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The Times Times 2 - 22 March 2018

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On Thursday
March 22 | 2018
Darling, I?ve written a
to-do list for you ? again.
Have you read it?
Men, do you really need
instructions from your wives?
2
1G T
Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
times2
?Put stamp on
Facebook apologises
to you personally
(they know you well)
Deborah Ross
A
s Facebook and
Cambridge
Analytica
continue to
pass the buck as
to who exactly
is responsible
for mining data
from 50 million Facebook users
? ?We were authorised,? says
Cambridge Analytica; ?No, you
weren?t,? says Facebook ? one
does wonder what an apology
would look like either way. Like
this, perhaps:
?We would like to extend our
most sincere apologies to anyone
who had their data harvested
along with the data of their online
friends. We deeply regret this
incident and are taking
immediate corrective measures
intended to regain confidence.
?We take privacy issues
very seriously and did not live
up to that responsibility. We are
truly sorry, without exception,
and understand that Sandra Paul
(114 Bridge Road, Manchester)
does not need this extra worry on
top of four small kids, thrush, a
demanding job and her regular
Tesco drop late on Tuesdays.
(By the way Sandra, you forgot
toilet paper. Again.)
?We are disappointed that some
of the actions we have taken have
served to create mistrust. This is
wholly unacceptable even though
David Benson (Engleby Road,
Plymouth) has had trust issues
that predate this matter and go
back to when he was six and his
dad walked out on the family. This
is why he has yet to enjoy a longterm relationship and, while we
don?t wish to add to his problems,
from where we are looking we can
see that several tiles have come
loose on his roof. And the
chimney stack needs work.
No sense
of an
ending
Now is probably not the
best time, but I have
been thinking of
starting a Facebook
group for those who fall
into the depths of
despair when a TV
drama series concludes
without ? and I
apologise for getting a
bit technical here ? A
Proper Ending.
Occasionally, a show
will still have A Proper
?We have reviewed our data
security practices and are putting
additional protections in place to
protect the integrity of your
information. We apologise for any
inconvenience, whether you are
Jane Parr, who is looking
particularly nice today, or Sheila
Dupont, who went with the red
skirt, finally, or James Belfry,
whose symptoms could be syphilis
but he does tend towards the
worst-case scenario so it could
just be a regular STD. We are
hoping he attends that
appointment with his GP, which
is at 5.45pm today, and that he
leaves plenty of time for parking
since it is likely to be difficult at
that hour.
?We must, of course, also
apologise to everyone?s friends
even if those friends are bitchy
behind their back. Yours are very
bitchy, Susan Long, with the blue
Fiat parked outside. You should
Alexander Nix, chief executive
of Cambridge Analytica
Ending. Collateral had
A Proper Ending even
though any Ending
would have been
acceptable, simply
by virtue of the fact
it had Ended. But
otherwise they leave
you hanging, while
waving the prospect of
a further series under
your nose, which just
isn?t the deal.
Here?s the deal: we?ll
watch week by week;
you give us A Proper
Ending. I?m investing,
you reward. It?s not
rocket science even
though many rocket
scientists may wish it
were, ?since we would
Are to-do lists and basic instructions
infantilising men? Or are they just part
of married life, asks Robert Crampton
hear what they?re saying in the
?group? they created to explicitly
exclude you so that they didn?t
have to read your ?boring? posts.
However, we can tell you that
decent window insulation will
save you money in the long
run, which answers that question,
when nobody else did. But we
don?t know why the clock in
your car is running a bit fast.
Nice cat, btw. Nice, from every
possible angle.
?Needless to say, we deeply
regret the exposure of personal
information that occurred. We
can not put an exact time on the
breach, but it might have been
while Bob Landis was wanking to
porn when his wife thought he
was researching lawnmowers or
while Jeanette Cowey was tracing
all her old schoolfriends and
discovering how much more
successful they are.
It could also have occurred
while Sian Russell was hunting
down the nice vet who fixed her
dog?s paw this morning and may
or may not be married (he is
married, but not happily).
Naturally, we empathise with Mrs
Landis, who wonders why it takes
Bob for ever to do anything and
has posted a poll: should I go
out and buy the goddamn
lawnmower myself??
?To reiterate, we are determined
to get this right in the future,
and to stick to simply harassing
you with ?Mahabis slippers?
whenever you go online, which is
permissible even if it drives you
nuts. It drives Amy Jackson (42,
blood group O) of Temple Street,
Cardiff, nuts but since her teenage
son is drunk in the park and has
just had a penis drawn on his
forehead, we do not think she can
afford to get uppity with us.?
All the names in this are made up
almost certainly get
home a lot earlier?.
The latest series
without A Proper
Ending has been Save
Me (look away now if
you wish to avoid
spoilers). This is the
Sky thriller written by
Lennie James and
starring James as well
as Suranne Jones.
Admittedly, it did
concern a missing
child, which is a wellworn trope, but it was
interestingly different,
written as if we were at
the theatre, unlike any
police procedural you
have seen and was just
terrific, basically. Just
terrific until the final
episode, that is. That
girl wasn?t even Jody!
James has since said
he planned to create a
?returning? series, as if
that may be of some
comfort, which it isn?t. I
wonder: before we put
in the hours, could we
be given some kind of
indication? Could
shows be marked
APE if they come
with A Proper Ending
and NAPE if there is
Not A Proper Ending?
This is something
our Facebook group
may wish to discuss.
While we are being
harvested, obviously.
V
ictoria Bingham,
the headmistress of
South Hampstead
High School for
girls in London, has
advised her charges
that it is important,
as they mature and
embark on careers, relationships and
raising children, not to infantilise the
man in their future lives by trying to
micro-manage every aspect of
domestic existence. Bingham singles
out the practice of a woman leaving
her partner a to-do list of household
tasks as an example of behaviour to be
avoided. Such attempts at total control,
Bingham reckons, place unnecessary
pressure on hard-working women
while providing a poor role model to
impressionable daughters.
Don?t be afraid to let the blokes take
the strain. That?s Bingham?s message.
I write as a man married to a
woman possessed of quite
extraordinary powers of efficiency,
energy and organisational prowess.
My friends call my wife ?Bruce?,
as in Bruce ?the Boss? Springsteen.
We have a son and a daughter,
both almost adult.
In so far as Bingham is saying that
girls should not bother trying to please
everyone all the time, I agree. The
quest for perfection is futile and can
be dangerous. Yet be careful what you
wish for: chaos may well ensue.
My wife leaves me lists all the time.
Not as many lists as when the kids
were small and were, occasionally,
placed in my sole care, but still a fair
number. Nowadays the lists arrive
mostly before we travel somewhere.
A recent one reminded me to take
?passports and tickets? to the airport.
Back in the day the lists were
handwritten and focused on the
correct procedures for warming milk,
togging up the youngsters in the
winter and microwaving gloop. ?To
do? tended to morph into ?how to?. As
a new father lacking the first clue
about anything baby-related, yet
keen to keep my offspring
alive, I followed my wife?s
instructions religiously.
Except for that time when I
didn?t bother with gloves and
little Sam ended up at the
doctors with borderline
frostbite.
That?s the bummer:
whatever it is that
Nicola orders, however
apparently absurd,
she?s pretty much
always right. She
once left me a to-do
list including the
words ?put stamp on
envelope before you post
it? ? possibly her most
demeaning edict ever.
The point being
that before consulting
her list I had indeed
forgotten the stamp.
Our daughter, Rachel, is
mildly asthmatic. When she was six
we were on holiday in the Middle East.
Hubbly-bubbly pipes were
commonplace. ?Can I try?? Rachel
asked. ?No,? Nicola said. ?Sure you
can, sweetheart,? I said, proffering the
nozzle. Rachel duly took a big hit off
the shisha and just as duly fell over.
That said, as regards hats, coats,
scarves and wellies, and vegetables
and bedtimes and swearing and
age certificates on films, while in
her infrequent absences I have
not always precisely adhered to
my wife?s clearly conveyed written
commands (handwritten, typed or
chalked on the blackboard in our
kitchen), the little darlings are both
still alive, aren?t they?
That?s probably mostly down to
Nicola. I?m sorry if this sounds ? and
indeed is ? sexist, but most women
seem instinctively to know more than
most men about how best to bring up
children. Most of us recognise this.
Hence the female penchant for writing
lists for men. History proves that mere
oral commands don?t work. We forget
or weren?t listening in the first place
because the football?s on.
Has Rachel grown up to believe that
men require careful supervision? The
idea that Bingham regards as so
harmful? Too right she has! As regards
her daddy at any rate. A good thing
too: not long ago she saved the house
from burning down after my failure to
remove the plastic sleeve from a
ready-meal. It?s not a gender issue,
though; Sam keeps a watchful eye on
his father too. ?Maybe switch the
toaster off before you stick the knife
in,? he advised me recently.
I?m no slob, nor am I useless. I do
my share (sort of) around the house. I
hold down a job. I even write to-do
lists for myself. Sometimes I even
carry them out. I find it helps if you
write the list after you?ve already
accomplished a number of the chores.
But the truth is that my wife has
higher standards and is far more
committed to, and better equipped
at, maintaining them.
Some tasks I regard as trivial
and cosmetic. What does it
matter how the cushions are
arranged on the sofa? Or
whether the kitchen roll I get
at Mustafa?s has a pattern or
not? (She doesn?t hold with
patterned kitchen roll.) On
balance, however, her
attention to detail,
preferably written down, is
invaluable. When the
washing machine started
leaking water all over the
floor I put a towel down, then
called Nicola. ?Did you shut
the door fully?? Er, yes, I
replied, nudging the catch
closed.
If only she had left me a
memo saying, ?Shut the
washing machine properly,?
then that flood would never
have happened.
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
3
1G T
times2
envelope,? my wife wrote
COVER: ROMEO MORI/MADAM FIGARO/CAMERA PRESS; BELOW: GETTY IMAGES
We?re going out
with Joel and Kate.
You like them
I lack a key part
of the brain
Harry Wallop
T
here?s a scene in The Devil
Wears Prada where the icy
boss, played by Meryl
Streep, is receiving guests at
a black-tie ball. Behind her
stands her intern, played by Anne
Hathaway. As a couple approach
Streep from across the room, the
martinet turns to Hathaway with a
look of suppressed panic in her eyes.
The young assistant saves the day,
whispering: ?That?s Ambassador
Franklin, and he?s with the woman he
left his wife for, Rebecca.?
In my marriage I am perpetually
Meryl Streep, caught in that ten
seconds of social anxiety ? never
knowing anyone?s name or what I am
supposed to be doing. Before we go
to dinner with friends, standing on
the doorstep, my wife always has to
do an Anne Hathaway. ?They?re
called Kate and Matt, remember?
And their children are Frankie,
Tommy, Sam and Nancy. You like
them.? The penny slowly drops.
My wife finds this infuriating. I find
it a remarkably efficient use of
shared brain power. She can retain
the most astonishing details about
people. She is even able to tell me the
name of our former postman?s
daughter. I mean, the postman was
lovely and ? hallelujah ? delivered
before 9am, but we moved house a
decade ago. It?s Charlotte. How she
remembers this is a mystery.
She says it is purely because she
makes an effort with people and I am
lazy. I argue it?s because men, or
certainly I, lack this key part of the
brain. I just can?t do people.
It becomes more of an issue when
dealing with my children. Not their
names. I know their names.
Although I usually have to call my
wife and ask for their dates of birth
when filling in forms. Hey, I have
four. And their DOBs are peculiarly
unmemorable. I tried to get our
final one induced a month early on
11/11/11, so we would finally have a
child whose birthday I could
remember, but I was told that
wasn?t an option on the NHS.
No, the real issue arises when I am
occasionally in charge of the kids.
On those days I get a flurry of hourly
texts to remind me of the ludicrously
complicated after-school plans
involving French underwater origami
The lowdown
Great crested
newts
I need directions
? and a nudge
Tony Turnbull
M
y wife is not an inveterate
list-maker. She doesn?t
write lengthy instructions
on how to dress the
children for school.
There?s an assumption we pull equal
weight on the domestic front: children
fed and out of the door in the morning;
fed and in bed in the evening. If the
headcount?s the same, it?s job done.
None of this is to say that Amanda
trusts me. I still need all the direction I
can get, but she favours a more verbal
channel of communication, generally
as she?s driving to work and just as I?m
settling down with a coffee. It?s almost
as if she thinks nothing would get
done if she didn?t chivvy me along. It?s
nudge theory in action.
Ring, ring. ?Can you remember to
get the builder to fix that window??
Absolutely, the second I get home.
Ring ring. ?Sorry, me again. Can you
also sign the will and send it to the
solicitors? And don?t forget it?s your
niece?s birthday on Tuesday. And what
happened about the window cleaner?
You have done it, haven?t you??
Later I will sit at my desk at work
with the nagging feeling of things left
undone, but can I for the life of me
remember what they were.
So it is, a week later, that the
windows that aren?t broken are still
dirty, the will is unsigned on my desk
and Amanda got a call from my sister
saying we had forgotten her daughter?s
birthday. ?Well,? I mumble, ?you
should have written it down on a list.?
lessons or some such. Cherie Blair
once said she juggled a lot of balls
and sometimes dropped them. That?s
me too. I drop them the whole time. I
am Cherie and Meryl. It?s not a good
combination. But I cannot reasonably
be asked to remember to take the
six-year-old to football, and the code
to let him through the gate, and not
to burn the macaroni cheese (which
my wife made the night before, with
oven instructions attached).
The most recent ?Harry being in
charge? was last week and involved
this text exchange:
Me: ?Do I need to leave note at
school office, telling them C is
bringing A home??
Wife: ?Yes, we discussed this.?
Me: ?What class are they in??
Wife: ?How do you not know
this? We ARE IN MARCH. WE
ARE HALFWAY THROUGH THE
YEAR!! C is in 5K, A is in 1C.?
Me: ?The caps lock was
unnecessary. I had no idea there
was even a 5K. Who knew??
Wife: ?THE CAPS LOCK WAS
BECAUSE YOU WERE BEING
UNBELIEVABLY DIM. IF YOU
TURNED UP TO A PARENTS?
EVENING YOU MIGHT KNOW
WHAT CLASS THEY WERE IN.?
You see? A people person. Just not
with her husband.
Nature news. Great crested newts
are atheists.
Come again, Attenborough? I lost
you at the great crested bit. Let alone
the tripe about the atheism.
A tribe of newts ? a protected
species, FYI ? have moved in on
Ed Sheeran?s turf, exactly where
he plans to build a chapel. It?s
clearly a protest.
This is as clear as pond water. Ed
Sheeran wants to build a chapel?
By his castle on the hill?
Don?t be facetious. Sheeran wants
to build the Saxon-style chapel on
his Suffolk estate, but he?s facing an
angry backlash from residents, who
say the development shows a ?total
disregard to the local ecology?,
especially given that his neighbour?s
pond is home to ?one of the largest?
populations of newts in the area.
So, to quote spiritual Sheeran and
Taylor Swift in their hit song,
everything has changed now?
Not at all. Sheeran submitted
the application shortly after he
announced his engagement to
Cherry Seaborn in January.
One can only assume he wants
to marry his English rose in his
chapel. Which is the other problem.
The pesky locals don?t like the
idea of ?another? church in the
village (apparently there?s a
perfectly good one already).
Sounds like an awful place to live.
Pesky wildlife and pesky neighbours.
I?m not sure you?re taking this
news as seriously as you should
be. The villagers are up in arms.
Another lambasts Sheeran, saying:
?It would appear that the applicant
? in his desire to satisfy the needs
of the spiritual world ? continues
to overlook his obligations to the
living world, particularly that of
protected species.?
Seems all very touch and go to me.
Next you?ll be telling me that
Sheeran once dated the newts, wrote
a song about the messy break-up and
now they?re upset . . .
Ben Clatworthy
4
1G T
Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
times2
People think that
rowing is only
for ?posh? schools
It?s considered a sport for the privileged ? but a new
programme is changing that. By Damian Whitworth
O
n a blustery March
morning on the
banks of the
Thames at
Hammersmith,
Aron Assefa, an
engaging 13-yearold, is explaining
his new-found passion for rowing.
?When I first went on the water I
was scared about the boat tipping and
falling in the freezing water and
everyone getting angry with me,? he
says. ?But it was easier than I thought,
everyone worked together. It?s a good
workout and a nice way to let off
steam.? Mohamed Dubed, 14, chips in:
?If one person fails, you all fail.?
Aron and Mohamed, pupils at Ark
Burlington Danes Academy, are part
of Future Blues, a programme for
schools with the ambition of
revolutionising rowing, turning it from
a bastion of privilege to a sport for all.
Boathouses, boats and rowing
coaches don?t come cheap, so it is
perhaps no surprise that the eights
preparing to compete for Oxford and
Cambridge in the Boat Race this
weekend are dominated by students
who attended private schools (six
private schools, one grammar and one
state in the Cambridge men?s boat and
four private, two grammar and two
state schools represented in the Oxford
boat). Of the 117 schools registered with
British Rowing, the sport?s governing
body, 97 are private schools.
Students
often say
that it?s the
first time
they?ve felt
relaxed
in ages
However, one rowing club in west
London is attempting to substantially
alter that statistic. On a stretch of river
lined with historic boat clubs, Fulham
Reach is new, built beneath a block of
luxury flats in an agreement between
the developer and Hammersmith and
Fulham council. It has the same highspec fittings as the flats above.
The trustees of the boat club
decided that the key to reaching out to
the community was to offer rowing to
local schoolchildren. Their programme
of six-week learn-to-row classes for
Year 9 students (aged 13 and 14) has
grown from four schools to all twelve
secondary schools in Hammersmith
and Fulham. The schools make a small
contribution, but the scheme has been
mostly funded by the club, with money
from the developer and fundraising.
Many students have already signed
up to return and five schools have
since registered with British Rowing.
The club has joined with the Boat
Race Company and its sponsors to
launch Future Blues, a scheme to roll
out lessons to the 52 schools in the
four boroughs along the race route.
?The dream for us is that we
revolutionise the sport at a junior
level,? says Steve O?Connor, the club?s
chief executive, who learnt to row at a
Nottingham state school. ?I?d love to
see one of our students win the Boat
Race. That would be a good story.?
In the meantime his aims are
broader. ?Unlocking the potential of
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the times | Thursday March 22 2018
5
1G T
CHRIS MCANDREW AND AMIT LENNON FOR THE TIMES
times2
Not read Elena
Ferrante? Just
watch it on TV
T
young people through rowing. We can
introduce the sport to people who
wouldn?t normally get the opportunity
and they can learn about teamwork,
confidence, focus and ambition,? he
says. ?We can show that by being in
rowing they excel in those four areas
and transfer those skills into other
areas of their lives, ideally academics.?
O?Connor regards it as ?absolutely
bonkers? that every school in the
country isn?t rowing.
Heading out on to the tidal Thames
expands the comfort zone of many
teenagers. ?It requires confidence
being out in the middle of the river. A
lot of the kids don?t know it?s called
the Thames, definitely don?t know it?s
called the tideway. There?s that thing
of conquering your fear and getting
out there. We?ve had half a dozen
cases of students who start with
refusing to walk down the pontoon
because they are scared of
falling in, then eventually we
will get them in a boat.?
Very often they love it. ?The
feedback we get from students
is things like, ?It was the first
time I could relax in ages, it
Above: Joe Regan,
Jeriel Quainoo,
Kadeem Gushman,
Patrick Sherlock and
Daniel Gardiner. Above
right: Aron Assefa.
Below: Annabelle
Hogan and Emer Tesh
theboatrace.org
was nice not to have my phone on me.?
They can sit in the middle of the river
and see for a mile clear, which in
London you don?t really get elsewhere.
And if they don?t like it, at least they
know because they have tried it. They
can never say, ?Rowing is that elitist,
posh sport.? They did it at school.?
One morning the rowers are from a
school that is operating out of
temporary buildings on the edge of
Wormwood Scrubs. Kensington
Aldridge Academy relocated from its
site at the bottom of Grenfell Tower
after the fire last year in which four of
its students and one former pupil died.
?It?s fun being out on the water with
your friends,? says Daniel Gardiner, 15.
Kadeem Gushman, 14, says he is
enjoying a new challenge. ?It?s relaxing
when everyone is working together
and you?re just chilling out. Clears
your mind.?
David Benson, their head teacher,
says: ?The coaches and facilities at
Fulham Reach Boat Club provide an
exciting opportunity for our students
to train in a sport many will not have
had the opportunity to try before.?
Schuyler Audley-Williams, 13,
started rowing at Fulham Reach last
year after showing promise on a
rowing machine. He is at the West
London Free School, which is soon to
join the club. He started rowing when
he was being home-schooled after he
didn?t get into his preferred secondary
school. The club offered him some free
lessons and after one session he was
hooked. ?I knew this was something
I could carry on with and enjoy, and
knowing I had an opportunity to do
this was really exciting,? he says.
A few months later he won a
two-minute indoor rowing race at the
London Youth Games and then broke
the British records for 100m and 500m
in his age group on a rowing machine.
He now rows four times a week on
the river. ?Always training in the same
way enhanced my focus,? he says.
?When it?s a nice day it always makes it
easier. When it?s a cold frosty morning
it?s harder work, but you think, ?This is
why I?m here.? Afterwards it?s such a
satisfying feeling to know you have
pushed through that.?
An organisation that helps stateschool children to go to boarding
schools on full bursaries suggested
that, with his rowing ability, Schuyler
should apply to Eton. He passed the
tests and starts there in September.
Aside from talents such as
Schuyler, girls tend to be better
rowers than boys when they start.
?At the end of the year we run a
regatta with all the schools
and four girls won it overall,?
O?Connor says. ?The firstyear girls are much quicker
because they listen to the technical
coaching, whereas boys get in and
want to pull really hard and that
actually slows the boat down. Usually
the girls will go faster to start with,
until the boys twig.?
Annabelle Hogan, 14, and Emer
Tesh, 15, from Sacred Heart High
School, are in their second year of
rowing and compete. ?Not many
places offer this kind of stuff to state
schools, so it?s good that state schools
are doing it now,? Annabelle says.
Emer adds: ?I always want to keep
rowing and even if I don?t get to the
Boat Race it?s a fun sport as a hobby.?
Almost 80 per cent of the children
who come to Fulham Reach say they
want to continue after their initial
learner course. ?The trick is now trying
to facilitate that,? O?Connor says.
?How do we keep 80 per cent of them
on the water? That is a challenge.?
O?Connor points out that many
clubs are not being used much of the
time. ?They are very busy between
6pm and 8pm four nights a week and
Saturday mornings, but closed the rest
of the time. I know it?s going to be
slightly tricky trying to get people to
give up their boat clubs to use, but
that?s all part of the challenge.?
At British Rowing they see what is
being done at Fulham Reach as a
potential template for other cities.
?They are blazing a trail for the sport,?
says Phil Hornsey, the director of
membership and rowing community.
?It is probably the best example of this
sort of programme, but it is not alone.?
He points to a project at the Jubilee
Riverside Centre in Slough, which has
provided free lessons to Somali
children, and Warrington Youth
Rowing, which offers lessons
on the Mersey for children on
free school meals.
Rowing?s association with privilege
is ?something we want to face up to,?
Hornsey says. This month British
Rowing produced a guide for clubs on
how to boost diversity. ?It is something
that our community wants to change.?
In recent years the profile of rowers
has altered in other ways. Since
London 2012, when women won gold
medals in three rowing events, there
has been a 56 per cent increase in
female participation and there is now
close to a 50:50 gender split,
something many other sports envy.
In a few years? time it could be
worth checking the crews of the Boat
Race to see if any of them feature
state-school Fulham Reach alumni.
And if they don?t, at least the children
who grow up along the river will know
how to scull their way up and down it
and, hopefully, they?ll feel a little bit
proud of that. As Mohamed puts it:
?Now I can say, ?I did rowing.? ?
he announcement that one
of the most talked-about
books of the past few years,
Elena Ferrante?s My
Brilliant Friend, is going to
be adapted for television comes as
great news to those of us who are
time-poor but desperate to be on the
pulse culturally. I know that
Ferrante?s books are brilliant and I?m
sure they make a lovely bedtime
read, but I tend to feel quite tired by
10pm and just want to watch telly
instead. Still, nobody likes to feel left
out at dinner parties, so I don?t think
I?ll be the only one excited that,
thanks to HBO, I?ll be able to join in
with the hype behind this eight-part
series set in the dreamy Italian
locations painted in the first of
Ferrante?s Neopolitan novels.
Filming is underway in Caserta,
near Naples, and the show will be
quite an event. Producers reportedly
spent eight months searching for the
two pairs of actresses to play Lenu
and Lila, the characters whose
lifelong friendship is at the centre of
the novel, auditioning 9,000 children
and 500 adults. Elisa Del Genio will
play Elena Greco, the narrator, and
Ludovica Nasti will play Lila Cerullo,
her best friend, as children, while
Margherita Mazzucco and Gaia
EDUARDO CASTALDO/HBO
Gaia Girace and Margherita Mazzucco
Girace will portray the characters in
adolescence. The task of creating
Ferrante?s world is enormous:
215,000 sq ft of sets include
14 exterior apartment buildings
and five interior sets of apartments,
while the costume department has
created 1,500 outfits.
The Italian director Saverio
Costanzo plans to stick pretty closely
to the story, and the series will air in
Italian with English subtitles, with a
view to adapting the remaining three
Neapolitan novels afterwards. The
mysterious Ferrante (who writes
under a pseudonym) has had a hand
in advising on set choices and
storylines by email. She told
The New York Times: ?As far as the
collaboration on the script, I don?t
write, I don?t have the technical skills
to do it, but I am reading the texts
and send detailed notes.?
All we know about the transmission
date is that we will be able to watch it
before the end of the year. With luck
it will appear just in time to cheer us
up as what is sure to be a balmy
English summer comes to an end.
Emily Sargent
6
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Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
the table
Danger! Reading
this article could
give you spaghetti
carbonara rage
If you think Nigella?s recipe is all wrong,
just wait until you try the pasta by this
Michelin-starred chef, says Lucy Holden
I
am in a gleaming kitchen at
Brown?s Hotel in Mayfair,
London, ruining a three-star
carbonara with Heinz Beck.
Along with the delicate fresh
pasta parcels, I?ve just tipped the
bed of flour on which they were
cushioned into a pan of boiling
water, and the man in command at La
Pergola, the most famous restaurant in
Rome, is now calmly trying to retrieve
it with a spatula. This is possibly not
the red-carpet reception his dish
deserves.?The flour wouldn?t normally
go into boil,? he says, very decently, I
think, as it starts to set like crusts of
bread in the bubbles.
Beck ? who is tiny and seems to
have popped up out of the earth like
a mole in chef whites and round
Wind in the Willows glasses ? has
just come back to London
since doing a stint at the
Lanesborough five years ago.
The 54-year-old German has
spent nearly half his life at La
Pergola, which has been
awarded three Michelin stars
under his name. Now, thanks to
the new menu at Beck at
Brown?s, which will officially
open next month, he is allowing
Londoners a taste of the restaurant,
including his signature carbonara.
Although Beck describes his choice
of ingredients and method as
?traditional? a dozen times, it?s far
from conventional. For a start, he
doesn?t use spaghetti, which seems
bold to me. As for the sauce, well,
there doesn?t seem to be any.
?Where is it?? I ask when he plates
some up, and he looks at me as though
I?m a wide-eyed Charlie and he Willy
Wonka. ?Inside,? he says mysteriously.
Call me a purist, but no sauce? And
no spaghetti wrapped luxuriously,
strand by strand, in what Nigella calls
?that chin-dripping, love-soaked
primal feast??
It?s a brave chef who messes about
with probably the most fiercely
contested recipe in Roman cookery.
Nigella, for example, was accused of
heralding the ?death of Italian cuisine?
last year after pouring double cream
into hers, although her mentor, Anna
Del Conte, advises doing precisely that
in her book Gastronomy of Italy.
Admittedly, Nigella went farther offpiste than the doyenne of Italian food
writing, and after posting a recipe on
Facebook that included a triple blow
of cream, wine and nutmeg, was told
that she might as well ?make it with
Turkey Twizzlers? if she was going to
ruin it completely.
Italian tempers also flare at the
suggestion of using either lardons or
parmesan, although the Rome-based
food writer Rachel Roddy makes
special dispensation for both
ingredients in her otherwise traditional
recipe in Five Quarters: Recipes and
Notes from a Kitchen in Rome. As for
cr鑝e fra頲he, it?s probably a capital
offence in the Italian capital.
Even carbonara?s history is
contested. Sophia Loren claims to
have been cooked a slap-up carbonara
lunch by charcoal burners (carbonari)
she met in the Apennine mountains
while filming Two Women in 1960,
while others say it was a dish invented
by local cooks for American GIs
juggling rations of bacon and eggs.
I used to tell people carbonara was
the only thing I could cook, having
dated a chef for three years and left
without learning anything else. I can?t
bring myself to tell Beck that, though,
after seeing his ingredients laid out in
little Saturday Kitchen pots and
realising onion is nowhere to be seen.
I need to apologise to everyone I?ve
made carbonara for; I had no idea.
Then there?s the pan itself. Something?s
bubbling in it. ?Butter?? I ask, like I?m
James Martin. He stares at me. His
face makes it plain it isn?t. ?Never use
butter in carbonara,? he says, locking
deadly serious eyes on mine.
The pan of what I thought was
butter is actually veal stock, and he
first adds finely diced guanciale, cured
Roman pork cheeks that were
traditionally used because they were
cheap. ?It?s harder to find over here,?
he admits, adding that it?s not ?awful?
to use bacon, but never under any
circumstances use smoked. He eyes
me with suspicion as he says this.
Into the pan next goes finely diced
courgette, which isn?t traditional, but is
intended to add a little colour to the
plate. Then I?m instructed to plop a
dozen of the crinkly little fagottelli ?
the little pinched square parcels made
of very thinly rolled fresh pasta ? into
a pan of boiling water.
At La Pergola a chef is dedicated to
twisting thousands of these every
day, and they are served as part of
its ?265 tasting menu. At the
more casual Mayfair restaurant,
they are to be served as a main
course for �, alongside a
modern Italian menu that
includes sweetbreads and fava
beans, milk-fed lamb,
langoustine spaghetti and an
incredible red mullet ?sandwich?.
The pasta is made the day
before to give it a little more bite,
then it?s filled with a mixture of
pecorino and egg to make a
mousseline version of the sauce that
explodes into a little soup of carbonara
when you bite into it. ?Always
pecorino, not parmesan?? I ask, for
that?s one of the most fiercely
contested carbonara questions. Beck
just stares at me. ?Always!? he says,
smiling at the stupidity of the question.
?Parmesan is Emilia-Romagna!?
?Who?s she??
?Emilia-Romagna? means ?outside
of Rome?, he says. It?s a different
region of Italy (parmesan is made in
Parma) and a Roman classic wouldn?t
involve anything but traditional
Roman ingredients. Tell that to Anna
Del Conte.
I almost daren?t ask where the
cream is, but when I pluck up the
courage he tells me that cream is for
charlatans. ?It?s for people who can?t
cook it properly on the heat, because if
the temperature is too high or too low
the cheese crumbles and the sauce
isn?t smooth,? he explains. Adding
Heinz Beck and
Lucy Holden at Brown?s
Hotel in London. Left:
Beck?s carbonara
cream makes it smooth ? but it?s sort
of cheating. ?No butter or olive oil
goes near the dish either, with the
pork cheeks cooked in their own fat.
Everything is designed to keep what
can become a very heavy dish as light
as possible.?
When served, each pretty yellow
parcel is spotted with the jewel-like
pink and green of the pork and
courgette. The effect of biting into
the pasta is like biting into a Chinese
dumpling and feeling the hot liquid
flood into your mouth; the tiny
shards of crisp pork cheek add a
delicious crunch.
?Sometimes dishes take a long time
to create,? Beck says. ?This one took
a few weeks. I always found spaghetti
carbonara difficult to digest because
it?s so heavy and anyway, everyone
was making it with spaghetti, so I
wanted to do something different.
Another of the big problems with the
traditional version is the texture of
the eggs, they can scramble, so I
decided to use fagotelli to protect the
eggs. It?s a modern version based on
traditional flavours.
?I wake up in the morning to create
new dishes, it?s what drives me,? he
concludes, before retrieving his wheely
suitcase to head off for a flight back to
Rome. ?But is this my favourite?
Asking a chef that is like asking a
mother which is her favourite child.?
Beck at Brown?s opens at Brown?s
Hotel on Albemarle St, London
on April 16 (roccofortehotels.com)
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
7
1G T
CHRIS MCANDREW FOR THE TIMES
the table
Anyone for a slice of cake from
Meghan and Harry?s boho baker?
S
Rachel
Roddy?s
classic
spaghetti alla
carbonara
Carbonara is the best
example of a pasta dish
in which the sauce is
inseparable from the
pasta. It?s one in which
the elements ?
guanciale and its fat,
beaten eggs, grated
cheese and a slosh of
starchy pasta-cooking
water ? come together
to form a soft yellow
cream on strands of
spaghetti or rigatoni. It
is, like most good things,
simple, but requires
la pratica (practice),
which I don?t say to be
off-putting, just honest.
In Rome, guanciale is
traditionally used for
carbonara (purists claim
it is indispensable).
That said, quite a few
Romans I know prefer
pancetta. I like both.
If you can?t find either,
then bacon works too.
Serves 4
Ingredients
150g guanciale, pancetta
or bacon
A little olive oil
450g spaghetti
2 whole eggs and 2 extra
yolks
80g grated pecorino or
parmesan, or a mixture
Salt and freshly ground
black pepper
Method
1 Bring a large pan of
water to a rolling boil.
Cut the guanciale into
short, thick strips. In a
large frying pan over
a moderate heat, cook
the guanciale in a little
olive oil until the fat has
rendered and the pieces
are golden and crisp.
Remove from the heat.
2 Add salt to the boiling
water, stir, then add the
spaghetti, fanning it out
and using a wooden
spoon to gently press
and submerge the
strands. Cover the pan
until the water comes
back to the boil, then
remove the lid and
continue cooking until
it is al dente (check the
cooking time on the
packet and start tasting
at least 2 min earlier).
3 While the pasta is
cooking, in a largish
bowl whisk together
the eggs, egg yolks,
grated cheese, a pinch
of salt and plenty of
black pepper.
4 Heat up the meat
pan again, and once hot,
use a slotted spoon to
remove three quarters of
the guanciale pieces on
to a small plate, leaving
the last third and the
fat in the pan.
5 Drain the pasta,
reserving a cupful of the
cooking water. Add the
pasta to the frying pan,
stirring so that each
strand is coated with fat.
6 Turn off the heat, then
add the egg and cheese
mixture and a little
cooking water. Using a
wooden spoon or fork,
mix everything together
vigorously so each strand
is coated with a creamy
sauce. Add a little more
cooking water if the
sauce is too stiff. Serve
immediately, dividing the
rest of the guanciale
between the plates.
From Five Quarters by
Rachel Roddy (Salt Yard
Book Company, �)
ituated in an unprepossessing
whitewashed building in
Hackney, east London, it
would be easy to dismiss Violet
bakery as another hipster
coffee shop in an area that is rife with
them. However, those in the know,
including, it transpires, Meghan
Markle, will tell you that its owner
makes the best cakes you?ll ever eat.
Kensington Palace announced this
week that Markle and Prince Harry
have commissioned Claire Ptak to
summon up for their wedding cake
an organic lemon and elderflower
sponge decorated with butter cream
and fresh flowers. It won?t be her first
high-pressure commission. Last year,
she made a mocha gluten-free
birthday cake for Jamie Oliver?s wife,
Jules. ?She?s humble, talented and
brilliant,? Oliver said yesterday.
The actor David Schwimmer, aka
Ross from Friends, is a regular at
Violet, as is Henry Dimbleby, the
founder of the Leon restaurant chain.
After commissioning Ptak to make a
cake for his company?s? fifth birthday
(see recipe, right), Dimbleby asked
Ptak to collaborate with him on
Leon?s third cookbook, which is
devoted to cakes and puddings. Leon
also developed a successful business
strategy called ABC ? always bring
cake ? which meant bringing one
of her creations to any important
meeting, including when pitching to
landlords for new restaurant sites.
Markle met Ptak two years ago
when she interviewed the baker for
her lifestyle website the Tig. The
women share similar interests and
have similar roots. Like Prince
Harry?s wife-to-be, Ptak grew up in
California, the daughter of actors.
Softly spoken and a little bit boho,
she started out working as a pastry
chef at Alice Waters?s trendy organic
restaurant Chez Panisse, in Berkeley,
before moving to London in 2005.
Dimbleby says that what sets Ptak
apart is that, ?Claire always feels
cutting edge, but never gimmicky.?
So what is the secret to making
a good cake? According to Ptak, it?s
?great ingredients and a little
patience?. And what she enjoys most
about making them? ?Eating them.?
Since the royal announcement, it?s
likely that Violet will be inundated
with new fans. They will have to fight
the regulars if they want to get their
hands on the sharp lemon slices and
blood orange and polenta muffins.
Bridget Harrison
Claire Ptak and,
right, Meghan Markle
GEORGIA GLYNN SMITH
Claire Ptak?s
coconut
sponge
cream cake
This is a cake that we
make at Violet every
week. People go wild
for the coconut filling,
which is adapted from
an old Hawaiian
pudding recipe. When
I was asked to create
a cake for Leon?s fifth
birthday this was the
first cake I thought of.
It just has this look to it
that screams celebration.
Serves: 12-15
Preparation time:
40 min
Cooking time: 50 min
Ingredients
125g unsalted butter,
very soft
200g caster sugar
3 free-range eggs
� tsp salt
300g self-raising flour
175ml coconut milk
For the filling
100ml coconut milk
50g caster sugar
40ml water
1 tbsp cornflour, mixed
with 2 tbsp water
A pinch of salt
For the syrup
150ml coconut milk
100g sugar
� tsp vanilla extract
A pinch of salt
To decorate
300ml whipped cream
100g coconut shavings
Method
1 Heat the oven to 160C/
gas 3, with the fan on.
Butter a 23cm cake tin;
line with baking paper.
2 Cream the butter and
sugar until almost white
and fluffy. Add the eggs
and salt, and mix until
fully incorporated.
3 Add half the flour until
just combined. Add the
coconut milk and mix
until combined. Then
add the remaining flour
and mix well.
4 Pour the mixture into
the cake tin and smooth
the top. Bake in the oven
for 40-50 min, until a
skewer inserted comes
out clean and the cake
springs back to the
touch. Let the cake cool
completely in the tin.
5 To make the filling,
put the coconut milk,
sugar and water into a
heavy pan and place
over a moderate heat.
Stir to dissolve the sugar,
then turn up the heat
to high. Add the
cornflour mixture to
the pan with the salt
and whisk until thick.
Pour the mixture into
a bowl and press
clingfilm over the
surface. Let it cool,
then chill in the fridge
for at least 2 hours.
6 Heat the syrup
ingredients together
in a small saucepan and
cook over a medium
heat for 5 min.
7 Split the cooled cake
into three layers. Drizzle
with the syrup and
sandwich with the
coconut filling. Cover
the top and sides of the
cake with whipped
cream and sprinkle with
generous amounts of
coconut shavings.
Leon: Baking &
Puddings by Claire
Ptak and Henry
Dimbleby is published
by Conran, �
(octopusbooks.co.uk)
8
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Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
arts
The playwright
who is rewriting
Hollywood history
Tony Kushner talks to Dominic Maxwell about
reworking West Side Story for Spielberg, Angels in
America and the UK success of Caroline, or Change
I
n London Tony Kushner?s
musical Caroline, or Change has
just got the sort of five-star
reviews that the playwright
might have written himself (if
he?d dared). ?A modern
masterpiece,? said the London
Evening Standard this week.
?Sensational,? said The Times. Kushner
has yet to see it in London, but was
wowed when he saw the same
production in Chichester last year and
was desperate for it to move to town.
Still, speaking to me from his office
in Manhattan, he admits that he has
plenty to keep him occupied before he
makes it over to the Hampstead
Theatre, where the show is playing.
After our interview he plans to spend
the rest of his day working on a
screenplay that Brad Pitt has
commissioned from him. He Wanted
the Moon is a biopic about Dr Perry
Baird, a medical star of the interwar
years who did breakthrough research
into bipolar disorder just as he started
to suffer from it himself.
Kushner, 61, has also written the
screenplay for a new film version of
West Side Story, which Steven
Spielberg will shoot next year. At some
point soon, he hopes, Spielberg will
return to The Kidnapping of Edgardo
Mortara, the film that Kushner wrote
for him in which Mark Rylance was
due to play Pope Pius IX. The project
floundered last year because, despite
auditioning 3,600 child actors, they
couldn?t find the perfect one to play
the six-year-old Italian-Jewish boy at
the film?s centre. It?s a big ask, Kushner
admits, but the search goes on.
And there?s more. He has written
another film for the actress Viola
Davis about Barbara Jordan, the
African-American congresswoman
who made a key speech during the
Watergate affair in which she pointed
out that the constitution must be
protected from all attackers, even if
that attacker is the president of the
United States. Things tend to come
back to politics with Kushner. ?It
would be timely to make the film
now,? he says, ?because here we are
again ? except so much worse.?
Not that he?s neglecting playwriting.
He is in the early stages of a play about
Donald Trump (of which more later).
And while he has written the first
half of his musical about the death
of the great American playwright
Eugene O?Neill with his Caroline,
or Change composer, Jeanine
Tesori, he has stalled on the
second half. That?s the half in
which he has to depict O?Neill
dying in a Boston hotel room.
?I am having Oedipal issues.
It?s like killing Dad, you know?
As a playwright there is
something really terrifying
about doing that, but I am
trying to get over it.?
On the sidelines he has two
big revivals going on. On
Tony Kushner, who
has adapted West Side
Story, top, for Spielberg
Sunday his biggest hit, Angels in
America, the show he won a Pulitzer
prize for in 1993, opens again on
Broadway. This two-part, seven-hour
epic about Aids and Reaganism, love
and loyalty, sexuality and religion,
opens on Broadway having been a
smash hit at the National Theatre in
London last year. Nathan Lane,
Andrew Garfield and Denise Gough
are among the cast reprising their roles
in Marianne Elliott?s production.
Kushner was driven to write Angels
after seeing people around him in the
gay community in Eighties New York
get ill and die and by the Reaganite
politics of the day. He was also inspired
by his belated coming out as gay when
he was 26. Yet it?s Caroline, or Change
that is his most autobiographical work.
It?s set in 1963 in a liberal Jewish
household in Lake Charles, Louisiana,
not unlike his own. While the civil
rights movement gathers strength
in the background, the family
employ as their maid a local black
woman, Caroline, for $30 a week.
She spends most of the show
doing the family?s washing in the
basement ? although Kushner,
who gave us Mormon puppet
shows and supernatural beings in
Angels in America, gives singing
cameos to Caroline?s washing
machine, tumble dryer and radio.
Upstairs the Gellman family?s
new stepmother tries to get her
eight-year-old stepson, Noah, to
stop leaving his change in his trouser
pockets when they go to the wash. The
plot revolves around what happens
after she tells Caroline to keep the
money rather than giving it back to
Noah. It?s a plot that is daring, and
finally devastating, in how it filters
huge changes in society through lifesized gestures.
The Gellmans are not precisely the
Kushners, he insists, but several details
are straight from life. Kushner was
born in New York, but grew up in Lake
Charles, the middle child of a father,
Bill, a clarinettist and conductor, and a
mother, Sylvia, a bassoonist. When he
was 11 his mother got breast cancer
and had to leave the family home for
six months. Although Sylvia lived for
another 22 years, Tony, his older sister,
Lesley, and younger brother, Eric, for a
while got a taste of life without a
mother. And he?s fairly sure that his
mother did introduce a rule that any
money he left in his pockets was fair
game for the maid. Yet he points out
that Noah isn?t precisely him, just as
Caroline isn?t precisely Maudie Lee
Davis, their real-life maid.
Davis, 87, still lives in Lake Charles.
In the new production the superb
Sharon D Clarke makes Caroline a
dignified but unsentimental, unsmiling
stage presence. ?The default acceptable
behaviour of black maids who worked
for white families back then, Jewish or
otherwise, was of indefatigable
cheerfulness,? Kushner says. ?I liked
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
9
1G T
ALASTAIR MUIR; HELEN MAYBANKS; GETTY IMAGES; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
arts
Me?sha Bryan and
Sharon D Clarke in
Caroline, or Change.
Right: Andrew
Garfield and Nathan
Stewart-Jarrett in
Angels in America
her a lot, but she didn?t smile a lot. You
didn?t f*** around with her.?
He sent Davis the script to check it
was all right by her. Then she came to
see the first production at the Public
Theater in New York in 2003. After
the show Kushner sat in the back of a
cab with her and her daughter and
asked, nervously, what she thought.
She said she recognised Caroline?s
devotion to her family. She didn?t
recognise the character?s anger as her
own, though. ?I was never like that,?
she said. At which point Davis?s
daughter raised her eyebrows at
Kushner in a way that reassured him
his memories were about right.
He stays in touch with Davis. Just
after Trump got elected, Kushner rang
Caroline, or Change
is at the Hampstead
Theatre, London NW3
(020 7722 9301),
to April 21. Angels
in America is at
the Neil Simon
Theatre, New York
(angelsbroadway.com)
to June 30
her for a chat and her first question
was to check that he is no relation to
the president?s son-in-law, Jared
Kushner. He was able to reassure her
that he is not.
For all his screen work, the theatre
is closest to his heart. ?But it doesn?t
pay the rent. Or give me health
insurance.? Angels in America must
have paid a bit of rent? He laughs.
?Oh, I have no complaints. Angels has
done very nicely. And Caroline too. All
these things generate income.? He
wasn?t joking about the health
insurance, though. He gets that from
his screenwriting, through belonging
to the Writers? Guild. ?And in a
barbaric country like the United
States, where we don?t have a national
health service, that actually matters.?
Talking to Kushner is a bit like seeing
one of his plays. He is exhilaratingly
intelligent, full of opinions and ideas
and, although he never loses sight of
the point he is making, is discursive
rather than concise. Answers are never
short, but never dull. His most recent
play came in at three and a half hours
and was sprawling, but wonderful, like
its title: The Intelligent Homosexual?s
Guide to Capitalism and Socialism with a
Key to the Scriptures. I wonder if
screenwriting gives him the chance to
be a slick professional, trim and
focused, but he says not. He was
nominated for an Oscar for his script
for Spielberg?s film Lincoln, but his first
draft had 500 pages. Spielberg was
happy with that, apparently, because it
let him pick out the bits he was
interested in. Still, Kushner quite likes
being a writer for hire. ?It relieves you
of a certain burden of responsibility.?
Not that he sounds detached when
arguing why it?s worth doing a new
West Side Story. It wasn?t his idea, but
that of Spielberg, who has never done
a musical before. Yet while Kushner
loves the stage show and original film
(?Who doesn?t??), after writing two
drafts of his own version he is able to
expound at length on what they may
be able to improve. ?Natalie Wood is
in no sense of the word Puerto Rican.
None of the actors are singing their
own stuff apart from Rita Moreno. It
has genius choreography by the
greatest choreographer of its age
[Jerome Robbins], but the language of
its ballet is of its era.?
Spielberg is keen for the street kids
to look like street kids: less clean and
mature than before. And Kushner has
tried to bring out the immigrant status
of the Puerto Rican gang, the Sharks.
?This was all there in the original, but
maybe not as clear as it needs to be in
2018.? The setting will remain 1950s
New York, though, otherwise, he says,
you would have to change Stephen
Sondheim?s lyrics. ?You would have to
be out of your mind to do that.?
As long as I?m not
Jared Kushner
I?m doing well
Such challenges excite him. The
more restricted options of theatre fire
him up even more. ?Like novelists,
film-makers have so many tools with
which to tell a story. Plays, mostly, are
a series of arguments. It?s an incredibly
impoverished form of storytelling in
one sense, but I love that about it. I
love that it?s this sort of impossible
task. That?s the fun of it, the game of
it. It?s sort of like plumbing.?
His latest U-bend is his Trump play.
He felt strongly the need to write it ?
hey, what else is anyone thinking
about? Yet, although he featured
Trump?s one-time lawyer and mentor,
Roy Cohn, as one of the main
characters in Angels in America, he has
never wanted to include Trump in the
story. ?Because Trump is, without any
exaggeration, borderline psychotic, a
pathological narcissist. And I think part
of the horror of the last year and a half
? a small part, but a real part ? is the
boredom of this. You can?t ever turn on
the news or think about anything but
him, but he is dull. He has never read a
book. He has never said a thing worth
quoting except in disgust. He is vulgar
to an unimaginable degree. He?s cruel,
he?s greedy, he?s profoundly disloyal, he
has no relationship to reality, he?s really
a bore. And so to be trapped in that
stunted, warped, primitive mentality,
how do you put that on stage??
He suspects that Trump would love
to be included, just as he is convinced
that he secretly loves Alec Baldwin?s
impression of him on Saturday Night
Live. Because he would rather be
talked about than be kept off stage. So
Kushner will keep him off stage.
The closest we will get to Trump in
Kushner?s output, then, is Cohn, played
with vituperative glee by Nathan Lane,
offering Trumpian wisdom such as:
?You want to be nice or you want to be
effective? Make the law or be subject
to the law?? Arguably part of the
renewed appeal of Angels is that the
politics of today mirrors the politics of
the mid-1980s. Kushner can be very
nearly as rude about Reagan as he is
about Trump. ?Yes, I am glad that it
seems to be working for audiences. I
think, though, that I would happily
trade the play?s feeling of relevance in
exchange for being able to say that we
have left Reaganism behind.?
If the political climate of the 1980s
finds its echo now, socially things have
undeniably changed. Kushner has
homes in Manhattan and
Massachusetts, with his husband, Mark
Harris. Putting on a gay play is much
less controversial than it was in the
early 1990s. He points out that there is
still work to be done, for equality for
women too. ?But things have changed
enormously since then, thank God.?
Yet while Angels in America is ?a gay
play? and Caroline, or Change is ?a play
about race?, Kushner?s plays don?t
really boil down quite as neatly as that.
They are full of big arguments, yet
tend not to have heroes or villains,
martyrs or malice. Hence Kushner?s
inability to write Trump, perhaps; he
just sees him as beyond redemption. ?I
hope I have never written an issue
play. I don?t think theatre is the most
effective method for proselytising.?
Kushner is delighted by the reception
to Caroline, or Change. ?It always seems
to work.? Still, he knows it will take
more than this to stop him being Tony
?Angels in America? Kushner. He?s
comfortable with that. ?Why not? I like
all my children very much. But I know
that the first thing in my obituary will
be that I wrote Angels in America. I
know I won?t have another thing like
that. I know its success is something to
do with the play and also something to
do with its timing. I am OK with it.? He
chuckles. ?As long as I am not Jared
Kushner, I think I?m doing well.?
Ektertaikmekts
Theatres
HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
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THE OPERA
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10
1G T
Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
television & radio
Fridge-magnet philosophy from a Playboy model
BBC
Carol
Midgley
TV review
The Secret Helpers
BBC Two
{{(((
Zoe Ball?s Hardest Road
Home
BBC One
{{{{(
I
n The Secret Helpers nice people
said nice things to other nice
people via a secret earpiece. And
I?m sorry, but it was awful. No
offence to those who took part, but
it was sentimental mediocrity dressed
up as documentary. I kept having to
check that it really was on BBC Two.
The premise was that two (lovely,
actually) men going through a difficult
time received advice and pep talks
from strangers in various parts of the
world through an ear device. The
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
The Art of Now:
Band Politics
Radio 4, 11.30am
Every pop star of the past
20 years should listen to
this. For songs can be about
interesting things. Take
Nadine Shah, a singersongwriter who writes
about gentrification, the
refugee crisis and the NHS.
Chris Hawkins, of BBC
6 Music, presenting, sees
Shah as a new breed of
singer who ?steps beyond
music into a kind of political
journalism?. True, it?s a
particular journalism ?
don?t expect the Telegraph
with beats. But it?s a change
from Ed Sheeran.
The Hitchhiker?s
Guide to the Galaxy
Radio 4, 6.30pm
?Arthur is enjoying his
journey thoroughly as he
talks to the great lost love
of his life, Fenchurch . . .
Sadly for Arthur, this is not
the actual person, but a
holographic construct.? It?s
hard not to listen to this
latest instalment of these
Hitchhiker?s adaptations
with a sense of unease. So
much of this world has
come true. Today we have
touring holograms, such as
the one of Elvis. Will we get
Deep Thought tomorrow?
Stars John Lloyd, Simon
Jones and Jane Horrocks.
?sages? included two former New York
cops, an Irish nun, a healer in South
Africa and a former Playboy model in
Norway. Me neither. We watched
while these people repeatedly stated
the obvious, occasionally throwing
in some fridge-magnet philosophy,
while the recipient made out it was
life-changing.
Gwen in South Africa told us that
Dan, who had suffered a terrible
double stroke and was fretting about
his wedding speech, was ?a bit
stressed?. The cops suggested to Brett,
a father of newborn twins, that his
wife may want to go for a coffee. The
nun suggested burping the babies.
Kind, yes, but televisually lamer than
a post-Grand National horse.
What was the point of it? There was
nothing here that their mates or a
barmaid down the local couldn?t have
told them in a heartbeat. Why did it
require cameras in four far-flung
countries to tell an anxious man
to take deep breaths or eat more
healthily? And it was all set to the
kind of background music that
assumes you need violin strings to
signal when a moment is poignant
because you?re too moronic to judge
for yourself.
And why didn?t the wives know
about the earpiece? What did it add?
The set-up felt fake and about as
weighty as candyfloss. Perhaps you
think me harsh and a horrid cynic
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Dev 5.45
Newsbeat 6.00 Dev 7.00 Phil Taggart 9.00
The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00 The
Residency: James Blake 12.00 BBC Radio 1?s
Residency: Mura Masa 1.00am Toddla T
3.00 BBC Radio 1?s Residency: The Black
Madonna 4.00 Radio 1?s Early Breakfast
Show with Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Bob Harris Country 8.00
Jo Whiley 10.00 The Radio 2 Arts Show with
Anneka Rice 12.00 The Craig Charles House
Party (r) 2.00am Radio 2?s Tracks of My
Years Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Have A
Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Feelgood Friday 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3?s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein presents a selection of classical
music and the author and playwright Kate
Mosse reveals the cultural in?uences that
have inspired and shaped her life and career
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Debussy (1862-1918)
Donald Macleod explores Debussy?s
contented domestic life in the years leading
up to the First World War. Debussy
(Serenade for the Doll; Poissons d?or ?
Images for piano Set 2; Rondes de Printemps
? Images; La plus que lente; Trois Poemes
de St閜hane Mallarm� and Jeux)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Fiona Talkington presents a series of
concerts from LSO St Luke?s in London
featuring the music of Claude Debussy and
Ildebrando Pizzetti. In today?s concert, Owain
Park conducts the BBC Singers in some of
Pizzetti?s choral music, including his
remarkable Requiem and the Shelley setting
A Lament. Debussy (Trois chansons de
Charles d?Orl閍ns); Pizzetti (A Lament;
Requiem; 2 Canzoni corali; De Profundis);
and Debussy arr Clytus Gottwald (Des pas
sur la neige ? from Preludes, Book 1)
One of the sages: the former model and nutritionist Lilian
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Penny Gore introduces Engelbert
Humperdinck?s setting of Hansel and Gretel,
the classic story from the Brothers Grimm,
and continues this week?s focus on recent
Ulster Orchestra recordings, with works by
Piers Hellawell and Proko?ev, conducted by
Rafael Payare. In a performance from the
Royal Opera House, Colin Davis conducts
Humperdinck?s fairy-tale opera with a cast
featuring the mezzo Angelika Kirschlager,
the sopranos Diana Damrau, Elizabeth
Connell, Anja Silja, Pumeza Matshikiza, Anita
Watson, Eri Nakamura, Simona Mihai, and
the baritone Thomas Allen, with the Tif?n
Boys? Choir, the Tif?n Children?s Chorus and
the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House.
Humperdinck (Hansel and Gretel) 3.45 Piers
Hellawell (Wild Flow) 4.05 Proko?ev
(Symphony No 5 in B ?at, Op 100)
5.00 In Tune
Katie Derham presents music, chat and arts
news. Her guests include the Carducci
Quartet, who perform live in the studio
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
Music by Lars-Erik Larsson, Alfred Brendel
and Jennifer Higdon
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
Tom Redmond presents a concert of Mozart,
Beethoven and Debussy given live in
Liverpool by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic
Orchestra, conducted by Vasily Petrenko with
Stephen Hough on piano. Tonight?s
programme begins with Mozart?s overture to
The Abduction from the Seraglio. Debussy
conjures up the sultry warmth of Spain in
Iberia, the second in his late orchestral
triptych, Images, then to the sea with La
Mer. Before the interval, Stephen Hough
performs Beethoven?s First Piano Concerto.
Mozart (Overture, The Abduction from the
Seraglio); Beethoven (Piano Concerto No 1);
and Debussy (Ib閞ia ? Images; and La Mer)
10.00 Free Thinking Festival
As the BBC screens its new arts series,
Civilisations, David Olusoga, joins the
presenter Philip Dodd, the anthropologist Kit
Davis and the historian Kenan Malik to
consider our different notions of history
10.45 The Essay: New Generation
Thinkers
Emma Butcher looks at what can be learnt
from the writing of young soldiers in
con?icts including the Battle of Trafalgar
11.00 Late Junction
Nick Luscombe presents rare soul from the
reissued record Two Sisters from Bagdad, the
sounds of the composer Henry Threadgill and
wedding music from Azerbaijan
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am-8.31 (LW) Test Match Special:
New Zealand v England
The opening day of the ?rst Test in Auckland
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 In Our Time
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Keywords for Our Time
The journalist and language columnist Oliver
Kamm considers ?the national debt? (4/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
With Jenni Murray. Including at 10.45 the 15
Minute Drama: Part four of Based on a True
Story, the thriller by Delphine de Vigan
11.00 From Our Own Correspondent
Kate Adie introduces reports from across the
globe. Last in the series
11.30 The Art of Now: Band Politics
Investigating a new wave of politically
engaged bands. See Radio Choice
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Katie Hims. On the same day in 1918 that
Women?s Day raised funds for the WAAC
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week: The Wood
By John Lewis-Stempel. The story of one
year in the life of a wood
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: The King of the Flat White
as Narrated by Her Majesty Queen
Elizabeth II
By Ewa Banaszkiewicz and Mateusz Dymek.
A Polish immigrant is severely beaten the
night after the Brexit vote, losing not only
his good looks but his perfect British accent
3.00 Ramblings
Clare Balding joins a teacher on one of her
regular walks around York (6/7)
3.27 Radio 4 Appeal
On behalf of Sport Relief (r)
3.30 Open Book
Mariella Frostrup talks to the crime writer
Joseph Knox about his debut novel Sirens,
and Stella Duffy discusses completing Ngaio
Marsh?s un?nished ?nal novel (r)
4.00 The Film Programme
The director Ava DuVernay talks about her
new fantasy adventure A Wrinkle in Time
4.30 BBC Inside Science
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
because it was clearly well-intentioned
and next week does look more
promising. But this episode felt like
a labyrinthine way of telling us
nothing at all.
I have always found it hard not
to like Zoe Ball. After watching
Zoe Ball?s Hardest Road Home
it is totally impossible. What a
courageous thing to do when she is
clearly raw with grief. Ball, who lost
her partner, Billy Yates, to suicide last
year, cycled from her birthplace in
Blackpool to Brighton to raise money
and awareness of mental-health issues
for Sport Relief and suffered for
her trouble.
It wasn?t just the rain and hail, which
often seemed to be flying sideways
into her face, or the exhaustion, which
sometimes brought her to tears and
caused her to fall. It was the ?Could I
have done something?? question that
haunts the loved ones of those who
take their own lives. In interviews in
which her voice broke and her love for
Yates filled the screen, Ball said she
could see the pain of depression in his
eyes. He couldn?t make sense of what
was happening to him.
The last time she saw him he blew
her a kiss as he left on his bike. She
is grateful to have had that farewell.
That 350-mile journey she did for him.
Heartbreaking story; deeply
impressive woman.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 The Hitchhiker?s Guide to the
Galaxy: Hexagonal Phase
Sci-? comedy based on Eoin Colfer?s novel
And Another Thing, adapted and directed by
Dirk Maggs. See Radio Choice (3/6)
7.00 The Archers
Ruth hears some interesting news
7.15 Front Row
A round-up of arts news and reviews
7.45 Based on a True Story (4/5) (r)
8.00 Law in Action
David Gauke, Lord Chancellor and Secretary
of State for Justice, speaks to Joshua
Rozenberg. Last in the series (r)
8.30 The Bottom Line
An overview of the business world
9.00 BBC Inside Science (r)
9.30 In Our Time (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Reservoir 13
By Jon McGregor (4/10)
11.00 It?s Jocelyn
Sketches and stand-up (3/4) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Political news presented by Sean Curran
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week: The Wood
Broadcast earlier (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00-5.20 (LW) Test Match Special:
New Zealand v England
Commentary on the second day of the ?rst
Test in Auckland
1.00 As BBC World Service
8.30 Seems Like a Nice Boy: The Story of
Larry Grayson. A pro?le of the entertainer
9.00 Short Works: The World of Somerset
Maugham. The Three Fat Ladies of Antibes
9.15 Once Upon a Time There Was a Beatrix.
Fantasy drama by Lavinia Murray 10.00
Comedy Club: The Hitchhiker?s Guide to
the Galaxy ? Hexagonal Phase 10.30
Sketchorama. The rising stars of the comedy
circuit show off their wit and imagination
11.00 Masala FM. A leading ?royal? phones
in 11.30 Bleak Expectations. By Mark Evans
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 6.00 Steve
Lamacq?s Roundtable 7.00 Marc Riley 9.00
Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music Recommends with
Steve Lamacq. A bite-sized edition 1.00am
Goth Lyrics with Murray Lachlan Young 2.00
The Ocean 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Digital only
8.00am Marriage Lines 8.30 The Goon Show
9.00 It?s Your Round 9.30 The Inimitable
Jeeves 10.00 The Raj Quartet 11.00 Short
Works: The World of Somerset Maugham
11.15 Once Upon a Time There Was a
Beatrix 12.00 Marriage Lines 12.30pm The
Goon Show 1.00 A Charles Paris Mystery: An
Amateur Corpse 1.30 Seems Like a Nice Boy:
The Story of Larry Grayson 2.00 The Norfolk
Mystery 2.15 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen?s
History of Home 2.30 The Old Curiosity Shop
2.45 The North (and Almost Everything in
It) 3.00 The Raj Quartet 4.00 It?s Your
Round 4.30 The Inimitable Jeeves 5.00
North by Northamptonshire 5.30 The
Hitchhiker?s Guide to the Galaxy: Hexagonal
Phase 6.00 The Destruction Factor 6.30
Great Lives 7.00 Marriage Lines 7.30 The
Goon Show. Comedy with Spike Milligan
8.00 A Charles Paris Mystery: An Amateur
Corpse. Based on a novel by Simon Brett
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Anna Foster 1.00pm
Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
Live Sport 8.00 5 Live Formula 1. The team
looks ahead to the Australian Grand Prix
9.00 5 Live Sport. The day?s sports news
10.00 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Lawrence Dallaglio 10.00 Jim White,
Ray Parlour and Bob Mills 1.00pm
Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Danny Kelly and
Darren Gough. News from the footballing
world 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott
celebrates the Chamber Orchestra of Europe.
Mozart (Divertimento in F; and Ave Verum
Corpus); Tchaikovsky (Pezzo Capriccioso,
Op 62); Dvor醟 (Slavonic Dances, Op 46); and
Schubert (Sonata in C ? Grand Duo) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
11
1G T
TRISTRAM KENTON; GETTY IMAGES
Dance
Requiem pour L
Sadler?s Wells
Pop
Tune-Yards
Roundhouse, NW1
T
Y
{{{{(
{{{{{
he maverick Belgian
choreographer Alain Platel
has never catered to purists,
but I won?t argue with him.
Not when the results of his
pursuit of new artistic blends are as
subtle, varied and stirring as this.
In previous productions for Platel?s
company, Les Ballets C de la B, he
offered often playful yet passionate
dance-theatre treatments of
Monteverdi, Bach, Mahler and the like.
Often the music was rendered live and
sometimes in collaboration with the
composer Fabrizio Cassol, as is the
case here. This time they?re tackling
not just Mozart?s last work, its
completion curtailed by death, but also
the subject of death itself.
Platel?s handling of this touchy topic
is epic, but sensitive. One of the
constants in this dance-lite concert is
Cassol?s radical, Afro-pop-slanted
arrangements, performed live by a cast
of 14 singers and instrumentalists. The
other is slow-motion black-and-white
film footage of a dying, middle-aged
woman (the L of the title) that is
projected as a backdrop throughout
the 100 minutes. The camera?s view is
unflinching as she drifts in and out of
consciousness while propped up in
bed, attended by family and friends.
The filming of L?s demise occurred
with her permission. Although the
musicians rarely acknowledge her
image directly, occasionally ? and
uncannily ? it?s as if she appears to
be listening to them, whether they?re
clustered together or roaming
individually on a stage covered in rows
of gradually rising, oblong black
platforms, like graves in a cemetery.
You could regard this offbeat take on
Mozart?s Requiem as a kind of grief
party, by turns solemn and ceremonial,
but also joyous and lively. The cast are
in gumboots, presaging a climactic
stomping about on those graves, but
the dance content is minimal. The
musicianship, however, is masterly,
fronted by a trio of classically trained
vocalists juxtaposed against the
musically looser styles of three
physically wiry, African-born singers.
At times the voices rise
tempestuously on waves of layered,
finger-snapping rhythm supplied by an
accordion, euphonium, percussion and
electric guitar, but they can also
soothe. A few abrupt tonal shifts and
false endings aside, it makes for a
largely extraordinary experience.
Donald Hutera
Pop
Sam Smith
FlyDSA Arena,
Sheffield
{{{((
artsfirst night
?I
O?Casey draws us into lives
changing for ever even as characters
just appear to drink in the bar, where
a speaker (here a voice on the telly)
talks up the ?exhilaration? of war.
Songs are sung, both impassioned and
ironic. The English soldiers arrive, in
modern combats, and they are scared
and lifesize too. Meanwhile, the play
manages, without being cynical, to
suggest that war is always a mess, a
clumsy tool for solving problems.
Jon Bausor?s strip-lit set gives us a
three-storey piece of scaffolding for
the tenement block. Then, as the
world tilts into madness ? looting,
bleeding, fighting, hiding, dying ? the
scaffolding turns on to its side. Such
directorial devices pan out, but it?s the
acting that counts most. Holmes?s
14-strong cast are simply superb.
Although O?Casey?s writing is
old-fashioned in the way that it asks
Nora Clitheroe to slide into Ophelialike deliriousness, Kate Stanley
Brennan does a great job at the centre
of an ensemble that makes us feel how
uncomfortably close those offstage
gunshots are. Great performances
too from Ian Lloyd Anderson as her
husband, Niall Buggy as her eccentric
uncle, and Phelim Drew, Hilda Fay,
Julie Maguire, Janet Moran and
Ciaran O?Brien as neighbours. A
playful, painful and resonant evening.
Box office: 020 8741 6850, to April 7
ou don?t often come across
a band that makes you
think and your body contort
and jink. Talking Heads
and their smart, spiky new
wave were one, Fela Kuti?s activist
Afrobeat was another and the smilingassassin charm of Nina Simone a
certainty. Tune-Yards, fronted by
Merrill Garbus and her husband,
Nate Brenner, are among them.
And while the Oakland-based group?s
achievement and success is modest
by comparison with the others?, they
expertly craft together compelling
songs in a tone all their own.
?Are you ready to dance even
though it?s only a Tuesday?? Garbus
roared with an optimism not usually
seen in north London. Fortunately,
she left little room for British frigidity.
A cranked-up Eighties disco drumbeat
and her spectacular looped vocals
propelled Look at Your Hands with
the force of a fire hose. West African
tribal beats in Water Fountain
provoked an increasingly raucous
and frisky atmosphere. Mingus-style
baritone sax samples, cascading bass
lines and Garbus?s vengeful screams
like a wronged cavewoman combined
magnificently in Gangsta.
Many bands opt to make their live
shows ornate versions of their
recorded material. Not this one. This
was absorbing, ambitious stuff at
a breakneck BPM. Tune-Yards? fourth
album, I Can Feel You Creep Into My
Private Life, released this year, shifted
towards the danceable, borrowing
from Chicago house, disco and early
techno. Yet the message from Garbus,
who recently attended
a six-month workshop on whiteness
and racial justice, is of a brave, rather
divisive self-interrogation. ?I use my
white woman?s voice to tell stories of
travels with African men,? she warbled
in an askew arpeggio during Colonizer
as irresistible, industrial EDM beats
rendered the room a Berlin club.
Once a puppeteer and ukulele
player, Garbus used to perform in
costume and face paint. Yet here
the stage was shorn of all but simple
lighting. It was a shrewd decision.
Her kaleidoscopic bric-a-brac music
is more than enough; her work
humble and urgent. To close the set
the elevated electropop of Heart
Attack gave one last sample of that
miraculous voice: warped siren,
stalking feline, primal aggressor.
Peter Yeung
musical misery, it was perfect. No
dancing, no jazz hands. The only
concession to showbiz was in the
encore, when the 25-year-old climbed
a spiral staircase and sang Palace from
the top of a golden pyramid. The only
song you could call perky was Restart,
which had shades of Kool and the
Gang-style disco-funk and a snatch of
Luther Vandross and Janet Jackson?s
The Best Things in Life Are Free.
Other than that, it was wall-to-wall
woe. One-note, yes, but that note was
pretty stirring. Smith?s voice was full of
rippling power on Money on My Mind,
weightless pain on Lay Me Down, and
beautifully controlled falsetto on his
James Bond theme, Writing?s on the
Wall. The most emotional track was
Him, an example of something
surprisingly rare: a man singing a love
song explicitly about another man.
?Love is love,? Smith said imperiously.
?I am a proud, proud gay man.?
His formidable phalanx of backing
singers gathered round him on the
cascading harmonies of the gospel
standard I Sing Because I?m Happy,
a title with more than a tinge of irony.
You wonder if Smith had Whitehall?s
words in mind towards the end when
he introduced Scars, a plangent ballad
about his parents splitting up: ?You
may think it?s super-depressing, but
it?s good to listen to sad music when
you?re sad.? And to sing it, clearly.
Ed Potton
SSE Hydro, Glasgow, Fri and Sat
Hilda Fay, Janet Moran and Niall Buggy play Dubliners at the time of the Easter Rising
Rising to the occasion
A superb cast
help to bring
this fine Sean
O?Casey revival
to vibrant life,
says Dominic
Maxwell
Theatre
The Plough
and the Stars
Lyric, W6
{{{{(
f you like Adele songs, but find
them too upbeat, you?re in for
a treat,? said the comedian Jack
Whitehall before Sam Smith
played at the Brits last month.
A bit cruel, perhaps, but he kind of
had a point. Smith, right, is not one of
life?s pedal-to-the-metal hellraisers. Yet
his neurotic, broken-hearted soul has
garnered him four Grammys, an
Oscar and album sales of more than
17 million. This homogeneous, but
impeccably performed show was the
first of a 92-date world tour that could
elevate Smith even farther.
He started and finished hunched on
a chair that emerged from the stage
and at the end sank back into it. As a
metaphor for his brand of distilled
I
will be honest, the heart sinks
when a theatre threatens to
start ?unleashing contemporary
resonances? in a great play.
Not that old texts should be
sacrosanct. And Sean O?Casey?s drama
set around the 1916 Easter Rising,
which prompted a riot on its first
performance in Dublin in 1926, is
never an easy evening. It?s just that
you wonder whether kitting out
characters in Manchester United strips,
or asking them to direct some lines
straight at the stalls in a way that?s
part Brechtian, part Dick Whittington,
serves to keep the audience interested,
or to keep the director interested.
In this instance, the odd moment
of oversell aside, the audience is
the winner. Yes, Sean Holmes?s
production, first seen at the Abbey in
Dublin in 2016, takes a while to go
from garrulous to gripping, but that?s
this play for you. O?Casey lets us into
the lives of the ordinary Dubliners
in a tenement block. The carpenter
putting a new lock on a door, later
swigging from tinnies he plucks
from his plastic bag. The gossipy
charwoman whose tuberculosis-ridden
girl will later be carried off in a coffin.
The young firebrand never far from
his next socialist spiel. At their centre
the young couple, the Clitheroes,
torn apart after the husband, Jack, is
lured back to the Irish Citizen Army.
12
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Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Martin Luther
King
ITV, 9pm
Trevor
McDonald
has covered
many stories
in his five-decade
career, but there is
one that he has always
wanted to explore ?
Pearl Mackey King and
meets students and
activists who were
inspired by King to
fight for civil rights. In
the interests of balance,
McDonald interviews
an ex-member of the
Ku Klux Klan and talks
to a historian about the
horrors of lynching in
20th-century America.
There are also modern
black role models,
including Naomi
Campbell and Colin
Powell, who
acknowledge the debt
they owe King.
Progress has been
made, but not enough.
?Were he alive today,
he would probably be
on the march again,?
says McDonald. ?This
time against inequality
and injustice, the twin
evils that still scar
millions of black
American lives.?
Big Cats About
the House
BBC Two, 8pm
Giles Clark is the
British zookeeper who
raised two tiger cubs
at home with his family
in a quiet Australian
suburb, as captured in a
2014 BBC documentary,
Tigers About the House.
Clark is back in the
UK to run the Big Cat
Sanctuary in Kent.
Conservation is a major
part of his new role
and he is adopting
a newborn jaguar cub
that has been neglected
by its mother, taking
it into the family home
to be hand-reared.
Maya is cute, but
vulnerable, and needs
as much care as a
baby, night feeds
and all. Then he
notices a problem
with Maya?s sight . . .
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
Early
marital home; and to
the Lorraine Motel in
Memphis, Tennessee,
where he was
assassinated. He starts
with the monumental
?I have a dream?
speech, the key ideas of
which, he discovers,
were off-the-cuff. He
interviews King?s key
allies, including the
veteran singer Harry
Belafonte, tracks down
King?s assistant, Willie
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Holding Back the Years. Nicki
Chapman meets people having children later in life (AD)
10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Two properties in
south-east London (AD) 11.00 The Sheriffs Are Coming.
The sheriffs attempt to get money back for a
grandmother who was conned by a local builder 11.45
Caught Red Handed. A computer shop owner who tracked
down a burglar (r) (AD) 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Two
teams compete at the East of England Showground (r)
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Jimmi is puzzled by a
seemingly innocent young man who is desperate to be
arrested (AD) 2.15 A Place to Call Home. George is still
depressed about James?s rejection of life at Ash Park,
while Elizabeth ignores an important note from Douglas?s
solicitor 3.00 Escape to the Country. A professional
couple keen to escape London and move to Hampshire (r)
(AD) 3.45 Money for Nothing. Old bedroom cabinets and
a steamer trunk are restored 4.30 Flog It! From Sandon
Hall in Staffordshire (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show hosted
by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at Six;
Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Repair Shop (r) 6.30 Holding Back the Years
(r) (AD) 7.15 The Sheriffs Are Coming (r) 8.00 Sign
Zone: Earth?s Natural Wonders (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria
Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily
Politics 1.00pm Two Tribes (r) 1.30 Yes Chef. Mary Ann
Gilchrist puts four amateurs through a series of culinary
tests (r) 2.15 Monty Halls? Great Irish Escape. Monty
takes to the water to electronically tag the ?ns of basking
sharks off the West Coast of Ireland so their movements
can be tracked by scientists (r) (AD) 3.15 Planet Earth.
Following the epic journey of a humpback whale and its
calf as they travel from a tropical paradise to the species?
great feeding ground in the icy polar seas (r) (AD) 4.15
Spy in the Wild. Animals getting up to mischief, from
birds stealing ?sh and elephants having temper tantrums
to cheating chimps and lemurs getting high by snif?ng
toxic millipedes (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your Money Where
Your Mouth Is. Eric Knowles and Ochuko Ojiri search a
car-boot sale in Chester?eld, where items of interest
include antique coin scales and a John Wayne mirror 6.00
Eggheads. Quiz hosted by Jeremy Vine 6.30 The Repair
Shop. Restoring a Boulle-work clock and a Georgian desk
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs
and fashion news, as well as showbiz stories 9.25 The
Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning.
Phillip Scho?eld and Holly Willoughby present chat and
lifestyle features, including a look at the stories making
the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen
12.30pm Loose Women. The ladies put the world to
rights once more and invite a guest to chat about what
they are up to 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge
Rinder. Cameras follow the criminal barrister Robert
Rinder as he takes on real-life cases in a studio courtroom
3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. The team travels to Buxton in
Derbyshire, where Karen Dalmeny digs deep for some war
memorabilia, and Jan Keyne forms an instant attachment
to a creamware jug (r) 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard
hosts the arcade-themed quiz show in which contestants
drop tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a �,000 jackpot 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh
presents as contestants pit their wits against the Chaser
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.30 Frasier (r)
(AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 11.00
Undercover Boss USA (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary
12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Four contestants in Bristol
compete for the �000 prize (r) 1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers.
Pickwicks are tempted by a theatre organ with a �,000
asking price (r) 2.10 Countdown. With Dictionary Corner
guest Len Goodman 3.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or
Away. A Devon duo choose between homes in Dorset and
Tenerife (r) 4.00 A New Life in the Sun. A Portsmouth
couple race to open their new B&B before the end of the
season, while a knife skills course at a British-run French
cooking school does not end well 5.00 Four in a Bed.
Expectations are high as the guests arrive at the Compton
Swan in Berkshire (r) 5.30 Star Boot Sale. The model and
presenter Nancy Sorrell plunders her home for things to
sell, choosing a painting by her husband Jim Moir ?
better known as the comedian Vic Reeves ? as her
big-ticket item 6.00 The Simpsons. Marge signs up Bart
for piano lessons (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Leela hears
some devastating news about Peri (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. The day?s
news comes under scrutiny from Matthew Wright and the
panel, with viewers and the studio audience invited to
share their opinions 11.15 Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It Away.
Paul and Ben are called in to evict squatters from a
residential property, but something about the squat does
not quite add up for the team (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
Observational documentary giving an insight into the
work of doctors at a medical practice (r) (AD) 1.10 Access
1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15
NCIS. An army scientist goes missing, so Abby is asked to
temporarily replace him on a top-secret research project
? but Gibbs later learns her life could be in danger (r)
(AD) 3.15 FILM: Secrets in the Attic (PG, TVM,
2016) A teenager ?nds a youth hiding in the attic of the
house she has just moved into, and discovers he has been
accused of murder. Thriller starring Abbie Cobb and Max
Lloyd-Jones 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Mishti
obtains full confessions from Rafael, Jayden and Sue (r)
(AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Hunter realises Irene knew
about Olivia?s in?delity (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7PM
Top
pick
the life of Dr Martin
Luther King Jr. In this
powerful and personal
documentary
commemorating the
50th anniversary of the
death of the civil rights
leader in April 1968,
McDonald travels to
locations that are
integral to King?s
story: to Alabama
and Montgomery,
Birmingham and
Selma; to King?s first
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine
7.00 Saving Lives at Sea The Lowestoft
crew are called out to help a sailor who
does not want to be rescued, and a
Good Samaritan is saved after trying
to help a dog which jumped into the
river Thames (11/12) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Lisa faces the
consequences of her actions (AD)
8.00 Big Cats About the House New
series. The big cat expert Giles Clark
works to transform the Big Cat
Sanctuary in Kent into a centre of
global excellence for conservation. In
the opening episode, Giles provides
care to a ?ve-day-old black jaguar cub.
See Viewing Guide (1/3) (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Marlon makes a fatal
error that he fears could ruin his
friendship with Jessie (AD)
9.00 Civilisations Mary Beard explores art
and religion and how the two have
inspired each other, focusing on the
fundamental problem of making god
? or gods ? visible in the human
world. See Viewing Guide (4/9) (AD)
9.00 Martin Luther King by Trevor
McDonald To mark 50 years since the
assassination of the civil rights leader
in 1968, the broadcaster travels to
America?s Deep South to ?nd out about
Martin Luther King and what he meant
to people. See Viewing Guide (AD)
8PM
7.30 EastEnders Stacey grills Jean about
what she has just said (AD)
8.00 MasterChef Amol Rajan asks the last
quarter-?nalists to make their own
version of a full English breakfast (AD)
9PM
8.30 Not Going Out A missing toy keyring
leads to a rift with Toby and Anna. See
Viewing Guide (3/7)
9.00 EastEnders There is a shock in Albert
Square when Kat Moon turns up (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
9.30 Still Game Jack and Victor take up
walking football (3/6) (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street David wants to
leave Weather?eld for a new life in
New Zealand with his father (AD)
10.00 MOTD: The Premier League Show
Magazine programme featuring news
and action from the Premier League
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
10.30 Regional News
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days? political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Top Gear Matt LeBlanc tests the
world?s fastest-accelerating car, with a
little help from NASA. Chris Harris
pens a heartfelt love letter to the
Citroen 2CV, while Rory Reid samples
cars from South Korea (4/6) (r)
12.15am Sign Zone: MasterChef The week?s best
amateurs are challenged by the critic Jay Rayner to make
an exceptional pie, sweet or savoury, using their own
pastry (r) (AD, SL) 12.45-2.00 Imagine: Mel Brooks ?
Unwrapped. Alan Yentob interviews the comedy actor,
director and producer Mel Brooks (r) (SL)
7.00 The Yorkshire Vet Casebook New
series. Favourite stories and unseen
footage from the series, following the
Yorkshire vet Julian Norton, his partnerr
Peter Wright and their team (1/10)
8.00 Location, Location, Location Kirstie
Allsopp and Phil Spencer search the
Reading area for a young woman who
wants a home in the suburb of
Caversham and two teachers who need
a family home before term starts
8.00 Bargain-Loving Brits in the Sun
The ?tness instructor and entrepreneur
Anthony organises a coach trip to the
Algar waterfalls, while the female
impersonator James and his partner
David rent a working farm (7/8)
9.00 My Baby?s Life: Who Decides?
(2/2) The mother of a 12-year-old
quadriplegic girl ?ghts to get her
daughter the treatment she needs, but
doctors question whether her quality
of life will be enough (AD)
9.00 Do the Right Thing with Eamonn
& Ruth Eamonn Holmes and Ruth
Langsford try to save a playground for
children with disabilities from closure
and investigate the deaths of babies by
suffocating on nappy sacks (3/4)
10.00 The Job Interview The RAC
interviews for a roadside patrol of?cer
and the Kettering mortgage broker
TMP needs a case manager to guide its
clients through the borrowing process.
Last in the series
10.00 Under Siege (15, 1992) Terrorists
in?ltrate a US battleship in a carefully
orchestrated move to steal its arsenal
of nuclear weapons, unaware the ship?s
resourceful cook ? a veteran US Navy
Seal ? and a stripper are about to foil
their plans. Action adventure starring
Steven Seagal, Erika Eleniak, Gary
Busey and Tommy Lee Jones
7.30 Britain vs Russia: A New Cold
War? Tonight Adam Shaw
investigates relations with Russia
after the chemical attack in Salisbury
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.45 Question Time David Dimbleby chairs
the debate from Leeds, West Yorkshire,
with a panel of politicians and other
guests facing topical questions
7.00 Channel 4 News
10.45 The World?s Ugliest Pets Caroline
Quentin meets unattractive pets, and
searches for a canine to represent the
UK at The World?s Ugliest Dog Contest
in Petaluma, California (r) (AD)
11.45 The Durrells The family is surprised
to ?nd out that Leslie has three
different girlfriends (1/8) (r) (AD)
12.40am Lethal Weapon With Christmas approaching,
Murtaugh and Riggs are called to a homicide only to
?nd the victim is an old friend (r) (AD) 1.25 Jackpot247.
Live interactive gaming 3.00 Britain vs Russia: A New
Cold War? Tonight (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00
The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
11.05 Gogglebox Troy: Fall of a City,
Match of the Day, Sir Bruce: A
Celebration, Crufts, Amazing Hotels:
Life Beyond the Lobby, and One Born
Every Minute are reviewed by the
armchair critics (r) (AD)
12.05am Seven Year Switch (r) (AD) 1.05 One Born
Every Minute (r) (AD) 2.00 The Supervet (r) (AD) 2.55
The Truth About Your Pay: Channel 4 Dispatches (r) (AD,
SL) 3.25 Coast vs Country (r) 4.20 Location, Location,
Location (r) 5.15 Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 5.40-6.00
Kirstie?s Fill Your House for Free (r)
12.10am SuperCasino Live interactive gaming 3.10
GPs: Behind Closed Doors. The work of doctors at a
medical practice (r) (AD) 4.00 Britain?s Greatest Bridges.
The story behind the construction of the Forth Rail Bridge
(r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 House Busters
(r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Not Going Out
BBC One, 8.30pm
The children are the
focus of tonight?s
well-crafted farce, with
Lucy convinced that
Toby and Anna?s son,
Jack, has stolen a
keyring from Charlie.
Lucy wants Lee to go
with her and confront
their friends, but Lee
has other ideas: ?When
there?s a problem
between friends, you?re
supposed to do the
adult thing ? don?t
mention it, resent them
for a few weeks and
hope the whole thing
goes away.? Lucy wins
the argument, but
Jack denies it and Lee
becomes obsessed with
proving the boy?s guilt.
?I know how the mind
of an eight-year-old
boy works,? he says.
It gets a bit awkward.
Civilisations
BBC Two, 9pm
Mary Beard joins the
pilgrims gathered for
sunrise at the Angkor
Wat temple complex
in Cambodia. They are
there to witness the
moment the sun seems
to balance on the
temple?s central spire.
?It?s religious art at its
most spectacular,? says
Beard. The classicist?s
second and final
contribution to the
series explores the
subject of religious art,
a medium used to
?make gods visible in
the human world?.
Beneath all such works
lie danger and risk;
Beard visits sacred
sites across the world
to examine how artists
tread the fine line
between idolatry
and blasphemy.
Contagion
BBC Four, 9pm
Dr Hannah Fry and
Dr Javid Abdelmoneim
oversee the simulation
of an outbreak of a fatal
contagion in a small
town. The hope is that
the groundbreaking
experiment will save
lives when (?not if ?,
Fry emphasises) a real
pandemic hits the UK.
There have been four
global outbreaks of
deadly flu in the past
100 years. App
technology ?infects?
users while tracking
their movements and
social interactions over
24 hours. A team of
mathematicians then
simulate how the virus
could spread. If you
want to save yourself
75 minutes, then there?s
a simple message ?
wash your hands.
Sport Choice
Sky Sports Golf, 2.15pm
It?s the second day of
the WGC-Dell Match
Play Championship
at Austin Country Club
in Texas. The field
consists of the top 64
players available from
the official world golf
rankings on March 11.
The world No 1,
Dustin Johnson, is the
defending champion.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 7.00 RSPCA
Animal Rescue (r) (AD) 8.00 Motorway Patrol
(r) 9.00 Road Wars (r) 10.00 Warehouse 13 (r)
11.00 Forever (r) (AD) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry goes undercover (3/4) (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. Oliver must decide whether to ask
his former team-mates for help when Cayden
James tightens his hold over the city
9.00 SEAL Team. New series. Action drama
starring David Boreanaz
10.00 Jamestown. Maria commits a crime (r)
11.00 The Force: Essex. Documentary following
police in the county (r) (AD)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD)
1.00am Brit Cops: Law & Disorder (r) (AD) 2.00
Most Shocking (r) 3.00 The Force: Essex (r)
(AD) 4.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r) 4.30 It?s Me or
the Dog (r) (AD) 5.00 Futurama (r)
6.00am The Guest Wing (r) (AD) 7.00 Storm
City (r) (AD) 8.00 Richard E Grant?s Hotel
Secrets (r) (AD) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00
House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing
(r) 5.00 House (r) (AD)
6.00 House. Medical drama (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A jogger?s
mutilated body is discovered in a park (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny and Jackie help to ?nd
the killer of one of Erin?s informants (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: Warning ? This Drug May Kill
You (2017) Documentary focusing on the
devastating effects of addiction (r)
10.10 Our Cartoon President. An embarrassing
video surfaces of the First Lady rolling her eyes
10.45 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. (r)
11.20 Hotspots: On the Frontline. Reporting in
troubled spots around the world (r)
12.20am Divorce. Robert and Frances reminisce
(r) 12.55 Billions (r) (AD) 2.05 Blue Bloods (r)
3.00 Dexter (r) 4.10 The West Wing (r)
6.00am Motorway Patrol (r) 7.00 Highway
Patrol (r) 7.30 Border Patrol (r) 8.00 UK Border
Force (r) (AD) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00
Cold Case (r) 11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia
12.00 Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
1.00pm Air Rescue (r) 2.00 Stop, Search, Seize
(r) (AD) 3.00 Nothing to Declare UK (r) 4.00
Nothing to Declare (r) (AD) 5.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Air Rescue (r)
6.30 Air Rescue (r) (AD)
7.00 The Real A&E (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Conviction. A mass grave is found (r) (AD)
10.00 Scandal. Olivia tries to make sure Mellie
does not name Jake as her new chief of staff
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 The Good Doctor (r)
3.00 Nashville (r) 4.00 Nothing to Declare UK
(r) 5.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia (r)
6.00am Darbar Festival 2017 7.00 Joseph
Calleja: A Night in Malta 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 9.30 Landscape Artist of the Year
2016 10.30 Video Killed the Radio Star (AD)
11.00 The Seventies (AD) 12.00 Soundbreaking
(AD) 1.00pm Discovering: Claude Rains (AD)
2.00 Tales of the Unexpected 2.30 Landscape
Artist of the Year 2016 3.30 Video Killed the
Radio Star 4.00 The Eighties (AD) 5.00 Elvis
Presley: A Legend in Concert
6.00 Discovering: Janet Leigh (AD)
7.00 Andr� Rieu: How It All Began. The life and
career of the Dutch violinist
8.00 The Glyndebourne Opera Cup
9.00 The Divorce. Opera Australia?s production
of the comedic opera starring Marina Prior
11.00 Portrait Artist of the Year 2018
12.00 National Treasures: The Art of Collecting
1.00am The Glyndebourne Opera Cup 2.00
Close to You: Remembering the Carpenters 3.15
30 Degrees in February 4.30 Tales of the
Unexpected 5.00 Auction
6.00am Live Test Cricket: New Zealand v
England. Coverage of the opening day of the ?rst
Test at Eden Park in Auckland, where the
two-match series gets under way 8.30 Live Test
Cricket: South Africa v Australia. Day one of the
third Test from Newlands in Cape Town 3.30pm
Virat Kohli: IPL King 3.45 England v New
Zealand Classics 4.00 Test Cricket 5.00 Cricket
Debate 5.30 Sky Sports News
7.00 Live Premier League Darts. Coverage of
round eight from the SSE Hydro in Glasgow,
including Gary Anderson v Simon Whitlock and
Raymond van Barneveld v Peter Wright
10.30 Live World Golf Championships: The
WGC-Dell Match Play Championship. The second
day?s play at Austin Country Club in Texas
12.00 F1 Report 12.30am Live Formula 1. The
Australian Grand Prix ?rst practice session.
Coverage of the opening round of the season
from Albert Park, Melbourne 2.45 Live Test
Cricket: New Zealand v England. Coverage of the
second day of the ?rst Test in Auckland
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View.
News, comment and analysis from Stormont
and Westminster 11.15 Question Time
12.15am This Week 1.00-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 11.00am Bargain Hunt
(r) 11.20-1.45pm Live Match of the Day
Wales: China Cup ? China v Wales (Kick-off
11.35). The semi-?nal match in the friendly
tournament 9.30-10.00 Rhod Gilbert?s Work
Experience. The comedian tries his hand at
being a classical musician. Last in the series
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 Soft
Border Patrol. The gang carries out a lengthy
strip search. Last in the series (r) 11.15 Party
Political Broadcast. By the Alliance Party 11.20
MOTD: The Premier League Show
11.50-12.15am Top Gear: Extra Gear (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00-1.00pm First
Minister?s Questions. Nicola Sturgeon answers
questions in the Scottish Parliament 6.30
Saving Lives at Sea (r) (AD) 7.30-8.00
Timeline. Thought-provoking stories
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm-1.30 BBC News
at One; Weather 1.45-2.15 Two Tribes (r)
10.00-10.30 Still Game 11.15 MOTD: The
Premier League Show 11.45-12.45am Gareth
Thomas? Silver Skydivers for Sport Relief. The
former rugby star does a charity skydive (r)
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1985. Music by Tears for
Fears, Simply Red and Fine Young Cannibals (r)
8.00 Secret Universe: The Hidden Life of the
Cell. Documentary showing what happens to a
single human cell as it comes under attack from
a virus, demonstrating how it defends itself
from the hostile organism (r) (AD)
9.00 Contagion! The BBC Four Pandemic.
Hannah Fry and Dr Javid Abdelmoneim front this
social media experiment to test the threat of ?u
to the UK, using app technology to ?infect? users
and track their interactions over 24 hours. See
Viewing Guide (AD)
10.15 Michael Mosley vs the Superbugs. The
presenter investigates how bacteria are ?ghting
back against antibiotics (r) (AD)
11.15 Britain?s Outlaws: Highwaymen, Pirates
and Rogues. Urban crime, fraud and corruption.
Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.15am Top of the Pops: 1985. Music by Tears
for Fears (r) 12.45 The Inca: Masters of the
Clouds (r) (AD) 2.45 Britain?s Outlaws:
Highwaymen, Pirates and Rogues (r) (AD, SL)
3.45-4.00 Sounds of the Seventies (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Rules of
Engagement (r) 8.00 How I Met Your Mother (r)
(AD) 9.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 10.00 2 Broke Girls
(r) (AD) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big
Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 3.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine. Double bill (r) (AD) 5.00
The Goldbergs. Double bill (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 My Hotter Half
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
8.30 Young Sheldon (AD)
9.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
9.30 Derry Girls (r) (AD)
10.00 Five Star Hotel
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 First Dates (r) (AD) 1.05am Five Star
Hotel (r) 2.05 Tattoo Fixers on Holiday (r) (AD)
3.00 Marvel?s Agents of SHIELD (r) (AD) 3.55
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 4.15 Rules of
Engagement (r) 5.00 Rude(ish) Tube (r)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.30 A Place
in the Sun: Home or Away (r) 11.35 Four in a
Bed (r) 2.10pm Celebrity Come Dine with Me
(r) 4.50 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away (r)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick operates on
a Bengal cat with a broken back (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud returns to
Belfast where he visits Thomas and Dervla
O?Hare, who set out to build a split-level home
on an almost vertical hillside (r) (AD)
9.00 The Good Fight. Tensions remain high when
the ?rm learns another Chicago lawyer has been
murdered by a client. A surprise witness is called
to testify against Maia (AD)
10.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? The edition
focuses on the rapidly growing number of 999
calls connected to the over-75s, with PC Phil
Bridge searching Trowbridge to ?nd a
73-year-old woman with dementia (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A registrar treats a man
who has been having seizures (7/8) (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
An Italian restaurant (r) 1.05 The Good Fight (r)
(AD) 2.05 999: What?s Your Emergency? (r)
(AD) 3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am 12 Angry Men (U, 1957) Legal
drama starring Henry Fonda (b/w) 1.00pm
Operation Petticoat (U, 1959) Nurses,
children and an expectant mother are invited on
board a submarine and disrupt the captain?s
plans. Second World War comedy with Cary
Grant (AD) 3.25 Juggernaut (PG, 1974)
Thriller starring Richard Harris 5.40 Avatar
Special 5.50 Avatar (12, 2009) A soldier
uses a genetically engineered body to help an
alien tribe ?ght off a corrupt mining corporation.
Sci-? adventure with Sam Worthington (AD)
9.00 The Drop (15, 2014) A bartender who
secretly works for gangsters gets involved in a
robbery gone wrong that digs up long-buried
secrets. Crime drama starring Tom Hardy (AD)
11.10 Contraband (15, 2012) A reformed
international smuggler must return to his old
line of work to save his family from a ruthless
drug lord. Crime thriller starring Mark Wahlberg
1.20am-3.40 The 36th Chamber of Shaolin
(18, 1978) A gentle scholar devotes his life to
mastering martial arts so he can avenge his
family?s murders. Adventure starring Chia Hui
Liu and Lieh Lo. In Mandarin
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals (r) 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Who?s Doing the Dishes? (r) (AD) 7.55
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.20 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 9.25 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20
The Bachelor (r) 12.15pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.45 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
4.50 Judge Rinder (r) 5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Clips feature a
man falling off a bridge into a canal (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Including a
builder falling through a ceiling (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 Celebrity Juice Live. New series. Guests
include Georgia ?Toff? Toffolo
11.05 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.55am Two
and a Half Men (r) 1.50 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records (r) 2.20 Teleshopping
5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) 7.55 The Royal (r) (AD) 8.55
Judge Judy (r) 10.15 Inspector Morse (r)
12.35pm The Royal (r) (AD) 1.40 Heartbeat (r)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.50 On the
Buses (b/w) (r) 4.55 You?re Only Young Twice
(r) 5.25 Rising Damp (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. A sniper strikes (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A factory owner is
suspected of foul play (r) (AD)
8.00 Vera. DCI Vera Stanhope sets out to solve
the murder of a teenage girl 11 years earlier,
exposing the secrets and lies of a community.
Hugo Speer guest stars (2/4) (r) (AD)
10.00 Unforgotten. Cassie quizzes Marion and
the inquiry reveals her close relationship with an
IRA activist (3/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 Unforgotten. Marion jeopardises her
marriage by refusing to open up about the past,
Colin is blackmailed even further and a
disturbing allegation about David opens up a
second line of inquiry (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am DCI Banks (r) (AD) 2.00 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 8.00 Ironside (r) 9.00
Quincy ME (r) 10.05 Minder (r) (AD) 11.10 The
Saint (r) 12.15pm Storage Wars (r) 12.45 Live
Snooker: Players Championship. Coverage of the
afternoon session on day four, featuring the
second quarter-?nal from Venue Cymru in
Llandudno, played over the best of 11 frames
5.00 Football?s Greatest: Paul Gascoigne (r)
5.15 The Avengers (r)
6.15 Storage Wars. The buyers head to the hills
of Murietta for an auction, and Dave drives
Darrell to breaking-point (r)
6.45 Live Snooker: Players Championship. The
evening session on day four, featuring the third
quarter-?nal from Venue Cymru in Llandudno,
played over the best of 11 frames
11.00 FILM: The Dictator (15, 2012) A
tyrant travels to America to address the UN, but
is left stranded there after an assassination
attempt goes wrong. Comedy starring Sacha
Baron Cohen, Anna Faris and Ben Kingsley
12.40am Minder (r) (AD, SL) 1.45 Deals,
Wheels and Steals (r) 2.45 ITV4 Nightscreen
3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm
Top Gear (AD) 3.00 Impossible Engineering (AD)
4.00 World?s Most Dangerous Roads 5.00 Top
Gear. With Rory Bremner (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. A race through Lisbon (AD)
7.00 World?s Most Dangerous Roads. Twenty
Twelve co-stars Hugh Bonneville and Jessica
Hynes go on a road trip through the former
Soviet republic of Georgia (2/3)
8.00 Dara O Briain?s Go 8 Bit. With Anna
Richardson and Nish Kumar
9.00 QI XL. With Cariad Lloyd, Romesh
Ranganathan and Phill Jupitus
10.00 Not Going Out. Lucy accidentally runs
over a pet rabbit belonging to a client?s daughter
10.40 Not Going Out. Lee, Lucy and Daisy get
stuck high above the mountains in a cable car
11.20 QI XL. An extended edition with Sandi
Toksvig, Clive Anderson and Henning Wehn
12.20am Mock the Week 1.00 QI 1.35 Would I
Lie to You? 2.15 Mock the Week 2.55 Suits
(AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
Bill 12.00 Death in Paradise 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Bread 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London?s Burning (AD) 4.00 Death
in Paradise 5.00 Bergerac
6.00 Steptoe and Son (b/w)
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Clegg climbs a
tree to prove a point, but gets stuck up
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. A renowned
womaniser turns his attentions to Nora Batty
8.00 A Place to Call Home. Elizabeth is
unimpressed with the way Regina is behaving
9.00 FILM: The Hound of the Baskervilles
(15, TVM, 2002) Holmes and Watson
investigate tales of a mysterious hound
terrorising a family on Dartmoor. Mystery
starring Richard Roxburgh and Ian Hart
11.00 Birds of a Feather
11.40 The Bill. Boyden?s estranged daughter has
information regarding a man?s violent death
12.40am Ashes to Ashes. Alex encounters her
future husband 2.35 London?s Burning 3.30
Garden Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Who Do You Think
You Are? (AD) 11.00 Impossible Railways (AD)
12.00 Time Team 1.00pm Hidden India (AD)
2.00 Planet Earth (AD) 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00
Medieval Murder Mysteries 5.00 Impossible
Railways. Routes across mountains (AD)
6.00 The Dambusters? Great Escape: Secret
History. The RAF?s defeat of the German
battleship Tirpitz in November 1944
7.00 The Day When Stalin Won the War. How
Stalin managed to seize a large chunk of Europe
8.00 Nazi Victory: The Post-War Plan. Hitler?s
plans to revolutionise Germany?s transport
system. Last in the series
9.00 The Two Ronnies. With Randy Crawford
10.00 The Two Ronnies. With Marti Webb
10.40 The Two Ronnies. With Elkie Brooks
11.30 Steptoe and Son. Harold enthusiastically
starts writing an article for the parish magazine
12.05am Steptoe and Son. Harold joins an
amateur dramatics society, convinced he has
star quality 1.25 Tales of Irish Castles 2.20
Sounds of the Seventies 3.00 Home Shopping
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 The Kyle Files (r) (AD) 11.35 Lethal
Weapon (r) (AD) 12.25am Teleshopping
1.25 After Midnight 2.55 Britain vs Russia:
A New Cold War? Tonight (r) 3.20 ITV
Nightscreen 4.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 7.30pm-8.00 UTV Life 10.45
Britain vs Russia: A New Cold War? Tonight
11.15 The World?s Ugliest Pets (r) (AD)
12.10am The Durrells (r) (AD) 1.00
Teleshopping 2.30-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Pincidh
Dincidh D� (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.35 Na
Floogals (r) 5.45 Su Shiusaidh (Little Suzy?s
Zoo) (r) 5.55 Fitheach (Raven) 6.10
Sealgairean Sp騬sail (History Hunters) (r) 6.30
D� a-nis? (What Now?) (r) 7.00 Turas a?
Bhradain (The Salmon?s Journey) (r) 7.35
Speaking Our Language (r) 8.00 An L� (News)
8.15 Sgeul Seirbheis 8.30 E騬pa (European
Current Affairs) 9.00 DIY le Donnie 9.45
Piobairean Bhoirnis (Pipers of Bornish) (r) 9.55
Fraochy Bay (r) 10.00 Belladrum 2017: Twin
Atlantic (r) 10.35 Luingean Lannsaireachd
11.20 Hebridean Celtic Music Festival: Suil air
Ais (r) 11.30-12.00 Mach a Seo! (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Dona Direidi (r) 6.15 Tili a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 6.25 Halibalw (r) 6.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 6.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 7.00 Meic y
Marchog (r) 7.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 7.30
Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 7.40
Peppa (r) 7.45 Cacamwnci 8.00 Holi Hana (r)
8.10 Amser Stori 8.15 Boj (r) 8.30 Abadas (r)
8.40 Bla Bla Blewog (r) 8.55 Ben a Mali a?u
Byd Bach O Hud (r) 9.05 Sbridiri (r) 9.25
Meripwsan (r) 9.30 Straeon Ty Pen (r) 9.45 Cei
Bach (r) 10.00 Dona Direidi (r) 10.15 Tili a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 10.25 Halibalw (r) 10.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 10.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 11.00 Meic
y Marchog (r) 11.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 11.30
Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 11.40
Peppa (r) 11.45 Cacamwnci (r) 12.00 News
12.05pm Darn Bach o Hanes (r) (AD) 12.30
Lle Aeth Pawb? Merched Pop 65-75 (r) 1.30
Sion a Si鈔 (r) 2.00 News 2.05 Prynhawn Da
3.00 News 3.05 Yr Ynys (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr
5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Hendre Hurt
(r) 5.15 Stwnsh: Tref a Tryst 5.45 Stwnsh: Edi
Wyn (r) 6.00 News 6.05 Cwpan China 7.00
Heno 7.30 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.00 Gwaith/
Cartref (AD) 9.00 News 9.30 Pawb a?i Farn
10.30 Hansh 11.00-11.35 Mwy o Sgorio (r)
14
Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
2
3
4
5
8
6
7
9
21
1
20
18
11
18
16
12
13
16
14
17
25
6
18
7
2
20
20
19
6
6
21
16
25
6
24
18
20
6
2
A
13
1
1
22
16
12
6
1
2
V
18
1
6
13
18
9
25
12
14
22
14
15
11
16
16
12
20
24
12
10
19
Train Tracks No 362
25
15
6
7
16
18
25
9
22
21
11
4
25
19
12
20
26
12
1
18
20
25
22
3
4
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
Block of paper (3)
Building robber (7)
Rub out (5)
Bury (5)
Break (a rule) (7)
Lack of courage (8)
High temperature (4)
Knock unconscious (4)
Solution to Crossword 7605
SC
O
F U
P
A L
E
S T
A L
A
I R
G
DE
R E E N SMOO T H
N O A C W
S S COCK T A I L
U T
O N
L E L U I A P E E K
R C U
RA I N RUS S E T
C A O
M
TO L A BRADOR
N
A C T
R I T A N T OM I T
T
P
I
R O
S ER T CAN I NE
16 Rapidly increase (8)
20 Take back (7)
21 Short choral work (5)
23 Official order (5)
24 Eg, rust (S, not Z) (7)
25 Male offspring (3)
2
20
5
18
2
21
24
A
25
19
5
25
14
16
4
5
1
22
3
19
21
20
18
18
24
B
18
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
5
6
7
13
15
17
18
19
22
18
6
10
18
21
20
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
14
15
3
4
5
6
16
17
18
19
B
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
A
V
Down
1
2
3
4
10
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Woodwind player (6)
Badly behaved child (4)
Elaborately intricate (6)
Transfer from public to
private ownership (13)
Stage scenery (5)
Cuban dance (8)
Firmly fix (6)
Large surplus stock (8)
Sequence; tone row (6)
German dance (6)
Respect, admire (6)
Board game (5)
Hindmost part (4)
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Lexica No 4187
K
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KenKen Difficult No 4282
Futoshiki No 3134
Kakuro No 2093
3
16
15
19
7
13
6
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
?
34
4
11
28
>
<
14
14
7
?
21
16
29
19
3
23
3
<
?
?
34
14
4
26
35
10
31
24
14
29
24
4
8
11
4
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
16
30
14
12
10
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
35
12
4
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
4
5
25
Across
3
3
24
8
2
17
6
17
23
26
6
B
26
25
2
9
22
3
23
22
3
3
19
20
5
6
17
22
13
1
23
13
4
42
16
17
� PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3290
� PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7606
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
Four competitors from the FIDE
World Chess Candidates in Berlin
opted for a warm-up at the Tal
Memorial in Moscow. Interestingly, the Tal Memorial Blitz, as
can be seen below, was won by
the lowest-rated player from
Berlin, Sergei Karjakin. The highest-rated, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, struggled to avoid last place.
White: Sergei Karjakin
Black: Hikaru Nakamura
Tal Memorial Blitz, Moscow 2018
________
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谅媚牌侨
Here we have a fairly typical
Maroczy Bind position. The key
elements of the Maroczy structure
are the white pawns on e4 and c4,
attempting to cramp Black and
inhibit the ... d6-d5 break. White
now plays to gain further space
on the queenside.
26 a3 Qc7 27 b4 a5 28 bxa5
A clever capture. White has
envisaged the ingenious continuation 28 ... Nxa5 29 c5! and if 29 ...
dxc5 30 Rd7 wins.
28 ... Bc3 29 Nd5!!
A brilliant and unexpected
move. It is particularly impressive
that Karjakin found this in a blitz
game. White is now winning.
29 ... exd5 30 Bb6
This is the key to White?s play.
He not only skewers the black
rook on d8 but also discovers an
attack against the bishop on c3.
30 ... Qc8 31 Qxc3 d4 32 Bxd4
Nxd4 33 Rxd4 Qc7 34 f3 Re6 35
Qb4 Ra8 36 Rd5 h5 37 Rb5 Ra7
38 c5 dxc5 39 Rxc5 Qb8 40 Rd7
Re8 41 Rcc7 Rf8 42 Qb3 b6 43
Rxa7 Black resigns
59 x 2 ? 13 � 5
2/
3
+8
50%
OF IT
+7
�
MEDIUM
167 x 4
25%
OF IT
+ 83
90%
OF IT
+ 64
30%
OF IT
+ 57
HARDER
188 x 5 + 994 x 3 + 88
90%
OF IT
? 839
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 997
80%
OF IT
EASY
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 26
OF IT
Karjakin
Nakamura
Nepomniachtchi
Artemiev
Kramnik
Grischuk
Dubov
Andreikin
Anand
Svidler
Fedoseev
Mamedyarov
Morozevich
Gelfand
1
*
0
0
0
1
0
0
�
�
0
�
�
0
0
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
1 1 1 0 1 1 浇1 浇1 1
* 1 �1 �浇浇�0 * 浇浇0 1 1 1 �1
浇* 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 ��
0 �* 0 0 1 1 �1 浇
0 �1 * 1 浇1 1 �1
浇1 1 0 * ��1 0 �
0 1 0 0 浇* �1 1 ��1 0 ��* �1 1 �
�0 ���* 1 0 1 1
�1 0 0 1 0 1 0 * 1 0 0
浇��0 0 1 0 * ��0 �1 �0 1 �* 0
0 0 浇0 ��1 0 1 *
10
8�
7�
7
7
7
6�
6�
6
6
5
5
5
4
________
� DrD 4kD] Winning Move
郉bD DpDp]
遬D D 0 D] Black to play. This position is from
Moscow 2018.
轉 D DqD ] Mamedyarov-Dubov,
The highest-rated player in Berlin will not
軶) DND D] have been pleased with the outcome of
蹹 DpDB) ] this ?warm-up? game. How did Black now
跴D D I )] tear into his exposed king?
贒 DR$ D ] For up-to-the-minute information follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Rubber
?Q 9 6
?KQ J
?Q J 9 8
?K 9 3
?K 2
?A 3 2
?A K 4 2
?AQ J 5
N
W
E
S
? J 10 8 7 5 4 3
?10 7
?7
?8 6 4
S
W
N
E
1NT
Dbl
2?
4? (1) Pass
6? (2) Dbl
End
(1) Bullish but finesses (through West) will
work.
(2) Facing ? AQJ10xx, there?ll be 12 tricks
via the marked club finesse.
Yesterday?s answers
baht, bash, basho, bast, bath, bathos,
bats, boast, boat, boho, boost, boot,
booth, boots, bosh, both, bowshot,
hobo, sabot, showboat, soba, stab, stob,
swab, taboo
Killer Gentle No 5922
16
15
7
12
3
6
?Q 9 6
???-
E
S
? J 10 8
???-
?A
?9 8
?
?
Declarer ruffs East?s heart with
the ten and, whether or not West
elects to overruff with the queen,
he cannot win a trick. Doubled
slam made. Only an impossibleto-find low spade opening lead by
West would have ruined the fun.
Do email me if you see a
smother play at the table. I don?t
expected my inbox to be flooded.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
2
3
9
27
8
5
7
4
16
10
8
16
14
2
9
9
14
17
15
6
11
17
12
3
5
16
9
+
25
9
20
8
22
9
+
19
20
20
20
21
8
8
9
14
25
10
24
19
15
11
20
11
21
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
�
=2
�
�
2
=
21
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
We?ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
x
x
x
= 36
=
6
=
45
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Kakuro 2092
Quick Cryptic 1052
Codeword 3289
HOME R
E
A
U
M I N S T
D
I
P
CO
D
N
I
N O RWA
A
L
T
HOU S E
E
G
R E H A B
T
O
A
WA S HO
BA S I S
V A
U
P
K
I
F RAG I L E
F
C
E
E Y E B R OW
R
S
H
QU E S T I O
J
I
I
R
UN T I L
R E
M
V
B L A Z E WO
L
R
R
I
E NCR Y P T
F L O T S AM
O
L
U
E
D I N E D
E R
U
B
I
SM I CDU S T
S
R
R
A
HORN E T
Y
C
S
T
E
MOU S E
M W P
A
B E OWU L F
A
R
N
R
D I T T O
U T
2
9
8
1
6
5
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3
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2
6
1
2
9
4
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1
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Set Square 2095
4
5
3
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2
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1
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2
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1
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9
3
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x
2
-
+
8
x
9
+
+
1
+
+
5
+
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x
1
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2
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3
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4
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9
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6
1
1
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5
9
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2
3
2
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1
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6
3
4
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2
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1
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3
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1
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1
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1
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1
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3
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3
2
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1
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3
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2
7
1
8
1
3
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5
2
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2
9
1
6
4
7
3
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7
6
4
9
3
8
1
5
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3
1
7
4
6
8
2
1
4
8
2
5
6
3
9
7
5
3
4
8
2
7
1
6
9
L
A
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G
E
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I
E
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T
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B
R
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O
E
A X E D
I
I
KOU T
U
E
A S E D
2 9 1
4 8 6
1 6 3
7
2 1 4
7 3 9
9 7
6 8
2 9 7
1 8 9
7
9 7
9
9
6
8
7 9
3
1
3
8
9
1
3
4 2 1
2 1 3
9 7
7
9
8 9 6
3 5 2
9 7
6 9
4 1 6
9 3 8
�
3
5
7
3
1
4
2
1
Train Tracks 361
1
Quintagram
1 Dairy
2 Motto
3 Choose
4 Keswick
5 Saxophone
3
1
6
3
3
5
5
2
A
7
3
4
5
1
4
3
1
B
C
O
M
G
T
G
A
N
S
M
O
T
A
Y
T
C
H
T
P
Futoshiki 3133
1
3 < 5
4
1
3
4
?
5
2
?
1
5
3
2
?
5 > 4
1
?
2
3
5
2
KenKen 4281
1
?
3
H
O
Y
2 < 4
O
O
H
S
I
H
Cell Blocks 3172
Lexica 4186
S
4
A
R
U
S
A
A
N
T
O
T
R
4 3 6
2
4
9
2
3
6
Y
4
2
2
2
Suko 2191
Word watch
Brain Trainer
Nidifugous (b)
Of young birds,
leaving the nest
Niding (a)
Nothing (archaic)
Nudation (c) The
process of
removing
garments, causing
to be naked
Easy 9
Medium 168
Harder 6,152
Chess
1 ... Rc2+! 2 Ke3
Bxe4 3 Bxe4
Qf2+ 4 Kxd3
Rd8+ mates
quickly
Quiz
Killer 5921
7
6
2
3
8
9
4
1
5
L
A
N
O
L
I
N
-
7
L
Sudoku 9745
17
4
Lexica 4185
27min
= 105 the numbers
x
-
Sudoku 9744
Killer Tough No 5923
Enter each of
x
Solutions
Sudoku 9743
6
x
Killer 5920
N
W
6
9
17
5min
17
12
Contract: 6? Dbled, Opening Lead: ? K
?K 2
???5
2 2
2 2
3
6
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 9 words, average;
13, good; 18, very good; 24, excellent
Advanced
?A
?9 8 6 5 4
?10 6 5 3
?10 7 2
4
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
Set Square No 2096
12
Dealer: West, Vulnerability: Neither
5
6
4 6
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Bridge Andrew Robson
As the late Victor Mollo once said,
?The smother play. A play so rare
that in a long life of bridge hands it
might not occur once.? Here is the
classic smother ending:
Dummy
West ? A
East (on lead)
? K10 ?2
?AK
-? trumps Declarer
? QJ
It appears West must win his
guarded ? K. And indeed he
would win ? K if he, dummy or
South were leading. However with
his partner leading (?A), his ? K
is ?smothered?. For if he overruffs
declarer?s ? J with ? K, dummy?s
? A then declarer?s ? Q win; and if
he refuses to overruff, ? J wins
followed by ? Q to (? K and) ? A.
Thank you to reader Graeme
Knox from Stirling for reacquainting me with this old gem. History
doesn?t record whether the deal
really occurred at the table or was
the construction of a fertile mind. I
suspect the latter.
You win the king of hearts lead
with the ace, cash the ace-king of
diamonds, discarding a heart, and
ruff a red card. You play a club to
the jack and ruff a red card. You
play a club to the queen and ruff
another red card. You lead a club
to the ace and ruff the last red
card. Now see the ending across.
You lead and run the eight of
spades, playing East for the ace
for his double of the slam, and for
it to be bare, as his other cards
will be hearts (for his rescue to
2? ). After winning his bare ace,
his partner?s guarded queen of
spades is smothered.
SQUARE
IT
Polygon
Tal Memorial Blitz, Moscow 2018
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Tal Blitz
Cell Blocks No 3173
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
8
1
7
6
9
5
2
4
3
6
2
9
4
1
3
7
5
8
3
8
6
9
4
2
5
7
1
2
9
5
7
6
1
8
3
4
4
7
1
5
3
8
9
2
6
1 Ronald Reagan 2 Henry V 3 Squirrel 4 Cubit
5 Jeremy Irons. He played those roles in Reversal of
Fortune, Brideshead Revisited, The Borgias and the
2003 Comic Relief parody Harry Potter and the Secret
Chamberpot of Azerbaijan 6 Write 7 2666 8 Hubert
de Givenchy 9 Cy Twombly 10 A sudden and
favourable resolution of events in a story or a happy
ending 11 Joseph Haydn 12 Some Girls 13 Fortnite
14 Warrington Wolves 15 Moira Stuart
22.03.18
MindGames
Mild No 9746
Fill the grid so that every
column, every row and
every 3x3 box contains
the digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
Josephine
Balmer
Nidifugous
a Very smoky
b Leaving the nest
c Rusting
Niding
a Nothing
b Extemporising
c Time-wasting
Nudation
a Robbery
b A telling-off
c Removing garments
Fiendish No 9747
3
2 6
3 9 2
4 6
7
1
2
9
4
4
8
5 3
2
8
1
8
1
6
3
1
6 4
2 5
1 9
4
Super fiendish No 9748
8
1
7
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
4
7
5
7
8 9 2
4 3
9
7
8
2 8
9
1
6
2
5 4
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight to receive four clues for any of today?s
puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
Answers on page 15
The Times Daily Quiz Olav Bjortomt
Suko No 2191
MARK CUTHBERT/GETTY IMAGES
1 Which future US
president began the
first of seven terms
as Screen Actors
Guild (SAG) president
in 1947?
11 Which Austrian
composer?s last 12
symphonies are
alternately named after
Johann Peter Salomon?
2 Which English king
was victorious at the
1415 Battle of Agincourt?
3 Which rodent name is
derived from the Greek
word skiouros, meaning
?shadow-tailed??
4 The Biblical type of
which ancient unit of
length is typically about
45.7cm or 18 inches?
5 Which actor links
Claus von B黮ow,
Charles Ryder, Pope
Alexander VI and
Severus Snape?
12 Which 1978 Rolling
Stones album has the
songs Miss You, Beast of
Burden and Shattered?
15
6 Dysgraphia is the
inability to do what
coherently?
dress in the opening of
Breakfast at Tiffany?s?
9 Donald Judd mocked
which US painter?s
Nine Discourses on
Commodus as ?a few
drips and splatters??
7 Which Roberto
Bola駉 novel, set in
the fictional city of
Santa Teresa, has a
numeric title?
10 Coined by JRR Tolkien,
the word ?eucatastrophe?
refers to what type of
story development?
8 Which Frenchman
designed Audrey
Hepburn?s little black
13 Epic Games founder
Tim Sweeney described
which 2017 game as
?Minecraft meets Left
4 Dead??
14 In 2004, which Super
League rugby club moved
from Wilderspool to the
Halliwell Jones Stadium?
15 Which newsreader
is pictured?
Answers on page 15
Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the
spaces so that the number in each
circle is equal to the sum of the four
surrounding spaces, and each colour
total is correct
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1053 by Hurley
1
2
3
4
8
5
9
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
19
18
20
21
Across
1 Petty of?cer?s time with Jack
maybe? Write home about it
on this? (8)
5 Return of transport system?
He?s not to be believed (4)
8 Once more avail oneself of
second half of Chartreuse (5)
9 Inquisitive making cold female
angry (7)
11 Southern shops check
television (5,6)
13 Oddly after wins, King
vulnerable (2,4)
14 Earnings once I?m working (6)
16 Movement of pendulum
affected at collision (11)
18 Society, one advancing money,
very small (7)
19 Combine having some fun, it
entertains (5)
20 Were defeated, upsetting lots
(4)
21 Stuck in mud maybe, need to
have re?ective peek round (44)
Down
1 In proper kit ? a bene?t from
work (4)
2 Game, suppress scams (6,7)
3 Roman emperor?s brought over
a fellow?s cold dish (6,5)
4 Soccer of?cial with complaint
gets second drink (6)
6 We note minions relaxed
outside working hours (2,4,3,4)
7 Was indignant about
unopened gift at end with no
name (8)
10 Change arrangements
in relation to Conservative
personality (11)
12 Come to life in California
merry-go-round (8)
15 Engineers accommodated in
farm building, dull (6)
17 Old car of poor quality, roof
coming off (4)
Yesterday?s solution on page 15
4 1
2
9
8 6 3
1
5
4
7
6
7
2 4
2
3
6
8
3
2 1
1 8 6 7
3
0
Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music Recommends with
Steve Lamacq. A bite-sized edition 1.00am
Goth Lyrics with Murray Lachlan Young 2.00
The Ocean 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Digital only
8.00am Marriage Lines 8.30 The Goon Show
9.00 It?s Your Round 9.30 The Inimitable
Jeeves 10.00 The Raj Quartet 11.00 Short
Works: The World of Somerset Maugham
11.15 Once Upon a Time There Was a
Beatrix 12.00 Marriage Lines 12.30pm The
Goon Show 1.00 A Charles Paris Mystery: An
Amateur Corpse 1.30 Seems Like a Nice Boy:
The Story of Larry Grayson 2.00 The Norfolk
Mystery 2.15 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen?s
History of Home 2.30 The Old Curiosity Shop
2.45 The North (and Almost Everything in
It) 3.00 The Raj Quartet 4.00 It?s Your
Round 4.30 The Inimitable Jeeves 5.00
North by Northamptonshire 5.30 The
Hitchhiker?s Guide to the Galaxy: Hexagonal
Phase 6.00 The Destruction Factor 6.30
Great Lives 7.00 Marriage Lines 7.30 The
Goon Show. Comedy with Spike Milligan
8.00 A Charles Paris Mystery: An Amateur
Corpse. Based on a novel by Simon Brett
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Anna Foster 1.00pm
Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5
Live Sport 8.00 5 Live Formula 1. The team
looks ahead to the Australian Grand Prix
9.00 5 Live Sport. The day?s sports news
10.00 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Lawrence Dallaglio 10.00 Jim White,
Ray Parlour and Bob Mills 1.00pm
Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Danny Kelly and
Darren Gough. News from the footballing
world 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott
celebrates the Chamber Orchestra of Europe.
Mozart (Divertimento in F; and Ave Verum
Corpus); Tchaikovsky (Pezzo Capriccioso,
Op 62); Dvor醟 (Slavonic Dances, Op 46); and
Schubert (Sonata in C ? Grand Duo) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
11
1G T
TRISTRAM KENTON; GETTY IMAGES
Dance
Requiem pour L
Sadler?s Wells
Pop
Tune-Yards
Roundhouse, NW1
T
Y
{{{{(
{{{{{
he maverick Belgian
choreographer Alain Platel
has never catered to purists,
but I won?t argue with him.
Not when the results of his
pursuit of new artistic blends are as
subtle, varied and stirring as this.
In previous productions for Platel?s
company, Les Ballets C de la B, he
offered often playful yet passionate
dance-theatre treatments of
Monteverdi, Bach, Mahler and the like.
Often the music was rendered live and
sometimes in collaboration with the
composer Fabrizio Cassol, as is the
case here. This time they?re tackling
not just Mozart?s last work, its
completion curtailed by death, but also
the subject of death itself.
Platel?s handling of this touchy topic
is epic, but sensitive. One of the
constants in this dance-lite concert is
Cassol?s radical, Afro-pop-slanted
arrangements, performed live by a cast
of 14 singers and instrumentalists. The
other is slow-motion black-and-white
film footage of a dying, middle-aged
woman (the L of the title) that is
projected as a backdrop throughout
the 100 minutes. The camera?s view is
unflinching as she drifts in and out of
consciousness while propped up in
bed, attended by family and friends.
The filming of L?s demise occurred
with her permission. Although the
musicians rarely acknowledge her
image directly, occasionally ? and
uncannily ? it?s as if she appears to
be listening to them, whether they?re
clustered together or roaming
individually on a stage covered in rows
of gradually rising, oblong black
platforms, like graves in a cemetery.
You could regard this offbeat take on
Mozart?s Requiem as a kind of grief
party, by turns solemn and ceremonial,
but also joyous and lively. The cast are
in gumboots, presaging a climactic
stomping about on those graves, but
the dance content is minimal. The
musicianship, however, is masterly,
fronted by a trio of classically trained
vocalists juxtaposed against the
musically looser styles of three
physically wiry, African-born singers.
At times the voices rise
tempestuously on waves of layered,
finger-snapping rhythm supplied by an
accordion, euphonium, percussion and
electric guitar, but they can also
soothe. A few abrupt tonal shifts and
false endings aside, it makes for a
largely extraordinary experience.
Donald Hutera
Pop
Sam Smith
FlyDSA Arena,
Sheffield
{{{((
artsfirst night
?I
O?Casey draws us into lives
changing for ever even as characters
just appear to drink in the bar, where
a speaker (here a voice on the telly)
talks up the ?exhilaration? of war.
Songs are sung, both impassioned and
ironic. The English soldiers arrive, in
modern combats, and they are scared
and lifesize too. Meanwhile, the play
manages, without being cynical, to
suggest that war is always a mess, a
clumsy tool for solving problems.
Jon Bausor?s strip-lit set gives us a
three-storey piece of scaffolding for
the tenement block. Then, as the
world tilts into madness ? looting,
bleeding, fighting, hiding, dying ? the
scaffolding turns on to its side. Such
directorial devices pan out, but it?s the
acting that counts most. Holmes?s
14-strong cast are simply superb.
Although O?Casey?s writing is
old-fashioned in the way that it asks
Nora Clitheroe to slide into Ophelialike deliriousness, Kate Stanley
Brennan does a great job at the centre
of an ensemble that makes us feel how
uncomfortably close those offstage
gunshots are. Great performances
too from Ian Lloyd Anderson as her
husband, Niall Buggy as her eccentric
uncle, and Phelim Drew, Hilda Fay,
Julie Maguire, Janet Moran and
Ciaran O?Brien as neighbours. A
playful, painful and resonant evening.
Box office: 020 8741 6850, to April 7
ou don?t often come across
a band that makes you
think and your body contort
and jink. Talking Heads
and their smart, spiky new
wave were one, Fela Kuti?s activist
Afrobeat was another and the smilingassassin charm of Nina Simone a
certainty. Tune-Yards, fronted by
Merrill Garbus and her husband,
Nate Brenner, are among them.
And while the Oakland-based group?s
achievement and success is modest
by comparison with the others?, they
expertly craft together compelling
songs in a tone all their own.
?Are you ready to dance even
though it?s only a Tuesday?? Garbus
roared with an optimism not usually
seen in north London. Fortunately,
she left little room for British frigidity.
A cranked-up Eighties disco drumbeat
and her spectacular looped vocals
propelled Look at Your Hands with
the force of a fire hose. West African
tribal beats in Water Fountain
provoked an increasingly raucous
and frisky atmosphere. Mingus-style
baritone sax samples, cascading bass
lines and Garbus?s vengeful screams
like a wronged cavewoman combined
magnificently in Gangsta.
Many bands opt to make their live
shows ornate versions of their
recorded material. Not this one. This
was absorbing, ambitious stuff at
a breakneck BPM. Tune-Yards? fourth
album, I Can Feel You Creep Into My
Private Life, released this year, shifted
towards the danceable, borrowing
from Chicago house, disco and early
techno. Yet the message from Garbus,
who recently attended
a six-month workshop on whiteness
and racial justice, is of a brave, rather
divisive self-interrogation. ?I use my
white woman?s voice to tell stories of
travels with African men,? she warbled
in an askew arpeggio during Colonizer
as irresistible, industrial EDM beats
rendered the room a Berlin club.
Once a puppeteer and ukulele
player, Garbus used to perform in
costume and face paint. Yet here
the stage was shorn of all but simple
lighting. It was a shrewd decision.
Her kaleidoscopic bric-a-brac music
is more than enough; her work
humble and urgent. To close the set
the elevated electropop of Heart
Attack gave one last sample of that
miraculous voice: warped siren,
stalking feline, primal aggressor.
Peter Yeung
musical misery, it was perfect. No
dancing, no jazz hands. The only
concession to showbiz was in the
encore, when the 25-year-old climbed
a spiral staircase and sang Palace from
the top of a golden pyramid. The only
song you could call perky was Restart,
which had shades of Kool and the
Gang-style disco-funk and a snatch of
Luther Vandross and Janet Jackson?s
The Best Things in Life Are Free.
Other than that, it was wall-to-wall
woe. One-note, yes, but that note was
pretty stirring. Smith?s voice was full of
rippling power on Money on My Mind,
weightless pain on Lay Me Down, and
beautifully controlled falsetto on his
James Bond theme, Writing?s on the
Wall. The most emotional track was
Him, an example of something
surprisingly rare: a man singing a love
song explicitly about another man.
?Love is love,? Smith said imperiously.
?I am a proud, proud gay man.?
His formidable phalanx of backing
singers gathered round him on the
cascading harmonies of the gospel
standard I Sing Because I?m Happy,
a title with more than a tinge of irony.
You wonder if Smith had Whitehall?s
words in mind towards the end when
he introduced Scars, a plangent ballad
about his parents splitting up: ?You
may think it?s super-depressing, but
it?s good to listen to sad music when
you?re sad.? And to sing it, clearly.
Ed Potton
SSE Hydro, Glasgow, Fri and Sat
Hilda Fay, Janet Moran and Niall Buggy play Dubliners at the time of the Easter Rising
Rising to the occasion
A superb cast
help to bring
this fine Sean
O?Casey revival
to vibrant life,
says Dominic
Maxwell
Theatre
The Plough
and the Stars
Lyric, W6
{{{{(
f you like Adele songs, but find
them too upbeat, you?re in for
a treat,? said the comedian Jack
Whitehall before Sam Smith
played at the Brits last month.
A bit cruel, perhaps, but he kind of
had a point. Smith, right, is not one of
life?s pedal-to-the-metal hellraisers. Yet
his neurotic, broken-hearted soul has
garnered him four Grammys, an
Oscar and album sales of more than
17 million. This homogeneous, but
impeccably performed show was the
first of a 92-date world tour that could
elevate Smith even farther.
He started and finished hunched on
a chair that emerged from the stage
and at the end sank back into it. As a
metaphor for his brand of distilled
I
will be honest, the heart sinks
when a theatre threatens to
start ?unleashing contemporary
resonances? in a great play.
Not that old texts should be
sacrosanct. And Sean O?Casey?s drama
set around the 1916 Easter Rising,
which prompted a riot on its first
performance in Dublin in 1926, is
never an easy evening. It?s just that
you wonder whether kitting out
characters in Manchester United strips,
or asking them to direct some lines
straight at the stalls in a way that?s
part Brechtian, part Dick Whittington,
serves to keep the audience interested,
or to keep the director interested.
In this instance, the odd moment
of oversell aside, the audience is
the winner. Yes, Sean Holmes?s
production, first seen at the Abbey in
Dublin in 2016, takes a while to go
from garrulous to gripping, but that?s
this play for you. O?Casey lets us into
the lives of the ordinary Dubliners
in a tenement block. The carpenter
putting a new lock on a door, later
swigging from tinnies he plucks
from his plastic bag. The gossipy
charwoman whose tuberculosis-ridden
girl will later be carried off in a coffin.
The young firebrand never far from
his next socialist spiel. At their centre
the young couple, the Clitheroes,
torn apart after the husband, Jack, is
lured back to the Irish Citizen Army.
12
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Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Martin Luther
King
ITV, 9pm
Trevor
McDonald
has covered
many stories
in his five-decade
career, but there is
one that he has always
wanted to explore ?
Pearl Mackey King and
meets students and
activists who were
inspired by King to
fight for civil rights. In
the interests of balance,
McDonald interviews
an ex-member of the
Ku Klux Klan and talks
to a historian about the
horrors of lynching in
20th-century America.
There are also modern
black role models,
including Naomi
Campbell and Colin
Powell, who
acknowledge the debt
they owe King.
Progress has been
made, but not enough.
?Were he alive today,
he would probably be
on the march again,?
says McDonald. ?This
time against inequality
and injustice, the twin
evils that still scar
millions of black
American lives.?
Big Cats About
the House
BBC Two, 8pm
Giles Clark is the
British zookeeper who
raised two tiger cubs
at home with his family
in a quiet Australian
suburb, as captured in a
2014 BBC documentary,
Tigers About the House.
Clark is back in the
UK to run the Big Cat
Sanctuary in Kent.
Conservation is a major
part of his new role
and he is adopting
a newborn jaguar cub
that has been neglected
by its mother, taking
it into the family home
to be hand-reared.
Maya is cute, but
vulnerable, and needs
as much care as a
baby, night feeds
and all. Then he
notices a problem
with Maya?s sight . . .
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
Early
marital home; and to
the Lorraine Motel in
Memphis, Tennessee,
where he was
assassinated. He starts
with the monumental
?I have a dream?
speech, the key ideas of
which, he discovers,
were off-the-cuff. He
interviews King?s key
allies, including the
veteran singer Harry
Belafonte, tracks down
King?s assistant, Willie
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Holding Back the Years. Nicki
Chapman meets people having children later in life (AD)
10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Two properties in
south-east London (AD) 11.00 The Sheriffs Are Coming.
The sheriffs attempt to get money back for a
grandmother who was conned by a local builder 11.45
Caught Red Handed. A computer shop owner who tracked
down a burglar (r) (AD) 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Two
teams compete at the East of England Showground (r)
(AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional
News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Jimmi is puzzled by a
seemingly innocent young man who is desperate to be
arrested (AD) 2.15 A Place to Call Home. George is still
depressed about James?s rejection of life at Ash Park,
while Elizabeth ignores an important note from Douglas?s
solicitor 3.00 Escape to the Country. A professional
couple keen to escape London and move to Hampshire (r)
(AD) 3.45 Money for Nothing. Old bedroom cabinets and
a steamer trunk are restored 4.30 Flog It! From Sandon
Hall in Staffordshire (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show hosted
by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at Six;
Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The Repair Shop (r) 6.30 Holding Back the Years
(r) (AD) 7.15 The Sheriffs Are Coming (r) 8.00 Sign
Zone: Earth?s Natural Wonders (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria
Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily
Politics 1.00pm Two Tribes (r) 1.30 Yes Chef. Mary Ann
Gilchrist puts four amateurs through a series of culinary
tests (r) 2.15 Monty Halls? Great Irish Escape. Monty
takes to the water to electronically tag the ?ns of basking
sharks off the West Coast of Ireland so their movements
can be tracked by scientists (r) (AD) 3.15 Planet Earth.
Following the epic journey of a humpback whale and its
calf as they travel from a tropical paradise to the species?
great feeding ground in the icy polar seas (r) (AD) 4.15
Spy in the Wild. Animals getting up to mischief, from
birds stealing ?sh and elephants having temper tantrums
to cheating chimps and lemurs getting high by snif?ng
toxic millipedes (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your Money Where
Your Mouth Is. Eric Knowles and Ochuko Ojiri search a
car-boot sale in Chester?eld, where items of interest
include antique coin scales and a John Wayne mirror 6.00
Eggheads. Quiz hosted by Jeremy Vine 6.30 The Repair
Shop. Restoring a Boulle-work clock and a Georgian desk
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs
and fashion news, as well as showbiz stories 9.25 The
Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning.
Phillip Scho?eld and Holly Willoughby present chat and
lifestyle features, including a look at the stories making
the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen
12.30pm Loose Women. The ladies put the world to
rights once more and invite a guest to chat about what
they are up to 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge
Rinder. Cameras follow the criminal barrister Robert
Rinder as he takes on real-life cases in a studio courtroom
3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. The team travels to Buxton in
Derbyshire, where Karen Dalmeny digs deep for some war
memorabilia, and Jan Keyne forms an instant attachment
to a creamware jug (r) 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard
hosts the arcade-themed quiz show in which contestants
drop tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a �,000 jackpot 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh
presents as contestants pit their wits against the Chaser
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.30 Frasier (r)
(AD) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 11.00
Undercover Boss USA (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary
12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Four contestants in Bristol
compete for the �000 prize (r) 1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers.
Pickwicks are tempted by a theatre organ with a �,000
asking price (r) 2.10 Countdown. With Dictionary Corner
guest Len Goodman 3.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or
Away. A Devon duo choose between homes in Dorset and
Tenerife (r) 4.00 A New Life in the Sun. A Portsmouth
couple race to open their new B&B before the end of the
season, while a knife skills course at a British-run French
cooking school does not end well 5.00 Four in a Bed.
Expectations are high as the guests arrive at the Compton
Swan in Berkshire (r) 5.30 Star Boot Sale. The model and
presenter Nancy Sorrell plunders her home for things to
sell, choosing a painting by her husband Jim Moir ?
better known as the comedian Vic Reeves ? as her
big-ticket item 6.00 The Simpsons. Marge signs up Bart
for piano lessons (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Leela hears
some devastating news about Peri (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. The day?s
news comes under scrutiny from Matthew Wright and the
panel, with viewers and the studio audience invited to
share their opinions 11.15 Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It Away.
Paul and Ben are called in to evict squatters from a
residential property, but something about the squat does
not quite add up for the team (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
Observational documentary giving an insight into the
work of doctors at a medical practice (r) (AD) 1.10 Access
1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15
NCIS. An army scientist goes missing, so Abby is asked to
temporarily replace him on a top-secret research project
? but Gibbs later learns her life could be in danger (r)
(AD) 3.15 FILM: Secrets in the Attic (PG, TVM,
2016) A teenager ?nds a youth hiding in the attic of the
house she has just moved into, and discovers he has been
accused of murder. Thriller starring Abbie Cobb and Max
Lloyd-Jones 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Mishti
obtains full confessions from Rafael, Jayden and Sue (r)
(AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Hunter realises Irene knew
about Olivia?s in?delity (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7PM
Top
pick
the life of Dr Martin
Luther King Jr. In this
powerful and personal
documentary
commemorating the
50th anniversary of the
death of the civil rights
leader in April 1968,
McDonald travels to
locations that are
integral to King?s
story: to Alabama
and Montgomery,
Birmingham and
Selma; to King?s first
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine
7.00 Saving Lives at Sea The Lowestoft
crew are called out to help a sailor who
does not want to be rescued, and a
Good Samaritan is saved after trying
to help a dog which jumped into the
river Thames (11/12) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Lisa faces the
consequences of her actions (AD)
8.00 Big Cats About the House New
series. The big cat expert Giles Clark
works to transform the Big Cat
Sanctuary in Kent into a centre of
global excellence for conservation. In
the opening episode, Giles provides
care to a ?ve-day-old black jaguar cub.
See Viewing Guide (1/3) (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Marlon makes a fatal
error that he fears could ruin his
friendship with Jessie (AD)
9.00 Civilisations Mary Beard explores art
and religion and how the two have
inspired each other, focusing on the
fundamental problem of making god
? or gods ? visible in the human
world. See Viewing Guide (4/9) (AD)
9.00 Martin Luther King by Trevor
McDonald To mark 50 years since the
assassination of the civil rights leader
in 1968, the broadcaster travels to
America?s Deep South to ?nd out about
Martin Luther King and what he meant
to people. See Viewing Guide (AD)
8PM
7.30 EastEnders Stacey grills Jean about
what she has just said (AD)
8.00 MasterChef Amol Rajan asks the last
quarter-?nalists to make their own
version of a full English breakfast (AD)
9PM
8.30 Not Going Out A missing toy keyring
leads to a rift with Toby and Anna. See
Viewing Guide (3/7)
9.00 EastEnders There is a shock in Albert
Square when Kat Moon turns up (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
9.30 Still Game Jack and Victor take up
walking football (3/6) (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street David wants to
leave Weather?eld for a new life in
New Zealand with his father (AD)
10.00 MOTD: The Premier League Show
Magazine programme featuring news
and action from the Premier League
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
10.30 Regional News
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days? political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Top Gear Matt LeBlanc tests the
world?s fastest-accelerating car, with a
little help from NASA. Chris Harris
pens a heartfelt love letter to the
Citroen 2CV, while Rory Reid samples
cars from South Korea (4/6) (r)
12.15am Sign Zone: MasterChef The week?s best
amateurs are challenged by the critic Jay Rayner to make
an exceptional pie, sweet or savoury, using their own
pastry (r) (AD, SL) 12.45-2.00 Imagine: Mel Brooks ?
Unwrapped. Alan Yentob interviews the comedy actor,
director and producer Mel Brooks (r) (SL)
7.00 The Yorkshire Vet Casebook New
series. Favourite stories and unseen
footage from the series, following the
Yorkshire vet Julian Norton, his partnerr
Peter Wright and their team (1/10)
8.00 Location, Location, Location Kirstie
Allsopp and Phil Spencer search the
Reading area for a young woman who
wants a home in the suburb of
Caversham and two teachers who need
a family home before term starts
8.00 Bargain-Loving Brits in the Sun
The ?tness instructor and entrepreneur
Anthony organises a coach trip to the
Algar waterfalls, while the female
impersonator James and his partner
David rent a working farm (7/8)
9.00 My Baby?s Life: Who Decides?
(2/2) The mother of a 12-year-old
quadriplegic girl ?ghts to get her
daughter the treatment she needs, but
doctors question whether her quality
of life will be enough (AD)
9.00 Do the Right Thing with Eamonn
& Ruth Eamonn Holmes and Ruth
Langsford try to save a playground for
children with disabilities from closure
and investigate the deaths of babies by
suffocating on nappy sacks (3/4)
10.00 The Job Interview The RAC
interviews for a roadside patrol of?cer
and the Kettering mortgage broker
TMP needs a case manager to guide its
clients through the borrowing process.
Last in the series
10.00 Under Siege (15, 1992) Terrorists
in?ltrate a US battleship in a carefully
orchestrated move to steal its arsenal
of nuclear weapons, unaware the ship?s
resourceful cook ? a veteran US Navy
Seal ? and a stripper are about to foil
their plans. Action adventure starring
Steven Seagal, Erika Eleniak, Gary
Busey and Tommy Lee Jones
7.30 Britain vs Russia: A New Cold
War? Tonight Adam Shaw
investigates relations with Russia
after the chemical attack in Salisbury
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.45 Question Time David Dimbleby chairs
the debate from Leeds, West Yorkshire,
with a panel of politicians and other
guests facing topical questions
7.00 Channel 4 News
10.45 The World?s Ugliest Pets Caroline
Quentin meets unattractive pets, and
searches for a canine to represent the
UK at The World?s Ugliest Dog Contest
in Petaluma, California (r) (AD)
11.45 The Durrells The family is surprised
to ?nd out that Leslie has three
different girlfriends (1/8) (r) (AD)
12.40am Lethal Weapon With Christmas approaching,
Murtaugh and Riggs are called to a homicide only to
?nd the victim is an old friend (r) (AD) 1.25 Jackpot247.
Live interactive gaming 3.00 Britain vs Russia: A New
Cold War? Tonight (r) 3.25 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00
The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
11.05 Gogglebox Troy: Fall of a City,
Match of the Day, Sir Bruce: A
Celebration, Crufts, Amazing Hotels:
Life Beyond the Lobby, and One Born
Every Minute are reviewed by the
armchair critics (r) (AD)
12.05am Seven Year Switch (r) (AD) 1.05 One Born
Every Minute (r) (AD) 2.00 The Supervet (r) (AD) 2.55
The Truth About Your Pay: Channel 4 Dispatches (r) (AD,
SL) 3.25 Coast vs Country (r) 4.20 Location, Location,
Location (r) 5.15 Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 5.40-6.00
Kirstie?s Fill Your House for Free (r)
12.10am SuperCasino Live interactive gaming 3.10
GPs: Behind Closed Doors. The work of doctors at a
medical practice (r) (AD) 4.00 Britain?s Greatest Bridges.
The story behind the construction of the Forth Rail Bridge
(r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 House Busters
(r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Not Going Out
BBC One, 8.30pm
The children are the
focus of tonight?s
well-crafted farce, with
Lucy convinced that
Toby and Anna?s son,
Jack, has stolen a
keyring from Charlie.
Lucy wants Lee to go
with her and confront
their friends, but Lee
has other ideas: ?When
there?s a problem
between friends, you?re
supposed to do the
adult thing ? don?t
mention it, resent them
for a few weeks and
hope the whole thing
goes away.? Lucy wins
the argument, but
Jack denies it and Lee
becomes obsessed with
proving the boy?s guilt.
?I know how the mind
of an eight-year-old
boy works,? he says.
It gets a bit awkward.
Civilisations
BBC Two, 9pm
Mary Beard joins the
pilgrims gathered for
sunrise at the Angkor
Wat temple complex
in Cambodia. They are
there to witness the
moment the sun seems
to balance on the
temple?s central spire.
?It?s religious art at its
most spectacular,? says
Beard. The classicist?s
second and final
contribution to the
series explores the
subject of religious art,
a medium used to
?make gods visible in
the human world?.
Beneath all such works
lie danger and risk;
Beard visits sacred
sites across the world
to examine how artists
tread the fine line
between idolatry
and blasphemy.
Contagion
BBC Four, 9pm
Dr Hannah Fry and
Dr Javid Abdelmoneim
oversee the simulation
of an outbreak of a fatal
contagion in a small
town. The hope is that
the groundbreaking
experiment will save
lives when (?not if ?,
Fry emphasises) a real
pandemic hits the UK.
There have been four
global outbreaks of
deadly flu in the past
100 years. App
technology ?infects?
users while tracking
their movements and
social interactions over
24 hours. A team of
mathematicians then
simulate how the virus
could spread. If you
want to save yourself
75 minutes, then there?s
a simple message ?
wash your hands.
Sport Choice
Sky Sports Golf, 2.15pm
It?s the second day of
the WGC-Dell Match
Play Championship
at Austin Country Club
in Texas. The field
consists of the top 64
players available from
the official world golf
rankings on March 11.
The world No 1,
Dustin Johnson, is the
defending champion.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 7.00 RSPCA
Animal Rescue (r) (AD) 8.00 Motorway Patrol
(r) 9.00 Road Wars (r) 10.00 Warehouse 13 (r)
11.00 Forever (r) (AD) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry goes undercover (3/4) (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. Oliver must decide whether to ask
his former team-mates for help when Cayden
James tightens his hold over the city
9.00 SEAL Team. New series. Action drama
starring David Boreanaz
10.00 Jamestown. Maria commits a crime (r)
11.00 The Force: Essex. Documentary following
police in the county (r) (AD)
12.00 Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD)
1.00am Brit Cops: Law & Disorder (r) (AD) 2.00
Most Shocking (r) 3.00 The Force: Essex (r)
(AD) 4.00 It?s Me or the Dog (r) 4.30 It?s Me or
the Dog (r) (AD) 5.00 Futurama (r)
6.00am The Guest Wing (r) (AD) 7.00 Storm
City (r) (AD) 8.00 Richard E Grant?s Hotel
Secrets (r) (AD) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00
House (r) (AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing
(r) 5.00 House (r) (AD)
6.00 House. Medical drama (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A jogger?s
mutilated body is discovered in a park (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny and Jackie help to ?nd
the killer of one of Erin?s informants (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: Warning ? This Drug May Kill
You (2017) Documentary focusing on the
devastating effects of addiction (r)
10.10 Our Cartoon President. An embarrassing
video surfaces of the First Lady rolling her eyes
10.45 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. (r)
11.20 Hotspots: On the Frontline. Reporting in
troubled spots around the world (r)
12.20am Divorce. Robert and Frances reminisce
(r) 12.55 Billions (r) (AD) 2.05 Blue Bloods (r)
3.00 Dexter (r) 4.10 The West Wing (r)
6.00am Motorway Patrol (r) 7.00 Highway
Patrol (r) 7.30 Border Patrol (r) 8.00 UK Border
Force (r) (AD) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r) 10.00
Cold Case (r) 11.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia
12.00 Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
1.00pm Air Rescue (r) 2.00 Stop, Search, Seize
(r) (AD) 3.00 Nothing to Declare UK (r) 4.00
Nothing to Declare (r) (AD) 5.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r)
6.00 Air Rescue (r)
6.30 Air Rescue (r) (AD)
7.00 The Real A&E (r) (AD)
7.30 The Real A&E (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Conviction. A mass grave is found (r) (AD)
10.00 Scandal. Olivia tries to make sure Mellie
does not name Jake as her new chief of staff
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
1.00am Cold Case (r) 2.00 The Good Doctor (r)
3.00 Nashville (r) 4.00 Nothing to Declare UK
(r) 5.00 The Biggest Loser: Australia (r)
6.00am Darbar Festival 2017 7.00 Joseph
Calleja: A Night in Malta 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 9.30 Landscape Artist of the Year
2016 10.30 Video Killed the Radio Star (AD)
11.00 The Seventies (AD) 12.00 Soundbreaking
(AD) 1.00pm Discovering: Claude Rains (AD)
2.00 Tales of the Unexpected 2.30 Landscape
Artist of the Year 2016 3.30 Video Killed the
Radio Star 4.00 The Eighties (AD) 5.00 Elvis
Presley: A Legend in Concert
6.00 Discovering: Janet Leigh (AD)
7.00 Andr� Rieu: How It All Began. The life and
career of the Dutch violinist
8.00 The Glyndebourne Opera Cup
9.00 The Divorce. Opera Australia?s production
of the comedic opera starring Marina Prior
11.00 Portrait Artist of the Year 2018
12.00 National Treasures: The Art of Collecting
1.00am The Glyndebourne Opera Cup 2.00
Close to You: Remembering the Carpenters 3.15
30 Degrees in February 4.30 Tales of the
Unexpected 5.00 Auction
6.00am Live Test Cricket: New Zealand v
England. Coverage of the opening day of the ?rst
Test at Eden Park in Auckland, where the
two-match series gets under way 8.30 Live Test
Cricket: South Africa v Australia. Day one of the
third Test from Newlands in Cape Town 3.30pm
Virat Kohli: IPL King 3.45 England v New
Zealand Classics 4.00 Test Cricket 5.00 Cricket
Debate 5.30 Sky Sports News
7.00 Live Premier League Darts. Coverage of
round eight from the SSE Hydro in Glasgow,
including Gary Anderson v Simon Whitlock and
Raymond van Barneveld v Peter Wright
10.30 Live World Golf Championships: The
WGC-Dell Match Play Championship. The second
day?s play at Austin Country Club in Texas
12.00 F1 Report 12.30am Live Formula 1. The
Australian Grand Prix ?rst practice session.
Coverage of the opening round of the season
from Albert Park, Melbourne 2.45 Live Test
Cricket: New Zealand v England. Coverage of the
second day of the ?rst Test in Auckland
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View.
News, comment and analysis from Stormont
and Westminster 11.15 Question Time
12.15am This Week 1.00-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 11.00am Bargain Hunt
(r) 11.20-1.45pm Live Match of the Day
Wales: China Cup ? China v Wales (Kick-off
11.35). The semi-?nal match in the friendly
tournament 9.30-10.00 Rhod Gilbert?s Work
Experience. The comedian tries his hand at
being a classical musician. Last in the series
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 Soft
Border Patrol. The gang carries out a lengthy
strip search. Last in the series (r) 11.15 Party
Political Broadcast. By the Alliance Party 11.20
MOTD: The Premier League Show
11.50-12.15am Top Gear: Extra Gear (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00-1.00pm First
Minister?s Questions. Nicola Sturgeon answers
questions in the Scottish Parliament 6.30
Saving Lives at Sea (r) (AD) 7.30-8.00
Timeline. Thought-provoking stories
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm-1.30 BBC News
at One; Weather 1.45-2.15 Two Tribes (r)
10.00-10.30 Still Game 11.15 MOTD: The
Premier League Show 11.45-12.45am Gareth
Thomas? Silver Skydivers for Sport Relief. The
former rugby star does a charity skydive (r)
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1985. Music by Tears for
Fears, Simply Red and Fine Young Cannibals (r)
8.00 Secret Universe: The Hidden Life of the
Cell. Documentary showing what happens to a
single human cell as it comes under attack from
a virus, demonstrating how it defends itself
from the hostile organism (r) (AD)
9.00 Contagion! The BBC Four Pandemic.
Hannah Fry and Dr Javid Abdelmoneim front this
social media experiment to test the threat of ?u
to the UK, using app technology to ?infect? users
and track their interactions over 24 hours. See
Viewing Guide (AD)
10.15 Michael Mosley vs the Superbugs. The
presenter investigates how bacteria are ?ghting
back against antibiotics (r) (AD)
11.15 Britain?s Outlaws: Highwaymen, Pirates
and Rogues. Urban crime, fraud and corruption.
Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.15am Top of the Pops: 1985. Music by Tears
for Fears (r) 12.45 The Inca: Masters of the
Clouds (r) (AD) 2.45 Britain?s Outlaws:
Highwaymen, Pirates and Rogues (r) (AD, SL)
3.45-4.00 Sounds of the Seventies (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Rules of
Engagement (r) 8.00 How I Met Your Mother (r)
(AD) 9.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 10.00 2 Broke Girls
(r) (AD) 11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD)
12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big
Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 3.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 4.00
Brooklyn Nine-Nine. Double bill (r) (AD) 5.00
The Goldbergs. Double bill (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 My Hotter Half
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
8.30 Young Sheldon (AD)
9.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
9.30 Derry Girls (r) (AD)
10.00 Five Star Hotel
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 First Dates (r) (AD) 1.05am Five Star
Hotel (r) 2.05 Tattoo Fixers on Holiday (r) (AD)
3.00 Marvel?s Agents of SHIELD (r) (AD) 3.55
Brooklyn Nine-Nine (r) (AD) 4.15 Rules of
Engagement (r) 5.00 Rude(ish) Tube (r)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.30 A Place
in the Sun: Home or Away (r) 11.35 Four in a
Bed (r) 2.10pm Celebrity Come Dine with Me
(r) 4.50 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away (r)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick operates on
a Bengal cat with a broken back (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud returns to
Belfast where he visits Thomas and Dervla
O?Hare, who set out to build a split-level home
on an almost vertical hillside (r) (AD)
9.00 The Good Fight. Tensions remain high when
the ?rm learns another Chicago lawyer has been
murdered by a client. A surprise witness is called
to testify against Maia (AD)
10.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? The edition
focuses on the rapidly growing number of 999
calls connected to the over-75s, with PC Phil
Bridge searching Trowbridge to ?nd a
73-year-old woman with dementia (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A registrar treats a man
who has been having seizures (7/8) (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
An Italian restaurant (r) 1.05 The Good Fight (r)
(AD) 2.05 999: What?s Your Emergency? (r)
(AD) 3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am 12 Angry Men (U, 1957) Legal
drama starring Henry Fonda (b/w) 1.00pm
Operation Petticoat (U, 1959) Nurses,
children and an expectant mother are invited on
board a submarine and disrupt the captain?s
plans. Second World War comedy with Cary
Grant (AD) 3.25 Juggernaut (PG, 1974)
Thriller starring Richard Harris 5.40 Avatar
Special 5.50 Avatar (12, 2009) A soldier
uses a genetically engineered body to help an
alien tribe ?ght off a corrupt mining corporation.
Sci-? adventure with Sam Worthington (AD)
9.00 The Drop (15, 2014) A bartender who
secretly works for gangsters gets involved in a
robbery gone wrong that digs up long-buried
secrets. Crime drama starring Tom Hardy (AD)
11.10 Contraband (15, 2012) A reformed
international smuggler must return to his old
line of work to save his family from a ruthless
drug lord. Crime thriller starring Mark Wahlberg
1.20am-3.40 The 36th Chamber of Shaolin
(18, 1978) A gentle scholar devotes his life to
mastering martial arts so he can avenge his
family?s murders. Adventure starring Chia Hui
Liu and Lieh Lo. In Mandarin
6.00am The Planet?s Funniest Animals (r) 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.10
Who?s Doing the Dishes? (r) (AD) 7.55
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.20 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 9.25 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20
The Bachelor (r) 12.15pm Emmerdale (r) (AD)
12.45 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.45 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
4.50 Judge Rinder (r) 5.50 Take Me Out (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Clips feature a
man falling off a bridge into a canal (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Including a
builder falling through a ceiling (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 Celebrity Juice Live. New series. Guests
include Georgia ?Toff? Toffolo
11.05 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.55am Two
and a Half Men (r) 1.50 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records (r) 2.20 Teleshopping
5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) 7.55 The Royal (r) (AD) 8.55
Judge Judy (r) 10.15 Inspector Morse (r)
12.35pm The Royal (r) (AD) 1.40 Heartbeat (r)
2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.50 On the
Buses (b/w) (r) 4.55 You?re Only Young Twice
(r) 5.25 Rising Damp (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. A sniper strikes (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A factory owner is
suspected of foul play (r) (AD)
8.00 Vera. DCI Vera Stanhope sets out to solve
the murder of a teenage girl 11 years earlier,
exposing the secrets and lies of a community.
Hugo Speer guest stars (2/4) (r) (AD)
10.00 Unforgotten. Cassie quizzes Marion and
the inquiry reveals her close relationship with an
IRA activist (3/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 Unforgotten. Marion jeopardises her
marriage by refusing to open up about the past,
Colin is blackmailed even further and a
disturbing allegation about David opens up a
second line of inquiry (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am DCI Banks (r) (AD) 2.00 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 8.00 Ironside (r) 9.00
Quincy ME (r) 10.05 Minder (r) (AD) 11.10 The
Saint (r) 12.15pm Storage Wars (r) 12.45 Live
Snooker: Players Championship. Coverage of the
afternoon session on day four, featuring the
second quarter-?nal from Venue Cymru in
Llandudno, played over the best of 11 frames
5.00 Football?s Greatest: Paul Gascoigne (r)
5.15 The Avengers (r)
6.15 Storage Wars. The buyers head to the hills
of Murietta for an auction, and Dave drives
Darrell to breaking-point (r)
6.45 Live Snooker: Players Championship. The
evening session on day four, featuring the third
quarter-?nal from Venue Cymru in Llandudno,
played over the best of 11 frames
11.00 FILM: The Dictator (15, 2012) A
tyrant travels to America to address the UN, but
is left stranded there after an assassination
attempt goes wrong. Comedy starring Sacha
Baron Cohen, Anna Faris and Ben Kingsley
12.40am Minder (r) (AD, SL) 1.45 Deals,
Wheels and Steals (r) 2.45 ITV4 Nightscreen
3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm
Top Gear (AD) 3.00 Impossible Engineering (AD)
4.00 World?s Most Dangerous Roads 5.00 Top
Gear. With Rory Bremner (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. A race through Lisbon (AD)
7.00 World?s Most Dangerous Roads. Twenty
Twelve co-stars Hugh Bonneville and Jessica
Hynes go on a road trip through the former
Soviet republic of Georgia (2/3)
8.00 Dara O Briain?s Go 8 Bit. With Anna
Richardson and Nish Kumar
9.00 QI XL. With Cariad Lloyd, Romesh
Ranganathan and Phill Jupitus
10.00 Not Going Out. Lucy accidentally runs
over a pet rabbit belonging to a client?s daughter
10.40 Not Going Out. Lee, Lucy and Daisy get
stuck high above the mountains in a cable car
11.20 QI XL. An extended edition with Sandi
Toksvig, Clive Anderson and Henning Wehn
12.20am Mock the Week 1.00 QI 1.35 Would I
Lie to You? 2.15 Mock the Week 2.55 Suits
(AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
Bill 12.00 Death in Paradise 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Bread 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London?s Burning (AD) 4.00 Death
in Paradise 5.00 Bergerac
6.00 Steptoe and Son (b/w)
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Clegg climbs a
tree to prove a point, but gets stuck up
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. A renowned
womaniser turns his attentions to Nora Batty
8.00 A Place to Call Home. Elizabeth is
unimpressed with the way Regina is behaving
9.00 FILM: The Hound of the Baskervilles
(15, TVM, 2002) Holmes and Watson
investigate tales of a mysterious hound
terrorising a family on Dartmoor. Mystery
starring Richard Roxburgh and Ian Hart
11.00 Birds of a Feather
11.40 The Bill. Boyden?s estranged daughter has
information regarding a man?s violent death
12.40am Ashes to Ashes. Alex encounters her
future husband 2.35 London?s Burning 3.30
Garden Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Who Do You Think
You Are? (AD) 11.00 Impossible Railways (AD)
12.00 Time Team 1.00pm Hidden India (AD)
2.00 Planet Earth (AD) 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00
Medieval Murder Mysteries 5.00 Impossible
Railways. Routes across mountains (AD)
6.00 The Dambusters? Great Escape: Secret
History. The RAF?s defeat of the German
battleship Tirpitz in November 1944
7.00 The Day When Stalin Won the War. How
Stalin managed to seize a large chunk of Europe
8.00 Nazi Victory: The Post-War Plan. Hitler?s
plans to revolutionise Germany?s transport
system. Last in the series
9.00 The Two Ronnies. With Randy Crawford
10.00 The Two Ronnies. With Marti Webb
10.40 The Two Ronnies. With Elkie Brooks
11.30 Steptoe and Son. Harold enthusiastically
starts writing an article for the parish magazine
12.05am Steptoe and Son. Harold joins an
amateur dramatics society, convinced he has
star quality 1.25 Tales of Irish Castles 2.20
Sounds of the Seventies 3.00 Home Shopping
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 The Kyle Files (r) (AD) 11.35 Lethal
Weapon (r) (AD) 12.25am Teleshopping
1.25 After Midnight 2.55 Britain vs Russia:
A New Cold War? Tonight (r) 3.20 ITV
Nightscreen 4.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 7.30pm-8.00 UTV Life 10.45
Britain vs Russia: A New Cold War? Tonight
11.15 The World?s Ugliest Pets (r) (AD)
12.10am The Durrells (r) (AD) 1.00
Teleshopping 2.30-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Pincidh
Dincidh D� (Pinky Dinky Doo) (r) 5.35 Na
Floogals (r) 5.45 Su Shiusaidh (Little Suzy?s
Zoo) (r) 5.55 Fitheach (Raven) 6.10
Sealgairean Sp騬sail (History Hunters) (r) 6.30
D� a-nis? (What Now?) (r) 7.00 Turas a?
Bhradain (The Salmon?s Journey) (r) 7.35
Speaking Our Language (r) 8.00 An L� (News)
8.15 Sgeul Seirbheis 8.30 E騬pa (European
Current Affairs) 9.00 DIY le Donnie 9.45
Piobairean Bhoirnis (Pipers of Bornish) (r) 9.55
Fraochy Bay (r) 10.00 Belladrum 2017: Twin
Atlantic (r) 10.35 Luingean Lannsaireachd
11.20 Hebridean Celtic Music Festival: Suil air
Ais (r) 11.30-12.00 Mach a Seo! (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Dona Direidi (r) 6.15 Tili a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 6.25 Halibalw (r) 6.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 6.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 7.00 Meic y
Marchog (r) 7.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 7.30
Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 7.40
Peppa (r) 7.45 Cacamwnci 8.00 Holi Hana (r)
8.10 Amser Stori 8.15 Boj (r) 8.30 Abadas (r)
8.40 Bla Bla Blewog (r) 8.55 Ben a Mali a?u
Byd Bach O Hud (r) 9.05 Sbridiri (r) 9.25
Meripwsan (r) 9.30 Straeon Ty Pen (r) 9.45 Cei
Bach (r) 10.00 Dona Direidi (r) 10.15 Tili a?i
Ffrindiau (r) 10.25 Halibalw (r) 10.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 10.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 11.00 Meic
y Marchog (r) 11.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 11.30
Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 11.40
Peppa (r) 11.45 Cacamwnci (r) 12.00 News
12.05pm Darn Bach o Hanes (r) (AD) 12.30
Lle Aeth Pawb? Merched Pop 65-75 (r) 1.30
Sion a Si鈔 (r) 2.00 News 2.05 Prynhawn Da
3.00 News 3.05 Yr Ynys (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr
5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Hendre Hurt
(r) 5.15 Stwnsh: Tref a Tryst 5.45 Stwnsh: Edi
Wyn (r) 6.00 News 6.05 Cwpan China 7.00
Heno 7.30 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.00 Gwaith/
Cartref (AD) 9.00 News 9.30 Pawb a?i Farn
10.30 Hansh 11.00-11.35 Mwy o Sgorio (r)
14
Thursday March 22 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
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Train Tracks No 362
25
15
6
7
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18
25
9
22
21
11
4
25
19
12
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26
12
1
18
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25
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3
4
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
Block of paper (3)
Building robber (7)
Rub out (5)
Bury (5)
Break (a rule) (7)
Lack of courage (8)
High temperature (4)
Knock unconscious (4)
Solution to Crossword 7605
SC
O
F U
P
A L
E
S T
A L
A
I R
G
DE
R E E N SMOO T H
N O A C W
S S COCK T A I L
U T
O N
L E L U I A P E E K
R C U
RA I N RUS S E T
C A O
M
TO L A BRADOR
N
A C T
R I T A N T OM I T
T
P
I
R O
S ER T CAN I NE
16 Rapidly increase (8)
20 Take back (7)
21 Short choral work (5)
23 Official order (5)
24 Eg, rust (S, not Z) (7)
25 Male offspring (3)
2
20
5
18
2
21
24
A
25
19
5
25
14
16
4
5
1
22
3
19
21
20
18
18
24
B
18
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
5
6
7
13
15
17
18
19
22
18
6
10
18
21
20
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
14
15
3
4
5
6
16
17
18
19
B
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
A
V
Down
1
2
3
4
10
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday?s solution, right
Woodwind player (6)
Badly behaved child (4)
Elaborately intricate (6)
Transfer from public to
private ownership (13)
Stage scenery (5)
Cuban dance (8)
Firmly fix (6)
Large surplus stock (8)
Sequence; tone row (6)
German dance (6)
Respect, admire (6)
Board game (5)
Hindmost part (4)
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Lexica No 4187
K
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F
L
Y
A
A
S
N
E
P
E
G
R
A
O
A
P
U
M
E
O
M
A
S
I
O
E
L
I
A
P
G
A
Winners will receive a Collins English Dictionary & Thesaurus
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shaded boxes. Text TIMES followed by a space, then your
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No 4188
L
A
See today?s News section
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A
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G
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KenKen Difficult No 4282
Futoshiki No 3134
Kakuro No 2093
3
16
15
19
7
13
6
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
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4
11
28
>
<
14
14
7
?
21
16
29
19
3
23
3
<
?
?
34
14
4
26
35
10
31
24
14
29
24
4
8
11
4
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
16
30
14
12
10
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
35
12
4
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
4
5
25
Across
3
3
24
8
2
17
6
17
23
26
6
B
26
25
2
9
22
3
23
22
3
3
19
20
5
6
17
22
13
1
23
13
4
42
16
17
� PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3290
� PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7606
the times | Thursday March 22 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
Four competitors from the FIDE
World Chess Candidates in Berlin
opted for a warm-up at the Tal
Memorial in Moscow. Interestingly, the Tal Memorial Blitz, as
can be seen below, was won by
the lowest-rated player from
Berlin, Sergei Karjakin. The highest-rated, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, struggled to avoid last place.
White: Sergei Karjakin
Black: Hikaru Nakamura
Tal Memorial Blitz, Moscow 2018
________
� D 4rDkD]
郉pD 1pgp]
遬Hn0pDpD]
轉 D D D ]
� DPDPD D]
蹹PD GQDP]
跴D $ )PD]
贒 DRD I ]
谅媚牌侨
Here we have a fairly typical
Maroczy Bind position. The key
elements of the Maroczy structure
are the white pawns on e4 and c4,
attempting to cramp Black and
inhibit the ... d6-d5 break. White
now plays to gain further space
on the queenside.
26 a3 Qc7 27 b4 a5 28 bxa5
A clever capture. White has
envisaged the ingenious continuation 28 ... Nxa5 29 c5! and if 29 ...
dxc5 30 Rd7 wins.
28 ... Bc3 29 Nd5!!
A brilliant and unexpected
move. It is particularly impressive
that Karjakin found this in a blitz
game. White is now winning.
29 ... exd5 30 Bb6
This is the key to White?s play.
He not only skewers the black
rook on d8 but also discovers an
attack against the bishop on c3.
30 ... Qc8 31 Qxc3 d4 32 Bxd4
Nxd4 33 Rxd4 Qc7 34 f3 Re6 35
Qb4 Ra8 36 Rd5 h5 37 Rb5 Ra7
38 c5 dxc5 39 Rxc5 Qb8 40 Rd7
Re8 41 Rcc7 Rf8 42 Qb3 b6 43
Rxa7 Black resigns
59 x 2 ? 13 � 5
2/
3
+8
50%
OF IT
+7
�
MEDIUM
167 x 4
25%
OF IT
+ 83
90%
OF IT
+ 64
30%
OF IT
+ 57
HARDER
188 x 5 + 994 x 3 + 88
90%
OF IT
? 839
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 997
80%
OF IT
EASY
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 26
OF IT
Karjakin
Nakamura
Nepomniachtchi
Artemiev
Kramnik
Grischuk
Dubov
Andreikin
Anand
Svidler
Fedoseev
Mamedyarov
Morozevich
Gelfand
1
*
0
0
0
1
0
0
�
�
0
�
�
0
0
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
1 1 1 0 1 1 浇1 浇1 1
* 1 �1 �浇浇�0 * 浇浇0 1 1 1 �1
浇* 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 ��
0 �* 0 0 1 1 �1 浇
0 �1 * 1 浇1 1 �1
浇1 1 0 * ��1 0 �
0 1 0 0 浇* �1 1 ��1 0 ��* �1 1 �
�0 ���* 1 0 1 1
�1 0 0 1 0 1 0 * 1 0 0
浇��0 0 1 0 * ��0 �1 �0 1 �* 0
0 0 浇0 ��1 0 1 *
10
8�
7�
7
7
7
6�
6�
6
6
5
5
5
4
________
� DrD 4kD] Winning Move
郉bD DpDp]
遬D D 0 D] Black to play. This position is from
Moscow 2018.
轉 D DqD ] Mamedyarov-Dubov,
The highest-rated player in Berlin will not
軶) DND D] have been pleased with the outcome of
蹹 DpDB) ] this ?warm-up? game. How did Black now
跴D D I )] tear into his exposed king?
贒 DR$ D ] For up-to-the-minute information follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Rubber
?Q 9 6
?KQ J
?Q J 9 8
?K 9 3
?K 2
?A 3 2
?A K 4 2
?AQ J 5
N
W
E
S
? J 10 8 7 5 4 3
?10 7
?7
?8 6 4
S
W
N
E
1NT
Dbl
2?
4? (1) Pass
6? (2) Dbl
End
(1) Bullish but finesses (through West) will
work.
(2) Facing ? AQJ10xx, there?ll be 12 tricks
via the marked club finesse.
Yesterday?s answers
baht, bash, basho, bast, bath, bathos,
bats, boast, boat, boho, boost, boot,
booth, boots, bosh, both, bowshot,
hobo, sabot, showboat, soba, stab, stob,
swab, taboo
Killer Gentle No 5922
16
15
7
12
3
6
?Q 9 6
???-
E
S
? J 10 8
???-
?A
?9 8
?
?
Declarer ruffs East?s heart with
the ten and, whether or not West
elects to overruff with the queen,
he cannot win a trick. Doubled
slam made. Only an impossibleto-find low spade opening lead by
West would have ruined the fun.
Do email me if you see a
smother play at the table. I don?t
expected my inbox to be flooded.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
2
3
9
27
8
5
7
4
16
10
8
16
14
2
9
9
14
17
15
6
11
17
12
3
5
16
9
+
25
9
20
8
22
9
+
19
20
20
20
21
8
8
9
14
25
10
24
19
15
11
20
11
21
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
�
=2
�
�
2
=
21
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
We?ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
x
x
x
= 36
=
6
=
45
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Kakuro 2092
Quick Cryptic 1052
Codeword 3289
HOME R
E
A
U
M I N S T
D
I
P
CO
D
N
I
N O RWA
A
L
T
HOU S E
E
G
R E H A B
T
O
A
WA S HO
BA S I S
V A
U
P
K
I
F RAG I L E
F
C
E
E Y E B R OW
R
S
H
QU E S T I O
J
I
I
R
UN T I L
R E
M
V
B L A Z E WO
L
R
R
I
E NCR Y P T
F L O T S AM
O
L
U
E
D I N E D
E R
U
B
I
SM I CDU S T
S
R
R
A
HORN E T
Y
C
S
T
E
MOU S E
M W P
A
B E OWU L F
A
R
N
R
D I T T O
U T
2
9
8
1
6
5
4
3
7
3
4
6
7
8
2
1
9
5
7
1
5
9
4
3
8
2
6
1
2
9
4
5
8
6
7
3
6
8
7
3
1
9
2
5
4
Set Square 2095
4
5
3
6
2
7
9
8
1
8
6
2
5
3
4
7
1
9
9
3
4
8
7
1
5
6
2
5
7
1
2
9
6
3
4
8
4
x
2
-
+
8
x
9
+
+
1
+
+
5
+
6
x
1
6
3
8
7
2
9
5
4
8
9
4
5
3
1
2
7
6
5
7
2
6
9
4
3
1
8
3
2
8
7
1
5
4
6
9
4
5
9
3
2
6
7
8
1
6
1
7
9
4
8
5
2
3
9
8
6
4
5
7
1
3
2
2
3
5
1
8
9
6
4
7
7
4
1
2
6
3
8
9
5
3
6
2
8
7
1
5
4
9
9
8
4
5
2
3
7
6
1
1
7
5
9
6
4
8
2
3
2
5
1
7
9
8
6
3
4
8
3
7
2
4
6
9
1
5
4
9
6
3
1
5
2
8
7
7
4
9
6
3
2
1
5
8
6
1
8
4
5
9
3
7
2
5
2
3
1
8
7
4
9
6
2
9
6
4
8
3
5
1
7
3
5
1
2
9
7
8
6
4
4
7
8
6
1
5
9
2
3
1
4
7
8
2
6
3
9
5
9
3
2
5
7
1
4
8
6
6
8
5
3
4
9
2
7
1
8
1
3
7
5
2
6
4
9
5
2
9
1
6
4
7
3
8
7
6
4
9
3
8
1
5
2
9
5
3
1
7
4
6
8
2
1
4
8
2
5
6
3
9
7
5
3
4
8
2
7
1
6
9
L
A
R
G
E
I AN T
I
E
UDGE
T
OOS E
B
R
I NG
O
E
A X E D
I
I
KOU T
U
E
A S E D
2 9 1
4 8 6
1 6 3
7
2 1 4
7 3 9
9 7
6 8
2 9 7
1 8 9
7
9 7
9
9
6
8
7 9
3
1
3
8
9
1
3
4 2 1
2 1 3
9 7
7
9
8 9 6
3 5 2
9 7
6 9
4 1 6
9 3 8
�
3
5
7
3
1
4
2
1
Train Tracks 361
1
Quintagram
1 Dairy
2 Motto
3 Choose
4 Keswick
5 Saxophone
3
1
6
3
3
5
5
2
A
7
3
4
5
1
4
3
1
B
C
O
M
G
T
G
A
N
S
M
O
T
A
Y
T
C
H
T
P
Futoshiki 3133
1
3 < 5
4
1
3
4
?
5
2
?
1
5
3
2
?
5 > 4
1
?
2
3
5
2
KenKen 4281
1
?
3
H
O
Y
2 < 4
O
O
H
S
I
H
Cell Blocks 3172
Lexica 4186
S
4
A
R
U
S
A
A
N
T
O
T
R
4 3 6
2
4
9
2
3
6
Y
4
2
2
2
Suko 2191
Word watch
Brain Trainer
Nidifugous (b)
Of young birds,
leaving the nest
Niding (a)
Nothing (archaic)
Nudation (c) The
process of
removing
garments, causing
to be naked
Easy 9
Medium 168
Harder 6,152
Chess
1 ... Rc2+! 2 Ke3
Bxe4 3 Bxe4
Qf2+ 4 Kxd3
Rd8+ mates
quickly
Quiz
Killer 5921
7
6
2
3
8
9
4
1
5
L
A
N
O
L
I
N
-
7
L
Sudoku 9745
17
4
Lexica 4185
27min
= 105 the numbers
x
-
Sudoku 9744
Killer Tough No 5923
Enter each of
x
Solutions
Sudoku 9743
6
x
Killer 5920
N
W
6
9
17
5min
17
12
Contract: 6? Dbled, Opening Lead: ? K
?K 2
???5
2 2
2 2
3
6
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 9 words, average;
13, good; 18, very good; 24, excellent
Advanced
?A
?9 8 6 5 4
?10 6 5 3
?10 7 2
4
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
Set Square No 2096
12
Dealer: West, Vulnerability: Neither
5
6
4 6
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Bridge Andrew Robson
As the late Victor Mollo once said,
?The smother play. A play
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