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The Times Times 2 11 September 2017

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September 11 | 2017
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2
1GT
Monday September 11 2017 | the times
times2
?One breast
Miranda Kerr is right.
I feel manly when I?m
holding on to my rod
Kevin Maher
C
ome on, women.
What?s wrong with
you? You?re being far
too butch in the home.
Are you trying to drive
your man away? You
need to put on those
glad rags, apply some
proper make-up, fix your husband a
nice cool evening drink and stand
back, stop nagging and simply marvel
as you allow him to experience his
masculinity in all its unbridled glory.
These, apparently, are the words of
advice that modern women should
carefully heed, according to the
millionaire underwear model, skincare
guru and self-help author Miranda
Kerr. When interviewed recently, Kerr,
who is married to the billionaire
Snapchat co-founder Evan Spiegel,
said that women need to ?empower?
their men to feel masculine at home.
Because, really, there?s nothing more
empowering for a man than that
moment when his wife walks over to
him, looks at her watch, sighs, and
says: ?OK. You can be masculine now.
Go on. Off you go. Do something
manly. You have my permission. But
hurry up and don?t break anything.?
Surely there?s something intensely
counterintuitive about the very idea of
being ?allowed? to be manly? It speaks
of a disbelieving dolt in a lumberjack
shirt, tentatively reaching for the
toolbox, while trying to ignore the
patronising gaze of his implacable
partner. And what?s with the
obsession with being manly at
home? What does Kerr expect from
the modern domesticated male?
Wood-chopping? Lifting heavy
stuff? Breaking down plywood
partitions with his bare hands?
It?s embarrassing and it?s dated.
Little more than trivial,
role-playing nonsense for
the uber-rich. Right?
Well, unfortunately, I know
exactly what Kerr means.
Really. I can honestly attest
to being infused with
feelings of masculinity
that are so potent they?re
almost toxic whenever
I do some quality
man-jobs around the
home. And I don?t
mean the paltry
Bad news
for box-set
bingers
I always knew it, and
now, finally, science
has proved that
binge-watching is
rubbish. Yes, the
entry-level tasks such as fixing
that cracked remote control or
replacing that plug. I am referring to
monumental, hold-on-to-your-hats,
John Wayne-style household heroism.
Last year, for instance, our drains
were blocked. We had been living
in the house for eight years and
the drains had become decidedly
?cloggier? until, finally, we had reached
crisis point ? water everywhere,
followed by an emetic cloud of stink.
On closer examination I could see that
neighbouring pipes also ran into our
overflow, plus a broken grate meant
that a load of decomposed leaves and
builders? detritus had been compacted
deep down into the main blockage.
This was an industrial-strength
crisis that required, at the very least,
a professional call-out squad. And
did I call them out? Hell, no! Instead
I ordered a set of plumbing rods,
rolled up my sleeves (literally), covered
my mouth with a cowboy bandana
(sticking to the western theme)
and began, in the most literal way
imaginable, ramming the shit
out of those drains.
It was high drama, with sudden
eruptions of noxious drain juice from
random covers as far as 30 or 40 feet
away. Finally, with my rods at full
extension and battering away like
you wouldn?t believe, the blockage
collapsed and disintegrated, and the
flow returned. The pleasure was almost
beyond words. I returned indoors,
sweat-stained and triumphant,
like
l a god. I was, in essence, the
aapotheosis of masculinity. It was
certainly the most manly I?d been,
I?m pretty sure, in my entire
life. I spent the rest of the
evening just sitting there,
still in my work duds,
being admired.
b
I look back now
aand I can still vividly
rremember that feeling.
And, equally, I look around
the house and I wonder
when the next big crisis is
going to strike ?
the next big drama
to allow me, once
again, just like
Miranda says,
to be my most
masculine self.
contemporary habit of
consuming TV shows at
a rate of six or seven
episodes a sitting is,
says the University of
Melbourne, far from
satisfactory in the
long term.
Apparently, if you
binge-watch your
favourite series you will
not absorb it as well
as those viewers who
watch it patiently, with
old-fashioned attention
spans, one precious
episode every week, just
like we used to do with
Dallas back in the day.
This resonates
profoundly with
me. The last show I
binge-watched was the
2003 BBC series State
of Play. I had always
wanted to see it, finally
In this extract from her new book, the
BBC presenter Victoria Derbyshire lays
bare her experience of chemotherapy
Saturday, November 7, 2015
Today I?m grumpy (what was my
excuse before chemo?).
Sprouts
and sex?
No thanks
Speaking of domestic
stereotypes . . . I am
slightly baffled by the
claims of an exhausted
midwife, who pleaded
with prospective
parents, via social
media, to refrain from
yuletide nookie
because it inevitably
contributes to a
baby-birth traffic jam
in maternity wards
every September.
Even more baffling
is this Christmas
climax myth seems to
be true: according to
the Office for National
Statistics, September 25
is the year?s most
popular day for giving
birth. Meaning that
Christmas is the most
popular time for, well,
giving and receiving.
Yet I still can?t quite
comprehend it. Think
about it. It?s Christmas.
You?ve cleared up all
the wrapping paper,
peeled the sprouts,
fed and watered the
relatives, had the
arguments, dealt
with the crying kids,
endured the miserably
rainy walk, felt mildly
nauseous while
watching the telly but
nonetheless tackled the
general sense of
numbed and sickened
exhaustion with
another seven slices
of Christmas cake.
What next? Oh
yeah! Mmmm. Yum,
yum! Let?s make a
baby! Seriously?
bought the box set
and watched it over
a weekend marathon
(four episodes one
night, two the next day).
All I can tell you
about it now, however,
is that it features David
Morrissey and John
Simm, and they shout
a lot, and it?s mostly
nighttime. Dallas, on
the other hand . . .
Saturday, November 21
It?s my friend Paul?s 40th birthday
party. Back in the summer, after I was
diagnosed, making sure I was at this
event was one of my priorities. My
aim was to have treatment done by
today. How naive I was in the early
days of cancer.
As I wash my hair over the bath,
several long, wet strands suddenly
begin to collect in the plughole. Not
loads, but enough for me to know that
this is down to the chemo.
It?s a surprise, but I?m unruffled, and
as I see some of the hair detaching
itself from my head, I say out loud,
?Oh, wow.?
?What is it, darlin??? my partner,
Mark, calls.
?My hair?s falling out,? I say, deadpan.
Friday, November 27
This afternoon I try to wash my hair.
A mundane task becomes a
nightmare. When I start to rub
shampoo in, it begins to get matted.
The more it mats, the more hassled
yet determined I become to de-mat it.
As I lean over the bath, I can see long
hairs slipping from my head into the
plughole, while the rest of the hair
continues to tangle. When I stare into
the mirror, I look like Mr Rochester?s
wild wife from Jane Eyre ? hair
sticking out, uncontrollable. I wrap
a towel round my head and consider
how much hair is falling out after
just two chemo cycles, while wearing
the cold cap. It?s depressing. Then,
a positive to counterbalance the
negative ? but if I hadn?t worn the
cap, it could have been worse.
I put on a beanie hat and set off for
an appointment with Amy to collect
my wig, which is ready. Good timing.
By the time I get to her salon, I?m
pretty stressed as I reveal the mess
on my head. She?s seen it all before,
and explains what?s happening: the
hair that?s falling out has got caught
in the hair that remains on my head
? hence a tangled shambles. It takes
a good twenty minutes for her to
comb through the knots, leaving a
large clump of it on her floor. As I
watch, tears balance in my eyes but
don?t spill over.
Then she brings in my handmade
wig. I?m taken aback by how much
like my hair it is. I?m quietly thrilled ?
this is the one thing that?s going to
help me carry on working. My
emotions are so volatile ? one
moment tears, the next elated. Amy
demonstrates how to put it on.
I stare at myself in the mirror. I?m
me, but with a wig ? a wig that looks
remarkably like my own hair, yet to
me it?s clearly not my own hair. It
takes a few seconds to absorb the way
it looks. In my head there is disbelief
that I?m in a situation which means I
need to wear a wig. But it looks . . . sort
of all right. Finally and tentatively I
say, ?OK . . . it looks . . . OK. Doesn?t it?
Or does it not?? I?m so unsure because
it?s crazy even to be wearing a wig at all.
As I remove it, I express anxiety
about how secure it is, and whether it
will blow off in strong wind, for
example, but Amy says in her
experience, definitely not. I ask if I can
take home the hair that?s fallen out.
?Are you sure you want to?? she asks.
I am.
Back home my hairdresser, Alan,
arrives to cut a few more layers into
the wig and to trim my real hair. As so
much has fallen out or been brushed
out today, it?s very thin on top,
particularly at the front. About half of
my hair remains. Losing it bothers me
much, much more than losing a breast.
Why is that? Because without your
hair, you don?t look like you.
Tuesday, December 1
I make two decisions, both of which
help me regain some control, having
lost all control of what happens with
my hair: I?m going back to work
tomorrow, and I?m going to wear the
wig properly for the first time.
I?m edgy, though, so practise putting
it on and sticking it down. I?m forcing
myself to go back, because the sooner
I get on with wearing it, the more
normal it will become. Physically I feel
fine; mentally I know it?s about
confronting my anxiety over wearing a
wig in front of friends, colleagues and
our TV audience.
Losing my hair
bothers me much,
much more than
losing a breast
Wednesday, December 2
I?m awake for a couple of hours in the
night before the alarm goes off at
3.30am ? I?ve set it even earlier to
give me time to put my wig on. It feels
like a huge hurdle.
Louisa, my editor, knows, of course,
and she?s promised to tell me on
talkback (from where she sits in the TV
gallery, through my earpiece) if the wig
moves or looks peculiar at any point in
our two-hour programme. That?s my
biggest worry. Carol, one of our makeup artists, knows too. I?m somewhat
paranoid about being on television and
viewers realising because it looks
obvious; and I?m not ready to tell
everyone yet because I want to get
used to wearing it myself first. Just
before I go on air at 9am, Carol comes
into the studio to do a final check.
Under my breath, so none of the crew
can hear, I say: ?Can you tell?? She
beckons me to the side of the studio
and gives it a slight tug forward on my
head, before saying: ?No, not now!?
We can?t help giggling conspiratorially.
It?s farcical.
the times | Monday September 11 2017
3
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gone, little hair, no eyelashes?
PHOTOGRAPH BY DAN KENNEDY FOR THE TIMES MAGAZINE. STYLING: PRUE WHITE. HAIR: ALAN BRENT, USING SCHWARZKOPF PROFESSIONAL. MAKE-UP: JULIA WREN, USING NARS
The tears
come. I can?t
believe I?ve
had cancer.
I can?t believe
I?ve endured
chemotherapy
Sunday, January 10, 2016
Four days after my fourth chemo.
I feel like a very, very old woman.
I can barely move, am totally
wiped out and find it difficult to get
out of bed even to go to the loo
because of agonising pains in my
stomach and lower back. Mark
advises me to stay where I am and
says he?ll take care of everything.
I feel guilty but relieved.
As I drift in and out of sleep I?m
aware of the front door closing, the
dog?s barks and the children?s
footsteps. I have zero energy, and
aches in my legs and hips which
remind me of going into labour.
Maybe this is the cumulative effect
of chemo. Despite paracetamol,
Anadin and ibuprofen, I can?t
alleviate the aching, nor can I get
comfortable in bed. Later I shuffle
downstairs for a bowl of cornflakes,
and then walk painfully back up
to bed.
It?s the worst day I?ve had since
I got cancer, and I hate it.
Monday, January 11
I?m still wiped out. I wake to a text
saying that David Bowie is dead. He
had cancer. I don?t want to know any
more and switch my phone off.
Tuesday, January 12
I hear the clock from the church
opposite chime at 3am, 4am, 5am.
I find eyelashes on my pillow when
I finally wake at eight-ish, but the
fact that they?re falling out barely
registers because I still feel like shit.
It hurts to swallow, I can?t lie on
either side in bed because it?s so
painful. I don?t want to talk to
anyone, nor do I want contact from
anyone. Friends text me and I?m
too low to answer. The idea of ever
going back to work seems a
million miles away. There?s a
possibility of me hosting a debate
with the candidates who want to
be the next president of Fifa,
football?s world governing body, in
a few weeks. The thought of it fills
me with dread, even though I want
to do it ? I just don?t know when
I?ll feel well enough to revise for it.
I stay in bed all day, rise to try to
eat at teatime and go back upstairs
at half seven. Mark and the children
are carrying on as normal, but I
detest that they?re seeing me like this.
SHIRT BY VANESSA SEWARD AT NET-A-PORTER.COM;
SKIRT BY FENDI AT BROWNSFASHION.COM;
SHOES BY MANOLO BLAHNIK, MANOLOBLAHNIK.COM
Thursday, January 14
It?s announced that Alan Rickman is
dead, from cancer. In an unhysterical
way I find it difficult to cope with
hearing about another high-profile
death from cancer. And then I feel
guilt ? I should be grateful because
I?m still here.
Slowly, I?m emerging from the
painful fog. Today I can stand upright
and walk without crippling aches in
the tops of my legs and hips.
Now, with a little energy
coming back, I need to get
out in the fresh air before all
my muscles seize up. It?s cold,
but the sun is shining and I
inhale the cool air and try to
forget the past few days.
Apart from anything else,
it is so boring being in bed
all day.
Wednesday, January 27
Penultimate chemo. This is significant,
although mine and Mark?s routine is
the same as it is every three weeks:
I pack my chemo survival kit ?
blankets, a scarf, hot-water bottle and
phone. Mark takes the iPad,
newspapers, water and bags so he can
go to Tesco. On the car radio Chris
Evans is playing Sir Duke by Stevie
Wonder; the words ?you can feel it all
over? seem appropriate ahead of what
I?m about to experience in the next
couple of hours.
The cold cap goes on at 9.30am and
swiftly induces nausea, but again I?m
not actually sick, I just retch a couple
of times.
Monday, February 1
It?s the Monday after the penultimate
chemotherapy. I?ve spent a few days
sleeping off the drugs, and am still
wearily spaced out. There are about
three eyelashes left on the top of each
eyelid and underneath ? just very
short stubs. As a result, most of the
week my eyes have been streaming.
I?m now sanguine about any more
side-effects ? so the eyelashes go, and
I think, yep, come on, what else have
you got? What else do you want to test
me with?
Monday, February 8
I weigh myself at 4.15am. I?ve put on
half a stone since treatment began. I
don?t feel like I?m eating more, but
clearly I?m less active than normal. Plus
I?m taking steroids, which can lead to
weight gain. It feels pretty unimportant
compared to everything else.
Back at work, and in our brightly lit
studio just before we go live on air, I
record some more video diary. Despite
the full TV make-up, including false
lashes, it can?t hide my swollen eyes.
I receive a tweet from a viewer
saying they could see a tear trickle
down my cheek while presenting
today. I explain it?s not a tear in the
traditional sense; my eyes are weeping
as a side-effect of the chemo.
Monday, February 22
LAST CHEMO!!! Wake up at 6am in a
really good mood. Last summer I was
facing the unknown, aghast at the
cataclysmic news that I had cancer.
Here I am today with one breast gone,
little hair, no eyelashes or brows ?
and also, hopefully, no stray cancer
cells inside me either. In a few hours?
time I?ll be able to put the most brutal
part of treatment behind me.
Mark is with me as usual, and this is
the easiest session of the six. It passes
quickly. Suddenly the egg timer rings,
which means it?s finished. I raise both
my arms and clench my fists.
?That?s it,? I say, but my voice is
subdued, not triumphant. ?Cool.?
Then I draw the blanket to my eyes
and cover my face. The tears come.
I can?t believe it. I can?t believe
I?ve had cancer. I can?t believe
I?ve endured chemotherapy.
I can?t believe that?s it. I?m
shell-shocked.
Times readers can order
copies of Dear Cancer, Love
Victoria for the special
price of �.99 (rrp �.99)
by calling 01903 828503 and
quoting ref R1117
4
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Monday September 11 2017 | the times
times2
Ostentatious?
?It?s not who we
are as a family?
The Greek royal family made headlines with this summer?s
most lavish society party, but Princess Marie-Chantal would
rather be known for her work, she tells Barbara McMahon
S
ince Princess MarieChantal of Greece moved
with her family to New
York this summer, her
dainty feet have barely
touched the ground. It is
9am and she has been up
for hours, talking on the
telephone to London, where her
children?s clothing company is based.
Later she must settle the third of her
five offspring in his new school and
supervise the arrival of the family?s
belongings at their latest residence.
?Life is a lot of moving parts right
now,? she says. ?There?s so much to
co-ordinate but women are good at
that, don?t you think??
We meet in the lobby of the
luxurious Carlyle Hotel in Manhattan
and, despite the early hour, the
48-year-old is a vision of highmaintenance glossiness ? sleek blond
hair, immaculate make-up and
diamonds worn as casually as costume
jewellery. Dressed in blue jeans, a
white chiffon blouse and with a pink
jacket draped around her shoulders,
she is clearly at ease in this venerable
hotel, which hosts royals, celebrities
and high-society types in apartmentstyle suites. She greets a succession of
friends who pass by. ?Buon giorno,?
she says to one. ?Tu vas bien?? she
asks another.
She and her husband, Crown Prince
Pavlos, the eldest son of King
Constantine II of Greece, have
uprooted the family from London.
What made them leave their gorgeous
mansion in Cheyne Walk, Chelsea,
and decamp to Manhattan? ?My
daughter Olympia is at university
here and Tino, my number two, is
going to Georgetown University [in
Washington] and we felt ? we?re a
family, we move like a caravan ? so
we thought it would be fun to make
the move,? she replies.
Her husband?s financial business is
based here and the couple, who were
married in 1995, have lived in New
York before so the city is familiar to
them, she adds.
Three of their children, Princess
Maria-Olympia, 21, Prince
Constantine-Alexios, 18, and Prince
Achileas-Andreas, 17, were born in
the US and the other two, Prince
Odysseas-Kimon, 12, and Prince
Aristidis-Stavros, 9, were born in
the UK. ?They?re so cute. They
keep me busy ? keep me on my
toes, really,? she says.
Not all families of seven can up
sticks when the mood takes them, of
course, but money is not a problem.
The middle daughter of the billionaire
entrepreneur Robert Miller, who made
his fortune from duty-free shopping,
and the Ecuadorian socialite Maria
Clara Pesantes Becerra, Marie-Chantal
was already wealthy when she married
her Prince Charming. In the Sunday
Times 2017 Rich List of Britain?s
wealthiest women, she is ranked No 14
with an estimated fortune of
�58 billion shared across her family.
The princess would not be the first
member of European royalty to feel
that she will be able to live a more
anonymous life in the US, and a
desire for a lower profile would be
understandable after this summer
when the family were splashed all over
the newspapers. Photographs emerged
of an extravagant party held in
Gloucestershire as a joint celebration
It was a private
party ? I should
have had a ban
on Instagram
for Prince Pavlos?s 50th birthday and
their daughter Olympia?s 21st.
Guests were asked to ?revolutionise?
black tie, and threw themselves into
the challenge with gusto. The birthday
girl wore an embellished evening
gown and a pair of �0 Gucci
trainers, Prince Charles?s goddaughter
India Hicks had a dress shirt and bow
tie painted on her naked torso and
attendees such as Paris Hilton, her
sister Nicky Rothschild and Ivy and
Isabel Getty posed for high-spirited
pictures that were shared on
Instagram using the hashtag
#5021revolution. The event was
variously described in headlines as
?ostentatious?, ?lavish? and ?decadent?.
?It was a private party,? the princess
says with a sigh. ?It was a dress-up
party, a theme party, and young
people are expressive ? it?s a different
generation. The Instagram posts
somehow got the better of us. I should
have had a ban, and people are
learning from that.
?It?s sad that it had to be
misrepresented that way because it?s
not who we are as a family. But you
can?t win everybody?s hearts, right??
She says she has now put that
incident, which she calls ?unpleasant?,
behind her.
Proximity to her two oldest children
aside, another reason for the move
across the Atlantic is to grow her
childrenswear empire, also called
Marie-Chantal. ?My brand is like my
sixth child,? she says. ?I was a young
mother, pregnant with my third child,
when I started it and I wanted to work.
I?m creative. I love to draw and I
wanted to do something in the world
of cosmetics or luxury or retail
because that was what I was exposed
to through my father?s business.?
The company is in its 17th year
and she has two shops in the UK,
an online business and is in the
third season of a collaboration with
Marks & Spencer. ?We have had
some bumps along the way. Retail
is detail, and it?s incredibly
challenging, but I absolutely love
doing it,? she says.
Marie-Chantal dresses, shorts,
trousers and coats are often
seen on junior members of
European royal families. Prince
Oscar and Princess Leonore of
Sweden, Princess Josephine of
Denmark and Princess
Caroline of Monaco?s
grandchildren Sacha and
Prince Pavlos and
Princess Marie-Chantal
of Greece and their
family. Left: on their
wedding day in 1995
India Casiraghi all wear her outfits.
How useful it must be to be so well
connected.
Celebrities such as Victoria
Beckham, Reese Witherspoon and
Kim Kardashian also buy the exquisite
but expensive clothing. The prices ? it
costs between � and � for a sleep
suit ? tell you everything about her
target market and the princess agrees
that the clothes she designs are
expensive. ?I?ve always wanted to
deliver the very best,? she says.
Her latest venture is a collaboration
with Silver Cross, the luxury British
pram manufacturer beloved of the
British royals. ?I was obsessed with
prams when I had my children,? the
princess says. ?When Olympia was
born, of course we had a Silver Cross. I
went through a couple of prams.?
I can?t fault her on enthusiasm as
she swipes through images of the
collection. ?This one is divine,? she
says of the Kensington, a hand-built
coach pram that has been updated
under her directions. There is none of
the garish patterns or flimsy
construction of some modern prams
the times | Monday September 11 2017
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COVER: MARK STEWART/CAMERA PRESS. BELOW: GETTY IMAGES; BRONSONVANWYCK/INSTAGRAM
How the other half party
Left: Princess Olympia strikes a pose. Above: Prince
and Princess Michael of Kent with Valentino, Queen
Maxima of Holland and Prince Pavlos. Below left:
India Hicks. Below: Princess Marie-Chantal (second
from right) in party mood with friends
? this model has a milky-cream body,
grey flannel top and hood, leather
handlebars and a cotton mattress
designed with the princess?s signature
angel wings design. I can see William
and Kate pushing number three
around in this one.
Again, the princess?s royal
connections have come in handy. She
posted on her Instagram account an
old black-and-white photograph of her
mother-in-law and the former Queen
of Spain with their Silver Cross prams,
taken in 1966. ?I sent it to the CEO of
Silver Cross and said, ?You have to see
this?,? she says, laughing.
For publicity photographs for the
launch of the new range, she borrowed
Princess Margaret?s Land Rover.
?David Linley very sweetly lent me the
Land Rover because there?s an iconic
photograph of the Queen and Prince
Philip [taken at the Badminton Horse
Trials in 1968] which I wanted to
recreate in part,? she says.
?I think we are so moved by the
nostalgia of our childhoods, looking
back at all the beautiful pictures and
recreating them and adapting them.?
As if five children, her own business
and her collaborations weren?t enough,
the princess also writes a Gwyneth
Paltrow-style blog that she calls a
?lifestyle edit for the modern parent
and child?. The latest entry is about
children?s etiquette at the dinner table
and shows a rather grand dinner
setting, complete with multiple knives
and forks and water and wine glasses.
Not your everyday dinner placement
but a reminder that Princess MarieChantal?s world is not like most
people?s. Indeed, she is one the richest
women in the world, and doesn?t have
to work, which does raise the question:
why does she do it?
?A lot of people ask me that,? she
says. ?I mean, why wouldn?t I work? I
was raised by an incredible role model:
my father.?
Both her sisters, Pia Getty and
Alexandra von Furstenberg, work
(in their young, socialite days the
glamorous trio were known as the
Miller girls). ?My older sister [Pia] is in
the film business, and she does
documentaries, and my younger sister
does furniture and design. We?ve all
established ourselves as workers. I
wouldn?t be fulfilled just going out to
lunch. If I wasn?t doing this I?d be
doing something else.
?I?ve instilled the same discipline in
my kids. I think it?s really important
for them to go out and find something
that will motivate them, find a passion
and make it work.?
The princess believes that her
children?s generation has choices that
hers never had. ?They will be able to
Uberise themselves, meaning they can
find so many new and creative ways of
doing great things.
?Most of my friends? children, they
don?t want to be bankers or lawyers.
They?re looking to make a difference
in their own lives and in the future ?
I am a worker.
I?ve instilled the
same discipline
in my kids too
there are all these new choices
i
and
different business models. The web is
changing the world and changing
careers and changing people?s views
on how to move forward.?
She hopes to open the first
American Marie-Chantal store within
the next year and says she is relishing
the challenge of building her brand in
the US and in Asia. She is clearly an
ambitious businesswoman with steely
determination and a laser-like focus
on success.
?I?m a small fish in a very, very big
pond so it?s like, ?How do I get the
brand out there?? ? she says.
She is looking forward to this next
chapter in her life. ?It?s like a page has
turned, with my two kids in university,
the 17-year-old doesn?t need me as
much and the two little guys are at
school and so excited about living
somewhere new.
?There?s an amazing energy in New
York that reminds me of Hong Kong
where I grew up. You wake up and you
think anything?s possible. I?m a
working girl and I love that idea.?
mariechantal.com; silvercrossbaby.com
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Monday September 11 2017 | the times
life
Peace
Ask Professor Tanya Byron
My son is about to start boarding
school and he can?t stop crying
N
My son is 13 and due
to start boarding
school. This year he
has started to show
a lot of anxiety; first
around his exams this
summer, convinced he would fail
(he didn?t); then around going to
a boarding school 40 minutes from
where we live. This anxiety has led
him to cry for hours, so much so that
I can?t comfort him. He is a sociable
person, makes friends easily, is good
at sport and popular. However, he is
also entering puberty.
I can?t work out whether we
should forget boarding school.
I don?t need him to go, there is a
perfectly good school in our town,
but his older brother has left home
for university, some of his friends
were going and he initially thought
it a good idea and was excited by it
? lots of sport and company and
home three nights a week. Or do
I stick to the plan and if he doesn?t
like it, change after a term or so?
His life is further complicated
because his father and I divorced
when he was a baby and, although
my son has a good relationship with
his father, he isn?t keen on his
father?s girlfriend. My son and I have
a good relationship and I am also
concerned that he will worry about
me when he is away. I have tried
to tell him and show him I will be
OK ? I have a lot of friends, work
and, while I will miss him, I will be
absolutely fine ? but I am not sure
he really feels this. Please advise me
on how to deal with this anxiety.
Laura
Q
N
Your son is showing
anticipatory anxiety
and separation anxiety
and these need to be
addressed so that he
can understand how
to cope in the face of forthcoming
challenges. While the short answer
might be to change plans and take a
place at a day school, the problem with
doing that now means that your son
addresses fear via avoidance rather
than by developing an understanding
of how to manage that anxiety.
That said, I am not suggesting that
boarding school is the right place for
your son to continue his education
? only time will tell. Indeed it may
be better for his development to
remain at home full-time during
his adolescence and prepare to leave
when he has finished school and
is ready to think about his next life
steps. The problem is that if you pull
him out now, you reinforce his sense
of helplessness in the face of fear.
There is clearly a significant amount
of anticipatory anxiety here and,
as we learn as we get older, situations
we dread are rarely anywhere near
as difficult when we face them.
Therefore the risk of making a
decision then changing one?s mind
before confronting the reality means
that avoidance becomes a coping
strategy for life challenges. In terms
A
of developing your son?s resilience, this
would set an unhealthy precedent.
He may also be experiencing
separation anxiety, which would be
understandable. It is a challenge
leaving home while still a child and,
although he would come back three
nights a week, the familiar rhythm
and routines of his life would change,
particularly in relation to daily contact
with you. While at 13 he is beginning
to individuate and will at times see
himself as very separate to you, he will
also want and need to have you close
and for you to be that significant
attachment that comforts him on the
rollercoaster of adolescence. This may
feel possible as a part-time boarder,
Take an approach
enabling him to
address anxiety
and confront fear
but considering this issue has given
him an overwhelming sense of the
separation that will ensue, makingg him
feel like a vulnerablee younger child.
Given the family circumstances,
it is also likely that he fears leaving
you alone. While you
u have tried
to reassure him, he may, as your
younger child, feel a sense of
responsibility for you
u and your
wellbeing. Recognising
ing how different
it felt at home when his older brother
left, he worries about
ut you being home
alone and so his separation
aration anxiety,
and the impending sense of loss it
brings him, becomess bound up
with his perception of you
and how you will feel.
el.
You also raise attachment
achment
issues related to your
ur
separation from his father
and his dislike of his
father?s girlfriend. Is the
girlfriend unlikeable or
does your son struggle
gle to
accept her as part off his
father?s life because she
is not you, his mother?
er?
Does he worry that, if
the girlfriend came into
his father?s life when
n
you separated and hee
no longer lived with
the family, then oncee
he leaves you to go
to boarding school
you will, being alone,
e,
find someone to
fill the void left
by him and his
brother? These are
complicated feelingss
that he may not
understand and
articulate, but
which do need
thinking through.
I am also struck
by the anxious
perfectionism shown
n
around exam time. Wanting to do
well and feeling nervous about exams
and results is different from feeling
overwhelmed by an irrationally
catastrophic fear of failure and
crying in response. Perfectionism
is characterised by high anxiety
linked to a fear of failure that can also
manifest in procrastination and an
inability to make a decision in case it
is the ?wrong? one. This indicates
an emotionally immature personality
that struggles with challenges and
tolerating the fluidity of outcome and
experience. Bright perfectionists often
risk compromising their potential
because they tend to play safe to
maintain a status quo rather than take
a leap of faith, try something new and
accept that trial and error is part of
learning and development.
All this points to a lack of resilience
that, given the increase in presenting
anxiety disorders, is seen more
in young people than in previous
generations. Much is written about
what has been (unkindly) labelled
the snowflake generation with
overprotective parenting, an
overemphasis on academic
achievement and lack of risk and
challenge being seen as reasons for
this increase in anxiety issues.
My advice is to take an approach
that enables your son to learn how
anxiety and confront his
to address anxiet
fears. This would mean that he and
anxiety management
you look at anxie
techniques and he
strategies and tec
learns to use them when his anxiety
particularly when his mind
spikes, particular
terrifying ?what if?
races with terrify
associated with anticipatory
questions associa
body goes into the
anxiety and his b
response. I suggest you
fight-flight respon
www.moodjuice.scot.nhs.uk/
look at www.mo
professional/pdfGuides.asp
profess
and the
th website?s cognitive
behavioural
therapy guides
behav
and panic.
for anxiety
an
Once
On your son does
go to
t the school, as he
decided
to do, and faces
de
down
his fear, if, after
do
giving
it at least a term,
giv
he is managing being
there
the without anxiety
but
b still feels that
boarding
school is
b
not
n the right place
for
f him at this time
of his life, he must
o
be
b empowered to
express
this. He must
ex
not
no feel that he has to
subscribe
to some
sub
macho
ideal and
m
pretend
he doesn?t
pre
have tthe feelings he
does. This
Th way he grows
in resilien
resilience in all kind of
ways ? h
he learns not to
avoid what
wha he is scared of
and also le
learns to express his
considered fe
feelings without fear
of being perceived
as weak.
perce
If you have a problem
p
and would like Professor
Tanya Byron?s h
help, email
proftanyabyron@thetimes.co.uk
proftanyabyron@
The Norwegian
ambassador to the
UK was behind the
Oslo accords. Now
she?s the focus of
a West End play.
By Andrew Billen
O
n November 4,
1995, Mona Juul
was dining with the
Palestine Liberation
Organisation (PLO)
leader, Yasser
Arafat, in Gaza. It
had been a day of
celebration. Earlier, the 36-year-old
Norwegian diplomat had attended a
huge demonstration in Tel Aviv in
support of the breakthrough peace deal
between the PLO and Israel. Then the
news came through. The Israeli prime
minister, Yitzhak Rabin, had been
killed at the rally. ?So,? Juul says, ?we
were with Arafat when we heard that
Rabin was killed. Arafat was incredibly
shaky and completely shocked. He
even said it: ?I lost my partner.? ?
It is not the killing of Rabin that,
22 years on, is being marked by the
transfer of a Tony award-winning
Broadway play to the National Theatre
in London before a West End run, but
the peace process itself. Juul and her
husband, Terje Rod-Larsen, brokered
the secret, backchannel negotiations
that led to the 1993 Oslo accord. Rabin
and Arafat?s handshake, signalling that
Israel was handing control of Gaza
to the Palestinians in return for
recognition of its legitimacy, was
historic. JT Rogers?s play Oslo insists,
however, that the real drama lay in the
four months of tortuous, unlikely,
sometimes hilarious, clandestine
diplomacy before it.
We are talking in Juul?s room at
the Norwegian embassy in Belgravia,
where she is now ambassador. She
is a youthful 58. Her younger self was
played by Jennifer Ehle in the New
York production, and the casting is no
flattery, even now. The play?s success
still makes for an unlikely moment
in an eventful life. When its future
director, Bartlett Sher, whose children
went to the same school in New York
as Juul?s twins, suggested that Juul?s
adventure in diplomacy might make
a play, her reaction was: ?Dream on.?
Within a decade she was sitting in the
Lincoln Center admiring what she felt
was a very good play while trying to
overlook some of the particulars.
It is true, for instance, that during
her first posting as a diplomat, to the
Egyptian capital, Cairo, she and her
husband spent a week in Gaza and
were moved by the sight of young
Palestinians throwing stones at Israeli
soldiers. The specific ?boys? who, the
play claims, provoked the couple to try
anything to give them ?a different
narrative? she does not recall. The
play?s greater truth is what matters.
?I think part of the reason people
are going to see a three-hour political
play about the Middle East is that it
the times | Monday September 11 2017
7
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life
crisis . . . You?d better call Juul
DAVID BEBBER FOR THE TIMES; LIFE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES; CHARLES ERICKSON
carries a message that we need to talk.
Society is now so polarised that what
is lacking is hope and anything that
can bring people together. And it is
possible! I mean, the PLO and Israel!
If they could come together, why can?t
we talk across the nations??
Even to Islamic State, if we knew
whom to talk to?
?We should talk to almost everyone.?
With the exception of?
?I?m not a politician, of course.
Personally, I think there are limits,
maybe on some kind of moral or other
grounds, but in order to make peace
you have to speak to your enemy.?
Yet President Trump says that the
time for talking to North Korea is past.
?Exactly, but it was unthinkable for
some time that you could have the
factions in Northern Ireland sitting
there in the same government.?
She explains her role in the Oslo
negotiations in two ways. Her husband
was an academic whom she met
when she was his student (?very
politically incorrect,? she jokes). He
used the cover of research into the
West Bank and Gaza to bring together
government-approved academics from
both sides. Yet it was she who gave
the process credibility by bringing the
backing of Norway?s government.
Second, while Rod-Larsen was the
?creative risk-taker?, she provided
the realism: ?Hang on. Wait a little.?
One thing going for them both was
their nationality. Norway had no dog
in this fight and was genuinely capable
of supporting both sides? desires for
homelands. The national temperament
may have helped. ?A Norwegian never
takes up too much space in a room.?
A Norwegian perhaps also knows
from observation that glacial progress
is still progress. ?Gradualism?, by
which disagreements are resolved
consecutively by personal negotiation
between representatives who grow to
trust each other ? as opposed to
?totalism?, where every issue lies
confrontationally on the table ? has
become the Norwegian model for
facilitating peace talks in Sri Lanka,
Colombia, Sudan and Guatemala.
It is not, apparently, an approach
favoured by those negotiating Brexit,
I say. ?In all negotiations personalities
matter. Atmospherics matter. When
you get into the room and you have
an issue that you have to resolve, there
is pressure on you. You have the time
pressure. You have all the world looking
at what is going on when you come
out of the room. But it?s incredibly
important that you are willing and
able to listen to the other side.?
Red lines are important, and she
has sympathy with the UK position
papers. ?But then of course you have
to gradually, inch by inch, get through
to find common ground.?
Yet the EU negotiator Michel Barnier
and the Brexit secretary, David Davis,
cannot even agree on where to start.
?There might be things going on in the
negotiations rooms that aren?t public,?
Juul says. ?If you are to go out and
comment all the time, you?re speaking
to your own constituencies and then
you have to say things that do not
necessarily reflect 100 per cent [what is
going on in the negotiation]. You have
to let it be known you are strong and
you are steady on your course.?
So inside the room Davis and Barnier
could be getting on like a house on fire?
?You never know. What was important
[with Oslo] was that it was kept secret.?
Could a backchannel approach work
here, then? ?I think it is very helpful
that some issues are taken out of the
public eye a little. I?m a strong believer
in backchannel democracy.?
Norway couldn?t help us out here?
She smiles and shakes her head.
?Norway is not a member of the EU,
but we are a member of the single
market, so we have our own interest
to take care of in this context.?
She does say, however, that having
twice voted against membership of the
EU, Norway has forged a profitable
relationship with Brussels. ?We know
there is a life outside the EU.?
Juul has her own ideas of what great
leadership looks like, and Rabin and
Arafat are, predictably, the examples
she offers me. Of Britain?s leadership,
she says that she couldn?t comment.
So, I ask theoretically what she
might think of a leader who, having
bombed in one election, announces
she intends to fight the next.
?Another leader in the Middle East
that I admire a lot and I?m very close
to is Shimon Peres. He lost so many
elections, but he always came back. He
was foreign minister, prime minister,
president. And I remember him saying,
?Quitters lose; stayers win.? I was
thinking about this when I saw the
headline today [about Theresa May?s
aspirations to stay on].? A sneaking
admiration for our prime minister?
?Yes, I admire people that have a target
and a goal and can take the heat.?
Peacemakers may be blessed, but
they rarely stay popular. Between
2001 and 2004 Juul was Norwegian
ambassador to Israel. The second
intifada was killing thousands and the
PLO was voted out of power in the
Palestinian authority in favour of
Hamas. For the Israeli right, Oslo
became a betrayal. Her enemies in
government spread a story that a
$90,000 peace prize awarded to her
and Rod-Larsen had never been
declared to her employees in Norway.
That was true, but ramping it into a
scandal must have been depressing.
?Yet, I was ambassador there with
Ariel Sharon as the prime minister,
and nobody could claim that he was
sort of a friend of the Oslo agreement,
but I had the best contact with him.?
Above, from left: Mona
Juul; Yasser Arafat and
Yitzhak Rabin with Bill
Clinton in 1993. Below:
Jennifer Ehle and
Jefferson Mays in Oslo
Theresa
May? I
admire
people that
can take
the heat
Oslo opens tomorrow
at the National
Theatre, London SE1;
nationaltheatre.org.uk
So once again a personal rapport
helped? ?And you know, during
Sharon?s tenure, he was the one
who pulled the settlers out of Gaza,
in the realisation that [the violence]
could not continue.?
Juul is no Mother Teresa. In a later
job at the Norwegian delegation to the
UN, a memo to Norway was leaked in
which she called the secretary-general
of the time, Ban Ki-moon, ?spineless
and charmless?. Candour to her
foreign ministry was her job, but she
admits the incident was ?an incredibly
difficult period in my professional and
also personal life?, not least because
she had got to know Ban a little. ?I
think he took it quite well.? Did they
speak afterwards? ?It took a while.?
More impressively, despite long
separations due to their work, Juul and
Rod-Larsen managed to keep their
marriage together. Having for years
been the UN?s Middle East envoy, he
heads the International Peace Institute
think tank in New York and has
therefore seen Oslo rather more often
than she has. Their twins, a boy and
a girl, live with her in London. When
Juul took her daughter to the play she
was mainly impressed that an actor
from the TV sitcom Modern Family
was sitting in front of them.
I ask if the accord came about
through the naive optimism of youth
and Juul says ?probably?, but adds
that, even though those heady four
months of talks were followed by 25
years of killing, she is still an optimist
for the two-state solution. ?What is
needed is leadership, decision-making
to make the painful compromise that
is required. It is completely lacking,
I think, on both sides.
?That?s why it?s important for me
to speak about this. The play itself
carries a very important message. My
husband always says, ?It is possible to
do the impossible.? Perhaps he?s right.?
8
1GT
arts
?Playing demented
harridans and old
crones ? that?s
my career now?
Opera singer Rosalind Plowright has had to adjust to
stay at the top of her game, she tells Richard Morrison
R
osalind Plowright
laughs so heartily that
sub-editors at The
Times raise their weary
eyes from the screen to
clock the glamorous
68-year-old dame, who
once had the opera
world from La Scala to the Met at her
feet. ?That was a while ago,? she says.
?Playing demented harridans and old
crones ? that?s my career now.?
That?s true for the next few months
anyway. For the delectation of
audiences across northern England
she is about to portray what she calls
?the mother-in-law from hell? in
Jan醕ek?s rarely seen short opera Osud
(?Fate?). ?I play the classic possessive
mother who thinks no man is good
enough for her daughter,? she says.
Is she basing her characterisation on
anyone in particular? ?Yes,? she says,
?but let?s leave it at that.?
Osud is an autobiographical piece, in
a way, because the central figure is a
struggling composer. ?I play his wife?s
mother, who goes raving mad in one
short scene,? Plowright explains. ?It?s a
licence to go completely over the top.
It even says in the score, ?with
grotesque movements?. When I sang
My new
roles have
much more
character
than the
simpering
soprano
leads
the role in a production in Stuttgart
they even had me thumping the piano
with my feet because I couldn?t stand
my son-in-law?s tune.?
Is the role the most unpleasant
?demented harridan? Plowright has
played? ?Heavens no,? she replies.
?Kabanicha [the mother-in-law in
another Janacek opera, Katya
Kabanova] is the worst of the lot. I just
sang that role again in Berlin with
Simon Rattle conducting, and it was
one of the most difficult things I?ve
ever done. Mind you, the production
didn?t help. There?s a very short scene
involving Kabanicha and Dikoy [a rich
old merchant] that?s normally a bit
playful and suggestive, but the director
wanted it totally upfront sexually.
Which at my age is a bit daunting. I
can?t begin to spell out what I had to
do. One critic wrote, ?She really threw
herself into it? ? but honestly, I had
no other option.?
The forthcoming production of Osud
in which Plowright appears is part of
an unusual experiment. Instead of
touring full-length works this autumn,
Opera North is offering a season of six
?Little Greats?, short operas that pack
a punch disproportionate to their
brevity. Besides Osud there are those
Monday September 11 2017 | the times
the times | Monday September 11 2017
9
1GT
CHRIS MCANDREW FOR THE TIMES; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; MARY ROBERT/LEBRECHT
regularly twinned Italian verismo
masterpieces Cavalleria rusticana and
Pagliacci, plus (for light relief)
Bernstein?s Trouble in Tahiti, Ravel?s
L?enfant et les sortil鑗es and the first
collaboration by Gilbert and Sullivan,
Trial by Jury.
arts
The gimmick is that, in Leeds
anyway, the operas are differently
paired on different nights, so punters
can mix and match ? or pay to
see just one. There?s also a � ticket
offer for newcomers to opera, and
a weekend in which it?s possible to
see all six.
There?s another upside, though,
which is very much in keeping with
Opera North?s policy of staying
loyal to a family of singers. These
short but vivid operas offer a host
of smaller character roles that can
be played by seasoned veterans
such as Plowright, who also appears
in Cavalleria rusticana.
?I?m loving a lot of the roles I?m
doing now,? she says. ?Parts like
the Countess in Tchaikovsky?s
Queen of Spades, the Baroness
in Samuel Barber?s Vanessa,
Mrs Sedley in Britten?s Peter
Grimes ? they have a lot
more character than the
simpering soprano leads.
Obviously I can?t sing those
roles any more anyway,
From top: Rosalind
Plowright in Andrea
Ch閚ier in 2015; in
Otello in 1987. Below:
with Bryn Terfel in
Die Walk黵e in 2005
and I hardly look the part, so it?s
great to give my career a new chapter
in this way.?
You could argue, though, that
Plowright is now on the third chapter
of her career ? because in 1999, soon
after she turned 50, she made a risky
but highly successful switch from
soprano to mezzo.
?I had been having difficulty with
the top Cs, and if you haven?t got a
secure top C you really need to get
out of that repertoire,? she says. ?The
problems came on after I had children
? a lot of sopranos find that
hormonal changes affect their voices.
Switching to mezzo wasn?t really a
change, more a relaxing of the voice
to let the middle and lower registers
speak naturally.?
Was it a relief to make the switch?
?Believe me,? she says, ?when you?ve
sung Aida, the joy of singing Amneris
[the lower female lead in the same
opera] is incredible. You don?t have to
worry about what a Verdi soprano has
to do all the time, which is hold the
top line in those huge ensembles. You
can just croon along.?
Whether soprano or mezzo, the
Worksop-born singer has had a
remarkable life in opera. ?I?ve never
really counted how many roles I?ve
done,? she says, ?but I know that
I?ve sung 16 or 17 Verdis, including
both the soprano and mezzo solos
in the Requiem.?
Along the way she has sung under
the baton of most of the great
conductors. Her favourite? ?It has
to be [Carlo Maria] Giulini,? she says.
?I remember going into music shops
when I was a student at the Royal
Northern College of Music in
Manchester and seeing these huge
posters of him in those wonderfully
tailored Italian suits. I was drooling
about him even then, so when I got
the chance to record with him [most
notably as Leonora on his classic
recording of Verdi?s Il trovatore] I was
terribly nervous. He was wonderful,
though. Bit slow with the tempos,
mind you, but in those days I could
deal with that.?
Slightly more bizarre was her
encounter with Herbert von Karajan.
?I never worked with him, but I did
audition. Right at the beginning of
my career I was summoned to
Salzburg, and he asked me to cover
[understudy] for Katia Ricciarelli,
who was recording Turandot.
Well, a) Ricciarelli should
never have been singing
Turandot, and b) there
was no way I could sing
it either. But Karajan
was notorious for that
? putting a voice type
that was completely wrong into a role
that was too big. Many sopranos came
and went that way.?
If that was a lucky escape, the
greatest night of Plowright?s
professional life was a lucky break. It
was in 1984, and she had been singing
Aida at the Deutsche Oper.
?I was at Berlin airport the next
morning when I got word that the
soprano down to sing Aida that night
at Covent Garden was ill and there
was nobody to replace her.
?My first thought was, ?It?s
impossible, I can?t do this,? but the
Covent Garden management were
in a terrible state because they
thought they would have to go dark.
So then I thought, ?My God, I have
a duty as an English soprano to ride
to the rescue of England?s premier
opera house.? They held the opening
curtain by half an hour and I went on
opposite Pavarotti, delivered one hell
of a Ritorna vincitor, and the house
just exploded.?
Sadly, the sequel to that story isn?t
so happy. Plowright feels that, at the
peak of her career when she was
getting engagement after engagement
at the biggest opera houses in Italy,
Germany, France and America, she
was comprehensively ignored in
London, by English National Opera
(?I haven?t sung there since John Berry
took over in the mid-1990s?) and by
the Royal Opera.
?I have no idea why,? she says.
?You would have to ask Peter Katona
[Covent Garden?s veteran casting
director]. I?m not the only one, either.
I keep coming across wonderful British
singers with great careers abroad ?
Andrew Foster-Williams is one who
springs to mind ? who can?t get a foot
in the door at Covent Garden. I guess
it?s a very British trait, not celebrating
your native talent.?
She was going back to Covent
Garden in 2019 to sing Kabanicha in
a new production of Katya Kabanova.
?I had a contract, signed and sealed,?
she says. ?Then Esa-Pekka Salonen,
who was supposed to conduct it,
dropped out. As did the scheduled
director. The new team ? Ed Gardner
and Richard Jones ? decided they
wanted a ?younger? Kabanicha. Well,
I got on to Equity [the singers? union],
who said, ?That?s disgraceful.? So we
challenged Covent Garden and they
agreed to pay my contract anyway.?
That was brave, I say, fighting back
against the power of Covent Garden.
?I don?t have anything to lose at my
time of life,? Plowright says. ?I don?t
really give a shit, to be honest.?
The Little Greats season opens at
the Grand, Leeds (0844 8482720),
on Saturday
10
1GT
Monday September 11 2017 | the times
television & radio
A lukewarm starter with more heat to follow
NICKY JOHNSTON/ITV
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Cold Feet
ITV
{{{((
Strike
BBC One
{{{{(
T
he new series of Cold Feet
began as if someone were
trying to win a bet: how
many clich閟 is it possible to
cram into an opening five
minutes? Tease the viewer that Tina?s
pregnant with what turns out to be
hammy dream sequence: tick. Lorry
drives through puddle drenching
James Nesbitt as Adam in his
interview suit: tick. Adam goes to shop
to buy new clothes; emerges in toosmall hipster jeans 20 years too young
for him: tick (why would he do this?
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
The Conversation
World Service, 11.30am
Each week The
Conversation brings
together two women with
similar careers but different
cultures, to discuss their
paths to success. This week?s
interviewees are Olympic
gymnastic champions: the
American Simone Biles and
the Romanian-born Nadia
Comaneci. Biles talks about
how to concentrate under
any circumstance, while
Comaneci explains why
she didn?t smile when she
scored the first perfect
Olympic 10. It wasn?t
because she wasn?t happy,
but because she didn?t quite
realise she had; the
scoreboard hadn?t been
designed to hold any
number higher than nine.
Prime Cut
Radio 4, 2.15pm
Say the word ?prime cut? in
the context of Australian
drama and you know what
to expect: a world of barbies,
tinnies and clich閟. So you
can see why it?s the perfect
title for a thriller writer to
take and turn to much
darker uses. In this yarn,
by Alan Carter, the lump of
meat in question is instead a
woman: a headless torso has
been found and it?s up to
the detective, Cato Kwong,
to find out whodunnit.
Manchester?s full of shops. Adam can?t
be unfamiliar with the stonking great
Arndale Centre. Why not go there for
middle-aged attire?). As for that
cringe-making song-and-dance routine,
even the cast looked apologetic.
The good news is that it got
better, was still glossy and uplifting,
but hasn?t yet reached the standard
of the last series, which was a joy,
especially, ironically, when tackling
Pete?s depression. For an opener
this lacked zing and felt more like a
mid-series episode.
Still, it thrums with potential. The
women?s tense, schoolyard friendship
triangle (Jen and Tina want to be
chief BF with Karen, the popular girl)
shows bitchy promise. Jen is jealous
that Karen went shopping with Tina;
Tina thinks Jen has a big mouth.
Leanne Best as Tina is far better
than the lifeless, pull-string doll Rachel
ever was. Rachel?s dead but, tell me,
would any of us have noticed?
Good comedy value too is
shambling posho David?s new career
as a financial adviser to the ladieswho-lunch Cheshire set. Though
there was more corniness here with
talk of tax-deductible boob jobs and
millionaire Nikki referring to her own
friends, without irony, as ?WAGs?.
Does anyone actually talk like that?
David looks likely to be seduced by
Nikki, though, so we?ll look forward to
that. Not enough was made of John
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 Radio 1?s Specialist Chart with Phil
Taggart 10.00 Huw Stephens 1.00am
Friction 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce. The
singer-songwriter Paul Heaton begins his
Tracks of My Years selection 12.00 Jeremy
Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00 Simon
Mayo 7.00 Paul Jones. The blues organist
Lucky Peterson and his band join Paul at
Maida Vale Studios for a session
performance 8.00 Jo Whiley. A mix of
new music and classic album tracks, with
guests dropping in to the studio to chat
10.00 Ricky Ross?s New Tradition. The
Deacon Blue frontman shares some of the
new music he has enjoyed throughout the
week, and explores the origins of today?s
most popular tracks 11.00 David Rodigan.
The DJ celebrates the life and music of Prince
Buster, who became known as the King of
Ska 12.00 Johnnie Walker Meets Elkie
Brooks. An interview with the ?British Queen
of Blues? (r) 1.00am Johnnie Walker meets
Alice Cooper (r) 2.00 Radio 2?s Jazz Playlists
3.00 Radio 2 Playlists: Great British
Songbook 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: Hidden
Treasures 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Music, news and the occasional surprise,
presented by Petroc Trelawny. 7.00, 8.00
News. 7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
Suzy Klein explores potential companion
pieces for Rimsky-Korsakov?s Scheherazade,
and Simon Rattle talks about the ideas and
in?uences that are important to him
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Alexander Goehr
All this week, Donald Macleod is in
conversation with Alexander Goehr at the
composer?s cottage in a village outside
Cambridge, beginning with a discussion
about his early life. Alexander Goehr (Cities
and Thrones and Powers; The Deluge, Op 7;
and Little Symphony, Op 15)
1.00pm News
The Cold Feet gang have returned for more midlife comedy
1.02 Live Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Sara Mohr-Pietsch presents live from
London?s Wigmore Hall as the soprano
Sophie Bevan is accompanied by the pianist
Sebastian Wybrew for an all-English recital,
including songs by Britten, Gurney, Vaughan
Williams and Grainger
2.00 Afternoon Concert
Penny Gore presents the ?rst of a week of
concerts featuring Simon Rattle conducting
the Berlin Philharmonic, featuring a
performance of Mahler?s Seventh Symphony
4.30 In Tune
A selection of music, plus news from the arts
world. Including 5.00, 6.00 News
6.30 Composer of the Week:
Alexander Goehr (r)
7.30 Radio 3 in Concert
Jamie MacDougall presents the opening
concert of the Edinburgh International
Festival, recorded at the Usher Hall on
August 5. Celebrating the 70th year of the
festival, the programme features the
Scottish Chamber Orchestra performing
Haydn?s Surprise Symphony, which opened
the ?rst-ever festival. The orchestra is
joined by the Edinburgh Festival Chorus
and soloists for Mendelssohn?s Lobgesang
Symphony, directed by the Spanish conductor
Pablo Heras-Casado. Haydn (Symphony No
94 ?Surprise); and Mendelssohn (Symphony
No 2 ? Lobgesang)
10.00 Music Matters
Recordings of composer William Goodchild,
Frozen Planet producer Vanessa Berlowitz
and ?eld recordist Jez Riley French detail
how music alters perceptions of the
natural world (r)
10.45 The Essay: Paradise Lost
John Milton?s Paradise Lost was ?rst
published 350 years ago and remains the
most important long poem in the English
language, coming out of a time of
revolutionary upheaval in Britain and
being a political poem as much as a
theological one. In the ?rst of ?ve
re?ections on it by authors, historians and
theologians, Sean O?Brien discusses Milton?s
adventurousness in Paradise Lost
11.00 Jazz Now
Emma Smith presents Nerija in concert at
Pizza Express Jazz Club London, while
Soweto Kinch meets the American bassist
Christian McBride
12.30am Through the Night
Jonathan Swain introduces by Beethoven,
Sibelius, Kilar, Penderecki, Stenhammar,
Nielsen, Grieg, Rimsky-Korsakov, Arvo P鋜t,
Gedimas Gelgotas, Imants Kalnins,
Tchaikovsky and Handel arr Schnyder
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
9.00 The English Fix
Patrick Wright examines George Orwell?s
essay The Lion and the Unicorn (1/4)
9.30 Oliver Burkeman Is Busy
Oliver Burkeman looks at the bene?ts of
a little idleness. Last in the series (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week:
South and West
By Joan Didion (1/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Including at 10.45 the 15 Minute Drama:
The Pursuits of Darleen Fyles, by Esther
Wilson and Pauline Harris
10.30-6.45pm (LW) Live Test Match
Special: England v West Indies
11.00 The Race to Fingerprint
the Human Voice
Rory Bremner explores the role of the human
voice in forensic phonetics (r)
11.30 Fags, Mags and Bags
Alok?s old friend returns to Lenzie after
becoming a Hollywood star (3/4)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Sebastian Baczkiewicz
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Whodunnit:
The Calendar Conspiracy
Michael Blastland investigates why
summer-born children generally do
worse in education than those born in
autumn or winter (1/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Crime Down Under ?
Prime Cut
By Alan Carter A case involving a headless
torso gives disgraced detective Cato Kwong
one last shot at redemption.
See Radio Choice (1/2)
3.00 Counterpoint
The second of the semi-?nals (11/13)
3.30 The Food Programme
Dan Saladino goes in search of ?zero
compromise? natural wine makers (r)
4.00 Printing a Nation
Anindita Ghosh explores how the printing
press made modern India (2/2) (r)
4.30 Beyond Belief
The life of Khadijah, the ?rst wife of the
prophet Muhammad (5/7)
Thomson?s Pete, but there are hints his
black dog will return. That toe-curling
dream sequence, incidentally, obviously
signposted Adam?s baby hunger. Now,
can we never speak of it again?
In TV terms we?ve only known
Cormoran Strike for four hours. Yet
after one and a bit series he already
feels like a familiar fleck on the living
room carpet and a welcome face in
the TV listings, which shows how
plausible, and likeable, Tom Burke has
made him. The new series of Strike,
The Silkworm, is more complex and
gory than The Cuckoo?s Calling: we?ve
already had an act of self-mutilation
with a giant safety pin and the full
disembowelling of a missing author, as
depicted in his own novel. As for the
publishing world, it emerges as ghastly,
but I do recommend imagining it as
JK Rowling settling a few personal
scores (no evidence for this, of course,
but good fun anyway).
The standout performance was
Monica Dolan as Leonora Quine, the
dead author?s long-suffering wife, left
to care for their disabled daughter and
now in the frame for his murder.
Wonderful. Holliday Grainger is ever
stronger as Strike?s assistant, Robin,
torn between her dullsville fianc� and
her love for the job (which happens
to come with a much sexier boss).
She seems to much prefer the latter.
Who the hell wouldn?t?
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 Just a Minute
With Paul Merton, Rufus Hound and Sarah
Kendall (6/8)
6.45 (LW) Just a Minute (6/8)
7.00 The Archers
Tony needs to let go
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 The Pursuits of Darleen Fyles (r)
8.00 The DUP Deal
Chris Page examines the deal between the
Conservatives and the DUP
8.30 Crossing Continents
Bulgaria?s shrinking population (7/9) (r)
9.00 Natural Histories
Brett Westwood explores the snail (r)
9.30 The English Fix
Patrick Wright examines George Orwell?s
essay The Lion and the Unicorn (1/4) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
International news round-up
10.45 Book at Bedtime:
Crime Down Under ? The Dry
By Jane Harper, abridged by Sara Davies.
Lies, alibis and a confrontation muddy the
waters of Aaron Falk?s investigation (6/10)
11.00 Blast
With poems by Andrew McMillan, Richard
Scott, Emily Berry and Kathryn Maris
11.30 Today in Parliament
Sean Curran reports from Westminster
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
South and West (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
8.00 In a Right State by Hilary Mantel.
Comic tale, read by Miriam Margolyes 8.30
The Original. Alkarim Jivani explores the
importance of originality 9.00 Modern Welsh
Voices. Brown Jug. By Linda Ruhemann 9.15
A House Halfway to Africa. Drama with Pete
Postlethwaite 10.00 Comedy Club: Just a
Minute. With Paul Merton, Gyles Brandreth,
Andy Hamilton and Sue Perkins 10.30 Jason
Cook?s School of Hard Knocks. The best way
to behave at a funeral 11.00 The News Quiz
Extra. Extended edition of the comedy panel
show 11.45 Armstrong & Miller
Radio 4 Extra
6 Music
Digital only
8.00am To the Manor Born 8.30 Dad?s Army
9.00 Hidden Treasures 9.30 Getting
Nowhere Fast 10.00 The Pallisers 11.00
Modern Welsh Voices 11.15 A House
Halfway to Africa 12.00 To the Manor Born
12.30pm Dad?s Army 1.00 In a Right State
by Hilary Mantel 1.30 The Original 2.00 The
Siege 2.15 Charisma: Pinning Down the
Butter?y 2.30 South Riding 2.45 Vanished
Years 3.00 The Pallisers 4.00 Hidden
Treasures 4.30 Getting Nowhere Fast
5.00 Says on the Tin 5.30 Just a Minute
6.00 The Heart of Hark?un 6.30 A Good Read
7.00 To the Manor Born. Devere takes a
shine to Mrs Forbes-Hamilton?s guest.
Comedy with Penelope Keith 7.30 Dad?s
Army. Comedy with Arthur Lowe
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Adrian Chiles 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
Mark Chapman presents the build-up to West
Ham United v Hudders?eld Town 8.00 5 Live
Sport: Premier League Football 2017-18 ?
West Ham United v Hudders?eld Town
(Kick-off 8.00) 10.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live
Football Social. Reaction to this evening?s
match between West Ham United and
Hudders?eld Town 10.30 Sam Walker
1.00am Up All Night 5.00 Reports
5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Breakfast with Max
Rushden and Joey Barton 10.00 Jim White
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off
10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am Extra Time with
Adam Catterall
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc Riley
9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Lauren Laverne 1.00am
The Record Producers 2.00 Long Players
2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6 Music?s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Alexander Armstrong
presents an autumn-themed show 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday September 11 2017
11
1GT
MARK ALLAN
artsfirst night
Concert
Kohn Foundation
Song Competition
Wigmore Hall
Theatre
One Day, Maybe
A secret location, Hull
I
{{{((
W
{{{{(
hat makes a great
recitalist? John
Brancy, the first of
two American
baritone finalists in
the 2017 Wigmore Hall/Kohn
Foundation International Song
Competition, offered oven-ready
charisma and polish in his deftly
constructed programme of songs from
composers and poets whose lives had
been touched by war: William Denis
Browne, Ives, Orff, Poulenc, Bernstein
and Wilfrid Sanderson.
Brancy?s glossy sound impressed,
but it was the delicacy of phrasing, the
smartness of the segues and the range
of colour from the pianist Peter Dugan
that really struck, especially in the
sudden shift from Sanderson?s
sentimental adieu, God be with our
boys tonight, to the bright, bony
candour of Bernstein?s Whitman
setting To what you said.
If only the second American
baritone, Josh Quinn, had enjoyed
a similarly stimulating partnership
with his pianist. Quinn has excellent
French, German and Russian
diction, an easy manner and a real
understanding of poetry. He, too,
offered smart programming ? Ives,
Duparc, Caplet, Tchaikovsky and
Harrison Birtwistle?s tart miniature
The Mouse Felt ? but You Zhao?s
playing seemed stuck in the plush
darkness of Wolf?s Der Genesene
an die Hoffnung.
Like Quinn, the American mezzosoprano Clara Osowski may be
destined for heavier repertoire. Her
middle range is lovely, her German
exquisite, but the stillness that worked
to her advantage in Liszt, Schumann
and Schubert began to look like
inhibition. Adjustments of tone and
attack in Dutilleux?s Fantasio and
Rihm?s Leben und Tod were made on
Osowski?s behalf by the pianist Tyler
Wottrich. Poulenc, in particular, needs
something more from a singer: their
neck, shoulders, hands, their eyes.
A beautiful voice is not enough to
animate a recital, and animation was
what the New Zealand baritone Julien
Van Mellaerts and the British pianist
Gamal Khamis brought to their
Schumann, Britten, Tchaikovsky and
Debussy, alert to the specifics of style,
language and character in each
miniature narrative. No surprise that
Van Mellaerts, witty and wiry-toned,
walked away with the top prize.
Anna Picard
Theatre
Doubt: A Parable
Southwark Playhouse, SE1
A
{{{{(
t the start of this play by
John Patrick Shanley, the
nun Sister Aloysius, the
headmistress of St Nicholas
Church School in the
Bronx, is lecturing the latest addition
to her staff, Sister James, on the evils
of Biros. ?Ballpoints make the children
press down,? she says, her lips a
humourless line, adding despairingly:
?Penmanship is dying all across this
felt strangely undernourished.
In fact, the final week at the Proms
had several disappointments.
Amsterdam?s Royal Concertgebouw
Orchestra sounded tepid under
Daniele Gatti at the start of the
month, and the Vienna Philharmonic?s
two Proms on Thursday and Friday
were similarly unimpassioned. In both
cases I sensed great orchestras resting
on their laurels and insufficiently
galvanised by their conductors.
It took the Vienna Phil almost the
whole of two concerts ? until the
final movement of its final piece,
Beethoven?s Seventh Symphony ? to
produce genuine excitement, and even
then the conductor Michael Tilson
Thomas (Prom 74) had to swing his
arms like a discus thrower to wake
the players up. Earlier, Brahms?s
St Anthony Variations and Mozart?s
Piano Concerto in E flat, K449, were
played on autopilot, despite the soloist
Emanuel Ax?s graceful striving.
And Mahler?s Sixth Symphony the
previous evening (Prom 72)? Under
Daniel Harding?s mostly pointless
direction it was ill-balanced (the brass
far too dominant) and starved of
emotional commitment, notably
around the finale?s hammer blows.
Worse, the famed Vienna strings
sounded mundane. Either the players
aren?t as classy as they were, or they
were going through the motions. That?s
not good enough. The BBC should give
these once-proud ensembles a few
years off to regain their appetite for
thrilling the British public.
f the location for the new sitespecific promenade installation
from the dreamthinkspeak theatre
company starts out as a dead
ringer for a disused office building
in Hull city centre, that?s because
that?s where we are. If it then becomes
a future-tech South Korean shopping
mall, or a claustrophic maze in which
you have to evade ghostly guards, or
a set of deserted police interrogation
rooms, or a shoes-off tea ceremony to
honour those who died in the
Gwangju Uprising of May 1980, that?s
because the company?s director,
designer, co-deviser (with his cast of
38) and all-round arthouse dungeon
master, Tristan Sharps, has a good eye
for a stunt and a great eye for detail.
One Day, Maybe starts with one
of his typically nifty set pieces: a
?hologram? of the young protestors
who then climb out of the screen to
join us in the present. And if you don?t
know all about the Gwangju Uprising,
how the West was complicit in its
violent repression and how that led
into South Korea?s democratisation
a few years later, in part that?s OK,
because the evening is predicated on
the western consumer not wanting to
think too hard about where our latest
consumer miracle is coming from.
So soon we?re forgetting about these
ghosts, getting lost in the novelty as
the Korean-spouting staff of the
fictitious Kasang Corporation invite us
to hoist our personalised tablet devices
around a shopping mall. A moment
later they help us to monitor the every
move of the scary soldier we have to
dodge in the maze we?ve been plonked
into as we help Kasang to research its
new videogame.
What follows is a hunt-the-clues
mystery that leads into stylised role
play that fills us in on the events of
May 1980. Well, partly. I had to get
googling afterwards for a bite-sized
summary of what it all meant. If they
sometimes lose us in the detail, the
level of imagination, craftsmanship
and commitment to this show,
commissioned by Hull City of Culture
2017, is often breathtaking.
The closing installation of hundreds
of chairs that commemorate the dead
is an indescribably beautiful moment
that makes a sometimes disparate
collection of surprising moments come
together. It is, like so much of
dreamthinkspeak?s work, wonderfully
overambitious and fitfully stupendous.
Dominic Maxwell
hull2017.co.uk/onedaymaybe, to Oct 1
Play. In 2008 it was turned into a film,
starring Philip Seymour Hoffman and
Meryl Streep. This strong production,
directed by Ch� Walker, strips the play
back to its basics and is riveting.
There is nowhere for anyone to
hide, not least because the audience
surrounds the stage. The set, by
PJ McEvoy, is simple but effective,
consisting of a raised platform in the
shape of a cross, with the floor made
of stained-glass panels that, at certain
moments, light up. This serves as
a platform from which to deliver
sermons (Father Flynn is keen on
sermonising) and as Sister Aloysius?s
office as she interrogates Sister James
about what Father Flynn has been
doing with the school?s only black
student, Donald Muller. It?s also
where she confronts Donald?s mother
in an agonisingly intense moral maze
of a scene.
The cast is very strong. Stella Gonet
as Sister Aloysius and Jo Martin as
Donald?s mother, Mrs Muller, are
particularly outstanding. Their furious
exchanges prompted the audience to
burst into applause. The play is
presented as 90 minutes straight
through and, after a slightly lacklustre
start, it grips. Is he guilty? Is she
playing God? Doubts, we have a few.
But that?s the genius of this play.
Ann Treneman
Box office: 020 7407 0234, to Sept 30
Pomp without pep
Sakari Oramo conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra in an incongruous and lacklustre Last Night
There were
plenty of flags
but not enough
thrills as the
2017 Proms
came to an end,
says Richard
Morrison
Last Night of
the Proms
BBCSO/Oramo
{{(((
Proms 72, 74
Vienna
Philharmonic
{{(((
Royal Albert Hall
I
t?s 40 years since I reviewed my
first Last Night of the Proms, and
I can?t remember many in those
decades that felt as lacklustre as
Saturday?s. Hard to say why,
because the BBC Symphony
Orchestra, Singers and Symphony
Chorus performed well enough under
Sakari Oramo?s direction.
Perhaps many small but irritating
things combined to dampen the
atmosphere. The activists outside the
Albert Hall handing out free EU flags
contrived to turn what has always
been an ironic and light-hearted ritual
into a political statement. Then the
BBC?s weird decision to pay homage to
the significant anniversaries of three
composers and Finnish independence
produced an incongruous procession
of items, made worse by prolonged
gaps that killed momentum.
The choice of Nina Stemme as
star-turn also misfired. She?s a
magnificent Wagner soprano, and
when she hit her stride the Liebestod
from Tristan und Isolde was impressive.
Her Valkyrie-esque Rule, Britannia!
certainly shivered the timbers, too.
When miked up for show tunes by
Weill and Gershwin, however, she
sounded forced and unidiomatic.
Zippy, cartoonish new miniatures by
Lotta Wenn鋕oski and John Adams
(the latter a blatant trailer for his
next opera) amused the ear, and it
was good to hear Kod醠y?s thrilling
Budavari Te Deum, with Lucy Crowe
excelling in the stratospheric soprano
solo. Yet this three-hour evening
country.? It?s hard to like Sister
Aloysius, for she?s often harsh, in
judgment and in manner.
She patrols her school like a Valkyrie
in a habit. Her present worries include
penmanship, the frost-vulnerable
bushes in the courtyard, her belief
that Sister James is far too nice, and
her suspicions that the local priest,
Father Brendan Flynn, is overly keen
to spend time alone with the boys.
With him, she suspects the worst, but
she has no proof.
This play, set in 1964, explores the
subject of doubt and certainty on
many levels, and you can see why it
won the Pulitzer for drama in 2005,
not to mention the Tony for Best
Stella
Gonet
as Sister
Aloysius
12
1GT
Monday September 11 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Rellik
BBC One, 9pm
Over the next
six weeks two
dramas will
go head-tohead at 9pm ? Liar on
ITV (see right) and this
high-concept crime
thriller on BBC One.
What makes them
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7PM
Early
Top
pick
remarkable is that
both have been written
by Harry and Jack
Williams, the brothers
behind The Missing.
The more ambitious
of the two is Rellik,
a drama that will likely
set Twitter ablaze as
viewers attempt to keep
up with its sprawling,
dense and at times
maddeningly confusing
plot. Like Harold
Pinter?s Betrayal,
Christopher Nolan?s
Memento and Martin
Amis?s Time?s Arrow,
Rellik operates with
a reverse chronology
(Rellik is ?killer?
backwards, geddit?).
This one requires every
ounce of concentration
you have (I would
recommend taking
notes). We begin with
the detective Gabriel
Markham (Richard
Dormer), his face
horrifically scarred
from an acid attack,
attempting to arrest a
suspected serial killer.
It goes wrong and the
suspect is shot dead,
but before we can dwell
on that too much we
are whooshed a few
hours back in time to
see the police setting up
the arrest operation.
And then we go back
again. And again. By
the end of episode six
we will see, presumably,
the identity of the killer
as they murder their
first victim. Confused?
You will be. The action
is relentless, with a
migraine-inducing
soundtrack adding to a
sense of disorientation,
but Dormer is
compelling as the
obsessed cop, and the
clever reveals make
almost every scene a
lightbulb moment.
Upstart Crow
BBC Two, 8.30pm
Ben Elton?s Shakespeare
sitcom, which casts the
Bard as a vain social
climber, returns for a
deserved second series.
Tonight?s inspiration
is Othello, with
Shakespeare (David
Mitchell) hoping that a
charismatic African
prince will help him to
curry favour with the
authorities that grant
coats of arms. While
the domestic scenes in
Stratford-upon-Avon
smack of ye olde
sitcome, Shakespeare?s
misadventures in
London are always
great fun and prove
that Elton can still craft
lines that others can
only dream of. Emma
Thompson and Noel
Fielding will join the
cast later in the series.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Council House Crackdown.
Michelle Ackerley reveals how a Turkish pensioner
pretended to be Scottish in order to get a council property
and �0,000 in bene?ts 10.00 Homes Under the
Hammer. Properties in Cheshire, Kent and Cumbria (r)
11.00 Dom on the Spot. A Manchester traf?c cop is called
to a serious collision 11.45 Thief Trackers. The team
show one young biker how he might become a victim of
crime 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. New series. From the
National Botanic Garden of Wales (AD) 1.00 BBC News at
One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Ruhma ?nally makes a decision about her
married name (AD) 2.15 The Boss. New series. Return
of the quiz hosted by Susan Calman 3.00 Escape to the
Country. Jules Hudson is on a property hunting mission in
Oxfordshire with two newlyweds (r) (AD) 3.45 Garden
Rescue. Neighbours who have decided to combine their
respective plots into one garden (AD) 4.30 Celebrity
Money for Nothing. Sarah Moore and Jay Blades visit the
homes of Ben de Lisi and Caprice Bourret 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 Council House
Crackdown (r) 7.15 Garden Rescue (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign
Zone: The Big Family Cooking Showdown (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm For What It?s Worth (r) 1.45
Coast (r) 2.00 Glorious Gardens from Above (r) 2.45 Who
Do You Think You Are? Danny Dyer sets out to ?nd out
more about his working-class family in the East End of
London, but unearths an extraordinary lineage stretching
back to the 11th century (r) (AD) 3.45 Great British
Railway Journeys. Michael Portillo embarks on a railway
journey along England?s south coast (r) (AD) 4.15 Planet
Earth II. Wildlife that inhabit the world?s grasslands,
exploring how animals adapt to survive in areas that
endure some of the most dramatic seasonal changes seen
in the world (r) (AD) 5.15 Flog It! Paul Martin and
experts Christina Trevanion and Will Axon travel to the
Oxford Union, where they pick out collectibles to be sold
at auction, including an autograph book (r) 6.00 Richard
Osman?s House of Games. Angela Scanlon, Clive Myrie,
Sara Pascoe and Rick Edwards test their general
knowledge skills 6.30 Eggheads. Quiz show
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Yvie Burnett chats about
her new book Yes, You Can Sing! Plus, a mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment and fashion news,
as well as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip 9.25 The
Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip Scho?eld
and Holly Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features,
including a look at the stories making the newspaper
headlines and a recipe in the kitchen. Including Local
Weather 12.30pm Loose Women. The presenter Rylan
Clark-Neal and the American plus-size model Tess
Holliday join the panel for more topical studio discussion
from a female perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather
2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras follow criminal barrister
Robert Rinder as he takes on real-life cases in a studio
courtroom 3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. David Dickinson
and the team are in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, where
David Ford makes an offer on a sword and a seller
receives a huge surprise from Fay Rutter (r) 4.00 Tipping
Point. Game show hosted by Ben Shephard 5.00 The
Chase. Quiz show hosted by Bradley Walsh 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 The King of Queens (r) 8.00
Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 9.00 Frasier (r) 10.00
Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 11.00 Coast vs
Country. The experts help a couple looking for a property
in Scotland (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary
12.05pm Couples Come Dine with Me. Three couples
compete in south London (r) 1.05 French Collection. Three
Brits are given 800 euros to spend at an antiques market
in Toulouse 2.10 Countdown. With Gloria Hunniford in
Dictionary Corner 3.00 Cheap Cheap Cheap. Game show
4.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away. Jasmine Harman
and Jonnie Irwin help a couple from Australia looking for
a holiday home within reach of their daughter in England,
viewing properties in West Yorkshire and Normandy 5.00
Come Dine with Me. Four dinner parties in Portsmouth
and Southampton 6.00 The Simpsons. Ned Flanders takes
in a pair of female lodgers, but their raunchy activities
prompt him to consider moving away from Spring?eld
altogether (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Lisa is still uncertain
about being a surrogate for Louis and Simone, while Lily
is devastated when she ?nds out that it is unlikely she
will get into Oxford or Cambridge (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can?t
Pay? We?ll Take It Away. Sheriff Paul Bohill tackles the
case of a small debt owed by ex-footballer Neil Ruddock,
before being forced to evict a school dinner lady in south
London (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel
Inspector. Alex Polizzi visits The Black Bear Hotel in
Wareham, Dorset, where the business is losing money
and reviews are bad, leaving the presenter to
demonstrate how an inn should be run (r) 1.10
Access. Showbiz news and gossip 1.15 Home and
Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS. The team
?ies to Israel, but receives a hostile reception from
Ziva?s father, who is the head of Mossad ? and Gibbs is
forced to make a tough decision (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM:
Jane Doe ? Ties That Bind (PG, TVM, 2007)
The former government agent investigates the murder
of a company whistle-blower ? but the suspect appears
to have a cast-iron alibi. Thriller starring Lea Thompson
and Joe Penny 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours.
Mishti is horri?ed to hear what Leo has been accused of
(r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Mason wakes from his
coma (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and
Alex Jones present topical stories
and chat with famous faces
7.00 Emmerdale Emma tries to make
amends, and Tracy looks forward to
her birthday (AD)
7.30 Inside Out Documentary series
focusing on regional stories of interest
7.00 Antiques Road Trip Charles Hanson
and Catherine Southon head for
their ?nal auction in Congleton,
Cheshire, before Christina Trevanion
and Mark Stacey set out on the ?rst
leg of their journey (3/10)
8.00 EastEnders The guilt becomes too
much for one resident, who ends up
facing demons from the past (AD)
8.00 University Challenge Shef?eld
Hallam takes on Newcastle.
Jeremy Paxman asks the questions
8.30 Why Mum Died: Britain?s Sepsis
Crisis ? Panorama Alistair Jackson
reports on how deaths from sepsis
might have been prevented
8.30 Upstart Crow New series. Return
of the comedy with David Mitchell,
guest starring Steve Toussaint.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 Rellik New series. DCI Gabriel
Markham and his team are working to
?nd a serial killer when a break in the
case leads them to a potential suspect.
Crime thriller starring Richard Dormer,
with Jodi Balfour and Paterson Joseph.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 The Search for a New Earth
Stephen Hawking thinks the human
species will have to populate a new
planet within 100 years if it is to
survive. In this programme, he is joined
by engineering professor Danielle
George and his former student
Christophe Galfard to examine if
humans could relocate to other
planets, meeting scientists and
engineers working on the means and
method. See Viewing Guide (1/2) (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.30 BBC Reggional News and Weather
10.45 Imagine: Cameron Mackintosh
? The Musical Man With a career
spanning 50 years and a catalogue of
hits to his name including Cats, Les
Mis閞ables, Phantom of the Opera and
Miss Saigon, Cameron Mackintosh is
about to launch hit US musical
Hamilton in London. Alan Yentob
meets the impresario to discover how
a timber merchant?s son became the
most successful man in musical
theatre and in the process changed the
face and sound of the business across
the globe. See Viewing Guide
12.15am Live at the Apollo (r) 1.05-6.00 BBC News
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Emily Maitlis
11.15 Astronauts: Do You Have What It
Takes? The remaining candidates head
to a secret facility in Sweden, where
they are deliberately deprived of
oxygen to see if they can recognise
the signs of hypoxia (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.15am Sign Zone: Celebrity MasterChef The
presenter Ulrika Jonsson, the opera singer Lesley Garrett,
the actor Nick Moran, the broadcaster Aasmah Mir and
the children?s presenter Barney Harwood enter the
Masterchef kitchen (r) (AD, SL) 1.15-2.15 No More Boys
and Girls: Can Our Kids Go Gender Free? (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Cricket on 5 England v West Indies.
Mark Nicholas presents highlights of
the ?fth day of the third Test,
which took place at Lord?s. With
commentary by Michael Vaughan,
Geoffrey Boycott and Simon Hughes
8.00 Countrywise: Guide to Britain
Liz Bonnin takes a trip down the
River Severn during one of its massive
tidal bores (r)
8.30 Coronation Street Eileen and Nicola
pay a surprise visit to Phelan?s house,
Anna resolves to help Seb, and Sarah is
troubled by the change in Gary (AD)
8.00 Jamie?s Quick & Easy Food Recipes
for a one-pan ?sh dish and apple
crumble cookies (4/8) (AD)
8.00 Police Interceptors New series. The
return of the documentary following
the work of elite crime-?ghting units,
this time riding along with of?cers
from the Durham, Cleveland and
Cheshire forces (1/12)
9.00 Liar New series. A teacher ?nds
herself entangled in a web of deceit
and confusion after a date with a
widowed surgeon. Thriller starring
Joanne Froggatt and Ioan Gruffudd.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 The Undateables New series. Return
of the programme following disabled
people as they search for romance,
with the ?rst edition featuring an
autistic transport fanatic and a
Paralympic hopeful (1/5) (AD)
7.30 Coronation Street Andy tastes
freedom when Phelan takes a risk.
Meanwhile, Anna tackles Seb about
his home life (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.40 Lisa Riley?s Baggy Body Club
Cameras follow the former Emmerdale
actress as she deals with excess skin
caused by weight loss, including drastic
surgery to have it removed (r) (AD)
11.40 The Jonathan Ross Show The host
is joined by the actress Natalie Dormer,
the singer Rag ?n? Bone Man and the
comedian Jack Dee (2/12) (r)
12.40am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively
chat from the presenting team 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Guests air their differences (r) 3.55 ITV
Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
8.30 Superfoods: The Real Story Kate
Quilton ?nds out if nuts might be the
key to a stress-free life (4/8) (AD)
9.00 Paddington Station 24/7 New
series. The return of the programme
that goes behind-the-scenes at
London?s transport hubs, this time
meeting the army of workers who keep
Paddington station running (1/4)
10.00 Gogglebox The ?y-on-the-wall
series capturing households? instant
reactions to this week?s television
returns, including The Great British
Bake Off, Doctor Foster and
The Crystal Maze (r) (AD)
10.00 Britannia: Secrets of the Royal
Yacht Rob Bell examines iconic ships
that have played signi?cant roles in
Britain?s maritime and cultural history,
beginning with the Royal Yacht
Britannia (1/2) (r)
11.05 Britain?s Bene?t Tenants
In Manchester, letting agent Amin
is on the trail of a woman who has
fallen behind in her rent, but he
discovers a nasty surprise when he
arrives at her house (3/3) (r)
11.05 The Frozen Ground (15, 2013)
A state trooper tries to bring a serial
killer to justice with the help of the
only woman to escape from him.
Fact-based crime drama starring
Nicolas Cage and John Cusack
12.05am Random Acts (AD) 12.35 60 Days in Jail
(AD) 1.25 The Supervet: Bionic Specials (r) (AD, SL) 2.25
FILM: Aligarh (2015) Fact-based Indian drama starring
Manoj Bajpayee and Rajkummar Rao 4.30 Location,
Location, Location (r) (SL) 5.25 Kirstie?s Fill Your House
for Free (r) 5.30-6.00 Four in a Bed (r)
12.55am SuperCasino 3.10 GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
Doctors deal with cases of severe joint and shoulder pain
(r) (AD) 4.00 Criminals: Caught on Camera. Nick Wallis
joins the Met?s robbery squads on a Friday night shift (r)
(SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Great Artists (r)
(SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest (r) (SL)
the times | Monday September 11 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
The Search for
a New Earth
BBC Two, 9pm
?We?re all doomed!?
says Professor Stephen
Hawking at the start of
this documentary about
humanity?s need to leave
earth in 100 years?
time. Those aren?t quite
his words ? he says
that he is ?convinced
that humans need to
leave earth and that
preparations must be
in place within 100
years? ? but you?ll be
fretting about your
great-grandchildren
nonetheless. Professor
Danielle George and
Christophe Galfard zip
around the globe (their
flights presumably
speeding up the
destruction of earth) to
investigate the steps we
are making to set up
camp across the galaxy.
Liar
ITV, 9pm
Coming over as Doctor
Foster with a grisly
twist, Liar pits Joanne
Froggatt?s strong-willed
teacher, Laura, against
Ioan Gruffudd?s smooth
surgeon, Andrew. It is
all sweetness and light
at first as the newly
single Laura bumps
into the handsome
widower at the school
gates and winds up
taking his number.
However, Laura wakes
up the morning after
their first date with a
foggy recollection of
the night before,
convinced she has been
raped. Andrew denies
it. It feels a delicate
subject for a twisty
six-part thriller, but the
performances are castiron and the drama
grips from the word go.
Imagine
BBC One, 10.45pm
Alan Yentob interviews
Cameron Mackintosh,
?the most successful
musical producer in the
world?. Yentob looks at
Mackintosh?s early
career to understand
how his name became
a stamp of quality on
every venture he has
taken from page to
stage and offers behind-
the-scenes insight into
Mackintosh?s numerous
hit musicals, from
My Fair Lady to Les
Mis閞ables. Featuring
interviews with the
composers and lyricists
who helped to realise
some of the most
memorable musical
numbers in theatre,
and a fittingly
wonderful soundtrack,
this is a must-see.
Catherine Pearson
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7pm
West Ham United,
without a point from
their opening three
matches, take on
in-form Huddersfield
Town at the London
Stadium (kick-off 8pm).
Defeat for the home
side could well lead to
Slaven Bilic becoming
the first managerial
casualty of the season.
Sky1
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Road Wars (r) 7.00 Hawaii Five-0 (r)
8.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) (AD) 10.00 Modern Family (r)
11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 12.00 Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 2.00pm NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 3.00
Supergirl (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00
Futurama (r) 5.30 Modern Family (r)
6.00 Modern Family. Jay and Phil compete for
the job of basketball coach (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Five episodes (r)
9.00 FILM: Green Zone (15, 2010) A military
of?cer searching Iraq for weapons of mass
destruction after the US invasion uncovers a
conspiracy. Paul Greengrass?s thriller starring
Matt Damon and Greg Kinnear
11.15 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life. As
Karl explores the impact of waste on our planet,
he meets a roadkill chef (5/6) (r) (AD)
12.15am A League of Their Own (r) (AD) 1.15
The Force: Manchester (r) (AD) 2.15 Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.05 Motorway Patrol (r) (AD) 4.00
Animal 999 (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
8.00 Storm City (r) (AD) 9.00 The Guest Wing
(r) (AD) 10.00 The West Wing (r) 12.00
Without a Trace (r) 1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00
The British (r) (AD) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00 Without a Trace (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD)
9.00 Big Little Lies. Madeline is outraged over
a slight from Renata (r) (AD)
10.05 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
10.40 Real Time with Bill Maher. The comic
invites guests to discuss the week?s events (r)
11.50 FILM: The Immortal Life Of
Henrietta Lacks (TVM, 2017) The story of a
poor African-American tobacco farmer whose
cells became one of the most important tools in
medical history. Starring Oprah Winfrey (r)
1.40am Looking (r) 2.15 Without a Trace (r)
3.10 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
4.05 The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Nothing
to Declare (r) 8.00 Million Dollar Listing: NYC
(r) 9.00 Road Wars (r) 10.00 Border Security:
Canada?s Front Line (r) (AD) 11.00 Cold Case
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 1.00pm Criminal Minds
(r) 3.00 Cooks to Market (r) 3.15 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 4.15 UK Border Force (r) (AD)
5.15 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.45 My Kitchen Rules: Australia. Caitie and
Demi from Victoria dish up their three courses
8.00 Sun, Sea and A&E. Seasonal worker Richard
is involved in a hit-and-run (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. The BAU investigates
three disturbing cases (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds. The BAU tracks a
vigilante who is determined to avenge the
murder of his mother (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. Kate?s niece is kidnapped
by people traf?ckers (r)
12.00 Bones. Double bill (r) (AD) 2.00am
Customs UK (AD) 4.00 Sun, Sea and A&E (r)
(AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Nuages 6.15 Rain 7.35 Die Grosse
Fuge 8.00 Auction 8.30 Watercolour Challenge
9.00 Tales of the Unexpected 10.00 Soundstage
Presents Stevie Nicks 11.00 The Lot of Fun:
Where the Movies Learned to Laugh 12.00
Discovering: Judy Garland (AD) 1.00pm Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 2.00 Auction 2.30
Watercolour Challenge 3.00 The Big Beat: Fats
Domino and the Birth of Rock ?n? Roll
5.00 Discovering: Queen
6.00 Discovering: David Niven (AD)
7.00 Tate Britain?s Great British Walks
8.00 Palmyra: Rising from the Ashes (AD)
9.00 Ludovico Einaudi: Elements ? Live
10.15 Carole King: Tapestry Live from Hyde
Park. The singer-songwriter performs her 1971
album Tapestry in front of 65,000 people
11.30 FILM: Chocolat (12, 2000) Drama
1.45am Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 2.45
Auction 3.15 Watercolour Challenge 3.45
Ludovico Einaudi: Elements ? Live 5.00 The
South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00
Premier League Daily 10.30 Live Test Cricket:
England v West Indies. Coverage of day ?ve of
the series-concluding third Test at Lord?s
6.00pm Test Cricket: The Verdict
6.30 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Live MNF: West Ham United v Hudders?eld
Town (Kick-off 8.00). Action from the Premier
League encounter at the London Stadium.
The sides have had contrasting starts to the
campaign, with the Hammers losing their ?rst
three matches, and the Terriers enjoying an
excellent start to their maiden Premier season
with two victories and a draw
11.00 Through the Night
12.00 Live NFL: Minnesota Vikings v New
Orleans Saints (Kick-off 12.10). All the action
from the encounter between the respective
NFC North and NFC South sides, at US Bank
Stadium 4.00am Live NFL: Denver Broncos v
Los Angeles Chargers. Coverage of the ?nal
game in the opening week of ?xtures
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 Home
Ground 10.40 Peacemakers 11.40 Imagine:
Cameron Mackintosh ? The Musical Man.
See Viewing Guide 1.10am Live at the Apollo
(r) 1.55-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 Grand Tours
of Scotland?s Lochs
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 X-Ray:
Back to Class
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00
This Farming Life
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 11.15pm It?s My Shout:
Short Films from Wales 11.30 Astronauts: Do
You Have What It Takes? (r) (AD)
12.30am-1.15 Coast (r)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Homeless:
Stories from the Street 10.40 Sharp End
11.10-11.40 Wales on TV
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 The People?s
History Show 10.30 Scotland Tonight 11.05
The Jonathan Ross Show (r) 12.05am
Teleshopping 1.05 After Midnight 2.35-5.05
ITV Nightscreen
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Lesser Spotted
Journeys 12.40am Teleshopping 1.40-3.00
ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Brushing Up On: British Bridges.
Comedian and journalist Danny Baker presents
a guide to Britain?s bridges(2/4) (r)
8.00 Dangerous Earth. The inner workings of
spectacular natural wonders (1/6) (r)
8.30 Dangerous Earth. The inner workings of
volcanoes (2/6) (r)
9.00 The Normans. Professor Robert Bartlett
examines the expansion toward southern
Europe and the Middle East in the 11th century,
which began with the conquest of Sicily and
culminated in the First Crusade (3/3) (r) (AD)
10.00 Blood and Gold: The Making of Spain with
Simon Sebag Monte?ore. The presenter
examines Spain?s Golden Age under Philip II
through to the Spanish Civil War and
dictatorship under Franco. Last in the series (r)
11.00 A Very British Murder with Lucy Worsley.
The historian examines Britain?s enduring
fascination with murder (r) (AD)
12.00 She-Wolves: England?s Early Queens (r)
1.00am How to Be Bohemian with Victoria
Coren Mitchell (r) (AD) 2.00 Dangerous Earth
(r) 3.00-4.00 The Normans (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Coach Trip:
Road to Zante (r) (AD) 7.00 Made in Chelsea (r)
8.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD) 9.00 2 Broke Girls
(r) (AD) 10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00 How I Met
Your Mother (r) (AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r)
(AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
2.00 Melissa & Joey (r) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r)
4.00 2 Broke Girls. Double bill (r) (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs. Double bill (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Lily starts to rebel (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Zante ? Final Week.
The last leg for the tourists starts in ancient
Olympia in Greece (AD)
8.00 FILM: Home Alone (PG, 1990) Family
comedy starring Macaulay Culkin (AD)
10.00 Celebs Go Dating. Frankie Cocozza and
Sarah-Jane Crawford sign up to the agency?s
books and are thrown in at the deep end (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am The IT Crowd. Double bill (r) (AD, SL)
1.10 Celebs Go Dating (r) (AD) 2.15 First Dates
Hotel (r) (AD) 3.15 Tattoo Fixers (r) (AD, SL)
4.05 Rude(ish) Tube. Amusing internet videos
(r) 4.55 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun (r)
11.00 Four in a Bed (r) 1.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 3.50 Time Team (r) 5.55
George Clarke?s Amazing Spaces (r) (AD)
6.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo. Documentary
about the animals of Chester Zoo, using new
micro-rig technology to capture the behaviour of
the animals and their close relationships with
their keepers (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Revisiting Francis and
Karen Shaw, who bought a peel tower in
Yorkshire, discovering that the cost of restoring
it has meant the reality of living there is nothing
like their dream (1/4) (r) (AD)
9.00 9/11: 102 Minutes That Changed America.
Amateur footage and audiotape recorded by
people around New York, giving an insight into
their experiences of the September 11 attacks
on the World Trade Center in 2001 (r)
11.10 9/11: Elite Rescue Cops. How the NYPD
Emergency Service Unit saved lives at great
personal cost on the day of the terror attacks (r)
12.10am 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD) 1.15 Sex
Diaries: Gigolos (r) 2.20 Grand Designs (r) (AD)
3.20-4.00 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am Jubal (PG, 1956) Western starring
Glenn Ford and Ernest Borgnine 1.05pm
Apache Territory (PG, 1958) Western
starring Rory Calhoun 2.30 Shane (PG, 1953)
A mysterious gun?ghter defends a family of
homesteaders intimidated by a cattle baron and
his henchmen. Western starring Alan Ladd 4.50
Guns at Batasi (PG, 1964) British military
drama starring Richard Attenborough (b/w)
6.55 Field of Dreams (PG, 1989) Baseball
fantasy with Kevin Costner and Ray Liotta
9.00 Prometheus (15, 2012) A spacecraft
travels to another world in search of aliens that
may have created the human race. Ridley Scott?s
sci-? thriller with Noomi Rapace
11.25 The Negotiator (15, 1998) A hostage
negotiator is framed for murder and takes
captives of his own to ensure his pleas of
innocence are heard. Thriller with Samuel L
Jackson and Kevin Spacey (AD)
2.10am-4.00 Gone Too Far! (12, 2013)
A London teenager is reunited with his
estranged brother, but fears his sibling will
damage what little street cred he has. Comedy
drama with Malachi Kirby and OC Ukeje
6.00am You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r) 6.25
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.15
Below Deck (r) 8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30
Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.30 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20 Below Deck (r)
11.15 Dress to Impress (r) 12.20pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.45
The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress. Dating show
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Top 100 Shockers (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Alan uses Charlie?s
house to hook up with an ex-girlfriend (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Charlie bonds with
Lindsey?s former husband (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
10.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
10.55 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.25 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.55 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.25am American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.50
The Cleveland Show (r) (AD) 1.45 Scorpion (r)
(AD) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am On the Buses (r) (SL) 6.25 The Royal
(r) (AD) 8.20 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 9.20 Where
the Heart Is (r) (AD) 10.20 Judge Judy (r)
11.15 Rising Damp (r) 11.45 On the Buses (r)
12.55pm Griff?s Great Britain (r) 1.25
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.25 The Royal (r) (AD)
3.25 Wild at Heart (r) 4.25 On the Buses (r)
5.30 Rising Damp. Rigsby meets a mystic (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. Walker investigates a
mysterious car crash (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica helps a private
eye investigate his partner?s murder (r)
8.00 Agatha Christie?s Marple.
While holidaying at the plush Bertram?s Hotel in
London, Miss Marple is presented with
a fresh mystery to solve when the reading of a
will leads to murder (r)
10.10 Law & Order: UK. The hunt for the killer
of a seemingly innocent family man brings
Ronnie into contact with his old boss, former DI
Natalie Chandler (4/8) (r) (AD)
11.05 Light?elds (1/5) (r) (AD)
12.10am Sherlock Holmes: The Sign of Four (r)
2.10 ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Storage Wars: Texas
(r) 7.35 The Saint (r) 8.40 Ironside (r) 9.40
Quincy ME (r) 10.45 Minder (r) (AD) 11.50 The
Professionals (r) (AD, SL) 12.50pm Cycling:
Vuelta a Espa馻 (r) 1.50 Ironside (r) (AD) 2.55
Quincy ME (r) 4.00 Minder (r) (AD) 5.00 The
Avengers. Astronomers are murdered (r)
6.05 The Car Chasers. A major buyer turns up
looking for some serious cars (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. Wartime documents (r)
8.00 Fishing Allstars. Double bill (r)
9.00 Car Crash Global. Documentary featuring
dash-cam video footage of a host of
astonishing accidents (r)
10.00 FILM: Double Jeopardy (15, 1999)
A woman seeks revenge on her husband for
faking his death and framing her for murder, but
a parole of?cer is determined to stop her.
Thriller with Ashley Judd and Tommy Lee Jones
12.10am FILM: United 93 (15, 2006)
Fact-based drama starring Christian Clemenson
(AD) 2.20 Tommy Cooper (r) (AD, SL) 2.45
ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 Jay Leno?s Garage 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 12.00 Jay
Leno?s Garage 1.00pm Top Gear (AD) 3.00
Brojects in the House 3.30 Brojects 4.00 Cops
UK: Bodycam Squad 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. Motoring magazine (AD)
7.00 Motorway Cops. A trucker is caught using
his mobile phone at the wheel
8.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish. The
comedian examines the appeal of greatest hits
albums, and the abuse of superlatives
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With Gina Yashere,
Sam Simmons and Ellie Taylor
10.00 Room 101. With Alexander Armstrong,
Kelly Holmes and Henry Blofeld
10.40 Room 101. With Jonathan Ross, Michael
Vaughan and Sara Pascoe
11.20 QI. With guest panellists Jeremy
Clarkson, John Sessions, Alexander Armstrong
12.00 Would I Lie to You? 12.40am Mock the
Week 1.20 QI 2.00 Would I Lie to You?
2.40 Parks and Recreation 3.30 The
Indestructibles 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am David Copper?eld 8.00 Danger?eld
9.00 Pie in the Sky 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer Wine 1.40
Brush Strokes 2.20 Birds of a Feather 3.00
Danger?eld 4.00 Pie in the Sky 5.00 Bergerac.
A charity boss is found dead 6.00 Brush Strokes
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. The trio decide
there is pro?t to be made from a heatwave
7.20 To the Manor Born. A massive car repair
bill forces Audrey to revert to real horse power
8.00 Life on Mars. Gene is convinced a bomb
warning is the work of the IRA, prompting Sam
to try to open his boss?s eyes to the bene?ts of
effective community relations (3/8)
9.00 Death in Paradise. DI Richard Poole and his
team investigate when a body is discovered in
the pool of a cosmetic surgery clinic (3/8) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. A tabloid editor approaches
the detectives with evidence implicating a
world-famous chef in a murder (4/8) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Tracey becomes an
agony aunt after ringing a local radio station
12.00 The Bill 1.00am Garrow?s Law. Legal
drama (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Antiques Roadshow 7.10 Medieval
Dead 8.00 Hitler?s Olympics: The Boys of ?36
9.00 Tenko 10.00 Time Team 2.00pm Secrets
of War 4.00 Sharpe
6.00 Tenko. Red Cross parcels reach the camp
7.00 The Nazis: A Warning from History.
Historians and former of?cials discuss Hitler?s
rise to power and reveal the extent to which it
was helped by grassroots support for Goering?s
feared secret police, the Gestapo (2/6) (AD)
8.00 Monarchy by David Starkey. The historian
examines the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of England,
revealing how, despite resisting the attacks of
King Canute, it eventually fell to the forces of
William the Conqueror (2/6) (AD)
9.00 Fawlty Towers: Re-opened. A tribute
originally made to mark 30 years since the
screening of the comedy?s ?nal episode
11.05 Fawlty Towers. Basil holds a gourmet
night to enhance the hotel?s reputation (AD)
11.40 Monarchy by David Starkey (2/6) (AD)
12.40am The Nazis: A Warning from History
(AD) 1.40 Secrets of War 2.35 Raiders of the
Lost Art 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15 Na
Braithrean Cuideachail (The Koala Brothers) (r)
5.25 Botannan Araid Uilleim (William?s Wish
Wellingtons) (r) 5.30 Su Shiusaidh (Little
Suzy?s Zoo) (r) 5.35 Bruno (r) 5.40 Ceitidh
Morag (Katie Morag) (r) 5.55 An Rud As Fhearr
Leam (r) 6.00 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse)
(r) 6.15 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks
(ALVINNN!!! and the Chipmunks) (r) 6.40
Ard-Sgoil a? Chnuic Annasaich (Strange Hill
High) (r) 7.00 Sruth gu Sal (r) 7.30 Speaking
Our Language (r) 7.55 Earrann Eachdraidh
(History Shorts) (r) 8.00 An L� (News) 8.30
Fionnlagh (r) 9.00 Trusadh: A? Ceannsachadh
Ciorram (Limitless Wilderness) (r) 10.00
Bannan (The Ties That Bind) (r) 10.35 The
Northern Lights (r) 11.30 Ce騦 bho Perthshire
Amber (r) 11.55-12.00 Fraochy Bay (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Hafod Haul (r) 6.15 Guto
Gwningen (r) 6.30 Sam T鈔 (r) 6.40 Twt (r)
6.55 Peppa (r) 7.00 ASRA 7.15 Ynys Broc M魊
Lili 7.20 Digbi Draig (r) 7.35 Jen a Jim Pob
Dim (r) 7.50 Sara a Cwac (r) 8.00 Sbarc (r)
8.15 Ty Mel (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r)
8.35 Syrcas Deithiol Dewi (r) 8.45 Dwylo?r
Enfys (r) 9.00 Igam Ogam (r) 9.10 Oli Dan y
Don (r) 9.25 Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 9.35
Cymylaubychain (r) 9.45 Bach a Mawr (r)
10.00 Hafod Haul (r) 10.15 Guto Gwningen (r)
10.30 Sam T鈔 (r) 10.40 Twt (r) 10.50 Peppa
(r) 11.00 ASRA (r) 11.15 Ynys Broc M魊 Lili
(r) 11.20 Digbi Draig (r) 11.35 Jen a Jim Pob
Dim (r) 11.50 Sara a Cwac (r) 12.00 News S4C
12.05pm Heno (r) 1.00 Celwydd Noeth (r)
1.30 Byd o Liw: Arlunwyr (r) 2.00 News S4C
2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C 3.05 Y Plas
(r) (AD) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil
5.05 Stwnsh: Boom! 5.15 Stwnsh: Fideo Fi (r)
5.35 Stwnsh: Sgorio 6.00 News S4C 6.05 100
Lle (r) (AD) 6.30 Ral飋+. Action from the
Woodpecker Stages 7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm. Kelly has to leave Cwmderi in a hurry,
while Ei?on regrets inviting Megan to stay at
Penrhewl (AD) 8.25 Garddio a Mwy. Iwan
Edwards plants potatoes that will be ready for
Christmas 9.00 News 9 9.30 Ffermio 10.00
Tom Maldwyn Pryce. The life and career of the
Ruthin-born racing driver, who is the only
Welsh driver to have won a Formula One grand
prix and was killed in a race in South Africa in
1977 (r) 10.30-1.05am Clwb Rygbi. Zebre v
Scarlets. Another chance to see the PRO14
encounter at the Stadio Sergio Lanfranchi
14
Monday September 11 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7441
1
2
3
Codeword No 3125
4
5
23
6
23
21
1
12
2
Scrabble � Challenge No 1955
2
3
25
17
16
25
6
16
9
23
21
16
23
12
5
4
24
2
6
7
9
10
11 12
2L
2W
9
8
2W
r
3L
a
2L
2L
l
pal 2L
2L
o 2L y
fro 3L
2W
loof
2W
2W
7
8
7
9
11
12
19
P
14
I
10
11
21
13
23
14
23
12
6
12
13
14
15
16
23
3
16
16
14
2
8
19
19
25
5
21
21
2L
20
22
3
25
17
16
25
17
20
18
25
R
3
9
12
17
21
15
2
7
2
9
14
19
13
2W
22
19
26
23
9
19
13
23
18
2
11
23
1
7
22
21
19
10
10
2
23
21
What seven-letter word can you
play with this rack?
3
22
8
6 Surveyed using a grid of
three-sided figures (12)
7 Nervous or silly laughter
(6)
8 Country house and farm (6)
9 Related to wings (4)
10 Youngster (8)
12 Food thickener (4-4)
Solution to Crossword 7440
CR I S I
E N
A BO L
D W
N EWS R
R H
O
EC Z EM
L
T OM T I
V U
E N
RE ED
S
P C
I SH
K
I
E E L
L
F
Y
A
T A B
T
E
E X A
N N
S
HA K E
R M
T
E
NSURE
G
ENDER
O
S M
L E TOP
D M
M I NE
V N
V E L T E
16 Slightly mad (4)
18 Neither male nor female
(6)
20 Affectionate address (6)
21 Making less pure (12)
1
13
14
15
17
19
2
3
4
5
6
14
21
13
16
6
22
What eight-letter word can you
play with this rack?
KEENPIN
25
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
I
A
L
B
I
S
P
I
D
O
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
W
I
O
D
H
A
N
I
U
K
N
M
L
D
I
A
S
R
E
M
H
A
X
G
D
R
A
U
X
I
E
Futoshiki No 2996
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
?
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
5
<
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE� is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ㎝attel 2017
?
7
30
4
7
16
4
24
19
24
11
9
7
30
24
33
12
4
6
14
14
16
5
22
<
L
Kakuro No 1955
24
>
K
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
E
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4117
J
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 415 029)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3912
P
I
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
I
H
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
A
G
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday?s solution, right
No 3911
F
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
13
P
R
One hanging behind (8)
Requisition for stores (6)
Hollow bubbling sound (6)
Art movement (4)
Old measure of distance (6)
Test of performance (5)
Cooked with cheese and
breadcrumbs (2,6)
? Jackson, actress (6)
Precious red stone (6)
Cause of infuriation (3,3)
Norwegian composer (5)
Of great height (4)
25
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Down
1
2
3
4
5
6
11
4
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
3
E
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
17
21
25
2W
oddrain
20
21
2L
<
?
6
4
19
8
6
25
6
11
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
6
?
3
19
12
7
24
23
16
32
16
31
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
6
7
6
3
16
� PUZZLER MEDIA
2
D
the times | Monday September 11 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Ivan Cheparinov
Black: Dimitrios Mastrovasilis
FIDE World Cup, Tbilisi 2017
Queen?s Gambit Declined
1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 c4 e6 4 Nc3
c5 5 cxd5 Nxd5 6 e3
A major alternative is 6 e4.
6 ... Nc6 7 Bd3 Be7 8 a3 0-0 9
Nxd5 Qxd5 10 Qc2 h6 11 Bh7+
Kh8 12 Be4 Qd6 13 dxc5 Qxc5 14
Qxc5 Bxc5 15 b4 Be7
White has emerged from the
opening with a slight but clear
advantage. The impetus for a
draw is quite strong but Cheparinov succeeds in extracting every
ounce of advantage from the
position.
16 Bb2 Bd7 17 Ke2
Improving on Ivkov-Kluger,
Sombor 1967 which went 17 0-0 f5
18 Bc2 a6 and was soon drawn. It
is more natural, given the simplifications that have occurred, to
________
� Dr4 DkD]
�Dbgp0 ]
� DnDpD 0]
轉 D D D ]
� ) DBD D]
�) D )ND ]
� G DK)P)]
贒 $RD D ]
谅媚牌侨
20 b5
Driving Black back but even
stronger is 20 Rxd7 Rxd7 and
only now 21 b5, winning two
pieces for a rook after which
White is winning easily.
20 ... Nb8 21 a4 b6 22 Bb7
Stronger is 22 Be5, when White
will follow up Bxb8 and invade
the seventh rank with a rook.
22 ... Rxc1 23 Rxc1 f6 24 e4 Kf7
Black should have tried 24 ... e5
to prevent White?s next move.
25 e5 Bc5 26 Nd2 fxe5 27 Ne4
Bd4 28 Ba3 Be8 29 Nd6+ Ke7 30
Rc7+ Rd7 31 Rc8 Rd8
________
� hR4bD D]
�D i 0 ]
� 0 HpD 0]
轉PD 0 D ]
軵D g D D]
蹽 D D D ]
� D DK)P)]
贒 D D D ]
谅媚牌侨
EASY
51
x 2 ? 16 � 2
MEDIUM
123
+ 87
102
x9
HARDER
________
醨D D 4kD] Winning Move
�gbDp0 ]
� hpD D 0] White to play. This position is from
Helsingor 2017.
轉qD D D ] Pantzar-Sebastian,
Although the black king appears safe for
� D DN)PD] the moment there are very few defenders
�) D D D ] nearby. This gives White the chance for a
跙)QG D )] spectacular breakthrough. How?
贒 DRDRDK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
+2/3
OF IT
1
+ 97 + /2
OF IT
x4
80%
OF IT
4/7
+5
x3
?7
�
+ 79
3/4
? 76
80%
OF IT
x3
OF IT
? 784
OF IT
+ 659 +OF1/IT5 x 2
1/2
OF IT
2
2
7
?K 8
?A K J 7
?AQ J 5 3
?A 7
? J 10 6 5 N
?10 5 3 2 W E
?8 4 2
S
?5 2 ? Q 7 3
?Q 9 8 6
?K 7
?J 9 6 3
S
W
N
E
1?(1) Pass(2)
1?
Pass
4?(3) Pass
5?(4) Pass
6? (5) End
(1) Very heavy for a One-bid but I?m a fan.
Providing the bidding doesn?t end there
(possible but unlikely in the modern aggressive game), you?ll have a chance to develop
the hand more accurately.
(2) I would have chanced 2?. You?re keen for
a club lead; also, 2? over 1? makes life particularly awkward for the opponents, consuming much bidding space (although here, 2?
doubled would go for -1,100).
(3) A clever gadget to show the best possible hand in support of hearts ? a hand that
can underwrite the Five-level facing a minimum response.
(4) Knows his Kx facing partner?s first suit
will be gold dust. Fine to cue bid a king, facing length.
(5) There cannot be Seven, as partner has
denied the ace of spades.
Contract: 6? , Opening Lead: ? J
However, you can untangle
things. You cross to the queen of
spades, ruff a spade, cash the jack
of hearts, cross to the king of diamonds, cash the queen of hearts
discarding dummy?s club and lead
over to dummy?s diamonds,
Twelve tricks and slam made.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
2
+
All the digits
x
= 90 from 1-9 are
-
x
1
�
+
+
x
+
+
=
21
=
11
=
60
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 14 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
We?ve
= 9 works?
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Killer Gentle No 5619
16
9
11
17
6
8
19
13
6
11
Tredoku 1490
4
8
8
24
17
13
11
Killer Tricky No 5620
19
10
23
19
14min
1 2 4
3 1 2
1
4 3
1 2
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+
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8
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1 2
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10
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+
4
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17
9
5
11
15
23
7
8
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6
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20
1
1
4
3
8
2
16
8
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
3
6
4
3 6
1
9
7
5
6
8
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S
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KenKen 4116
7
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1
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2
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C
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Lexica 3910
N
U
R
B
J
L
A
-
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1
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+
+
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C
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1
Cell Blocks 3007
12
2
4
1
?
1 < 2 < 3
?
5 > 3
4
5
1
Lexica 3909
5
+
16
4
Sudoku 9304
4 2
2 1
2 5 3 9
1
7
6 8 9 4
8 9 7 5
7
2
9 2 4 1
1 2
3 1
Set Square 1957
16
9
4
3 > 2
13
14
3
2
5
?
4
Chess 1 Nf6+! gxf6 2 Qg6+ leads to a winning attack,
eg, 2 ... Kh8 3 Qxh6+ Kg8 4 Qg6+ Kh8 5 Qxf6+ Kh7
6 Bb1+ Kg8 7 Bc3 and wins
6
8
3
Scrabble 1954
RHIZOME E11 down (84)
WHYEVER F12 down (38)
4
9
8
Suko 2026
Futoshiki 2995
16
17
4
7
Solutions
11
7
9
17
4min
18
16
?A 9 4 2
?4
?10 9 6
?KQ 10 8 4
4
x
Saturday?s answers
assist, dais, daisy, diss, dissatisfy, ditsy,
fast, fist, sadist, said, sass, sassy, sati,
satisfy, sift, sissy, staid, stasis, stay, tass
Dealer: North, Vulnerability: Both
Pairs
4
2 6
x
Kakuro 1954
Probably my favourite tournament
of the year is the English Bridge
Union Summer Meeting Swiss
Pairs, now held in Eastbourne. As
holders of the trophy, Alexander
Allfrey and I had high expectations
for 2017. However, we were very
average for much of the event, and,
breakfasting on the last morning
with Gill and Lynton Stock, I proffered (lying a disappointing 24th
out of 214) that we had no chance
of retaining the trophy. We were to
get lucky ? more later.
Lynton showed me this instructive point I had overlooked on a
deal from the evening before. Plan
the play in 6? on ? J lead (on the
4-1 heart split, a club lead would
defeat the slam but how could West
know when East failed to bid 2??).
Say you play a low spade from
dummy, hoping East will grab the
ace. East also plays low (best) to
prevent you scoring the king and
queen separately, and you win the
queen. You cross to the ace-king of
hearts, hoping for a 3-2 split but
East discards. Needing a spade ruff
for your 12th trick, you lead the
king of spades, East winning the
ace and switching to the king of
clubs. You win the ace but cannot
return to hand to ruff the third
spade and also untangle the hearts
to draw West?s ?10x ? down one.
Let us replay the slam. You must
play the king of spades from
dummy at trick one (key play). East
cannot duck ? presenting you
with a second spade trick. But let
him win the ace and switch to the
king of clubs. You win dummy?s ace
and cash the ace-king of hearts,
getting the bad news.
12
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 1958
From these letters, make words of
three or more letters, always
including the central letter. Answers
must be in the Concise Oxford
Dictionary, excluding capitalised
words, plurals, conjugated verbs (past
tense etc), adverbs ending in LY,
comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 13 words, average;
18, good; 23, very good; 28, excellent
13
Bridge Andrew Robson
5
10
Polygon
4
32 Nf7+ Black resigns
After 32 ... Kxf7 33 Rxd8, White
90%
OF IT
+6
� PUZZLER MEDIA
The FIDE (World Chess Federation) World Cup continues in
Tbilisi, Georgia until the close of
this month. Most of the world?s
leading grandmasters are competing including world champion
Magnus Carlsen, former world
champions Viswanathan Anand
and Vladimir Kramnik and such
highly rated contestants as Levon
Aronian, Wesley So, Fabiano Caruana and Hikaru Nakamura.
Other notables include the former
world championship challenger
Sergei Karjakin, the newly minted
British champion Gawain Jones,
Michael Adams and David Howell.
Today?s game is a fine strategic
effort from early on.
keep White?s king in the centre.
17 ... Rfd8 18 Rhd1 Kg8 19 Rac1
Rac8
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
World Cup
Cell Blocks No 3008
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
S
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Killer 5618
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Codeword 3124
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Quiz 1 Ludwig van Beethoven
2 Morning sickness or pregnancy sickness
3 Co Galway
4 Henry II
5 Vertigo
6 US vice-president
7 Austro-Prussian War or Seven Weeks? War
8 Aniseed or anise
9 Georgios Papadopoulos
10 Arthur Dove
11 Ivan Turgenev
12 Star Trek: Discovery
13 Bread
14 Michael Phelps
15 Biffy Clyro
4
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L AN DMA
U O O
P AWE D
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Word Watch
Thimblerigger (b) A
cheat, one who plays
thimblerig, a version of
the three cups game
Flypitcher (c) One who
sells from a flypitch, an
area for unlicensed
market stalls
Double shotgun (c) In
the southern US, a
house sharing a wall
with its neighbour
Brain Trainer
Easy 46; Medium 732;
Harder 6,516
11.09.17
MindGames
Easy No 9305
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9306
8
9
6
1
4 2 5 7 6
2
7 5 8
2 4
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
8 7
6
3 5
7 6
4
5 1 2
8
4
8
7 1
Thimblerigger
a A small boat
b A cheat
c A large needle
Flypitcher
a A baseball rookie
b A bird
c An unlicensed trader
Double shotgun
a A large stagecoach
b An enforced
marriage
c A semi-detached
house
Answers on page 15
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
6
2
6
1
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by Olav Bjortomt The Times Quiz Book
11 Which Russian
author (1818-83) wrote
the story Hamlet of
Shchigrovsky Province?
12 Which upcoming
TV show is the first
Star Trek series since
Star Trek: Enterprise
concluded in 2005?
2 Hyperemesis
gravidarum (HG) is
a severe form of
which illness?
9 Alexandros
Panagoulis (1939-76)
became famous for his
1968 attempt to
assassinate which
Greek dictator?
6 The holder of
which political
office resides at
Number One
Observatory Circle?
4 Mary, Queen of Scots
was brought up at the
court of which French
king, the husband of
Catherine de? Medici?
7 Podol, Trautenau,
Langensalza and
Gitschin were battles
in which 1866 war?
5 Which Alfred
Hitchcock film is
named after a
sensation of whirling
and loss of balance?
5
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
15
3 Connemara is a
cultural region in
which Irish county?
10 Sometimes
credited as the first
American abstract
painter, who
painted Me and
the Moon (1937)
and Tanks (1938)?
8 The Greek spirit
ouzo is flavoured with
which aromatic seed?
13 The US actress and
comedian Aubrey
Plaza was named after
the 1972 song Aubrey by
which American band?
The Times Quiz Book by
Olav Bjortomt is out now.
To order your copy visit
harpercollins.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Friday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 914
14 Which swimmer,
with 28 medals, is the
most decorated
Olympian of all time?
15 Which Scottish
rock band is pictured?
Answers on page 15
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Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
The Times Quick Cryptic No 915
1
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Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
1 The Emperor Concerto
(1811) was which German
composer?s fifth and
final piano concerto?
Fiendish No 9307
3
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
Across
1 Gloria, poorly, received by
doctor in plant (8)
5 Girl having a ?eld day (4)
8 Leave, parking in narrow
opening (5)
9 Bring information back about
old soldier (7)
11 A new daily, ultimately not
one in particular (3)
12 Strengthen control by armtwisting (9)
13 Failing to change sides (6)
15 The French in conversation in
holiday camp building (6)
18 Singer his rector trained (9)
19 Send up a drill (3)
20 Perception, in a sense (7)
21 Turn of phrase in papers I?m
carrying round (5)
22 Egg shell (4)
23 Moving on pearls, one?s own
(8)
Down
1 Relish slander involving
celebrity (7)
2
3
4
6
7
10
14
16
17
18
19
Genuinely devoid of energy in
comeback (5)
Achieve excellent start (3,8)
Go wild seeing permit with
tear (3,3)
Clothes appear out on line (7)
A European losing last match
(5)
Loco ? where one may end
up after crash? (3,3,5)
Force almost abandoned
wreckage found at sea (7)
Warm weather Malta needs (7)
Astute running may get you a
bronze, perhaps (6)
Cold, member making ascent
(5)
Strange article about piece of
?ction (5)
ive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
Mark Chapman presents the build-up to West
Ham United v Hudders?eld Town 8.00 5 Live
Sport: Premier League Football 2017-18 ?
West Ham United v Hudders?eld Town
(Kick-off 8.00) 10.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live
Football Social. Reaction to this evening?s
match between West Ham United and
Hudders?eld Town 10.30 Sam Walker
1.00am Up All Night 5.00 Reports
5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Breakfast with Max
Rushden and Joey Barton 10.00 Jim White
1.00pm Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian
Durham and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off
10.00 Sports Bar 1.00am Extra Time with
Adam Catterall
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart
Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc Riley
9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Lauren Laverne 1.00am
The Record Producers 2.00 Long Players
2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6 Music?s
Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Alexander Armstrong
presents an autumn-themed show 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday September 11 2017
11
1GT
MARK ALLAN
artsfirst night
Concert
Kohn Foundation
Song Competition
Wigmore Hall
Theatre
One Day, Maybe
A secret location, Hull
I
{{{((
W
{{{{(
hat makes a great
recitalist? John
Brancy, the first of
two American
baritone finalists in
the 2017 Wigmore Hall/Kohn
Foundation International Song
Competition, offered oven-ready
charisma and polish in his deftly
constructed programme of songs from
composers and poets whose lives had
been touched by war: William Denis
Browne, Ives, Orff, Poulenc, Bernstein
and Wilfrid Sanderson.
Brancy?s glossy sound impressed,
but it was the delicacy of phrasing, the
smartness of the segues and the range
of colour from the pianist Peter Dugan
that really struck, especially in the
sudden shift from Sanderson?s
sentimental adieu, God be with our
boys tonight, to the bright, bony
candour of Bernstein?s Whitman
setting To what you said.
If only the second American
baritone, Josh Quinn, had enjoyed
a similarly stimulating partnership
with his pianist. Quinn has excellent
French, German and Russian
diction, an easy manner and a real
understanding of poetry. He, too,
offered smart programming ? Ives,
Duparc, Caplet, Tchaikovsky and
Harrison Birtwistle?s tart miniature
The Mouse Felt ? but You Zhao?s
playing seemed stuck in the plush
darkness of Wolf?s Der Genesene
an die Hoffnung.
Like Quinn, the American mezzosoprano Clara Osowski may be
destined for heavier repertoire. Her
middle range is lovely, her German
exquisite, but the stillness that worked
to her advantage in Liszt, Schumann
and Schubert began to look like
inhibition. Adjustments of tone and
attack in Dutilleux?s Fantasio and
Rihm?s Leben und Tod were made on
Osowski?s behalf by the pianist Tyler
Wottrich. Poulenc, in particular, needs
something more from a singer: their
neck, shoulders, hands, their eyes.
A beautiful voice is not enough to
animate a recital, and animation was
what the New Zealand baritone Julien
Van Mellaerts and the British pianist
Gamal Khamis brought to their
Schumann, Britten, Tchaikovsky and
Debussy, alert to the specifics of style,
language and character in each
miniature narrative. No surprise that
Van Mellaerts, witty and wiry-toned,
walked away with the top prize.
Anna Picard
Theatre
Doubt: A Parable
Southwark Playhouse, SE1
A
{{{{(
t the start of this play by
John Patrick Shanley, the
nun Sister Aloysius, the
headmistress of St Nicholas
Church School in the
Bronx, is lecturing the latest addition
to her staff, Sister James, on the evils
of Biros. ?Ballpoints make the children
press down,? she says, her lips a
humourless line, adding despairingly:
?Penmanship is dying all across this
felt strangely undernourished.
In fact, the final week at the Proms
had several disappointments.
Amsterdam?s Royal Concertgebouw
Orchestra sounded tepid under
Daniele Gatti at the start of the
month, and the Vienna Philharmonic?s
two Proms on Thursday and Friday
were similarly unimpassioned. In both
cases I sensed great orchestras resting
on their laurels and insufficiently
galvanised by their conductors.
It took the Vienna Phil almost the
whole of two concerts ? until the
final movement of its final piece,
Beethoven?s Seventh Symphony ? to
produce genuine excitement, and even
then the conductor Michael Tilson
Thomas (Prom 74) had to swing his
arms like a discus thrower to wake
the players up. Earlier, Brahms?s
St Anthony Variations and Mozart?s
Piano Concerto in E flat, K449, were
played on autopilot, despite the soloist
Emanuel Ax?s graceful striving.
And Mahler?s Sixth Symphony the
previous evening (Prom 72)? Under
Daniel Harding?s mostly pointless
direction it was ill-balanced (the brass
far too dominant) and starved of
emotional commitment, notably
around the finale?s hammer blows.
Worse, the famed Vienna strings
sounded mundane. Either the players
aren?t as classy as they were, or they
were going through the motions. That?s
not good enough. The BBC should give
these once-proud ensembles a few
years off to regain their appetite for
thrilling the British public.
f the location for the new sitespecific promenade installation
from the dreamthinkspeak theatre
company starts out as a dead
ringer for a disused office building
in Hull city centre, that?s because
that?s where we are. If it then becomes
a future-tech South Korean shopping
mall, or a claustrophic maze in which
you have to evade ghostly guards, or
a set of deserted police interrogation
rooms, or a shoes-off tea ceremony to
honour those who died in the
Gwangju Uprising of May 1980, that?s
because the company?s director,
designer, co-deviser (with his cast of
38) and all-round arthouse dungeon
master, Tristan Sharps, has a good eye
for a stunt and a great eye for detail.
One Day, Maybe starts with one
of his typically nifty set pieces: a
?hologram? of the young protestors
who then climb out of the screen to
join us in the present. And if you don?t
know all about the Gwangju Uprising,
how the West was complicit in its
violent repression and how that led
into South Korea?s democratisation
a few years later, in part that?s OK,
because the evening is predicated on
the western consumer not wanting to
think too hard about where our latest
consumer miracle is coming from.
So soon we?re forgetting about these
ghosts, getting lost in the novelty as
the Korean-spouting staff of the
fictitious Kasang Corporation invite us
to hoist our personalised tablet devices
around a shopping mall. A moment
later they help us to monitor the every
move of the scary soldier we have to
dodge in the maze we?ve been plonked
into as we help Kasang to research its
new videogame.
What follows is a hunt-the-clues
mystery that leads into stylised role
play that fills us in on the events of
May 1980. Well, partly. I had to get
googling afterwards for a bite-sized
summary of what it all meant. If they
sometimes lose us in the detail, the
level of imagination, craftsmanship
and commitment to this show,
commissioned by Hull City of Culture
2017, is often breathtaking.
The closing installation of hundreds
of chairs that commemorate the dead
is an indescribably beautiful moment
that makes a sometimes disparate
collection of surprising moments come
together. It is, like so much of
dreamthinkspeak?s work, wonderfully
overambitious and fitfully stupendous.
Dominic Maxwell
hull2017.co.uk/onedaymaybe, to Oct 1
Play. In 2008 it was turned into a film,
starring Philip Seymour Hoffman and
Meryl Streep. This strong production,
directed by Ch� Walker, strips the play
back to its basics and is riveting.
There is nowhere for anyone to
hide, not least because the audience
surrounds the stage. The set, by
PJ McEvoy, is simple but effective,
consisting of a raised platform in the
shape of a cross, with the floor made
of stained-glass panels that, at certain
moments, light up. This serves as
a platform from which to deliver
sermons (Father Flynn is keen on
sermonising) and as Sister Aloysius?s
office as she interrogates Sister James
about what Father Flynn has been
doing with the school?s only black
student, Donald Muller. It?s also
where she confronts Donald?s mother
in an agonisingly intense moral maze
of a scene.
The cast is very strong. Stella Gonet
as Sister Aloysius and Jo Martin as
Donald?s mother, Mrs Muller, are
particularly outstanding. Their furious
exchanges prompted the audience to
burst into applause. The play is
presented as 90 minutes straight
through and, after a slightly lacklustre
start, it grips. Is he guilty? Is she
playing God? Doubts, we have a few.
But that?s the genius of this play.
Ann Treneman
Box office: 020 7407 0234, to Sept 30
Pomp without pep
Sakari Oramo conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra in an incongruous and lacklustre Last Night
There were
plenty of flags
but not enough
thrills as the
2017 Proms
came to an end,
says Richard
Morrison
Last Night of
the Proms
BBCSO/Oramo
{{(((
Proms 72, 74
Vienna
Philharmonic
{{(((
Royal Albert Hall
I
t?s 40 years since I reviewed my
first Last Night of the Proms, and
I can?t remember many in those
decades that felt as lacklustre as
Saturday?s. Hard to say why,
because the BBC Symphony
Orchestra, Singers and Symphony
Chorus performed well enough under
Sakari Oramo?s direction.
Perhaps many small but irritating
things combined to dampen the
atmosphere. The activists outside the
Albert Hall handing out free EU flags
contrived to turn what has always
been an ironic and light-hearted ritual
into a political statement. Then the
BBC?s weird decision to pay homage to
the significant anniversaries of three
composers and Finnish independence
produced an incongruous procession
of items, made worse by prolonged
gaps that killed momentum.
The choice of Nina Stemme as
star-turn also misfired. She?s a
magnificent Wagner soprano, and
when she hit her stride the Liebestod
from Tristan und Isolde was impressive.
Her Valkyrie-esque Rule, Britannia!
certainly shivered the timbers, too.
When miked up for show tunes by
Weill and Gershwin, however, she
sounded forced and unidiomatic.
Zippy, cartoonish new miniatures by
Lotta Wenn鋕oski and John Adams
(the latter a blatant trailer for his
next opera) amused the ear, and it
was good to hear Kod醠y?s thrilling
Budavari Te Deum, with Lucy Crowe
excelling in the stratospheric soprano
solo. Yet this three-hour evening
country.? It?s hard to like Sister
Aloysius, for she?s often harsh, in
judgment and in manner.
She patrols her school like a Valkyrie
in a habit. Her present worries include
penmanship, the frost-vulnerable
bushes in the courtyard, her belief
that Sister James is far too nice, and
her suspicions that the local priest,
Father Brendan Flynn, is overly keen
to spend time alone with the boys.
With him, she suspects the worst, but
she has no proof.
This play, set in 1964, explores the
subject of doubt and certainty on
many levels, and you can see why it
won the Pulitzer for drama in 2005,
not to mention the Tony for Best
Stella
Gonet
as Sister
Aloysius
12
1GT
Monday September 11 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Rellik
BBC One, 9pm
Over the next
six weeks two
dramas will
go head-tohead at 9pm ? Liar on
ITV (see right) and this
high-concept crime
thriller on BBC One.
What makes them
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7PM
Early
Top
pick
remarkable is that
both have been written
by Harry and Jack
Williams, the brothers
behind The Missing.
The more ambitious
of the two is Rellik,
a drama that will likely
set Twitter ablaze as
viewers attempt to keep
up with its sprawling,
dense and at times
maddeningly confusing
plot. Like Harold
Pinter?s Betrayal,
Christopher Nolan?s
Memento and Martin
Amis?s Time?s Arrow,
Rellik operates with
a reverse chronology
(Rellik is ?killer?
backwards, geddit?).
This one requires every
ounce of concentration
you have (I would
recommend taking
notes). We begin with
the detective Gabriel
Markham (Richard
Dormer), his face
horrifically scarred
from an acid attack,
attempting to arrest a
suspected serial killer.
It goes wrong and the
suspect is shot dead,
but before we can dwell
on that too much we
are whooshed a few
hours back in time to
see the police setting up
the arrest operation.
And then we go back
again. And again. By
the end of episode six
we will see, presumably,
the identity of the killer
as they murder their
first victim. Confused?
You will be. The action
is relentless, with a
migraine-inducing
soundtrack adding to a
sense of disorientation,
but Dormer is
compelling as the
obsessed cop, and the
clever reveals make
almost every scene a
lightbulb moment.
Upstart Crow
BBC Two, 8.30pm
Ben Elton?s Shakespeare
sitcom, which casts the
Bard as a vain social
climber, returns for a
deserved second series.
Tonight?s inspiration
is Othello, with
Shakespeare (David
Mitchell) hoping that a
charismatic African
prince will help him to
curry favour with the
authorities that grant
coats of arms. While
the domestic scenes in
Stratford-upon-Avon
smack of ye olde
sitcome, Shakespeare?s
misadventures in
London are always
great fun and prove
that Elton can still craft
lines that others can
only dream of. Emma
Thompson and Noel
Fielding will join the
cast later in the series.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Council House Crackdown.
Michelle Ackerley reveals how a Turkish pensioner
pretended to be Scottish in order to get a council property
and �0,000 in bene?ts 10.00 Homes Under the
Hammer. Properties in Cheshire, Kent and Cumbria (r)
11.00 Dom on the Spot. A Manchester traf?c cop is called
to a serious collision 11.45 Thief Trackers. The team
show one young biker how he might become a victim of
crime 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. New series. From the
National Botanic Garden of Wales (AD) 1.00 BBC News at
One; Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Ruhma ?nally makes a decision about her
married name (AD) 2.15 The Boss. New series. Return
of the quiz hosted by Susan Calman 3.00 Escape to the
Country. Jules Hudson is on a property hunting mission in
Oxfordshire with two newlyweds (r) (AD) 3.45 Garden
Rescue. Neighbours who have decided to combine their
respective plots into one garden (AD) 4.30 Celebrity
Money for Nothing. Sarah Moore and Jay Blades visit the
homes of Ben de Lisi and Caprice Bourret 5.15 Pointless.
Quiz show hosted by Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC
News at Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Flog It! Trade Secrets (r) 6.30 Council House
Crackdown (r) 7.15 Garden Rescue (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign
Zone: The Big Family Cooking Showdown (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live
12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm For What It?s Worth (r) 1.45
Coast (r) 2.00 Glorious Gardens from Above (r) 2.45 Who
Do You Think You Are? Danny Dyer sets out to ?nd out
more about his working-class family in the East End of
London, but unearths an extraordinary lineage stretching
back to the 11th century (r) (AD) 3.45 Great British
Railway Journeys. Michael Portillo embarks on a railway
journey along England?s south coast (r) (AD) 4.15 Planet
Earth II. Wildlife that inhabit the world?s grasslands,
exploring how animals adapt to survive in areas that
endure some of the most dramatic seasonal changes seen
in the world (r) (AD) 5.15 Flog It! Paul Martin and
experts Christina Trevanion and Will Axon travel to the
Oxford Union, where they pick out collectibles to be sold
at auction, including an autograph book (r) 6.00 Richard
Osman?s House of Games. Angela Scanlon, Clive Myrie,
Sara Pascoe and Rick Edwards test their general
knowledge skills 6.30 Eggheads. Quiz show
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Yvie Burnett chats about
her new book Yes, You Can Sing! Plus, a mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment and fashion news,
as well as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip 9.25 The
Jeremy Kyle Show 10.30 This Morning. Phillip Scho?eld
and Holly Willoughby present chat and lifestyle features,
including a look at the stories making the newspaper
headlines and a recipe in the kitchen. Including Local
Weather 12.30pm Loose Women. The presenter Rylan
Clark-Neal and the American plus-size model Tess
Holliday join the panel for more topical studio discussion
from a female perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather
2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras follow criminal barrister
Robert Rinder as he takes on real-life cases in a studio
courtroom 3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. David Dickinson
and the team are in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, where
David Ford makes an offer on a sword and a seller
receives a huge surprise from Fay Rutter (r) 4.00 Tipping
Point. Game show hosted by Ben Shephard 5.00 The
Chase. Quiz show hosted by Bradley Walsh 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 The King of Queens (r) 8.00
Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 9.00 Frasier (r) 10.00
Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 11.00 Coast vs
Country. The experts help a couple looking for a property
in Scotland (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary
12.05pm Couples Come Dine with Me. Three couples
compete in south London (r) 1.05 French Collection. Three
Brits are given 800 euros to spend at an antiques market
in Toulouse 2.10 Countdown. With Gloria Hunniford in
Dictionary Corner 3.00 Cheap Cheap Cheap. Game show
4.00 A Place in the Sun: Home or Away. Jasmine Harman
and Jonnie Irwin help a couple from Australia looking for
a holiday home within reach of their daughter in England,
viewing properties in West Yorkshire and Normandy 5.00
Come Dine with Me. Four dinner parties in Portsmouth
and Southampton 6.00 The Simpsons. Ned Flanders takes
in a pair of female lodgers, but their raunchy activities
prompt him to consider moving away from Spring?eld
altogether (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Lisa is still uncertain
about being a surrogate for Louis and Simone, while Lily
is devastated when she ?nds out that it is unlikely she
will get into Oxford or Cambridge (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 Can?t
Pay? We?ll Take It Away. Sheriff Paul Bohill tackles the
case of a small debt owed by ex-footballer Neil Ruddock,
before being forced to evict a school dinner lady in south
London (r) 12.10pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel
Inspector. Alex Polizzi visits The Black Bear Hotel in
Wareham, Dorset, where the business is losing money
and reviews are bad, leaving the presenter to
demonstrate how an inn should be run (r) 1.10
Access. Showbiz news and gossip 1.15 Home and
Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS. The team
?ies to Israel, but receives a hostile reception from
Ziva?s father, who is the head of Mossad ? and Gibbs is
forced to make a tough decision (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM:
Jane Doe ? Ties That Bind (PG, TVM, 2007)
The former government agent investigates the murder
of a company whistle-blower ? but the suspect appears
to have a cast-iron alibi. Thriller starring Lea Thompson
and Joe Penny 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours.
Mishti is horri?ed to hear what Leo has been accused of
(r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Mason wakes from his
coma (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 The One Show Matt Baker and
Alex Jones present topical stories
and chat with famous faces
7.00 Emmerdale Emma tries to make
amends, and Tracy looks forward to
her birthday (AD)
7.30 Inside Out Documentary series
focusing on regional stories of interest
7.00 Antiques Road Trip Charles Hanson
and Catherine Southon head for
their ?nal auction in Congleton,
Cheshire, before Christina Trevanion
and Mark Stacey set out on the ?rst
leg of their journey (3/10)
8.00 EastEnders The guilt becomes too
much for one resident, who ends up
facing demons from the past (AD)
8.00 University Challenge Shef?eld
Hallam takes on Newcastle.
Jeremy Paxman asks the questions
8.30 Why Mum Died: Britain?s Sepsis
Crisis ? Panorama Alistair Jackson
reports on how deaths from sepsis
might have been prevented
8.30 Upstart Crow New series. Return
of the comedy with David Mitchell,
guest starring Steve Toussaint.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 Rellik New series. DCI Gabriel
Markham and his team are working to
?nd a serial killer when a break in the
case leads them to a potential suspect.
Crime thriller starring Richard Dormer,
with Jodi Balfour and Paterson Joseph.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 The Search for a New Earth
Stephen Hawking thinks the human
species will have to populate a new
planet within 100 years if it is to
survive. In this programme, he is joined
by engineering professor Danielle
George and his former student
Christophe Galfard to examine if
humans could relocate to other
planets, meeting scientists and
engineers working on the means and
method. See Viewing Guide (1/2) (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.30 BBC Reggional News and Weather
10.45 Imagine: Cameron Mackintosh
? The Musical Man With a career
spanning 50 years and a catalogue of
hits to his name including Cats, Les
Mis閞ables, Phantom of the Opera and
Miss Saigon, Cameron Mackintosh is
about to launch hit US musical
Hamilton in London. Alan Yentob
meets the impresario to discover how
a timber merchant?s son became the
most successful man in musical
theatre and in the process changed the
face and sound of the business across
the globe. See Viewing Guide
12.15am Live at the Apollo (r) 1.05-6.00 BBC News
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day?s
events presented by Emily Maitlis
11.15 Astronauts: Do You Have What It
Takes? The remaining candidates head
to a secret facility in Sweden, where
they are deliberately deprived of
oxygen to see if they can recognise
the signs of hypoxia (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.15am Sign Zone: Celebrity MasterChef The
presenter Ulrika Jonsson, the opera singer Lesley Garrett,
the actor Nick Moran, the broadcaster Aasmah Mir and
the children?s presenter Barney Harwood enter the
Masterchef kitchen (r) (AD, SL) 1.15-2.15 No More Boys
and Girls: Can Our Kids Go Gender Free? (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Cricket on 5 England v West Indies.
Mark Nicholas presents highlights of
the ?fth day of the third Test,
which took place at Lord?s. With
commentary by Michael Vaughan,
Geoffrey Boycott and Simon Hughes
8.00 Countrywise: Guide to Britain
Liz Bonnin takes a trip down the
River Severn during one of its massive
tidal bores (r)
8.30 Coronation Street Eileen and Nicola
pay a surprise visit to Phelan?s house,
Anna resolves to help Seb, and Sarah is
troubled by the change in Gary (AD)
8.00 Jamie?s Quick & Easy Food Recipes
for a one-pan ?sh dish and apple
crumble cookies (4/8) (AD)
8.00 Police Interceptors New series. The
return of the documentary following
the work of elite crime-?ghting units,
this time riding along with of?cers
from the Durham, Cleveland and
Cheshire forces (1/12)
9.00 Liar New series. A teacher ?nds
herself entangled in a web of deceit
and confusion after a date with a
widowed surgeon. Thriller starring
Joanne Froggatt and Ioan Gruffudd.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
9.00 The Undateables New series. Return
of the programme following disabled
people as they search for romance,
with the ?rst edition featuring an
autistic transport fanatic and a
Paralympic hopeful (1/5) (AD)
7.30 Coronation Street Andy tastes
freedom when Phelan takes a risk.
Meanwhile, Anna tackles Seb about
his home life (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.40 Lisa Riley?s Baggy Body Club
Cameras follow the former Emmerdale
actress as she deals with excess skin
caused by weight loss, including drastic
surgery to have it removed (r) (AD)
11.40 The Jonathan Ross Show The host
is joined by the actress Natalie Dormer,
the singer Rag ?n? Bone Man and the
comedian Jack Dee (2/12) (r)
12.40am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively
chat from the presenting team 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle
Show. Guests air their differences (r) 3.55 ITV
Nightscreen 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
8.30 Superfoods: The Real Story Kate
Quilton ?nds out if nuts might be the
key to a stress-free life (4/8) (AD)
9.00 Paddington Station 24/7 New
series. The return of the programme
that goes behind-the-scenes at
London?s transport hubs, this time
meeting the army of workers who keep
Paddington station running (1/4)
10.00 Gogglebox The ?y-on-the-wall
series capturing households? instant
reactions to this week?s television
returns, including The Great British
Bake Off, Doctor Foster and
The Crystal Maze (r) (AD)
10.00 Britannia: Secrets of the Royal
Yacht Rob Bell examines iconic ships
that have played signi?cant roles in
Britain?s maritime and cultural history,
beginning with the Royal Yacht
Britannia (1/2) (r)
11.05 Britain?s Bene?t Tenants
In Manchester, letting agent Amin
is on the trail of a woman who has
fallen behind in her rent, but he
discovers a nasty surprise when he
arrives at her house (3/3) (r)
11.05 The Frozen Ground (15, 2013)
A state trooper tries to bring a serial
killer to justice with the help of the
only woman to escape from him.
Fact-based crime drama starring
Nicolas Cage and John Cusack
12.05am Random Acts (AD) 12.35 60 Days in Jail
(AD) 1.25 The Supervet: Bionic Specials (r) (AD, SL) 2.25
FILM: Aligarh (2015) Fact-based Indian drama starring
Manoj Bajpayee and Rajkummar Rao 4.30 Location,
Location, Location (r) (SL) 5.25 Kirstie?s Fill Your House
for Free (r) 5.30-6.00 Four in a Bed (r)
12.55am SuperCasino 3.10 GPs: Behind Closed Doors.
Doctors deal with cases of severe joint and shoulder pain
(r) (AD) 4.00 Criminals: Caught on Camera. Nick Wallis
joins the Met?s robbery squads on a Friday night shift (r)
(SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Great Artists (r)
(SL) 5.35-6.00 Nick?s Quest (r) (SL)
the times | Monday September 11 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
The Search for
a New Earth
BBC Two, 9pm
?We?re all doomed!?
says Professor Stephen
Hawking at the start of
this documentary about
humanity?s need to leave
earth in 100 years?
time. Those aren?t quite
his words ? he says
that he is ?convinced
that humans need to
leave earth and that
preparations must be
in place within 100
years? ? but you?ll be
fretting about your
great-grandchildren
nonetheless. Professor
Danielle George and
Christophe Galfard zip
around the globe (their
flights presumably
speeding up the
destruction of earth) to
investigate the steps we
are making to set up
camp across the galaxy.
Liar
ITV, 9pm
Coming over as Doctor
Foster with a grisly
twist, Liar pits Joanne
Froggatt?s strong-willed
teacher, Laura, against
Ioan Gruffudd?s smooth
surgeon, Andrew. It is
all sweetness and light
at first as the newly
single Laura bumps
into the handsome
widower at the school
gates and winds up
taking his number.
However, Laura wakes
up the morning after
their first date with a
foggy recollection of
the night before,
convinced she has been
raped. Andrew denies
it. It feels a delicate
subject for a twisty
six-part thriller, but the
performances are castiron and the drama
grips from the word go.
Imagine
BBC One, 10.45pm
Alan Yentob interviews
Cameron Mackintosh,
?the most successful
musical producer in the
world?. Yentob looks at
Mackintosh?s early
career to understand
how his name became
a stamp of quality on
every venture he has
taken from page to
stage and offers behind-
the-scenes insight into
Mackintosh?s numerous
hit musicals, from
My Fair Lady to Les
Mis閞ables. Featuring
interviews with the
composers and lyricists
who helped to realise
some of the most
memorable musical
numbers in theatre,
and a fittingly
wonderful soundtrack,
this is a must-see.
Catherine Pearson
Sport Choice
Sky Main Event, 7pm
West Ham United,
without a point from
their opening three
matches, take on
in-form Huddersfield
Town at the London
Stadium (kick-off 8pm).
Defeat for the home
side could well lead to
Slaven Bilic becoming
the first managerial
casualty of the season.
Sky1
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Road Wars (r) 7.00 Hawaii Five-0 (r)
8.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) (AD) 10.00 Modern Family (r)
11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 12.00 Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 2.00pm NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 3.00
Supergirl (r) 4.00 Stargate SG-1 (r) 5.00
Futurama (r) 5.30 Modern Family (r)
6.00 Modern Family. Jay and Phil compete for
the job of basketball coach (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Five episodes (r)
9.00 FILM: Green Zone (15, 2010) A military
of?cer searching Iraq for weapons of mass
destruction after the US invasion uncovers a
conspiracy. Paul Greengrass?s thriller starring
Matt Damon and Greg Kinnear
11.15 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life. As
Karl explores the impact of waste on our planet,
he meets a roadkill chef (5/6) (r) (AD)
12.15am A League of Their Own (r) (AD) 1.15
The Force: Manchester (r) (AD) 2.15 Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.05 Motorway Patrol (r) (AD) 4.00
Animal 999 (r) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD)
8.00 Storm City (r) (AD) 9.00 The Guest Wing
(r) (AD) 10.00 The West Wing (r) 12.00
Without a Trace (r) 1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00
The British (r) (AD) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00 Without a Trace (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD)
9.00 Big Little Lies. Madeline is outraged over
a slight from Renata (r) (AD)
10.05 Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
10.40 Real Time with Bill Maher. The comic
invites guests to discuss the week?s events (r)
11.50 FILM: The Immortal Life Of
Henrietta Lacks (TVM, 2017) The story of a
poor African-American tobacco farmer whose
cells became one of the most important tools in
medical history. Starring Oprah Winfrey (r)
1.40am Looking (r) 2.15 Without a Trace (r)
3.10 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r)
4.05 The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Nothing
to Declare (r) 8.00 Million Dollar Listing: NYC
(r) 9.00 Road Wars (r) 10.00 Border Security:
Canada?s Front Line (r) (AD) 11.00 Cold Case
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 1.00pm Criminal Minds
(r) 3.00 Cooks to Market (r) 3.15 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 4.15 UK Border Force (r) (AD)
5.15 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.45 My Kitchen Rules: Australia. Caitie and
Demi from Victoria dish up their three courses
8.00 Sun, Sea and A&E. Seasonal worker Richard
is involved in a hit-and-run (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. The BAU investigates
three disturbing cases (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds. The BAU tracks a
vigilante who is determined to avenge the
murder of his mother (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. Kate?s niece is kidnapped
by people traf?ckers (r)
12.00 Bones. Double bill (r) (AD) 2.00am
Customs UK (AD) 4.00 Sun, Sea and A&E (r)
(AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am Nuages 6.15 Rain 7.35 Die Grosse
Fuge 8.00 Auction 8.30 Watercolour Challenge
9.00 Tales of the Unexpected 10.00 Soundstage
Presents Stevie Nicks 11.00 The Lot of Fun:
Where the Movies Learned to Laugh 12.00
Discovering: Judy Garland (AD) 1.00pm Tales of
the Unexpected (AD) 2.00 Auction 2.30
Watercolour Challenge 3.00 The Big Beat: Fats
Domino and the Birth of Rock ?n? Roll
5.00 Discovering: Queen
6.00 Discovering: David Niven (AD)
7.00 Tate Britain?s Great British Walks
8.00 Palmyra: Rising from the Ashes (AD)
9.00 Ludovico Einaudi: Elements ? Live
10.15 Carole King: Tapestry Live from Hyde
Park. The singer-songwriter performs her 1971
album Tapestry in front of 65,000 people
11.30 FILM: Chocolat (12, 2000) Drama
1.45am Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 2.45
Auction 3.15 Watercolour Challenge 3.45
Ludovico Einaudi: Elements ? Live 5.00 The
South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00
Premier League Daily 10.30 Live Test Cricket:
England v West Indies. Coverage of day ?ve of
the series-concluding third Test at Lord?s
6.00pm Test Cricket: The Verdict
6.30 Sky Sports News at 6
7.00 Live MNF: West Ham United v Hudders?eld
Town (Kick-off 8.00). Action from the Premier
League encounter at the London Stadium.
The sides have had contrasting starts to the
campaign, with the Hammers losing their ?rst
three matches, and the Terriers enjoying an
excellent start to their maiden Premier season
with two victories and a draw
11.00 Through the Night
12.00 Live NFL: Minnesota Vikings v New
Orleans Saints (Kick-off 12.10). All the action
from the encounter between the respective
NFC North and NFC South sides, at US Bank
Stadium 4.00am Live NFL: Denver Broncos v
Los Angeles Chargers. Coverage of the ?nal
game in the opening week of ?xtures
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 Home
Ground 10.40 Peacemakers 11.40 Imagine:
Cameron Mackintosh ? The Musical Man.
See Viewing Guide 1.10am Live at the Apollo
(r) 1.55-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 Grand Tours
of Scotland?s Lochs
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 X-Ray:
Back to Class
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00
This Farming Life
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 11.15pm It?s My Shout:
Short Films from Wales 11.30 Astronauts: Do
You Have What It Takes? (r) (AD)
12.30am-1.15 Coast (r)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Homeless:
Stories from the Street 10.40 Sharp End
11.10-11.40 Wales on TV
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 The People?s
History Show 10.30 Scotland Tonight 11.05
The Jonathan Ross Show (r) 12.05am
Teleshopping 1.05 After Midnight 2.35-5.05
ITV Nightscreen
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Lesser Spotted
Journeys 12.40am Teleshopping 1.40-3.00
ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm Beyond 100 Days
7.30 Brushing Up On: British Bridges.
Comedian and journalist Danny Baker presents
a guide to Britain?s bridges(2/4) (r)
8.00 Dangerous Earth. The inner workings of
spectacular natural wonders (1/6) (r)
8.30 Dangerous Earth. The inner workings of
volcanoes (2/6) (r)
9.00 The Normans. Professor Robert Bartlett
examines the expansion toward southern
Europe and the Middle East in the 11th century,
which began with the conquest of Sicily and
culminated in the First Crusade (3/3) (r) (AD)
10.00 Blood and Gold: The Making of Spain with
Simon Sebag Monte?ore. The presenter
examines Spain?s Golden Age under Philip II
through to the Spanish Civil War and
dictatorship under Franco. Last in the series (r)
11.00 A Very British Murder with Lucy Worsley.
The historian examines Britain?s enduring
fascination with murder (r) (AD)
12.00 She-Wolves: England?s Early Queens (r)
1.00am How to Be Bohemian with Victoria
Coren Mitchell (r) (AD) 2.00 Dangerous Earth
(r) 3.00-4.00 The Normans (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Coach Trip:
Road to Zante (r) (AD) 7.00 Made in Chelsea (r)
8.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD) 9.00 2 Broke Girls
(r) (AD) 10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00 How I Met
Your Mother (r) (AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r)
(AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
2.00 Melissa & Joey (r) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r)
4.00 2 Broke Girls. Double bill (r) (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs. Double bill (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Lily starts to rebel (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Zante ? Final Week.
The last leg for the tourists starts in ancient
Olympia in Greece (AD)
8.00 FILM: Home Alone (PG, 1990) Family
comedy starring Macaulay Culkin (AD)
10.00 Celebs Go Dating. Frankie Cocozza and
Sarah-Jane Crawford sign up to the agency?s
books and are thrown in at the deep end (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.05am The IT Crowd. Double bill (r) (AD, SL)
1.10 Celebs Go Dating (r) (AD) 2.15 First Dates
Hotel (r) (AD) 3.15 Tattoo Fixers (r) (AD, SL)
4.05 Rude(ish) Tube. Amusing internet videos
(r) 4.55 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun (r)
11.00 Four in a Bed (r) 1.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 3.50 Time Team (r) 5.55
George Clarke?s Amazing Spaces (r) (AD)
6.55 The Secret Life of the Zoo. Documentary
about the animals of Chester Zoo, using new
micro-rig technology to capture the behaviour of
the animals and their close relationships with
their keepers (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Revisiting Francis and
Karen Shaw, who bought a peel tower in
Yorkshire, discovering that the cost of restoring
it has meant the reality of living there is nothing
like their dream (1/4) (r) (AD)
9.00 9/11: 102 Minutes That Changed America.
Amateur footage and audiotape recorded by
people around New York, giving an insight into
their experiences of the September 11 attacks
on the World Trade Center in 2001 (r)
11.10 9/11: Elite Rescue Cops. How the NYPD
Emergency Service Unit saved lives at great
personal cost on the day of the terror attacks (r)
12.10am 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD) 1.15 Sex
Diaries: Gigolos (r) 2.20 Grand Designs (r) (AD)
3.20-4.00 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am Jubal (PG, 1956) Western starring
Glenn Ford and Ernest Borgnine 1.05pm
Apache Territory (PG, 1958) Western
starring Rory Calhoun 2.30 Shane (PG, 1953)
A mysterious gun?ghter defends a family of
homesteaders intimidated by a cattle baron and
his henchmen. Western starring Alan Ladd 4.50
Guns at Batasi (PG, 1964) British military
drama starring Richard Attenborough (b/w)
6.55 Field of Dreams (PG, 1989) Baseball
fantasy with Kevin Costner and Ray Liotta
9.00 Prometheus (15, 2012) A spacecraft
travels to another world in search of aliens that
may have created the human race. Ridley Scott?s
sci-? thriller with Noomi Rapace
11.25 The Negotiator (15, 1998) A hostage
negotiator is framed for murder and takes
captives of his own to ensure his pleas of
innocence are heard. Thriller with Samuel L
Jackson and Kevin Spacey (AD)
2.10am-4.00 Gone Too Far! (12, 2013)
A London teenager is reunited with his
estranged brother, but fears his sibling will
damage what little street cred he has. Comedy
drama with Malachi Kirby and OC Ukeje
6.00am You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r) 6.25
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.15
Below Deck (r) 8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30
Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.30 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20 Below Deck (r)
11.15 Dress to Impress (r) 12.20pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.50 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 1.50 The Ellen DeGeneres Show 2.45
The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress. Dating show
7.00 You?ve Been Framed! Top 100 Shockers (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Alan uses Charlie?s
house to hook up with an ex-girlfriend (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Charlie bonds with
Lindsey?s former husband (r)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
10.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
10.55 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.25 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.55 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.25am American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.50
The Cleveland Show (r) (AD) 1.45 Scorpion (r)
(AD) 2.30 Teleshopping
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am On the Buses (r) (SL) 6.25 The Royal
(r) (AD) 8.20 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 9.20 Where
the Heart Is (r) (AD) 10.20 Judge Judy (r)
11.15 Rising Damp (r) 11.45 On the Buses (r)
12.55pm Griff?s Great Britain (r) 1.25
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.25 The Royal (r) (AD)
3.25 Wild at Heart (r) 4.25 On the Buses (r)
5.30 Rising Damp. Rigsby meets a mystic (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. Walker investigates a
mysterious car crash (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica helps a private
eye investigate his partner?s murder (r)
8.00 Agatha Christie?s Marple.
While holidaying at the plush Bertram?s Hotel in
London, Miss Marple is presented with
a fresh mystery to solve when the reading of a
will leads to murder (r)
10.10 Law & Order: UK. The hunt for the killer
of a seemingly innocent family man brings
Ronnie into contact with his old boss, former DI
Natalie Chandler (4/8) (r) (AD)
11.05 Light?elds (1/5) (r) (AD)
12.10am Sherlock Holmes: The Sign of Four (r)
2.10 ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Storage Wars: Texas
(r) 7.35 The Saint (r) 8.40 Ironside (r) 9.40
Quincy ME (r) 10.45 Minder (r) (AD) 11.50 The
Professionals (r) (AD, SL) 12.50pm Cycling:
Vuelta a Espa馻 (r) 1.50 Ironside (r) (AD) 2.55
Quincy ME (r) 4.00 Minder (r) (AD) 5.00 The
Avengers. Astronomers are murdered (r)
6.05 The Car Chasers. A major buyer turns up
looking for some serious cars (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. Wartime documents (r)
8.00 Fishing Allstars. Double bill (r)
9.00 Car Crash Global. Documentary featuring
dash-cam video footage of a host of
astonishing accidents (r)
10.00 FILM: Double Jeopardy (15, 1999)
A woman seeks revenge on her husband for
faking his death and framing her for murder, but
a parole of?cer is determined to stop her.
Thriller with Ashley Judd and Tommy Lee Jones
12.10am FILM: United 93 (15, 2006)
Fact-based drama starring Christian Clemenson
(AD) 2.20 Tommy Cooper (r) (AD, SL) 2.45
ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 Jay Leno?s Garage 9.00 Storage
Hunters UK 10.00 American Pickers 12.00 Jay
Leno?s Garage 1.00pm Top Gear (AD) 3.00
Brojects in the House 3.30 Brojects 4.00 Cops
UK: Bodycam Squad 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. Motoring magazine (AD)
7.00 Motorway Cops. A trucker is caught using
his mobile phone at the wheel
8.00 Dave Gorman: Modern Life Is Goodish. The
comedian examines the appeal of greatest hits
albums, and the abuse of superlatives
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With Gina Yashere,
Sam Simmons and Ellie Taylor
10.00 Room 101. With Alexander Armstrong,
Kelly Holmes and Henry Blofeld
10.40 Room 101. With Jonathan Ross, Michael
Vaughan and Sara Pascoe
11.20 QI. With guest panellists Jeremy
Clarkson, John Sessions, Alexander Armstrong
12.00 Would I Lie to You? 12.40am Mock the
Week 1.20 QI 2.00 Would I Lie to You?
2.40 Parks and Recreation 3.30 The
Indestructibles 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am David Copper?eld 8.00 Danger?eld
9.00 Pie in the Sky 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The
Bill 1.00pm Last of the Summer Wine 1.40
Brush Strokes 2.20 Birds of a Feather 3.00
Danger?eld 4.00 Pie in the Sky 5.00 Bergerac.
A charity boss is found dead 6.00 Brush Strokes
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. The trio decide
there is pro?t to be made from a heatwave
7.20 To the Manor Born. A massive car repair
bill forces Audrey to revert to real horse power
8.00 Life on Mars. Gene is convinced a bomb
warning is the work of the IRA, prompting Sam
to try to open his boss?s eyes to the bene?ts of
effective community relations (3/8)
9.00 Death in Paradise. DI Richard Poole and his
team investigate when a body is discovered in
the pool of a cosmetic surgery clinic (3/8) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. A tabloid editor approaches
the detectives with evidence implicating a
world-famous chef in a murder (4/8) (AD)
11.20 Birds of a Feather. Tracey becomes an
agony aunt after ringing a local radio station
12.00 The Bill 1.00am Garrow?s Law. Legal
drama (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Antiques Roadshow 7.10 Medieval
Dead 8.00 Hitler?s Olympics: The Boys of ?36
9.00 Tenko 10.00 Time Team 2.00pm Secrets
of War 4.00 Sharpe
6.00 Tenko. Red Cross parcels reach the camp
7.00 The Nazis: A Warning from History.
Historians and former of?cials discuss Hitler?s
rise to power and reveal the extent to which it
was helped by grassroots support for Goering?s
feared secret police, the Gestapo (2/6) (AD)
8.00 Monarchy by David Starkey. The historian
examines the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of England,
revealing how, despite resisting the attacks of
King Canute, it eventually fell to the forces of
William the Conqueror (2/6) (AD)
9.00 Fawlty Towers: Re-opened. A tribute
originally made to mark 30 years since the
screening of the comedy?s ?nal episode
11.05 Fawlty Towers. Basil holds a gourmet
night to enhance the hotel?s reputation (AD)
11.40 Monarchy by David Starkey (2/6) (AD)
12.40am The Nazis: A Warning from History
(AD) 1.40 Secrets of War 2.35 Raiders of the
Lost Art 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15 Na
Braithrean Cuideachail (The Koala Brothers) (r)
5.25 Botannan Araid Uilleim (William?s Wish
Wellingtons) (r) 5.30 Su Shiusaidh (Little
Suzy?s Zoo) (r) 5.35 Bruno (r) 5.40 Ceitidh
Morag (Katie Morag) (r) 5.55 An Rud As Fhearr
Leam (r) 6.00 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse)
(r) 6.15 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks
(ALVINNN!!! and the Chipmunks) (r) 6.40
Ard-Sgoil a? Chnuic Annasaich (Strange Hill
High) (r) 7.00 Sruth gu Sal (r) 7.30 Speaking
Our Language (r) 7.55 Earrann Eachdraidh
(History Shorts) (r) 8.00 An L� (News) 8.30
Fionnlagh (r) 9.00 Trusadh: A? Ceannsachadh
Ciorram (Limitless Wilderness) (r) 10.00
Bannan (The Ties That Bind) (r) 10.35 The
Northern Lights (r) 11.30 Ce騦 bho Perthshire
Amber (r) 11.55-12.00 Fraochy Bay (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Hafod Haul (r) 6.15 Guto
Gwningen (r) 6.30 Sam T鈔 (r) 6.40 Twt (r)
6.55 Peppa (r) 7.00 ASRA 7.15 Ynys Broc M魊
Lili 7.20 Digbi Draig (r) 7.35 Jen a Jim Pob
Dim (r) 7.50 Sara a Cwac (r) 8.00 Sbarc (r)
8.15 Ty Mel (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r)
8.35 Syrcas Deithiol Dewi (r) 8.45 Dwylo?r
Enfys (r) 9.00 Igam Ogam (r) 9.10 Oli Dan y
Don (r) 9.25 Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 9.35
Cymylaubychain (r) 9.45 Bach a Mawr (r)
10.00 Hafod Haul (r) 10.15 Guto Gwningen (r)
10.30 Sam T鈔 (r) 10.40 Twt (r) 10.50 Peppa
(r) 11.00 ASRA (r) 11.15 Ynys Broc M魊 Lili
(r) 11.20 Digbi Draig (r) 11.35 Jen a Jim Pob
Dim (r) 11.50 Sara a Cwac (r) 12.00 News S4C
12.05pm Heno (r) 1.00 Celwydd Noeth (r)
1.30 Byd o Liw: Arlunwyr (r) 2.00 News S4C
2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C 3.05 Y Plas
(r) (AD) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil
5.05 Stwnsh: Boom! 5.15 Stwnsh: Fideo Fi (r)
5.35 Stwnsh: Sgorio 6.00 News S4C 6.05 100
Lle (r) (AD) 6.30 Ral飋+. Action from the
Woodpecker Stages 7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm. Kelly has to leave Cwmderi in a hurry,
while Ei?on regrets inviting Megan to stay at
Penrhewl (AD) 8.25 Garddio a Mwy. Iwan
Edwards plants potatoes that will be ready for
Christmas 9.00 News 9 9.30 Ffermio 10.00
Tom Maldwyn Pryce. The life and career of the
Ruthin-born racing driver, who is the only
Welsh driver to have won a Formula One grand
prix and was killed in a race in South Africa in
1977 (r) 10.30-1.05am Clwb Rygbi. Zebre v
Scarlets. Another chance to see the PRO14
encounter at the Stadio Sergio Lanfranchi
14
Monday September 11 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7441
1
2
3
Codeword No 3125
4
5
23
6
23
21
1
12
2
Scrabble � Challenge No 1955
2
3
25
17
16
25
6
16
9
23
21
16
23
12
5
4
24
2
6
7
9
10
11 12
2L
2W
9
8
2W
r
3L
a
2L
2L
l
pal 2L
2L
o 2L y
fro 3L
2W
loof
2W
2W
7
8
7
9
11
12
19
P
14
I
10
11
21
13
23
14
23
12
6
12
13
14
15
16
23
3
16
16
14
2
8
19
19
25
5
21
21
2L
20
22
3
25
17
16
25
17
20
18
25
R
3
9
12
17
21
15
2
7
2
9
14
19
13
2W
22
19
26
23
9
19
13
23
18
2
11
23
1
7
22
21
19
10
10
2
23
21
What seven-letter word can you
play with this rack?
3
22
8
6 Surveyed using a grid of
three-sided figures (12)
7 Nervous or silly laughter
(6)
8 Country house and farm (6)
9 Related to wings (4)
10 Youngster (8)
12 Food thickener (4-4)
Solution to Crossword 7440
CR I S I
E N
A BO L
D W
N EWS R
R H
O
EC Z EM
L
T OM T I
V U
E N
RE ED
S
P C
I SH
K
I
E E L
L
F
Y
A
T A B
T
E
E X A
N N
S
HA K E
R M
T
E
NSURE
G
ENDER
O
S M
L E TOP
D M
M I NE
V N
V E L T E
16 Slightly mad (4)
18 Neither male nor female
(6)
20 Affectionate address (6)
21 Making less pure (12)
1
13
14
15
17
19
2
3
4
5
6
14
21
13
16
6
22
What eight-letter word can you
play with this rack?
KEENPIN
25
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
I
A
L
B
I
S
P
I
D
O
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
W
I
O
D
H
A
N
I
U
K
N
M
L
D
I
A
S
R
E
M
H
A
X
G
D
R
A
U
X
I
E
Futoshiki No 2996
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
?
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
5
<
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE� is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ㎝attel 2017
?
7
30
4
7
16
4
24
19
24
11
9
7
30
24
33
12
4
6
14
14
16
5
22
<
L
Kakuro No 1955
24
>
K
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
E
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4117
J
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 415 029)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3912
P
I
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
I
H
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
A
G
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday?s solution, right
No 3911
F
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
13
P
R
One hanging behind (8)
Requisition for stores (6)
Hollow bubbling sound (6)
Art movement (4)
Old measure of distance (6)
Test of performance (5)
Cooked with cheese and
breadcrumbs (2,6)
? Jackson, actress (6)
Precious red stone (6)
Cause of infuriation (3,3)
Norwegian composer (5)
Of great height (4)
25
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Down
1
2
3
4
5
6
11
4
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
3
E
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
17
21
25
2W
oddrain
20
21
2L
<
?
6
4
19
8
6
25
6
11
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
6
?
3
19
12
7
24
23
16
32
16
31
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
6
7
6
3
16
� PUZZLER MEDIA
2
D
the times | Monday September 11 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Ivan Cheparinov
Black: Dimitrios Mastrovasilis
FIDE World Cup, Tbilisi 2017
Queen?s Gambit Declined
1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 c4 e6 4 Nc3
c5 5 cxd5 Nxd5 6 e3
A major alternative is 6 e4.
6 ... Nc6 7 Bd3 Be7 8 a3 0-0 9
Nxd5 Qxd5 10 Qc2 h6 11 Bh7+
Kh8 12 Be4 Qd6 13 dxc5 Qxc5 14
Qxc5 Bxc5 15 b4 Be7
White has emerged from the
opening with a slight but clear
advantage. The impetus for a
draw is quite strong but Cheparinov succeeds in extracting every
ounce of advantage from the
position.
16 Bb2 Bd7 17 Ke2
Improving on Ivkov-Kluger,
Sombor 1967 which went 17 0-0 f5
18 Bc2 a6 and was soon drawn. It
is more natural, given the simplifications that have occurred, to
________
� Dr4 DkD]
�Dbgp0 ]
� DnDpD 0]
轉 D D D ]
� ) DBD D]
�) D )ND ]
� G DK)P)]
贒 $RD D ]
谅媚牌侨
20 b5
Driving Black back but even
stronger is 20 Rxd7 Rxd7 and
only now 21 b5, winning two
pieces for a rook after which
White is winning easily.
20 ... Nb8 21 a4 b6 22 Bb7
Stronger is 22 Be5, when White
will follow up Bxb8 and invade
the seventh rank with a rook.
22 ... Rxc1 23 Rxc1 f6 24 e4 Kf7
Black should have tried 24 ... e5
to prevent White?s next move.
25 e5 Bc5 26 Nd2 fxe5 27 Ne4
Bd4 28 Ba3 Be8 29 Nd6+ Ke7 30
Rc7+ Rd7 31 Rc8 Rd8
________
� hR4bD D]
�D i 0 ]
� 0 HpD 0]
轉PD 0 D ]
軵D g D D]
蹽 D D D ]
� D DK)P)]
贒 D D D ]
谅媚牌侨
EASY
51
x 2 ? 16 � 2
MEDIUM
123
+ 87
102
x9
HARDER
________
醨D D 4kD] Winning Move
�gbDp0 ]
� hpD D 0] White to play. This position is from
Helsingor 2017.
轉qD D D ] Pantzar-Sebastian,
Although the black king appears safe for
� D DN)PD] the moment there are very few defenders
�) D D D ] nearby. This gives White the chance for a
跙)QG D )] spectacular breakthrough. How?
贒 DRDRDK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
+2/3
OF IT
1
+ 97 + /2
OF IT
x4
80%
OF IT
4/7
+5
x3
?7
�
+ 79
3/4
? 76
80%
OF IT
x3
OF IT
? 784
OF IT
+ 659 +OF1/IT5 x 2
1/2
OF IT
2
2
7
?K 8
?A K J 7
?AQ J 5 3
?A 7
? J 10 6 5 N
?10 5 3 2 W E
?8 4 2
S
?5 2 ? Q 7 3
?Q 9 8 6
?K 7
?J 9 6 3
S
W
N
E
1?(1) Pass(2)
1?
Pass
4?(3) Pass
5?(4) Pass
6? (5) End
(1) Very heavy for a One-bid but I?m a fan.
Providing the bidding doesn?t end there
(possible but unlikely in the modern aggressive game), you?ll have a chance to develop
the hand more accurately.
(2) I would have chanced 2?. You?re keen for
a club lead; also, 2? over 1? makes life particularly awkward for the opponents, consuming much bidding space (although here, 2?
doubled would go for -1,100).
(3) A clever gadget to show the best possible hand in support of hearts ? a hand that
can underwrite the Five-level facing a minimum response.
(4) Knows his Kx facing partner?s first suit
will be gold dust. Fine to cue bid a king, facing length.
(5) There cannot be Seven, as partner has
denied the ace of spades.
Contract: 6? , Opening Lead: ? J
However, you can untangle
things. You cross to the queen of
spades, ruff a spade, cash the jack
of hearts, cross to the king of diamonds, cash the queen of hearts
discarding dummy?s club and lead
over to dummy?s diamonds,
Twelve tricks and slam made.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
2
+
All the digits
x
= 90 from 1-9 are
-
x
1
�
+
+
x
+
+
=
21
=
11
=
60
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 14 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
We?ve
= 9 works?
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Killer Gentle No 5619
16
9
11
17
6
8
19
13
6
11
Tredoku 1490
4
8
8
24
17
13
11
Killer Tricky No 5620
19
10
23
19
14min
1 2 4
3 1 2
1
4 3
1 2
3 1
8 9
8
6 8 5
8 9 7
6
12
19
11
17
3
+
6 5 9
7 9 8
8
9 8
1 2
3 1
1 4
3
4 1 2
2 3 1
10
7
+
4
x
+
10
17
9
5
11
15
23
7
8
11
22
6
10
20
1
1
4
3
8
2
16
8
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
3
6
4
3 6
1
9
7
5
6
8
4
3
2
3
4
5
9
7
2
8
1
6
8
2
9
4
1
6
3
7
5
S
5
5
2
KenKen 4116
7
1
6
8
3
5
2
9
4
5
3
1
6
2
9
7
4
8
9
7
2
3
8
4
6
5
1
4
6
8
7
5
1
9
2
3
C
A
x
Lexica 3910
N
U
R
B
J
L
A
-
3
4
6
5
3
2
4
7
1
8
9
2
+
+
2
8
4
1
9
3
5
6
7
x
6
+
8
7
x
Z
C
C
A
E
I
L
K
N
C
U
E
D
1
Cell Blocks 3007
12
2
4
1
?
1 < 2 < 3
?
5 > 3
4
5
1
Lexica 3909
5
+
16
4
Sudoku 9304
4 2
2 1
2 5 3 9
1
7
6 8 9 4
8 9 7 5
7
2
9 2 4 1
1 2
3 1
Set Square 1957
16
9
4
3 > 2
13
14
3
2
5
?
4
Chess 1 Nf6+! gxf6 2 Qg6+ leads to a winning attack,
eg, 2 ... Kh8 3 Qxh6+ Kg8 4 Qg6+ Kh8 5 Qxf6+ Kh7
6 Bb1+ Kg8 7 Bc3 and wins
6
8
3
Scrabble 1954
RHIZOME E11 down (84)
WHYEVER F12 down (38)
4
9
8
Suko 2026
Futoshiki 2995
16
17
4
7
Solutions
11
7
9
17
4min
18
16
?A 9 4 2
?4
?10 9 6
?KQ 10 8 4
4
x
Saturday?s answers
assist, dais, daisy, diss, dissatisfy, ditsy,
fast, fist, sadist, said, sass, sassy, sati,
satisfy, sift, sissy, staid, stasis, stay, tass
Dealer: North, Vulnerability: Both
Pairs
4
2 6
x
Kakuro 1954
Probably my favourite tournament
of the year is the English Bridge
Union Summer Meeting Swiss
Pairs, now held in Eastbourne. As
holders of the trophy, Alexander
Allfrey and I had high expectations
for 2017. However, we were very
average for much of the event, and,
breakfasting on the last morning
with Gill and Lynton Stock, I proffered (lying a disappointing 24th
out of 214) that we had no chance
of retaining the trophy. We were to
get lucky ? more later.
Lynton showed me this instructive point I had overlooked on a
deal from the evening before. Plan
the play in 6? on ? J lead (on the
4-1 heart split, a club lead would
defeat the slam but how could West
know when East failed to bid 2??).
Say you play a low spade from
dummy, hoping East will grab the
ace. East also plays low (best) to
prevent you scoring the king and
queen separately, and you win the
queen. You cross to the ace-king of
hearts, hoping for a 3-2 split but
East discards. Needing a spade ruff
for your 12th trick, you lead the
king of spades, East winning the
ace and switching to the king of
clubs. You win the ace but cannot
return to hand to ruff the third
spade and also untangle the hearts
to draw West?s ?10x ? down one.
Let us replay the slam. You must
play the king of spades from
dummy at trick one (key play). East
cannot duck ? presenting you
with a second spade trick. But let
him win the ace and switch to the
king of clubs. You win dummy?s ace
and cash the ace-king of hearts,
getting the bad news.
12
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 1958
From these letters, make words of
three or more letters, always
including the central letter. Answers
must be in the Concise Oxford
Dictionary, excluding capitalised
words, plurals, conjugated verbs (past
tense etc), adverbs ending in LY,
comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 13 words, average;
18, good; 23, very good; 28, excellent
13
Bridge Andrew Robson
5
10
Polygon
4
32 Nf7+ Black resigns
After 32 ... Kxf7 33 Rxd8, White
90%
OF IT
+6
� PUZZLER MEDIA
The FIDE (World Chess Federation) World Cup continues in
Tbilisi, Georgia until the close of
this month. Most of the world?s
leading grandmasters are competing including world champion
Magnus Carlsen, former world
champions Viswanathan Anand
and Vladimir Kramnik and such
highly rated contestants as Levon
Aronian, Wesley So, Fabiano Caruana and Hikaru Nakamura.
Other notables include the former
world championship challenger
Sergei Karjakin, the newly minted
British champion Gawain Jones,
Michael Adams and David Howell.
Today?s game is a fine strategic
effort from early on.
keep White?s king in the centre.
17 ... Rfd8 18 Rhd1 Kg8 19 Rac1
Rac8
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
World Cup
Cell Blocks No 3008
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
S
W
E
E
T
Killer 5618
3
3
2
4
4
7
2
4
1
3
5
8
9
6
8
9
3
4
6
7
2
5
1
6
1
5
9
8
2
4
7
3
1
7
8
6
9
4
5
3
2
S
O
C
M
R
U
O
S
N
I
C
E
E
A
M
E
Codeword 3124
2
4
6
7
5
3
1
8
9
5
3
9
8
2
1
7
6
4
3
5
7
2
1
6
9
4
8
9
6
1
5
4
8
3
2
7
Quiz 1 Ludwig van Beethoven
2 Morning sickness or pregnancy sickness
3 Co Galway
4 Henry II
5 Vertigo
6 US vice-president
7 Austro-Prussian War or Seven Weeks? War
8 Aniseed or anise
9 Georgios Papadopoulos
10 Arthur Dove
11 Ivan Turgenev
12 Star Trek: Discovery
13 Bread
14 Michael Phelps
15 Biffy Clyro
4
8
2
3
7
9
6
1
5
L AN DMA
U O O
P AWE D
I
H
E
N E E D
C
R
P
QU E U E D
U
E
A F T E R S
F
O A
F L AGGE
E
S
E
DU T Y
D
R K
J E E P
I
W X
R
BR A V ADO
B
F
L
V
ON F E T T I
N
L
D
R E S UME
C
D
N
UN
P L U S
D
Z
A
I
D
E N D E D
L
R
E
L
E NOUNC E
Word Watch
Thimblerigger (b) A
cheat, one who plays
thimblerig, a version of
the three cups game
Flypitcher (c) One who
sells from a flypitch, an
area for unlicensed
market stalls
Double shotgun (c) In
the southern US, a
house sharing a wall
with its neighbour
Brain Trainer
Easy 46; Medium 732;
Harder 6,516
11.09.17
MindGames
Easy No 9305
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9306
8
9
6
1
4 2 5 7 6
2
7 5 8
2 4
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
8 7
6
3 5
7 6
4
5 1 2
8
4
8
7 1
Thimblerigger
a A small boat
b A cheat
c A large needle
Flypitcher
a A baseball rookie
b A bird
c An unlicensed trader
Double shotgun
a A large stagecoach
b An enforced
marriage
c A semi-detached
house
Answers on page 15
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
6
2
6
1
8
4
5 2
7 1
6
5
7 1 4
8
9
7
4
2
9 8
1
8
5
7 3
by Olav Bjortomt The Times Quiz Book
11 Which Russian
author (1818-83) wrote
the story Hamlet of
Shchigrovsky Province?
12 Which upcoming
TV show is the first
Star Trek series since
Star Trek: Enterprise
concluded in 2005?
2 Hyperemesis
gravidarum (HG) is
a severe form of
which illness?
9 Alexandros
Panagoulis (1939-76)
became famous for his
1968 attempt to
assassinate which
Greek dictator?
6 The holder of
which political
office resides at
Number One
Observatory Circle?
4 Mary, Queen of Scots
was brought up at the
court of which French
king, the husband of
Catherine de? Medici?
7 Podol, Trautenau,
Langensalza and
Gitschin were battles
in which 1866 war?
5 Which Alfred
Hitchcock film is
named after a
sensation of whirling
and loss of balance?
5
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
15
3 Connemara is a
cultural region in
which Irish county?
10 Sometimes
credited as the first
American abstract
painter, who
painted Me and
the Moon (1937)
and Tanks (1938)?
8 The Greek spirit
ouzo is flavoured with
which aromatic seed?
13 The US actress and
comedian Aubrey
Plaza was named after
the 1972 song Aubrey by
which American band?
The Times Quiz Book by
Olav Bjortomt is out now.
To order your copy visit
harpercollins.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Friday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 914
1
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