close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Times Times 2 -13 October 2017

код для вставкиСкачать
ARTS
October 13 | 2017
The world’s unluckiest band
The bizarre story of X Japan
Four members of
the band X Japan
2
1GT
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
times2
Caitlin
Moran
7
DOWN
Carla Bruni
Celebrity Watch
10
DOWN
Lauren
Goodger
The former star
of The Only
Way Is Essex
has drawn
attention to
herself by posting
a picture of her
i
rejoicing in her seminakedness, as is a
woman’s motivationally
complicated and
perception-fraught right!
Attending a friend’s baby
shower, she apparently
became restless with the
activities being confined to
“talking about someone else’s
baby”, went to the bathroom,
removed her trousers, bent
over, and posted a picture of
her arse on Instagram. As one
does. See also: snapping own
arse at Remembrance Sunday dinner;
child’s birthday party; cat funeral, etc.
While the reaction on social media
was, to be brisk, negative, CW would
like to offer a possible defence of
Goodger’s Baby Shower Bum PopOut. Is there a chance, CW wonders,
that Goodger’s pose was misconstrued
and that, rather than attempting to
appear alluring, she was recreating the
bent-double, arse-out, no-dignity-left
stage of a 36-hour posterior labour, in
keeping with the baby-shower theme?
Such behaviour must, surely, have a
greater motivation than “I want to
show people my arse on the internet”,
and a sympathetic simulacrum of the
cervix being cranked open by a skull
the size of a mango would do it.
Although CW is almost certain that
Goodger was just flashing her arse for
“likes”, it does offer her the opportunity
to buy the “I was living through my
pregnant friend’s impending pain”
excuse from CW for its usual fee of
$777,777 and the promise not to show
CW her arse again throughout the
term of their working relationship.
9
DOWN
Chris and
Kem
The breakout stars
of this year’s Love
Island — heartwarming simpleton
bromancers Chris and
Kem — have released
their first single, Little Bit Leave It
this week. Exciting! Except! The
rap titan Lethal Bizzle has taken
objection to the single, claiming his
catchphrase, “Leave it”, has been
stolen and that Chris and Kem
have infringed his copyright.
Although CW always had
sympathy
for innovators
s
whose copyright is infringed
w
by
b Johnny-come-latelys, it feels
iit must contest Mr Bizzle’s claim
to have invented/popularised the
phrase “Leave it”. CW has heard the
phrase “LEAVE IT!” screamed at
p
ffighting men outside pubs at 11.10pm,
and in parks as dogs approach a pile
of fox poo, for years. If “LEAVE IT!”
was invented by anyone, it was by the
girlfriends of drunk men and the
owners of scatological schnauzers.
These people should get together to
form a countersuit against Mr Bizzle.
Or everyone could, of course,
just leave it.
8
DOWN
Marigay
McKee
CW finds itself
returning to a
subject essayed at
length on these
pages: Hello!
magazine’s
weekly sixpager on some
rich heir/bastard
you’ve never heard of, showing off
their chateau/castle/ranch in a slot that
should be called “Hope You Feel Shitty
About Your Hovels Now, Peasants”.
Rubbing our noses into her
multimillion seaside house in the
Hamptons this week was “New Yorkbased British merchandising expert”
Marigay McKee, who explained that
none of its bedrooms is allocated to
any of the family’s adult children
when they visit. Instead, they are
colour-coded. “We have ‘Sunshine’,
‘Snow’, ‘Marine’, ‘Greige’ and ‘Oatmeal’.
Everyone chooses which one they want,
when they get here. It makes it fun!”
No, Marigay. It makes it WAR.
You
Y don’t think those offspring
are all jockeying to get the “better”
rooms (“Sunshine” “Snow” and
“Marine”, obviously), and
leave the “supplicant
rooms” of “Porridge” and
“Meh Whatever” to the
losers? People might die,
Marigay. Or, at the least,
sulk through Christmas.
What’s the point of being
W
insanely rich if you base a
rroom around the concept
of porridge? It’s baffling.
o
4
Long-term readers will be up to speed
on one of CW’s many sidelines —
Ranking Celebrity Projects in Order
of Their Perceived Inadvertent
Double Entendres. A perfume
called Sarah Jessica Parker’s Lovely;
the film invariably referred to as
Kathryn Bigelow’s Hurt Locker; and
the entire can of worms that is
Penelope Keith’s Hidden Villages.
This week a new project joins
CW’s throng of accidental shame
with the news that the supermodel
and former first lady of France
Carla Bruni has released an album
called French Touch — which CW
understands to be a technique it
takes several months to master and
is reliant on at least one participant
being double-jointed and able to leave
the country at short notice should the
authorities find out.
UP
Jamie Oliver
6
DOWN
Cindy Crawford
It’s been a week of massive PR
errors (see No 1), so scant
attention was given to a
“quack quack oops” from the
supermodel who gave birth to
a supermodel (16-year-old
phenomenon Kaia Gerber)
and so should be referred to as a
“supermomdel” if the world is to do
as God wishes and make as many
weak puns as possible before we all
die in a fiery inferno.
Discussing her “ambassadorship”
— “ambassadorship” being the posh
word for “huge cheques from” — for
one brand, Crawford gushed: “They
are about quality, heritage, legacy
and timelessness.”
Unfortunately, the brand Crawford
was speaking of was Omega watches,
for whom “timelessness” would be a
possibly fatal disadvantage.
5
UP
Liam Gallagher
Anecdote of the Week
goes to Liam Gallagher.
A vignette was reported
in the NME that’s so
perfect, CW will offer
no comment. The floor
is Gallagher’s: “I’ve met
[Paul McCartney] a few
times — he’s been
absolutely a dream. The
last time was at the
Royal Albert Hall. He
goes, ‘Why are you
always in a rush? Sit
down, sit down.’ I sit
down and he goes, ‘Do
you like margaritas?’
I said, ‘Yeah, but I had
something before
I come out, I don’t eat
at this time of night.’
“He said, ‘They’re
f***in’ drinks, you
stupid prick.’ I thought
he was
offering me
a pizza.”
There are very few people CW admires
more than Jamie Oliver — a dedicated
leftwing father with a lisp, a bit of a
tum and the ability to crank out
buttery pasta at a minute’s notice. It
was, therefore, thrilled to see that some
manner of business deal with Land
Rover had landed Oliver a car that
is, simultaneously, the world’s Most
Chef-y and the world’s Most Silly. “I
dreamt big, and what they’ve done has
blown my mind,” he said, taking Hello!
around an estate car rigged with a
slow cooker, olive-oil dispenser, two
burners, a tap and a table. “It’s tailored
perfectly for the family and me.”
That’s as may be, but CW noted
that, on top of the above-mentioned
spec, Land Rover has put a toaster in
the central console between the front
seats. CW doesn’t pretend to know
everything about the safety protocols
involved in car design, but it suspects
that doing a ton on an M4 slip road,
reaching to change down into third
and suddenly having hot toast pop up
into your hand could be un-useful.
Although you would have a snack
to nibble on while you
waited for paramedics to
retrieve your severed legs
from a nearby hedge.
3
DOWN
David Beckham
Another of CW’s longterm projects is battling
the hurtful presumption
that the millionaire
footballer is thick just
because he wore a skirt
once, has long hair and
talks in a squeaky voice.
As CW has repeatedly
stated, these accusations
are almost certainly down
to the ingrained misogyny
that perceives feminine
traits as intellectually inferior. Even
when Beckham revealed that one of
his hobbies was colouring in picture
books of The Lion King, CW stuck to
its guns because it had invested a lot
of time and energy into this one and
it wasn’t about to back down lightly.
However, CW’s commitment to the
cause was tested this week when
Beckham revealed his newest tattoo,
“Seven”, on his left forefinger.
Most presumed it was a
reference to the shirt number
he played in for Manchester
United, but there is also
the sneaking suspicion
it might be there in case
he gets lost counting to
ten on his fingers. STOP
PROVIDING OPEN GOALS,
DAVID! YOU NEED TO START
PLAYING
IN SOME MANNER OF
P
IMAGE-DEFENCE POSITION!
the times | Friday October 13 2017
3
1GT
times2
2
DOWN
Spencer
Matthews
While on Loose Women
with the model Vogue
Williams, Spencer
Matthews committed
a rookie, schoolboy
Love Error.
To celebrate his
new romantic
partner’s birthday,
the former star of
Made in Chelsea
handed Williams
a small, square box.
Such as a woman
would generally expect
to find containing an
engagement ring.
1
NON MOVER
Harvey
Weinstein
This was the week when the world
finally learnt about Harvey Weinstein.
For the past two decades, when
Weinstein was spoken about at
industry parties, it would prompt a
familiar conversational template:
name of now-famous actress + what
he had said/done to her. It was never
about the films. It was always about
the women he had assaulted or
terrified — and there are so many.
In the past week Léa Seydoux, Asia
Argento, Mira Sorvino, Ashley Judd,
Rosanna Arquette, Angelina Jolie,
Gwyneth Paltrow, Jessica Hynes, Cara
Delevingne and Ambra Battilana
Gutierrez have spoken out, and that’s
not half of the ones CW has heard
about. This indicates the industrial
scale that this happened on. It was in
many ways Weinstein’s primary job:
eating up the confidence and
autonomy of talented, shining women,
while making films on the side.
Like an awful, mythical
archetype, an appalling
garbage man, he
enforced secrecy and
shame on 52 per cent of
the people he came into
contact with.
This year’s
Oscars will be
an extraordinary
event, now that
it is known as a
convention for
women against
whom Weinstein
committed crimes.
Rows and rows of chairs
containing box-office
legends — women who,
on the screen, wield
swords, or quip hard, or
dance, or fly, or sing —
all of whom used to
shudder when Weinstein
walked by. This has been
the case for more than
two decades. The
difference now is that
all these women can
speak out. The New
York Times and
However, when Williams opened
the box, she discovered a key to
a Vespa scooter, which was parked
in the studio, instead.
On reading this story CW
became very tense. A great
many 32-year-old women, on
being handed something that
looked like an engagement
ring but turned out to be a
scooter would become so
furious that they might
very well stomp
outside and ram the
scooter on to the
third finger of their
left hand, shouting
“F*** YOU — I’M
SAYING THIS IS
A RING. WE’RE
ENGAGED.”
Never falsely
deploy a small box around
d
a woman with five good
years of ovaries left. That’s
what CW’s saying.
The New Yorker’s Ronan Farrow —
whose estranged father is Woody
Allen, meaning he does, perhaps,
know something about the way
powerful men work in Hollywood —
closed in on Weinstein, the levee
broke and 20 years’ worth of filth
cascaded over Hollywood.
Many have expressed surprise, and
even anger, that these legions of
women did not speak out earlier —
that they “let” Weinstein abuse them.
It’s a classic move: a man’s monstrous
crimes are revealed and some people
ask reflexively: “Was this ultimately
the fault of women?”
There are a few points here. First,
more than 60 women spoke out about
Bill Cosby and he was not convicted.
Speaking out about sexual assault
is not generally a behaviour that
is rewarded. Second, the extent to
which women are not believed about
rape and sexual assault is hard to
overestimate. CW saw a Twitter
exchange about Weinstein — Man: “I
don’t know why women don’t report
sexual abuse.” Woman: “It’s because
when we do, we’re not believed.” Man:
“I find that hard to believe.” And third,
look at the stats on Hollywood: in
2016, 98 per cent of films had no
women directors of photography;
91 per cent had no women
directors; 78 per cent
had no women editors;
76 per cent had no women
creators; 71 per cent had
no women writers.
Men have the money.
Men make films.
Hollywood is
owned by men.
Weinstein isn’t the
only one behaving
like this. If you
speak out against
billions of dollars
of male capital,
you will never
enjoy making
a film again.
So this raises
the question of
which is the more
feminist
act:
f
exposing assault, but
never working again;
or enduring it, to stay
in the game in the
hope that, one day,
you’ll be powerful
enough to start a
rival industry?
The hot list
What to do this weekend
Film
The Party
Sally Potter’s latest film is
71 minutes of increasingly
manic hilarity. It is, essentially,
the north London dinner party
from hell, featuring a newly
appointed shadow minister
for health (Kristin Scott Thomas,
on fire), a New Age healer
(Bruno Ganz) and a lesbian
couple (Emily Mortimer and
Cherry Jones) expecting IVF
triplets. On general release,
see review p8
Opera
Giulio Cesare
English Touring Opera
are staging Handel’s 1724
masterpiece as a two-parter, The
Death of Pompey and Cleopatra’s
Needle, in an uncut edition. It’s
a risky decision, but worth it
for the detailed stagecraft
and affecting performances.
New Theatre Royal, Portsmouth
(023 9264 9000), part one tonight,
part two tomorrow
Dance
BalletBoyz
The all-male troupe shines in a
dark and serious programme of
contemporary dance that offers
four new works by Javier de
Frutos, Iván Pérez, Christopher
Wheeldon and Craig Revel
Horwood, along with a revival
of Russell Maliphant’s majestic
Fallen. Sadler’s Wells, London EC1
(020 7863 8000), tonight and
tomorrow
Comedy
Mat Ewins: Adventureman 7:
The Return of Adventureman
Spoof Indiana Jones-style
multimedia adventure meets
cheery-chappie stand-up with
— new to Ewins’s act — a canny
sprinkle of anti-whinge, pro-fun
manifesto. One of the funniest
shows you’ll see this year.
Soho Theatre, London W1 (020
7478 0100), tonight and tomorrow
Visual art
Degas: A Passion for Perfection
The centenary of the great
modernist’s death is marked
with a show as wonderful as
it is informative.
Fitzwilliam Museum,
Cambridge (01223 332900),
today and tomorrow
Pop
Marc Almond
One of Britain’s greatest singers
puts his rich voice in front of
an orchestra for songs from
his new album, Shadows and
Reflections. Ipswich Regent (01473
433100), tomorrow; New Theatre
(0844 8713020), Oxford, Sunday
Theatre
Young Frankenstein
This zany musical of Mel
Brooks’s beloved film about
a mad scientist in Transylvania
is going to be a monster hit.
Laugh? More like a howl.
Garrick Theatre,
WC2, 0330
3334811, tonight
and tomorrow
In Saturday Review tomorrow
No turkeys: 40 Christmas shows to
book, chosen by the Times critics
Saturday October 14 2017
7-DAY
TV & RADIO
GUIDE
page 27
The art of fog
How the French
impressionists fell
for British weather 8
40
shows for
Christmas
Our critics pick
the best tickets
art books theatre film music
television what’s on puzzles
4
1GT
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
arts story
cover
Suicide, bankruptcy and cult
The Japanese band who have packed out Wembley Arena and sold 30m
records talk to Will Hodgkinson as a documentary about them comes out
W
alking the
streets of
Osaka can
make an
Englishman
feel like a
Neanderthal
seeing
civilisation for the first time. People
pass by with an unobtrusive but
determined air, as if following a script
that remains classified for anyone
born outside Japan. I have come
here to meet the band who have
captured its strange mix of discipline
and eccentricity, public order and
private chaos better than any other, a
band who have sold 30 million albums
in the country yet remain almost
unknown outside it: X Japan.
Formed in 1982 by the drummer and
composer Yoshiki (Hayashi), X Japan
have the grandiosity of Queen, the
heavy-metal hysteria of Iron Maiden
and the symphonic sophistication of
classical music, all tied up with a
healthy dose of melodrama. They
invented visual kei, a theatrical,
kabuki-influenced approach to
rock typified by towering mohicans,
gothic make-up and outfits more
suited to a manga hero on a visit
to an S&M club. Their story involves
suicide, brainwashing, cult
membership, crippling pain and
success against the odds. And it begins
with Yoshiki, the band’s visionary
leader, who wasn’t expected to
make it out of childhood.
“I feel like this life is just a dream,”
says Yoshiki, an otherworldly,
unfailingly polite, rather delicate
51-year-old who, thanks to years
of head-banging, has to wear a
permanent neck brace. “If you are
still alive after everybody thought
you would die, you want that dream
to be interesting,” he says in excellent
English. “When I was a boy I had such
severe asthma that I was hospitalised
for half of the time. My mother was
told I would not live to adulthood.
I hated life. Only music saved me.”
We’re in a vast hotel suite in Paris,
a few days before we meet again at
X Japan’s arena concert in Osaka.
Yoshiki has flown in to attend a Japan
expo and promote We Are X, the
rockumentary director Stephen Kijak’s
film about the band. A photographer,
a film-maker and various managers,
assistants and hair and make-up
people are following Yoshiki at every
turn. He is a big deal in Japan.
When he isn’t with X Japan he is
variously a classical pianist, a kimono
designer and a winemaker. He began
playing the piano at the age of four, but
credits the death of his father, when
he was 11, with giving him the anger
and drive to become a rock star. His
mother told him that his father died of
a heart attack. It was only years later
he discovered it was suicide. “I was old
enough to know something wasn’t
Female fans at the
funeral of Hide, lead
guitarist with X Japan
We don’t
talk about
emotions
in Japan
right,” says Yoshiki, with a slight smile
that, combined with his ever-present
sunglasses, is enigmatic more than
joyful. “But I told myself, ‘If they say
he had a heart attack, he had a heart
attack.’ I didn’t see the signs. He was
very artistic, he was playing piano, he
was a tap dancer, he ran a kimono
shop. He was versatile and successful.
And in Japan people don’t want to talk
about death. But death is all around
us. It is everywhere.”
Six weeks before our interview
Yoshiki had an artificial disc inserted
into his neck vertebrae. The procedure
was so serious that he had to write his
will before surgeons agreed to operate
on him. He also has tendinitis and
carpal tunnel syndrome, which
makes drumming and playing piano
agonising. Still asthmatic, he collapses
frequently on stage due to lack of
oxygen. I ask him if he is in pain as we
speak. “Yes, completely,” he replies
serenely. “I am also on extremely
heavy medication.”
Just like so many angry, confused
youngsters, Yoshiki found his outlet in
rock’n’roll. It began at 11 when he went
to his local record shop, in Chiba, and
bought Love Gun by Kiss instead of
the Mozart recording he was meant to
get for his classical music education.
The Japanese public school system is
strict, and Yoshiki fell foul of his
teachers after putting “rock star”
as his preferred career choice. When
he grew his hair over his ears, his head
was shaved. It didn’t take long for
Yoshiki and Toshimitsu “Toshi”
Deyama, a fellow schoolboy rocker
and future singer with X Japan, to
find each other.
“My family is from the countryside,
so me having bright blond hair,
wearing make-up and liking Kiss was
unimaginable,” says Toshi, through an
interpreter, when I speak to him
Diisc
scov
oveer
ov
er the 50 be
b st ski and snowboaard resorts,
in
ncl
clud
u in
ng tr
t ip
ps fo
forr th
t e whole family and where
too go on
n a bud
dge
get.
t.
Pick
Pi
k up yo
ourr cop
o y off The Times
e thi
es
h s Sa
aturday.
the times | Friday October 13 2017
5
1GT
arts
cover story
worship: the story of X Japan
COVER: COURTESY OF DRAFTHOUSE FILMS. BELOW: LUIGI & IANGO © 2017 CONDÉ NAST JAPAN. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED; KAZUHIRO NOGI/GETTY IMAGES
X Japan in the 1980s. Back row: Pata, guitarist; Toshi, singer and former cult member; Hide, guitarist,
committed suicide in 1998. Front row: Yoshiki, drummer, now wears a neck brace; Taiji, bassist, hanged
himself in jail in 2011. Right: Yoshiki with model Mica Argañaraz on the cover of this month’s Vogue Japan
before X Japan’s concert in Osaka. “All
I wanted to do in childhood was sing.
It was only when I wanted to be a rock
star that it became a problem.”
“We don’t talk about emotions in
Japan,” Yoshiki says. “But when I
heard the Sex Pistols, Led Zeppelin
and David Bowie, it seemed like all the
anger and sadness I was feeling was
legitimate. Toshi was a good kid. He
was cheerful and popular, he was
playing baseball and volleyball and he
was never out of control in the way
I was, but he was the only other boy
in school who liked rock music, and
that meant I was not alone.”
In the beginning at least, X Japan
were as misunderstood as the young
Yoshiki. On leaving school and
abandoning plans to study at a
classical music conservatory, Yoshiki
borrowed money from his mother
to set up a record label and pitched
in with Japan’s underground punk
community. However, the band
did not fit in: too flamboyant,
too commercial, too fond of hair
products to be taken seriously. Critics
wrote them off as poseurs. With
Yoshiki cherry-picking the best
musicians on Japan’s burgeoning
heavy metal scene and getting the
bassist Taiji and the guitarists Pata
and Hide into the band, however, they
became a popular phenomenon.
I get to witness that phenomenon at
a concert hall in Osaka Castle, where
X Japan perform a semi-classical
acoustic set. Yoshiki, banned from
playing drums until his neck heals, is
on piano. And it is like no concert
I have seen. As the band run through
unplugged versions of fan favourites
including Kurenai and Endless Rain,
the entire audience wave illuminated
batons in unison. They maintain a
respectful silence during the songs
and scream uncontrollably as soon
as they finish. It is like a cult, which
is fitting because that is exactly
what Toshi joined at the height
of X Japan’s career.
You go
overseas
and
nobody
knows who
you are
It began in 1997. Yoshiki, hoping to
break into the global market, relocated
the band to Los Angeles and hired a
vocal coach to teach Toshi to sing in
English. “He could hit the notes, but
he couldn’t pronounce the words and
it damaged his confidence,” Yoshiki
says. “You play the Tokyo Dome and
everybody loves you. You go overseas
and nobody knows who you are. It
caused a bad frame of mind that
allowed Toshi to be manipulated.”
“I got a lot of influences from
different people,” says Toshi, who
joined the controversial Home of
Heart cult after meeting his wife, the
actress Kaori Moritani, while starring
in a musical production of Hamlet. She
introduced him to the cult’s founder,
who told him that X Japan were evil,
and the most effective way for Toshi
to purge that evil was to hand over
the money he made from it to the
cult. “At the time I had no confidence
to go overseas and I was strongly
influenced by the ideas [the cult] gave
me, so I quit the band.”
Pictures of Toshi from the time
show a short-haired man in dull,
misshapen clothes with a beatific
smile and an acoustic guitar, a
transformation from the leather-and
make-up clad rock beast of just a
few months past. Yoshiki knew
something was wrong, but not
the extent to which his singer had
been manipulated. Home of Heart
commanded Toshi to cut off all
relations with his family.
By an awful coincidence, on
May 2, 1998, the body of X Japan’s
charismatic guitarist Hide was found
at his apartment, hanged by a towel
tied to a doorknob. He was 33.
Within a week three
female teenage
fans committed
copycat suicides.
“I think it was
a mistake,” Yoshiki
says. “He was the
most positive person
in the band, very
practical, much
better organised
than me. Everything
was moving forward
in his life. I see no
reason for it.”
X Japan’s bassist,
Taiji, had been
sacked in 1992 after
arguments over
money, but he
turned up at Hide’s
funeral. “He was completely changed,”
h ged ”
Yoshiki says. “He had no teeth after
getting into a fight and he was an
alcoholic, living on the street. I gave
him some money and told him to buy
some teeth.”
In 2011 Taiji was arrested after
arguing with his female manager
on a plane from Tokyo to Saipan.
The next day he hanged himself in
a Saipan jail cell.
At least Toshi came back from the
dead, metaphorically speaking. He
had been touring as an acoustic artist,
singing the “healing music” of Home
of Heart, but the money he was
making — and handing over to the
cult — was a fraction of what he could
make with X Japan. In 2007 Masaya
commanded Toshi to reunite the band.
“He came to my studio in Los
Angeles and it was a strange feeling,
happy and sad at the same time,”
Yoshiki says. “It is always nice to see
an old friend, but this was not the
person I grew up with. The cult
people had been telling him he was
ugly, that he had bad thoughts. He
was giving them $10,000 a month
and in return they gave him a new
personality. We started playing shows
again, and that’s when Toshi thought,
‘Why are they telling me to play
with X Japan when they told me that
X Japan was evil?’ ”
When he finally relinquished ties
with Home of Heart and his wife after
ten years, Toshi was bankrupt.
“I have so many regrets in my life,”
says Toshi, who, when I ask him to
describe his time in the cult, says
that to do so would take at least five
hours and he is going on stage in five
minutes. “Now I don’t want to look
back. I just want to sing and perform
with the band. People from all over
the world are waiting for us.”
Toshi could be right. In 2014 X Japan
sold out Madison Square Garden in
New York, and this year they sold out
Wembley Arena. “If X Japan were
born in America or England and sang
in English, they might be the biggest
band in the world,” says Gene
Simmons, an Israeli who transformed
into an American before making it
with Kiss. Given that the band have
survived two suicides, one cult
indoctrination and countless medical
conditions, Yoshiki’s plan to turn
X Japan into a global phenomenon
doesn’t seem so far-fetched.
After the concert in Osaka I ask
Yoshiki, who lives in LA, if he has a
wife or children, or even a long-term
girlfriend. “Not
really,” he replies,
vaguely. “I just
va
have a studio and I
ha
work all the time. I
w
will think about my
w
life when the album
lif
is done.” Let’s hope
he gets on with it. It
has been 26 years
ha
since the last one.
si
As to whether
30 million record
sales, composing
sa
music for Emperor
m
Akihito’s tenth
A
anniversary and
an
becoming one of
be
Japan’s most enduring
Ja
icons has done
ic
alleviate the pain that rips
anything to allevia
through Yoshiki’s body and soul, it
seems not.
“I am more confused today than
when I was 16,” he says, his elusive
half-smile forever in place. “Mentally,
however, I am stronger than ever.
If I can survive childhood, when
I was meant to die, I can survive
anything. Now I want to take
X Japan to the world.”
Then he disappears into a waiting
fleet of cars, entourage following
respectfully in his wake.
Yoshiki is giving a live Q&A for a
screening of We Are X at Odeon
Covent Garden, London WC2, on
October 20; odeon.co.uk
6
1GT
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
arts
Richard Morrison the arts column
London must learn from the concert-hall mess made in New York
I
t’s all gone pear-shaped in New
York. Last week the city’s biggest
arts complex, Lincoln Center,
announced that it was ditching
a project, planned for 13 years, to
gut its main concert hall, home
of the New York Philharmonic,
and build a new auditorium
within the shell of the old building.
The escalating cost (half a billion
dollars at the last estimate) was only
half the reason for pulling the plug.
There was also the dawning realisation
that the project would make the NY
Phil homeless for three years, at a time
when its finances are precarious and
its subscriber base shrinking.
So this humiliating volte-face was
inevitable. Even so, it must be galling for
Deborah Borda. Only seven months ago
this legendary orchestral manager was
lured back to New York from the Los
Angeles Philharmonic, where she
oversaw the building of the stunning
Walt Disney hall. Now she finds herself
running a second-tier orchestra with a
third-rank conductor (Jaap van Zweden)
in a fifth-rate venue.
The new plan is to try to improve
the dead acoustics, dated appearance
and impersonal ambience of the 1960s
hall by “incremental” steps. As
Londoners will recall, however, from
the ill-fated attempt ten years ago to
conjure up a similar miracle cure for the
Royal Festival Hall, that’s a chronically
expensive way of generating mass
disappointment. The only solution to
badly shaped, barn-sized postwar
concert halls is dynamite.
Unfortunately, there’s an added
complication in New York. Money. No,
not the hundreds of millions still to be
raised for the hall’s redevelopment, but
the $100 million already pledged by
David Geffen, the film and music
mogul — in return for which the hall
was named after him. Geffen said last
week that he is “happy” with the
abrupt change of plan, adding: “I know
they will do something great.”
That sounds suspiciously
magnanimous for a man who has
forked out $100 million for a project
that has been dumped. It transpires,
however, that so far Geffen has
handed over only $15 million. The
rest was to follow in instalments as
the rebuilding project hit certain
targets, which of course it now won’t.
So, will the centre still get the full
$100 million from Geffen, who has
MATT MOYER/AP
If we can’t
leave
Britain we
can walk
around it
Lincoln Center in New York is ditching its plan to gut its main concert hall in order to build a new auditorium
meanwhile pledged hundreds of
millions to other cultural projects?
If not, will the hall be “de-named”?
And where’s the rest of the money to
improve the place going to come
from? In an interview this week
Geffen castigated other ultra-rich New
Yorkers for not following his lead and
backing the project — but if you were
a Fifth Avenue billionaire, why would
you bankroll a scheme that has
another’s name on it?
There’s a British angle to all this, and
I don’t just mean the spectacle of the
ubiquitous Thomas Heatherwick (who
was masterminding the hall’s redesign)
losing another high-profile assignment
so soon after the brutal crushing of his
London Garden Bridge dream. This
week the Barbican and London
Symphony Orchestra announced the
architect for London’s proposed new
concert hall. Their choice is ironic and
perhaps risky, given the coincidence of
timing. It’s an American company, Diller
Scofidio + Renfro, which has also been
closely involved in transforming the
concrete brutalism of Lincoln Center.
Unlike the abandoned Geffen Hall
project, however, the Barbican plan
Sailing into No 10
on a sea of grime
Is the aggressive but
increasingly popular
musical genre known as
grime a force in British
politics? That intriguing
idea is floated by a new
report, State of Play:
Grime. Jointly undertaken
by Ticketmaster and the
University of Westminster,
it
found
Grime star
that 24
Stormzy
per cent of
grime fans
ns who voted
Labour in the last election
said they were influenced
by a campaign called
#Grime4Corbyn. That a
68-year-old white man
cou yet be propelled
could
into Downing Street
in
by a form of music
largely nurtured by
la
black and Asian
bla
is one
tteenagers
een
off the many oddities
o
politics today. No
in pol
wonder the report
wond
calls grime potentially
“the most disruptive
cultural transformation
since punk”. Yet there’s
still time for the Tories to
Call Me By Your Name: preview screenings
A n e xc l u s i ve o p p o r t u n i t y fo r s u b s c r i b e r s
It’s 1983 in northern Italy, amid the sun drenched splendour Elio and Oliver will discover the beauty of
awakening desire that will change their lives forever. Call Me By Your Name (Cert 15) will be released on Friday,
October 27 but subscribers can see it first and free on Thursday, October 19.
Book tickets now at mytimesplus.co.uk
mytimesplus.co.uk
is to build a new hall from scratch on
a different site. More than ever this
looks like the right way forward. Yet
it too relies on the precarious
strategy of offering naming rights to
one super-rich philanthropist or
corporation, while being careful not
to alienate others whose money will
also be needed.
That will require silky diplomatic
skills, to put it mildly — but at
least those managing the London
project can look at the mess in
New York and avoid making the
same mistakes.
jump on the grime
bandwagon. Despite
#Grime4Corbyn, the
report discovers that
22 per cent of grime
fans actually voted
Conservative.
As for the comparison
with punk, let’s not forget
that, despite all the noise
that punk made in its
late-1970s heyday, it was
still Thatcher who won
the 1979 election.
Dune by dune and
dispute by dispute,
one of the great
recreational visions
of our time is slowly
being realised. It’s
the England Coast
Path, which Natural
England is on track
to complete by
2020. Every section
has thrown up
problems — of
balancing the rights
of landowners and
ramblers, protecting
wildlife and
livestock, coping
with rising sea levels
and erosion, and a
thousand other
issues. On top of
that, government
spending cuts have
more than once
threatened to
terminate the
project or put it into
cold storage.
Yet in three years
we should be able to
walk all 2,795 miles
of England’s coast.
Just as well, perhaps,
given the possibility
that by then we will
have crashed out of
the EU without any
sort of deal. With
flights grounded,
visas required even
for a day in Calais
and sterling plunging
against the euro,
rambling holidays
round rain-swept
Essex marshes
may suddenly seem
very attractive.
EVENT
the times | Friday October 13 2017
7
1GT
arts
THE
CRITICS
Ed Potton
has fun with the new Lego movie p9
Will Hodgkinson
falls for the rapturous St Vincent p10
Rachel Campbell-Johnston
is disappointed in Tate St Ives p12
The Snowman you want to melt
LMK MEDIA
connection between the snowman
killer and an unsolved nine-year-old
murder case that involved another
hard-drinking, rule-breaking
maverick detective, played by a
seemingly discomfited Val Kilmer,
with lips barely moving and
dialogue badly dubbed, it would
appear, by Lee Marvin.
It gets worse. Katrine pursues the
killer using a covert high-tech gadget
that’s essentially a suitcase-sized iPad
(it’s titter-inducing and very Naked
Gun). There’s a subplot involving a
billionaire industrialist running a sexslave sideline (yep, one of them) that
roars into view then fizzles out with no
explanation. Meanwhile, the death of a
pivotal character is fudged (are they
actually dead or just a bit blue?),
the big film
This disastrous
adaptation of the
icy literary thriller
by Jo Nesbo is a
Scandi noir dud,
says Kevin Maher
T
here is, somewhere out
there, an alternative
universe in which The
Snowman is a triumph.
In that other place the
combined talents of
the Bafta-winning
director Tomas
Alfredson (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy,
Let the Right One In), the Oscarnominated co-writer Hossein Amini
(The Wings of a Dove) and a prestige
cast led by the double Oscar nominee
Michael Fassbender have produced
a peerless Scandi-noir thriller.
Successful and globally adored, it
will be only the first of 11 adaptations
of Jo Nesbo’s bestselling Harry
Hole adventures and will reinvent
Fassbender as a cynical Nordic
Bond for our time. In our world,
unfortunately, The Snowman is
mostly terrible.
It’s confused. It’s clichéd. It’s
dated, dubious and unintentionally
silly. Fassbender plays Hole, a
hard-drinking, rule-breaking detective
who has seemingly emerged straight
from an Eighties time machine to
wander the streets of Oslo in an
alcoholic funk and occasionally stalk
his ex-girlfriend, Rakel (Charlotte
Gainsbourg, playing nothing more
complex than “useful emotional
leverage in future scenes with villain”).
Luckily for Harry a serial killer soon
appears. This is Norway, after all. A
sparsely populated country of five
million people and God knows how
classic
film
of the
week
The detective
has seemingly
emerged from
a time machine
made a snowman? It’s not that easy.
The snow can be wrong. You need
tons of space to roll the balls. Plus
our serial killer always has just the
right-sized twigs to do the arms, even
in an area, like an empty concrete
cellar, with no trees. Does he bring
the twigs with him? Does he pre-make
the face ball?
These questions would hardly
matter if the film had a semblance of
narrative logic and coherence. Instead
Hole is partnered with a new female
recruit, Katrine (Rebecca Ferguson),
who in crime school has apparently
studied his greatest hits and sees a
clearly in the hope that they might
return when the success of this first
masterpiece justifies a sequel (don’t
hold your breath).
Fassbender does his best with an
extremely slight central protagonist
(gets drunk, is grumpy, has red eyes,
repeat), often playing him with gritty
integrity, as if he has just stumbled off
the set of an early-1970s John
Cassavetes movie. Ferguson and
Gainsbourg, with even less to play with,
sleepwalk through the proceedings with
a similar air of grim professionalism.
The ending is hopeless too, but by
then that’s not a surprise since it has
ceased to be unintentionally amusing.
Because The Snowman is not Showgirls
or Fifty Shades of Grey. It’s not the
latest Nicolas Cage action travesty
either. It’s not a cheap knock-off made
by second-rate personnel. It’s a serious
thriller, made for adult filmgoers, by
the best movie-makers in the business.
And that’s why it’s so depressing.
at how corny it was, and were baffled
about where, exactly, it was set. The
cast are half-American, half-English,
but all bad. The generic interiors (all
London) are clearly not American.
The plot is Gremlins gone mad,
with pleasure-seeking Frank (Sean
Chapman) buying a zany Rubik’s Cube
in Morocco, only to find that it rips
him apart with hooks and chains,
while summoning undead bondage
freaks from hell into his attic.
Never fear, Frank’s equally lusty
lover (Clare Higgins) has a plan. She
seduces men and murders them, so
Frank can be reanimated and torn
apart once more by the bondage
freaks from hell.
The gore-filled effects have really
dated, too. Oh no! They’re tearing a
piece of rubber apart, with hooks! The
horror, indeed.
Kevin Maher
Released in cinemas today
Walking in the air, we ain’t: Michael Fassbender as a hard-drinking maverick detective in The Snowman
The Snowman
15, 119min
{((((
Hellraiser
(1987)
18, 94min
{{(((
many serial killers. This one’s different,
though. He’s devious, merciless and
supremely intelligent. We know this
because his calling card is a snowman.
Yes, after murdering and
dismembering his female victims, our
killer, instead of biting them (like
Francis Dolarhyde in Red Dragon) or
dropping a moth cocoon into their
mouths (like Buffalo Bill in Silence of
the Lambs), builds his trademark
snowman. And not just any snowman,
either. But a proper thing, with three
quality balls of descending size, twigs
for arms and coffee beans for teeth.
Has anyone on this production ever
E
ven in the 1980s,
Hellraiser was
snicker-inducing.
Written and directed
by the horror
ssupremo Clive Barker, it was
a film you watched with your
friends and, once you got
over the shock of all
the pins in faces
and hooks in
skin, you giggled
8
1GT
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
film
arts reviews
Noah and his career arc
Dafoe”. Only she mispronounces it
as “William Dafoe” because the silly
boast isn’t enough in itself. Baumbach
wants you to know that Maureen is
awful, uncultured and probably lying.
Is there a film-maker out there who
delights in loathing their characters
more than Baumbach does?
A plot, of sorts, eventually surfaces,
involving a minor exhibition for
Harold, a potentially fatal fall, lots
Toxic, funny,
moving — this is
Noah Baumbach’s
best film yet, says
Kevin Maher
The Meyerowitz
Stories (New
and Selected)
Dustin Hoffman
plays a deluded
New York
patriarch
B
15, 112min
{{{{(
y turns gorgeously toxic
and deliciously feral,
the sheer intensity of
emotional aggression in
this, Noah Baumbach’s
best feature to date,
can be almost
overwhelming.
Released on Netflix and in Curzon
cinemas, the latest from the Brooklyn
writer-director is a study of familial
resentment starring Dustin Hoffman,
in his strongest role in years, as the
deluded New York patriarch Harold
Meyerowitz. Harold is a remarkable
creation. A passive-aggressive tyrant
and essentially failed sculptor, he is
certainly related to the failed writer
played by Jeff Daniels in Baumbach’s
breakout film of 2005, The Squid and
the Whale.
Harold never shouts, he never rages,
yet his mouth is a bubbling sewer that
spews out nothing but deluded
self-regard (“I’m doing the best work
of my life now,” he announces to
uninterested strangers) and cruel
dismissals of the adult children who
he feels are beneath his genius.
His elder son, Danny (Adam
Sandler), is an unemployed divorcé,
while Matthew (Ben Stiller) is a
successful Los Angeles-based
accountant. Both are regularly chided
Dustin Hoffman and
Emma Thompson in
The Meyerowitz Stories
(New and Selected)
by Harold for not being “artistic” (a
key theme in Baumbach’s movies is
creative snobbery).
Harold is matched, however, by his
wife, Maureen, fabulously played by
Emma Thompson in tie-dyed wraps,
fright wig and John Lennon specs.
Maureen is also self-obsessed, and is
best summed up by the scene in which
she describes a man’s face as “sinewy,
like an old lover of mine, Willem
What happens when 125 artists are
hired to hand-paint 62,000 frames of
film in the post-impressionist style of
Vincent van Gogh? You get an
indecently rich, visually sumptuous
viewing experience that animates
some of his most famous paintings.
Gasp as The Starry Night swirls and
moves. Swoon as the Café Terrace at
Night bubbles into life. And be
only mildly interested as the Polish
animator Dorota Kobiela tries to
concoct a narrative to justify all the
bravura stylism.
So we have Douglas Booth
as an inquisitive postmaster’s son
who is determined to understand
the truth about Van Gogh’s death
(suicide, murder or accident?).
He pings between paintings. He
talks to Van Gogh’s subjects.
But it hardly matters. Just watch
and enjoy.
School Life
6 Below
12A, 100min
12A, 96min
A year in the life of an idyllic junior
school, in a rustic setting, with caring
teachers nurturing shy and difficult
personalities. It could be a re-run of
Nicolas Philibert’s award-winning
documentary Être et Avoir, but this
time it’s set in Ireland and it’s about
Headfort School, a prep school
(Ireland’s only one, in fact), set in
sprawling old grounds in the lush
county of Meath. There are some
lovely observations from the directors
Neasa Ni Chianáin and David Rane,
especially the scenes of music lessons
(cue off-key Rihanna renditions). Yet
the lack of context or argument is
frustrating. Why, for instance, is a prep
school in Ireland educating Korean
and Russian children for Eton?
This is
based on
the true
story of Eric
LeMarque, a
professional ice
hockey playerr who got lost in 2004
while snowboarding in the High
Sierras, in California. Starring the
Nineties heartthrob Josh Hartnett,
above, as LeMarque, it manages to
hit the appropriate beats of this
snowbound survival tale (digs ice
shelters, scares off wolves, drinks
meltwater) while also being incredibly
dull. It’s like 127 Hours, only he’s not
stuck in the one place and he’s a bit
cold. Will he survive? Will he be stuck
on the mountain? Who cares?
Loving Vincent
12, 91min
{{{((
{{{((
Don’t you just hate it when you’re
having a dinner party in north London
to celebrate your promotion to the
opposition front benches and your
husband reveals that he’s having an
affair? Then your lesbian best friend
announces that she’s pregnant with
IVF triplets and the husband of your
other friend turns up, fully armed,
with the intention of killing someone?
This is the scatterbrained premise,
stunningly played and deftly executed,
of The Party, the funniest film yet from
The Party
15, 71min
{{{{(
Timothy Spall,
Cillian Murphy, Emily
Mortimer and Patricia
Clarkson in The Party
the writer-director Sally Potter
(Orlando). At 71 minutes, it’s a
breakneck one-act dash, with rapidfire ruminations on God, the health
service and money and built around a
towering turn from Kristin Scott
Thomas as the new shadow minister.
There are scenes where Scott
Thomas plays several competing
emotions simultaneously, often
through grimaces alone, but with
masterful aplomb. What do we want?
More Scott Thomas comedies! Now!
of sniping in a hospital, a cameo
appearance from Sigourney Weaver
(playing Sigourney Weaver) and a
chance for brothers Danny and
Matthew to bond. Here Stiller and
Sandler are the perfect pair, both
gifted at playing wounded eccentrics.
And while Sandler is allowed scenes
of violent, expressive fury (he is
Harold’s resentment brought to life), it
is Stiller’s character who must deliver
the painful truths, wondering aloud:
“If Harold wasn’t a great artist, that
means he was just a prick.”
There are moments of optimism
and beauty in all this, and they often
feature Danny’s idealistic and ebullient
daughter (a star-making turn from
Grace Van Patten). But the film is
ultimately a bittersweet battering,
with the emphasis on the bitter.
{{(((
the times | Friday October 13 2017
9
1GT
arts
film reviews
The Ritual
15, 94min
{{(((
An unholy combination of Deliverance,
The Blair Witch Project, The Wicker
Man and Loaded, David Bruckner’s
Brit horror follows a group of
thirtysomething mates to the Swedish
wilderness, where they honour the
memory of a murdered friend with
hiking, cringeworthy “bantz” and a
series of limp scares.
Rafe Spall is as watchable as ever
as Luke, who is haunted for not
intervening in the assault on his dead
pal. However, the rest of the group are
a paper-thin rabble that include
Robert James-Collier (Thomas the
footman from Downton Abbey), the
rather wet Arsher Ali and a deeply
annoying Ed Balls lookalike played by
Sam Troughton. You yearn for them
to be disembowelled by the monster
in the woods. They are, praise be,
but any tension fizzles away in the
pagan-tastic finale.
Boy
Still mad about the toys
The animated
franchise returns
with a perky script
and a terrific cat,
purrs Ed Potton
S
talking the Lego city of
Ninjago is a huge and
petrifying monster.
Animated plastic citizens
run screaming as it pads
along the building-block
streets, dashing down
skyscrapers and launching
itself at aircraft. Is it an alien? A robot?
A dinosaur, perhaps? No, this
loathsome predator is . . . a realisticlooking house cat, picking its way
bemusedly through the candycoloured cartoon world. Prepare
yourself for the sandpaper-tongued
(and actually very cute) terror that is
Meowthra!
The Lego Movie had its earworm
theme song, Everything is Awesome,
The Lego Batman Movie had a deeply
self-referential Caped Crusader, and
this latest joyous instalment in the
franchise has Meowthra (the name is a
nod to Mothra, the winged antagonist
in the Godzilla films). It’s surely the
best use of a feline on film since Jones
in Alien. Co-directed by Charlie Bean
(SpongeBob Squarepants), Paul Fisher
(How to Train Your Dragon) and Bob
Logan (Madagascar), this will for ever
be known as the movie with the
massive moggy. Which is helpful
because, let’s face it, Ninjago doesn’t
quite have the recognition factor of
Batman. Unless you’re a small child, in
which case it may well be the best
thing in the world.
Featuring a line of Lego toys that
became a TV series, it’s the saga of a
team of colour-coded teenage ninjas
who fight evil using martial arts and
an array of whizzy vehicles — a
robotic dragon, an aquatic spider and a
war machine fitted with record decks
so that its pilot can scratch while he
skirmishes. Which is pretty much
perfect fodder for the kind of intricate,
anarchic and thrilling animation that
the Lego films do so well.
Dave Franco voices the head ninja,
Lloyd, who, when he’s not doing
somersaults, gets a hard time at school
because he is the son of Garmadon,
the preening, four-armed super-villain.
Your popularity with your peers is
bound to take a knock when your
father is launching daily attacks on
your home city from his volcano lair.
As voiced by Justin Theroux, sounding
like a dead ringer for Alec Baldwin,
Garmadon is a dad from hell to rank
with Dr Evil in the Austin Powers
The Lego
Ninjago Movie
U, 101min
{{{{(
The Times
Film Show
Kevin Maher and
Ed Potton discuss
The Snowman
thetimes.co/uk/arts
Double Date
15, 89min
{{{((
Two sisters lure lustful males back to
their mansion and stab them to pieces
to the strains of Yazoo’s Only You in
Benjamin Barfoot’s feature debut,
which shapes up to be a standard if
stylish horror before taking an
intoxicated detour into Inbetweenersstyle comedy. Not all the gags hit their
Kelly Wenham, Georgia Groome, Michael Socha and Danny Morgan
films, hilariously offensive and
consistently mispronouncing his son’s
name as “Le Loyd”.
That’s just one of a hoard of sly
treats for parents. The perky script not
only proves that there’s still mileage in
gags about Lego figures having no
fingers, just clawlike “cup-holders”; it
also satirises kung-fu movies, Amazon
reviews, draconian despots, the
sensational reporting of disasters on
TV and, of course, Donald Trump
(Garmadon’s sing-song syntax has
more than a hint of the orange one’s).
Jackie Chan voices Master Wu, the
ninjas’ spiritual leader and spouter of
“needlessly cryptic metaphors”.
A strength of The Lego Movie was its
live-action framing device, featuring
Will Ferrell as another rubbish father,
while a flaw of The Lego Batman Movie
was its lack of one. So hurrah that
they have reintroduced the trick here,
with a non-animated prologue and
epilogue, featuring Chan again, with
eyebrow fully cocked. The conceit is
that Chan’s shopkeeper is acting out
the whole story of the film for a young
customer with Lego figures and —
ta-dah — his pet cat.
Just as Toy Story did by featuring an
owner of the toys, it reminds us that
these films are about play and
imagination. Yes, they’re also
effectively feature-length adverts for
Lego, but this is rampant capitalism at
its most arch and entertaining.
mark but the central quartet all have
their charms: Kelly Wenham’s
bloodthirsty vamp, her reluctant
sibling (Georgia Groome) and the next
men on their kill list: one cocksure
(Michael Socha), the other (Danny
Morgan), a dweeb who signed up to a
virgins’ dating site and received his
only reply from a 12 year-old Chinese
boy. It’s all done with vim and it
doesn’t take itself too seriously; just as
well given the lurid violence and
black-magic subplot.
15, 87min
{{{{(
Much-garlanded in its native New
Zealand in 2010, Taika Waititi’s wonky
coming-of-age comedy finally gets a
deserved UK release. The year is 1984,
and Michael Jackson and ET loom
large in the bored rural life of Boy
(James Rolleston), a hapless 11-yearold Maori kid whose more
flamboyantly named relatives include
Dallas, Dynasty and Falcon Crest.
With their mother dead and their
grandmother away, Boy and his family
have to fend for themselves until the
return of his errant father (an amusing
Waititi), with his ridiculous
pompadour, epic weed habit and
delusions of grandeur.
It’s best described as a Kiwi
Napoleon Dynamite, gawky, deadpan
and poignant like that cult hit, with a
smattering of great lines such as:
“You’ll end up like all those other
dopeheads round here, laughing at
nothing and crying at everything.”
Bitch
15, 93min
{{(((
An intriguing premise becomes a bit of
a dog’s dinner in Marianna Palka’s
dark indie parable. Apparently
inspired by a patient of the Scottish
psychiatrist RD Laing, it
tells the tale of Jill (Palka), a
downtrodden American housewife
who starts acting like a dog —
barking, crawling on all fours and
rolling around in her own faeces.
It sounds like a comedy, but there’s
little that’s funny about Jill’s situation
— she’s clearly suffering from a severe
mental illness. The message is clear —
her doormat existence has reduced
her to the status of an animal — but
Palka undercuts that by concentrating
for most of the film on her selfish
douchebag of a husband (Jason Ritter).
With Jill growling depressingly in the
basement, his attempts to get the
children to school and work the
washing machine do provide some
comedy, but it’s of the clichéd Daddy
Day Care variety, which clashes rather
with the feminist satire. A mess.
10
1GT
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
arts
music reviews
St Vincent, the
patron saint of
sparkling music
I
This album is near-perfect, writes Will Hodgkinson
t would be easy to get annoyed
by Annie Clark, for reasons of
envy if nothing else. As St
Vincent she has become the
poster girl for a new kind of pop
pretentiousness. She’s a beautiful,
stylish, gender-fluid polymath
who thinks nothing of appearing
on stage dressed as a toilet or
honouring her various hairstyles with
their own names (“Audrey Hepburn
with anger-management issues” was
a good one).
And if that isn’t enough, just
imagine the kind of overachieving kid
who ran the school theatre club and
wrote Bertrand Russell quotes on her
bedroom wall while growing up in
Texas before becoming one half of
a music/fashion super-couple with
Cara Delevingne and gracing every
fashion-week front row going.
Even the cover of Clarke’s new
album, Masseduction, in which she
shows off her shapely legs and bottom
in avant-garde fashion, is annoying
(yet titillating). However, you can’t
stay annoyed for long because, on the
strength of Masseduction, Clark is
some sort of a genius.
It’s a close-to-perfect creation,
unique and filled with character, yet
accessible and catchy. Her lyrics are
culled from experience — there is
a lot seemingly inspired by the end
of Clark’s 18-month relationship with
Delevingne — while at the same
time being outward-facing enough to
address such varied topics as America’s
avalanche of pharmaceuticals, the
vagaries of desire and the dominion
of public images over private lives.
The obvious comparison is Talking
Heads, who also knew how to present
strange ideas in appealing ways, but
35-year-old Clark reveals more
vulnerability, tenderness and
sensuality than David Byrne (with
whom she made an album in 2012).
There isn’t a bad track on here,
and some deserve special mention.
Los Ageless has the icy beats and
space-age syntheziser riffs of a
nightclub floor-filler, but when we
reach the chorus, with Clark asking,
“How could anybody have you and
lose you and not lose their mind?”
with a quiver of desperation, it
becomes something else entirely.
Pills, which has the manic phrasing
of the Tom Tom Club’s Wordy
Rappinghood, reflects a society in
which there are “pills to f***, pills to
eat, pills, pills, pills down the kitchen
sink”. And Slow Disco, which is slow
but not exactly disco, is a beautiful and
terribly sad portrait about knowing
you can’t be a part of somebody’s
world, with Clark going to a glitzy
pop
St Vincent
Masseduction
Loma Vista/Caroline
International
{{{{{
She is
funny,
sexy,
eccentric,
revealing
and
perceptive
Essential
tracks
Django Django
Tic Tac Toe
The galloping guitars
and harmonies recall
their first album.
PartyNextDoor
Damage
Synth-splashed R&B
feat, the spunky Halsey.
Brooke Bentham
Losing, Baby
Austere beauty from
the South Shields
singer-songwriter.
Hear these and more at
spoti.fi/essentialtracks
fashion do and promising to “slip my
hand from your hand, and leave you
dancing with a ghost”.
Masseduction is not so unique that
it exists in a vacuum. It has elements
of Sparks’ wit, Kate Bush’s romance,
Kraftwerk’s sympathy for robot life,
and LCD Soundsystem’s knowing cool.
When Clark sings, “You’re the only
motherf***er in New York who can
stand me,” on New York, she could be
a female version of Lou Reed singing
to his third wife, Laurie Anderson.
The producer, Jack Antonoff, who
has worked with Lorde and Taylor
Swift, has ensured the album will be
aurally acceptable to a millennial
generation weaned on contemporary
pop. Mostly, though, Masseduction is
the sound of an accomplished artist
channelling personal pain into strange
new music. St Vincent has proved that
you can be funny, sexy, eccentric,
revealing and perceptive, all on one
sparkling album. Frankly, it isn’t fair.
Wu-Tang Clan
The Saga Continues
eOne
{{{((
Martin Shkreli, the former chief
executive officer of Turing
Pharmaceuticals, paid $2 million for
the sole copy of a previous album by
the Wu-Tang Clan before hiking the
price of a lifesaving drug by 5,000 per
cent and going to jail for fraud. He has
discovered respect is something that
cannot be bought.
“My price hikin’ like the pills
Martin Shkreli sell,” mocks Redman
on Lessons Learn’d. It’s one of the
18 tracks of an album that returns to
the Staten Island rappers’ trademark
mix of cinematic samples, comic-book
humour and violent portraits of street
hustling. Pearl Harbor is the album’s
epic, with the production overlord
RZA, Method Man and Sean Price
pitching in menacingly.
Meanwhile, People Say offers a
primer in the life of a drug dealer
and Why Why Why takes on
America’s increasingly
ngly
fractious racial
landscape against
lilting reggae. The
Wu-Tang Clan
have been called
the greatest rap
group for good
reason. Although
this breaks no new
ground, it’s still
a masterclass in
bruising hip-hop.
King Krule
The OOZ
Beck
Colors
{{{{(
{{(((
XL Recordings
Archy Marshall was but a teenager
when in 2012 he was hailed as
the great hope of British music,
reflecting on the gloomier aspects of
adolescence in a Joe Strummer growl
against hip-hop, jazz and dischordant
post-punk. On his second album the
southeast Londoner is in crepuscular
mood, capturing the ennui of the small
hours with moody jazz and the lyrical
equivalent
of night terrors. “Nothing
q
is working
workin with me,” he wails on
Slush Puppy,
the gentleness of
P
the music
highlighting the
m
pain of the words.
Nineteen
meandering
N
reflections of interior
ref
misery are a lot to get
mi
through,
but there are so
thr
many
m
an remarkable moments
that
that iit’s easy to slip into
Marshall’s
Marsha late-night world.
Archy Marshall aka King Krule
Virgin EMI
For the past two decades Beck has led
the way. Whether digging deep into
freaky funk or introspective folk-rock,
the auteur from LA has been endlessly
imitated, never matched. Now the
tables have turned. The title track of
Colors features electronic pan pipes,
that scourge of cheesy pop in 2017,
while Seventh Heaven sounds like an
indie band who turned up for the
photo shoot but forgot to plug their
guitars in. And I never thought I
would see the day when Beck did a
Coldplay imitation called Fix Me.
He is skilled enough to construct
derivative pop; from a lesser talent the
album would be impressive. Dreams is
filled with hooks, and the rapping on
I’m So Free has the maniacal insistence
of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. But this
is the man behind such masterpieces
as Midnite Vultures and Morning Phase.
Compared with those classics, Colors
is a big disappointment.
the times | Friday October 13 2017
11
1GT
NEDDA AFSARI
arts
radio
Should we grill or coax
our radio interviewees?
Catherine
Nixey
Radio
review
Iain Dale
LBC, Tues, 5pm
I
The Letters of Sylvia Plath
Radio 4, Mon-Fri, 10.45am
St Vincent
t wasn’t exactly a Paxo grilling.
“And then,” Iain Dale said to
Theresa May, “Freddie the Frog
came. What went through your
head then?” It was the second
question in Tuesday afternoon’s
LBC interview with the prime
minister — or as the station was
excitably marketing it: “Theresa May’s
first interview since THAT speech.”
The rest of the interview was barely
more challenging than that question
about the coughing. The tone was
genial. There was a joke or two.
There was even (those of you who
usually listen to Radio 4 might want
to look away now) a phone-in. Helen
rang in from Horsham to ask about
cough medicine. Callum rang in
from Northampton and confessed to
being a young Tory, and doubtless had
to spend Wednesday hiding in his
locker at school.
This is not how British politics is
done on radio. As any fule kno, British
politics is adversarial. Our Victorian
forebears were (allegedly) spaced two
swords’ length apart in parliament to
stop them from duelling. Modern
politicians are expected to duel in
their turn; in PMQs, on telly and
especially on Radio 4’s Today.
Proper interviewers reference
“Freddie the Frog”.
Which is a pity. Because, as it turned
out, all this LBC geniality succeeded
where many a more aggressive
interview had failed. It gave a couple
of good news stories. More than that,
this interview worked as a piece of
radio. What is the point of an
interview? To get stories, yes. But also
— and for most people this is more
important — to get a sense of the
person. What they are like. To relax
them. Engage them. Not too much.
You don’t want Desert Island Discs.
But you want more than you
often get from Today. It has
mellowed a bit recently,
but all too often John
Humphrys’s
questions
dominate his
interviewees’
answers. The
new editor
Sarah Sands
and presenter
Nick Robinson
— far from a
blunt instrument
nt
— have improved
ed
Today a bit, but
it can still be
aggressively male.
le. That
locking of swords
ds works well
for some interviewees.
ewees. A swordsman
such as Boris Johnson, Eton and
Oxford-trained, flourishes in such
an environment.
Many don’t. Hillary Clinton’s
autobiography has been much
discussed for the way in which —
relaxed at home with that glass
of chardonnay, away from the
trouser-suited, aggressively male
American political world — she
sounds less like the Hillarybot
and more like someone you
would vote for.
Here, May went easier on the strong
and stable and chatted a bit more
about the cough linctus. No, she didn’t
unbutton completely. Yes, there were
evasions. Yes, Dale — a former Tory
candidate — might have been too
easy. But as a listener you got more
of a sense of her than you had yet.
Why didn’t you take some honey
for that speech, asked one concerned
LBC listener. I’m diabetic, said May
— another nugget. You can’t imagine
Humphrys coaxing out personal
details through questions on
cough linctus.
More of the personal in The
Letters of Sylvia
Sylvi Plath on
Radio 4, though
little
th
that was restrained.
Plath, left, was as
volatile
volat as the sky;
every
eve encounter
seemed
to result
see
in a new gush
of emotion,
especially
when
es
she
sh wrote of
falling
in love
fa
with
wit Ted
Hughes,
a “large,
Hug
hulking,
hulki healthy
Adam, half-French,
half-Irish with
a voice like the
t thunder
of God”. And, the passage of
time proved, another sw
swordsman.
It’s impossible to listen to anything
about Plath without hearing her
future in the past, and the abridgers
of this didn’t stint on the dramatic
irony, especially in the closing
sentence. “We will be so happy
together,” wrote Plath of her new
marriage to Hughes. “Wish us luck.”
Giving Vaughan Williams the deep freeze
O
nce upon a time Britain
sent herring to Bergen.
Now we’re sending
our conductors and our
music. Edward Gardner,
the chief conductor of the Bergen
Philharmonic, recently toured the
UK with his new orchestra and
showcased not just glossy Grieg, but,
less predictably, electrifying Walton.
Meanwhile, the conductor Andrew
Davis has been clocking up works by
Vaughan Williams with the same
orchestra, a cycle on Chandos that
concludes with one of the composer’s
most awesome works — and one of
his most intimate.
Norway’s second city is, overall,
more damp and chilly than frozen
and blasted, but the Bergen Phil
finds a clear affinity with the
Sinfonia Antartica. On previous
showings I’ve found the piece lacking
cohesion — the composer drew it
together from his score for the 1948
classical
Andrew Davis
Sinfonia
Antartica
Chandos
{{{{(
Andrew Davis
film Scott of the Antarctic — but
there’s an inexorability about this
performance and a strong tragic
undertow that makes it a compelling
listen throughout. Davis
authoritatively builds up the tension
without any fussiness, and even the
diffuse scherzo, which includes a motif
apparently imitating the waddling gait
of penguins, has a disorientating
lurching energy: this isn’t Happy Feet.
In the Sinfonia Antartica Vaughan
Williams set himself the tricky
challenge of using a symphony —
most clearly associated with heroic
struggle — to depict emptiness and
failure. This is brilliantly pulled off
here in the churning textures of the
third movement (man versus nature
— no contest), capped by the great
white blast of an organ.
Ambiguous consolation, but
never easy sentiment, is
offered in the delicately
contrasting intermezzo and
an uneasy, etiolated finale.
You’ll need your nerves
settling after that, and
balm is supplied by the
cultivated baritone of
Roderick Williams in Vaughan
Williams’s little-known Four Last
Songs, settings of intimate poems by
his second wife, Ursula, that date from
the last years of the composer’s life.
Tender confessions always sound good
when performed by Roderick Williams
— sometimes it barely seems as if he’s
singing — so it was a canny decision
to allot this music to a baritone for the
first time, and Williams’s voice sits
nicely alongside the mellow colours of
Anthony Payne’s 2013 orchestrations.
The second rarity on the album
sheds another light on Vaughan
Williams: the Piano Concerto in C
major in its 1946 version for two
pianos. Mercurial, sometimes
hard-edged, sometimes romantically
daydreamy, it’s not top drawer, but it’s
persuasively done here. The pianists
Louis Lortie and Hélène Mercier
intelligently join the dots, by turns
skittish and reflective.
Neil Fisher
12
1GT
arts
visual art
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
MIKE NEWMAN FOR THE TIMES; REBECCA WARREN/COURTESY MAUREEN PALEY, LONDON/MATTHEW MARKS GALLERY, NEW YORK/ GALERIE MAX HETZLER, BERLIN/TATE
The new gallery is
carved into the rock
at Tate St Ives
Great space, shame about the art
I should like to
spend my whole
life reading it...
Northanger Abbey
Get a
£50
Amazon.co.uk
Gift Card when
you subscribe
to the TLS
Find a lifelong companion in the
Times Literary Supplement, the
world’s leading international literary
journal 1 year (50 issues) at £120
plus £50 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card
To subscribe visit tlssubs.imbmsubs.
com/amazon50 or call 01293 312178
& quote code AMAZON50
Amazon.co.uk is not a sponsor of this promotion. Amazon.co.uk Gift
Cards (“GCs”) may be redeemed on the Amazon.co.uk website towards the
purchase of eligible products available on www.amazon.co.uk. GCs cannot
be reloaded, resold, transferred for value, redeemed for cash or applied to
any other account. Amazon.co.uk is not responsible if a GC is lost, stolen,
destroyed or used without permission. See www.amazon.co.uk/gc-legal for
complete terms and conditions. GCs are issued by Amazon EU S.à r.l. All
Amazon ®, ™ & © are IP of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates.
The St Ives gallery
upstages its debut
show, says Rachel
Campbell-Johnston
S
tand on the seafront and
look through the great
curve of glass that forms
the façade of Tate St Ives.
You see a big, outlined
woman caught in mid-leap.
Arms reaching, legs
kicking, breasts bouncing,
she hurls herself spreadeagled across
an abstract backdrop. Roger Hilton’s
much-loved Oi Yoi Yoi certainly makes
an enthusiastic meet-and-greet figure
as, after long months of closure for a
thorough redevelopment, Tate finally
reopens its southwestern outpost.
Rebecca Warren is the artist chosen
to introduce us to a striking gallery
that has been carved out of the cliff.
This new space is impressive. And
although later exhibitions may make
use of moveable partitions, for this
inaugural show it can be seen in its
glorious, fully open expanse.
A couple of dozen sculptures of
assorted sizes are scattered about;
solitary monoliths and loosely
gathered groups. The arrangement
feels enticingly rhythmic. It articulates
the emptiness. At its best this display
works to show off the new gallery
spaces extremely well.
Beyond that, all but the art-world
anorak will surely feel a bit let
down. Couldn’t curators have come
up with something a bit more
exciting to inaugurate this amazing
gallery? It takes a card-carrying
postmodernist to discover the point
of Warren’s sculpture.
All That Heaven Allows — the title is
taken from a 1955 Hollywood film —
is the artist’s first big solo show in this
country for eight years. Her work has
moved on from the Rodin-meetsRobert-Crumb lumpy clay
figures that won her a 2006
Turner prize nomination.
Warren creates images that are
wilfully fluid. She works in clay,
bronze, steel and neon; paper and
pom-poms. She finds her ideas all
over the place. You might spot Picasso
combined with a pop song; or De
Kooning adorned with a tartan
criss-cross. You will never quite be able
to explain these strange amalgams.
Those who aren’t firmly plugged into
contemporary artistic fashions will
most probably be disappointed. But
don’t worry because, if you start with
the new gallery, you will perk up when
you discover that this is just one extra
feature that Tate St Ives can offer. The
expanded museum can now present
you with what it should always have
had in the first place: a permanent
exhibition of the work of the artists
who put St Ives at the heart of Britain’s
modernist map.
Couldn’t curators
have come up
with something
more exciting?
A suite of six or seven galleries —
their displays will be refreshed
regularly — take you on a
chronological trip through a century
of modernism. You are introduced to
the main players of the St Ives story,
Barbara Hepworth, Ben Nicholson,
Alfred Wallis and Henry Moore
prominent among them. Yet, even as
the display shows you several of their
iconic pieces — Hepworth’s beautifully
balanced 1935 marble Three Forms or
Christopher Wood’s extraordinary
1930 painting Zebra and Parachute —
the hang emphasises that there is no
single narrative of modernism. Right
from the beginning the show puts its
focus on diversity.
The curators emphasise that
pioneering artists shared influences;
they looked at ethnographic carving
or the naive paintings of the retired
Cornish fisherman Alfred Wallis.
They also shared ideas. Like-minded
talents are gathered together. A white
relief by Nicholson hangs alongside
a Mondrian abstract.
The display moves onwards, through
the era of the Second World War,
where the works shown in a
deliberately sparsely hung gallery
capture a prevailing mood of austerity,
to a brighter gallery revelling in the
work of a second generation of St Ives
talents, in the bright colours of
Patrick Heron or Roger Hilton.
And from there it moves
outwards and links the
modernist vision that was
m
fostered
in this tiny seaside village
fo
with
w the wider world. Works by
Hepworth
are shown alongside
H
pieces by the Cuban Carmen Herrera
or the Lebanese Saloua Raouda
Choucair. Even as visitors are given
exactly what they want, the curators
persuade
them to look a bit farther,
p
expand
their expectations.
e
Little wonder that Oi Yoi Yoi greets
the visitor so exuberantly. A gallery
that for too long has been left to
languish
on its laurels is
l
relaunched into a new world
of vibrant possibilities.
Tate St Ives reopens tomorrow
Los Hadeans III and VII
by Rebecca Warren
the times | Friday October 13 2017
13
1GT
first night
arts
ALASTAIR MUIR
Dance
Origami
Battersea Power
Station, SW11
T
{{{((
aking photographs during
a performance is commonly
prohibited, but this show is
anything but common. An
entirely novel and highly
photogenic interpretation of the
Japanese art of paper-folding, the
40-minute solo is presented outdoors
— and free of charge — twice a day
in five London locations by Dance
Umbrella. It’s a festival curtain-raiser,
but one without a curtain.
Origami was created in France by
the dancer, choreographer and circus
artist Satchie Noro and the builder,
designer and poet Silvain Ohl.
Although it doesn’t necessarily expand
in the imagination or provide an
especially deep poetic resonance, their
cunning collaboration is still quietly
spectacular. The gist of it is a duet
between Noro and a shape-shifting
orange shipping container. Clad in
a few colourful layers of street clothes,
but sans harnessing, Noro carefully
walks, spins on, hangs and swings
from the huge metal object’s surfaces
and edges. While Noro’s mood
sometimes seems a touch dreamy, her
movement is always elegant, articulate
and serenely, securely decisive.
You get a sense, at times, that she
loves the container, which, for its part,
has been discreetly cut into geometric
segments that keep opening and
closing via a series of internal pulleys.
At one point Noro tenderly strokes
one of the taut cables holding its parts
together; a bit later she briefly uses
another cable as a tightrope, then
stretches out and suspends herself
from it. Yet Noro also harbours a
violent streak, revealed when she
wields an axe before crashing it down
on the container’s top. The suggestion
here could be that love hurts.
Part of the pleasure of this
ambiguous performance is seeing it
against an urban backdrop. On the
opening day it was Battersea Power
Station and a veritable ballet of cranes
and machinery accompanying the
area’s transformation. Fred Costa’s
evocative score is another welcome
element of Origami. Worth venturing
out for, whatever the weather.
Donald Hutera
Origami runs to Sun. Details:
danceumbrella.co.uk
Theatre
The End of Hope
Soho Theatre, W1
T
{{{{(
he Northern Irish playwright
David Ireland gave us one of
the best — and easily the
most astonishing — plays of
2016 with Cyprus Avenue.
In it, a Belfast loyalist named Eric
becomes obsessed with the idea that
his month-old granddaughter is Gerry
Adams. He goes as far as to draw a
beard on her with permanent marker.
The End of Hope (which is a coproduction between Soho Theatre and
the Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond)
begins with a man indulging in some
vigorous rumpy-pumpy with a 5ft
mouse. Ireland, clearly, likes to grab
Wallis Giunta and Quirijn de Lang in Trouble in Tahiti
Bad marriages,
great operas
Opera North makes a compelling case
for a pair of 20th-century rarities about
unholy wedlock, says Richard Morrison
Opera
Osud/Trouble
in Tahiti
Grand, Leeds
{{{{(
L
eos Janácek’s intense,
obsessive Osud (Fate) and
Leonard Bernstein’s laid-back,
bitter-sweet Trouble in Tahiti
are miles apart in atmosphere
and musical style, but they share two
traits that make them an intriguing
double bill in Opera North’s The Little
Greats season of one-act operas.
Both are autobiographical and both
reflect bleakly on failed marriages. If
yours is heading for the rocks, you
might be better advised to spend the
evening down the boozer, rather than
seeing your anguish mirrored in song.
On the other hand, the two shows
are too good to miss. Osud is about
a composer (John Graham-Hall,
your attention. We’re in Belfast
again, where Janet and Dermot
have hooked up via the internet
for a night of casual sex. “I’ve
never had sex with a giant mouse
before,” says Dermot, post-coitus.
“That was nice,” says Janet,
the mouse.
Ireland is no gimmicky writer,
however, and just as Eric’s
baby-Gerry delusion was a
device with which to eviscerate
sectarian politics, so Janet’s
mouse costume — which
Elinor Lawless wears
throughout — is an entry
point to a freewheeling,
majestically entertaining,
all-too-brief hour that touches
on everything from religion
Rufus Wright and Elinor
Lawless in David Ireland’s play
compellingly driven) so fixated on
writing his opera that he overlooks the
despair in his wife (Giselle Allen, very
touching) or the legacy of trauma
crippling his son. A mad, interfering
mother-in law doesn’t help, especially
when vested with Rosalind Plowright’s
trumpeting power.
All this is staged by Annabel Arden
in a surreal whirl that evokes
joyous spa town, claustrophobic
apartment and music conservatoire
with minimum props and scenery.
There are seasoned supporting
performances, superb choruses and
punchy, energised orchestral playing
under Martin André’s direction.
You can understand why Osud is
rarely seen. Compared with Janácek’s
bigger operas, it is episodic and
experimental. Yet its music veers from
near-Straussian lyricism to passages
that seem wrenched from some inner
neurosis. When delivered as well as
this, it demands to be heard.
Trouble in Tahiti was Bernstein’s first
opera, written in 1952, and it has
strange aspects too. Depicting a listless
marriage in suburban America (the
title refers to an escapist movie that
the couple go to see, rather than
talking to each other), it was partly
composed by the gay Bernstein on his
own honeymoon, which seems like an
act of supreme irony or prophecy or
both. His biographers, however, think
that the witty, wry libretto (which he
wrote himself) reflected his parents’
marriage rather than his own.
Either way, it’s a fabulously nuanced
piece for two characterful singeractors (here the outstanding Wallis
Giunta and Quirijn de Lang), plus a
suave close-harmony trio (Fflur Wyn,
Joseph Shovelton and Nicholas
Butterfield), who sing hilariously bland
eulogies to the American Dream in
radio-jingle style. Matthew Eberhardt’s
slick staging and Charles Edwards’s
designs match those jingles with big
billboard advertisements.
And the score, lovingly conducted
by Tobias Ringborg, is terrific, ranging
from moody jazz riffs to gorgeously
yearning ballads. You sense the future
composer of West Side Story flexing his
Broadway muscles.
Box office: 0844 8482700, to Oct 21
Bruce Springsteen brings
his life and music to
the Broadway stage
First Night in the main paper
and identity to body
dysmorphia and the various
merits of ITV programming.
The pillow talk in this
devious little two-hander starts
iinnocently enough, but Dermot
starts to notice red flags when Janet
describes choking her husband to
death with a giant courgette and
dismisses Channel 4 as a network
for “gay, deaf Pakistanis”. Janet is
coarse, abrasive, witty and
dangerous — and she knows
how to push all of Dermot’s
woolly liberal buttons.
Dermot is left floundering,
not knowing if he is a man or
a mouse. “Don’t get me
started on Tony Blair!” he
cries, unprompted. Sublime.
Ireland’s plays are about
people at odds. With each
other: Catholic v Protestant,
Concert
London Sinfonietta/
Atherton
St John’s Smith Square, SW1
A
{{{{{
twist of the feather boa.
A shimmy of the hips.
An evening glove unpeeled.
“This is my lot in this
rum world,” sings the
showgirl, “to be a lowly handmaid of
the arts, so that the gentlemen
can get a thrill.”
Framed by muted brass, louche
snaps of woodwind and accordion,
the queasy glow of a steel drum and
the sullen kick of a banjo, the
stripper in Bertolt Brecht’s Gedanken
eines Revuemädchens is one of many
voices in Hans Werner Henze’s
song cycle Voices. Some are wry,
some are bitter. Some are seductive,
some are psychotic. Many, too
many, have been damaged by
experience.
Commissioned in 1973 by London
Sinfonietta and the conductor David
Atherton, Voices has either not aged
or simply become relevant again. Last
heard in London at a Late Night Prom
in 2006, it’s an angry, sexy, tender and
witty polemic. Its texts, uniformly
excellent, are drawn from poems by
Cuban, African-American, Italian,
German and Greek writers, and from
Ho Chi Minh’s Prison Diary. Its music
draws on Viennese waltzes, Weimar
cabaret songs, the sulky marches of
tinpot dictatorships, Renaissance
dance, baroque suspensions and
the dewy melancholy of Mahler’s
orchestral songs.
An electric guitar screams in neon
brights; ocarinas and musical glasses
wail in muffled grief; trombone, horn
and trumpet sound sarcastic fanfares.
Everyone in the ensemble has to play
a second or third part: popping
balloons for gunshots, ringing
handbells, humming, cat-calling,
stepping awkwardly into a mourning
chorus in The Worker.
Atherton and the London
Sinfonietta own this music and wore
it with pride as Victoria Simmonds
and Daniel Norman assumed the
characters of the stripper, the convict,
the revolutionary, the spinster, the
lover, the witness, the accuser: singing
solo and, in the blushing melismas of
Das Blumenfest, in duet. A powerful,
unforgettable account of this versatile,
thrilling work.
Anna Picard
Irish v British, ITV v Channel 4 —
but also, more importantly, with
themselves. His characters are walking
bundles of conflict, waging war
against different sides of their
personality, never quite able to make
peace with who they are. Dermot is
the chauvinist feminist, Janet the
outrageous recluse. The director, Max
Elton, wisely opts for a light touch,
putting Ireland’s rich dialogue front
and centre.
Rufus Wright is excellent as the
self-important Dermot, but it is
Lawless who embodies Ireland’s biting,
incandescent, thoroughly salty writing.
You could listen to her barbed asides,
in that east Belfast brogue, all evening.
Did I mention it is funny? It is.
Absolutely hilarious. This mouse roars.
Chris Bennion
Box office: 020 7478 0100. The
production runs to Nov 11
14
1GT
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
first
arts night
JOHAN PERSSON
Concert
Aurora Orchestra/Collon
St George’s, Bristol
Theatre
Cockpit
Lyceum, Edinburgh
V
T
{{{{(
ienna. City of Dreams. In
its tour through all 27 of
Mozart’s piano concertos,
the Aurora Orchestra has
stopped off in the Austrian
capital. This is where Mozart wrote
his greatest works and where, a
century later, Mahler honed his craft.
It’s also where Mozart fell into poverty.
Where Mahler was chased out by
antisemitism. Dreams are actually
sometimes nightmares.
If the pairing of these very different
Viennese composers left me feeling
“almost, but not quite” about the
programme, there were so many
memorable musical moments that it
didn’t really matter. Mahler’s moody,
early Piano Quartet is no masterpiece,
but I was won over by the impassioned
playing of the violinist Maia Cabeza,
the violist Max Baillie, the cellist
Sébastien van Kuijk and the pianist
John Reid. These same forces, with
added depth from the double bassist
Ben Griffiths and sensitive solo
playing from Reid, were also excellent
in a chamber arrangement of Mozart’s
Mahler provided
the evening’s
emotional heart
Piano Concerto No 11. The shift from
angst to cheer was initially almost
comical, but Mozart soon turned on
the charm.
Das Lied von der Erde was the
emotional heart, however. Mahler’s
deeply felt song-symphony based on
ancient Chinese poetry was performed
in Iain Farrington’s distillations for 16
instrumentalists. It was like looking at
a restored old master — the colours
came up far more brightly than
expected, from the horn call in Das
Trinklied vom Jammer der Erde and the
piccolo sunbursts of Von der Jugend, to
the lonely violin and oboe in Der
Einsame im Herbst and the ballerinabox violin in Von der Schönheit.
The tenor Andrew Staples
impressively hurled out his three wild
songs, but it was the mezzo Sarah
Connolly who sang straight from the
heart. I won’t forget her final Der
Abschied: that cool flute and menacing
double bass, then a voice of rich, lunar
beauty lighting up this long farewell.
Rebecca Franks
At Kings Place, N1, tomorrow
{{{{(
The set, by Rae Smith, is impressive, but the play is simplistic and more than a little depressing
A mythological mess
Rory Mullarkey
belabours the
point in his
clunky new
history play,
says Ann
Treneman
Theatre
Saint George
and the Dragon
Olivier
{{(((
Five stars for
The Killing of
a Sacred Deer
at the London
Film Festival
thetimes.co/uk/arts
I
t’s hard not to like St George as
played by John Heffernan, tall and
ungainly, naive, brave and just a bit
silly. He looks a bit like an Eric Idle
impersonator, always craning his
neck, looking round the huge Olivier
stage for his nemesis. “You can’t kill
the dragon,” he is told. “The dragon
is unkillable,” George, hands on
armoured hips, retorts. “But killing the
unkillable dragon is literally my job.”
This one’s for England, then, or,
perhaps En-ger-land. Rory Mullarkey’s
new play is a history-lite triptych
that feels, rather unnervingly, like a
smaller and less engaging version of
the 2012 Olympics opening ceremony.
He starts in the Middle Ages, when
dragons had three heads and so were
easier to spot. Next it’s the Industrial
Revolution, with soulless factories
belching fire. Finally, it’s London today,
amid the rubbish bins, football chants
and (sigh) hen parties.
It’s simplistic and more than a
little depressing at times. St George
is the good guy, the dragon the bad.
Mullarkey isn’t content just to have
a metaphor, he must also belabour it
until you feel like shouting: “You can
stop now. We get it.” I think we all
knew, from the start, that we were
heading, like a runaway train, towards
a message about Brexit, like it or not.
Lyndsey Turner directs what feels
like some sort of mythical culture
mash-up. The dragon, played with
panache by Julian Bleach, bears more
than a little resemblance to Scar, the
baddie in The Lion King: they have
that same nasal sneer, drip of disdain,
evil stare. Meanwhile, St George
appears as though he has escaped
from a Monty Python skit. Then, just
to confuse us further, there’s also a bit
of Harry Potter thrown in, with
some quidditch-type sky action.
The set, by Rae Smith, is impressive
with each age symbolised by a group
of buildings (Bruegel-esque homes,
Manchester factories, a mini Canary
Wharf). They revolve and we see that
one part of the circle, ingeniously, lifts
up, showing us the home where our
heroine Elsa lives. (Of course there’s
a heroine! It’s a myth! There has to be
a damsel in distress.)
This identity play is almost three
hours long and it is hit and miss
from the start. Some jokes work,
some songs don’t. Heffernan lifts
the mood considerably with his
endless optimism. “We are the
greatest nation on the face of the
Earth!” he shouts.
But soon even he starts to droop
and the whole enterprise feels more
than a bit clunky, and I’m not just
talking about the body armour.
Box office: 020 7452 3000, to
Dec 2. This review ran in late
editions yesterday
he promotional image for
this revival of Bridget
Boland’s Cockpit is a frenzied
blue scribble in the middle
of the map of Europe. The
simple image encapsulates the
impossible task — depicted in the play
— of returning displaced peoples to
their countries of origin in the
aftermath of the Second World War,
yet it also speaks eloquently of the
inadequacies of the nation state in
2017. Boland’s script feels so up-to-date
that it inspires repeated glances at the
programme notes to double-check
that it really does date from 1948.
The play, given an absorbing and
handsome production by Wils Wilson,
takes place in a German theatre in
1945. British soldiers are using the
auditorium as a makeshift prison camp
for refugees and prisoners. What
seems an apparently straightforward
business of sorting everyone by
nationality and loading them into
trucks bound east and west proves
a nightmare for the men in charge,
Captain Ridley (Peter Hannah) and
Sergeant Barnes (Deka Walmsley).
Faced with bitter clashes between
communists and the bourgeoisie,
Polish nationalists and a young Jewish
mother, and members of the French
resistance and suspected collaborators,
the helpless Ridley can only reach for
platitudes as the conflicts mount
around him. “What we have been
fighting for is democracy,” he says,
“and democracy is what you will get,
whether you like it or not.” His
pronouncement, with its echoes in
every western attempt at nation
building from Vietnam to Iraq and
Libya, provokes ripples of derision.
Wilson and her international
ensemble expertly handle the gradual
build in tension, which is occasionally
punctured by nicely judged scenes of
collegiate activity and a show-stopping
sequence in which a young soprano
brings everyone briefly together
with a rendition of Violetta’s aria from
La traviata.
The only slight disappointment is
the staging. Although a portion of the
audience is seated on the stage, the
Lyceum’s auditorium is not intimate
enough for us to feel we are in the
thick of the action. It remains, though,
a strong and timely production, with
its fraught atmosphere enhanced by
Kai Fischer’s lighting designs and
haunting music composed and
arranged by Aly Macrae.
Allan Radcliffe
Box office: 0131 248 4848, to Oct 28
Entertainments
Theatres
CAMBRIDGE
0844 412 4652
MATILDA THE
MUSICAL
MatildaTheMusical.com
HER MAJESTY'S 0844 412 2707
THE BRILLIANT ORIGINAL
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
www.ThePhantonOfTheOpera.com
QUEEN'S
0844 482 5160
The Musical Phenomenon
LES MISÉRABLES
Theatre Royal Drury Lane
42nd STREET
020 7087 7760
Eves 7.30, Mats Wed & Sat 2.30
www.LesMis.com
St Martin's
020 7836 1443
65th year of Agatha Christie's
THE MOUSETRAP
Mon-Sat 7.30, Tues & Thu 3, Sat 4
www.the-mousetrap.co.uk
Vaudeville Theatre 0330 333 4814
Oscar Wilde's
A WOMAN OF NO
IMPORTANCE
Mon-Sat 7.30, Thu & Sat 2.30
Classicspring.co.uk
Please be advised th
to 084
4 numbers can
to 7p per minute plu
network provider’s c
the times | Friday October 13 2017
15
1GT
television & radio
A fresh spin on the single, boozy Fleabag type
MARK JOHNSON/CHANNEL 4
Carol
Midgley
TV review
GameFace
E4
{{{((
An Hour to Catch a Killer
ITV
{{{{(
‘M
y life’s a piece of shit,”
said Marcella to a
suicidal woman about
to leap from a building
in GameFace. “I’m an
actor who hasn’t acted in anything for
four years. I’m £28k in debt, my
boyfriend of 12 years married a girl
he’d known for six days in Vegas. I’ve
got fat hands.” This litany of failure
cheers the jumper no end. “Christ,” she
says, ”sounds like you should jump.”
The dysfunctional, boozy, tragicomic
lives of single thirtysomething women
Radio Choice
Chris Bennion
St Pancras Pianos
Radio 4, 11am
“It came to me by surprise.
I was on the escalators at
St Pancras one day and
I saw these pianos and,
like most piano tuners, I
thought to myself, ‘They
need tuning.’ ” Like Richard
Lewis, many of us have
been on the escalators
at St Pancras and noted
those incongruous pianos.
It is unlikely that your
first thought was that you
must whip out your tuning
fork, but the St Pancras
pianos are eye-catching
nonetheless. Ear-catching,
perhaps? The players are
always so remarkably
skilled and this lovely show
stops to listen and chat to
some of the regulars who
tickle these public ivories.
Friday Night is
Music Night
Radio 2, 8pm
Recorded at the London
Coliseum in September, this
special concert celebrates
the music of Queen.
Richard Sidwell conducts
the BBC Concert Orchestra,
which is joined by four of
the cast of the West End hit
We Will Rock You to mark
the 40th anniversary of the
band’s sixth album, News of
the World (which contains
We Are the Champions
and We Will Rock You).
are common comedy currency at the
moment and the results can vary. In
this case Roisin Conaty, who plays
Marcella, has the talent to move from
hilarity to heartbreak in an instant and
make each extreme equally convincing.
At times it felt a bit Miranda-withf-words, at others a touch Fleabag,
yet even though it was treading on a
well-beaten track it still managed to
feel fresh, mostly due to the force of
Marcella’s personality and some nice
original touches: she brings home from
a club a man who has never watched
Friends — bizarre given that it’s never
off the telly — and is in hysterics
at every episode. “The cat is smelly.
Ha ha!” I may have undersold it, but
this was one of the funniest bits.
Conaty has created a likeable,
comedic but hapless protagonist in
Marcella, a woman who turns up to
be the Disney Princess at a children’s
party half-pissed and with red wine
lips and tortures herself by stalking
her ex and his new wife on Instagram,
writing unwise drunken messages such
as “You hat-wearing pair of shithawks”.
There were a couple of flat moments
but it was well-observed and delivered
with quality. I hope it does well.
An Hour to Catch a Killer with
Trevor McDonald was a remarkable,
if distressing, documentary, but
throughout I could think only one
thing: imagine what it was like for
Alice Ruggles’s parents to watch it.
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Adele Roberts
12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00
The Official Chart with Greg James. The
bestselling music 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Radio
1’s Dance Anthems with Greg James 7.00
Annie Mac 10.00 Pete Tong 1.00am B.Traits
4.00 Radio 1’s Essential Mix
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce. Tunes
by the Monkees and Elbow complete Faye
Tozer’s Tracks of My Years 12.00 Jeremy
Vine 2.00pm Gary Davies 5.00 Simon Mayo
7.00 Tony Blackburn’s Golden Hour
8.00 Friday Night Is Music Night. The BBC
Concert Orchestra perform music by Queen at
the London Coliseum. See Radio Choice
10.00 Sounds of the 80s. Sara Cox is joined
by the former Bucks Fizz members Cheryl
Baker, Jay Aston and Mike Nolan, who
discuss pop stardom in the 1980s 12.00
Anneka Rice: The Happening 2.00am Radio
2’s Funky Soul Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
New to 2 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist: 21st Century
Songs 5.00 Huey on Saturday
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Music, news and the occasional surprise,
presented by Petroc Trelawny
9.00 Essential Classics
The Illusionist Derren Brown reveals the
cultural influences that have shaped him
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Vivaldi (1678-1741)
Antonio Vivaldi’s late works for the stage,
including pieces from the opera Griselda.
Vivaldi (Scocca dardi l’altero tuo ciglio —
Griselda, RV718, Act 2 Sc 7; Griselda, RV718,
Act 2 Sc’s 11-14; Catone in Utica, RV705,
Act 2 Sc’s 12-14; and Concerto in D for violin,
2 oboes, 2 horns and timpani, RV562A)
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
The pianist Ashley Fripp performs Schumann,
Debussy and Poulenc in the town hall at
Stromness as part of the St Magnus
International Festival 2017 series, joined by
the clarinettist Joseph Shiner. Introduced
by Kate Molleson. Schumann (Drei
Fantasiestücke, Op 73); Debussy (Première
rhapsodie, L116; Images, Première Série,
L110); and Poulenc (Clarinet Sonata, FP184)
Roisin Conaty as Marcella, the hapless protagonist of GameFace
2.00 Live Afternoon Concert
Tom Redmond presents a concert from the
BBC Philharmonic at MediaCityUK in Salford.
Pietari Inkinen conducts a complete
performance of Smetana’s Ma Vlast. Plus,
works by Sibelius, Nicola LeFanu and Elgar,
conducted by Jamie Phillips, Clark Rundell
and Andrew Davis respectively. 2.00
Smetana (Ma Vlast) 3.25 Sibelius
(Symphony No 1) 4.00 Nicola LeFanu
(Wind-blown Seeds) 4.20 Elgar (Falstaff)
5.00 Live In Tune
Sean Rafferty launches Why Music? The
Key to Memory from London’s Wellcome
Collection. His guests include Evelyn Glennie
7.00 Seven Ages of Memory
Philip Ball talks to neuroscientists about
when people first become their musical
selves through memories, and asks if it is
inevitable that this will be lost with age
7.30 Live Radio 3 in Concert
From London’s Maida Vale Studios, the
Aurora Orchestra presents a concert devoted
memory and music. In the first half, ancient
Greece, a much-admired flautist and New
England are recalled by Claude Debussy,
Pierre Boulez and Charles Ives. After the
interval, the orchestra asks the audience
to do the memorising. Enter the Musical
Memory Palace as, with the help of Aurora
Orchestra and the conductor Nicholas Collon,
the Grandmaster of Memory Ed Cooke
reveals how to memorise the dramatic and
complex first movement of Mozart’s late
Symphony No 40, before the orchestra plays
the complete symphony. Listeners at home
can join in by following online a series of the
same mnemonic symbols that the audience
is seeing. Presented by Sarah Walker.
Debussy (Syrinx); Boulez (Mémoriale) Ives
(3 Places in New England) 8.45 Mozart
(Symphony No 40 in G minor, K550)
10.00 The Verb
Ian McMillan presents a “memorisable”
cabaret of the word, with the biographer,
historian and critic Jenny Uglow, the actor
Julian Glover, and Rachel Parris and Amy
Cooke-Hodgson from the improvisation
theatre company Austentatious
10.45 The Essay:
The Strangeness of Memory
The neuropsychologist Dr Catherine Loveday
explores what life is like when you can
only live completely in the present
11.00 World on 3
Performances by the British-Iraqi singer Alya
Al-Sultani, the Senegalese kora player
Seckou Keita and the UK folk singer Sam Lee
from Wellcome Collection in London
1.00am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With John Humphrys and Sarah Montague
8.31 (LW) Yesterday in Parliament
9.00 Desert Island Discs
With the composer James MacMillan (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 15 Minute Drama:
Ten Days That Shook the World
By John Reed, dramatised by Robin Brooks.
The ex-prime minster Kerensky has
joined forces with the Cossacks and is
advancing on Petrograd (5/10)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Discussion and interviews with Jenni Murray.
Including at 10.45 the Book of the Week:
The Letters of Sylvia Plath (5/5)
11.00 St Pancras Pianos
Music is explored through a lyrical
improvisation telling the stories of those
who play the street pianos at St Pancras
Station in London. See Radio Choice
11.30 The Rivals
The Moabite Cipher, by R Austin Freeman.
Dramatised by Chris Harrald. Lestrade recalls
how he joined with Dr James Thorndike to
protect a pastor. Last in the series (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 50 Things That Made
the Modern Economy
Double-entry bookkeeping (10/15)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Russia in Five Babushka Dolls
A member of the activist group known as
Pussy Riot. Last in the series
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Hamlet
By William Shakespeare. Hamlet returns
unexpectedly to Elsinore, where Claudius
and Laertes have laid plans to murder him
at a fencing match. Last in the series (r)
3.00 Gardeners’ Question Time
Peter Gibbs chairs the discussion from
Wakehurst Place in West Sussex
3.45 Short Works
Hurricane Season, by Maxine Beneba Clarke
4.00 Last Word
Obituary series, with Julian Worricker
4.30 Feedback
Listeners’ views. Presented by Roger Bolton
4.55 The Listening Project
Brothers who grew up in a children’s home
recall the abuse they suffered
I don’t mean that as a criticism. Alice’s
family had consented to and appeared
in the programme, which took us
through the investigation to find her
killer in real time via dash-cam
footage, interview-room videos and
body cameras worn by the detectives.
Yet no matter how prepared you are,
imagine watching actual footage of the
police arriving after that 999 call, of
knowing that there on the bathroom
floor, as officers collect forensic
evidence, is your beautiful daughter’s
body, her throat slit by her stalker exboyfriend, her blood not yet cleared up
(we didn’t see any of that, mercifully).
Imagine being able to view the
moment when the killer was arrested,
feigning innocence, bluffing through
the interview until caught lying, then
changing his answers to “no comment”.
Imagine watching the eyes of the man
less than 24 hours after he’s murdered
your child and seeing nothing but the
desire for self-preservation.
The hero was DCI Lisa Theaker of
Northumbria Police, whose skill and
presence of mind ensured that enough
was done in that first “golden hour” to
secure a speedy arrest and charge. But
how much courage must it have taken
for Alice’s parents, Sue and Clive, to
put their pain and loss up for public
consumption so that others may
benefit in the future? Extraordinary
couple, extraordinary programme.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 The News Quiz
Miles Jupp hosts the panel game (6/8)
7.00 The Archers
Philip is a knight in shining armour
7.15 Front Row
A round-up of arts news and reviews
7.45 15 Minute Drama: Ten Days That
Shook the World (5/10) (r)
8.00 Any Questions?
Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate
from Wellington Church in Glasgow, with Ian
Blackford MP, Iain Martin, peer Michael
Forsyth and Chi Onwurah MP
8.50 A Point of View
Reflections on a topical issue
9.00 Streets Apart:
A History of Social Housing
Omnibus. The story of housing for those
disadvantaged in British society
10.00 The World Tonight
News round-up with Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime: The Omen
By David Seltzer, abridged by Jeremy
Osborne. Thorn has confirmed the
truth about Damien (5/5)
11.00 A Good Read
The actress Sally Lindsay and the writer
Jonathan Harvey talk about books (2/9) (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Mark D’Arcy reports from Westminster
11.55 The Listening Project
Mayella and Naomi discuss coming to terms
with childhood abuse
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
The Letters of Sylvia Plath (5/5) (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again 8.30
Brothers in Law 9.00 The Motion Show 9.30
After Henry 10.00 Dover and the Claret
Tappers 11.00 Alan Howard Reads 11.15
Joan and the Baron 12.00 I’m Sorry I’ll Read
That Again 12.30pm Brothers in Law 1.00
The Drowned Men’s Inn 1.30 Ken Clarke’s
Jazz Greats 2.00 When Hitler Stole Pink
Rabbit 2.15 The Drawings on the Wall 2.30
Love for Lydia 2.45 Tombstone 3.00 Dover
and the Claret Tappers 4.00 The Motion
Show 4.30 After Henry 5.00 Hazelbeach
5.30 The Casebook of Max and Ivan 6.00 The
Parasite 6.30 Soul Music 7.00 I’m Sorry I’ll
Read That Again. Comedy with John Cleese
7.30 Brothers in Law. Roger Thursby defends
an accident-prone artist 8.00 The Drowned
Men’s Inn. (2/2) Mystery by Georges
Simenon 8.30 Ken Clarke’s Jazz Greats.
George Melly discusses Bessie Smith 9.00
Alan Howard Reads. The Sentence by Nina
Raine 9.15 Joan and the Baron. By Mark
Burgess 10.00 Comedy Club: The Casebook
of Max and Ivan. An author discovers his
books have inspired a criminal 10.30 Bleak
Expectations. Comedy by Mark Evans 10.55
The Comedy Club Interview 11.00 Absolute
Power. Comedy with Stephen Fry 11.30
World of Pub. Dodgy Phil plans to improve
the fortunes of Barry and Garry’s bar
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 1.00pm The Friday
Sports Panel 2.00 Kermode and Mayo’s Film
Review 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport:
The Friday Football Social 10.00 Stephen
Nolan 1.00am Up All Night 5.00 5 Live
Boxing with Costello & Bunce (r) 5.30 5 Live
Sport: The Friday Football Social (r)
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ally McCoist 10.00 Jim White 1.00pm
Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham
and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off: Birmingham
City v Cardiff City. Commentary on the
Championship fixture at St Andrew’s
(Kick-off 7.45) 10.00 The Two Mikes
1.00am Extra Time with Tom Latchem
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Nemone 10.00 Lauren Laverne
1.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Stuart Maconie
4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Iggy Pop 9.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 12.00 Nemone’s Electric
Ladyland 2.00am 6 Music Classic Concert
3.00 6 Music Live Hour 4.00 Hitsville USA:
The Story of Motown 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 Bill
Turnbull 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott marks
Friday 13th October with music by composers
plagued by superstition, including Rossini
and Tchaikovsky 10.00 Smooth Classics
1.00am Katie Breathwick 4.00 Jane Jones
16
1GT
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
James Jackson
Australian
Wilderness with
Ray Mears
ITV, 8pm
Who would
you trust to
take you on
a GPS-free
walkabout in the
outback and to dive in
its wild waters? How
Early
Top
pick
about Ray Mears, that
overgrown Boy Scout,
as he’s dubbed? This
stout, benign figure is
someone who knows
how to make fire with
a couple of sticks and
navigate a journey by
starlight in a desert.
And you wouldn’t want
to get lost in the Aussie
wilderness, whatever its
charms. Yet despite
Mears donning his
khaki shorts and bush
hat, the first in this new
series has less to do
with survival skills,
settling instead largely
for a routine wildlife
dive in Western
Australia’s Ningaloo
Reef — meeting a
green sea turtle and
a large bull stingray.
Before this, Mears
enjoys exploring a
craggy limestone gorge
a mile from the shore,
which was itself part of
the reef 20 million
years ago. “Travelling
across this ancient land
is like exploring a living
museum,” he says,
picking up a fossilised
tooth that once
belonged to an 80ft
megalodon shark.
Which makes you think
about sharks — fitting,
because the episode
climaxes with Mears’s
encounter with a whale
shark and a brief look
at how these leviathans
are being identified
using Nasa-style
technology. All of
which hardly adds up
to essential television,
with none of the
blockbuster credentials
that accompany
comparable BBC series
(you just wait for Blue
Planet II in a couple of
weeks). Yet this is a
perfectly pleasant
half-hour to zone out to.
Nile Rodgers
BBC Four, 9pm
The death of disco was
a brutal assassination.
In 1979 a mob blew up a
huge crate of records
during a Chicago
baseball game, with
“Disco Demolition
Night” hitting the news
and achieving instant
infamy. How Nile
Rodgers, one of the
architects of the genre,
bounced back remains
irresistible. Forced off
the stage, he became
producer to the stars:
Diana Ross (Upside
Down; I’m Coming
Out), David Bowie (the
Let’s Dance album) and
Madonna (Like a
Virgin). Allow this
great storyteller to spill
the beans on how he
sprinkled his magic
dust and (re)ignited
these icons’ careers.
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Rip Off Britain. The finance deals
used by millions of people to buy a new car. Last in the
series 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in
Argyll and Bute, Nottinghamshire and Cornwall (r) 11.00
A Matter of Life and Debt. A young man’s experience of
dealing with loan sharks (AD) 11.45 Caught Red Handed.
The story of a post office under savage attack (AD)
12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Teams compete in Kingston upon
Thames, south-west London (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45
Doctors. Zara and Daniel go on an unusual date, where an
argument has drastic consequences (AD) 2.15 The Boss.
Quiz hosted by Susan Calman. Last in the series 3.00
Escape to the Country. Ginny Buckley helps a couple
hoping to move to rural south Somerset after 18 years
without a garden (r) (AD) 3.45 Money for Nothing. Sarah
Moore transforms items from Dunbar Recycling Centre,
including a fire-damaged table and some glass demijohns
4.30 Antiques Road Trip. James Braxton and Christina
Trevanion head to Ayr, Scotland 5.15 Pointless. Quiz
show hosted by Alexander Armstrong 6.00 BBC News at
Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am Real Lives Reunited (r) 6.30 Rip Off Britain (r)
7.15 A Matter of Life and Debt (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign Zone:
Gardeners’ World (r) (SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire 11.00
BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm The
Code (r) 1.45 The £100K House: The Final Fix. Piers Taylor
revisits Wajid and Anam, who have hit a problem as they
near the completion of their ambitious home (r) (AD)
2.45 Wild West: America’s Great Frontier. The series
concludes with a journey along America’s West coast.
Last in the series (r) (AD) 3.45 Great American Railroad
Journeys. Michael Portillo journeys from Manassas to
Richmond (r) (AD) 4.15 This Farming Life. Sybil prepares
for George’s 50th birthday and the arrival of relatives
from England, while persistent rain means Martin’s cattle
are yet to be turned out of their winter sheds (r) 5.15
Flog It! Paul Martin and the team value antiques in
Longleat, Wiltshire, including an autograph book and a
marble statuette that once found use as a backyard
goal-post (r) 6.00 Strictly Come Dancing: It Takes Two.
Zoe Ball is joined by a trio of famous super fans to discuss
all things ballroom. Gethin Jones reports from the Strictly
studio with the latest news from rehearsals
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Anne Reid talks about her
latest stage role in A Woman of No Importance 8.30
Lorraine. Presented by Lorraine Kelly 9.25 The Jeremy
Kyle Show. Studio chat show 10.30 This Morning.
Christoph Waltz talks about his role in the new film
festival hit Downsizing, alongside Matt Damon and
Kirsten Wiig. Presented by Eamonn Holmes and Ruth
Langsford 12.30pm Loose Women. The The Only Way Is
Essex star James “Arg” Argent joins in the debate from a
female perspective 1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge
Rinder. Cameras follow Robert Rinder as he takes on
real-life cases in a studio courtroom 3.00 Alphabetical.
Jeff Stelling hosts the quiz in which three new
contestants take on the reigning champion, answering
questions based around letters of the alphabet 4.00
Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the arcade-themed
quiz show in which contestants drop tokens down a choice
of four chutes in the hope of winning a £10,000 jackpot
5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as four
contestants answer general knowledge questions and
work as a team to take on ruthless quiz genius the Chaser
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am The King of Queens (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves
Raymond (r) 9.05 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05 Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 11.05 Undercover Boss USA.
A cafe franchise’s Chief Operating Officer goes undercover
in her own company (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary
12.05pm Come Dine with Me. Dinner-party challenge
from Cardiff (r) 1.05 A New Life in the Sun. A diving
instructor looks for a change of career (r) 2.10
Countdown. Michael Whitehall guests in Dictionary
Corner 3.00 Find It, Fix It, Flog It. Finding value in a crop
sprayer, a fire guard and some wooden clamps 4.00 My
Kitchen Rules. Childhood friends Clare and Niall from the
Isle of Skye create a menu using the best produce from
land and sea in their restaurant for the night, The Misty
Isle 5.00 Four in a Bed. Thee final day of competition
sees the B&B owners meet for the last time to find out
what they have been paid and to settle some scores 5.30
Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star. Steph and Dom
Parker discover one of the guests is an undercover hotel
inspector 6.00 The Simpsons. Bart becomes a
Catholic (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Tony, Brody, Damon
and Mac play a game of poker (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Matthew
Wright and the panel debate the day’s issues before
opening the discussion to the studio audience and inviting
viewers to call in or text their opinions 11.15 Can’t Pay?
We’ll Take It Away. An episode combining new and
unforgettable past cases, with the High Court
Enforcement Agents tackling troublesome situations in
Manchester, London and Liverpool (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 The Hotel Inspector. Alex Polizzi visits
Eden Lodge B&B in the Cornish resort of Falmouth and
is unimpressed by the decor in the bedrooms and the
condition of the indoor swimming pool (r) 1.10 Access.
Showbiz news and gossip 1.15 Home and Away (AD)
1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS. Gibbs and his team
investigate the bizarre deaths of a US Marine and two of
his friends (r) 3.15 FILM: Hit & Run (PG, TVM, 2015)
A lawyer is riding high after putting a notorious swindler
behind bars, but a former cop threatens to blackmail her.
Thriller starring Josie Davis 5.00 5 News at 5 5.30
Neighbours. Sonya realises her love for Toadie is as strong
as ever (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Alf and Scarlett
find a boat adrift in the bay (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7PM
IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MUSIC
7.00 The One Show Alex Jones and Amol
Rajan host the week’s final edition
7.00 Coast: The Great Guide Neil Oliver
and Tessa Dunlop present a guide to
England’s south coast, featuring a trip
on a flotilla of boats that includes
a prototype yacht being prepared for
the America’s Cup (7/8) (r)
7.00 Emmerdale Vanessa struggles, while
Paddy has advice for a friend (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.30 Coronation Street Phelan acts fast
to cut off Daniel’s line of enquiry (AD)
7.30 Unreported World The recent
landslides in Sierra Leone (3/8)
8.00 EastEnders Stacey prepares for the
social worker’s visit, only for her
and Martin to get a shock (AD)
8.00 Mastermind Specialist subjects are
the films of director James Cameron,
the artist Georgia O’Keefe, the rock
band Guns N’ Roses and King Henry IV
8.00 Australian Wilderness with Ray
Mears New series. Investigating the
tricks of surviving the Australian
Outback. See Viewing Guide (1/7)
8.30 Would I Lie to You? With Warwick
Davis, Hugh Dennis, Katherine Ryan
and John Simpson (4/9) (r)
8.30 Only Connect Victoria Coren Mitchell
presents as a team of Sherlock Holmes
fans take on three theatre workers
8.30 Coronation Street Todd’s brush
with the law infuriates Billy (AD)
8.00 The Crystal Maze A team of fast
food workers take on the Maze’s Aztec,
Medieval, Industrial and Futuristic
zones, tackling a range of physical,
mystery, skill and mental challenges.
Last in the series (AD)
8.00 Britain by Bike with Larry &
George Lamb In Pembrokeshire, the
father-and-son duo head out with a
fisherman to skirt the coast around
Little Haven, Larry takes a tour of an
Iron Age fort and George attempts part
of the Tour of Pembrokeshire (3/4)
9.00 Have I Got News for You Richard
Ayoade guest-hosts the satirical
current affairs quiz, with team captains
Ian Hislop and Paul Merton (2/10)
9.00 Gardeners’ World Monty Don adds
gooseberries to his fruit garden,
divides and moves herbaceous
perennials and advises on the best
bulbs to plant for cut flowers next
year. Including Weather
9.00 Cold Feet Adam and Pete are cornered
into holding a joint 50th birthday
dinner. However, a surprise visitor with
an unexpected revelation threatens to
cut the evening short (6/7) (AD)
9.00 Gogglebox Fly-on-the-wall series
capturing households’ instant reactions
to this week’s television, with the
armchair critics passing judgment
from the comfort of their own sofas
9.00 A Celebrity Taste of Italy Judith
Chalmers, Ian Lavender, Rula Lenska,
Johnny Ball and Diana Moran sample
some Italian-style rest and relaxation.
Judith also learns how to make her
husband’s favourite pasta (3/4)
10.00 The Last Leg Adam Hills, Josh
Widdicombe and Alex Brooker are
joined by guests Armando Iannucci and
Sue Perkins for a comic review of
moments from the past seven days
10.00 Claire King: In Therapy The
54-year-old former Emmerdale and
Coronation Street actress turns to the
therapist Mandy Saligari to regain the
strength of confidence for which she
was once so well known (3/6)
11.05 First Dates A part-time wrestler
returns to the restaurant for a second
chance as he sits down with a
20-year-old barista, while a hotel
inspector and a DJ bond over their
shared love of pop music (r) (AD)
11.05 Aircrash: Disaster Over New York
Documentary exploring the events of
November 12, 2001, when American
Airlines 587 crashed into Belle
Harbour, New York, shortly after
taking off from JFK Airport (r)
12.10am FILM: As Above, So Below (15, 2014)
Horror starring Perdita Weeks 1.50 Back (r) (AD) 2.20
The Great British Bake Off: An Extra Slice (r) (AD) 3.00
Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond (r) (AD, SL) 4.00 Grand
Designs Australia (r) 4.55 Best of Both Worlds (r)
5.50-6.15 Motor Sport: Volkswagen Racing Cup
12.00 SuperCasino Live interactive gaming 4.00am
A Fatal Friendship: Countdown to Murder. The killing of
Stacey Mackie, who was burned to death in her own flat
(r) 4.45 House Doctor. A three-bedroom Victorian
property in Camden, north London (r) (SL) 5.10 Divine
Designs (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
9PM
8PM
7.30 A Question of Sport Sue Barker
hosts, with Amy Williams, Tymal Mills,
Chris Sutton and Max Chilton (r)
Late
11PM
10PM
9.30 Porridge Prison bad boy Dougie
Parfitt expects a favour.
See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.00 Mock the Week Best bits and unseen
material from the series (12/13)
10.00 ITV News at Ten; Regional News
10.25 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.35 The Graham Norton Show
Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell discuss
their big-screen horror-thriller, The
Killing of a Sacred Deer
11.25 Josh Work picks up for Josh when his
agent gets him a gig supporting
a big act on tour (2/6) (AD)
11.55 The Apprentice The candidates are
challenged to make-over a bedroom in
a five-sstar hotel, before pitching their
ideas to the hotel manager and a
leading interior designer (r)
1.00am-6.00 BBC News
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
7.00 The Gadget Show Jon Bentley
appraises some tea-making tech, while
Georgie Barrat follows a trail to Italy
that leads to a personal cargo-carrying
robot. Plus, the G Team puts a range
of dash-cams to the test (2/12)
10.45 After the News With Emma Barnett
11.05 Dragons’ Den The panel assesses the
profit-making potential of business
plans for a range of eco mannequins,
cork-based yoga mats, and a cycling
navigation device (r) (AD)
11.15 Bad Move Nicky and Steve discover
an ancient public right of way runs
through their garden (4/6) (r) (AD)
12.05am Snowfall An educated young man seeks a way
to get on in life. Hard-hitting drama about the beginnings
of the crack epidemic in 1980s Los Angeles (r) (AD) 1.00
Sign Zone: When Kids Abuse Kids — Panorama (r) (SL)
1.30-3.00 FILM: Risk (15, 2016) Documentary about
Wikileaks founder Julian Assange (AD, SL)
12.40am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance
to participate in live interactive gaming from the
comfort of their sofas 3.00 Storage Hoarders. Aggie
MacKenzie meets a man who hopes to get his hands on a
family fortune (r) (SL) 3.50-6.00 ITV Nightscreen.
Text-based information service
11.45 Tonight at the London Palladium
Featuring performances by Blondie
and Olly Murs (6/8) (r)
the times | Friday October 13 2017
17
1GT
television & radio
Rock and Roll
Sky Arts, 9pm
An excellent edition
looking at the rock
artists who have “kept
it real”. This initially
means US punk artists
of the 1980s and 1990s
who raged at “the man”
— bands such as
Nirvana, Fugazi and
Black Flag (the musical
equivalent of a furious,
prolonged one-fingered
salute). Hearing these
middle-aged artists
look back on their
discordant youths may
make you feel a bit old
and wonder where all
the great subversive
bands are today. The
programme offers great
insights from Martin
Carthy on Scarborough
Fair, and Mark
Knopfler on seeing
Bob Dylan going
electric in Newcastle.
Porridge
BBC One, 9.30pm
Episode two and the
reheated prison sitcom
hits its stride. While
suggesting the grimness
of being locked up, of
having oversized
meatheads stomping
around and of being
under the narrow-eyed
gaze of prison guards,
the writers Dick
Clement and Ian
La Frenais keep the
humour light. Mark
Bonnar has great fun
nailing the over-the-top
Presbyterian manner
of the Scottish screw
Meekie (“Lippy, lippy,
lippy; thinks he’s the
bee’s knees!” he sneers
at Fletch’s cocky
comebacks), who
sniffs out a scheme to
smuggle in a cake of
dubious ingredients.
A watchable half-hour.
The Interviews:
Oliver Reed
Yesterday, 10pm
A retrospective
collating a career’s
worth of Oliver Reed
chat-show appearances
isn’t going to be short
of colour. But aside
from the legless antics
(when he was
knowingly playing up
to his image), there
are many revealing
titbits. His uncle was
the Oscar-winning
director Carol Reed
(The Third Man,
Oliver!). As a tearaway
teenager he went in
and out of 13 schools,
and received his
training as an actor
from working in
Hammer films and,
more intriguingly,
watching people in
pubs. His training in
life too, perhaps.
Sport Choice
Sky Sports Football, 7pm
Since Neil Warnock
took over at Cardiff
City, the Bluebirds have
picked up 22 wins, 12
draws and lost 12 times.
They are top of the
Championship and look
nailed on for promotion.
Tonight they travel to
St Andrew’s to face
Birmingham City
(kick-off 7.45pm).
Sky One
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Hawaii Five-0 (r) 7.00 Road Wars (r)
8.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD) 9.00 The Dog
Whisperer (r) (AD) 10.00 Modern Family (r)
11.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 12.00 House (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Golf’s Funniest Moments (r)
(AD) 5.00 The Flash. Captain Cold returns (r)
6.00 Modern Family. Andre persuades Phil to be
spontaneous when they go car shopping (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Back-to-back episodes (r)
8.30 Modern Family. Phil and Claire realise that
Alex may be more self-sufficient than they give
her credit for when they drop in for a quick visit
9.00 Sing: Ultimate A Cappella. Five more vocal
groups go head-to-head in the medley round and
give performances inspired by Bruno Mars
10.05 The Simpsons. Double bill (r)
11.00 The Russell Howard Hour (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own. With Tom Daley
(r) (AD) 1.00am Brit Cops: Rapid Response (r)
3.00 The Blacklist (r) (AD) 4.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 5.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) (AD)
6.00am Urban Secrets (r) 8.00 The British (r)
(AD) 10.00 The West Wing (r) 12.00 Without a
Trace (r) 1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
(r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 The Guest
Wing (r) (AD) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00 Without a Trace. Jack is taken prisoner (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A serial
killer preys on victims who share a birthday (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Erin’s attempt to convict
a mob boss faces difficulties when her
informant leaves witness protection (r) (AD)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Daenerys arrives in
Slaver’s Bay looking to form an army (r) (AD)
10.10 Game of Thrones. Margaery and her
grandmother encourage Sansa to speak freely
about Joffrey, Jaime finds a way to pass the
time, and Arya encounters outlaw group the
Brotherhood Without Banners (r) (AD)
11.25 Heroin: Cape Cod USA. Documentary
looking at the impact of heroin in Cape Cod (r)
12.55am Dexter 2.05 Blue Bloods (r) (AD)
3.00 Californication (r) 4.10 The West Wing (r)
6.00am 60 Minute Makeover (r) 7.00 Obese:
A Year to Save My Life USA (r) 8.00 CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation (r) 9.00 Criminal Minds (r)
11.00 Highway Patrol (r) 12.00 Road Wars (r)
1.00pm UK Border Force (r) (AD) 2.00 Nothing
to Declare UK (r) 2.30 Nothing to Declare.
Triple bill (r) (AD) 4.00 CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation (r) 5.00 Criminal Minds (r)
6.45 My Kitchen Rules: Australia
8.00 Children’s Hospital. A 10-month-old girl
undergoes surgery to correct a hiatus hernia (r)
8.30 Children’s Hospital. An 11-year-old with a
cleft lip and palate undergoes major surgery (r)
9.00 Bones. As Booth languishes in prison,
Brennan and the team try to exonerate him (AD)
10.00 Bones. Booth and Brennan uncover
evidence of a years-old conspiracy (AD)
11.00 Bones. The body of a radio host is found,
leading the team to a sordid secret (AD)
12.00 Criminal Minds (r) 2.00am Scandal. Huck
proves his loyalty (r) (AD) 3.00 Customs UK
(AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am Joseph Calleja: A Tribute to Mario
Lanza 7.50 Classical Destinations 8.00
Watercolour Challenge 8.30 Tales of the
Unexpected (AD) 9.30 The Hollies: Look Through
Any Window 12.00 Discovering: Sidney Poitier
1.00pm Tales of the Unexpected (AD) 2.00
Auction 2.30 Watercolour Challenge 3.00
Discovering: James Brown 3.30 Marvin Gaye:
Greatest Hits Live 4.30 Bob Dylan: The Folk
Years. The musician’s early career (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Steve McQueen
7.00 Trailblazers: Electronic Music
8.00 The Sixties. The changing social landscape
9.00 Rock and Roll. An exploration of the search
for truth in rock ‘n’ roll. See Viewing Guide
10.30 Tony Visconti’s Unsigned Heroes
12.00 Brian Johnson’s A Life on the Road
1.00am Classic Albums 2.00 Tales of the
Unexpected (AD) 2.30 Auction 3.00
Watercolour Challenge 3.30 Rock and Roll
5.00 South Bank Show Originals: David Lean
5.30 South Bank Show Originals: Paula Rego
6.00am Live PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic .
Coverage of the second day’s play 7.30 Live ATP
Masters Tennis: The Shanghai Masters. Coverage
of the fifth day’s play 9.00 Live European Tour
Golf: The Italian Open. Coverage of the second
day 2.20pm Live International T20 Cricket: India
v Australia. Coverage of the final game in a
three-match T20I series in Hyderabad
6.00 Liverpool v Man Utd Countdown
7.00 Live EFL: Birmingham City v Cardiff City.
Coverage of the Championship fixture, which
takes place at St Andrew’s (Kick-off 7.45)
10.00 Liverpool v Man Utd Countdown. A look
ahead to the Premier League clash
11.00 Best PL Goals: Liverpool v Man Utd
11.30 Gary Neville’s Soccerbox. Gary Neville and
Jamie Carragher discuss some of the most
memorable matches they played in their careers
12.00 Sky Sports News 4.00am Live PGA Tour
Golf: The CIMB Classic. Coverage of the third
day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala
Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 7.30pm-8.00 Landward.
A special edition from the Black Isle. Dougie
Vipond meets the scientists studying the
impact of marine development on dolphins,
while Arlene Stuart goes coastal rowing
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 W1A.
The team deals with protests against the
decision to axe the BBC Big Swing Band (AD)
11.05 Mock the Week 11.35 Snowfall (r)
12.30am-1.00 Sign Zone: How to Stay Young.
A woman discovers the damage her diet is
doing to her skin. Last in the series (r)
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00 Coast: The
Great Guide. Neil Oliver and Tessa Dunlop
present a guide to the cluster of islands off
Scotland’s Western coastline, visiting Argyll, St
Kilda and the Inner and Outer Hebrides (r) (AD)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Coast & Country.
Andrew Price tackles a challenging route up
Mount Snowdon, while Ruth Wignall visits
picturesque waterfalls near Betws-y-Coed
DIGITAL RADIO • APP • VIRGINRADIO.CO.UK
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1984 (r)
8.10 The Good Old Days. Featuring Ken Dodd
and the King’s Singers (r)
8.55 Pop Go the Sixties (r)
9.00 Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music
Business. The record producer, songwriter,
composer and guitarist recalls working with
Diana Ross, David Bowie, Madonna and Duran
Duran. See Viewing Guide (2/3)
10.00 Sharon Osbourne Presents Rock & Roll’s
Dodgiest Deals. The music manager and
promoter reflects on rock ‘n’ roll deals, from
Little Richard’s half a cent a record for Tutti
Frutti to Robbie Williams’ £80million advance (r)
11.00 Top of the Pops 1983: Big Hits.
A compilation of some of the biggest hits of the
year, celebrating the genres of soul, reggae, jazz,
new wave and pop. Performers include Wham!,
the Police, Culture Club, and UB40 (r)
12.00 The Story of Funk: One Nation Under a
Groove (r) 1.00am Top of the Pops: 1984 (r)
1.40 Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music
Business (r) 2.40-3.40 Sharon Osbourne
Presents Rock & Roll’s Dodgiest Deals (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 7.00 Charmed (r)
8.00 Melissa & Joey (r) 9.00 2 Broke Girls (r)
10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 12.00 The Goldbergs (r)
1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00
Melissa & Joey (r) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r) 4.00
2 Broke Girls (r) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) 5.30
Stage School. The day of the Showcase arrives
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Glenn and Grace are alarmed by
recent findings and Mandy gets a loan (AD)
7.30 Extreme Cake Makers (r)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: The Twilight Saga: Breaking
Dawn — Part 1 (12, 2011) Vampire Edward
and human Bella get married. Romantic fantasy
starring Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson
11.20 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.50 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.20am Rude Tube (r) 1.25 Tattoo Fixers (r)
2.25 First Dates (r) (AD) 3.20 GameFace (r)
4.15 Rude(ish) Tube (r) 4.40 How I Met Your
Mother (r) (AD) 5.20 Rude(ish) Tube (r)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun (r)
10.00 FILM: Rio Grande (U, 1950) Western
starring John Wayne (b/w) (AD) 12.10pm
Kirstie’s Vintage Gems (r) 12.35 Grand Designs
(r) (AD) 1.35 A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun
(r) 3.45 Sun, Sea and Selling Houses (r) 4.50
Homes by the Sea (r) (AD) 5.50 The Supervet. A
cat is brought in with a shattered thighbone (r)
6.55 Car SOS. Fuzz Townshend and Tim Shaw
spruce up a 1970 Lotus Elan in Warwickshire (r)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud meets a
carpenter building two timber houses in south
London, who has trouble when inexperience
combines with a soaring budget (8/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 Professor T. The kidnapping of a
six-year-old boy shocks the team, though
Professor T questions the innocence of the
child’s seemingly distraught parents (AD)
10.05 24 Hours in A&E. A five-year-old is
rushed in struggling to breathe (r) (AD)
11.10 24 Hours in A&E. A motorcyclist is
brought in after crashing into a car (r) (AD)
12.15am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA.
An Irish pub in New York (r) 1.10 24 Hours in
A&E (r) (AD) 3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am It Came from Beneath the Sea
(U, 1954) Monster adventure starring Kenneth
Tobey (b/w) 12.35pm The Man from
Laramie (U, 1955) Western starring James
Stewart 2.40 Hell Below Zero (U, 1954)
Action adventure starring Alan Ladd 4.30 The
Great St Trinian’s Train Robbery (PG,
1966) Comedy starring Frankie Howerd
6.35 The Host (12, 2013) An alien parasite’s
host refuses to surrender her consciousness,
and she falls in with a human resistance group.
Sci-fi adventure starring Saoirse Ronan
9.00 Last Vegas (12, 2013) Four
sixtysomething friends decide to relive their
wild youth with a trip to Las Vegas. Comedy
with Michael Douglas and Robert De Niro (AD)
11.15 Gladiator (15, 2000) A Roman general
is forced to fight as a gladiator and uses his
position to seek revenge for the murder of his
family. Epic historical drama with Russell Crowe,
Joaquin Phoenix and Derek Jacobi (AD)
2.10am-4.00 Skyline (15, 2010) A couple try
to escape when alien spacecraft descend from
the sky, mesmerising the humans below with
mysterious lights. Sci-fi thriller with Eric Balfour
6.00am You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r) 6.25
Totally Bonkers Guinness World Records (r) 7.15
The Great Indoors (r) (AD) 8.00 Emmerdale (r)
(AD) 9.30 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 10.20
The Great Indoors (r) (AD) 11.20 Dress to
Impress (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale. The Dingles
demand answers (r) (AD) 1.50 The Ellen
DeGeneres Show 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
6.00 Dress to Impress. From Manchester
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Top 100 Animals. The
pick of the show’s archive of animal clips (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Walden decides to tell
Kate the truth, so he flies to New York (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men. Lyndsey threatens to
end her relationship with Alan (r)
9.00 FILM: Fast & Furious 5 (12, 2011)
A fugitive assembles a team of criminals for a
heist in Rio, but the FBI’s top manhunter is on
their trail. Action adventure sequel starring
Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson (AD)
11.35 Family Guy. Brian discovers that the cure
for cancer is being kept secret (r) (AD)
12.05am Family Guy (r) (AD) 1.05 American
Dad! (r) (AD) 1.35 Bromans (r) 2.25
Teleshopping 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Classic Coronation Street (r) 6.50
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.55 Where the Heart Is (r)
(AD) 8.55 Wild at Heart (r) 9.55 Judge Judy (r)
10.20 Inspector Morse (r) 12.40pm Wild at
Heart (r) 1.40 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.40 Classic
Coronation Street (r) 3.50 Inspector Morse (r)
6.00 Heartbeat. A beauty queen is targeted by
mysterious attackers ahead of a contest (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica attends
the funeral of an old friend (r) (AD)
8.00 Rosemary & Thyme. A school harbours
secrets someone is prepared to kill for (r)
9.00 Long Lost Family. A woman searches for
the sister she never knew (r) (AD)
10.05 Lewis. The master of Gresham College, an
amateur astronomer, is found dead at the Oxford
University observatory, and Lewis finds there
are numerous suspects (2/4) (r) (AD)
12.05am Mr Selfridge (r) (AD) 1.10 FILM:
Changeling (15, 2008) Clint Eastwood’s
fact-based drama starring Angelina Jolie, John
Malkovich and Jeffrey Donovan (AD, SL)
3.30 Lewis (r) (AD, SL) 5.10 On the Buses
(b/w) (r) (SL) 5.40 ITV3 Nightscreen
6.00am The Chase (r) 7.45 The Avengers (r)
8.50 Cash Cowboys (r) 9.50 Pawn Stars (r)
10.50 Cash Cowboys (r) 11.50 The Avengers (r)
12.55pm River Monsters (r) 1.30 Live ITV
Racing. Coverage of the 1.50, 2.25, 3.00, 3.35
and 4.10 races at Newmarket, and the 2.45 and
3.55 races from York 4.30 River Monsters. A
freshwater giant (r) 5.00 The Avengers (r)
6.05 Counting Cars. Danny helps two bikers (r)
6.35 Counting Cars. Danny gets in trouble (r)
7.00 Pawn Stars. A part of Apollo 11 (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars. The first Spider-Man comic (r)
8.00 River Monsters (r) (AD)
8.30 River Monsters (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: GoldenEye (12, 1995) James
Bond goes in pursuit of a satellite weapon that
has fallen into the hands of a criminal. Spy
adventure starring Pierce Brosnan (AD)
11.45 FILM: The Devil’s Advocate (18,
1997) A lawyer is unaware his new boss is not
what he seems to be. Supernatural thriller
starring Al Pacino and Keanu Reeves (AD)
2.30am World Boxing Super Series. A preview
of George Groves v Jamie Cox 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.00 Scrapheap
Challenge 8.10 American Pickers 9.00 Storage
Hunters 10.00 American Pickers 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Sin City Motors 4.00 Steve
Austin’s Broken Skull Challenge 5.00 Top Gear.
Featuring a race to Monte Carlo (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. The presenters build a car that
can be turned into a hovercraft (AD)
7.00 Top Gear. The presenters race one another
across St Petersburg in Russia (AD)
8.00 Cops UK: Bodycam Squad. Following the
work of the Staffordshire Police force
9.00 FILM: Centurion (15, 2010) A Roman
centurion leads his men to rescue his captured
general after his legion is wiped out by Pictish
rebels. Action thriller with Michael Fassbender
11.00 Red Dwarf. Lister and the crew dock at a
research station where scientists claim to have
manufactured a “cure” for evil (r) (AD)
11.40 Zapped. Brian faces trial (r) (AD)
12.20am QI XL. The panellists include Noel
Fielding 1.20 The Last Man on Earth (AD)
2.20 Zapped (AD) 3.00 Harry Hill’s TV Burp.
Double bill 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 London’s Burning 9.00
Casualty 10.00 Bergerac 11.00 The Bill 1.00pm
Last of the Summer Wine 1.40 Brush Strokes
2.20 Birds of a Feather 3.00 London’s Burning
4.00 Pie in the Sky 5.00 Bergerac
6.00 Brush Strokes. Jacko finds himself in a
predicament and tries to get out of trouble
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Compo seizes
the opportunity to break into showbusiness
7.20 As Time Goes By. A Hollywood producer is
full of ideas about filming one of Lionel’s books
8.00 The Brokenwood Mysteries. Jared
discovers a severed human hand in a crayfish
pot, begging the questions who does it belong to
and are they still alive? (3/4) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. A case involving Sandra’s
father is reopened (5/8) (AD)
11.05 Birds of a Feather. Sharon and Tracey’s
school reunion brings back a few memories
11.50 The Bill. An agoraphobic old lady thinks
her neighbours are being burgled
12.20am The Bill. CID sets a trap 12.50
London’s Burning 1.50 No Place Like Home
3.25 Garden Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Dickinson’s Real Deal 6.45 Battle
Factory 7.10 Secrets of Britain 8.00 Time Team
10.00 Who Do You Think You Are? (AD) 12.00
Time Team 2.00pm Wildest Africa 3.00 Coast
(AD) 4.00 Open All Hours 4.40 Steptoe and Son
5.20 Some Mothers Do ’Ave ’Em
6.00 Hitler’s Champions. (1/2) How the Nazis
used sport for propaganda purposes
7.00 Hitler’s Champions. (2/2) How the Nazis
used sport for propaganda, with Germany’s
athletes presented as the perfect physical ideal
8.00 Who Do You Think You Are? Mary Berry
traces her family tree, taking her from her home
town of Bath to Norwich, uncovering ancestors
including a book-binder and a corset-maker (AD)
9.00 Who Do You Think You Are? The actor
Martin Shaw tries to find out more about his
paternal grandfather Edwin (AD)
10.00 Oliver Reed: The Interviews. The life of
the hell-raising actor. See Viewing Guide
11.00 David Starkey’s Monarchy (6/6) (AD)
12.00 Wildest Africa. Exploring the landscape
of Victoria Falls 1.00am Hitler’s Champions
2.00 Tenko Reunion 3.00 Home Shopping
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Animal 999.
Officer Connie experiences something of a
hedgehog day, while Officer Alistair has a
mystery stowaway — all the way from India
10.45-11.15 Judge Rinder’s Crime Stories. The
barrister Robert Rinder examines the case of
then 11-year-old Tye Hawkins, who in
September 2015 was knocked down in a hit and
run 12.40am Teleshopping 1.40 After
Midnight 3.10 ITV Nightscreen 4.35 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 UTV Life. An
eclectic mix of stories and studio guests with
which to usher in the weekend 12.40am
Teleshopping 1.40-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15
Rathad an Sutha (64 Zoo Lane) (r) 5.25 Calum
Clachair: Gleann na Grèine (Bob the Builder:
Project Build It) (r) 5.35 Ceitidh Morag (Katie
Morag) (r) 5.50 Seonaidh (Shaun the Sheep)
(r) 6.00 Glac Blake (Get Blake) (r) 6.10
Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks (ALVINNN!!! and
the Chipmunks) (r) 6.35 Machair (r) 7.00 An
Là (News) 7.25 Fraochy Bay (r) 7.30 Na
Ceiltich (Celtic History) (r) 8.00 Togaidh Sinn
Fonn (Join in the Music) (r) 8.25 Binneas (r)
8.30 Puirt-adhair (Highland Airports) (r) 9.00
Da la ’s an Damhair (Two Days in October) (r)
10.00 Seirm. Featuring Tift Merrit (r) 11.00
Marilyn Monroe (r) 11.50-12.00 Belladrum
2016: Cridhe Tartan — Gavin James (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Hafod Haul (r) 6.15 Guto
Gwningen (r) 6.30 Sam Tân (r) 6.40 Twt (r)
6.50 Peppa (r) 7.00 Cacamwnci (r) 7.15
Olobobs 7.20 Digbi Draig (r) 7.35 Dona Direidi
(r) 7.50 Sara a Cwac (r) 8.00 Ysbyty Cyw Bach
(r) 8.15 Ty Mel (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r)
8.35 Syrcas Deithiol Dewi (r) 8.45 Dwylo’r
Enfys (r) 9.00 Igam Ogam (r) 9.10 Oli Dan y
Don (r) 9.25 Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 9.35
Cymylaubychain (r) 9.45 Bach a Mawr (r)
10.00 Hafod Haul (r) 10.15 Guto Gwningen (r)
10.30 Sam Tân (r) 10.40 Twt (r) 10.50 Peppa
(r) 11.00 Cacamwnci (r) 11.15 Olobobs (r)
11.20 Digbi Draig (r) 11.35 Dona Direidi (r)
11.50 Sara a Cwac (r) 12.00 News S4C a’r
Tywydd 12.05pm Heno (r) 12.30 Yr Anialwch
(r) 1.30 Her yr Hinsawdd (r) (AD) 2.00 News
S4C a’r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News
S4C a’r Tywydd 3.05 Cyfrinach Oes y Cerrig (r)
4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05
Stwnsh: Tag 5.45 Stwnsh: Gwboi a Twm Twm
(r) 6.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05 04 Wal (r)
6.30 Garddio a Mwy (r) 7.00 Heno 7.30 Pobol
y Cwm. Ed is worried that Sioned will change
her plea (AD) 8.25 Ysgol Ddawns Anti Karen.
The dance tutor Anti Karen threatens to pack it
all in 8.55 Apêl DEC: Argyfwng Rohingya 9.00
News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30 Deuawdau Rhys
Meirion. With the Cardiff-born folk singer Frank
Hennessy 10.30-11.35 Bang. Sam panics when
the police question him about Cai (r) (AD)
18
Friday October 13 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7469
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3153
5
6
6
7
13
22
3
24
Scrabble ® Challenge No 1979
1
7
22
16
24
19
N
22
14
16
24
12
4
1
T
Y
5
6
7
9
10
11 12
2L
2W
22
8
2W
t 2W
3L
i 3L
ere
2L
op
be
eating
3L
n 3L
E
2W
K
2W
8
9
10
6
13
12
6
12
24
23
12
1
14
15
16
5
20
22
13
17
20
3
2
20
1
5
20
12
3
10
20
3
23
23
24
11
12
2L
15
16
18
16
26
26
24
25
22
3
20
14
9
13
26
12
13
2W
2L
2W
12
2W
21
24
21
12
16
21
16
22
26
woriman
F
G
H
I
J
L
20
What play covers two doubleword squares with this rack?
21
12
15
3
26
24
19
22
13
3
8
16
20
20
4
19
clogrow
19
What is the highest-scoring play
involving the W ?
23
26
cross
1 Relating to maj
a or routes (8)
5 We
W nt on horseback (4)
8 Fork point (5)
9 Neck vein (7)
11 Hav
a e an obligation to pay
a
(3)
12 Wa
Way of doing something (9)
1 Catch in a snare (6)
13
15 Bodily catalyst (6)
Solution to Crossword 74
7 68
US
P
DE
C
T I
E
S S
ED
E
A L
V
ME
I F
I
DM I N
A A
I GAN
M C
T AGE
18 Viollent seizure off power
(4,5)
19 Hearing organ (3)
20 Giv
i e up; desert (7)
21 Relating to sea fo
f rces (5)
22 Basic cause or origin (4)
23 Wa
W lking like soldiers (8)
11
20
19
18
25
22
5
25
20
13
20
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Y
14
T
Down
1 Sanction, ratify
f (7)
2 The things there (5)
3 (Of a screw) advancing on
turning clockwise (5-6)
4 Lacking all dignity (6)
6 Strong condemnation (7)
7 Eagle's nest (5)
10 Common cocktail (3,3,5)
14 Afr
f ican bird; our coat
(anagram
m) (7)
16 Hearing protector (7)
17 Section of a poem (6)
18 Seat (5)
19 Concluding words (5)
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
N
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
U
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 303 501)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3960
I
L
S
N
E
A
G
P
R
T
S
H
P
A
A
O
S
U
U
U
M
R
I
Y
K
S
G
E
E
T
Y
N
D
E
G
K
S
S
U
N
A
E
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
B
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4145
Futoshiki No 3020
<
>
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE® is a registered
d trademark
d
k off J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd
d ©Mattell 2017
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Yesterday’s solution, right
No 3959
Kakuro No 1979
>
28
34
3
8
4
3
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
∨
24
16
4
14
>
17
27
34
∧
40
4
8
12
16
23
3
6
3
26
24
12
7
7
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
4
38
15
16
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
16
24
24
15
>
17
17
17
7
2
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
16
17
24
7
24
16
17
6
4
4
© PUZZLER MEDIA
16
6
20
AMB L I NG
I
A
I
A N DW I C H
C N E S
NE P T
T E A
E Y
L
RANNY MA
R N D M
HOT L I NE A
O W S
T N
WO O L
CARD
D R
C E
YOK E SHOR
4
19
26
G
A
S
R
I
N
G
3
5
23
20
18
22
20
17
20
13
17
© PUZZLER MEDIA
11
24
D
the times | Friday October 13 2017
19
1GT
MindGames
White: Hikaru Nakamura
Black: Emil Sutovsky
chess.com Masters,
Isle of Man 2017
Queen’s Gambit Accepted
1 d4 d5 2 c4 dxc4 3 e4
The main line used to be 3 Nf3
but the more aggressive text has
become increasingly popular.
3 ... Nf6
An acceptable alternative is the
counterattacking 3 ... e5.
4 e5
White is obliged to make this
advance, ceding the d5-square, as
the natural 4 Nc3 now permits
the riposte 4 ... e5 under even
more favourable circumstances.
4 ... Nd5 5 Bxc4 Bf5
Far more usual is 5 ... Nb6.
6 Ne2
The critical test of Black’s
move order must be 6 Qb3, radiating threats towards both b7 and
f7, the twin sensitive points in the
black camp. After 6 Qb3 e6 7
Qxb7 Nb6 8 Bb5+, Black appears
to have very little for the pawn he
has lost. Nevertheless, Nakamura
prefers a less adventurous route.
6 ... e6 7 0-0 Nb6 8 Bb3 c5 9 Be3
c4
________
árh 1kg 4]
à0pD Dp0p]
ß h DpD D]
ÞD D )bD ]
Ý Dp) D D]
ÜDBD G D ]
ÛP) DN)P)]
Ú$NDQDRI ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
10 Bxc4 Nxc4 11 Qa4+ Nd7
Missing the point. Superior is 11
... Nc6 12 Qxc4 Rc8, when Black’s
bishop pair and general play on
the light squares conspire to grant
him some counterplay for his lost
material.
12 Qxc4 Rc8 13 Qa4 Bc2
Black’s opening experiment more
or less expires with this somewhat
desperate expedient, after which
his queenside pawn structure is
decimated and his prospects of
salvation vanish.
14 Qxa7 Bd3 15 Nbc3 Ba6 16 d5
Forced but also forcing. Nakamura exploits Black’s lack of
development and uncastled king
while simultaneously establishing
an escape route for the white
queen’s retreat from Ultima Thule
on a7.
16 ... Nxe5 17 Rfd1 Nd3 18 dxe6
Bd6 19 exf7+ Kxf7 20 Qd4 Re8 21
Qd5+ Kf8 22 Qf5+ Kg8 23 Bg5
Qc7 24 Qd5+ Kh8 25 Rxd3
Bxh2+ 26 Kh1 Bc4 27 Qd7 h6 28
g3 hxg5 29 Qxc7 Rxc7 30 Rd2
Rf7 31 Nd4 Black resigns
________
á D 4 D D] Winning Move
àD D D ip]
ß 0 D 1 D] Black to play. This position is from
Isle of Man 2017.
Þ0NDrDph ] Gelfand-Zatonskih,
White had been slowly nursing an extra
Ý DQ) D D] pawn towards victory but has now
Ü) D D ) ] stumbled into a clever trap. Can you see
Û ) D $ )] what he has overlooked?
ÚD DRD DK] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
26
MEDIUM
86
HARDER
285 + 456
Take this trump suit:
Dummy
♠A 8 6 5
♠ 10 7 4 2
♠ Q6
♥9 8 7 3 W N E ♥-----♦
10
♦A 9 8 7 6
S
Declarer
♣KQ 10 7♠ Q J 3
♣A 9 6 3
♠ AK5432
♥A K 5 4 3
The first thing to say to yourself
♦KQ J 2
is, “I have an eight-card spade fit
♣J
(good), therefore the opponents
S
W
N
E
have five spades. They are probably splitting three-two.”
1♥
Pass
2♥
Pass
3♥ (1) End
It will usually be right to get rid
of the opposing trumps as soon as (1) Game invitation.
possible. After that, your
y
winningg
Contract: 3♥ , Opening Lead: ♦10
cards will not be trumped (ruffed).
It will be important to know when
West led his singleton ♦10, East
the opponents have run out of winning ♦A and returning ♦6.
trumps. You will need to count.
West ruffed and led ♣K (top of a
Does that fill you with fear? sequence), which won, then ♣Q.
Don’t worry. If you count in the
Declarer ruffed and played ♥A.
correct fashion, it will be easy.
East discarded to reveal the 4-0
Each time the opponents play a split but declarer was not going to
trump, you will reduce the number miscount. He was missing just four
of missing trumps by one. In the hearts and West had already ruffed
above example, yyou start byy leading once, then followed once. There
♠ 2 to ♠ Q (low from the longer were two hearts out and declarer
length to high in the shorter drew them with dummy’s ♥QJ. He
length); assuming both opponents now led ♠ K. West won ♠ A but
follow with a spade, you can reduce declarer could ruff his ♣10 and
the number of missing spades down cash ♠ QJ and ♦KQ. Nine tricks.
from five to three. Next you lead
I have seen many players mis♠ 6 to ♠ K; assuming both oppo- count when they count in rounds
nents have followed suit again, you — “One round of trumps that’s four
can count that the number of miss- (or, here, three), two rounds of
ing spades has been reduced from trumps that’s eight”... If you count
three to one. You also now know that way,
y it’s veryy easyy to forget an
that their spades have split 3-2 — opponent ruffing earlier (as here).
you’ll find it helps enormously to
Last point: East should have
think in terms of the opposing overtaken ♣K with ♣A to give
splits. There being just one spade West another diamond ruff. With
out, you lead ♠ A and that spade is ♠ A to come, that’s one down.
removed. You have drawn trumps.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
+7
– 84 + 1/2 + 87
OF IT
÷3
x 5 + 12
2/7
OF IT
x 2 – 45 + 1/3 – 78
OF IT
x 4 – 458 +OF1/IT2 – 762 x 3 – 879
3/4
OF IT
–7
90%
OF IT
11/12
OF IT
2
15
23
10min
8
7
10
5
28
8
5
18
30
7
22
15
21
2
22
7
20
22
12
9
7
7
14
5
14
Killer Deadly No 5672
8
56min
24
19
27
16
15
10
12
x
18
21
16
22
=
12
Codeword 3152
Kakuro 1978
6 5
9 7
8 4 5
9 7
5 8 9
7 6 8
3
9 8
7 4 2
3 1
8 9
6 8 4 5
9 7 1 3
6 2 1
7
2
9
4
1 2 8
8 5 9 6
3 1 6 8
7 9
5
7
8
3
1
9
2
4
6
3
9
4
2
7
6
5
1
8
1
2
6
4
8
5
3
7
9
7
5
3
8
9
4
6
2
1
6
5
9
1
8
4
2
7
3
3
2
4
6
7
9
1
8
5
7
1
8
2
5
3
4
6
9
4
9
1
5
2
8
6
3
7
9 8
7 9 3
7 2
3
1 3 5
2 1 3
9 7
4 2 1
4 2
5 3
E
P
I
S
O
D
E
T
S
A
R
2
4
1
6
3
7
8
9
5
6
1
5
9
4
2
7
8
3
4
8
7
1
5
3
9
6
2
9
3
2
7
6
8
1
5
4
2
7
5
9
3
6
8
1
4
8
3
6
7
4
1
9
5
2
5
6
7
8
9
2
3
4
1
9
8
3
4
1
5
7
2
6
1
4
2
3
6
7
5
9
8
8
6
4
5
2
7
9
3
1
5
1
2
9
6
3
7
8
4
3
4
7
6
9
5
2
1
8
3
9
6
2
1
7
8
5
4
5
7
1
4
3
8
9
2
6
2
8
9
1
7
4
3
5
6
6
9
8
2
3
1
5
4
7
4
3
1
7
5
9
8
6
2
7
2
5
8
4
6
1
9
3
1
∧
4
2
4
3
7
8
2
1
5
6
9
2
8
5
9
7
6
4
3
1
9
1
2
7
6
5
3
4
8
6
5
3
1
8
4
2
9
7
7
4
8
3
9
2
6
1
5
4
1
3 > 2
∧
5
3
3 < 4 < 5
1
3
5
1
4
6
8
3
2
3
4
5
2
5
x
2
4
7
x
x
+
+
5
2
9
-
x
x
Suko 2054
5
4
8
9
1
3
6
2
7
9
7
2
5
6
8
3
4
1
1
3
6
2
4
7
5
9
8
8
5
3
4
7
2
9
1
6
2
6
4
1
5
9
8
7
3
7
1
9
3
8
6
4
5
2
6
8
5
7
2
4
1
3
9
4
9
7
8
3
1
2
6
5
3
2
1
6
9
5
7
8
4
W
I
I
P
C
K
A
A
E
R
S
C
P
H
O
V
R
E
E
F
Lexica 3958
3 < 4
-
V
O
L
U
P
T
U
OP E
U
L
S P I
L
T
Y P E
Scrabble 1978
FOOTSLOG A8
across (39)
GOVERNOR B10
down (24)
OM
I
AN
K
E
R
F E
N
RA
M
T E
D
N
Lexica 3957
5
3
4
1
6
9
5
4
3
7
8
2
Set Square 1981
4
2
8
2
4
6
5
9
1
7
3
Z O
R
RG
A
I N
Z
RA
Sudoku 9380
1
5
6
3
8
2
4
7
9
Futoshiki 3019
17
2
9
7
3
4
1
8
6
2
5
Killer 5670
KenKen 4144
6
2
U P R I GH T
H
N
A
RO J E C T
T
X
R
NOU T
EQ
R
D
E VO I D
S
I
C
P
D E T A I L
W B
U
K I L L
R E
N
Y
A
AGE
P L A
Sudoku 9379
8
6
9
5
2
1
4
3
7
2
∨
1
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
=
37
Solutions
12
12
= 15
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
14
15
+
+
=
39
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
= 56
x
x
13
21
x
x
Cell Blocks 3035
18
= 120 from 1-9 are
x
x
17
6
All the digits
x
÷
4
24
6
+
Killer 5669
22
2 2
6
4 3
Sudoku 9378
6
4
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 1982
Killer Moderate No 5671
20
2
2
Yesterday’s answers
nous, onus, oops, opus, plus, pons,
sloop, slop, snoop, solo, sool, soon,
soul, soup, spoof, spool, spoon,
spoonful, unspool
16
2
3 2
6 7
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 13 words, average;
18, good; 24, very good; 31, excellent
Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
♠K 9
♥Q J 10 6
♦5 4 3
♣8 5 4 2
x3
50%
OF IT
Polygon
13
Bridge Andrew Robson
Beginner Corner 25
Drawi
awing trumps and counting
EASY
x 2 + 12
© PUZZLER MEDIA
The US grandmaster Hikaru Nakamura took a share of second prize
in the chess.com Masters at the
Isle of Man International. He was
equal with former world champion
Viswanathan Anand earning him
£18,750. In today’s game Nakamura, who remained unbeaten
throughout the event, overruns a
well-informed and normally solid
grandmaster opponent.
Prima facie this would appear
to be a blunder. However, in spite
of losing a pawn to a small combination this thrust is just about
justifiable.
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Silver medal
Cell Blocks No 3036
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
1
x
+
8
Quiz 1 East Sussex 2 Tony Blair 3 Vitreous
humour or vitreous body 4 Monty Python’s Life
of Brian 5 Anglesey 6 North Korea 7 The
Comedy of Errors 8 Hugh Bonneville 9 A
mechanical toy consisting of two wooden sticks
10 Perihelion 11 Turkey 12 Things Fall Apart
13 Simon Steen-Andersen 14 Newcomb ball
15 Andrea Palladio. Its proper name is Villa
Almerico Capra
S
C
H
A
R
U
S
S
O
T
P
E
O
U
N
T
L
A
I
R
D
E
Word watch
Boubou (b) A bird (an
African shrike)
Chiru (c) A Tibetan
antelope
Sapajou (b) A capuchin
monkey
Brain Trainer
Easy 15; Medium 711;
Harder 5,577
Chess 1 ... Rc5! is
disastrous for White,
mainly because ... Qc6+
will follow. For example,
2 dxc5 Rxd1+ 3 Rf1 Qc6+
4 Kg1 Nh3 is mate
13.10.17
MindGames
Mild No 9381
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Boubou
a A mistake
b A bird
c An endearment
Chiru
a Boiled milk
b A shaman
c An antelope
Sapajou
a A magical
incantation
b A monkey
c A children’s game
Answers on page 19
3
Difficult No 9382
4
7
1
9
6
5
9
1
7 5 2
4 8
8 2
4
8
8 7
6
9
5
3
9
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Fiendish No 9383
4
9
3 4
5
4
2
5 What is the largest
island in the Irish Sea
by area?
6
2
3
6
9
13 Which Danish
composer created the
2009 video installation
Run Time Error and
the 2012 piece Black
Box Music?
6 Barbara Demick
wrote the awardwinning book
Nothing to Envy
about real lives in
which country?
Fletcher, in the
sitcom W1A?
7 The musical The
Boys from Syracuse is
based on which
Shakespeare play?
10 Which word
describes the closest
point to the sun in a
planet’s orbit?
8 Who plays BBC
head of values, Ian
11 The akbash and
kangal are shepherd
5
8
12
9 Also called a ouija
windmill, what is a geehaw whammy diddle?
19
21
6
7
11
14
16
7
The Times MindGames: Word
Puzzles & Conundrums and
Number & Logic Puzzles are
out now. To order copies visit
timesbooks.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Yesterday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 938
14 Similar to
volleyball, which
sport was invented by
Clara Baer in 1895?
15 Which architect
designed the pictured
Villa La Rotonda
near Vicenza?
Answers on page 19
15
17
18
20
22
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Joker
9
13
2
6
12 Which 1999 album
by the rap group the
Roots is named after a
Chinua Achebe novel?
10
8
3
dog breeds from
which country?
4
7
by Olav Bjortomt Times MindGames books
15
1 7
Across
1 Small group running riot (4)
4 Begin introducing law that’s
upset faithful (8)
8 Find record has finished (8)
9 Severely hit British meat (4)
10 New reverend returning to run
what ministers do (6)
11 Copper on front of short polar
dome (6)
12 Frequently in condition, organ
is the latest in technology
(5,2,3,3)
16 Part of turkey baster is broken
(6)
17 Ingenious key comes with
operating handle (6)
19 Bird inside of skip found by
waif, oddly (4)
20 Forgetfulness leads to our best
violin being shattered (8)
21 De Gaulle’s language mostly
about English — it turned wild
(8)
22 Reportedly expensive source of
venison (4)
3
8
3 5
9
1
9
5
4 8
2
The Times Quick Cryptic No 939
1
7
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 In which modernday county was the
Battle of Hastings
fought in 1066?
4 Which 1979 film
features the quote:
“He’s not the
Messiah. He’s a very
naughty boy!”?
9
3
GETTY IMAGES
3 Which clear gel fills
the area of the eye
between the lens and
the retina?
5
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
2 Jonathan Powell
served as which
prime minister’s
Downing Street
chief of staff?
7
8
8 2
6
5
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
Down
2 Endangered creature Greek
character’s keeping at home (5)
3 Process of arranging gold
treasury share (13)
4 Small flat playing card? (5)
5 Cooking nearly all tropical
fruit (7)
6 Source of oil quietly set aside
is still looking good (4-9)
7 Rose Walker (7)
10 Reversed slump in American
petrol (3)
13 Row about slip showing
dog chasing foxes (7)
14 Remote camp for soldier not in
mail (7)
15 Deserter’s returning as sailor
(3)
17 Some tobacco licensing is a
pain (5)
18 Wear down Queen with
celebratory poem (5)
8
4 6
9
6 4
1
7
5
2
5
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
5 235 Кб
Теги
The Times, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа