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The Times Times 2 28 August 2017

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On Monday
August 28 | 2017
Men, sex and power:
the woman who taught
me everything
By Daisy Goodwin
2
1GT
Monday August 28 2017 | the times
times2
Like Victoria,
The French get
post-holiday blues,
and I know why
Hilary Rose
P
ity the poor French. First
I read the embarrassing
news that their
president, whom they
were so smug about only
a few weeks ago, has
spent �,000 on
make-up in his first three
months in office. Much as it pains me
to be fair, I should admit that that
figure includes a professional make-up
artist to apply it, but, still, �k is a lot
of slap and, seeing as I?m not a French
taxpayer and not footing the bill, I
have to offer him grudging respect.
What products can he be using to
run up a tab like that? I thought men
in the public eye only wore a bit of
foundation and powder, but if that?s all
Macron is wearing then it must be
mixed under the light of a full moon
by vestal virgins to cost so much.
In the interests of research, I have
spent five minutes examining his face
online and I have reached a disturbing
conclusion. I think he doesn?t only
wear make-up on TV. I think he wears
it to leave the house. Also, his face is
exactly the same colour as his wife?s, as
if they?ve both been Tango?d with the
same gunk. Maybe they have. Ew.
Anyway, now, after enduring the
indignity of an expensively made-up
president, it?s time for what the French
call la rentr閑. Having spent the whole
of August in their bijou little g顃e in the
Loire valley, or wherever it is they go
on holiday, they?re returning to their
homes and cities and offices for the
autumn term. How half of Europe still
gets away with taking the whole of
August off is beyond me. Does Paris
seriously think that nicking half the
City?s business post-Brexit is going to
work if they disappear on holiday for a
month every summer?
I live in an area that?s popular with
French people because the Lyc閑 is
near by and every year I dread their
return. August is bliss. The roads are
empty and there are plenty of parking
spaces. The dogs being walked are
reassuringly big and labrador-ish, not
funny little frizzy things you can fit in
Bathtimes
are too
boring
When it comes to
the big issues, I?m
invariably on the wrong
side of the argument.
Everyone else cuts
carbs, I exist on them.
Everyone else does
social media, I don?t. So
I?m relieved I?ve got one
thing in common with
the rest of the country:
Daisy Goodwin was 19 when she first
read the young Queen?s diaries. The
writer of the hit TV series says it was a
lesson in how to deal with men and life
Let Diana
rest in
peace
your handbag, which the government
should make a priority of banning
after Brexit, because what is Brexit for
if not to take back control of our dogs?
Best of all, in August, there is an
absence of bilingual two-year-olds
hurtling towards my shins on scooters.
I haven?t had any time off yet and
I?m spending the holiday weekend at
home, which seems preferable to
spending it on the Paris ring road or
the A303. More worryingly, surely, is
that having a whole month off in
August is a fast-track way to
depression in September. Apparently,
French therapists are never more in
demand than at this time of year.
Magazines are full of advice on how
to cope with the post-holiday blues.
So I have a better idea: don?t go on
holiday next year. Stay where you are.
If you never go somewhere nicer, you
don?t know what you?re missing and
you won?t have to hire a therapist to
help you readjust to the banality of
everyday life. Choose life. Choose
home. And remember it?s downhill
from now, mes amis, all the way to
Christmas. I expect you?ll be having
another month off then as well.
The 20th anniversary of
the death of Princess
Diana was always going
to matter. The only
question was how much,
to whom and what form
it would take. Only 20
minutes into last night?s
documentary, watching
it began to feel ghoulish.
Tomorrow night
there will be yet
another programme
about her. For weeks
there has been endless
analysis of her clothes,
her hairstyles, even the
height of her heels.
Why? Because, 20
years after her death,
Diana still sells.
Her life and death
was a tragic, messy
business. Only
historians will be able
to untangle the role of
the paparazzi and
media, Diana?s
relationship with them,
all those people who
wanted to see stories
and photographs of her,
and bought the papers
and magazines that
provided them, and
who then, on her death,
shot the messenger.
Diana was no angel.
She was flawed like the
rest of us, but she is
gone. Enough weeping
and wailing and
bemoaning our loss.
We should let the poor
woman rest in peace.
Kevin Maher is away
never used it. In the
end I was persuaded to
buy a smaller one. If I
ever sell up, I was told,
buyers would expect a
bath in the bathroom,
which when you put it
like that doesn?t seem
unreasonable. I road
tested my new small
bath on arrival, found it
as unsatisfactory as the
bigger version, and will
never get in it again.
The pollsters who
think that our bath
aversion means we?ve
forgotten how to relax
are wrong. We have
stopped taking baths
because it?s an
inefficient way of
getting clean, our
houses are heated so
we rarely need a bath
to warm up, and there
are better ways to
unwind. We?ve realised
that there?s nothing
relaxing about lying in
dirty water, getting
sweaty and bored.
True relaxation is
mindlessly eating
carbs, staring out of the
window and not feeling
you have to post about
it on Instagram.
almost no one takes
baths. According to a
poll, only one in four of
us has a bath to relax.
As many as that?
How can you stand it?
I buy into the theory ?
candles, a glass of wine,
unwinding ? because
about once every ten
years I try it. Within 30
seconds, I?m too hot. In
less than a minute, I?m
bored and fidgeting.
When I did up my
flat a few years ago, I
wanted to do away with
the enormous bath on
the grounds that I
S
he is not, on the face of it,
an obvious role model.
A mother of nine who in
every photograph gazes
up submissively at her
husband and who
submerged herself in
mourning after he died, a
woman who opposed female suffrage
and told her grandchildren who to
marry. Yet Victoria was the most
powerful woman of her age, one
who survived an awful childhood, a
shattering bereavement and the stress
of ruling a country from the age of 18
to become the most visible woman in
the world. She?s the girl for me.
Queen Victoria was everywhere
when I was growing up in London in
the Seventies. Her stern marble
features gazed at me when I played in
Kensington Gardens or when I visited
the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Victorian conjured up a world of red
brick, dark furniture and stifled
feelings. To call someone Victorian
was to say that they were stern,
sexually repressed and out of touch
with the modern world. To me,
Victoria was an old bag in a bonnet,
permanently dressed in black, who
took no pleasure in anything. Her
most famous saying was ?We are not
amused?, and to my childish self she
did not look amusing at all.
A few years later I was at the
University of Cambridge reading
history. My special subject was Queen
Victoria and the media, taught by the
great scholar David Cannadine. I
picked the topic because I had heard
what a great teacher he was rather
than the subject, and when I got my
first reading list, which included
several volumes of Victoria?s diaries,
my heart sank.
I remember sitting in the university
library reading room, all dim lighting
and studious quiet, and looking at the
red leather-bound volumes in front of
me. Reluctantly I opened the first one
and found a page at random.
November 1839; Victoria was 19, the
same age as me. I started to read:
?Friday, November 1, 1839. It was
piercingly cold, and I sat in my cape,
which dearest Albert settled
comfortably for me. He was so cold,
dear Angel, being in grande tenue with
tight white cazimere pantaloons
(nothing under them) and high boots.
We cantered home again.?
My hoot of laughter was met by a
chorus of shushes. This was not the
Victoria of my childhood. As I read on
I discovered not a grumpy old bag, but
a passionate teenager who liked
dancing, music, dogs and, last but not
least, men. She was, I have to say, a girl
after my own heart. Like her, I liked
parties and dancing and champagne
and, of course, men.
This was the beginning of what has
been a 30-year relationship. We
weren?t always as close as we are now
that I write about her pretty much
every day, but it would be fair to say
that she has been lurking in the
background. I followed her example
and proposed to the long-suffering
man who is now my husband. Like
Victoria, I am not very good at
concealing my impatience with men
who think they know more than I do
and, like Victoria, I eat too much and
too fast and I don?t really care.
I have read all the biographies, but
found that they were no substitute for
the Queen?s own inimitable voice. She
kept diaries all her life; someone
calculated she wrote 62 million words
in her lifetime. No other monarch has
been such an indefatigable recorder of
her own life, or as entertaining. The
most significant entry is the one she
wrote on the day she became Queen:
?spent an hour quite alone?. Here was
a girl who had been watched and
supervised all her life by her mother
and her Svengali, Sir John Conroy,
who couldn?t even walk down the
stairs on her own, asserting herself
against her tormentors ? no
Stockholm syndrome for Victoria.
When I was a child I was frightened to
death of my stepfather, he bullied me
just as Conroy did Victoria, and I
I discovered not a
grumpy old bag,
but a passionate
teenager
know how much courage it takes to
stand up to a man whom your mother
loves and you loathe.
As a mother, it was a relief to see
that Victoria did not succumb to baby
brain. Like her I suffered from
postnatal depression and, like her, I
found it hard to understand why
something I loved so much could
make me feel so hopeless. She, poor
woman, had no choice about having
nine children (no contraception); on
the other hand I wanted more
children than I was able to have
(endometriosis), but I take comfort
from Victoria?s utter briskness when it
comes to her children. As someone
who has agonised about whether I was
giving my children enough attention, I
feel hugely encouraged by Victoria?s
lack of handwringing over whether
she was a good enough mother. As far
as Victoria was concerned her children
were lucky to have her, an attitude
that I can only aspire to.
When I look at the photographs of
Victoria and Albert, in which she
looks up at him in a rather submissive
pose, all I think is that she is
photographically protesting too much.
It isn?t easy being better known than
your spouse; I know that my husband
dies a little every time he is introduced
as Daisy?s husband, or someone
the times | Monday August 28 2017
3
1GT
times2
I proposed to my husband
The lowdown
Hatfishing
COVER: KATIE WILSON FOR THE TIMES; BELOW: GETTY IMAGES
I heard you got dumped. Sorry
about that.
Hey ho, his loss. Girl power. I am a
queen. Etc, etc.
More importantly ? are you back
on Tinder?
Certainly am. And Bumble. And any
other dating app that will have me.
Well, prepare yourself for the
new wave of dating lingo.
My millennial dictionary is poised.
Good. Beware the ?hatfisher??.
Oh my. Sounds sinister.
Certainly is. Much like the
?catfisher?? and ?kittenfisher??, the
?hatfisher?? is a deceitful beast.
He?ll lure you in, quite cleverly,
with a seemingly keen interest in
headwear, only to later reveal . . .
What? Reveal what?
assumes his name is Goodwin (I didn?t
change my name, of course). I can
only imagine how Albert, the cleverest
royal we?ve ever had, must have felt
about having to walk behind his wife. I
imagine that submissive pose Victoria
adopted in photographs was her way
of redressing the balance, but there
was never any real doubt who was the
boss. As Albert wrote ruefully a few
months after their marriage to one of
his friends: ?I am the husband, but not
the master in the house.?
It is in the past three years that my
relationship with the Queen has
become central. Not only is she paying
the bills (I earn my living writing
Victoria, the TV series), but in an
almost eerie way she is behind me at
every crucial point in my life. When I
got the call to say that my house was
on fire I was in the Victoria section of
the London Library reading about the
Queen?s disputes with the Buckingham
Palace builders. The Queen was
suitably imperious: ?I want to move
into the palace Next Week!? It took me
almost a year to get back into my
house, but, like Victoria, I didn?t skimp
on the chandeliers.
About five months later I went for a
mammogram and saw the
radiographer making that face you
never want the radiographer to make.
It wasn?t so bad, just a very small
tumour, but I felt rather dizzy. At
another moment I might have
brooded, but I found that brooding
Daisy Goodwin with
Jenna Coleman.
Top right: Coleman
and Tom Hughes in
Victoria
wa iincompatible with writing about
was
the gloriously unintrospective Victoria.
As I wrote about my young spirited
heroine asserting herself against the
forest of old men trying to mansplain
her into submission (a phenomenon I
knew something about having worked
at the BBC in the Eighties), I felt my
spirits lift. Victoria had bouts of
hypochondria (usually when there was
something she didn?t want to do), but
she was astonishingly stoic about the
prolapsed uterus (ouch) that her
doctor discovered only when he
examined her after her death.
Victoria?s greatest virtue now to my
middle-aged mind is her lack of
personal vanity. As someone who has
just spent a ludicrous amount of
money paying to be starved in a
German boot camp, I can only admire
the way in which after Albert died she
gave up the corsets and let herself go.
She bought into that most delectable
of British institutions, the afternoon
tea, to tide over the peckish gap
between lunch and dinner. Victoria
never said: ?Does my bum look big in
this?? At her golden jubilee in 1887, her
prime minister Lord Rosebery
implored the widowed Queen to wear
a crown at her public appearances. She
refused, saying that her people knew
that she was a poor widow woman,
and she wore her widow?s cap.
There was no doubt at all, however,
of her majesty. Once, Victoria went to
the opera with the Empress Eug閚ie,
who was a famous beauty married to
the French Emperor Napol閛n III.
They stood in the box while the
orchestra played the Marseillaise and
God Save the Queen. Afterwards both
women sat down, but while Eug閚ie
looked over her shoulder to check
there was a chair, Victoria sat down
without looking. She knew the chair
would be there. I want to be the kind
of woman who knows the chair will
always be there. To take your place in
the world without excuse or apology,
to be always and unrepentantly
yourself, that?s the lesson I take from
Victoria. Thanks to her I have
discovered my inner matriarch.
An enormous forehead, terrible
haircut, or ? whisper it ? no hair
at all! Dun dun duuuuuuun!
The horror!
Well, worse things have happened.
True. I have no issue with any of the
above. It would be the lying that
disappointed me most.
An omen of things to come.
Snake territory, if ever I saw it. So,
what are the signs to look for?
Check out his dating app profile
and social media posts. Is he
sporting a hat in every photo? Are
the photos cropped or angled to cut
out the top of his head? Does he say
he likes short girls, who even with
heels would not be able to see
above his shoulders?
Fine. Noted. What about in person?
Same again. Has he worn a hat or
hoodie to every date? Does he
refuse to take it off in bed or,
worse, restaurants?
That would just be bad manners.
Especially the latter.
A crime more offensive than the
hatfishing itself.
Quite right. *Sighs*
You all right?
Well, grateful
ateful as I am
for this forewarning,
I can?t say
ay it makes
me optimistic
mistic for
future romance.
omance.
Hang in
n
there, sister.
ister.
Just be
wary off
anyone
who takes
kes
you to a
milliner?s
r?s
on the
first date.
te.
Hannah
h
Rogers
4
Monday August 28 2017 | the times
1GT
times2
From Love Island to Big Ben: it?s
Summer isn?t even over, but have you
already forgotten what has happened?
Olav Bjortomt tests your memory
TV quickies
1 Which TV presenter was named as
the BBC?s highest-paid female star?
2 Which retailer?s rugs were revealed
to be the source of the furs worn by
characters such as Jon Snow in Game
of Thrones?
3 Which actor, who was the only one
to appear in all 295 episodes of Last of
the Summer Wine, died aged 96?
4 The reality TV dating show Love
Island was revealed to have received
four times as many applications as
which top university?
5 Which Coronation Street character?s
famous pinny, headscarf and hair
curlers were sold at auction for �200?
6 Who played the priest Father
Michael Kerrigan in Jimmy
McGovern?s latest TV drama, Broken?
Political question time
7 Which politician said that he ?toyed
with Marxism? at university after
reading a biography of Trotsky that
?was like a light going on??
8 Who said of Donald Trump: ?It
takes two to tango and I am not
tangoing with this guy. I?ve got better
things to do??
9 ?Oh, Jeremy Corbyn!? sung to the
tune of which White Stripes song
became a rallying chant for Labour
supporters at Glastonbury?
10 Which joint chiefs of staff, Theresa
May?s closest aides, were forced
to resign over their roles in
the Conservative
election campaign?
11 The chart-topping
musician Kid Rock
announced that
he was planning
to do what?
12 Which
politician was
called a ?blond
British wombat?
during his visit
to Australia?
13 Just before the
Queen?s speech, which
Labour MP said: ?Better get
your skates on. The first race is at half
past two??
14 Complete the infamous Twitter
typo from Donald Trump: ?Despite
the constant negative press . . .??
Arts for art?s sake
15 Which Turner prizewinning artist
created two Brexit-themed vases that
he named Matching Pair?
16 Which Spanish artist?s body was
exhumed for a paternity test to
determine whether he was the father
of a 61-year-old tarot card reader
named Maria Pilar Abel?
17 Rather fittingly, Bill Murray
attended consecutive evening
showings of which Broadway musical?
18 Which two Olivias star in the new
Lucy Kirkwood play, Mosquitoes, on
the National Theatre?s Dorfman stage?
19 The Royal Academy recreated the
studio of which French artist for
an exhibition that opened on
August 5?
20 A statue of which
co-author of The
Communist Manifesto was
brought to Manchester by
the Turner prize-nominated
artist Phil Collins?
21 Which US artist?s skull painting
Untitled (1982) sold for $110.5 million in
New York, setting a record price for an
American artist at auction?
17
XX
X
X
Celebrity mastermind
22 Which 23-year-old singer became
the first British celebrity to reach
30 million followers on Twitter?
23 In July the Tory MP Jacob ReesMogg announced the birth of his sixth
child. Which of the following was not
one of his new son?s names: Theodore
Sixtus Dominic Boniface Christopher?
24 The Australian model Miranda
Kerr married which tech company
chief executive?
25 An apricot rose called Dame was
launched by the Shropshire grower
David Austin Roses at the Chelsea
Flower Show. After which actress was
it named?
26 What was the name of the hedge
fund manager who married Pippa
Middleton on May 20?
27 Which couple named their
newborn twins Alexander
and Ella?
61
28 On social media,
Jeremy Corbyn?s
youngest son,
Tommy, was
singled out for
bearing ?an
uncanny
resemblance? to
which star of The
Lord of the Rings?
The sporting
arena
29 The swimmer Adam Peaty broke
which world record twice in one day?
30 Which three-time Wimbledon
singles champion was declared
bankrupt in June?
31 Who defeated Venus Williams to
win her first Wimbledon singles title
and her second grand slam?
32 Who won a record seventh FA Cup
as a manager?
33 Which US sports team topped the
Forbes list of most valuable sports
franchises, with a value of $4.2 billion?
34 Synchronised swimming was
officially renamed what?
35 Takuma Sato became the first
Asian driver to win which American
motor race?
26
31
34
Dedicated follower
of fashion?
36 Which French fashion house was
accused of appropriating indigenous
Australian culture for featuring a
�100 boomerang in its 2017 spring/
summer collection?
37 Which French vehicle
manufacturer launched a nail polish
so that drivers can match their car?
38 What were men allowed to do at
Royal Ascot for the first time in the
event?s history?
39 Which French fashion house
brought out stilettos with wheels, or
rollerskate stilettos, called the Anya
100 Patch Pump Roller?
40 Which American artist put the
Mona Lisa, Van Gogh?s A Wheat Field
with Cypresses and Rubens?s The Tiger
Hunt on Louis Vuitton bags for his
Masters collaboration?
41 Which doll was given 15 new
iterations by Mattel, with hairstyles
the times | Monday August 28 2017
5
1GT
times2
the bumper bank holiday quiz
4
58
2
changed the name of his Singhsbury?s
convenience store to what?
53 A Cornish seafood restaurant
named after which chef ousted
L?Enclume as No 1 in The Good Food
Guide 2018?
54 In an item for the TV show Rip Off
Britain, which presenter tested positive
for opiates after eating a loaf of poppy
seed bread and a poppy seed bagel
over the course of three days?
24
Popcorn posers
55 Which knight voiced the Poop in
The Emoji Movie?
56 Who finally apologised
for the ?atrocious
cockney accent? he
adopted for Mary
Poppins?
XX
57 Who became the
second woman to
win the award for
best director at
Cannes, for her film
The Beguiled?
58 Daniel Day-Lewis
announced he was retiring
from acting, with his final
performance coming in Phantom
Thread, a film by which US director?
59 Which former Miss Israel played
the title role in Wonder Woman?
59
8
XX
XX
including a man bun
and cornrows?
42 The freed former soldier
Chelsea Manning was
photographed by Annie
Leibovitz for which
magazine?s 125th anniversary
September issue?
Read ?em and
weep
43 Which book, ghostwritten by Tony
Schwartz, did the former basketball
player Dennis Rodman take to give to
Kim Jong-un on his latest visit to
North Korea?
44 Who is the author of Beren and
L鷗hien, a newly published novel about
a man who falls in love with an elf?
45 Which term, referring to a genus of
American weevil, became the last word
in the Oxford English Dictionary?
46 Which English comedian and actor
published Believe Me: A Memoir of
Love, Death and Jazz Chickens?
47 The Pride and
Prejudice quote,
?I declare after all
there is no enjoyment like
reading!?, said by Caroline
Bingley (who was no fan of
literature), has been chosen
for what?
A bit random
Answers on
page 6
48 Who won the 2017 Bailey?s
Women?s Prize for Fiction for
her novel The Power?
Food for thought
49 Poundland delayed the launch
of its Twin Peaks chocolate bar
because of a legal dispute over its
similarity to which product?
50 How many ingredients form the
title of Jamie Oliver?s new cookbook?
51 According to a British Nutrition
Foundation poll, 29 per cent of five to
seven-year-olds believe that fish
fingers are made of what?
52 After a legal row with
Sainsbury?s, Jel Singh Nagra
39
60 The blue-and-white striped design
of which Nobel prizewinning nun?s
sari was trademarked to protect
her reputation?
61 Big Ben fell silent for repairs. It will
not be heard daily until which year?
62 Giant plastic pipe segments, the
longest being 1,574ft long, washed up
on beaches at Winterton and Sea
Palling in which county?
63 The D-Day veteran Bryson
William Verdun Hayes became, at the
age of 101, the world?s oldest person to
take part in which activity?
64 Which Nobel peace prizewinner
gained a place at the University of
Oxford to read philosophy, politics
and economics?
65 Heinz Green Sauce
ketchup, Coca-Cola BlaK,
Harley-Davidson cologne and
Trump: The Game are among the
exhibits in Helsingborg, Sweden,
home to the new Museum of what?
Science and technology
challengers
66 Which country minted a glow-inthe-dark coin (a two-dollar ?toonie?)
to mark its 150th anniversary?
67 Launched in 2011, which Nasa
spacecraft photographed Jupiter?s
Great Red Spot on its sixth orbit
around the planet?
68 Filing for bankruptcy protection in
June, the Japanese firm Takata makes
which product?
69 A computer error caused the US
Geological Survey (USGS) to issue a
warning about a magnitude
6.8 earthquake that had
already taken place
in Santa Barbara,
29
California. In which
year did it actually
happen?
70 Arriving in
Portsmouth in
mid-August, which
aircraft carrier is the
largest warship built for
the Royal Navy?
71 Travis Kalanick stepped
down as the chief executive of
which company?
72 Fossils discovered in which African
country suggested that Homo sapiens
emerged at least 300,000 years ago,
100,000 earlier than hitherto thought?
Rock goes to college
73 An edition of Monopoly honouring
which band features ?A Kind of Magic?
and ?In the Lap of the Gods? cards?
74 Which grime artist, real name
Joseph Junior Adenuga, was named
songwriter of the year at the Ivor
Novello awards?
75 New Rules was a No 1 hit for which
singer of Kosovan parentage, who was
?caught snogging? Chris Martin at
Glastonbury?
76 Which former ship-based pirate
station was handed its first full-time
AM broadcast licence in May?
77 Predominantly sung in Spanish,
which song by the Puerto Rican pop
star Luis Fonsi featuring the rapper
Daddy Yankee became the moststreamed song of all time?
78 Which US rapper reintroduced the
hyphen in his stage name after
previously simplifying it in 2013?
6
1GT
Monday August 28 2017 | the times
life
Professor Tanya Byron
My mother has been hyper since two deaths in the family
N
Seven years ago my
father died of cancer.
For two years before
his death my mother,
now 88, cared for him.
His final months were
very hard work and she spent a long
time recovering physically. When
he died she went into hyper
control-freak mode, ordering me
and my three siblings about ?
we obeyed, even when some of her
actions were questionable.
After that she went into
high-activity mode on her house ?
redecorating and throwing out vast
quantities of anything from furniture
and clothes to my father?s computer,
which she was adamant that she?d
never learn to use.
The next year her only sister died
unexpectedly. My aunt?s house was
in a state, but my mother eventually
cleared it with the help of my
brother. I helped her to sell it.
This was stressful. When I made
suggestions I was told to keep quiet
? this summarises much of her
attitude over the past seven years.
My siblings never question her
decisions, even if they think she is
wrong. I occasionally tactfully make
suggestions, but she will never accept
any other point of view.
My mother continues to throw stuff
out and her house is increasingly
bare. She also ?does it up?, with a
DIY person in most weeks and a
gardener. She talks endlessly of
moving, worried that she?ll become
a ?burden? to us, and doesn?t want
to leave her house ?in a mess?. We?ve
assured her that she is not and that
her house looks better than ours.
It feels as if she is emptying her
house to die. She is healthy for her
age, if a little frail, doesn?t take any
prescription drugs and her parents
lived to good ages (late eighties and
early nineties). She still drives
everywhere and sees her friends.
How do I help her to become
happier in her surroundings so that
Q
she can enjoy her last years? When
she is on form my mum is great fun
and can be very sympathetic.
Sally
N
Your mother?s
behaviour sounds
like a reaction to
two significant
bereavements that,
while logical in terms
of clearing the properties of
possessions of those who have died,
does seem excessive. You are clearly
concerned that this behaviour is
masking underlying difficulties, given
how extreme it appears.
Bereavement affects people in
different ways: for some it can lead to
a state of depressed inertia; for others,
similar to your mother, it can lead
ead
to what has been described as a state
of ?bereavement mania?.
We have to be cautious about
ut
ascribing a label to a grief reaction,
tion,
as this implies pathology and denies
the individuality and normalityy of this
process. Despite the implications
ns
of the term ?mania?, I do not wish
to suggest your mother is struggling
ggling
with a diagnosable mental illness.
ess.
However, if after one or multiple
tiple
bereavements a person shows
usual and expected grief reactions,
ons,
but they are taken to the extreme,
me,
becoming established over timee
to the point where they may
impair quality of life and
functioning, this can indicate a
complicated grief reaction thatt
requires professional support.
That said, grief is difficult
because it varies so much in
how it presents itself, and can
make the sufferer feel helpless
in the face of the often
uncontrollable emotions it
causes. It can creep in
unexpectedly, which also
makes it more challenging to
deal with. At a rational level it
is clear that your mother is
managing her grief by
A
At some
stage your
mother?s
mood
may crash
28 Elijah Wood
The sporting arena
29 50m breaststroke
30 Boris Becker
31 Garbi馿 Muguruza
32 Ars鑞e Wenger
33 Dallas Cowboys
34 Artistic swimming
35 Indianapolis 500 or
Indy 500
Answers
TV quickies
1 Claudia Winkleman
2 Ikea
3 Peter Sallis
4 University of
Cambridge, right
5 Hilda Ogden
6 Sean Bean
Political question time
7 Tony Blair
8 Sadiq Khan
9 Seven Nation Army
10 Nick Timothy and
Fiona Hill
11 Run for the US Senate
as a Republican
12 Boris Johnson
13 Dennis Skinner
14 Covfefe
Arts for art?s sake
15 Grayson Perry
16 Salvador Dal�
organising her life without those she
has loved and lost. As your father?s
carer she had to take a task-focused
approach to his care; understandably
this continued for her after he died.
Additionally it is well known that the
internal chaos of grief can be managed
by taking a task-focused approach to
dealing with what feels like external
chaos (eg organising your aunt?s
house) ? as many of us find, sorting
and tidying can offer relief when life
feels overwhelming.
And so, while your mother may
have felt more ?ready? for the death
of your father, the unexpected death
of her sister was a traumatic shock
and an additional bereavement that
may have escalated the ?manic? and
controlling behaviour that she has
been displaying.
disp
Your m
mother is likely to be wanting
to protect you and your siblings from
emotional challenge of ?clearing
the emoti
out? after someone has died. To go
through a deceased loved one?s
possessions can be incredibly
possessio
distressing, although for some
distressin
cathartic stage of the grieving
it is a cath
process.
proce However, if your mother
is taking
this to extremes,
ta
does this represent her
unacknowledged
pain relating
una
to your father?s absence,
resulting
in a need to remove
re
aall traces of him, including
changing
the environment that
ch
they
th once shared? This also
lleaves her potentially open
tto being financially exploited
by those she pays to support
this
t process (ie her DIY
person),
and therefore your
p
concerns
are important and
co
need to be addressed so
n
that she does not end up
tha
financially
drained, living in an
finan
empty home that is subject to
constant
consta alterations.
Mania,
Mani the opposite of depression,
often presents
as nonstop
pre
and excessive
activity, euphoria
e
self-confidence, accompanied by
self-confi
17 Groundhog Day
18 Olivia Colman and
Olivia Williams
19 Henri Matisse
20 Friedrich Engels
21 Jean-Michel Basquiat
Celebrity mastermind
22 Harry Styles
23 Theodore
24 Evan Spiegel of Snapchat
25 Dame Judi Dench
26 James Matthews
27 George and Amal
Clooney
Dedicated follower
of fashion?
36 Chanel
37 Renault
38 Remove their jackets due
to ?very hot conditions?
39 Saint Laurent
40 Jeff Koons
41 Ken
42 American Vogue
Read ?em and weep
43 Trump: The Art of the
Deal
44 JRR Tolkien
45 Zyzzyva
46 Eddie Izzard
insomnia and irritability. A hypomanic
state (which may better describe your
mother?s behaviour) is where there
is a sense of reality among the flurry
of activity. Mania is also understood
as a common defence strategy
against depression: turning the
helplessness of sadness on its head by
being busy and purposeful. However,
exhaustion will eventually set in,
leading to burnout, and the reemergence of depression.
It was the psychoanalyst Melanie
Klein who described the emotional
and psychological value of manic
defences as a way of distracting the
conscious mind (eg with a flurry of
activity and mental checklists) from
feelings of helplessness and despair.
Your mother?s resistance to your
suggestions may highlight that you
are pushing against an important
psychological defence mechanism of
which she cannot let go.
I suspect that your mother?s
behaviour represents a defence against
her feelings of grief. That she can still
be fun and is seeing friends is a good
thing, and it must be emphasised that
it would be damaging to label your
mother?s grief-related behaviour as
pathological, because everyone grieves
in their own way.
However, if there is an underlying
depression, the risk is that at some
stage your mother may become burnt
out and her mood will crash.
Therefore, while respecting her
choices regarding how she manages
widowhood, the loss of her sister
and her considerations regarding
her own death, I advise that you
gently open up a non-threatening
and non-judgmental conversation
about what this behaviour may
represent and how she can have
support (eg through counselling
or bereavement-support groups)
to address the pain of her losses in
a more managed and healthy way.
If you have a problem and would like
Professor Tanya Byron?s help, email
proftanyabyron@thetimes.co.uk
47 To appear on the new �
note featuring Jane Austen
48 Naomi Alderman
Food for thought
49 Toblerone ? Twin Peaks
has a double peak, while
Toblerone has one
50 Five
51 Chicken
52 Morrisinghs
53 Nathan Outlaw ?
the restaurant is called
Outlaw?s Fish Kitchen
54 Angela Rippon,
right
Popcorn posers
55 Sir Patrick
Stewart
56 Dick Van Dyke
57 Sofia Coppola
58 Paul Thomas
Anderson
59 Gal Gadot
A bit random
60 Mother Teresa
61 2021
62 Norfolk
63 Skydiving
64 Malala Yousafzai
65 Failure
Science and
technology
challengers
66 Canada
67 Juno
68 Air bags
69 1925
70 HMS Queen
Elizabeth
71 Uber
72 Morocco
Rock goes to
college
73 Queen
74 Skepta
75 Dua Lipa
76 Radio Caroline
77 Despacito
78 Jay-Z
the times | Monday August 28 2017
7
Saturday Review
1GT
Bank holiday Jumbo crossword
Jumbo crossword No 1282
Cryptic clues
Across
1 A shrew or a rat in a haversack
emptied out (9)
6 Forbidden to hold onto European
correspondent?s material (7)
10 Bully leading female here to see
shrink (5)
13 Not all cadets reorganised from
the right unit (7)
14 Daughter stands, listening for
engines: ... (7)
15 ... for this, maybe, boy penning
verses at home (7)
16 Place in Scotland offering short
thick chips with beef (8,3,8)
17 Not to feel remorse odd at first (3)
18 More or less giving up work (4,2)
20 Airmen owed so much, we
turned to crime, briefly (3,3)
21 Lauren at university modelled
nude (2,7)
23 Male with adrenalin coursing:
one?s not settled an inch (10)
25 Songs about sleuth to help to tell
a story (3,8)
29 Taking temperature, fear
mistake (5)
30 Running course for Mexicans
teaching religion: nothing well
done (3,5)
31 Part of US food range ? variable
sandwiches (8)
34 Reserved term for what
salespeople can do (4,4)
36 Put back in check, prepared to
capture queen (8)
37 Old officer king had murdered in
Guernica ? tho? oddly
overlooked (5)
39 The writer?s extraordinary true
story that has secret ending? (7,4)
41 Established batting fails on
women?s cricket team (4,6)
43 Pick plays together with quest to
find dance music (9)
45 Ten-gallon container maybe,
which dispenses whiskey with
punch (6)
47 Groom reportedly completed
arrangement before marriage (6)
49 Practice enabling one to take lead
in computer game (3)
50 A number pledging future
constitutional support (5,5,4,5)
52 Irrational to bring up forgetting
a piece of pipe music (7)
53 Moslem territory that?s claimed
by China? (7)
54 Touch base to form gathering (7)
55 Live and prosper, wanting for
nothing (5)
56 We?re stars, female, playing our
parts? (7)
57 In retirement, I would add, fairly
active (9)
1
Down
1 Child brought up that Kelvin,
without partner, fosters is
mine (8)
2 Loose end left by Bottom,
perhaps, in mechanical play (5)
3 Sort of speech from duke looking
for private boxes (5-6)
4 I require that disco at first should
break even (6)
5 Knocking on ... rather more than
a bit? (2,6,4)
6 Many know, when speaking,
the matter is closed! (2,3,2)
7 A new vow, while yet fresh,
is novel (3,3,2,4,3)
8 Watch found on Himmler,
perhaps, that?s offered cheap ...
(4,6)
9 ... Add free chain, with flimsy
wrapping (5,2)
10 Not a soldier?s way of life (5,6)
11 What may be said to pump you
up with air fit to burst (4,3,2)
12 Rex replaced old gal?s toy (3,4)
19 Director once having surgeon
assuming a part, briefly (7)
22 Just dealing fine with
broadcasting of songs, etc (4,4)
24 Certain elements of rehearsal
matter especially (4,5,6)
26 Tense chosen by boy when
speaking (8)
27 Rich yoghurt, and ham, on
vacation: that takes some
beating! (6)
28 What can film you and me at an
earlier time in the morning (6)
32 Letter from Greek bank for
S American (7)
33 We ask to be showered with
toffees in religious celebration
(5,2,5)
35 Impertinence from judge and
wise man closely linked (5,2,4)
37 Pledge that?s giving too much? (11)
38 Making time, heading off in
Advent (10)
40 Of a kind that may be crossed
with a butterfly? (9)
42 Sport that?s fast acquiring drug
habit (8)
43 University course in Latin which
wasn?t serious (7)
44 I felt that expanding RAM would
be an improvement (5-2)
46 Classic Kojak, when describing
his head! (3,4)
48 Second drop taking longer (6)
51 Small hooter rousing some hotel
workers (5)
Thinking space
For more crosswords and your favourite
puzzles go to thetimes.co.uk
2
3
4
5
13
6
7
8
9
14
10
11
12
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
45
44
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
55
53
56
54
57
Name......................................................................................................... Prizes
Address.....................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................
............................................................ Postcode.....................................
Phone number......................................................................................
The prize for each of the first
correct solutions to the
Cryptic and times2 Jumbo
clues to be opened will be a
collection of Times reference
books ? including The Times
Universal Atlas of the World, Collins English
Dictionary & Thesaurus, and Bradford?s Crossword
Solver?s Dictionary published by HarperCollins.
Entries should be marked ?Cryptic? or ?times2?
and sent to: The Times Jumbo Crossword 1282,
PO Box 2164, Colchester, Essex CO2 8LJ, to arrive
by September 7. The winners and the solutions will
be published on September 9.
times2 clues
Across
1 Apply (for an issue of shares) (9)
6 Musical indication meaning heavy
or weighty (7)
10 Clean and stylish (5)
13 Take back (7)
14 Makes smaller or lower (7)
15 Person who points out likely race
winners (7)
16 Invader in 1066 (7,3,9)
17 Small brooch; skittle (3)
18 Substance added to dough to make
it rise (6)
20 Irrational fear of something (6)
21 How insulating clothing is designed
to work (9)
23 Plant with five-petalled flowers (10)
25 Provider of cheap accommodation
(5,6)
29 No longer living together (5)
30 Select carefully (4-4)
31 Mechanism that allows a vehicle
to be guided (8)
34 Appetite stimulant (8)
36 Tree-dwelling (8)
37 Male duck (5)
39 Period between periods of normal
rule (11)
41 Commander?s attribute (10)
43 Type of bread (9)
45 Serviette (6)
47 One who strikes an attitude to
impress (6)
49 Spherical object or shape (3)
50 Soccer (11,8)
52 Flow of ice (7)
53 Tombstone inscription (7)
54 Moving to music (7)
55 Electricity cable support (5)
56 Obliterate completely (7)
57 Seafront walkway (9)
Down
1 Astutely (8)
2 Plant leaf chewed in the East (5)
3 Woodwind player (US spelling) (11)
4 Early enough (2,4)
5 Of great consequence (12)
6 Man-powered taxi (7)
7 Educational establishment (9,6)
8 Common trailing plant (10)
9 One of the Muses (7)
10 Place one over another (11)
11 Device for controlling an
aircraft (9)
12 Cruel and oppressive rule (7)
19 Mean; mediocre (7)
22 (Of a building) having many storeys
(4-4)
24 Scientific procedure (15)
26 One such as Conrad Hilton (8)
27 Cutter down of trees (6)
28 Spicy preserved sausage (6)
32 Believe to be so, suppose (7)
33 Emotional association between
two people (12)
35 Process of being exposed to,
eg, nuclear rays (11)
37 Stop providing or making (11)
38 (Done) inexpensively (2,3,5)
40 Brief or concise representation (9)
42 Introductory section
(of, eg, a play) (8)
43 Temporary substitute (7)
44 Sudden large increase (7)
46 Not to be shared or revealed (7)
48 Caribbean cult (6)
51 Part of the psyche (5)
8
1GT
Monday August 28 2017 | the times
arts
Why the Big Moon are
heading for the stars
Warning: this band may seriously cheer you up. The London pop group,
the outliers on this year?s Mercury prize shortlist, delight Stephen Dalton
T
he Big Moon don?t
make sensational
claims about their
music. They have
come simply to save
humankind from bad
news ? and maybe
even from Ed Sheeran
too. The London indie-rock quartet?s
chief weapon of mass seduction is
their Mercury-nominated debut Love
in the 4th Dimension, one of the most
infectious, bittersweet, heart-jangling
British guitar albums of this decade.
Perched on a bouncy hotel bed in
Seattle, the Big Moon front woman
Juliette Jackson and the bass guitarist
Celia Archer make contact down a
crackly Skype line in the middle of
their US tour. It?s a no-frills trip, with
the band driving and tour-managing
themselves, beating jet lag with
alcohol. Their plan is to break America
before America breaks them. So far
the natives have proved friendly.
?They laugh when we say things,?
Jackson says. ?I don?t know if it?s with
us or at us. Hopefully both.?
?America is quite intimidating,?
Archer says, frowning. ?It does feel like
this huge meal that you?re never going
to finish, but you just have to start
eating the peas, one by one.?
In late July the Big Moon learnt that
Love in the 4th Dimension had been
shortlisted for the Hyundai Mercury
prize. They were rehearsing a Bonnie
Tyler song when their manager,
Louise Latime, popped by to break the
news. ?We screamed and hugged and
cried and popped champagne, and I
broke a string on my guitar,? Jackson
says. ?The cover we were working on
was Total Eclipse of the Heart, which is
the best to sing when you?ve got some
amazing news.?
?Yeah, it comes from a really deep,
guttural place,? says Archer, ?like
throwing up emotion. We puked a lot
of emotion that day. And prosecco.?
Mercury nominees are told a week
I was drunk for
a week when we
found out we?d
been nominated
before the shortlist is announced, then
sworn to secrecy. ?I was drunk for a
week,? says Archer, beaming. ?Every
night I was out with different people
who I definitely didn?t tell before it
was announced.?
These twentysomething Mercury
debutantes are up against some
heavyweight competition, including
Stormzy, Kate Tempest and Sheeran.
When pressed to explain Sheeran?s
superstar appeal, Jackson and
Archer respond in perfect unison:
?Errrr, no comment.?
?But you can?t argue with his
level of success,? Archer adds
diplomatically, ?and he does make
all of his own music, and he has
written incredibly successful songs
for other huge acts. Mass appeal is
important. You can?t tell millions of
people they are wrong for liking
something.?
When she first conceived the Big
Moon three years ago, Jackson was
working as a waitress in a cocktail
bar, which makes her a living pop
lyric. She had played in bands, but not
as songwriter or lead singer. Initially
thwarted in her search for bandmates,
she began writing songs anyway. Then
she assembled a group to play them,
mostly calling on friends of friends.
She and Archer are from southeast
London suburbia, the guitarist Sophie
Nathan is a Londoner and the
drummer Fern Ford is from Caerphilly.
?I wanted our band to be a place
where we were happy and having a
good time,? Jackson says. ?I?ve been
in bands before where people aren?t
having fun, or they get really
controlling, or stuff gets weird and
scary. So it was much more important
to have the right people. I wanted us
to be a group of friends who could
really enjoy this.?
This sense of unbridled joy is key to
the Big Moon?s charm. Their stage
shows are fizzy and rowdy, their
interviews giggly and cheeky, their
music videos lively cartoonish romps
full of paint fights and cross-dressing
cowboys and boozy Barbie dolls. They
certainly make being in a band look
fun. ?It?s all fake,? Archer says,
deadpan. ?We absolutely hate this.
Yeah, it?s the worst. Thing. Ever.?
Y
She?s joking, of course. The Big
Moon told the NME that they ?bring
jjoy in a time when everything?s going
to shit?. Their buoyant sing-along
guitar anthems offer a refuge from
tthe anxiety about extremist politics
and terrorism, but they are quick to
sideline charges of naive escapism.
?When I was writing these songs I
was falling in love with someone for
the first time,? Jackson says. ?They are
written from the heart, so I guess
that?s why the album does sound so
optimistic and bewildered and
wide-eyed, because I felt so emotional
about that. It was a really extreme
feeling. Also, the songs were all written
before Brexit happened and Trump
got elected, so the world does feel
different now. But yeah, when the
songs were written I felt really happy.?
The boyfriend who inspired
Jackson?s devotional lyrical gushing is
the times | Monday August 28 2017
9
1GT
CHARLOTTE PATMORE
arts
The Mercury
nominees in full
Alt-J Relaxer
Cerebral art rockers who got
together at the University of Leeds
Blossoms Blossoms
The indie-pop band from Stockport
have a way with a catchy tune
Dinosaur Together, As One
The list?s ?token jazzers?
Ed Sheeran Divide
Appears to have been forgiven for
ruining Game of Thrones
Glass Animals How to Be
a Human Being
Oxford group who gave us the
life-affirming single Life Itself
J Hus Common Sense
Rapper who combines Afrobeat,
dancehall and hip-hop
Kate Tempest Let Them Eat Chaos
Poet rapper and author with a fiery
presence and pungent wordplay
Loyle Carner Yesterday?s Gone
Thrilling beats and poetic lyrics put
him in a league of his own
Sampha Process
Singer-songwriter who blends Stevie
Wonder smoothness and raw feeling
Stormzy Gang Signs & Prayer
Rapper?s debut combines hard-edged
urban with a disarming softer side
The Big Moon Love in the
4th Dimension
One of only two all-female acts on
the list: the new Brit Pop
The xx I See You
Three shy Londoners making gauzy,
understated pop
the artist Max Dovey, who ?makes
performance art about networks and
computers and robots?. The pair met
in the woods at a music festival two
and a half years ago, when the
Big Moon began touring. ?We
spontaneously snogged!? Jackson roars
with delight. No drugs or alcohol were
involved? ?Of course not. It was pure
love,? she says, grinning. ?We were
intoxicated with poetry.?
Which is a sweet story, although
randomly kissing strangers in
woodland is probably not the best
dating advice to give the band?s young
male fans. ?I think I did pull him
towards me,? Jackson concedes. ?I
don?t think he would have been the
grabber. He?s not a grabby guy, Max.
He?s consensually grabby, ha! One of
those good dudes.?
In the light of Dovey?s crucial role as
Jackson?s muse, I hardly dare ask this,
but are they still together? ?Yeah, he?s
still in my life. We just moved in
together,? she says. ?It?s a true-love
story. He?s the best.?
As an all-female band, the Big Moon
are outliers in the male-dominated
music industry. Their manager, album
producer and touring sound engineer
are all women too. But Jackson bristles
at any suggestion of deliberate gender
bias in choosing collaborators.
?Totally accidental,? she insists. ?We
do what?s best for the band and choose
the best people for the job. And
sometimes they happen to be women.
The Big Moon: from
left, Celia Archer, Fern
Ford, Juliette Jackson
(also on facing page)
and Sophie Nathan
It?s just so
cathartic
making
a really
loud noise
We get this question a lot, obviously,
but what a disservice it would be to
the songs and to everybody?s time and
energy if we weren?t picking the best
people for the job. A project that was
entirely limited by a gender would be
completely dumb. We work with
plenty of men as well.?
All four band members have
partners at home. In Seattle, homesick
blues are biting. ?Sometimes you get
to that point in the tour where you?re
in bad mood and really prickly and
thin-skinned and everything feels
personal,? Archer says. ?You miss your
friends and the people that you love
are in different time zones.?
Fortunately, even in their rare low
moods, the Big Moon have the great
consolation of playing rowdy,
love-drunk indie rock to a room full
of strangers. ?We are lucky to have
that release,? Jackson says.
?If you have a bad day, we get to go
on stage at the end and yell. It?s so
cathartic and therapeutic, making a
really loud noise and looking across at
your friends because it?s something
you love and you?ve worked on
together for a long time. And there
are people in the audience from the
other side of the world singing along
to this thing that you wrote in your
bedroom. That is mental.? Mental
and magnificent.
The Big Moon tour the UK from
September 23. Love in the 4th
Dimension (Fiction) is out now
10
1GT
Monday August 28 2017 | the times
television & radio
Queen Victoria?s libido is endlessly entertaining
GARETH GATRELL/ITV
Carol
Midgley
TV review
Victoria
ITV
{{{((
Strike: The
Cuckoo?s Calling
BBC One
{{{{(
I
t?s often said that Queen Victoria
loved sex, but not what sex has a
habit of producing. This was
certainly the vibe in the opening
episode of Victoria as the Queen
admitted that she didn?t much ?like?
her newborn daughter, but clearly
very much liked getting into Albert?s
super-snug britches whenever she got
the chance. (For no reason at all we
were told that Albert ?dressed to the
left?. As a critic, I was forced to rewind
and check.) ?I miss this,? said Victoria
Radio Choice
Joe Clay
Radio 2?s Day of Rock
Radio 2, from 9.30am
Something a bit different
for bank holiday Monday
on Radio 2 as the station
celebrates all things rock.
At noon the Canadian
rocker Bryan Adams shares
his record collection; from
2pm Tony Blackburn
focuses on women in rock;
Simon Mayo takes listeners?
requests from 5pm; and
Paul Jones has the best of
classic blues rock from 7pm.
Anyone fond of outrageous
anecdotes is well served at
8pm when Johnnie Walker
meets Alice Cooper.
Subterranean
Homesick Blues
Radio 4, 10.45am
After a disastrous affair 20
years previously, are John
and Maggie older and wiser
enough to try again? ?If
you?re lonely, maybe it
could be something to do
with you,? John says to
Maggie when she calls him
out of the blue, having
ended their previous
dalliance by kicking him
out of bed in the middle of
the night. ?We?re both
peculiar and possibly
allergic to genuine
affection,? she retorts. Bill
Nighy and Anna CalderMarshall are deliciously
spiky in AL Kennedy?s witty
take on grown-up romance.
(Jenna Coleman), pawing at Albert?s
clothes. They retired to a chaise
longue, but coitus was interrupted by
royal nannies bringing forth the infant
princess as the Queen glowered over
thwarted leg-over. If any historians
know how she regained her rampant
libido five minutes after giving birth
and sustained it as a procession of kids
ensued, there are many Mumsnet
users who would love to hear it.
However, it?s a visual treat to have
Victoria back for its second series,
even if at times it?s ludicrously soapy,
the two main actors are far more
beautiful than their muses (it?s Brad
and Angelina does Albert and
Victoria) and the below-stairs
sub-plots and upstairs sumptuousness
scream: ?Will this sell, Downton-style,
in America?? The arrival of Diana
Rigg as a battleaxe duchess took it into
slapstick and felt shoehorned in for
banal ?light relief?. The drama is
stronger on the serious stuff, such as
the political panic over 4,000 British
soldiers being hacked to death in
Afghanistan. However, Coleman and
Tom Hughes are plenty talented
enough to make this and their
hairbrush-throwing marital rows
credible. Reportedly they?re a real-life
item, which may help.
Nudge-nudge references to
copulation were plentiful as if there
was a risk we would miss the point.
Albert?s father proclaimed that his son
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Scott Mills 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 The Matt Edmondson Show
4.00 Dev 5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Dev 7.00
Daniel P Carter 9.00 Radio 1?s Specialist
Chart with Phil Taggart 10.00 Huw Stephens
1.00am Friction 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Sara Cox. Sitting in for Chris Evans
9.30 Ken Bruce. Kicking off ?Radio 2?s Day
of Rock?, the Hungarian pianist Peter Bence
performs rock classics. See Radio Choice
12.00 Bryan Adams Rocks! Includes an
acoustic session from Sting and rock
reminiscences from Robert Plant and Jackson
Browne 2.00pm Tony Blackburn. Rock?s top
female musicians, from Pink to Bonnie Raitt
5.00 Simon Mayo. Rock requests 7.00 Paul
Jones. A special blues-rock playlist, with
tunes by Led Zeppelin, Janis Joplin and
Cream 8.00 Johnnie Walker meets Alice
Cooper. The DJ hears from the American
musician and ?Godfather of Shock Rock?
Alice Cooper 9.00 Rick Wakeman?s Key to
Keys in Rock. The long-standing Yes member
celebrates the music of fellow rock
keyboardists 10.00 Ricky Ross?s New
Tradition 11.00 David Rodigan 12.00
Johnnie Walker?s Sounds of the 70s (r)
2.00am Radio 2?s Jazz Playlist 3.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Great British Songbook 4.00 Radio 2
Playlist: Hidden Treasures
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Music, news and the occasional surprise with
Petroc Trelawny. Including 7.00, 8.00 News.
7.30, 8.30 News Headlines
9.00 Essential Classics
Rob Cowan sets the tone and mood of the
day?s programme with a range of music to
intrigue, surprise and entertain. Plus, Rob?s
guest this week is the author Michael
Morpurgo, who is one of the UK?s best-loved
children?s authors, and novels such
as Private Peaceful, War Horse, and The
Butter?y Lion are now classics
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Brahms (1833-1897)
Donald Macleod explores a selection of the
larger orchestral works Brahms composed,
and looks at the composer?s life in the
periods in which they were written (r)
Jenna Coleman stars as the young monarch in the ITV series
1.00pm News
1.02 Live BBC Proms 2017:
Proms at Cadogan Hall
Petroc Trelawny introduces a recital from the
London venue in which the pianist Pavel
Kolesnikov performs music by Chopin,
including a selection of mazurkas.
Chopin (Waltz in A ?at, Op 69, No 1;
Impromptu in A ?at, Op 29; Waltz in
C sharp minor, Op 64, No 2; FantasyImpromptu in C sharp minor, Op 66;
Fantasy in F minor/A ?at, Op 49; Mazurkas
? selection; and Scherzo in E, Op 54)
2.00 Afternoon on 3
Jonathan Swain introduces another chance to
hear last Monday?s Prom from the Royal
Albert Hall, with Mirga Grazinyte-Tyla
conducting the City of Birmingham
Symphony Orchestra in a performance of
Beethoven?s Fifth Symphony, as well as
works by Stravinsky and Gerald Barry (r)
4.30 In Tune
Sean Rafferty is joined by guests including
the Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes,
who performs live in the studio ahead of his
appearance at the BBC Proms
6.00 News
6.02 Composer of the Week:
Brahms (1833-1897) (r)
7.00 Live BBC Proms 2017
Donald Macleod presents Glyndebourne
Festival Opera?s production of Mozart: La
clemenza di Tito starring Alice Coote and
Richard Croft, from London?s Royal Albert
Hall. The collision of love and ambition in
Mozart?s morally con?icted ?nal opera, and
the compassion of a wronged emperor, make
for a scenario as relevant today as in the
ancient Rome where it is set. Blending
ravishing arias with intricate human
psychology, La clemenza di Tito ranks among
the ?nest of Mozart?s mature works. Mozart
(La clemenza di Tito ? Act 1; and Act 2)
10.15 Literary Pursuits
In a new series, Sarah Dillon is a literary
detective on the hunt for the story behind
the story of how great works were written.
She begins with Dickens?s masterpiece, Great
Expectations. Begun in 1860, Sarah asks why
Dickens was writing it so fast ? he ?nished
it in nine and a half months ? and why he
famously changed the ending (r)
11.00 Jazz Now
Soweto Kinch presents a concert from
Munich by the American saxophonist Mark
Turner?s quartet, featuring the bassist Joe
Martin, the trumpeter Jason Palmer and the
drummer Jonathan Blake
12.30am Through the Night Performances
of Smetana, Martinu and Dvor醟
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
9.00 Mastertapes
Randy Newman talks about his 1972
album Sail Away (1/2)
9.30 Oliver Burkeman Is Busy
Why people feel they are continually busy (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week:
How Not to Be a Boy
The comedy actor and writer Robert Webb
reads from his memoir (1/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Discussion and interviews, presented by Jane
Garvey. Including at 10.45 the Drama:
The second series of AL Kennedy?s comedy
drama Subterranean Homesick Blues.
See Radio Choice (1/5)
10.30-6.45 (LW) Test Match Special:
England v West Indies
11.00 Jenny Eclair is Listless Today
Comedian and writer Jenny Eclair dispenses
with her to-do list as she attempts to
understand why women write so many
11.30 Fags, Mags and Bags
Comedy, written by and starring Sanjeev
Kohli and Donald McLeary (1/4)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Mike Walker
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Streets Apart:
A History of Social Housing
The story of housing for those disadvantaged
in British society (1/10)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: For the Time Being
By Tony Jones. A man travels back in time to
give his younger self advice that could
change everything
3.00 Counterpoint
Three contestants take part in the last heat
of music quiz (9/13)
3.30 The Food Programme
The popularity of dried and salted cod (r)
4.00 Queens of Chapeltown
Colin Grant reports on the 50th anniversary
of the Leeds West Indian Carnival
4.30 Beyond Belief
Religious attitudes to begging (3/7)
5.00 PM
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O?Clock News
would not neglect his bedroom duties.
By the end the couple were horizontal
between the sheets again with Albert
purring that there would be much
more of this. Yes, we get it ? they had
nine kids and oodles of sex. Think of
Mumsnet, please.
It was, of course, a coy formality
that the credits for Strike: The
Cuckoo?s Calling recorded it was
based on the novels by Robert
Galbraith. Everyone knows that
Galbraith is JK Rowling, who wanted
to write crime fiction free from Potter
baggage. It seems to have paid off.
What looks on paper like recycled
clich� ? fleabitten private detective
with dysfunctional life; clever female
sidekick; beautiful woman suffering a
violent death (quelle surprise) ?
managed to be different: old-fashioned
and fresh simultaneously. Neither did
it use female death as titillation, which
makes a nice change.
It?s mostly thanks to Tom Burke,
whose masterfully restrained
performance as Cormoran Strike, a
war-veteran amputee and estranged
son of a rock star, who talks to his false
leg and pees in the office crockery, was
entirely persuasive. Nerds have
already tried to find ?hidden? parallels
with Harry Potter (oooh, Holliday
Grainger, who plays Robin, sounds like
Hermione Granger doesn?t it?). Can we
not do this? It?s grown-ups? time now.
carol.midgley@thetimes.co.uk
6.30 Just a Minute
With Paul Merton, Paul Sinha, Janey Godley
and Mark Watson (4/8)
6.45 (LW) Just a Minute
With Paul Merton, Paul Sinha, Janey Godley
and Mark Watson (4/8)
7.00 The Archers
Oliver is unable to say no
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Subterranean Homesick Blues
By AL Kennedy (1/5)
8.00 Gordon Goes Forth
Gordon Brown shares the story of three
bridges in whose shadow he lives
8.30 Crossing Continents
Current affairs reports (5/9) (r)
9.00 Natural Histories
Brett Westwood uncovers people?s
relationship with eels (12/25) (r)
9.30 Mastertapes
Randy Newman responds to questions from
the audience (2/2) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
10.45 Book at Bedtime: Afterworld
By Anthony Doerr (1/5)
11.00 Pepys the Musician
Lucie Skeaping hears music written for
diarist Samuel Pepys (r)
11.30 Enlightenment After Dark
Allan Little hosts discussions, beginning with
one on Utopia (1/5)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
How Not to Be a Boy
By Robert Webb (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am To the Manor Born 8.30 Dad?s Army
9.00 Hidden Treasures 9.30 Be Prepared
10.00 The White Guard 11.00 Good Show
Clarissa 11.15 To Serve Them All My Days
12.00 To the Manor Born 12.30pm Dad?s
Army 1.00 A Case for Dr Morelle 1.30 The
Stasi Jigsaw Puzzle 2.00 Annals of the
Parish 2.15 Could Do Better 2.30 South
Riding 2.45 Darling Monster 3.00 The White
Guard 4.00 Hidden Treasures 4.30 Be
Prepared 5.00 Living with the Enemy 5.30
Just a Minute 6.00 Five Tales by Saki 6.15
Brian Aldiss Short Stories 6.30 A Good Read
7.00 To the Manor Born. Comedy 7.30 Dad?s
Army. Comedy with Arthur Lowe 8.00 A Case
for Dr Morelle. The Will. By Ernest Dudley
8.30 The Stasi Jigsaw Puzzle. The scientists
trying to salvage East German secret service
records 9.00 Good Show Clarissa
9.15 To Serve Them All My Days. By RF
Delder?eld. From 2006 10.00 Comedy Club:
Just a Minute. A special episode recorded at
the Edinburgh Festival 10.30 Jason Cook?s
School of Hard Knocks 10.55 The Comedy
Club Interview 11.00 The Museum of
Curiosity. With guests Penny Rose, Francis
Wheen and Clive Oppenheimer 11.30 Vent
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 When
Michael Met Johnny (r) 11.00 The Day I Met
Diana 12.00 5 Live Sport. A round-up of the
day?s sports news 1.00pm Afternoon Edition
4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport: The
Monday Night Club. A look back at the
weekend?s football results 9.00 5 Live
Boxing. Analysis of Floyd Mayweather v
Conor McGregor 10.00 5 Live Sport: US Open
Tennis 2017. A round-up of the ?rst day of
the US Open at Flushing Meadows in New
York 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
talkSPORT
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Max Rushden and Ray Wilkins 10.00
Lynsey Hipgrave 1.00pm Hawksbee and
Jacobs 4.00 Sam Matterface and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Hawksbee and Jacobs
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Craig Charles 10.00 Cerys
Matthews 1.00pm Guy Garvey 4.00 Huey
Morgan 7.00 Don Letts? Culture Clash
Radio 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Lauren Laverne 1.00am
Otis Redding Story 2.00 Elvis and Dewey:
Red, Hot and Blue 2.30 6 Music Live Hour
3.30 6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
7.00am The Ultimate Classic FM Chart with
Tim Lihoreau 10.00 The Ultimate Classic FM
Chart with John Suchet 1.00pm The
Ultimate Classic FM Chart with Bill Turnbull
4.00 The Ultimate Classic FM Chart with
John Brunning 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones features
music and musicians from black and minority
ethnic roots, including works by Joplin,
Dvor醟, Saint-Georges and Gershwin 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday August 28 2017
11
1GT
ROBERT ORMEROD FOR THE TIMES; MARILYN KINGWILL
Prom 53
Beneath the Underdog:
Charles Mingus Revisited
Royal Albert Hall
Edinburgh comedy
Burns & Quartermaine
Gilded Balloon
T
{{{{(
S
{{{{(
hould you mess with Charles
Mingus? At first it seemed as if
the conductor Jules Buckley
and his arrangers were too
eager to smooth the rough
edges from the bandleader?s raucous
anthems. I couldn?t help thinking we
might have been better off squeezing
into Ronnie Scott?s earlier in the
month to catch the annual visit by
those ornery New Yorkers the Mingus
Big Band. Those reservations soon
dissolved though. Where last year?s
Metropole Orkest homage to Quincy
Jones was ponderous and meandering,
this performance grew tighter with
each number, climaxing with a joyous
Better Git It In Your Soul.
Mingus?s spirit was definitely in the
air. Before illness struck him down he
was a burly, manic and sometimes
pugilistic presence. The pink-haired
baritone saxophonist Leo Pellegrino
distilled those larger-than-life
elements into a barnstorming solo on
Moanin?, combining blues licks with
frenzied dance steps that were a mix
of Jim Carrey and that great R&B
showman Big Jay McNeely. Some
purists might have disapproved, but
then didn?t Mingus himself inject
a blast of strip club burlesque into
Pussy Cat Dues and the like?
Elsewhere, the nimble trombonist
Bart van Lier serenaded the audience,
while Christian Scott ? a trumpeter
who has received the overhyped
?young lion? treatment ? was
unusually cool and understated.
Shabaka Hutchings?s bass clarinet
added discreet colour, while Kandace
Springs, a singer in the Roberta Flack
mould, made the most of her cameos,
drawing the audience into a singalong
on God Must Be a Boogie Man?.
On Fables of Faubus the orchestra?s
shrieking dissonances were more akin
to some haunted house scene from a
Laurel and Hardy film. Over the top?
Maybe, but so was Mingus himself.
Clive Davis
Proms at . . .
Multi-Story Orchestra
Peckham Car Park, SE15
J
{{{{{
ohn Adams said his 1985
masterpiece Harmonielehre was
partly inspired by a dream of an
oil tanker taking off from San
Francisco Bay. During the spineshuddering climaxes of the Multi-Story
Orchestra?s expert performance under
Christopher Stark, I did wonder if their
Peckham car-park venue would take
off in similar fashion. Especially when
passing trains added a strangely
congruous screech to the pulsating
percussion and surging strings.
Exhilarating stuff, yet Harmonielehre
wasn?t even the highlight of Saturday
afternoon?s Prom. It was pipped by
I am I say, written for this orchestra
and 100 local schoolchildren by Kate
Whitley. Joyously ecological in spirit, it
was expertly crafted so that the kids?
simple refrains were intensified by
multilayered instrumental textures and
expressive lyricism for the vocal soloists
(Ruby Hughes, Michael Sumuel).
artsfirst night
In 纋ex Oll�s production the characters from 1840s Paris have been transplanted to the 21st century
A love story for our time
Turin?s Puccini
staging proved
a highlight of
the Edinburgh
Festival, says
Anna Picard
Edinburgh opera
La boh鑝e
Festival Theatre
{{{{{
S
tep out of the theatre and you
see them on the pavements:
laughing, talking and kissing;
falling in love and running out
of money. Animated and
individuated by Puccini in 1896, Henri
Murger?s composite characters from
the Quartier Latin of 1840s Paris have
never grown old. In 纋ex Oll�s
production of La boh鑝e, brought to
the Edinburgh Festival by Teatro
Regio Torino and the conductor
Gianandrea Noseda, only the period
and the location have changed.
Mim�, Rodolfo, Musetta, Marcello,
Colline and Schaunard live in a
modern development on the fringe of
a European city. It?s an area where
African street traders are harassed by
the police; where street-walkers,
construction workers, hen parties and
medics smoke in the lemon-yellow
light of an all-night bar; where the
bourgeoisie come to enjoy a day pass
to the demimonde.
The essentials of Puccini?s opera
remain intact: a sense of fragility and
the transient kindnesses of an urban
community, choreographed in
extraordinary detail by Oll�. Coupled
with Noseda?s buoyant reading of the
score, its panoramas and melting
close-ups, the translucency of the
orchestra and the emotionally direct,
text-alert singing of the central sextet,
Plumped up to 36 voices, the men of
the BBC Singers were in tremendous
form on Saturday night for a Prom of
Czech music largely inspired by one
Hussite chorale, hurled out at the start
in unaccompanied unison. The Czech
conductor Jakub Hrusa instilled such
passion into the BBC Symphony
Orchestra that an evening of rarities
made a thrilling impression. Highlights
were Suk?s lush orchestral portrait
Prague and Martinu?s weird but
gripping Field Mass, which juxtaposed
martial trumpets and drums, anguished
baritone declamation (Svatopluk Sem,
masterful) and exquisite close harmony
for the male chorus.
The previous evening the orchestra
of La Scala, Milan, was disappointing
under Riccardo Chailly. They
accompanied Leonidas Kavakos in a
stolid performance of Brahms?s Violin
Concerto, then threw a battery of
percussion at Respighi?s Fountains of
Rome, followed by his even more
rambunctious Pines of Rome. Those
gargantuan tone poems always pack a
punch, but apart from some fine
woodwind principals I didn?t detect
any special character in the orchestra.
Richard Morrison
Pop
Reading Festival
Little John?s Farm,
Reading
{{{{(
the effect was overwhelming.
Streetlife never disappears from
view in Alfons Flores?s fluid set of
apartment blocks and metal stairways.
Romance is signalled by a shift in Urs
Sch鰊ebaum?s lighting, as the warm
glow of orange from a hundred rooms
serves as an analogue to starlight
when Mim� (Erika Grimaldi) and
Rodolfo (Giorgio Berrugi) meet.
If any company owns La boh鑝e it is
Teatro Regio. The singing and acting
of the chorus in Act II, amplified by
the bright, focused voices of the
National Youth Choir of Scotland, was
exhilarating, the timing faultless. As
Kelebogile Besong?s feral Musetta
worked her way across the caf� tables,
putting on a show for Marcello
(Simone Del Savio), the busy crowd
scene ended in a flash, as Matteo
Peirone?s Alcindoro reeled at the bill.
In the chill of Act III, before
Grimaldi?s show-stopping Addio senza
rancor, a rough sleeper comforts Mim�.
When she returns to die in the last act
we saw the lonely misery of Benjamin
Cho?s Schaunard, the anxiety of Nicola
Ulivieri?s Colline, and another young
couple starting their life together, two
storeys up, in Mim�s former home.
Life goes on. To realise so many
characters in music and movement
with such tenderness and clarity is
ensemble work of the highest order.
T
his year the veteran festival
bagged Eminem, left, the
44-year-old rapper who ?
despite rarely releasing
records these days ? has
seen his popularity soar thanks to
streaming. When he walked on the
Reading stage sporting sideburns
half-hidden by a camouflage hoodie,
kids who were babies in his heyday
couldn?t believe their eyes. The deeper
he delved into his back catalogue, the
louder they sang along.
?How many people
remember this shit??
the rapper asked of his
15-year-old opener, Square Dance.
Plenty, although poor sound at the
start meant that many had a
problem hearing it. By the third
song, 3AM, that was sorted and
Eminem had hit his stride, or
rather was semi-crawling across
tthe stage, mimicking lyrics about
carrying out a killing spree. Yet
Eminem has mellowed. Rather than
play the chainsaw-wielding
pantomime villain of his past, he was
smiley and relaxed, only briefly baring
his teeth for an anti-Trump rant. Even
then he preceded a chant of ?When I
hey are, they tell us, the first
double act of their kind:
a white Australian comic
and an indigenous Australian
comic. And if a British
audience goes in not quite recognising
the gulf between Brendon Burns,
a former Edinburgh Comedy Award
winner, and Craig Quartermaine, the
younger comic he was introduced to
18 months ago when he was back
home in Perth, they leave with a
potent but pleasurable reminder of
how racial differences still play a part
on even the most liberal of us.
The marvel of this show, Race Off,
though, is the properly funny way it
mixes the spiky with the sympathetic,
the provocative with the playful. The
pair take us through Burns?s awkward
visit to his new friend?s house, where
he fails to hide his shock that
Quartermaine?s wife is white.
Quartermaine drops in a telling statistic
about the indigenous community in
Australia: 3 per cent of the population,
80 per cent of the prison population.
The pair relay their racially charged
tales with mutual affection and
comedy-roast rambunctiousness.
Burns, the loud guy in a vest, declares
this ?a love letter to liberalism?.
Quartermaine, the younger performer,
proves an acerbic tonic to his partner
(?a nerve ending in a singlet?).
They work wonders to keep an
ideas-laden piece feel live, light on its
feet, one night only ? even if, as we?ve
seen before with Burns, spontaneity
shields theatricality. They have found
a way to bounce all these ideas back
on their audience and have done so in
a way that is as convivial and inclusive
as it is sharp-eyed and surprising.
I need to be vague about the last
third of the show because I don?t want
to spoil anything in what is a serious
return to form for Burns and a strong
calling card from Quartermaine. It?s
well worth seeing this potent new duo.
Dominic Maxwell
Box office: 0131 622 6552, tonight
say f**k, you say Trump? by claiming
that he didn?t want to cause
controversy or use his platform to ?be
all political and shit?. He did change
his T-shirt for a ?Fack Trump? slogan
vest, but was too busy tearing through
his 30-song set list to chat again.
It was a pity that a medley
containing his classics My Name Is,
Without Me and The Real Slim Shady
was left until almost the end but, with
a new album rumoured to be due this
autumn, it was promising that the
superstar had finally ditched daft
props for a full band that included
a grunge-rock guitarist.
Other highlights of a sunny Saturday
were two acts tipped for next month?s
Mercury prize: Oxford?s jittery-pop
quartet Glass Animals and the laidback London rapper Loyle Carner,
likely the only act of the weekend to
feature lashings of saxophone. The
former were responsible for this year?s
ludicrous ?pineapple ban?, which fans
circumvented by bringing fruity
inflatables. A sea of pineapple-shaped
lilos held aloft? How times have
changed since burning rubber tyres
was a Reading tradition.
Lisa Verrico
12
1GT
Monday August 28 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Catherine Pearson
Imagine
BBC One, 10.30pm
?I never
believe it
can?t happen
here,? says
Margaret Atwood of her
1985 dystopian novel,
The Handmaid?s Tale.
At a time when Donald
Trump is criticised for
8PM
9PM
10PM
interview Atwood is
told: ?You have a
marvellous sense of
not communicating
anything about
yourself.? She also has
a reputation for being
frightening, something
that she appears to
enjoy. Along with a
collection of literary
scholars, Yentob
looks at Atwood?s
monumental influence
over the Canadian
national identity and
how her work,
described as being
apolitical, but acutely
observational, speaks
to and about women.
?Women suffer in my
novels because most
women I talk to seem
to have suffered,? she
says. The discussion
surrounding Atwood?s
inspiration for The
Handmaid?s Tale is a
reason to watch on its
own, but being in the
presence of such an
astute and intelligent
woman makes this
documentary
compelling viewing.
Strike: The
Cuckoo?s Calling
BBC One, 9pm
Cormoran Strike?s
investigation into the
death of the model Lula
Landry continues in the
slick crime drama
based on Robert ?JK
Rowling? Galbraith?s
novel of the same
name. The police
doubt that Lula was
murdered, even when
a development
involving her homeless
friend Rochelle looks
likely to assist Strike?s
case. Tansy Bestigui is
keen to conceal where
she was on the fateful
night and Lula?s
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.00 Country?le: Summer Diaries.
New series. An insight into life in the British countryside
9.45 Homes Under the Hammer. Properties in
Northumberland, Derbyshire and Kent (r) (AD) 10.45
Britain?s Home Truths. Gregg Wallace looks at how
inner-city living has developed (r) (AD) 11.30 Close Calls:
On Camera. A paraglider plunges out of control (r) (AD)
12.00 Bargain Hunt. Two teams test their antiques
knowledge (AD) 1.00pm BBC News at One; Weather
1.20 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.30 Red Rock. Keith
?nds he is not cut out for debt collecting (AD) 2.10
Impossible. Game show hosted by Rick Edwards (r)
2.55 Escape to the Country. A couple of childhood
sweethearts seek a rural retreat in the Devon countryside
(AD) 3.30 Garden Rescue. Designing a garden for a
family of seven in Lincolnshire (r) (AD) 4.15 Flog It!
Making a pro?t at auction (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show
in which contestants try to score the fewest points
possible (r) 6.00 BBC News at Six; Weather 6.20 BBC
Regional News; Weather 6.30 The Royal Edinburgh
Military Tattoo 2017. Bill Paterson narrates highlights of
the event held on the esplanade of Edinburgh Castle
6.00am The World?s Most Photographed (r) 6.30 Heir
Hunters (r) (AD) 7.15 Bargain Hunt (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign
Zone: The Big Family Cooking Showdown (r) (AD, SL)
9.00 FILM: Over the Hedge (U, 2006) Animated
comedy featuring the voice of Bruce Willis 10.15
Hammy?s Boomerang Adventure (r) 10.20 FILM: Mr
Peabody & Sherman (U, 2014) Animated comedy with
the voice of Ty Burrell 11.45 Natural World (r) (AD)
12.45pm Diamond League Athletics: Zurich Highlights (r)
1.30 Talking Pictures. Including interviews with Sidney
Poitier, Denzel Washington and Morgan Freeman (r) 2.15
FILM: The Long Ships (PG, 1963) Adventure with
Richard Widmark 4.15 Planet Earth. Camera crews follow
wildlife in the Arctic and Antarctic, including humpback
whales feeding and an emperor penguin colony?s
nine-month migration (r) (AD) 5.15 Put Your Money
Where Your Mouth Is. James Braxton takes on Kate Bliss
at an auction house in Kent (r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show
hosted by Jeremy Vine (r) 6.30 Royal Recipes. Michael
Buerk and chef Anna Haugh celebrate food served to
royal family members while they are enjoying country
pursuits, including sausages made from pheasant
6.00am Good Morning Britain 8.30 GMB Today. Chloe
Madeley talks to her father Richard and Ranvir Singh
about online trolling and the pressure of growing up with
famous parents 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 10.30
This Morning. Chat and lifestyle features 12.30pm Loose
Women. Interviews and topical studio discussion from a
female perspective 1.45 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge
Rinder. Cameras follow the criminal barrister Robert
Rinder as he takes on real-life cases in a studio courtroom
3.00 Dickinson?s Real Deal. David Dickinson and his team
of antiques dealers are in Edinburgh, where jewellery
catches Tim Hogarth?s eye and paperweights attract Karen
Dalmeny?s interest (r) 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben Shephard
hosts the arcade-themed quiz show in which contestants
drop tokens down a choice of four chutes in the hope of
winning a �,000 jackpot (r) 5.00 Cash Trapped. Quiz
hosted by Bradley Walsh in which six contestants answer
questions and try to trap one another out of the game,
before one goes up against the rest in the ?nal round
6.00 Britain?s Best Walks with Julia Bradbury. A walk on
the Isle of Man. Last in the series (r) 6.25 Regional
News; Weather 6.40 ITV News; Weather
6.15am Kirstie?s Vintage Gems (r) 6.25 Will & Grace (r)
7.10 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.00 Frasier (r) 8.55
The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 10.15 FILM: Step Up 4
? Miami Heat (12, 2012) Dance drama sequel starring
Kathryn McCormick 12.05pm The Simpsons. Homer
changes his name (r) (AD) 1.05 French Collection. Three
Brits search for collectibles in Villeneuve-l鑣-Avignon,
southern France 2.10 Countdown. With Martin Lewis in
Dictionary Corner 3.00 Cheap Cheap Cheap. Barry
threatens Noel Edmonds with a mallet 4.00 A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun. Laura Hamilton shows a Redditch
couple ?ve apartments in Torrevieja, Spain (r) 5.00 Come
Dine with Me. The ?rst of week of dinner parties from
Manchester 5.30 Streetmate. Scarlett Moffatt visits
Cardiff to help Sophie ?nd a man who can match her
feisty personality 6.00 The Simpsons. A health inspector
eats a pickled egg at Moe?s and instantly drops dead,
prompting the authorities to threaten closure, so Homer
decides to offer his friend ?nancial support (r) (AD)
6.30 Hollyoaks. Cindy continues to be terrorised and
someone tries to break into the Cunninghams?, and
Hunter sneaks into The Dog ?at to surprise Neeta (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Journalist
and broadcaster Matthew Wright is joined by a panel of
guests and the studio audience to debate the issues of
the day 11.15 Home and Away (AD) 11.45 Neighbours
(AD) 12.15pm 5 News Lunchtime 12.20 FILM: Rio
Lobo (PG, 1970) A former Union colonel heads for Texas
to recover stolen gold bullion and settle a few old scores.
Western starring John Wayne and Jorge Rivero 2.35
FILM: The Searchers (U, 1956) An American Civil War
veteran searches for his niece, who has been abducted by
a renegade Comanche tribe. John Ford?s Western, with
John Wayne, Natalie Wood and Jeffrey Hunter 5.00
Home and Away. Justin, Scarlett and Alf?s ?shing trip
takes a sinister turn after the stranger who has been
following them tampers with the boat (r) (AD) 5.30
Neighbours. Paul?s call to arms reignites Terese?s spirits
and she decides to not go down without a ?ght (r) (AD)
6.00 Ultimate Strongman: Battle of Britain. Four-man
teams from England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales
compete over six events, including the 450Kg tyre ?ip,
stones of strength and giant ?ag hoist. From Bangor,
County Down; followed by 5 News Update
7.00 Gordon Buchanan: Elephant
Family & Me Gordon Buchanan
encounters a family of African
elephants in the wilderness of Kenya,
and attempts to gain their trust so he
can observe them (2/2) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Aaron is ready for his
?ght with Jason, but is determined to
confront his opponent beforehand (AD)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.30 Coronation Street Gary receives a
another Ukrainian job offer, and
Gemma is upset to discover Zoe and
Roxy set up a fake dating account (AD)
7.30 Secrets of Your New Car:
Channel 4 Dispatches Morland
Sanders investigates Britain?s
thriving new car market
8.00 EastEnders Shirley confronts Linda
about her attitude towards Mick (AD)
8.00 University Challenge
Oxford Brookes takes on the
Courtauld Institute of Art
8.00 Countrywise: Guide to Britain Ben
Fogle explores a huge underground
cavern in Yorkshire Dales (r)
8.00 Jamie?s Quick & Easy Food Recipes
include sesame seared tuna and a
messy meatball bun (2/8) (AD)
8.30 Would I Lie to You? With Mel
Giedroyc, David Haye, Martin Kemp
and Romesh Ranganathan (1/9) (r)
8.30 Nadiya?s British Food Adventure
Nadiya Hussain heads to the
West Country (7/8) (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Gary hides his
pain as he tells Sarah about his next
job, and Rosie accuses Zoe and
Roxy of cyber terrorism (AD)
8.30 Superfoods: The Real Story Kate
Quilton investigates whether eggs
really are good for the eyes (2/8)
9.00 Strike: The Cuckoo?s Calling
The private detective tells the police
the circumstances of Rochelle?s
death merit further investigation, and
learns from Lula?s friends she was
looking for her biological family.
See Viewing Guide (2/3) (AD)
9.00 Dangerous Borders: A Journey
Across India & Pakistan Adnan
Sarwar meets a Pakistani woman
challenging tradition by becoming a
?ghter pilot, while Babita Sharma
visits one of the holiest Hindu sites in
the world. See Viewing Guide (3/3)
9.00 The Theory of Everything (12,
2014) Biopic of Stephen Hawking,
exploring the renowned astrophysicist?s
romance with future wife Jane during
their time at university in the 1960s
and his initial diagnosis with motor
neurone disease, which doctors
believed would lead to his death within
two years. Undaunted by deteriorating
health, he continued his
groundbreaking research into the
origins of the universe. Fact-based
drama starring Eddie Redmayne,
Felicity Jones and David Thewlis (AD)
9.00 999: What?s Your Emergency?
A burglar is caught red-handed
stealing food from someone?s freezer,
while a 999 call is received from a
woman whose home is being
ransacked while she is in her bed
7.30 Wallace & Gromit: A Close Shave
The animated characters get mixed up
in sheep rustling (r) (AD)
11PM
feminist lens. She was
home-schooled until
the age of eight
in a house without
electricity and running
water. Atwood?s view
of the world has a
distinctly North
American philosophical
edge (?Parenting is not
a job, it?s a condition of
the universe,? she
muses) and her respect
for the natural world is
clear. In an early TV
BBC One
7PM
Early
Top
pick
his misogynistic
conduct, the themes of
patriarchal domination
in Atwood?s Booker
prizewinning novel
have found a new
resonance ? and,
thanks to the recent TV
adaptation, Atwood?s
star shines bolder than
ever. Atwood talks to
Alan Yentob about her
Canadian upbringing,
her writing and seeing
the world through a
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.20 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.30 Imagine: Margaret Atwood ? You
Have Been Warned! Alan Yentob
meets the Canadian author in Toronto
to discover how a childhood spent
between the wilderness and the city
helped shape her vision of herself and
the world. See Viewing Guide
Late
11.30 Mary Shelley?s Frankenstein (15,
1994) A medical student creates a
living creature from the body parts of
corpses. Gothic horror starring Robert
De Niro and Kenneth Branagh
1.30am-6.00 BBC News
10.00 Normal for Norfolk Desmond
MacCarthy and his team prepare to
reopen the cafe on Mother?s Day. Last
in the series (AD)
10.30 Midnight?s Children (12, 2012)
Two babies are born at midnight on the
day India becomes independent of
British rule in 1947, but are switched
at birth. As the two children grow to
adulthood, one in wealth the other in
poverty, they ?nd their lives are
constantly intertwined while the
nation around them experiences
sweeping social change. Drama based
on Salman Rushdie?s novel, starring
Satya Bhabha and Siddharth
12.45am Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?
The remaining candidates have to cope with a simulated
emergency splashdown (r) (AD) 1.45 Sign Zone: Celebrity
MasterChef. With Jim Moir, Angellica Bell, Stephen
Hendry, Julia Somerville and Henri Leconte (r) (SL)
2.45-3.45 Secrets of Silicon Valley (r) (AD, SL)
11.20 ITV News
11.40 Britain?s Busiest Motorway
Traf?c of?cers deal with a ?ood
on the M25 (5/6) (r)
12.10am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. The host invites
guests to air their differences over family and
relationship issues (r) (SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
10.00 The Secret Life of the Holiday
Resort Another look at life at an
all-inclusive Holiday World Resort in
Benalm醖ena, Malaga, to see what
Britons get up to while on holiday in
the sun and what keeps them happy
11.05 Naked Attraction
Anna Richardson invites contenders
Ray and Jimmy to each select their
dates from a line-up of potential
partners revealing themselves one
body part at a time (r) (AD)
12.00 Random Acts 12.30am 60 Days in Jail
1.20 The Supervet (r) 2.15 Location, Location, Location
(r) (SL) 3.10 Little British Isles with Alison Steadman (r)
(AD) 4.05 Double Your House for Half the Money (r) (AD)
5.00 Selling Houses with Amanda Lamb (AD)
5.55-6.00 Kirstie?s Vintage Gems (r)
7.00 Cricket on 5 England v West Indies.
Highlights of the fourth day of the
Second Test in the three-match series,
which takes place at Headingley
8.00 All New Traf?c Cops A classic
high-speed pursuit and tactical stop on
the motorway is undertaken to catch
criminals who have stolen a boiler
from a plumber?s merchant
9.00 In Solitary: The Anti-Social
Experiment Three members of the
public are challenged to spend ?ve
days in solitary con?nement,
monitored by a team of experts led by
the psychologist Pauline RenniePeyton. See Viewing Guide
10.30 When Live TV Goes Horribly
Wrong Memorable on-air hitches,
including the presenter Sarah Cawood
recalling the time The National Lottery
Jetset studio was invaded by Fathers
for Justice protestors, the Bucks Fizz
star Cheryl Baker offering insight into
Eurovision?s most off-key moments,
and the veteran journalist John
Stapleton opening up about the
occasion The Time, The Place was
taken off the air due to a
demonstration (r)
1.15am SuperCasino 3.10 GPs: Behind Closed Doors (r)
(AD) 4.00 My Mum?s Hotter Than Me! Documentary
about people who will stop at nothing to outdo their
children or grandchildren in the fashion and beauty stakes
(r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 House Busters
(r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Monday August 28 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
smarmy ex-boyfriend,
Evan, makes himself
known to Robin.
Strike becomes
involved in the glitzy
modelling world when
he meets one of Lula?s
old friends.
Dangerous
Borders
BBC Two, 9pm
In this reflective final
instalment Adnan
Sarwar and Babita
Sharma travel to the
northern and most
contested part of the
India-Pakistan border.
Sharma visits the
state of Jammu and
Kashmir, a region
claimed by both
countries at partition,
meeting Indians
affected by
cross-border attacks.
Meanwhile, Sarwar
heads into the
mountains of northern
Pakistan, the site of
recent terrorist attacks
on tourists and Shia
Muslims. Sharma
unearths the upsetting
reality of the mass
blinding of children
in Srinagar at the
hands of Indian
security forces, and
Sarwar looks at a
different border, the
China-Pakistan
Economic Corridor.
In Solitary
Channel 5, 9pm
Could you handle five
days in solitary
confinement? This
one-off special puts five
candidates to the test.
Portakabins contain
everything they need to
survive comfortably for
five days and they can
press the big red button
to leave at any time. It
isn?t torture, but the
lack of sunlight and the
absence of a clock
make this challenge
unnecessarily tough.
?Not all of them
will survive,? the
introduction announces
somewhat misleadingly
as the tech-loving
contestants take to
their ?pods??. It?s soon
clear that the struggle
isn?t with social media
deprivation, it?s lack of
human contact.
Game of Thrones
Sky Atlantic, 9pm
While some
long-running shows
like to drag it out as
the end approaches,
the seven-episode
penultimate season of
this fantasy epic has
been an exercise in
wish fulfilment for fans.
From main characters
finally meeting (Jon
Snow and Daenerys)
and others reunited
(Arya and Sansa) to
getting to see those
mighty dragons in
action and a proper
m阬閑 against the army
of the dead ? what?s
left? In tonight?s finale,
Snow, Daenerys and
Tyrion must convince
Cersei that the biggest
threat to the Lannisters
isn?t the Dragon Queen,
but the White Walkers.
Joe Clay
Sky1
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 8.00 Monkey Life
(r) (AD) 9.00 The Dog Whisperer (r) 10.00 It?s
Me or the Dog (r) (AD) 11.00 Modern Family (r)
12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 2.00pm Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.00 Supergirl (r) 4.00 The Flash (r)
6.00 Duck Quacks Don?t Echo. With Mel
Giedroyc, Andrew Flintoff and Johnny Vegas (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Back-to-back episodes (r)
9.00 Carpool Karaoke Special. James Corden
takes Katy Perry and Jennifer Lopez for a
musical spin in his SUV (r) (AD)
10.00 A League of Their Own. The former
Liverpool defender Jamie Carragher, the
funnyman Jimmy Carr and the Sky Sports
presenter Kirsty Gallacher guest (r) (AD)
11.00 Micky Flanagan Thinking Aloud. The
comedian tackles the issue of offence (r) (AD)
12.00 Karl Pilkington: The Moaning of Life (r)
(AD) 1.00am A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
2.00 The Force: Manchester (r) (AD) 3.00 Brit
Cops: Rapid Response (r) (AD) 4.00 Animal 999
(r) 5.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD)
6.00am The Guest Wing (r) (AD) 8.00
Richard E Grant?s Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 10.00
The West Wing (r) 12.00 Without a Trace (r)
1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r) 2.00
Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 Urban Secrets (r)
4.00 The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00 Without a Trace. Crime thriller (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A prisoner
bursts into ?ames while trying to escape (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny?s loyalty is tested
when he is assigned to the case of a childhood
friend, who is under investigation (r) (AD)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Fantasy drama starring
Lena Headey, Peter Dinklage and Emilia Clarke.
Last in the series. See Viewing Guide
10.30 Thronecast. Companion show to
Game of Thrones. Last in the series
11.30 Game of Thrones. Fantasy drama s
tarring Lena Headey. Last in the series (r)
1.00am Twin Peaks: The Return. Mystery
2.10 Real Time with Bill Maher (r) 3.20 Ballers
(r) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00am Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
7.00 Nothing to Declare (r) 8.30 Road Wars (r)
9.30 My Kitchen Rules: Australia (r) 10.45
Nothing to Declare (r) 11.45 Sun, Sea and A&E.
Seven back-to-back episodes (r)
6.45pm My Kitchen Rules: Australia.
Cooking series challenging contestants to
transform their homes into pop-up restaurants
8.00 Elementary. Sherlock?s father commissions
Joan to investigate the six-month-old case of
his employee?s missing sister, who left a video
message to explain her disappearance (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. Garcia travels to Texas to
confront the man she shot at the diner
as his execution on death row looms (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds. A suspicious plane
crash mirrors a tragedy from Kate?s past (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. A serial killer?s
victims are covered in scratches (r)
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 1.00am Road Wars
2.00 Sun, Sea and A&E (r) 4.00 Elementary (r)
(AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am 3 Stars in Munich 8.00 Auction 9.00
Watercolour Challenge 10.00 Tales of the
Unexpected 11.00 The South Bank Show 12.00
Discovering: Humphrey Bogart (AD) 1.00pm
Tales of the Unexpected 2.00 Diana: Her Story
? The Book That Changed Everything 3.00 Elvis
?56 Special (AD) 4.15 Queen Rock Montreal
6.10 FILM: Michael Jackson ? The Life of
an Icon (12, 2011) Documentary exploring the
life of the pop singer, from his early days with
the Jackson 5 to his rise to solo stardom
9.00 Andr� Rieu: Making the Magic. The Dutch
violinist performs in Bucharest, and reveals
the secrets behind his open-air concerts
10.00 The Shadows: The Final Tour. A 2004
concert by the instrumental rock band, in which
Hank Marvin, Bruce Welch and Brian Bennett
reunited to perform some of their hit tunes
1.00am Tales of the Unexpected 2.00 Auction
2.30 Watercolour Challenge 3.00 Andr� Rieu:
Making the Magic 4.00 The Sixties 5.00 The
South Bank Show Originals
6.00am Transfer Centre
10.00 Transfer Centre Special
10.30 Live Test Cricket: England v West Indies.
Coverage of day four of the second Test from
Headingley. The sides last met in a Test here
in 2007, when England won handsomely by
an innings and 283 runs, which owed much
to a stellar batting performance by Kevin
Pietersen, who scored 226 runs from just
262 balls, while Ryan Sidebottom and Steve
Harmison starred with the ball
6.30pm Test Cricket: The Verdict. Reaction to
day four of the second Test between England
and the West Indies
7.00 Transfer Centre. The latest football
transfer developments
10.00 Live The Debate. Discussion on the
latest Premier League news
11.00 Transfer Centre
1.00am Live WWE Late Night Raw. Wrestling
action from the States 4.15 WWE from the
Vault 5.00 Transfer Centre
BBC One Scotland
As BBC One except: 6.50pm The Royal
Edinburgh Military Tattoo 2017. Bill Paterson
narrates highlights of the event held on the
esplanade of Edinburgh Castle, with the
Massed Bands of Her Majesty?s Royal Marines
taking centre stage 7.50-8.00 Grand Tours of
Scotland. Paul Murton visits the Isle of Mull
BBC Two Wales
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm Nature?s
Weirdest Events. Chris Packham looks at
unusual natural events, including a village
invaded by billions of tiny crabs (r) 7.30-8.00
Weatherman Walking: Holyhead Mountain and
Newborough Warren (r) 10.30 Rhod Gilbert?s
Work Experience (r) 11.00 FILM: Midnight?s
Children (2012) Two men switched at birth ?nd
their lives intertwined as they grow up in newly
independent India. Drama starring Satya
Bhabha 1.15am-1.45 Sign Zone: Yorkshire
Wolds Way with Paul Rose (r)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 6.25pm-6.40 ITV News Wales
at Six 8.00-8.30 Fishlock?s Choice. Trevor
Fishlock investigates whether Wales is
underselling its ?ghting past, with many
Viking, Roman and Celtic battle?elds unknown
to potential heritage tourists
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Edinburgh
Festival 2017. Highlights of the best events
from across the capital as viewers get the
chance to sample the atmosphere of the annual
arts and cultural extravaganza (AD)
12.10am Teleshopping 1.10 After Midnight
2.40-5.05 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 World War One at Home: Despatches from
Tyneside. A community project revealing
Tyneside?s vital role in the con?ict (r)
8.00 War at Sea: Scotland?s Story. David
Hayman examines the nation?s role in the naval
campaign of the First World War,
beginning by looking at the use of Scapa Flow
as the British ?eet?s base (1/2) (r)
9.00 The Normans. Professor Robert Bartlett
explores the expansion and unchecked
ambition of the Norman empire, and how its
impact still resonates in today?s culture
and politics (1/3) (r) (AD)
10.00 Blood and Gold: The Making of Spain
with Simon Sebag Monte?ore. Simon Sebag
Monte?ore explores the history of Spain (r)
11.00 Himmler: The Decent One ? Storyville.
An insight into the life and mindset of SS
commander Heinrich Himmler, told through
letters, photographs and diaries that were
found at his family home in 1945 (r)
12.30am Fabric of Britain. The history of
knitting (r) 1.30 War at Sea: Scotland?s Story (r)
2.30-3.30 The Normans (r) (AD)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Coach Trip:
Road to Zante (r) (AD) 7.00 Made in Chelsea
Christmas (r) 8.00 Melissa & Joey (r) (AD) 9.00
Black-ish (r) (AD) 10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00
How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD) 12.00 The
Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big Bang
Theory: Geeks Getaway (r) (AD) 5.00 FILM:
Rio (U, 2011) Animated comedy with the
voices of Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway
7.00 Hollyoaks (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Zante (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 Made in Chelsea: Ibiza. Sam tries to come
to terms with his split from Tiff (AD)
10.00 Celebrity First Dates. With Sian Lloyd,
Daniel Brocklebank, Jess Woodley and Musharaf
Asghar. Last in the series (r) (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.35 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.00 Gogglebox (r) (SL) 1.05am Made in
Chelsea: Ibiza (r) (AD) 2.10 Celebs Go Dating (r)
(AD) 3.00 Celebrity First Dates (r) (AD) 3.55
New Girl (r) (AD) 4.15 Rude(ish) Tube (r) 4.40
How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am Food Unwrapped (r) (AD) 9.35 A Place
in the Sun: Home or Away (r) 10.35 Four in a
Bed (r) 1.15pm Come Dine with Me (r)
3.55 Four in a Bed. Four episodes (r)
6.05 Four in a Bed. The B&B owners meet for
the last time to settle some scores (r)
6.40 FILM: Water for Elephants
(12, 2011) Romantic drama with Reese
Witherspoon and Robert Pattinson (AD)
9.00 All Gardens Great and Small. Dee Hart
Dyke meets Sue and Earl as they open their
eclectic north London garden complete with
home-made follies and visits Julia and David?s
plot adjacent to Warwick Castle
10.00 Obsessive Compulsive Cleaners. An of?ce
manager who spends more than three hours
cleaning every evening tries to help a Portslade
woman who has 10 years? worth of clutter (r)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. Forty-year-old Adrian
crashed his bike into a car and may have a chest
injury requiring emergency surgery (r) (AD)
12.05am Ramsay?s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 All Gardens Great and Small. With Dee
Hart Dyke (r) 2.05 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD)
3.15-3.50 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs
(U, 2009) Animated adventure sequel with the
voice of John Leguizamo 12.45pm Johnny
English Reborn (PG, 2011) Spy comedy
sequel starring Rowan Atkinson (AD) 2.50 The
Book of Life (U, 2014) Animated adventure
with the voice of Diego Luna 4.40 The Devil
Wears Prada (PG, 2006) Comedy drama
starring Meryl Streep (AD)
6.50 Knight and Day (12, 2010) A woman is
kidnapped and dragged into a rogue secret
agent?s mission to clear his name after he
is framed as a traitor. Comedy adventure
starring Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz
9.00 Four Weddings and a Funeral (15,
1994) A man?s misfortunes in love look set to
change when he meets an American beauty at a
wedding. Richard Curtis?s romantic comedy
starring Hugh Grant and Andie MacDowell
11.15 Byzantium (15, 2012) Two female
vampires come to a seaside town in search of a
hiding place, but ?nd their past catching up with
them. Horror starring Gemma Arterton
1.35am-3.50 Under the Skin (15, 2013)
Sci-? drama starring Scarlett Johansson
6.00am Totally Bonkers Guinness World
Records: Bonkingly Big Hits (r) 6.50 The Cube:
Celebrity Special (r) 7.35 Emmerdale (r) (AD)
8.05 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 9.05 You?ve
Been Framed! Best of the Best (r) 10.05 FILM:
Space Chimps (U, 2008) Animated sci-?
comedy with the voice of Andy Samberg 11.50
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.20pm Coronation Street
(r) (AD) 1.20 Catchphrase Celebrity Couples
Special (r) 2.20 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.40
Best of You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
6.45 FILM: Charlie and the Chocolate
Factory (PG, 2005) Tim Burton?s children?s
fantasy, based on Roald Dahl?s novel, starring
Johnny Depp and Freddie Highmore (AD)
9.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
9.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
10.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
11.00 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.00 The Cleveland Show (r) (AD) 12.55am
Two and a Half Men (r) 1.25 Scorpion (r) (AD)
2.15 Jonas Blue: The Hot Desk (r) 2.25
Teleshopping 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am On the Buses (r) (SL) 6.25 The Royal
(r) (AD) 7.20 Heartbeat (r) (AD) 8.20 Where
the Heart Is (r) (AD) 9.25 Judge Judy (r) 10.50
Rising Damp (r) 11.20 You?re Only Young Twice
(r) 11.50 The Darling Buds of May (r) 1.00pm
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 2.00 The Royal (r) 3.05 The
Darling Buds of May (r) 4.15 You?re Only Young
Twice (r) 4.50 On the Buses (r) 5.20 Rising
Damp (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Jessica helps an
eccentric neighbour accused of murdering his
former partner with a curious invention (r) (AD)
8.00 Midsomer Murders. A teacher is killed, and
Barnaby suspects the intended target was a
Midsomer University science fellow (r) (AD)
10.00 Law & Order: UK. DS Sam Casey is
brought in to investigate the shooting
of Devlin (1/7) (r) (AD)
11.00 The Street. Jonas Armstrong plays a
Territorial Army soldier coming to terms with
the terrible physical and psychological scars
resulting from his tour of Afghanistan (3/6) (r)
12.20am The Blonde Bombshell (r)
2.05 ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Storage Wars: Texas
(r) 7.10 The Darts Show (r) 7.40 The Saint (r)
8.40 Ironside (r) (AD) 9.45 Quincy ME (r)
10.45 Minder (r) (AD) 11.50 The Professionals
(r) 12.50pm Cycling: Vuelta a Espana (r) 1.50
FILM: Every Which Way But Loose (12,
1978) Action comedy starring Clint Eastwood
(AD) 4.05 FILM: Superman (PG, 1978)
Comic-strip adventure starring Christopher
Reeve, Gene Hackman, Margot Kidder
and Marlon Brando (AD)
7.00 Pawn Stars (r)
7.30 Pawn Stars (r)
8.00 River Monsters (r) (AD)
9.00 River Monsters (r)
10.05 FILM: Patriot Games (15, 1992)
A former CIA agent prevents an assassination
attempt by an IRA splinter group, but one of the
terrorists swears revenge on him. Thriller
starring Harrison Ford and Sean Bean
12.25am Motorsport UK. Highlights from
Snetterton (r) 1.25 The Professionals (r) (AD)
2.25 Tommy Cooper (r) (AD, SL) 2.50 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Top Gear: Burma
Special (AD) 9.20 Top Gear (AD) 10.50 Cops UK:
Bodycam Squad 11.50 FILM: Escape to
Victory (PG, 1981) Second World War
adventure starring Michael Caine 2.05pm
FILM: Kelly?s Heroes (PG, 1970) Second
World War adventure starring Clint Eastwood
4.55 Top Gear: Burma Special (AD)
7.35 Top Gear. Jeremy, Richard and James
compare the Mercedes SLS, the Porsche 911 GT3
RS and the Ferrari 458 Italia in an epic road
trip up America?s east coast (AD)
9.00 Live at the Apollo. Stand-up show from
London?s Hammersmith Apollo, welcoming
guests Adam Hills and Gina Yashere to the stage
10.00 Room 101. Politician John Prescott,
actress Rebecca Front and comedian Micky
Flanagan join Frank Skinner, making the case
for their pet hates to be banished
10.40 Room 101. With guests Nick Hewer,
Carol Vorderman and Rhod Gilbert
11.20 QI. Comedy panel game show
12.00 QI 12.40am Mock the Week 1.20 QI
2.40 Suits (AD) 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am Hetty Wainthropp Investigates
2.00pm The Inspector Lynley Mysteries
6.00 The Inspector Lynley Mysteries. Lynley and
Havers investigate the murder of a doorkeeper
at the House of Lords, which they initially
connect to the victim?s gambling debts
8.00 Life on Mars. Sam gets the chance to
prevent a crime before it happens when he
comes face to face with the younger version of a
killer he arrested in 2006 (1/8)
9.00 Death in Paradise. The owner of a
plantation is found with a machete in his back
? but all the suspects have alibis (1/8) (AD)
10.00 New Tricks. Pilot episode. Superintendent
Sandra Pullman is sidelined after a failed
hostage rescue and put in charge of a
new department manned by a motley
crew of former detectives (1/7) (AD)
11.55 Spooks. When Tom is accused of
murdering the Chief of Defence staff, Danny and
the team try to ?nd out what happened and
whether he has really turned traitor (1/10) (AD)
1.00am Spooks. Triple bill (AD) 4.00
Home Shopping. Armchair buys
6.00am Secrets of War 9.00 Atlantic: The
Wildest Ocean on Earth 12.00 Human Planet
(AD) 3.00pm Abandoned Engineering (AD)
4.00 The True Story of the Mary Celeste
5.00 Impossible Engineering (AD)
6.00 Games on the Battle?eld. The role
of sport in the First World War
7.00 Graham Hill: Driven. An intimate portrait
of motor racing star Graham Hill, the only man
to win the Formula One World Championship,
Indianapolis 500 and Le Mans 24-hour race (AD)
8.20 Rallying: The Killer Years. The evolution of
the motorsport in the 1980s, which saw
the relaxation of rules and the emergence
of the high-speed Group B era ? posing
an enormous risk to spectators (AD)
9.40 Deadliest Crash: Disaster at Le Mans.
An accident that killed more than 80 people at
the 1955 Le Mans 24-hour race (AD)
11.00 Games on the Battle?eld. The role of
sport in the First World War
12.00 Mummy Mysteries 1.00am Rallying: The
Killer Years (AD) 2.00 Deadliest Crash: Disaster
at Le Mans (AD) 3.00 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Lesser Spotted
Journeys. Joe Mahon visits the village of
Lisbellaw in Co Fermanagh, where he learns
how Victorian mills in the area got all their
power from a small stream 12.10am
Teleshopping 1.10-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15 Na
Braithrean Cuideachail (The Koala Brothers) (r)
5.25 Botannan Araid Uilleim (William?s Wish
Wellingtons) (r) 5.30 Na Luchagan Fhiacla
(Tales of the Tooth Fairies) (r) 5.35 Ceitidh
Morag (Katie Morag) (r) 5.55 An Rud As Fhearr
Leam (r) 6.00 Donnie Murdo (Danger Mouse)
(r) 6.10 Alvinnn agus na Chipmunks
(ALVINNN!!! and the Chipmunks) (r) 6.35
Ard-Sgoil a? Chnuic Annasaich (Strange Hill
High) (r) 7.00 Turas a? Bhradain (The Salmon?s
Journey) (r) 7.30 Speaking Our Language (r)
7.55 Earrann Eachdraidh (History Shorts) (r)
8.00 An L� (News) 8.15 Sgeul Seirbheis (r)
8.30 Stoidhle (The Dressing Up Box) (r) 9.00
Trusadh: Posadh ann an Alba (Marriage in
Scotland) 10.00 Bannan (The Ties That Bind)
(r) 10.30 Diary of Britain: Men and Iron (r)
11.10 Cuirm@Celtic: Stockton?s Wing (r)
11.55-5.00am Close
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Hafod Haul (r) 6.15 Guto
Gwningen (r) 6.30 Sam T鈔 (r) 6.40 Twt (r)
6.50 Peppa (r) 7.00 ASRA 7.15 Ynys Broc M魊
Lili 7.20 Digbi Draig (r) 7.35 Jen a Jim Pob
Dim (r) 7.50 Sara a Cwac (r) 8.00 Sbarc (r)
8.15 Ty Mel (r) 8.20 Y Dywysoges Fach (r)
8.35 Syrcas Deithiol Dewi (r) 8.45 Dwylo?r
Enfys (r) 9.00 Igam Ogam (r) 9.10 Oli Dan y
Don (r) 9.25 Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 9.35
Cymylaubychain (r) 9.45 Bach a Mawr (r)
10.00 Ben Dant (r) 10.15 Sam T鈔 (r) 10.30
Bobi Jac (r) 10.40 Octonots (r) 10.55 Peppa
(r) 11.00 Heini (r) 11.15 Blero yn Mynd i
Ocido (r) 11.25 Twm Tisian (r) 11.35 Antur
Natur Cyw (r) 11.50 Cymylaubychain (r) 12.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 12.05pm Pobol y Cwn (r)
1.00 Celwydd Noeth (r) 1.30 Byd o Liw:
Arlunwyr (r) 2.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 2.05
Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 3.05 Y
Plas (r) (AD) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh:
Bernard (r) 5.05 Stwnsh: Gogs (r) 5.10
Stwnsh: Ben 10 (r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Sgorio
6.00 News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 100 Lle (r)
(AD) 6.30 3 Lle: Eigra Lewis Roberts (r) 7.00
Heno 8.00 Pobol y Cwm (AD) 8.25 Y Ty
Cymreig (r) 9.00 Rasus 2017 10.00 Ffermio
10.30-11.35 Dylan ar Daith (r)
14
Monday August 28 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7429
2
3
4
5
6
7
4
13
14
5
Scrabble � Challenge No 1945
16
14
20
16
10
4
18
B
21
8
21
19
1
26
9
26
13
26
23
21
22
22
13
22
11
10
12
13
22
1
11
23
14
16
13
15
17
18
4
23
13
10
16
24
16
20
22
1
14
8
23
1
10
23
5
14
6
26
10
18
26
11
23
4
12
13
16
4
1
23
16
17
25
7
18
21
4
2L
4
16
20
23
23
2
22
5
21
26
10
17
5
26
1
18
16
15
20
16
16
3
Solution to Crossword 7428
G
I
N
G
E
R
B
E
E
R
22
B E AU J O L A
U C O E
NCUR C L A S
K O K
E L
P N E UMO
E O Y E
ARE L Y AM I
I
S O
X POS I TOR
A
I
I
E S P EC T
S A
H A C E
M A L TWH I S K
I S
B
S I C
E H
N I A
R
DS T
I
R
S E E
P U
L E S
A E
Y
2W
qua
psi
2L
u
2L
p 2L
3L
we 3L
2W
tier
2L
D
E
2W
2W
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
12
16
1
13
17
15
16
19
17
16
1
15
19
5
5
HALANIC
23
What eight-letter word can you
play with this rack?
18
21 However; but (8)
22 Decorated; killed (4)
23 East Asian boat (6)
24 Red fruit (6)
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Down
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
A
2 Reflexive pronoun (7)
3 Underlying support for an
idea (5)
4 Designates for a purpose
(8)
5 Bathroom powder (4)
6 Animal moving seasonally
(7)
7 Place where birds rest (5)
12 Coarse lead pellets for guns
(8)
14 Lighter-than-air craft (7)
15 Clothing (7)
17 Triangular river mouth (5)
19 Belief in a supreme being
(5)
20 Chinese currency (4)
B
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
O
D
A
C
R
T
O
U
L
K
S
N
H
U
A
A
M
E
R
I
R
K
A
I
E
K
I
R
L
N
B
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 415 029)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3892
U
O
O
T
V
P
E
R
T
I
E
M
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4105
Futoshiki No 2986
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
Kakuro No 1945
<
?
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE� is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ㎝attel 2017
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
B
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
R
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday?s solution, right
No 3891
<
30
16
10
13
23
?
17
13
23
16
10
22
25
30
23
10
26
<
23
8
16
32
17
9
6
25
?
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
What seven-letter word can you
play with this rack?
13
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Decorative ball of wool (6)
Character of a sound (6)
(Membership) charges (4)
System of faith (8)
Long-haired cat (7)
Excessive urgency (5)
Smoked sausage (11)
Love deeply (5)
Crash helmet (4,3)
11 12
bangoes
24
11
1
5
8
9
10
11
13
16
18
10
2L
2W
11
22
Across
9
19
20
23
8
3L
23
26
7
2W
4
A
10
6
2W
21
R
9
5
<
18
25
?
4
23
4
14
13
13
20
?
4
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
25
22
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
16
6
34
17
16
16
4
6
3
27
13
� PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3113
the times | Monday August 28 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Fabiano Caruana
Black: Sergei Karjakin
St Louis Rapid 2017
________
醨D 1 4kD]
郉bD DpDp]
� 0 h gpD]
轉 DpH D ]
輕D ) ) D]
蹽PDB) DQ]
� D D DP)]
贒 $ DRI ]
谅媚牌侨
Caruana has built up a powerful kingside attack and now continues energetically.
Much as in the pivotal AVRO
1938 tournament, which included
no fewer than four world champions (previous, incumbent and to
come) among its eight contestants, the older immortals, Anand
and Kasparov suffered in comparison with their younger rivals.
At AVRO it was the peripatetic
structure of the event that handicapped the veterans, with rounds
being held in different Dutch
towns, causing much inconvenient travelling on a daily basis. In
St Louis, it was the pressure created by the fast time limit that
dimmed the performance of the
two former world champions.
EASY
22
x2
MEDIUM
113
+ 57 +1/5
HARDER
+6
OF IT
+ 437
21 SQUARE
IT
1/5
SQUARE
IT
OF IT
+8
x 4 + 76
50%
OF IT
50%
OF IT
2
�
*
�
0
�
1
�
�
0
0
3
1
�
*
�
0
1
0
0
�
0
4
0
1
�
*
�
�
�
0
�
�
5
1
�
1
�
*
0
�
�
�
0
6
0
0
0
�
1
*
1
1
�
1
7
1
�
1
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�
0
*
�
0
1
8
�
�
1
1
�
0
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1
9
1
1
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�
�
�
1
�
*
0
10
1
1
1
�
1
0
0
0
1
*
6
5�
5�
5
4�
4
4
3�
3�
3�
________
� D DrDkD] Winning Move
�D DpD ]
遪D DrD $] White to play. This position is a variation
Navara-Karjakin, St Louis 2017.
轉q0 D D ] from
White has given up a piece to expose the
� DRD D D] black king. This looks promising as the
�)PD DQ) ] black queen and knight are so distant.
� D D ) D] How can White conclude the attack?
贒 D D I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
? 91
3/5
OF IT
5/6
OF IT
+ 12
+ 98 x 3
+1/2 ? 654
x 4 + 768 +1/2 + 998 OF
IT
OF IT
Saturday?s answers amount, atom,
manus, mason, mast, matt, moan, moat,
most, mount, muon, muso, must, mutant,
mutt, mutton, notam, sawm, smut,
snowman, soma, stoma, stum, stuntman,
stuntwoman, sumo, townsman, unman,
unmown, utmost, woman
Killer Gentle No 5597
17
8
11
17
14
5min
10
7
17
? A K J 10 2
?A J 7 6 4
?K J
?2
?7 6
N
?W E
S
?Q 8 6 4
?Q J 10 8 7 6 5
?Q 9 8 4
?K 10 9
?9 7 3 2
?4 3
?5 3
?Q 8 5 3 2
?A 10 5
?A K 9
4
17
17
6
20
15
16
3
11
9
7
Table Two
N
Dbl
ruff a heart and ruff his fourth
diamond. 4? made and England
+130. A small gain but every little
counts. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
�
8
13
4
11
14
6
17
14
11min
26
7
-
=
48
=2
=
54
=
105
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Tredoku 1488
7
31
18
8 7 9
6 9 8
8 6
5
8 1 2
9 3 1
9 7
1 2
3 4 2
6 1
4
2
1
5
3
5
1
4
3
?
4
2
5 > 3
?
3 < 4
2 > 1
1
1 < 3
4
2
8 9 7
6 3 4
7 5
2 1
3 8
1
9
3
Set Square 1947
2
x
8
7
+
6
+
4
+
9
�
1
+
+
-
3
22
12
19
18
13
9
3
15
30
3
8
8
17
11
3
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
4
6
3
5
9
8
6
4
3
7
1
2
4
6
2
7
1
8
9
5
3
9
8
7
1
2
4
3
6
5
1
3
6
8
5
9
2
4
7
5
KenKen 4104
2
5
4
3
7
6
8
9
1
7
1
5
4
8
2
6
3
9
6
4
9
5
3
7
1
2
8
8
2
3
9
6
1
5
7
4
Lexica 3890
C
C
H
A
I
W
K
R
M
A
I
D
E
E
Z
T
W
A
E
F
S
I
4
4
4
3
8
9
6
7
4
3
1
2
5
3
5
2
1
9
8
7
6
4
1
7
4
2
5
6
3
8
9
Quiz: 1 San Marzano tomato
2 Harry Styles
3 Neil LaBute
4 Andromeda galaxy (M31)
5 Queen Victoria
6 Sendai
7 Jefferson Davis
8 Christopher Marlowe
9 Kinky Boots
10 Cyprus, hence the metal?s name
11 Pierre Christin
12 Inner ear
13 Laa-Laa
14 Conor McGregor
15 GoPro
6
3
7
5
2
1
4
9
8
U
H
D
B
A
O
F
I
T
D
I
U
R
Y
A
E
T
V
Y
Killer 5596
6
10
3
7
1
2
9
5
4
8
6
Lexica 3889
x
x
9
1 2
9 3 6 8
7
7 9
7 9
1 5 2
4 9 8 6
3 8
3 1
3 6 2 8
1 2 4 6
Cell Blocks 2995
22
5 > 2
Sudoku 9272
3 1
1 2
x
13
9
Suko 2014
Futoshiki 2985
Chess 1 Rh7! is overwhelming. After 1 ... Re1+
(1 ... Kxh7 2 Qxf7+ mates quickly) 2 Kg2 Qxc4
3 bxc4 Kxh7 4 Qxf7+ Kh8 5 Qf6+ Kg8 6 Qxa6
White wins easily
5
21
=5
x
+
14
15
9
Contract: 4?(by W), Opening Lead: ? A
3
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Scrabble 1944
COLUMNS E5 across (44)
BUXOM F8 across (38)
E
4?(1)
3?
end(2)
(1) Perfect competitive bid to the (ten card)
level of the fit by Henry Rose.
(2) Rather cautious by North, who should
probably have doubled (for take-out) again.
x
7
Killer Tricky No 5598
Contract: 5? (by S) , Opening Lead: ?Q
W
-
20
S(Gahan)
S
x
+
8
20
W
N(Cope)
E
3?
Dbl(1) Pass
3?
Pass
4?
5?(2)
Pass
Pass
5? (3) end
(1) Might have bid 4? to show 5? -5?.
(2) It is normally better in a competitive auction to decide on your limit and bid it immediately. East?s pass-then-bid route allowed
North-South to locate their spade fit.
(3) Close decision. On the one hand, partner could have nothing for the forced 3?
bid; on the other, he has a hand far better
suited to play than defence ? indeed, from
his perspective, E-W could be making 5?.
x
17
8
12
Table One
+
= 41 from 1-9 are
2
Dealer: West, Vulnerability: Neither
Teams
All the digits
+
Solutions
Kakuro 1944
England had a fantastic finish in the
Under-16s to the 26th European
Youth Bridge Team Championships.
They leapt from tenth to fourth (out
of 16) in the last three matches, and
so qualified for the world championships in China next year. Well
done to Oscar Selby-Henry Rose,
Liz Gahan-Andy Cope and Alex
Pemberton-Theo
Anoyrkatis.
Captain Mike Bell; coach Sarah Bell.
This board from England v
Sweden features fine defence from
the Swedish East at Table One.
However the fine result at Table
Two by Selby-Rose neutralised it;
indeed England gained.
West led the queen of clubs and
East reasoned as follows. ?Partner
would have led a singleton heart,
so either he has two (and declarer
has one), in which case we have no
third defensive trick; or partner
has no hearts at all.?
East overtook the queen of clubs
with the king and switched to a
heart. West ruffed and returned a
diamond, declarer, Liz Gahan,
guessing correctly to play dummy?s
jack. East won the ace and (should
have) led another heart. Down two
(actually down one when East neglected to give his partner a second
heart ruff). England -50.
At Table Two, West, Oscar
Selby, bought it in 4?. North
cashed two top spades and
switched passively to his singleton
club. Declarer drew trumps and
led a diamond to the queen. North
won the king and tried to cash the
ace of hearts. Declarer ruffed and
led up a second diamond. With
North?s jack appearing, declarer
could win the ace, cash the ten,
5
x
5
4
9
Bridge Andrew Robson
5 2
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Set Square No 1948
From these letters, make words of three
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 14 words, average;
19, good; 23, very good; 28, excellent
8
4
2
7 3
4 4
3
3 3
4
Polygon
St Louis Rapid 2017
1
1 Aronian
*
2 Nakamura
�
3 Caruana
0
4 Nepomniachtchi 1
5 Dominguez
0
6 Le
1
7 Karjakin
0
8 Kasparov
�
9 Anand
0
10 Navara
0
� 2 + 12
� PUZZLER MEDIA
The much-vaunted return to
competitive play of former world
champion Garry Kasparov in St
Louis did not produce the anticipated fireworks, at least not in
games won by Kasparov himself.
Instead, the pyrotechnics were left
to others, including today?s sparkling win by Fabiano Caruana
against the reigning world blitz
champion, Sergei Karjakin.
23 Nd7 Be7 24 Nxf8 Bxf8 25 f5
Despite having won material it
is important for White to continue
actively before Black?s queenside
play becomes threatening.
25 ... axb3 26 fxg6 hxg6 27 Bxg6
fxg6 28 Qe6+ Kh7 29 Bxd6
29 Rxf8 also does the trick as
29 ... Qxf8 30 Rc7+ is crushing.
29 ... Qxd6
If 29 ... Bxd6 then 30 Rf7+
mates quickly.
30 Rf7+ Kh6 31 Qh3+ Kg5 32 g3
Black resigns
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Rapid play
Cell Blocks No 2996
Brain Trainer
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
N
E
R
Codeword 3112
5
1
9
8
7
4
2
3
6
4
2
8
6
3
9
5
1
7
2
4
1
9
8
5
6
7
3
7
8
3
4
6
2
9
5
1
9
6
5
3
1
7
8
4
2
I
S
P U
A
WA
N
T
T
WH
I
S A
T
D
C
O
R
O
N
E
R
I
N
L
A
Y
I C L E
B A
O N O
E R
S I X T
G
I
R
T I NG OU
N O
I B E
SMA
U
S
Z Z
C L I Q
Z
H
S
V AG E
S P
R M U
E D
E Y E L
C K
L
E
E E N
F
J
T DO
Y
S H
Q M
U E Y
E
R
E A R
Z
H
E T
Word Watch
Frampler (a) Someone
who brawls; a
quarrelsome person
Francise (c) To make
or become Frenchspeaking (Canada)
Francium (b) An unstable
radioactive element
Brain Trainer
Easy 67; Medium 933;
Harder 6,522
28.08.17
MindGames
Sudoku
Easy No 9273
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9274
3
Frampler
a Someone who brawls
b An embroiderer
c A trespasser
Francise
a To sell goods
b A tax
c To start speaking
French
Francium
a Lace
b An element
c An ancient currency
Answers on page 15
3 7
5 4
3 1
5
2
5 7 8
7 9 2
8
4 1 2
2
6
1
7
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
9
7 9
6
PUZZLER MEDIA
5 4 8
3
7
9
1
6
3
5
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
11 Which writer created
the French sci-fi comics
series, Val閞ian and
Laureline, with artist
Jean-Claude M閦i鑢es?
15
(?the Boy Jones?) stole
the underwear of
which monarch?
8 The actor Kit
Harington was
named after which
Elizabethan playwright?
4 What is the nearest
major galaxy to the
Milky Way?
9 Land of Lola, Sex is
in the Heel and The
History of Wrong Guys
are numbers from
which musical?
5 Disguised as a
chimney sweep, the
teenager Edward Jones
7 Who was president of
the Confederate States
from 1861 to 1865?
10 In the Roman
era, copper was
principally mined
12 M閚i鑢e?s disease is
a condition of which
part of the body?
13 Which Teletubby
is yellow and has a
curly antenna?
14 Which Irish fighter
is the reigning UFC
lightweight champion?
15 Which American
make of action
camera is pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 905
3
4
8
9
11
12
5
17
20
22
6
7
14
15
16
18
19
21
23
RR I SON
E
C O
N A
OV E
C
U
N
G T I R E D
G
NGU E I N
H
U
K E
H A N
T
E
N
SO F TWA R E
W O
T
R
P L U S
H A Y
I
N
RD
E
P
T
CH
RON
D
OE S
D S
T
A
S
F I
S
U F
R
E E
E
AW
H
P E
E
E L
F
K
X
D
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Flamande
10
13
GA
S
E T
R
DO
L
T O
G
D Y
Across
1 Release cadet, excited at start
of holiday (6)
4 Be a tell-tale in class (6)
8 After a week, child in custody
becomes uncooperative (7)
10 Path leads to the Roman
amphitheatre in Livorno (5)
11 Millions in America ?nding
something negative (5)
12 Hoisted a very short distance
within a day (7)
13 First of tea cakes for newlyformed working group (4,5)
17 Garment superior to
everything else? (7)
19 One nibbles morsel with some
hesitation (5)
20 Portion of pastry dish, plus
crepe without ?lling (5)
21 Saint sick in a boat? (7)
22 Film for adults only, once,
mother sneaking daughter in
at the front (3,3)
23 Military commander to reveal,
we hear, weapon (6)
3
5
4 3 5
7 6
9 2
4
8
4 1
1 2
Turn to page 7 for
your bank holiday
prize puzzle
Friday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 904
5
7 8
1
by Olav Bjortomt Jumbo crossword
6 Which ?City of
Trees?, the capital of
Miyagi prefecture,
hosts the largest
Tanabata festival
in Japan?
2
3
2 1
6
2 1
4
7 3
6
9 7
2
6 5 4
7 1
2 8 4
6
on which
Mediterranean island?
3 The Mercy Seat (2002),
Autobahn (2003) and
Reasons to Be Pretty
(2008) are plays by
which US film director?
6
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 Which tomato, from
the Sarno Valley near
Mount Vesuvius, is
needed to make a true
Neapolitan pizza?
2 Which pop star plays
Alex, a private in the
Argyll and Sutherland
Highlanders, in the
2017 film Dunkirk?
8 4
5 3
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
1
Fiendish No 9275
Down
1 Armed criminal clutching end
of knife? Gosh! (4,2)
2 Preparing to walk with dog, or
going in the van (6,3,4)
3 Charles and little sister in the
frame? (7)
5 Unacceptable, whichever way
you look at it (3,2)
6 Another song is composed at
minimum expense? (2,1,10)
7 Illness man contracted, along
with woman (6)
9 Depressed before autumn?s
rainstorms? (9)
14 Polish bishop out of work?
Nonsense (7)
15 Weapon made by two
Englishmen down under (3-3)
16 Alternatively, I must go to
northern US state (6)
18 Sports venue in Delaware,
namely (5)
8 9
6
3
only
7.00am Craig Charles 10.00 Cerys
Matthews 1.00pm Guy Garvey 4.00 Huey
Morgan 7.00 Don Letts? Culture Clash
Radio 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music
Recommends with Lauren Laverne 1.00am
Otis Redding Story 2.00 Elvis and Dewey:
Red, Hot and Blue 2.30 6 Music Live Hour
3.30 6 Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
7.00am The Ultimate Classic FM Chart with
Tim Lihoreau 10.00 The Ultimate Classic FM
Chart with John Suchet 1.00pm The
Ultimate Classic FM Chart with Bill Turnbull
4.00 The Ultimate Classic FM Chart with
John Brunning 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones features
music and musicians from black and minority
ethnic roots, including works by Joplin,
Dvor醟, Saint-Georges and Gershwin 10.00
Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday August 28 2017
11
1GT
ROBERT ORMEROD FOR THE TIMES; MARILYN KINGWILL
Prom 53
Beneath the Underdog:
Charles Mingus Revisited
Royal Albert Hall
Edinburgh comedy
Burns & Quartermaine
Gilded Balloon
T
{{{{(
S
{{{{(
hould you mess with Charles
Mingus? At first it seemed as if
the conductor Jules Buckley
and his arrangers were too
eager to smooth the rough
edges from the bandleader?s raucous
anthems. I couldn?t help thinking we
might have been better
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