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The Times Times 2 20 December 2017

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On Wednesday
What the fashion
director wants
for Christmas
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Yes, real
says Anna Murphy
December 20 | 2017
2
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Wednesday December 20 2017 | the times
times2
Open marriage?
Six-year-old sadists
want vengeance. I’m
with them on that
Hannah Betts
O
GETTY IMAGES
ur taste for the
rougher forms of
rough justice would
appear to start
young. Scientists
have discovered six
to be the age at
which children
derive enough pleasure from
witnessing vengeful punishment that
they are prepared to pay for the
experience. (Although, maybe this
was more about the recipients being
puppets? I’ve never met a puppet
I didn’t want to punch.)
Nikolaus Steinbeis, from University
College London, argues that this sort
of thing is all part of being human.
“We need to get away from the
judgment,” he says. “Punishment is
a very effective way of ensuring others
around you behave in a fair way.”
However, he also noted a certain
sadistic satisfaction in operation:
“On the one hand they were seeing
punishment . . . so there was a frown.
But this was also mixed with pleasure,
and smiling.”
Much as we like to think of
ourselves as modern, noble and
forgiving, as with those six-year-old
sadists the yearning for vengeance
runs deep. Naturally, like all liberal,
therapised, right-minded individuals,
I view ritualised corporal punishment
as the most appalling and
anachronistic savagery. Yet give me
a piquant form of revenge served
suitably chilled and, obviously, I’m
totally down with it.
My formative moment took place
at 18 months, when my mother first
disciplined me — a tiny tap on the
wrist — after I’d put myself in danger.
I immediately walloped her back.
Matters escalated until she felt forced
to give me a definitively firm tap. Later,
as she did the washing-up, she felt a
small but discernible pressure on the
back of her leg. I was having the last hit.
My favourite Latin maxim has
always been Nemo me impune lacessit.
Literally: “Nobody shall injure me
with impunity.” Betts translation:
“No one f***s with me and lives.” It
also happens to be the motto of
Scotland — an entire nation bent on
retribution. Unlike the Scots I suppress
my festering resentments beneath a
veil of insouciance, but festering they
I think I
need to get
out more
Britain leads the world,
according to Ofcom —
but only when it comes
to the gentle arts of
internet shopping,
Neil Gaiman on
modern love and
Terry Pratchett’s
last request to him.
By Catherine Nixey
A smashing
act of
kindness
remain. “Rage is your defining
characteristic,” my beloved noted
recently, although whether it is
my penchant for the phrase “I will
destroy you”, or tendency to emit
observations such as, “In my mind
I am coming at you like a flying bear,”
I couldn’t say.
Accordingly, while my official
position may be summarised in the
old Chinese proverb “Before you
embark on a journey of revenge, dig
two graves”, my unofficial position is:
rock on. Compare my liberal-seeming
belief that life will punish the authors
of all offences. You could call it treehugging karma; an idea that people
who behave terribly will have others
behave terribly towards them. Or you
could refer to it as a vicious and
unerring conviction that if you behave
impeccably yourself, life will smite,
bludgeon and crush all opponents,
obliterating them by means of their
own unwinning personalities.
Happily, life has thrown few epic
nemeses in my direction, but when
it has I have seen this happen time
and again — not least as the monsters
who perpetrate such atrocities tend
to be hyperbolically inflated nutjobs
requiring only a pin to prick them.
The faux friend, psychotic lover or
satanic boss — no need to go medieval
on their asses. Life will do it for you.
Revenge: best served cold, and laterally.
availing ourselves of
click-and-collect
services and guzzling
on-demand TV.
Yeah, sorry, it’s me.
I work from home. How
else am I supposed to
while away the hours
— not least now that
Amazon provides not
only books, but an
infinite number of
ever more obscure
non-needs? According
to my account details, in
the past six months
I have bought: thermals,
assorted pen refills,
bogus supplements,
unused fitness devices,
eye masks, planetary
guides, discontinued
scent and a rubber
corset (since returned).
At the moment
I am receiving daily
My superstition that
no bad deed will go
unpunished is rivalled
only by a belief that
a good deed will for
ever shine.
My late mother
boasted an addiction
to Portmeirion china.
When she died we were
left with shelf after
shelf of its wares, kept
for a “best” that never
took place. I assumed
possession of the
teapot, pledging to use
it rather than keep it as
a museum piece. Alas,
last week disaster
struck and PMT
clumsiness rendered it
smashed into
unglueable pieces.
Incredibly, but 24
hours after my
Instagram lamentation,
Jo, an extremely
generous Times reader
from Sussex, was
standing outside Peter
Jones presenting me
with a spanking new
version, drawn from
her late mother-in-law’s
haul. Jo too feels
that these objects
should be loved and
enjoyed — even by
a ham-fisted hack.
I was, and remain,
profoundly moved.
Carol Midgley is away
deliveries of Break
Your Own Geodes kits,
the great Betts
Christmas gift of 2017.
Meanwhile, my
mainlining of The
Walking Dead means
that I caught myself
feeling more than a
little stabby on Oxford
Street the other eve. It
may be time to return
to office life.
N
the use of the words “red Morocco” to
describe its collection. There are,
needless to say, armchairs (winged)
and rugs (Turkish). Gaiman is not, you
suspect, the sort of man to buy his
books in Tesco.
The genre of fantasy has undergone
something of a revolution recently.
It used to belong to that category of
things, like bad driving, that people
would do, but deny. Gaiman was
frequently told in Hollywood that
“nobody understands or watches
fantasy”. He’d reply by listing fantasy
blockbusters, “and they’d say, ‘Yeah,
yeah, but Lord of the Rings doesn’t
count.’ ” The BBC in turn was “pretty
nervous” about doing its first
Gaiman adaptation, Neverwhere,
a few years back.
Now, post Game of Thrones and
Lord of the Rings, fantasy has come out
of the closet. When Gaiman finished
Anansi Boys for Radio 4, the station’s
controller sent him “a lovely letter”
telling him how much she enjoyed his
shows. Once, hearing that the
controller of Radio 4 liked fantasy
would have felt akin to learning that
your maiden aunt enjoyed death
metal. Now it feels fine.
Gaiman is acting as showrunner
(Hollywood speak for top banana)
on Good Omens. He hasn’t wholly
eil Gaiman was
feeling pleased. It
was 2005 and
Hollywood had
called. A leading
director was
interested in buying
Anansi Boys,
Gaiman’s bestselling, prizewinning
novel based on African folklore.
Gaiman had written it for his friend
Lenny Henry because Henry had
complained that “there are no black
protagonists in our horror movies”.
And now here was this director keen
to buy it. You can imagine Gaiman’s
excitement. The conversation
continued, and at some point the
director said: “And of course we’ll
make all the characters white.”
Gaiman didn’t sell it.
No matter. Gaiman would hardly
miss a Hollywood adaptation as he is
having something of a moment. An
adaptation of his 2001 novel American
Gods was one of the big series of 2017.
The BBC, with Amazon, is making an
adaptation of Good Omens, his and
Terry Pratchett’s book about Satan, to
be broadcast in 2019 starring Michael
Sheen and David Tennant. The
composer Mark-Anthony Turnage
has adapted Gaiman’s Coraline into
taken to his new role. “It was
an opera, to be presented
Terry’s fault,” he says. “I
by the Royal Opera
in March. Next week
should be off writing
you will be able to
novels.”
hear Anansi Boys in
He and Pratchett had
a six-part adaptation
always wanted to watch it
on Radio 4 from
on screen, but “neither of us
Christmas Day.
wanted to make it. We
I meet Gaiman on
wanted somebody
the set of Good
else to make it and
Omens, which is
for us to just sort of
being filmed at a
look clever.”
freezing airfield in
They had
Hemel Hempstead
delightedly planned
in Hertfordshire.
a scene in a sushi
You sense that this
restaurant (their
location would
favourite food) in
please Pratchett: if
which they would sit as
Pratchett’s Satan
extras and eat sushi.
were to turn up
For years they had
Gaiman with his wife,
anywhere it would
looked for screenwriters,
Amanda Palmer
be Hemel
but no one was quite right.
Hempstead.
Then, after his Alzheimer’s
Outside,
started to get worse,
characters in
“Terry reached out to me
summer clothes
and wrote me a letter. He
wander through
said, ‘Nobody else cares
the snow shivering
for the old girl like you and
and pretending
I do. And I have never asked
that it is August.
you to do anything before
Gaiman invites me
and we’ve been friends for
out of the cold into
35 years. Please write this
the set’s bookshop.
so I can see it before the
It is cold too.
darkness.’ ” It was, Gaiman
It has been
says, his breath misting in the
created to perfectly
air of the freezing bookshop,
match the
“a last request, I guess”.
specifications of the
So he said OK. Gaiman has
book and Gaiman’s script,
been working on it for 18 months
and it is sumptuous — the
and it will go on for most of next
sort of place that demands
year. People ask him what he’s going
Terry said to me,
‘Please write it so
I can see it before
the darkness’
the times | Wednesday December 20 2017
3
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times2
Not now we’ve got a child
CHRIS MCANDREW FOR THE TIMES
The lowdown
Crossushi
Food trends of 2017. Go!
Oh God. The pressure. Err, tacos!
Insects! Portuguese food! Avocado!
Anything that can be instagrammed!
Golly. And I thought I was
the foodie.
It was my new year’s resolution
to eat only at hipster pop-ups.
Well, it certainly shows. Still, there
is a very late entry to the mad food
trend of the year list, but it might
just take the proverbial cake.
Hit me. I love cake.
Crossushi.
Crossushi?
Correct. A food hybrid, much like
its cousin the (with good reason)
much-lauded cronut.
Except?
to showrun next and he says:
“Nothing. I’m going to become a
retired showrunner.”
It is, he says, “the absolute opposite
of being a novelist”. You have to get
up “ridiculously early” and deal with
budgets and office politics. He is
looking forward to going back to
writing books: in part because “you
get up whenever you want”.
Radio seems to appeal to him more
as a medium. For one thing, the
special effects are cheaper. For
another, it’s faster. In film-making you
crawl through the script at the rate of
a page a day. “It’s the magic of radio,”
he says. “You just get it done.”
After Gaiman told the Hollywood
director (who he refuses to name
“because they are famous still and
perhaps they have learnt better”) that
what he had said was “stupid and
offensive” and that he wasn’t going to
sell him his book, Anansi Boys was
taken up by Radio 4.
They didn’t make it all white. Indeed
at the read-through, which Gaiman
describes as “glorious”, only one of
the actors, Julian Rhind-Tutt, of the
20-odd cast wasn’t black. One of the
other actors went up to him and
said: “Well, now you know how we
normally feel.”
Anansi Boys is a bit about the
African folk character Anansi, who
spins stories, and quite a lot about
how embarrassing parents are.
Gaiman has four children — three
from his first marriage and one from
his marriage to the Dresden Dolls
singer, Amanda Palmer. “I have had
an embarrassing father and I have
been an embarrassing father,” he says.
“The embarrassingness of fatherhood
is simply inbuilt into the condition
of father.”
Embarrassment in the Gaiman line
seems to centre on clothing. Gaiman’s
siblings cringed at their father’s
bright yellow shoes. For his youngest
daughter it was the pyjama onesie
that he drove her to school in. The
day he got out of the car and displayed
it was, for her, “the single most
mortifying thing that had ever
happened to anybody”.
Onesies aren’t his only
unconventional act. His marriage to
Palmer was, initially, “a very open
relationship”. They have a two-year-old
son. So while it is “a theoretically open
relationship, it’s kind of closed in
Neil Gaiman at home.
Above right: David
Tennant and Michael
Sheen on the set of
Good Omens
Anansi Boys is on
Radio 4 daily from
Christmas Day at
11.30pm (December 30
at 2.30pm), then online
at bbc.co.uk/radio4
pr ti B
practice.
Because neither of us is going
to sleep with other people when we’ve
got a two-year-old with us, and
neither of us is going to sleep with
other people when the other can’t
because they’ve got a two-year-old
with them.
“There is a fairness to relationships.
At some point maybe it will open up
again. Right now it’s kind of moot,” he
says, given that they are “sharing a
bedroom with a two-year-old who’s
just figured out how to get out of his
crib. So that is the answer to that. It’s
boring and human, I’m afraid.”
Behind Gaiman, in the bookshop,
Michael Sheen wanders past in fawn
corduroy and a puff of grey hair,
like smoke. In the bookshop is a
hatstand on which something black
hangs. Gaiman points to it. “Terry’s
hat and scarf.”
After Pratchett died in 2015 Gaiman
said his job “is to ensure the world
speaks his name”. And he has.
Constantly, whatever the cost. The
work Gaiman is doing on Good Omens
will cost him a year and a half in
writing time (that’s two novels, says
Gaiman, who measures out his life in
pages rather than coffee spoons), but
for him, it is worth it.
Does he see it as a tribute to him?
Nothing so mawkish. “I don’t go into
each day thinking, ‘Ah, a tribute to
Terry Pratchett.’ I go in thinking, ‘Got
to make a film, let’s get it done.’ ”
A few days before I arrive they are
filming the scene in the sushi
restaurant. It was just as Pratchett
would have wanted. Better. Fantasy
is niche no more and this adaptation
has attracted some of the biggest
names in television. “Four nights ago
I got to be in a sushi restaurant with
Jon Hamm and Michael Sheen acting
away,” Gaiman says.
And Gaiman couldn’t bring himself
to be the extra he and Pratchett had
dreamt he would be.
“I couldn’t do it on my own. I would
just sit there and cry. Ninety-five per
cent of the time I’m just making this
thing. And then there is that little five
per cent of the time, like the sushi
restaurant, where . . . it destroyed me.”
Except slightly different. Because
instead of a doughnut, it is a cross
between a croissant and . . .
Don’t say it. Sushi? Really?
Exactly.
That’s rotten. Why would anyone
eat that?
People do. In California the
crossushi (actually named the
California croissant) is
instagrammed regularly at Mr
Holmes Bakehouse. Apparently it
sells out quicker than whatever
Meghan Markle wears.
Eugh. First Trump, now this! What
are the Americans playing at?
You’re not the only one to feel that
way. The crossushi has caused quite
the stir on social media — and you
know what that means.
What?
The millennials are unhappy.
Nothing new there. But wait, I’m
still confused. How can you combine
a croissant with sushi?
You top it with sesame seeds and
fill it with smoked salmon,
wasabi, pickled ginger and nori
seaweed. Then you serve soy sauce
on the side.
Sacré bleu! What would the
French say?
Best not to mention it.
Hannah Rogers
4
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Wednesday December 20 2017 | the times
fashion
On my lust list: velvet trainers, PJs
This is not the
time of year to
play it safe, says
Anna Murphy
T
is the season to make
merry, be you shopping
for yourself or
someone else. Which
means buying items
that bring joy not only
to the giver and the
receiver, but also —
just as importantly, to my mind — to
the beholder. Fashion’s oft-overlooked
superpower is to make the world a
jollier place. And, gosh, it needs to be
made jollier at the moment.
When you see someone wearing
something bright, something twinkly,
something just the right side of
bonkers, it’s hard not to smile. I know
because I am often that someone, and
strangers regularly come up to me to
compliment me — while grinning —
on the stuff that’s not black or navy.
(Although I offset the look-at-me
flourishes with plenty that’s workaday,
of course. It’s just not this that garners
the compliments.)
Lots of women tell me they worry
about wearing colour, or pattern, or
anything too different from the norm.
Stop worrying. Start enjoying. There
are few rules any more. You could
wear these corking Nike velvet trainers
in your seventies, but they would be
a great present for a 17-year-old too.
That knockout yellow silk dress? Also
as great on grandmother as on
granddaughter. Indeed, there are no
age limits on any of these present
ideas of mine. It’s all about attitude.
And I say that if your attitude to date
has been to play it safe, then ditch it.
I happen to feel it’s our moment, and
we should embrace it.
Pyjamas
The perfect present. Indulgent but
practical. My silk jimjams make
me feel better about life. Seriously.
£295, libertylondon.com
There are
few rules
now. Stop
worrying,
start
enjoying
Slippers
If these aren’t a prime candidate for
self-gifting then I don’t know what is.
Who says slippers have to be dull?
Wrong! Podiatric perfection. £69, toa.st
Phone case
The British label Preen doesn’t only make
the most gorgeous dresses in the business,
it does the most ladylike iPhone cases too.
£80, preenbythorntonbregazzi.com
Gilet
If you love
someone very
much and want
them to love you
very much in
return, buy them
this sublime
shearling gilet.
£450, whistles.com
Trainers
The acceptable face of trainer bling.
These velvet Nike Air Force 1s are very
grown-up and very cool. Accessorise with
a tuxedo suit to make like a 21st-century
Marlene Dietrich. £75, asos.com
Heels
The most happy-making shoes you can buy.
My kind of bug’s life. If Philip May’s reading,
buy some for Theresa! She needs cheering up.
£265, russellandbromley.co.uk
Eye mask
Because it’s all about getting your beauty
sleep, and this silk eye mask is big enough to
ensure no light gets in and it won’t crease your
skin. £70, oliviavonhalle.com
Ring
Made using traditional Masai techniques by
a social enterprise in Tanzania. Just one of
the ethnic goodies on this lovely website.
£29, dar-leone.com
Sunglasses
I know what you are thinking about these
Dolce & Gabbana shades: “Too fashion.” I
promise you the shape is flattering. And the hue
lifts like a scarlet lippy. £200, mytheresa.com
Shirt
There are so many special shirts at Essentiel
Antwerp that it’s difficult to choose. This
embellished-collar beauty edges it, but it’s
hard, it’s hard. £119.20, essentiel-antwerp.com
Phone charger
Because front-row types even like to charge
their phone fashionably, courtesy of this
quirky Fiorucci x Soda Shop collaboration.
£35, soda.shop
the times | Wednesday December 20 2017
5
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fashion
and an eye mask if it gets too much
Necklace
Mango’s jewellery design
team are on fire. There’s
so much that’s good. And
cheap. £29.99, mango.com
Socks
I am a socks geek and Bonne
Maison’s are among the best.
£15, trouva.com
Watch
Somehow both modern and classic,
another beauteous timepiece from
this British boutique operation.
£325, uniformwares.com
Purse
What do you give the woman who
has everything, aka me? A ponyskin
purse would do nicely, thank you.
£149, penelopechilvers.com
Brooch
So many delectable Macon & Lesquoy
brooch designs, but it’s got to be the radish.
No idea why. £16, smallable.com
Hat
Burberry has some fabulous mad-granny
knits this season and I love them all.
£150, burberry.com
Jumper
I’ve worn this jumper to death already. Like
everything from this British brand it’s
wonderfully cosy, great quality (mine looks
brand new) and the contrast details add
interest. £290, blake-ldn.com
Bag
A practical crossbody in superlatively
impractical rainbow brights. Except,
precisely because it goes with nothing,
this bag will go with everything.
£99, kurtgeiger.com
Perfume
It’s hard to choose between the six
globetrotting scents from this new British
perfumery, but for loyalty’s sake I favour
London, a mix of Rose de Mai absolute and
cedarwood. £65, gallivant-perfumes.com
Candle
Because ever since I encountered the
glorious ridiculousness that is a scented
candle with eyes I have wanted one.
Not nutty enough? It smells of coffee, in
a good way. £50, anyahindmarch.com
Dress
Kitri is slaying it — or should
that be sleighing it? — with the
Christmas party dresses this
year. This yellow satin number
is ineffably sumptuous. £185,
kitristudio.com
Hero drops
This all-natural complexion brightener
from a homegrown brand is many a
make-up artist’s secret weapon. It contains
ten natural essential oils, as well as
vitamin C. £18.24, theheroproject.co.uk
Scarf
The Norwich-based designer Sally Nencini
produces assorted varieties of knitted
loveliness. My favourite is this scarf, though
I am mighty tempted by the blankets too.
£58, sallynencini.com
6
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Wednesday December 20 2017 | the times
television & radio
Revenge is not so sweet in this timely drama
RORY MULVEY/CHANNEL 4
James
Jackson
TV review
Shamed
Channel 4
{{{{(
U2 at the BBC
BBC One
{{(((
I
t’s easy to imagine Channel 4 still
seething over losing its techno-fable
series Black Mirror to Netflix a
couple of years ago. At the time
Channel 4’s boss publicly stated
her disappointment about a series
“that couldn’t be a more Channel 4
show” disappearing off after the big
money. The show is now hyped more
than ever. Since then the channel has
given us The Watchman and Electric
Dreams (call it the Mirror effect),
neither of which has really matched its
robbed jewel’s darkly glinting quality.
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Soul Music
Radio 4, 9am
It was Christmas Eve and
Archbishop John Sentamu
was lying in bed, struggling
with pneumonia and
worrying about his ill
mother. Then O Holy Night
came on the radio.
Suddenly, as the words rang
out — “a thrill of hope, the
weary world rejoices” —
Sentamu felt transported.
This programme looks at
the hymn’s genesis (a wine
merchant, of all people,
wrote the lyrics in 1847).
Katie Melua also pops up,
talking about the impact
that the song had on her as
an eight-year-old émigrée
from crumbling postcommunist Georgia.
The East Coast
Listening Post
Radio 4, 11.15pm
If you have been irritated
by American podcasts, then
listen to this excellent satire
on the same. From the
moment it opens, with
the host reading an advert
for a bafflingly low-end
product (“Support for the
East Coast Listening Project
comes from Cheereal:
cereal to lift your mood”),
to the intrusive musical
background and the folksy
descriptions of the
rebarbative interviewees,
it is a pitch-perfect spoof.
Yet as a queasy cautionary tale for
the smartphone generation Shamed
got closer (indeed, the title sequence
— a single shot of the word “Shamed”
given an electric jolt — felt
near-identical), even if it edged more
into the territory of a 15-certificate
torture-horror flick.
The first half-hour operated on the
question “why?”: why has a young
man, Nathan, been abducted and
locked in a room? Why has a young
woman, Sarah, engineered this? Why
do her eyes burn with cold, vengeful
fury? In keeping you in the dark with
Nathan, the tale pulled you in very
nicely, or rather very nastily, as you
wondered what revelation was coming.
Eventually it all became clear: as
a holiday rep in Tenerife ten years
earlier Nathan had presided over a
drunken Sarah performing a sex act in
a nightclub as a mob of leering blokes
bayed her on. She had been filmed on
a phone and her life had been ruined.
So it turned out to be a woman
revenge-shaming a man, which is very
timely, but as things became more
speechy it entered a moral quagmire.
Here was Sarah getting her groove back
by ruining Nathan’s life on social media
— an eye for an eye — making him
perform the same sex act on a male
co-hostage. A distasteful ending, like a
sniggery teenager’s idea of vengeance.
More simply, though, Anthony
Philipson’s drama did succeed as a
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00
Huw Stephens 1.00am Benji B 3.00 BBC
Radio 1 & 1Xtra’s Stories: Dreams with Annie
Nightingale 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 The Folk Show with Mark
Radcliffe 8.00 Jo Whiley. The DJ hosts a
“Christmas Knee’s Up” at Maida Vale studios
10.00 Mark Kermode’s Celluloid Jukebox
11.00 Will Young Essential R&B 12.00 Pick
of the Pops (r) 2.00am Radio 2 Playlists
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s breakfast
show. This month we are featuring a daily
prelude and fugue from Book 2 of Bach’s
Well-Tempered Clavier, and today’s is No 20
in A minor, BWV889. Also including listener
requests and the Breakfast Advent Calendar
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein takes us through the morning
with the best in classical music. Plus, Suzy
explores potential companion pieces for a
well-known piece of music
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Bach (1685-1750)
Donald Macleod explores JS Bach’s time as
Cappellmeister at the Court in Cöthen. Bach
(Es strahle die Sonne — Cantata BWV66a
— Der Himmel dacht auf Anhalts; Allegro
— Brandenburg No 4 in G, BWV1049;
Concerto for Two Violins, BWV1043; and
Two-Part Inventions, BWV772-786)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
The violinist Isabelle Faust plays the Solo
Sonatas No 1 and 3. Presented by Penny
Gore. Bach (Sonata No 1 in G minor,
BWV1001; Partita No 3 in E, BWV1006; and
Sonata No 3 in C, BWV1005)
2.00 Live Afternoon Concert
Tom Redmond presents a concert from
Media City, Salford, in which the BBC
Philharmonic performs a programme of Bach
arrangements and pieces by Steve Elcock
and Alban Berg. Steve Elcock (Choses
A past misdeed caught up with Nathan (Nick Blood) in Shamed
renversées par le temps ou la destruction, Op
20); Bach arr Reger (O Mensch, bewein’ dein’
Sünde gross, BWV622); Berg (Violin
Concerto); and Bach arr Elgar (Fantasia and
Fugue in C minor, BWV537)
3.30 Choral Evensong
An Advent Sequence recorded in Edington
Priory Church during the 2017 Festival of
Music within the Liturgy. Organ Prelude: Wir
glauben all en einen Gott, BWV680 (Bach).
Chant: Ubi caritas et amor (plainchant).
Reading: Matthew 25 vv 31-46. Hymn: I
Heard the Voice of Jesus Say (Kingsfold).
Motet: Beati mundo corde (Byrd). Reading:
For the Time Being (WH Auden). Chant:
Rorate coeli (plainchant). Reading: The
Communion of Saints (Eric Milner White).
Motet: Warum ist das Licht gegeben
(Brahms). Hymn: How Shall We Sing
Salvation’s Song? (Llangarron). Organ
Voluntary: Toccata in F, BuxWV156 (Buxtehude)
4.30 Words and Music
Poetry and prose inspired by pearls (r)
5.45 New Generation Artists
Highlights from recent recordings of the
current New Generation artists. Jerome Kern
(Song Is You — Music in the Air); Guy
Ropartz (Piece in E flat minor for trombone
and piano); Mendelssohn (String Quartet in E
minor, Op 44 No 2); Hindemith (Clarinet
Sonata); Donald Swann (Old Songs of Lost
Love); James Lynam Molloy (Love’s Old
Sweet Song); and Ivor Novello (My Life
Belongs to You — The Dancing Years)
7.00 Bach Walks
Journeys on foot with JS Bach
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
Marking the 500th anniversary of the
Reformation. Schütz (Nun lob, mein Seel,
den Herren, SWV41; Nicht uns, Herr, sondern
deinem Namen, SWV43; and Danket dem
Herren, denn er ist freundlich, SWV45); Bach:
(Gott der Herr ist Sonn und Schild — Cantata
No 79; and Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott —
Cantata No 80) (r)
10.00 Reformation 500
Chris Bowlby visits Wittenberg on the
500th anniversary of the Reformation (r)
10.45 The Essay:
Luther’s Reformation Gang
Dr Charlotte Woodford of Cambridge
University discusses the contribution of
Katharina Von Bora, wife and theological
sparring partner, to Luther’s Reformation (r)
11.00 Late Junction
Music for mid-winter with the Winter
Solstice approaching, featuring Sufjan
Stevens, Sudan Archives and David Cain
12.30am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day (3/12)
6.00 Today
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Soul Music
How the carol O Holy Night touched the lives
of people around the world, including Katie
Melua. See Radio Choice (1/5)
9.30 Why I Changed My Mind
Why Katharine Birbalsingh declared Britain’s
state education system broken (2/4) (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week:
Village Christmas
By Laurie Lee (3/5)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Discussion and interviews, presented by Jane
Garvey. Including at 10.41 the Drama:
Holmes and Watford by Jon Canter (3/5)
10.55 The Listening Project
Two 10-year-old boys discuss the importance
of friendship. Fi Glover presents
11.00 Iceland’s Dark Lullabies
Andri Snaer Magnason reflects on the dark
side of the Icelandic Christmas (r)
11.30 It’s a Fair Cop
Tales from the police front line (6/6) (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Shaun McKenna
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 His Master’s Voices
Considering the legacy of the UK’s first
gramophone records (3/5) (r)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Curious Under the Stars
By Annamaria Murphy. First in the latest
series of the comedy drama about Gareth and
Diane, pub landlords in Glan Don, a village
perched on the Welsh coast (1/3)
3.00 Money Box Live
3.30 All in the Mind
The potential of the human mind (8/8) (r)
4.00 Thinking Allowed
4.30 The Media Show
The latest news from the media world
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 Jeremy Hardy Feels It
Jeremy explains sadness (2/4)
7.00 The Archers
Alan attempts to take control
7.15 Front Row
sharp warning about how one’s actions
are fair game for the unfading
judgment of social media. The young
will always make mistakes, except now
their lives can be dismantled in the
blink of a hashtag with devastating
consequences. There can’t be enough
dramas making this point.
U2 at the BBC was the Irish rock
veterans’ latest gift to the public. More
commonly spotted from the other end
of a sports stadium, here they were at
Abbey Road performing strings-andchoir-enhanced versions of their
anthems, which meant views of Bono’s
fillings as he bellowed out Beautiful
Day etc. The suspicious odour of
promotion hung heavy when Bono
introduced a new song as “one of the
most extraordinary things we’ve ever
had the good fortune of being part of”.
The tracks were superbly performed,
but couldn’t we have had a more
probing rock critic doing the interview
bits? Instead, we had Cat Deeley. So for
a band who once used their position to
subvert and play with the idea of being
stadium stars, this felt disappointingly
generic and diluted, but perhaps that’s
rock music today for you. There was at
least some remarkable insider-view
footage of the boys on tour in Brazil,
where Deeley didn’t just get to go
backstage, but on stage at their Sao
Paulo stadium gig. Now that’s what I
call an access-all-areas pass.
james.jackson@thetimes.co.uk
7.45 (LW) Holmes and Watford
By Jon Canter (3/5)
7.45 Holmes and Watford (3/5) (r)
8.00 We Need to Talk About Death
Joan Bakewell explores what happens to our
digital assets when we die (2/3)
8.45 Encounters
9.00 Science Stories
The story of Michael Faraday (5/5)
9.30 Soul Music (1/5) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Ritula Shah
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Eleanor
Oliphant Is Completely Fine
By Gail Honeyman (8/10)
11.00 Life on Egg
Comedy by Dan Maier (2/2) (r)
11.15 Lazy Susan:
East Coast Listening Post
Comedy by Celeste Dring and Freya Parker.
Journalist sisters Jenna and Dana tour the
UK and interview its inhabitants in their
quest to reveal something meaningful.
See Radio Choice (1/4)
11.30 Today in Parliament
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Village Christmas (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Navy Lark 8.30 A Very Private
Man 9.00 Act Your Age 9.30 Life, Death and
Sex with Mike and Sue 10.00 The Holly and
the Ivy 11.00 Truman Capote Short Stories
11.15 Wednesdays with Strangers 12.00
The Navy Lark 12.30pm A Very Private Man
1.00 A Case for Paul Temple 1.30 Hairpieces
for Horses and Clogs for Dogs 2.00 The
Remains of the Day 2.15 A Cause for
Caroling 2.30 Dombey and Son 2.45 Alive,
Alive Oh! and Other Things That Matter 3.00
The Holly and the Ivy 4.00 Act Your Age
4.30 Life, Death and Sex with Mike and Sue
5.00 Like They’ve Never Been Gone 5.30
Jeremy Hardy Feels It 6.00 A Little Twist of
Dahl 6.15 Charles Dickens: Tales of the
Supernatural 6.30 Musical Legends 7.00 The
Navy Lark 7.30 A Very Private Man 8.00 A
Case for Paul Temple. New production of a
serial from 1946 8.30 Hairpieces for Horses
and Clogs for Dogs. The relationship between
animals and their owners 9.00 Truman
Capote Short Stories. The Thanksgiving
Visitor: Part One. Abridged and produced by
Jane Marshall 9.15 Wednesdays with
Strangers. By Nick Leather. From 2009
10.00 Comedy Club: Jeremy Hardy Feels It.
Jeremy returns with a new series that not
only seconds an emotion, but explains it too
10.30 Alan Parker’s Christmas Special.
A festive mix of comedy and music 11.30
Clayton Grange. By Neil Warhurst with
additional material by Paul Barnhill
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
Build-up to Bristol City v Manchester United
in their Carabao Cup quarter-final 8.00 5 Live
Sport: Carabao Cup Football 2017-18 —
Bristol City v Manchester United (Kick-off
8.00) 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Jim White 1.00pm Hawksbee and
Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Huey Morgan 7.00 Marc Riley
9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends 1.00am The First Time with
Paul Heaton 2.00 Joe Strummer’s London
Calling 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6
Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones presents
a performance by chamber choir the Sixteen.
Alan Bullard (Glory to the Christ Child); John
Joubert (There is no rose); John Rutter
(There is a flower); Traditional French arr.
Kitson (Quelle est cette odeur); Kim Porter
(Christmas Eve); Howells (A Spotless Rose);
Marco Galvani (On Christmas Morn — World
premiere performance); Traditional
(Somerset Carol; and Past three o clock);
Poulenc (Un soir de neige); Palestrina (O
magnum mysterium); and Bob Chilcott
(Pilgrim Jesus) 10.00 Smooth Classics.
With Margherita Taylor 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday December 20 2017
7
1G T
HELEN MAYBANKS
Theatre
Alice in Winterland
Rose, Kingston
Concert
Joyce DiDonato
Wigmore Hall
C
T
{{{{(
allooh callay! Here’s a family
show to celebrate, with
fantastical thrills, humour,
brains and a big, beating
heart. The director Ciaran
McConville’s reworking of Lewis
Carroll, drawing on Alice’s Adventures
in Wonderland, Through the
Looking-Glass and Jabberwocky,
infuses the picaresque narrative with
emotional potency. Eamonn
O’Dwyer’s songs embrace rapturous
melody, lyrical wit and spry rhythm.
And Timothy Bird’s design is
transporting. The cast, performing
alongside five professional actors, are
from the Rose Youth Theatre. Their
talent and polish are impressive.
Carroll’s topsy-turvy world is given
resonance and urgency by a First
World War setting, pointing up the
surreal horror of trench combat and
nonsensical political power-mongering.
The staging begins, in the elegant hall
of a large house, with a childhood
montage, Alice growing from a baby
in her parents’ arms to the familiar
little girl in blue. The war kills her
mother and leaves her father
shell-shocked; on Christmas Eve her
bullying aunt arrives to whisk her off
to finishing school. Dad makes her a
farewell gift of his pocket watch and
desolate Alice wishes time would stop.
Miraculously, doors open in the walls
like windows on an advent calendar
and the White Rabbit appears, Alice’s
whiskery guide to Winterland.
The despotic Queen of Hearts (an
operatic, grotesque Gloriana, played
with gusto by Susannah van den Berg)
is Aunt Margaret transformed. Mother
(Amanda Gordon) reappears as a
purring, enigmatic Cheshire Cat,
Father (Daniel Goode) as a befuddled
Mad Hatter. Even the family butler,
Dodgson (a sly allusion to Carroll’s
real name), becomes the White
Knight. This is a coming-of-age tale
too; Alice must liberate Winterland
before going home to face her future.
Madeleine Lynes made a touching
opening-night Alice. Among the
puppets are cheeky talking flowers,
giant butterflies and a lonely
Bandersnatch resembling a mangy
wolf with wings, who flies through
a snowstorm, Alice on his back. The
spectacular climax brings a battle with
an enormous, nightmarish Jabberwock
symbolising loss, grief and trauma.
It’s all delivered with passion and
panache: a shivery joy.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 020 8174 0090, to Jan 7
artsfirst night
{{{{(
Laura Main as Princess Fiona and Steffan Harri as the great green ogre lead a committed cast
A romp in the swamp
Despite its
hyperactive
staging, this
new touring
show is great
fun, says
Allan Radcliffe
I
Theatre
Shrek the
Musical
Edinburgh
Playhouse
{{{((
t would be fair to say that stage
musicals inspired by animated
films have a chequered history.
The experimental director and
designer Julie Taymor gave
Disney’s screen-to-stage version of
The Lion King a truly theatrical
treatment that still stands up 18 years
after its premiere. Other shows from
the same stable, including lavish
productions of Tarzan and The Little
Mermaid, failed to exert the same grip
on the public imagination.
Shrek the Musical, returning to UK
theatres for a 13-month tour, falls
somewhere between the originality
of Taymor’s vision and the airbrushed
aesthetics of lesser shows that
originated as cartoons. In terms of
production values and commitment
of the ensemble there is little to fault.
Yet the addition of the third dimension
has the effect of flattening the
subtlety and nuance that made the
DreamWorks film such a pleasure.
The costumes, designed by Tim
Hatley, are colourful, faithful to
images from the film and the children’s
book by William Steig, and, in some
cases, technically ingenious. Yet they
are also so busy and complicated that
they tend to overwhelm the human
beings underneath. Steffan Harri, the
handsome and talented actor playing
the ogre, has to sing and emote with
his head encased in a kind of green
helmet. The pageant of fairytale
characters among the supporting cast
are required to twirl and high-kick in
pantomime-style padding.
All of which is not to say that this
remount, directed by Nigel Harman,
who originated the role of the
villainous Lord Farquaad in the West
End, isn’t great fun in places. Marcus
Ayton milks all the best wisecracks as
Donkey, Shrek’s sidekick. Laura Main
is very funny and dynamic as the
princess with a humdinger of a secret,
while Samuel Holmes succeeds in
bringing a measure of pathos to his
role as the pint-sized baddie with a
Napoleon complex.
Visually, the show impresses. It is
no mean feat to make the huge stage
at the Playhouse appear full, but
Hatley’s set gains depth and
perspective from Duncan McLean’s
clever video projections. To some
extent the technical wizardry (which
includes a gigantic puppet dragon)
proves a useful distraction from the
blandness of the score, by Jeanine
Tesori, which is deficient in catchy
hooks and contains no discernible
11 o’clock number.
Indeed, it is the curtain-call
rendition of the Monkees’ I’m a
Believer that gets the audience on their
feet and singing along. It’s a fittingly
upbeat ending to a show that, despite
its flaws, charts a lively route through
the swamp towards a well-deserved
happy ever after.
Box office: 0844 8713014, to Jan 7;
touring to Jan 6, 2019
he power of a diva at the top
of her game is an impressive
thing. Joyce DiDonato has
sold out the Wigmore Hall
twice this week, which
may not seem surprising except that
she is doing it with a programme that
is far from populist.
Her groupies tend to rave about her
voice, which, some slightly overshot
top notes apart, did sound wonderfully
peachy. Even more impressive, though,
is the intelligence and boldness with
which she deploys it.
Here the second half was devoted to
a song cycle written for her five years
ago — Camille Claudel: Into the Fire, by
the fecund American composer Jake
Heggie. He also wrote the “death row”
opera Dead Man Walking, in which
DiDonato will star when it comes to
the Barbican in March.
If not about death row, the song
cycle also has its dark side. Claudel
(1864-1943) was a fine sculptor and
Auguste Rodin’s lover (she probably
aborted his child) before being
discarded by him and incarcerated by
her brother in an asylum, where she
spent the last 30 years of her life.
Heggie’s cycle, setting an evocative
text by Gene Scheer, traces that
downward path in seven cleverly
crafted movements for soprano and
strings (the excellent Brentano String
Quartet). The music is unashamedly
recollective — I think that’s the
kindest word — in that it deliberately
alludes to the styles of Claudel’s era.
You can hear Debussy, Ravel,
Villa-Lobos and Reynaldo Hahn in the
mix, while a slow and anguished fugal
interlude for strings alone seems
straight out of a Shostakovich quartet.
Yet the cycle hangs together and was
the more effective for being delivered
as reflective reverie rather than
histrionic melodrama. It was as if
DiDonato, as Claudel, was floating
free from her imprisonment to try to
understand her traumatic life.
To precede this with songs by
Claudel’s contemporaries Strauss and
Debussy was logical (especially as
Claudel reputedly slept with the
latter), but it made for an unvaried
first half, since Heggie’s string
arrangements of Debussy’s Chansons
de Bilitis made them sound as lush and
wistful as Strauss’s Op 21 songs. And
a string-quartet rarity, Guillaume
Lekeu’s sepulchral movement, Molto
adagio sempre cantante doloroso,
provided no light relief whatsoever.
Richard Morrison
Ektertaikmekts
Theatres
HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
Please be adv
calls to the
en
can cost up to
mikute plus y
provider’s cos
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
St Martin's
020 7836 1443
66th year of Agatha Christie's
THE MOUSETRAP
Today & Friday 3pm & 7.30pm,
Tomorrow 7.30pm, Saturday 4pm
& 7.30pm
www.the-mousetrap.co.uk
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MISÉRABLES
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
Theatre Royal Drury Lane
42nd STREET
020 7087 7760
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8
1G T
Wednesday December 20 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Judi Dench: My
Passion for Trees
BBC One, 8pm
The title
may make
you think
that this is
another of those
offerings where a
national treasure is
paired with a subject
Early
Top
pick
in an arbitrary manner.
However, by the time
the credits roll you
will be in no doubt that
Judi Dench has a
genuine passion for
trees, and her
enthusiasm and love
of the subject elevates
the programme. Even
the most committed
city dweller will have
had their spirits lifted
by the sight of one of
these “beautiful,
magical beings”, as our
guide describes them.
Dench’s favourite place
is the secret woodland
at the bottom of her
garden in Surrey that
she has been nurturing
for 30 years. She
started it with her
husband, Michael
Williams. He died in
2001, but even before
that, every time a
friend or relative died,
a tree would be planted
in their honour. So
every tree has
emotional significance
for Dench. “This is
Jeff,” she says. “This is
one of my brothers.”
A silver birch planted
in honour of one of her
actor friends is “just
like him . . . very tall and
very pale”. From this
moving opening, Dench
explores a year in the
life of her trees to try
to understand her
woodland’s vital role in
our history and future.
She explores their
complex root systems
and learns how
effective trees are
as carbon-capture
machines. The more
she discovers, the
more passionate she
becomes. “My life now
is just trees,” she says,
before correcting
herself. “Trees and
champagne.”
The Secret Life
of the Zoo
Channel 4, 8pm
Christmas for the
animals at Chester Zoo
bears a striking
similarity to our
celebrations, especially
when it comes to the
chimps. The keepers
have lovingly made
gifts for our simian
cousins, but with leader
Dylan occupied by
female attention, it’s
a bit of a free-for-all
when they come to
seek out their presents.
Elsewhere, the horned
rhino couple Beni and
Asha are experiencing
a spot of family
dysfunction, while the
zoo’s thousand-strong
family of leafcutter
ants are building a
new home for
themselves out of their
Christmas bounty.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Let’s Get a Good Thing Going.
Four people from Wakefield pitch community projects to
locals 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Featuring
properties in central London, Kent and Cheshire (r) (AD)
11.00 Street Auction. Neighbours surprise a Belfast
woman who uses her own difficult life experience to help
others 11.45 Fake Britain. Fire blankets with fraudulent
safety claims (r) 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Two teams
compete in Builth Wells in Powys (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC
News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
1.45 FILM: Raiders of the Lost Ark (PG, 1981)
Archaeologist Indiana Jones tries to locate the Ark of the
Covenant before the Nazis get their hands on it. Steven
Spielberg’s action adventure with Harrison Ford and Karen
Allen (AD) 3.35 FILM: Chicken Run (U, 2000) A
headstrong chicken and her fellow fowls plan to escape
from a farm before they are turned into pies. Nick Park’s
animated comedy with the voices of Mel Gibson and Julia
Sawalha (AD) 4.55 Book of Dragons. Short film. The
legend behind the Book of Dragons 5.15 Pointless. Quiz
show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News
at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.30am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 7.00 Sign Zone:
Nigella’s Christmas Table (r) (AD, SL) 8.00 David Suchet:
In the Footsteps of St Peter (r) (AD) 9.00 Victoria
Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 11.30 Daily
Politics 1.00pm The Link (r) 1.45 Terry and Mason’s
Great Food Trip. Terry Wogan and Mason McQueen explore
the Roman city of Bath (r) 2.15 Home Away from Home.
Presented by Gyles Brandreth (r) 3.00 Inside Claridge’s.
Thirty delegations from around the world arrive at the
hotel for the Olympics and world-famous Danish eatery
Noma sets up a pop-up restaurant in the ballroom. Last in
the series (r) (AD) 4.05 Alaska: Earth’s Frozen Kingdom.
The challenges faced by the state’s tough and resourceful
animal and human inhabitants during the eight months of
winter as they cope with cold and darkness. Last in the
series (r) (AD) 5.05 The Blue Planet. How species
inhabiting the ocean’s edge deal with the dangers
of an ever-shifting environment (r) (AD) 6.00
Sacred Rivers with Simon Reeve. The adventurer travels
along the Ganges from the foothills of the Himalayas to
the Bay of Bengal to explore how India’s economy has
affected its religious culture (r) (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Ashley Banjo chats about
hosting A Night for the Emergency Services, and Christian
Slater talks about his starring role on the West End stage
in Glengarry Glen Ross 8.30 Lorraine. The comedian and
actress Rebel Wilson discusses her new film, Pitch Perfect
3 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30 This Morning. Chat
and lifestyle features, including a look at the stories
making the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the
kitchen 12.30pm Loose Women. Another helping of
topical studio discussion from a female perspective,
featuring an interview with Sarah Millican 1.30 ITV
News; Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras follow the
criminal barrister Robert Rinder as he takes on real-life
cases in a studio courtroom 3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal.
David Dickinson and his team of dealers are in Harrogate,
North Yorkshire, where Helen Gardiner, Simon Schneider
and David Ford hope to spot more valuable items (r)
4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the quiz show in
which contestants drop tokens down a choice of four
chutes in the hope of winning a £10,000 jackpot (r) 5.00
The Chase. With Bradley Walsh 6.00 Regional News;
Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am 3rd Rock from the Sun (r) (AD) 7.40 Everybody
Loves Raymond (r) 9.00 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 The Big
Bang Theory (r) (AD) 11.00 Ramsay’s Kitchen
Nightmares USA (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary
12.05pm Jamie’s Cracking Christmas. Jamie Oliver makes
turkey curry and panettone tart (r) 12.25 FILM: Carry
On Nurse (PG, 1959) The disgruntled patients on the
men’s ward of a hospital plan revenge on the stern
matron sent to keep them under control. Comedy starring
Kenneth Williams and Hattie Jacques (b/w) (AD) 2.10
Countdown. With Rufus Hound in Dictionary Corner 3.00
Lost and Found. A heavily pregnant pug cross loses her
owner, and staff try to help her and her new litter adjust.
Meanwhile, a blind labrador needs a new home 4.00 A
Place in the Sun: Winter Sun. Jasmine Harman helps Sri
Lankan couple Kulan and Kamala search for a property on
Portugal’s Algarve, with a budget of £200,000 5.00
Kirstie’s Handmade Christmas. Kirstie Allsopp hosts a
handmade stocking competition 6.00 The Simpsons.
Homer gets trapped in a cave (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks.
Harry and Ste get closer, Misbah makes Imran get a job,
and Milo thinks he has got rid of Armstrong (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 FILM: The Snow Queen (U,
2012) Animated fantasy with the voices of Jessica Straus
and Cindy Robinson 10.35 FILM: Jack and the
Beanstalk (U, 2009) A boy in a fairy-tale land must
perform a heroic deed to avoid being kicked out of school,
so goes to confront a giant. Fantasy adventure with Colin
Ford 12.25pm FILM: James and the Giant Peach (U,
1996) An unhappy orphan discovers an enormous peach
and goes on a magical journey with six friendly insects.
Animated and live-action fantasy starring Paul Terry 1.55
FILM: My Angel (PG, 2011) A 15-year-old sets out to
find an angel’s halo after dreaming that it would save his
seriously ill mother. Festive family drama starring Joseph
Phillips 3.40 FILM: Christmas Carol (PG, TVM,
2016) A handsome man challenges a well-organised and
disciplined woman’s traditional holiday views, forcing her
to learn how to compromise. Seasonal comedy starring
Anne Heche 5.20 FILM: A Fairytale Christmas (PG,
TVM, 2013) A woman spending Christmas organising
the sale of a mansion is torn between her feelings for an
old flame and the aloof owner. Romantic drama starring
C Thomas Howell and Haylie Duff (AD)
Get a
Armistead Maupin – How I wrote Tales of the City
The Perfect
Christmas Gift
Paula Byrne Celebrated houses of fiction
Edward Allen Marianne Moore, and more
Nabeelah Jaffer Islam and Britishness
Libby Purves Tinder of the 1940s
SEPTEMBER 15 2017 No. 5972
972
n
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.the-tls.co.
THE TIMES LITERARY
ARY SU
SUPPLEMENT
Patrick J. Murray Montaigne’s social network
Jamie Fisher Angry like Mailer
Charlotte Shane Provocations of feminism
Samuel Earle Never getting bored of Barthes
SEPTEMBER 29 2017 No. 5974
n
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THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
SEPTEMBER 22 2017 No. 5973
n
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THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
Tales of addiction
Inspirations of Dante
Rowan Williams
Ian Thomson
Wandering, wondering
£20
Laura Freeman Dress like a writer
Colin Grant Lost voices of immigration
Anne McElvoy The passion of Merkel
Krishan Kumar On statues and Nazis
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Terri Apter
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Waterstones
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Annette Kobak on women and the Grand Tour
Jan Marsh on Ruskin in Europe
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones host the live magazine show,
with a team of roving reporters
presenting stories of interest from
around the UK, plus studio guests
7.00 The Sweet Makers at Christmas
Four modern confectioners recreate the
treats of Christmas past — and
discover how their predecessors helped
create many of the culinary festive
traditions enjoyed today (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Lydia and Sam are torn
over a decision, and Liv urges Aaron to
go on a date with Alex (AD)
8.00 Judi Dench: My Passion for Trees
The actress meets experts and
historians to discover how embedded
trees are in Britain’s history and how
important they are to its future.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
The four remaining chefs fight to
secure their place amongst the final
three, with one contestant leaving the
competition after a cook-off in the
MasterChef kitchen (AD)
8.00 Gino’s Italian Coastal Escape Gino
heads to the Aeolian Islands (8/8)
9.00 The Real Marigold on Tour
Sheila Ferguson, Rustie Lee, Paul
Nicholas and Dennis Taylor head to
Iceland, where they split their time
between the capital city of Reykjavik
and a small fishing village.
See Viewing Guide (3/4) (AD)
9.00 Peaky Blinders In the final episode
of the series, the night of the big fight
arrives, and as the bell rings and the
crowd goes wild, dangers lurk in the
shadows for Tommy Shelby and his
family, and Tommy soon discovers
who he can truly trust. See
Viewing Guide (6/6) (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 World’s Strongest Man 2017
Highlights of the Europe’s Strongest
Man event, which took place at First
Direct Arena in Leeds, and featured
Hafthor Bjornsson in action. Presented
by James Richardson, with
commentary by Colin Bryce
and Danny Wallace (3/11)
8.30 Coronation Street Leanne falls
victim to a con, Aidan asks Johnny for
his backing, and Todd bans Billy from
confessing to the Barlows (AD)
8.00 The Secret Life of the Zoo at
Christmas Chester Zoo’s keepers are
busy making gifts for all the animals,
but with chimp leader Dylan otherwise
occupied by female attention, it is a
chaotic free-for-all when the festive
parcels are handed over to the chimps.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors Dr Farida
Ahmad tries to get to the bottom of
why her patient Robert is complaining
of dizzy spells whenever he goes
jogging, concerned that his dizziness
may be a sign of a tropical disease
from working abroad (AD)
9.00 A Night for the Emergency
Services Members of the emergency
services team show off their
performance skills, teaming up with
the likes of Diversity, Leona Lewis,
Michael Ball and Alfie Boe
9.00 The Channel: The World’s Busiest
Waterway During the first summer
since the camp known as the Jungle in
Calais was demolished, ferry captain
Mark and his crew guard their ship
from migrants (4/4)
9.00 Legally Blonde (12, 2001)
A seemingly dizzy teenager is
heartbroken when her boyfriend dumps
her because he thinks she is not
intelligent enough to help his political
career. To prove him wrong she enrols
at Harvard, but finds herself out of her
depth as other students do their best
to humiliate her. Comedy with Reese
Witherspoon, Luke Wilson, Selma Blair,
Matthew Davis and Victor Garber
7.30 Coronation Street Leanne dips
her toe back into the dating game.
Meanwhile, Aidan and Alya hope
to clinch a big new deal (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 The League of Gentlemen The
situation in Royston Vasey reaches an
earth-shattering climax (3/3) (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 Male Rape: Breaking the Silence
The stories of three men who are
victims of rape and are now
breaking their silence
10.30 Mock the Week Christmas Special
Dara O Briain and Hugh Dennis host a
festive special and are joined by an
array of quests (13/13)
10.30 Regional News
11.25 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat and
Tears The junior doctors come to the
end of their placements, as Jo
performs her most complicated surgery
so far, and Jess helps a patient with a
heart problem (8/8) (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7PM
Waterstones Gift Cards may be redeemed in any Waterstones store in the UK towards the purchase of all eligible Waterstones products available. Gift Cards cannot be redeemed for cash. Waterstones Gift Cards will be sent within 28 days of purchasing a TLS subscription.
12.00-6.00 BBC News
11.00 Alternativity: The Performance
Contemporary performance of the
nativity play (2/2)
10.45 Car Crash Britain: Caught on
Camera Road accidents and
near-misses captured on personal
cameras, including what happened
when a man’s runaway tractor crashed
into his ex-wife’s garden (1/4) (r)
11.30 Cunk on Christmas The Weekly Wipe
commentator examines the true
meaning of Christmas by exploring
pagan winter festivals (r) (AD)
11.45 Play to the Whistle Panel show with
guests including Frank Lampard,
Bradley Walsh and John Terry (1/6) (r)
12.00 Dara and Ed’s Road to Mandalay Dara O Briain
and Ed Byrne reach Thailand, where they find out about
locals’ reaction to the tourist explosion in Bangkok (r)
(AD) 1.00am Employable Me (r) (AD) 2.00 Sign Zone:
Attenborough and the Giant Elephant (r) (AD, SL)
3.00-4.00 Rick Stein’s Road to Mexico (r) (AD, SL)
12.35am Jackpot247 3.00 May the Best House Win.
Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire homeowners Julie D’Ray,
Claire Newman, Pauline Tulloch and Irita Stipra rate one
another’s properties, hoping to win the £1,000 prize (r)
(SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Guests air their differences (r) (SL)
10.00 Gogglebox The armchair critics share
their opinions on what they have been
watching during the week. The
programme captures their instant
reactions and lively discussions from
the comfort of their homes (r) (AD)
11.05 Micky Flanagan: Back in the Game
The comedian performs to his home
crowd at London’s Hackney Empire,
regaling his audience with tales of
middle age, marriage and a man’s
prerogative. Recorded as part of the
comic’s Back in the Game tour (r)
12.40am Alan Carr Live: Spexy Beast The comedian
performs at the Manchester Arena (r) 1.35 One Born
Every Minute. Documentary (r) (AD) 2.30 The Supervet
(r) (AD) 3.25 Grand Designs Australia (r) 4.25 Phil
Spencer: Secret Agent (r) (AD) 5.20 Jamie’s Comfort Food
(r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown. With Rufus Hound (r)
10.55 Football on 5: The Carabao Cup
Highlights of the quarter-finals, which
featured Arsenal v West Ham United,
Leicester City v Manchester City,
Chelsea v Bournemouth, and Bristol
City v Manchester United
12.15am The Lego Story: Brick by Brick Charting
the history of the toy, looking at how the company has
grown since its origins in 1930s Denmark (r) 1.15
SuperCasino 3.10 Top 20 Funniest (r) 4.00 Now That’s
Funny! (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Great
Artists (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Wednesday December 20 2017
9
1G T
television & radio
The Two Ronnies
BBC Four, 8pm/9pm
The endless repeats of
festive offerings from
Messrs Corbett and
Barker used to draw
the ire of the licencefee payer. However,
there may be a more
receptive audience for
the comforting
nostalgia provided by
these two archive gems.
In Old Fashioned
Christmas Mystery
(1973) it is Christmas
Eve 1874 and the turkey
has been stolen. Can
the bumbling detectives
Piggy Malone and
Charley Farley deduce
who stole it? The
format even allows for
a classic Barker
monologue. There is
also a repeat of The
Two Ronnies Christmas
Show from 1982, with
guest David Essex.
The Real Marigold
on Tour
BBC One, 9pm
Paul Nicholas, Sheila
Ferguson, Dennis
Taylor and Rustie Lee
are sampling life in
Iceland, which has one
of the highest life
expectancies in the
world. They start in
the fishing village of
Husavik, which is
populated mostly by
oldies. They try “hot
potting” in the
geothermal waters,
sing with a choir and
go whale watching,
but find the perpetual
daylight unsettling.
The pace is upped a bit
when they travel to the
capital, Reykjavik,
where Ferguson goes
on a date with a chap
she met in Husavik.
“This one I’ll see
again,” she says.
Peaky Blinders
BBC Two, 9pm
There’s a brutal climax
to the fourth series of
Steven Knight’s period
drama, with the
opening scenes set to
the backdrop of the
boxing match between
Bonnie Gold and
Goliath. The tense and
bloody scrap in the ring
is nothing compared
with what goes on
behind the scenes as
Luca Changretta
(Adrien Brody) exacts
his revenge on the
Shelby clan. If only
Tommy (Cillian
Murphy) had heeded
the cryptic pre-fight
warning of Alfie
Solomons (Tom Hardy).
“Big will f*** small,”
the bushy-bearded
Jewish gangster growls
at Tommy. “I already
know who wins.”
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7.30pm
Bristol City welcome
Manchester United to
Ashton Gate in the
quarter-finals of the
Carabao Cup (kick-off
8pm). The Robins
landed the plum
tie against the
defending champions
by hammering Crystal
Palace 4-1 in the
previous round.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Futurama (r) 7.30 The Simpsons (r)
9.30 Modern Family (r) 11.00 David
Attenborough’s Wild City (r) (AD) 12.00 Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 2.00pm NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 3.00
Golf’s Funniest Moments (r) (AD) 4.00 Modern
Family (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r)
6.00 Futurama. Bender gets down to the serious
business of home brewing (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Michael Bublé’s Christmas in Hollywood.
Festive special, with guest appearances by
Celine Dion, Tori Kelly and Sharon Jones
9.00 FILM: The Rock (15, 1996) Action
thriller starring Sean Connery and Nicolas Cage
11.40 The Russell Howard Hour. Topical comedy
and entertainment show (r)
12.40am A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
1.40 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 2.40 The Force:
Manchester (r) 3.40 Micro Monsters with David
Attenborough (r) 4.05 David Attenborough’s
Wild City (r) (AD) 5.00 Big Cats: An Amazing
Animal Family. The evolution of cats (r) (AD)
6.00am Urban Secrets (r) 7.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation. Seven episodes (r)
2.00pm Blue Bloods. Six episodes (r) (AD)
6.00 Blue Bloods. Frank hunts a colleague’s
killer (1/2) (r) (AD)
7.00 Blue Bloods. A member of the Reagan
family is shot (2/2) (r) (AD)
8.00 Micro Monsters with David Attenborough.
Battles and rivalries within the world of bugs (r)
8.30 Micro Monsters with David Attenborough.
How creepy-crawly predators defuse the
defences of their prey (r)
9.00 Game of Thrones (r)
10.15 Game of Thrones. Battle commences as
the Lannisters launch their bid for the throne.
Robb rounds up his allies, Tyrion forms an
unlikely alliance and a sinister new enemy
emerges at Castle Black (r) (AD)
11.35 Game of Thrones (r) (AD)
12.50am Band of Brothers (r) 2.15 The
Sopranos (r) (AD) 3.20 The Tunnel: Vengeance
(r) 4.20 Blue Bloods (r) (AD)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Motorway Patrol (r) (AD) 12.00 UK
Border Force (AD) 1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize
(r) (AD) 2.00 Nothing to Declare. Four
back-to-back episodes (r) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 Children’s Hospital (r) (AD)
7.30 Children’s Hospital (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Holmes investigates a
dangerous drug trial (r) (AD)
9.00 Grey’s Anatomy. A disaster at a funfair
sparks a wave of memories
10.00 Scandal. Gladiators come together to
celebrate Quinn and Charlie’s big day
11.00 Criminal Minds. The team investigates a
murderer striking on the same date each year (r)
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 1.00am Criminal Minds.
Three episodes (r) 4.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
5.00 Nothing to Declare. Double bill (r)
6.00am Arts Scholarships: Sky Academy 6.10
The Sleeping Beauty 8.30 Landscape Artist of
the Year 2017 9.30 The Legendary Bing Crosby
(AD) 10.45 Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music
12.00 Johnny Cash Christmas Special 1977
1.00pm Tales of the Unexpected. Double bill
2.00 André Rieu: European Dream 3.00
Discovering: Dean Martin (AD) 4.00 The Sixties
(AD) 5.00 The Seventies (AD)
6.00 The Eighties (AD)
7.00 Frank Sinatra: In Concert at the Royal
Festival Hall. A 1970 performance by the singer
8.00 André Rieu: My Musical Year
9.00 FILM: The Phantom of the Opera
(12, 2004) Musical starring Gerard Butler,
Emmy Rossum and Miranda Richardson
11.30 Rod Stewart: Merry Christmas, Baby. The
rock singer performs songs from his debut
Christmas album. Recorded in 2012
12.45am Johnny Cash Christmas Special 1977
1.45 Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music 2.55
La Boheme 5.00 Tales of the Unexpected
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00
Premier League Daily 11.00 Sky Sports Daily
12.00 Sky Sports News 1.30pm Live
International T20 Cricket: India v Sri Lanka.
Coverage of the first match in a three-game
series, staged at Barabati Stadium in Cuttack
5.00 Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Sky Sports Tonight
7.30 Live Carabao Cup: Bristol City v Manchesterr
United. (Kick-off 8.00). Coverage of the
quarter-final clash at Ashton Gate, as the Robinss
look to produce an upset against the holders.
The hosts have been in good form so far this
season and have already claimed two Premier
League scalps. See Viewing Guide
10.30 Conor Benn: The Destroyer. A profile of
the boxer, the son of legendary fighter Nigel
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the day’s
talking points and a look ahead to the events
that are likely to make the news tomorrow
12.00 Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Nolan’s
Christmas Cracker. Daniel O’Donnell, Nathan
Carter and guests join Stephen Nolan in studio
for a night of Christmas cheer and festive fun
11.40 Male Rape: Breaking the Silence. The
stories of three men who are victims of rape
12.20am Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat and
Tears. The junior doctors come to the end of
their placements (AD) 12.50-6.00 BBC News
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BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Scot Squad. The
police deal with an expensive drop of whisky.
Last in the series 11.10 Male Rape: Breaking
the Silence 11.50 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat
and Tears (AD) 12.20am Weather for the
Week Ahead 12.25-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Young, Welsh
and Pretty Minted. Cameras follow Erin Budina,
an Instagram influencer from Cowbridge in the
Vale of Glamorgan 11.10 Male Rape: Breaking
the Silence 11.50 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat
and Tears (AD) 12.20am Weather for the
Week Ahead 12.25-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 1.45pm Inside Claridge’s
(r) (AD) 2.45 Politics Scotland (r) 3.30-4.05
Terry and Mason’s Great Food Trip (r)
To subscribe visit tlssubs.imbmsubs.com/tlswater12 or call 01293 312178 and quote code TLSWATER12
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Crime Files
10.45 Gino’s Italian Coastal Escape
11.10-11.45 Wales on TV (r)
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
7.30 Christmas University Challenge. The
second semi-final of the Christmas contest (r)
8.00 The Two Ronnies: Old Fashioned Christmas
Mystery. The two comedians host Christmas
dinner, but someone steals the turkey and they
must put their heads together to capture the
thief. Comedy starring Ronnie Corbett and
Ronnie Barker. See Viewing Guide (r)
9.00 The Two Ronnies: Christmas Show 1982.
Featuring Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett in
a special Christmas show of sketches, joined by
their guest David Essex. See Viewing Guide (r)
10.00 The Story of Fairytale of New York. The
making of the Pogues and Kirsty MacColl’s
classic Christmas song (r)
11.00 TOTP2: Christmas 2012. Mark Radcliffe
introduces a selection of archive festive songs,
including tracks by Slade, Wizzard, Ramones,
Mahalia Jackson and Paul McCartney (r)
12.30am The Two Ronnies (r) 1.30 Bought
with Love: The Secret History of British Art
Collections (r) 2.30-3.30 The Trains That Time
Forgot: Britain’s Lost Railway Journeys.
Presented by Andrew Martin (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
7.55 Rude(ish) Tube Shorts (r) 8.10 FILM: The
Dog Who Saved the Holidays (PG, TVM,
2012) Comedy sequel starring Shelley Long
10.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 11.00 How I
Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 12.00 New Girl (r)
(AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
2.00 Kevin Can Wait (r) (AD) 3.00 How I Met
Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New Girl (r) (AD)
5.00 Black-ish (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 The Goldbergs: Merry Christmas (r) (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Don’t Tell the Bride: Christmas on Ice
10.00 8 Out of 10 Cats Christmas Special (r)
10.55 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.25 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.50 Gogglebox (r) (AD)
12.55am Rude Tube (r) 2.00 8 Out of 10 Cats
Christmas Special (r) 2.45 Gogglebox (r) (AD)
3.35 Rude Tube (r) 4.05 How I Met Your Mother
(r) (AD) 4.50 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.35 Four in
a Bed (r) 12.10pm A Place in the Sun: Winter
Sun (r) 2.20 Time Team (r) 4.30 The Great
British Bake Off (r) (AD) 5.50 Jamie’s Festive
Feast. Dishes for lazy winter days (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. A Great Dane comes to the
clinic needing major spinal surgery (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud revisits
carpenter Bill Bradley and his wife Sarah, who
set out to build two timber houses on a very
limited space in south London (r) (AD)
9.00 Penelope Keith’s Coastal Villages.
Penelope discovers the seaside villages of
Northumberland and the Scottish Borders (AD)
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. A 66-year-old man is
admitted to A&E after sustaining a head wound
during a 10-foot fall, and an arm injury
threatens to leave a father-of-three unable to
use his right hand (5/8) (r) (AD)
11.10 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown
Christmas Special. With Kathy Burke (r)
12.15am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.10 Penelope Keith’s Coastal Villages (r) (AD)
2.15 24 Hours in A&E. Documentary (r) (AD)
3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am True Grit (PG, 1969) Western
starring John Wayne 1.35pm Stalag 17 (PG,
1953) Second World War PoW drama starring
William Holden (b/w) 4.00 The Train (15,
1964) French Resistance forces try to stop the
Nazis exporting national treasures to Germany.
Second World War adventure with Burt
Lancaster and Paul Scofield (b/w)
6.50 Romancing the Stone (12, 1984)
Comedy adventure starring Michael Douglas
9.00 Night at the Museum: Secret of the
Tomb (PG, 2014) Nightwatchman Larry
searches for a way to repair the magical artefact
that brings museum exhibits to life. Fantasy
comedy sequel starring Ben Stiller (AD)
10.55 X-Men: First Class (12, 2011) The
first generation of the superhero team is
brought together in the 1960s to avert a nuclear
war. Superhero adventure prequel starring
James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender (AD)
1.30am-3.25 100 Bloody Acres (15, 2012)
Three people on their way to a music festival are
given a lift by two brothers who enhance their
organic fertiliser with human blood. Comedy
horror starring Angus Sampson
6.00am The Cube: Celebrity Special (r) 6.45
Britain’s Got Talent: Top 10 Child Stars (r)
7.35 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.00 All Star Family
Fortunes Christmas Special (r) 9.00 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 9.50 Mr Bean (r) (AD)
10.20 FILM: Jack Frost (PG, 1998) Family
fantasy drama (AD) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r)
(AD) 12.50 You’ve Been Framed! at Christmas
(r) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.40 The
Jeremy Kyle Show: Lie Detector Shockers (r)
6.00 Take Me Out Celebrity Special (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! at Christmas (r)
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! With Bells On! (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 FILM: The Hangover Part III (15,
2013) Comedy sequel starring Bradley Cooper
11.05 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.35 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.05am Family Guy (r) (AD) 1.00 American
Dad! Double bill (r) (AD) 2.00 Ghosted (r) (AD)
2.25 The Keith and Paddy Picture Show. Double
bill (r) 3.15 Celebrity Juice: Xmas Gogglyboxers
(r) 4.05 Scorpion (r) (AD) 4.45 Britain’s Got
Talent: Top 10 Child Stars (r) 5.35 Totally
Bonkers Guinness World Records (r)
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Judge Judy (r) 6.20 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 7.10 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 8.10 The
Royal (r) 9.15 Judge Judy (r) 10.30 A Touch of
Frost (r) 12.35pm The Royal (r) 1.40 Heartbeat
(r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation Street. Double
bill (r) 3.45 A Touch of Frost (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. Rivalry between two brass
bands gets out of hand (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A friend of Jessica is
accused of murder (r) (AD)
8.00 Midsomer Murders. Barnaby and Jones
investigate a spate of ghoulish wedding-themed
murders, beginning with the drowning of a
woman made to look like a bride (r) (AD)
10.00 Cilla. The singer fails to crack America.
Last in the series (r) (AD)
11.00 The Guilty. Maggie charges her prime
suspect, despite remaining unconvinced he is the
culprit, and a brutal death then seems to close
the case for good (3/3) (r) (AD)
12.05am Agatha Christie’s Marple. The reading
of a will leads to murder (r) 2.00 The Knock (r)
3.50 A Touch of Frost (r) 5.30 Judge Judy (r)
5.50 ITV3 Nightscreen
6.00am Snooker v Darts (r) 6.05 The Chase (r)
7.45 Storage Wars: Texas (r) 8.40 Pawn Stars
(r) 9.35 Ironside (r) 10.40 Quincy ME (r) 11.45
The Sweeney (r) 12.50pm The Professionals (r)
(AD) 1.55 Ironside (r) 2.55 Quincy ME (r) 4.00
The Sweeney (r) 5.00 The Professionals (r) (AD)
6.00 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
6.30 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 The Chase Celebrity Special (r)
9.00 FILM: Rambo III (18, 1988) Vietnam
veteran John Rambo heads for Afghanistan on a
quest to rescue his old boss Colonel Trautman
from prison. Action adventure starring Sylvester
Stallone and Richard Crenna (AD)
11.05 FILM: Crank: High Voltage
(18, 2009) Action thriller sequel starring Jason
Statham and Amy Smart
1.10 River Monsters (r) 2.10 Ax Men. Gabe
catches his men helping his rivals (r) 2.55 It’s
Not Rocket Science (r) 3.45 ITV4 Nightscreen
3.55 The Professionals (r) (AD, SL) 4.45 The
Sweeney (r) (SL) 5.35 Tommy Cooper (r)
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters. Double bill 10.00 American Pickers.
Three episodes 1.00pm The Hurting. Double bill
2.00 Top Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors 4.00
Ice Road Truckers 5.00 Timber Kings
6.00 Top Gear (AD)
7.00 The Hurting
7.30 The Hurting
8.00 QI XL. Josh Widdicombe, Susan Calman and
Matt Lucas answer questions on Noel
9.00 Taskmaster: Champion of Champions.
A two-part special welcoming back all five of the
show’s series champions
10.00 Would I Lie to You? With Miles Jupp,
Heston Blumenthal, Emilia Fox and Ed Byrne
10.40 Would I Lie to You? With Rhod Gilbert,
Kelly Hoppen, Carol Vorderman and Hal
Cruttenden. Hosted by Rob Brydon
11.20 Would I Lie to You?
12.00 Room 101 12.40am Mock the Week 1.20
QI 2.00 Taskmaster: Champion of Champions
3.00 Would I Lie to You? 3.35 Parks and
Recreation 4.00 Home Shopping
7.25am Call the Midwife (AD) 10.00 The Bill
12.00 Catherine Cookson’s A Dinner of Herbs
3.00pm Call the Midwife. Double bill (AD) 5.40
Last of the Summer Wine (AD)
6.20 Last of the Summer Wine
7.00 Porridge. Christmas special from 1975. The
inmates plan a Christmas escape (AD)
8.00 Death in Paradise. A prisoner is stabbed to
death while being transported to Saint Marie,
proving especially puzzling for Richard as he was
handcuffed to the man at the time (5/8) (AD)
9.20 Death in Paradise. A tropical disease
strikes down Richard and, as Camille is in Paris,
Dwayne and Fidel are left to solve the murder of
a diver, found in shallow water with odd
markings on his chest (6/8) (AD)
10.40 New Tricks. The team reopens the
16-year-old case of a political aide’s murder.
Drama with John McArdle (7/10) (AD)
11.50 Taggart. An opera singer becomes the
prime suspect when her estranged husband’s
lover is killed. Drama with Mark McManus (3/3)
2.35am Call the Midwife. Christmas special of
the drama (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Battleplan (AD) 8.00 Time Team 10.00
The Light of Dawn: The Normandy Landings
11.00 The First Silent Night 12.00 Time Team
2.00pm The Hunt (AD) 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00
Porridge 4.40 Steptoe and Son
6.00 The World at War. The Allied offensive in
the Pacific. Narrated by Laurence Olivier
7.00 Surviving the Holocaust: Freddie Knoller’s
War. Accompanied by extensive archive footage,
an Austrian-born Jew talks about his life under
the Nazis, when he fled from Vienna to Belgium
and France before being betrayed and sent to
Auschwitz and Belsen concentration camps
8.00 Machines of War. The history of the
machine gun. Last in the series (AD)
9.00 Napoleon. The French emperor’s ultimate
defeat at the Battle of Waterloo (AD)
10.00 Porridge. Godber revises for an exam
10.40 Steptoe and Son. Harold brings home a
vintage What the Butler Saw machine
11.20 Steptoe and Son
12.00 Machines of War (AD) 1.00am Napoleon
(AD) 2.00 Machines of War. The history of the
machine gun (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Car Crash Britain: Caught on Camera.
Documentary (r) 12.05am Teleshopping 1.05
After Midnight 2.35 Storage Hoarders (r)
3.25-5.05 ITV Nightscreen
UTV
As ITV except: 10.45pm Judge Rinder’s Crown
Court 11.10 Car Crash Britain: Caught on
Camera (r) 12.10am Play to the Whistle (r)
1.00 Teleshopping 2.00-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Saoghal Bodach na Nollaig (r) 5.05
Peppa (r) 5.10 Ben & Hoilidh san Rioghachd
Bhig (Ben & Holly’s Little Kingdom) (r) 5.35
Rupert (r) 6.00 BB agus Bellag (r) 6.05
Ard-Sgoil a’ Chnuic Annasaich (Strange Hill
High) (r) 6.30 Dè a-nis? (What Now?) 7.00
Innsean an Iar: Hebrides (r) 7.30 Speaking Our
Language (r) 7.55 Earrann Eachdraidh (History
Shorts) (r) 8.00 An Là (News) 8.30 Thuige Seo
(r) 9.00 Linn de Dhealbhan (Johnston
Collection) 10.00 Fonn Fonn Fonn (r) 10.30
Cuirm@Celtic: Mairi Nic a Ghobhainn (r) 11.00
A’Fagail Bharraigh. Documentary (r)
11.45-12.00midnight Torcuil’s Guide to Being
a Gael. Comedy presented by Torcuil Lamont (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Yr Ysgol (r) 6.15 Chwedlau Tinga
Tinga (r) 6.25 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 6.40
Sam Tân (r) 6.50 Nico Nôg (r) 7.00 Deian a
Loli a’r Gacen Nadolig (r) 7.20 Digbi Draig (r)
7.35 Gwdihw (r) 7.50 Mwnci’n Dweud Mwnci’n
Gwneud (r) 8.00 Octonots (r) 8.10 Ty Mel (r)
8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r) 8.35 Guto
Gwningen (r) 8.45 Yn yr Ardd (r) 9.00 Popi’r
Gath (r) 9.10 Stiw (r) 9.20 Ben a Mali a’u Byd
Bach O Hud (r) 9.35 Tomos a’i Ffrindiau (r)
9.45 Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 10.00 Yr Ysgol (r)
10.15 Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 10.25 Blero yn
Mynd i Ocido (r) 10.40 Sam Tân (r) 10.50 Nico
Nôg (r) 11.00 Deian a Loli a’r Teledu (r) 11.15
Olobobs (r) 11.20 Digbi Draig (r) 11.35
Gwdihw (r) 11.50 Mwnci’n Dweud Mwnci’n
Gwneud (r) 12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
12.05pm Heno (r) 12.30 Garddio a Mwy (r)
1.00 Natur Nadolig Iolo (r) 2.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 3.05 Codi Hwyl (r) (AD) 4.00 Awr Fawr
5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Y Dyfnfor
5.25 Stwnsh: Fideo Fi Nadolig 5.30 Stwnsh:
Rhyfel Mawr Trwy Lygaid Ifanc (r) 6.00 News
S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad (r) 6.30
Pobol Port Talbot (r) 7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm (AD) 8.25 Ar y Bysus 9.00 News 9 a’r
Tywydd 9.30 Hwyl ’Steddfod y Ffermwyr Ifranc
10.30-11.35 Llwyfan (r)
10
1G T
Wednesday December 20 2017 | the times
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7527
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3211
5
6
9
7
16
11
10
13
13
23
3
5
13
22
12
3
21
21
11
7
24
16
17
24
14
13
15
4
21
22
25
24
3
21
23
21
12
23
13
21
10
13
18
1
3
4
3
2
6
3
4
5
3
22
6
12
5
23
A
13
25
3
19
4
21
17
1
22
3
2
20
20
22
25
8
21
25
17
5
5
7
5
7
3
24
1
22
3
22
1
18
25
19
18
8
4
20
24
21
21
23
21
14
15
23
5
8
9
25
Train Tracks No 286
5
11
22
13
5
8
4
25
7
7
22
25
1
21
23
25
24
26
25
5
22
13
11
2
23
4
25
5
15
22
20
21
6
6
B
24
13
7
13
22
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
25
22
1
7
8
9
11
13
15
Sugar solution (5)
Food connoisseur (7)
Provoking laughter (7)
Early satellite (7)
Beetle pest (6)
Firms, businesses (9)
(Of a view) unbroken and
wide (9)
Solution to Crossword 7526
SUP PR
O O E
CA L Y P
K
I
O
POUR
P
T
UN J US
R U
I N J UR
T
I
I
A T T I C
N S K
SOUK
E S
T
SO
L
I
D
T
I
ED
I
O
C
E Y
S
POOR
R U E
OF T EN
C S E
NK L I NG
Z
A
OF F END
A
E
SOUR
C S R
R I GAM I
S G C
E T E E T H
19 Party nibble (6)
21 Make happy (7)
23 Orifice; opportunity (7)
24 Military skill (7)
25 Spy; service provider (5)
19
23
25
5
15
15
13
D
22
15
L
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
L
D
Down
1 Mouse-like mammal (5)
2 Slice of bacon (6)
3 Open to the people (6)
4 Grows old (4)
5 Subatomic particle (6)
6 Unit of sound intensity (7)
10 Relating to digestion (6)
12 Discover the position of (6)
14 Missile’s warhead (7)
16 Strange thing (6)
17 Optical recorder (6)
18 Scarcity of food (6)
20 Rowing boat (5)
22 Inquisitive (4)
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica
No 4055
No 4056
N
S
Y
R
B
T
R
I
K
A
A
C
F
F
H
L
E
I
M
A
E
G
S
E
O
S
E
A
L
O
P
L
A
E
K
T
K
P
O
F
Y
T
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4203
Futoshiki No 3068
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
>
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
∧
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
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3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
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English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
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by a space, then your three
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Kakuro No 2027
>
7
4
28
3
16
16
13
13
30
29
16
17
7
6
12
8
31
<
16
30
7
16
< 4
2
∧
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
>
30
17
17
8
24
26
24
35
17
15
29
12
30
33
24
9
19
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
16
4
30
<
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
7
16
16
30
12
17
4
© PUZZLER MEDIA
17
the times | Wednesday December 20 2017
11
1G T
MindGames
White: José Capablanca
Black: Herbert Jacobs
Simultaneous display, London 1922
Dutch Defence
1 d4 f5 2 e4
The Staunton Gambit, a sharp
line that the serene world champion would scarcely have considered in a formal tournament. In
the ambience of a simultaneous
display he clearly felt such liberties were permissible.
2 ... fxe4 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 Bg5 Nc6 5
f3 e3
Giving back the pawn to slow
down White's development.
6 Bxe3 e6 7 Bd3 b6 8 Nh3 Bb7 9
Qe2 Nb4 10 0-0-0 Nxd3+ 11 Qxd3
Bb4
The amateur has emerged from
the opening with an equal position against the world champion.
12 Rhe1 Qe7 13 Nb5
________
á D D 4kD]
à0bDpDqDp]
ß 0 0p0 D]
ÞD D D D ]
Ý D ) D D]
ÜDP4QDPH ]
ÛPD D DP)]
ÚD IR$ D ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
A well-timed trade of two
rooks for the queen.
22 Qxc3 Rc8 23 Qxc8+ Bxc8 24
d5 f5 25 dxe6 dxe6 26 Kb1
26 Rxd6 fails to 26 ... Qc7+.
26 ... d5 27 Re5 Qc7
Stronger is 27 ... Qf6 with the
idea of ... Qh4.
28 f4 Qc3 29 Ne2 Qb4 30 Nd4 a5
31 Kb2 b5 32 g3 Qc5 33 Re2 Bd7
34 Rc2 Qb6 35 a3 Kf7 36 Nf3 b4
37 Ne5+ Ke7 38 a4 Be8 39 Ka2
A blunder, missing Black's next.
39 ... Bxa4
Now 40 bxa4 b3+ wins.
40 Rdc1 Be8 41 Rc7+ Kf6
A catastrophe for Black, who
has played very well up to here.
After 41 ... Kd6 Black is not worse.
42 Rf7+ Black resigns
42 ... Bxf7 43 Nd7+ picks up the
queen.
________
á D DrD i] Winning Move
à0pD D Dn]
ß Dq0PDQD] White to play. This position is from
London 2013.
ÞD 0RD D ] Gupta-Ledger,
White has a monstrous attack along the
Ý D D ) D] g- and h-files but is hampered by the pin
ÜD g D D ] against his rook on the h1-a8 diagonal.
ÛPD D D )] How did he continue?
ÚD D D $K] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
37 - The weaker defender may
give the vital clue
When reconstructing the opposing
hands, you will focus on the opponent about whom most is known,
the stronger hand, the one that did
the bidding.
You may very well reach crunch
point, where you can say to yourself, “Either he [the stronger hand,
say West] has Hand A, or Hand B,
but I don't know which.” Now is
the moment to work out what
West holding Hand A (and then B)
would give his partner. If the East
hand facing West Hand B is inconsistent whereas the East hand facing West Hand A is consistent,
West has Hand A. “Elementary,
my dear Watson”.
Try this 4♠ on West's ♣A lead
after the bidding below:
♠Q 3
♥A K 5 3
♦K J 9 3 2
♣52
♠A K J 9 8
♥8 7
♦10 8 7 5
♣84
S
W
N
E
1NT(12-14) Pass(1) Pass
4♠
End
2♠ (2) Pass
(1) Cautious but he’s in second position.
(2) Bold in fourth (protective) position.
East plays ♣Q under West's
♣A, a standard defensive play to
show ♣QJ and invite partner to
underlead ♣K. At trick two, West
leads ♣3 and East wins ♣9, then
at trick three switches to ♠2.
Your ♠8 wins the trick and you
cash ♠AK, both following to
reveal the 3-3 split. Because you
have two spades left, you can
afford to see what's going on in the
per se uninteresting hearts; for
that may help you to decide how
to play the very interesting
diamonds. When you cross to
♥AK and ruff ♥3, you see East's
♥Q and West's ♥10.
You can delay no longer. It's time
to play the key suit, diamonds. You
lead ♦10, West playing low. Do you
run ♦10, or rise with ♦K? You
pause to reconstruct West's hand.
We know he has ♠xxx; either
♥10xx or ♥J10xx; and ♣AK to
some number of clubs. He must
hold ♦A to get to 12-14 points; he
could hold ♦Q too, but he may not.
If he has ♦AQx, you must run ♦10;
if he holds ♦Ax(x), you must rise
with dummy's ♦K. What to do?
Think about East — that's what
to do. If West holds ♦AQx, East
has a small singleton. He would
surely switch to it at trick three.
Therefore, West cannot have
♦AQx. You rise with ♦K and lead
another diamond. When ♦Q and
♦A fall together, you ruff any
return and cash the two long diamonds. Game made.
♠Q 3
♠6 5 4
♥J 10 6 2
♦A4
♣A K 7 3
♥A K 5 3
♦K J 9 3 2
♣5 2
♠ 10 7 2
N
♥Q 9 4
W E
♦Q 6
S
♣Q J 10 9 6
♠A K J 9 8
♥8 7
♦10 8 7 5
♣8 4
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
1/2
OF IT
1/5
+9
+7
÷5
+ 1/2
– 65 ÷ 2 + 86
MEDIUM
157 x 4 + 54
HARDER
166 x 7 + 875 x 3 + 679
OF IT
SQUARE
IT
30%
OF IT
OF IT
4/5
OF IT
+ 18
2/3
OF IT
2
– 98 +OF/3IT
+ 897 + 1/2 + 887 + 1/4
OF IT
OF IT
2
Killer Tricky No 5777
17
16min
33
20
13
17
17
13
17
12
7
9
20
22
11
12
19
14
21
4
17
15
Killer Deadly No 5778
11
4
17
54min
23
19
8
7
18
16
30
7
21
7 9
9 8 6
3
1 2
8 9 3
9 7 1
3 1
7
1 3 2
2 1
4
7
2
8
9
5
3
6
1
8
6
3
7
2
1
5
9
4
1
4
5
6
7
3
9
8
2
+
=
39
2
3
9
5
7
8
4
1
6
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
= 27
=
11
5
4
1
3
9
6
7
8
2
6
7
8
4
2
1
9
5
3
1
8
6
2
4
9
3
7
5
O F F I C E
O
E
H
Z OD I AC
E
I
D E S E R T
Y
S I NG L Y
Q O O
URN
F L
A
Y
T
L I MP
E
O
URG
RUMP
G
9 8
8 7 9
5
1 3
1 4 2
3 2 1
3 5
4
8 7 9
9 8
2
3
7
3
2
1
4
9
6
8
7
3
5
3
8
9
2
5
7
1
4
6
7
5
6
3
1
4
8
2
9
3
2
7
6
1
5
8
4
9
4
9
5
7
8
3
2
6
1
8
1
2
9
5
4
6
3
7
9
6
4
1
3
7
5
2
8
7
5
3
8
6
2
1
9
4
2
1
7
8
5
6
3
4
9
3
5
9
4
1
2
8
6
7
6
4
8
3
9
7
2
1
5
6
7
3
5
6
2
1
9
8
4
6
9
2
8
3
5
1
4
7
5
1
7
9
6
4
8
3
2
4
8
3
2
7
1
6
9
5
3
5
1
7
9
8
2
6
4
1
9
4
5
3
8
6
7
2
4
2
1
9
6
5
7
3
8
9
8
3
1
7
4
5
2
6
5
7
6
2
8
3
4
9
1
9
6
8
5
4
2
3
7
1
2
7
4
6
1
3
5
8
9
1
4
6
3
5
9
7
2
8
8
3
9
1
2
7
4
5
6
7
2
5
4
8
6
9
1
3
6 3
5
∨
4
2
3
5
∨
1
2
∨
1
5
1
3
2
4
3
∧
4
Set Square 2029
-
x
12
4
3
7
+
x
x
x
9
5
8
+
x
x
+
1
4
5
4
4
4
3
4
A
4
6
4
1
3
1
B
D
O
M
E
D
Suko 2112
4
1
9
7
2
3
6
5
8
5
8
7
6
4
9
2
1
3
3
6
2
5
1
8
7
4
9
6
9
8
1
3
7
4
2
5
1
5
4
2
9
6
3
8
7
7
2
3
4
8
5
9
6
1
2
7
1
9
5
4
8
3
6
9
3
5
8
6
2
1
7
4
8
4
6
3
7
1
5
9
2
P
A
N
O
G
M
T
H
B
E
R
E
O
I
W
N
E
L
D
E
N
D
H
L
Lexica 4054
1
4 > 3
∧
5
2
2
3
Lexica 4053
Futoshiki 3067
5
1
T
E
N
A
B
L
E
Sudoku 9534
8
6
2
7
4
9
1
5
3
Killer 5776
2
3 2
Train Tracks 285
F
CHA
A L SO
Y
Y AR
K
A
U
I ON
DU
T
T
I
V I R T U
J
O
U T T E R E
G W
W I GWA
E
L
A
F L E X E
Sudoku 9533
6
2
7
1
8
9
4
5
3
KenKen 4202
16
19
9
=
1
3 < 4
∨
2
1
18
+
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
9
3
8
5
4
2
6
1
7
12
12
=9
÷
x
5
7
8 7
9 5
9
4
2 1
1 3
3
5
Cell Blocks 3093
26
+
x
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Codeword 3210
7
9
9 6
7 8
6
2
3 4
5 2
1
3
21
11
= 140 from 1-9 are
÷
-
Kakuro 2026
14
11
20
11
All the digits
x
-
8
Killer 5775
25
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Solutions
5
9
1
4
3
6
2
7
8
9
8
8
5
+
Sudoku 9532
12
2
12
x
Yesterday’s answers
eel, elf, else, eon, fee, feel, felon, fen,
flee, flense, floe, foe, lee, leno, lens,
leone, lone, lose, née, nose, olé, one,
oneself, see, seel, self, sen, sene, sloe,
sole, sone
22
2 7 2
2
4
Set Square No 2030
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 13 words, average;
18, good; 25, very good; 32, excellent
8
4
2
3
2
Polygon
16
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
55 – 9
EASY
© PUZZLER MEDIA
In my series on momentous chess
occurrences in London I come
today to the visit by the celebrated
world champion José Capablanca
in 1922. In the international tournament of that year Capablanca
displayed overwhelming superiority to take first prize unbeaten
ahead of such outstanding luminaries of the day as Alexander
Alekhine, Akiba Rubinstein and
Efim Bogolyubov.
Capablanca's victories from that
tournament are relatively well
known so, to celebrate the champion's appearance in London, I
have selected an impressive but
little-known game against a confident opponent from a simultaneous display.
Bluff. Black can safely play 13 ...
Bxe1 and after 14 Nxc7+ Kd8 15
Nxa8 Bb4, Black is well on top.
13 ... Rc8
Missing his chance.
14 c3 Bd6 15 Nxd6+ cxd6 16 Bg5
Bd5 17 b3 0-0 18 Nf4 Bb7 19 Nh5
Qf7 20 Bxf6
The world champion misjudges
the following transaction. 20
Nxf6+ gxf6 21 Bd2 is equal.
20 ... gxf6 21 Ng3 Rxc3+
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
José in London
Cell Blocks No 3094
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
6
-
÷
1
Quiz 1 Keith Moon 2 St Olga or [princess] Olga of Kiev
3 Yitzhak Rabin 4 Mother Night 5 King Louis XIV of
France 6 Emmanuel Courvoisier 7 Élysée Palace (from
the Elysian Fields) — the official residence of the
president of France 8 Phoebe Waller-Bridge 9 The Wild
Duck 10 A chain reaction of collisions between orbital
technology (spent rockets, satellites etc). Each collision
generates debris fragments, each of which triggers further
collisions and more debris 11 Electroluminescence —
leading to the discovery of the light-emitting diode (LED)
12 Tracy Letts 13 Alexis Soyer 14 Boxing 15 Ted Hughes
T
F
L
O
G
U
I
N
U
I
S
N
L
I
G
T
J
E
C
H
T
S
Word watch
Matuta (a) The Roman
goddess of the dawn
Seltzogene (b) A
Victorian device for
carbonating water
Barrel (c) The quill of
a feather
Brain Trainer
Easy 18; Medium 590;
Harder 6,610
Chess 1 Rg2! is a clever
unpin, planning 1 ... Qxd5
2 Qxe8+ mating. The
other point of the move is
revealed after Black’s
actual reply 2 ... b5 (there
is nothing better) 2
Qxh7+! Kxh7 3 Rh5 mate
20.12.17
MindGames
Difficult No 9535
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Fiendish No 9536
3
4
7
9 1
6
Matuta
a A goddess
b In safety
c Ripe cheese
Seltzogene
a Inherited liveliness
b A water device
c An antacid
Barrel
a To press-gang
b Very loud
c A quill
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
Super fiendish No 9537
6
2
5
1 2 6
7
1 2
4 2
8 9
2 9
5
8 9 3
5
6
1
6 3
4
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
8
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
2 6
9
4
1
2 7
8 5
8
9 5
1 6
5
4
6
9 7
2
7
4
6
15
8 Which actress
played the title role in
her play Fleabag and
its TV adaptation?
portrait, painted in
1701, of which man?
6 Which cognac
company founder
started a drinks
firm with Louis
Gallois, mayor of
Bercy, in 1809?
7 Which Paris palace’s
name is derived from
Greek mythology’s place
of the blessed dead?
12 Which US
dramatist’s 2008 play
Superior Donuts was
turned into a sitcom
starring Judd Hirsch?
13 Which French chef
wrote A Shilling
Cookery for the People?
9 The Australian
film The Daughter
(2015) was inspired
by which Henrik
Ibsen play?
14 The expressions
“going the distance”
and “saved by the bell”
come from which sport?
10 Seen in the film
Gravity, what is
Kessler syndrome?
15 Which late poet
laureate is pictured?
Answers on page 11
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 986
The Times Quick Cryptic No 987
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
13
12
14
15
17
22
16
18
20
19
21
23
5 6
7
8
2
3
6
6
I
N
S
E
N
S
I
T
I
V
E
A CQU I
A
N
ORMA
E
N
A R L I N
M
U I T OR
N
U
S U
I C
I
I S I B L
O U
CR E S T
S I T I ON
T
A
B
AMN E S I
K
E
RU
E S S
T
V
MOD E S
N
S P E ND E
H W R
A DOP
E
A
L
V
F A L L E N
B
A
R
B
I
T
U
R
A
T
E
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Mara
8
9
6
7 4
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
11 The engineer HJ
Round was the first
to report observation
of which optical
phenomenon from a
solid state diode?
5 Hyacinthe Rigaud’s
most famous work is a
4 1
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
1 Which drummer with
the Who overdosed
on the alcohol
withdrawal drug,
Heminevrin, in 1978?
4 Which Kurt Vonnegut
novel is about Howard
W Campbell Jr, a
wartime spy posing as
a Nazi propagandist?
7
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
3 In 1992, who began
his second term
in office as prime
minister of Israel?
9
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
2 In the 10th century,
which widow of Igor I,
prince of Kiev, became
the first recorded
female ruler in Russia?
5
6 7
8
3 1
2 3 9
Across
1 Hanger-on, where jumping
soldiers found? (8)
5 Fraud when computers backed
up (4)
9 Fruit old, as it happens (5)
10 Elation after moving
something on foot (7)
11 Day before some revelry (3)
12 Hot, brewed in red mug,
wonderful thing (9)
13 Certain to keep leaders of
every country safe (6)
15 Public school distress (6)
17 Cheat exactly behind joker
(4,5)
19 Hair somewhat scruffy, viewed
from behind (3)
20 Thus a monarch is very wet (7)
21 Nation in debt, in arrears
initially (5)
22 However, one is a legendary
monster (4)
23 Estimate cooking with the
most beef, say? (8)
Down
1 Mastery of witty leaders in the
newspapers (7)
2 Tossed her in river (5)
3 Traditional food dishes here,
2p off (9,3)
4 Carry mark — symbol (5)
6 Batteries may be attached to
this horse (7)
7 Second half of larger tooth (5)
8 Mark, fractionally wrong on
medical tip (7,5)
14 Fruit in stream, did you say?
(7)
16 Permit fighting rhetoric (7)
17 Copper retiring, needing little
work (5)
18 Corner, where top cut from
knot (5)
19 Manipulate confectionery (5)
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