close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Times Times 2 - 13 April 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
April 13 | 2018
They mucked up my masterpiece!
(Relax, they made it better)
Ordeal by Innocence and the art of the screen adaptation
2
1G T
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
KARENYHAN/TWITTER
times2
7
Caitlin
Moran
DOWN
Channing
Tatum and
Jenna Dewan
Celebrity Watch
10
UP
Adele
In “HeartWarming Love
News” this week,
the world learnt
that when Chatty
Man host Alan
Carr married his
long-term
partner, Paul
Drayton, the
ceremony
was arranged
by Carr’s friend
d
Adele — who
was ordained so
she could officiate att their
th wedding.
After Carr revealed this story, Adele
took to her Instagram and posted a
picture of herself in her ministerial
robes captioned, “Seeing as the cat’s
out the bag, I married two of my best
friends . . . You know me any excuse to
dress up #LoveisLove.”
As CW pondered this beautiful act,
a thought suddenly struck it: being
ordained and conducting the wedding
is a brilliant way for women to get
out of being a bridesmaid. No
strappy maroon BHS slipdress for
Adele! Instead, she’s dressed like a
boss camp pope and swerving the
whole “hen weekend in Faliraki” in
favour of ordering a 20ft-high wall
of flowers and practising saying:
“You may now kiss the groom.”
This is why patriarchy spent
so long stopping women being
ordained! They wanted us to stay
out of that shit! Adele’s blown the
whole thing wide open. Brava, Adele!!
Brava! Also: do you take bookings?
CW’s totally up for a vow renewal.
9
DOWN
Paul Hollywood
Ah, the secret languages of love.
Is anything more intoxicating
(to the participants) or
bewildering (to the
onlookers)? This week
the secret language of
love was brought to
the forefront by
Great British Bake
Off scab Paul
Hollywood. A man
who found fame
later in life, 52-yearold Hollywood left his
wife of 20 years within a
few years of becoming
a household name and started
dating a 22-year-old barmaid called
Summer Monteys-Fullam — as is
the tradition in our culture. The
pre-fame marriage is as a cube
of sugar in a champagne cocktail.
It dissolves.
However. Since Hollywood’s
girlfriend is so young, she has
chronicled their relationship on
her social media channels — as
is the new cultural tradition.
This is why, as of Monday, the
world knew that MonteysFullam’s secret love-name for
Hollywood is “Cake Cake”, and
that his love has “turned me
from a girl, to a woman, and to
a house woman”.
Putting aside “Cake Cake”,
which sounds like the name
a toddler would give a toy
panda,
we must turn to the
p
apparent
effect of being
a
loved by Hollywood: turning you
from a girl, to a woman, and thence
to a “house woman”. CW presumed
that, having worked in a bar,
Monteys-Fullam would know what
“house woman” sounds like: the
cheapest one on the menu. Dude! No!
Don’t walk into a word trap like that!
#feminism #cakecakeandeatit
8
9
UP
The Queen
and David
Attenborough
Next week Her Majesty teams up with
Sir David Attenborough to talk about
the threatened global environment
in The Queen’s Green Planet on
ITV. The papers have been full
of inspiring pictures of these
two, walking around the
gardens of Buckingham
Palace and discussing
initiatives that could
safeguard the
world’s forests.
However, CW
feels that the main
thing this picture
raises is whether
it’s wrong to “ship”
David Attenborough
and the Queen? They
make such a goodlooking couple.
To live to any age is to see your
certainties smashed, over and over,
and this week is no exception, with
the sad news that Channing Tatum
— the star of the two greatest
movies ever made, Magic Mike and
Magic Mike XXL — is divorcing his
wife of ten years, Jenna Dewan.
“We have lovingly chosen to
separate as a couple,” Tatum posted
on his Instagram. “We’re just two
best friends realising it’s time to
take some space.”
CW would have
staked everything —
everything — on the
long-term viability of a marriage in
which Dewan once went on Lip Sync
Battle, dragged up as Tatum in Magic
Mike, and recreated his infamous
strip to Ginuwine’s Pony. It was the
silliest, sexiest thing CW’s ever seen.
If that can’t keep love alive, what will?
6
DOWN
Amal Clooney
In a profile piece on Clooney in this
month’s Vogue, her husband, George,
revealed that the moment he realised
he had to propose to her was while
on safari in Africa. “Some giraffes
walked up to her,” Clooney recalled.
“They just came out of the blue. I
took a picture of her, and she was
smiling. I said to my buddy
Ben, ‘You know, I think I
should ask her to marry me.’ ”
Reading this story has lifted
a huge
weight from CW’s heart.
h
For years it hasn’t understood why
the actor, writer, director, campaigner,
humanitarian and all-round 24-carat
vag-magnet George Clooney had
not, at any point during CW’s
20-year-long, wholly unrequited
crush, proposed to CW.
Now it gets it. CW simply never
stood next to a giraffe, in all that time,
and smiled. That’s what George is into,
and CW never scratched that itch.
Had CW known, it would have carted
a giraffe on a lead all around Soho
until it got proposed to.
5
DOWN
Rick Astley
Headline of the week goes to the
NME, which relayed the following
confusion from clean-cut ironic
1980s icon Rick Astley — he of
“Rickrolling” fame. “Rick Astley
says he has ‘no idea’ why Dave
Grohl invited him onstage to
perform with Foo Fighters.”
Here at Celebrity Watch,
we believe we know exactly
why: because — LOL.
4
UP
Daniel
Day-Lewis
Want to know what millennials think
when they spot the reclusive, now
retired, multi-Oscared actor Daniel
Day-Lewis on the subway in New
York? Is it “His intensity in My Left
Foot was astonishing”, or “The burden
of portraying Abraham Lincoln in
Lincoln must have been immense”, or
even “Why has he mysteriously retired
when he has so many more decades of
performances left to give?”? No.
“Daniel Day-Lewis Uses Flip Phone”
Buzzfeed reported breathlessly,
reproducing a secretly snapped shot
of Day-Lewis using a phone that
was manufactured in 1997.
While arguments raged about why
he was on the subway with an ancient
phone — with many concluding that
he must be in deep Method research
to play Steve from Myspace in a secret
comeback project — CW was amused
to see that what everyone seemed not
to have noticed is that the flip phone is
being played by Andy Serkis.
3
DOWN
Beyoncé and
Jay-Z
CW’s fascination with Beyoncé and
Jay-Z’s forthcoming husband-andwife tour, On the Run, continues.
Beyoncé’s stepfather claims the tour
will “confront the hard subjects” —
the presumption being that this will
include Jay-Z’s infidelity, Beyoncé’s
furious response, Lemonade, and the
struggle involved in two billionaires
staying and working together.
However, CW would point out
that Fleetwood Mac and Abba have
already totally covered all that stuff.
And that if Jay-Z and Beyoncé really
want to “confront the hard subjects”
in their marriage, a midsection
“he-said she-said” duet on which is
the best way to load the dishwasher
— Jay-Z keeps putting the pans in,
Beyoncé keeps telling him THE
NON-STICK COATING IS NOT
DISHWASHER-PROOF AND IT
ONLY TAKES A MINUTE TO
SWILL IT OUT IN THE SINK, YOU
MASSIVE ANUS — would really set
the artistic truth agenda for 2018.
the times | Friday April 13 2018
3
1G T
times2
2
DOWN
Wayne Rooney
This week’s biggest “Hmmmm, I
Think I See What You’re Doing
There” went to the footballer, whose
marriage has been repeatedly
imperilled by what we might
term “wandering trousers”.
Rooney and his wife,
Coleen, started dating
when he was 16. Rooney’s
trouser journeys first hit
the headlines when, aged
18, he visited a brothel ten
times and gave a sex worker
his autograph — a bit of a
giveaway, all told, “secret shagwise”.
Rooney was later caught having
had sex with another sex worker,
who was 48 and a grandmother. The
tabloids had a field day making
misogynistic comments about the
sex-mad “Auld Slapper”, and after
making a public apology to Coleen,
Rooney entered a bit of a trouser
hiatus — only to make a spectacular
comeback the month before Coleen
gave birth to their first child, when
1
DOWN
Kylie
It’s tricky being incredibly famous and
doing dozens of interviews a day. It’s
like an emotional and intellectual
obstacle course. Some of the questions
will be serious — “Why did your last
relationship break up?”, “Do you think
you’ll ever have children?” — and you
try to give reasonable answers
knowing that the headline will still,
undoubtedly, be: “DOOMED IN
LOVE: I still haven’t found ‘The One’
at 49 — Kylie” and “HEARTBROKEN:
I guess I will never have children —
Kylie.” You are wary.
By way of contrast, other questions
are just throwaway, silly space-fillers
and so, relieved, you relax. “It’s just a
light-hearted thing,” you think.
“No comebacks on this! I’m just
going to say the first thing that
comes into my head! Hurrah!”
And so to Minogue, who
was asked by Hello! Fashion
Monthly for her ultimate
dinner date. “Paul Newman
in the Sixties or Seventies,”
she replied with a smile.
Now CW doesn’t want
to be disingenuous here
— it gets that it was just a
throwaway choice — but,
frankly, it’s been stepping
through the logistics on
Kylie’s answer and the
thing is, it raises more
questions than it answers.
For starters Kylie has
— sloppily — not
specified if this is
a scenario that
involves a time
machine or not. If
it does, then Kylie
needs to go into
more details about
how she got the time
machine and how
she’s using it.
he hired a £1,000-a-night sex worker,
who went to The Sun and witheringly
described his prowess as “average”.
Then there was the threesome and
the woman Rooney drunkenly got
into a car with — only to be pulled
over by the police before things could
go any farther . Anyway. That’s the
context. Now, to this week’s Heat.
“Wayne sends Coleen on a £100k
‘Trust Trip’,” the headline ran.
“Wayne has splashed out
£100,000 on a holiday to
Dubai for Coleen and their
four sons — to prove that
she can trust him.”
Now call CW
“twitchy”, but it feels
a bit “nah — don’t think
so” about the concept of
a “trust trip” organised by
a man who keeps banging
around. It sees the clever branding
of calling it a “trust trip”. That
almost works! If you close your
eyes. And your brain. But it has a
sneaking suspicion that if you went
to the head office of Trust Trips Ltd
and removed its flashy new signage,
underneath you’d see an older sign
reading: “Cat’s Away, Mice Will Play
Trips Ltd (incorporating Eye Don’t
See, Heart Don’t Grieve After Tours,
and Wahey Lads Inc).”
(Whole can of worms in itself: if she’s
got a Tardis, but is using it only for
dating — rather than preventing, say,
war — what are the public image
ramifications of that? It’s going to go
down worse than her ill-fated 1997
“indie” album.) Is she first going back
in time to the day Newman met his
wife of 50 years, Joanne Woodward, to
lock her in a toilet so that they don’t
meet? That first date would be quite
difficult, what with the muffled sounds
of Woodward banging on the door,
shouting, “Let me out! I have a terrible
feeling that fate is being perverted!”
Presumably, as is the way with
these things, Kylie would have in her
possession a photograph from 2000
of Newman, Woodward and their
three daughters, the faces of the three
daughters slowly fading, à la Back to
the Future, as her and Newman’s date
progressed; which would be another
massive vibe-killer. Kylie wouldn’t
technically be murdering them
— merely preventing their
future existence — but it
feels like the kind of subject
that would take up at least
one episode of The Moral
Maze and surely put a
dampener on pudding
— and banging.
And if Kylie’s
not using a time
machine then, at
the point she
goes on her hot
date with Paul
Newman in the
Sixties and
Seventies, she
would be aged
between
minus eight
and 12 — at
which point
The Moral
Maze
wouldn’t
M
touch
it with
t
a bargepole.
In short, CW feels
t
that
Kylie’s not given
t subject enough
this
thought. No wonder she’s
still single at 49!
The hot list
What to do this weekend
Dance
English National Ballet
The company presents an
evening of North American
choreography, including a rare
world premiere from William
Forsythe and a revival of Jerome
Robbins’s rarely seen — and
wonderfully feral — 1951 ballet
The Cage. Sadler’s Wells, London
EC1 (020 7863 8000) tonight
and tomorrow
Film
Custody
This French-language gem is
well worth ferreting out. Xavier
Legrand’s film about a bitter
custody battle captures the
desperation, love and hurt of
domestic abuse, but it ends up as
an edge-of-your-seat thriller. On
general release. See review, page 8
Pop
Dua Lipa
The 22-year-old EnglishAlbanian pop superstar whose
massive hit New Rules has
become an anthem for
young feminism. O2 Apollo
Manchester (0844 4777677),
tomorrow and Sunday
Exhibition
Monet and Architecture
Curators take a new approach to
one of history’s most popular
artists by focusing on Monet’s
paintings of great buildings.
National Gallery, London WC2
(0800 9126958), today, tomorrow
and Sunday
Comedy
Michael McIntyre’s Big
World Tour
Small, but gleefully accurate
observations; venues so large
that he’ll need a pilot’s licence to
get from the dressing room to
the stage. McIntyre is back!
Motorpoint Arena, Cardiff (029
2022 4488), tomorrow and Sunday
Theatre
Chicago the Musical
This dark musical about murder
and mayhem stars Cuba
Gooding Jr as a hotshot lawyer,
but every member of this cast,
not to mention the onstage
orchestra, shines. Sexy and
sultry with dancing to die for
(and some do). It’s all that jazz
and more. Phoenix Theatre,
London WC2 (0844 8717627),
tonight and tomorrow
Opera
Luisa Miller: live in HD
A new role for Plácido Domingo
— his 149th — as Miller in
Verdi’s drama, which hasn’t been
seen at the New York Met in
more than a decade. Sonya
Yoncheva, right with Domingo,
is the heroine. Various cinemas
(www.metopera.org), tomorrow
(12.30pm)
In Saturday Review tomorrow
From Hamlet to A Streetcar
Named Desire: the best plays ever
Saturday April 14 2018
7-DAY
TV & RADIO
GUIDE
page 23
Lily James
Britain’s new
war-time
sweetheart
Did I make
the list, Yorick?
The greatest
plays of all time
art books theatre film music
television what’s on puzzles
4
1G T
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
cover story
Whodunnit? The mysterious
case of the rewritten classics
Shakespeare adaptation, Romeo and
Juliet. Shakespeare sprinkled his magic
Bard-dust over the poem to transform
it into one of the greatest theatre
hits. In Brooke’s version, the action
unfolds slowly. After Romeo and
Juliet meet, Romeo spends “a weeke
or two” working up the courage to
speak to her. In the sexed-up
Shakespeare version the pair declare
their love the same night they meet.
Shakespeare’s ending is bloodier too:
the Bard kills off Mercutio, Paris and
Lady Montague, who all survive
Brooke’s poem unscathed.
As Ordeal by Innocence ends (with
a different murderer than Agatha
Christie’s original) James Marriott
considers the most famous plot changes
C
ripes, books are
boring. Meandering
plots, long passages
of introspection,
reflections on the
human condition.
That stuff isn’t going
to work on telly.
Where’s the drama? The sex? The
exotic locations? Thankfully, armies of
screenwriters are on hand to gussy up
the tedious plots of classic literature,
adding a steamy romp here and an
edge-of-your seat plot twist there.
This is unfair. Not every adaptation
means a neanderthal TV producer
trampling all over a classic. Sometimes
humdrum authors need a hand. What
works on the page won’t automatically
succeed on screen. After all, from one
perspective, the greatest writer in the
language, William Shakespeare, was
nothing more than a salacious hack
sexing up respected works of history.
Anybody nowadays read Holinshed’s
Chronicles? How about Plutarch’s
Parallel Lives? Thought not. But
Henry V? Antony and Cleopatra?
Now we’re talking.
A recent beneficiary of this sort
of narrative tinkering is the queen
of suspense herself, Agatha Christie.
A BBC adaptation of her novel Ordeal
by Innocence changes the book’s
ending — and even more daringly,
the identity of the murderer. The
critics love it but, predictably, howls
of outrage have echoed across
cyberspace. Irate fans have pointed
out that Christie, the bestselling
novelist of all time, doesn’t need
any help plotting a story.
They have some reason to be
anxious. Although Shakespeare was
a master adaptor himself, he had a
tough time at the hands of later
writers, who found his plays a bit,
well . . . depressing. Ambroise Thomas’s
1868 opera Hamlet ends with the
ghost of the prince’s father helpfully
clarifying that “the crime is avenged”,
and instructing Hamlet to become
king. The show ends with everyone
singing: “Long live Hamlet! Long
live the King!” How nice.
If audiences in the old days
wanted less death, nowadays they
want more sex. Most 19th-century
novels don’t get much raunchier
than a glance from behind a fan
or a particularly enthusiastic cuddle.
However, in the modern age, no
Most improved Forrest Gump
Claire Danes and
Leonardo DiCaprio
in Baz Luhrmann’s
Romeo + Juliet
period drama is complete without a
gratuitous sex scene. Even a novel as
staid as George Eliot’s philosophical
provincial epic Middlemarch has to
have its sexy moments (see the
1994 BBC adaptation).
Here is a rundown of some of the
most (and least) successful adaptations
in history (look out for spoilers):
Best adaptation Romeo and
Juliet by William Shakespeare
Poor old Arthur Brooke missed a
trick. Nobody reads his plodding poem
The Tragicall Historye of Romeus and
Iuliet (1562) any more. But you may
have heard of the blockbuster
If the tale of Forrest Gump, the
marathon-running, shrimp-farming
Vietnam vet with an IQ of 70, seems
unrealistic then you should try reading
the oh-so-zany original novel by
Winston Groom. In Groom’s overstuffed book, Forrest variously goes
into space with a monkey, is captured
by cannibals and becomes a chess
champion, a professional wrestler and
a stunt man. Sometimes, less is more.
Most abused classic novel
The Scarlet Letter
It’s hard to know where to start with
the notorious 1995 film adaptation of
Nathaniel Hawthorne’s American
classic, starring Demi Moore. Most
egregiously, the film has the book’s
adulterous heroine, Hester Prynne,
ditch her scarlet “A” (for adultery)
and run off to start a jolly new life
the times | Friday April 13 2018
5
1G T
cover story
COVER AND BELOW: JAMES FISHER; JOSS BARRATT/BBC/MAMMOTH FILMS/ACL; GETTY IMAGES; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
The cast of
Ordeal by
Innocence
bit about a raptor being blown up with
a bazooka: “The animal on the left
simply exploded, the upper part of
the torso flying into the air, blood
splattering like a burst tomato . . .” At
the end of the book the dino’s island
is immolated in a napalm fire storm.
Cannily, Spielberg left the island
intact . . . meaning it could return
for the 2015 sequel, Jurassic World.
Angriest author The Shining
Everyone agrees that Stanley
Kubrick’s film The Shining is a stonecold cinematic classic. Well, everyone
apart from Stephen King, who wrote
the book that it’s based on. There are
countless changes between the book
and the novel. Most significantly, in
King’s book, which destroys the evil
hotel, Danny thwarts Jack with the
help of an exploding boiler, unlike in
the film where he lures him to his
death in a freezing maze. King was so
disgruntled that he made his own
(terrible) mini-series of The Shining.
Tom Hanks in Forrest Gump
in the Carolinas. Of course in
Hawthorne’s tragic (and realistic)
novel she wears the letter for the rest
of her life and it even appears on her
gravestone. That’s not to mention the
fact that the film adds gratuitous sex
scenes and a battle between the
Puritans and the Native Americans.
Unsurprisingly, the film won a Golden
Raspberry for “worst remake”.
Most family-friendly cuts
Jurassic Park by
Steven Spielberg
If you thought Steven Spielberg’s
dino-tastic romp Jurassic Park was
scary, you probably shouldn’t read
the book that it’s based on. Michael
Crichton’s grisly novel is full of scenes
that would have rendered the film
decidedly family-unfriendly. Try this
Most pointless exotic location
Heathcliff by Cliff Richard
Emily Brontë’s Heathcliff is rugged
and brooding, a lost soul filled with
darkness. Cliff Richard is . . . none of
those things. That didn’t stop him
taking to the stage as Brontë’s hero in
Heathcliff, his 1996 musical adaptation
of Wuthering Heights. “Does a fluffy
bunny have despair gnawing at its
soul?” asked The Times critic Richard
Morrison. Leaving aside the show’s
bizarre casting, the singer also made
the strange decision to send Heathcliff
on a peculiar gap year to India, China
and Africa. This did, however, allow
for some exotic choreography that
can hardly have been envisioned by
Brontë in the original book.
that it featured more minutes
of film per page than any book
adaptation in cinematic history.
Jackson padded out JRR Tolkien’ss
spritely novel with scenes and
characters borrowed from his other
her
writings. Most irritatingly
Radagast the Brown, an unloved
clownish wizard (effectively the
Jar Jar Binks of Middle Earth),
who appears only briefly in
The Lord of the Rings, pops
up everywhere in Jackson’s
Hobbit films. Radagast ferries
characters around on a sledge
pulled by rabbits, consults with
Gandalf and plays a pivotal role in
n
the epic final battle. And he has
a cutesey hedgehog friend called
Sebastian. Tolkien must be veritably
ably
spinning in his grave.
Best sexed-up adaptation
House of Cards
Andrew Davies is a master of
sexing up classic novels for TV.
He did a good job of spicing up
Michael Dobbs’s thriller House of
Cards for a 1990 BBC TV adaptation.
The show’s plot hinges on the chief
whip Francis Urquhart’s affair with
Mattie Storin, a young tabloid
reporter. Davies kinked things up by
having Storin refer to Urquhart as
“daddy” in the pair’s steamier
moments. He also has Urquhart
throw her off a building (screaming
“Daddyyyy!” as she falls). In the book,
Urquhart kills himself. In the TV
show he continues his political
career and we leave him driving
towards Buckingham Palace to
form a government,
presumably with much
more political knavery
ahead of him.
Most bloated adaptation
The Hobbit by Peter Jackson
Best literary novel
adaptation
Brooklyn
One analysis of Peter Jackson’s turgid
three-film version of The Hobbit found
Screen adaptations of
modern literary novels
Above: Jack Nicholson
in The Shining and,
below, Emory Cohen
and Saoirse Ronan
in Brooklyn
aren’t always happy affairs (see the
2010 adaptation of Martin Amis’s
Money or last year’s film of Julian
Barnes’ss T
The Sense of an Ending).
Barnes
However, the 2015 film of Colm
Tóibín’s touching novel Brooklyn
seems to have kept everyone
happy,
happ despite a few tweaks to
the plot. The film misses out an
awkward
moment in which the
aw
ingenue
Irish immigrant Eilis
ing
wakes
up everyone else in her
wa
New
Ne York boarding house by
shagging
her boyfriend too
sha
loudly.
Most significantly, the
lou
film’s
film’ ending is more definitive
(look away if you hate spoilers).
In
we watch Eilis fall into
In the film
f
the
the arms of her American beau, Tony,
that she’s pretty damn
making it clear
c
glad to be back in New York. In the
ambiguous whether
book, it’s more
m
she’s glad to have chosen the new
world over her native Ireland.
Stupidest happy ending
King Lear by Nahum Tate
Ah, the tragedy and nobility
of King Lear! How could anyone
improve on the heart-rending final
scene in which a broken Lear cradles
the lifeless body of his daughter
before dying himself? The
17th-century hack poet
Nahum Tate thought he
could make it better by
cheering things up a bit.
After
all, all that death
A
is
i a bit of a downer, isn’t
it? In Tate’s version a
heroic
(and surprisingly
h
energetic) Lear storms
the stage, rescues
his daughter from
her would-be
executioners and
marries
her off
m
to
t Edgar. Hurrah!
The
T final part of
Ordeal
by Innocence
O
is
i on BBC One,
9pm,
Sunday
9
6
1G T
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
arts
Richard Morrison the arts column
The closure of St John’s, Smith Square would be a cultural tragedy
O
ne door opens,
another closes. At
least potentially. In
the week when the
Queen Elizabeth
Hall came back
to life after a
£38 million
refurbishment, I learn that another
famous London classical music venue
is in such financial difficulties that
unless it finds substantial new funding
it will shut for ever in 2019, exactly 50
years after its rebirth as a concert hall.
The venue is St John’s, Smith
Square — Thomas Archer’s soaring
quadruple-towered baroque church in
the heart of Westminster. Bombed
almost to oblivion in 1941, it was
restored as a concert hall in the
1960s and has hosted more than
300 events a year ever since, with
a special emphasis on Renaissance
and baroque music, for which its
luscious acoustics are perfect.
In recent years, under the inspired
leadership of Richard Heason
(recently voted “concert hall manager
of the year” by his peers in the
industry), it has transformed its
programming too, attracting good
crowds and critical acclaim with
imaginative festivals. And all with
a staff of only eight people — a
tiny fraction of the workforce
at comparable venues.
Yet St John’s receives no regular
public subsidy. Not from the Arts
Council, which gives £338,000 a year
to its slightly smaller competitor, the
Wigmore Hall, and an extraordinary
£18 million to the Southbank Centre
across the river. Not from the Heritage
Lottery Fund, even though it costs
thousands each year to maintain this
superb 290-year-old building. And not
from Westminster city council, which
infamously cut its own arts budget
to zero five years ago.
The result is that the trust running
St John’s has been posting a deficit
of about £250,000 a year on a
turnover of just over £1 million. In the
past this black hole was plugged by
gala concerts and dinners, private
donations and by dipping into
reserves. Those days are over. The
reserves are nearly exhausted, and
historic donors (members of the
Sainsbury family, for instance, who
had a home in Smith Square and
largely paid for St John’s new organ
AFP/GETTY
St John’s was restored in the 1960s and hosts more than 300 events a year
The church
was bombed
almost to
oblivion in 1941
in the 1990s) have made it clear
that they won’t prop up the hall’s
finances indefinitely.
So a magnificent concert venue a
stone’s throw from parliament and
Whitehall could well close in 18
months’ time. The symbolism of that
won’t be lost on musicians and music
lovers. They will see it as emblematic
of the political establishment’s abject
indifference to the survival of serious
culture in this country. Sadly, however,
I don’t think more than a handful of
the 20,000 politicians and civil
servants who work within half a mile
of St John’s will even notice its closure
— although the dismal spectacle of
a grade I listed building being boarded
up on their doorsteps may embarrass
them after a while. Especially as
they proceed to spend £3.5 billion
refurbishing the Houses of Parliament.
Would London’s status as a
world-class musical capital be
endangered if St John’s closed? It is
true that over the past 20 years other
admirable middle-sized concert halls
have sprung up in the capital, such as
Cadogan Hall, LSO St Luke’s, Milton
Court and Kings Place. None, in my
view, has the same serene elegance
or acoustic warmth as St John’s, nor
showcases such an eclectic mix of
professional musicians and highquality amateur and youth ensembles.
Then there’s the question of what
function the building would have. It’s
still a consecrated church, but I very
much doubt that the Church of
England would want it back.
Westminster isn’t short of grandiose
temples. And turning St John’s into
some sort of museum or heritage
venue would cost millions more than
the comparatively small cost of
sustaining it as a concert hall.
Any civilised government would
step in and ensure that this landmark
flourished in the role for which it is so
eminently suited. So far, however, the
response to the St John’s trustees from
the government’s arts quangos has
been: “Your problem, not ours.” So
the trustees are hunting for a saviour
from the private sector. Or, as their
chairman, Martin Smith, put it to me,
for an “extraordinarily public-spirited,
English baroque-loving, musicophile
philanthropist who would be prepared
to give us a minimum of £200,000
a year for at least ten years”. That’s a
total of £2 million — small change to
some of those who live or work in SW1.
On behalf of all those English
baroque-loving musicophiles who
don’t have that kind of money to spare,
I wish St John’s well. In the 1960s
Westminster council’s planners wanted
to complete the Luftwaffe’s work by
demolishing what remained of the
church and building a car park.
Instead, heroic fundraising by local
people led to it being restored exactly
as it was in 1728. Closing this beautiful
building now — letting it stand empty,
purposeless — would not only be bad for
music, it would also be an indefensible
betrayal of the far-sighted donors who
rescued it half a century ago.
A truly
epic song
cycle
As a fellow cyclist I
doff my helmet to the
rising young baritone
David Jones. This
May and June he
will cycle, or rather
“song-cycle”, the
1,000-odd miles from
John o’ Groats to
Land’s End, pausing
nine times along the
route to perform
Ralph Vaughan
Williams’s Songs
of Travel — having
passed through some
of the very
landscapes that
inspired Vaughan
Williams and the
poet he set: Robert
Louis Stevenson.
Jones’s aim is
not just to mark the
60th anniversary of
Vaughan Williams’s
death, but also to
raise funds for that
excellent charity
Live Music Now,
which sends
young professional
performers into care
homes and hospitals.
Check out songcycle.com) if you
want to sponsor
his epic pedal.
What a stirring
project! As Stevenson
put it in the great
final lines of the
song-cycle’s most
famous number,
The Vagabond: “All
I ask, the heaven
above/ And the
road below me.”
Although, in
this case, I think
a puncture repair
kit may also come
in handy.
Free ebook: Persons Unknown
EXC LU S IVE
R E WA R D S F O R
SUBSCRIBERS
A brutal murder. A family under suspicion. A detective with no one left
to trust. Read the gripping new literary thriller from the Sunday Times
bestselling author of Missing, Presumed.
To download the eBook visit mytimesplus.co.uk
This offer is open to UK and Ireland subscribers and residents only. For full terms and conditions, visit mytimesplus.co.uk
the times | Friday April 13 2018
7
1G T
arts
THE
CRITICS
Larushka Ivan-Zadeh
laps up a French custody battle p8
Will Hodgkinson
falls for the songs of Laura Veirs p10
Sam Marlowe
sees a powerful Syrian allegory p15
Monkey movie doesn’t swing it
including a skinny cowardly wimp
called Connor (Jack Quaid), who
exists only, in dramatic terms, to
remind us that Davis is a real man.
Then there’s the sultry Amy (Breanne
Hill), who makes a pass at Davis (she
wants a private lesson in, fnar fnar,
“submission techniques”) and exists
only to remind us that Johnson is
playing, well, a real man. And finally
there’s the overweight specky nerd
Nelson (PJ Byrne), who watches
Amy making a pass at Davis and
then half-turns to camera and coos:
“Women love him.” Yes, OK, we get
it! He’s a real man. He’s a nice guy.
He’s a great guy. He’s the Rock.
However, he’s terribly, even
aggressively, bland. Utterly devoid
of sexual charisma (he rarely does
sex scenes), or even a hint of erotic
danger, his appeal is based instead
the big film
Kevin Maher
pounds his chest in
horror at this bland
gorilla flick
A
summer blockbuster
in everything but
release date,
Rampage is a
monster movie that
bursts into life in the
first five minutes
with an exquisitely
tense sequence set on board an
experimental satellite, featuring an
astronaut (Marley Shelton) being
pursued through zero gravity by a
giant bloodthirsty rat. It is giddy,
bravura film-making and includes
severed limbs, some supercharged
growth hormones (hence the giant
rodent) and a breakneck race to an
escape pod. It’s also quite the
statement. And it sets up sky-high
expectations for the film to come,
which will essentially be about a
triumvirate of multistorey creatures (a
wolf, an alligator and an albino gorilla,
all infected with the aforementioned
growth hormones) that terrorise the
city of Chicago. Which is fine. But
then the Rock arrives.
Ah yes, the Rock, aka Dwayne
Johnson, the 45-year-old former
professional wrestler turned global
box-office dynamo. Here he plays
the special forces commando turned
San Diego-based primatologist
Davis Okoye, an animal lover who
has turned his back on humanity
(because people can be bad) and
whose best friend is a gorilla called
George (they do “rude” sign-language
bantz together). Naturally, after a
freak infection event, George becomes
a member of the supersized trio
and so the journey of the film is
one of salvation, not just for Chicago,
but also for the deep-seated and
classic
film
of the
week
The Rock’s
appeal is based
on the cartoonish
eyebrow raise
And it seeps through his films in the
characters he plays (tough on the
outside, but sensitive inside) and in the
cute ironic wink of his entire onscreen
existence. There’s a scene in Rampage
where Davis fears that George is dead
and the camera hugs Johnson’s face,
and he attempts “sad lips” even though
it’s blatantly obvious that he simply
does not have the technical ability to
convey anything above or below a
self-regarding quip. Elsewhere, in
a quiet moment when the movie
attempts to provide Davis with a
backstory, he sighs to his token love
interest Kate Caldwell (Naomie
Harris, wasted): “I’ve fought in
wars all over the world.” And again,
he simply cannot sell that line.
When we meet Davis he is
surrounded by fellow primatologists,
on the inoffensive one-liner, the
cartoonish eyebrow raise and the
reassuring safety of character as
anodyne corporate product. And it
works. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
made nearly $1 billion around the
globe. Rampage, no doubt, will be
eagerly consumed by teens from
Buenos Aires to Bangladesh and
Birmingham to Beijing. They’ll thrill
at the sight of Davis and George
hooking up for a battle royal on
the streets of Chicago. They’ll gasp
as Davis and Kate hop into a
malfunctioning helicopter and surf it
down a collapsing building. They’ll
punch the air in triumph as Davis
takes command of a machinegun
and lets rip. Yet they will also know,
in their hearts, that Rampage is a
soulless, joyless experience, and
a machine-tooled tribute to the
inoffensive prowess of its leading man.
here erupting
eru
as
a fully formed
big-s
big-screen
star,
play
playing the
nam
nameless
tac
taciturn
“st
“stranger” who
sly
slyly upends the
tiny border town
of Sa
San Miguel,
aand
nd cchallenges
vvillains
illains with the
cclassic
lassic lin
line: “My mule
don’t like people laughing. He gets the
crazy idea you’re laughing at him.”
Better still, the director Sergio Leone
frames every shot as a widescreen
masterpiece. The score, by Ennio
Morricone, is operatic and sublime.
And when Eastwood appears at the
end — seemingly risen from the dead
— on the windblown dusty streets,
and the music swells in sympathy,
it’s all too much. Utter bliss.
Kevin Maher
Rereleased in cinemas today
The Rock does not have the technical ability to convey anything above or below a self-regarding quip
Rampage
12A, 107min
{{(((
A Fistful of
Dollars (1964)
15, 96min
{{{{{
life-affirming friendship between
George and Davis.
It’s bloody thin, but that’s the point.
It’s a Rock movie! Shut up, sit back
and, as he used to say in his wrestling
days, just smell what the Rock is
cooking! Alas, after graduating from
quirky supporting roles (Be Cool
and Get Smart) to mainstream
entertainment (see his San Andreas
and Jumanji franchises — both with
sequels on the way), the Rock, these
days, mostly seems to be cooking
slightly burnt blancmange (tasteless,
inoffensive, sludgy and overdone).
He is, by all accounts and
by the anecdotes of friends and
acquaintances who have worked
with him, a great guy. However, that
appears to be all there is. That’s the
Dwayne Johnson USP. A great guy.
This is the film that
launched a thousand
d
super-stylish Hollywood
gunfights. (The
quick-draw cowboy
was a screen staple
before this, but
rarely done with
such poetry.) It is
also the film that
launched Clint
Eastwood, right
with Marianne Koch,
8
1G T
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
film reviews
A fierce
French
fight for
the kids
A riveting family
drama about a desperate
custody battle thrills
Larushka Ivan-Zadeh
The newcomer Thomas Gioria delivers a nuanced performance opposite Denis Ménochet, who plays his father, in this French gem
Custody
15, 93min
B
{{{{(
uried amid a week of noninspiring film releases, this
French gem is well worth
ferreting out. In 2013 the
debut director/writer Xavier
Legrand was Oscar-nominated for
his short film Just Before Losing
Everything, about domestic violence.
Here he takes that same concept and
the same two lead actors to deliver
a striking calling card.
Recalling the Iranian Oscar-winner
A Separation, the first 15 minutes play
out in real time as a procedural legal
hearing. Miriam (Léa Drucker) is
requesting sole custody of her two
children, 17-year-old Joséphine
(Mathilde Auneveux) and 11-year-old
Julien (Thomas Gioria). Her lawyer
explains that the children want
nothing to do with their father,
who had been violent towards them.
No convincing evidence is presented
of that violence. Meanwhile, the
father, Antoine (Denis Ménochet), is
arguing that he has the right to see his
children. It is up to the judge (Saadia
Bentaïeb) to rule if Antoine should be
granted partial custody of Julien.
Listening to the ugly “he said/she
said” of a strangers’ custody battle
may sound more like the nightmare
of being trapped by a ranting divorcé
at a dinner party than an enticing
night out at the cinema. However,
from the outset Legrand skilfully
constructs Custody as a riveting
detective drama. What is the truth of
this painful situation? Legrand keeps
us guessing. His cool lens is held at a
deliberate distance from his subjects,
the storytelling confidently elliptical,
challenging viewers to fill in blanks.
At its finest moments, of which
there are many, Custody captures the
desperation, the love and the hurt of
domestic abuse, and the performances
are flawless. That Legrand started out
as a child actor, appearing in Louis
Malle’s Au Revoir les Enfants at the age
of seven, presumably explains why he
can coax such nuance from the
newcomer Gioria. He is likely to be
a sought-after director of actors. The
overriding style here is naturalistic,
observational — very much in the raw,
social-realist tradition of the Dardenne
brothers. A peek behind closed doors
into a familial war zone, where daily
survival involves venturing across a
high-tension terrain scattered with
emotional landmines.
That this all explodes — lock,
stock and two smoking barrels — into
thriller territory in the heart-stopping,
if somewhat implausible, third act
is something of a surprise. A sign,
perhaps, that Legrand is keeping his
options open? Custody won him Lion
of the Future for the best debut at
the Venice Film Festival last year.
Hollywood or Cannes could
equally prove to be his kingdom.
The gruelling
fable A Gentle
Creature
A Gentle Creature
18, 143min
{{{((
Sharing a title only with the
Dostoevsky short story of the same
name, this gruelling crime and
punishment fable drags you down,
down, down into the serpentine
circles of Russia’s penal system. When
a care parcel that she sent to her
husband in prison is returned without
explanation, an unnamed, near mute
woman (Vasilina Makovtseva, her
eyes engorged with silent suffering)
attempts to investigate, only to get
stuck in a hellish, vodka-soaked
Siberian prison town.
Notable for its long takes and cheery
chit-chat along the lines of “We are all
going to die” and “I’ll cough up TB
on you”, this Russian miserabilist
epic marks a return to fiction for the
Ukrainian director Sergei Loznitsa.
His satiric/surrealist climax gets lost
in translation and its accompanying
sexual violence is gratuitous, but
nevertheless Loznitsa fires off a
claustrophobic indictment of
contemporary Russia. No wonder
he had to shoot it in Latvia.
the times | Friday April 13 2018
9
1G T
film reviews
Truth is, it’s scarily bad
PETER IOVINO
This teen horror
film set during
college kids’ spring
break in Mexico
is a mess, says
Kevin Maher
I
t was probably impressive
on paper. Import essential
narrative structure of
high-concept horrors such as
Final Destination or Ring. Copy
themes from violent xenophobic
travel thrillers such as Paradise
Lost, Hostel or The Ruins. And
finally, inject a tiny dash of sass and
bikini-filled montages, with a spring
break slasher setting, courtesy of Cabin
Fever or Piranha 3D. The result? An
execrable mess and a gobsmacking
horror show in all the wrong ways.
The warning signs are there
from the start, as our seven blank,
luckless and barely sketched Yankee
protagonists (all college students,
including, yawn, the studious brunette,
the “slutty” blonde, the wooden jock
and the nerd) enjoy a spring break
vacation in spooky Mexico. They
drink cocktails, they shout, “Spring
break, bitches!”, they say, “Meh-heeco!” a lot and they get cursed by an
invisible demon who lives in a ruined
mountaintop monastery and forces
them to play the game truth or dare
for ever, only with a sinister demonic
twist. The forfeit for the players is not
shame or embarrassment, but death.
(I know! What’s next? Demonic
Monopoly? “Do not collect £200.
Go straight to hell.”)
The real shocker here is that
between them the director, Jeff
Wadlow (he made the teen fighting
film Never Back Down), and four
credited screenwriters managed to
produce a film that’s so muddy in
concept and tonally bizarre. The
15, 98min
{{(((
Wahey, it’s the pregnancy Britcom
with a twist! This time they’re lesbians!
Yep. Morning sickness, cravings and
farting. So much more funny when it’s
lesbians. Or so seems to be the core
concept of this nominal comedy, set
in Warwickshire and featuring the
brilliant Lucy Punch (miscast here)
as the uptight, baby-craving barrister
Olivia, who becomes pregnant
through IVF just as her zany punk
girlfriend, Alex (Faye Marsay), has
discovered that she too is pregnant,
from a one-night stand with a lesbianfancying Scottish divorcé called John
(David Tennant — from Hamlet to
Broadchurch to this?) The relationships
strain, so-called hilarity ensues and
only a bold and genuinely intriguing
third-act diversion into darkness
saves this from being the stinker
of the season.
Even When I Fall
12A, 93min
{{{{(
Lucy Hale, whose character becomes the unwitting participant in a game of truth or dare
Truth or Dare
15, 100min
(((((
Western
12A, 121min
{{{((
The arrival of a group of German
construction workers in a village
in Bulgaria would, in most film
scenarios, form the backbone of
a wacky culture-clash comedy.
Western, from the writer-director
Valeska Grisebach, takes that
premise and moulds it into
something far more unsettling.
She focuses on the engineer
Meinhard (Meinhard Neumann,
like a hangdog, moustached Keith
h
Carradine) and how this culturallyy
curious (alleged) former soldier acts
cts
as a bridge between the two ostensibly
nsibly
hostile groups; he befriends a local
al
man and takes horse-riding lessons
ns
from the man’s nephew. As the film
progresses and the construction
work stalls (they’re building a dam)
Meinhard becomes more enigmatic.
Was he a soldier? Is he a liar?
Grisebach offers us hints of a
drama that never fully unfolds.
You, Me and Him
demon spends an inordinate amount
of screen time not murdering, not
hacking, not terrifying the kids and
the audience alike, but simply trying to
split up the central romance between
Slutty Blonde (Violett Beane) and
Wooden Jock (Tyler Posey). He forces
Studious Brunette (Lucy Hale) to
admit, on pain of death, her romantic
feelings for Wooden Jock. Which is
strangely soapy and odd, but not
in the slightest bit scary.
Elsewhere, the demon manifests
itself only in the distorted faces of
other students, via a shamefully cheap
and tacky effects gimmick that can be
accomplished on any smartphone.
(Or, as Studious Brunette observes,
half apologetically: “It’s like some
messed-up Snapchat filter!” Yeah,
but that doesn’t make it any better.)
The game, nonetheless, drags on and
the ramshackle plot brings our
diminishing bunch (the dares get
more dangerous and they
keep dying) back to the
Mexican monastery
(someone actually says:
“Let’s google ‘Mexico’
and ‘truth or dare’ ”)
for a climax that is
confused, tedious and
triumphantly pointless.
Much like the entire
preceding abomination.
Marlina the Murderer
in Four Acts
The Titan
15, 95min
15, 93min
{{(((
Utterl bonkers in the best possible
Utterly
way, this
t stylish Indonesian spaghetti
western is anchored around a
west
powerhouse performance from
pow
Marsha Timothy as a young widow
Ma
with a penchant for machetewit
wielding
vengeance.
w
ie
Marlina is introduced in a
M
on the Indonesian island
ffarmhouse
arm
off Su
Sumba (bonus holiday porn),
o
where
w
here a gang of local bandits finally
meet ttheir match — she decapitates
and poisons the others. The rest
one an
of the film has a more laconic,
occasionally comedic tone, as Marlina
occasi
journeys to a distant police station
(decapitated bandit head in hand) and
dodges the wrath of the bandit
community. It’s a political film that
wears its feminism lightly (all the
men are dolts), but one that lives in
the empathetic turn of its lead.
Released throughout the world
on Netflix, but unexpectedly “gifted”
to the UK with a big-screen release,
The Titan is a dystopian sci-fi movie
that boasts a muscular premise, but
little else.
Avatar’s Sam Worthington is
at his most charmless, seemingly
channelling a slightly aggressive
sirloin as he plays the dead-eyed
ex-marine Rick Janssen who, in the
year 2048, has been chosen to undergo
a serious of profound chromosomal
alterations to pave the way for
humanity’s inevitable exodus to
Saturn’s vaguely (in fact, barely)
Earth-like moon, Titan.
The atmosphere on Titan is
mostly nitrogen. So to survive,
and to become the literal and
metaphorical “Adam” for an entirely
new species (“Homo titanus” says
the film, without a smirk), Janssen
is injected with enzymes that
{{{{(
{{{
Meinhard Neumann as
Meinhard in Western
Right: Sheetal
in Even
When
I Fall
Six years in the making, this gripping,
occasionally dreamlike and uplifting
documentary looks at the modern-day
slave trade between Nepal and India.
(Apparently, 10,000 women and
children are taken south from Nepal
every year.) It focuses on two
women, Saraswoti and
Sheetal, who were
sold into the Indian
circus circuit as
children and
have returned
tto Kathmandu
to reclaim their
lives. They use their
liv
hard-won skills (Sheetal
h
is an impressive aerial
acrobat, Saraswoti is
llethal with hula hoops) to
travel the globe, from Dubai
tr
tto Glastonbury, and preach
their anti-slavery message.
A quiet triumph.
will essentially transform him into a
blue-skinned bat-fish, which seems
a tad excessive.
Along the way Janssen’s beloved
wife, Abi (Taylor Schilling from
Orange is the New Black, slumming it),
gasps a lot and looks horrified while
the movie around her, directed by the
German newcomer Lennart Ruff,
never quite justifies itself as anything
other than a small-screen distraction.
The dystopian sci-fi film The Titan
has a muscular premise, but little else
10
1G T
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
music reviews
JASON QUIGLEY; JORDA FRANTZIS
The pram in
the auditorium
pop
The geologist turned folk singer writes movingly
about art and motherhood, says Will Hodgkinson
Laura Veirs
The Lookout
Bella Union
{{{{(
Cardi B
Invasion of
Privacy
Atlantic
{{{((
Right: Cardi B and,
top right, Laura Veirs
A
bespectacled former
geologist who does
a podcast about
motherhood and
music, Laura Veirs
has spent the past
two decades singing
tasteful acoustic
indie-folk songs about love, life
and keeping chickens. So far, so
conforming to the fashion-conscious
liberalism parodied in the American
comedy series Portlandia. Yet the
unpretentious clarity, melodic
prettiness and lyrical wisdom on this
(inevitably) Portland-dwelling singer’s
latest album transcends the smashed
avocado-munching clichés and lifts it
into the realms of a minor classic.
Veirs has said that The Lookout is a
reflection on “the fleeting beauty of
life . . . and the chaos of post-election
America”. Another reaction to
President Trump destined to preach to
the converted, in other words, but to
my ears it sounds more like a reaction
to middle age and the acceptance of
mortality accompanying it.
This is a rich seam of material, well
mined in film and literature, but not so
much in rock and pop, which tends to
rely on a fantasy of endless youth for
its commercial
appeal. Hence we
have Everybody
The DominicanTrinidadian Belcalis
Almanzar, aka whitehot rapper Cardi B, has a
remarkable story. A New
Yorker who escaped poverty
and bad relationships via
stripping, she promoted
herself through some
hilariously bawdy
Instagram posts before
hitting it big with last
year’s self-affirming
Bodak Yellow.
Needs You, on which Veirs deals
with the demands of her five and
seven-year-old sons when all she
really wants to do is escape to an attic
studio and work on music. “Out in the
yard, kids pull on your sleeves,” she
sings in a heavily echoed vocal. She
doesn’t sound entirely happy about it.
Not that this depiction of the
domestic life is free of romance. The
eerie Mountains of the Moon paints a
vision of kings and queens dancing at
a feast; the musical equivalent to a
pre-Raphaelite painting. The Meadow
uses simple piano and violin lines to
capture a carefree day in the country
— “no hate, just springs and light
green leaves” — and the sadness of
knowing it must end.
These pieces rarely get past
the three-minute mark, and do not
push into unfamiliar territories. Watch
Fire features breathy vocals from the
songwriter Sufjan Stevens, When It
Grows Darkest has what sounds like
bent sitar notes and the title track,
The Lookout, features classical strings,
but Veirs is sticking to what she knows.
It is what she does in the standard
song form that counts: capturing the
tension between the drive of the artist
and the love of a mother. This may be
an unshowy, humble album, but it is
superbly executed and, in its own
way, supremely confident.
Almanzar has given much of her
big-label
debut over to extolling the
b
jjoy of wealth and the agony of fame
— “Cardi B is so problematic is the
hashtag,” she moans on Best Life —
and while nothing quite matches
the catchy otherworldliness of
her breakout smash, she is
funny, sharp and relatable.
“I went through your phone
last
l night. Saw some things
I didn’t like,” she confesses
on
o Thru Your Phone. We’ve
all been there.
John Prine
The Tree of Forgiveness
Goat Girl
Goat Girl
{{{{(
{{{{(
Oh Boy/Thirty Tigers
Once pegged as the new Bob Dylan,
Illinois-born Prine is really a more
modest poet of the Midwest, sticking
to folk and country for straightforward
tales of tenderness and intimacy.
“Come on home. You don’t have
to be alone,” he sings on the lovely
Summer’s End, expressing the most
simple sentiment with profundity.
Phil Spector, who is in jail for
murder, gets a songwriting credit
on God Only Knows, in which Prine
sings about the price paid for hurting
people as you pass through life.
Having survived cancer, he even
finds space in his heart to forgive
critics, “those syphilitic parasitics”,
on When I Get to Heaven. Now
that’s saying something.
Rough Trade
South London has thrown up a bunch
of bands over the past few years, and
this young female four-piece may just
be the most interesting.
Combining clattering rockabilly,
punk and a touch of country with
realist-surrealist lyricism, Goat Girl’s
debut seems to offer a chance for the
band members to give expression to
the kind of sentiments that polite
society doesn’t generally allow for.
“Creep on the train, I really want to
smash your head in,” announces the
singer Clottie Cream. Burn the Stake
advocates a fiery death for various
establishment figures; The Man is a
rock’n’roll blast of teenage lust. All this
makes up an album that is fascinating,
exciting and strangely liberating.
Bombard yourself with Mozart’s sonatas — quirks and all
classical
Ibragimova/
Tiberghien
Mozart Violin Sonatas
Hyperion
{{{{(
Fouchenneret/
Zaoui/Merlin
Gabriel Fauré: Horizons
Aparté
{{{{(
C
ompared with some other
multivolume series, the five
releases in Hyperion’s set of
Mozart’s violin sonatas may
seem insignificant. The tally
for the same label’s Romantic Piano
Concerto series stands at 74. But it’s
still a sad day for collectors now that
Mozart has spun his last note.
The music, of course, is one of the
attractions. There are happy surprises
even in the childhood sonatas, while a
later creation, K526, almost bombards
the listener with ingenuity, quirks and
contrapuntal delight.
It’s the glorious performers, though,
who make this series essential. Alina
Ibragimova’s violin tone may lack a
taste of honey, but her wiry, athletic
leaps bring zestful life to every bar.
Cédric Tiberghien’s piano is more
galvanising still. The repertoire
includes a charming variation set
and the K570 piano sonata, laced up
with a violin part added by rogue
hands. I loved it all.
The performers in Aparté’s double
album Horizons, devoted to Fauré’s
chamber music, don’t quite reach
Ibragimova and Tiberghien’s levels of
Fauré’s life.
incendiary flair. However,
ever,
life I lost my heart
to the rolling
paragraphs
this composer needs
r
of the Trio, Op 120, the
other key elements:
dark power of the late
precision and dignity,
shyness and rapture,
piano
pia nocturnes and
the nimble Cello
a mastery of the long
evolving line.
Sonata
No 2. One
So
With these
quibble:
the album
qu
ingredients, Pierre
cover.
cov What genius
Fouchenneret (violin),,
thought
it a good idea
tho
Simon Zaoui (piano),
to sh
shoot the musicians
Alina Ibragimova and
Raphaël Merlin (cello))
wearing
wearin “funny” fake
Cédric Tiberghien
and the tenor David Lefort
moustaches?
Not the
moustac
rarely disappoint. Beauties
mustachioed Fauré, for sure.
uties here
are the works from thee last decade of
Geoff
Geoff Brown
the times | Friday April 13 2018
11
1G T
DONCASTER MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY; BRIGHTON AND HOVE MUSEUMS AND ART GALLERIES; TARSILA DO AMARAL
exhibition
I
n the autumn of 1944, as
the western Allies advanced,
reclaiming Nazi-invaded
territories inch by grinding inch,
a peculiar exhibition was being
staged at the Royal Academy. It
was of Brazilian art. And it is this
— a little-known and, until now,
all but forgotten bit-part player in
war’s far wider theatre — that a new
show at the Sala Brasil (the cultural
wing of the Brazilian embassy in
London) celebrates.
