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The Times Times 2 6 September 2017

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September
p
6 | 2017
Brights! Tweeds! Furs!
Anna Murphy on killer coats for autumn
From left: faux fur, �5, stories.com; �9, available from October 12, hobbs.co.uk; faux fur, �5, stories.com
2
1GT
Wednesday September 6 2017 | the times
times2
Is it possible
Putting ?smoking? as
a hobby on your CV is
better than ?kayaking?
Carol Midgley
T
he most common lie
that people tell on
their CVs, a survey
found, is about their
qualifications. Liars,
I say. Everyone knows
? or at least they did
when I was young ?
that what people lie about most is their
hobbies. In my day those ?interests?
were, I recall, the stuff of hilarious
fiction. ?Ah you spotted my passion for
white water rafting, marathon running
and mountaineering? Yes, that keeps
me busy most Saturdays, but on
Sundays I tend to relax by mentoring,
litter picking and playing football in
the local league (true, I am captain but
there?s no ?I? in team, amirite?)?
Often it was worse. When I was a
lumpen teenager desperate to fill the
huge space allocated for ?hobbies? on
the application form for a part-time
job, I wrote ?helping others?. I still
picture the management in that
supermarket bent over their sick
buckets (I wasn?t hired). It was also,
needless to say, not entirely accurate.
So I?m not clutching my pearls that
much over a Reddit report in which
employers reveal some of the worst
modern CV entries. I agree that bad
grammar, the biggest declared gripe,
should be a one-strike-and-you?re-out
offence (a book entitled Crap CVs
reveals that one legendary application
read: ?I am looking for a proffreading
[sic] position?, a faux pas almost
too perfect to be true). But I can?t
understand why some bosses complain
that people list ?banal? hobbies such
as ?yoga, wine and Netflix?.
Yoga, wine and Netflix? What?s
wrong with that? At least it?s honest.
And totally normal. What more would
you want from an employee? One
woman reportedly described herself
by using the wine glass emoji, which,
granted, is unwise since it suggests she
is made of 13 per cent alcohol. But it
isn?t pretentious BS either, which I?d
judge as being equally important.
According to another report, one
applicant put ?smoking? as a hobby.
Respect. There?s someone who will
give a true answer to a straight
question. Would you rather read some
egotistical and probably invented guff
about the leadership qualities gained
from extreme kayaking?
Dame Judi
airs her
knickers
Maybe I?m wrong and young people
don?t bullshit as much as they used to.
Maybe they do genuinely have lots of
interests or are so sick of jumping
through hoops and Duke of Edinburgh
awards they can?t be fagged any more
(a YouGov survey found ?personal
interests? were only the fourth most
lied-about thing on CVs. Amazing.)
Apparently three of the worst things
to write that you enjoy are ?reading
books, television and spending time
with friends and family?. But isn?t
that what most people enjoy? (The
reasoning is that ?everyone can read?
so it doesn?t count as an interest. Mmm,
most people can run too, but you don?t
see them hauling their arses round the
park do you?) And doesn?t this then
encourage the applicant to write ?cello
practice, ballet and skydiving? even
though the only diving they do is down
the back of the couch to find enough
loose change to order a Domino?s?
Some of the questions put to
applicants these days are so
traumatising I wouldn?t have the
energy left to lie. A friend?s daughter
was recently asked: ?If there were a
movie of your life what would it be
about and who would play you?? What
kind of lose-lose horror is this for a
junior office job? If you say Scarlett
Johansson/Ryan Gosling you look a
vain tool and if you say something
humble such as, ?Someone authentic
from the estate where I grew up to
keep it real, yeah?? you look an
insufferable tool. When it?s someone
you have to sit next to for eight hours
a day, it?s hard to say which is worse.
At 82 Judi Dench has
said she still has sexual
desire and a penchant
for ?naughty? knickers.
Good for her, you may
say and I?d agree
(though the word
?naughty? applied to
any underwear tends
to make me queasy).
Yet judging by the
rabid online responses
to these remarks, you?d
think she had confessed
to eating babies or
walking naked round
Asda. ?Ugh, revolting?,
?Keep it to yourself,
love? and ?I?m going to
barf ? are some of the
printable ageist retorts.
One likened elderly sex
to beating the dust out
of an old carpet.
An American neurologist claims he can
heal the damage caused by dementia.
Experts are sceptical, says Lois Rogers
I heart
anti-tiger
parents
What?s the opposite
of a helicopter parent?
Whatever it is, Lynda
La Plante?s mother
was it. When Lynda
mentioned that a show
of hers was on TV,
Flossie would reply:
?Well, if it clashes with
the football I?m not
watching.? Once she
asked her daughter:
?Did you write Prime
Suspect?? The show
was three series in
at the time.
Harsh perhaps, but
in an age when parents
hover like raptors over
their kids? every move
and trumpet every
minor success on
Facebook, isn?t this
refreshing? And so
much healthier.
The poet Simon
Armitage may have
been slightly gutted
when, as revealed by
The Times?s Diary
yesterday, he saw a
collection of his works
in a skip in his native
Huddersfield and
opened a book to see
the words, ?To Mum
and Dad, with love,
Simon?, but at least he
and La Plante could
breathe. Better surely
than being smothered
by the roaring ambition
of a tiger parent?
I suppose Dench
can take comfort in
knowing that such
keyboard trolls are
almost certainly
virgins with dirty
fingernails living in
their mothers? spare
rooms and cultivating
the breath of Hades?
guard dog. I dare say
she?ll get over it.
A
s the frazzled mother
of four children
under ten, Eleanor
Smith didn?t think it
was significant when
she didn?t recognise
her children?s friends
at the school gates.
Then, when she started mixing up
actors? faces and couldn?t follow
plotlines any more, she put it down
to middle-aged absent-mindedness.
As a former lawyer who was heavily
involved in charity work, Smith, then
40, was used to keeping several plates
spinning simultaneously. Yet what
she?d dismissed as the effects of stress
were the first signs of Alzheimer?s
dementia, a disease that afflicts about
1 in 14 people over the age of 65 and,
unless a miracle treatment emerges,
will incapacitate two million people in
Britain by 2050. ?It is really shocking
to reflect on how I was,? she says.
?I started feeling really tired in the
afternoons, I didn?t participate in
board meetings, I felt that I couldn?t
follow complex arguments. My
vocabulary seemed to be shrinking
and I would forget what I was saying
halfway through a sentence.?
Smith, from New Jersey, is one of
1,000 people who have signed up to
ReCODE, a radical programme that
claims to reverse Alzheimer?s disease
by getting participants to undergo a
We do know
that people get
better on this
programme
lifestyle overhaul. Within four months
of beginning it, she says, her ?brain
fog? had vanished.
The protocol has so far been the
subject of only one successful published
scientific study involving ten patients.
Yet up to 100 times as many are now
using ReCODE, which its author, Dr
Dale Bredesen, details in his new book,
The End of Alzheimer?s. The American
neurologist is in talks with Cleveland
Clinic in Ohio and the hospital
provider Providence Health to conduct
trials involving 150 patients to compare
the effects of ReCODE with Aricept,
the standard drug given to those with
early stage Alzheimer?s. Bredesen, who
is a professor of neurology at the
University of California in Los Angeles,
is confident that his system can show
complete reversal of early stage mental
decline in a matter of months.
The main principle of Bredesen?s
theory is that amyloid plaques, the
sticky connection-blocking gunge
identified by Aloysius Alzheimer when
he first described the brain condition
in 1906, are not the cause of dementia,
but a symptom of the brain?s
unsuccessful efforts to repair itself.
His regimen involves up to
150 markers, including blood tests
and questions about medical history,
exposure to anaesthetics and
environmental factors. The results
are then processed by the ReCODE
computer algorithm (the patented
element of intellectual property in
the programme), which produces an
individualised set of supplements and
other strategies to reverse the onset of
memory loss. Making these changes,
Bredesen says, fosters the natural
elimination of amyloid plaques and the
restoration of healthy brain function.
More than 450 doctors, nurses,
neuropsychologists and nutritionists
have been trained in how to deliver it,
and Bredesen says that 12 UK doctors
have shown interest in administering
ReCODE. It is due to become more
widely available in Britain after a
doctors? training programme next year.
?Alzheimer?s is what happens when
the brain tries to protect itself from
three threats: inflammation caused
by poor diet or disease; a shortage
of supportive nutrients; or toxins such
as metals or moulds,? says Bredesen,
who has co-authored 225 pieces of
published research in his career. ?We
now know that an extensive network
of molecular interactions is involved in
the development of Alzheimer?s, so a
broader-based approach is bound to be
more effective, and we do know that
people get better on this programme.?
Initial costs for the diagnosis and the
prescribed anti-Alzheimer?s regimen
are about �000, with annual
maintenance costs for a battery of
dozens of dietary supplements
averaging a similar amount.
For Smith the benefits far outweigh
the cost. She recalls the disease taking
hold in a way that was ?very slow
and insidious?. The nadir was ?when
I was helping a friend run a stall at
a fundraising event. People kept
coming up to greet me using my name
and I had no idea who they were. I
had to busy myself in the background
because it was so embarrassing.? It was
only nine years later, when Smith was
49 and heard a radio programme
discussing prosopagnosia (the inability
to recognise people?s faces) and its
connection with other symptoms of
Alzheimer?s, that she started to realise
that something was badly wrong.
Her 78-year-old father, who lives
near by, also has advanced dementia
and no longer recognises his family;
her grandmother died of Alzheimer?s,
aged 70. ?I decided to get myself tested
for genetic susceptibility, which I just
hadn?t dared to do earlier because
there was no treatment,? Smith says.
Genetic profiling, which costs about
�0, has taken off in a big way in
America, with thousands wanting
to know if they have an increased
inherited risk of conditions that have
killed loved ones so that they can
modify their lifestyles accordingly.
Smith was tested for variations of
the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene,
which is crucial for organising the
transport of cholesterol and other fats
found in high concentrations in the
brain (these are vital for the function
the times | Wednesday September 6 2017
3
1GT
times2
to reverse Alzheimer?s?
The lowdown
Michelle Obama
does Beyonc�
GETTY IMAGES
Below: Dale Bredesen,
who has devised an
anti-Alzheimer?s
regimen for patients.
Above: posed by models
The End of Alzheimer?s
by Dr Dale Bredesen
is published by
Penguin, �.99
period of at least ten hours each day,
including no snacking for three hours
before bed. Bredesen even recommends
that people buy ketone meters, which
measure levels in blood, urine or breath,
to check that they are doing it correctly.
Smith, now 51, takes an extraordinary
personalised daily cocktail of more
than 30 supplements, each designed
to improve the function of specific
receptors in her brain. She religiously
exercises for 30 minutes six days out of
seven, eats little or no processed food
and ensures that she fasts according
to Bredesen?s stipulations. She uses
melatonin and magnesium to ensure
that she sleeps for seven to eight hours
every night to maximise ?brain detox?.
Other Bredesen patients show
similar discipline and enthusiasm ?
still, the stigma of dementia remains.
Many of the case studies in the book
? Smith included ? refuse to be
identified for fear it will damage their
personal or professional prospects.
That is not the case for Julie
Gregory, 55, a therapist from Indiana
who runs a global support network
for ApoE4 carriers. Like Smith, she
carries one copy of the rogue ApoE4
gene and noticed brain-processing
problems in her forties. She follows a
similarly rigorous health-management
programme but believes it is worth it.
?ReCODE transformed my life,? she
says. ?My cognitive performance was
I miss the Obamas.
We?ve been through this. You?ve
got to put those days behind you.
I know, but I keep thinking of
Michelle. What is she up to?
Is she still as thoughtful and
inspiring as she always was? Is
she still campaigning for better
nutrition for kids and access to
education for girls everywhere?
Mainly she?s been dressing up
as Beyonc�.
Don?t trivialise my idol!
No, I?m serious. The former first
lady is one of 18 women ? including
Serena Williams and Beyonc�s
daughter Blue Ivy Carter ? who
dressed up as the pop star for
a photoshoot this week to mark
her 36th birthday. They donned
wide-brimmed hats, heavy necklaces
and braided pigtails in a recreation
of Beyonc�s costume in her famous
video for her song Formation.
Beyonc�s got bloody good friends,
then. On my 36th birthday
only seven people turned up
and none of them observed the
fancy-dress theme.
I told you, my babysitter cancelled.
I don?t want to hear it. Anyway, I?ve
always known that Michelle was
generous and compassionate, but
it does seem like a lot of fuss for a
birthday that you?d hardly call a
milestone ? what?s it all about?
As you have intuited, there was a bit
more to it. The images were posted
on Beyonc�s website with the words,
?Join us in supporting Houston relief
efforts #beygoodhouston?, and a link
to donate to two charities. The
money will go towards supporting
those in Houston ? Beyonc�s home
town ? who have been affected
by Hurricane Harvey.
Now it all becomes clear. A
headline-grabbing publicity stunt
to help those in crisis ? how very
Michelle. But do you think she?d
come to my 37th?
Not likely.
Hattie Crisell
BEYONCE.COM
of brain synapses or connections).
Smith was devastated to discover that
she was a carrier of one ApoE4 copy,
which the British Alzheimer?s Society
and experts agree may double the risk
of developing dementia (for carriers of
two it increases to four or five times).
?The gene clinic didn?t give me any
help. They just told me to eat healthily
and exercise, and come back in six
months to see if they could get me on
a drug trial. I had the testing because
I thought I could prevent the problem,
not to be told that it was already too
late and I was in trouble.?
After reading about Bredesen?s work,
a relative suggested she give ReCODE
a try. Local doctors put her through
the tests and, four months down the
line, Smith?s typing speed rocketed,
she regained the ability to sight-read
music and her vocabulary expanded
well beyond its previous limits.
However, Bredesen?s regimen is not
for the faint-hearted. He says that
there are 36 different mechanisms
contributing to Alzheimer?s progression
and all have to be tackled separately.
One of the 36 requirements is the
stimulation of ketone production
(which produces a pear-drop smell on
the breath) when the body begins to
break down fat stores because food is
not being supplied. He says this state is
beneficial for the brain and everyone
should have an overnight food-free
in the bottom third for my age group;
now I am in the top 10 per cent
according to the tests.?
Sally Weinrich, a senior academic
nurse from South Carolina, says she
knew she had an increased risk of
developing dementia because the
condition has affected a large number
of her close relations. When she
started to notice her own cognitive
impairment the 76-year-old got
in touch with Bredesen and asked
a local physician to measure the
different indicators set out in
ReCODE. ?The interesting thing
about this is that as soon as you stop
taking the treatment you notice your
cognitive function start to decline
within a few days,? she says. ?It really
works.? She has been on the
programme for nearly three years.
?We are looking for people to
actually get better on this protocol
and stay better,? Bredesen says. ?If you
have signs of cognitive decline in your
forties or fifties and sixties, 20 years
before you get Alzheimer?s, that?s
when we can do something about it.
?Our longest patients have been
on this for more than five years. One
patient has gone off it four times
for various reasons and each time
she has rapidly regressed.?
British authorities remain sceptical.
?There?s no firm evidence that this
type of intensive lifestyle regime can
?reverse? Alzheimer?s disease, so the
way this approach is being marketed
is concerning,? says Doug Brown, the
research director at the Alzheimer?s
Society. ?The research published so far
involves just ten people with memory
impairments and only half of them
would meet the criteria for being
diagnosed with Alzheimer?s disease.
It?s therefore impossible to determine
which, if any, of the elements in this
therapy can improve memory and
thinking abilities in people in the
early stages of dementia.?
Karen Ritchie heads a European
Alzheimer?s disease collaboration in
France and is scientific adviser to the
Alzheimer?s Research UK trust. She
says that ?dealing with some of these
? blood pressure, diabetes prevention,
diet, may push back dementia onset,
but not reverse the disease process?.
Bredesen points out that of
244 potential Alzheimer?s drugs
tested between 2000 and 2010, only
one, Memantine, was approved by
American and European regulators.
However, Stephen Pearson, a
psychiatrist who leads an Alzheimer?s
drug trial unit in Plymouth, is
unmoved. ?Bredesen has done
important research, but I struggle
with his claim to have found a cure.
Effective treatment will come from a
drug and I?m optimistic that we will
have one in five to ten years? time.?
Either way, Bredesen is pressing
on. ?Dramatic reductions in the
prevalence of dementia could be
achieved if more people underwent
genetic testing to determine their
ApoE status and initiated a preventive
programme long before any symptoms
appeared,? he says. ?We want people
to remain mentally sharp, then be
acutely ill only for a few seconds at
the end of their life before they die.
We don?t want them to suffer this
grim descent into a mental abyss.?
Some names have been changed.
4
1GT
Wednesday September 6 2017 | the times
fashion
It?s the season of
statement coats
(so don?t play it
safe with black)
�9,
whistles.com
Forget classic styles in dull shades ? any good outfit this
autumn starts with a look-at-me coat, says Anna Murphy
Y
ou may have been
labouring under the
misapprehension that
a coat was primarily
about keeping you
warm. I certainly was,
until recently. What
sartorial innocents
we are! Turns out a coat is about
making a statement. Hence the latest
redeployment of a once-innocent
noun as a suddenly rather annoying
adjective by the fashion community.
This autumn you shouldn?t be
shopping for any old coat, but a
mouthy one. Call it opinionated, call it
assertive, call it ? if you want anyone
else to have a clue what you are on
about ? a statement coat.
Of course, statement bags have
been around for a couple of decades.
No doubt it was only a matter of time
before other items earned the
modifier, but the coat held out for
longer than, say, the heel. Why?
Because unlike a pair of look-at-me
stilettos, the coat remained, for most
of us, a practical purchase based
around price per wear. Which meant
it tended to be classic (for which read:
boring) in terms of cut and colour,
and therefore not a statement at all.
Thing is, a great coat is a one-stop
way to change up your look. Who
will notice that you are wearing your
favourite black trousers again if they
are overcoated ? literally ? with,
say, Warehouse?s floral fur? (�,
warehouse.co.uk, available October
23). Heck, you could be starkers under
that coat and no one would clock it.
It?s this game-changer capability
that explains why, when the front row
does its packing for the February
shows, ie for properly chilly weather,
many of them squeeze four ? yes,
four ? coats into their suitcase(s),
sometimes more. (In the interests of
keeping it comparatively real, I travel
with a mere two.) Why? Because
front-rowers, despite their reputation
to the contrary, and with some notable
exceptions (step forward, Anna Dello
Russo, if you even can in that skintight
mini and those skyscraper heels) also
tend to have a favourite pair of black
trousers that they can?t bear not to
wear. And they too find it easier to get
a coat that fits than trousers that do.
However, they know that it behoves
them to appear above such humdrum
matters, so they wear a coat that
serves as a distraction, which looks
anything but dull.
Back in the real world a great coat
can serve as a downright disguise.
It can provide the perfect subterfuge
if one hasn?t had the time or the
inclination this morning to bother
even with those black trousers. Many
of us spend at least part of our time
in gym kit or, more generally, in what
I call comfy kit, namely clothes
spawned from gym gear that have been
re-tooled in non-gym-appropriate
fabrics. How to look immediately
more upscale? Courtesy of a
killer coat.
Or as the designer Michael Kors
? a master at the genre ? put it to
In the real world
a great coat can
serve as the
perfect disguise
me recently: ?Something ugly can be
made better. Just put a fabulous coat
on top.? There?s nothing more fabulous
than, say, his cheetah brushed-mohair
trench (that?ll be �970 to you,
michaelkors.com). Of the 65 looks
in his autumn/winter show, almost
half included a coat, and not one
was even an approximation of dull.
Admittedly Kors? mainline collection
targets the super-rich. ?My customers
don?t pay attention to the seasons
any more,? he said. ?They are always
on the move.? However, even those
of us whose monthly trajectory
encompasses a handful of postcodes
as opposed to timezones can learn
from this approach. Not least because,
let?s face it, life on Greenwich Mean
Time ensures that a coat always
gets plenty of playtime.
So we Brits more than anyone
should celebrate how coat shopping
has become fun. This winter, like
never before, it involves more colour,
more pattern, more quirky detail than
you might have imagined possible
when you yawned your way through
school-uniform coat shopping at the
age of 11. Heck, even navy coats have
turned interesting. I give you, as just
one example, the wrap-front stunner
from John Lewis?s Modern Rarity
brand (�0, johnlewis.com), just one
of five corkers designed by the
London-based Eudon Choi that
launch tomorrow. This is one of the
stand-out ranges for me for coats this
season, along with Hobbs (from �9,
hobbs.co.uk) and LK Bennett (from
�5, lkbennett.com).
There is only one disadvantage
that I can see, which is the problem
of how to navigate your way through
the different options. So here?s my
guide to this season?s fantastic five.
The stealth statement: it?s
not a contradiction in terms
For many of us this is still going to be
the best kind of declaration to make,
coat-wise ? an approach that isn?t too
shouty, but has the odd flourish here
and there to turn something that
might be boring into something that
isn?t remotely. It?s Modern Rarity?s
collaboration with Choi that delivers
on this better than anyone else, in
particular its delicious cream-collared
style with frilled hem (�0, available
from tomorrow). I also like Uterq黣?s
forest-green trench-jacket with an
extra-wide belt and its denim duster
coat with white topstitching (�5 and
�5 respectively, uterque.com). Not
forgetting & Other Stories? navy car
coat with detachable faux-fur collar
(�5, stories.com) and Jigsaw?s
black-and-mustard melange with
contrast black sheepskin pockets
(�8, jigsaw-online.com). Then
there?s the lovely grey crombie with
embroidered blossom detailing from
the new-to-the-UK Polish brand
Reserved ? its Oxford Street store
opens today (�.99, reserved.com).
The rise of fashion tweed
If there?s one thing that we all learnt
ages ago surely it?s that it?s hard to
look hip in a tweed coat. Well, scrub
that, courtesy of Balenciaga, a label
so hip that it merits a new adjective.
(Balip? Or, some harsher critics might
say, blip?) The tweed coat was out
in force in its autumn/winter show,
reinvented somewhat troublingly to
the less avant-garde observer by way
of the kind of writ-large misbuttoning
that, should it ever have been seen on
the person of the tweed-wearer par
excellence Miss Marple, would have
spelt disaster for the murder-solving
rate in St Mary Mead.
Thankfully there are a number of
tweed takes that look more uptown
than down-and-out. My favourites are
LK Bennett?s great collarless, belted,
big-pocketed style (�0, available
from September 13, lkbennett.com),
Modern Rarity?s more low-key
crombie (�0, available from
tomorrow) and the considerably less
low-key ? indeed, gloriously shouty
? houndstooths from Hobbs (doublebreasted with a black trim, �9, from
September 14, hobbs.co.uk) and Marks
& Spencer Autograph (the pattern
audaciously magnified, available from
October 10, �, marksandspencer.com).
I also love the classiness of Brora?s
herringbone take (�5, available from
the beginning of October, brora.co.uk)
and the Bet Lynchiness of Essentiel
Antwerp?s faux leopard collar version
(�9, essentiel-antwerp.com).
the times | Wednesday September 6 2017
5
1GT
fashion
�0, available
18,
from September
m
.co
on
rm
ja
tara
�150,
celticandco.com
�0, from
September 7,
Modern Rarity
x Eudon Choi,
johnlewis.com
�95,,
�5,
uterque.com
ute
terque.co
om
The wallpaper coat:
therapy at half the price
I didn?t think that I would ever be
recommending to anyone a coat that
looks like the wall of a downstairs loo
circa 1967. However, throwing a bit of
pattern over all the plain that makes
up the bread and butter of most of
our wardrobes will make you ? and
everyone else ? feel markedly
cheerier. My favourites, and I feel
passionately about them all, which
rather underlines my point, are
Hobbs?s red-black-and-white check
(�9, available from October 12,
hobbs.co.uk) and pink-on-black
floral (�9, from September 21)
and Whistles? partial floral (�9,
whistles.com). Similarly swoonsome
are M&S Collection?s pink-on-black
floral (�, available from October 10,
marksandspencer.com) and Ba&sh?s
sage-yellow-and-white mohair
checked jacket (�0, available
shortly, ba-sh.com).
All things bright
and beautiful
If you prefer to make a statement that
is slightly less bold-face, then plump
for colour rather than pattern. Think
poppy-hued rather than poppy field.
The small London brand Harris Wharf
is particularly good on colour ? there
are 32 shades in total ? which it
delivers in unstructured unlined felt.
?Our coats don?t seem casual, but
secretly they are very comfortable,?
says its co-founder Giulia Acchiardi.
?They look like a proper coat or jacket,
but feel like a cardigan.? Pick from sky
blue, emerald or blush, among others
(from �0, net-a-porter.com).
Then there?s another boutique
British label, the cape specialist
(yes, really) Sands & Hall. Its chic
fitted style comes in a gorgeous
bright yet soft rose tweed (�9,
available from mid-September,
sandsandhall.com). Also pretty in
pink is Cos?s blush wool car coat
(�5, cosstores.com). For a double
whammy of colour and embellishment
there?s Tara Jarmon?s showstopping
jewel-scattered emerald crombie
(�5, tarajarmon.com).
Red is the coat colour of the season,
however, as showcased memorably
at Max Mara, where its signature
camel-hair number was reinvented
in scarlet. The motherlode is �305
(maxmara.com), but if you can?t get
over that hump, budgetarily
speaking, then there?s Reiss?s
sumptuously cut berry-red
Chiltern beaut (�0, available
September 25, reiss.com) or Tara
Jarmon?s tomatoey trench style
(�5, available September 18,
tarajarmon.com). You?re spoilt for
choice, in fact: there?s also Marks &
Spencer Autograph?s slimline car coat
(�9, marksandspencer.com) and
Hobbs? Arletta wrap (�9, available
October 12, hobbs.co.uk).
Showaddywaddy chic
Fear not. I am not heralding the
return of dodgy teddy boy suits, but
of brilliant teddy girl coats. And, to
clarify further, I actually mean teddy
girl as in teddy bear ? as in, so furry
is the current influx of shearling and
faux everything that, if it weren?t for
the slick tailoring, you might end up
looking like something propped up at
the end of a cot. (Shout out to my new
nephew, Atticus, whose cot looks like
something out of Where the Wild
Things Are.)
There?s an embarrassment of
cuddlesome riches on offer, quite
a number of which are from the
�, from October 23,
warehouse.co.uk
sheepskin specialist Celtic & Co. Like
its reversible curly coat, available in
navy, charcoal and cream, which is
smooth on one side and, well, you
can probably guess on the other
(�100, celticandco.com). Or its
half-red, half-black hooded number,
which you can also switcheroo (�150,
available from September 28). Then
there?s Whistles?s chic brown Hema
jacket with a patchwork of different
textures (�5, whistles.com) or cream
Audrey Hepburn-appropriate number
(�5, available from September 24),
and J&M Davidson?s similarly
make-like-a-polar-bear white
shearling Laura coat (�035,
jandmdavidson.com). Grrrr.
On the faux front I am in love
with Charlotte Simone?s Big Softie
coat in black with either a pale blue
or pink section on the back (�0,
charlottesimone.com), not to mention
Tara Jarmon?s brown-with-a-hot-pinkcollar coat (�0, available September
18, tarajarmon.com). Then there?s
Zara?s textured blush style (�.99,
zara.com), plus Helen Moore?s
charcoal jacket and ? in jet, silver or
midnight ? bomber (�2 and �5
respectively, helenmoore.com).
Twitter: @timesfashion
6
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Wednesday September 6 2017 | the times
fashion
Time to crack out the
perfect cardi
?T
When it comes to knits, the
holy grail is a pale neutral
that doesn?t look frumpy. I?ve
found it, says Anna Murphy
is the season of the
cardi. At Prada, for
example, it came
beaded in mohair,
with sky-blue
embellishment
on grass-green
fluffiness, no less.
Very shouty indeed, in other words,
and that?s even before you factor in
that it was stacked on top of a knitted
bra top and a skirt with a marabou hem.
However, for me it?s always the
season of the cardi, which is why I am
in the market for the opposite variety
of knit, the kind of neutral that quietly
gets on with the business of keeping
you just that bit warmer than you
otherwise would be while also
allowing you to showcase the dress,
jumpsuit or shirt underneath. (If I?m
wearing a T-shirt as my underlayer
I?ll always favour a crew-neck knit.)
That?s the point of a cardi as far as I
am concerned: it?s the sideshow rather
than the main attraction. Which isn?t
with my fashion friend Julietta a while
back I could barely get out a hello
before I was excitedly asking where
her perfection of a cream cardi came
from. The answer? She didn?t know.
It was ten years old. Sigh. This is the
kind of sartorial go-to that used to be
much easier to track down, like ? I
digress ? that other wardrobe
essential turned 21st-century fashion
This
i sartorial
i l
go-to used to be
much easier to
track down
to say that it can?t be very lovely.
Indeed, because I wear my cardigans
such a lot, utter loveliness is a
prerequisite, but it should be dialled
down, the better to go with everything.
It?s easy to find darker neutrals, of
course ? a good black or navy or grey
? but wearing any of these with an
otherwise pale ensemble can add
an undesirable weightiness. And even
if the rest of your outfit is dark, a paler
knit can lighten and brighten, and is
less likely to add bulk. Not forgetting
the power of pale ? especially
blush or white ? to enhance your
complexion. (If you have blue or green
eyes I am sure you don?t need me to
tell you the wonders that a muted blue
or green will work on your behalf.)
The problem is, it?s so much harder
to find a pale knit that is just the right
shade of whatever. Too often pink,
camel or cream will make you look
anaemic or frumpy. And then there?s
the cut. It needs to be just so to avoid
making you look like a Barbara Pym
character. I love Jane and Prudence,
but I don?t want to look like either
of its heroines.
That?s why when I see someone
wearing a good example of the genre
I always ask where it?s from. And the
response is usually as telling as it is
disappointing. When I had breakfast
&Daughter?s Emly cardigan, �5
unicorn, the taffeta slip petticoat.
So it is with considerable excitement
that I unveil for your delectation, or,
if not, most certainly for mine, the
new Emly cashmere cardigan from
the small Scottish brand &Daughter
(�5, and-daughter.com). It?s not
cheap, but that?s because it?s locally
spun and hand-finished. The
quality is peerless. It also comes in
grey,
but if you have been reading
attentively then you will know
that this is rather beside the
point. It is available from
Friday, but you can reserve
yours on the website now.
At a lower price point
there?s Arket?s white woolblend style (�, arket.com),
Uniqlo?s off-white merino
(�.90, uniqlo.com) and
Filippa K?s white or fawn
mohair (�0, filippa-k.com).
No-logo go-to trainers
I?ve always found it
straightforward to
track down trainers
for outside the gym,
but tricky to find a
performance-focused
pair that rings my bell.
They are just so boring.
And so branded. I?ve
never liked logos
? they may be having
a moment, but I am
choosing to ignore it
? and nor do I like
designs so obvious that
they don?t even need a
logo to be identifiable.
When it comes to
trainers to train in
rather than to fanny
around in (always my
preference as an
activity as well as an
aesthetic) this dictum
gets problematic. It?s
the mega-brands that
are most reliable on
performance. However,
I?ve come across an
exception: the boutique
American operation
Athletic Propulsion
Labs, or APL as it?s
known to its growing
band of followers,
of which I am one.
As one would expect
of a brand founded
by sports geeks (twin
brothers who played
sport at college level
in California), these do
what it says on the tin.
?APL set out to rival
the big sports brands,?
says Caroline Lucey
of activeinstyle.com,
one of my favourite sites
for below-the-radar
activewear. ?They
really deliver in terms
of performance,
comfort and design.?
They also come in a
range of hues, and
will be recognised
only by the trainer
cognoscenti.
The new-season
colours have just
come into stock
(from �5).
There?s even a nude
cashmere style,
left, of which Pym
would surely have
approved (�0).
Instagram:
@annagmurphy
She?s just wild
about Harry ?
and we?re quite
keen on her
Prince Harry?s
girlfriend has
given an interview
to Vanity Fair,
declaring herself
in love. I?ve got my
own crush, says
Hannah Betts
S
eptember: back to school,
back to work, back to the
great quotidian dullness.
But what is this? Meghan
Markle is gracing the cover
of Vanity Fair and is finally
passing comment on her
relationship with Prince
Haz after 14 months? decorous silence.
?We?re a couple. We?re in love,? she
reveals. ?I?m sure there will be a time
when we will have to come forward
and present ourselves and have stories
to tell, but I hope what people will
understand is that this is our time.
This is for us. It?s part of what makes
it so special, that it?s just ours . . .
Personally, I love a great love story.?
the times | Wednesday September 6 2017
7
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ELY FOR
PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER LINDBERGH EXCLUSIV
VANITY FAIR
fashion
IS
S IT ROYAL
O
BLUE?
U ?
In a sense Markle is the great
anti-fashion style icon. Instead as
an actress and the former collaborator
on a women?s workwear line with
Reitmans, she is an expert in
packaging herself as the product.
Her unfussy look photographs
beautifully. Moreover, it suggests
that she knows herself and what works
for her, is confident, has hinterland ?
a 36-year-old with responsibilities
beyond merely dressing up. Markle
rigs herself out in the manner of a
woman who has got a job, had sex and
seen a bit of the world. This appears
in contrast to cloistered, purpose-built
Princess Kate, or Diana before her.
Markle?s style feels accessible, as
if she?s one of us, only doing it rather
better. A fashion friend sighs: ?She?s
not wearing anything of particular
interest, yet the way she wears things
makes them greater than the sum
of their parts.
?We?d think of her look as playing
safe: navy button-through dresses, a
strapless LBD, but they are the sort
of things you?d see on someone in the
street and stop them to ask where
their dress is from. She dresses like
the woman we?d like to be.? When
FLESH? JUST A SLICE OF MIDRIFF
An anti-fashion
if i
style icon, she is
unswayed by the
whims of stylists
The considered adult response to
this is, of course: ?SWOON?. She?s
in love, we?re in love. For the women
of Blighty have developed a distinct,
cool-girl crush on you, Markle. For
your style, your ease, your attitude
and the all-round cut of your
extremely beauteous jib. The phrase
?breath of fresh air? is an overworked
platitude, but in Markle?s case the
phrase feels apt. Life brings precious
few guilty pleasures, but MM is
shaping up into one nicely.
We don?t get to meet royals and
prospective royals, we merely get
to lay eyes on them. Accordingly,
reacting to their sartorial choices isn?t
to reduce them to this ? it?s just all
we?ve got to go on.
And our heroine?s dress sense is
fascinating by merit of not being that
fascinating. Think: simple, structured,
clean-lined ? befitting Suits, the legal
drama she found fame on. Her colour
palette is limited, she does casual
brilliantly and can clearly work a
capsule travel wardrobe, what with all
the plane-hopping required to sustain
a long-distance relationship (and the
recent three-week African holiday
with Harry). As a personal style, it?s
sleek, sexy and understated.
For Vanity Fair she sports �500worth of tulle, which is as princessy
and ? scream! ? bridal as we?ve ever
seen her. However, even this frock is
in classic black and white, and worn
barefoot, while her more customary
red-carpet guise is the little black dress
paired with straightforward stilettos.
KNOWS HOW TO WORK A SHIRT
CAN PULL OUT THE
STOPS IF NEEDED
Markle wears high-street it?s merely
another example of her being a
human being. I love the revelation
that when she auditioned for her role
in Suits she set out in black jeans, a
spaghetti-strap top and heels. When
it occurred to her that she needed to
look a little more lawyer-like she raced
into H&M and grabbed a dress for $35.
The best thing about the way MM
dresses is that she?s not defined by
it; just as she is not defined by who
she?s dating. As she says in her Vanity
Fair interview: ?We were very quietly
dating for about six months before
it became news, and I was working
during that whole time, and the only
thing that changed was people?s
perception. Nothing about me
changed. I?m still the same person
that I am, and I?ve never defined
myself by my relationship.?
Here is a prospective princess who
won?t get made over by The Firm
because what would they have to
teach her? There will be no slip-ups
because she has the safety net of
knowing her own style. And even if
she ever did resort to Kate?s beloved
patent nude pumps, they wouldn?t
seem prissy, but totally phwoar.
And the guiltiest of girlish secrets?
We can be oh so coolly excited about
her wedding dress, given that she?ll be
in her late thirties, going bridal second
time around. Will it be strapless and
sexy, a Bianca Jagger trouser suit, or
chic dress-and-jacket combo? The
waiting game will be pure bliss.
The October
issue of
Vanity Fair
is on sale
on Friday,
September 8
8
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Wednesday September 6 2017 | the times
arts
The Wire to the
West End: the rise
of Clarke Peters
It has been decades since the actor first brought his
musical Five Guys Named Moe to the British stage. It
serves as a warning to all men, he tells Andrew Billen
T
he rumbustious
musical Five Guys
Named Moe first hit
the stage 27 years
ago. On its way
to a four-year run
on the West End, it
transformed the
reputation of the songbook musical,
the post-Joan Littlewood Theatre
Royal Stratford East, and the play?s
creator, Clarke Peters ? the same
Clarke Peters who became Detective
Lester Freamon in The Wire.
Five Guys has since been staged
countless times, although perhaps
never as inventively as right now, in
Cameron Mackintosh?s new pop-up
spiegeltent at Marble Arch in central
London. Sitting with me in the theatre
bar the morning after a preview, Peters
admits that this revival worried him.
The problem is the story. A guy
named Nomax, originally played by
Peters and now by Edward Baruwa,
has been dumped by his girlfriend,
Lorraine, for neglectfulness.
Back at his pad and drunk, Nomax,
in one of theatre?s most spectacular
fits of delirium tremens, fancies
five dancing jazz musicians emerge
from the radio to educate him on
how to handle a woman by performing
the songs of the Forties singer and
saxophonist Louis Jordan.
Unfortunately, to modern ears,
many of the lyrics sound like tips
to ensure misogynist disaster. I Like
?Em Fat Like That objectifies a certain
body type (?When she bounces down
the street/ She?s a whole heap of
honey?). Knock Me a Kiss observes:
?If my horse could only cook/ I?d
marry him instead.? I notice that
in the new version a line has been
inserted about having heard enough
chauvinism for one night.
Above: Clarke Peters.
Above right: Dex Lee,
Horace Oliver and
Idriss Kargbo in Five
Guys Named Moe
?That?s what I was concerned
about,? says Peters, 65 and sporting a
colourful waistcoat. ?Then I look at
what?s happening with the audience
and particularly the women, you
know, of a certain size, loving [I Like
?Em]. It?s always meant to be a love
story, a love letter to women. Respect
for you, I don?t care what you look like.
If that gem is inside, then we?re going
to be really great friends, if nothing
else. But I was very concerned about
the way it was going to be viewed now.
I wasn?t so concerned back in the
Nineties. So, I put in a line like, ?This
man has no sense for satire.? ?
Then there is Petting and Poking,
ostensibly a celebration of domestic
violence. ?There is a song that?s about
domestic violence and the punchline
of that is, ?Oh, ain?t married life
wonderful?? ? says Peters. ?These
people suffered through it, and that?s
the way that relationship is. The
the times | Wednesday September 6 2017
9
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HELEN MAYBANKS; MICHAEL LECKIE FOR THE TIMES
question was: ?Do you want your
relationship to be like that, Nomax?? ?
It?s a warning? ?Absolutely.?
The show?s safer moral is that men
need to talk to one another. Young
men need advice, but rarely get it,
says Peters, often because of the
absence of a father. ?I wouldn?t just
say young, black American men.
I would say young Latino men in
America. I would say young poor
men here in England. It?s not just
a racial thing. It?s more a social
economic thing that has wrenched
families apart and encouraged the
sale of sex as a commodity.?
Peters came from a stable
professional home in New Jersey,
but when at 24 he told his father, an
advertising manager for a construction
company, that he was getting married,
the reply was: ?Oh no. You?re not
going to do what I did.?
?That was just the worst. By that
time we were already committed.?
Yet his marriage to the singer Janine
Martyne, which produced two
children, did not endure. He thinks
now his father was simply saying
he was too young.
It is probably best to take Five Guys
Named Moe as a joyful display of
uninhibited male energy. That is
certainly how the audience received
it the night I saw it. Yet the piece
emerged out of a hard time for
Peters, who was by then a father
again, this time with Joanna Jacobs
(daughter of the BBC DJ, David).
He was working on Carmen Jones
at the Sheffield Crucible, but his
family was in Salisbury. For four
arts
months, he saw them for about four
hours a week.
?I was in a really bad place. Well, it
wasn?t a really, really bad place, but it
was one of those curious places that a
young man finds himself. You want to
be home, but you?re not home. You
have a child that you want to be with,
but you?re on the road and you?re
working. That separation puts
pressure on you and your partner,
but also on the child.?
Writing Five Guys was his way of
telling Jacobs that he loved her, and
some healing ensued. Tragically,
however, their four-year-old son,
Guppy, died of a kidney tumour about
the same time and the relationship
foundered. ?There?s no manual on how
to deal with that type of grief.? There
was certainly not the counselling
available today, or the culture of
talking things out. At the preview
Peters realised that instead of it
concluding with Nomax ringing
Lorraine to beg to come over, the
last line should be ?Let?s talk?.
Peters married again and has
another son, Max. The recipe for his
successful marriage to Penny, he tells
me, includes one ingredient even the
five guys do not broach: celibacy, or
more accurately non-penetrative
tantric sex. He is rightly wary that a
newspaper article may not be the best
place to discuss either it or the other
strictures of the Brahma Kumaris
faith he has adopted.
?Well, the best thing to do is to try
it,? he says when I express scepticism.
?It?s like trying to describe God. The
moment you try, you?ve lost it. And
I think that celibacy is probably the
same. You will not know what the
challenges are or how you feel or what
you gain from it, except by abstaining.?
Unlikely though it may sound,
Peter believes Five Guys fits into his
spiritual journey from American
Episcopalianism to Indian mysticism.
He thinks it may be the answer to a
prayer he uttered before a group of
yogis in India in the late Eighties, that
he make something that would spread
happiness across the world. ?And the
result is now, 30 years later, we?re
here, in Marble Arch. I get goose
bumps thinking about it.?
A sign above the Spiegeltent
nevertheless welcomes us to New
Orleans, which gives me the chance to
ask the star of Treme, the HBO series
about the aftermath of Hurricane
Katrina, about its recent successor.
Met by federal apathy, Katrina killed
more than 1,800 mainly black people
in New Orleans. Harvey, hitting Texas,
has claimed nearer 50 lives and
President Trump seems to be all over
it. Has collective shame over New
Peters in The Wire
with Sonja Sohn
Women of
a certain
size love
the song
I Like
?Em Fat
Like That
Orleans resulted in this more vigorous
response? Peters doesn?t think so,
remarking pointedly that two previous
Republican presidents, the Georges
Bush, live in Texas.
?You know, two years ago I was
asked, ?Have things gotten better in
America?? And I was saying no and
they were arguing, ?But you have a
black president.? If you have no sense
of what America?s history is about,
then I cannot convince you. Yes,
on the cover it looks wonderful, but
if you open up the book and start
reading through the chapters, you
can see it is just a new cover on
the same old shite.?
I enjoy that final word, more
Sheffield than New Jersey. Is there a
danger, however, that having played
The Wire?s most beatific character,
Clarke will be mistaken for a wise
man? ?That was Freamon. That was a
character written by David Simon and
Ed Burns, probably more Ed Burns.
My attention to detail has been
interpreted as wisdom when in actual
fact I was an actor trying my best to
keep my job, make sure that I didn?t
raise my head above the parapet and
listen for my next line.?
The Wire was the second
transformative moment of his career,
leading to a stage Othello co-starring
The Wire?s Dominic West and a new
wave of roles for him as a man of
gravitas. He has just finished the
second season of Hugh Laurie?s series
Chance, categorised as ?surf noir?.
If the question unspoken in Five
Guys is why Lorraine would take
back the sexist, uncommunicative
Nomax, the answer may be that
Nomax is an unreformed version of
Peters, and the man is irresistible.
?Don?t forget to mention God,? he
advises me warmly as I leave.
Five Guys Named Moe is at the
Marble Arch Theatre, London W1
(03333 444167), to February 17
10
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Wednesday September 6 2017 | the times
television & radio
A doctor you can trust ? to go off the rails
LAURENCE CENDROWICZ/BBC
James
Jackson
TV review
Doctor Foster
BBC One
{{{{(
The 21st Century
Race for Space
BBC Two
{{{{(
T
wo years on from the most
awkward dinner party since
the Last Supper, when
Gemma Foster dropped a
nuclear bomb on her husband
and their neighbours (?This soup is
lovely. By the way, dear friends, my
hubby has been bonking your angelic
daughter...?), Doctor Foster has
returned with a contender for the most
awkward housewarming party in history.
Gemma ? goaded, drunk, mad as
hell ? turned up at the soir閑 of her
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
The Compass
World Service, 1.30pm
The Royal Observatory at
Greenwich must adore
Dava Sobel, who fronts this
episode of The Compass.
Before her book Longitude
became the runaway
bestseller of the 1990s,
everyone must have
slouched round its museum
wondering why it had all
those boring clocks in it.
Now they slouch around
knowing that those clocks
contain the story of one of
the greatest dramas of the
scientific Enlightenment.
Today?s Compass looks at
the Big Bang and includes
an immortal clip from the
man who unwittingly coined
the term, the Cambridge
mathematician Fred Hoyle.
Proms at . . .
The Tanks at
Tate Modern
Radio 3, 10.15pm
Tonight?s Prom, as its
name suggests, comes from
the tanks at Tate Modern.
These concrete bunkers
were once used to store
oil for Giles Gilbert Scott?s
great power station above
and are now a performance
space. This evening they
will be re-echoing to the
sound of the electronic
musician Actress, a new
work by Catherine Lamb
and a dash of Exaudi.
ex-husband, Simon, and his young
bride to make the hosts, the guests
and, most importantly of course, TV
viewers everywhere squirm over their
glasses of sauvignon. Ah, doctor, how
we?ve missed your house calls!
After a toe-curling toast, Gemma
and Simon were alone in the bedroom.
?Admit you?re starting to get a hard-on
just looking at me,? she told him, a
crazed smile playing across her lean
features. ?I?m all about games.? It?s war.
You?d have thought that Simon, for
all his priapism, would have learnt not
to mess with his Medea ex given how
it ended last time (she convinced him
she had murdered their son). But that
would be no fun at all, and so far this
really is compulsively bonkers fun.
The party scene highlighted this
show?s irresistibility and its tendency
towards madness. As the camera glided
through a tableau of cavorting guests
like a stylised fever dream, it looked so
classy you forgot about the likelihood
of all the local friends so cheerfully
welcoming back Simon. And perhaps
estate agents can shed light on whether
home counties professionals really do
set up acid syringes on their front lawns
while staring murderously into the
distance, as Gemma was soon doing,
over a thunderous augury of strings.
Yet there?s little point in picking holes
in a show that so expressly embraces
exaggeration. No other drama does
hatred so well, and there?s too much to
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James.
Music and chat 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg
James 7.00 Annie Mac 9.00 The Surgery
with Gemma & Dr Radha 10.02 Phil Taggart
1.00am Benji B 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 The Folk Show with Mark
Radcliffe. Traditional and contemporary folk
and acoustic music, with live sessions 8.00
Jo Whiley. A mix of new and classic tracks,
with guests dropping in to chat 10.00 CMA
Music Festival 2017. Music and interviews
from the second night of this year?s festival
11.00 The Great American Songbook. Leo
Green considers the legacy of the songwriter
and composer Harry Warren, a proli?c talent
who eschewed the Hollywood party scene to
remain a committed family man (r) 12.00
Pick of the Pops. Paul Gambaccini compares
hits from 1958 and 1967 (r) 2.00am Radio 2
Playlists: Country Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Easy 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Radio 2
Rocks 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents Radio 3?s breakfast
show, featuring listener requests. 7.00, 8.00
News. 7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
Rob Cowan is joined by the theatre and ?lm
director Dominic Dromgoole, who discusses
his career and also shares his passion for
classical music. Rob?s Proms Artist of the
Week is the Russian violinist Alina
Ibragimova. Ibragimova is one of the world?s
leading violinists, excelling in a wide range of
repertoire and as both a soloist and chamber
player. Hartmann (Concerto funebre)
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Mozart (1756-1791)
Donald Macleod explores the chamber music
of Mozart?s Vienna years, this time focusing
on one of the string quartets that caused
Haydn to declare Mozart ?the greatest?.
Mozart (12 Variations in G for piano and
violin on La Berg鑢e C閘im鑞e, K359; and
String Quartet in C, K 465 ? Dissonance)
1.00pm News
Suranne Jones returned as the hapless GP Gemma Foster
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Fiona Talkington presents the third of four
concerts featuring Elgar chamber music from
LSO St Luke?s in London. Elgar (Violin
Sonata; and Sospiri); and Vaughan Williams
(The Lark Ascending ? original version for
violin and piano)
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Another chance to hear the Royal
Concertgebouw Orchestra perform works by
Wolfgang Rihm and Bruckner, at London?s
Royal Albert Hall. Presented by Petroc
Trelawny. Wolfgang Rihm (In-Schrift); and
Bruckner (Symphony No 9 in D minor) (r)
3.30 Choral Evensong
Sung by the Charles Wood Summer School in
St Patrick?s Church of Ireland Cathedral,
Armagh. Introit: Oculi Omnium (Wood).
Responses: Radcliffe. Psalm 34 (Attwood).
First Lesson: Jeremiah 17 vv.5-18. Of?ce
Hymn: Lord of all hopefulness (Slane).
Canticles: Gloucester Service (Howells).
Second Lesson: Matthew 12 vv.22-32.
Anthem: Te lucis ante terminum (Balfour
Gardiner). Final Hymn: Christ triumphant,
ever reigning (Guiting Power). Organ
Voluntary: Toccata (Duru?�). Philip Scriven
(organist), David Hill (artistic director)
4.30 In Tune
Ian Skelly with a lively mix of chat, arts news
and live performance. His guests include the
Israeli oud player Yair Dalal
6.00 News
6.02 Composer of the Week:
Mozart (1756-1791) (r)
7.00 Live BBC Proms 2017
Live at BBC Proms, the London Philharmonic
Orchestra and Vladimir Jurowski in
Shostakovich?s Symphony No 11, plus
Proko?ev?s First Violin Concerto with the
soloist Alina Ibragimova. Presented by
Andrew McGregor. Stravinsky (Funeral Song,
and Song of the Volga Boatmen); Proko?ev
(Violin Concerto No 1 in D); Britten (Russian
Funeral); and Shostakovich (Symphony No 11
in G minor ? The Year 1905)
10.15 Live BBC Proms 2017
Sara Mohr-Pietsch hosts an Open Ear concert
of music live from the Tanks, Tate Modern,
featuring Rodrigo Constanzo, Exaudi, London
Contemporary Orchestra and Actress. Emilie
Levienaise Farrouch (New Work); Catherine
Lamb (Prisma Interius V); Cassandra Miller
(Guide); and Exaudi: Actress arr. Hugh Brunt
(Momentum). See Radio Choice
11.30 Late Junction
Verity Sharp introduces music by the French
composer Fran鏾is-Bernard M鈉he, plus noise
band the Elks? imitation of a stag?s wail
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
News headlines and sport with Mishal
Husain and Nick Robinson
8.30 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Fry?s English Delight
Stephen Fry explores Australian dialects with
the help of Adam Hills (3/4) (r)
9.30 All in a Chord
Examining the chord of C major (5/5) (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week:
Every Third Thought
By Robert McCrum. The author re?ects on
how people approach and accept death (3/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Discussion and interviews, presented by Jane
Garvey. Including at 10.41 the 15 Minute
Drama: The Inheritors (3/5)
10.56 The Listening Project
The anxiety of leaving home for University
11.00 Vitriolic
Ayshea Buksh looks at the complex picture
behind the rise in acid attacks (r)
11.30 Relativity
Richard Herring?s comedy series about four
generations of family (1/4)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Sarah Daniels
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Streets Apart:
A History of Social Housing
Lynsey Hanley explores how the right to buy
policy changed council housing forever (8/10)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: The Interrogation
By Roy Williams. DS Max Matthews and
DC Sean Armitage investigate when a
sixth-form student is seriously attacked
on his way to college (3/3) (r)
3.00 The Death of Retirement
Paul Lewis investigates the future of
retirement (7/7) (r)
3.30 In Sickness and in Social Care
Why the NHS and social services struggle to
meet an ageing population?s needs (1/2) (r)
4.00 Is One Career Enough?
Sarfraz Manzoor asks if it is better to
specialise or build a portfolio career (r)
4.30 The Media Show
The latest news from the media world
5.00 PM
relish in the performances of Suranne
Jones as as Gemma, a vortex of
loathing and sexual energy, and Bertie
Carvel as Simon. The question of his
sudden wealth ? and his very
unrepentance in returning to town ?
has me hooked. Just how did Gemma
resist giving that smug smirk a slap as
he told her she needs ?to move on??
There?s a deceptive skill going on
here, in the look? the shifting colour
palettes between Gemma?s home and
Simon?s modernist mansion ? and the
apparent ease with which the writer,
Mike Bartlett, has drawn us back into
the milieu of sex and mind games, red
bras and lethal blades, his great trick
being to make you forget that a second
series was barely necessary.
In The 21st Century Race for Space
Brian Cox met the companies driven
by ?positive? ambitions in tourism and
industry in space (what noble men our
billionaires are ? if there?s a profit to
be made) and was mind-boggling for
revealing just how close we are to a
new era. There are even plans under
way to land engineers on asteroids.
Jeff Bezos of Amazon talked about
his plans to save humanity by moving
all heavy industry off Earth. Perhaps
all those saved tax dollars will be a
good thing after all. Alas, Cox failed to
ask Bezos the big question about his
plans for space travel: will Amazon
Prime members get free shipping?
james.jackson@thetimes.co.uk
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 Ankle Tag
The bath has sprung a leak, and Gruff wants
to book an ethical plumber (3/4)
7.00 The Archers
Lexi learns more about Ambridge,
and Adam takes control
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 The Inheritors (3/5) (r)
8.00 The Fix
Dawn Austwick and David Willetts challenge
youngsters to solve the problem of
alcoholism in Britain (4/4)
8.45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand
In the ?rst of a new series, the comedian
tries to understand the Kardashians (1/6)
9.00 Costing the Earth
Tom Heap reports on environmental
destruction caused by tourism (1/11) (r)
9.30 Quirke?s Cast and Crew
The work of camera operators (3/4) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime:
Crime Down Under ? The Dry
By Jane Harper, abridged by Sara Davies. Old
enmities ?are up as Aaron Falk digs deeper
into the Hadler deaths (3/10)
11.00 The John Moloney Show
John battles with being kept on hold while
changing utilities provider (3/4)
11.15 Before They Were Famous
The surprising early careers of celebrated
authors (2/6) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Presented by Susan Hulme
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Every Third Thought (r)
12.45 Sailing By
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Navy Lark 8.30 Hancock?s Half
Hour 9.00 Genius 9.30 Up the Garden Path
10.00 Waverley 11.00 Short Works: The
World of Somerset Maugham 11.15 Arabian
Afternoons 12.00 The Navy Lark 12.30pm
Hancock?s Half Hour 1.00 Sidney Chambers
and the Shadow of Death 1.30 The Goulash
Archipelago 2.00 The Siege 2.15 Charisma:
Pinning Down the Butter?y 2.30 South
Riding 2.45 Country Girl 3.00 Waverley
4.00 Genius 4.30 Up the Garden Path
5.00 Odd Balls 5.30 Ankle Tag 6.00 The
Heart of Hark?un 6.30 Off the Page 7.00
The Navy Lark. Comedy with Leslie Phillips
7.30 Hancock?s Half Hour. Comedy with Tony
Hancock 8.00 Sidney Chambers and the
Shadow of Death. By James Runcie 8.30 The
Goulash Archipelago. The jazz bassist Arnie
Somogyi pays for food with music. From
2008 9.00 Short Works: The World of
Somerset Maugham. A sea captain named
Red revisits an island lagoon from his youth
9.15 Arabian Afternoons. A Dish of
Pomegranates by Peter Jukes 10.00 Comedy
Club: Ankle Tag. Bob strikes up a friendship
with a woman he meets in a local museum
10.30 The Secret World. The Arctic Monkeys
reveal their love for Woman?s Hour 11.00
Lee Mack and Friends at the Fringe. With
Andy Parsons, Lucy Porter, Tim Minchin and
Jimeoin. From 2005 11.30 The Nick Revell
Show. Nick overdoes his ?tness regime
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
Mark Chapman presents sports news,
interviews and features 7.30 5 Live Sport
? Review 9.00 5 Live Sport: The Tuffers and
Vaughan Cricket Show. Cricket discussion
10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Max Rushden and Dean Saunders 10.00
The Two Mikes 1.00pm Hawksbee and
Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Adam Catterall
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Stuart Maconie 4.00 Steve
Lamacq 7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe
12.00 6 Music Recommends with Mary Anne
Hobbs 1.00am The Record Producers. The
work of Mickie Most 2.00 Essential Albums
of the 90s 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6
Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.15 A Classic
FM Recital: Live from Dumfries House
10.00 Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday September 6 2017
11
1GT
ANTHONY ROBLING; MARILYN KINGWILL
Jazz
Django Bates and the
Frankfurt Radio Big Band
Ronnie Scott?s, W1
Prom 69
Pittsburgh SO/Honeck
Royal Albert Hall
A
{{{((
J
{{{{(
azz projects inspired by the
Beatles haven?t always ended
happily ? that otherworldly
spirit is sometimes lost behind
a fog of abstruse harmonies and
ever-shifting time signatures ? so
admirers of the Fab Four can be
forgiven for wondering whether they
should venture into Frith Street this
week. They needn?t worry; this one
takes off.
Anyone familiar with Django Bates?s
compositions for the Loose Tubes big
band might have feared that his 50th
anniversary homage to Sgt Pepper?s
Lonely Hearts Club Band would end up
sinking beneath the weight of its
whimsy. Bates is an exceptionally
talented keyboard player who has had
a fatal weakness for undergrad pranks.
His collaboration with the Frankfurt
Radio Big Band works all the better
for being relatively conservative,
the songs providing a sturdy spine.
Recreating the album, track by track,
lyrics and all, Bates is less interested
in giving room to grandstanding solos
than in exploring textures. If Loose
Tubes had been playing Being For the
Benefit of Mr Kite! the reference to
Henry the horse would probably have
prompted a 12-minute waltz. Bates
and his team are much more
respectful ? and engaging.
The members of the Danish trio
Eggs Laid By Tigers form a rock-solid
rhythm section. Martin Ullits Dahl
delivered the vocals straight down the
middle. The multi-talented Stuart Hall
added electric sitar, and on A Day in
the Life the immaculate Frankfurt
horn section managed to recreate
that resounding climactic detonation.
As a bonus we got a soaring version
of Penny Lane and a Strawberry Fields
Forever arrangement in which the
trombones nimbly took the place of
the original cello. Bates, who had been
adding quirky synthesized sound
effects throughout, threw in a couple
of Ronnie Scott?s jokes as well. The old
bebopper would have liked that. He
would probably have enjoyed the
music too.
Clive Davis
To Saturday. ronniescotts.co.uk
Pop
Jessie Ware
Islington
Assembly Hall, N1
{{(((
T
artsfirst night
William Whelton?s dance numbers cleverly fill the limited space with wit and small-scale spectacle
Slick whimsy for hippies
This snappy
and energetic
revival of a
twee musical
almost makes
it sing, says
Sam Marlowe
Theatre
Pippin
Hope Mill
Theatre,
Manchester
{{{((
here are many praiseworthy
things about Jessie Ware.
She sings well, she moves
well, she looks good and she
can deliver her smooth
soul-pop without breaking sweat ?
impressive when she?s wearing a
long-sleeved Victorian-style dress
in a sauna-like concert hall.
There was nothing, however,
that was remarkable about this show
by the 32-year-old south Londoner.
Ware, right, has long been touted
as a kind of millennial
Sade, but she
had none of that
weightless slinkiness
here. Cocktail-bar torch
songs such as Kind of . . .
Sometimes . . . Maybe,
delivered in her
creamy alto, were
more than enough to
sate a crowd that was
thick with couples on
dates, but it was mostly
S
tephen Schwartz is the
composer of the hit musicals
Godspell and Wicked, but
Pippin, which opened on
Broadway in 1972, is decidedly
the runt of the litter. It?s a scrap of
winsome whimsy ? a hippy dippy
morality tale with existentialist
pretensions, wrapped in a weird
and somewhat sickly faux naivety.
Jonathan O?Boyle?s revival is slickly
staged, performed with brio, and
boasts snappy choreography by
William Whelton that frequently tips
its hat to the show?s original director,
Bob Fosse. Nothing could induce me to
care about the whining titular hero or
his cartoonish quest of self-discovery.
Here, though, the journey is colourful,
pacey and stuffed with eye-catching
details to distract from the story?s
sugar-coated, hollow heart.
Roger O Hirson?s book is a
meandering nonsense of picaresque
adventure, delivered, in a hoary
metatheatrical framing device, by
a troupe of strolling thespians. Pippin
(the suitably fresh-faced Jonathan
Carlton), son of the medieval monarch
Charlemagne, sets off in search of
fulfilment, blundering through war,
casual sex, religion, politics and the
arts. O?Boyle and the designer Maeve
Black supply a vaudevillian setting,
with a tarnished gilt proscenium and
the cast in fishnets and Pierrot ruffs.
Genevieve Nicole as the sinister
Leading Player who chivvies Pippin
along is part circus ringmaster, part
corseted dominatrix, even, on
occasion, wielding a whip.
Schwartz?s poppy score, featuring
the familiar songs Magic to Do and
Corner of the Sky, is pleasantly tuneful
if a touch bland. And Whelton?s dance
numbers, sinuous, angular, sprinkled
with jazz hands and fingerclicks,
cleverly fill the limited space with wit
and small-scale spectacle. There are
some fine turns from the company:
Mairi Barclay doubles impressively
as Pippin?s wicked, wily stepmother
and his twinkly grandmother. Tessa
Kadler delivers stand-out vocals as
Catherine, the true love who finally
gives Pippin?s life meaning.
Pippin himself is a bit of a drip, and
there?s not much Carlton can do about
that, but he sings well, while Nicole
marshals the action with a creepy
seductiveness that she might almost
have borrowed from the Emcee in
Cabaret. It would take magic, if not
a miracle, to redeem this twee, holey
show, but O?Boyle nearly pulls it off.
To Sept 23. hopemilltheatre.co.uk
derivative, earthbound stuff. Devotion
and Running were briefly rousing, but
soon forgotten, lacking the stardust
that elevates a decent performer into
a great one. If that seems harsh, then
Ware has reached a point in her
career where she must be judged
by exacting standards.
With three Brit nominations, two
Top 10 albums and a
forthcoming third that
includes a collaboration
with Ed Sheeran,
w
expectations are
high for this likeable
woman from Clapham.
w
Excellent performances
should be a matter
of course.
Otherwise, she
could be headed for
the same limbo of
mediocrity that
claimed Sophie
Ellis-Bextor,
Daniel Bedingfield,
Paloma Faith and so many other
British solo artists.
Ware did have an excuse: this
was her first headline show since
having her first baby almost exactly
a year ago. ?This time last year I was
having contractions,? she said during
a break between songs. Anyone who
gets up on a stage again so soon
deserves respect.
It is to be hoped that during this
short run of shows at the Assembly
Hall Ware will find an extra pinch
of pizzazz and forge a stronger
connection with the crowd.
Hopefully, her lack of outstanding
songs will be solved by the new album.
The tracks from it were certainly
among the highlights here, from the
skittishly emotional Selfish Love to
the lovely Midnight, in which she
finally unleashed some vocal
somersaults. So all is not lost. But
she needs to up her game.
Ed Potton
Islington Assembly Hall, Thur-Fri
merica?s one-time Steel
City still boasts an almost
frighteningly smooth yet
powerful orchestra. The
Pittsburgh Symphony
Orchestra announced its presence at
the Proms (a one-night-only landing)
with John Adams?s 1995 Lollapalooza,
a juggernaut of brass that snarls and
belches like some kind of animatronic
monster. Not so much a curtain-raiser
as a curtain-shredder, it did the job in
thumping fashion.
This sort of piece isn?t really the
sweet spot of the orchestra?s music
director, Manfred Honeck, however.
The Austrian conductor is more about
refinement, and shaped many finely
calibrated moments in the evening?s
main event, Mahler?s Symphony No 1,
while deploying the full might of the
Pittsburghers when he wanted ?
notably in the last movement?s
gathering climax, where three rows of
stentorian double basses and ranks of
full-beam trumpets and horns suddenly
made themselves felt. Elsewhere,
Honeck focused on harnessing
buttery strings and silken pianissimos,
everything so soft and tactile that even
the tuba announcing Mahler?s weird
funeral march sounded as if it were
swathed in velvet.
This was fine musicianship, but in
the service of a not-always convincing
journey from A to B. The opening
movement, the gradual awakening of
nature, slumbered almost right until
its end. And having written in the
programme about the importance of
the ?rustic? scherzo not being played
like a waltz, Honeck, below, then
produced heavy, rather pedantic
accents on the rhythms; no peasant
would have cavorted to this knees-up.
Still, at least the conductor was in his
Viennese element in the delicious
Strauss waltz encores.
Filling the concerto slot, meanwhile,
was Anne-Sophie Mutter in the
Dvor醟 Violin Concerto ? formidable
in style and carefully ticking off a list
of effects: imperious portamentos,
jaunty tremolos, daringly thinned
down tone for the start and close of
the slow movement. However, the
sum effect was rather brittle, lacking
the zest and earthy lyricism of Dvor醟
at his best ? and not helped by more
ponderous tempos. Mutter?s whizzing
Bach encore was another flash of steel,
but silver would have been more
welcome.
Neil Fisher
12
1GT
Wednesday September 6 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Catherine Pearson
Back
Channel 4, 10pm
The comedy
power duo
of David
Mitchell
and Robert Webb are
indeed back. There?s
no denying that this
pair are at their best
together, and with a
World?s Busiest
Cities: Mexico City
BBC Two, 8pm
shortage, while Rani
enjoys food from the
famous street markets
and Snow discovers
how skyscrapers
are built in an
earthquake zone.
Mountain: Life
at the Extreme
BBC Two, 9pm
The second episode
explores ?life on the
roof of the world? in
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Council House Crackdown.
A football coach secretly subletting his social housing
property 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Including a
house with wonky ?oors in Derbyshire (r) (AD) 11.00
Dom on the Spot. Dominic Littlewood joins traf?c cop
Matt Picton in Manchester 11.45 Thief Trackers.
Following the trail of a bicycle thief 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. From the market town of Hungerford in Berkshire
(r) (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC
Regional News; Weather 1.45 Doctors. Emma seeks
professional support from Jimmi (AD) 2.15 Red Rock.
Angela bends the rules with tragic results (AD) 3.00
Escape to the Country. Jules Hudson helps a couple search
for a family home in the Shropshire countryside (AD)
3.45 Garden Rescue. Charlie Dimock and the Rich brothers
are challenged to come up with a Mughal inspired design
for a small courtyard garden in Harrow (AD) 4.30
Celebrity Money for Nothing. Sarah Moore and Jay Blades
search the homes of Miranda Krestovnikoff and Danny
Clarke 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show presented by Alexander
Armstrong and Richard Osman 6.00 BBC News at Six;
Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 Council House
Crackdown (r) 7.15 Garden Rescue (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign
Zone: See Hear (SL) 8.30 Great British Menu (r) (SL)
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
11.30 Daily Politics 1.00pm Lifeline (r) 1.10 For What
It?s Worth (r) 1.55 A to Z of TV Gardening (r) 2.10
Glorious Gardens from Above (r) 2.55 Coast Australia.
The southwest corner of the country, where Neil Oliver
retraces the steps of six Irish prisoners-of-conscience and
Brendan Moar ?nds out about a botanical pioneer (r) (AD)
3.45 Great British Railway Journeys. Michael Portillo
journeys from Preston to Swinton (r) (AD) 4.15 Planet
Earth II. Animals that live in mountain ranges, including
rival snow leopards, grizzly bears using trees to shed
their winter fur, and golden eagles hunting over
snow-capped peaks (r) (AD) 5.15 Flog It! The antiques
experts James Lewis and Anita Manning try to get their
hands on the best items to be sold at auction in Shef?eld,
and the presenter Paul Martin visits Shef?eld FC (r) 6.00
Richard Osman?s House of Games. Nish Kumar, Clara
Amfo, Anneka Rice and Al Murray test their general
knowledge skills 6.30 Eggheads. Hosted by Jeremy Vine
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Presented by Lorraine Kelly 9.25
The Jeremy Kyle Show. The host invites guests to air
their differences over family issues 10.30 This Morning.
Phillip Scho?eld and Holly Willoughby are joined by the
comedian and actor Eddie Izzard as he chats about his
new ?lm Victoria & Abdul 12.30pm Loose Women.
Another helping of topical studio discussion from a
female perspective, featuring interviews 1.30 ITV News;
Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras follow the criminal
barrister Robert Rinder as he takes on real-life cases in
a studio courtroom 3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. David
Dickinson and the dealers visit the RAF Museum in
London, where Mark Stevens barters hard for a bracelet,
and Chris Skitch tries to snap up the ?rst camera to visit
the moon (r) 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the
arcade-themed quiz show 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh
presents as contestants Helena, Angela, Robert and Dave
answer general knowledge questions and take on the
ruthless quiz genius the Chaser and secure a cash prize
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 The King of Queens (r) 8.00
Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 9.00 Frasier (r) 10.05
Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 11.00 Coast vs
Country (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm
Couples Come Dine with Me. Three couples from Plymouth
compete (r) 1.05 French Collection. Three Brits go
shopping for a bargain in Carpentras, Provence 2.10
Countdown. With Gloria Hunniford in Dictionary Corner
3.00 Cheap Cheap Cheap. James and Sophia hope their
knowledge of rackets will keep them in the competition
4.00 A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun. Ben Hillman helps
a couple who have recently returned to the UK after 15
years in Greece scour the Canary island of Fuerteventura
for a new home in the sun (r) 5.00 Come Dine with Me.
In Middlesbrough, a pub landlord serves classic dishes
with a modern twist at his 1980s-themed evening
5.30 Streetmate. Scarlett Moffatt sets up a date at an
aquarium for a 20-year-old 6.00 The Simpsons. Moe?s
bar is threatened with closure (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks.
A ?ashback reveals more of the events from the night
Amy died. Meanwhile, Tony unburdens his concerns
about Harry and Ste at his daughter?s grave (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and his guests talk about the issues of the day,
with viewers calling in to offer their opinions 11.15 The
Yorkshire Vet. Peter Wright tries to save the life of a cow
whose uterus prolapsed while calving, and Julian Norton
meets a 300kg boar named Donald (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel Inspector. Alex Polizzi tries to
settle a problem between the manager of a Redditch hotel
and the Paris-based owner, who monitors her every move
on CCTV cameras (r) 1.10 Access. Showbiz news and
gossip 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD)
2.15 NCIS. The agents travel to LA to work with another
NCIS team on an investigation that escalates into a
high-priority case, and Tony begins to pry into Ziva?s life
(r) (AD) 3.15 Rosamunde Pilcher: The Unknown Heart.
Conclusion. Elizabeth is torn between whether she should
return to Duncan or commit herself to Andrew, and her
body seems to be rejecting her new heart (r) (AD) 5.00 5
News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Toadie and Sonya steal the
statue from Lassiter?s (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away.
Maggie asks Ben to reconsider his renovation plans for
the pier (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and Alex
Jones present the live magazine show
7.00 Emmerdale Emma struggles to keep
a secret, Ross goes out on a limb and
Jai is left reeling (AD)
7.30 Fake Britain Matt Allwright explores
the whitening business that has ruined
its customers? teeth (6/10)
7.00 This Farming Life New series.
The return of the documentary series
offering an insight into modern
farming life. In the ?rst episode, new
entrant farmers Janet and Alastair
take their lambs to auction on the
island of Mull (1/12)
8.00 Celebrity MasterChef
The actor Brian Bovell, the popstar
Jaymi Hensley, the singer Patti
Boulaye, the comedian Abdullah Afzal
and the television personality
Reverend Kate Bottley enter the
MasterChef kitchen (7/12) (AD)
8.00 World?s Busiest Cities:
Mexico City Dan Snow, Anita Rani
and Ade Adepitan go behind-thescenes to reveal the hidden systems
and people running the densely
populated Mexican capital, Mexico City.
See Viewing Guide (2/4) (AD)
9.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build Nick
Knowles and the designer Oliver Heath
enlist an army of volunteers to help
renovate the Liversidge family home in
Hull, which is in desperate need of
future-proo?ng (4/9) (r) (AD)
9.00 Mountain: Life at the Extreme
This episode looks at life on the
highest mountain range on Earth, the
Himalayas, following snow leopards
as they creep into isolated mountain
villages. See Viewing Guide (2/3) (AD)
10PM
BBC One
Early
Anita Rani, Ade
Adepitan and Dan
Snow venture to
Mexico City to see how
the megalopolis copes
with its 22 million
inhabitants. Home
to Mexico?s tallest
building and the world?s
No 1 consumer of
water, the city is a
colourful, sprawling
maze that relies
on unregulated
settlements and
unofficial, unmapped
buses called peseros
to accommodate
its population and
the daily commute.
A fluent Spanish
speaker, Adepitan
heads to the rural
communities to
investigate solutions
to the city?s water
7PM
for four months in
1987. Andrew is an
immodest busybody,
and on his journey
to the homestead
he interferes in the
lives of strangers
with disastrous
consequences.
Stephen?s bohemian
mother and sister
welcome Andrew back
with open arms, but it?s
not clear that we can
trust a word he says.
8PM
out in pine panelling.
He?s not having an
easy time with his
imperceptible grief;
there are sausage-roll
quantities for the wake
to consider and he?s
managed to get
lumbered with an
ill dog. Or rather,
?an asthma-causing
piss and vomit
machine?. Enter
Andrew (Webb),
Stephen?s foster brother
9PM
Top
pick
dark script from Simon
Blackwell, a writer on
Peep Show (the cult
sitcom that made
Mitchell and Webb?s
names), there?s plenty
of deliciously wicked
humour to enjoy.
When Stephen?s father,
Laurie, dies, it becomes
Stephen?s responsibility
to take the reins of
the family business, a
local pub that Stephen
(Mitchell) has decked
10.00 BBC News at Ten; followed by BBC
Regional News and Weather; and
National Lottery Update
Late
11PM
10.45 A Question of Sport
With Jazz Carlin, Liam Phillips, Martyn
Williams and Kevin Campbell
11.15 Live from the BBC The comedian
Josie Long takes to the stage to
perform a stand-up routine (4/6)
11.45 Who Do You Think You Are?
The actor and ?lm-maker Noel Clarke
starts his search in Trinidad as he
uncovers his ancestry, but soon ends
up on one of the smallest and most
beautiful islands in the Caribbean
(8/10) (r) (AD)
12.50am-6.00 BBC News
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Starting Up, Starting Over
A 43-year-old woman decides to give
up her job as a nanny and follow a
childhood dream to live off the land
with her own small farm (3/6)
8.00 Love Your Home and Garden
Alan Titchmarsh and his expert team
of architects, builders and gardeners
transform a house and garden in
Eltham in southeast London for
the Seesurrun family (2/3) (AD)
8.00 Location, Location, Location
Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer are
house-hunting in and around Bristol,
as Kirstie searches for a property for
Craig and Rich, who have been looking
for a home for over a year
8.00 GPs: Behind Closed Doors
Doctors deal with cases of severe
joint and shoulder pain, including a
man who was hurled over the bonnet
of a car in a bike accident, leaving him
with pain in his shoulder (AD)
9.00 Long Lost Family In the ?nal episode
of the series, a woman longs to know
the reasons behind her adoption, while
a man searches for his brother given up
after a wartime affair (7/7) (AD)
9.00 Grand Designs New series. After a
four year stint living in New Zealand,
an intrepid pair want to build a
Kiwi-style hill house on the slopes of
the Malvern hills in Worcestershire.
See Viewing Guide
9.00 Can?t Pay? We?ll Take It Away
Sheriffs try to recover almost �400
from a company director for unpaid
invoices in Manchester, while agents
in Kent chase nearly �000 owed by
a couple for unpaid rent
7.30 Coronation Street Eileen seeks the
truth behind Phelan?s behaviour.
Meanwhile, Will comforts Michelle
on Robert?s day in court (AD)
10.00 QI With Alan Davies, Lucy Porter,
Frankie Boyle and Ross Noble (r)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.00 Back New series. Comedy starring
David Mitchell and Robert Webb.
See Viewing Guide (1/6)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Evan Davis.
10.30 Regional News
10.40 The eBay Scammers Detectives go
after a gang who are making millions
conning thousands of victims in a new
online crime targeting customers of
online marketplace eBay (r)
10.35 999: What?s Your Emergency?
Police are dispatched when a
four-year-old boy is found wandering
the streets alone and an eight-year-old
is discovered making a camp in an area
frequented by drug users (r) (AD)
11.15 The 21st Century Race for Space
Brian Cox gains access behind the
scenes at Virgin Galactic, Blue Origin
and Spaceport America, exploring what
is really happening in privately
?nanced space ?ight (r) (AD)
12.15am Sign Zone: See Hear Sebastian Cuncliffe
looks back at the 2017 Dea?ympics in Samsun, Turkey (r)
(SL) 12.45 India?s Partition: The Forgotten Story.
Gurinder Chadha explores the events surrounding the
Partition of India (r) (AD, SL) 1.45-2.15 Suzi Perry?s
Queens of the Road. Documentary (r) (SL)
11.40 British Touring Car Championship
Highlights Round eight from
Rockingham Motor Speedway
12.55am Jackpot247 3.00 May the Best House Win.
A mill-worker?s cottage, a plush city centre penthouse, a
narrow boat and restored Victorian home are highlighted
as the property-comparing contest arrives in Manchester
(r) (SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy
Kyle Show. Guests air their differences (r) (SL)
10.00 Fifty Shades of Grey (18, 2015)
A naive young literature student?s
life is thrown into turmoil by an affair
with a mysterious billionaire. Initially
she is intrigued by his aloof and
distant manner, but soon realises he
is harbouring dark secrets and desires.
Erotic drama based on EL James?s
bestseller starring Jamie Dornan and
Dakota Johnson (AD)
11.35 Educating Greater Manchester Life
at Harrop Fold Secondary in Salford,
Greater Manchester (1/8) (r) (AD)
12.35am The Secrets of Sleep A 36-year-old who has
?nally received a diagnosis of narcolepsy. Last in the
series 1.30 FILM: The Tree of Life (12, 2011) Drama
starring Brad Pitt, Sean Penn and Hunter McCracken 3.50
Location, Location, Location (r) 4.45 Building the Dream
(r) (AD) 5.40-6.00 Kirstie?s Handmade Treasures (r)
12.15am My Secret Sex Fantasy (r) 1.15
SuperCasino 3.10 Best of Up Late with Rylan. Chat show
4.00 Now That?s Funny! Pleasure seekers get more than
they bargained for at an amusement park (r) (SL) 4.45
House Doctor (r) (AD, SL) 5.10 House Busters (r) (SL)
5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest. Documentary (r) (SL)
the times | Wednesday September 6 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
the Himalayas. Home
to Mount Everest and
some of the world?s
deepest gorges, the
mountain range is
teeming with life.
There are the lone
male Yunnan
snub-nosed monkeys
looking for someone
to cuddle up to during
the freezing Himalayan
nights; the greater
horseshoe bats that
hide in the caves of the
mountains; and the
Bactrian two-humped
camels. With
breathtaking
cinematography,
the documentary
also introduces the
Buddhist community
working to protect
endangered snow
leopards, the monks
who create art from
powdered calcite and
the competitors of the
Everest marathon.
Grand Designs
Channel 4, 9pm
After 18 years Grand
Designs continues to
inspire and amaze with
its innovative home
designs. For the first
episode of the new
series the presenter
Kevin McCloud is in
the Malvern Hills in
Worcestershire with
the New Zealand-loving
couple John and Jill.
Having bought a plot
of land, they survey
it and draw up plans
to create a hillside
home for their family
of five. Self-professed
?housebuilding virgins?,
the couple have steep
terrain and lots of
granite to deal with
as well as some
controversial window
designs. Can they build
their dream Hobbit
home in 18 months?
Storyville
BBC Four, 10pm
In November 1999 a
six-year-old boy was
found off the coast of
Florida in a small boat.
He had been drifting
alone after his mother
had drowned during
their attempt to escape
Cuba for the US. This
edition of Storyville tells
the story of the boy,
Eli醤 Gonz醠ez, now 23,
including his
experience fleeing
Cuba and the bitter
custody battle between
his Cuban father
and his American
relatives after his
rescue. The film
examines the difficult
relationship between
the two countries and
the impact of Fidel
Castro?s death last year
as Gonz醠ez tells his
story for the first time.
Sport choice
Eurosport 1, 3.30pm
Coverage of the
tenth day of the US
Open features action
from the quarter-finals.
Roger Federer and
Rafael Nadal are on
course to meet in the
semi-finals, assuming
they can overcome
Juan Mart韓 del Potro
(Federer) and Andrey
Rublev (Nadal) today.
Sky1
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Hawaii Five-0 (r) 8.00 Monkey Life (r)
(AD) 9.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) 10.00 Modern
Family (r) 11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 12.00
Hawaii Five-0 (r) 2.00pm NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
3.00 Supergirl (r) 4.00 The Flash (r)
6.00 Modern Family (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Freddie Down Under. Andrew Flintoff and
Rob Penn head to Darwin (r) (AD)
9.00 Colony. Will, Katie, and Broussard search
for a way out of the colony (AD)
10.00 A League of Their Own US Road Trip.
James Corden, Jamie Redknapp, Jack Whitehall
and Andrew Flintoff take part in a baseball
challenge at the LA Angels? stadium (r) (AD)
11.00 Air Ambulance ER. A 16-year-old boy
suffers a major head injury (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.00 A League of Their Own (r) (AD) 1.00am
The Force: Manchester (r) (AD) 2.00 Ross Kemp
on Gangs (r) (AD) 3.00 Motorway Patrol. Double
bill (r) 4.00 Animal 999. Double bill (r) (AD)
5.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 8.00 Urban Secrets (r)
10.00 The West Wing (r) 12.00 Without a Trace
(r) 1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The British (r)
(AD) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00 Without a Trace. Martin is shot (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A naked
corpse is found in the desert (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny learns he is under
investigation by the district attorney (r) (AD)
9.00 Ray Donovan. Abby starts construction on
the new bar, Terry attempts to win back
Maureen one last time, and Bridget opens up to
her boyfriend about her father (4/12)
10.00 I?m Dying Up Here. Goldie?s ex-husband
shows up and asks her for a favour, while a fan
shows her love for Eddie in an unusual fashion
11.05 The Sopranos. Dr Mel? disagrees with
Tony about his self-evaluation (r)
12.15am The Sopranos (r) 1.20 Looking (r)
1.55 Tin Star 2.55 Ray Donovan (r)
4.00 The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00am Cooks to Market (r) 6.15 60 Minute
Makeover (r) 7.15 Border Security: Canada?s
Front Line (r) 8.15 Road Wars (r) (AD) 9.15 My
Kitchen Rules: Australia (r) 10.30 Nothing to
Declare (r) (AD) 12.00 Criminal Minds (r)
1.00pm Bones (r) (AD) 2.00 Cold Case (r)
3.00 Cooks to Market (r) 3.15 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 4.15 UK Border Force (r) (AD)
5.15 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.15 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.45 My Kitchen Rules: Australia
8.00 Sun, Sea and A&E. Documentary following
British tourists hospitalised abroad (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: Along Came a Spider (15, 2001)
Detective thriller prequel to Kiss the Girls,
starring Morgan Freeman, Monica Potter,
Michael Wincott and Dylan Baker (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. The BAU joins the hunt
for a serial killer operating in Wisconsin (r)
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 1.00am Nashville (r)
2.00 Bones. Double bill (r) (AD) 4.00 Criminal
Minds (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Celtic Woman: Destiny ? Live in
Concert 8.00 Auction 8.30 Watercolour
Challenge 9.00 Tales of the Unexpected 9.30
South Bank Masterclasses: Joan Armatrading
9.45 Eric Clapton: Slowhand at 70 ? Live at the
Royal Albert Hall 12.00 Discovering: James
Cagney (AD) 1.00pm Tales of the Unexpected.
Double bill 2.00 Auction 2.30 Watercolour
Challenge 3.00 UB40: Live at Montreux Jazz
Festival 2002 5.00 Discovering: Cash
6.00 Discovering: John Wayne (AD)
7.00 Fake! The Great Masterpiece Challenge
8.00 Tony Visconti?s Unsigned Heroes
9.00 FILM: Chocolat (12, 2000) Drama with
Juliette Binoche and Johnny Depp
11.15 Sex & the Silver Screen. Censorship in
Depression-era Hollywood
12.25am FILM: Get ?em Off (18, 1976)
The history of striptease 1.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 2.00 Auction 2.30 Watercolour
Challenge 3.00 The South Bank Show Originals
4.00 Darbar Festival 2015 5.00 I Am La Scala
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans. Including
news and views on today?s early stories 8.30
Live New Zealand NPC Rugby: Wellington v
Hawke?s Bay (Kick-off 8.30). Coverage of the
?xture, which takes place at the Westpac
Stadium 10.20 Rugby Greatest Games. Toulon v
Saracens in the 2014 European Rugby Champions
Cup ?nal. 10.30 Premier League Daily. Updates
from the top ?ight 11.00 Sky Sports Now 12.00
Sky Sports Today. The latest sports news and
developments 5.00pm Sky Sports News at 5
6.00 Sky Sports News at 6. The latest news
7.00 Sky Sports Tonight. Leading sports stories
8.00 Fight Night. Floyd Mayweather v Conor
McGregor. A chance to see the bout, which took
place at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada
10.00 The Debate. Discussion on the latest
Premier League news
11.00 Through the Night. A round-up of the
day?s stories and a look ahead to the events that
are likely to make the news tomorrow
12.00 Through the Night
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm-1.10
Community Life. Father Brian D?Arcy is in
Fermanagh making an appeal on behalf of
Action Mental Health. Plus, a report on the
Trailblazers Power Chair Football team (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 1.00pm For What It?s
Worth. Antiques quiz show hosted by Fern
Britton (r) 1.45 Glorious Gardens from Above.
Christine Walkden visits Bodnant Garden in
Snowdonia, where she explores an area
reminiscent of a Himalayan valley amid the
mountains, and pops into the nearby
Bodysgallen Hall (r) 2.30 Politics Scotland
3.35-3.45 Lifeline. Dan Snow appeals on
behalf of the British Polio Fellowship, an
organisation supporting and empowering
people in the UK living with the late effects of
polio and post-polio syndrome (r)
STV
As ITV except: 10.30pm Scotland Tonight
11.05 The eBay Scammers. Detectives go after
a criminal gang who are making millions
conning thousands of victims in a new online
crime targeting customers of online
marketplace eBay (r) 12.05am Teleshopping
1.05 After Midnight 2.35 Storage Hoarders.
Two women struggle to part with their
belongings (r) 3.25-5.05 ITV Nightscreen
UTV
As ITV except: 12.55am Teleshopping
1.55-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 World War One at Home: Whose Side Are
You On? A story of industrial con?ict in Devon
during the First World War (r)
8.00 Storm Troupers: The Fight to Forecast the
Weather. Alok Jha charts the progress of
computer-based forecasting through its
pioneers, including American mathematician
Jule Charney and the Met Of?ce?s John Mason.
Last in the series (r) (AD)
9.00 The Golden Age of Steam Railways. A bid
to rescue narrow gauge railways (1/2) (r)
10.00 Storyville: The Boy Who Changed
America. The story of Elian Gonzalez, a
six-year-old boy found ?oating alone off the
coast of Florida in November 1999, and the
custody battle that played out in the aftermath
of his rescue. See Viewing Guide
11.25 Tales from the National Parks. Gold is
discovered in Loch Lomond and the Trossachs
National Park. Last in the series (r)
12.25am Storm Troupers: The Fight to Forecast
the Weather. Documentary (r) (AD) 1.25 The
High Art of the Low Countries (r) 2.25-3.25
The Golden Age of Steam Railways (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Coach Trip:
Road to Zante (r) (AD) 7.00 Made in Chelsea (r)
8.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD) 9.00 Black-ish (r)
(AD) 10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00 How I Met
Your Mother (r) (AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r)
(AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
2.00 Melissa & Joey (r) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r)
4.00 2 Broke Girls. Double bill (r) (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs. Double bill (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Zante (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Don?t Tell the Bride
10.00 Celebs Go Dating. Arg goes boating for
his second date with Yasemin (AD)
11.05 Made Over By. A local council worker is
given a wardrobe makeover
12.10am The Big Bang Theory. Double bill (r)
(AD) 1.00 Celebs Go Dating (r) (AD) 2.05 First
Dates (r) (AD) 3.00 Don?t Tell the Bride (r) 3.50
Rude Tube (r) 4.15 Baby Daddy (r) 4.40 How I
Met Your Mother. Double bill (r) (AD)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun (r)
11.00 Four in a Bed (r) 1.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Summer Sun (r) 3.50 The Somme?s Secret
Weapon: A Time Team Special (r) 4.50 Secrets
of the Saxon Hoard: A Time Team Special (r)
5.55 Vet on the Hill (r)
6.55 George Clarke?s Amazing Spaces. A man
planning to build a Victorian-style bathing
machine in Margate (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows
Sarah and Dean Berry, who bought an
18th-century folly ? a castle perched on a
hilltop ? near their home town of Newport,
Gwent (3/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 A Year on the Farm. Following the work of
the Hodgson family who own a sheep farm in
Cumbria. Last in the series (AD)
10.00 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. With
Lee Mack, Catherine Tate and Miles Jupp (r)
11.05 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. With
David Walliams and Jessica Hyne (r)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 A Year on the Farm (r) (AD) 2.05 Grand
Designs (r) (AD) 3.10-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats
Uncut. With Joe Wilkinson and Rachel Riley
11.00am The Nebraskan (PG, 1953)
Western starring Philip Carey 12.20pm Guns
at Batasi (PG, 1964) British military drama
starring Richard Attenborough (b/w) 2.30
Destry Rides Again (U, 1939) Comedy
Western with James Stewart and Marlene
Dietrich (b/w) 4.25 Voyage to the Bottom of
the Sea (U, 1961) Sci-? with Walter Pidgeon
6.35 Snow White & the Huntsman (12,
2012) Fantasy adventure starring Kristen
Stewart and Chris Hemsworth (AD)
9.00 12 Years a Slave (15, 2013) A black
man in pre-Civil War New York is abducted and
spends years living in slavery. Fact-based period
drama with Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender
and Benedict Cumberbatch (AD)
11.40 Stoker (18, 2013) A teenager becomes
infatuated with her mysterious uncle in the
aftermath of her father?s death. Thriller starring
Mia Wasikowska and Nicole Kidman (AD)
1.40am-4.00 The Debt (15, 2010) Former
Mossad agents ?nd the secrets behind their
killing of a Nazi war criminal 30 years ago
coming back to haunt them. Thriller starring
Helen Mirren and Tom Wilkinson
6.00am You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r) 6.25
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.15
Below Deck (r) 8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30
You?ve Been Framed Gold Rides Again! (r) 9.30
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20 Below Deck
(r) 11.15 Dress to Impress (r) 12.20pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 You?ve Been Framed!
Reloaded (r) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r)
2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress. Three singletons try to
win the affections of former goth Dom
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You?ve Been Framed! Gold. Featuring
bridesmaids behaving badly (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.30am Two
and a Half Men (r) 1.20 Release the Hounds (r)
2.25 Teleshopping 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Judge Judy (r) 6.40 The Royal (r) (AD)
7.40 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 8.40 Where the Heart
Is (r) (AD) 9.45 Judge Judy (r) 11.05 Rising
Damp (r) 11.35 You?re Only Young Twice (r)
12.05pm On the Buses (r) 12.40 Griff?s Great
Britain (r) 1.05 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.10 The
Royal (r) (AD) 4.15 You?re Only Young Twice (r)
4.50 On the Buses (r) 5.25 Rising Damp (r)
5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica?s cruise with
her niece is disrupted by threats (r) (AD)
8.00 Foyle?s War. Police superintendent Foyle is
frustrated at seeing everyone else go off to war,
until he ?nds himself ?ghting his own battle on
the home front (r) (AD)
10.05 Law & Order: UK. A jeweller is found dead
with his hands and teeth missing (1/8) (r) (AD)
11.05 If I Had You. Sarah Parish stars in this
one-off crime drama as DI Sharon Myers, who
returns to her hometown in the picturesque
Peak District to escape the hustle of the city and
spend time with her childhood friend (r)
1.05am Wycliffe. A ?sherman is killed at sea
(r) (SL) 2.05 Judge Judy (r) 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am Storage Wars: Texas (r) 6.25 Minder
(r) (AD) 7.15 The Professionals (r) (AD) 8.10
Cycling: Vuelta a Espa馻 (r) 9.10 Storage Wars:
Texas (r) 9.40 Cycling: Tour of Britain (r) 10.45
Live Cycling: Tour of Britain Live. Coverage of
stage four 3.45pm Goals of the 80s (r) 4.00
Minder (r) (AD) 5.00 The Professionals (r) (AD)
6.00 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
6.30 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
7.00 Cycling: Vuelta a Espa馻
8.00 Cycling: Tour of Britain. Action from stage
four. Presented by Matt Barbet and Yanto Barker
9.00 FILM: You Only Live Twice (PG, 1967)
James Bond investigates the disappearance of
US and Soviet spacecraft and ?nally comes face
to face with his deadliest enemy. Spy thriller
with Sean Connery and Donald Pleasence (AD)
11.20 FILM: The Gauntlet (18, 1977) A cop
protects a prostitute from corrupt of?cials who
plan to stop her testifying in a Mob trial. Action
adventure directed by and starring Clint
Eastwood. With Sondra Locke (AD)
1.40 Ax Men (r) (SL) 2.30 Tommy Cooper (r)
(SL) 2.55 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 12.00 Jay
Leno?s Garage 1.00pm Top Gear (AD) 3.00
Brojects in the House 3.30 Brojects 4.00 Cops
UK: Bodycam Squad 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. Motoring magazine (AD)
7.00 Cops UK: Bodycam Squad. Following the
work of the Staffordshire Police force
8.00 QI XL. With Victoria Coren Mitchell
9.00 Live at the Apollo. The sitcom star and The
Last Leg regular Josh Widdicombe welcomes
Londoner Nathan Caton and the Australian comic
Celia Pacquola to the stage at London?s
Hammersmith Apollo
10.00 Mock the Week. With Angela Barnes, Rob
Beckett, Ed Byrne, Milton Jones and Miles Jupp
10.40 Mock the Week. With Rob Beckett, Gary
Delaney, Ed Gamble, Rhys James and Zoe Lyons
11.20 QI. With Doon Mackichan
12.00 Would I Lie to You? 12.40am Mock the
Week 1.20 QI 2.00 Would I Lie to You? 2.40
Parks and Recreation. Double bill 3.35 The
Indestructibles 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 Danger?eld 9.00 Pie in
the Sky 10.00 All Creatures Great and Small
11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer
Wine 1.40 Brush Strokes 2.20 Birds of a
Feather 3.00 Danger?eld 4.00 Pie in the Sky
5.00 All Creatures Great and Small
6.00 Brush Strokes. Lionel is determined to
scotch Jacko?s relationship with his daughter
Lesley. Comedy starring Karl Howman
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Compo talks
about the two subjects closest to his heart ?
love and ferrets. Comedy starring Bill Owen
7.20 To the Manor Born. Audrey injures her back
8.00 Inspector George Gently. After an
unidenti?ed burnt body is found near an RAF
base, Gently works alongside Special Branch
of?cers who suspect the victim was involved
with the IRA. Martin Shaw stars (1/2) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. The squad investigates a
barrister?s death (1/8) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Dorien visits a psychic
12.00 The Bill 1.00am The Cazalets 2.10 David
Copper?eld. David revisits Peggotty 3.00
Garrow?s Law (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Antiques Roadshow 7.10 Medieval
Dead 8.00 Codebreaker 9.00 Tenko 10.00 Time
Team 2.00pm Secrets of War 4.00 Sharpe
6.00 Tenko. The women are captured by the
Japanese and marched to their internment camp
7.00 The Light of Dawn: The Normandy
Landings. Part one of a two-part documentary
about the D-Day landings, exploring the political
and economic background to the plan and Hitler?s
strategies to thwart the attack
8.00 History?s Greatest Hoaxes
9.00 Fawlty Towers. Penny-pinching Basil tries
to save money on building costs (AD)
9.40 Monty Python?s Best Bits (Mostly). The
comedy troupe?s most popular sketches (AD)
10.20 To the Manor Born. Audrey injures her
back, but soon recovers when DeVere invites her
on a skiing trip. Penelope Keith stars
11.00 Fawlty Towers. Basil tries to stop an
unmarried couple lowering moral standards (AD)
11.45 History?s Greatest Hoaxes
12.40am The Light of Dawn: The Normandy
Landings 1.40 Secrets of War 2.35 Raiders of
the Lost Art 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm Peppa (r) 5.10 Creag nam Buthaidean
(Puf?n Rock) 5.25 Ben & Hoilidh san Rioghachd
Bhig (Ben & Holly?s Little Kingdom) (r) 5.50 Su
Shiusaidh (Little Suzy?s Zoo) (r) 5.55 Donnie
Murdo (Danger Mouse) (r) 6.05 Aithne air
Ainmhidhean (All About Animals) (r) 6.30 D�
a-nis? (What Now?). New series. The team
commemorates 20 years since the ?rst Harry
Potter book was published, including
interesting facts about the connection between
Edinburgh and the stories 7.00 Sruth gu Sal.
The rivers of Scotland (r) 7.30 Speaking Our
Language (r) 7.50 Earrann Eachdraidh (History
Shorts) (r) 8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 Dualchas
a? Chaisteil (The Castle) (r) 9.00 The Northern
Lights (r) 9.55 Dhan Uisge (Loch Maree) (r)
10.00 Ce騦 bho Perthshire Amber (r) 10.25
Bannan (The Ties That Bind) (r)
11.00-12midnight Balaich na h-Airde (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 6.15 Guto
Gwningen (r) 6.30 Sam T鈔 (r) 6.40 Twt (r)
6.50 Nico N鬵 (r) 7.00 Cacamwnci (r) 7.15
Olobobs 7.20 Digbi Draig (r) 7.35 Gwdihw (r)
7.50 Mwnci?n Dweud Mwnci?n Gwneud (r) 8.00
Ty Mel (r) 8.05 Sbarc (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges
Fach (r) 8.35 Syrcas Deithiol Dewi (r) 8.45
Abadas (r) 9.00 Igam Ogam (r) 9.10 Oli Dan y
Don (r) 9.25 Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 9.35
Cymylaubychain (r) 9.45 Llan-ar-goll-en (r)
10.00 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 10.15 Guto
Gwningen (r) 10.30 Sam T鈔 (r) 10.40 Twt (r)
10.50 Nico N鬵 (r) 11.00 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Yr
Ysgol (r) 11.15 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Teulu Ni (r)
11.20 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Jen a Jim Pob Dim (r)
11.35 Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Sbridiri (r) 11.55
Dysgu Gyda Cyw: Tatws Newydd (r) 12.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Co?o ? Hedd
Wyn (r) (AD) 12.30 Garddio a Mwy (r) 1.00 Y
Dref Gymreig (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd
2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd
3.05 Yr Afon (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh:
Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh: Y Dyfnfor 5.25 Stwnsh: Ni
Di Ni (r) 5.30 Stwnsh: Llond Ceg ? Mwy O
Gega! New series. In this episode, we?ll be
discussing the environment ? asking how we
as individuals can help ? and looking at the
importance of recycling and at ways of
conserving energy 6.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd
6.05 100 Lle (r) (AD) 6.30 Celwydd Noeth (r)
7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y Cwm. Someone from
Liv?s past comes back to haunt her, and Hannah
?nds it dif?cult to forgive Chester?s past (AD)
9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30 Hedd Wyn: Canrif
o Go?o. Ifor ap Glyn tells the story of the
Welsh poet, Hedd Wyn, 100 years after his
death on the battle?elds of Belgium 10.30
Twm Morys a?r Cadeiriau Coll (r) 11.001.15am Sgorio Rhyngwladol
14
Wednesday September 6 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7437
1
2
3
Codeword No 3121
4
5
6
21
7
10
6
10
23
2
Scrabble � Challenge No 1952
23
1
25
10
2
18
15
16
1
12
21
1
1
8
7
8
9
10
3W
6
11 12
13
2L
3W
3L
8
9
17
26
11
12
13
2
16
15
16
21
14
2
6
9
26
26
1
10
16
13
18
8
1
7
2
5
6
21
21
12
18
13
1
17
1
17
1
14
21
25
2
18
4
6
12
12
21
17
10
16
2
18
3
26
4
24
18
2
1
17
12
18
22
18
2
14
1
1
18
8
9
19
1
17
26
16
einptuz
1
What?s the highest score using
the Z with this rack?
4 Make (a sound); complete
(5)
7 RAF unit (8)
8 Broad; cricket delivery (4)
9 Power to influence (8)
10 Road around a town (6)
13 Conflict (6)
14 Nepalese soldier (6)
Solution to Crossword 7436
ROT
RA
U G S D
N T O T T OM
D
L
R
I
FO L D UN T
E N
RR I NGGU L
A E
E
ED A V ENG
O G N P
I MA L
SQU
E E U
L
K
MER L
I L
I
AN
N
I E
T
L
ER
O
I B
I
I N
15 Physical damage, harm (6)
18 Subjugates (8)
19 Crack, split (4)
20 Slow-moving reptile (8)
21 Spanish port (5)
18
23
23
1
16
2
1
18
7
F
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
F
Down
1 Turn to bone (6)
2 Cry on a great discovery
(6)
3 Grown-ups (6)
4 Not defeated (8)
5 Italian dessert (8)
6 Go back (on a promise) (6)
11 Died; rotted (8)
12 Excessive sentimentality (8)
14 Celtic language (6)
15 In the original position
(2,4)
16 Sleeveless jacket (6)
17 Unconscious response (6)
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
L
I
Y
O
F
O
R
O
L
O
F
R
Z
M
O
Y
B
R
Y
C
E
S
E
K
L
I
R
Y
N
A
C
T
L
R
A
N
B
O
A
M
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Medium No 4113
Futoshiki No 2993
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
<
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
10
26
17
29
14
28
26
29
9
22
4
30
20
10
23
4
4
4
?
9
<
<
>
I
SCRABBLE� is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ㎝attel 2017
21
<
H
Kakuro No 1952
16
?
F
G
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 415 029)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3906
L
E
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
A
D
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
D
C
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday?s solution, right
No 3905
B
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
P AR
I
E
P A I
I
T
T WO
R
HE
C
OWN
N A
DEC
O H
ROO
26
L
A
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
16
20
21
2L
What?s the highest score using
the Q with this rack?
21
5
2L
Aehqsuy
19
2
2L
2L
21
12
2W
fame
2L
2L
v
2W
o
e
inform 3L
2L
ode
2L
3W
e
2L
17
1
18
12
18
6
20
14
11
15
22
10
16
?
?
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
26
16
12
3
30
11
28
21
4
23
10
13
4
4
3
7
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
19
6
11
4
4
27
19
3
4
28
19
� PUZZLER MEDIA
5
14 15
the times | Wednesday September 6 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Mikhail Tal
Black: Mikhail Botvinnik
Moscow 1966
Caro-Kann Defence
1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 exd5 cxd5 4 c4
Nf6 5 Nc3 g6 6 Qb3 Bg7 7 cxd5
0-0 8 Nge2 Na6
8 ... Nbd7 is the other move
tried here.
9 g3 Qb6 10 Qxb6 axb6 11 Bg2
Nb4 12 0-0 Rd8 13 d6
This move, returning the pawn
at once, has a much better track
record than 13 Bg5.
13 ... exd6
13 ... Rxd6 is playable but leaves
Black passively placed after 14 Bf4
Rd7 15 Be5.
14 Bg5 Re8 15 a3 Nc6 16 Rfe1
White stands slightly better as
his light-squared bishop is powerful and the black queenside pawns
are vulnerable.
16 ... Bg4 17 Bxf6
Tal opts for a forcing continuation but it was better to maintain
the tension with 17 Be3.
17 ... Bxf6 18 Nd5 Bd8 19 Nec3
Rxe1+ 20 Rxe1 Ra5
________
� D g DkD]
郉pD DpDp]
� 0n0 DpD]
�DND D ]
� D ) DbD]
�) H D ) ]
� ) D )B)]
贒 D $ I ]
谅媚牌侨
21 Ne3
Even stronger was 21 Re8+ Kg7
22 Ne3 Bd7 23 Bxc6 Bxe8 24 Bxe8,
when the two minor pieces outweigh the rook.
21 ... Bd7 22 Nc4 Ra8 23 d5 Nd4
24 Nxd6
White wins a pawn and Black
remains with the problem of the
weak b-pawns.
24 ... Rb8 25 Nce4 f6 26 Nc4
White should win easily enough
here. His main concern is not to
allow the activation of Black?s
bishops.
26 ... Kf8 27 h3 Nb3 28 Bf1 b5 29
Ncd6 f5 30 Re3
An accurate move. 30 Nc3 b4
31 axb4 Be7 allowed Black counterplay.
30 ... fxe4 31 Rxb3 Ke7 32 Nxe4
Rc8 33 g4 Rc1 34 Kg2 Re1 35 f3
Rd1 36 d6+ Kf7 37 Bxb5
White has three extra pawns
and is in full control. Botvinnik
could happily have given up here.
37 ... Be6 38 Rc3 Rd4 39 Rd3
Rxd3 40 Bxd3 Bd5 41 Nc5 b6 42
Be4 Be6 43 Nd3 Bb3 44 f4 Ke6
45 f5+ Black resigns
________
� 4 DrDkD] Winning Move
�0 1p0p]
� Dp0bh D] White to play. This position is from
Helsingor 2017.
轉 D D D ] Urkedal-Sokolov,
The key element in this position is
� DPDQ) D] White?s terrifying pressure against g7
�) G ) D ] from the g1-rook and the c3-bishop. How
� ) DB) )] did he exploit this to the full?
贒 DRI $ ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Counting and Card Placement Dealer: North, Vulnerability: Neither
22 - PRC in another guise ?
?A K 5 2
no choice of lead
?A 7 5 3 2
?K 3
Let?s play a game. Your friend has
?K J
two bags. In one, there are only
?9 8 7
?6
N
red balls; in the other, half the balls
?K J 9
?Q 10 6 4
W E
are red and half black. Your friend
?A J 7 2
S
?
Q
9
6
4
reaches into one of the bags (you
?Q 7 4
?
A963
can?t see which) and pulls out a red
? Q J 10 4 3
ball. From which bag do you think Contract: 4? ?8
?10 8 5
she pulled?
?10 8 5 2
Right ? the bag with only red balls. Lead: ?4
If she?d pulled from the other bag,
S
W
N
E
she may have pulled out a black.
1?
Pass
Now bridge. Say you have bid
1? (1) Pass
4? (2) End
1?-2?-4? and as declarer receive
(1) To say, ?always respond with six+
?J opening lead. As the play pro- points? doesn?t mean you should not
gresses, you reconstruct West, the respond with fewer than six points. If you
leader?s, hand. You discover his have a shortage in the suit partner opened
clubs are ?J103. Which is the and a higher ranking five-card suit, you can
more likely hand for West?
shade your response. You may improve the
part-score ? or even make game...
West (a)
West (b)
?K 10 3
? J 10 3
? J 10 3
The answer is West (b). Use
Principle of Restricted Choice
arguments. With (a), West might
have led ?J ? about half the time.
The moral is: don?t play the
leader to have a very similar alternative ? or he might have made it.
On our 4? deal, West led ?4.
He would not lead from ?A, so as
declarer, you play ?3 from dummy.
East wins ?J, cashes ?A felling
?K, then switches to ?7 (best).
You win ?Q and start on
hearts, hoping to set up a long card
eventually should the suit split 4-3.
You lead ?8 to ?A and ruff ?2.
You now lead ?2 towards ?KJ,
West playing ?3, and it?s that
dreaded king-jack guess. Which
way do you go?
32
x2
MEDIUM
61
x 7 + 45 x 2 ? 88
HARDER
109 + 688
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
30%
OF IT
+4
x2
2/3
?8
1/2
OF IT
x 3 + 567 x 2 + 958
OF IT
+8
1/4
OF IT
? 59 +1/3 + 45 x 2
OF IT
+1/5 + 896
+ 368 OF
IT
50%
OF IT
4
3
Killer Tricky No 5612
7
12
19
15min
8
19
17
22
12
13
17
30
18
8
19
14
8
12
18
6
17
10
10
Killer Deadly No 5613
17
21
55min
10
19
17
26
15
10
20
26
13
20
20
9 4
8 6 7
8 9
9 7
8 9 5
3
7 3 1
9 5 2
3 1
8 4
-
8
2
9
7
1
5
3
6
4
6
5
1
2
3
4
7
9
8
3
7
4
9
6
8
1
5
2
5
3
2
1
4
9
8
7
6
-
=3
=
34
=
216
9
3
5
4
1
6
8
7
2
2
4
8
7
3
9
6
5
1
7
1
6
5
8
2
9
4
3
6
2
7
9
5
8
3
1
4
M K
A
F I X I NG
S
N
E
U S E D
NO
I
D
OV E RBA L
E
E
S H OW J
P
E
R
MAGA Z I N
N
R
T
K I T S CH
C
E
E
7
9
6
8
3
1
9
6
8
3
7
2
5
4
1
1
9
5
6
2
3
4
8
7
2
8
6
4
5
7
9
1
3
7
4
3
8
9
1
6
2
5
5
8
4
3
2
1
7
6
9
1
9
3
6
4
7
2
8
5
3
7
1
2
6
5
4
9
8
8
6
2
1
9
4
5
3
7
4
5
9
8
7
3
1
2
6
Suko 2022
7
9
7
2
8
1
4
5
6
9
3
1
5
6
2
3
9
7
8
4
3
4
9
8
6
7
1
5
2
8
6
2
5
9
3
4
7
1
Sudoku 9294
4
7
3
6
1
8
9
2
5
5
9
1
4
7
2
8
3
6
2
8
4
7
5
1
3
6
9
9
1
5
3
8
6
2
4
7
6
3
7
9
2
4
5
1
8
7
3
5
2
8
6
9
4
1
8
4
6
9
3
1
2
7
5
6
8
1
7
4
2
5
3
9
5
2
4
3
9
8
7
1
6
3
9
7
6
1
5
8
2
4
Killer 5611
4
7
3
8
5
9
1
6
2
9
6
8
1
2
3
4
5
7
1
5
2
4
6
7
3
9
8
2
1
9
5
7
4
6
8
3
1
2
5
1 < 3
4
5 > 3
4
2
5
2
3
2
?
3
3
?
4
5
1
4
?
?
2 < 5
1
1
Set Square 1954
9
4 4 3
2
2 3
3 2
7
3
4
6
x
5
8
-
�
x
+
1
2
7
x
-
x
-
7
6
5
4
2
3
8
1
9
2
8
3
9
7
1
6
4
5
4
1
2
6
3
8
5
9
7
3
7
6
5
4
9
2
8
1
8
5
9
7
1
2
3
6
4
5
9
7
1
8
6
4
3
2
6
3
4
2
9
7
1
5
8
1
2
8
3
5
4
9
7
6
S
P
R
Y
P
A
C
A
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G
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Lexica 3904
4
+
9
4
1
8
6
5
7
2
3
Lexica 3903
Futoshiki 2992
4 5
3
Scrabble 1951
URANIUM F7
across (11)
SAPPHIRE A8
across (135)
P
F
H
HOOK E D
O O
F
B I L I T Y
I
S
Y
ANC E
A
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UMP I NG
N
F
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S K EW
A
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SQU I N T
E
G O
Sudoku 9293
4
1
7
5
8
6
2
3
9
8
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
=7
x
-
=
14
5
5
7
1 5 8
3 7 9
7 9
2 6 1
6
2
9 7
3 8 9
1
8
23
4
+
-
8
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
x
Codeword 3120
1 5 3
2 4 1
3 2
5 2
3 1
1
4
2
8
4 1 3
6 2 1
4 2
3
23
All the digits
= 1 from 1-9 are
Solutions
KenKen 4112
17
23
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Cell Blocks 3003
18
3
+
+
23
17
2
x
3
Killer 5610
12
2
2
x
Sudoku 9292
12
4
-
Kakuro 1951
20
20
8
3
4
3
3 2
Set Square No 1955
Yesterday?s answers
aunt, aunty, nut, nutria, ruin, run,
runt, runty, rut, rutin, ryu, tau, tui,
tun, tuna, turn, unary, uni, unit,
unitary, unity, urn, yuan, yurt
12
2
6
6
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 11 words, average;
15, good; 20, very good; 26, excellent
(2) Can?t take a joke. (Seriously, North has
a fabulous supporting hand and naturally
places his partner with rather more).
There?s nothing in the bidding
to go on but there is something in
the opening lead. West has
seemingly led from ?Q. If he held
?Q, may he not have led from
?Q? There?s a PRC argument to
suggest that he may, so play him
for ?A not ?Q; that he had no
equivalent suit from which to lead.
You rise with ?K ? success. You
ruff ?3, both following a third
time to reveal the 4-3 split. You
ruff ?10, ruff ?5 and can lead
your remaining spade over to
?AK, drawing East?s spades, and
table ?7, a length winner. You give
up only the last trick, ?J, but that?s
ten tricks and game made.
+6
Polygon
17
Bridge Andrew Robson
?J 10 3
EASY
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Mikhail Tal stormed the chess
Olympus in 1960, his irresistible
force proving that the apparently
immovable object, represented by
the Red Czar of Soviet chess,
Mikhail Botvinnik, was in fact
also subject to Galileo?s pronouncement, ?E pur si muove?.
Nevertheless, Tal held on to the
title only until 1961, earning the
soubriquet Winter King in Soviet
circles. Today?s game is from the
post-championship part of his
career.
Botvinnik blunders. After 20 ...
Nxd4 21 Re8+ Kg7 22 Nxb6 Rb8
23 Ncd5 Nf3+ 24 Kh1 Ne5, White
is only slightly better.
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Winter King
Cell Blocks No 3004
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
4
x
+
Quiz 1 Black 2 Kezia Dugdale 3 The Exorcist
4 John Nettles 5 The Maids or Les Bonnes
6 Vincent van Gogh 7 The first 8 Tales of the
Unexpected 9 White 10 Lining of the stomach
11 Ore Mountains 12 WEB Du Bois 13 Ted
Turner 14 Shai Hope of the West Indies
15 Chris O?Dowd
3
W
H
A
M
I
B
O
O
R
Y
T
S
S
P
H
I
T
A
C
E
A
M
K
Y
Word watch
Mixologist (a) A server in
a bar, especially of cocktails
Siffleur (b) A male
professional whistler
Yarr (a) To growl or snarl,
esp. of dogs (Scots)
Brain Trainer
Easy 9; Medium 1,074;
Harder 5,462
Chess 1 Rxg7+! Kxg7
2 Qg2+ Kf8 3 Qg5! is
overwhelming
06.09.17
MindGames
Difficult No 9295
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Mixologist
a A bar server
b A gregarious person
c Someone who
studies parties
Super fiendish No 9297
5
3
7
6
5
Siffleur
a A flower-picker
b A whistler
c A flan
Yarr
a To growl
b Garrulous
c An old sailor
Answers on page 15
Fiendish No 9296
5
8
5
2 7
5
9
1 6
9
4 2
2
1
6
5
6 8
7 9
4
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
6
1 4 3
1
7
4
9 8 7
6
8
1
3 4
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
8
2
8 6
4
9
7
4 3
9
9
1
3
1
by Olav Bjortomt The Times Quiz Book
2 Who has resigned as
leader of the Scottish
Labour Party?
12 The Souls of Black
Folk (1903) is a classic
work by which AfricanAmerican writer?
3 Linda Blair played the
possessed child Regan
in which 1973 film?
4 Who played DCI
Tom Barnaby in
the ITV series
Midsomer Murders?
5 Jean Genet loosely
based which 1947 play
on the case of the
murderous sisters
Christine and L閍 Papin?
6 In May 1889, which
Dutch painter began
15
work on Giant Peacock
Moth, which he selftitled Death?s Head Moth?
7 The calends is which
day of every month in
the Roman calendar?
8 The winning
entry in a TV Times
competition, Blue
Marigold (1982) was
an episode written for
which show?
9 The actor David
Jason and the
singer Cilla Black
were both born with
what surname?
10 Gastritis occurs
when which part of
the body becomes
inflamed after it has
been damaged?
11 Klinovec and the
Fichtelberg are the
13 First held in 1986,
the Goodwill Games
were conceived by
which American
media mogul?
The Times Quiz Book by
Olav Bjortomt is out now.
To order your copy visit
harpercollins.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Yesterday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 911
14 Who is the first
batsman to hit two
hundreds in a firstclass cricket match
at Headingley?
15 Which Irish actor
is pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 912
1
2
3
4
5
7
8
9
10
11
12
15
16
19
20
22
23
24
13
14
17
F OO T P
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N A T UR
C
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E V I T A
N
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S P E E D
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A
C E S S I
T
D
K
I NON E
N
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GR E Y
A T
A
E R
Z
A
N
Y
A
ON
N
S E
X
R E
H
G L U T
O H
E S E R V E
M R
S
CO L Y T E
K
U
C E N S U S
S
H
COUR T
R
T
U
L EME N T
E
Y
O
I ND E E R
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Orpheus
6
18
21
8
1
7
Across
4 Dishonest action that has
strings attached? (6)
7 Wake-up call ? not one
initially rousing partygoer (8)
8 Salad ingredient in Parisian
drinking-den (6)
9 Irrationality of peacekeepers
regarding a family member (8)
10 Wine served in Boudicca?s time
(4)
12 European citizen, a chap
around at that time (8)
15 Damage ceramic vessel? Crazy
(8)
18 Grass some ungulates rejected
(4)
20 Re?nement of English member
swinging cane (8)
22 Move fast, beginning to study
engraving, perhaps (6)
23 Theatre act ?nished? Here?s
something to eat (8)
24 Girl carrying Republican
papers for 24 hours (6)
Down
1 Film director of slender build
(4)
2 Vegetable a girl cooked at ?rst
without hesitation (8)
3 Blood constituent originally
lacking in paternal
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4 Continental commander of
British Expeditionary Force?
(6)
5 Inferior wall decoration father
obtained to begin with (4)
6 Purchase made by the 4 dn,
always with silver inside (8)
11 Substance used by painter, one
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13 Company traditionally starts
to trade with Orient (3)
14 Storyteller from Scottish island
going north to river (8)
16 Fairly easy on the eye (6)
17 Those people pinch gold?
That?s the hypothesis (6)
19 Turkey, for example, that?s
served in can (4)
21 Team removing last of luggage
from railway junction (4)
3
6
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8
1
7
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7 4
2
GETTY IMAGES
highest peaks in which
mountain range in
central Europe?
6
5
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 The flag of Belgium
is coloured yellow, red
and what?
9
4
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The Times Daily Quiz
5 2
9.00 Short Works: The World of
Somerset Maugham. A sea captain named
Red revisits an island lagoon from his youth
9.15 Arabian Afternoons. A Dish of
Pomegranates by Peter Jukes 10.00 Comedy
Club: Ankle Tag. Bob strikes up a friendship
with a woman he meets in a local museum
10.30 The Secret World. The Arctic Monkeys
reveal their love for Woman?s Hour 11.00
Lee Mack and Friends at the Fringe. With
Andy Parsons, Lucy Porter, Tim Minchin and
Jimeoin. From 2005 11.30 The Nick Revell
Show. Nick overdoes his ?tness regime
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MW: 693, 909
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with Emma Barnett 1.00pm Afternoon
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talkSPORT
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with Max Rushden and Dean Saunders 10.00
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6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Stuart Maconie 4.00 Steve
Lamacq 7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe
12.00 6 Music Recommends with Mary Anne
Hobbs 1.00am The Record Producers. The
work of Mickie Most 2.00 Essential Albums
of the 90s 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6
Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.15 A Classic
FM Recital: Live from Dumfries House
10.00 Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Wednesday September 6 2017
11
1GT
ANTHONY ROBLING; MARILYN KINGWILL
Jazz
Django Bates and the
Frankfurt Radio Big Band
Ronnie Scott?s, W1
Prom 69
Pittsburgh SO/Honeck
Royal Albert Hall
A
{{{((
J
{{{{(
azz projects inspired by the
Beatles haven?t always ended
happily ? that otherworldly
spirit is sometimes lost behind
a fog of abstruse harmonies and
ever-shifting time signatures ? so
admirers of the Fab Four can be
forgiven for wondering whether they
should venture into Frith Street this
week. They needn?t worry; this one
takes off.
Anyone familiar with Django Bates?s
compositions for the Loose Tubes big
band might have feared that his 50th
anniversary homage to Sgt Pepper?s
Lonely Hearts Club Band would end up
sinking beneath the weight of its
whimsy. Bates is an exceptionally
talented keyboard player who has had
a fatal weakness for undergrad pranks.
His collaboration with the Frankfurt
Radio Big Band works all the better
for being relatively conservative,
the songs providing a sturdy spine.
Recreating the album, track by track,
lyrics and all, Bates is less interested
in giving room to grandstanding solos
than in exploring textures. If Loose
Tubes had been playing Being For the
Benefit of Mr Kite! the reference to
Henry the horse would probably have
prompted a 12-minute waltz. Bates
and his team are much more
respectful ? and engaging.
The members of the Danish trio
Eggs Laid By Tigers form a rock-solid
rhythm section. Martin Ullits Dahl
deliver
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