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The Times Times 2 - 26 April 2018

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April 26 | 2018
La grande séduction
How Macron pulled off the big schmooze
2
1G T
Thursday April 26 2018 | the times
times2
‘The fact that
Just how, oh how
did Kate do it? I may
have an inkling
Deborah Ross
T
PRESS ASSOCIATION
he Duchess of
Cambridge gave
birth to a baby
boy — no name
yet, as I write,
but I’m hoping
for Of Darkness
— and six hours
later she was standing on those
hospital steps, looking fabulous,
so people are asking: how did
she do it?
It’s a mystery, to be sure. How
did she do it? How, how, how?
I’m certain if I, for instance, had
a baby in the exclusive private
wing of a hospital with a whole
slew of midwives in attendance,
as well as a whole slew of
consultant obstetricians and
paediatricians, should they be
required, I’d still be as stressed
as if I’d pulled the emergency
cord and nobody came. Or pulled
the cord and was told there was
only one obstetrician on duty
and the obstetrician is backed up,
but will try to see you after six
hysterectomies, 29 ventouse
deliveries and 87 caesareans
have been cleared. Don’t push!
And don’t pull the cord again,
time-waster!
I don’t know. I see how such
things might take a toll on your
appearance, just as begging and
begging for an epidural until your
face is caked in tears and snot
might take a toll on your
appearance, and just as biting into
your own arm might take a toll on
your appearance, particularly as
it’s likely to leave an unsightly
scar. Also, having to wait hours
for an episiotomy, that can take
it out of you and make you look
quite peaky, as can the lack of
à la carte, and only a Twix for
Fat people,
the new
smokers
Rose McGowan, the most vociferous
of Harvey Weinstein’s accusers, tells
Julia Llewellyn Smith how her life has
changed since she claimed he raped her
your trouble. But, come on, we’re
clutching at straws here.
So it’s a mystery. A total,
complete and absolute mystery.
How did she do it? How, how,
how? True, the duchess had her
hairdresser on site too, but what
use is a hairdresser in such
circumstances, really? Yes,
childbirth can be unkind to a
hairdo. The tears and the snot will
have worked their way in there,
and the sweat, as well as those
clots from the placenta, because
those clots get everywhere, and
maybe there has been vomit. It
may even be that the hair is rigid
and on end, due to the tears and
the snot and the sweat and the
Jamie Oliver has
written a letter to
Theresa May, urging
her to act on obesity by
banning Bogof offers on
junk food, restricting
advertising on such
foods and so on, and
with good reason.
Apparently obesity
represents a deadlier
threat to health than
smoking, which is
frightening, and also
makes you wonder: are
fat people the new
smokers? And if so,
how would this even
play out? If you are
going to be fat, would
you mind being fat at
the bottom of the
garden, or at least
opening a window? I’m
pregnant, you may have
clots and the vomit. You may look
like Christine from The Phantom
of the Opera, turned upside down,
then righted again, but the hair
didn’t follow. However, aside from
washing it all out and offering a
stunning, bouncy, shiny blow-dry,
can we properly say having a
hairdresser to hand makes that
much of a difference? In truth?
Same with the woman who
curates the duchess’s wardrobe.
She was present too, and said,
presumably: “Yes, yes, of course
you can stumble out foggily in
that blood-splattered nightie with
the bits of sick on it, and those
clots, because those clots get
everywhere, and those wet
patches, is that your milk coming
through? But here’s the £4,000
bespoke Jenny Packham dress
I curated for you, in my role as
curator. And here are the £400
shoes. Shall we give it a try? Arms
up, love, and I’ll do the rest.” So
there is that, but we are getting
quite petty now.
I guess we’ll never know how
she did it, just as we’ll never know
how she could look so relaxed
and serene on those hospital
steps. OK, she wasn’t faced with
having to take the bus home with
amniotic fluid still trickling down
her legs because the hospital
parking would have set her back
about £48,000, so no car. And she
didn’t have to worry about the
situation at home, given there’s
the nanny at Kensington Palace,
as well as all those servants to
take the heat off.
But even so, how did she do it?
How? It’s a miracle, that’s what it
is. A miracle, plain as day. And
I’m sorry, but I’m just not
prepared to hear otherwise.
noticed, and therefore
I’ll thank you not to be
fat near me or my
unborn baby?
Perhaps there will
even come a time when
people will look back
and ask how anyone
was allowed to be fat on
the top deck of a bus, or
fat at the cinema, or fat
at their desk. If you are
going to be fat at your
desk, could you maybe
point your fat in the
opposite direction?
Agreed, tackling
smoking and tackling
obesity are not
equivalent — no one
needs to smoke,
everyone needs to eat;
you can shame smokers
without worrying about
collateral damage in
the form of eating
disorders — but as I’m
having fun with this
analogy, I shall simply
continue. Should we
make fat people huddle
outside office buildings,
if they want to be fat,
and if they must persist
in killing themselves in
this way?
Obesity is a complex
problem, existing at
that juncture where
advanced capitalism,
the necessity of
consumption, personal
volition and changes to
lifestyle meet, but if we
can say one thing with
certainty, that one
thing is this: you can’t
be fat secretly then try
to disguise it with
mints. We will know.
R
ose McGowan should
be hailed as a heroine.
In 2016, before the
Harvey Weinstein
scandal exploded, she
said on Twitter that
she had been raped by
a “studio head”. When
last year other actresses such as
Ashley Judd and Salma Hayek claimed
that Weinstein had assaulted them, she
was the first to join in, and the loudest,
adding that Weinstein had tried to ruin
her career and buy her silence. But in
Hollywood, at least, she is perceived
less as a trailblazer for the ensuing Me
Too movement as a liability to it,
prone to profane diatribes against not
only Weinstein but the entire “myopic,
self-fellating” film industry, which, she
says, for more than 20 years colluded
in Weinstein’s atrocities.
McGowan refuses to accept the
mealy-mouthed Time’s Up waffle as a
sufficient response to the scandal. She
scoffs at actresses wearing black on
the Golden Globes red carpet. When
the near-sacred Meryl Streep was said
to be planning to join the “silent
protest”, McGowan accused her of
“hypocrisy”. Streep maintained she
had no idea of Weinstein’s behaviour.
McGowan’s peers have greeted her
outbursts with embarrassed silence;
at this year’s self-flagellating award
ceremonies no mention was made of
her. “People avoided me,” she tells me
cheerfully. “I was a dangerous
quantity. People didn’t want to catch
what I had. When you break it down
that you’re simply trying to stop an
international rapist, it’s pretty strange.”
Sitting in a meeting room in The
Times, McGowan, 44, is not at all what
I expected. I admire her recent memoir
Brave, which combines an account of
her Dickensian childhood with an
excoriating exploration of Hollywood’s
“self-fellating” status and how it
promotes misogyny. “We laugh at
those executives in their yellow
Lamborghinis,” she says, “but these are
the people that mould our minds.”
I push the book on to teenage girls,
hoping that they will imbibe its
message that “Hollywood creates a
f***-up mirror for you to look in”, but
I’m still not looking forward to
meeting McGowan. On chat shows
she has babbled incoherently, and in
print often comes across as furious to
the point of derangement. I’m worried
that the mildest question might
inadvertently provoke a meltdown.
Yet the McGowan sitting before me
is friendly and with an appealingly dry
sense of humour, albeit also prone to
wafty Californian statements (“I used
to sleep in my grandma’s satellite dish,”
she says at one point). “I’m always
portrayed as this rabid, angry person,
but I can say these horrible things and
still be laughing,” she says.
She’s in a black and gold vintage
jacket and a knee-length black lacy
skirt; her vivid face is framed by a
pixie cut — an act of defiance against
Hollywood’s “fantasy f***-toy ideal”,
she says. “I know what it’s like to be in
a movie theatre with a guy and be
uncomfortable because there’s a hot
babe in it. I understood that I was also
the one causing that feeling,” she says,
adding quietly: “It’s weird being a pixel.”
She’s in London with her lawyer to
“submit to parliament” about
abolishing non-disclosure agreements
“if there’s sexual harassment or abuse
or assault”. Next month she will be
back to appear at the Hay literary
festival. “I can’t wait. I’m a book nerd.”
She no longer acts. “I always hated
it, though I happened to be good at it.
I doubt they’ll ever stop calling me an
actress, but I now see myself as an
artist and activist.” She’s keen to move
to London and is scouting out homes
in the hip Bethnal Green area in the
East End. “My work is really about
raising awareness and in America they
fight it hard. I’m down for a fight, but
there’s a point where you go, ‘Here’s
the blueprint, here you go.’ Here it’s a
clean start and I’ve earned it.”
Occasionally McGowan’s claims
about her life before and after the
revelation, as Weinstein’s employees
harassed her during the writing of the
book, sound too bizarre to be true. She
was “followed by Israeli spies”, and
even, she thinks, had her computer
hacked and nude photos of her and
her ex-husband released. These stories
are supported, though, by evidence
collated for The New Yorker by Ronan
Farrow, whose work on Weinstein,
Those executives
in their yellow
Lamborghinis
mould our minds
detailing how he hired private security
firms employing ex-Mossad agents
to silence his victims, has just won
a Pulitzer prize. Weinstein’s
spokeswoman has said: “It is a fiction
to suggest that any individuals were
targeted or suppressed at any time.”
“Someone asked if I was paranoid,”
McGowan says. “I was, like, ‘No, it’s
real. They tried to destroy me in every
way.’ They came quite close.” She’s
awaiting a court case in Virginia,
where she’s charged with possessing
cocaine, found in a wallet she lost on
an aeroplane and which her lawyers
claim was planted. “Usually, I use fake
names, but I can’t when I fly and that’s
always when things happen to me. The
level of conspiracy is vast.”
McGowan was born in Italy, where
her American parents lived in the freelove-practising cult Children of God.
Growing up in squalor, she was forced
to sing on the streets of Rome to earn
cash for the cult’s leader, something
that she compares to her Hollywood
experiences. Only when the cult began
the times | Thursday April 26 2018
3
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times2
I’m still sane is a miracle’
ALISA CONNAN FOR THE TIMES; HAIR AND MAKE UP: JULIE COOPER/TERRI MANDUCA
advocating sex with children did her
father — he had several “wives” and
she was unclear who her mother was
— return to the US with his children.
“I found America so shocking. They
had orange cheese,” she says crisply.
For the next few years McGowan
shuttled between her cruel father and
flaky mother, who had returned to the
US. By the age of 12 she was begging,
sleeping rough and vulnerable to
predators. “It was just so cold,” she says
bleakly. She fell into acting at the age of
15, after seeing an advertisement for
extras. She hated the degradations of
cattle-call auditions and developed an
eating disorder, but felt safe from the
paedophiles who prowled the streets.
She was 23 and seemed on the verge
of a Cinderella ending when her agent
arranged for her to meet Weinstein in
a restaurant during the Sundance Film
Festival. The venue was changed to his
hotel suite, where she claims Weinstein
stripped her, forced her into a Jacuzzi
and performed oral sex on her.
“That was the day when evil entered
my life,” she says softly, tears pricking
at her eyes. “I was so shocked because
I thought I’d outsmarted all the trolls.”
She consulted a lawyer, who told her
that she would never win a court case
because she had filmed sex scenes. “I
was an actress; I was just disposable.”
Weinstein settled, without admitting
any wrongdoing, for $100,000. Many
don’t understand why she took it. “I
didn’t accept it, I requested
it; there’s a difference. I did
it because I wanted to buy
a billboard on Sunset
Boulevard that said, ‘Harvey
Weinstein is a rapist’, but the
company I tried to buy it
from wouldn’t let me.”
Others ask why, years after the
event, McGowan allowed herself
to be photographed with Weinstein
on the red carpet. “He would
orchestrate that,” she says. “He’d grab
you tightly round the ribcage and you
would just leave your body and smile
because what else can you do in front
of the cameras when you’re being
touched by the person who hurt you,
who ruined your life? It’s beyond
warped. I was placed next to him at a
dinner in Cannes at his request, him
and his wife — she didn’t talk to me,
but I didn’t want to talk to her either. I
had to auction something on stage and
he put his arm around me and talked
into the microphone at the same time
as me. There are so many levels of
horror and again you’re trapped.”
She could have found another job. “I
was famous, what other work are you
going to get?” she says. “An account
executive job somewhere? I was stuck.”
I wouldn’t buy this were it not that she
was terrified of becoming homeless
again. Yet she claims Weinstein, who
“was Hollywood’s de facto figurehead,
he was thanked more times than God
Top: Rose McGowan
and, above, with
Harvey Weinstein
in 2005
Brave by Rose
McGowan is published
by HarperCollins, £20
at the Oscars”, told directors and
producers that McGowan was difficult
and unstable (he denies this), making it
impossible for her to find decent roles.
How do other Hollywood women
cope with such humiliation, I ask. “I
think a lot of people are lucky enough
to have friends and allies,” she says,
again blinking away tears. “All that
was stolen from me by . . .” She can’t say
Weinstein’s name. “I was alone in that
world and it was harrowing. Even my
family were confused about the
difference between the person they
knew and the character they read
about constantly being slut-shamed.”
The “weirdo” reputation she says
Weinstein promoted was cemented by
her engagement to the rocker Marilyn
Manson. There followed an unhappy
relationship with the director and
Quentin Tarantino collaborator Robert
Rodriguez (the book accuses both of
misogyny) and a brief marriage to the
artist Davey Detail. She’s happiest, she
says, in her present relationship. “It’s
with a really stellar creature, a nonbinary situation,” she says cryptically,
although she has posted on Instagram
pictures of herself with the musician
Josh Latin, aka Boots.
Despite her #RoseArmy Twitter
following, McGowan feels far from
vindicated; she is deeply shaken by
what she describes as harassment from
Weinstein’s people. “The fact that I’m
still here and have come through quite
sane is nothing short of a miracle.”
Despite more than 80 accusations of
abuse, Weinstein, who is reportedly in
an Arizona clinic, hasn’t faced criminal
charges. “If it was an African-American
man and two women said he stole my
purse, do you not think that would be
enough?” she asks tight-lipped.
She’s full of fury for Weinstein’s
staff. “Ultimately, the fault
lies with [him], but I actually
find those he employed to
come after me and the
other survivors more
reprehensible because
they’re not insane, so what’s
their excuse?” Weinstein has
“unequivocally denied” all
allegations of non-consensual
sex and “confirmed that there
were never any acts of retaliation
against any women who refused
his sexual advances”.
In February her former manager, Jill
Messick, who, according to McGowan,
responded to news of the rape by
telling her it would help her career,
killed herself. Messick’s family issued
a statement saying that Messick had
reported McGowan’s account of what
happened to her bosses and believed
the matter had been “settled”. “I was
there when it happened,” McGowan
says after a long pause. “I feel terribly
for [Messick’s] family, but she had a lot
of troubles over the years. I hope she
finds peace on the astral plane.”
In the unapologetic spirit that upsets
so many, she refuses to pander to men
who protest that they are “good guys”.
“I hear that all the time,” she says,
shrugging. “I say to men and women,
‘I think we all, including me, can be
10 per cent better.’ Everyone wants
[assault victims] to go away so they
can feel better. It’s not my job to make
people feel better.”
It’s not, but I say goodbye to her
feeling, quite unexpectedly, uplifted.
The lowdown
Paul Pester
All the nice girls like a man in
a suit.
You mean that you, specifically, like
a man in a suit, because you are
lacking in imagination and have an
undiagnosed older-man complex?
Yes.
Well, I have bad news. Get used to
Lycra. Exhibit A is the 54-year-old
boss of TSB, Paul Pester, who . . .
Whoa. Paul Pester? That’s just not
an OK name. A man can’t go
around for 54 years being called
Paul Pester, it’s not fair.
Well, he has probably got used to it,
and it’s the least of his problems.
Allow me to resume. A photograph
has been circulated widely of Pester
all Lycra’d up. In a wetsuit, to be
precise, while doing a triathlon.
So? He’s hardly the first middleaged man to try to get fit or do a
triathlon. Who’s laughing?
Apart from you, you mean?
I’m sympathising with his
surname, not laughing at his
wetsuit. It’s different.
Whatever. Mainly the laughter is
coming from all the TSB customers
who were furious that they couldn’t
access their online accounts for days.
So what did poor Mr Pester do?
He went on TV to say that there had
been no data-security breach, it was
just that the bank’s computers
couldn’t cope with demand.
What else did he say?
“For the vast majority of our
customers, in the vast majority of
ways, the bank is running smoothly.”
That must have soothed the fraying
tempers of those affected.
One would imagine so, yes.
So what did they say?
Ha ha ha ha ha ha, look at the
Mamil in his wetsuit.
How unpleasantly vulgar of them.
If you’ll forgive me, I have a date
with a man in a suit.
He’ll be in Lycra at the weekend.
You’ll see.
Hilary Rose
4
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Thursday April 26 2018 | the times
times2
They held hands, they kissed
Macron’s wooing
of Trump didn’t
surprise anyone in
France. He just
can’t help himself,
says Adam Sage
E
mmanuel Macron’s state
visit to the US has done
much to reinforce his
claim to be Donald
Trump’s best friend on
the world stage. They
planted an oak tree
together, kissed on both
cheeks and got up close as Trump
flicked dandruff from Macron’s collar
before a press conference.
Some commentators were amazed to
see such displays of affection between
two figures who are poles apart
politically — the 40-year-old, proEurope, globalist intellectual French
man and the 71-year-old, earthy,
Brexit-backing protectionist American.
Those familiar with Macron were
less surprised. They pointed out that
he has always been attracted to older
people, especially when they are in
positions of authority, and
inevitably tries to chat them up.
Brigitte Macron, his wife, is
the most obvious example, given
that she was a teacher at his
secondary school when he
seduced her and is 24 years his
senior. But there are many
others too — philosophers,
bankers and politicians — who
have fallen for Macron’s charm
at one point or another.
So it came as no shock when
he tried to seduce Trump as
well, at least not to Anne Fulda,
the author of a biography
entitled Emmanuel Macron, Such
a Perfect Young Man. “He needs
to be admired by those he
frequents, particularly by his
elders, by those who have a
power he does not possess,” she
wrote. “He wants to conquer
them, to embrace them.”
A couple of years ago rumours
circulated in Paris that he was gay, but
he denied them and there has never
been evidence to back them up. Fulda
has another theory, claiming that he is
an “asexual Don Juan . . . in whose eyes
seduction is not linked to sexuality,
nor the accumulation of feminine
conquests, but instead to a sort of
perpetual narcissistic reassurance”.
Whatever the truth, there is no
doubt that it is easy to fall for Macron.
Brigitte Macron and
Melania Trump at the
White House
Christophe Castaner, the
C
ggeneral secretary of La
République en Marche,
R
Macron’s centrist party,
M
cconfessed that there was
a “romantic dimension” to
ttheir relationship, at least on
his side. By this he did not
h
mean that he was prepared to
m
gget into bed with the president,
just that he was devoted
ju
beyond duty.
b
“I need a boss and I need to
aadmire him. And everything
aabout Emmanuel is fascinating.
His career, his intelligence, his
H
vvivacity, his physical power,
eeven,” Castaner said.
Whereas the tactile Nicolas
Sarkozy would greet visitors with
S
a pat on the back, Macron “plants
his eyes in your eyes and puts
h
a hook on your deepest soul”,
wrote Challenges, the business
w
magazine, in an article that
m
described the French president as
“a weapon of mass seduction”.
Macron’s greatest assets are an
uncanny knack for guessing what his
visitors want to hear and an ability to
express that better than they can often
do themselves.
When I interviewed him before he
became president he was a bewitching
mixture of relaxed charm and political
acumen, arguing for the sort of
reforms that Britons tend to think
France needs. When the flash failed to
work, he invited the photographer to
return the next day, despite the
anguished remonstrations of his aides,
who claimed that he had no time. I
came away thinking that he was
particularly laid-back for a French
politician, but we subsequently
discovered the error of our ways. Since
entering the Élysée Palace he has
ridden roughshod over opposition
parties, unions and the media.
Fulda says that the French
establishment is full of people
“subjugated by the little Macron who
have sometimes had the impression
afterwards that their pockets have
been picked”. François Hollande, his
predecessor, is a case in point, falling
under Macron’s spell when he was a
merchant banker and giving him
his first job in politics as economy
minister, but then being stabbed in
the back by his protégé, who left the
cabinet, founded a political party and
ran for the presidency.
It remains to be seen whether
Trump will come to regret meeting
Macron too. For now, however, he
appears enthralled and Macron’s visit
is playing well at home. “Even if you
detest this Macron, you have to admit
that when it comes to seduction, he’s
good,” Roselyne Bachelot, a former
centre-right health minister, said.
the times | Thursday April 26 2018
5
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times2
COVER: REUTERS, GETTY. BELOW: ASSOCIATED PRESS; GETTY IMAGES, REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Anatomy of
a seduction
Lock eyes
The hug
(and that was the men)
I was seduced by les
hommes Lisa Hilton
I
have always been a bit of a
pushover where French men are
concerned. From my first French
kiss at the age of 14 on the school
exchange, to my first experience
of real sex (where you learn you
can have an orgasm with someone
other than yourself) in Paris, to
an incandescent scramble on the
omelette plaque in the Breton
restaurant where I waitressed, I have
lived the cliché and discovered that,
like all clichés, it turns out to be true.
French men just are seductive. It’s
admittedly disconcerting to find that
I have something in common with
Donald Trump, but watching the great
comb-over being bowled over on
Emmanuel Macron’s state visit, I
almost felt sorry for him. Seeing him
all wide-eyed and twitchy under the
Macron charm offensive, it was
obvious he didn’t have a chance.
Yet what is it that makes French
men so alluring? The accent? The
natty way with a cashmere scarf?
After living in France for years, I have
realised it’s more accurate to suggest
that French men take a seductive
approach to life. As Elaine Sciolino, an
American journalist and the author of
La Seduction: How the French Play the
Game of Life, suggests, charming
people is seen as part of the pleasure
of living, “to attract or influence, even
if it’s just for fun”.
Perhaps the mistake we Brits make
is to assume that seduction is confined
to erotic encounters. That may be why
an infamous letter to Le Monde, signed
by many prominent French women
Flirtation is
part of civilised
behaviour —
it’s expected
including Catherine Deneuve, in
which it was claimed that “seduction is
not a crime” was met with anger and
bewilderment in the UK. Now, as in
the 19th century, the figure of the vile
seducer in Anglo-Saxon culture is
associated with the abuse of power,
whereas in French the word merely
implies a particular means of
interacting. La séduction is not the
same as sexual harassment — it can
be a look, a smile, a word or a gesture
— but in my observation French men
flirt with everyone, even each other.
Flirtation is viewed as part of
civilised behaviour; it’s expected at
dinner parties and in shops and is
woven throughout the most mundane
encounters of daily life. The idea that
flirting implies the acceptance of
sexual harassment is confusing — as
one Frenchman put it: “I meet eyes
with a woman to acknowledge her
beauty, whether it is present or past.
If the look is returned, it may be
appropriate to speak, but that is
never taken for granted.”
Perhaps that’s also the key to the
charm of French men — that it’s not
reserved for the conventionally
attractive. The ingrained desire to
seduce means any woman can enjoy
its focus. In Les Hommes et Les
Femmes, a series of conversations with
the writer Françoise Giroud, the
philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy listed
the attributes that he found seductive:
“a voice, a silhouette, a way of smiling,
a name, an image”.
Traditionally, women have been
much more present in French culture
— unlike in England they were not
banished from the dinner table when
the moment came for serious
conversation and the French have
always valued esprit, spirit or intellect,
as much as beauty. The idea that every
The kiss
woman h
has
as some
something
thing
h
unique that the
cultivated man will discover is pretty
compelling. As, perhaps, is a more
relaxed attitude to the rules of
monogamy. One summer, while
waiting for a boyfriend to join me at
our house in the French countryside, I
found myself being pursued by a local
farmer. He was no Parisian
sophisticate (his love offerings
consisted of melons), but when I
refused him on the grounds that I was
expecting my partner, he told me not
to be so bourgeoise. I confess I wasn’t.
The only downside of French charm
is that it’s not necessarily consistent.
After a relationship with a French chef
ended a few years ago, I was wailing to
an English friend, who did that AngloSaxon thing of patting you vaguely
with a hankie and waiting for the
snotty blubbering to stop. “The thing
is,” he muttered in a slightly envious
tone, “they’re just shits. Seductive, but
shits.” Even through a film of tears, I
couldn’t help thinking wistfully of how
much more effectively he would have
comforted me had he been French.
the times | Thursday April 26 2018
7
1G T
the table
The poshest farm shop in Britain
— and the Lady who created it
From the creamery
to the luxury spa,
the Daylesford
estate oozes class,
says Lucy Holden
Léoube rosé jelly
with berries
L
ady Bamford is no angel.
Yes, she has just planted
36 different kinds of
apple tree in her orchard
so her chickens have
somewhere “exciting” to
peck. And she brought
back wilderness
wetlands, teeming with kingfishers,
that make Gloucestershire “look like
the Serengeti” when horned cattle
march through in the mist. You could
even describe her as the woman who
tackled plastic waste before David
Attenborough — they’ve never had
plastic bags at her farm shop. “But I do
lots of awful things,” Carole Bamford
admits. “I have fun and do lots of
naughty things — it’s just important to
have a conscience too.”
The woman behind Daylesford
Organic Farm (an estate which also
has a spa, a cookery school and a
creamery), and three London farm
shops is about to publish Nurture, the
40-year story of Daylesford, and she’s
nervous. “Lady B”, as her staff
affectionately refer to her, doesn’t want
to appear too evangelical and is the first
to admit that she “can’t be green all the
time”. She is, after all, the wife of the
billionaire JCB tycoon Lord Bamford,
and life sometimes gets in the way —
such as when they were reported to
have flown 180 friends, including
Jeremy Clarkson and the Delevingne
sisters, on private jets to India for their
joint 70th birthdays two years ago.
Yet Bamford, who looks like a
miniature Joanna Lumley, with big
pearly teeth and glittering eyes, and
who today is dressed entirely in pale
lemon — sundress, hat, handbag,
purse and heavy lemon quartz — feels
that everybody should do something.
“Did I think when my daughter was
born and I started to think about what
she ate and how important organic
was that it would be as important
today as it is? No,” she says. “But it’s
not a question of ‘can we afford to be
organic?’ We can’t afford not to be.
Especially if we want to look after the
planet for our children and their
children. We need to change a lot
about the way we farm in the UK.”
If you’re an animal, though, you’ve
really hit the jackpot if you’re born
into the Daylesford estate’s luxurious
2,270 acres. During a tour of the farm
I overhear one person say: “It’s like the
Four Seasons . . . for sheep.” The cows
(aka “The girls”) are in the bottom
fields by the creamery — they’re
milkers, which I’m told, live twice as
long as they do on other farms. The
fairytale farm even has a 21-year-old
tractor driver called Clover.
Serves 8
Ingredients
1 litre Rosé de Léoube, or other dry
rosé wine; 275g caster sugar;
3 sprigs of mint, plus extra to decorate;
2 star anise; 4 slices of lemon;
10 gelatine leaves; 200g raspberries;
200g loganberries; 200g tayberries
Method
1 Line a 1-litre loaf tin, or similar size
mould, with clingfilm, with some
hanging over the sides — this will help
when turning out the set jelly.
2 In a small pan, gently heat the wine
with the sugar, mint sprigs, star anise
and lemon slices. Stir to dissolve the
sugar and allow to infuse for a couple
of min. Meanwhile, soak the gelatine
leaves in a small bowl of cold water.
Strain the wine through a sieve and
add the softened gelatine leaves to the
wine, squeezing out any excess water
first. Stir to dissolve.
3 Pour a centimetre of jelly into the
lined mould and place in the fridge to
set. Once set, add the berries in layers,
then pour over the remaining wine
mixture. Carefully return to the fridge
and leave to set for at least 4-6 hours.
4 To serve, unmould the jelly on to a
dish and decorate with mint sprigs.
Lady Bamford
Nurture: Notes and
Recipes from
Daylesford Farm by
Carole Bamford, £35,
is published by Square
Peg on May 3
In the farm’s restaurant, over a lunch
of spring minestrone, chicken with
massaged kale and petal-pink Provence
rosé from the family’s French vineyard,
Bamford discusses how she has built
an ethical empire with a turnover of
£23.7 million. Home-grown wine is one
of hundreds of items that the company
sells, from French trim beef (£155.99
for 4kg) to tweed throws (£220).
While it may be the poshest farm in
the UK, it’s also the most sustainable.
Bamford’s constant questioning seems
to be partly responsible — she raves
about how Blue Planet II got people
discussing plastic and wishes someone
“would do the same for organic”.
Employing the appropriately named
Tim Field, an environmental and
behavioural biologist, 11 years ago, was
her brainwave. Field, who looks like a
6ft-tall schoolboy, is the intelligence
behind a lot that happens on the farm.
“It’s never been more important to
talk about meat and dairy production,
he says, because of “polarisation” in
our food habits. “It’s veganism versus
cheap supermarket rubbish, which is
produced intensively and puts limits on
our planet. But how do we justify
eating meat and dairy? Partly because
it’s so important for the fertility of the
land, wild flowers and plants and the
insects that feed on them and are so
important for our ecosystem.” In his
opinion, a vegan world is unsustainable.
Field — who last week met the
Prince of Wales and the environment
secretary Michael Gove to discuss UK
farming practices — is also a “bee
man”. The colonies on the estate “are a
symbol of the environment they’re in,”
he says, so their recent decline is a
worry: “We lost a lot, but you can’t
mollycoddle bees by interfering too
much or they won’t survive without
you. Natural selection,” he laments.
Jez Taylor, an outdoorsy Rufus
Sewell-lookalike, is the head of the
market garden. He strolls through
acres of crops, followed everywhere by
a labrador called Norman, and
pointing out a row of “salad bling”,
otherwise known as onion flowers.
“We also produce cut-flowers, so we
don’t have to buy them off the back of
Dutch lorries any more. I’ve been
drawn into this world of pretty names
like ‘belle epoque’,” he says, grimacing.
Skylarks hover in the blue above
the orchard which is part of a new
“agroforestry” practice — Bamford
came back from a trip to the US with
a book listing “100 solutions to right
the CO2 in the atmosphere by 2050”,
and this was one of them.
That’s what they mean when they
describe Daylesford as a “zero-waste
farm”, and with a bit of careful dating
between the milkers and the Hereford
bulls, no boy calves are sent straight to
the abattoir. “It’s more like arranged
marriage than dating,” Taylor says.
They are even thinking of following
in the footsteps of Faviken, the lauded
Swedish restaurant run by Magnus
Nilsson, and serving “retired dairy
cow” as a dish. “It’s supposed to have
the most wonderful marbling,” says
Field. “Besides, we don’t want it to go
into dog food or kebabs.”
8
1G T
Thursday April 26 2018 | the times
arts
Can a singing teacher to the stars
Ross Campbell, a professor of singing at the Royal
Academy who trains the best of the best, took on his
hardest challenge yet: pop writer Will Hodgkinson
T
here is one person in
this world who thinks
I have a fantastic
singing voice: me.
That’s why I’m always
singing in the shower,
singing while
hoovering the stairs,
even (so I’m told) singing in my sleep.
Unfortunately, everyone else is
labouring under the illusion that the
dulcet chimes ringing out of my
mouth are akin to the yowl of a DIY
bodger who has hammered a large
nail into his thumb.
“They say being tone deaf is a myth.
Having spent the last two decades
with you I’m not so sure,” said my wife
last week, having failed to appreciate
my unique interpretation of Neil
Young’s Old Man. The children have
a more succinct response to my
singing: “Shut up.”
To address the situation I’ve come to
Peterborough in Cambridgeshire to
meet Ross Campbell, the author of
Singing, a clear-headed handbook on
the physical realities of how to use our
voices in music. Campbell is a
professor of singing at the Royal
Academy of Music in London and a
former opera performer, and he works
with opera stars who have suffered
ffered
emotional trauma and subsequent
quent
vocal breakdown, or classical
singers whose vocal
muscularity has changed with
h
age, for whom what once
came naturally must now be
worked at. In other words,
he’s training the best of the
best. Nonetheless, he has
agreed to work with an
enthusiastic amateur for an
afternoon. And it turns out that,
hat,
while I have been going around
nd
telling everyone how great I am, I
actually think, deep down, that
at I suck.
“You have a tight jaw. You need to
release it,” Campbell says as he plays a
note on the piano and tells me to hit it.
“And your tongue is getting in the way,
because you feel vulnerable opening
up your throat. Maybe someone told
you to stop singing when you were a
kid, because you are unconsciously
blocking your larynx, like a dog that
won’t let go of a bone. You are
stopping yourself from singing.”
You are
blocking
your
larynx,
like a dog
that won’t
let go of
a bone
Campbell is right. In the 1980s our
primary school supplied a choir for the
West End production of Evita. The
music teacher spent every lesson
training the chosen ones, while the
rest of us sat in another room and
amused ourselves in whatever way
unsupervised 11-year-old boys will.
There are no prizes for guessing which
group I fell into.
“Nothing wrong with your pitch,”
says Campbell, words I will memorise
to unleash at my family when
necessary, after a bit of guidance leads
to the right note. The first rule of
singing, it turns out, is to listen. The
brain needs time to process the note
and send the information to the
larynx. And as obvious as this may
sound, singing is a technical process.
Adele may have an incredible ability
to evoke the sadness of a
fiftysomething woman who has had
her heart broken several times, but
she is still working with muscle
memory and physical training; she
simply has a performer’s ability to
make it personal. With the endless
debates on emotional content,
originality, taste, style and integrity
that accompany the world of rock
and pop, it is easy to forget this.
“People tthink we sing with our
mouths. Actually, the best sounds
come ffrom our throat,” Campbell
explains
expla as he holds up a model
of th
the larynx, our organ for
speaking
and singing. “This
spe
is yyour piano, your violin,
your
you flute.”
The
T larynx looks a lot uglier
than
tha all three. “All the notes
we sing are tuned within the
vocal
voca folds in the larynx, which
are two
tw thirds the size of your
little
Campbell says. “The
little finger,”
fin
larynx
larynx goes
go up in the neck with
higher pitch,
pitc down with lower pitch,
and tilts when
wh we cry or sob.”
Going from
fro a lower to an upper
register in singing is like a gear
change, and one that is likely to sound
like yodelling unless we cover it up
through “crying”, which essentially
means putting feeling into a note and
generally — but not always — adding
vibrato. In opera and classical music
the larynx is always tilted to create
the crying effect.
“It is working quite well, your
larynx,” Campbell says as I do my
best impression of a heartbroken
crooner. “Your pitching is good,
although do try to come back to the
same note. But there is a fundamental
thing we must all do: support our air
flow. This is where a lot of singers fall
foul. They throw too much air at
singing, thinking they’re getting
louder. Instead they’re just destroying
their voices and unbalancing natural
resonances in the process.”
If you try to sing with too much
force you close the “false” vocal folds
that sit above the true ones and can
end up with nodules, as Elton John
did. Campbell demonstrates how the
entire body, not just the throat, is used
for singing. Breathing properly means
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the times | Thursday April 26 2018
9
1G T
arts
s cure our critic’s tuneless warble?
ZAC FRACKELTON FOR THE TIMES; GETTY IMAGES
Ross Campbell’s
five classic
singing
mistakes
0 Singing goes in, not out
Don’t push your throat outward.
The sound comes in. Singing is an
implosion, not an explosion, even
when belting.
0 Good singing uses more than
just the throat
It is a misconception that only the
throat is used in singing, which is
tantamount to disaster. We are not
singing heads. We need the support
from our entire body.
0 Bad posture
Do not put the chin up and out,
particularly when singing a high
note. Do not lurch forward like a
rock star. All the sound should be
centred into the body.
0 Do not sing with your mouth
The best sounds come from the
throat; that is where the information
from the brain is sent. Your mouth
should be loose. The jaw and tongue
just get in the way.
0 Do not sing in one voice for
all music
Learn to use different voice qualities
in the same song, just as a painter
uses colours on a palette. Twanging,
crying, speech and belting are there
to be mixed up.
not wasting air. We must have good
posture for the larynx to have space to
work properly, and we need what he
calls a “Rambo neck” — using the
mastoid muscles — to create stability.
Rock singers in particular have a
tendency to lean forward when they
should be centred. Most importantly,
singing goes into the body, not out.
Our best resonator is the throat, so
singing has to come from there, not
from the mouth. As Campbell says:
“Singing is a one-way street. You have
to pull the sound in.”
It turns out that there are a handful
of ways to sing. The first is called
speech quality, which is as you would
expect: a style that follows the natural
cadences of talking, without vibrato
or emotion, but slightly sweetened.
Campbell makes me sing Happy
Birthday in speech mode and it sounds
almost insulting. Then he shows how
to end each line in the aforementioned
crying mode, thereby creating
something that does actually sound
like singing.
“We all love crying, don’t we?” he
says, displaying a kind of “happy”
crying that goes up and a sobbing —
akin to crooning — that goes down.
“The crying most commonly used
in rock and pop puts the tilted larynx
in a high position, and it is happier
and richer. The sob, the tilted larynx
in a low position, is the biggest part of
the operatic tradition and it sounds
sad. Bing Crosby was a great sobber.”
There is also twang. A resonating
device that sounds awful on its own,
this is useful when combined with
other singing styles. You hear it a
lot in country music, and the
most jazz hands-friendly
parts of musical theatre.
“Let’s have a look at
your twanger,” Campbell
suggests, and since
we’re getting on so
famously, I say: “Why not?”
“This is a ring of muscle
above the false vocal folds
called your aryepiglottic
sphincter, alias your
twanger, which you constrict,”
he says. “It is used in opera,
typically in the middle of a phrase.
A wicked witch in a panto will be
Will Hodgkinson seeks
Ross Campbell’s help
in improving his
version of Old Man by
Neil Young, below
using nasal twang.” Campbell utilises
twang in a way that evokes character
and depth. When I do it, unwelcome
visions of Kenneth Williams come
to mind.
“The trick is to start with twang in
a note and then take it off. You have
to be careful, though. A couple of years
ago the whole of the West End was
doing nothing but twang. Twang
suggests a higher range than you might
have because the sound is thinner.”
Then there is belting, tantamount
to yelling and used at moments of
musical climax. Think of Roger
Daltrey belting his heart out on the
Who’s Love, Reign O’er Me. “You only
use this in the high part of your voice,”
Campbell says. “It is emotionally
driven and I don’t introduce young
singers to belting. You can damage
your voice if you’re not careful.”
Singers generally use several voice
qualities within a piece of music, often
within the same phrase, and
as to whether you are a
soprano, a mezzo, a tenor or
a baritone, Campbell recommends
letting your voice tell you what it is as
you develop. “You have a basic voice
that gives you timbre — Tony in West
Side Story is definitely a tenor — but
you build range through training.”
Finally it is time to run through
a number, and what better to get a
novice singer going than Elton John’s
pre-nodule classic Your Song? It
doesn’t take long to appreciate Your
Song’s qualities. It bounces through
a series of major and minor chords
and uses the speech quality, crying
and twanging forms of singing. Some
notes elongate, others flow into one
another, and the effect is moving. It
isn’t as easy to sing as it sounds. There
is a lot to remember, for one thing.
“Don’t pull the vowel down,”
Campbell says when I sing the line
“It’s a little bit funny” as if I’m trying
to flog copies of The Big Issue. “Keep
it light, in the upper throat. You’re
mangling every single note. Stop
sounding miserable.”
Campbell tells me something no
music teacher ever did: I’m working
too hard. “Opera is specific, but pop is
all over the place. We speak sloppy,
‘Let’s have a look
at your twanger,’
he suggests.
‘Why not?’ I say
we breathe in the middle of words, it’s
a whole different style. Can you speak
in tune? Yes, you can. Then you can
sing pop.”
That makes me think of Leonard
Cohen, Nico, Lou Reed and other
people who were not great singers
as such, but brought great style and
conviction to their words. And then
a strange thing happens. I actually
manage to sing properly, albeit
briefly. In Your Song the line “I don’t
have much money, but boy, if I did”
ends with three quick descending
notes. I get it right — and feel
strangely emotional.
“That’s the best singing you’ve done
so far, and it’s not an easy line,”
Campbell says. “Every exercise has got
to live, every exercise needs to have
emotion. You need to do the technique
and the feeling together because that
is how you will perform.”
The real revelation, after we
manage to get through a passable
rendition of Your Song, is that singing
is physical. You think of singing as
something character-based, personal
and innate, but it is a skill to be trained
in like any other. “You do need to
breathe life into singing, which is the
spiritual side of it,” Campbell adds. “In
the end, that is the most important
ingredient. It’s no good just being a
technically great singer. You need to
integrate your acting into it.”
I think my performance of Your
Song will be restricted to the bathroom
for now, but I would recommend
Campbell’s singing tuition to anyone
who has been told, at some point or
other, that their voice sounds as if it is
rising from the pits of Hell. Learning
to sing properly is liberating. I’m
completely exhausted after going a
few rounds with Campbell and his
piano, and not quite up there with
Kiri Te Kanawa, but energised. This
may be terrible news for my wife
and children, but it is true: everyone
can sing.
Singing, an Extensive Handbook
for all Singers and their Teachers
by Ross Campbell is published by
Novordium
10
1G T
Thursday April 26 2018 | the times
television & radio
Hugh’s overweight, angry and on the rampage
ANDREW HAYES-WATKINS/BBC
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Britain’s Fat Fight
BBC One
{{{{(
The Assassination
of Gianni Versace
BBC Two
{{{{(
W
ere you braced for
Hugh FearnleyWhittingstall’s love
handles? There was
no warning that “some
viewers may find the following scenes
disturbing” as he yanked up his shirt
while a GP measured his dad-bod.
He weighed about 12st 7lb clothed,
which seemed reasonable for a chap
of 53. But no. He looked chinned as
the doc said that his “abdominal
circumference” was 93cm and should
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Guilty Architecture
Radio 4, 11.30am
Hitler didn’t quite get what
he wanted, architecturally
speaking. The dream of
reconstructing Berlin never
happened. He did get some
of it, however. The Third
Reich threw up many grand
buildings. These same
buildings are crumbling
and causing not only
architectural, but moral
problems. Take the Nazi
rally grounds in
Nuremberg. What should
Germany do with them and
their poisonous legacy?
Jonathan Glancey speaks to
two British architects,
David Chipperfield and
Norman Foster, who have
been involved in restoring
similarly fraught structures
in Germany.
The Food Chain:
Fussy Eating Culture
World Service, 11.30am
French children, as we all
know, don’t throw food. Or
do they? Emily Thomas
takes a global look at fussy
eating. Is it caused by that
intractable problem known
as poor parenting? Or is it
caused by the even more
intractable problem known
as “the toddler”? Thomas
speaks to parents from Hong
Kong to Calcutta to gather
choice tips. And probably
banana in her hair too.
be under 90. He was overweight and
at risk of type 2 diabetes. But being too
fat in the UK, where the NHS buckles
under the obesity crisis and a Greggs
pasty is a light snack, is normal.
Britain’s Fat Fight with Hugh
Fearnley-Whittingstall is a flabby
title, but he was impressively firm
with the multinational food companies
that peddle sugar. He turned up at
Nestlé’s HQ wheeling a toy traffic
light and demanding to know why
high-sugar cereals aren’t colour-coded
red. His finest hour came when he set
up shop outside WH Smith, protesting
at how it pushes chocolate at the till
like a drug dealer. As someone who
has banged on about this for years,
I found it immensely pleasing to see
his “WH Sugar” sign and the wall of
900 chocolate bars, which, he said, is
how many WH Smith sells every
45 seconds. The company bigwigs’
neck veins must have been bulging.
Fearnley-Whittingstall is at his
best when angry, so it was most
entertaining when he ranted at
WH Smith’s hypocrisy (its website
makes pious noises about promoting
healthier eating, yet even its self-serve
tills try to press confectionery on you).
“Right on the screen in front of you it
says, ‘Would you like to buy a f***ing
chocolate orange!’ ” he spluttered.
Many anti-obesity/healthy-eating
documentaries are deathly dull.
Store-shaming is more fun.
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00
Radio 1’s Residency: James Blake 12.00 BBC
Radio 1’s Residency: Mura Masa 1.00am
Toddla T 3.00 Radio 1 Comedy: Birthday Girls
House Party 4.00 Radio 1’s Early Breakfast
Show with Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Amol Rajan 7.00 Bob Harris Country 8.00 Jo
Whiley 10.00 The Radio 2 Arts Show with
Anneka Rice 12.00 The Craig Charles House
Party (r) 2.00am Radio 2’s Tracks of My
Years Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Have
A Great Weekend 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Feelgood Friday 5.00 Nicki Chapman
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein presents. The arts and culture
supremo Peter Bazalgette talks to Suzy
about the ideas that inspire him
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Strozzi (1619-1677)
Continuing to explore the life and
music of Barbara Strozzi. Strozzi (Le tre
grazie, Op 1 No 4; Lamante segreto,
Op 2 No 16; La vendetta, Op 2 No 9;
Cantata — Sino alla morte mi protesto, Op 7
No 1; Con male nuove — Questa è la nuova,
Op 3 No 5; Salve Regina, Op 5 No 11;
and O Maria, Op 5 No 7) (r)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Sarah Walker presents the third of four
concerts of songs by Tchaikovsky and his
friends from last Saturday’s BBC Radio 3 Big
Chamber Day at Saffron Hall in Essex. The
event, curated by the pianist Anna Tilbrook,
features the soprano Anush Hovhannisyan,
the mezzo Caitlin Hulcup, the tenor
Alessandro Fisher and the bass-baritone
Ashley Riches. This concert is Tchaikovsky
and the French, with music by Berlioz, Bizet,
Debussy, Gounod and Saint-Saëns as well
as by Tchaikovsky himself
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall declared war on excess sugar
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Georgia Mann presents this week’s Opera
Matinee; a performance of Francesco Cilea’s
Adriana Lecouvreur by the Vienna State
Opera Orchestra and Chorus, conducted by
Evelino Pidò and featuring the soprano Anna
Netrebko, the tenors Piotr Beczala, Raúl
Giménez and Pavel Kolgatin, the baritone
Roberto Frontali, the mezzos Elena Zhidkova
and Miriam Albano, the basses Alexandru
Moisiuc and Ryan Speedo Green, and the
soprano Bryony Dwyer. The plot concerns a
theatre group at the Comedie-Francaise in
Paris. Cilea (Adriana Lecouvreur)
4.30 BBC Young Musician 2018
Georgia Mann presents highlights from this
year’s Young Musician brass finalists, ahead
of the Brass Category Finals on Friday
5.00 In Tune
Katie Derham’s guests include Danielle de
Niese, Menahem Pressler, Mark Simpson and
the Navarra Quartet, who are all appearing at
Queen Elizabeth Hall tomorrow. Siglo de Oro
perform live and discuss their new CD
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
Including Mitsuko Uchida playing Mozart, an
uplifting march by Elgar and a serene
part-song by James MacMillan
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
The BBC SSO and the conductor Matthias
Pintscher perform music by Smetana and
Dvorák, and the French virtuoso David
Kadouch joins them to play Chopin’s Second
Piano Concerto, from City Halls, Glasgow.
Presented by Jamie MacDougall. Smetana
(Vltava; and Sarka — Ma Vlast); Chopin
(Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor); and
Dvorák (Symphony No 4 in D minor)
10.00 Free Thinking
The novelist Tomoyuki Hoshino, the
photographer Suzanne Mooney, the writer
and photographer Mariko Nagai and the
film-maker Kyoko Miyake look at life in
Tokyo for the Heisei generations
10.45 The Essay: Dark Blossoms
Christopher Harding tells the story of a
famous crime, which also serves as a
metaphor for the theft of post-war promises
of liberty and openness in 1960s Japan
11.00 Exposure
Live sets by Tomoko Sauvage, MimiCof and
Hatis Noit recorded at Spiritland in London.
Part of Radio 3’s Night Blossoms season of
Japanese music and culture
12.00 Late Junction
A mixtape from the composer, experimental
guitarist, turntablist and producer Otomo
Yoshihide, who is one of the most dynamic
forces in Japanese experimental music
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day (r)
6.00 Today
With Nick Robinson and Justin Webb
8.30 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 In Our Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the
discovery and understanding of the proton
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: Sharp —
The Women Who Made an Art of
Having an Opinion
Michelle Dean remembers Pauline Kael,
whose movie reviews in The New Yorker
made her one of the most influential critics
of her day (4/5)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Discussion and interviews from a female
perspective. Including at 10.45 the 15
Minute Drama: Part four of Curious Under
the Stars by Annamaria Murphy
11.00 Crossing Continents
A Brazilian company built on a policy of
bribery, asking what it reveals about how
some Brazilians have been doing business
11.30 Guilty Architecture
Jonathan Glancey asks whether buildings
with a controversial history deserve to be
restored. See Radio Choice
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Sarah Daniels. In Folkestone, Kitty
determines to lead a less selfish life
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Chinese Characters
The story of Wang Jingwei, who was
condemned as China’s worst traitor
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Mythos
By Julian Simpson. A sinkhole opens up
beneath London, and Lairre and Parker are
tasked with rescuing Johnson from the
depths of the city. Last in the series
3.00 Open Country
Lincolnshire people inspired by flowers
3.27 Radio 4 Appeal
On behalf of Ehlers-Danlos Support UK (r)
3.30 Open Book
Carys Davies discusses her novel West (r)
4.00 The Film Programme
Including a new discussion strand with
women in the film industry
4.30 BBC Inside Science
The latest scientific research
How odd to feel bereft that a serial
killer is out of your life. Darren Criss’s
portrayal of the narcissist Andrew
Cunanan has been so faultless in
The Assassination of Gianni Versace
that when it ended last night with
Cunanan in a body bag I was sorry
to see the back of him. Which feels
uncomfortable. Seeing his photo on
TV as America’s most wanted man,
Cunanan’s reaction was to smile and
drink champagne: fame is all he
wanted. Imagine how thrilled he’d
be with this luscious series.
Nothing, though, should detract
from the brilliance of Criss’s
performance, blowing the rest of the
cast out of the water. While some
mid-series episodes were meandering,
Criss provided a constant spine of
quality in his beguiling monster.
His friend Ronnie offered an insight
into Cunanan’s motivation, telling the
police that he wanted the world to
know his pain, that he’d had to live
a lie. When he killed a “bunch of
nobody gays” the cops didn’t care, but
now he’d shot a celebrity they did.
Meanwhile, Cunanan’s preening
father was promising to fly to his
son while greedily brokering the
movie rights to his life story. Even as
Cunanan put the gun in his mouth he
couldn’t resist a last lingering look in
the mirror, vanity the last thing to go.
Criss’s awards are surely in the bag.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 Alone
By Moray Hunter. Mitch tries to avoid his
sister-in-law by hiding out with Ellie (1/6)
7.00 The Archers
Shula makes a fresh start, and Jazzer is
surprised by a face from the past
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Curious Under the Stars (r)
8.00 The Briefing Room
David Aaronovitch discusses big issues
8.30 In Business
An investigation into how businesses can
stop workplace harassment (4/8)
9.00 BBC Inside Science (r)
9.30 In Our Time (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With James Coomarasamy
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Nikesh Shukla
— The One Who Wrote Destiny
By Nikesh Shukla. After their mother’s
death, Neha and Raks spend time with Ba.
Read by Bhasker Patel, Chetna Pandya, Maya
Sondhi, Indira Varma and Taru Devani (9/10)
11.00 Beef and Dairy Network
The spoof magazine features an interview
with the US fast food boss Roy Gluck Jr (4/4)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Analysis of the day’s developments
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week: Sharp —
The Women Who Made an Art of
Having an Opinion (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am J Kingston Platt’s Showbiz
Handbook 8.30 The Goon Show 9.00
Listomania 9.30 HR 10.00 The Idiot 11.00
Grounded 11.15 Forest Tales 12.00 J
Kingston Platt’s Showbiz Handbook
12.30pm The Goon Show 1.00 Rogue
Justice 1.30 Sud-U-Like 2.00 Expo 58 2.15
Shakespeare’s Restless World 2.30 Good
News 2.45 Catch Me If You Can 3.00 The
Idiot 4.00 Listomania 4.30 HR 5.00 Hopes
and Desires 5.30 Alone 6.00 The Man Who
Was Thursday 6.30 Great Lives 7.00 J
Kingston Platt’s Showbiz Handbook. Comedy
with Peter Jones. From May 1986 7.30 The
Goon Show. Comedy with Spike Milligan 8.00
Rogue Justice. Thriller by Geoffrey
Household. Originally broadcast in 2009 8.30
Sud-U-Like. The role of the launderette
9.00 Grounded. Dreamland by Fred D’Aguiar
9.15 Forest Tales. The Story of Melusine by
Colin Haydn Evans. From 1996 10.00 Comedy
Club: Alone. By Moray Hunter. Comedy
starring Angus Deayton 10.30 The
Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy: The
Secondary Phase. Arthur and companions do
a lot of digging. From 1980 10.55 The
Comedy Club Interview. A chat with a guest
from the world of comedy 11.00
Wondermentalist Cabaret. From Totnes,
South Devon 11.30 Bleak Expectations.
By Mark Evans. Originally broadcast in 2009
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 The Emma
Barnett Show with Anna Foster 1.00pm
Afternoon Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00
5 Live Sport. Build-up 8.05 5 Live Sport:
Europa League Football 2017-18 — Arsenal v
Atletico Madrid (Kick-off 8.05) 10.00
Question Time Extra Time 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Jim White, Ray Parlour and Bob Mills
1.00pm Rushden and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off.
With Mark Saggers 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Stuart Maconie 4.00 Steve
Lamacq 6.00 Steve Lamacq’s Roundtable
7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe. A session
by 23 Skidoo 12.00 6 Music Recommends
1.00am Classic Albums 2.00 Classic
Scottish Albums 2.30 6 Music Live Hour
3.30 6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Another evening of
the finest new recordings. Strauss Junior
(Roses from the South Waltz, Op 325;
Debussy (Children’s Corner); Haydn (Violin
Concerto in G, Hob.VII:4); Brahms (Piano
Concerto No.1 in D minor, Op 15); and
Offenbach (Jacqueline’s Tears) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Jane Jones
the times | Thursday April 26 2018
11
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MANUEL HARLAN
artsfirst night
Jonjo O’Neill as Jimmy
and Sophie Russell as
Jess in The Prudes
Opera
4.48 Psychosis
Lyric Hammersmith, W6
Pop
Sheridan Smith
Royal Albert Hall
T
I
{{{{(
he scene is set ten minutes
ahead as soon as the stage
safety curtain lifts. Clinical
white walls. A chair. A table.
Muzak on a loudspeaker; the
sounds are meant to soothe, but are
about as annoying as having needles
repeatedly thrust into your brain. It’s
the perfect contrasting prelude for
4.48 Psychosis, Philip Venables’s
adventurous opera based on Sarah
Kane’s extraordinary play about
clinical depression. It’s forever on edge
and deeply expressive too.
Premiered two years ago, Ted
Huffman’s production, commissioned
from the Royal Opera House and the
Guildhall School of Music and Drama,
grips and moves all over again in this
first revival. The challenging text of
Kane’s play (no named characters, no
stage directions) is brilliantly pushed
towards a new brand of opera. It’s a
virile, magpie kind of score, equally
peppered with militant stomps,
baroque lamentations and the fiery
duets of two percussionists banging
out the rhythms of unspoken dialogue
projected on to the back wall.
Venables’s best creative decision was
to spread the bulk of Kane’s blunt,
mordant words between six soaring
female voices, often wrapped in
warming close harmony. GwenethAnn Rand is unflinching as the selfabusing protagonist, filled with anger
and craving love, and Lucy Schaufer is
the doctor who offers only clichés and
medications. The ensemble powerfully
deliver under the microscope of
Hannah Clark’s minimalist set.
The conductor Richard Baker and
the 12 musicians of Chroma light
plenty of their own fires with
a sinuous, cockeyed ensemble heavy
with saxophones and violas. Against
the odds, Venables’s opera makes
Kane’s rage and despair musically
eloquent and emotionally fulfilling.
It’s quite a package.
Geoff Brown
Box office: 020 8741 6850, to May 4
Pop
Tangerine Dream
Union Chapel, N1
T
{{{{(
he death of Edgar Froese in
2015 robbed electronic music
of one of its hairy founding
fathers. Froese led Tangerine
Dream to the front line of
“kosmische musik” in Seventies Berlin,
helping David Bowie to get off drugs
along the way. The patchouli whiff of
hippydom (get a load of that name)
meant that the German synth band
were rarely as fashionable as Can or
Kraftwerk, but their utopian influence
on trance and ambient music was
huge, and their lush dreamscapes have
soundtracked more than 60 films and,
recently, Netflix’s Stranger Things.
They’ve had a Buddha-like number
of incarnations, but could they survive
without Froese? His son Jerome,
another former member, said that they
were dead without his father. Well,
they felt very much alive here, joining
the LED dots between the analogue
and digital eras. They didn’t play Love
{{(((
Keeping the spark alive
Anthony
Neilson’s smart
play takes a
wry look at sex
and middle age,
says Dominic
Maxwell
Theatre
The Prudes
Royal Court
Jerwood Upstairs,
SW1
{{{{(
L
ove can’t always be easy and
sex can’t always be sexy. So
how do a couple entering
middle age keep things
steamy? And how do men
and women corral their animal urges
in a new world in which the agenda of
gender is centre stage?
“If anyone feels like they want to
leave, now might be a good time,”
Jimmy tells us, just after he and his
girlfriend, Jess, have revealed that they
are planning to have sex right in front
of us tonight. Spoiler ahoy: there will
be no live rutting in Anthony Neilson’s
smart, sketchy, amusing, awkward,
stimulating two-hander.
Yet there is a reason this couple are
proposing to reconsummate their
relationship like this, in a mocked-up
boudoir (great work from the designer
Fly Davis) with thick carpet and pink
ceiling drapes. It has been 14 months
since they last had sex. So they are
here to talk us through their issues,
then to copulate their way past them.
Or else, Jess says, that’s them finished.
It’s rare for a playwright to put
impotence upfront. Rarer still when it’s
treated with as much merry nuance as
this, with acid wit alongside enormous
empathy for characters whose world
on a Real Train, to which Tom Cruise
seduced Rebecca De Mornay in Risky
Business, but we got the Moog majesty
of their theme for the cult movie
Sorcerer and the sumptuous peaks and
eerie troughs of 1984’s Horizon.
Froese’s chosen successor, Thorsten
Quaeschning, has taken over his
big-man-with-long-hair role, lurking
like a cosmic yak behind machines
covered in blinking lights. He has
recruited a star of new electronica in
Ulrich Schnauss, whose modernity
could be felt in the abstract blocks of
melody of new songs such as It is Time
to Leave When Everyone is Dancing,
based on Froese’s sketches. The
electric violinist Hoshiko Yamane felt
like a spare part at times, although her
bow triggered celestial samples in the
final improvised section, where drifting
chords clashed with hurtling beats.
Froese’s widow, Bianca, dedicated
the show to “our father, our leader”
and when his image came up on
screen there were gruff cheers from an
audience dominated by middle-aged
men. Yet there was enough innovation
to suggest that Tangerine Dream need
not be the preserve of the paunchy.
Ed Potton
Theatre
Tonight at 8.30
Jermyn Street
Theatre, SW1
{{{((
Romola Garai
in The Writer
at the Almeida
First Night, main paper
view is bang up to date. “I don’t know
what’s allowed any more,” says Jimmy,
after a neat Kevin Spacey joke from
Jess. As they sit on stools and sip white
wine for courage, we find out what
prompted this celibacy. After finding
out something unpleasant about Jess’s
early sexual experiences, Jimmy has
retreated into his head, a woke-y mess
of male guilt and warped desire. Does
he want to see her as a victim? Does
he want to see himself as a victim?
Shouldn’t it be about her, not him?
The Prudes clunks a bit as it tries to
find a format to match their skewwhiff
relationship and prods at issues
age-old yet excitingly up-to-date. But
this is never just some Relate session
stuck on stage. It is an exploration of
sex in which the characters’ intimacy
with their audience is sometimes more
straightforward than their intimacy
with each other.
It is performed with a gorgeously
sensitive blokeishness by Jonjo O’Neill,
as Jimmy, and with a dab-hand
mixture of love, wit and exasperation
by Sophie Russell as the woman going
to extremes to recalibrate this
relationship. It’s frank, funny, brave
and surprising.
Box office: 020 7565 5000, to June 2
T
his is an epic undertaking:
nine one-act Noël Coward
plays, performed by a
dizzyingly multi-tasking
ensemble on a diminutive
stage. Written in 1935 as a showcase
for Coward and Gertrude Lawrence,
Tonight at 8.30 is rarely revived in its
entirety. Quite apart from the
technical demands, it’s a mixed bag:
heartache piquantly offsets the froth,
but the slightest sketches are
disposable. The director Tom Littler
arranges the pieces into three themed
triple bills. Perhaps inevitably, there’s
some clatter and clutter, and the
singing that some of the plays call for
is erratic. Otherwise, it’s a production
of silken elegance and intelligence,
acted with a zest and charm that
obscure the threadbare moments.
The first grouping, Bedroom Farces,
offers a trio of marital tales, each with
its own mood. We Were Dancing is
a wry, gossamer depiction of love at
first sight on a tropical dancefloor,
a whimsically romantic Sara Crowe
waltzing with a stranger while her
husband (Nick Waring) stands by,
upper lip stiff, clutching her reticule.
Deliciously funny, Ways and Means
t was almost as if there were two
shows going on at one and the
same time. You could, if you
wanted to, focus on the affecting
spectacle of Sheridan Smith
bonding with her audience. Here was
a talented performer who has been
through personal turmoil trying to
find her feet again in public, Judy
Garland-style. “I am so nervous,”
Smith declared at the start of the
evening, and she made it seem true.
The actual music wasn’t so engaging.
It didn’t help that the Albert Hall’s
acoustics were up to their usual tricks.
Time and again the echo of the drums
thwacked against the far wall. Where
I was sitting — close up, stage left —
the orchestra’s string section was
almost inaudible.
Smith was not in the mood for
subtlety either. It took guts to open
with Don’t Rain on My Parade.
Big Spender played to her brassy
strengths too. Ultimately, though, the
programme was about as nuanced as
an X Factor final. The actress-singer’s
recent self-named album is built
around some distinctive material, from
Gnarls Barkley’s Crazy to Leiber and
Stoller’s I Smell a Rat, yet Smith and
her arrangers tended to pump them up
to the same arena-anthem dimensions.
She gave us a glimpse of Cilla Black
— someone she has portrayed on the
small screen — in a solid treatment of
Anyone Who Had a Heart. Trying to
haul herself on to a stool by the piano,
she indulged in some Hylda Baker-like
clowning. The audience loved every
minute. Along with the slapstick we
had to contend with her relentlessly
downmarket patter. The photos of her
projected on the screen behind her
were cool and chic in a 1950s sort of
way; in the flesh she preferred to be
one of the lads, burping and swearing,
chuckling about booze and having
a good laugh at her pot belly. All that
was missing was a kebab van parked at
the side of the stage.
Clive Davis
has Waring and Miranda Foster as
a couple scheming their way out of
gambling debts on the Côte d’Azur.
Shadow Play is a startling dream piece
in which Crowe’s betrayed wife,
drugged with sleeping pills, reimagines
the blissful beginnings of her marriage.
The Secret Hearts section brings
delicate agony in Still Life, the play
that became Brief Encounter, with
Waring and Foster falling for each
other over teacups while Rosemary
Ashe’s station café manager and
Stefan Bednarczyk’s ticket inspector
carry on an earthier flirtation. In
Nuclear Families, the standout is the
tragic The Astonished Heart, a cruelly
acute depiction of a love triangle.
There are skits on manners and
hypocrisy, and affectionate send-ups
of society eccentrics and theatrical
types. Louie Whitemore’s designs are
sumptuous, but fussy, needing endless
resets. Still, Bednarczyk alleviates
those longueurs as a capital Coward,
delivering quips and melodic medleys
at the piano. By the end you feel
gorged on a lavish selection of
amuse-bouches, moved and amused.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 020 7287 2875, to May 20
12
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Thursday April 26 2018 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Gabriel Tate
Super Fast Falcon
BBC Two, 8pm
Schoolyard
legend has it
that the
cheetah is
the fastest animal on
Earth, but its top speed
of 75mph pales
compared with the
astonishing 242mph
steep dive — or “stoop”
— is a majestic sight. In
the Windy City, rising
thermals aid flight,
street lighting helps
24-hour hunting and
the waterfront
furnishes a supply of
avian prey. In a heartstopping sequence one
of the young falcons
drops live prey and the
parent swoops on to
a busy highway to
collect it. The climax
is a slightly silly but
thrilling chase in which
an Olympic skier with a
lure stuck to his helmet
attempts to evade Rudi
as they race down a
mountain. However, it’s
as neat a summation as
any of the programme’s
Reithian commitment
to inform and
entertain. Kudos,
throughout, to the
camera crew for
keeping up.
Ambulance
BBC One, 9pm
Beginning on a joyful
note when a
switchboard operator
helps with a birth at the
other end of the line,
this third series swiftly
becomes inspiring —
and makes you angry.
It follows dedicated but
overworked staff
handling more than
200 calls an hour. In
this opener teams are
dispatched to help a
couple of pensioners
and a musician, but the
most telling scenes
come when one
paramedic has to deal
with her own family
emergency. Sequences
such as these elevate
Ambulance; it’s as
much about the people
who do these jobs
and why as about the
jobs themselves.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
Early
in captivity. Rudi, with
a four-year-old named
Moses, becomes a
guinea pig (not literally;
that would be a
different genre of
programme altogether)
as Lloyd trains it to
survive in the wild and
tests out the bird’s
unmatched capabilities;
they can, for example,
spy a tennis ball-sized
lure from 3km. A
peregrine falcon in a
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Rip Off Britain: Food. How to
ensure a fridge is working efficiently 10.00 Homes Under
the Hammer. Properties in County Durham, Glamorgan
and South Yorkshire (AD) 11.00 Heir Hunters. A search
leads to the story of a war hero 11.45 The Housing
Enforcers. An eviction takes a shocking turn in Stroud
12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Two soldiers go up against a pair
of brothers (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather
1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Valerie
and Al spend the night at a sleep clinic, although he is
rather sceptical about the whole exercise (AD) 2.15 800
Words. A collision with a jet-ski puts Woody in a coma
(AD) 3.00 Escape to the Country. Alistair Appleton
travels to the Peak District to help a couple buying their
first property together. (r) (AD) 3.45 Flipping Profit.
Catherine Southon, Tony Wong and Micaela Sharp search
for items in Faversham (AD) 4.30 Flog It! From
Powderham Castle near Exeter, where Will Axon gets to
grips with a mysterious wooden club and Claire Rawle is
taken by a dove brooch (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show with
Alexander Armstrong and Richard Osman 6.00 BBC News
at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 Heir Hunters (r)
7.15 Rip Off Britain: Food. The team investigate a
door-to-door pots and pans scam (r) 8.00 Sign Zone:
David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities. Whether
animals and plants have developed an awareness of
mathematics (r) (AD, SL) 8.30 Kate Humble: Off the
Beaten Track. A trip to one of the least populated areas in
the UK (r) (SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire. News and
current affairs 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily
Politics. Jo Coburn and her guests discuss the latest
parliamentary proceedings and what has been happening
in the world of politics 1.00pm Live Snooker: The World
Championship. The sixth day’s play gets under way at the
Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, featuring the conclusion of
the penultimate first-round match between Anthony
McGill and Ryan Day, and the first session of the opening
fixture in round two. Presented by Jason Mohammad
6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine (r)
6.30 Britain in Bloom. Chris Bavin visits a dedicated
group of gardeners in Grimsby who are planning to
brighten up a neglected stretch of river that runs through
one of the most deprived estates in town
6.00am Good Morning Britain 8.30 Lorraine.
Entertainment, current affairs and fashion news, as well
as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip 9.25 The Jeremy
Kyle Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip
Schofield and Holly Willoughby present chat and lifestyle
features, including a look at the stories making the
newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen 12.30pm
Loose Women. The ladies put the world to rights once
more and invite a guest to chat about what they are up to
1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras
follow the criminal barrister Robert Rinder as he takes on
real-life cases in a studio courtroom 3.00 Tenable. A team
from the highway maintenance office calling themselves
the Hard Shoulders answer top 10 list questions on
subjects including Formula One, pizza toppings and music.
Quiz hosted by Warwick Davis 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben
Shephard hosts the quiz show in which contestants drop
tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a £10,000 jackpot 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh
presents as contestants pit their wits against the Chaser,
adding money to the jackpot for the final chase 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 3rd Rock from the Sun (r)
(AD) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.30 Frasier (r)
10.05 Ramsay’s Hotel Hell. A West Virginia hotelier
whose hoarding habit has left little room for guests (r)
(AD) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA. The president of Moe’s
Southwest Grill goes undercover (r) 12.00 Channel 4
News Summary 12.05pm Coast vs Country. A couple who
want to move to the Cumbria/Lancashire borders (r) (AD)
1.05 Posh Pawnbrokers. An unusual Harley-Davidson
motorbike, a flapper purse and a pair of solid gold coins
keep Dan and Ellie busy in Sheffield (r) 2.10 Countdown.
With guest Chris Packham 3.00 A Place in the Sun: Home
or Away. Properties in Devon and the Dordogne region of
France (r) 4.00 Escape to the Chateau: DIY. Wild boars
cause chaos around one couple’s chateau (AD) 5.00 Four
in a Bed. The guests check in at Ivanhoe Guest House in
Bridlington, where Mick and Gill Jennings hope their
simple approach will win the day (r) 5.30 Buy It Now. A
Sheffield inventor struggles to describe his product 6.00
The Simpsons. Lisa is shocked to bump into Sideshow Bob
during a field trip (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Adam is
persuaded by Glenn to do another job (r) (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. The day’s
news comes under scrutiny from Matthew Wright and the
panel 11.15 The Yorkshire Vet: A Five Legged Lamb &
Other Curious Creatures. The staff of Skeldale Veterinary
Centre have to deal with a lamb born with five fully
formed legs (r) (AD) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.15
GPs: Behind Closed Doors. Dr Zareena Hyder meets with a
distraught mother-to-be who has just been diagnosed
with gestational diabetes (r) (AD) 1.10 Access. Showbiz
news and gossip 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45
Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS. (2/2) Ziva and Gibbs lead
the mission to rescue the captured Marine in Afghanistan
and discover that her captor’s siblings have bigger plans
and are at large in America (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: Patricia
Cornwell’s The Front (15, TVM, 2010) Detective Win
Garano is recruited to reinvestigate a decades-old murder,
but finds someone is killing all the witnesses. Mystery
drama starring Andie MacDowell and Daniel Sunjata 5.00
5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Leo’s private investigator
reveals information about Mishti’s late fiancé (r) (AD)
6.00 Home and Away. Ryder finally asks Coco out on a
date (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7PM
Top
pick
that a peregrine falcon
can reach. Peter
Capaldi narrates this
eye-opening
documentary that
follows two peregrine
falcons and their
fledglings making a
seemingly unlikely life
in downtown Chicago,
as well as the progress
of Rudi, a falcon taken
in by Lloyd and Rose
Buck, an English
couple who breed birds
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine,
featuring chat and stories of interest
7.00 Antiques Road Trip James Braxton
and Christina Trevanion make their way
around the north east of England.
Then Arusha Irvine and Philip Serrell
begin a new search (8/10)
7.00 Emmerdale Moira is stunned to
discover who was responsible for the
attack on Ross (AD)
8.00 The Truth About Obesity Chris
Bavin seeks out the latest research
into the problem, finding out what it
means to be obese, what it does to the
body and looking at the most
up-to-date solutions available (AD)
8.00 Super Fast Falcon The peregrine
falcon is the fastest animal on earth,
able to reach speeds of more than
200mph. This documentary reveals the
secrets behind this high-speed recordbreaker. See Viewing Guide (AD)
8.00 Emmerdale Charity and Vanessa fear
for Tracy’s safety (AD)
9.00 Ambulance New series. Documentary
about the West Midlands Ambulance
Service. A day shift takes an
unexpected turn for paramedic Nat
when a 999 call suddenly becomes very
personal. See Viewing Guide
9.00 Civilisations Simon Schama considers
art in the modern world, asking
whether it should create a realm to
help people escape or if it should
transform how they live. Last in the
series. See Viewing Guide (AD)
9.00 Harold Shipman: Doctor Death
Twenty years since the arrest of
Britain’s most prolific serial killer,
detectives speaking for the first time
reveal how he got away with
murdering 250 patients over three
decades. See Viewing Guide (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7.30 EastEnders Arshad is frantic after
Harley’s kidnapping (AD)
8.30 Paul O’Grady: For the Love of
Dogs — India New series. People who
dedicate their lives to helping sick and
abandoned dogs in Delhi (1/4) (AD)
10.00 MOTD: The Premier League Show
News and highlights
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Newsnight With Emily Maitlis
10.30 Regional News
11.45 This Week Andrew Neil introduces a
round-table chat, in which he, Michael
Portillo and other guests take a look
back at the past seven days’ political
and parliamentary developments
12.35am-6.00 BBC News
11.15 Snooker: The World Championship
The final session on day six at the
Crucible Theatre, featuring the final
first-round match between Judd Trump
and Chris Wakelin, and the
continuation of round two
12.05am Snooker: World Championship Extra Hazel
Irvine introduces extended highlights of a match from the
sixth day of the ranking tournament at the Crucible
Theatre in Sheffield 2.05 Sign Zone: MasterChef (r) (AD,
SL) 2.35 The Secret Helpers (r) (AD, SL) 3.35-4.20
Murder, Mystery and My Family (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 The Nightmare Neighbour Next
Door A dispute with the residents of a
mobile home leads to a man being
attacked with a hammer, and a woman
decides to tackle a dog mess problem
in her council block (2/6) (r)
8.00 Location, Location, Location Phil
Spencer catches up with two first-time
buyers — Keon and Zoe, who searched
west and south London, and Laura and
Phil, who wanted to settle in Bath
8.00 Bad Tenants, Rogue Landlords
A landlord offers a former tenant the
use of a spare room until she gets back
on her feet, but then struggles to evict
her — and things get more difficult
when the woman moves her partner in
9.00 999: What’s Your Emergency?
Wiltshire’s emergency services deal
with people who live alone, including
an elderly woman who has suffered a
fall but is longing for a chat (AD)
9.00 Can’t Pay? We’ll Take It Away!
Stewart and Vic take on an eviction
case in Nottingham, where they find a
volatile tenant who insists he has the
right to stay. The duo also chase
£5,000 for an unpaid parking fine
7.30 Secrets of Your Online Shop:
Tonight Investigating consumers’
rights when shopping online
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.45 Question Time David Dimbleby chairs
the debate from Bury St Edmunds,
Suffolk, with a panel of politicians and
other guests facing topical questions
7.00 Channel 4 News
10.45 Uefa Europa League Highlights
Action from the semi-final first-leg
matches, as the teams looked to gain
an advantage ahead of next week’s
second-leg fixtures
11.45 Play to the Whistle Comedy sports
quiz with Anthony Joshua, Kevin
Bridges and Jon Richardson (2/6) (r)
12.20am Lethal Weapon Riggs and Murtaugh respond
to the murder of an escaped patient of Dr Cahill’s (r) (AD)
1.05 Give It a Year. A former Royal Marine who started a
woodland adventure business (r) (AD) 1.30 Jackpot247
3.00 Secrets of Your Online Shop: Tonight (r) 3.25 ITV
Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
10.00 True Horror Docudrama based on real
horror stories, continuing with the tale
of a mother who fears her father-inlaw has returned from the dead, with a
horrific plan to steal her children (AD)
11.05 Gogglebox Programmes including The
Shining, Britain’s Got Talent, Antiques
Roadshow, The Queen’s Green Planet,
Buy It Now and The Yorkshire Vet get a
grilling from the critics (r) (AD)
12.00 The Real Football Fan Show Supporters air
their views on the Premier League 12.35am The Island
with Bear Grylls (r) (AD, SL) 1.30 The Secret Life of the
Zoo (r) (AD) 2.25 Class of Mum and Dad (r) (AD) 3.20
Come Dine Champion of Champions (r) 4.15 Building the
Dream (r) (AD) 5.10-6.00 Fifteen to One (r)
10.00 Michael Portillo: Our Housing
Crisis — Who’s to Blame? As he
traces the rise and fall of the British
council estate, Michael Portillo
investigates the story of the social
housing revolution that has
transformed the country
11.30 Where There’s Blame, There’s a
Claim Two women who had botched
procedures, but are yet to see any of
their compensation (3/3) (r)
12.00 SuperCasino 3.10am GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
Cases include a mother-to-be with diabetes (r) (AD) 4.00
Tattoo Disasters UK (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor. Ann
Maurice smartens up a basement flat in Stoke
Newington, north London (r) (SL) 5.10 Wildlife SOS (r)
(SL) 5.35-6.00 House Doctor (r) (SL)
the times | Thursday April 26 2018
13
1G T
television & radio
Civilisations
BBC Two, 9pm
What this sprawling
and often thrilling
series has lacked in
narrative coherence it
has made up for in
challenging thinking —
and there’s plenty of the
latter here as Simon
Schama concludes
proceedings with an
examination of art in
the face of unthinkable
horror and the gaping
maw of commerce.
His observations on
art’s response to the
Holocaust and stout
defence of modernism
are as spiky and
articulate as you would
expect, if not paired
particularly cohesively.
Not, perhaps, the
hoped-for landmark
series, Civilisations has
nevertheless been
engaging television.
Harold Shipman:
Doctor Death
ITV, 9pm
ITV’s focus on crime
reaches one of the
true horror stories of
the past century: the
poisoning of more than
250 people by a GP so
seemingly respectable
that he appeared on a
1982 World in Action to
discuss mental illness.
This compelling affair
follows a police
investigation that
began with suspicions
over a forged will and
ended with Shipman
turning his back on
detectives during
interviews, his
pathological arrogance
and desire for control
undiminished until his
suicide in prison. A
chilling profile, handled
with care by the Emmy
winner Jonathan Jones.
Barry
Sky Atlantic, 10.45pm
Barry (Saturday Night
Live alumnus Bill
Hader) is an average
schmuck with an
untidy apartment and
moribund social life.
He’s also a Marine
turned hitman with
deep ennui-cum-PTSD.
When a series of events
land him in an acting
class run by Henry
Winkler’s tyrannical
guru, he falls for the
craft and a girl, spying
an escape route from
his grim existence.
Grabbing the attention
from the first camera
pan, Hader’s wry,
low-key comedy gives
up its treasures at a
leisurely pace, but his
understated turn is set
off by richly enjoyable
character turns and
inspired dialogue.
Sport Choice
Sky Sports Golf, 1pm
The Classic of New
Orleans tees off in
Louisiana today.
Purists may be
horrified to hear that
it will be the first
tournament to feature
walk-up music.
However, there are
some great pairings,
including Bubba Watson
with Matt Kuchar.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Animal 999 (r) 7.00 Meerkat Manor (r)
8.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD) 9.00 Motorway
Patrol (r) (AD) 10.00 Road Wars (r) 11.00
Warehouse 13 (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The
Simpsons (r) 5.30 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Arrow. In his darkest place yet, Oliver
wonders if he has failed at everything
9.00 SEAL Team. Jason comes to blows with his
rival and Charlie Team boss Beau Fuller
10.00 In the Long Run. Rumours throw
Bagpipes’s plans up in the air. Last in the series
10.30 Football’s Funniest Moments (r)
11.00 The Force: North East (r)
12.00 Brit Cops: Frontline Crime UK (r) 1.00am
Ross Kemp: Extreme World (r) (AD) 2.00 Most
Shocking (r) 3.00 Duck Quacks Don’t Echo (r)
(AD) 4.00 The Real A&E (r) (AD) 4.30 The Real
A&E (r) 5.00 It’s Me or the Dog (r)
6.00am Urban Secrets (r) 7.00 Richard E
Grant’s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 8.00 Fish Town
(r) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r)
(AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue
Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00
House. The team treats a champion matador (r)
6.00 House. Medical drama (r) (AD)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A film star
is implicated in a murder at his penthouse (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Frank enlists the help of a
notorious mob lawyer (r) (AD)
9.00 Billions. Taylor travels to Silicon Valley to
explore new business opportunities (5/12)
10.10 Silicon Valley. Richard tries to persuade a
big company to come on board with PiperNet
10.45 Barry. Dark comedy. See Viewing Guide
11.20 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (r)
11.55 Mike Judge Presents: Tales from the Tour
Bus. George Jones and Tammy Wynette (3/8)
12.30am Tin Star. Elizabeth finds a key witness
(r) (AD) 1.30 Blue Bloods (r) 2.30 House of Lies
(r) 3.05 Animals (r) 4.05 The West Wing (r)
6.00am Motorway Patrol (r) 7.00 Highway
Patrol (r) (AD) 7.30 Border Patrol (r) 8.00
Border Security: Canada’s Front Line (r) 9.00
Elementary (r) (AD) 10.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 11.00 Cold Case (r) 12.00
Children’s Hospital (r) (AD) 1.00pm Medical
Emergency (r) (AD) 2.00 Send in the Dogs (r)
3.00 Nothing to Declare (AD) 5.00 Border
Security: Canada’s Front Line (r)
6.00 Medical Emergency (r) (AD)
6.30 Medical Emergency (r) (AD)
7.00 Children’s Hospital (r) (AD)
7.30 Children’s Hospital (r) (AD)
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Madam Secretary
10.00 Scandal. Personal turmoil strikes Olivia
11.00 Criminal Minds (r) 12.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 1.00am Britain’s Most
Evil Killers (r) 2.00 Nashville (r) 3.00 CSI:
Crime Scene Investigation (r) 4.00 Nothing to
Declare. Double bill (r) (AD) 5.00 Border
Security: Canada’s Front Line (r)
6.00am Maestro: The Director’s Cut 7.35 André
Rieu: Dreaming 9.00 Watercolour Challenge
9.30 The Adventurers of Modern Art 10.30
Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 11.00 Trailblazers
12.00 The Seventies (AD) 1.00pm Discovering
(AD) 2.00 Watercolour Challenge 2.30 The Art
Show (AD) 3.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD)
4.00 Trailblazers 5.00 The Seventies (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Robert Mitchum (AD)
7.00 The Gospel Music of Johnny Cash
8.00 Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison
9.00 Urban Myths: Johnny Cash and the Ostrich.
Comedy starring Frank Skinner (AD)
9.30 Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears (AD)
10.45 Johnny Cash: A Legend in Concert
11.30 Urban Myths: Johnny Cash and the
Ostrich (AD) 12.00 National Treasures: The Art
of Collecting 1.00am Monty Python: Almost the
Truth 2.05 Psychob*****s 2.35 FILM:
Leonard Cohen — I’m Your Man (12, 2005)
4.30 Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 5.00 Auction
5.30 Auction: David Bowie Collector
6.00am European Tour Golf 7.30 Live European
Tour Golf: The Volvo China Open 10.30 Live ATP
Tennis: The Barcelona Open. Coverage of the
fourth day in the clay-court tournament at the
Real Club de Tenis Barcelona 3.00pm Live Indian
Premier League: Sunrisers Hyderabad v Kings Xi
Punjab. Coverage from the Rajiv Gandhi
International Cricket Stadium in Hyderabad
7.00 Live Premier League Darts. All the action
from round 13 of the season, which takes place
at Manchester Arena, where the matches to take
place are Peter Wright v Michael Smith, Daryl
Gurney v Michael van Gerwen, Simon Whitlock v
Gary Anderson, Raymond van Barneveld v Rob
Cross, and Michael Smith v Michael van Gerwen
10.00 Sky Sports News at Ten
11.00 Sky Sports News
12.00 Live NFL Draft. Coverage of day one from
AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, where
representatives of the NFL teams select from
the finest college players to add to their roster
5.00am Sky Sports News
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm The View.
A review of the week’s political news, including
reports on the latest events at Stormont and
Westminster. Plus, comment and analysis with
studio guests 11.15 Question Time 12.15am
This Week 1.00-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 The Arts
Show. An interview with the author Bernard
MacLaverty, the story of how 50 years ago
Mary O’Malley started the Lyric Theatre, and
music by Elma Orkestra 11.15 MOTD: The
Premier League Show 11.45 Snooker: The
World Championship 12.35am-2.05 Snooker:
World Championship Extra
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 12.00midday-1.00pm
First Minister’s Questions. Nicola Sturgeon
answers questions in the Scottish Parliament
7.00pm The Beechgrove Garden. Jim McColl
and Carole Baxter plant a range of ruby and red
potatoes, Chris Beardshaw adds a few new
roses and Brian Cunningham reviews the winter
damage to his alpine garden 7.30-8.00
Timeline. Thought-provoking stories
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Uefa Europa League Highlights. Action
from the semi-finals 12.05am Lethal Weapon
(r) (AD) 12.50 Teleshopping 1.50 After
Midnight 2.50 Secrets of Your Online Shop:
Tonight (r) 3.15 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 1.30am-3.00 Teleshopping
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days; Weather. News and
analysis from Washington DC and London
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1985. John Peel and Janice
Long present the edition from August 29,
including music by Dan Hartman, D Train,
Madness and the Thompson Twins
8.00 Dive WWII: Our Secret History. The team
uncovers more U-boats and submarines sunk as
part of the German surrender and dives to the
wreck of Hitler’s deadliest vessel (2/2)
9.00 Putin, Russia & the West. An insight
into Barack Obama’s campaign to win over
Dmitry Medvedev, and a look at the Russian
president’s own complex relationship with
Vladimir Putin. Last in the series (AD)
10.00 Horizon: Swallowed by a Sink Hole. Iain
Stewart travels to Florida to investigate the sink
hole that killed a man in February, 2013, when it
opened up beneath his bedroom (6/12)
11.00 Law and Order. (3/4) The focus of the
1970s drama switches to the solicitor (3/4)
12.20am Top of the Pops: 1985 12.50 Danny
Baker’s Great Album Showdown 1.50 Putin,
Russia & the West (AD) 2.50-3.50 Dive WWII:
Our Secret History (SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (AD) 7.00 Rules of
Engagement 8.00 How I Met Your Mother (AD)
9.00 New Girl (AD) 10.00 2 Broke Girls (AD)
11.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD) 12.00 The
Goldbergs (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory
(AD) 2.00 How I Met Your Mother (AD) 3.00
New Girl (AD) 4.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Extreme Cake Makers
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
8.30 Young Sheldon (AD)
9.00 Brooklyn Nine-Nine (AD)
9.30 Derry Girls (AD)
10.00 The Inbetweeners (AD)
10.35 The Windsors (AD)
11.10 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
11.40 The Big Bang Theory (AD)
12.10am First Dates (AD) 1.15 Tattoo Fixers
(AD) 2.15 Gogglebox (AD) 3.10 The
Inbetweeners. Will does work experience (AD)
3.40 The Windsors (AD) 4.05 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine (AD) 4.30 Rules of Engagement
8.55am Food Unwrapped (AD) 9.30 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun 11.35 Four in a Bed
2.10pm Come Dine with Me 4.50 A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun 5.50 Ugly House to Lovely
House with George Clarke (AD)
6.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo. Cameras follow
giraffe Orla who is about to give birth (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud revisits a
couple whose daring design based on a
Norwegian longhouse-style property on
Scotland’s west coast caused them building and
financial problems (3/3) (AD)
9.00 The Good Fight. A Democratic Party
consultant approaches the firm to develop an
impeachment strategy against the president.
Lucca is suspicious after an impromptu visit
from Colin’s mother (AD)
10.05 Emergency Helicopter Medics. A farmer is
pierced through the chest with a spike, and a
motorcyclist is flown to hospital (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A mother and daughter
involved in a serious car crash (AD)
12.10am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA
1.05 The Good Fight (AD) 2.15 24 Hours in A&E
(AD) 3.15-4.00 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut
11.00am Samson and Delilah (U, 1949)
Biblical drama starring Victor Mature 1.35pm
The Spoilers (12, 1955) Western starring
Anne Baxter (b/w) 3.15 Retreat, Hell! (PG,
1952) Korean War drama starring Frank Lovejoy
(b/w) 5.05 Winchester ’73 (U, 1950)
Western starring James Stewart (b/w)
6.55 Never Been Kissed (12, 1999)
A clumsy would-be reporter’s assignment to
pose as a high-school student brings back
painful memories of her own awkward
adolescence. Comedy with Drew Barrymore (AD)
9.00 Prisoners (15, 2013) The distraught
father of a missing child kidnaps a man he
believes is responsible for her disappearance.
Thriller starring Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal,
Paul Dano and Viola Davis (AD)
12.00 Everly (18, 2014) A woman forced into
prostitution by a criminal overlord fights back
against her oppressor. Action thriller starring
Salma Hayek 1.50am-3.40 Cheap Thrills (15,
2013) A wealthy couple offer an unemployed
man and his drinking buddy money to carry out a
series of twisted challenges. Comedy thriller
starring Pat Healy and Ethan Embry
6.00am The Planet’s Funniest Animals 6.20
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records 7.10
Who’s Doing the Dishes? 7.55 Emmerdale (AD)
8.20 Coronation Street (AD) 9.25 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 10.20 The Bachelorette
12.15pm Emmerdale (AD) 12.45 Coronation
Street (AD) 1.45 The Ellen DeGeneres Show
2.35 The Jeremy Kyle Show
6.00 Take Me Out
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold. Humorous
footage, including an out-of-control rally car
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Herb goes on a wild
party binge at the beach house
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Jake cheats on his
girlfriend with her 18-year-old daughter
9.00 Family Guy (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (AD)
10.00 Celebrity Juice. With John Newman, Maya
Jama, Stacey Solomon and Joe Swash
10.50 Family Guy (AD)
11.20 Family Guy (AD)
11.45 American Dad! (AD)
12.10am American Dad! (AD) 12.40 Plebs (AD)
1.10 Two and a Half Men 2.05 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street 6.55
Heartbeat 7.55 The Royal 9.00 Judge Judy
10.20 Agatha Christie’s Marple 12.30pm The
Royal 1.35 Heartbeat 2.40 Classic Coronation
Street 3.45 On the Buses 4.50 You’re Only
Young Twice 5.25 George and Mildred 5.55
Heartbeat. Liz Merrick falls under suspicion
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica visits London,
where she investigates the mysterious murder
of an MP whose body disappeared shortly after
he was found dead. Guest starring Trevor Eve
and Sharon Maughan (AD)
8.00 Vera. The ugly truth about a murder
victim’s past begins to emerge when the body of
a drug dealer washes up on a beach, while Vera
copes with revelations of her own (3/4) (AD)
10.00 Housewife, 49. Bafta-winning drama
starring Victoria Wood as a downtrodden woman
whose life takes an upward turn when she
volunteers for the WVS during the Second World
War. With David Threlfall (AD)
12.05am A Touch of Frost. Jack investigates a
mysterious hit-and-run killing (SL) 2.15 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Saint 6.50 Pawn Stars 7.30
Ironside 8.25 Quincy ME 9.30 Minder (AD)
10.35 The Saint 11.35 The Avengers 12.45pm
Ironside 1.50 Quincy ME 2.50 Minder 3.50 The
Saint 4.55 The Avengers
6.05 Cash Cowboys. Scott Cozens and Sheldon
Smithens attend a museum’s closing-down sale
7.00 Pawn Stars. The guys prepare a surprise
for Chumlee’s 30th birthday
7.30 Pawn Stars. Chumlee is surprised when the
guys give him a motorcycle for his birthday
7.55 The Chase: Celebrity Special. Michael Parr,
Alex Scott, Jennifer Metcalfe and Bill Turnbull
work as a team to take on the Chaser
9.00 FILM: Moonraker (PG, 1979) James
Bond’s search for a missing space shuttle leads
to an industrialist bent on genocide — and a
rematch with old foe Jaws. Spy adventure
starring Roger Moore and Lois Chiles (AD)
11.40 FILM: Crank: High Voltage (18,
2009) Action thriller sequel starring Jason
Statham, Amy Smart and Dwight Yoakam
1.35am The Americans. Philip has stunning
news 2.30 The Protectors 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors 4.00 Steve
Austin’s Broken Skull Challenge 5.00 Top Gear.
The team enters a 24-hour endurance race (AD)
6.00 Room 101. With David Tennant, Trevor
McDonald and Aisling Bea
6.40 Would I Lie to You? With Hugh Dennis, Ben
Fogle, Kate Silverton and Craig Revel Horwood
7.20 Would I Lie to You? Rob Brydon hosts the
panel show, with Dermot O’Leary, Mel Giedroyc,
Josh Widdicombe and Matt Dawson
8.00 Have I Got a Bit More News for You.
Extended edition. Hosted by Sue Perkins, with
guests Roisin Conaty and Sadiq Khan
9.00 QI XL. With Brian Blessed and Sean Lock
10.00 Uncle. Comedy starring Nick Helm (AD)
10.40 Mock the Week. With Ed Byrne, Stewart
Francis, Rob Beckett and Katherine Ryan
11.20 Mock the Week. Compilation
12.00 QI 1.20am Mock the Week 2.00 QI
3.15 Parks and Recreation 3.40 The
Indestructibles 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning (AD)
9.00 Casualty (AD) 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
Bill 12.00 Lovejoy 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine 1.40 Hi-de-Hi! 2.20 Birds of a Feather
3.00 London’s Burning (AD) 4.00 You Rang,
M’Lord? 5.00 Lovejoy
6.00 Hi-de-Hi! Gladys is promoted
6.40 Keeping Up Appearances. The social climber
Hyacinth has her eye on a new car (AD)
7.20 Last of the Summer Wine. Clegg and Truly
reminisce about Compo
8.00 Death in Paradise. Humphrey and the team
investigate the shooting of Fidel’s old friend,
who had been working as an escort (3/8) (AD)
9.00 The Doctor Blake Mysteries. Blake tries to
prove a death row prisoner’s innocence (4/10)
10.00 New Tricks. The case of a zookeeper
thought to have been killed by a tiger in 2006 is
reopened when evidence suggests the victim
died before the big cat got to him (10/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Sharon tries social
climbing — but ends up meeting a snake
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London’s Burning (AD)
2.00 The Pinkertons (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Coast (AD) 7.10 Pointless 8.00 Time
Team 9.00 Coast (AD) 10.00 Murder Maps
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Team 1.00pm Super Tornado 2.00 Earth’s
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Murder Maps 5.00 Impossible Engineering (AD)
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The rivalry between the two war leaders (AD)
7.00 Inside the Court of Henry VIII. Profiling the
part-Renaissance prince, part-medieval tyrant
8.00 The Stuarts: A Bloody Reign. New series.
Professor Kate Williams reassesses the House
of Stuart’s history, starting with James I (AD)
9.00 dinnerladies. Philippa has a bright idea for
raising the spirits of the kitchen staff (AD)
9.40 dinnerladies. The girls celebrate
Japanese-style at their work party (AD)
10.20 dinnerladies (AD)
11.00 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
11.40 Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?
12.20am Whatever Happened to the Likely
Lads? 1.00 Black Ops. The rescue of kidnapped
aid workers (AD) 2.00 Auschwitz: The Nazis and
the Final Solution 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Bruno (r) 5.22
Igam Ogam (r) 5.30 Flapair is a Charaidean
(Flapper and Friends) (r) 5.40 Su Shiusaidh
(Little Suzy’s Zoo) (r) 5.45 Na Floogals (r)
5.55 Botannan Araid Uilleim (William’s Wish
Wellingtons) (r) 6.00 Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.15 Tree
Fu Tom (r) 6.35 Am Prionnsa Beag (The Little
Prince) (r) 7.00 Bailtean Alba (Scotland’s
Towns) (r) 7.25 Horo Gheallaidh Shorts (Celtic
Music Shorts) (r) 7.30 Speaking Our Language
(r) 7.55 Fraochy Bay (r) 8.00 An Là (News)
8.30 Fianais. John Morrison talks to Joe
MacNeil about the Iranian Revolution of 1979
9.00 Baby Killer? Sgeulachd Jessie King (r)
10.00 Belladrum 2017: Vukovi 10.30 Luingean
Lannsaireachd (Surgery Ships) 11.10
Sgeul Seirbheis (r) 11.25-11.55 Seòid a’
Chidsin: The Kitchen Coves (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Rapsgaliwn (r) 6.15 Blero yn
Mynd i Ocido (r) 6.25 Halibalw (r) 6.35 Igam
Ogam (r) 6.50 Sam Tân (r) 7.00 Chwedlau
Tinga Tinga (r) 7.10 Yn yr Ardd (r) 7.25 Dip
Dap (r) 7.30 Patrôl Pawennau 7.45 Cacamwnci
8.00 Syrcas Deithiol Dewi (r) 8.10 Pingu (r)
8.15 Boj (r) 8.30 Abadas (r) 8.40 Bla Bla
Blewog (r) 8.55 Ben a Mali a’u Byd Bach O Hud
(r) 9.05 Sbridiri (r) 9.25 Meripwsan (r) 9.30
Straeon Ty Pen (r) 9.45 Cei Bach (r) 10.00
Dona Direidi (r) 10.15 Tili a’i Ffrindiau (r)
10.25 Halibalw (r) 10.35 Igam Ogam (r)
10.45 Y Brodyr Coala (r) 11.00 Meic y Marchog
(r) 11.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 11.30 Mwnci’n
Dweud Mwnci’n Gwneud (r) 11.40 Peppa (r)
11.45 Cacamwnci (r) 12.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 12.05pm Straeon y Ffin (r) 12.30 Ffit
Cymru (r) 1.30 Sion a Siân (r) 2.00 News S4C
a’r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C
a’r Tywydd 3.05 O Gymru Fach (r) (AD) 4.00
Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh:
Hendre Hurt (r) 5.15 Stwnsh: Tref a Tryst 5.45
Stwnsh: Edi Wyn (r) 6.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
6.05 ’Sgota gyda Julian Lewis Jones (r) (AD)
6.30 Rownd a Rownd. Iolo persuades Philip to
find a love interest (AD) 7.00 Heno 7.30 Pobol
y Cwm. Dani is not happy to find her mother
drinking in the Deri with Gwyneth. Non does
her best to avoid DJ and Sioned (AD) 8.00 Y Ty
Arian. A Merthyr Tydfil family take on the
financial challenge 9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd
9.30 Cwymp yr Ymerodraethau. The fall of the
Ottoman Empire 10.30 Hansh. Tunes, comedy
and fresh faces 11.00-11.35 Mwy o Sgorio.
Dylan Ebenezer and Owain Tudur Jones are
joined by TNS’ midfielder Aeron Edwards (r)
14
Thursday April 26 2018 | the times
1G T
MindGames
1
2
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Codeword No 3320
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Train Tracks No 392
7
17
4
26
3
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M O
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© PUZZLER MEDIA
times2 Crossword No 7636
17
19
9
3
21
5
17
1
1
4
14
1
S
17
21
17
16
16
3
11
11
17
18
8
15
15
19
17
18
12
24
11
19
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16
B
20
16
24
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25
14
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
21
4
1
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
Limited in extent (10)
School test (4)
In instalments (6)
Bring and hand over (7)
Loyal and hard-working (8)
Board game (5)
Pass across (7)
Happening quickly (5)
T RAC T
E H
OD I A
MA
S P
DO L A T
C G
A I GNE
A E
I L
I RR I
S U
C T OMO
S
O
O
N
E
R
O
R
L
A
T
E
R
G
P A L
T
GER
A
OUS
L
E A K
U
AN T
C
PH
12
13
15
16
17
14
1
1
18
14
19
20
10
14
25
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
14
15
16
4
5
6
7
8
9
17
18
19
20
21
22
O
Down
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
11
Solution to Crossword 7635
SUB
T U
CAMB
M O
T ERN
N
I
C
CAMP
V
L
DE T A
N G
GURU
E E
17 Daring adventure (8)
18 Hairdressers (7)
19 Separate (6)
20 Inflamed swelling (4)
21 Irrelevant to the subject
(10)
Electrical component (8)
Piercing cry (6)
To the back (8)
Principle, belief (5)
Please greatly (7)
Loving stroke (6)
Aridity (7)
Mention in an official
report (8)
Lack of variety (8)
Dish of minced meat (7)
South American river (6)
Gambling establishment (6)
Break out suddenly (5)
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11
12
13
23
24
25
26
S
M
Every letter in this crossword-style grid has been substituted for a number
from 1 to 26. Each letter of the alphabet appears in the grid at least once. Use
the letters already provided to work out the identity of further letters. Enter
letters in the main grid and the smaller reference grid until all 26 letters of the
alphabet have been accounted for. Proper nouns are excluded.
Yesterday’s solution, right
Lexica No 4237
O
A
I
L
No 4238
I
B
P
H
I
O
E
D
A
O
A
T
B
L
I
I
F
K
T
N
O
E
W
L
R
E
O
L
F
C
A
O
S
A
Futoshiki No 3159
C
T
35
16
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
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Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
13
22
22
16
16
23
28
21
4
24
8
6
6
6
28
3
22
10
11
14
7
<
<
Fill the blank squares so that every row and column contains
each of the numbers 1 to 5 once only. The symbols between
the squares indicate whether a number is larger (>) or
smaller (<) than the number next to it.
4
15
15
>
34
Fill the grid using
the numbers 1 to 9
only. The numbers
in each horizontal
or vertical run of
white squares add
up to the total in
the triangle to its
left or above it.
The same number
may occur more
than once in a row
or column, but not
within the same
run of white
squares.
6
4
∧
14
29
17
9
<
15
24
33
35
3
∧
∨
3
Winners will receive a Collins English Dictionary & Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle and text in the numbers in the three
shaded boxes. Text TIMES followed by a space, then your
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order) and your contact details.
Kakuro No 2118
26
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
W
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce
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KenKen Difficult No 4312
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N
See today’s News section
10
17
5
24
13
4
10
35
8
17
4
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
the times | Thursday April 26 2018
15
1G T
MindGames
The Gashimov Memorial in memory of Vugar Gashimov (19862014) is in progress in Shamkir,
Azerbaijan. The line-up is powerful, including world champion
Magnus Carlsen, his former challenger Sergei Karjakin and, according to the live ratings, world
number three Shakhriyar Mamedyarov. The field would have
been even stronger had it not
been for the replacement of former world champion Vladimir
Kramnik on grounds of ill health
by Radoslaw Wojtaszek.
There will be full reports in this
column and games can be followed via the 2seeitlive link on
the header of The Times Twitter
feed @times_chess. Today’s game
and puzzle feature Vugar Gashimov, who sadly died at the age of
just 27.
White: Maxim Rodshtein
Black: Vugar Gashimov
Ohrid 2009
Modern Benoni
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 c5 4 d5 d6
5 Nc3 exd5 6 cxd5 g6
The Benoni cedes White a central pawn majority but aims for
attacking chances with the bishop
on g7, the mobile queenside
pawns and the open e-file.
7 g3 Bg7 8 Bg2 0-0 9 0-0
White has chosen a relatively
quiet counter to the Benoni. More
aggressive lines involve a quick
f2-f4 and an attempt to steamroller Black with a quick e4-e5.
9 ... Re8 10 Bf4 a6 11 a4 b6 12
Re1 Nh5 13 Bg5 Qc7 14 e4 Nd7 15
Rc1 h6 16 Bd2 Qb8 17 Bf1 Ra7 18
b3 Nf8 19 h3 Rae7 20 Qc2 g5
This move creates space for
Black to ferry his pieces to the
kingside in support of his powerful doubled rooks on the e-file.
21 Kg2 Ng6 22 Bd3 Nf6 23 Rh1
This bizarre move suggests that
White is unable to find a constructive plan
23 ... Qb7 24 Rce1 Bd7 25 Bc1 b5
26 axb5 axb5 27 Bb2 c4
An ingenious thrust that energises his tactic on move 29. If 27 ...
Bxh3+ at once, then 28 Rxh3 g4 29
Rhh1 gxf3+ 30 Kxf3 Ne5+ 31 Kg2
is playable for White.
28 bxc4 bxc4 29 Bxc4
________
á D DrDkD]
àDqDb4pg ]
ß D 0 hn0]
ÞD DPD 0 ]
Ý DBDPD D]
ÜD H DN)P]
Û GQD )KD]
ÚD D $ DR]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
29 ... Bxh3+ 30 Kg1
After 30 Rxh3 g4 31 Rhh1 gxf3+
the capture 32 Kxf3 is impossible
due to 32 ... Ne5+, picking up the
c4-bishop. This variation explains
Black’s 27th move.
30 ... Rc8 31 Ba2 Nxe4
A torrent of sacrifices releases
the energy in Black’s position.
32 Rxh3
32 Rxe4 is met by 32 ... Rxe4 33
Qxe4 Qxb2.
32 ... Nxc3 33 Rxe7 Nxe7 34 Bxc3
Rxc3 35 Qe4 g4 36 Qxg4 Qa6
White resigns
The bishop has no escape and
Black also plans ... Rc1+ and ... Qf1.
________
á i D D D] Winning Move
àDB4 D 0 ]
ß DPD 0 0] White to play. This position is from
Dhabi 2006.
ÞDrD 0PD ] Gashimov-Kengis,
Black is surviving in this position only
Ý ) h D )] because his knight on d4 is keeping the
Ü) DQD D ] white major pieces at bay. How did
Û D D DqD] Gashimov brush this feeble defence aside?
ÚDK$RD D ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
49 – 8
EASY
MEDIUM
HARDER
103 x 3 + 66
117 x 7 + 537
+8
÷5
–7
20%
OF IT
+ 79
+1/2
OF IT
+ 55
+ 1/2
OF IT
75%
OF IT
+ 885
+ 1/2
OF IT
+ 778 x 2 – 958
♠8 7 2
♥A 7 2
♦J 9 6
♣Q J 6 2
Pairs
N
E
Yesterday’s answers able, amber, amble,
ambler, bale, baler, balm, bare, barm,
beam, beamer, bear, beer, bema, berm,
blame, blare, blear, brae, bream, embalm,
embalmer, ember, emblem, lamb,
lamber, marble, member, ramble, rebel
Killer Gentle No 5977
15
8
10
4
15
7
14
14
3
7
3
17
16
6min
8
19
16
6
14
8
3
15
12
4
11
10
13
23
8
6
12
15
8
14
3
13
E
S
♠♥8 ( l e d )
♦A 8
♣-
-
♠♥J
♦4 2
♣-
felling West’s king and tabled the
eight. Phew — 11 tricks.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
7
6
+
5
22
11
27
12
24min
5
30
6
8
11
20
15
23
9
6
20
11
22
17
4
16
12
8
-
+
20
7
10
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
1
÷
x
+
÷
=
20
=
12
=
24
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Codeword 3319
P
F W C W H
A
A VOC A DO HOA RD
S
V
R
I
V
H
C
R E T R A C E
K I T T Y
E
E
E
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L I T H E
P I R A T E S
E
P
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OV E R A C T
N I N J A
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P
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T
A P P L A UD
D A CH A
P
R
E
O H
S
G
N A S C E N T
OV E R T
R
Y
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R
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J A
A
YO
W
AB
L
K I
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4
3
2
3
8
6
5
9
4
7
1
6
9
4
2
7
1
8
3
5
Set Square 2120
7
1
5
8
3
4
2
9
6
3
5
2
4
1
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7
6
9
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1
7
6
3
2
4
1
9
8
5
2
x
6
+
+
x
4
x
9
-
+
+
3
÷
8
x
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6
4
7
1
2
8
3
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9
5
8
2
4
3
9
7
1
6
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9
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4
8
7
3
5
2
9
6
1
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2
1
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9
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8
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2
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7
7
9
6
2
1
3
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8
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2
4
5
8
9
7
1
3
6
3
1
8
5
4
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2
8
6
4
7
2
5
3
1
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1
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3
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1
9
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2
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8
1
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7
6
3
4
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3
8
6
7
9
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1
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4
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2
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1
9
8
1
7
3
9
4
6
5
2
3
2
9
5
1
6
8
7
4
2 1 3
4 2 1
7
1 3 2
2 1 4
6 5
6 7 9
9 8
5 9 8
5 7
7 9
7 9 8
9
6 1
8
5
5 3 4
3 2 1
8
1
1 2
2
1 2 3
3 1
8 9
9 7 4
3 1
3 1 2
1 2
6 8 9
2 6 7
4
5 8 9
9 7 8
Train Tracks 391
1
Quintagram
1 Poet
2 Grave
3 Riddle
4 Bluebell
5 Hot potato
5
4
2
6
3
2
3
5
6
5
2
A
3
1
1
+
3
7
1
B
M
E
L
O
N
L
A
R
M
U
O
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N
A
G
I
X
S
E
G
M
A
O
Q
U
R
L
E
D
G
I
N
3
∨
1
2
1
∧
4
3
2 < 4
2 < 4 < 5
1
5
∨
3
5
2
4
12
E
O
T
Suko 2221
5
KenKen 4311
U
3 > 2
∧
∨
5
1
4
3
E
3
2
4
6 4 2
M
P
N
Futoshiki 3158
1
Cell Blocks 3202
Lexica 4236
P
Brain Trainer
Easy 45
Medium 1,056
Harder 2,758
4
6
3
3
Word watch
Penthia (c) An
unidentified
plant mentioned
in the works of
Spenser
Palliard (b) A
beggar or vagrant
Pipe (a) In
mining, an
irregular or
elongated vein
of ore
Chess
Killer 5976
9
7
4
6
3
2
1
8
5
F EMUR
L
A
U
I T I NG
T
L
B
AB L Y
G O
L E XOR
A
I
D EM I C
I
O K
O Z ON E
L
D
T
I N S A Y
-
B
4
1
9
5
8
7
2
6
3
Kakuro 2117
CK PO T
L
U W
UR S
E X
B
H
E
S COND S
V
S
L L E D
F
O R
S
BOOK
E P I
E
F
Q R
BRA V URA
O H
I
N
POS I T
GA
Killer 5975
12
-
x
Quick Cryptic 1077
Sudoku 9825
19
=9
x
8
Enter each of
the numbers
from 1 to 9 in
the grid, so
that the six
sums work.
= 47 We’ve placed
two numbers
to get you
started. Each
sum should be
= 3 calculated left
to right or top
to bottom.
x
Lexica 4235
Killer Tough No 5978
17
N
2 5
Divide the grid
into square or
rectangular
blocks, each
containing one
digit only.
Every block
must contain
the number of
cells indicated
by the digit
inside it.
Solutions
Sudoku 9823
Contract: 5♠ , Opening Lead: ♥ 3
W
4
2 3 2
8
2
Sudoku 9824
1♠
2♣(1)
2♠ (2) Pass
4♣(3) Pass
4♠ (4) Pass
5♠ (5) Pass
Pass(6) Pass
(1) Dubious suit quality but tempting given
the vulnerability and nice 5431 shape.
(2) Would much rather have ♠ QJx and
♣xxxx but “if in doubt, support.”
(3) Splinter bid, showing slammy values
with a singleton (void) club.
(4) Lousy trump support, lousy shape and
wasted values in clubs.
(5) Still — dubiously — trying for slam. “Are
you really bad, or merely quite bad?”
(6) Really bad. North’s one asset is the ace
of hearts but that’s not enough.
♠♥A
♦6
♣Q
7/
16
OF IT
4
From these letters, make words of four
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 9 words, average;
13, good; 19, very good; 26, excellent
Advanced
W
♠♥♦K 7
♣K
+ 99 x 2
4
Set Square No 2121
16
♠Q
♠ K J 10
N
♥J 10 9 6 5 4
♥3
W E
♦10 4 2
♦K 7 5 3
S
♣9 7 3
♣K 10 8 5 4
♠A 9 6 5 4 3
♥KQ 8
♦AQ 8
♣A
S
+9
© PUZZLER MEDIA
15
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
SQUARE
IT
Polygon
Bridge Andrew Robson
After optimistically trying for slam
on today’s deal from a duplicate at
my club, South had to fight hard to
restrict his losers to two. It appears
he must lose the king of diamonds
in addition to two spades.
Declarer won West’s singleton
heart lead with the king and
cashed the ace of spades. At most
tables, where the contract was a
mere (but entirely sensible) 4♠ ,
declarer next led a second spade.
West took his king-jack and exited
with a club (best). Declarer won
his bare ace, crossed to the ace of
hearts and led a diamond to the
queen. West won the king and that
was ten tricks and game made.
Our buccaneering hero in 5♠
needed to avoid the diamond loser.
After cashing the ace of spades at
trick two, he found the key play of
cashing the ace of clubs before
exiting with a second spade. West
won the king-jack but now had to
lead a minor from a king. It did not
matter which he chose — in practice it was a (reluctant) diamond.
Declarer played dummy’s nine
of diamonds and beat East’s ten
with the queen and ran his three
remaining spades, discarding two
clubs and a diamond (the jack)
from dummy. He then cashed the
queen of hearts and, in the ending
across, led to dummy’s ace of
hearts.
West was squeezed. To keep his
king of clubs, he had to bare the
king of diamonds. At trick 12,
declarer led dummy’s diamond
and, from West’s bid, his reluctance to switch to diamonds and
his unease when discarding, read
the ending. He rose with the ace,
60%
OF IT
x 2 + 13
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Gashimov Memorial
Cell Blocks No 3203
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
1 Qxb5! Nxb5
2 Rd8+ Rc8
(2 ... Ka7 3 Ra8+
Kb6 4 Ra6
mate) 3 Rxc8+
Ka7 4 Ra8+ Kb6
5 c7 wins
Quiz
1 Greenwich 2 Ronald and Reginald Kray
3 Deepwater Horizon oil spill or BP oil spill or Gulf of
Mexico oil spill 4 Rhodium 5 Garth Brooks 6 Mount
St Helens 7 Bullets over Broadway 8 David Lidington
9 Edward IV 10 Great Lent 11 Sardinia 12 Selangor
13 Olympus 14 France 15 Bushmills. It claims to be the
“world’s oldest whiskey distillery”
26.04.18
MindGames
Mild No 9826
Fill the grid so that every
column, every row and
every 3x3 box contains
the digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
Josephine
Balmer
Penthia
a A thought process
b A warlike woman
c A plant
Palliard
a Cowardly
b A beggar
c A transport crate
Pipe
a An ore vein
b Sprightly
c To work a con
Fiendish No 9827
Super fiendish No 9828
5
3
5 3 8
2 7
1
6 9
4 1
7 4
2
9
2
3 6
7
6 8 5
2
8 3 1 6
9 2
7
5 4 8 9
2
8 1
2 9
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
8
6 8 1 4
2
4 3 9
5 9 6
7
7 8 1
9 1 7
7
2 8
9
6
5
7
7 3
1
9
1
1
6 8 9
2
9 4
5 1
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight to receive four clues for any of today’s
puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
Answers on page 15
The Times Daily Quiz Olav Bjortomt
Suko No 2221
ALAMY
1 The Blackwall Tunnel
under the Thames links
Tower Hamlets with the
Royal Borough of where?
11 Pane carasau is a
traditional flatbread from
which Italian island?
12 Shah Alam is the
capital of which
Malaysian state, whose
royal capital is Klang?
2 Leonard “Nipper”
Read led the police
effort that got which
identical twin criminals
convicted in 1969?
3 Which 2010 disaster
was the largest
accidental marine oil
spill in petroleum
industry history?
13 Founded by Takeshi
Yamashita, which
Japanese company
introduced the Pen halfframe camera in 1959?
15
6 Alan Hovhaness’s
Symphony No 50
commemorates which
American volcano?
4 Which silvery-white
metal derives its name
the Greek for “rosecoloured”?
5 No Fences (1990), Ropin’
the Wind (1991) and Sevens
(1997) are albums by
which US country star?
Office minister and
chancellor of the Duchy
of Lancaster?
7 Which Woody Allen film
centres on the making
of the play God of Our
Fathers by David Shayne?
8 Which MP for
Aylesbury is the Cabinet
9 Who began his second
reign as king of England
on April 11, 1471?
10 In Eastern
Christianity, Clean
Monday is the first day
of which fasting season?
14 In 2017, which
country won a sixth IHF
World Men’s Handball
Championship title?
15 Which distillery
in County Antrim,
Northern Ireland,
is pictured?
Answers on page 15
Place the numbers 1 to 9 in the
spaces so that the number in each
circle is equal to the sum of the four
surrounding spaces, and each colour
total is correct
The Times Quick Cryptic No 1078 by Mara
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
16
18
19
20
21
22
24
23
25
Across
1 Risk a second letter (4)
3 Beginning to skate, took a fall
— slipped up (8)
9 Info at the bottom? (3-4)
10 Rover has no crackers (5)
11 Ostentation comes initially in
story, looking back (5)
12 Throw Austen out (6)
14 Unfortunate incident arose,
being careless (13)
17 Curry cold — very cold! (6)
19 Watch, maybe, to send back (5)
22 In fact, a long claw (5)
23 Formerly large case (7)
24 Muscular men mostly backed
fee being revised (8)
25 Tolerate a beast (4)
Down
1 Fast traveller in news item (8)
2 Nothing in wet rubbish left
drier (5)
4 Playful language getting not
very far — yikes! (6-2-5)
5 Old king, some person I met
on the way up (5)
6 Greek character embracing a
dance (7)
7 Remarkably odd, old old bird
(4)
8 Cushion frequently seen under
bottom of missus (6)
13 I agree to try and try again!
(4,4)
15 Fish, a whopper for Wally (7)
16 Seduce mate almost entirely
the wrong way (6)
18 Restorative note (5)
20 Treasure finally found under
different palm tree (5)
21 Hurt toe, perhaps, first in
slippery bath (4)
DIGITAL RADIO • APP
VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
Yesterday’s solution on page 15
3
4
5
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