At the outbreak of the Second
World War Brazil had adopted a
neutral position. However, in 1944
it became the only South American
nation to contribute fighting troops.
The first 5,000 members of what was
to become the 25,000-strong Brazilian
Expeditionary Force landed that
summer in Naples. They would forge
their way upwards through the
northern Apennines, joining
eventually with French troops at
Susa as the end of hostilities in
Italy was declared.
What made Brazil’s contribution
to the war effort so peculiar was that,
along with fighting troops, the country
sent a donation of paintings by 70
national artists. These, put on show
in London before touring seven other
venues around Britain, were to be sold
to raise funds. About 100,000 people
turned up to see this exhibition. For
almost all of them it would have been
their first contact with Brazilian art.
The British, at the beginning, were
not much impressed. The Royal
Academy only agreed to play host
because it had been put under Foreign
Office pressure. The critic Sacheverell
Sitwell wrote the catalogue preface.
“This gift,” he began in a commentary
that became increasingly patronising
as he progressed, “is so delicately
phrased a tribute to the body of young
men who saved civilisation and kept
the mechanised brutes from our
shores that the least we can do is to
take their paintings seriously and
try, in return, to help them with
our criticisms.”
What do we make of the works
now? The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian
Modernism Painted for War reunites
two dozen of the canvases that passed
into British collections. (The rest are
scattered across the globe and can be
found anywhere from Lisbon to
Auckland.) The result is an oddly
disparate show, a random mishmash
of subjects and styles. Pictures range
from an utterly unremarkable portrait
sketch by Alcides da Rocha Miranda
(who became a key player in Brazil’s
modernism movement), through a
charmingly naive beach scene by
Cardoso Júnior (who only picked up
paintbrush and palette as a hobby in
his seventies), to Candido Portinari’s
The Scarecrow (The Half-Wit), which,
with its eerie magical-realist aura,
makes the highlight of this show.
The otherworldly atmosphere
of this last painting is not typical.
Those who come hoping for vibrant
tropical palettes or for exotic
carnivalesque subjects will be
disappointed. There are a handful
of unmistakably Brazilian pictures:
This celebrates
a peculiar show
that happened in
1944 at the RA
a jungly semi-abstract, a sunburnt
landscape with palms, a pair of Bahian
women on the steps of their colonial
baroque church. More often, though,
the paintings could have come from
anywhere. Mostly, what you see feels
like European modernism in second
or third-rate translation. Who would
guess that the painter of the banana
in a fruit bowl could have reached out
into her garden and picked it? The
composition is so muted and sombre
and drab.
Many of the artists who contributed
had been to Europe. They had imbibed
It’s a disparate
collection — a
mishmash
of styles
A diplomatic feat:
but is it good art?
This Brazilian modernist hotchpotch fails to thrill,
but Rachel Campbell-Johnston applauds its intent
Main: Oscar Meira’s
Sailor (1914). Left:
Tarsila do Amaral’s
Fazenda (1943).
Top: Emiliano Di
Cavalcanti’s Woman
From Bahia, c 1944
the international modernist styles. You
are more likely to spot the influences
of cubism than of their native Brazil.
The result is dispiriting, not least
when you remember Brazil’s brave
contributions to architectural
modernism, or think of the postwar
art scene: the exuberant inventions
of Hélio Oiticica, or the shocking
performances and sensual installations
of Cildo Meireles, both made familiar
to us by Tate Modern shows.
This show is far from thrilling. Yet
what it does record is a crux point.
In the 1920s Brazil had marked the
centenary of its independence with a
week of art shows, performances and
discussions in which it clearly declared
its intention to rid itself culturally of
second-hand European imports. This
intent came to fruition after the war
with the foundation of the São Paulo
biennale in 1951, the founding of a
new capital, Brasilia, in 1960 and the
flourishing of a vibrant contemporary
scene. In between came this peculiar
exhibition. It marks, suggests its
curator, the turning point.
More than that, it served a political
purpose. This show, when it was first
staged, was intended to play a
diplomatic role. It professed the
alliance between Brazil and Britain.
This alliance still stands. And, as
Britain prepares for Brexit, the
moment to mark it returns. Our
country is looking to forge stronger
trade links with South America. This
show arrives as a reassurance that
such links have borne the test of time.
It plays once again a diplomatic role.
The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian
Modernism Painted for War is at the
Sala Brasil, London SW1 to June 22
12
1G T
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
film
Kenneth Williams, the life and times
of a tortured and obnoxious genius
REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; HARRY TODD/GETTY IMAGES
Roger Lewis
remembers the
Carry On star, who
died 30 years ago
K
enneth Williams was
a lifelong victim of
what we might call
the metaphysical
hangover. He’d be
the life and soul of a
chat show or a party,
where everyone
would be in hysterics. Then he’d go
home to his spartan flat and pour
out his misery and bitterness in his
diaries and letters, which were
published after his death, probably
by suicide, 30 years ago.
It transpired that he had always
hated having to be a comedian — “It
is scandalous that such a talent should
ever be placed in such appalling
jeopardy” — and although he was
renowned for his innuendos (“my end
is in sight”), sniggering lewdly and
pulling funny faces, he comes across
today, if you watch his work, as more
of a horror movie creature than as
a naturally funny man.
Williams on the screen (and in
radio recordings) is a thing of voodoo
feathers and parakeet shrieks. What’s
notable about the scene in Carry On
Doctor, for example, where he is
tortured by the patients, plunged
into an ice bath and strapped to an
operating table, is his complete, furious
resistance. Williams won’t give in.
As Citizen Camembert (“the big
cheese”) consigning people to the
guillotine in Carry On Don’t Lose Your
Head, again he is someone who won’t
back down. He was notable always as
a spiteful little bully, with hard, dark
eyes, and he clearly loved poncing
about in cloaks and togas. In his
performances he positively preens
— and hisses. He delighted in being
artificial, the vocal mannerisms, the
exaggeration, as if he were always
watching himself twisting in a mirror.
He was born in King’s Cross,
London, in 1926 and was obnoxious
almost immediately. Cast in a
school play, he “withdrew from the
production because someone was rude
to me’’. It was going to be ever thus. If
Williams was not permitted to be the
centre of attention, “he could be just
vile”, remembers Fenella Fielding.
Reading the biographies by Russell
Davies and Christopher Stevens, it is
clear that Williams enjoyed honing
his malice to a high sheen. There was
nothing he enjoyed more than stirring
up trouble and spreading gossip
among theatre companies and on film
sets, and as a disruptive influence he
was egged on by his mother, Louie.
One theory about Williams’s
apparent suicide is that he was so
scared of losing Louie to dementia
that he preferred to die first. The
bleak joke is that Williams died on
April 15, 1988, at the age of 62; his
mother lasted until she was 89, full
Top to bottom: Williams with Joan Sims, with Barbara Windsor, and with Sims and Hugh Paddick in 1969
of beans in an old folks’ home until
her death in 1991.
Williams’s family resided in a
succession of small flats and “dark
houses, overrun with rats” in
Bloomsbury. Louie washed and
pressed clothes in a pyjama factory
and Charlie, her surly husband, was
a barber who once threw a customer
out of his salon for requesting a blow
wave. There is a blue plaque marking
that spot in Marchmont Street.
Charlie stoutly maintained that
“the stage is for nancies” and bullied
Kenneth for “giving yourself airs’’.
Just about his
only pleasure
was his
hypochondria
Charlie was to die horribly in 1962,
after accidentally swallowing a bottle
of cleaning fluid. Did Kenneth switch
the canisters?
When Williams was evacuated to
Bicester, Oxfordshire, during the war,
he was the last child to be given a
billet. He was told that the “nasty
sneer on your face” put people off, so
he was taken in by a vet. He was called
up in 1944 and against the odds was
happy in a barracks, where he clowned
and told stories. He was sent to the
Far East, where he started to make
appearances in concerts for the
Combined Services Entertainment.
Starting out in rep, after he was
demobilised, Williams understudied
Richard Burton in Swansea. He
worked on The Beggar’s Opera with
Laurence Olivier and Moby Dick
with Orson Welles, who sent him
hand-drawn Christmas cards.
He was not a team player,
however, as his repertoire of
whining, leering and drawling
upset the balance of the play.
He was a cabaret turn, rather
than an actor — and when he
flared his nostrils he looked
like a carved horse on a
carousel, or, says Ray Galton,
the comedy sketch writer, “an
illustration from a fairytale book”,
a grotesque goblin.
Perhaps knowing his range was
narrow, Williams turned down the
offer of an Old Vic season with
Richard Burton and Claire Bloom. He
wouldn’t play Ariel — perfect for him
in so many ways you’d have thought.
Williams rejected Welles’s idea that he
play the Fool to Welles’s Lear in New
York, because that would have meant
moving too far away from Louie.
Despite his litany of complaints
over the years — the thought of
appearing anywhere with Tony
Hancock “put him in a foul temper”,
he “dripped vitriol” on the Carry On
films and the revues he was in with
Maggie Smith were “a mediocre mess
of pottage” — Williams was accepting
of his second-rate fate, and he made
a good living, traipsing obediently
around the chat show circuit, turning
up to record radio parlour games.
He provided voiceovers for
Murray Mints, Dixcel toilet paper,
Pomagne cider, Supersoft nappies,
and countless other advertisements.
His snarling tomfoolery was linked to
his sadomasochism, so he refused
to accept any recognition or prizes.
“They can stick their awards up their
arseholes,” he said of the Bafta
committee. There was something
self-lacerating going on — if he was in
work of quality, he would sabotage it.
In 1954, as the Dauphin in George
Bernard Shaw’s Saint Joan, his “bilious
resentment” of a fellow actress
wrecked the run. When he worked
with Fielding he stepped on her
lines and accused her of “transparent
inanity’’ to the management
behind her back. Sandie Shaw was
“loathsome” and Sir Ralph Richardson
had “a face like a bumhole’’. Nicholas
Parsons was “death . . . awful” and
Amanda Barrie was someone to whom
Williams took “an immediate dislike’’.
Williams was impossible. “Nobody
can teach me anything,” he declared
of directors. In his leisure moments he
was worse. On holiday he was liable
to fly home early or disappear. “I
suddenly felt very bored with all this
walking about and breathing fresh air,”
he’d explain. If he ventured on a
beach, he would do so wearing jacket
and collar and tie; literally buttonedup, deliberately uncomfortable.
Williams’s monkish flat was
absolutely minimal, the furniture
wrapped in cellophane. He wouldn’t
allow anyone to use his lavatory. No
one ever stayed the night. He was
phobic about human contact, and his
masturbatory sex life was based on
listening to Joe Orton tell anecdotes
about Tangiers. Just about his only
pleasure was his hypochondria. He
went to see the doctor most days
about his myriad psychosomatic
ailments — haemorrhoids,
ulcers, swollen gums, rashes,
an irritable bowel and
a spastic colon.
He hardly seems to have
been human at all. He was
more a jet of demonic vapour.
He had no tenderness. He had
a half-sister, Pat, whom he
despised. “There is a quality of
imbecility about the physical nature
of her that amounts to nausea.” When
you’ve managed to get rid of everyone
else, when you’ve rejected or spoilt
marvellous chances that came your
way, there’s nobody left to exterminate
except yourself. The autopsy revealed
that Williams had died from a
combination of barbiturates and
Zantac, which he had been taking in
huge doses to suppress stomach acidity.
Yet what about his psychic acidity?
Apart from his mother, he never
had a relationship. In the biopic,
Fantabulosa!, Michael Sheen makes the
comedian a sort of melancholy tragic
hero. However, I think that softened
him. The last words in his diary are:
“Oh, what’s the bloody point?” At the
end, he was to emulate the one man
who was more rancorous about him
than even he was about himself —
Charlie, the loathed father, who was
also 62 when he was found dead in
suspicious circumstances.
Roger Lewis is the biographer
of Peter Sellers, Laurence
Olivier, Charles Hawtrey
and Anthony Burgess
the times | Friday April 13 2018
13
1G T
radio
EAMONN M. MCCORMACK/GETTY IMAGES
Catherine Nixey
Radio
Stephen Fry’s
Great Leap Years
iTunes
{{{{{
The actor’s new
science podcast
deserves its No 1
chart position
S
ixty or seventy thousand
years ago, something very
strange happened to the
human brain. It went from
being a bit ho-hum — able
to kindle fire, make stones pointy
and outwit the odd lion — to
being extraordinary.
As Stephen Fry explains in his new
podcast, Great Leap Years, at this
point in prehistory the human brain
suddenly seemed “to become
supercharged”. It developed a skill
that was “remarkable, magical,
profound”. It developed words.
Now, in this six-part series,
Fry is going to make use of those
words to explain some of the clever
technological things that have
happened since. And he’s going
to tell us quickly. This is big history.
Think Sapiens, but speedier. Within
the first episode we’ve bounced
past the cognitive revolution, the
agricultural revolution and seen
the technological one approaching.
Later we will get Gutenberg, modern
computing and Moore’s law.
In some ways Fry is an
unusual person to do a podcast on
technology. He is a language man,
not a sums one. As he puts it, in
an elegant apologia, his attitude
to numbers “approximates my
attitude to tigers. They are, to be
sure, beautiful beyond words:
magnificent, strange, fascinating
and powerful — but they fill me
Fry is absurdly
good with words,
but comfortable
with them too
with awe, dread, fear, a deep sense
of inadequacy and a presentiment
that unless I run away, I will
wet myself.”
That is an extraordinary
sentence to find in a podcast. You
might think that radio is the written
word, read out. You’d be wrong.
Writing is a needy, demanding sort
of medium. It requires that you are
still, attentive, silent and (usually)
sitting down. If you don’t understand
a written phrase instantly, your eye
can rove back over the page,
returning, rereading, checking.
There is no relistening on the
radio. Radio sentences get one hit,
that’s it. Radio journalists are duly
drilled in the art of simplicity.
Subclauses are out. Parentheses
(which confuse the ear) are
banished. Spoken radio is simple
to the point of barren.
Fry’s sentences, by contrast,
demand your attention — and
reward it. This is not radio to do the
dishes to. It is radio that makes you
hold your breath. You listen to Fry’s
sentences with much the same
feeling of expectation as you watch
a figure-skater: wondering what
bravura move will come next;
where it is going to touch down.
When each sentence does finally,
elegantly land you have that same
urge to applaud.
If that makes this sound
tiresomely showy, it isn’t. Fry is
absurdly good with words, but
comfortable with them too. He’s
as likely to reference Stanley
Kubrick as Wittgenstein. This
may be clever, but it is also easy
— and a joy to listen to. Not just
for the words, either. While most
podcasts sound as though they are
made by two blokes in their back
room, this has a 75-piece orchestra
playing music composed by Guy
Farley, one of the composers
from The Crown.
Listen to Fry and you realise
that some brains have been even
more supercharged than most.
14
1G T
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
television & radio
Low marks for this contrived school ‘experiment’
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Living with the
Brainy Bunch
BBC Two
{{(((
Urban Myths
Sky Arts
{{{((
T
wo words to make the
heart sink when they
preface a TV documentary
are “groundbreaking
experiment”. For this you
can usually read, “Contrived situation
invented for telly”, and for that you can
probably read, “Hawthorne effect”,
the alterating of subjects’ behaviour
when they know that they’re being
watched. So we learn little that’s real
about anything at all.
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Music Planet:
Kathryn Tickell with
Fatoumata Diawara
in Session
Radio 3, 11pm
Radio 3 has given itself a bit
of a refit this month. This
new Friday evening show is
part of that revamp. Music
Planet is a programme
playing what Radio 3 is
still calling world music.
It’s a deliciously antiquated
phrase. On tonight’s show
Kathryn Tickell will be
speaking to Fatoumata
Diawara, a singer from
Mali, while Cerys Matthews
will be presenting music
from the Senegalese singer
Mar Seck and Malian kora
player Ballaké Sissoko.
The News Quiz
Radio 4, 6.30pm
John Lloyd, who created QI,
The News Quiz and pretty
much everything else good
on the radio, once dismissed
his brilliance in starting
these programmes. “I feel
sometimes I’ve had only one
idea . . . you take a lot of dull
stuff and you make it very
interesting and funny.”
Lloyd also had another idea:
everyone on The News Quiz
had to be a journalist. After
some sluggish years, it’s
returning for a new series
using that formula again,
hosted by Miles Jupp.
The “groundbreaking experiment”
in Living with the Brainy Bunch was
sending two of the lowest-achieving
GCSE pupils in a London school to
live with two of the highest achievers
for six weeks to see if parental
influence affects exam results. (Does
anyone seriously think it doesn’t?)
Anyway, we saw Jack, 15, who last year
got 105 detentions, getting to school
on time when he lived with the
multilingual Tharush — though when
Jack was forbidden to stay out all night
he did so anyway. We saw Hollie, also
15, who was living with head girl Holly
and clearly suffering from anxiety —
probably not helped when she was
asked at the dinner table, “How many
Shakespeare plays can you name?”
The idea was that after weeks of
early nights and homework they’d be
tested to see how much they’d
improved. And they had — Jack went
from a grade E to a C and Hollie from
a grade F to a D. But they were only
tested in maths, as if this is the only
subject that matters. What about
English? We’d already seen that Jack
didn’t know how to spell “grounded”.
