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Elle Canada - June 2018

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#STANDOUT
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armani-beauty.ca
Cate Blanchett
the new fragrance
STORYBOARD
@ E L L E C A N A D A
SHE’S ON A BOAT!
Is beauty editor Victoria smiling
because (a) she’s OOO touring ginger fields in Vietnam with Kiehl’s
(p. 80) or (b) she’s secretly holding a
beer? Answer: (c) All of the above.
WHEN IN PARIS...
...you simply must stay at a luxe hotel
with a gorgeous garden. Merci
beaucoup, L’Hôtel du Collectionneur—
our home away from home in the
eighth arrondissement.
TRUE BLUE
Frida Kahlo’s colour-saturated
home turned museum in
Mexico City had writer Julia
Eskins questioning her commitment to neutrals (p. 90).
SIT PRETTY
TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL; ALL PHOTOS BY ELLE CANADA STAFF
A MODEL’S
BEST FRIEND
Even Tyra would have
trouble deciding who’s
serving better face—
model Pauline or her
canine co-star Jungo in
our summer-shorts shoot
(p. 60). Check our Insta
for more BTS footage
captured on the Huawei
P20 Pro phone.
How do you make
perching on a bar
stool look graceful?
Step one: Be Heather
Ogden. For our full
convo with the iconic
Canadian ballerina,
turn to p. 31.
QU-ELLE
SURPRISE!
Art director Jed stumbled
across this vintage ELLE
illustration in a secondhand store in Paris. As
you do. ■
Get a behind-the-scenes
look at each issue as it
happens by following us on
Instagram @ELLECanada.
ELLECANADA.COM
9
69
Glitter stretch
marks? Yes, please.
31
Ballet dancer Heather
Ogden is the most elegant
human we know.
COVER STORIES
24
44
47
69
74
80
SHOPPING “Slip” into something
more comfortable.
PSYCHE Why women tend to do
the emotional heavy lifting in
relationships. By Katherine Laidlaw
FASHION Celebrate the (longawaited) return of warmer weather
with retro florals and shorts.
BODY SPECIAL Your legs
deserve their own beauty routine.
BODY SPECIAL How to
win the fitness mind game.
By Wing Sze Tang
BEAUTY Jasmine Tookes brings
you beachy-makeup inspo.
STYLE & FASHION
21
23
26
28
SHOW NOTES High-concept
creativity on the couture runways.
SCOOP Direct-to-consumer brands
reinventing how we shop for
wardrobe staples.
SHOPPING Wear a rainbow this
season; plus, your dream summer
shoes decoded.
STYLE Shapewear is taking over
the runways, but what does that
mean for us? By Liz Guber
JUNE 2018
94
Step away from
the wine.
FEATURES
31
34
PHOTOGRAPHY, BENJAMIN KANAREK (MODEL) & GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS); SEEDLIP NON-ALCOHOLIC SPIRITS ($45 EACH, SEEDLIPDRINKS.COM).
OPPOSITE: PHOTOGRAPHY, RILEY STEWART (H. OGDEN); NYLON AND ELASTANE CROP TOP (ADIDAS BY STELLA MCCARTNEY) AND TULLE SKIRT (SIMONE ROCHA)
36
40
42
89
92
94
RADAR PROFILE National Ballet
of Canada star Heather Ogden on
body positivity. By Carli Whitwell
RADAR FOCUS Your summermusts list.
CELEBRITY Zadie Smith’s lust
for life. By Keziah Weir
MONEY How an unexpected
pregnancy forced one finance
guru to rethink her budget.
By Bridget Casey
RELATIONSHIP A trans woman’s
journey watching an ex fall in love.
By Casey Plett
LIFESTYLE Exploring the art and
food of Mexico City. By Julia Eskins
INTEL Our latest tech obsessions.
LIFESTYLE Who needs alcohol to
have fun? By Carli Whitwell
BEAUTY & WELLNESS
78
79
47
84
You’ve never styled shorts
like this before.
86
BEAUTY BUZZ This month’s new
and noteworthy must-haves.
BEAUTY EDIT The products
we’re coveting now.
BEAUTY What’s the deal
with ginger and skincare?
By Victoria DiPlacido
HEALTH Oprah was right: Bread
is delicious. By Victoria DiPlacido
EVERY MONTH
9
ON THE COVER
Jasmine Tookes is wearing a dress by Saint Laurent by
Anthony Vaccarello, a pearl and diamond earring by
Mizuki and diamond and opal earrings by Maria Tash.
Photography Tom Schirmacher Styling Samira
Nasr Makeup Benjamin Puckey (Bryant Artists) Hair
Gavin Harwin (The Wall Group) Manicure Gina
Edwards (Kate Ryan Inc.)
STORYBOARD
12
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
15
CONTRIBUTORS
16
LETTERS
20
ELLE ONLINE
96
HOROSCOPE
97
SHOPPING GUIDE
98
OVERHEARD
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
THIS SPRING, after spending far too
many months in fitness hibernation than I
care to publicly admit, I emerged from my
cave of Netflix and Uber Eats to head back
to the gym. My slothdom masquerading as
self-care had run its course. I have to admit
that this issue of ELLE Canada was part of
the prompt for my shift: It felt incongruous
to be planning fitness stories with the team
when my activity tracker was at the “I
don’t know her” phase of our relationship.
Now that I’m back in the (sore-muscle)
saddle and working out regularly, I realize that the gym serves as a metaphor for
life. There are no shortcuts. Whether it’s
getting a six-pack or saving the world,
no achievement happens overnight and
reaching an ambitious goal requires
work—lots of it. You can’t rush progress.
Growth takes time. (So does a six-pack.)
Also: Your mindset determines your success. At the gym, I’m trying to stop myself
12
ELLECANADA.COM
2018
from yelling things at my trainer like “I
can’t do this!” or “Nope—that’s impossible!” (spare a thought for anyone working
out near me) because studies show that
the way you think can significantly affect
what you accomplish (see “Head Strong”
on page 74). The belief that things are
difficult is often illusory—it’s your mind
playing tricks on you. And, much to my
surprise, I have discovered that I actually
can do those last five squats—go figure.
When you’re stressed or tired, it’s even
easier for negative thinking to creep in
and derail your dreams. You wouldn’t let
a friend talk to herself that way, so you
shouldn’t let yourself either.
Finally: Kiss your comfort zone goodbye. One of my favourite quotes is about
moving beyond what you know and into
the unknown: “The shell must break before the bird can fly.” It reminds me of
how rewarding it is when you get to the
other side of a difficult challenge. Discovering what you’re truly capable of takes
guts, but imagine how high you might be
able to soar.
Vanessa Craft
Editor-in-Chief
Follow me on Instagram and
Twitter @vanessacraft.
What do you want to see in the magazine?
We want to know! Tell us at
editors@ELLECanada.com
or #TellELLECanada.
PHOTOGRAPHY, CARLYLE ROUTH; HAIR & MAKEUP, SABRINA RINALDI (P1M.CA); STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; V. CRAFT IS WEARING A BLOUSE BY VERONICA
BEARD (AT TNT, TNTFASHION.CA) AND A RING BY MICHAEL MICHAEL KORS
JUNE
ELLECANADA
@ELLECANADA
ELLECANADA
@ELLECANADA
c a n a d a
ELLECANADA.COM
One easy way
to reach us:
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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Vanessa Craft
VICE-PRESIDENT, TVA
Lyne Robitaille
ART DIRECTOR Jed Tallo
FASHION DIRECTOR Anthony Mitropoulos
PUBLISHER Jacqueline Howe
FASHION
SENIOR DIRECTOR, MEDIA SOLUTIONS, TRANSACTIONAL Jerome Leys
KEY ACCOUNT DIRECTORS, NATIONAL ADVERTISING SALES David Garby,
Andrea McBride, Akta Sharma (on leave) ADVERTISING COORDINATOR
Maddie Belanger NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jillian Dann-Macerollo
STYLE EDITOR
Liz Guber
MARKET EDITOR
ADVERTISING SALES, TORONTO 416-227-8248
Elaine Jyll Regio
FEATURES & COPY
MANAGING EDITOR Carli Whitwell
PRODUCTION & COPY EDITOR Ciara Rickard
BEAUTY & HEALTH
SENIOR HEALTH & BEAUTY EDITOR Katherine Flemming
BEAUTY EDITOR Victoria DiPlacido
(on leave)
ART
ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR
Elena Viltovskaia
ASSISTANTS
Natalie Brennan, Patricia Karounos
INTERNS
Sarit Cohen, Caitlin Leonard, Rebecca Mitchell, Meera Solanki Estrada
CONTRIBUTORS
Véronique Delisle, Marjorie Dunham-Landry, Jane Fielding, Brian Fleming, Charli
Howard, Benjamin Kanarek, Andrea Karr, Katherine Laidlaw, Samira Nasr, Georgia
Nicols, Geoffrey Ross, Carlyle Routh, Tom Schirmacher, Nelson Simoneau, Riley
Stewart, Wing Sze Tang, Madison van Rijn, Keziah Weir
MULTI-PLATFORM EDITIONS
CREATIVE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL EDITIONS Chris Bond
Download the ELLE Canada app for iPad on the App Store. Digital editions
are also available on Molto, Zinio, Kobo, Press Reader and Google Play.
HEARST MAGAZINES INTERNATIONAL
SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, CFO & GENERAL MANAGER Simon Horne
SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, DIRECTOR OF LICENSING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
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Jeannette Chang SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Kim St. Clair Bodden
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, EDITORIAL Astrid Bertoncini
EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL BRANDING Peter Yates
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SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT/ELLE INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR Valéria Bessolo Llopiz SENIOR
VICE-PRESIDENT/DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENSES, DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT &
SYNDICATION Mickael Berret ELLE INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIONS Charlotte Deffe,
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CEO Claudio Piovesana claudio.piovesana@lagardere-active.com
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ELLE® and ELLE Canada® are used under licence from
the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse.
Registered user: TVA Group – Hearst Publications Inc., 1010, rue de Sérigny, 4th
Floor, Longueuil, Quebec J4K 5G7. Contents copyright © 2018 by TVA Group
– Hearst Publications Inc. ELLE Canada is published 11 times per year except for
occasional combined, expanded or premium issues. May not be reprinted without
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NATIONAL SALES Paul Cummins, Gwen O’Toole, Tony Vigario, Joanna Woodman
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DIGITAL PRE-PRESS SERVICES
DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Johanne Perron
PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Linda Desjardins
MARKETING, COMMUNICATIONS & EVENTS
SENIOR MARKETING DIRECTOR, PUBLICATIONS Martine Aubin
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TRANSPORTATION COORDINATOR Susan Kuskelin
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ELLE CANADA IS PUBLISHED BY
TVA GROUP – HEARST PUBLICATIONS INC.
SENIOR MANAGEMENT, TVA GROUP INC.
PRESIDENT & CEO France Lauzière
VICE-PRESIDENT & DIRECTOR OF FINANCES Denis Rozon
PRESIDENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES Jean-François Reid
EXECUTIVE VICE-PRESIDENT OF ADVERTISING Donald Lizotte
VICE-PRESIDENT OF COMMUNICATIONS Véronique Mercier
CONTRIBUTORS
CASEY
PLETT
WRITER
The gig Born in Manitoba and
now based in Windsor, Ont.,
Plett doesn’t believe in love at
first sight...but “maybe at the first
two weeks.” In “Stand By Me”
(p. 42), the author reflects on her
journey from life as a teenage
boy to a woman officiating her
ex’s nuptials. Wise words “By
definition, picking your battles
requires fighting some.”
JASMINE
MODEL
TOOKES
The gig California native Tookes is this month’s cover
star and is also featured in our marine-inspired “Life
Aquatic” beauty shoot (p. 80). Jet set and go
“Travelling is one of my favourite perks of being a
model, and I try to plan a new trip whenever I have time
off. I recently went to Antarctica—it was incredible.”
BRIDGET
CASEY
WRITER
The gig Calgary’s millennial money expert Casey gets
real about financially planning for her surprise pregnancy in “What to Expect
Financially When You’re
Unexpectedly Expecting”
TEXT, MEERA SOLANKI ESTRADA; PHOTOGRAPHY, ALEYAH SOLOMON (J. ESKINS)
(p. 40). Passion project
“I watch cooking shows and
try to replicate the recipes.
In an alternate life, I am a
MasterChef contestant.”
JULIA ESKINS
WRITER
The gig Torontonian Eskins
tours Mexico City’s kaleidoscopic
art and design scene in “City
and Colour” (p. 89). Treasure
hunt “I collect jewellery on my
PAULINE
MODEL
HOARAU
travels. My favourite piece is a
The gig A native of Reunion Island, off
silver necklace from the Grand
the coast of Madagascar, Hoarau now
Bazaar in Istanbul.”
calls New York and Paris home. She had
some canine co-workers in “Short Story”
(p. 47). Weekend vibes “I love being
outdoors! My perfect Sunday would be
going on a hike with friends.” ■
ELLECANADA.COM
15
LETTERS
@fillintheblank1
I love @priyankachopra!!!
So beautiful! Excited to
get a copy.
@jodieh1131
I look up to her
so much because
of her femininity,
intelligence and
strength.
WORD
UP
GOOD JEANS I’m a long-time
@PC_SuperTrooper
Gorgeousness; can’t
wait to read the whole
interview. The excerpts
are such a tease.
THI S MON TH’S BES T
TWEETS
TRUE ALLYSHIP Awesome work, Kelly
Boutsalis and ELLE Canada, on “Voices of Change”
@Kellyinspires1
I was wearing a velour
track suit the day I met my
husband. He said he’ll always
remember it. Wonder if the
platform flip-flops I wore with
it will come back too.
[ELLE Society, April 2018]. I was a bit nervous to
@kris_quinner
“Voices of Change” article—
great read! Enjoyed reading
about indigenous issues and
hearing voices of 3 strong and
influential women.
of the three indigenous women featured, and
@beauty_nomad
Was just in Russia in
November and totally blown
away by their fashion!
@Quartzqueen18
Thanks for featuring Keira
Knightley in your April 2018
issue—such a wonderful
actress and lovely, down-toearth person. Looking
forward to viewing her
upcoming projects.
dive into this piece as I was concerned that it might
subscriber to your magazine, soaking up your
fashion tips and enjoying the assortment of articles. April’s denim spread [“Dark Matter,” ELLE
Fashion] really thrilled me. I wear denim pretty
much every day. I love its look and versatility.
In fact, I once argued with someone about its
fashion status and its place in a professional
wardrobe. The model’s hair and makeup are
a perfect complement to the dark-denim aesthetic. I love the minimalist but totally cool
accessories and the interesting assortment of
pieces. Excellent fodder for my ongoing love
affair. Nancy Daoust, Sudbury, Ont.
read as condescending toward indigenous people
and that this would change my high opinion of a
magazine I’ve subscribed to for almost two decades.
However, the article successfully amplified the voices
Boutsalis clearly felt encouraged to speak her truth
as well. As a white woman of settler descent who
works to bridge relationships between First Nations
in B.C. and organizations, I am hyper-aware of the
differences between acting as an activist, an advocate or an ally. Finding balance and learning when
it is appropriate to wear each of these hats is part of
what I consider my personal journey toward reconciliation. Often, I observe or feel an underlying tone
DIGITAL DETOX
Courtney Shea’s
short-lived romance with artificial intelligence
[“It’s (Too) Complicated,” ELLE Life, April 2018]
was bang on! This piece made me feel that I’m
not alone in my trouble accepting the way technology is taking over our lives. I applaud you
for having the guts to print this piece because
not everyone will be in agreement with it. We
have lost our connection with one another.
Shea talks about the Jetsons in the piece—at
least they got it right and still had dinner together. Thanks, ELLE Canada, for touching on this
subject—I welcome change but not if it means
losing who we are. Alana Boland, email
of “speaking on behalf of” indigenous peoples and
communities in speech as well as literature, however
well intended. I did not observe that or feel that with
this article, and I applaud ELLE Canada for using
your platform to encourage the process of reflection
and thought-provoking change. True allyship, in my
opinion. Hailey Berry, email
This month’s
best letter wins
a Dove gift
pack (valued
at $115).
Send us your letters via email at ELLELetters@ELLECanada.com or snail mail at ELLE Canada, 25 Sheppard Ave. W., Suite 100, Toronto, Ont., M2N 6S7.
Include your name and address. Letters may be edited.
16
ELLECANADA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY, NINO MUÑOZ (P. CHOPRA)
Your tweets,
Instas, emails
and more.
®
“the vibe is good, and
the fuchsia
is bright.”
summer
2018
all daisy long
young, wild
& me
empower-mint
making
harmony
sunny daze
America’s
nail salon
expert.
since 1981.
ELLECANADA.COM
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&
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RUN
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E M AN I
AR M
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TWITTER
NEWSLETTER
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Like us to get style scoops,
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COLLAGE, SARIT COHEN; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE
1.
Sandals special: the
ELLE editors’ picks
of the season.
2.
How to save your hair from
humidity. (It’s possible.)
3.
The must-see movies,
TV shows and concerts
of the summer.
T R E N D S
R U N WAY
&
S H O P P I N G
N E W S ,
TEXT, VANESSA CRAFT; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE
This season’s hautecouture shows in Paris
were a magical mélange
of high-concept design
and edgy glamour.
SHOW NOTES
SHOW
Viktor & Rolf
MOOD
Creativity through
constraint. The Dutch
designers created their
pretty flower- and bowfuelled collection using
only Japanese technical
duchesse satin and cut
it on the bias.
SHOW
Valentino
MOOD
Bold contradictions.
Combining a blue
feathered hat with an
electric-yellow coat
and a pair of loose,
sand-coloured trousers
shouldn’t work, but, like
much of the delightfully
unexpected combinations at this impressive
show, they came
together magically.
SHOW
Chanel
MOOD
22
SHOW
SHOW
Dior
Givenchy
MOOD
MOOD
Surrealist chic. Maria Grazia
Chiuri held her show in a
muslin-wrapped tent at the
Musée Rodin, a nod to her
artistic inspiration. A cinematic range of sheer gowns,
cage skirts and tailored
trouser suits—the majority
in black and white—played
into the theme.
Structured femininity. A
stunning couture debut
from Brit Clare Waight
Keller, whose confident, unexpected use
of ombré feathers and
dramatically structured
pieces ushered in a
new era of couture for
the French house.
ELLECANADA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY & BACKSTAGE)
Opulent optimism. A
lush French garden set
the scene for models in
black veils and dreamy
pastel shades. Delicate
chiffon and silk played
off against sparkling
tweed jackets with
rounded shoulders.
The collection was as
effervescent as a glass
of champagne.
STYLE
From top: Arjé,
Easy 8 and
Wardrobe NYC
HOW TO SHOP NOW
Three direct-to-consumer brands are
streamlining the hunt for elevated
basics with capsule collections.
E A S Y 8 When fashion designer Misha Nonoo
sat down to plan Easy 8, an offshoot of her self-titled core
label, she considered “the kind of wardrobe a working
woman who leads a full life would want.” The result is an
eight-piece range you can mix and match to create 22
outfits. You can purchase the entire bundle or pick and
choose items, like the slick blazer dress that can be worn
solo or paired with wide-leg trousers and a turtleneck
from the collection. Since Nonoo introduced the concept,
it’s all she wears. “We lead such hectic lives, and we’re
always looking for ways to simplify. It’s especially useful
when I travel. It’s great knowing I have pieces no matter
where I am in the world.” (From $180, mishanonoo.com)
A R J É This two-year-old NYC line, founded by
husband-and-wife duo Oliver Corral and Bessie Afnaim
Corral, swaps seasons for “chapters.” The brand drops
four tightly edited capsules a year, and, unlike typical
collections, which rewrite the trends every season, each
chapter builds on the one that came before. The vibe is
restrained yet bohemian—think long silk tunics paired
with floor-grazing trousers and androgynous suiting with
an insouciant ease. As for the name? It’s Greek for “the
essence of everything”—a fitting description for clothes
that feel right for any occasion, locale or mood. (From
$155, arje.com)
W A R D R O B E N Y C Shopping Wardrobe
NYC is a package deal—you can’t buy single pieces
from this range of luxury basics founded by stylist Christine
Centenera and designer Josh Goot. Instead, choose between four- or eight-piece “kits” consisting of perfected
button-downs, midi-skirts and tees in a stark black-andwhite palette. These unadorned items are meant to be the
building blocks of a functional wardrobe, and the brand
is also releasing an athleisure kit this season. Just add your
own spin with accessories and never wonder what to wear
again. (From $2,500, wardrobe.nyc)
PAC K ING O RDERS
TEXT, LIZ GUBER
W H A T T O B R I N G O N Y O U R N E X T V A C AY , N O M A T T E R W H E R E S U M M E R T A K E S Y O U .
THE SHOES San Francisco brand Allbirds,
best known for its ultra-comfortable and surprisingly stylish wool runners, is branching out—
literally. Its latest textile uses eucalyptus pulp to
create a breathable and cooling material. The
first style in this new range, the Skipper, riffs on
the classic boat shoe. ($135, allbirds.ca)
THE HAT The summer hats designed by L.A.
native Janessa Leoné are unlike any you’ve
ever seen before. Some of the handwoven
straw toppers feature dramatic cage detailing,
while others are practical for travel: You can
roll them up to put them in a suitcase and they
don’t crease. (From $460, janessaleone.com)
EVERYTHING ELSE Emilia Wickstead, a
London-based designer known for her ladylike
frocks, has just launched a resort capsule with
MATCHESFASHION.COM. The collection features high-necked swimsuits in retro floral prints
and airy dresses you can float in all summer.
(From $347, matchesfashion.com)
ELLECANADA.COM
23
STYLE
SLIP SERVICE
The trendiest ways to wear the slinky classic.
O FF - DU T Y
ON A D ATE
GIRLS NIGHT
Silk dress, Simone Pérèle
($239, simone-perele.com)
Polyester dress, River Island
($109, riverisland.com)
Silk dress, Rebecca Taylor
($670, rebeccataylor.com)
COACH
NDER
ALEXA
WANG
Acrylic, wool
and alpaca
vest, M.i.h
Jeans ($350,
at matches
fashion.com)
Cotton T-shirt,
Gap ($24.95,
gapcanada.ca)
Modal and silk scarf,
Nordstrom ($53,
nordstrom.com)
Leather sandals, Nine West
($130, ninewest.ca)
Cotton pants,
Zara ($22.90,
zara.com)
Leather and gold-plated-metal bracelet,
Miansai ($134, miansai.com)
H A N D - H E L D
Leather and suede, Ganni
($535, at mytheresa.com)
24 E L L E C A N A D A . C O M
Leather and denim, Paula Cademartori
($1,926, paulacademartori.com)
Faux leather, Poppy & Peonies
($99, poppyandpeonies.com)
Leather, Mackage ($382,
at shopbop.com)
Faux leather, Violet Ray ($52.60,
at Nordstrom, nordstrom.com)
STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)
Faux-leather sandals, Aldo
($90, aldoshoes.com)
18-karat-gold-plated-metal,
rhinestone and glass-bead
earrings, Nocturne ($230,
nocturne.co.uk)
Gold-plated-sterlingsilver and resin
necklace, Ejing
Zhang ($574,
ejingzhang.com)
NEW
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moisture barrier
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Exclusively in G.M. Collin spas.
Visit www.gmcollin.com to locate a spa near you.
STYLE
A PA I R A N D A S PA R E
MIU MIU
Whether you’re all about the drama or like to keep it
low-key, prepare to meet your sole mates.
Patent-leather booties, Acne
Studios ($760, at Holt
Renfrew, holtrenfrew.com)
Suede kitten heels, Winners
($100, winners.ca)
Zebra-calf-hair heels,
Michael Kors (price upon
request, michaelkors.com)
Leather heels,
Jimmy Choo
($1,447,
jimmychoo.com)
TIP
Pair this season’s
gladiator-glam
shoes with a denim
midi-skirt for a look
that packs some
unexpected edge.
Kid-leather
sandals, Christian
Louboutin ($2,575,
at Holt Renfrew,
holtrenfrew.com)
Leather slingbacks,
Yuul Yie ($490,
yuulyieshop.com)
CAGED HEELS
VALENTINO
Suede sneakers, Converse
($100, converse.ca)
Polyester and suede sneakers,
Ted Baker ($210, tedbaker.com)
S U M M E R Y SN E A KE R S
26
ELLECANADA.COM
Leather sneakers, Lacoste
($180, lacoste.com)
STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)
E
ALTUZARRA
ST YL
K IT TE N H E E L S
STYLE
STYLE
TIP
5
The excitement over
double rainbows
shouldn’t be reserved
for the natural phenom. Pair a standout
sweater or blazer
with equally vibrant
accessories and wait
for the “oohs” and
“aahs” to roll in.
7
DOLCE & GABBANA
THOM BROWNE
6
4
8
3
MISSONI
STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (BACKSTAGE)
9
2
R AINBOW
BRIGHT
Show your true colours this season.
1. Sequined pouch, Attico ($642, at mytheresa.com). 2. Sterling-silver
and enamel charm, Pandora ($50, pandora.net). 3. Georgette top,
Maram ($718, shop.maramparis.com). 4. Silk sandals, Pierre Hardy
($995, pierrehardy.com). 5. Polyester and zinc earrings, ASOS
($16.30, asos.com). 6. 14-karat-rose-gold, diamond, ruby, sapphire
and emerald necklace, EF Collection ($513.30, at shopbop.com).
7. Cotton top, Mira Mikati ($794, at farfetch.com). 8. Polyurethane
clutch, Topshop ($60, at Hudson’s Bay, thebay.com). 9. Cotton socks,
Happy Socks ($15.70, happysocks.com). 10. Textured-weave slides,
10
Loeffler Randall ($383, at shopbop.com).
1
ELLECANADA.COM
27
STYLE
SHAPE OF YOU
FASHION AND SHAPEWEAR’S relationship is as fickle as Justin and Selena’s. Women
concealed their corsets for centuries, revealed
them in the ’80s (thanks, Madonna and Gaultier)
and then all but abandoned them in the noughties
(thanks, athleisure). But if today’s runways are
any indication, shapewear in all its forms—from
belts that resemble waist cinchers to full-on corsets—is back, albeit with a different message.
For Tibi’s spring/summer 2018 collection, designer Amy Smilovic accented relaxed checked
suiting with wide contoured belts that hearkened
back to early-20th-century girdles—if girdles were
28
ELLECANADA.COM
made out of tinted PVC. The scooped-out waists
and heightened hips were a sharp contrast to the
easy, flowing pieces the New York label is known
for, and that was the point. “This opposition was
important to me,” says Smilovic. “The fundamental shift in attitude now is that if you want to shape
your body, you can. If you don’t, then don’t.” Still,
the designer was intrigued by the idea of turning
shapewear on its head. “I love taking something
with the rigid history of a corset, something that
was hidden, and bringing it to the forefront.”
Tibi wasn’t the only show with girded waists. At
Marni, Francesco Risso riffed on the fluid lines of
PHOTOGRAPHY, EMIL PABON (MODEL) & IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)
The runways have renewed their love affair with
waistlines, but what does it mean for our bodies? BY LIZ GUBER
TI B
I
A
AD
PR
IE
R
TH
IV
OL
SK
EY
EN
S
MU
E
GL
R
PR
OE
A
NZ
H
SC
OU
LE
R
UNDERGARMENT OR GOING-OUT TOP? THERE’S NO NEED TO DECIDE.
19th-century stays with panelled tops covered in
naive plaid and floral prints. Things took an edgier
turn at Mugler, where denim corsets carved out
models’ waists with taut seams. The look evoked
Wonder Woman levels of power, but still one
pondered how the models got any oxygen. The
takeaway: What was once hidden (unless you are
Madonna) is now front and centre.
Lauren Bitar, consultant at California-based
retail-strategy firm RetailNext, credits brands
like six-year-old Fleur du Mal with blurring the
lines between what you wear out and what you
wear underneath. One of the label’s stretchy black
bodysuits comes with tuxedo lapels that would pair
well with a pencil skirt, while another, enticingly
named the Satin Bullet, offers moulded cups and
contoured seams. Undergarment or going-out top?
There’s no need to decide.
When it comes to shopping for actual shapewear, and not just fashion that mimics it, the
millennial approach is different from previous generations’. “They want shapewear, but they want
to be comfortable and look natural,” says Liliana
Mann, founder of Rêve Rouge, a Toronto lingerie
boutique geared toward younger shoppers. “They
don’t want to look two sizes smaller. They don’t
like Spanx or even the word ‘Spanx.’” Instead, Rêve
Rouge carries cool-kid lines like Opaak, a German
brand that uses fabrics made from recycled materials. Opaak’s high-waisted panties offer the kind of
compression that’s subtle enough for daily wear,
but, unlike Bridget Jones’ famously frumpy datenight undies, they also look good peeking out above
the waistband of your Levi’s.
Fortnight, a Canadian brand carried at Rêve
Rouge, among other shops, specializes in highwaisted bottoms, jersey slips and bodysuits that
look like vintage lingerie but perform much like
shapewear. The line uses stretch and non-stretch
panels in strategic spots and breathable, moisturewicking nylon to create garments that are functional, not restrictive. “Thanks to beautiful tailored
fabrics, these pieces can be embraced, not thought
of as a layer of oppression,” says Fortnight’s owner
and designer, Christina Remenyi.
As our clothes become more and more casual,
these throwback details can feel downright novel.
Fledgling online brand Orseund Iris shot to Instafame when Bella Hadid was spotted wearing its
jersey corset over a white dress shirt. Thanks to
cheeky wiring that runs under the bust, the label’s
corsets are subversive and unapologetic rather than
constraining and secretive.
So, is it safe to declare that fashion has rebranded
shapewear as a beacon of body positivity? Not so
fast, says Bitar. “On one side, women are being open
and real about their bodies, but at the same time
we’re still torturing ourselves,” she says, pointing to
the persistent popularity of so-called waist trainers,
the corset-like cinchers that make dubious weightloss claims. On Instagram, posts with the hashtag
#waisttraining have almost hit one million, thanks
in part to the endorsement of a certain Kardashian.
“We’ve already been wearing corsets for hundreds
of years—I don’t know why they’re getting a highfive,” adds Bitar. After all, it’s just another case of
fashion prizing a narrow vision of beauty—literally.
If there’s one take on this trend that does deserve a high-five, it’s the Proenza Schouler outfit
donned by Tracee Ellis Ross at a luncheon earlier
this year. The actress wore a watermelon-hued
skirt set accented with a leather harness bra overtop. The look read as neither fashion victim nor
patriarchy dupe. “She’s owning her femininity
and power,” says Ross’ stylist Karla Welch. “In a
way, it’s like armour. It’s very Joan of Arc.” ■
ELLECANADA.COM
29
Presented by:
HP V Awareness
IT’S ALL ABOUT
CANCER PREVENTION
Tyler Puley, Dr. Vivien Brown, and Anubha Momin
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Photo: Max Rosenstein
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) globally,
and may be one of the most poorly understood by
the general public. Roughly 80 percent of sexually active adults will be exposed to the virus at
some point in their lives and it has been directly
implicated in the development of not only cervical cancers, but also other cancers including anal
cancer, penile cancer, and throat cancer. And,
because we have vaccines against HPV, we’re in a
strong position to help prevent these cancers if we
can successfully build awareness through a wellinformed conversation.
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recently hosted a Facebook Live event inviting
experts to talk about HPV awareness and prevention. Present on stage were Dr. Vivien Brown, Past
President of the Federation of Medical Women
of Canada (FMWC), sexual health advocate
Anubha Momin, and Tyler Puley, Co-Founder of
TEALPOWER, an awareness group focused on
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the event addressed some of the most common
questions about HPV and what we can do to help
reduce HPV-related cancers in Canada.
Taking a proactive approach
By helping prevent HPV through immunization, we have the ability to help prevent some
HPV-related cancers, and that’s a rare opportunity. “In this conversation surrounding HPV and
cancer, what’s so exciting is that it’s preventable,”
says Dr. Brown. “If I could give you a vaccine
to prevent colon cancer or breast cancer, we
wouldn’t be talking about sex or how you get the
cancer. We’d just say, ‘Sign me up.’”
Public immunization programs now exist
across Canada for both boys and girls beginning at the age of 9, but the vaccines are also
approved by Health Canada for men up to the age
of 26 (quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines) and
women up to the age of 45 (bivalent, quadrivalent,
and nonavalent vaccines).
Other ways to help prevent HPV include
limiting your number of sexual partners, using
condoms, and quitting smoking. Regular cervical
cancer screening (or Pap tests) is also important
to help catch abnormal cells before they develop
into cervical cancer.
cervical cancer, both the disease itself as well as
the treatment of the disease, is extremely scary
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tions like this are so important.”
Moving the conversation forward requires
taking control of our sexual health and talking
proactively about STIs like HPV. “Your sexual
health is a part of your overall health and wellbeing,” says Momin. “We should be talking about
it with our friends, holding each other accountable,
reducing stigma, and normalizing the process of
testing and vaccination.”
Canada forged a bold path last year by becomLQJWKH¿UVWFRXQWU\LQWKHZRUOGWRGHVLJQDWHD
national HPV Prevention Week, achieved through
the advocacy of FMWC and other committed
groups. The second annual prevention week is
coming up in October, but it’s never too early to
take a proactive approach to help reduce your risk.
This conversation can save lives
The fundamental truth is that these cancers can
kill both Canadian men and women, and awareness and education can help reduce HPV-related
cancers. Puley lost his partner, Alison Salinas,
to cervical cancer in 2015, and he’s committed
to raising awareness so that others may live.
“Watching someone you care about go through
7KLVDUWLFOHZDVPDGHSRVVLEOHWKURXJKWKHVXSSRUWRI0HUFN&DQDGD,QF7KHRSLQLRQVLQWKLVDUWLFOHDUHWKRVHRIWKHH[SHUWVIHDWXUHGDQGWKHDXWKRUDQGGRQRWQHFHVVDULO\UHÀHFWWKHYLHZVRI0HUFN&DQDGD,QF
TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, RILEY STEWART; STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; STYLING ASSISTANT, ENA DE ARMAS;
ORGANZA JACKET (SID NEIGUM), NYLON AND ELASTANE SPORTS BRA (NIKE) AND ORGANZA SHORTS (MARIE SAINT PIERRE)
Heather Ogden is at the
top of her game.
T R A C K I N G
T H E
B E S T
I N
M O V I E S ,
B O O K S ,
M U S I C
&
RADA
A R T
Multimedia ballet Frame by Frame
FUN FACT: Heather Ogden spends more time
training in one day than we’ve logged at the gym
all month. “We’re in the studio about six hours a
day,” the National Ballet of Canada principal dancer tells us during a rare break between pliés and
pas de deux. “There’s ballet class, where we train
and warm up, and then we split up for separate
rehearsals,” she says. “There are six different
blocks of rehearsals and an hour for lunch. In between, dancers will often fit in Pilates, and we have
a gym. In some ways, dancers look delicate, but
we’re strong; we’re athletes.”
We’re ready for a massage just listening to
Ogden’s schedule, but it’s no big deal for the
Toronto native. She has been dancing since she was
six, a member of the National Ballet since 1998
and a principal with the company since 2005.
Along the way, she has starred in countless shows,
from The Sleeping Beauty to The Nutcracker to
this summer’s groundbreaking Frame by Frame,
a multimedia collaboration with Canadian filmmaker Robert Lepage and Ogden’s husband,
Guillaume Côté, choreographic associate with the
National Ballet (and a crazy-talented dancer in
his own right). We spoke to Ogden shortly after
she and Côté returned from a family vacation in
Florida with their children, Emma Rose, three, and
Léo Jeffrey, one.
Please tell us you took some time off from training
during your holiday. [Laughs] “I did rest, for sure.
But I don’t want to stop moving completely. I
went swimming one day, and I went to the gym.
I’m so used to it. Movement in my body makes
me feel good. [But] we’d just finished a big season
with Sleeping Beauty—it’s mentally and physically tiring, so it’s healthy to take a little break.”
The mental side of performing must be as hard as
the physical. “There’s a higher level of focus. This
32
ELLECANADA.COM
is what we work for—the shows—so each
time, you want it to be the best you’ve ever
done it. Luckily, I don’t have a big problem
with nerves, which I’m super-grateful for.”
Do you have any pre-show superstitions? “When
I first joined the company, I used to have these
little good-luck charms—jewellery and a beautiful pillbox. It was silly. I was 17. Now I feel it’s
all about the warm-up. I find comfort and
calmness in being prepared. I like the process of
getting my makeup and hair done. I hate to be
rushed. I get into the studio early [to warm up].
If I need privacy, I’ll put earphones in and listen to
music—a workout mix if I want to get pumped up
or sometimes classical music.”
You kept dancing right into your second trimester
during your second pregnancy. That doesn’t happen a lot in ballet. “With my first child, I had
morning sickness and was much more cautious.
But with Léo, I had tons of energy. At three
months’ pregnant, I performed at the Lincoln
Center in New York and thought that that would
be my last show, but I still felt really good. A
month after that, we were doing a new piece of
choreography at the Art Gallery of Ontario, and
the choreographer was totally open to me dancing. If it had been traditional ballet onstage, I
wouldn’t have been dancing that far along.”
That sends such a good message. “I felt strong and
happy, so I thought, ‘Why don’t I try to continue?’
I was showing a bit. But people were like, ‘Why
should you hide it? It’s beautiful. You’re growing
another life.’”
The idea of the “ideal ballet body” is changing,
thanks to people like Misty Copeland [the American
ballet dancer who was told she was too muscular
to succeed]. Have you noticed that? “She’s definitely sending that message. If Misty had listened to
what people said, she would have just stopped
dancing. But she was strong enough [to keep
going]. I think these strong women we’re raising
are going to break a lot more barriers than we even
believe possible.”
Is that important for you—that the next generation
of dancers has a positive body image? “Yes, especially having a daughter—I always want to be careful with my words around her. [So, for example,
saying things like] ‘If you eat this, you’re going to
be strong like Moana [the Disney character].’ I’m
making sure her role models are strong, healthy
women. I feel it’s my job to show her that.” ■
PHOTOGRAPHY, DAVID LECLERC
RADAR
ON O U R
BO O K SH E L F
T H E PA G E S W E ’ V E
DEVOURED THIS MONTH...AND
YOU SHOULD TOO.
WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU LULULEMONS Sure, Andy had
the good cheekbones, but we’ve always been Team
Emily. (We’ll take an Hermès-wrapped cynic over an
apple-pie optimist any day.) Now Miranda Priestly’s
former number one is getting her own starring role in
this newest novel from The Devil Wears Prada author
Lauren Weisberger. Emily has long since left Runway
mag to become a Hollywood image consultant for
delinquent celebs. But at the ancient age of (gasp!)
36, she’s experiencing a career downturn. She may
get her second chance...in the suburbs of Connecticut
of all places.
THE FAVORITE SISTER Reality TV can get pretty ugly—
post-rose-ceremony mascara tears, anyone? But in the
latest thriller from Jessica Knoll, author of Luckiest
Girl Alive, it’s downright twisted. Brett and Kelly are
Type A sisters competing to be the next top entrepreneur on a show called Goal Diggers—until Brett, the
fan fave, turns up dead. This is a delicious nail-biter
but also a serious commentary on pop culture’s annoying penchant for playing women against one another.
THE MARS ROOM If you’re addicted to Orange Is the
New Black, prepare to be riveted by this gritty story.
Single mom Romy Hall is serving two consecutive
life sentences for killing her stalker, and she takes the
reader back and forth between her past—a neglected
childhood followed by drug use and sex work—and
the present. Rachel Kushner’s depiction of prison life
ranges from harrowing to humorous, and you’ll find
yourself feeling empathy for the inmates and rooting
for Romy to be given a second chance.
STILL WATER A shady little town, a mysterious disappearance and corrupt police: Amy Stuart’s follow-up
to her bestselling debut, Still Mine, has all the ingredients of a gripping whodunit. Sally Proulx and her young son are missing, and Clare has been hired to
find them. But when she starts asking questions, she realizes that nobody really
wants to answer them—at least not truthfully. Things go from iffy to threatening when she is forced to face a secret from her own past.
THE DEATH OF MRS. WESTAWAY One day, Hal receives a letter bequeathing her
a large inheritance from a grandmother she didn’t know existed. THE dream,
right? Well, there’s a snag: The letter wasn’t meant for her. But being a tarot
reader on a pier in an English seaside city doesn’t go far toward paying off the
dodgy loan sharks she owes, so Hal tries to get the inheritance anyway and ends
up knee-deep in the family secrets of the Westaways. Cue drama and intrigue,
complete with a creepy mansion, eccentric relatives and a menacing housekeeper.
YOU COULD WIN!
Head over to ELLECanada.com/books for
your chance to win one of four prize packs containing all of this month’s top picks.
RADAR
1) OCEAN’S 8
How do you make a good
franchise even better? Reboot it with an all-female
all-star cast. Sandra Bullock
steps into the Louboutins of
Debbie Ocean (sister to
George Clooney’s Danny)
to pull off a heist at the
Met Gala. The crew she
assembles also happens to
include your dream BFFs:
Cate Blanchett, Rihanna
and Mindy Kaling.
SEE, WATC H, GO
3 T I T L E S O N O U R
“ S U M M E R M U S T S ” L I S T
2) SWEETBITTER You don’t really need an excuse
to pour yourself a glass of wine and relax in front of the TV,
but this drama gives you the perfect one. The series, based
on Stephanie Danler’s page-turner and green-lit by Brad Pitt,
follows 22-year-old Tess (Ella Purnell), who lands a job at
one of New York’s scene-iest (yes, we made that a word)
restaurants just after moving to the city.
3) DEFYING CONVENTION
RIVERDALE’S
HAYLEY LAW IS
THE HAPPIEST
WORKAHOLIC
WE KNOW.
If we ever complain about being too busy, remind us about actress Hayley Law’s schedule. The Vancity native, 25, has been in the biz for two
years and already has two TV shows (notably, she plays Valerie on Riverdale), two movies and a music career on her resumé. When we spoke,
Law had just wrapped the fantasy film Spontaneous. After bidding farewell to the crew, she also made sure to say bye to…craft services? “I
did a little drive-through,” she says. “I’d never had devilled eggs before, and they are so good.” Here, we recap the first chapter of Law’s career.
JILL OF ALL TRADES Before making the leap to acting, Law “literally worked everywhere.” “There was a running joke when we were shooting
Riverdale. Whenever we went for dinner, they’d ask, ‘Hayley, do you work here? Have you worked here?’ But the weirdest job I had was working at
a deli. It was so not my thing.” SECOND TIME’S A CHARM Aside from a McDonald’s commercial, Riverdale was the first acting job Law ever
booked. “I was surprised. I thought it was only a two-episode thing, and they were like, ‘No, this is the real deal.’” NETFLIX STAR Shortly after, she
won the role of Lizzie Elliot on the sci-fi series Altered Carbon. (No spoilers—just watch it.) One of the best parts, she says, was working with showrunner Laeta Kalogridis. “[When I work with female producers and directors], as soon as I step on-set, there’s an instant ‘Hell ya’ connection.” SIDE
HUSTLE She also released an album, Hayleau, in 2016 and has been working on a follow-up to the synth-y R&B EP.
34
ELLECANADA.COM
TEXT, PATRICIA KAROUNOS; PHOTOGRAPHY, GRAY HAMNER (H. LAW)
This
summer, the Winnipeg Art Gallery is celebrating
women who redefined art in Canada. The exhibition
travels back to the Modernist period and features
30 groundbreakers—from Emily Carr to Marion
Nelson Hooker—who challenged gender roles.
P A R TY
in Pink!
T
B RA
LE
E
GIRLS’
NIGHT
OUT WINES’
C
E
TH
Y
10
R
N
A
IT’S A PINK
CELEBRATION!
NI
A
VERS
Grab your BFFs and join ELLE Canada as we
celebrate the 10th anniversary of Girls’ Night Out
Wines with manicures, makeup and hairdos! Indulge in ice
cream, birthday cake and a gourmet-candy bar by Kerr’s.
THURSDAY, JUNE 14 , 7–9 P.M.
‘1871’ BERKELEY CHURCH, 315 QUEEN STREET EAST, TORONTO
TICKETS: $40
DRESS CODE:
YOUR CUTEST PINK SUMMER DRESS
PRESENTED BY
ERT!
AUSE AL
GOOD-CYOUR PRE-LOVEDSORIES TO
DONATE GS AND ACCES RONTO®!
HANDBAOR SUCCESS TO rg
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DRESS F
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TO PURCHASE TICKETS, VISIT
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MUST BE LEGAL DRINKING AGE
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36
ELLECANADA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES/JUSTIN HOLLAR
CELEBRITY
OPEN BOOK
Author Zadie Smith is not the woman you assume her to be.
BY KEZIAH WEIR
ZADIE SMITH has an almost unsettling
lack of pretense. As she sits down across from
me at Lafayette in Manhattan’s NoHo (her
choice; she lives nearby), there’s no attempt at
small talk, no forced laughter just to fill space.
She’s reserved—blunt, even. We’re here to talk
about her new essay collection, Feel Free, but
as for doing press interviews, she says, “No
offence; I don’t think anyone relishes it.”
What’s disconcerting about this is that to
read Smith’s writing is to feel not only that you
know her but also that she knows you. It’s easy
to confuse her with the best friend you haven’t
yet met. She doesn’t use social media, yet
Instagram abounds with more than 21,000
posts hashtagged #zadiesmith by her ardent
fans: reposts of glamorous photo shoots, shots
of her novels nestled beside mugs of coffee.
Mention Smith’s name in a group conversation
and at least one person—often young, usually
female—will reverently breathe a variation of
“I love her.”
Smith has been busy since she first burst
onto the literary scene in 2000 at the age of 24
with her debut novel, White Teeth. Set in the
racially diverse North London neighbourhood
in which she grew up, it earned her titles like
“the face of multicultural Britain.” Then came
The Autograph Man in 2002, On Beauty in
2005, NW in 2012 and Swing Time in 2016.
For the past 10 years, Smith has been living
in New York as a self-described “immigrant
with a green card,” and while her fiction remains primarily concerned with London life,
in her essays—originally published in the likes
of The New York Review of Books and The
New Yorker—she has become an essential recorder and investigator of American life and
culture. In particular, “a lot of my subjects are
black artists,” she says. “It’s about inserting
myself and feeling this commonality in the
black artistic community in America.” The day
before our meeting, she was awarded the City
College of New York’s Langston Hughes h
ELLECANADA.COM
37
CELEBRITY
“I REALLY AM SUCH A GREEDY
PERSON FOR LIFE.
I DON’T HAVE TIME TO WASTE
PRETENDING TO BE ALIVE.”
Medal, joining such luminaries as Maya
Angelou and James Baldwin.
As suggested by the new collection’s title,
the essays of Feel Free are deliciously unhampered and far-reaching. A profile of comedy
duo Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele
(“Brother From Another Mother”) abuts musings on Joni Mitchell and questions of taste
(“Some Notes on Attunement”), and there is
the “Elegy for a Country’s Seasons” and a piece
called “On Optimism and Despair.” “Meet
Justin Bieber!” turns out to be about identity,
Socrates, a German-Jewish philosopher and,
yes, the Biebs himself, as he’s never been considered before. Blending the so-called high and
low, Smith renders lofty subjects accessible and
elevates pop culture to the divine. She is equally
comfortable employing personal narrative,
literary and artistic criticism, thoughtful interrogations on race and class and, often, chucklealoud humour: She writes of skim-reading Lady
Chatterley’s Lover, “leaping over paragraphs in
search of genitals.”
When we meet, Smith is wearing a long
grey Acne Studios coat and a grey turtleneck.
Her hair is swathed in a signature head wrap
(red, like her lipstick), and she drops a pair of
sunglasses on the table (red too). She knows
that her straightforward nature can be jarring:
It got her into trouble during the first writing
workshop she taught at New York University,
she says, back in 2010. She’d never taken a
workshop herself, so when she was told that
students would submit work and she would
38
ELLECANADA.COM
critique it, she figured it would be most informative to do so in front of the entire class. One
student cried.
And yet, as we talk, she cracks droll jokes
and makes offhand, unnervingly-spot-on observations about my own psyche. Her reticent
demeanour doesn’t inhibit her from being engaged and engaging—she simply hasn’t the
bandwidth to put on an act. She’s busy. She’s
on a year-long sabbatical from her teaching job
at NYU, but she still has books to read and
write—not to mention a seven-year-old daughter and a five-year-old son (who, this week,
gave her a case of pink eye), friends (among
them Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Lena
Dunham) and family (who are still based in
London). “I really am such a greedy person for
life,” she says. “I don’t have time to waste pretending to be alive.” And as far as being an
object of worship goes, “I can’t take seriously
any relationship apart from the personal,” she
says. “All love of strangers is not real to me.”
Born Sadie Smith in 1975 (she switched to
Zadie at the age of 14), she grew up on a public-housing estate in northwest London with
her Jamaican-born mother, Yvonne Bailey,
her British father, Harvey Smith, and her two
younger brothers, Luke and Ben. The local
library provided an escape from her parents’
arguing (they divorced when Smith was a
teen), as did her primary school, a cultural
melting pot that Smith describes as “a third
black, a third South Asian” plus the offspring
of middle-class “socialist white people.” In
Feel Free, Smith includes an appeal for the ap- Emmett Till and was shown at the Whitney
parently bygone era of embracing difference in Biennial—a contemporary-American-art exhi“Fences: A Brexit Diary.”
bition—in 2017. In an examination that touchSmith studied literature at King’s College, es on arguments both personal and rational,
Cambridge—in those days, attendance was free. Smith writes, “I realized I resent the implication
While there, she wrote a few music reviews and that black pain is so raw and so unprocessed—
a little short fiction, but it wasn’t until the end and black art practice so vulnerable and invisof her final year that she began writing what ible—that a single painting by a white woman
would become White Teeth. When she gradu- can radically influence it one way or another.”
ated, a publisher and Cambridge alum called,
For Smith, writing essays is a way of workasking what she was working on. Smith handed ing through big questions, but writing fiction
over the unfinished manuscript and landed a is a kind of creative voyeurism. “I get to be
two-book deal for a rumoured $450,000.
a young, handsome black man, climb into his
It was also at Cambridge that Smith met her skin and walk around,” she says. “It’s very
now husband, Northern Irish poet Nick Laird. freeing.” She has also been a Jewish-Chinese
Close readers might catch a sweet nod to him Londoner (The Autograph Man), a biracial
in White Teeth, when one character describes British assistant to a white Australian pop
to another “all the good-lookin’ men, all the star (Swing Time) and an adulterous white
rides like your man Nicky Laird.” Smith says American father (White Teeth, On Beauty).
they were just “best friends” at the time and Now, she’s working on a novel about a real-life
wouldn’t start dating for another few years, British highwayman in the late 1800s.
but, she adds, “I guess I was trying to flirt with
Smith has said before that she doesn’t parhim, even then.” Now the pair are working on ticularly like the process of writing, that she
adapting Swing Time for television. Her dream is often disappointed by the result. And yet
cast includes Ruth Negga and Gugu Mbatha- she persists. Before I can ask her why, Smith
Raw, but “every novelist in New York has a TV answers the question herself with the same
show,” she says. “I’m not going to get excited.” circuitous eloquence she employs in her esIn an era pervaded by hot takes and Twitter says: “There is a feeling in many people of
wars, Smith rarely toes the line when it comes transcendence,” she says. Before meeting
to the outrage du jour. She is not irritated, for me, for example, she went for a run by the
example, by questions about her children or Hudson River, the sun in her eyes and Kanye
marriage, though she was at one time. “I inter- West’s gospel song “Ultralight Beam” in her
nalized all things female as being in some way ears. That, she says, is one kind of transcenpassive or lesser. You only have to have children dence. There’s also organized religion: Islam,
to realize that that really is the biggest con the Christianity, Judaism. Smith has read the texts
world has ever projected.”
of all three faiths and thinks of them as comWhat does outrage her is “the
pelling philosophies of life. “I supstructural economic inequality of
pose if I thought of a metaphysical
black lives.” But even in discussions
element,” she says, “the ‘good’ to
of race and appropriation, her posme is basically what people mean by
itions can be surprising. In her essay
God: the existence of, the idea of,
“Getting In and Out,” Smith argues
good. I think of these philosophies
against a viral open letter calling for
as an enormous lake feeding into
the removal and destruction of Dana
this thing called the Good. Literature
Zadie Smith’s latest
Schutz’s painting Open Casket,
is also a tributary, a smaller one, in
collection of essays
which depicts the famous 1955 futhis lake. To participate in it is to be
is out now.
neral photograph of 14-year-old
close to God.” ■
ELLECANADA.COM
39
MONEY
WHAT TO
EXPECT
FINANCIALLY
WHEN YOU’RE
UNEXPECTEDLY
EXPECTING
+
For ELLE Canada editors’
saving hacks, head to
ELLECanada.com.
40
ELLECANADA.COM
from a reclusive long-lost uncle, but other months I barely
brought in enough to cover my rent. In other words, I felt
nowhere near financially ready for a baby.
I wasn’t emotionally ready either. I had breezed through
my 20s racking up degrees and job titles, operating under
the naive belief that I was too responsible and accomplished for any major life
I FOUND OUT I was unexpectedly pregnant the day event to catch me by surafter my 31st-birthday party. My boyfriend and I could still prise. Getting accidentally
measure our relationship in weeks, and I was living alone pregnant felt profoundly
in a sparsely furnished one-bedroom apartment in Calgary. careless, even though I had
I had just wrapped up a tumultuous first year of self- been totally careful. (PSA:
employment as a personal-finance blogger but had yet to The 2 percent failure rate
master the seemingly impossible task of issuing myself a of condoms is no joke.) The
regular paycheque. Even though I had money saved (obvs, magnitude of responsibilI follow my own advice), my monthly income was feast ity was crushing, as was
or famine. There were times when I earned enough that my the price tag. According
bank account looked like I’d received a small inheritance to Statistics Canada, the
PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS
How money expert
Bridget Casey budgeted
her way through a
surprise pregnancy.
average cost to raise a child from birth to age 18 is approximately $250,000, which made my sudden situation feel a
lot like being signed up for a mortgage while I was sleeping.
The upside to pregnancy is, unlike, say, covering a
broken dishwasher, you have nine months to save money
before your baby arrives. You can breathe a little easier
when you realize that you don’t have to buy maternitywear until your second trimester and your first daycare
bill won’t come due for a
while. While my body and years for the calm preparation of welcoming a little somemy future no longer be- one new. My lifestyle changed so much that even without
longed entirely to me, my putting any restrictions on my spending, money started
money still did—for now. accumulating in my bank account—one of the perks of a
And I had to make the boring social life, I guess.
most of it.
I set up a dedicated “baby fund” to capture that cash
Budgeting isn’t glamor- I was no longer spending. Every Monday, I transferred
ous, but when the unex- $50 from my chequing account to this fund. I still use it
pected strikes, the degree of to this day. It’s true that $50 won’t solve all your finanpredictability it provides is cial woes, but it can slowly but surely make a difference.
exactly what you need to Once my daughter was born, additional sources of instay sane. With the help of come, like the Canada child benefit, which is a monthly
friends, family and Google, payment from the government to Canadian families, and
I made a list of all the one- child support from my baby’s father, helped with my new
time purchases and month- expenses. (FYI: Canada.ca has a list of all the benefits and
ly costs that come with tax credits you’re entitled to as a parent.) Not having to
having a baby. I then rec- worry about paying my bills while trying to get the hang
onciled my income with my of motherhood (sleep deprivation, learning to breastfeed,
upcoming new expenses to all that good stuff) meant that my attention was focused
determine what I could af- where it was needed: on my baby.
ford and what I could save.
But my time off didn’t last long. Since I’m selfThankfully, drastic life employed, I really couldn’t afford to take more than a
changes often lead to drastic three-month maternity leave from my company. To make
spending changes. My wine the transition easier, I returned to work slowly, starting out
budget instantly became $0, with only three hours a day, two days a week. Between our
and exhaustion and nausea breastfeeding schedule and the parental separation anxiety
during pregnancy forced I battled in those early months, I physically couldn’t do
my dining-out budget to more. But as my daughter grew and I learned how to indwindle right after it. My tegrate work back into my life, it got progressively easier.
favourite stores didn’t carry Now, when my mom friends lament jumping back into
maternity clothes, so I didn’t 40-hour workweeks after a year off with their babies, I’m
even feel the urge to shop glad I had the luxury of rearranging my life around my
when I walked through a new role as a mother on my own time.
mall. Instead, I spent time
My daughter’s first birthday is rapidly approaching.
browsing online sales and Our days have now settled into a peaceful routine of work
seeking out consignment and play, and it’s hard to remember a time when I worried
stores, looking for a ward- whether I’d be able to make it. We don’t always get to
robe inexpensive enough to choose what happens to us, financially or otherwise, but
justify wearing it for only a we can control how we respond to it. My diligent budgetfew months. I quickly grew ing and planning paid off—and because of that I was able
accustomed to quiet nights to make unexpected parenthood part of my ordinary life.
in, trading the fast-paced It’s proven to be as expensive as promised, but it’s also
excitement of my childless turned out to be the best investment I’ve ever made. ■
3 WAYS T O
PREPARE YOUR
WAL L ET FOR T HE
UNEXPECT ED
ACTUALLY MAKE
A BUDGET Calculating the
money you have coming in
and going out is the easiest
way to sock money away, say
our experts. (There is literally
an app called You Need a
Budget—try it.) If you can, advises Casey, who runs the website Money After Graduation,
leave 5 to 10 percent of your
monthly budget unallocated.
“This is enough to capture
minor unexpected expenses
without your having to cut costs
elsewhere. Whatever you don’t
use, transfer to savings.”
IF YOU DON’T SEE IT,
YOU WON’T SPEND IT
“Automatic transfers are
your best friend,” says Dave
Nugent, chief investment officer
at Wealthsimple. “Having
an amount deposited in your
savings or investment account
means it just happens. You
don’t get to convince yourself
that you’ll contribute double
next month because you had to
chip in for that wedding gift.”
DON’T BOW TO
PEER PRESSURE Yes, it
sucks being the only one who
can’t blow $200 at Drake’s
new resto. But if you don’t have
the money, don’t spend it, and
be honest with your friends
about why, says Shannon Lee
Simmons, a certified financial
planner. “Let them know what’s
not going to happen for you
financially if you do [splurge]—
you won’t be able to put money
away toward your debt or a
vacation,” she says. “Then, ask
what else is possible.” You can
always join them for a Drakewatch post-dinner drink.
ELLECANADA.COM
41
RELATIONSHIP
STAND
BY ME
BY CASEY PLETT
TWELVE YEARS AFTER I BROKE UP with my
high-school girlfriend, Angela, I found myself in a forest
clearing wearing a black dress and bright-red lipstick and
officiating at a wedding. I was 29 and 100-percent bleach
blond, and six years had passed since I’d decided I was a
woman and started taking hormones to transition. I was
about to say “Love is always part of what we are doing
right.” For teenage me—a green-haired boy who hadn’t
quite figured out yet that he wasn’t a boy—all of this would
have been weird enough even without the fact that one of
the newlyweds-to-be standing in front of me was Angela.
Angela and I had the kind of
sweet and dramatic high-school romance you might find in a YA novel.
When we began dating, I was 16 and
she was 17. We were theatre kids in
a university town on the West Coast,
kissing in my stepdad’s old beater
car, exchanging instant messages,
watching old horror movies and
Buffy the Vampire Slayer episodes
and sneaking out after curfew to go to all-night diners.
Before I met her, I was cynical about love the way only a
teen can be and flat-out disillusioned about marriage. My
parents had divorced when I was four. I had zero memories
42
ELLECANADA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY, THE LICENSING PROJECT/PAUL FARNHAM (MAIN IMAGE) & GETTY IMAGES (ROSES)
The catharsis
of watching an
ex find love.
of my mom and dad together and lots of memories of
them apart and overworked, lonely and exhausted. It
seemed like the whole business had just caused them a lot
of misery. Marrying young, like them? Or marrying at all?
Not for this kid.
But Angela and I confided in each other, trusted each
other. She put makeup on me for the very first time while
we were sitting in a school hallway. (“Close your eyes,”
she said, studying my face intently as she applied eyeliner.)
I half-jokingly asked if I could put on her dresses; she said
yes, and I would wear them to school. Kids shouted and
jeered and asked her, “You’re okay with this?” And she replied, “He looks so pretty.” Later, in the quiet by the river
in a park, she told me about her history with depression,
and I told her I loved her. I was still sour on the idea of
marriage—of, like, hearts-and-flowers romance forever—
but Angela taught me that I could probably do love.
When we broke up after a year of dating, we stayed
friends. I got drunk at her house, brought her cheesecake
on her birthday. She burned me R.E.M. CDs. We made
banana pudding in the middle of the night and drove
around our neighbourhood, surprising insomniac friends
with dessert. A few months later, she came out to me. She
was in love with a girl. Two years later, I came out to her:
I wanted to be a girl, I said, and then spent the next few
years waffling about what to do about that. Through it all,
Angela and her then-new partner, the same person she’s
still with today, were always kind, so kind, in a way that
many people back then weren’t.
I moved east, and we fell out of touch in the years that
followed, but the scant times I went home, I always visited
Angela. Watching her relationship grow and seeing her
pull through her father’s disownment for her queerness,
raise an adopted child and finish school—all while living
with a supportive, loving partner—was calming for me,
a twentysomething transsexual who found commitment
so intimidating that she literally ran away from the last
stranger she hit it off with. It made me feel that stability
was possible, even if it felt a long way off for me.
Three years ago, on my way through town from a conference in California, I dropped in at their place to stay the
night. That’s when they told me they were having a commitment ceremony in honour of their 10-year anniversary:
Would I officiate it?
Any doubts I might have had were
quelled by the simple fact that Angela
had been there for me and I needed to
be there for her. And I believed in what
they had. By this point, I’d seen Angela
in this relationship for nearly a decade,
and in the frustrating way that ham-itup clichés prove real, I’d realized that
maybe marriage isn’t some eternal state
for cynics and romantics to respectively
disavow or lust after—maybe marriage
is just a special word for a love that’s
been around long enough to celebrate.
So that’s how I ended up in a black
dress in a forest. The wedding, at
Angela’s mom’s house in the country,
was relaxed and fun—the ceremony
was under 10 minutes and the food and
drink were limitless. Later, we danced
on the patio behind the house to
’80s music. Old friends from high
school showed up, including one
I’d lost post-transition and hadn’t
seen for years. We hugged it out
by the beer keg and the goat pen.
It was a beautiful night, and the
Casey Plett’s first
stars were out. All the guests slept
novel, Little Fish,
in tents on the lawn, and the next
is out now. She’s
also the author
day Angela and I said our nonof the short-story
tearful and very warm goodbyes.
collection A Safe
Girl to Love.
The distance between us means
we don’t see each other often. But
it’s only physical distance—I feel nothing
but tenderness for her and her partner.
It’s funny how people from your past
can bring out the better parts of you.
When I was younger, I thought my mom
and dad made a mistake in marrying:
They were “wrong” for each other and
should have married someone “right.”
Someone perfect. But, of course, perfect
partners don’t exist. Angela taught me that and also that I was
worthy of permanent love—or whatever you want to call
marriage. Today, when I fight with an ex or think about a
terrible date that ended in rejection, I remind myself of the two
of them in the forest, and I remember those words, “Love is
always part of what we are doing right,” and I believe in love
for myself too. ■
ELLECANADA.COM
43
PSYCHE
IT TOOK KRISTINE * about a year to realize
that something in her seemingly idyllic relationship
wasn’t quite right. She and her boyfriend had fallen
for each other over long days spent road-tripping
around Ontario. But, 10 months in, she started to
notice some red flags in how he approached the necessary tasks that come with keeping a relationship
on track. For one, he couldn’t plan ahead. “I rely
on you to be my calendar,” he’d tell her when she
would comment on his lack of initiative. And when
it came to making dinners together, all the details
were on her—from coming up with meals they both
liked to picking up groceries to remembering to take
the chicken out of the freezer in the morning. Her
boyfriend also relied on her to spend hours dissecting his emotional state, insisting he wanted to deal
with his increasingly serious depression on his own
instead of going to a therapist. He would turn every
conversation about their relationship, like whether
or not they should move in together, into one about
how discouraged he felt in his job or how he needed her help to get motivated. “I’d walk away and
think, ‘He hijacked that a little bit,’” says Kristine.
“I was eager to help, but I hadn’t noticed how much
our dynamic had changed. It was way more draining on me than I realized.”
Sound familiar? Maybe you’ve had this type of
BY KATHERINE LAIDLAW
exchange with a friend who asks what’s new and
then dumps on you for eons over cappuccinos or
with the co-worker who uses you as an armchair therapist, venting until long after your
other colleagues have gone home. Or perhaps your older brother always assumes you’ll
remember to pick up Mom’s birthday present and organize her party. If it happens once
or twice, you may not notice. It’s one thing for your best friend to make a conversation
all about her the morning after a breakup, but when that kind of behaviour repeats itself
over and over, it can start to wear on you.
There’s an actual term for this kind of mentally taxing feelings management: emotional labour. Coined in 1983 by sociologist Arlie Hochschild to describe jobs that require
you to put your feelings aside to get the job done (think flight attendants, nurses and
teachers), the term has gradually crossed over into our personal lives. Today, it’s often
used to describe the quiet mental work required to keep a relationship or household
humming—keeping track of when the laundry needs to be done or planning ahead to
ensure your mother-in-law gets her birthday card in the mail on time. Some call it “the
overhead of caring.”
Think of a flight attendant staying calm as a disgruntled passenger yells at her, or the
way you continue to rub your partner’s back and offer conciliatory murmurs an hour
into a rant about his or her boss, or even faking an orgasm to make your partner feel
LABOUR
OF
LOVE
44
ELLECANADA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE
Why women tend to carry the
emotional weight in relationships
—and what we can do about it.
better about his or her sexual performance. I’ve had partners say “All you have to do is
ask” when I’ve expressed frustration over always being the one to remember when the
dish soap is running low. But that’s the problem: Regularly having to delegate to someone
with less initiative is exhausting. It’s not the act of buying the soap—it’s the stress of being
the one who constantly has to think about it. And, spoiler alert, research tells us that this
kind of work is still largely, and most effectively, done by women.
In fact, a Canadian study that analyzed the satisfaction of nearly 2,000 heterosexual
couples in committed relationships, published this year in the Journal of Social and Personal
Relationships, found that women putting in the work made for a happier relationship
overall. But why should the onus be on us? Cultural expectations—you know, the antiquated male-breadwinner and female-homemaker roles we were assigned centuries ago—
are in part to blame, says the study’s co-author Rebecca Horne, a University of Toronto
psychology doctoral student in the Relationships and Well-Being Lab. “Traditional gender
norms frame women as nurturing and men as more independent and stoic.” Society and
tradition have conditioned men and women to act this way, she adds, with little evidence
to hold up the argument that women are just better, biologically, at feelings.
One thing is clear: This imbalance, no matter the type of relationship, can have consequences. Research is still evolving (as subjects go, emotional labour is relatively young) and results are mixed, but, of satisfaction from this gesture, consider whether there’s
according to a study in the Journal of Marriage and Family, another way he or she could help pick up the slack.
“One of the ways I get people to think about emotional
couples with an equal division of housework (which is inextricably linked with the emotional labour that keeps a labour is to consider their personal resources—we only
household running) report being more satisfied with their have so many resources available to us in a given week,”
sex lives. There’s also anecdotal evidence that women who says Christopher Shillington, a psychotherapist and clincarry more of the emotional load are more likely to cheat ical director of the Umbrella Mental Health Network in
on their partners out of resentment. Another study, done Toronto. And once they’re gone, you’re tapped. After a
by researchers at the Australian National University and tiring week at work managing your boss’s frustrations,
published in the Journal of Family Issues, looked at couples researching itinerary options for your upcoming romantic
raising children and found that female partners who gave vacation and coordinating a baby shower for your sismore than they received emotionally reported feeling less ter, maybe you just don’t have the emotional capacity to
loved. “If a woman perceives herself to be doing more than spend Sunday brunch listening to your friend complain
her husband, then that does seem to have a more negative about how stressed she is that her in-laws are coming to
town. And that’s okay.
outcome,” says Horne. “So it really is about equity.”
Often, resolving the problem is as easy as saying someHere’s another piece of this puzzle: Sometimes people
don’t even know when they’re making you do all the emo- thing—gently. “Frame it in a way that’s not all about astional heavy lifting. Margeaux Feldman, a Toronto-based serting boundaries for yourself but about asking your loved
writer and Ph.D. student, recalls being subjected to an one what their boundaries are,” says Shillington. When
avalanche of emotion from her roommate every time she Feldman and her roomie hashed it out, he surprised her
asked him how his day went. “I wouldn’t realize until the by telling her she was right. “He realized he needed more
next day that the reason I was feeling so awful was because support in his life beyond just me,” she says.
As for Kristine, after months of enduring her boyfriend
we didn’t talk about me at all,” she says. She eventually
started to dread coming home to play supporting character saying he didn’t have the capacity to schedule plans, pick
to whatever drama was going on in his life. “It’s weird to up groceries once in a while or ask her how she was feeling
have a conversation about emotional labour because you once he’d unloaded on her, she decided enough was
tend to fall into certain routines after time,” agrees Horne. enough. They broke up, and now he’s on a waiting list to
“Sometimes you don’t really realize you have competing see a therapist. For her part, in her next relationship, she
plans to take note of these imbalances earlier. “We all have
goals or expectations until you’re in a conflict scenario.”
So how do we break the cycle? First, consider whether our strengths. Some people are more organized, and some
you’re giving more than you’re getting—and if it both- people can’t cook,” she says. “In a perfect world, it would
ers you. For some, reducing emotion work means losing be finding each other’s interests and building off that and
a sense of purpose that comes with caring for others. If setting boundaries. It’s hard to stop and think about it
you find yourself complaining about making your partner’s when things are going so great, but you have to.” ■
lunch but you won’t stop doing it because you think “I
can do it better if I just do it myself” or you get a spark *Name has been changed.
ELLECANADA.COM
45
extra
JUNE 2018
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up with an energized-looking
complexion. nivea.ca
Reimagined by the likes of Prada and
Louis Vuitton, shorts have emerged as the
season’s high-fashion must-have.
47
J U N E
FASHIO
PHOTOGRAPHY, BENJAMIN KANAREK; COTTON SHIRT AND SHORTS, STRETCH-COTTON SOCKS AND LEATHER SNEAKERS (PRADA)
FANCY PANTS
2 018
Summer’s seminal piece, refined.
SHORT STORY
PHOTOGRAPHY BENJAMIN KANAREK STYLING VÉRONIQUE DELISLE
FASHION DIRECTION ANTHONY MITROPOULOS ART DIRECTION JED TALLO
Polyester jacket
and shorts (Alice
and Olivia), suede
pumps (Manolo
Blahnik) and leather
bag (Saint Laurent,
at ssense.com)
Cotton, linen and sequin
jacket and acetate and
rayon Bermuda shorts
(Michael Kors Collection),
cotton camisole (AllSaints,
at Hudson’s Bay) and
leather sandals (Versace)
Wool blazer, silkorganza shirt and knitcotton shorts (Kenzo),
leather shoes (Nina
Ricci) and leather bag
(Off-White c/o Virgil
Abloh, at ssense.com)
Lace top, wool
Bermuda shorts and
feather boa (Nina
Ricci), leather sandals
(Manolo Blahnik) and
leather bag (Prada,
at ssense.com)
Cotton and satin shirt
(Alexander Wang, at
ssense.com), suede
shorts (Valentino),
leather mules (Rochas)
and smartphone
(Huawei P20)
Silk shirt, acetate,
polyamide and
elastane vest, silk
shorts and leather
sneakers (Louis Vuitton)
Viscose jacket, metallic top
and gabardine shorts (Tom
Ford) and leather sandals
(Versace). For details, see
Shopping Guide. Model,
Pauline Hoarau (The Society
Management); makeup,
Fanny Maurer (Backstage
Agency/Clarins France); hair,
Tomoko Ohama (Calliste
Agency); photographer’s
assistant, Claudia Wagner;
makeup assistant, Julie
Hoyez; styling assistant, JeanLuc Favre. Special thanks to
Hôtel du Collectionneur in
Paris (hotelducollectionneur.
com), dog trainer Moise
Soussi and Huawei Canada.
Silk and sequin dress
(Johanna Ortiz) and
Swarovski-crystal
earrings (Jennifer Behr)
Imbue your look with retro-sweet florals.
SECRET GARDEN
PHOTOGRAPHY NELSON SIMONEAU STYLING VÉRONIQUE DELISLE
FASHION DIRECTION ANTHONY MITROPOULOS ART DIRECTION JED TALLO
Satin dress (Mary
Katrantzou)
Polyester-chiffon top
(Zimmermann) and silk
scarf (Hermès)
Bathing-suit top (Diane
von Furstenberg), silk
shirt (Johanna Ortiz), silkjacquard shorts (Krizia)
and acrylic earrings
(Oscar de la Renta)
Viscose and cotton dress
and crystal and metal
earrings (Marni)
Linen jacket and pants
(Max Mara) and cotton
bra (Natasha Zinko)
Sequin bra top and shorts
(Dolce & Gabbana)
Silk dress and
beaded cotton and
silk collar (Rochas)
Satin-crepe top and
skirt and leather and
metal pumps (Proenza
Schouler). For details,
see Shopping Guide.
Model, Mélodie
Vaxelaire (Elite Paris);
makeup, Anne Caroline
Ayot (Agence Aurelien/
Pat McGrath Labs); hair,
Tobias Sagner (Calliste
Agency); photographer’s
assistants, Margaux
Jouanneau and Jérôme
Vivet; styling assistant,
Jean-Luc Favre
NEW
WAKE UP TO ENERGIZED AND
YOUNGER-LOOKING SKIN.
UNIQUE FORMULA
POWERFUL Q10 + PURE VITAMIN C
REJUVENATE THE LOOK OF SKIN OVERNIGHT
NIVEA.ca
BO
G U I D E
C O U N T E R - C U LT U R E
N E E D - T O - K N O W
YO U R
BEAUT
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PHOTOGRAPHY, MAX ABADIAN
So you’ve neglected
everything from the
neck down for the past
six months? Free
yourself from the layers
of warm clothing
and read on.
ELLECANADA.COM
69
BEAUTY
Charli Howard in one
of her Instagram photos
2
WRITER ANDREA KARR’S CELLULITE
BOTHERED HER ENOUGH TO TRY THIS
NEW-TO-CANADA PROCEDURE.
DY
CELLULITE IS a touchy subject. While
SP
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IAL
I don’t think women should be told
their bodies need fixing, I do believe we have the right to change
what we don’t like—and in my
case, that includes the dimples
on my butt and thighs. So
when I hear about Cellfina,
a minimally invasive in-office procedure approved by
Health Canada in mid-2017,
I have no qualms about trying
it. The treatment is purportedly
different from anything else on
the market because it works by snipping the fibrous septae, a.k.a. the bands
that tether skin to connective tissue—like pins
in a tufted couch. These bands create the dimples
that affect 95 percent of women but appear to
serve no other purpose. To start the procedure,
Dr. Mark Lupin, a Victoria-based dermatologist,
circles about 40 of my dimples with a marker. He
then suctions sections of my flesh and injects each
with anaesthetic. (This is the most painful part.)
Once I’m numb, he punctures each divot and uses
a micro-blade to sever the fibrous septae. Though
this sounds dramatic, I can barely feel it. The
whole procedure, which costs $4,000 to $6,000,
takes about an hour, and typically only one visit
is required. I spend the next two days horizontal
and wearing a diaper in case of anaesthetic leakage (glamorous, I know); the bruising and minor
discomfort that follow last for three weeks, though
I was warned that it could be four to six. A few
months later, my cellulite looks about 50-percent
less obvious, although I may see more improvement for up to a year as the collagen rebuilds. Because the treatment is so new, the current research
shows that the results last for up to three years, and
four-year data will soon be available. My dimpling
isn’t totally gone, but I knew Cellfina wouldn’t be
a cure-all. Sure, perfection would be nice, but it’s
really about happiness, as Lupin told me, and
that’s one goal I’ve achieved…at least as far as my
butt is concerned.
WAVY,
BABY
Two women
on their relationships
with cellulite.
1
CURVE MODEL AND MISFIT AUTHOR CHARLI
HOWARD DOES NOT WANT TO BE CALLED
“BRAVE” FOR POSTING PHOTOS OF HERSELF
WITH VISIBLE CELLULITE.
“IT’S VERY HARD to love your body in a society
that tells you lumps and bumps are wrong—especially
in the industry I’m in. It can be a bit overwhelming to be
around super-tiny people all the time, but I can honestly
tell you from experience that no one is perfect. When I was
a straight-size model, I’d always hide and turn my back to
the stylist on set. Cellulite was the hardest thing to learn
to love about myself. But I’d rather not live my life looking back and thinking ‘Oh, God, I didn’t wear a swimsuit or go to the beach because I was scared that people
were looking at my cellulite.’ I don’t want to wake up in
50 years and think ‘I wish I hadn’t spent time worrying
about that.’ When people call me brave for posting Instagram photos showing my cellulite, I just think, ‘How can
you be brave for something that’s normal?’ I’m just posting
what every woman has but that they’re expected to hide.
I believe that women should do what makes them feel
good. As a feminist, I think people should represent themselves however they want to, and if using creams and treatments to get rid of cellulite is your thing, then go for it.
It’s about acceptance; women shouldn’t beat each other up
for having it or not. There’s more to life than cellulite.”
AS TOLD TO VICTORIA DIPLACIDO
70
ELLECANADA.COM
TEXT, VICTORIA DIPLACIDO, WITH FILES FROM ANDREA KARR; PHOTOGRAPHY, BEN RITTER (C. HOWARD/@CHARLIHOWARD), GEOFFREY ROSS (NUBODY SKIN TONING DEVICE) & GETTY IMAGES (MODEL)
BO
NuBody Skin Toning Device
($500, mynuface.com)
O TH E R O PTI O N S
Dr. Michael S. Kaminer, one
of the creators of Cellfina,
began developing the procedure partly because of his
observations after performing
liposuction on patients. “Even
when we removed the fat, the
cellulite didn’t get better,” he
says, because it did not affect
the fibrous bands creating the
dimples. (Which is a good reminder that cellulite can appear
on all body sizes.) Sculptra, a
type of filler, can be injected
beneath hollows to smooth skin
for up to two years. Cellulite
can look less noticeable after
skin-tightening treatments,
whether with at-home devices,
like the micro-current-based
NuBody, or professionalstrength options, like the
ultrasound-based Ultherapy
or the new radio-frequency
device Thermage FLX. At
Toronto’s Clarity Medspa, a
treatment called Exilis, which
uses both radio frequency and
ultrasound simultaneously, can
be combined with massage
cupping to stimulate lymphatic
drainage, which improves the
appearance of skin. Just manage your expectations with
these less-invasive options.
S M O O T H
A WO R D
ON B U TT
MAS KS
(AS SEEN ON
INSTAGRAM)
IF YOUR MAIN CONCERN IS ACNE-LIKE BUMPS
(WHICH, IN THAT REGION, ARE USUALLY CAUSED BY
INFLAMMATION AROUND A HAIR FOLLICLE), A LEAVEON PRODUCT, LIKE A TONER OR SERUM, CONTAINING
GLYCOLIC OR SALICYLIC ACID WOULD BE AN
EFFECTIVE SHORT-TERM FIX, SAYS DR. JULIA CARROLL,
A TORONTO-BASED DERMATOLOGIST. BUT IF YOU’RE
INTENT ON MASKING FOR THE ’GRAM, A REGULAR
CLARIFYING FACE MASK WILL DO THE TRICK. (SHOULD
THE PROBLEM CONTINUE, SEE A DERM.)
O P E R A T O R
Here’s a category for which there’s covert, pent-up demand:
anti-chafing products. Case in point: When Megababe
Thigh Rescue Anti-Chafe Stick ($25, at geebeauty.ca)
launched last summer, it sold out within the week. The
soothing aloe and pomegranate-seed-extract formula—now
back in stock and available in Canada—isn’t sticky and
comes in packaging that’s good-looking enough to display. h
ELLECANADA.COM
71
BEAUTY
BO
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YOU’RE
SO VEIN
You can usually
the advent of enleave them be.
dovenous treatIt’s not necessary
ments—treating
to treat varicose
the veins from
veins most of the
the inside rathtime, says Dr. John Harlock, a vascular surgeon er than from the outside with surgery,” says
at McMaster University and a partner at the Harlock. These include endovenous laser therHamilton Vein Institute in Ontario. Veins ap- apy (EVLT) and endovenous radio-frequency
pear when the one-way valves allowing blood closure. The latest and least invasive options
to flow up toward the heart weaken, forcing include endovenous sealing, which uses a kind
it to return downward. “I tell people they are of medical glue (like VenaSeal), and foam injecfighting gravity,” he says. For most people, the tions (like Varithena and ClariVein). Because
complaints are cosmetic, he adds, although vari- they are not heat-based, these require less local
cose veins can cause symptoms like achiness, anaesthetic—ideal for the needle-averse. Note:
itchiness and feelings of fatigue in the legs. But Saskatchewan is the only province that covers
if there is pronounced swelling or skin changes, EVLT, and private insurers rarely do, so most
patients pay for treatments out of pocket, says
head to a doctor.
Women are more likely to develop varicose Harlock. Pricing varies, but, on average, these
veins. (Sorry.) Pregnancy will make them worse, treatments cost from $3,000 to $4,000.
Compression socks—wear them.
and genetics, being on one’s feet a lot
Harlock calls them the “mainstay”
(say, for work), obesity and age
of any vein treatment; wearing
are also factors.
N A M E
them continuously for 48 hours
Invasive treatments aren’t
C H E C K
post-procedure and then only
your only option. “The
Varicose veins are larger than
during the day for two weeks
main advancement over
three millimetres in diametre,
may help prevent recurrence.
the past few years has been
reticular veins are one to three
millimetres and “spider” veins
(telangiectasias) are less than
one millimetre.
I C Y M I :
# G L I T T E R S T R E T C H M A R K S
Instagram artist Sara Shakeel uses Photoshop to overlay glitter and other
sparkling motifs on stretch marks, and we can’t get enough. Since trying
to recreate this IRL—applying glitter neatly to your body and getting it to
actually stay there—might be somewhat of a Sisyphean task, try French
Girl Lumière Rose Dorée Body Oil ($60, frenchgirlorganics.com) for
similar joyous sparkle but with more hydration and less mess.
72
ELLECANADA.COM
TEXT, VICTORIA DIPLACIDO; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS & BATH SALTS) & GETTY IMAGES (MODEL)
The deal with visible veins.
MISSED
AN ISSUE?
T H E J O Y O F A PR O FE S S I O N A L BODY SCRUB
Having someone else exfoliate your body is, admittedly, indulgent—but there’s
nothing better for your skin, particularly post-winter. After being scrubbed within an inch of my life at a bare-bones hammam in Istanbul a few years ago, I
felt smoother, yes, but also somehow physically lighter, like I’d shed a layer of
skin. (And, uh, I probably had.) At home in Toronto, I make a biannual trip to
the Miraj Hammam Spa, which offers traditional hammam treatments as well
as body scrubs and wraps from Caudalie. When I leave, my entire body feels
softer than a baby’s foot. VICTORIA DIPLACIDO
KEEP THE GLOW
GOING WITH:
1. Aveeno Positively Radiant
Dark Spot Corrector Body Cream
($14.50, at drugstores and massmarket retailers), featuring a patented soy complex that uses soybean
protein to improve discoloration.
2. Dr. Barbara Sturm Anti-Aging
Body Cream ($140, at geebeauty.
ca), which is full of olive-oil-derived
squalane to protect the skin barrier
and antioxidant-rich purslane (a
leafy-green succulent) to ward off
damage from free radicals.
3. James Read Self Tan Fool Proof
Bronzing Mousse Face & Body
($32, at one2oneonline.com), an
easy way to self-tan. Shower off any
oils or rich creams before you apply
as they can cause streaks. ■
ELLECANADA.COM
73
GET CAUGHT UP TODAY,
AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY
FROM THE
ELLE CANADA STORE.
Visit ELLECanada.com/store
BODY
BO
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EC
WING SZE TANG
HEAD STRONG
74
ELLECANADA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY,DEREK KETTELA / TRUNK ARCHIVE
IAL
To clinch your
fitness goals, you
have to win the
mind game. BY
WHEN I STARTED RUNNING , I had a
classic case of imposter syndrome: I was a health
editor without an athletic bone in my body. In my
search for a workout I could at least tolerate, I got
on the treadmill. At first I could only manage “1
and 1s”: running for a minute and walking for a
minute to recover—repeating ’til tired. It didn’t
take long.
So when my personal trainer at the time floated the far-fetched idea of signing up for a race, I
thought, “I couldn’t possibly.” But I did. Four
months later, I ran my first 10K. Two years after
that, when a friend asked if I wanted to try a
marathon (that’s 42.2 kilometres—or about 105
laps of your standard high-school track), my
knee-jerk reaction was “No freaking way.” But I
did. It took an agonizing four hours and 25 minutes to finish.
Eventually, when I’d improved my running
enough to wonder if I could ever, maybe in my wildest dreams, qualify for the Boston Marathon—a
holy-grail race that only 10 percent of marathoners
are fast enough to get into—I thought, “How?!”
But I did. As I write this, I’m two weeks away from
that Boston start line.
Every step of the way, I doubted myself, I
struggled, I failed. Still, I kept going because I’m
stubborn, and gradually I came to change my
mind. I wouldn’t have achieved any of those goals
if I hadn’t believed I could—but exactly how our
mental game sets our own physical limits is a lot
more complicated than having a cheesy mantra.
Even the fittest people on
earth—the elite athletes who
spend their whole lives honing
their bodies—prioritize getting into the right headspace.
“We worked with a mentalprep coach, who was with us
throughout the [2018 Olympic
Winter] Games and almost every moment leading into the final event; he gave us cues to just
stay focused, present and connected,” says Tessa
Virtue, Canada’s ice queen, who’d already trained
for 20 years with skating partner Scott Moir by
that point. The payoff: two gold medals.
In our pursuit of physical feats, our mindset
matters—but exactly how much is, surprisingly,
still up for debate. Alex Hutchinson, former longdistance runner for the Canadian national team
and author of the new book Endure: Mind, Body,
and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human
Performance, describes the brain’s role in endurance as “perhaps the single most controversial
topic in sports science.” He points out that in the
traditional “body as machine” view, it is thought
that the body sets our limits and the brain simply
determines how close we can get to them.
But in the late ’90s, Tim Noakes, one of the
world’s most influential (and radical) sports scientists, put forward a groundbreaking concept
known as the “central governor” theory, which
holds that the brain reigns supreme: It alone dictates the seemingly physical limits we feel during a
long bout of exercise. What’s more, says Noakes,
our mind always wants to quit before our body
runs out of gas—it’s the brain’s way of protecting us from pushing too far and risking physical
harm. More bluntly, he believes that fatigue is
actually an emotion. Under his theory, when my
exhausted legs are begging me to slow down or
give up during the last hour of a marathon, it’s
not because my heart can’t go on or my muscles
have no more glycogen (the fuel they need to
keep working) and I’m about to keel over. Rather,
my mind’s messing with me, making me despair.
According to Noakes, our feelings of fatigue are
illusory and they develop “largely independent of
the real biological state of the athlete,” he wrote in
a paper for the journal Frontiers in Physiology. h
OUR MIND ALWAYS WANTS
TO QUIT BEFORE OUR
BODY RUNS OUT OF GAS.
ELLECANADA.COM
75
BODY
To support his case, he points to the so-called “end Hendrickson, who set the American record at eight
spurt”—our tendency to suddenly pick up the pace minutes and 35 seconds. “He says he hits what
as we near the finish line, when we should be at our feels like his limit a little after four minutes,” says
Hutchinson. “His breathing muscles start contractmost physically depleted.
Illusion or not, fatigue feels pretty damned real ing involuntarily, and his body thinks he’s done.
when every fibre of your being is screaming at you But he has learned that he can keep his mouth
to stop. There have been many races where I’ve shut—it’s uncomfortable, but he can ignore it.
fallen short of my goals because my mental game That, to me, is such a great illustration of warning
was shaky—when I’ve caved to the urge to slow or signs versus stop signs.”
Of course, there are times when we should liswalk—and as I psych myself up to face Boston’s
legendarily tough course (when there’s a climb ten to our body’s limits and heed the stop signs:
No amount of fortitude and will
called Heartbreak Hill, you know
to persist will help if, say, you’ve
it’s hard), I need to figure out how
MUSICAL MANTRAS
fractured your foot. “Pushing
to get my head right.
THAT GET ELLE
through a mental block or finWhen people underperform
EDITORS THROUGH
ishing off a set past the point of
on game day as a result of their
THE TOUGHEST
initial muscle fatigue is how you
mindset, it’s because “they can’t
WORKOUTS
grow beyond plateaus,” says Mia
regulate the emotion or stress
Nikolajev, a Toronto-based cerwhen they’re challenged [and
tified personal trainer, strength
things start going wrong]—they’re
and conditioning specialist and
overwhelmed,” explains Peter
founder of BodyMorphology.
K. Papadogiannis, psychology
“It’s okay to work out through
lecturer at York University and
sore muscles. But the standard of
sports-psychology team director
“STRONGER” BY
‘No pain, no gain’ comes with a
for the Toronto Marathon. “Their
KANYE WEST
caveat. Torn tissues or joint aches
self-talk changes: ‘I can’t do it,’ ‘I
“N-now th-that that don’t kill me /
and injuries feel very different
don’t see how I’m going to come
Can only make me stronger /
from the average soreness after
back.’ They let external and inI need you to hurry up now /
a tough training session. If your
ternal distractions take control
’Cause I can’t wait much longer”
brain is sending warnings—pain,
of them.” When we’re physically
inflammation, alarm bells—rest
taxed, we lean even more heavily
or even a checkup may be waron our mental skills to keep goranted.” If, however, your first
ing, he adds, but, like with any
thought is “This is hard” yet you
muscle, we need to train our
know you’re totally fine, then
mind. Learning to breathe easy—
push through, adds Nikolajev.
slowly and deeply, as a technique
“THE GREATEST” BY SIA
As we chase new fitness goals,
for staying relaxed—and visual“Uh-oh, running out of breath,
our sense of effort is the final arbiizing how you want to perform
but I / Oh, I, I got stamina … /
ter; it’s what matters, explains
(pre-race and during) are just two
Don’t give up, I won’t give up /
Hutchinson. Of course, physiostrategies that can go a long way.
Don’t give up, no no no”
logical factors like our heart rate or
Hutchinson argues that our
levels of lactate (what creates that
physical limits are not as immutmuscle-burning sensation) count
able as they may seem. While
too—but they don’t directly limit
researching Endure, what surus. Rather, they only limit us by
prised him most were the feats of
contributing to our subjective sense
freedivers—people who can hold
of effort, says Hutchinson. And
their breath for “totally mind“DOG DAYS ARE OVER” BY
there are ways to make hard things
boggling” periods of time underFLORENCE + THE MACHINE
seem easier—by changing our inwater (the current world record is
“Run fast for your mother run fast for
ternal monologue with positive
11 minutes and 35 seconds) withyour father / Run for your children
for your sisters and brothers”
self-talk, for instance.
out scuba gear. He cites Brandon
76
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“That trickery has real effects,” says Hutchinson. “We’ve
changed our perceived sense of effort, and in doing so, we’ve
changed how fast or far we can go and whether we’re able to
continue or not.” This may sound too-good-to-be-true simple,
but I’m reminded of the first marathon I ran without falling apart
midway: As I clicked off each kilometre, I kept reminding myself
that I actually felt okay, that I’d suffered worse during the most
gruelling training sessions (and survived) and that my goal was
within reach. I had Kanye’s “Stronger” on my playlist and repeated “This is what you came for” in my head. It worked. “The
evidence tells us that self-talk makes a measurable and quantifiable difference to endurance,” confirms Hutchinson.
To perform your best under pressure, you need to train your
brain, says Hutchinson, and there are opportunities in everyday
life to practise. If, say, you’re obliterated from a long day at the
office, don’t bail on your workout—consider it an exercise in
pushing through the mental fatigue.
I have no idea how I’ll do on Boston’s Heartbreak Hill, but
I’ve come a long way—and I have to believe that what has
gotten me to this start line (body, mind, super-stubbornness)
will carry me all the way to the finish. ■
GEAR U P
KEEP YOUR
M I N D O N W H AT
M AT T E R S — Y O U R
TRAINING—WITH
FITNESS PICKS
T H AT C O V E R
YOUR BASES.
Stash N’ Run Bra,
Lululemon ($64, lululemon.
com) This running bra’s genius
double layer creates two front
pockets (for tucking cash or
energy gels).
Wing successfully completed the Boston Marathon—not that
we ever doubted her!
HOW TO MAKE CR AZYAMBITIOUS GOAL S DOABLE
FRE E YO U R M I N D WITH TH ES E TI PS FROM
M I A N I KO L A J EV, TO RO NTO - B A S E D
CE RTI FI E D PE RSO N A L TR A I N E R A N D
FOU N DE R O F BO DYMO RPH O LOGY.
REFRAME YOUR GOALS. Nikolajev nudges clients to think SMART—a goalsetting acronym that stands for specific, measurable, achievable, relevant (“What’s
your ‘why’ or motivation?”) and time-bound (set a deadline). Instead of, say, vaguely
aspiring to look like Karlie Kloss, your starter goal could be working up to running
for 30 minutes non-stop by the end of summer to improve your overall cardio. LAY
OUT A PLAN. Once you’ve decided on your priorities, commit to an actionable
step-by-step. “When we see something with an end point, it’s a lot more approachable and doable,” says Nikolajev. MAKE IT ROUTINE. Willpower sounds mighty,
but it’s fickle. Habits seem boring, but they work. “If you’ve established two or three
things you do every day, you will look like you have willpower. It’s not willpower—you
may not want to do it, you have no energy to do it, but you’re still going to do it
because that’s the habit you’ve bred into your day.” BE KINDER TO YOURSELF.
If you’re bummed because your body doesn’t look like it used to, know that hormonal changes (priming you for the child-bearing years and, later, menopause)
happen to us all, says Nikolajev. “I try to remind women that they can find a place
of loving self-acceptance and still want to be better.” Having gratitude for who you
are now will enable you to make progress with “greater ease, joy and speed.”
Vichy Idéal Soleil Sport
Ultra-Light Refreshing Lotion
SPF 60 ($29.95, vichy.ca)
This sweat-resistant sunscreen
provides high protection without a
goopy finish or white cast.
Session Shorts, Tracksmith
($74, tracksmith.com) These
are made of a cool Italian knit
and sport a speedy hare (the
label’s spirit animal).
Adizero Boston 6, Adidas
($150, adidas.ca)
A lightweight and comfy shoe,
this is made for zippy
workouts and races.
ELLECANADA.COM
77
BALMAIN
BEAUTY
L’Oréal Paris Age
Perfect Cell Renewal
Rosy Tone Cream
($36). For details, see
Shopping Guide.
T H E C ROW N
Love Beauty
and Planet
Volume
and Bounty
Shampoo
and
Conditioner
($9 each)
SH CYCLE
Three
reasons why new
hair-care line Love Beauty
and Planet is the real deal when it
comes to lessening our environmental
impact: 1. Instead of clinging to hair, the conditioners
were formulated to “shatter” when wet, washing away on
average 10 seconds faster than other products—
saving you about a wine bottle’s worth of water per shower.
2. Hair-care labels are designed to withstand humidity in the
shower, but if they don’t peel off cleanly when it comes time to
recycle, that bottle goes to a landfill. The brand consulted with
North American recycling plants to design a compatible glue
so that no bottle gets left behind. 3. Even the fragrance
notes were mindfully sourced: Ingredient suppliers were
tasked with refining their farming and distillation
methods so they could produce betterquality essential oils and reduce
deforestation.
ON THE “BEAUT Y” INDUSTRY “I wish
we could find another word. Of course there
is such a thing as beauty, and some people
are undeniably beautiful. David Beckham—I
mean, I’m sorry, that’s one [type of beauty] and
let’s recognize that and love it and appreciate
it. But when I put on my lovely pinky moisturizer or my lipstick, it’s not because I’m trying to
look beautiful—because I’m not
beautiful; I’m okay-looking—it
makes me feel cool and good
and energized. As my lovely
hairstylist said, it gives me swagger. So maybe we should call it
swagger. The swagger industry.”
ON PARTICIPATING IN THE
SWAGGER INDUSTRY “[When I joined
L’Oréal Paris], I said, ‘Look, I hate the word
“anti-aging.”’ It has always offended me. It puts
such pressure on women: ‘Oh, you’re not allowed to get old.’ Well, excuse me, we do, and
we have as much legitimacy and substance and
presence in the world as anybody else, so we
are claiming our space.”
THE PRIME SUSPECT
“When you ask a geisha to tell you the single most important
thing about her skincare, she’ll always say it’s the bintsuke wax,” says Victoria Tsai, founder of the Japanese-beautyinspired line Tatcha. “It keeps moisture in the skin and pollution and makeup out of pores.” Made with four types of
silk proteins—which have a molecular composition similar to human skin—the new Tatcha The Silk Canvas primer
($62) provides the same benefits while intensifying any pigment you put on top of it (concealer, eyeshadow, what
have you) without the heaviness of actual wax on your face. Win-win.
78 E L L E C A N A D A . C O M
TEXT, VICTORIA DIPLACIDO; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (BACKSTAGE) & GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS)
WA
Dame Helen Mirren delivers such thoughtful, good-humoured commentary that it would
be irresponsible to summarize it. Thus, here is
what the Academy Award-winning actress and
L’Oréal Paris spokesperson had to say about
the complicated relationship women have with
beauty and aging during a recent trip to Toronto.
HER PHILOSOPHY ON AGING “Well, it’s
inevitable, and it happens to all of us unless
we die young. I never wanted to die young.
I still don’t. I’m far too curious about life. So if
you don’t die young, you’re going to get old—
you might as well come to terms with that fact.”
BEAUTY
2
1
3
4
T H E
B E A U T Y
E D I T
STEAL MY
SUNSHINE
The products we’re
coveting now.
TEXT, VICTORIA DIPLACIDO; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS
6
5
1. What’s easier than using one product for both lips and cheeks? Using one in this foolproof soft-pink hue. You can apply Pixi Beauty MultiBalm in Baby Petal ($16) while sitting
in the back of an Uber and still come out looking like you’ve been working with makeup genius Amanda Bell. 2. The packaging for the fruity-floral Nina Ricci Les Monsters de Nina
Ricci Eau de Toilette Natural Spray ($96 for 50 mL) has been given a limited-edition makeover in the form of lovable monsters Luna (pictured) and Nina. Anthropomorphizing
cosmetics has never been this much fun. 3. CoverGirl Flourish by LashBlast Mascara ($11) is best used on days when you don’t want your eyelashes to be the star of the
show. Think of it primarily as a lash treatment (coconut, papaya and avocado oils provide hydration) with the side benefit of a subtle mascara. 4. “In Japan, foundation is considered
the final step in skincare—it’s a fundamentally different philosophy that impacts how we formulate,” says Tyler Heiden Jones, general manager of Japan’s Kosé, the parent company
of revered skincare line Decorté, which has recently expanded into colour cosmetics. This philosophy is also true for the Eye Glow Gem in BL980 and GR781 ($35 each).
They lay down impressive pigment and leave skin feeling like it has been moisturized. 5. Nude by Nature Perfecting Concealer ($24) is the rare product that’s both pigmented
enough to cover discoloration and hydrating enough to use under the eyes without emphasizing every line and crevice. We award bonus points for the formula’s brightening vitamin
C, sourced from the Australian Kakadu plum. 6. Individually, green colour corrector neutralizes redness, purple and blue brighten sallowness (on medium/dark and light skin tones,
respectively) and yellow cancels out blue (like your under-eye circles). Correct it all in one go with a swirl of Givenchy Prisme Libre Mat Finish & Enhanced Radiance Loose
Powder ($79). For details, see Shopping Guide.
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Inspired by the
pearlescence of oyster
shells, makeup artist
Benjamin Puckey
applied lustrous lilac
eyeshadow to lids and
cheeks and used a
fluffy brush to soften
the edges. Try Estée
Lauder Pure Color Envy
Defining EyeShadow
Wet/Dry in Steely Lilac
($29). Gold necklace
with rose-quartz and
sapphire pendant
(Dezso by Sara Beltrán)
Supermodel Jasmine Tookes is here to liberate your
idea of beachy beauty. No tousled hair required.
LIFE AQUATIC
PHOTOGRAPHY TOM SCHIRMACHER
Puckey combined
cream and powder in
cerulean hues to get
a multi-dimensional
effect on lids. Try
L’Oréal Colour Riche
Mono Eyeshadow in
Teal Couture ($7) and
Clé de Peau Beauté
Cream Eye Color Solo
in Pure and Vivacious
Aqua Blue ($60).
Add a light-catching
gleam to the face and
body with Elizabeth
Arden Eight Hour Cream
Skin Protectant ($29).
Paillette-embellished silk
top (Bottega Veneta),
polyamide and elastane
bikini bottoms (Solid &
Striped) and diamond
and opal earrings and
opal earring (Maria Tash)
Puckey created an oceanic
eye by blending emerald
and blue shadows. Try
Urban Decay Distortion
Eyeshadow Palette
($65). Nautilus-shell and
brass earring (Mounser,
at Barneys New York),
pearl earring (Mizuki)
and diamond earring
(Maria Tash). For details,
see Shopping Guide.
Model, Jasmine Tookes
(IMG Models); makeup,
Benjamin Puckey (Bryant
Artists); hair, Gavin
Harwin (The Wall Group);
styling, Samira Nasr;
manicure, Gina Edwards
(Kate Ryan Inc.)
BEAUTY
GINGER
AID
When applying
Kiehl’s Ginger
Leaf & Hibiscus
Firming Mask
($69), make sure
to massage into
skin, says Vanngo.
For details, see
Shopping Guide.
A millennia-old wellness ingredient is back in the
spotlight—but can it live up to modern-day expectations?
Victoria DiPlacido gets to the root of the matter.
which is the last place anyone would look for me if
I were to go missing. Checking out ginger at a local
market? Maybe. But standing among the narrow
green blades of the unpicked plants? Not a chance.
I’m a city girl. Yet the promise of a new ginger-leaf
extract being used to stoke hyaluronic-acid production in skin was intriguing; could an age-old plant
deliver? So here I am, with Hung Vanngo, the first
global consulting makeup artist for Kiehl’s skincare,
and 14 female farmers, snaking through rows of
ginger plants in Hoa Binh, a few hours’ drive from
Hanoi, the capital city. Though born in Vietnam,
Vanngo seems out of place too—maybe because he’s
so many time zones away from his roster of A-list
clients, including Selena Gomez, Jennifer Lawrence
and every Victoria’s Secret Angel you can name.
We’ve both travelled a few thousand kilometres
to visit the organic family-run farm responsible for
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leaves for Ginger Leaf & Hibiscus Firming Mask,
the new overnight face treatment from Kiehl’s, and
the more I learn, the less unlikely it seems to find
two skincare obsessives like us here, dodging
mosquitoes at sundown, to get an up-close-andpersonal look at the process.
As I stand shoulder to leaf with the lush, fullgrown plants, I’m told by one of the farmers—
through her translator—that producing the leaves
is a six-month undertaking that involves treating the
plants much the way I imagine you would a family
pet: feeding them twice daily (in their case, with a
mix of organic compost and manure), providing
adequate hydration and removing pests, should
they appear. When it comes time to pick the leaves,
they are cut from the middle of the stems, gently
washed, wrapped into bundles, trimmed to uniform
size and then packed vertically to dry until ready for
PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (MODEL) & GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS)
I’M ON A GINGER FARM in Vietnam, growing, harvesting and preparing the ginger
transport. It takes five days to complete a harvest—
and the work is, impressively, all done by hand.
Ginger, also known by its Latin name Zingiber
officinale, is part of the Zingiberaceae family, which
includes turmeric and cardamom. The plants have
been used in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese
medicines to ward off colds and promote digestion
and circulation, among other things, for at least
2,000 years, but that hasn’t stopped scientists in this
century from researching the perennial.
Known for its potent anti-inflammatory and
antioxidant effects (as detailed in a 2013 review in
the International Journal of Preventive Medicine
that covered a decade’s worth of research), ginger is
the “perfect” ingredient for use in beauty according
to Jennifer Hirsch, a U.K.-based beauty botanist
who works with brands looking to formulate with
plant actives. “It’s incredibly satisfying when ethnobotany going back centuries is backed up by scientific research. It’s almost a ‘told you so’ moment for
all the generations of traditional use,” she says.
“Using the leaves of the plant is a newer concept,” Geoffrey Genesky, scientific director for
Kiehl’s, tells me over a meal of grilled chicken rolled
with ginger leaves, vegetables with ginger sauce and
a ginger dessert jam. Usually, ginger leaves are discarded in favour of the root or stem, but the brand
took an interest when it was found that the extract
kick-starts an enzyme, hyaluronan synthase 2 that
produces hyaluronic acid (the cushy substance that
keeps skin hydrated and plump—a synthetic version of it is used in many injectable fillers).
According to one study of 25 volunteers aged
42 to 65, nasolabial folds (i.e., laugh lines) were
markedly less noticeable after using ginger-leaf
extract twice daily for three months when compared to a placebo. In my own—entirely subjective,
less rigorous—study, applying the rich, pleasingly
pink mask felt like the skincare equivalent of tucking yourself in with a cashmere blanket. Put it on
S P I C E
Sri Lankan ginger is paired with
willow-bark extract, a natural
source of salicin, in The Body Shop
Ginger Scalp Care Shampoo
($11) to calm an inflamed scalp.
Warming ginger and stimulating peppermint provide a fullbody wake-up call in Biotherm
Bath Therapy Invigorating Blend
Body Scrub ($28).
before bed (it goes on clear and absorbs like a
moisturizer, with little to no tack) and you’ll wake
up with the skin of someone who actually drinks
eight to 10 glasses of water a day.
While recipes for mix-it-yourself ginger skincare
for brightening and tightening abound online,
Hirsch cautions against playing amateur herbalist
with the ingredient, particularly when it’s in essential-oil form. “Diluted, ginger essential oil has been
shown to help stimulate blood flow to the surface
of the skin—hugely beneficial to its appearance and
proper functioning,” she explains. “But concentrated, it can be a skin irritant.”
Ginger devotees needn’t be worried about a
lack of professionally formulated options. This
July, The Body Shop will release a conditioner to
pair with its immensely popular Ginger Scalp Care
Shampoo. Launched in the ’90s, the shampoo for
dry scalps has peaked in popularity in the past few
years (anecdotally, some people believe ginger may
help with hair loss, though this is not a claim made
by The Body Shop), and it is now the brand’s topselling product worldwide. Olay’s new line of radiance-boosting body and facial cleansers contain
crushed ginger for its aromatherapeutic benefits,
which are said to be energizing and uplifting.
Back at the farm, Vanngo tells me that ginger has
somewhat of a sentimental value for him. At age
six, he fled Vietnam with two of his siblings and
lived in a Thai refugee camp for three years before
Canada allowed them to immigrate to Calgary. He
still waxes nostalgic for the traditional Vietnamese
dishes, some including ginger, that his older sister
would cook in their new home.
On our long, winding drive back to Hanoi, I find
a piece of a crumpled leaf I’d picked earlier in my
purse and reflect on how far I’ve travelled to be reminded that some of the best skincare ingredients
aren’t dreamed up by scientists in a lab. Sometimes
you have to get outside. ■
R A C K
The natural ginger extract in Jo
Malone Dark Amber & Ginger
Lily Cologne Intense Spray
($150 for 50 mL) is collected using CO2 to preserve the scent.
Canadian company Saje combines ginger with lemon and
echinacea in its Ginger-Aide
($8.95) tablets, designed to
soothe an achy stomach.
Olay Microscrubbing Cleansing
Infusion Hydrating Glow Body
Wash with Crushed Ginger
($7.50) both exfoliates and
hydrates for super-glowy skin.
ELLECANADA.COM
85
HEALTH
in bread and pastries,
Oprah, if you recall
Grain simply sifts out
those Weight Watchers
the larger particles of bran.
commercials, is a big fan
Other Canadian comtoo. Makeup guru Bobbi
panies, like Anita’s Organic Mill
Brown recently told The New York
in Chilliwack and True Grain in the
Times that she loves the stuff (preferably
Okanagan Valley, both in British Columbia,
covered with butter) more than her children. But not are also offering made-to-order flours milled from
everyone is into it, and I understand why.
Canadian wheat, which is regarded as some of the best
Bread, particularly white bread, has a bad rep for be- in the world. What distinguishes Grain, says Bishop, is
ing low in nutrients and high in calories. At work din- that its products are “fully traceable”—its wheat is purners, when it’s placed on the table, people wonder aloud chased directly from Canadian farmers, so information
if they dare eat it. If it’s the right bread, I say “Hell, on the areas in which it is grown is available online.
yes”—and a handful of Canadian companies agree with
Claire Saksun, wine director at Vancouver’s Royal
me. At Vancouver-based dry-goods company Grain, co- Dinette restaurant, where a variety of breads baked
founders Shira McDermott and Janna Bishop say they are from freshly milled grains are served, says that customon a mission to “revolutionize” the way people consume ers demand traceability in most foods—consider how
flour. Quality-wise, they deem the all-purpose variety to you might order seafood (Pacific or Atlantic salmon?),
be one of the worst offenders of all flours because of how eggs (free-range or caged?) and vegetables (organic and
highly processed it needs to be in order to be shelf-stable. in season?)—but seem to forget about raw products like
Using an in-house stone mill imported from Austria, they flour. “People don’t think of flour in the same way as
grind the entire grain of wheat—the bran, germ and endo- fruits, vegetables and wine,” she says. “But they should.”
sperm—which leaves the natural oils intact, resulting in
If the nutrition argument doesn’t sway you, consida more flavourful and nutritious flour. Comparatively, er that using freshly milled flour also results in bettermost store-bought white, or all-purpose, flour will con- tasting bread. “It is so much more flavourful,” says Patti
tain only the starchy endosperm and none of
Robinson, a veteran baker of 10 years who
the more perishable fatty germ and fibre-rich
uses flour from Ontario’s Merrylynd Organics
bran. (Fibre, as we know, is key to digestive
Farm to bake loaves that are sold at Paris Paris
health. “The good bacteria in your microrestaurant and farmers’ markets in Toronto.
biome love fibre,” says Toronto-based regis“You can taste the difference from grain to
tered nutritionist Nanci Guest. Keeping a
grain, and even from farmer to farmer, based
healthy population of them is good news for
on how they treat their soil, where they are
Grain organic flours
things like our immune system and cognitive
geographically located and how their season
(from $13, eatgrain.ca)
functioning.) To make the finer varieties used
went.” Pass me the olive oil. ■
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PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS
Th
ec
I LOVE BREAD.
LET THEM
EAT
WHEAT
O
ID
AC
PL
g bread. BY VIC
n
i
y
o
j
TO
en
RI
r
o
AD
f
e
I
s
a
L I F E
G O O D
T H E
T O
G U I D E
Y O U R
Exploring Mexico City’s thriving
art and design scene. Oh, and can
we talk about the food?
PHOTOGRAPHY, COURTESY TETETLÁN
BY JULIA ESKINS
I’D NEVER CRAVED a vibrant wardrobe—
historically, the brightest colour in my closet
has been grey—until I visited Frida Kahlo’s
house in Mexico City. Located in the artistic
district of Coyoacán, Kahlo’s lifelong home,
which is known as La Casa Azul for its cobaltblue exterior, is a celebration of the late painter
and political activist’s life and oeuvre. Every
day, throngs of Kahlo enthusiasts explore the
museum’s rooms, eager to absorb her brilliance, which is echoed in the blue-and-yellowtiled kitchen, the vivid self-portraits hanging on
the walls and her enviable closet. (The latter has
inspired the fashion world too, most recently h
Inside Tetetlán, a
cultural centre,
yoga studio and café
LIFESTYLE
Casa de los
Azulejos in
Centro Histórico
La Casa Azul and (right)
Coyoacán street art
the Cushnie et Ochs and Roland Mouret spring 2018 collections.)
As I walked its halls—making a mental note to hit the boutiques
later—I wondered what Kahlo would say if she could see the
international spotlight now shining on her and her home city.
Thanks to artists like Kahlo, Mexico’s capital has long been
a creative hub. But, like craft beer at a wine bar, this influence
was often overlooked by the rest of the world. Now we are
paying attention, especially given the city’s status
as the World Design Capital of 2018. This nod
from the World Design Organization is basically a
giant gold star for the creative-based urban renewal
that has been happening here over the past decade. Think affordable housing by edgy architects
like Frida Escobedo, investment in green space and
tech, and burgeoning art and food scenes.
For travellers like you and me, that means lots to
see and do (and eat). There are over 150 museums in the city—my
fave was the Museo Soumaya, which boasts a curvilinear aluminum exterior as beautiful as the 66,000 works of art inside.
There are also leave-you-breathless architectural projects such as
the Torre Reforma (the tallest building in Mexico City) plus too
many restaurants to count. “There’s a special vibe in the city,”
says Emilio Cabrero, general director of Design Week Mexico and
World Design Capital Mexico City 2018. “People are visiting the
city for the gastronomy and the arts. The creative industry is not
very well documented in Latin countries, but we want to make it
a powerful tool for future generations.”
As neighbourhoods evolve, there has been a conscious
effort not to bulldoze over the past. Rather, says Cabrero,
the goal is to use design to transform the city “with respect to the traditions of Mexico and at the same time preserve what is valuable.” The result is a mash-up of old
and new that feels unique. Residential Condesa (Mexico City’s
version of SoHo) harbours an impressive collection of art-deco
homes that have been transformed into cafés and bars, while the
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The Museo Soumaya and
(left) the Palacio de Bellas Artes
PRO TIP
Stay on or near Paseo de la
Reforma (the city’s main avenue, which is
lined with luxury hotels like the Four Seasons
Hotel Mexico City)—you’ll be within steps of
key attractions. Among them is the Fernando
Romero-designed Museo Soumaya (above),
home to the world’s largest collection of Rodin
sculptures outside of France.
Castillo de Chapultepec, Camino
Real (inset) and designer Carla
Fernández (below)
PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES (CASA DE LOS AZULEJOS & LA CASA AZUL), COURTESY
CDMX MEXICO CITY (MUSEO SOUMAYA & DESIGN WEEK MEXICO) & JULIA ESKINS
(CASTILLO DE CHAPULTEPEC, CAMINO REAL & PALACIO DE BELLAS ARTES)
Design Week Mexico (left),
the bar at Zanaya (below)
and a dish at Pujol (right)
bustling Centro Histórico is lined with
art-nouveau and neoclassical gems. Start
off by admiring the orange-and-yellow
dome of the Palacio de Bellas Artes (as
well as the art collection inside), and
then stroll by Casa de los Azulejos, a
16th-century building famous for its
blue-and-white-tiled facade. Other
spaces have been transformed into
urban markets where gourmet tacos
are snatched up like The Row at a
sample sale. (Best bet: Casa Quimera
in Roma Norte.) Inside the stables of
a home designed by Luis Barragán,
Mexico’s most influential architect,
you’ll find Tetetlán, a multi-faceted
space featuring a showcase for local designers and artists-inresidence, a yoga studio and a café. Finally, pop over to Roma, a
barrio that feels like the Brooklyn of this capital city.
After touring Kahlo’s home, I was on a colour kick, so I
headed a few blocks south to discover the mesmerizing markets
of her neighbourhood, filled with rainbow piñatas, hot tamales
and handcrafted voodoo dolls. It’s not just tourists who love
Coyoacán; Mexican fashion designer Carla Fernández and her
husband, artist Pedro Reyes, recently remodelled a home in the
storied district, collaborating with artisanal craftsmen to incorporate old-world stonemasonry into the interior design. That passion for preserving traditional techniques extends to her work on
her eponymous label. For the pieces, Fernández collaborated with
weavers from Chiapas, an area of Mexico that designers are increasingly turning to for inspiration and production partnerships.
Like Fernández, many other designers express “made in
Mexico” pride by combining craft techniques with global trends.
Up-and-coming fashion designers like Armando Takeda and
Alejandra Quesada collaborate with artisans from indigenous
communities to accent their collections with hand-embroidered and ikat-patterned textiles. If your suitcase isn’t
full from shopping in Coyoacán, head to Onora for
handcrafted home decor and Cañamiel for high-end
Latin fashion from locally loved brands. At the latter, I found a few colourful pieces to punctuate my
notoriously neutral wardrobe. I’ll never abandon
my love of black, but the next time I’m feeling adventurous (or missing the sun
glistening over the Palacio
de Bellas Artes), I’ll don my
new yellow scarf and think
of Mexico City and all that
it inspires. ■
Pujol is one of the city’s
hardest-to-get-into restos.
A TASTE OF MEXICO CITY
The city’s food scene is as captivating as its
design, as award-winning chefs infuse Mexican
cuisine with international flavours. Eating chips
and guac should most definitely be on your itinerary, along with these delicious destinations.
CHURRERÍA EL MORO
$
Serving churros and hot chocolate 24 hours a
day since 1935, El Moro is one of the city’s most
historic establishments for the piped fried dough.
You can enjoy the dessert any way you like—
with sugar, cinnamon or cajeta (caramel sauce).
MERCADO ROMA
$ $
Traditional street food is exalted to gourmet status
in the city’s first hipster food hall. The sleek design
by Mexican architect Michel Rojkind does not
overshadow the main attraction: more than 50
stalls boasting everything from wagyu-beef tacos
to pink-corn pozole stew (a Mexico City favourite) by celebrity chef Zahie Téllez.
FIFTY MILS
$ $ $
Prefer your cocktails with a side of speakeasy
chic? Mixology duo Mica Rousseau and Axel
Pimentel pull out all the stops (and sometimes a
blowtorch) behind a marble bar, turning classic
drinks into experimental libations.
ZANAYA
$ $ $ $
In the courtyard of the Four Seasons Hotel Mexico
City, Zanaya pairs the seafood-heavy dishes of
Nayarit, a region on Mexico’s Pacific coast, with
interiors by Martin Brudnizki Design Studio. The
star dish is the Zarandeado, which is made with
fish that’s flown in fresh daily and grilled using a
500-year-old method.
PUJOL
$ $ $ $
Secure a table before booking your flight—reservations here are harder to score than tix to the
On the Run II tour. But it’s well worth it. Enrique
Olvera’s wildly successful venture has long been
ranked among the world’s best kitchens. While
staying true to its molecular-gastronomy roots,
Pujol’s latest revamp is stirring the pot once
again. Among the additions is an 11-seat taco
omakase bar—adding a splash of Japanese
elegance to Mexican fine dining.
ELLECANADA.COM
91
INTEL
P H OTO F I N I S H
Your selfie game just got a lot stronger.
Helena Christensen has Skyped in from New York to Paris to talk to a handful of international journalists about the launch of Huawei’s latest cellphones,
the P20 and the P20 Pro. And, as is often the case with video chats, the
supermodel turned photographer—whose work has appeared in the likes
of ELLE, Vogue and now the P20 campaign—is coming through a little
bit choppy and pixelated. In other words, decidedly unlike the magazinequality images the phones produce.
The P20 Pro (which has a larger display and longer battery life than the
P20) boasts the first triple lens (made by camera-industry giant Leica, nbd)
in any phone camera. The result is crisp, bright photos, even when you’ve
zoomed in as far as poss to take a photo of that Ryan Reynolds look-alike
in the corner of the bar. But don’t take our word for it. “For a photographer,
it’s absolutely, mind-blowingly amazing to work with a camera that is this
technologically advanced,” says Christensen.
Also worth noting: The cameras on both the P20 and the P20 Pro have
artificial-intelligence capabilities. (Take that, Alexa.) They learn to recognize
more than 500 scenarios in 19 categories (such as person, object or landscape) and automatically balance exposure and brightness. That’s not to
say Christensen hasn’t learned a trick or two from being behind (and in front
of) the camera. Watch the light, she advises. “Hold up your hand and move
it around to see how the light on it changes. Whatever the skin on your palm
looks like is very much how the skin on your face will look in a photo.” Now
you’re ready for your Insta close-up.
Huawei P20 Pro (price upon request,
through your phone-service provider)
THE LATEST IN LIFESTYLE AND TECH
WIRELESS NETWORK
The new est w a y t o connect for you r ca reer.
On the biggest networking fail you can make “Discounting the incredible opportunities that networking can bring.
One connection can change the course of your career and your
life. Never be afraid to make the first move and to follow up with
kindness.” (We’re always partial to a thank-you card.) On her
favourite apps “I really love the meditation app Headspace. It
helps me calm down after a stressful day. I also use Wag [the app
that links people with dog walkers] for my dog, Jet. I always want
to take him on more walks, and this is such an easy solution to
make sure he gets enough exercise daily.”
ELLE
L OV E S
Just when we finally got rid of our Madonna-tape collection (True Blue foreva), the medium appears to
be having a renaissance—sales of both cassettes and cassette players were up last year. Even Gucci is into the trend—it shouted out Tokyo’s vintagecassette haven, music store Waltz, on its travel app. Not here for this cumbersome-to-carry nostalgia trip? Try the UO Tune In Bluetooth Cassette
Boombox ($94, at Urban Outfitters, urbanoutfitters.com). It plays tapes and your “Papa Don’t Preach” Spotify playlist.
92
ELLECANADA.COM
TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES (BEES)
Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe Herd wanted to give women the
same control over their careers that she has brought to their dating
lives. Enter Bumble Bizz, which allows women to swipe right to connect with a potential employer or mentor—but, just like on the dating app, the women have to make the first move.
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LIFESTYLE
RAISE
YOUR
GLASS
How to party sober
and still enjoy yourself.
BY CARLI WHITWELL
around the time you downed a Smirnoff Ice at a house party so you could
work up the giggly nerve to make out with your crush, Bryce.) And even
though you’re a grown-up now, which means you should no longer feel compelled to kowtow to peer pressure (or Google Bryce more than once a year),
sometimes saying no to that extra glass of Bordeaux on a girls night or that
tequila shot on your birthday feels, well, wrong...right?
Maybe not. From hangovers to calorie overload to post-mojito sugar crashes,
not to mention that boxing class you booked for Saturday a.m., there are
94
ELLECANADA.COM
PHOTOGRAPHY,
JEROEN W. MANTEL
WHEN DID DRINKING become synonymous with fun? (Probably
HO
plenty of reasons not to go as hard
on a night out. And a new generation
of mixologists are in agreement that
you can still have all the buzz—without the booze.
“When it comes to enhancing
someone’s experience at a restaurant
or bar, being drunk definitely isn’t
the goal,” says Robin Goodfellow,
owner of Pretty Ugly in Toronto. At
the West End cocktail bar, they serve
“placebos” : alcohol-free mixed
drinks that look like cocktails and,
more importantly, taste like cocktails.
These aren’t the saccharine Shirley
Temples of your childhood—they are
artisanal masterpieces in Mad Menapproved stemware. The bar team
creates all their concoctions in-house
or uses Seedlip, a non-alcoholic spirit that comes in two flavours: Spice
94, a citrus-cardamom blend, and
the herbaceous Garden 108, made
from peas, spearmint, rosemary and
thyme. (It pairs perfectly with tonic.)
Newish to Canada and now
stocked in bars in Vancouver,
Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal,
Seedlip is the brainchild of English
farmer turned distiller Ben Branson.
Even Kate “I bathe in champagne”
Moss is a fan. Notably, it’s made
mostly of distilled herbs and is
sugar-, sweetener- and calorie-free,
which makes it a major draw for
today’s wellness-focused socializer.
You know the type: “I just went to
SoulCycle; my body is a temple.”
“People are becoming increasingly
mindful of their health, what they
put in their bodies and where their
food and drink come from,” says
Branson. “This is forcing a recalibration of our relationship with alcohol.” Indeed, statistics show that
even though Canadians drink more
than the global average (face palm),
binge-drinking—consuming four
or more drinks in one sitting—has
slowed here since 2007.
Who needs booze? Or the bar,
for that matter? You have probably already heard of Daybreaker
parties (sober a.m. workout raves).
Jacques Martiquet’s Vancouver-based
Party4Health goes a step further: The
former paramedic runs events such
as bike raves, silent discos (everyone
wears headphones) and undies runs.
“Partying in its purest form is about
social inclusion, dancing, feeling euphoric and connecting with other
people,” he says. “Why is this really
healthy activity founded on drug use
and alcohol consumption?”
He could be right. Perhaps the
flush you get after a night of dancing
isn’t from the three (or four) vodka
tonics you had but, rather, from
the thrill of feeling connected with
friends and even strangers in our
increasingly isolated digital world.
In any case, if it means waking up
without a hangover, we’re willing to
give it a try. ■
2 MORE
( ACTUALLY
FUN ) W A Y S T O
A BSTA I N
TO...
MIX IT UP
Evelyn Chick,
m a n a g e r o f To r o n t o ’s
P r e t t y U g l y, p r e s e n t s
the Clover Field
placebo. And, yes,
i t ’s e a s y e n o u g h f o r
you to make at home.
INGREDIENTS
6 raspberries
15 mL elderflower cordial
(available at boutique
grocery stores)
30 mL verjus (available at
boutique grocery stores)
60 mL Seedlip Garden
108 (available online
or at Pusateri’s)
1 egg white
DIRECTIONS
Muddle raspberries in a
shaker tin and then add
other ingredients. Shake
well and strain into a tall
vintage coupe. Garnish
with extra raspberries.
SHINE
MOVEMENT
THE LEISURE CENTRE
Who needs booze when you can get an all-natural
buzz via the luxury elixirs flown in from NYC’s The
Alchemist’s Kitchen to this Vancouver store? (Take
your pick from Love Potion, Brain Tonic, Kombucha
Revitalizer and more.) Not a believer? This shop
also boasts a water sommelier who can select for
you one of seven blends from around the world,
including one from a North Pole glacier.
W
FPO
Combine The Moth with the
chillest open-mic night and
you’ve got this inspiring
travelling performance
pop-up. The New York Times
called it “happy hour
without the booze.”
ELLECANADA.COM
95
HOROSCOPE
(MAY 21 – JUNE 20)
96
(JUNE 21 — JULY 22)
(JULY 23 — AUG. 22)
This is the perfect month to update your wardrobe because you like what you see in the mirror. Also, there may be disputes about shared
property or inheritances, and power dressing
will help you deal with that. Meanwhile, welcome a chance for solitude in beautiful surroundings. Vacations and romance are promising.
Welcome to your most popular month of the
year. Enjoy schmoozing with friends and colleagues. The more you interact with others, the
more opportunities will come your way. Be patient with partners because Mars opposite your
sign makes you more easily annoyed. Continue
to improve home and real estate.
(AUG. 23 – SEPT. 22)
(SEPT. 23 – OCT. 22)
(OCT. 23 – NOV. 21)
It’s a good time to make your move because
bosses and VIPs admire you now, even if you
don’t do anything special. Seize this opportunity
and make your pitch because you have the
energy to work hard and give things your best
shot. Friendships are warm and supportive. In
fact, a friend could become a lover....
You are hungering for a change of scenery and
stimulating adventure. Travel if you can. Take a
course. Meet people from different backgrounds.
Discover new restaurants. Your goal is to broaden your horizons this month. Romance might be
in the cards because this is a very sexy time as
well. It’s time to shake things up a little.
You feel passionate and intense this month.
Romance will be hot. You might meet someone
from another culture or a foreign country. This is
likely partly because you want to travel for pleasure right now. (Home is chaotic and busy, so you
want to escape.) With lucky Jupiter in your sign,
the odds are that your wishes will be granted.
(NOV. 22 – DEC. 21)
(DEC. 22 – JAN. 19)
(JAN. 20 – FEB. 18)
Partnerships and close friendships are your
focus right now. Because the Sun is opposite
your sign, you will learn more about how you
relate to those who are closest to you. You will
be confident and bold, which means you’ll
speak your mind. Gifts and goodies will also
come your way—keep your pockets open.
You’re setting high standards for yourself this
month. You want to work hard and be productive and efficient in everything you do. You also
want to be healthier. With fair Venus opposite
your sign, romance, friendships and close
relationships are blessed. Keep your receipts
because you’re spending big.
It’s playtime! Romance, love affairs, getaways,
parties, get-togethers and sports events top your
menu. Relations with co-workers are warm and
supportive. Meanwhile, with Mars in your sign,
you have the energy of three people. A romantic interest could develop at work. Either way,
expect praise and possibly a raise.
(FEB. 19 – MARCH 20 )
This is a social, playful, romantic month, yet you
also want time to cocoon at home and focus on
family and your private life. Time spent with a
parent might be important. Travel opportunities
look promising. Likewise, anything to do with
higher education, publishing, the media, medicine and the law is an opportunity for you.
(MARCH 21 – APRIL 19)
(APRIL 20 – MAY 20)
This is a fast-paced month, and you’re popular!
Your days will fly by in a blur of short trips, visits
with siblings and relatives, reading, writing and
studying, numerous appointments as well as redecorating and entertaining at home. Good luck
keeping your iCal organized. Even your dealings with groups will be intense and competitive.
Last month your ambition was fired up, and it will
stay that way until mid-August. This month your
focus is on money and earnings. (You’re spending a lot—perhaps because it’s an ideal year for
Taureans to get married?) You can make money
from your words, which is good news for those in
sales, marketing, teaching, acting and writing. ■
ELLECANADA.COM
For your daily and weekly horoscope, visit
ELLECanada.com/horoscope.
TEXT, GEORGIA NICOLS; ILLUSTRATIONS, MADISON VAN RIJN
It’s your birthday! All eyes are on you. People and favourable situations are
attracted to you now. Look for ways to boost your income, especially because you’re buying treasures for yourself and loved ones. Fortunately, you
have many opportunities to improve your health and your job—take advantage of this blessing because it comes your way only once every 12 years.
SHOPPING GUIDE
Alexander Wang At ssense.com. Alice and Olivia aliceandolivia.com. AllSaints At
Hudson’s Bay, thebay.com. Biotherm biotherm.ca. Bottega Veneta bottegaveneta.
com. Clé de Peau Beauté At Holt Renfrew, holtrenfrew.com. CoverGirl At drugstores
and mass-market retailers. Decorté At Saks Fifth Avenue, saksfifthavenue.com.
Dezso by Sara Beltrán dezsosara.com. Diane von Furstenberg At NET-A-PORTER.
com. Dolce & Gabbana dolcegabbana.com. Elizabeth Arden elizabetharden.ca.
Estée Lauder esteelauder.ca. Givenchy At Sephora, sephora.com. Hermès hermes.
com. Jennifer Behr jenniferbehr.com. Johanna Ortiz johannaortiz.co. Jo Malone
London jomalone.ca. Kenzo kenzo.com. Kiehl’s kiehls.ca. Krizia krizia.it. L’Oréal
Paris At drugstores and mass-market retailers. Louis Vuitton louisvuitton.com. Love
Beauty and Planet At drugstores and mass-market retailers. Manolo Blahnik
manoloblahnik.com. Maria Tash venusbymariatash.com. Marni marni.com; at
shopbop.com. Mary Katrantzou marykatrantzou.com. Max Mara maxmara.com.
Michael Kors Collection michaelkors.ca. Mizuki mizukijewelry.com. Mounser At
Barneys New York, barneys.com. Natasha Zinko natashazinko.com. Nina Ricci
ninaricci.com. Nina Ricci (beauty) At drugstores and mass-market retailers. Nude
by Nature nudebynature.ca. Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh At ssense.com. Olay At
drugstores and mass-market retailers. Oscar de la Renta At shopbop.com. Pixi
Beauty At Shoppers Drug Mart, shoppersdrugmart.ca. Prada prada.com; at ssense.
com. Proenza Schouler proenzaschouler.com. Rochas rochas.com. Saint Laurent
At ssense.com. Saje saje.com. Solid & Striped solidandstriped.com. Tatcha At
Sephora, sephora.com. The Body Shop thebodyshop.com. Tom Ford tomford.com.
Urban Decay urbandecay.com. Valentino valentino.com. Versace versace.com.
Zimmermann zimmermannwear.com. ■
97
BECAUSE THERE IS NO SUCH
THING AS BEING “OFF THE
RECORD” WHEN YOU
ILLUSTRATIONS, MADISON VAN RIJN
WORK HERE.
98
ELLECANADA.COM
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