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Highlights for Children - June 2018

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JUNE 2018
Highlights.com
P
A
E
C
ES into
Summer!
STUFFED
S’MORES
Page 33
Dragon
EGGS?
Page 13
h
t
n
o
M
s
i
h
T
n
u
F
4
Letter-Writing
Twists
1 . Instead of writing a letter,
catch up with a friend by
drawing scenes from your life
in comic-strip form.
Answer on page 38.
Fin
how d out
o ne
is tu artist
ocean rning
tra
artw sh into
See p ork.
ag e 2
2.
June 8 Is
World Oceans Day
Help take care of our oceans by picking
up any trash you see on the shore. Not
going to the beach? Even hundreds of
miles from the shore, trash that blows or
washes into storm drains, streams, lakes,
and rivers can make its way to the sea.
You can help by picking up litter in your
town. Just be sure to ask an adult first
and wear gloves.
Tongue Twister
Ph
o
Bella blows
blue bubbles.
Mystery
Lydia’s
L os t
Lemons
s
l of lemon
Lydia’s bow
s
n
the lemo
tipped and
w
d away! Ho
have rolle
you find?
many can
to
A ns w
er on pa
ge
38
.
2. Send your friend the first
paragraph of a story. Ask him or
her to write the next paragraph
and send it back. Keep taking
turns until the story is finished.
3. Mail your friend a random
squiggle drawn on paper. Ask
your friend to draw a picture
using the squiggle as a starting
point and send it back with a
new squiggle for you to draw on.
4. Include a secret note. With your
friend, decide on a code to use
in your letters. For example,
perhaps the last letter of each
word you write spells out a
short hidden message.
Find the
Pictures
Can you find each of these
13 pictures at another
place in this magazine?
Dear Reader
JUNE 2018 • VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 6 • ISSUE NO. 800
By Christine French Cully
Editor in Chief
Founded in 1946 by Garry C. Myers, Ph.D.,
and Caroline Clark Myers
Editor in Chief: Christine French Cully
Vice President, Magazine Group Editorial: Jamie Bryant
Creative Director: Marie O’Neill
Editor: Judy Burke
Art Director: Patrick Greenish, Jr.
Senior Editor: Joëlle Dujardin
Associate Editor: Linda K. Rose
Assistant Editors: Patty Courtright, Allison Kane
Crafts and Activities Editor: Lisa Glover
Copy Editor: Joan Prevete Hyman
Senior Production Artist: Dave Justice
Production Assistant: Susan Shadle Erb
Contributing Science Editor: Andrew Boyles
Editorial Offices: 803 Church Street, Honesdale, PA 18431-1895.
E-mail: eds@highlights.com.
To submit manuscripts, go to Highlights.submittable.com.
(Writers younger than 16: please use the postal address above.)
CEO: Kent S. Johnson
Vice President, International: Andy Shafran
Senior Editor, International: Julie Stoehr
Business Offices: 1800 Watermark Drive,
P.O. Box 269, Columbus, OH 43216-0269.
Copyright © 2018, Highlights for Children, Inc.
All rights reserved.
HIGHLIGHTS FOR CHILDREN is published monthly.
Cover price: $4.95
ISSN 0018-165X (print); ISSN 2330-6920 (online)
Printed by LSC Communications, Glasgow, KY.
Designed for home and classroom use.
Periodical postage paid at Columbus, Ohio;
Toronto, Ontario; and at additional mailing offices.
U.S. Postmaster: Send address changes to Highlights for Children,
P.O. Box 6038, Harlan, IA 51593-1538. Canada Post: Publications
Mail Agreement No. 40065670. Return undeliverable Canadian
addresses to P.O. Box 99 Stn. Main, Milton, ON L9T 9Z9.
Sometimes we make our list of customer names and addresses
available to carefully screened companies whose products and
services might be of interest to you. We never provide children’s
names. If you do not wish to receive these mailings, please contact
us and include your account number.
To order, make a payment, change your address,
or for other customer-service needs, such as changing
your contact preference, please contact us:
• Online: www.Highlights.com
• Call: 1-800-255-9517
• Write: P.O. Box 5878, Harlan, IA 51593-1378
As part of our mission to help make the world
a better place for the children of today and
tomorrow, Highlights is committed to
T S:
PARE Nchild is
making responsible business decisions
r
u
o
y
that will protect our natural resources
If
dy
ite rea
and reduce our environmental impact.
not qu ghts, call
hli
for Hig witch to
AWARDS Highlights has been
to s
t
given awards by The Association
ive ™ a
High F ime.
t
of Educational Publishers, The
any
Education Center, LLC, Family Choice
Awards, Freedoms Foundation, Graphic Arts
Association, iParenting Media, Magazine Design and Production,
National Association for Gifted Children, National Conference of
Christians and Jews, National Parenting Center, National Safety
Council, Parents’ Choice, Parent’s Guide to Children’s Media
Awards, and Printing Industry Association. HighlightsKids.com
is a participant in the Kids Privacy Safe Harbor program of the
Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU) of the Council of Better
Business Bureaus.
Honoring
Our Dads
This month, in Ask Arizona®
(pages 40–41), Arizona tries to create
the perfect Father’s Day gift. If you’re
trying to think of a great gift for your dad or
grandfather or other special person who is like a dad to you,
check out Arizona’s advice. She reminds us that it’s not the
actual gift that’s important, but rather the thought behind it.
And that’s the point of Father’s Day, right? It’s a day for
expressing appreciation for the many things our fathers do
for us. And, wow, do they do a lot!
I was thinking about this recently when I spent a few days
at the beach. We spent hours watching the seagulls and
pelicans, the rolling surf—and the dads having fun with their
kids. I watched as one father taught his son to paddleboard.
At first, the boy was afraid. He fell off the board and into
the water over and over. But his dad was right beside him,
helping him stand up and try again. After about an hour, the
boy was paddleboarding on his own and feeling great!
Dads—they encourage us to try new
things, pick us up when we fall, and
believe in us. Has your dad or another
special person in your life been there
for you? I hope you’ll write and
tell me your story.
Your friend,
Write to me!
Christine@Highlights.com
This magazine of wholesome fun
is dedicated to helping children grow in basic skills and knowledge,
creativeness, in ability to think and reason, in
sensitivity to others, in high ideals and worthy ways of living—for
®
children are the world’s most important people .
in
Gift photo by iStock/Getty Images Plus/kirin_photo.
June
VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 6 • ISSUE NO. 800
Dear Highlights,
—Amelia, Ontario, Canada
Moving can be hard. We hope these tips help, Amelia!
1 Ask your
friends for their
addresses and
phone numbers
to stay in touch.
2 Think of
making new
friends and going
to a new school as
an adventure.
3 Talk about
the move with
your family. It’s a
big change for all
of you!
Stand
Tall!
June 21 is
World Gira
ffe
Day.
28
22
8
6
Yes, Katy Did
14
Did Katy do it?
7
Everyone’s cooling off!
The Timbertoes®
A muddy rescue.
8
Calady’s Quest
Who will rule the
kingdom next?
10
Goofus and
Gallant®
Making things right.
11
Gallant Kids
Sanya Pirani dreams
big and works hard.
12
15
Jokes
A book by Mack A. Roon.
16
A Bigger Digger
This machine is longer than
two football fields.
18
JUNE 2018
Crafts
Action dice and a wallet
for Father’s Day.
20
Blow Out the Sun
Wind up the crickets.
22
Art for the Sea
Sculptures that call attention
to ocean pollution.
My Sci
Why don’t people
in Antarctica feel
upside down?
4
Hidden Pictures®
Puzzle
25
Paws and Think
Lots to do at a campground.
Sea
Cleanup!
Priscilla the
Parrotfish is
made
entirely of
plastic
trash from
the
ocean.
26
Create Your
Own Game
Try out some games
that kids made up.
27
Design a
Snow Globe
What would be in your
dream snow globe?
28
Game On!
Jordan is too far behind
to win . . . or is he?
What’s a
chair?
31
Check . . . and
Double Check
A shark with clean teeth.
32
Can You Camp?
Yes, you can! Find out how.
34
Your Own Pages
See work from creative kids
like Autumn.
36
Jupiter’s Shrinking
Storm
This storm on Jupiter is
bigger than Earth!
38
Riddles
What did the teddy bear
say after dinner?
39
BrainPlay
Name an animal that
might use a chair.
Autumn Marroquin
Age 7 • Illinois
40
Ask Arizona®
Advice from a giant rabbit
and two cats.
42
Dear Highlights
Lukas likes to keep
his room clean.
43
Picture Puzzler
A movie in the park.
JUNE 2018
5
Yes, Katy Did
By B.J. Lee
Art by Alleanna Harris
Katie kept her katydid
inside a cardboard box.
Katie didn’t worry that
there weren’t any locks.
When Katie went outside to play,
Katy did hop out.
When Katie came back in the house,
she couldn’t help but shout,
“My plants have holes in every leaf!
Did my Katy do it?
A plant does not get nibbled if
there’s not a bug to chew it.”
Katie ran and checked the box
and saw the upturned lid.
“Aha!” cried Katie. “There’s my proof
that little Katy did.”
6
JUNE 2018
The
The rain is
finally over!
Timbertoes
®
By Rich Wallace • Art by Ron Zalme
The kids splashed through puddles.
The mud was slick.
Spot chased some birds.
Spot wouldn’t move.
Tommy went to the rescue.
Come on,
Spot!
Spot jumped free.
Tommy and Spot rinsed off in the pond.
Whoa,
buddy!
JUNE 2018
7
Calady’s
Quest
By Teresa Bateman
Art by Sheyda Abvabi
“Richard
must have
failed the
test.”
Calady hadn’t intended
to go on a quest. When her
father, the king, announced
that a quest would determine
which of his children would be
the next ruler, Calady had
known her older brothers, the
twins, would compete for the
prize. Richard and Derek soon
galloped off, each searching
for the “most valuable thing
in the kingdom.”
Everyone waited, wondering
who would win. But when weeks
had passed with neither twin’s
return, Calady knew something
was wrong. She searched her
brothers’ rooms for clues. After
determining where each brother
had gone, she told her lady-inwaiting about her plan and
slipped out of the castle to find
Richard and Derek.
Calady first rode in search
of the Waters of Healing—
Richard’s goal. She’d read that
those who failed a test at the
Waters turned to
stone. But what
was the test?
She came upon
a beautiful garden.
And leaning against
a tree, a f lask at his lips, was
Richard, still as granite! Calady
sighed. “Whatever the test was,
Richard must have failed it.”
A sign by the water said “No
Thyself.” What did that mean?
Calady had read about a lady
who’d used these waters to save
her sons and about a knight who
had healed a sick friend. Calady
suddenly knew what to do. She
scooped up some water and
dripped it onto her brother’s lips.
He blinked. “How . . . ?”
“No Thyself,” she said. “You
can take the waters only to help
someone else, not yourself.” She
filled her brother’s f lask. “Here’s
your treasure. Because I dipped
it for you, it should be safe to
take. Now let’s hurry.
I think Derek is
facing a dragon.”
They rode east
until they arrived
at Dragon Crest.
Calady knew
something
was wrong.
8
JUNE 2018
A mountain rose in the distance.
After climbing most of the night,
they reached the dragon’s cave.
“Psst!” A whisper came from
nearby. It was Derek, one leg
wrapped in a red-soaked cloth!
In his lap was a battered crown.
“It’s a great treasure,” Derek
explained. “The dragon had
stolen it from Bernard the Bold.
I took it from the dragon, but he
nearly caught me.” He pointed
to his leg. “Do you have water?”
Richard smiled and offered
his f lask. At the first drops,
Derek’s leg began to heal.
“This is wonderful,” Derek
said, “but now you’re trapped as
well. I wish you hadn’t come.”
“The dragon believes you’re
alone and hurt. That’s no longer
true,” Calady pointed out. She
looked at her brothers, their
faces as alike as two sides of a
rainbow. “What’s more, books
I’ve read say dragons are easily
confused. If you make them
dizzy enough, they’ll sleep for a
solid week. Here’s my plan.”
Her brothers were skeptical
at first, then began to grin.
At dawn, Richard climbed
down the mountain and yelled,
“HEY, DRAGON!”
A roar came from above.
The dragon took wing.
“OVER HERE!” Derek
shouted from the mountaintop.
He waved the crown.
The dragon bellowed. His
treasure was in danger. He f lew
back to the cave. But wait! Who
had the crown? Now there were
two men, both exactly alike and
neither one injured.
Back and forth the dragon
swooped as the brothers called.
The dragon’s head twisted this
way and that, and as he spun, he
grew dizzier and dizzier until his
eyes crossed. He dropped to the
ground and fell asleep.
“Dragons are easily
confused.”
Derek and Calady joined
Richard, and they all embraced
before starting the long journey
home. A few days later, they rode
into the castle courtyard.
Once everyone had celebrated
and his children had rested, the
king asked about their quests.
Richard pulled out the f lask.
“These are the Waters of
Healing,” he said. “I used them
to mend Derek’s leg.”
The king nodded. “Impressive.
And of great worth if they
helped your brother.”
Derek handed the crown
to his father. “It belonged to
Bernard the Bold and saved
Richard’s life by distracting
the dragon.”
“This was once used to crown
new rulers,” the king said, “but
its worth increases if it saved
your brother’s life. It will be
hard to choose between you.”
“You haven’t asked Calady,”
Richard pointed out.
“She’s been a-questing too,”
said Derek.
The king smiled. “What
treasure do you bring?” he
asked, looking at his daughter’s
empty hands.
“She brings me,” Richard said,
stepping to Calady’s side.
“And me.” Derek joined them.
“Her knowledge saved us both.”
“Well,” said the king, “I
suppose the question is, What
do I value most: healing waters,
a battered crown, or my sons
safely home?” He turned to
Calady, placing the crown of
Bernard the Bold on her head.
“Truly, nothing is of more value
than those we love.”
“HEY, DRAGON!”
Goaonfd us
Gallant
There’s some of Goofus and Gallant in us all.
When the Gallant shines through, we show our best self.
®
“I’m sorry for the way I acted
before,” says Gallant.
Idea by Lyla Boling, Age 8, Florida
After Goofus yells at his
friends, he doesn’t apologize.
Idea by Lyla Boling, Age 8, Florida
Gallant moves things out of
the way so no one will trip.
Goofus leaves things that
people can trip over.
YOUR Goofus and Gallant Moments
“I felt like Goofus
“I felt like Goofus
“I felt like Gallant
when I ate my
brother’s candy.”
when I hung up the
phone without saying
good-bye.”
when I reused paper
instead of throwing
it away.”
Saruul, Age 8, Utah
Simon, Age 10, Arizona
10
JUNE 2018
Moxie, Age 5, New York
Art by Leslie Harrington.
Gallant
Kids
Reaching for
the Stars
S
anya Pirani has a big goal.
She’s trying to raise enough
money to feed a village of 700
people for a year. That’s $56,210!
When Sanya was eight, she
watched a video with her mom.
“I saw a girl with torn clothes, no
shoes, and immense sadness and
fear in her eyes,” says Sanya.
She wanted to help people
like the girl in the video. With
her mom’s permission, she went
online and found a charity, Feed
My Starving Children (FMSC),
that packs and ships meals to
hungry people all over the world.
When Sanya learned the cost of
feeding a village, she made that
her goal. She named her project
“Reach for the Star in You.”
Photo by Dilshad Pirani.
Sanya Pirani works hard
to feed hungry children.
Sanya knew it would take a lot
of work to raise so much money,
so she asked four of her friends to
help. Together, they raised $8,000
in three months.
Sanya brainstormed creative
ideas to inspire people to give.
She handed out Compassion Jars
to families and businesses. “You
fill them up with loose change for
people in need,” she says. Another
idea was Bookmarks for Help.
“I cut out pieces of cardstock and
decorated them.” Each bookmark
sold for a $5 donation.
Dream Big and Work Hard
After Sanya’s team raised
$17,000 and then $25,000, they
celebrated by hosting events at
FMSC. The governor, a state
representative, and more than
“I felt like Gallant
“I felt like Gallant
when I helped my little
sister find her stuffedanimal puppy.”
when I cut my hair
to donate for cancer
patients.”
Evan, Age 10, Connecticut
Grace, Age 8, Arizona
Sanya’s Favorite
s
FOOD: La
sagna
HOBB IES: Drawin
g, reading, and w
riting
AN IMALS: Dogs
and horses
COLO RS: Blue an
d pu
rple
100 family members and friends
showed up to pack meals.
Sanya is certain she’ll reach
her goal of $56,210. She is fueled
by the belief that every child
deserves food and other basic
human rights. Plus, she says, she
believes what her mom has always
told her: “You dream big with a
pure heart, and your dream will
come true with hard work and
determination.”
Highlights is proud to know
this Gallant Kid.
—Sara Matson
Tell us when you’ve felt like
Goofus or Gallant! Visit
HighlightsKids.com or write to
Goofus and Gallant Moments
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
JUNE 2018
11
MY SC
Blood vessels under the dark
patches help regulate the
giraffe’s temperature.
Don’t Laugh
at the Giraffe
A giraffe looks like something a
cartoonist might draw, with its long
legs, neck, and tongue. But what looks
cartoonish to humans works well for
this towering mammal’s grassland life.
A giraffe’s height helps
it keep an eye out for
predators and reach
leaves and buds on
acacia trees, where it
gets most of its food
and water.
Tight skin
and strong
blood vessels
keep blood
from pooling
in its legs.
I know gravity keeps us
on Earth. But why don’t
people in Antarctica
feel upside down?
Julia Dutill
Age 11 • Pennsylvania
When you look at a globe,
it may seem as if north is
“up” and south is “down.” But
no matter where you go on
Earth’s surface, “down” is
toward the center of the
planet. Gravity is always
pulling your whole body and
By Dougal Dixon
Art by Robert Squier
Thick heart walls
pump with force
to keep blood
moving to the
brain against the
pull of gravity.
Short face
Beibeilong
bay-bay-long
“baby dragon”
The only known fossils of
Beibeilong are of eggs and
a hatchling baby. From the
fossils, scientists can tell that
Beibeilong was similar to
Oviraptor. The egg size shows
that Beibeilong was one of the
biggest known oviraptorosaurs.
Big beak
WHERE:
China
HOW LONG:
Unknown; estimated
adult size 25 feet
Strong
hind legs
WHAT IT ATE:
Probably plants
and small animals
everything around you in the
direction of Earth’s core.
Whether you are in
Antarctica, at the equator,
or anywhere else on Earth,
if you’re upright with your
feet on the ground, you feel
(and you are) right-side up.
18-inch-long
eggs, among
the biggest
ever found for
a dinosaur
WHEN:
90 million years ago
252
Triassic
201
Jurassic
145
66
Cretaceous
Present
Cenozoic
JUNE 2018
13
Want ae?
challeng
Making a Splash
5
k page 1
Fold bac the
to hide
clues.
picture
By Gary LaCoste
In this big picture, find the shoe, glove, ruler, wedge of lemon, artist’s brush, ladder,
hockey stick, slice of pizza, balloon, bowl, heart, pencil, fishhook, crown, domino,
drinking straw, boomerang, musical note, sock, sailboat, pennant, and banana.
14
JUNE 2018
Check out our Hidden Pictures app!
Picture Clues
shoe
glove
ruler
JOKES
“Knock, knock.”
“Who’s there?”
“Hawaii.”
“Hawaii who?”
“I’m great.
Hawaii you?”
wedge of
lemon
hockey
stick
Amũra Minggia, North Carolina
slice of
pizza
ladder
balloon
artist’s
brush
heart
pencil
bowl
domino
Two atoms were walking
down the street.
Atom #1: I think I just lost
an electron.
Atom #2: Are you sure?
Atom #1: Yes, I’m positive.
Cailyn Myers, Illinois
Apple and Orange were
searching for their friend
Banana. Apple said to Orange,
“Keep your eyes peeled!”
Gabriel Lifschitz, New Jersey
Cinnamon Roll #1: I’m afraid to
roll down a hill.
Cinnamon Roll #2: Why?
Cinnamon Roll #1: Because I’m
already rolled!
Kate Lewis, Colorado
Make us laugh!
Send a joke or riddle, along with your
name, age, and address, to
A book never written: Pastries
and Candies by Mack A. Roon.
Connor, Ontario, Canada
crown
fishhook
musical
note
sock
drinking
straw
boomerang
Feathered Fun
pennant
banana
By Cindy Breedlove
sailboat
BONUS
Can you also find
the golf club,
snake, needle,
and bell?
Answers on HighlightsKids.com.
I heard, while underneath some oaks,
Two woodpeckers tell knock-knock jokes.
Someone liked them. “Tee-hee-hee,”
Laughed a little chickadee.
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
A Bigger
By Andy Boyles, Contributing Science Editor
Bagger 288 is a giant digging machine.
It can move enough dirt in one day to fill
96 Olympic swimming pools. A typical
digging machine working eight hours a
day, seven days a week would take more
than 10 months to do the same job.
The machine was built in 1978 to
mine coal for electrical power in
Germany, and it’s still going strong.
It’s one of the
world’s biggest
machines.
Here’s how
it works.
Connecting Bridge
It swings side to
side to pour the
material into a
loading wagon.
Rope Winch
A giant spool moves the
bucket arm up and down by
winding and unwinding steel
ropes that lead up through the
towers and down to the arm.
16
JUNE 2018
Workers
Crawlers
Twelve treads move
the machine slowly—
faster than a snail but
slower than a turtle.
Digger
Bagger 288 is one of the
largest machines in the world.
HOW BIG
IS IT?
TALLER
THAN THE
STATUE
OF
LIBERTY
Steel Ropes
They support
the bucket arm.
Bucket
Arm
2
LONGER
THAN
It moves
the bucket
wheel into
place.
FOOTBALL
FIELDS
EACH BUCKET CAN FILL
22
BATHTUBS
HEAVIER
THAN
4
APOLLO
MOON
ROCKETS
Cabin
Conveyor Belt
It carries soil and coal
to another conveyor
belt in the connecting
bridge.
The person
who runs
the bucket
wheel sits
in here.
Bucket Wheel
As the wheel
turns, its 18
buckets dig
nonstop.
DRIVES
THE
BUCKET
WHEEL
WITH AS
MUCH
POWER AS
13
PICKUP
TRUCKS
Photo by ©thyssenkrupp_2017. Photos at right, from top: iStock/wizreist,
iStock/antpkr, iStock/jgroup, iStock/jamesbenet, iStock/sihuo0860371.
Crafts
Action Dice!
Make This
Next Month!
A Game for 2 or More Players
By Karen Dobyns
1. Trace each side of two square tissue boxes
onto cardstock. Cut out the 12 squares.
2. Write an action phrase onto six squares with a marker.
On the other six squares, write a number of seconds
or repetitions.
3. Use double-sided tape to attach the actions to one
box and the numbers to the other.
To Play: Players take
turns rolling the
dice and following
the instructions that
land faceup. The first
player to complete all
six actions wins.
CRAFT CHALLE NGE! Make a boat using a plastic container,
tape, and craft foam. Share your result on HighlightsKids.com.
Bonus!
Make a more
durable wallet by
covering it with
duct tape.
Wallet
for
Dad
1. Fold a 9-inch-by-6-inch sheet of
cardstock in half lengthwise.
2. Glue the narrow edges together.
Fold it in half to form a wallet.
3. Cut two small rectangles
out of cardstock. For a pocket,
By Sheila M. Hausbeck
Craft samples by Buff McAllister. Photos by Guy Cali Associates, Inc., except
pages 18–19 (background) by iStock/Getty Images Plus/KatarzynaBialasiewicz.
Sri Lankan Sesath
By Lisa Haag Kang
Sesaths are traditional Sri Lankan sunshades
that are woven from palm leaves. They were
introduced from India more than 2,200 years
ago and have been used in Buddhist rituals since
then. Today, they are also used for decoration
and in the religious festival of Kandy Esala
Perahera, which is held during the summer.
Birdhouse
Mobile
By April Theis
1. Cut out a birdhouse,
birds, and leaves from
cardstock. Add a
wiggle eye to each bird.
2. For the mobile, cover a
long cardboard tube
with paper. Use ribbon
to hang the birdhouse
from the tube. Glue on
the birds and leaves.
3. Punch a hole in each
end of the tube. Add
a ribbon hanger.
glue the bottom and sides of one
to the inside of the wallet on
the right. Write a note for your
dad on the other, and glue it
on the left.
4. Create coupons to put inside.
1. Paint a 16-inch wooden dowel red. Let it dry.
2. Cut a large red circle out of poster board
and five smaller, different-sized circles out
of cardstock. Glue the circles on top of one
another, smallest to largest, to form the shade.
Keep glue away from the edges.
3. Cut small circles, triangles, and flowers for
decoration. Glue them onto the shade.
4. Lay the dowel across the sesath. Poke two sets
of holes, and use two pieces of ribbon to tie
the dowel in place.
JUNE 2018
19
Blow Out
the Sun
By Sara Valafar
Art by Demelsa Haughton
Wrap up the day. Pack it away.
Carry it off on a silver tray.
Shake out the green grass that blankets the hill.
Tomorrow we’ll play there, we will, we will.
Roll up the rivers and tie them with string.
Tune the owl and set it to wing.
Turn on the fireflies
and wind up the crickets.
Scatter night sounds into the thickets.
Unplug the oceans.
Drain the deep seas.
Sweep the deserts under the trees.
Squeeze out the clouds and hang them to dry.
Gather the birds and fold up the sky.
Stack the mountains one by one.
Lock up the woods and blow out the sun.
Sprinkle bright stars and turn on the moon.
Tomorrow will come soon, soon, soon.
JUNE 2018
21
Art for the
These sculptures are a call for clean oceans.
By Gail Skroback Hennessey
Greta the Great
is made of
plastic beach
trash. See the
sneaker tread
under her nose?
22
JUNE 2018
Sea
1 Each sculpture
starts with washed
and sorted plastics.
2 Next, the sculptor
studies photos of her
subject. 3 Then, Greta
the Great takes shape.
1
Angela Haseltine Pozzi didn’t
Illinois, is hosting an exhibit
through September 2018. One of
Washed Ashore’s sculptures,
Turtle Ocean, received a rare
honor. It was displayed at the
Smithsonian Institution’s National
Museum of Natural History in
Washington, D.C.
like seeing plastic trash washing
up on the shore near her home in
Bandon, Oregon. She wanted to
rally her community to clean it up,
so she started an organization and
called it Washed Ashore: Art to
Save the Sea.
Here’s how it works: Volunteers
help clean up Oregon’s 300 miles
of shoreline. Then, using only
plastics from the beach cleanup,
Ms. Pozzi and her staff and many,
many volunteers create sculptures
of sea animals.
Ms. Pozzi says, “I want to create
sculptures that make people take
a look and think, ‘How can there
be this much trash on the beach?’
The Washed Ashore sculptures,
hopefully, will make people
consider their plastic purchases
and be aware of how so much
plastic ends up in the oceans.”
Ms. Pozzi started Washed
Ashore in 2010. Since then, more
than 10,000 volunteers have
collected 21 tons of trash and
helped create more than 70 works
of art. Four traveling exhibits have
displayed the sculptures in more
than 18 places, such as the San
Francisco Zoo, Georgia Aquarium,
and the National Zoological Park.
Shedd Aquarium in Chicago,
Plastics Are Forever
People have used plastics to
create life-saving medical devices,
inexpensive containers and
gadgets, and toys, of course. But
unlike wood, cotton, and other
natural materials, plastics don’t
break down into anything useful
to other living things. Instead,
they stay for years in landfills,
waterways, and the oceans. The
materials are harmful to some sea
animals, such as turtles, sea lions,
and birds. Some of these creatures
eat plastic objects that look like
food. Others become entangled in
plastic nets or packaging.
Many people are working to
keep plastics out of the oceans.
When they can, they buy things
that are made of natural
materials. They recycle the
plastics they use, and they dispose
of plastic trash properly. Still, far
too many plastics end up in the
(Continued on next page)
2
3
Photos by © WashedAshore.org, except page 24 (scales) iStock/Getty
Images Plus/Bet_Noire, (pyramid) iStock/Getty Images Plus/Lindrik,
(plastic bottles) E+/Getty Images/craftvision.
JUNE 2018
23
1 Henry the
Giant Fish.
2 Ms. Pozzi
and Zorabelle
the Rockhopper
Penguin.
3 Octavia the
Octopus.
4 Lidia the Seal.
1 2
(Continued from page 23)
oceans. Some are dumped
directly into the sea. Others are
washed down creeks and rivers,
which f low into oceans. And
others are left lying on land,
where winds carry them down
to shores and into the water.
“Remember, sea level is
downhill from everywhere,”
Ms. Pozzi says.
Big Fish, Big Message
Most Washed Ashore
sculptures are about 9 feet tall
and take from six months to
a year to complete. One of the
first was Henry the Giant Fish,
a 15-foot-long red-and-yellow
fish. Ms. Pozzi and her team
used yogurt lids, bottle caps,
toys, lighters, and shotgun shells
in its creation.
Since then, they have
made sculptures of many more
animals, such as an octopus,
a seal, a parrotfish, a jellyfish, a
marlin, a sea horse, a shark, a
turtle, and a puffin.
In the sculptures, viewers can
see what each piece was before
it became part of the artwork.
They know that every bit—a
f lip-f lop, plastic boot, doll’s car,
comb, sand shovel, fishing buoy,
toothbrush, bottle cap, or
bottle—was found on a beach.
Art by Teamwork
How Much Plastic?
Scientists estimated the
amount of plastic that
made its way into the
oceans during one year
(2010). From 192 nations,
up to 14,000,000 tons of
plastic went into the sea.
That’s more than twice
the weight of the Great
Pyramid of Giza.
Ms. Pozzi gives credit to
everyone who helps. “One person
didn’t create these sculptures,”
she says. “Some people have
picked up the plastic, others
have sorted the items by color.
Still others have washed each
piece of plastic trash. Volunteers
have drilled holes or helped to
make the small wire-stitched
panels, while others welded the
giant frames. I do the heads and
detail work, and my staff and
I take all the pieces everyone
contributes to finish the work.”
3
4
Which sculpture is Ms. Pozzi’s
favorite? “I do love the octopus,
named Octavia,” she says. Each
of the seven-foot-long arms is
doing something different—
holding the handlebars of a
bright-yellow tricycle, opening a
microwave oven that has a red
plastic lobster inside, pulling a
drink out of a cooler, or trying
on a shoe.
The Washed Ashore team
is working on sculptures of a
tufted puffin and a dolphin, with
plans for more sculptures. Says
Ms. Pozzi, “Until we run out of
plastic on the beach, the work
will continue.”
At the Campground
d
n
s
w
a
a
P
T hink
Why might people like to go
camping? What are some things
people do at a campground?
What sounds might you hear
outside during the day? At night?
How is camping different from
other kinds of vacations? What
things would you need to pack?
Would you like to go camping?
Why or why not?
Art by David Coulson.
So much to
see, hear,
and smell!
Create Your
Own Game
We asked you to make up a game and sha
re it with
us. Here are some of the fun ideas we receive
d!
I would create a video game
where you pick a season, then you
take a picture of your face and put
it onto a body figure that matches
the season. Next you pick an
activity to go with your season.
For example, if you picked winter,
you could have sledding races.
You would have remotes to do the
movements in the game. Once you
win three games in the season,
you get first place.
Caroline Pienkosz
Age 10 • Illinois
Animal Run
Animal Run is a board game.
Each person is an animal
running toward the zoo. Draw
a card with a number to move
forward. Everyone has fun
together trying to help all
the animals reach the zoo.
Everybody takes turns making
the sound of each animal.
Shane Sawhill
Age 5 • California
Make Your
Own House
Star Chase
I play this game with my family. Each player gets a figure to move on
the board. During your turn, you roll the dice and move your figure. Each
square is numbered. If you land on “1,” you do one jumping jack. If you
land on “2,” you run two laps around the room. If you land on “3,” you
jump up and down three times. The first player to reach the star wins.
Mila Silk
Age 6 • Washington
26
JUNE 2018
Make Your Own House
is a video game. It starts
as a garden. Then you
build a house. You can
upgrade your house
and garden.
Karlos Jebrail
Age 7 • Rhode Island
Number-opoly
Materials
• A deck of cards with the
kings and jokers removed
• Two dice
Rules
1. Draw a card and place it
faceup in the discard pile.
2. Roll two dice.
3. If you can add, subtract, or
multiply the numbers on the
dice to get the number on
the card, you keep the card.
(Jacks are worth 11; queens
are worth 12.)
4. If you roll doubles on the
dice, you get another turn.
5. Take turns until the whole
deck has been used up.
Whoever has the most cards
at the end of the game wins.
Lincoln Eeten
Age 9 • Wisconsin
Run in Space
My video game would be Run in
Space. I like learning about space.
Benjamin Alabi
Age 7 • New York
Bubbles and Algae
There is one bubble and 10 algae. The bubble holds a Hula-H
oop
and says, “Algae away!” and they run away. If the bubble captur
es
algae in the Hula-Hoop, the algae become seaweed. They sit
down
and sway their arms. If the Hula-Hoop just touches the algae,
they
sit out until the next round. The object is to avoid being touch
ed or
captured by the Hula-Hoop.
Lavinia Pitts
Age 7 • Washington, D.C.
Animal Colors
There is a spinner with animals
and colors on it. There are cards
with matching animals and colors
on them. Players take turns
spinning the wheel and f lipping
over a card. They try to f lip over
the card that matches the animal
and color that the arrow landed on.
Naomi Andress
Age 9 • Florida
Design
a Snow
Globe
It may be June, but
we’re thinking snow!
What would your
dream snow globe
show? Sparkling
sand sculptures?
Shimmering snow?
Or something else?
Send us a drawing
of your snow globe
on unlined paper.
Please include your
name, age, and
complete address.
Mail to
Design a Snow Globe
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
We must receive
your reply by
July 1, 2018, to
consider it for
publication.
De
d
Jordan’s stamina is tested.
By Rich Wallace • Art by Rafa Alvarez
around the track. He glanced at
his watch—4:00 in the morning!
And the race wasn’t nearly over.
Spectators clapped as Jordan
entered the homestretch for
what felt like the thousandth
time.
“Where’s Devin?” Jordan
called to his father in the
bleachers. “It’s time to switch!”
Jordan kept pedaling. Riders
could stay on the bike as long
as they wanted, but all four
members of each relay team had
to participate in the 12-hour
race. And bikes had to stay in
motion except for minor repairs.
Jordan, Devin, Tara, and
Bryan had decided they’d each
be on the bike for three one-hour
shifts. That would give them a
couple of long stretches to sleep
in the tents.
Jordan had barely slept
during his first break. He was
definitely ready to crawl into
his sleeping bag now.
Devin whistled as he finally
ran out of the boys’ tent at 4:15,
snapping on his helmet.
“Sorry—I overslept!” Devin
said as Jordan hopped off the
bike. “How are we doing?”
“Third place,” Jordan replied,
squinting in the bright stadium
lights. He gulped some water as
28
JUNE 2018
he watched Devin sprint away.
Thirty-six teams started the
Overnight Bike Classic at 8:00 P.M.
on Friday. Officials kept track of
the number of laps each team
covered. Supporters had pledged
donations to charity for each lap,
and there were trophies for the
top teams.
Jordan had passed two riders
and had drawn a little closer to
second place, but the leader was
several laps ahead. He felt a hand
on his arm and turned.
“Great work,” Jordan’s dad
said. “Try to get a nap. Before you
do, though, wake Bryan.”
4:00 in the
morning! And
the race wasn’t
nearly over.
The giant tent was dimly lit.
A dozen boys were rolled into
sleeping bags while others sat on
the ground with snacks. Jordan
waved to some of the parents
who were sitting at a table,
supervising the tent.
Jordan nudged Bryan’s red
sleeping bag with his foot. Bryan
grunted and rolled up tighter.
“Devin’s out on the track,” Jordan
said. “You’re next.”
Br y
an
Devin
A Mile Behind
Jordan yawned as he cycled
Ta
r
a
Jordan
v
in
an
GAME
ON!
J or
Tara
Bryan
Bryan rubbed his eyes.
“Feels like I slept two minutes.”
Jordan laughed. “That’s two
more than I did. I’m hungry.
What do we have to eat?”
Bryan pointed to the team’s
cooler. “See for yourself.”
Jordan grabbed a granola bar.
“Team Green is way out there,
a mile in front.” He shook his
head. “I’m exhausted but too
keyed up. Let’s go outside.”
The cyclists were so spread
out that it was impossible to tell
which place each team was in.
But Jordan was well aware of
the top five teams. He watched
in admiration as the leader
raced past in his green jersey.
Jordan suddenly felt another
wave of exhaustion pass over
him. “I need to get some sleep,”
he said to Bryan. “Make up some
ground on Team Green.”
Despite all the chatter in the
tent, Jordan slept like a rock
until Bryan shook his shoulder
at 6:50 A.M. “Tara’s finishing,”
Bryan said. “We’re in fourth, not
far behind second and third.”
“How far ahead is Team
Green?” Jordan asked.
“More than four laps,” Bryan
said. “It’s up to you.”
Tara was finishing strong,
moving into third place as
Jordan wiped the sleep from his
eyes. Jordan bumped fists with
Jerry Myers, the Team Green
captain, who was also waiting to
ride. “See you at breakfast,”
Jordan said with a laugh. “Or
maybe I’ll see you when I pass
you five times.”
“No chance of that,” Jerry said
as his teammate zoomed into the
exchange zone.
Tara followed a few seconds
later. Jordan grabbed the
handlebars. Tara hopped off the
bike, and he hopped on.
“The final hour!” Tara called.
“Make it count.”
Jordan passed several riders.
Jerry Myers held a steady pace,
A Tip from
the Author
In any long race, it’s
important to pace yourself.
If you go too fast at the
start, you might use up your
energy too quickly.
Rich Wallace is the author of
dozens of sports novels for
kids, including the books in the
Winning Season and Kickers
series. He has played and
coached a lot of sports too.
but Jordan caught him after
several laps.
“I’ve still got you by a mile,”
Jerry said.
Jordan nodded. He was more
(Continued on next page)
The leader
raced past.
Jordan sweated and puffed,
but he was moving fast.
(Continued from page 29)
concerned with second place.
The rider up ahead in the red
jersey held that spot.
“Jor-dan! Jor-dan!” He felt
a burst of confidence as his
teammates chanted his name.
A Tip from a Kid
During the 100-yard
dash, don’t focus on who
is around you. Keep your
eyes on the track and
never give up.
Rahquail Kriven
Age 9 • North Carolina
Share a sports tip!
Send it to
Sports Tips
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
30
JUNE 2018
Little by little, he caught up to
the second-place rider and
moved ahead.
Hold this spot, Jordan told
himself. The championship was
out of reach, but coming in
second would be great too.
When he looked ahead,
Jordan was shocked to notice
Jerry pedaling very slowly.
Was he hurt?
“Chain came off,” Jerry said
as Jordan cycled past. “I need a
pit stop.”
Jordan passed Team Green
another time as Jerry and his
teammates made repairs near
the finish line.
Two laps behind.
“Fifteen minutes!” Tara yelled.
Jordan passed Jerry a fourth
time. The lead was less than a
lap now. But Jerry’s bike was
fixed, and Team Green hurried
back onto the track.
Three-quarters of a lap was
nearly impossible for Jordan to
make up. But he had to try.
Parents and other spectators
had gathered to watch the end
of the race, which was just a few
minutes away.
Jordan sweated and puffed,
but he was moving fast. He
pedaled onto the backstretch.
Team Green was just ahead.
“Ladies and gentlemen,” said
the announcer, “after 11 hours
and 59 minutes of riding, these
two teams are separated by less
than 100 yards!”
Jordan had the momentum.
Team Green’s chain was barely
holding up. But there was so
little time.
The announcer counted down
the seconds: “10 . . . 9 . . . 8 . . .”
Jordan cut the lead to 25 yards.
“7 . . . 6 . . . 5 . . .”
At zero, the race would end.
Jordan bore down harder.
Team Green’s bike
chain was barely
holding up.
Jerry Myers leaned forward
and churned.
“4 . . . 3 . . . 2 . . .”
Jordan gritted his teeth.
His front wheel drew even with
Jerry’s back one.
“1 . . . zero!”
Jerry raised his arms in
triumph.
Jordan’s legs ached, but he
hadn’t felt tired at all as he raced
that final hour. He hadn’t even
thought about it.
So close, he said to himself.
I almost did it. But second place
felt pretty good too.
s!
Bomnauny ants
n
How ou find i
y
n
?
ca
ce n e
the s
Ants
Everywhere
By Kris MacLeod
Use the clues to think of words
that contain the word ant.
1 . Has a stem and leaves.
2. To wish for something.
3. A big cat with a black coat.
4. You wear them on your legs.
5. A very tall fairy-tale character.
6. A large African or Asian mammal.
7. Part of an insect or a radio.
8. Lean or tilt.
9. Far away.
10. A baby.
Answers on page 38.
Check . . . and Double Check
Compare these two pictures. Can you find at least 18 differences?
JUNE 2018
31
Can
You
CAMP?
Near or far, outside or in—
yes, you can!
By Lisa Glover
Navigate by
the Stars
Observing the stars to find your path is one of the first ways that people used the oldest
science: astronomy. Know which way to go before starting out on a starlit adventure.
North
Star
Pointer
Stars
N
W
E
S
1. Find the Big Dipper.
2. Identify the two
3. Extend the line
pointer stars. Draw
an imaginary line
between them.
upward. The first
bright star you come
to is the North Star,
Polaris.
4. If you are facing the North
Star, then north is in front
of you, south is behind
you, east is on your right,
and west is on your left.
Fire Up Your Food
Ask an adult for help with anything sharp or hot.
CHARRED CHEESE
Butter two slices of bread on one side. Place cheese between
the unbuttered sides. Wrap the sandwich in three layers of
foil. Ask an adult to place it on hot coals. Cook each side for
three minutes, using tongs to flip the sandwich. Let it cool.
Art by Andrew Roberts. Photos by Guy Cali Associates, Inc.,
except camp scene by iStock/anatolly_gleb.
Build
a Tent
Make sure you
have shelter
before it
gets dark!
CH A LL E N
GE
What els
e can yo
u
use to m
ake a ten
t
?
Wh at sh
ap e s
work be
st?
Share a Silly Story
Copy this story, and have your friends fill in the
blanks as you go. Then read the story back to them
in a dramatic voice!
The (Object) in the Woods
One (adjective) day, I was hiking with my friends in the woods.
We’d been traveling for (amount of time) and we were
1. Tie a rope between two trees.
(adjective). “Let’s set up camp!” I said as we came to a (place). In
the middle of the (same place) was a (same object) that looked
like it had been there for (amount of time). It made us feel
2. Place a towel on the ground
below the rope.
(adjective), so we tossed it aside. As night fell, we heard a noise
close by. “That sounded like a (animal),” said (friend’s name).
“What if it’s the mythical (creature) from (another place)?” said
(another friend’s name), sounding (adjective). Suddenly, the
3. Toss a sheet over the rope,
noise became louder, and the (same object) emerged, (number)
half on each side.
times the size it was before. It chased us through the dark as we
stumbled over (plural noun), stopping only when we left the
(same place). When we returned to the (same place) in the
4. Pull the sheet to the edges
of the towel, and place a few
rocks along the edges on
both sides.
lse
What eou
ca n y
na
stuff i ?
s’more
morning, the (same object) was back to its normal size, exactly
where we first saw it. Quickly, we packed up and (verb in past
tense) away. The (same object) might still be out there. . . . STUFFED S’MORES
Use a table knife to poke a slit in the top of a marshmallow. Put
two chocolate chips into the slit. Place the stuffed marshmallow
on a stick and roast it over the fire, chocolate-chip-side up. When
it’s browned, place it between two graham crackers.
Your Own
Pages
Cows and Camels
I know that
pandas eat bamboo,
cows say moo,
and skunks smell lik
e
my stinky shoe,
but I also know
birds can f ly,
giraffes’ necks are hig
h,
and camels live where
the deserts are dry.
Fish live in the sea
and in the jungle is
a monkey,
but those animals
aren’t for me.
I don’t want a frog
or a bat—
all I want is a simple
dog or a cat.
Gavin Yang
Age 8 • Minnesota
Bugs
gs,
Smooth bugs, rough bu
ugs,
Pricklebugs, stickleb
gs that sting,
bu
d
an
Bugs that bite
wing,
Bugs that f ly upon a
here to there,
Bugs that crawl from
Bugs are everywhere.
so small,
Bugs so big and bugs
so tall.
gs
Bugs so shor t and bu
ce
Every bug in every pla
,
es
tch
clu
Ends up in my
er.
nt
hu
g
Because I’m a bu
Constantina Kostopo
ulos
Age 9 • Pennsylvania
Mars
Mars is cold.
Mars is red.
There may be life
there,
some have said.
Rovers roam
around all day,
taking photos
a world away.
Zoe Lee
Age 8 • North Carolina
34
JUNE 2018
Tristram Woodman
Age 7 • Maine
Nate Butts
Age 7 • Georgia
Flying Kites
You know when to
go,
when you feel a re
sistance.
You must run a ve
ry long distance.
W hen it f lies, it he
ads for the skies
and when it comes
down,
you might get a fro
wn.
But then if you pu
ll
and charge like a
bull,
then it goes up
until it ends
and then you do it
again.
Josh and John Ga
rrison
Age 10 • Michigan
Beautiful Lantern
Joanna Li
Age 7 • Texas
Halfway
I am halfway to Grandma’s house.
I am halfway through seven.
I am halfway paying attention.
What is happening now?
Volcanic Eruption
Adelaide Baird
Age 7 1/2 • Massachusetts
The land is rumbling
Cracks are forming
Tension below ground rising
Then a thunderous grumbling
Followed by an explosion, indeed deafening
Mountaintop is torn off, disintegrating
Out shoots a lava torrent, bright and burning
Thick ash, a rain of scorching rocks pelting
Upon the land ringing with the whooshing
Fiery lava pouring
Down the mountainside it goes streaming
While life is f leeing
The land which this fury is ravaging,
destroying
The volcano is erupting.
Beach Day
B right su nshi ne
E ach day is very hot
A lways fu n
C al ling seag ul ls
H appy, lively place
D ipping in the wa rm wate
A ction ever ywhere
You shou ld be happy
Husna Hamid
Age 11 • Georgia
r
on a be ac h day!
Alexa Duncan
Age 9 • Alabama
Zachary Schwarz
Age 7 • Illinois
Bulldozer
Ervin Stacy
Age 6 • Maryland
Right on the Ocean
Right on the ocean,
in a big black boat,
I spy a spooky island
in the middle of the sea.
d.
So I lead my boat to the lan
X marks the spot!
out
I follow my map, and I get
.
a shovel, and I dig and I dig
,
Then I see something big
od.
made out of wo
I pull it out . . .
“Argh, me matey . . .
a treasure for me!”
Marco Garufi
Age 8 • New York
Share Your
Creative Work
We’d love to see it!
Art must be on unlined paper.
Poems must have fewer than
75 words. All submissions
must be created by you.
We cannot
return your
work, so you
might want to
keep a copy.
Nate Sarver
Age 10 • Virginia
Include your name, age,
and address. Mail to
Your Own Pages
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Jupiter’s
Shrinking
Storm
The biggest storm
on any world in
the solar system
is getting smaller.
By Ken Croswell, Ph.D.
I
t’s snowing, but the clouds
are red. The wind howls at
400 miles an hour, faster than
a hurricane. And it’s colder
than the North Pole.
Welcome to the largest
storm on any world in the
solar system.
This storm is bigger than any
on Earth. In fact, it’s bigger than
Earth itself! And it has been
raging for more than 100 years.
Named the Great Red Spot,
this storm is on Jupiter, the
largest planet that goes around
the Sun. The storm is an oval,
shaped like an egg. But it’s
shrinking. No one knows why—
or what it will do next.
Astronomers discovered the
36
JUNE 2018
Great Red Spot by looking at
Jupiter through telescopes.
In the late 1800s, the spot was
25,500 miles long—more than
three times bigger than Earth.
In 1979, spacecraft f lew past
Jupiter and saw that the storm
was only 14,500 miles long.
Smaller and Rounder
Now the Hubble Space
Telescope can track the storm.
“It’s at the smallest size
that we’ve ever seen it,” says
Dr. Amy Simon, an astronomer
who studies the storm. In 2017,
it was just 10,160 miles long.
That’s still bigger than Earth,
which is 7,926 miles across.
But the Great Red Spot isn’t
as great as it used to be.
Its shape is changing too. “It
has gotten quite a bit rounder,”
says Dr. Simon. At this rate, it
could be perfectly round in just
a few years.
Jupiter differs greatly from
Earth. It’s 11 times wider. And
it’s made mostly of hydrogen
and helium. On Earth, these are
gases that are lighter than air.
We fill balloons with helium to
make them rise.
But most of the hydrogen and
helium on Jupiter is not in the
form of gas. Instead, Jupiter’s
great gravity squeezes the
hydrogen and helium, turning
most of these elements into a
liquid. Only the outer part of
Photos: pages 36–37 by NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin Gill; page
37 (Jupiter) NASA, ESA, and A. Simon (NASA Goddard); (Earth) NASA.
See Jupiter
Tonight!
Because J
up
and bright, iter is so large
It looks lik it’s easy to see.
ea
Look for J brilliant star.
upite
southeast r in the
ern sk y
soon after
sunset.
WHOOSH!
Jupiter is the
fastest-spinning
planet in the
solar system.
Jupiter is gas. And that’s where
the Great Red Spot is.
Hurricane or Not?
“It is not a hurricane,”
says Dr. Simon. “It’s an
anti-hurricane.” On Earth,
hurricanes north of the equator
spin counterclockwise, and
hurricanes south of the equator
spin clockwise. The Great
Red Spot is south of Jupiter’s
equator, but it spins counterclockwise. That’s why Dr. Simon
calls it an anti-hurricane.
No one knows why the Great
Red Spot is red. Like Jupiter’s
air, the spot is made mostly of
hydrogen and helium gases. But
they have no color. So something
else must color the spot red.
The Great Red Spot has lasted
longer than any storm on Earth.
That’s because Jupiter is so
different from Earth. On Earth,
hurricanes weaken when they
move from sea to land, and when
they move north or south.
Neither of these things
happens on Jupiter. Right
beneath its air, there is no land,
only liquid hydrogen and helium.
You’d have to go into Jupiter’s
core to hit solid rock. So a storm
on Jupiter can’t weaken by
moving over land.
Also, Jupiter has horizontal
bands of f lowing air that prevent
storms from moving north or
south. So the Great Red Spot
stays at the same latitude. That,
too, keeps it from breaking up.
Yet the storm is shrinking.
“Could it disappear?” asks
Dr. Simon. “Sure. Would I bet
money on it one way or the other?
Probably not.” There’s only one
way to find out what will happen
to it next. “We really need to
keep watching.”
Jupiter and Earth
88,846 miles
483,600,000 miles
12 years
9 hours, 55 minutes
-236 degrees F
Hydrogen and helium
Hydrogen and helium
69
Great Red Spot
Diameter
Distance from Sun
Time to Go Around Sun
Time to Spin Once
Average Temperature
Air Is Mostly . . .
Planet Is Mostly . . .
Number of Moons
7,926 miles
92,960,000 miles
1 year
23 hours, 56 minutes
60 degrees F
Nitrogen and oxygen
Rock and iron
1
Smoothie Twister
S
L
E
D
RI D
Who is drinking each smoothie?
1.
4.
3.
2.
What did the teddy bear
say after dinner?
1
James Benners, Massachuse
tts
rite
What is a bee’s favo
e?
pl
ap
kind of
2
Marley Hurt, Ohio
A.
B.
C.
D.
What do you get when you
cross a permanent marker
with a dog?
3
Aria Thomas , Missouri
Answers below.
Answers
page 38
Jackson Allen, Flo
rid
4
Smoothie Twister
1. B. 2. D. 3. A. 4. C.
page 43
page 2
e to eat?
Where do ants lik
a
5
Picture Puzzler
Fun This
Month
Lydia’s Lost
Lemons
Why did
the phone
go to the
dentist?
Makayla Vega, New York
What do you call a pig
that knows karate?
Mystery Photo —
Seashell.
Bonus!
page 31
Why did the glue like
the plan?
7
Ants Everywhere
1. Plant. 2. Want.
3. Panther. 4. Pants.
5. Giant. 6. Elephant.
7. Antenna. 8. Slant.
9. Distant. 10. Infant.
6
Brad Anzo, Texas
Noel Russell, Indiana
Which kind of book
is an
oilcan’s favorite?
Nora Jackson, Minn
esota
8
Covers: Escape into Summer! by Gary LaCoste; What’s Wrong?® by David Helton
38
JUNE 2018
9
nts go
Why don’t elepha
pool?
e
th
swimming at
nia
Matthew King, Pe
nnsylva
Answers: 1. “I’m stuffed.” 2. Honeycrisp.
3. A shar-pei. 4. At restaur-ants. 5. It had a
bad Bluetooth. 6. A pork chop. 7. Because he
stuck to it. 8. Nonfriction. 9. They would
always lose their trunks.
Illustration credits: Page 2: Kevin Zimmer; 12: Rich Powell; 15: Jokes by Rich Powell, “Feathered Fun” by Maarten
Lenoir; 27: Alyssa Bermudez; 31: Ants Everywhere by Luke Flowers, Check . . . and Double Check by Pat Lewis;
38: Mike Moran; 39: Erin Mauterer, except numbers by iStock /Ukususha, waves by iStock /saemilee.
Photo credits: Page 2: iStock /Lefteris_; 3: Gina Lenz; 4: iStock /Getty Images Plus/Creativeye99;
4–5: © WashedAshore.org; 12–13: Martin Harvey/Alamy Stock Photo; 26: iStock/Getty Images Plus/Diane
Macdonald; 39: (flower hat) iStock/izusek, (guinea pig) iStock/IgorDutina, (yarn) iStock/BrianAJackson,
(rubber-band ball) iStock/plherrera, (goldfish) iStock/GlobalP, (hand) iStock/pressureUA, (paint) iStock/Grafner,
(girl) iStock/YouraPechkin.
yarn
d
l
u
o
W
good
a
e
k
a
m p rope?
jum
WHY
R
WHY O T?
NO
What
is the
funniest
kind
of hat
you’ve
ever
seen?
START
Take y
o
ur bra
W HO
or
W HAT
is awake
w he n y o
u’re
asleep?
Name
an animal
that might
use a
chair.
How would you
use each of these
superpowers?
GIANT SN E
E Z ES
STRETCHY FE ET
PAINT FLOWING FROM
YOUR FINGERS
What are
some
things
that move
in waves?
hike!
Do you think
there is
MATH in ART?
ART in MATH?
What makes
you think that?
u
What can yo
make from
s?
rubber band
What’s a
chair?
in on a
Can you
predict who
will make a
good friend?
Why or why
not?
THE
END
If insects
wore clothes,
WHAT MIGHT
THEY USE TO
MAKE THEM?
How
did you
choose
your
favorite
sport?
JUNE 2018
39
Ask
Arizona
®
I want to give my da
d
something special fo
r
Father’s Day. Do you
have
any ideas?
—Looking in Littleton
Clues to the
Perfect Gift
By Lissa Rovetch • Art by Amanda Morley
Dear Looking,
Every Father’s Day goes the
exact same way in my house. My
sister, brother, mom, and I bring
my dad breakfast in bed. He
always does a good job of acting
surprised, even though I doubt
he’s surprised at
all! So this year,
just like you, I
wanted to give him
something special.
Only I had zero
idea what that
could be.
When I was
hanging out at the
pool after swim class, I asked
my friends for ideas.
“We always get my dad a new
baseball cap,” said Lana.
“That’d be perfect,” I said.
“But my dad refuses to wear
anything other than his ratty
old ‘lucky’ hat.”
“When I was little, I used to
check out this one book from the
library over and over again,”
said Isabel.
“Hmm,” I said. “I’m
not sure my dad would
want a picture book.”
Isabel laughed. “I’m
not saying you should
give him a picture book.
I wanted to tell you
about what happens
in that book. A girl
is trying to find the perfect
present for her mom, and a giant
rabbit comes along and tells her
to think about what her mom
This year,
I wanted to
give my dad
something
special.
40
JUNE 2018
really likes. So because the girl’s
mom loves bright colors, the girl
fills a basket with all different
colors of fruit.”
“OK, I understand,” I said.
“You’re saying I should think
about my dad’s favorite things.”
I didn’t happen to know any
giant rabbits. But I did know
two cats who have a history of
giving good advice.
“You guys spend a lot of time
with Dad,” I said to my cats
when I got home. “What do you
think he likes most?”
In reply, my younger kitty,
Charlie, hopped onto the table
by the big chair in our living
room. He landed on a pile of my
dad’s mystery novels.
“That’s it!” I said. “Dad loves
to read. Especially mystery
novels. But what if I get one he’s
already read? I can’t ask which
one he’d like because then it
wouldn’t be a surprise.”
Just then, my older cat, Cow,
started batting something
around. It was a marker from
my marker set.
“That’s where the green
marker went!” I said.
I’m crossing my
fingers my dad will
like the gift a lot!
“You’re saying I should
think about my dad’s
favorite things.”
And suddenly, I knew just what
to do. I gave Cow an extra-long
ear scratch in exchange for my
marker, and then I got to work
writing my very own mystery.
“It might not be the best story
ever written,” I told my cats. “But
at least I’ll know Dad has never
read it before.”
Since one of my dad’s favorite
mystery series is about a detective
named Sherlock Holmes and
his assistant, Dr. Watson, and
my cats had helped give me the
idea, I made the main characters
“That’s it!”
(or should I say “CAT-racters”?)
Furrlock Holmes and Dr. Catson.
And since my dad owns a grocery
store and spends a lot of time at
the checkout counter, I called it
“The Case of the Missing Money.”
At the end, Furrlock Holmes
figures out the reason all the
money in the cash register keeps
disappearing. A family of mice
who live in the wall have decided
the paper bills would make good
stuffing for their beds and the
shiny coins would make fancy
plates for their dinner parties.
But I can’t tell you how this
real-life story ends, because
Father’s Day is still a couple of
days away and I haven’t given my
dad his surprise yet. I’m crossing
my fingers he’ll like it a lot!
So anyway, dear Looking,
when it comes to figuring out an
extra-great present, the advice
from that giant rabbit is actually
pretty helpful. Try taking a few
minutes to think about your dad.
Figure out his favorite things.
Then make your own version of
one of those things—a book, a
game, a batch of muffins, or new
lyrics to a song he likes. If you
make it yourself, it’s guaranteed
to be one of a kind!
Ciao for now,
Arizona
Dear
Highlights
I let my friend
borrow one of my
stuffed animals.
She’s going to give
it back next time we
meet, but I’m afraid
she’s going to lose it.
Ramona, California
It was nice of you to share your stuffed animal with your
friend. Most likely, if your friend leaves it in her home, it won’t
get lost. If it helps ease your worries, you might ask your
parents if it would be OK for you to call your friend and ask
her to keep the stuffed animal in her house until you see her
again. If there are toys you care a great deal about, maybe you
can allow friends to play with them at your house but not take
them outside of your home.
I like to keep our
room clean, but
my younger brother
doesn’t even care.
Lukas, West Virginia
You might kindly talk
to your brother about
how you’ve been feeling.
He may not realize that a
messy room upsets you.
Perhaps the two of you can
agree to put things back
right away when you are
finished using them.
You might also try inviting your brother to join you when you
clean. You could even turn cleaning into a game you both enjoy.
For example, you could turn on some music and see who can put
away more things before the song ends. It’s a fun competition,
and you both win a clean room!
42
JUNE 2018
I’m doing a fund-raiser
to go to nationals for
rock climbing. I get really
nervous when I hand
out flyers asking people
to donate.
Riley, Massachusetts
Few people feel comfortable
asking others for money. It
might help to remember that
many of the people you’ll be
asking will be excited about
the opportunity you have and
may wish to support you in
pursuing this dream.
When you approach people,
stand up straight, smile, and
greet them in a friendly way.
Briefly explain your rockclimbing accomplishments and
your dream to go to nationals.
Politely ask if the person
would like to participate in
your fund-raiser, and say
thank you whether or not he
or she decides to donate. Your
parents or coach may be able
to give you some tips.
Write to us!
Please include your name, age,
and full address. Mail to
Dear Highlights
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Or e-mail us at Letters@Highlights.com.
Art by Keith Frawley.
r
e
l
z
u
z
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Picture
n
e scene. Ca
th
in
n
e
d
id
are h
Eight words
rs ?
, fun, and sta
h
tc
a
w
,
ie
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mo
Art by Kelly
Kennedy
,
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en, park, g
you find scre
Bondu1s0!
Fin
f
bags o
n.
popcor
Answers on pa
ge 38.
What’s
Wrong?
®
Which things in this
picture are silly?
It’s up to you!
Visit our website!
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