While there were illuminating
moments (they should have made
more of Tharush’s mother telling Jack
she’d got into Europe from Sri Lanka
in a container and despaired that
young people here take education for
granted) the most glaring question was
glossed over. Namely, how did the
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 The Official
Chart with MistaJam 5.45 Newsbeat
6.00 BBC Radio 1’s Dance Anthems with
MistaJam 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 Pete Tong
11.00 Danny Howard 1.00am B.Traits
4.00 Radio 1’s Essential Mix
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Fearne Cotton 9.30 Trevor Nelson
12.00 Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright
5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 Tony Blackburn’s
Golden Hour 8.00 Friday Night Is Music
Night. Performance by the BBC Concert
Orchestra 10.00 Sounds of the 80s. Sara Cox
plays a selection of music from the decade
and is joined by guests who reflect on their
careers during the 1980s 12.00 Anneka Rice:
The Happening 2.00am Radio 2’s Funky Soul
Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: New to 2
4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: 21st Century Songs
5.00 Huey on Saturday
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Ian Skelly presents a selection of classical
music. Plus, Ian is once again joined by the
comedian, writer, director and jazz fan
Stewart Lee who talks about the cultural
influences that have inspired and shaped
his life and career
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Pachelbel (1653-1706)
Johann Pachelbel was one of the most
exceptional musical minds of his generation
— a composer of brilliant choral and keyboard
music and a huge influence on JS Bach. Yet
more than three centuries on, his reputation
rests almost exclusively on one piece —
his Canon in D, one of the most famous
classical works. Donald Macleod unravels
the rich musical legacy of the composer,
ending the week with a brilliant Magnificat
setting and a final, unique, take on the Canon
from a Japanese jazz iconoclast. Pachelbel
(Lobet den Herrn — Psalm 150; Aria
Sebaldina in F Minor — Hexachordum
Apollinis; and Magnificat in C, P250,
originally E Flat); and Hiromi Uehara after
Pachelbel (Pachelbel’s Canon)
Holly, her mother and Hollie in Living with the Brainy Bunch
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Sarah Walker introduces highlights from the
Norfolk and Norwich Chamber Music series.
This programme features Beethoven and
Dvorák, performed by Gould Piano Trio and
the Haffner Wind Ensemble. Beethoven
(Piano Trio in C minor, Op 1 No 3); and
Dvorák (Serenade in D minor, Op 44)
2.00 Live Afternoon Concert
At Hoddinott Hall, Cardiff, a concert marking
the 90th anniversary of the BBC National
Orchestra of Wales, with works by Huw
Watkins, Bruch, Mozart and Mathias.
Huw Watkins (Three Welsh songs for string
orchestra); Bruch (Double Concerto in
E minor for clarinet and viola); Mozart
(Piano Concerto No 22 in E-flat, K482);
Mathias (Symphony No 3); and
Daniel Jones (Cloud Messenger)
4.30 BBC Young Musician 2018
Highlights from this year’s Young Musician
percussion finalists
5.00 In Tune
Featuring music by Debussy, Monteverdi
and Chopin
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
A bunch of surprises from In Tune’s eclectic
Mixtape: an evocative Debussy string
quartet, outstanding basslines from
Monteverdi’s Vespers, a bubbling Chopin
prelude, the sublime Agnus Dei from
Duruflé’s Requiem, plus an outing from
William Walton’s Facade and a classic song
from Doris Day — and more besides!
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
At London’s Barbican, the BBC Symphony
Orchestra, under the conductor Andrew
Davis, in works by Elgar, Raymond Yiu and
Elkington. Elgar (The Starlight Express
— excerpts; and The Spirit of England,
Op 80); Raymond Yiu (The World Was Once
All Miracle — London Premiere); and Lilian
Elkington (Out of the Mist)
10.00 The Verb
With the writer and actress Ruth Jones and
the poet Raymond Antrobus
10.45 The Essay:
One Bar Electric Memoir
The artist and writer Harland Miller recalls
the mid-1990s, when based in New York,
the old anxieties over money and
accommodation lingered on
11.00 Music Planet
Kathryn Tickell introduces the Malian singer
Fatoumata Diawara in session.
See Radio Choice
1.00am Through the Night
Jonathan Swain presents a piano recital from
Josep Maria Colom in Barcelona (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day (r)
6.00 Today
News headlines and analysis
9.00 The Reunion
Sue MacGregor reunites the witnesses of the
Enfield poltergeist of 1977 (2/5) (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week:
Packing My Library
By Alberto Manguel. The best-selling author
and renowned bibliophile meditates on his
vast personal book collection and champions
the vital role of all libraries (5/5)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Discussion and interviews. Including at
10.45 the 15 Minute Drama: How Does That
Make You Feel? by Shelagh Stephenson (5/5)
11.00 The Opt Out
Polly Weston reports on the opt-out organ
donation system
11.30 When the Dog Dies
By Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent (3/6) (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Lucy Catherine. Last in the series
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Chinese Characters
Rana Mitter relects on the life of one
of China’s most important feminist
authors (5/20)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: The Deletion Committee
By Mark Lawson. Following pressure from
campaign groups and social media, a wax
works museum feels compelled to
re-evaluate and purge many of its most
celebrated exhibits
3.00 Gardeners’ Question Time
From Cranfield University, Bedfordshire
3.45 Short Works
Unmade, by David Hayden
4.00 Last Word
Obituaries, presented by Matthew Bannister
4.30 Feedback
4.55 The Listening Project
A conversation between a refugee and the
host who shares her home
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 The News Quiz
Topical comedy panel game, hosted by Miles
Jupp. See Raadioo Chooicce (1//8)
parents of the low achievers, who had
described themselves as “laid-back” or
reluctant to attend parents’ evenings
because teachers never said anything
“nice”, feel now that their children had
shot up two grades by living under
someone else’s roof? (Or trying harder
for the cameras, maybe?) Would they
take more interest in the homework
from now on? We weren’t really told
and it was all wrapped up quickly. A
bit of a cop-out when the main lesson
to be learnt seemed to be theirs.
What to call something that is nicely
performed, but as substantial as a wisp
of candyfloss? Watching Urban Myths
was like eating a Milky Way: perfectly
pleasant, but not much to get your
teeth into. Gemma Arterton gave an
artfully caricatured performance as
Marilyn Monroe who, according to
legend, needed 47 takes to say the line
“It’s me, Sugar” in Some Like It Hot,
with the exasperated director Billy
Wilder (James Purefoy). This
programme put her ditziness down
to pills and vodka, but also suggested
she was more wily than she let on. In
a 23-minute comedy, however, the
continual mangling of that one line
started to grate. It was better when
Wilder gave Monroe her dressingroom pep talk, which ended in the injoke final line: “Nobody’s perfect.” This
wasn’t perfect either, but it passed
a cordial half-hour.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
7.00 The Archers
Shula receives a shock
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 How Does That Make You Feel?
By Shelagh Stephenson (r)
8.00 Any Questions?
Topical discussion from Oxford Town Hall
8.50 A Point of View
Tom Shakespeare reflects on a topical issue
9.00 Home Front Omnibus
Parts 26-30. By Lucy Catherine
10.00 The World Tonight
With Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Rabbit Is Rich
By John Updike (10/10)
11.00 Great Lives
The comedian, broadcaster and political
commentator Ayesha Hazarika nominates
Jayaben Desai (r)
11.30 Ramblings
Clare Balding explores the beaches of
Aberlady Bay with local school pupils and
teachers (3/7) (r)
11.55 The Listening Project
Two friends recall the Bali bombing (r)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Packing My Library (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again 8.30
Brothers in Law 9.00 It’s Your Round 9.30
After Henry 10.00 Jude the Obscure 11.00
Podcast Radio Hour 12.00 I’m Sorry I’ll Read
That Again 12.30pm Brothers in Law 1.00
White Heat 1.30 Arthur Mee: Encyclopaedist
2.00 The Essex Serpent 2.15 Disability: A
New History 2.30 Tristram Shandy 2.45 On
Her Majesty’s Secret Service 3.00 Jude the
Obscure 4.00 It’s Your Round 4.30 After
Henry 5.00 The Stanley Baxter Playhouse
5.30 The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase 6.00 The Scarifyers: The
King of Winter 6.30 Mastertapes 7.00 I’m
Sorry I’ll Read That Again 7.30 Brothers in
Law. Comedy 8.00 White Heat. Thriller by
Melanie McGrath 8.30 Arthur Mee:
Encyclopaedist. The life and work of the
journalist, historian and educator 9.00
Podcast Radio Hour. Sarah Wade and Sofie
Hagen recommend their favourite podcasts
10.00 Comedy Club: The Hitchhiker’s Guide
to the Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase. Dirk Maggs’
adaptation of Eoin Colfer’s novel And
Another Thing. Last in the series
10.30 The Show What You Wrote. Sketches
about science and nature 10.55 The Comedy
Club Interview. Arthur Smith chats to Shazia
Mirza 11.00 Kevin Eldon Will See You Now.
Featuring sketches about carpentry and
subatomic physics 11.30 A Look Back at the
Nineties. Comedy with Brian Perkins
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 Chiles on
Friday 1.00pm The Friday Sports Panel
2.00 Kermode and Mayo’s Film Review 4.00
5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport: The Friday
Football Social. A look ahead to the
weekend’s football action 9.30 At Home with
Colin Murray. The presenter talks to some of
the biggest names in sport 10.00 Stephen
Nolan. Topical debate on the day’s main
stories 1.00am Up All Night 5.00 Under the
Weather 5.30 Saturday Breakfast
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ally McCoist 10.00 Jim White, Perry
Groves and Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee and
Jacobs 4.00 Sam Matterface and Darren
Gough 7.00 The Season Ticket with Danny
Kelly and Laura Woods 10.00 The Two Mikes
1.00am Extra Time with Tom Latchem
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe 4.00
Steve Lamacq 7.00 Iggy Pop 9.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 12.00 Nemone’s Electric
Ladyland 2.00am 6 Music Classic Concert
3.00 6 Music Live Hour 4.00 The Celluloid
Jukebox 5.00 Jon Hillcock
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00
Nicholas Owen 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall
5.00 Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
8.00 The Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott
concludes Philharmonia Week with a
complete performance of the Orchestra’s new
recording of Rachmaninov’s Symphony No.2,
released a few days ago. Walton (Orb and
Sceptre); Mozart (Piano Concerto No 23 in
A); Elgar (Pomp and Circumstance March No
4 in G); Bizet (The Pearlfishers — duet); and
Rachmaninov (Symphony No 2 in E minor
Op 27) 10.00 Smooth Classics 1.00am
Katie Breathwick 4.00 Jane Jones
the times | Friday April 13 2018
15
1G T
first night
Out of the
ruins of Syria,
a sharp and
startling satire
This allegory
about the
destruction of
the ancient city
is bold, brutal
comedy, says
Sam Marlowe
Theatre
Palmyra
Battersea Arts
Centre, SW11
{{{{(
Concert
SCO/Swensen
Concert Hall,
Perth
{{{{(
ALEX BRENNER
T
he ancient Syrian city of
Palmyra has repeatedly
been the scene of conflict
throughout its history, yet
until recently it remained
extraordinarily well preserved — a
Unesco world heritage site, popular
with visitors who came to view its
temples, colonnades and Roman
amphitheatre. Since 2015, though,
much of it has been wrecked and
looted by Isis, cultural desecration
that has been labelled “a war crime”
by Unesco’s chief. It’s that image of
destruction, and the tension between
what we regard as civilisation and
barbarism, that inspire this short,
stimulating piece by the clowning
duo Bert and Nasi.
Over an hour, using little more
than a couple of chairs, a stepladder,
some smashed crockery and — most
importantly — a hammer, the pair
explore the impulses that lead to
violence. Their interaction, at first
amusing and apparently affectionate,
swiftly and shockingly turns
menacing. As witnesses we are
implicated in its outcome and
even forced to participate.
A
s one of Scotland’s leading
cultural figures, Sir James
MacMillan has spoken out
on many controversial
issues and attracted a fair
bit of hostility as a result. As his
country’s leading composer, however,
he has become increasingly taciturn
over the years about the emotional,
metaphysical and possibly political
emotions running through his music.
Perhaps the two things are
connected. Just because instrumental
music has no words doesn’t mean that
it can’t carry a powerful message, but
there is no obligation for the composer
to spell out what it is. And in his
recent concertos — magnificently
multilayered creations showcasing
oboe and viola respectively —
Nasi Voutsas and Bertrand Lesca are the clowning duo whose interaction goes from affectionate to menacing
Handel’s stately aria Lascia ch’io
pianga plays as Bertrand Lesca
(louche, lanky, French) and Nasi
Voutsas (softer, seemingly more
hesitant) take their seats before us.
Nasi has a pristine white plate. Bert’s
is in smithereens. Nasi offers effusive
condolences — who could have done
such a thing? — and a brotherly
shoulder to cry on. Bert’s response is
to ask, with an unnerving smile, if he
can borrow Nasi’s plate, a favour he
repays by gleefully smashing it. To add
insult to injury, he mockingly repeats
all Nasi’s earlier comforting platitudes.
Now the knives — or rather the
hammers — are irrevocably out. They
fight over the chairs, as if they were
disputed territory. They strew the
stage with boxfuls of broken china,
a visual echo of the rubble of ravaged
cities. As hostilities mount, they vie
for our sympathies, like warring
factions trying to win allies and arms.
After relentless goading, Nasi furiously
simulates bludgeoning his partner
about the head. Bert turns to us, all
calmness and reason: Nasi is crazy,
don’t we agree? Nasi fights back with
terse interjections, furious silences
and a final, verbal attack of deadly
precision.
It’s a loose political allegory and an
unflatteringly accurate picture of the
more savage influences governing
human relationships and behaviour —
the hunger for power, the urge to
destroy out of spite or vengeance.
The shifts from the comic to the
deeply unsettling are achieved with
quicksilver skill. Palmyra is startlingly
effective: jagged, knockabout fun with
a decidedly sharp edge.
Box office: 020 7223 2223, to April 14;
Shoreditch Town Hall, London EC1
(020 7739 6176), April 17 to 28
MacMillan has seemed to enjoy
creating a smokescreen by writing
an anodyne programme note that
provides no explanation for the
music’s turbulence.
He has done the same thing with
his new Saxophone Concerto, superbly
premiered on Wednesday by the
young Australian virtuoso Amy
Dickson with the Scottish Chamber
Orchestra under Joseph Swensen.
To judge from MacMillan’s written
introduction, the three-movement
piece is a fantasy on traditional
Scottish dances — the strathspey, reel,
jig and so on — with a homage to
Gaelic psalm-singing, as heard in the
Western Isles, at its centre. Well, so it
is, but that doesn’t begin to describe
the tensions and ambiguities of this
absorbing piece. The first movement,
for instance, has the macabre, driven
relentlessness of Shostakovich or
Prokofiev at their most sardonic. The
saxophonist may have folk-derived
music, but she seems forced to march
to the beat of massed strings used
more for their percussive qualities
than their lyrical possibilities. At times,
indeed, there’s a hint of the sectarian
Scottish and Irish marching bands —
and that’s never a positive sign in
MacMillan’s music.
The middle movement does indeed
provide repose and relief: the soloist
as cantor, the strings as congregation,
picking up on her Gaelic-tinged
contours and amplifying them like
overlapping ripples until a gorgeous
modal melody emerges.
With the finale, however, we are
back in the land of enigma. At first it
sounds like conventional virtuoso fun,
with the saxophone freewheeling
giddily over a jig that starts as an
exhilarating unison tune played
pizzicato by the strings. Yet the ending
is left hanging in the air, strange,
dislocated, dissonant and unresolved
— as if the pure joy of the ceilidh has
dissipated in the harsh light of dawn.
In the same concert Dickson
deployed her wonderfully rich,
focused timbre to evoke the more
conventional, romantic world of
Glazunov’s 1934 Saxophone Concerto,
and Swensen conducted lugubrious
Sibelius and over-hearty Beethoven.
Richard Morrison
City Halls, Glasgow, tonight
David Hare’s Moderate
Soprano in the West End
First Night in the main paper
Entertainments
Entertainment
HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
Book your advertisement or
announcement now at:
thetimes.co.uk/ advertise
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MISÉRABLES
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
St Martin's
020 7836 1443
66th year of Agatha Christie's
THE MOUSETRAP
Mon-Sat 7.30, Tues & Thu 3, Sat 4
www.the-mousetrap.co.uk
Vaudeville Theatre 0330 333 4814
Oscar Wilde's LADY
WINDERMERE'S
FAN
Mon-Sat 7.30pm, Thu & Sat 2.30
Classicspring.co.uk
%
Please be adv
calls to 084
4n
can cost up to
minute plus y
provider’s cos
16
1G T
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
James Jackson
The City
and the City
BBC Two, 9pm
In the retrodystopian
world of
Beszel,
Inspector Borlu
(David Morrissey) is
like Sam Spade with a
masochistic streak. “I
Early
Top
pick
appreciated a beating
every now and again,”
his weary voiceover
mutters as he gets
battered by thugs in a
nocturnal backstreet
gutter. “It sharpened
me up.” Morrissey
manfully carries this
gloomy, stylishly shot
adaptation of China
Miéville’s acclaimed
novel, an unusual kind
of police mystery. Last
week’s first episode
introduced us to the
hangdog Borlu as he
got on the case of a
young woman’s corpse
in Beszel, a place where
the rain comes down
hard and the light bulbs
don’t seem to go higher
than 40 watts. This
week he travels to the
off-limits, co-existent
city of Ul Qoma. In this
parallel murkhole,
smoking is an almost
hangable offence and
Borlu is frustrated at
having to bend to his
frosty Ul Qoma
superior, Senior
Detective Dhatt. As he
discovers more about
the life of the victim,
he is reminded of his
long-vanished wife
(in flashbacks) — the
emerging question is
whether solving the
case will help him to
learn the truth about
her. However, plot
details feel less relevant
to one’s enjoyment of
the series than the
look, the sense of
character and the
bigger ideas flying
around. The way in
which Beszel and Ul
Qoma’s inhabitants are
unable not just to
acknowledge each
other, but even see
each other, is a
persuasive metaphor
for our modern cities.
BBC Young
Musician
BBC Four, 7.30pm
The talent on display
continues to be hugely
impressive as the
competition moves
into the percussion
category final. The
youngest competitor
bringing modern
repertoire to life in
Birmingham is only
15 years old. The
chairwoman of the
jury, the composer
Kerry Andrew, is joined
by the Bulgarian-born
Daniella Ganeva,
a pioneer of solo
percussion and one of
the finest marimba
artists around, and
Owen Gunnell, a BBC
Young Musician finalist
who has gone on to a
successful career
around the world.
Tonight may get loud.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Live Commonwealth Games
2018. Further coverage on day nine in Queensland.
Katarina Johnson-Thompson — who missed the 2014
Games in Glasgow due to injury — concludes her pursuit
of gold at the Carrara Stadium, where the heptathlon
800m takes place 1.00pm BBC News at One; Weather
1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Daniel
is concerned when he thinks a child is at risk from one of
his patients (AD) 2.15 800 Words. When Woody and
Smiler find yet another thing wrong with the Turners’
house they have to evacuate to the motel, where George
encounters Dean — a feared nemesis from his childhood
(AD) 3.00 Escape to the Country. Sonali Shah searches
for properties in Suffolk (AD) 3.45 Money for Nothing.
Sarah Moore transforms items from Dunbar Recycling
Centre (r) 4.30 Flog It! A compilation of valuations from
the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Croombe in south
Worcestershire and Crowcombe Court in Somerset (r)
5.15 Pointless. Quiz show in which contestants have to
score the fewest points possible by giving the least
obvious correct answers to questions 6.00 BBC News at
Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Live Commonwealth Games 2018. Hazel Irvine
presents continued coverage on day nine of the Games in
Queensland. Robina Stadium hosts the start of the fast
and frenetic rugby sevens competition, with the women’s
event getting under way with preliminary-round matches
including New Zealand v South Africa, Australia v England
and Fiji v Wales 9.15 Oxford Street Revealed (r) (AD)
10.00 Homes Under the Hammer (r) 11.00 Britain’s
Home Truths (r) (AD) 11.45 Dom on the Spot 12.15pm
Bargain Hunt. Two teams compete at the East of England
Showground, one of the largest antique fairs in the
country. Later, things get a little exciting at the auction in
Staffordshire (r) (AD) 1.00 Commonwealth Games 2018.
Jason Mohammad presents highlights of day nine from
Queensland, with 27 gold medals up for grabs in sports
including athletics, diving, lawn bowls, rhythmic
gymnastics and wrestling 5.15 Put Your Money Where
Your Mouth Is. Antiques experts Eric Knowles and Danny
Sebastian attend the Showdown Auction, with Danny
risking it all and Eric getting passionate about pottery
when he finds a Davenport dish (AD) 6.00 Eggheads.
Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine
6.00am Good Morning Britain 8.30 Lorraine.
Entertainment, current affairs and fashion news, as well
as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip 9.25 The Jeremy
Kyle Show. Studio chat show (r) 10.30 This Morning. A
mix of chat, lifestyle features, advice and competitions.
Presented by Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford
12.30pm Loose Women. An all-female panel from
various backgrounds across the entertainment and
journalism industries chat about their own lives,
interview guests, and discuss topical issues 1.30 ITV
News; Weather 2.00 Live ITV Racing: Grand National
Festival. Coverage from Aintree of five races on the
second day of the prestigious meeting, at 2.20, 2.50,
3.25, 4.05 and 4.40. With analysis from AP McCoy, Mick
Fitzgerald, and Luke Harvey, commentary by Richard
Hoiles, reports from Matt Chapman, Oli Bell, Alice
Plunkett, and fashion reports from Charlotte Hawkins and
Mark Heyes 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as
four more contestants answer general knowledge
questions and work as a team to take on quiz genius the
Chaser and secure a cash prize 6.00 Regional News;
Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.30 Frasier (r)
10.05 Ramsay’s Hotel Hell (r) (AD) 11.00 Undercover
Boss USA (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm
Come Dine with Me. Dinner party contest from
north-west Wales (r) 1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers (r)
2.10 Countdown. Jimmy Osmond is in Dictionary Corner
3.00 A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun. A Dorset couple
search for a holiday home in western Algarve (r) 4.00
Escape to the Château: DIY. It is crunch time for Jonathan
and Michael, who are facing their investors (AD) 5.00
Four in a Bed. The B&B owners discover what they have
been paid and settle some scores (r) 5.30 Star Boot Sale.
The Outnumbered actor Tyger Drew-Honey puts items up
for sale and is not afraid to turn down offers that are
below his asking price. Last in the series 6.00 The
Simpsons. Another trio of Hallowe’en stories, including
Homer given a Dr Seuss-style makeover (r) (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Mandy, Luke and Oliver are surprised by a
visitor in the village, while Cindy suggests a mother and
daughter night for Holly. Elsewhere, Brody and Buster
clash over decisions for Damon (r) (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can’t
Pay? We’ll Take It Away! In Coventry, the sheriffs chase
£10,000 owed by a publican to a contractor, while agents
in central London try to recover almost £8,000 owed to a
firm of accountants (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime
12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. The doctors treat
patients with mental health problems, including a
pregnant woman afraid she is developing depression and
a boy who struggles to control his anger (r) (AD) 1.10
Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD)
2.20 NCIS Special: Game of Shadows. The team flies
to Israel, but receives a hostile reception from Ziva’s
father, who is the head of Mossad — and Gibbs is forced
to make a tough decision (r) (AD) 3.20 FILM: Patient
Killer (PG, TVM, 2015) A hypnotherapist haunted by a
client’s suicide wonders if there are sinister forces at
work while treating a similar patient. Thriller starring
Victoria Pratt and Casper Van Dien 5.00 5 News at 5
5.30 Neighbours. Jane starts an extensive search of
her former home (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Tori
enlists outside help as she tries to stop Robbo going to
jail (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7PM
For
For
o full
f ter
te m
mss and
d ccondi
ondi
o
nd tion
ion
ons,
on
s, visit
s,
isit
it tsl
tslsubs
ssubs
ub .imb
imb
im
m msub
msubs.co
s bs.co
su
s.com/SU
m/SU
/SUB600
/
B60
B6
60
6
0 0
7.00 The One Show Alex Jones hosts the
final edition of the week
9PM
8PM
7.30 Sounds Like Friday Night
Featuring Lily Allen, Sam Smith,
James Bay, 5 Seconds of Summer
and Little Mix (2/5)
8.00 EastEnders Woody has his eyes on a
new venture (AD)
8.30 MasterChef: The Final The last
three cooks are tasked by John Torode
and Gregg Wallace to produce the best
three dishes of their lives in their bid
to become the show’ss 14th champion.
Last in the series (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
9.30 Have I Got News for You Hosted
by Victoria Coren Mitchell (2/9)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.25 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.35 The Graham Norton Show The host
catches up with stars of Rampage,
Dwayne Johnson and Naomie Harris.
Martin Freeman discusses horror
anthology Ghost Stories, while Roger
Daltrey performs his new single (2/13)
11.25 Wannabe New series.
Comedy, written by and starring
Lily Brazier (1/4)
11.50-6.00am Live Commonwealth
Games 2018 Coverage as the 10th
and penultimate day of the Games gets
under way in Queensland. The women’s
hockey final takes centre stage at Gold
Coast Hockey Centre, followed by the
men’s and women’s 4x100m relays at
the Carrara Stadium
6.30 Today at the Games Clare Balding
and Gabby Logan round up action
from day nine of the Commonwealth
Games in Queensland, where various
athletics, diving and lawn bowls
medals were decided
7.00 Emmerdale Aaron and Liv prepare for
her day in court (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 The Gadget Show A family’s internet
security is put to the test by a hacker,
who discovers how easy it is to gain
access to their gadgets. Plus, some tips
on how to better protect yourself
online (5/12)
8.00 Gardeners’ World Monty Don gets to
grips with a new project, beefs up his
borders by dividing perennials and
celebrates spring-flowering shrubs.
Plus, Carol Klein profiles the camellia.
Includes weather
8.00 Love Your Garden A couple who
founded a charity to support bereaved
families get a garden makeover from
the team (2/8) (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Simon is accused
of stealing Toyah’s money (AD)
8.00 I Don’t Like Mondays Guest
Jonathan Ross joins host Alan Carr for
the show in which audience members
compete to get the chance to resign
live on air and receive their whole
year’s salary in one go (2/3)
8.00 Springtime on the Farm
Kelvin Fletcher gets to go on a date in
a rhubarb triangle, plus there are
updates from all of the stories covered
earlier in the week (5/5)
9.00 The City & the City
Borlu believes extreme right
nationalist group leader Major Syedr
knows more about Mahalia’s death
than he is prepared to reveal.
See Viewing Guide (2/4) (AD)
9.00 Lethal Weapon A secret about
Riggs’ deceased wife is revealed when
he visits his father-in-law in prison,
while Murtaugh tries to impress
Captain Avery (AD)
9.00 Gogglebox Capturing the households’
instant reactions to what they are
watching on television from the
comfort of their own sofas (AD)
9.00 Jane McDonald: My Life Story
Profile of the singer, examining her
rise to fame as one of the country’s
first reality television stars on 1998
docusoap The Cruise and subsequent
career as a performer and presenter
7.30 Coronation Street Eva reaches a big
decision about the baby (AD)
10.00 Episodes Matt tries to secure
confirmation of a new series.
See Viewing Guide (3/7) (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.00 Lee and Dean The builders carry
out their first ever job for a gay
couple (3/5) (AD)
10.00 Will & Grace Jack suffers a crisis of
faith after he breaks up with Drew
10.30 Newsnight With Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
10.35 8 Out of 10 Cats Aisling Bea is
joined by Joel Dommett and James
Acaster, while Rob Beckett teams up
with Joe Swash and Roisin Conaty to
discuss memorable moments from
school (10/11) (r)
10.30 Will & Grace The best friends
discover a connection between their
parents. Last in the series
11.35 The Assassination of Gianni
Versace: American Crime Story
Andrew targets wealthy men in
San Diego (7/9) (r) (AD)
10.45 Invictus (12, 2009) Newly elected
President Mandela finds himself the
leader of a racially and economically
divided nation, and seeks a means to
unite the people. The country’s entry in
the 1995 Rugby World Cup provides a
perfect opportunity, and he enlists the
aid of captain Francois Pienaar in
making his team an inspiration to all
South Africans. Fact-based drama
starring Morgan Freeman (AD)
11.50 Rude Tube (9/10) (r)
12.30am Sign Zone: Civilisations How traditions
developed in the years following the Renaissances (r)
(AD, SL) 1.30 Picasso’s Last Stand. The last decade
of the great artist’s life (r) (AD, SL) 2.30 The
Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story
(r) (AD, SL) 3.30-6.00 BBC News
1.15am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 Take on the Twisters. Julia Bradbury
presents the quiz show where contestants compete to
take on the eight giant sandtimers (r) 3.50-6.00
ITV Nightscreen. Text-based information service
12.50am FILM: Oldboy (18, 2013) A man who was
kept prisoner for 20 years then released seeks revenge on
the people who captured him. Spike Lee’s thriller remake
starring Josh Brolin 2.35 Kiss Me First (r) (AD, SL) 3.30
Building the Dream (r) (AD) 4.25 The Question Jury (r)
5.20-6.15 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star (r)
11.05 Front Row Late Mary Beard and
guests discuss The Assassination of
Katie Hopkins and The Wound
11.20 Rob Beckett’s Playing for Time
Josh Widdicombe joins the host
to play video games from the late
1990s (3/4) (AD)
11.05 Greatest Ever Celebrity Wind Ups
Joe Pasquale revisits more pranks,
including Justin Bieber’s elaborate trick
upon Taylor Swift, and incognito
meet-and-greets with Michael Bublé
and Mark Hamill (5/6) (r)
12.00 SuperCasino Viewers get the chance to take
part in live interactive gaming 3.10am GPs: Behind
Closed Doors. The doctors treat patients with mental
health problems (r) (AD) 4.00 The Great Yorkshire Bridge
(r) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Divine Designs (r)
(SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Friday April 13 2018
17
1G T
television & radio
Nat King Cole:
Afraid of
the Dark
BBC Four, 9pm
A worthy repeat of this
2014 feature-length
portrait of Nat King
Cole, filled, as you
would expect, with that
wonderful velvet croon.
Most notably, it sets his
success against the
racism that he and his
family suffered. In one
bit of footage we
see him on stage
in skin-lightening
make-up (to cater to
white audiences).
There’s also the story
of how he moved to a
Los Angeles suburb
where his neighbours
said that they didn’t
want “undesirables”.
Cole agreed, saying
that if any arrived he
would be the first to let
his neighbours know.
The Nineties
Sky Arts, 9pm
The entertaining
look at the most
game-changing aspects
of the 1990s turns its
focus to Bill Clinton,
the first rock’n’roll
president. When he
romped to victory over
George Bush in 1992 he
was a bright new dawn,
a sax player who
admitted to having
smoked dope (but
not inhaling), who
schmoozed with Bono
and knew Martin
Luther King’s “I have
a dream” speech by
heart. The romping
continued once he was
in the White House
and tonight’s edition,
inevitably, ends up with
his impeachment trial.
Clinton’s twinkle was
irresistible to many, but
not to Kenneth Starr.
Episodes
BBC Two, 10pm
How much more can
this cynical satire
squeeze out of Matt
LeBlanc’s libido? The
fallout of his tryst with
a girl from his game
show continues — his
young sons have seen
the sex tape of it online.
Now that would be an
awkward fatherly chat.
And it’s still a show full
of sharp lines about
acting, scriptwriting
and ego. Witness
Sean the Brit (Stephen
Mangan) advising
LeBlanc on the TV
pitches coming his
way: “Nix anything that
says ‘comes to realise’.
Because whatever it
is, the network will
insist you ‘come to
realise’ it by the end
of the pilot, so then
you’ve got no show.”
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7pm
After a dreadful start,
Aston Villa look like a
solid bet to finish in the
play-off places. It’s been
the opposite for Leeds
United, who started
well, but faded away.
Paul Heckingbottom
is in charge, as
Leeds travel to Villa
Park for tonight’s
Championship match.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Supergirl (r) 8.00 Futurama (r)
8.30 Modern Family (r) 9.30 The Simpsons (r)
11.00 Warehouse 13 (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r)
5.00 The Simpsons (r)
6.00 Futurama. Farnsworth reveals why he
is so devoted to Zoidberg (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Back-to-back episodes (r)
8.30 Modern Family. Gloria and Mitch are
invited to a party at Oprah’s house
9.00 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life.
Karl continues to investigate life’s big questions
by exploring the key factors that shape
people’s identities (2/6) (r) (AD)
10.00 Sky Sports’ Funniest Moments: Best Bits.
Players, pundits and comics look back at comical
moments from the world of Sky Sports (r) (AD)
12.00 A League of Their Own (r) (AD) 1.00am
In the Long Run (r) 1.30 Brit Cops: War on
Crime (r) 2.20 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 The
Real A&E 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 The British (r) (AD)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House (r)
6.00 House. The medic discusses his latest case
with his therapist (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
An ice-hockey player is killed during a match (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny and Baez search for
a missing journalist (r)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Jaime finally visits
Tyrion in jail after some persuasion from Bronn,
and also has a mission for Brienne (r) (AD)
10.10 Game of Thrones. Jon and his men attack
the mutineers at Craster’s Keep (r) (AD)
11.10 Game of Thrones. Stannis and
Davos arrive in Braavos for their meeting
with the Iron Bank (r) (AD)
12.10am The Sopranos. Double bill (r)
2.35 Crashing (r) (AD) 3.10 Without a Trace (r)
4.10 The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00am Motorway Patrol (r) (AD) 7.00
Highway Patrol (r) (AD) 7.30 Border Patrol (r)
8.00 Border Security: Canada’s Front Line (r)
(AD) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 11.00 Cold Case
(r) 12.00 The Real A&E (r) (AD) 1.00pm Air
Rescue (r) 2.00 To Catch a Smuggler: JFK
Airport (r) (AD) 3.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
5.00 Border Security: Canada’s Front Line (r)
6.00 Air Rescue (r)
6.30 Air Rescue (r) (AD)
7.00 The Real A&E
7.30 The Real A&E
8.00 America’s Next Top Model. Reality series
9.00 Nashville. Daphne struggles to accept
Deacon and Jessie’s relationship
10.00 The Enfield Haunting (1/3) (r) (AD)
11.00 The Enfield Haunting (2/3) (r) (AD)
12.00 The Enfield Haunting (r) (AD)
1.00am Britain’s Most Evil Killers (r) 2.00
Blindspot (r) 3.00 Criminal Minds (r) 4.00
Nothing to Declare (r) (AD) 5.00 Border
Security: Canada’s Front Line (r)
6.00am Dvorák: The Complete Symphonies
6.55 Giselle 9.00 Watercolour Challenge
9.30 Landscape Artist of the Year 2015
10.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD)
11.00 Trailblazers: Nuclear Protest 12.00 The
Sixties (AD) 1.00pm Discovering: Max von
Sydow (AD) 2.00 Watercolour Challenge 2.30
Landscape Artist of the Year 2015 3.30 Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 4.00 Trailblazers: Acid
House 5.00 The Sixties (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Julie Andrews (AD)
7.00 Johnny Cash: Song by Song (AD)
7.30 Dolly Parton: Song by Song (AD)
8.00 Video Killed the Radio Star
8.30 Discovering: Foo Fighters (AD)
9.00 The Nineties. See Viewing Guide
10.00 Foo Fighters: Austin City Limits. The rock
band perform for the US music programme
11.15 Brian Johnson’s A Life on the Road
12.15am Classic Albums (AD) 1.15 Pearl Jam:
Let’s Play Two 3.30 The Summer of Love (AD)
4.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
6.30 Paddock Uncut 6.45 Live Formula 1. The
second practice session for the Chinese Grand
Prix 8.50 Great F1 Cars 9.00 Good Morning
Sports Fans 11.00 Live European Tour Golf: The
Open de España 1.00pm Live PGA Tour Golf:
The RBC Heritage 3.00 Live Indian Premier
League: Royal Challengers Bangalore v Kings XI
Punjab. Coverage of the latest match taking
place at M Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore
7.00 Live EFL: Aston Villa v Leeds United
(Kick-off 7.45). All the action from the
Championship fixture at Villa Park
10.15 Live The Debate. Premier League news
11.15 PL Greatest Games. Arsenal v Tottenham
Hotspur from 2010
11.30 Premier League Preview
12.00 Sky Sports News 2.00am Formula 1
3.45 Live Formula 1. Coverage of the third
practice session for the Chinese Grand Prix at
the Shanghai International Circuit 5.15 F1
Report 5.45 Paddock Uncut
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 6.30pm Your Home in
Their Hands (r) 7.30 Live Ulster Rugby: Ulster
v Ospreys (Kick-off 7.35). Coverage of the
match from the 20th round of PRO14 fixtures,
which takes place at Kingspan Stadium
9.30-10.30 The City & the City (AD) 11.05
Episodes (AD) 11.35 Front Row Late
12.05am-12.30 BBC News
Get the best writing on big books
and big ideas, across all platfor ms.
Help
lp us ce
cele
eb
brrrat
atte th
a
this
i won
is
onde
d rrff ull iss
de
ssue
ue
e,
ge
et an
n ann
nnu
ual su
ua
subs
bscr
bs
c ip
cr
pti
t on
n to
od
day
a and a
sp
pe
eccia
al li
l mi
mite
ted ed
te
edit
itio
it
ion
io
n an
nniive
verssar
a y mu
m g,,
forr as l it
fo
it tl
t e ass £2.
2 30
3 0 per
e wee
eek.
k
k.
To subscribe visit tlssubs.imbmsubs.com/SUB6000 or call 01293 312178 and quote code SUB6000
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 BBC Young Musician 2018. Percussionist
Joby Burgess joins Josie d’Arby as the
competition continues with the multiinstrumentalists in the percussion category
final. See Viewing Guide
9.00 Nat King Cole: Afraid of the Dark.
A look into the private journals of the music
legend, who overcame a period of racial
segregation and prejudice in America to become
one of the greatest jazz icons of all time.
See Viewing Guide (r)
10.30 Joy of the Guitar Riff. Documentary
exploring the impact of the guitar riff on
popular music over the past 60 years, including a
look at how it became the foundation on which
rock ‘n’ roll was built (r)
11.30 Rollermania: Britain’s Biggest Boy Band.
Members of the classic Bay City Rollers line-up,
as well as songwriters, producers and record
company promoters, recall the group’s rise to
fame in the 1970s (r)
12.30am Cilla at the BBC (r) (AD) 1.30 Totally
British: 70s Rock ‘n’ Roll (r) 2.30-4.00 Nat King
Cole: Afraid of the Dark (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Rules of
Engagement (r) 8.00 How I Met Your Mother (r)
(AD) 9.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 10.00 2 Broke Girls
(r) (AD) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big
Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 3.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 5.00 The
Goldbergs. Double bill (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Leela is shocked by the arrival
of a new face in the village (AD)
7.30 Extreme Cake Makers (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: GI Joe — Retaliation (12, 2013)
Action adventure sequel starring Dwayne
Johnson, Ray Park and Bruce Willis
11.10 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.40 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am First Dates (r) (AD) 1.10 Tattoo
Fixers (r) (SL) 2.20 Gogglebox (r) (AD) 3.10
Rude Tube (r) 4.05 How I Met Your Mother (r)
(AD) 4.50 Rules of Engagement (r)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.30 A Place
in the Sun: Summer Sun (r) 11.35 Four in a Bed
(r) 2.10pm Come Dine with Me (r) 4.50 A Place
in the Sun: Summer Sun (r) 5.55 Kirstie and
Phil’s Love It or List It (r) (AD)
6.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo. Black rhino
Kitani is due to give birth (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. A builder and his family
pursue their dream of converting a derelict
church into a home, giving up their jobs and
sacrificing their life savings to do so. Kevin
McCloud presents (5/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Rough Justice. The body of diamond trader
is recovered from a swimming pool. In Flemish
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. Staff at St George’s
Hospital tackle one of their most dramatic
emergencies when 60-year-old rail worker Alan
is airlifted to the helipad after being hit by a
high-speed train (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A baby is rushed in
after suffering a seizure and losing
consciousness (r) (AD)
12.10am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.10 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD) 3.15-3.55
8 Out of 10 Cats: More Best Bits (r)
11.00am A Monster in Paris (U, 2011)
Animated comedy with the voice of Vanessa
Paradis 12.45pm The SpongeBob Movie:
Sponge Out of Water (U, 2015) Animated
comedy with the voice of Tom Kenny 2.30
How to Train Your Dragon (PG, 2010)
Animated fantasy with the voice of Jay Baruchel
(AD) 4.20 Tooth Fairy (PG, 2010) Family
comedy starring Dwayne Johnson
6.25 X-Men 2 (12, 2003) Superhero
adventure sequel starring Hugh Jackman
9.00 X-Men: The Last Stand (12, 2006)
The mutant heroes battle old ally Jean Grey,
returned from the dead as the destructive and
seemingly unstoppable Phoenix. Superhero
sequel starring Hugh Jackman (AD)
11.05 My Entire High School Sinking
into the Sea (12, 2016) An earthquake
causes a school to slide into the sea and slowly
begins to sink. Animated teen comedy with the
voice of Jason Schwartzman
12.35am Bad Teacher (15, 2011) Comedy,
with Cameron Diaz and Justin Timberlake (AD)
2.25-4.00 The Sitter (15, 2011) Comedy
starring Jonah Hill and Max Records
6.00am The Planet’s Funniest Animals (r)
6.20 Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r)
7.10 Who’s Doing the Dishes? (r) (AD)
7.55 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.55 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold (r) 9.25 The Ellen DeGeneres
Show (r) 10.20 The Bachelor (r) 12.15pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 1.15 You’ve Been Framed!
Gold (r) 1.45 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.35
The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 4.50 Judge Rinder (r)
5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold.
Comical clips, narrated by Harry Hill (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 FILM: American Pie 2 (15, 2001)
The teenage friends get together after their first
year at college and set out to broaden their
sexual horizons over the summer. Comedy
sequel with Jason Biggs and Chris Klein (AD)
11.05 Family Guy. Peter is forced to return
to third grade (r) (AD)
11.35 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.05am American Dad! (r) (AD) 1.05 Two and
a Half Men (r) 1.55 Totally Bonkers Guinness
World Records (r) 2.20 Teleshopping. Buying
goods from home 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) 7.55 The Royal (r) (AD) 9.00
Judge Judy (r) 10.20 Inspector Morse (r) (AD)
12.35pm The Royal (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat (r)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.50 On the
Buses (r) 4.55 You’re Only Young Twice (r) 5.25
Rising Damp (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. One of Jessica’s
friends is charged with murder (r) (AD)
8.00 Agatha Christie’s Marple. A gathering at
the Devon estate of Miss Marple’s old school
friend Lady Tressilian leads to murder (r)
10.00 The Syndicate. Denise is devastated
when her husband leaves — until Leanne
reminds her he will come running back once he
knows about their lottery win, while Bob’s brain
scan reveals more than expected (2/5) (r)
11.05 Killer Women with Piers Morgan. The
story of Ashley Humphrey, convicted for
shooting another woman in 2003 (r) (AD)
12.05am Vera (r) (AD) 1.55 The Zoo (r) 2.50
Million Dollar Princesses (r) 3.40 On the Buses
(r) (SL) 4.35 Rising Damp (r) 5.25 Judge Judy
(r) 5.45 ITV3 Nightscreen
6.00am The Chase (r) 7.35 Pawn Stars (r) 8.25
Ironside (r) (AD) 9.30 ITV Racing: The Opening
Show 10.30 British Touring Cars: Crashes and
Smashes (r) 10.45 The Saint (r) 11.50 The
Avengers (r) 12.50pm Ironside (r) 1.55 Quincy
ME (r) 2.55 Minder (r) (AD) 4.00 The Saint (r)
5.00 The Avengers (r)
6.10 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
6.40 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. A Second World War
memento and a loud toy gun (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 The Virtual Grand National 2018.
One-off special aimed at predicting the outcome
of the Grand National
9.00 Car Crash Britain: Caught on Camera.
Road accidents and near-misses captured on
personal cameras (1/4) (r)
10.00 FILM: Rambo — First Blood Part II
(15, 1985) Action adventure sequel starring
Sylvester Stallone (AD)
12.00 The Americans (r) (AD) 1.00am Minder
(r) (AD, SL) 2.00 Fifth Gear (r) 2.50 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors 4.00 Steve
Austin’s Broken Skull Challenge 5.00 Top Gear.
Motoring magazine (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. Jeremy, Richard and James try to
improve the ambulance (AD)
7.00 QI XL. Cariad Lloyd, Dermot O’Leary and
Phill Jupitus compete alongside resident
panellist Alan Davies, as Stephen Fry hosts
an extended edition of the quiz show
8.00 Into the Fire (2/9) (r)
9.00 Fawlty Towers. Basil goes to great
lengths to prove a guest has smuggled
a woman into his room (AD)
9.45 Fawlty Towers. A guest’s death plunges
the hotel into chaos (AD)
10.25 Fawlty Towers. Sybil walks out on Basil
on their anniversary (AD)
11.00 Have I Got a Bit More News for You.
Victoria Coren Mitchell hosts the topical quiz
12.00 QI 1.15am Mock the Week 1.55 QI 3.15
Parks and Recreation 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
Bill 12.00 Lovejoy 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine 1.40 Hi-de-Hi! 2.20 Last of the Summer
Wine 3.00 London’s Burning (AD) 4.00 You
Rang, M’Lord? 5.00 Lovejoy
6.00 Hi-de-Hi! Jeffrey hosts a music recital
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. Barry competes
with a fitness-mad neighbour
8.00 Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries. Phryne is
duped into investigating an Australian Rules
football coach’s missing lucky cap, and instead
discovers a gruesome murder
9.00 WPC 56. A predator targets contestants in
a beauty pageant (1/5) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The team reopens the case of
a murdered palaeontologist after learning he
was opposed to his museum’s dealings with a
fuel company (1/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. A stranger asks for
help with a leaking car radiator
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London’s Burning (AD)
2.15 The Pinkertons (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Who Do You Think
You Are? (AD) 11.00 The World’s Weirdest
Weapons (AD) 12.00 Time Team 1.00pm The
Hunt (AD) 2.00 Life in Cold Blood 3.00 Coast
(AD) 4.00 Private Lives of the Monarchs (AD)
5.00 The World’s Weirdest Weapons (AD)
6.00 Churchill’s Bodyguard
7.00 Rallying: The Killer Years.
The motorsport’s Group B era (AD)
8.00 Operation Grand Canyon with Dan Snow.
The historian and his team conclude their
re-creation of the expedition (2/2) (AD)
9.00 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
First episode of the classic comedy sequel
9.40 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
Terry arrives home from the Army
10.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
11.00 Private Lives of the Monarchs.
Tracy Borman explores the decadent
Reformation court of Charles II (AD)
12.00 The World’s Weirdest Weapons (AD)
1.00am Scotland’s Murder Mysteries 2.00
Black Ops (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 7.30pm Live Scrum V:
Ulster v Ospreys (Kick-off 7.35). Ross Harries
presents coverage of the match from the 20th
round of PRO14 fixtures, which takes place at
Kingspan Stadium 9.30-10.30 The City & the
City. See Viewing Guide (AD) 11.05 Episodes.
See Viewing Guide (AD) 11.35 Front Row Late
12.10am-12.30 Coast (r)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Velindre:
Hospital of Hope. Pauline comes to terms with
the stigma of her diagnosis
STV
As ITV except: 2.00pm-5.00 Live Racing on
STV: Grand National Festival. Ed Chamberlin
and Francesca Cumani present coverage from
Aintree of five races on the second day of the
prestigious meeting, at 2.20, 2.50, 3.25, 4.05
and 4.40 8.00-8.30 Peter & Roughie’s Friday
Football Show 1.15am Teleshopping 2.15
After Midnight 3.15 Tenable (r) 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 UTV Life.
An entertaining and eclectic mix of stories and
studio guests with which to usher in the
weekend 1.15am Teleshopping. Buying goods
2.45-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Pàdraig Post: SDS (Postman Pat: SDS)
5.15 Zack & Quack (r) 5.35 Su Shiusaidh
(Little Suzy’s Zoo) (r) 5.40 Charlie is Lola
(Charlie and Lola) (r) 5.50 Seonaidh (Shaun the
Sheep) (r) 6.00 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks (r)
6.10 Fior Bhall-coise (Extreme Football) (r)
6.35 Machair (r) 7.00 An Là (News) 7.25 Live
PRO14 Rugby Union 9.30 Dealbhan Fraoich (r)
10.00 Seirm (r) 11.00 Bog Mummies/Cuirp sa
Pholl-mhonach (r) 11.50-12.00midnight
Dhan Uisge (River Garry) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Hafod Haul (r) 6.15 Y
Dywysoges Fach (r) 6.25 Guto Gwningen (r)
6.40 Tomos a’i Ffrindiau (r) 6.50 Ty Mel (r)
7.00 Meic y Marchog (r) 7.15 Ysbyty Cyw Bach
(r) 7.30 Nico Nôg (r) 7.40 Digbi Draig (r) 7.50
Twm Tisian (r) 8.00 Cymylaubychain (r) 8.10
Oli Wyn 8.20 Crads Bach y Traeth (r) 8.25 Cled
(r) 8.40 Marcaroni (r) 8.55 Bach a Mawr (r)
9.10 Stiw (r) 9.25 Yn yr Ardd (r) 9.35 Nodi (r)
9.45 Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 10.00 Hafod Haul (r)
10.15 Y Dywysoges Fach (r) 10.25 Guto
Gwningen (r) 10.40 Tomos a’i Ffrindiau (r)
10.50 Ty Mel (r) 11.00 Meic y Marchog (r)
11.15 Ysbyty Cyw Bach (r) 11.30 Nico Nôg (r)
11.40 Digbi Draig (r) 11.50 Twm Tisian (r)
12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 12.05pm Genod y
Carnifal (r) (AD) 12.30 Band Cymru 2018 (r)
1.30 Llys Nini (r) 2.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
3.05 Pengelli (r) 3.30 Dei a Tom (r) 4.00 Awr
Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Larfa (r) 5.05 Stwnsh:
Crwbanod Ninja (r) 5.30 Stwnsh: Gogs (r) 5.35
Stwnsh: Y Gemau Gwyllt (r) 6.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 6.05 Celwydd Noeth (r) 6.30 Garddio a
Mwy. The gardening and nature show returns,
with Meinir Gwilym getting advice before
buying her first greenhouse (r) 7.00 Heno.
Magazine programme 8.00 Pobol y Cwm. There
is more tension in Maes y Deri between Kath
and Mark (AD) 8.25 Codi Hwyl. Dilwyn Morgan
and John Pierce Jones continue their journey
along the Scottish coast to the yachting
harbour of Craobh Haven 9.00 News 9 a’r
Tywydd 9.30 Galw Nain Nain Nain. Iwan Parry,
from Caernarfon, goes on three dates with the
help of her grandmother, Elizabeth Williams
10.05 Bocsio. New series. The preparations
at the Ice Arena Wales as some of Wales’
leading fighters step into the ring in the Fire
and Ice night of professional boxing
10.35-11.40 Parch (r) (AD)
18
Friday April 13 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3309
5
6
18
7
8
18
26
9
13
11
26
11
5
19
11
22
23
2
2
N
15
15
25
1
11
26
19
16
18
7
21
10
26
9
4
14
26
16
26
12
13
22
11
19
10
17
21
3
Train Tracks No 381
17
U
21
18
12
1
8
7
26
11
7
16
1
4
1
3
4
5
6
3
3
20
20
2
20
18
22
© PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7625
5
A
25
4
9
B
22
1
20
9
20
6
19
3
25
5
18
4
21
1
16
7
17
18
1
2
17
21
5
2
26
19
18
10
2
20
21
1
4
16
9
22
16
1
22
4
12
3
25
26
23
2
26
18
22
2
4
2
22
1
2
5
24
16
21
26
26
26
B
22
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
23
21
Across
1
8
9
10
11
13
15
Eg, native of Vilnius (10)
Tool for nuts (7)
Easy, secure (5)
Grew older (4)
French emperor (8)
North European sea (6)
Says (6)
Solution to Crossword 7624
B U
A L UMN
I
F H
R I F L E
S
R
GRO
A O
I
CA L L C
C D
ODDME
R U R
D I SCO
T
S
A G
US A
S N
I NG
G
UNDS
T
EN T R
A
I
N T M
I
M
OB E
N R
N
VO I D
W A
RA I N
D C
T A T E
Y S
E S
S
I AM I
V C
L I S K
D
17
18
21
22
23
Eg, native of Tallinn (8)
Indian garment (4)
Not telling the truth (5)
Amount left over (7)
Lowest (10)
10
14
4
25
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
14
15
3
4
16
17
U
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
N
B
Down
2 Silly (5)
3 Indirect indication (4)
4 Antenna (6)
5 Not fully formed (8)
6 Just beginning to show (7)
7 Acrobatic exercises (10)
8 Large insect (4,6)
12 Twelve hours after noon (8)
14 Eg, native of Riga (7)
16 Bother, fuss (6)
19 Wheel rods (5)
20 Very gloomy (4)
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday’s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or
text TIMECODE to 84901. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network
access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution
call 0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica No 4219
G
T
A
S
Y
I
If you enjoy the times2 Crossword, you’ll
love Quintagram, our new and exclusive
clue-solving challenge
S
T
E
Y
Q
L
B
U
O
W
I
D
R
E
O
A
N
L
E
O
R
I
See today’s News section
U
S
O
Solve our new word puzzle
U
P
Winners will receive a Collins English Dictionary & Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle and text in the numbers in the three
shaded boxes. Text TIMES followed by a space, then your
three numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your name, address
and postcode to 84901 (UK only), by midnight. Or enter
by phone. Call 09012 925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three answer numbers (in any
order) and your contact details.
