close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Times Times 2 – 27 November 2017

код для вставкиСкачать
November 27 | 2017
On Monday
Meet Jeremy
Paxman?s
favourite
interviewer
Why Emma Barnett
is a rising star
2
1GT
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
times2
I will finish the
Peter O?Toole couldn?t
have been drunk and
successful? What tosh
Kevin Maher
H
ave you heard the
new one about Peter
O?Toole? He walks
into a bar. And then
he walks right out
again. And that?s it.
Well, it is if we are
to believe the hype
surrounding a new biography of the
Lawrence of Arabia star, eight-time
Oscar nominee and famously
?drunken hellraiser?, who died in 2013.
The biographer, who was given
access to O?Toole?s unreleased private
papers, claims that the actor?s
infamous alcohol consumption (he
was so drunk on a night off from
filming Lawrence that he mistook a
Beirut nunnery for a brothel, with
typically hilarious consequences ?
oh yes, he was a card!) has been wildly
exaggerated, and his legend needs to
be reassessed. Why? Because, claims
the author, the private papers reveal
that O?Toole knew what he was doing,
and ?he knew he wanted to be famous,
and he wanted to be a star??.
Hmmm. I don?t mean to be pedantic,
but there is nothing paradoxical or
worth reassessing in the idea of a
drunken actor wanting to be, or even
becoming, famous. I?d say it?s almost
a prerequisite of the gig. And it?s not
just acting either.
The professional world, from
humble waiter to high-flying corporate
chief executive, is full of jobs that
can be performed with incredible
competence while fully intoxicated. It
is only our relatively recent knee-jerk
abhorrence of the idea of a boozetinged workday that has created this
strange sanctimonious culture of
denial, as if daytime boozing were
a comedy curiosity confined only to
the full seven seasons of Mad Men.
On the contrary, I was that humble
waiter in the early 1990s in London.
And chances are, if you ate in our
restaurant on any busy Saturday
night, you were most likely attended
to by a drunken server (me included).
A large, thirst-quenching and
ever-replenishing jug of Long Island
iced tea on the bar, strictly for staff,
was the source. What are you going
to do? I was a good waiter too. Often
with as many as 40 or 50 customers
at a time. And I never messed up.
Before that I was also, very briefly,
a labourer on a building site where a
couple of lunchtime pints was no big
Kids, come
in from
the code
Oh joy of joys! There is
a god! A professor at a
management school in
Ben Saunders is determined to complete
the Antarctic walk that claimed the life
of Henry Worsley. By Will Humphries
Throwing
stones in a
pink castle
deal ? followed, obviously, by the
use of dangerous heavy machinery
(the one labourer who did injure
himself on my watch was a teetotaller
? got hit in the eye with a flying
fragment of stone).
I worked in TV for a bit too, where
cocaine use (not mine!) on the job
was unremarkable and where several
double whiskies, hand-delivered to
crew before a difficult afternoon?s
shooting, was as normal as the doling
out of green juices today. And then to
journalism, where lunchtime meetings
in restaurants were gently stewed in
large wines and occasional digestifs.
I can?t say with pinpoint accuracy
when it all changed. But I do recall,
specifically, a ?celebratory? lunch to
mark the publication of my first novel
in 2012. There were six of us at the
table, in giddy mood. The waiter
arrived (he seemed sober enough).
And we all, without conferring,
ordered fizzy water. I remember
thinking: ?So this is it? It?s happened.
The boozing is finally over.?
Here?s the rub. No one, it seems,
has become markedly better at their
job since then. We aren?t living in a
world of extra-special super-sentient
workers, who are better waiters, better
builders and better journalists simply
because they?re sober. Of course,
alcohol can be a terrible thing, and
a slippery life-wrecking addiction
(ditto fags, drugs, sugar and Facebook).
But to imply that it exists in entire
opposition to success, productivity
and creativity is naive in the extreme.
Just look at Peter O?Toole.
Illinois has written an
academic paper
suggesting that
teaching your kids
computer coding is
pointless. Computer
languages emerge,
evolve and die too
quickly, he says, to
make their acquisition
at school level in any
way relevant to the
working environment.
To which I can only
roar, in gloating
triumph: ?Yes! Yes!?
This compensates for
all those encounters
with passive-aggressive
parents who corner you
at parties and say, ?Yah,
Bethany?s school is
Don?t you just hate it
when a beautiful
blonde model poses
for some oddly
anachronistic softcore
photos in and around
your parents? castle?
You do if you?re Gabriel
Forbes-Sempill, the
daughter of Lord
Sempill, who handed
over Craigievar Castle
in Aberdeenshire to the
National Trust for
Scotland in 1963 (oh,
that Lord Sempill!).
The pink castle
(the result of a 2009
renovation) was used
as a location for some,
ahem, ?artistic?
photography (think
Timotei advertisement,
with or without
clothes). This quickly
escalated into a
legal battle (the
photographer is
suing for libel) when
Forbes-Sempill became
aware of the pictures
and raised objections
with the trust. ?I am
by no means a prude,?
she said. ?But I don?t
believe my parents gave
the castle to the nation
for this sort of thing.?
This sort of thing?
Isn?t it a bit rich
to be accused of a
lapse of taste from
someone who?s
defending a bright
pink toy-town castle?
soooo progressive. They
do coding classes, like,
three times a week.
They?re really
preparing them for the
future. How about
yours??
?Mine? Mine are
busy not wasting their
time worrying about
bloody coding.?
O
n January 22, 2016
the polar explorer
Henry Worsley
pitched his tent for
the final time on
the Antarctic ice
field after 70 days
pulling a sled
through the harshest environment
on Earth. After collapsing, exhausted,
inside he recorded an audio message
to say he could go no farther.
The 55-year-old former SAS soldier
was attempting to become the first
person to cross Antarctica on foot
and unsupported and was within just
30 miles of his finish line and a place
in the record books.
His disappointment was absolute,
but he believed, as did his family and
friends, that he would recover and
return to take on a challenge that
had proved too much this time.
?When my hero, Ernest Shackleton,
was 97 miles from the South Pole on
the morning of January 9, 1909, he
said he?d shot his bolt. Well, today I
have to inform you with some sadness
that I too have shot my bolt,? he said
into the voice recorder.
?My journey is at an end. I have
run out of time, physical endurance ?
the simple sheer inability to slide one
ski in front of the other, to travel the
distance required to reach my goal.
Many mountaineers battle away and
fail to reach the summit. My summit
is just out of reach.?
He signed off: ?No matter. I?ll lick
my wounds. I will heal over time.
And I will come to terms with
the disappointment.?
He then called for emergency
rescue and was airlifted out. Initially
it was thought that he was simply
dehydrated and malnourished ?
it was discovered that he was suffering
from a serious abdominal infection
only when he was treated at
the Union Glacier base camp in the
southern Ellsworth Mountains, 1,870
miles from the southern tip of Chile.
Three days after his rescue, Worsley
died from multiple organ failure.
?We thought he was home and dry,?
says Ben Saunders, Worsley?s friend
and fellow polar explorer, who had
helped him to plan for the journey
and had been in communication with
him during the crossing.
?It?s amazing he had the presence
of mind to call for a pick-up flight
with the finish almost in sight. He was
within a hair?s breadth. I have huge
admiration for him making that
decision. I don?t think any of us
realised what a bad way he was in.?
At first Saunders vowed never to
return to the continent that had
claimed the life of his friend, but as
the months passed an idea began to
germinate: maybe he could complete
Worsley?s journey as a memorial to his
friend and in honour of the cause he
had died supporting.
Worsley had been raising money
for the Endeavour Fund, a charity
supporting wounded soldiers managed
by the Royal Foundation of the Duke
and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince
Harry. He had raised �0,000 for
wounded veterans before his journey
ended, but that swelled to �0,000
after his death.
Joanna, Worsley?s widow, supports
Saunders?s determination to take on
the unaccompanied trek from Berkner
Island to the Ross Ice Shelf via the
South Pole and the Leverett Glacier.
The 40-year-old, who lives in
Richmond, west London, with his
fianc閑, Pip Harrison, 27, a charity
fundraiser, has plenty of experience
when it comes to surviving the frozen
desolation of Antarctica.
After 17 years of leading polar
expeditions, he holds the record
for completing the longest
human-powered polar journey in
history. In 2014 he and his fellow
British adventurer Tarka L?Herpiniere
became the first explorers to finish
the expedition that defeated Captain
Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest
Shackleton, a 105-day, 1,800-mile
round trip from Ross Island on the
coast of Antarctica to the South
Pole and back again. In 2004 the
Plymouth-born explorer became
only the third person in history to
ski solo to the North Pole. He knows
his way around a glacier.
But he admits that taking on
Worsley?s final journey will be a
different proposition from anything
else he has attempted because it will
be more than a test of physical and
I don?t think any
of us realised
what a bad way
Henry was in
mental endurance, it will be an
emotional journey in pursuit of
a goal that felled his friend.
The former army officers met in
2006 when Worsley was planning
his first polar expedition, leading a
team of three following Shackleton?s
route to the South Pole from Cape
Crozier on Ross Island.
Speaking to me last month from
a hotel in Punta Arenas, Chile, where
he was making his final preparations
before setting off for Antarctica,
Saunders recalls how he was the
more experienced polar explorer
when the two men met ? although he
was 15 years younger. ?A friend in the
small polar community had put us in
touch,? he says. ?It was an amazing
meeting of minds and we hit it off
straight away. I was a bit of a geek
and had figured out things like how
to send stuff back by satellite phone
and he wanted to know about tech.
?The story that struck me the most
from his first trip to Antarctica was
when he and his team camped at the
edge of the Beardmore Glacier and
Henry climbed a small peak near
by called Mount Hope,? Saunders
the times | Monday November 27 2017
3
1GT
times2
trek that killed my friend
MARTIN HARTLEY
charts in terms of how inhospitable it
can be, and travelling solo ? and I
think Henry felt the same ? is the
ultimate challenge.?
Saunders says that Antarctica can
be the most monotonous and boring
place on Earth, but amid the drudgery
come extreme highs. He likens
his relationship with the continent
to that of a drug user with his drugs.
It sucks up huge amounts of money
and has killed relationships, but you
can?t know how good it feels without
experiencing it.
And as with drugs, the soaring highs
can give way to crushing lows. The
Doing this puts a
strain on people
around you ? it?s
a selfish pursuit
says. Shackleton had discovered
and named Mount Hope on his
Nimrod expedition in 1908 and
climbed it to see if he could spot a
route to the pole.
?When Henry climbed it in 2008,
exactly 100 years on, he found a
cairn ? a small pile of stones ?
with the names of Shackleton and his
teammates scratched into one of the
stones. I?m not sure if anyone even
knew that was there before Henry
discovered it, or if anyone had seen it
in a century.? Saunders says that he
was in communication with Worsley
during his fateful journey last year, but
won?t say anything more about what
happened out on the ice. It is still too
raw, he says.
From his hotel in Chile, Saunders
flew to Berkner Island to begin his
three-month trek on November 8 and
has so far been caught in white-outs
so disorientating that he couldn?t tell
whether he was walking through the
air or on the ground. He also spent an
exhausting day scaling the blue ice of
the Wujek Ridge.
In the 24-hour daylight of the early
austral summer he will push himself
to extremes in temperatures so low
that just a few minutes? exposure
could cause permanent injury.
In a blog he describes walking into
a ferocious wind during a white-out
as ?like being stuck on one of those
elliptical trainer machines in a gym,
turned up as hard as it will go, so that
each churning stride and arm-swing
takes a good three or four seconds?.
So why do it? ?There is a chance for
me to use my experience of 17 years
doing polar expeditions to honour
Henry and finish the trip for him,? he
says. ?Everything about it is off the
Polar explorer Ben
Saunders is crossing
Antarctica on foot
physical pain of dragging a 125kg sled
for close to 1,000 miles, while climbing
3,100m in temperatures as low as
minus50C, is absolute.
Saunders admits that his trips
used to focus solely on his personal
experience and the breaking of
endurance records, but his friend?s
death has made him re-evaluate the
purpose of his expeditions. Now they
are for charity as much as the records.
His recent engagement has also
thrown the dangers into stark relief.
Saunders says Harrison was aware of
what she was getting involved with
when they met, but he has never
before
had a wedding to get back
for. Now that he does,
he
h admits that his
?threshold
for risk has
?
decreased?.
d
?This is a selfish
pursuit,?
he says. ?But I
p
am
a realising more than
ever
the strain it puts on
e
the
t people around you. I
never
really appreciated
n
that
before. Henry
t
would
encourage
w
people
to pursue the
p
grandest
goals, though
g
he
h would be the last
person
to deter anyone
p
from
following a
f
dream
like this.?
d
To make sure he
was
w fit enough,
Saunders
trained
S
solidly
for a year
s
using
a combination
u
of
o endurance training
? cycling,
cycling running
ru i and hiking with a
weighted backpack ? and gym-based
weight training with a coach. He looks
like a middleweight boxer, but has the
endurance of an ultra-marathon
runner. In the summer he cycled
750km in five days in Norway and
he can deadlift 200kg.
That?s what is required if there?s a
chance you?ll need to save your own
life by pulling yourself and a sled out
of a crevasse.
You can sponsor Ben Saunders at
uk.virginmoneygiving.com/polarben
and track his progress live at
bensaunders.com. He is being
supported with specialist equipment
and clothing by Canada Goose
The lowdown
Beyonc�s
Christmas gift
Did you just flick me the Vs?
Excuse me?
The Vs. The two-fingered salute.
The forks.
An obscene hand gesture? I?d never
be so lewd.
My mistake. I?m seeing it
everywhere, ever since I discovered
Beyonc�s new Christmas clothing
collection.
What?s the link?
Beyonc�, or Queen Bey as she?s
sometimes known, has launched a
line of festive bits and bobs for the
pleasure of her fans. I?d give it a
three-star review: some pieces, such
as the jumpers printed with
?Holiday Beyonc� Sweater?, seem
as though they might have been
rushed off without a lot of thought,
to be honest.
As a literal description of the product
though, that?s excellent. No one can
accuse her of misleading marketing.
True. And other pieces are
quite special. Allow me to draw
your attention to the Holidayonc�
T-shirt.
Great wordplay. What does it
look like?
It features a photograph of the
lady herself wearing silver antlers
and an astonishingly low-cut dress,
and holding two fingers up to
all her fans.
That?s very rude ? what have we
done to deserve that?
It does seem a bit abrasive. The
answer may lie in a cultural
confusion, though. The V-sign is
an offensive gesture in the UK,
Australia, India, Pakistan and
New Zealand, but in the US it?s
simply a harmless variation on
the ?peace? sign. It?s widely used
in the hip-hop industry.
Ahh, so no offence intended. Still,
what a minefield it must be for those
travelling internationally.
Quite. In fact George Bush Sr, on a
visit to Australia in 1992, cheerfully
flicked the Vs at some protesters.
He meant it in a friendly way, but
unsurprisingly that wasn?t how it
was received.
Well, it?s been a fascinating chat, but
now perhaps you could **** off. And
I mean that in the friendly, American
sense.
That one doesn?t require
translation.
on.
Hattie
Crisell
4
1GT
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
times2
Move over, Adrian ?
Emma is in the hot seat
now, and she?s going far
She skewered Jeremy Corbyn and grilled Theresa May ? now Emma Barnett is
taking over Adrian Chiles?s primetime slot on Radio 5. By Helen Rumbelow
W
hen Jeremy
Paxman
was asked
recently for
his favourite
political
interrogator
(after
himself of course), he came up with
a surprising name: Emma Barnett.
Not John Humphrys, Evan Davis
or Robert Peston ? none of the old
guard of blokes who have been
hammering away at politicians for
decades ? but a 32-year-old woman
who joined the BBC only last year,
fresh from running the women?s
section of a national newspaper.
But what a year it has been. Barnett
is the new darling of the airwaves.
Who was it who skewered Jeremy
Corbyn (the morning after a gentle
prodding from Paxman) in one of the
most talked-about interviews of this
year?s election? Barnett, ambushing
him about his poor grasp of the figures
from her seat as the youngest Woman?s
Hour host in history. Who was it
holding the first sit-down interview
with Theresa May after her disastrous
general election, eliciting details of her
tearful hug with her husband, Philip,
on seeing the exit polls? Barnett again,
from her new role as talk show-host
on BBC Radio 5 Live.
We meet in the Westminster radio
studio where from January The Emma
Barnett Show will be broadcast most
mornings on Radio 5 Live. She is
strikingly unlike the generic, tightly
coiffed and buttoned-up TV presenter.
She rocks her trademark bright floral
wrap dress with big hair, big glasses,
big views and big plans. It plays well
on the small screen. She is from
Manchester, but to me she feels almost
American in her directness and drive.
She is an intriguing character: an
avowed women?s rights campaigner
who made the decision ?to thrive? after
a catastrophic end to her upbringing,
when her father was imprisoned for
running a chain of brothels.
?I had always been ambitious,?
she wrote of that time ten years ago.
?That word British people like to
loathe, especially when attached to
a woman. But now I had fire in my
belly.? People do keep telling her
she is ambitious, and not always
in a good way. As Barnett said in
her TED talk, that word is often
used against determined women
as a sneer; they want too much.
Perhaps a better word would be
fearless. She enjoys big-game
hunting senior politicians, often using
Paxman?s famous ?repeat the question
without mercy? tactic. However,
this year her work rate has been in
overdrive, and the number of roles
she has taken on would put most
newbie broadcasters in therapy.
In addition to her Sunday Times
column, she hosted Newsnight this
summer (?Why not? It?s exciting, it?s
adrenaline?); she became the new face
of the BBC?s Sunday Morning Live; she
co-hosted The Pledge on Sky News;
she experimented with a new format
in hosting After the News on ITV; and
is the first woman to present a solo
show on Radio 5 Live, which was
dubbed ?Radio Bloke? after the
departure of Victoria Derbyshire.
Now on the fast-track, Barnett is
being rewarded with an expanded
Radio 5 show branded under her
name and running each morning
from Monday to Thursday, pushing
Adrian Chiles to the corner of the
schedules. Barnett has made female
empowerment a theme of her career.
?Don?t lose custody of your ambition?
is a favourite piece of advice; her
ambition doesn?t even spend weekends
away. I ask her whether, as someone
who lent her voice to the call for better
pay for women at the BBC, she thinks
she earns a fair wage.
?Yes I do, actually. You?re always
judged on your work. I have had an
extraordinarily interesting year. That?s
not just because of the news agenda,
but because of what I?ve done with the
news agenda. I think the new show in
I fought for that
interview with
Mrs May. I hadn?t
been given it
January will be a reflection of my
work and the value that it has been
accorded. Which isn?t just about
money. I feel it?s a great platform,
but I?ve also fought for that.?
When I ask her about the pressure
to produce a story when she was
?given? the opportunity to interview
the prime minister for 20 minutes in
July, she corrects me immediately. ?I
hadn?t been given it by anyone, I went
and got it. I pitched to them. I fought
for that interview with Mrs May. It
was nice for her to be interviewed
by someone not called Andrew,
James or John. Also a very wise
boss once said to me, as I was going
into broadcasting, the day you stop
pitching you become a gob on a stick.
So I am a presenter that books guests,
including the prime minister.?
She was given two days? notice of
the May interview and spent them
deep in hours of strategising, using
role-play to rehearse, with her editor
standing in as a ?very good Theresa
May?. She had three separate versions
of questions planned depending on
May?s reactions. ?An interview is an
intellectual game of chess. Especially
one like that.?
As a girl, she wanted to be an
actress. When I ask for her
broadcasting idols, it doesn?t surprise
me when she mentions Paxman:
?I used to enjoy the theatre of his
interviews enormously.? She had
a happy middle-class childhood in
Manchester, with a businessman
father who was unusually secretive
about his work and a stay-at-home
mother. Emma was an only child,
?which is probably why I?m able to talk
to myself for three hours on the radio
if no one wants to get in touch?.
She went to the private Manchester
High School for Girls, ?a big influence
on me?. I ask her why. ?You had this
can-do attitude; you?re going to be
not just as good as the boys, but better
if you go to the school where the
Pankhursts sent their daughters.?
She went back to the school
recently for a speech day and
?woke them all up with stories
of how many ?lates? I would
get for snogging my boyfriend
by the tree? before giving
them her call to arms about
ambition. Barnett was on
course
for a career in drama.
c
She went to Nottingham
University, where she met
her husband, to study
history and politics, yet
she put acting first.
However, after deciding
that she didn?t relish the
spells
of unemployment
s
in acting, she met a guy
?whose dad was the
window
cleaner, or
w
something, for someone
on The Sunday Times?. She
levered
the contact and
le
spent
a week at the newspaper
sp
?sorting
the post?. I tell her she
?
Emma Barnett at BBC
Millbank Studios. Left:
Adrian Chiles, Theresa
May and Jeremy Corbyn
The Emma Barnett
Show is on BBC Radio 5
Live from Monday,
January 8, 10am-1pm
the times | Monday November 27 2017
5
1GT
COVER: SOPHIA SPRING. BELOW: DOMENICO PUGLIESE FOR THE TIMES. HAIR AND MAKE-UP: JULIE COOPER/TERRI MANDUCA
times2
reality is I?ve written about that
subject and that chapter and,? she
sighs, ?I am much more than that. I
think to connect the two is not a fair
representation of who I am.?
She decided to write about her
father (we don?t manage to talk much
about it) because she wanted her
audience to feel they could know
and trust her. In this vein she has
braved many taboo subjects, such
as her painful endometriosis, or her
The antisemitism
got so bad Corbyn
himself said it
was unacceptable
must be one of the most successful
work experiences in history: within
a decade she would have a column
at the paper.
At Woman?s Hour, where she also did
work experience, she has become the
regular standby presenter. She enjoyed
being an agent provocateur as a
newspaper women?s editor, trying to
convert ?those who weren?t converted?
to the new sexual politics. ?I also felt
there was a lot more joy to be had.
Bitching, moaning and whining about
the plight of being a woman isn?t great.?
I try to steer her back to the ?most
painful? time of her life, her father?s
conviction when she was 23. She was
in London when she was told of it and
en route back to Manchester fell to
her knees on a Tube train and sobbed.
She was very angry with him. She
has written that she could either let
the revelation ?break me into tiny
ashamed pieces or use my anger
to fuel my passion for life, love and
my work?. Are they now reconciled?
?Yes. It was a long time ago.?
She is a committed feminist, and I
ask her how she squares that with her
father?s role in the sex industry. She
responds by questioning my question,
probably rightly. ?You?re asking me to
be defined by something that wasn?t
my action, but a man?s actions. That in
itself I find an interesting question, if I
may put it back to you. I think the
inconsistent lack of outrage when it
came to her Orthodox Judaism, which
has only male leaders. She wrote: ?On
that topic I am a full-fat hypocrite.?
Yet all of this only gave the trolls
material when she rose to prominence.
After her Corbyn interview there
were the expected attacks from his
supporters, but what was unexpected
was the onslaught of misogynistic and
antisemitic abuse. ?The bulk of the
love I get is misogynistic. I was more
aggrieved by the antisemitism. It got
so bad that day that Jeremy Corbyn
himself said it was unacceptable the
abuse I was receiving.?
One Labour Party member was
suspended for the antisemitic tweets
he directed at Barnett. ?I?d really like
to use this interview to invite him
around to my house for Friday night
dinner, to disabuse him of the idea I?m
a Zionist shill. The offer is open ? as
long as I can record it. I don?t have
Friday night dinner every week, but
obviously for him I would pull out all
the stops. There will be roast chicken.
?I?m quite addicted to finding out
why people think what they think and
not just being offended. We?re living in
an age of apologising not for views,
but for being caught. I want to
understand why you had those views
in the first place. I don?t really care
about your apology.?
Does it get to her? ?It did shock me
to see. It was going nuts that day. It was
the antisemitism I was really cut by,
struck by. Everything else washes over
me, but that stuck in my head more as
I want to know why it?s still there.
George Orwell wrote a fantastic essay
about why these tropes stick around. I
remember re-reading it that night, in a
hotel in Skegness on the election trail.?
She wants more religion on her
show, but not pussyfooting around it;
not being so British. What would be
her dream interviews? Of
course, she replies: ?Donald
Trump.? But also Monica
Lewinsky and Ched Evans,
the footballer ultimately
cleared of rape, and ?I?d really
like to interview Liam
Gallagher on Brexit?.
She?s a kind of anti-Bridget
Jones, the opposite of that
double-edged archetype of a
neurotic, self-effacing and
therefore failing female TV host.
Instead, exceptionally confident
and acute in live on-air exchange,
Barnett has earned what is no doubt
the first of her big promotions. I tell
her that under pressure she appears
calm: an unusual combination of
still and tough. ?Do you think it?s
working?? she asks. Definitely, I say.
Yes, I would
pay � to see
Aidan Turner
in the flesh
P
atriotic though I am, I
suspect that few of us
can say, hand on heart,
that freezing Mondays in
November are much of a
cause for celebration. That is, until
today. Why? Because it has just been
announced that Aidan Turner is to
make his West End debut in June.
If you?re saying ?Who he?? then for
heaven?s sake start paying attention
to the world around you.
Turner is the actor who plays
Ross Poldark. He has been on our
tellies Sunday after Sunday, wearing a
tricorn hat and a cape to very fetching
effect. He has ridden manfully across
Cornish clifftops on a horse and taken
his shirt off to scythe a passing field of
wheat, or maybe it was barley, who
knows? Arable farming isn?t really
my thing. Turner, on the other hand,
is. He took his shirt off and, just as
when Colin Firth dived into the lake
in Pride and Prejudice, a star was
born. And next June we will get to
see him in the flesh, right there, on
stage, in front of us, for the not at
all princely sum of �.
Ten pounds to gaze at Aidan
Turner! If that isn?t a reason to
live, I don?t know what is.
?I think people will be surprised,?
he has said. ?It?s the farthest I can
get from Ross Poldark that I can
possibly imagine.?
On one level, this is disappointing.
Poldark is magnificent. Also, he is to
play a not very nice man in a quite
gory play. To be specific, he?s playing
a terrorist in The Lieutenant of
Inishmore, in which people get
tortured and cats meet untimely ends.
It is true that if you?re in a � seat
you should probably pack binoculars.
It is also true that I loathe going to
the theatre on the grounds that it is
not conducive to a) having dinner, or
b) talking. However, for Aidan Turner
in the flesh I may make an exception.
At the very least, it will get me
through what is left of November.
Hilary Rose
6
1GT
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
life
Ask Professor Tanya Byron
I am in my fifties and phobic about sex
N
I am in my early
fifties and generally
happy and healthy.
I have a career I enjoy
and a good circle
of friends, but I seem
to have a deep fear of getting
intimate with anyone.
I have a number of close female
friends, but that is all they are,
friends. My phobia is activated when
I try to make any kind of intimate
gesture, such as holding hands,
touching or kissing. If the other
party makes the gesture first,
that is OK. But if she does not,
the result is stalemate.
I have attempted sex twice.
The first time was about 20 years
ago, but I made such a pig?s ear
of it that I was dumped and it was
many years before I tried again.
In the meantime, my few attempts
at relationships failed and I went
into what I can only call
emotional quarantine.
I met someone a few years ago
and we hit it off. After some weeks
she raised the subject of sex and I
explained that I?d only done it once.
She respected me for my honesty. We
did have sex and again I made a pig?s
ear of it and she rejected me.
I have curious and positive
feelings about sex, but these are
cancelled out by fear of the unknown,
the ?yuck? feeling that sex is dirty
and a belief that asking a woman
for sex is morally wrong and will
result in rejection.
I am prudish and cautious by
nature, but most of my friends
describe me as gregarious. My
female friends suggest that I put
up too many barriers. I think they
are right, but I suspect that the
phobia is the cause and the
consequence of that ? and it
then becomes self-perpetuating.
How can I break out of this cycle?
Peter
Q
N
You are right when
you describe these
life-impacting
difficulties as a phobia
? an extreme or
irrational, obsessive
fear of or aversion to something.
From what you describe it sounds as
if you struggle with genophobia (also
erotophobia or coitophobia), the fear
of sex acts and sexual intercourse.
While classed as a phobia,
genophobia can also cause sexual
dysfunction, social anxiety disorder
and develop out of post-traumatic
stress disorder and so is a multi-layered
issue that needs careful understanding
rstanding
and intervention.
Underlying personality also
o plays
a role because many people hold
beliefs about sex that are negative
ative
and fearful. These lead to the
avoidance of intimacy and thee feelings
of inadequacy and loneliness that
you describe.
You have friends you are open
pen
with and so are happy to get close
to people, and you can also meet
people with a view to dating
and developing an intimate
relationship. No problems there.
ere.
The irrational fear kicks in
when you face the next stepss
towards intimacy.
And while you can and
want to, when it feels time
to cross the physical line
the panic is triggered as
you contemplate where that
will lead and your ability
to deliver. Anxious intimacy
can be clumsy and
uncomfortable, leading, as
you have found, to rejection
that further reinforces beliefss
of inadequacy, increased fearr
and longer-term avoidance.
Indeed, having tried sex
twice and had extremely
negative and rejecting
feedback, your belief that you
u
A
The Sale.
Some
people are
brought up
to view sex
as dirty
are inadequate means you have
extreme levels of performance anxiety.
A common response is flight, an
inbuilt survival instinct. When
anxiety is irrational (ie there is no real
threat to survival), but the flight
response becomes default, avoidance
reinforces the belief that you are
unlikely to ever succeed in this area of
your life. You are right when you say
this negative and upsetting state of
affairs is self-perpetuating.
Many phobias have an underlying
set of beliefs that also sustain the
overwhelming fear and panic. It is
interesting that you, while positively
sex, have a prudish
curious about
ab
that makes you feel that
nature tha
to have sex with
asking a woman
w
wrong and that the act is
you is wro
dirty. These
Thes beliefs would have led
to the phobia
phob developing and cause
significant internal conflict, which
makes you put up barriers.
Your tas
task is two-fold: you need
to address and challenge the
entrenched underlying negative
entre
beliefs about sex and learn ways
belie
manage your anxiety when
to m
there is mutual attraction so
ther
that you are able to develop
tha
your sexual prowess and
yo
become confident.
b
To explore the long-held
underlying beliefs you will
un
need to consider where they
n
sstem from. Did they develop
in childhood, or following
traumatic experiences
rrelated to sex? Some people
aare brought up within homes
where sex is viewed as dirty
w
(and
(a even wrong) and so find
it d
difficult to feel comfortable
what are natural human
with w
drives. Issues relating to sexuality
can also play a role.
explore this carefully I advise
To exp
that you ffind a psychosexual therapist
help you to unpick these
who can h
process their emotional impact
beliefs, pro
and challenge their validity. Visit the
website of the College of Sexual and
Relationship Therapists (cosrt.org.uk),
or counselling-directory.org.uk/
sexualissues.html or findatherapy.org/
sex_therapy.
Therapy will address the physical,
emotional and cognitive symptoms
of intimacy phobia, as well as explore
and challenge underlying beliefs
and judgments. Your catastrophic
predictions cause performance
anxiety and so become a self-fulfilled
prophecy. You will be asked to
understand triggers and the automatic
negative thoughts that follow them.
You will also learn strategies, such
as relaxation techniques, that will
help you to stay calm when you
begin to panic.
Overall these approaches will
build up your psychological resilience
so that you decatastrophise your
interpretation of sexually intimate
behaviour. You can talk to your GP
for a referral for cognitive behavioural
therapy or see bps.org.uk.
This is also about honesty
and finding a compassionate and
non-judgmental partner who can
be supportive. Sex is one aspect
of communication and, for you,
one that you can learn to enjoy
as you master your anxiety and feel
confident enough to develop your
sexual skills. However, as would be
the case if you were learning to swim,
take it slowly and build up towards
intercourse as outlined in the sensate
focus method (download a PDF at
counselling-matters.org.uk).
You are a man who is liked by
many and so have much to offer to a
partner. Therefore focus on being with
someone who can love you for who
you are and so will want to help you to
grow your sexual skills with patience,
compassion and understanding.
If you have a problem and would like
Professor Tanya Byron?s help, email
proftanyabyron@thetimes.co.uk
Ends
tonight.
Limited
Subscribe and get seven days of papers
for just �67.
time
only.
Hurry, limited time left.
Save up to
78%
on the
cover price
Save up to 78% on the cover price.
timespacks.com/sale or call 0800 028 5345
What do you
subscribe to?
UK residents only, aged 18 or over. This offer is subject to availability. New subscribers only. Visit store.thetimes.co.uk for full T&Cs. Offer includes instant access to our Classic 7 day pack for a minimum term of 3 months from your start date, followed by a rolling quarterly contract.
the times | Monday November 27 2017
7
1GT
times2
Why I froze my eggs like Rita
CHRIS MCANDREW FOR THE TIMES; GETTY
IMAGES
Singer Rita Ora has
revealed that she
has stored her eggs.
I?ve done it too,
says Kate Leahy
I
spent two years researching egg
freezing. I had thought I was
ready, but as the consultant
talked me through the treatment
plan I was about to embark on
? reeling off the potential risks,
side-effects and off-putting low
success rates ? I suddenly felt
very unprepared.
Rita Ora froze her eggs when she
was in her early twenties, which has
been called a ?positive move?? by
medics because the younger you do it,
the better. However, I have unwittingly
become part of ?generation egg? ?
women in their thirties and forties
panicked into taking motherhood into
their hands in the absence of the right
situation to make it happen naturally.
The procedure is becoming more
popular, but not among women in
their twenties. The most common age
to freeze eggs is between 37 and 39,
according to the Human Fertilisation
and Embryology Authority, the UK?s
independent regulator of the use of
eggs and embryos in fertility
treatment. Two years ago 35 clinics
around the country offered egg
freezing to women for medical and
social reasons. Now it?s 41.
Known in medical terms as oocyte
cryopreservation, egg-freezing has
been around since the 1980s, first as
the ?slow-freezing? method, which was
primarily offered to cancer patients
facing infertility from their treatment.
In about 2007 a more effective method
of flash-freezing was introduced to
prevent damaging ice crystals forming
on the eggs. While the number of
women having the treatment
continues to grow, the statistics are
still in their infancy. The most recent
report from 2014 included in-depth
data on the procedure for the first time.
In the UK just 59 women froze their
eggs in 2005, compared with 816 in
2014. The number of eggs being
thawed and used in treatment,
however, is still very low mainly due
to the most common reason for
treatment: no male partner. Statistics
also show just a 14 per cent pregnancy
rate. Even though the figures do not
offer much hope ? and I have to be
realistic and accept that my treatment
may never result in a baby ? I have
also talked to people who have been
through the procedure successfully.
That is enough for me to know that
there is at least a chance.
It was at my cousin?s 40th birthday
party six years ago that I heard about
egg-freezing, when her single friend
said that she had frozen hers and got
?quite a haul?. I listened, praying I
would never find myself in the same
situation, yet here I am ? 39 and just
as far from motherhood as I was then.
Unlike many women who go through
this process, I have a partner, but we
met after I had decided to freeze my
eggs. Although we hope to have a
family, we are not yet ready for such a
big step. At 33, he?s younger than me
so we?re still very much in the early
days of our relationship. He assures
me that he wants the same things as I
do in the future, but knowing that
didn?t alter my decision. The reason I
I suddenly found
myself 39 and
still no closer to
being a mother
decided to freeze my eggs was to avoid
being in a position where I had to rely
on someone else to have a family.
My egg-freezing package cost �300
(it?s now �800 at the same clinic),
but that?s not including the drugs
(between �0 and �500 depending
on individual requirements), the scan
(�0) to give my ovaries and uterus
the once-over and the anti-m黮lerian
hormone blood test (�0) to
check my ovarian reserve.
Women are born with all the eggs
they will ever have and this blood test
establishes what percentage you have
left. It?s also the marker used to
establish the amount of hormone
stimulation you will need. My levels
are high, which feels like a very small
win in the big fertility lottery.
Injecting my first daily dose of
buserelin was as alien as I expected. I
tapped the needle on my skin,
pretending to inject, as I built
up to doing it for real. The drug
suppressed my hormones for a
couple of weeks before I had to
send them back the other way
with the addition of a folliclestimulating injection.
In the fourth week I had three scans
to measure my follicles to see if I was
ready for collection, but the doctor
said they weren?t growing to size.
Before, I hadn?t considered that the
treatment might not work. I cried the
whole way home, panicked about the
money, and felt as if it had already
failed. The nurse increased my
stimulation. ?We can always up it
more on the next go,? she said. ?Next
go? I can?t afford this one, let alone
another,? I replied. She seemed
Rita Ora and, above
left, Kate Leahy
shocked that I expected it to work first
time. I was shocked that she didn?t.
At each scan I felt a pang of sadness
at seeing my barren womb and
wondered what it would be like to see
a baby in there. At the final one the
nurse said: ?You?ve got a lovely lining.?
I asked what that meant. She replied:
?Nothing to you as you aren?t coming
back for embryo transfer.? ?Does that
mean it will still be good in a few
years?? I asked. Her reply ? ?Not
necessarily? ? was a reminder that
there are no guarantees.
Finally, I injected the ?booster?
shot, which is responsible for the
maturation of the eggs, and 36
hours later was back at the clinic
ready for collection. Then, after
�500, 53 injections and six
internal scans, the operation to
aspirate the eggs was over in less
than 20 minutes.
A week after the operation,
I ended up in A&E.
My bowel had blocked after
the operation and was pushing
on my swollen ovaries. This
is rare so no one expected it
to happen. In hospital the
gynaecologist decided there
was nothing wrong and sent
me home. A few hours later
I woke again, this time in
such excruciating pain I was
vomiting and dripping in
sweat. This time my boyfriend
called an ambulance.
The paramedics had to
administer gas and air just to get
me downstairs. It nearly went
from bad to worse at the hospital
when the consultant said he wanted
to operate to remove the offending
ovary. I was terrified. It was only
because my boyfriend begged him to
let me first try an enema that I still
have both ovaries intact.
This lack of aftercare from the
clinic has been my only regret. It
felt as though once I?d had the
procedure I had paid for I was
on my own. I was sent home with
a leaflet on embryo transfer (which
I wasn?t having), no follow-up
appointment, and a cursory warning
to watch out for the signs of ovarian
hyperstimulation syndrome. I
immediately googled the latter to
discover a confusing amount of
information and symptoms, some of
which can be fatal. It?s not a good
place in which to find yourself alone. I
contacted the clinic later and they
have since amended their procedures.
Before I began I felt lucky that
science gave me an option to go it
alone. But even with a support system
in place I was surprised by how
isolated I felt at times, especially when
sneaking into the toilets at work to
inject myself, or on that first day of
injections when I braced myself,
feeling like there was no turning back.
Yet what the statistics and my
niggles couldn?t deter me from is my
deep longing to have a baby. It?s clear
that the rates of success are low and
that the cost and emotional impact
definitely need to be considered, but it
always comes back to the same thing:
I?m not in a position to have a family
right now. So, flawed and uncertain as
it may be, this feels like my best safety
net for the future.
8
1GT
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
arts
?I?ve got a job I love, but a lot of
the time I am really struggling?
The comedian Marcus Brigstocke talks to Dominic Maxwell about his new role
playing PT Barnum on stage and why he still battles his addictions every day
M
arcus Brigstocke
is a highly
accomplished
comedian, but is
he the greatest
showman on
Earth? That, as
he is the first to
admit, is a stretch. Nonetheless here
he is, days away from his first public
tightrope walk as the all-singing, allcrowd-pleasing PT Barnum, the
19th-century American who brought
razzle-dazzle first to circus and then to
politics. ?There?s a sucker born every
minute? ? that was one of his. Will
only suckers swallow this middle-class,
opinionated stand-up in the title role
of the musical Barnum, first played by
Jim Dale on Broadway in 1980, but for
ever associated over here with its first
West End star, Michael Crawford?
Showing me around the circus set in
the Menier Chocolate Factory theatre
in south London, Brigstocke stops for a
moment to display the bandage on his
left shin. The tightrope walk he has to
do at the end of Act I is not hugely
high in this basement venue, but it can
still hurt if you fall on to the steel wire.
Then there is the singing he has
to do, having only appeared in two
other musicals: the Monty Python
musical Spamalot and two Proms
performances this summer of
Oklahoma! ?This show is a huge
ask for me,? he says.
So why choose this Radio 4 regular
for such a testing role? Was there
something about his appearances on
Entertainments
Entertainment
Theatres
CAMBRIDGE
St Martin's
020 7836 1443
66th year of Agatha Christie's
020 7087 7745
MATILDA THE
MUSICAL
THE MOUSETRAP
MatildaTheMusical.com
Mon-Sat 7.30, Tues & Thu 3, Sat 4
www.the-mousetrap.co.uk
HER MAJESTY'S 020 7087 7762
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MIS蒖ABLES
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
Theatre Royal Drury Lane
42nd STREET
020 7087 7760
Vaudeville Theatre 0330 333 4814
Oscar Wilde's
A WOMAN OF NO
IMPORTANCE
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
Classicspring.co.uk
%
Please be advised that
calls to 084 numbers
can cost up to 7p per
minute plus your network
provider?s costs.
Book your
advertisement or
announcement now
Use our self-service website
and follow the simple steps.
thetimes.co.uk /
advertise
Open
7 daysk
a wee
the times | Monday November 27 2017
9
1GT
ADRIAN SHERRATT/CAMERA PRESS
panel shows such as Have I Got
News For You? or Mock the Week
that made the American director
Gordon Greenberg think he could
wrangle a Victorian circus? Is there
something about Brigstocke?s
successful stand-up tours that
screamed ?song-and-dance man??
As it happens, yes. Granted, the
Menier?s artistic director, David
Babani, has known Brigstocke since
they were studying drama together
at the University of Bristol. Yet
Brigstocke still had to audition for
Greenberg before he was cast. ?They
said from the start that they wanted
someone who can walk on stage and
look like they own it,? Brigstocke says.
?And I?m both posh and a stand-up
comic, so at every level I can do that.
?Gordon from the start has said to
me, ?Do the thing you do, just own it.? ?
Brigstocke likes Barnum the man a
lot. He was anti-slavery, pro-women?s
rights and he helped to build schools
and hospitals. He used his expert
flim-flam to enter local politics. ?He
was a bullshit artist of the highest
order. And now we see that thing
working again, with Trump and with
Brexit, with to my mind malevolent
ends.? Still, he insists that the show
remains a celebration, not a satire.
It has taken a fair bit of homework,
but then Brigstocke always does his
homework. As soon as he was cast he
had a tightrope rigged up at his home
in south London. Mostly, though, he
has been going out to a circus school
after rehearsals; his ceiling at home is
too low to stop him from reaching for
it when he starts to wobble. ?I?m
6ft 2in, I?m 44, I?m not very fit, I?m all
the wrong shape for wire-walking,
but I?m a bit of a rhino: I just go at it,
again and again.?
Because he is well-spoken,
outspoken on the issues of the day and
sensibly dressed (one of his live shows
was called Planet Corduroy) we tend to
see Brigstocke as a sensible chap.
When you look at his life, though, it
turns out that starring in an acrobatic
American musical is just the sort of
sudden left turn he has always taken.
He was in rehab by the age of 17
for an addiction to food, drink and
drugs. After that he went from 24st to
11st in seven months. High only on the
thrill of his new physique, he would go
out dancing in clubs, where he was
spotted and asked to be a podium
dancer. In the early 1990s he was
getting paid to dance in the Ministry
of Sound in London by night and
teaching Rollerblading by day. He
also worked for a while as a deck hand
on a North Sea oil rig. A few years
later he combined his twin passions
for stand-up and snowboarding by
setting up the alpine comedy festival
Altitude. He, his fellow comedian
Andrew Maxwell and their two friends
went on to lose �0,000.
?Financially, I?m a lunatic. We set up
Altitude and I lost every penny I ever
made.? In 2014 he competed in ITV?s
celebrity ski-jumping show The Jump.
He sustained ?a dreadful injury? ?
he was unable to work for months
after snapping the cruciate ligaments
in his knee and it still hurts every
day ? but says he would happily
do it again. ?I loved it. And goading
Scottish nationalists and Brexiteers
and the rest of it in my act . . . No,
I?m not sensible at all.?
Recently, he says, he has gone
through ?mental health difficulties?
after spending too much time on
social media. ?I ask for no sympathy.
I like what I do. People have a right
to come back and go, ?Screw you,
you?re wrong.? But it is also my
responsibility to know how to
deal with that. And sometimes
that?s difficult.? On a 60-date
tour, he will spend two hours
a day on stage. ?Then the only
thing I say to another human
being over the next 22 hours
is, ?Table for one, thanks.? Again,
I ask for no sympathy. But it can
be brutal.?
So now he doesn?t allow himself
to look at Twitter or Facebook in
his bedroom. Meditation and
mindfulness, activities he would have
found absurd a year ago, he now
considers ?totally necessary?. His son,
Alfie, is 15, his daughter, Emily, is 12.
He worries that we have no map for
the world they are navigating.
