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The Times Times 2 – 15 November 2017

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November 15 | 2017
t
e
v
l
e
V
n
o
i
t
u
revol
Sequin
squad
Left: kimono, �8,
freepeople.com. Right:
slip dress, �, Intimately
at freepeople.com
Which party tribe will you join?
2
1GT
Wednesday November 15 2017 | the times
times2
Social media
My cat may be fat, but
she?s too much of a pussy
to start working out
Carol Midgley
C
ats, says an Essex
veterinary surgeon,
need to be exercised
like dogs to stop them
getting fat. Hear, hear.
I just ran to tell my
tabby the news and she
couldn?t have been
more on board. ?Why don?t we get this
party started right away, maybe with
some press-ups and a few laps of the
garden?? she almost seemed not to say.
?It?s your call because you know how
much we cats live to obey others and
care nothing for our own pleasure. Yes,
it?s raining ? but what the hell!?
What she really did, of course, when
I found her asleep on the same pile of
clean laundry where she had been
curled for nine consecutive hours, was
to ignore me, then, when I tried to lift
her up, hiss. I?m not saying that
Carolina Vilches Romo, an expert in
feline medicine and surgery, is wrong.
Not at all. I?m just saying you?ve got
about as much chance of getting my
cat to exercise if she doesn?t fancy it as
you have of getting a snake to man the
phones at the Samaritans.
Romo counsels against buying a lead
to take your cat for walks, which is a
relief. I once got one and we never got
beyond the front path. Georgie just lay
on the floor, a dead weight, so I had to
drag her like a striped mop. But, as it
happens, I am concerned about her
piling it on and getting diabetes. When
we got her she was a bag of bones
rescued from the streets. She had been
pregnant, but so malnourished that
the kittens died. Three years later she
is what Asos calls ?curvy? and the vet
tells me to limit her food. But that?s
the thing: she?s now such a fussy little
drama queen that I have to cajole her
to eat anything at all from the posh
range of foods I buy. And if she
senses I?m pleased that she enjoyed
something she never touches it again
and stalks away with her tail in the air.
Yet she is beginning to have a ?fuller
figure?. How?
Once, when reviewing a book called
The Trainable Cat, I briefly managed to
get her to jump over some tiny fences
I?d made with the help of a rubber
mouse tied to a stick (yes, I?m
deranged). But the next time I tried
she hissed when she?d had enough and
ran away. Cats are natural contrarians
and control-freaks. They do what they
like when they like. So if as much as
a drop of rain falls from the sky, that
means she will not leave my duvet for
24 hours or even void her bladder.
If ?exercise? meant ?biting my
owner?s toes in the night because she
had the cheek to move them?, then
I suppose she might be persuaded.
If it included ?dabbing my paw in a
cup of tea or packet of crisps just to
ruin it for the human? or ?knocking
staplers/pens/keys off a shelf just
because I can?, ditto. If there were a
category for ?evilly swiping the
harmless, friendly dog when he?s
walking past, thus getting him into
trouble because it made him growl?,
cats would be Olympic standard. Just
as they would be at ?kneading
humans? chests at 4am?; ?clawing the
stair carpet?; ?staring at squirrels?;
?sitting in a box for no reason?;
?jumping on the bed when my owner
is putting on clean sheets, thus soiling
them immediately? and ?crapping on
my owner?s favourite garden plants
with a facial expression that says,
?Because f*** you, that?s why.? ?
If you really want to exercise your
cat, just lock it in a room for an hour
with a bluebottle. You?ll have no
blinds, ornaments or soft furnishings
left, but what price a nice trim puss?
GETTY IMAGES
O come
all ye
faithful?
Advent calendars are
not the simple pleasure
they once were. Take
the Lovehoney Sex Toy
calendar, retailing at
�0, which promises a
different thrill behind
each of the 24 doors.
What says ?Christmas?
more than opening
a window to
reveal a
silicone
butt plug,
a vibrator,
ankle cuffs, a
Jaron Lanier is known as the sage of
Silicon Valley ? he is also Facebook?s
biggest critic. By Damian Whitworth
Keep your
redbreasts
to yourself
I haven?t yet bought any
Christmas cards, but I
know which smutty
design I won?t be
choosing: a robin
redbreast. Sorry if
anyone?s offended,
but here we see the
corrupting power of the
slattern ?red-chest?.
Facebook recently
blocked the sale of
cards featuring a robin
because of their
?sexual? and ?adult?
nature. Quite right. You
can see in the picture
that the shameless little
floozy is flaunting its
bosomy feathers and
showing way too much
spindly knee.
I suppose we
shouldn?t be surprised
that Facebook got the
vapours over the word
?breast? given that two
years ago it suspended
a pub?s account because
it was called the Black
Cock Inn. How ironic,
then, that it is
Facebook that is urging
users to send in nude
pictures of themselves
as a way to combat
revenge porn. The idea
is to send them to
Messenger and get
them ?hashed? before
anyone else does.
Hmm. Nice of the
website to offer, but it
does require rather a
lot of trust, doesn?t it?
It also feels a bit like
burning all your money
to stop it being stolen.
I have a much better
way of ensuring no one
ever posts nude photos
of me. I?d rather eat my
own head than have
one taken.
blindfold or a feather
tickler? Is anyone else
nostalgic for the
days when the
most you
expected from
an advent calendar
was a chocolate bell?
J
aron Lanier is the Silicon
Valley guru who coined the
phrase ?virtual reality?. He is
one of the pioneers of VR
and one of its greatest
evangelists. He is also its
prophet of doom. ?Never
has a medium been so
potent for beauty and so vulnerable to
creepiness,? he writes in his new book.
Lanier came up with the phrase
?virtual reality? in the 1970s, even
before he began developing 1980s
versions of the headsets that allow
users to experience immersion in a
computer-generated world. Finally,
after years of false dawns, affordable
headsets are available in high-street
shops, even if they are not yet
ubiquitous. A visionary rather than a
businessman, Lanier did not become a
VR mogul, but he still works on VR
projects, as an interdisciplinary
scientist for Microsoft. He combines
this with vocal criticism of the tech
industry in books and lectures.
A brilliant mathematician, fluent
writer and gifted musician who owns
and plays more than 1,000
instruments, Lanier is a polymath who
looks as if he would be more at home
in a desert hippy community than
a California tech campus. He ambles
through the gothic corridors of the
St Pancras Renaissance Hotel in
London in a voluminous black T-shirt
and baggy trousers, his dreadlocks
hanging to his waist, and finds a quiet
corner in which to talk. He is never
less than attentive, but sometimes his
pale blue eyes seem to be looking
dreamily into a different realm.
This week Sean Parker, an early
president of Facebook, said that the
social-media site was designed to be
addictive and consume as much of our
time as possible, giving us a ?dopamine
hit? through ?likes? and comments.
Lanier, who used to know Parker but
hasn?t kept up with him, expresses
similar views about Facebook in his
new book, which was written about in
the US just before Parker spoke out.
?It?s possible the timing is related. I?d
like to ask him,? he says. ?In defence of
him and Zuck [Mark Zuckerberg]
nobody fully knew what this would be
like before trying it. I doubt very much
that anyone had a complete view of
how this could unfold.?
The tech giants are, he argues,
behaviour modification agents, with
a business model to keep us on their
sites as long as possible during our
waking hours. He charges these
companies with holding our attention
by making us angry, insecure or
scared. ?The most effective situation
is one where users get into weird
spirals of mob-like agreement or
disagreement with other users,?
he writes. Lanier regards it as a
fundamental flaw of the configuration
of the internet that users were allowed
to remain anonymous online.
Who we become friends with, what
we buy and the news we consume is
based on these companies? algorithms.
With so much information available
free of charge it is often hard to know
the source or the agenda of those
supplying the information.
?I would argue that traditional
advertising helped to build society
because it gave people shared
experiences and it helped to promote
the future,? Lanier says. The way that
the internet companies monitor our
habits and interests and feed that into
their algorithms to present us with
new people to connect with or
products to buy is not so helpful.
?You can change people?s character,
you can make them more irritable, you
can make them xenophobic. In fact the
negative is easier to invoke than the
positive. And so this tends to naturally
attract actors who benefit from
seeking that result, either to destabilise
a nation that is perceived as a foe or to
try to corral people into a peer group,
political or business or whatever. This
technique tears society apart.?
An extreme result of the opaque
origin of what comes into our news
feeds is the apparent tampering by
Russia in the US presidential election
and, perhaps, the EU referendum.
Users get into a
spiral of mob-like
agreement or
disagreement
Lanier warns that in a future when we
are all locked into virtual reality we
could be more effectively targeted.
?When we have seen election
tampering over social media by hostile
foreign information warfare outfits;
when we have seen all the abuse
online; and when we have seen all of
the scams online and the loss of access
to truth, we are lucky we are dealing
with the very crude services that exist
today. Facebook and Twitter are very
crude. That?s really nothing compared
to what is coming.
?We already know from laboratory
experiments that putting people into
virtual worlds can be incredibly
effective at changing their behaviour,
and those changes can happen
without the person?s awareness. So a
combination of something like what
Facebook is today with where virtual
reality might go in the future could be
so destructive of a sense of truth, a
sense of free will, the sense of the civil
project. It could be really the
destruction of us all. But what I am
hoping is that our encounters with the
cruder forms of technology will
prepare us.?
Lanier loves the ?treat? of exploring
virtual worlds, the ?thrill? of picking
up a virtual object (using a special
glove). He talks excitedly of the work
of a young designer who created a
program in which users interact with
others in a world where they trace
the times | Wednesday November 15 2017
3
1GT
times2
is tearing society apart
The lowdown
Thunderfoot
GETTY IMAGES ; ULRICH BAUMGARTEN/GETTY IMAGES
evolution, morphing by stages from
molecule to human. He likens the
difference between reality and virtual
reality to that between the real world
and the theatre.
He lauds VR as a ?palate cleanser?
that enables us to return to the real
world and appreciate ordinary
experiences that we take for granted.
It is a useful tool for researching what
a human being is in terms of cognition
and perception.
Yet as virtual reality becomes more
sophisticated, so that in theory we will
be able to act out whatever fantasies
we want wherever we want, it is not
hard to see horrors around the corner.
VR could be used, say, to create worlds
in which the user encounters a
computer-generated version of
someone they know for pornographic
satisfaction or offer games of jihadi
terror to those who might be
vulnerable to recruitment.
When we are diving into virtual
worlds the companies hosting us will
potentially gain more sophisticated
information about our desires and
personalities. ?Virtual reality could be
thought of as the most ideal and
high-tech behaviour-modification
chamber, where anything about you
can be measured and anything about
what you perceive in the world can be
changed as a result,? Lanier says.
He has heard powerful people in
Silicon Valley talking about a future
where robots do all the work and people
while away their days in virtual-reality
worlds. He doesn?t think this will
happen and certainly doesn?t want it to.
?The idea of staying in VR all day is
abhorrent and the reason why is that I
love VR too much. If you love fine
wines you don?t want to drink all day.?
To stop us from being hooked into
tech companies, now and in the VR
future, the business model of the
companies has to change. ?The
problem right now is this movement,
mostly driven by the left, to make
everything free leaves a company like
Facebook with no alternative.? They
have to ?spy? (his word) on us.
He would have loved to have seen a
charge of one hundredth of a penny
for every email that is sent. That
would have done much to stop spam
and would have given the tech
companies income. He now proposes
an annual fee to use Facebook and the
like that would reduce the need for us
to be exposed to those trying to sell us
stuff all the time. He would also like to
see users of the sites paid for the
exploitation of their data. The people
at Facebook and Google ?are on the
whole very well intentioned and good
people. It?s a systemic problem.?
In the meantime some of us are on
these sites more than others. President
Trump, whom Lanier met years ago,
is a creation and a victim of the
social-media age. ?He is showing the
signs of this weird nervous personality
Above: Jaron
J
L i r
Lanier
that comes from social-media
addiction, which is what it?s like when
you have been tied into this
behaviour-modification loop and you
are constantly pecking at that button
for your treat. It has nothing to do
with left or right or young or old. All
kinds of people have this same
personality now. I see it in young
people often pursuing causes that I
have sympathy with, but their
character and the way they are doing
it has a hopelessness about it because,
as with Trump, they are just caught up
in this addiction and not even seeing
the world very accurately any more.?
Lanier, 57, has lived quite a life. He
grew up in El Paso, just on the Texas
side of the border with Mexico. He
went to school for a while in Ciudad
Ju醨ez, in northern Mexico. Later, in a
Texas school, he was bullied. His
mother, who was a pianist and stock
trader, died in a car crash when he was
nine. His father, a sometime journalist
and teacher, allowed the precocious
Lanier to design the home they built
together. It consisted of large geodesic
domes and years later collapsed.
Recalling this Lanier emits a long,
high, infectious laugh.
He left school two or three years
early to study maths, first in New
Mexico and then in New York, paying
his way by selling goat?s cheese from
his own goats. He worked on a
magazine, played piano in a bar and
did various other jobs before winding
up in Silicon Valley in the 1980s.
One of his inspirations for creating
VR was an incident in his childhood
when one evening the local phone
service had a glitch and all the
children found themselves talking to
each other. That is the sort of magic
he seeks to recreate. ?That very
positive experience was possible
because it wasn?t manipulated by any
third party. Had it persisted for a
second night or a third night then
some provocateur or profit-seeker
would have come along and ruined it.?
His wife, Lena, is a child
psychologist and they have an
11-year-old daughter, Lillibell. She
and her friends were the guinea pigs
for the VR version of Minecraft. Lanier
doesn?t use any social media, but is
as laid-back as his parents were with
him when it comes to his daughter?s
use of it. ?She is a separate person
and I think people have to learn
their own lessons. I don?t take a
controlling approach.?
He regards himself as the ?loyal
opposition? in the tech world. ?I still
get my meal card in Silicon Valley. I
get invited to things. But sometimes
they get pissed at me.? Microsoft is
very tolerant and he
says there is a ?big
beautiful wall? between
his work for the company and his
public intellectual views.
At school he used to stare out
of the window as if hypnotised. ?I
still do. I am content to sit and think.
One of the losses of this business
model of trying to keep people
continuously in the thrall of a device
is the loss of daydreaming.?
Dawn of the New Everything:
A Journey Through Virtual Reality
by Jaron Lanier is published
tomorrow by the Bodley Head, �
What?s your worst nightmare?
The spider that was on my bedroom
ceiling this morning.
Oh, man up. Spiders are tiny.
This one wasn?t. This was the size
of a side plate.
Be grateful it wasn?t Thunderfoot
in your bedroom.
Thunderfoot? Are you referring to
my beloved? How rude.
No, Thunderfoot the dinosaur.
It was the length of three
double-decker buses. Scientists
have found a 110-step set of
footprints stretching 500ft in
the Jura region of France.
I?m guessing this is the sort of thing
palaeontologists find interesting?
Yes, because they are real people,
with proper jobs, expanding the
limits of human knowledge. As
opposed to, say, you.
I?m pretty sharp, as it happens. I bet
it?s Jura as in Jurassic.
You just googled that didn?t you?
Yes.
Pretending to be clever. Sad.
Well, unlike the spider on your
bedroom ceiling, Thunderfoot is
properly huge, a sauropod 114ft long
and weighing 35 tonnes. Each
footprint is 5ft wide. It made
elephants look like mice.
But how can they tell how big it was?
Man alive, a seven-year-old could
figure that one out. By the depth
of the prints and the length of the
stride, you fool. Put it this way: the
footprints are so big they?re craters.
What?s that noise?
Nothing to worry about. I expect
it?s just urban foxes.
It?s a sort of thumping. It?s loud. And
it?s coming nearer.
There?s nothing to be afraid of
because Thunderfoot was
herbivorous.
Oh well that?s fine then, only a total
wuss would be scared of a gigantic
vegetarian dinosaur the size of St
Paul?s thumping around rural France.
Quite so. Just as only a total wuss
would be scared of a spider on the
bedroom ceiling. Are you a man or
a mouse?
Eek.
Hilary Rose
4
1GT
Wednesday November 15 2017 | the times
fashion
Time to
sparkle ?
or be soft
and plushy
SEQUIN SQUAD
Velvet or lurex? Take your pick from
the top two looks as the Christmas
party season sweeps in. By Hattie Crisell
N
ovember?s a bit early
to be talking about
Christmas ? I?m the
misanthrope who
doesn?t acknowledge
it?s happening until
December 23. Yet
with the first office
parties held on Tuesdays in November
in the hope of getting a good deal at
All Bar One, we have no time to waste
in addressing the big question: what
are we going to wear?
Christmas party wear is a genre of its
own. The look is supposed to bring to
mind snow-topped lampposts and
twinkling night skies, even though the
reality is drizzle and murk. This time
around, two competing fashion camps
have taken hold: velvetmania and disco
fever. On the former front you?ll be
hard-pushed to find a high-street or
designer brand that isn?t wall to wall
with this most tactile of materials,
Boots, �0,
Shellys London at
freepeople.com
which has been on the up since its
re-emergence on the catwalks for
autumn/winter 2016. Saturation point
is probably approaching, so if you want
to get some wear out of it, commit now.
At & Other Stories, a new collection
inspired by Lou Doillon (the stylish
actress and singer Jane Birkin?s equally
stylish daughter) includes a longsleeved black jumpsuit in a culotte
style with a jewelled collar (�,
stories.com) that will be available next
week. I?m taken with a black velvet
dress by Intropia, which has an
asymmetric hem and silver stars
embroidered over the shoulders (�0,
intropia.com); it?s a tasteful hint of
sparkle that?s also very elegant. If
you?re wearing black, carry a metallic
or colourful bag ? I?m waiting for
December?s product drop at Kurt
Geiger, which will include a rainbowstriped clutch the label is calling the
Party Envelope (�, kurtgeiger.com).
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the times | Wednesday November 15 2017
5
1GT
fashion
AXELLE/BAUER-GRIFFIN/FILMMAGIC/GETTY IMAGES; CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES
VELVET REVOLUTION
Left: dress, �0,
No.1 Jenny Packham
at debenhams.com.
Right, from top:
Cate Blanchett in
Gucci; dress, �,
warehouse.co.uk
Intropia is also selling some
beautiful cherry-red velvet trousers
with an elasticated waist (to make
room for as many dry-roasted peanuts
as your heart desires at this time of
year ? just me? �6, intropia.com).
They stop at the ankle, so wear them
with a pair of statement shoes such as
If wearing black,
carry a metallic
or colourful bag
Office?s Hottie stilettos, which are
embellished at the back with faux
pearls and gems (�, office.co.uk), or
Rogue Matilda?s loafer-ish feathered
Birdie shoes (�5, roguematilda.com).
Whistles has a dedicated ?velvet
edit? on its website, including a devor�
dress in a delicate salmon-ish hue
(�9). There?s also a black pencil skirt
(�, both whistles.com) that would
work well with a silk blouse and ankle
boots (on which note, I like Ted
Baker?s Ishbel printed versions, �0,
tedbaker.com). The great thing
about velvet is that it makes even
a casual outfit look soign閑 ? if
you aren?t one for fuss, try Free
People?s short emerald-green
kimono (�8, freepeople.com)
over jeans. You might even add
Intropia?s art deco-inspired
earrings, with an arc of black stones
set against gold beads (�,
intropia.com).
On the other hand, spare a
thought for the haptodysphoriacs.
That?s a real word, according to
the internet ? the name for
someone who finds the sensation
of velvet (or peaches) unpleasant. I
know one woman who can?t bear to
be in the same room as it, let alone
wear it; this must be a very difficult
season indeed for her. Velvet, which
can be made of cotton, silk or
synthetic yarns and is characterised by
its short pile, is high maintenance and
easily marked (be careful with spills,
and avoid hanging it while wet or
ironing it), so it?s a risky investment.
Left: model Martha
Hunt in Galvan. Right,
from top: jacket, �8,
and skirt, �9,
loveshackfancy.com;
blouse, �.99, and
trousers, �.99,
mango.com
From top: �5,
russellandbromley.co.uk;
�0, boden.co.uk
Happily the other festive option is to
wrap yourself in metallics and
sparkles like the human equivalent
of a box of Quality Street. The
fashion industry is obsessed with
Studio 54-esque pizzazz; Adwoa
Aboah is on the cover of the new
Vogue in lashings of iridescent blue
eyeshadow; the sequin specialist
Michael Halpern is the young
designer of the moment (one of his
embellished poloneck tops costs
�5, matchesfashion.com); and
everyone?s downloading Kirakira+,
an app that makes Instagram
photos and videos twinkle.
You can twinkle in real life too.
The Dubai-based brand Kage has
a gold and blue floral tunic-style
dress ? the Cameran ? with bell
sleeves and a frill around the hem
(�0, bykage.com). Warehouse is
combining velvet and bling with a
sequinned, high-necked dress in gold,
blue or black (�, warehouse.co.uk).
The very brave may even be tempted
by Zara?s short and sparkling ?blazer
dress? (�.99, zara.com), although
there?s a risk of looking like you?ve
been locked out in the nude and
forced to borrow a jacket from
Liberace. If you?re young and leggy
you don?t need to worry about that. If
not, try it with skinny black trousers.
Peter Pilotto has several pieces in
gold and silver fil coup� (a jacquard-like
texture), including a mid-calf length
skirt draped on one side (�225,
matchesfashion.com). Go for
sophisticated shimmer in Ba&sh?s
emerald-green jumpsuit with puff
shoulders (�0, ba-sh.com) or Karen
Millen?s plum-coloured, slinky satin suit
(tie-belt blazer, �0 reduced to �2;
wide-legged trousers, � reduced to
�). If you want to embrace all-out
Ferrero Rocher bling you won?t do
better than the brand?s gold, pleated
maxi dress (�0, all karenmillen.com)
? bring your own cleavage.
If neither velvetmania nor the
lure of lurex seizes you, there is of
course a third option. Accessorise your
dressing gown with the TV remote,
some sherry and a Terry?s Chocolate
Orange, and say to hell with parties
until 2018.
Instagram @hattiecrisell
6
1GT
Wednesday November 15 2017 | the times
fashion
Found! The jumper I?ve wanted for years
I
flag up Honey & Co: The Baking Book.
The blueberry, hazelnut and ricotta
cake is especially toothsome.
Instead I will mention Baileys?
stunning old shell necklaces from Mali
(�0) and vintage linen smocks from
France (�), both legitimate fare for a
fashion director to comment on and
both perfect for Keaton?s character
Erica Barry, should she ever take off
that funnel-neck. After all, something
has indeed gotta give, and maybe, just
occasionally, it?s that mega-knit.
The perfect knit
only existed in
a Diane Keaton
film ? until now.
By Anna Murphy
have lost track of the number of
times that I?ve found myself
talking about a particular film
with an old girlfriend or a new
one. Neither of us can quite
remember what it is called. We
know it is one of those bouncy
titles that women are supposed
to like. Is it She Wants It But Can She
Have It? Could it be Guess Who?s
Going to Stay Over?
We always have to google it, but
we both know which film is under
discussion. It?s the one in which
Diane Keaton has that great white
funnel-neck jumper, conducts a love
affair with Keanu ?Catnip? Reeves ?
who is a couple of decades her junior
? and owns a fabulous house in the
Hamptons. (And, oh yes, there is some
gone-to-seed bloke in it called Jack
Nicholson, but I mean, whatevs.)
Yes, that is exactly how Something?s
Gotta Give ? which is what said film is
called ? can be summed up. Keaton?s
jumpers are so good that they get top
billing above Reeves and a house so
perfect in all its beachside greigeness,
that even Kirstie Allsopp would get
her knickers in a twist about it.
Here is knitwear of which dreams of
the most gossamer variety are made.
Here is knitwear in which a woman in
her fifties can pull a man in his thirties.
No one is better than the writerdirector Nancy Meyers at whipping up
filmic fantasies that capture the
imagination of the modern woman
lock, stock and jumper.
No wonder I have been looking for a
similar knit ever since. And here it is, a
IIn a twist
Brora?s jumper and,
left, Baileys? necklace
It iis
knitwear
in which a
woman in
her fifties
can pull a
man in his
thirties
mere
re 14 years later,
l t Brora?s
B
eight-ply
Scottish cashmere funnel-neck in
what you and I might call white, but
which Brora calls ?swan?. It?s not
cheap, but that?s because I have never
encountered a less cheap-looking
? or feeling ? jumper in my life
(�5, also in navy, brora.co.uk).
Now I just need to track down
those cakestands that adorn Meryl
Streep?s kitchen in It?s Complicated,
another delectable piece of Nancy
Meyers wish-fulfilment. This film
also has some gone-to-seed bloke
in it. Alec Baldwin this time. But, as
discussed, whatevs.
The right mix
Actually, I?ve got the cake-stand box
ticked courtesy of one of my favourite
repositories of retro and ethnic
quirkiness, baileyshome.com. I am
probably not supposed to be writing
about cake-stands, this being a fashion
column and all, but Baileys?
scallop-footed white porcelain
iterations are particularly lovely (from
�). Just as I am probably not
supposed to be writing about my new
favourite book of cake recipes either,
but while we are here I may as well
One thing?s for sure, Erica Barry
O
never had a knicker drawer as
n
shameful as mine. The percentage of
sh
items that have long lost any
it
acquaintance with the notion of
ac
elastication is, I fear, well into double
el
figures. Why? Because it?s difficult to
fig
find pants that I like and that like me.
fin
And when it comes to tricky retail
An
propositions, despite ? or perhaps
pr
because
of ? my job, I tend to put
b
e
them
off. I just can?t, forgive me, be
th
arsed.
It has reached the stage,
ar
however, where I can?t ignore the
h
ho
problem
any more. So I have done the
p
r
and, lo, I present to you the
llegwork
le
g
Australian eco-underwear brand
A
Au
Boody, which uses organic, chemicalB
Bo
ffree
re bamboo yarn.
Why bamboo? Because it is one of
the fastest growing ? and therefore
most renewable and sustainable ?
plants on the planet. And the fabric
produced from it is known for its
breathability and antibacterial
qualities. Boody adds a touch of
nylon and elastane to render its
underwear as stretchy and wrinklefree as it is soft. The brand also
eschews seams, so the result looks as
sleek as, well, you do. (Am still
working on that bit.)
There are five knicker shapes in
white, black or nude; my favourite is
the boyleg brief (�95, boody.co.uk).
The assorted vests, T-shirts and
bodies are also top-notch.
Instagram: @annamurphy
My Favourite
cartoons
from 2017 from
�.99
plus P&P
We give May
?ve months.
February, April, June,
August and November.
Purchase a 2018 calendar by Peter Brookes at
timescartoons.co.uk or call 020 7711 7826.
the times | Wednesday November 15 2017
7
1GT
fashion
Will you buy
the new clothes
from M&S?
Hattie Crisell casts
her eye over next
season?s collection
Jacket, �9
Dress, �
Jacket, �, shoes, �,
bag, �. Right: skirt,
�9, necklace, �, bag,
�, available from April
I
t has been several years since
M&S-watching became a
national sport. As a country, we
have a soft spot for the brand
we think of as quintessentially
British (though one of its
founders, Michael Marks, was
originally Polish ? thank God
for immigration). We grew up wearing
its pants and socks, receiving its
pyjamas on Christmas Day, and eating
its superlative chocolate biscuits and
Percy Pigs. So ever since the company?s
womenswear sales first floundered ?
more than a decade ago now ? we?ve
all been rooting for Marks & Spencer,
waiting for a collection that would help
it to compete on the fashion front with
the likes of Zara. It may be time to
tweak the conversation.
This week?s preview of the brand?s
spring/summer 2018 collection ?
plus a capsule of kimono-inspired
eveningwear launching online today,
produced in collaboration with
Graduate Fashion Week award-winner
Claire Tagg ? was in line with what
we might call the new normal. It
highlighted M&S?s season-after-season
strengths ? underwear, outerwear
and cashmere, for example ? but also
the other areas in which the brand just
can?t quite crack the winning formula.
More on those later.
If there is one clothing department
you?re loyal to at Marks & Sparks,
it?s likely to be underwear. The team
behind this must be a truly well-oiled
machine: for spring, bras, knickers and
lacy one-pieces are as pretty and
well-constructed as ever. Bralets have
proved such a hit that the brand will
now offer them up to a G cup, with
hidden structure to provide support.
Top, �.50
The Rosie Huntington-Whiteley line,
now celebrating its fifth anniversary,
is M&S?s most successful lingerie
collection to date ? ?We estimate
something like one in 50 British
women owns a Rosie bra,? says
Soozie Jenkinson, who heads lingerie
design. For spring it will include a
full-cup shape. I wonder if they all
say a group prayer each day that
Huntington-Whiteley never gets
bored with bras.
A recce of a London branch
on Monday reminded me how
strong M&S?s cashmere
offering is: at its heart is
a round-neck Autograph
jumper available in 12 colours
for � a pop, with a host of
other styles available. For
spring, I learnt yesterday,
they?ve introduced a long,
grey M&S Collection
cardigan (�) that looks
deliciously comfortable, like
something you would put on
the moment you get home and
refuse to remove.
The design team have picked
up on the trend for shirting, and
that?s reflected in some useful
pieces that would work equally
well for the office or the
weekend: one neat blue pinstripe
M&S Collection top is cleverly
gathered and draped at the collar
(�.50). An Autograph shirt in
the same stripe flares from the
waist with a hem that dips at the
back (�.50), and a crisp white
V-neck blouse is pulled in by a
sash (�.50).
Outerwear, as always, includes some
well-priced corkers. I like a knee-
Jacket, �
Dress, �
Above: top, �.50, trousers,
�.50, available from
February. Left: jeans, �,
boots,
�, available from
b
February.
Below left: bag,
F
�.50,
available from April
�
llength coat in a large red check
(�). A cropped leather Autograph
jjacket (�9) is reversible: olive green
on one side, navy on the other, and
modern in its collarless, clean style. A
black-and-white gingham trench coat
has been given pleasing proportions:
broad lapels and a generously wide
belt, all the better to give the effect
of a small waist (�). There are also
strong accessories for next season,
in particular a cross-body navy and
teal satchel (�.50), a Jackie O-ish
top-handle pink bag (�.50) and a
pair of white pointed mules with a
chic V cut-out at the front (�).
And yet, despite all these hits,
there are misses. The colours at
M&S are often uninspiring and
muddy ? some of the spring
prints in browns and dusky
pinks don?t feel contemporary.
Polka dots are a detail too
many
on a satin, powder-blue
m
blouse with gathered sleeves,
and lilac palazzo pants feel like
a throwback. I?m sure there
are women who would wear
the
t brand?s full-length
patchwork
dress in blue and
p
brown velvet, or the wide-legged,
mustard
trousers ? but these are
m
tough
looks to pull off, and I suspect
t
they?re
not what most of us are
t
looking for when we step into M&S.
Every woman has a mental database
of places to shop ? stores that get the
job done. It?s hard to gauge M&S?s
position in that database today. The
retailer could take a leaf out of Boden?s
book ? the brand that offers bold
colours, upbeat prints and designerinspired details, but always remains
accessible. Or it could be a bit more
Uniqlo ? synonymous with
affordable, functional knitwear. It
could certainly benefit from a stricter
edit: my store visit on Monday
reminded me that the womenswear
offering is large enough to get lost in.
But what Marks & Spencer does better
than its competitors is the userfriendly detail: the earrings that are
made in hypoallergenic materials; the
Insolia cushioning and nonslip soles
that improve the comfort of high
heels; the swimsuits with support
inside to flatter the figure. That, to me,
is what?s brilliant about M&S.
So, to the important bit: what to be
ready for when the spring and summer
collections drop (starting in February).
An ankle-length Autograph coat
in buttercup yellow (�): your
springtime palate cleanser. A cream
M&S Collection maxidress with
bracelet sleeves, a gathered waist and
a tasselled hem (�): the ideal holiday
frock. A dark M&S Collection shirt
printed with exotic florals (�.50):
for me, the most successful of all its
printed pieces. The straight-legged,
cropped M&S Collection jeans (�)
with the brand?s touch of practicality:
slightly stretchy denim. A pair of
strappy, red faux-suede stilettos (�)
with that clever Insolia technology.
Products that are both covetable and
comfortable: it?s Marks & Spencer?s
signature trick. With a bit more focus,
it could be a magic formula.
8
1GT
Wednesday November 15 2017 | the times
arts
The songwriting team behind th
Will Hodgkinson meets the pair behind
the five-star show about a boy who
wants to wear a dress to his school prom
I
t?s the classic British story:
a plucky outsider fights
insurmountable odds to win the
hearts of the nation. But enough
of Everybody?s Talking About
Jamie transferring from a threeweek run at Sheffield?s Crucible
Theatre to the West End. Let?s
talk about the teenage drag queen
who inspired this unlikely hit musical.
?Jamie?s director, Jonathan Butterell,
was channel-hopping when he caught
a BBC Three documentary on a
16-year-old boy from a Durham
council estate called Jamie Campbell
who wanted to wear a dress to his
school prom,? says Nica Burns. After
reading a five-star review in this paper
from Ann Treneman, The Times?s chief
theatre critic, the theatrical impresario
and co-owner of six West End theatres
attended a matinee of the Sheffield
production. There she saw everyone
from grandchildren to grandmothers
wipe tears away as they gave a
standing ovation. Burns resolved to
defy the laws of financial sanity and
stage Everybody?s Talking About Jamie
in the West End. ?Jamie had come out
to his mother at 13 and had been
wearing dresses around the house, so
the story isn?t about him being gay. It
is about acceptance and the
unconditional love a single mother
has for her son.?
I?m in a rehearsal space in Euston,
London, watching the peroxide-blond
actor John McCrea sashay across the
floor with the gangly elegance of a
gazelle in heels. McCrea certainly
doesn?t play Jamie as a victim. In fact
he?s a bit of a brat, given supreme
confidence by his adoring mother and
the amused kids at school, and
undefeated by the one bully who finds
his campness a threat. After a careersadvice psychometric test tells Jamie he
should be a forklift truck driver, he
leads his class in a celebration of his
fabulousness called Don?t Even Know It.
Meanwhile, his best friend, a Muslim
girl with the Hindu name of Pritti,
finds that in working-class Sheffield
dreams of being a doctor are deemed
far more fantastical than those of
being a drag queen. One critic called
Jamie a ?PC flag-waving show?.
Maybe, but as a snappy, singalong,
feelgood musical on the importance of
family and community, it is also as
traditional as they come.
?We knew it was the kind of story
that can burst into song,? says Dan
Gillespie Sells, who wrote the music,
after the rehearsal comes to an end.
?But neither me nor Tom [MacRae,
who wrote the book and lyrics] have
done musicals before. Without Johnny
Butterell holding our hands through
the entire project we would have come
up with something very odd indeed.?
At a time when most musicals are
written by elder statesmen such as
Andrew Lloyd Webber or Elton John,
Gillespie Sells and MacRae, both
neatly turned out and with a
short-haired, Tintin-like air to them,
are an unlikely pair. Gillespie Sells is
the leader of the pop band the Feeling.
MacRae, a TV scriptwriter whose
credits include Doctor Who and the
sitcom Threesome, lives in Hollywood
where he is working on a show called
The Librarians. Neither has experience
of musicals, but as thirtysomething
People kept
telling me our
songs could be
in a musical
gay men with adored mothers ?
two in Gillespie Sells?s case as he was
brought up by a lesbian couple ?
Jamie?s story chimed. The pair met
on a gay rights march in 2013 and
resolved to try working together.
After the show-tune monolith
Michael Ball introduced them to
Butterell, their journey towards
musical theatre glory began.
?Johnny B was looking for writers
who could take the story of Jamie and
make it relevant and contemporary,?
MacRae says. ?Dan is a pop-music
writer. I?m a pop-fiction writer doing
TV, trying to hit mass-market. Our
sensibilities fell easily into the project.?
He?s My Boy, a heartrending ballad
from Jamie?s mother, Margaret,
performed by Josie Walker, captures a
mother?s love for her son in the
tear-jerking style of Adele. Work of
Art, performed on the cast album
by Sophie Ellis-Bextor (who is married
to the Feeling?s bassist, Richard Jones),
is pure disco. The pizzazz of the score
recalls Jesus Christ Superstar, Tommy,
Cabaret and every musical loved by
the kind of person who threatens to
enact choreographed routines at the
drop of a hat.
?I like the kitsch side of pop, and
I?ve never been fussed about my music
being too shiny,? Gillespie Sells says.
?I got thinking about musical theatre
in the first place because people kept
telling the Feeling our songs could be
in a musical. I think they might have
been trying to insult me at the time.?
Weren?t the constraints of writing
songs with narrative purpose a
challenge for a man used to pop?s
John McCrea, centre,
with the cast of
Everybody?s Talking
About Jamie. Above
right: McCrea as
Jamie. Right: Jonathan
Butterell, Dan Gillespie
Sells and Tom MacRae
Entertainments
Theatres
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MATILDA THE
MUSICAL
MatildaTheMusical.com
HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MIS蒖ABLES
Theatre Royal Drury Lane
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020 7087 7760
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
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020 7836 1443
65th year of Agatha Christie's
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Mon-Sat 7.30, Tues & Thu 3, Sat 4
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Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
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the times | Wednesday November 15 2017
9
1GT
arts
hee coolest new West End musical
JOHAN PERSSON; THE OTHER RICHARD
MacRae boasts: ?I got head-hunted
to work in television in Los Angeles.
Now I live in a beautiful house in
Hollywood. I was coming out of my
house the other day when I
remembered being 15 and telling the
deputy head I wanted to go to
Hollywood and be a writer. He
laughed in my face. What if he
said, ?Go for it. I
believe in you?? I
probably wouldn?t
have remembered
the conversation.
But because he
laughed it never
left me. Miss
Hedge is both
good-natured and
dream-crushing,
which is what I
remembered
about my own
teachers.?
That is also
one of the most
reassuring
aspects of Jamie:
its characters
are quite nice. Jamie?s
mie?s
teachers are concerned for his welfare.
lf
The kids are on Jamie?s side.
He has an endlessly supportive mum.
His father isn?t so much horrible as
weak-willed and absent. A moving
scene finds the kids picketing the
school prom because
the teachers won?t allow Jamie to
attend it wearing a dress, which seems
implausible until you learn it
happened to the real Jamie.
?It would have been much easier to
make the kids a bunch of Asbo chavs,
a simple case of us and them,? MacRae
says. ?In fact the kids are more
accepting and tolerant than any
kale-eating middle-class liberal. In
Hollywood most people have been
born into the industry. In television
in England, every producer I have
ever worked with went to public
school. With Dan and Johnny, for the
first time in my career I?m working
with people who went to
impressionistic approach? ?The
constraints liberated my imagination,?
Gillespie Sells says. ?The song has a
job to do, you have to get from here to
here, and there is a character?s voice to
write in, so as a result you pay
attention to detail. Often in pop you
sing a few nice-sounding words before
getting to the point in the chorus, but
if you listen to an Abba song there is
not a word wasted. That was my goal.?
MacRae says it was ?an
apprenticeship? for him. He used as his
lyrical model Ode to Billie Joe by
Bobbie Gentry, a country-pop classic
that tells the story of a love affair, a
suicide and a Mississippi farming
family?s indifference to it. ?Dan is
really good at something I sometimes
struggle with, which is simplicity. Pop
works well when it is uncomplicated.?
Gillespie Sells says that pop ?has to
let people in. It has to be generous and
it can?t afford to put a barrier up. I?d
love to be avant-garde, but the really
dangerous place to be is on the
borderline of cheesiness. If you do
something obscure enough, nobody?s
ever going to judge it.?
At the heart of Jamie?s appeal is, of
course, Jamie. Fun but flawed, with a
good heart and a big ego, he?s the kind
of kid who wants to do bigger and
better things than everyone else. And
he has his nemesis in Miss Hedge, the
well-meaning, but unimaginative
teacher who tells Jamie to stop
showing off and fall back in line.
Gillespie Sells and MacRae used their
memories of being misunderstood
teens as inspiration.
?It was quite easy to go back to
my angst years,? Gillespie Sells
says. He left Ashmole
comprehensive in north London
at 14 to study at the Brit School, a
performing-arts academy more
sympathetic to dreams of musical
glory. ?Johnny B, Tom and I
understand Jamie?s world. We all
went to state schools, we?re all gay
and we all had big plans in places
where you were expected to go
into a normal job. All the teachers
ever said to my parents was, ?We?d
love to teach Dan music all day, but
we have to teach him maths and
English and other stuff too because
what are the chances of him being
a musician?? ?
comprehensives. We?re from this
world, so we?re not about to patronise
the people in it.?
Gillespie Sells spent ten years
trying to make it before landing a
record deal with the Feeling.
MacRae got an early break by being
mentored by the Doctor Who writer
Russell T Davies, but it was ten years
before he landed his own series,
Threesome.
From
F
conception
c
to West End,
Everybody?s
E
Talking About
T
Jamie
has taken
Ja
three
years. Given
th
that
th staging a
musical
is widely
m
accepted
as an
a
excellent
way of
e
losing vast sums
lo
of money, both
o
have had an
h
unusually smooth
u
journey into this
jo
fabulous yet
fa
problem-strewn
p
world.
w
?I?ve loved writing
for older voices, ffor women?s voices,
and with a greater musicality than
radio allows,? Gillespie Sells says. ?I
don?t know if you?ve noticed, but radio
At 15, I told a
teacher I wanted
to be a writer. He
laughed at me
hits don?t have middle-eights any
more. You can?t have more than 30
seconds before getting to the chorus,
and you can?t shift around with key
changes in the way the Beatles and
Stevie Wonder did. But songs in
musical theatre modulate, they
grow and they?re dynamic. You are
writing songs for an audience sitting
in a chair, following a story. With
radio you are making music to
microwave lasagne to.?
Before Gillespie Sells and MacRae
head back to attend one more
rehearsal before previews begin, one
question remains: what did the real
Jamie think of it all?
?We asked him if he was
OK with the principle of the
musical,? says MacRae, who, not
wishing to let reality stifle his
vision, did not meet Jamie
Campbell until the musical
was written. ?He thought it
would be two poofs and a
piano in a pub theatre. Three
years later he came to the
dance studio we were rehearsing
in and he was literally on the floor.
By which I mean he fell off the sofa
in a foetal ball, sobbing. We had to
stop for a bit while he pulled
himself together.?
Audience members for Everybody?s
Talking About Jamie have suffered a
similar fate. No wonder everybody?s
talking about it.
Apollo Theatre, London W1,
from November 22
10
1GT
Wednesday November 15 2017 | the times
television & radio
How media titans fought over football stickers
MARIO TAMA/GETTY IMAGES
James
Jackson
TV review
Stuck on You
ITV4
{{{((
Passions
Sky Arts
{{{{{
S
earching down into the nether
regions of your EPG (electronic
programme guide) isn?t always
an exercise in resigned futility.
Just occasionally there be TV
treasures down there, squashed into
the wall of listing-blocks a few tiers
above repeats of Ninja Warrior on
Challenge or Beavers in Vegas on
Babestation TV. Take last night. If you
hadn?t surfed down the listings you
might have missed the fantastic little
story told in ITV4?s Stuck on You:
The Football Sticker Story.
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
The Compass
World Service, 1.30pm
Gary Gerstle is looking at
revolutionary movements in
America ? everything from
the original Tea Party to the
modern one and on to the
campaign for gay rights.
Gerstle has an interesting
take on these upheavals:
he argues that they are less
errors in the operation of
America?s democracy than
ways in which it progresses.
Listen for the interview with
one of the leaders of the gay
rights movement who, as a
young man, told his pastor
that he was having ?funny
feelings? about his sexuality.
The pastor said: ?I know
what you?re trying to tell
me. All you need is to marry
a good woman and that?ll
take care of that problem.?
So the man married the
pastor?s daughter.
Radio 3 in Concert
Radio 3, 7.30pm
Tchaikovsky felt a bit
down in the mouth after
the premiere of his Fifth
Symphony. ?I have come
to the conclusion that it
is a failure,? was his verdict.
The critics tended to agree.
Its luscious romantic strings
have since risen in the
public?s estimation. The
BBC Philharmonic perform
it as well as Rossini?s
Semiramide Overture.
Here was a history of the footballsticker album that wasn?t simply an
I Love the ?70s-type laff at memories of
going ?got . . . got . . . need? in the
playground ? although there was
quite a bit of that, and the programme?s
basic style did insist on incessant
signposting on the soundtrack.
But although nostalgia was in the
passenger seat ? one man recalled
swapping his Airfix battleship for a
George Best sticker ? driving the
programme was an unfamiliar tale of
how the humble sticker became a
multimillion-pound slugfest between
Robert Maxwell and Rupert Murdoch.
Four of the men at the heart of the
craze recalled it all. How The Sun?s shy
and retiring editor Kelvin MacKenzie
threw his wallet on the table at
Panini?s offices in Italy to win its
business. How Maxwell went one
better and bought Panini outright,
before showing a talent for sucking all
the joy out of the national act of
placing stickers in dog-eared albums.
And so the four Panini employees
were cast as David to Goliath, setting
up a rival group, Merlin Publishing,
which Maxwell set about crushing by
holding its distributors to ransom. The
saga had a happy ending: Maxwell was
soon overboard, while Merlin
survived, flourished, then made a
packet by selling out for $50 million.
There?s surely a movie to made about
all this ? a quirky hobby causing
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James. Music and
chat 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 The 8th with
Charlie Sloth 11.00 Huw Stephens 1.00am
Benji B 3.00 BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra?s Stories:
Music By Numbers ? The 1975 4.00
Early Breakfast with Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo. With the author Lee Child 7.00
The Folk Show with Mark Radcliffe 8.00 Jo
Whiley 10.00 Night Fever: The Rise of the
Bee Gees 11.00 Marcus Mumford. The
Mumford & Sons frontman speaks about his
in?uences (r) 12.00 Pick of the Pops (r)
2.00am Radio 2 Playlists: Country Playlist
3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Easy 4.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Radio 2 Rocks 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3?s
classical breakfast show
9.00 Essential Classics
Vladimir Jurowski, the Principal Conductor of
the London Philharmonic Orchestra,
discusses his cultural inspirations
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Soviet Russia (1953-1991)
Donald Macleod?s exploration of Soviet music
reaches the 1970s as the space race gathers
pace, and the Cold War reaches ever
more terrifying heights. Ustvolskaya
(Composition No 1 ? Dona nobis pacem ?
part three); Gubaidulina (In croce);
Martynov (The Beatitudes); and Schnittke
(Choir Concerto ? ?rst movement)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Alexander Melnikov?s second concert setting
the musical context of Revolution in 1917.
Prokoviev (Five Poems of Anna Akhmatova,
Op 27 ? The Sun Has Filled the Room; Real
Tenderness; Memory of the Sun; Hello!; The
Grey-Eyed King; and The Ugly Duckling, Op
18); Rachmaninov (Vocalise, Op 34 No 14; Six
Romances, Op 38 ? In My Garden at Night;
To Her; Daisies; The Rat-Catcher; The Dream;
A-u! ? The Quest; and; Do Not Sing My
Beauty to Me, Op 4 No 4)
The humble sticker turned into a Fleet Street slugfest
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Verity Sharp introduces performances with
Vadim Gluzman (violin) and the Orchestra
della Svizzera Italiana, conducted by Markus
Poschner. Proko?ev (Symphony No 1 ?
Classical; and Violin Concerto No 1); and
Mozart (Symphony No 41 ? Jupiter)
3.30 Choral Evensong
A Russian Orthodox Prayer Service with
music from Rachmaninov?s setting of the
Divine Liturgy of St John Chrysostom
recorded in 2003 by the Choir of King?s
College, Cambridge, with added commentary
by the Very Revd Archimandrite Kyrll Jenner.
Celebrant: Tobias Sims. Deacon: Peter Scorer.
Director of Music: Stephen Cleobury.
Rachmaninov: Liturgy of St John Chrysostom,
Op 31 (commercial recording)
4.30 New Generation Artists
Performances by Alexandra Soumm,
Peter Moore and Andrei Ionita. Debussy
(Violin Sonata); Bach (Arioso ? arr
from Harpsichord Concerto in F minor,
BWV1056); and Weber (Romance)
5.00 In Tune
Sean Rafferty presents, with guests
including the organist Anne Page, and
members of Camerata Tchaikovsky (formerly
known as the Russian Virtuosi of Europe),
who play live. Including 5.00, 6.00 News
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An imaginative, eclectic mix of music,
featuring favourites together with
lesser-known gems, with a few surprises
thrown in for good measure
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
Tom Redmond presents from the Victoria
Hall, Hanley, as the violinist Jennifer Pike,
and the BBC Philharmonic, conducted by
Diego Matheuz play. Rossini (Overture:
Semiramide); Bruch (Violin Concerto No 1);
and Tchaikovsky (Symphony No 5)
10.00 Free Thinking
The BBC news head James Harding on a
stage version of Network starring Bryan
Cranston and directed by Ivo van Hove.
See Radio Choice
10.45 The Essay: Ten Artists
That Shook the World
The ceramicist Claire Curneen tells the
strange story of the State Porcelain Factory
and examines two of its dinner plates
that were repurposed after the
Revolution of October 1917
11.00 Late Junction
Max Reinhardt shares new ambient sounds
by Jeff Witscher, shimmering music from
Cairo and a preview of the Hudders?eld
Contemporary Music Festival
12.30am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With Sarah Montague and Nick Robinson
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Only Artists
Tom Morris and Miles Chambers (2/6)
9.30 Life Drawing
Martin Rowson draws and interviews
the journalist Julia Langdon (2/5) (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor reclects on the rock art of
Africa?s San people, and a Shinto shrine
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Lively discussion and interviews, presented
by Jenni Murray. Including at 10.41 the
Drama: Part three of Children in Need:
D for Dexter by Amanda Whittington (3/5)
10.55 The Listening Project
Fi Glover presents as two young carers
re?ect on time spent just being teenagers
11.00 The Con?dence Trick
Laura Barton searches for a type of
con?dence that is enriching (3/3) (r)
11.30 It?s a Fair Cop
Comedic tales from the police front line, with
the audience asked whether they think all
crime should be reported to the police ?
with surprising results (1/6) (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
In Tynemouth, Johnnie sees more to Aunt
Phyllis than he had suspected (3/40)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week:
The Dawn Watch
Conrad meets Marguerite Poradowski and
emotional letters follow ? for years.
By Maya Jasanoff (3/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: The Interrogation
By Roy Williams. Sean agrees to go for a
drink with an old friend, but does not realise
what he is letting himself in for (3/3) (r)
3.00 Money Box Live
Paul Lewis and his guests offer listeners
advice on their ?nancial questions
3.30 All in the Mind
Claudia Hammond launches the 2018 All in
the Mind Awards (3/8) (r)
4.00 Thinking Allowed
Thought-provoking issues
4.30 The Media Show
mayhem among media titans. All
down to the strange magic of opening
a sticker packet outside the newsagent
to see if Kenny Dalglish was inside.
Even better, slightly farther down
the EPG, was the latest in Sky Arts?s
Passions series, with Andrew Motion
assessing Philip Larkin, the poet he
knew well, but whose reputation he
did much to complicate with his
biography in 1993. In other words, the
profile had a unique take on a uniquely
contradictory subject ? Larkin, you?ll
recall, had three women on the go
even though he looked like a gone-toseed Vic Reeves. Motion?s memories
ranged from diverting titbits (Larkin
advised him to drink port at breakfast)
to intimate confidences, such as the
last time he saw his mentor, ailing in
hospital on the day of Live Aid.
All this was never less than warm,
revelatory and unflinching, yet the
seam running through was how we
could square the beloved poet with the
racist views (?Enoch was right?) dug
up in the biography. Motion ? who
seemed to have a mischievous glint in
his eye ? surmised that ?the man is
sometimes difficult; the poems are
always wonderful?. It felt as if he were
defending his defacing of a famous
portrait. But, he argued, wouldn?t we
rather have the whole Larkin rather
than bits and pieces? By the end of an
absorbing hour, you could only agree.
james.jackson@thetimes.co.uk
4.56 The Listening Project
A Children in Need-funded play and
youth group at Alison House (r)
5.00 PM
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 All Those Women
Comedy by Katherine Jakeways (1/4) (r)
7.00 The Archers
Ruth tries to play matchmaker
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor reclects on the rock art of
Africa?s San people, and a Shinto shrine
8.00 The Moral Maze
A debate on the ?uidity of gender
and trans rights (6/9)
8.45 Four Thought
Head of Acting at the Royal Central School of
Speech and Drama in London Geoff Colman
discusses truth and reality in acting (1/8)
9.00 Costing the Earth
Tom Heap reports from the UN Climate
Change Conference in Bonn (r)
9.30 Only Artists (2/6) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime: First Person
By Richard Flanagan (8/10)
11.00 Lenny Henry: Rogue?s Gallery
Lenny Henry writes and stars as a family
butcher whose son is a musical prodigy (1/4)
11.15 Yours Truly, Pierre Stone
Pierre is too busy writing to Tess Daly to
notice that his life is falling apart (4/4)
11.30 Today in Parliament
11.55 The Listening Project (r)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
The Dawn Watch (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Navy Lark 8.30 Hancock?s Half
Hour 9.00 Say the Word 9.30 The Sit Crom
10.00 Pride and Prejudice 11.00 Short
Works: The World of Somerset Maugham
11.15 Tom Thumb Redux 12.00 The Navy
Lark 12.30pm Hancock?s Half Hour 1.00
Rogue Male 1.30 The Wreck of the Alba 2.00
Regeneration 2.15 Cosmic Quest 2.30 The
Kiss 2.45 Looking for Mrs Livingstone 3.00
Pride and Prejudice 4.00 Say the Word 4.30
The Sit Crom 5.00 The Cavity Within 5.30
Andy Hamilton Sort of Remembers 6.00
Earthsearch I 6.30 Musical Genes 7.00
The Navy Lark. Comedy 7.30 Hancock?s
Half Hour. Comedy with Tony Hancock
8.00 Rogue Male. Thriller by Geoffrey
Household 8.30 The Wreck of the Alba. The
story of the Alfred Wallis painting 9.00
Short Works: The World of Somerset
Maugham. Louise is perpetually at death?s
door 9.15 Tom Thumb Redux. By Melissa
Murray 10.00 Comedy Club: Andy Hamilton
Sort of Remembers. A focus on the subject of
animals 10.30 Before They Were Famous.
Spoof documentary detailing the surprising
early careers of celebrated authors 10.45 No
Tomatoes 10.55 The Comedy Club Interview
11.00 Hard to Tell. Comedy 11.30 Radio 9
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
Mark Chapman presents the day?s sports
news 7.30 5 Live Cricket: Greatest Ashes XI
9.30 5 Live Cricket. Extraordinary Ashes
stories 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ray Parlour 10.00 Jim White 1.00pm
Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham
and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off. With
Mark Saggers 10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am
Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe 4.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 7.00 Marc Riley. The Burning
Hell perform 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Mary Anne Hobbs
1.00am The First Time with Neil Tennant
2.00 Amazing Grace 2.30 6 Music Live Hour
3.30 6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics
8.00 The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones
celebrates the 75th birthday of Daniel
Barenboim. Mozart (Concerto for two Pianos
in E-?at); Schubert (Symphony No.9 in C ?
The Great); Beethoven (12 Variations on
a Theme by Handel); and Sibelius (Valse
Triste) 10.00 Smooth Classics. With
Margherita Taylor 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday November 15 2017
11
1GT
JAN VERSWEYVELD
Concert
Gabriela Montero
Wigmore Hall, W1
Pop
Julie Byrne and
Michael Chapman
Union Chapel, N1
W
{{{((
hether she?s hurling
social-media rebukes
at the government of
her native Venezuela
or conjuring fiery
interpretations on the ivories, Gabriela
Montero is never dull. You don?t come
out of her recitals thinking, as you do
of many modern pianists, ?Amazing
technique, but where?s the charisma??
She had second helpings when the
plates of personality were handed out.
Which doesn?t mean that she
invariably fires on all cylinders. This
Radio 3 lunchtime concert clearly left
her admirers underenthused, to judge
from the polite but not thunderous
applause. I could see why.
In Schumann?s Kinderszenen the odd
finger-slip or miscalculated smudge of
pedalling worried me less than the
mannered phrasing. Of course you
don?t want these evocative miniatures
played with metronomic inflexibility,
but Montero?s concept of rubato makes
Vladimir Horowitz?s interpretations
sound like the epitome of restraint.
Then there?s her pungent timbre.
That suited the mock-heroic grandeur
of Ritter vom Steckenpferd, the ?knight
of the hobby-horse?, where she evoked
duelling swords, but less so Tr鋟merei,
which, if it were a dream at all,
sounded like a very troubled one.
Her volatility was better suited to
Shostakovich?s Piano Sonata No 2.
With typical irony the composer
described it as ?a trifle?. It?s anything
but. Written during the Second
World War, when Shostakovich
and his family, evacuated to Moscow,
were living in poverty, the piece
sandwiches a bleak Largo between
movements of nightmarish
hammering. Montero vividly captured
its harrowing intensity, even if
she sometimes seemed intent on
emulating an entire orchestra playing
the Leningrad Symphony.
Perhaps that performance
exhausted her, because the promised
improvisation that followed (dedicated
?to my broken country, Venezuela?)
was perfunctory: a limpid, minor-key
melody floated over Rachmaninov-like
textures. Still, very few classical
pianists have the guts to risk any sort
of improvisation in public. Long may
Montero remain the embodiment of
Jean Brodie?s celebrated maxim,
?Safety does not come first.?
Richard Morrison
Theatre
Trestle
Southwark Playhouse, SE1
S
{{{{(
ometimes life?s most seismic
shifts come quietly. And so
it is for Harry and Denise,
sixtysomethings whose
unremarkable paths cross in
a Yorkshire village hall in this delicate
drama by Stewart Pringle. The play,
sensitively directed by Cathal Cleary,
has a gentle acuity and displays
a shrewd attention to things and
people that are routinely overlooked.
Its motif is a trestle table ?
utilitarian, collapsible and easily
tidied away. Its pair of retirees could
artsfirst night
{{{{(
O
ratings have taken a dip. He has a rage
attack on air and a star is born.
Bryan Cranston is brilliant as Beale.
He takes his tiny bit of stage and owns
it. He?s messianic, composed and
gravelly voiced, both sensible and
insane. Think Jeremiah and Moses
with a bit of Hare Krishna thrown in.
Douglas Henshall is also grown-up
good as Max Schumacher, who is
Beale?s best friend and boss. Even
Michelle Dockery, who always seems
to be acting on eggs, has her moments
as the TV executive from hell.
They do their best to hold the entire
shebang together, but often lose out to
the sheer sensory cacophony of this
production. Flashing lights. Pulsating
ad breaks. Music that is either tonal or
screechy. Images fight to be seen,
cameras rotate this way and that,
filming the actors, the restaurant, us.
Characters keep eating (or being
seduced) in the restaurant.
Lee Hall?s adapted script is slow to
take off; about halfway through the
two-hour performance it finds its pace.
The outrage feels real but the satire
lacks a savage edge. The postscript
ending is ridiculous.
In the end, it?s just too tricksy. How
dare they do that to Howard Beale?
Box office: 020 7452 3000, to
March 24. This review ran in late
editions yesterday
ne is a 76-year-old
Yorkshireman who
launched his career in
1966 when, standing in
the rain outside a Cornish
folk club, he offered to play his guitar
in exchange for free entry. The other
is a 26-year-old native of Buffalo,
New York, who picked up a guitar
at the age of 17 after her father, an
acoustic fingerpicking maestro,
developed multiple sclerosis and
could no longer play. At this double
headliner, both offered examples
of the troubadour tradition.
?I wrote this for Bert Jansch. He
didn?t want it,? said Chapman, with
wit as dry as a Yorkshire stone wall,
of It Ain?t So, before launching into
a fluid, percussive piece that, in
Chapman?s stony, mournful voice, was
hypnotic. Chapman is a habitu� of the
folk club circuit of fifty years standing,
but Soulful Lady, from his 1970 classic
Fully Qualified Survivor, is a riff-heavy
funk-rocker, the recorded version of
which features David Bowie?s guitarist
Mick Ronson. With just a solitary
acoustic guitar, Chapman recaptured
the song?s bite.
Byrne is a quiet singer whose 2017
album Not Even Happiness was a
word-of-mouth hit, and you can see
why. There is nothing pushy about her,
but the music, somewhere between
new age ambience, singer-songwriter
reflection and acoustic folk, gets under
your skin nonetheless. Accompanied
by violin and keyboard, she sat crosslegged and played fingerpicking guitar
while singing, in sonorous tones,
words that captured an introverted
form of determination.
?I?ve been called heartbreaker for
doing justice to my own,? she claimed
on Follow My Voice, a song so stark
that the silences between the notes
were as affecting as the notes
themselves. The music suited the
austerity of the setting, particularly
the organ hum of I Live Now as a
Singer, the title of which is true. Byrne
recently gave up a job as a New York
park ranger to do this full-time.
?Michael Chapman is one of my
heroes. I hope I can tour for another
50 years,? she said. This low-key but
affecting concert made that seem like
a very sensible way to spend one?s life.
Will Hodgkinson
of the neighbourhood improvement
committee, which he
chairs. He has a gavel
that he bought on eBay,
but has never felt brave
enough to bang.
Denise
(Connie
D
Walker),
a chatty, busy
W
bookworm,
runs Zumba
b
classes in the same hall.
They fall into the habit
of stacking the chairs
and folding up the table
together
before Denise?s
t
keep-fit punters turn up.
Soon they?re sharing secrets
and sandwiches. But their
relationship
doesn?t bloom
r
predictably.
Instead, among
p
the tentatively proffered
bouquets and confidences,
there are painful misunderstandings
and thorny political disagreements,
and ultimately a courageous reckoning
of how much happiness each of them
has managed to grab and hold on to
over the years ? and how much
might still be within reach.
The performances are true and
tender, and the writing is full of
poignant observation: the ugly anorak
that, to an indifferent world, turns the
fit, Lycra-clad Denise into a sad old
woman; Harry?s fastidious manners
and haunting of the garden centre,
even though it was his wife, not he,
who had green fingers. It?s a play of
muted joy and ache that penetrates
to the bone. A stealthy heartbreaker.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 020 7407 0234. To
November 25
Bryan Cranston is messianic and composed, sensible and insane as the news anchor Howard Beale
A design for strife
Fantastic
performances,
but a frenetic
production
clogs up this
Network, says
Ann Treneman
Theatre
Network
Lyttelton, SE1
{{(((
Photographic
Portrait Prize
Read Nancy Durrant?s
verdict on the annual
competition ?
First Night in News
surrender to being
similarly diminished.
Instead they take centre
stage in encounters
that, for all their
banality, have a
profound intimacy
and quirky romance.
And, like the two ends
of the trestle, they
offer a shaky kind
of support, propping
each other up ? and
sometimes letting
one another down.
Harry (Gary Lilburn),
a widower, fills his
days with whist,
pointless errands,
shifts at Citizens Advice
and weekly meetings
S
o let me get a few things off my
chest because I?ve just come
out of Network and I?m mad as
hell and I?m not going to take it
any more. The set infuriated
me. It was like a teenager?s bedroom
? but crazier. It?s as if the director, Ivo
van Hove, and the designer, Jan
Versweyveld, took one look at that big
stage and thought: ?Oh, we can?t have
that, let?s go to Sets ?R? Us and fill it up
with stuff.?
They have turned one third of the
stage into a restaurant and bar, a
moody New York jazzy-type place.
Waitresses in slinky green lurk among
the low-lit tables where members of
the audience sit looking even moodier.
There are cocktails and cutlery.
There?s a bakery, for God?s sake. The
other side of the stage is occupied by
glass cubicles where TV people sit and
do whatever it is they do. The back is
filled by a screen because, hey, this is a
satire about TV and so, duh, we need a
humongoid screen.
Grrrr. Attention-deficit set-making.
In the end there was only one small
bit of the stage, admittedly in the
centre, that was left for actual acting.
That?s where Howard Beale lives and
works. Just in case you haven?t seen
the Paddy Chayefsky-scripted film of
1976, Beale is a veteran New York
news anchor who is fired because his
Gary Lilburn and
Connie Walker as
Harry and Denise
in Trestle
12
1GT
Wednesday November 15 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Peaky Blinders
BBC Two, 9pm
Snoop Dogg?s
favourite
super-stylish
1920s-set
gangster drama returns
for a fourth six-episode
run, following the
exploits of Tommy
Shelby (Cillian Murphy)
Early
Top
pick
and his razor-haired
cohorts. At the end
of the third series we
witnessed most of the
Shelby family being
arrested after Tommy
had dealt with the
Russian threat. ?I?ve
made a deal with
people even more
powerful than our
enemies,? said Tommy,
as his furious kin were
led away in shackles.
However, in the
opening scenes of
tonight?s episode
it looks as though
Tommy?s plan might
backfire as those
closest to him are
dragged, kicking,
screaming and
punching, to the
gallows. Will they
hang? SPOILER
ALERT! Will they
heck, but it takes
a last-minute
intervention from King
George V (he?s a crafty
one, that Tommy) to
spare them from
dangling. Yet Tommy
has some serious work
to do if he is to make
peace with his family.
Perhaps the arrival of
the Oscar-winning
actor Adrien Brody,
as a sharp-suited
Italian-American
who poses a serious
threat to the Shelby
clan, can bring them
back together. Some
hardcore fans were
critical of the third
series, with its focus on
Russian aristocracy and
materialism, but the
creator, Steven ?Taboo?
Knight (who has
written every episode),
has promised that this
series is a return to its
gritty roots. He?s not
kidding, as tonight?s
blood-soaked
conclusion attests.
The Secret
Life of the Zoo
Channel 4, 8pm
It is impossible to say
who are the more
engaging characters in
this wonderful series ?
the animals of Chester
Zoo or the humans
who care for them.
The keepers adore their
charges and familiarity
gives them a deep
insight. And it takes all
sorts. Ripley is a jewel
wasp, one of only five
(or six, they?re not easy
to count) females to the
hundred or so males
at the zoo. As Heather
Prince, one of the
keepers, reveals the
jewel wasp?s unusual
reproductive behaviour,
you start to realise the
inspiration behind
Ripley?s name. ?It?s
such a lovely bedtime
story, kids,? she says.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 The Housing Enforcers. An empty
property in Margate that could present a serious ?re risk
10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Featuring properties in
Kent, the north of England and the Midlands (r) (AD)
11.00 Getting the Builders In. Donna desperately needs
an of?ce revamp in Sandhurst, and Karl has a �,000
budget to overhaul his garden in Urmston, Greater
Manchester 11.45 Fugitives. A chance encounter with
a Dutch policeman brings a dangerous robber to justice
12.15pm Bargain Hunt. From the British Motor Museum
in Warwickshire (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather
1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Valerie
tries to help a vulnerable teenage girl who has reached
crisis point, while Sid goes Christmas shopping with
Karen (AD) 2.15 Impossible. Game show hosted by Rick
Edwards (r) 3.00 Escape to the Country. Alistair Appleton
helps a couple in the Welsh county of Ceredigion (AD)
3.45 Royal Recipes. Michael Buerk and Paul Ainsworth
resurrect a 14th-century dish (AD) 4.30 Flog It! The team
are at Herstmonceux Castle in Sussex 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Hairy Builder (r) (AD) 6.30 The Housing
Enforcers (r) 7.15 Getting the Builders In (r) 8.00 Sign
Zone: Nigella: At My Table (r) (AD, SL) 8.30 Caught Red
Handed (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC
Newsroom Live 11.30 Daily Politics. Coverage of Prime
Minister?s Questions from the House of Commons at
12.00 1.00pm Permission Impossible: Britain?s Planners.
A couple?s home is put at risk after they changed their
plans without permission and a proposal to build 523
houses on greenbelt land in Hertfordshire meets
opposition from locals (r) 2.00 Live Tennis: ATP World
Tour Finals. The afternoon session on day four from The
O2 in London, where the round-robin match between
Grigor Dimitrov and David Gof?n is set to take place
4.45 Frankie Howerd: Talking Comedy. Clips from Frankie
Howerd?s talk show appearances (r) 5.15 Street Auction.
Paul Martin and Danny Sebastian are in Wiltshire, raising
funds so that Jim Sutton, who spends his time looking
after others, can visit his ?ying ace uncle?s grave in
Canada (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by
Jeremy Vine 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two.
How the contestants are shaping up for Saturday
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Rhino farm owner John
Hume talks about new ?lm Trophy, which looks at the
evolving relationship between big game hunters and
wildlife conservationists 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment,
current affairs and fashion news, as well as showbiz
stories, cooking and gossip 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show.
Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning. Chat and lifestyle
features, including a look at the stories making the
newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm
Loose Women. The ladies chat about the issues that have
everyone talking today and are joined by Martin Clunes
and Tamara Ecclestone 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00
Dickinson?s Real Deal. David Dickinson and the team are in
Harrogate, North Yorkshire, where Simon Schneider gets
into a row over a car mascot, and Helen Gardiner is
ganged up on (r) 3.00 Tenable. Quiz hosted by Warwick
Davis in which a team of housemates from London
answers questions about top 10 lists, then tries to score
a perfect 10 in the ?nal round 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben
Shephard hosts the arcade-themed game show 5.00
The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents the quiz show 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) (AD) 9.00 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s
Hotel Hell. Part one of two. A West Virginia hotelier
whose hoarding habit has left little room for guests (r)
(AD) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA. The CEO of a solar and
home security business investigates how his staff work
(r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Come Dine
with Me. A dinner party battle in Essex (r) 1.05 My
Kitchen Rules. In the ?rst of two semi-?nals at Chateau
Impney in Worcestershire, two teams must create a
three-course Indian-inspired menu that will impress
today?s guest judge Tony Singh 2.10 Countdown. With
Dictionary Corner guest Margaret Mountford 3.00 A Place
in the Sun: Summer Sun. Properties in the La Marina Alta
region of Spain?s Costa Blanca (r) 4.00 Coast vs Country.
A semi-retired couple looking to downsize in Norfolk 5.00
Four in a Bed. The third night comes from Cledan Valley in
mid-Wales 5.30 Steph and Dom?s One Star to Five Star.
Steph and Dom challenge the owners to improve their
basic breakfast 6.00 The Simpsons. Mr Burns ?ghts
over his beloved teddy bear (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks.
Ryan and Tegan make a public announcement (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Topical talk
show 11.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. Observational
documentary giving an insight into the work of doctors at
a medical practice (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.15
The Hotel Inspector. Alex Polizzi visits the Bellingham,
a 33-bedroom Victorian hotel in Wigan (r) 1.05 Access
1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD)
2.15 NCIS. The agents investigate the death of a Navy
lieutenant at the Pentagon, but discover the chief suspect
died days before his apparent victim (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM:
Christmas Confessions (PG, 2015) A struggling
actress who moved to New York to pursue her dreams
returns to the small town she escaped years before for
the festive season, where a romance with an old
acquaintance shows her that the life she left behind may
be better than Broadway. Romance starring Sarah
Lancaster and Brendan Penny 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30
Neighbours. Steph agrees to accept her mother as an
investor (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Ash and VJ
consider how to handle the situation with Mick, unaware
Irene has put him up in a motel. Coco secretly calls Ziggy
and begs her to come home (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
Know which films to see and get
2-for-1 cinema tickets.
Subscribers can read ?lm reviews from Kevin Maher and Ed Potton, see exclusive
preview screenings and get 2-for-1 Odeon cinema tickets every week.
7PM
7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip
Chesney Hawkes and Debbie McGee
scour the southeast in search of all
things antique. Debbie hopes to conjure
up a pro?t with a mantle clock and a
hunting ?ask, while Chesney is taken
by a 100-year-old weathervane
7.00 Emmerdale Paddy and Chas decide
that they need to tell the truth, and
Pollard is evasive when pressed over
the plans for the golf course (AD)
7.30 Coronation Street Phelan ?elds
some tricky questions from the
police, while Zeedan pushes Rana
and Kate together (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 100 Per Cent Hotter: Make Me
Over New series. Mothers Jodie and
Keshia receive makeovers, but it
remains to be seen whether they get a
positive rating from the public (1/12)
8PM
8.00 DIY SOS: The Million Pound Build
for Children in Need The DIY SOS
team descend on Swansea to tackle
one of their biggest challenges
to date, as they build a centre and
supported housing for young people
in care and leaving care (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
Marcus Wareing sets the six chefs the
task of preparing and cooking a fresh
pasta dish with tiger prawns, before
they have the chance to impress with
their Signature Dish, with three of
them leaving the competition (AD)
8.00 Gino?s Italian Coastal Escape Gino
D?Acampo reveals the hidden Tuscany,
and travels to the region of Lazio via
an ancient Roman highway (3/8)
8.30 Coronation Street Nicola threatens
all that Phelan holds dear. Meanwhile,
Todd begs Billy not to dredge up
ancient history (AD)
8.00 The Secret Life of the Zoo New
series. Black rhino Kitani is due to give
birth at Chester Zoo and help swell the
ranks of this endangered species, but,
having lost three previous calves, it is
a worrying time and the keepers are
concerned that things aren?t going
to plan. See Viewing Guide (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors Polio
sufferer Paul comes in with a severely
swollen ankle and Christine, who
recently had a stroke, is still suffering
from a headache, vision problems and
impaired hearing. Jackie is suffering
from pains in her stomach and worries
it may signify a heart problem (AD)
9.00 The Apprentice Candidates have to
create advertising campaigns for a new
car in Essex, splitting into two teams.
For one of the groups, a confusing
car name and a strange choice of
advertisement location causes them
dif?culty, while the others are led
off course by a lack of direction
9.00 Peaky Blinders New series. Tommy
receives a mysterious letter on
Christmas Eve 1925 and realises
that the Shelbys are in danger of
annihilation, despite his new-found
and unprecedented legitimacy. Cillian
Murphy and Helen McCrory star.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 Gone to Pot: American Road Trip
Christopher Biggins and Bobby George
are feeling the full effects of
over-indulgence. John Fashanu and
Linda Robson meet a mum who claims
that medical marijuana has
transformed her daughter?s life.
Concludes on Friday at 9pm (2/3) (AD)
9.00 Lifers Behind Bars Documentary
exploring what it is like to serve a
long-term prison sentence in Britain.
Filmed over a year with unprecedented
access to jails, the programme meets
the men convicted of murder and
serving mandatory life sentences.
See Viewing Guide (1/2)
9.00 Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It Away
Gareth and Mitch are in north Devon
with a writ to recover more than
�000 owed by a dissatis?ed customer
to a supplier of windows and doors. A
landlord wants his property back after
months of rent arrears and alleged
anti-social behaviour in Nottingham
10.00 Man Down Dan takes his Behavioural
Unit on a historical school trip with
hopes of becoming a ?bright light? his
troubled kids can follow (4/6) (AD)
10.30 Greg Davies: The Back of My
Mum?s Head Stand-up comedy from
the Lowry in Salford. The tour received
rave reviews and was extended to
94 dates, including multiple sell-out
nights at London?s Hammersmith
Apollo and Southbank Centre (r)
10.00 The Moors Murderers Left Me for
Dead Documentary hearing the stories
of people who escaped from Britain?s
most notorious serial killers, beginning
with two men who, as pre-teens,
were approached separately by
Ian Brady and Myra Hindley (1/2)
Late
11PM
10PM
7.00 The One Show Alex Jones and
Michael Ball present topical stories
from around the UK. Plus, a chance to
catch up with Matt Baker as the
Rickshaw Challenge arrives in Hawick
9PM
UK residents only, aged 18 or over. This offer is subject to availability. New subscribers only. Visit store.thetimes.co.uk for full T&Cs.
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 The Apprentice: You?re Fired
Interview with the show?s freshly
rejected candidate (7/12)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 A Question of Sport Sue Barker
asks the questions in the quiz, with
Greg Rutherford, Jonathan Davies,
Keri-Anne Payne and Ellie Downie
11.15 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat and
Tears Jin treats a homeless man and
Jo ?nds herself dealing with broken
bones and severed ?ngers (3/8) (AD)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
11.45 The Week the Landlords Moved In
Landlords spends a week living in their
own rentals, including a woman who is
forced to question her ethics when she
?nds a pensioner struggling to cope in
one of her attic rooms (5/5) (r) (AD)
12.50am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Ireland with Simon Reeve Exploring
the history of both the Republic of
Ireland and Northern Ireland. In the
?rst episode, Simon travels along
the coast, joining the thousands who
try to climb the sacred mountain
of Croagh Patrick (1/2) (r) (AD)
10.40 On Assignment Juliet Bremner
reports from New York on Lyme
Disease. Chris Ship explores identity
and stereotyping in Toronto (7/10)
11.15 Heathrow: Britain?s Busiest
Airport Behind the scenes at the
airport. Heavy fog throws Heathrow
into turmoil and strands passengers,
while visibility has dropped to less
than 100m and safety of?cer Chris is
forced to marshal planes (1/3) (r)
12.15am Sign Zone: Harry Potter ? A History of
Magic Documentary exploring the myths, traditions and
everyday artefacts that inspired JK Rowling as she wrote
the Harry Potter novels (r) (AD, SL) 1.15-2.15 Eat Well
for Less? Gregg Wallace and Chris Bavin help a family
from Surrey try to lower their food bills (r) (AD, SL)
12.10am Jackpot247 Interactive gaming 3.00 May the
Best House Win. Homeowners in Yorkshire vie for the
�000 prize as they score one another?s properties, which
include a quirky cottage and a modern detached property
inspired by a Spanish villa (r) (SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r) (SL)
11.35 999: What?s Your Emergency?
Documentary looking at the impact on
the emergency services of the rising
number of rough sleepers (r) (AD)
12.35am Pokerstars Championship Highlights from
the Monte Carlo Main Event 1.30 Ramsay?s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (r) 2.20 FILM: To the Wonder (12,
2012) Terrence Malick?s drama with Ben Af?eck and Olga
Kurylenko 4.20 Grand Designs Australia (r) 5.15 Kirstie?s
Fill Your House for Free (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
11.05 Murder on the Internet Conclusion
of the documentary looking at the
dangers of online dating apps, told
through police archive and interviews
with friends and families of victims, as
well as police, lawyers, psychologists
and dating experts (2/2) (r)
12.05am The Body in the Lake: Countdown to
Murder The events surrounding the killing of Carol Park
(r) 1.00 SuperCasino. Live interactive gaming 3.10 Law &
Order: Special Victims Unit (r) (AD) 4.00 My Mum?s
Hotter Than Me! (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
Divine Designs (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Wednesday November 15 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
Lifers
Behind Bars
Channel 4, 9pm
The Channel 4 cameras
are inside a Scottish jail
for a two-part series
revealing what it?s like
to serve a long-term
prison sentence in
Britain. HM Prison
Shotts, halfway
between Edinburgh and
Glasgow, is Scotland?s
only maximum-security
prison, a purpose-built
facility designed for the
country?s most violent
offenders. Of the 500
prisoners, more than
200 are incarcerated
for murder. ?We?re no
here to be pampered,?
says one inmate.
Drugs and violence
are commonplace
and there?s no sense
that anyone will be
rehabilitated in this
grim environment.
Venus Uncovered
BBC Four, 9pm
Bettany Hughes has
come to shatter the
illusion of Venus as
a bit of ?divine totty?,
getting back to the
goddess as the ancients
understood her ? ?a
shape-shifting creature
of creation and
destruction . . . the force
behind all lusts and
urges?. That?s not the
premise for a boring
documentary, and
Hughes delivers a
captivating hour,
starting in Cyprus,
where she reveals a
lurid tale of severed
genitals, foaming seas
and a beautiful deity
emerging from a shell.
Hughes also uncovers
Venus?s eastern origins
and learns how the
might of Rome was
tied to the goddess.
Detectorists
BBC Four, 10pm
Children of the 1980s
will appreciate some of
the cultural references
in tonight?s episode
of the gentle comedy,
as the phrase ?chinny
reckon? gets a rare
airing and Lance?s
daughter objects to his
?tacky? Athena tennis
girl poster. Simon
Farnaby and Paul Casar
return as the rival
metal detectorists,
who are competing
for permission to detect
on the farmland that
Lance and Andy have
been scouring for the
past five years just as
it looks like it may give
up its secrets. Lance
also has a disastrous
appointment with
a hypnotherapist
(played by Line of
Duty?s Claudia Jessie).
Sport choice
BT Sport 1, 7.30pm
Tranmere Rovers of the
National League host
Peterborough United in
the FA Cup first-round
replay at Prenton Park
(kick-off 7.45pm).
The first match at
Peterborough?s ABAX
Stadium ended 1-1, with
Tranmere?s Andy Cook
coming off the bench
to head the equaliser.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 7.00 Zoo Tales (r)
(AD) 8.00 Micro Monsters with David
Attenborough (r) 8.30 Send in the Dogs
Australia (r) 9.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) 10.00
David Attenborough?s Conquest of the Skies (r)
(AD) 11.00 Modern Family (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00
NCIS: Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00
The Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD) 6.30 The Simpsons (r)
8.00 DC?s Legends of Tomorrow. The team runs
into Rip in London in 1897. Arthur Darvill guests
9.00 Marvel?s Inhumans. Medusa and Louise
desperately hunt for Black Bolt
10.00 Bounty Hunters. Barnaby, Nina and Leah
are left in a tight spot when the statues vanish
10.35 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own. Quiz with James
Corden (r) (AD) 1.00am The Force: North East
(r) 2.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) 3.00
Brit Cops: War on Crime (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Storm City (r) (AD) 7.00 The British (r)
(AD) 8.00 Fish Town (r) 9.00 The West Wing
(r) 11.00 House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without
a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00
The West Wing (r) 5.00 House (r) (AD)
6.00 House. An African dictator is brought
in for treatment (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
A basketball star?s son is murdered (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Frank must decide if the
NYPD will participate in a gang raid (r) (AD)
9.00 Band of Brothers. Easy Company takes
the town of Carentan, resulting in casualties
despite its apparent success (3/10) (r)
10.25 Band of Brothers. A group of
inexperienced paratroopers joins Easy Company
in time for Operation Market Garden (4/10) (r)
11.45 The Sopranos. Jason Barone?s father dies,
while Tony?s health improves (r) (AD)
1.00am The Sopranos. Johnny puts pressure on
Tony (r) (AD) 2.10 Tin Star (r) 3.05 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 4.20 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Highway Patrol (r) 12.00 Road Wars
(AD) 1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds.
A television starlet is stalked by a killer (r) (AD)
6.00 Criminal Minds. The team visits Mexico (r)
7.00 My Kitchen Rules: US. The comedian
Andrew Dice Clay hosts a dinner party
8.00 Elementary. A ?nancier is killed following
a damning news story (r) (AD)
9.00 Grey?s Anatomy. Meredith struggles to
come up with a new plan for Owen?s sister
10.00 Scandal. New series. The political drama
returns. Olivia faces her toughest challenge yet
11.00 Criminal Minds. A copycat killer (r)
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 1.00am Stalker (r) 2.00
Road Wars (AD) 3.00 My Kitchen Rules: US
4.00 Border Security: America?s Front Line
(r) (AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Pavarotti: A Voice for the Ages 7.15
Proko?ev: The Complete Symphonies 8.00
Auction 8.30 Watercolour Challenge 9.00 Tales
of the Unexpected 10.00 Master of Photography
(AD) 11.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
12.00 Discovering: Richard Harris 1.00pm Tales
of the Unexpected 2.00 Watercolour Challenge
2.30 Auction 3.00 Elvis: The Final Hours (AD)
4.00 Too Young to Die (AD) 5.00 Discovering:
Amy Winehouse 5.30 Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: James Coburn (AD)
7.00 Raphael: In Search of Beauty
8.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017. The
competition heads to Paddy?s Hole in South Gare
9.00 War and Peace. Adaptation of Tolstoy?s epic
starring Clemence Poesy and Malcolm McDowell
11.00 Passions. Exploring Philip Larkin?s legacy
12.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
1.00am Tales of the Unexpected. Double bill
2.00 Auction 2.30 The Art Show (AD)
3.30 Troublemakers: The Story of Land
Art 5.00 The South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00
Premier League Daily. Updates from the top
?ight 11.00 Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Live Tennis:
ATP World Tour Finals ? Grigor Dimitrov v David
Gof?n. Coverage of the afternoon session on the
fourth day from the O2 in London, as the
round-robin stage of the tournament continues
4.00pm Live: CSA T20 Challenge ? Knights v
Titans. Coverage of the round-robin match from
Diamond Oval in Kimberley, South Africa
7.30 Live Grand Slam of Darts. Coverage of day
?ve at the Wolverhampton Civic Hall, featuring
the opening four second-round matches
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the day?s
talking points and a look ahead to the events
that are likely to make the news tomorrow,
featuring previews and interviews
12.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the day?s
talking points 4.00am Live Test Cricket: India v
Sri Lanka. Coverage of the opening day?s play
in the ?rst Test at Eden Gardens in Kolkata,
as the teams begin their three-match series
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Nolan Live.
Lively debate on issues affecting Northern
Ireland, with Stephen Nolan 11.40 A Question
of Sport. With Greg Rutherford, Jonathan
Davies, Keri-Anne Payne and Ellie Downie
12.10am Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat and
Tears. Jin treats a homeless man 12.40 The
Week the Landlords Moved In. Last in the
series (r) (AD) 1.40-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 10.30pm Wales Live.
Weekly show featuring hard-hitting stories and
in-depth interviews 11.05 A Question of Sport.
With Greg Rutherford, Jonathan Davies,
Keri-Anne Payne and Ellie Downie 11.35 Junior
Doctors: Blood, Sweat and Tears. Jin treats a
homeless man (AD) 12.05am The Week the
Landlords Moved In (r) (AD) 1.05 Weather
for the Week Ahead 1.10-6.00 BBC News
Or cross your fingers at the Box Office.
Subscribers save 33% on the cover price.
Call 0800 028 5069 or visit timespacks.com/subscribe
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Scot Squad.
New series. The team are joined by new
recruits Megan Squire and Andrea McGill,
plain-talking, plain-clothes detectives, who are
fully cognisant of the word on the street 11.10
A Question of Sport. With Greg Rutherford,
Jonathan Davies, Keri-Anne Payne and Ellie
Downie 11.40 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat
and Tears (AD) 12.10am The Week the
Landlords Moved In (AD) 1.10 Weather for
the Week Ahead 1.15-6.00 BBC News
What do you
subscribe to?
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 11.15pm Spotlight.
Investigating the rise in deaths from
prescription drug abuse (r) 11.45-12.15am
Motherland. Julia gets involved in a school
fundraiser to impress a former colleague (r)
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys. Part
two of two. Arriving in Istanbul, Michael Portillo
goes on a boat trip on the Bosphorus (2/10) (r)
8.00 Gods and Monsters: Homer?s Odyssey with
Simon Armitage. The poet Simon Armitage
explores Homer?s famous work (r) (AD)
9.00 Venus Uncovered: Ancient Goddess of Love.
Bettany Hughes discovers the surprising roots
and modern relevance of Venus.
See Viewing Guide
10.00 Detectorists. Old enemies are snif?ng
around as Lance and Andy start ?nding some
decent items. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.30 The League of Gentlemen. A new road is
planned for Royston Vasey (r)
11.00 Sleuths, Spies & Sorcerers: Andrew
Marr?s Paperback Heroes. The broadcaster
explores the fantasy genre (r)
12.00 Francesco?s Venice. The city in the 18th
century (r) (AD) 1.00am Gods and Monsters:
Homer?s Odyssey with Simon Armitage (r) (AD)
2.00 The Genius of Turner: Painting the
Industrial Revolution (r) (AD) 3.00-4.00 Venus
Uncovered: Ancient Goddess of Love (r) (SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Tegan is concerned about
Granny Campbell being back (AD)
7.30 Streetmate. Scarlett Moffatt sets up a
date at an aquarium for 20-year-old Sam (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: Rise of the Planet of the Apes
(12, 2011) A genetically engineered
chimpanzee develops superior intelligence and
leads other apes to rebel against the human
race. Sci-? thriller starring James Franco (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Rude Tube. Alex Zane presents (r)
1.10 The Inbetweeners (r) (AD, SL) 2.15 First
Dates (r) (AD) 3.05 Rude Tube (r) 4.00
Black-ish (r) (AD) 4.45 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.45pm A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun (r) 2.50 Come Dine with
Me (r) 3.50 Time Team. Double bill (r)
5.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo (r)
6.55 The Supervet. A four-year-old chinchilla
arrives for surgery on a broken leg (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows
the progress of Stephen Yeoman and Anita
Findlay, who want to build a cutting-edge,
post-industrial house (7/9) (r) (AD)
9.00 999: On the Frontline. In Warwick, a
46-year-old man is paralysed from his neck down
six weeks after major spinal surgery (10/10)
10.00 Obsessive Compulsive Country House
Cleaners. A duo cleans up Forcett Hall, a
Georgian manor in North Yorkshire (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A 71-year-old woman is
rushed in after being knocked over by her
husband?s car, and four-year-old Maddi is
brought in with an injured neck (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA. A
restaurant in West Babylon, New York (r) 1.10
999: On the Frontline (r) 2.10 24 Hours in A&E
(r) (AD) 3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am Ride Lonesome (U, 1959) Western
starring Randolph Scott 12.30pm Hanover
Street (PG, 1979) Second World War drama
with Harrison Ford and Leslie-Anne Down 2.40
Flying Tigers (PG, 1942) Second World War
drama starring John Wayne and John Carroll
(b/w) 4.40 Two Rode Together (PG, 1961)
John Ford?s Western starring James Stewart
6.55 X-Men (12, 2000) Mutant outsiders with
strange powers ?ght to defend mankind from a
superhuman terrorist faction. Sci-? comic-book
adventure starring Hugh Jackman (AD)
9.00 Exodus: Gods and Kings (12, 2014)
The adoptive brother of the pharaoh of Egypt
tries to free the country?s slaves during a series
of plagues. Ridley Scott?s biblical epic starring
Christian Bale and Joel Edgerton
11.55 Transcendence (12, 2014) A scientist
is assassinated, but resurrected as an arti?cial
intelligence that makes horri?c plans for the
human race. Sci-? drama with Johnny Depp,
Rebecca Hall and Morgan Freeman (AD)
2.15am-4.00 The Bunker (18, 2016)
German comedy horror starring Pit Bukowski,
Daniel Fripan and Oona von Maydell
6.00am The Cube (r) 6.45 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records (r) 7.10 Dinner Date (r)
8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30 The Cube:
Celebrity Special (r) 9.30 The Ellen DeGeneres
Show (r) 10.20 Dinner Date (r) 11.20 Dress to
Impress (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.50 You?ve Been Framed! Top 100 Shockers (r)
1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.45 The
Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r)
6.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
6.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy. Ryan Reynolds guests (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy. Stewie kidnaps the entire cast
of Star Trek: The Next Generation (r) (AD)
10.00 Family Guy. Cleveland returns (r) (AD)
10.30 Family Guy. Lauren Bacall guests (r) (AD)
11.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
11.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.00 Ghosted (r) (AD) 12.30am The Keith
Lemon Sketch Show (r) 1.30 Release the
Hounds (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am On the Buses (r) 6.25 Classic
Coronation Street (r) 7.15 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
8.20 Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 9.15 Judge Judy (r)
10.35 A Touch of Frost (r) 12.40pm Wild at
Heart (r) (AD) 1.40 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40
Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.45 A Touch of
Frost (r) 5.55 Heartbeat. A man dies falling
from a bridge, while Peggy?s new look and
odd behaviour causes a stir (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica enters the
seedy world of political corruption to investigate
a baf?ing double murder (r) (AD)
8.00 Foyle?s War. Foyle comes up against racial
tensions and the might of the US Army when
a black GI is suspected of murdering a local
woman (2/3) (r) (AD)
10.00 Endeavour. Morse meets his
intellectual match when a serial killer haunting
the streets of Oxford keeps himself one step
ahead of the law and leaves cryptic messages
to goad the police (2/4) (r) (AD)
12.00 A Touch of Frost. An unwelcome house
guest infuriates DI Frost (r) 2.00am ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
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8.40 Pawn Stars (r) 9.35 Ironside (r) 10.40
Quincy ME (r) 11.50 The Sweeney (r) 12.50pm
The Avengers (r) 1.55 Ironside (r) 3.00 Quincy
ME (r) 4.00 The Sweeney (r) 5.00 The
Avengers. Investigating a sinister computer (r)
6.05 Storage Wars (r)
6.35 Storage Wars. Darrell and Brandon ?ght (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. A set of buttons (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. Taxidermy animals (r)
8.00 Britain?s Busiest Motorway (1/6)
8.30 Britain?s Busiest Motorway. Traf?c of?cers
deals with a crane that has exploded (2/6) (r)
9.00 Inside London Fire Brigade. Following
the work of the city?s ?re service, including
accounts of the Grenfell tragedy (1/3) (r)
10.00 FILM: Transporter 3 (15, 2008)
Underworld courier Frank Martin transports the
kidnapped daughter of a crooked government
minister across Europe. Action thriller sequel
with Jason Statham and Natalya Rudakova (AD)
12.15am The Avengers (r) 1.20 Ax Men (r)
2.15 Tommy Cooper (r) (AD, SL) 2.45 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 12.00 Don?t
Say It, Bring It 1.00pm Top Gear (AD)
3.00 Sin City Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice Road
Truckers 5.00 Impossible Engineering
6.00 Top Gear. Jeremy and James rescue
Richard from a remote area of Canada (AD)
7.00 Don?t Say It, Bring It.
Game show presented by Jason Byrne
7.30 Don?t Say It, Bring It
8.00 James May?s Cars of the People. The social
signi?cance of cars in the 20th century (1/3)
9.00 Live at the Apollo. Al Murray hosts,
with Shappi Khorsandi and Russell Kane
10.00 Zapped. Brian tries to befriend a touring
theatre group. Sylvester McCoy guests (AD)
10.40 Would I Lie to You? With Bill Oddie, Frank
Skinner, Jon Richardson and Sarah Millican
11.20 QI. With Jo Brand, Alan Davies, Vic
Reeves and Clive Anderson. Stephen Fry hosts
12.00 Room 101 (AD) 12.40am Mock the Week
1.20 QI 2.00 Room 101 (AD) 2.40 8 Out of 10
Cats 3.10 Suits (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
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a Feather 3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 Pie in
the Sky 5.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
6.00 A Fine Romance. Laura holds a dinner party
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Compo and
Foggy drink too much at a funeral (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. Lionel and Jean sneak
away to the country in the early hours
8.00 The detective investigates the murder of
black woman Dolores Kenny, a regular at a local
club?s soul all-nighters. Drama set in 1968 with
Martin Shaw and Lee Ingleby (1/4) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The investigators reopen the
15-year-old case of a vagrant who was strangled,
when DNA tests on a suspected robber reveal
the man to be the victim?s son. Peter Davison
and Keith Allen guest star (2/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Sharon?s 30th birthday
looms. Pauline Quirke and Linda Robson star
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London?s Burning
2.00 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 The Russian
Revolution in Colour 8.00 Time Team 10.00
Impossible Engineering (AD) 11.00 The Russian
Revolution in Colour 12.00 Time Team 2.00pm
Great Barrier Reef with David Attenborough
3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Some Mothers Do ?Ave
?Em 5.20 Whatever Happened to the Likely
Lads? Terry tracks down his former girlfriends
6.00 The Great Escape: Revealed (AD)
7.00 After Hitler. (1/2) Documentary about
the aftermath of the Second World War
8.00 The Golden Age of Canals. Documentary
charting the changing face of Britain?s
canals after the Second World War
9.00 The Russian Revolution in Colour. (2/2)
The rise of Lenin?s totalitarian state (2/2)
10.00 Porridge. Christmas special from 1975.
The inmates plan a Christmas escape (AD)
11.00 The Two Ronnies. With Elton John
11.55 The Golden Age of Canals. Documentary
charting the changing face of Britain?s
canals after the Second World War
1.00am The Great Escape: Revealed (AD) 2.00
Weekend Warriors (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00
MasterChef: The Professionals. Six chefs face
assorted challenges, including making
a dish with cod?s cheeks (AD)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Crime Files.
The search for a missing landlord in Swansea
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 On Assignment 11.40 Bear Grylls:
Mission Survive (r) (AD) 12.35am
Teleshopping 1.35 After Midnight 2.35 Storage
Hoarders (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 12.10am Teleshopping
1.10-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puf?n Rock) (r) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san
Rioghachd Bhig (Ben & Holly?s Little Kingdom)
(r) 5.50 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse) 6.05
Dragonan: Reis chun an iomaill (Dragons: Race
to the Edge) 6.30 D� a-nis? (What Now?) 7.00
Turas a? Bhradain (The Salmon?s Journey) (r)
7.30 Speaking Our Language (r) 7.55 Earrann
Eachdraidh (History Shorts) (r) 8.00 An L�
(News) 8.30 Prosbaig 9.00 Cunnart (r)
10.00 Fonn Fonn Fonn (r) 10.30 Horo
Gheallaidh (Celtic Music Sessions) (r)
11.00-12.00 Air an Rathad: Eco-Friendly (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 11.00 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Sbarc (r)
11.15 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Ti Fi a Cyw (r) 11.20
Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r)
11.35 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Cwm Teg (r) 11.40
Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Sbridiri (r) 12.00 News S4C
a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Y Brenin Arthur (r) 12.30
Cefn Gwlad (r) (AD) 1.00 Caeau Cymru (r) 1.30
Portmeirion (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05
Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05
Ar y Lein (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil
5.05 Y Dyfnfor 5.25 Ni Di Ni (r) 5.30 Rhyfel
Mawr Trwy Lygaid Ifanc (r) 6.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad (r) 6.30
Mabinogi-Ogi (r) 7.00 Heno 7.30 Rownd a
Rownd (AD) 7.55 Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm
(AD) 8.25 Ar y Bysus 9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd
9.30 Parti Bwyd Beca 10.00 Rygbi Pawb
10.45-11.50 Dylan ar Daith (r)
14
Wednesday November 15 2017 | the times
1GT
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7497
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3181
5
13
6
7
23
8
9
5
17
5
11
19
14
7
14
15
3
23
10
10
23
11
18
8
5
3
2
14
19
19
7
3
3
14
23
24
13
10
23
13
18
6
21
12
13
23
18
10
3
Train Tracks No 256
26
4
19
5
24
19
1
3
3
11
23
3
12
9
21
5
19
5
7
15
3
21
14
9
23
4
4
2
5
2
4
5
19
2
10
19
3
10
A
8
4
4
20
13
25
1
18
4
6
3
19
5
21
1
19
5
16
1
16
11
10
23
7
5
4
23
24
10
17
13
9
23
19
4
5
21
7
R
20
19
23
18
14
11
22
19
B
N
5
7
11
21
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
21
13
1 Nonsense (8)
7 Annul (a decree/decision)
(6)
8 That which follows (6)
9 French mathematician (6)
10 Island off India (3,5)
12 Extremely bad (7)
13 Within a building (7)
Solution to Crossword 7496
T RA P
O T
NE T
I
E
COMP
P
L A T E
I
MANU
I
Y
T E L L
E O
DUNE
D
I
S
Q
U
A
L
I
F
Y
OO
X
K Y
G
T E
N
Y
S
AC
H
K E
M
F E
R
L AMB
W E
E B A S S
P R
I
RA I DED
G
E
CENSUS
T H
T UR I NG
R N
L
EN GOO
E
L
S
AR L E S S
16 Become pale and weak (8)
17 Works hard; transplants (6)
18 Rigidly enforced (6)
20 Size, scale (6)
21 Calmness, gravity (8)
7
14
4
8
18
19
9
5
4
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
9
10
11
12
13
22
23
24
25
26
N
21
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
R
Down
1 Variety of lettuce (3)
2 Something one comes to
like (8,5)
3 Shoe protector (6)
4 Factory-made building (6)
5 Memorialising (13)
6 Allowed to remain
undisturbed (4,5)
10 Curly and looped lines (9)
11 Limestone landscape (5)
14 Exams taken again (6)
15 Bonding for bricks (6)
19 Attempt (3)
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 4006
P
L
R
D
V
A
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
E
H
T
D
P
S
A
R
S
A
H
Y
L
J
Z
E
I
O
E
S
I
R
A
Y
T
S
E
B
D
T
W
E
X
O
N
T
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4173
Futoshiki No 3043
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
No 4005
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2002
<
<
38
12
23
16
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
2
20
6
12
4
>
11
16
30
16
36
<
?
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
17
26
7
>
38
23
15
3
?
24
14
38
<
23
21
4
2
17
24
16
21
5
23
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
4
24
15
6
34
6
19
8
15
23
38
13
� PUZZLER MEDIA
18
the times | Wednesday November 15 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Alexander Grischuk
Black: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
European Team Championship,
Crete 2017
Ruy Lopez
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4
d6 5 0-0 Bd7 6 Re1 g5
A rara avis in modern chess. At
first sight this thrust of the Black
g-pawn looks ridiculous but on
the few occasions that it has been
tried Black has fared very well.
7 Bxc6
The game Korchnoi-Portisch,
Wijk aan Zee 1968 varied instead
with 7 d4 g4 8 Bxc6 Bxc6 9 Nfd2
Qh4 10 Nc4 Bg7 11 dxe5 dxe5 12
Nc3 Rd8. Here White should play
13 Qe2 with a plus. Instead
Korchnoi sensationally blundered
with 13 Nd5 and after 13 ... Bxd5
14 exd5 g3, Black won a piece as
the c4-knight is loose.
7 ... bxc6 8 d4 g4 9 Nfd2 exd4 10
Nb3 Ne7
Black wisely does not seek to
cling to his extra pawn with 10 ...
c5 when 11 c3 dxc3 12 Nxc3 blasts
open the position in favour of the
better-developed player, in this
case clearly White.
EASY
MEDIUM
HARDER
x3
21
+7
80%
OF IT
? 8 � 12
146
+ 78 + 1/2
244
x 3 + 654 + 1/2 + 996
OF IT
x 3 + 22
OF IT
________
� DND Dri] Winning Move
郉pD D D ]
遬D 0 D g] Black to play. This position is from
Crete 2017.
�) DP0 D ] Macovei-Papadopoulos,
Black has a powerful concentration of
� DRDPDnD] force on the kingside and, despite the
蹹 D D Gr] reduced material, this now proved
� ) D D )] decisive. How did he power through?
�$ D D DK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
x3
?9
70%
OF IT
+ 97 + 1/2 ? 87
4/5
OF IT
+ 918
OF IT
50%
OF IT
+ 715
32 - Psychology and Table Feel
(2) The Shotgun, the Sticky Card
and the Overly Bored Card
Let?s return to last Wednesday:
Dummy
?Q753
Declarer
?AJ109864
Although the odds narrowly favour
the drop (?A, to hope for a 1-1 split),
you should cross to dummy to lead
?Q. East may (erroneously) cover
with ?K from ?K2.
Say East doesn?t cover ?Q, but...
(a) East plays low in a split-second, far quicker than normal tempo,
what can be termed ?the shotgun?.
or
(b) East finds his cards are a bit
sticky and he struggles to play his
card normally.
or
(c) East looks around the room,
asks whether there are any biscuits, comments on the weather.
He doesn?t look interested.
Question: Who do you think
has ?K in those three scenarios?
Answer: I would guess that East
holds ?K in all three cases.
(a). The Shotgun. East is ready
for the card; he doesn?t want to
give anything away; he doesn?t
want to flinch; but he is too ready.
Bang! His ?2 hits the table almost
before ?Q is led. If he had a
singleton ?2, would he really be so
pent up?
(b). The Sticky Card. East is
nervous. He is perspiring; his cards
get sticky. Need I say more?
(c). The Overly Bored Card. If
East had a singleton ?2, he?d be
sitting normally. East is feigning
lack of interest with ?K2 and overdoing it (ethically dubious, by the
way, although not as bad as pretending to think with a singleton
? which is absolutely banned).
N
?10 6 4 2
?KQ 6 3
?-
W
S
Contract: 6?
Lead: ?K
S
3?
E
Killer Tricky No 5722
23
8
22
19
20
12min
19
20
16
28
10
19
11
27
11
7
20
10
20
?7 5 3
29
27
7
W
Pass
19
Killer Deadly No 5723
24
N
4
51min
35
24
22
7
14
7
19
play a shotgun, a sticky card, or an
overly bored card. Say East plays
low in tempo (well done East ?
but covering with ?K is clearly
wrong given declarer has advertised seven clubs, leaving West
with a void).
You rise with ?A ? and curse
when West discards. All is not lost.
You cross to ?AK dumping ?9, ruff
?3, cross to ?K, ruff ?7, cross to
?A, ruff ?J and now exit with ?J.
East wins ?K but has only diamonds left. You ruff in one hand,
dump the spade loser from the other
and claim your slam. Great recovery.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
2
3
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
+
x
x
+
x
3
=
8
+
=
27
=
75
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 48 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
= 10 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Codeword 3180
S T OP CO
E
V
I
I N E P T
Z
R
Y
E A T S
S
L
I
DR Y I NG
I
H
S T I MU L
A M M
V I BRAN
O U
N
WE E K
E
5
8
6
3
2
1
7
9
4
7
6
8 4
9 2
6 1
5
9
1 3
8 1 7 9 2
3 9 8 1
2 1
4
5 9
9 8 4 6 7
5 6 2
1
7 9 3 1
2 4 6
9 4 3
9 8
8 2 1
1
5
7
3
8
2
6
4
9
6
4
8
9
5
1
2
7
3
9
2
5
8
4
7
3
6
1
2
3
9
8
4
7
5
1
6
4
1
7
5
6
9
2
8
3
9
5
4
2
8
3
1
6
7
2
6 4
9
6
3
Train Tracks 255
CK
AC T S
U
H
H Q
P L A T E AU
F
L
E
I
U F F E R E R
L W
E
BAN J O S
S
Y
O
U S
P UMA
R
E
R
C
T
CONCH
A
H
A
E
X T O L L E D
Sudoku 9453
8
1
3
6
2
9
4
5
7
7
6
4
5
1
3
8
9
2
5
8
2
1
7
6
9
3
4
4
9
6
2
3
5
7
1
8
3
7
1
4
9
8
5
2
6
7
6
8
9
1
5
4
3
2
1
2
3
6
7
4
8
5
9
8
4
1
7
9
6
3
2
5
6
7
5
1
3
2
9
4
8
3
9
2
4
5
8
6
7
1
4
8
7
9
3
6
5
1
2
3
6
9
1
5
2
8
7
4
5
2
1
7
4
8
3
6
9
8
9
4
5
7
3
6
2
1
2
7
3
6
1
9
4
8
5
9
3
8
2
6
5
1
4
7
7
4
2
3
8
1
9
5
6
6
1
5
4
9
7
2
3
8
1
3
4
6
2
8
9
5
7
5
6
7
4
1
9
3
2
8
9
4
5
3
7
1
2
8
6
3
7
1
8
6
2
4
9
5
6
8
2
5
9
4
7
1
3
7
5
8
9
4
6
1
3
2
2
9
6
1
5
3
8
7
4
4
1
3
2
8
7
5
6
9
8
2
3 < 5
?
?
2
3
2 < 4
1
5
1
4 > 1
2
4
?
5
1
2
3
?
4
5
4
1
5
6
3
-
x
5
3
?
3 > 2
2
3
4
x
x
+
�
8
7
9
x
-
x
4
5
2
8
7
3
9
1
6
6
8
9
4
5
1
3
7
2
8
7
4
3
2
6
5
9
1
1
6
5
9
4
7
2
8
3
2
9
3
1
8
5
6
4
7
9
1
8
2
3
4
7
6
5
5
2
6
7
1
9
8
3
4
3
4
7
5
6
8
1
2
9
H
A
O
S
P
L
V
E
A
I
O
N
Y
C
O
P
E
P
A
R
N
Y
Lexica 4004
Set Square 2004
5
7
3
1
6
9
2
4
5
8
Lexica 4003
Futoshiki 3042
2
3
3
8
2
9
7
3
5
6
4
1
Suko 2082
Sudoku 9454
1
5
6
8
2
4
7
9
3
Killer 5721
Cell Blocks 3063
31
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
�
7 8 9
9 6 8
9 7
1
8 7 3
9 5
1 2
3 8 9
1 9 7
3 1
KenKen 4172
24
= 2 from 1-9 are
Kakuro 2001
13
22
All the digits
+
-
E
34
-
x
30
End
You win West?s ?K lead with
?A and, although the odds
slightly favour dropping ?K, lead
?Q in the hope East will cover, or
4
+
19
24
5
6
Killer 5720
?Q J 9 5
?10 8 5 4 2
?K 7
6?
3
3
12 2
Solutions
2
3
9
7
6
4
1
8
5
13
26
?8
?9 7
?A J 10 9 8 4 2
3/4
OF IT
3
Sudoku 9452
21
?J 9
90%
OF IT
Yesterday?s answers
age, agent, ago, ego, gannet, gat, gate,
gean, gen, genoa, gent, get, gnat, goat,
gone, gonna, nag, neg, nog, nonage,
nong, tag, tang, tango, teg, tog, toga,
tong, tonga, tonnage
?A K 8
? Q 10 6 4 2
OF IT
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 11 words, average;
15, good; 20, very good; 25, excellent
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
?A K 7 3
?A J
?Q 6 5 3
2 2 2
Set Square No 2005
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
2/
3
Polygon
________
醨D D 4kD]
郉 0 D gq]
遬Dp0N0nD]
轉 D D D ]
軵) DPDpD]
蹹 D G D ]
� DP! )p)]
�$ D $ I ]
谅媚牌侨
An excellent sacrifice to enable
his last remaining pieces to come
to direct grips with the white king.
25 Nxf8 Rxf8 26 Bf4 f5 27 exf5
Nh4 28 Ra3
The last chance was to return
some material with 28 Qd3. After
the text he is overwhelmed.
28 ... Qxf5 29 Bg5 Nf3+ 30 Rxf3
gxf3 31 Bh6 Qd5 32 Qc1 Bc3 33
Re3 Bd4 34 Rd3 Re8 35 c3 Bxf2+
A neat way to conclude an
imaginative attack.
36 Kxf2 Re2+ White resigns
SQUARE
IT
� PUZZLER MEDIA
The Azeri grandmaster Shakhriyar
Mamedyarov led his team to victory in the European Team Chess
Championship in Crete, which
finished last week. Mamedyarov
has an enterprising style as can be
seen from his buccaneering choice
of opening in today?s game. Mamedyarov faces a powerful opponent
in the needle match between Azerbaijan and Russia, which ended in
a victory for Azerbaijan.
11 Nxd4 Bg7 12 Nc3 0-0 13 Bg5 f6
14 Be3 Qe8 15 Qd3 Qf7 16 Qd2
Qg6
Black?s kingside pawn structure
looks suspect but his bishop pair
and the concentration of pieces
around his king swiftly convert
the potential disadvantage into a
weapon of attack.
17 Bf4 h5 18 b4 h4 19 a4 Qh5 20
Be3
Both sides attack fiercely on
the flanks but the ultimate target
for Black is the white king. For
this reason White needs to bring
more units over to the kingside,
so 20 Rad1 is superior to the retrograde move of the bishop.
20 ... h3 21 Nce2 hxg2 22 Nf4
Qh7 23 Nfe6 Bxe6 24 Nxe6 Ng6
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Team laureate
Cell Blocks No 3064
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
1
+
x
2
Quiz 1 The Spy Who Loved Me 2 JMW Turner
3 International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
4 Mount Pel閑 5 Kourtney, Kim and Khlo� Kardashian
6 Willem Johan Kolff 7 Rescue Me 8 That of finding,
among all plane figures of a given perimeter, the one
enclosing the greatest area 9 Heinrich Hertz 10 Surtr
or Surt 11 Emperor Kangxi. His other names were
(personal name:) Xuanye, (temple name:) Qing Shenzu,
(posthumous name:) Rendi 12 Vanguard 1. The first
solar-powered satellite, it weighed 3lb and was 6in in
diameter 13 Al Horford 14 Balance beam 15 Sue Perkins
B
A
S
P
R
O
E
A
T
O
O
R
H
O
E
R
G
A
N
O
S
H
N
T
Word watch
Ookpik (b) A sealskin
owl doll made by
Canadian Inuit
Overmorrow (a) The day
after tomorrow
Ooidal (b) Egg-shaped (of
a skull or head)
Brain Trainer
Easy 26; Medium 1,026;
Harder 1,803
Chess 1 ... Rxh2+! 2 Kg1
(2 Bxf2 Nf2 is mate) 2 ...
Be3+ 3 Kf1 Rf8+ 4 Ke1
Bd2+ 5 Kd1 Ne3 mate
15.11.17
MindGames
Sudoku
Difficult No 9455
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Fiendish No 9456
3
9 2
4
8 4
2 1 6
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
3
4 8
1 7
Ookpik
a To criticise
b A doll
c A harpoon
5
8
9 7
4
Ooidal
a Swampy
b Egg-shaped
c Of the spirit world
Answers on page 15
1
3
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
3 6
2
12 Placed in Earth orbit
by the US on March 17,
1958, what did Nikita
Khrushchev dub ?the
grapefruit satellite??
15
6 Which physician
(1911-2009) invented the
kidney dialysis machine?
4 The 1902 eruption of
which volcano destroyed
the city of Saint-Pierre
on Martinique?
7 ?Can?t you see that I?m
lonely?? is a repeated
lyric in which 1965 hit
for Fontella Bass?
5 Which American
sisters founded the
boutique clothing
and accessory chain
DASH in 2006?
8 Known to 2ndcentury BC Greek
mathematicians,
what is the
isoperimetric problem?
3
3
4
9 Which German
physicist (1857-94)
showed James Clerk
Maxwell?s theory
of electromagnetism
was correct?
10 Which fire giant
will face and kill the
Norse god Freyr
during Ragnarok?
11 Which Qing dynasty
emperor?s reign of 61
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
13 Miss Universe 2003
Amelia Vega is the
wife of which Boston
Celtics player from the
Dominican Republic?
14 The Yurchenko
loop is a skill
performed on which
apparatus in women?s
artistic gymnastics?
15 Which comedian and
broadcaster is pictured?
Answers on page 15
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
21
20
22
23
V E
S
NC
A
OP
E
E
O
CR
D
R E
A
I L
R
H
C
A R
A
K N
K
OS
H
D A
F
L T
S P
R
BO
V
D I
N
OC
E
S
M
L E
M
R E
E D
I
S S
P
S E
R
K S
E
S
R T
A
A T
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Hurley
8
9
7
H A NDO
A
X
A
L I P S Y
E
G
S
J E
L
N
B
A F L AM
A
A
N
K I NGS
N
E
K
ON L Y
L
T
E X I T
Across
1 Excellent example as writer of
music embraces church (8)
5 Smug person, greedy one ?
about right (4)
9 Bother man, non-Tory, on
regular basis (5)
10 Port fashionable in the past (7)
11 Man sent tweet off? Writings
from much earlier (3,9)
13 Arrogant and noisily changing
third letter (6)
15 Dictator recalled in Marmara
Sea chronicle (6)
17 Characters in chintz are in
such order (12)
20 Charlie greeting thin foreigner
(7)
21 Peace campaigner having
crossed river, acted as
chauffeur (5)
22 Primarily treacly, tiny, overpretty (4)
23 After review one?s free as
predicted (8)
6
1
7
1 4
The Times Quick Cryptic No 962
2
4
7 4
Yesterday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 961
4
3
2
6 1
1
9
4
1
years, starting in 1661,
was the longest in
Chinese history?
3
1
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
3 What is the world?s
largest independent
humanitarian network?
1
2
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 Barbara Bach played
the Bond girl Anya
Amasova in which
1977 film?
2 Which Englishman
painted Chichester Canal
(c 1828), The Evening
Star (c 1830) and Peace
? Burial at Sea (1842)?
8
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
7 5
5
5
PUZZLER MEDIA
7 9
8 2
1
6 9
4
8 5
Overmorrow
a The day after
tomorrow
b A lengthy ditch
c To stretch finances
3
2 6
9
7
6
Super fiendish No 9457
Down
1 Flier succeeded with wangle ?
not half! (4)
2 With no pressure move to
capture small portion (5)
3 Possibly try gal?s craze ? one
looking ahead (7,5)
4 Adaptable, she can exchange
cheque for coins? (6)
6 After upcoming editor brought
in, backs lecturers (7)
7 Favour sentimental stuff,
dulcet in the extreme,
on vessel (4,4)
8 Suitable for scamming? Very
well! (3,2,1,6)
12 Cold king associated with
economy ? that?s de?nite (53)
14 Split, make changes over
stretch of turbulent water (7)
16 Shed in ?eld not being moving
(4-2)
18 Initially appearing lively,
outgoing, now extremely
solitary (5)
19 Some prefer northern plant (4)
8
9
9
9
6
6
3
8
4 5
charisma??
She had second helpings when the
plates of personality were handed out.
Which doesn?t mean that she
invariably fires on all cylinders. This
Radio 3 lunchtime concert clearly left
her admirers underenthused, to judge
from the polite but not thunderous
applause. I could see why.
In Schumann?s Kinderszenen the odd
finger-slip or miscalculated smudge of
pedalling worried me less than the
mannered phrasing. Of course you
don?t want these evocative miniatures
played with metronomic inflexibility,
but Montero?s concept of rubato makes
Vladimir Horowitz?s interpretations
sound like the epitome of restraint.
Then there?s her pungent timbre.
That suited the mock-heroic grandeur
of Ritter vom Steckenpferd, the ?knight
of the hobby-horse?, where she evoked
duelling swords, but less so Tr鋟merei,
which, if it were a dream at all,
sounded like a very troubled one.
Her volatility was better suited to
Shostakovich?s Piano Sonata No 2.
With typical irony the composer
described it as ?a trifle?. It?s anything
but. Written during the Second
World War, when Shostakovich
and his family, evacuated to Moscow,
were living in poverty, the piece
sandwiches a bleak Largo between
movements of nightmarish
hammering. Montero vividly captured
its harrowing intensity, even if
she sometimes seemed intent on
emulating an entire orchestra playing
the Leningrad Symphony.
Perhaps that performance
exhausted her, because the promised
improvisation that followed (dedicated
?to my broken country, Venezuela?)
was perfunctory: a limpid, minor-key
melody floated over Rachmaninov-like
textures. Still, very few classical
pianists have the guts to risk any sort
of improvisation in public. Long may
Montero remain the embodiment of
Jean Brodie?s celebrated maxim,
?Safety does not come first.?
Richard Morrison
Theatre
Trestle
Southwark Playhouse, SE1
S
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