce previously released a disc when
he was making his way in the world as
He is a natural
storyteller and a
relaxed showman
Nathan Watson. (His full name is ?
deep breath ? Nathan Daniel
Decosta Boyce Watson.)
He is a natural storyteller and a
relaxed showman. By the time his
band had finished their second set he
had encouraged his audience to dance
amid the tables of this recent addition
to the West End music circuit. His
sleek band, you sensed, could work up
an even more imposing head of steam
at an all-standing venue.
Boyce?s vocals were impeccable,
his light timbre occasionally
morphing into an Al Green-style
falsetto. The equally assured vocalist
Izzy Warner added her own gospel
embellishments. Original numbers
including No Holding Back and
I Can Already Tell were crisp and
authoritative. Good Music may
have been a slightly preachy anthem
about our computer-driven playlist
culture, but Boyce delivered it with
authentic passion.
Clive Davis
this production, with Tricia Thorns
directing. The set, by Leigh Malone,
is quite basic, but it has had to be
adapted around that of the other show,
Into the Numbers, that is on stage here.
The acting is good. Jilly Bond is
touching as the brazen if desperate
Ginnie and Patience Tomlinson is
particularly believable as Brenda
the nympho.
Yet it feels as if Healy is
ttrying to do too much.
Towards the end there is a
sub-thriller twist that would
dismay even Columbo. The
strongest theme is sex and
the middle-aged woman,
but it gets smothered by
the rest of the flotsam
on this Yarmouth beach.
Still, disco anyone?
Ann Treneman
Box office: 0844 8471652,
to Jan 23
12
1G T
Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Kiri
Channel 4, 9pm
Anything
scripted by
Jack Thorne
(National
Treasure) and with
Sarah Lancashire
(Happy Valley) as the
lead character was
always likely to register
Early
Top
pick
highly on the Bafta
scale and Kiri does not
disappoint. Lancashire
is Miriam, a social
worker who loves her
job and believes in it.
She?s equal parts kind,
ballsy and no-nonsense
? attributes that in a
lesser actress?s hands
could feel hackneyed,
but Lancashire makes
Miriam a believable
human being. She has a
dog with gout, arthritis,
testicular cancer
and lockjaw and who
?farts like a trooper?.
?According to the
vet he?s got low-level
depression,? she tells
a fellow dog walker.
?I said to the vet,
?Low-level? With
all that it?s a miracle
he?s not suicidal.? ?
The tone at the outset
is fairly jocular, with
Lancashire doing her
peerless salt-of-the-
earth shtick. Then it
goes dark ? pitch
black ? as Miriam
becomes caught up
in an abduction plot
when a young girl
called Kiri goes missing.
Kiri disappears during
a supervised visit
overseen by Miriam,
and the social worker
is soon blamed.
Thorne told Radio
Times: ?My mum spent
most of her life in the
caring professions
and I?ve always
wanted to find a
way of examining
the pressures they
are put under.? A
drama exploring just
this would have been
interesting enough,
but Thorne is a skilled
writer and the thriller
element ? the
abduction and events
thereafter ? is just
as compelling.
The Truth About
Looking Good
BBC One, 8pm
The cosmetics market
in the UK is worth a
staggering �billion a
year, with many of us
happy to spend vast
sums of money on
products that promise
to improve and
transform the way we
look. But do they work?
Cherry Healey, whose
bathroom cabinet is
overflowing with beauty
products, is teaming up
with scientists from the
University of Sheffield
and a group of
25 volunteers to put
some of these everyday
cosmetics, including
moisturisers, through
a series of tests. The
beauty journalist Sali
Hughes also has some
tips on how to save
money on make-up.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Rip Off Britain: Holidays. A coach
trip company that failed to deliver to passengers 10.00
Homes Under the Hammer (r) (AD) 11.00 Wanted Down
Under. A couple and their two children sample life in
Australia for a week 11.45 Close Calls: On Camera.
A ?shing trawler sinks off the Shetland Isles 12.15pm
Bargain Hunt. Two teams of ?re-?ghters compete (r)
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Ruhma fears for the safety
of Besa and baby Tamanna (AD) 2.15 Father Brown.
A girl is left for dead at a school fete (AD) 3.00 I Escaped
to the Country. Jonnie Irwin is reunited with house
hunters in Suffolk 3.45 The Farmers? Country Showdown.
Poultry farmer Rebecca Tonks hopes to attract attention
to her new egg products 4.30 Antiques Road Trip.
Charles Hanson and Anita Manning travel through the
Lake District on their search for pro?t-making
collectibles, with items including a human skeleton and a
King Charles spaniel 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show hosted by
Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC News at Six; Weather
6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 6.55 Party Political
Broadcast. By the Conservative Party
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 The Farmers?
Country Showdown (r) 7.15 Antiques Road Trip (r) 8.00
Sign Zone: Fern Britton Meets Stefanie Reid (r) (SL) 9.00
Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 11.30
Daily Politics 1.00pm Coast (r) 1.15 Brazil with Michael
Palin (r) (AD) 2.15 Himalaya with Michael Palin. In the
village of Lekhani in Nepal, Michael watches potential
Gurkha recruits being put through their paces. He then
commences the 4,200m ascent to Annapurna Base Camp
(r) 3.15 The Great British Winter. Ellie Harrison
continues her exploration of Britain?s most extreme
winter landscapes, searching for beauty behind the
bleakness within forest environments (r) 4.15 Great
Barrier Reef with David Attenborough. Following his visit
to the Great Barrier Reef in 1957, the broadcaster returns
and uses the latest ?lming techniques to unlock the
secrets of the natural wonder (r) (AD) 5.15 Flog It! Paul
Martin is joined by Claire Rawle and James Lewis at St
Albans Cathedral, where items include a pipe shaped like
a polar explorer (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by
Jeremy Vine 6.30 Great British Railway Journeys.
Michael Portillo travels from Newport to Clevedon (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30
This Morning. Chat and lifestyle features, including a look
at the stories making the newspaper headlines and a
recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose Women. Another
helping of topical studio discussion from a female
perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder.
Cameras follow the criminal barrister Robert Rinder as
he takes on real-life cases in a studio courtroom 3.00
Dickinson?s Real Deal. This compilation edition includes
railway tickets and a bracelet bought for just 50p from a
charity shop, with Tim Hogarth and Tracy Thackray-Howitt
among the experts 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard
hosts the arcade-themed quiz show in which contestants
drop tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a �,000 jackpot 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh
presents as contestants David, India, Ged and Sam
answer general knowledge questions and take on ruthless
quiz genius the Chaser and secure a cash prize (r) 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.25 Party Political Broadcast.
By the Conservative Party 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.10am Jamie?s Comfort Food. Gennaro Contaldo helps
Jamie Oliver make bolognese ravioli (r) 6.20 3rd Rock
from the Sun (r) (AD) 7.10 Everybody Loves Raymond (r)
8.35 Frasier (r) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares
USA. Gordon Ramsay revisits four restaurants he earlier
tried to save (r) 11.00 Sun, Sea and Selling Houses.
A family from West Sussex search for a home in Almeria,
Spain (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Live
Darts: BDO Lakeside World Professional Championships.
Rob Walker presents coverage of the afternoon session on
the ?fth day of the tournament staged at Lakeside
Country Club in Frimley Green 5.00 Come Dine with Me.
Haslemere mayor Sahran kicks off the competition in the
Sussex and Surrey borders, before train driver Ralph,
lingerie ?tter Kim and proud northerner Lindsey take
their turns (r) 6.00 The Simpsons. Homer, Marge and
the kids hitch a ride on a train, where they are
entertained by a tramp who tells them a series of
colourful yarns based on American folklore (r) (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Tony and Diane are caught up in the tunnel
devastation after the car crash, and Misbah has to act
fast to save her children from an approaching lorry (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and his guests talk about the issues of the day
11.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. A man who needs
regular medication for epilepsy is unwilling to break
Ramadan fast to take tablets (r) (AD) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel Inspector. Alex Polizzi
heads to Gloucestershire to breathe new life into a
two-star, 11-bedroom hotel, and reverse the
establishment?s dwindling occupancy rates (r)
1.10 Access. Showbiz news and gossip 1.15 Home and
Away (r) (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS.
The agents investigate the murder of a prank-loving
Marine on Halloween, and discover his death may be
linked to his fondness for practical jokes (r) (AD) 3.15
FILM: The Wrong Babysitter (15, TVM, 2017)
A mother worries about leaving her daughter for an
out-of-town trip, until her neighbour offers to babysit
? only for the girl to go missing. Thriller starring Daphne
Zuniga 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Mark probes
Louise for information when the police arrive and arrest
her (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Irene is rushed to
hospital (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
Sale.
Get seven days of papers
from �67 a week.
Limited
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only
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7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine show
featuring topical reports from around
the UK and big-name studio guests
7.00 Rick Stein?s Road to Mexico The
chef continues down the Californian
coastline immortalised by John
Steinbeck, through LA and into San
Diego where a local ?shmonger cooks
him a ?sh chilli (2/7) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Chrissie tells Belle about
all Lachlan?s problems, in the hope that
she will end their relationship (AD)
8.00 The Truth About Looking Good
Cherry Healey and a team of
independent scientists conduct an
experiment that puts everyday
cosmetic and beauty products to
the test. See Viewing Guide (AD)
8.00 Tom Kerridge?s Lose Weight For
Good Tom shows the group of dieters
quick and easy recipes they can make
at home (2/6) (AD)
8.30 Trust Me, I?m a Doctor Zoe
Williams learns more about a
sleeping disorder that causes
thousands of road accidents each year
8.00 Britain?s Brightest Family New
series. Families take part in a
knock-out tournament
9.00 Miriam?s Big American Adventure
Miriam Margolyes travels to Indiana to
visit a summer camp, where she joins
hundreds of young campers as they
begin their days pledging allegiance
to God and the US ?ag (2/3) (AD)
9.00 Fighting for Air Dr Xand van Tulleken
conducts the ?rst ever large-scale
experiment using people to try and
bring about a quanti?able
improvement in air quality for a single
day. See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 Girlfriends Sue reluctantly faces the
arrival of her birthday, and tensions
rise when her son Andrew confesses a
big secret at her birthday celebrations.
See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Starting Up, Starting Over Julie
and Trevor desire to leave their
successful businesses behind to follow
their dream of a quieter life, and decide
to open their own haberdashery in a
village in the Cotswolds (5/6) (r)
8.00 Kirstie and Phil?s Love It or List It
Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer meet
the Tuck family in Long Eaton,
Derbyshire, who have grown weary of
their cramped, three bedroom
semi-detached home (2/8) (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors
A former prisoner visits the surgery
with a long list of health concerns,
and a young patient with a painful
rash around his mouth and chin is
treated by Dr David Jewell (AD)
9.00 Kiri New series. Four-part drama
starring Sarah Lancashire. Social
worker Miriam is caught up in a police
investigation when a young girl goes
missing on one of her supervised
visits. See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
9.00 Celebrity Big Brother Highlights of
the housemates? past 24 hours under
the all-seeing eye of Big Brother as the
famous faces cope with living under
constant surveillance, with all the
arguments and alliances, as well as
the revelations in the diary room
10.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? The
return of the programme following the
emergency services, this time focusing
on the work of the police, paramedics
and ?re service in Wiltshire (r)
10.05 Celebrity Big Brother?s Bit on the
Side Rylan Clark-Neal presents the
CBB companion show, including famous
guests? thoughts on developments
and behind-the-scenes insights
7.30 Coronation Street Rana is quick to
put Sophie off when she expresses her
interest in Kate, and Tyrone has bad
news for Chesney (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Seb tells
Eileen that Phelan is not who she
thinks he is (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 Mock the Week With James Acaster,
Ed Gamble, Rhys James, Nish Kumar
and Zoe Lyons (2/13) (r)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 A Question of Sport With Emily
Diamond, Mark Foster, James Horwill
and Mark Stoneman
10.30 Newsnight With Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
11.15 And They?re Off for Sport Relief
Ore Oduba hosts a sporting challenge
in which famous faces compete in a
series of bizarre races, while members
of the public try to predict which star
will win (1/6) (r)
11.15 Inside the Factory
Gregg Wallace investigates the
production of sauces in the
Netherlands, and Cherry Healey lends
a hand with making the glass jars
needed for mayonnaise (5/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am-6.00 BBC News
12.15am Sign Zone: DIY SOS ? The Big Build
Adapting the home of a West Sussex woman who was
paralysed in a bicycle accident (r) (AD, SL)
1.15-2.15 The Real T. Rex with Chris Packham.
The naturalist uses new research to create a CGI
representation of the dinosaur (r) (AD, SL)
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7PM
Offer ends February 5, 2018. UK residents aged 18 or over only. Offer open to new and existing subscribers. Existing subscribers will need to recontract. Offer is for access to our Classic 7 day pack only. Subject to availability. 12 month minimum term. Discount over 3 months, followed by standard pricing of �.67 per month. Terms and conditions apply. Visit store.thetimes.co.uk for full T&Cs.
10.45 Heathrow: Britain?s Busiest
Airport Focusing on the connecting
passengers travelling through
Heathrow, and the challenges of
transferring in the ?ve-square-mile
airport, with 200 gates and four
terminals (2/3) (r)
11.40 Holiday Horrors: Caught on
Camera Series looking at what can go
wrong on holiday (1/4) (r)
12.35am Jackpot247 3.00 Tenable. A team of tram
workers from Shef?eld answer questions about top 10
lists, then try to score a perfect 10 in the ?nal round (r)
(SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. The host invites guests to air their differences
over family and relationship issues (r) (SL)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E Cameras follow
Marie, 31, who arrives at St George?s
A&E, in southwest London,
after collapsing at home with an
unexplained headache (r) (AD)
12.05am Pokerstars Championship Cash Challenge
1.10 FILM: The Social Network (12, 2010)
Fact-based drama starring Jesse Eisenberg (AD, SL) 3.15
Grand Designs Australia (r) 4.10 Location, Location,
Location (r) (SL) 5.00 Coast vs Country (r) (AD)
5.50-6.20 Four in a Bed (r)
10.50 Football on 5: The Carabao Cup
Colin Murray presents highlights of
the semi-?nal ?rst-leg matches,
in which the teams tried to secure an
advantage ahead of the second leg in
two weeks time
12.10am Police Interceptors An arrest snowballs into
a ?rearms stand-off for Damo (r) 1.10 SuperCasino.
Viewers get the chance to take part in live interactive
gaming 3.10 GPs: Behind Closed Doors (r) (AD) 4.00 Now
That?s Funny! (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
Wildlife SOS (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest (r) (SL)
the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Fighting for Air
BBC Two, 9pm
Is it possible to improve
the quality of the air
that we breathe in
just one day? The man
with a plan is Dr Xand
van Tulleken, who is
enlisting the help of
the good folk of Kings
Heath in Birmingham
to stage the first
large-scale experiment
of its kind: using people
power to try to bring
about a quantifiable
improvement in air
quality. With pollution
levels on the high
street on the edge of
legal limits, the odds
are stacked against the
doctor and his team,
which include some
of the best experts
in pollution science.
Can they succeed
where governments
have failed?
Girlfriends
ITV, 9pm
The twist at the end of
last week?s episode of
the drama about
women of a certain
age wasn?t necessary ?
the cherry on top of a
cake that was already
overstuffed with plots.
Ageism, divorce, gay
sons, criminal sons,
infidelity, secrets, lies . . .
it?s all here. So did
Linda (Phyllis Logan)
push Micky overboard,
as his ?mistress? has
claimed? It?s the least
interesting thing about
Girlfriends, with the
bits rooted more in
reality the reasons to
stay with it. These
include Gail (Zo�
Wanamaker) caring
for her mother and Sue
(Miranda Richardson)
struggling with a
landmark birthday.
Hansa Studios
Sky Arts, 9pm
Hansa Studios in Berlin
is where David Bowie
recorded his classic
albums ?Heroes? and
Low during an exile
in the city from 1977
to 1979. Located in a
wasteland in what was
West Berlin, just a few
hundred yards from the
remains of the Wall,
the studio has a global
mystique, up there
with Abbey Road. It
has also hosted U2,
Depeche Mode, Nick
Cave and REM. This
meticulous, featurelength documentary
traces the history of the
studio and the music
recorded there, with
contributions from
Bowie (in archive
footage), his producer
Tony Visconti and
REM?s Michael Stipe.
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7.30pm
Chelsea and Arsenal
clash at Stamford
Bridge in the first leg
of the Carabao Cup
semi-final (kick-off
8pm). Having fielded
a weakened side in
their FA Cup defeat
to Nottingham Forest,
Ars鑞e Wenger is
under pressure to play
a strong XI tonight.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Futurama (r) (AD) 7.00 Monkey Life
(r) (AD) 8.00 Meerkat Manor (r) 9.00 Road
Wars (r) 10.00 Stargate Atlantis (r) 11.00
MacGyver (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons. Double bill (r) 6.00 Futurama (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 A League of Their Own. With Anthony
Joshua, Mo Farah and Emma Bunton (r) (AD)
9.00 A League of Their Own: US Road Trip 2.0.
James, Jamie, Jack and Andrew perform with
the LA Rams cheerleaders (r) (AD)
10.00 The Russell Howard Hour. Labour MP
and shadow home secretary Diane Abbott (r)
11.00 The Force: North East. A man high on
drink and drugs launches a tirade of abuse,
and a domestic ?ght leads to an arrest (r)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r)
1.00am Hawaii Five-0. Double bill (r) 3.00 The
Blacklist (r) (AD) 4.00 Stop, Search, Seize
(r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 The British (r) (AD)
8.00 Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) (AD)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House.
The team treats an ice-hockey player (r) (AD)
6.00 House. The team treats a boy whose
choking nightmares become a reality (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A doctor?s
wife and a newspaper editor are found dead (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Frank contends with a
whistleblower within the NYPD (r) (AD)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Jon Snow goes beyond
the wall to capture a white walker (r) (AD)
10.20 Game of Thrones. Tyrion tries to save
Westeros from itself as everyone meets in Kings
Landing to discuss the fate of the realm (r) (AD)
11.50 The Sopranos. AJ is prescribed tablets
after his split from Blanca (r) (AD)
1.00am The Tunnel: Vengeance (r) 2.05 Dexter.
A suspicious Doakes has Dexter followed (r)
3.10 Banshee (r) (AD) 4.20 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life (AD) 8.00 Chicago Fire (r)
9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00 Cold Case (r)
11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia 12.00 House
Hunters International (r) 1.00pm To Catch a
Smuggler: JFK Airport (r) 2.00 Nothing to
Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 Chicago Fire (r) 5.00 CSI:
Crime Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 The Chef?s Line
7.30 The Real A&E (4/10) (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Holmes and Watson join
the hunt for a ruthless criminal who killed two
paramedics and abducted a woman (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 Bones (r) (AD)
3.00 Scandal (r) (AD) 4.00 The Chef?s Line (r)
4.30 The Real A&E (r) (AD) 5.00 The Best of
Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Andr� Rieu 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected (AD) 9.30 Hollywood: Singing and
Dancing (AD) 10.45 Monty Python?s Personal
Best 12.00 Too Young to Die (AD) 1.00pm
Discovering: Natalie Wood (AD) 2.00 Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 2.30 Hollywood: Singing
and Dancing (AD) 3.45 Monty Python?s Personal
Best 5.00 Too Young to Die (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Spencer Tracy (AD)
7.00 Tina Turner: Live in Rio. A 1988 concert at
the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro
8.30 Video Killed the Radio Star.
The challenges and visions behind
David Bowie?s music videos (AD)
9.00 Hansa Studios: By the Wall 1976-90.
Documentary. See Viewing Guide
10.30 FILM: Scott Walker ? 30 Century
Man (12, 2006) Documentary about the
musician, exploring his pop stardom in the 1950s
and 60s, to his more experimental work
12.30am Depeche Mode: Live in Berlin
1.55 Heimat 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 8.30 Live Tie
Break Tens: Melbourne. Coverage of the
invitational tournament 11.00 Transfer Centre
11.30 Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Sky Sports News
3.00pm Transfer Centre 3.30 Sky Sports News
7.00 Transfer Centre. The latest developments
7.30 Live Carabao Cup: Chelsea v Arsenal
(Kick-off 8.00). Coverage of the semi-?nal
?rst-leg encounter at Stamford Bridge, as the
London rivals look to gain an advantage ahead
of the second leg at Emirates Stadium in two
weeks. The Blues have won this tournament on
?ve occasions, most recently in 2015, and their
fourth triumph saw them defeat the Gunners at
Millennium Stadium in 2007. Arsenal have lifted
the trophy twice in their history, while that loss
to Chelsea was one of ?ve times they have
?nished as runners-up. See Viewing Guide
10.00 The Debate. The latest developments
11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 9.00pm-10.00 The Storm
That Saved a City. The storm of 1968 10.45
Miriam?s Big American Adventure (AD)
11.45 A Question of Sport 12.15am And
They?re Off for Sport Relief 1.00 Weather for
the Week Ahead 1.05-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 6.55pm-7.00
Party Political Broadcast. By the
Welsh Conservative Party
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30
Survivors. The voices from the Troubles (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm Brazil with
Michael Palin (r) (AD) 2.00 Flog It! (r) 2.40
Politics Scotland 3.45 Coast (r) 4.00 The Great
British Winter (r) 5.00-6.00 Great Barrier Reef
with David Attenborough (r) (AD)
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 3.15pm-4.15 The Great
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11.05 Heathrow: Britain?s Busiest Airport.
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1.05 After Midnight 2.35 Storage Hoarders (r)
3.25-5.05 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys.
(2/2) Michael Portillo concludes his travels
through Germany (6/10) (r) (AD)
8.00 Handmade: By Royal Appointment. Objects
made under the royal warrant (r) (AD)
8.30 A Stitch in Time. Exploring the lives of
historical ?gures through their clothes (AD)
9.00 England?s Forgotten Queen: The Life and
Death of Lady Jane Grey. Three days into her
reign, the clock is already ticking for Jane as
Mary Tudor, determined to seize power of the
throne, raises an army (2/3) (AD)
10.00 Fit to Rule: How Royal Illness Changed
History. The medical histories of the later
Stuarts and the Hanoverians (r) (AD)
11.00 The Wonderful World of Blood: with
Michael Mosley. Michael Mosley takes an
in-depth look at blood (r) (AD)
12.00 Top of the Pops: 1981. Double bill (r)
1.20am England?s Forgotten Queen: The Life
and Death of Lady Jane Grey (r) (AD)
2.20-3.20 Workers or Shirkers? Ian Hislop?s
Victorian Bene?ts (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Coach Trip:
Road to Tenerife (r) (AD) 7.30 Streetmate (r)
8.00 Charmed (r) 9.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD)
10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(r) (AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
2.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD) 3.00 Baby Daddy
(r) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Tenerife (AD)
8.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
8.30 The Goldbergs (AD)
9.00 Don?t Tell the Bride. Groom-to-be Daniel
plans a Caribbean-carnival style wedding
10.00 Body Fixers. Helping a distraught
bride-to-be who has lost all her hair (r)
11.10 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Gogglebox (r) 1.10 The Goldbergs (r)
(AD) 1.45 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD, SL) 2.40
Don?t Tell the Bride (r) 3.35 Celebs Go Dating (r)
(AD) 4.25 Rude(ish) Tube (r) 4.50 Charmed (r)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.30 A Place
in the Sun: Home or Away (r) 10.30 Four in a
Bed (r) 1.05pm Come Dine with Me (r)
3.50 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away (r)
5.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick and the
team deal with two emergency cases (r)
7.55 Grand Designs. Adam Purchase and his
partner Nicola Brennan try to restore a Grade
II-listed silver-mine engine-house in Cornwall
on a budget of �0,000 (6/12) (r) (AD)
9.00 Location, Location, Location. Kirstie
Allsopp and Phil Spencer visit the seaside in
pricey Kent to help two sets of buyers, including
a family of six, search for a new home (r)
10.00 Grand Designs. After a four year stint
living in New Zealand, an intrepid pair want to
build a Kiwi-style hill house on the slopes of the
Malvern hills in Worcestershire (r) (AD)
11.05 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. With
David Walliams, Jessica Hynes and Rhod Gilbert.
Plus, Sam Simmons in Dictionary Corner (r)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 Location, Location, Location (r) 2.05 Grand
Designs (r) (AD) 3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am Four Guns to the Border (U,
1954) Western starring Rory Calhoun 12.40pm
Pimpernel Smith (U, 1941) An unassuming
English professor smuggles enemies of the state
out of Nazi Germany. Second World War
adventure starring Leslie Howard and Francis L
Sullivan (b/w) 3.10 Last Train from Gun Hill
(12, 1959) Western starring Kirk Douglas,
Carolyn Jones and Anthony Quin 5.05 Master
of the World (PG, 1961) Sci-? adventure
starring Vincent Price and Charles Bronson
7.10 Chronicle (12, 2012) Three teenagers
develop superhuman abilities, but one of them is
corrupted by his new-found power. Sci-? thriller
starring Dane DeHaan and Alex Russell (AD)
9.00 Exodus: Gods and Kings (12, 2014)
The adoptive brother of the pharaoh of Egypt
tries to free the country?s slaves during a
series of plagues. Action adventure starring
Christian Bale and Joel Edgerton (AD)
11.55-3.45 JFK (15, 1991) New Orleans
district attorney Jim Garrison opens his own
investigation into the 1963 assassination of
President John F Kennedy. Drama starring
Kevin Costner and Gary Oldman
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 6.55 Dress to Impress (r) 7.45
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.20 The Cube (r) 9.25 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.10 Who?s Doing
the Dishes? (r) 11.10 Dress to Impress (r)
12.10pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.40 The Big
Soap Quiz: Coronation Street v Emmerdale (r)
1.45 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.35 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men
8.30 Superstore. The employees are given a
chance to win a cash bonus (AD)
9.00 FILM: 22 Jump Street (15, 2014)
Two cops are sent undercover at a university,
but their friendship is threatened as they join
different student cliques. Crime comedy with
Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum (AD)
11.15 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.45 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.15am American Dad! Double bill (r) (AD)
1.10 Two and a Half Men (r) 1.40 Superstore
(r) (AD) 2.05 Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 The Royal (r)
9.00 Judge Judy (r) 10.15 The Darling Buds
of May (r) 12.35pm The Royal (r) 1.40
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 4.20 On the Buses (r) 4.55 Rising
Damp (r) 5.25 George and Mildred (r)
6.00 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Grady?s wedding is
marred by an untimely death ? but with Jessica
among the guests, it is not long before the
culprit is taken into custody (r) (AD)
8.00 Endeavour. Morse meets his
intellectual match when a serial killer haunting
the streets of Oxford keeps himself one step
ahead of the law and leaves cryptic messages to
goad the police (2/4) (r) (AD)
10.00 Foyle?s War. Foyle investigates a
burglary at the headquarters of a multinational
company, and a murder soon leads him to
believe the ?rm are conducting covert business
with the Nazis (3/4) (r) (AD)
12.15am Inspector Morse (r) 2.10 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Pawn Stars (r) 7.30
Ironside (r) 8.35 Quincy ME (r) 9.35 Minder (r)
(AD) 10.40 The Sweeney (r) 11.45 The
Professionals (r) (AD) 12.50pm Ironside (r)
1.50 Quincy ME (r) 2.55 Minder (r) (AD) 4.00
The Sweeney (r) 5.00 The Professionals (r) (AD)
6.05 The Car Chasers (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars. The guys are offered a Second
World War code-breaking machine (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. Chumlee designs a new
uniform for the team, while the guys examine a
guitar that appeared in a James Bond movie (r)
7.55 River Monsters. A mystery sea monster
washes up on a UK beach (r)
9.00 FILM: The Enforcer (18, 1976)
Maverick cop ?Dirty? Harry Callahan is
unwillingly teamed up with a female partner as
he takes on a terrorist group. Crime thriller
sequel starring Clint Eastwood (AD)
11.00 FILM: Hard Target (18, 1993)
Action thriller starring Jean-Claude Van Damme,
Yancy Butler and Lance Henriksen (AD)
12.55am The Americans (r) 2.00 The Sweeney
(r) 2.50 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Deadly 60 on a Mission 4.00 Ice
Road Truckers 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Best of Top Gear. A look back at some of
the best ever bits of Top Gear (AD)
7.00 Cops UK: Bodycam Squad. Following the
work of the Staffordshire Police force, re?ecting
the daily challenges of combating crime and
revealing fresh insights into modern policing
8.00 Yianni: Supercar Customiser. New series.
Following the work of Yianni Charalambous,
car customiser for the rich and famous
8.30 Yianni: Supercar Customiser. Yianni works
on a vehicle owned by DJ Charlie Sloth (AD)
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With guests Jason
Manford and Michael McIntyre
10.00 Taskmaster. Lolly Adefope tries painting,
and Hugh Dennis is befuddled by an egg (r)
11.00 QI. Double bill
12.20am Mock the Week 1.00 QI. Double bill
2.20 Mock the Week 3.00 Live at the Apollo
4.00 Home Shopping. Buying goods
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The Bill 12.00
The Duchess of Duke Street 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Steptoe and Son (b/w) 2.20
Birds of a Feather 3.00 London?s Burning 4.00
New Tricks (AD) 5.00 The Duchess of Duke
Street. George Duggan wins a landslide victory
6.00 One Foot in the Grave. Victor and Margaret
return from holiday to a shock
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. The pensioners
encounter a prophet of doom
7.20 Goodnight Sweetheart. Yvonne and Phoebe
invite Gary to dinner on the same evening
8.00 Inspector George Gently. A young woman?s
body is washed up beside a pier, leading Gently
and Bacchus to question the staff and guests of
the holiday camp where she worked (2/4) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. UCOS looks into the murder
of a private investigator (7/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. The squabbling sisters
are suspected of burglary in Chigwell
12.00 The Bill 1.00am Bergerac 2.15 Crocodile
Shoes 3.10 A Fine Romance 3.25 Garden
Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Abandoned
Engineering (AD) 11.00 Slow Train Through
Africa with Griff Rhys Jones 12.00 Time
Team 1.00pm Human Planet (AD) 2.00
Yellowstone 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Slow Train
Through Africa with Griff Rhys Jones 5.00
The World?s Weirdest Weapons (AD)
6.00 Battleplan. Documentary
7.00 Abandoned Engineering. Abandoned
projects of the space age (2/6) (AD)
8.00 Hunting Down the Nazis. Documentary
about Simon Wiesenthal, who dedicated his life
to tracking down Nazi war criminals (2/2) (AD)
9.00 Open All Hours. Grumpy grocer
Arkwright buys a guard dog
9.40 Open All Hours. Arkwright attends a
funeral, leaving Granville in charge of the shop
10.20 Open All Hours. Arkwright organises a
sales drive in a bid to boost pro?ts
11.00 The Two Ronnies. Featuring an
instalment of Hampton Wick
12.00 The Two Ronnies 1.00am Museum
Secrets 2.00 Pointless 3.00 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Rare Breed:
A Farming Year 10.45 Eamonn Mallie:
Face to Face With 11.10-11.40 Britain?s
Brightest Family 12.35am Teleshopping
2.05-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puf?n Rock) (r) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san
Rioghachd Bhig (Ben & Holly?s Little Kingdom)
(r) 5.50 Seonaidh (Shaun the Sheep)
6.00 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse) 6.10
Dragonan: Reis chun an iomaill (Dragons:
Race to the Edge) 6.35 Te Bheag a? Ghruffalo
(The Gruffalo?s Child) (r) 7.00 An Lot (The
Croft) (r) 7.35 Speaking Our Language (r)
8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 Turas a? Bhradain
(The Salmon?s Journey) 9.00 Air Toir
Manachainn Dheir (The Lost Monastery of
Deer) 10.00 Air an Rathad (On the Road) (r)
10.30 Port (r) 11.00 DIY le Donnie (r)
11.45-12.00 Torcuil?s Guide to Being a Gael (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Yr Ysgol (r) 6.15 Cwpwrdd Cadi
(r) 6.25 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 6.40 Tomos
a?i Ffrindiau (r) 6.50 Nico N鬵 7.00 Gwdihw (r)
7.15 Digbi Draig (r) 7.30 Dipdap 7.35 Sam T鈔
7.45 Deian a Loli a?r Lori Ledrith 8.00 Octonots
(r) 8.15 Ty Mel (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r)
8.30 Guto Gwningen (r) 8.45 Yn yr Ardd (r)
9.00 Popi?r Gath (r) 9.10 Stiw (r) 9.25 Ben a
Mali a?u Byd Bach O Hud (r) 9.35 Holi Hana (r)
9.45 Tecwyn y Tractor (r) 10.00 Deian a Loli a
Thylwyth Teg y Dannedd (r) 10.15 Cwpwrdd
Cadi (r) 10.25 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 10.40
Tomos a?i Ffrindiau (r) 10.50 Nico N鬵 (r)
11.00 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: F?ic a F?ac (r) 11.10
Dysgu Gyda Cyw: 123 (r) 11.25 Dysgu Gyda
Cyw: Cwm Teg (r) 11.30 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Do
Re Mi Dona (r) 11.45 Dysgu Gyda Cyw:
Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 12.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 12.05pm Crwydro (r) 12.30 Priodas
Pum Mil (r) 1.30 Cerys Matthews a?r Goeden
Faled (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05
Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05
Pengelli (r) 3.30 Cledrau Coll (r) 4.00 Awr
Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Y
Dyfnfor 5.25 Stwnsh: Dewi a?r Ditectifs Gwyllt
(r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Ffrindiau am Byth (r) 6.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad (r)
6.30 Mwy o Sgorio 7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm (AD) 8.25 Darren Drws Nesa 8.55
Darllediad Gwleidyddol gan y Ceidwadwyr
Cymreig 9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30
Chwaraeon y Dyn Bach (AD) 10.00 Rygbi Pawb
10.45-12.20am Carwyn (r) (AD)
14
Wednesday January 10 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7545
1
2
3
Codeword No 3229
4
5
6
1
9
19
24
Train Tracks No 302
26
1
12
24
26
1
16
I
7
12
1
7
9
1
20
19
10
17
12
14
1
6
16
4
6
1
19
6
5
5
1
13
20
19
15
6
21
15
1
24
6
13
17
25
3
1
3
7
3
4
4
18
4
12
2
G
8
11
2
1
20
23
19
20
14
12
24
19
15
19
18
1
18
1
A
6
5
6
11
5
24
3
4
3
16
18
19
16
19
6
11
6
21
1
16
21
26
21
20
1
16
3
9
1
17
16
14
7
16
1
25
22
15
16
18
1
19
20
19
7
19
25
20
24
7
1
26
2
16
B
20
2
5
16
25
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
21
9
3
7
8
9
10
11
13
15
17 Short pleasure trip (6)
18 High-pitched neigh (6)
19 Deer's horn (6)
20 Park keeper (6)
21 Possessing aptitude (8)
Last offers (8)
Vast dark space (6)
Baltic state (6)
Antelope (6)
Bad stroke in snooker (6)
Betting stake (4)
Bike (5)
Oil of rose petals (4)
A
K EN
N
I V A
I
E S
O
ARS
A
D F
A
T ER
I
K
A F R I C
I
N
L S
I CO
E
R
ARCHER
O D
E MOU N
E
L
AC T I OU
A
U
L A P S E
M
20
8
6
3
24
21
25
16
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
14
15
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
G
I
Down
Solution to Crossword 7544
M
AWA
R R
ARR
U A
DUN
G
HE
M
SHE
A N
L I T
T
24
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
E
A
R
N
D
I
S
U
S
E
1
2
3
4
5
6
11
12
13
14
15
16
Cured ham (6)
Formal discussion (6)
Unfortunate (7)
Form a mental image of (7)
Liqueur made with eggs (8)
Almond liqueur (8)
Self-important (8)
Abstaining from alcohol (8)
Worry; business (7)
On the sheltered side (7)
The East (6)
Gentle; offer (6)
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica
No 4085
No 4086
R
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
D
O
L
A
A
I
R
R
U
E
T
C
I
O
L
E
H
B
R
A
T
Y
E
D
O
E
A
T
B
W
I
S
I
V
F
S
L
G
T
C
W
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4221
Futoshiki No 3083
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
84901 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2042
20
?
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
24
27
14
?
3
17
16
34
22
23
17
7
4
17
3
9
13
38
21
4
>
?
?
<
?
3
6
32
27
17
10
7
3
4
17
16
6
7
5
15
18
23
30
24
19
10
<
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
24
26
16
16
19
14
17
15
17
� PUZZLER MEDIA
10
the times | Wednesday January 10 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
White: AlphaZero (computer)
Black: Stockfish (computer)
AlphaZero v Stockfish Match,
London 2017
Queen?s Indian Defence
1 Nf3 Nf6 2 d4 e6 3 c4 b6 4 g3
Bb7 5 Bg2 Be7 6 0-0 0-0 7 d5
exd5 8 Nh4 c6 9 cxd5 Nxd5 10
Nf5 Nc7 11 e4 d5 12 exd5 Nxd5 13
Nc3 Nxc3 14 Qg4 g6 15 Nh6+
Kg7 16 bxc3 Bc8
Black?s coming manoeuvres are
designed to drive the white queen
away from the vicinity of the
black king.
17 Qf4 Qd6 18 Qa4 g5
Isolating and winning White?s
far-flung knight. However, White
gains compensation in terms of
open lines and the exposure of
Black?s king.
19 Re1 Kxh6 20 h4 f6 21 Be3 Bf5
22 Rad1 Qa3 23 Qc4 b5
A piece and a pawn in arrears
and with his queen being har-
________
醨h D 4 D]
�D g Dp]
� DpD DkD]
轉pD Db0 ]
� D D D D]
�) G ) ]
跴D D )BD]
贒 DR$ IQ]
谅媚牌侨
Utterly astounding. AlphaZero
retreats the queen to one of the
worst squares on the board simply
to overload the black defences by
trading off the important lightsquared bishops. Even now it is
not immediately apparent that
the white attack is worth such a
huge investment in material.
26 ... Kg7 27 Be4 Bg6 28 Bxg6
hxg6 29 Qh3 Bf6 30 Kg2
It is a hallmark of AlphaZero?s
attacking play that it garnishes
vicious onslaughts with quiet
moves that improve its prospects
in many different directions.
30 ... Qxa2 31 Rh1 Qg8 32 c4
Re8 33 Bd4 Bxd4 34 Rxd4 Rd8
35 Rxd8 Qxd8 36 Qe6 Nd7 37
Rd1 Nc5 38 Rxd8 Nxe6 39 Rxa8
Kf6 40 cxb5 cxb5 41 Kf3 Nd4+ 42
Ke4 Nc6 43 Rc8 Ne7 44 Rb8 Nf5
45 g4 Nh6 46 f3 Nf7 47 Ra8
Nd6+ 48 Kd5 Nc4 49 Rxa7 Ne3+
50 Ke4 Nc4 51 Ra6+ Kg7 52 Rc6
Kf7 53 Rc5 Ke6 54 Rxg5 Kf6 55
Rc5 g5 56 Kd4 Black resigns
________
� DqD DkD] Winning Move
郉p0 0pgp]
� hnD DpD] Black to play. This position is from
Riyadh 2017.
轉 HrD D ] Carlsen-Artemiev,
Here Black exchanged rooks and Carlsen
� D ) DPD] went on to win. Instead Black could have
蹹PD )NDP] gained a crucial material advantage. What
踨G DQ)KD] should he have played?
�$ DRD D ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
40 - Counting in Defence: start
during the bidding
and promote declarer?s slightly
higher cards (eg ?KJ97). A good
diamond lead would be ?A1086;
?A432 would make a poor lead.
So that leaves hearts. You know
for sure partner has at least four
hearts ? otherwise N-S would be
playing in 4?. Partner?s hearts are
sitting over dummy?s; you have a
nice sequential holding. Lead ?J.
You led your shortest suit.
When the opponents bid, they do
so to describe their hand to their
partner. This is at the cost of giving
away information to you. So listen.
Try to count their shapes ?
sometimes they?ve painted such a
pretty picture that you know their
shape before you?ve even led. Then Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
you can be more effective with that
?A 3
all-important opening card.
?A J 3
Take this auction:
?J 7 4
S
2?
2NT
3NT
W
Pass
Pass
End
N
1?
2?
3?
E
Pass
Pass
Pass
?9 5 4 2
?8 7 6
?A 8 3
?Q 9 5
?K 8 6 4 2
N
W
E
S
64 ? 12
EASY
? K J 10 7 6
?J 9 2
Contract: 3NT ? K 10 4 2
As West, your hand is: ?J 10
?KQ 2
Try to decide on your ?A 4 3 2
Lead: ?Q
?J
lead before reading on. ? J 9 6 2
S
W
N
E
It is almost certain that North
Pass
2?
Pass
1?
(ie dummy) is 5?4?1?3?. South?s
2?
Pass
3?(1) Pass
shape is less certain but he won?t
3NT
End
have three spades or four hearts
(giving a fit); and his diamonds will (1) Fourth Suit Forcing ? more info, please.
As West, let?s reflect on declarer?s
be really good, for he has bid 3NT
facing a partner who has adver- shape. He has advertised 5?4? with
tised a singleton. He is probably a diamond stop, likely three cards. He
2?3? 4?4?, 2?2? 4?5? or probably has just one club in a
5?4?3?1? shape. Given West?s
perhaps 1?3?4?5?.
Nothing stands out but you can rubbish hand with declarer?s missing
eliminate clearly bad suits. Your honours looking favourably placed,
partner has at most two clubs. something dynamic is needed.
Hoping to pin declarer?s
Leading from ?J9xx would be folly.
Dummy has five spades, declarer singleton ?10/?J, West led ?Q.
probably has two. Leading from Bingo! Trick one went ?Q, ?2, ?3,
?J. Next came ?9, covered by ?K
?J9x would also be folly.
Diamonds may appear superfi- and ?A. East switched to ?10 and
cially attractive. However, your pips West won ?A then led ?5 through
are so lousy that you figure to squash ?864 to East?s ?107. Down one.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
partner?s intermediates (eg ?Q1086)
3/4
5/12
x2
x2
?6
+ 1/2
? 89 � 2 + 78
OF IT
251 + 521 x 4 + 228
+1/2
OF IT
OF IT
? 878
?9
OF IT
5/16
OF IT
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 476
�
? 68 x 5
80%
OF IT
? 997
2
5
3
Polygon
3
2 2
7
3 2
6
2 6
2
4
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 2045
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 15 words, average;
21, good; 25, very good; 30, excellent
x
All the digits
x
x
= 42 from 1-9 are
-
+
=9
+
x
+
-
=
70
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
+
4
x
Yesterday?s answers
air, airy, ani, any, naris, nary, nay, rai,
rain, rainy, raisin, raisiny, rani, ray,
ria, san, sari, sarin, say, yarn
3
=
11
=8
=
27
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Killer Tricky No 5810
16
13
13
12min
14
11
7
21
8
16
13
14
21
19
14
11
7
17
10
Solutions
Codeword 3228
Kakuro 2041
19
19
11
3 9 8
1 4 6
7 9
9 3 5
8 1 2
7
5 4
1 3
2 1 3
2 1
1 7
2 9
4
2
2 1
3 4
9
2
2 1
2 1
4
6
5
17
10
12
12
10
8
13
17
12
6
1
9
4
7
5
8
3
2
5
8
2
1
3
9
4
7
6
4
3
7
2
6
8
9
1
5
1
9
4
3
2
6
7
5
8
Killer Deadly No 5811
18
3
12
24
20
16
26
10
21
8
7
3
5
9
1
2
6
4
7
2
6
8
1
3
5
4
9
9
4
8
6
5
7
3
2
1
3
5
1
9
4
2
6
8
7
5
9
6
2
7
4
1
3
8
9
4
1
6
3
2
7
8
5
2
6
5
7
9
8
3
1
4
8
3
7
4
5
1
6
2
9
6
8
2
1
4
7
5
9
3
7
1
9
5
2
3
8
4
6
3
5
4
8
6
9
2
7
1
20
16
20
4
8
30
21
7
6
2
5
8
3
1
4
9
6
4
8
9
4
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
3
2
4
8
6
9
3
7
5
4
1
2
7
4
8
6
1
3
2
9
5
1
9
3
5
2
8
7
4
6
2
5
4
1
9
6
8
7
3
9
7
1
8
3
2
5
6
4
3
8
6
7
5
4
9
2
1
9
3
8
6
7
2
4
5
1
6
5
4
1
3
9
7
8
2
1
2
7
8
4
5
9
3
6
2
9
3
4
6
8
5
1
7
4
1
6
3
5
7
2
9
8
8
7
5
9
2
1
3
6
4
2
2
1
5 > 2
5
?
4
3
1
?
4 > 3 > 2
1
4 > 3 > 2
?
3 < 5
1
3 6
�
x
2
9
6
3
+
+
-
�
5
4
5
1
7
-
+
+
+
1
4
6
3
5
3
4
2
A
5
4
5
1
4
1
B
Suko 2130
8
5
6
9
3
7
1
4
2
1
7
2
6
4
8
9
5
3
4
3
9
1
5
2
7
6
8
7
4
8
2
6
1
3
9
5
2
9
1
3
7
5
4
8
6
5
6
3
4
8
9
2
7
1
9
8
5
7
1
3
6
2
4
6
1
7
5
2
4
8
3
9
3
2
4
8
9
6
5
1
7
V
F
I
A
X
P
R
E
L
E
B
P
O
O
E
L
W
L
D
R
A
Y
Lexica 4084
1
9
3
Lexica 4083
Set Square 2044
3
3
3
8
1
2
9
4
6
7
5
1
Sudoku 9582
6
2
5
9
4
7
1
3
8
5
2
Cell Blocks 3111
21
5
4
9
7
1
6
8
2
3
4
?
3
7
13
4
3
7
2
8
1
6
5
9
Futoshiki 3082
18
20
5
1
2
4
6
9
3
8
7
Killer 5809
KenKen 4220
21
19
51min
4
7
8
3
1
5
9
6
2
Train Tracks 301
MS
AB L E
O
E
E
X
GYMS L I P
U
I
C
I
L E T CH E R
S
T
E
T EMP T S
B
D
R
RK
J E E P
U G
T
A
T
RA Z OR
A
U
E
E
L OBU L E S
Sudoku 9581
2
6
5
7
8
4
1
9
3
Killer 5808
1
2
3
9
8
6
4
5
7
OPOS S U
D
X
A
OM I T S
U
D
H
ROAN
F
N
N
W I T H E R
H
R
AARD V A
C
U O
KUMQUA
E M S
DA Y S
G
9 8
2 7 3 1
1
1 2
5 9
2 4
1 3 7 9
1 5 8
1 2 3
4 7 9 8
2 9 8 4
Sudoku 9580
?Q 8
?Q 9 5
?10 9 6 5
?A 10 7 3
OF IT
83 x 7 + 57
MEDIUM
HARDER
3/4
� PUZZLER MEDIA
In the new year?s honours list the
UK artificial intelligence genius
Demis Hassabis was awarded a
richly deserved CBE. Hassabis has
driven artificial intelligence to
new heights, first by orchestrating
the creation of a program that has
mastered the fiendishly difficult
Oriental game of go. Second, he
has transferred the learning techniques to chess. In a 100-game
match against the renowned Stockfish program, Hassabis?s AlphaZero scored an overwhelming
victory, winning 28 games, losing
none and producing in the process a number of games that defy
all human logic.
assed, it is not at all clear that
White has sufficient compensation for the lost material. The way
in which White now reintroduces
the queen into the attack is little
short of miraculous.
24 hxg5+ fxg5 25 Qh4+ Kg6 26 Qh1
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Demis Hassabis CBE
Cell Blocks No 3112
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
8
+
x
4
Quiz 1 Tagalog 2 Walk on the moon ? during
the Apollo 12 mission 3 Vietnam 4 Revolver
5 The Executioner?s Song 6 Shin Bet or Shabak ?
the Israeli organisation 7 Addison?s disease. It is
named after Thomas Addison 8 Newcastle upon
Tyne 9 Edmund the Martyr 10 Mellotron
11 Allied invasion of Sicily 12 Chile 13 Triage
14 Vegard Ulvang 15 James Callaghan
C
H
T
O
A
S
L
E
P
T
E
W
L
S
I
V
M
E
N
T
A
R
G
E
Word watch
Kilonova (a) A star
collision
Kinkajou (c) A small,
long-tailed mammal from
the Americas
Kermis (b) A festival or
fair, often to collect
charitable funds
Brain Trainer
Easy 9; Medium 460;
Harder 4,299
Chess 1 ... Rxb2! 2 Qxb2
Rxc5 leaves Black with
the clear material
advantage of two minor
pieces against a rook
10.01.18
MindGames
Sudoku
Difficult No 9583
Fiendish No 9584
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
7
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
1
3
9 4
Kilonova
a An astronomical
event
b A small republic
c A ballet move
6
Kinkajou
a A fetish
b A board game
c An animal
Kermis
a Spiralled
b A fair
c Bright green
Answers on page 15
5 7
3 8 4 2
8
6
7 6
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
9
6 5 2
2
8
3 1
6
4
5
3
9
7
6 7
7
3
9
2
8
4 8
3
6 1
3
6 1
8 4
9
4
8
1
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
1 The standardised
form of which language
is often called Filipino?
15
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
intended to cover
which 1943 invasion?
12 The Loa and the B韔
B韔 are the two longest
rivers in which South
American country?
2 In November 1969,
Pete Conrad became the
third person to do what?
about six former heads
of which internal
security service?
7 Named after an
English physician,
which disease is also
known as primary
adrenal insufficiency
and hypoadrenalism?
5 The US criminal Gary
Gilmore is the subject of
which non-fiction novel
by Norman Mailer?
8 In 1976, Eldon Square
shopping centre opened
in which English city?
6 The Gatekeepers
(2012) is a documentary
9 By tradition, Ivar
the Boneless and his
brother Ubba killed
which 9th-century
king of East Anglia?
10 In 1962, variety
pianist Geoff Unwin
was hired to promote
the use of which
keyboard instrument?
11 Operation Mincemeat
was a deception
13 Which process
of determining the
priority of patients?
treatments derives its
name from the French
for ?to separate??
2
8
3
4
5
9
6
HU
N
N I
F
CO
R
AM
14 Which Norwegian
cross-country skier
won three golds
and one silver at
the 1992 Albertville
Winter Olympics?
15 Which prime
minister is pictured?
Answers on page 15
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
22
21
23
N
E
P
N T E R
I N
S
A
N E T E E N
N
V
N S T E L L A
U
R O
P E R E
T H
M
I
N
S
T
E
R
Johnny Morris, Travel writer, Times Expert Traveller
O
A T E
A F F
I
I ON
N
E A D
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Teazel
7
This country house hotel is a living
artwork created by chef patron, and
adopted national treasure, Raymond Blanc OBE
Yesterday?s S T U R D Y E T H I C S
Quick
W A
E
T
I
H
Cryptic
W I N D OW S H O P P E R
S
I
I
P
R
solution
S T OA
P RO T OCO L
No 1001
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1002
1
2 9 6
9 8 2
5
3
4
2
1
2
6
4
6
8 3 7
7 8
1
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
GETTY
4 Tomorrow Never
Knows is the closing
track on which studio
album by the Beatles?
5
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 The figure-hugging
ao dai tunic is worn
by women of which
Asian country?
4
5
9
2 8
PUZZLER MEDIA
2
3
7
Super fiendish No 9585
Across
1 Barrister that?s soft and
smooth (4)
3 Sheriff?s of?cer to leave money
for waiters (8)
8 Chap gets older but copes (7)
10 P
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