As an addict ? ?27 years clean,
man!? ? he knows he has to be
careful. ?Cocaine will give you a
300 per cent increase in dopamine
release. Online porn a 200 per cent
increase: you won?t run out, you won?t
black out and it?s free. Social media is
lower down on that chart, but go there
and you still get a big dopamine hit
every time. Bit of oxytocin if you get
Marcus Brigstocke.
Below: PT Barnum and
General Tom Thumb.
Above left: Barnum on
some 1854 sheet music
I like elites.
People who
know more
than I do
arts
it right. And it can make you feel
better. Until it doesn?t.?
This is very Brigstocke, I suggest:
having these sorts of stats to hand. He
nods happily. ?Information?s good.
Expertise is a good thing. I like elites.
The true sense of elites. People who
know more than I do.?
You could say, he supposes, that
saying ?yes? to a big risk like Barnum
is another kind of addictive behaviour.
He has no great career plan, although
he says that as younger comedians
come through, it?s useful to be able
to diversify. So keen was he to do
Barnum that he pulled out of or
postponed other, better-paying
jobs: a second series of his gadgetry
show for the Dave channel, The Joy
of Techs; the corporate gigs that no
comedian boasts about, but which
pay so well; and preparation for
a stand-up tour.
If and when that tour happens, he
says, he will return to concentrating
on politics rather than his personal
life, unlike his previous two shows.
In his first stand-up show he talked
about his early years: the weight loss,
the dancing, the oil rig. In the second
he touched on the break-up of his
marriage to Sophie, which ended after
he had an affair with his Spamalot
co-star Hayley Tamaddon.
?Having been through a divorce
and a messy break-up, I wrote a
show about happiness. I became
very aware of how entitled we are as
straight white men. Perhaps we should
have known, but it wasn?t a subject
even five years ago. And I thought,
?Well I?m a straight white male, albeit
broken by everything that happened,
privately educated, I?ve got two happy,
healthy children, I?ve got a job that
I love. I should skip most places, but
a lot of the time I am very unhappy
and really struggling.?
He insists he is not addicted to
danger, but admits that putting
together a comedy show is always ?a
thrilling risk. One day the audience
might say, ?Not today, enough of you.? ?
His ex-wife lives a short drive away.
?We don?t hang out, but we are good
parents to our kids, I think. Certainly
when it comes to the children ? and
this is all credit to her, not me ? they
came first.? He is not long out of a
relationship, ?and for the first time
ever I do feel like there is not that
frenetic need to be with somebody?.
Brigstocke appears incapable of
taking it easy. He is a big fan of
Prince. The day after Prince died
last year, Brigstocke decided it
was ridiculous that he loved
music so much, but couldn?t play
an instrument. So he took up
the trombone. One day he would
like to set up a jazz club, which
he would call the Second Line.
?That?s my big ambition. If I ever
have enough money to lose that
much money.?
If this rhino attitude to work and
leisure alike is down to his addictive
personality finding new things to do
with itself, he is comfortable with that.
?I am restless, but I am happy with
that. I don?t feel like I?m running
around chasing myself. I am not going
to do an Amy Winehouse or a Charlie
Parker because I love my children and
my life.? And so he gets up and starts
preparing for another tightrope walk.
Albeit one that?s only a few feet from
the ground. ?I work more than I
should, but I?m not reckless.?
Barnum is at the Menier Chocolate
Factory, London SE1 (020 7378 1713),
to March 3
10
1GT
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
television & radio
Non-stop joking aboard the Walters Express
JOSS BARRATT/CHANNEL 4
James
Jackson
TV review
Coastal Railways
Channel 4
{{{((
Joe Orton Laid Bare
BBC Two
{{{{{
A
t what point do we call for a
moratorium on presenterson-a-train TV? You?d think
Michael Portillo and Chris
Tarrant?s eternal rail trips
would suggest that we have enough of
this format filling the schedules, but
someone at Channel 4 has taken the
alternative view ? people like it, let?s
make more! The bright spark had a
further brainwave: forget Paxman or
Merton, let?s get a woman instead and,
in a truly novel twist, someone
unquestionably liked by everyone.
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Lou Reed: A Life
Radio 4, 1.45pm
Lou Reed belongs to a cache
of rockers (cf David Bowie)
who probably appeal to the
hearts and minds of media
commissioners more than
of listeners. However this is
fascinating as social history
as much as pop history.
Born to an upwardly mobile
American family for whom
respectability was all,
Reed alarmed everyone by
starting to read The Story of
O and experiment with his
sexuality. Depression, then
a spell of electroconvulsive
therapy followed, which
Reed saw as an Oedipal
betrayal by his parents.
His mother blamed herself.
Rabbit Redux
Radio 4, 10.45pm
?In summer, the granite
curb, starred with mica,
and the baking curbside
cars wince beneath the
brilliance, like a frozen
explosion.? Genius, that was
the consensus when John
Updike?s Rabbit series came
out in the Seventies. Listen
to its descriptions now, read
by Toby Jones, and what
really strikes you is how
preposterously overwritten
they are, as though a
sixth-former has entered a
competition and is trying
their utmost to ?describe?
things. Fans will like it.
That?s about as far as the USPs of the
companionable Coastal Railways with
Julie Walters go, unless you count the
actress?s apparent determination to
not go more than 20 seconds of
babbling away without a jokey remark.
The opening three minutes of comingup montage was a veritable torrent of
sparkly-eyed fun. And as she boarded
the Jacobite steam train that runs from
Fort William to Mallaig in the west
Highlands, she breezily told us: ?Now
the techie, geeky bit ? it has one
track and must have been a bugger to
build!? It makes Portillo seem like
grouchy old Ian Nairn by comparison.
At times this irrepressible approach
felt like the programme?s strength and
its weakness. The Jacobite was initially
framed within its appearance in the
Harry Potter films, as if this is the
reason we would be interested in it.
Walters was even presented with a
magical liquorice wand. The local
characters she met, such as a Mallaig
langoustine wrangler, almost seemed
like foils for her down-to-earth, force10 vivacity. A visit to a nearby country
estate once used by the British secret
service felt as much an excuse for her
to beat up a retired major who looked
like a member of the Wild Geese.
That?s all well and good, but do the
makers of these shows have to make
the ?serious? bits quite so brief? There
were accounts of the Highland
Clearances and the tale of a young
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac. A journey of musical discovery 9.00 The
8th with Charlie Sloth 11.00 Huw Stephens
1.00am Radio 1?s Drum & Bass Show with
Rene LaVice 3.00 Radio 1?s Specialist Chart
with Phil Taggart 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce
12.00 Paddy O?Connell 2.00pm Steve
Wright 5.00 Simon Mayo. With the America
City author Chris Beckett 7.00 The Blues
Show with Paul Jones 8.00 Jo Whiley. Music
and chat 10.00 Laura Mvula: God Made Me
Funky 11.00 Jools Holland. With Alison
Moyet 12.00 Johnnie Walker?s Sounds
of the 70s (r) 2.00am Radio 2?s Jazz
Playlists 3.00 Radio 2 Playlists: Great British
Songbook 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Hidden
Treasures 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Music, news and the occasional surprise,
with Petroc Trelawny. Including 7.00, 8.00
News. 7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein takes listeners through the
morning with the best in classical music
and the restaurateur and television
presenter Rick Stein talks about the
ideas that have inspired him
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Koechlin (1867-1950)
Donald Macleod explores musical elegance
and wit in the work of the French composer
Charles Koechlin, best known for his pieces
based on Kipling?s Jungle Book, including his
early vocal works, including two ravishing
songs for soprano and orchestra. Koechlin
(Pour Les Trait Rapides ? Etude for
saxophone and piano, Op 188 No 1;
Si Tu Le Veux, Op 5; Dame Au Ciel;
Aux Temps De Fees ? Quatre Po鑝es
d?Edmond Haraucourt, Op 7; Au loin, Op 20
? Afar; Seal Lullaby; Night Song In the
Jungle; Song of Kala-Nag ? Three Poems
after The Jungle Book, Op 18; Final ?
Anim� Et Gai ? Flute Sonata, Op 53; and
Amphise Et Melitta, Op 31 No 4) (r)
1.00pm News
Julie Walters is the latest presenter on a train in Coastal Railways
1.02 Live Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Sara Mohr-Pietsch introduces a live recital
from London?s Wigmore Hall in which the
cellist Andrei Ionita is accompanied by the
pianist Itamar Golan. Bach (Cello Suite
No 1 in G, BWV 1007); and Shostakovich
(Cello Sonata in D minor, Op 40)
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Tom McKinney presents a selection of the
?nest concerts from across Europe all this
week, celebrating 50 years of the European
Broadcasting Union?s music exchange. Today?s
programme features the conductor Herbert
Blomstedt, who turned 90 this year.
Mendelssohn (The Hebrides ? Fingal?s Cave,
Op 26; Symphony No 4 in A, Italian; and
Symphony No 3 in A minor, Scottish); Chopin
(Piano Concerto No 1 in E minor, Op 11); and
Rachmaninov (Symphonic Dances, Op 45)
5.00 In Tune
Katie Derham introduces live music by the
tenor Ian Bostridge, the pianist Julius Drake
and the saxophonist Jess Gillam and Carlo
Rizzi looks forward to conducting the Hall�
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
An imaginative, eclectic mix of music
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
Johannes Wildner conducts the BBC Concert
Orchestra in a concert celebrating the 50th
anniversary of the European Broadcasting
Union, from LSO St Luke?s in London.
Presented by Petroc Trelawny. Dobrinka
Tabakova (Orpheus? Comet ? EBU
commission, ?rst performance);
Britten (Suite on English Folk Tunes ?
A Time There Was ? Op.90); Mozart
(Sinfonia Concertante K364); and Beethoven
(Piano Concerto No.5 ? Emperor)
10.00 Music Matters
As the Hudders?eld Contemporary Music
Festival celebrates its 40th year, Sara
Mohr-Pietsch assesses its impact on
the West Yorkshire town in the context
of a local music scene that also includes
one of the UK?s leading choral societies
and a thriving folk circuit (r)
10.45 The Essay:
More Letters to Writers
Ian Sansom resumes his imaginary
correspondence with the world?s great
writers, beginning by asking Dante Alighieri
if he really meant all those things that
he wrote about Hell
11.00 Jazz Now
A concert by Henri Texier and his Hope
Quartet at King?s Place as part of the 2017
London Jazz Festival, with the saxophonists
Francois Courneloup and Sebastien Texier
and the drummer Louis Moutin
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am-8.00 (LW) The Ashes:
Australia v England
Day ?ve of the ?rst Ashes Test
5.30am News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
8.00 (LW) Today
9.00 Start the Week
Sakari Oramo, Sointu Fritze and Horatio Clare
discuss Finland on the 100th anniversary
of its independence with Amol Rajan
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Those ruling under a mandate from the gods
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Presented by Jane Garvey. Including at
10.45 the 15 Minute Drama: Part one of
Ben Cottam?s comedy drama The Latvian
Locum starring Dolya Gavanski (1/5)
11.00 The Untold
Stories of 21st-century Britain (4/16)
11.30 A Month of Maureen
Theodora Potts: Victorian Psychic. Comedy
drama starring Maureen Lipman (4/4)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Sarah Daniels (11/40)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week:
Lou Reed: A Life
Demetri Goritsas reads from Anthony
DeCurtis?s biography of the rock musician,
beginning with the formation of the Velvet
Underground. See Radio Choice (1/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Day Release
By Peter Jukes. Frank and his ex-cellmate
Geoff are running a rehabilitation
project for ex-offenders. Return of the
drama about an ex-lifer (1/3)
3.00 Round Britain Quiz
Northern Ireland takes on the South of
England in the quiz (3/12)
3.30 The Food Programme (r)
4.00 Snapshots
Following a leading photographer at work on
a shoot, exploring both the process of
photographing and the subject?s experience
of being captured on ?lm (1/4)
4.30 Beyond Belief
Ernie Rea discusses the importance of the
east in Christian architecture (3/8)
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
wartime spy killed in a concentration
camp, but they were mere blips on the
Walters Express. ?I?m such a speedy
old fizz-brain!? she said. Fizzy seems
an apt description for the show, and
instrumental in justifying its existence.
Joe Orton Laid Bare chronicled the
Sixties icon?s story not just through
personal recollections of his peers, his
sister Leonie, and his diaries (archly
depicted by Bryan Dick), but also, in a
coup, new information on his murder.
It was argued that a jealous TV
executive, Peter Willes, drove Orton?s
lover, Kenneth Halliwell, to his fatal
state of paranoia. Tapes recorded of a
Dr Ismay, psychiatrist to Willes and
Halliwell, played here for the first
time, appeared to back up the theory.
The revelations alone made it a far
more important profile than your
average hagiography, but before those
there were also well-acted excerpts
(how great is Ben Miles?) of the plays
that helped us to get under the skin of
them. These suggested that the plays
are very of their time ? all impish
provocation rubbing up against
closeted Britain ? while the Oh!
Calcutta! sketch seemed simply puerile.
But the amorality of Entertaining
Mr Sloane (with that ridiculous word
?vaginalatrous?) and Loot continue to
provoke, if perhaps in different ways
today. Leave the last word to Leonie:
?It does shock you, but it?s still funny.?
james.jackson@thetimes.co.uk
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 I?m Sorry I Haven?t a Clue
From the Winter Gardens in Margate (3/6)
7.00 The Archers
Jennifer learns something shocking
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Living with the Gods (r)
8.00 Document
Examining transcripts of a secret Nazi radio
station that broadcast to Scotland (2/3)
8.30 Crossing Continents
The story of a massacre of Rohingya muslims
in a small village in Myanmar (r)
9.00 Natural Histories
Exploring the human relationship with
reindeer. Last in the series (r)
9.30 Start the Week (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Ritula Shah
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Rabbit Redux
By John Updike. See Radio Choice (1/10)
11.00 Mastertapes
Emeli Sand� chats about her debut album
Our Version of Events (1/8)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Presented by Susan Hulme
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Lou Reed ? A Life (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am Hello Cheeky 8.30 Dad?s Army 9.00
Just a Minute 9.30 Living with Betty 10.00
Plantagenet 11.00 Stories from Songwriters
11.15 The Secret Place 12.00 Hello Cheeky
12.30pm Dad?s Army 1.00 Rogue Male 1.30
Burl Ives 2.00 Dangerous Visions: Never Let
Me Go 2.15 Cosmic Quest 2.30 An Expert in
Murder 2.45 Room Full of Mirrors 3.00
Plantagenet 4.00 Just a Minute 4.30 Living
with Betty 5.00 Winston Comes to Town
5.30 I?m Sorry I Haven?t a Clue 6.00 Ice 6.30
A Good Read 7.00 Hello Cheeky. Comedy
with Tim Brooke-Taylor 7.30 Dad?s Army.
Comedy with Arthur Lowe 8.00 Rogue Male.
By Geoffrey Household 8.30 Burl Ives. The
life and career of the in?uential folk singer
9.00 Stories from Songwriters. Sunset to
Break Your Heart by Barb Jungr 9.15 The
Secret Place. By Clare Bayley 10.00 Comedy
Club: I?m Sorry I Haven?t a Clue. With Graeme
Garden, Tim Brooke-Taylor, Barry Cryer and
Jan Ravens 10.30 Dave Podmore?s World of
Cricket. Pod causes havoc in Hollywood
10.55 The Comedy Club Interview. A chat
with a guest from the world of comedy
11.00 The Now Show. Steve Punt and Hugh
Dennis present a satirical look through the
week?s news 11.30 The Problem with Adam
Bloom. The comedian reveals how stand-ups
come up with all their witty gags. Comedy
with Alistair McGowan 11.45 Brian
Appleton?s History of Rock ?n? Roll.
Comedy starring Graham Fellows
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Adrian Chiles 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport:
The Monday Night Club. A look back at the
weekend?s football results 9.00 5 Live Sport:
The Tuffers and Vaughan Cricket Show.
A review of the ?rst Ashes Test 10.00
Flintoff, Savage and the Ping Pong Guy
10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Joey Barton 10.00 Jim White, Danny
Murphy and Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee
and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off: Queens Park Rangers v
Brentford (Kick-off 7.45). Commentary on
the Championship ?xture at Loftus Road
10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am Extra Time
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc
Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends: Album of the Year 1.00am
The First Time with Marianne Faithfull 2.00
The Look of Love: The Story of the New
Romantics 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Jane Jones 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Emma Nelson features pieces
from great composers which were once lost.
Beethoven (King Stephen Overture); Zipoli
(Elevazione); Mozart (Piano Concerto No.27
in B-?at); Allegri (Miserere); Schumann
(Violin Concerto in D minor Opus Posth); and
Traditional (Stac Dona) 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday November 27 2017
11
1GT
MARILYN KINGWILL
Opera
Falstaff
Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool
Concert
Bavarian RSO/Jansons
Barbican
I
J
{{{((
t takes a stern mind not to be
charmed by the undulating art
deco interior of Liverpool?s
Philharmonic Hall, but even the
building?s greatest fans wouldn?t
trumpet its fitness for doubling as
Windsor?s Garter Inn and the other
settings of Verdi?s wonderful Falstaff.
This drawback didn?t seem to
diminish the audience?s enjoyment of
the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic?s
concert staging, but it certainly did
mine. Desultory props; the orchestra
scattered too wide; an oblong video
projection too small to leave any
useful impression: none of these
helped to create the tightly focused
performing space that the opera?s fun
and frolics need. Amy Lane, the
evening?s stage director, tried to make
the logistics work, but her assignment
was almost impossible.
Key to the audience?s pleasure, of
course, was Bryn Terfel?s fat knight ?
his padded paunch just about reined in
by trousers, braces and commodious
gown. Whether sprawled over a chair
or swaggering towards Windsor?s
merry ladies, Terfel delivered his
signature role with plenty of spirit,
though I missed that extra twinkle
difficult to muster without
atmospheric sets, sharp entrances and
exits, and the electricity that crackles
on a fully functioning theatre stage.
Among the supporting company,
Rebecca Evans and Anthony Clark
Evans delivered the goods as the
bountiful, quick-witted Alice and her
more uptight husband Ford. Others,
cast from the young singers of the
invaluable European Opera Centre,
paled a little alongside. I did though
relish the physical energy of Max
Zander and Lancelot Nomura, pushed
and shoved all over the place as
scallywags Bardolfo and Pistola. Verdi?s
quicksilver music, of course, never
failed; the orchestra shone under
Vasily Petrenko, and Terfel slightly
muted is better than no Terfel at all.
Geoff Brown
Concert
BBC SO/Sondergard
Barbican
I
{{{((
n 1945 Benjamin Britten took a
jaunty dance from Purcell?s
incidental music for Aphra Behn?s
Abdelazer, threw it on a potter?s
wheel, and coloured it in the
primary hues of brass, woodwind and
strings to educate a generation of
music-lovers. Fifty years later, in
response to The Young Person?s Guide
to the Orchestra, Poul Ruders crafted
Concerto in Pieces from the cackling
chorus of witches in Purcell?s Dido and
Aeneas. The trigger for the witches?
laughter is the impending tragedy of
two lovers separated by a grand deceit.
Nothing is ever as simple as it seems
in Purcell, and Ruders?s gift is to
suggest that ambivalence.
This was the opening gambit in
Thomas Sondergard?s concert with the
BBC Symphony Orchestra: writing as
clear as glass, spiked with the
hallucinogens of celesta, tubular bells
and vibraphone. Ruders?s motifs are
artsfirst night
{{{{(
Marianela Nu馿z and
Vadim Muntagirov
A classic beauty pageant
Ashton?s ballet
is a glorious
homage to the
19th century,
says Debra
Craine
Dance
Sylvia
Covent Garden
{{{{(
W
hen people talk about
how pretty classical
ballet is, this is the
kind of thing they
mean. Frederick
Ashton?s three-act production, which
he created in 1952 as a showcase for
Margot Fonteyn, is chock full of
vigorous and beautifully placed
choreography, all of it designed to
animate and decorate the stage at
every turn. Even the Naiads, Dryads,
Sylvans, Fauns, Peasants and Muses
who adorn Ashton?s scrupulously
detailed ballet are imbued with their
own charm. Sylvia is a wonderful
challenge for the dancers of the Royal
Ballet and a glorious homage to the
pageantry of the 19th century.
The story? Not much, to be honest,
and Ashton does little to give purpose
or dramatic heft to his mythological
tale. A shepherd, Aminta, falls in love
with Sylvia, a nymph of the goddess
Diana. Sylvia is captured by the
huntsman Orion, is rescued by Eros
and reunited with Aminta, all in good
time to enjoy a fabulous third act in
those of Dido?s courtiers and enemies,
but for the tuba, which stutters like the
scurvy poet in Act I of The Fairy
Queen. The playing was smart but
related only vaguely to Sondergard?s
gestures. The disconnect became yet
more obvious in Shostakovich?s
Concerto in C minor for piano,
trumpet and strings, the lower of
which were largely left to their own
devices.
The pianist Behzod Abduraimov
played with vim and wit, identifying
precisely the Beethovenian bite in
Shostakovich?s score, its melancholy
and deadpan humour. Plucked from
his usual position in the orchestra, the
trumpeter Alan Thomas played
sweetly and neatly while looking
exquisitely uncomfortable in front of
the strings.
As dense as seal skin, the first bass
note of Also sprach Zarathustra was
the most exciting aspect to
Sondergard?s Strauss. The narrative
was undercooked and the ensemble
slack but the textures were reliably
alluring, lit by lovely playing from the
principal horn, Martin Owen, and the
cor anglais player, Alison Teale.
Anna Picard
Pop
Jools Holland
Rhythm & Blues
Orchestra
Royal Albert Hall
{{{{(
the manner of The Sleeping Beauty.
The 1876 Delibes score is felicitous,
bright, irresistible (and well played, for
the most part, with Simon Hewett
conducting); designs by Christopher
and Robin Ironside are a nod to classic
French painting (think Poussin,
Lorrain) and are as sweet as candy.
On opening night, performances
were buoyant. Marianela Nu馿z was
Sylvia and no surprise that she
embodies the strength and wiliness of
an Amazonian nymph who leads the
hunt, tricks her evil captor and
eventually finds true happiness with
a mere mortal. Nu馿z?s poised and
powerful dancing was consummately
lovely, sensual and gutsy.
As Aminta, Vadim Muntagirov has
noble stature and impressive long
lines. His Act III variation was a
knockout, dynamically delivered and
handsomely etched. Valentino
Zucchetti impressed as Eros, the god
who orchestrates this slender tale of
romance, Thiago Soares was Orion ?
having fun as the villain of the piece.
Box office: 020 7304 4000, to Dec 16
I
n some quarters saying you like
Jools Holland?s big band is akin to
confessing that you keep a stash of
Max Bygraves LPs under your bed.
This puzzles me. Is it because
Holland hangs out with Prince
Charles? Or because he is invariably
the first port of call for TV producers
looking for a music presenter?
Purists tend to look down their
noses at him because his musicians
stray all over the stylistic dial. Yet that,
to some of us, is part of the attraction:
Holland ? who turns 60 next year ?
runs an outfit that is a glorious
throwback to an era when bands
courted a broad audience by mixing all
sorts of dancefloor rhythms. The last
of the legends to do it on this scale,
you could argue, was Lionel Hampton,
and he has been dead for nearly 20
years. We need someone to keep the
tradition alive, and Holland?s
showmanship and inveterate curiosity
make him the ideal candidate.
Yes, there is a hammy streak at
times, that boogiefied version of Flight
of the Bumble Bee being the prime
example. Look beyond the showbiz
trimmings, though, and you realise
that the programme is a love letter to
ust before the Bavarian Radio
Symphony Orchestra arrived
in town, its chief conductor
Mariss Jansons went on record
saying that women conductors
weren?t his ?cup of tea?. Cue outcry,
particularly as the Latvian was also at
the Barbican to be awarded the gold
medal of the Royal Philharmonic
Society.
An official apology followed. Also
cheers, when in his acceptance speech
on stage, Jansons said ?every boy and
girl? should have the chance to realise
the dream of conducting. How
dispiriting, though, that one of today?s
finest conductors couldn?t have come
to that conclusion before. When, way
back in 1938, the legendary Nadia
Boulanger was asked what it felt like
to be a woman conductor, she replied:
?I?ve been a woman for a little over
50 years, and I?ve got over my initial
astonishment.? Quite.
Musically, though, this was an
uplifting occasion. Jansons?s long
relationship with his German
orchestra ? one of the world?s
greatest ? has reaped dividends, with
every focused flick of the baton, every
gentle gesture with his hands evoking
rich detail. The glowing Bavarian
sound was ideal for the heavenly
opening movement of Beethoven?s
Fourth Piano Concerto, yet the strings
were startlingly fierce in the Andante,
an angry mob to be soothed by the
generous-toned, powerful pianist
Yefim Bronfman.
That ?special intensity? that pianist
Mitsuko Uchida, presenting Jansons
with his medal, pinpointed as one of
the conductor?s unique virtues was
also on display in Prokofiev?s Fifth
Symphony. Once described by the
composer as ?a song of praise of free
and happy mankind?, the music itself
often subverts this tagline. In this
expansive performance it was the
sense of hidden forces at work, always
ready to erupt, that was really telling.
Rebecca Franks
ska, swing and other traditions that
are nowadays banished to the
specialist radio schedules
Fats Domino?s passing gave Holland
the opportunity to reminisce about
visiting the great man three decades
ago. Jos� Feliciano, fortunately, is still
with us, and opened his cameo with
California Dreamin? before adding
As You See Me Now, the title track
from the album that he and Holland
have just released. There was a certain
poignancy in hearing an artist of
Feliciano?s stature thanking Radio 2 so
profusely for placing him on his
playlist. A reminder that these are
hard times in the music business.
It was a pity that his segment could
not have lasted longer. Then again, the
short sets are part of the showband
formula. Beth Rowley channelled
Bessie Smith, Louise Marshall raised
the gospel temperature. And at the
close Ruby Turner once again
upstaged everyone, this time with a
rendition of Let the Good Times Roll
that tipped its hat to the Ray Charles
Orchestra and yet sounded, somehow,
even bluesier.
Clive Davis
Tour dates: joolsholland.com
12
1G T
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Paul Hollywood:
A Baker?s Life
Channel 4, 8pm
Paul
Hollywood,
the sun-dried
Great British
Bake Off judge in the
open-necked shirts,
is not just a baker?s
harshest critic, but also
Early
Top
pick
his own. ?Take your
jumper off, change your
jeans and lose weight,?
he advises his 2010 self,
as he endures watching
his GBBO audition
tape. Much of this first
episode in Hollywood?s
bright and breezy new
baking series concerns
itself with the mystique
of Bake Off. As well as
that audition tape, we
see Hollywood?s screen
test with Mary Berry,
we get a glimpse behind
the scenes in the Bake
Off marquee, and
Hollywood talks about
the show?s move to
Channel 4. In each
episode the Wirral?s
walrus of love knocks
up four bakes from his
?personal cookbook?.
Tonight we get some
beefburgers, a
Venice-inspired pizza
and a ?celebration?
madeira cake. The most
entertaining bake,
however, involves the
tables being turned in
the marquee, as the
former contestants Val
Stones and Selasi
Gbormittah set
Hollywood a challenge
before taking revenge
as judges (?I thought
it might have been
bigger,? Val says). This
is a decent PR move for
Hollywood, who comes
across as far more
good-humoured and
grounded than in
Bake Off. He?s honest
too, revealing that
he thought the show
would be a failure, that
early criticism of his
judging style stung and
that he feels that Berry,
Mel Giedroyc and Sue
Perkins ?abandoned?
Bake Off. ?Why am I
getting called a traitor?
I was loyal.? The oven
gloves are off.
Would I Lie to You?
BBC One, 8.30pm
Surmising that actors
make excellent liars,
the comedy panel show
has drafted in three
of them. Helping
David Mitchell to sort
fact from fiction are
Sheila Hancock and
Stephen Mangan, while
Mark Bonnar and the
presenter Anita Rani
join Lee Mack for
some mistruths and
misdirection. Among
the tall tales are
Hancock?s claim that
she keeps a spare house
key attached to her cat
and Rani?s assertion
that she caused her
street to be evacuated
on the day she moved
in. Most importantly,
can Mitchell remember
which episode of Knight
Rider he watched with
his neighbour?
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Claimed and Shamed. A railway
worker?s personal injury claim is revealed as fraudulent
10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in Kent,
north-west London and Stoke-on-Trent (r) 11.00 The
Housing Enforcers. Matt Allwright gets a surprise in
Stroud when an eviction takes a shocking turn (r) 11.45
The Sheriffs Are Coming. Lawrence puts the squeeze on
a ?nance company that has not paid its rent 12.15pm
Bargain Hunt. Hunting for antiques in Oswestry,
Shropshire (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30
BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Austin is
unhappy to ?nd out Rob is Lily?s foster father, while
Latoya con?des in one of her fellow inmates while on
remand (AD) 2.15 Armchair Detectives. Three amateur
sleuths try to solve the murder of a criminal 3.00 Escape
to the Country. Nicki Chapman helps a couple looking for
a property in Gloucestershire on a budget of �0,000 (r)
(AD) 3.45 Royal Recipes. Michael Buerk and Paul
Ainsworth recreate a royal wartime staple (AD) 4.30 Flog
It! From Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Island Parish Sark Winter (r) (AD) 6.30 Claimed
and Shamed (r) 7.15 Royal Recipes (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign
Zone: Women at War ? 100 Years of Service (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm The Link. Quiz show (r)
1.45 Terry and Mason?s Great Food Trip. Terry Wogan
and Mason McQueen explore Kent (r) 2.15 Going Back,
Giving Back. An east London family who have never seen
the sea (r) 3.00 The Indian Doctor. Comedy drama set in
the 1960s starring Sanjeev Bhaskar and Ayesha Dharker
(r) (AD) 3.45 Oxford Street Revealed. Thames Water
sewer ?ushers try to tackle a build-up of fat (r) 4.15
Wartime Farm. Ruth Goodman, Alex Langlands and Peter
Ginn try to increase the farm?s productivity using methods
from 1943, when Britain suffered its worst food
shortages of the Second World War (r) (AD) 5.15 Put
Your Money Where Your Mouth Is. The antiques experts
Eric Knowles and Catherine Southon compete for their
chosen charities at the Ardingly Antiques and Collectors
Fair in West Sussex (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted
by Jeremy Vine 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two.
Zoe Ball chats to the latest couple to be voted out
6.00am Good Morning Britain. The Britain?s Got Talent
winner Ashleigh Butler talks about her ?rst panto
season after the passing of faithful sidekick Pudsey, and
is joined by her new canine friend Sully 8.30 Lorraine.
Entertainment, current affairs and fashion news, as well
as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip. Presented by
Lorraine Kelly 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show
10.30 This Morning. Victoria Beckham and Eva Longoria
talk about their friendship to Alison Hammond at the
Global Gift Gala. Ben Fogle details why he is campaigning
for more protection for pets. Including Local Weather
12.30pm Loose Women. The panellists chat about the
issues that have everyone talking and are joined by the
comedian Micky Flanagan 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00
Judge Rinder. Real-life cases in a studio courtroom
3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. The team is in Prestatyn,
where Corrie Jeffery is interested in some Coptic crosses,
David Hakeney has his eye on unusual pottery and Tony
Geering gets advice on personal grooming (r) 4.00
Tipping Point. Game show hosted by Ben Shephard (r)
5.00 The Chase. Quiz show hosted by Bradley Walsh
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) 9.00 Frasier (r) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen
Nightmares USA. An Italian restaurant in Pennsylvania
run by warring siblings (r) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA.
The chairman and CEO of a camping company goes
undercover (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm
Come Dine with Me. Four contestants in Brighton
compete to hold the perfect dinner party, beginning
with a clothing store owner ? who holds a Brian
Blessed-themed evening (r) 1.05 Kirstie?s Handmade
Christmas. Kirstie Allsopp visits Austria to learn how to
make woollen mittens and mulled wine (r) (AD) 2.10
Countdown. With Linda Papadopoulos in Dictionary Corner
3.00 Lost and Found. New series. The work of canine
rescue charity Dogs Trust 4.00 A Place in the Sun: Winter
Sun. A Jersey couple looking for a home in Fuerteventura
5.00 Four in a Bed. The competition begins at Church
Street Cobbles in Maccles?eld, Cheshire 5.30 Come Dine
with Me. A barista hosts the ?rst dinner party from in
and around Newcastle 6.00 The Simpsons. Lisa runs for
class representative ? against her best friend (AD)
6.30 Hollyoaks. Marnie is concerned about Mac (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. The journalist
and broadcaster Matthew Wright is joined by a panel of
guests and the studio audience to debate the issues of
the day 11.35 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. Dr Farida Ahmad
and Dr Pelly help teenagers struggling to cope with their
home lives, and Dr Liz Lee offers advice to a patient with
what seems to be a contraceptive coil problem (r) (AD)
12.30pm The Gadget Show. Georgie Barrat tries out a
virtual reality platform designed to help ?lm-makers.
Plus, the Fitbit smart watch is pitted against the Apple
Watch S3 (r) 1.25 5 News at Lunchtime 1.30 Neighbours
(AD) 2.00 FILM: Christmas Mail (PG, 2010)
A postman is asked to spy on a woman employed to
answer children?s letters to Santa, but falls in love with
her. Festive romantic comedy starring Ashley Scott and
AJ Buckley 3.45 FILM: A Perfect Christmas (PG,
TVM, 2012) An advertising executive meets a
department store mannequin that has come to life, and
?nds it has become her perfect man. Festive fantasy
starring Claire Coffee and Ryan McPartlin 5.30
5 News at 5.30 6.00 Neighbours. Mark is suspended and
questioned by the police (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
The Perfect
Christmas
Gift
Get a
Armistead Maupin ? How I wrote Tales of the City
Paula Byrne Celebrated houses of fiction
Edward Allen Marianne Moore, and more
Nabeelah Jaffer Islam and Britishness
Libby Purves Tinder of the 1940s
SEPTEMBER 15 2017 No. 5972
n
www.the-tls.co.uk
the-tls.co
THE TIMES LITERARY
ARY SU
SUPPLEMENT
Patrick J. Murray Montaigne?s social network
Jamie Fisher Angry like Mailer
Charlotte Shane Provocations of feminism
Samuel Earle Never getting bored of Barthes
SEPTEMBER 29 2017 No. 5974
n
www.the-tls.co.uk
THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
Laura Freeman Dress like a writer
Colin Grant Lost voices of immigration
Anne McElvoy The passion of Merkel
Krishan Kumar On statues and Nazis
UK �50 USA $8.99
SEPTEMBER 22 2017 No. 5973
UK �
n
www.the-tls.co.uk
THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
Tales of addiction
Inspirations of Dante
Rowan Williams
Ian Thomson
Wandering, wondering
Eric J. Iannelli
Terri Apter
UK �50 USA $8.99
�
Waterstones
Gift Card when
you subscribe
to the TLS
Annette Kobak on women and the Grand Tour
Jan Marsh on Ruskin in Europe
Find a lifelong companion in the TLS, the
world?s leading international literary journal.
Buy a subscription to the Times Literary
Supplement as a present (even for yourself)
and get a � Waterstones Gift Card.
To subscribe visit tlssubs.imbmsubs.com/tlswater12 or call
01293 312178 and quote code TLSWATER12
7PM
Waterstones Gift Cards may be redeemed in any Waterstones store in the UK towards the purchase of all eligible Waterstones products available. Gift Cards cannot be redeemed for cash. Waterstones Gift Cards will be sent within 28 days of purchasing a TLS subscription.
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present topical stories and chat
7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip The
poet Pam Ayres and her friend and the
actor Geoffrey Whitehead join experts
James Braxton and Kate Bliss on a
quest to ?nd items to sell at an
auction in Cirencester, Gloucestershire.
Their search takes them through
Hampshire and Berkshire
7.00 Emmerdale Rebecca confesses
everything she knows to Lawrence, and
Tom is evasive when Debbie tries to
have a serious conversation (AD)
7.30 Coronation Street Todd turns
detective to set Billy?s mind at rest,
while Mary enjoys precious time
with her grandson (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Weather Terror: Brits Abroad
Britons caught up in extreme weather
events while overseas. Recounted
stories include a family camping trip
in the south of France blighted by
torrential ?oods, and a pair of visitors
whose arrival in the Philippines
coincided with a typhoon (1/6) (r)
8.00 EastEnders Willmott-Brown tasks
Max with keeping Lauren quiet, and
Woody faces a dilemma (AD)
8.00 University Challenge The second
round of the student quiz continues.
Jeremy Paxman asks the questions
8.30 Would I Lie to You? Comedy panel
show with Mark Bonnar, Sheila
Hancock, Stephen Mangan and Anita
Rani. See Viewing Guide (2/10)
8.30 Nigella: At My Table Including
recipes for spiced lamb kofta, rose and
pepper pavlova, egg curry, and white
chocolate cheesecake (5/6) (AD)
8.00 The Martin Lewis Money Show
Advice on the huge savings that can
be made while shopping even when
there isn?t a sale on (2/12)
8.30 Coronation Street Todd attempts to
hide the truth, Faye decides where her
loyalties lie, and Gemma discovers
Henry?s family connections (AD)
8.00 Paul Hollywood: A Baker?s Life
New series. The Bake Off judge shares
his favourite recipes from a lifetime of
baking. See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
8.30 Supershoppers New series.
The consumer advice show returns,
beginning with advice on how to
buy cheaper car insurance (1/4)
8.00 Sinkholes: Sucked Under
Tom Backhouse investigates sinkholes
caused by collapsed mine shafts,
including one that opened up in front
of a ?at and led down to an abandoned
mine, and a homeowner reveals how
he is stuck in an unsellable house that
is surrounded by sinkholes (2/3)
9.00 New Tricks Sandra and her seasoned
colleagues reopen the 16-year-old case
of a political aide?s murder when a
dormant offshore bank account
containing �,000 is discovered in his
name. With John McArdle, Jason Durr
and Kika Mirylees (7/10) (r) (AD)
9.00 Employable Me New series. The
documentary returns to follow the
stories of eight more people with
disabilities as they battle to ?nd work,
beginning by focusing on a 52-year-old
businessman who had a stroke and
a 22-year-old man with Tourette?s.
See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
9.00 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of
Here! Ant and Dec present the survival
challenge, as the famous faces
continue their ordeal in the Australian
jungle, with one of the campmates
facing another Bushtucker Trial
9.00 999: What?s Your Emergency?
The edition focuses on the rapidly
growing number of 999 calls connected
to the over-75s, with PC Phil Bridge
searching Trowbridge to ?nd a
73-year-old woman who is in the
latter stages of dementia and has
disappeared while out with her son
9.00 Chris Tarrant: Extreme Railway
Journeys Chris travels through the
Middle East to explore what remains
of the colonial railways that were built
there more a hundred years ago. In the
Wadi Rum valley, Chris boards a steam
train along one of the few bits of the
Hejaz railway still in use (4/4)
10.00 First Dates Podium dancer Khloe sits
down for a meal with former Ibiza club
promoter Rick, who shares her love of
music, and ecologist Andrew has dinner
with aid worker Charlotte, while Neil
meets retired pub landlady Eileen,
who is a fellow mod (AD)
10.00 Secrets of the Tube: Going
Underground Rob Bell examines how
London?s overcrowding problem was
the issue that prompted the building
of the world?s ?rst underground
railway, which linked Paddington and
a terminus at Farringdon and went into
operation in January 1863 (3/4) (r)
11.05 Don?t Tell the Bride New series.
Groom-to-be Carl plans a Spanish
wedding for his ?anc閑 Rebecca, as he
tries to arrange the perfect day to
meet her expectations for a high-class
affair. Previously seen on E4
11.05 Inside the Mega Twister
Documentary recalling the tornado that
struck El Reno, Oklahoma, in May
2013. Combined with many ?rst-hand
accounts, recordings from scientists,
and some CGI animations, this ?lm
offers an unprecedented journey
through the heart of the storm (r)
12.10am One Born Every Minute (r) (AD) 1.05 The
Secret Life of 5 Year Olds (r) (AD) 2.00 FILM: Neerja
(15, 2016) A ?ight attendant puts her life at risk during
a hijack to save her passengers. Fact-based thriller with
Sonam Kapoor 4.15 The Truth About Muslim Marriage
(r) (SL) 5.10 Draw It! (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.05am Aircrash: The Miracle of Flight 32 The
Airbus A-380 that suffered engine failure over Singapore
in November 2010 (r) 1.00 SuperCasino 3.10 Law &
Order: Special Victims Unit (r) (AD) 4.00 Now That?s
Funny! (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Divine
Designs (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest (r) (SL)
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7.30 The Billion Pound VAT Scam:
Panorama Current affairs report
covering a story behind the headlines
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.45 Have I Got a Bit More News for
You Stephen Mangan hosts an
extended edition of the topical quiz,
with Steph McGovern and Jo Caul?eld
joining team captains Ian Hislop
and Paul Merton (7/10)
10.00 Insert Name Here With
Hugh Dennis, Suzannah Lipscomb,
Rebecca Front and Phil Wang (2/8)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Emily Maitlis
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.45 Killer Women with Piers Morgan
The journalist and broadcaster Piers
Morgan travels across the USA to meet
some of America?ss most notorious
female killers in a quest to discover
what drives women to kill. He visits
Erin Caffey, who masterminded the
murder of her entire family (1/2) (r)
11.30 Michael McIntyre?s Big Show
With Danny Dyer and Gary Barlow.
Plus, performances by Russell Kane
and Clean Bandit (2/6) (r)
11.15 Blitz: The Bombs That Changed
Britain Documentary telling the
stories of bombs dropped on Britain
in the Second World War, beginning
with an unexploded bomb that fell on
the East End of London on the ?rst
night of the Blitz (1/4) (r) (AD)
11.45 Life Inside Jail: Hell on Earth
Documentary ?lmed in Albany County
Correctional Facility (1/2) (r)
12.30am The Graham Norton Show The ?lm-maker
and actor Mel Gibson makes his debut on the show,
joined by fellow actors Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg and
John Lithgow. Strictly Come Dancing?s Shirley Ballas also
guests, while the singer-songwriter Kesha performs
Learn to Let Go (r) 1.25-6.00 BBC News
12.15am Sign Zone: Country?le The rural affairs
show visits Hertfordshire, where Sean Fletcher builds
a home ?t for a king?sher, and John Craven revisits his
scouting days by cooking on a woodland ?re (r) (SL)
1.10-2.10 Blue Planet II. An insight into creatures
that live on coral reefs, including groupers (r) (AD, SL)
12.35am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort
of their sofas with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and
lively chat 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r) (SL)
3.55 ITV Nightscreen. Text-based information service
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
the times | Monday November 27 2017
13
1G T
television & radio
Employable Me
BBC Two, 9pm
The series returns
with eight more
jobseekers whose
various disabilities are
rather unfairly holding
them back. Tonight?s
opener focuses on the
lively 22-year-old Ryan,
who suffers from one
of the most severe cases
of Tourette?s in the
country, and Andy, 52,
a former superbike
rider who is recovering
from a near-fatal
stroke. To suggest that
the job market is tough
for them is something
of an understatement
? Andy, who was once
a managing director,
has sent more than
3,000 job applications
and received one
interview. Their
determination helps to
leaven the air of futility.
Last Men in
Aleppo: Storyville
BBC Four, 10pm
Last year?s Netflix
documentary The
White Helmets brought
this courageous group
of volunteers in Aleppo
to the world?s attention.
If you have the stomach
for it, here is another
superb, horribly
immersive film
following their rescue
efforts in a city under
constant bombardment.
Theirs is a horrendous
ordeal as they pull
bodies from rubble,
again and again. The
camera ? be warned
? does not flinch.
There are moments of
levity, including a man
bursting a football, but
the impression is of
a group of thoroughly
decent men trying to
bail out the Titanic.
Private Lives of
the Monarchs
Yesterday, 9pm
Tracy Borman turns
her attention to George
III and George IV,
two kings who could
hardly have been more
different, despite being
father and son. George
the elder was ?Farmer
George?, the humble
country squire, who
stayed faithful to his
plain wife and enjoyed
tinkering with his
astrological toys; the
son, however, in the
decidedly unminced
words of the historian
Dominic Selwood, was
?a pleasure-loving,
lascivious,
hard-drinking,
hard-gambling, venal,
vindictive, nasty,
small-minded ruler.
The worst monarch this
country has ever had.?
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7.30pm
The West London rivals
Queens Park Rangers
and Brentford clash in
the Championship
tonight at Loftus
Road (kick-off 7.45pm).
