close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Sunday Post English Edition – October 15, 2017 part 1

код для вставкиСкачать
October 15, 2017 �80
Pudsey
Bear?s
�k pay
packets
No. 5843 - E
Revealed Casting couch scandal
I never met
any men
like Harvey
Weinstein
when I was
in Hollywood.
I met plenty
in Scotland
though
PAGE 7
INSIDE
TV star speaks out Pages 4&5
EXPOSED
STRICTLY
STAR IS OUR
COVER GIRL
How con
gang stole
football
fortune
MICAL FO
DE
O
CA
L CLU
AL
TB
AMILTON
A
PAGE 6
SCOTLAND?S
FIRETRAP H
SCHOOLS
By Andrew Picken
undreds of problems
have been uncovered in schools
around Scotland after secret
fire safety inspections.
Experts sound alarm after secret audits
reveal safety flaws in country?s classrooms
The audits ordered by worried
councils found many measures
designed to slow and halt the
spread of fires were not in place at
schools built under controversial
private-public partnerships.
We can reveal at least 25 schools
have needed urgent repairs and
one expert said many of the flaws
found could not be more serious:
?These things are essential. We
are talking about life and death.?
Special reports Pages 10&11
2
October 15, 2017
NewS
sundaypost.com
Curves:
MAGAZINE
An 18 to
30 stone
holiday
venue in
Scotland
It?s taken 20 years for Caroline Flack
to start the career she really wants
OPInIOn
page 9
SPORT
lorraine on george michael - Page 22
Family:
Sisters
cut off hair
to support
their auntie
The doctor won?t see
you now as GPs? new
deal rules them out of
routine appointments
page 13
Interview:
How much
has ballet
changed
in the past
60 years?
leader reveals check-ups will be delegated under proposals
By Andrew Picken
APICKEN@SUNDAYPOST.COM
pages 14 & 15
P
Jackie:
atients will no longer see
their family doctor for routine
matters under a shake-up of
Scotland?s GP services.
Iconic
girls? mag
to reveal
all its old
secrets
sundaypost.com/news
InsIde
pages 32 & 33
A new contract for the country?s
5000 GPs will be unveiled next
month with big changes planned.
As well as no longer doing vaccinations, the new deal is also set
to see doctors hand over drug
monitoring, repeat prescriptions,
routine diabetic checks and all
blood tests to non-GPs.
Hundreds of new health professionals, including physios and
pharmacists, will need to be
recruited to take over the work,
which is still expected to be provided from surgeries.
Last week an opinion poll found
more than two-thirds of patients
wanted to see a doctor first when
making an appointment.
Dr Alan McDevitt, who is leading talks with the Scottish
Government on behalf of GPs,
said soaring workloads meant his
members ?can?t keep spinning the
same plates?.
However, Margaret Watt, of the
Dr Alan
McDevitt,
Scottish
GPC chair
Scotland Patients Association,
said the answer was simply more
GPs given more than one in four
Scottish practices were currently
trying to fill a vacancy.
She added: ?Patients already tell
us they don?t see enough of their
doctor, so anything that makes
this situation worse will not be
welcome.
?I don?t think people have an
issue with the GP being a gatekeeper, referring them on to other
services where necessary, but you
want to see the GP first as they
have the overview of everything
that is going on with your health.
?The answer is more GPs and
proper funding, not shuffling the
deckchairs about.?
If agreed by BMA members, the
new contract will come into force
in April ? but some of the changes
will be phased in over three years.
As well as a chronic disease
monitoring team, there will be
prescribing room services for
Mesh victims head to
edItOrIal pOlICy
The Sunday Post is committed to journalism of the
highest standards, producing our newspaper with
accuracy, honesty and fairness. Our journalists adhere to
the Society of Editors? Code of Practice, administered by
the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO). It
is our policy to publish clarifications and corrections as
quickly as possible. To make a complaint, please email
us at editor@sundaypost.com or write to The Editor, The
Sunday Post, 2 Albert Square, Dundee, DD1 9QJ or call
01382 575541. If we cannot resolve your complaint, IPSO
can be contacted at www.ipso.co.uk, by emailing
complaints@ipso.co.uk or calling 0300 1232220.
appointments such as asthma
check-ups. A treatment room
service would become responsible for blood tests, dressing
changes or other procedural tasks
requested by GPs or hospitals.
Dr McDevitt, chairman of the
BMA?s Scottish GP Committee,
said: ?These changes, if agreed by
GPs, will simply mean there will
be more people around to do
things.
?Most people will be familiar
with practice nurses and healthcare assistants. There will be more
people doing that sort of thing.
?Since we don?t have enough
doctors we want to make sure if
you really need an appointment
with a GP, you will get one.
?It will be more of a team
approach and the GP will be the
leaders of the team.?
Last month The Sunday Post
revealed 87 surgeries across
Scotland were operating closed or
restricted lists as a result of staff
shortages and soaring demand.
Health Secretary Shona Robison
said: ?A new GP contract will provide significant benefits for GPs,
patients and healthcare staff.
?We are working closely with
the BMA and others to make sure
the new contract best fits the
needs of patients, allowing GPs to
focus their time on the most
complex cases.?
Elaine Holmes, left, and Olive McIlroy
The voices of Scotland?s
mesh victims will be heard
at Westminster this week as
the Government is urged to
suspend the controversial
procedures.
East Renfrewshire MP
Paul Masterton, one of the
speakers at Wednesday?s
parliamentary debate on the
issue, will highlight the lifechanging injuries suffered
by women in Scotland to
hammer home his call for
suspension and a safety
review.
He said: ?The many
women I?ve met through
Scottish Mesh Survivors
have left me in no doubt
over what must happen
now. I fully intend being
their voice in this debate.?
Kath Sansom, of the UK?s
Sling The Mesh campaign
group said injured women
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
Match
Post
city in seventh heaven - post match
War hero
just couldn?t
forget what
he?d seen
ADVICE
October 15, 2017
3
Cartoons
Health
Kenny Dalglish? would
he take Scotland job?
NewS
the worst financial habits - page 38
Paw Broon
has a tidy
plan for the
family?s junk
RELAX
P L U S
5
pages of
puzzles
when transistor radio was the big thing - page 46
Lorna?s little sister Courtney, six, watches
Brian Maguire fit her arm on Friday
Lorna grabs her
opportunity for
a bionic arm
Lorna Kemp
tries out her
new arm
on Friday
A teenager is trialling a bionic limb she
hopes will help her do housework ? and
learn to play the drums.
Lorna Kemp, 17, from Westray in
Orkney, had the state-of-the- art device
fitted last week in Glasgow, making her
one of only 10 people in Scotland to
have one.
If the trial proves successful she hopes
to raise the �,000 needed to buy it.
Lorna, who was born without her lower
right arm, said: ?It?s the little girly things
like doing my hair and painting my nails ?
I need mum to help me with those things.
?I?ve always wanted to play the drums,
even though mum will probably hate the
racket they make. I?d like to try the piano
and the guitar as well.
?It?s the wee things, like cooking
and cleaning that this new hand will
help with. I could maybe get my own
place to live, too.?
Brian Maguire, director of HCi Viocare
who supplied the limb said: ?We?re in no
rush to take the hand back from Lorna.
?I?ll make sure she?s got plenty of time
trialling it before she buys it.?
Westminster to urge ministers to suspend ops that ruined their lives
across the country will be
represented.
Hundreds of thousands of
women worldwide have
reported injuries from the
implants, used to treat
bladder problems and pelvic
organ prolapse, but medical
watchdogs insist the benefits
outweigh the risks.
Mr Masterton said: ?Mesh
procedures must be
suspended until
manufacturers can prove
their devices are safe.
?Surgical mesh must be
reclassified to reflect the
injuries suffered by thousands
of women across the country.
?Many of the studies and
reports into the safety of these
devices have been funded in
some way by manufacturers.
?Injured women are the
evidence of what has gone
wrong, not flawed figures.?
Last month, a woman in
Philadelphia was awarded
� million in damages over
injuries she sustained from
one of the devices most often
used in Scotland.
Manufacturers have paid
more than �illion to victims
in the US, Scotland faces its
biggest ever health claim
against the NHS with almost
450 cases, and thousands
more are taking legal action.
Scotland became the first
country in the world to
suspend the use of mesh in
2014 after a successful
petition by Elaine Holmes,
from Newton Mearns, and
Olive McIlroy, from Renfrew,
who both suffered crippling
injuries.
They both resigned ?in
disgust? from the safety
review commissioned by the
Scottish Government after it
was revealed all four medical
experts on the panel had
financial links to mesh
manufacturers.
Campaigners, who also
claimed ??vital safety
evidence? was ?tampered
with? in Scotland?s review,
said they are delighted the UK
Government has woken up to
the scandal.
Ms McIlroy, 60, said: ?The
UK Government has the
opportunity to really make a
difference and protect
patients from further
devastating injuries.
?It?s too late for all of us, but
they need to prevent devices
being introduced without
rigorous safety tests and
introduce a register so
problems can be flagged up.
?We hope the UK
Government grasp that
opportunity.?
4
October 15, 2017
News
sundaypost.com
THE RAISED VOICE
THE MINISTER
Investigation Actress speaks out in wake of casting couch scandal
This has to stop and
we have to stop it
By Angela Constance MsP
Equalities Minister
As we heard the awful
stories this week as
women came forward to
share their testimonies, it?s
clear that, across society,
we must take action.
We must challenge
attitudes that can lead to
harassment, abuse,
violence and bullying.
We still hear excuses for
men perpetrating these actions or, through
attempts to legitimise the objectification of
women, an inference that women are
somehow to blame for the harassment or
abuse perpetrated on them.
We must call out these actions and
words, and the misogyny and sexism
behind them, for what they are.
We need to recognise these attitudes are
harmful. We need to stand against it. And
we must all do this. Men and women. It?s no
longer OK to ignore comments or make
excuses as it?s ?the way it?s always been?.
Violence against women is about power
and control.
It is never the fault of those who suffer the
abuse. That is why, as a government, we
take all forms of gender-based violence
seriously.
A key component of our Equally Safe
strategy is ensuring the harmful attitudes,
acts and behaviours ? those laughed off as
?banter? ? are addressed early.
There is no place for sexism or harassment
and it should not be tolerated ? socially
or legally.
Is simple respect really
too much to hope for?
By Rosa Zambonini
Campaigner and blogger
While trying to do my job,
I have come across men,
powerful men, who made
me cry myself to sleep.
Men who have taken
my outgoing personality
as a green light to talk to
me in a way they would
never talk to a man.
I?m blonde and I wear
makeup. I?ve had a boob
job and fillers. So have they the right to
patronise and treat me with disrespect?
Maybe I have to realise that even 2017
isn?t a place I can be myself without
harassment but writing this now the tears
are falling down my face.
How many times did I go to bed wishing I
could run away? Too many. Even as I type
this I?m frightened someone is saying:
?She?s such an attention seeker.?
Do you know what it?s like to have to
avoid a corridor in your place of work
because you feel sick to your stomach?
Or what it?s like to worry you will lose your
job because you can?t take ?flirty banter??
When I was 14 a boy put his hand up my
top and I vomited for a whole day. I told
my parents and they made sure something
was done. My mother and father told me it
was never ever my fault if someone
mistreated me and it never would be.
I should be able to wear my heels,
lipstick and big hair in peace. Every
woman deserves respect and to feel safe.
I was very uncomfortable
to. Then the directors, both
told me not to tell anyone.
By Russell Blackstock
and Gordon Blackstock
rblaCkstoCk@sundaypost.CoM
A
n actress has spoken
out in the wake of the Harvey
Weinstein scandal to claim
women are routinely harassed
and hounded by powerful men
in the Scottish screen industry.
Joanne Thomson, a rising star,
says a casting couch culture still
exists in Scotland, while she ? and
many other actresses ? have been
forced to endure sexual harassment.
Ms Thomson ? nominated for a
string of awards for her
performances in hit ITV drama In
Plain Sight ? has demanded that
the torrent of allegations against
Weinstein, until recently one of the
most powerful men in the movie
industry, should provoke a debate
about the abuse of power by many
men in positions of influence.
She spoke out as artists and
campaigners echoed concerns that
predatory men were present in the
Scottish arts? scene.
Writing in The Sunday Post
today, Equalities Minister Angela
Constance demands action to
change the attitudes leading to the
harassment and abuse of women.
Ms Thomson claims many
female colleagues have told her of
being sexually harassed and
assaulted while trying to do their
job. A number of well-known
Scottish actresses have now formed
an unofficial self-help group to tip
each other off about sex pests and
predators on set, including male
directors, producers and actors.
The actress, from Glasgow, said:
?I have numerous friends and
colleagues who have been sexually
assaulted and I have encountered
this sort of behaviour myself.
?Whenever a job comes up, a lot
of the women text around to warn
each other about some of the men
involved and also to remind them
to keep their wits about them.
?I have spoken to some of
these men and have called
them out, but it is disgraceful
that women should have to do
these things. It shouldn?t be
our responsibility.
?The problem in Scotland
and the rest of the UK may not
be as bad as it is in
Hollywood but
you still have to
Harvey
Weinstein
be careful. All I know is that I did
not experience the problems there
that I have done here.?
Ms Thomson, 27, got her first
taste of sexist attitudes in the acting
business as a young drama student.
She said: ?Two well-known TV
and film directors asked me to dress
up in lingerie and be filmed in
various sexual positions
with two actors. I was
very uncomfortable
with the whole idea
because it sounded
pornographic. But I was going to
agree to it because I was scared not
to.
?The directors told me not to tell
anyone about it and I was so
terrified I said ?yes?.
?Many actresses are vulnerable
and want to get on in the business
but I was the only girl asked to do
this and I didn?t feel good about it.
?My then-boyfriend was angry
when he found out what I had been
asked to do and thankfully my
friends talked me out of it. I could
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
5
about doing it but scared not
well-known in the industry,
I was so terrified I said yes
? Actress Joanne Thomson describes an audition in Glasgow
Picture: Andrew Cawley
Joanne Thomson in Glasgow
on Friday, main, and, above,
acting with Douglas Henshall in
TV drama In Plain Sight
easily have gone ahead with it
and footage like that could end
up all over the internet.?
Ms Thomson has often
received unwanted attention
from men while working and said
many female colleagues had
experienced similar harassment.
She said: ?There?s this idea that if
you don?t sleep with men in the
business then you won?t get on.?
She hopes the Weinstein
scandal ? the movie mogul has
been sacked by his company
after allegations that he pursued
and harassed actresses for sex ?
will serve as a wake-up call.
?There is no one figure as big
or as powerful as Harvey
Weinstein in the business in
Britain, never mind Scotland, so
something on this scale hopefully
wouldn?t happen here,? she said.
?Weinstein had the power to
dictate whether someone works
again or not and I can
understand why some actresses
would be reluctant to complain.?
She believes many women
don?t come forward because
sexual harassment is often
difficult to prove.
?There rarely seems to be
consequences for this kind of
behaviour for the men who do it,
and they are manipulative
individuals,? she said.
Ms Thomson was treated well
by American producers and
directors on a recent trip to
Hollywood for auditions and
would not hesitate to return now.
We SAy PAGe 20
?Weinstein being found out
could be a good thing for women
in the workplace everywhere.?
Meanwhile, one of Scotland?s
leading theatre directors called
for action to eradicate sexism.
Jemima Levick, artistic director
of all-female theatre company
Stellar Quines, said: ?I remember
being propositioned by an older
director when I was starting out.
?It was eye-opening.
?I blocked his advances and
complained to the producer who
reprimanded him. But I was in
no way the only one and he
continues to work in the industry.
?Eyebrows are often raised
when he turns up at a function
with a much younger actress on
his arm.?
Lorne Boswell, spokesman for
Equity in Scotland, said the
actors? union was aware of
allegations of predatory
behaviour.
?Some members have reported
concerns confidentially,? he said.
?We are there to listen and would
take formal action if necessary,
including informing the police.?
In a Creative Scotland survey
earlier this year, one respondent
said ?sexism and casual sexual
harassment? was endemic.
Yesterday, Janet Archer, the
organisation?s chief executive
officer, said: ?Bullying and sexual
harassment should be
confronted wherever it occurs.?
Meanwhile, Weinstein was
reportedly still in a rehab clinic
yesterday being treated for ?sex
addiction?. Police in London and
New York are investigating sexual
assault allegations, which the
film producer has denied.
Judy MurrAy PAGe 21
roSS KInG In The MAG
THE CAMPAIGNER
and says sexism and harassment in Scotland is as bad as Hollywood
Horror stories
here, there and
everywhere
By Laura Bates
Everyday Sexism Project
?We?ve
decided to
sex it up a bit,
now take your
top off.?
Those words,
now seared
into my
memory, were
spoken to me
at a television
audition during a brief period
when I worked as an actress in
London.
Sexism and harassment in the
UK entertainment industry were
rife.
I heard horror stories about
directors who bombarded
young actresses with sexual
requests, implying career
advancement would follow if
they acquiesced, or career
suicide if they refused.
I saw friends return in tears
from castings where
inappropriate demands had
been made of them, and
watched their agonies as they
chose to remain silent rather
than risk being blacklisted by
powerful men.
When I started the Everyday
Sexism Project in 2012 and
more than 100,000 testimonies
of gender inequality poured in,
it became apparent that such
behaviour was devastatingly
common in other industries too.
In fact, there didn?t seem to be
any type of workplace that
was exempt.
From a female teacher who
had been assaulted in the staff
room, to a junior doctor whose
consultant told her to sit on his
lap if she wanted help
interpreting an x-ray.
A waitress told to grin and
bear it when customers put
their hands between her legs.
A DJ who, due to constant
groping, had come to dread
the job she once loved.
A YouGov survey last year
proved what the anecdotal
evidence suggested: more
than half of all women and two
thirds of young women had
experienced workplace sexual
harassment.
Far from a rare scandal
confined to the glamorous
world of Hollywood, the kind of
behaviour described in the
allegations against Harvey
Weinstein is experienced by
women everywhere, in all kinds
of jobs, on a daily basis.
If anything positive can
come of these horrendous
stories, it is my hope that they
might help at last to destroy
the culture of silence and
normalisation that surrounds
workplace sexual harassment.
It is incredibly difficult for
victims to speak out.
But bystanders, colleagues
and businesses can and should
be taking action to end this
endemic scourge.
October 15, 2017
Joshua Boyle
News
sundaypost.com
howzat for love?
6
Hostages
return after
rape and
murder
A woman has been rescued
from freezing waters in
Aberdeen harbour.
Aberdeen?s inshore
lifeboat crew was called to
Regent Quay at 1.40am
yesterday. She was found
clinging to the bottom rung
of a quayside ladder.
The woman was taken to
Aberdeen Lifeboat Station
before being transferred to
an ambulance.
Crew member Cal Reed
said: ?This lady was clinging
to the ladder but was unable
to climb out of the water.
Our presence saved this
woman?s life.?
Cricketer Ben Stokes put his recent
troubles behind him as he married
fiancee Clare Ratcliffe yesterday.
The couple tied the knot at the
church of St Mary the Virgin in East
Brent, Somerset in a ceremony
attended by friends, family and the
all-rounder?s teammates past and
present.
Among the guests were England
skipper Joe Root, former Test
captain Alistair Cook, fast bowler
Stuart Broad, wicket-keeper Jos
Buttler and Durham teammate Paul
Collingwood.
There were loud cheers from
guests at the end of the ceremony
as the happy couple posed for
pictures and kissed outside the
church.
Stokes got hitched just a month
after his arrest following an alleged
brawl outside a Bristol nightclub.
He was seen wearing a bandage
on his damaged right hand
yesterday but removed it minutes
before the ceremony.
Football fraudsters posed
as fraud-busters to rob club
? Source claims Hamilton lost almost � to gang posing as bank watchdogs
By Russell Blackstock
A
rblackstock@sundaypost.com
C
riminals posed as officials
from a bank?s fraud department to
dupe Hamilton Academical FC
into handing over almost �
million, according to sources.
The Scottish Premier League club
is reeling after losing the money to
the gang.
Today, we can reveal how the
fraudsters are thought to have
conned the South Lanarkshire club.
A source familiar with details of the
fraud said: ?There?s sympathy for
what?s happened but there?s a degree
of surprise they?ve fallen for the scam.
?It seems fraudsters contacted
Accies to say they were from their
bank?s fraud department and that
they had identified them as being
susceptible to fraud.
MICAL FO
DE
O
CA
L CLUB
AL
TB
Woman in
quay drama
Cricketer Ben Stokes kisses bride Clare after removing a bandage
he had earlier been wearing around his injured right hand, inset
HAMILTON
Taliban terrorists raped a
captive American woman
and killed her child, her
Canadian husband has
revealed.
Joshua Boyle and Caitlan
Coleman were taken
hostage almost five years
ago while reportedly
backpacking in Afghanistan.
She was pregnant with their
first child at the time.
Mr Boyle told reporters at
Toronto?s Pearson
International Airport the
couple had been trying to
deliver aid to villagers in a
part of the region, controlled
by the Taliban, ?where no
NGO, no aid worker, and no
government? could reach
when they were kidnapped.
Last week, they returned
with three children, all born
in captivity, the youngest of
whom is understood to be in
poor health.
In a statement, Mr Boyle
said: ?The stupidity and the
evil of the Haqqani network
in the kidnapping of a
pilgrim ... was eclipsed only
by the stupidity and evil of
authorising the murder of
my infant daughter.
He also spoke of ?the
stupidity and evil of the
subsequent rape of my
wife.?
The family were finally
rescued by the Pakistani
army after a US tip-off
during an operation near
the Afghan border.
Ms Coleman?s father had
previously said the decision
to visit the dangerous
country was
?unconscionable?.
Bandaged Ben
is bowled over
?The criminals then advised Accies
to move their funds into another
account and that?s when the money
vanished.?
It?s been repor ted the raid
plundered funds set aside for vital
upgrades at Accies? SuperSeal
Stadium.
The club ? which has the smallest
budget in Scotland?s top division ?
had been doing relatively well
financially and does not have an
overdraft facility.
It hoped to use saved-up cash to
carry out remedial work at the ground
as well as building an indoor training
pitch and other facilities, sources say.
It?s latest accounts from June 2016
show the club has assets of more than
� and had �0,000 in the bank.
Their finances had been boosted
by a thriving youth academy, which
has seen them develop and sell on
players such as James McCarthy and
Scottish cap James McArthur.
Accies called in police and football
bosses put Scotland?s 42 teams on
alert after it emerged Heart of
Midlothian had been conned out of
around �,000 earlier this year.
It has also been reported that four
other unnamed clubs may have fallen
for the con.
Accies said it would not have
survived this month if directors had
not agreed to cover the huge financial
shortfall.
Chairman Les Gray and directors at
the Lanarkshire outfit ? who have no
credit facilities ? pledged to personally
pay wages and other costs to cover
the losses.
In a statement, Accies said:
?Hamilton Academical FC have been
the target of an elaborate fraud
resulting in the loss of a substantial
sum of monies.
?The Police Service Scotland and
our bank are working closely with the
c l u b, c o n d u c t i n g a c r i m i n a l
investigation to pursue those
individuals responsible.?
Yesterday, a club spokesman said:
?We have nothing further to add at
this stage as a police investigation is
under way.?
Scottish Professional Football
League (SPFL) chief executive Neil
Doncaster described the crime as
?very serious?.
?We will be monitoring the
situation closely and working in
conjunction with Hamilton in the
days and weeks ahead,? he added.
In August, the SPFL warned clubs
to guard against fraud after third
division Annan Athletic failed to
receive an �,000 payment from the
league at the end of the season.
Police Scotland launched an
investigation after the money
apparently vanished, before being
retrieved.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
Scotland is bracing itself for
winds of up to 80mph as
Hurricane Ophelia
approaches.
The category three storm
is expected to arrive in the
early part of the week for
what has been dubbed
?Mayhem Monday?.
The Met Office has issued
severe weather alerts ahead
of Ophelia?s arrival, warning
of potential power cuts,
damage to buildings and
disruption to transport and
mobile phone signal.
Parts of England are
expected to see the mercury
rise over the coming days
thanks to the tropical storm,
however, with temperatures
of 25C predicted.
The hurricane, which will
be a storm when it hits the
UK, arrives exactly 30 years
after the Great Storm of 1987
killed 18 people.
DID YOU
KNOW?
In Switzerland,
public toilets are lit
with blue lights so
drug users can?t
find their veins.
Prison for
two-time
acid attacks
Criminals caught with
corrosive substances twice
will be automatically jailed
for at least six months in a
clamp down on acid attacks.
The new ?two strikes? rule
mirrors the regime for those
convicted of more than one
knife possession offence.
The steps follow a surge in
violent offences recorded by
police.
Home Secretary Amber
Rudd said: ?All forms of
violent crime are totally
unacceptable, which is why
we are taking action to
restrict access to offensive
weapons and crack down on
those who carry acids with
the intent to do harm.?
Meanwhile, police in
Sussex are hunting for two
victims who allegedly fled
after having acid thrown in
their faces in Hastings on
Friday night.
October 15, 2017
7
Critics say Pudsey?s good cause pays higher wages than others
Children and greed? Charity?s
average salary hits �,000
By Gordon Blackstock
gblackstock@sundaypost.com
T
he BBC?s charity Children
In Need has been accused of
paying ?excessive? wages on the
eve of its annual fundraising
drive.
Accounts for the charity ? which
will host its annual telethon next
month on BBC channels to raise
money for disadvantaged children ?
reveal employees were paid an
average of �,000 last year.
The average salary across the UK
is an estimated �,000.
Average pay at the charity ? which
hands out grants to organisations
who work with youngsters ? is much
higher than other children?s charities
that do similar work, according to
experts.
Since launching in 1980, the BBC?s
flagship charity has grown incredibly.
L a s t Nov e m b e r, p re s e n t e r s
Rochelle and Marvin Humes ? in a
role Sir Terry Wogan made famous
before passing away in 2016 ?
revealed a record-breaking total of
more than � million had been
raised during the TV appeal, while
the overall total reached �m.
But critics argue that too much of
the income is spent on running
costs.
Last year?s accounts show the
number of charity employees at its
HQ in Salford has gone up from 96 in
2015 to 104 last year.
In all, �4 million was spent on
staff costs last year ? up marginally
from the year before.
By comparison, other children?s
charities spent significantly less per
person than the �,000 average
Children In Need spent on its staff.
The latest accounts for Children
1st, for example, showed that it spent
�96m on wages for its 201
employees, an average of �,600 per
employee, while Barnardos spent
�5m on its 8270 staff across the
UK, an average of just �,000 per
worker.
Charity campaigner David Craig,
author of The Great Charity Scandal
and founder of the Snouts In The
Trough website, said: ?The average
cost per employee at the BBC?s
Children In Need seems unusually
high compared to other charities
and excessive.
?Some similar charities have high
wages but include staff such as
specialist nurses.
comparison
Ophelia
blows into
Scotland
News
Charity
Greg James, Fearne Cotton and Pudsey at a Children in Need fundraiser in London last November
?Children In Need don?t have
those types of specialist roles.
?Children In Need will claim what
they do is quite different to other
charities as they just collect and
distribute money rather than
working with front-line staff helping
real people.
?Nevertheless, the BBC Children
In Need?s salary structure seems
more than generous compared to
other charities.?
The average wage included that of
outgoing chief executive of the
organisation, David Ramsden.
Mr Ramsden ? who led the charity
for nine years before being replaced
by Simon Antrobus last November ?
had seen his wages go up from
around �1,000 to nearly
�0,000.
It is unclear what Simon Antrobus
is now being paid but Children In
Need?s website say the salary is
�5,000 per year.
Mr Antrobus was previously chief
executive of drug and alcohol charity
Addaction and had been in charge of
the organisation since 2009.
He had previously held senior
positions at the disability charity
Scope and Parkinson?s UK.
In 2006, it was revealed longrunning host Sir Terry Wogan had
been paid more than �,000 to
anchor the TV appeal, on top of his
�0,000-a-year Radio 2 salary.
When the details emerged he said
he would ?happily do it for nothing?.
But BBC bosses argued they found
it ?appropriate? to pay the fee.
And in 2014, the BBC charity was
forced to defend itself after it was
revealed it had nearly �m sitting in
investments instead of giving it to
the needy.
CEO salary
A spokeswoman for BBC Children
In Ne e d s a i d : ?Ev e r y p o u n d
generously donated by the public
goes towards our work supporting
disadvantaged children and young
people in the UK.
?We employ a small workforce of
highly-skilled people with
experience in a range of specialist
disciplines to ensure that funds
raised are spent responsibly and
make a real, lasting difference to
young lives across the UK.
?We were delighted to raise �m
last year, thanks to the generosity of
the British public, and these figures
show that our salary expenditure is
low compared to income generated.
?It is vital that we put this money
to good use by allocating and
monitoring grants professionally to
achieve the greatest impact for
children and young people.?
Average cost
per employee
CEO salary per
employee managed
Income
Employee
costs
Number of
employees
�.8m
�402m
104
�5,000
�,326
�06
�.7m
�959m
201
�,000 to
�,000
�,622
�2
�8.6m
�5.6m
8270
�0,000 to
�9,000
�,024
�
.
sundaypost.com
Complaints
as shops
knock back
old �coins
Shoppers were left furious
after having old pound coins
rejected a day before they
rolled out of circulation.
While some stores will let
people continue spending
their round pounds for a
limited extra period, the
coins are no longer legal
tender as of today.
But complaints flooded in
across social media about
companies not accepting
the cash ahead of the
deadline.
A McDonald?s spokesman
admitted a coin in
Washington, Sunderland,
was rejected erroneously,
although repeated reports
suggested the issue was
more widespread across the
chain.
And Aldi, which has
extended the deadline, also
said that staff at their store
had made a mistake by
refusing to accept the coins.
It is thought that around
400 to 450 million old round
coins are still lying around
in wallets, pockets and piggy
banks up and down the
country, with people
returning old pound coins at
a rate of up to 60 million per
week.
Iceland, Tesco, Aldi,
Poundland and Greggs have
all announced they will
extend the deadline for
accepting the old coin.
Banks and building
societies have also said they
will continue to accept
deposits for the round
pound. NatWest said it has
seen a rush of people offloading their old pounds.
Dad abused
star Martine
Former soapstar Martine
McCutcheon has opened up
about the abuse she and her
mother suffered at the
hands of her father.
Speaking in an interview
yesterday, the Loose Women
presenter said her dad
threatened to ?drop her over
a balcony? once.
She said: ?My father also
had drink and drug
problems ? he would see red
and do horrific things.
?Mum suffered domestic
abuse at his hands and,
when I was a baby, he
threatened to drop me over
a balcony when he was high.?
October 15, 2017
9
Only two Adelie penguin chicks, like the one pictured, survived in a 36,000-strong colony after a breeding season in the Antarctic
branded ?catastrophic? by experts. Unusual levels of ice late in the season meant adults travelling further for food and chicks starving
By Marion Scott
mail@sundaypost.com
A
holiday entrepreneur is
to set up a plus-size resort in
Scotland.
Martine McCutcheon
NewS
PENGUINS IN CRISIS
sundaypost.com
James King, and his Scottish
adviser Mel Cohen, have already
created a unique retreat for larger
people in the Bahamas.
Now James, 62, has been
?inundated? with messages asking if
he could build a ?Club 18 to
30-stone? in Scotland.
The Bahamas-based
businessman said: ?Scotland has
some of the most stunning scenery
in the world, beautiful beaches and
the most welcoming people.
?I?ve been inundated with
messages asking if I could develop a
plus-size resort in the UK, and I
believe Scotland would be the ideal
place.?
The entrepreneur, who developed
his first resort on the idyllic,
100-mile-long Eleuthera island, has
asked plus-size model and former
beauty queen Mel, 49, from
Glasgow, to search for locations.
He said: ?I believe that not only
will we attract UK-based visitors,
but the fact that so many
Americans, Canadians and
Australians have family ties here
means we will be a big draw there
too.?
Mel, who turned her life around
after deciding to embrace being
curvy, said: ?I know we can provide
a wonderful place for people to
Scots want to holiday at
a Club 18 to 30 Stone so
I?m going to open one
Travel entrepreneur scouts locations for plus-size resort
Mel Cohen, left, and plus-size funseekers in ITV?s The 18-30 Stone Holiday
relax and be themselves without
fear of being judged.
?I?m busy looking for the perfect
place, close enough to an airport
but accessible to the jaw-dropping
scenery we have around us.
?Scotland is ideal. We might not
have all-year-round sunshine but
we have the ?wow? factor with our
history and scenery.
?I?m convinced we could attract
overseas visitors as well as guests
from all over the UK looking for a
weekend of pampering or a longer
relaxing holiday.?
Mel acted as an adviser to James
as he set up his Bahamas resort,
which features in an ITV
programme, to be broadcast on
October 24, and mentored guests as
they holidayed on the island.
Specially-designed furniture,
bedrooms and bathrooms cater for
large sizes, and guests are
encouraged to be themselves
without feeling self-conscious.
Mel said: ?I know only too well
how awful plus-size men and
women are made to feel in this
image-obsessed world we live in.
?Body shaming is cruel and the
damage it can do to someone?s
confidence is hard to overcome.
?I?ve met plus-size holidaymakers
who wouldn?t come out of their
bedroom because they felt so
intimidated.
?We aim to make all of that a
thing of the past and create a warm
supportive atmosphere where our
guests can just be themselves.?
After a lifetime in the travel
business, James reckons larger
guests are ignored by mainstream
firms.
He said: ?It?s unfair nobody caters
for plus sizes, even though almost
half of all holiday couples have a
plus-size partner.?
10
October 15, 2017
News
sundaypost.com
Call for sprinklers in social
housing after Grenfell horror
Hillary Clinton
Hillary goes
back home
Former US presidential
candidate Hillary Clinton
has been given an honorary
doctorate from Swansea
University.
She said the honour
?meant the world to her? ?
having discovered her
ancestors were from the
Celtic country.
The honorary doctorate
recognises Mrs Clinton?s
commitment to promoting
the rights of families and
children around the world.
The research into
Mrs Clinton?s Welsh roots
was first sparked back in
1999 when her mother,
Dorothy Rodham, whose
maiden name was Howell,
talked about her Welsh
ancestry to a British guest at
a White House reception.
Genealogists have
calculated Mrs Clinton is
31.2% Welsh in origin.
A Labour MSP
wants to change
the law in the wake
of the Grenfell
disaster to ensure
all new council and
housing association
properties have
sprinklers fitted.
David Stewart,
member for the
Highlands & Islands,
said the move was
a ?common sense
proposal that will
save lives?.
His plans for a
Member?s Bill at
Holyrood are being
brought forward
after the blaze in
London which
claimed around
80 lives.
Mr Stewart will
launch a consultation on the proposals in the coming
months, and aims
to change the law
to place a duty on
councils and housing associations to
install sprinklers in
new-build social
housing.
The consultation
will also consider if
the legislation could
These safety
that are nice in
the difference
Flaws in blaze
prevention
at dozens of
PFI schools
INVesTIGATION
By Andrew Picken
apicken@sundaypost.com
be applied
retrospectively to
properties, and if it
could be extended
to cover the private
housing sector.
Mr Stewart said:
?The tragic events
of the Grenfell
disaster put fire
safety to the
forefront of many
people?s minds.
?There is a gap in
our legislation that
can be filled by a
common sense
proposal that will
save lives.
?Scotland should
pass legislation to
make installation of
sprinklers in all new
dwellings
compulsory.?
The proposals
have won the
backing of the Fire
Brigades? Union,
with regional officer
Denise Christie
saying: ?We owe it
to the victims,
victims? families and
residents of Grenfell
to do everything we
can to avoid any
future tragedies.?
OWN YOUR OWN HOLIDAY HOME AT
SOUTHERNESS HOLIDAY PARK AND YOU CAN...
D
ozens of Scotland?s
schools have been built without
proper fire safety measures, we
can reveal.
Hundreds of safety defects have
been uncovered in secret surveys of
primary and secondary schools built
using the controversial Private
Finance Initiative (PFI) model.
The safety measures, which are a
legal requirement, are designed to
prevent fires spreading and allow for
the safe evacuation of buildings.
But surveys obtained by this newspaper show a string of serious problems including safety walls not built
to their proper height and holes in
ceilings which would allow a blaze to
spread. Experts last night said the
building standards can be
?the difference
between life and
death?.
Schools in Edinburgh,
Aberdeenshire and Dumfries and
Galloway are among those where the
problems were discovered.
However, the scale of the issue
across Scotland remains unknown as
some councils are refusing to release
their surveys while others have yet to
finish reviews.
There are 350 privately-financed
schools in Scotland and fire safety
issues have already been found at 25,
with most of the problems stemming
from when they were built.
Critics of the private-public partnership contracts have claimed contractors were left to ?mark their own
homework? during construction of
schools with council chiefs admitting they were legally powerless to
force them to make any changes.
Niall Rowan, chief executive of
BUY
NOW
PAY
2018*
PITCH FEES
INCLUDED
UNTIL 2019!?
DEPOSITS
FROM
10%
?
PAYMENT
OPTIONS
AVAILABLE
Holiday homes
from �,995*
Call us today to arrange an appointment
on: 01387 213158 or visit:
parkdeanresorts.co.uk/own-southerness
?Offers available to new customers only who complete a holiday home purchase between 18/09/17-01/12/17 inclusive. Buy now pay 2018 offer
provides 3 deferred finance repayments. First repayment 4 months after completion of the loan. Finance provided by Zebra Finance Limited.
Available for loan values of �000-�,000 with a term of 87 months inclusive of the 3 month deferral. Available on purchase of new and
selected used holiday homes. ?Minimum deposit of 10% of total sale price (or �000 if greater) required including a minimum cash deposit of
�000. *Prices vary between models and Parkdean Resorts parks. Subject to availability. Images are for illustration purposes. All prices include VAT.
Inquiry chief
Industry
expert:
Prof
John
Cole
The consortium running Edinburgh?s PFI
schools tried to claim serious fire safety
issues were ?minor in nature?.
Edinburgh Schools Partnership (ESP)
had been ordered to assess fire safety at
17 schools, but told the city council:
?There were a number of remediation
measures required across the estate but
measures are not things
theory but not vital. They?re
between life and death
? Expert Niall Rowan sounds alarm over scrutiny of school buildings
trade body the Association for
Specialist Fire Protection, said the
tragedy at Grenfell Tower in
London when 80 people died in
June, had put new focus on the
dangers.
He said: ?These safety measures are not things that are nice in
theory but not essential. They can
quite literally be the difference
between life and death.
?You would be amazed how
quickly smoke can travel through
a gap in a ceiling and through a
building, often getting quite far
from the seat of the fire.
?Something like fire doors are
relatively simple to fix but once
you?re in to the ceilings it gets
messy and expensive. It can be 10
times as expensive to fix problems
retrospectively than getting it
right first time.?
Fire stopping is the process of
sealing any holes in walls or ceilings with fire resistant materials
in order to prevent the spread of
smoke or fire, and is a mandatory
requirement of the Scottish
Building Standards.
The issue of fire stopping
only came about in the
independent inquiry into
unsafe walls at 17 Edinburgh
schools last year.
The inquiry lead, Professor
John Cole, flagged up fire safety
issues in the capital and The
Sunday Post then asked every
council for copies of any fire surveys carried out in their schools.
Aberdeenshire Council released
a report from August 2016 which
outlined 251 fire safety issues at
six of its PFI schools, 40 of which
w e re d e s c r i b e d a s ?m a j o r
non-compliance?.
The school with the biggest
problem was Portlethen Academy
with 11 major issues among 87
defects. This included missing fire
dampers, which close off ducts
when there is a rise in temperature during a fire.
Independent contractor WSP
described the problems with the
damper and fire-break walls as
stemming from the original
construction.
Speaking to MSPs on Holyrood?s
education committee in June,
Allan Whyte, head of property and
facilities management for
Aberdeenshire Council, explained
the local authority?s approach
to PFI ahead of the six
schools being opened in 2006. He
said: ?The property teams took a
light touch approach.
?Our involvement was to oversee some of the design aspects ?
general aesthetics and so on.
?At that time, construction professionalism was almost out of
favour in relation to input from
the council.?
Robertson Construction, which
built the six PFI schools, last night
confirmed ?all remedial works in
relation to fire stopping were
completed in early 2017?.
Critics say one of the problems
with the fire safety issues, and
other construction issues, in the
first tranche of Scotland?s PFI
school was a lack of independent
verification.
Falkirk Council has admitted
that in its first batch of nine PFI
schools, it was not possible for
their clerk of works ? a councilemployed inspector who makes
sure building standards are being
properly followed ? to intervene
directly.
The clerk had to report back to
the council who then reported to
the in-house team. Crucially
the council admitted
in a letter to MSPs on Holyrood?s
education committee, ?there was
no obligation on the part of the
contractors to take action?.
This position was mirrored in
P e r t h a n d K i n r o s s , We s t
Du n b a r t o n s h i re a n d No r t h
Lanarkshire.
According to the repor ts
re l e a s e d by Du m f r i e s a n d
Galloway Council, six issues have
been identified during regular
surveys at two of its PFI schools ?
Castle Douglas Primary and
Moffat Primary.
They included missing cavity
barriers within the ceiling, but all
necessary repairs have now been
completed, say the authority.
In Edinburgh, there were
breaches of fire-stopping across
all 17 of its first generation PFI
schools ? ranging from minor
gaps around pipes and cables to
some larger holes.
The city?s council said a programme of remedial work is now
under way and the schools
will be completely
safe to be used.
Portlethen
Academy
in Aberdeen
surprised by scale of failures dismissed by bosses
these were considered to be minor in nature
and, importantly, did not impact on the safe
operating of the sites or any requirement to
revisit the fire exit strategies.?
However, Professor John Cole, the expert
leading the inquiry after a wall collapsed at a
PFI school, noted in his report that the
probe was ?surprised at the extent and
nature of the breaches?. The academic was
also surprised the breaches had not been
spotted via regular fire inspections.
Specialist firm Olsson was hired last
December to deliver a review, which council
chiefs are declining to publish although
results from the first two schools checked
revealed defective fire-stopping measures in
walls. A City of Edinburgh Council
spokesman said: ?All fire-stopping surveys
have been completed on our PPP schools
and a programme of remedial work is under
way. The Edinburgh Schools Partnership
have confirmed that the schools remain safe
to occupy.?
ESP declined to comment.
News
ANALYSIS
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
October 15, 2017
11
It is incredible
that we knew
nothing of
this. Until now
Alan Dunlop
Leading architect
The incredible thing about this is
that we would have known nothing
about these fire safety issues if the
wall had not collapsed at Oxgangs
Primary in Edinburgh.
If that wall was still standing then
we would all be none the wiser ? and
that should be a deep concern for
everyone who rightly expects schools
to be built to the highest standards.
For me, the contract is as culpable
as the construction failures, as it led
to shortcutting in the construction
process and that is why things such
as wall ties and fire stops were
missed out.
The thing that ties all of the issues
highlighted here is a simple lack of
inspection, someone on site ? a clerk
of works ? to make sure things are
being done properly.
Under a traditional building
contract the architect has a duty to
inspect the work at regular intervals
and has the power to ask the
contractor to act if they feel the
building isn?t being built properly.
Under Public
Private Partnership
(PPP) contracts they
no longer have that
authority, they are
now working for the
contractor, not the
client ? in this case
the education
department.
My experience of
councils and
education
Alan
departments is they Dunlop
may be clever in
other ways, but they
have absolutely no idea how a
building contract actually works.
They are left relying on the good
will and the truthfulness of the
contractor to make sure things are
done properly, it is blind faith in
many ways as the contractor and
their subcontractors are effectively
marking their own homework.
The other aspect is the trades on a
site ? the PPP contractor is often
playing a management role and they
use subcontracting for plumbing,
bricklaying and the like.
This has driven down the rates on
offer, for many subcontractors it is
the only game in town so they take
the work, but it increases the
chances of corners being cut as they
are encouraged by the contractor to
speed up at every stage.
In turn, the subcontractor has no
real incentive to complete the work
to a high standard when they are
being pushed for time.
Although PPP is something of a
historical arrangement, its
replacement in Scotland, Non Profit
Distrubting, (NPD) is far from a
perfect replacement.
I do agree schools being built
under NPD are better designed but I
am worried our public buildings are
still today financed and constructed
by private businesses and there is a
basic conflict.
They are commercial enterprises
there to make money and there is
always the possibility that building
standards could be compromised to
achieve that.
.
sundaypost.com
Search for
two girls
A worried mum has made
an appeal after her daughter
and her friend went missing.
Pauline Dixon took to
Facebook to try to track
down her daughter Leah, 14,
and friend Jasmine Agnew,
12, who disappeared from
Renfrewshire on Friday.
Leah was last seen in
Gauze Street, Paisley, at
around 9.10am Friday while
Jasmine, who is also known
as McGowan, left her home
in Sandy Road, Renfrew, at
around 3pm the same day.
Leah?s mum Pauline
wrote: ?We think that this is
something [the girls] have
planned in advance.?
Her post had been shared
more than 9000 times by
yesterday.
Inspector Steven Espie
said: ?We believe they may
have got on a bus and
travelled to Falkirk.?
making the cut
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
13
Hair we go! Sisters lop off their locks for charity
Three sisters have shorn to great
lengths to help a charity for kids who
have lost their hair to cancer and
other illnesses.
Six-year-old twins Saskia and Niko
Greensmith and big sister Jayla, 10,
have all cut off their waist-length hair.
The girls, from Busby, East
Renfrewshire, each donated 15
inches of their tresses. Beautifully
plaited, it adds up to almost four feet
of hair.
The idea came to the youngsters as
their auntie Claire has alopecia.
?Claire?s just in her early 30s and
she?s quite open about being bald,?
said the girls? mum, Caroline, 32.
?She?ll often go without round the
house but she has wigs and the girls
were asking how children get wigs.
?When I told them a charity, Little
Princess Trust, provided real hair they
decided themselves to donate.?
The girls had grown their hair long
since birth but had no hesitation in
having it all cut off last week.
Caroline, who was used to plaiting
it before school each morning, fixed it
one last time and now it?s about to
be handed over to the charity.
?They actually love their new chinlength hairstyles and I?m so proud
they came up with this lovely idea on
their own.?
More than �0 has been raised
through Caroline?s justgiving page.
Sisters Niko, Jayla and Saskia, left to right, below,
donated their hair to support Claire, above left,
with son Oscar, while Jayla prepares for the chop
sigN up today
Weekly
Newsletter
Would you like to receive
specially-crafted news
and features from our
writers during the week?
Our newsletter will deliver
top stories straight to
your inbox. Sign up at:
sundaypost.com
Fears for
steel fund
Steel bosses could ?pull the
plug? on a pensions scheme
set up to secure the future
of 130,000 workers, a
Commons committee has
warned.
Tata announced a new
fund to replace the British
Steel Pension Scheme
earlier this year after
workers voted to accept
lower benefits in return for
investment to secure jobs.
This cleared the way for a
merger with German firm
Thyssenkrupp.
But work and pensions
select committee chairman
Frank Field has warned the
company could in theory
scrap the scheme as it is not
regulated by UK authorities,
leaving staff stuck with the
Pension Protection Fund, a
compensation scheme for
people whose pension funds
have become insolvent.
Searching for paradise? Catch
a ferry and choose an island
Survey claims Scotland?s isles have Britain?s best quality of life
By Russell Blackstock
rblackstock@sundaypost.com
T
he Scottish Highlands and
Islands have topped a study ranking the 50 best places in Britain to
bring up children.
The annual quality of life index
from the Halifax revealed that the
Orkney Islands and Shetland retain
the two top spots they occupied in
last year?s study.
Meanwhile the Western Isles have
been knocked down to fourth place
Blue skies frame Luskentyre beach
on Harris in the Western Isles
by new entrant Craven in Yorkshire
and Humber.
Russell Galley, managing director
of Halifax, said: ?Measuring the best
quality of life for children covers a
range of factors including class size,
spending per pupil and academic
results. Kids in the top-ranked places
will often be surrounded by a greater
proportion of adults in full-time
employment who also consider
themselves to be happy.
?Different areas have aspects that
appeal to parents? individual preferences ? where some may consider
employment levels and class sizes,
others may be more drawn to exam
results or amenities in an area itself.?
The northern tip of the Scottish
islands ranks well in the list due to
the primary school class size of 17.3
and pupil to teacher ratio in secondary schools of 13.4 in the Western
Islands ? the lowest in Britain.
It compares to an average primary
school size nationwide of 27 and a
pupil to teacher ratio nationwide of
20.9.
The three Scottish islands also see
children being able to walk about in
relative freedom, with an average of
81 vehicles for square kilometre in
the Western Islands, 147 in the
Orkneys and 150 in the Shetlands,
compares to 9729 in Britain.
But there?s bad news for kids who
like online games, with only between
71% and 86% of households having
access to fast broadband ? well below
the national average of 94%.
Along with the three groups of
Scottish islands, a further 10 places
in the top 50 are in Scotland, including the Highlands, Perth and Kinross,
Argyle and Bute, Dumfries and
Galloway and the Scottish Borders.
14
October 15, 2017
News
sundaypost.com
Two top dancers celebrate ballet?s revival after 60 years and
Oriol Junqueras
Plea for
unity over
Catalonia
One of Catalonia?s top
separatist leaders pushing
for a break from Spain has
called for unity as disputes
over strategy threaten to
split the secessionists.
Oriol Junqueras,
Catalonia?s regional vice
president and head of the
Republican Left party, said:
?We must preserve the unity
that is necessary to go all the
way on this path to a
republic.?
The leaders of the region
want to leave Spain.
But cracks have appeared
among Catalan separatists
since regional President
Carles Puigdemont
announced on Tuesday that
he was delaying an outright
declaration of independence
?for a few weeks? to give
talks with Spain?s central
government in Madrid a
chance.
Pope Francis
Vatican
conviction
after probe
A Vatican court has
convicted the former
president of the Pope?s
children?s hospital of
diverting around �8,000 in
donations to renovate a
cardinal?s flat.
The original charges
against Giuseppe Profiti had
been embezzlement, but the
court convicted him of a
lesser offence of abuse of
office.
Profiti was given a oneyear suspended sentence.
Neither the cardinal who
benefited from the
renovation nor the
contractor who was
apparently paid twice for
doing the work was charged.
Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone,
the Vatican?s former
secretary of state, Cardinal
Bertone has insisted he
knew nothing of the
hospital?s payment.
Sophie
Martin
dances in
Swan Lake,
main, and
rehearses in
studio, left
The industry is so competitive,
but it?s a mix of talent and luck
? Sophie Martin
I play the fairy and was surprised how hard,
technically, the choreography was. I wouldn?t
have thought it would be so modern.
We had to learn the steps and watch them
performed on a black and white film, which is
different to how we usually learn.
I found it a challenge to dance something
that requires a very strong classical technique,
but it?s not your typical classical ballet.
There?s the MacMillan touch where you take
the steps further, stretch further.
The challenge was to push ourselves
through the technique but still be clean, as
today we are required to be tidier with our
work.
To be successful as a dancer you have to be
flexible and have a wide repertoire to draw on.
Every company does modern,
contemporary work. You can be ?en pointe?
one night and barefoot the next.
The industry is competitive but at the same
time, it?s a mix of talent and luck.
Sometimes it?s just being at the right place
at the right time.
The school I trained at, The Conservatory
National Sup閞ieur of Paris, didn?t feed into a
ballet company so I knew I would probably
have to leave Paris.
The year I auditioned, Scottish Ballet was
looking for 14 contracts at once, which just
never happens.
Had it been the next year, when there was
maybe two, I may not have made the cut.
Depending on the size of the ballet, you can
have 100 dancers competing for one spot.
I?ve been dancing professionally for 14 years
and hope to continue for at least another five.
But at 32 I really feel it nowadays and don?t
recover as quickly. When I was 20, I could skip
stretching one night and be fine the next day.
Now I need to stretch and drink water in the
evening so I don?t cramp the next day.
If you are in a principal role and dancing a
lot in rehearsals it can be full-on and very
tiring. We work six days a week. Monday to
Friday, 10 to 6.30 with an hour lunch and a
15-minute break in the morning and
afternoon. On Saturdays we have a half-day.
I?ve done this for so long I know how to
avoid injuries and blisters.
I do have a little niggle here or there, maybe
my knee will tighten up, but nothing major.
Of course, I still get blisters but I know how
to deal with them better now.
They were much worse in school but then
you had to learn to dance through the pain.
If you want to be successful you have to stay
busy, so you can?t be injured all the time.
Now we have a physiotherapist with us all
day long at work.
There?s acupuncture to relax the muscles
and I?ll have a massage once or twice a week.
My longest tour was two years ago in the US
where we performed for a whole month.
It was tiring but when you are performing
every night you have to have another cast.
And if you were performing very hard you
might have an occasional night off.
But if I?m careful my body is strong enough
to keep going.
The hard thing is moving around a lot and
knowing it?s going to stop one day.
But it?s very rewarding. We do a lot of
different works so every day is a challenge.
Knowing it?s going to stop soon, I?m trying
to make the most of it.
Sophie Martin joined Scottish Ballet in 2003
and was promoted to principal in 2008.
She dances the role of the fairy seducer.
THE SHIFTING
It has been almost 60 years
since Kenneth MacMillan?s
spellbinding choreography for
The Fairy?s Kiss first mesmerised
audiences.
The dark, supernatural ballet,
Le Baiser de la F閑, was inspired
by Hans Christian Andersen?s
The Ice Maiden and has now
By Laura smith
lasmith@sundaypost.com
been revived in a new
production by Scottish Ballet.
MacMillan, from Dunfermline,
created the work in 1960 for
The Royal Ballet, and this revival
marks the 25th anniversary of
his death and its first
presentation since 1986.
Telling the story of a young
man stolen by a fairy on the
eve of his wedding, the
original choreography to
Stravinsky?s music has been
faithfully reconstructed by
Diana Curry from fragmented
records including rehearsal
notes and old video
recordings.
Curry said: ?Times have
changed? today?s dancers
jump higher, their legs go
higher, they train
differently.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
reveal how their jobs have changed over the last six decades
Donald today, left, and, above, dancing with
Svetlana Beriosova in Sleeping Beauty in 1960
I?d get cortisone injections
and be on stage that night
? Donald MacLeary
I created the leading role of the Young
Man in the Fairy?s Kiss in 1960 so it
felt quite nostalgic to see it performed
by a different generation.
I don?t think ballet has changed a
great deal since I was performing.
Today?s dancers, while incredibly
skilled, don?t seem to have the speed
we once had.
Ballet back then was fast, so I think
we were better on stamina.
Teaching someone Romeo today,
they find it really tough. So you can?t
say training is any better now ? it?s
just as physical.
I don?t agree with anyone who says
dancers today jump higher or kick
higher than we did back then.
Dancing has always been tough
and it takes a lot of rehearsing to
succeed. We rehearsed six days a week
for between six and eight hours.
If you were a principal you could
finish at 1.30pm to have a rest then
do, say, the four acts of Swan Lake in
the evening and then be back in class
the next morning at 10am.
I toured a lot when I was younger.
In my teens, I did a 22-week tour
doing eight shows a week and
travelled on my Sunday off.
You?d rehearse three different
ballets during the day.
My first big foreign tour was eight
months in Australia when I
performed Swan Lake with Lynn
Seymour.
Back then if you had an injury you
had to seek treatment and pay for it
yourself.
I was very lucky that I had a
naturally strong physique. When I had
an injury I just danced with it.
I used to have cortisone injections
in the morning and go on that night.
Finally, I had an operation on my
Achilles tendon and when they
opened my leg the ligament had
crystalised and was trapped between
the tendons. That was what was
causing me so much pain.
Luckily I was still dancing at 45.
Dancers are much more protected
now. In companies such as The Royal
Ballet dancers have physiotherapists.
It?s as competitive as ever but now
there are more companies to work with,
so dancers have more opportunities.
I was very lucky that they asked me
to stay on at the Opera House to
coach other principals, including
Darcey Bussell, and take care of
Kenneth MacMillan?s repertoire.
I was with the company for 53 years
and retired at 70 but I?ve been going
back every now and again to help out.
The Fairy?s Kiss is a particularly
difficult ballet to master and this
version is very faithfully done.
This was 57 years ago and the
choreography still proved a challenge
for them so it just shows dancing was
just as difficult in those days.
Donald MacLeary, former ballet
master with The Royal Ballet,
performed the lead role in The
Fairy?s Kiss. Now 80, he advised
Scottish Ballet on their revival.
DANCE OF TIME
?Reining that back, asking them
to mimic the original dancers would
be wrong, however.
?We want this to be a real
revival ? a tribute to Kenneth
that shows today?s audiences
how brilliant he was in
1960.?Scottish Ballet is touring the
one-act ballet across Scotland .
See scottishballet.co.uk/whats-on
for dates and details.
Here, principal Sophie Martin and
legendary dancer Donald
MacLeary speak about their
experiences in ballet and what
they believe has changed in
the ballet world in the last six
decades.
October 15, 2017
15
Eight men
charged in
drug probe
Eight men have been
charged with drugs offences
after police executed search
warrants across Scotland,
Cheshire and North Wales as
part of a major probe.
Officers executed
warrants at 10 addresses on
Thursday as part of an
18-month investigation into
alleged conspiracy to supply
Class A and B controlled
drugs.
Police said that eight
people were each charged
with four offences of
conspiracy to supply
cocaine, ecstasy, cannabis
and amphetamine.
In Scotland the men
charged were Scott George
McAllister, 44, of
Cumbernauld; James
McLaughlin and James
Campbell Clark, both 42 and
of Kilwinning; and Steven
Clark, 41, of Stevenston.
DID YOU
KNOW?
One 18-inch
pizza is more
pizza than two
12-inch pizzas.
First flight
at airport
fittingly late
The first scheduled airline
service to the British
overseas territory of
St Helena has landed ? and,
true to the much-maligned
airport?s chequered history,
it was late.
The UK taxpayer-funded
development on the remote
South Atlantic island
welcomed its first 78
commercial airline
passengers at just before
2pm yesterday,
approximately 45 minutes
behind schedule, following
the departure from
South Africa.
St Helena Airport, built
with �5 million of funding
from the Department for
International Development,
was due to open last year
but the launch of
commercial flights was
delayed because of
dangerous wind conditions.
.
With Special Guest
April l6 / 17
EDINBURGH, Playhouse
April 19
PERTH, Concert Hall
April 20
DUNDEE, Caird Hall
April 21
ABERDEEN, BHGE Arena
Tickets on sale 20th October at 10am
Gigsandtours.com Ticketmaster.co.uk
VIP packages available from sjm-vip.com
Presented by SJM Concerts & DFC
garybarlow.com
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
17
Fundraiser in dock after
stealing �k from charity
Do you love
leftovers?
There?s an
app for that
Organiser embezzled a fortune
TV THRILLER
Yo! Sushi are on board
By Vic Roderick
and Connor Boyd
mail@sundaypost.com
A
An app has been released
that allows food outlets to
resell food that would
otherwise be binned at the
end of the night.
Too Good To Go is an
innovative social enterprise
that ensures takeaway
leftovers don?t go to waste
by offering meals for as low
as �and a maximum of
�80.
The application is live in
three Scottish cities and
there are currently 16
restaurants signed up,
including some branches of
Yo! Sushi.
For restaurants, cafes and
bakeries across Scotland,
their waste bins are
overflowing with good food
that has gone unsold or
cannot be donated to
charity as they do not meet
the necessary criteria.
Natalie Ferguson, from
Cafe Bellina in Edinburgh,
said: ?We thought it was a
great idea. Less waste and
more customer satisfaction.
?We shut at 5pm so we let
customers know how many
portions we have for sale at
a discounted price through
the app and they arrive to
collect from 4.30 onwards.
?We?ve had about 12
customers in the short time
we?ve been on it so I can
only see it going up.
Everyone loves a bargain.?
Zero Waste Scotland says
the hospitality industry,
which covers waste
generated from restaurants,
bakeries and cafes, spends
around �m a year on food
that is ultimately wasted.
former fundraiser is
facing a jail sentence after
admitting stealing tens of
thousands of pounds from her
charity.
Road killers
to get life
Proposals to introduce life
sentences for killer drivers
will tackle a ?real problem?
in Scotland, a minister said.
The UK Government?s
plans would raise sentences
for causing death while
speeding, racing or using a
mobile phone from the
current ceiling of 14 years.
Life terms will also be
given for drink and drug
drivers convicted of careless
driving resulting in death.
Scotland Officer Minister
Lord Duncan said it would
?address these senseless
crimes that devastate far too
many families each year?.
No lie, second series is planned
Hit TV thriller Liar, starring
Joanne Frogatt, above, is
ready to return after
tomorrow night?s climax.
The ITV drama, pitching the
word of a rapist against his
victims, has won five million
viewers and producers are
exploring a second series.
Meanwhile, actor Ioan
Gruffudd says he could be
?the most hated man in
Britain? after playing rapist
Andrew Earlham. He said: ?I
may be on the Tube and
people will move away or the
older generation will come at
me with their umbrellas!?
Claire Paton organised black tie
events and fundraising dinners in
her role as Scottish manager of
the Electrical Industries Charity.
Her job with the trade charity ?
a London-based organisation
w h i c h g i v e s p ra c t i c a l a n d
financial support to electricians
and their families ? saw her rub
shoulders with sport stars and TV
personalities at charity events.
But Paton, from Bathgate in
West Lothian, was secretly raiding
the charity?s accounts over 10
months, between November 2014
and September 2015.
The 46-year-old ? whose highend sports car was kitted out with
personalised number plates ? was
discovered to have been stealing
after auditors at the charity
noticed missing cash.
She was sacked and reported to
the police in 2015 before the trade
body ? who used to be known as
the Electrical and Electronics
Benevolent Association ? went to
court to bankrupt her in a bid to
reclaim the estimated �,000
they believe she stole.
Paton has now pleaded guilty to
embezzling �,000 from the
charity at Livingston Sheriff
Court.
She has since been made
bankrupt, but the Crown Office
has also ser ved her with a
Proceeds of Crime claim for
�,000, alleging that was how
much she had profited from her
criminal conduct.
Sheriff Martin Edington
adjourned the case for a criminal
justice social work report and
assessments of Paton?s suitability
for unpaid work and a restriction
of liberty order.
He told her: ?This, I?m afraid to
say, is a serious charge and
background reports are required,
in my view, before sentence is
passed.?
During her career with the
c h a r i t y, P a t o n o r g a n i s e d
fundraising events for its regional
committees in Glasgow, Aberdeen
and Edinburgh.
These included annual dinners
at Christmas and on Valentine?s
Day, and boxing tournaments and
other events featuring celebrity
guests at some of the most
prestigious venues in Scotland.
In 2009, the electrical and
electronics charity raised more
?
Paton, above,
and her car
with personal
number plates
than �,000 at its annual
Chr istmas lunches held in
Edinburgh and Glasgow.
A black tie boxing event at the
Edinburgh Corn Exchange in
2012 raised around �00.
Paton also hosted a 2013 event
a t t h e O l d C o u r s e Ho t e l ,
St Andrews, for which guests paid
� each.
For mer footballers Chick
Charnley, Frank McAvennie and
comedian Joe Camay have
attended the events she has
organised.
Before she was caught, Paton
proudly posted a photo of a white
BMW saloon with the private
number plate C1 PTN on her
social media pages. Her posts also
included a picture of her grinning
at the camera at a function at
Glasgow?s Grand Central Hotel
and drinking wine with a pal in an
upmarket bar.
We approached Paton at her
�0,000 flat in Bathgate but she
refused to comment.
Tessa Ogle, managing director
of Electrical Industries Charity,
said: ?I can confirm Claire Paton
w a s l e t g o f o l l ow i n g t h e
allegations.?
Howe ve r, s h e re f u s e d t o
comment further.
Paton is due to return to court
to be sentenced next month.
Paton proudly posted photos of her BMW,
complete with personalised number plates
October 15, 2017
sundaypost.com
politics
insight
18
It was like a
hunter with a
wild animal.
The fear turns
him on
Actress Emma de Caunes
on being pursued by
disgraced movie mogul
Harvey Weinstein
We asked 18
times. All we
wanted was a
Scottish-style
referendum
Leader of Catalonia,
Carles Puigdemont,
justifies staging poll on
breakaway from Spain
INumBers
12%
Patients are
less
likely to die if operated
on by a woman
surgeon, says a study
5 years after being
seized in Afghanistan,
couple Josh Boyle and
Caitlin Coleman were
freed
693 655
By Kieran Andrews
kiandrews@sundaypost.com
N
icola Sturgeon?s big
speech had a raft of major
announcements last week.
A not-for-profit state-owned
energy firm, council tax exemption
for care leavers and, of course,
jokes about the Prime Minister?s
conference fiasco all went down a
storm at the SNP conference in
Glasgow.
Despite the
competition,
doubling childcare
funding was one of
the most eyecatching moments.
Providing 30
hours of childcare a
week for every
three and fouryear-old and
Naomi
eligible two-yearEisenstadt
old by 2020 has
been a party promise since 2014.
What was new was a hike in
funding to �0 million a year.
The investment is huge but,
experts warned, successfully
delivering a step-change in
nursery hours might need more
than money to cope with
the demand for
skilled staff.
The
First
M i n i s t e r ?s
announcement
was backed by
her
former
poverty tsar.
N a o m i
Eisenstadt says the
extra cash will help
struggling families by
removing a �0 a
month burden on their
finances but money
alone will not close
Wee kids.
Big sums.
Huge job
First Minister has promised
�0m for more childcare
but, here, experts ask if cash
on its own is ever enough?
,
customers
had their details stolen
by hackers, credit check
agency Equifax admits
the attainment gap or deliver
better life-changes for children
from poorer areas.
She reckons the people
looking after pre-school pupils
should be paid more if the
attainment gap between the
richest and poorest is to be
closed.
The Oxford academic said:
?It?s about who you are training.
You need high level graduates
alongside what used to be
called nursery nurses.
?Scotland
used to have
a
fine
tradition
of producing nursery nurses.
Basically we don?t pay people
enough.
?As an anti-poverty measure,
it is very sensible, but it won?t
close the gap.
?If the wages aren?t high
enough you don?t attract the
right candidates.?
We reported last month that
councils fear the flagship policy
of doubling childcare provision
from 15 hours a week to 30 will
cause a recruitment crisis.
A report by local authority
umbrella body COSLA raised
doubts about the work required
to hit the Scottish Government?s
target, with an estimated 14,000
additional staff required.
It potentially is a
criminal offence,
yes, and a civil
one as well
Lawyer Andrew Fitchie
admits passing inaccurate
information to Edinburgh
City Council at the inquiry
into the trams fiasco
Nicola
Sturgeon
meets some
young fans at
her party?s
Glasgow
conference
last week
Fight for them
Yvonne MacHugh urges
PM to help secure release
of her fiance and five
others being held in India
It just seems,
increasingly, the
Scottish Government
is almost ignoring
scientific evidence.
I find it sad
Chris Masters, co-chair of
the Scottish Science
Advisory Council, speaks
after ministers ban fracking
Question time ?too venomous?
Question Time needs more experts to
tackle an ?ugly atmosphere? around the
show, a former BBC news chief has said.
Roger Mosey claimed guests have
rejected invitations to appear because of
the ?venom? in the studio.
He called on its new editor Hilary O?Neill
to book more academics and scientists to
produce less heat and more light.
Mr Mosey wrote in the New Statesman:
?Corbynistas, Nats and Ukippers tend to
make more noise than the retreating
Blairites or Tory moderates.?
A BBC spokesman said the show gives
people the chance to hold politicians to
account and take part in a ?sometimes
lively, but always important debate on the
issues that affect them?.
.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
October 15, 2017
There are, says COSLA,
?significant challenges in
increasing the workforce and
ensuring they are appropriately
trained?.
Currently, all three and fouryear-old and some two-yearolds are eligible for 600 hours of
funded nursery care a year,
equivalent to 16 hours a week
during term time.
This allowance is set to double
to 1140 hours a year by 2020.
Na t i o n a l D a y Nu r s e r i e s
Association (NDNA) Scotland say
the principle is sound but
question the sustainability.
Purnima Tanuku OBE, chief
executive of NDNA Scotland,
said: ?Nurseries are keen and
willing to support delivery of 1140
hours, but without sufficient
funding and support to deliver
the hours then it won?t be
sustainable.
?There is a real fear that settings
will not be around in 2020 to
support the delivery of this policy.
?We know all authorities across
Scotland have submitted
expansion plans in September on
how they will deliver the blueprint
which we envisage will determine
the funding rates.?
She added: ?Due to low pay in
the sector largely caused by
inadequate government funding,
many staff members leave the
private sector for more attractive
salaries in the public sector.
?The Scottish Government?s
ambition for all practitioners to
be paid at least the Scottish Living
Wage will help this situation, but
must be backed up by enough
investment to make this
possible.?
? We r e c o m m e n d t h a t
communication between local
authorities and partner providers
must be strengthened and a
culture of true partnership
between all providers developed
in order to ensure the blueprint
aim of the parents having real
choice and deliver y being
?provider neutral? becomes a
reality.?
Meanwhile, colleges worry
they won?t be able to produce the
graduates required and serious
concerns remain about basic
infrastructure, like simply having
enough nursery buildings.
Alison Payne, of the Reform
Scotland thinktank, claimed the
number of state nurseries would
have to double to meet demand.
?It?s an ambitious project but
t h e r e?s j u s t n o t e n o u g h
information out there about how
it is going to be implemented,?
she said.
Is there a solution? The Scottish
Childminding Association thinks
its members could fill the void.
Chief executive Maggie
Simpson said: ?As a parent, I?m
going to make all sorts of
assumptions that nursery is
where the child is going to go
learn something and the
childminder is where they are
going to play.
?Play is where they learn.?
She added: ?As long as that
service is of sufficient quality, and
we know quality is high in 94% of
childminders, it would make
sense for local authorities to get
their skates on and commission
childminding services.
?Of the 6000 childminders in
Scotland, only about 100 are
being commissioned because at
the moment local authorities
don?t need to use us so don?t.
?The result is, if they don?t start
using that quickly they aren?t
going to be there anymore.?
What FIRSt MINIStER SaId ON ChILdCaRE
By 2020, we will deliver around 30 hours a week for
every three and four-year-old and eligible two-year-old.
It will give children the best start in life. and working
parents will save around �0 a month on the costs of
childcare.
Right now, we invest around �0 million a year in
early years education and childcare. I can announce
today that, by the end of this Parliament, that will rise
to �0 million a year.
experts question snp?s fracking ban
The SNP?s fracking ban was a
?political judgment? rather than an
evidenced-based decision, leading
experts have said.
Professor Stuart Haszeldine, of
Edinburgh University, said the
Scottish Government had sided
with public opinion, despite a lack
of robust scientific evidence to
back up its position. He said that,
from a scientist?s point of view,
more evidence-gathering was necessary before a decision was taken.
He added: ?The job of a politician
is different. Their job is to represent
the electorate, take on board all of
the information and come to an
overall political judgment.?
Meanwhile, Glasgow University
professor Susan Waldron accused
ministers of being selective in the
evidence used to justify the ban.
She was part of a group of
experts, set up by ministers, that
concluded in 2014 that fracking
could be carried out safely if properly regulated.
opinion
politics
19
By Mandy
Rhodes
OUR NEW COLUMNIST
Brexit Secretary David Davis after talks in Brussels last week
Firms are walking away as
Tories play their silly games
This time last year, I chaired a
discussion among business
leaders about the impact of
Brexit.
With the country still
reeling from the result of the
EU referendum, all we?d really
been told at that point was
?Brexit means Brexit?.
Since then we have had a
snap election in which
Theresa May lost her majority,
he party becoming embroiled
in a humiliating display of
self-flagellation that would
shame ferrets in a sack.
Stability, which is all
business craves, now seems
but a pipe dream.
Yes, Britain has entered
formal negotiations to leave
the EU but the scene remains
staggeringly the same.
Brexit still just means
Brexit, still without substance,
some 16 months after the
country voted for it.
Brexit Secretary David
Davis attends summits
without a single sheet of
notes, while his colleagues
can?t even agree what those
notes should say.
Chancellor Philip
Hammond is accused by his
own side of coming ?close to
sabotage? with a refusal to
spend millions of pounds of
taxpayers? money preparing
for a no-deal with an EU
which he now, apparently,
refers to as the ?enemy?.
And with every day
that passes and a new
self-inflicted Tory wound
is exposed, hopes that next
week?s summit of EU leaders
could move us on from
talking about the divorce
and into dividing up the
spoils fade. There is still no
agreement on what we are
asking for, yet there is a
cavalier assumption that once
we decide, the Europeans will
simply form an orderly queue
to hand it to us on a plate.
Meanwhile, business is
leaving. Companies are
reluctantly and quietly
quitting the City of London;
removing door plaques,
talent, expertise and their
cash, and the Government
doesn?t seem to care a jot.
Financial institutions don?t
want to leave the UK, but the
UK has left them. This Tory
Government is devoid of
direction, policy or purpose,
irrevocably divided by Brexit.
We have the absurdity of a
Prime Minister and some of
her most senior ministers
attempting to deliver
something they campaigned
against because it would be
bad for the country.
This is what they call
democracy. And in Scotland,
where the vote to Remain was
overwhelming, that
democratic deficit has never
felt more pained.
Theresa May told us
that politics was not a game,
yet the Conservatives are
approaching Brexit like some
riotous version of a Victorian
party parlour game.
No wonder our European
partners look on bemused.
They want us to get on with
the job but see a fractured
Government floundering
around, manufacturing a
grievance about a negotiation
that they instigated, can?t
control and now must
pretend they can win.
Europe isn?t angry with us,
it?s just disappointed.
MaNdy RhOdES IS EdITOR OF hOLyROOd MagazINE.
www.holyrood.com TWITTER @holyroodmandy
October 15, 2017
opinion
view
We need many
more women with
much more power
Harvey Weinstein is big enough and ugly
enough to take care of himself.
He is also rich enough to afford the best
lawyers and might be needing them in the
months and years ahead.
We do not, however, need to trawl in the
mire of the appalling behaviour of a man
who was, until very recently, one of the
movie industry?s most powerful.
He is a disgrace, of course, deserving all
the opprobrium being heaped on the
mouldering remains of his reputation.
There is enough shame to go round,
though, more than enough for his A-list
buddies who knew but said nothing for all
those years; enough for the kow-towing
staff ushering starlets to his suite; enough
for those suggesting he might be a sex
addict rather than a bully, a predator and
possibly, despite his denials, a sex offender.
There is enough shame too for the
apologists, who continue to suggest, in a
roundabout, between the lines, more in
regret than anger way that, well, perhaps
the women were not entirely blameless?
That Harvey was only doing what any
man with his power and wealth might do.
It is hard to know who should be more
insulted by their
weasel words,
women or men?
Because no, none
of these women
deserved his awful
attention and no, not
all men would act
like an animal if they
thought they could
get away with it.
No one with
even the vaguest
knowledge of the film
industry, not a single
person, was apparently surprised by
Weinstein?s disgrace. Similarly, no one can
be surprised that there are men like
Weinstein here in Scotland, in the film
industry, in every industry.
Actress Joanne Thomson, inset, should be
applauded for her bravery in speaking out
to expose Scotland?s casting couch culture.
The men she describes encountering
while simply trying to do her job might not
have Weinstein?s power and money, their
behaviour might not be as extreme ? that is
hard to imagine ? but they share his brutal,
casual sexism.
There are few women, in Scotland, in any
country, who have not suffered unwanted
attention from a man, who have not been
made to feel unsettled or worse by the way
she has been looked at, spoken to, bullied
or patronised.
And it?s time for all of us ? men, women,
parents of sons and daughters ? to make
them understand their behaviour is
pathetic at best, abhorrent at worst.
There should be no hiding place in the
workplace for sexism of any kind, in any
form. If we see it, or hear it, in our offices
and factories, film sets and TV studios, pubs
or cafes, we should call it what it is.
And that is just one reason, albeit an
important one, why we need more women
in positions of power, more women with
more say and more influence.
Because it is not just Weinstein?s cronies
and staff who have remained silent for too
long. We have too.
It is time to find our voice.
sundaypost.com
ART OF THE SHIPYARDS
20
Lachlan Goudie?s Shipyard depicts HMS Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Navy?s largest warship, during its assembly at Rosyth
By Bill Gibb
bgibb@sundaypost.com
A
s a boy Lachlan Goudie
remembers his dad?s childhood tales of
life on the River Clyde.
A figurative painter, Alexander saw a
bustling river, full of industry and busy
shipyards.
By the time Lachlan, 41, was growing up
in Glasgow in the 1980s it was a very
different, more desolate, environment.
Now Lachlan, an acclaimed artist like
his father, is showing there is still a life and
vitality with a new exhibition called
Shipyard.
He has spent the past seven years
visiting the Govan, Scotstoun and Rosyth
yards to capture their world on canvas.
Initially he sketched from the other
bank of the Clyde before being invited
into Govan to continue in greater depth.
?I was unconsciously prejudiced before
I went in, thinking they?d see me as some
perfumed ponce coming in with
his sketchbook,? Lachlan told
The Sunday Post.
?So I was a bit anxious,
but to a man and
woman they were
sensitive, interested,
curious about what I
was up to. It was
amazing how many
would then tell me they
drew or painted, or
were a musician.
?They were really
creative. When I?d ask
about them bashing all this
metal they?d take umbrage
and say they weren?t metalbashers, they took such care
about their craft.?
Lachlan spent
endless hours
Lachlan
Goudie
The yards aren?t
museums. They
are always evolving.
Things move there
at incredible pace
? Artist Lachlan Goudie
sitting in corners, sketching the
surprisingly fast-changing environment.
?People are curious at first but I was
there for so long they forget you?re there,?
says Lachlan, known to millions from
BBC1?s The Big Painting
Challenge.
?You?re a witness to everyday
life in these amazing places, like
seeing a performance
happening before your eyes.?
Lachlan was at the yards for
the construction and fitting out
of HMS Duncan, the last Type 45
destroyer, and aircraft carriers
HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS
Prince of Wales.
Shipyard, which has just opened at
the Scottish Maritime Museum in
Irvine before moving to
Portsmouth, features 70 of
Lachlan?s artworks.
But having been
in the yards
since 2009,
his passion
is such
that he
still visits and also has books full of
sketches yet to be transferred to canvas.
He drew Govan, complete with the
massive cranes that had been part of the
yard for generations.
?They were like moving sculptures and
seeing them come down was quite sad.
?But the yards are always evolving, they
aren?t museums. The speed with which
things happen in these places is
extraordinary,? he says.
Although artists documented Britain?s
shipyards during the First and Second
World Wars, Lachlan?s unprecedented
access over so many years has provided a
unique 21st Century documentation.
?I think it?s a record of Scotland?s
shipbuilding and engineering prowess,?
he adds. ?And of the people who make that
legacy live.
?You go to museums to see the past, but
here you?re seeing something happening
right now.
?These yards are part of our national
skillset we must never lose. We should
value these places and people.?
n Shipyard is at the Scottish Maritime
Museum, Irvine until Feb 12.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
opinion
October 15, 2017
21
passing shot
judy murray
We can?t blame victims for not
coming forward earlier but we
must find ways of protecting
those who do, as it?s not their fault
T
he big talking point of the week has been the
Harvey Weinstein scandal. It seems everyone has
something to say about it.
Scandal-hit movie
mogul Weinstein
� 2017 Judy Murray, all rights reserved
?
Most people
are not brave
enough to be
a lone voice,
to take it
further
It reminds me of the terrible stories we?ve heard about
the abuse of power in football. Both situations have been
about people in positions of power, control and wealth
using their status for evil.
If you?ve always had a dream to be a movie star or a
footballer, the threat of someone ending that dream if
you speak out must be so scary.
Will you be ostracised? Will the community shun you?
There are also the feelings of shame and
embarrassment that it has happened to you. It is never
the victim?s fault, but those feelings are commonplace.
And if you are brave enough to tell someone, will that
person be brave enough to take it further ? or will they
do nothing?
I reckon that, with the Harvey Weinstein situation,
there may be much more to come.
There must have been people who knew what was
going on. And, for selfish reasons, or because they were
scared, they never spoke up.
You will always get people protecting their own
interests. So many women have spoken up since the first
few women agreed to go public.
There?s been criticism from some quarters that the
likes of Gwyneth Paltrow and Angelina Jolie didn?t speak
Dawn French celebrated in style this
week when she released a photograph
taken to mark the fact that she?s just
turned 60.
It was taken by photographer Trevor
Leighton, who also took photographs of
her as an 18-year-old student.
They went on to become great friends,
so maybe that helps explains why she
looks so relaxed.
Actually, she has always struck me as
being confident and secure in her own
skin.
She is one of the many women in the
public eye who are proof that you don?t
have to ?give up? as the years go by.
Like Helen Mirren, she?s growing older
fabulously.
We can?t halt the ageing process, but
we can ease its impact.
Everything catches up with us,
everything heads south (sadly) but we
can make sure we wear clothes and
colours that suit us, get our hair cut and
coloured ? I?m loving my white hot
blonde ? eat sensibly and continue to
exercise.
It?s not what you have, but what you
do with what you have that counts.
up sooner. They are huge stars now ? but when it
happened to them, they weren?t.
And Angelina did say in her statement that she chose
not to work with Weinstein again and warned others who
chose to work with him about his alleged behaviour.
I don?t think victims should be criticised for not
coming forward sooner.
It?s a huge step for anyone to take ? and people, no
matter what walk of life they are from, find strength in
numbers. That?s why so many allegations are coming out
now.
Most people are not brave enough to be a lone voice
and we can?t blame them for that.
I?m a huge believer that, within sport, there must be
safeguarding units. People need to be able to go to
someone independent, who will be able to take action,
without victims fearing repercussions.
And we need to think of different ways of protecting
the vulnerable.
On TV a few months ago I saw a group of teenage girls
who had created an app to fight cyberbullying. It was
safe for users, who could remain anonymous but still get
advice.
These abuses of power occur in many walks of life and
Hollywood is no different.
But hopefully we can find a way to make it easier for
victims to come forward without fear.
?
She is
proof that
women
don?t have
to ?give up?
as the
years go
by. She?s
growing
older
fabulously
Dawn?s
charming
portrait.
Picture by
Trevor
Leighton
A young Andy Murray
Andy almost
missed awards
as he was
locked in loo
Tickets have gone on sale
for the 2017 BBC Sports
Personality Of The Year.
This time around, it?s at
Liverpool?s Echo Arena.
I love the fact that it is
now held in different
locations and has been
opened up to the public.
The first time I went was
2004, when Andy won Junior
Sports Personality Of The
Year.
It was so different then.
It was held in the BBC
studios in London and there
were about 200-300 people
there ? mainly the athletes
and their families.
We arrived a bit late as
Andy managed to get
himself locked in the toilet
of the hotel we were staying
in before we left.
We?d taken his best friend
? Andy was only 17 and
those kind of high-profile
events were a bit daunting
for all of us, so he was there
for moral support ? and he
came running along to my
room to tell me what had
happened.
I called reception and the
hotel handyman appeared
and proceeded to kick the
door open to get Andy out.
Andy had flown in from
Spain earlier that day and it
had all been a bit of a rush.
We realised he had no
cufflinks and had to borrow
a pair from a display in the
hotel shop.
We didn?t want to buy a
pair as they were too
expensive and unlikely to be
worn again. Waste not, want
not, and all that.
I think at this year?s event
there will be more focus on
women?s sport.
There have been so many
highlights on a global stage,
such the England Women?s
Team winning the Cricket
World Cup. Girl power!
email judy your thoughts at judymurray@sundaypost.com
October 15, 2017
opinion
sundaypost.com
Yourview
Little sympathy for
son?s car commute
� star letter
Having a good blether with my eldest son one windy
Sunday recently, he remarked on the dreaded winter
ahead, travelling to and from work in the dark.
I?m afraid I gave him little sympathy as I told him
of my own trips to work.
Living three-up in a Glasgow tenement, I had to
walk to the nearest tram stop then through the city
centre to get to work in the east end, often in the
dark. All to work a 40-hour week, which earned me
�75 in today?s money.
He, on the other hand, steps out of his threebedroom house and into his car ? and for much
more money than myself!
A slight change in lifestyle overall...
Betty Carey, Balfron
By the book
I was interested in the
recent news that there
was going to be a series
of stamps honouring
Ladybird books, one of
which was Tootles The
Taxi.
I still have this
book 30 years after
purchasing it and I
would not part with it.
Our fourth greatgrandchild is due and
we have read it many
times to the others.
Rose Belchamber,
East Kilbride
In the jeans
It is not often that I
agree with Donald
MacLeod.
However, his article
about wearable
technology from Levi?s
was spot on.
I had the honour to
work in the late ?70s and
?80s for this company
and the article
reminded me of the
many ?off-the-wall?
ideas they developed.
The majority were
never successful and
they always returned to
what made the money ?
good, quality, basic
jeans.
David Robertson,
Troon
Drink down
If Scotland has a real
problem with alcohol,
as you reported last
week, then it needs to
realise that its national
drink whisky isn?t some
kind of benign nectar
but a dangerous
product whose adverse
straIGHt FrOm tHe Heart
readers? letters
22
lorraine
from club Tropicana to
confronting grief and
taking on Blair and Bush,
George was a rare breed
? a humble superstar
I
effects must be taken
seriously.
Perhaps the industry
must be held to account
and introduce ?excess
drinking can damage
your health? notices of
the kind that have long
appeared on cigarette
packets.
Tim Mickleburgh,
Grimsby
still can?t believe George Michael is
no longer with us and this Christmas it
will be a year since his death.
A fan?s
tribute to
George
Michael
Keep it real
The subject of
constantly evolving
technology in the Email
Jury recently was
interesting and got me
thinking ? are some of
the advancements really
necessary or could they
be doing more harm
than good?
Social media is
causing isolation, as we
spend more and more
time on computers than
with real people.
There are certainly
positive advances in
technology in many
areas, but are some
really for our benefit or
perhaps more about
making money?
Geraldine Syson,
Milngavie
Good food
In response to the
article on Robin Cook?s
speech about chicken
tikka masala being a
true British national
dish, I say ye cannie
beat haggis and neeps,
ye cannie beat mince
and tatties (just ask Oor
Wullie), and ye cannie
beat our famous fish
and chips!
Norman MacDonald,
Dunblane
Write to: Readers? Page, The Sunday Post, 2 Albert Square,
Dundee, DD1 9QJ. Email: readerspage@sundaypost.com
?
I turned
into a
blushing,
mumbling
fangirl
He was such a talented singer-songwriter.
A decent and generous man, but also
incredibly private, and rather shy.
Tomorrow night, we will get a rare
glimpse into his life, with the screening of a
documentary he was working on right up
until his death.
I?ve been lucky enough to have a sneak
preview. It is honest, candid and provides
real insight into the life of one of our
greatest music stars.
It all kicks off in the ?80s when George
and pal Andrew Ridgeley created Wham!
and gave us some cracking pop records.
Club Tropicana is one of my favourite
summer songs. Every time I hear it I can
almost smell the Ambre Solaire and taste
those Pi馻 Coladas.
One of the most heartbreaking parts of
the documentary is when George talks
about his first real love, Anselmo Feleppa.
Never-before-seen footage of the two
laughing together shows that they had a
real bond.
In 1990, Anselmo died of an Aids-related
illness. George is very emotional when
talking about Anselmo and the death of his
beloved mum from cancer four years later.
At the time, he felt ?picked on by the
Gods?. He channelled his grief into music,
writing the No. 1 single Jesus To A Child as a
tribute to Anselmo.
I only met George once, when he
appeared on GMTV. It was around the time
em@il Jury
I have a summer home in
Zakynthos in Greece. It?s so
peaceful and quiet, plus the lovely
sunshine. Carol Whitehead,
Prestwich
As soon as I cross one of the
bridges spanning the Forth into
Fife, I feel at home and happy. I
can?t imagine living anywhere
else in the world. Margaret Gibb,
Fife
of the controversial Shoot The Dog single,
which addressed the actions of then-PM
Tony Blair and former US President George
Bush in the build-up to the Iraq War.
I would love to tell you that we had a
deep conversation about the ramifications
of Bush and Blair?s decisions, but I just
turned into a complete fangirl and starting
blushing and muttering incoherently about
how much I loved his music.
A few years ago he was supposed to
come on my show, but he had a really bad
cold so we did the interview over the phone.
I would have happily risked catching his
lurgy, but George would never have allowed
a TV crew in his house for a live show. He
was too private for all of that.
He was funny and smart as a whip. I
could have talked to him for hours.
What the documentary really illustrates
is how uncomfortable he was with all the
by-products of fame.
He loved writing music and performing,
but felt so uncomfortable ?selling? himself.
We have also found out after his death
about his many acts of kindness, including
quietly donating money to parents who
couldn?t afford IVF and who then went on
to have babies.
The documentary is stuffed with
high-profile fans and friends including
Elton John, Stevie Wonder and Ricky
Gervais.
He was a very special man and has left a
remarkable legacy.
n George Michael: Freedom, Channel 4,
tomorrow, 9pm.
The 10 happiest places to live in the UK were revealed
I?m very happy in Kelso. Folk are
very friendly and polite. It is also a
beautiful town steeped in history.
Allison Scotland, Roxburghshire
Stonehaven in Aberdeenshire has
a beautiful harbour, seafront and
lots of cafes but most of all I love
the friendly people there. Judi
Martin, Aberdeenshire
For me, it has to be the Isle of
Arran. My husband has gone
there since he was born and
he?s now 71! I fell in love with it,
too. We spend as much time
there was we can. Irene Allison,
Airdrie
The happiest place for me is
Lanark. I was married there 54
JOIN THE JURY! VIsIt www.tIny.cc/jOInemaIljury AND fILL IN THE ONLINE fORm
.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
I feel very sorry for travellers left
high and dry once again by
France?s air traffic controllers.
It happens every year, usually
around peak holiday times, and
causes misery for thousands. Surely
the authorities and unions can get
round the table and sort it out.
It?s unfair that so many people
have to suffer because of one
small group of disgruntled
employees and stubborn bosses.
The EU has not only let
the catalan people down,
it has let democracy down
C
arlsberg don?t do
irony, but Spain does, as
Thursday?s Fiesta Nacional
de Espana proved.
let vile killer
rot in hell
Travel firm right to foil
fake freebie-hunters
So a court has finally
decided that Ian Brady?s
remains are to be
disposed of with no
ceremony.
Good.
The Moors murderer,
who died aged 79 in May,
was the very definition of
evil.
If there is a hell then I
sincerely hope he spends
eternity stoking the fires.
He deserves nothing
but our deepest and utter
contempt.
I doubt the couple jailed over false food
poisoning claims will try another scam to get
something for nothing.
Deborah Briton and Paul Roberts claimed
they fell ill while on two separate package
holidays to Majorca.
In fact, they just wanted a freebie but were
caught lying.
In a landmark private prosecution brought
by Thomas Cook, they have both been handed
jail sentences. She got nine months and he
will serve 15.
The fact they received prison terms will
hopefully deter people from making bogus
claims against hotels and restaurants who can
ill afford the bad publicity.
last week. Where in the world makes you happiest?
years ago and it is a lovely place.
James Brown, Whitburn
Glasgow ? it?s the friendliest city in
the country. Says it all! Graham
D?arcy, Glasgow
A country estate called
Kingairloch, on the Morvern
peninsula of Argyll, where I
TO bEcOmE paRT Of THE TEam
spent seven very happy years
while my late father was head
forester there. We took our
granddaughter a few years
ago and her first comment was:
?It?s lovely... you can hear the
silence!? Davie Kerr, Lochaber
Spain ? because it?s nice and
hot for the majority of the year.
Bliss! Sandra Ritchie, West
Lothian
23
Gordon?s a
goner from
cursed job
The poll sparked huge rallies for independence and unity
Passengers endure delays because of striking French air traffic controllers
October 15, 2017
Donald
MacLeod
there can be only one
Kelly
fOllOW mE
ON TWITTER
@reallorraine
opinion
A public holiday to
celebrate Spanish unity took
place amid growing tensions.
Spanish premier Mariano
Rajoy used it as an occasion
to intimidate the
independence-seeking
Catalans with a massive
show of force.
He paraded Spain?s
military muscle to let them
know, in no uncertain terms,
any talk of secession from
Spain wouldn?t be tolerated.
It was to reaffirm his
position that the referendum
was against the law.
A buckled law which
Catalan president Carles
Puigdemont rightly ignored,
when he carried out his
threat to hold a democratic
referendum, which Rajoy?s
tooled-up militia tried to
stop.
There were shocking
scenes of violence carried
out on peaceful civilians
trying to vote, troubling
images that were beamed
around the globe.
A staggering 90% of those
able to reach a ballot box
without being battered voted
in favour of independence.
Rajoy ignored the protests.
Instead, he put Spain on a
war footing, docking
warships in the harbour at
Barcelona.
Sadly, in light of the threats
and lack of talks, it looks
likely, especially if the
Catalans formally announce
their unilateral intention to
break away, that the pain in
Spain will get worse.
Make no mistake, another
catastrophic Spanish civil
war could break out. So
where are the level heads,
the peacemakers?
Well not in the EU, that?s
for sure. They have shown no
desire to become involved in
negotiating a peace.
Incredible when the EU is
supposed to be a champion
of democracy.
Remember, Spain opposed
Scotland?s right to have a
referendum and they still
don?t even recognise Kosovo?s
right to exist.
That is so very wrong. So
why then are so many people
in Scotland, especially within
Labour and the SNP, so intent
on staying in the EU in the
event Scotland ever becomes
independent?
The EU is clearly not fit for
purpose.
It is failing Europe, it is
failing democracy, and looks
more self-serving with every
passing day.
Their actions, or lack of
them, and their mealymouthed words of support
for the Spanish Government
over the wishes of the
Catalans is disgraceful.
Anyone who believes the
EU is the dream ticket to the
promised tariff-free land of
democracy, of the single
market and freedom of
movement should wake up to
the reality that they are
anything but.
With regards to remaining
in the EU after independence,
Scotland should be very
careful what it wishes for.
Certainly not until the
EU gets their house in order,
starting with Spain, a country
who has always spoken out
against any democratic
attempts or desires to have
self-determination.
Masters of glorious
failure, Scotland?s baw
burst yet again last week
when they failed to reach
next summer?s World Cup
in Russia.
Another chance to
qualify for the finals of a
major international
football tournament
blown. A poor result in
Slovenia which forced the
SFA into making an even
poorer decision ? the
sacking of gutted manager
Gordon Strachan.
Five years in the job, 41
games in charge, 19 wins,
10 draws and 12 losses,
two failed attempts to
qualify for a major finals
and one ridiculed excuse
about genetics and his
number was up.
Malky Mackay is now in
as interim boss but who
will be next to accept this
poisoned chalice on a
permanent basis?
Will we see a return of
my big pal Alex McLeish?
Wouldn?t be a bad choice.
Or will the SFA do the
unthinkable and pick
former England manager
Sam Allardyce? I wouldn?t
put it past them! After all,
he has a 100% record for
England. Played 1, Won 1...
Michael Fish delivers
the infamous forecast
BBC rained
on my parade
There was gales of
laughter when I read BBC
weatherman Michael Fish
wouldn?t have dismissed
the hurricane of 1987 if
the MET Office had a
supercomputer at the
time.
Blow me down! What
next? Snow is cold, the
sun is hot, the wind windy
and rain is wet?
I?m sure the BBC still
use a crystal ball to
predict the weather.
The promiseed dry
Wednesday afternoon,
but my NRS charity
fundraising golf day was
nearly called off due to a
biblical downpour.
24
October 15, 2017
News
sundaypost.com
Whisky goes against the grain
A whisky made to a 19th Century
recipe has been crowned the
world?s best dram.
But, once again, it?s not a
Scotch.
The Colonel EH Taylor FourGrain Bottled In Bond Aged 12
Years may be a bit of a mouthful.
But the new edition of Jim
Murray?s Whisky Bible describes
the American creation as ?sheer
undiluted beauty?.
It?s the fourth year on the trot
that Scotch has been overlooked
for the top spot but Glen Grant
18-year-old Rare Edition took
third prize.
Mr Murray taste-tested more
than 1200 new whiskies for the
2018 edition of his guidebook
before arriving at a winner.
The champion nip ? produced
by the Buffalo Trace distillery in
Kentucky ? is named after one of
the pioneers of bourbon.
Mr Murray writes that the
Taylor Four-Grain has a taste
that?s ?soothing yet exciting?.
Brexit protests
in Edinburgh
Lifeboat skipper on the rescue
Hundreds of people
gathered in Edinburgh
yesterday to protest against
Brexit.
The rally was one of a
number of events held
across the UK, urging the
government to think again
on leaving the EU.
Speakers included
Labour, the Liberal
Democrats and SNP
politicians.
Dressed for a
handbags and
By Janet Boyle
jboyle@sundaypost.com
A
lifeboat skipper has
told how he dramatically
rescued 40 survivors fleeing
the terrorist attack on London
Bridge last June.
YOU?VE
EARNED IT.
WHY NOT
CLAIM IT?
You give so much to your community,
so don?t be embarrassed about asking
for ?nancial help when you need it ?
especially if your circumstances have
changed recently. For example, you
might be able to get pension top-ups,
council tax reductions, and support
if you?re disabled.
Ask about the bene?ts you may be
entitled to: call 0800 023 2581 for
your nearest Citizens Advice Bureau.
cas.org.uk/bureaux
The attack left eight victims
dead and 48 injured before police
shot the three terrorists.
Chris Walker helped revellers
escaping the knife and van assault
as they fled to the banks of River
Thames.
RNLI lifeboats had been
scrambled to attend to victims.
On the way, police had radioed
to warn they were heading into a
terrorist attack.
By the time skipper Chris and
his crew reached the scene, some
people had jumped into the water
to escape the carnage.
The terrorists had ploughed
into pedestrians on the bridge in
a white van speeding at 50mph.
They then ran amok in nearby
bars.
Chris and his crew of the RNLI
Tower lifeboat along with a spare
lifeboat and crew, arrived a
minute after the third terrorist
was shot dead by police.
But security forces feared there
could be more at large.
Chris 37, who comes from
Dumbarton, was tasked to look
for victims in the water.
Sadly, the body of Frenchhman
Xavier Thomas was not found in
the water for another two days.
The dad-of-two said: ?Nothing
prepares you for the moment
when you have to work in a
terrorist attack.
?I asked my volunteer crew if
he wanted to continue.
?He nodded without hesitation,
and we got on with the job, not
knowing what lay ahead.
?Police and security forces
guided us so that we would be out
of the target range of any terrorists
still on the loose.?
In nearby pubs, survivors had
hidden in terror as the attackers
rampaged through the area.
Some victims died despite
brave attempts by others to fight
them off with chairs, broken
glasses and anything that came
to hand.
Huddled and scared, the
frightened survivors
desperately wanted to get to
safety.
So Chris and his crew on
the two lifeboats were
requested by police to
mount a rescue service
to take them along the
river to safety.
He said: ?They were
mostly women who
were scared witless
by the attack.
?Groups were led
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
25
of terrified survivors in the chaotic aftermath of the London Bridge terror attack
night out, they came carrying their
heels, fleeing the mayhem above
? Lifeboat skipper Chris Walker on rescue of revellers
Revellers are
rescued by
Chris and crew,
main. His
lifeboat races
to scene, top,
and scours
Thames for
survivors,
above.
Sadly, the body
of Xavier
Thomas, right,
with girlfriend
Christine
Delcros, was
not found for
two days
Heroic: Chris
Walker
down to nearby St Mary Overie
Dock to be led on to the lifeboats.
?Clutching handbags and their
high heels they climbed down a
12ft ladder and were helped
aboard.
?Some were in tears and
distraught, but most were just
terrified.
?But all were grateful to
get out of the hell of
there.?
Once the boat was
loaded with 19
survivors, Chris and
his crew headed
along the river to
Tower Pier, half a mile
away.
They passed under
London Bridge where
the nightmare had
unfolded.
As he looked back on the scene
Chris could see his terrified
passengers weeping and hugging
each other, thankful they were
heading to safety.
At the same moment two
Special Forces helicopters were
landing on Tower Bridge.
He said: ?It is a sight I will never
forget.
?The full impact of the attack
was summed up in that moment.
?I thought of those who had
been murdered and what their
families were about to go through
on hearing the news.
?People had set out to have a
night out with friends but some
were never coming home.
?Some of the lucky ones were in
the boat with me and the crew.
?They had run for their lives but
others had not been so lucky.?
After he ferried his passengers
to safety, Chris and the crew
headed back for more survivors.
This time, 12 scrambled on
board, clinging to each other and
in tears.
The four-minute trip back to
We s t m i n s t e r B r i d g e w a s
completed slowly.
Carrying a passenger load could
make for a rough ride because of
the cramped space on board.
And the river was especially
choppy because of the frenetic
activity of police boats.
The RNLI depends entirely on
donations from the public, which
sets it apart from government
agencies and allows it to run
independently.
In his five years as a skipper on
the UK?s busiest station, Chris and
his crew have saved dozens of
people from the Thames.
A large number are distressed
and want to end their lives.
He said: ?Sadly, some have been
rescued more than once from
jumping in. You cannot help but
feel compassion for them.?
Throughout his 20-year career,
Chris has brought three people
?back from the dead?.
The love of boats and water
came from his late father, Basil,
who had a 21ft sailing boat called
Tarda, on Loch Lomond.
Chris? family would sail out to
Inchmurrin and camp on the
island.
Sadly, Basil died at 32, losing a
battle with leukaemia when Chris
was just five, and his mum Liz, left
with two young boys, reluctantly
sold the boat.
His love of water never wavered
and by 17 Chris was a member of
Helensburgh RNLI as well as
working as a boat builder.
A change of direction saw him
take a course in maritime leisure
management, which led to a swap
in RNLI stations to Calshot on the
Solent, near Southampton.
Several career moves eventually
landed Chris at his busy Thames
job.
On his days off with his family
? Chris works four days on and
four off ? he is dad to sons eightyear-old Basil and Ewan, five.
His wife Sally is a mental health
worker.
He said: ?My work rota allows
me to be about for the family,
which is vital when your job
throws you into the front line of
tragedy.
?The close-knit team at the
station and strong family support
at home is vital to sur vive
heartbreaking days.
?But I am incredible lucky to be
in a job I love.?
.
SALE
NOW ON
PURE
SHOWERING
PLEASURE
At Victor Paris, you?ll ?nd an unbelievable choice of
stunning shower designs and styles to suit all budgets.
SCOTLAND?S LARGEST
BATHROOM SHOWROOMS
CHOICE OF DESIGNER
WALK IN BATHS IN STORE
EDINBURGH | GLASGOW | DUNDEE
www.victorparis.com
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
27
Pioneer for TV women puts success down to hard work and good luck
Jane Gardam
Novelist?s
memoirs
struggles
Novelist Jane Gardam has
described penning her
memoirs as ?the most
difficult thing I?ve ever
done?.
The writer, best known
for her trilogy of novels
about an ex-colonial QC
nicknamed Old Filth, said it
is far easier to write fiction.
She told BBC Radio 4?s
Desert Island Discs: ?It?s
horrific, it?s like being
psychoanalysed. You could
go on forever with it.?
Jane told host Kirsty
Young that writing helped
her to process the trauma of
falling backwards into the
fire at her family home
when she was just six years
old.
As she approaches her
90th birthday, Jane also
revealed that she loathes
ageing and finds it
terrifying.
Gloria, centre, is passionate about BBC consumer show Rip Off Britain, which she presents with Angela Rippon, on left, and Julia Somerville
Ian Rankin
Author Ian
ends beer?s
dry spell
The first pint of an
Edinburgh beer last
available 33 years ago has
been pulled by crime author
Ian Rankin.
The Rebus writer poured
a glass of Leith Heavy, taken
off the taps in 1984, at the
capital city?s Oxford Bar after
a local homebrewer brought
the beverage back to life.
Steven Hope decided to
resurrect the drink and
managed to track down the
daughter of Ken Garden,
who created the beer in the
1970s.
?I chose to recreate it out
of pure intrigue,? Mr Hope
said.
Mr Rankin said: ?Anything
that?s got a bit of history
always interests me. If Rebus
came in here and it was on
tap I?m sure he would try it.
?He?s never been shy
about trying new beers.?
I?m sure there is ageism and
sexism going on behind my
back but I haven?t seen it
? Presenter Gloria Hunniford
By sally McDonald
smcdonald@sundaypost.com
R
ip Off Britain presenter
Gloria Hunniford is a pioneer for
women on the small-screen.
Already one of TV?s first female
presenters, in 1982 Gloria became
the first woman to have her own
daily show on BBC Radio 2.
She was also among the first to
host her own TV chat-show, Sunday,
Sunday, interviewing stars like
Dustin Hoffman and James Stewart.
But the presenter did not join the
protests from other BBC women
broadcasters over the corporation?s
controversial gender pay gap, after it
emerged that two-thirds of stars on
the biggest salaries were men.
Gloria said: ?I am sure ageism and
sexism goes on behind your back but
I have not experienced it.
?You can only speak as you find
and I have been in broadcasting for
48 years.
?I believe in fate and being in the
right place at the right time.
?But you have to work hard to
keep that place. I have never had to
look for a job or been out of a job.?
Now aged 77, and with nearly half
a century of broadcasting under her
belt, Gloria is showing no signs of
slowing down.
She said: ?Retirement is not in my
vocabulary.?
The star, who started out as a
singer in her native Northern Ireland,
got her first break with the BBC in
1969. She had been invited to the
studios to talk about a record she
made.
They liked her so much she was
invited to join Ulster?s equivalent of
the Today programme.
She admits to be being terrified on
her first assignment, explaining:
?There were few women behind the
camera then.?
The news conference was a male
dominated affair and when she
presented her list of questions to her
boss he tore them up. ?He told me if
I was concentrating on the questions
I wouldn?t listen. He taught me to listen. But I like people ? you have to be
interested in people to do this job.
?People think my job is glamorous, but it?s not glamorous being out
in the rain or travelling five hours in
the car to Manchester to film. A lot of
my friends say, ?how can you be
bothered?? But I enjoy it.?
The Loose Women panellist and
One Show reporter, who raised three
children and built a career at the
same time, believes she has been
lucky.
Gloria ? who with her second husband Stephen Way shares 10 grandchildren ? received an OBE for her
tireless services to cancer charities
after losing her cherished TV presenter daughter Caron Keating.
There seems to be no stopping this
woman who, this week, will launch
her new autobiography My Life.
When she does relax, she loves
nothing more than being with her
family, especially her grandkids.
?They call me Glo,? she said.
?Family is everything to me. I just
want them around me.
?Irrespective of my TV career I
have always been ?mum? first. That?s
the most important job. If I could live
my life again I would have more
children.?
Gloria is passionate about the Rip
Off Britain consumer affairs show.
She co-hosts with Angela Rippon
and Julia Somerville and admits that
shoddy customer care gets right up
her nose.
?Lack of service really makes my
blood boil,? she said.
?I went to a buy a unit for my bathroom and the guy would not get off
his back-side to help us. I ended telling him there were lots of other bathroom shops and voted with my feet
and my purse and left.
?You?re lucky if you can get an
appointment these days. I rang for a
doctor?s appointment and the girl
said the doctor didn?t have one for
two weeks. I expected her to ask if it
was urgent and to offer an alternative ? she didn?t.?
28
October 15, 2017
NewS
sundaypost.com
C4 gags Tim
over Strictly
results fear
By Bill Gibb
BgIBB@sundaypost.com
Strictly star Simon
Rimmer has revealed
TV bosses have had to
gag his Sunday Brunch
co-host Tim Lovejoy.
Tonight?s results
show is pre-recorded
on a Saturday evening
and fellow Strictly
celebrity Debbie
McGee accidentally
revealed who had been
voted off on a radio
show last Sunday.
Now, after Tim
almost did the same
on TV two weeks back,
Channel 4 bosses have
imposed a ban to
avoid a Beeb backlash.
?We actually had to
have a meeting last
week about things we
can say on Sunday
Brunch,? celebrity chef
Simon, 54, told The
Sunday Post before last
night?s show.
?We have to trim a
bit of the chat we can
have about Strictly
because Tim isn?t the
best at keeping
secrets.?
Tim was in the
audience again last
night to see Simon and
pro partner Karen
Clifton dance a Samba
to Barry Manilow?s
Copacabana.
By Murray Scougall
mscougall@sundaypost.com
A
fter a decade of trying
for a baby and three failed IVF
attempts, Rebekah Bilbrough
could not have been happier
when her little son Erik arrived
safely.
Simon Rimmer
Simon, who was in
the dance-off last
week, said he?ll never
forget his waltz to
Liverpool FC anthem
You?ll Never Walk
Alone.
?The reaction I?ve
had since has been
unbelievable. It?s been
so humbling. I was at
Hillsborough and
everyone knows how
close to my heart it is.?
Despite his wife Ali
laughing at him when
he showed off his first
dance steps at home,
Simon has been a hit
with older female fans.
?There seems to be a
bit of mum-lust out
there,? he admitted.
n Strictly Come
Dancing: The Results,
BBC1, 7.15pm tonight.
Kate?s uncle charged
Kate Middleton?s uncle Gary
Goldsmith, 52, has been charged
with assault by beating.
It follows an alleged incident
near his home in Wimpole Street,
London, at 1.20am on Friday.
Goldsmith, the younger
brother of the Duchess?s mother
Carole, was bailed to appear at
Westminster Magistrates? Court.
Briton falls to death
taking photos on trip
A British man has
fallen to his death in
India, moments after
taking photographs.
Roger Stotesbury
had taken some shots
from a temple in
Orchha, 160 miles
south of the Taj Mahal,
when he plummeted
30ft on Friday.
Mr Stotesbury, a
father of two grown-up
children from Oxford,
was travelling with
wife Hilary when
tragedy struck. India
was to be their final
Brave mum reveals her hopes of new happiness after
stop on a world tour. A
family spokesman
said: ?He had gone to
take some views from
the temple. He put his
equipment down and
then he fell.?
Writing on their
blog, the couple said
they were renting out
their home and trying
to live on �0 a day.
They added: ?We
thought now is the
time to travel whilst we
still have the health
and energy. After all,
you only live once.?
The delivery had been traumatic
and she almost died giving birth, losing perilous amounts of blood as her
organs shut down and doctors feared
death or brain damage.
Her pregnancy had been a ray of
light after some dark years following
a terrible skiing accident, which had
left Rebekah?s husband Glenn
paralysed.
And, taking Erik home from hospital, she was looking forward to being
a mum to her baby and building her
family. Then, two weeks later, she felt
a lump in her breast. It was cancer,
one of the most aggressive types.
After successfully undergoing surgery and treatment, Rebekah, 39,
hugged Erik at the family?s home in
Cumnock, Ayrshire, and insisted she
would leave the recent dark years
behind her.
She added: ?I felt like I hadn?t been
happy for a long time but I have to
move forward.
?My happiness is my responsibility. I?m finally getting there.?
The shocking series of events were
so extreme that she was diagnosed
with post traumatic stress disorder.
She said: ?I was seeing a counsellor
for the PTSD.
?She explained that most people
go through two traumatic events in
their lives ? some might have none,
others one ? but she said what we
had gone through was way off the
scale.?
Rebekah credits much of her optimism and positive attitude to a support group at The Beatson cancer
centre in Glasgow.
The six-week programme called
Fear of Recurrence offers a forum for
survivors, supported by expert staff,
to help them come to terms with life
after cancer.
She said: ?Now I feel like I?m in a
better place and every month the
cancer seems further away.
?Erik is absolutely thriving and he
is such a happy child, and that makes
us so pleased.?
Life seemed much simpler in 1999,
when she and Glenn, now 53, both
ski enthusiasts, met on the slopes.
They married five years later.
But the snow was also to be the
setting for a horrible accident.
?It was Christmas Eve 2007 and we
were skiing in Austria,? said Rebekah.
?We were on the last ski of the day
and I was walking ahead with a
friend when Glenn fell.
?Because he was on the flat at the
time, his feet kicked him on the back
of the head as he fell over and damaged his spinal cord.
?In just two seconds, life had
changed for ever.
?For me, the hardest part was
knowing what the doctors were going
to tell him. He had always said he
would rather be dead than
paralysed.
?He is paralysed from the chest
down, with just a little bit of movement in his biceps and triceps.
?To be honest he still hasn?t come
to terms with it. He probably never
My husband was
paralysed on the
slopes but, after
ten years of trying
and four rounds of
IVF, we were so
happy when I got
pregnant. I almost
died in hospital
giving birth but,
after everything,
I brought my baby
son home. Then,
two weeks later, I
found a lump...
? Survivor Rebekah Bilbrough
Glenn and
Rebekah
before the
skiing
accident
which
turned
their lives
upside
down.
Above
right, at
home with
son Erik
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
29
a brutal series of life-shattering blows left her with post traumatic stress disorder
about my aunt?s cancer returning,
then I was reading the cancer forums
and seeing another person had
passed away there.
?Glenn developed very bad sores
that we think have been brought on
by stress and he was off work for six
months.
?But because I?ve also been off,
money became tight and he had to
go back. He?s still dealing with the
issue.
?We?ve really found out who our
friends are during the last little while.
?They have really come through
for us and would drop anything if we
needed them.
?Another positive is that I?ve been
in touch with two long-lost sisters.
?I haven?t seen one of them for 32
years and the other I?ve not met in 20
years, but we?re meeting up next
month.
?I?m one of five and there was a big
age gap between us.
?Due to the family dynamics we all
went off and did our own things, and
lost touch.
?We?re really looking forward to
seeing each other again.?
After completing her treatment,
Rebekah was invited to join the Fear
Of Recurrence programme, which is
co-funded by The Beatson and Breast
Cancer 2000 and led by Dr Natalie
Rooney and Fiona Sinclair, a therapeutic radiographer.
Picture James Williamson
will.? They flew back to the UK on
New Year?s Day and Glenn spent the
next nine months in hospital.
He now has a 24-hour care team
and has been able to return to fulltime work with the National Air
Traffic Services.
The couple had been on the IVF
waiting list before Glenn?s accident,
but to add to their distress the first
three attempts failed.
Finally, in August 2015, Rebekah
found out she was pregnant.
?It was great news but I was terrified that something might go wrong,?
she said.
?Apart from low iron levels, the
pregnancy went fine.
?But just before my due date I felt
a change in Erik?s movement and the
team at Crosshouse Hospital said I
needed to be induced. The following
day I was told I required an emergency C-section. I called home to get
Glenn in, but the doctors said they
couldn?t wait.
?Erik arrived fine but a clot went
into my lungs and I stopped
responding.
?I had an amniotic fluid embolism,
which is rare and usually fatal. I was
haemorrhaging from everywhere.
?The surgeons worked on me for
six hours, but my organs were shutting down and I was on dialysis.
?They decided to do a hysterectomy and ovary removal. They
weren?t sure if it would work but it
was my only chance.
?It was only when I woke up two
days later that they knew I didn?t
have brain damage.?
So it was a miracle when she was
deemed fit enough to leave hospital
less than three weeks later. But there
was more trauma just around the
corner.
A fortnight after returning to the
family home, Rebekah felt a lump as
she rolled over in bed. It was breast
cancer.
Rebekah said: ?I knew straight
away it was breast cancer because
my mum, aunt and great aunt have
all had it.
?My first thought was: ?Who will
look after Erik and Glenn???
Although the genetic test came
back negative, Rebekah?s intuition
was correct and she was diagnosed
with triple negative breast cancer.
?Glenn and I had to plan who
would take Erik if something happened to us,? she said.
?We always thought Glenn would
go first, because at 53 he?s older and
is the injured one, but we didn?t factor in that I might get ill. There were
so many big things going on.
?Glenn?s mum passed away
through cancer at that time and my
mum was also diagnosed with cancer before Erik was born.
?You?re told not to Google your illness, but it becomes an obsession.
You want to know what you are fighting ? and the figures for triple negative breast cancer are especially
terrifying.
?When my treatment ended I had
mixed feelings, because my friend ?
who also had triple negative ? wasn?t
responding so well.
?I felt pleased for myself but guilty
she wasn?t doing well. Her wedding
was in June and she passed away in
July.
?I thought about my friend and
?
My counsellor told me
most people have two
traumatic events in
their life. Some have
none, some have one.
She said what we
have gone through
is off the scale
?We were in small groups and
there were tears, laughter, fear ? basically every emotion ? in a very safe
environment,? said Rebekah.
?Fiona and Natalie were great and
they gave us techniques to calm
down the negative feelings. I still use
those techniques today.
?I think it?s very positive that we?re
now thinking about aftercare. As
good as the physical treatment was,
t h e r e w a s n?t h e l p a v a i l a b l e
afterwards.
?I think people believe that once
you?ve been through it, you can just
go back to normal.
?Although I was very lucky to have
great support from my friends, people need to be more aware that you
still have all these emotions.
?But there are still reminders
around and that?s why I?m glad I did
the programme.?
The pilot is conducted through
weekly two-hour sessions, with 71
women having already been referred
in the first six months.
Dr Rooney, a clinical psychologist,
said: ?The programme we?ve developed includes both practical and
emotional coping techniques for
managing those ?what if? worries.
?Thanks to funding we?ve received
from Breast Cancer 2000, we?re
already seeing positive results and
hope we can support many more
over the coming months.?
Steven Don, chair at Breast Cancer
2000, said: ?We are delighted to be
working closely with Beatson Cancer
Charity and funding pilot projects
which will support many people
g o i n g t h r o u g h b re a s t c a n c e r
treatment.?
.
Are you wearing your jewellery?
Or is it time to sell?
More people buy jewellery at Christmas than any other time of
year; if you have jewellery that never comes out, why not sell in the
dedicated jewellery auction to be held on Sunday 10 December?
It couldn?t be easier to sell at McTear?s:
1
Come along to our Auction Galleries, Monday?Saturday,
or email sarah@mctears.co.uk images of your jewellery
and receive a free auction estimate, or call 0141 810 2880
to arrange a complimentary home visit for suitable items.
2
Consign your items to the December jewellery auction
by Friday 3 November, an auction that is run live online
on a platform that attracts six million visitors annually
from 120 worldwide.
3
Sit back and wait for the proceeds of sale to be sent to you;
it?s that simple.
With a specialist jewellery auction every three weeks,
McTear?s really is Scotland?s Jewellery Auctioneers.
To discuss selling at McTear?s,
please contact Sarah Cotter,
Head of Jewellery, Watches & Coins
0141 810 2880
sarah@mctears.co.uk
Platinum, diamond and sapphire bracelet est. �000?�000. Auction date: Sunday 29 Oct 2017.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
31
Sir David Attenborough
Our oceans
need saved
says David
Broadcasting legend Sir
David Attenborough says
immediate action is needed
to tackle plastic pollution in
the world?s seas.
Speaking ahead of the
new series of the BBC?s Blue
Planet II, Sir David said
?every one of us? has a
responsibility for the oceans
and that rising sea
temperatures and plastics
were urgent issues.
Filming the series
revealed ?tragedies? caused
by plastics in the ocean,
such as an albatross feeding
its young with plastic
rubbish instead of squid, the
veteran broadcaster warned.
Sir David said: ?We could
actually do something about
plastic right now. And I just
wish we would.?
n Blue Planet II begins at
8pm on Sunday, October 29,
on BBC One.
Don?t look down... The McLenaghan family album: from left, Mike, 16-year-old Kirk and Bill; Kirk today; and Bill larking about on the chimneys
Sooty, sweep and sons
Third generation chimney-cleaner reveals business is going through the roof
By Janet Boyle
jboyle@sundaypost.com
I
f you thought sweeping
Scotland?s chimneys was a dying
trade, think again.
While lum cleaners might provoke
memories of a bygone age they are in
demand again.
Edinburgh-based firm Auld Reekie
has revealed a full order book thanks
to the boom in wood fire stoves and
people burning logs on their fires.
Third-generation sweep Kirk
McLenaghan, 47, said: ?Any fears
that we might one day go out of
business have been swept aside by
the huge drive for wood-burning
stoves and fires.
?Since they became trendy our
work books have been full.
?Fires went out of fashion for a
while and some businesses closed
but we are still at the top.
?We have cleared out chimneys
choked with birds, nests ... and even
a huge crab.
?It?s a mystery how it managed to
climb up on the roof and down the
lum as it was 10 inches wide and too
big for a bird to carry.?
The dad of two has climbed to the
top of the family firm, which was
founded by his grandad Bill after the
Second World War. Kirk began his
apprenticeship aged eight when he
was helped to the top of an
Edinburgh tenement by his dad
Mike, now 70.
His safety equipment was the
sturdy rubber grip of a pair of school
sandshoes and a rope.
After his grandad guided him to
the edge of the roof to let him see
over, Kirk was hooked ? and the trio
of sweeps worked together until Bill
retired at 70.
Kirk said: ?I can?t think of a better
job. As you can imagine, I have never
been scared of heights.
?Most people wouldn?t like to get
their hands, faces and pretty much
everything else black with soot.
?But the freedom sweeping
chimneys gives you is pretty much
amazing.
?Every day is different.
?Nothing beats the thrill of seeing
the city and surrounding area from
on high.
?While others are stuck behind
screens in offices I see the world
from the top,? he said. ?Some of the
views over Edinburgh and other
town and cities are stunning.
?The trick is never to look down as
you climb a ladder.?
Kirk is the proud dad of Rhianne,
24, and Jade, 25, but he has given up
hope of persuading either of his
daughters to join him on the roofs.
He smiled: ?I have five grandchildren. Maybe my grandson Leo, who?s
five, might.?
Sweep Kirk
McLeneghan
on a rooftop
in Edinburgh
last week
Chris Packham
TV Chris to
bare all on
Asperger?s
Chris Packham has bared
his soul about his Asperger?s
to help fellow patients out of
their ?dark place?.
The wildlife presenter
says his condition helps him
cope with the pressures of
presenting Autumnwatch,
which returns next Monday.
The 56-year-old tells all
about his autism, diagnosed
in 2005, in Chris Packham:
Asperger?s And Me, screened
on Tuesday on BBC2.
?Asperger?s has assets for
doing programmes like
Autumwatch, because I
remember everything I
read,? Chris told The Sunday
Post.
?There are a large number
of people out there coming
to terms with the condition.
?I hope doing this will
help them find some way of
structuring a future for
themselves.?
Picture
Andrew
Cawley
32
October 15, 2017
News
sundaypost.com
Our best
Russian
anger at UK
Stalin film
Writers on why legendary mag
Scottish director Armando
Iannucci is renowned in the
UK for poking fun at the
establishment.
But Russia is not finding
his latest effort ? which
takes a humourous look at
the demise of dictator
Joseph Stalin ? quite so
funny.
The Death Of Stalin
fictionalises the infighting in
the days after the Soviet
leader?s death in 1953 and
has received rave reviews in
Britain. Russian writer and
nationalist politician Nikolai
Starikov called the subject
matter tasteless, however.
He said: ?The death of any
person is not a subject for
comedy, and even more so
the death of a head of state
and a great leader.
?He was the leader of a
state that was an ally of
Great Britain during the war.
?Could you imagine the
Russians making a film
mocking the death of a
British King??
Volga Films, the Russian
distributor of The Death Of
Stalin, said it will apply for a
licence for the film after its
release in the UK this Friday.
By Ali Kirker
David Cassidy, Donny Osmond
or Wham!
And if you needed advice
about boys, spots or best-friend
troubles, you?d find it ?
particularly from the magazine?s
agony aunts, Cathy and Claire.
For girls struggling with the
sometimes overwhelming
feelings the teenage years can
bring, it was a combination of big
sister and best friend.
Now, former editor Gayle
Anderson and writer Shona
Main, are appearing at the
Dundee Literary Festival to
remember their days at Jackie
and reveal the secrets of the
magazine?s success.
And they believe interest is
stronger than ever.
Most people imagined the
magazine was run from a trendy
office down south. But in fact it
was produced in Dundee offices
far from swinging London. Gayle,
58, believes that was part of the
secret of its success.
?It helped that we were
Scottish, based in Dundee and
that within the offices there was
a real feeling of community,? said
Sunday Post writer but
once Jackie pop editor
M
ention Jackie to
women of a certain age and
the reaction is always the
same.
?I read it every week. Never
missed it,? they?ll say.
From the ?60s to the early ?90s
it was an essential weekly read
for generations of teenage girls,
poring over its advice, pin-ups
and photo stories.
Although Jackie folded 25
years ago, it is still a legend in
the world of publishing. In its
heyday it was a colossus, selling
one million copies a week.
It was the go-to guide for all
the information on the pop stars
of the day ? whether that was
Gayle Anderson, left, with
former colleague Shona Main
UNBEATABLE CHOICE & VALUE
ON LCV AT WESTERN NISSAN!
ALL WITH 5 YEAR / 100,000 MILE WARRANTY!
OVER 100 IN STOCK - VANS, CREW BUSES, DROPSIDES, TIPPERS & PICKUPS!
NAVARA
NAVARA
NV200
NV300
NV400
NV400
SE L3H2 2.3 dCi 130
TEKNA 2.3 dCi 190 4X4
DOUBLE CAB
TREK-1� 2.3 dCi 190 4X4
DOUBLE CAB LIMITED
EDITION IN BLACK OR WHITE
LIST PRICE FROM: ..............�,835
OUR PRICE FROM:..............�,695
LIST PRICE FROM: ............. �,705
OUR PRICE FROM:..............�,695
LIST PRICE FROM: ..............�,190
OUR PRICE FROM:..............�,595
LIST PRICE FROM: ..............�,390
OUR PRICE FROM:..............�,995
LIST PRICE FROM: ...............�,112
OUR PRICE FROM:............. �,579
LIST PRICE FROM: ............. �,975
OUR PRICE FROM:.............�,398
SAVE UP TO:............. �140
SAVE UP TO:.............�010
SAVE UP TO:.............�595
SAVE UP TO:............�,395
SAVE UP TO:.............�533
SAVE UP TO:............. �577
? New 67-Reg - in stock!
? Twin Sliding Side Doors
? Bluetooth Integration
? Rear Parking Camera
? Full Bulkhead
? New 67-Reg - in stock!
? Air Conditioning
? Rear Parking Sensors
? Front Fog Lights
? Smartphone Dock
? 67-Reg with Delivery Mileage
? Choice of Colours Available
? Spacious & Versatile Van
? Bluetooth Integration
? Electric Pack
? 17 & 67-Reg with Delivery
Mileage
? Choice of Colours Available
? Rear Parking Sensors
? Bluetooth Integration
? Electric Pack
? 67-Reg with Delivery Mileage
? Choice of Colours in Manual
& Automatic
? Heated Leather Seats
? Sat Nav & Around View
Cameras
? 18? Alloys & Side Steps
? 67-Reg with Delivery Mileage
- Manual & Auto Available
? Sports Premium Tonneau
Cover with Style Bars
? Heated Leather Seats
? Sat Nav & Around View
Cameras
? 18? Black Alloys
Acenta 1.5 dCi 90
Acenta L1H1 1.6 dCi 120
E L2H2 2.3 dCi 110
EDINBURGH VAN CENTRE
LCV RANGE ALSO AVAILABLE AT:
1 Skene Place, Luxury Car Village,
Newbridge, Edinburgh EH28 8TJ
WESTERN DUNFERMLINE
Crossgates Road, Halbeath, Dunfermline KY11 7EG. Tel: 01383 667 696
Tel: 0131 622 6431
WESTERN STIRLING
Springkerse Trade Park, Stirling FK7 7GN. Tel: 01786 637 001
www.westernnissan.co.uk
Opening hours:
9-6 Monday to Friday, 9-5 Saturday and 12-5 Sunday
FINANCE OPTIONS AVAILABLE
Hire Purchase, Lease Purchase, Finance
Lease, Contract Hire. Contact us for Flexible
Terms, Low Deposits, Competitive Rates &
Business Like Advice.
Purchase prices shown exclude VAT and Road Fund Licence. Offers shown are subject to availability and are for business users only. Valid until 29th December 2017. Finance is subject to status. Terms and Conditions Apply. Images are for illustration purposes only.
friend Jackie
was essential reading for generations of girls
the freelance writer. ?We didn?t
sound patronising because we
were quite near the readers? own
age. Most of us were from small
towns and rural communities.
We understood what it was like
to feel alone.?
Before becoming editor in
1988, Gayle was pop editor. The
working-class girl from Dundee
was soon rubbing shoulders with
the biggest names in music.
?When I met Simon Le Bon he
was in the bath in his hotel room.
Luckily there were lots of
bubbles! He shouted he was
Captain Invincible,? she said.
?Whitney Houston phoned my
house. And George Michael and
Andrew Ridgeley were both great.
?To be sitting in Andrew
Ridgeley?s house, eating
Mr Men biscuits and watching
Blackadder with him, was surreal
for a girl from Dundee.?
Filmmaker Shona, 47, met her
fair share of famous people, too,
but for her, it was everyday life in
the office that meant most. She
said: ?We had so much fun ? I
remember rollerblading along
the corridor and one of the
directors of the company was
coming the other way. He said
good morning and carried on.?
Gayle is writing a memoir and
has interest from several agents.
Jackie The Musical was a huge hit
when it toured the country last
year and there are whispers of a
run in London?s West End.
She has a theory about why
interest remains so strong.
?It helped so many people,?
she says. ?Some of the letters we
saw in Cathy and Claire were not
quite as politically correct as they
would be now. But there was still
really great advice. There were
letters dealing with racism,
transgender issues and bullying.?
Shona believes that the world
is a poorer place without Jackie.
?There are so many pressures
on girls,? she said.?The beauty of
Jackie was it was a trusted place
you could go to for advice. It
didn?t try to make you grow up
too quickly.
?We were like the Google of the
time for teenage girls!?
Jute, Jam & Jackie, Saturday, DC
Thomson Media, Meadowside,
Dundee, 5.30pm.
Heartthrob David Essex
on the cover in 1975;
right, Janet Dibley in
Jackie The Musical
IN MY VIEW
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
33
?
Like a print version of a big
sister. I read it cover to cover
?
Nothing in my career beats
saying: ?I?m Jackie from Jackie?
Arts journalist Jan Patience remembers Jackie
as one of her favourite things.
?Jackie magazine was the print version of a
big sister. A bit like my best friend, Morag, who
was two-and-a-half years older than me and an
avid reader.
?Growing up in Ayrshire in the 1970s, it was
Morag who told me about periods, make-up,
boys and Marc Bolan. I used to read her
cast-off Jackies from cover to cover. I never
told my mum.
?Recently, I was given a copy of Jackie from
1974. Beneath the masthead and above a picture
of a pretty blonde cover girl it declared: ?Not just
a pretty face. Like millions of girls ? now old
enough to be grandmothers ? I took that
message on board.?
BBC Scotland?s news anchor Jackie Bird began
her career in journalism at much-loved mag.
?It was the bible of every teenage girl, and
their brothers too, who used to sneak a look to
get an idea how the female psyche worked.
?We may have had a
trendy address in London for
readers to write to, but the
sacks of mail were transported
overnight in a van to Dundee
where most of the writers like
me lived in tenements and got
the bus to work.
?In terms of opening doors,
nothing I?ve done in my career
beats the years when I was able
to say: ?I?m Jackie from Jackie?.? Jackie Bird
34
October 15, 2017
News
sundaypost.com
Email hack
blamed
on Tehran
A cyber-attack on the UK
Parliament was carried out
by Iran, reports claim.
Some 9000 email
accounts were targeted on
June 23. Although Russia
was initially blamed,
newspaper reports say that
investigators traced the
attack to the Tehran regime.
Ninety accounts were
compromised.
The Scottish Parliament
was subject to a sustained
cyber-attack last month,
which reportedly originated
in China.
Senior sources said there
was no new information to
link Iran to the attempt to
access Holyrood emails.
A spokeswoman for the
Scottish Parliament said:
?We will not comment
publicly, especially as this is
part of an ongoing police
investigation.?
DID YOU
KNOW?
Doreen, pictured in front of the haunted four-poster, has also smelled pipe smoke
in the bedroom. Left, a portrait of John Farquharson?s son, also called John
Spooky smoke is no joke for creepy castle?s staff
The ghost of a womanising 17th
Century colonel is giving castle
staff the heebie-jeebies ? by
leaving the smell of pipe smoke in
his old bedroom.
The smoking spectre is believed
to be the ghost of John
Farquharson, the Black Colonel
who apparently haunts Braemar
Castle near Ballater, Aberdeenshire.
Staff have noticed the smell of
tobacco smoke in one of the
colonel?s favourite rooms. The
outline of a reclining figure has also
been spotted indented in the
sheets of a four-poster bed.
Doreen Wood, vice chairman of
the Braemar Community Group,
which runs the castle, said: ?He was
a womaniser so that is one of the
bedrooms he would have known
and he still visits.
?I?ve never seen him but you
smell pipe smoke.?
Welcome to our village of the
damned (for ten nights only)
Highland hamlet hosts huge Halloween hootenanny
By Mike Merritt
mail@sundaypost.com
A
Highland village is
bidding to become Scotland?s
Halloween capital by staging a
spooktacular festival.
The 10-day event is being held in
Durness, Scotland?s most northerly
village, with events in three
?haunted houses?, a Halloween
costume ball, ghost story sessions,
and even a surfing event for
zombies. It?s being organised by
fireman and artist Philipp Tanzer,
who said: ?I love Halloween and I
wanted to give something back to
the community.?
Mr Tanzer, 39, said the festival
had attracted attention from all
over the UK.
One of the highlights will be a
zipwire ride, suspended up to 95ft
above Ceannabeinne, and expected
to reach speeds of around 40 mph.
The 745-feet wire is not only on
the most northerly point on mainland UK but also it?s in such an
exposed position that its operation
is ?weather dependent?.
Smoo Cave, the largest sea cave
entrance in Britain, will host two
professional actors from the
Netherlands for the event.
?Smoo Cave is an impressive
landmark and it?s not surprising
that there are a lot of stories and
legends surrounding this mystical
place,? Mr Tanzer said.
?Some of them are true and some
not but we will try to bring them all
to life with light projections.?
For children, there will be ghost
stories, monster-making pottery
and a kids? costume party.
?This is the biggest and, I think,
the only Halloween festival in the
UK,? Mr Tanzer added.
n The festival kicks off from
October 22. For more info, visit
www.halloweenfestival.net
If you ate a polar
bear?s liver you?d
probably die as the
human body can?t
process that amount
of Vitamin A.
More than
30 trapped
on fair ride
More than 30 people were
trapped in mid-air for hours
when a fairground ride
broke down.
The Power Tower at Hull
Fair was closed yesterday
after it was halted by
suspected computer failure
on Friday night.
Humberside Police said
those on the ride were aged
between nine and 60. There
were no injuries reported.
Hull City Council said:
?The owner is conducting
rigorous tests to find the
cause of the computer
system failure.?
Humberside Fire and
Rescue Service said the ride
became stuck at about
6.30pm and the last person
was removed at 1am.
Phil Leake, incident
commander, said those
trapped were ?extremely
calm and patient?.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
News
October 15, 2017
35
Prisoners get tattoos and
scars removed on the NHS
Cash-strapped health boards admit offering convicts costly cosmetic surgery
The November 1976 tour
Sex Pistols
lost their
bottle in
Dundee
By Gordon Blackstock
gblackstock@sundaypost.com
Inmates at
Saughton
Jail in
Edinburgh,
left, can
get their
tattoos
removed
at the
taxpayer?s
expense
P
risoners are receiving
cosmetic surgery on the NHS ?
including having tattoos and
scars removed.
Two health boards are offering
convicts cosmetic procedures
funded by the taxpayer.
NHS Tayside and NHS Lothian
both admit a small number of
inmates have benefited from
the work, including the use of lasers
to remove body art.
The pioneering treatment can
cost between � and �0 per session, with some tattoos requiring 10
t o 2 0 s e s s i o n s t o b e e ra s e d
completely.
Prisoners at Saughton in
Edinburgh and privately-operated
HMP Addiewell in Livingston have
had the procedures, according to
NHS Lothian.
Laser tattoo removal is ?rarely
carried out by the NHS?, according to
the NHS Choices website. But bosses
admit a small number of prisoners
have benefited from the work since
2012.
The health board says fewer than
five cosmetic procedures have been
carried out in each of the last five
years at St John?s Hospital in
Livingston and the Lauriston
Building in Edinburgh.
The 10 ops include ?skin grafts for
scar removal, cyst removal and also
laser treatment for tattoo removal.?
NHS Lothian is also one of only a
few health boards offering tattoo
removal to general patients.
Meanwhile, NHS Tayside ? which
is responsible for the health care of
inmates at Castle Huntly open prison
near Dundee and HMP Perth ? says
?less than five prisoners? had cosmetic work between January 2012
and December 2016.
Those ops were carried out
because the prisoners satisfied the
?Adult Exceptional Aesthetic Referral
Protocol?.
The 2011 guidelines permit cosmetic procedures on the NHS ?on an
exceptional basis where there is clear
evidence of benefit to the patient?
despite it not treating an ?underlying
disease.? The rules approve ops such
as nose jobs, breast uplifts, facelifts
and even hair transplants.
The health board insisted the prisoner ops took place following a clinical assessment and all cases were
?judged against criteria on an individual basis.?
But the work came despite financial difficulties in recent years which
led to NHS Tayside repeatedly being
bailed out by Scottish Government
loans.
Last week, Scotland?s spending
watchdog found it faced a ?high risk?
of failing to balance its budget in the
current financial year.
Scottish Conservative shadow justice secretary Liam Kerr said: ?People
will be annoyed that inmates can
enjoy this kind of benefit from a
hard-pressed NHS.?
However, Pete White, of Positive
Pr i s o n ? Po s i t i v e Fu t u re s, a n
organisation which supports the
reintegration of prisoners back into
society, said: ?It?s perfectly fair that
prisoners have the same access to
healthcare on the NHS as other
members of the public.?
In the US, prisoners have had
gang-affiliated tattoos removed in
exchange for enrolment in courses.
Cleared MP still waiting for apology from Sturgeon
Michelle Thomson
A former SNP MP has
revealed she is still waiting for
an apology from Nicola
Sturgeon after being cleared
of any wrongdoing in a
mortgage fraud police probe.
Two months ago Michelle
Thomson ? who resigned the
SNP whip when police began
the fraud investigation and
was then suspended from the
party ? said she wanted an
apology for the way she was
treated by her party at the
time.
The First Minister
responded: ?Michelle is now,
happily, in the position where
she can put this behind her.
?She has been cleared of
any wrongdoing and I am
sure she is very relieved about
that so we can now look
forward and have a
discussion directly with her.?
However, the former
Edinburgh West MP last night
said: ?I have not, as yet, heard
from Nicola Sturgeon?.
An SNP spokesman said
national secretary, Patrick
Grady had been in touch with
Ms Thomson to open
discussions about her
readmission to the party.
Ms Thomson was engulfed
in a controversy surrounding
a solicitor used by her defunct
property firm who was found
guilty of professional
misconduct.
The ex-banker found out in
July she would not face
charges after the investigation
was dropped due to lack of
credible evidence.
The former Edinburgh West
MP said August she was hopeful
?the SNP will do the right thing?
and she would appreciate a
?personal discussion? with
the First Minister.
Punk legend Glen Matlock
admitted he bottled his first
visit to Scotland ? after the
Sex Pistols were showered in
a hail of glass during a gig.
The infamous concert at
Dundee Technical College in
1976 saw the bassist ? with
bandmates Johnny Rotten,
Steve Jones and Paul Cook ?
run for cover.
Glen, who is currently on
tour and plays Aberdeen?s
Lemon Tree tonight, said: ?I
played Scotland with the Sex
Pistols in 1976 and we
played at a teacher training
college in Dundee.
?We got bottled off. There
weren?t many people there
but they must have drunk a
lot cause there were lots of
bottles.
?We had to go off stage.
The door was just behind
the drum riser and it was
going ?bang, bang, bang?
from the sound of the
bottles for 15 minutes.
?Eventually they ran out
of ammo so we went to the
bar to get a drink.
?These two blokes there
said to us, ?Why didn?t you
come out and play more
songs?? and we said, ?You
were throwing bottles at us!?
?They replied, ?But we
read you liked that?.?
Glen, who will soon been
touring Australia and New
Zealand, has already played
Paisley and Edinburgh last
week, and says he?s always
ready to rock.
He said: ?I just need Silk
Cut and some coffee. It
keeps me on my toes.
?Then I strap on my guitar
and off I go.?
Sex assault
report in EK
Police closed a stretch of
road near an East Kilbride
school yesterday, following a
report that a woman had
been sexually assaulted.
Officers were called to
Whitehalls Terrace, close to
St Louise Primary School.
A Police Scotland
spokeswoman said: ?Police
received a report of a sexual
assault on a 22-year-old
woman on Whitehills
Terrace near Straud Road, in
the early hours.?
The area was cordoned off
while inquiries continued.
.
36
October 15, 2017
News
sundaypost.com
As we
see it
Our quirky take On the week?s news
Going to
the wall
Driving on
a Brie road
The world famous
Nuart Festival ? which
has its home in
Norway ? is coming to
Scotland.
Aberdeen is to host
the event, which sees
national and
international street
artists leaving their
work on city walls.
A ?call for walls? has
gone out to property
owners and
businesses who can
host artwork in 2018.
Let?s hope the walls
have ears.
A van was pulled
over by police in
Cambridgeshire last
week for being
?overloaded with
cheese?.
The transit van,
which was classed as
being 41% overweight
with cheddar, was
pulled over by road
traffic officers as part
of a week-long
campaign of roadside
checks.
Perhaps police told
the owner to Drive
Caerphilly...
Watch?s mixed fortune
Images
f the w
?It wisnae me miss... honest!? This photograph, from the Foot O? The Walk Series,
shows a wee boy holding his hand out as he gets a row. Picture: Andy Moxon
A rare Rolex watch that nearly
landed in a cement mixer has sold
for �k at auction.
Orange numerals on the vintage
watch made it incredibly rare.
But the timepiece came close to
a sticky end when it fell off its
owner?s wrist into a cement mixer.
Luckily it was saved ? or those
really would have been hard times!
Toilet
humour
Lessons
needed
An artist from Texas
will soon be feeling
flush when he sells of
his famous collection
of painted toilet seats.
Barney Smith, 96,
has spent decades
building up his
remarkable display of
1300 loo seats.
He certainly won?t
get a bum deal, as art
experts suggest the
haul could be worth a
five-figure sum.
Who knows where
collection will end up
? maybe the Loo-vre?
A new survey found
that one in three Brits
didn?t know that
American and France
were our allies during
the Second World War.
One in 20 actually
thought we fought
alongside Germany,
Italy and Japan.
And one in 10 had
no idea of Hitler?s
involvement.
Time may be
passing ? but that?s
the point of school
history lessons.
Must do better!
Around the w
A mischievous young schoolgirl gets a stern ticking off from her teacher at
Paisley?s Craigielea Primary School during the mid-?70s. Picture: Larry Herman
A simpler time... children turn a tru
Two hardworking, young apprentices expertly come together to put the
finishing touches to ship parts in Tyneside in 1937. Picture: Edith Tudor-Hart
Something interesting has clearly c
children in Glasgow?s Gorbals in th
rld
When it comes to recent news stories about polls,
attention has been on Catalan?s independence bid.
But in New Zealand, feathers are flying over votefixing claims in the Bird Of The Year contest.
Shockingly, this is the second time in three years
the poll has been hit by such dishonesty.
The competition, run by the Forest And Bird
organisation, found a Christchurch resident had
ignored the ?one person, one vote? rule and set up
112 email accounts in order to show support for
the white-faced heron.
It follows on from two teenagers creating fake
accounts in 2015 to vote for the kokako bird.
The kea currently leads the polls, but who knows
what flights of fancy bird lovers will get up to
before voting ends on October 23.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
37
Coo Clayton has been a primary school
teacher in Edinburgh for the past 15
years.
Originally from St Andrews, she now
lives in the capital with her husband and
three young children, and is always
coming up with little stories to keep the
kids entertained.
One wet November evening, Coo was
collecting her daughter Maggie from
nursery.
Both were in a bad mood and Maggie?s
refusal to wear her mittens didn?t help.
The walk home should have taken five
minutes, but instead it
was nearer 20 because
Maggie kept throwing
the mittens out of her
buggy.
By the time the pair
reached home, the
mittens were ruined ?
but it gave Coo the idea
for a story, Maggie?s
Mittens.
It tells the tale of a little girl, Maggie,
who refuses to wear her mittens and
finds a way of getting rid of them as she
visits various locations around Scotland.
No potential children?s book is
complete without some great
illustrations and Coo was on the lookout
for just the right artist.
When the head of art at Coo?s school
met illustrator Alison Soye in a coffee
shop and saw some of her work, she
knew she was just perfect.
The duo?s debut has just been released
and is Waterstones? Scottish Children?s
Book Of The Month. Not a bad result for
a frustrating trip home from nursery!
uck into an impromptu climbing frame, in a photo capturing the street playgrounds of Glasgow in the 1950s. Picture: Roger Mayne
caught the attention of these four inquisitive
he mid-?60s. Picture: Joseph McKenzie
October 15, 2017
One wet walk
home proved
the write stuff
the magic and wonder of childhood will be the subject of a new exhibition of
photographs at the scottish national Portrait gallery in edinburgh this autumn.
When We Were Young will explore how the lives of children have fascinated
photographers from the earliest days of the medium to the present day.
Three young boys at a fish processing plant in Aberdeen in 1908 show the scale
of the giant cod being shipped to Portugal. Picture: MacMahon of Aberdeen
the battle to save english
week
NewS
A Word on
the Words
By Steve
Name Finan
in here
sfinan@sundaypost.com
Do you know what STD (as in STD code,
used when phoning) stands for? It is the
somewhat archaic-sounding ?subscriber
trunk dialling?. Glasgow?s is 0141,
Edinburgh?s 0131, Aberdeen?s 01224.
They were introduced in 1958 so that
people served by different telephone
exchange areas could dial one another
without having to be connected by an
operator. It wasn?t until 1979 that every
area of the UK had an STD.
They annoy me.
Not STD codes themselves, of course.
Permitting pleasant Plymouth people to
directly dial Dundee dear ones can only
be a good thing.
It is the first digit of STDs that
provokes my ire. Almost everyone
pronounces it ?oh?, like the letter ?O?.
It isn?t an oh, it is a zero. You can see
the difference. A 0 is narrower than an O.
A Sunday Post staff member has a
mobile phone number that contains a
zero. When reading her number aloud
she calls the first zero ?oh? but the
second zero a zero.
Why do people do this?
It is, plainly, a bad habit. English usage
sometimes seems to have more bad
habits than examples of good practice.
Bad habits, lazy pronunciation, poor
punctuation and plain ignorance are
combining to damage our language.
We should fight back, and we can start
by calling a zero a zero. Every time.
.
38
October 15, 2017
Raw Deal
Family?s
terrible
chat line
situation
pages 40 & 41
Health &
Family
Racing
cars have
helped
war hero
pages 42 & 43
June Field
World?s
greatest
psychic
helps you
see page 45
advice
sundaypost.com
M ney
MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR CASH
ENERGY
BOOST
One million more
vulnerable energy
customers will see their
bills drop by an average
of �0 from this
winter.
Ofgem is to extend
the prepayment meter
safeguard to
households receiving
the Warm Home
Discount.
Safeguard tariffs
limit how much a
supplier can charge a
customer per unit of
energy.
ouR toP 3
MoRtGAGES
This week: five-year
fixed rates
Yorkshire Building
society: 1.55% fixed
until November 30,
2022; maximum
loan-to-value: 65%;
fee: �95, no
incentives.
sainsbury?s Bank:
1.69% fixed until
December 31, 2022;
maximum
loan-to-value: 75%;
fee: �5, includes
incentives.
Advice
post Office Money:
2.11% fixed until
November 30, 2022;
maximum
loan-to-value: 85%;
no fee, includes
incentives.
The
Sunday PoSt
Source: moneyfacts.co.uk
(all rates subject to change)
GETTING
PERSONAL
Britons spend an
average of just over
�,000 transforming
their new home.
Home owners
typically spend
�,419 putting their
own stamp on a
property after they first
move into it, a survey
from estate agent
Tepilo.com found.
The living room is
most likely to be
tackled first, followed
by the kitchen and
main bedroom.
toP SAVERS
Source: moneyfacts.co.uk
(all rates subject to change)
This week: our selection of two-year, fixed-rate bonds
al Rayan Bank gross rate: 2.22%; minimum investment:
�00.
BLMe gross rate 2.10%; minimum investment: �,000.
atom Bank gross rate 2.05%; minimum investment: �.
How to give up your worst
financial habits for good
W
e?ve reached the halfway
point in Stoptober as smokers up
and down the country attempt to
quit cigarettes.
But, whether or not you?re taking part
in the anti-smoking campaign, why not
also consider conquering any nasty
financial habits you?ve picked up?
?This Stoptober is a great opportunity
to stub out your worst financial habits,?
says Sarah Coles, a personal finance
analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown.
Not sure you even have any? Well,
some of those practices might have
become so ingrained that you don?t
even notice them.
So what are the warning signs, and
how can you kick your worst foibles into
touch? Here, Sarah shares her expert
insights ...
Casually dipping into debt
If you regularly dip into your
overdraft, you need to identify regular
costs you can cut. This may mean
shopping around on essential bills and
groceries, or cutting out those things
you don?t get much value from, such as
gym memberships or expensive media
packages.
If you?re a repeat offender, consider
setting up text alerts in online banking,
which will let you know if you?re
running the risk of going overdrawn.
Only paying the minimum amount
back on your borrowing
The minimum payment required on
your credit card can easily lull you into
a false sense of security. But by paying
the debt down at a snail?s pace, you
could be racking up shocking interest
charges.
If you have expensive debts like credit
cards, it?s essential to pay them off as
quickly as possible. If you have a
significant balance, it may be worth
switching in order to cut interest
payments in the interim. However, if
you switch, it?s vital to see this purely as
a mechanism for debt repayment. If
you?re tempted to rack up more
borrowing, you?ll end up in an even
more expensive position.
Forgetting about your savings
According to a 2015 study, some 80%
of easy access savings accounts hadn?t
been switched in the previous three
years. Neglecting savings is an
expensive habit to fall into.
Even in this era of low interest rates, it
pays to make a date to regularly check
what you are earning on your savings,
and if the rate is no longer competitive,
make a switch.
Wary of black-box thinking
Black box insurance policies can help drivers
access cheaper premiums as they monitor how
people actually drive.
But some motorists are put off, feeling it?s a
way of ?big brother watching you?, or fearing
they won?t be able to drive at night.
But Admiral says it?s all about how, rather than
where or when, you drive. The devices offer a
chance to show you are a safe driver, looking at
your driving style and measuring braking,
cornering and speed. And you might not get as
big a saving if you regularly drive at night but
you could still qualify for discounts.
Gunnar Peters, head of telematics at Admiral,
says: ?These myth-busters should dispel people?s
worries.?
Not making the most of tax shelters
At the start of each tax year, it?s worth
taking stock of your savings and
investments, and asking yourself
whether you really need to be paying
tax on them.
putting plans off
Long-term goals like retirement may
seem a long way off, but every day you
save makes a big difference. It?s not just
the years of contributions you will miss
by putting things off, but the effect of
compounding returns ? which is
jaw-dropping.
There are always too many demands
on your money, but as a general rule, it
pays to invest as much as you can afford
for retirement, as early as possible.
Buyer?s guilt ..?
Two thirds of young people expecting support
from ?the bank of mum and dad? to get on
the property ladder feel guilty about relying
on their family, a report has found.
Some 66% of 18 to 40-year-olds feel this
sense of guilt, according to the findings from
Yorkshire Building Society.
More than half (59%) of would-be home
owners expect to receive financial help from
parents or other family members in order to
buy a property, the research found.
Simon Bradley, senior manager at
Yorkshire, said: ?The burden of how it could
negatively impact their family?s finances is
leading many young adults to feel guilty
about accepting help.?
your questions answered
Your
I enjoyed last week?s
Query about the village
of Moscow. Now I have
another ? Dallas in
Moray. What can you
tell me about it? ? D.
The village sits on the
banks of the River
Lossie, just 10 miles
from Elgin.
The name Dallas
comes from the Gaelic
name of the village,
Dollas, meaning ?valley
of water?.
William Anderson,
who was born in the
village, was awarded the
Victoria Cross for
conspicuous bravery in
the First World War.
ueries
Pub row ? what was the
name of the Rangers
player of the ?70s,
Quinton or Quenton
Young? ? A.
That was Quinton
Young, who turned out
for the Gers 82 times
from 1973-76.
He began his career
with his local side, Ayr
United, in 1969, making
67 appearances until a
move in 1971 to
Coventry City.
After Rangers, he
notched up 67 games
for East Fife.
If you have a question,
write to The Queries Man,
The Sunday Post,
2 Albert Square, Dundee,
DD1 9QJ or email
query@sundaypost.com
Does a horse have
exactly one
horsepower? ? H.
Engineer James Watt
came up with the
measurement to
compare the output of
steam engines with the
power of work horses.
Horsepower (hp) is a
unit of measurement
for power, which is the
rate at which work is
done over an extended
period of time ? so
horses can produce
around 14 or 15hp.
By comparison, a
human is capable of
five hp at peak power
production.
It?s a family affair
when it comes to
Academy Awards
i
?m a big fan of singer/
songwriter Randy Newman?s
music ? songs such as Short
People and I Love L. A. are
absolute classics.
He has also written music for
films and has won a couple of
Oscars.
While reading about him, I
discovered his brother and uncle
were Academy Award winners, too.
So my Query is this ? are the
Newmans the family with the most
Oscar winners? ?J.
Randy has won Best Original Song
twice, in 2002 for If I Didn?t Have You
(from Monsters, Inc) and in 2011 for
We Belong Together (from Toy
Story 3).
His brother, Lionel, won Best Score
in 1969 for Hello Dolly! and their
stORYBEhINDthEMOVIE
I love The Muppet Movie. Can
you share any
behind-the-scenes tales? ? S.
Prior to the lovable gang?s first
theatrical outing, audiences
were only accustomed to seeing
hand puppets from the waist up.
The 1979 comedy broke the
rules by displaying the zany
characters? entire bodies.
One memorable musical
scene, featuring Kermit the Frog
alone on a log in a swamp, took
five days to complete.
To control the
banjo-strumming Muppet,
creator Jim Henson spent hours
underwater inside a cramped
diving bell, oxygen pumped in
through a hose.
?No place for someone with
claustrophobia,? he admitted.
advice
October 15, 2017
39
CAN
YOu
DO ME A
FAVOuR?
? I would like to find
a new home for my
110 Whisky
Magazines if anyone
is interested.
Bill Third, call
01343541462
? Can anyone let
me know where I
can buy vanishing
cream face
moisturising? I used
to use the Pond?s
make but this was
discontinued and I
can?t seem to find
one like it.
June Fleming,
83A Hercus Loan,
Musselburgh, East
Lothian, EH21 6BA
? Can anyone
supply me with an
instruction manual
on how to use a
Thread Delta OL1000
overclocker? I can
cover all costs.
Catherine McCurdy,
19B Colt Place,
Coatbridge, ML5 3HU
? I?m looking for
knitting patterns for
Argyle socks and
Fairisle jumpers and
cardigans. I?ve
searched in vain so
would appreciate
any help.
H. Stark, 27 Craigie
Road, Ayr, KA8 0EZ
uncle, Alfred Newman, won nine
Oscars for writing scores for movies
such as Camelot and The King And I,
giving the Newmans a total of 12
Oscars, the most for a single family.
Between the three, they were also
nominated by the Academy a further
59 times.
However, if you are judging the
most successful clan by the number
of Oscar-winning relatives, it has to
be the Coppolas.
Francis Ford Coppola has won five
times as director of iconic movies
such as The Godfather.
His daughter Sofia, son-in-law
Spike Jonze, father Carmine, brotherin-law David Shire, nephew Nicholas
Cage and niece-in-law Patricia
Arquette, have all won a golden
statuette, making it seven family
members.
Whatever happened to
the actor who played
Trevor in EastEnders?
? I.
Lennoxtown-born
Alex Ferns played the
part of abusive husband
Trevor so well he
received death threats!
Since leaving Albert
Square in 2002, Alex has
continued his TV acting
career, most notably in
Wolfblood.
He has also had roles
in films such as The
Legend Of Tarzan and the
forthcoming Romans.
stORYBEhINDthEsONg
What can you tell me about
Ironic by Alanis Morissette? ? L.
You can?t blame the grammar
police for taking light-hearted
pot-shots at the singer in the 21
years since its release.
While various scenarios
outlined in the lyrics ? ?rain on
your wedding day?, ?a black fly
in your Chardonnay? ? are
unfortunate, they aren?t actually
here to help
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
examples of irony! The
Canadian-American finally
allowed herself in on the joke
when she duetted with US chat
show host James Corden on a
reworked version two years ago.
Laughing, she sang: ?It?s
singing ironic ... but there are no
ironies.?
Sales of parent album Jagged
Little Pill have topped 33m.
? Can anyone tell
me where I can buy
a screen for my back
door so I can leave it
open and not have
cats coming in to my
house?
Miss A. McTaggart,
65 Cedar Avenue,
Stirling, FK8 2PJ
thANks
? To all who sent me
patterns, especially
the lady who
delivered them to
my house.
A. E. H. Traill,
Edinburgh
? To all the generous
readers who sent me
knitting patterns. I will
make use of them
all.
Margaret Telfer,
Inverurie
If you?d like to ask
readers a favour, write
to Favours, The Sunday
Post, 2 Albert Square,
Dundee, DD1 9QJ, or
email favours@
sundaypost.com
.
the page that gets things done
40
October 15, 2017
RawDeal
T
he summer holidays
are a distant memory. But, for
some people, the memory isn?t
very happy.
You never quite know what you
are getting in to when you leave
these shores for two weeks. You
might have the best of holidays,
but then you might have a
nightmare time. And what looks
good in a brochure might not
turn out quite how you expect it.
Renting a house or apartment
opens up an entirely new set of
circumstances and pitfalls to be
wary of.
Dr Ken Black, of Edinburgh,
took his three children for a
holiday in Modica, on the
southern coast of Sicily. It was a
fantastic holiday in a city so
beautiful it is a UNESCO Heritage
site.
They stayed in the picturesque
18th Century Palazzo Polara, close
to the San Giorgio Cathedral. It is a
quite spectacular setting for a
holiday and has, it must be said, a
slew of favourable reviews online.
But Dr Black didn?t have a good
holiday. In contrast to the
comments he?d seen on websites,
he found it difficult to relax.
Dr Black says that soon after
arriving he discovered the
housekeeper required access to
the property daily to water the
plants. While accepting the
necessity, he had reservations
over the invasion of privacy.
After these visits, he began to
get warning emails from the
owner commenting on whether
the palazzo was tidy, which
carried a suggestion that if
it wasn?t tidy he might be
charged extra. The emails also
mentioned that a piece of
furniture had been moved.
Dr Black said: ?No harm had
been done, we had simply
moved a piece of furniture.?
Another email invited him to
be respectful of the palazzo,
which, it said, ?has a very
important history?. He says he
was told the housekeeper ?will
pass by again tomorrow to
ensure all is in good order?.
And this continued throughout
the holiday. Dr Black said one
email mentioned a moved rug.
He said: ?There were numerous
loose rugs on polished stone
floors and the agent threatened
that we might be charged
because we moved one and
hadn?t returned it to its original
position.
?No harm or damage was done
? we simply moved it a bit.?
The palazzo Dr Black rented was beautiful inside and the city of Modica was wonderful ? but he says the retained deposit is a mystery
Apartment was left tidy but 250
euro deposit wasn?t returned
There was a shock at the end of
the holiday. Dr Black said: ?The
owner notified us by email that
the ?house was left in an appalling
state like we have never seen in
the three years since starting
rentals?.
?It went on to tell us: ?The
situation has been documented
and submitted to HomeAway (the
letting agent) earlier this week?.?
But Dr Black argues: ?If the
evidence was submitted before
we left how could it be stated that
the flat was in an appalling state
when we left? We had, in fact,
ensured the flat was very tidy and
asked the agent to inspect it. He
commented after doing so that it
was tidy but that we?d moved a
rug. No items were damaged or
broken.?
But Dr Black?s 250 euro deposit
(�2.26) wasn?t returned to him.
He wrote to Raw Deal.
Dr Black says the owner
refused to provide evidence of
any damage done to the property,
meaning his deposit was retained
but he wasn?t told why.
Raw Deal got in touch with
HomeAway and, in fairness to
them, will give their reply: ?We
looked into this complaint and
can confirm that HomeAway does
not have any other records of
traveller complaints or negative
traveller experience on this
specific property or owner.
?In fact, we note that the
majority of traveller reviews on
HomeAway related to the owner
and this property since 2016 are
very positive. We also note there
are no open complaints with our
HomeAway customer service
team relating to this property or
this owner.?
So why was Dr Black?s deposit
retained? After correspondence
with HomeAway, we still don?t
have an answer.
Raw Deal will not stay quiet
and just go away when our
inquiries aren?t answered.
Be careful when you rent
abroad. It often pays to check
independent review websites like
Trustpilot before booking
holidays.
Do you have a pRoblem?
email your address and daytime/mobile number to RawDeal@sunDaypost.com or write to Raw Deal, sunday post, 2 albert street, Dundee, DD1 9QJ. (please include sae).
n Briefly outline the problem and how you would like it resolved. n Include contact details of the other party and any customer ref/order numbers.
n By requesting Raw Deal?s assistance you agree for your name, location and a photo to be published.
sundaypost.com
ADVICE
October 15, 2017
41
Thank you
I can?t believe it. My order is suddenly
found. Where has it been for two
months? Why couldn?t shipping
company find it before now? Thank
you very much. I can?t see how you
managed that! ? R. Brown, Ayrshire.
This is the second time you have
helped me with my electric and
gas bill. You have made an OAP
very happy, even though it wasn?t
a large amount of money. Thank
you. ? Mrs V. Dunn, via email.
Vulnerable son keeps
calling adult chat lines
This is a horribly difficult situation for a
family to find itself in.
We will not, for obvious reasons, name
the people involved.
Mr X and his wife have an adult son.
We?ll call him John, though that isn?t his
real name.
John has problems. He is autistic and
suffers several obsessive compulsive
disorders. His father describes him as
very gullible. He is easily taken in by all
sorts of scams and lies.
John is alone in the family home at
times. He has been phoning numbers he
finds on adult contact websites. These
sites offer ?chat? of a sexual nature, with
pictures of beautiful women as the people
who are ? supposedly ? on the other end
of the line.
John has run up bills of �0 per week,
or higher, doing this ? and it has been
going on for more than three years.
There are hundreds, even thousands, of
these lines available to call, so it isn?t as
simple as barring one number.
John needs access to a phone, however,
to contact his mother and father, as his
carers, if anything goes wrong.
His mother and father have implored
John not to do this any more.
They have enlisted the help of his social
worker and even spoken to local
councillors. But to no avail.
They even contacted police, but were
advised that an adult, no matter a
vulnerable adult or not, phoning a number
that clearly advertises its per-minute
charges doesn?t involve any criminality.
John?s father reckons it is irresponsible of
these expensive phone lines to accept
John?s phone calls. Any member of the
public would baulk at bills of more than
�00 per year.
He asked if Raw Deal could do anything.
Mr X reckons that the companies doing
this make no provision at all for vulnerable
adults. Instead, they make every effort to
keep any caller on the line for as long as
they can to make as much money as
possible.
They are, in his opinion, taking
advantage of a person who isn?t fully
responsible for his own actions and who is
not considering all aspects of what appears
to be (if you look at these adverts) a highly
attractive young woman who is eager to
engage in quite salacious chat.
He reckons this ?just another scam?, but
one that is within the law.
It?s a difficult one, Mr X.
As you say, there isn?t a law against this.
There doesn?t seem to be any easy way to
protect someone from themselves.
We contacted BT, the country?s most
experienced phone provider, to ask if
Cordless
Lithium-ion
Leaf Blower
SAVE
�
72
HOUR
DEAL
OFFER
O
THE WE F
EK
Phone ?chat? lines can cost a fortune
there was anything that they thought Mr X
could do.
A spokesperson said: ?Without knowing
who Mr X?s phone provider is, we can only
give general advice based on what we
might do in such a situation.
?There are a couple of options for calls
to premium rate lines. BT offers a free
premium rate call-barring option to UK
based 0900-0909 numbers, or an account
holder can alternatively arrange to have a
PIN on the line which means the phone
can only be used when someone has the
pin (there?s a small charge for this service).
?However, your reader mentions a
specific website (Raw Deal will not be
giving details of the website). Parental
controls can be used by an account holder
to block access to certain types of web
sites. BT offers these free and they can be
managed online.?
?Our advice would be to contact your
service provider in the first instance to
discuss your options.?
We at Raw Deal are grateful for BT?s
advice, and we will advise Mr X of the
options BT kindly offered.
But, sadly, there doesn?t seem to be a
foolproof way to stop Mr X?s son from
doing this.
It is a hugely difficult, and sad, problem
of the modern world.
for more help
n Get further advice: advice@citizensadvicedirect.org.uk
n Take your complaint further: www.ombudsman-services.org
n Trading standards: www.tradingstandards.co.uk
Effortlessly tidy up leaves with this 20V cordless
ONLY
garden leaf blower from Garden Gear. This powerful
machine is completely cordless, meaning there are
no leads to restrict you or get tangled up in?it also
PLUS �95 P&P
allows you to carry out jobs wherever you need to.
The long blower tube is perfect for blowing leaves
out of hard-to-reach places into a neat and easy-to-remove pile. Once
you have finished, the blower tube can be removed and thanks to this
innovative space-saving design, the machine can easily be stored away.
The leaf blower comes with a long-lasting 1500mAh lithium-ion battery,
giving you powerful performance combined with a quick charge time of
3-5 hours. Ergonomically designed, this leaf blower features a soft grip
handle and is comfortable to use, weighing just 1.76kg.
Also available for �.99 is an additional 20V battery, compatible with
the entire 20V Garden Gear range, to allow you to work for longer
periods without delay.
Was �.99 Usually �.99
G1166 20V Leaf Blower
D9533 Spare 20V Battery �.99
�.99
CALL: 0871 911 7011 quoting 77380
(Lines open 8am ? 8pm, 7 days a week. Please have your credit/debit card details to
hand) Calls cost 13p/min plus your phone company?s access charge.
ONLINE: www.dc-thomsonoffers.co.uk
If you wish to return an unwanted product, then you may do so at your own cost within 30 days. All returned products must be in mint, re-saleable condition and in the original
packaging. Due to weight, delivery will take between 5 and 7 days and is charged at �95. We are unable to deliver this product outside mainland UK, to Scottish Highlands, Isles
or BFPO addresses. BVG Group do not refund postage on unsuitable items or cancelled orders. Your contract for supply of goods is with BVG Group. BVG?s ?was? pricing refers to the
original selling prices offered on our website www.cjoffers.co.uk, and in our retail store between 3rd July and 3rd October 2017. Please allow 7 days for delivery. Offer subject to
availability and open to UK readers only. Offer ends midnight 17.10.2017.
.
October 15, 2017
Advice
sundaypost.com
Health and
your concerns
by The Doc
We need saliva to speak ? but a
blockage can lead to surgery
A young man came into the surgery
last month looking worried, after
finding a lump on his jaw.
It was at the side of his face, just
below and slightly to the front of his
ear.
The small lump had appeared
recently so, since it was painless and
unlikely to be an infection, I sent him
up to the hospital for a scan.
This was a precautionary measure,
done in order to rule out anything
sinister.
His troublesome lump seemed to
be in his parotid gland.
These are typically located either
side of the mouth and beneath the
ears.
Our parotid glands are one of three
pairs which produce saliva in the
mouth.
This is, of course, the fluid which
helps us break down and lubricate
our food.
Chemicals in saliva helps keep our
teeth strong but it also helps us talk,
too.
If you?ve ever had to do a bit of
public speaking you might be aware
of how difficult it can be with a dry
mouth.
The parotid gland can be affected
by mumps.
This condition causes it to swell up
and make one look not unlike a
hamster.
My patient?s scan at the hospital
also included using a needle to take a
wee sample from the lump.
It turned out to be something
called a pleomorphic adenoma.
That?s quite a scary title for what is
actually a rather benign tumour.
These tumours in the parotid
glands are in fact relatively common.
However, the majority of them ?
80% or so ? are in fact not cancerous.
That doesn?t mean you should
ignore a lump like that if one pops up.
They should always be checked out
by an expert.
Most are eventually removed
surgically, to prevent any future
problems.
Salivary gland swellings can also be
caused by a wee stone.
These can form in the gland
following a build-up of calcium in the
area.
We?re not entirely sure why this
happens, although some people who
take blood pressure drugs and
antihistamines are more at risk of
developing them.
A swelling of the cheek gland might
also be caused by other illnesses such
as sarcoidosis, a collection of cells
which become inflamed.
case study
42
War hero Kenny
couldn?tgetthe
horrorsof battle
out of his mind
After enduring misery of PTSD, dad?s newfound
love of racing cars has helped turn his life round
Proud dad
Kenny
enjoys
bonding
with son
Harris
in the
garage ?
but it?s a
far cry
from just a
few years
ago
The Doc Replies
I was walking back
from the shops last
week and began to
feel a bit of chest
pain. Might it have
been caused by the
cold weather?
Some people who
suffer from angina do
report that their chest
pain can be a bit worse
in cold weather. The
reasons are unclear. For
people who suffer from
angina, any extra effort
such as walking up hills
or stairs or walking
against a strong wind
can bring on chest pain.
If you find this
happening more
frequently or this is a
new symptom then it
would be worth getting
checked out.
The barber noticed
bald patches at the
back of my head and
said I should be
checked for
alopecia. What is it?
Small patches of hair
loss are often associated
with alopecia areata.
However, it can
sometimes be caused
by a fungal infection
such as ringworm. With
both these conditions,
the skin will appear
relatively normal
underneath with no
scarring. If there is
scarring evident it is
likely to be something
else, and you should see
your GP. In most cases
of alopecia areata, the
hair will regrow within a
few months to a year
and the area will remain
small. Often with small
patches there is no
treatment needed.
However, if the area is
getting larger you
should also speak to
your family doctor.
Why does the skin
turn red with sunburn?
This is due to
inflammation. Sunburn
is caused by an excess
of ultraviolet light. As
ever, I?d advise people
to avoid sunburn by
taking a few simple
steps, such as not
staying in sunlight for
too long, using high
factor sunblock, and
keeping exposed skin
covered ? especially
while staying in hot
countries.
Unfortunately the Doc can?t directly respond to each query, or guarantee a reply.
When in doubt contact your own GP
By Laura Smith
lasmith@sundaypost.com
I
n his garage-turned-car
workshop, Kenny Watson is refitting
the brake line of his second-hand
Subaru Impreza.
There?s a metallic clang in the
background as four-year-old Harris
happily mixes up his dad?s tools.
But just one year ago, this ordinary
father-son experience was unthinkable
for the decorated war hero.
?When my son was born, it felt like
the worst day of my life,? admitted the
28-year-old, from Fife.
At the time, Kenny was waging a
mental battle with PTSD.
And the horrors he faced during
gruelling tours of Iraq and Afghanistan
still raged in his mind.
?At the time, I couldn?t physically be
around children. Hearing their screams
was one of the triggers that took me
straight back,? said Kenny. ?I thought I
was still on tour amid mass casualties
and would act out. Harris wouldn?t even
come near me.?
But today, Kenny is on the fast-track
to recovery thanks to an unlikely new
hobby ? building a race car.
Three years of therapy has helped
him face up to what he saw on the
frontline.
Yet his family life really started to
improve when his wife suggested he
focus on a project, and Kenny chose to
pursue his love of motor racing.
He said: ?I had this old, ordinary car
just sitting there and decided to turn it
into a race car. The way this has
brought me forward and helped my
recovery is massive.?
Kenny joined the army at 16 and later
went on to serve as a sniper with
Edinburgh battalion, The 3 Rifles.
He was officially diagnosed with
PTSD in 2014, and was later medically
discharged from the military in
February 2017 due to back injuries and
hearing loss he sustained on tour.
Struggling to separate past from
present, Kenny admits horrific
flashbacks drove him to self-harm.
The Doc Replies, The sunDay posT, 2 albeRT squaRe, DunDee DD1 9qJ oR email us aT Doc@sunDayposT.com
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
family
Advice
October 15, 2017
43
Maggie
listens
Looking for practical advice, relationship help or emotional
support? As a mum-of-four, grandmother-of-eight and dear
friend to many, Margaret?s years of experience make her
the ideal person to turn to with your worries
My friend in need repaid my
kindnessbyhurtingme.Should
I give her another chance?
Dear Maggie My friend has
been through a tough time
recently and I?ve been trying to
support her.
Her marriage has broken
down, she?s been off work and
has understandably struggled to
keep on top of things at times.
I?ve tried to be there for her as
much as I can, to listen and take
her out when she?s been feeling
down.
We had a day out planned with
the kids a few weeks ago and
we?d all been really looking
forward to it.
But with just a couple of hours
notice, she cancelled, saying
she wasn?t up to it and asked if
I?d go on my own with the
children.
The next day I heard from
another friend that she?d been
out with other people instead.
I felt really hurt, angry and
taken advantage of, but knowing
she?s not had it easy lately I
didn?t want to have a big
blow-up so I?ve just kept my
distance since.
Now she?s back in touch and
saying she needs support again.
What do you think I should do?
Maggie says After being so
Kenny?s
racing
car has
helped the
former
soldier find
a new
lease of
life after
being
diagnosed
with PTSD
In his darkest moments, he even tried
to commit suicide.
?When I was alone in the house, I
started getting social anxiety and
thought I was back on tour,? he
recalled.
?I smashed my trophies and tried to
burn my medals. I just wanted
whatever this thing was inside me out.?
His erratic behaviour threatened to
permanently separate Kenny from his
partner and their young son.
Kenny added: ?PTSD is an invisible
injury that can destroy relationships
and rip apart your career and who you
are as a person.
?Everything started to engulf me
because I didn?t have a distraction.?
But it turned out the distraction
Kenny needed was sitting in his garage
all along. Learning as he went, Kenny
dedicated a few hours every day to his
new project, which he named PTSD
Performance.
The family garage became a safe
haven, and as the car took on a new life,
so did Kenny. Best of all, it?s helped him
forge a strong bond with his son.
?It would have been so easy to shut
the garage door but working on the car
naturally brings us together,? added the
proud dad.
?Now we?re joined at the hip! He loves
the car and comes with me to all the
races.?
Harris now has his own racing suit,
helmet and even a small replica of his
dad?s car.
Next year, Kenny plans to compete in
the Super Lap Scotland competition at
Knockhill Racing Circuit in Fife.
While keeping his own recovery on
track, the future racer hopes his story
will help challenge stigmas around
mental health and PTSD, and help raise
cash for one of his key supporters, The
Army Benevolent Fund.
Kenny, who now works as a smart
meter installer, also plans to partner
with Disabled Motorsport Scotland to
help others get into racing.
?It?s about rebuilding your life and
having a sense of purpose,? he added.
?I still have bad days but now I?m
better at dealing with them.
?I?ll never allow myself to fall
backward. I?m not the same person I
was a year ago.?
Find out more at www.facebook.
com/ptsdperformance
supportive to your friend I know
you must be feeling very let
down by her behaviour.
It?s hurtful to realise someone
you trust is actually taking
advantage of you.
Now it could be that her
Dear Maggie I?m getting
married at Christmas, a big white
wedding with all my family and
friends there.
I?m quite traditional so I?d like a
seating plan for the meal.
However, my husband-to-be
says it?s better if people sit with
people they know.
It?s a difficult decision as I don?t
want to start married life with a rift.
Maggie says Follow your
instincts.
Clearly you are comfortable
with tradition and would feel
more comfortable with a seating
plan, so go with that.
This means you won?t be
fretting if people drift about on
emotions are all over the place,
perhaps she?s not sleeping well
and not thinking straight.
But the bottom line is ? lying to
a good friend is unacceptable.
If she had been honest with
you and said she was meeting
another friend, you may well
have felt a bit miffed about it but
you would have respected her
honesty.
When people are emotionally
needy they sometimes forget the
boundaries of decent behaviour.
They become a drain on their
close friends and family and I
think it?s time you had a good,
honest talk with her about the
way she?s behaving.
If she carries on this way she?s
in danger of alienating the
people who care about her.
Yes, she?s come through a
difficult time, but she has to learn
to cope with the reality of the
situation.
She has to stop the ?poor me?
syndrome and realise life goes
on, she has a family to raise and
is fortunate to have good friends.
But if she continues to take
advantage of your friendship
that will be damaging.
Go round to visit her some
night soon when the children are
in bed and have a good honest
chat.
Hopefully she?ll realise her
mistake and you can both get
back to where you were.
It?s important to be there for
friends when they need us ? but
don?t be a pushover.
the day deciding where they
want to sit.
Yes, there?s a case for saying sit
with people you know at
weddings, but there?s also the
point that a wedding is a good
time to get to meet others you
don?t know.
A word of warning ? don?t start
married life worrying if what you
do will cause rifts.
Be yourself ? that doesn?t
mean insisting on your own way
at all times, it means listening to
your new relatives and
considering their point of view,
and being flexible to change.
Most important of all, when all
the planning is complete, enjoy
your big day.
Best wishes to you both.
wRiTe To Maggie listens, The sunday post, 2 albert square, Dundee, DD1 9qJ
oR eMail maggielistens@sundaypost.com
Margaret reads all letters but cannot enter into personal correspondence. Names will be changed if you wish
.
PoP down to your local
chemist to Protect yourself
from flu this winter
C
old and flu
season is almost
here which means
now?s the time to
get your winter flu jab.
And the great thing is,
you don?t need to go to your GP to get it.
Many chemists how offer the injection
within the pharmacy, meaning you don?t
need to wait for an appointment or a
specific drop-in clinic to make sure you
still fit and healthy during the cold winter
months.
Getting the winter flu jab can protect you
and the people around you by preventing
the spread of the bug, which can be
passed through sneezing, coughing or
touching infected people or surfaces.
And if you are a high risk person ? anyone
aged 65 or over, pregnant women, or
children and adults with underlying
health conditions or weakened immune
systems ? there can be more serious
consequences of catching the flu,
including pneumonia. The NHS currently
offers the injection free to people who fall
into
these
categories.
The flu injection is the most effective
protection against various strains of the
flu virus, including swine flu. It doesn?t
completely cut out the chance of getting
any types of flu, however studies have
shown that if you do, it tends to be milder
and shorter-lived than if you don?t have
the jab.
According to the NHS, the best time
to have a flu vaccine is in the autumn,
from the beginning of october to early
November, so don?t wait ? head to your
local pharmacy now.
Flu Vaccination Service
Don?t let flu get you down this winter, take a minute or two to beat the flu.
Walk-in service available at:
257a Leith Walk, Edinburgh, EH6 8NY6
Milton Road West, Edinburgh, EH15 1LF
173 Piersfield Terrace, Edinburgh, EH8 7BR
18-20 Comiston Road, Edinburgh, EH10 5QE
37 Moredun Park Road, Edinburgh, EH17 7ES
228-230 Crewe Road North, Edinburgh, EH5 2NS
2 Pentland View Court, Currie, Edinburgh, EH14 5NP
65 West End, West Calder, West Lothian, EH55 8EJ
34 Main Street, West Calder, West Lothian, EH55 8DR
16 Central Avenue, Grangemouth, Stirlingshire, FK3 8SD
5 Moss Knowe, Kildrum, Cumbernauld, G67 2HU
5 Oliver Place, Hawick, Roxburghshire, TD9 9BG
51 High Street, Inverkeithing, Fife, KY11 1NL
15 Bannockburn Road, Stirling, FK7 0BP
Dears Pharmacy are a group of
five pharmacies in Edinburgh & Fife.
We offer a Quadrivalent Flu Vaccine to protect
against four strains of flu.
No appointment necessary.
Our expert pharmacists are on hand to help
you prepare for the winter.
Price: �per vaccine.
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm.
Saturday 9am to 1pm (Drylaw 2pm).
Website link:
https://dearspharmacy.co.uk/preparing-for-winter-2017/
Edinburgh: Drylaw, Easter Road & Oxgangs.
Fife: Kelty & Glenrothes.
See Berni our pharmacist online at www.
cadhampharmacy.com/flu/ giving Rebecca her
flu jag and discussing why we should all think
about being protected at Home and Abroad!!
Only �to Protect yourself and help
stop the spread of FLU THIS WINTER!!
No appointment necessary
24 Main Street,
Balerno, Edinburgh, EH14 7EH.
Telephone 0131 449 5477.
www.lindsayandgilmour.co.uk
Protect yourself against
the Flu
Book in for your
annual
Flu Jab
WALK IN SERVICE at Cadham
Pharmacy Health Centre
DROP IN FLU VACCINATION CLINIC
�OFF
with this advert
Scotland?s Award Winning Pharmacy
celebrates most recent success at
the Pharmacy Business Awards UK
winning BUSINESS OF THE YEAR
and the prestigious
INNOVATION Award at
Independent Pharmacy Awards 2017
Call 0131 658 1274
Fleming Pharmacy 131 Liberton Brae
Edinburgh EH16 6LD
To advertise your
8 Cadham Centre, Glenrothes
PHARMACY'S FLU
JAB VACCINATION
SERVICE
www.cadhampharmacy.com/flu
01382 575757
Tel 01592 743639
please contact
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
advice
October 15, 2017
45
JuneField
The world?s greatest psychic
Did sister hear
my words?
Dear June A few days
before my sister passed, I
wrote a letter to her
expressing our family?s
love for her and sharing
our belief in the afterlife.
Her husband said he
read the letter to her but
was unsure if she could
hear the words.
I?ve always wondered
if she was able to receive
my written thoughts and
love for her.
Juiliana, Powys.
June Says
Your sister
would have heard your
heartfelt words as they
were read by her
husband, even though
she was unconscious.
When a physical life is
nearing an end, the spirit
inside the body is very
much alive.
The process we call
death is that of the spirit
vacating the body. The
period of time just prior to
passing is when the spirit
begins to separate itself
from the physical body.
It varies significantly
from every individual in
the same way some can
be born into the world
with ease while others
find it more difficult.
The end result is that
once the separation has
been made, the spirit
then lives on after
physical death.
During this transition,
although the physical
body can seem
unresponsive, the spirit
housed inside is aware of
any words spoken and
people present during
this time.
Once free of the ailing
physical body that was
wearing out, they will no
longer feel any pain or
discomfort.
Your sister is no longer a
physical being but the
love she holds for you as
a spiritual being remains
unconditional and
unchanged.
Dear June My husband
died 20 months ago, leaving
me a widow at 31 years old,
with three children.
We miss him so very much,
although I?m plodding on for
the sake of the children but
in a sense of limbo.
I feel so lonely. I would
love to connect with him to
be sure he is OK and I know
the whole family would, too.
I pray my mum
and my girl are
together in spirit
Dear June Living without my daughter over the past eight
Hyperflex Aqua Rotary Shaver
SAVE
�
JUST
�.99
PLUS �95 P&P
years has been very hard. We all miss her.
She had leukaemia. She fought hard and had everything
to live for but, at the end, had no choice but to leave her
six-year-old daughter, who she desperately wanted to stay
with.
She had gone back to college and had only just qualified
as a teacher when her illness was diagnosed.
My Mum is on the other side and even though we never
really got along, I pray they are together.
Winnie, Dundee.
The Hyperflex Aqua is a rotary shaver that features superb shaving technology, designed
to be tough on stubble but easy on contours. Fusing Remington?s Hyperflex technology
for close shaving with the ComfortFloat cutters, it gives the most comfortable shave with
maximum coverage. The head on the shaver uses silver ions to resist bacteria giving a
cleaner shave with less irritation. The cutters are supremely adjustable to the contours of
the face capturing hair growing in any direction for a quick and close shave. It is 100%
waterproof for use in and out of the shower, giving you ultimate choice for a suitable
shave. Powered by a Lithium-ion battery, there is up to 50 minutes usage time on a full
charge and it features indicator lights for when charge is ready or needed. The shaver is
cordless and comes with a charge stand of universal voltage, UK standard two pin plug,
carry pouch and has a manufacturer?s two-year guarantee. Was �9.99.
June Says
D9723 Hyperflex Aqua Rotary Shaver �.99
I understand
the fight any mother would
show in order to stay with her
child a little while longer.
Most parents experience a
protective, instinctive, love
and responsibility to their kid.
It is an unexplainable
feeling of unconditional love.
Although the will of each
spirit is strong, the physical
body it is housed in does not
last for ever.
Vacating the body does
not mean a spirit won?t stay
close by their loved ones.
That connection can?t be
broken and they will be
there to share in the happy
times and provide love and
support during darker days.
I get the impression your
daughter was very close to
her nana and this created a
bit of disharmony between
you and your mum.
I smell the strong scent of
lilies and feel they would
have been a favourite
flower for one of them.
I do feel your daughter?s
passing was peaceful with
all of the family present and
closure was achieved for all.
Your daughter has the
greatest trust in you and
knows you will always love
and look after her child.
I also feel your daughter
was open about her illness
and left instructions. Did she
plan her funeral?
He was the glue that held
us together and left a very
big void in our lives.
Kerrie, via email.
June Says
Your husband
will now be safely over on
spirit side and surrounded by
love and support from family
and friends.
It is quite amazing how a
mother finds that extra
I sense your mum?s
passing was quick and she
shows me number 70. Was
she 70 when she passed?
Although I strongly sense
your mum and daughter are
together, your girl stands
alongside two older ladies,
not just her nana, who are
both loving and protective.
Worry not, as she is safe,
loved and stays very close
to the family she loves but
had to leave behind.
Ladies Epilator
JUST
�.99
SAVE
�
PLUS �95 P&P
VERDICT
She was surrounded by
our strong family love when
she passed over.
We often talked at great
length before she died and
she had everything
organised and left letters
and instructions.
I promised I would
support my son-in-law and
to always be there for my
grandchild.
Lilies were a favourite of
my mum and she loved my
daughter.
They were very close and
at times it created a
conflict between us when
she would take her side.
My mum died suddenly,
just before her 70th birthday.
I think the other lady was
my mum?s sister, who she
was close to.
strength after a loss in order
to look after her family.
Although your husband is
no longer of the physical, he
is still connected to you all as
you are, and always will be,
the family he loves but had
to leave behind because his
physical body died.
While he may be unseen,
he will be there to love and
support you all as well as to
wipe away the tears.
WoulD you lIkE a REaDIng fRom JunE? Email junefield@sundaypost.com or write to June Field, The Sunday
Post, DC Thomson & Co Ltd, 2 Albert Square, Dundee, DD1 9QJ (Please include your telephone number)
Remove hair instantly from delicate areas like the underarms, upper lip and chin. This clever
device removes hair from the root which stops it from growing back for weeks and even
encourages hair depletion. A high-speed rotating epilation head ensures thorough removal
of even the shortest of hairs, leaving a silky smooth finish. This compact and cordless
epilator can also be used for eyebrows, bikini line and leg touch-ups.
Requires 2 x AAA batteries (included). Was �.99.
D5714 Ladies Epilator
D1842 4 x AAA Duracell Batteries �49
CALL: 0871 911 7011 quoting 77382
Lines open 8am-8pm 7 days a week. Please have your credit/debit card details to hand.
Calls cost 13p/min plus your phone company?s access charge.
BY POST: Sunday Post Offer 77382, PO Box 87, Brecon LD3 3BE
ONLINE: www.dc-thomsonoffers.co.uk
Name........................................................ ITEM
CODE QTY PRICE TOTAL
Address .................................................... Hyperflex Aqua Shaver D9723
�.99
.................................................................. Ladies Epilator
D5714
�.99
.................................................................. AAA Duracell Batteries
Postcode ..................................................
Telephone ................................................
Email Address ..........................................
Postage & Packing
D1842
�49
�95
Total Cost Of Order
I enclose a cheque/postal order, made payable to BVG Group for the total amount of � ....................
(Please write your name and address on the back of your cheque.)
If you wish to return an unwanted product, then you may do so at your own cost within 30 days. All returned products must be in mint, re-saleable condition and in the
original packaging. Please note delivery to Northern Ireland, Isle of Man, BFPO address and Scottish Highlands and Islands is �95. Delivery to the Channel Islands, Scilly
Isles and Eire is �.95. BVG Group do not refund postage on unsuitable items or cancelled orders.Your contract for supply of goods is with BVG Group. BVG?s ?was? pricing
refers to the original selling prices offered on our website www.cjoffers.co.uk, and in our retail store between 3rd July and 3rd October 2017. Please allow 7 days for delivery.
Offer subject to availability and open to UK readers only. DC Thomson & Co.Ltd and its group companies would like to contact you about new products, services and offers
we think may be of interest to you. If you?d like to hear from us by post, please tick here telephone, please tick here or email, please tick here . From time to
time, carefully chosen partner businesses would like to contact you with relevant offers. If you?d like to hear from partner businesses for this purpose please tick here .
Offer subject to availability and open to UK readers only. Please allow up to 7 days for delivery. Offer ends 15.04.2018.
77382
.
46
October 15, 2017
honest truth
Secrets of
Scotland?s
whisky
smugglers
page 49
oor wullie &
the broons
WID YE
LIKE TAE
EXPLAIN, MY
WEE HERO AS YE GIVE ME
THAT FIVER
BACK.
Wullie has
money
problems
pages 52 & 53
horoscopes
Your week
ahead in
the stars
sundaypost.com
Memories
october 18, 1954
By Craig Campbell
L
october 16, 1978
Thanks to the innovators at Texas Instruments, you could listen to your radio anywhere
Transistor radio was
bigger than Dallas!
With ?50s radios, however,
the new-fangled transistor
was where it was at, as they
were relatively light,
uncomplicated and wouldn?t
burn themselves out any
time soon.
They also required far less
power, so a small battery
would do the job, whether
you were listening in from
the kitchen while doing the
cooking or relaxing on some
faraway island.
The Regency TR-1 was
what they called that first
one in 1954, although they
couldn?t persuade RCA,
Philco or anyone else to
make them ? they were
among the major
radiomakers of the day, and
for some reason didn?t fancy
this new gizmo.
A man named Ed Tudor
did, thankfully. President of
Texas Industrial
Development Engineering
Associates, he predicted sales
of 20 million radios in three
years.
Alas, while many other
companies would jump on
the bandwagon and produce
their own transistor radios,
the TR-1 had a rocky time.
They reckon just one in
five of the early ones worked
properly, and as they cost
$446 in today?s money, they
weren?t cheap, either.
TR-1 sold about 150,000
units, while within a year or
two, you could get a tiny one,
small enough to fit on your
wrist, from other makers.
Japan, meantime, was
more than catching up,
designing them cheaper,
smaller and better-looking.
Some things never change!
The
Sunday PoSt
october 16, 1939
For the first time in the Second
World War, the Luftwaffe directly
attacked British territory.
It was the Firth of Forth, and
nine Luftwaffe planes damaged
three British ships, killing 16
Royal Navy crew.
The assault was met by
Spitfires of 603 Squadron, which
shot down three enemy aircraft.
Children at the time described
what they saw, believing they
were watching some kind of
this week
With his background,
it?s amazing Cole
Porter, who died on this
date, worked as hard
as he did.
Born into a wealthy
Indiana family, he
could have done
anything he pleased,
but worked feverishly
to write some of the
all-time greatest songs.
His mother had
altered his birth year,
making him two years
younger to seem even
more precocious, but
he?d learned violin at
six, then piano, and
wrote his first operetta,
aged just 10.
ater generations
think of Dallas, as a
massive TV show, but in
the ?50s it was all about
radio.
The transistor radio, to be
precise, designed and
manufactured by Texas
Instruments (TI).
The transistor itself had
only been around since 1947,
and TI were faster than J.R.
Ewing doing an oil deal to be
the first to get radios out
there.
Small portable receivers,
transistor radios, would
swiftly become the
most-popular electronic
communication device in
history ? yes, even compared
to today?s smartphones and
tablets.
Soon, you could use your
tranny to listen to the big
football match or the latest
pop hits, the Queen?s
speeches and the shipping
forecast.
Billions were made and
sold in the ?60s and ?70s, and
the big attraction was their
small size, letting you tune in
anywhere.
Without them, we might
never have seen the CD, the
Walkman, the MP3 player or
iPod.
Small was cool, and ease of
use was a must.
In the world of guitar
amplifiers, using valves was,
and still is, the big thing.
When valves heat up, they
impart a beautiful warmth to
the tone of your Fender or
Gibson, and guitar heroes
swear by them.
Looking back
at what made
the news in
years gone by
october 15, 1964
mail@sundaypost.com
Relax
see page 56
RELAX
rehearsal, and they cheered as
the planes? bombs rained down.
?The man from ARP came and
told us it was real and told us to
get inside and then we realised it
was the real thing,? one recalled.
It?s thought that the Germans
were hoping to knock out the
Forth Bridge itself.
Spitfires from Glasgow and
East Lothian were among those
involved, and their actions saw
the first-ever enemy aircraft shot
down by the planes that would
play such a major role in the
conflict.
Leader of the Junkers flight,
Hauptmann Helmut Pohle, is
reported to have said he was a
personal friend of prominent
Nazi Hermann Goering, who
had been a gifted fighter pilot in
the Great War.
He demanded a Red Cross
flight home, but was sent to the
Tower of London instead.
John Paul II became
the first non-Italian
Pope in more than 400
years. He became one
of the most-popular
Popes ever, and we
haven?t had another
Italian Pontiff since!
The current Pope,
Francis, is the first born
outside Europe since
Syrian Gregory III in the
8th Century.
october 18, 1851
Famous novel MobyDick was first published
as The Whale.
Herman Melville?s
epic tale of Captain
Ahab and the creature
that bit off his leg
continues to enchant
and entrance each
new generation.
october 19, 1812
Just as Hitler?s overconfident and overstretched forces would
do in the next century,
Napoleon made a
humiliating retreat from
Russia.
Bonaparte had
taken an incredible
half a million soldiers
and staff to Moscow.
His winter quarters
were destroyed by fire,
however, and he was
forced to retreat or risk
some huge losses.
october 20, 1977 An
air crash killed rock
band Lynyrd Skynyrd?s
lead singer, guitarist,
backing singer and
three others.
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
5 YEARS AGO
RELAX
October 15, 2017
47
A newborn L?Hoest?s monkey, that has not been
given a name yet, peeps out at Edinburgh Zoo
Francis Gay
MY wEEk
10 YEARS AGO
Artist Kurt Wenner (seated left) in Waterloo Station,
London, finishes his eye-catching 3D artwork
The love between a mother and
her daughter ? it?s a work of art!
M
um had decided her two-yearold?s intellectual stimulation ought to be
more than just cartoons on TV, so she
took her to the art exhibition.
The little one was a bundle of energy,
running around and only stopping by
paintings of animals.
?That a hoss!? she shouted. ?That a doggy!
That a wion!? Then she almost ran into me.
She stopped, telling her mum: ?An? that a
man!?
15 YEARS AGO
Crimewatch presenter Fiona Bruce goes for a drive
in the Robin Reliant from Only Fools And Horses
MORE SPORT MEMORIES IN GOLDEN YEARS - SEE POST MATCH
A.A. Milne, the
creator of Winnie
the Pooh, is being
celebrated in a new
film.
It came to mind
as I saw the couple,
perhaps in their 70s,
peering intently
over the side of a
bridge.
After a few
seconds, they
turned as one and
ran to the other side
where they peered
down into the water
again.
She jumped,
waved her hands in
the air, and
laughed.
So, I took a
chance and
shouted: ?You are
never too old for
pooh-sticks, are
you??
The man looked
over, noticing me
for the first time.
He pumped a fist
in the air, and
shouted: ?Never!?
Something else
to thank Alan
Alexander Milne
for.
Write to:
?Yes, dear,? mum said, taking her by the
wrist. ?But the man isn?t in the exhibition.?
There was a competition on the go to find
the most beautiful work in the hall.
I found myself entranced by patience,
teaching, trust, unbounded energy, unbridled
joy, and love, and I realised that my favourite
wasn?t on any wall.
The most beautiful thing in that hall, as far
as I was concerned, was the relationship
between a mother and daughter.
June had commented on the
resemblance between a friend
and her two granddaughters,
only to be told there was no
biological link between the
gran and one of the wee girls.
?I couldn?t count the number
of times I was told I looked like
my dad when I was young,?
she told me.
?No one outside the
immediate family knew I was
adopted, but people were
always amazed by the
similarity.
?Looking back on those
times, I often wondered if,
somehow, we might grow to
look like the ones we love.?
I couldn?t say, June, but it
really is a beautiful idea!
Autumn leaves are falling,
Winter?s drawing near,
Darker nights are with us,
Soon ?twill be another year;
Yet think of cosy evenings,
We share with family and friend,
A very simple pleasure,
But one to recommend.
Patrick informed his
Twitter followers that
some nasty things
had been said, and
he didn?t want any
of that on his
account, so he had
deleted the
comments.
He ended by
saying, ?Let?s keep
it lovely, yeah??
He didn?t say,
?Let?s keep it
polite,? or, ?Let?s
keep it civil.?
He didn?t settle
for the basic
standard we might
hope for. He took
that as a given,
then he went up a
notch and
encouraged his
followers to go with
him.
We can do the
same in our
everyday
exchanges with
others, online or in
person. Take civil
and polite as a
base line, then go
higher. Make your
conversations lovely
? and others will join
you there!
Francis Gay at The Sunday Post, 2 Albert Square, Dundee, DD1 9QJ or email: francisgay@sundaypost.com
.
YOU have seen it in the
papers, it?s on TV, and is
earning rave reviews all
over the internet! So,
don?t miss this opportunity
to get your own supply of
the ?miracle? cream that?s
taking the UK by storm...
AS SEEN IN THE NATIONAL PRESS AND MAGAZINES
The No.1 Eye Cream
to banish dark circles
and ?ne lines as
voted by Marie Claire
The miracle cream
that ?even advert watchdog says
WILL banish wrinkles!?
Daily Mail
07.09.16
GUARANTEED!
INSTANT
RESULTS
? THAT WILL LAST ?
ALL DAY
LONG!
AFTER
BEFORE
My Perfect Eyes
BEFORE
is a non-surgical
cosmetic miracle which
erases puffiness, ?ne
lines, dark circles and
wrinkles in 60 seconds,
yet lasts for hours!
Prepare to be amazed... BEFORE
AFTER
INTRODUCTORY
? OFFER ?
W
Perfect Eyes helps you look younger and feel more
con?dent, instantly! Get yours today and perk-up
your peepers in less than a minute! And with results that
last all day long, you?ll never look tired again...
Have you ever spent a small
fortune on anti-ageing creams
and lotions, only to wait months
for ?results? which, frankly, leave
you feeling underwhelmed?
My Perfect Eyes is different.
This incredible new product
delivers amazing results instantly,
whenever you want to look your
best... guaranteed!
INSTANT RESULTS!
My Perfect Eyes will instantly
?erase? those common signs of
ageing eyes: puf?ness, ?ne lines,
dark circles, crow?s feet, bags
and wrinkles. You?ll look years
younger and feel more con?dent
instantly... and the results last for
up to 10 hours!
TRIED & TESTED!
My Perfect Eyes is tried and tested
to alleviate your tired and ageing
eye problems. Wear it all day ? or
all night! ? safe in the knowledge
that you are still going to look
amazing, long after the clock
strikes midnight!
Forming an extremely ?ne
and invisible veil under the eye,
My Perfect Eyes will leave your
skin notably smoother, soft and
younger looking... guaranteed!
APPLICATIONS
INSTANTLY ERASES
THE SIGNS OF TIRED
AGEING EYES:
FINE LINES,
CROWS FEET
& WRINKLES
BAGS &
PUFFINESS
AFTER DARK CIRCLES
How to make problem eyes
SAVE �
HALF
PRICE
perfect in 60-seconds ?at!
ould you like to wipe away the years? My
100
SO EASY TO APPLY!
There are no tricks to applying My
Perfect Eyes. Place a small drop
on your ?ngertip, smooth it into
the skin around the eyes (under
make-up) and watch in wonder as
the non-penetrative lightweight
formula works its magic. You
can see the transformation as it
happens. Don?t believe us? Watch
the 1-minute real time video at
www.myperfecteyes.co.uk
100% SATISFACTION!
You will love My Perfect Eyes.
For added peace of mind, we will
refund your purchase within the
?rst 30 days if you are anything
less than delighted with your new,
younger-looking eyes.
Results Impress Cosmetics Doctor
He says: ?I?m really impressed by
the results of My Perfect Eyes. As
a cosmetic doctor, I don?t think
I?ve seen a cream before that can
achieve those kind of results.?
Dr Hugo Kitchen has over 25 years experience
in advanced non-surgical aesthetic treatments
and a well-deserved and enviable reputation
for being a leading provider in his ?eld.
My Perfect Eyes invite you to try their
popular 10g / 100 applications bottle
with a 30-Day Satisfaction Guarantee!
�
Was �.95 NOW ONLY
HIGH
.95 DEMAND
Standard
10g bottle
EXPECTED
BONUS FREE GIFT when you DOUBLE UP!
Don?t miss out on our incredible DOUBLE-UP
offer. Double your supply of My Perfect Eyes
to a generous 200 application supply ? also
at half price ? for only �.95 (was �.95).
ORDER NOW and you will also receive a supply
of My Perfect Night, our equally-impressive
night cream containing the super ingredient,
Ameliox. A value of �.95, but yours FREE
today with every DOUBLE-UP order!
200
APPLICATIONS
YOURS
FREE!
? ORDER NOW BY PHONE, ONLINE OR POST ?
Call on 020 3866 9343
Please tick as required:
INTRODUCTORY OFFER
1 x My Perfect Eyes 100
10g / 100 Applications
Was �.95
Now only
SAVE � �.95 +P&P �99
DOUBLE-UP BONUS OFFER
1 x My Perfect Eyes 200
20g / 200 Applications
Was �.95
Now only
SAVE � �.95 +P&P �99
PLUS: My Perfect Night
Was �.95 YOURS FREE!
or visit www.myperfecteyes.co.uk
Or post coupon: The Perfect Cosmetics Company Ltd,
7a East?eld Place, Rugby, CV21 3AT.
Post completed coupon to: The Perfect Cosmetics Company,
7a East?eld Place, Rugby, CV21 3AT
I enclose a cheque made payable to The Perfect Cosmetics Company Ltd, or
Charge my credit / debit card (all major cards: Mastercard / Visa / Maestro)
Card
No.
Start
Date
Security
No.
Exp
Date
Issue
No.
Name
Address
Postcode
Email
Tel
�99 P&P for delivery to UK only. �99 Europe, �.99 Rest of World
Signature
SP18
sundaypost.com
a sit down with daniEL MaccannELL
sundaypost.com
relax
October 15, 2017
49
Honest Truth
A new book, Scotland?s Secret History, studies the illicit distilling and smuggling of whisky from the mid-1600s to the early 20th Century.
Author Daniel MacCannell told Murray Scougall about laying myths to rest and telling tales stranger and more adventurous than fiction
What is your
background?
I?m a historian
with an expertise
in Scottish
architecture. I
earned a PhD at
the University of Aberdeen and
was elected a Fellow of the Royal
Geographical Society in 2017.
Armed gangs helped themselves to
whisky galore in underground racket
Why did you feel a book on
this subject was important?
The ?hand-me-down? feel of
whisky history books was getting
out of control. Since Ian
MacDonald?s Smuggling in the
Highlands in 1914, smuggling
stories have more often been
embellished than researched,
and many had not been told until
now.
How was the centuries-old
detail in the book unearthed?
Eleventy grillion hours in the
National Records and other
collections, cheered on by the
late lamented Mr Charlie Gordon
of William Grant & Sons!
When was illicit distilling at its
peak and why?
Just before the end of the
Napoleonic Wars in 1814 as the
armed forces, still responsible for
domestic law enforcement, were
stretched thinly around the
world.
Who were the illegal distillers
and was it often a full-time
job?
Certainly it was full-time for
some, including the Bain
The illicit
Highland
whisky trade
as captured
by Sir Edwin
Landseer in
the 19th
Century
brothers of Cabrach, who
?accumulated wealth from
smuggling alone? until they were
caught in 1824. The range of
social types involved was also
much wider than we expected.
What is the biggest myth the
book dispels?
That the distillers were
poverty-stricken and remained
so, selling their wares outright to
exploitative gangs from the
Lowlands and Ireland who then
marketed it in the central belt or
sent it across the border into
WIN
We have a fabulous prize on
offer this week ? a two-night
bed and breakfast weekend
stay for two with dinner on the
first evening at The Lodge At
Perth Racecourse PLUS a pair
of tickets to Scone Palace?s
Spirits Of Scone Halloween
Show!
This year, Scone Palace will
be celebrating Halloween with
six nights of spookiness.
Building on last year?s
success, this year?s ghostly trail
HOw tO
enter:
England. There were places
where this happened, but in
north-east Scotland
highly organised gangs controlled
integrated networks of
production and distribution
aimed at northern port towns.
To what lengths did the distillers
go to continue their operations
or keep them secret?
The sheet-iron ?belly canteen?
used to simulate a pregnancy
bump probably takes the biscuit,
but there were fake sand dunes
and all sorts. You name it, really.
Did the industry ever turn
violent?
Often, but rarely lethal ?
probably because to ?win? one of
their encounters with the
authorities, all the smugglers had
to do was escape with their
barrels intact.
They saw the revenue officers
as opponents to be outsmarted
rather than enemies to be
exterminated.
Therefore they armed
themselves with the latest
military weapons more to deter
combats than to win them.
Did the smuggling network
stretch beyond Scotland and
Britain?
We have no ?smoking gun?
documentation of illicit whisky
being exported from Aberdeen or
Banff to Scandinavia or the
Netherlands, but it would be
surprising if none had been,
given the gigantic amount of
whisky smuggled to those and
other Scottish ports by land.
Why did illicit distilling die out
in the early 20th Century?
Draconian fines and prison
sentences ? though nothing
seems to deter today?s vodka
counterfeiters, so whether it
really did die out ? or ever will ? is
a debate we could have.
Did the industry learn a lot
from the illicit distillers?
It?s fair to say the product was
perfected during smuggling?s
40-year heyday. Today?s industry
is in some ways just a legalised,
safety-checked, and hugely
up-scaled version of the illicit one.
n Scotland?s Secret History: The
Illicit Distilling and Smuggling of
Whisky by Charles MacLean and
Daniel MacCannell is available
now from Birlinn.
a two-night stay
at the lodge at
perth racecourse
will be longer and so much
scarier than before, with some
truly gruesome characters
from Scottish history being
brought back to life with
blood-curdling stories inspired
by local folklore.
This thrilling illuminated tour
around the palace grounds
includes the ancient
graveyard and the ghoul?s
maze.
Be warned, you never know
who you might meet when
you go down to the woods at
night...!
If your nerves can take it,
why not join one of the ghostly
storytelling sessions in the
haunted chapel?
Finish your night with a
selection of ghoulishly hot and
tasty food in the coffee shop
or visit the monster
marshmallow pit along the
way.
The coffee shop will be open
from 5.00pm to 8.30pm.
plus tickets to
scone palace?s
spirits Of scone
Halloween show
TO Be iN WiTH A CHANCe TO WiN jUST ANSWeR THe fOLLOWiNg qUeSTiON:
Halloween falls on which date?
a OctOber 29 b OctOber 30 c OctOber 31
call: 09012 925 257
Calls should cost no more than �02 ? calls from
mobiles or payphones may cost a lot more.
Or text SUNPOST followed by a space
then your answer, name and address to
Texts cost �00 plus your standard operator charge.
83149
Ts & Cs: Winner will be chosen at random from combined correct entries after 9.00am on the closing date of Friday, October 20, 2017. Prize is as stated. Your personal data will not be used for any other purpose than entry to this competition. Details of winner available on
request. Premium Rate Telephone Services Department, D.C. Thomson & Co. Ltd, 2 Albert Square, Dundee, DD1 9QJ, or by phoning the helpline on 01382 426103. For full competition Ts & Cs please send a large SAE to The Sunday Post Newspaper Marketing, Copy of your
competition terms, D.C. Thomson & Co. Ltd., 2 Albert Sq., Dundee DD1 9QJ or visit www.sundaypost.com/competition-terms/
.
P R E M I E R MA N
BETTER THAN
HALF PRICE
Sizes
S-5XL
NOW ONLY
�
Grey
Chests
?
36?-66?
FREE DELIVERY*
for new customers
Airforce
Classic
Cardigan
Beige
BEST SELLER year after year this
?Aclassic
jacquard design just never
dates. Lightweight and stylish with
handy front pockets and an easy zip
fastening it can be worn with just
about anything.
Green
With it?s BETTER THAN HALF PRICE
?saving
? now at only �, you won?t
buy better on the high street.
Machine washable. Material content: Acrylic
The offer price of � is available if you order before
30th April 2018 using the codes opposite.
SEND NO MONEY NOW ? EASY RETURNS
BETTER THAN HALF PRICE!
QTY
To order please quote ITEM NO. ML772YL
SIZES: S(36/38), M(39/41),
L(42/44), XL(45/47), 1XL(48/50),
2XL(52/54), 3XL(56/58),
4XL(60/62)in, 5XL(64/66)in
WAS
�
.50
NOW
� �.50
Post to: Premier Man, PMA 7274, 40 Lever Street, Manchester, M99 1SA
0871 984 7274
Calls cost 13p per minute plus your phone company?s access charge. Lines open 7am-10pm, 7 days a week
OR VISIT
SEND NO MONEY NOW
www.premierman.com/7274
To order online please enter the 7 digit Item No.
Post, phone or order online today. Orders are usually delivered within 7 days but please allow up to 14 days
in exceptional circumstances. Subject to availability. You can cancel your order by notifying us or returning
the item for any reason up to and including the fourteenth day after the day of delivery of the item. Please
take good care of the item as we may deduct monies from any refund if the value of the item is reduced as
a result of your unreasonable use of the item. If you return all the items in an order we will refund the cost of
the returned items plus the delivery charge (excluding any additional charges for nominated or next day
delivery) however, where the return is made via our courier or through a Hermes Parcel Shop we will charge
you a return fee which will be deducted from your refund. The return fee will not exceed the original delivery
charge. If you return the item by any other means this will be entirely at your cost. Your statutory rights are
not affected. For further information please refer to our catalogue or website or ask the advisor when you call.
CHOOSE THE WAY YOU PAY
When we accept your order this will act
as a request to apply for a credit account,
subject to status. You can either pay in
full by cheque, credit or debit card or
choose to spread the cost using our
repayment facility. If you choose this
facility, interest charges will apply.
Reg.office: JD Williams & Co. Ltd, Griffin
House, 40 Lever Street Manchester M60
6ES. Reg in England 178367.
ITEM NO.
COLOUR
PRICE
Standard Delivery for new customers
Standard Delivery for existing customers
FREE*
�50
SIZE
ML772YL
ML772YL
ML772YL
ML772YL
SAVE
? Offer ends 30th April 2018. The offer price is only available when you quote the item number on this advertisement at the time of order. Reference
to the WAS price is to the price stated on our website, www.premierman.com on 03/09/17. Prices may have changed since this date and you may
want to visit our website to check the savings available before you place your order. * Free standard delivery and free returns are only available to
new customers on their first order from this advertisement. After your first order our normal delivery terms and conditions will apply. Please see website
for full details.
TO ORDER
NOW CALL
IMPORTANT: WE WILL BE UNABLE TO PROCESS YOUR ORDER IF YOU DO NOT PROVIDE ALL
APPLICABLE INFORMATION. PLEASE COMPLETE IN BLACK INK AND BLOCK CAPITALS.
PMA 7274
? IMPORTANT: We can?t process your
order without these details.
TOTAL
Title (Mr/Mrs/other):
First Name(s):?
Surname:
Address:
Postcode:
D.O.B (DD/MM/YY):?
Tel No. (inc. STD):
E-mail (if applicable):
Choose the payment method that suits you best:
By Personal Account
By Cheque
By Credit/Debit Card
Please make cheque(s) payable to Premier Man
Enter credit/debit card
number and sign below:
Expiry
date:
Post to: Premier Man, Dept. PMA 7274, 40 Lever Street, Manchester, M99 1SA
Orders from Ireland welcome. For new customers from the Republic of Ireland, standard delivery on this order will be free with subsequent orders
charged at ?4.99. For customers from the UK standard delivery on subsequent orders may vary. Calls may be monitored or recorded for training
and quality purposes. Your order acts as a request to apply for a credit account subject to status. Right to refuse application is reserved. We?ll do a
credit search using credit reference agencies to confirm your identity, and to give us information about you and people you are financially linked with
for credit assessment. Our search will be recorded and seen by other organisations that offer credit. If you choose to open and operate a credit account
we?ll share information about how you run it with these agencies and other organisations for fraud prevention and debt collection. We may share
your information with other organizations. We or they may contact you for marketing purposes by mail, telephone, email or otherwise. If you do not
wish this to happen please tick this box . Subject to availability. The promotion ends on 30th April 2018.
Signature
nal Song
twice, in 2002 for If I Didn?t Have You
(from Monsters, Inc) and in 2011 for
We Belong Together (from Toy
Story 3).
His brother, Lionel, won Best Score
in 1969 for Hello Dolly! and their
stORYBEhINDthEMOVIE
I love The Muppet Movie. Can
you share any
behind-the-scenes tales? ? S.
Prior to the lovable gang?s first
theatrical outing, audiences
were only accustomed to seeing
hand puppets from the waist up.
The 1979 comedy broke the
rules by displaying the zany
characters? entire bodies.
One memorable musical
scene, featuring Kermit the Frog
alone on a log in a swamp, took
five days to complete.
To control the
banjo-strumming Muppet,
creator Jim Henson spent hours
underwater inside a cramped
diving bell, oxygen pumped in
through a hose.
?No place for someone with
claustrophobia,? he admitted.
advice
October 15, 2017
39
CAN
YOu
DO ME A
FAVOuR?
? I would like to find
a new home for my
110 Whisky
Magazines if anyone
is interested.
Bill Third, call
01343541462
? Can anyone let
me know where I
can buy vanishing
cream face
moisturising? I used
to use the Pond?s
make but this was
discontinued and I
can?t seem to find
one like it.
June Fleming,
83A Hercus Loan,
Musselburgh, East
Lothian, EH21 6BA
? Can anyone
supply me with an
instruction manual
on how to use a
Thread Delta OL1000
overclocker? I can
cover all costs.
Catherine McCurdy,
19B Colt Place,
Coatbridge, ML5 3HU
? I?m looking for
knitting patterns for
Argyle socks and
Fairisle jumpers and
cardigans. I?ve
searched in vain so
would appreciate
any help.
H. Stark, 27 Craigie
Road, Ayr, KA8 0EZ
uncle, Alfred Newman, won nine
Oscars for writing scores for movies
such as Camelot and The King And I,
giving the Newmans a total of 12
Oscars, the most for a single family.
Between the three, they were also
nominated by the Academy a further
59 times.
However, if you are judging the
most successful clan by the number
of Oscar-winning relatives, it has to
be the Coppolas.
Francis Ford Coppola has won five
times as director of iconic movies
such as The Godfather.
His daughter Sofia, son-in-law
Spike Jonze, father Carmine, brotherin-law David Shire, nephew Nicholas
Cage and niece-in-law Patricia
Arquette, have all won a golden
statuette, making it seven family
members.
Whatever happened to
the actor who played
Trevor in EastEnders?
? I.
Lennoxtown-born
Alex Ferns played the
part of abusive husband
Trevor so well he
received death threats!
Since leaving Albert
Square in 2002, Alex has
continued his TV acting
career, most notably in
Wolfblood.
He has also had roles
in films such as The
Legend Of Tarzan and the
forthcoming Romans.
stORYBEhINDthEsONg
What can you tell me about
Ironic by Alanis Morissette? ? L.
You can?t blame the grammar
police for taking light-hearted
pot-shots at the singer in the 21
years since its release.
While various scenarios
outlined in the lyrics ? ?rain on
your wedding day?, ?a black fly
in your Chardonnay? ? are
unfortunate, they aren?t actually
here to help
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
examples of irony! The
Canadian-American finally
allowed herself in on the joke
when she duetted with US chat
show host James Corden on a
reworked version two years ago.
Laughing, she sang: ?It?s
singing ironic ... but there are no
ironies.?
Sales of parent album Jagged
Little Pill have topped 33m.
? Can anyone tell
me where I can buy
a screen for my back
door so I can leave it
open and not have
cats coming in to my
house?
Miss A. McTaggart,
65 Cedar Avenue,
Stirling, FK8 2PJ
thANks
? To all who sent me
patterns, especially
the lady who
delivered them to
my house.
A. E. H. Traill,
Edinburgh
? To all the generous
readers who sent me
knitting patterns. I will
make use of them
all.
Margaret Telfer,
Inverurie
If you?d like to ask
readers a favour, write
to Favours, The Sunday
Post, 2 Albert Square,
Dundee, DD1 9QJ, or
email favours@
sundaypost.com
.
the page that gets things done
40
October 15, 2017
RawDeal
T
he summer holidays
are a distant memory. But, for
some people, the memory isn?t
very happy.
You never quite know what you
are getting in to when you leave
these shores for two weeks. You
might have the best of holidays,
but then you might have a
nightmare time. And what looks
good in a brochure might not
turn out quite how you expect it.
Renting a house or apartment
opens up an entirely new set of
circumstances and pitfalls to be
wary of.
Dr Ken Black, of Edinburgh,
took his three children for a
holiday in Modica, on the
southern coast of Sicily. It was a
fantastic holiday in a city so
beautiful it is a UNESCO Heritage
site.
They stayed in the picturesque
18th Century Palazzo Polara, close
to the San Giorgio Cathedral. It is a
quite spectacular setting for a
holiday and has, it must be said, a
slew of favourable reviews online.
But Dr Black didn?t have a good
holiday. In contrast to the
comments he?d seen on websites,
he found it difficult to relax.
Dr Black says that soon after
arriving he discovered the
housekeeper required access to
the property daily to water the
plants. While accepting the
necessity, he had reservations
over the invasion of privacy.
After these visits, he began to
get warning emails from the
owner commenting on whether
the palazzo was tidy, which
carried a suggestion that if
it wasn?t tidy he might be
charged extra. The emails also
mentioned that a piece of
furniture had been moved.
Dr Black said: ?No harm had
been done, we had simply
moved a piece of furniture.?
Another email invited him to
be respectful of the palazzo,
which, it said, ?has a very
important history?. He says he
was told the housekeeper ?will
pass by again tomorrow to
ensure all is in good order?.
And this continued throughout
the holiday. Dr Black said one
email mentioned a moved rug.
He said: ?There were numerous
loose rugs on polished stone
floors and the agent threatened
that we might be charged
because we moved one and
hadn?t returned it to its original
position.
?No harm or damage was done
? we simply moved it a bit.?
The palazzo Dr Black rented was beautiful inside and the city of Modica was wonderful ? but he says the retained deposit is a mystery
Apartment was left tidy but 250
euro deposit wasn?t returned
There was a shock at the end of
the holiday. Dr Black said: ?The
owner notified us by email that
the ?house was left in an appalling
state like we have never seen in
the three years since starting
rentals?.
?It went on to tell us: ?The
situation has been documented
and submitted to HomeAway (the
letting agent) earlier this week?.?
But Dr Black argues: ?If the
evidence was submitted before
we left how could it be stated that
the flat was in an appalling state
when we left? We had, in fact,
ensured the flat was very tidy and
asked the agent to inspect it. He
commented after doing so that it
was tidy but that we?d moved a
rug. No items were damaged or
broken.?
But Dr Black?s 250 euro deposit
(�2.26) wasn?t returned to him.
He wrote to Raw Deal.
Dr Black says the owner
refused to provide evidence of
any damage done to the property,
meaning his deposit was retained
but he wasn?t told why.
Raw Deal got in touch with
HomeAway and, in fairness to
them, will give their reply: ?We
looked into this complaint and
can confirm that HomeAway does
not have any other records of
traveller complaints or negative
traveller experience on this
specific property or owner.
?In fact, we note that the
majority of traveller reviews on
HomeAway related to the owner
and this property since 2016 are
very positive. We also note there
are no open complaints with our
HomeAway customer service
team relating to this property or
this owner.?
So why was Dr Black?s deposit
retained? After correspondence
with HomeAway, we still don?t
have an answer.
Raw Deal will not stay quiet
and just go away when our
inquiries aren?t answered.
Be careful when you rent
abroad. It often pays to check
independent review websites like
Trustpilot before booking
holidays.
Do you have a pRoblem?
email your address and daytime/mobile number to RawDeal@sunDaypost.com or write to Raw Deal, sunday post, 2 albert street, Dundee, DD1 9QJ. (please include sae).
n Briefly outline the problem and how you would like it resolved. n Include contact details of the other party and any customer ref/order numbers.
n By requesting Raw Deal?s assistance you agree for your name, location and a photo to be published.
sundaypost.com
ADVICE
October 15, 2017
41
Thank you
I can?t believe it. My order is suddenly
found. Where has it been for two
months? Why couldn?t shipping
company find it before now? Thank
you very much. I can?t see how you
managed that! ? R. Brown, Ayrshire.
This is the second time you have
helped me with my electric and
gas bill. You have made an OAP
very happy, even though it wasn?t
a large amount of money. Thank
you. ? Mrs V. Dunn, via email.
Vulnerable son keeps
calling adult chat lines
This is a horribly difficult situation for a
family to find itself in.
We will not, for obvious reasons, name
the people involved.
Mr X and his wife have an adult son.
We?ll call him John, though that isn?t his
real name.
John has problems. He is autistic and
suffers several obsessive compulsive
disorders. His father describes him as
very gullible. He is easily taken in by all
sorts of scams and lies.
John is alone in the family home at
times. He has been phoning numbers he
finds on adult contact websites. These
sites offer ?chat? of a sexual nature, with
pictures of beautiful women as the people
who are ? supposedly ? on the other end
of the line.
John has run up bills of �0 per week,
or higher, doing this ? and it has been
going on for more than three years.
There are hundreds, even thousands, of
these lines available to call, so it isn?t as
simple as barring one number.
John needs access to a phone, however,
to contact his mother and father, as his
carers, if anything goes wrong.
His mother and father have implored
John not to do this any more.
They have enlisted the help of his social
worker and even spoken to local
councillors. But to no avail.
They even contacted police, but were
advised that an adult, no matter a
vulnerable adult or not, phoning a number
that clearly advertises its per-minute
charges doesn?t involve any criminality.
John?s father reckons it is irresponsible of
these expensive phone lines to accept
John?s phone calls. Any member of the
public would baulk at bills of more than
�00 per year.
He asked if Raw Deal could do anything.
Mr X reckons that the companies doing
this make no provision at all for vulnerable
adults. Instead, they make every effort to
keep any caller on the line for as long as
they can to make as much money as
possible.
They are, in his opinion, taking
advantage of a person who isn?t fully
responsible for his own actions and who is
not considering all aspects of what appears
to be (if you look at these adverts) a highly
attractive young woman who is eager to
engage in quite salacious chat.
He reckons this ?just another scam?, but
one that is within the law.
It?s a difficult one, Mr X.
As you say, there isn?t a law against this.
There doesn?t seem to be any easy way to
protect someone from themselves.
We contacted BT, the country?s most
experienced phone provider, to ask if
Cordless
Lithium-ion
Leaf Blower
SAVE
�
72
HOUR
DEAL
OFFER
O
THE WE F
EK
Phone ?chat? lines can cost a fortune
there was anything that they thought Mr X
could do.
A spokesperson said: ?Without knowing
who Mr X?s phone provider is, we can only
give general advice based on what we
might do in such a situation.
?There are a couple of options for calls
to premium rate lines. BT offers a free
premium rate call-barring option to UK
based 0900-0909 numbers, or an account
holder can alternatively arrange to have a
PIN on the line which means the phone
can only be used when someone has the
pin (there?s a small charge for this service).
?However, your reader mentions a
specific website (Raw Deal will not be
giving details of the website). Parental
controls can be used by an account holder
to block access to certain types of web
sites. BT offers these free and they can be
managed online.?
?Our advice would be to contact your
service provider in the first instance to
discuss your options.?
We at Raw Deal are grateful for BT?s
advice, and we will advise Mr X of the
options BT kindly offered.
But, sadly, there doesn?t seem to be a
foolproof way to stop Mr X?s son from
doing this.
It is a hugely difficult, and sad, problem
of the modern world.
for more help
n Get further advice: advice@citizensadvicedirect.org.uk
n Take your complaint further: www.ombudsman-services.org
n Trading standards: www.tradingstandards.co.uk
Effortlessly tidy up leaves with this 20V cordless
ONLY
garden leaf blower from Garden Gear. This powerful
machine is completely cordless, meaning there are
no leads to restrict you or get tangled up in?it also
PLUS �95 P&P
allows you to carry out jobs wherever you need to.
The long blower tube is perfect for blowing leaves
out of hard-to-reach places into a neat and easy-to-remove pile. Once
you have finished, the blower tube can be removed and thanks to this
innovative space-saving design, the machine can easily be stored away.
The leaf blower comes with a long-lasting 1500mAh lithium-ion battery,
giving you powerful performance combined with a quick charge time of
3-5 hours. Ergonomically designed, this leaf blower features a soft grip
handle and is comfortable to use, weighing just 1.76kg.
Also available for �.99 is an additional 20V battery, compatible with
the entire 20V Garden Gear range, to allow you to work for longer
periods without delay.
Was �.99 Usually �.99
G1166 20V Leaf Blower
D9533 Spare 20V Battery �.99
�.99
CALL: 0871 911 7011 quoting 77380
(Lines open 8am ? 8pm, 7 days a week. Please have your credit/debit card details to
hand) Calls cost 13p/min plus your phone company?s access charge.
ONLINE: www.dc-thomsonoffers.co.uk
If you wish to return an unwanted product, then you may do so at your own cost within 30 days. All returned products must be in mint, re-saleable condition and in the original
packaging. Due to weight, delivery will take between 5 and 7 days and is charged at �95. We are unable to deliver this product outside mainland UK, to Scottish Highlands, Isles
or BFPO addresses. BVG Group do not refund postage on unsuitable items or cancelled orders. Your contract for supply of goods is with BVG Group. BVG?s ?was? pricing refers to the
original selling prices offered on our website www.cjoffers.co.uk, and in our retail store between 3rd July and 3rd October 2017. Please allow 7 days for delivery. Offer subject to
availability and open to UK readers only. Offer ends midnight 17.10.2017.
.
October 15, 2017
Advice
sundaypost.com
Health and
your concerns
by The Doc
We need saliva to speak ? but a
blockage can lead to surgery
A young man came into the surgery
last month looking worried, after
finding a lump on his jaw.
It was at the side of his face, just
below and slightly to the front of his
ear.
The small lump had appeared
recently so, since it was painless and
unlikely to be an infection, I sent him
up to the hospital for a scan.
This was a precautionary measure,
done in order to rule out anything
sinister.
His troublesome lump seemed to
be in his parotid gland.
These are typically located either
side of the mouth and beneath the
ears.
Our parotid glands are one of three
pairs which produce saliva in the
mouth.
This is, of course, the fluid which
helps us break down and lubricate
our food.
Chemicals in saliva helps keep our
teeth strong but it also helps us talk,
too.
If you?ve ever had to do a bit of
public speaking you might be aware
of how difficult it can be with a dry
mouth.
The parotid gland can be affected
by mumps.
This condition causes it to swell up
and make one look not unlike a
hamster.
My patient?s scan at the hospital
also included using a needle to take a
wee sample from the lump.
It turned out to be something
called a pleomorphic adenoma.
That?s quite a scary title for what is
actually a rather benign tumour.
These tumours in the parotid
glands are in fact relatively common.
However, the majority of them ?
80% or so ? are in fact not cancerous.
That doesn?t mean you should
ignore a lump like that if one pops up.
They should always be checked out
by an expert.
Most are eventually removed
surgically, to prevent any future
problems.
Salivary gland swellings can also be
caused by a wee stone.
These can form in the gland
following a build-up of calcium in the
area.
We?re not entirely sure why this
happens, although some people who
take blood pressure drugs and
antihistamines are more at risk of
developing them.
A swelling of the cheek gland might
also be caused by other illnesses such
as sarcoidosis, a collection of cells
which become inflamed.
case study
42
War hero Kenny
couldn?tgetthe
horrorsof battle
out of his mind
After enduring misery of PTSD, dad?s newfound
love of racing cars has helped turn his life round
Proud dad
Kenny
enjoys
bonding
with son
Harris
in the
garage ?
but it?s a
far cry
from just a
few years
ago
The Doc Replies
I was walking back
from the shops last
week and began to
feel a bit of chest
pain. Might it have
been caused by the
cold weather?
Some people who
suffer from angina do
report that their chest
pain can be a bit worse
in cold weather. The
reasons are unclear. For
people who suffer from
angina, any extra effort
such as walking up hills
or stairs or walking
against a strong wind
can bring on chest pain.
If you find this
happening more
frequently or this is a
new symptom then it
would be worth getting
checked out.
The barber noticed
bald patches at the
back of my head and
said I should be
checked for
alopecia. What is it?
Small patches of hair
loss are often associated
with alopecia areata.
However, it can
sometimes be caused
by a fungal infection
such as ringworm. With
both these conditions,
the skin will appear
relatively normal
underneath with no
scarring. If there is
scarring evident it is
likely to be something
else, and you should see
your GP. In most cases
of alopecia areata, the
hair will regrow within a
few months to a year
and the area will remain
small. Often with small
patches there is no
treatment needed.
However, if the area is
getting larger you
should also speak to
your family doctor.
Why does the skin
turn red with sunburn?
This is due to
inflammation. Sunburn
is caused by an excess
of ultraviolet light. As
ever, I?d advise people
to avoid sunburn by
taking a few simple
steps, such as not
staying in sunlight for
too long, using high
factor sunblock, and
keeping exposed skin
covered ? especially
while staying in hot
countries.
Unfortunately the Doc can?t directly respond to each query, or guarantee a reply.
When in doubt contact your own GP
By Laura Smith
lasmith@sundaypost.com
I
n his garage-turned-car
workshop, Kenny Watson is refitting
the brake line of his second-hand
Subaru Impreza.
There?s a metallic clang in the
background as four-year-old Harris
happily mixes up his dad?s tools.
But just one year ago, this ordinary
father-son experience was unthinkable
for the decorated war hero.
?When my son was born, it felt like
the worst day of my life,? admitted the
28-year-old, from Fife.
At the time, Kenny was waging a
mental battle with PTSD.
And the horrors he faced during
gruelling tours of Iraq and Afghanistan
still raged in his mind.
?At the time, I couldn?t physically be
around children. Hearing their screams
was one of the triggers that took me
straight back,? said Kenny. ?I thought I
was still on tour amid mass casualties
and would act out. Harris wouldn?t even
come near me.?
But today, Kenny is on the fast-track
to recovery thanks to an unlikely new
hobby ? building a race car.
Three years of therapy has helped
him face up to what he saw on the
frontline.
Yet his family life really started to
improve when his wife suggested he
focus on a project, and Kenny chose to
pursue his love of motor racing.
He said: ?I had this old, ordinary car
just sitting there and decided to turn it
into a race car. The way this has
brought me forward and helped my
recovery is massive.?
Kenny joined the army at 16 and later
went on to serve as a sniper with
Edinburgh battalion, The 3 Rifles.
He was officially diagnosed with
PTSD in 2014, and was later medically
discharged from the military in
February 2017 due to back injuries and
hearing loss he sustained on tour.
Struggling to separate past from
present, Kenny admits horrific
flashbacks drove him to self-harm.
The Doc Replies, The sunDay posT, 2 albeRT squaRe, DunDee DD1 9qJ oR email us aT Doc@sunDayposT.com
sundaypost.com
sundaypost.com
family
Advice
October 15, 2017
43
Maggie
listens
Looking for practical advice, relationship help or emotional
support? As a mum-of-four, grandmother-of-eight and dear
friend to many, Margaret?s years of experience make her
the ideal person to turn to with your worries
My friend in need repaid my
kindnessbyhurtingme.Should
I give her another chance?
Dear Maggie My friend has
been through a tough time
recently and I?ve been trying to
support her.
Her marriage has broken
down, she?s been off work and
has understandably struggled to
keep on top of things at times.
I?ve tried to be there for her as
much as I can, to listen and take
her out when she?s been feeling
down.
We had a day out planned with
the kids a few weeks ago and
we?d all been really looking
forward to it.
But with just a couple of hours
notice, she cancelled, saying
she wasn?t up to it and asked if
I?d go on my own with the
children.
The next day I heard from
another friend that she?d been
out with other people instead.
I felt really hurt, angry and
taken advantage of, but knowing
she?s not had it easy lately I
didn?t want to have a big
blow-up so I?ve just kept my
distance since.
Now she?s back in touch and
saying she needs support again.
What do you think I should do?
Maggie says After being so
Kenny?s
racing
car has
helped the
former
soldier find
a new
lease of
life after
being
diagnosed
with PTSD
In his darkest moments, he even tried
to commit suicide.
?When I was alone in the house, I
started getting social anxiety and
thought I was back on tour,? he
recalled.
?I smashed my trophies and tried to
burn my medals. I just wanted
whatever this thing was inside me out.?
His erratic behaviour threatened to
permanently separate Kenny from his
partner and their young son.
Kenny added: ?PTSD is an invisible
injury that can destroy relationships
and rip apart your career and who you
are as a person.
?Everything started to engulf me
because I didn?t have a distraction.?
But it turned out the distraction
Kenny needed was sitting in his garage
all along. Learning as he went, Kenny
ded
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
13
Размер файла
73 776 Кб
Теги
The Sunday Post, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа