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The Times Times 2 - 22 November 2017

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Jacket, �0, uterque.com
November 22 | 2017
2
1G T
Wednesday November 22 2017 | the times
times2
At 14 I joined
I?d be proud to be
a fifth-class British
Airways passenger
Carol Midgley
Dianne Lake was still a young teenager
in 1967 when she was taken to meet the
notorious cult leader. Here, she recalls
how he began grooming her that night
REUTERS
Howards
End of
credibility
I
sn?t it terrible, appalling and
outrageous that British Airways
is introducing a ?pay least, board
last? system so that people with
cheapo tickets must do a pound
shop-style walk of shame? The
airline says ?group boarding? in
which passengers are categorised
from 1 to 5 according to how much
they paid (1 being your la-di-da First
Classers and 5, no doubt, shoeless
peasants with a coupon deal and gin
miniatures hidden down their
knickers) will ?further improve the
customer journey?.
Oh, will it now? Not for the runts of
the flight it won?t, say an infuriated
public. You may as well have the cabin
crew announce each budget flyer by
Tannoy for optimum humiliation.
?Last and very much least please
welcome on board Mike and Brenda
who paid a tightwad 40 quid each.
Treating the missus on the cheap,
Mike? Ah well, it?s the thought that
counts. Sort of. Your cramped seats are
back here by the bogs. Bit whiffy, but
you get what you pay for, eh, Brenda??
So, yes, very undignifed. Yet a voice
in my head whispers: ?But is it, though
? is it really?? Because if I paid �0
for a flight and the person in front of
me paid �0, I see that as a win for
me. Not a ?walk of shame? but a ?walk
of pride?. Where?s the kudos in paying
over the odds? Surely it?s the other
way round. Normal economy
passengers (group 4) will look on
bitterly when it emerges that for �0
more they boarded precisely 90
seconds earlier and, far from looking
down on you, will be quizzing you on
your booking techniques.
The thing about planes is that,
unlike trains, everybody gets a seat, so
Have you
got bright
armpits?
It?s late November,
so by now, of course,
your body will be
?red-carpet ready?
for the party season.
Mine certainly is,
who cares if you have to board last
with your carry-on luggage? It?s not
your problem if the overhead lockers
are full. The crew have to find
somewhere to stow it or no one takes
off. And if the plane goes down
everybody dies together regardless of
whether they have fresh linen napkins
in front of them or a plastic tray-table
crusted with nose-pickings from 2015,
which I usually do.
And if I must be honest, the selfinterested voice in my head says
something else too. It says: ?Hmm,
remember those times when you?ve
had to get a train at short notice,
forked out �0 and STILL HAD TO
STAND FOR TWO HOURS?
Remember when you were squatting
at eye level with two swaying groins as
a woman, relaxing in a seat with a
table and plug socket, remarked that
she had paid only � and got a
reserved seat too by booking early?
And you wanted to smash your head
into the faecal carpet??
It?s selfish but I would very much
have welcomed a ?pay least, board
last system? that day. And indeed on
many occasions when I board a train
and ride 100 miles next to a stinking
toilet. With trains it?s often a ?pay
least, get treated much better? system
if you ask me.
So if anything I think BA?s policy will
actually start ?So how much did you
pay then?? passenger conversations,
which may backfire. On every package
holiday I?ve been on the most
annoying person is the bore who
boasts that he paid �0 last-minute
all-in as others glower enviously and
vow to copy him next time. There?s no
shame in a bargain ? on the contrary,
it?s a badge of honour.
How horrified were
you, on a scale of one to
ten, that in the BBC
adaptation of Howards
End Aunt Juley, played
by Tracey Ullman,
spooned jam on to her
toast, which was ?not
done? in 1910?
I?ve watched it eight
times now and still
couldn?t care less. But
some viewers were
apparently dismayed by
this tiny oversight along
with other details, such
as in some scenes the
men wore hats indoors
(again, not ?done?).
Anachronisms and
slip-ups can spoil a
period drama, but, FFS,
it?s not as if Aunt Juley
were slurping on a
Starbucks? Frappuccino
while a van man
listening to Magic FM
drove past the window,
is it? Do people really
let minute details like
cutlery ruin the whole
thing? This is makebelieve in costumes and
wigs, folks ? that
rectangle in your living
room isn?t an actual
time machine. I blame
the Tripadvisor era in
which people are
beadily poised to find
fault at every turn
As for using a spoon
? what?s wrong with
that by the way? It?s
better than putting a
disgusting buttersmeared knife into the
jam, making the next
user ? or is this just
me? ? have to retch
and chuck it in the bin.
spade-work there? Are
you some kind of
savage? If you have any
self-respect you will
get your armpits
?brightened? because,
as we know, this area
can darken over the
years, look ?ugly? and
let the side down.
Luckily you can buy
armpit whitening
creams, some of which
contain harsh
chemicals, but so what?
It?s not as if there?s
anything important
near your armpits or
anything. I like to think
of it as the upper-body
version of anal
bleaching (you?ve got
that one in the bag,
right?) and we?re lucky
someone?s thought of
yet another body part
to improve. What a
time to be alive.
?party-ready? being my
permanent watchword.
So you?ll have had a
back steam, a butt
facial, a face facial, an
eyelash tint and fillers
for the back of your
hands because, let?s not
forget, ladies, those
bastards don?t half
?betray your age?.
But wait: what about
your armpits? Don?t tell
me you?ve done no
Dianne Lake was 14 when the cult
leader and mass murderer Charles
Manson inducted her into his
?family? of followers. The child of
roaming hippies, Shirley and Clarence,
she spent much of her early teens
at the Hog Farm, a Californian
commune in the San Fernando Valley,
Los Angeles. In 1967, while she was
at the Hog Farm, she met a man
named Richard and his girlfriend
Allegra, who would introduce her
to Manson. Lake would later testify
against Manson in court.
?H
ey, Chicken Little,
we want you to
meet someone
groovy.?
I?d been with
Richard and his
girlfriend Allegra
for a couple of
weeks, when they invited me out
with them to a party. It was going to
be a nice change for me, as Richard
and Allegra were speed freaks and
many of their speed-freak friends
used their house as a crash pad. At
least pot smokers liked to eat. The
speed freaks seemed to live on air
and whatever they popped into their
veins. I was dying
for a hamburger and
a soda.
?That sounds far
out,? I said. Anything
that was a change of
pace was going to be
fine with me.
?We are going to a
party in Topanga at
this place called the
Spiral Staircase House.?
And with that, we
were off.
When we arrived, we climbed the
stairs that led into the living room, and
a red-haired girl got up to greet us.
She stared at me for a minute and ran
back to her friends yelling, ?Dianne is
here! Dianne is here!?
I was incredibly confused. As far as I
knew we weren?t planning to go to the
party until the last minute, so I couldn?t
imagine they were expecting me.
The girl returned with three other
girls, who all took turns hugging me.
The red-haired girl, who called herself
Lynette, said, ?You are even prettier
than your picture. Charlie is going to
be so happy to meet you.?
She took my hand and led me to
where a bunch of people were sitting
in a circle, and in the middle of the
floor sat a small man playing the
guitar. There were girls surrounding
him, singing along to his soulful music
of songs I?d never heard before. The
girls sat me down and Lynette kept her
arms around my shoulder. As soon as
the music stopped, she jumped up and
pulled me by the hand.
?Charlie, we found Dianne. She?s
here!? They weren?t just excited, they
were overjoyed. It had been ages since
I felt truly wanted, and all the
attention made me feel like royalty.
They were beaming with love and I
felt it. Without hesitation, they sat me
in their circle as if I belonged, and
strange as it may seem, I felt like I
belonged there too. Lynette must have
sensed my confusion, because she
began to explain how they recognised
me. While I?d been off in the Haight,
they?d met my mother at the Hog
Farm. Apparently, my mother had
given them my photo and told them to
keep an eye out for me if they made it
to San Francisco.
What I didn?t understand then and
only learnt much later was that my
parents and siblings had done more
than just run into the Family at the
Hog Farm and given them my photo.
They?d actually taken a trip into the
desert with them, travelling in the black
school bus that Charlie drove around in
and outfitted for his followers.
Many people were painting buses,
bread trucks and VW vans with
psychedelic Day-Glo colours. Charlie
and the girls chose to make a different
statement with their monochrome
home on wheels, tricking out a surplus
school bus by painting it all black,
including
the windows,
in
which
made him easy
w
to
t spot. To the residents
of
o Tujunga and the
Hog
H Farm, Charlie
was
w known as Black
Bus
B Charlie.
As it turned out, all
my
m family had a story
about
an encounter with
a
Charlie
before I?d even
C
met
m him. Back then, the
alternative
community
a
in Southern
California was still
South
relatively small, but it fascinates me
how Charlie and the girls had been
circling my orbit long before our paths
intersected. Riding on the bus with the
crew, my mother had thought Charlie
was interesting and that his girls were
nice ? she?d even dropped acid with
him. A couple of Charlie?s girls even
introduced my then 11-year-old
brother, Danny, to French kissing.
Lynette was adamant that I?d finally
found my way home ? to them ?
and quickly I came to agree.
?We went to San Francisco looking
for you,? she said. I couldn?t believe
that they went to all that trouble
for me. It never occurred to me to
consider how strange a statement
that was. To me it was magical and
We had only
smoked pot, but
I felt as if I were
on a trip, his trip
the times | Wednesday November 22 2017
3
1G T
times2
Charles Manson?s family
The lowdown
Cornish Kern
GETTY IMAGES; ASSOCIATED PRESS
beautiful. It was the answer to what
my heart had been missing.
Charlie stood up and looked into
my eyes so deeply that I almost turned
away. Instead I held his gaze and felt
like he was looking into me.
?So, this is our Dianne,? he said
and pulled me to his chest in a hug
so close I could feel his heartbeat.
He held on for several seconds and
I felt my resistance fade. I was used
to the hippie hugs at the Hog Farm,
but this felt warm and real. Tears
welled up into my eyes as I took in
his embrace. Charlie held me at
arm?s length, looked at me and said,
Above: Charles Manson
and, top, Susan Atkins,
who was convicted for
her part in the Manson
?family? killings.
Far left: Dianne Lake
in 1970 and, above
right, now aged 64
?Oh, you?re beautiful. I want
to talk to you. I?ve been
looking for you.?
I sat next to him and
listened as he sang and
told funny stories. My first
impression was that he was
charming, witty and most of
all intriguing.
?Have some root beer, little
darling. I give you the last sip in
honour of your arrival.?
Lynette and a girl named Patty
stroked my hair and passed me a joint
while Charlie strummed on the guitar.
At first I thought Patty was homely.
She had a prominent bulbous nose
and thin lips. But when she smiled, her
face became beautiful to me. She
exuded a motherly warmth and was
obviously smitten with Charlie. His
presence was disarming. He continued
to sing and seemed to make up the
words as he went along. ?Dianne is
home,? he sang out and the girls
joined in with the chorus: ?Home is
where you are happy.?
Everything felt like a dream.
I had been around groups of people
grooving on music, but they were
often into their own trip. These girls
seemed to love one another. They
were affectionate like best friends or
sisters. They weren?t trying to outdo
each other in their outrageousness, as
was true of those at the Hog Farm,
where everything seemed like one big
joke. There was something different
about this group of girls and about
Charlie, and while I wasn?t sure what it
was, I immediately knew I wanted to
be a part of it. Like a raindrop joining
a puddle, I blended in easily, my
loneliness disappearing. For the first
time in my life I felt like I was in the
right place at the right time.
There was a lot of unspoken
communication between Charlie and
the girls. His expression changed
slightly, and as if the scene had been
rehearsed, Patty took his guitar from
him. He stood, took my hand and
led me outside to the bus. It reminded
me of a raja?s palace, with mattresses
on the floor and Indian-print
bedspreads and carpets hanging from
the walls. Pillows were strewn about
and colourful swirls were painted
on any surface not covered with
fabric. This explosion of colour was
the last thing I?d expected from the
black exterior.
We sat facing each other and the
anticipation swelled up inside me. I
expected a kiss, but instead Charlie
had me put my hands up against his.
He moved his hands in different
directions until I caught on that I was
to follow his every move. It was a
game and I was more than eager to
play. It was like he was syncing up our
energy. He sped up until I could no
longer follow and he started to laugh.
Then he guided me on to the mattress
and again looked into my eyes so that
I felt there was no one else but the two
of us in the entire world.
?You are so beautiful, my little one.?
His voice was barely above a whisper,
but I heard it reverberate through my
consciousness. We?d only smoked pot,
but I felt as if I were on a trip, his trip,
and he was guiding my every move.
There was something magnetic about
him, even though I wasn?t sure
I even found him attractive.
He wasn?t as handsome as
some of the men I had
pursued. The attraction
was more chemical and
inevitable without any
thought about whether
I would or wouldn?t.
I watched as Charlie put on
his jeans. He was clearly a man, but
also seemed like a boy. He was playful,
and that made me feel even more
comfortable with him. Sometimes
after I would sleep with a man I would
be left feeling empty. My experience
with Charlie was the beginning of
something. I felt appreciated by him,
not just like some pretty young thing.
Charlie was offering me more than
sex. He told me I should forget my
parents and give up my inhibitions.
He made it clear he wanted me to be
a part of the group; his group. It felt as
if there was no turning back. With
other older men, I?d been playing the
role of a woman ? Charlie made me
feel like I?d actually become one. He
said everything I needed to hear.
That night I went home with
Richard and Allegra, but I knew I
would return. The decision seemed so
natural; a date with destiny.
Extracted from Member of the
Family: Manson, Murder and Me by
Dianne Lake and Deborah Herman,
published by Harper Element, �.99
Oh dear . . . the French are up
in arms!
Quelle surprise. What is it today?
A strike?
No, cheese.
And what?s caused the stink?
The Cornish Kern. It?s an Alpinestyle cheese from, well, Cornwall.
Ah, so it?s the lack of mountains?
The French are very protective of
their enormous peaks.
No it?s worse than that. The Kern
has just been crowned overall
champion at this year?s World
Cheese Awards.
Pardon? The what?
They?re the Oscars of the cheese
world and the judges ? the cheese
board as it were ? described it as
?visually stunning, with its standout
dark rind? and said that the
?quality of milk is really evident in
this cheese?.
So it?s yummy and a looker?
Apparently so. The big cheeses said
they would be ?glad to have it on
any table?.
Yikes! I can only imagine that grated
on the French.
Sure has. Their old fromage only
just managed to nose into the Top
Ten for the second year running.
Their producers clearly aren?t
ageing well.
Nor is their wine. It?s the second
time they?ve been shown up by little
England in so many years. Last year
an elite group of Parisian booze
experts said that English sparkling
wine was better than champagne.
Awks . . . benefit of the doubt, maybe
they were still drunk from the night
before?
Not at all. It was a blind taste test
and to make the insult even worse
many of the judges were convinced
that some of the English fizz was
from France.
Get us. Maybe we?ll be OK on our
own after Brexit after all.
Doubt it. But frankly I don?t give
an Edam.
Ben Clatworthy
4
1G T
Wednesday November 22 2017 | the times
fashion
This coat was made
for walking
O
Tired of looking like a hill walker
when it rains? A Scandinavian has
set out to make us look cool in
bad weather, says Anna Murphy
bviously I am
desperately unique,
which is why I long
assumed I was the
only person
pondering the
question: why is the
clothing we actually
need, as opposed to merely want, often
so very undesirable?
It?s not hard to render yourself
properly warm and watertight if you
are going to be yomping across a moor
(bliss) and are likely to encounter only
another walker or two (double bliss).
As the hill walker Alfred Wainwright,
the author of A Coast to Coast Walk:
St Bees Head to Robin Hood?s Bay ? an
epic perambulation that is definitely
on my to-do list ? said, ?There?s no
such thing as bad weather, only
unsuitable clothing.?
But what about if, as I have, you
have pledged to take a daily
constitutional round your local park,
come rain or shine, and know that
there is a good chance you might meet
someone you know, someone you
would rather didn?t condemn you for
clothes so despairingly functional as to
make you look as if you were, well,
walking from St Bees Head to Robin
Hood?s Bay?
Turns out a similar question was
preying on the mind of Alexander
Stutterheim in 2010. Not the St Bees
Head bit, but the ?why does rainwear
usually look so rubbish?? bit.
Stutterheim, a Swedish copywriter for
Saab, arrived early for a meeting at a
caf�. It was raining, and he looked
through the window at the people
passing outside. ?Nobody even came
close to being well dressed, not one
single person,? he recalls. ?Suddenly I
realised there was actually nothing
nice to wear in bad weather.?
A few weeks later Stutterheim was
clearing out his late grandfather?s home
in the Stockholm archipelago when he
came across the nonagenarian?s
raincoat. ?It was a classic fisherman?s
raincoat, in heavy oilcloth. It was too
tent-like, but it looked cool.? He
modernised the cut in rubberised
cotton and the result is what I deem
to be the most acceptable face of
rainwear today, the Mosebacke, which
is handmade and comes in ten colours,
including this chic burgundy, below left
(�0, stutterheim.com). There is also
a straight-cut men?s version, the
Stockholm, for the same price.
Every detail has been tweaked to
deliver peak practicality. Even the
seams are double-welded. As the
website declares: ?Our raincoats have
undergone severe testing in horrible
conditions both at sea and in the city.?
You?ve got to love the Swedes. I can?t
imagine a more functional item than a
Stutterheim, yet it is also indubitably
cool. Yes, to my mind it definitely
merits proper-noun status.
Statement earphones
It?s all about the detail this season.
Little tweaks that add a new feel to an
old outfit, that customise a look and
make it personal. A pair of statement
earrings here. Some look-at-me socks
(a fast-growing category in designer
land) there. It?s easy, it?s comparatively
cheap and it?s a way to brighten up
your day, even if the bigger picture
clothes-wise has to be more serious.
Sweating the detail can be fun.
There are all sorts of new details
to get excited about at the recently
launched website Soda Shop. It offers
assorted quirky bits and pieces that
would provide rich pickings for the
kind of Father Christmas who prefers
not to be predictable.
I like these customised Apple
earphones, above, which have been
reinvented courtesy of intricate
thread weaving in 13 colour options
(�, soda.shop).
Face book
If you even start to
think about it just
the teensiest bit, it is
kind of ridiculous that
most of us believe the
way to better skin is
simply to slap more
product on it. In fact,
putting matters of
beauty to one side,
we are all adept at
drawing conclusions
from our face, or
someone else?s, as to
what lies beneath.
We know what a face
looks like when it?s
tired or ill. We just
aren?t good at what
else it might be telling
us, at making sense of
the detail.
In her informationpacked new book,
Perfect Skin: Unlocking
the Secrets (�.99,
Vermilion), the
celebrity facialist
Alexandra Soveral
reveals the face to
be, well, just another
kind of book. And she
gives us the means to
read it then deal with
whatever problems
it is manifesting.
From acne to rosacea,
by way of eyebags
and witchy chin hairs
(sigh), Soveral explains
what it is trying to tell
us ? from diet, to
hormonal issues, to
stress ? and shares
her secrets for nuking
your issues naturally.
I am a big fan of
her products
(available from
alexandrasoveral.co.uk),
but here she offers
low-cost homemade
alternatives, such as
a blemish-buster that
uses lavender and tea
tree oils, a toner made
from rose-water and
cider vinegar, and an
exfoliating method that
requires only honey
and, er, a toothbrush.
I have tried them all.
They are all great.
Here?s how to make
your skin look much
better for much less.
�.99 well spent.
Instagram:
@annagmurphy
Skirt, �0,
reiss.com
Jacket, �9,
baukjen.com
How to wear
Leather has moved
on from plain
black. This season
it?s a case of go
bright or go home,
says Hattie Crisell
I
wouldn?t blame you if, when you
hear the words ?leather clothing?,
your brain jumps straight to
Cher: the studding years. Perhaps
even more unsettlingly, it may
jump to the 1998 image I?ve just
stumbled across of Carol
Vorderman as Cher on Stars in
their Eyes, clad in lace tights, thigh
boots and a leather basque. Once seen,
it cannot be unseen, and therein lies
the problem. While most of us are
unfazed by leather in footwear and
accessories, a certain trashtastic
Eighties vibe has persisted around the
same fabric in clothing ? which is
why it?s so pleasing to see this year?s
leather striking out in an entirely
different direction.
The leather ? and faux leather ?
trend emerging more recently isn?t
about black; it embraces a spectrum
of crayon-box colours, and it?s quite
the palate-refresher. Consider the
Russian entrepreneur Miroslava
Duma in brick-red leather at Milan
Fashion Week, the fashion blogger
Helena Bordon?s pale-blue Philosophy
coat with a dalmatian-print collar
or the stylist Chriselle Lim peacocking
in Paris in a bright pink Valentino
coat. The American actress Kate
Walsh was out last week in a purple
leather midiskirt; the British actress
Gemma Arterton chose a Ralph &
Russo gold leather dress for a recent
awards ceremony; and even Kate
Garraway has worn a red PVC pencil
skirt for Good Morning Britain. If
Garraway can make this look
reasonable at 6am we can all find a
way to make it work for us.
The rules are as follows. First of
all, one leather piece per outfit is
enough, and it?s to be mixed with
other textures: head-to-toe leather
brings to mind fetishwear and is
distracting, not chic. If you?re
dressed like luxury car upholstery
from the waist down try something
matt like cashmere or crisp
cotton on the top half; if you?re
the times | Wednesday November 22 2017
5
1G T
fashion
GETTY IMAGES
Fashion
entrepreneur
Miroslava
Duma in coat
by Bally
Jacket, �9,
massimodutti.
com
Stylist
Chriselle Lim
in coat by
Valentino
leather ? the new colour rules
wearing a leather jacket you can?t find
a better companion than denim.
For something appropriate for
work, a leather skirt is by far the
smartest purchase ? a pencil skirt
such as Reiss?s ox-blood Tris (�0,
reiss.com) if your colleagues can cope
with the sex appeal, or Finery?s
refined, cobalt-blue A-line version
(�9, finerylondon.com) if not.
Leather trousers are best kept away
from the corporate world, but in any
case they don?t need to be skintight
and vampy any more; a navy pair in
the Whistles sale is straight-legged,
cropped and high-waisted (�5
reduced to �0, whistles.com).
Suede gives a different effect: softer
to the touch and the eye, it?s an
upmarket way in if you?re not sold
on dressing in leather. It?s also highly
vulnerable to stains and damage, so
buy something such as Liquiproof
fabric protector (�, liquiproof.co.uk),
which repels oil and water, and spray
liberally before you wear (the same
brand also does a protector for
conventional leathers, also �).
Jason Markk has a suede-cleaning
kit that could be your saviour if rain,
wine or children manage to
circumvent the aforementioned
protector (�95, urbanindustry.co.uk).
On that note, always obey the washing
instructions with these fabrics ? how
they should be cleaned varies from
leather to leather.
Into this trend come faux leather
and faux suede too, and here we could
easily enter a moral maze. While faux
leather may be more appealing to
vegetarians, it?s usually made with
plastics such as PVC or polyurethane,
which to varying degrees have a
damaging impact on the environment.
Real leather, of course, is associated
One piece per
outfit is enough,
and mix it with
other textures
with methane production and
deforestation ? but it?s generally a
by-product, or at least a co-product, of
meat and dairy farming, so its specific
impact is difficult to estimate. There
are innovators developing better
substitutes ? mostly using vegetable
matter, though Stella McCartney?s
?alter nappa? is made from recycled
bottles and vegetable oil ? but not a
huge number of retailers offering
those to the public yet. In general,
leather substitutes tend to be more
affordable than the real thing ? and
the real thing, in my opinion, tends to
feel nicer.
Now to the shopping. I suggest that
if you?re going to buy something in
leather ? which is rightfully
expensive ? you make it a good piece
of outerwear that you?ll wear often
and for a long time to come. With that
in mind, Gestuz?s Odelia suede jacket
is cherry red, smart enough for a
formal event and reduced from �9
to �5 (asos.com).
The brightest may be Paul Smith?s
turquoise biker jacket (�0,
paulsmith.com), while Marks
& Spencer has a primrose yellow
bomber jacket that would look
particularly good on darker skin
tones (�9, marksandspencer.com).
Zara?s bottle-green leather coat is
sophisticated and tough (�9), and its
faux-suede trench in red has the
advantage of being machine-washable
(�.99, both zara.com). Uterq黣 has a
pink suede zip-up jacket with a black
and white design across the shoulders
(�0) ? I?m calling this a cocktail
jacket because it has a definite party
Skirt, �5,
stories.com
feel ? or try the label?s maroon lamb?s
leather aviator jacket, which looks
incredibly warm (�0, both
uterque.com).
If you?re bold enough to shop
beyond the outerwear department,
Paul Smith?s dusty-pink nappa dress
is beautiful (�5, paulsmith.com);
A.W.A.K.E?s saffron-yellow
faux-leather trousers would look
great with navy or black (�0,
net-a-porter.com), as would Topshop
Boutique?s asymmetrical silver leather
skirt (�0, topshop.com). And just for
fun, let?s take a quick trip to fantasybudget land, which has rich pickings
when it comes to leather. I won?t
pretend that �550 is a sum I would
spend on a piece of clothing, but if you
feel inclined, then the best might be
The Row?s simple crimson suede coat
(net-a-porter.com). Proenza Schouler?s
high-necked pink leather dress is a
dream (�920, net-a-porter.com),
while Whistles? leopard-print shearling
biker caused me several minutes of
financial angst (�5, in store only).
None of the options I?ve outlined
here should leave you looking
remotely like a 1980s rock goddess ?
but if that is in fact the look that
you?re striving for, lace tights and a
perm still go a long way.
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the times | Wednesday November 22 2017
7
1G T
fashion
The rise of the anti It bag
Right: dark red
small cocktail
stirrer bag, �5.
Below, bottom left:
Milner nano
crossbody, �0,
sophiehulme.com
No extra zips, no
frills and prices
below �0 are the
secrets of Sophie
Hulme?s success,
says Hattie Crisell
E
Socialite
Elena
Perminova
Model Hailey
Baldwin
Elle
accessories
editor Donna
Wallace
GETTY IMAGES
ver heard of the
affordable designer
handbag? It?s not quite
an oxymoron. These
days there exists a
category of bag that?s
made with high-quality
craftsmanship, but at a
cost that doesn?t mean sacrificing a
holiday abroad ? �0 to �0-ish.
Of course, affordable is a relative term,
and what it?s relative to is the cultural
monster once known as the It bag: the
defunct Mulberry Alexa (from �0),
the Fendi Baguette (from �150) or, at
the top end, the Herm鑣 Birkin
(starting at �820).
In 2011 ? at the tail end of a period
of madness when the It bag was
marketed as a must-have ? a young
womenswear designer called Sophie
Hulme launched her handbag range.
You might call her products anti-It
bags: they were devoid of celebrity
associations or seasonal frills and she
intended them to be used for years. It
was a formula so successful that the
next year she won a British Fashion
Award for Emerging Talent in
Accessories. She soon dropped her
clothing line to focus on bags, and
today her label ? with a small
staff of about 25 ? is spoken of
in the same breath as similarly
priced mega-brands such as
Michael Michael Kors. On
Monday Hulme opened her first
bricks-and-mortar store, a pop-up in
the Burlington Arcade in Mayfair,
London; she has a flagship branch
opening in Chiltern Street,
Marylebone, early next year and
international stores are coming soon.
When I meet Hulme at her
headquarters in Islington, north
London ? an open-plan building that
was once a toy factory and later a
party house that Hulme shared with
six flatmates ? I find her heavily
pregnant, energetic and cheerful. I?m
used to seeing art books in designers?
studios, but I am not expecting the
chunky volume that lies on the desk in
front of her, which is catchily entitled
One-Man Pneumatic Life Raft Survival
Kits of World War II.
?It?s one of my favourite books,? she
declares, laughing. A lot of Hulme?s
research focuses on military design,
from which her brand borrows a
utilitarian approach. She shows me
a bag from her spring 2018
collection as an example. It has
sliding brass bolts that allow the
owner to adjust and detach the
shoulder strap. ?This is based on a
piece of hardware that I found on
an old military rucksack. It was
quite different ? it looked a bit
uglier,? she says. Her version is clean
and stylish. ?Because it is so much
Sophie
Hulme
about function and it works really well,
for me that is incredibly beautiful.?
Hulme started her brand in 2007,
straight out of college. For a long time
she was both chief executive and
creative director ? she has a curious
intellect and a skill for multitasking ?
though she has recently hired
someone to do the first role so that she
can focus on the latter. ?It was a
wrench no longer being CEO because
I find it so exciting, but I wouldn?t
have been able to work on the
collection, then launch retail and do
the international expansion that we
are planning. It?s that classic thing of
?do less and do it well?.?
There are a couple of obvious
factors in Hulme?s success: the first is
the emphasis she puts on function
over fashion. The brand?s first hit was
the Albion, a simple, boxy leather tote
We use far higher
quality leather
than others in
our price bracket
with handles attached to gold-plated
brass panels that look good, but also
make the bag sturdy and durable. It?s
still popular. Unlike many designer
bags, it?s not festooned with elaborate
zips, straps and flaps. ?The bag serves
the person rather than vice versa,?
Hulme says. ?I can?t find beauty in
unnecessary things for things? sake.?
Her pricing ? within the reach of
many professional women ? has also
worked in her favour. Hulme?s least
expensive model is the Milner Nano
Crossbody, �0, a neat mini bag that
can be worn on its strap or converted
into a clutch. You?ll be lucky to
squeeze more than your phone, card
and keys into that one, but several of
the brand?s larger shoulder bags and
totes come in at less than �0.
?The prices are a really important
pillar of what the brand stands for,?
Hulme says. She bases them on ?what
you get for your money?, she says.
?Actually it means that we use far
higher-quality leathers than other
people in our price bracket. People
frankly had never heard of me ? I?m
sure many of them still haven?t ? but
they?ve still been moved to buy, and I
think that is purely because of the
quality for the price point.?
Not all her bags are what I would
call affordable, however. At the top
end are python-skin pieces
approaching the �000 mark. I ask
whether the brand is drifting into
more expensive territory. ?Interesting,?
she says, before answering carefully.
?We introduced some groups that
were a bit higher so that we were able
to use the best possible leather, but
that is certainly not a direction that
we want to go in. One of our
bestsellers for the last couple of
seasons was the Cocktail Stirrer Bag
[�5 to �5], so we?re certainly not
moving up as a trend.?
Next year she will introduce
products that use scrap leather to
reduce waste. A new line of
patchworked handbags will be made
with inlaid pieces, with colours varying
from bag to bag depending on which
leftovers are available. At the
Burlington Arcade pop-up, customers
can have initials added to bags, again
laser-cut from scraps. Hulme wants to
keep moving in a more sustainable
direction. ?I think that up until fairly
recently people have underestimated
the consumer ? people do care about
[the environment] and they do want
things to be done properly.?
The first moment that she felt her
success was when she saw a woman
with a Sophie Hulme bag on the bus
? though she says she resisted the
urge to introduce herself. ?I did do it
another time actually, when I was at a
friend?s hen do,? she recalls. ?There
was a girl in the loo who had one of
my bags, and because I was quite
drunk I told her. I hadn?t processed
that I was at an Eighties do, so I had
crimped hair, a ridiculous fluorescent
tutu and leg warmers. This woman
looked at me, like, ?This is not what I
thought I?d bought into.? ? She roars
with laughter. Like her bags, she
remains refreshingly fuss-free.
Instagram: @hattiecrisell
8
1G T
Wednesday November 22 2017 | the times
arts
The rock star who?s making
Christmas music cool again
Tom Chaplin, of Keane, tells Will Hodgkinson about his post-rehab comeback and
why trying to get a foot in the Christmas market is ?like breaking into Fort Knox?
T
he halls are decked
with boughs of holly,
the mince pies are
fresh out of the oven
and the mulled wine
is flowing. Which is
frankly peculiar
because it is a
blisteringly hot day in September and
the trees in nearby Hyde Park haven?t
even thought about shedding their
leaves yet. We are gathered in a smart
Victorian hall opposite Buckingham
Palace to witness Tom Chaplin, the
former singer of Keane, a band that
sold more than ten million albums,
perform songs from his Christmas
album, Twelve Tales of Christmas.
?It?s like breaking into Fort Knox, the
Christmas market,? laments Chaplin,
38, who has changed since his days in
Keane. Gone are the baby-smooth
pink cheeks and lank mop of hair, to
be replaced by manly stubble and a
quiff. He is also, at 6ft 2in, taller than
you might imagine. ?It would be lovely
if one of my songs could get to that
place. And not just for the pension.?
A month after the performance, on
a much colder October afternoon,
we?re in the kitchen of the small, neat
flat in south London that Chaplin
shares with his wife, Natalie, and
their three-year-old daughter, Freya.
Chaplin is elaborating on why he
made the record: Christmas albums
are, by their very nature, naff and he
wanted to make one that wasn?t.
Starting it with Walking in the Air
might not be the best way to achieve
that goal (although Chaplin has a
radical new take on that song), but
Twelve Tales of Christmas does have
a certain frosty, twinkling charm.
Covers of the Pretenders? 2000 Miles
and Joni Mitchell?s River are tender;
piano-led originals such as Midnight
Mass, a reflection on the spiritual pull
that even the irreligious feel, bring a
mood of communion. Chaplin is a
former choirboy with a Catholic
mother and an Anglican father. In
2013 Keane?s Somewhere Only We
Know became the theme to that sacred
event: the John Lewis Christmas
advertisement. I wonder if he made
the album out of a desire to capture
the real meaning of Christmas, or
whether he just needed to capitalise
on the success of his 2016 solo debut,
The Wave, by bashing out a festive
knees-up. The answer? A bit of both.
?I was brought up a Roman Catholic.
Mum made damn sure we went to
church each Sunday, and she presented
Jesus dying on the cross and being
resurrected as fact,? Chaplin says.
?Something about all of that jarred.?
He did spend his early years believing
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that a large, jolly man would land on
the roof of the family house in Battle
in Sussex and squeeze himself down
the chimney, but a terrible loss of faith
came when he was seven. ?I rumbled
Santa Claus,? he says, with a touch of
sadness. ?There was always a satsuma
in the bottom of our stockings, and on
Christmas Eve I counted the number
of satsumas in the fruit bowl. When
I went to count them the following
morning, five had gone. The parents
had no comeback for that one. It was
quite scientific of me, really.?
Then, from the way his mouth is
twitching, I can tell he is about to tell
me something he knows he shouldn?t.
?I was a boarder at an Anglican
school, and the Catholics had to go
to church when everyone else was at
chapel,? he says. ?But it wasn?t very
well policed, so I would go down to the
local market instead. A guy ran a stall
selling old porn mags, which were of
high value at a boys? boarding school
in the Nineties, so I bought four for a
quid and flogged them in the dorms.
Maybe I was unconsciously saying
I didn?t believe in Catholicism.?
Having recovered from the shame
of his days as a teenage porn baron,
Chaplin recalls more innocent
moments of Christmases past. He
remembers his parents standing
outside the house and ringing sleigh
bells on Christmas Eve to convince
him and his brother and sister that
Tom Chaplin and, left,
performing with Keane
the times | Wednesday November 22 2017
9
1G T
JOSH SHINNER
Christmas
is one of
those rare
times
when we
try and be
less selfish
Santa was indeed on his way. His
mother did stockings for her kids right
up until they came back from university.
?They were quite practical,? he says.
?You would get a toothbrush.?
This year, the extended clan will be
at their parents? house in Kent. Tom
and Natalie will give stockings to
each other before he sneaks down
early on Christmas morning and takes
a bite out of the mince pie left out for
Santa, to protect Freya and the other
grandchildren from having the same
terrible realisation that he did.
Twelve Tales of
Christmas is
out now on Island
arts
There will be a hearty walk in the
afternoon followed by golf on Boxing
Day. He doesn?t say whether Twelve
Tales of Christmas will be on the stereo
as the family pull the crackers, but he
does say that the album addresses the
kind of issues that Christmas throws
up. We Remember You This Christmas
is about honouring the dead while
appreciating the living. Another Lonely
Christmas is about the sadness many
of us feel at a time when the pressure
is on to be happy. The poignant For
the Lost is about trying to face the
future with optimism, not easy after
a bad year for the world.
?I wrote that during the crazy time
of the London Bridge stabbings, the
Manchester bombing and the Grenfell
Tower fire,? he says. ?For someone
who wants to go around randomly
stabbing members of the public or
blowing themselves up I would say,
?Why don?t you stop for a moment and
try doing something positive instead??
It may be a naive hope but as my
therapist says, nobody is born evil. You
can get sucked into a vortex of bad
news, but Christmas is one of those
rare times when we try and be less
selfish. Or at least do the washing-up.?
Chaplin has had to consider his own
response to fame. Given Keane?s image
as a bunch of Waitrose-frequenting
wusses it came as a shock when their
singer checked into rehab in 2006,
relapsing, on and off, until 2015. Serge
Pizzorno of Kasabian claimed that
Chaplin was the first star to go to
rehab for port addiction, but it turned
out to be more serious than that.
?It began in 2005, when everything
went mad with Hopes and Fears,?
says Chaplin, referring to Keane?s
six million-selling debut. ?Then in
2006 I had been on a bender in Tokyo.
I had a show to do that evening and
was so wasted that I went to the
airport and got on a flight and came
home without telling anyone instead.
?I stopped doing cocaine after that,
which was always my white hole of
madness, but still drank and took
other drugs. Then that got boring
so I started doing coke again in 2011,
leading to another bout of rehab just
before the last Keane album. And after
that it was just a problem. I will have
been three years clean in January.?
Chaplin has been in therapy to
understand why he fell into drugs in
the first place. He says that as a
typical middle-class boy he was
taught to bottle up his emotions,
while adolescent self-consciousness
about his appearance didn?t help.
?Hopes And Fears happened and
I thought being the frontman of
the band, feeling loved and special,
would be the answer to all my
problems, but of course I felt even
more self-conscious than ever. My
weight ballooned, I hid behind my
hair, and I see pictures of myself
from that time and feel sad for that
person. You can?t enjoy any of that
stuff unless you feel happy with who
you are. You just make it worse.?
What saved him? ?It was being
forced into therapy,? he says. ?The
cockiness of the frontman is matched
by the total crippling frailty and
insecurity going on underneath.
Otherwise, why would you need
to do it? Now I?m in a weird place
because I feel more real. I don?t have
to present a front.? As for Keane, a
question mark hangs over going back
there. They are yet to officially split.
They have also not recorded a new
album since Strangeland in 2011.
?I don?t know,? Chaplin sighs. ?At
the heart of Keane is the relationship
between me and Tim [Rice-Oxley,
keyboardist and main songwriter]. We
have love for each other, but massive
envy and resentment too, and part
of what drives me to go on a solo
adventure is to say, ?F*** you, I can
do this myself.? It?s pathetic. I could
probably collaborate with Tim and
do something much better, but we?ve
never been very good at saying how
we feel about each other. So many
areas of my life are now organised
and happy and this is still a problem.
If it is going to happen again it will
require a bit of honesty and hard
work from both sides.?
Before we finish, Chaplin makes
a last stab at convincing me that
Walking in the Air is an excellent way
to launch his Christmas album and not
naff at all. ?It?s a poetic love song,? he
says of the ballad written by Howard
Blake and sung by the choirboy Peter
Auty for the 1982 animated version
of Raymond Briggs?s The Snowman.
?Take away the snowman and it?s a
song about shagging.?
I?ll never be able to watch The
Snowman in the same light again.
Winter weekend breaks
Fancy a bracing walk, dinner by an open fire or a cosy
hotel getaway? Don?t miss The Times? guide to the best
winter weekend breaks in Britain.
Pick up your copy of The Times this Saturday.
10
1G T
Wednesday November 22 2017 | the times
television & radio
Rustic Rick, a chef with no artificial ingredients
BBC/DENHAM PRODUCTIONS LTD/AREZOO FARAHZAD
Chris
Bennion
TV review
Road to Mexico
BBC Two
{{{{(
The Truth About
Muslim Marriage
Channel 4
{{{((
R
ick Stein has some hard
words for any lily-livered
Brits who holiday abroad
and ?behave much as they
do at home?. He?s got their
number: ?Cup of tea at 11, then a stroll,
before lunch at their favourite caf�,
where they secretly hope there?ll be
lamb chops on the menu. Maybe with
mint sauce.? At the halfway stage,
Rick Stein?s Road to Mexico has
finally reached Mexico, where lamb
chops are not on the menu and
Radio Choice
Joe Clay
Science Stories
Radio 4, 9pm
You must surely have heard
some variation on the ?river
crossing? puzzle, involving
deducing how a man can
carry a wolf, a goat and
some cabbages across a
river in the shortest number
of journeys. It was one of
the problems featured in
Propositiones ad Acuendos
Juvenes (or Problems to
Sharpen the Young), written
by the 8th-century monk
Alcuin of York. Alcuin?s
puzzles laid the foundations
for a branch of mathematics
called combinatorics ?
the thinking behind
today?s computer coding.
Philip Ball, in conversation
with the historian Mary
Garrison, discusses Alcuin?s
work, which is proof that
the Dark Ages were not
the era of scholarly decline
we once thought.
The Songs and Shows
of World War I: 1917
Radio 2, 10pm
The US has finally entered
the war as Russell Davies?s
series exploring the music
of the First World War
reaches 1917. Sadly, all you
might be left with after
listening is an earworm of
the Go Compare ads, which
use the melody of Over
There, a song to galvanise
young Americans to enlist.
?you eat what she eats?. You like it or
leave it, he says. ?And I lllllove it.?
Now that he has crossed the border,
what will Stein be treating his tastebuds
to? Red-hot tacos? Huauzontle
pancakes? A bowl of mancha manteles?
Actually, no. First on Stein?s culinary
tour of Mexico is a Caesar salad. That?s
right: a bit of lettuce, some croutons,
parmesan, an anchovy if you?re feeling
wild. The kind of thing you knock up
on a Thursday night when you can?t
face cooking. Or flavours.
But! Before you chuck your lamb
chop at Stein, the Caesar salad is
indeed a native Mexican dish, invented
in Tijuana when the city was a den of
vice for Prohibition-fleeing Americans,
who flocked across the border for the
booze, girls and romaine lettuce. It did
get a little more exciting, with Rick
chomping his way down the Pacific
coast, snacking on venison tacos and
borrego tatemado. ?I lllllove it,? he said.
What a joy Stein is. There isn?t a
scrap of media training about him ?
he did, after all, learn the trade from
Keith Floyd. He hasn?t even mastered
the art of swallowing his food before
launching into his next sentence,
peppering his descriptions with garbled
apologies for his uncouth manners
(and, presumably, the cameraman with
whatever he is eating). There?s nothing
of The One Show false enthusiasm
either. On eating what has been voted
the best breakfast in the world: ?It
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show 10.00
Clara Amfo 12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott
Mills 4.00 Greg James 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00
Greg James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 The 8th
with Charlie Sloth 11.00 Huw Stephens
1.00am Benji B 3.00 BBC Radio 1 and
1Xtra?s Stories 4.00 Jordan North
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce
12.00 Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright
5.00 Simon Mayo 7.00 The Folk Show with
Mark Radcliffe. Traditional and contemporary
folk and acoustic music 8.00 Jo Whiley. A
mix of new music and classic tracks, with
guests dropping in to the studio to chat
10.00 The Songs and Shows of World War I.
Russell Davies returns with the annual
programme celebrating the music of the First
World War, this time focusing on tunes
popular during 1917. See Radio Choice
11.00 Marcus Mumford. The Mumford &
Sons frontman plays his favourite tracks (r)
12.00 Pick of the Pops (r) 2.00am Radio 2
Playlists: Country Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Easy 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Radio 2
Rocks 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Clemency Burton-Hill presents the breakfast
show, featuring listener requests. Including
7.00, 8.00 News. 7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
With Rob Cowan. Rob presents the best in
classical music. 9.30 Potential companion
pieces for Debussy?s gentle impressionistic
masterpiece for the piano Clair de Lune
? one of his most popular works in no small
part due to its appearance in numerous
movie soundtracks. 10.10 Time Traveller.
10.50 The children?s author Dame Jacqueline
Wilson talks about the ideas that have
inspired her throughout her life
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Monk (1917-1982)
Donald Macleod and Brian Priestley discuss
Thelonious Monk?s Brilliant Corners, which
was released in 1956. Fats Waller/Andy
Razaf (Honeysuckle Rose); Monk (Brilliant
Corners; Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are; and
Pannonica); Barris (I Surrender, Dear); and
Monk/Best (Bemsha Swing)
1.00pm News
Rick Stein was a joy as he sampled the local dishes in Mexico
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Quatuor Mosa飍ues performs in the Chalmers
Memorial Church at the Lammermuir
Festival. Presented by Jamie MacDougall.
Mozart (String Quartet in G, K387); and
Donizetti (String Quartet No 17 in D)
2.00 Live Afternoon Concert
Stuart Flinders presents a concert from
the BBC Philharmonic at MediaCityUK in
Salford. Lyadov (Kikimora); So?a Gubaidulina
(Viola Concerto); Ravel (Rapsodie
espagnole); and Ibert (Escales)
3.30 Choral Evensong
An archive broadcast from York Minster to
mark the 100th birthday of Francis Jackson,
which he celebrated last month. Francis
Jackson was Organist of York Minster from
1946-82. Introit: Let My Prayer Come Up
(Bairstow). Responses: Jackson. Psalms 53,
54, 55 (Vann, Crotch, Clark, Atkins). First
Lesson: Exodus 14 vv 5-14. Canticles:
Bairstow in G. Second Lesson: 1 Corinthians
15 vv 35-49. Anthem: Lord, I Call Upon Thee
(Bairstow). Hymn: God That Madest Earth
and Heaven (East Acklam). Organ Voluntary:
Impromptu for Sir Edward Bairstow
(Jackson). Organist and Master of the Music:
Philip Moore. Assistant Organist: John Scott
Whiteley. First broadcast 10 July 1996 (r)
4.30 New Generation Artists
Georgia Mann introduces some tracks from
Ilker Arcayurek?s debut recording of Schubert
songs exploring the theme of loneliness.
Schubert (Fr黨lingsglaube, D686; Nachtst點k,
D672 ? Mayrhofer; Sehnsucht, D879); and
Debussy (Pour le piano)
5.00 Live In Tune
An edition from Watford Colosseum with the
BBC Concert Orchestra and performances by
Stlie Antico and the trombonist Peter Moore.
Including 5.00, 6.00 News
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An imaginative, eclectic mix of music
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
The London Philharmonic Orchestra
performs. Bridge (Summer); Proko?ev (Piano
Concerto No 3); Beethoven (Wind Sextet in E
?at, Op 71); and Tchaikovsky (Symphony No
1 ? Winter Daydreams)
10.00 Free Thinking
Kelly and Zach Weinersmith share visions of
the future with Rana Mitter. Plus, former
Australian PM Kevin Rudd discusses power
10.45 The Essay:
Desperately Seeking Eternity
Naomi Alderman?s thoughts on eternity (r)
11.00 Late Junction
The DJ, musician and podcaster Tayo Popoola
selects songs for the evening
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
News headlines and sport, with Sarah
Montague and Nick Robinson
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Only Artists
Two artists discuss creative questions (3/6)
9.30 Life Drawing
With Ralph Steadman (3/5) (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Communities that believe they are not the
sole inhabitants of a landscape
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Presented by Jane Garvey. Including at 10.41
the 15 Minute Drama: The Pillow Book by
Robert Forrest (3/5)
10.55 The Listening Project
The simple, restorative joy of movement
and music. Fi Glover presents
11.00 Local News:
What Are We Missing?
Valley Fontaine explores what now
constitutes local news
11.30 It?s a Fair Cop
Al?e Moore takes a light-hearted look at
reasonable force (2/6) (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
The munitionettes take a stand (8/40)
12.15 Autumn Budget 2017
Presented by Martha Kearney
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: The Tragic
History of My Nose
Comedy by Alastair Jessiman. In Moscow
1852, Nikolai Gogol nurses his nose as he
works on a sequel to his novel Dead Souls
3.00 Money Box Live
Paul Lewis and his guests offer listeners
advice on their ?nancial questions
3.30 All in the Mind
The winners of this year?s Brain Prize discuss
their work on reward (4/8) (r)
4.00 Thinking Allowed
4.30 The Media Show
The latest news from the media world
5.00 PM
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 All Those Women
Jen is driven to compete with Stu in the
parenting stakes (2/4) (r)
7.00 The Archers
Lilian tries to make amends
means nothing to me.? On the origins
of the margarita: ?I don?t really care.?
You may prefer Nigella Lawson?s purr
or James Martin?s studied bonhomie,
but Stein is for those of us who prefer
our TV chefs a little more rustic. Like
him or leave him. Me, I lllllove him.
Channel 4 has recent ? chequered
? history with documentaries about
British Muslims. My Week as a Muslim
was roundly criticised for its use of
?brownface? when a narrow-minded
white British woman was
?transformed? into a Muslim of
Pakistani descent. The Truth About
Muslim Marriage, despite its shockhorror title, was thankfully a rather
more sober and serious affair. And
there wasn?t a prosthetic nose in sight.
Instead at the heart of it was a quite
astonishing discovery ? a large
proportion of Muslim women in the
UK who believe they are legally
married are in fact not. The nikah
religious ceremony is not recognised
under UK law, leading to a grimly
inevitable conclusion when rows about
who should put the bins out escalate
into something bigger.
?Children suffer disproportionately,
women suffer disproportionately,?
said an imam. ?Men get away with it
scot-free.? The kicker was that the UK
is miles behind most other countries
on this matter, once again revealing
our authorities? squeamishness when
dealing with the ?M-word?.
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Living with the Gods
Communities that believe they are not the
sole inhabitants of a landscape (r)
8.00 The Moral Maze
With Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor,
Michael Portillo and Mona Siddiqui (7/9)
8.45 Four Thought
Dalia Elmelige shares her experiences of
life as a Muslim in America (2/8)
9.00 Science Stories
Philip Ball dives into the Dark Ages to reveal
the presumed author of the river-crossing
riddle. See Radio Choice (1/5)
9.30 Only Artists
Artists discuss creative questions (3/6) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Ritula Shah
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Exit West
By Mohsin Hamid (3/5)
11.00-5.20am (LW) Test Match Special
Australia v England
11.00 Lenny Henry: Rogue?s Gallery
Tanya Moodie plays a frustrated artist in this
darkly comic tale (2/4)
11.15 Joseph Morpurgo?s Walking Tour
A tour of Yosemite National Park (1/4)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Political news presented by Sean Curran
11.55 The Listening Project
Members of the public share conversations
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
The Vanity Fair Diaries
By Tina Brown (3/5)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Navy Lark 8.30 A Very Private
Man 9.00 Act Your Age 9.30 The Sit Crom
10.00 Plantagenet 11.00 No One Belongs
Here More Than You 11.15 Goldengrove
12.00 The Navy Lark 12.30pm A Very
Private Man 1.00 Rogue Male 1.30 City
Messengers 2.00 Gilead 2.15 Cosmic Quest
2.30 An Expert in Murder 2.45 The Black
Count 3.00 Plantagenet 4.00 Act Your Age
4.30 The Sit Crom 5.00 The Cavity Within
5.30 All Those Women 6.00 The Voice of
God 6.30 Musical Genes 7.00 The Navy Lark
7.30 A Very Private Man. David and Helen
swap Croydon for the Yorkshire countryside
8.00 Rogue Male. Thriller by Geoffrey
Household. First aired in 2004 8.30 City
Messengers. The work of cycle couriers.
From 2008 9.00 No One Belongs Here More
Than You. An agoraphobe meets a young boy
9.15 Goldengrove. By Frances Byrnes.
Originally broadcast in 2008 10.00 Comedy
Club: All Those Women. Comedy by Katherine
Jakeways 10.30 Before They Were Famous.
Spoof documentary looking at the surprising
early careers of celebrated authors 10.45
No Tomatoes. Comedy with Ian Potter 10.55
The Comedy Club Interview. A chat with a
guest from the world of comedy 11.00
Hard to Tell. Tom arranges a Valentine?s Day
surprise for Ellen 11.30 Radio 9. A doctor
who is obsessed with Womble songs
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 12.30pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 6.30 5 Live Sport.
Build-up to the night?s Champions League
coverage 7.45 5 Live Sport: Champions
League Football 2017-18. Coverage of the
night?s Champions League football 10.00 The
Ashes 12.00 The Ashes 5.00am Reports
5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast 10.00
Max Rushden, Ray Parlour and Bob Mills
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off
10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am Extra Time
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and
Stuart Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00
Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Mary Anne Hobbs
1.00am The First Time with Roger Taylor
2.00 The Look of Love: The Story of the New
Romantics 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones features
musicians who were all born on this day.
Delibes (Coppelia ? Mazurka); Rodrigo
(Fantasia para un Gentilhombre); Dvorak
(Piano Concerto in G minor); WF Bach
(Sinfonia in D); and Britten (Variations on a
Theme of Frank Bridge) 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday November 22 2017
11
1G T
CATHERINE ASHMORE
World music
Carminho Sings Jobim
Barbican
T
{{{{(
o an outsider they can
sometimes sound like two
different languages. With its
soft, nasal shades, the
Portuguese we hear on a
Jo鉶 Gilberto record can make the
cadences of the motherland appear
harsh and guttural. Bossa nova is all
about understatement; fado, the folk
music of Portugal, is much more
declamatory, sometimes downright
melodramatic.
The two traditions were woven
together in this compelling display at
the EFG London Jazz Festival, with
the young fado singer known as
Carminho (full name, Maria do Carmo
Carvalho Rebelo de Andrade) paying
homage to Ant鬾io Carlos Jobim. For
this project she could not have had
better guides. The cellist and arranger
Jaques Morelenbaum is a master of
this kind of chamber music and the
Jobim connection was made flesh in
the self-effacing form of the
composer?s son, Paulo, on guitar, and
grandson Daniel on piano.
Admittedly, Morelenbaum?s presence
did sometimes leave you wishing that
his wife, Paula, could have been there
too. No singer caresses Sabi� or O
Grande Amor with as much tenderness
and precision. Yet if Carminho?s
versions did not flow as seductively,
her more jagged approach and broader
dynamic range had compensations of
their own. On Retrato em Branco e
Preto she gave Chico Buarque?s lyrics
the full measure of ruefulness.
Morelenbaum added washes of
subtle colour, while the drummer
Paulo Braga gave the quartet just the
right amount of momentum. Wave, a
song that Anglo-American singers
often turn into stodgy MOR, took
flight here. Before she left, Carminho
soared on Saudades do Brasil em
Portugal, a lament by Jobim?s
collaborator, the poet and diplomat
Vinicius de Moraes. Two continents
came within touching distance.
Clive Davis
Comedy
Greg Davies
Eventim Apollo, W6
G
{{{((
reg Davies is an outsized
presence in British comedy,
plying a vision of barely
fettered vitality in
The Inbetweeners, Cuckoo,
Taskmaster and his starring sitcom
Man Down. These claims to
small-screen fame, he warns at the
start of You Magnificent Beast, don?t
quite hint at the material he?s about to
bellow at us. ?I am a very dirty boy.?
Well, he wasn?t so dirty before, and
maybe that?s why I was less persuaded
than usual by his biggest-selling and
least charming live show. Davies is
still a strong storyteller, a big kid
forever astounded and amused by life?s
capacity for ludicrousness. This burly,
6ft 8in comic sells us on his tall stories:
the man-sized teddy bear his mum
made for him; the three-hour speech
that Chris Eubank gave when he
visited the school where Davies taught
drama. At his best, when he describes
Robert Murray as Tom and Victoria Simmonds as Baba the Turk
On the merry
road to Bedlam
First-rate performances and a magical
setting launch the inaugural production
of a new company, says Rebecca Franks
Opera
The Rake?s
Progress
Wilton?s, E1
{{{{(
T
here may be a more
atmospheric and appropriate
theatre in which to stage
Stravinsky?s The Rake?s
Progress, but I wouldn?t bet
on it. The intimate Wilton?s Music Hall
is right in scale and feel. Just as the
composer refracted the 18th century
in his bittersweet neoclassical score,
sitting by his father?s deathbed and
being interrupted by a male nurse
telling him about his son?s mania for
roast chicken, he makes us feel as if
we were in the pub with our funniest
friend. And that friend is on a roll.
Davies strings this all together with
a theme about the disparity between
how we see ourselves and how others
see us. Which sounds stimulating, until
you realise that it takes in pretty much
every story ever told. He pays tribute
to his dad, whose rambunctious
absurdity motored so much of his act
before. Yet with dad a more spectral
presence, there is a new coarseness at
play, a diminution of the generosity
that used to make Davies such delicious
company. Rococo churlishness outguns
affectionate exasperation as he
describes meeting a cabbie who claims
to have played bass for A-ha, or wearily
giving in to the advances of an
enamoured Bristolian rendered brutish
by red wine.
The show (touring to December 13)
went down a storm with its crowd. Yet
as with Dan, his boobyish character
on Man Down, I loved the energy, but
was left a bit cold by the oversell.
Dominic Maxwell
Jazz
A Concert for
Alice and John
Barbican
{{{{{
Five stars for the
Modigliani show
at Tate Modern
First Night, main paper
artsfirst night
a London of the past is preserved in
the venue?s faded splendour. In one of
the Georgian bars, I could almost
believe I had seen Tom Rakewell
himself stopping for a tot of gin on his
Hogarthian journey from bucolic bliss
to brothel to Bedlam.
A choice setting, then, for the
inaugural production of OperaGlass
Works, set up by the actor-director
Selina Cadell and the dramaturg Eliza
Thompson to bring chamber operas
up close to audiences. With Alan
Bennett, Stephen Fry and Vanessa
Redgrave on the list of supporters, this
fledgling outfit has cachet. And this is
a fine outing for Stravinsky?s morality
tale. A little safe, perhaps, but drawing
first-rate performances.
If Cadell doesn?t entirely overcome
the opera?s occasional longueurs, this
period-dress production scores in
other ways. The interplay between art
and life, artifice and truth, for instance.
Laurence Cummings directs the
spirited Southbank Sinfonia on stage,
initially sporting a resplendent wig
that would have made Handel jealous.
A chorus member glances knowingly
at the audience as he sprinkles leaves
to suggest a garden. Wooden ladders
dotted around the stage are used
literally and metaphorically, a banner
depicting a snake completing this
devilish game of luck and fate.
Almost every word of WH Auden
and Chester Kallman?s libretto is clear,
and it is a good choice to dispense
with surtitles. Robert Murray makes
a moving Tom Rakewell, an affable
innocent, his voice always sweet. And
who wouldn?t be lured in by Jonathan
Lemalu?s gravelly, smiling Nick
Shadow, there to make Tom?s every
wish come true? Victoria Simmonds
relishes Baba the Turk, with a beard
to rival Kenneth Branagh?s Poirot
moustache, while Susanna Hurrell?s
Anne Trulove is a joy throughout.
Fine turns too from the supporting
roles and chorus, and special mention
for the trumpeter Etty Wake?s solo,
bright as a gold coin. Best of all is the
mad scene, the emotional truth of the
opera wrapped up in a delusion. As
Tom, believing himself to be Adonis,
declares his love for Venus, Anne sings
him to sleep with infinite tenderness.
Box office: 020 7702 2789, to Sat
F
ifty years after the death of
John Coltrane and a decade
after the death of Alice
Coltrane, the influence of the
husband-and-wife pillars of
spiritual jazz is growing. The Coltranes
believed that universal musical
structures transcended humanity?s
divisions. After listening to three and
a half hours of sublimely transcendent,
Coltrane-focused music, you could
only conclude that they were right.
The 77-year-old free-jazz master
Pharoah Sanders was the main event,
but with the Denys Baptiste Quartet
and the Alina Bzhezhinska Quartet
interpreting John and Alice
respectively this was a rare concert
(part of the EFG London Jazz Festival)
in which each beautiful element was as
important and captivating as the next.
Bzhezhinska, from Ukraine, shares
with Alice a mastery of the jazz harp,
a niche among niches, and put her
own slant on the cascading glissandi
of Lovely Sky Boat while bringing out
the ancient mystery of Journey in
Satchidananda, the latter featuring
a remarkable solo by the saxophonist
Tony Kofi. The Denys Baptiste
Quartet followed with compositions
Dance
Pavement
Sadler?s Wells
K
{{{{(
yle Abraham has become
a force in American
dance since founding
Abraham.In.Motion in 2006.
This past weekend his
company made its London debut with
an hour-long production inspired in
part by John Singleton?s powerhouse
1991 film Boyz n the Hood as well as by
the writings of the civil rights activist
WEB Du Bois. The good news is that
Sadler?s Wells has already promised
to present more of Abraham?s work.
Pavement is an oblique yet powerful
consideration of urban American life,
particularly in terms of race relations.
Singleton?s film revolves around the
fates of three young black males in
inner-city Los Angeles. Pavement is
sketchier, eschewing narrative in
favour of a looser construction that
allows us to read more into the
alternately expansive and suggestive
interactions between four black men
(including Abraham), two white men
and one black woman. Abraham?s
experience of growing up in two
primarily black neighbourhoods of
Pittsburgh was another key influence.
The setting was simple: a metal
fence upstage and above it a basketball
hoop behind which images of
residential buildings were projected.
This left plenty of space for the cast to
express themselves physically and to
some extent verbally. Their sometimes
tellingly detailed movement slipped
continuously between the vernacular
and the virtuosic, all of it cued by a
richly layered soundtrack featuring
Vivaldi, Bach and Britten as well as
Jacques Brel and Sam Cooke.
Whether deceptively casual and
throwaway or sharply precise, nothing
the cast did was overstated or
dramatically dishonest. Yes, Pavement
might have benefited from greater
visual texture, but what it conveyed
about the complexities of human
relations was delivered with notable
integrity, grit and grace.
Donald Hutera
from John Coltrane?s later work and
some audience participation: getting
us to meditate. ?Imagine you are at
the top of Everest and you can see all
the other peaks,? Baptiste requested,
adding that we shouldn?t worry about
the Earth being round since this was
our astral place. Accompanying our
journey within was the perfect blend
of expression, sophistication and fun,
with the quartet bouncing around
John Coltrane?s endlessly complex
music with virtuosity, not excessive
reverence.
Sanders looked like a wise old sage
as he shuddered on to the stage. He
recorded with both Coltranes and is
the living successor to their deep
approach, which goes way beyond
jazz; after summoning the chaos of
life itself with the wild saxophone
notes of The Creator Has a Master Plan
he chanted the statement of the title.
It was impossible not to be swept up
by the profundity of music and
sentiment. The Coltranes were on
lifelong missions to create peace and
enlightenment through sound. This
remarkable concert achieved that, if
only for a few hours.
Will Hodgkinson
12
1G T
Wednesday November 22 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Joe Clay
Digging for
Britain
BBC Four, 9pm
The
fascinating
series in
which
Professor Alice Roberts
introduces discoveries
unearthed from
archaeological digs all
Early
Top
pick
over the British Isles
during the past year
returns. The first of
four episodes features
digs from the west of
England. The
excavations are filmed
by the archaeologists,
so we observe their
painstaking work and
witness the significant
finds being dug up. The
archaeologists then
bring their discoveries
into the Digging for
Britain laboratory,
so Roberts and her
colleagues can analyse
and discuss what
these items tell us
about our ancestors.
At a dig in Avebury,
near Stonehenge in
Wiltshire, a lost
monument is
transforming our
understanding of Stone
Age Britain. In
Staffordshire a haul of
2,500-year-old gold
reveals our Iron Age
ancestors? surprisingly
continental tastes,
while in Repton,
Derbyshire, a skull
brings Roberts face to
face with a Viking
warrior, shedding new
light on their invasion
of Britain. Meanwhile,
over in Danebury, Andy
(Mackenzie Crook) and
Lance (Toby Jones)
think they may have
stumbled on a Roman
burial site as the final
series of the wonderful
Detectorists continues
(BBC Four, 10pm).
Could they be on the
verge of unearthing a
fictional hoard of gold
to match the one found
in Staffordshire?
Elsewhere, the penny
finally drops for Andy
in his day job and
Maggie (Lucy
Benjamin) turns up
unexpectedly.
Mary Berry?s
Country House
Secrets
BBC One, 8pm
In a new four-part
series, the nation?s
surrogate grandma
explores stately homes
through the prism
of food, starting at
Highclere Castle, better
known to many as
Downton Abbey. Berry
meets the 8th Earl of
Carnarvon and his wife
to find out what it takes
to keep a vast pile such
as Highclere running
in the 21st century
(spoiler: loads of cash).
As well as having a
poke about and
meeting some of the
staff, Berry does a bit
of cooking, making
raspberry tartlets for
afternoon tea and a
gooseberry fool for
a grand dinner party.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Claimed and Shamed. A chancer
tries to cash in on medical treatment that never took
place 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Martin Roberts
meets property investors in the Midlands and Cumbria (r)
(AD) 11.00 The Housing Enforcers. Matt Allwright
investigates a ?ea-infested property (r) 11.45 The
Sheriffs Are Coming. The sheriffs confront a man who has
not paid the rent he owes to a single mum 12.15pm
Bargain Hunt. Paul Laidlaw and Caroline Hawley help two
teams in Edinburgh (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Al goes to talk to Mrs Tembe, with surprising
results. Meanwhile, Zara attends the funeral of a patient
(AD) 2.15 Armchair Detectives. Susan Calman hosts as
three amateur sleuths try to solve a ?ctional crime 3.00
Escape to the Country. Jules Hudson helps two ex-pats
hoping to return to their roots in North Yorkshire (AD)
3.45 Royal Recipes. Michael Buerk and the chef Anna
Haugh sample a luxurious dish (AD) 4.30 Flog It! From
Crowcombe Court, West Somerset 5.15 Pointless. Quiz
show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News
at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Island Parish Sark Winter (r) (AD) 6.30 Claimed
and Shamed (r) 7.15 Royal Recipes (r) 8.00 Sign Zone:
Nigella ? At My Table. Including a recipe for beef and
aubergine fatteh (r) (AD, SL) 8.30 Caught Red Handed.
A jeweller must act fast when armed men attack his
shop (r) (AD, SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC
Newsroom Live 11.30 The Budget. Andrew Neil presents
coverage and commentary of Chancellor of the Exchequer
Philip Hammond?s Autumn 2017 Budget 3.30pm WPC 56.
Despite Fenton?s threat, Gina risks everything to prove
Donald?s innocence. Meanwhile, as William Parker is laid
to rest, Jack has his eyes on a new potential suspect (r)
(AD) 4.15 Wartime Farm. Ruth Goodman, Alex Langlands
and Peter Ginn experience the conditions Britain?s farmers
faced during the Blitz in 1940, when three million city
dwellers ?ed to the countryside (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your
Money Where Your Mouth Is. Mark Franks and Philip
Serrell travel to Stacey?s Auctioneers in the market town
of Rayleigh in Essex, where they bid for bargains they can
later sell on for charity (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz hosted by
Jeremy Vine 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two. A
look at how the contestants are shaping up for Saturday
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Christopher Biggins chats
about donning the panto dame out?t once again for a new
production of Aladdin 8.30 Lorraine. With James and
Dave Franco 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30 This
Morning. Phillip Scho?eld and Holly Willoughby present
chat and lifestyle features, including a look at the stories
making the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the
kitchen 12.20pm The Chancellor?s Budget 2017: An ITV
News Special; Weather 1.55 Regional News; Weather
2.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. David Dickinson?s roving
antiques tour arrives in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, where an
unusual violin confuses Faye Rutter, and Debbie Serpell
sets her eye on a vase (r) 3.00 Tenable. Quiz hosted by
Warwick Davis in which a team of ?ve prison of?cers
from the north east answers questions about
top 10 lists, then tries to score a perfect 10 in the ?nal
round 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the
arcade-themed quiz show (r) 5.00 The Chase. Bradley
Walsh presents as four contestants answer general
knowledge questions and take on ruthless quiz genius
the Chaser in an attempt to secure a cash prize 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond. Three episodes (r) (AD) 9.05 Frasier. Double
bill (r) 10.05 Ramsay?s Hotel Hell. Gordon Ramsay tries
to rescue a multimillion-dollar hotel in Loudonville, Ohio
(r) (AD) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA. The CEO of a fast
food restaurant goes undercover (r) 12.00 Channel 4
News Summary 12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Four
dinners parties from Maidstone and Rochester (r) 1.05
Kirstie?s Handmade Christmas. The presenter visits a
Christmas night market in Hoxton, London (r) (AD) 2.10
Countdown. With Gyles Brandreth in Dictionary Corner
3.00 A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun. A woman who
dreams of owning a family holiday home in Barbados
4.00 Coast vs Country. A couple looking to move from the
outskirts of London to Kent 5.00 Four in a Bed. The group
head to Sands Resort Hotel and Spa in Newquay 5.30
Come Dine with Me. A pilot hosts the latest dinner party
in Devon 6.00 The Simpsons. The death of a friend
prompts four locals to address their regrets 6.30
Hollyoaks. Mandy panics when Luke goes missing, Damon
wants nothing to do with his mother and Darren is furious
to ?nd out that Jack has spent �000 on a record (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and his guests talk about the issues of the day,
with viewers calling in to offer their opinions 11.15
Access. Showbiz news and gossip 11.20 FILM: Chasing
Christmas (PG, 2005) Three ghosts try to change a
man?s mean-spirited ways by taking him back in time,
but he ends up getting stranded in 1965. Fantasy comedy
starring Tom Arnold and Andrea Roth 12.50pm Chinese
Food in Minutes. Steamed wine sea bass and a spicy beef
dish (r) 1.10 5 News Lunchtime 1.15 Home and Away
(AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS. Gibbs and the
team attend the funeral of a fallen colleague before
identifying the man they believe to be the port-to-port
killer, and rushing to apprehend him (r) (AD) 3.15
FILM: A Snow Globe Christmas (PG, TVM, 2013)
A television executive wakes up in another world where
she has a family, and must decide which life she wants to
lead. Festive fantasy with Alicia Witt and Donald Faison
5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Paul gets cold feet at
the courthouse (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Mason
cannot bear to attend Beth?s funeral, while Maggie and
Ziggy have a heart to heart (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
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7.00
The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones host the live magazine show,
with a team of roving reporters
presenting stories of interest from
around the UK, plus studio guests
7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip
The actresses Anna Chancellor
and Holly Aird take to the antique
shops of the Home Counties,
assisted by the experts Natasha
Raskin Sharp and Margie Cooper
7.00 Emmerdale Chrissie reaches
breaking point, Tom is interrogated,
and Megan feels con?icted (AD)
8.00 Mary Berry?s Country House
Secrets New series. Mary discovers
the rich history of our nation?s
greatest stately homes through food,
beginning with Highclere Castle,
the real-life Downton Abbey.
See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
8.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
The latest heat begins with the six
chefs having to prepare and cook a
pigeon crown and an accompanying
sauce in just 20 minutes, in a Skills
Test set by Monica Galetti (AD)
8.00 Gino?s Italian Coastal Escape
Gino meets an octogenarian on the
ancient island of Elba (4/8)
9.00 The Apprentice Alan Sugar tasks the
candidates with running a selection of
their own services for dog owners,
including a luxury canine spa and a dog
obedience class. See Viewing Guide
9.00 Peaky Blinders As the Shelbys come
to terms with the events of Christmas
Day, Tommy tries to unite his family
and makes a decision he may come to
regret, as a bold enemy makes his
move. See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
9.00 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of
Here! Ant and Dec present the
survival challenge, as the famous
faces continue their ordeal in the
Australian jungle, struggling to
complete the tough daily tasks
and dreaded Bushtucker Trials
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Traf?c Cops The police deal with
a suicidal man, an Eritrean woman
dumped out of a lorry by people
traf?ckers, and a woman who has
had a ?ght with her boyfriend (r)
8.00 The Secret Life of the Zoo The
keepers try to work out why male red
panda Jung is losing weight, with a full
medical examination scheduled after a
special diet fails to solve the problem.
West African mandrill JC is being
challenged for his dominant position
by his sons Ludo and Jareth (AD)
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors Dr Farida
Ahmad and Dr Pelly help teenagers
struggling to cope with their home
lives, and Dr Liz Lee offers advice to
a patient with what seems to be a
contraceptive coil problem (AD)
9.00 Violent Men: Behind Bars Filmed
over a year, this episode follows men
serving long sentences for crimes of
violence, from the moment they are
sentenced, as they face up to years
behind bars. The programme reveals
the day-to-day reality for some of the
500 men in HMP Shotts (2/2)
7.30 Coronation Street Michelle takes
matters into her own hands, and
uninvited guests interrupt Sally?s
inauguration party (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Robert refuses
to accept his diagnosis, Gina feels
the force of Sally?s fury, and Gemma
meets her Prince Charming (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 The Apprentice: You?re Fired
Interview with the show?s freshly
rejected candidate (8/12)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.00 Man Down A health visitor suggests
that what mum and new baby need
is a ?daddy day? (5/6) (AD)
9.00 Raped: My Story Documentary
dealing with the emotional impact and
aftermath of rape, told through the
personal stories of 10 people sharing
their own experiences. Told directly
to camera, these are vividly honest
accounts that reveal the impact of
rape on someone?s life, far beyond the
moment of rape itself, focusing on the
emotional and psychological effects as
well as the interrogation of the legal
process. See Viewing Guide
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 A Question of Sport With Shane
Williams, Stephen Hendry, Pamela
Cookey and Danny Talbot
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
and Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
11.15 Junior Doctors: Blood, Sweat and
Tears Omar treats a bride who has
suffered a fall (4/8) (AD)
11.20 Britain?s Cycling Superheroes: The
Price of Success The controversy
surrounding Britain?s international
cyclists and the two men who have led
the nation to recent successes in both
the Olympics and the Tour de France (r)
10.45 Uefa Champions League
Highlights A round-up of the
matchday ?ve ?xtures, which included
FC Basel v Manchester United, Qarabag
FK v Chelsea, and Paris Saint-Germain
v Celtic from tonight. Mark Pougatch
presents, with analysis from Roy
Keane and Glenn Hoddle, and
commentary by Clive Tyldesley,
Sam Matterface and Joe Speight
10.30 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown
Jimmy Carr hosts the quiz as Sean Lock
and Henning Wehn compete against
Jon Richardson and Victoria Coren
Mitchell. Tom Allen joins Susie Dent in
Dictionary Corner, while Rachel Riley
looks after the numbers and letters
with help from Joe Wilkinson (1/5) (r)
10.30 #MeToo: The Debate A studio
audience of rape survivors, lawmakers, support workers and voluntary
organisations, journalists and famous
faces drill down into issues raised by
Raped: My Story, as well as some of
the broader issues stemming from
current controversies
11.35 999: What?s Your Emergency? Call
handlers dealing with people who have
severe mental health issues (r) (AD)
11.30 I?m 20 But Look 60: Extraordinary
People Catching up with a teenager
with a rare genetic condition (r)
12.20am Sign Zone: The Week the Landlords
Moved In Landlords spend a week living in their own
rentals, including a woman who is forced to question her
ethics when she ?nds a pensioner struggling to cope in
one of her attic rooms (r) (AD, SL) 1.20-2.20 Eat Well
for Less? With Gregg Wallace (r) (AD, SL)
12.10am Heathrow: Britain?s Busiest Airport An
employee helps a passenger who has lost her daughter (r)
1.00 Jackpot247 3.00 May the Best House Win. Four
homeowners in Birmingham rate one another?s properties
(r) (SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Guests air their differences (r) (SL)
12.30am Pokerstars Championship Highlights of the
event from Monte Carlo 1.25 The Simpsons. A comet
heads for Spring?eld (r) (AD) 2.15 FILM: Intruders
(15, 2011) Horror starring Clive Owen 3.55 Phil Spencer:
Secret Agent (r) (AD) 4.50 Draw It! (r) 5.15 Kirstie?s Fill
Your House for Free (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.30am Criminals: Caught on Camera The use of
CCTV to ?ght crime (r) (AD) 1.00 SuperCasino 3.10 Law
& Order: Special Victims Unit. A businessman is stabbed
(r) (AD) 4.00 Witch Hunt: A Century of Murder (r) (SL)
4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Divine Designs (r) (SL)
5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS. Documentary (r) (SL)
Late
11.45 Live at the Apollo Featuring
comedy sets by Jason Manford, Chris
Ramsey and Doc Brown (2/6) (r)
12.20am-6.00 BBC News
the times | Wednesday November 22 2017
13
1G T
television & radio
The Apprentice
BBC One, 9pm
The 11 remaining
candidates have a
surprise early-morning
visitor as Lord Sugar
calls at the house first
thing to reveal the
latest task, which
involves the teams
taking over a doggy
daycare business. They
must decide which
services to offer to
generate the most
revenue. Amid a
cacophony of terrible
canine-related puns,
both teams flounder,
with one ending up in
deep doo-doo when
they underestimate
the scale of a
pooper-scooping
contract. In the
boardroom Lord Sugar
turns rottweiler as the
losing team get a
serious mauling.
Peaky Blinders
BBC Two, 9pm
What a coup it was for
Steven Knight and the
makers of the stylish
gangster drama to get
Hollywood A-list talent,
in the form of Adrien
Brody, on board for
the fourth series. His
character, Luca
Changretta, made a
fleeting appearance
in last week?s opener
(oozing menace as he
uttered his solitary
line), but he is more
prominent in tonight?s
raw and violent
episode, after arriving
in Small Heath to
avenge the death of his
father, Vicente. ?These
men will not leave our
city until the whole
family is dead,? says
Tommy. ?That?s how it
works. An eye for an
eye.? It?s war.
Raped: My Story
Channel 5, 9pm
In Britain 97,000
people are raped every
year ? one person
every six minutes.
Only 3 per cent of
the perpetrators are
convicted. The law
protects the anonymity
of the victims, but ten
? nine women and one
man ? have chosen
to speak out in this
powerful documentary.
The film consists solely
of their harrowing
testimonies, which
makes it extremely
tough to watch. In most
of the cases seemingly
ordinary situations
were the precursor to
a terrifying and
life-changing ordeal.
?There is no part of my
life that hasn?t been
affected by being
raped,? says one woman.
Sport choice
BT Sport 1, 11pm
Coverage of the Ashes
begins as Australia and
England clash at the
Gabba in Brisbane. The
Aussies haven?t lost
a Test match at the
?Gabbatoir? since 1986
and nobody is giving
England much hope of
ending that run against
Mitchell Starc and the
Aussie quicks.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) 7.00 Animal 999 (r)
8.00 Send in the Dogs (r) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) 10.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD)
11.00 Modern Family (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r)
5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r)
6.00 Futurama. American sitcom (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 DC?s Legends of Tomorrow. A messed-up
timeline traps Helen of Troy in 1930s Hollywood
9.00 Marvel?s Inhumans. Maximus makes a
game-changing move
10.00 Bounty Hunters. Barnaby and Nina
try to steal the statues back
10.35 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
11.30 A League of Their Own. James Corden
hosts the sports quiz (r) (AD)
12.30am Road Wars (r) 1.00 The Force: North
East (r) 2.00 Night Cops (r) (AD) 3.00 Brit
Cops: Law & Disorder (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
7.00 Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 Fish Town (r)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) (AD)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing. Double bill (r)
5.00 House. Hugh Laurie stars (r) (AD)
6.00 House. A day in the life of Cuddy (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A bank
robbery leads to tragedy (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Eddie and Jamie become
involved in a complicated adoption case (r) (AD)
9.00 Band of Brothers. Winters is promoted to
a desk job, but ?nds the change of pace hard to
accept. Damian Lewis stars (5/10) (r)
10.15 Band of Brothers. Easy Company spends a
grim Christmas in the trenches as frostbite and
hunger take their toll, but Eugene Roe ?nds his
luck changing after meeting a nurse (6/10) (r)
11.40 The Sopranos (r) (AD)
12.50am The Sopranos (r) (AD) 2.00 The Wire
(r) 3.20 Californication. Hank and Kali write a
song (r) 4.00 The West Wing. Two episodes (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese: A
Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Gold Coast Cops (r) 12.00 Road Wars (r)
1.00pm Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00
Nothing to Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds (r)
7.00 My Kitchen Rules: US. The ?nal two teams
face off in the season ?nale. Last in the series
8.00 Elementary. Sherlock investigates the
murder of an up-and-coming ballerina (r) (AD)
9.00 Grey?s Anatomy. The arrival of Harper
Avery puts Bailey on edge
10.00 Scandal. Mellie hosts a state dinner in
the hope of securing peace in the Middle East
11.00 Criminal Minds. The agents welcome a
new member as they hunt for a killer (r)
12.00 Elementary (r) (AD) 1.00am Bones (r)
(AD) 2.00 Criminal Minds (r) 3.00 My Kitchen
Rules: US (r) 4.00 Border Security: America?s
Front Line (r) (AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Joshua Bell Presents Musical Gifts
7.20 Proko?ev: Piano Concertos 8.00 Auction
8.30 Watercolour Challenge 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 10.00 Master of Photography (AD)
11.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017 12.00
Discovering: Rex Harrison (AD) 1.00pm Tales of
the Unexpected 2.00 Watercolour Challenge
2.30 Auction 3.00 Classic Albums 4.00 Too
Young to Die (AD) 5.00 Discovering: Paul Weller
(AD) 5.30 Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: Yul Brynner (AD)
7.00 Artemisia: Painting to Survive
8.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
9.00 War and Peace. Adaptation of Tolstoy?s
epic starring Malcolm McDowell
11.00 Passions. Barry Humphries examines
the art of the Weimar Republic
12.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017
1.00am Tales of the Unexpected 2.00 Auction
2.30 The Art Show (AD) 3.30 Hey, Boo: Harper
Lee and To Kill a Mockingbird 5.00 The South
Bank Show Originals. Double bill
6.00am Total Goals 9.00 Good Morning Sports
Fans. Today?s early stories 10.00 Premier
League Daily 11.00 Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Sky
Sports News 4.00pm Live: Ram Slam T20
Challenge. Dolphins v Warriors. Coverage of the
round-robin match from Kingsmead Cricket
Ground in Durban, South Africa
7.30 Live EFL: Ipswich Town v Shef?eld
Wednesday (Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of the
Championship clash from Portman Road. The
Tractor Boys have the upper hand in recent
meetings with the Owls, having won four of the
last seven encounters. However, last season?s
corresponding ?xture ?nished 1-0 to
Wednesday, with Kieran Lee scoring the only
goal of the game in the 77th minute
10.00 The Debate. Discussion on the latest
Premier League news
11.00 Sky Sports News. A round-up of the day?s
talking points and a look ahead to the events
that are likely to make the news tomorrow
12.00 Sky Sports News. The latest headlines
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Nolan Live
11.40 A Question of Sport. With Shane
Williams, Stephen Hendry, Pamela Cookey and
Danny Talbot 12.10am Junior Doctors: Blood,
Sweat and Tears. Anna learns how to deliver
bad news (AD) 12.40 Live at the Apollo.
Comedy sets by Jason Manford, Chris Ramsey
and Doc Brown (r) 1.10-6.00 BBC News
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BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Scot Squad.
The traf?c cops tackle a dodgy driver and the
detectives smash a smuggling operation 11.10
A Question of Sport 11.40 Junior Doctors:
Blood, Sweat and Tears (AD) 12.10am Live at
the Apollo (r) 12.40 Weather for the Week
Ahead 12.45-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 10.30pm Wales Live
11.05 A Question of Sport 11.35 Junior
Doctors: Blood, Sweat and Tears (AD) 12.05am
Live at the Apollo (r) 12.35 Weather for the
Week Ahead 12.40-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 11.20pm Spotlight
11.50-12.20am Motherland. A party ruins
Julia?s plans before an event at work (AD)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 2.30pm-3.30 Politics
Scotland. A round-up of political news (r)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Crime Files
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
7.30 Great Continental Railway Journeys. Part
one of two. Michael Portillo takes a trip in a
Maserati sports car (5/10) (r)
8.00 How the Wild West Was Won with Ray
Mears. The adventurer investigates how the
American wilderness shaped the Wild West,
beginning by exploring the landscapes of three
great mountain ranges (1/3) (r) (AD)
9.00 Digging for Britain. New series. Visiting
archaeological digs, starting with the west of
Britain. See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
10.00 Detectorists. Andy and Lance try to
protect their land. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.30 The League of Gentlemen. Mr Chinnery
has an accident with a tortoise (r)
11.00 Sleuths, Spies & Sorcerers: Andrew
Marr?s Paperback Heroes. Exploring the
espionage genre. Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.00 FILM: Peggy Guggenheim ? Art
Addict (2015) Pro?le of the socialite who
became a central ?gure in the modern art
movement 1.30am How the Wild West Was
Won with Ray Mears (r) (AD) 2.30-3.30
Digging for Britain (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
8.00 FILM: Ghostbusters II (PG, 1989)
The spectre-hunting team reunites to save New
York from a river of slime generated by the
negativity of the city?s inhabitants. Comedy
sequel starring Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd
10.10 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
10.40 The Big Bang Theory. The girls go on a
weekend trip to Las Vegas (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Rude Tube (r) 1.10 Gogglebox (r) (SL)
2.10 The Inbetweeners. Double bill (r) (AD, SL)
3.10 Rude Tube (r) 4.05 Black-ish. Double bill
(r) (AD) 4.45 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.45pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 2.50 Come Dine with Me (r)
3.50 Time Team (r) 5.55 The Secret Life of the
Zoo. A giraffe gives birth at Chester Zoo (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. A golden retriever puppy
with horri?c facial injuries is brought in (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud revisits an
amphibious house built on a small island on the
Thames in Buckinghamshire to discover how
well the ?oating house performs (8/9) (r) (AD)
9.00 Walks with My Dog. Famous people explore
the British outdoors while taking their
four-legged friends for a stroll, beginning with
Robert Lindsay and Angela Grif?n (r) (AD)
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. A woman arrives at St
George?s A&E after cutting her hand on her
lawnmower, and a boatsman turns up with a
piece of driftwood lodged in his eye (r) (AD)
11.05 Kinky Britain. The world of bespoke
online fetish video production (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 Ramsay?s Hotel Hell (r) (AD) 2.00 24
Hours in A&E (r) (AD) 3.05-3.45 8 Out of 10
Cats Uncut. With David Hasselhoff (r)
11.00am Hanover Street (PG, 1979) Second
World War drama with Harrison Ford 1.10pm
The Yellow Mountain (PG, 1954) Western
starring Howard Duff 2.45 The Black Shield
of Falworth (U, 1954) Adventure with Tony
Curtis 4.50 None Shall Escape (PG, 1944)
War drama with Alexander Knox (b/w)
6.35 Beautiful Creatures (12, 2013)
Fantasy starring Alden Ehrenreich
9.00 Cowboys & Aliens (12, 2011) A
mysterious stranger leads the people of a
Wild-West town to ?ght back against an
invasion from another world. Sci-? Western
starring Daniel Craig and Harrison Ford
11.20 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance
(12, 2011) The demon biker is enlisted by a
monk to help protect a boy whom the Devil has
sinister plans for. Fantasy thriller sequel with
Nicolas Cage, Idris Elba and Ciaran Hinds
1.10am-3.30 Young Detective Dee: Rise of
the Sea Dragon (12, 2013) A young Dee
Renjie becomes a magistrate and is soon
investigating reports of a sea monster. Mystery
adventure prequel starring Mark Chao, Carina
Lau and Feng Shaofeng. In Mandarin
6.00am The Cube (r) 6.45 Dinner Date (r) 7.35
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.00 The Cube: Celebrity
Special (r) 9.00 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r)
9.50 Dinner Date (r) 10.50 I?m a Celebrity? Get
Me Out of Here! (r) 11.50 Planet?s Got Talent
(r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 You?ve
Been Framed and Extreme! (r) 1.50 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of Here! (r)
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Featuring a
woman falling foul of a chipmunk (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Including a
game of tug-of-war and dogs dancing on ice (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 I?m a Celebrity: Extra Camp. Maya Jama
joins hosts Scarlett Moffatt, Joe Swash and Joel
Dommett to chat about the latest developments
11.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! Double bill (r) (AD)
1.00am Ghosted (r) (AD) 1.30 The Keith Lemon
Sketch Show (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 8.00 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
8.55 Judge Judy (r) 10.20 A Touch of Frost (r)
12.35pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat
(r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation Street. Double
bill (r) 3.45 A Touch of Frost (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. Rachel reassures a witness in a
case he is safe under her care (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica visits Quebec
to testify on behalf of an old friend wrongly
accused of murdering his wife (r) (AD)
8.00 Doc Martin. A secret admirer leaves Ruth
feeling uncomfortable (3/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Endeavour. Morse hunts a multiple
murderer who is strangling married women
across Oxford, but as the suspect list narrows,
he and Thursday ?nd their private lives turned
upside down (3/4) (r) (AD)
11.05 Blue Murder. Detective and single mother
Janine Lewis fears she will struggle to balance
her responsibilities as she returns to work
following maternity leave (1/4) (r) (AD)
12.35am A Touch of Frost. A fox-hunt saboteur
is murdered (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am Hat-Trick Heroes II (r) 6.15 The Chase
(r) 8.00 Storage Wars (r) 8.50 Pawn Stars (r)
9.50 Ironside (r) 10.50 Quincy ME (r) 11.50
The Sweeney (r) 12.50pm The Avengers (r)
1.55 Ironside (r) 3.00 Quincy ME (r) 4.00
The Sweeney (r) 5.00 The Avengers (r)
6.05 Storage Wars (r)
6.35 Storage Wars (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars (r)
7.35 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 Britain?s Busiest Motorway (4/6) (r)
8.30 Britain?s Busiest Motorway (5/6) (r)
9.00 Inside London Fire Brigade (2/3) (r)
10.00 FILM: The World Is Not Enough (12,
1999) James Bond is assigned to protect an oil
heiress from an infamous terrorist planning to
destroy a pipeline. Spy adventure starring
Pierce Brosnan, Robert Carlyle, Sophie
Marceau and Robbie Coltrane (AD)
12.40am FILM: Death Wish IV ? The
Crackdown (18, 1987) Crime thriller sequel
with Charles Bronson, Kay Lenz, Perry Lopez and
George Dickerson (AD) 2.45 Goals of the 70s (r)
2.50 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 12.00 Don?t
Say It, Bring It 1.00pm Top Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin
City Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice Road Truckers 5.00
Timber Kings. Beat builds a Western-style
saloon for a millionaire
6.00 Top Gear (AD)
7.00 Don?t Say It, Bring It. Double bill of the
game show presented by Jason Byrne
8.00 James May?s Cars of the People.
The world of the microcar (2/3)
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With Lenny Henry,
Andy Parsons and Ed Byrne
10.00 Zapped. The Super Solstice represents
Brian?s last chance to get home (AD)
10.40 Would I Lie to You? With Lorraine Kelly,
Dara O Briain, Barry Cryer and Sue Perkins
11.20 QI. Sean Lock, Bill Bailey and Jo Brand
join Alan Davies and Stephen Fry for questions
on subjects beginning with the letter E
12.00 Room 101 (AD) 12.40am Mock the Week
1.20 QI 2.00 Live at the Apollo. With Lenny
Henry 3.00 The Money Pit 4.00 Home Shopping
7.00am The Bill 8.00 London?s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine (AD) 1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 Pie in the
Sky 5.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
6.00 A Fine Romance. Mike ?ies to Brussels
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Foggy believes
he has discovered a giant woodpecker (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. Judith?s old ?ame
Alistair asks Sandy for a date
8.00 Inspector George Gently. A young woman
is left to drown in an upturned car by its driver,
but her connection to an aristocratic family?s heir
apparent impedes Gently and Bacchus?s
investigation (2/4) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The team probes the mystery
of a missing scientist, who disappeared in 2004
while working on a revolutionary project that
had attracted the interest of many large
organisations (7/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London?s Burning
2.00 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 Secrets of War
8.00 Time Team 10.00 Armada ? 12 Days to
Save England 11.00 Impossible Engineering
(AD) 12.00 Time Team 2.00pm Galapagos 3.00
Coast (AD) 4.00 One Foot in the Grave 5.00 The
Green Green Grass. Christmas edition of the
Only Fools and Horses spin-off from 2007
6.00 The World at War
7.00 After Hitler. Documentary examining the
Nuremberg Trials, the division of Germany, and
the founding of the United Nations
8.00 Shakespeare: The Legacy with John
Nettles. The actor examines the life of the Bard,
trying to discover what may have happened in a
gap where he disappears from historical records
9.00 Napoleon: The Egyptian Campaign. (1/2)
The French general?s military expedition to Egypt
10.00 Porridge. Christmas special from 1976.
Fletch is caught making booze in his cell (AD)
11.00 The Two Ronnies: Christmas Show.
Festive sketches with guest Patrick Troughton
12.00 Shakespeare: The Legacy with John
Nettles 1.00am The World at War 2.00
Secrets of War 3.00 Home Shopping
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Uefa Champions League Highlights
12.30am Teleshopping 1.30 After Midnight
2.30 Storage Hoarders (r) 3.20 ITV
Nightscreen 4.05 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 1.00am Teleshopping
2.00-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puf?n Rock) (r) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san
Rioghachd Bhig (Ben & Holly?s Little Kingdom)
(r) 5.45 Seonaidh (Shaun the Sheep) (r)
5.55 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse) 6.05
Dragonan: Reis chun an iomaill (Dragons: Race
to the Edge) 6.30 D� a-nis? (What Now?) 7.00
Turas a? Bhradain (The Salmon?s Journey) (r)
7.30 Speaking Our Language (r) 7.55 Earrann
Eachdraidh (History Shorts) (r) 8.00 An L�
(News) 8.30 Prosbaig 9.00 Cum Greim
10.00 Fonn Fonn Fonn (r) 10.30 Horo
Gheallaidh (Celtic Music Sessions) (r)
11.00-12midnight Gillean Grinn (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Yr Ysgol (r) 6.15 Teulu Mewn
Bacpac (r) 6.25 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 6.40
Sam T鈔 (r) 6.50 Nico N鬵 7.00 Deian a Loli a?r
Swigod Hud 7.15 Olobobs 7.20 Digbi Draig (r)
7.35 Gwdihw (r) 7.50 Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n
Gwneud (r) 8.00 Octonots (r) 8.10 Wmff (r)
8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r) 8.35 Y Teulu Mawr
(r) 8.45 Yn yr Ardd (r) 9.00 Popi?r Gath (r)
9.10 Stiw (r) 9.20 Ben a Mali a?u Byd Bach O
Hud (r) 9.35 Tomos a?i Ffrindiau (r) 9.45
Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 10.00 Deian a Loli a?r
Llyfrgell (r) 10.15 Teulu Mewn Bacpac (r)
10.25 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 10.40 Sam
T鈔 (r) 10.50 Nico N鬵 (r) 11.00 Dysgu Gyda
Cyw: Sbarc (r) 11.15 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Heini (r)
11.30 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Rapsgaliwn (r) 11.45
Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Cwm Teg (r) 11.50 Dysgu
Gyda Cyw: Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r)
12.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Heno (r)
12.30 Cefn Gwlad (r) (AD) 1.00 Caeau Cymru
(r) 1.30 Portmeirion (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 3.05 Ar y Lein (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr
5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Y Dyfnfor
5.25 Stwnsh: Ni Di Ni (r) 5.30 Stwnsh: Rhyfel
Mawr Trwy Lygaid Ifanc (r) 6.00 News S4C a?r
Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad (r) 6.30
Mabinogi-Ogi (r) 7.00 Heno 7.55 Chwedloni
8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25 Ar y Bysus 9.00
News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30 Parti Bwyd Beca
10.00 Rygbi Pawb 10.30-11.35 Llwyfan (r)
14
Wednesday November 22 2017 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7503
2
3
4
5
6
13
7
8
9
20
17
9
17
23
17
21
1
10
11
19
2
15
21
17
22
24
2
12
13
14
15
17
18
1
24
22
7
15
24
7
9
17
21
14
2
22
1
16
5
1
1
24
1
1
9
14
20
1
5
3
3
26
1
21
20
24
19
9
10
5
4
24
9
17
4
26
4
3
1
20
14
3
A
19
15
1
5
17
3
22
12
9
24
25
7
10
5
15
10
19
1
7
1
24
4
2
24
10
2
22
2
23
17
1
21
B
L
15
1
1
1
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
23
8
Solution to Crossword 7502
B I R T HD
L
E A
I N F UR I
N U D
DA T E S
E
F
M I DD L E
A
O
N SQUE
A X E N
G P CH
E X I L E
R A
D
A Y
D S A
A T E
G M
I R I U
O N
B A T
M R
A K
F
R C
I PO L
N M
A Y BR
M F
UNA
M T
PH I
S G
U
T L E
E
A S T
C R
A T A
K C
E A K
16 Religious ceremony (4)
18 Facial cosmetic (8)
20 Musical works featuring
soloists (8)
21 State of agitation (4)
22 Sphere (4)
23 County near London (6)
Down
2 One more (7)
3 Put on one's clothes (5)
4 Study of integers and their
properties (6,6)
5 Throw in random
directions (7)
6 Foreign (5)
7 Medical discipline (12)
13 Stage show (7)
15 Lift up (7)
17 Distinctive smell (5)
19 Deduce (from evidence) (5)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
17
21
19
2
16
20
19
1
7
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
9
10
11
12
13
22
23
24
25
26
L
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Forgive (an offence) (6)
Mammal; close securely (4)
Drill; dull person (4)
Fruit; language (8)
Poisonous gas (8)
Portable shelter (4)
Cause, bring about (6)
Soup dish (6)
4
D
4
1
5
8
9
10
11
12
14
2
24
21
Across
5
19
1
22
3
9
24
17
19
1
11
21
4
8
17
18
6
19
24
7
15
22
25
7
16
2
Train Tracks No 262
D
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday?s solution, right
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
Lexica
G
No 4016
E
B
L
E
S
U
U
L
K
F
M
R
E
O
R
S
M
P
I
M
T
O
B
H
L
A
T
E
S
E
D
T
U
L
O
P
D
B
A
E
E
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4179
Futoshiki No 3048
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
<
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
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charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2007
<
2
?
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
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No 4015
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
29
30
8
12
14
16
32
21
29
11
12
15
7
7
<
23
23
18
8
4
>
4
36
11
29
7
9
15
32
4
6
<
<
?
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
12
6
16
23
11
29
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
30
39
3
7
24
11
16
42
16
11
16
12
� PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3187
the times | Wednesday November 22 2017
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Magnus Carlsen
Black: Ernesto Inarkiev
World Rapid Championship,
Dubai 2014
King?s Indian Defence
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 f3 c5 4 d5 d6 5
e4 Bg7 6 Nc3 0-0 7 Bg5 h6 8 Be3
e6 9 Qd2 exd5 10 cxd5 Re8 11
Nge2 Nbd7 12 Nc1 a6 13 Be2 h5
14 0-0
Carlsen sees it is more important to mobilise the white army
than to restrain Black?s queenside
pawns.
14 ... Nh7 15 Nd3
Connecting the rooks and
bringing the knight into contact
with many important squares
such as e5, f4, and even b4.
________
� Dr1rDkD]
郉bD Dpg ]
遬h 0 hpD]
轉pDPD Dp]
� ) GP) D]
蹹 DBD D ]
� D !NHP)]
贒 $ DRI ]
谅媚牌侨
White?s extra central pawn is
more valuable than Black?s backwards a-pawn.
24 ... Rxc1 25 Rxc1 Nfd7 26 Bxg7
Kxg7 27 Qb2+ Qf6 28 Qxf6+
Nxf6 29 g3 Nc4
Removing the rooks with 29 ...
Rc8 was better. Now Carlsen finds
a powerful regrouping.
30 Bxc4 bxc4 31 Nc3
Not 31 Rxc4? Bxd5! and the
tide turns in Black?s favour.
31 ... Nd7 32 Rd1 f5 33 Rd4 Nb6
34 Nfd1 fxe4 35 Ne3
The world champion has placed
all of his pieces where they will be
maximally effective.
35 ... Bc8 36 Nxe4 c3 37 Kf2 Bb7
38 Nxc3 Re7 39 h3 Ba8 40 g4
hxg4 41 hxg4 Bb7 42 Kf3 Rc7 43
Ne4 Nc8 44 f5 gxf5 45 Nxf5+
Kg6 46 Nexd6 Nxd6 47 Nxd6
Ba8 48 Kf4 Rc1 49 Nf5 Rf1+ 50
Ke5 Kg5 51 Kd6 Rb1 52 Kc5 Rc1+
53 Kb6 Rc8 54 d6 Rb8+ 55 Kc7
Rb7+ 56 Kc8 Black resigns
________
� D D i 4] Winning Move
�D D D ]
� 0 HpDn0] Black to play. This position is from
Perez-So, St Louis 2017.
轉 hr)pD ] Dominguez
Black now found a clever move that
� G D ) D] pinpointed various tactical weaknesses in
�) D D )R] the white position and led to a decisive
� $ DKD D] gain of material. What did he play?
贒 D D D ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
47
MEDIUM
19
SQUARE
IT
HARDER
155 + 578
75%
OF IT
+6
1
+ 87 +OF/IT2
75%
OF IT
?6
x4
50%
OF IT
1/3
OF IT
? 38
+9
x2
50%
OF IT
+ 61 + 1/2 ? 79
+ 6 � 12
OF IT
+ 668 x 3 + 1/2 ? 778
OF IT
4/5
OF IT
Killer Tricky No 5733
7
16min
27
8
10
22
12
12
22
19
11
10
3
21
22
13
?J 8 5 4
?J 9
?J 9 5 3
?K 10 8
N
W
E
21
27
16
22
S
? AQ 2
Contract: 3NT ? AQ 3 2
?A 8 6
Lead: ?3
?J 4 3
?10 8 6 5
?Q 10
?AQ 9 7 2
S
W
N
E
1?
Pass
1?
Pass
2NT(1) Pass
3(2)
Pass
3NT
End
3? (2) Pass
(1) 17-18 balanced (strong case for playing
a 1NT rebid as 15-17 though).
(2) Showing delayed (ie three-card) support.
Relieved to have escaped the
club lead, you beat ?Q with ?A
and count eight top tricks. The
decision suit is spades, where you
have a possible finesse ? that suit
must be delayed. In hearts there are
no decisions, so you cash ?AKQ.
On the third heart West
discards ?8 (uneasily). You now
lead ?6 to ?K, East playing ?10.
You cash ?AQ and lead ?2, but
West follows low a third time and
it?s crunch point.
We know West has either ?xxx,
?Jx, ?J9xx, ?(?)xxx or ?Jxxx,
?Jx, ?J9xx, ?(?)xx. Would not
West have led a club with a fourcard suit that rated to be better
than his diamonds? Playing him
for the second hand, you finesse
?10. Success! East discards and
you cash ?K ? nine tricks.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
21
23
18
3
28
13
54min
11
24
21
18
2 1
1 3 2
3
1 2
9 7 1
8 9 7
3 1
2
2 1 3
1 3
5
7
8 7
9 5
9
4
7 2
9 1
8
5
7
8
9
6
2
4
5
1
3
5
2
4
3
8
1
7
6
9
8
6
1
2
3
9
4
5
7
15
9
9
5
2
7
4
6
1
3
8
2
3
5
8
9
7
6
4
1
1
9
8
4
6
2
3
7
5
6
4
7
5
1
3
8
9
2
4
5
1
6
8
2
9
7
3
7
2
8
3
9
4
1
6
5
6
3
9
5
7
1
2
8
4
1
4
5
2
3
7
6
9
8
3
6
2
9
1
8
4
5
7
8
9
7
4
6
5
3
1
2
9
7
3
8
2
6
5
4
1
5
8
6
1
4
3
7
2
9
2
1
4
7
5
9
8
3
6
=
1
=
12
V I L I F Y
E
O O
NO T AR Y
U
G
E X P R E S
I
SMOO T H
T
N
U
OD E
B L
O
E
E
P URR
F
E
I D E
DRUM
Z
7 9
7 9 8
5
1 3
1 4 2
3 2 1
3 5
5
3 2 1
1 3
22
8
2
7
9
6
1
4
5
3
1
3
6
8
5
4
2
7
9
4
9
5
7
2
3
8
6
1
4
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
3
10
6
6
7
1
4
8
9
5
3
2
4
2
5
9
1
6
7
3
8
7
3
6
8
2
4
1
9
5
8
9
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
6
3
7
2
1
6
9
5
8
4
4
?
5
7
x
x
4
9
5
4
2
6
3
7
9
1
8
2
6
9
1
7
5
3
8
4
7
1
4
3
9
8
6
2
5
3
5
8
2
4
6
1
9
7
5
4
9
2
3
8
6
1
7
1
6
8
7
4
5
3
2
9
6
5
3
4
9
1
8
7
2
9
1
7
5
8
2
4
6
3
2
8
4
6
7
3
9
5
1
�
5
2
3
4
1
6
5
7
8
9
9
1
7
4
3
8
2
5
6
5
6
8
9
2
7
4
1
3
7
9
6
8
5
1
3
4
2
4
2
1
6
7
3
8
9
5
8
5
3
2
9
4
6
7
1
6
7
2
5
4
9
1
3
8
3
8
5
7
1
2
9
6
4
1
4
9
3
8
6
5
2
7
1
?
2
2
?
4
3
4 > 3
5
1 < 4
3
5
3
8
A
L
B
S
S
T
U
U
O
D
S
E
E
I
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2
2
x
x
6
x
-
A
1
5
4
B
R
O
X
T
H
Y
R
A
Y
A
P
L
Y
Lexica 4014
x
x
Suko 2088
Lexica 4013
-
x
R I A
S
A L K
M A
MAN
O C
NGE
I
ACK
N
CH E
U
E
DA L
Sudoku 9470
9
8
3
5
1
2
7
4
6
Set Square 2009
4 2
2
2
Train Tracks 261
H
A
QU I P
M
T
A M
S L Y
H
T
WH I
P
ACK J
R O
GAU
A
L
S AN
Futoshiki 3047
9
11
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 15 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
= 13 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
2
?
2 < 3
?
4
1
6
22
=
35
Killer 5732
Cell Blocks 3069
10
-
1
22
x
x
3
12
7
Sudoku 9469
4
7
3
1
5
8
9
2
6
7
22
+
x
5
16
x
All the digits
= 2 from 1-9 are
Codeword 3186
7
9
9 6
7 8
2
5
1 9
3 8
6
7
21
7
1
-
-
KenKen 4178
20
+
x
Killer 5731
Killer Deadly No 5734
?9 7
2
Solutions
3
1
6
9
7
5
2
8
4
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
?K 7 4
?K 7 4 2
?6 5
4
3
-
Sudoku 9468
9
2 2
-
Kakuro 2006
8
14
24
5
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 2010
Yesterday?s answers
est, gel, gelt, get, glue, glute, gluteus,
guest, gules, gulet, leg, lest, let, leu,
lues, luge, lute, set, slue, sue, suet, teg,
tule, use, ute
27
9
3 2
4
4
3
2
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 13 words, average;
18, good; 24, very good; 30, excellent
(A) can be played early while
(B) should ideally be delayed.
? K 10 6 3
? 879
2 2
Polygon
18
Bridge Andrew Robson
Counting and Card Placement
33 - More Discovery Play:
Delaying the choice suit
Playing a bridge hand is like solving a murder mystery. You?re
working hard to turn uncertainty
into certainty.
In your efforts to ascertain the
whereabouts of the 26 missing cards,
you should focus on shape ? the
shape of two hidden hands; and
high-card points ? the number of
points they each hold. Sometimes
one will be a more productive
avenue; sometimes the other; sometimes both. It helps to concentrate on
one opposing hand, the one about
which you know most. Naturally,
when you know one opposing hand,
you can work out the other.
In your quest to learn more
about the opposing hands, you can
play on suits that have only one
way to be played; but you should
be reluctant to play on suits that
have choices of play. Delay those
suits and maybe you?ll play them
more effectively once you?ve garnered more information.
Contrast:
Dummy
Dummy
?AQ32
?AQ92
(A)
(B)
Declarer
Declarer
?K1054
?K1043
In (A), you have only one way to
play the suit. Cash ?AQ and, if
West discards, finesse ?10. You
cannot pick up ?J98x with West.
In (B), you can cash ?A but now
have a choice of which ?Q9/?K10
finesse position to retain, depending on which opponent you think is
more likely to have ?J87x.
EASY
x2
� PUZZLER MEDIA
The S鋗isch variation against the
King?s Indian has a reputation as
one of the most solid, indeed
monolithic, weapons with which
to combat that volatile defence. It
is interesting to note that Tigran
Petrosian, in his many duels as
White against the eminent King?s
Indian specialist Svetozar Gligoric, invariably won when using
the S鋗isch, whereas when adopting alternative approaches, the
Armenian world champion suffered some humiliating losses.
A new book by Eric Montany,
Opening Repertoire: The Modern
S鋗isch (Everyman Chess), focuses on the relatively unusual subvariation based on the development of White?s queen?s bishop to
g5, rather than e3, a line I have
used myself with considerable
success, as we shall observe later
this week.
15 ... Ne5 16 Nf2 b5 17 a3 Rb8 18
b4 cxb4 19 axb4 Bb7 20 f4 Nd7
After 20 ... Nc4 21 Bxc4 bxc4 22
Bd4 Nf6 23 Rfe1, Black lacks the
necessary counterplay against
White?s centre.
21 Bd4 Rc8 22 Rac1 Nhf6 23 Bd3
Nb6 24 Ne2
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Monolithic
Cell Blocks No 3070
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
1
Quiz 1 Iris 2 40 3 London Calling 4 Bertie Ahern.
His daughter is Cecelia Ahern 5 George I
6 Max Immelmann 7 Tel Aviv 8 Zinc sulphate
9 Vegetarian. It was founded in 1898 10 Milan
11 How I Won the War 12 William Langland
13 Friedrich Nietzsche 14 Seabiscuit 15 Dame
Kiri Te Kanawa
F
F
U
A
S
W
I
S
T
H
A
R
O
G
N
E
Word watch
Millefiori (a) Decorative
glassware
Milneb (c) An organic
compound used as a
fungicide
Millenary (b) A sum or
aggregate of one thousand
Brain Trainer
Easy 6; Medium 362;
Harder 6,181
Chess 1 ... Nd3! 2 Rc2
Ndxf4+ 3 gxf4 Nxf4+
4 Kf3 Nxh3 wins material.
White can do nothing
constructive with the
discovered check
22.11.17
MindGames
Difficult No 9471
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Fiendish No 9472
5
6
4
7
7
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
1
1
Millefiori
a Glassware
b A relaxed attitude
c A pastry
3
Milneb
a A teddy-bear
enthusiast
b A short cloak
c A fungicide
9
8
2
2
6
Millenary
a An ex-soldier
b An aggregate
c Headwear
Answers on page 15
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
7
6
9 5 6
4
9
3
2
5
1 6 8
6
Super fiendish No 9473
6
3
1 3
4
5
3
9 7
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
3 7
5
3
8
9
12 Who wrote
the 14th-century
allegorical narrative
poem Piers Plowman?
15
6 Which German First
World War flying ace
was known as ?the
Eagle of Lille??
7 The town planner
Patrick Geddes presented
the 1925 master plan
for which Israeli city?
8 Which inorganic
compound was
historically known as
white vitriol?
4
8
9 Based in Zurich, Haus
Hiltl is the world?s
oldest continuously
open type of which
restaurant?
10 The Piccolo Teatro,
Italy?s first permanent
theatre, was founded
in which city in 1947?
11 On the cover
of Rolling Stone
magazine?s first issue
13 Which German
philosopher
introduced the
concept of eternal
recurrence in his
work The Gay Science?
Yesterday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 966
14 Known as ?Silent
Tom?, Tom Smith
became famous as
the trainer of which
American racehorse?
15 Which recently
retired opera star
is pictured?
Answers on page 15
13
7
16
14
17
19
22
6
11
12
15
5
18
20
23
T
R
A
N
S
E
P
T
S
A
G
A
AME
I
B
R TWO
R
T
P E L T
L
R I ME
G
K N I G
O
I
MB E R
L
T
ME T H
S T
A
R K
E
I
T
M I
N
H T
U
R
N
Y S
AGN A N T
R
P
R
A L P H A
S
O M
MP A I R
N
P
N I S T E R
N
U
HOA RD
A
V
E
U N D OWN
D
I
C
I D L E
T
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Pedro
9
10
1
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
was a photo of John
Lennon in which film?
3
4
1 9 8 5 4
The Times Quick Cryptic No 967
2
3
2 8
8 7
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
2 What is the
minimum age of a
quadragenarian?
1
6
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 Which coloured part
of the eye shares its
name with a flower?
5 Which British
monarch was the son
of Ernest Augustus,
Elector of BrunswickL黱eburg and Sophia
of Hanover?
6
9 2
5 4
GETTY IMAGES
4 The daughter of which
former Taoiseach of
Ireland wrote the 2004
novel PS, I Love You?
4
7
7
7 1
1 6
5
2
4
3
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 Which 1979 double
album by the Clash
features the tracks Lost
in the Supermarket
and Clampdown?
5 1
4
5
21
Across
8 Fire or non-?re, possibly (7)
9 String of islands having a
charge for crossing? (5)
10 Summons to meal draws in
one attending (5)
11 Boat more likely to ?oat? (7)
12 Curious when taken aback by
excellent Japanese warrior (7)
14 Manmade material sported by
many Londoners (5)
15 Country I name that has
rejected support (5)
17 Prominent foreigner seen in
street (7)
19 Gangster in So?a, corrupt in a
short time (7)
20 Danger for each one left (5)
22 Small corner hard to be found
in French resort (5)
23 Out of bed, drunk and tense
(7)
Down
1 Equipment includes new
telephone (4)
2 Ratify a ?ne company (6)
3
4
5
6
7
12
13
16
18
20
21
Mist surrounds river and pond
creature (4)
Not something you?ll salvage
from a wreck, perhaps (2-6,5)
Alarming changes in key
election seat (8)
Job almost entirely involving
the mail (6)
Instrument, note, used in lively
recital (8)
I?m beginning to mature
in handling of golf-club under
waterlogged conditions (8)
Boy, English, engaged in
study? That?s sensible (8)
A mistake to change sides? (6)
Wind up new newspaper
appearing in middle of week
(6)
Compassion? Heartless party
will suppress it (4)
First of lunches consumed
behind schedule (4)
DIGITAL RADIO ? APP
VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
4
3
1
2
7
of Frank Bridge) 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday November 22 2017
11
1G T
CATHERINE ASHMORE
World music
Carminho Sings Jobim
Barbican
T
{{{{(
o an outsider they can
sometimes sound like two
different languages. With its
soft, nasal shades, the
Portuguese we hear on a
Jo鉶 Gilberto record can make the
cadences of the motherland appear
harsh and guttural. Bossa nova is all
about understatement; fado, the folk
music of Portugal, is much more
declamatory, sometimes downright
melodramatic.
The two traditions were woven
together in this compelling display at
the EFG London Jazz Festival, with
the young fado singer known as
Carminho (full name, Maria do Carmo
Carvalho Rebelo de Andrade) paying
homage to Ant鬾io Carlos Jobim. For
this project she could not have had
better guides. The cellist and arranger
Jaques Morelenbaum is a master of
this kind of chamber music and the
Jobim connection was made flesh in
the self-effacing form of the
composer?s son, Paulo, on guitar, and
grandson Daniel on piano.
Admittedly, Morelenbaum?s presence
did sometimes leave you wishing that
his wife, Paula, could have been there
too. No singer caresses Sabi� or O
Grande Amor with as much tenderness
and precision. Yet if Carminho?s
versions did not flow as seductively,
her more jagged approach and broader
dynamic range had compensations of
their own. On Retrato em Branco e
Preto she gave Chico Buarque?s lyrics
the full measure of ruefulness.
Morelenbaum added washes of
subtle colour, while the drummer
Paulo Braga gave the quartet just the
right amount of momentum. Wave, a
song that Anglo-American singers
often turn into stodgy MOR, took
flight here. Before she left, Carminho
soared on Saudades do Brasil em
Portugal, a lament by Jobim?s
collaborator, the poet and diplomat
Vinicius de Moraes. Two continents
came within touching distance.
Clive Davis
Comedy
Greg Davies
Eventim Apollo, W6
G
{{{((
reg Davies is an outsized
presence in British comedy,
plying a vision of barely
fettered vitality in
The Inbetweeners, Cuckoo,
Taskmaster and his starring sitcom
Man Down. These claims to
small-screen fame, he warns at the
start of You Magnificent Beast, don?t
quite hint at the material he?s about to
bellow at us. ?I am a very dirty boy.?
Well, he wasn?t so dirty before, and
maybe that?s why I was less persuaded
than usual by his biggest-selling and
least charming live show. Davies is
still a strong storyteller, a big kid
forever astounded and amused by life?s
capacity for ludicrousness. This burly,
6ft 8in comic sells us on his tall stories:
the man-sized teddy bear his mum
made for him; the three-hour speech
that Chris Eubank gave when he
visited the school where Davies taught
drama. At his best, when he describes
Robert Murray as Tom and Victoria Simmonds as Baba the Turk
On the merry
road to Bedlam
First-rate performances and a magical
settin
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