Both sides have been
inconsistent so far
this season and
are mid-table, but still
in reach of the play-offs
? and relegation.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 8.00 Animal 999
(r) 9.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD) 10.00
Monkey Life (r) (AD) 11.00 Modern Family (r)
12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00
Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30
Futurama. The Olympics get under way (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Supergirl. Winn and the team discover
an alien ship has crashed in deep water
9.00 A League of Their Own. With Ruud Gullit,
Alex Scott and Kevin Bridges (r) (AD)
10.00 Bounty Hunters. Barnaby and Nina
attempt to steal the statues back (r)
10.35 Sick Note. Dr Glennis goes undercover
to extricate himself and Daniel (r)
11.05 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own (r) (AD) 1.00am
The Force: Essex (r) 2.00 Night Cops (r) (AD)
3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r)
(AD) 7.00 Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 Storm City (r)
(AD) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r)
(AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue
Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r)
5.00 House. Medical drama (r) (AD)
6.00 House. Medical drama (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. An infant
dies in a car during a heatwave (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Linda?s brother Jimmy gets
into trouble with the mob (r) (AD)
9.00 Alan Partridge?s Mid Morning Matters.
How to let go of petty grudges (r) (AD)
9.30 Alan Partridge?s Mid Morning Matters.
Sidekick Simon has some bad news (r) (AD)
10.00 Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry is
blackmailed by an employee
10.50 Camping. Comedy (3/6) (r) (AD)
11.25 Camping (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.00 Vice Principals (r) 12.35am Bill Maher:
Live from DC (r) 1.55 Blue Bloods (r) (AD)
2.45 The Wire (r) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Gold Coast Cops (r) (AD) 12.00 Border
Security: America?s Front Line (r) (AD) 1.00pm
Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00 Nothing to
Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds. Homes are set on ?re (r)
6.55 My Kitchen Rules New Zealand.
New series. Contestants transform their
homes into pop-up restaurants
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. A killer in Texas is
targeting prominent members of the community
10.00 Blindspot. The agents chase a deadly
bomber terrorising Manhattan
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 Elementary. With Aleksa Palladino (r)
(AD) 1.00am CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
2.00 Criminal Minds (r) 4.00 My Kitchen Rules
New Zealand 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am A Christmas Carol: The Concert (AD)
7.35 Proko?ev: Piano Concertos 8.00 Auction
8.30 Watercolour Challenge 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 10.00 My Shakespeare 11.00
Treasures of the British Library (AD) 12.00
Discovering: Janet Leigh (AD) 1.00pm Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 2.00 Watercolour
Challenge 2.30 Auction 3.00 Duran Duran:
Working for the Skin Trade 4.00 Trailblazers:
New Romantics 5.00 Discovering: Iggy Pop (AD)
5.30 Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: Rod Steiger (AD)
7.00 Master of Photography (AD)
8.00 Andr� Rieu: Romance
10.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017.
The last of the heats takes place
11.00 Discovering: Eli Wallach
12.00 Passions 1.00am Tales of the
Unexpected (AD) 2.00 Auction 2.30 Talks
Music (AD) 3.30 Joshua Bell Presents Musical
Gifts 4.50 Arts Scholarships: Sky Academy
5.00 The South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Live Test Cricket: India v Sri Lanka.
Coverage of the fourth day?s play in the second
Test at the Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium
in Jamtha, Nagpur 11.15 My Icon: Michael
Holding 11.30 Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Sky
Sports News 5.00pm Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Skyy Spports Tonigght
7.30 Live EFL: Queens Park Rangers v Brentford
(Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of the Championship
clash between the London rivals at Loftus Road.
See Viewing Guide
10.00 The Debate. Discussion
11.00 Sky Sports News. The day?s talking points
12.00 Sky Sports News 1.00am NFL Jay Ajayi
Running Back Masterclass 1.15 Live NFL:
Baltimore Ravens v Houston Texans (Kick-off
1.30). Coverage of the clash between the AFC
North and AFC South sides at M&T Bank
Stadium 4.45 Live Test Cricket: India v Sri
Lanka. The ?fth day?s play in the second Test
at the Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm True North:
The Flower Shop. Daily life at a ?ower shop in
West Belfast 11.10 Have I Got a Bit More
News for You. Stephen Mangan hosts, with
guests Steph McGovern and Jo Caul?eld 11.55
Michael McIntyre?s Big Show. With guests
Danny Dyer, Gary Barlow, Russell Kane and
Clean Bandit (r) 12.55am The Graham Norton
Show. With guests Mel Gibson, Will Ferrell,
Mark Wahlberg, John Lithgow and Shirley
Ballas (r) 1.45-6.00 BBC News
Angela Lansbury in Murder
She Wrote (ITV3, 6.55pm)
Steve Coogan as Alan
Partridge (Sky Atlantic, 9pm)
FBI profilers on Criminal
Minds (Sky Living, 9pm)
A profile of rock singer Iggy
Pop (Sky Arts, 5pm)
Animated US comedy
Family Guy (ITV2, 9pm)
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Christmas University Challenge 2015. With
famous graduates of University College London
and the University of Birmingham (r)
8.00 Building the Ancient City. Andrew
Wallace-Hadrill examines how the ancient
Romans made their city work (r) (AD)
9.00 The Other Pompeii: Life and Death in
Herculaneum. Professor Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
provides an insight into the lives of the
inhabitants of the Roman town (r) (AD)
10.00 Last Men in Aleppo: Storyville.
Documentary following the work of the White
Helmets, a volunteer organisation comprising
ordinary Syrians who conduct search and rescue
missions after military strikes and attacks in
the Syrian city of Aleppo. See Viewing Guide
11.30 From Scotland with Love. Documentary
using archive footage to explore themes of love,
loss, resistance, migration, work and play, set to
a soundtrack composed by King Creosote (r)
12.40am Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. The
inspiration behind the poem (r) 1.40 The Other
Pompeii: Life and Death in Herculaneum (r) (AD)
2.40-3.40 Building the Ancient City (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Myra promises to ?lm
Neeta?s memorial for Hunter (AD)
7.30 First Dates Abroad (r) (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Made in Chelsea. Jamie tries to play
peacemaker between Alik and Louise
10.00 Made in Chelsea Does Come Dine with
Me. With Jamie Laing, Louise Thompson,
Georgia Toffolo and Alex Mytton (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Tattoo Fixers. Sketch rids Sam
and Rod of the ?lth on their feet (r) 1.10
Gogglebox (r) (SL) 2.10 Made in Chelsea (r)
3.05 First Dates (r) (AD) 4.00 Black-ish (r)
(AD) 4.40 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 2.45 Come Dine with Me (r)
3.50 Time Team (r) 5.55 The Secret Life of the
Zoo. A porcupine meets a new mate (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. A Bengal cat?s tiny bones are
painstakingly reset after a road accident (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows an
architect?s project to build an unusual �0,000
house out of four shipping containers, welded
together to form a giant cross and cantilevered
on the family farm in Co Derry (4/10) (r) (AD)
9.00 Vet on the Hill. Two French bulldogs need
help with their incontinence, while Scott Miller
brushes up on his farm veterinary skills (AD)
10.00 The Billion Pound Hotel. Taking a look
inside the Burj Al Arab in Dubai, dubbed the
world?s most luxurious hotel, following the
stories of a variety of guests who pay anything
up to �,000 a night for a suite (r)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. Patients include a man
hit by a pizza delivery motorbike (r) (AD)
12.10am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 Vet on the Hill (r) (AD) 2.05 24 Hours in
A&E (r) (AD) 3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am The Duel at Silver Creek (PG,
1952) Don Siegel?s Western starring Audie
Murphy 12.35pm Crash Dive (PG, 1943)
Romantic wartime drama starring Tyrone Power
and Anne Baxter 2.45 Bitter Victory (PG,
1957) Second World War drama with Richard
Burton and Curt Jurgens (b/w) 4.50 Earth vs
the Flying Saucers (U, 1956) Sci-? drama
starring Hugh Marlowe and Joan Taylor (b/w)
6.35 Beautiful Creatures (12, 2013)
A teenager falls in love with a girl, only to
discover she is a witch and must soon choose
a side in a magical con?ict. Fantasy based on
Kami Garcia?s novel starring Alden Ehrenreich
9.00 Solace (15, 2015) A psychic helps the
FBI to identify a serial killer, but realises the
murderer has mental powers of his own. Crime
thriller with Anthony Hopkins and Colin Farrell
11.05 American Reunion (15, 2012) Old
friends attending a high-school reunion make
disastrous attempts to relive their teens.
Comedy sequel to the American Pie movies,
with Jason Biggs and Alyson Hannigan
1.15am-3.10 The Beat Beneath My Feet
(15, 2015) Comedy drama starring Luke Perry
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 6.20 Planet?s Got Talent (r)
6.45 Dinner Date (r) 7.35 Emmerdale (r) (AD)
8.00 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.00 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 9.50 Dinner Date (r)
10.50 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of Here! (r)
12.20pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 Coronation
Street (r) (AD) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show
2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of Here! (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy. Brian posts an
offensive tweet that goes viral (AD)
9.30 Ghosted. Max and Leroy go undercover to
investigate an incident at a country club (AD)
10.00 I?m a Celebrity: Extra Camp. Fleur East is
among the guests on the companion show
11.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.00 Family Guy (r) (AD) 12.30am American
Dad! (r) (AD) 1.00 Scorpion (r) (AD) 1.55
Christmas Bonkers Guinness World Records (r)
2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
8.55 Judge Judy (r) 10.15 A Touch of Frost (r)
12.35pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat
(r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.45
A Touch of Frost (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
6.55 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica?s cousin, a
dance hall performer, turns detective after she is
suspected of murdering her lover (r) (AD)
8.00 Doc Martin. The doctor suspects a patient?s
breathing dif?culties may be linked to asbestos
and Penhale puts up warning notices about the
substance?s harmful properties (6/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Midsomer Murders. Barnaby and Jones
are called away from a team-building exercise
to investigate a fatal explosion at a haulage
yard in Calham Cross (r) (AD)
11.00 Blue Murder. Pete pressures Janine for
a divorce as she grapples with the case of a
murdered childminder in which the only witness
is an autistic youngster (4/4) (r) (AD)
12.35am A Touch of Frost. Armed robbers lead
Frost a merry dance (r) (SL) 2.20 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am Snooker v Darts (r) 6.10 The Chase
(r) 7.40 Cash Cowboys 8.30 Storage Wars: Best
of Jarrod and Brandi (r) 8.55 Storage Wars: Best
of Darrell and Brandon (r) 9.25 Ironside (r)
10.30 Quincy ME (r) 11.35 The Sweeney (r)
12.35pm The Avengers (r) 1.50 Ironside (r)
2.55 Quincy ME (r) 4.00 The Sweeney (r)
5.00 The Avengers. Crime thriller (r)
6.05 Cash Cowboys. A visit to Yukon (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. A tortoise-shell guitar (r)
7.35 Pawn Stars. A fossilised mastodon tusk (r)
8.00 River Monsters. Investigating piranhas (r)
8.30 River Monsters. Alligator gar ?sh (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: Die Another Day (12, 2002)
James Bond?s pursuit of a Korean terrorist leads
to a British billionaire who has constructed
a devastating orbital weapon. Spy adventure
starring Pierce Brosnan and Halle Berry (AD)
11.45 FILM: The Road (15, 2009) A man
and his son go in search of sanctuary in the
aftermath of a cataclysm that has devastated
the world. Drama starring Viggo Mortensen (AD)
1.55am Motorsport UK. Action from Brands
Hatch 2.50 ITV Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge Roadshow: Welly Wanging 8.10
American Pickers 9.00 Storage Hunters UK
10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top Gear.
Double bill (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors. Reality
TV show 4.00 Ice Road Truckers 5.00 Timber
Kings. A deal to build an elaborate doghouse
6.00 Top Gear. Will Young guests (AD)
7.00 The Hurting. New series. Clip show
featuring the voice of Jake Yapp
7.30 The Hurting. Clip show
8.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.
Dave asks what the term generation really
means, whether life hacks are any use
and why his mum uses emojis
9.00 Live at the Apollo. Lee Mack hosts, with
performances by Rich Hall and Danny Bhoy
10.00 Dara O Briain?s Go 8 Bit.
With Bob Mortimer and Holly Walsh
11.00 QI XL. Extended edition. With Jo Brand,
Alan Davies, Colin Lane and David Mitchell
12.00 Room 101. Frank Skinner hosts 12.40am
Mock the Week 1.20 QI 2.00 QI XL 3.00
The Money Pit 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am New Tricks (AD) 8.00 London?s Burning
9.00 Casualty 10.00 Campion (AD) 11.00 The
Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer Wine (AD)
1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a Feather
3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 Pie in the Sky
5.00 Campion. Part two of two (AD)
6.00 A Fine Romance. Laura goes hunting for
a new ?at and Mike insists on going along
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. A stranger gives
Compo, Clegg and Foggy an old van (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. Lionel is concerned
that he has no pension plans
8.00 Ashes to Ashes. An interview with a
murder suspect puts Alex in mortal danger (6/8)
9.00 Death in Paradise. A birdwatcher is
stabbed to death with his own knife (6/8) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The team investigates the
killing of a zookeeper, thought to have been
mauled to death by a tiger in 2006 (10/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Sharon starts to feel
broody, and Tracey has her work cut out
pampering Garth in the school holidays
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London?s Burning
2.05 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.10am Cash in the Attic 7.00 Raiders of the
Lost Art (AD) 7.25 Time Team 9.15 Walking
Through History 10.20 The Blue Planet (AD)
11.30 Time Team 1.30pm Oceans 2.25 Secrets
of War 3.20 Coast (AD) 4.25 Blackadder II (AD)
5.00 Time Team. A visit to Westminster Abbey
6.00 The World at War. The events leading u
p to the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbour
7.00 Nazi Hunters. How Hitler?s deputy
Hermann Goering was captured by the Allies,
leading to his suicide by poisoning in 1946
8.00 Timewatch: QE2 ? The Final Voyage.
Documentary following the ?nal voyage of RMS
Queen Elizabeth 2, which was launched in 1967
9.00 Private Lives of the Monarchs. Tracy
Borman investigates the lives of George III
and his eldest son. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.00 Steptoe and Son. Christmas special from
1974. Harold plans to spend Christmas abroad
11.00 The Two Ronnies Christmas Special.
A festive edition, ?rst aired in 1984
12.00 Timewatch: QE2 ? The Final Voyage
1.00am Nazi Hunters 2.00 Ancient
Black Ops (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 9.00pm-10.00 The Force:
The Story of Scotland?s Police. The history of
policing in Scotland and recounting stories of
the men and women behind the uniform
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 X-Ray.
Rachel Treadaway-Williams investigates a
bogus letting company 10.40 The Billion Pound
VAT Scam: Panorama. Current affairs report
11.10 Have I Got a Bit More News for You.
Stephen Mangan hosts, with guests Steph
McGovern and Jo Caul?eld 11.55 Michael
McIntyre?s Big Show (r) 12.55am The
Graham Norton Show (r) 1.45 Weather for
the Week Ahead 1.50-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 I L醨 an
Aonaigh. With guest Eoghan McDermott and
music by the Whileaways 11.15-12.15am
Other Voices: A Feast for the Seasons. With
music by Beoga, Jealous of the Birds, Ryan Vail,
Picture This, Rosie Carney and Touts
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 6.00pm-6.30 ITV News Wales
at Six 10.45 Sharp End. Political discussion
with Adrian Masters and guests 11.15-11.45
Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears.
Exploring the Flinders mountains
ITV Westcountry
As ITV except: 10.30pm-10.45
ITV News West Country
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Killer Women with Piers Morgan. The
journalist and broadcaster meets some of
America?s most notorious female killers in a
quest to discover what drives women to kill (r)
12.05am Teleshopping 1.05 After Midnight
2.35 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.45 View from
Stormont. Current affairs and political analysis
12.35am Teleshopping. Buying goods
from home 1.35-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15
Rathad an Sutha (64 Zoo Lane) (r) 5.25 Treud
na Dluth-choille: Grad-Naidheachd (Jungle
Bunch) 5.35 Bruno (r) 5.40 Charlie is Lola
(Charlie and Lola) (r) 5.50 Seonaidh (Shaun the
Sheep) (r) 6.00 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse)
(r) 6.15 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks (r) 6.35
Ard-Sgoil a? Chnuic Annasaich (Strange Hill
High) (r) 7.00 Innsean an Iar: Hebrides (r)
7.30 Speaking Our Language (r) 8.00 An L�
(News) 8.30 Kerry?s Kirsty: Rothan gu
Robhanais (r) 9.00 Trusadh: Heisgeir ? Eadar
na h-Eileanan (The Monachs: Between the
Islands) 10.00 Horo Gheallaidh (Celtic Music
Sessions). With Cherish the Ladies (r) 10.30
Cum Greim (r) 11.30-12.00midnight Feis
Chiuil Thiriodh (Tiree Music Festival) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 10.00 Y Ffair Aeaf 2017.
Coverage of the Royal Welsh Winter Fair 12.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Y Ffair Aeaf
2017 3.55 News S4C a?r Tywydd 4.00 Awr Fawr
5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Pyramid (r)
5.30 Stwnsh: Larfa (r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Sgorio
6.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd
Dillad (r) 6.30 3 Lle (r) 7.00 Heno 7.55
Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25 Y Ffair
Aeaf 2017 9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30
Y Ffair Aeaf 2017 10.00 Ar y Bysus (r)
10.35-12.30am Clwb Rygbi Rhyngwladol
14
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7507
2
3
4
5
6
7
3
14
18
7
8
9
9
11
26
10
11
26
1
12
13
14
15
16
17
14
14
3
10
23
15
16
11
8
Train Tracks No 266
19
12
8
25
26
5
4
4
6
10
11
23
15
14
23
18
14
4
15
17
4
26
15
19
20
18
14
5
24
18
14
12
1
18
8
8
4
4
7
26
18
15
5
18
25
20
5
26
3
5
3
2
12
26
23
25
22
4
26
8
18
25
15
5
18
18
3
9
2
4
5
25
6
A
18
1
20
5
26
12
21
7
15
9
B
O
5
22
26
Source of light (4)
Level of quality (8)
The greater number (8)
Regulation, principle (4)
Eg, cumulus (5)
Large room (7)
Mild, kind (6)
University lecturer (6)
Obstacle to movement (7)
Solution to Crossword 7506
BUCK L
L
H E
E AD I NG
N E A
AC I F I C
Y
EWE S T
O E D
ARDY A
L M M
AD I O S
L
U E
HYDRO L
ED
O
G
R
O
S
V E
OWN
O
ROU
F
CE A
R
S S E
P
E
N
A
L
I
NNUA L S
E R
I
T A T I ON
R E G
Y S I S
20 Elite (5)
23 Unable to speak (4)
24 Forming an end (8)
25 Process of giving birth (8)
26 Short written message (4)
Down
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
12
14
16
17
19
21
22
10
23
6
7
5
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
W
15
Across
8
Help, benefit (5)
Result of multiplication (7)
Slip on wet ground (4)
In any place (8)
Kind of wheat (5)
Alleviate (pain) (7)
Projection on a toothed
wheel (3)
Take up residence in a
different place (8)
One moved from danger (7)
Publicly accuse (7)
Male sheep (3)
Jewish teacher (5)
Adjust to new conditions (5)
Fighting force (4)
13
15
7
15
13
9
14
13
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
8
9
21
22
10
11
12
13
23
24
25
26
L
W
O
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday?s solution, right
S
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 4022
R
D
P
O
C
F
I
U
L
E
A
T
L
S
U
L
P
T
N
L
O
C
V
I
C
O
E
E
F
T
N
Y
N
O
O
Z
O
K
L
U
P
W
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4183
Futoshiki No 3051
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
>
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2010
>
?
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 4021
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
I
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
15
L
� PUZZLER MEDIA
25
D
R
O
P
A
N
C
H
O
R
4
24
23
1
4
8
9
10
11
13
15
18
2
23
22
23
3
3
10
21
2
5
3
23
14
14
>
24
18
37
16
14
6
21
27
8
32
4
15
2
?
4
4
13
>
13
16
3
7
7
12
39
21
11
9
22
17
9
4
21
21
12
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
3
4
16
4
6
4
2
1
<
<
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
4
10
24
14
28
16
30
23
17
16
� PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3191
the times | Monday November 27 2017
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Ding Liren
Black: Magnus Carlsen
Champions Showdown Blitz,
St Louis 2017
English Opening
1 Nf3 Nf6 2 c4 c5 3 Nc3 e6 4 g3
b6
In my column last Saturday,
giving Lev Aronian?s drastic win
against Anish Giri, I pointed out
that the seemingly slow flank
openings, as employed in today?s
game and Saturday?s, can lead to
speedy and crushing results. This
can happen in a way that one
would normally expect to be
reserved for open games, such as
those arising from the Sicilian
Defence. Aronian, playing White,
destroyed Giri in just 27 moves.
Here, Carlsen annihilates Ding
in a mere 23 moves and with the
black pieces. What further evidence could one demand to demonstrate that flank openings can
be as red in tooth and claw as the
EASY
24
x2
MEDIUM
11
SQUARE
IT
HARDER
102
+8
75%
OF IT
�
x 2 ? 88
50%
OF IT
x 3 + 964
60%
OF IT
________
醨D D DkD] Winning Move
�D 0pDp]
� D D 1pD] Black to play. This position is from
online game, chess.com 2017.
�! HrD D ] So-Carlsen,
There is a key weakness in the white
� D D D D] position that the world champion now
蹹PD ) D ] exploited with ruthless efficiency. How
� DRDn)P)] did he continue?
贒 D DRDK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
OF IT
? 12 x 7
+8
+ 67 x 5 + 98 � 2 + 89
+ 882 + 3/4
OF IT
x 2 ? 788
50%
OF IT
+ 473
4 4
3
Killer Gentle No 5740
19
13
6
4
6
7
3
x
Admire declarer coping with the Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
foul trump split on today?s deal
?A 6 4
from a duplicate. He won West?s Pairs
?AQ 5 3
ten of spades lead with the king
?7 6 4
and led a heart, gasping when
?9 6 5
West discarded (and encouraging
? 10 9 8 5
?7 3 2
N
ten of diamonds). Plan the play.
??K 10 9 8 6
W E
?K 10 9 8 5 3 S
You cannot afford to play
?Q J
?7 4 3
?K 10 8
dummy?s queen or you?ll lose three
?
KQ J
heart tricks. Declarer made no mis?J 7 4 2
take, rising with the ace. At trick
?A 2
three, he led a club to the queen,
?AQ J 2
the finesse winning. He then
S
W
N
E
crossed to the ace of spades and led
1?
Pass
3?
Pass
a club to the jack. He cashed the ace
4?
End
of clubs, observing the 3-3 split and
followed with the queen of spades,
Contract: 4? , Opening Lead: ? 10
pleased to see East follow.
Here is the position:
?-
5
14
12
25
3
?9
??K 9 8 5 3
?-
??Q 5 3
?7 6 4
?N
W
E
S
??J 7 4
?A 2
?2
??K 10 9 8
?Q J
?-
Declarer cashed the ace of diamonds and led a second diamond.
West rose with the king, swallowing his partner?s second diamond.
This was best defence ? but not
good enough. He followed with the
nine of diamonds and East (down
to ?K1098) ruffed with the eight.
Declarer overruffed with the
jack of hearts and we have reached
the three-card ending across.
Declarer could lead any card
from his hand and play a low heart
from dummy. East could win the
trick with the nine of hearts but
?9
??8 5
?-
?Q 5 3
??N
W
E
S
??7 4
??2
??K 10 9
??-
then would have to lead from
?K10 round to dummy?s ?Q5.
Ten tricks and game made.
Masterfully manoeuvred by
declarer ? but not such a great
matchpoint result. Several Souths
declared 3NT. They ducked West?s
diamond lead, won the second and,
with East having no more diamonds and with clubs playing for
four tricks (via two finesses), those
declarers garnered ten tricks via
three spades, two hearts, a diamond
and four clubs. Their +430 beat our
hero?s +420 by the crucial ten
points. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
13
x
16
13
9
8
8
15
20
8
9 7 5
8 9 6
8
6 8 9
5 9 7
3 1
9 7
1 2 7
3 1 9
8 6
22
21
9
7
9
4
6
8
�
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
x
5
6
8
2
1
9
4
7
8
9
5
5
1
6 8
8 9
x
3
+
8
6 2
3
12
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
4
5
3
2
6
7
9
8
1
5
2
4
3
4
5
1
2
5
6
4
3
9
8
7
2
1
6
3
5
8
7
9
4
9
4
3
7
6
2
1
5
8
5
2
2 < 3
4
Suko 2092
1
KenKen 4182
8
5
7
1
9
4
6
3
2
7
8
1
9
3
6
4
2
5
3
6
4
5
2
7
8
1
9
5
9
2
4
8
1
3
7
6
P
x
4
5
U
S
O
B
H
B
K
J
E
B
C
T
W
O
L
N
E
5
5
8
4
7
9
5
1
6
3
2
9
1
2
6
3
8
7
5
4
6
5
3
7
2
4
8
9
1
P
E
L
A
C
L
L
M
P
N
T
A
D
M
N
T
O
T
2
7
1
3
8
9
5
4
6
I
A
Killer 5739
2
2
Lexica 4020
E
x
7
2 2
4
3
8
2
7
9
5
6
1
5
x
6
x
4
23
4
1
?
5
Lexica 4019
+
x
12
11
1
Train Tracks 265
3 < 4
5
?
4
?
3
Sudoku 9480
3 1
5 7 2 9
7
5 7
4 3
3 1
3
1 2
8
2
2 6
6 7 9
7 8
5
9
7
1
+
13
4
=
5
Futoshiki 3050
Set Square 2012
2
12
23
4
=
3
1
?
5 > 3 > 2
9
16
14
=
192
2 > 1
?
3
2
�
25
12
x
Tredoku 1501
Cell Blocks 3073
21
�
Solutions
8
23
-
5
13min
20
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 9 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
= 56 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Chess 1 ... Qxf2! is crushing as
2 Rxf2 Rd1+ mates. White tried
2 Qe1 but this lost swiftly to
2 ... Ng3+! 3 hxg3 Rh5 mate.
14
Killer Tricky No 5741
9
�
9
18
10
= 2 from 1-9 are
+
7
11
All the digits
9
+
+
15
14
11
6
-
4
Kakuro 2009
Bridge Andrew Robson
2
2
2
-
16
7
8
2
18
16
14
21
4min
8
11
13
5
+
Saturday?s answers deer, deluder, dree,
dress, dresser, druse, dueler, duress,
elder, leer, lesser, lure, redd, reddle, rede,
redress, reed, reel, reuse, rudd, rudder,
rudderless, ruddle, rude, rule, ruled,
ruler, ruse, seer, sere, slur, slurred,
sudser, suer, surd, sure, udder, user
13
7
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 2013
From these letters, make words of three
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 12 words, average;
17, good; 22, very good; 28, excellent
16
6
2
4
Polygon
________
� 1 D D 4]
郉bDngk0 ]
遬D 0pD D]
轉pD D Dp]
� D !P) D]
蹹 H $ D ]
跴) D D )]
贒 $ DBI ]
谅媚牌侨
21 Rg3
In a sharp situation White loses
his footing. After the correct 21
Bh3 Bd8 fails to 22 Bxe6+ Kxe6
23 Qxg7, while 21 Bh3 Bf6 22 e5
Bd8 23 Ne4 Bb6 is refuted by 24
Bxe6+. In both cases White would
win.
21 ... Bf6 22 e5 Bd8 23 Ne4 Bb6
White resigns
3/4
+7
� PUZZLER MEDIA
World champion Magnus Carlsen
asserted his authority in decisive
fashion with an overwhelming
victory in his contest against the
Chinese grandmaster Ding Liren
in St Louis earlier this month. The
overall score was 67-25. In fact,
Carlsen had already clinched
victory with 13 rounds to spare, a
record that even Bobby Fischer
(famed for his 100 per cent victories) would have been proud to
achieve.
Here is one of the world champion?s surprisingly crushing wins
against a player acknowledged to
be in the world elite.
ostensibly more aggressive openings deriving from 1 e4.
5 Bg2 Bb7 6 0-0 a6 7 Re1 d6 8 e4
Be7 9 d4 cxd4 10 Nxd4 Qc7
The opening has now transposed into the well-known Hedgehog variation, the topic of a new
book, The Hedgehog, by Sergey
Kasparov (Everyman Chess), which
I reviewed in this column on
Monday, November 20. 10 ... Qc7
is an important precaution as the
careless 10 ... Nbd7 fails to 11 e5
Bxg2 12 exf6 winning.
11 Be3 Nbd7
Of course 11 ... Qxc4 allows 12
Rc1, when Black?s queen will find
herself in all sorts of difficulties.
12 Rc1 Rc8 13 f4 Qb8 14 g4 h5
A new move varying from 14 ...
g6 or 14 ... Qa8, as seen previously.
15 g5 Ng4 16 g6 Rxc4 17 gxf7+
Kxf7 18 Bf1 Nxe3 19 Rxe3 Rxd4
20 Qxd4 b5
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Record win
Cell Blocks No 3074
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
U
B
E
R
I
Codeword 3190
4
8
6
2
7
5
3
1
9
3
9
5
1
4
6
2
8
7
7
3
9
8
1
2
4
6
5
1
2
4
5
6
3
9
7
8
5
6
8
4
9
7
1
2
3
Quiz 1 Tequila 2 Salvator Mundi 3 Star Wars ?
full title Star Wars: Episode IV ? A New Hope
4 Slovenia 5 She?s Gotta Have It 6 Post Malone
7 Tanzania 8 Oneworld 9 The Crucible
10 Frankfurt [am Main] 11 York 12 John Dalton
13 Hammond organ 14 Sergio Ramos
15 Owen Smith
SQ
U
BO
W
A J
Y
U
N
A
B
A
S
H
S
E
M I D
U
D I S
G A
E L D
A S H
A
K
E X H I
W O
R
AR B
B
S
OU S EM
S W
N I GH T
N
I
T EMP E
S
E S T
C
S
U
B
T
O
T
A
L
F
R
E
E
Y L UM
I
U
I T E D
D
R E A L
N
E
I D
O
S
SWA N
M E
E V E
N
Z
N T R E
Word Watch
Quich (c) To move or
shake (also ?quetch?)
Dich (a) An exclamation
meaning ?may it do?
Lich (c) A body, dead
or living
Brain Trainer
Easy 71; Medium 498;
Harder 2,956
27.11.17
MindGames
Sudoku
Easy No 9481
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9482
3 1
7 6
8 5
7 5
4 1
6
8 4
2 3
9
2
8
9
7 5
4
3 1
8
6
1
7
Quich
a In haste
b A flan
c To shake
Dich
a May it do
b To let go
c A furrow
Lich
a To stroke
b Let it be
c A body
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
PUZZLER MEDIA
7
6
8 1 3
1
5
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Fiendish No 9483
1
4 6 5
3
9
2 1
3 9
7
9
2 8
6 3
5
5
4 2 5
7
9 4
11 The martyr St
Margaret Clitherow
(1556-86) is sometimes
called ?the Pearl? of
which English city?
2 Which painting,
attributed to Leonardo
da Vinci, has sold at
auction for a record
�0 million?
12 Which scientist
(1766-1844) is best
known for proposing the
modern atomic theory?
2
15
reworked as the
director?s first TV series,
showing on Netflix?
6 Known for the
single White Iverson,
the US rapper Austin
Richard Post uses
what stage name?
7 Lake Natron is a
salt and soda lake
located in which
African country?
3
4
5
8
8 Which airline alliance
includes British
Airways, Iberia, Cathay
Pacific and Qantas?
13 The Leslie speaker
is most commonly
associated with which
electric organ?
9 In which play by
Arthur Miller is the
character Giles Corey
pressed to death?
14 Which Real
Madrid defender
dropped the Copa del
Rey under a victory
parade bus in 2011?
10 The ten tallest
buildings in Germany
are all located in
which city?
15 Which Labour MP for
Pontypridd is pictured?
Answers on page 15
6
7
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
19
22
23
7
Friday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 969
21
D
O
C
I
L
I
T
Y
R
A
P
T
EMOB
B
A
R
R
ONDON E
G
A
G
D E R I
A Y
M E
URNO F T H
A
O
T
UNDR E AM
C
B
L O
VO I D
U
Y
E
UR K E Y
R I E F S
U
P
I
B R I L L
S
K
S I ON
C
D
P
E Y E A R
P
I
T
DOC
I
I
E
C K J AW
A
O
A
L UN A R
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Mara
9
10
3
1 8
9
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
The Times Quick Cryptic No 970
1
5
9
6 2 7
2
6
4
4 9
4
9
8
2
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
1 ?Made from the
finest Weber Blue
Agave?, Patr髇 styles
itself as the ?world?s
highest-quality? what?
5 Which Spike Lee
movie has been
1 3 5
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
4 Borut Pahor was
recently re-elected
president of which
EU state?
2
8
9
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
3 The moon Yavin 4 is
home to the
headquarters of the
Rebel Alliance in
which 1977 film?
1
6
3
Across
1 French produce MP embraced
by whip (9)
6 Sweet potato, no starter (3)
8 Odd variety, by the way (7)
9 Highest-ranked group in
personnel I tested (5)
10 I put shampoo liberally around
head of poodle ? muddy
animal? (12)
12 Female relative ? male
different (6)
13 Bill after Elizabeth (6)
16 Kick the telly ? might it
shock the children? (4-2-3-3)
19 Taken to court, last of source
material (5)
20 31 days of course initially has
to be right (7)
22 Some say a king is bovine (3)
23 Matter resolved with hospital
department: medical care (9)
Down
1 Actors thrown (4)
2 Red tram carrying half a dozen
uphill (7)
3
4
5
6
7
11
12
14
15
17
18
21
Soldiers from the platoon each
?nishing (3)
Former lover abandoned, not
entirely immune (6)
Number new, not yet
developed (6-3)
Proper to accommodate a
Trojan king (5)
One putting clothes on
sideboard (7)
Identi?cation carried by
current leader (9)
A joke in my digni?ed
appearance (7)
Dif?culty beginning to trace
foreign currency (7)
In moat he swims (2,4)
Lip ? part of the face (5)
Club welcoming rogue at ?rst,
ill-mannered child (4)
Nip nipper! (3)
DIGITAL RADIO ? APP
VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
2
of spirit,
though I missed that extra twinkle
difficult to muster without
atmospheric sets, sharp entrances and
exits, and the electricity that crackles
on a fully functioning theatre stage.
Among the supporting company,
Rebecca Evans and Anthony Clark
Evans delivered the goods as the
bountiful, quick-witted Alice and her
more uptight husband Ford. Others,
cast from the young singers of the
invaluable European Opera Centre,
paled a little alongside. I did though
relish the physical energy of Max
Zander and Lancelot Nomura, pushed
and shoved all over the place as
scallywags Bardolfo and Pistola. Verdi?s
quicksilver music, of course, never
failed; the orchestra shone under
Vasily Petrenko, and Terfel slightly
muted is better than no Terfel at all.
Geoff Brown
Concert
BBC SO/Sondergard
Barbican
I
{{{((
n 1945 Benjamin Britten took a
jaunty dance from Purcell?s
incidental music for Aphra Behn?s
Abdelazer, threw it on a potter?s
wheel, and coloured it in the
primary hues of brass, woodwind and
strings to educate a generation of
music-lovers. Fifty years later, in
response to The Young Person?s Guide
to the Orchestra, Poul Ruders crafted
Concerto in Pieces from the cackling
chorus of witches in Purcell?s Dido and
Aeneas. The trigger for the witches?
laughter is the impending tragedy of
two lovers separated by a grand deceit.
Nothing is ever as simple as it seems
in Purcell, and Ruders?s gift is to
suggest that ambivalence.
This was the opening gambit in
Thomas Sondergard?s concert with the
BBC Symphony Orchestra: writing as
clear as glass, spiked with the
hallucinogens of celesta, tubular bells
and vibraphone. Ruders?s motifs are
artsfirst night
{{{{(
Marianela Nu馿z and
Vadim Muntagirov
A classic beauty pageant
Ashton?s ballet
is a glorious
homage to the
19th century,
says Debra
Craine
Dance
Sylvia
Covent Garden
{{{{(
W
hen people talk about
how pretty classical
ballet is, this is the
kind of thing they
mean. Frederick
Ashton?s three-act production, which
he created in 1952 as a showcase for
Margot Fonteyn, is chock full of
vigorous and beautifully placed
choreography, all of it designed to
animate and decorate the stage at
every turn. Even the Naiads, Dryads,
Sylvans, Fauns, Peasants and Muses
who adorn Ashton?s scrupulously
detailed ballet are imbued with their
own charm. Sylvia is a wonderful
challenge for the dancers of the Royal
Ballet and a glorious homage to the
pageantry of the 19th century.
The story? Not much, to be honest,
and Ashton does little to give purpose
or dramatic heft to his mythological
tale. A shepherd, Aminta, falls in love
with Sylvia, a nymph of the goddess
Diana. Sylvia is captured by the
huntsman Orion, is rescued by Eros
and reunited with Aminta, all in good
time to enjoy a fabulous third act in
those of Dido?s courtiers and enemies,
but for the tuba, which stutters like the
scurvy poet in Act I of The Fairy
Queen. The playing was smart but
related only vaguely to Sondergard?s
gestures. The disconnect became yet
more obvious in Shostakovich?s
Concerto in C minor for piano,
trumpet and strings, the lower of
which were largely left to their own
devices.
The pianist Behzod Abduraimov
played with vim and wit, identifying
precisely the Beethovenian bite in
Shostakovich?s score, its melancholy
and deadpan humour. Plucked from
his usual position in the orchestra, the
trumpeter Alan Thomas played
sweetly and neatly while looking
exquisitely uncomfortable in front of
the strings.
As dense as seal skin, the first bass
note of Also sprach Zarathustra was
the most exciting aspect to
Sondergard?s Strauss. The narrative
was undercooked and the ensemble
slack but the textures were reliably
alluring, lit by lovely playing from the
principal horn, Martin Owen, and the
cor anglais player, Alison Teale.
Anna Picard
Pop
Jools Holland
Rhythm & Blues
Orchestra
Royal Albert Hall
{{{{(
the manner of The Sleeping Beauty.
The 1876 Delibes score is felicitous,
bright, irresistible (and well played, for
the most part, with Simon Hewett
conducting); designs by Christopher
and Robin Ironside are a nod to classic
French painting (think Poussin,
Lorrain) and are as sweet as candy.
On opening night, performances
were buoyant. Marianela Nu馿z was
Sylvia and no surprise that she
embodies the strength and wiliness of
an Amazonian nymph who leads the
hunt, tricks her evil captor and
eventually finds true happiness with
a mere mortal. Nu馿z?s poised and
powerful dancing was consummately
lovely, sensual and gutsy.
As Aminta, Vadim Muntagirov has
noble stature and impressive long
lines. His Act III variation was a
knockout, dynamically delivered and
handsomely etched. Valentino
Zucchetti impressed as Eros, the god
who orchestrates this slender tale of
romance, Thiago Soares was Orion ?
having fun as the villain of the piece.
Box office: 020 7304 4000, to Dec 16
I
n some quarters saying you like
Jools Holland?s big band is akin to
confessing that you keep a stash of
Max Bygraves LPs under your bed.
This puzzles me. Is it because
Holland hangs out with Prince
Charles? Or because he is invariably
the first port of call for TV producers
looking for a music presenter?
Purists tend to look down their
noses at him because his musicians
stray all over the stylistic dial. Yet that,
to some of us, is part of the attraction:
Holland ? who turns 60 next year ?
runs an outfit that is a glorious
throwback to an era when bands
courted a broad audience by mixing all
sorts of dancefloor rhythms. The last
of the legends to do it on this scale,
you could argue, was Lionel Hampton,
and he has been dead for nearly 20
years. We need someone to keep the
tradition alive, and Holland?s
showmanship and inveterate curiosity
make him the ideal candidate.
Yes, there is a hammy streak at
times, that boogiefied version of Flight
of the Bumble Bee being the prime
example. Look beyond the showbiz
trimmings, though, and you realise
that the programme is a love letter to
ust before the Bavarian Radio
Symphony Orchestra arrived
in town, its chief conductor
Mariss Jansons went on record
saying that women conductors
weren?t his ?cup of tea?. Cue outcry,
particularly as the Latvian was also at
the Barbican to be awarded the gold
medal of the Royal Philharmonic
Society.
An official apology followed. Also
cheers, when in his acceptance speech
on stage, Jansons said ?every boy and
girl? should have the chance to realise
the dream of conducting. How
dispiriting, though, that one of today?s
finest conductors couldn?t have come
to that conclusion before. When, way
back in 1938, the legendary Nadia
Boulanger was asked what it felt like
to be a woman conductor, she replied:
?I?ve been a woman for a little over
50 years, and I?ve got over my initial
astonishment.? Quite.
Musically, though, this was an
uplifting occasion. Jansons?s long
relationship with his German
orchestra ? one of the world?s
greatest ? has reaped dividends, with
every focused flick of the baton, every
gentle gesture with his hands evoking
rich detail. The glowing Bavarian
sound was ideal for the heavenly
opening movement of Beethoven?s
Fourth Piano Concerto, yet the strings
were startlingly fierce in the Andante,
an angry mob to be soothed by the
generous-toned, powerful pianist
Yefim Bronfman.
That ?special intensity? that pianist
Mitsuko Uchida, presenting Jansons
with his medal, pinpointed as one of
the conductor?s unique virtues was
also on display in Prokofiev?s Fifth
Symphony. Once described by the
composer as ?a song of praise of free
and happy mankind?, the music itself
often subverts this tagline. In this
expansive performance it was the
sense of hidden forces at work, always
ready to erupt, that was really telling.
Rebecca Franks
ska, swing and other traditions that
are nowadays banished to the
specialist radio schedules
Fats Domino?s passing gave Holland
the opportunity to reminisce about
visiting the great man three decades
ago. Jos� Feliciano, fortunately, is still
with us, and opened his cameo with
California Dreamin? before adding
As You See Me Now, the title track
from the album that he and Holland
have just released. There was a certain
poignancy in hearing an artist of
Feliciano?s stature thanking Radio 2 so
profusely for placing him on his
playlist. A reminder that these are
hard times in the music business.
It was a pity that his segment could
not have lasted longer. Then again, the
short sets are part of the showband
formula. Beth Rowley channelled
Bessie Smith, Louise Marshall raised
the gospel temperature. And at the
close Ruby Turner once again
upstaged everyone, this time with a
rendition of Let the Good Times Roll
that tipped its hat to the Ray Charles
Orchestra and yet sounded, somehow,
even bluesier.
Clive Davis
Tour dates: joolsholland.com
12
1G T
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Paul Hollywood:
A Baker?s Life
Channel 4, 8pm
Paul
Hollywood,
the sun-dried
Great British
Bake Off judge in the
open-necked shirts,
is not just a baker?s
harshest critic, but also
Early
Top
pick
his own. ?Take your
jumper off, change your
jeans and lose weight,?
he advises his 2010 self,
as he endures watching
his GBBO audition
tape. Much of this first
episode in Hollywood?s
bright and breezy new
baking series concerns
itself with the mystique
of Bake Off. As well as
that audition tape, we
see Hollywood?s screen
test with Mary Berry,
we get a glimpse behind
the scenes in the Bake
Off marquee, and
Hollywood talks about
the show?s move to
Channel 4. In each
episode the Wirral?s
walrus of love knocks
up four bakes from his
?personal cookbook?.
Tonight we get some
beefburgers, a
Venice-inspired pizza
and a ?celebration?
madeira cake. The most
entertaining bake,
however, involves the
tables being turned in
the marquee, as the
former contestants Val
Stones and Selasi
Gbormittah set
Hollywood a challenge
before taking revenge
as judges (?I thought
it might have been
bigger,? Val says). This
is a decent PR move for
Hollywood, who comes
across as far more
good-humoured and
grounded than in
Bake Off. He?s honest
too, revealing that
he thought the show
would be a failure, that
early criticism of his
judging style stung and
that he feels that Berry,
Mel Giedroyc and Sue
Perkins ?abandoned?
Bake Off. ?Why am I
getting called a traitor?
I was loyal.? The oven
gloves are off.
Would I Lie to You?
BBC One, 8.30pm
Surmising that actors
make excellent liars,
the comedy panel show
has drafted in three
of them. Helping
David Mitchell to sort
fact from fiction are
Sheila Hancock and
Stephen Mangan, while
Mark Bonnar and the
presenter Anita Rani
join Lee Mack for
some mistruths and
misdirection. Among
the tall tales are
Hancock?s claim that
she keeps a spare house
key attached to her cat
and Rani?s assertion
that she caused her
street to be evacuated
on the day she moved
in. Most importantly,
can Mitchell remember
which episode of Knight
Rider he watched with
his neighbour?
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Claimed and Shamed. A railway
worker?s personal injury claim is revealed as fraudulent
10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in Kent,
north-west London and Stoke-on-Trent (r) 11.00 The
Housing Enforcers. Matt Allwright gets a surprise in
Stroud when an eviction takes a shocking turn (r) 11.45
The Sheriffs Are Coming. Lawrence puts the squeeze on
a ?nance company that has not paid its rent 12.15pm
Bargain Hunt. Hunting for antiques in Oswestry,
Shropshire (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30
BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Austin is
unhappy to ?nd out Rob is Lily?s foster father, while
Latoya con?des in one of her fellow inmates while on
remand (AD) 2.15 Armchair Detectives. Three amateur
sleuths try to solve the murder of a criminal 3.00 Escape
to the Country. Nicki Chapman helps a couple looking for
a property in Gloucestershire on a budget of �0,000 (r)
(AD) 3.45 Royal Recipes. Michael Buerk and Paul
Ainsworth recreate a royal wartime staple (AD) 4.30 Flog
It! From Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Island Parish Sark Winter (r) (AD) 6.30 Claimed
and Shamed (r) 7.15 Royal Recipes (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign
Zone: Women at War ? 100 Years of Service (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm The Link. Quiz show (r)
1.45 Terry and Mason?s Great Food Trip. Terry Wogan
and Mason McQueen explore Kent (r) 2.15 Going Back,
Giving Back. An east London family who have never seen
the sea (r) 3.00 The Indian Doctor. Comedy drama set in
the 1960s starring Sanjeev Bhaskar and Ayesha Dharker
(r) (AD) 3.45 Oxford Street Revealed. Thames Water
sewer ?ushers try to tackle a build-up of fat (r) 4.15
Wartime Farm. Ruth Goodman, Alex Langlands and Peter
Ginn try to increase the farm?s productivity using methods
from 1943, when Britain suffered its worst food
shortages of the Second World War (r) (AD) 5.15 Put
Your Money Where Your Mouth Is. The antiques experts
Eric Knowles and Catherine Southon compete for their
chosen charities at the Ardingly Antiques and Collectors
Fair in West Sussex (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted
by Jeremy Vine 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two.
Zoe Ball chats to the latest couple to be voted out
6.00am Good Morning Britain. The Britain?s Got Talent
winner Ashleigh Butler talks about her ?rst panto
season after the passing of faithful sidekick Pudsey, and
is joined by her new canine friend Sully 8.30 Lorraine.
Entertainment, current affairs and fashion news, as well
as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip. Presented by
Lorraine Kelly 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show
10.30 This Morning. Victoria Beckham and Eva Longoria
talk about their friendship to Alison Hammond at the
Global Gift Gala. Ben Fogle details why he is campaigning
for more protection for pets. Including Local Weather
12.30pm Loose Women. The panellists chat about the
issues that have everyone talking and are joined by the
comedian Micky Flanagan 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00
Judge Rinder. Real-life cases in a studio courtroom
3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. The team is in Prestatyn,
where Corrie Jeffery is interested in some Coptic crosses,
David Hakeney has his eye on unusual pottery and Tony
Geering gets advice on personal grooming (r) 4.00
Tipping Point. Game show hosted by Ben Shephard (r)
5.00 The Chase. Quiz show hosted by Bradley Walsh
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) 9.00 Frasier (r) 10.05 Ramsay?s Kitchen
Nightmares USA. An Italian restaurant in Pennsylvania
run by warring siblings (r) 11.00 Undercover Boss USA.
The chairman and CEO of a camping company goes
undercover (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm
Come Dine with Me. Four contestants in Brighton
compete to hold the perfect dinner party, beginning
with a clothing store owner ? who holds a Brian
Blessed-themed evening (r) 1.05 Kirstie?s Handmade
Christmas. Kirstie Allsopp visits Austria to learn how to
make woollen mittens and mulled wine (r) (AD) 2.10
Countdown. With Linda Papadopoulos in Dictionary Corner
3.00 Lost and Found. New series. The work of canine
rescue charity Dogs Trust 4.00 A Place in the Sun: Winter
Sun. A Jersey couple looking for a home in Fuerteventura
5.00 Four in a Bed. The competition begins at Church
Street Cobbles in Maccles?eld, Cheshire 5.30 Come Dine
with Me. A barista hosts the ?rst dinner party from in
and around Newcastle 6.00 The Simpsons. Lisa runs for
class representative ? against her best friend (AD)
6.30 Hollyoaks. Marnie is concerned about Mac (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. The journalist
and broadcaster Matthew Wright is joined by a panel of
guests and the studio audience to debate the issues of
the day 11.35 GPs: Behind Closed Doors. Dr Farida Ahmad
and Dr Pelly help teenagers struggling to cope with their
home lives, and Dr Liz Lee offers advice to a patient with
what seems to be a contraceptive coil problem (r) (AD)
12.30pm The Gadget Show. Georgie Barrat tries out a
virtual reality platform designed to help ?lm-makers.
Plus, the Fitbit smart watch is pitted against the Apple
Watch S3 (r) 1.25 5 News at Lunchtime 1.30 Neighbours
(AD) 2.00 FILM: Christmas Mail (PG, 2010)
A postman is asked to spy on a woman employed to
answer children?s letters to Santa, but falls in love with
her. Festive romantic comedy starring Ashley Scott and
AJ Buckley 3.45 FILM: A Perfect Christmas (PG,
TVM, 2012) An advertising executive meets a
department store mannequin that has come to life, and
?nds it has become her perfect man. Festive fantasy
starring Claire Coffee and Ryan McPartlin 5.30
5 News at 5.30 6.00 Neighbours. Mark is suspended and
questioned by the police (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
The Perfect
Christmas
Gift
Get a
Armistead Maupin ? How I wrote Tales of the City
Paula Byrne Celebrated houses of fiction
Edward Allen Marianne Moore, and more
Nabeelah Jaffer Islam and Britishness
Libby Purves Tinder of the 1940s
SEPTEMBER 15 2017 No. 5972
n
www.the-tls.co.uk
the-tls.co
THE TIMES LITERARY
ARY SU
SUPPLEMENT
Patrick J. Murray Montaigne?s social network
Jamie Fisher Angry like Mailer
Charlotte Shane Provocations of feminism
Samuel Earle Never getting bored of Barthes
SEPTEMBER 29 2017 No. 5974
n
www.the-tls.co.uk
THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
Laura Freeman Dress like a writer
Colin Grant Lost voices of immigration
Anne McElvoy The passion of Merkel
Krishan Kumar On statues and Nazis
UK �50 USA $8.99
SEPTEMBER 22 2017 No. 5973
UK �
n
www.the-tls.co.uk
THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
Tales of addiction
Inspirations of Dante
Rowan Williams
Ian Thomson
Wandering, wondering
Eric J. Iannelli
Terri Apter
UK �50 USA $8.99
�
Waterstones
Gift Card when
you subscribe
to the TLS
Annette Kobak on women and the Grand Tour
Jan Marsh on Ruskin in Europe
Find a lifelong companion in the TLS, the
world?s leading international literary journal.
Buy a subscription to the Times Literary
Supplement as a present (even for yourself)
and get a � Waterstones Gift Card.
To subscribe visit tlssubs.imbmsubs.com/tlswater12 or call
01293 312178 and quote code TLSWATER12
7PM
Waterstones Gift Cards may be redeemed in any Waterstones store in the UK towards the purchase of all eligible Waterstones products available. Gift Cards cannot be redeemed for cash. Waterstones Gift Cards will be sent within 28 days of purchasing a TLS subscription.
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present topical stories and chat
7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip The
poet Pam Ayres and her friend and the
actor Geoffrey Whitehead join experts
James Braxton and Kate Bliss on a
quest to ?nd items to sell at an
auction in Cirencester, Gloucestershire.
Their search takes them through
Hampshire and Berkshire
7.00 Emmerdale Rebecca confesses
everything she knows to Lawrence, and
Tom is evasive when Debbie tries to
have a serious conversation (AD)
7.30 Coronation Street Todd turns
detective to set Billy?s mind at rest,
while Mary enjoys precious time
with her grandson (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Weather Terror: Brits Abroad
Britons caught up in extreme weather
events while overseas. Recounted
stories include a family camping trip
in the south of France blighted by
torrential ?oods, and a pair of visitors
whose arrival in the Philippines
coincided with a typhoon (1/6) (r)
8.00 EastEnders Willmott-Brown tasks
Max with keeping Lauren quiet, and
Woody faces a dilemma (AD)
8.00 University Challenge The second
round of the student quiz continues.
Jeremy Paxman asks the questions
8.30 Would I Lie to You? Comedy panel
show with Mark Bonnar, Sheila
Hancock, Stephen Mangan and Anita
Rani. See Viewing Guide (2/10)
8.30 Nigella: At My Table Including
recipes for spiced lamb kofta, rose and
pepper pavlova, egg curry, and white
chocolate cheesecake (5/6) (AD)
8.00 The Martin Lewis Money Show
Advice on the huge savings that can
be made while shopping even when
there isn?t a sale on (2/12)
8.30 Coronation Street Todd attempts to
hide the truth, Faye decides where her
loyalties lie, and Gemma discovers
Henry?s family connections (AD)
8.00 Paul Hollywood: A Baker?s Life
New series. The Bake Off judge shares
his favourite recipes from a lifetime of
baking. See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
8.30 Supershoppers New series.
The consumer advice show returns,
beginning with advice on how to
buy cheaper car insurance (1/4)
8.00 Sinkholes: Sucked Under
Tom Backhouse investigates sinkholes
caused by collapsed mine shafts,
including one that opened up in front
of a ?at and led down to an abandoned
mine, and a homeowner reveals how
he is stuck in an unsellable house that
is surrounded by sinkholes (2/3)
9.00 New Tricks Sandra and her seasoned
colleagues reopen the 16-year-old case
of a political aide?s murder when a
dormant offshore bank account
containing �,000 is discovered in his
name. With John McArdle, Jason Durr
and Kika Mirylees (7/10) (r) (AD)
9.00 Employable Me New series. The
documentary returns to follow the
stories of eight more people with
disabilities as they battle to ?nd work,
beginning by focusing on a 52-year-old
businessman who had a stroke and
a 22-year-old man with Tourette?s.
See Viewing Guide (1/4) (AD)
9.00 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of
Here! Ant and Dec present the survival
challenge, as the famous faces
continue their ordeal in the Australian
jungle, with one of the campmates
facing another Bushtucker Trial
9.00 999: What?s Your Emergency?
The edition focuses on the rapidly
growing number of 999 calls connected
to the over-75s, with PC Phil Bridge
searching Trowbridge to ?nd a
73-year-old woman who is in the
latter stages of dementia and has
disappeared while out with her son
9.00 Chris Tarrant: Extreme Railway
Journeys Chris travels through the
Middle East to explore what remains
of the colonial railways that were built
there more a hundred years ago. In the
Wadi Rum valley, Chris boards a steam
train along one of the few bits of the
Hejaz railway still in use (4/4)
10.00 First Dates Podium dancer Khloe sits
down for a meal with former Ibiza club
promoter Rick, who shares her love of
music, and ecologist Andrew has dinner
with aid worker Charlotte, while Neil
meets retired pub landlady Eileen,
who is a fellow mod (AD)
10.00 Secrets of the Tube: Going
Underground Rob Bell examines how
London?s overcrowding problem was
the issue that prompted the building
of the world?s ?rst underground
railway, which linked Paddington and
a terminus at Farringdon and went into
operation in January 1863 (3/4) (r)
11.05 Don?t Tell the Bride New series.
Groom-to-be Carl plans a Spanish
wedding for his ?anc閑 Rebecca, as he
tries to arrange the perfect day to
meet her expectations for a high-class
affair. Previously seen on E4
11.05 Inside the Mega Twister
Documentary recalling the tornado that
struck El Reno, Oklahoma, in May
2013. Combined with many ?rst-hand
accounts, recordings from scientists,
and some CGI animations, this ?lm
offers an unprecedented journey
through the heart of the storm (r)
12.10am One Born Every Minute (r) (AD) 1.05 The
Secret Life of 5 Year Olds (r) (AD) 2.00 FILM: Neerja
(15, 2016) A ?ight attendant puts her life at risk during
a hijack to save her passengers. Fact-based thriller with
Sonam Kapoor 4.15 The Truth About Muslim Marriage
(r) (SL) 5.10 Draw It! (r) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
12.05am Aircrash: The Miracle of Flight 32 The
Airbus A-380 that suffered engine failure over Singapore
in November 2010 (r) 1.00 SuperCasino 3.10 Law &
Order: Special Victims Unit (r) (AD) 4.00 Now That?s
Funny! (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Divine
Designs (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest (r) (SL)
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7.30 The Billion Pound VAT Scam:
Panorama Current affairs report
covering a story behind the headlines
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.45 Have I Got a Bit More News for
You Stephen Mangan hosts an
extended edition of the topical quiz,
with Steph McGovern and Jo Caul?eld
joining team captains Ian Hislop
and Paul Merton (7/10)
10.00 Insert Name Here With
Hugh Dennis, Suzannah Lipscomb,
Rebecca Front and Phil Wang (2/8)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Emily Maitlis
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.45 Killer Women with Piers Morgan
The journalist and broadcaster Piers
Morgan travels across the USA to meet
some of America?ss most notorious
female killers in a quest to discover
what drives women to kill. He visits
Erin Caffey, who masterminded the
murder of her entire family (1/2) (r)
11.30 Michael McIntyre?s Big Show
With Danny Dyer and Gary Barlow.
Plus, performances by Russell Kane
and Clean Bandit (2/6) (r)
11.15 Blitz: The Bombs That Changed
Britain Documentary telling the
stories of bombs dropped on Britain
in the Second World War, beginning
with an unexploded bomb that fell on
the East End of London on the ?rst
night of the Blitz (1/4) (r) (AD)
11.45 Life Inside Jail: Hell on Earth
Documentary ?lmed in Albany County
Correctional Facility (1/2) (r)
12.30am The Graham Norton Show The ?lm-maker
and actor Mel Gibson makes his debut on the show,
joined by fellow actors Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg and
John Lithgow. Strictly Come Dancing?s Shirley Ballas also
guests, while the singer-songwriter Kesha performs
Learn to Let Go (r) 1.25-6.00 BBC News
12.15am Sign Zone: Country?le The rural affairs
show visits Hertfordshire, where Sean Fletcher builds
a home ?t for a king?sher, and John Craven revisits his
scouting days by cooking on a woodland ?re (r) (SL)
1.10-2.10 Blue Planet II. An insight into creatures
that live on coral reefs, including groupers (r) (AD, SL)
12.35am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort
of their sofas with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and
lively chat 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Talk show (r) (SL)
3.55 ITV Nightscreen. Text-based information service
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
the times | Monday November 27 2017
13
1G T
television & radio
Employable Me
BBC Two, 9pm
The series returns
with eight more
jobseekers whose
various disabilities are
rather unfairly holding
them back. Tonight?s
opener focuses on the
lively 22-year-old Ryan,
who suffers from one
of the most severe cases
of Tourette?s in the
country, and Andy, 52,
a former superbike
rider who is recovering
from a near-fatal
stroke. To suggest that
the job market is tough
for them is something
of an understatement
? Andy, who was once
a managing director,
has sent more than
3,000 job applications
and received one
interview. Their
determination helps to
leaven the air of futility.
Last Men in
Aleppo: Storyville
BBC Four, 10pm
Last year?s Netflix
documentary The
White Helmets brought
this courageous group
of volunteers in Aleppo
to the world?s attention.
If you have the stomach
for it, here is another
superb, horribly
immersive film
following their rescue
efforts in a city under
constant bombardment.
Theirs is a horrendous
ordeal as they pull
bodies from rubble,
again and again. The
camera ? be warned
? does not flinch.
There are moments of
levity, including a man
bursting a football, but
the impression is of
a group of thoroughly
decent men trying to
bail out the Titanic.
Private Lives of
the Monarchs
Yesterday, 9pm
Tracy Borman turns
her attention to George
III and George IV,
two kings who could
hardly have been more
different, despite being
father and son. George
the elder was ?Farmer
George?, the humble
country squire, who
stayed faithful to his
plain wife and enjoyed
tinkering with his
astrological toys; the
son, however, in the
decidedly unminced
words of the historian
Dominic Selwood, was
?a pleasure-loving,
lascivious,
hard-drinking,
hard-gambling, venal,
vindictive, nasty,
small-minded ruler.
The worst monarch this
country has ever had.?
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7.30pm
The West London rivals
Queens Park Rangers
and Brentford clash in
the Championship
tonight at Loftus
Road (kick-off 7.45pm).
Both sides have been
inconsistent so far
this season and
are mid-table, but still
in reach of the play-offs
? and relegation.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 8.00 Animal 999
(r) 9.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD) 10.00
Monkey Life (r) (AD) 11.00 Modern Family (r)
12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00
Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r) 5.30
Futurama. The Olympics get under way (r) (AD)
6.00 Futurama (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Supergirl. Winn and the team discover
an alien ship has crashed in deep water
9.00 A League of Their Own. With Ruud Gullit,
Alex Scott and Kevin Bridges (r) (AD)
10.00 Bounty Hunters. Barnaby and Nina
attempt to steal the statues back (r)
10.35 Sick Note. Dr Glennis goes undercover
to extricate himself and Daniel (r)
11.05 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own (r) (AD) 1.00am
The Force: Essex (r) 2.00 Night Cops (r) (AD)
3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r)
(AD) 7.00 Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 Storm City (r)
(AD) 9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r)
(AD) 1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue
Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r)
5.00 House. Medical drama (r) (AD)
6.00 House. Medical drama (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. An infant
dies in a car during a heatwave (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Linda?s brother Jimmy gets
into trouble with the mob (r) (AD)
9.00 Alan Partridge?s Mid Morning Matters.
How to let go of petty grudges (r) (AD)
9.30 Alan Partridge?s Mid Morning Matters.
Sidekick Simon has some bad news (r) (AD)
10.00 Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry is
blackmailed by an employee
10.50 Camping. Comedy (3/6) (r) (AD)
11.25 Camping (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.00 Vice Principals (r) 12.35am Bill Maher:
Live from DC (r) 1.55 Blue Bloods (r) (AD)
2.45 The Wire (r) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Gold Coast Cops (r) (AD) 12.00 Border
Security: America?s Front Line (r) (AD) 1.00pm
Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00 Nothing to
Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds. Homes are set on ?re (r)
6.55 My Kitchen Rules New Zealand.
New series. Contestants transform their
homes into pop-up restaurants
8.00 Elementary (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. A killer in Texas is
targeting prominent members of the community
10.00 Blindspot. The agents chase a deadly
bomber terrorising Manhattan
11.00 Criminal Minds (r)
12.00 Elementary. With Aleksa Palladino (r)
(AD) 1.00am CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
2.00 Criminal Minds (r) 4.00 My Kitchen Rules
New Zealand 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am A Christmas Carol: The Concert (AD)
7.35 Proko?ev: Piano Concertos 8.00 Auction
8.30 Watercolour Challenge 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 10.00 My Shakespeare 11.00
Treasures of the British Library (AD) 12.00
Discovering: Janet Leigh (AD) 1.00pm Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 2.00 Watercolour
Challenge 2.30 Auction 3.00 Duran Duran:
Working for the Skin Trade 4.00 Trailblazers:
New Romantics 5.00 Discovering: Iggy Pop (AD)
5.30 Watercolour Challenge
6.00 Discovering: Rod Steiger (AD)
7.00 Master of Photography (AD)
8.00 Andr� Rieu: Romance
10.00 Landscape Artist of the Year 2017.
The last of the heats takes place
11.00 Discovering: Eli Wallach
12.00 Passions 1.00am Tales of the
Unexpected (AD) 2.00 Auction 2.30 Talks
Music (AD) 3.30 Joshua Bell Presents Musical
Gifts 4.50 Arts Scholarships: Sky Academy
5.00 The South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Live Test Cricket: India v Sri Lanka.
Coverage of the fourth day?s play in the second
Test at the Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium
in Jamtha, Nagpur 11.15 My Icon: Michael
Holding 11.30 Sky Sports Daily 12.00 Sky
Sports News 5.00pm Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Skyy Spports Tonigght
7.30 Live EFL: Queens Park Rangers v Brentford
(Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of the Championship
clash between the London rivals at Loftus Road.
See Viewing Guide
10.00 The Debate. Discussion
11.00 Sky Sports News. The day?s talking points
12.00 Sky Sports News 1.00am NFL Jay Ajayi
Running Back Masterclass 1.15 Live NFL:
Baltimore Ravens v Houston Texans (Kick-off
1.30). Coverage of the clash between the AFC
North and AFC South sides at M&T Bank
Stadium 4.45 Live Test Cricket: India v Sri
Lanka. The ?fth day?s play in the second Test
at the Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm True North:
The Flower Shop. Daily life at a ?ower shop in
West Belfast 11.10 Have I Got a Bit More
News for You. Stephen Mangan hosts, with
guests Steph McGovern and Jo Caul?eld 11.55
Michael McIntyre?s Big Show. With guests
Danny Dyer, Gary Barlow, Russell Kane and
Clean Bandit (r) 12.55am The Graham Norton
Show. With guests Mel Gibson, Will Ferrell,
Mark Wahlberg, John Lithgow and Shirley
Ballas (r) 1.45-6.00 BBC News
Angela Lansbury in Murder
She Wrote (ITV3, 6.55pm)
Steve Coogan as Alan
Partridge (Sky Atlantic, 9pm)
FBI profilers on Criminal
Minds (Sky Living, 9pm)
A profile of rock singer Iggy
Pop (Sky Arts, 5pm)
Animated US comedy
Family Guy (ITV2, 9pm)
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Christmas University Challenge 2015. With
famous graduates of University College London
and the University of Birmingham (r)
8.00 Building the Ancient City. Andrew
Wallace-Hadrill examines how the ancient
Romans made their city work (r) (AD)
9.00 The Other Pompeii: Life and Death in
Herculaneum. Professor Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
provides an insight into the lives of the
inhabitants of the Roman town (r) (AD)
10.00 Last Men in Aleppo: Storyville.
Documentary following the work of the White
Helmets, a volunteer organisation comprising
ordinary Syrians who conduct search and rescue
missions after military strikes and attacks in
the Syrian city of Aleppo. See Viewing Guide
11.30 From Scotland with Love. Documentary
using archive footage to explore themes of love,
loss, resistance, migration, work and play, set to
a soundtrack composed by King Creosote (r)
12.40am Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. The
inspiration behind the poem (r) 1.40 The Other
Pompeii: Life and Death in Herculaneum (r) (AD)
2.40-3.40 Building the Ancient City (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Myra promises to ?lm
Neeta?s memorial for Hunter (AD)
7.30 First Dates Abroad (r) (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Made in Chelsea. Jamie tries to play
peacemaker between Alik and Louise
10.00 Made in Chelsea Does Come Dine with
Me. With Jamie Laing, Louise Thompson,
Georgia Toffolo and Alex Mytton (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Tattoo Fixers. Sketch rids Sam
and Rod of the ?lth on their feet (r) 1.10
Gogglebox (r) (SL) 2.10 Made in Chelsea (r)
3.05 First Dates (r) (AD) 4.00 Black-ish (r)
(AD) 4.40 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 2.45 Come Dine with Me (r)
3.50 Time Team (r) 5.55 The Secret Life of the
Zoo. A porcupine meets a new mate (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. A Bengal cat?s tiny bones are
painstakingly reset after a road accident (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows an
architect?s project to build an unusual �0,000
house out of four shipping containers, welded
together to form a giant cross and cantilevered
on the family farm in Co Derry (4/10) (r) (AD)
9.00 Vet on the Hill. Two French bulldogs need
help with their incontinence, while Scott Miller
brushes up on his farm veterinary skills (AD)
10.00 The Billion Pound Hotel. Taking a look
inside the Burj Al Arab in Dubai, dubbed the
world?s most luxurious hotel, following the
stories of a variety of guests who pay anything
up to �,000 a night for a suite (r)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. Patients include a man
hit by a pizza delivery motorbike (r) (AD)
12.10am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 Vet on the Hill (r) (AD) 2.05 24 Hours in
A&E (r) (AD) 3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am The Duel at Silver Creek (PG,
1952) Don Siegel?s Western starring Audie
Murphy 12.35pm Crash Dive (PG, 1943)
Romantic wartime drama starring Tyrone Power
and Anne Baxter 2.45 Bitter Victory (PG,
1957) Second World War drama with Richard
Burton and Curt Jurgens (b/w) 4.50 Earth vs
the Flying Saucers (U, 1956) Sci-? drama
starring Hugh Marlowe and Joan Taylor (b/w)
6.35 Beautiful Creatures (12, 2013)
A teenager falls in love with a girl, only to
discover she is a witch and must soon choose
a side in a magical con?ict. Fantasy based on
Kami Garcia?s novel starring Alden Ehrenreich
9.00 Solace (15, 2015) A psychic helps the
FBI to identify a serial killer, but realises the
murderer has mental powers of his own. Crime
thriller with Anthony Hopkins and Colin Farrell
11.05 American Reunion (15, 2012) Old
friends attending a high-school reunion make
disastrous attempts to relive their teens.
Comedy sequel to the American Pie movies,
with Jason Biggs and Alyson Hannigan
1.15am-3.10 The Beat Beneath My Feet
(15, 2015) Comedy drama starring Luke Perry
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 6.20 Planet?s Got Talent (r)
6.45 Dinner Date (r) 7.35 Emmerdale (r) (AD)
8.00 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.00 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 9.50 Dinner Date (r)
10.50 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of Here! (r)
12.20pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 Coronation
Street (r) (AD) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show
2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 I?m a Celebrity? Get Me Out of Here! (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy. Brian posts an
offensive tweet that goes viral (AD)
9.30 Ghosted. Max and Leroy go undercover to
investigate an incident at a country club (AD)
10.00 I?m a Celebrity: Extra Camp. Fleur East is
among the guests on the companion show
11.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.00 Family Guy (r) (AD) 12.30am American
Dad! (r) (AD) 1.00 Scorpion (r) (AD) 1.55
Christmas Bonkers Guinness World Records (r)
2.20 Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.55
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
8.55 Judge Judy (r) 10.15 A Touch of Frost (r)
12.35pm Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 1.35 Heartbeat
(r) (AD) 2.40 Classic Coronation Street (r) 3.45
A Touch of Frost (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
6.55 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica?s cousin, a
dance hall performer, turns detective after she is
suspected of murdering her lover (r) (AD)
8.00 Doc Martin. The doctor suspects a patient?s
breathing dif?culties may be linked to asbestos
and Penhale puts up warning notices about the
substance?s harmful properties (6/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Midsomer Murders. Barnaby and Jones
are called away from a team-building exercise
to investigate a fatal explosion at a haulage
yard in Calham Cross (r) (AD)
11.00 Blue Murder. Pete pressures Janine for
a divorce as she grapples with the case of a
murdered childminder in which the only witness
is an autistic youngster (4/4) (r) (AD)
12.35am A Touch of Frost. Armed robbers lead
Frost a merry dance (r) (SL) 2.20 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am Snooker v Darts (r) 6.10 The Chase
(r) 7.40 Cash Cowboys 8.30 Storage Wars: Best
of Jarrod and Brandi (r) 8.55 Storage Wars: Best
of Darrell and Brandon (r) 9.25 Ironside (r)
10.30 Quincy ME (r) 11.35 The Sweeney (r)
12.35pm The Avengers (r) 1.50 Ironside (r)
2.55 Quincy ME (r) 4.00 The Sweeney (r)
5.00 The Avengers. Crime thriller (r)
6.05 Cash Cowboys. A visit to Yukon (r)
7.05 Pawn Stars. A tortoise-shell guitar (r)
7.35 Pawn Stars. A fossilised mastodon tusk (r)
8.00 River Monsters. Investigating piranhas (r)
8.30 River Monsters. Alligator gar ?sh (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: Die Another Day (12, 2002)
James Bond?s pursuit of a Korean terrorist leads
to a British billionaire who has constructed
a devastating orbital weapon. Spy adventure
starring Pierce Brosnan and Halle Berry (AD)
11.45 FILM: The Road (15, 2009) A man
and his son go in search of sanctuary in the
aftermath of a cataclysm that has devastated
the world. Drama starring Viggo Mortensen (AD)
1.55am Motorsport UK. Action from Brands
Hatch 2.50 ITV Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge Roadshow: Welly Wanging 8.10
American Pickers 9.00 Storage Hunters UK
10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top Gear.
Double bill (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors. Reality
TV show 4.00 Ice Road Truckers 5.00 Timber
Kings. A deal to build an elaborate doghouse
6.00 Top Gear. Will Young guests (AD)
7.00 The Hurting. New series. Clip show
featuring the voice of Jake Yapp
7.30 The Hurting. Clip show
8.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.
Dave asks what the term generation really
means, whether life hacks are any use
and why his mum uses emojis
9.00 Live at the Apollo. Lee Mack hosts, with
performances by Rich Hall and Danny Bhoy
10.00 Dara O Briain?s Go 8 Bit.
With Bob Mortimer and Holly Walsh
11.00 QI XL. Extended edition. With Jo Brand,
Alan Davies, Colin Lane and David Mitchell
12.00 Room 101. Frank Skinner hosts 12.40am
Mock the Week 1.20 QI 2.00 QI XL 3.00
The Money Pit 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am New Tricks (AD) 8.00 London?s Burning
9.00 Casualty 10.00 Campion (AD) 11.00 The
Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer Wine (AD)
1.40 A Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a Feather
3.00 London?s Burning 4.00 Pie in the Sky
5.00 Campion. Part two of two (AD)
6.00 A Fine Romance. Laura goes hunting for
a new ?at and Mike insists on going along
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. A stranger gives
Compo, Clegg and Foggy an old van (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. Lionel is concerned
that he has no pension plans
8.00 Ashes to Ashes. An interview with a
murder suspect puts Alex in mortal danger (6/8)
9.00 Death in Paradise. A birdwatcher is
stabbed to death with his own knife (6/8) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The team investigates the
killing of a zookeeper, thought to have been
mauled to death by a tiger in 2006 (10/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Sharon starts to feel
broody, and Tracey has her work cut out
pampering Garth in the school holidays
12.00 The Bill 1.00am London?s Burning
2.05 In Deep 4.00 Home Shopping
6.10am Cash in the Attic 7.00 Raiders of the
Lost Art (AD) 7.25 Time Team 9.15 Walking
Through History 10.20 The Blue Planet (AD)
11.30 Time Team 1.30pm Oceans 2.25 Secrets
of War 3.20 Coast (AD) 4.25 Blackadder II (AD)
5.00 Time Team. A visit to Westminster Abbey
6.00 The World at War. The events leading u
p to the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbour
7.00 Nazi Hunters. How Hitler?s deputy
Hermann Goering was captured by the Allies,
leading to his suicide by poisoning in 1946
8.00 Timewatch: QE2 ? The Final Voyage.
Documentary following the ?nal voyage of RMS
Queen Elizabeth 2, which was launched in 1967
9.00 Private Lives of the Monarchs. Tracy
Borman investigates the lives of George III
and his eldest son. See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.00 Steptoe and Son. Christmas special from
1974. Harold plans to spend Christmas abroad
11.00 The Two Ronnies Christmas Special.
A festive edition, ?rst aired in 1984
12.00 Timewatch: QE2 ? The Final Voyage
1.00am Nazi Hunters 2.00 Ancient
Black Ops (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 9.00pm-10.00 The Force:
The Story of Scotland?s Police. The history of
policing in Scotland and recounting stories of
the men and women behind the uniform
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 X-Ray.
Rachel Treadaway-Williams investigates a
bogus letting company 10.40 The Billion Pound
VAT Scam: Panorama. Current affairs report
11.10 Have I Got a Bit More News for You.
Stephen Mangan hosts, with guests Steph
McGovern and Jo Caul?eld 11.55 Michael
McIntyre?s Big Show (r) 12.55am The
Graham Norton Show (r) 1.45 Weather for
the Week Ahead 1.50-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 I L醨 an
Aonaigh. With guest Eoghan McDermott and
music by the Whileaways 11.15-12.15am
Other Voices: A Feast for the Seasons. With
music by Beoga, Jealous of the Birds, Ryan Vail,
Picture This, Rosie Carney and Touts
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 6.00pm-6.30 ITV News Wales
at Six 10.45 Sharp End. Political discussion
with Adrian Masters and guests 11.15-11.45
Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears.
Exploring the Flinders mountains
ITV Westcountry
As ITV except: 10.30pm-10.45
ITV News West Country
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 Killer Women with Piers Morgan. The
journalist and broadcaster meets some of
America?s most notorious female killers in a
quest to discover what drives women to kill (r)
12.05am Teleshopping 1.05 After Midnight
2.35 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 10.45pm-11.45 View from
Stormont. Current affairs and political analysis
12.35am Teleshopping. Buying goods
from home 1.35-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15
Rathad an Sutha (64 Zoo Lane) (r) 5.25 Treud
na Dluth-choille: Grad-Naidheachd (Jungle
Bunch) 5.35 Bruno (r) 5.40 Charlie is Lola
(Charlie and Lola) (r) 5.50 Seonaidh (Shaun the
Sheep) (r) 6.00 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse)
(r) 6.15 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks (r) 6.35
Ard-Sgoil a? Chnuic Annasaich (Strange Hill
High) (r) 7.00 Innsean an Iar: Hebrides (r)
7.30 Speaking Our Language (r) 8.00 An L�
(News) 8.30 Kerry?s Kirsty: Rothan gu
Robhanais (r) 9.00 Trusadh: Heisgeir ? Eadar
na h-Eileanan (The Monachs: Between the
Islands) 10.00 Horo Gheallaidh (Celtic Music
Sessions). With Cherish the Ladies (r) 10.30
Cum Greim (r) 11.30-12.00midnight Feis
Chiuil Thiriodh (Tiree Music Festival) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 10.00 Y Ffair Aeaf 2017.
Coverage of the Royal Welsh Winter Fair 12.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Y Ffair Aeaf
2017 3.55 News S4C a?r Tywydd 4.00 Awr Fawr
5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Pyramid (r)
5.30 Stwnsh: Larfa (r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Sgorio
6.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd
Dillad (r) 6.30 3 Lle (r) 7.00 Heno 7.55
Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25 Y Ffair
Aeaf 2017 9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30
Y Ffair Aeaf 2017 10.00 Ar y Bysus (r)
10.35-12.30am Clwb Rygbi Rhyngwladol
14
Monday November 27 2017 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7507
2
3
4
5
6
7
3
14
18
7
8
9
9
11
26
10
11
26
1
12
13
14
15
16
17
14
14
3
10
23
15
16
11
8
Train Tracks No 266
19
12
8
25
26
5
4
4
6
10
11
23
15
14
23
18
14
4
15
17
4
26
15
19
20
18
14
5
24
18
14
12
1
18
8
8
4
4
7
26
18
15
5
18
25
20
5
26
3
5
3
2
12
26
23
25
22
4
26
8
18
25
15
5
18
18
3
9
2
4
5
25
6
A
18
1
20
5
26
12
21
7
15
9
B
O
5
22
26
Source of light (4)
Level of quality (8)
The greater number (8)
Regulation, principle (4)
Eg, cumulus (5)
Large room (7)
Mild, kind (6)
University lecturer (6)
Obstacle to movement (7)
Solution to Crossword 7506
BUCK L
L
H E
E AD I NG
N E A
AC I F I C
Y
EWE S T
O E D
ARDY A
L M M
AD I O S
L
U E
HYDRO L
ED
O
G
R
O
S
V E
OWN
O
ROU
F
CE A
R
S S E
P
E
N
A
L
I
NNUA L S
E R
I
T A T I ON
R E G
Y S I S
20 Elite (5)
23 Unable to speak (4)
24 Forming an end (8)
25 Process of giving birth (8)
26 Short written message (4)
Down
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
12
14
16
17
19
21
22
10
23
6
7
5
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
W
15
Across
8
Help, benefit (5)
Result of multiplication (7)
Slip on wet ground (4)
In any place (8)
Kind of wheat (5)
Alleviate (pain) (7)
Projection on a toothed
wheel (3)
Take up residence in a
different place (8)
One moved from danger (7)
Publicly accuse (7)
Male sheep (3)
Jewish teacher (5)
Adjust to new conditions (5)
Fighting force (4)
13
15
7
15
13
9
14
13
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
8
9
21
22
10
11
12
13
23
24
25
26
L
W
O
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday?s solution, right
S
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 4022
R
D
P
O
C
F
I
U
L
E
A
T
L
S
U
L
P
T
N
L
O
C
V
I
C
O
E
E
F
T
N
Y
N
O
O
Z
O
K
L
U
P
W
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4183
Futoshiki No 3051
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
>
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2010
>
?
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 4021
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
I
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
15
L
� PUZZLER MEDIA
25
D
R
O
P
A
N
C
H
O
R
4
24
23
1
4
8
9
10
11
13
15
18
2
23
22
23
3
3
10
21
2
5
3
23
14
14
>
24
18
37
16
14
6
21
27
8
32
4
15
2
?
4
4
13
>
13
16
3
7
7
12
39
21
11
9
22
17
9
4
21
21
12
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
3
4
16
4
6
4
2
1
<
<
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
4
10
24
14
28
16
30
23
17
16
� PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3191
the times | Monday November 27 2017
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Ding Liren
Black: Magnus Carlsen
Champions Showdown Blitz,
St Louis 2017
English Opening
1 Nf3 Nf6 2 c4 c5 3 Nc3 e6 4 g3
b6
In my column last Saturday,
giving Lev Aronian?s drastic win
against Anish Giri, I pointed out
that the seemingly slow flank
openings, as employed in today?s
game and Saturday?s, can lead to
speedy and crushing results. This
can happen in a way that one
would normally expect to be
reserved for open games, such as
those arising from the Sicilian
Defence. Aronian, playing White,
destroyed Giri in just 27 moves.
Here, Carlsen annihilates Ding
in a mere 23 moves and with the
black pieces. What further evidence could one demand to demonstrate that flank openings can
be as red in tooth and claw as the
EASY
24
x2
MEDIUM
11
SQUARE
IT
HARDER
102
+8
75%
OF IT
�
x 2 ? 88
50%
OF IT
x 3 + 964
60%
OF IT
________
醨D D DkD] Winning Move
�D 0pDp]
� D D 1pD] Black to play. This position is from
online game, chess.com 2017.
�! HrD D ] So-Carlsen,
There is a key weakness in the white
� D D D D] position that the world champion now
蹹PD ) D ] exploited with ruthless efficiency. How
� DRDn)P)] did he continue?
贒 D DRDK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
OF IT
? 12 x 7
+8
+ 67 x 5 + 98 � 2 + 89
+ 882 + 3/4
OF IT
x 2 ? 788
50%
OF IT
+ 473
4 4
3
Killer Gentle No 5740
19
13
6
4
6
7
3
x
Admire declarer coping with the Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
foul trump split on today?s deal
?A 6 4
from a duplicate. He won West?s Pairs
?AQ 5 3
ten of spades lead with the king
?7 6 4
and led a heart, gasping when
?9 6 5
West discarded (and encouraging
? 10 9 8 5
?7 3 2
N
ten of diamonds). Plan the play.
??K 10 9 8 6
W E
?K 10 9 8 5 3 S
You cannot afford to play
?Q J
?7 4 3
?K 10 8
dummy?s queen or you?ll lose three
?
KQ J
heart tricks. Declarer made no mis?J 7 4 2
take, rising with the ace. At trick
?A 2
three, he led a club to the queen,
?AQ J 2
the finesse winning. He then
S
W
N
E
crossed to the ace of spades and led
1?
Pass
3?
Pass
a club to the jack. He cashed the ace
4?
End
of clubs, observing the 3-3 split and
followed with the queen of spades,
Contract: 4? , Opening Lead: ? 10
pleased to see East follow.
Here is the position:
?-
5
14
12
25
3
?9
??K 9 8 5 3
?-
??Q 5 3
?7 6 4
?N
W
E
S
??J 7 4
?A 2
?2
??K 10 9 8
?Q J
?-
Declarer cashed the ace of diamonds and led a second diamond.
West rose with the king, swallowing his partner?s second diamond.
This was best defence ? but not
good enough. He followed with the
nine of diamonds and East (down
to ?K1098) ruffed with the eight.
Declarer overruffed with the
jack of hearts and we have reached
the three-card ending across.
Declarer could lead any card
from his hand and play a low heart
from dummy. East could win the
trick with the nine of hearts but
?9
??8 5
?-
?Q 5 3
??N
W
E
S
??7 4
??2
??K 10 9
??-
then would have to lead from
?K10 round to dummy?s ?Q5.
Ten tricks and game made.
Masterfully manoeuvred by
declarer ? but not such a great
matchpoint result. Several Souths
declared 3NT. They ducked West?s
diamond lead, won the second and,
with East having no more diamonds and with clubs playing for
four tricks (via two finesses), those
declarers garnered ten tricks via
three spades, two hearts, a diamond
and four clubs. Their +430 beat our
hero?s +420 by the crucial ten
points. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
13
x
16
13
9
8
8
15
20
8
9 7 5
8 9 6
8
6 8 9
5 9 7
3 1
9 7
1 2 7
3 1 9
8 6
22
21
9
7
9
4
6
8
�
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
x
5
6
8
2
1
9
4
7
8
9
5
5
1
6 8
8 9
x
3
+
8
6 2
3
12
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
4
5
3
2
6
7
9
8
1
5
2
4
3
4
5
1
2
5
6
4
3
9
8
7
2
1
6
3
5
8
7
9
4
9
4
3
7
6
2
1
5
8
5
2
2 < 3
4
Suko 2092
1
KenKen 4182
8
5
7
1
9
4
6
3
2
7
8
1
9
3
6
4
2
5
3
6
4
5
2
7
8
1
9
5
9
2
4
8
1
3
7
6
P
x
4
5
U
S
O
B
H
B
K
J
E
B
C
T
W
O
L
N
E
5
5
8
4
7
9
5
1
6
3
2
9
1
2
6
3
8
7
5
4
6
5
3
7
2
4
8
9
1
P
E
L
A
C
L
L
M
P
N
T
A
D
M
N
T
O
T
2
7
1
3
8
9
5
4
6
I
A
Killer 5739
2
2
Lexica 4020
E
x
7
2 2
4
3
8
2
7
9
5
6
1
5
x
6
x
4
23
4
1
?
5
Lexica 4019
+
x
12
11
1
Train Tracks 265
3 < 4
5
?
4
?
3
Sudoku 9480
3 1
5 7 2 9
7
5 7
4 3
3 1
3
1 2
8
2
2 6
6 7 9
7 8
5
9
7
1
+
13
4
=
5
Futoshiki 3050
Set Square 2012
2
12
23
4
=
3
1
?
5 > 3 > 2
9
16
14
=
192
2 > 1
?
3
2
�
25
12
x
Tredoku 1501
Cell Blocks 3073
21
�
Solutions
8
23
-
5
13min
20
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 9 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
= 56 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Chess 1 ... Qxf2! is crushing as
2 Rxf2 Rd1+ mates. White tried
2 Qe1 but this lost swiftly to
2 ... Ng3+! 3 hxg3 Rh5 mate.
14
Killer Tricky No 5741
9
�
9
18
10
= 2 from 1-9 are
+
7
11
All the digits
9
+
+
15
14
11
6
-
4
Kakuro 2009
Bridge Andrew Robson
2
2
2
-
16
7
8
2
18
16
14
21
4min
8
11
13
5
+
Saturday?s answers deer, deluder, dree,
dress, dresser, druse, dueler, duress,
elder, leer, lesser, lure, redd, reddle, rede,
redress, reed, reel, reuse, rudd, rudder,
rudderless, ruddle, rude, rule, ruled,
ruler, ruse, seer, sere, slur, slurred,
sudser, suer, surd, sure, udder, user
13
7
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 2013
From these letters, make words of three
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 12 words, average;
17, good; 22, very good; 28, excellent
16
6
2
4
Polygon
________
� 1 D D 4]
郉bDngk0 ]
遬D 0pD D]
轉pD D Dp]
� D !P) D]
蹹 H $ D ]
跴) D D )]
贒 $ DBI ]
谅媚牌侨
21 Rg3
In a sharp situation White loses
his footing. After the correct 21
Bh3 Bd8 fails to 22 Bxe6+ Kxe6
23 Qxg7, while 21 Bh3 Bf6 22 e5
Bd8 23 Ne4 Bb6 is refuted by 24
Bxe6+. In both cases White would
win.
21 ... Bf6 22 e5 Bd8 23 Ne4 Bb6
White resigns
3/4
+7
� PUZZLER MEDIA
World champion Magnus Carlsen
asserted his authority in decisive
fashion with an overwhelming
victory in his contest against the
Chinese grandmaster Ding Liren
in St Louis earlier this month. The
overall score was 67-25. In fact,
Carlsen had already clinched
victory with 13 rounds to spare, a
record that even Bobby Fischer
(famed for his 100 per cent victories) would have been proud to
achieve.
Here is one of the world champion?s surprisingly crushing wins
against a player acknowledged to
be in the world elite.
ostensibly more aggressive openings deriving from 1 e4.
5 Bg2 Bb7 6 0-0 a6 7 Re1 d6 8 e4
Be7 9 d4 cxd4 10 Nxd4 Qc7
The opening has now transposed into the well-known Hedgehog variation, the topic of a new
book, The Hedgehog, by Sergey
Kasparov (Everyman Chess), which
I reviewed in this column on
Monday, November 20. 10 ... Qc7
is an important precaution as the
careless 10 ... Nbd7 fails to 11 e5
Bxg2 12 exf6 winning.
11 Be3 
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
3 792 Кб
Теги
The Times, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа