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The Times Times 2 - 28 November 2017

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November 28 | 2017
She’s the one!
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Tuesday November 28 2017 | the times
times2
An introduction
by a friend, a fast
courtship and tea
with the Queen
For six months they dated
in secret — now Harry and
Meghan’s engagement is
global news. Katie Nicholl
traces the relationship
I
t was the top secret meeting
with Her Majesty the Queen
that gave it away. For a while
the world had known that
Harry was in love. There was
that kiss at the polo and a rare
and very public embrace at
the Invictus Games. But it
was Harry’s decision to introduce
his girlfriend Meghan Markle to
his grandmother that signalled
an engagement announcement
really was imminent.
To many royal observers the
clues that this romance was
going to end with a wedding were
there all along. When Meghan was
photographed at the opening
ceremony of the Invictus Games, the
most important date in Harry’s annual
calendar, in Toronto in September
with a royal protection officer in tow,
she might as well have been wearing
an engagement ring. For it is protocol
that a protection officer is assigned to
a royal fiancée.
Then there was that body language.
As Harry and Meghan made their way
hand-in-hand to watch the wheelchair
tennis on the second day of the
sporting competition, smiling in the
autumn sunshine, they looked like any
other couple in love. That they felt
comfortable enough to embrace in
front of the world’s gaze and Meghan’s
mother, Doria, who had been invited
to watch the closing ceremony from
Harry’s private box, spoke volumes.
Ever since Harry met Meghan,
in the summer of 2016, this royal
romance has felt different. This is a
21st-century couple playing by their
own rules.
From that first snatched kiss at the
polo, a rite of passage for any wouldbe princess, to the society weddings
they have attended over the past year
as a couple, it was only going to be
a matter of time before their own
wedding. They were inseparable at
the Jamaican nuptials of Harry’s best
friend, Tom Inskip, earlier this
year and they were seated together
at Pippa Middleton’s wedding in
the summer where their names
appeared next to each other on the
seating plan. Then there was the
intimate camping safari holiday in
August to celebrate Meghan’s 36th
birthday in Harry’s beloved
Botswana, which the prince
describes as his “second home”.
Their quiet weekend “à deux” in
London at the end of September
to celebrate his 33rd birthday
proved just how much Meghan
had tamed the once wayward
prince and hinted that Harry was
finally settling down.
This followed Meghan’s candid
and frankly extraordinary
interview in Vanity Fair
magazine in which some
thought she breached royal
etiquette by talking publicly
about her romance. “We’re two
people who are really happy and
iin love,” she said, adding that she
loved “a great love story”. It was as
teasing as it was telling, with Meghan
hinting that the day would come when
they would have a story to tell.
“I’m sure there will be a time when
we will have to come forward and
present ourselves and have stories
to tell, but I hope what people will
understand is that this is our time.”
For some months, the whispers
among those in the know was that
a royal engagement was just around
the corner, and indeed it was.
Compared with William and Kate,
Harry and Meghan’s courtship has
Above: Prince Harry
and Meghan Markle
after their engagement
announcement.
Right: Markle in the
TV show Suits.
Far right, from top:
Markus Anderson;
Tom Inskip;
Nottingham Cottage
in the grounds of
Kensington Palace,
where the couple will
live; the diamond
engagement ring
the times | Tuesday November 28 2017
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COVER AND BELOW: GETTY IMAGES. BELOW: REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; BACKGRID; JAMES WHATLING/SPLASH NEWS; SNOWDON/CAMERA PRESS; TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER RICHARD POHLE
moved at lightning speed. Although
the pair managed to date under the
radar for six months after meeting
in the summer last year, within weeks
of their romance becoming public
Meghan had moved her belongings
into Harry’s bachelor pad,
Nottingham Cottage, at Kensington
Palace, which she has transformed
and now calls home.
“We’re all expecting this to end with
a ring on Meghan’s finger,” one of the
prince’s friends told me a year into
their courtship. “Harry is madly in
love with her and is the one driving all
this talk about their future together.”
Apparently Harry knew he had met
“the one” after their first meeting. He
revealed in last night’s BBC interview
After the first
date Harry,
already besotted,
asked to meet up
that they were set up on a blind date
by a mutual girlfriend in London in
June last year. The couple have several
mutual friends including Markus
Anderson, one of Meghan’s closest
confidants and a consultant for Soho
House, where the couple met several
times during their early courtship.
They clicked from the outset.
Meghan, who for several years has
juggled her acting career in Toronto
with humanitarian work, had just
returned from a trip to Rwanda to help
to promote a clean-water initiative and
Harry was keen to hear about her
work in Africa.
After that initial date Harry, already
besotted, asked for Meghan’s number
and bombarded her with text
messages asking if she wanted to
meet again.
Like Diana, Princess of Wales, his
mother, Harry has always worn his
heart on his sleeve and when he falls
in love he falls hard. “Diana always
told the boys, ‘Do what your heart tells
you,’ ” says the former royal chef
Darren McGrady, who worked for the
Prince and Princess of Wales when
Harry was growing up. “I think that’s
exactly what Harry’s doing.”
After they met in London, Harry
went to Africa for several weeks to
help on an elephant conservation
project in Malawi. He kept in touch
with Meghan and as soon as he was
home, the pair sneaked away for a
weekend to Soho Farmhouse,
Soho House’s country outpost
in the Cotswolds.
By this stage the prince had told
just a handful of people that
he was dating the
American actress. He
was keen to keep the
romance below the
radar and confided
only in his brother
and the Duchess of
Cambridge, and his
closest friends Guy
Pelly and Inskip. “Guy
and his wife, Lizzy,
knew about Meghan from
the start and Harry
introduced them early on,” says
one of the prince’s friends. “Lizzy and
Meghan really got along, which was
nice because I don’t think Meghan got
Skippy’s [Inskip’s] humour at the start.”
The prince’s friends realised things
were serious when he invited
Meghan to Balmoral for his 32nd
birthday that September. The Queen
had given him the keys to her Scottish
residence, where she spends every
summer, and Harry had invited a
small gathering that included his
cousin Princess Eugenie to go
shooting. The Queen had not met
Meghan by this stage because there
was no need, but Harry had told his
grandmother about the new girl in his
life and she was, according to a family
friend, delighted for him.
When Meghan returned to Toronto
to film the next series of Suits, the
couple spoke daily on Facetime
and made plans for Harry to visit
the city the next month. Within days
of his arrival, however, the couple
were forced to go into hiding when
on October 30 a British tabloid
broke the news of the royal
romance.
There was no
comment from
Harry’s aides at
Kensington Palace,
but, tellingly, no
denial. The story
was followed around
the world and
Meghan’s celebrity
was elevated. She had
gone from being a littleheard-of actress to being
suddenly famous. “The whole
world watched the whirlwind
overnight. It was fairly overwhelming,”
says her half-sister, Samantha Grant.
Meghan was used to being in the
public eye, but this sudden media
interest was on another level. Her
family were doorstepped by reporters,
while her Toronto home was
surrounded by paparazzi. “It has its
challenges, and it comes in waves —
some days it can feel more challenging
than others,” she said of the press
attention in that landmark Vanity Fair
interview. “And right out of the gate it
was surprising the way things changed.
But I still have this support system all
around me and, of course, my
boyfriend’s support.”
Continued on page 4 W
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Tuesday November 28 2017 | the times
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‘She has a worldly experience that
X Continued from page 3
While Harry had expected the media
interest, he and Meghan balked at the
intensity of the coverage, especially
what Harry perceived to be the
negative undertones about his
girlfriend’s race and background.
Meghan is mixed-race (her father
is white and her mother is black),
something she has written about.
It wasn’t just Meghan’s mixed-race
heritage that generated headlines, or
that her great-great-grandfather was a
slave, as she revealed in one of many
interviews. It was also that she was
older than the prince and a divorcée.
Meghan married the American film
producer Trevor Engelson in 2011, but
they separated within two years.
There were the inevitable
comparisons with Wallis Simpson,
whose marriage to Edward VIII in
1937 rocked the monarchy. Back at the
palace there was plenty of chatter
There were clues
— Meghan wore
a necklace with
H and M on it
about the American actress who had
won the prince’s heart.
By November last year Meghan
was back in London and Harry
arranged for her to meet William
and Kate, who live across the
courtyard at Kensington Palace. He
wanted his brother and sister-in-law’s
approval. Meghan reportedly
presented Kate with the gift of a
leather-bound dream journal.
Several months later Harry
introduced Meghan to his father,
Prince Charles, and his stepmother ,
the Duchess of Cornwall, who liked
her “enormously”, according to a
family friend. The Queen met Meghan
in October over tea at Buckingham
Palace and was, according to a family
friend, charmed by the actress.
“The Queen is happy that Harry has
finally found someone who is making
him so happy,” says the source.
While Meghan had won over
Harry’s family and friends, Meghan’s
high profile, particularly on social
media, set off alarm bells among some
courtiers. As the romance got more
serious Meghan posted less on
Instagram (where she has a million
followers) and Twitter and closed
down her lifestyle blog, which was
called The Tig. While she never
commented on her relationship with
Harry, there were clues. On one
occasion she wore a necklace with the
initials H and M, and in an interview
with her local newspaper she said: “My
cup runneth over and I’m the luckiest
girl in the world.”
While Harry’s previous girlfriends
Chelsy Davy and Cressida Bonas shied
away from the limelight, it seemed
Meghan knew how to handle it.
An American actress and divorcée
isn’t the conventional aristocrat that
many predicted Prince Harry would
marry, but according to the royal
historian Hugo Vickers, that is to
Meghan’s advantage. “I suppose on
paper she’s everything you don’t want
her to be — an older woman, a
divorcée — but her more positive
qualities could suit her well for the
role. She has a certain worldly
experience that she would need.”
Nonetheless, given the sensitive
issue of privacy and the royals, it was
going to take a skilled hand to
navigate these uncharted waters.
Quietly, at Harry’s request, his aides
were made available to help Meghan
from an early stage. The royal lawyers
at Harbottle and Lewis were drafted in
to help when pictures of a supposedly
topless Meghan were hawked to the
tabloids. They were of someone else,
but the prince’s legal team had been
on hand to help out — and it wasn’t
the only occasion.
“Meghan’s introduction to the
British media was pretty full-on and it
freaked her out,” says a source. “She
got it into her head from an early
stage that the press had it in for her.”
Harry was privately furious with
what he deemed a gross invasion
into Meghan’s life. He had complained
during an interview the year before:
“Even if I talk to a girl, that person
is then suddenly my wife and people
go knocking on her door. If or when
I do find a girlfriend, I will do my
utmost . . . to ensure that me and her
can get to the point where we’re
actually comfortable with each other
before the massive invasion that
is inevitably going to happen into
her privacy.”
He felt that his girlfriend was being
exposed to an unjust level of intrusion
and harassment and took matters into
his own hands in November last year
Top left: Markle
M rkle
watches Harry, above,
playing polo at Coworth
Park, Ascot. Top centre:
Markle with her beagle,
Guy. Top right: in
Rwanda with the
charity World Vision
when he released an unprecedented
statement on Twitter. Acknowledging
for the first time that Meghan was his
girlfriend, he claimed that the actress
had been “subject to a wave of abuse
and harassment”. The romance was
now official.
Meghan maintained a dignified
silence, even when her extended
family gave interviews to the press.
Her half-sister painted a less than
flattering picture of Meghan as a social
climber, while her half-brother,
Thomas Markle Jr, opened the family
album and described Meghan as
perfect princess material. Her mother,
Doria Radlan, a yoga teacher and
social worker to whom Meghan is
very close, refused to speak to the
numerous reporters who knocked on
the door of her Los Angeles home,
while Meghan’s father, Thomas, a
former Hollywood lighting director,
went to ground at his home in Mexico.
Meanwhile, Meghan became more
press savvy and hired a new LA-based
publicist. “Meghan started getting
advice from the palace from quite an
the times | Tuesday November 28 2017
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she will need’
JAMES WHATLING; MEGHAN MARKLE/INSTAGRAM; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Things I only eat and
drink at Christmas
Robert Crampton
I
early stage. Harry wanted to protect
her from the outset and made sure she
had proper advice when it came to
handling the media,” says one of her
friends.
According to the Canadian gossip
columnist Shinan Govani, who knows
Meghan, she was more careful about
where she went to avoid being
photographed. “While you used to see
her around lots, she suddenly went
very quiet,” Govani says.
That was until Meghan’s carefully
orchestrated Vanity Fair interview,
given ostensibly to promote the most
recent series of Suits.
“I can tell you that at the end of the
day I think it’s really simple,” she told
the magazine. “We were very quietly
dating for about six months before
it became news, and I was working
during that whole time, and the only
thing that changed was people’s
perception. Nothing about me
The Queen will
be consulted
on where the
couple will wed
changed. I’m still the same person that
I am, and I’ve never defined myself by
my relationship.
“I don’t read any press. I haven’t
even read press for Suits. The people
who are close to me anchor me in
knowing who I am. The rest is noise.”
The interview was unprecedented
and seen by royal watchers as a
“coming out piece” for Meghan. Two
months later Meghan quit Suits and
moved to Britain to set up home with
Harry at Kensington Palace.
It was apparently her decision to put
her acting career on ice. According to
one of her friends: “Meghan has been
over acting for some time. She wants
to channel her energy into her
humanitarian work from now on.”
With her charitable work already
established, Meghan will no doubt
prove to be an excellent and
incredibly glamorous consort to
Harry. Some of her Hollywood
habits are already rubbing off on the
prince, who now starts his mornings
with a green juice and practises yoga
with his fiancée.
In the interim there is plenty to be
done while a wedding is planned and
the Queen will have to be consulted
on the all-important matter of where
the couple will wed and whether she
will bestow a title once they are
married. Harry is said to be keen to
marry at St George’s in Windsor.
Royal aides say that Meghan and
Harry will continue to live at
Nottingham Cottage for some months.
While it is small, Nott Cott, as it
is known, is a comfortable and
functional starter home. And as one
Kensington Palace courtier points out:
“The Duke and Duchess lived there
when they had Prince George.”
The couple are said to be
house-hunting in Norfolk and
Oxfordshire for a country bolt hole.
There is every chance that the
Queen will make one of the cottages
on the Sandringham estate available.
Harry loves Wood Farm, a shooting
lodge, where he often takes friends
for weekends. It was earmarked for
him at one point and would make
a perfect wedding present. Like his
brother, Harry longs to move to the
country, get a dog and start a family.
With her new wardrobe of Barbour
jackets and Hunter boots, Meghan
should fit right in.
Katie Nicholl is a royal author and
commentator. Her book Harry: Love,
Life, and Loss (Hachette Books) is
out in the new year
am reliably informed that this
Christmas, sherry is back. Great
news! In my childhood, certain
items of food and drink, sherry
foremost among them, saw the
light of day only at this time of
year. I trust this is the start of
a trend. Having long been
relegated to semi-obscurity as a mere
flavouring for trifle, thanks to the twin
boom in popularity of cocktails and
tapas among lovely young people,
sales of amontillado and manzanilla
are enjoying a recovery. So says
Majestic Wine, at any rate.
Please note that thus far this
renaissance applies to dry sherry only.
The education of the hipster palate
is yet to extend to Harveys Bristol
Cream. Once the kids meet up with
their respective aunties in a few weeks,
I’ve no doubt this further refinement
will arrive swiftly afterwards.
For some of us the merits of sherry
never went away. At the fag end of
a big night, other supplies exhausted,
you could rely on finding a
cobweb-shrouded bottle of Croft
Original in the under-stairs
cupboard, next to the
bleach and the spare
loo rolls. Goes
down a treat at
3am, does Croft
Original, don’t
you agree?
The last
time I had a
sherry was at
my cousin
George’s
wedding to
his lovely
Spanish bride
Lourdes in
Seville in 2008.
The service was at
about 6pm, but the
food didn’t appear until
close to midnight. In the interim
numerous trays of the celebrated local
hooch circulated freely. Accompanying
tapas notwithstanding, few of the Brit
guests were coherent for the speeches.
Creeps up on you does sherry.
I hope other traditional winter
tipples are due for a comeback. I have
fond teenage memories of apricot
brandy. Or plum brandy. Or peach
Keep your
hands off
her smalls
A woman has chosen
to end her ten-year
marriage because,
I read, her soon-to-bebinned husband
persistently trashes
brandy. Or possibly all three; it’s hard
to recall after four decades. The
specific fruit involved isn’t relevant
— whatever grog it was gathering
dust in the Crampton family
sideboard in 1977, it tasted delicious
to my experimentally thirsty
13-year-old palate.
I don’t to this day know if my
parents ever noticed — and now it’s
too late to ask. If they did spot the
dwindling liqueur levels, I like to think
they indulged the stolen swigs as a
harmless introduction to the pleasures
of alcohol for a curious teenager.
Indeed, if my own kids hadn’t already
moved beyond the same stage, I’d
consider getting in a similar stash
by way of training them up.
The festive season is, of course, the
traditional time to wheel out this sort
of entry-level booze. Baileys is hard
to beat. As for advocaat, that’s more
problematic. A full-on properly
constructed snowball, as my grandma
Amy and great-aunt Adele, whose
annual alcohol intake each comprised
one such concoction precisely once
a year, would attest, is
delightful. As regards
a surreptitious
slurp, however,
the neat viscous
yellow gloop
doesn’t quite
do the trick.
I don’t
know
whether
eggnog has
caught on
(I suspect,
with due
deference
to Amy and
Adele, it has
not), but most
other formerly
one-off special-occasion
delicacies are now available
year-round. While I only indulge in
walnuts, dates, cigars, Terry’s
Chocolate Oranges, After Eights,
Matchmakers and mince pies over
Christmas, this is no doubt a positive
development in consumer choice. In
terms of our national health, perhaps
not so much. Although satsumas are
good for you, right?
her underwear
whenever it’s his turn
to get a load on.
Shrinks her smalls,
apparently. Or enlarges
them. Or dyes them.
Or bleaches them.
Or does something
ruinous anyway.
Bottom line: this
lady has decided
her lingerie loss-rate
is unacceptable.
Unacceptable enough
as to be grounds
for divorce.
I suspect other
factors may be
involved. If not, might
I suggest the following
tip by way of laundryrelated marriage
counselling? Nothing
wrong with sharing the
washing-machine
duties, but pants (hers
and, God knows, his)
should stay within the
Students,
don’t dress
as a miner
Warming up for the
festive season as we
now are, even before
November has drawn
to a close, the spectre
of seasonal parties
starts to loom large.
And going, “Woo woo,
be careful,” over the
shoulder of this
spectre comes the
issue of choosing a
spectacularly ill-judged
theme for those same
parties. As Durham
University students
have just discovered.
These undergrads —
disappointingly, yet not
surprisingly, for those
of us who enjoy the
game, members of a
rugby club — planned
a get-together with
costumes based on the
1984-85 miners’ strike.
Backs were asked to
attend as policemen,
forwards as
soon-to-be-unemployed
miners. At a famously
posh university located
smack in the middle
of an equally famous
former coalfield, this
counts as a poor
choice. They have
wisely reconsidered.
Parties? Bring it on.
Fancy-dress parties?
In these politically
sensitive times, I’m
struggling to think of
any outfit that isn’t
best avoided.
wearer’s remit. It’s
a bit like witnessing
sit-down visits to
the loo: better for
all that the mystery
be preserved.
About 15 years ago
my wife stone-cold
refused to wash my
hankies any longer. In
that one decision, as
much as any other, I
suspect, lies the secret
of our union’s longevity.
6
Tuesday November 28 2017 | the times
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‘People called me controlling,
ballsy, outspoken, even crazy’
Liv Tyler had a rock’n’roll childhood before becoming a film star. Now she hangs out with the
Beckhams and the Delevingnes. She tells Vassi Chamberlain why no one pushes her around
L
iv Tyler is an actress
whose career has chased
her a lot harder than she
has ever chased it. After
a long hiatus — falling in
love, having two children
in quick succession and
moving to London — she
is back at work, and perhaps for the
first time in her life is ambitiously
looking for new roles, something
that she has always shied away from
doing in the past. Perhaps it is no
coincidence that she turned 40 this
year, a moment that gave her pause
for thought.
After years of trying to unravel who
and what she is, she appears to have
found stability with her British fiancé,
the football agent Dave Gardner —
the father of her two youngest
children, Sailor, two, and Lula, one —
who manages his best friend David
Beckham’s career. England also
happens to be where most of her
girlfriends — Kate Moss, Lucie de la
Falaise, Stella McCartney and, a more
recent addition, Poppy Delevingne —
reside. She describes her life today as
busy, chaotic and funny. “I’m so in love
and happy right now,” whispers the
woman who first caught our attention
with her sexy-sweet voice in Stealing
Beauty, Bernardo Bertolucci’s Tuscan
ode to summer love.
Sitting opposite me on a bench in
the Farm Girl café in Notting Hill,
London, wearing a school-run mum
uniform of Stella McCartney for
Adidas leggings and an oversized Max
Mara coat, Tyler still has an almost
child-like air. Her long, dark hair, sideparted and swept over one shoulder, is
wet from the shower, making her look
younger than most of the 20-year-olds
on their laptops around us. Tyler’s
voice is part of the package — girlie
and seductive, but also authoritative
and principled when it needs to be.
“But we’ve met before,” she
exclaims, turning her wattage on me.
Yes, at Glastonbury, I tell her. “Aha,
I knew it,” she says. “We wandered
through those fields at all hours with
Brooklyn and David [Beckham], Cara
and Poppy [Delevingne]. I was just
amazed at the kindness and the
overall good vibes.”
It was day three of the festival and
as we ambled our way to the Rabbit
Hole, a tented after-hours party, she
occasionally let out curious little birdlike noises: “Cacaw, cacaw, cacaw.” It
seemed normal at the time, but the
sound stuck with me. “It’s a super New
York thing,” she says. “Kids who grow
up in certain neighbourhoods have a
call so they can communicate with
their gang. We learnt it off friends who
grew up in the projects. If you’re a few
blocks away and you hear the call then
you immediately turn round.” Her
father has one too. “His is really
funny,” she says. “It’s good to have
your family call. It’s the only way to
get anybody’s attention.”
It is well known that she is the
biological result of a liaison between
her mother, Bebe Buell, a musician,
model and former Playboy centrefold,
and Steven Tyler, the lead singer of the
American rock band Aerosmith.
However, for the first few years of her
life she believed that her father was the
singer, songwriter and producer Todd
Rundgren. It wasn’t until Liv noticed a
Right: Liv Tyler in
Gunpowder and The
Lord of the Rings
She
describes
her life
today as
busy,
chaotic
and funny
dark-haired girl standing at the side of
the stage at a Guns N’ Roses concert
that she had any reason to question
her paternity. She pointed out the
uncanny resemblance to her mother.
“I saw this girl, Mia [Tyler’s daughter
from his marriage to the actress
Cyrinda Foxe], standing there and she
literally looked like my twin,” Tyler
says. “I turned to my mom and she
looked at me with those big, beautiful
doe eyes of hers. They were all glassy
and she just started to cry. So I said,
‘Is that my sister?’ and Mom just
said, ‘Yes.’ ”
Buell took her aside and explained
that her father was not Rundgren, but
Tyler, whom she had had a brief
relationship with. “She told me what
had happened when I was born, you
know, the complications.” It’s an
oblique reference to Steven Tyler’s
drug addiction at the time, which
Buell had wanted to protect her young
child from, with the help of Rundgren,
who signed her birth certificate even
though he knew there was a chance
that Liv was not his daughter.
She says that Buell’s bravery and
honesty is the reason she is happy
within herself. “She’s amazing, my
mom,” she says. “She was so young
when she had me, only 23, and was in
a sort of flux with Todd and with
Steven. And neither of those
relationships ultimately worked out,
which I can only imagine was really
scary for her.” She says that she never
heard her mother utter a bad word
about either man.
Does she remember the moment
when she first met Tyler as her father?
“I do. It was at one of Todd’s shows,”
she says. “I felt a connection to my
father that I’d never really felt with
anyone before. I sort of fell in love
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7
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BELOW: CEDRIC BUCHET. IMAAN HAMMAM ON PORTER COVER: CAMILLA AKRANS
times2
GETTY IMAGES
Top: Liv Tyler with her
partner, Dave Gardner,
and, above, her father,
Steven Tyler. Left:
Liv Tyler photographed
by Cedric Buchet
for Porter
with him, except of course it wasn’t
that, it was a kinship and a closeness.”
Wasn’t it confusing for her, having to
transfer her allegiances from
Rundgren to this unknown figure
whom she has variously described as
being like a wizard and a pirate? “It
was quite complex that whole thing
because Todd’s really my father too,”
she says. “He raised me for a big part
of my life. I have a special bond and
love with him as well.”
She was brought up in the East
Village, New York, where her teenage
group was mostly made up of the kids
of nearby creatives, such as Julian
Schnabel and Loulou de la Falaise. She
attended a private school, “but not like
Eton or anything, just a very normal,
wholesome private school”. She started
modelling at 14 and within a year had
moved to acting, appearing in several
roles during her teens. However, it was
Stealing Beauty in 1996 that put her on
the international map.
Blockbusters followed and she
appeared opposite Ben Affleck and
Bruce Willis in Armageddon, but it was
her role as the elf Arwen in the Lord of
the Rings trilogy — with her alabaster
skin, dark hair and otherworldly
quality — that really cemented her
status. She could well have graduated
from there to a career similar to that
of Julia Roberts. Instead, she opted to
focus on an early marriage to the
British musician Royston Langdon
from the band Spacehog and her first
child, Milo, who is now 12. She
prioritised relative stability over
plaudits, choosing fashion and beauty
contracts with brands such as
Givenchy, whose face she remained for
ten years. The result being that key
moments in film, rather than a raft of
movies, have been Tyler’s forte.
Conversely for one with such strong
father figures, conversation often leads
back to the importance of the female
influences in her life, namely her
Going back to
work is almost
like a vacation
or an escape
mother and her grandmother; how
they protected her, the lessons that
they taught her. She talks intently
when describing her role as a mother,
how she carves out time in her day for
her three children (as well as
Gardner’s son Grey, from his first
marriage, who part-lives with them).
They bake cookies and snuggle
together in their pyjamas at weekends,
but she says that she doesn’t always
get it right.
As her career enters a new phase
she is careful to choose roles that fit in
with her family life, but that also give
her a little me time. Her most recent
project, for example, the three-part
BBC television series Gunpowder, was
shot in England. “It’s almost like a
little vacation or an escape, in a way,”
she says about her return to work. “I’d
say, ‘Goodnight, I love you’; grab my
little wheelie bag, get on the train with
my dialect coach and for those three
hours on the train to Leeds I would
speak in my English accent. We would
laugh and do the lines and have a little
wine. I’d arrive, have a good sleep,
then work for a couple of days, then
come back home. And it was such an
The full interview
appears in the latest
issue of Porter, on sale
from Friday
amazing feeling, because it did make
me feel more balanced.”
The family live in Primrose Hill in
north London. “It’s a cute little village
and totally discreet.” They are also
building a house. She shows me photos
of the works on her phone. “I’m having
a dusty rose stair runner going up the
middle of the house, with ebonised
floors, they’re all like herringbone.
Katie Grove is helping me, who has
done all of Kate Moss’s houses.”
Twice during our conversation I ask
her if she and Gardner will marry.
They are engaged, she refers to him
frequently as “my love” and there is an
inescapably large diamond on her
finger. Twice she ignores me and
charmingly talks about something else.
“I sense you’re an old-fashioned girl . . .”
I say. So she says: “This is the
wallpaper . . .” I let a couple of sentences
pass, then continue: “So I suspect
marriage . . .” To which, without missing
a beat, she replies: “I guess so, um, the
sofa is going to be in this fabric.”
It’s not the only time that I notice
her strong sense of self-preservation.
If I go off topic and talk tangentially
about something not directly related
to her, she quickly brings me back on
message. “So you were asking about
my career,” she says.
Later, she sends me two emails
asking if I need anything. She’s worried
that she didn’t properly address where
she stands on feminism. When I had
asked her about it she’d pussyfooted
around the subject. Not now. “I am a
feminist and proud to be one,” she
writes. “In my life I have had people
call me controlling for being detailoriented, ballsy for following my heart
and taking risks, outspoken or even
crazy for speaking my mind and not
taking bullshit from people. It amazes
me when this happens and motivates
me to work harder to speak up for what
I believe in for myself and all women.”
What a shame I don’t live in
Primrose Hill; I can almost hear her
calling: “Cacaw, cacaw, cacaw!”
8
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Tuesday November 28 2017 | the times
arts
Spies on stage: the story behin
George Blake was one of the most notorious spies in British
history. His relationship with a petty criminal is at the heart
of a play opening in Hampstead. Ben Macintyre reports
O
n October 22, 1966,
an Irish petty
criminal threw a
ladder made from
rope and knitting
needles over the
wall of Wormwood
Scrubs prison to a
prisoner waiting on the other side. The
escaper climbed the wall, dropped 20ft
down the other side and was dragged,
bleeding, to a getaway car. Both men
fled to the Soviet Union.
The escaped prisoner was George
Blake, one of the most notorious spies
in British history. His accomplice was
Sean Bourke, a drunken miscreant
who had befriended Blake behind bars
and helped him to escape not because
he shared his communist ideology, but
because he liked him.
The unlikely relationship between
these two utterly different men is the
subject of Simon Gray’s play Cell
Mates, which is being revived for the
first time at Hampstead Theatre in
northwest London. When it was first
staged, in 1995, it was overshadowed
by the abrupt departure of one of its
leading actors, Stephen Fry, who went
to Bruges, leaving a distressed note of
apology and an astonished co-star, Rik
Mayall. Fry was later diagnosed with
bipolar disorder. Simon Ward replaced
him, but the play closed after a month.
The revival is long overdue, not
least because of its strong modern
echoes in an age of renewed Russian
espionage. The story of Britain’s
communist spies is usually treated as a
moral fable, of treachery and political
betrayal. In Gray’s hands, by contrast,
this is a story of the different layers of
truth, the lure of self-dramatisation
and, above all, a single relationship
between two very singular jailbirds.
“They fall in love without realising
From top: the spy George Blake and
his escape accomplice Sean Bourke
it,” says Edward Hall, the artistic
director at Hampstead Theatre
and the director of Cell Mates.
“There is absolutely no evidence of
a physical relationship, but there is
co-dependence and spiritual need.
A man with many sides met a man
with no side to him.”
Of the crop of Britain’s postwar
KGB spies, Blake was the oddest. Born
George Behar in the Netherlands, the
son of an Egyptian-Jewish father and a
Dutch mother, he joined the Dutch
resistance under Nazi occupation and
escaped to Britain in 1943 disguised as
a monk. He took British citizenship,
joined MI6 and in 1948 was posted to
Seoul under diplomatic cover to gather
intelligence on China and communist
North Korea.
Captured by the advancing North
Korean army in 1950, he was held
prisoner for three years, during which
time he read the works of Karl Marx,
turned against the capitalist West, and
eventually volunteered to spy for the
KGB. MI6 later claimed he had been
brainwashed, coerced or blackmailed
into co-operation with the Soviets, but
Blake insisted he had converted
voluntarily after witnessing the
ruthless American bombing of Korean
villages. “I felt I was on the wrong
side,” he said, many years later.
For the next seven years he passed
to the KGB a wealth of highly
damaging information, most notably
the Anglo-American intelligence
operation to tap Russian
communication from a tunnel beneath
Berlin. He exposed scores, and
perhaps hundreds of CIA and MI6
agents to the KGB; many perished.
In 1961 he finally came under
suspicion, thanks to evidence from a
Polish defector. He was interrogated
by MI6 and denied everything, until
one of his questioners remarked that
he must have been tortured into
changing sides. Blake snapped: “No.
I myself approached the Soviets and
offered my services to them of my
own accord.” At the Old Bailey, less
When the play was
first staged Stephen Fry
disappeared to Bruges,
leaving an astonished
co-star, Rik Mayall
than a month after confessing, Blake
was sentenced to 42 years in prison, at
that time the longest sentence handed
down by a British court.
The same year, Bourke was
sentenced to seven years for sending a
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the times | Tuesday November 28 2017
9
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arts
n Simon Gray’s Cell Mates
nd
DONALD COOPER
Geoffrey Streatfeild and Emmet
Byrne rehearsing the new production
“The sentence was such that it almost
became a question of honour to
challenge it . . . Like a PoW, I had a
duty to escape,” he said. Bourke was
determined to help.
Once he was on the outside, Bourke
smuggled a two-way radio to Blake to
co-ordinate the plan. For years the
British authorities claimed that the
escape was a fiendishly clever plot
masterminded by the KGB, or even
the IRA (a theory based solely on the
fact that Bourke was Irish). In fact the
escape plan was entirely home-grown
and remarkably amateurish; more
Ealing comedy than James Bond.
On the evening of his escape Blake
broke through a window in the prison
corridor while the other inmates and
‘Spies betray
people,’ says Blake
in the play. ‘It
becomes a habit’
bomb in a biscuit tin to a policeman,
who was unhurt. Bourke was born in
Limerick and his life had been a stew
of alcohol, deprivation and crime. His
first sentence at the age of 12 was for
stealing bananas from a lorry.
In Wormwood Scrubs Bourke edited
the prison magazine, to which Blake
was a contributor. The cell mates were
hardly soul mates. Bourke was not
remotely interested in politics, let
alone the radical ideology espoused by
Blake, a most uncommon criminal.
Within the prison there was
considerable sympathy for Blake, who
was nicknamed “the Professor” and
was felt, with some reason, to have
been made a scapegoat by the
establishment. Among his supporters
were Michael Randle and Pat Pottle,
jailed anti-nuclear protesters who
considered Blake’s sentencing an act
of vicious retribution by the state.
As Hall points out, Blake and
Bourke made the oddest odd couple.
“A guileless, open, flat-footed Irishman
meets a highly complex DutchEgyptian.” Gray, who died in 2008,
was intrigued by the emotional drama
far more than the political or legal
aspects of the story. “There is no
judgment,” Hall says. “Gray’s not
interested in whether he’s a criminal
or not. That’s dull.”
Blake was a model prisoner at
Wormwood Scrubs, but still a rebel.
Cell Mates is at the
Hampstead Theatre,
London NW3,
from Thursday to
January 20. Box office:
020 7722 9301,
hampsteadtheatre.com
guards were engrossed in a film show,
slid down a porch and reached the
perimeter. Bourke, it seems, had not
considered how Blake would get down
the other side of the wall; he landed
hard, fracturing his wrist.
After hiding with the help of Randle
and Pottle and their friends, Blake
went to the USSR via East Germany,
after being transported across Europe
under the false floor of a camper van.
Bourke soon followed him, to escape
detection by the British police, and it is
here that Gray, in Act II of his play,
finds much of the emotional tension.
Bourke wants to go home; Blake wants
and needs him to stay, so begins to
deceive and manipulate him, tricking
his former accomplice into remaining,
in effect, his cell mate. The personal,
intimate treachery echoes a wider
infidelity that lies at the heart of the
Blake story, in both fact and fiction.
“Spies betray people,” says Gray’s
George Blake, played in the new
production by Geoffrey Streatfeild. “It
becomes a — a habit. Difficult to
break. It’s what we do. Even when it
isn’t strictly necessary.”
Accusations of disloyalty also
erupted in 1995, when Fry walked out
of the original production in one of
the most dramatic episodes in recent
theatrical history. Gray was livid. “I’m
a friend of Stephen’s. I have great
sympathy because he was hurt and
stressed, but what he left behind him
was the most awful chaos and distress
for other people who loved him,
including me.”
On Fry’s website, a passage about
Cell Mates reads: “The experience still
haunts him, but the depression has
now faded to embarrassment and the
anger to forgiveness.” Fry did not
reappear on the London stage for
another 17 years.
After a year and a half in Soviet
Russia, Bourke returned to Ireland and
the celebrity that he had always
craved. Britain tried to have him
extradited, but the Irish courts ruled
that the escape had been a political
act. In June 1991 Randle and Pottle
were tried for their parts in the escape.
They argued that while they did not
condone Blake’s espionage, his
sentence had been unjust and
motivated by political revenge. They
were acquitted on all counts.
Bourke wrote an account of the
escape, for which he was paid a large
advance, but swiftly drank all the
money and ended up in alcoholic
penury, living in caravan in Kilkee,
where he died in 1982. Some claimed,
without a shred of evidence, that he
had been poisoned by the KGB.
Blake celebrated his 95th birthday in
Russia on November 11. He still denies
accusations of treachery. “To betray,
you first have to belong. I never
belonged,” he declared on his 90th
birthday. That line, intriguingly, is
lifted without acknowledgment from
an interview in 1963 with Kim Philby,
his fellow spy and Soviet exile. As
Blake’s multi-layered, deceptive story
returns to the stage, there is
something fitting about one spy
secretly stealing the words of another.
Like most denizens of the espionage
world, Blake made himself up as he
went along.
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1G T
Tuesday November 28 2017 | the times
television & radio
Mel and Sue who? ‘Squidgy’ Paul has moved on
CHANNEL 4
Chris
Bennion
TV review
A Baker’s Life
Channel 4
{{{((
Last Men in Aleppo
BBC Four
{{{{(
P
anto season is upon us (oh
yes it is) so it is perfectly
fitting that the King Rat of
The Great British Bake Off,
Paul Hollywood, began his
new baking series last night. “People
love to hate me,” he said, “that’s part of
the fun.” However, Paul Hollywood: A
Baker’s Life couldn’t have been a more
positive PR exercise if it had been
called Paul Hollywood: Maybe Mel and
Sue Were the Bads Guys All Along.
Ostensibly Hollywood was
“opening up his personal cookbook”
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Is Uni Worth It?
Radio 4, 8pm
There are shoals of clever
people out there studying
whether or not forking
out £9,000 a year to get
drunk, sleep in and skip
lectures is a sensible use of
money. Alison Wolf, who
wrote a book called Does
Education Matter?, is one
such specialist. There are
many others who could
argue for either side, but
they are not interviewed
here. Instead we mainly
get the stories of two
sixth-formers (one of
whom is appositely enough
named Destiny). A waste
of an interesting title.
The Documentary
BBC World Service, 8pm
Fascinating food, cod. The
biography of this fish is like
a biography of globalisation.
Ever since the time of the
Vikings the Norwegians
have exported it in a
dried version known as
“stockfish”. It is made by
drying out cod on wooden
frames in cold winter air.
You might imagine that
Viking fare would have
gone out of fashion, but
no: today it is sold in vast
quantities and is especially
popular in Nigeria.
Victoria Uwonkunda
travels to Norway and
Lagos to learn more.
(calm, ladies) to treat us to a vaguely
biographical selection of tasty treats.
In reality, this first episode was firmly
about letting us know that he had
moved on from Bake Off’s BBC divorce
— in fact, he is happier than ever,
has lost loads of weight and is finally
getting some “me time”. And if it made
Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and Mary
Berry a little bit jealous, well, that’s fine.
Hollywood made some of the right
noises: he was “sad” that Mel, Sue
and Mary didn’t make the move to
Channel 4. But, my, what faint praise
he chose to damn them with. “We
were like a dysfunctional family,” he
said of his former colleagues. “We sort
of worked.” Compare this with the
treatment of his new “friends” (oh yes,
“friends” was bandied around like a
homemade cosh), Noel Fielding, Sandi
Toksvig and Prue Leith. “The four
of us have been out for many, many
meals now. There’s a genuine love
between us all.” Genuine. Ouch.
For all of Hollywood’s musky
machismo, he’s a sensitive soul. He felt
that Mel, Sue and Mary “abandoned”
Bake Off, yet, “I was loyal. Why am I
getting called a traitor?” Forget them,
Paul! You have a new family now. Prue
thinks you’re “squidgy” (on the inside),
Noel said you’re “funny” and Sandi
believes you’re “kind”. The programme
did not ask Mel and Sue for their
opinions, although they too might have
called him squidgy (on the outside).
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00
Annie Mac 9.00 The 8th with Charlie Sloth.
Live from the top of BBC HQ 11.00 Huw
Stephens 1.00am Annie Nightingale 3.00
BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra’s Stories: Music by
Numbers — The Weeknd 4.00 A dele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Jamie Cullum 8.00 Jo
Whiley 10.00 Levi Roots. The best of British
reggae 11.00 Nigel Ogden: The Organist
Entertains 11.30 Listen to the Band
12.00 Sounds of the 80s (r) 2.00am
Radio 2’s Folk Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: 90s Hits 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Wednesday Workout 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3’s classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein takes us through the morning
with the best in classical music, and we hear
about Rick Stein’s cultural inspirations
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Koechlin (1867-1950)
Donald Macleod discusses the composer’s
visit the New World in 1918 and The Spring
Running, his symphonic poem based on
Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book.
Koechlin (Paysages et marines — excerpts;
Finale — The Joy — Piano Quintet No 1;
Spring in the Forest; Mowgli; The Running;
and Night — The Spring Running —
symphonic poem after The Jungle Book) (r)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Mozart from the Harpa Concert Hall in
Reykjavik, as part of Radio 3’s celebration of
50 years of the European Broadcasting
Union’s music exchange — a swapping service
between European broadcasters — this
week’s lunchtime concerts come from a range
of concert halls. Presented by Ian Skelly.
Mozart (Larghetto and Allegro in E flat);
Arvo Pärt (Spiegel im Spiegel); and
Mozart (Rondo in D, K485; and
Piano Quartet No 1 in G minor, K478)
Paul Hollywood revealed the sensitivity beneath his machismo
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Tom McKinney presents concerts from across
Europe this week. Today’s selection includes
Herbert Blomstedt’s 90th birthday concert
with the Swedish Radio Symphony, plus the
Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra recorded
at the Prague Spring International Music
Festival. Beethoven (Symphony No 3 in E flat
— Eroica); Strauss (Tod und Verklärung);
Wagner (Overture: Tannhäuser); Smetana
(Overture: The Bartered Bride); Schumann
(Piano Concerto in A minor, Op 54); and
Beethoven (Symphony No 6 in F — Pastoral)
5.00 In Tune
Katie Derham presents a lively mix of music,
chat and arts news. Her guests include the
jazz vocalist Pete Horsfall and his band.
Including 5.00, 6.00 News
7.00 In Tune Mixtape
A specially curated playlist includes Pictures
by Mussorgsky, a dance by Dvorak as well as
Britten’s dazzling depiction of the sun-god,
Young Apollo
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
Edward Gardner conducts a concert
celebrating the Philharmonia Chorus’
60th anniversary featuring three English
composers. Presented by Sara Mohr-Pietsch,
recorded on Sunday 5 November at the Royal
Festival Hall. Elgar (Overture: In the South
— Alassio); Joseph Phibbs (Clarinet
Concerto); and Walton (Belshazzar’s Feast)
10.00 Free Thinking
The Rt Hon David Willetts talks to Philip
Dodd about universities. The UK Minister for
Universities and Science from 2010 to 2014,
his new book considers both the history
and the global role they now play
10.45 The Essay:
More Letters to Writers
Continuing his series of imaginary
correspondences, Ian Sansom finds himself
once again in the gutter, looking at the stars.
As his dispatches to the world’s great writers
resume, he finds himself increasingly
shocked by their decidedly frank answers
11.00 Late Junction
The Wire editor Derek Walmsley is Verity
Sharp’s guest tonight, exploring how
collectives are increasingly shaping the
sounds of now. Also in the show, there’s
music direct to your bloodstream as Verity
shares industrial-strength bass music from
the producer and former Napalm Death
drummer Mick Harris that, “under the right
circumstances”, promises stampedes
12.30am Through the Night
Catriona Young presents a concert of
Mozart, Schumann and Ravel by the
Modigliani Quartet
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
8.30 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 The Long View
Comparing Russian meddling in America with
the covert British activities to bring America
into the war effort in the 1940s (2/4)
9.30 One to One
A selection of respected broadcasters
interview people whose stories interest
them the most (2/5)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Living with the Gods
Neil MacGregor on societies who have
banished religion
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Presented by Jane Garvey. Including at 10.45
the 15 Minute Drama: Part two of Ben
Cottam’s comedy drama The Latvian Locum
11.00 The End of Sand
Yogita Limaye investigates concerns that
vital reserves of sand may be running out (r)
11.30 A Call to Art
An insight into the revival of protest
art in Peru and Argentina (3/3)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Sarah Daniels (12/40)
12.15 Call You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Book of the Week:
Lou Reed — A Life
Demetri Goritsas reads from Anthony
DeCurtis’s biography of the musician.
In part two, the Velvet Underground
become The Factory’s house band (2/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Day Release
By Peter Jukes. Frank helps out in a
restorative justice conference, but a police
intelligence report about his daughter spurs
him to look for his own kind of justice (2/3)
3.00 Short Cuts (3/6)
3.30 Mastertapes
Emeli Sandé answers questions about her
debut Our Version of Events (2/8)
4.00 I Was
Annie Ross, who stood in for Billie Holiday
at Harlem’s Apollo Theatre (1/4) (r)
4.30 A Good Read
The comedians Nish Kumar and Katy Brand
discuss their favourite books (9/9)
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
The show itself was pleasant and
light, with Hollywood coming across
rather well. The highlight was seeing
his Bake Off audition tape from 2010,
which had the long-ago feel of a Pathé
newsreel. You could see the very
moment this nervous, stuttering baker
got the gig. “This sort of product, erm,
is what you’re looking for in some
bread,” he said, waggling a baguette
about. But then came the seeded knot.
Those blue eyes narrowed. “It looks
pale, it looks ill, it looks disgusting.
I wouldn’t give that to my dog.”
Boo, hiss! Give him the job!
You might have already been
familiar with the White Helmets, an
ad hoc group of men in Aleppo who
move heaven and earth, and rubble,
to try to save lives after the daily
airstrikes inflicted on the city. But last
night’s Storyville: Last Men in Aleppo
was still remarkable. It was a jolting
first-person account that did not flinch
from the horrors it encountered. It was
so immersive that you felt caked in
dust just watching. I don’t need to tell
you how horrific it is to watch babies
being pulled, lifeless, from collapsed
buildings, so I will end on a chink of
light that the documentary captured.
Playing football, in a rare quiet
moment, one of the White Helmets
kicked the ball into a grumpy chap’s
moped. He burst it. It was like a scene
out of Dad’s Army and a poignant
reminder that life, somehow, goes on.
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 Ed Reardon’s Week
Ed introduces Maggie to his children (6/6)
7.00 The Archers
Noluthando has some tough love for Freddie
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Living with the Gods (r)
8.00 Is Uni Worth It?
Two sixth formers, one from a state school
once in special measures and another
from a private school, discuss the cost of
university. See Radio Choice
8.40 In Touch
News, views and information for people
who are blind or partially sighted
9.00 All in the Mind
Programme exploring the limits and
potential of the human minds (5/8)
9.30 The Long View (2/4) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Rabbit Redux
By John Updike. While the moon landing
gets underway, Harry and Janice unearth
the truth about their broken marriage.
Read by Toby Jones (2/10)
11.00 Miss Marple’s Final Cases
Agatha Christie dramatisation by Joy
Wilkinson (1/3) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Lou Reed — A Life (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Ken Dodd Show 8.30 The Men
from the Ministry 9.00 The Now Show 9.30
The Adventures of John and Tony 10.00
Plantagenet 11.00 Stories from Songwriters
11.15 Wolf 12.00 The Ken Dodd Show
12.30pm The Men from the Ministry 1.00
Rogue Male 1.30 The Beat Hotel 2.00
Dangerous Visions: Never Let Me Go 2.15
Cosmic Quest 2.30 An Expert in Murder 2.45
Room Full of Mirrors 3.00 Plantagenet 4.00
Wordaholics 4.30 The Adventures of John
and Tony 5.00 1834 5.30 Ed Reardon’s Week
6.00 Ice 6.30 Dad Made Me Laugh 7.00 The
Ken Dodd Show. Comedy from May,1964
7.30 The Men from the Ministry. The duo are
sent to Cornwall and get embroiled in dodgy
doings 8.00 Rogue Male. Thriller by Geoffrey
Household. First aired in 2004 8.30 The Beat
Hotel. The role a Parisian hotel played for the
Beat Generation writers 9.00 Stories from
Songwriters. One Swallow by You Are Wolf,
the artist known as Kerry Andrew
9.15 Wolf. By Alan Harris. Darkly comic tale
about a man who will do whatever it takes to
get ahead in journalism 10.00 Comedy Club:
Ed Reardon’s Week. Comedy starring
Christopher Douglas as a curmudgeonly
author 10.30 In and Out of the Kitchen.
Damien arrives in the Lake District to film
his new television programme Poets And
Their Palates 11.00 Revolting People.
Comedy with Andy Hamilton
11.30 Vent. Comedy with Neil Pearson
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Adrian Chiles 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport
8.00 5 Live Sport: Premier League Football
2017-18 — Watford v Manchester United
(Kick-off 8.00). Commentary from Vicarage
Road 10.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live Football
Social 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ray Parlour 10.00 Jim White, Micky
Gray and Bob Mills 1.00pm Hawksbee and
Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc
Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Tom Ravenscroft 1.00am
The First Time with Bob Stanley 2.00
The Look of Love: The Story of the New
Romantics 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Jane Jones 5.00 Classic FM
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00 The Full
Works Concert. Emma Nelson features works
which have made their mark on the classical
music scene throughout history. Grieg
(Piano Concerto in A minor); Saint-Saëns
(Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso); Mozart
(Symphony No.41 in C — “Jupiter”); and
Dvorák (Symphony No.7 in D minor) 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Tuesday November 28 2017
11
1G T
artsfirst night
TRISTRAM KENTON
Pop
Fleet Foxes
O2 Brixton Academy, SW9
Concert
London Sinfonietta
St John’s Smith Square, SW1
I
A
{{{{(
t’s remarkable what a trip to the
Lake District and a couple of old
Steeleye Span albums can lead to.
In 2005 Robin Pecknold, 19, left his
native Seattle for a sightseeing trip
around Cumbria. Inspired by its misty
beauty and the early 1970s British
folk he listened to there, Pecknold
returned to the US to make an album
funded by a couple of maxed-out
credit cards. Freewheeling but hymnal,
like the missing link between Crosby,
Stills and Nash and a Gregorian chant,
the 2008 album Fleet Foxes should
have been a niche concern. Incredibly
it was a huge hit, ushering in a
folk-rock revival and throwing Fleet
Foxes’ intense, interior frontman into
a spotlight he was ill prepared for.
By 2012 it all got too much and
Pecknold retreated, enrolling as an
undergraduate at Columbia
University. This year’s comeback
album, Crack-Up, is a complex triumph
documenting in elliptical form
Pecknold’s burnout and rebirth, while
the first of two nights at Brixton
showed just how remarkable Fleet
Foxes can be. “It’s been too long,”
Pecknold said before almost two hours
of shifting, impressionistic music that
expanded on the band’s original
template to go everywhere from free
jazz to heavy rock while never losing
the ancient, spectral quality that made
them stand out in the first place.
With Pecknold and Skyler Skjelset
swapping guitars constantly and
Morgan Henderson playing everything
from flute to tuba to double bass, this
could not have been an easy concert
to perform. It began with I Am All
That I Need/Arroyo Seco/Thumbprint
Scar, the musically rich, lyrically
impenetrable three-parter opening to
Crack-Up, but with the band members
honed so tightly and the sound so
unusually clear (for a rock concert) it
was a pleasure to be challenged by it.
Old favourites such as the lullabylike White Winter Hymnal and the
stark, folky Tiger Mountain Peasant
Song, performed by Pecknold solo on
acoustic guitar, softened the shock of
the new. The mid-Noughties folk-rock
boom is long gone, but the band that
inaugurated it have returned as one of
the most accomplished acts out there.
Will Hodgkinson
Dance
Amore
London Coliseum
{{{((
The Gruffalo’s
Child comes to
the West End
First Night, main paper
F
{{{{(
Faith Omole as Jack, Kayla Meikle as Daisy the Cow and Kraig Thornber as Dame Lotte Trottalot
Bonkers but full of beans
Despite its
insincerity,
this outrageous
panto will
satisfy fans,
says Dominic
Maxwell
Theatre
Jack and the
Beanstalk
Lyric, W6
{{{((
or fans of the Russian
ballerina Svetlana Zakharova,
this was a bumper evening.
A trio of international
choreographers featured on
this London triple bill, simply titled
Amore, and Zakharova was the
centrepiece of each of their works.
Whatever the quality of the
choreography on offer — and it was
uneven — the willowy Bolshoi
ballerina was out of this world.
Yuri Possokhov (formerly of the
Bolshoi himself) offered Francesca da
Rimini, a stylised take on the Divine
Comedy tale about the tragic love
affair between unhappily married
Francesca and young Paolo. It’s set to
Tchaikovsky’s 25-minute symphonic
poem, played by the English National
Opera Orchestra with Pavel Sorokin
conducting, and with a set design
that references Rodin’s sculpture
The Gates of Hell.
I
t’s that time of the year again, and
if you find the tradition of panto all
too absurd, then the Lyric’s latest
offering may be just the seasonal
treat for you. As is customary here,
it’s a panto that is so knowingly
bonkers, it is virtually a spoof of itself.
It’s a colourful, outrageous adventure
that’s never too far from its next big
set piece; its next nod; its next wink.
That’s its biggest virtue and
also its setback: the best pantos,
the ones that beguile for the full
two hours plus, squeeze in sincerity
as well as tomfoolery. Yet there is
plenty to celebrate since its gag-happy
writer, Joel Horwood, jiggles with
more gender roles than just the
usual man-in-a-dress dame
(represented well here by Kraig
Thornber plying old-school wordplay
from under a watering-can hat as
Dame Lotte Trottalot).
Faith Omole is a fine Jack, trying to
pay off a year’s rent with the carrots
that she alone appears to be able to
grow in an otherwise barren London.
Daniel Fraser wears a ruff and a Lord
Percy wig as Jill, the milquetoast son
of Vikki Stone’s villainous Fleshcreep.
Stone plies terrific, overgrown-toddler
energy as this awful local landlord.
Whether she is firing out fiendish
With passion, jealousy and murder
on the menu, it’s a melodramatic
love triangle, augmented by an
ensemble of ladies-in-waiting (who
act out Francesca’s emotions) and
a trio of men, billed as Guardians
of the Inferno. Zakharova emoted
grandly as Dante’s desperate heroine,
while her fabulously extended limbs
and silken phrasing made even the
most ungainly aspects of Possokhov’s
knotted choreography look glorious.
Denis Rodkin was a pretty-boy
Paolo and Mikhail Lobukhin
went into embarrassing dramatic
overdrive (a bad Russian habit) as
the nasty husband.
The German dance-maker
Patrick de Bana created The Rain
Before it Falls for Zakharova and
danced in it himself (with Denis
Savin). It’s another enigmatic trio — a
room, a woman, two men — that runs
the gamut of emotions on a mostly
one-liners from behind her drawn-on
beard or dressing up in knowingly
weak disguises, her scene-stealing
lights up the stage.
Kayla Meikle as Daisy the Cow
and Cherelle Skeete as the Fairy
Godmother also impress. They are all
such good singers, though, that you
might wish for a moment in which to
sit back and enjoy them dashing their
way through Motown tunes or recent
hits (Ed Sheeran, Clean Bandit)
without everything getting subverted
quite so quickly.
Granted, Sean Holmes and Jude
Christian’s zippy production allows for
some moments of wonder: the giant
beanstalk that breaks through Jack’s
bed up to the ceiling, say. There is a
touch of the trendy teacher, though,
about a show where every scene is
more about knowingness than it is
about enchantment. So it’s hard to
swallow the idea that we should
believe in magic from a panto so keen
to prove that it would never be so
sappy as to take any of this rubbish
seriously. The details are too inventive
to resist for long. I just wish it were
uncool enough to play a few moments
straight, if only to give the subversions
something solid to play against.
Box office: 020 8741 6850, to Jan 6
Svetlana Zakharova and Denis
Rodkin in Francesca da Rimini
empty stage. Zakharova, dressed in
fetching purple, angled her body into
a masterpiece of expressionism,
although even she couldn’t overcome
fter 50 years and more
than 400 premieres, the
London Sinfonietta is
entitled to a season of
retrospective selfcongratulation. Not that there was
anything too complacent about this
programme, which revisited four
ferociously challenging miniatures
written for the Sinfonietta and
stunningly revived under Martyn
Brabbins’s unflappable direction.
They ranged from the late 1970s,
when Harrison Birtwistle wrote Silbury
Air (although we heard the 2003
revision) through the early 1980s
(Iannis Xenakis’s Thalleïn and
Wolfgang Rihm’s Chiffre ii: Silence
to be beaten) to the early 1990s
(Colin Matthews’s Contraflow).
So plenty of variety, then? Well,
up to a point. It’s a weakness of the
Sinfonietta’s legacy that, although
new-music connoisseurs are able to
spot the differences between the four
pieces, non-specialists would probably
have felt that they occupied very
much the same fierce sonic landscape.
Partly that’s because the ensemble’s
line-up — basically one each of every
orchestral instrument — more or less
dictates a certain sonic spectrum.
However, there’s also the question
of whether its commissioning policy
concentrated too much on a narrow
group of post-serialists, especially in
the 1970s and 1980s, when, we know
with the benefit of hindsight, the really
fresh thinking was coming from the
American minimalists and others
outside the magic circle of composers
approved by Pierre Boulez.
At 20 or 30 years’ distance, for
instance, the Xenakis and Rihm pieces
sounded tortured but diffuse and the
Birtwistle typically multi-layered and
multi-pulsed, but pretty dense and
unfathomable (rather like Silbury Hill
itself). Significantly it was the
Matthews piece, probably the least
“progressive” of the four, that wore its
age best; it was clear and concise, with
jazzy flecks and a gradual wind-down
of energy to a beguilingly tranquil end.
It was interesting to hear these
craggy avant-garde classics again, but
I’m glad we are living in a more
diverse and less dogmatic era.
Richard Morrison
the mystifying torment and aimless
ambition of De Bana’s occasionally
creepy choreography.
After that we needed a break from
gloom and doom and we got it in the
form of jolly japes from the Irish
choreographer Marguerite Donlon.
Her Strokes Through the Tail (the title
comes from the shorthand musical
notation of repeated notes) was
inspired by listening to Mozart’s
40th Symphony (the ENO Orchestra
again). As Donlon says: “Soon the
notes metamorphosed into dancers
and I clearly saw five men and one
exquisite ballerina.” Exquisite indeed.
Even with Donlon’s mischief-making
choreography, Zakharova emerged
as a magnificent and mesmerising
creature of the stage, happy to
be a playmate in this high-spirited
and eccentric romp, superbly
performed by all.
Debra Craine
12
1G T
Tuesday November 28 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Grand Designs:
House of the Year
Channel 4, 9pm
The Riba
House of the
Year is always
a little bit
like art’s Turner prize.
Usually the winner
is not the most
aesthetically pleasing,
Early
Top
pick
but a work that
challenges and pushes
forward the form.
Pretentious? Riba?
Kevin McCloud,
however, is in his
element as he presents
the last of those on the
longlist — this week’s
offerings are “naked
minimalism” — before
announcing the seventh
building to make the
shortlist and revealing
the overall winner. The
first of the four “nude”
houses profiled tonight
is Highgate House in
north London, a bricky,
blocky thing that gets
McCloud in a lather. It’s
an “ode to brick”, he
says, it’s “monumental
minimalism . . .
or minimal
monumentalism”. It is
“not to be trifled with”
and McCloud loves it.
To me it looks like a
rather funky modern
library, but then I don’t
have to live in it. Next
up is Hidden House,
also in London, which
— you guessed it — is
hidden away between
towering edifices in
Islington. The scrap of
land on which a school
caretaker’s shed stood
has been transformed
into “a Swiss army
knife” of a house. Third
is Peacock House, on
the Suffolk coast, made
up of three barn-like
buildings constructed
around an outside
courtyard, which the
residents describe as
“the main room in the
house”. In Britain?
Are they mad? Finally
we have Whole
House, also in London,
another ingenious
space solution — it
was carved into a tiny
space that used to be
a garage.
The A Word
BBC One, 9pm
You’d have to have a
heart like a granite
batholith not to warm
to Peter Bowker’s
drama — if nothing
else thanks to the
stunning Lake District
vistas. After revealing
his thought-crime
infidelity last week
Paul is bundled off to
Manchester with Alison
to see if they can patch
up their crumbling
relationship, while
Eddie seems curiously
keen to teach Joe to
ride his bike, rather
than spend the
weekend with his
“Manchester
girlfriend”. Elsewhere,
Maurice has an
epiphany at a fell race
and Ralph has a date.
As ever, it is all
beautifully understated.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Claimed and Shamed. A bogus
injury scam is foiled 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer.
Properties about to be auctioned in Devon, Lancashire and
Derby (AD) 11.00 The Housing Enforcers. Challenges
facing tenants on the Scilly Isles (r) 11.45 The Sheriffs
Are Coming. Officers Tommy and Craig seek out the boss
of a steel company which owes money to a former
employee 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. A pair of students take
on two Australians in Malvern (r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at
One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. With Lily’s condition worsening and the baby’s
birth imminent, Austin realises there is someone he
needs to call, while DI Stanton takes drastic action
to protect Zara, Daniel and Joe (AD) 2.15 Armchair
Detectives. A mystery B&B guest is found dead in Susan
Calman’s whodunit quiz 3.00 Escape to the Country.
A retired Burton upon Trent couple look for a south Devon
home (AD) 3.45 Royal Recipes. Michael Buerk and Anna
Haugh cook a favourite dish of Princess Anne (AD) 4.30
Flog It! Valuing antiques in Gloucester (r) 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am An Island Parish: Sark (r) (AD) 6.30 Claimed and
Shamed (r) 7.15 Royal Recipes (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign Zone:
Great British Menu: The Finals (r) (SL) 9.00 Victoria
Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily
Politics 1.00pm The Link (r) 1.45 Terry and Mason’s
Great Food Trip (r) 2.15 Channel Patrol. The crew of Navy
destroyer HMS Duncan is put to the test in a simulated
battle, while a team from Southampton harbour patrol
works to keep the busy port running during a boat show
(r) 3.00 The Indian Doctor. Richard Sharpe asks local
street urchin Dan Griffiths to steal a mysterious diary
from the surgery (r) (AD) 3.45 Oxford Street Revealed.
Plainclothes police officers tackle the problem of drug
dealers (r) 4.15 Wartime Farm. Ruth Goodman, Alex
Langlands and Peter Ginn prepare for D-Day by growing
flax used in parachute webbing, fighter aircraft fuselages
and ropes, and learn about carrier pigeons (r) (AD) 5.15
Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is. Eric Knowles and
Catherine Southon go head-to-head at a car boot sale in
London (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy
Vine 6.30 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two. Zoe Ball
chats to more couples about their training progress
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment, current affairs
and fashion news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and
gossip. Presented by Lorraine Kelly 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip
Schofield and Holly Willoughby present chat and lifestyle
features, including a look at the stories making the
newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen. Including
Local Weather 12.30pm Loose Women. The boxer Ricky
Hatton drops into the studio to discuss his career, and the
team also talks about the day’s topical issues 1.30 ITV
News; Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras follow
criminal barrister Robert Rinder as he takes on real-life
cases in a studio courtroom 3.00 Dickinson’s Real Deal.
David Dickinson and his team visit Edinburgh, where
David Hakeney locks horns over a bronze moose and
Henry Nicholls pins his hopes on a piece of jewellery
(r) 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the
arcade-themed quiz show (r) 5.00 The Chase.
Bradley Walsh presents the quiz show 6.00
Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares USA. Gordon Ramsay visits a
family-owned restaurant in Monrovia, California (r) 11.00
Undercover Boss USA. The President and COO of Rollins
Incorporated works incognito (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News
Summary 12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Dinner-party
challenge from Eastbourne 1.05 Kirstie’s Handmade
Christmas. Kirstie Allsopp visits Slovakia (r) (AD) 2.10
Countdown. Linda Papadopoulos is in Dictionary Corner
3.00 Lost and Found. Eight smelly puppies are rescued
and need to clean up their act in new homes 4.00 A Place
in the Sun: Winter Sun. A Sunderland couple seek the
perfect Spanish property with a £55,000 budget 5.00 Four
in a Bed. The second visit is to the Victoria Bikers pub in
Leicestershire 5.30 Come Dine with Me. A teacher hopes
to impress her Newcastle guests with a ginger-themed
menu 6.00 The Simpsons. Principal Skinner introduces
a unique incentive to make pupils behave. Meanwhile,
Lisa helps Krusty with his money troubles (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Myra promises to film Neeta’s memorial for
Hunter, unaware that he is planning to attend (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and guests talk about the issues of the day, with
viewers calling in to offer their opinions 11.35 FILM: 40
Below and Falling at Christmas (PG, TVM, 2015)
When a teacher is forced to travel to her impending
wedding in a blizzard with a stranger, she is left
questioning her future plans. Romantic comedy with
Jewel Staite 1.25pm 5 News at Lunchtime 1.30
Neighbours (AD) 2.00 FILM: The Christmas Switch
(PG, 2014) A hustler is asked to magically swap bodies
with a dying man at Christmas in return for either a
million dollars or having all his past sins forgiven. He
chooses the money, but as he watches the other man
using his body to do good deeds, he begins to reconsider
what is important in his life. Fantasy starring Brian
Krause and Cedric Smith 3.40 FILM: Snowmance
(PG, TVM, 2016) A woman recovering from a break-up
wonders if she will ever find true love. Romantic comedy
starring Ashley Newbrough, Jesse Hutch and Adam Hurtig
5.30 5 News at 5.30 6.00 Neighbours. Paige becomes
concerned about Mark’s recent behaviour and questions
their relationship (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
Get a
Armistead Maupin – How I wrote Tales of the City
The Perfect
Christmas Gift
Paula Byrne Celebrated houses of fiction
Edward Allen Marianne Moore, and more
Nabeelah Jaffer Islam and Britishness
Libby Purves Tinder of the 1940s
SEPTEMBER 15 2017 No. 5972
972
n
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THE TIMES LITERARY
ARY SU
SUPPLEMENT
Patrick J. Murray Montaigne’s social network
Jamie Fisher Angry like Mailer
Charlotte Shane Provocations of feminism
Samuel Earle Never getting bored of Barthes
SEPTEMBER 29 2017 No. 5974
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THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
SEPTEMBER 22 2017 No. 5973
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THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
Tales of addiction
Inspirations of Dante
Rowan Williams
Ian Thomson
Wandering, wondering
£20
Laura Freeman Dress like a writer
Colin Grant Lost voices of immigration
Anne McElvoy The passion of Merkel
Krishan Kumar On statues and Nazis
UK £3.50 USA $8.99
UK £3
Eric J. Iannelli
Terri Apter
UK £3.50 USA $8.99
Waterstones
Gift Card when
you subscribe
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Annette Kobak on women and the Grand Tour
Jan Marsh on Ruskin in Europe
7PM
8PM
8.00 Holby City In light of Nina’s news,
Matteo can no longer run from their
past, and Jac faces mounting
pressures, both personal and
professional. Meanwhile,
an unwelcome visitor puts
Donna in a tough position (AD)
9.00 The A Word Worried that her parents
are starting to pull apart, Rebecca
packs Paul and Alison off for the
weekend in an attempt to make them
reconnect. Back home at the Lakes,
Maurice has a crisis during a fell race,
and Eddie tries to teach Joe to ride a
bike. See Viewing Guide (4/6) (AD)
Late
11PM
10PM
7.00 The One Show Another mix
of nationwide reports and live
studio-based chat hosted by
Matt Baker and Alex Jones
7.30 EastEnders The Carters plan a party
for Woody and Whitney’s departure,
while Phil tries to find out why Aidan
was meeting up with Vincent (AD)
9PM
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10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.45 Drugsland Cameras follow Rich and
Jo, a couple united in love and their
heroin habit. To try and deal with
begging and rough sleeping in the city
centre, the council and police have
joined forces. Police officer Mark
Blackledge and council worker
Richard Hawkridge are hoping the
couple will accept their help or will
the couple end up in prison (2/4)
11.45 Life and Death Row Capital
punishment through the eyes of young
people whose lives have been shaped
by it, featuring the case of Daniel
Lopez, who was pulled over for driving
erratically in 2009 (1/3) (r) (AD)
12.50am-6.00 BBC News
6.55 Live MOTD: England Women v
Kazakhstan Women
(Kick-off 7.05). Coverage of the 2019
World Cup qualifier, which takes place
at the Weston Homes Community
Stadium in Colchester. These countries
have never met before, and the home
side — now managed by Mo Marley
following the departure of Mark
Sampson — will come into the fixture
as heavy favourites against the
minnows, who are ranked 66th in the
world, 63 places below the Lionesses
7.00 Emmerdale Bob wants to make
amends for forgetting Brenda’s
birthday, and Lawrence faces the
shocking truth about Robert (AD)
7.30 Save Money: Good Food The team
helps a Rotherham family cut the cost
of their meals, and Susanna Reid
investigates premium smoothies (2/5)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Yorkshire: A Year in the Wild
Autumn is on hold as summer
continues, with balmy conditions
throwing a life line to the roe deer as
they prepare for the winter ahead. For
other animals, mating season has
arrived, making for a dangerous time
at Ravenscar Beach (3/4) (r)
8.00 How to Spend It Well at
Christmas with Phillip Schofield
New series. The presenter reveals the
must-have toys for Christmas 2017,
Jonathan Ross investigates nostalgic
toys from years gone by, and Stacey
Solomon tests the latest physical
board games for December 25 (1/3)
8.00 The Secret Life of 5 Year Olds
Cameras reveal how five-year-olds
including talented maths fan Nathan,
socially nervous Daisy, and romantics
Jack and Miylah, learn to recognise
and deal with risk (4/4) (AD)
8.00 Jo Brand’s Cats & Kittens Inspector
Anthony rescues a cat who has given
birth under a disused cabin. Cameras
also follow Chloe, a cat who has been
stuck up a tree for five days, and
Jo meets a woman who runs a cat
sanctuary at her home (3/6)
9.00 MasterChef: The Professionals
Challenges for the six chefs include
making a filled pasta dish with a sauce
to accompany it. They must also make
a signature dish to be judged by
Monica Galetti, Marcus Wareing
and Gregg Wallace (AD)
9.00 I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of
Here! Ant and Dec present the
survival challenge, as the famous
faces continue their ordeal in the
Australian jungle, struggling to
complete the tough daily tasks
and dreaded Bushtucker Trials
9.00 Grand Designs: House of the Year
Kevin McCloud reveals the winner
of the most prestigious prize for
residential architecture, the Royal
Institute of British Architects
House of the Year 2017.
See Viewing Guide (4/4) (AD)
9.00 Ben Fogle: New Lives in the Wild
The presenter travels to Missouri to
live with wilderness expert Bo, who
gave up life on the road with his band
to teach Stone Age skills to modern
day man. Ben discovers how his host
combines a primitive life with the
need to survive in the present (7/8)
10.00 The Robot Will See You Now
Cameras follow a personal assistant
robot called Jess. Together with her
team of operator assistants, Jess uses
AI-based analysis to offer couples
and families advice on some of the
problems that life throws up.
See Viewing Guide (AD)
10.00 The 90s: The Most Shocking
Celebrity Moments A countdown of
infamous incidents from the 1990s,
including Hugh Grant’s arrest and OJ
Simpson’s murder trial. The programme
also looks back at Eric Cantona kicking
a fan during a match, Jarvis Cocker
interrupting Michael Jackson’s
performance at the Brit awards,
and David and Victoria Beckham’s
lavish wedding. Featuring contributions
from Louis Walsh, Shaun Ryder,
Bez, Michael Burke, Darren Day, Gail
Porter, Tim Vincent, Liz McClarnon
and Kerry Katona (2/3) (r)
10.00 Motherland While Paul is away,
he sends his parents to help Julia.
See Viewing Guide (4/6) (AD)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day’s
events presented by Evan Davis
11.15 NFL This Week Mark Chapman
presents action from the 12th round of
fixtures, which included Pittsburgh
Steelers v Green Bay Packers, New
England Patriots v Miami Dolphins and
Philadelphia Eagles v Chicago Bears
12.05am Extreme Wives with Kate Humble In
north-east India, Kate encounters the Khasi people, who
practise a matrilineal way of life (r) (AD) 1.05 Sign Zone:
The Apprentice. The candidates are tasked with running
a selection of services for dog owners (r) (SL) 2.05-3.30
Basquiat: Rage to Riches. Documentary (r) (AD, SL)
10.05 ITV News
10.35 Regional News
10.45 On Assignment John Ray
investigates a natural disaster in
Sierra Leone, John Irvine looks into a
controversy surrounding the Taj Mahal,
and Debi Edward meets Mongolian
sumo wrestlers (9/10)
11.20 Lethal Weapon While investigating
a series of violent crimes connected
to a church, Riggs faces a moral
dilemma of his own when the first
anniversary of Miranda’s death
sends him to a new low (r) (AD)
12.15am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 Loose Women. The boxer Ricky Hatton
drops into the studio to discuss his career, and the team
also talks about the day’s topical issues (r) 3.50 ITV
Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
11.05 Gogglebox The armchair critics share
their opinions on programmes including
I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!,
The Weakest Link Celebrity Special for
Children in Need, Mary Berry’s Country
House Secrets, The Secret Life of the
Zoo, Blue Planet II, The Theory of
Everything and the News (r) (AD)
12.10am Music on 4: The Great Songwriters Noel
Gallagher talks about his life in music 1.05 Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 1.55 One Born Every Minute
(r) (AD) 2.50 The Search for a Miracle Cure (r) (AD, SL)
3.45 Grand Designs Australia (r) 4.40 Best of Both
Worlds (r) (SL) 5.35-6.20 Countdown (r)
1.00am SuperCasino Live interactive gaming 3.10
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. A baby is abandoned
outside a gym (r) (AD) 4.00 Now That’s Funny!
Pleasure seekers get more than they bargained for at an
amusement park (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
Divine Designs (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick’s Quest (r) (SL)
the times | Tuesday November 28 2017
13
1G T
television & radio
Passions
Sky Arts, 9pm
Previous episodes of
this marvellous series
have shone new light
on some of the biggest
names in the arts —
Noël Coward, William
Blake, Philip Larkin —
but Chi-chi Nwanoku
takes on a different
task. Her inspiration
is the mixed-race
British composer
Samuel ColeridgeTaylor (Hiawatha’s
Wedding Feast) and via
his often-overlooked
story Nwanoku sets
out to rediscover the
lost works of black
classical music. She
recently founded
Chineke!, Europe’s first
black and minority
ethnic orchestra, whose
first performance
was of a work by
Coleridge-Taylor.
Motherland
BBC Two, 10pm
Apologies to the
hands-on grandparents
out there — you
are next in line for a
drubbing in the sitcom
that takes no prisoners.
With Julia (Anna
Maxwell Martin)
desperate for childcare,
her considerate
husband (on a stag do,
naturally) sends his
parents over to help, a
proposition that Julia
finds about as welcome
as having her kneecap
scraped. David Calder
and Penny Ryder are
perfect as the doddery
in-laws who “don’t
want to get in the way”
yet manage to turn
everything into a
teeth-clenching chore.
Calder’s way with a
bowl of soup is a minor
comic masterpiece.
The Robot Will
See You Now
Channel 4, 10pm
Have you grown
comfortable yet asking
Siri what the weather
will be like or getting
Alexa to recommend
something for dinner?
If so, you may be ready
for the next-level AI
helper. Jess, a personal
assistant robot, doesn’t
just answer the small
questions, she helps
with the big ones too —
marriage problems,
infidelity, dating advice.
This programme asks if
we are ready to trust
our secrets to
something that looks
like a fancy Hoover.
Sport Choice
BT Sport 1, 7.15pm
In a round of midweek
fixtures in the Premier
League, Watford
welcome Manchester
United to Vicarage
Road (kick-off 8pm).
The Hornets have been
in excellent form
this season, with the
Brazilian forward
Richarlison proving an
inspired signing. The
Red Devils, meanwhile,
can once again call on
the talents of Zlatan
Ibrahimovic, who has
returned from injury.
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Monkey Life (r) (AD) 8.00 Animal 999
(r) 9.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD) 10.00
Monkey Life (r) (AD) 11.00 Modern Family (r)
12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 1.00pm Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 4.00
Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00 The Simpsons (r)
5.30 Futurama. Bender finds fame (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry makes a deal (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 The Flash. Barry comes face to face
with DeVoe, whose past is revealed
9.00 Strike Back: Retribution. Novin infiltrates
the home of a Belarusian drug lord
10.00 Sick Note. Dr Glennis hatches a plan to
make Daniel’s fake illness more believable
10.30 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
11.30 A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
12.30am Road Wars. Vehicle crime (r) 1.00
The Force: Essex (r) 1.30 Duck Quacks Don’t
Echo 2.00 Night Cops (r) (AD) 3.00 Brit Cops:
Frontline Crime UK (r) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r)
6.00am Richard E Grant’s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
7.00 Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 Storm City (r) (AD)
9.00 The West Wing (r) 11.00 House (r) (AD)
1.00pm Without a Trace (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods
(r) (AD) 3.00 The West Wing (r) 5.00 House (r)
6.00 House. The curmudgeonly doctor lends
a hand at the scene of a disaster (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
A warehouse freezer becomes a crime scene (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Jamie and Eddie respond
to a distress call from a woman (r) (AD)
9.00 Spielberg. The acclaimed documentarian
Susan Lacy pulls back the curtain on the
remarkable career of one of the most illustrious
filmmakers in the world, Steven Spielberg (r)
11.40 Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry is
blackmailed by an employee and
tormented by someone from his past (r)
12.30am FILM: The Immortal Life Of
Henrietta Lacks (TVM, 2017) Drama
starring Oprah Winfrey and Rose Byrne (r)
2.30 The Wire (r) 4.25 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Gold Coast Cops (r) 12.00 Border
Security: America’s Front Line (r) (AD) 1.00pm
Stop, Search, Seize (r) (AD) 2.00 Nothing to
Declare (r) (AD) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.00 Criminal Minds. Gideon interrogates
a serial killer in a Nevada restaurant (r)
7.00 My Kitchen Rules New Zealand. Childhood
friends serve up a date-night dessert
8.00 Elementary. A pioneering cancer
researcher is found dead (r)
9.00 Chicago Fire. Cruz finds himself in a bad
spot when an off-duty incident begins to unravel
10.00 World’s Most Evil Killers. A profile of
travelling German serial killer Volker Eckert
11.00 Criminal Minds. Four men disappear (r)
12.00 Bones. Double bill (r) (AD) 2.00am
Criminal Minds (r) 4.00 My Kitchen Rules
New Zealand 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Classical Destinations 6.10 Christmas
in Norway with the St Olaf Choir 7.25 Prokofiev:
Violin Concerto 8.00 Auction 8.30 Watercolour
Challenge 9.00 Tales of the Unexpected (AD)
10.00 Talks Music (AD) 11.00 Trailblazers: New
Romantics 12.00 Discovering: Rod Steiger (AD)
1.00pm Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 2.00
Watercolour Challenge 2.30 Auction 3.00
Painting the Johnsons 4.00 Landscape Artist of
the Year 2017 5.00 Discovering: U2 5.30
Watercolour Challenge 6.00 Discovering: Gina
Lollobrigida (AD) 7.00 The Seventies (AD)
8.00 Too Young to Die. Judy Garland (AD)
9.00 Passions. A tribute to the composer
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor. See Viewing Guide
10.00 The History of Comedy (AD) 11.00
The Lot of Fun: Where the Movies Learned to
Laugh 12.00 A Young Doctor’s Notebook &
Other Stories (AD) 1.00am Passions 2.00 Tales
of the Unexpected (AD) 3.00 Auction 3.30
Master of Photography (AD) 4.30 Baim Archive
5.00 The South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Live Test Cricket: India v Sri Lanka.
Coverage of the fifth day’s play in the second
Test at the Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium
in Jamtha, Nagpur 11.15 Masterclass: Kumar
Sangakkara 11.30 Sportswomen 12.00 Sky
Sports News 5.00pm Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Gillette Soccer Special. News and
results from tonight’s matches
7.30 Gillette Soccer Special. Julian Warren
introduces pre-match reports and news of
all tonight’s goals as they go in
10.30 Premier League Highlights.
Leicester City v Tottenham Hotspur
11.00 Premier League Highlights.
Brighton & Hove Albion v Crystal Palace
11.30 Premier League Highlights. West
Bromwich Albion v Newcastle United
12.00 Sky Sports News 1.00am Live WWE Late
Night Smackdown. Spectacular wrestling action
with the over-the-top stars of the States
3.00 Sky Sports News. The day’s talking points
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Spotlight. Social
and political issues 11.10 Pop Goes Northern
Ireland. A look back at the key events of 1988
(r) 11.40 Drugsland. Cameras follow a couple
of Bristol heroin addicts 12.40am Life and
Death Row (r) (AD) 1.40-6.00 BBC News
Find a lifelong companion in the TLS, the world’s leading international literary journal.
Buy a subscription to the Times Literary Supplement as a present
(even for yourself) and get a £20 Waterstones Gift Card.
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 8.00pm-9.00 River City.
Callum makes an accusation against Amber
10.45 Holby City. In light of Nina’s news,
Matteo can no longer run from their past (AD)
11.45 Drugsland. Cameras follow a couple of
Bristol heroin addicts 12.45am Life and Death
Row. A look at capital punishment through the
eyes of young people (r) (AD) 1.45 Weather
for the Week Ahead 1.50-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Man of Steel:
Sanjeev Gupta. Brian Meechan follows steel
baron Sanjeev Gupta at work 11.30 Drugsland.
Cameras follow a couple of Bristol heroin
addicts 12.30am Life and Death Row.
A look at capital punishment through the eyes
of young people (r) (AD) 1.30 Weather for
the Week Ahead 1.35-6.00 BBC News
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 True
North: The Flower Shop. Daily life at a flower
shop in West Belfast (r) 11.15 Insert Name
Here. With Hugh Dennis, Suzannah Lipscomb,
Rebecca Front and Phil Wang 11.45 NFL
This Week 12.35am-1.05 BBC News
To subscribe visit tlssubs.imbmsubs.com/tlswater12 or call 01293 312178 and quote code TLSWATER12
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days. News and analysis
from Washington DC and London
7.30 Christmas University Challenge 2015. Oriel
College, Oxford, takes on Trinity College,
Cambridge. Jeremy Paxman hosts (r)
8.00 Darcey Bussell’s Looking for Audrey. The
Strictly judge and former Royal Ballet star
Darcey Bussell explores the work and private life
of the much-loved actress Audrey Hepburn (r)
9.00 From Andy Pandy to Zebedee: The Golden
Age of Children’s TV. The story of the struggle to
deliver television programmes for children, who
were an often overlooked audience in the days
before everything went digital (r)
10.00 Arena: Ken Dodd. A tribute to the
comedian and singer, originally shown in 2007 to
mark his 80th birthday, in which he discusses
more than 50 years of making people laugh (r)
11.00 A303: Highway to the Sun. Tom Fort
charts the troubled history of the A303 (r)
12.00 The Maharajas’ Motor Car: The Story of
Rolls-Royce in India (r) 12.55am Revolution
and Romance: Musical Masters of the 19th
Century (r) (AD) 1.55 Darcey Bussell’s Looking
for Audrey (r) 2.55-3.55 Arena: Ken Dodd (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
9.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 10.00 Black-ish
(r) (AD) 11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 New Girl (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
3.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 4.00 New
Girl (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Marnie attempts to seduce a
confession out of Mac about the explosion (AD)
7.30 First Dates Abroad (r) (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory. The guys compete for
a tenured professor position. (r) (AD)
9.00 Tattoo Fixers. Lisa pays tribute to her
idol, Robbie Williams (AD)
10.00 Rude Tube. Alex Zane presents a
countdown of internet clips (r)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am Celebrity First Dates (r) (AD) 1.10
Gogglebox (r) (SL) 2.10 Tattoo Fixers (r) (AD)
3.05 Rude Tube (r) 4.00 Black-ish (r) (AD)
4.40 Charmed (r) (SL)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
10.00 Four in a Bed (r) 12.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 2.45 Come Dine with Me (r)
3.50 Time Team (r) 5.55 The Secret Life of the
Zoo. A rare okapi has mating problems (r) (AD)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick and his
team’s first patient is a West Highland terrier
puppy that has a problem with its paws (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows a
couple as they transform a neglected half-acre
site in Gloucestershire. With 27 protected trees
on the plot, their solution is to build a modern
treehouse (1/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Fatal Flight 447: Chaos in the Cockpit.
The facts behind the crash of the Air France
flight in June 2009 (r)
10.00 Flights from Hell: Caught on Camera.
Documentary exploring the extremes of human
behaviour in airports and on planes (r)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A man is treated after a
high-speed collision (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
From Plainfield, New Jersey (r) 1.05 8 Out of 10
Cats Does Countdown (r) 2.05 24 Hours in A&E
(r) (AD) 3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am The Yellow Mountain (PG, 1954)
Western starring Howard Duff 12.35pm The
Fighting Seabees (U, 1944) Second World
War drama starring John Wayne (b/w) 2.40
None Shall Escape (PG, 1944) Second World
War drama starring Alexander Knox (b/w) 4.25
The Poseidon Adventure (PG, 1972)
Terrified survivors race against time to escape
from a capsized luxury cruise liner before it
sinks. Disaster movie starring Gene Hackman
6.45 The Tourist (12, 2010) Romantic thriller
with Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie
8.50 The Riot Club Interview Special
9.00 Taken 3 (12, 2014) Ex-CIA agent Bryan
Mills fights to clear his own name after being
framed for his ex-wife’s murder. Action thriller
sequel with Liam Neeson and Forest Whitaker
11.15 99 Homes (15, 2014) A single father
tries to support his family by working for the
ruthless businessman who evicted them from
their home. Drama starring Andrew Garfield
1.30am-3.50 Animal Kingdom (18, 2010)
An orphaned teenager is adopted into his
grandmother’s criminal family. Crime thriller
starring James Frecheville and Guy Pearce
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records (r) 6.20 Planet’s Got Talent (r) 6.45
Dinner Date (r) 7.35 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.00
Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.00 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 9.50 Dinner Date (r) 10.50
I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! (r) 11.50
Planet’s Got Talent (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r)
(AD) 12.50 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.55 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Guests air their differences (r)
6.00 I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!
Dennis, Jamie, Shappi and Becky compete
in the latest challenge (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.05 I’m a Celebrity: Extra Camp.
Companion programme to the reality show
11.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! Francine tests Stan’s love
for her (r) (AD) 12.30am Plebs (r) (AD) 1.30
Release the Hounds (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Judge Judy (r) 6.20 Classic Coronation
Street (r) 7.10 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 8.15 Wild at
Heart (r) (AD) 9.10 Judge Judy (r) 10.35 A
Touch of Frost (r) 12.35pm Wild at Heart (r)
(AD) 1.40 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic
Coronation Street (r) 3.50 A Touch of Frost (r)
(AD) 5.50 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
6.55 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica investigates
the murder of a deputy’s wife (r) (AD)
8.00 Doc Martin. The doctor becomes convinced
something is wrong with him following a chat
with his mother, and Mrs Tishell visits the
surgery only to find herself falling in love with
Martin all over again (7/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Midsomer Murders. The murder of a
reclusive couple in Dunstan awakens memories
of a fatal road accident and the disappearance
of a teenager 20 years earlier for local boy
DS Ben Jones (r) (AD)
11.05 Blue Murder. Janine Lewis suffers a close
shave when a colleague is murdered just metres
away from where she is standing (1/4) (r)
12.35am A Touch of Frost (r) (AD) 2.20 ITV3
Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am British Touring Cars: Crashes and
Smashes (r) 6.10 The Chase (r) 7.45 Cash
Cowboys (r) 8.35 Pawn Stars (r) 9.30 Ironside
(r) 10.35 Quincy ME (r) 11.35 The Sweeney (r)
12.45pm The Avengers (r) 1.50 Ironside (r)
2.55 Quincy ME (r) 4.00 The Sweeney (r)
5.00 The Avengers (r)
6.05 Cash Cowboys (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 The Celebrity Chase (r)
9.00 FILM: Passenger 57 (15, 1992) An
ex-cop boards a flight on which a terrorist is
being transported to prison and becomes
embroiled in a hijack attempt. Action thriller
starring Wesley Snipes and Bruce Payne (AD)
10.50 FILM: Mars Attacks! (12, 1996)
The inhabitants of Earth scramble to repel an
invasion by a seemingly invincible Martian army.
Tim Burton’s sci-fi comedy starring Jack
Nicholson, Glenn Close and Pierce Brosnan (AD)
1.00am FILM: The Dictator (15, 2012)
Comedy starring Sacha Baron Cohen 2.40 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 12.00
American Pickers 1.00pm Top Gear (AD) 3.00
Sin City Motors (AD) 4.00 Ice Road Truckers
5.00 Timber Kings. An elaborate doghouse
6.00 Top Gear. Motoring magazine (AD)
7.00 The Hurting. Clip show
7.30 The Hurting. Clip show
8.00 Taskmaster. Mark Watson and Nish Kumar
make toast together and Sally Phillips spreads
absinthe on it. Greg Davies dishes out the
absurd A-list challenges once more
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With Dara O Briain,
Greg Davies and Stewart Francis
10.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish.
Dave tests the merits of man versus machine,
in all its life-like glory
11.00 Alan Davies: As Yet Untitled. David
Mitchell, Liza Tarbuck, Dane Baptiste and Lolly
Adefope sit down with Alan for more chat
12.00 Room 101 12.40am Mock the Week
1.20 QI 2.00 Live at the Apollo 3.00 The Money
Pit 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Campion (AD) 11.00 The Bill
1.00pm Last of the Summer Wine (AD) 1.40 A
Fine Romance 2.20 Birds of a Feather 3.00
London’s Burning. Billy tackles a tough opponent
4.00 Pie in the Sky 5.00 Campion (AD)
6.00 A Fine Romance. Mike’s attempt to ask
Laura an important question is interrupted
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Howard
discovers an outbreak of a household pest (AD)
7.20 As Time Goes By. Jean decides to go online
8.00 Death in Paradise. A birdwatcher is
stabbed to death with his own knife (6/8) (AD)
9.00 New Tricks. The team investigates the
death of a 1970s rock star (4/8) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. Jack reveals he is quitting,
but before Sandra, Brian and Gerry can
question him, they are handed their latest
case — an unsolved murder dating back more
than 160 years (1/10) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather
12.00 The Bill. A prostitute is attacked 1.00am
London’s Burning 2.00 In Deep 3.35 Garden
Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Cash in the Attic 7.10 Secrets of War
8.00 Time Team 10.00 The True Story of the
Mary Celeste 11.00 Private Lives of the
Monarchs (AD) 12.00 Time Team 2.00pm
Oceans 3.00 Coast (AD) 4.00 Steptoe and Son
5.00 The Two Ronnies Christmas Special
6.00 The World at War
7.00 Battle of Britain: The Real Story. The
author James Holland explores the Battle of
Britain from the German point of view
8.00 The True Story of the Mary Celeste.
Investigating the mystery of the deserted ship
9.00 Armada: 12 Days to Save England. Dan
Snow examines the impact of the battle on
Elizabeth I’s royal court (2/3)
10.00 Morecambe and Wise: The Greatest
Moment. Liza Tarbuck introduces the comedy
duo’s best moments, featuring celebrity guests
who starred on their shows, including Angela
Rippon and Des O’Connor (AD)
11.30 Christmas Night with the Two Ronnies
12.30am The True Story of the Mary Celeste
1.30 Battle of Britain: The Real Story 2.25
Mummy Mysteries 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 1.45pm First Minister’s
Questions. Full coverage of AMs’ questions to
the First Minister 2.35 Channel Patrol (r) 3.20
The Indian Doctor (r) (AD) 4.05 Oxford Street
Revealed. Plainclothes police officers tackle the
problem of drug dealers (r) 4.35 Wartime
Farm. Ruth Goodman, Alex Langlands and Peter
Ginn prepare for D-Day (r) (AD) 5.35-6.00 Flog
It! From Basingstoke (r)
STV
As ITV except: 10.35pm Scotland Tonight
11.10 On Assignment. John Ray investigates a
natural disaster in Sierra Leone 11.45 Lethal
Weapon. Riggs and Murtaugh examine the
murder of one of LA’s fashion expeditors (r)
(AD) 12.35am Teleshopping 1.35 After
Midnight 3.05 ITV Nightscreen 4.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 10.45pm UTV Up Close. A look
at domestic violence 11.45 On Assignment.
A natural disaster in Sierra Leone 12.15am
Teleshopping 1.15-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Leugh le Linda (r) 5.20 Su Shiusaidh
(Little Suzy’s Zoo) (r) 5.35 Treud na
Dluth-choille: Grad-Naidheachd (Jungle Bunch)
(r) 5.40 Bruno (r) 5.45 Na Floogals (r) 5.55
Oran le Fiona (r) 6.00 Seoc (Jack) (r) 6.20
Ceistean Lara (r) 6.35 Sealgairean Spòrsail
(History Hunters) (r) 7.00 Tathadh (r) 7.25
Fraochy Bay (r) 7.30 Speaking Our Language
(r) 8.00 An Là (News) 8.30 Fuine (Home
Baking). Last in the series (r) 9.00 Opry an
Iúir. With The High Kings and Nell Ní Chróinín
(r) 9.55 Dhan Uisge (Loch Maree). Wild
swimming (r) 10.00 Trusadh: Heisgeir — Eadar
na h-Eileanan (The Monachs: Between the
Islands) (r) 11.00 Togaidh Sinn Fonn (Join in
the Music) (r) 11.25 Binneas: Na Trads — The
Speirs Family (r) 11.30-11.55 Alleluia!
(Spiritual Music & Verse) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw 10.00 Y Ffair Aeaf 2017.
Coverage of the second day of the Royal Welsh
Winter Fair 12.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
12.05pm Y Ffair Aeaf 2017 3.55 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil
5.05 Stwnsh: Tag 5.35 Stwnsh: Dreigiau —
Marchogion Berc (r) 6.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd
6.05 04 Wal (r) 6.30 Parti Bwyd Beca (r) 7.00
Heno 7.30 Rownd a Rownd (AD) 7.55
Chwedloni 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25 Y Ffair
Aeaf 2017 9.00 News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30
Y Ffair Aeaf 2017 10.00 Cythrel Canu (r) 10.30
Mel a Nia (r) 11.00-11.35 999: Y Glas (r)
14
Tuesday November 28 2017 | the times
1G T
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7508
1
2
3
Codeword No 3192
4
7
9
5
6
8
9
8
23
6
10
3
5
11
17
12
22
1
4
19
7
23
12
13
19
21
15
6
Train Tracks No 267
20
10
11
10
5
24
19
16
26
15
11
21
3
5
4
3
3
3
4
4
13
21
3
2
1
18
26
4
18
5
26
2
26
T
13
13
14
3
10
5
19
10
5
26
9
6
U
15
19
26
21
3
11
R
16
26
17
18
19
20
14
6
26
2
2
26
12
5
2
2
4
5
12
19
14
22
19
7
5
26
13
10
26
11
12
12
26
13
21
26
4
A
7
25
12
1
26
Lay tracks to enable the train to travel from village A to
village B. The numbers indicate how many sections of rail
go in each row and column. There are only straight rails
and curved rails. The track cannot cross itself.
23
3
19
13
1
7
3
8
3
6
3
B
12
25
26
Across
1
4
9
10
Corn cutting tool (6)
See; pimple (4)
Chemically inactive (5)
(Of a woman) continually
criticise (a husband) (7)
11 Animal's front foot (7)
12 Of a former age (5)
13 Collector of old things (11)
Solution to Crossword 7507
MP S T ANDA
R K N U
J OR I T Y RU
D D W U
OUD CHAMB
C R E
N T L E RE AD
S E R
RR I ER CRE
A
T
A A
MB
T ERM I N
B
L M G
L I V ERY NO
R
E
L
I
E
V
E
D
E
R
R
A
AM
D
A L
P
T E
17 Was idle (5)
19 Forestall (3-4)
22 Board a rail service (7)
23 Type of adhesive (5)
24 Sliding window frame (4)
25 Heavy filling food (6)
20
22
11
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
14
15
16
17
18
T
7
8
20
21
9
10
11
12
13
22
23
24
25
26
© PUZZLER MEDIA
24
7
U
19
R
Down
1
2
3
5
6
7
8
14
15
Rigid (5)
V-shaped line (7)
Illuminated (3,2)
Pretentious person (5)
Stealing; charming (6)
Equestrian sport (11)
Situated under cover (6)
Eg, a native of Delhi (6)
As much as one may carry
(7)
16 High-pitched signals (6)
18 Greek letters (5)
20 Apply (a force) (5)
21 Aromatic herb (5)
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Lexica
No 4023
No 4024
B
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
L
I
L
D
B
R
I
O
G
E
K
H
J
C
I
X
M
L
I
R
Y
O
P
Y
R
E
U
E
T
S
G
I
D
G
A
E
E
A
O
A
P
E
I
R
B
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4184
Futoshiki No 3052
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
∧
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
∧
What are your favourite
puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
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by midnight. Leave your three
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and your contact details.
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
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Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 2011
<
32
30
7
12
34
16
30
23
34
27
16
30
30
4
<
<
∨
<
6
16
24
10
17
10
39
14
6
4
18
30
14
11
32
4
6
16
37
10
4
7
7
>
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
22
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
16
17
14
6
9
24
13
34
© PUZZLER MEDIA
22
15
21
10
L A
V
MA
I
C L
O
GE
V
B A
C
DU
E
DE
6
2
the times | Tuesday November 28 2017
15
1G T
MindGames
White: Magnus Carlsen
Black: Ding Liren
Champions Showdown Blitz,
St Louis 2017
Sicilian Defence
1 e4 c5
The opening moves of Chigorin-Rubinstein, Kiev 1903 were
1 e4 e6 2 Qe2 Nc6 3 f4 Nd4 4
Qd3 c5 5 Nf3 with complex play.
2 Nf3 e6 3 d3 Nc6 4 g3 d5 5 Qe2
The chief hallmark of the Chigorin variation.
5 ... Nf6 6 Bg2 Be7 7 0-0 0-0 8 e5
Nd7 9 c4
The point of this is to slow
down black counterplay by blocking the centre and the queenside.
9 ... d4 10 Re1
In Smyslov-Gligoric, Amsterdam
1964 White tried 10 h4 at once.
10 ... Rb8 11 h4 b5 12 cxb5 Rxb5
13 Na3 Rb8 14 Nc4 Nb6
In general, Black wishes to
challenge White’s knight on c4.
An alternative way of doing this is
________
á D Dq4 i]
à0bD gp0 ]
ß 4nDpD G]
ÞD 0 ) DQ]
Ý DP0 D )]
ÜD DPD )N]
ÛPD D )BD]
Ú$ D $ I ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
21 ... f5
Under altered circumstances
this is a desperate expedient that
simply leaves Black a pawn down
in a middlegame without queens.
However, 21 ... gxh6 22 Qxh6+
Kg8 fails to 23 Be4.
22 Qxe8 Rxe8 23 Bd2 Kg8 24
Nf4 Kf7 25 Bf3 g6 26 Rab1 Rxb1
27 Rxb1 Ba8 28 h5 g5 29 Ng6
Bd8 30 Rb5 g4 31 Bg2 Bb6 32 a4
Black resigns
Any temptation to fight on can
be discouraged by the fact that
the immnent 33 a5 will lead to the
total destruction of what remains
of Black’s queenside. Once the
defensive bishop is driven away,
Rxc5 will finish the job.
________
á D D 4kD] Winning Move
àD D D 0 ]
ßbD D D 0] Black to play. This position is from
online game, chess.com 2017.
ÞD D 0 D ] Carlsen-So,
Black is winning here as the combination
Ý D DpDqD] of the pin against the d3-knight and the
ÜD )N)pD ] advanced pawn on f3 suffocate White.
ÛP) D ) D] What is the quickest way to victory?
ÚD DR$KDQ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
♠ 10 4
♥♦10
♣K 10 9
♠K 8
♥J 6 5
♦J
♣N
W
E
S
♠J 9 7 2
♥♦Q
♣7
♠ AQ 6 5 3
♥♦K
♣-
Needing a 2-2 diamond split, at
trick eight declarer exited with
dummy’s jack of diamonds, a bold
MEDIUM
HARDER
43
x 7 – 12 ÷ 2
50%
OF IT
♠K 8
♥J 6 5 4 3 2
♦A J 7 4 2
♣-
♠ 10 4
N
♥Q 8 7
W E
♦10 9
♣A K 10 9 5 3 S
♠J 9 7 2
♥A
♦Q 6 5 3
♣7 6 4 2
S(Telfer)
W
OF IT
+ 13 x 2
+ 81 x 4 – 51 x 2 – 68
12
x 9 + 78
97
x 7 + 826 x 3 + 463 + 1/2 – 97
OF IT
80%
OF IT
– 766
–9
1/2
OF IT
50%
OF IT
2
3
2
From these letters, make words of
three or more letters, always
including the central letter. Answers
must be in the Concise Oxford
Dictionary, excluding capitalised
words, plurals, conjugated verbs (past
tense etc), adverbs ending in LY,
comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 16 words, average;
22, good; 26, very good; 30, excellent
Killer Moderate No 5742
10
17
8
7min
9
9
17
13
12
17
8
16
8
19
12
5
3
10
17
13
9
22
21
29
4
12
12
Killer Tough No 5743
21
20
E
1♠
Pass
2♣
2NT(1) 3NT
5♦(2) Pass
Pass
Dbl(3)
End
(1) Unusual 2NT, showing at least five-five
in the other two suits. Note 2NT shows a
shapelier hand than a take-out double,
although both calls show the unbid red suits.
(2) Great shot. Holding ♦Qxxx in one red
suit and the bare ace in the other is very,
very powerful offensively.
(3) You can hardly blame East for doubling.
His has plenty of defensive strength and his
partner has responded at the two-level.
23
10
17
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
10
30
3
23
13
20
16
13
6
8
2
5
9
7
4 1 2
3
9 2 4
1
3 1
7
5
5
8
3
6
4 6
7
1 3
9 4 2 1 7
8 6
6 8
4
7 9
5
8
4
3
2
6
1
7
9
3
9
6
4
7
1
2
5
8
1
2
7
9
5
8
3
6
4
9
7
8
1
3
4
5
2
6
=3
=
14
=
13
9
5
2
4
3
7
6
1
8
7
6
8
1
2
9
4
5
3
1
4
3
6
5
8
9
2
7
4
9
1
8
6
3
5
7
2
4
6
3
5
8
2
7
9
1
7
1
9
2
4
3
6
8
5
6
4
2
8
1
5
9
3
7
8
3
5
7
6
9
4
1
2
8
2
5
7
9
4
3
6
1
3
7
6
2
1
5
8
9
4
5
3
7
9
4
2
1
8
6
2
1
9
3
8
6
7
4
5
6
8
4
5
7
1
2
3
9
4
1
2
5
9
4 4
3
2
8
7
2
5
9
4
1
3
6
5
3
4
6
8
1
7
9
2
4
9
1
6
7
2
3
8
4
5
7
4
5
3
1
9
6
2
8
5
9
1
7
2
3
8
4
6
4
6
7
5
1
8
2
3
9
2
8
3
9
6
4
5
7
1
1
4
5
2
7
6
9
8
3
3
9
8
2
6
5
4
1
7
4
5
9
8
3
6
2
7
1
2
6
3
1
4
7
5
8
9
1
8
7
9
5
2
3
6
4
6
2
8
1
3
9
7
5
4
7
3
9
4
8
5
1
6
2
3
1
2
6
5
7
4
9
8
9
7
6
8
4
1
3
2
5
8
5
4
3
9
2
6
1
7
2 > 1
4
5 > 4 > 2 > 1
4
5
3
2
2
1
5
3
2
1
3 < 4 < 5
+
x
7
2
2
2
4
8
5
-
+
x
2
1
9
+
+
÷
÷
5
7
2
8
3
9
4
1
6
4
1
9
6
2
5
8
7
3
7
4
1
3
5
6
2
9
8
9
6
3
1
8
2
7
4
5
8
2
5
4
9
7
6
3
1
2
9
4
5
6
3
1
8
7
6
3
8
2
7
1
9
5
4
1
5
7
9
4
8
3
6
2
T
R
O
P
I
C
U
O
T
O
O
Z
N
C
S
N
O
V
E
D
Y
Lexica 4022
1
∧
4
6
3
8
6
7
1
4
5
2
9
Lexica 4021
Set Square 2013
6
6
3
Suko 2093
Sudoku 9483
6
2
1
4
7
8
9
5
3
Futoshiki 3051
5
2
CANCAN
O
I
B
R GU S T
G H
C
I A T I ON
N
RA T E D
O W
G
I RON
U
N
P
I CK L E D
S
L
R
H E Y DA Y
Killer 5741
KenKen 4183
18
Train Tracks 266
BAN T AM
L
A
U
D I F F U S E
B
F
T
S I Z E
A V
T
N
E X AGGE
Q
J UGG L I N
E
R
N
T R I O
P R
R W U
E Y E L E T
3
1
Sudoku 9482
2
5
1
6
9
7
8
4
3
12
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
+
Codeword 3191
9 7
5 7 1
9 8 5 7
2 1
2 6 3
4 5
8
1 3
9
1 3
1 4 2 9
3 2 1 7
23
12
=7
+
9
=
17
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Solutions
19
20
-
-
All the digits
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Cell Blocks 3074
9
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
= 50 from 1-9 are
x
+
5
∨
3
22
5
+
+
22
Contract: 5♦ Dbled, Opening Lead: ♣A
and counter-intuitive (but entirely
correct) play, removing his
remaining diamonds from both
hands. East won the king (West
following — phew) but was endplayed to lead a spade from his
ace-queen.
Declarer won East’s low spade
with dummy’s king and could cash
his three long hearts. The last trick
was conceded to East’s high spade
but that was 11 tricks and doubled
game made with just 16 high-card
points. “Six-five, come alive.”
25min
16
13
N
2
x
+
Killer 5740
♠ AQ 6 5 3
♥K 10 9
♦K 8
♣Q J 8
4
+
Sudoku 9481
12
6
3 3
5 4
Kakuro 2010
12
18
17
3
2 6
+
Yesterday’s answers
ache, cha, chant, chat, cheat, each,
echt, enchant, etch, eth, hat, hate,
heat, hen, henna, natch, neath, nth,
tach, tache, teach, tech, tench, than,
thane, the, theca, then
8
4
Set Square No 2014
Dealer: East, Vulnerability: Both
Teams
1/2
+4
Polygon
6
Bridge Andrew Robson
Fabulous bidding judgement and
ensuing declarer play by David
Telfer of Chichester resulted in
him making 5♦ doubled as South.
At all the other tables, East-West
were peacefully making 3NT.
What a swing.
If West had led his partner’s
spades, declarer would have lost
to East’s ace-queen and, later, to
the king of diamonds. Down one
would still represent a healthy
swing in favour of North-South
(-200) compared with conceding
3NT (-600). However, when West
led a normal ace of clubs, declarer
actually had a chance to make his
doubled game.
Declarer ruffed the club,
crossed to the ace of hearts and
returned to the ace of diamonds.
Knowing East held the king of diamonds on the bidding, there was
no point in finessing and, as you’ll
see, every point in not finessing.
Declarer ruffed a second heart,
ruffed a second club, ruffed a third
heart (pleased to see the 3-3 split)
and ruffed a third club (exhausting
East of his clubs).
Here is the position:
EASY
–7
© PUZZLER MEDIA
World champion Magnus Carlsen
and the leading Chinese grandmaster Ding Liren contested an
extended match in St Louis earlier
this month that gave them the
opportunity to experiment with a
wide variety of openings, some of
them rarely seen. One of these
was favoured by the great Russian
master of the late 19th and early
20th centuries Mikhail Chigorin.
Chigorin liked to play 2 Qe2
against the French Defence. In
today’s game Carlsen takes a leaf
from Chigorin’s book and plays
Qe2, although delaying it to the
fifth move.
14 ... Ba6, as seen in HollinbergerCastaneda, Indianapolis 2009.
15 b3 Nxc4
Having encouraged White to
weaken the square c3, 15 ... Nd5 is
also worthy of consideration.
16 bxc4 Rb6 17 Ng5 h6 18 Nh3 Bb7
Natural enough but fatal. Black
must arm himself against the
coming storm by transferring his
bishop to e8, thus 18 ... Bd7 19 Qg4
Kh8 20 Qh5 Be8 and if 21 Bxh6,
as in the game, then 21 ... f5
throws White back in confusion.
19 Qg4 Kh8 20 Qh5 Qe8 21 Bxh6
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Spirit of Chigorin
Cell Blocks No 3075
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
3
-
x
7
Quiz 1 £5 note 2 Sage 3 He married
4 Underfloor heating — that uses direct
heat transfer from wood smoke 5 Algeria
6 Steven Mnuchin — the treasury secretary
7 Calzedonia Group 8 Richard Pryor
9 Darwin 10 Pablo Picasso 11 Brazil 12 Georgia
13 Stand by Me 14 Anja Pärson 15 Agouti
F
L
L
O
U
P
I
S
U
L
C
I
K
F
T
P
A
L
E
L
E
W
N
Word watch
Skreegh (b) To screech
or shriek (Scots)
Kenaf (c) A tropical
Asian plant
Skrik (b) A fright
(South African)
Brain Trainer
Easy 141; Medium 611;
Harder 2,565
Chess 1 ... Rf5! essentially
leaves White defenceless
against the coming ...
Rh5 when mate will
quickly follow
28.11.17
MindGames
Sudoku
Mild No 9484
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9485
8
1 5
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Skreegh
a Illegal alcohol
b To shriek
c A burial mound
Kenaf
a Unfashionable
b A hot drink
c A plant
Skrik
a To squeeze
b A fright
c A mouse
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
9 6
2
5 6
3 1 9 4
8
PUZZLER MEDIA
2 4
7
8 5
6
3 1
8
5
2 4
7
9
9
6
1
8 2
5
3 6
1
9
4
Super fiendish No 9486
5
4 8 2 1 3
8
7 5 3 9
1 9
6
2 1
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
GETTY IMAGES
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
11 The 124m-high conical
Cathedral of Maringá
is in which South
American country?
1 The 1st Duke of
Wellington and
George Stephenson
have both appeared on
which banknote?
12 The Altamaha
River is a major river
in which US state?
15
6 Which US cabinet
member is married to
the Scottish actress
Louise Linton?
3 In the nursery
rhyme, what happened
to Solomon Grundy
on Wednesday?
7 Founded by Sandro
Veronesi, which Italian
corporation owns
the fashion brands
Intimissimi, Tezenis
and Falconeri?
4 In Korean traditional
architecture, ondol
or gudeul is a form
of what?
5 By area, what is
the largest country
in Africa?
8 … Is It Something I
Said? (1975) and LA
Jail (1976) are albums
by which US standup comedian?
9 On the morning
of February 19, 1942,
188 Japanese planes
attacked which northern
Australian city?
10 Jacqueline Roque
was the muse and
second wife of
which artist?
13 Which song begins:
“When the night has
come/ And the land
is dark”?
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 970
14 The Croatian skier
Janica Kostelic was
known for her rivalry
with which Swedish
slalom champion?
15 Which tropical
American rodent of
the genus Dasyprocta
is pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 971
1
2
8
3
4
5
9
6
7
10
12
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
22
21
23
MB E
E
X
NGE
M
POP
R
T
E R
S
A
I N T
D
H
O
E
N M
T R E
R T
W
E
N
O T
Y
PO
N
H E
P UD
R
R
L I T E
A
S
AMU S
E
S T E R
R
BOX
U
B
C T OB E R
O
L
A
A TME N T
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Flamande
11
13
C AME
A
A
S T R A
X
T
H I P
S
MO T H
A
J A C K
E
H
S U E D
E
T
Y A K
Across
1 Auction in Greater
Manchester town (4)
3 Broadcast supporting church
service (3,5)
8 Hot peas served mushy in cafe
(7)
10 Old relative taken round a
peaceful place (5)
11 Home with aunt’s turned out a
nightmare, to put it briefly
(2,1,8)
13 Ancient boat largely
remodelled? Not right (6)
15 Opening of super gym — girl’s
getting in shape (6)
17 Listen carefully and correct
the vocabulary I use (4,2,5)
20 Send away eleven in the
Spanish league, finally (5)
21 Drawing Michelangelo finally
put into box (7)
22 Least relaxed person from
Bangkok, we hear, before trial?
(8)
23 Debutante shortly retires,
clutching a piece of jewellery
(4)
6 7 2
3
4
9
9
2
5
4
2
7
6
1
6
9
4
6
8
3 6
7 3 5
2
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
2 Lincolnshire sausage
is made distinctive
by its inclusion of
which herb as a
main ingredient?
7
5
Down
1 Is painful to introduce IT
sessions (8)
2 Picked up a small, headless
mammal (5)
4 Mischievous Bantu warriors
make less noise! (6)
5 Our rhymes showing peace
and love in the 60s (6,5)
6 Woman got up to protect
former boxing champ (7)
7 Language used by writer’s
expressive (4)
9 Our Theresa’s awful
confinement (5,6)
12 Maybe salty waters one
avoided in the end (8)
14 Glib man unexpectedly
helping with farm deliveries?
(7)
16 Items of clothing and hose
male imported (6)
18 French banker about to receive
honour? Not half (5)
19 Former PM’s endless pressure
(4)
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