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The Times Times 2 - 15 March 2018

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March 15 | 2018
Hanging out
with Stephen
Hawking
By Giles Whittell
2
1G T
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
times2
?In my dreams
Pity me, an old penny
stuck in a drawer. Do
I now face pennocide?
Deborah Ross
A
long-forgotten
penny stuck
in a drawer
somewhere
writes
exclusively for
The Times:
?You?d think,
having been stuck in this drawer
for all this time, that I wouldn?t
have heard the news. You?d think
that because I?m in the dark,
literally ? oh, how I yearn for
light and the sun on my face! ? I
am in the dark in all ways, but I
am not. I know. We have our ways.
Jonathan, the penny who has been
down the back of the sofa for so
long that he thinks he was once
handed over during a transaction
in Mac Fisheries, but can?t be
sure (?Maybe I just dreamt it??),
is right at the centre of things,
so he hears it all and keeps us
informed. He can hear the TV, so
he listens to all the news while
also keeping us up to date with
shows such as MasterChef, which
we like, and Collateral, which we
stuck with even though it was a bit
wordy. Still, better than that
Midwife shite.
?So Jonathan gets all the info
and whispers it to the coppers
who have been tipped into the
vases on the mantelpiece down
the years, who whisper it to the
coppers in the old biscuit tin, who
whisper it to the coppers in the
old toffee box, who whisper it to
the coppers in the jar, who
whisper it to the coppers who
have been heaped on the side for
as long as anyone can remember,
who in turn whisper it down into
this drawer, to Lulu and me.
?Obviously, there are many of
us in this dark, dark drawer, but
I like pork
pies: I feel
such a fool
I am especially attached to Lulu,
given that one of us must have
encountered a sugary residue
at some point, so we are firmly
stuck together. I don?t love Lulu,
? I love Antonia, who is in the
biscuit tin, and is still as brilliantly
shiny as the day she was minted
? but it won?t be easy to prise
us apart. There?s some lint
involved too. Still, mustn?t
complain. At least we?re not
covered in caked-on black gunk
like Cheryl. (?I wish I looked like
Antonia,? she often sobs.)
?The point is that we know
what is happening in the world,
and we know about Philip
Hammond?s spring statement and
his proposal to remove us from
circulation, although we don?t
hear, ?remove from circulation?,
we hear, ?pennocide?. And also
?twopennocide? since our 2p
brethren are also under threat.
Our 2p brethren have the size
advantage and can be bossy (?Yes,
but you?d expect that from David
Hare?), yet we rub along all right,
Quiche? In. Pork pies?
Out. Raspberries,
leggings, ready-made
mashed potato, big
tellies and body
moisturiser? In.
Small tellies, edam,
digital camcorders
and peaches/
nectarines? Out.
This is the annual
shake-up of the UK?s
official shopping
basket, which is used to
calculate inflation and
to make us wonder:
?What? People aren?t
eating pork pies in
front of small tellies
any more?? Followed
by: ?I wish they?d said
something earlier since
I spent most of
yesterday eating pork
pies in front of a small
GETTY IMAGES
The long silences were awkward, then
soothing, but it was Stephen Hawking?s
response to a child?s question that
astounded interviewer Giles Whittell
as a rule. Pennocide.
Twopennocide. You bastards.
?We have served you well, but
you?re saying we are pursebustingly, trouser-saggingly,
drawer-hoggingly useless? That
this has become the cashless
society? That we cost more to
produce than we return to the
economy? That 60 per cent of us
are used once then never again
and 8 per cent of us are simply
thrown away? Thrown away! FFS,
even Cheryl, with her caked-on
black gunk, wants to live. ?I have a
good idea for Dragons? Den, which
I think Deborah might wish to
invest in,? she says. ?Or Peter, but
Deborah would be first choice, for
10 per cent of the business.?
?True, having to live in drawers
and tins and jars isn?t ideal, and
it?s the same with being stuck
down the back of the sofa ? ?It?s
hot,? says Jonathan ? but until
now we have always had hope.
We don?t expect to swim with
dolphins, but do hope to feel the
sun on our faces, the wind in our
hair, and that Deborah will invest,
even if it?s going to cost us as
much as 20 per cent of the
business. Yet you?re planning a
pennocide? Shame on you. And
shame on the 5p coin who has
been muddled in with us and
thinks this is all hilarious, but
as I?ve said to him: ?You?re very
small and too faffy for most
people?s fingers so you have
nothing to laugh about, mate.?
That shut him up.?
(Newsflash: we?ve just heard the
penny is to be reprieved and the
penny is thrilled. ?The truth is, I
do kind of hope to swim with
dolphins one day,? said the penny.
?Or a manatee.?)
telly and now I feel
such a fool. How long
has everyone else been
eating quiche in front
of a big telly, and how
long would it take me
to catch up??
The basket, created
by the Office for
National Statistics,
which follows 714
products and services
every month to
understand changes in
the cost of living, puts
items in and out every
year to reflect changes
in eating habits and
lifestyle and technology
and ? wait, hang on,
people really aren?t
eating pork pies in
front of small tellies
any more? Or is this
some kind of wind-up?
Best you tell me now
because I don?t want to
be eating quiche in
front of a big telly when
I could be eating a pork
pie in front of a small
telly and then you go:
?Ha ha, joke!?
Similarly, I don?t
want to be heaving
on leggings postmoisturisation, then
have you say that?s a
wind-up too. I?ve yet
to heave on leggings
post-moisturisation,
but imagine it must be
quite like trying to pull
up tights while still
damp. It?s just not funny
if you?re going to make
someone do that when
they don?t have to. It?s
unkind, cruel. And you
need to grow up.
B
eing ushered into the
presence of Stephen
Hawking was, I wrote
at the time, like being
admitted to the flight
deck of the starship
Enterprise. There was
the soft background
hum of computers and air purifiers.
Crew members kept an eye on the
technology, but were still able to chat
quietly among themselves. And a
journey was being conducted through
the cosmos, if only in the mind of the
captain, the man in the wheelchair
behind the main flight console.
It was the late summer of 2013.
Eddie Redmayne was in the process of
filming a fictionalised version of
Hawking?s life. A feature-length
documentary had just been released
offering a factual one. The man
himself was in his office in the
Cambridge University Centre for
Theoretical Cosmology, hands folded
neatly in his lap. Later, one of them
would be offered by his technical
assistant for me to shake.
He had been dressed smartly for
the occasion, as he always was for
engagements with the press and
public, and, as befitted the most
famous scientist on Earth, he
was fully prepared: his answers to
questions I?d submitted in advance
had been printed for him and lay on a
clipboard on his console, aka desk.
Despite this I was expected to repeat
the questions as if this were a normal
interview. Hawking, who had lived
with motor neurone disease for nearly
half a century longer than doctors
thought possible, would then twitch
his glistening right eye and run the
answers through the deadpan Dalekstyle voice simulator that he had never
upgraded because it had become a
part of him.
I asked the first question. The new
documentary on his life showed that
he was almost never alone ? but was
he ever lonely? The eye twitched and
the answer came: ?I?m very rarely
alone. I usually have one or two carers
watching over me. When I?m working
I don?t notice them, but at other times
my carers keep me grounded and in
touch with popular culture. Physics
and the universe are all very well, but
they are cold and dead. I would be
very lonely if it weren?t for family,
friends and carers.?
Then silence.
For at least 20 years there has been
no question in journalism quite like:
?Would you like to interview Stephen
Hawking?? The answer was always,
and naturally, yes. You wanted to meet
him to experience the Hawking
phenomenon unmediated by
television or his alter ego as a walk-on
player in The Simpsons. You wanted to
see if genuine communication were
possible with someone who could
communicate only one agonisingly
slow letter at a time. Yet the ground
rules were clear. He had the best
excuse of any interviewee on the
planet for insisting on time to prepare,
which raised the question of what you
might actually do with him once you
were together in his office.
He had an answer to that too.
The eye twitched again, this time
unprompted. There was another
pause for the Dalek to process a
programmed instruction. Then it said:
?You can ask a live question . . . You can
ask extra questions.? This was
unbelievably exciting. We?d been told
You had to accept
the strangeness
of it all, as he had
to for decades
that what passed for live repartee in
Hawking?s world would depend on his
health on the day. I had also read that
he was an adept manipulator of the
media. If so, he was on form that day.
When the words were uttered it felt as
if the Pope had invited me to stick
around and chat about contraception.
We were going to try to talk.
At this stage in his life, four and a half
years before his death, the tiny muscle
to the right of his right eye was the only
one left in Hawking?s body over which
he had any control. I and others who
met him since swear that we saw him
smile involuntarily, but a smile is an
easy thing to imagine. What was clear
was that his maximum speaking speed
was about a word a minute.
He did have one quicker way of
communicating. His assistants
explained that sometimes an eyetwitch simply meant ?yes? and that he
could let the right corner of his mouth
droop more than usual to indicate
?no?. With this in mind, my first
follow-up question had, I hoped, a
simple yes/no answer.
One of the questions on the
clipboard read: ?When are you
happiest?? To this he had answered:
?I?m happiest when I discover
something new that no one knew
before. It gives a thrill nothing
can match.? So, I wondered, did
he think he would ever experience
that thrill again?
Jonathan Wood, his technical
assistant, was on the lookout for a
twitch or a droop, but didn?t see one.
Instead the Dalek spoke after a tenminute silence: ?I?m working on
something called firewalls. Ever since I
discovered that black holes aren?t
completely black, physicists have been
puzzled over the implications.?
They still are. Indeed, Hawking?s
fellow physicists have not yet proved
his theory, based on pure maths, that
black holes emit a tiny amount of
light. If they had he would have been
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
3
1G T
times2
I?m always able-bodied,? he said
COVER: SCOPE FEATURES. BELOW: MURDO MACLEOD; SWNS
ultimately regards his science, his
defiance of motor neurone disease for
so long will live on as one of his most
astonishing achievements, and survival
did not come cheap. Cambridge
University and the NHS did what they
could, but in the end he met most of
the costs of his round-the-clock care
himself from the proceeds of his books
and public appearances. At the time I
met him he was said to be worth
between � million and � million,
but his overheads were high. He lived
to work, and worked to live.
An audience with Hawking was just
that ? a spectacle. Yet putting
questions to him was by no means
pointless, and one of his prepared
answers left me literally lost for words.
The question had come from a child
who had been studying The Tempest at
school. I was to ask Hawking if he ever
dreamt he was able-bodied. ?In my
His defiance of
his disease was
an astonishing
achievement
entitled to expect a Nobel prize, and if
they ever do, ?Hawking radiation? will
become his most significant scientific
legacy. In the meantime he had not
answered my question about repeating
the thrill of discovery, so I put it again
in another way. Was he saying the
question was impossible to answer?
This time the eye did twitch. Wood
provisionally confirmed a ?yes?, but it
turned out that the great man was
writing again. After another ten
minutes he said: ?I can?t know until
I discover it.?
On re-reading that interview I
wonder just how irritating it can have
been for Hawking to have an
interviewer repeat a question as if
engaged in a normal conversation. I?ll
never know, but I do know that the
initial awkwardness of the long silences
between us quickly morphed into
something much more soothing. All
you had to do was accept the
strangeness of it all, as he had been
forced to for decades. Then, while
waiting for his answers, you could
wonder what he was thinking, and
give up when you realised that nine
tenths of his mind was probably
contemplating the intricacies of
firewalls, and chat sotto voce with his
helpers or just soak up the atmosphere.
He could think and enjoy Wagner
and TV, but couldn?t eat, move or wash
unaided. He had four full-time staff
who cared for him in three shifts: two
daytime and one long solo stint at
night. Neatly arranged under a long
windowsill in his office were about 50
half-gallon containers of distilled
water for a humidifier connected to
the pipe between his ventilator and his
throat. He still travelled in principle,
often in executive jets laid on by
billionaire supporters, although in
practice he had been forced to cancel a
trip to California that week on account
of a health scare. He had written that
he was never more than one ventilator
malfunction from disaster.
What stayed with me that day was
the image of Stephen Hawking simply
staying alive. However history
Stephen Hawking, who
died yesterday aged 76.
Above right: at his
graduation in 1962
dreams I?m always able-bodied,? he
replied. ?Either I don?t admit to myself
that I?m disabled, or I feel that by will
alone I can overcome it.?
At that point I should have asked if,
like Caliban, he ever woke up and
?cried to dream again?, but I didn?t. The
quote had been supplied along with the
question, but whether because I was
too anxious to stick to science or had
been lulled to sleep by the long silences,
I forgot all about it. It?s too late now, but
you never know. There might just be a
disembodied quantum Hawking
consciousness tearing through the
cosmos even now, dreaming of coxing a
men?s eight on the Cherwell (which he
did in his youth), flirting with his
admirers (which he did into old
age) and hearing that the lesser
minds he has left behind have finally
proved the existence of Hawking
radiation. Experts say that the proof
is only a matter of time, and he wrote
the book on that.
4
1G T
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
times2
Is it the end of the
world if your child
isn?t academic? No
Sir Ken Robinson is the education guru who gave the
most-viewed TED talk yet, in which he said that schools
kill children?s creativity. Helena de Bertodano meets him
T
welve years have
passed since Sir Ken
Robinson delivered
his hilarious and
eviscerating TED
talk Do Schools Kill
Creativity? It is the
most viewed talk in
TED?s history, recently surpassing
50 million online views. No one is
more surprised than Robinson, who
hadn?t even prepared a script. ?It was
improv,? he says. ?I was just speaking
to the room.?
A few weeks later the organisers
asked if they could put it online,
something TED had not done before.
Robinson ? knighted in 2003 for
services to art ? was in two minds:
he asked them to send a copy and
settled down to watch it with his wife,
Terry. ?Afterwards I said, ?What did
you think?? She said, ?I wish you?d
worn a different shirt.? ?
So the video went online, touching
a nerve that ran deep. Parents? latent
fear that the education system was
failing their children suddenly had a
champion. The essence of Robinson?s
talk is a passionate argument to foster
a system of education that nurtures
creativity rather than deadens it.
His latest book, You, Your Child and
School, is his first addressed directly
at parents, offering practical advice
on how to support your child through
the system, however flawed that
system is. ?It?s not a book on how to
be a wonderful parent,? he says. ?I?m
not lining up with Dr Spock and the
tiger mums.?
His aim is to ?say something
sensible and coherent? to parents and
he does so in a way that is neither
patronising nor critical. ?Many parents
are anxious, perplexed and worried:
they recognise that kids today are
under extraordinary amounts of
pressure . . . [But] to some degree
parents are part of the problem,
adding to the intense pressure by
assuming that the right thing is for
all kids to go to university.?
His critics say that he highlights
genuine problems in the education
system, but offers no solutions. ?The
idea that I am sitting in the Bodleian
Library just venting at people is
bollocks,? Robinson scoffs when we
meet at a restaurant in Los Angeles,
where he has lived since 2001.
Indeed, he has been at the heart
of education for decades, helping
schools, universities, teacher-training
programmes, even governments: he
Sir Ken Robinson: ?Some people are pathologically opposed to what I say?
chaired a government commission in
the UK on creativity, education and
the economy. ?It?s not like I?m on the
outside looking in. I?ve been kicking
around education for over 40 years.
And I?m a parent too.?
Terry arrives at the restaurant first,
while Robinson, 68, who had polio as
a child and moves a little awkwardly,
follows behind. He sits down and
orders a cappuccino. Terry, petite and
glamorous, sits opposite us, ?keeping
track of time?. It quickly becomes clear
that she is integral to everything he
does. ?I am his partner and muse. I
even did the first drafts of the Element
book,? she says, referring to his work
about finding one?s passion.
They work and think as a team.
As Terry says: ?Our kids grew up
overhearing us in the bedroom talking
about [educational] issues.? She turns
to her husband: ?It?s been our life,
hasn?t it??
?We talk about other things as well,?
says Robinson.
Terry, a published novelist under her
pen name, Th閞鑣e, looks doubtful.
?Occasionally,? she says.
They met more than four decades
ago, when Terry, a teacher at the time,
attended one of his lectures. Robinson
was about to cancel it because hardly
anyone had shown up, but then he
clapped eyes on Terry. ?She appeared
in her jeans and white T-shirt and
I thought, ?Wait a minute.? It was
9.30am and I thought, ?If I talk long
enough, maybe coffee?? ?
?He talked for an hour and a half,?
Terry says, ?and I was in love by the
end. I remember him saying, ?If you
could describe a picture in words,
there would be no need for a picture.?
People say the lights go on when you
hear a person speak, and that was
definitely it for me.?
He is an extraordinary speaker,
which is why his first TED talk (he
has done three) seduced so many.
Taken apart, the talk is a work of
comic genius and his sense of timing
is impeccable.
Humour comes naturally to
Robinson, who grew up in a large
working-class family in Liverpool.
?I find things funny. I?m one of seven
[children] and my experience of
Liverpool and the family is almost
constant unbroken hysteria.? This
despite spending eight months in
hospital with polio, aged four, followed
a few years later by an industrial
accident that felled his father,
rendering him quadriplegic at 45.
Everyone Robinson meets is exposed
to his wit. Posing for the picture that
accompanies this article, he asks the
photographer: ?Is this in any sense the
pinnacle of your career?? And when
the photographer tells him he is
awesome, Robinson says: ?Could we
stay in touch? All Terry tells me is
I?ve got a blemish. It?s been 40 years
Parents
are part
of the
problem.
They add
to the
pressure
on kids
You, Your Child and
School by Ken
Robinson is published
by Allen Lane, �.99
now and I?m ready for the next thing.?
If he had not contracted polio, he
says he fondly imagines he might have
become a professional footballer, like
one of his brothers, who played for
Everton?s first team. ?I was very strong
and very quick. Even now I know
intuitively what I would do if
somebody kicked a ball towards me.?
Ironically, perhaps, he credits his
state school with the making of him.
?They saw something in me I didn?t
see in myself and I rose to it.? He
started at a special school for the
disabled, but after passing the 11-plus
went to Liverpool Collegiate School,
then Wade Deacon Grammar School,
before studying English and drama at
Bretton Hall College of Education.
His parents, he says, were supportive,
but ? unlike many parents today ?
not overly involved. ?They weren?t at
the school gate going, ?What?s this?
You got 75 per cent on the essay,
but we read it and we think it?s a
clear 82 per cent.? ?
In 1985 he became a director of
the Arts in Schools Project, an
initiative to develop arts education,
then professor of education at the
University of Warwick. In 2001 he
received a call from the Getty
Museum in Los Angeles, asking him to
become an adviser. ?It was the third of
January in the Midlands. It was
raining. We left immediately.?
However, he is keen to point out
that, although he is based in
California, his interest in education is
worldwide; he works with
governments and education systems in
Europe, Asia and the US and is
constantly on the move. I ask if he
finds it hard to say no to things. There
is an instant whoop of laughter from
the other side of the table. Terry is
leaning sideways out of her chair, in
hysterics. He starts laughing too. ?One
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
5
1G T
times2
JOHN CHAPPLE FOR THE TIMES; GETTY IMAGES
The banker who created a suit
that?s as comfy as your yoga kit
by Hilary Rose
J
about getting to university, but getting
to a particular university. But it should
not be about the amount of ivy on the
walls. I remember Michael Gove
[when he was education secretary]
saying that his aim was to make
everybody eligible for Oxford or
Cambridge ? as if that style of
academic work were the high-water
mark of all forms of human
endeavour. I thought, ?Has he lost
his mind?? And even if we accepted
that, how many people can possibly
get in? Does everybody else become
also-rans? It?s a kind of intellectual
apartheid, which I detest.?
Robinson is optimistic ? ?an eternal
optimist?, according to Terry ? that
education will change. ?I think quite
convulsive changes are already afoot.
There are plenty of great schools out
there doing the things I?m talking
about; I advise a number of them.?
Often asked if he would start a
school himself, Robinson says it would
take up all his time at the expense of
his larger mission. ?It?s not like I?m 38
now. I think my time is better spent
this way, acting as a megaphone for
the people who are already doing it.?
After 17 years in LA, the Robinsons
are planning to return home soon.
Kate, who lives in London, is due to
have their first grandchild next month
and the rest of his family still live in
Liverpool. ?Nobody?s getting any
younger. Well I am obviously ? but
nobody else is.?
Robinson is undaunted by his
detractors. ?I know there are some
people who are pathologically opposed
to what I say. That?s fine, I come from
a disputatious background.?
Most of those who disagree with
him have seen only his first TED talk
and have not read his books. ?I?m
more than just a video,? says Robinson
drily. ?I wasn?t invented at TED.?
RICHARD YOUNG
of the most time-consuming things in
my life,? Terry says, ?is picking up the
pieces of Ken saying yes to everything.
It?s a real issue ? he needs to clone at
least 100 of himself. He?s always doing
people favours, giving free talks, it
drives me insane. I?m the bad cop, he?s
the good cop.?
Yet Robinson is deeply driven. ?Kids
are being educated right now. We?re
putting them through these systems
at the most vulnerable and formative
points of their lives. We can?t afford to
throw kids under the bus like this . . .?
The need for change is particularly
urgent in state schools, which have to
follow a standardised teaching model.
However, it is not just state schools
that can get it wrong. ?There is
nothing in the nature of schools
being state or private, charter or
free, that guarantees anything.?
Robinson and Terry struggled with
schools for their children, switching
between state and private, even
homeschooling their daughter after
watching ?the light go out of her eyes?
at her exclusive LA private girls? school.
The overriding message of his latest
book is that every child is different
and they should be encouraged to find
their natural talents and not be forced
to fit a template. Of his two children,
one went to university, the other left
school at 16. Both are doing equally
well: his son, James, is an actor
and writer; his daughter, Kate, is
an international consultant in
creativity and innovation in education.
University, he says, can be ?absolutely
valuable and worthwhile?, but it
is not for everyone and with huge
technological change sweeping the
world it is hard to predict what
degrees will be worthwhile and how
the job market will look in the future.
?Higher education has a kind of
hypnotic spell, and now it?s not just
Joanna Dai
oanna Dai was on a plane when
she had her eureka moment. An
investment banker in the City,
she had been up since 4.30 that
morning to catch a flight to
Sweden. Fifteen hours of back-to-back
business meetings later, she was on the
flight home to London. Her clothes
were killing her.
?My waistband was digging in so
much I wanted to explode,? she says.
?There was no flexibility in my clothes,
they were constrictive round the arms
and the waist. I wondered if there
could be workwear that looked like a
power suit, but felt like yoga clothes.?
She packed in her job, enrolled on
a three-week pattern-cutting course
at the London College of Fashion and
set about finding out. Eighteen months
later Dai clothing was born.
Lots of brands say that they
have found the solution to
dressing for busy working
women. For many of them,
it?s so much guff. Dai is
different, and has become a
word-of-mouth sensation. As
fast as new stock appears on
the website, daiwear.com, it
sells out.
Why? Because the
clothes really do
feel as if you could
go to the gym in
them. I wear them
myself. You?re not
pulling them up or
pushing them
down, or easing
the waistband
because it?s
digging in. It?s that
good feeling that
you get when
your clothes just
work, so you can
get on with your
life. And they go
in the washing
machine. And
they have pockets.
?For me, being
able to fit your
mobile, ID and credit
card in your pocket is all
you need to go and meet
someone for lunch,? Dai
says. ?You don?t want a
big tote bag. It?s about
functionality.?
Dai, 32, was born and
raised in southern
California and spent her
life in comfortable,
breathable clothes
designed for being
active. Then she joined
the analyst programme
at JP Morgan in New
York, straight out of
university, rising through
the ranks to become
vice-president in debt
syndication, issuing new
bonds from the world?s
largest companies to UK
and European investors.
?Suddenly I was wearing
this unbreathable fabric for
75 hours a week. I was trying
to be taken seriously by the managing
directors, so I wore suits and jackets,
but lots of workwear is made from
wool and there?s not a lot of stretch.
You get dressed in the morning and
by the time you?ve had lunch you?re
uncomfortable.?
What Dai wanted was smart
tailoring, made from super-stretchy
fabric, that was easy to look after,
ethically made, environmentally
sustainable and didn?t cost the earth.
?I asked myself if being comfortable
could empower your confidence and
performance at work.?
She planned to keep costs down by
selling direct from a website because,
My waistband
was digging in. I
wanted to explode
as she points out, that allows her to
connect with her customers and
incorporate their feedback straight
into what she does. Yet she had no
background in fashion, and had never
sewn anything. What she did have
was a good business mind and a
hunch. In the 18 months it took from
that flight home from Sweden to
launching the brand, she was racked
by doubts. Working in the City was
all she?d known.
?Leaving was a big risk. I self-funded
this on a fairly small budget, but I
knew it could fail,? Dai says. She
persuaded the society fashion designer
Emilia Wickstead ? whose clothes
have been worn regularly by the
Duchess of Cambridge ? to let her
intern at her London studio (it
probably helped that Wickstead had
designed Dai?s wedding dress). While
an intern, Dai helped Wickstead with
her financial systems and Wickstead
shared her fashion knowledge.
Wickstead warned her that starting a
clothing brand was a huge
undertaking. ?Emilia told me jokingly
that she wished she?d invented the
Post-it Note, because it would have
been easier.?
Dai?s risk-averse husband, who also
worked in finance, took a similar view.
?He said, ?Good luck. The chances are
that you will fail.? ?
She badgered her former colleagues
for feedback on the samples of her
clothes. She wanted real women, she
says, with a whole range of body types,
not only straight size-eight fit models.
She has kept the collection minimal
? a blouse, one pair of trousers and a
jacket, in navy or black, and a handful
of dresses ? although more styles and
colours are launching in May, along
with size-16 pieces. Now it?s looking
very much as if her hunch was right,
with her customers ranging from their
from early thirties to 65-plus. ?I?ve
spoken to so many women in their
forties who say, ?When you get to my
age you can?t be bothered being
uncomfortable,? ? she says. ?They see
this as a solution.?
6
1G T
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
the table
A cordon bleu meal
for �! Ambassador,
you are spoiling us
Haute cuisine dinner parties on a budget ? pas de probl鑝e,
the French embassy?s head chef tells Richard Godwin
C
haos reigns at the
R閟idence de France in
London. Chanel has
commandeered the
main drawing room for
a display of jewellery,
and fashionistas carry
furniture back and
forth across the monochrome marble
? almost bumping into the chef Gilles
Quillot. He is carrying dishes up to the
library, in which the embassy?s head of
protocol is also attempting to work.
?I?m going to need to keep coming
through,? she tells Quillot as she cuts
a path between a morel-stuffed
camembert and a lighting rig. A
dashing philosophe looks down from
his portrait with an inscrutable smirk.
All the comings and goings? C?est
normal! ?Each ambassador has his own
style and a way that he wants to work
? it makes it very interesting,? Quillot
says on returning to his kitchen. ?You
can see the state of the rooms up there.?
Quillot, a proud son of Normandy, is
the head chef at the R閟idence and
commands culinary operations from
the basement of the 1855 mansion in
Kensington Palace Gardens. Over 20
years he has served five ambassadors.
?They all give me the white page [carte
blanche] to prepare their food,? he says.
The present ambassador, Jean-Pierre
Jouyet, is an epicure. ?A few weeks ago
he asked me for chicken � la d?Albufera,
which is named after a famous battle
between the French and the English. It
was the only one that Napoleon won.?
Although I later can?t find any evidence
to support the claim that it was named
after a blow to us Brits, the dish was a
creation of Auguste Escoffier, the father
of French gastronomy. It consists of
poached chicken stuffed with foie gras
and garnished with cockerel kidneys
and the combs from their heads.
In some ways, Quillot?s next task is as
daunting as that dish. He is preparing a
gala dinner on Wednesday for 100 VIPs
? royalty, politicians, sportsmen and
celebrities ? for Go鹴 de France, the
government?s annual celebration of
French gastronomy. It?s not something
that would unduly stress the chef were
it not for a financial hurdle: it has to be
done for � a head. Normally he gets
to play with four or five times that.
Go鹴 de France ? or Good France
as it?s also called ? is an initiative of
the Ministry of Europe and Foreign
Affairs. Led by Michelin-starred
generals, 3,000 chefs are deployed
around the globe to flamb� and deglaze
under the battle cry: ?Let?s eat French!?
?There is nothing chauvinistic about
this rallying call,? says Alain Ducasse,
one of the chefs behind the initiative.
?French cuisine enjoys a worldwide
reputation because it proposes but
does not impose. Such is the source of
its strength and influence.?
?We want to celebrate the fact that
we sit down for dinner,? Quillot says.
?The fact that we take time. That we
have good food and good wine and we
share it with friends. It comes from
Escoffier again. The epicurean spirit.?
Quillot insists that the � limit isn?t
an austerity initiative from Emmanuel
Macron?s government, but rather an
attempt to show that a high-class gala
dinner can be prepared by everyone at
a low cost. ?I have to admit, between
us, when the idea first went out I said,
?No! Please don?t do this to me!? I mean
the embassy needs to stay the embassy.
And all the products I love are
expensive: scallops and langoustines
are not going to fit into this dinner.?
Still, while Go鹴 de France is taking
place at embassies worldwide, only
Britain must make do with budgetary
constrictions. Perhaps they don?t want
to waste those langoustines on us.
Actually, Quillot says the inspiration
came from our famous catchphrase
?For the many not the few?. Which is
actually the campaign slogan of Jeremy
Corbyn?s Labour Party. Interesting.
And in any case, Quillot came round
to the idea. ?You can?t serve caviar,
obviously, but then you don?t need to
be a chef to serve caviar. So we realised
it would be a good occasion to show
that it is the knowledge of the chefs
that is important.?
So French cooking isn?t just about
ramming everything full of foie gras
and truffles and dousing everything in
butter and salt, it is about conviviality,
Where next?
Discover Britain?s best places to live
in our exclusive 48-page magazine.
Out this Sunday.
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
7
1G T
KATIE WILSON FOR THE TIMES
no industry there, it is all extracted by
a co-op of 70 farmers.? As we speak, a
box of the first white asparagus of the
season arrives from Landes.
However, he does make some
concessions. ?What I love in Britain is
the lamb. The lamb here is beautiful,?
he says. Hence his lamb dish: a simple
process of browning a shoulder, slowbraising it in a spiced lamb-stock
liquor until it falls off the bone, leaving
it to infuse overnight, removing the
rendered fat, shaping the meat into
circular moulds, reducing the sauce by
half, thickening with a roux and
glazing the meat before reheating.
?Then you will have a really shiny
sauce that is stuck on to the meat,
which makes you want to bite into it.?
OK, it?s involved, but most of the
work is done long before service,
which makes it pretty dinner-party
adaptable. He serves it with mashed
potatoes from Le Touquet ? he
favours a 2:1 potato-to-butter ratio ?
and peas because we?re in England.
His tip for his tarte tatin, meanwhile,
is to make sure that no bits of apple
are poking over the edge, so that the
tarte looks geometrically even and
that no stray bits get burnt.
As we settle down to mange I am
pleased to see that the embassy staff
insist that the television is turned off,
Don?t tell me that
if you feel a bit
down you don?t
want tarte tatin
Gilles Quillot at the
French embassy in
London
agriculture and taking your sweet time.
And time, as a famous philosophe
(actually Kanye West) once remarked,
is the only true luxury.
We get down to cooking. For the
actual dinner Raymond Blanc will be
creating the starter ? a bit like when
you ask your mate to bring round the
pudding, only with the patron of Le
Manoir aux Quat?Saisons. Not to be
outdone today, Quillot demonstrates a
simple cold fennel soup, shaving the
bulb translucently thin, saut閕ng in a
little Proven鏰l olive oil, lobbing in a
bit of Pernod and a star anise, then
boiling it for only a few minutes (?A
cold soup must never taste cooked?).
The result, served with a little yoghurt
and cheese, is a liquid approximation
of a spring day in Provence.
The embassy gets most of its veg
from Rungis, the wholesale market
outside Paris. ?It is important that we
use the best products even if they cost
more as we have to pay the farmers
enough so they can live,? Quillot says.
?All of my butter comes from Issigny.
And I use salt from Gu閞ande. Every
time I buy a kilo of salt I know that 70
families are living from this. There is
that the fennel soup is served with a
nice young chablis and the lamb with a
sensational 2006 grand vin from the
Bordeaux producer Ch鈚eau Pape
Cl閙ent. Meanwhile, they discuss
culinary horrors that they?ve witnessed
in the UK. The man who failed to
identify an artichoke in a supermarket.
The children unaware of the point
of ripeness at which a persimmon
should be eaten (extremely ripe). The
schoolgirl who gagged when she bit
into a non-seedless grape.
Some things never change: the
missionary zeal with which France
regards its gastronomy, its pity for
everyone else. Then again, some
things do change. Britain is hardly the
culinary backwater it once was, and
I?m not sure we cast such envious
glances across the Channel any more.
Has our nation?s growing interest in
international cuisine made French
gastronomy seem a little . . . pass�
?I wouldn?t call French cuisine oldfashioned,? Quillot says. ?There is not
fashion in food. French cuisine has a
place in everyone?s heart. Don?t tell me
that if you feel a bit down you don?t
want to sit in front of a tarte tatin.?
You wouldn?t want him to say
anything other than that, would you?
He takes his role of chef to the French
ambassador in London very seriously.
It sounds fun too. ?I have some old
recipe books from the 16th century
and they are very interesting,? he says.
?For example, I didn?t know that you
could eat swan. They would boil it,
cook it on the stove and then roast it
in the oven.? Don?t tell the Queen.
You can take part in the Go鹴 de
France experience at one of 44
participating restaurants in the UK:
restaurateurs.goodfrance.com/en/
participating-restaurants
A dinner
party for
d
� a hea
the table
Cold fennel soup with goat?s cheese and olive oil
1 Slice the fennel finely. In a saucepan
warm 20ml olive oil and gently fry the
fennel and the star anise for 3-4 min.
Add the Ricard and the water and
bring to the boil. Simmer for 1 hour.
2 Blanch half the parsley for 1 min in
boiling water, then cool it in icy water.
Blend the fennel soup and the parsley,
season and allow to cool. Refrigerate
for at least 3 hours.
3 Season the cheese with chives, salt
and espelette pepper. Return to fridge.
4 Add the yoghurt to the soup and
divide between eight bowls. Add a
spoonful of goat?s cheese, olive oil, the
radish, remaining herbs and the
flowers. Serve with toast on the side.
700g fennel bulb
Provence olive oil
2 star anise
50ml Ricard aperitif
1.5 litres water
� bunch flat-leaf parsley
320g fresh goat?s cheese
� bunch chives
Espelette pepper
150g yoghurt
24 garlic flowers
2 radishes, finely sliced
8 slices of bread, toasted
Braised lamb shoulder with sweet spices
1.5kg onions
1 shoulder of lamb
50ml Provence olive oil
3 litres lamb stock
10 saffron threads
1 star anise
4 cardamom pods
3g Tasmania pepper
(or Sichuan pepper)
200ml white wine
300g butter
50g flour
600g potatoes, peeled
70ml hot milk
20g wholegrain mustard
1kg fresh peas
3 carrots (1 white,
1 purple, 1 orange)
The day before
1 Preheat the oven to 120C/gas �. Peel
and slice the onions. Sear the seasoned
shoulder in olive oil in a pan on the
hob. Once brown on all sides, remove
the meat from the pan and add the
sliced onions and the spices. Leave to
cook for a few minutes, then deglaze
with the wine. Add the stock and the
shoulder and bring to the boil, then
roast in the oven for at least 4� hours.
2 For the roux, melt 50g butter in a
saucepan, add the flour and let it cook
slowly for 5 min. Cool and refrigerate.
3 Check if the meat is cooked; it
should easily separate from the bone.
Leave to rest in the pan and in the
fridge for 24 hours.
On the day
4 Remove the meat from the pan and
bring the juice to the boil. Pass it
through a fine sieve and let it reduce
for 5 min. Adjust the sauce to desired
thickness by adding some cold roux.
5 Warm the meat in the oven at 160C/
gas 3, generously pouring the sauce on
it until glazed.
6 For the mash, cook the potatoes in
salty water. Drain and then mash the
potatoes, add 200g butter and the hot
milk, then the wholegrain mustard.
7 Cook the peas in salted water for
4 min. Refresh in ice-cold water. Peel
and slice the carrots. Cook them with
50g butter and 100ml water with the
lid on for 5 min. Add the cooked peas,
season to taste and serve with the
lamb and potatoes.
Raw-milk camembert de Normandie with morel cream and salad
10g dried morels
2 gelatine leaves
100g fromage frais
50g whipping cream
1 raw-milk camembert
de Normandie
1 bag mixed spring salad
10ml cider vinegar
30ml extra virgin
olive oil
1 Soak the morels in 20ml water for 3
hours. Remove the morels and reserve.
2 Warm the remaining water and add
the gelatine leaves. Put in the fridge to
cool. Mince the morels and add the
fromage frais, the morel water and the
whipped cream. Season to taste with
salt and freshly ground pepper.
3 Create a mould for the camembert by
placing parchment paper on a plate.
Cut the cheese in half horizontally.
Place the bottom half on the paper,
add the morel cream, cover with the
top half and wrap in the parchment
paper. Leave in the fridge overnight.
4 Undo the parchment paper and put
the camembert back in its box. Serve
with well-seasoned spring salad
dressed with vinegar and olive oil.
Thin apple tart with honey and cinnamon butter and ice cream
For the ice cream
250g sugar
1 litre milk
2g salt
12 egg yolks
For the tart
100g butter
100g honey
Vanilla pod
1 cinnamon stick
8 Granny Smith apples
8 discs puff pastry,
12cm diameter
All recipes serve 8
1 Carefully caramelise 100g sugar in
20ml water in a pan over medium
heat. Add another 30ml water to the
caramel to reduce the heat. Allow to
rest for 1 hour.
2 In a separate pan, boil the milk with
75g sugar and the salt. Meanwhile, mix
the egg yolks with 75g sugar in a
heatproof bowl. Pour the boiling milk
on the egg-yolk mix. Return to the
pan and cook on low heat for 5 min
without boiling, while stirring
continuously with a wooden spoon.
Once cooked, add the caramel and
leave to cool on a bed of ice. Pour into
an ice-cream maker and follow the
manufacturer?s instructions.
3 Melt the butter in a pan and add the
honey. Add the vanilla pod and the
cinnamon stick and allow to infuse for
1 hour.
4 Heat the oven to 160C/gas 3. Peel
and thinly slice the apple and arrange
on the puff-pastry disc. Baste with
some of the butter-honey mix and
cook for 30 min, spreading on more of
the butter-honey mix every 10 min.
5 Serve warm with a spoonful of the
salted caramel ice cream.
8
1G T
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
arts
?With film you have a story. Ph
As he shows his Polaroids in London, Wim Wenders, the director of Paris,
Texas, talks to Ed Potton about his extraordinary new film about the Pope
I
have more than an hour with
Wim Wenders, which is just as
well. There are 72 action-packed
years to cover: the wanderlust
that took the director from his
native west Germany to
America; movies such as Paris,
Texas and Wings of Desire that
established him as an arthouse
heavyweight; the five wives; anecdotes
about Dennis Hopper, Nick Cave,
Annie Leibovitz and Pope Francis
(now that would be a dinner party); his
later, Oscar-nominated documentaries
about Buena Vista Social Club and the
choreographer Pina Bausch (one
about the Pope is in the works, more
of which later). That?s before getting to
the reason why I?ve been invited to
Wenders?s airy studio in Berlin: his
second career as a photographer.
A show of his pictures, Early Works
1964-84, opens next week in London.
It?s a CV so monumental that I do a
silent cheer when I see a sticker on a
photocopier that reads: ?Save the
planet. It?s the only one with beer.?
Phew. A drop of frivolity in an ocean
of overachievement. Wenders is
actually very good company ?
professorial (he still teaches at the
University of Fine Arts in Hamburg),
formidably fluent in English and quick
to laugh. After making my goodbyes
at the end I realise I?ve forgotten
something and rush back to ask him a
final question. He smiles and says: ?Ah,
you?re like Peter Falk in Columbo! ?Just
one more thing.? ?
Wenders knew Falk, of course: he
starred in Wings of Desire (1987), in
which angels haunt a black-and-white
Berlin. Nick Cave (?quite an
underground hero in the city?)
contributed two songs to the
soundtrack. The film was still full of
the atmosphere of postwar Germany,
where there was ?a huge sense of
desperation and loneliness?. You can
see why Wenders was keen to travel,
why as a boy in D黶seldorf he fell in
love with the chutzpah of the US.
After studying in Germany and
making his early films there, he
directed a string of movies in America.
Seventies New York features heavily in
the London show, the excited tourist
snapping Polaroids of skyscrapers and
his Manhattan breakfast.
The Polaroids are drawn from his
collection of 3,500, but he gave away a
Right: Wim Wenders
and, above, with Pope
Francis, the subject of
his forthcoming film
The Pope
is the most
courageous
man I have
ever met
lot more than that. ?It was always fun
to take Polaroids,? he says. ?As I took
so many, my arms and my body took
the picture ? I almost didn?t need to
look through the viewfinder any more.
With a normal camera there is a
certain controlling process involved,
which takes away the spontaneity.?
Many of the pictures are more
notable for their stories than their
artistry. There?s a portrait of a stetsonwearing Dennis Hopper, whom
Wenders cast in two films. ?I visited
him in his painting studio in Taos and
we spoke a lot about photography. He
was a great photographer.? A blurred
one of Leibovitz, whom Wenders met
in New York when they were in their
early twenties. They ended up going
on a road trip from San Francisco to
Los Angeles, two future icons in a car.
There?s another Polaroid of
Wenders?s glasses, which are very
similar to the ones he?s wearing today.
?Everything?s still blue,? says one of
his assistants, and today, at least, it?s
true: glasses, linen suit, shirt. His blue
trousers are tucked into his blue socks
from his cycle ride from the home that
he shares with his wife, Donata, who
is, perhaps tellingly, a photographer.
His other marriages were to actresses:
the Germans Edda K鯿hl and
Lisa Kreuzer, the American Ronee
Blakley and the Frenchwoman
Isabelle Weingarten.
He loves his parallel careers.
?With film you have a story to tell.
Photography is more detective work,
more listening than talking.? That
process has become complicated in the
digital age, he says. ?The photograph
has lost its aura of being truthful.? You
can now ?put a few clouds in, nobody
will notice, you can erase something,
nobody will notice. Is it still
photography? Or isn?t it another form
of painting?? When it comes to social
photography or war photography,
?that propensity for manipulation
bothers the hell out of me?.
His influences were less
photographers than painters, from
Vermeer to Edward Hopper, whom he
loved for his framing and ?dedication
to the subject of solitude. No other
painter ever painted loneliness so
stubbornly.? Wenders?s photographs,
too, are often lonely, devoid of people.
?As soon as there?s a person in a
photograph, all eyes go to that person.?
The same goes for animals, he says,
pointing at another picture from the
show, a black-and-white landscape of
Uluru (aka Ayers Rock), with dogs in
the foreground. ?The dogs steal the
show from the holy mountain!? he
says with a chuckle. Animate subjects
?make it easier for you to grasp a
photo?, he says. ?But not many people
know any more how to look at place.
A while ago we couldn?t even survive
without [a sense of place]. Today we
have navigation systems and instant
maps, which are replacing [it].?
Place is equally important to
his films, most of which ?came into
being because of the urge to explore
a place . . . and find the story that could
only happen there?. That?s why he
loves Ken Loach and Mike Leigh:
?Their characters are drenched in
their own local story.?
Sometimes those principles go out
the window. He once wrote about how
Hammett, his troubled American film
about the writer Dashiell Hammett,
?lost its soul? when they were forced
to shoot in a studio. ?That?s an old
wound ? don?t rip it open! But it?s
true.? He sometimes walks out of
movies ?when I realise, God, it?s all
shot on green screen?.
He had to compromise again on his
new movie, Submergence. Starring
Alicia Vikander and James McAvoy,
it?s set in Somalia and Greenland, but
was shot in neither. Somalia, with its
pirates and terrorists, was ?somewhere
you don?t want to go. Even the author
of the novel, Jonathan Ledgard, said,
?For heaven?s sake, don?t go there!? ?
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the times | Thursday March 15 2018
9
1G T
arts
hootography is detective work?
MATT CARR/GETTY IMAGES; � WIM WENDERS, COURTESY OF WIM WENDERS FOUNDATION; COURTESY OF DEUTSCHES FILMINSTITUT, FRANKFURT; IPA/INSTAR IMAGES
The ideas
that
formed
America
have gone
down the
drain
They shot instead in Djibouti, ?where
there was no tradition of film-making
whatsoever?. Instead of Greenland
they went to the Faroe Islands. ?The
greenest place I?ve ever been to; all
these fantastic rocks full of moss.?
The digital revolution has left a
mark on film as well as photography.
Would he make a film for Netflix?
?Sure,? he says. ?Then again, I?ve
learnt the hard way that it?s better
to be your own producer.? Netflix
is famously laissez faire, though.
?There?d be no reason not to work
with them if it?s the right story.?
He?s certainly no Luddite, having
been one of the first people to make
an all-digital movie (Buena Vista Social
Club), work with high-definition video
(Until the End of the World) and direct
a documentary in 3D (Pina). ?So I?m
a sucker for technology, but you also
have to evaluate, what is it forcing you
into?? Shooting on green screen is
cheaper, but ?we?re losing something,
a sense of real adventure and place?.
Yes, he admits that ?every now and
then one of these big American
movies blows me away?. He adored
Blade Runner 2049 (?I loved the
original so much, but eventually I
went and was flabbergasted.?) Too
many films, though, ?are based on
formulas?, he says. ?I can?t stand sitting
in a cinema and thinking, ?I?ve seen
this already.? It drives me crazy.?
Above, from top,
Wenders?s photographs:
Sydney, 1984; Dennis
Hopper, 1976; Valley of
the Gods, Utah, 1977
Early Works: 1964-84
is at Blain Southern,
London W1, from
March 23 to May 5
(020 7493 4492).
Submergence and
Pope Francis: A Man
of His Word are to be
released in May
That?s why he was drawn to
documentaries, ?because you come to
work in the morning and you don?t
know yet what?s going to happen?. A
few years ago he was invited to the
Vatican to discuss what became Pope
Francis: A Man of His Word. ?You don?t
say no to such an invitation,? Wenders
says. He was given carte blanche,
privileged access to the Pope and the
Vatican archive. ?I was assured that
there was not going to be any
interference,? he says.
Instead of a film about the Pope?s
life, he decided to make one about ?his
vision of the Church and of the world?.
They shot four long sessions over two
years and the Pope looks directly into
the camera. ?I don?t appear as the
interviewer: I figured it was not about
me,? Wenders says. Could this be a dig
at Werner Herzog, his only rival for
the title of greatest living German
director, who likes to appear in his
own documentaries? Wenders is too
canny to name names.
He calls the Pope ?the most
courageous man I have ever met?. An
improvement on the last guy? ?I never
like to compare,? he says. ?But I just
know ? and that?s why the film is
called A Man of His Word ? that he
lives what he preaches.? Although
Wenders was raised as a
Roman Catholic by his
mother and his father, a
surgeon, he is is now a
churchgoing ecumenical
Christian. His gushing,
however, suggests that he
may have changed his
views on Catholicism.
?Sure,? he says. ?We all
know bad things, we all
know good things . . .
Here?s somebody who
wants to change things .?
Not just in the Church:
?He also wants to
change things in our
environment or in
politics. He thinks our
economic system is
built on greed and
growth instead of the
common good.?
Wenders seems to
have more faith in the
Pope than he does in
America. ?I lived
there for 15 years,? he
says. ?That turns a juvenile dream
into something else.? He has got the
American Dream out of his system,
he says. ?What I didn?t get out of my
system is the dream of America
itself. The ideas that formed
America are still fabulous. What
they have become, however, is
something altogether different. It?s
all down the drain.?
Even his wanderlust, expressed in
his Road Movie trilogy of the
Seventies, has faded. ?You realise
that staying somewhere is quite
exotic, has secret pleasures that I
ignored all my life. I never had a
dog because I was never there. But
now for the first time . . .? Was his
wandering one of the reasons he
didn?t have children? ?No,? he
says. ?I couldn?t have any, and
found that out when I was a
young man, due to an illness I had
when I was very young.?
Still, his life seems full of friends,
godchildren and colleagues, many of
the last young and female. Nothing
creepy about that, he insists: he?s a big
supporter of Me Too and likes his film
crews to be 50:50 men and women. ?If
you ever end up with a film that is
more men than women, the film went
down the drain, because there wasn?t
any chemistry. And in my office we
have to fight for the presence of men
because I really like working with
women.? And when Wenders needs
to escape, there?s always his second
career. ?As a film-maker you are
surrounded by hundreds of people
every day,? he says, but ?photography
is such a beautiful lonesome job?.
10
1G T
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
television & radio
We aren?t bovvered enough about the bulldog
BBC/SHINE TV LTD
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Saving the British Bulldog
BBC One
{{{((
Save Me
Sky Atlantic
{{{((
S
aving the British Bulldog
tackled human stupidity,
selfishness and spectacular bad
taste in wilfully breeding
flat-faced dogs that wheeze like
60-a-day smokers. The presenter, the
comedian Catherine Tate, was clearly
furious about this, so it?s a pity the
producers didn?t encourage her to slip
into character as the cockney Nan and
shout: ?WHAT a fakkin liberty.?
Because a liberty is precisely what
it is. Bulldogs didn?t originally look
like this, as Tate?s picture from 1817
Radio Choice
Joe Clay
The Art of Now:
Dangerous Places
Radio 4, 11.30am
What use is art in a war
zone? That is the composer
Errollyn Wallen?s question
as she meets people making
music, poetry and theatre in
places of conflict. We hear
Mazen Kerbaj, a cartoonist
and free improviser, playing
a trumpet duet with the
bombs as they fall on Beirut
during the 2006 war in
Lebanon. The journalist and
poet Bejan Matur describes
living as a Kurd in southern
Turkey, while the actor
Ahmed Tobasi, an exmember of Palestine?s
Islamic Jihad, talks about
Jenin?s Freedom Theatre.
The Hitchhiker?s
Guide to the Galaxy
Radio 4, 6.30pm
Dirk Maggs?s latest
adaptation is based on the
book And Another Thing . . .
by Eoin Colfer, with
unpublished Adams
material. There?s handy
exposition for non-diehards:
?Zaphod Beeblebrox?s two
heads and three arms have
become as much a part of
Galaxy law as the single,
twitching brain cell hanging
in the dark cavern of the
Ravenous Bugblatter Beast?s
cranial dome or Eccentrica
Gallumbits?s third breast.?
Wonderful stuff.
showed. They had long tails, leaner
bodies, a normal-looking head and
the benefit of being able to breathe
because their muzzles hadn?t been
shortened by genetic design so that
some of them die as young as three.
Who do we think we are, creating
a creature that is ?not fit for life? just
so it will look more like Winston
Churchill? (One of the most popular
names for British bulldogs is Winston.
Another is Boris. One woman tried to
claim it?s not because of Boris Johnson,
but, seriously, who else is it going to be
? Boris Becker?) The exaggerated
facial rolls rub hair into their eyes and
cover their nostrils. The soft palate at
the back of their throat gets sucked
into their airways. It is 24/7 torment,
but, hey, if your snorting, choking
hound looks ?cuter?, so be it.
What baffled me, though, is that the
extreme ones didn?t look ?cute? at all.
They resembled suffering, snuffling
seals on bandy legs pleading to know
why they look as if they?ve been hit
in the face with a frying pan. The ones
that had been out-bred in Essex with
other types of bulldog to correct their
deformities were far prettier.
We weren?t told why their popularity
has quadrupled their number in
15 years or why anyone finds this
look desirable. When the Kennel Club
man told Tate that they don?t have
mandatory health testing and were
reluctant to bring in stricter legislation
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00
BBC Radio 1?s Residency: Artwork 12.00 BBC
Radio 1?s Residency: Tokimonsta. Hip
hop-tinged electronica 1.00am Toddla T
3.00 BBC Radio 1?s Residency: TQD 4.00
Early Breakfast with Jordan North
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Bob Harris Country 8.00
Jo Whiley. Jo is live from SXSW in Austin,
Texas with Nile Rodgers, Kim Deal and live
music from Gaz Coombes 10.00 The Radio 2
Arts Show with Anneka Rice 12.00 The Craig
Charles House Party (r) 2.00am Radio 2?s
Tracks of My Years Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Have A Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Feelgood Friday 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3?s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests.
9.00 Essential Classics
Presented by Ian Skelly. The journalist, war
correspondent, broadcaster and author Kate
Adie reveals the sometimes surprising
cultural in?uences that have inspired her
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Haydn (1732-1809)
Donald Macleod continues to explore Haydn?s
London years. In early February 1794, after
an absence of more than 18 months, Haydn
?nally made it back to the English capital. He
may have lingered longer than he had
intended to in Vienna, but he hadn?t been
malingering, and he took with him the fruits
of his labours ? the scores of six string
quartets and a symphony. It was this
symphony ? No 99 ? that he chose to
reacquaint London audiences with his music,
and he later unleashed his Grand Overture
with the Militaire Movement ? what is
known today as his Military Symphony.
Haydn (Trio No 1 in C for 2 ?utes and cello,
Hob IV:1 ? 3rd mvt Finale, Vivace; 6 Original
Canzonettas, Hob XXVIa:30 ? No 6, Fidelity;
Symphony No 100 in G, Hob I:100 ? Military;
Piano Sonata in E ?at, Hob XVI:52)
Catherine Tate asked why the dogs are bred to be so unhealthy
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in
Glasgow is the setting for this recital in
which the British soprano Ruby Hughes, a
former Radio 3 New Generation Artist, joins
the pianist Joseph Middleton to highlight
unjustly neglected works alongside more
celebrated contemporaries. Alma Mahler (Die
stille Stadt; Laue Sommernacht; Lobgesang);
Gustav Mahler (Kindertotenlieder); and
Helen Grime (Bright Travellers)
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Kate Molleson presents a recording of
Donizetti?s opera La Favorite, from Teatro
Real, Madrid, conducted by Daniel Oren. Sung
in French by the baritone Simone Piazzola,
the mezzo Jamie Barton, the soprano Marina
Monz�, the tenors Javier Camarena, Antonio
Lozano and Alejandro del Cerro, and the bass
Sim髇 Or?la, with the Teatro Real Chorus
and Orchestra. Donizetti (La Favorite)
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty with a lively mix of
chat, arts news and live performance.
Including 5.00, 6.00 News
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An eclectic non-stop mix of music, featuring
old favourites together with lesser-known
gems, and a few surprises thrown in
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert (Live)
Stuart Flinders presents a concert of Bach,
Mendelssohn and Shostakovich given by the
Hall� Choir, Youth Choir and Orchestra, the
pianist Charles Owen and the conductor Mark
Elder, live from the Bridgewater Hall in
Manchester. Bach (Keyboard Concerto No 1 in
D minor, BWV 1052); Mendelssohn (Psalm
114, Op 51); Interval. Shostakovich
(Symphony No 8 in C minor, Op 65)
10.00 Free Thinking Festival
Anne McElvoy discusses the impact of social
media on the way people behave, talking to
the writers Julia Hobsbawm and Laurence
Scott, and the tech blogger Abeba Birhane
10.45 The Essay: New Generation
Thinkers
Eleanor Lybeck re?ects on the pioneering
Victorian women who saw education as a
?rst step toward emancipation ? only to be
satirised by Gilbert and Sullivan in their
comic opera, Princess Ida. Recorded
with an audience at Sage Gateshead as
part of Radio 3?s Free Thinking Festival
11.00 Late Junction
Presenter Nick Luscombe introduces an
eclectic selection of musical styles and
cultures, including a mixtape by the Japanese
recording artist and producer Cornelius
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With Mishal Husain and Justin Webb
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 In Our Time
A debate on St Augustine?s account of his
conversion to Christianity
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 An Alternative History of Art
A pro?le of Dorothy Iannone (9/10)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Presented by Jenni Murray. Including at
10.45 the 15 Minute Drama: Part four of the
11th series of A Small Town Murder
11.00 From Our Own Correspondent
Reports from across the globe
11.30 The Art of Now: Dangerous
Places
Artists working in places of con?ict and
danger around the world. See Radio Choice
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Sarah Daniels. On the same day in 1918
the RMS Amazon was sunk off the Irish
coast. With Lizzy Watts (9/40)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Horse Story
Clare Balding discovers the secrets of the
thoroughbred racehorse (4/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: School Drama
By Andy Mulligan. A school brings in hasbeen television star Geoff Cathcart to help
stage a production of Romeo and Juliet, but
Geoff is not quite who he seems (2/4) (r)
3.00 Ramblings
Clare Balding walks in the Peak District with
Maxwell Ayamba, who founded a rambling
group for black men in Shef?eld (5/7)
3.27 Radio 4 Appeal
On behalf of the Lullaby Trust (r)
3.30 Open Book
Literary critic James Wood discusses writing
his ?rst novel, Upstate. Lucy Mangan talks
about the joy of childhood reading (r)
4.00 The Film Programme
With Paddington 2 director Paul King and
writer Simon Farnaby, and Ruben Ostlund
discusses his satirical drama The Square
4.30 BBC Inside Science
The latest scienti?c research
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
in case it deterred people from
registering it was blindingly obvious
what Tate should have said to his
feeble reply: ?Am I bovvered, though??
It says something about the calibre
of the lead actors in Save Me that
Suranne Jones?s performance, strong
though it is, is one of the least
memorable. If you haven?t already
binged on the box set, then last night?s
episode was number three in which
Stephen Graham?s almost sympathetic
portrayal of a gentle-voiced, convicted
paedophile ? almost, that is, until
you see him searching dark-web
paedo sites called ?Bruised Fruit?
and ?Virgin Pain? ? is masterful.
Last night Lennie James?s Nelly
didn?t let his angst over his daughter
Jody?s disappearance stop him trying
to cop off with Jody?s mother (Jones)
and getting his end away with Zita.
One of Save Me?s great many strengths
is that its world is credible and most
characters are flawed or weak. One
niggle was that when the police played
Claire the terrible recording of Jody
calling 999 you couldn?t hear what
Jody was saying because the
soundtrack drowned it out. Why?
But all credit that it manages to
tackle the bleak and harrowing subject
of child sex abuse without being
gratuitous. Unlike, mentioning no
names, some dramas I can think of.
Oh, go on then: Marcella.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 The Hitchhiker?s Guide to the
Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase
Sci-? comedy tale based on Eoin Colfer?s
novel And Another Thing, adapted by Dirk
Maggs. See Radio Choice (2/6)
7.00 The Archers
Jim is caught in the middle
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme, presented by John Wilson
7.45 A Small Town Murder (4/5) (r)
8.00 Law in Action
Joshua Rozenberg explores the emerging law
regarding self-driving vehicles (3/4) (r)
8.30 The Bottom Line
An overview of the business world (7)
9.00 BBC Inside Science (r)
9.30 In Our Time (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Long Drop
By Denise Mina, abridged by Sian Preece.
William Watt is shocked to be recalled to the
witness box. Read by Liam Brennan (9/10)
11.00 It?s Jocelyn
Sketches and stand-up (2/4) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Presented by Susan Hulme
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am An Alternative History of Art
A pro?le of Dorothy Iannone (9/10) (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am Marriage Lines 8.30 The Goon Show
9.00 It?s Your Round 9.30 The Inimitable
Jeeves 10.00 The Raj Quartet 11.00 Five
Stories by Penelope Fitzgerald 11.15 Behind
Closed Doors 12.00 Marriage Lines
12.30pm The Goon Show 1.00 Sherlock
Holmes with Carleton Hobbs 1.30 In Search
of Originality 2.00 A Delicate Truth 2.15
Grimm Thoughts 2.30 The Old Curiosity Shop
2.45 Perilous Question: The Drama of the
Great Reform Bill 1832 3.00 The Raj Quartet
4.00 It?s Your Round 4.30 The Inimitable
Jeeves 5.00 Double Income, No Kids Yet
5.30 The Hitchhiker?s Guide to the Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase 6.00 Pattern Recognition
6.30 Great Lives 7.00 Marriage Lines. Baby
Helen is annoying Kate and George?s
neighbours 7.30 The Goon Show. Comedy
with Spike Milligan 8.00 Sherlock Holmes
with Carleton Hobbs. The Illustrious Client by
Arthur Conan Doyle 8.30 In Search of
Originality. Ian Peacock explores whether it
is possible to create something truly unique
9.00 Five Stories by Penelope Fitzgerald.
Read by Nicholas Farrell 9.15 Behind Closed
Doors. By Clara Glynn 10.00 Comedy Club:
The Hitchhiker?s Guide to the Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase. Dirk Maggs? adaptation of
Eoin Colfer?s novel And Another Thing
10.30 Newsjack. Comedy sketches 11.00
Masala FM. Comedy with Meera Syal
11.30 The Hudson and Pepperdine Show.
Mel turns up with a baby. From 2004
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Chloe Tilley 1.00pm The
Cheltenham Festival. Commentary on day
three 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport
7.30 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby. A look ahead
to this weekend?s action 8.30 5 Live Sport.
OJ Borg previews the UFC?s visit to London
9.30 At Home with Colin Murray 10.00
Question Time Extra Time 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ally McCoist 10.00 Jim White, Ray
Parlour and Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee
and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Tom Ravenscroft 6.00 Tom
Ravenscroft?s Roundtable 7.00 Vic Galloway.
Sitting in for Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe
12.00 6 Music Recommends with Steve
Lamacq 1.00am The Radiohead Story 2.00
Higher and Higher: The Life and Soul of
Jackie Wilson 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Aled Jones 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. The music of the Royal
Concertgebouw Orchestra. Wagner (Ride of
the Valkyres); Beethoven (Symphony No 2 in
D, Op 36); Strauss (Serenade in E-?at);
Dvorak (Piano Concerto in G minor, Op 33)
Ravel (Rapsodie Espagnole) 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
11
1G T
artsfirst night
CHRISTIE GOODWIN/REDFERNS/GETTY IMAGES
hat Kylie Minogue is lovely
is an axiom of pop, and
nothing that happened
during this packed, intimate
show dispelled it. The band
played, the fans went berserk and
Minogue was, well, lovely. Strip away
the twinkly magnetism and waves of
goodwill, though, and what was
underneath? Minogue?s voice and the
songs, most of which were from her
forthcoming album, Golden, were
often a bit ho-hum. The suspicion
remains that she is a fabulous
entertainer, but a slightly mediocre
musician. That may matter less when
she?s playing arenas, as she will in the
autumn. In the balconied confines of
the Caf� de Paris, however, her
limitations were sometimes exposed.
Golden was recorded largely in
Nashville and many of the songs that
Minogue introduced here had a
country swing. If it was a shock to
hear her veering away from her
signature dance-pop, especially in one
of London?s most famous nightclubs,
her amiability smoothed over the
cracks on the cantering country pop
of Shelby 68, an ode to one of her first
cars in Melbourne. Often, though, her
voice was ineffectual, tinny on Golden
and tiny on One Last Kiss. Much of the
new material was forgettable too;
Music?s Too Sad was the beigest of
ballads, while Raining Glitter sounded
like an offcut from one of Madonna?s
lesser albums.
Minogue?s vim, though, was
undimmed. ?This might be the
smallest stage we?ve ever performed
on,? she said, flashing one of her
scorching smiles. She?s 49, but could
pass for 15 years younger, and she
certainly looked the part of a hoedown
queen ? double denim, big hair,
twinkling rhinestones. You wonder
whether the country makeover is
more about the clothes than the
music; it?s certainly not as committed
as Justin Timberlake?s recent
reinvention as a grizzled outdoorsman.
When she led the crowd in a rendition
of the country standard Islands in the
Stream it was fun, but basically a step
above mass karaoke.
Her voice got richer as the show
went on and the last songs were
rousing: a singalong take on All the
Lovers from 2010, a featherlight
version of an even older one, Hand on
Your Heart, and the punchy new
single, Dancing, delivered from a stool.
Yet it was hard to shake the impression
that Minogue was functioning more as
a charismatic cheerleader than a
compelling artist. Sometimes being
lovely isn?t quite enough.
UK tour starts at the Metro Radio
Arena, Newcastle, on Sept 18
Farquhar?s Restoration comedy
The Recruiting Officer in Australia
in 1789, the play is a brilliant
deconstruction of hierarchy, morality
and the human value of art. A richly
textured ensemble piece, here it looks
deft and elegant when one actor
embodies a character physically, while
another supplies the speech. The
scrolling captions give the unfolding
action an enhanced Brechtian flavour.
And the signing, woven into scenes,
not only has an almost commedia
dell?arte grace and
expressiveness, but
adds layers of nuance and colour.
There?s a sense, often, that groups
of convicts are eavesdropping on
the fringes of their oppressors?
interactions, sharing the information
they glean, quietly mocking or secretly
plotting escape or subversion.
Admittedly, there is some sacrifice
of pace. Yet there?s plenty of piercing
loveliness, pitch-black gallows humour
and sheer ribaldry to compensate. Tim
Pritchett as Ralph, the lieutenant with
directorial ambitions, is hilariously
tormented by his motley troupe of
players, among them
Pop
Anderson .Paak
O2 Academy, SW9
A
{{{{(
nderson .Paak is a showstealer through and
through. The 32-year-old
Californian is spearheading
the latest wave of
sumptuous Los Angeles neo-soul, but
only a few years ago he was homeless
and working on a cannabis farm
with his second wife and child. He
outshone Kendrick Lamar and Snoop
Dogg in co-writing six standout tracks
for Dr Dre?s lauded 2015 comeback,
Compton, and soon became a prot間�
to the godfather of West Coast rap.
?This man right here is destined to
be a superstar,? Dre declared during a
brief cameo on the Academy stage,
performing his seminal The Next
Episode. It proved all too much
for the delirious, 5,000-strong crowd.
And .Paak was in no mood to pacify
passions. He fizzed and crackled as
if making up for lost time during
a fleeting set. It was as if David
Attenborough were describing a hyena
in mating season as .Paak hopped,
humped and crawled about the stage
during the hip-thumping Come Down.
An eclectic blend of genres
including Sixties funk, rap, jazz,
Seventies soul and Nineties hip-hop
was on show, and there was even the
odd prog-rock solo from the backing
band, the Free Nationals. Glowed Up,
.Paak?s electronic banger with the
Canadian producer Kaytranada, was
mixed with R Kelly?s Ignition to bizarre
but thoroughly enjoyable effect. The
pace changed as .Paak, who began
playing drums at church aged 11, took
to percussion for The Bird, a twinkling
highlight about an alcoholic father and
a gambling Korean mother told
through husky half-singing.
It?s this brash yet introspective
quality that sets .Paak?s Californian
hedonism apart ? there is substance
behind the sun. Two Grammy
nominations for 2016?s Malibu, his
second album, confirmed that talent.
And his wild, orange jumpsuit-clad
braggadocio made up for the rare bits
of weaker material. The audience
bayed for more.
Peter Yeung
Theatre
Our Country?s
Good
Nottingham
Playhouse
{{{{(
Kylie Minogue, a fabulous entertainer, but a mediocre musician
Vim without
the volume
Playing a gig this intimate exposed the
singer?s vocal shortcomings and that
of her new material, says Ed Potton
Pop
Kylie Minogue
Caf� de Paris, W1
{{(((
W
ho gets to speak, and
who gets listened
to, is a key theme
in Timberlake
Wertenbaker?s 1988
modern classic. So her drama acquires
fresh force when it?s delivered in
voices that are infrequently heard
on our stages or, actually, almost
anywhere in public life.
Directed by Fiona Buffini, this
is the third production by Ramps
on the Moon, the integrated D/deaf
and disabled theatre consortium.
Incorporating British Sign Language
and captions, it is illuminating,
sensitive and current. And, with
its intertwining of verbal
and visual language, it
has a poeticism that is
stirring and at times
almost hypnotic.
Based on the true
story of a group of
British officers
and transported
convicts who
staged George
T
Concert
Maurizio Pollini
Royal Festival Hall
T
{{{{{
here have been times in
Maurizio Pollini recitals
when it has been easy
enough to gauge what the
veteran pianist has been
thinking, but difficult to know what he
was feeling. Inscrutable, that?s the
word. Or, occasionally, icy. None of
that remoteness, though, was
displayed in this uplifting recital. The
older Pollini grows (he?s 76), the more
he seems to recapture the youthful joy
of playing the piano, communing with
the great masters ? sometimes,
indeed, singing along with them in
muffled snatches of vocalise.
The piano was his usual touring
model, a Steinway-Fabbrini, richly
endowed with rainbow colours; the
masters were Schumann and Chopin.
Schumann?s familiar Arabeske,
sounding limpidly beautiful, slightly
questioning and delicately etched with
fluctuating dynamics and speeds,
started us off on a high note. A slight
dip followed with Pollini?s treatment
of one of Schumann?s oddments, the
B minor Allegro ? tempestuous
enough, although a tad impersonal ?
but from then on nothing wavered.
With the Concert sans orchestre, the
three-movement version of
Schumann?s Third Piano Sonata,
written in anguished separation from
Clara Wieck, the love of his life, the
central andantino throbbed with
nobility as well as pain. Before and
after, notes cascaded and roared with
enough heat to generate a percussive
stamp from Pollini?s right foot.
Chopin swept through the second
half, initially in a delicate key with
the silvery, hesitant beauties of the
F minor Nocturne, Op 55, which was
not so much played as stroked. The
gears changed for his mighty B minor
Sonata, its rapid fingerwork tossed off
with a propulsive power and glitter.
Three generous encores followed,
dominated by a commanding and
passionate C sharp minor Scherzo.
That done, Pollini still had energy left
for smiling warmly and signing CDs.
Amazing.
Geoff Brown
Alex Nowak as the stagestruck,
Garrick-fixated former pickpocket
Sideway, and Fifi Garfield?s mutinous
Dabby, who, like many actresses
nowadays, quite reasonably wants
to play the juicy role of a rakish
sergeant instead of the bit part of
?silly milkmaid?. Gbemisola Ikumelo
as a woman sentenced to hang for
stealing food is ferociously tough and
heartbreakingly wistful. Milton Lopes
is a compelling presence as a nameless
Aboriginal Australian, watching as his
country is appropriated.
Gender, race, class ? 30 years since
Wertenbaker?s play first appeared, the
inequalities she interrogates
remain an urgent part of
Britain?s sociopolitical
conversation. This
production tackles
them
with acuity
t
and
a in its own
eloquent language.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 0115 941
9419 to March 24,
touring to June 2
12
1G T
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Four Days That
Shook Britain
ITV, 9pm
Last year
Britain was
hit by four
terrorist
attacks in quick
succession ? car and
knife atrocities at
Westminster Bridge
7PM
Early
Top
pick
(March 22) and London
Bridge (June 3); a
suicide bombing at a
concert in Manchester
(May 22); and a car
attack outside Finsbury
Park Mosque, north
London (June 19). With
the first anniversary of
the Westminster attack
approaching, the Bafta
award-winning Minnow
Films (7/7: One Day in
London; Damilola: Our
Loved Boy) has made
8PM
9PM
an endurance athlete,
was in the Westminster
courtyard when Khalid
Masood attacked the
Houses of Parliament
and stabbed PC Keith
Palmer to death. ?It
was so much to take in,
because it didn?t seem
real,? he says. Doorman
Ozzie Gandaa describes
Borough Market after
the attack on London
Bridge: ?There were
people running
everywhere. You could
just see panic and fear
in people?s eyes.? And
the imam Mohammed
Mahmoud had just
finished prayers at the
mosque in Finsbury
Park when Darren
Osborne ploughed
a van into Muslims.
?They are innocent
men and women
who did nothing to
deserve this attack,?
Mahmoud says.
BBC Two, 8pm
It?s a great night for
Reithian values on
the BBC, with Simon
Schama?s great art
history lecture (BBC
Two, 9pm) and another
edifying railway
journey with Michael
Portillo. The latter is
on the route of the
Transcaucasus Railway,
built by the time of his
1913 Bradshaw?s to haul
oil from the landlocked
Caspian Sea at Baku
to the Black Sea at
Batumi. He journeys in
reverse, tasting tea in
Ozurgeti, taking in the
early years of Joseph
Stalin (born in Georgia)
and attending a
traditional Georgian
wedding in Tbilisi,
respectfully muting his
usually garish clothing.
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Holding Back the Years. Fiona
Phillips investigates the loneliness epidemic in Britain
(AD) 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in
Camden, Bootle and North Lanarkshire (AD) 11.00 The
Sheriffs Are Coming. A car dealer refuses to pay a
motorist back for a car that broke down after three days
11.45 Caught Red Handed. A house burglar who met his
match at the foot of the stairs (r) (AD) 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. From Elsecar Heritage Centre, South Yorkshire (r)
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Karen meets a cowboy
searching for the man who shot his father (AD) 2.15 A
Place to Call Home. Elizabeth and Douglas disagree over
how to raise David 3.05 Escape to the Country. A couple
search for a family home with land in Wiltshire (AD) 3.45
Coast and Country Auctions. A visit to the Bala Autumn
Sale in north Wales 4.30 Flog It! Paul Martin presents
from Norwich Cathedral, where experts Thomas Plant and
Kate Bateman ?nd a religious relic from France and a
Martin Brothers vase (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show
hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at
Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Repair Shop (r) 6.30 Holding Back the Years
(r) (AD) 7.15 The Sheriffs Are Coming (r) 8.00 Sign
Zone: Earth?s Natural Wonders (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria
Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily
Politics 1.00pm Two Tribes (r) 1.30 Yes Chef (r) 2.15
Your Home in Their Hands. Amateur interior designers
come to the rescue of a family facing a style stalemate,
and a couple who fear turning a masculine chapel into a
feminine abode (r) (AD) 3.15 Planet Earth. David
Attenborough looks at subterranean life, from cave
angel?sh in Thailand to ?ve million bats whose droppings
support an entire ecosystem in a chamber in Borneo (r)
(AD) 4.15 Into the Wild with Gordon Buchanan. The
?lm-maker and Dermot O?Leary visit the Western Isles,
where they encounter a stag, visit a shag colony and
search for seals and golden eagles (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your
Money Where Your Mouth Is. Paul Hayes and John
Cameron search for bargains at Ardingly Antiques Fair,
where John hopes to get lucky with a wishing well and a
painting takes Paul on a Shakespearean journey 6.00
Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine (r) 6.30 The
Repair Shop. A music box damaged during the Blitz
6.00am Good Morning Britain. The Grammy-winning
singer Michael McDonald talks about US politics, his
recent revival with Solange and his new album and tour
8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs and fashion
news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip 9.25
The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This
Morning. Phillip Scho?eld and Holly Willoughby present
chat and lifestyle features, including a look at the stories
making the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the
kitchen 12.30pm ITV News; Weather 1.00 Live ITV
Racing: Cheltenham Festival. Ed Chamberlin and Francesca
Cumani present coverage of the third day of the
prestigious festival, including feature race the 3.30 Sun
Bets Stayers? Hurdle Race. Plus, further races at 1.30,
2.10, 2.50 and 4.10. With commentary by Richard Hoiles
4.30 Britain?s Best Walks with Julia Bradbury. Julia heads
to Loch Lomond, a freshwater Scottish loch that crosses
the Highland Boundary Fault and is the largest inland
stretch of water in Great Britain by surface area (r) 5.00
The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as contestants pit
their wits against the Chaser 6.00 Regional News;
Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.15am 3rd Rock from the Sun (r) (AD) 7.05 Everybody
Loves Raymond (r) 8.00 Winter Paralympics Breakfast
9.00 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares
USA (r) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA. A real estate boss
goes undercover in his business (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News
Summary 12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Four cooks in
Hampshire compete (r) 1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers. Items of
interest include a caravan, a luxury houseboat and a
vintage jigsaw puzzle (r) 2.10 Countdown. The motor
racing presenter Suzi Perry joins Susie Dent in Dictionary
Corner 3.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away. A couple
look at properties in Great Yarmouth and the Costa Blanca
(r) 4.00 A New Life in the Sun. A couple leave Wales to
run a bar in southern Spain 5.00 Four in a Bed. The
guests judge Alan and Denise, owners of Troy House in
Painswick (r) 5.30 Extreme Cake Makers. A beach scene
complete with jelly sea, crispy marshmallow rocks and
dozens of hand-carved bathers, and a 2x3ft portrait of a
birthday girl using icing and edible inks (r) 6.00 The
Simpsons. Marge tries to protect Maggie from the
dangers of children?s television (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks.
Nancy confronts Darren about their problems (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can?t
Pay? We?ll Take It Away. Max and Steve head to London
to try to recover more than �,000 in court costs. Aron
and Cona chase almost �000 owed after a debtor failed
to repay a loan to her ex-partner (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. Carrie tells
the story of her diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder,
while Sue describes how she feared she was developing
Parkinson?s disease before she sought help (r) (AD) 1.10
Access. Showbiz news and gossip 1.15 Home and Away
(AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.20 NCIS: Naval Killer.
Ducky is attacked by a knife-wielding woman who accuses
him of war crimes, alleging he tortured and killed her
brother in Afghanistan in the early 1980s. Starring David
McCallum (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: Fatal Defense (15,
TVM, 2017) A woman signs up for self-defence classes.
However, her handsome instructor soon develops a
frightening obsession with her. Thriller with Ashley Scott
and David Cade 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Susan
is pleased when Karl takes Izzy to task over her lack of
parenting skills (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Maggie is
sent to have a biopsy (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 Saving Lives at Sea A climber falls
in a remote cave on the Gower
Peninsula, so the Mumbles crew are
called in, and in Portreath, lifeguards
battle to save a teenager who is
determined to surf (7/12) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale A dif?cult day lies ahead
for both Paddy and Chas (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.30 Undercover: Rough Sleeper ?
Tonight Adam Holloway goes
undercover to investigate the rise of
homelessness on Britain?s streets
7.30 Winter Paralympics Today A
round-up of action from day six in
Pyeongchang, South Korea (SL)
7.00 The Secret Life of Kittens
Concluding the documentary following
kittens from birth to 12 months old,
revealing how the sights, smells and
sounds they experience during this
period shape their unique personalities.
Last in the series (r)
8.00 MasterChef Seven more amateur
cooks create a dish from a selection of
poussin, beef cheeks, pork mince,
mackerel and tiger prawns, before four
of them go on to cook two courses for
the 2012 and 2006 champions (AD)
8.00 Great Continental Railway
Journeys Michael Portillo takes in
Georgia and Azerbaijan as he journeys
through the former Russian empire,
including visits to a tea plantation and
a museum dedicated to Joseph Stalin.
See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Debbie ?nds herself
backed into a corner (AD)
8.00 Location, Location, Location New
series. Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer
search York for ?rst-time buyers
expecting their ?rst child and a
Yorkshire couple moving from London
to be near their family
8.00 Bargain-Loving Brits in the Sun
The cabaret star Mark ?lms a video to
play as part of his show, the sisters
Vina and Nilam launch a business
selling spice kits and the tattoo artists
Blane and Mark need customers (6/8)
9.00 Not Going Out Lucy arranges a
special surprise for Lee?s birthday.
See Viewing Guide (2/7)
9.00 Civilisations Simon Schama explores
the artistic depiction of nature. He
discovers that landscape painting is
seldom a straightforward description
of observed nature but rather a
projection of dreams and idylls.
See Viewing Guide (3/9) (AD)
9.00 Four Days That Shook Britain
Documentary telling the story of
people who were directly affected by
the wave of terror attacks that shook
Britain across a four-month period in
2017. See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 My Baby?s Life: Who Decides?
Observational documentary about
children on life support, and the
dif?cult decisions facing their parents
and the doctors who care for them.
See Viewing Guide (1/2) (AD)
9.00 Do the Right Thing with Eamonn
& Ruth Eamonn Holmes and Ruth
Langsford present the consumer show,
with reports on house ?res caused by
white goods and conmen targeting
people using their phones (2/4)
10.00 The Job Interview Aston Martin
recruits a group leader, a position that
involves overseeing production of the
company?s luxury cars, and the
Swansea tour operator Cruise Nation
looks for a salesperson (5/6)
10.00 Hunted and Confronted: Cowboys,
Crooks and Chancers Paul Connolly
lifts the lid on a gang of cold-calling
criminals using a roo?ng scam to steal
thousands, and also goes undercover to
investigate a letting agency (3/4)
11.00 Winter Paralympics Highlights
Clare Balding and Jonnie Peacock
review the best of the action from day
six in Pyeongchang, which included
alpine skiing and wheelchair curling
11.05 Police Interceptors Liam and his dog
Vader bring down a ?eeing suspect,
while Kev and Spike rescue a man
trapped in an overturned car after a
spectacular crash (r)
12.15am-6.00 Live Winter Paralympics Day seven
from Pyeongchang, which features the banked slalom
snowboarding event at Jeongseon Alpine Centre, in which
Great Britain will hope Owen Pick, Ben Moore and James
Barnes-Miller are in medal contention, while the
wheelchair curling semi-?nals are due to commence
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am Cowboy Builders. Laura
Hamilton and Dan Lobb help a Worcester couple (r) 4.00
World?s Most Pampered Pets. Lizards treated as house
guests and ducks dressed for the catwalk (r) (SL) 4.45
House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 House Busters. Life-enhancing
changes (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and
Angellica Bell present the magazine
9.30 Still Game A spooky new undertaker
moves into town (2/6) (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 MOTD: The Premier League Show
Gabby Logan presents the magazine
featuring news and highlights
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Newsnight With Emily Maitlis
8.30 The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska
Captain Tuvo tries to give the
passengers a front-row view of the
scenery. Last in the series (AD)
10.30 ITV News at Ten
10.45 Question Time Topical debate from
Dover, chaired by David Dimbleby
11.00 Regional News
11PM
Late
Great Continental
Railway Journeys
BBC One
7.30 EastEnders Keanu is furious to learn
Karen spent the night with Mitch (AD)
10PM
this harrowing
90-minute film that
tells the personal
stories of the people
who were caught up in
the atrocities. ?I don?t
remember hearing any
bang,? recalls Lucy
Jarvis, who was injured
in the Manchester
bombing. ?Suddenly I
was on the floor and
couldn?t see properly . . .
I felt like I wanted to
sleep.? John McAvoy,
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days? political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Top Gear Matt LeBlanc and Chris
Harris take second-hand sports cars
across the Japanese island of Honshu,
while Rory Reid explores Tokyo?s
weirdest car-based subculture (3/6) (r)
11.15 Regional Programme
12.15am Sign Zone: MasterChef The week?s best
amateurs are challenged by critic William Sitwell to make
an exceptional dessert showcasing either alcohol or spices
(r) (AD, SL) 12.45-1.45 Nigel Slater?s Middle East. The
writer visits Turkey, starting in Istanbul, then heading to
the rural heartlands of Central Anatolia (r) (AD, SL)
12.45am Lethal Weapon Riggs and Murtaugh are
drawn into a fatal world of conspiracy theories.
Meanwhile, Riggs? relationship with Molly evolves (r)
(AD) 1.30 Jackpot247. Interactive gaming 3.00
Undercover: Rough Sleeper ? Tonight (r) 3.25 ITV
Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
11.45 Uefa Europa League Highlights
Action from the last-16 second-leg
matches, including Arsenal v AC Milan
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Not Going Out
BBC One, 9pm
In the worst on-screen
birthday celebration
since Cathy Brener?s
11th birthday party
in The Birds, Lucy
celebrates Lee?s special
day by inviting their
family and friends to
join them in an Escape
Room. For those
unfamiliar with the
concept, you are locked
in a room and can only
get out by solving a
series of puzzles and
riddles. ?This is the
worst lock-in ever,? says
Lee?s dad (Bobby Ball).
Frank turns out to be
an aspiring Columbo,
amid all the bickering
and Lee?s rising panic
when he finds himself
padlocked to a ?bomb?.
?Is it a wind-up?? Lee
asks. ?Must be if it?s
ticking,? Toby replies.
Civilisations
BBC Two, 9pm
Even the staunchest
advocate of Kenneth
Clark?s original series
should set aside their
objections to watch
Simon Schama?s
compelling analysis of
one of humankind?s
deepest artistic urges
? to depict nature.
According to Schama,
landscape art is ?rarely
a depiction of the way
the world is, but a
vision of the way we
would like it to be?.
Most importantly, it is a
way ?to understand our
civilisation?. He starts
in 10th-century China
with the scrolls of the
Song dynasty, and his
global journey also
takes in Renaissance
country villas and
the photography of
Ansel Adams.
My Baby?s Life:
Who Decides?
Channel 4, 9pm
Based at Southampton
Children?s Hospital?s
Paediatric Intensive
Care Unit, this two-part
observational
documentary provides
a heartbreaking insight
into the lives of sick
children who can be
kept alive, but probably
never cured. Advances
in medical science?s
ability to prolong life
have huge cost
implications for the
NHS, raising complex
questions about quality
of life. We meet parents
exploring every way
to keep their children
alive, but also the
family of a young girl
with a heart defect
who have taken the
difficult decision to
cease treatment.
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 3.30pm
The Arnold Palmer
Invitational is a
professional golf
tournament on the
PGA Tour. Rory
McIlroy has committed
to playing for the
fourth year running
after narrowly losing
last year, when he
finished two shots
behind Marc Leishman.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) 7.00 RSPCA Animal
Rescue (r) 8.00 Motorway Patrol (r) 9.00 Road
Wars (r) 10.00 Warehouse 13 (r) 11.00 Forever
(r) (AD) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm
Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r)
5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. A disagreement between Oliver and
Dinah puts one of the team in jeopardy
9.00 Carpool Karaoke Special. With guests
Katy Perry and Jennifer Lopez (r) (AD)
10.00 Jamestown. Rumours circulate that
Samuel has risen from his grave (r)
11.00 The Force: Essex. Of?cers deal with a
woman threatening to kill herself (r) (AD)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD)
1.00am Brit Cops: Rapid Response (r) (AD)
2.00 Most Shocking (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(r) 4.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r) (AD) 4.30 It?s Me
or the Dog (r) (AD) 5.00 Futurama (r)
6.00am Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 Richard E
Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 9.00 The West
Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) 1.00pm Without a
Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The
West Wing (r) 5.00 House (r) (AD)
6.00 House. The doctor becomes intrigued by an
artist with distorted vision (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. The case of
a woman who was raped disturbs Sara (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. An incident at a church tests
Frank?s diplomatic skills (r) (AD)
9.00 Britannia. Rome shows Britannia how it
conducts business. Last in the series (9/9) (AD)
10.00 Our Cartoon President. The President is
determined to outdo Canada?s Justin Trudeau
10.35 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. A
satirical look at news and pop culture (r)
11.10 Divorce. Frances ?nds herself inspired by
an unknown artist (3/8) (r)
11.45 Britannia (9/9) (r) (AD)
12.45am Billions (r) (AD) 1.55 Blue Bloods (r)
2.55 Girls (r) (AD) 4.05 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 The Real A&E
(r) (AD) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00 Cold
Case (r) 11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia
12.00 Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 Border Security:
Canada?s Front Line (r) (AD) 5.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 The Real A&E (9/10) (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E (10/10) (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Conviction. The lawyers take on the case of
a woman jailed for killing an athlete (r) (AD)
10.00 Scandal (AD)
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
3.00 Border Security: Canada?s Front Line (r)
(AD) 4.00 Nothing to Declare (r) 5.00 The
Biggest Loser: Australia (r)
6.00am Matilda & Me (AD) 7.00 Mariinsky
Ballet: Cinderella 9.00 Tales of the Unexpected
9.30 Master of Photography (AD) 10.30 Video
Killed the Radio Star (AD) 11.00 The Seventies
(AD) 12.00 Soundbreaking (AD) 1.00pm
Discovering: Dean Martin (AD) 2.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 2.30 Master of Photography (AD)
3.30 Video Killed the Radio Star (AD) 4.00 The
Seventies (AD) 5.00 Soundbreaking (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Peter Sellers.
7.00 Tarzan: The Man Behind the Legend. A look
at the evolution of the character
8.00 The Eighties. Technological innovations
made during the decade (AD)
9.00 The Ritchie Blackmore Story. Brian May is
among those paying tribute to the guitarist (AD)
11.00 Portrait Artist of the Year 2018
12.00 National Treasures: The Art of Collecting
1.00am The Gardens of Pompeii (AD) 2.00 The
Art of the Joy of Sex (AD) 3.00 Master of
Photography (AD) 4.00 Dag 4.30 Tales of the
Unexpected 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 7.30 Live ICC
Cricket World Cup Quali?er: West Indies v
Afghanistan. Coverage of the Super Sixes match
from Harare Sports Club in Zimbabwe 3.30pm
Live PGA Tour Golf: The Arnold Palmer
Invitational. The featured groups on the ?rst day
at the Bay Hill Club & Lodge in Orlando, Florida
6.00 Live PGA Tour Golf: The Arnold Palmer
Invitational. Further coverage of the opening day
7.00 Live Premier League Darts. Coverage of the
seventh round of the season, which comes from
the Motorpoint Arena in Nottingham
10.30 Sky Sports News at Ten
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the
day?s main talking points
12.00 Sky Sports News. The day?s talking
points. 2.00am Live ATP Masters Tennis: The
BNP Paribas Open. Coverage from day eight,
which takes place at Indian Wells Tennis Garden
in California, where the reigning champion is
Roger Federer 4.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View. The
week?s political news 11.15 Question Time
12.15am This Week 1.00-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 9.30pm-10.00 The Big
Six Nations Kick Off with Gabby and Gareth
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 Soft
Border Patrol (r) 11.15 MOTD: The Premier
League Show 11.45-12.15 Mock the Week (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00-1.00am First
Minister?s Questions 6.30pm Saving Lives at
Sea (r) (AD) 7.30-8.00 Timeline
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 6.30pm Saving Lives at
Sea (r) (AD) 7.30-8.00 Scrum V Classics (r)
10.00-10.30 Still Game (AD) 11.15 MOTD:
Premier League 11.45-12.45 Top Gear (r)
ITV Anglia
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Anglia Late
Edition. Political issues affecting the region
ITV Border/Tyne Tees
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Around the
House. Political discussion with Paul Brand
ITV Central
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Central Lobby
ITV Granada
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 The Granada
Debate. Political debate with Alison Mackenzie
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1985. Featuring archive
music by Bruce Springsteen, Madonna, Billy
Ocean, Sister Sledge and Marillion (r)
8.00 The Brain: A Secret History. Michael
Mosley explores how the study of abnormal
brain activity has helped reveal the workings of
the organ and meets a woman with alien hand
syndrome. Last in the series (3/3) (r)
9.00 The Ruth Ellis Files: A Very British Crime
Story. A focus on the three weeks leading up to
Ruth Ellis?s execution, including attempts to
save her and her last-minute admission of an
accomplice. Last in the series (3/3)
10.00 Timeshift: Crime & Punishment ? The
Story of Corporal Punishment. The history of
physically imposed discipline (8/9) (r)
11.00 Blues America. Concluding part, looking
at blues music in the postwar period (r)
12.00 Top of the Pops: 1985 (r) 12.30am
Tom Jones at the BBC (r) 1.30 The World?s
Most Photographed (r) 2.00 The High Art of the
Low Countries (r) (SL) 3.00 The Secret Life of
Books: The Mill on the Floss (r) 3.30-4.00
The Beauty of Anatomy (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Couples Come
Dine with Me. Three couples in Manchester (r)
8.00 Baby Daddy (r) 9.00 Melissa & Joey (r)
10.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 11.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 12.00 The
Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory
(r) (AD) 2.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
3.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 My Hotter Half
8.00 The Big Bang Theory. Amy guest stars on
the new Professor Proton show (AD)
8.30 Young Sheldon (AD)
9.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
9.30 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
10.00 Five Star Hotel. Lydia hosts a hen party
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 First Dates (r) (AD) 1.05am Five Star
Hotel (r) 2.10 Tattoo Fixers (r) (AD) 3.00
Timeless (r) 3.45 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
4.30 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) 9.30 A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 11.35 Four in a Bed (r)
2.10pm Come Dine with Me (r) 4.50 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick treats a
border collie for a suspicious lump (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Revisiting Francis and
Karen Shaw, who bought a peel tower in
Yorkshire, discovering that the cost of restoring
it has meant the reality of living there is nothing
like their dream (1/4) (r) (AD)
9.00 The Good Fight. New series. An
unfortunate event brings the ?rm together,
along with the prospect of a new partner (AD)
10.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? A look at
the impact on the emergency services of the
rising number of rough sleepers, with Wiltshire
police?s call handlers dealing with complaints
about the homeless every day (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A man is rushed in with
severe knife wounds (1/8) (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 The Good Fight (r) (AD) 2.05 999: What?s
Your Emergency? (r) (AD) 3.10-3.55 8 Out of
10 Cats Uncut. With Carol Vorderman (r)
11.00am Dakota (PG, 1945) Western with
John Wayne (b/w) 12.40pm Run for Cover
(U, 1955) Western with James Cagney 2.30 12
Angry Men (U, 1957) Legal drama starring
Henry Fonda (b/w) 4.30 The War Wagon (U,
1967) Western starring John Wayne
6.35 We Bought a Zoo (PG, 2011) A
widowed father-of-two takes over ownership of
a struggling zoo, and tries to restore it to its
former glory. Fact-based comedy drama starring
Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson
9.00 RoboCop (12, 2014) A critically injured
police of?cer is rebuilt as a crime-?ghting
cyborg, but struggles to retain free will. Sci-?
thriller remake with Joel Kinnaman (AD)
11.15 I, Frankenstein (12, 2014) The
scientist?s monster is caught up in a war
between supernatural beings who want the
secret of his immortality. Fantasy adventure
with Aaron Eckhart and Bill Nighy (AD)
1.00am-3.00 The Fly (18, 1986) A scientist?s
experiments with teleportation lead to a
terrifying transformation after his body is
genetically fused with a ?y. Horror remake
starring Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals (r)
6.20 Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r)
7.10 Who?s Doing the Dishes? (r) (AD) 7.55
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.20 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 9.25 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.15
The Bachelor (r) 12.05pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.35 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.35 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 4.50 Judge Rinder (r)
5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Children
perform a stage version of The Exorcist (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. More
viewer-submitted comical mishaps (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Kandi tries to get
back with Alan, but he turns her down (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Walden feels being a
billionaire clouds his interaction with women (r)
9.00 FILM: The Hangover Part III (15,
2013) Drinking pals are forced to ?nd a
gangster. Comedy sequel starring Bradley Cooper
11.05 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.35 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.05am Family Guy (r) (AD) 12.30 American
Dad! (r) (AD) 1.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) 7.55 The Royal (r) (AD) 8.55
Judge Judy (r) 10.20 Inspector Morse (r)
12.35pm The Royal (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat (r)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.50 On the
Buses (r) 4.55 You?re Only Young Twice (r) 5.25
Rising Damp. Rigsby discovers he has a rival (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. A road accident causes chaos (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A famous concert
pianist?s wife is murdered (r) (AD)
8.00 Vera. A teenage boy is found dead in a
reservoir near a remote rural town. Vera takes
on the case, and uncovers a web of fractured
relationships in the community (4/4) (r) (AD)
10.00 Unforgotten. A body in a suitcase unites
Cassie and Sunny in another cold case
investigation (1/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 Unforgotten. Cassie and Sunny build a
picture of their victim by talking to his ex-wife
and son, before looking back at the original
investigation ?les ? and very soon they have a
few suspects (2/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am DCI Banks (r) (AD) 2.00 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 7.35 Pawn Stars (r) 8.25
Ironside (r) 9.30 ITV Racing: The Opening Show
10.30 The Protectors (r) 11.00 The Saint (r)
12.05pm The Avengers (r) 1.10 Ironside (r)
2.10 Quincy ME (r) 3.15 Minder (r) (AD) 4.20
The Saint 5.25 The Avengers (r)
6.35 Storage Wars. Mary looks for love (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. The team examines secret
documents and a photo of Einstein (r)
7.35 Pawn Stars. A valuable ?rst edition of
David Thoreau?s classic book Walden (r)
8.00 FILM: On Her Majesty?s Secret
Service (PG, 1969) James Bond is sent to
track down master criminal and arch-enemy
Blofeld, who is intent on destroying world peace.
Spy adventure starring George Lazenby (AD)
10.55 FILM: Born to Raise Hell (18, 2010)
An Interpol agent swears vengeance on the
Russian gun smugglers responsible for the death
of his partner. Action thriller starring Steven
Seagal and Dan Badarau (AD)
1.00am Minder (r) (AD, SL) 2.00 Bond Girls
Are Forever (r) (AD) 2.45 ITV4 Nightscreen
3.00 Teleshopping
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Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm
Top Gear (AD) 3.00 Impossible Engineering (AD)
4.00 Road Cops 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. Luxury vehicles bought for the
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teenagers when the police are called (7/10)
7.30 Road Cops. Of?cers discover a garden
packed with marijuana plants (8/10)
8.00 Dara O Briain?s Go 8 Bit. Jonathan Ross and
Suzi Ruffell play a series of video games,
including Final Fight, Aladdin and Titan Fall 2
9.00 QI XL. An extended edition of the comedy
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10.00 Josh. Geoff watches Josh perform, and
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10.40 Josh. Kate and Owen organise a fancy
dress party for Josh?s birthday (AD)
11.20 QI. Christmas special from 2006
12.00 QI 12.40am Would I Lie to You? 1.20
Mock the Week 2.00 QI 2.40 Suits (AD)
3.30 QI 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
Bill 12.00 New Tricks (AD) 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Bread 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London?s Burning (AD) 4.00 New
Tricks (AD) 5.00 Bergerac
6.00 Steptoe and Son. Albert reveals secrets
about his romantic past (b/w)
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Chaos abounds
at a parade held to celebrate a famous battle
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. Lionel abandons
his wife while out on a drive in the hills
8.00 A Place to Call Home. George is asked to
host a Japanese trade delegation
9.00 Lady Chatterley?s Lover. Adaptation of DH
Lawrence?s novel about an aristocratic woman
who embarks on a passionate affair (AD)
11.00 Birds of a Feather. Sharon takes full
advantage of her sister?s hospitality
11.40 The Bill. Hollis and Page arrest a thug
guilty of extorting money from his neighbour
12.40am Ashes to Ashes. Alex has 24 hours to
stop her parents? death 1.40 The White Queen
2.50 Ashes to Ashes 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Who Do You Think
You Are? (AD) 11.00 Medieval Dead 12.00
Time Team 1.00pm Wildest Africa 2.00 Planet
Earth (AD) 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Medieval
Dead 5.00 Royal Murder Mysteries
6.00 Inside Hitler?s Killing Machine. The
establishment of the concentration camps,
revealing how quickly they turned into a tool for
mass murder. Last in the series
7.00 The Day When Hitler Lost the War. How
Hitler?s invasion of Russia led to his defeat
8.00 Nazi Victory: The Post-War Plan. How
Hitler used recreation to promote his ideology,
setting up the world?s largest beach resort (5/6)
9.00 The Two Ronnies. Music by Elkie Brooks
10.00 The Two Ronnies. Vintage comedy
10.50 Blackadder the Third. Edmund falls foul of
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11.30 Blackadder the Third. Edmund gets caught
up in the French Revolution (AD)
12.10am Blackadder the Third (AD) 12.50
Mummies Alive 1.50 The Nazis: A Warning from
History (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
ITV London
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 The Late
Debate. News and events at Westminster
ITV Meridian
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 The Last Word
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Love Your
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ITV West/Westcountry
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 The
Westcountry Debate. Political stories
ITV Yorkshire
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Last Orders
STV
As ITV except: 1.00pm-4.30 Live Racing on
STV 11.05-11.45 Scotland Tonight 1.30am
Teleshopping 2.30 After Midnight 3.30
Undercover: Rough Sleeper ? Tonight (r)
3.55 ITV Nightscreen 4.35 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Britain?s
Brightest Family (AD) 1.30am Teleshopping
2.30-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Pincidh
Dincidh D� (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.34 Bruno
(r) 5.35 Na Floogals (r) 5.45 Srath Sona
(Happy Valley) (r) 5.55 Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.05
Sealgairean Sp騬sail (History Hunters) (r) 6.30
D� a-nis? (What Now?) (r) 7.00 Turas a?
Bhradain (The Salmon?s Journey) (r) 7.30
Speaking Our Language (r) 7.55 Binneas: Na
Trads (r) 8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 E騬pa
(European Current Affairs) 9.00 DIY le Donnie
9.45 Belladrum 2017: Dub Pistols. A set by the
English ska band 10.20 Dhan Uisge (Easdale)
(r) 10.25 Luingean Lannsaireachd (Surgery
Ships) 11.15 Ce騦 bho Perthshire Amber (r)
11.30-12.00 Mach a Seo! (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw (r) 12.00 News 12.05pm Darn
Bach o Hanes (r) (AD) 12.30 Alex Jones: Y Fam
Gymreig (r) 1.30 Sion a Si鈔 (r) 2.00 News
2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News 3.05 Yr Ynys (r)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh 6.00 News 6.05
Ar Werth (r) 6.30 Rownd a Rownd (AD) 7.00
Heno 7.30 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.00 Gwaith/
Cartref (AD) 9.00 News 9.30 Pawb a?i Farn
10.30 Hansh 11.00-11.35 Mwy o Sgorio (r)
14
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
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Train Tracks No 356
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A
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1
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B
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Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
23
6
Across
1 Escapes, avoids (6)
5 Alpine house (6)
8 River of Dresden and
Hamburg (4)
9 Carriageway border (8)
10 Burrowing rodent (6)
12 Unit of length (4)
15 Iron smelters (5,8)
Solution to Crossword 7599
T I ME S
E A
T
A BRE A S
R T
T
S T Y L US
R SQ
B
U
B E E K E E
A U A
C R YWO L
H A
J U J I T S
G T
21
N
UNR
T
SCA
L
UE A
V
P ER
RA
F
Z
L OZ
U
L
X E
M R
A V E L
G L
NDA L
U P
M I SH
E
W
B I E S
N P
ENGE
E A
RROR
16
17
19
21
22
23
Like burnt remains (4)
Obtain by threats (6)
Fish-eating bird (3,5)
Arm bone (4)
Biblical hero (6)
Verse form (6)
Down
2
3
4
5
6
7
11
13
14
Articles of some worth (9)
Colouring substance (3)
Form into layers (8)
Informal talk (4)
Attacker (9)
Finish (3)
Processed vegetables (5,4)
Eviction from lands (9)
Plants growing along the
ground (8)
18 Dialect form of against (4)
20 Long historical period (3)
21 Vase; tea vessel (3)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
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14
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puzzles in MindGames?
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J
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce
a completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4276
Futoshiki No 3129
>
Kakuro No 2088
4
17
<
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
4
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
12
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
O
See today?s News section
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30
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Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
14
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
6
10
>
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� PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3284
� PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7600
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
Today?s game shows the favourite
from the FIDE World Chess
Candidates tournament in Berlin,
currently in progress, succumbing
to one of his main rivals for qualification to the world championship, set for London in November. The notes are based on those
in the new book First Steps: CaroKann Defence (Everyman Chess)
by Andrew Martin.
White: Sergei Karjakin
Black: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
FIDE Grand Prix, Zug 2013
Caro-Kann Defence
1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 Nc3 dxe4 4
Nxe4 Bf5 5 Ng3 Bg6 6 h4 h6 7
Nf3 Nd7 8 h5 Bh7 9 Bd3 Bxd3 10
Qxd3 e6 11 Bd2 Ngf6 12 0-0-0
Be7 13 Kb1 Qb6
It is not clear that the queen is
that useful on b6. Importantly,
she will have to move again for
Black to be able to play ... b7-b5. A
better plan is to play 13 ... Qc7 and
follow up ... 0-0-0.
14 Rhe1 0-0 15 Nf5
This is a great move. It solves
the problem of the knight on g3
and lines up a sacrifice on h6.
15 ... Bb4
16 Nxh6+
Very direct and a bit surprising,
as White is not in any immediate
position to finish Black off.
16 ... gxh6 17 c3 Ba3 18 Bc1 Rfe8
19 g4
This is the real point of the sacrifice made several moves ago and
the idea that elevates the whole
plan with 16 Nxh6+. White wants
to open the g-file and get the
rooks into the game.
19 ... Nh7 20 c4 Bf8 21 g5 hxg5 22
Nxg5 Nxg5 23 Bxg5 Kh8 24 Rg1
Karjakin has wasted no time at
all and has built up a massive
attack. Note that Black?s queen on
b6 is doing precisely nothing.
24 ... Qc7 25 Qf3 f6 26 Bf4
Not 26 Bxf6+, when Black would
survive after 26 ... Nxf6 27 Qxf6+
Bg7 28 Qg5 Qf7.
26 ... Bd6 27 Qg3 Nc5
Mamedyarov cannot face 27 ...
Rg8 28 Bxd6 Rxg3 29 Bxc7 Rxg1
30 Rxg1 Kh7, although Black can
play on for a while here.
28 Bxd6 Qh7+ 29 Ka1 Ne4 30
Qh4 Rg8 31 f3 Ng5
31 ... Nxd6 loses to 32 Qxf6+
Rg7 33 h6.
32 Qf4 Qf5 33 Qxf5 exf5 34 Be7
Nxf3 35 Rgf1 Rg3 36 d5 cxd5 37
cxd5 Kg7 38 Rd3 Kf7 39 Bd6
Nh2 40 Bxg3 Black resigns
After 40 ... Nxf1 41 Bf4 the
knight is trapped on f1.
________
醨D D 4kD]
�DnDp0 ]
The FIDE World Chess Candi� 1pDph 0]
dates tournament, to decide who
轉 D DNDP]
will play Magnus Carlsen for the
world championship, is under way
� g ) D D]
in Berlin. Full results plus all
蹹 DQDND ]
games can be followed in real
跴)PG )PD]
time via the 2seeitlive link on the
贒KDR$ D ]
header of The Times Twitter feed
谅媚牌侨
@times_chess.
________
� D D DkD] Winning Move
�D DpD ]
� D D D D] Black to play. This position is from
Moscow 2018.
轉 DPD D ] Pogonina-Svane,
White is clearly lost but is fishing around,
� DpDPG 0] hoping for a miracle on the basis that the
�) D Dp0r] black rook is slightly stuck (1 ... g2 2 Bh2).
� ) D ) D] How did Black put this to an end?
贒 D D I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
37 x 2 ? 9 � 5 + 3
MEDIUM
212 x 4 + 86
50%
OF IT
? 77
30%
OF IT
? 88 x 8 + 37 x 3
HARDER
281 + 813 x 4
+ 1/2
OF IT
? 644
90%
OF IT
+ 977
? 10 9 5
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??J 9 5 4 3 2
S
?K J 7 6 4 2
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OF IT
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6
3
Yesterday?s answers
accursed, cadre, card, cedar, cred,
crud, crude, crusade, curd, cursed,
dace, dare, dear, druse, ecad, read,
rude, sacred, sard, sauced, scad, scared,
scud, surd, used
Killer Gentle No 5911
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14
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3
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5min
7
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B U
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S
A S
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CR
N K
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E C
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HO
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K E
S
T H
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P E
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U S
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andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
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20
19
14
16
9
22
10
10
8
16
16
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
= 23 the numbers
x
+
+
= 34
-
1
x
x
x
=
41
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
We?ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
x
x
= 27
=
3
=
84
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
5
6
9
7
4
1
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2
8
1
8
7
9
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1
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E
P
L
U
M
M
E
T
T
L
T
O
N
F
A
Z
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D
L
S
R I V AC
N
N
P S E T
E
I
O T HBA
O
I RAD E
U
Y
OND
U
D
H
OO L OG
W B
I NGO
Set Square 2090
7
5
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2
1
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3
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1
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2
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6
P T
R
S Y
S
I T
5 1
3 2 6
8
4 6 9
2 1 5
1 3
2 3
6 4 1
9 8
7 9
E R
I
E D
D
A L
E
E D
-
7
9 5
4
2
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6 7
4 9
1 8
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2
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1
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6 7
9
8
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8
Train Tracks 355
1
Quintagram
1 Pop
2 Iowa
3 Gimmick
4 Endanger
5 Don
Bradman
3
1
4
6
4
2
5
3
2
5
2
5
2
+
1
6
1 8
6 9
5 7
5
1
1
2
4 2
3
A
6
1
5
C
A
L
L
T
O
G
U
E
M
X
E
O
A
S
T
D
A
C
D
S
S
2
L
R
T
I
S
M
Q
5
4
1 < 2
5
?
1
4
2
1
5 > 4
3
KenKen 4275
4 5
Y
T
U
I
L
T
6
2
2
2
2
10 5
4
2
2
Suko 2185
Word watch
Brain Trainer
Dimpsy (c)
Twilight
(Southwest
dialect)
Dimidiate (b)
Divided in halves
Dimpsey (a) On
Dartmoor, a
low cloud with
fine rain
1 < 3
2
3
O
U
E
2 < 3
?
4
5
5
E
I
Futoshiki 3128
3 > 1
?
4
3
Cell Blocks 3166
Lexica 4176
U
Easy 4
Medium 807
Harder 3,341
Chess
Killer 5910
8
1
4
6
5
9
7
2
3
Kakuro 2087
Y
S L E
E
E
X
AU T OP
R
T
O
L L
QU
Y
A
N
G L I D
E
K
NWA N T
Z
L
H
Y
I D E
M N
F
E J E C T
B
Killer 5909
16
Enter each of
+
x
T A T
O
A
R I F
T
F
OW E
I
T
S E A
E
S T E
H Q
E F U
L
I
L I P
Sudoku 9729
8
x
Lexica 4175
Killer Tough No 5912
E
Only an opening diamond lead
would defeat 7NT ? breaking up
the communication for the
squeeze. You can hardly blame
West for failing to find the diamond lead. In other words, 7NT by
South cannot be beaten.
5
Codeword 3283
H E S I
O C
L A R E
R
P
L D
T R
I
A B A C K
L
F A
MA
G
L
GR A T
E
I
A D E R
Sudoku 9727
10
8
Quick Cryptic 1047
4
7
11
Contract: 7NT, Opening Lead: ? 10
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
Solutions
Sudoku 9728
1?
Pass
1?
Pass
2NT(1) Pass
3?
Pass
4?
Pass
5?(2) Pass
5?(2) Pass
5NT(3) Pass
7?
Dbl(4)
7NT(5) End
(1) 18-19 in the modern style (it?s so
unwieldy to jump to 3NT with a balanced 19).
(2) Cue bid, showing first-round control
(usually the ace, maybe ? as in 5? ? a void).
(3) With partner having cue bid the ace of
diamonds, all North needs opposite is
? AQx. His 5NT bid is the grand slam force,
asking for two of the three top trump honours for Seven.
(4) Lightner double, asking for an unusual
opening lead. West is ruffing diamonds.
(5) Guessing his fate (7? beaten on a diamond ruff), North, hoping partner holds the
ace of clubs, runs to 7NT. (This raises the
interesting thought that West could make a
bluff double of 7? to frighten North out of
a making 7? into a failing 7NT.)
6
3
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 12 words, average;
17, good; 23, very good; 30, excellent
8
?3
?K 10 7 4
?J 10 9 6 3
?K 10 6
4 2
2
4
Set Square No 2091
Advanced
N
SQUARE
IT
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
Pairs
3/
4
Polygon
13
Bridge Andrew Robson
Alan Oddie from Bedfordshire
reports this fascinating grand slam
from the Porthcawl Pairs. Of the
two grand slam contracts under
consideration, 7? and 7NT, 7? is
superior (looking at North-South?s
26 cards), for you can survive a 4-1
diamond split if trumps split 2-2
(or 3-1 with the defender with the
three spades holding four diamonds). After two rounds of
trumps, you can play four rounds
of diamonds (including the crucial
ruff).
However, both 7? and 7NT
seem wrecked by the 5-0 diamond
split. 7? (doubled), declared by
North, would undoubtedly have
failed at the first hurdle with East
leading the jack of diamonds and
West ruffing (indeed it would go
down even if West forgot to ruff).
There are only 11 winners in
7NT ? but watch East fall victim
to a triple (progressive) squeeze.
You win West?s spade lead and play
all six spades. East discards two
hearts, a club and a diamond but
has no good discard on dummy?s
last spade. To keep four diamonds,
he must bare a king ? say he
chooses clubs.
You cash the ace of hearts, cross
to the ace of diamonds and cash
the ace of clubs. When East?s king
falls, you continue with the promoted queen of clubs.
East is now squeezed between
the king of hearts and the jackten-nine of diamonds. Away goes
the king of hearts to keep the diamond guard but you cash the promoted queen of hearts and lead to
the king-queen of diamonds.
Grand slam made.
EASY
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Caro-Kann
Cell Blocks No 3167
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
1 ... Rh1+! 2 Kxh1
gxf2 and Black
promotes and
then mates
Quiz
1 Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary 2 Modus operandi
3 Spitting Image 4 Sulphur 5 United Nations 6 The
Princess Bride 7 Nissan 8 As You Like It by Shakespeare
9 Michelangelo 10 Sam Cooke 11 Binturong (Arctictis
binturong). The other is the kinkajou 12 Philippines
13 Patrice Leconte 14 Henri Leconte 15 Lychee or
litchi (Litchi chinensis)
15.03.18
MindGames
Mild No 9730
Fill the grid so that every
column, every row and
every 3x3 box contains
the digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
Josephine
Balmer
Dimpsy
a Unreliable
b A petticoat
c Twilight
Dimidiate
a To have couples
counselling
b Divided in halves
c To belittle
Dimpsey
a Fine rain
b A carriage
c A smartly-dressed man
Answers on page 15
Fiendish No 9731
8
1
5 8
2 9
7
6
3 5 8 2 7
9
3
4 7
8
6 9
3
2
4 9
1
3 1
7
5
9
Super fiendish No 9732
6 9 4
2
7
2
5
2
3
3 8
9
1
4
3
6
7
5 2
5
8
9
8 4
5
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight to receive four clues for any of today?s
puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
The Times Daily Quiz Olav Bjortomt
Suko No 2185
GETTY IMAGES
1 Which American
federal prison, known
as ?The Rock?, operated
from 1934 to 1963?
11 Also called the
bearcat, which animal
is one of only two in
the order Carnivora
with a prehensile tail?
2 Often shortened to MO,
which Latin phrase means
?method of operating??
3 Which ITV puppet
show had a 1986 No 1
with The Chicken Song?
12 Malacanang Palace
is the official residence
of which Asian
country?s president?
The Forest of Arden
based on which play?
13 Which French
filmmaker directed
Monsieur Hire (1989), The
Hairdresser?s Husband
(1990) and Ridicule (1996)?
9 Which artist designed
the Laurentian Library,
part of the Basilica of
San Lorenzo, Florence?
14 Yannick Noah and
which fellow Frenchman
won the French Open
men?s doubles title in 1984?
10 Which ?King of Soul?
was aged 19 when he
joined the gospel group,
the Soul Stirrers, in 1950?
15 Which tree of the
soapberry family produces
the pictured fruit?
Answers on page 15
15
4 In the Bible, which
nonmetallic element is
known as brimstone?
and High Adventure ?
abridged by William
Goldman??
5 In 1946, the
Norwegian politician
Trygve Lie became
which organisation?s
first secretary-general?
7 Nismo is the tuning
and performance
division of which
Japanese carmaker?
6 Which novel is ?S
Morgenstern?s Classic
Tale of True Love
8 Albert Pinkham Ryder
depicted Rosalind and
Celia in the painting
Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the
spaces so that the number in each
circle is equal to the sum of the four
surrounding spaces, and each colour
total is correct
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1048 by Pedro
1
2
3
4
8
9
11
12
5
14
15
20
22
7
10
13
17
6
16
18
19
21
2 6 8
9
9
3
8
9 6
3
4 5
9
2 3
1
6 5
8
7
3
4
2 9 5
5
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
Across
1 Say no to junk (6)
4 Neckwear twisted after
suppressing a disturbance (6)
8 Dif?cult individual to wake?
Not entirely (7)
10 Rubbish used to be placed next
to note (5)
11 Strip to highlight one?s naked
glory, primarily (5)
12 Me, a Lord, excited in peer?s
estate (7)
13 Fool is amusing or funny (9)
17 Astronomical phenomenon
in bits of ?lm shown in middle
of week (7)
19 Mere husband taken in by
prophet (5)
20 Failure, involving new
argument (3-2)
21 Security is regressive in
storehouse (7)
22 Ship entering sound exhibiting
dif?culty (6)
23 Larder with unknown level (6)
Down
1 Marsupials circling stone to
?nd places to rest (6)
2 Deafen sailors at sea in North
Atlantic location (6,7)
3 Firearm that?s initially carried
by Japanese VIP (7)
5 Apparently argumentative
boatman? (5)
6 Princesses had unusual source
of funds (4,9)
7 Erotic extremes in story about
sporty group (6)
9 Lead that woman with a
daughter to eat fruit (9)
14 Stop him dancing in part of
rock arena (4,3)
15 Expensive getting only half of
this in shortage (6)
16 Fairly unimportant to bridge
river (6)
18 Review body, perhaps, to
criticise closures of theatre and
hospital (5)
23
Yesterday?s solution on page 15
2
e Old Curiosity Shop
2.45 Perilous Question: The Drama of the
Great Reform Bill 1832 3.00 The Raj Quartet
4.00 It?s Your Round 4.30 The Inimitable
Jeeves 5.00 Double Income, No Kids Yet
5.30 The Hitchhiker?s Guide to the Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase 6.00 Pattern Recognition
6.30 Great Lives 7.00 Marriage Lines. Baby
Helen is annoying Kate and George?s
neighbours 7.30 The Goon Show. Comedy
with Spike Milligan 8.00 Sherlock Holmes
with Carleton Hobbs. The Illustrious Client by
Arthur Conan Doyle 8.30 In Search of
Originality. Ian Peacock explores whether it
is possible to create something truly unique
9.00 Five Stories by Penelope Fitzgerald.
Read by Nicholas Farrell 9.15 Behind Closed
Doors. By Clara Glynn 10.00 Comedy Club:
The Hitchhiker?s Guide to the Galaxy:
Hexagonal Phase. Dirk Maggs? adaptation of
Eoin Colfer?s novel And Another Thing
10.30 Newsjack. Comedy sketches 11.00
Masala FM. Comedy with Meera Syal
11.30 The Hudson and Pepperdine Show.
Mel turns up with a baby. From 2004
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Chloe Tilley 1.00pm The
Cheltenham Festival. Commentary on day
three 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport
7.30 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Rugby. A look ahead
to this weekend?s action 8.30 5 Live Sport.
OJ Borg previews the UFC?s visit to London
9.30 At Home with Colin Murray 10.00
Question Time Extra Time 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ally McCoist 10.00 Jim White, Ray
Parlour and Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee
and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Tom Ravenscroft 6.00 Tom
Ravenscroft?s Roundtable 7.00 Vic Galloway.
Sitting in for Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe
12.00 6 Music Recommends with Steve
Lamacq 1.00am The Radiohead Story 2.00
Higher and Higher: The Life and Soul of
Jackie Wilson 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Aled Jones 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. The music of the Royal
Concertgebouw Orchestra. Wagner (Ride of
the Valkyres); Beethoven (Symphony No 2 in
D, Op 36); Strauss (Serenade in E-?at);
Dvorak (Piano Concerto in G minor, Op 33)
Ravel (Rapsodie Espagnole) 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
11
1G T
artsfirst night
CHRISTIE GOODWIN/REDFERNS/GETTY IMAGES
hat Kylie Minogue is lovely
is an axiom of pop, and
nothing that happened
during this packed, intimate
show dispelled it. The band
played, the fans went berserk and
Minogue was, well, lovely. Strip away
the twinkly magnetism and waves of
goodwill, though, and what was
underneath? Minogue?s voice and the
songs, most of which were from her
forthcoming album, Golden, were
often a bit ho-hum. The suspicion
remains that she is a fabulous
entertainer, but a slightly mediocre
musician. That may matter less when
she?s playing arenas, as she will in the
autumn. In the balconied confines of
the Caf� de Paris, however, her
limitations were sometimes exposed.
Golden was recorded largely in
Nashville and many of the songs that
Minogue introduced here had a
country swing. If it was a shock to
hear her veering away from her
signature dance-pop, especially in one
of London?s most famous nightclubs,
her amiability smoothed over the
cracks on the cantering country pop
of Shelby 68, an ode to one of her first
cars in Melbourne. Often, though, her
voice was ineffectual, tinny on Golden
and tiny on One Last Kiss. Much of the
new material was forgettable too;
Music?s Too Sad was the beigest of
ballads, while Raining Glitter sounded
like an offcut from one of Madonna?s
lesser albums.
Minogue?s vim, though, was
undimmed. ?This might be the
smallest stage we?ve ever performed
on,? she said, flashing one of her
scorching smiles. She?s 49, but could
pass for 15 years younger, and she
certainly looked the part of a hoedown
queen ? double denim, big hair,
twinkling rhinestones. You wonder
whether the country makeover is
more about the clothes than the
music; it?s certainly not as committed
as Justin Timberlake?s recent
reinvention as a grizzled outdoorsman.
When she led the crowd in a rendition
of the country standard Islands in the
Stream it was fun, but basically a step
above mass karaoke.
Her voice got richer as the show
went on and the last songs were
rousing: a singalong take on All the
Lovers from 2010, a featherlight
version of an even older one, Hand on
Your Heart, and the punchy new
single, Dancing, delivered from a stool.
Yet it was hard to shake the impression
that Minogue was functioning more as
a charismatic cheerleader than a
compelling artist. Sometimes being
lovely isn?t quite enough.
UK tour starts at the Metro Radio
Arena, Newcastle, on Sept 18
Farquhar?s Restoration comedy
The Recruiting Officer in Australia
in 1789, the play is a brilliant
deconstruction of hierarchy, morality
and the human value of art. A richly
textured ensemble piece, here it looks
deft and elegant when one actor
embodies a character physically, while
another supplies the speech. The
scrolling captions give the unfolding
action an enhanced Brechtian flavour.
And the signing, woven into scenes,
not only has an almost commedia
dell?arte grace and
expressiveness, but
adds layers of nuance and colour.
There?s a sense, often, that groups
of convicts are eavesdropping on
the fringes of their oppressors?
interactions, sharing the information
they glean, quietly mocking or secretly
plotting escape or subversion.
Admittedly, there is some sacrifice
of pace. Yet there?s plenty of piercing
loveliness, pitch-black gallows humour
and sheer ribaldry to compensate. Tim
Pritchett as Ralph, the lieutenant with
directorial ambitions, is hilariously
tormented by his motley troupe of
players, among them
Pop
Anderson .Paak
O2 Academy, SW9
A
{{{{(
nderson .Paak is a showstealer through and
through. The 32-year-old
Californian is spearheading
the latest wave of
sumptuous Los Angeles neo-soul, but
only a few years ago he was homeless
and working on a cannabis farm
with his second wife and child. He
outshone Kendrick Lamar and Snoop
Dogg in co-writing six standout tracks
for Dr Dre?s lauded 2015 comeback,
Compton, and soon became a prot間�
to the godfather of West Coast rap.
?This man right here is destined to
be a superstar,? Dre declared during a
brief cameo on the Academy stage,
performing his seminal The Next
Episode. It proved all too much
for the delirious, 5,000-strong crowd.
And .Paak was in no mood to pacify
passions. He fizzed and crackled as
if making up for lost time during
a fleeting set. It was as if David
Attenborough were describing a hyena
in mating season as .Paak hopped,
humped and crawled about the stage
during the hip-thumping Come Down.
An eclectic blend of genres
including Sixties funk, rap, jazz,
Seventies soul and Nineties hip-hop
was on show, and there was even the
odd prog-rock solo from the backing
band, the Free Nationals. Glowed Up,
.Paak?s electronic banger with the
Canadian producer Kaytranada, was
mixed with R Kelly?s Ignition to bizarre
but thoroughly enjoyable effect. The
pace changed as .Paak, who began
playing drums at church aged 11, took
to percussion for The Bird, a twinkling
highlight about an alcoholic father and
a gambling Korean mother told
through husky half-singing.
It?s this brash yet introspective
quality that sets .Paak?s Californian
hedonism apart ? there is substance
behind the sun. Two Grammy
nominations for 2016?s Malibu, his
second album, confirmed that talent.
And his wild, orange jumpsuit-clad
braggadocio made up for the rare bits
of weaker material. The audience
bayed for more.
Peter Yeung
Theatre
Our Country?s
Good
Nottingham
Playhouse
{{{{(
Kylie Minogue, a fabulous entertainer, but a mediocre musician
Vim without
the volume
Playing a gig this intimate exposed the
singer?s vocal shortcomings and that
of her new material, says Ed Potton
Pop
Kylie Minogue
Caf� de Paris, W1
{{(((
W
ho gets to speak, and
who gets listened
to, is a key theme
in Timberlake
Wertenbaker?s 1988
modern classic. So her drama acquires
fresh force when it?s delivered in
voices that are infrequently heard
on our stages or, actually, almost
anywhere in public life.
Directed by Fiona Buffini, this
is the third production by Ramps
on the Moon, the integrated D/deaf
and disabled theatre consortium.
Incorporating British Sign Language
and captions, it is illuminating,
sensitive and current. And, with
its intertwining of verbal
and visual language, it
has a poeticism that is
stirring and at times
almost hypnotic.
Based on the true
story of a group of
British officers
and transported
convicts who
staged George
T
Concert
Maurizio Pollini
Royal Festival Hall
T
{{{{{
here have been times in
Maurizio Pollini recitals
when it has been easy
enough to gauge what the
veteran pianist has been
thinking, but difficult to know what he
was feeling. Inscrutable, that?s the
word. Or, occasionally, icy. None of
that remoteness, though, was
displayed in this uplifting recital. The
older Pollini grows (he?s 76), the more
he seems to recapture the youthful joy
of playing the piano, communing with
the great masters ? sometimes,
indeed, singing along with them in
muffled snatches of vocalise.
The piano was his usual touring
model, a Steinway-Fabbrini, richly
endowed with rainbow colours; the
masters were Schumann and Chopin.
Schumann?s familiar Arabeske,
sounding limpidly beautiful, slightly
questioning and delicately etched with
fluctuating dynamics and speeds,
started us off on a high note. A slight
dip followed with Pollini?s treatment
of one of Schumann?s oddments, the
B minor Allegro ? tempestuous
enough, although a tad impersonal ?
but from then on nothing wavered.
With the Concert sans orchestre, the
three-movement version of
Schumann?s Third Piano Sonata,
written in anguished separation from
Clara Wieck, the love of his life, the
central andantino throbbed with
nobility as well as pain. Before and
after, notes cascaded and roared with
enough heat to generate a percussive
stamp from Pollini?s right foot.
Chopin swept through the second
half, initially in a delicate key with
the silvery, hesitant beauties of the
F minor Nocturne, Op 55, which was
not so much played as stroked. The
gears changed for his mighty B minor
Sonata, its rapid fingerwork tossed off
with a propulsive power and glitter.
Three generous encores followed,
dominated by a commanding and
passionate C sharp minor Scherzo.
That done, Pollini still had energy left
for smiling warmly and signing CDs.
Amazing.
Geoff Brown
Alex Nowak as the stagestruck,
Garrick-fixated former pickpocket
Sideway, and Fifi Garfield?s mutinous
Dabby, who, like many actresses
nowadays, quite reasonably wants
to play the juicy role of a rakish
sergeant instead of the bit part of
?silly milkmaid?. Gbemisola Ikumelo
as a woman sentenced to hang for
stealing food is ferociously tough and
heartbreakingly wistful. Milton Lopes
is a compelling presence as a nameless
Aboriginal Australian, watching as his
country is appropriated.
Gender, race, class ? 30 years since
Wertenbaker?s play first appeared, the
inequalities she interrogates
remain an urgent part of
Britain?s sociopolitical
conversation. This
production tackles
them
with acuity
t
and
a in its own
eloquent language.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 0115 941
9419 to March 24,
touring to June 2
12
1G T
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Four Days That
Shook Britain
ITV, 9pm
Last year
Britain was
hit by four
terrorist
attacks in quick
succession ? car and
knife atrocities at
Westminster Bridge
7PM
Early
Top
pick
(March 22) and London
Bridge (June 3); a
suicide bombing at a
concert in Manchester
(May 22); and a car
attack outside Finsbury
Park Mosque, north
London (June 19). With
the first anniversary of
the Westminster attack
approaching, the Bafta
award-winning Minnow
Films (7/7: One Day in
London; Damilola: Our
Loved Boy) has made
8PM
9PM
an endurance athlete,
was in the Westminster
courtyard when Khalid
Masood attacked the
Houses of Parliament
and stabbed PC Keith
Palmer to death. ?It
was so much to take in,
because it didn?t seem
real,? he says. Doorman
Ozzie Gandaa describes
Borough Market after
the attack on London
Bridge: ?There were
people running
everywhere. You could
just see panic and fear
in people?s eyes.? And
the imam Mohammed
Mahmoud had just
finished prayers at the
mosque in Finsbury
Park when Darren
Osborne ploughed
a van into Muslims.
?They are innocent
men and women
who did nothing to
deserve this attack,?
Mahmoud says.
BBC Two, 8pm
It?s a great night for
Reithian values on
the BBC, with Simon
Schama?s great art
history lecture (BBC
Two, 9pm) and another
edifying railway
journey with Michael
Portillo. The latter is
on the route of the
Transcaucasus Railway,
built by the time of his
1913 Bradshaw?s to haul
oil from the landlocked
Caspian Sea at Baku
to the Black Sea at
Batumi. He journeys in
reverse, tasting tea in
Ozurgeti, taking in the
early years of Joseph
Stalin (born in Georgia)
and attending a
traditional Georgian
wedding in Tbilisi,
respectfully muting his
usually garish clothing.
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Holding Back the Years. Fiona
Phillips investigates the loneliness epidemic in Britain
(AD) 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in
Camden, Bootle and North Lanarkshire (AD) 11.00 The
Sheriffs Are Coming. A car dealer refuses to pay a
motorist back for a car that broke down after three days
11.45 Caught Red Handed. A house burglar who met his
match at the foot of the stairs (r) (AD) 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. From Elsecar Heritage Centre, South Yorkshire (r)
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Karen meets a cowboy
searching for the man who shot his father (AD) 2.15 A
Place to Call Home. Elizabeth and Douglas disagree over
how to raise David 3.05 Escape to the Country. A couple
search for a family home with land in Wiltshire (AD) 3.45
Coast and Country Auctions. A visit to the Bala Autumn
Sale in north Wales 4.30 Flog It! Paul Martin presents
from Norwich Cathedral, where experts Thomas Plant and
Kate Bateman ?nd a religious relic from France and a
Martin Brothers vase (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show
hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at
Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Repair Shop (r) 6.30 Holding Back the Years
(r) (AD) 7.15 The Sheriffs Are Coming (r) 8.00 Sign
Zone: Earth?s Natural Wonders (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria
Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily
Politics 1.00pm Two Tribes (r) 1.30 Yes Chef (r) 2.15
Your Home in Their Hands. Amateur interior designers
come to the rescue of a family facing a style stalemate,
and a couple who fear turning a masculine chapel into a
feminine abode (r) (AD) 3.15 Planet Earth. David
Attenborough looks at subterranean life, from cave
angel?sh in Thailand to ?ve million bats whose droppings
support an entire ecosystem in a chamber in Borneo (r)
(AD) 4.15 Into the Wild with Gordon Buchanan. The
?lm-maker and Dermot O?Leary visit the Western Isles,
where they encounter a stag, visit a shag colony and
search for seals and golden eagles (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your
Money Where Your Mouth Is. Paul Hayes and John
Cameron search for bargains at Ardingly Antiques Fair,
where John hopes to get lucky with a wishing well and a
painting takes Paul on a Shakespearean journey 6.00
Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine (r) 6.30 The
Repair Shop. A music box damaged during the Blitz
6.00am Good Morning Britain. The Grammy-winning
singer Michael McDonald talks about US politics, his
recent revival with Solange and his new album and tour
8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs and fashion
news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip 9.25
The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This
Morning. Phillip Scho?eld and Holly Willoughby present
chat and lifestyle features, including a look at the stories
making the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the
kitchen 12.30pm ITV News; Weather 1.00 Live ITV
Racing: Cheltenham Festival. Ed Chamberlin and Francesca
Cumani present coverage of the third day of the
prestigious festival, including feature race the 3.30 Sun
Bets Stayers? Hurdle Race. Plus, further races at 1.30,
2.10, 2.50 and 4.10. With commentary by Richard Hoiles
4.30 Britain?s Best Walks with Julia Bradbury. Julia heads
to Loch Lomond, a freshwater Scottish loch that crosses
the Highland Boundary Fault and is the largest inland
stretch of water in Great Britain by surface area (r) 5.00
The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as contestants pit
their wits against the Chaser 6.00 Regional News;
Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.15am 3rd Rock from the Sun (r) (AD) 7.05 Everybody
Loves Raymond (r) 8.00 Winter Paralympics Breakfast
9.00 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares
USA (r) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA. A real estate boss
goes undercover in his business (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News
Summary 12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Four cooks in
Hampshire compete (r) 1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers. Items of
interest include a caravan, a luxury houseboat and a
vintage jigsaw puzzle (r) 2.10 Countdown. The motor
racing presenter Suzi Perry joins Susie Dent in Dictionary
Corner 3.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away. A couple
look at properties in Great Yarmouth and the Costa Blanca
(r) 4.00 A New Life in the Sun. A couple leave Wales to
run a bar in southern Spain 5.00 Four in a Bed. The
guests judge Alan and Denise, owners of Troy House in
Painswick (r) 5.30 Extreme Cake Makers. A beach scene
complete with jelly sea, crispy marshmallow rocks and
dozens of hand-carved bathers, and a 2x3ft portrait of a
birthday girl using icing and edible inks (r) 6.00 The
Simpsons. Marge tries to protect Maggie from the
dangers of children?s television (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks.
Nancy confronts Darren about their problems (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can?t
Pay? We?ll Take It Away. Max and Steve head to London
to try to recover more than �,000 in court costs. Aron
and Cona chase almost �000 owed after a debtor failed
to repay a loan to her ex-partner (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. Carrie tells
the story of her diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder,
while Sue describes how she feared she was developing
Parkinson?s disease before she sought help (r) (AD) 1.10
Access. Showbiz news and gossip 1.15 Home and Away
(AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.20 NCIS: Naval Killer.
Ducky is attacked by a knife-wielding woman who accuses
him of war crimes, alleging he tortured and killed her
brother in Afghanistan in the early 1980s. Starring David
McCallum (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: Fatal Defense (15,
TVM, 2017) A woman signs up for self-defence classes.
However, her handsome instructor soon develops a
frightening obsession with her. Thriller with Ashley Scott
and David Cade 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Susan
is pleased when Karl takes Izzy to task over her lack of
parenting skills (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Maggie is
sent to have a biopsy (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 Saving Lives at Sea A climber falls
in a remote cave on the Gower
Peninsula, so the Mumbles crew are
called in, and in Portreath, lifeguards
battle to save a teenager who is
determined to surf (7/12) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale A dif?cult day lies ahead
for both Paddy and Chas (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.30 Undercover: Rough Sleeper ?
Tonight Adam Holloway goes
undercover to investigate the rise of
homelessness on Britain?s streets
7.30 Winter Paralympics Today A
round-up of action from day six in
Pyeongchang, South Korea (SL)
7.00 The Secret Life of Kittens
Concluding the documentary following
kittens from birth to 12 months old,
revealing how the sights, smells and
sounds they experience during this
period shape their unique personalities.
Last in the series (r)
8.00 MasterChef Seven more amateur
cooks create a dish from a selection of
poussin, beef cheeks, pork mince,
mackerel and tiger prawns, before four
of them go on to cook two courses for
the 2012 and 2006 champions (AD)
8.00 Great Continental Railway
Journeys Michael Portillo takes in
Georgia and Azerbaijan as he journeys
through the former Russian empire,
including visits to a tea plantation and
a museum dedicated to Joseph Stalin.
See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Debbie ?nds herself
backed into a corner (AD)
8.00 Location, Location, Location New
series. Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer
search York for ?rst-time buyers
expecting their ?rst child and a
Yorkshire couple moving from London
to be near their family
8.00 Bargain-Loving Brits in the Sun
The cabaret star Mark ?lms a video to
play as part of his show, the sisters
Vina and Nilam launch a business
selling spice kits and the tattoo artists
Blane and Mark need customers (6/8)
9.00 Not Going Out Lucy arranges a
special surprise for Lee?s birthday.
See Viewing Guide (2/7)
9.00 Civilisations Simon Schama explores
the artistic depiction of nature. He
discovers that landscape painting is
seldom a straightforward description
of observed nature but rather a
projection of dreams and idylls.
See Viewing Guide (3/9) (AD)
9.00 Four Days That Shook Britain
Documentary telling the story of
people who were directly affected by
the wave of terror attacks that shook
Britain across a four-month period in
2017. See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 My Baby?s Life: Who Decides?
Observational documentary about
children on life support, and the
dif?cult decisions facing their parents
and the doctors who care for them.
See Viewing Guide (1/2) (AD)
9.00 Do the Right Thing with Eamonn
& Ruth Eamonn Holmes and Ruth
Langsford present the consumer show,
with reports on house ?res caused by
white goods and conmen targeting
people using their phones (2/4)
10.00 The Job Interview Aston Martin
recruits a group leader, a position that
involves overseeing production of the
company?s luxury cars, and the
Swansea tour operator Cruise Nation
looks for a salesperson (5/6)
10.00 Hunted and Confronted: Cowboys,
Crooks and Chancers Paul Connolly
lifts the lid on a gang of cold-calling
criminals using a roo?ng scam to steal
thousands, and also goes undercover to
investigate a letting agency (3/4)
11.00 Winter Paralympics Highlights
Clare Balding and Jonnie Peacock
review the best of the action from day
six in Pyeongchang, which included
alpine skiing and wheelchair curling
11.05 Police Interceptors Liam and his dog
Vader bring down a ?eeing suspect,
while Kev and Spike rescue a man
trapped in an overturned car after a
spectacular crash (r)
12.15am-6.00 Live Winter Paralympics Day seven
from Pyeongchang, which features the banked slalom
snowboarding event at Jeongseon Alpine Centre, in which
Great Britain will hope Owen Pick, Ben Moore and James
Barnes-Miller are in medal contention, while the
wheelchair curling semi-?nals are due to commence
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am Cowboy Builders. Laura
Hamilton and Dan Lobb help a Worcester couple (r) 4.00
World?s Most Pampered Pets. Lizards treated as house
guests and ducks dressed for the catwalk (r) (SL) 4.45
House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 House Busters. Life-enhancing
changes (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and
Angellica Bell present the magazine
9.30 Still Game A spooky new undertaker
moves into town (2/6) (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 MOTD: The Premier League Show
Gabby Logan presents the magazine
featuring news and highlights
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Newsnight With Emily Maitlis
8.30 The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska
Captain Tuvo tries to give the
passengers a front-row view of the
scenery. Last in the series (AD)
10.30 ITV News at Ten
10.45 Question Time Topical debate from
Dover, chaired by David Dimbleby
11.00 Regional News
11PM
Late
Great Continental
Railway Journeys
BBC One
7.30 EastEnders Keanu is furious to learn
Karen spent the night with Mitch (AD)
10PM
this harrowing
90-minute film that
tells the personal
stories of the people
who were caught up in
the atrocities. ?I don?t
remember hearing any
bang,? recalls Lucy
Jarvis, who was injured
in the Manchester
bombing. ?Suddenly I
was on the floor and
couldn?t see properly . . .
I felt like I wanted to
sleep.? John McAvoy,
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days? political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Top Gear Matt LeBlanc and Chris
Harris take second-hand sports cars
across the Japanese island of Honshu,
while Rory Reid explores Tokyo?s
weirdest car-based subculture (3/6) (r)
11.15 Regional Programme
12.15am Sign Zone: MasterChef The week?s best
amateurs are challenged by critic William Sitwell to make
an exceptional dessert showcasing either alcohol or spices
(r) (AD, SL) 12.45-1.45 Nigel Slater?s Middle East. The
writer visits Turkey, starting in Istanbul, then heading to
the rural heartlands of Central Anatolia (r) (AD, SL)
12.45am Lethal Weapon Riggs and Murtaugh are
drawn into a fatal world of conspiracy theories.
Meanwhile, Riggs? relationship with Molly evolves (r)
(AD) 1.30 Jackpot247. Interactive gaming 3.00
Undercover: Rough Sleeper ? Tonight (r) 3.25 ITV
Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
11.45 Uefa Europa League Highlights
Action from the last-16 second-leg
matches, including Arsenal v AC Milan
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Not Going Out
BBC One, 9pm
In the worst on-screen
birthday celebration
since Cathy Brener?s
11th birthday party
in The Birds, Lucy
celebrates Lee?s special
day by inviting their
family and friends to
join them in an Escape
Room. For those
unfamiliar with the
concept, you are locked
in a room and can only
get out by solving a
series of puzzles and
riddles. ?This is the
worst lock-in ever,? says
Lee?s dad (Bobby Ball).
Frank turns out to be
an aspiring Columbo,
amid all the bickering
and Lee?s rising panic
when he finds himself
padlocked to a ?bomb?.
?Is it a wind-up?? Lee
asks. ?Must be if it?s
ticking,? Toby replies.
Civilisations
BBC Two, 9pm
Even the staunchest
advocate of Kenneth
Clark?s original series
should set aside their
objections to watch
Simon Schama?s
compelling analysis of
one of humankind?s
deepest artistic urges
? to depict nature.
According to Schama,
landscape art is ?rarely
a depiction of the way
the world is, but a
vision of the way we
would like it to be?.
Most importantly, it is a
way ?to understand our
civilisation?. He starts
in 10th-century China
with the scrolls of the
Song dynasty, and his
global journey also
takes in Renaissance
country villas and
the photography of
Ansel Adams.
My Baby?s Life:
Who Decides?
Channel 4, 9pm
Based at Southampton
Children?s Hospital?s
Paediatric Intensive
Care Unit, this two-part
observational
documentary provides
a heartbreaking insight
into the lives of sick
children who can be
kept alive, but probably
never cured. Advances
in medical science?s
ability to prolong life
have huge cost
implications for the
NHS, raising complex
questions about quality
of life. We meet parents
exploring every way
to keep their children
alive, but also the
family of a young girl
with a heart defect
who have taken the
difficult decision to
cease treatment.
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 3.30pm
The Arnold Palmer
Invitational is a
professional golf
tournament on the
PGA Tour. Rory
McIlroy has committed
to playing for the
fourth year running
after narrowly losing
last year, when he
finished two shots
behind Marc Leishman.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) 7.00 RSPCA Animal
Rescue (r) 8.00 Motorway Patrol (r) 9.00 Road
Wars (r) 10.00 Warehouse 13 (r) 11.00 Forever
(r) (AD) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm
Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r)
5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. A disagreement between Oliver and
Dinah puts one of the team in jeopardy
9.00 Carpool Karaoke Special. With guests
Katy Perry and Jennifer Lopez (r) (AD)
10.00 Jamestown. Rumours circulate that
Samuel has risen from his grave (r)
11.00 The Force: Essex. Of?cers deal with a
woman threatening to kill herself (r) (AD)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD)
1.00am Brit Cops: Rapid Response (r) (AD)
2.00 Most Shocking (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(r) 4.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r) (AD) 4.30 It?s Me
or the Dog (r) (AD) 5.00 Futurama (r)
6.00am Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 Richard E
Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 9.00 The West
Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) 1.00pm Without a
Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The
West Wing (r) 5.00 House (r) (AD)
6.00 House. The doctor becomes intrigued by an
artist with distorted vision (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. The case of
a woman who was raped disturbs Sara (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. An incident at a church tests
Frank?s diplomatic skills (r) (AD)
9.00 Britannia. Rome shows Britannia how it
conducts business. Last in the series (9/9) (AD)
10.00 Our Cartoon President. The President is
determined to outdo Canada?s Justin Trudeau
10.35 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. A
satirical look at news and pop culture (r)
11.10 Divorce. Frances ?nds herself inspired by
an unknown artist (3/8) (r)
11.45 Britannia (9/9) (r) (AD)
12.45am Billions (r) (AD) 1.55 Blue Bloods (r)
2.55 Girls (r) (AD) 4.05 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 The Real A&E
(r) (AD) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00 Cold
Case (r) 11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia
12.00 Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 Border Security:
Canada?s Front Line (r) (AD) 5.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 The Real A&E (9/10) (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E (10/10) (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Conviction. The lawyers take on the case of
a woman jailed for killing an athlete (r) (AD)
10.00 Scandal (AD)
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
3.00 Border Security: Canada?s Front Line (r)
(AD) 4.00 Nothing to Declare (r) 5.00 The
Biggest Loser: Australia (r)
6.00am Matilda & Me (AD) 7.00 Mariinsky
Ballet: Cinderella 9.00 Tales of the Unexpected
9.30 Master of Photography (AD) 10.30 Video
Killed the Radio Star (AD) 11.00 The Seventies
(AD) 12.00 Soundbreaking (AD) 1.00pm
Discovering: Dean Martin (AD) 2.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 2.30 Master of Photography (AD)
3.30 Video Killed the Radio Star (AD) 4.00 The
Seventies (AD) 5.00 Soundbreaking (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Peter Sellers.
7.00 Tarzan: The Man Behind the Legend. A look
at the evolution of the character
8.00 The Eighties. Technological innovations
made during the decade (AD)
9.00 The Ritchie Blackmore Story. Brian May is
among those paying tribute to the guitarist (AD)
11.00 Portrait Artist of the Year 2018
12.00 National Treasures: The Art of Collecting
1.00am The Gardens of Pompeii (AD) 2.00 The
Art of the Joy of Sex (AD) 3.00 Master of
Photography (AD) 4.00 Dag 4.30 Tales of the
Unexpected 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans Bitesize
7.00 Good Morning Sports Fans 7.30 Live ICC
Cricket World Cup Quali?er: West Indies v
Afghanistan. Coverage of the Super Sixes match
from Harare Sports Club in Zimbabwe 3.30pm
Live PGA Tour Golf: The Arnold Palmer
Invitational. The featured groups on the ?rst day
at the Bay Hill Club & Lodge in Orlando, Florida
6.00 Live PGA Tour Golf: The Arnold Palmer
Invitational. Further coverage of the opening day
7.00 Live Premier League Darts. Coverage of the
seventh round of the season, which comes from
the Motorpoint Arena in Nottingham
10.30 Sky Sports News at Ten
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the
day?s main talking points
12.00 Sky Sports News. The day?s talking
points. 2.00am Live ATP Masters Tennis: The
BNP Paribas Open. Coverage from day eight,
which takes place at Indian Wells Tennis Garden
in California, where the reigning champion is
Roger Federer 4.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View. The
week?s political news 11.15 Question Time
12.15am This Week 1.00-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 9.30pm-10.00 The Big
Six Nations Kick Off with Gabby and Gareth
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 Soft
Border Patrol (r) 11.15 MOTD: The Premier
League Show 11.45-12.15 Mock the Week (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00-1.00am First
Minister?s Questions 6.30pm Saving Lives at
Sea (r) (AD) 7.30-8.00 Timeline
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 6.30pm Saving Lives at
Sea (r) (AD) 7.30-8.00 Scrum V Classics (r)
10.00-10.30 Still Game (AD) 11.15 MOTD:
Premier League 11.45-12.45 Top Gear (r)
ITV Anglia
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Anglia Late
Edition. Political issues affecting the region
ITV Border/Tyne Tees
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Around the
House. Political discussion with Paul Brand
ITV Central
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Central Lobby
ITV Granada
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 The Granada
Debate. Political debate with Alison Mackenzie
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1985. Featuring archive
music by Bruce Springsteen, Madonna, Billy
Ocean, Sister Sledge and Marillion (r)
8.00 The Brain: A Secret History. Michael
Mosley explores how the study of abnormal
brain activity has helped reveal the workings of
the organ and meets a woman with alien hand
syndrome. Last in the series (3/3) (r)
9.00 The Ruth Ellis Files: A Very British Crime
Story. A focus on the three weeks leading up to
Ruth Ellis?s execution, including attempts to
save her and her last-minute admission of an
accomplice. Last in the series (3/3)
10.00 Timeshift: Crime & Punishment ? The
Story of Corporal Punishment. The history of
physically imposed discipline (8/9) (r)
11.00 Blues America. Concluding part, looking
at blues music in the postwar period (r)
12.00 Top of the Pops: 1985 (r) 12.30am
Tom Jones at the BBC (r) 1.30 The World?s
Most Photographed (r) 2.00 The High Art of the
Low Countries (r) (SL) 3.00 The Secret Life of
Books: The Mill on the Floss (r) 3.30-4.00
The Beauty of Anatomy (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Couples Come
Dine with Me. Three couples in Manchester (r)
8.00 Baby Daddy (r) 9.00 Melissa & Joey (r)
10.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 11.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 12.00 The
Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory
(r) (AD) 2.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
3.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 My Hotter Half
8.00 The Big Bang Theory. Amy guest stars on
the new Professor Proton show (AD)
8.30 Young Sheldon (AD)
9.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
9.30 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
10.00 Five Star Hotel. Lydia hosts a hen party
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 First Dates (r) (AD) 1.05am Five Star
Hotel (r) 2.10 Tattoo Fixers (r) (AD) 3.00
Timeless (r) 3.45 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
4.30 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) 9.30 A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 11.35 Four in a Bed (r)
2.10pm Come Dine with Me (r) 4.50 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick treats a
border collie for a suspicious lump (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Revisiting Francis and
Karen Shaw, who bought a peel tower in
Yorkshire, discovering that the cost of restoring
it has meant the reality of living there is nothing
like their dream (1/4) (r) (AD)
9.00 The Good Fight. New series. An
unfortunate event brings the ?rm together,
along with the prospect of a new partner (AD)
10.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? A look at
the impact on the emergency services of the
rising number of rough sleepers, with Wiltshire
police?s call handlers dealing with complaints
about the homeless every day (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A man is rushed in with
severe knife wounds (1/8) (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 The Good Fight (r) (AD) 2.05 999: What?s
Your Emergency? (r) (AD) 3.10-3.55 8 Out of
10 Cats Uncut. With Carol Vorderman (r)
11.00am Dakota (PG, 1945) Western with
John Wayne (b/w) 12.40pm Run for Cover
(U, 1955) Western with James Cagney 2.30 12
Angry Men (U, 1957) Legal drama starring
Henry Fonda (b/w) 4.30 The War Wagon (U,
1967) Western starring John Wayne
6.35 We Bought a Zoo (PG, 2011) A
widowed father-of-two takes over ownership of
a struggling zoo, and tries to restore it to its
former glory. Fact-based comedy drama starring
Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson
9.00 RoboCop (12, 2014) A critically injured
police of?cer is rebuilt as a crime-?ghting
cyborg, but struggles to retain free will. Sci-?
thriller remake with Joel Kinnaman (AD)
11.15 I, Frankenstein (12, 2014) The
scientist?s monster is caught up in a war
between supernatural beings who want the
secret of his immortality. Fantasy adventure
with Aaron Eckhart and Bill Nighy (AD)
1.00am-3.00 The Fly (18, 1986) A scientist?s
experiments with teleportation lead to a
terrifying transformation after his body is
genetically fused with a ?y. Horror remake
starring Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals (r)
6.20 Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r)
7.10 Who?s Doing the Dishes? (r) (AD) 7.55
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.20 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 9.25 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.15
The Bachelor (r) 12.05pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.35 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.35 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 4.50 Judge Rinder (r)
5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Children
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viewer-submitted comical mishaps (r)
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8.30 Two and a Half Men. Walden feels being a
billionaire clouds his interaction with women (r)
9.00 FILM: The Hangover Part III (15,
2013) Drinking pals are forced to ?nd a
gangster. Comedy sequel starring Bradley Cooper
11.05 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.35 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.05am Family Guy (r) (AD) 12.30 American
Dad! (r) (AD) 1.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
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Judge Judy (r) 10.20 Inspector Morse (r)
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2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.50 On the
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7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A famous concert
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8.00 Vera. A teenage boy is found dead in a
reservoir near a remote rural town. Vera takes
on the case, and uncovers a web of fractured
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10.00 Unforgotten. A body in a suitcase unites
Cassie and Sunny in another cold case
investigation (1/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 Unforgotten. Cassie and Sunny build a
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and son, before looking back at the original
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12.05am DCI Banks (r) (AD) 2.00 ITV3
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2.10 Quincy ME (r) 3.15 Minder (r) (AD) 4.20
The Saint 5.25 The Avengers (r)
6.35 Storage Wars. Mary looks for love (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. The team examines secret
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7.35 Pawn Stars. A valuable ?rst edition of
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8.00 FILM: On Her Majesty?s Secret
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Blofeld, who is intent on destroying world peace.
Spy adventure starring George Lazenby (AD)
10.55 FILM: Born to Raise Hell (18, 2010)
An Interpol agent swears vengeance on the
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1.00am Minder (r) (AD, SL) 2.00 Bond Girls
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9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
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Summer Wine 1.40 Bread 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London?s Burning (AD) 4.00 New
Tricks (AD) 5.00 Bergerac
6.00 Steptoe and Son. Albert reveals secrets
about his romantic past (b/w)
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Chaos abounds
at a parade held to celebrate a famous battle
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. Lionel abandons
his wife while out on a drive in the hills
8.00 A Place to Call Home. George is asked to
host a Japanese trade delegation
9.00 Lady Chatterley?s Lover. Adaptation of DH
Lawrence?s novel about an aristocratic woman
who embarks on a passionate affair (AD)
11.00 Birds of a Feather. Sharon takes full
advantage of her sister?s hospitality
11.40 The Bill. Hollis and Page arrest a thug
guilty of extorting money from his neighbour
12.40am Ashes to Ashes. Alex has 24 hours to
stop her parents? death 1.40 The White Queen
2.50 Ashes to Ashes 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Who Do You Think
You Are? (AD) 11.00 Medieval Dead 12.00
Time Team 1.00pm Wildest Africa 2.00 Planet
Earth (AD) 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Medieval
Dead 5.00 Royal Murder Mysteries
6.00 Inside Hitler?s Killing Machine. The
establishment of the concentration camps,
revealing how quickly they turned into a tool for
mass murder. Last in the series
7.00 The Day When Hitler Lost the War. How
Hitler?s invasion of Russia led to his defeat
8.00 Nazi Victory: The Post-War Plan. How
Hitler used recreation to promote his ideology,
setting up the world?s largest beach resort (5/6)
9.00 The Two Ronnies. Music by Elkie Brooks
10.00 The Two Ronnies. Vintage comedy
10.50 Blackadder the Third. Edmund falls foul of
Dr Johnson. Guest starring Robbie Coltrane (AD)
11.30 Blackadder the Third. Edmund gets caught
up in the French Revolution (AD)
12.10am Blackadder the Third (AD) 12.50
Mummies Alive 1.50 The Nazis: A Warning from
History (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
ITV London
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 The Late
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As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 The Last Word
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Love Your
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ITV West/Westcountry
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 The
Westcountry Debate. Political stories
ITV Yorkshire
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Last Orders
STV
As ITV except: 1.00pm-4.30 Live Racing on
STV 11.05-11.45 Scotland Tonight 1.30am
Teleshopping 2.30 After Midnight 3.30
Undercover: Rough Sleeper ? Tonight (r)
3.55 ITV Nightscreen 4.35 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 11.15pm-11.45 Britain?s
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BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Pincidh
Dincidh D� (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.34 Bruno
(r) 5.35 Na Floogals (r) 5.45 Srath Sona
(Happy Valley) (r) 5.55 Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.05
Sealgairean Sp騬sail (History Hunters) (r) 6.30
D� a-nis? (What Now?) (r) 7.00 Turas a?
Bhradain (The Salmon?s Journey) (r) 7.30
Speaking Our Language (r) 7.55 Binneas: Na
Trads (r) 8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 E騬pa
(European Current Affairs) 9.00 DIY le Donnie
9.45 Belladrum 2017: Dub Pistols. A set by the
English ska band 10.20 Dhan Uisge (Easdale)
(r) 10.25 Luingean Lannsaireachd (Surgery
Ships) 11.15 Ce騦 bho Perthshire Amber (r)
11.30-12.00 Mach a Seo! (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw (r) 12.00 News 12.05pm Darn
Bach o Hanes (r) (AD) 12.30 Alex Jones: Y Fam
Gymreig (r) 1.30 Sion a Si鈔 (r) 2.00 News
2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News 3.05 Yr Ynys (r)
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Ar Werth (r) 6.30 Rownd a Rownd (AD) 7.00
Heno 7.30 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.00 Gwaith/
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10.30 Hansh 11.00-11.35 Mwy o Sgorio (r)
14
Thursday March 15 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
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Train Tracks No 356
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6
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9
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2
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24
1
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5
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2
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3
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6
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A
12
3
7
1
10
3
9
1
17
4
2
19
19
3
21
10
9
5
R
18
21
19
2
20
11
10
11
2
14
H
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3
6
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20
12
15
16
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B
I
3
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Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
23
6
Across
1 Escapes, avoids (6)
5 Alpine house (6)
8 River of Dresden and
Hamburg (4)
9 Carriageway border (8)
10 Burrowing rodent (6)
12 Unit of length (4)
15 Iron smelters (5,8)
Solution to Crossword 7599
T I ME S
E A
T
A BRE A S
R T
T
S T Y L US
R SQ
B
U
B E E K E E
A U A
C R YWO L
H A
J U J I T S
G T
21
N
UNR
T
SCA
L
UE A
V
P ER
RA
F
Z
L OZ
U
L
X E
M R
A V E L
G L
NDA L
U P
M I SH
E
W
B I E S
N P
ENGE
E A
RROR
16
17
19
21
22
23
Like burnt remains (4)
Obtain by threats (6)
Fish-eating bird (3,5)
Arm bone (4)
Biblical hero (6)
Verse form (6)
Down
2
3
4
5
6
7
11
13
14
Articles of some worth (9)
Colouring substance (3)
Form into layers (8)
Informal talk (4)
Attacker (9)
Finish (3)
Processed vegetables (5,4)
Eviction from lands (9)
Plants growing along the
ground (8)
18 Dialect form of against (4)
20 Long historical period (3)
21 Vase; tea vessel (3)
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J
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce
a completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4276
Futoshiki No 3129
>
Kakuro No 2088
4
17
<
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
4
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
12
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
O
See today?s News section
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>
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30
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Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
14
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
6
10
>
4
28
3
?
3
7
29
<
10
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� PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3284
� PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7600
the times | Thursday March 15 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
Today?s game shows the favourite
from the FIDE World Chess
Candidates tournament in Berlin,
currently in progress, succumbing
to one of his main rivals for qualification to the world championship, set for London in November. The notes are based on those
in the new book First Steps: CaroKann Defence (Everyman Chess)
by Andrew Martin.
White: Sergei Karjakin
Black: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
FIDE Grand Prix, Zug 2013
Caro-Kann Defence
1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 Nc3 dxe4 4
Nxe4 Bf5 5 Ng3 Bg6 6 h4 h6 7
Nf3 Nd7 8 h5 Bh7 9 Bd3 Bxd3 10
Qxd3 e6 11 Bd2 Ngf6 12 0-0-0
Be7 13 Kb1 Qb6
It is not clear that the queen is
that useful on b6. Importantly,
she will have to move again for
Black to be able to play ... b7-b5. A
better plan is to play 13 ... Qc7 and
follow up ... 0-0-0.
14 Rhe1 0-0 15 Nf5
This is a great move. It solves
the problem of the knight on g3
and lines up a sacrifice on h6.
15 ... Bb4
16 Nxh6+
Very direct and a bit surprising,
as White is not in any immediate
position to finish Black off.
16 ... gxh6 17 c3 Ba3 18 Bc1 Rfe8
19 g4
This is the real point of the sacrifice made several moves ago and
the idea that elevates the whole
plan with 16 Nxh6+. White wants
to open the g-file and get the
rooks into the game.
19 ... Nh7 20 c4 Bf8 21 g5 hxg5 22
Nxg5 Nxg5 23 Bxg5 Kh8 24 Rg1
Karjakin has wasted no time at
all and has built up a massive
attack. Note that Black?s queen on
b6 is doing precisely nothing.
24 ... Qc7 25 Qf3 f6 26 Bf4
Not 26 Bxf6+, when Black would
survive after 26 ... Nxf6 27 Qxf6+
Bg7 28 Qg5 Qf7.
26 ... Bd6 27 Qg3 Nc5
Mamedyarov cannot face 27 ...
Rg8 28 Bxd6 Rxg3 29 Bxc7 Rxg1
30 Rxg1 Kh7, although Black can
play on for a while here.
28 Bxd6 Qh7+ 29 Ka1 Ne4 30
Qh4 Rg8 31 f3 Ng5
31 ... Nxd6 loses to 32 Qxf6+
Rg7 33 h6.
32 Qf4 Qf5 33 Qxf5 exf5 34 Be7
Nxf3 35 Rgf1 Rg3 36 d5 cxd5 37
cxd5 Kg7 38 Rd3 Kf7 39 Bd6
Nh2 40 Bxg3 Black resigns
After 40 ... Nxf1 41 Bf4 the
knight is trapped on f1.
________
醨D D 4kD]
�DnDp0 ]
The FIDE World Chess Candi� 1pDph 0]
dates tournament, to decide who
轉 D DNDP]
will play Magnus Carlsen for the
world championship, is under way
� g ) D D]
in Berlin. Full results plus all
蹹 DQDND ]
games can be followed in real
跴)PG )PD]
time via the 2seeitlive link on the
贒KDR$ D ]
header of The Times Twitter feed
谅媚牌侨
@times_chess.
________
� D D DkD] Winning Move
�D DpD ]
� D D D D] Black to play. This position is from
Moscow 2018.
轉 DPD D ] Pogonina-Svane,
White is clearly lost but is fishing around,
� DpDPG 0] hoping for a miracle on the basis that the
�) D Dp0r] black rook is slightly stuck (1 ... g2 2 Bh2).
� ) D ) D] How did Black put this to an end?
贒 D D I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
37 x 2 ? 9 � 5 + 3
MEDIUM
212 x 4 + 86
50%
OF IT
? 77
30%
OF IT
? 88 x 8 + 37 x 3
HARDER
281 + 813 x 4
+ 1/2
OF IT
? 644
90%
OF IT
+ 977
? 10 9 5
?9 6 3 2
??J 9 5 4 3 2
S
?K J 7 6 4 2
?A
?KQ 8 7 5 4
?N
W
E
S
? AQ 8
?Q J 8 5
?A 2
?AQ 8 7
W
OF IT
?6
x2
+ 1/5
OF IT
�
? 884 � 2
6
3
Yesterday?s answers
accursed, cadre, card, cedar, cred,
crud, crude, crusade, curd, cursed,
dace, dare, dear, druse, ecad, read,
rude, sacred, sard, sauced, scad, scared,
scud, surd, used
Killer Gentle No 5911
6
14
14
13
21
3
13
5min
7
7
16
17
14
3
13
17
13
4
10
12
6
B U
N
I D
U
B E
I
T A
S
A S
A
T Y
E
CR
N K
I
E C
K
HO
N
K E
S
T H
E
P E
L
U S
11
12
6
18
16
17
9
16
11
21
3
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
8
6
27
10
32min
11
8
22
10
24
12
28
13
10
11
7
8
9
20
19
14
16
9
22
10
10
8
16
16
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
= 23 the numbers
x
+
+
= 34
-
1
x
x
x
=
41
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
We?ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
x
x
= 27
=
3
=
84
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
5
6
9
7
4
1
3
2
8
1
8
7
9
3
2
5
6
4
3
4
2
6
5
8
9
7
1
8
3
6
4
1
5
2
9
7
2
9
4
8
7
3
6
1
5
E
P
L
U
M
M
E
T
T
L
T
O
N
F
A
Z
E
D
L
S
R I V AC
N
N
P S E T
E
I
O T HBA
O
I RAD E
U
Y
OND
U
D
H
OO L OG
W B
I NGO
Set Square 2090
7
5
1
2
6
9
4
8
3
6
7
8
3
2
4
1
5
9
4
2
5
1
9
7
8
3
6
9
1
3
5
8
6
7
4
2
8
x
4
x
x
3
x
6
+
+
7
x
x
2
-
9
+
6
9
5
3
1
2
4
7
8
7
8
2
4
6
5
1
3
9
1
4
3
7
9
8
2
5
6
4
3
8
1
7
6
9
2
5
9
1
7
2
5
3
8
6
4
C
2
5
6
8
4
9
3
1
7
8
6
9
5
2
1
7
4
3
8
3
1
5
4
7
2
6
9
2
4
9
3
1
6
5
8
7
7
5
6
2
8
9
3
1
4
3
1
4
8
9
5
6
7
2
5
3
8
6
1
4
7
9
2
9
2
6
7
5
3
1
8
4
7
1
4
9
8
2
6
5
3
8
9
3
1
4
5
2
7
6
5
7
1
9
3
4
6
8
2
3
2
4
6
8
7
5
9
1
9
6
8
4
7
2
1
3
5
5
2
7
1
6
3
4
9
8
1
9
5
7
3
4
8
2
6
4
7
3
6
2
8
9
5
1
6
8
2
9
5
1
7
4
3
1
4
7
2
9
6
8
3
5
2
6
5
3
7
8
9
4
1
3
7
9
4
2
1
5
6
8
6
5
2
8
3
7
4
1
9
4
8
1
5
6
9
3
2
7
9
3
6
7
4
2
1
8
5
5
2
7
8
3
1
6
4
9
7
5
3
4
8
6
2
9
1
2
8
1
9
7
5
3
6
4
6
4
9
1
2
3
8
5
7
1
9
8
3
6
4
5
7
2
4
6
2
5
1
7
9
3
8
3
7
5
2
9
8
4
1
6
P T
R
S Y
S
I T
5 1
3 2 6
8
4 6 9
2 1 5
1 3
2 3
6 4 1
9 8
7 9
E R
I
E D
D
A L
E
E D
-
7
9 5
4
2
2
3
6 7
4 9
1 8
5
1
3
5
7
2
1
3
4
8
1
9
8
6 7
9
8
9
6
1
2
4
9
8
Train Tracks 355
1
Quintagram
1 Pop
2 Iowa
3 Gimmick
4 Endanger
5 Don
Bradman
3
1
4
6
4
2
5
3
2
5
2
5
2
+
1
6
1 8
6 9
5 7
5
1
1
2
4 2
3
A
6
1
5
C
A
L
L
T
O
G
U
E
M
X
E
O
A
S
T
D
A
C
D
S
S
2
L
R
T
I
S
M
Q
5
4
1 < 2
5
?
1
4
2
1
5 > 4
3
KenKen 4275
4 5
Y
T
U
I
L
T
6
2
2
2
2
10 5
4
2
2
Suko 2185
Word watch
Brain Trainer
Dimpsy (c)
Twilight
(Southwest
dialect)
Dimidiate (b)
Divided in halves
Dimpsey (a) On
Dartmoor, a
low cloud with
fine rain
1 < 3
2
3
O
U
E
2 < 3
?
4
5
5
E
I
Futoshiki 3128
3 > 1
?
4
3
Cell Blocks 3166
Lexica 4176
U
Easy 4
Medium 807
Harder 3,341
Chess
Killer 5910
8
1
4
6
5
9
7
2
3
Kakuro 2087
Y
S L E
E
E
X
AU T OP
R
T
O
L L
QU
Y
A
N
G L I D
E
K
NWA N T
Z
L
H
Y
I D E
M N
F
E J E C T
B
Killer 5909
16
Enter each of
+
x
T A T
O
A
R I F
T
F
OW E
I
T
S E A
E
S T E
H Q
E F U
L
I
L I P
Sudoku 9729
8
x
Lexica 4175
Killer Tough No 5912
E
Only an opening diamond lead
would defeat 7NT ? breaking up
the communication for the
squeeze. You can hardly blame
West for failing to find the diamond lead. In other words, 7NT by
South cannot be beaten.
5
Codeword 3283
H E S I
O C
L A R E
R
P
L D
T R
I
A B A C K
L
F A
MA
G
L
GR A T
E
I
A D E R
Sudoku 9727
10
8
Quick Cryptic 1047
4
7
11
Contract: 7NT, Opening Lead: ? 10
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
Solutions
Sudoku 9728
1?
Pass
1?
Pass
2NT(1) Pass
3?
Pass
4?
Pass
5?(2) Pass
5?(2) Pass
5NT(3) Pass
7?
Dbl(4)
7NT(5) End
(1) 18-19 in the modern style (it?s so
unwieldy to jump to 3NT with a balanced 19).
(2) Cue bid, showing first-round control
(usually the ace, maybe ? as in 5? ? a void).
(3) With partner having cue bid the ace of
diamonds, all North needs opposite is
? AQx. His 5NT bid is the grand slam force,
asking for two of the three top trump honours for Seven.
(4) Lightner double, asking for an unusual
opening lead. West is ruffing diamonds.
(5) Guessing his fate (7? beaten on a diamond ruff), North, hoping partner holds the
ace of clubs, runs to 7NT. (This raises the
interesting thought that West could make a
bluff double of 7? to frighten North out of
a making 7? into a failing 7NT.)
6
3
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 12 words, average;
17, good; 23, very good; 30, excellent
8
?3
?K 10 7 4
?J 10 9 6 3
?K 10 6
4 2
2
4
Set Square No 2091
Advanced
N
SQUARE
IT
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
Pairs
3/
4
Polygon
13
Bridge Andrew Robson
Alan Oddie from Bedfordshire
reports this fascinating grand slam
from the Porthcawl Pairs. Of the
two grand slam contracts under
consideration, 7? and 7NT, 7? is
superior (looking at North-South?s
26 cards), for you can survive a 4-1
diamond split if trumps split 2-2
(or 3-1 with the defender with the
three spades holding four diamonds). After two rounds of
trumps, you can play four rounds
of diamonds (including the crucial
ruff).
However, both 7? and 7NT
seem wrecked by the 5-0 diamond
split. 7? (doubled), declared by
North, would undoubtedly have
failed at the first hurdle with East
leading the jack of diamonds and
West ruffing (indeed it would go
down even if West forgot to ruff).
There are only 11 winners in
7NT ? but watch East fall victim
to a triple (progressive) squeeze.
You win West?s spade lead and play
all six spades. East discards two
hearts, a club and a diamond but
has no good discard on dummy?s
last spade. To keep four diamonds,
he must bare a king ? say he
chooses clubs.
You cash the ace of hearts, cross
to the ace of diamonds and cash
the ace of clubs. When East?s king
falls, you continue with the promoted queen of clubs.
East is now squeezed between
the king of hearts and the jackten-nine of diamonds. Away goes
the king of hearts to keep the diamond guard but you cash the promoted queen of hearts and lead to
the king-queen of diamonds.
Grand slam made.
EASY
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Caro-Kann
Cell Blocks No 3167
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
1 ... Rh1+! 2 Kxh1
gxf2 and Black
promotes and
then mates
Quiz
1 Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary 2 Modus operandi
3 Spitting Image 4 Sulphur 5 United Nations 6 The
Princess Bride 7 Nissan 8 As You Like It by Shakespeare
9 Michelangelo 10 Sam Cooke 11 Binturong (Arctictis
binturong). The other is the kinkajou 12 Philippines
13 Patrice Leconte 14 Henri Leconte 15 Lychee or
litchi (Litchi chinensis)
15.03.18
MindGames
Mild No 9730
Fill the grid so that every
column, every row and
every 3x3 box contains
the digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
Josephine
Balmer
Dimpsy
a Unreliable
b A petticoat
c Twilight
Dimidiate
a To have couples
counselling
b Divided in halves
c To belittle
Dimpsey
a Fine rain
b A carriage
c A smartly-dressed man
Answers on page 15
Fiendish No 9731
8
1
5 8
2 9
7
6
3 5 8 2 7
9
3
4 7
8
6 9
3
2
4 9
1
3 1
7
5
9
Super fiendish No 9732
6 9 4
2
7
2
5
2
3
3 8
9
1
4
3
6
7
5 2
5
8
9
8 4
5
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight to receive four clues for any of today?s
puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
The Times Daily Quiz Olav Bjortomt
Suko No 2185
GETTY IMAGES
1 Which American
federal prison, known
as ?The Rock?, operated
from 1934 to 1963?
11 Also called the
bearcat, which animal
is one of only two in
the order Carnivora
with a prehensile tail?
2 Often shortened to MO,
which L
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