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The Times Times 2 - 12 April 2018

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On Thursday
April 12 | 2018
Jeremy Thorpe tried to kill me
Norman Scott on the scandal that shook Seventies Britain
Ben Whishaw as
Norman Scott in
the BBC’s A Very
English Scandal
2
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Thursday April 12 2018 | the times
times2
‘What drives a
Please don’t make
me rate you, I have
feedback fatigue
Deborah Ross
T
GETTY IMAGES
he other morning
I woke in the
early hours feeling
as if I’d done
something
rubbish, but could
not work out what
it was. I had killed
no one, as far as I was aware.
I pay my taxes, recycle, feed the
birds. I am in possession of a book
that should have been returned to
Golders Green library in 1972, but
I knew it wasn’t that worry, on
this occasion.
So what was it nagging away at
me? And then I realised: I didn’t
give feedback to Tina! And then
I had to ask myself: what kind of
a monster am I? True, it could
have been worse. If I’d been
Harold Shipman, say, and had
been asking, “What kind of a
monster am I?” I can see the
question would take on different
proportions, but still, I had done
a bad thing and there was no
getting round it. Or getting
back to sleep.
Here’s the background. A
couple of weeks earlier I had
purchased a personalised child’s
birthday card from eBay and the
next day received a message from
the seller, Tina, saying that she
was sorry she didn’t get back to
me immediately, but she had
been visiting family.
However, she was now back
on it and she hoped that Louis,
seven, had a wonderful birthday
and that Louis, seven, liked the
card — “which I so enjoyed
making for him” — and “please
let me know that you are happy
with it as that is very important
to me”. And I had not responded.
Again: what kind of a monster
am I?
Obviously, Tina’s eBay rating
depends on positive feedback
and my experience was positive
— the card was exactly as
described — but even so: I Had
Private
schools,
show some
class
She admits that her split with fellow
actor James Norton was ‘acrimonious’,
but Jessie Buckley is enjoying success
and her single life, she tells Nick Curtis
Not Responded. Had her rating
plummeted as a consequence?
Does Tina have another source of
income? Were her children now
starving as the bills pile up? As I’d
left it so long, how might I best
reply? Should I say I’d been away?
You can’t visit
the dentist now
without saying
how you feel
Why am I now having to have
a relationship with this person?
Christ, if only I’d gone to Clinton
Cards, I WOULDN’T BE
AWAKE AT 4AM WORRYING
ABOUT IT!
The fact is, although I knew
the guilt would catch up with me
eventually, I had not responded
to Tina because I could not be
bothered. You might say that I’m
According to Mary
Bousted, the head of
the National Education
Union, “pushy parents”
are driving private
school teachers
“insane” with their
demands. She said their
thinking is: “We’re
paying all this money
for our children to be
educated, therefore we
expect you to get them
through their exams
with very good grades
and to a top university.”
Well, yes. That is
rather the point of a
private education, isn’t
suffering from feedback fatigue.
It feels as if every minute of every
day you’re being asked to rate
this, rate that, thumbs up, thumbs
down, smiley face, sad face, and
would you mind taking a minute
to fill in this quick survey?
You can’t call a service provider,
visit the dentist, buy a sandwich,
rent a car, get the washing
machine fixed, go to the theatre,
purchase a £2.99 personalised
birthday card, renew an insurance
policy or do anything without
having to say how you feel about
the experience. How do I feel
about re-insuring my car with
Admiral today? I feel nothing.
Precisely nothing. But if
someone’s going to get into
trouble over this, could you just
put down “over the moon”?
So it’s all meaningless, surely.
(How was your treatment with
James today? Terrific!) As for
Uber, well. I just give five stars,
every time, because why wouldn’t
you, when the driver is also rating
you? A driver can be subject to “a
quality intervention” and can be
“deactivated” if their ratings fall
too much, and I don’t want that
on my head. Not on top of
worrying about Tina and whether
her children are now wearing
rags. So it’s five stars even if we
get lost and there is a poo in the
footwell. It’s five stars even if the
radio is tuned to Nigel Farage on
LBC, although it does pain me,
in those circumstances.
I long for the days of nice, clean
transactions where you didn’t
have to have relationships with
anybody. In, out, job done. I’ve
just responded to Tina — sorry, I
was in hospital! — because I don’t
want another sleepless night, but
I’m hoping we can somehow draw
a line under this. How about:
unless I appear outside your
premises with a placard saying
“DEATH TO YOU!” can we just
assume everything is fine?
it? Apart from meeting
the right people? These
parents have put their
money down for a
Bentley so don’t want to
come away with some
crappy little runaround,
do they? I rather
sympathise.
True, state sector
parents can be just
as bad. Falsifying
addresses to get their
children into the best
schools, suddenly
taking an interest in
all matters Quaker,
constantly ferrying
their kids between
extra maths and extra,
extra maths and so on.
They want a Bentleychild too — and why
not? — but if one is not
forthcoming, at least
they don’t have to
accept it was despite
having had every
advantage.
So private schools are
just going to have to
suck it up, because
otherwise what are
they going to say?
Isabella was always a
crappy little runaround
and there simply wasn’t
anything we could do?
J
essie Buckley has an unusual
take on her role in the BBC
adaptation of Wilkie
Collins’s 1860 thriller The
Woman in White. She plays
the spirited, resourceful
Marian Halcombe, who
fights to save her half-sister
from an unhappy marriage and a
lunatic asylum. “I had just finished a
book about Janis Joplin when I read
for Marian, and I thought she was like
a Dickensian Janis,” says the 28-yearold Irish actress, Doc Marten boots on
her feet, hair in a jagged red pixie cut,
her accent pure Kerry.
“There was an interesting
revolutionary conversation going on
in the book and the script about these
two sisters who have been brought up
in an unconventional way, and you
watch them push at the boundaries
of the male-dominated world. They
started a revolution before the word
feminism was even put in the
English dictionary.”
Buckley has such pervasive youthful
enthusiasm that it’s hard to believe it is
ten years since she blew away Andrew
Lloyd Webber and most of his fellow
judges on I’d Do Anything, the BBC
talent show designed to find a Nancy
and an Oliver Twist for Lloyd
Webber’s West End revival of Oliver!
The big-voiced, frizzy-haired girl from
rural Killarney, then just 17, applied
only because she had failed an
audition at a London drama school
the day before, and went all the way
to the final, where she lost to Jodie
Prenger in the public vote.
However, Lloyd Webber kept in
touch. She was at his birthday bash
the week before we met — “just a
party for some of his friends in the
Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, which
you can do if you own the place”
— where he quizzed her about The
Woman in White. Buckley chides
herself for forgetting that he had
based a musical on the book, but
to be fair, she has been busy.
Her second place in the talent show
earned her a role in Trevor Nunn’s
production of A Little Night Music
alongside Maureen Lipman at the
Menier Chocolate Factory in London,
which transferred to the West End.
Next, apparently accidentally, she
picked up gigs as a jazz singer, having
played harp, piano and clarinet
throughout her childhood and taken
the male musical roles of Tony in
West Side Story, God in Children of
Eden and Freddy Trumper in Chess
at her convent school in Tipperary.
Her mother is a singer and a
harpist, her father a bar manager and
a poet, and her parents encouraged
self-expression in Buckley and her
four younger siblings. Then in 2010
she turned her back on singing and
musical theatre to enrol at Rada.
Since graduating in 2013 she has
performed Shakespeare at the Globe
and in the West End, opposite Jude
Law and Judi Dench.
Buckley has also staked out a place
for herself as a TV actress of depth
and versatility in Peter Moffat’s
end-of-Empire drama The Last Post,
Tom Hardy’s overblown Taboo (she
was a bastion of restraint as the widow
Lorna Bow) and as the suffering
Marya Bolkonskaya in the BBC’s
superb War and Peace.
“I really fell in love with Marya.
I had a gut reaction to the heart of
that woman,” she says. “She is very
different to me, a very delicate
porcelain vase, but her soul was
full of hope, despite being in an
oppressive relationship. It was great
to explore that, and to work with Jim
[Broadbent, who played her father]
and Tom Harper, who is the very
best man and friend and director.”
She doesn’t mention her other
co-star and (now-ex) boyfriend James
Norton, tipped to be the next James
Bond: they broke up at Christmas,
and we will return to him later.
This year alone Buckley is shooting
One of my
resolutions this
year is to love
the right love
a biopic of Judy Garland and a series
about the Chernobyl disaster, and has
two films coming out, as well as The
Woman in White. Does she look back
to the ingenue she was and boggle?
“I can’t believe I moved to London
when I was 17,” she concedes. “But
whether it was blind ignorance or
blind courage, I had an amazing
experience.” On the talent show she
was cosseted and put up in a house
in Hammersmith with the other
contestants, and when she learnt that
she would be earning £300 a week at
the Chocolate Factory she thought she
had hit the jackpot. “Apart from £20
from working in a café when I was
young, I’d never earned anything
before, so I thought that was loads of
money,” she says. “I very quickly learnt
that you cannot live in London on that.”
She seems to have fallen repeatedly
on her feet, and on stage and screen
she projects an assurance beyond her
years. However, it was not always easy.
“I remember going for a general
meeting when I started out with a
casting agent,” she says. “He probably
thought, ‘Who the f*** is this person?’
He made me speak in RP [received
pronunciation] and I couldn’t do it
because I was so nervous. At the end,
he laughed and said, ‘Well, you will be
nothing more than a cabaret singer.’ ”
Such power plays are fairly common
throughout the entertainment industry,
she suggests. “I have never been
sexually harassed, but power is messy.
It is not clear-cut. It’s complicated. To
be a man in our day and age is still
the times | Thursday April 12 2018
3
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times2
man? Muscles and money’
GETTY IMAGES; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
colleges. We all cook together and go
out together and watch things like The
Trip and don’t talk about our own
stuff. I only moved in last year and
it has been a godsend to get away.”
What, from actors, I ask? “Yeah.”
Tabloid reports suggest that Norton
left her for another actress, but
Buckley won’t go into details.
“We have broken up, yes. It was
acrimonious, but it’s a tough job to
have a relationship and he is a great
man and we are great friends. That’s
it!” She forces a laugh. “How
diplomatic can I sound?”
Is it hard to have relationships
within the business? “Yeah, it is I
think,” she says. “If you are away
for a year filming, you are just not
I have never
been sexually
harassed, but
power is messy
driven by heroism and muscles and
power and money and cock and all
that stuff. We need to talk together,
men and women, about where we are
going together. It’s not just #MeToo,
it’s #UsToo. It has to be a dialogue.”
She has never been daunted by
famous directors or co-stars: Dench,
with whom she acted in The Winter’s
Tale for Kenneth Branagh, is “such a
minx and witty and still loves her job.
She was 80 years of age and turned
up to work having got her first tattoo,
‘Carpe Diem’, on her wrist. A proper,
punk, brilliant woman. These are
people who have changed the face
of theatre or film-making in their
time, but when it comes to the job you
have to put that aside, you are a team
and you find a dialogue together,
which is irrelevant
to what has
gone before.”
Work still
gives her panic
attacks, though.
“Sometimes
it’s not healthy. Sometimes
etimes it can
keep you up at night. But maybe that
is part of it — if you take the risk to be
honest it’s scary,” she says. Her chosen
metaphor for acting is peeling back
layers of skin.
Buckley confirms that she is single
and rents a room in east London, “in a
house of non-actors, which is the best
thing that has ever happened to me.
One’s an environmental activist, one’s
a teacher, one works for a company
that campaigns for diversity in
Top: Jessie Buckley
at the Olivier awards
last year and, above,
with her ex-boyfriend
James Norton in 2016
The Woman in White
begins on BBC One on
Sunday, April 22, at 9pm
physically around at points. One of my
resolutions this year, whether in work
or friendships or relationships, is to
love the right love. Then what’s meant
for you won’t pass you by.”
This sounds like a quotation from
one of her countrymen, Yeats or Synge
or Keane. “No, I just made that up,”
she says, smiling. “There is a lot of
stuff [around you] that is immediately
seductive and attractive, and to pick
out the truth sometimes takes time
and patience. But it is better to hold
out for those things than dip in for
immediate satisfaction.”
Professionally, at least, she is sure
that she has chosen the right love.
Beast, in which she plays a troubled
woman flirting with a possible
murderer (“I was scared of her”)
comes out this year, as does Country
Music, directed by Harper, in which
she is an ex-jailbird mother of two
and a wannabe crooner. She co-wrote
the songs with the scriptwriter Nicole
Taylor, and is
cconsidering gigging
in character when
the soundtrack album
th
is released. She also
wants to write
w
ssomething herself.
“I want to play
a female clown,”
sshe says. “That’s
ssomething interesting
tto play as a woman
— someone who
degrades themselves to
d
bring laughter to life.”
b
Buckley has been
ssuch good fun that
I risk ending on a
facetious question. Has
fa
her striking
hair been a help or a
ki red
dh
hindrance? “I am a faux-ginge,” she
says. “I’ve done 50 shades of red for
the past two years for work. It’s just
a colour, it’s only hair, it’s irrelevant.
I could shave it off tomorrow if I
wanted.” But, I say, red hair has often
been seen as a bar to superstardom, by
everyone from Nicole Kidman (who
dyed it) to Charles Dance (who blamed
it). Buckley looks pensive, then gives a
broad grin. “Well, I’m f***ed, then!”
The lowdown
Versailles
They are cancelling Versailles.
What — you mean where Kim
and Kanye got married?
Please don’t tell me that is your
only point of reference to one of the
most beautiful royal residences in
the world.
Obviously not.
Phew.
It’s also the name of that wildly
pornographic BBC Two television
show veiled as a historical drama.
Am I right to assume that is what
is being cancelled?
Bingo — and precisely for that
there, ahem, pornography you
mentioned. Are you a fan?
*Shrugs*
Is that a no?
It’s an: I only really started watching
it because it filled the War and
Peace-shaped hole in my life and
I didn’t even know it was still on.
But you can vouch for the script’s
romp factor?
Er, yes. But it’s a French show.
So?
The French love sex.
Not that you’re broadly
stereotyping . . .
OK — that may be a sweeping
generalisation. But they seem far
cooler about shagging, particularly
on television. You won’t find a
Frenchie bristling at a bare buttock
or offering to make a cup of tea every
time a sex scene comes on screen.
I’m actually surprised anyone British
could make it through three series of
watching Louis XIV bonk his way
through every courtier going.
Well, apparently the French got
sick of it too. Despite a mega
budget of £21 million, viewings of
Versailles have plummeted in
Britain and France because of the
constant sex scenes. Hence the new
series — coming out soon — will be
its last. It seems that there is such
a thing as too much sex.
C’est la vie. At least one thing will
be guaranteed.
What’s that?
It’ll go out with a bang.
Hannah Rogers
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Thursday April 12 2018 | the times
times2
‘I can almost still feel
the muzzle of the gun
— my dog totally and
utterly saved my life’
A new drama is about to reignite interest in Britain’s biggest
political sex scandal of the Seventies. The man at its centre
tells Helen Rumbelow how close he came to being murdered
N
orman Scott lives
on the edge of
nowhere, in an
ancient farmhouse
that has been
sheltering people
from the buffeting
Dartmoor winds
since the 11th century. It has sheltered
him since one of the most sensational
political scandals of the 20th century.
A then illegal gay affair with a
charismatic party leader, a secret that a
vauntingly ambitious man would do
anything to hide, leading to a murderplot trial that would shock the nation.
The protective barking of eight dogs
sounds my arrival. It dies down only
once we are inside, surrounded by
pictures, a mix of Scott’s children,
long-term boyfriend, horses and dogs.
Ah, dogs. Only the older generation
— Scott is now 78 — will remember
the “trial of the century” in 1979
when Jeremy Thorpe, the former
Liberal Party leader, was accused of
inciting Scott’s murder. Even more
sensationally, he got off. The one thing
the public knew for sure was that a
gunman had lured Scott to the moors
and shot dead his Great Dane, Rinka.
I knew almost nothing about it, like
so many people who will watch Hugh
Grant and Ben Whishaw play Thorpe
and Scott in the new BBC drama A
Very English Scandal next month. If you
are like me, you will have to pause at
each stage of this highly improbable
series of events, mouth agape, and say:
“Wait — what — seriously?”
The shock value has shifted in a
generation. It isn’t that a senior
politician had gay lovers, but that the
later trial in our democratic nation of
such a senior politician, on such a
serious charge, in such recent history
had been so compromised. Or that the
establishment so effectively closed
ranks around Thorpe, the high-society
Old Etonian who came tantalisingly
close to a leadership role in a coalition
government, who had wanted to marry
Princess Margaret. (Thorpe wrote to a
friend on Margaret’s engagement to
Antony Armstrong-Jones that: “I
rather hoped to marry the one and
seduce the other.”)
Meanwhile, Scott — who had, let’s
not forget, feared for his life with a
gun to his head — was described this
way to the jury by one of the most
infamously biased judges in history:
“He is a crook . . . he is a fraud. He is
a sponger. He is a whiner. He is a
parasite.” Somehow, through an
obscuring bulk of Great Danes and
homophobia, Scott was made a
laughing stock.
“In a strange way I am dehumanised,”
Scott said to me on the phone as I
arrange my visit. “I am not a person
in people’s eyes. I think that the
establishment will never change,
horrid people that they are. But they
didn’t get rid of me.”
I spend hours on slow trains to
Devon, reading the many books and
miles of newsprint written on the case,
and feel convinced that this TV series
will run almost as a second trial for
Scott, four decades on, with a more
sympathetic jury. It is no wonder that
the screenwriter, Russell T Davies of
Doctor Who fame, has been obsessed
with this case since he saw the trial
unfold at the age of 16.
“It’s the first gay story I ever heard,”
said Davies, dubbing Scott “one of
history’s most fascinating men”. Even
the casting feels foregone — in
Paddington 2 Hugh Grant plays a
baddie trying to eliminate the threat of
the outsider Paddington Bear, voiced
by Ben Whishaw. Now the pair grapple
again in the adult, true-crime version.
Was Scott a blackmailer who drove
Thorpe to desperate measures, as he
was so often painted at the time, or —
as emerges from Davies’s reclamation
— a vulnerable, mentally ill man who
was manipulated by a powerful
sociopath? Most of the main players,
Thorpe included, are dead, but I spend
days in the West Country talking to
Scott and to Stella Levy, Scott’s friend
and Devon neighbour of Thorpe, to
find out. “I’ve never told anything but
the truth,” says Scott. “It has all been
true, rather horribly.”
We are settled on his sofa now, in the
low-ceilinged farmhouse brimming
with antiques. A faint scream outside
startles us, but it is just one of his
chickens. He is a thin, upright man
who lives alone, still galloping across
the moor every day, still working as a
judge at horse shows. There is a touch
of the Brian Sewell about him, but he
flickers disarmingly between arch and
raw emotion; one author put it that
he has a lifelong knack of making
people feel protective towards him.
This makes me interrogate the fact
that I do feel protective towards him.
Over lunch we talk about his
enemies portraying him as a fantasist,
but even friends such as Levy
wondered on occasion whether he
was being paranoid about threats
by Thorpe’s intermediaries. In fact,
history tends to vindicate his version of
events, outlandish as it is. Does he ever
stop to wonder how mad it all was?
“That’s the thing, that was my life. It
isn’t now. I’ve got the most lovely life
and have had for years. And this is
what I should have been like, but that
man, Thorpe, was so evil.”
Truth is not an unambiguous good.
Scott told the truth about Thorpe’s gay
sex life. But for Thorpe that truth
represented the triple risk of blackmail,
criminal penalty and career ruin. Were
Scott’s written appeals to Thorpe after
the relationship ended an attempt at
blackmail? Scott denies it.
To judge a little better we need to go
back to the beginning. If Scott has been
dehumanised, I think dogs are partly
to blame. When I mention that I am
planning to see Scott, older colleagues
smile and say, “The dog in the fog!”
because they dimly recall the botched
assassination attempt on nearby
Exmoor in 1975. But dogs roam in and
out of Scott’s history with Thorpe.
The first night the pair had sex was
at Thorpe’s mother’s home, with
Scott’s beloved Jack Russell, Mrs
Tish, a witness. It was 1961 and
Scott was fresh out of psychiatric
hospital, having been treated for
severe depression. He was 21,
penniless and on primitive
antidepressants — he would
later make multiple suicide
attempts. A few months earlier,
Thorpe, then 32, had spotted
Scott, who worked training
horses for a friend, and gave him
m
his card, saying that he should call
if he ever needed help.
Thorpe was delighted when
Scott arrived at the House of
Commons in an emotional mess,
even more so when he submitted
to sex that night in the bedroom
Top: Stella Levy with
Scott. Above: How
The Times reported
Thorpe’s resignation
and, below, Levy today
Everyone
is a loser
in the long
run. You’re
all tainted,
a little bit,
by it
next to Thorpe’s mother.
Thorpe’s mother was a
fearsome woman who wore a
monocle and smoked cigars. “Mother’s
room!” Thorpe hissed in Scott’s ear to
keep Scott quiet. That night Thorpe
gave Scott the nickname “bunnies”,
because he looked like a frightened
rabbit, which Thorpe would later use
in letters that betrayed their intimacy.
His mother was impassive the next
morning at breakfast. Thorpe was, as
the author John Preston describes him
in the book on which the TV series is
based, “addicted to risk”.
These two incidents are not much in
doubt, but interpretations of the next
14 years vary. After that first night of
bad sex, why didn’t Scott leave? “I
couldn’t go home. I couldn’t tell my
mother, I was caught by him. He said,
‘I’ll look after you.’ ”
In a highly confusing twist, Thorpe
effectively became Scott’s employer, by
holding his National Insurance card
and paying him a weekly stipend,
which he would collect from the House
of Commons. For a while, Scott says,
they lived together. “He would bring
back these lorry drivers and sailors,
and send me off to take the dog for a
walk. He’d say, ‘I don’t want you to get
into bed with me tonight.’ ”
Scott would sleep on a camp bed in
the dressing room instead. He says
Thorpe actually “hated sex” — to him
it represented conquest more than
enjoyment. After they parted, Scott
says Thorpe used the insurance card to
manipulate him, making it difficult for
him to find work. In Thorpe’s eyes,
Scott was a dangerous blackmailer
intent on revenge. At times the two
men’s fortunes were good. The Sixties
swung and Scott found work as a
model,
while Thorpe’s political star
m
rose. More often they were locked
into blaming the other for ruining
their
life.
t
More canines: Thorpe shocked his
parliamentary colleague Peter Bessell
by seeking Scott’s murder. “Peter,”
Thorpe is quoted as saying in Preston’s
book, “it’s no worse than shooting a
sick dog.” Did Scott blackmail Thorpe?
Never, he says. He once approached
his mother for help in obtaining his
insurance card. “I felt awful doing
that. A lot of people say that was
the times | Thursday April 12 2018
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COVER: BBC; BELOW: MILLIE PILKINGTON FOR THE TIMES, VERNON DEWHURST, THE TIMES NEWSPAPERS LTD
times2
Left: Norman Scott today and, above, Jeremy Thorpe in 1977
very unkind of me. It wasn’t unkind,
I was starving, literally.”
Cut to the night on Exmoor in 1975.
Andrew Newton, a small aircraft pilot,
lured Scott into his car, “so stupid of
me to go”. Scott insisted that Rinka
came too, for protection. He was
unaware that Newton was phobic of
dogs, which would distract the amateur
hitman. Scott also did not realise that
Newton had “dug a grave” on the
moors. Newton drove erratically into
the night, looking for this grave, then
stopped. He got out of the car, decided
that he needed to kill Rinka first, then
as he turned the gun on Scott it
jammed. Scott struggles to talk about
this and says he can “almost still feel”
the muzzle of the gun on his head.
“He had been going, ‘F***! F***!’ and
shaking the gun. What you have to
realise is that had Rinka not been with
me he would have killed me.”
Rinka saved your life.
“Rinka totally and utterly saved my
life. It’s so sad. I had been trying to give
her the kiss of life. My whole face was
covered in blood.”
Newton drove off, leaving Scott
alone on Exmoor. Scott then managed
to flag down an off-duty AA man,
who called the police.
Scott is distressed, he abandons his
lunch without eating anything. Do you
feel justice has been done? “Not at all.”
At the time there were those who
sided with Scott. Later, in 1975,
Auberon Waugh wrote in Private Eye:
“My only hope is that sorrow over his
friend’s dog will not cause Mr Thorpe’s
premature retirement from public life.”
After the 1979 trial Peter Cooke, the
comedian, who befriended Scott, did a
savage satire of the judge’s partiality in
the show The Secret Policeman’s Ball. I
am interested in what others thought.
I turn to Levy, 71, who runs an art
gallery in Barnstaple.
Levy met Scott while modelling —
the jacket he wears in their photoshoot
together is the jacket that he wore on
the night of the shooting on the moors.
Soon afterwards she settled into family
life with her husband, Jack Levy, an
advertising executive, and his three
children. By coincidence they bought
a holiday home in Devon in Thorpe’s
constituency. It was Scott’s refuge
when he was feeling most depressed
and he once attempted suicide there.
Notes on
a scandal
1961 Norman Scott met
Jeremy Thorpe in the
Cotswolds, where Scott
worked at a stables.
1968 Thorpe married
Caroline Allpass. The
next year they had a
son, Rupert. Allpass
died in a car accident
a year later.
1969 Scott married
Sue Myers.
1973 Thorpe married
Marion Stein.
1975 Andrew Newton
shot Scott’s dog with a
handgun on Exmoor.
1979 A jury at the Old
Bailey cleared Thorpe
of attempted murder.
Scott also stayed with the Levys in
London during the trial.
Letter archives were released a few
years ago showing that Thorpe had
tried to smear the Levys because of
their support of Scott. Thorpe wrote to
the prime minister Harold Wilson in
1976, falsely insinuating that Jack Levy
was running Scott as a prostitute in a
“vice ring”. Thorpe also added that the
large bath they built for the children to
splash in at their Devon home was “big
enough for six people”.
“It’s a pathetic letter, isn’t it?” says
Levy, when we talk in a Barnstaple
hotel. “He was desperate, but to
make something up like that, I was
astounded. From a man who was held
in such high esteem and still is down
here. That’s why I go slightly quiet if
people walk by.”
Why? A lot of the older generation
here in Thorpe’s constituency remain
very loyal, she says. She, meanwhile,
found Thorpe amoral, “no scruples, but
ultra charming”, even later turning on
the smile for her as a neighbour,
despite everything.
“What is horrific is how near Jeremy
Thorpe was to running the country
with Edward Heath. While in the
background he is organising this for
Norman. It feels unbelievable.”
She often walked with Scott to
collect his £5 a week from the House of
Commons — “I found it odd” — but
she did not question it. I ask her to
describe Scott then: “Very elegant, very
funny, but with a slight bitter streak
that comes when you’ve been made to
feel humiliated.”
Scott’s stories about Thorpe’s
schemes against him became a
running theme of their friendship, and
Levy would feel sceptical. She regrets
that now. “He talked of being followed
or people stealing papers. Things that I
would almost dismiss because at that
time you think, ‘No, don’t be silly, this
is just fabrication’, but when you piece
it together and read it in the books
then of course you realise it happened.
“Norman rang me on the night that
the dog was shot on Exmoor. I was at
the flat in London. He said, ‘They’ve
killed my dog.’ I didn’t even take it in,
it felt farcical. Because of my attitude I
think Norman put the phone down on
me. On reflection I can understand
why. If you’re in a hell of a state and
that extraordinary thing’s happened
to you, well, you’re pretty emotional.
And getting someone being a
bit patronising.”
Is this film going to mark a
redemption? “I don’t know. There
was a vindication for Norman. But
everyone is a loser in the long run.
You’re all tainted, a little bit, by it.”
I look at the photos of her and Scott
modelling together. Was that a golden
time in his life? “I would say that his
golden time of his life is now. He has a
hard existence up there on Dartmoor.
But he is stoic and determined. He
thrives on that.”
Scott’s life went on being
complicated. He has two adult
children, grandchildren and an ex-wife
who committed suicide. He often
suffered for being gay. After his divorce
he was only allowed access to his son
for half an hour, four times a year.
“Because I was homosexual there had
to be a probation officer present in
case I assaulted him.” During his
interrogations by police he was
sometimes put in a woman’s cell. To
intimidate you? “Yes. And they’d bang
my head against the cell wall.”
“Oh, I laughed at [the police officer]
when he was banging my head. I said,
‘Every time you do that, you’re just
showing how stupid you are, because
I’m telling you the truth.’ ” Did that feel
like bravery? “It was just survival.”
For the past 20 years Scott has
been in a happy long-term relationship
with an artist. His partner “hates what
people have done to me, because he
knows me, he can see me as the
person I am, he doesn’t want any
of the other rubbish”.
The dogs sleep contentedly now.
What would Scott have wanted to have
happened to Thorpe? “I think he
should have gone to prison,” he says.
“And that also would have made my
life so different, because people would
have believed me.”
6
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Thursday April 12 2018 | the times
the table
Aw, shucks. How to
slurp oysters like the
Hollywood A-listers
Bobby Groves sources the best British bivalves for Chiltern Firehouse, the
celebrity hangout in Marylebone. Lucy Holden goes fishing with him
T
here are oysters and
then there are oysters
fit for the A-list, and
if anyone knows how
to fish for Hollywood
it should be Chiltern
Firehouse in London,
which opened to much
fanfare in 2014. Because it’s not only
Bradley Cooper, Cara Delevingne and
Orlando Bloom eyeing up the oysters
as they saunter past the cart on their
way in, but also international oyster
lovers with a taste for luxury produce.
The Russians are crazy about them,
says Bobby Groves, 31, who runs the
restaurant’s “oyster programme”; one
regular eats two dozen with his wife
most days of the week, a costly amusebouche at about £120. In Suffolk, at the
oysterage owned by Bill Pinney — an
oysterman who supplies up to 500
rock oysters to Chiltern each week —
the record is 13 dozen. That’s one man
eating 156 oysters for lunch. “His
boyfriend only ate seven dozen. I don’t
think he was hungry,” Pinney laments.
Groves selects and orders four or
five varieties to serve from the cart at
Chiltern each day. He met Pinney, 64,
three years ago and decided that his
Butley Creek rock oysters were perfect
for the restaurant. Today he has come
to Pinney’s oysterage to check out
how the bivalves are doing.
Pinney’s father set up the business in
the 1950s by importing half-grown
scars to prove it. He can identify the
environmental conditions of any he
tastes and recall their “tasting notes”
from memory. The most famous
variety, he says, is the Belon oyster,
which is fished from the Belon River
in Brittany, France. “Belon oysters are
the champagne of oysters. They have
a lovely sweet mineral taste.”
“The oysterage is very established
and respected, and they have strict
Belon oysters are
the champagne of
oysters. They’ve a
lovely sweet taste
Portuguese oysters, which, says Pinney,
“grew really well on the bottom of the
river. It took a couple of years to fatten
them up then he had thousands. But
oyster farming is like all farming, it’s a
risky business. Particularly cold
winters kill them off because the water
becomes too cold.” These days, most
rock oysters grown in Britain are
Japanese varieties (also known as
Pacific oysters) — they are hardier
than native varieties and cope better
with temperature and tidal changes.
Groves, who grew up in East Anglia,
is an oyster connoisseur with shucking
Bobby Groves at
Bill Pinney’s oyster
farm in Suffolk
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rules about how they produce and
farm oysters, much like the way the
Champagne region has strict rules
about how they produce wine. But
even the French can’t spot them
sometimes. They walk past the natives
on the cart at Chiltern and say, ‘Oh,
you’ve got Belon!’, when actually
they’re from Essex.”
Groves is constantly sent “samples”
in the post. “I’ve tried thousands,” he
says — but anyone who thinks that
they must all begin to taste the same
would be wrong. “Oysters filter
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a day, so like wine and cheese they
begin to taste of the environment they
grow in and can vary from bay to bay,”
he says. “Achill rock oysters from Co
Mayo in Ireland have a peaty finish
because of peat bogs in the area — it’s
whiskey country and that really comes
through in the taste. Maldon oysters
roatia
i is
i simply
i l one off Europe’s
’ mustsee destinations, ruled by the Romans,
Byzantines, Venetians and the Habsburgs –
and all have left their legacies. Byron
christened it, ‘Pearl of the Adriatic’, George
Bernard Shaw ‘Paradise on Earth’, to us
it’s simply idyllic. Naturally beautiful and
historically fascinating, it feels wonderfully
Mediterranean. This matchless blend of
history, Mediterranean ambience and truly
stunning natural beauty is, and rightly so,
on the discerning traveller’s map once again.
C
Selected departures up to October, 2018.
the times | Thursday April 12 2018
7
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the table
MICHAEL LECKIE FOR THE TIMES; GETTY IMAGES
Bill Pinney’s angels
on horseback
This recipe works best with large,
plump oysters. Go for something like
large rock oysters. They stay fresh for
a few days in the fridge, but don’t
open them until you prepare the dish.
Serves two for a light lunch
The new Michelin-star
meal: takeaway chicken
S
Ingredients
4 rock oysters
4 rashers of streaky bacon
4 slices of white bread, toasted and
cut into rounds
1 small onion, finely chopped
Salad to garnish
Method
1 Open the oysters and lay each one
on the end of a rasher of bacon.
Sprinkle a small amount of raw onion
over the top then roll the oyster to
the end of the bacon until it is
completely wrapped.
2 Stick a cocktail stick through the
middle to hold it together, then place
under the grill for 5-10 min until the
bacon is crisp.
3 Meanwhile, toast the bread
and use a biscuit cutter to cut it
into rounds.
4 Pour a little of the oyster’s juice
over the bread, then serve it on top,
accompanied by the salad.
have more of a vegetable taste because
they pick up earthy notes from the
marshes and mudflats around the
River Blackwater, and oysters from
Menai in Wales have a very fresh taste
because water from Snowdonia runs
straight down on to the Menai Strait.”
Pinney’s Butley Creek rock oysters
are a bestseller and towards the end of
April, when indigenous native oysters
cannot legally be fished (to protect
their number) they really shine. Native
oysters take four or five years to grow,
whereas rock oysters fatten in two and
have a rounder, flatter shell and a
more mineral and briny taste. They’re
more expensive because they’re
seasonal, but both are on the Chiltern
menu for between £3 and £5 each. “If
you were to find a wild native oyster
during the summer, you could still eat
it, but it would have a milky taste
because it’s reproducing. Some people
actually prefer them like that, but it’s
quite . . . unpalatable. It is like brown
crab meat mixed with milk,” he
grimaces. “Rock oysters are the ones
to savour at this time of year.”
So how do you fish for oysters for the
A-list? In a battered old army assault
landing craft wearing waterproof
orange dungarees, if Pinney is anything
to go by. He whizzes us out into the
middle of the river, where thousands
of baby oysters are growing in mesh
sacks and mushroom crates near
the surface of the water, to keep them
away from greedy starfish and crabs.
They start life as seeds and can be as
small as a fingernail for months. When
they’re big enough they’re dropped
into the middle of the river where they
can pick up more nutrients from the
riverbed. Pinney trawls about for
them, dodging seals — the river is
swimming with them — and lugging
huge muddy nets of them over the
side and into the boat. By this point
some of them are as big as my hand.
“Look, twins!” he says excitedly when
we find two stuck together.
After being pressure-washed and
purified they arrive looking perfectly
pristine on iced platters at Chiltern
and at his own restaurant, Pinney’s, in
Orford. At this unassuming little place,
which opened in 1963, you can get a
dozen oysters for about £17, as well as
the oak-smoked salmon he produces in
wooden sheds near the oysterage. It’s
so good that Chiltern Firehouse orders
20 sides of the fish a week, making
Pinney responsible for feeding many of
the A-list, given that the dish is
another of the restaurant’s signatures.
Pinney’s also serves angels on
horseback, a 1930s classic, wrapping
the oysters in bacon and grilling them
until the bacon is crisp. “Some people
will always prefer them raw, but they
can be lovely cooked,” Pinney says.
“Tempura oysters are brilliant, but
they’re like steaks; different qualities
of oysters should be served in different
ways. Jersey rock oysters are naturally
smaller so they would shrivel up too
much if cooked, but they’re fantastic
for canapés. You don’t want to mess
about with them too much. Lemon
and a pint of Guinness is all I need.”
“Frying a native oyster would be
sacrilege,” Groves agrees. He lives and
breathes oysters and runs his own
stall, Bobby’s Oysters, at Spitalfields
Market in east London when he’s not
shucking them at Chiltern. “There my
aim is to make them as affordable as
possible, because they might have
luxury status now, but originally they
were a food for the poor. Everyone
should be able to enjoy them.”
At Chiltern, the cart — inspired
by those found on the streets of Paris
— serves oysters immediately after
they’re shucked, and the kitchen
invents different garnishes for
different times of year, matching them
to the flavour of the oyster.
“The magic of oysters is that they
are one of the very few products that
you can eat in their purest form,” says
Nuno Mendes, Chiltern’s executive
chef. “If you live in a city, the
opportunity to have something that’s
so fresh from the sea and still alive is
very rare, you really experience the
taste of the terroirs of the sea, and
when you arrive at the restaurant the
cart is the first thing you see, so the
smell hits you and really tickles your
palate. I love them with lemon, and
they also work with good-quality raw
dairy and a bit of olive oil.”
By raw dairy, Mendes means
something like an unpasteurised
crème fraîche — oysters dressed
with smoked crème fraîche,
pumpkin seed oil and chives
are currently on the menu
at Chiltern Firehouse.
Pinney’s oysterage is now
legendary at the restaurant,
with waiters who sell the
highest number of oysters
invited for a trip on the river to
see how they’re grown first-hand.
“It’s a real treat to see how they’re
fished here in beautiful, muddy
Suffolk, 100 miles away from
Marylebone, and to taste them
fresh from the river,” Groves says.
“Although, unfortunately the first
guy who won the outing didn’t
eat fish.”
Chan says
it is like
a cooking
version of
kung-fu
Top: Hawker Chan and,
above, his soy chicken
ince street food became a
buzzword in about 2010, food
trucks have run rings around
dreary suburban restaurant
chains. Street food is worth an
estimated £600 million a year, and in
the economic environment that saw
Prezzo close 94 stores, Meatwagon
has parlayed one burger van into
11 Meatliquor restaurants.
The apotheosis of this trend is
Chan Hong Men, aka Hawker Chan.
Until 2016 he was an uncelebrated
vendor selling
Malaysian street
st
chicken in Singapore. Then he was
awarded a Michelin star for the
awarde
Hong Kong-style soy chicken
and rice that he turned out
at £2
£ a plate. Since then,
Hawker
Chan outlets have
Ha
appeared
all over Asia, and
ap
recently
he spent a few days
rec
slinging
his chicken at a
slin
pop-up
event in London.
pop
On
O one of them, he sold
1,440
portions (360 birds) in
1,440 p
three
hours.
Such was demand
th
th
ho
that
100 people were left
th more than
th
t
disappointed, despite having queued in
disappointed
driving rain in the hope of paying £6
— that’s the inflationary effect of fame
for you — for a pillow of rice with
sweet soy sauce, a handful of soybeans,
two slices of cucumber and a chopped
soy chicken arranged in a fan.
I was lucky enough to be served just
before the van ran out of chicken, and
while others were left pleading with
the staff I was scoffing meat so juicy
that it almost dissolved in the mouth.
Then it was time for an audience
with Chan himself. From what I could
make out from a translator, the lean
and youthful 53-year-old cook didn’t
seem to take anything except his food
too seriously. “He has spent his career
making chicken more tender,” I was
told. “When he saw his competitors
were using bigger chickens, he decided
to use smaller chickens. The advantage
is that the sauce penetrates better.”
Chan cooks his chickens for over
an hour in a lightly spiced soy stock.
I tried to ask how often he changes
the liquid in the pots but he just let out
a giggle. “He wouldn’t change it every
day,” the translator confided, while
Chan jovially wagged his finger at me
as though he was Colonel Sanders and
I was about to ask him for his secret
blend of herbs and spices. “In the
morning,” added the translator, “he
will
w top up the cooking pots with
more soy sauce and Chinese herbs.
He says it is like a cooking version
of
o kung-fu.”
Chan then relayed the story about
when his staff in Singapore
noticed that David Beckham
was
w standing in the queue
patiently waiting for his soy
chicken. No one jumped over
the counter to serve him. There
was no special treatment.
As street food is accepted
into
the world of Michelin, this
i
ffelt like Chan’s take-home message
— that some of the best food is
now
n accepted to be of the people,
by
b the people, for the people. All
we
w have to do is join the end of a
queue and hope that the food
q
doesn’t
run out before we reach
d
the
t front of it.
Phil
P Robinson
8
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Thursday April 12 2018 | the times
arts
Hide your wrapping paper! Chris
Christo’s plans for the Mastaba project in the Serpentine in Hyde Park
The artist who wrapped the Reichstag
plans to float barrels on the Serpentine.
Rachel Campbell-Johnston reports on
the artist’s triumphs and disasters
A
new landmark is
about to be erected
in our capital. A
massive trapezoidal
prism constructed
from 7,506 stacked
oil barrels will soar
66ft (20m) skywards
from the surface of the Serpentine in
Hyde Park. This enormous floating
sculpture, painted red, white, blue and
(rather less predictably) purple, will
take the form of a mastaba — a shape
that in ancient Egypt, apparently, was
very à la mode. Looking like a pyramid
with its peak lopped off, it was popular
with tomb-building pharaohs.
However, in modern-day London
it may not necessarily
ly prove
so popular. Critical
opinion will no doubt
bt
vary wildly. For
every member of
the public who
flocks to the lake’s
fringes with an
iPhone outthrust,
another will
deplore it as an
(albeit temporary)
eyesore.
Its creator should
be well prepared for
either response. In the
he
course of the collaborative
orative
career that began in the early Sixties
between Christo, a Bulgarian émigré,
and Jeanne-Claude, his then new
French wife — who died in 2009 aged
74 — the pair got used to attracting as
much condemnation as acclaim. The
monumental projects that they
created together may have progressed
over the past 50 years, growing in
scale and conceptual relevance, but
they have remained as controversial as
they are audaciously ambitious. It still
takes a defiant combination of brute
bureaucratic force, obsessive
engineering and overweening vision to
pull off each feat. Success and failure
go hand in glove for Christo.
Triumphs
Wall of Oil Barrels, Paris, 1961
One afternoon in 1961 an unknown
Bulgarian art student named Christo
Javacheff blocked the narrow Rue
Visconti in Paris’s Latin Quarter with
a wall of coloured oil barrels. It was a
protest against the recently erected
Berlin Wall, he declared. His iron
curtain was pulled down only a few
hours later and forgotten, but its
creator was not. This, the first
monumental work by an artist
now famous for his temporary
transformations of landmarks, set
the precedent for a succession of
spectacular creations.
Wrapped Coast, Sydney, 1969
Forget that sparkly roll of Christmas
paper from the corner shop. It
took a million
milli square feet of
erosion-control
synthetic
erosionfabric,
fabric 35 miles of
polypropylene
rope,
poly
25,000
fasteners,
25,
threaded
studs and
th
clips
cl to parcel up
1.5
1 miles of rocky
coastline
like a
c
present.
Christo
p
had
h already
experimented
with
ex
immuring
smaller
imm
objects,
objec but by
wrapping
wrappi up the
shoreline of Little Bay
in Sydney he created the
largest single artwork ever made at
that time. Even the presidents of
Mount Rushmore were upstaged.
The message was revelation through
concealment. By defamiliarising a
well-known natural setting, Christo
revealed the essential form and shape
of the coast. It proved so successful
a trick that it was to be tried again
and again.
Running Fence, California, 1976
Plans to build an 18ft-high fabric wall
across 24 miles of Californian
farmland brought Christo and JeanneClaude their first real taste of
controversy. Despite hiring nine
lawyers to secure the consent of 59
dairy farmers, landowners and
ranchers, they still had to go through
18 public hearings to get their final
approval. People just didn’t understand
what they were doing. Was Christo a
Soviet spy, some wondered? Others
feared that he was the forerunner of
property developers. Yet by the time
the fence was finished, dropping down
at the end towards the Pacific Ocean,
it was being widely acclaimed as an
artistic marvel. Close to four years of
collaborative effort had paid off. And
when, after a fortnight, it was
dismantled, the ranchers were given
the steel cables, the poles and the
white nylon fabric, so, quite apart
from the aesthetic spectacle, it was
useful too.
Surrounded Islands, Miami, 1983
For this project 11 manmade barrier
islands in Biscayne Bay, Miami, were
skirted about with frilly ripples of
DayGlo pink fabric. Photographed
Top: the Floating Piers,
Lake Iseo, Italy, 2016.
Above: The Gates,
New York, 2005.
Above right: Wrapped
Reichstag, Berlin,
1971-1995. Left: Christo
and his wife and artistic
partner, Jeanne-Claude,
who died in 2009
from the air, this was one of the
defining artistic images of its era, but it
had not been achieved without a fight.
The prospect of floating 6.5 million
square feet of polypropylene in the
Miami waters left environmental
groups aghast. Lawsuits were filed.
Everyone sued everyone else.
Hearings were held. “What about the
manatees?” cried the wildlife groups.
In the end it got sorted — not least
when it was discovered that the
endangered manatees were gathering
under the sheltering fringes to mate.
The result marked a turning point in
the cultural identity of Miami as a
growing destination for art.
Wrapped Reichstag, Berlin, 1971-1995
This was a mockery of Germany’s
democratic traditions, declared the
the times | Thursday April 12 2018
9
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arts
t s getting his hands on London
to’
MARCO BERTORELLO/GETTY IMAGES; WOLFGANG VOLZ/LAIF/CAMERA PRESS; GETTY IMAGES; ANDRÉ GROSSMANN © 2017 CHRISTO
them. To assemble Valley Curtain it
took Christo 28 months to string
18,600sq m of orange nylon fabric
from Grand Junction to Glenwood
Springs in the Grand Hogback
mountain range. Thanks to a gale
warning, the piece remained in situ
for only 28 hours. That’s a month
of work per hour.
The Umbrellas, Japan and US, 1984-91
The idea was to create what Christo
described as “a symphony in two
parts”. Two huge groups of umbrellas
— one lot yellow, the other blue
— were to be erected at the same
time in California and Japan. The
former would be widely scattered,
the latter more densely arranged in
an installation intended to reflect
similarities and contrasts between
ways of life in the two different
countries. At first the installation
seemed like a success. About three
million people had already turned
up, using the sites as playgrounds,
picnic spots and wedding backdrops,
when suddenly one of the Californian
umbrellas was toppled by high winds.
It crashed down and killed a 33-yearold woman. Christo ordered that the
exhibit should immediately be closed.
However, a second death occurred
during the disassembly. A Japanese
worker tangled the arm of his crane
in a power line and was electrocuted.
throngs. In 16 days, Corriere della
Sera reported, there were 1.5 million
visitors. There were several problems,
among them the fact this project
could only be completed with the help
of the arms-manufacturing Beretta
family, who donated their private
island for Christo’s use. Such
controversies aside, this feat of
engineering could turn out to be
Christo’s most important artwork.
Imagine the potential of this type
of temporary bridge. It could be
deployed after floods or in the wake
of natural disasters, put to use along
coastlines as sea levels rise. It may
look poetic in the pictures, but it is
potentially immensely practical too.
Disasters
The Reichstag’s
vast hulk was
turned into
something subtle
German chancellor Helmut Kohl.
Christo’s plans to encase the symbolic
heartland of his nation’s government
in silvery fabric were put to a
parliamentary vote. The results were
dramatically close: 223 were against
it; 292 voted for. However, as Christo
saw it, the debate was as much a part
of the artwork as the wrapping
process. A project that took 24 years
from conception to completion
could be seen as a study of the way
that attitudes can be transformed
over time. The result was beautiful
— the vast, bombastic hulk was
transformed into something delicate
and subtle. Christo may insist that
pieces bear no deeper meaning, but
as Germany struggled with questions
of identity post-reunification, this
attention-grabbing project felt
peculiarly poignant.
The Floating Piers, Lake Iseo, 2016
For three weeks in the summer of
2016, people felt as though they were
walking on water. A series of floating
polyethylene walkways covered in
light orange fabric were laid down
across the surface of Lake Iseo in
northern Italy. Visitors crossed from
the mainland to islands in exuberant
Top right: Surrounded
Islands, Miami, 1983.
Above: Running Fence,
California, 1976
The Mastaba will float
on the Serpentine in
Hyde Park, London,
from June 18 (weather
permitting) to
September 23
42,390 Cubic Feet Package,
Minneapolis, 1966
It took a while for Christo to get off
the ground. When the 42,390 Cubic
Feet Package — a parcel of four US
army high-altitude research balloons
with 2,800 more coloured balloons
inside them — was finally inflated it
was meant to be airlifted from the art
school campus in Minneapolis to the
front lawn of the nearby Institute of
Arts. However, weather conditions
were dangerously gusty and in the end
it was lifted by helicopter only 20ft off
the ground before it was dumped back
down again.
Valley Curtain, Colorado, 1972
The debacle of the 42,390 Cubic Feet
Package was not the last time that the
weather put paid to Christo’s plans;
natural forces have repeatedly foiled
The Gates, New York, 2005
The artists battled with angry locals,
community leaders, environmental
protesters and park officials (they
made 41 formal presentations in 1980
alone) for a total of 26 years before
getting permission to create The Gates:
their first and only large-scale New
York installation. The original plan
had suggested that 15,000 fabricdraped steel gates should be planted in
the earth of Central Park. By the time
all the bureaucratic kerfuffle was done,
only 7,500 free-standing vinyl gates
were approved. Mayor Michael
Bloomberg praised them as “one of the
most exciting public art projects ever
put on anywhere in the world”, but
other spectators were decidedly
underwhelmed by this orange slalom
course — not least the park keepers
responsible for unfurling the fabric
when it rolled over the crossbars in
the wind.
Over the River, Colorado
This six miles of silvery canopy
suspended in sections over 42 miles
of the Arkansas River was two decades
in the planning and cost $15 million
of the artists’ own money in
development. Then, last year, the
project was abandoned. This was not
because of the fierce opposition from
wildlife groups, but because the terrain
in which it was planned was federally
owned. Now it had a new landlord —
Donald Trump — and Christo wanted
nothing to do with him. His decision
to pull the plug was a highly visible
artistic protest against America’s new
administration. Was it a good way to
get the point across? Many believed
that a project taking place on a river
that traversed red and blue states
would have drawn valuable attention
to the importance of the stewardship
of federal land.
10
1G T
Thursday April 12 2018 | the times
television & radio
Hangover? Blame it on the gender-fluid god
Chris
Bennion
TV review
Bacchus Uncovered
BBC Four
{{{{(
From World War
to Cold War
Yesterday
{{{((
‘I
have taken more out of alcohol
than alcohol has taken out of
me,” Winston Churchill is
supposed to have said, a quote
that is always cheering to the
habitual drinker. However, lurking
within those rosy-cheeked words is a
warning — the demon drink may be
mankind’s No 1 source of inspiration
and relaxation, but it is also its feet of
clay. In Bettany Hughes’s Bacchus
Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy
she found a god who gave with one
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
The Hitchhiker’s
Guide to the Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase
Radio 4, 6.30pm
Perhaps it was Stephen
Hawking’s cameo in the
first episode, but the airing
of the last in this series
seems to mark the end of
an era. Hitchhiker’s Guide
feels as though it belongs
to a more innocent time,
when sci-fi was sci-fi and
not incipient sci-fact. If you
can keep a handle on all the
jargon, though, it’s
entertaining. The jargon
isn’t new — the original
Hitchhiker was awash with
Zaphod Beeblebroxes and
whatnot — it just somehow
wore it lightly. The cast
includes Jim Broadbent
and John Lloyd and there
are some excellent
observations on religion.
Assignment: The
Child Saver of Mosul
World Service, 10.06pm
If only the children in The
Silver Sword had bumped
into their own Sukaina
Mohamed Younes. She
is astonishing. A council
official in the battered
Iraqi city of Mosul, she
has decided to find and
identify all the missing
children in the former
Islamic State stronghold
and reunite them with
their families.
hand, but took with the other (yes, she
“went in search” of the Greek deity).
She also “found” a god of wine who
has been worshipped for millennia,
whose power can still be felt today,
who almost rivalled Jesus for
popularity and who can claim a good
chunk of responsibility for civilising
humankind (trot that out next time
someone objects to opening the
second bottle). Hughes looked hard
and she found Bacchus lurking in
8,000-year-old Georgian pots, sailing
with the East India Company and
tripping at Woodstock. And before you
ask, no, Hughes hadn’t been on the
pinot grigio. In fact, that was just
about the most disappointing aspect
of the whole programme — if Hughes
wasn’t going to spend half her travels
sloshed then the Beeb could at least
have had the decency to send Rick
Stein along with her.
Strikingly, Bacchus — or Dionysus
— is celebrated to this day. On the
Greek island of Skyros the population
gather once a year for three days of
carousing, boozing and cross-dressing
(oh yes, Bacchus was the original
gender-fluid god) in honour of
Dionysus. Some of the more outgoing
local chaps dress as geros, “ancient
ones”. The costume for these mischiefmakers is a mask made from the skin
of a prematurely born goat and lots
and lots of massive bells. “It makes you
feel really cool,” said one young man
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00
BBC Radio 1’s Residency: Black Madonna
12.00 Radio 1’s Residency: Bradley Zero
1.00am Toddla T 3.00 Radio 1 Comedy: Ray
Moss No Stone Unturned 4.00 Radio 1’s
Early Breakfast Show with Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Fearne Cotton 9.30 Trevor Nelson
12.00 Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright
5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Bob Harris Country
8.00 Jo Whiley. Sea shanty band Fisherman’s
Friends perform live in session 10.00 The
Radio 2 Arts Show with Anneka Rice. Jason
Watkins comes straight off stage from
performing in Frozen in the West End, and
actor David Gyasi chats about television
drama Troy: Fall of a City 12.00 The Craig
Charles House Party (r) 2.00am Radio 2’s
Tracks of My Years Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Have A Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Feelgood Friday 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Ian Skelly presents a selection of classical
music. Plus, the comedian and writer Stewart
Lee talks about the cultural influences that
have inspired and shaped his life and career
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Pachelbel (1653-1706)
Donald Macleod unravels the rich musical
legacy of a composer known almost
exclusively for one iconic work: the ”Canon in
D”. After a peripatetic life in Stuttgart and
Gotha, Pachelbel finally comes home to
Nuremberg. A selection of brilliant secular
songs take us to Nuremberg — and
Pachelbel’s dream job, back home at the
console of the organ at St Sebaldus’s Church.
Pachelbel (Das Gewitter im Aprilen;
Musikalische Ergötzung in B; O grosses
Musienlicht; Keyboard Suite No 29 in E
minor; Gute Walther unser Raths; Variations
on Pachelbel’s Canon — String Quartet No 6,
3rd mvt; Chaconne in F minor; and Mein
Leben, dessen Creuz für mich)
Bettany Hughes celebrating Bacchus at Skyros’s Goat Festival
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Sarah Walker introduces further highlights
from the Norfolk and Norwich Chamber
Music series with Quatuor Ebene performing
works by Beethoven and Dutilleux.
Beethoven (String Quartet in E minor, Op 59
No 2 — Razumovsky); and Dutilleux (String
Quartet — Ainsi lanuit)
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Ralph Vaughan Williams’ opera
The Poisoned Kiss, performed by the
BBC National Orchestra of Wales — under
the baton of Richard Hickox — as it
celebrates its 90th anniversary. Vaughan
Williams (The Poisoned Kiss); and William
Mathias (In Arcadia)
4.30 BBC Young Musician 2018
Kate Molleson presents highlights from this
year’s Young Musician competition, featuring
a selection of performances by the
percussion finalists
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty presents a lively mix of chat,
arts news and live performance
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An eclectic non-stop mix of music, featuring
old favourites together with lesser-known
gems, and a few surprises thrown in
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
The BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
conducted by Yan Pascal Tortelier play Ravel,
Beethoven and Berlioz. You can’t always get
what you want. Diaghilev had wanted
another ballet from Ravel — instead he
composed La Valse, which Diaghilev called a
masterpiece, but not a ballet. Beethoven
wanted a pianist to perform his just finished
4th piano concerto. No one came forward,
and Beethoven had to play his most personal
and poetic concerto himself. The Scottish
pianist Steven Osborne plays the music that
asks as many questions as it answers. Ravel
(La Valse); Beethoven (Piano Concerto No 4);
and Berlioz (Symphonie Fantastique)
10.00 Free Thinking
The American novelist and essayist
Marilynne Robinson talks religion, fiction and
US politics in conversation with Rana Mitter
10.45 The Essay:
One Bar Electric Memoir
Harland Miller talks about moving from New
York to Berlin, the city to be in because of
German expressionism and David Bowie
11.00 Late Junction
A mixtape from former Sonic Youth member
Jim O’Rourke, a celebration of 10 years of
the psych-rock label Fruits De Mer and Indian
electronica from Disco Puppet
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day (r)
6.00 Today
With Nick Robinson and Justin Webb
9.00 In Our Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss George and
Robert Stephenson
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week:
Packing My Library
By Alberto Manguel (4/5)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Jenni Murray presents discussion and
interviews. Including at 10.45 the 15 Minute
Drama: How Does That Make You Feel? by
Shelagh Stephenson (4/5)
11.00 Crossing Continents
A woman’s mission to reunite families amid
the rubble of Mosul
11.30 Cold Art
Louise K Wilson meets artists who are
inspired by the Cold War
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Lucy Catherine
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Chinese Characters
The Jesuit priest who brought together
Renaissance Europe and Ming China (4/20)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: How We’re Loved
Written by and starring Francesca Martinez
3.00 Open Country
Helen Mark visits Coventry to discover the
places in between urban and rural landscapes
3.27 Radio 4 Appeal
On behalf of the Shannon Trust (r)
3.30 Open Book
Diana Evans talks to Mariella Frostrup about
her novel Ordinary People (r)
4.00 The Film Programme
Antonia Quirke talks to Noel Cronin, the
founder of TV station Talking Pictures
4.30 BBC Inside Science
The latest scientific research
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the
Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase
Adaptation of Eoin Colfer’s novel And
Another Thing. See Radio Choice (6/6)
7.00 The Archers
There is tension at Home Farm
over the clanging. Bacchus — the
god of wine, theatre and tinnitus.
Perhaps these earsplitting geros are
simply trying to remind us of our
forthcoming hangovers.
There’s always a hangover. The
Romans, those great hooverers of
ancient Greek culture, were suspicious
of Bacchus. It transpires, however, that
this was mainly because the cult of
Bacchus was a female-dominated area,
and that would never do. Tellingly, the
Romans pushed wine heavily on
conquered regions. “Wine overcame
native barbarians as easily as if they’d
been attacked by weapons,” wrote one
Roman general. There’s a reason why
the ancient Greeks watered down
their booze. Hughes reasoned that
wine should be drunk in moderation.
The NHS will thank her.
“Alcohol clearly played a part at
Yalta,” we were told during 1945-1953:
From World War to Cold War.
Despite that title, last night’s first part
focused on a single week — the Yalta
Conference of February 1945, when
Churchill met Stalin and Roosevelt in
Crimea to carve up Europe. It was a
solid war-doc, taking us painstakingly
through the seven days of negotiations,
but I wanted to know about the
dinners. Imagine! Winston, Joseph and
Franklin thrashing things out as the
saperavi flowed. Bacchus must have
been at Yalta somewhere. Bettany
Hughes would have found him.
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 How Does That Make You Feel?
By Shelagh Stephenson (r)
8.00 The Briefing Room
David Aaronovitch discusses big issues
in the news
8.30 In Business
Developments in the worlds of business
and industry (2/8)
9.00 BBC Inside Science
The latest scientific research (r)
9.30 In Our Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss George and
Robert Stephenson (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Rabbit Is Rich
By John Updike (9/10)
11.00 Beef and Dairy Network
The spoof magazine show hosted by
Benjamin Partridge (2/4)
11.30 The Digital Human
How the online realm can be a portal to a
better physical world (1/6) (r)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Packing My Library
By Alberto Manguel (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
10.30 Sketchorama. The rising stars of the
comedy circuit show off their wit and
imagination 11.00 Wondermentalist
Cabaret. Matt Harvey’s comedy-infused
poetry cabaret 11.30 Bleak Expectations.
By Mark Evans. First aired in 2009
Radio 4 Extra
6 Music
Digital only
8.00am Marriage Lines 8.30 The Goon Show
9.00 Listomania 9.30 HR 10.00 Jude the
Obscure 11.00 Missing 11.15 The Man on
the Green Bicycle (r) 12.00 Marriage Lines
12.30pm The Goon Show 1.00 White Heat
1.30 Old Photographs Fever: The Search for
China’s Pictured Past 2.00 The Essex Serpent
2.15 Disability: A New History 2.30 Tristram
Shandy 2.45 On Her Majesty’s Secret Service
3.00 Jude the Obscure 4.00 Listomania 4.30
HR 5.00 North by Northamptonshire 5.30
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase 6.00 The Scarifyers: The
King of Winter 6.30 Great Lives 7.00
Marriage Lines 7.30 The Goon Show. Comedy
with Spike Milligan, Harry Secombe and
Peter Sellers 8.00 White Heat. Thriller by
Melanie McGrath 8.30 Old Photographs
Fever: The Search for China’s Pictured Past.
The popularity of historical photographs in
China 9.00 Missing. By Gillian Tindall. First
aired in 1992 9.15 The Man on the Green
Bicycle. By Jennifer Curry (r) 10.00 Comedy
Club: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase. Dirk Maggs’ adaptation of
Eoin Colfer’s novel And Another Thing
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Clare McDonnell 1.00pm
Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
Live Sport. A round-up of the day’s sports
news 8.00 5 Live Sport: Commonwealth
Games 2018. A round-up of the day’s events
9.30 5 Live Formula 1. A look ahead to this
weekend’s Chinese Grand Prix 10.00
Question Time Extra Time. Adrian Chiles and
Chris Mason introduce coverage of Question
Time 1.00am Up All Night 5.00 Reports
5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Jim White, Ray Parlour and Bob Mills
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe
4.00 Steve Lamacq 6.00 Steve Lamacq’s
Roundtable 7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe
12.00 6 Music Recommends with Steve
Lamacq 1.00am The Celluloid Jukebox
2.00 Eye Witness to History 2.30 6 Music
Live Hour 3.30 6 Music’s Jukebox
5.00 Jon Hillcock
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00
Nicholas Owen 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall
5.00 Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
8.00 The Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott
continues Classic FM’s celebration of the
Philharmonia Orchestra, and she begins with
a curtain-raiser by Weber. Weber (Oberon
— overture); Beethoven (Piano Concerto No
5 in E-flat Op 73 — Emperor); Sibelius
(Karelia Suite); Respighi (Adagio with
Variations for Cello and Orchestra); Carl
Davis (Pride and Prejudice Suite); and
Vaughan Williams (Norfolk Rhapsody No 1)
10.00 Smooth Classics 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday April 12 2018
11
1G T
JOHAN PERSSON; MARIEKE MACKLON
Comedy
Tom Allen
Soho Theatre, W1
Pop
Lissie
Omeara, SE1
H
P
{{{{(
e preens, he sneers, he
wants to be your best friend.
There is a delicious cocktail
of personality traits rattling
around in Tom Allen’s
routines. Dressed in an immaculate
suit, like a would-be master of the
universe on The Apprentice, he can be
obnoxiously overbearing and painfully
needy. Ultra-sensitive at heart, Allen
has learnt how to fend off the world
with studied bursts of arrogance.
When he strikes up a conversation
with an audience member he can be
all ears. Yet don’t expect him to listen
for long, this man is a case study in
attention deficit disorder.
He keeps up a frantically camp pace
in his show Absolutely, his relentlessly
staccato delivery can make Graham
Norton seem shy and retiring. You
could argue that we have passed the
stage when punchlines about being
gay should seem fresh or entertaining,
but Allen cleverly weaves his sexuality
into recurrent flashbacks to a lowerclass upbringing in Bromley. What can
his effing-and-blinding parents have
made of a boy who seemed intent on
turning himself into a 21st-century
Noël Coward?
Allen turns up on the television
panel game treadmill nowadays, but
fans of radio comedy will remember
him as Young Pip in that canny
Dickensian parody Bleak Expectations.
He brings a similarly adroit touch
to his stand-up persona. The
anecdotes about his childhood are a
neatly judged mix of realism and ripe
exaggeration; he has a comic actor’s
precise sense of timing. True, one or
two of the monologues — including
reminiscences of the exhausting
rituals of a children’s birthday party —
outstayed their welcome. Still, his
manic intensity almost carried
them off.
A visit to a Pizza Express supplied
him with some deft observations about
how we dine now, our coupons at the
ready. A run-of-the-mill conceit?
Maybe, but once again his eye for
detail impresses. He nearly came
unstuck with the obligatory interplay
with punters at the start of the
evening. When a group of women
sitting at a table near the stage decided
not to play along in the usual way,
Allen patiently circled, waiting to fire
off his poison darts. They hit home in
the end.
Clive Davis
Box office: 020 7478 0100, to
Saturday, then touring to Sept 19.
Details: tomindeed.com
artsfirst night
{{{{(
Gavin Spokes as Charles Ingram and Keir Charles as Chris Tarrant play Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
This one’s a winner
A play about
TV’s ‘coughing
major’ game
show scandal
is compulsive
viewing, says
Sam Marlowe
Theatre
Quiz
Noël Coward
Theatre, WC2
{{{{(
Ann Treneman
on the return
of Chicago
First Night, main paper
C
an we truly believe our eyes
and ears, or do we only ever
see what we want to see? In
James Graham’s glittering
play you can take your pick
from an array of alternative facts, but
you might struggle to find the truth
among the razzle-dazzle. One thing’s
for sure, though — Quiz is a winner.
Part garish, interactive game show,
part courtroom drama, it probes the
2001 scandal of Charles Ingram, the
“coughing major” accused of cheating
on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
Beneath the shiny surface, there’s also
an astute exploration of the ways in
which manipulated narratives and
false perceptions distort almost every
aspect of modern life, from the creep
of showbiz into politics to the rise of
reality TV, with its Big Brother-style
faux democracy, and social media,
on which we present edited versions
of ourselves.
The production by Daniel Evans,
which transferred from Chichester, is
a whirling, neon wonder, revelling in
all the ludicrous comedy, desperation
and pathos of a story where the stakes
keep inexorably rising. It’s utterly
compulsive viewing. Robert Jones’s set,
a glowing cube flanked by screens and
banks of onstage audience members,
transforms from studio to legal arena,
the glare of Tim Lutkin’s lighting and
the pulsing menace of Ben and Max
Ringham’s music ramping up the
pressure on the bewildered major,
played by Gavin Spokes. We’re all
equipped with electronic keypads and
we get to play jury twice, voting
Ingram guilty or not guilty after
evidence from the prosecution and
defence. Witnesses are called and key
moments, on and off camera, are reenacted, offering conflicting accounts.
It’s as frenetic as an extended
commercial break, yet a vivid picture
of British society emerges. There are
pub quizzes, combining our “two
greatest loves — drinking and being
right”. There’s a potted history of
popular game shows, in which Keir
Charles — also spot-on as the
programme’s host, Chris Tarrant —
hilariously impersonates Leslie
Crowther and Des O’Connor. There
are slick TV executives and geeky
quiz-show obsessives, one of whom
acerbically observes that in a country
riven by class, life itself feels like
a game that’s unfairly rigged. Then
there are the Ingrams, ordinary
Middle Englanders beset by family
debt and sucked into a narrative
beyond their control.
They become national hate figures,
a fury that abates only after 9/11
knocks them off the news agenda. By
the end, poignantly, Graham shows
a man still paying a high price for his
notoriety. “I tried to be entertaining,”
Ingram says, teary-eyed and defeated.
He is. And so — incontrovertibly — is
this clever, coruscating play.
Box office: 0844 4825140 to June 16
erhaps a few more pop stars
should take a leaf out of Lissie
Maurus’s book. In 2015 the
35-year-old singer, below,
from Rock Island, Illinois,
dealt with being dropped by her record
label and splitting with her boyfriend
by leaving California for a 50-acre
farm in Iowa, learning how to plant
trees and keep bees, and relaunching
herself as an independent artist. It
worked. Last year David Lynch asked
Lissie to appear in TV’s rebooted Twin
Peaks. Now the self-released Castles
has become her first Top Ten album.
“You definitely need a vinyl of
my album, and a CD, and probably a
T-shirt,” said Lissie, keeping in mind
that the merchandise stand provides
the fuel that keeps the wheels of an
independent artist’s tour bus rolling.
Meanwhile, backed by a four-piece
band who brought out her rocking
tendencies, she proved herself to be
a modern Stevie Nicks — a likeable,
throaty-voiced singer who has a way
of imbuing accessible, adult-orientated
rock with real feeling and emotion.
“Some kinds of love are the worst.
This is about losing my mind,” said
Lissie of Shroud, on which she had
a chance to do some heads-down
rocking with her very good guitarist
and bassist, both women. She showed
a gentler side on Oh Mississippi, which
sounded like old southern folk-blues,
but was an original about growing up
next to the Mississippi River.
Best of all was Best Days, a countryrock message of optimism and an
autobiographical reflection on the
singer’s own situation. It sounded like
a drive-time classic that should be
blasting out of a pick-up truck, which
is just as well because, as she told us in
the song, she has bought one.
Circumstances ensured that Lissie
didn’t become a flash-in-the-pan pop
star. She has grown into an assured
singer-songwriter who, to judge by this
excellent show, is in it for the long run.
Will Hodgkinson
Entertainments
Entertainment
St Martin's
020 7836 1443
66th year of Agatha Christie's
THE MOUSETRAP
Mon-Sat 7.30, Tues & Thu 3, Sat 4
www.the-mousetrap.co.uk
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announcement now at:
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LES MISÉRABLES
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
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THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
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12
1G T
Thursday April 12 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Law & Order
BBC Four, 10pm
The 1978
series
Law &
Order
by GF Newman was
groundbreaking TV.
The four-part drama
demonstrated not only
that you could bribe
Early
Top
pick
and twist the honest
British copper, but
that in the Met in the
Seventies it was de
rigueur. According to
its author, after it went
out a Home Office
minister, John Harris,
summoned the BBC’s
then director-general,
Sir Ian Trethowan,
and told him that this
was not the kind of
programme the BBC
should be making
and that it should
never be sold abroad.
Trethowan’s response
was apparently robust,
but the series wasn’t
repeated until 2009,
and again now nine
years later. In the
opening episode, A
Detective’s Tale, Chief
Inspector Trout of A10
(the precursor to AC-12
in Jed Mercurio’s Line
of Duty) receives a
tip-off about a meeting
between a policeman
and a criminal. The
bent copper is Fred
Pyle, played brilliantly
by Derek Martin, better
known as Charlie Slater
(RIP) in EastEnders.
Pyle grabs the odd
suspect by his orange
Y-fronts, but next to
Jack Regan he is a
positively gentlemanly
member of the
Sweeney. A Detective’s
Tale tells the story of
the framing
of an armed robber
called Jack Lynn.
He is not involved in
the robbery under
investigation, but Pyle
considers he is “well
overdue”. Next week’s
episode, A Villain’s
Tale, shows us Lynn
for the first time, played
by Peter Dean, followed
by A Brief’s Tale and
A Prisoner’s Tale.
Andrew Billen
Living with the
Brainy Bunch
BBC Two, 8pm
Yet another reality TV
education experiment,
as two underachieving
Year 11 pupils
from Chessington
Community College in
Greater London spend
half a term living under
the same roof as two of
the highest-achieving
pupils in their year.
Jack and Holly struggle
with results and
behaviour, but will a
new routine, featuring
rules, tough homework
schedules and curfews,
turn their lives around?
Well, duh, of course,
but how about if Holly
and Jack’s parents had
enforced a similarly
strict regime in the
first place? Turns out
parental influence over
education is important.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Live Commonwealth Games
2018. Clare Balding and Gabby Logan introduce further
coverage on day eight in Queensland, featuring athletics,
beach volleyball and hockey 1.00pm BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
1.45 Doctors. Sid’s head is turned by a new receptionist
while they deal with a problematic patient, and Zara is
determined to keep her cool during the conflict resolution
course (AD) 2.15 800 Words. George is getting a lot of
unexpected attention from the local women, things come
to a head at Fiona’s museum fundraiser, and Arlo has
a run-in at school with the McNamara family (AD) 3.00
Escape to the Country. Jules Hudson heads to the North
Wessex Downs area of southern England to help a couple
with a £500,000 budget secure their very first home in
Britain (r) (AD) 3.45 Money for Nothing. Reinventing a
wicker table and chair, two paraffin lamps and a firepit
(r) 4.30 Flog It! The team heads to Sandon Hall in
Staffordshire (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show hosted by
Alexander Armstrong and Richard Osman 6.00 BBC News
at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.55 Party Election Broadcast. By the Green Party
6.00am Live Commonwealth Games 2018. Hazel Irvine
introduces coverage as day eight of the Games continues
in Queensland, with the final of the men’s beach
volleyball taking place along with women’s lawn bowls
9.15 Oxford Street Revealed. The actress Michelle Keegan
visits House of Fraser (r) (AD) 10.00 Homes Under the
Hammer. The team explores properties in Stoke-on-Trent,
London and Dudley (r) 11.00 Britain’s Home Truths.
Gloria Hunniford explores housing in Northern Ireland (r)
(AD) 11.45 Dom on the Spot. Attempts to catch and fine
litter-throwers in Cardiff 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Experts
Caroline Hawley and David Harper aid two teams as they
scour an antiques fair at Epsom Racecourse, Surrey, in a
bid to pick up bargains to sell for profit at auction (r)
(AD) 1.00 Live Commonwealth Games 2018. Jason
Mohammad introduces the concluding programme of live
coverage on day eight in Queensland, as the men’s 800m
final takes place at the Carrara Stadium 5.15 Put Your
Money Where Your Mouth Is. Eric Knowles and Danny
Sebastian visit Sint-Truiden in Belgium, where Danny
finds an antique sewing machine and Eric finds out how
modern bronzes are cast (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show
6.00am Good Morning Britain 8.30 Lorraine. Avengers
stars Paul Bettany and Elizabeth Olsen chat about their
return to the big screen in the franchise’s latest offering,
Avengers: Infinity War. Presented by Lorraine Kelly 9.25
The Jeremy Kyle Show. The host invites guests to air
their differences over family and relationship issues
10.30 This Morning. Phillip Schofield and Holly
Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features, including
a look at the stories making the newspaper headlines and
a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm Loose Women. The
ladies put the world to rights once more and invite a
famous guest to chat about what they are up to 1.30 ITV
News; Weather 2.00 Live ITV Racing: Grand National
Festival. Ed Chamberlin and Francesca Cumani present
coverage from Aintree of five races on the opening day of
the prestigious meeting, at 2.20, 2.50, 3.25, 4.05 and
4.40. With analysis from AP McCoy, Mick Fitzgerald, and
Luke Harvey, commentary by Richard Hoiles, and reports
from Matt Chapman, Oli Bell, Alice Plunkett, and Lucy
Verasamy 5.00 The Chase. Quiz show hosted by Bradley
Walsh 6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.25 Party Election
Broadcast. By the Green Party 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.30 Frasier (r)
10.05 Ramsay’s Hotel Hell. Gordon Ramsay visits a
Tuscan-style hotel in New Mexico (r) (AD) 11.00
Undercover Boss USA. The future CEO of Peavey
Electronics goes incognito among the firm’s staff (r)
12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Come Dine
with Me. Four amateur chefs from Stamford, Lincolnshire,
compete (r) 1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers. Dan inspects a
diamond eternity ring and a Victorian gold chain (r)
2.10 Countdown. Jimmy Osmond is in Dictionary Corner
3.00 A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun. A woman from
Cheshire searches for a holiday home on the Costa Blanca
(r) 4.00 Escape to the Château: DIY. Dick Strawbridge
searches for a stash of wine hidden during the Second
World War (AD) 5.00 Four in a Bed. The guests spend the
night at Massimo Perrulli’s hotel in County Durham (r)
5.30 Star Boot Sale. Model and presenter Vogue Williams
sells her designer clothes 6.00 The Simpsons. Homer
returns from a nuclear convention a changed man
(r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Kim’s patience begins to wear
thin as she tries to keep herself occupied (r) (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. The day’s
news comes under scrutiny from Matthew Wright and the
panel 11.15 Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away! Paul Bohill
and Steve Pinner try to repossess a house (r) 12.10pm
5 News Lunchtime 12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
Dr Shazia Javed meets a young boy with an unusually
high temperature and no identifiable cause, and a patient
drives himself to the surgery after suffering from a
suspected stroke (r) (AD) 1.10 Access 1.15 Home and
Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.20 NCIS. The team
works alongside the FBI to catch the killer of an
Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent who was
murdered during a poker game at the Secretary of the
Navy’s house (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: The Killing Game
(12, TVM, 2011) A sculptor whose daughter was
murdered receives phone calls from the killer, and tries to
identify him before he strikes again. Mystery based on
Iris Johansen’s novel, with Laura Prepon and Ty Olsson
5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Sonya upsets Toadie
by revealing she does not want any more children (r) (AD)
6.00 Home and Away. Coco tries to deal with her
situation at home (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine,
featuring chat and stories of interest
6.30 Today at the Games Clare Balding
and Gabby Logan introduce highlights
of day eight of the Commonwealth
Games in Queensland. More athletics
finals were scheduled at the Carrara
Stadium. Plus, the men’s and women’s
beach volleyball finals took place
at Coolangatta Beachfront
7.00 Emmerdale Ross will not back down,
and Chas is at breaking point (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Finals The chefs
Ashley Palmer-Watts and Jonny Glass,
of Heston Blumenthal’s London
restaurant Dinner, show the hopefuls
how to create one of the meticulous
dishes on their menu (AD)
8.00 Living with the Brainy Bunch Two
struggling 15-year-old students from
Chessington Community College in
Greater London move in with two of
the highest achievers in their year to
see whether the change in environment
and parental influence improves their
results. See Viewing Guide (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Rhona fears for her life,
Megan makes a confrontation, and
Paddy tries to put things right (AD)
9.00 Not Going Out The school lollipop
man gets on the wrong side of Lee and
Lucy by handing out sweets (6/7)
9.00 Civilisations Simon Schama looks
at the links between colour and
spirituality, exploring the French
cathedrals of Amiens and Chartres,
Japanese woodblocks and
Matisse’s great chapel at Vence.
See Viewing Guide (7/9) (AD)
9.00 The Investigator: A British Crime
Story The journalist and former
detective Mark Williams-Thomas’s
trail brings him to three women who
were killed in similar circumstances
within four months of each other
in Glasgow in 1977 — and a
new prime suspect (2/3) (AD)
9PM
8PM
7.30 EastEnders Kat tells Hayley to leave
Walford for good, Vincent assures
Kim he has a plan and Whitney is torn
over what to do about Woody (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
9.30 Still Game Isa is excited when an
old flame returns to Craiglang,
and Methadone Mick enrols in a
mysterious online course (6/6) (AD)
8.30 The Cruise: Sailing the Caribbean
Marcella makes the final preparations
for a wedding ceremony (2/3) (AD)
10.00 MOTD: The Premier League Show
Magazine programme featuring
news and highlights
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Kirsty Wark
10.30 Regional News
11.45-6.00am Live Commonwealth
Games 2018 JJ Chalmers introduces
coverage as the heptathlon continues
with the long jump and javelin
disciplines. There is also action from
the women’s pairs lawn bowls medal
matches, while Tom Daley is aiming
to regain the Commonwealth
synchronised 10m diving title
11.15 Secret Agent Selection: WW2
People undergo the training
programme of the Special Operations
Executive. In the opening edition, the
students face the SOE’s demanding
selection process, an intense
four-day course (1/5) (r) (AD)
12.15am Sign Zone: Reggie Yates — Searching for
Grenfell’s Lost Lives The presenter meets families and
friends of people who died in the Grenfell fire (r) (AD, SL)
1.15 MasterChef. The first group of contestants head to
the Eneko restaurant (r) (AD, SL) 2.15 Amazing Hotels:
Life Beyond the Lobby (r) (AD, SL) 3.20-6.00 BBC News
7.00 Steve Backshall’s Hedgehog
Rescue Steve Backshall visits a
hedgehog rescue centre in Surrey
founded by Brian May. He meets the
dedicated staff and discovering the
stories behind some of the animals
being treated, and helps to release a
successfully treated hedgehog (r)
8.00 Location, Location, Location Kirstie
Allsopp catches up with two couples
who originally wanted homes near the
coast, leading her and Phil Spencer to
search Devon and Norfolk
8.00 Springtime on the Farm A report
from the lamb hospital at Barnsley’s
Cannon Hall Farm, a host of newborn
chicks get a check-up and JB Gill
looks at the rise in alpaca farming.
Presented by Peter Wright, Julian
Norton and Adam Henson (4/5)
9.00 Indian Summer School Ethan ruffles
a few feathers with a controversial
article in the school newspaper on
being the first “out” gay boy at Doon,
Jack goes on a trek into the Himalayas
— a trip designed to build his
confidence and all the boys
retake their GCSEs (3/3) (AD)
9.00 Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away!
Tempers start to fray as Stewart and
Elmor set out to evict a tenant from a
property in Manchester and a car
salesman is not happy about paying a
dissatisfied customer, and a pub
licensee claims she is unable to pay the
rent she owes to her ex-landlord
7.30 OAP Bootcamp: Tonight Ideas to
improve health for the over-65s, for
whom loneliness and lack of exercise
are the big causes of poor health
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.45 Question Time David Dimbleby chairs
the debate from Liverpool, with a panel
of politicians and other guests facing
topical questions from the audience
7.00 Channel 4 News
10.00 24 Hours in Police Custody The
return of the programme that follows
the work of Bedfordshire Police
around-the-clock, beginning with a
major investigation into an allegation
of police corruption (1/6) (r)
10.00 Undercover: Nailing the
Fraudsters Paul Connolly investigates
the world of the online romance
fraudster. He creates his own profiles
to turn the tables on scammers and
tells the story of one lonely heart who
was conned out of £1.7 million by a
man she thought loved her (3/6)
11.45 Play to the Whistle With panellists
Michail Antonio, Judy Murray
and Joel Dommett (5/6) (r)
11.05 First Dates Recruitment consultant
Lee, who’s 32, sits down for a date
with 32-year-old Abbi, hoping that she
may be the perfect partner that he can
settle down with. Meanwhile, politics
graduate Cameron bonds with fellow
politics lover Joe over matters of the
state and the heart (r) (AD)
11.05 The Murderer Next Door:
Countdown to Murder The events
leading up to the killing of Joanna
Yeates by Vincent Tabak in
December 2010. Featuring dramatic
reconstructions and interviews
with Joanna’s parents (1/8) (r)
12.40am Lethal Weapon Riggs and Murtaugh are
thrown into the world of counterfeit money (r) (AD)
1.25 Jackpot247 3.00 OAP Bootcamp: Tonight. Ideas to
improve the over-65s’ health (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen.
Text-based information service 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy
Kyle Show. Guests air their differences (r) (SL)
12.05am 999: On the Frontline Paramedics treat a
71-year-old for a broken ankle (r) 1.00 Class of Mum and
Dad (r) (AD) 1.55 The Supervet (r) (AD) 2.50 George
Clarke’s Old House, New Home (r) (AD) 3.45 Building
the Dream (r) (AD) 4.40 The Question Jury (r)
5.35-6.00 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star (r)
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
A young boy with an unusually high temperature causes
concern for the doctors (r) 4.00 My Mum’s Hotter Than
Me! Documentary (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor. Visiting a
Hove bungalow with a lurid colour scheme (r) (SL) 5.10
Divine Designs (r) (SL) 5.35 -6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
10.45 Uefa Europa League Highlights
Action from the quarter-final
second-leg matches, which were CSKA
Moscow v Arsenal, Sporting Lisbon v
Atlético Madrid, FC Red Bull Salzburg v
Lazio, and Marseille v RB Leipzig
the times | Thursday April 12 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
War Above
the Trenches
Yesterday, 8pm
When you think of the
First World War, your
first thought is of the
bloody and futile war of
attrition in the trenches
and battlefields.
However, there is
another story to be
told, of a war fought in
the skies, as recounted
in this fascinating,
detailed two-part
documentary presented
by Professor Saul
David. Based on Peter
Hart’s book Bloody
April, this is the story
of the bitter struggle
for aerial supremacy
fought by the Royal
Flying Corps, brought
to life by dramatic
reconstructions,
archive footage and
the diaries of those
involved.
Civilisations
BBC Two, 9pm
Simon Schama is
looking at colour and its
importance in religion,
using the stained glass
windows of the gothic
cathedrals in Amiens
and Chartres. “All this
stained glass were
meant to be immense
expanses of jewel-like
radiance,” he explains,
“so that when you were
in here, you got a
glimpse of paradise.”
Using colour as a
symbol of the divine
wasn’t exclusive to the
Christian church and
Schama touches on
how other civilisations
used it. But he reserves
his most purple prose
for Giambattista
Tiepolo’s ceiling fresco
in Würzburg, and
Henri Matisse’s
chapel at Vence.
Urban Myths
Sky Arts, 9pm
The second run of
comedies that take
their plot from a
possibly apocryphal
anecdote begins with
Marilyn Monroe and
Billy Wilder on the set
of Some Like It Hot.
The myth is that
Monroe needed almost
50 takes to get the line
“It’s me, sugar” correct.
Gemma Arterton is
Monroe, and as this
is a comedy it’s more
of a caricature than
Michelle Williams’s
nuanced take in
the 2011 film
My Week with Marilyn.
James Purefoy is
Wilder, the director,
while her co-stars Tony
Curtis (Alex Pettyfer)
and Jack Lemmon
(Adam Brody) take bets
on when she will nail it.
Sport Choice
Sky Sports Golf, 3pm
The RBC Heritage
gets under way today
at Hilton Head, South
Carolina. Luke
Donald’s run of
near misses continued
last year when he
finished runner-up
for the fifth time.
Donald was beaten
by Wesley Bryan,
the American rookie.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Supergirl (r) 8.00 Futurama (r) 8.30
Modern Family (r) 9.30 The Simpsons (r) 11.00
Warehouse 13 (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons. Double bill (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry unleashes a monster (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. Nyssa al Ghul returns to warn Thea
she is the next target of a renegade group of
League of Assassin members
9.00 SEAL Team. The bodyguard of the team’s
target recognises Jason
10.00 In the Long Run. Walter and Agnes
step in to save their god-daughter
Cynthia’s engagement party
10.30 Football’s Funniest Moments (r)
11.00 The Force: North East. The cells fill up
during a busy Saturday night in Newcastle (r)
12.00 Air Ambulance ER (r) 1.00am Brit Cops:
War on Crime (r) 2.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
4.00 The Real A&E 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 The British (r) (AD)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House.
A relationship is reignited for Wilson (r) (AD)
6.00 House. Medical drama (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
A photographer is murdered (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Frank Reagan deals with the
fallout of an accidental shooting (r) (AD)
9.00 Billions. Chuck faces a dilemma when he is
given a perverse directive (3/12)
10.10 Silicon Valley. Richard tries to
micromanage the new team members’ quarrels
10.45 Our Cartoon President
11.20 Our Cartoon President
11.55 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver.
A satirical look at news and pop culture (r)
12.40am Divorce (r) 1.15 The Sopranos.
Double bill (r) 3.15 Blue Bloods (r) (AD)
4.15 The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00am Motorway Patrol (r) (AD)
7.00 Highway Patrol (r) (AD) 7.30 Border Patrol
(r) (AD) 8.00 UK Border Force (r) 9.00
Elementary (r) (AD) 10.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Cold Case (r) 12.00 The Real A&E (r)
1.00pm Air Rescue (r) 2.00 To Catch a
Smuggler: JFK Airport (r) (AD) 3.00 Nothing to
Declare (r) (AD) 5.00 Border Security: Canada’s
Front Line. Double bill (r) (AD)
6.00 Air Rescue (r) (AD)
6.30 Air Rescue (r)
7.00 The Real A&E
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Madam Secretary
10.00 Scandal. Cyrus revels in being
America’s newest hero
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Britain’s Most Evil Killers (r) 2.00
Nashville (r) (AD) 3.00 Criminal Minds (r) 4.00
Nothing to Declare (r) (AD) 5.00 Border
Security: Canada’s Front Line (r) (AD)
7.00am A Tribute to James Horner: Hollywood
in Vienna 9.00 Watercolour Challenge 9.30
Landscape Artist of the Year 2015 10.30 Tales
of the Unexpected (AD) 11.00 Trailblazers: Punk
12.00 The Sixties (AD) 1.00pm Discovering:
Terence Stamp (AD) 2.00 Watercolour Challenge
2.30 Landscape Artist of the Year 2015 3.30
Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 4.00 Trailblazers:
Nuclear Protest 5.00 The Sixties (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Max von Sydow (AD)
7.00 The Nineties. Documentary
8.00 Discovering: Marilyn Monroe (AD)
9.00 Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and
Billy Wilder. Comedy. See Viewing Guide
9.30 FILM: Some Like It Hot (U, 1959)
Romantic comedy with Jack Lemmon (b/w)
11.45 Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and
Billy Wilder. Comedy anthology
12.15am Billy Wilder: Nobody’s Perfect (AD)
1.15 We Remember Marilyn 3.15 National
Treasures: The Art of Collecting 4.15 South
Bank Masterclasses: Tracey Emin
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 11.00 Live
European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana
1.00pm Live PGA Tour Golf: The RBC Heritage.
Coverage of the opening day at Harbour Town
Golf Links in Hilton Head, South Carolina, one of
five tournaments given invitational status by
the PGA Tour 3.00 Live Indian Premier League:
Sunrisers Hyderabad v Mumbai Indians.
Coverage of the match taking place at the Rajiv
Gandhi International Cricket Stadium, Hyderabad
7.30 Live EFL: Bradford City v Shrewsbury Town
(Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of the League One
encounter at the Northern Commercials Stadium
10.00 The Debate. The latest news
11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00 Sky Sports News 2.00am F1 Report 2.30
Paddock Uncut. News and action from China
2.45 Live Formula 1: The Chinese Grand Prix.
Coverage of the first practice session at the
Shanghai International Circuit 4.45 Williams
FW11 5.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 9.30pm-10.00
Rhod Gilbert’s Work Experience. Rhod is thrown
in at the deep ends as he joins the rigorous
Royal Navy training scheme — which isn’t good
news for a man who struggles with
seasickness. He is also given a chance to take
the helm of one of Her Majesty’s warships —
only to take this crash-course in marine
navigation all too literally. Last in the series
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 Still
Game. Isa is excited when an old flame returns
to Craiglang, and before long romance is
blossoming. But she cannot help feeling guilty
about her husband, even though he died years
ago, so she seeks advice on what to do for the
best. Meanwhile, Boabby starts learning to
drive, scaring the life out of anyone who tries
to teach him. Last in the series (AD) 11.15
MOTD: The Premier League Show. Magazine
show 11.45-12.15 Sign Zone: See Hear (r)
STV
As ITV except: 2.00pm-5.00 Live Racing on
STV: Grand National Festival. Coverage of five
races from Aintree 10.30 Scotland Tonight
11.05 Uefa Europa League Highlights. Action
from the quarter-final second-leg matches,
which were CSKA Moscow v Arsenal, Sporting
Lisbon v Atletico Madrid, FC Red Bull Salzburg v
Lazio, and Marseille v RB Leipzig 12.05am
Lethal Weapon (r) (AD) 1.00 Teleshopping
2.00-3.00 After Midnight 3.25 ITV
Nightscreen 4.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
Subscribe today
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UTV
As ITV except: 1.25am Teleshopping
2.55-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days; Weather
7.30 The Sky at Night. Chris Lintott and Maggie
Aderin-Pocock reveal results from NASA’s
Curiosity and ESA’s ExoMars TGO missions
8.00 Commonwealth Games Extra. Extended
highlights from day eight of the Games in
Queensland, with athletics finals taking place at
the Carrara Stadium, along with beach volleyball
at Coolangatta Beachfront
9.00 Putin, Russia & the West. Former Ukraine
president Leonid Kuchma tells the inside story
of his country’s 2004 elections, and Kremlin
officials explain how they clamped down on
Putin’s critics in Russia 2 4 r AD
10.00 Law and Order. Drama series from 1978
telling the story of an investigation from four
different perspectives. The first installment
gives a detective’s view of the crime. Derek
Martin stars. See Viewing Guide (1/4) (r)
11.20 Totally British: 70s Rock ‘n’ Roll. Archive
performances from shows including The Old Grey
Whistle Test and Top of the Pops (2/2) (r)
12.20am Danny Baker’s Great Album
Showdown (r) 1.20 Putin, Russia & the West (r)
(AD) 2.20-3.20 The Brontes at the BBC (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Rules of
Engagement (r) 8.00 How I Met Your Mother (r)
(AD) 9.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 10.00 2 Broke Girls
(r) (AD) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big
Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 3.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 5.00 The
Goldbergs. Double bill (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Extreme Cake Makers (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
8.30 Young Sheldon (AD)
9.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine. Terry, Jake and Rosa
go undercover at a fantasy convention (AD)
9.30 Derry Girls (r) (AD)
10.00 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD)
10.30 The Windsors (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am First Dates (r) (AD) 1.10 Tattoo
Fixers (r) (SL) 2.15 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD,
SL) 2.45 The Windsors (r) (AD) 3.10 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 3.35 Rude Tube (r) 4.25 The
Goldbergs (r) 4.50 Rules of Engagement (r)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.30 A Place
in the Sun: Summer Sun (r) 11.35 Four in a Bed
(r) 2.10pm Come Dine with Me (r) 4.50 A Place
in the Sun: Summer Sun (r) 5.55 Kirstie and
Phil’s Love It or List It (r) (AD)
6.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo. Mr Parsons the
chameleon meets a new mate (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. A couple who have bought
a disused solarium to convert into a penthouse,
only to face serious difficulties trying to build on
top of another structure (4/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 The Good Fight. Adrian and Diane represent
a television network planning to air a segment
that could derail a movie star’s career. Maia and
Lucca spend time with the Chicago police (AD)
10.15 The Undateables. A trainee accountant
with a stammer faces his fear of talking to
women so he can find a partner (2/4) (r) (AD)
11.15 24 Hours in A&E. A woman undergoes
an emergency procedure to unblock an
artery suffering a heart attack, and a man
is rushed in following a seizure (r) (AD)
12.20am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.20 The Good Fight (r) (AD) 2.30 24 Hours in
A&E (r) (AD) 3.30-3.55 Food Unwrapped (r)
11.00am The Rugrats in Paris: The Movie
(U, 2000) Animated adventure with the voice
of Christine Cavanaugh 12.35pm Spirited
Away (PG, 2001) Animated fantasy with the
voice of Daveigh Chase 3.00 Ice Age:
Continental Drift (U, 2012) Animated
comedy sequel with the voice of Ray Romano
4.45 Short Circuit 2 (PG, 1988) Sci-fi
comedy sequel with Fisher Stevens (AD)
6.55 X-Men (12, 2000) Sci-fi comic-book
adventure starring Hugh Jackman (AD)
9.00 A Bigger Splash (15, 2015) A rock star
recovering from surgery finds her peaceful
Mediterranean retreat disrupted by the arrival of
a former lover. Drama with Tilda Swinton (AD)
11.30 As Above, So Below (15, 2014)
Archaeologists fall victim to strange forces
preying on their dark secrets while exploring a
network of underground tunnels. Horror
starring Perdita Weeks and Ben Feldman
1.20am-3.45 The Kingdom of Dreams and
Madness (PG, 2013) Documentary about the
work of staff at Studio Ghibli in the run-up to
the releases of The Wind Rises and The Tale of
the Princess Kaguya. In Japanese
6.00am The Planet’s Funniest Animals (r) 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Who’s Doing the Dishes? (r) 7.55 Emmerdale (r)
(AD) 8.20 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.25 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20 The Bachelor
(r) 12.15pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.45
Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
4.50 Judge Rinder (r) 5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold. Harry Hill
narrates camcorder calamities (r)
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold. Comical clips,
narrated by Harry Hill (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 Celebrity Juice. With guests Richard
Blackwood and Gary Lucy
10.50 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.15 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.40 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.10am American Dad! Stan and Hayley visit a
gun theme park (r) (AD) 12.35 Plebs (r) (AD)
1.35 Two and a Half Men (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) 7.55 The Royal (r) (AD) 9.00
Judge Judy (r) 10.20 Inspector Morse (r) (AD)
12.30pm The Royal (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat (r)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.45 On the
Buses (r) 4.50 You’re Only Young Twice (r) 5.25
Rising Damp (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A funeral plunges
Jessica into the middle of a mystery that has
remained unsolved for 20 years (r) (AD)
8.00 Vera. The detective’s former colleague,
Sergeant Stuart Macken, is left badly burned
when his house is petrol-bombed, while his
teenage daughter fights for her life in intensive
care. As Vera tries to discover why anyone would
attempt to kill Stuart, her investigation leads to
revelations about his personal life, and she has
to face memories of her own (1/4) (r) (AD)
10.00 My Boy Jack. Daniel Radcliffe stars as
Jack, the ill-fated son of the poet Rudyard
Kipling who fought and died in the trenches of
the First World War (r) (AD)
12.05am A Touch of Frost (r) 2.00 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 7.35 Pawn Stars (r) 8.25
Ironside (r) 9.30 ITV Racing: The Opening Show
10.30 Barcelona’s European Glory (r) 10.45 The
Saint (r) 11.45 The Avengers (r) 12.50pm
Ironside (r) 1.55 Quincy ME (r) 2.55 Minder (r)
(AD) 4.00 The Saint (r) 5.05 The Avengers (r)
6.10 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
6.35 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 The Big Fish Off
9.00 FILM: The Man with the Golden Gun
(PG, 1974) James Bond investigates the death
of a world-renowned scientist and is drawn into
a battle of wits with a wily assassin. Spy
adventure starring Roger Moore (AD)
11.30 FILM: Universal Soldier —
Regeneration (18, 2009) A reanimated
super-soldier is revived once more to face an old
enemy and a deadly new one. Sci-fi thriller
sequel starring Jean-Claude Van Damme
and Dolph Lundgren (AD)
1.30am Minder (r) (AD, SL) 2.30 The
Protectors (r) (SL) 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors 4.00 Steve
Austin’s Broken Skull Challenge 5.00 Top Gear.
The trio create a street circuit in Spain (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. The presenters build a car that
can be turned into a hovercraft (AD)
7.00 QI XL. An extended edition, in which
Stephen Fry probes the subject of Messing with
Your Mind, with Sarah Millican, Tommy Tiernan,
Josh Widdicombe and Alan Davies
8.00 Dara O Briain’s Go 8 Bit.
With Katherine Ryan and Phil Wang
9.00 QI XL. With Ronni Ancona,
Dave Gorman and Lee Mack
10.00 Not Going Out. Lucy is forced to look
after her god-daughter
10.40 Not Going Out. The gang spends a
weekend on Frank’s new boat
11.20 Mock the Week. With Josh Widdicombe,
Milton Jones, Ed Byrne and Chris Ramsey
12.00 QI 1.20am Mock the Week 2.00 QI 3.15
Parks and Recreation 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
Bill 12.00 Lovejoy 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine 1.40 Hi-de-Hi! 2.20 Last of the Summer
Wine 3.00 London’s Burning (AD) 4.00 You
Rang, M’Lord? 5.00 Lovejoy
6.00 Hi-de-Hi! Jeffrey arranges an interview for
Peggy, whose ambition is to be a Yellowcoat
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Smiler takes up
dancing to impress a woman
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine
8.00 Death in Paradise. Richard Poole meets a
sticky end at a university reunion, so another
British inspector is flown out to investigate.
Crime drama with Ben Miller (1/8) (AD)
9.00 The Doctor Blake Mysteries. A member of
staff is found dead at the hospital (2/10)
10.00 New Tricks. The detectives reinvestigate
a 30-year-old heist, but their future is
threatened by allegations that a high-ranking
officer was involved in the crime (10/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London’s Burning 2.00
The Pinkertons (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Who Do You Think
You Are? (AD) 11.00 The World’s Weirdest
Weapons (AD) 12.00 Time Team 1.00pm Wild
Caribbean 2.00 Life in Cold Blood 3.00 Coast
(AD) 4.00 Private Lives of the Monarchs (AD)
5.00 The World’s Weirdest Weapons (AD)
6.00 Churchill’s Bodyguard. The FBI warn that
Winston Churchill could be in grave danger
7.00 Hunting Down the Nazis. Documentary
about Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal (1/2) (AD)
8.00 War Above the Trenches. Documentary
about the Royal Flying Corps, recreating the
aerial struggle of the First World War.
See Viewing Guide (1/2) (AD)
9.00 The Two Ronnies. Elaine Paige guest stars
10.00 The Two Ronnies. Vintage comedy
10.40 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
Bob is reunited with Terry in London
11.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
12.00 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
12.40am Auschwitz: The Nazis and the Final
Solution 1.40 Black Ops 2.30 Sounds of the
Seventies 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Bruno (r) 5.22
Igam Ogam (r) 5.30 Flapair is a Charaidean
(Flapper and Friends) (r) 5.40 Su Shiusaidh
(Little Suzy’s Zoo) (r) 5.45 Na Floogals (r)
5.55 Botannan Araid Uilleim (William’s Wish
Wellingtons) (r) 6.00 Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.15 Tree
Fu Tom (r) 6.35 Am Prionnsa Beag (The Little
Prince) (r) 7.00 Bailtean Alba (Scotland’s
Towns) (r) 7.25 Horo Gheallaidh Shorts (Celtic
Music Shorts) (r) 7.30 Speaking Our Language
(r) 8.00 An Là (News) 8.30 Brigh a’ Chiuil
(Return to the Voice) (r) 9.00 All That Lies
Behind Me (Sgeulachd Donald Merrett) (r)
10.00 Belladrum 2017: Torridon 10.30
Luingean Lannsaireachd (Surgery Ships)
11.15 Ceòl bho Perthshire Amber (r)
11.30-12.00midnight Seòid a’ Chidsin:
The Kitchen Coves (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Dona Direidi (r) 6.15 Tili a’i
Ffrindiau (r) 6.25 Halibalw (r) 6.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 6.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 7.00 Meic y
Marchog (r) 7.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 7.30
Mwnci’n Dweud Mwnci’n Gwneud (r) 7.40
Peppa (r) 7.45 Cacamwnci 8.00 Holi Hana (r)
8.10 Amser Stori 8.15 Boj (r) 8.30 Abadas (r)
8.40 Bla Bla Blewog (r) 8.55 Ben a Mali a’u
Byd Bach O Hud (r) 9.05 Sbridiri (r) 9.25
Meripwsan (r) 9.30 Straeon Ty Pen (r) 9.45 Cei
Bach (r) 10.00 Dona Direidi (r) 10.15 Tili a’i
Ffrindiau (r) 10.25 Halibalw (r) 10.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 10.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 11.00 Meic
y Marchog (r) 11.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 11.30
Mwnci’n Dweud Mwnci’n Gwneud (r) 11.40
Peppa (r) 11.45 Cacamwnci (r) 12.00 News
S4C a’r Tywydd 12.05pm Straeon y Ffin (r)
12.30 Ffit Cymru (r) 1.30 Sion a Siân (r) 2.00
News S4C a’r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00
News S4C a’r Tywydd 3.05 O Gymru Fach (r)
(AD) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Larfa (r)
5.05 Stwnsh: Hendre Hurt (r) 5.15 Stwnsh:
Tref a Tryst 5.45 Stwnsh: Edi Wyn (r) 6.00
News S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05 Ar Werth (r) 6.30
Rownd a Rownd (AD) 7.00 Heno 7.30 Pobol y
Cwm. After doing some research online, Jim
realises that Eileen’s symptoms are likely to
last a long time. The gnomes return from their
trip (AD) 8.00 Gwaith/Cartref. Kayleigh and
Bleddyn are up to their necks in trouble. Last in
the series (AD) 9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30
Cwymp yr Ymerodraethau. Hywel Williams
charts the Decline and Fall of the Roman
Empire 10.30 Hansh. Tunes, comedy and fresh
faces 11.00-11.35 Mwy o Sgorio (r)
14
Thursday April 12 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
1
2
3
4
6
Codeword No 3308
5
15
7
8
23
26
26
20
10
2
9
26
17
Train Tracks No 380
23
8
6
17
16
14
20
3
22
8
10
3
8
22
22
14
17
17
20
1
25
11
17
14
21
17
© PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7624
4
17
1
4
1
3
2
4
5
6
3
10
2
M
10
8
14
25
1
6
B
3
11
25
3
14
1
11
11
17
14
3
A
12
22
13
19
14
10
1
12
17
25
17
3
6
26
14
17
2
5
15
9
5
22
1
17
22
25
2
1
7
10
21
26
A
23
4
16
17
18
19
20
24
5
5
21
1
18
14
1
3
14
3
5
17
17
25
18
21
14
1
13
13
21
17
25
B
22
17
21
Across
6
7
9
10
11
Former student (7)
Shun (5)
Long-barrelled weapon (5)
Firmly instil (7)
Particle's lowest energy
condition (6,5)
14 Offices with many
phones (4,7)
Solution to Crossword 7623
COA X
A
L
F
NU L L I F
O O E
P OWE R
Y A C
BRE A
S
L
T RE A SO
O
E
WA T E R
E A U
DYNAM I
18
20
P
S
Y
C
H
O
K
I
N
E
T
I
C
O L AR I S
O
I
E
CA B L E
U
S
OS ANNA
O W
F A S T
N A W
T A B L E
H
I
A
RE L L I S
M
I
E
RA I L
17
19
21
22
Leftover (7)
City of Florida (5)
Dance club (5)
Stone pillar (7)
20
1
22
22
21
17
16
26
5
26
22
21
22
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
7
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
14
15
4
5
6
7
8
17
18
19
20
21
M A
Down
1 Polish; expert (4)
2 Not courageous (8)
3 Allocate (a task) (6)
4 Criminal group (4)
5 At the present time (8)
6 Haughty affectation (4)
8 Eg, waltzes, tangos, etc (6)
11 Proverbially rare stuff (4,4)
12 Grass cutter (8)
13 Harmony; treaty (6)
15 People of a country (6)
16 Ill (4)
18 God of love (4)
20 Keenly enthusiastic (4)
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
16
11
12
13
22
23
24
25
26
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or
text TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network
access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution
call 0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica No 4217
W
C
O
R
E
T
S
H
R
I
U
A
D
R
I
E
E
G
I
O
M
A
C
E
L
T
E
L
A
A
D
Winners will receive a Collins English Dictionary & Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle and text in the numbers in the three
shaded boxes. Text TIMES followed by a space, then your
three numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your name, address
and postcode to 84901 (UK only), by midnight. Or enter
by phone. Call 09012 925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three answer numbers (in any
order) and your contact details.
No 4218
R
I
See today’s News section
10
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday’s solution, right
Solve our new word puzzle
If you enjoy the times2 Crossword, you’ll
love Quintagram, our new and exclusive
clue-solving challenge
9
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What are your favourite
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Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
D
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce
a completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4300
Futoshiki No 3149
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
∧
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
17
>
16
∧
∨
5
Kakuro No 2108
>
∧
∨
17
30
16
12
16
30
4
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
11
17
16
6
29
4
4
4
26
16
22
∨
10
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
29
38
19
3
4
8
23
21
3
4
9
30
<
29
4
10
29
21
13
16
8
9
28
17
24
14
16
12
23
16
© PUZZLER MEDIA
17
the times | Thursday April 12 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
Fabiano Caruana has performed
well in London. In December last
year he won the London Chess
Classic, ahead of Magnus Carlsen,
although their individual clash
ended as a draw. Caruana hopes
that in the championship bout in
London this November, the city
that has smiled on his efforts
before will do so again. He will be
attempting to become the first
American world champion since
Bobby Fischer.
One result by Caruana stands
out as being very much in the
Fischer mould, this being his
amazing score at St Louis 2014
where he also defeated Carlsen.
White: Magnus Carlsen
Black: Fabiano Caruana
Sinquefield Cup, St Louis 2014
________
árDbD $ 4]
à0pg D 0k]
ß DpD DN0]
ÞD h D 1 ]
Ý D DPD D]
ÜD ) D )P]
ÛP) H DPD]
Ú$ DQD I ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
19 Nxh8
19 Rxh8+ Kxg6 20 Nf3 Qe3+ 21
Kh1 Nxe4 gives an overwhelming
attack. 22 Qc2, pinning the knight,
runs into the spectacular 22 ... Qe2!!
23 Qxe2 Nxg3+ 24 Kg1 Nxe2+ and
Black is winning.
19 ... Bg4
A dramatic disclosure against
White’s intrepid rook on f8. 19 ...
Qe3+ first is also strong.
20 Qf1 Nd3
Another way to play the attack
is 20 ... Rxf8 21 Qxf8 Bxh3, when
22 gxh3 is met by 22 ... Qxd2 (22 ...
Qxg3+ 23 Kf1 Qd3+ 24 Ke1 Qe3+
25 Kf1 leads to a draw) with good
chances.
21 Qxd3 Rxf8 22 hxg4 Qxg4 23
Nf3
Better is 23 Nb3 but, in spite of
his extra material, White’s position is so riddled with weaknesses
that Black has the advantage.
23 ... Qxg3 24 e5+ Kxh8 25 e6
Carlsen wants to distract Caruana with his passed e-pawn but
this is a forlorn hope.,
25 ... Bb6+ 26 Kh1 Qg4 27 Qd6
Rd8 28 Qe5 Rd5 29 Qb8+ Kh7
30 e7 Qh5+ 31 Nh2
This loses. 31 Qh2 was forced
but then 31 ... Qe8 rounds up the
e-pawn and leaves Black winning.
31 ... Rd1+ 32 Rxd1 Qxd1+ 33 Nf1
Qxf1+ 34 Kh2 Qg1+ White resigns
1/
2
1/
4
EASY
39 x 2 – 4
MEDIUM
96 + 87 x 3 – 89 x 2 – 98
HARDER
161 x 7 + 946 x 3 – 971
OF IT
+ 11
OF IT
25%
OF IT
–8
x3
+4
x2
50%
OF IT
– 77
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 68
+ 866
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 731
50%
OF IT
2
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Becoming Bobby
Cell Blocks No 3191
Brain Trainer
2
Polygon
3
5 3
4
3
4
6 2
2
2
3
4
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
4
Set Square No 2111
© PUZZLER MEDIA
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 13 words, average;
18, good; 24, very good; 30, excellent
+
+
+
+
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
= 50 We’ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
= 6 calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
8
+
÷
-
Yesterday’s answers
aloe, also, jealous, jealousy, joual,
joule, lase, lose, louse, lousy, lues, lyse,
ousel, sale, seal, slay, sley, sloe, slue,
sola, sole, soul
= 11 the numbers
+
x
+
Enter each of
2
÷
=
20
=
2
=
10
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Sinquefield Cup, St Louis 2014, Final Crosstable
1
2
3
4
5
6
Caruana
Carlsen
Topalov
Aronian
Vachier-Lagrave
Nakamura
1
**
0½
00
0½
00
0½
2
1½
**
½½
0½
½½
½0
3
11
½½
**
1½
0½
00
4
1½
1½
0½
**
1½
½½
5
11
½½
1½
0½
**
½½
6
1½
½1
11
½½
½½
**
Killer Gentle No 5955
8½
5½
5
4
4
3
________
á D Dkg 4] Winning Move
àDRD DpDp]
ßpD 0 0 D] Black to play. This position is from
Grenke 2018.
Þ1 D 0 DQ] Pajeken-Bellahcene,
The white king is terribly exposed but for
Ý D hPD D] the moment Black must deal with the
ÜD D I D ] threat of Qxf7+. How did he do this while
Û D D )P)] maintaining his own attack?
ÚD D DBDR] For up-to-the-minute information follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
17
13
8
7
14
13
15
7
E
M
O
T
E
4
S
C
A
M
P
I
23
13
3
13
Solutions
Quick Cryptic 1067
6
17
9
7
8
16
14
21
21
20
3
8
8
20
11
8
23
14
5
9
1
5
2
4
6
8
9
3
7
E POS T E RO
E
T
X
D
OA TME
I A
N
N
R
AGE
S UR E
T
T
X
E S T H E T I C
E
E
I
CH A P T
CH
E
R
R
A
EME N T O OR B
U
N W O
L
N D I A N S UMME
9
6
7
2
1
3
4
8
5
4
3
8
9
7
5
1
2
6
8
7
4
6
3
1
2
5
9
5
9
1
8
2
7
3
6
4
U S
A
A L
U
N T
E
F
U
C
H
S
I
A
G
E R
A
I T
E
R
L
O
G
I
C
2
8
5
1
9
6
7
4
3
6
1
3
7
8
4
5
9
2
7
4
9
3
5
2
6
1
8
7
x
32min
20
7
23
14
x
1
+
9
27
11
10
18
19
21
20
18
10
23
9
14
18
+
x
2
+
6
1
2
8
9
6
4
3
7
5
6
7
9
5
8
3
1
2
4
4
3
5
1
7
2
9
8
6
9
5
2
4
3
7
6
1
8
8
4
6
2
1
9
7
5
3
3
1
7
8
5
6
4
9
2
2
9
1
3
4
8
5
6
7
7
8
4
6
9
5
2
3
1
5
6
3
7
2
1
8
4
9
8
3
9
2
7
4
6
5
1
1
6
2
5
9
3
4
8
7
4
7
5
1
8
6
9
2
3
2
8
6
7
1
5
3
4
9
3
9
1
6
4
8
5
7
2
7
5
4
3
2
9
8
1
6
5
4
7
9
3
1
2
6
8
6
2
3
8
5
7
1
9
4
9
1
8
4
6
2
7
3
5
23
9
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
4
1
8
9
7
2
5
3
6
3
7
9
5
4
6
1
8
2
2
5
6
8
3
1
4
9
7
7
8
3
1
9
5
2
6
4
9
2
4
7
6
8
3
5
1
5
6
1
3
2
4
9
7
8
1
9
7
4
8
3
6
2
5
8
4
2
6
5
9
7
1
3
6
3
5
2
1
7
8
4
9
3
6
4
7
2
9
5
1
8
2
5
9
1
6
8
7
3
4
7
9
8
5
3
2
1
4
6
6
3
2
4
9
1
8
5
7
4
1
5
8
7
6
3
2
9
8
7
3
2
4
5
9
6
1
5
2
6
9
1
7
4
8
3
9
4
1
6
8
3
2
7
5
OR
U
I N
N
L Y
5 9
9 7 8
8 9
6 8 9
6 7
1 3
2 4 6
9
5 4 8
1 3
E R
I
I N
G
L L
E
E T
+
2 1
2 4 3
3
1 4 2
3 1
9 7
8 6 2
2 1
2 1 4
3 5
Train Tracks 379
1
Quintagram
1 Hat
2 Flax
3 Zodiac
4 Steel band
5 Alan Turing
3
3
3
5
3
3
5
4
4
4
2
5
2
-
9
2 4
1 9 7
7 5 8 9
5
3 5
5 6 8
8 9 7
3 1
1
2 4 1 3
1 2 3
4 8
A
4
4
1
J
O
Y
T
S
I
T
U
N
C
5
∨
4
∨
2
A
M
R
A
H
M
I
B
T
5 > 3 > 2 < 4
∧
4
5
1
2
∧
2
4 > 3
1
∧
1
2
5
3
∨
∧
3
1
4
5
KenKen 4299
T
G
O
Y
U
L
C
U
O
N
T
2
2
4
T
O
P
E
2
6
8
4 2
I
U
Futoshiki 3148
1
∧
3
J
O
O
S
Cell Blocks 3190
Lexica 4216
P
2
6
4
2
3 2
Suko 2209
Word watch
Brain Trainer
Backend (a) The
season of autumn
Bacca (b) A
simple, fleshy
fruit such as the
grape or cranberry
Baculum (c) A
bony support in
the penis of
certain mammals
Easy 32
Medium 569
Harder 1,999
Chess
Killer 5954
1
8
7
3
5
4
6
9
2
Y MA J
A
E
U
P UMP K
P
O
E
E D
AB
D
C O
HOA X
B
N
A L F S K
N
E
I
D
T RO
I
T
S
T R I NK
B
Killer 5953
27
3
+
5
+
F
Sudoku 9793
7
+
Lexica 4215
Killer Tough No 5956
22
8
x
Sudoku 9792
26
OUNDR
N
E
ADGE
E
P
UR V E Y
N
N SWE R
Q D
OU T
C
A
L
AR L A N
E
Z
ADD Y
Set Square 2110
3
2
6
5
4
9
8
7
1
Kakuro 2107
Codeword 3307
P R
E
E D
U
ON
D
A
N
A T
Sudoku 9791
Bridge Andrew Robson
Tim Seres (pronounced serresh), Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Both
who died in 2007, was the Don
Advanced
♠K 9 8 7 6
Bradman of Australian bridge. His Teams
♥Q 10 7
obituary said, “The simplest way to
♦
Q732
describe Tim’s standing in the
♣6
Australian bridge world is to quote
♠A 2
♠ Q 10 5 3
N
Shakespeare: ‘He doth bestride the
♥9 2
♥K 5 4
W E
narrow world like a colossus’.
♦A K 10 4 S
♦J 9 6 5
♣Q 9 8 7 3♠ J 4
♣5 4
Unarguably so much better than
anyone else, Tim was one of the huge
♥A J 8 6 3
natural talents that very occasionally
♦8
surface in competitive endeavours.”
♣A K J 10 2
Here is a celebrated (but slightly
(Seres)
W
N
E
S
flawed) example from the 1981
1♥
2♣(1)
2♥
Pass
World Bridge Team Championships.
4♥
End
West cashed the ace of diamonds
and switched to a heart. East cor- (1) Not my cup of tea, vulnerable to-boot.
rectly declined to cover dummy’s Put me down for a pass.
queen, declarer, Seres, crossing to
Contract: 4♥ , Opening Lead: ♦A
the ace of clubs and running the jack
♠K 9 8 7
(West declining to cover with the
♥queen declarer knew he had), and a
♦Q 7
diamond discarded from dummy.
♣Declarer now led up a spade,
♠
2
♠ Q 10 5
N
West rising with the ace and lead♥♥W E
ing his second heart (his second
♦K 10
♦J 9 6
S
spade would have been better).
♣Q 9 8 ♠ J
♣Declarer won the jack and cashed
♥
86
the ace, drawing East’s king.
♦In the six-card ending across,
♣A 10 2
with declarer needing five tricks,
Seres led a fourth heart. If West round to the ace-ten, while a diathrew a club, declarer could give mond (say the king) would be
up a club and set up a long club. If ruffed, a spade led to the king and
West threw the ten of diamonds, the promoted queen of diamonds
declarer could cross to the king of cashed. Game made.
spades and either exit with a diaThere is no doubt Seres’s two of
mond, discarding a club, or ruff the clubs exit is beautiful. But if I were
diamond and exit with a low club. being picky, I would say he should
Either way, West would be end- ruff a low club at trick four, pick up
played. So West let go his spade.
trumps, then drive out the queen
Declarer now found the very of clubs and lead towards the king
elegant play of exiting with the of spades. Far more prosaic and far
two of clubs. West won but had no less columnworthy.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
good option. A club would run
7
5min
1 ... Bh6+! 2 Qxh6
distracts the
white queen and
now 2 ... f5! wins,
eg, 3 Qh5 (3 exf5
Nxf5+ wins the
queen) 3 ... Qc3+
4 Bd3 f4 mate
Quiz
1 The Louvre 2 Gospel 3 The Wombles 4 Leonard
Bernstein 5 Hungary 6 Devonian period 7 The Conners
— in Roseanne 8 Ready Player One 9 Shylock — in
The Merchant of Venice 10 Wally in the Where’s Wally?
books 11 Styx 12 Gustav Kirchhoff 13 LittleBigPlanet
14 Arkle — Gold Cup winner in 1964, 1965, 1966
15 Colonel Harland Sanders — of KFC fame
12.04.18
MindGames
Mild No 9794
Fill the grid so that every
column, every row and
every 3x3 box contains
the digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
Josephine
Balmer
Backend
a A season
b An alleyway
c A theatrical costume
Bacca
a A spicy dish
b A fruit
c A pipe
Baculum
a A surgical instrument
b An infectious organism
c A small bone
Answers on page 15
Fiendish No 9795
6
9 3
Super fiendish No 9796
4
5 1
1
5
6 4 9
8
3
5
8 7
1
7
9
2
5
8
7
8
4
9 6 7
7
3
9
8
1
6
5
7
4
1
2
7
3
4
8
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
3
4
6
8
9
3
2
1
7
3 6
8 9
9
5
5
8
4 7
4 6 1
2
3
7
6
1
4
9
7 4
2
5
1
7 2
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight to receive four clues for any of today’s
puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
The Times Daily Quiz Olav Bjortomt
Suko No 2209
ALAMY
hits include Lady, Babe
and Mr Roboto?
1 IM Pei designed the
glass-and-steel pyramid
that serves as the main
public entrance to
which Paris museum?
2 Used to describe four
New Testament books,
which word derives from
the Greek for “good news”?
3 Elisabeth Beresford
introduced which pointynosed furry creatures in
a 1968 children’s book?
4 Which West Side Story
composer became music
director of the New York
Philharmonic in 1958?
5 Once used as a
royal guard dog, the
modern-day kuvasz
breed was developed in
which country?
12 Which German
physicist, who explained
the Fraunhofer lines
in the sun’s spectrum,
coined the term “blackbody radiation”?
15
6 Named after an English
county, which geologic
period is often dubbed
the “Age of Fish”?
7 Which TV sitcom
family lived at 714
Delaware Street in
Lanford, Illinois?
9 Which Shakespeare
character says: “The
villainy you teach me
I will execute — and it
shall go hard”?
10 Odlaw is the nemesis
of which bobble-hatted
globetrotter, whose
friends include
Wizard Whitebeard?
8 Wade Watts, aka
Parzival, is the hero of
which 2018 Steven
Spielberg film?
11 Formed in Chicago in
1972, which rock band’s
13 Players control the
creature Sackboy in
which 2008 puzzle
platform video game?
14 At 212, which triple
Cheltenham Gold Cupwinner’s Timeform
rating is the highest
ever awarded to a
steeplechaser?
15 Which American fast
food pioneer is pictured?
Answers on page 15
Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the
spaces so that the number in each
circle is equal to the sum of the four
surrounding spaces, and each colour
total is correct
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1068 by Izetti
1
2
3
4
8
5
9
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
21
20
22
23
Across
1 Former lover having requests
cries (8)
5 Stylish little bird with tail
hidden (4)
8 Trips made by drunkard
rolling over outside old city (5)
9 Loner in sports ground,
learner needing exercise (7)
11 Supports politicians giving
accounts of what happened
earlier (11)
13 Musical dramas are so
fantastic when piano is
included (6)
14 A day given opening — now
on calendar? (6)
17 Temporary pavilion so
unstable, sheltering Rex (11)
20 Hospital official who could
give Ron meal (7)
21 Candle that a person gets hold
of (5)
22 Fiddler supposedly with refusal
to entertain the Queen (4)
23 Most exciting preliminary
contest involving fantastic side
(8)
Down
1 Poet denied king food (4)
2 Fall apart, having cold and
noise in stomach? (7)
3 Group of coots in Asia flying
(11)
4 Confused situation with
nothing right in church service
(6)
6 Sixty minutes with one
beautiful female (5)
7 Oily liquid ruining eco-store
(8)
10 Odd creation modified and
harmonised (11)
12 Arrive shortly on flat territory
and grumble (8)
15 Pill, see, could be this shape (7)
16 Go through church under
mass of stonework? (6)
18 Shell of yellow hue on French
sea (5)
19 Exclamation of annoyance
when daughter meets rodent
(4)
Yesterday’s solution on page 15
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