No 4220
E
U
R
P
B
H
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard
network charge. Winners will be picked at random from all
correct answers received. One draw per week. Lines close at
midnight tonight. If you call or text after this time you will not
be entered but will still be charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390
(Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
A
O
D
O
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
N
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce
a completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4301
Futoshiki No 3150
Kakuro No 2109
3
23
30
17
8
16
38
21
13
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
∨
28
23
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
16
37
7
14
17
9
∨
3
4
6
1
4
>
<
3
4
24
∨
22
8
6
31
15
7
>
13
32
17
4
5
3
<
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
5
4
16
17
4
32
16
6
10
3
6
10
9
© PUZZLER MEDIA
21
the times | Friday April 13 2018
19
1G T
MindGames
The new European champion is
the Croatian grandmaster Ivan
Saric, whose exploits I shall celebrate in a forthcoming column.
Today I congratulate the British
champion Gawain Jones and the
UK Knockout champion Luke
McShane on their joint share of
second prize, which has qualified
both British grandmasters for the
next stage of the qualifying cycle
for the 2020 World Chess Championship Match.
White: Luke McShane
Black: Alexei Fedorov
European Individual, Batumi 2018
King’s Indian Defence
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 g3 Bg7 4 Bg2
0-0 5 Nc3 d6 6 Nf3 c6 7 0-0 Bf5
Black has chosen a provocative
line of the King’s Indian, tempting
White’s central pawns forwards in
the hope of weakening them. The
cost for Black is the loss of several
tempi with the queen’s bishop.
8 Ne1 Be6 9 d5 cxd5 10 cxd5 Bd7
11 h3 Na6 12 Nd3 Qa5 13 Bd2
Rfc8
________
árDrD DkD]
à0pDb0pgp]
ßnD 0 hpD]
Þ1 DPD D ]
Ý D D D D]
ÜD HND )P]
ÛP) GP)BD]
Ú$ DQDRI ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
14 Re1
Preparing the natural advance
e4 followed by e5. Curiously, this
is a new move with 14 a3, 14 a4
and 14 e4 being preferred in previous play.
14 ... Qd8 15 e4 Be8
Having played provocatively,
Black now slides into passivity. In
his cramped quarters it was best
to trade pieces with 15 ... Nc5.
16 e5 dxe5
16 ... Nd7 may be playable but
Black was evidently concerned
about the bold reply 17 e6.
17 Nxe5 Nc5 18 Bg5 a5 19 Qd2 a4
20 Rad1 a3 21 b3 Qa5 22 Nc4
Qb4 23 d6
________
árDrDbDkD]
àDpD 0pgp]
ß D ) hpD]
ÞD h D G ]
Ý 1ND D D]
Ü0PH D )P]
ÛPD ! )BD]
ÚD DR$ I ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
White’s concentration of force
in the centre follows classically
approved precepts. Black must
have been pinning his hopes on
the following tactical transaction
but it is hardly surprising that the
British grandmaster can refute
this lateral demonstration by
further powerful centralisation.
23 ... Nxb3 24 axb3 Qxb3 25 Bxf6
Bxf6 26 Nd5 Qxc4 27 d7
27 dxe7 is also strong.
27 ... Bxd7 28 Nxf6+ exf6 29
Qxd7 Rc7 30 Re8+ Kg7 31 Rxa8
Rxd7 32 Rxd7 b5 33 Bd5 Qd3 34
Raa7 Kh6 35 Kg2 b4 36 Bf3 Qb1
37 Rxf7 Kg5 38 h4+ Kf5 39 Rfe7
Black resigns
________
árD DkD 4] Winning Move
àg DnDp0p]
ß D DpD D] White to play. This position is from
Jones-Berchtenbreiter, Batumi 2018.
ÞD Dp) D ] The
black queen is en prise but if White
ÝQ0 D D D] whips it off with 1 fxe3 then 1 ... Bxe3+
Ü) D 1ND ] exposes an attack against the white queen.
Û D D )P)] How did White improve on this?
Ú$ D DRI ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
3/
5
x2
–4
147 x 2 – 22
+ 1/4
OF IT
x 3 – 57
x4
+ 1/2
OF IT
62 + 8
EASY
MEDIUM
284 + 618
HARDER
cheap trick with ♣10. Correctly
lead ♣K and you will force out
♣A. Note from declarer’s perspective, it will be better not to beat
♣K with ♣A (not winning is
“ducking”). When declarer wins
♣Q that follows with ♣A, he has
exhausted East of clubs and can
safely lose the lead to that player.
The key to defending notrumps is
length. Exhaust the opponents of a
suit and your remaining cards will
win, whether they are an ace or a
two. It follows that you should
normally lead from your longest Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
suit. It matters less which (low)
card you select, but the standard
♠ 10 6 3
♥AQ 2
choice is the fourth card down.
♦J 9 6 4
Lead ♥7 from ♥KJ973, ♠ 3 from
♣KQ 2
♠ Q10532 and ♦2 from ♦AJ62.
♠K 8 7 4 2 N
♠9 5
When partner sees your ♦2, part♥J 9 8 4 W E ♥10 7 5 3
ner can work out you hold precisely
♦K 2
♦A 7
S
four diamonds (not more), as ♦2
♣10 8 ♠ AQ J ♣J 9 6 4 3
was your fourth highest (and of
♥K 6
course your lowest).
♦Q 10 8 5 3
Having established the basic
♣A 7 5
idea, let’s consider exceptions.
S
W
N
E
Question: When would you not
lead your longest suit?
1♦
Pass
3♦
Pass
Answer: When it has been bid
3NT(1) End
by an opponent; or when partner (1) 5♦ is too many tricks to win.
has bid — you would tend to lead
partner’s suit.
Contract: 3NT, Opening Lead: ♠ 4
Question: When would you lead
a different card in your longest
West led his fourth highest
suit, not the fourth highest?
spade, ♠ 4. Declarer won ♠ J and,
Answer: If your long suit was needing diamond tricks to make
headed by three touching high nine, at trick two led ♦3. West
cards, you should prefer to lead the played low and East won ♦A. East
top of the sequence; that way returned his second spade, West
declarer will not make a cheap beating ♠ Q with ♠ K and leading
trick. Lead ♣K from ♣KQJ62 and ♠ 2 to set up his two long cards.
♦Q from ♦QJ1072.
Declarer tried ♦5 but West won
Consider this layout.
♦K and cashed ♠ 87. Down one.
Dummy
Note, if declarer had led the first
West ♣974
East
diamond from dummy, East would
♣KQJ62 ---♣85
have to rise with ♦A, as the secDeclarer
ond spade lead had to come from
♣A103
his side, through ♠ AQ.
Lead ♣6 and declarer will win a
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
+ 1/2
OF IT
OF IT
+ 774
2/
3
+8
OF IT
2/
3
OF IT
3/
4
OF IT
– 48
– 885
x2
–8
1/
2
+ 87
OF IT
7/
8
OF IT
– 897
2 2
2
4
4
6
3
9
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
4
4 2
5
2
Polygon
Set Square No 2112
© PUZZLER MEDIA
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 10 words, average;
14, good; 18, very good; 23, excellent
Yesterday’s answers deem, deer, deme,
demo, demote, derm, deter, doer, dome,
doom, door, dorm, dote, doter, dree,
erode, meed, mode, mood, odometer,
odor, rede, redo, reed, rode, rodeo,
rood, rooted, teredo, toed
Killer Moderate No 5957
11
20
23
6
9
15
17
15
7
16
20
6
11min
7
13
8
7
14
11
6
24
4
8
17
9
16
7
13
4
8
6
17
10
8
11
12
6
13
23
17
22
23
12
3
22
17
15
22
13
8
19
12
8
2
7
22
7
11
11
8
+
16
23
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
÷
÷
= 10
+
x
+
x
=
12
= 108
=
17
=
10
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Codeword 3308
WH
O
ME
B
AD
T
J
F
E S
N
N E
E
L I
I M
O
R
A
K S
S
S
P
S I
E
E R
C
H E
S
CH I C
O R
E C L U S E
O R O
T OR I E S
R
O
A D V E N T
I
L
E
ON A L
A
I
D
T A P E R
E
S
A
A D I E S T
7
1
6
8
9
2
4
3
5
3
8
4
7
5
6
2
9
1
5
2
9
4
3
1
6
7
8
2
9
7
3
6
8
5
1
4
6
3
1
9
4
5
7
8
2
8
4
5
1
2
7
3
6
9
9
7
2
5
1
3
8
4
6
4
6
3
2
8
9
1
5
7
1
5
8
6
7
4
9
2
3
4
+
5
+
+
-
7
x
+
+
9
-
2
+
6
+
7
2
3
9
8
1
6
5
4
9
1
5
7
6
4
8
3
2
4
6
8
2
3
5
7
1
9
8
9
1
4
5
3
2
6
7
3
7
2
6
9
8
5
4
1
8
1
5
4
8
7
9
3
2
6
2
3
7
5
1
6
4
9
8
6
8
9
3
4
2
1
7
5
2
4
3
7
9
5
8
6
1
6
5
8
2
4
1
7
3
9
1
7
9
8
3
6
2
4
5
9
1
2
5
6
4
3
8
7
5
8
7
3
1
2
6
9
4
8
9
6
4
2
7
5
1
3
7
3
1
6
5
9
4
2
8
4
2
5
1
8
3
9
7
6
9
6
7
3
4
8
2
1
5
8
2
5
9
1
7
6
3
4
1
4
3
6
2
5
9
7
8
5
1
4
2
6
9
7
8
3
3
9
8
5
7
4
1
2
6
6
7
2
8
3
1
4
5
9
7
5
1
4
8
6
3
9
2
4
3
9
1
5
2
8
6
7
2
8
6
7
9
3
5
4
1
3
÷
4
7
2
8
3
1
6
5
9
3
5
9
6
2
7
8
4
1
1
4
3
9
7
6
2
8
5
2
9
8
5
1
3
7
6
4
7
6
5
2
4
8
9
1
3
5
3
6
1
9
2
4
7
8
9
2
4
7
8
5
1
3
6
8
1
7
3
6
4
5
9
2
7
9
9 6
7 8
6
5
1 8
2 9
6
7
5
7
8 7
9 5
9
4
9 3
7 1
8
5
1
3 2
5
1
1 4
3 2
3
3
6 8
9
3
1
3
2
1
5
9
7
Train Tracks 380
1
Quintagram
1 Par
2 Grace
3 Physics
4 Death cap
5 Stockpile
4
1
3
2
4
5
6
3
2
6
3
2
A
4
5
1
1
C
A
W
O
I
C
E
C
E
D
V
O
D
F
E
I
A
R
T
T
3
5
1
3 > 1
2
∧
∧
5
4 > 3
∧
∨
2
5
1
∨
1
3
4
∨
< 4
2
5
KenKen 4300
I
R
U
P
M
I
E
2
D
M
R
Futoshiki 3149
2
Cell Blocks 3191
Lexica 4218
R
A
E
O
L
L
G
A
A
D
Suko 2210
5
1
4
2
3
4
5 3
Brain Trainer
Easy 56
Medium 384
Harder 4,164
2
4
3
3
6 2
2
2
3
4
4
Word watch
Tutania (c) An
alloy containing
tin and copper,
used mostly for
decorative
purposes
Tubaist (b) A
tuba player
Tuatua (a) An
edible marine
bivalve from New
Zealand waters
Chess
Killer 5956
6
8
1
4
5
9
3
2
7
7 9
9 8 6
3
1 2
8 9 3
9 7 1
3 1
6
9 8 7
7 9
÷
H
4
3
6
4
9
7
8
1
5
2
R I DGE
A
R
X
B L E E P
B
D
I
I GGE R
E
E
CORN
I
H
T I ARA
I
L
R
Z Z L E D
E
O
L
NO T T Y
B
S
5
4
6
1
2
7
9
8
3
Kakuro 2108
OOS H
B
P
C
S
E K E S T
R
P
A
A P T
T R
R
E
I V E D
A
N
T
QU I R E
U
D M
E D Y
P U
S
L
O
T T L E
K
Set Square 2111
Killer 5955
21
+
Enter each of
the numbers
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
We’ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
= 23
+
E X C L A
R
S
A
T OUR S
S M O
B A C
L
I
C
OP E R A
T
M
P ROV I
L
R O
A L MON
E
I
N E RO
Sudoku 9796
16
÷
Lexica 4217
56min
16
-
Quick Cryptic 1068
Sudoku 9795
Killer Deadly No 5958
x
Solutions
Sudoku 9794
Bridge Andrew Robson
Beginner Corner 51
Fourth highest of your longest
(and strongest) suit v notrumps
OF IT
1/
2
© PUZZLER MEDIA
European championship
Cell Blocks No 3192
Brain Trainer
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Chess Raymond Keene
1 Qc6! safeguards
the queen and
threatens the rook
on a8, leading to
a win of material.
After 1 ... Qb6
2 Qxa8+ Qb8
3 Qxb8+ Bxb8
White won easily
Quiz
1 William I or William the Conqueror 2 Berkshire
3 Brookside 4 Bros 5 Thylacine or Tasmanian tiger
6 The Red Shoes 7 Sean Penn 8 Almond 9 The atomic
bomb used in the Soviet Union’s first nuclear weapon
test 10 Siwa Oasis 11 Amines 12 Horse & Hound
13 Bookmaker 14 Richard Virenque 15 Ivan Pavlov —
as in Pavlov’s dog
13.04.18
MindGames
Mild No 9797
Fill the grid so that every
column, every row and
every 3x3 box contains
the digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
Josephine
Balmer
Difficult No 9798
5 6
1
8
2
8
7 5
8 6
4
3
Tutania
a A light cloth
b A mythical land
c An alloy
9
1 2
9
1
5 7
1
Tuatua
a A shellfish
b Selflessness
c A flower garland
Answers on page 19
1
5
9 6
9
3 6 9
9 5
8
3
4
7
4
1
9
6
6
Tubaist
a A member of an art
movement
b A musician
c A tropical plant
Fiendish No 9799
8
3 9
8
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
9 4
7
3 9 1
1 7
4
9
2
7
6 5 3
7
3
5
8
9 2
6 1
4 7 5
8 6 2
1
2
8
1 2 7
3
5
9
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight to receive four clues for any of today’s
puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
The Times Daily Quiz Olav Bjortomt
Suko No 2210
GETTY IMAGES
1 Who was the first
Norman king of England?
11 Which derivatives
of ammonia are
compounds containing
a basic nitrogen atom
with a lone pair?
2 In 1957, which county
was recognised by the
Queen as “Royal” due
to the presence of
Windsor Castle?
12 Debuting in
1884, what is the
world’s oldest
equestrian magazine?
3 From 1993 to 1995,
Anna Friel played Beth
Jordache in which
Channel 4 soap?
15
9 Detonated at the
Semipalatinsk test
site in 1949, what
was the RDS-1,
codenamed First
Lightning?
film is named after
a fairytale by Hans
Christian Andersen?
4 Which English boy
band had its sole UK
No 1 single with I Owe
You Nothing?
5 Benjamin died at
Hobart Zoo in 1936. He
was the last known of
which marsupial species?
6 Which ballet-themed
Powell and Pressburger
13 Founded in 1989,
BoyleSports is
Ireland’s largest
independent what?
7 Which double Oscarwinner wrote the 2018
debut novel Bob Honey
Who Just Do Stuff?
8 Two nuts are mentioned
in Genesis — pistachios
and which product of
the tree Prunus dulcis?
10 Which urban oasis
in Egypt was once
home to an oracle of
Ammon, hence its
ancient name
Ammonium?
14 Which French cyclist
(b 1969) won the Tour
de France’s King of
the Mountains jersey a
record seven times?
15 Which Russian Nobel
laureate is pictured with
back to camera?
Answers on page 19
Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the
spaces so that the number in each
circle is equal to the sum of the four
surrounding spaces, and each colour
total is correct
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1069 by Tracy
1
2
3
4
5
8
6
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
21
22
19
Across
1 Lengthens leases foremost of
dukes hold (4,4)
5 Ring up about second musical
work (4)
8 Tory side helping, thinking of
others (13)
10 Vehicle coming from Ayr
rolled over (5)
11 Exclusive group from lake bed
shown first (7)
12 Chinese food: turn down
whole lot (3,3)
13 Chase funds university
invested (6)
16 Surprise the Parisian after
dawn (7)
18 Found group in a cheerful
mood (3,2)
20 Notice plug (13)
21 Function of register
announced (4)
22 Flannel and soft soap (8)
Down
1 Large cola ordered in
neighbourhood pub (5)
2
3
4
6
7
9
12
14
15
17
19
Worker, having drink after
time, displays a fit of temper
(7)
Girl on sailing boat makes a
delivery (5,6)
Pull young girl across river (6)
Earlier religious building,
incomplete (5)
Frank’s following on (7)
Hear Stuarts rebuilt this
Scottish landmark (7,4)
Lose heart, as pride injured (7)
Defiant remark made by heavy
drinker in this place (2,5)
Cheery one, a learner driver
after information (6)
Iron block, a feature of
Elizabethan village (5)
Small-minded, rather lacking
in character, ultimately (5)
DIGITAL RADIO • APP
VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
Yesterday’s solution on page 19
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
5 419 Кб
Теги
The Times, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа