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Houston Chronicle – May 07, 2018

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ROCKETS TAKE 3-1 LEAD
IN SERIES WITH JAZZ
PAGE C1
Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and Chron.com | Vol. 117, No. 206 | $2.00 HHHH
NATION
Giuliani:
Trump
could plead
the Fifth
Rudy Giuliani,
President Donald
Trump’s new lawyer,
suggests that Trump
wouldn’t be
obligated to comply
with a subpoena by
the special counsel
and that he would
advise the president
against any interview
with Robert Mueller.
PAGE A7
Mostly sunny: High 92, Low 66
Oil job market still hasn’t returned Nuke
Rising crude prices haven’t sparked
increases in employment prospects
in some sectors of the workforce
By Collin Eaton
Kris
Schwendeman
flung a leather satchel
around his back and hiked
across the vast showroom
floor of the offshore industry’s largest annual summit, offering handshakes,
business cards and resumes in the hope that one
of the hundreds of oil companies at Houston’s NRG
Park would hire an experienced geologist.
The unemployed offshore specialist is one of
thousands of job seekers
still working to return to
an industry that only 18
months ago was shedding
workers by the thousands
as oil prices languished
and corporate profits tumbled. As U.S. oil prices
cruise above $65 a barrel,
job seekers like Schwendeman converged on the
Offshore Technology Conference, banking on the
belief that things must
have turned around by
now.
They were wrong.
While oil field workers
are getting snapped up for
jobs in the booming shale
plays of West Texas, the
market for scientists, engineers and other knowledge-based professions
that dominate Houston’s
energy workforce have yet
to return in any significant
numbers. Overall hiring
in the oil and gas industry
continues to lag behind
the rise in oil prices, leaving skilled, experienced
Oil continues on A12
Drilling down
60,000
The number of jobs that
have been lost in the industry since mid-2014.
6,000
Of those jobs lost, fewer
than 6,000 have come
back to the workforce.
20,000
Houston job losses in oil
and gas extraction since
the industry downturn
began in 2014.
Volcano devastates Hawaiian neighborhood
Houston Chronicle
Participants enjoy
the seventh annual
May the Fourth Art
Festival.
Maximilian Uriarte,
creator of the
“Terminal Lance”
comic strip that
enjoys a large
following among U.S.
Marines, has always
considered himself a
storyteller and was
looking for stories to
tell. PAGE D1
N EW YOR K T I M E S
— Ernest J. Moniz, former
Energy Department secretary
and nuclear scientist
Thousands of Star
Wars fans flock to
the seventh annual
festival — one of the
largest Star
Wars-themed art
festivals in the nation
— to see work from
nearly 100 artists and
wares from 40
vendors. PAGE A3
STAR
‘Terminal Lance’
and life in Corps
By David E. Sanger
and William J. Broad
“North Korea
could make Iran
look easy.”
Festival a force
for Star Wars
generations
Veterans of the
Federal Trade
Commission, which
gained five new
members, say it may
be outmatched
compared with the
constantly evolving
Silicon Valley.
PAGE B1
Verifying closure
of North Korea’s
program fraught
with uncertainty
As he weighs opening
nuclear disarmament negotiations with North
Korea, President Donald
Trump faces a regime
that for decades has hidden key elements of its
nuclear programs from
international monitors
and has banned inspectors from the country.
As a result, the first
step in any meaningful
agreement will be a declaration from North Korea about the scope of its
nuclear program, a declaration that no one will believe.
It will have to be fol-
CITY | STATE
BUSINESS
Tech watchdog
has weak bite
deal
won’t
be easy
U.S. Geological Survey
The eruption of Hawaii’s most active volcano, Kilauea, has forced the evacuation of more than 1,700
people, and 26 homes have been destroyed by the lava, which shot up as high as 100 feet in the air
Sunday. So far, 10 fissures have opened throughout the hardest-hit subdivision. Story on page A7.
Area leaders mull a third reservoir
They agree the project would protect
from flooding but differ on location
By Mike Snyder
Even before Hurricane
Harvey
dumped
14
months’ worth of rain on
the Houston area in four
days, government and
business leaders were
discussing the need to
build a third reservoir
west of the city — a key
step in completing a 78year-old plan to protect
the heart of Houston
from devastating floods.
That 1940 plan by the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers called for several
projects that were never
built, including a reservoir on White Oak Bayou,
a levee on Cypress Creek,
and about 50 miles of canals.
The engineers who
drew up that plan might
have gaped in astonishment at Greater Houston
2018 — a vast agglomeration of glittering skyscrapers and humble
bungalows,
narrow
streets and 24-lane freeways, cellphone towers
and salvage yards, strip
clubs and construction
cranes. Yet even as the region and its needs have
changed, the vision of an
additional reservoir has
endured.
Eight months after
Harvey, area leaders gen-
erally agree that a third
reservoir is needed to
supplement the protection provided by the
Barker and Addicks reservoirs — two projects in
the 1940 plan that did
come to fruition. Unresolved issues involving
the location, design and
primary goal of a third
reservoir, however, reflect broader questions
about regional values and
priorities.
These questions were
Emmett continues on A9
lowed by what experts
call the most extensive
inspection campaign in
the history of nuclear
disarmament, one that
will have to delve into a
program that stretches
back more than half a
century and now covers
square miles of industrial
sites and hidden tunnels
across the mountainous
North. And it may demand more than the 300
inspectors the International Atomic Energy
Agency now deploys to
assess the nuclear facilities of nearly 200 countries.
For Trump, getting the
right declaration and inspection process is critical given his argument
that false declarations
from Iran undercut the
legitimacy of the 2015 nuclear accord, which he is
debating pulling out of
later this week.
While there is no question Iran hid much of its
weapons-designing past,
North Korea has concealed programs on a far
North continues on A8
Landmark lawsuit brings heat relief to inmates
Navasota facility gets air conditioning; others may follow
By Gabrielle Banks
Graham Walzer / NYT
Maximilian
Uriarte, “Terminal
Lance” illustrator.
Yi-Chin Lee / Houston Chronicle
Former Alief resident Keith Cole and other inmates
brought the landmark lawsuit that led to air
conditioning being installed at the Pack Unit.
Index
Business .........B1 Crossword....D4 Horoscope ...D5 Sports..............C1
City/State.....A3 Directory .......A2 Lottery...........C8 TV....................D4
Comics ..........D5 Editorials.......A11 Nation ............A7 Weather ......B6
The heat woke him early.
Keith Milo Cole would sit
bolt upright in his prison
bunk, then soak his shirt in
the sink and slide it on
again.
He’d sit by the fan, sucking in deep gulps of air. Or
lie on the concrete floor.
The former Alief resident, who has spent decades in Texas prisons, saw
guards and inmates collapse during annual heat
waves.
Sometimes Cole, 64, who
has diabetes, hypertension
and cardiac problems, said
his heart would beat so fast
he thought he “positively,
absolutely” could die.
But this summer will be
different. After a historic,
four-year court battle for
what inmates contend is a
basic human right, air conditioning is now installed at
the Pack Unit in Navasota,
offering relief to the 1,400
inmates at the low-security,
geriatric facility.
And the landmark classaction lawsuit brought by
Cole and other inmates
over dangerous heat conditions finally could be resolved after a federal court
hearing Tuesday on a proposed settlement.
Other inmates also could
benefit. Even before negotiating a deal, Texas prison
officials began looking to
move tens of thousands of
vulnerable inmates into
Pack continues on A10
A2
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HHHH
NEWSMAKERS
LUXE LIFE
Houston VIPs share luxurious summer travel
plans and tips.
HoustonChronicle.com/luxelife
Zach Gibson / New York Times
As he battles brain cancer, Sen. John McCain is reckoning with his history and the future.
At home, McCain shares
some memories, regrets
Why Ben Carson's “welfare reform” would be a
disaster for housing.
By Jonathan Martin
N EW YOR K T IME S
PHOENIX — When former Vice
President Joe Biden traveled to Sen.
John McCain’s Arizona ranch last
Sunday to spend a few hours with
his ailing friend, the two reminisced about the “crazy senators” they
had served with, the overseas trips
they took together for decades and
the friendship McCain forged with
Biden’s two sons.
But the conversation on the sunsplashed deck off McCain’s bedroom was not all nostalgia.
“Here John knows he’s in a very,
very, very precarious situation, and
yet he’s still concerned about the
state of the country,” Biden said in
an interview. “We talked about how
our international reputation is
being damaged and we talked
about the need for people to stand
up and speak out.”
As he battles brain cancer and
the debilitating side effects of his
aggressive treatment, McCain himself is reckoning with his history
and the future, as he and a stream
of friends share memories and say
what needs to be said.
No one is saying goodbye, not
explicitly. The son and grandson of
admirals, McCain “doesn’t like
overt sentimentality,” as his friend
the former chief of staff Grant
Woods put it. But his visitors are
telling him they love him, how
much he has meant to them — and
together they are taking care of
unfinished business.
Criticism for Trump
The Republican senator encouraged the former Democratic vice
president to “not walk away” from
politics, as Biden put it before refusing to discuss a possible 2020
presidential run. McCain is using a
new book and documentary to
reveal his regret about not selecting
former Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman as
his running mate in 2008. His intimates have informed the White
House that their current plan for
his funeral is for Vice President
Mike Pence to attend the service to
be held in Washington’s National
Cathedral but not President Donald Trump, with whom McCain
has had a rocky relationship.
And some of his associates,
though not his family, have started
to quietly put out word that they
want a “McCain person” eventually
appointed to fill his Senate seat, a
GRAY
MATTERS
HoustonChronicle.com/GrayMatters
New York Times file
McCain says one of his regrets is not choosing Sen. Joseph Lieberman,
right, as his running mate in 2008 instead of Sarah Palin.
roster that includes his wife, Cindy.
John McCain, 81, is still in the
fight, struggling with the grim
diagnosis he received last summer:
He has been leading conference
calls with his staff in a strained
voice, grinding out three-hour
physical therapy sessions and rewarding himself most days with a
tall glass of Absolut Elyx on ice.
McCain, who is not doing interviews, delights in sitting out on
his deck where he once handled
slabs of ribs on the grill, friends
say. He and his wife listen to the
hummingbirds and the burbling
stream that runs through their
15-acre ranch, enjoy the verdant
scenery in an otherwise arid region
and divide their loyalties when the
hawks start pestering Peanut, their
Chihuahua mix. Cindy sides with
their dog, John the hawks.
It was also at his Hidden Valley
Ranch where the senator participated in a nearly two-hour HBO
documentary and co-wrote what he
acknowledges will be his last book,
“The Restless Wave,” both of which
are set to be released this month.
The film and the book, a copy of
which the New York Times obtained independently of McCain,
amount to the senator’s final say on
his career and a concluding argument for a brand of pro-free trade
and pro-immigration Republicanism that, along with his calls for
preserving the American-led international order, have grown out
of fashion under Trump.
In the book, McCain scorns
Trump’s seeming admiration for
autocrats and disdain for refugees.
“He seems uninterested in the
moral character of world leaders
and their regimes,” he writes of the
president. “The appearance of
toughness or a reality show facsimile of toughness seems to matter
more than any of our values. Flattery secures his friendship, criticism his enmity.”
Yet many in McCain’s own party
believe that, by selecting Sarah
Palin as his running mate in 2008,
he bears at least a small measure of
blame for unleashing the forces of
grievance politics and nativism
within the Republican Party.
TECHBURGER
Microsoft’s deal with Houston fits the
company’s ongoing reinvention.
HoustonChronicle.com/techburger
‘Another mistake’
While he continues to defend
Palin’s performance, McCain uses
the documentary and the book to
unburden himself about not selecting Lieberman, a Democrat-turnedindependent, as his running mate.
He recalls that his advisers
warned him that picking a vicepresidential candidate who caucused with Democrats and supported
abortion rights would divide Republicans and doom his chances.
“It was sound advice that I could
reason for myself,” he writes. “But
my gut told me to ignore it, and I
wish I had.”
Even more striking is how
McCain expresses his sorrow in the
documentary. He calls the decision
not to pick Lieberman “another
mistake” in his political career, a
self-indictment that includes his
involvement in the Keating Five
savings and loan scandal and his
reluctance to speak out during his
2000 presidential bid about the
Confederate battle flag flying above
the South Carolina Capitol.
Lieberman said he didn’t know
McCain felt that regret until he
watched the film. “It touched me
greatly,” he said.
Box office
Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore.
A Hearst newspaper
Marvel Studios via AP
After breaking opening weekend records, “Avengers: Infinity War” (with Josh
Brolin as Thanos) continued to dominate in its second weekend in theaters.
1. Avengers: Infinity War
$112.5 million
2. Overboard
$14.8 million
3. A Quiet Place
$7.6 million
4. I Feel Pretty
$4.9 million
5. Rampage
$4.6 million
6. Tully
$3.2 million
7. Black Panther
$3.1 million
8. Truth or Dare
$1.9 million
9. Super Troopers 2
$1.8 million
10. Bad Samaritan
$1.8 million.
Associated Press
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Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
A3
CITY | STATE
HCC shuts main campus after gun threat
Holman Street classes canceled when college
is alerted to anonymous Facebook message
By Lindsay Ellis
and Keri Blakinger
Houston Community College
is shutting down its Holman
Street campus Monday due to a
shooting threat made on social
media over the weekend, the
Texas 146
work to
begin in
summer
school said Sunday evening.
The FBI and local law enforcement are helping investigate the threat, which was published on Facebook, HCC
spokeswoman Linda Toyota
said.
“HCC takes all matters with
implications for the security of
its students, faculty and staff seriously,” the college said in an email. “HCC and its police department are actively working
with other law enforcement
agencies to identify the source of
the threat in an effort to eliminate the risk of harm.”
Officials did not offer details
about what the threat said. Toyota said no individuals were
named in the threat, which was
anonymous and specific to Central Campus on Holman.
Other HCC campuses will
still be open Monday, and the
college promised to provide additional security at those locations.
Toyota said HCC was made
aware of the threat on Saturday.
The Facebook post was deleted
that same day, she said.
About 150 course finals slated
for Monday at the Central Campus will be rescheduled to Friday, Toyota said.
She said it is the first time the
college has had to respond to a
threat from an unknown person.
“Usually,” she said, “we can
resolve it pretty quickly.”
Anyone with information related to the case can notify campus police at 713-718-8888.
A force to bridge generations
Clear Lake-area
project to take 3-4
years to complete
By Dug Begley
Work will start as early as
summer on a long-planned widening of Texas 146 at the mouth
of Clear Lake, a project that has
been eagerly awaited and feared
in Seabrook.
Webber, one of the region’s
largest road builders, was the
apparent low bidder when the
Texas Department of Transportation opened proposals for the
project last week in Austin. The
company bid $201.8 million for
the roughly four-mile-long project, which includes the bridges
needed along low-lying areas
and to carry Texas 146 traffic
atop local streets.
The highway is an often-agonizing trip slowed by 35 mph
speed limits and numerous vehicles turning on and off the road.
In many spots, once drivers enter it can be difficult to exit as
they compete with truck congestion in the area.
The upcoming work, along
with similar projects south of
the area in Galveston County,
will take Texas 146 from four
lanes to as many as 12 lanes in
some spots, and will add overpasses of various local streets.
The widened highway will be an
elevated freeway from NASA 1,
south to the League City Parkway.
During construction, officials
said four lanes will remain open
at all times. Work is expected to
Project continues on A4
By the numbers
$201.8M: Webber’s bid for
the widening of Texas 146.
12: Number of lanes planned in
some spots, up from four lanes
currently.
60: Approximate number of
businesses that will be displaced
by the work.
Yi-Chin Lee / Houston Chronicle
Different styles of paintings showcased the many characters of Star Wars at the seventh annual May the Fourth Art Festival on
Sunday in Houston. The two-day festival invited local artists to exhibit their art that celebrated the beloved movie franchise.
Star Wars-themed art show unites families
with crafts, wares that are ‘good for all ages’
By Paul Takahashi
Mary Mendez snapped some
photos as her 5-year-old daughters posed with the Boba Fettlike bounty hunter.
Alice and Amelia, wearing
Captain Phasma and Rey costumes, giggled as the Mandalorian mercenary — played by
volunteer Jerry Summers clad
in space armor and blaster —
gave the girls high-fives, then
pulled back his hand and feigned an injury.
“I love Star Wars, ever since I
was a kid,” Mendez, 30, said afterward with a smile. “The kids
have caught on, and they love it,
too. It’s a family thing. It’s good
for all ages.”
Thousands of Star Wars fans
flocked to the 7th annual May
the Fourth Art Festival, which
took place in an east downtown
warehouse this weekend. Nearly 100 artists and 40 vendors
showcased hundreds of art
pieces and craft goods inspired
by the storied Hollywood franchise.
Houston’s May the Fourth
celebration — a pun off the
iconic movie quote, “May the
Force be with You” — is one of
the largest Star Wars-themed
art festivals nationally. Between
300 and 400 people showed up
to the inaugural festival seven
years ago. Today, some 5,000
people visit the two-day event,
which showcases many emerging Houston artists.
The art festival has gotten so
big, it has caught the attention
of Disney, which owns Lucasfilm and the Star Wars franFestival continues on A5
Church gunman had deeply troubled past
By Sig Christenson
Long before Devin Patrick
Kelley gunned down 26 people
last November, he was a deeply
troubled airman whose supervisors repeatedly punished him
for a variety of offenses ranging
from insubordination to disobeying orders.
Kelley, 26, of New Braunfels,
not only killed 26 but wounded
another 20 in his Nov. 5 attack on
the First Baptist Church in
Sutherland Spring with a military-style assault rifle. He was
shot and wounded as he left the
building, then killed himself
with a handgun after a car chase
But the airman previously
was the subject of numerous
disciplinary actions.
In June 2011 Air Force police
launched a child-abuse investigation of Kelley at Holloman
AFB in New Mexico that eventually landed him in prison. The
next month, Kelley received the
first of nine Letters of Reprimand and Letters of Counsel-
ing. Stern warnings were issued
with each letter, some warning
his behavior was unacceptable
and would not be tolerated.
More disciplinary actions were
lodged against Kelley, yet he remained in the Air Force.
Air Force spokeswoman
Brooke Brzozowske said KelGunman continues on A4
Houston-area schools
score in H-E-B awards
Marching to make a difference
Cypress-Fairbanks
teacher brings home
$25K for self, school
By Mike Morris
Tim Warner
Participants begin the March of Dimes Walk, aimed at improving health of mothers and their
babies, on Sunday at the University of Houston, the 22nd such walk at the college campus.
Two Houston-area school districts and an experienced Cypress-Fairbanks ISD teacher
were among the big winners at
H-E-B’s 17th annual Excellence in
Education awards Sunday night.
Fort Bend ISD was named
Texas’ best large district, earning
a $100,000 grant, and the Humble
ISD trustees won the best school
board category, which carries a
$25,000 prize.
Pamela Broussard, who teaches English-language learners at
Cypress Falls High School as
head of the New Arrivals Center,
was one of the year’s two Lifetime
Achievement honorees, a category available to teachers with at
least 20 years of experience. She
will receive $25,000, along with a
matching grant for her school.
In total, the evening celebrated
the commitment of two principals, six teachers, one large district, one small district, a school
board and an early childhood facility as among the best in the
state.
CEO Charles Butt and other
H-E-B executives handed out a
combined $430,000 in cash
awards and grants. The program
has given away more than $9.5
million in cash and grants since
its launch in partnership with the
Texas Association of School Administrators in 2002.
In an evening of emotional
speeches from educators — some
of whom addressed lawmakers
in the room directly, arguing for
more funding for programs or
criticizing some state leaders’ embrace of school voucher programs — Broussard’s comments
were among the most well-received.
Her students don’t only come
from immigrant communities in
the U.S. but also from places like
Spain, Afghanistan and VenezuTeacher continues on A4
A4
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
CITY | STATE
REVIEW
Migos brings thunder to music festival’s return
JMBLYA hiccups, but
crowd comes out for
rappers J. Cole, Trae
By Joey Guerra
Hip-hop took center stage Sunday for the return of JMBLYA at
Sam Houston Race Park.
The festival has made yearly
appearances in Dallas and Austin
but hasn’t been in Houston since
2013. A healthy, diverse crowd
turned out for the daylong event,
which featured current hit-makers J. Cole and Migos across two
stages.
Weather is always a precarious
thing for festivals in Houston.
But Sunday at the Park proved
the ideal setting. There were
abundant water stations, plenty
of space to stretch out and even a
water slide.
It wasn’t without hiccups. A
pregnant Cardi B, likely one of
the biggest draws, was replaced
by Young Thug. Veteran rapper
T.I. also stepped in last-minute
for Kevin Gates, who was prohib-
Marco Torres
A diverse crowd turned out for JMBLYA’s return to Houston at Sam Houston Race Park on Sunday.
ited to travel as part of his parole.
The early part of the day was
peppered with performances by
SoundCloud rappers and local favorites, including Bun B and Trae
tha Truth.
Young Thug took the stage before sundown and had trouble
hyping up the crowd. The ap-
plause and singalongs were halfhearted.
“Houston, y’all ain’t turned up.
What’s up?” he asked. He frequently admonished the crowd
for not digging into the set.
He and a DJ zipped through
“My Boys,” With Them” and “Tomorrow Til Infinity” with vigor.
But the mood remained low-key.
“Digits” and “Best Friend”
seemed to wake up pockets of the
crowd. But an appearance by
Trae tha Truth seemed to barely
faze folks. Maybe they were missing Cardi B.
There was no such energy issue for Migos. The trio of Quavo,
Offset and Takeoff had the crowd
jumping before they even took
the stage. A DJ primed the people
with a series of thundering beats.
It notched up several levels
once Migos stepped onstage. The
group tore through a series of
songs: “Supastars,” the boom and
blare of “Deadz,” “Pipe it Up” and
“Trippin.” It sent a surge of electricity through the crowd.
They danced. They clapped.
They sang every word.
Most of the concession lines
emptied as fans flocked to the
stage.
Several folks lined the back of
the stage in the ultimate show of
VIP status. Among them was
Johnny Dang, local grill-maker to
the stars and a regular at Houston hip-hop shows.
The set list would have felt
complete even if “Bad and Boujee” had been cut, but when the
trio did launch into the monster
single, it created enough thunder
to likely be heard across the city.
joey.guerra@chron.com
twitter.com/joeyguerra
Teacher uses speech to praise ‘strong’ immigrant students
Teacher from page A3
ela. And she, in turn, spoke in her
acceptance speech of her work in
refugee camps and in places
where a good education can be
far too rare, like Syria and Afghanistan.
Broussard spoke most, however, of her students, whom she
wants “to be all they were created
to be.”
“They give me courage every
day,” she said. “They’re tenacious; they’re strong. Our immigrant families, there’s a lot of
things said about them, but they
bet their life, their families, their
cultures, their language, their
communities, their parades, their
holidays, everything on one thing
— that they believe that education
is going to make a difference.”
Cypress Falls High School
principal Becky Denton spoke of
the amazing progress Brous-
sard’s students make each year,
from the first week she meets
them, when Broussard has
taught them to say “Hi, my name
is…” and little else.
“By the semester, they’re talking in complete sentences. By the
end of the year, they’ll just blow
you away with their communication skills, with the way they’ve
settled in.”
The big award of the evening
went to Fort Bend ISD, a diverse
district with about 75,000 students speaking 100 languages.
Superintendent Charles Dupre
touched on that diversity in his
remarks, saying “it presents its
challenges, but it also presents
amazing opportunities.”
“This award is for the 11,000
employees and the amazing
school board that works as partners, as one unified team every
single day to inspire and equip
every single student to pursue fu-
tures beyond what they can
imagine,” Dupre said.
Humble ISD board president
Angela Conrad, in accepting the
award for best school board,
praised the trustees from other
districts who also were finalists
“When some people think of
boards they think of politics, but
these boards go beyond that,” she
said. “They focus on the greater
good.”
Conrad spoke of the “horrific
flooding” Hurricane Harvey
wrought in the northeast Houston area the district covers and
said she was proud that the district’s fiscal management allowed
it to provide buses, buildings and
staff to help during Harvey and
begin repairs at battered Kingwood High School quickly.
“We know how important
schools are to communities and
healing,” she said.
The annual Excellence in Edu-
cation process begins with the
grocery giant asking customers,
employees and civic leaders to
nominate educators and districts. Nominees — there were
more than 1,600 this year — then
submit applications and are winnowed to semi-finalists by a team
of judges.
Five regional judging panels
comprised of former winners,
administrators and civic leaders
then select 40 teacher and principal finalists, all of whom receive
prizes of between $1,000 and
$2,500; a similar process is used
to pick district and early education center finalists.
A statewide panel of judges
then conduct personal interviews with each finalist to select
winners.
The principals announced as
statewide winners Sunday, taking home $10,000 for themselves
and $25,000 for their schools,
were from Laredo and the Lubbock area.
Teachers honored in the
“Leadership” category — those
with between one and two decades on the job — were from
Dallas and Laredo. They took
home $10,000 for themselves and
$10,000 for their schools.
An early childhood center in
the Lubbock area took home a
$25,000 cash prize, and Lancaster
ISD in north Texas took home
$50,000 as the best small district.
The evening also featured a
keynote address from Sal Khan,
founder of Khan Academy, and a
standing ovation for Micheal
Brown, the Lamar High School
senior who made national headlines for being accepted to — and
receiving full-ride scholarships
from — 20 of the nation’s top colleges.
mike.morris@chron.com
Project will displace dozens of businesses along Texas 146
Project from page A3
last between three and four
years.
Though a boon for commuters, the project — which dates to
2004 and has been changed several times in response to public
comment — remains divisive,
especially in Seabrook. Nearly
60 businesses will be displaced
by the work.
“We’re getting there,” said
Paul Chavez, the city of Seabrook’s economic development
director, of the coming changes.
“A lot of the businesses are either in the process of relocating
or about to start that process.”
Nearly every business along
Texas 146 will be affected by the
widening, including popular
eateries, area drug stores and
banks.
Fewer effects are expected in
Kemah, where there is more
free space along the roadway.
Chavez said after years of
wondering whether construction would force them out,
many Seabrook business and
property owners have certainty.
“Some I’ve spoken to are actually looking forward to it,” he
said. “Many of them felt this
sword of Damocles is finally go-
ing away and finally happening.”
The city has spent years preparing for construction, recognizing that road work likely will
lower its property and sales tax
revenues as people visit and
shop elsewhere. Chavez said
economic development officials
also have saved for years to create assistance funds for eligible
businesses to help with reloca-
tion or improvements related to
lost revenue from the road
work.
Officials also will pay for
roadway signs, online resources
and marketing to help drivers —
especially delivery drivers and
emergency responders — navigate the area.
dug.begley@chron.com
twitter.com/DugBegley
Gunman on repeated cruelty toward wife: ‘I was just angry’
Gunman from page A3
ley’s supervisors “disciplined
him using available administrative tools to correct his behavior
and rehabilitate him” when he
failed to meet standards. Investigators began the child-abuse
probe after Kelley’s stepson was
admitted to a civilian hospital.
His wife said he had physically
abused her.
‘The guy was a loser’
Those allegations formed the
basis of his court-martial that resulted in a one-year prison sentence, followed by his expulsion
from the Air Force in 2014. A retired commander who reviewed
the records at the request of the
San Antonio Express-News said
Kelley should have been discharged long before he was sent
to prison.
“The guy was a loser,” said retired Air Force Gen. Eugene Habiger, a San Antonio resident
who led the U.S. Strategic Command and was vice commander
of Air Education and Training
Command at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph. “He shouldn’t
have remained in the Air Force.”
Documents detailing Kelley’s
many disciplinary issues are
part of a 610-page transcript of
his court-martial that was released to the Express-News. Kelley admitted in a plea agreement
that he had beaten his wife, Tessa Kelley, and her infant son.
His felony conviction should
have prevented him from purchasing the weapons from a licensed firearms dealer, but the
Air Force failed to provide Kelley’s criminal conviction records
Kelley
to a national
database used to
screen
people
seeking to buy
guns. A number
of lawsuits have
been filed by
families of the
victims or survi-
vors.
As part of his 2011 plea deal,
Kelley expressed remorse for
beating his infant stepson, who
suffered a cracked skull. He also
broke the child’s collarbone.
“Sir, this is the worst thing I’ve
done in my life and I will never
allow myself to hurt someone
like this again,” he told the judge,
according to the Air Force transcript. “A few times I got very
frustrated with (the child) when
he wouldn’t stop getting into
things. When Tessa wasn’t
around to take care of him, I
slapped him on the face and on
the body, more than once when
(the child) was crawling around
and tried to grab things he
wasn’t supposed to.”
Kelley left signs of his explosive temper in his path years before the shooting. Not long after
his release from prison and back
in the civilian world, Kelley was
charged with a misdemeanor for
cruelty to animals after abusing
a pet dog in Colorado. He later
threatened Michelle Shields, the
mother-in-law of his second
wife, Danielle Kelley, telling her
to stay away from a hospital
where she had their second
child.
“I will personally make it my
mission to destroy your entire
life,” he texted Shields, a San Antonio native and member of
Sutherland Springs Baptist
Church who didn’t attend services the day of the shooting. “I
suggest you don’t test my resolve.”
The trial transcript contains
documents that tracked everything from his many disciplinary
infractions and explanations for
them to his Cub Scout merit
badges. Just when he began to
have emotional problems isn’t
clear, but Kelley’s lack of impulse
control was documented before
he joined the Air Force. He was
suspended six times from New
Braunfels High School from
2004 to 2009 for offenses that
ranged from possession/sale of
drugs and profane language to
insubordination.
Air Force recruiters were not
required to ask for those disciplinary records.
Many ‘minor misconducts’
Kelley entered the service Jan.
5, 2010, went to Goodfellow AFB
in San Angelo for technical
training and served in Holloman’s 49th Logistics Readiness
Squadron. There, he earned a
“needs improvement” score on
his 2010-11 enlisted performance
evaluation, called an EPR, and
an “average” score” for a period
from September 2011-April 2012.
He received letters in both cases
warning that his subpar performance could affect eligibility for
assignments and promotions.
The letters started in the summer of 2011 and continued
through the following spring. In
one instance, a counseling letter
issued after he failed a hazardous materials preparer course
noted that he used a cell phone to
text others during training and
didn’t take time to perform progress checks. He also missed classes.
“Following initiation of the
child abuse investigation, but
prior to referral of court-martial
charges, Kelley engaged in several incidents of minor misconduct,” Brzozowske,the Air Force
spokeswoman, said. “The earliest incident occurred in July 2011
and the latest in March 2012. In
light of the ongoing criminal investigation, a disposition decision on the more serious assault
charges was pending; however,
Kelley’s command had an obligation to address any minor disciplinary infractions as they occurred.”
The earliest incidents of misbehavior on the job occurred not
long after a June 24, 2011attack on
his wife. Kelley testified that he
struck her at least twice between
that summer and April 27, 2012.
He also told the judge that he injured the baby April 27 and again
around June 16.
Kelley’s first Letter of Reprimand was issued July 22, 2011,
with a second one following four
days later. He received a Letter of
Counseling on Sept. 6, a Letter of
Reprimand on Sept. 12, and another Letter of Counseling on
Sept. 29.
Four more Letters of Reprimand were handed down starting Feb. 16. Two of them were issued March 19, with the last one
given the next day.
The Sept. 12 reprimand stated
he failed to obey an order and
that it was “not the first time.” In
a response, Kelley said, “It was in
a moment of lack of judgment
and failure on my part to not
think before I act.”
In the Feb. 16 incident, Kelley
disrespectfully addressed a
warehouse supervisor, called
her a foul name after leaving an
office and lied to an NCO when
confronted about it. He blamed
her for causing “an unprofessional conversation that could
have been avoided” but was
warned he had made a false official statement and that his “disrespect has been detrimental to
unit morale” and discipline of
the unit.
In one reprimand letter, given
after a March 18 incident involving insubordinate conduct and
failing to follow orders, he was
told, “I will not tolerate any further breeches of discipline by
you of any kind.”
‘No excuse’ for violence
If the spate of reprimand and
counseling letters suggested that
Kelley was angry, resentful and
undisciplined on the job, he was
a powder keg at home, grabbing
his wife by her throat for 15 to 20
seconds on June 24, 2011. He once
pulled her hair hard enough for
some of it to come out.
He wanted to keep her from
leaving the house.
“Every day I ask myself how I
could get that angry and hurt
her; I also punched her in the
arms a few times, which caused
bruises, and I also kicked her,”
Kelley told the judge. “I had no
legal justification or excuse to
put my hands on her. I was just
angry, and she wasn’t even attacking me.”
sigc@express-news.net
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
A5
CITY | STATE
Festival
goes on
despite
setback
Festival from page A3
chise. In April, a Disney lawyer
reached out to festival organizer
Dandee Warhol, threatening to
shut the event down for using
the Star Wars characters and
brand in its marketing.
Warhol, who operates a local
art studio called War’Haus, convened an emergency meeting
with his team and changed the
festival name to May the Fourth
Art Festival and added a disclaimer saying that the event is
not affiliated with LucasFilm or
Star Wars.
“We were two weeks away,
and there was no way I was going to shut this down,” Warhol
said. “So we changed everything
overnight.”
With a potential shutdown
averted, Star Wars fans, young
and old, streamed into the popup art venue over the weekend.
They admired handmade
necklaces with shiny aluminum
logos of the Death Star and the
Rebel Alliance, a skateboard
painted with Chewbacca and
crocheted, dog-shaped pillows
with names like “Luke Skywalkmyself.”
There also were paintings of
Han Solo, Obi-Wan Kenobi and
Princess Leia and even a pointillistic portrait of Boba Fett made
with hundreds of black and
white Stormtrooper and Darth
Vader stickers.
Toward the back of the venue,
Juan Salazar with Super Happy
Incredible Toys shop in the
Heights, was selling vintage Star
Wars action figures dating back
from the original movie release
in 1977. Next to the $24 first-edition Stormtroopers, Salazar was
selling figurines from the latest
Yi-Chin Lee photos / Houston Chronicle
Joey and Kim Casto admire Star Wars-inspired artwork at the May the Fourth Art Festival. The event was filled with pieces from
nearly 100 artists and wares from 40 vendors. Items included everything from Death Star necklaces to Chewbacca skateboards.
Star Wars offshoots.
“The generation that grew up
with Star Wars have children
who are growing up with their
own Star Wars,” Salazar said.
“Every generation has their own
Star Wars.”
Many parents brought their
young children to the art festival, several for the second or
third time, but always eager to
share their love of the movies
with the next generation of fans.
While youngsters said they
enjoyed
the
action-packed
blockbusters, the adults said
they appreciated the deeper story behind Star Wars: the battle
between good and evil and the
hero’s quest.
“It taps into all of the archetypes,” said Cynthia Miller, who
brought her 8-year-old daughter, Emma, to the festival. “I
think that’s why it speaks to a lot
of us.”
Elena McGlasson took her 6year-old son, Hamilton, to the
art festival for the first time. The
boy wore a Kylo Ren costume
but also brought an extra Darth
Vader one, just in case he wanted
an outfit change in the middle of
the festival, his mom said. Hamilton has yet to see the movies
but knows all the characters and
plotlines from playing with his
Star Wars Lego sets, she said.
“I’m glad we get to bond over
Star Wars,” McGlasson said.
“It’s really special.”
paul.takahashi@chron.com
twitter.com/paultakahashi
Many attendees, like Chris Lewis with his custom-made Star
Wars hat, showed their love of the franchise by dressing up.
A6
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
CITY | STATE
AROUND THE AREA
Man leads police
on chase, dies in
fiery car crash
A man died early Sunday in a Baytown crash
after refusing to pull over
for police.
An officer tried to stop
the driver just before 3
a.m., but the driver fled,
police said. He led police
on a chase that ended on
Texas 146 near Garth,
where he crashed and the
car caught fire.
Officers worked to
extinguish the flames, but
the driver was dead, police said. Authorities have
not released the man’s
name.
Houston police. A Houston Fire Department
EMS ambulance was
headed east on Beechnut,
transporting two patients
to a hospital with its siren
on and lights flashing.
At the intersection
with U.S. 59, an SUV
slammed into the side of
the ambulance, pushing it
up against a traffic light
pole in the median.
The occupants of the
SUV fled on foot without
giving any information,
police said.
Three firefighters and
two patients were inside
the ambulance, police
said; all were transported
to a nearby hospital.
Police: Two men
shot, in hospital
after road rage
Man allegedly
stabs friend
near Chinatown
Road rage led to a double shooting late Saturday
in west Houston, police
said.
Houston police are
seeking the driver of a
Dodge Charger who allegedly shot two men in
their 20s in the 12600
block of Richmond Avenue around 9 p.m. Both
men are hospitalized in
stable condition.
The victims were driving a Ford Mustang and a
Chevy Camaro near the
intersection of Richmond
and Kirkwood when the
driver of the Charger
pulled out a gun and shot
both of them and then
drove away, according to
police.
Suspect accused
of beating man
to death arrested
Montgomery County
officials have arrested
Thomas Lyn Barringer,
who is suspected of fatally beating a man with a
shovel while the man
slept.
The 26-year-old Living-
Tim Warner
Stepping lively at the Polish festival
Dancers in Polish-style dress step to traditional music on Saturday during the Houston Polish Festival at
Our Lady of Czestochowa Parish on Blalock Road. The annual event concluded Sunday.
ston man allegedly hit
Andrew Massey in the
face with the shovel’s
handle during an attack
in the early hours of
April 27. Massey died
Friday of his injuries.
A Montgomery County
Sheriff’s Office SWAT
team arrested Barringer
at about 2 a.m. at a Holiday Inn property on the
banks of Lake Conroe.
Barringer had been
released from prison just
weeks before the attack
on Massey.
He was arrested last
week after breaking in to
a home and stealing a car,
then fleeing into the
woods when police tried
to stop him, police said.
Barringer was sentenced
to three years in prison,
according to court re-
cords. He was released
on April 2 and still under
parole supervision, according to the Department of Public Safety.
Deputies rescue
man from trying
to jump to death
Two Harris County
sheriff’s deputies rescued
a man Sunday morning
who was trying to jump
from an overpass onto
Interstate 45.
The man was on the
bridge across I-45 at Richey Road in north Houston, said Deputy Thomas
Gilliland of the Harris
County Sheriff’s Office.
A little after 11 a.m., he
said, a bystander made a
911 call to report that a
man was trying to jump
from a bridge onto the
highway below. When
Deputies J. Leal and R.
Cruz arrived, Gilliland
said, the man was lying
across the bridge’s concrete retaining wall.
A bystander captured
on video what happened
next: The man dangled
from the side of the
bridge, nearly falling as
people gathered below to
try to help or catch him.
Just as it appeared he’d
let go and fall, the deputies reached down to grab
him, pulling him back
over the wall to safety.
They managed to pull
him back over the retaining wall and away from
danger, but the man was
determined, Gilliland
said; he jumped up and
moved toward the wall
again, still trying to jump.
This time, the deputies
pulled him to the ground
and handcuffed him.
The man, who is 19 or
20 years old, was taken to
Ben Taub Hospital for a
mental health evaluation,
Gilliland said.
Ambulance hit
by SUV, injuring
medics, patients
An SUV slammed into
an ambulance early Sunday in southwest Houston, injuring the medics
and patients onboard.
The driver of the SUV
and a passenger fled the
scene.
The crash happened
about 3 a.m. at the intersection of Beechnut
and U.S. 59, according to
A late-night argument
turned violent Saturday
when a man pulled out a
knife and stabbed another man several times,
police said.
The two men were
acquaintances, according
to Houston police. The
victim was visiting a
friend at the Happy
Home apartment complex
on Club Creek Drive,
which runs just south of
Chinatown.
Just before 11 p.m., the
suspect arrived at the
apartment, and the two
men got into an argument, police said. That’s
when the suspect pulled
out a knife and stabbed
his acquaintance several
times, including twice in
the chest, police said.
The victim was taken
to a local hospital in critical condition, but police
said he was listed as
stable after having surgery.
Police found the suspect in the apartment
complex and took him
into custody.
From staff reports
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
A7
NATION | WORLD
Fast-moving lava destroys 26 Hawaii homes
1,700 evacuees don’t
know when — or if —
they’ll be able to return
By Caleb Jones, Jennifer
Peltz And Sophia Yan
A S S OC IAT E D PRE SS
PAHOA, Hawaii — The number of homes destroyed by Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano climbed
to 26 Sunday as scientists reported lava spewing more than
200 feet into the air.
Some of the more than 1,700
people who evacuated prepared
for the possibility they may not
return for quite some time.
Hawaii officials said the decimated homes were in the Leilani
Estates subdivision, where molten rock, toxic gas and steam
have been bursting through
openings in the ground created
by the volcano. Black-andorange ribbons of molten rock
have curled onto roadways.
Amber Makuakane, 37, a
teacher and single mother of
two, said her three-bedroom
house in Leilani Estates was destroyed by lava.
The dwelling was across from
a fissure that opened Friday,
when “there was some steam
rising from all parts of the yard,
but everything looked fine,” Makuakane said.
Marco Garcia / Associated Press
Leilani Estates resident Sam Knox watches the lava stretch across the road near Pahoa, Hawaii.
There was no indication Sunday when the lava might stop or how far it might spread.
On Saturday, she received
alerts from her security system
that motion sensors throughout
the house had been triggered.
She later confirmed that lava
had covered her property.
“They don’t really understand,” she said about her children. “My son keeps asking me,
`Mommy when are we going to
go home?’ ”
Makuakane grew up in the
area and lived in her house for
nine years. Her parents also live
in Leilani Estates.
“The volcano and the lava —
it’s always been a part of my
life,” she said. “It’s devastating
… but I’ve come to terms with it.”
There was no indication
when the lave might stop or how
far it might spread.
“There’s more magma in the
system to be erupted. As long as
that supply is there, the eruption will continue,” U.S. Geological Survey volcanologist Wendy Stovall said.
About 240 people and 90 pets
spent Saturday night at shelters,
the American Red Cross said.
Officials intended to let some
residents return briefly Sunday
to fetch pets, medicine and documents, though Hawaii County
spokeswoman Janet Snyder
cautioned that plans could shift
with the rapidly changing situation.
The number of lava-venting
fissures in the neighborhood
grew overnight from eight to as
many as 10, Stovall said, though
some have quieted at various
points. Regardless, USGS scientists expect fissures to keep
spewing.
The openings could eventually consolidate into one powerful
vent, as has happened in some
previous Hawaii eruptions, Stovall said.
Kilauea (pronounced kill-ahWAY’-ah), one of the world’s
most active volcanoes, has been
erupting continuously since
1983. The USGS’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory issued a notice in mid-April that there were
signs of pressure building in underground magma, and a new
vent could form on the cone or
along what’s known as the East
Rift Zone. Leilani Estates sits
along the zone .
The crater floor began to collapse Monday, triggering earthquakes and pushing lava into
new underground chambers
that carried it toward Leilani
Estates and nearby communities.
Trump could ignore a subpoena from Mueller, Giuliani says
By Mark Berman
WAS H I NGT ON P O ST
President Donald Trump
would not have to comply with a
subpoena issued by the special
counsel investigating Russian
interference in the 2016 presidential election and could invoke the Fifth Amendment if he
does sit down with him, one of
his lawyers said Sunday.
“We don’t have to” comply
with a subpoena, Rudy Giuliani,
the former New York mayor who
recently joined Trump’s legal
team, said in a televised interview. “He’s the president of the
United States. We can assert the
same privileges other presidents
have.”
Giuliani’s claims comes less
than a week after the Washington Post reported that special
counsel Robert Mueller, who is
seeking to interview Trump,
had raised the possibility of subpoenaing the president during a
meeting this year.
Trump has shaken up his legal team in recent days, seeking
to take a more aggressive response to the probe that has en-
gulfed much of his presidency.
During an interview on ABC
News’ “This Week,” Giuliani repeatedly assailed Mueller’s
probe, questioning why he
would “walk (Trump) into a
prosecution for perjury” by letting him sit for an interview.
Trump has publicly said he
would speak to Mueller, but Giuliani said he was not prepared so
far to make that happen.
“Not after the way they acted,” Giuliani said. “I came into
this case with the desire to do
that, they keep convincing me
not to do that.”
The uncertainty regarding
whether Trump will sit for an interview with Muelle could ultimately make its way to the Supreme Court if it is not resolved.
A8
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HHHH
NATION | WORLD
Social Security
office closings
draw outcry
By Patricia Sullivan
WAS H I N GT O N P O ST
Jabin Botsford / Washington Post
"They are not that couple that holds hands just because; she is old-world European,” said Stephanie
Winston Wolkoff, a longtime friend of Melania Trump, on the president and first lady’s relationship.
A year into the presidency,
first lady raises her profile
By Emily Heil
and Josh Dawsey
WAS H I NGT ON P O ST
WASHINGTON
—
Donald
and
Melania
Trump’s remarkably separate daily routines begin
with him getting up
around 5:30 a.m., watching
cable news shows and
tweeting.
The first lady wakes in
her own bedroom a bit later, according to two close
friends of the Trumps. She
then readies their 12-yearold son for school, including checking to make sure
his homework is in his
backpack.
Amid the noise and
churn of the Trump administration — most recently about how the president paid money to silence
Stormy Daniels — Melania
Trump has settled into a
quieter routine, often apart
from the president, raising
their son and carving out a
place for herself in a most
untraditional
White
House.
The first lady has not directly addressed the affairs
that Daniels and another
woman, Karen McDougal,
said they had with her husband. But she has noticeably begun to raise her profile, independent from the
president’s, and she has
called a news conference in
the White House Rose Garden on Monday, a public
appearance that would
have been almost unthinkable just a few months ago.
“Her focus all along has
been children and this
launch is meant to formalize what her role will be for
the next three to seven
years,” said Stephanie
Grisham,
Melania’s
spokeswoman. She said
the first lady will devote
the rest of the Trump presidency to the issues children face today and their
well-being.
Staying private
In recent weeks, the first
lady has been at the center
of more high-profile events
than during the entire previous year — including attending the Houston funeral of former first lady
Barbara Bush solo.
Political marriages tend
to be more complicated
than most, but it’s striking
that the Trumps make so
little effort to project a
more united front. Although both are keenly
aware of the power of visual images, some of their
memorable moments together are awkward: Melania swatting his hand away
on a tarmac, and several
times caught on camera
seeming to resist his outreach.
“She is a dignified, private person, and she’ll deal
with her personal life in
private and it’s no one’s
business,” said Stephanie
Winston Wolkoff, a friend
of Melania’s. “They are not
that couple that holds
hands just because; she is
old-world European and
it’s not who she is.”
It is unusual to see a candid shot of the president
enjoying an unplanned
moment with his wife, or
even with Barron, the first
young son in the White
House since John F. Kennedy Jr. in the early 1960s.
The Trumps are often
apart even during their free
time, according to several
people who know the couple’s schedules. At Mar-aLago on holidays and
weekends, the president
golfs or dines with politicians, business executives
and media personalities on
the patio, while Melania is
often nowhere to be seen.
According to several current and former aides, the
president and first lady often do not eat together in
the White House either.
“They spend very little
to no time together,” said
one longtime friend of the
president.
Grisham said the president and Melania do spend
time with each other.
“Aside from the president’s
solo trips, the family
spends most evenings together.” She also played
down the headlines about
Trump’s alleged affairs and
said Melania “is focused on
being a mom. She’s focused
on being a wife, and she’s
focused on her role as first
lady. And that’s it. The rest
is just noise.”
A senior West Wing official, when asked about the
couple’s separate schedules and bedrooms, declined to comment, saying
it wasn’t official business.
Preventing ‘heartache’
Melania grants few interviews and declined to
speak for this article, but
during the campaign she
told The Washington Post
that she and her husband
are “very independent,”
adding, “We give ourselves
and each other space.”
According to several
people who know the couple, that space appears to
have grown wider under
the White House roof — especially since Daniels, a
porn star whose real name
is Stephanie Clifford, as
well as McDougal, a Playboy model, publicly talked
about their alleged affairs
with Trump during his
marriage to Melania. Daniels was paid $130,000 during the campaign by a
Trump attorney to stop
talking about the affair.
Last
week,
Trump
tweeted that he repaid the
attorney to “stop the false
and extortionist accusations made by her about an
affair.” Rudy Giuliani, one
of his lawyers, told NBC
News that payment was
made “to prevent personal
embarrassment and heartache to his wife.”
A series of shutdowns
across the country by the
Social Security Administration is causing major
difficulties for the elderly,
people with disabilities
and other beneficiaries,
activists and political leaders say.
The agency has closed
about 125 of its approximately 1,250 offices since
2000 — a 10 percent reduction, part of what officials
describe as a shift to greater use of online services in
an era of budget constraints and a growing
population of senior citizens.
In addition, all 533 Social Security Administration “contact sites” — locations that serve remote,
rural populations on a
weekly or monthly basis also have closed, said leaders of the union that represents Social Security employees.
Pending June closures
of the Arlington, Va., field
office and one of its Baltimore locations — neither
of which has been publicly
announced — come on the
heels of the shutdown of
offices in Milwaukee and
Chicago in the past year,
which elected officials also
protested to no avail.
A spokeswoman for the
agency attributed the Arlington closure to an expiring lease and an inability to find space nearby, an
explanation that elected
officials dispute.
“Closing the Arlington
office is a shortsighted
way to cut costs, and will
inflict hardship on people
least able to cope with it,”
Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va.,
said.
The number of Social
Security office workers
has dropped by 3,500
since 2010, and under the
funding level proposed by
the Trump administration, another 1,000 jobs
would be lost, said Max
Richtman, chief executive
of the National Committee
to Preserve Social Security
and Medicare, a Washington, D.C.-based advocacy
group.
Congress cut the agency’s operating budget every year from 2010 to 2017,
before increasing it this
year, he said. But with
10,000 Americans turning
65 every day, the demand
for Social Security services is not going away.
“Despite the recent
funding boost, SSA continues to close field offices,
primarily in urban neighborhoods,” he said.
Trump’s CIA nominee
offered to withdraw
A S S O CI AT E D P R E S S
WASHINGTON — Gina Haspel, President Donald Trump’s nominee to
lead the Central Intelligence Agency, offered to
withdraw her nomination,
two senior administration
officials said Sunday, amid
concerns that a debate
over a harsh interrogation
program would tarnish
her reputation and that of
the CIA.
White House aides on
Friday sought out additional details about Haspel’s involvement in the
CIA’s now-defunct program of detaining and
brutally interrogating terror suspects after 9/11 as
they prepared her for
Wednesday’s confirmation hearing. This is when
she offered to withdraw,
the officials said.
They said Haspel, who
is the acting director of the
CIA, was reassured that
her nomination
was
still on track
and will not
withdraw.
The officials
spoke
on
Haspel
the condition of anonymity to discuss internal
deliberations. The news
was first reported Sunday
by The Washington Post.
Haspel, who would be
the first woman to lead the
CIA, is the first career operations officer to be nominated to lead the agency
in decades. She served almost entirely undercover
and much of her record is
classified. Democrats say
she should be disqualified
because she was the chief
of base at a covert detention site in Thailand
where two terrorism suspects were subjected to
waterboarding, a technique
that
simulates
drowning.
North Korea’s atomic complex believed vast, well-hidden
North from page A1
larger scale and built an arsenal
of 20 to 60 nuclear warheads —
compared with none in Iran. In
fact, the Iran inspections, the
IAEA says, have gone on without a hitch in the past two years,
though it is a far smaller, comparatively easier effort.
“North Korea could make Iran
look easy,” Ernest J. Moniz, the
former Energy Department secretary and nuclear scientist who
negotiated many details of the
2015 deal during the Obama administration, said last week.
“This isn’t ‘Trust but verify,’”
he said, using Ronald Reagan’s
phrase from arms control negotiations with the Soviet Union.
“It’s ‘Distrust everything and
verify, verify, verify.’”
Success with a relatively small
force of inspectors in North Korea, according to former weapons inspectors, depends on the
full cooperation of its leader, Kim
Jong Un, in opening up the vast
nuclear enterprise he inherited
from his father and grandfather.
Four years ago, the RAND
Corp., which often conducts
studies for the Defense Department, estimated that finding and
securing the North’s weapons of
mass destruction if the nation
fell apart — or into any situation
in which it might be hostile to inspection — could require up to
273,000 troops. That is far more
than the peak of the American
occupying force in Iraq.
Like Iran, North Korea would
have to begin any denuclearization pact with a comprehensive
listing of all its atomic sites, factories and weapons — which U.S.
intelligence agencies would immediately compare with their
own estimates.
The complexity of the ensuing
verification would depend on
how extensive a “disarmament”
Trump has in mind — and
whether it matches Kim’s definition.
Everyone agrees that such a
program of disarmament would
involve the North surrendering
its nuclear arms. But U.S. intelligence agencies have vastly differing estimates of the size of the arsenal, be it the CIA’s assessment
of around 20 nuclear weapons or
the Defense Intelligence Agency’s estimate of about 60. That
means it is possible that inspectors will never know for sure if
they have found everything.
Inspections problematic
The Trump administration
has not said whether North Korea would have to dismantle
most or all of its nuclear-fuel production facilities, which are believed to be far more numerous
than Iran’s. Nor is it clear whether the North would have to give
up its missiles.
North Korea is also believed to
Korean Central News Agency / Associated Press
It’s unclear whether North Korea would have to give up its
missiles under a nuclear pact with the United States.
possess large stores of germ
weapons and nerve gas, like the
kind used to assassinate Kim’s
half brother in an attack last year
in Malaysia.
But it is the sprawling nuclear
complex that poses the largest
problem. Inspectors at the IAEA
are not trained to recognize or
handle nuclear weapons; they
are basically forensic accountants, keeping track of uranium
and plutonium flows through
factories and of equipment that
can be used to produce nuclear
fuel.
Ridding the North of its warheads would require military
specialists from the Western nuclear states — including “render
safe” teams trained to prevent
arms from detonating — as well
as possible agreements with China or Russia to take the weapons.
Even so, the agency is likely to
be overwhelmed.
Western experts put the
North’s total number of nuclear
sites — including its main atomic
center at Yongbyon, its mountain
testing complex and a number of
clandestine labs and facilities —
at 40 to 100, according to the
RAND report.
‘No good parallels’
That is just one metric to explain why the denuclearization
of North Korea has “no good parallels” in disarmament history,
said David A. Kay, a nuclear expert who in 2003 and 2004 led
the American hunt for unconventional arms in Iraq.
The goal of nuclear dismantlement in North Korea, Kay said in
an interview, “is far more complex than anything the administration is talking about,” because
its atomic complex is so large, so
advanced — and in some cases,
so well hidden.
The North’s atomic industrial
site sprawls over nearly 4 square
miles and has some 400 buildings — a vast maze largely unknown to the outside world, and
one that is much larger than
most U.S. weapon laboratories.
The 2014 RAND study, conducted for the U.S. Army, imagined the North’s collapse and a
military rush to secure and remove its weapons of mass destruction. The troop estimates
were driven by the need to secure
the nuclear sites, though the
study also looked at North Korea’s chemical and biological
arms, as well as long-range missiles.
In addition, the study took into account a wide range of expected opposition and hostility
from North Korea’s military. It
put the U.S. force requirements
at 73,000 troops in a situation
where it was unclear how they
would be received, or up to
273,000 if there was active resistance. The United States keeps
about 28,000 troops in South Korea.
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
A9
FROM THE COVER
Emmett: State, county should run reservoir
Emmett from page A1
highlighted in a report
last month by the Greater
Houston Flood Mitigation
Consortium, a panel of experts examining flooding
issues. The report noted
that a third reservoir concept known as “Plan 5,”
discussed in a 2015 Harris
County Flood Control
District study, was designed chiefly to enable
new development rather
than to protect places
where people already
lived and worked.
The
same
debate
emerged during planning
and construction of the
Grand Parkway, the area’s
outermost ring road. Critics said — and planners at
times acknowledged —
that the road was intended to open up new areas
for development rather
than to increase mobility
in existing communities.
The essence of this dispute is whether to focus
on planning to meet the
needs of future residents
or on enhancing the lives
of those already here.
Protecting the prairie
Harris County Commissioner Jack Cagle says
this is a false choice.
Cagle, whose northwest
Harris County precinct
includes areas likely to be
affected by a third reservoir, is calling for an approach that he says would
facilitate responsible development, benefit existing neighborhoods and
protect significant portions of the Katy Prairie
west of Houston, where
vegetation and wetlands
provide natural flood protection.
“The prairie can be the
thing that saves us,” said
Cagle, who calls his concept “Plan 7.”
Cagle says the reservoir
could be designed to
spread out over a broad
area of the prairie, in
keeping with a Dutch
A third reservoir
Proposed Cypress
Creek Levee
(1940 plan)
99
Cypress
Willlowbrrook
Cypress
Creek
Copperfield
Place
Potential third
reservoir site
(2015 plan)
WALLER
COUNTY
10
Fulsh
hear
Culllen
Parrk
Cinco
o
Ra
anch
Buffalo
Bayou
45
ADDICKS
RESERVOIR
Ala
lan
an agh
ghd
hdi
dis
is
Buffalo
Bayou
Buffalo
Bayou
Westheimer Rd.
Brays
Bayou
ay
Westpark Tollw
59
69
Source: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
flood control concept
known as “make room for
the river.”
“We need to try to create a system that integrates with the other two reservoirs and is of a robust
size that could actually
handle a Harvey-size
storm or larger and provide some protection
downstream,” Cagle said.
Cagle said more study
is needed to flesh out the
details of a third reservoir.
The study and subsequent
design and construction,
he said, could proceed
more quickly under local
management rather than
through the Corps of Engineers, which manages
the Addicks and Barker
reservoirs.
Corps projects, Cagle
said, tend to be “ploddingly planned.”
County Judge Ed Emmett agreed that the state
or the county should
build and operate the
third reservoir. Moreover,
Emmett said he wants the
state or federal government to protect significant portions of the Katy
Prairie by creating a pre-
69
610
8
BARKER
RESERVOIR
59
White
Oak
Bayou
290
Katy
FORT
BEND
COUNTY
5 miles
Jerse
ey
y
Villag
ge
e
6
HARRIS
COUNTY
Local officials agree a third
flood control reservoir west of
Houston is needed, but details
of its design and location have
not been determined.
DOW
WNTOWN
HOU
USTON
45
288
Houston Chronicle
“We need to try to create a system that
integrates with the other two reservoirs
and is of a robust size.”
Jack Cagle, Harris County commissioner
serve.
“I’m making calls” toward that goal, he said.
Emmett said the reservoir should not be located
in the Katy Prairie, although it should be sited
and designed to protect
the Cypress Creek watershed in the same area.
Assessing the cost
Estimates of the cost of
a third reservoir have hovered around $500 million,
and officials generally say
the funds should come
from the state or federal
government. Theoretically, a third reservoir could
be among the projects included in a multibilliondollar Harris County
flood bond election scheduled for Aug. 25.
The concept also has
drawn support from Harris Plus Flood Solutions, a
nonprofit founded in Jan-
uary by the West Houston
Association, a business
group, and the Greater
Houston Builders Association, a trade group for
homebuilders.
Harris
Plus’
advocacy
arm,
known as Houston Stronger, has developed a wish
list of projects with a total
cost of $58 billion.
Augustus
Campbell,
the CEO of the West
Houston
Association,
said the plan is conceptual and subject to change.
He said the organization
agrees that more study of
the details of the third reservoir is needed, but he
did not directly answer a
question about whether
the industry groups support the Plan 5 approach.
In addition to obvious
issues such as cost and lo-
cation, backers of a third
reservoir must wrestle
with potential confusion
based on terminology. A
reservoir, after all, is simply water pooled behind
some obstruction — logs
piled up by beavers, compacted earth stretched
across or parallel to a
stream, or a massive concrete edifice such as Hoover Dam.
The levees at Addicks
and Barker are made of
compacted earth, with
ends tapered toward the
ground and covered in
concrete.
“Each taper is at a different elevation to make
sure the rate of spillage
only gradually increases
(since all of the water is
going to the same bayou)
instead of gushing out
both sides at once,” Houston engineer Michael F.
Bloom writes in a discussion of the reservoirs on
his blog, Riparian Houston.
Addicks and Barker also have gates to control
the release of water from
the reservoirs behind the
earthen levees. During
Harvey, as unprecedented
rainfall filled the reservoirs, Corps of Engineers
officials opened these
gates, flooding hundreds
of houses downstream.
Levee without gates
A reservoir with gates
creates the potential for
pools behind the levees to
remain in place for longer
periods of time. If the
third reservoir is built in
the Katy Prairie, this
could damage vegetation
that helps to absorb floodwaters, provides wildlife
habitat and purifies water, said Mary Anne Piacentini, the CEO of the
nonprofit Katy Prairie
Conservancy.
“A levee (without gates)
would hold water, but it
would seep out naturally,”
she said.
Piacentini said she had
consulted with an ecologist who determined that
prolonged
inundation
could interrupt the life cycle of the vegetation and
make the soil less absorbent.
Cagle said his notion of
spreading out the water
over a large area would
keep it shallow, allowing
sunlight to penetrate and
sustain the valuable prairie grasses.
The commissioner acknowledged
potential
tension between the need
to take action before
memories of Harvey fade
and the risks of making
huge investments without
fully exploring the benefits and risks of each project.
“I’m wanting us to
move quickly,” Cagle said.
“I’m highly motivated on
this.”
mike.snyder@chron.com
twitter.com/chronsnyder
A10
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
FROM THE COVER
Pack
Unit
target
of suit
Pack Unit from page A1
cooler quarters, perhaps to
avert a swarm of additional
lawsuits from other prisons.
“I’m not sure it would
have happened without a
federal lawsuit,” said state
Sen. John Whitmire, DHouston, chair of the Texas
Senate corrections committee. “It’s an attitude among
the public and the Legislature, which speaks for the
public, that we don’t want
to spend money on people
who are murderers and
rapists.”
The 2014 suit filed by the
Pack inmates challenged
the deadly hot conditions
inside the rural prison, saying they violated constitutional protections against
cruel and unusual punishment. U.S. District Keith P.
Ellison has already concluded the state showed
“deliberate indifference” to
inmate conditions.
Cole, who is serving a life
sentence for killing his estranged wife on a west
Houston street 24 years
ago, knows he and his fellow inmates don’t generate
sympathy from all sectors
of the public.
“I’ve gotten letters from
people that say, ‘Extreme
heat? You can die and go to
hell,’ ” Cole said during a
visiting room interview
with the Houston Chronicle in February. “But the
fact of the matter is most
people in the free world
don’t realize … this is a life
or death situation.”
Prison officials acknowledged that 22 prisoners
died from extreme indoor
heat over 14 years in prisons from South Texas to
Dallas. But human rights
and health experts who
visited Texas prisons estimated that the actual number of heat deaths is much
higher.
‘Moral responsibility’
The historic settlement
expected to be finalized this
week requires that temporary air conditioning at
Pack be replaced — pending legislative approval —
by permanent cooling systems by May 2020. It also
resolves lawsuits involving
eight wrongful deaths and
a wrongful injury at other
prisons and awards the Edwards Law firm in Austin
$4.5 million for trying the
case.
And Bryan Collier, executive director of the Texas
prisons, is planning to relocate at-risk prisoners at 75
uncooled units to 29 prisons already equipped with
air conditioning, according
to two lawmakers briefed
on the plan.
Collier has proposed applying 26 medical categories outlined in the Pack
deal — such as people 65 or
older, with diabetes, coronary artery disease, asthma or who take antipsychotics or diuretics — to
identify inmates across
Texas in greatest need of
protection.
He hopes to make use of
Yi-Chin Lee / Houston Chronicle
Inmates at the Wallace Pack Unit in Navasota challenged the deadly hot conditions inside the rural prison in a 2014 lawsuit.
cold or illness, so why
would we not protect them
when we know heat is a
proven,
measurable
threat?” she asked.
Cooling America’s prisons
A Houston Chronicle survey of state prison systems across the U.S. found that five states
provide air-conditioned living quarters for all inmates and prison systems in 21 states provide
it for at least half their inmate population. However, many provide other ventilation systems.
AC IN STATE PRISONS
Wash.
No
Mont.
Ore.
Wyo.
N.H.
Vt.
N.D.
S.D.
Colo.
Calif.
N.M.
Mass.
R.I.
Mich.
Pa.
Iowa
Ill.
Kan.
Okla.
Texas
Ohio
Ind.
Mo.
W.Va.
Va.
Ky.
Conn.
N.J.
Md.
Del.
N.C.
Tenn.
Ark.
S.C.
Miss.
Alaska
Me.
N.Y.
Wis.
Neb.
Utah
Ariz.
Yes
Minn.
Idaho
Nev.
Most
Ala.
Ga.
La.
Hawaii
Fla.
Sources: State prison systems,
Federal Bureau of Prisons,
court documents, Texas
Commission on Jail Standards,
inmate advocates
the system’s existing 32,000
air-conditioned beds as
needed but may need additional fencing and cameras
to secure potentially violent prisoners. It could take
a few years before the
transfers are completed
but would be cheaper than
trying to air-condition the
old cell blocks.
“We have a moral responsibility to keep people
safe and healthy and ensure we’re not inflicting
‘cruel and unusual punishment,’” said Rep. James
White, R-Hillister, who
chairs the Texas House corrections committee.
Whitmire, a longtime
advocate for prison reform,
said he was optimistic
about the proposal after
more than a dozen discussions and walks through
Texas cell blocks with Collier.
“They don’t want to be
back in court,” he said.
“They’re going to be proactive. I think they’ve come a
long way.”
Gov. Greg Abbott said
through a spokesperson he
would not comment before
the Pack settlement was final. Sen. Joan Huffman, of
State prisons in the Gulf states, including Texas, do not offer air conditioning to most
inmates. However, Texas requires temperatures between 65 and 85 degrees at county
jails. In addition, 115 out of 122 federal prisons offer air conditioning on hot days.
the corrections committee,
also declined to comment.
Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who
plays a key role in prison
policy, did not respond to
requests for comment.
Report draws concern
The flood of civil rights
lawsuits followed after 12
inmates died at 10 Texas
prisons during heat waves
in 2011 and 2012. Among
others, family members
sued on behalf of Larry
McCollum, a 58-year-old
inmate at the Dallas-area
Hutchins Unit with less
than a year left on a checkcashing conviction, who
died after guards found
him with a body temperature of 109.
In contrast to these
claims, the 2014 class-action suit set out to protect
living inmates at the Pack
Unit. While no heat deaths
were officially recorded
there, inmates said the
prison failed to adhere to
“contemporary standards
of decency” and subjected
the unit’s geriatric and
medically compromised
population to “substantial
risk of serious injury or
death” during the summer
months.
Also prompted by the
heat deaths, a group of law
students from the Universi-
ty of Texas’ Human Rights
Clinic began visiting prisons and collecting data
about the health effects of
unmitigated heat. Their report, flagging at last 40
deaths at Texas prisons in
which they suspected extreme heat as a contributing factor, drew concern
from the United Nations’
Committee Against Torture and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.
The UT study also identified extreme heat deaths
at jails and prisons in California, Arizona, Florida,
New York and Michigan.
“These are, in some
ways, the most vulnerable
people in the country because they are at the hands
of the state … 24 hours a
day, and there’s no other
way for inmates to protect
themselves,” said Ariel Dulitsky, director of the UT
Human Rights Clinic.
State lockups in Texas
have been slower to modernize their cooling systems than county or federal
facilities. Since 1976, state
standards call for county
jails to keep the temperature between 65 and 85 degrees. The Bureau of Prisons also offers air conditioning at all but seven of
122 federal units.
3.01
Houston
Chronicle
But most of the 1.3 million people in state facilities
nationwide aren’t privy to
these advances. A survey
of state correctional systems by the Chronicle
found that five states provide air conditioning for all
inmates, while 21 other
states offer it for at least half
their prisoners. Texas is
among six southern states
that don’t have cooling for
the majority of inmates.
Unmitigated heat presents a unique threat in
Texas because hot spells
are protracted. Pack staffers logged 74 days in 2011
when the temperature surpassed 100 degrees.
“Heat is perilous for people who are compromised,
and many people in our
prisons are compromised,”
said Susi Vassallo, a certified corrections physician
who studied the effect of
heat at prisons across the
south and testified as an expert for the Pack inmates.
She said the elderly are
at the greatest risk, as well
as people who have conditions or take medicine that
impede the body’s ability to
regulate heat. Being held all
day in extremely hot, humid spaces forces the heart
to pump faster and the
body to sweat to the point
of dehydration. Air conditioning eliminates these
threats, she said.
State officials, however,
voiced concerns about the
cost of infrastructure improvements,
suggesting
that air-conditioned respite
rooms, cool showers and
ice water provided sufficient alternatives during
heat spells.
But Vassallo told the
Chronicle that Texas wardens don’t hesitate to aid
inmates during other
emergencies.
“It’s inconceivable that
we would not rescue these
prisoners from the dangers
of flooding, fire, electrocution, drowning, bacteria,
‘We’re still humans’
Ellison’s emergency order — after testimony from
prisoners who experienced
heat-related nausea, fainting and hospitalization —
established for the first
time at a Texas facility that
vulnerable inmates cannot
be housed in rooms that
surpass an 88-degree
threshold.
Lawsuits by inmates
seeking relief from unacceptable living conditions
are particularly tough to
win, legal scholars said.
“These cases are really
hard-fought, and typically
prison officials resist improving their conditions as
much as they possibly
can,” said Sharon Dolovich, director of the prison
law and policy program at
the University of California
at Los Angeles. “Prisoners
are not a popular constituency.”
Inmates’ rights cases
face a high threshold under
the Prison Litigation Reform Act of 1996, law professors said. They have to
show there’s a serious
threat of harm and prove
that officials are aware of
the threat.
Jeff Edwards, whose
small Austin firm joined
the Texas Civil Rights Project in representing the
Pack inmates, said building a case against a $3 billion state agency is laborious.
“People aren’t running
to go make money doing
prison litigation,” he said.
Cole said being at an airconditioned facility since
the court’s 2017 injunction
improved his physical and
mental health, but his
brother Derek said Cole
didn’t sign the settlement
because it doesn’t address
all his concerns. He’s
among dozens of inmates
who say the lawsuit
prompted retaliation, including excessive use of air
conditioning on cold days .
But another inmate,
Richard Elvin King, who is
incarcerated for three 1989
murder convictions, signed
off on the deal.
“We might have done an
inhuman deed, but we’re
still humans,” King said
during an interview in February. “Some of the guys
come in with a 10-year sentence that’s not aggravated,
and they end up dying because of the heat.”
King, 72, a Vietnam War
veteran and former railroad engineer from Nacogdoches, has high blood
pressure and diabetes. He
said the heat is a constant
threat.
“Somebody beating you
up? You try to avoid that
and you can avoid it. If
somebody wants to stab
you, you can stay out of the
way,” he said. “But the heat
is there all the time. …
There’s no getting away
from it.”
gabrielle.banks@chron.com
twitter.com/gabmobanks
HH
John C. McKeon
Publisher and President
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Jack Sweeney
Chairman
Nancy C. Barnes
Executive VP / Editor
Vernon F. Loeb
Managing Editor
A11
Evan Mintz
Opinion Editor
F o u n d e d 1 9 0 1 • A H e a r s t N e w s pa p e r
LETTERS
EDITORIAL
Free
press
Not OK
Regarding “With sexist
remarks, proportion
matters” (Page A15, Friday), professor Richard
Lebow’s “ladies lingerie”
line, his buddies’ laughing response and his
characterization of professor Simona Sharoni’s
complaint as “frivolous”
together comprise a perfect example of the assumption that a man is
entitled to get a cheap
laugh based on female
put-down, women’s feelings be damned. Lebow
surely did not consciously intend to offend. On
the contrary, he probably
Worry about
attacks on
journalists.
Television journalist
Chris Hayes got handcuffed and shackled to a
bench after objecting to
being barred from a public meeting on June 30,
2016. He’d gone to follow
up on his investigation of
a tiny town’s uninsured
and unregistered police
cars.
On Sept. 7, 2017, a crowd
of police officers knocked
down Mike Faulk, a newspaper reporter covering a
protest, and pinned him
to the ground. One pepper-sprayed him in the
face. Then Faulk got
hauled off to jail.
Hayes and Faulk were
eventually released. But
journalist Manuel Duran,
a Salvadoran national,
remains in custody — he,
too, was arrested while
covering a protest and
carrying press credentials
on April 3.
World Press Freedom
Day, May 3, filled social
media with images of
journalists jailed or killed
in countries ruled by
dictators and wracked by
violence. But the arrests
described above occurred
in America. They involved
journalists such as Hayes
of Fox 2 in St. Louis and
Faulk of the St. Louis
Post-Dispatch, as well as
Duran, an independent
journalist who remains in
U.S. immigration custody
though charges filed by
Memphis, Tenn., police
were dropped.
More troubling episodes appear in a new
report called Press Freedom Under Threat —
Mission to the United
States.
Because of an increase
in anecdotal reports of
attacks against U.S. journalists, international human rights experts recently completed that unusual
mission in America. One
stop was Houston. Reporters here told of receiving threats and hate mail
after writing about hotbutton issues like immigration reform. Texas
journalists and others
who cover and cross the
U.S.-Mexico border
shared accounts of unreasonable searches and
seizures of equipment,
including video, notes,
cameras and cell phones.
The report highlights
troubling trends: reporters subject to manhandling and arrests while
conducting interviews or
covering protests; unreasonable border searches;
aggressive use of subpoenas — beginning under the Obama administration — to compel journalists to identify sources,
and a rise in inflammatory
political rhetoric that has
declared the press an
enemy.
Of course, journalists
elsewhere in the world
still face greater danger.
But America’s leadership
and its constitutional
commitment to press
freedom has slipped. We
can all help reverse this
by supporting nonprofits
like the Committee to
Protect Journalists, which
monitor press freedom. It
also helps to subscribe to
outlets that support
watchdog reporting. And
those who serve in the
military, government and
police can assist by remembering that journalists serve as the public’s
eyes and ears — and
should not be subject to
beatings, unreasonable
searches or arrests for
doing their jobs.
Let’s empower women around the world
By Ray W. Washburne
There’s a growing recognition
that private investment is one of the
best tools we have for addressing
major world challenges from poverty to poor infrastructure to limited
opportunity. President Trump’s
National Security Strategy calls for
modernizing U.S. development
finance tools to help businesses
invest in developing countries, and
last week I had the honor of testifying before Congress on how that
proposal would advance global
development and American competitiveness.
But in a world facing so many
challenges, where should we be
investing? One clear answer is to
invest in the world’s women.
Although women own about 30
percent of the small and medium
enterprises in emerging markets,
they represent a much smaller fraction of the credit market. It is much
harder for women than men to find
jobs or access the financing needed
to start a business or grow an existing enterprise.
Empowering these women is one
of the most effective ways we can
make a positive difference in the
world. That’s because when women
earn a competitive income they
spend the vast majority of it on their
households — on food, health care
and education. Their families benefit, their communities benefit and
the world benefits. As the U.S. government’s development finance
institution, the Overseas Private
Investment Corporation invests in
development to promote prosperity
and global stability. And we know
that women are key to achieving
both.
One of the highlights of my visit
to the Summit of the Americas in
Lima, Peru, last month was launching OPIC’s 2X Americas initiative to
mobilize $500 million to projects
that will support women in Latin
America. 2X Americas is a key part
of OPIC’s global 2X Women’s initiative to empower women around the
world.
OPIC has a broad global reach,
supporting projects in 90 countries
from Asia to the Middle East and
Africa, and we have a strong and
longstanding focus on Latin America. Our model is based on helping
American businesses invest in
emerging markets that have great
need for investment and offer great
promise for investors, and many of
our American business partners,
including Noble Energy and Apache
Corporation, hail from Texas.
Today, OPIC has more than $5
billion — almost one-quarter of our
global portfolio — invested in Latin
America. As an agency committed
to advancing prosperity and stability, it’s imperative that we look first
to our closest neighbors. In recent
years, we’ve supported construction
of a major international airport in
Ecuador, power plants in Honduras
and El Salvador, and multiple microfinance lending projects that
have empowered underserved
entrepreneurs from Costa Rica to
Peru.
Now we’re strengthening our
focus on the region and its women.
In addition to pursuing projects
that will provide women access to
capital and to well-paying jobs,
we’ll apply a gender lens to all the
potential projects we review, to
consider how women will be impacted. When supporting a major
infrastructure project, we’ll consider how many of the jobs created
will be filled by women and
whether they will they be given
training to become managers.
With health care and education
projects, we’ll work to ensure that
girls and women are being served.
And of course, when we review
financial services projects to encourage microfinance and small
business lending, we’ll consider
how many of the loans will go to
female entrepreneurs and business owners.
Latin America is a vast and
diverse region encompassing major cities, remote villages and conflict-torn areas like the Northern
Triangle, where a lack of stability
has caused people to flee. Women
are a unifying factor across all
these places. Wherever we invest
in development, we can increase
our impact by investing in women.
Washburne is president and CEO of
the Overseas Private Investment
Corporation.
Don’t let Trump play us all for chumps
Ruth Marcus says buying the
president’s narrative would
make a laughingstock of the
rule of law.
We’re missing something important, indeed fundamental, in all the
legal-political chatter about whether Donald Trump will answer questions from the special counsel and
what might happen if the president
refuses.
We need to keep in mind: This is
the president, not an ordinary witness — or, to be more precise, ordinary subject — in a run-of-the-mill
criminal investigation. That fact
counsels, on the part of prosecutors, more respect for the president’s time and office than in the
usual case. But it also calls for, on
the part of the chief executive, more
respect for and accommodation of
the reasonable needs of the criminal justice system.
Please stop laughing. I know.
This president has, for months,
demonstrated the precise opposite,
seeking to undermine the legitimacy of the Justice Department generally and special counsel Robert
Mueller in particular. “This is a
witch hunt like nobody has ever
seen before,” Trump said Friday of
Mueller’s probe. “The problem we
have is that you have 13 people —
they’re all Democrats, and they’re
real Democrats; they’re angry Democrats.”
It is on us, the American people,
not to accept this. We must not
collude with him, however unwittingly, in lowering the bar for
the behavior we should expect from
a president.
In the current context, that
would not only mean refraining
from the kind of scurrilous criticism that has emanated from the
president and his minions about
the Justice Department and the
Mueller investigation. See, for another example, Rudy Giuliani describing the New York FBI agents
who raided the office and home of
Trump lawyer Michael Cohen as
“stormtroopers.”
It would also include a pledge to
cooperate, to the extent possible,
with investigators’ requests for
documents or testimony. (This was,
in fact, the approach of soon-todepart White House lawyer Ty
Cobb.) Yes, attorneys for an ordinary person in Trump’s circumstances would strongly advise him
not to voluntarily answer questions
from Mueller’s team. That advice
would be amped up a thousandfold by the reality-bending nature
of Trump’s ordinary discourse, and
the attendant additional legal jeopardy that presents.
But do we not — at least, should
we not — demand more of a president than that he protects his own
legal interests? Not out of the goodness of his heart — that naive I’m
not — but out of a sense that the
public expects more than simple
compliance with the letter of the
law and, more to the point, will
punish a president who fails to live
up to a higher standard?
Take a look at the topics about
which Mueller is said to want to
question Trump. They are all logical outgrowths of factual predicates. “They’re ridiculous questions,” Giuliani scoffed in an interview with Fox News. “’What did
you think?’ ‘What did you feel?’”
But of course state of mind is central to any potential obstruction
case. Any prosecutor would be
derelict not to ask.
Under ordinary circumstances,
although little is ordinary when a
president is under criminal investigation, political considerations
constrain legal strategy. What
would be the fallout from facing a
subpoena versus testifying volun-
tarily? What would be the political
implications of claiming executive
privilege? Of asserting the Fifth
Amendment right against selfincrimination?
Compare Bill Clinton then to
Trump now. Certainly, Clinton was
no model of civic virtue or transparency. But his behavior looks like
pattycake in contrast to Trump’s.
Clinton was the one to call for a
special counsel to investigate
Whitewater, albeit under intense
political pressure; Trump has never
conceded the need for a special
counsel. Clinton and advisers
griped about the vast right-wing
conspiracy against them and an
out-of-control prosecutor in the
form of Kenneth Starr, but with
nothing like the venom exhibited by
Trump.
When Starr sought Clinton’s
testimony on Monica Lewinsky,
Clinton’s lawyers slow-walked the
independent counsel for months,
and then bargained him down to a
single, four-hour interview at the
White House. But the prospect of
Clinton’s refusing Starr and invoking his Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination was
politically unthinkable.
“Clinton’s political advisers told
him that it was like placing a loaded
gun to his head,” Ken Gormley
wrote in his authoritative account
of the investigation. “Invoking the
Fifth Amendment sounded like
admitting guilt, which seemed like
a perfect recipe for impeachment
and removal.”
That it is possible, now, to imagine Trump taking the Fifth and
surviving is a measure of the brilliance and effectiveness of his
scorched-earth strategy to discredit
the investigation and investigators.
If everything is rigged and everyone
is crooked, good faith compliance is
for chumps. But buying Trump’s
narrative would make chumps of us
all and a laughingstock of the rule
of law. We cannot let that happen.
Marcus’ email address is
ruthmarcus@washpost.com
didn’t even think about it.
He didn’t have to; he was
entitled, or so he subconsciously felt. If his
mock floor request to the
imaginary elevator operator had been, for example,
men’s haberdashery or
home furnishings, it
would have been far less
humorous to his buddies
precisely because it would
have lacked the female
trivialization element that
made it so funny to them.
Sharoni’s complaint
does nothing to diminish
complaints of real and
continuing instances of
truly offensive behavior.
Indeed, a speeding ticket
for 45 mph in a 30 mph
zone does not diminish a
separate citation for driving a life endangering 120
miles per hour. The entire
spectrum of inappropriate male sexual behavior
toward females from
gratuitous put-down to
criminal sexual assault is
based on assumed entitlement and power over
women. And yes, time is
up. Count me with Sharoni; she was absolutely
right to complain.
Maureen Wharton,
Houston
Evangelicals
Regarding “White
House grace for Sutherland Springs,” (Page A1,
Friday), it is inconceivable
that any of the survivors
of the Sutherland Springs
slaughter would attend
President Trump’s National Day of Prayer
event. This president
refuses to execute his
constitutional duty to do
everything he can to protect the citizens of this
country from harm by
proposing sensible gun
control legislation. He
may not be able to prevail
against the power of the
NRA, but at least he
could make the effort.
Equally perplexing to
me is the statement by
Pastor Frank Pomeroy
that, “… it is obvious to
me that God had a plan
from the beginning.” I
assume that plan includes
the election of Trump for
president, and therein lies
a clue to the unwavering
support for Trump by
evangelical Christians.
Kenneth Meyers, Houston
Pap smears
Regarding “Baylor
reviews inaccurate Pap
smears” (Page A3, Thursday), I recalled the day in
the late 1970s when I sat
down with a resident
pathologist on my dissertation committee. We
met to discuss my research project. He read
scores of Pap smears with
amazing speed, while we
carried on a discussion of
my progress. I remember
thinking, “These are not
just slides, they are the
lives of women.” Has that
been forgotten? As a mere
graduate student, I kept
my mouth shut.
Today, pathologists
could do much better at
policing their own. No
pathology service company should be allowed to
continue operations without annually submitting
random slides read by its
staff to an expert pathology panel that determines
whether each Pap smear
was read correctly. Considering the lives of women are at stake, the company’s passing score
should be well above 99
percent. No such service
exists.
The life of a woman
should never depend on
which pathology laboratory examined her Pap
smear.
John T. James, Houston
BIBLE VERSE
And as ye would that men
should do to you, do ye also to
them likewise.
Luke 6:31
Send letters to the editor: Viewpoints c/o Houston Chronicle, P.O. Box 4260, Houston, Texas 77210 or viewpoints@chron.com.
We welcome and encourage letters and emails from readers. Letters must include name, address and telephone numbers for verification purposes only. All letters are subject to editing.
A12
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
FROM THE COVER
Oil job seekers wait for industry rebound
Oil from page A1
workers such as Schwendeman
to keep networking, passing out
resumes and hoping for the
phone to ring.
“It really hasn’t picked up yet,”
said Schwendeman, who lives in
Houston. “I’m just kind of going
around and talking to people
and seeing what lines of work
they’re in and hoping to apply
that to what I do.”
As Schwendeman demonstrates, job seekers who have
pinned their hopes on the oil
market recovery of the past few
months are likely to have to wait
a while longer before companies
start increasing the pace of hiring. While U.S. employment in
oil and gas extraction is off its recent bottom — a decade low of
144,500 in December – the industry has recovered fewer than
6,000 of the nearly 60,000 jobs
lost in oil bust that began in
mid-2014, according to the Labor
Department.
In Houston, employment in
oil and gas extraction — which
encompasses exploration and
production companies, but excludes energy services firms — is
just reaching a bottom. In
March, extraction companies
shed another 2,000 jobs in Houston compared to a year earlier,
according to the Labor Department. That brought job losses
during the downturn that began
in 2014 to 20,000, a decline of
more than one-third.
“There’s a perception of recovery, but there’s really no recovery
at this point,” said Ramesh
Anand, president of American
Personnel Resources in Houston. “It hurts me to see exceptionally qualified PhDs who
were talking to me two years ago
still meet me today looking for a
job.”
Anand, who has recruited
workers for the energy industry
since the 1980s, said he’s seen
more leads for reservoir managers and other skilled professionals in the Middle East than in the
United States. Here, instead of
combing professional publications, social media and confer-
Gary Fountain
Unemployed workers hoping to land jobs were among the crowds at the Offshore Technology Conference.
ences to find workers for oil companies, Anand is sifting through
the thousands of resumes that
have inundated his clients to
help them find the most qualified candidates.
In the meantime, he has
watched geologists give up on
the industry, becoming financial
advisers or finishing master’s
degrees in business.
It all comes down to the investment energy companies
have made in oil and gas fields in
Texas, the Gulf of Mexico and
around the world. Even with recent U.S. tax cuts, which most
companies returned to their
shareholders, spending on oil
field exploration and development is not growing enough yet
to stir broad job market activity.
Oil companies, analysts added, also are reluctant to accelerate hiring out of worries that
crude prices could quickly tum-
ble again. Instead, they are turning to robotics, data analysis, artifical intelligence and other
technologies to pump more oil
with fewer workers. That’s the
biggest reason employment
growth at oil explorers hasn’t
kept up with rising prices and rig
counts.
Joshua Osagie, 20, of Nigeria
was in high gear Wednesday afternoon in the NRG Arena,
scouring the conference for a job
he can take after he graduates
with a petroleum engineering
degree next year.
Looking for a position pretty
much anywhere around the
world, the young college student
said he’s eager to start working
and finally see the massive tools
of the offshore industry in action
— machinery humming and
whirring in the ocean, the real
life version of what he’s seen in
videos and textbooks in school.
But Osagie’s efforts hit roadblocks at OTC.
Most exhibitors shooed him
away, he said, directing him to
online applications on their websites. Few companies had recruiters on site. If they did, Osagie acknowledged, they were
probably looking for more experienced candidates. But Osagie
still had his pitch ready.
“I don’t have any experience,”
Osagie said, “but I want to get experience from you.”
Jose R. Gonzalez contributed.
collin.eaton@chron.com
twitter.com/CollinEatonHC
BUSINESS
HOW TO RECRUIT
MILLENNIALS
HoustonChronicle.com
/E-Edition
Houston Chronicle
Houston Chronicle | Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and Chron.com
@HoustonChron
Section B HH
Tech’s regulators might be outmatched
Observers of FTC say
it needs more teeth
against Silicon Valley
By Tony Romm
WAS H I NGT ON P O ST
Facebook and Google must
answer to new cops on the beat
— a group of five fresh Washington regulators at the Federal
Trade Commission who have the
power to punish Silicon Valley if
it misbehaves.
But veterans of the 103-year
old watchdog say that the agency
increasingly runs the risk of being outmatched by the very tech
giants it oversees without more
cash, cutting-edge staff and
stronger legal teeth.
“For a long time the FTC itself
has been pointing out the gaps in
its authority,” said Terrell
McSweeny, a Democratic commissioner who concluded her
three-year tenure last month.
“What I find hopeful about this
moment is that people are realizing the consequences of that and
having a conversation about it.”
On Tuesday, the FTC gained
its newest chairman, Joe Simons,
and soon he’ll be surrounded by
a full complement of four other
commissioners. They’ll be expected to monitor everything
from the fast-growing footprint
of companies like Amazon to the
security practices of the entire
tech industry.
Already, they face their first,
high-profile test: an investigation into Facebook’s recent privacy mishaps.
In March, the FTC announced
it would probe Facebook’s entanglement with Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy
that improperly accessed names,
“likes” and other personal information for up to 87 million of the
social site’s users. If the FTC
finds that Facebook erred, it
could result in massive fines —
penalties that some experts say
the agency must levy in order to
send an early message that it is
able, and willing, to police the
country’s tech behemoths.
“Will the new FTC have the
FTC continues on B2
CHRIS TOMLINSON
Commentary
Bloomberg file
Bloomberg file
Terrell McSweeny is a former
commissioner at the FTC.
Joseph Simons is the new
chairman of the FTC.
FOUNDATIONS
VW scam
polluted
careers
and the air
Martin Winterkorn undoubtedly worked hard to rise from a
research laboratory at Robert
Bosch to lead the Volkswagen
Group.
The metallurgist became one
of Germany’s top industrialists,
but rather than enter a comfortable retirement, at age 70 he
faces fraud charges in a U.S.
federal court.
A single decision, made in
the twilight of his career, will
forever define Winterkorn’s
legacy, no matter the outcome
of this case.
The former chief executive’s
fall from power into disrepute
should serve as a cautionary
tale for us all: One lapse of
integrity can cost us everything.
Federal prosecutors allege
that when Volkswagen executives briefed Winterkorn on
how engineers had rigged diesel vehicles to cheat on emissions tests, he instructed them
to let the fraud continue. By
doing so, he became personally
responsible for violating not
only clean air laws in dozens of
countries but betraying consumers who thought they’d
bought environmentally sound
products.
The fraud began to unravel
in early 2014, when a small
environmental watchdog
group, the International Council on Clean Transportation,
released a study reporting that
two VW diesel cars emitted up
to 35 times more nitrous oxide
than was allowed under federal
law. Upon learning of the in-
Steve Gonzales / Houston Chronicle
Workers move a piece of a new modular house being constructed in Houston's Heights neighborhood.
Heights custom home
built piece by piece
By Nancy Sarnoff
N
eighbors watched last week
as a remote-controlled hydraulic mover called a platypus carried a structure the
size of a mobile home onto a lot in the
Heights where it joined two others like
it. Three more were on their way.
In about four months, these socalled modules — framed concrete
slabs made in a warehouse in Navasota
— will have been transformed into a
3,000-square-foot architect-designed
house clad in glass, siding and masonry blocks centered on a courtyard.
“It’s going to look like a custom
home,” said Wayne Braun, owner of
the 6,250-square-foot lot near Fitzger-
Architects say prefab
housing is predictable,
reliable and the
‘future of construction’
ald’s night club.
The design, he said, is meant to
blend in with the Heights, “particularly
that part of the neighborhood where we
have bungalows and little warehouses.”
The house is a project of Evolution
Building Systems, a Houston company
recently formed by husband and wife
architects.
Rame and Russell Hruska started
their architecture practice in Houston
in 2001 and later expanded into residential construction. They launched
Evolution last year.
“We’ve always been interested in
prefab and different ways to build,”
Rame Hruska said. “We look at off-site
construction and really see it as a better
way to build and really the future of
construction.”
Advantages can include shorter construction schedules, reduced waste
and increased labor productivity, according to industry research cited in a
report from the National Institute of
Building Sciences.
Disadvantages include transportation restrictions that limit module size
and limited flexibility in future renovaModules continues on B2
Tomlinson continues on B4
STATE YOUR CASE
A charity can be named beneficiary of a retirement account
The information in this column
is intended to provide a general
understanding of the law, not as
legal advice. Readers with legal
problems, including those whose
questions are addressed here,
should consult attorneys for advice on their particular circumstances.
Q: I have designated a
charity as the beneficiary of
my IRA. When I die, can the
charity show the bank a certified copy of my death certificate and be entitled to my
IRA funds, or must it go
through probate to obtain
the funds? (I’m aware that a
payable on death, or POD,
would solve the problem, but
my bank doesn’t have a POD
form.)
A: Naming a
beneficiary on a
retirement account and designating a person as
RONALD
the POD benefiLIPMAN
ciary both accomplish the very same thing.
Both methods are designed to
pass the asset to the beneficiary
or beneficiaries you have
named after you have died.
With both, you are making
arrangements so that a person,
or several people, can receive an
asset you own without that
asset passing under your will.
Having a POD on an IRA is
simply not the way it’s done.
With IRAs, you designate one
or more beneficiaries.
As to your question, after you
have died, the charity will need
to contact your bank and fill out
the required forms in order to
claim the funds. A death certificate will almost certainly be
needed at that time.
Because you will have named
the charity directly as a beneficiary, it will not be necessary
for it to go through probate in
order to claim the IRA benefits.
Clearly, it is important for
you to let the charity know that
it has been named. Also, tell the
charity to be on the lookout so
it can claim the money when
the time comes.
Q: My stepfather died last
December. He and my mother had a joint bank account
and no other property. Per
his last will, all money is to
be distributed equally to his
four children. Who inherits
the money in the account?
A: The answer to your question depends on the type of
joint account the two of them
had.
If the account was a joint
account with rights of survivorship, then your mother gets
all of it automatically. It doesn’t
matter what his will says, as the
account passes to her by contract.
If the account was a joint
account held as tenants in common, then your mother would
keep her half and your stepfather’s half would pass to the
four children pursuant to the
terms of his will.
Of course, a tenants in common account means probate of
his will would be necessary.
Depending on how much money was in the account, it may
not be cost effective to go
through probate to claim the
money in just this one account.
That is a decision your mother
and the four children will need
to make.
It might be best to discuss
this matter with an attorney.
Ronald Lipman, of Houston law
firm Lipman & Associates, is
board certified in estate planning
and probate law by the Texas
Board of Legal Specialization.
Email questions to
stateyourcase@lipman-pc.com
B2
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
BUSINESS
FTC is limited in what it can pay its staff
FTC from page B1
will to take on today’s challenges
aggressively?” asked Jessica
Rich, the former director of the
agency’s Bureau of Consumer
Protection. “The FTC really is
under-resourced. So if it steps up
and takes on the challenges, it
still will have a limited amount of
resources to do that.”
The FTC’s purview is vast. It
reviews hospital mergers, responds to consumer reports
about robocalls and ensures that
products labeled as “made in the
USA” are actually manufactured
here. It stems from its more than
century-old mandate to promote
competition and penalize those
who engage in unfair or deceptive practices.
In recent years, though, the
FTC has evolved into the U.S.
government’s primary regulator
of the tech industry. While the
country may lack a single, federal online privacy law, the agency
still has managed to tap its powers to punish tech giants like
Facebook, Google, Twitter and
Uber for failing to protect the
sensitive
information
they
amass about their users.
Despite an ever-expanding
workload, the FTC’s authorities
and resources haven’t changed
much. Its budget this fiscal year
is $306 million — or about a third
of one percent of the revenue that
Google earned in 2017. Those limited funds help the agency maintain a workforce of about 1,140 —
roughly 300 fewer than it had almost four decades earlier, according to FTC records, well before it had to police the internet.
“One of the issues is the ability
to hire technologists,” acknowledged Rich, who is now the vice
president of consumer policy
and mobilization at Consumer
Reports. “The FTC simply can’t
pay what many technologists
make in not even the top echelons of companies.”
During an interview before
she departed, McSweeny praised
the agency for its track record,
citing the fact it’s achieved a “terrific return on taxpayer investment.” That includes major settlements with companies like
Volkswagen for allegedly defrauding drivers.
Still, she stressed the FTC
faces major structural challenges — issues that she and her predecessors long have highlighted
without much success. The FTC
is generally hamstrung in its
ability to write new rules, for example, and it isn’t always able to
fine tech companies on their first
privacy or security offense.
“It would be helpful to have
Congress clarify the FTC’s authority around privacy and data
security. It would be helpful to
have civil penalty authority. I
think it would be helpful for the
agency to have regulatory authority,” she said.
Those strictures now fall to Si-
mons, who officially assumed
the title of FTC chairmanafter
serving as an antitrust litigator at
the law firm Paul Weiss Rifkind
Wharton & Garrison for clients
like Microsoft and Sony. It’s not
his first tour of duty in the federal government: Simons worked
at the agency as its director of the
Bureau of Competition from 2001
to 2003. His office declined to
make him available for an interview.
He’ll be aided by two fellow
Republicans: Noah Phillips, a
former top aide to Texas Sen.
John Cornyn, and Christine Wilson, who was a top executive at
Delta. Opposite them will be two
new Democratic commissioners:
Rohit Chopra, a former regulator
at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and Rebecca
Slaughter, previously a top adviser to Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York.
To start, the agency is under
pressure to penalize not only
Facebook but other tech companies that mishandle consumers’
data.
“The FTC largely failed during the Obama years to address
the most pressing challenges,”
said Marc Rotenberg, the executive director of the Electronic
Privacy Information Center,
which brought the complaint
that led to the FTC’s settlement
with Facebook in 2011. “The evidence of that is made clear every
day.”
Others would like to see the
FTC under its new leaders take a
closer look at companies like
Amazon, Facebook and Google
for antitrust concerns. Regulators around the world increasingly are fearful that big tech is
too big — especially in Europe,
which is still probing Google. In
the U.S, the FTC hasn’t brought
such a major case since its own
probe of Google — an investigation it closed in 2013 by leaving
the company intact.
Modules are inspected before leaving the warehouse
Modules from page B1
tions. The modules making up
Braun’s home are fabricated in a
warehouse in Navasota, about 80
miles northwest of Houston.
The warehouse is operated by
GroundForce Building Systems,
a company that builds modular
homes and commercial buildings on wood and concrete slabs
and then delivers them on special
movers to sites across the state.
Evolution has an agreement with
GroundForce that allows it to use
the company’s concrete foundation system technology.
The Hruskas say modular
homebuilding is more predictable and reliable
It eliminates on-site construction variables that are hard to
control, like weather and labor
availability. Construction theft
becomes less of an issue.
Neighbors, too, experience
fewer nuisances with less waste,
noise and overall activity.
“Construction is disruptive,”
said Steve Heiney, a Heights resident who was riding his bicycle
when he stopped to watch the
modules being moved onto
Braun’s lot. When his neighbor’s
house was under construction,
there often was garbage and de-
Steve Gonzales / Houston Chronicle
Steve Heiney watches workers move sections of a house in the Heights. Advocates say modular
construction can ease stress on neighbors because it is less noisy and generates less waste.
THE SMART MONEY
The incredible con that I nearly fell for
In January 2007 I was
in the midst of building an
investment fund with a
growing roster of investors eager for me to manage more of their money.
The main thing limiting
my fund’s growth was
finding the diamond-inthe-rough investments
that fit my picky criteria
within a very niche market.
I felt so excited about
the investment opportunity from James Tibor.
He had founded Hot
Point Marketing in Chicago, but had agreed to separate from his company,
and had a judgment and
settlement agreement that
his company would pay
him. My investment was
to buy out Tibor’s settlement agreement (or judgment) for an upfront cash
payment to him and have
his company pay my fund
over a period of years. At
the agreed-upon price, my
fund stood to make a very
attractive return, assuming all went well.
The delightful thing
about this specialty investment was how perfectly it suited my fund. It was
too small for Wall Street,
too idiosyncratic for a
typical hedge fund. It was
large, but doable, for my
growing fund.
Importantly, it would
allow me to draw down
more investment capital
from my investors. The
whole thing seemed quite
safe.
Hot Point Marketing,
according to Tibor, had
substantial income from
work already done, meaning plenty of cash-flow to
support future payments.
Hot Point had a very
strong financial audit from
a respectable New York
firm as well as a big line of
credit from
a large regional bank.
By phone,
I interviewed
MICHAEL
Frank, Hot
TAYLOR
Point’s senior vice president, who
had signed the separation
agreement. He was taciturn and his voice a bit
muffled, but he verified all
the terms of the agreement. I left voice mails on
a Friday afternoon for the
regional bank just to confirm nothing in the company’s letter of credit had
changed.
Two things seemed
mildly off-putting.
I had reached out to the
New York-based auditor,
but the auditor hadn’t
been able to confirm
which partner had worked
with Hot Point. The auditor owed me a call back.
Next, the Dun & Bradstreet report we’d purchased — an online service providing credit reports on private companies — had been created a
few days after my due
diligence phone call with
Frank.
I have to say I was still
fired up to proceed and
figured we’d find answers
to those issues in the next
week.
I remained ready to
make the biggest investment of my fund management career when I left for
the weekend.
Thank you sweet mercy
for my employee at the
time – a kid just one year
out of college — who wondered over the weekend
about the due diligence
we’d already conducted.
So he Googled “James
Tibor fraud.”
Quite a bit turned up
with that simple search.
Tibor had already been
caught on charges of theft
and forgery. Tibor had
also accused a priest of
molesting him, only to
recant later. An investor,
similar to me, said he had
lost more than $100,000 to
Tibor.
I reached out online to
the investor and then to a
friend who worked for the
Department of Justice in
Chicago. By that point I
was safe from being swindled, but shaken by how
close I’d come.
The fancy audit that
had claimed more than $19
million in revenue and $8.1
million in assets? It turned
out that Hot Point never
had assets or revenue of
more than a trivial
amount, according to
court documents. The
bank line of credit was
fake.
In February 2009, Tibor
pleaded guilty to one
count of wire fraud for a
$100,000 fraud and other
attempts to defraud investors, including me. I
delivered a victim statement at his sentencing in
Chicago in May 2009,
where I faced him in his
orange jumpsuit. Tibor
received a sentence of 77
months in prison.
Here’s the scariest part
of the whole episode for
me: I do not think of myself as an easy mark, but
in retrospect Tibor’s con
seemed uniquely suited to
me. He used language of
secondary debt purchases,
which indicated to me he
was an insider. He knew
the due diligence I would
want. The conditions were
right, and “Frank,” the
fake colleague, hit all the
plausible points about the
investment when we
talked.
Even though something
was a bit “off” about the
Hot Point opportunity, I
wanted to believe. I needed that investment. I
wanted the high return it
seemed to promise. I
wanted to grow my fund.
A con is built on what
the victim craves.
Investors should prepare themselves for this
kind of mental assault.
Well, not just investors.
Every day we should apply some skepticism about
what we know to be true,
and what we just wish to
be true.
I don’t know how to
offer a “lessons learned”
except that when we see
something that perfectly
confirms what we already
want to believe, we should
take an extra moment and
a few additional steps to
verify it. Cultivating skepticism is a key skill of
investing, as well as citizenship.
The last communication
I received from the Department of Justice was
that Tibor was scheduled
for release from prison to
a halfway house and
would transfer to the
Salvation Army Freedom
Center in Chicago in January 2014.
A recent Google search
showed me a website
touting his marketing and
consulting skills.
My editors reached out
to Tibor through his website last week seeking
comment, but he didn’t
respond.
Michael Taylor is a
columnist for the San
Antonio Express-News and
author of “The Financial
Rules For New College
Graduates.”
michael@michael
thesmartmoney.com
twitter.com/michael_taylor
bris in his yard.
The Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation inspects
the modules before they leave the
factory.
“There’s a lot more assurance
that things will be built correctly,” Rame Hruska said. “The
walls, for example, get built on
jigs that lay flat, so it’s a much
more precision-built process
than just building in the field.”
Construction costs can be $175
per square foot or more depending on size and finishes. That is
on par with traditional custom
home construction, she said, but
it’s done in half the time.
Modular construction is more
common in other markets where
labor costs are higher, Russell
Hurska said.
Large production builders
don’t have the same incentives as
small, custom builders to go
modular.
“This won’t be something
right now that replaces a tract
home development on the west
side of town,” he said. “They get
similar
economies
because
they’re building repetitively
down a street.”
nancy.sarnoff@chron.com
twitter.com/nsarnoff
Largest mutual funds
Data provided by
Net asset value of selected major U.S. mutual funds two
trading days ago. Returns annualized. Dividends reinvested.
Name
Amcap Fund-A
Amer Bal Fund-A
Amer Cap Incm Bl
Amer Cap Wrld G&
Amer Europac GrAmer Fundm Inv
Amer New Persp-A
Amer Smallcap Wr
Amer Wash Mut In
Davis NY Vent Fd
Dodge & Cox Bal
Dodge & Cox Intl
Dodge & Cox Stk
Fdlty Bl Chip Gr
Fdlty Contrafund
Fdlty Diver Intl
Fdlty Equity-Inc
Fdlty Free 2020
Fdlty Grth & Inc
Fdlty Grth Co
Fdlty Low Pr Stk
Fdlty Magell Fd
Fdlty Puritan Fd
Fdlty Spar 500
Fdlty Value
Fidelity Bal Fd
Franklin Gr Fund
Franklin Income
Harbor Intl
Income Fd of Am
Pimco Tot Ret II
Pimco Tot Ret-In
T Rowe Pr Equity
T Rowe Pr Gr St
The Bond Fd of A
The Inv Co AmerVgrd 500 Idx FdVgrd Eur Stk STK
Vgrd Ins Tot Stk
Vgrd Tot Int St
Vgrd Tot St Mk I
Vgrd Totl Bd
Vgrd Wellingtn-I
Vgrd WIndsor II
Vgrd Windsor Inv
Ticker
AMCPX
ABALX
CAIBX
CWGIX
AEPGX
ANCFX
ANWPX
SMCWX
AWSHX
NYVTX
DODBX
DODFX
DODGX
FBGRX
FCNTX
FDIVX
FEQIX
FFFDX
FGRIX
FDGRX
FLPSX
FMAGX
FPURX
FUSEX
FDVLX
FBALX
FKGRX
FRIAX
HAINX
AMECX
PMBIX
PTTRX
PRFDX
PRGFX
ABNDX
AIVSX
VFINX
VEURX
VITNX
VGTSX
VTSMX
VBTIX
VWELX
VWNFX
VWNDX
Mgmt
Last Annual
Price Fee%
32.68 0.30
26.67 0.23
60.37 0.23
51.52 0.37
56.69 0.42
61.52 0.25
44.19 0.38
56.81 0.63
44.83 0.24
33.84 0.52
102.97 0.50
45.54 0.60
195.84 0.50
91.91 0.53
125.88 0.53
39.42 0.74
56.01 0.45
16.46 0.62
36.59 0.45
188.85 0.69
54.20 0.52
106.25 0.52
23.29 0.40
91.94 0.01
115.86 0.41
23.62 0.40
95.73 0.45
2.26 0.37
67.54 0.68
22.64 0.22
9.40 0.50
9.96 0.46
32.22 0.53
65.95 0.25
12.51 0.19
39.74 0.24
243.05 0.15
31.85 0.22
58.59 0.04
18.18 0.14
65.89 0.15
10.40 0.04
40.73 0.23
36.57 0.31
22.94 0.28
YTD
1-Yr
3-Yr
% Tot % Tot % Tot
Ret
Ret
Ret
3.8 17.7
9.9
–1.4
8.2
7.0
–3.1
4.8
3.5
1.2 14.8
7.5
0.8 16.3
6.3
–0.9 13.1 10.7
2.4 16.4
9.4
1.8 15.7
9.1
–1.4 12.6
9.6
–1.2 12.8
9.8
–2.2
5.7
6.9
–1.7
8.2
2.8
–2.4
9.7
9.3
4.7 22.5 13.2
4.4 21.0 13.3
–1.5 10.3
4.3
–5.2
3.6
5.7
–0.7
8.0
5.7
–3.1
8.2
7.3
5.7 27.7 15.8
–0.6 13.1
7.5
1.6 18.8 10.5
–0.2 10.7
7.1
–1.1 12.2
9.8
–4.4
5.1
4.7
–0.1
8.8
6.6
1.3 16.4 10.9
–2.1
2.7
3.4
0.0
8.9
2.0
–2.4
6.3
5.4
–2.1
0.2
1.6
–2.2
0.5
1.6
–3.0
8.9
7.3
5.3 20.8 13.8
–2.3 –0.8
0.9
–1.3 11.1
8.7
–1.1 12.1
9.7
0.7 12.8
4.5
–0.8 12.4
9.6
–0.1 14.3
5.1
–0.8 12.3
9.5
–2.4 –0.4
1.1
–2.5
7.2
6.6
–3.3
7.2
6.5
–2.0
9.8
6.8
Display Ad Name:
jobcmpcom3
2 cols x 1I
Position request:
Start date:
Pick up number: 0
2 Col Commer
INVESTMENT PROPERTY
Vet. Mem/Antoine. 1.78 Acres
77086, By Owner 713-264-2051.
Shop Chronicle Classifieds
every day for the best bargains
and selection.
WAREHOUSE SPACE
All areas NE, SE, SW, NW
45 LOCATIONS
2,000-200,000 sf 25¢ up.
Grade, semi-dock & dock high
Warehouse Associates
24 hours/day 713-461-9696
5 Yr
% Tot
Ret
13.5
8.6
5.0
9.0
7.5
12.6
10.9
10.5
11.6
11.8
9.4
6.2
12.5
17.0
14.7
6.4
8.3
6.7
10.5
18.1
10.3
14.3
9.4
12.5
9.8
9.0
13.9
4.7
4.0
6.9
1.3
1.4
9.0
16.6
1.3
11.7
12.4
6.1
12.4
5.5
12.2
1.4
8.2
9.6
11.0
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
B3
BUSINESS
SMALL BUSINESS
Just a few customers? Owners work
on strategies in case any of them leave
Though some prefer
having few clients,
such reliance can
be a weakness
By Joyce M. Rosenberg
A S S OC IAT E D PRE SS
NEW YORK — It’s a scary but
sometimes necessary way to operate — with only a few clients,
and perhaps just one. But what if
any of those customers leave in a
short time span, erasing a significant chunk of revenue?
“We are reliant on a few large
clients, and it is the key concern
that keeps me up at a night,” says
Brian Cairns, CEO of ProStrategix, a management consulting
group and Cairns Consulting, a
marketing company, based in
New York.
Cairns was a subcontractor
several years ago to his biggest
marketing client, who would
funnel business to him. But
when her company ran into
problems, his work dropped off.
Many small-business owners,
including consultants, publicists and architects, have only a
handful of customers or clients
at a time. If they work solo or
have just a few employees, they
can’t take on more work. And
small manufacturers that turn
out custom products for other
companies or for the government may have just those few
customers.
There are upsides: It’s less
complicated when an owner
doesn’t have a lot of accounts to
juggle. But it makes a business
more vulnerable. Owners find
they need strategies to be sure
they survive a revenue dip.
Cairns’ solution was to launch
ProStrategix, so he’d be less dependent on one customer.
Having a few clients gives Joanne Sonenshine’s consulting
group time to focus on their specific needs, but “there is a fear
Kathy Willens / Associated Press
Brian Cairns was a New York subcontractor several years ago to his biggest marketing client, who
would send business to him. But when her company ran into problems, his work dropped off, and
he needed to look for more business.
that if one or two go away, we are
in a serious financial conundrum,” she says. Sonenshine’s
company, Connective Impact,
works with nonprofits on projects that can last from a few
months to a few years. She takes
on three to six at a time.
But because Sonenshine’s
concerned about losing business, she networks, blogs, uses
social media and attends conferences. “I am constantly in business development mode,” says
Sonenshine, whose company is
based in Arlington, Va.
When Gayle Bu networks, she
offers potential clients a free 30minute consultation — but not
necessarily with the expectation
of being hired. Bu, who’s based
in Atlanta, is an online business
manager, working with companies and individual entrepreneurs.
“Even if you’re not the right
fit, they will tell their network
about you,” Bu says. She’s most
comfortable with four to six clients — and knows what it’s like
to lose two, one right after the
other.
“It was a pain in the neck, but
it wasn’t devastating because I
knew I just needed to call a couple of people and fill those slots
next week,” Bu says.
That approach is the key to
surviving, says Gene Marks,
owner of The Marks Group, a
small business consulting firm
in Bala Cynwyd, Pa.
“You should be thinking all
the time, ‘If I were fired on Friday, what is Plan B,’ ” he says.
Owners may not have to look
too far for more work, he says.
Those who have contracts with
one office or division of a large
business can do some prospect-
EXECUTIVES
Women are holding just
11 percent of top-paid jobs
in corporate America
By Jena McGregor
WAS H I NGT ON P O ST
The number of female
chief executives among
America’s largest corporations has long been stubbornly,
unsurprisingly
low.
This year, just 5 percent
of CEOs in the S&P 1500
index are women, compared with 4 percent in
2015 and 2014.
A study released by the
Pew Research Center this
month examines one reason that number may remain stuck for a long time
to come.
Pew analyzed the four
highest paid executives
beneath the CEO at each
company — likely steppingstone jobs to the CEO
role — and found that just
11.5 percent were held by
women, hardly a plentiful
pool from which to boost
the number of women at
the top.
Even more of an obstacle for women en route to
the corner office: The
analysis found that just 22
percent of the women
who’d actually climbed to
one of those top four spots
held positions — titles
such as president, chief
operating officer, or the
head of an operating division or major subsidiary
— that are typical grooming grounds for picking
the CEO’s heir apparent. A
much larger number were
in finance or administrative roles.
Anna Beninger, senior
director of research for
Catalyst, a nonprofit research firm, said that fits
with many senior female
executives’ career trajectories.
“Historically,
even
when when women make
it to those senior-most
ranks, they are in chief financial officer, head of legal, head of H.R. roles
which do not traditionally
allow individuals to demonstrate the skill set
boards are looking for
when tapping the next
CEO,” she said.
Perhaps the most surprising finding in the
study was which groups of
companies had the greatest share of women executives at the top.
Yes, broad sectors like
consumer discretionary
firms were above average,
with women making up
16.1 percent of the top jobs,
as were more narrow industries like specialty retail, which has eight companies with female CEOs
and 49 non-CEO top female executives.
But the category with
the highest mix of female
executives is more surprising: utilities. Women
hold 17.3 percent of nonCEO top jobs in utilities,
more than any other sector. Five of the 24 female
CEOs in the S&P 500 index lead utility firms.
Kay Fuhrman, a partner
at Heidrick & Struggles
who has worked in the
sector, says the industry’s
deregulation in the late
1990s forced utility companies to bring in many new
executives to help it commercialize, creating opportunities for many
women willing to make
that career jump.
Years later, those hires
have borne fruit, as the industries tend to groom
leaders from within.
ing in other parts of the company. Marks also recommends that
owners keep overhead low and
cash flow strong, giving themselves a cushion if a customer
suddenly leaves.
Staying alert to both positive
and negative changes with customers is also key. When Toys R
Us said in March it was shutting
its stores, for instance, it didn’t
come as a surprise to vendors,
Marks says.
“They knew where things
were going six months ahead,”
he says.
Business owners who focus
on government work deal with
the occasional unpredictability
of getting paid. When the federal
government shut for 16 days in
2013, contractors including
many small-business owners
faced a cash flow nightmare.
Psychologist Ashley Hamp-
ton has run into that doing evaluations of children and adults
for a state agency in Alabama.
When agencies approach the
Sept. 30 end of their fiscal year,
they start running out of money.
“What typically happens is in
mid-July or mid-August it starts
slowing down, and then in August it becomes a trickle and in
September, nonexistent,” says
Hampton, who’s located in
Trussville.
To help make up for the shortfall, Hampton has expanded her
geographic reach to 15 counties.
She’s also building a separate
coaching business for other
owners who are trying to build
companies.
Some owners start out with
many customers, then realize
they would work better with just
a few. Brian Foley used to rely on
thousands of people who used
his app, Buddytruk, which he
describes as an Uber for people
who need trucks for pickups
and deliveries. But advertising
costs to reach the public ran too
high, especially since individual
customers tended to use it once
in a while at most.
Two years ago, Foley began
focusing on deliveries for shoppers at stores like Costco in
Southern California and Austin.
People who buy big items like
patio furniture can get a truck to
deliver their purchases.
Foley, whose company is
based in Santa Monica, Calif.,
develops and maintains relationships with store managers
and employees so he can advertise Buddytruk to customers
while they’re shopping. If a
manager were to leave, there’s a
chance he could lose his company’s presence in a store and in
turn, thousands of dollars in
revenue each month.
“That’s definitely a worry of
ours. The longer the relationship lasts, the more of a moat
you create around yourself,” Foley says.
B4
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
BUSINESS
Tomlinson: Ruined legacy
can provide us all a lesson
Tomlinson from page B1
vestigation, a VW executive investigated, identified the problem in a
memo and requested a
meeting with Winterkorn, the indictment
says.
“The company knowingly continued to deny
the existence of emissions cheating in its vehicles,” according to the
U.S. Justice Department.
“Instead, VW sought to
deceive U.S. regulators
about the causes for the
significant discrepancies
between emissions tests
and emissions values
measured on the road.”
In the summer of 2015,
U.S. regulators threatened to block sales of
2016 models until VW
explained why its vehicles violated emissions
standards.
Winterkorn chaired a
meeting on July 27, 2015,
where executives laid out
the emissions cheating
scheme in detail and the
legal implications, prosecutors say.
“Upon being presented
with those and other
facts, Winterkorn did not
order his subordinates to
disclose the cheating but
instead agreed to continue to deceive U.S. authorities,” the indictment
alleges. He ordered executives to meet with U.S.
regulators, lie about the
emissions-cheating software and convince them
to allow sales of 2016
models.
When confronted with
a direct question from a
U.S. regulator, though,
one VW employee broke
ranks and told the truth
about how engineers had
programmed VW diesel
vehicles to detect emission tests and temporarily reduce emissions.
Fifteen days later, VW
confessed. Two weeks
after that, the board of
directors fired Winterkorn.
We’re unlikely to ever
fully understand Winterkorn’s reasoning. Neither he nor his attorney
is commenting. But there
are charitable explanations.
CEOs justify a lot of
bad behavior by invoking
their obligation to protect
shareholder value. When
the scope of the fraud
was laid out before him,
he could quickly surmise
the impact on VW’s stock
price.
Winterkorn also recognized that some VW
executives and engineers
had committed serious
felonies in multiple countries by selling 11 million
of these vehicles from
2007 to 2015. Why reveal
the fraud and open the
company up to criminal
charges until prosecutors
proved they had gathered
evidence?
Or maybe it was hubris; a powerful CEO in
charge of a global company worth billions of dollars looking down his
nose at pesky regulators
and expecting a slap on
the wrist.
After all, isn’t that
what happens typically
to white-collar criminals
who run companies big
enough to sink a nation’s
economy?
None of those calculations stand up to reason.
A corporate leader’s duty
to shareholders includes
identifying and stopping
criminal behavior, not
perpetuating it. Everyone
should know by now that
the cover-up is worse
than the crime.
VW’s stock did drop
after the revelations, and
the company has paid
more than $20 billion in
penalties to U.S. federal,
state and local authorities. But the company
has bounced back, promising to flood the world
with hybrid and electric
cars.
The marketing department has even turned the
crisis into a publicity
shtick. At Houston’s Art
Car Parade, a VW Beetle
billowing black smoke
participated.
Marketers handed out
pamphlets urging people
to join Emissions Anonymous, a 12 Step Program
for fighting climate
change.
“Step 12: List anyone
we have harmed and
make amends to them,
from consumers who
believed our lies about
‘clean diesel’ to any person or thing subject to
the effects of climate
change,” VW promises.
Winterkorn could not
imagine leading his company through the scandal
and back to profitability.
He couldn’t find the moral courage to speak up
and do the right thing
when confronted with
his company’s crimes.
Winterkorn will forever be the guy who failed
when it mattered most.
Don’t be that guy.
Chris Tomlinson is the
Chronicle’s business
columnist.
chris.tomlinson@chron.com
twitter.com/cltomlinson
TECHNOLOGY
Alibaba profits less
as it spends to grow
By Raymond Zhong
N EW YO R K T I ME S
SHENZHEN, China —
Alibaba, the online shopping giant, is increasingly
going offline. That is making some investors nervous.
The Chinese company
Friday reported a fall in
profit of nearly 30 percent
in the latest quarter, the
first such decline in a year
and a half. One reason:
Alibaba got a bump in
profit last year from sell-
ing its shares in a social
media app. Another culprit, however, was heavy
spending on Alibaba’s
businesses outside of ecommerce,
including
cloud computing and
brick-and-mortar retail —
which the company, counterintuitively, likes to call
“new retail.”
Those ventures are part
of Alibaba’s plan to broaden its empire and become
more of a full-service technology company akin to
Google. But some inves-
Legal Notices
tors appear to be fretting
about the cost of such expansion. Alibaba has already lost around $60 billion in market value since
its shares peaked in January.
They remain well above
their level a year ago, however, thanks to strength in
Alibaba’s core online business. In the first three
months of the year, total
revenue increased by
more than 60 percent over
the same period last year,
the company said Friday.
To place legal notices
email legals@chron.com or call 713.224.6868.
LEGAL NOTICES
CAUSE NUMBER:
2017-40399
IN THE 8333RD
JUDICIAL DISTRICT
COURT OF HARRIS
COUNTY, TEXAS
Plaintiff: GOOD,
YOLANDA
vs.
Defendant: KHANAL,
TANK
CITATION BY
PUBLICATION
THE STATE OF TEXAS
County of Harris
To: TANK KHANAL
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED to be and appear before the 333RD
Judicial District Court of
Harris County, Texas in
the Courthouse in the
city of Houston, Texas at
or before 10:00 o’clock
A.M. Monday, the 4th day
of June, 2018, being the
Monday next after the expiration date of forty-two
days after this citation is
issued, and you are hereby commanded and required then and there to
appear and file written
answer to the Original
Petition, filed in said
Court on the 16th day of
J u n e , 2 0 1 8 , in a suit
numbered 2017-40399
the docket of said court,
wherein
YOLANDA
GOOD is the Plaintiff (s)
and TANK KHANAL is
the Defendant (s), the nature of plaintiff’s demand
and the said petition alleging: MOTOR VEHICLE
ACCIDENT
NOTICE
BIDS
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is hereby given
that original Letters
Testamentary for the
Estate of CHRISTINE
RIVERS THOMPSON,
Deceased, were issued on
May 4, 2018, in Cause
No. PR38508, pending in
the County Court at Law
No. 3 And Probate Court,
Brazoria County, Texas,
to: LINDA M. GREER.
All persons having claims
against this Estate which
is currently being administered are required to
present them to the
undersigned within the
time and in the manner
prescribed by law.
c/o: A. G. Crouch
Attorney at Law
235 W. Sealy Street
Alvin, Texas 77511
DATED the 4th day of
May, 2018.
/s/ A. G. Crouch
A. G. Crouch
Attorney for LINDA M.
GREER
State Bar No.: 05148000
235 W. Sealy Street
Alvin, Texas 77511
Telephone: (281)
331-5288
Facsimile: (281)
331-9346
E-mail: agcrouch@
crouchlawoffice.com
Houston Community
College Invitation for Bid
(IFB) SALE OF APPROXIMATELY 23.402 ACRES
OF LAND (WESTHEIMER
) Project No. 18-11
TO CREDITORS
To place
bids or
proposal
notices email
legals@
chron.com
& PROPOSALS
Sealed proposals will be
received in Procurement
Operations (3100 Main St
reet, Room No. 11B01,
Houston, Texas 77002)
until 2:00PM (local time)
on Wednesday May 30, 2
018.
Documents can be obtained at: www.hccs.edu/
procurement.
Note: Ad size to be 1 column width, no paragraph
spaces, standard classified print.
Please run
this ad for following days:
April 30 and May 7,
2018.
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the
City Council of the City
of Deer Park, Texas
will hold a Public Hearing
at City Hall, 710 East San
Augustine Street,
Deer Park, Harris County,
Texas on Tuesday, May
15, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. at
which time and place
they will hear all persons
desiring to be heard on
or in connection with any
matter or questions
regarding an
ordinance amending the
local incentives that may
be offered to qualified
local businesses
participating in the Texas
Enterprise Zone Program.
Shannon Bennett, City
Secretary, TRMC
Posted on Bulletin Board
May 2, 2018
Plaintiff’s Summary for
Citation by Publication
On or about February 2,
2016, Plaintiff was a
passenger in a vehicle
driven by Defendant
traveling westbound in
the 3308 block of Holcombe street. A third
party was traveling behind Plaintiff and Defendant. To avoid making
a wrong turn, Defendant
began reversing in the
middle of the street
and collided with the
aforementioned
thirdparty vehicle. Defendant
was assigned sole fault
for the incident and cited
for operating a vehicle
without a valid driver’s
license and backing not
in safety. Plaintiff suffered severe physical injuries as a result of the
collision.
You have been sued. You
may employ an attorney.
If you or your attorney
do not file a written answer with the Clerk who
issued this citation by
10:00 a.m. on the Monday next following the
expiration of 42 days
from the date of Issuance of this citation and
petition, a default judgment may be taken
against you.
Notice hereof shall be
given by publishing this
Citation once a week for
four consecutive weeks
previous to the day
of 4th day of June, 2018,
in some newspaper published in the County of
Harris, if there be a
newspaper
published
therein, but if not, then
the nearest county where
a newspaper is published, and this Citation shall
be returned on the 29th
day of May, 2018, which
is forty two days after the
date it is issued, and the
first publication
shall be at least twentyeight days before said return day.
HEREIN FAIL NOT, but
have before said court on
said return day this Writ
with your return
thereon, showing how
you have executed same.
WITNESS: Chris Daniel,
District Clerk, Harris
County Texas
GIVEN
UNDER
MY
HAND AND SEAL OF
SAID COURT at Houston,
Texas this 17th day of
APRIL, 2018.
Newspaper: Houston
Chronicle
(SEAL)
CHRIS DANIEL ,
District Clerk
Harris County, Texas
201 Caroline, Houston,
Texas 77002
P.O. Box 4651, Houston,
Texas 77210
By: /s/ R. Alexander
R. Alexander, Deputy
District Clerk
Issued at the request of:
James P Lamey
Address:
3701
Kirby
Drive Suite 760
Houston, Texas 77098
Bar Number: 24094072
Tel: (832) 690-7000
The best ad advice, the
right price. Chronicle
Classifieds 713-224-6868.
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
B5
BUSINESS
Buffett deflects questions about successor
Billionaire encourages
focus on principles of
investing at meeting
By Josh Funk
A S S OC IAT E D PRE SS
OMAHA, Neb. — Billionaire
Warren Buffett deflected questions about his eventual successor at Berkshire Hathaway over
the weekend and encouraged
the thousands of people at his
annual meeting to focus more
on big picture investing principles than day-to-day events.
The shareholder meeting celebrates the successes of the conglomerate that Buffett built
with Berkshire Vice Chairman
Charlie Munger while offering a
chance to learn from the two accomplished businessmen.
Buffett doesn't plan to retire,
even though he's 87 years old,
but he invited more questions
about his eventual successor
earlier this year when he promoted Greg Abel and Ajit Jain
to vice chairmen and expanded
their responsibilities. Both men
Nati Harnik / Associated Press
Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, plays bridge
Sunday outside Borsheims jewelry store in Omaha, Neb.
now oversee about half of Berkshire's operating companies.
Buffett and Munger both said
little has changed because Berkshire's businesses largely run
themselves day-to-day. Buffett
said he still spends most of his
time reading about businesses,
thinking and fielding the occasional phone call.
“Part of the Berkshire secret
is that when there is nothing to
do, Warren is very good at doing
nothing,” Munger said.
Dairy Queen CEO Troy Bader was promoted to lead the restaurant chain this year, and he
said Berkshire's overall philosophy hasn't changed just because Buffett isn't directly overseeing the companies now.
“Warren preaches that we
should manage it as if it's our
own business and protect reputation,” Bader said.
Many shareholders say they
trust that Buffett has a solid
succession plan in place.
“He's done a phenomenal job
for his shareholders,” said Gary
Gocken, of Lincoln, Neb. “I
think they've got it all taken
care of as far as what will happen when they eventually retire
or move on.”
Longtime Berkshire board
member Ron Olson told Yahoo
Finance he thinks the new roles
for Abel and Jain will take some
pressure off of Buffett and make
it easier for him to continue
running Berkshire, which includes an eclectic mix of more
than 90 companies.
Berkshire investors are also
eager to see how Buffett might
spend the company's $116 billion
in cash and short-term investments. Buffett reiterated Saturday that he thinks shareholders
will be better off if that cash is
reinvested in the business, not
used for dividends.
Buffett encouraged everyone
in the crowd to make long-term
investments without worrying
about headlines, such as trade
disputes, Federal Reserve ac-
tions or the economy.
“The overriding question is:
How is American business going to do in your lifetime?” Buffett said.
The questions at the meeting
always include a few focused
more on life lessons than investing. Here are a few of the lessons Buffett and Munger offered:
• “If you're going to live a
long time, you're going to have
to continue learning,” Munger
said.
• “We're going to make mistakes. The most important
thing is that we do something
about it,” Buffett said.
• “We'd do a lot better in all of
our stockpicking if we did it in
retrospect,” Munger said.
Berkshire Hathaway Inc.
owns railroad, clothing, furniture and jewelry firms. Its insurance and utility businesses
typically account for more than
half of the company's net income. The company also has
major investments in such companies as American Express,
IBM and Wells Fargo & Co.
Yes, those calls
you’re ignoring
are increasing
By Tara Siegel Bernard
N EW YO R K T I M E S
Julia Rendleman photos / Washington Post
Aaron Stallings and Carmen Price work at Ardent Craft Ales in Richmond, Va. The two use Snag Work, a
website that allows them to pick up on-demand employment. Stallings said the flexibility trumps stability.
Now hiring for one day:
The gig economy hits retail
By Abha Bhattarai
understaffed businesses.
“Workers now have lots of options
to pick up shifts: Instacart, TaskRabbit, Postmates, Lyft,” said Peter Harrison, chief executive of Snag, the parent company of Snag Work, which
says it has 2.1 million active users.
“But for small businesses, there are
not ways for them to participate in
this revolution.”
WAS H I NGT ON P O ST
Aaron Stallings, who used to work
as a bill collector for Capital One, says
he’s no longer interested in having a
full-time job.
Instead, for the past year, he has
cobbled together work — 50, sometimes 60 hours a week — by parachuting into restaurants in Richmond, Va., that have last-minute
openings to prep food, bus tables and
bottle beer. There are obvious downsides, like the lack of health insurance
and the trouble of not having an employer withhold money for taxes. But
he says the arrangement reflects a
new reality in which flexibility
trumps stability. Plus, he says, he is
often treated better than full-time
employees.
“It’s stressful to show up and have
your first day almost every time,”
Stallings, 25, said, “but at least I don’t
feel miserable and stuck on the job.”
The gig economy is clocking in to
retailers and restaurants.
The unemployment rate is at a 17year low, but stagnant wages, chronic
underemployment and growing inequality are leading more Americans
to take on so-called side hustles.
Some want to supplement their incomes. Others are just trying to eke
out a living. Nearly 1 in 4 Americans
now earn money from the digital
“platform economy,” according to the
Pew Research Center. Most of that
work is for domestic tasks, such as
housecleaning and repairs, or driving
for companies such as Uber.
Growing trend
By moving into shops and cafes,
on-demand work stands to reshape a
broader slice of the U.S. economy.
There are implications for low-wage
workers, too, as a new class of employers fills its labor pool with on-call
temp workers. Retail and hospitality
— which accounts for 20 percent of
U.S. positions, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics — is the onramp for many employees to better
jobs. But the sector is also pinched by
rising minimum wages and health
Aaron Stallings checks the Snag
Work app for his next assignment.
care costs, and employers are seeking
more flexible work arrangements
that respond to the ebbs and flows of
their businesses.
But labor experts say companies
such as Snag Work could set a dangerous precedent. Employers are already wary of hiring full-time employees because of overtime and
health care costs, they say, and having
a pool of potential gig workers at the
ready could make matters worse for
those seeking the stability, benefits
and protections that come with fulltime work.
“We’re seeing only one trend here,
which is that the gig economy is big
and getting bigger,” said Diane Mulcahy, a lecturer at Babson College and
author of “The Gig Economy.” “Companies will do just about anything to
avoid hiring full-time employees.
Add to that the fact that there is no job
security anymore, and workers are
increasingly aware that they need to
work differently if they want to create
any sort of stability for themselves.”
Snag Work and other new platforms are the go-betweens, allowing
users to pick up open shifts from retailers, restaurants and hotels that
have gaps in their schedules. Wonolo,
which bills itself as 40 percent cheaper than traditional temporary staffing
companies, counts Coca-Cola, McDonald’s and Papa John’s Pizza
among its clients. Other startups include AllWork and Coople.
Snag Work, which recently expanded to Washington, D.C., says the
arrangements are mutually beneficial for cash-strapped workers and
New concerns
That’s where Snag Work comes in,
he says. This is how it works: Interested workers sign up online and are
vetted by Snag Work via Skype interviews and background checks. They
can search for open shifts — which
typically pay $10 to $15 an hour — on
the company’s app and sign up for the
ones they’re interested in. They clock
in and clock out and are paid through
Snag Work’s online platform. A
spokeswoman for Snag Work said
the company provides workers’ compensation coverage to all workers.
Labor economists and law professors say the system raises concerns
for some of the country’s most vulnerable workers.
“If a restaurant has dishwashers,
cooks, busboys, servers — those people are employees, they have a fair
number of protections under employment law, including a minimum
wage, overtime pay and family medical leave,” said Catherine Fisk, a law
professor at the University of California. “What is at risk for these Snag
workers is that they are potentially
entitled to none of that if they are
treated as independent contractors.”
Temporary workers also have fewer rights. They can’t unionize, for example, and don’t have the same legal
protections against workplace harassment that regular employees do,
according to Erin Johansson, with
Jobs With Justice, a nonprofit that advocates for workers’ rights.
“This is a very problematic trend
that has a downward pull on employer standards,” she said. “Who’s going
to stand up and speak up about sexual harassment if they feel like they’re
just going to be replaced by a gig
worker who has no rights on that?”
It’s not just you.
Those pesky robocalls
— at best annoying disturbances and at worst costly
financial scams — are getting worse.
In an age when cellphones have become extensions of our bodies, robocallers now follow people wherever they go, disrupting
business
meetings, church services
and bedtime stories with
their children.
Though automated calls
have long plagued consumers, the volume has
skyrocketed in recent
years, reaching an estimated 3.4 billion in April,
according to YouMail,
which collects and analyzes calls through its robocall blocking service.
That’s an increase of almost 900 million a month
compared with a year ago.
Federal lawmakers have
noticed the surge. Both the
House and Senate held
hearings on the issue
within the last two weeks,
and each chamber has either passed or introduced
legislation aimed at curbing abuses. Federal regulators have also noticed, issuing new rules in November that give phone companies the authority to
block certain robocalls.
More sophistacated
Despite these efforts,
robocalls are a thorny
problem to solve. Calls can
travel through various
carriers and a maze of networks, making it hard to
pinpoint their origins and
enabling the callers to
evade rules. Regulators
are working with the telecommunications industry
to find ways to authenticate calls, which would
help unmask the callers.
In the meantime, the deceptive measures have become more sophisticated.
In one tactic, known as
“neighborhood spoofing,”
robocallers use local numbers in the hope that recipients will be more likely to
pick up.
It’s a trick that Dr. Gary
Pess, a hand surgeon in
Eatontown, N.J., knows all
too well. He receives so
many calls that mimic his
area code and the first
three digits of his phone
number that he no longer
answers them. But having
to sort robocalls from
emergency calls has cost
him precious minutes.
Pess recounted an incident in which he didn’t
recognize a number and
figured it was a robocall.
He later learned it was an
emergency room doctor
calling about a person who
had severed a thumb that
he wanted Pess to reattach. “It delayed the treatment of a patient,” he said.
Consumer
advocates
say they worry the flood of
calls could get even worse.
A federal court ruling recently struck down a Barack Obama-era definition
of an auto-dialer, leaving it
to the Federal Communications Commission to
come up with new guidance. Advocates fear that it
will open up the field to
even more robocallers,
leaving consumers with
little recourse.
Business groups counter that defining auto-dialers too broadly would hurt
legitimate businesses trying to reach customers.
Increasing complaints
Robocallers see the current FCC leadership “as
friendly to industry,” said
Margot Saunders, senior
counsel at the National
Consumer Law Center,
“and they are anticipating
rulings that will enable
more calling and forgive
past mistakes — or violations of the current law.”
The federal Do Not Call
List, which is supposed to
help consumers avoid robocalls, instead resembles
a tennis net trying to stop a
flood. The list may prevent
some (but not all) legitimate companies from calling people on the list, but it
does little to deter fraudsters and marketers, some
of them overseas, who are
willing to take their chances and flout the law.
Complaints to federal
regulators are also increasing sharply. The Federal Trade Commission,
which oversees the Do Not
Call Registry, said there
were 4.5 million complaints about robocalls in
2017, more than double the
2.18 million complaints
logged in 2013.
Other efforts are underway. The Federal Trade
Commission has held contests to encourage app developers to create innovative ways to block calls.
And some phone companies offer blocking services, though “many people
don’t have access to free,
effective
roboblocking
tools,” said Maureen Mahoney, a policy analyst at
Consumers Union.
With some exceptions
— like calls from schools
on snow days — autodialed calls to mobile
phones are typically illegal, unless a person has
given prior consent. Advocates say courts have generally interpreted the law
to say that when a consumer revokes that consent, the calls must stop —
though they often don’t.
B6
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
WEATHER
ERIC
BERGER
TODAY'S
FORECAST
Houston Chronicle
A warm weather pattern
meteorologist
will stick around the
next several days, as
highs will be in the
upper 80s and low 90s.
Conditions are expected
to stay dry, however.
The next chance of rain
probably won't be until
the weekend.
90
66
TODAY
Mostly sunny.
H
90
67
88
67
87
68
88
70
87
73
89
67
TUESDAY
Mostly sunny.
WEDNESDAY
Mostly sunny.
THURSDAY
Mostly sunny.
FRIDAY
Mostly sunny.
SATURDAY
Mostly sunny.
SUNDAY
Mostly sunny.
NORTH AMERICA TODAY
Vancouver
<-0s
0s
L
Helena
H
weather at Eric Berger’s SciGuy
blog. blog.chron.com/sciguy
METRO AREA
OUTLOOK
TODAY: Sunny. Highs around
90. West winds around 5 mph.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows
in the mid-60s. Southwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
AIR QUALITY
Today’s forecast for
the entire metro area:
Cold front
Stationary
front
Los Angeles
L
Phoenix
Juarez
Rain
Ice
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Very
Low Moderate High high Extreme
Tampico
Guadalajara
L
Atlanta
Atlantic
Ocean
Miami
Havana
L
Cancun
Merida
Caribbean Sea
Veracruz
Belize City
Acapulco
Guatemala
Tegucigalpa
Forecasts, graphics and data provided by ©IBM Corporation 1994, 2018
FOR THE RECORD
Measurements taken at George
Bush Intercontinental Airport
KEY TO CONDITIONS
c-cloudy
d-drizzle
f-fair
fg-fog
h-hazy
i-ice
mm-missing
pc-partly cloudy
r-rain
rs-rain/snow
s-sunny
fl-flurries
sh-showers
sn-snow
ts-thunderstorms
w-windy
TEXAS
Abilene
Amarillo
Austin
Beaumont
Brownsville
Bryan/Col. St.
Corpus Christi
Dallas/FW
El Paso
Galveston
Kingsville
Laredo
Longview
Lubbock
McAllen
Midland/Od.
San Angelo
San Antonio
Texarkana
Victoria
Waco
Today Tomorrow
92/65/s 92/65/pc
94/61/s 92/54/pc
90/63/s
90/63/s
90/65/s
90/65/s
90/65/s
90/70/s
90/64/s 89/65/pc
85/67/s
83/70/s
91/68/pc 91/69/pc
94/61/pc 95/63/pc
85/72/s
83/72/s
91/63/s
90/66/f
94/65/s
94/67/s
88/63/s 88/65/pc
94/65/s 94/61/pc
92/65/s
92/67/s
94/65/s 95/67/pc
94/63/s 92/65/pc
90/63/s
88/63/s
86/62/pc 87/65/pc
90/63/s
88/65/s
90/63/s 90/65/pc
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Today Tomorrow
63/42/pc 70/46/pc
86/59/pc 90/57/pc
51/37/pc 50/42/cd
81/60/ts 79/60/sh
70/52/pc 72/52/pc
83/59/pc 84/61/pc
77/51/s
85/59/s
57/46/pc
61/49/pc
60/40/s
67/46/pc
84/61/pc 78/60/ts
79/58/ts
76/58/r
66/46/s
71/52/pc
68/49/pc 75/54/pc
By Anick Jesdanun
A S S OC IAT E D PRE SS
Complexity counts
Don't even think of using “password” as your
password. Picking any
common word as your
password should be avoided because it's easily
guessed using software
that tries out every word
in the dictionary.
However, you can get a
good password by combining two or more words,
such as “rocketcalendar.”
Sprinkle in some numerals
and
punctuation
marks, and make some of
those letters in caps, and
you've got a strong password. So “rocketcalendar”
becomes “rocket44!calendaR.” (But don't use that
one; the fact that it's in this
article means hackers
probably already have it in
their databases.)
Some services will even
require your passwords to
have certain characteristics.
As you type a new password on Twitter, the service will tell you whether
Raleigh
New Orleans
How to pick a new
password, now that
Twitter wants one
NEW YORK — Yet another service is asking you
to change your password.
Twitter said last week it
discovered a bug that
stored passwords in an internal log in plain text,
without the usual encryption. Though Twitter says
there's no indication that
anyone has stolen or misused those passwords, the
company is recommending a change as a precaution.
Here are some tips on
coming up with a new
password and safeguarding your account — even if
your password is compromised.
Wash., D.C.
Gulf of
Mexico
Mexico City
Honolulu
New York
Philadelphia
Houston
Snow
Anchorage
H
H Monterrey
Pacific
Ocean
Boston
Columbia
Jackson
Austin
San Antonio
Chihuahua
Thunderstorms
Detroit
Little Rock
Dallas
Hermosillo
Temperature
Degrees F
86°
High yesterday
64°
Low yesterday
84°
Normal high
Good
Unhealthy
65°
Moderate
Very unhealthy Normal low
94° in 1906
Record high
Unhealthy/
Hazardous
49° in 2013
Record low
sensitive
Inches
Precipitation
groups
Yesterday through 4 p.m. 0.00"
1.43"
Month to date
0.96"
Normal month to date
POLLEN AND MOLD
15.09"
Year to date
Yesterday’s readings by the
14.26"
Normal year to date
City of Houston:
Other readings
Countpercubicmeterofair Top wind speed
14 mph
Tree pollen Medium
30.15 in.
High barometer
Weed pollen Medium
30.07 in.
Low barometer
63°
High dewpoint
Grass pollen Medium
55°
Low dewpoint
Mold pollen Low
59°
Avg. dewpoint
93%
High humidity
Low Medium Heavy Ext. Heavy
35%
Low humidity
UV FORECAST
Oklahoma City
Albuquerque
El Paso
Ozone watch
Note: No measurements on weekends; charts in Sunday and Monday
papers reflect reading from previous
Friday
H
Madison
Des Moines Chicago
Indianapolis
Lincoln
St. Louis
Topeka
Denver
H
Las Vegas
Jet stream
Warm front
Cheyenne
Salt Lake City
Montreal
Toronto
St. Paul
L
San Francisco
H
Ottawa
Thunder Bay
Bismarck
Boise
Low
pressure
›› Get regular updates on the
Winnipeg
Sioux Falls
80s
90s
100s>
High
pressure
INTERNATIONAL
Saskatoon
Regina
Portland
20s
30s
70s
Forecast highs and location of weather systems at 3 p.m.
Calgary
Seattle
10s
40s
50s
60s
SciGuy
online
MOON PHASES
HOUSTON’S SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
Matt Rourke / Associated Press file
Twitter is recommending a change of passwords as a
precaution because of a bug it discovered.
it's “Too Obvious” or
“Weak.” Go for “Very
Strong.”
Keep passwords fresh
Each service should
have its own password. If
you use “rocket44!calendaR” on Twitter, don't use
it on Facebook. Once hackers get your password on
one service, they'll try it on
other services, too. Outsmart them by using a
fresh password each time.
It can be as simple as adding the first three letters of
the service's name, so
Twitter gets “rocket44!calendaRtwi” and Facebook
gets “rocket44!calendaRfac.”
You can turn to a password-manager service to
help you keep track of various passwords, though
make sure the one you use
hasn't had its own security
problems.
If you're storing passwords in a spreadsheet or
other document on your
computer, be sure to protect it with its own password (Microsoft Office
lets you encrypt files).
Avoid naming the file
“passwords.”
Call it “badmovies” or
something innocuous.
Reset and refresh
Some security experts
recommend that you
change your passwords
frequently, though treat
that advice with caution.
When there's a breach, it
doesn't matter whether
that password is two
weeks or two years old.
And if you change passwords too often, you risk
forgetting them and falling back on simpler, lesssecure passwords.
A better safeguard
You can ignore much of
this advice if you just do
one thing: Turn on twofactor
authentication,
which Twitter calls “login
verification.” You'll get a
text with a code each time
you try to log in from a
new device or web browser. So even if hackers get
your password, they can't
do much unless they have
your phone or some other
way to intercept the code.
Of course, this makes it
even more important to
protect your phone with a
passcode, so that no else
can get these texts if your
phone is lost or stolen.
NATIONAL cont.
Cleveland
Columbus, OH
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Great Falls
Hartford
Honolulu
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Juneau
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Oklahoma City
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Sacramento
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
Santa Fe
Seattle
St. Louis
Tucson
Wash., D.C.
Today Tomorrow
59/41/pc 66/48/pc
66/46/cd 75/52/pc
85/51/pc 79/48/pc
75/51/s 74/56/pc
64/43/s
70/47/s
76/50/pc 65/42/sh
49/34/fl 58/38/pc
67/50/ts
73/49/pc
68/43/pc 68/48/pc
83/70/sh
84/71/pc
70/47/pc 73/54/pc
86/59/pc 86/61/pc
60/43/pc 63/45/pc
77/55/s
78/61/pc
98/73/pc
100/77/s
84/60/pc 83/64/pc
69/57/f
69/57/f
80/58/pc 80/61/pc
86/73/sh 86/72/sh
61/44/s 68/47/pc
80/56/pc 74/55/pc
75/55/pc 78/59/pc
87/67/pc 87/68/pc
68/50/pc 68/53/pc
86/63/pc 87/66/pc
90/67/pc 89/67/pc
69/50/pc 68/50/pc
104/74/pc
104/75/s
66/47/f
72/51/pc
77/54/pc 80/56/pc
86/55/pc 85/55/pc
79/52/pc
79/55/s
70/59/f
69/60/f
70/52/f 70/52/pc
83/49/pc 85/49/pc
70/53/pc 76/53/pc
74/53/s 78/59/pc
101/67/pc 100/66/s
70/54/pc 72/54/pc
Today Tomorrow
Africa
Cairo
86/66/s
85/64/s
Cape Town
77/55/r
63/54/r
Casablanca
70/57/r 72/58/pc
Dakar
73/65/s
73/66/s
Johannesburg
71/47/s
70/51/s
Lagos
91/77/pc
91/78/pc
Asia/Pacific
Beijing
81/51/pc
81/53/s
Ho Chi Minh
92/79/ts 92/80/ts
Hong Kong
83/76/ts
84/77/ts
Islamabad
80/66/ts 84/65/pc
Jakarta
94/76/s
92/76/ts
Karachi
92/81/s
94/81/s
Kuala Lumpur
91/76/ts
92/77/ts
Manila
95/81/s
94/81/s
New Delhi
105/80/s
93/76/ts
Seoul
73/53/pc
73/47/pc
Shanghai
70/61/cd 75/55/pc
Singapore
90/79/pc 91/80/pc
Sydney
77/55/s 78/56/pc
Taipei
90/79/pc
83/71/r
Tokyo
70/59/r
61/55/r
Canada
Calgary
67/43/ts 69/43/pc
Edmonton
74/51/pc
75/43/pc
Montreal
58/40/pc
69/47/s
Toronto
52/43/pc
55/45/s
Vancouver
64/51/pc 68/54/pc
Winnipeg
85/48/s
72/47/pc
Europe
Amsterdam
77/54/s
77/55/s
Athens
74/61/r
76/62/r
Berlin
75/52/s
76/57/s
Copenhagen
63/47/s
65/50/s
Dublin
68/50/pc
57/43/r
Frankfurt
78/53/s
78/54/s
Geneva
75/53/s
75/55/r
Istanbul
68/59/r
69/61/r
London
80/51/s
77/50/s
Madrid
77/54/r
79/54/ts
Moscow
69/49/s 74/52/pc
Paris
77/53/s
79/54/s
Prague
72/46/s
72/52/s
Rome
76/60/ts
72/59/ts
Stockholm
73/46/s
68/44/s
Vienna
76/51/s
71/51/ts
Warsaw
75/50/s
80/55/s
Zurich
75/50/s
77/50/s
Latin American/Caribbean
Bogota
65/53/ts
66/53/r
Buenos Aires
73/67/pc
70/66/r
Caracas
77/64/r 79/64/pc
Havana
82/67/ts
86/69/s
Kingston
82/79/ts 84/79/ts
Lima
68/63/pc 67/63/pc
Rio
80/71/r
79/70/r
San Juan
87/77/sh 88/77/sh
San Salvador
90/69/ts 89/69/ts
Santiago
69/47/pc
71/48/pc
Sao Paulo
72/63/pc 69/61/pc
St. Thomas
84/75/pc 84/76/pc
Mexico
Acapulco
87/77/pc 87/76/pc
Cancun
85/69/r 85/69/pc
Guadalajara
82/59/ts 78/58/ts
Guanajuato
79/55/pc
75/53/ts
Mazatlan
91/69/s
89/69/s
Merida
88/69/pc 90/69/pc
Mexico City
75/55/pc
72/55/r
Puerto Vallarta 86/72/pc
85/71/s
Tampico
82/73/pc 82/72/pc
Veracruz
84/72/r 84/72/pc
Middle East
Baghdad
90/71/pc 86/67/pc
Beirut
77/65/r
72/64/ts
Dubai
97/79/s 100/83/s
Jerusalem
69/54/ts 66/53/pc
Kabul
74/46/s
78/48/s
Mecca
107/86/pc 106/80/pc
Riyadh
104/81/s
107/80/s
Tehran
83/63/s
83/64/r
Tel Aviv
77/63/ts 75/63/cd
Last
quarter
New
moon
May 7
May 15
Sunset today
Sunrise tomorrow
Moonrise today
Moonset today
First
quarter
Full
moon
May 21
May 29
8:02 p.m.
6:32 a.m.
1:46 a.m.
12:41 p.m.
COASTAL FORECAST
GALVESTON BAY: Northeast
winds around 5 knots to east
afternoon. Bay waters smooth.
Tonight: Southeast winds 5
to 10 knots to west after
midnight.
MATAGORDA SHIP
CHANNEL TO HIGH ISLAND
OUT 20 TO 50 MILES :
Northwest winds 5 to 10 knots
to north afternoon. Tonight:
South winds 5 to 10 knots.
GALVESTON TIDES
,12:39 p.m.
HIGHS:
LOWS:
03:32 a.m.,
RIVERS, CREEKS
AND BAYOUS
Location
Brays Bayou
Brazos River
Clear Creek
Colorado R.
Greens Bayou
Guadalupe R.
Little River
Navasota R.
Neches River
Pine Island B.
Sabine River
San Bernard R.
E. San Jac. R.
W. San Jac. R.
San Jacinto R.
Sims Bayou
Trinity River
Village Creek
White Oak B.
Flood Latest 24-hr.
stage stage chg.
South Main 54 16.7 0.0
Bryan
43 8.1+0.2
Hempstead 50 11.2+0.2
Richmond 48 10 -0.1
Piney Point 50 30 +1.8
Shepherd Dr. 23 1.6 +0.7
Friendswood 12 -0.2 -0.3
Austin
29 11.3 -0.4
Bastrop
25 4.8+0.9
La Grange 32 6.5 +2.4
Columbus 34 10.7+0.2
Wharton
39 7.8 0.0
Bay City
44 2.6 -0.5
Eastex Fwy. 61 39.3 +0.1
Hunt
12 7.8 -0.1
Comfort
26 3.8+3.8
Spring Branch 36 3.4+0.9
New Braunfels 7 1.9 -0.1
Gonzales
31 12.4+0.3
Cuero
20 8.6 0.0
Victoria
21 6.4 0.0
Dupont
20 11.1 -0.1
Little River 30 2 -1.8
Cameron
30 4.2+2.6
Easterly
19 3.2 0.0
Evadale
19 13.5 -0.7
Sour Lake
25 12.4 0.0
Bon Wier
30 15.6 -1.4
Deweyville 24 22 -0.1
Orange
4 0.7 -0.3
Burkeville 43 14.8 +1.3
E. Bernard 17 6.4 0.0
Sweeny
16 11.2 0.0
Cleveland 19 5.5+0.3
Conroe
11695.9 -0.3
Sheldon
10 0 -0.1
Telephone Rd. 30 -0.1 -0.2
Goodrich
36 5.6 -0.1
Liberty
26 7.7 0.0
Kountze
20 5.8 0.0
Heights Blvd. 48 8.3+0.4
TEXAS LAKES
Full Actual Release
level
level
cfs
61
Canyon Dam 909 905.4
201
201
0.0
Conroe
41.73 42.6
0.0
Houston
681 667.6
0.0
Lake Travis
131 131.3 1370
Livingston
SPORTS
HOCKEY
The Lightning and
Golden Knights advance to the next
round of the playoffs.
Page C2
Houston Chronicle
Houston Chronicle | Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and Chron.com
@HoustonChron
GOLF
Bernhard Langer
overcomes a shaky
start to win the Insperity Invitational.
Page C3
Section C HHHH
NBA PLAYOFFS H ROCKETS LEAD SERIES 3-1
Rockets 100, Jazz 87
GAME 5: 7 P.M. TUESDAY AT TOYOTA CENTER • TV: TNT
ROAD BLOCKER
Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle
Not in your house! Rockets center Clint Capela (15), who blocked six shots and totaled 15 rebounds, raises his game against Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell.
With Capela front and center,
it’s defense that gets the job done
SALT LAKE CITY
after he insisted on
— The buzzer soundremaining in the
ed, and James Harden
game after Rockets
raced to Clint Capecoach Mike D’Antoni
la’s face. Trevor Ariza
was ready to take
got there next. Then
him out for rest,
P.J. Tucker. Then
finishing with a caJONATHAN
FEIGEN
Chris Paul.
reer-high six rejecOn the Rockets
Doors can’t be
tions. But he had
slammed harder than
done more than that.
the way Capela shut down
Capela clearly demonthe Jazz down the stretch.
strated how the Rockets, for
Statements cannot be clearall their struggles offensiveer.
ly, from Harden’s turnovers
He had blocked four shots
to misfired 3s, turned back a
in the final two minutes, all
Rockets continues on C4
INSIDE
Role model
» Rockets coach Mike
D’Antoni praised by peers
for his innovative offenses.
Page C5
West duel
» Warriors take 3-1 lead in
series over Pelicans.
Page C5
Online
» More Rockets coverage at
houstonchronicle.com
and txsportsnation.com
Weekend in Utah showed gritty
Rockets could go to the Finals
SALT LAKE CITY —
They arrived in this city
questioned, forced to defend
themselves and their ways
yet again.
The Rockets’ unflinching
answer?
The grit, intensity and
teamwork that could carry
this team all the way to the
NBA Finals.
The Jazz’s arena screamed
and shook for Games 3 and 4
in this Western Conference
second-round series. James
Harden, Chris Paul, Clint
BRIAN T. SMITH
Commentary
Capela and Co. silenced and
dominated Vivint Smart
Home Arena, claiming both
games and confidently carrySmith continues on C4
DIAMONDBACKS 3, ASTROS 1
Obstruction of justice? Arguably
After entanglement
at third, umps give
Pollock go-ahead run
By Chandler Rome
PHOENIX — Silence enveloped the visitors’ clubhouse at
Chase Field, its occupants morosely dressing for a departing
airplane. Some clanked forks to
plates. Others milled about the
space quietly, averting their eyes
from the clips projected by the
large-screen computers at the
entrance.
Astros update
Sunday: Diamondbacks 3, Astros 1.
Record: 21-15.
Today: At Oakland, 9:05 p.m.
Starting pitchers: Dallas
Keuchel (1-5) vs. Brett Anderson
(0-0).
TV/radio: ATTSW; 790 AM,
850 AM /101.7 FM (Spanish).
Alex Bregman sat beneath
one. One hand controlled a
mouse. His other sat on his head.
Video ran before his eyes, re-
playing the sixth-inning obstruction call that made Sunday’s 3-1 loss difficult to explain
and, therefore, accept.
“The hottest hitter in the National League got a pitch to hit
and drove it to center field, and
that was the ballgame,” starting
pitcher Justin Verlander said.
“Or really, the umpire’s call at
third base was the ballgame. You
call it.”
Verlander pitched with a 1-0
lead when Daniel Descalso
coaxed an eight-pitch walk to
begin the sixth inning. A border-
Astros continues on C6
Jennifer Stewart / Getty Images
Alex Bregman (2) chases a ball eventually thrown home by
Justin Verlander to nab A.J. Pollock, who got the run anyway.
C2
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
HOCKEY | COLLEGES
NHL PLAYOFFS
NO. 21 HOUSTON 6, CENTRAL FLORIDA 3
Cougars salvage tough series
AAC frontrunners
to enter weekend
seeking to gain
more separation
By Joseph Duarte
Chris O'Meara / Associated Press
Center J.T. Miller had one of two second-period
goals for the Lightning as they ousted the Bruins.
Bolts, Knights
win big, advance
TAMPA, Fla. — Brayden Point and J.T. Miller
scored second-period
goals, helping the Tampa
Bay Lightning beat the
Boston Bruins 3-1 on
Sunday and advance to
the Eastern Conference
finals for the third time in
four years.
Andrei Vasilevskiy
stopped 27 shots — 14 in
the final period — for the
Lightning, who rebounded from losing the series
opener to eliminate Boston in five games.
Point erased a 1-0 Bruins lead with his unassisted goal at 10:43 of the
second period.
Miller's power-play
goal broke the tie less
than four minutes later,
and Anton Stralman
added an empty-netter
with 1:29 remaining to
end any chance for a
Boston comeback.
The Lightning again
did a good job of containing Boston's top line of
Patrice Bergeron, David
Pastrnak and Marchand.
Although the trio combined for 23 points in the
series (seven goals, 16
assists), 11 of those points
came in the Bruins' 6-2
win in Game 1.
Bergeron and Charlie
McAvoy assisted on David Krejci's goal in the
first period, but Vasilevskiy came up big against
the high-scoring line with
four huge saves — one on
Bergeron's point-blank
shot — in the closing
minutes while Tampa Bay
was killing off Boston's
last power-play.
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 3
SHARKS 0
Marc-Andre Fleury
made 28 saves in his
fourth shutout of the
playoffs and Vegas is
headed to the Western
Conference finals in its
inaugural season after
beating host San Jose in
Game 6 of their secondround series.
Cody Eakin sealed it
with an empty-netter to
help Vegas become just
the third team in NHL
history to win multiple
series in its first season.
From wire reports
“Shower well” is a
phrase used in the University of Houston clubhouse.
Have a rough outing? Just
wash those bad memories
away.
“As soon as you shower,
the past is the past,” second baseman Connor Hollis said. “If you had a bad
game yesterday, you just
can’t worry about that.”
After a 12-inning loss
Saturday night, part of an
overall rough day as Central Florida swept a doubleheader from UH, Ryan
Randel needed one of
those “Calgon, take me
away” moments.
Fresh and clean, Randel
tossed 52⁄3 shutout innings
in relief as the No. 21 Cougars beat the Knights 6-3
on Sunday to salvage the
final game of the weekend
series at Schroeder Park.
At 14-7 in the American
Athletic Conference, UH
(29-19) holds a 1½-game
lead over Connecticut,
East Carolina and South
Florida, all 11-7, with two
weekends left in the regular season. The Cougars
play at UConn in a threegame series beginning Friday and then, depending
on the results, must wait
another week to find out if
they capture the regularseason title for the third
time in the last four seasons.
“We need to go in there
next weekend and win
that series and make everybody chase us,” UH
coach Todd Whitting said.
To get to this point
hasn’t been easy for the
Cougars, who cooled off in
the past week with a pair
of one-run losses (to Sam
Houston State and Central
Florida) and another in extra innings.
“I love where we are at
right now,” Whitting said.
“We control our destiny.”
On Sunday, Whitting
Ryan
Randel
threw 52⁄3
innings of
relief to lift
UH to
victory.
praised the moves by
pitching coach Terry Rooney for “piecing that thing
together” after the Cougars burned through seven pitchers in Saturday’s
doubleheader
sweep.
Brayson Hurdsman, who
didn’t allow a run in 12⁄3 innings in Game 2 against
the Knights, allowed two
earned runs over three innings Sunday.
Randel, Houston’s regular Sunday starter, delivered a career-high 52⁄3 relief innings to give the
bullpen a rest.
The junior righthander
allowed only four hits,
keeping the ball mostly on
the ground and helped by
a pair of double plays on a
day defense was an adventure for the Cougars with a
season high-tying three
errors.
Told before the game he
was on standby, Randel
said, “I was ready to go.”
The outing was reminiscent of April 15, when
Randel
delivered
six
strong innings in a win
over Tulane to avoid a series sweep.
“That’s twice we’ve
been in a must-win situation and he pulled us
through,” Whitting said.
After the Knights took a
1-0 lead in the first inning
on a steal of home plate,
the Cougars answered
with four runs in the bottom half and another two
in the third. Cooper Coldiron drove in a pair of runs,
and Tyler Bielamowicz
had three hits and an RBI.
Joey Pulido got the final
out for his third save.
For UH, it comes down
to this: One weekend,
three games and a conference title on the line.
“We have to go out there
and take care of business,”
Hollis said.
joseph.duarte@chron.com
twitter.com/joseph_duarte
COLLEGE BASEBALL
No. 20 Texas takes down No. 9 Tech
LUBBOCK — Zach
Zubia hit a go-ahead
two-run homer in the
seventh inning after Kody
Clemens tied it with a
solo blast, and No. 20
Texas defeated No. 9
Texas Tech 7-5 on Sunday
to take their series, two
games to one.
Zubia finished with
three RBIs for the Longhorns (33-18,14-7 Big 12).
Michael Davis went
3-for-4 for the Red Raiders (35-14, 12-9).
TEXAS A&M 7, FLORIDA 3
Stephen Kolek held the
No. 1 Gators to three runs
over 62⁄3 innings, Hunter
Coleman and Cole Bedford homered, and the
Aggies won the finale to
avoid a three-game series
sweep and improve to
34-14 and 12-12 in the
Southeastern Conference.
UTSA 7, RICE 0
Chance Kirby struck
out 13 batters over 71⁄3
innings, Ben Brookover
and Joshua Lamb each
drove in three runs, and
the Roadrunners shut out
the Owls to avoid a threegame series sweep in San
Antonio and improve to
26-20 and 12-11 in Conference USA.
Rice fell to 20-26-2 and
9-13-2 in C-USA.
NEW ORLEANS 2
HOUSTON BAPTIST 1
The Huskies stranded
11 baserunners on their
way to dropping the series finale to the Privateers at Husky Field and
falling to 22-26 and 14-10
in the Southland.
GRAMBLING ST. 7
TEXAS SOUTHERN 6
Kamren Dukes went
1-for-4 to extend Division
I’s longest hitting streak
to 34 games, but Texas
Southern was edged in its
home finale to fall to
23-26 and 17-6 in the
Southwestern Athletic
Conference.
ELSEWHERE
TCU defeated Lamar
11-0 on Haylen Green’s
one-hitter in Fort Worth.
… Southeastern Louisiana
blanked Sam Houston
State, 6-0, in Hunstvolle.
… Dallas Baptist beat
visiting Evansville 7-1 to
cap a three-game sweep.
From web reports
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
C3
GOLF
INSPERITY INVITATIONAL
INSPERITY INVITATIONAL REPORT
Maggert makes
run but settles
for another 2nd
THE WOODLANDS —
For the second time in
three years, Jeff Maggert
shared second place at
the Insperity Invitational.
At least Maggert, who
resides in The Woodlands, gave himself a
chance on No. 18.
Facing a 30-foot birdie
putt that would put him
at 11 under and tied for
the lead if it were to go in,
Maggert couldn’t convert.
“It was makeable,” said
Maggert, who closed with
a back-nine 31 to get into
contention. “I’ve had that
putt a few hundred times
over the years, so I knew
exactly what it was going
to do.
“Coming off that fringe,
it got a little bouncy on
the grain and kicked off
line.”
Maggert shot a 3-under-par 69 on Sunday to
finish in a three-way tie
with Bart Bryant and
Paul Goydos.
Michael Wyke
Bernhard Langer celebrates after sinking his putt on the 18th hole to win the Insperity Invitational at The
Woodlands Country Club on Sunday.
Up to the challenge — again
Langer holds on,
wins tournament
for fourth time in
11 appearances
By Dale Robertson
THE WOODLANDS —
Bernhard Langer might
not own the Insperity Invitational, but he has, at the
very least, taken out a longterm lease on same.
“You know,” he said,
“this tournament is very
special in my heart. It’s a
great golf course, a great
venue, an extremely wellrun event.”
His warm, heartfelt,
sentiments are understandable. Langer has visited North Houston/South
Montgomery County 11
times as a PGA Champions
Tour golfer, always staying
with friends who have a
lovely home on the ninth
fairway, and he left with
the first-prize check for the
fourth time Sunday by
overcoming a shaky front
nine, a scarily errant drive
on the final hole and challenges from a trio of wouldbe usurpers, most notably
Paul Goydos.
What became a wire-towire triumph that began
with a Woodlands Country
Club Tournament Course
record-tying 63 on Friday
ended with a par-saving,
harder-than-it-looked 4foot putt, allowing Langer
to get safely up and down.
He shot 70-205 to win by a
single swing over Goydos,
who had charged into a
three-shot lead at one point
with Langer wobbling.
Bart Bryant (69) and Jeff
Maggert (69) also shared
the runner-up spot.
Maggert 0-for-5
Yeah, poor Maggert. The
onetime Texas A&M golfer
lives about 4 miles from the
course on which he has
been oft-thwarted, both in
the Insperity and the PGA
Tour’s Shell Houston
Open, having tied for second twice in three years after also being the runnerup in the Shell twice, in
Michael Wyke
Jeff Maggert misses his putt on the 18th hole that
would have put him in a playoff.
play tournaments, he admitted he was delighted to
avoid the tension of a third.
“Do I look a little older
now?” Langer said when
he walked into the interview room. “Or maybe just
a little more gray hair. I
didn’t really want to go into
another playoff.”
Leading by a stroke
when the final round began, Langer birdied the
first hole before struggling
almost into the turn, shooting a 37 after bogeying the
seventh and eighth holes as
Goydos surged. But birdies
on the ninth and 10th holes
got the two-time Masters
champion back on the
right track and Goydos,
who fashioned a 68,
wound up shaving only
one stroke off par over the
last nine holes. His closing
bogey ultimately prevented him from forcing Langer into yet another playoff.
“I played some pretty
good golf coming down the
stretch,” Langer said, “except for my tee shot on 18.
The last place I wanted to
go was into the trees on the
right. It was a bad shot. I
hit it a little fat.”
The ball landed behind a
TV trailer. He was permitted to move his ball one
club’s length to a better
spot. Although he couldn’t
see the green and admittedly didn’t make a perfect
swing with his 5-iron, he
wound up with an excellent lie.
“I had a nice chip shot
and got (the putt) in the
middle of the hole. One of
my better putts ever, under
the circumstances.”
Goydos hadn’t placed
higher than 24th in any
tour event this season, so
he came in “with almost zero expectations. I’m always
surprised when I play well,
especially this week. I had
no inclination that I was
going to be remotely competitive. But I probably
made the most birdies of
anybody (over the 54 holes)
but also, as it turned out,
too many bogeys.”
Goydos shocked
at being in lead
For the better part of
the day, Paul Goydos
was leading the tournament and by as many as
three shots.
That surprised Goydos,
who has struggled this
season.
But by tying for second
place and earning
$161,333, Goydos moved
up to 27th on the money
list with $217,406.
“I really had almost
zero expectations,” said
Goydos, whose 10-under
206 total was one shot
back of Bernhard Langer’s winning 11 under. “I
mean, I haven’t played
well all year.”
Goydos, who led the
field with 19 birdies, said
the reason he played well
this week on The Woodlands Country Club Tournament Course was simple. Being a good ballstriker, the course suits
his game.
“If I’m playing good, I
hit the ball pretty straight
and I hit the ball pin-high
a lot, and that’s what you
need to do here,” Goydos
said. “This is a golf
course where you get out
of position, you make
bogey. That’s just the way
it is.”
Key hole
NO. 18
PAR 4, 442 YARDS
Nursing a 1-shot lead, Bernhard Langer came out of
his tee shot and pushed his
3-wood into the trees on
the right. After taking a
one-club relief for line of
sight because the ball
landed directly behind an
NBC trailer, Langer faced a
blind shot, and his 5-iron
approach shot was leaking
before it landed 18 feet
right of the green. He
pitched to within 3 to 4
feet and made the putt for
par to secure the win.
pointing weekend for the
defending Insperity Invitational champion.
A year after winning
here for his only Champions Tour victory, Daly
never got untracked in
his two rounds — an
even-par 72 on Friday and
then a 5-over 77 on Saturday.
Bryant laments
missed putts
Bart Bryant, who
shared second place with
Paul Goydos and Jeff
Maggert, led the field in
greens hit in regulation
(45-of-54) but did not
make enough putts to get
over the hump, struggling
at times with the speed
on the greens.
“I wasn’t worried about
hitting thin shots or fat
shots, everything was just
on the button,” said Bryant, who finished with
back-to-back bogey-free
rounds. “I just kept
thinking, I’m going to
make some putts.
“But I stuffed it in
there a lot this week really close, where I didn’t
have to make them (all).”
Odds and ends
Scott Parel had one of
the longest drives of the
day on No. 18 but came
away with a bogey-5 because of a bad break.
Parel’s approach shot hit
a sprinkler head in front
of the back bunker.
The ball caromed and
quickly scooted across
the green and into the
water hazard fronting the
green. Parel finished with
a 72 and a 2-under total of
214. … Of Bernard Langer’s 37 Champions Tour
victories, 13 have been by
one shot. … Paul Goydos
was 8 under on the par 5s
and 36-for-42 in driving
accuracy, which were tied
for fourth in the field.
1996 and 1998. He entered
that tournament pretty
much every year from the
late 1980s through 2014
without closing the deal.
Now, he’s 0-for-5 in the
Champions event.
But rather than dwell on
his frustrations, Maggert,
54, saw his glass as being
half full, saying: “Five birdies on the back nine? I was
happy with that. Thirtyone. I’ll take that any day of
the year. It’s good to do it
and give yourself a chance.
It’s a confidence-builder
with our major (senior)
championships beginning
to start, with our first major (the Tradition) in two
weeks, then the Senior
PGA the following week.”
Maggert had a 30-foot
birdie putt from the fringe
that would have gotten him
into a playoff, too, but the
ball rolled wide of the hole.
“It was makeable,” Maggert said. “I’ve had that
putt a few hundred times
over the years, so I knew
exactly what it was going to
do. Coming off that fringe,
it got a little bouncy on the
grain and kicked off line.”
Speaking outside the
scorer’s tent while Langer
had two holes left, he said:
“We’ll see what happens.
It’s a tough finish, but Bernard’s a tough competitor
so I expect him to do well.”
In the end, Langer did.
“I was hoping I would
sit here (being interviewed
as the champion),” he said,
“but in golf you never
know. My script would
have been coming down
the last (fairway) with a
three-shot lead, but that
didn’t happen.”
Mark Calcavecchia ....................67-69-72
Russ Cochran............................68-70-70
Scott Dunlap ............................66-70-72
Miguel Angel Jimenez ...............67-69-72
John Huston .............................72-69-70
Billy Mayfair, ............................72-69-70
Steve Pate ................................69-71-71
Jerry Smith ...............................72-70-69
Kirk Triplett ..............................69-73-69
Sandy Lyle................................67-72-72
Colin Montgomerie....................68-72-71
214 (2 under); $10,340
217 (1 over); $5,390
Jay Haas...................................68-74-78
Tom Byrum.........................71-70-73
Carlos Franco .....................70-72-72
Mark O’Meara.....................70-73-71
Scott Parel.........................68-74-72
Esteban Toledo ..................72-70-72
Barry Lane................................73-72-72
Paul McGinley...........................73-74-70
222 (6 over); $2,420
212 (4 under); $14,520
Jay Don Blake ...........................70-74-71
Michael Bradley........................68-73-74
Todd Hamilton .........................70-69-76
Rocco Mediate ..........................70-74-71
Jesper Parnevik ........................69-72-74
Second behind Irwin
The title was Langer’s
37th on the PGA Champions Tour, second only to
Hale Irwin’s 45, and he’s
the first 60-year-old player
to win as many as four
times. He previously prevailed here in 2007 for his
first seniors title at age 50,
then repeated in 2008 and
completed his hat trick in
2014. That year Langer
nipped fellow Masters
champion Fred Couples by
one stroke, also finishing
with a 54-hole score of 205.
The $322,500 first-place
check moved Langer into
first place in the Charles
Schwab Cup standings.
Having lost in playoffs in
each of his last two regular
Champions Tour medal-
dale.robertson@chron.com
twitter.com/sportywineguy
Daly withdraws
because of knee
Citing a problem with
his knee, John Daly
pulled out of the tournament and did not tee it up
for the final round Sunday, capping a disap-
Richard Dean
Michael Wyke
Paul Goydos hits from the bunker near the 15th
green during the third round Sunday.
SUNDAY’S SCORES
205 (11 under); $330,000
Bernhard Langer........................63-72-70
206 (10 under); $161,333
Paul Goydos ..............................70-68-68
Bart Bryant................................70-67-69
Jeff Maggert ..............................66-71-69
207 (9 under); $80,960
David Frost ................................68-72-67
Brandt Jobe...............................69-70-68
Tom Lehman .............................67-72-68
Tom Pernice Jr. ..........................68-68-71
Kenny Perry ...............................73-65-69
208 (8 under); $45,886
Joe Durant.................................68-70-70
Kevin Sutherland.......................70-69-69
David Toms ................................70-71-67
209 (7 under); $33,073
Gary Hallberg ...........................70-72-67
Lee Janzen ................................72-66-71
Jerry Kelly.................................69-72-68
210 (6 under); $26,510
Marco Dawson ..........................69-70-71
Clark Dennis .............................73-68-69
Corey Pavin...............................70-68-72
Duffy Waldorf ...........................70-71-69
211 (5 under); $19,238
Glen Day ...................................70-71-70
Doug Garwood..........................67-75-69
Tommy Armour III......................70-71-71
Paul Broadhurst ........................70-71-71
Scott McCarron.........................67-76-69
213 (3 under); $12,375
Woody Austin ...........................69-72-72
Olin Browne..............................70-68-75
Dan Forsman ............................70-72-71
Wes Short, Jr............................72-68-73
215 (1 under); $8,140
216 (even); $6,380
Mark Brooks .............................72-77-67
Mike Goodes .............................68-70-78
Gene Sauers .............................70-78-68
218 (2 over); $4,840
Len Mattiace.............................71-77-70
Fran Quinn................................73-75-70
Scott Verplank..........................69-74-75
219 (3 over); $3,960
Stephen Ames..........................75-74-70
Bob Gilder.................................73-75-71
Tom Kite ...................................71-73-75
Jeff Sluman ..............................74-72-73
Willie Wood ..............................70-71-78
220 (4 over); $3,080
Billy Andrade............................73-75-72
Brad Burns ................................71-78-71
Michael Allen ............................70-71-81
Blaine McCallister .....................71-77-74
Ian Woosnam............................71-77-74
224 (8 over); $2,002
Brian Henninger........................76-78-70
Joey Sindelar ............................74-78-72
225 (9 over); $1,738
David McKenzie ........................75-73-77
Tom Purtzer..............................75-74-76
231 (15 over); $1,540
John Harris ...............................73-83-75
241 (25 over); $1,452
Jim Thorpe ...............................79-80-82
C4
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HHHH
NBA Playoffs
ROCKETS 100, JAZZ 87
MORE ONLINE AT HOUSTONCHRONICLE.COM/ROCKETS
1
2
3
4
5
6*
7*
ROCKETS 110
JAZZ 116
ROCKETS 108
ROCKETS 113
JAZZ 92
ROCKETS 100
JAZZ 87
JAZZ AT
ROCKETS
ROCKETS
AT JAZZ
JAZZ AT
ROCKETS
JAZZ 96
April 29
May 2
Friday
Sunday
Rockets lead series 3-1
7 p.m. Tuesday
TV: TNT
TBA Thursday
TV: ESPN
TBA May 14
TV: TNT
*—if necessary
Rockets paced by Paul’s 27 points
Rockets from page C1
Rockets 100, Jazz 87
FG
FT Reb
HOU
Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS
Ariza
31:51
2-7
0-0 0-4 0 3
6
Tucker
34:51
3-6
2-2 1-7 1 2 11
Capela
37:05 6-11
0-0 5-15 2 2 12
Harden
36:24 8-22
7-8 0-4 3 3 24
Paul
35:15 12-23
2-2 2-12 6 3 27
Gordon
25:45 3-10
2-2 0-2 2 3
9
Mbah a Moute
16:09
1-3
1-1 0-2 0 0
3
Green
12:39
2-5
0-0 0-1 0 2
6
Nene
10:00
0-1
2-2 1-2 1 3
2
Totals
240 37-88 16-17 9-49 15 21 100
Percentages: FG .420, FT .941. 3-point goals: 10-38,
.263 (Tucker 3-5, Green 2-5, Ariza 2-7, Gordon 1-6, Paul
1-6, Harden 1-7, Mbah a Moute 0-2). Team rebounds: 5.
Team turnovers: 13 (11 PTS). Blocked shots: 9 (Capela 6, Mbah a Moute, Paul, Tucker). Turnovers: 13 (Harden
8, Gordon 2, Mbah a Moute, Nene, Paul). Steals: 11
(Harden 4, Capela 2, Mbah a Moute 2, Paul 2, Nene).
Technical fouls: Capela, 8:08 fourth; coach Mike D’Antoni, 8:08 fourth; Paul, 00:20 fourth.
FG
FT Reb
UTA
Min
M-A
M-A O-T A PF PTS
Crowder
33:59
1-11
2-2
0-5 2 2
5
Ingles
40:36
6-13
1-2
0-8 4 3
15
Gobert
32:17
5-7
1-2 4-10 0 1
11
Mitchell
38:03
8-24
7-7
1-9 2 6
25
O’Neale
28:24
3-7
2-2
0-5 1 3
8
Neto
17:37
3-10
1-1
1-2 2 1
9
Favors
15:43
2-2
1-2
1-1 1 1
5
Jerebko
14:01
0-1
0-0
0-1 2 1
0
Exum
10:10
4-6
1-2
0-0 1 3
9
Burks
9:08
0-2
0-0
1-4 1 0
0
Totals
240 32-83 16-20 8-45 16 21 87
Percentages: FG .386, FT .800. 3-point goals: 7-29,
.241 (Neto 2-3, Ingles 2-7, Mitchell 2-7, Crowder 1-7, Exum 0-1, Jerebko 0-1, O’Neale 0-3). Team rebounds: 8.
Team turnovers: 16 (17 PTS). Blocked shots: 5 (Gobert 3, Crowder 2). Turnovers: 16 (O’Neale 4, Gobert 3,
Mitchell 3, Ingles 2, Neto 2, Burks, Favors). Steals: 8
(Mitchell 4, Crowder, Favors, Gobert, Ingles). Technical
fouls: Mitchell, 8:08 fourth.
Jazz run to take a 100-87 win
Sunday night and head home
with a 3-1 series lead.
“I can’t exactly tell you what
I was saying to him,” Harden
said. “He’s put himself in this
position to go out here and play
at a high level. He’s doing what
we ask him to do every single
night. As a result, six blocks
and 20 altered shots. That’s
what we need.”
Dream-like
That was the difference, so
much so that the ultimate authority on the subject could not
stop gushing.
“The six blocked shots, yes,
but it’s all the shots he
changed,” gushed Rockets legend Hakeem Olajuwon, the
NBA’s all-time leader in blocks.
“That’s impact.”
It was crucial, but it also
represented how the Rockets
gained control of the series.
After the Jazz made 50 percent
and 51.8 percent of their shots
in the first two games, they hit
on 41.7 percent Friday before
the Rockets held them to 38.6
percent Sunday, the worst
shooting against them in any of
their nine playoff games.
With the Rockets struggling
with their 3-point shooting —
their 26.3 percent was their
worst of the postseason — they
led by as much as 19, with the
defense controlling the game
from the outset.
“When Clint is active like
that, it’s hard to score,” Rockets
forward Ariza said. “He’s protecting the paint, he’s altering
shots, he’s making guys change
the way they are thinking
about attacking the rim. When
he’s playing like that, it’s hard
for anybody to score on us.”
That might not have been
enough to secure Capela’s place
in a Rockets Big Three until he
finished the game with his best,
proving he was ready to make
the enormous energy last. In a
matchup with Rudy Gobert, the
presumptive Defensive Player
of the Year, Capela added 12
points and 15 rebounds. But his
dominant finish demonstrated
endurance the Rockets considered his final test.
“I think he pole-vaulted over
that hurdle,” coach Mike D’Antoni said. “He cleared it by a lot.
The guy’s incredible the whole
time. He asked for a sub about
Houston
30 28 21 21 —
100
Utah
23 25 17 22 —
87
A: 18,306 (18,300). Officials: Mark Ayotte, James Williams, Ken Mauer, Bill Kennedy
turnovers.
After the Rockets led by 19
with three minutes left in the
third quarter, they were outscored 13-3 in the 4½ minutes
to end the third and start the
fourth. With six minutes left,
the Jazz were within five.
Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle
The Jazz have Rockets center Clint Capela (15) in the mood for a first-half jam session, conducted
at the expense of Utah guard Dante Exum.
four minutes to go in the game,
and he was tired. I called timeout. I was going to sub him.
“He said, ‘Oh no, the timeout’s good enough.’ He wanted
back in there. He was incred-
ible. I mean, he just makes a
difference on both ends.”
The Rockets needed that
because other than Paul’s celebrating his birthday by feasting
on midrange jumpers, they
could not get much of their
usual offense going. Paul had
27 points and 12 rebounds (one
shy of his career playoff high);
Harden made just eight of 22
shots and committed eight
Closing the deal
With that, the Rockets’ defense took over. The Jazz made
just one of their next seven
shots and just three of 14 in the
final six minutes of the game as
the Rockets shut down the lane
much as they had through the
second half.
The Jazz made just 10 of 24
shots in the lane in the second
half, largely because Capela
owned it.
“My mindset was to go out
there and play as hard as I
can,” Capela said. “I got a little
gassed before the timeout. But
after the timeout, two minutes
was enough for me."
It was enough for the Rockets to take a tough, physical,
low-scoring playoff game in one
of the NBA’s toughest venues
and win it on the dominant
play of their third star.
jonathan.feigen@chron.com
twitter.com/jonathan_feigen
Smith: This scrappy but uneven series is all but over
Smith from page C1
ing a 3-1 series lead back to Houston
with Golden State and the conference
finals clearly in sight.
One final image said it all: Capela
rejecting yet another Utah shot, then
Harden proudly pumping up the young
center by getting in his teammate’s face
as the clock hit :00.
“Every single night he has our back,”
Harden said.
The Rockets fought for and stood up
for each other in Utah.
This series — uneven, fiery, combative
— is all but over. And for as much as the
Rockets proved during the best regular
season in franchise history, they converted more NBA believers during a
long, tough weekend in SLC.
The Rockets, at best, split these two
last season.
In 2018, they can shoot the lights out
and pour in 70 points during a single
half. But defensive emotion and intensity were mission critical Sunday night, as
the Rockets held Utah to just 38.6 percent shooting from the field and 24.1
percent on 3-pointers.
Donovan Mitchell, the Jazz’s star
rookie, was 8-of-24 and faltered under
the home lights again. Capela turned
center Rudy Gobert, a Defensive Player
of the Year favorite, into the second-best
big man on the hardwood in both games
and is owning the interior of his second
consecutive series.
Asked if his team had been building
toward playoff road wins like these for
the last two seasons, coach Mike D’Antoni immediately answered, “Without a
doubt.”
“We made a pact to try to keep it under 100 (points) every game,” said D’An-
Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle
Chris Paul of the Rockets, left, and
Utah’s Rudy Gobert have differing
reactions to a call Sunday.
toni, who guided his team to 7-2 this
postseason. “And we’ll get to 100 (on
offense). ... If we can do our part on our
defense, with the communication and
energy and all that, then we’ve got a
really good shot to win.”
Right answer for the screams
Utah’s faithful yelled, supported and
pleaded for eight emotional quarters.
The best team on the court since the
first quarter of Game 1 rarely wavered
and never caved, downing the Jazz 10087 in Game 4 and answering all the
screams like only road winners can:
Two big victories.
“That was hard fought,” D’Antoni
said. “That was a tough one.”
The reigning NBA champions took a
3-1 lead against New Orleans hours before the Rockets took the court to echoing boos, with the team’s increasingly
linked trio of Harden, Paul and Capela
earning the most negative local reaction.
Ricky Rubio’s continued absence gave
D’Antoni’s team even more incentive.
Take both games from the Jazz in Salt
Lake City and return to Houston with a
commanding 3-1 lead, while Utah kept
trying to adjust to the loss of its starting
point guard.
The Jazz slowed the full-court action,
tightened up the defense that disappeared in Game 3 and shot 9-of-19 from
the field, despite another quiet start
from Mitchell. But the Rockets rolled off
30 points, led by 14 from Harden, who
received seven fouls shots to Utah’s six.
A gritty half only got more chippy.
Paul exited the court pointing and
talking; D’Antoni — who joked the game
required a helmet and shoulder pads —
chatted with a ref as his team entered its
tunnel.
Paul’s brother C.J. was temporarily
removed from the baseline and nearly
ejected during the third quarter, later
telling reporters that a case of mistaken
identity led to his exit.
“I don’t know. I saw them just try to
pull my brother out,” the veteran Rockets guard said. “That’s out. That’s out.
Might not be many playoff games I’ve
played in, but he’s been at all of ’em.
That’s out.”
Paul began the third quarter by thriving in the midrange, reaching 18 points
and extending his team’s lead to 65-50.
But the Rockets couldn’t put Utah away
and a 15-point advantage was again cut
to 10.
Capela, D’Antoni, Paul and Mitchell
received technical fouls.
The screams kept pouring down.
But 76-57 road team with three minutes left in the third was cut to a ninepoint advantage, then five, as the Rockets’ shots (26.3 percent overall on 3s)
kept falling short. They dug in, finishing
with muscle and heart. They stuck together, endured an offensive off night,
and finally pushed Utah away.
“It was a playoff atmosphere, playoff
intensity,” Harden said. “Like Chris
said, we knew they were going to come
out more aggressive. … We kept our
composure.”
Big Three do it again
As Jazz fans in yellow quietly walked
up the aisles, the Rockets ended it with
another Capela rejection — his sixth of
the night — and took both Ws in Salt
Lake.
“We’re not satisfied just being up 3-1,”
Harden said. “Start of training camp,
the beginning of the regular season and
the entire regular season, we didn’t
come this far just to be up 3-1 in the
semifinals. We’ve got a long way to go.”
One win away from the conference
finals, Paul, Capela and Harden — the
Rockets’ new playoff Big Three —
shared the same post-victory podium,
passing around praise and complimenting each other’s work.
The Jazz had given everything they
had.
The Rockets — victorious with defense, selflessness and teamwork —
were rolling out of Salt Lake as tough
road winners.
brian.smith@chron.com
twitter.com/chronbriansmith
HHH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
NBA Playoffs
C5
ROCKETS 100, JAZZ 87
MORE ONLINE AT HOUSTONCHRONICLE.COM/ROCKETS
ROCKETS REPORT
D’Antoni’s innovation a change of pace
SALT LAKE CITY — Warriors coach Steve Kerr on
Sunday, while discussing the
similarities between his offense
and his former assistant Alvin
Gentry’s with the Pelicans,
cited the influence of Rockets
coach Mike D’Antoni.
He also pointed out the significant change in D’Antoni’s
offense, a revision D’Antoni did
not dispute.
“I don’t even think it’s anything we claim that we created,” Kerr said before the Warriors’ Game 4 win in New Orleans. “I think the game has been
evolving over the last 15 years
or so. The guy who deserves
the most credit for changing
the way the league is played is
Mike D’Antoni.
“He’s the guy who eliminated
the center position and said
‘Let’s go small and fast and
shoot more 3s.’ I was inspired
by Mike, but I was also inspired by Pop (Spurs coach
Gregg Popovich) and Phil
Jackson in terms of basic ball
movement and screening. Pace
is the name of the game these
days. People go about it in different ways. Ironically, Mike’s
team is like the slowest in the
league right now. Didn’t see
that coming.”
Kerr exaggerated. The Rockets were 14th in pace during the
regular season, ninth in the
playoffs. But D’Antoni said the
change was intentional.
“It took a 10-year rouse to get
everybody to play fast, but I
knew we had to go slow,” D’Antoni said. “I finally got them
there. Now, we’re the only team
playing slow so we’re good.”
Actually, D’Antoni said he
adjusted to the style of his
point guards James Harden
and Chris Paul who prefer to
look things over in the half
court and who go one-on-one
on switches more than any
guards in the league.
“I thought I adjusted to
Steve Nash, adjusted to James
and Chris,” D’Antoni said.
“Everybody’s a little different,
but this is what they’re really
good at so that’s what we’re
doing.”
That was Kerr’s point.
“They’ve adapted to their
personnel and we’ve adapted to
ours,” he said. “But in general,
over the last decade-plus, the
game has gotten much faster,
and much more wide-open.”
Paul’s midrange
game has its place
In contrast to the Rockets’
reputation and preference for
shooting 3s and layups, coach
Mike D’Antoni said he not
number guys are like, ‘yeah,
that works’ because the numbers are right. If you’re just
normal, that wouldn’t work.
“That’s one of the reasons
I’m sure the organization got
Chris, for a lot of different reasons, but that’s definitely a
bonus.”
Injury continues
to impede Rubio
Utah’s Ricky Rubio tried to
return the Jazz’s 100-87 Game 4
loss, but coach Quin Snyder
said pregame that, while the
team’s point guard is closer
toward receiving a green light,
he’s not ready for playoff action.
“It’s hard for him right now,”
Snyder said. “I know how bad
he wants to play.”
Rubio tested his injured
hamstring Sunday morning.
But he missed his fourth consecutive game during the second-round series and his return is not set.
“He’s just not there,” Snyder
said.
Jazz forward Derrick Favors (sprained ankle) was
available before Game 4 but
lost his starting spot to veteran
Jae Crowder, whose insertion
into the starting lineup marked
the first major lineup change
for either team in the series.
Communication key
to winning ways
Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle
Rockets guard James Harden, center, had 24 points and was 7-of-8 from the free-throw line as the
Rockets left Utah up 3-1 after a 100-87 Game 4 win over the Jazz.
only does not object to Chris
Paul taking midrange shots,
but believes they are valuable
against defenses like Utah’s that
drop a center into position to
protect the rim.
“That gave us one more
weapon when teams set a big
back at the rim — James (
Harden) is more 3s and layups
— to be able to counteract bigs
just sitting back there,” D’Antoni said. “Every rule has an
exception. When you’re that
good at something, even the
The Rockets have asserted all
season that increased, up-front
communication has been a key
to the team’s success.
The ongoing dialogue has
continued in the playoffs, with
players offering honest critiques for the betterment of the
team.
The conversation can be
started by stars such as James
Harden and Chris Paul, or
role players including P.J.
Tucker. But coach Mike D’Antoni said the recurring theme
remains the same: winning.
“There's a mutual respect.
(Harden and Paul) both have
the same goals,” D’Antoni said.
“They also know that whoever
brings up the argument first
usually comes from a good
place. … They don't bring up
anything other than, ‘How do
we get better?’
“There’s mutual respect all
over. Not only between our two
stars but there are a lot of veterans on the team — a lot of the
guys have been through a lot.
And there's really no other
agendas floating around. Everybody wants just to win.”
Jonathan Feigen and Brian T. Smith
WARRIORS 118, PELICANS 92
Kerr’s ‘Hamptons 5’ lineup paves way to an easy win
By Connor Letourneau
SAN F R ANC ISC O C HRONICLE
NEW ORLEANS —
Warriors coach Steve Kerr
wasn’t about to let unflattering analytics shake his
trust in a lineup that
boasts four All-Stars in
their prime and a former
NBA Finals MVP.
So less than 48 hours after
watching
JaVale
McGee struggle as the
starting center against the
Pelicans’ small-ball attack
in Golden State’s Game 3
loss in the Western Conference semifinals, Kerr
started Andre Iguodala at
small forward, moved
Kevin Durant to power
forward and started Draymond Green at center. It
was that lineup, known
colloquially as the “Hamptons 5,” that paved the
Warriors’ way to a 118-92
rout of New Orleans on
Sunday at Smoothie King
Center.
Stephen Curry, Klay
Thompson, Iguodala, Durant and Green finished a
plus-26 in their 18 minutes
together on the court. To
ensure they would fly
back to Oakland with a 3-1
series lead, the Hamptons
5 — a nod to the resort
town where Durant was
recruited by the other four
in a June 2016 free-agency
meeting — authored a
game-changing run to
open the third quarter.
Gerald Herbert / Associated Press
Warriors forward Kevin Durant, right, scored 38
points in a 118-92 rout of the Pelicans on Sunday.
“Any time we’ve been in
any danger over the years,
we’ve gone to this lineup
— whether it’s as a starting
group or extra minutes,”
Kerr said. “Obviously, the
lineup worked, but it’s not
about the lineup — it’s
about how hard guys play
and how focused they
are.”
Three years after they
hastened the league’s
small-ball craze by riding
an undersize lineup to the
2015 NBA title, the Warriors have faced a conundrum this season: Why
has the Hamptons 5 been
relatively ineffective? A
lineup loaded with household names posted a modest regular-season net rating of plus-8.4. It had no
trouble scoring, but the
unit had a less-than-stellar defensive rating of 116.
Injuries and periodic
rest made it tricky for that
group to settle into a
groove. It also didn’t help
that, after watching Curry,
Thompson, Iguodala, Durant and Green overwhelm opponents last season, teams were better
versed on how to defend
the crew.
Still, Kerr recognized
that the shorter lineup
gave Golden State its best
chance of avoiding a 2-2
series tie. Iguodala is a stabilizing force. Green is the
Warriors’ only center who
can match New Orleans’
pace and contain Anthony
Davis — as much as possible, at least.
It all made starting the
Hamptons 5 together for
the first time an easy decision for Kerr. Two days after opening out of sync in
Game 3, Golden State
ratcheted up the tempo,
shut off driving lanes and
put hands on shooters.
“It really set the tone for
this game,” Green said of
Kerr’s lineup switch. “We
were flying around defensively to start the game,
and pushing the tempo offensively. It was a great adjustment for us, for sure.”
After going on a 21-10
run to open the second
half that opened up an 18point lead, Durant (38
points and nine rebounds)
and Green (eight points,
nine rebounds, nine assists) were free to watch
much of the fourth quarter
from the bench.
NBA PLAYOFFS AT A GLANCE
Western Conference
Conference semifinals
1. Houston vs. 5. Utah
(Rockets lead series 3-1)
G1: Houston 110....................................Utah 96
G2: Utah 116..................................Houston 108
G3: Houston 113 ...................................Utah 92
G4: Houston 100...................................Utah 87
G5: at Houston................................. 7 Tuesday
G6*: at Utah.............................. TBA Thursday
G7*: at Houston............................ TBA May 14
2. Golden State vs. 6. New Orleans
(Warriors lead series 3-1)
G1: Golden State 123 ..............New Orleans 101
G2: Golden State 121 ..............New Orleans 116
G3: New Orleans 119 ..............Golden State 100
G4: Golden State 118................New Orleans 92
G5: at Golden State .....................9:30 Tuesday
G6*: at New Orleans.................. TBA Thursday
G7*: at Golden State .................... TBA May 14
Eastern Conference
Conference semifinals
1. Toronto vs. 4. Cleveland
(Cavaliers lead series 3-0)
G1: Cleveland 113 ...................Toronto 112 (OT)
G2: Cleveland 128 ...........................Toronto 110
G3: Cleveland 105.......................... Toronto 103
G4: at Cleveland.............................. 7:30 today
G5*: at Toronto...................... TBA Wednesday
G6*: at Cleveland ........................... TBA Friday
G7*: at Toronto ............................ TBA Sunday
2. Boston vs. 3. Philadelphia
(Celtics lead series 3-0)
G1: at Boston 117 ................... Philadelphia 101
G2: Boston 108 .......................Philadelphia 103
G3: Boston 101.................Philadelphia 98 (OT)
G4: at Philadelphia .............................. 5 today
G5*: at Boston....................... TBA Wednesday
G6*: at Philadelphia....................... TBA Friday
G7*: at Boston ............................. TBA Sunday
* — if necessary
BOX SCORES
Warriors 118, Pelicans 92
Saturday’s late game
Cavaliers 105, Raptors 103
Golden State: Iguodala 2-7 0-0 6, Durant 15-27
6-6 38, Green 3-9 0-0 8, Curry 8-17 3-3 23,
Thompson 5-13 2-2 13, Looney 3-4 1-2 7, West
2-2 0-0 4, Bell 0-0 0-0 0, Pachulia 0-0 1-2 1,
McGee 1-2 0-0 2, Cook 5-8 2-3 12, Livingston 2-5
0-0 4, Young 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 46-95 15-18 118.
New Orleans: Moore 8-14 3-4 20, Mirotic 1-7 5-5
7, Davis 8-22 10-10 26, Rondo 2-10 1-4 6, Holiday 8-16 2-4 19, Miller 0-2 0-0 0, Hill 1-2 0-0 3,
Diallo 0-1 0-0 0, Clark 4-14 3-3 11, Liggins 0-0 0-0
0. Totals 32-88 24-30 92.
Toronto: DeRozan 3-12 2-2 8, Anunoby 7-12 0-2
18, Valanciunas 3-6 4-4 10, Lowry 9-13 5-6 27,
VanVleet 2-9 3-4 8, Miles 5-9 0-113, Siakam 3-6
0-0 6, Ibaka 3-7 4-4 11, Wright 0-1 2-2 2. Totals
35-75 20-25 103.
Cleveland: Smith 0-2 0-0 0, James 14-26 9-11
38, Love 7-14 6-7 21, Hill 4-7 2-2 12, Korver 6-8
2-2 18, Green 5-12 1-3 11, Thompson 0-1 0-0 0,
Hood 0-2 0-0 0, Clarkson 2-7 0-0 5. Totals 38-79
20-25 105.
Golden State
37 24 33 24 — 118
New Orleans
22 32 19 19 — 92
3-point goals: Golden State 11-33 (Curry 4-9,
Green 2-4, Durant 2-5, Iguodala 2-5, Thompson
1-6, McGee 0-1, Cook 0-3), New Orleans 4-26
(Rondo 1-2, Hill 1-2, Holiday 1-4, Moore 1-4, Mirotic 0-2, Miller 0-2, Davis 0-3, Clark 0-7).
Rebounds: Golden State 45 (Green, Durant 9),
New Orleans 51 (Davis 12).
Assists: Golden State 28 (Green 9), New Orleans 17 (Rondo 6).
Total fouls: Golden State 20, New Orleans 21.
Technicals: Green.
A: 18,513 (16,867).
Toronto
19 21 25 38 — 103
Cleveland
24 31 24 26 — 105
3-point goals: Toronto 13-33 (Anunoby 4-7,
Lowry 4-8, Miles 3-7, Ibaka 1-3, VanVleet 1-7,
Wright 0-1), Cleveland 9-25 (Korver 4-6, Hill
2-3, Love 1-3, James 1-4, Clarkson 1-4, Hood
0-1, Smith 0-1, Green 0-3).
Fouled out: Ibaka.
Rebounds: Toronto 41 (Valanciunas 11), Cleveland 36 (Love 16).
Assists: Toronto 14 (Lowry 7), Cleveland 18
(James 7).
Total fouls: Toronto 28, Cleveland 19.
A: 20,562 (20,562).
Their workhorse performances allowed Curry
(23 points) to ease back into a rhythm in his third
game back from a
sprained left knee liga-
ment that sidelined him
five-plus weeks. It hardly
mattered Thompson shot
5-for-13 from the field, including 1-for-6 from 3point range.
C6
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HHHH
BASEBALL
ASTROS REPORT
McHugh is all right with entrance a la cart
PHOENIX — The door
at the right-field bullpen
swung open far wider
than necessary for any
one person to depart it.
“I saw the cart started
to circle around, and I
almost couldn’t believe it
because it just never happens,” Astros manager
A.J. Hinch said. “And
then it really happened.”
Collin McHugh established himself as a trivia
answer Saturday night,
becoming the first pitcher
in a regular-season game
to use the Diamondbacks’
bullpen cart — a golf cart
with a white, baseballshaped exterior and a
black D-Backs helmet
atop it — for his journey
to the mound.
The history of these
machines is as long and
winding as the paths they
sometimes travel. The
1970s was the heyday of
these wackily designed
contraptions, but as time
wore on, their use faded.
Before the D-Backs
introduced their ride
prior to this season, the
last known cart was a
Harley-Davidson motorcycle with a sidecar in
Milwaukee, retired after
the 1995 season.
One of its occupants in
that final season? He’s
affiliated with the Astros,
too.
Steve Sparks rode the
Brewers’ bullpen cart
during his campaign with
Milwaukee as a 30-yearold rookie in 1995, the
same year its use ceased.
And he had incentive.
The Harley-Davidson
On deck: Astros at Oakland A’s
Ross D. Franklin / Associated Press
Justin Verlander’s 11-game regular-season winning
streak, dating to his last three Tigers starts, is over.
headquarters are in Milwaukee. Sparks’ teammate Kevin Seitzer, now
the Atlanta Braves’ hitting coach, was in the
market for a motorcycle.
The waiting list to receive
one was long.
“They told him if he
wanted to be bumped up
the waiting list, get one of
your relief pitchers to
ride the cart in because
no one was doing it,”
Sparks said. “I think I
was in the rotation, but I
was in the bullpen one
day, and I knew Seitzer
wanted to get bumped on
the list. So I told him if I
got in the game that day,
I’d ride the cart in.”
So on July 30, 1995,
Sparks climbed into the
sidecar and entered a
game against the California Angels in the fifth
inning. The cart carried
him around the warning
track in the outfield and
dropped him off, of all
places, in front of the
opposing dugout.
Angels players were
“getting on” Sparks. He
recalls Tony Phillips’
presence specifically.
Sparks yielded two
earned runs and three
hits across 42⁄3 innings of
relief.
“But I did it,” Sparks
said, “and (Seitzer) got a
motorcycle within two
weeks.”
Because Milwaukee’s
relievers were reluctant
to ride the cart that year,
Sparks believes it’s possible he was the last
pitcher to actually do so.
A 4-3 walkoff loss left
McHugh less inclined to
reflect on his decision to
ride the cart Saturday,
when he threw 11⁄3 scoreless innings of relief.
McHugh said the cart
was there and “that’s
what it’s for,” so he
hopped on. He noted
pitching coach Brent
Strom had ridden it following pregame bullpen
sessions during the first
two games of the series.
When/where: Today and Tuesday at 9:05 p.m., Wednesday at 12:35 p.m.; Oakland Coliseum.
TV/radio: ATTSW; 790 AM, 850 AM (Spanish), 101.7 FM
(Spanish).
Pitchers: Today, LHP Dallas Keuchel (1-5, 3.98) vs. LHP
Brett Anderson (0-0, 2.84); Tuesday, RHP Lance McCullers Jr. (4-1, 3.73) vs. LHP Sean Manaea (4-3, 1.63); Wednesday, RHP Gerrit Cole (3-1, 1.42) vs. RHP Daniel Mengden (2-3, 4.30).
Astros (21-15) update: Carlos Correa has a slash line of
.415/.474/.677 on the road this season. He’s 27-for-65 with
eight doubles, three home runs and 16 RBIs in 17 games
away from Minute Maid Park. … Correa also has yet to
make an error this year and has made 45 consecutive
errorless starts dating to last season. … Gerrit Cole’s most
recent outing, a one-hitter at Arizona on Friday in which
he struck out 16, marked only the 10th time in MLB history
a pitcher had at least 16 K’s while allowing one or no hits
in a shutout. The other pitchers to accomplish the feat:
Max Scherzer (twice in 2015), Brandon Morrow (2010),
Curt Schilling (2002), Kerry Wood (1998) and Nolan Ryan
(1991, 1990, 1973, 1972).
Athletics (18-16) update: Oakland, which took two of
three from the Astros at Minute Maid Park in an April
27-29 series, is coming off a three-game sweep of Baltimore and has gone 13-6 since starting the year 5-10. … The
A’s are 9-14 against AL West teams and 9-2 outside the
division. … Going into Sunday, Oakland pitchers were
averaging an MLB-low 2.48 walks per nine innings. … The
A’s have six stolen bases, tying them with the Cubs for the
major league low, out of an MLB-low 11 attempts. … Khris
Davis’ 12th-inning homer that beat the Orioles 2-0 on
Saturday marked the first time in franchise history (since
1901) that the A’s ended an extra-inning scoreless game
with a home run.
“Just following our
fearless leader,” McHugh
said.
The Diamondbacks
requested that McHugh
sign the cart Sunday
morning, but a miscommunication prevented it
from happening.
Whether McHugh’s
actions are replicated
remains to be seen. If so,
Hinch has a suggestion.
“I want it to go full-
fledged,” the manager
said Sunday. “I want it to
take me out to the
mound, I want it to take
(Strom) out to the mound,
I want it to take the reliever directly to the
mound. Let’s just go fullfledged through the
grass. Don’t worry about
tire marks or having to
rake behind it. Let’s just
make it a spectacle.”
Chandler Rome
Saturday’s late game
Diamondbacks 4, Astros 3
Houston
ab
Springer cf
5
Altuve 2b
4
Correa ss
5
Gurriel 1b
5
Reddick rf
3
Bregman 3b
3
McCann c
3
2-Marisnick pr
0
Stassi c
0
Gonzalez lf
2
Morton p
2
a-Gattis ph
1
McHugh p
0
Smith p
0
c-Fisher ph
1
Rondon p
0
Devenski p
0
Peacock p
0
Totals
34
Arizona
ab
Peralta lf
4
Descalso 3b
2
Hirano p
0
Boxberger p
0
d-Owings ph
0
Goldschmidt 1b
3
Pollock cf
4
Souza Jr. rf
3
Marte 2b
3
Ahmed ss
4
Mathis c
4
3-Dyson pr
0
Greinke p
2
Chafin p
0
Bradley p
0
b-Avila ph
0
1-Marrero pr-3b
1
Totals
30
r
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
r
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
4
h bi bb so avg
2 1 0 1 .273
0 0 1 0 .324
0 0 0 2 .298
1 0 0 0 .275
0 0 1 1 .235
1 0 1 0 .254
1 1 1 1 .271
0 0 0 0 .153
0 0 0 0 .244
0 0 2 1 .224
1 0 0 1 .500
0 0 0 0 .188
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --1 1 0 0 .185
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --7 3 6 7
h bi bb so avg
2 2 1 1 .296
1 0 1 1 .238
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 1 0 .236
0 0 2 1 .233
1 2 0 1 .298
0 0 1 0 .000
0 0 1 1 .218
0 0 0 1 .223
1 0 0 1 .216
0 0 0 0 .165
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 1 0 .148
0 0 0 0 .196
6 4 8 7
Houston
000 010 020 — 3 7 0
Arizona
110 010 001 — 4 6 0
a-grounded out for Morton in the 6th. b-walked
for Bradley in the 7th. c-doubled for Smith in the
8th. d-walked for Boxberger in the 9th. 1-ran for
Avila in the 7th. 2-ran for McCann in the 8th.
3-ran for Mathis in the 9th. LOB—Houston 10,
Arizona 10. 2B—McCann (3), Fisher (2), Descalso (5), Greinke (2). HR—Springer (7), off
Greinke; Peralta (6), off Morton. RBIs—Springer
(21), McCann (10), Fisher (8), Peralta 2 (19),
Pollock 2 (27). SB—Marrero (3). SF—Pollock.
Runners left in scoring position—Houston 5
(Springer 2, Reddick 2, Gattis); Arizona 4 (Pollock 2, Ahmed 2). RISP—Houston 2 for 6; Arizona 2 for 7. Runners moved up—Souza Jr..
Houston
ip h r er bb so np era
Morton
5 3 3 3 4 3 82 2.16
1
McHugh
1 ⁄3 1 0 0 2 1 33 0.68
2
Smith
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 6 9.00
Rondon
1 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.25
2
Devenski
⁄3 1 1 1 2 1 27 1.29
L, 1-1
Peacock
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.63
Arizona
ip h r er bb so np era
Greinke
5 2⁄3 5 1 1 2 5 102 4.10
Chafin
0 0 0 0 2 0 11 2.31
Bradley, H, 11 1 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.50
Hirano, BS, 1-1 1 2 2 2 2 1 25 3.14
Boxberger
1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.93
W, 1-2
WP—Chafin. Umpires—Home, Mike DiMuro;
First, Roberto Ortiz; Second, Brian Gorman;
Third, Dan Iassogna. T—3:34. A—39,154
(48,519).
Astros go 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position
Astros from page C1
line full-count slider was
deemed a ball by plate umpire Roberto Ortiz.
Paul Goldschmidt lazily
lifted Verlander’s next
pitch on the infield for the
first out, summoning A.J.
Pollock, the reigning NL
Player of the Month with
an OPS eclipsing 1.000
who had walked off this
Astros bunch Saturday
night.
Behind in the count 2-1,
Verlander offered a slider.
Pollock demolished it to
center field well over
George Springer’s head.
Descalso scored with ease.
A relay throw from shortstop Carlos Correa to
Bregman arrived at the
same time Pollock slid into
third base. Pollock slid
“toward the lane” of the
throw, Bregman said.
Rule book reference
“If a fielder is about to
receive a thrown ball and if
the ball is in flight directly
toward and near enough
to the fielder so he must
occupy his position to receive the ball he may be
considered ‘in the act of
fielding a ball,’ ” Rule 6.01
(h), the one detailing obstruction calls, reads in
the MLB rule book. “It is
entirely up to the judgment of the umpire as to
whether a fielder is in the
act of fielding a ball. After
a fielder has made an attempt to field a ball and
missed, he can no longer
be in the ‘act of fielding’
the ball.”
Bregman and Pollock
tried to stand — Pollock to
go home and Bregman to
retrieve the ball. Entanglement ensued, and on video
review it appeared Pollock
reached out to grab Bregman and impede his path.
“I turned around to look
and find the ball, and I got
grabbed and told that I
Jennifer Stewart / Getty Images
A.J. Pollock slides into third with his sixth-inning RBI triple, preceding his
getting entangled with third baseman Alex Bregman while the ball rolled away.
was interfering with him,”
Bregman said. “I don’t
know. That’s all I got.”
Third-base ump Mike
DiMuro called obstruction
on Bregman, allowing Pollock home plate and the DBacks a one-run lead.
A throw from Verlander, who was backing up
the play, and a tag from
Brian McCann arrived before Pollock slid in, but
they went for naught.
“It is the type of obstruction where you let the
play happen,” crew chief
Brian Gorman told a pool
reporter. “You don’t call
time automatically. You
wait as the play develops,
and if the obstruction had
something to do with the
play at the plate, which it
happened, then the umpire has the discretion to
score the run. If he gets
thrown out by 20 feet and
you didn’t think the obstruction had anything to
do with it, then he would
be out. But the obstruction
caused him to delay so
much that it caused him to
be out at the plate. So we
scored the run.”
Astros manager A.J.
Hinch conversed with
Gorman and DiMuro outside the dugout for more
than five minutes. Such
calls are not reviewable.
Hinch, cerebral and softspoken in nature, was perturbed postgame.
“Horse s--- rule and a
bad interpretation,” Hinch
said. “When the ball got
past, they both jump up,
and then Pollock sticks his
arm out and hits Bregman
and gets a free run. It’s an
interpretation;
there’s
nothing you can do about
it. It is a free pass to call obstruction any time there’s
contact. The fielder, by
rule, loses every right he
has. There’s nothing Bregman can do. What do you
want him to do, not go after the ball? You can’t just
make yourself disappear.”
Umpires were, appar-
ently, instructed to think
that.
“At umpire’s school,
they teach you that the
fielder has to disappear,”
Gorman said. “I know it is
impossible to do, but he
has to get out of his way.”
The Astros argued such
action was impossible.
Pollack’s grab exacerbated
matters.
“I’m not going to sit here
and critique an umpire for
making a call in live action. That’s not fair to
him,” said Verlander, who
rushed to back up the play.
“When you go back and
look at it, Bregman did everything right.”
Saturday’s game against
San Diego.
Kershaw is 1-4 with a
2.68 ERA this season
with 48 strikeouts and 10
walks in 44 innings.
Kershaw allowed two
runs and six hits over six
innings Tuesday against
Arizona. Roberts hopes
the injury is limited to the
biceps.
Kershaw will be examined by head team physician Dr. Neal ElAttrache.
arm.
The 29-year-old was
hurt while batting Wednesday against Atlanta,
and after an MRI and
scan New York said he
had been given the OK to
make Monday's start at
Cincinnati.
Instead, he was put on
the 10-day DL. The move
Wasted chances
Verlander threw six innings and struck out eight.
His removal was necessitated by the NL ballpark in
which he played.
Marwin
Gonzalez’s
one-out single preceded
an error on pinch hitter
Yuli Gurriel’s grounder,
production from the beleaguered bottom of the lineup to afford hope in the
seventh inning, when a response to the umpiring
was required.
Verlander’s spot in the
order arrived, with the tying run in scoring position
and one out. At 92 pitches,
he was replaced with
pinch hitter Evan Gattis.
Gattis had produced a
.188/.266/.282 slash line
entering Sunday’s proceedings. The D-Backs
countered with Yoshihisa
Hirano. Never before in
his major league career
had he inherited runners.
Here, two were on, and a
lead was his to protect.
The first fastball he offered Gattis missed. The
next three were swung
through, prolonging Gattis’ monthlong misery
with a 29th strikeout in his
95th plate appearance.
Leadoff hitter George
Springer jumped ahead in
the next at-bat 2-0. It ended, almost too fittingly,
with a fly out to Pollock.
Springer slammed his
helmet beyond first base,
disgusted at another opportunity wasted on an afternoon when the scenario
was far too familiar.
The Astros left nine
men on base and were 1for-10 with runners in
scoring position. They
stranded the go-ahead run
at first base with less than
two outs in the seventh,
and in the ninth, they
struck out twice against
Brad Boxberger with two
on and one out.
Jose Altuve, on his 28th
birthday, led off the sixth
with a triple. D-Backs
starter Michael Kock
nailed Correa with a fastball on his next pitch. Neither runner scored. Koch
tied Bregman up on a cutter that backed in, inducing a 6-4-3 double play after fanning Josh Reddick.
Diamondbacks 3, Astros 1
Houston
ab
Springer cf
5
Altuve 2b
4
Correa ss
3
Reddick rf
3
Bregman 3b
4
McCann c
3
Gonzalez 1b-lf
4
Fisher lf
2
a-Gurriel ph-1b 2
Verlander p
2
b-Gattis ph
1
Rondon p
0
Harris p
0
Smith p
0
d-Stassi ph
1
Totals
34
Arizona
ab
Peralta lf
4
Descalso 3b
3
Boxberger p
0
Goldschmidt 1b
4
Pollock cf
3
Souza Jr. rf
3
Marte 2b
3
Avila c
2
Ahmed ss
3
Koch p
1
De La Rosa p
0
Hirano p
0
c-Owings ph
1
Bradley p
0
Marrero 3b
0
Totals
27
r
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
r
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
h bi bb so avg
0 0 0 1 .264
1 0 0 0 .322
1 0 0 0 .299
0 0 1 1 .229
1 1 0 0 .254
0 0 1 0 .260
2 0 0 1 .234
0 0 0 1 .179
1 0 0 0 .280
1 0 0 1 .500
0 0 0 1 .186
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 1 .239
7 1 2 7
h bi bb so avg
1 0 0 2 .295
2 0 1 0 .253
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 .225
2 2 1 1 .306
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 2 .213
0 0 1 1 .143
0 0 0 2 .217
0 0 0 1 .200
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 1 .233
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 .196
5 2 3 10
Houston
010 000 000 — 1 7 1
Arizona
000 002 01x — 3 5 1
a-reached on error for Fisher in the 7th. b-struck
out for Verlander in the 7th. c-struck out for Hirano in the 7th. d-struck out for Smith in the
9th. E—Bregman (5), Descalso (2). LOB—Houston 9, Arizona 4. 2B—Correa (12), Descalso (6).
3B—Altuve (1), Pollock (3). HR—Bregman (2),
off Koch. RBIs—Bregman (13), Pollock 2 (29). S
—Koch. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 4 (Springer 3, Bregman); Arizona 2 (Peralta,
Marte). RISP—Houston 1 for 10; Arizona 1 for 6.
Runners moved up—Fisher, Ahmed, Descalso.
GIDP—Bregman. DP—Arizona 1 (Ahmed, Marte,
Goldschmidt).
Houston
ip h r er bb so np era
Verlander
6 3 2 1 3 8 92 1.17
L, 4-1
Rondon
1 0 0 0 0 2 17 2.08
1
Harris
⁄3 1 1 1 0 0 8 4.63
2
Smith
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 4 8.44
Arizona
ip h r er bb so np era
Koch, W, 2-0 6 1⁄3 6 1 1 0 3 77 2.13
De La Rosa
0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1.59
2
Hirano, H, 8
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.00
Bradley, H, 12
1 0 0 0 1 0 16 1.42
Boxberger
1 1 0 0 1 3 25 1.80
S, 11-11
Inherited runners-scored—Smith 1-1, De La Rosa 1-0, Hirano 2-0. HBP—Koch (Correa). Umpires—Home, Roberto Ortiz; First, Brian Gorman;
Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, Mike DiMuro.
T—2:55. A—35,632 (48,519).
Bregman ran out the
ground ball, left his helmet on the field, and
grabbed his glove, unaware he would be required to disappear when
he ran out for the bottom
half.
“It’s the way it was
called,” Verlander said. “It
sucks.”
chandler.rome@chron.com
twitter.com/chandler_rome
MLB REPORT
LOS ANGELES DODGERS
Ace LHP Clayton Kershaw was put on the
10-day disabled list with
left biceps tendinitis and
returned to Los Angeles
on Sunday for tests.
Los Angeles manager
Dave Roberts said Kershaw got hurt while trying to play catch before
NEW YORK METS
The club reversed
course and put RHP
Jacob deGrom on the DL
with a hyperextended
elbow in his pitching
was retroactive to Thursday, making deGrom
eligible to be activated
Sunday, when the Mets
play a series finale at
Philadelphia.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS
C Yadier Molina has
undergone surgery and is
expected to miss a month
after being hit in the
groin by a foul tip.
The Cardinals placed
Molina on the 10-day DL.
They said the eight-time
All-Star is projected to
miss at least four weeks
with what the team called
a “pelvic injury with
traumatic hematoma.”
From wire reports
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
C7
BASEBALL
BOX SCORES
Giants 4, Braves 3
OFFICIAL SPORTING GOODS RETAILER OF THE HOUSTON ASTROS™
MLB AT A GLANCE
AMERICAN LEAGUE
West Division
Los Angeles
Houston
Seattle
Oakland
Texas
East Division
Boston
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
Central Division
Cleveland
Minnesota
Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
W
21
21
19
18
13
L
13
15
14
16
23
Pct
.618
.583
.576
.529
.361
GB
—
1
1½
3
9
L10
5-5
4-6
6-4
5-5
4-6
Str Home Away
W-1 8-10 13-3
L-2 10-9 11-6
L-1
8-8 11-6
W-3 11-6 7-10
L-3 5-15
8-8
25
24
19
15
8
9
10
16
17
26
.735
.706
.543
.469
.235
—
1
6½
9
17
6-4
9-1
5-5
6-4
2-8
W-3
W-6
W-1
L-1
L-6
11-4
14-5
9-7
8-8
5-10
14-5
10-5
10-9
7-9
3-16
17
13
14
11
9
17
17
19
23
23
.500
.433
.424
.324
.281
—
2
2½
6
7
3-7
5-5
4-6
6-4
3-7
L-3
W-3
L-1
W-1
L-3
11-8
7-7
8-8
6-13
3-13
6-9
6-10
6-11
5-10
6-10
Results/schedule
Sunday’s results
Arizona 3, Houston 1
N.Y. Yankees 7, Cleveland 4
Toronto 2, Tampa Bay 1
Minnesota 5, Chicago White Sox 3
Kansas City 4, Detroit 2
Boston 6, Texas 1
Oakland 2, Baltimore 1
L.A. Angels 8, Seattle 2
Saturday’s results
Arizona 4, Houston 3
N.Y. Yankees 5, Cleveland 2
Detroit 3, Kansas City 2
Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 3
Minnesota 8, Chicago White Sox 4
Boston 6, Texas 5
Oakland 2, Baltimore 0 (12)
Seattle 9, L.A. Angels 8 (11)
Today’s games
Detroit (Fulmer 1-2) at Texas (Moore 1-4), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Romero 1-0) at St. Louis (Gant 1-0), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 1-5) at Oakland (Anderson 0-0), 9:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
West Division
Arizona
Colorado
San Francisco
Los Angeles
San Diego
East Division
Atlanta
Philadelphia
New York
Washington
Miami
Central Division
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Cincinnati
W
23
20
19
15
13
L
11
15
15
19
22
Pct
.676
.571
.559
.441
.371
GB
—
3½
4
8
10½
L10
6-4
7-3
8-2
4-6
4-6
Str Home Away
W-2 13-6 10-5
W-5
5-7 15-8
W-4 10-7
9-8
L-2
7-8 8-11
W-2 7-13
6-9
19
18
17
18
13
14
15
15
17
20
.576
.545
.531
.514
.394
—
1
1½
2
6
6-4
3-7
2-8
7-3
7-3
L-3
8-7
L-1 11-5
L-6 7-10
W-1 10-10
W-2 7-11
11-7
7-10
10-5
8-7
6-9
19
20
19
16
8
12
15
16
14
26
.613
.571
.543
.533
.235
—
1
2
2½
12½
6-4
4-6
5-5
5-5
3-7
W-4
L-1
W-1
L-4
L-2
8-7
11-7
9-11
8-8
4-12
11-5
9-8
10-5
8-6
4-14
Results/schedule
Saturday’s results
Arizona 4, Houston 3
St. Louis 8, Chicago Cubs 6 (10)
Philadelphia 3, Washington 1
San Francisco 11, Atlanta 2
Colorado 2, N.Y. Mets 0
Miami 6, Cincinnati 0
Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 3
San Diego 7, L.A. Dodgers 4
Sunday’s results
Arizona 3, Houston 1
Colorado 3, N.Y. Mets 2
San Francisco 4, Atlanta 3
Washington 5, Philadelphia 4
Pittsburgh 9, Milwaukee 0
San Diego 3, L.A. Dodgers 0
Miami 8, Cincinnati 5
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, late
Today’s games
San Francisco (Samardzija 1-1) at Philadelphia (Eflin 0-0), 6:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Conlon 0-0) at Cincinnati (Bailey 0-4), 6:10 p.m.
Miami (Garcia 1-0) at Chicago Cubs (Hendricks 2-2), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Romero 1-0) at St. Louis (Gant 1-0), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 3-3) at San Diego (Ross 2-2), 9:10 p.m.
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Angels’ Ohtani
wins in return
SEATTLE — Shohei Ohtani returned from a
sprained ankle and took a shutout into the seventh
inning while outpitching Felix Hernandez, Mike Trout
hit his 12th home run, and the Los Angeles Angels beat
the Seattle Mariners 8-2 on Sunday.
Ohtani (3-1) made his first start on the mound since
April 24. The two-way Japanese star seemed completely in rhythm and showed no effects, striking out six.
YANKEES 7, INDIANS 4: Gleyber Torres became the
youngest Yankees player to hit a walkoff homer, a
three-run shot in the ninth inning that lifted New York
over visiting Cleveland for its 15th win in 16 games. At
21 years and 144 days, Torres bettered Mickey Mantle,
who was 21 years and 185 days when he hit a three-run,
ninth-inning drive in a 6-3 win April 23, 1953.
PADRES 3, DODGERS 0: Eric Hosmer hit a go-ahead,
two-run homer for the second straight day, and San
Diego beat Los Angeles to take two of three in MLB's
first regular-season series in Mexico since 1999.
GIANTS 4, BRAVES 3: Andrew Suarez outpitched
Mike Soroka in a rookie matchup, and San Francisco
survived Atlanta's ninth-inning rally for the Giants'
first series sweep of the host Braves in four years.
RED SOX 6, RANGERS 1: Chris Sale struck out 12, J.D.
Martinez homered again, and Boston won at Texas to
maintain its AL East lead heading into a highly anticipated showdown at Yankee Stadium.
BLUE JAYS 2, RAYS 1: Kevin Pillar scored the tiebreaking run on Alex Colome's wild pitch in the ninth inning as Toronto won at Tampa Bay.
TWINS 5, WHITE SOX 3: Chicago's James Shields
pitched a no-hitter into the seventh inning before Minnesota rallied late for a win over the host White Sox.
ROYALS 4, TIGERS 2: Kansas City won a series for the
first time in 11 tries this season, beating visiting Detroit
as Mike Moustakas drove in three runs.
ROCKIES 3, METS 2: Ian Desmond hit a pair of solo
homers, including a tiebreaking drive in the eighth
inning that carried Colorado over host New York.
NATIONALLS 5, PHILLIES 4: Max Scherzer struck out 15
in only 61⁄3 innings, and Washington then rallied for
two runs in the ninth to beat visiting Philadelphia.
PIRATES 9, BREWERS 0: Chad Kuhl and Richard Rodriguez combined on a two-hitter, leading Pittsburgh
to a victory at Milwaukee.
ATHLETICS 2, ORIOLES 1: Andrew Triggs allowed two
hits in seven innings, and host Oakland rallied to beat
Baltimore and extend the Orioles' skid to six games.
MARLINS 8, REDS 5: Starlin Castro drove in three
runs for the second straight game, and Miami won its
fourth straight series, holding on at Cincinnati.
From wire reports
San Francisco ab
Blanco lf
4
McCutchen rf
3
Belt 1b
4
Hundley c
4
Sandoval 3b
4
Dyson p
0
Watson p
0
b-Tomlinson ph
1
Strickland p
0
Crawford ss
4
Hanson 2b
4
Jackson cf
3
Suarez p
2
Gearrin p
0
Longoria 3b
1
Totals
34
Atlanta
ab
Albies 2b
5
Acuna lf
4
F.Freeman 1b
4
Markakis rf
4
Bautista 3b
3
Flowers c
4
Camargo ss
3
Soroka p
1
S.Freeman p
1
Biddle p
0
Moylan p
0
a-Tucker ph
1
Winkler p
0
Vizcaino p
0
c-Suzuki ph
1
1-Culberson pr 0
Inciarte cf
4
Totals
35
r h
1 1
1 1
0 1
0 1
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 2
1 2
1 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 10
r h
0 1
1 2
0 1
0 0
1 1
0 2
1 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
3 9
bi
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
bi
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
3
bb
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
5
bb
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
so avg
0 .274
1 .246
0 .298
0 .333
1 .244
0 --0 --0 .250
0 --1 .250
1 .321
2 .232
2 .000
0 --0 .246
8
so avg
0 .285
1 .326
2 .307
1 .344
0 .300
1 .250
0 .226
0 .250
1 .000
0 1.000
0 --0 .272
0 .000
0 --0 .310
0 .176
1 .254
7
San Francisco
002 200 000 — 4 10 2
Atlanta
100 000 002 — 3 9 0
a-reached on error for Moylan in the 7th. b-flied
out for Watson in the 9th. c-doubled for Vizcaino in the 9th. 1-ran for Suzuki in the 9th.
E—Hanson 2 (3). LOB—San Francisco 10, Atlanta 7. 2B—Crawford (4), Hanson (3), Suzuki (5).
RBIs—Blanco (4), McCutchen (14), Hundley
(11), Sandoval (8), Flowers (1), Inciarte (12),
Suzuki (15). SB—Blanco (3). SF—McCutchen. S
—Suarez. Runners left in scoring position—San
Francisco 4 (Hundley, Sandoval, Jackson, Suarez); Atlanta 4 (Albies, Acuna, Camargo 2).
RISP—San Francisco 2 for 11; Atlanta 2 for 6.
Runners moved up—Belt, Inciarte. GIDP—Hundley, Crawford, Markakis, Camargo, Inciarte.
DP—San Francisco 3 (Hanson, Crawford, Belt),
(Hanson, Crawford, Belt), (Sandoval, Hanson,
Belt); Atlanta 2 (Soroka, Camargo, F.Freeman), (Bautista, Albies, F.Freeman).
San Francisco ip h r er bb so np era
Suarez, W, 1-1 5 1⁄3 7 1 0 1 6 93 3.06
2
Gearrin, H, 2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.86
Dyson, H, 5
1 0 0 0 0 0 13 3.00
Watson, H, 7
1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.57
Strickland
1 2 2 2 1 1 20 2.87
S, 8-10
Atlanta
ip h r er bb so np era
Soroka, L, 1-1
4 7 4 4 3 3 84 4.50
S.Freeman
2 2 0 0 2 3 31 3.77
2
Biddle
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.00
1
Moylan
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 5 2.31
Winkler
1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.17
Vizcaino
1 0 0 0 0 0 19 1.84
Inherited runners-scored—Gearrin 1-0, Moylan
1-0. WP—Suarez. Umpires—Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Jerry Layne;
Third, Greg Gibson. T—3:09. A—37,896
(41,149).
Red Sox 6, Rangers 1
Boston
Betts rf
Swihart lf
Benintendi lf-cf
Martinez dh
Moreland 1b
Bogaerts ss
Devers 3b
E.Nunez 2b
Bradley Jr. cf-rf
Leon c
Totals
Texas
DeShields cf
Choo dh
Kiner-Falefa 2b
Mazara rf
Profar ss
R.Nunez 3b
Rua lf
Guzman 1b
Perez c
Totals
ab
2
3
5
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
36
ab
3
4
3
3
4
4
4
4
3
32
r h
1 1
0 1
0 0
2 2
0 2
0 1
0 0
1 1
1 0
1 2
6 10
r h
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
0 2
1 1
0 0
0 0
1 5
bi bb so avg
0 0 0 .355
0 0 0 .160
0 0 2 .244
1 1 1 .349
1 0 0 .347
1 0 1 .333
0 0 1 .260
0 0 0 .229
0 0 2 .178
3 1 0 .154
6 2 7
bi bb so avg
0 0 1 .308
0 0 2 .245
0 1 1 .244
0 0 2 .278
0 0 0 .224
0 0 2 .167
1 0 2 .203
0 0 3 .183
0 0 1 .125
1 1 14
Boston
101 003 100 — 6 10 1
Texas
000 000 100 — 1 5 0
E—Devers (8). LOB—Boston 6, Texas 7.
2B—Martinez (8), Moreland (7). HR—Leon (1),
off Fister; Martinez (8), off Fister; Rua (2), off
Sale. RBIs—Martinez (27), Moreland (17), Bogaerts (16), Leon 3 (5), Rua (5). SB—DeShields
2 (6). Runners left in scoring position—Boston
2 (Devers 2); Texas 6 (Kiner-Falefa, Profar, Guzman 2, Perez 2). RISP—Boston 3 for 7; Texas 0
for 8. Runners moved up—Benintendi. GIDP—Rua. DP—Boston 1 (Sale, Bogaerts, Moreland).
Boston
ip h r er bb so np era
Sale, W, 3-1
7 4 1 1 1 12 103 2.02
Barnes
1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.51
Smith
1 1 0 0 0 2 15 4.22
Texas
ip h r er bb so np era
Fister, L, 1-3 6 1⁄3 9 6 6 2 5 103 4.02
Chavez
1 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 33 5.23
Barnette
1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.57
HBP—Sale 2 (Mazara,DeShields), Fister (Bradley Jr.). Umpires—Home, Dan Bellino; First, Phil
Cuzzi; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Adrian
Johnson. T—2:33. A—28,360 (49,115).
Nationals 5, Phillies 4
Philadelphia
Hernandez 2b
Hoskins lf
Neris p
Herrera cf
Altherr rf
Garcia p
Hunter p
Valentin lf
Santana 1b
Franco 3b
Florimon ss
Alfaro c
Arrieta p
a-Williams ph
Ramos p
Morgan p
Kingery rf
Totals
Washington
Harper rf
Turner ss
Rendon 3b
Adams 1b-lf
Wieters c
1-Bautista pr
Stevenson lf
b-Kendrick 1b
Taylor cf
Scherzer p
Solis p
Kintzler p
Torres p
c-Sierra ph
Doolittle p
d-Severino ph
Difo 2b
Totals
ab
4
5
0
5
3
0
0
0
4
3
4
4
2
1
0
0
1
36
ab
4
4
4
4
4
0
1
1
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
29
r
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
4
r
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
5
h bi bb so avg
0 0 1 3 .273
1 1 0 3 .282
0 0 0 0 .000
3 1 0 1 .333
0 0 0 2 .205
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 .000
1 0 0 1 .169
2 1 1 0 .283
1 0 0 2 .226
0 0 0 3 .211
0 0 0 2 .111
1 1 0 0 .203
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 1 .210
9 4 2 18
h bi bb so avg
0 0 0 1 .246
1 0 0 1 .281
1 2 0 0 .274
2 1 0 1 .296
1 0 0 0 .211
0 0 0 0 .000
1 0 1 0 .333
0 0 0 1 .281
0 0 2 1 .195
0 0 0 0 .238
0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 --0 0 1 0 .196
0 0 0 0 --0 1 1 0 .250
1 1 1 1 .289
7 5 6 6
Philadelphia
000 000 310 — 4 9 2
Washington
010 000 022 — 5 7 1
a-singled for Arrieta in the 7th. b-struck out for
Stevenson in the 7th. c-walked for Torres in the
8th. d-walked for Doolittle in the 9th. 1-ran for
Wieters in the 9th. E—Florimon (1), Neris (1),
Turner (4). LOB—Philadelphia 8, Washington 7.
2B—Hoskins (10), Herrera 2 (7), Santana (9).
HR—Franco (6), off Torres; Adams (8), off Arrieta. RBIs—Hoskins (23), Herrera (15), Franco
(26), Williams (5), Rendon 2 (6), Adams (18),
Difo (12), Severino (7). SB—Florimon (1).
CS—Stevenson (1), Taylor (1). Runners left in
scoring position—Philadelphia 2 (Altherr, Florimon); Washington 2 (Adams 2). RISP—Philadelphia 2 for 7; Washington 3 for 5. GIDP—Franco, Adams. DP—Philadelphia 2 (Hernandez,
Franco, Santana), (Morgan, Hernandez, Santana); Washington 1 (Rendon, Difo, Adams).
Philadelphia
ip h r er bb so np era
Arrieta
6 2 1 1 2 2 75 3.15
1
Ramos H, 3
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.63
1
Morgan H, 6
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 9 2.45
2
Garcia H, 6
⁄3 0 1 1 1 2 16 3.21
2
Hunter H, 3
⁄3 2 1 1 1 2 23 4.26
Neris L, 1-2
0 2 2 2 2 0 19 4.15
Washington
ip h r er bb so np era
1
Scherzer
6 ⁄3 5 1 1 2 15 111 1.74
Solis
0 1 1 1 0 0 4 4.72
2
Kintzler
⁄3 2 1 1 0 1 20 4.08
Torres
1 1 1 1 0 0 12 6.75
Doolittle
1 0 0 0 0 2 17 1.72
W, 1-1
Inherited runners-scored—Garcia 1-0, Hunter
1-1, Solis 1-1, Kintzler 1-1. HBP—Scherzer (Altherr), Neris (Kendrick). WP—Hunter. Umpires—Home, Sean Barber; First, Mike Winters;
Second, Rob Drake; Third, Mike Muchlinski.
T—3:33. A—30,611 (41,313).
Twins 5, White Sox 3
Minnesota
Mauer dh
Dozier 2b
Kepler cf-rf
Escobar 3b
Rosario lf
Grossman rf
LaMarre cf
Morrison 1b
Adrianza ss
Wilson c
Totals
Chicago
Garcia rf
Sanchez 3b
Abreu 1b
Delmonico lf
Davidson dh
Narvaez c
J.Rondon 2b
Anderson ss
Engel cf
Totals
ab
3
3
4
4
4
3
1
4
3
3
32
ab
3
4
4
3
2
4
4
3
3
30
r
1
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
5
r
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
3
h
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
1
0
0
4
h
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
5
bi bb so avg
0 1 0 .291
0 1 1 .234
1 0 2 .269
0 0 0 .311
2 0 0 .282
0 0 0 .176
0 0 1 .313
2 0 0 .182
0 1 1 .192
0 0 1 .000
5 3 6
bi bb so avg
1 0 1 .274
0 0 2 .293
0 0 2 .262
0 1 1 .242
1 1 2 .257
0 0 0 .176
0 0 0 .400
0 0 2 .254
0 0 2 .171
2 2 12
Minnesota
000 000 311 — 5 4 1
Chicago
001 001 100 — 3 5 1
E—Adrianza (3), J.Rondon (1). LOB—Minnesota
3, Chicago 5. 2B—Morrison (4), Sanchez (8),
Engel (2). HR—Rosario (7), off Jones. RBIs—Kepler (12), Rosario 2 (24), Morrison 2 (12),
Garcia (9), Davidson (19). SB—Rosario (4).
SF—Davidson. S —Garcia, Anderson. Runners
left in scoring position—Minnesota 3 (Mauer,
Escobar, Adrianza); Chicago 1 (Anderson).
RISP—Minnesota 2 for 7; Chicago 1 for 5. Runners moved up—Grossman, Kepler, Abreu.
Minnesota
ip h r er bb so np era
Gibson
6 2⁄3 4 3 3 2 8 102 3.49
1
Duke, W, 2-1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.86
Reed, H, 6
1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.06
Rodney, S, 5-8 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.86
Chicago
ip h r er bb so np era
Shields
6 2⁄3 2 3 3 2 5 91 5.14
1
Avilan
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 9 3.60
1
B.Rondon
⁄3 0 1 0 1 0 7 4.91
L, 1-2
2
Bummer
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 10 5.06
Jones
1 1 1 1 0 1 23 2.02
Inherited runners-scored—Duke 1-1, Avilan 2-2,
Bummer 2-1. WP—Gibson, Shields. Umpires—Home, Chad Whitson; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Stu Scheurwater. T—2:56. A—17,424 (40,615).
Royals 4, Tigers 2
Detroit
Martin cf
Iglesias ss
a-Castllnos ph
Martinez dh
Hicks 1b
Jones lf
Goodrum 3b
Machado 2b
Greiner c
Reyes rf
Totals
Kansas City
Merrifield 2b
Soler rf
Moustakas 3b
Perez dh
Cuthbert 1b
Duda 1b
Jay lf
Almonte cf
Escobar ss
Butera c
Totals
ab
5
3
1
4
4
4
3
4
4
4
36
ab
4
3
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
28
r h bi bb so avg
0 2 0 0 1 .287
1 1 0 1 1 .216
0 0 0 0 0 .311
0 1 0 0 1 .257
1 3 2 0 1 .292
0 0 0 0 2 .239
0 0 0 1 1 .189
0 1 0 0 0 .207
0 1 0 0 0 .250
0 1 0 0 1 .143
2 10 2 2 8
r h bi bb so avg
2 2 0 0 1 .252
1 2 0 1 1 .308
1 1 3 0 0 .291
0 1 1 0 1 .273
0 0 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 0 .239
0 0 0 0 0 .268
0 0 0 0 1 .214
0 1 0 0 1 .220
0 0 0 0 1 .175
4 7 4 1 6
Detroit
000 100 010 — 2 10 0
Kansas City
103 000 00x — 4 7 0
a-flied out for Iglesias in the 9th. LOB—Detroit
9, Kansas City 2. 2B—Martin (7), Merrifield (7),
Moustakas (8). HR—Hicks (3), off Junis.
RBIs—Hicks 2 (8), Moustakas 3 (23), Perez (7).
SB—Merrifield 3 (7), Soler (1). SF—Moustakas.
Runners left in scoring position —Detroit 3
(Martinez 2, Machado). RISP—Detroit 1 for 5;
Kansas City 2 for 3. Runners moved up—Martinez. GIDP—Jones, Moustakas 2. DP—Detroit 2
(Iglesias, Hicks), (Machado, Iglesias, Hicks);
Kansas City 1 (Moustakas, Merrifield, Cuthbert).
Detroit
ip h r er bb so np era
Boyd, L, 1-3
7 6 4 4 1 5 102 3.00
Farmer
1 1 0 0 0 1 7 4.50
Kansas City
ip h r er bb so np era
Junis, W, 4-2
7 8 2 2 1 8 98 3.18
1
Hill, H, 3
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.97
2
Keller, H, 3
⁄3 1 0 0 1 0 15 2.70
Herrera, S, 7-8 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 0.66
Inherited runners-scored—Hill 1-0, Keller 1-1.
Umpires—Home, Jansen Visconti; First, Manny
Gonzalez; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Laz Diaz.
T—2:16. A—18,424 (37,903).
Yankees 7, Indians 4
Cleveland
Lindor ss
Kipnis 2b
Ramirez 3b
Brantley lf
Encarnacion dh
Alonso 1b
1-Davis pr
Gonzalez 1b
Gomes c
Naquin rf
G.Allen cf
Totals
New York
Gardner lf
Judge rf
Gregorius ss
Sanchez c
Hicks cf
Walker 1b
Andujar 3b
Austin dh
a-Stanton ph-h
Torres 2b
Totals
ab
4
3
3
4
3
3
0
1
3
3
3
30
ab
4
3
3
4
4
2
4
2
0
4
30
r
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
4
r
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
1
1
7
h
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
4
h
1
1
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
1
6
bi bb so avg
1 0 0 .283
1 0 2 .184
0 1 1 .285
0 0 2 .323
0 1 2 .198
0 0 1 .210
0 0 0 .214
0 0 1 .375
0 0 2 .256
1 0 1 .319
0 0 1 .000
3 2 13
bi bb so avg
1 0 0 .203
2 1 2 .296
0 1 0 .311
0 0 3 .198
0 0 0 .240
1 2 0 .189
0 0 1 .274
0 1 2 .254
0 1 0 .227
3 0 2 .327
7 6 10
Cleveland
000 000 040 — 4 4 1
New York
000 000 034 — 7 6 0
a-pinch hit for Austin in the 9th. 1-ran for Alonso
in the 8th. E—Alonso (2). LOB—Cleveland 2,
New York 4. 2B—Lindor (10), Judge (9), Hicks
(4), Walker (3). HR—Torres (2), off Otero. RBIs—Lindor (20), Kipnis (13), Naquin (6), Gardner
(10), Judge 2 (23), Walker (8), Torres 3 (11).
SB—Davis (7). SF—Kipnis. Runners left in scoring position—New York 3 (Sanchez 2, Austin).
RISP—Cleveland 2 for 3; New York 4 for 10. Runners moved up —Andujar. GIDP—Andujar.
DP—Cleveland 1 (Lindor, Alonso).
Cleveland
ip h r er bb so np era
Clevinger
7 1⁄3 1 2 2 4 10 116 2.76
2
C.Allen
⁄3 4 3 3 1 0 32 3.60
L, 2-1, BS, 1-6
1
Otero
⁄3 1 2 2 1 0 8 5.52
New York
ip h r er bb so np era
German
6 0 0 0 2 9 84 2.66
Betances
1 3 3 3 0 2 32 5.79
Holder
1 1 1 0 0 0 17 6.23
Shreve, W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 3.46
C.Allen pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Umpires—Home, Lance Barrett; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Tony Randazzo. T—3:05. A—40,107 (54,251).
Blue Jays 2, Rays 1
Toronto
Hernandez rf
Donaldson 3b
Solarte 2b
Smoak 1b
Pillar cf
Morales dh
Alford lf
Maile c
Diaz ss
1-Gurriel Jr. ss
Totals
Tampa Bay
Span lf
Cron dh
2-Refsnyder dh
Duffy 3b
Miller 1b
Ramos c
Wendle 2b
Robertson ss
Smith cf
Gomez rf
Totals
ab
4
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
2
1
34
ab
4
2
0
4
3
4
4
4
2
4
31
r
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
2
r
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
h
0
0
1
1
2
0
1
0
1
1
7
h
0
0
0
2
0
2
0
1
0
3
8
bi bb so avg
0 0 2 .258
0 0 2 .224
0 1 1 .270
0 0 1 .257
0 0 0 .316
0 0 0 .152
0 0 1 .250
0 0 1 .294
1 0 0 .216
0 0 0 .236
1 1 8
bi bb so avg
0 0 1 .245
0 2 1 .256
0 0 0 .185
0 0 1 .295
0 1 1 .233
0 0 0 .315
0 0 1 .286
0 0 1 .295
0 2 1 .330
1 0 0 .200
1 5 7
Toronto
000 010 001 — 2 7 0
Tampa Bay
000 000 010 — 1 8 0
1-ran for Diaz in the 5th. 2-ran for Cron in the
8th. LOB—Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Pillar 2
(15). HR—Gomez (5), off Tepera. RBIs—Diaz
(13), Gomez (8). SB—Alford (1), Smith (8).
CS—Smith (4), Gomez (1).
Toronto
ip h r er bb so np era
Estrada
6 4 0 0 4 3 96 5.21
Clippard, H, 5
1 1 0 0 0 2 12 1.47
Tepera, W,
1 2 1 1 1 1 27 2.70
2-1, BS, 3-3
Osuna, S, 9-10 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 2.93
Tampa Bay
ip h r er bb so np era
Archer
7 5 1 1 0 6 97 5.32
Andriese
1 1 0 0 1 2 18 4.34
Colome, L, 2-4 1 1 1 1 0 0 14 5.17
T—2:56. A—14,032 (42,735).
Rockies 3, Mets 2
Colorado
Blackmon cf
Dahl rf
Arenado 3b
Parra lf
Story ss
Desmond 1b
Castro 2b
Wolters c
Freeland p
Shaw p
McGee p
b-Gonzalez ph
Ottavino p
Totals
New York
Lagares cf
Cespedes lf
Nimmo lf
Cabrera 2b
Frazier 3b
Flores 1b
1-Reyes pr
Bruce rf
Lobaton c
c-Gonzalez ph
Syndergaard p
Blevins p
Ramos p
a-Conforto ph
Robles p
d-Nido ph
Rosario ss
Totals
ab
5
5
2
3
4
4
4
1
3
0
0
1
0
32
ab
4
1
2
4
3
2
0
4
3
1
2
0
0
1
0
1
3
31
r
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
r
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
h
1
2
0
2
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
h
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
bi bb so avg
0 0 2 .289
0 0 0 .300
0 2 1 .315
1 1 0 .263
0 0 2 .222
2 0 1 .188
0 0 0 .188
0 2 0 .136
0 0 2 .071
0 0 0 --0 0 0 --0 0 1 .213
0 0 0 --3 5 9
bi bb so avg
0 0 1 .319
0 0 0 .246
0 1 2 .256
1 0 1 .333
1 0 1 .248
0 2 0 .213
0 0 0 .139
0 0 2 .236
0 0 1 .154
0 0 0 .231
0 0 2 .059
0 0 0 --0 0 0 --0 0 1 .184
0 0 0 --0 0 1 .147
0 0 1 .230
2 3 13
Colorado
011 000 010 — 3 8 0
New York
200 000 000 — 2 5 1
a-struck out for Ramos in the 7th. b-struck out
for McGee in the 9th. c-singled for Lobaton in
the 9th. d-struck out for Robles in the 9th. 1-ran
for Flores in the 9th. E—Syndergaard (1). LOB—Colorado 8, New York 6. 2B—Dahl (1), Parra
(6). HR—Desmond (5), off Syndergaard; Desmond (6), off Robles. RBIs—Parra (5), Desmond 2 (16), Cabrera (21), Frazier (21).
SB—Dahl (1), Wolters (1). SF—Frazier. Runners
left in scoring position—Colorado 3 (Blackmon,
Story, Freeland); New York 2 (Syndergaard, Nido). RISP—Colorado 0 for 7; New York 1 for 4.
Runners moved up—Bruce. GIDP—Desmond.
DP—New York 1 (Cabrera, Flores).
Colorado
ip h r er bb so np era
Freeland
7 4 2 2 1 8 103 3.95
W, 2-4
2
Shaw, H, 6
⁄3 0 0 0 0 2 10 6.06
1
McGee, H, 8
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 8 5.68
Ottavino
1 1 0 0 1 3 21 0.47
S, 1-2
New York
ip h r er bb so np era
Syndergaard
6 6 2 2 4 5 95 3.09
2
Blevins
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.87
1
Ramos
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.00
Robles, L, 2-1
2 2 1 1 1 2 27 3.60
HBP—Syndergaard (Wolters). Umpires—Home,
Eric Cooper; First, Chad Fairchild; Second, Bruce
Dreckman; Third, Mike Estabrook. T—3:02.
A—33,580 (41,922).
Pirates 9, Brewers 0
Pittsburgh
ab
Frazier 2b
4
Polanco rf
4
Marte cf
5
Bell 1b
4
Dickerson lf
5
Cervelli c
4
b-Diaz ph-c
1
Moran 3b
3
Mercer ss
4
Rodriguez p
1
Kuhl p
3
a-Moroff ph-ss
1
Totals
39
Milwaukee
ab
Cain cf
3
Perez lf
1
Yelich lf
3
Lopez p
0
Williams p
0
c-Aguilar ph
1
Braun 1b
4
Shaw 3b
3
Santana rf
2
Sogard 2b-ss
3
Arcia ss
2
Barnes p
0
Phillips lf-cf
1
3
Bandy c
Anderson p
1
Villar 2b
1
Totals
28
r h bi bb so avg
1 2 1 1 0 .261
0 0 1 0 3 .207
1 1 0 0 1 .279
2 1 1 1 1 .238
1 3 2 0 0 .315
1 1 0 0 1 .301
0 0 0 0 1 .385
2 1 1 2 0 .278
1 3 2 0 0 .239
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 1 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 1 .208
9 13 8 4 9
r h bi bb so avg
0 0 0 0 0 .267
0 1 0 0 0 .215
0 0 0 0 1 .281
0 0 0 0 0 1.000
0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 1 .350
0 0 0 0 3 .243
0 0 0 0 0 .230
0 1 0 1 1 .271
0 0 0 0 2 .100
0 0 0 0 0 .222
0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 1 .091
0 0 0 0 3 .196
0 0 0 0 1 .083
0 0 0 1 1 .274
0 2 0 2 14
Pittsburgh
210 004 110 — 9 13 0
Milwaukee
000 000 000 — 0 2 1
a-struck out for Kuhl in the 8th. b-struck out for
Cervelli in the 9th. c-struck out for Williams in
the 9th. E—Barnes (1). LOB—Pittsburgh 8, Milwaukee 3. 2B—Dickerson (10). 3B—Marte (4).
HR—Frazier (2), off Anderson; Mercer (1), off
Anderson; Bell (2), off Lopez. RBIs—Frazier (5),
Polanco (18), Bell (17), Dickerson 2 (24), Moran
(15), Mercer 2 (8). SF—Polanco. Runners left in
scoring position—Pittsburgh 5 (Polanco 2, Marte, Cervelli, Rodriguez); Milwaukee 1 (Braun).
RISP—Pittsburgh 5 for 12; Milwaukee 0 for 2.
GIDP—Sogard. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Frazier, Mercer, Bell).
Pittsburgh
ip h r er bb so np era
Kuhl, W, 4-2
7 1 0 0 2 8 108 4.12
Rodriguez
2 1 0 0 0 6 28 0.79
Milwaukee
ip h r er bb so np era
Anderson
5 1⁄3 5 5 5 2 3 95 3.97
L, 3-3
2
Barnes
⁄3 4 2 1 0 1 29 2.12
Lopez
2 3 2 2 1 2 34 5.40
Williams
1 1 0 0 1 3 26 2.38
Inherited runners-scored—Barnes 1-1. Umpires—Home, Marvin Hudson; First, James Hoye;
Second, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Jeff Kellogg.
T—3:02. A—38,285 (41,900).
Padres 3, Dodgers 0
Los Angeles
ab
Taylor ss
5
Hernandez 2b
3
c-Utley ph-2b
2
Kemp rf
5
Bellinger 1b
4
Barnes c
4
Farmer 3b
3
d-Pederson cf
1
Verdugo lf
4
Locastro cf
2
e-Muncy ph-3b
0
Stripling p
2
Cingrani p
0
a-Grandal ph
1
Baez p
0
Garcia p
0
f-Valera ph
1
Stewart p
0
Totals
37
San Diego
ab
Jankowski rf
4
Hosmer 1b
2
Villanueva 3b
4
Cordero lf
4
Pirela 2b
4
Yates p
0
Hand p
0
Galvis ss
4
Margot cf
3
Ellis c
4
Lauer p
2
b-Guerra ph
1
Stammen p
0
Asuaje 2b
1
Totals
33
r h bi bb so avg
0 0 0 0 2 .238
0 0 0 0 1 .220
0 0 0 0 1 .257
0 2 0 0 1 .333
0 2 0 1 2 .283
0 1 0 0 1 .196
0 1 0 0 1 .231
0 1 0 0 0 .278
0 0 0 0 1 .286
0 1 0 1 1 .286
0 0 0 1 0 .211
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 .272
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0 --0 8 0 3 12
r h bi bb so avg
2 2 0 0 1 .316
1 1 2 2 0 .297
0 0 0 0 1 .265
0 3 1 0 1 .272
0 1 0 0 1 .250
0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 2 0 0 0 .240
0 0 0 1 2 .169
0 2 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 1 .200
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 .194
3 11 3 3 8
Los Angeles
000 000 000 — 0 8 0
San Diego
000 020 10x — 3 11 3
a-popped out for Cingrani in the 6th. b-struck
out for Lauer in the 6th. c-grounded out for Hernandez in the 7th. d-singled for Farmer in the
8th. e-walked for Locastro in the 8th. f-struck
out for Garcia in the 8th. E—Jankowski (1), Villanueva 2 (7). LOB—Los Angeles 13, San Diego 9.
2B—Kemp (6), Ellis (1). 3B—Jankowski (2).
HR—Hosmer (5), off Cingrani. RBIs—Hosmer 2
(12), Cordero (14). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 7 (Taylor 2, Bellinger, Barnes
3, Stripling); San Diego 4 (Ellis, Lauer 2,
Asuaje). RISP—Los Angeles 0 for 9; San Diego 1
for 8. LIDP—Pirela. GIDP—Villanueva. DP—Los
Angeles 2 (Hernandez, Bellinger), (Taylor, Utley).
Los Angeles
ip h r er bb so np era
Stripling
4 4 0 0 2 5 68 1.93
Cingrani
1 3 2 2 0 1 21 6.23
L, 0-2
Baez
1 2 1 1 1 2 32 4.02
Garcia
1 1 0 0 0 0 12 0.00
Stewart
1 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.38
San Diego
ip h r er bb so np era
Lauer, W
6 7 0 0 1 5 102 5.79
1-1
Stammen
1 0 0 0 1 1 22 2.50
H, 7
Yates
1 1 0 0 1 3 20 0.87
H, 4
Hand
1 0 0 0 0 3 17 2.70
S, 9-11
Inherited
runners-scored —Garcia
2-1.
WP—Lauer. Umpires—Home, Alfonso Marquez;
First, Ramon De Jesus; Second, Jim Reynolds;
Third, John Tumpane. T—3:10. A—21,789
(26,999).
Athletics 2, Orioles 1
Baltimore
Gentry cf
Peterson lf
Machado ss
C.Davis 1b
Trumbo dh
Alvarez 3b
Santander rf
Joseph c
Vielma 2b
a-Mancini ph
Totals
Oakland
Semien ss
Joyce lf
Canha cf
K.Davis dh
Olson 1b
Chapman 3b
Pinder 2b
Piscotty rf
Lucroy c
Totals
ab
3
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
2
1
29
ab
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
31
r
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
r
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
h
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
3
h
1
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
7
bi bb
0 0
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
bi bb
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
1 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 1
so avg
2 .179
1 .204
0 .346
2 .171
1 .292
1 .205
0 .202
0 .148
2 .143
0 .258
9
so avg
1 .264
1 .198
0 .280
2 .215
1 .256
2 .232
0 .283
1 .243
0 .286
8
Baltimore
010 000 000 — 1 3 2
Oakland
000 200 00x — 2 7 0
a-singled for Vielma in the 9th.
E—Alvarez (1), Vielma (1).
LOB—Baltimore 3, Oakland 6.
2B—Joyce (7), Olson (6).
HR—Alvarez (7), off Triggs.
RBIs—Alvarez (14), K.Davis (29), Olson (14).
CS—Semien (1), Olson (1).
S —Gentry.
Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 1
(C.Davis); Oakland 2 (Semien, Chapman).
RISP—Baltimore 0 for 2; Oakland 1 for 5.
Runners moved up—Lucroy, K.Davis.
Baltimore
ip h r er bb so np era
Cobb, L, 0-4
6 5 2 1 1 5 103 7.61
Castro
1 1 0 0 0 1 17 4.35
Brach
1 1 0 0 0 2 13 5.40
Oakland
ip h r er bb so np era
Triggs, W, 3-1
7 2 1 1 0 9 96 4.41
Trivino, H, 2
1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.84
Treinen, S, 5-7 1 1 0 0 1 0 10 1.12
WP—Treinen.
Umpires—Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First,
Chris Guccione; Second, Dave Rackley; Third,
Larry Vanover.
T—2:25. A—17,112 (46,765).
Angels 8, Mariners 2
Los Angeles
Kinsler 2b
Trout cf
Upton dh
Valbuena 1b
Simmons ss
Cozart 3b
Blash rf
Young lf
Rivera c
Totals
Seattle
Gordon cf
Segura ss
Romine ss
Cano 2b
Cruz dh
Seager 3b
Haniger rf
Healy 1b
Zunino c
Gamel lf
a-Heredia lf
Totals
ab
5
4
5
3
5
4
4
3
5
38
ab
5
4
0
4
3
4
3
3
2
2
0
30
r h bi bb so avg
1 0 0 1 0 .198
1 3 3 1 1 .336
0 1 0 0 2 .237
0 1 0 1 1 .265
0 1 0 0 0 .350
2 2 1 0 0 .237
1 1 0 1 2 .250
2 1 1 1 1 .167
1 2 3 0 2 .279
8 12 8 5 9
r h bi bb so avg
0 1 0 0 0 .343
0 0 0 0 1 .290
0 0 0 0 0 .056
0 0 0 0 0 .283
0 0 0 0 1 .245
0 2 0 0 0 .240
1 1 0 1 2 .297
1 1 2 1 0 .246
0 0 0 2 1 .180
0 1 0 0 1 .167
0 0 0 2 0 .286
2 6 2 6 6
Los Angeles
020 004 002 — 8 12 0
Seattle
000 000 200 — 2 6 1
a-walked for Gamel in the 7th.
E—Romine (1).
LOB—Los Angeles 11, Seattle 8.
2B—Cozart (8), Rivera (3).
HR—Cozart (4), off Hernandez; Young (2), off
Hernandez; Trout (12), off Bradford; Healy (5),
off Ohtani.
RBIs—Trout 3 (24), Cozart (12), Young (5), Rivera 3 (8), Healy 2 (15).
SB—Trout (6).
S —Young.
Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 6
(Kinsler, Valbuena, Simmons 3, Young); Seattle 2 (Segura, Zunino).
RISP—Los Angeles 2 for 14; Seattle 0 for 4.
Runners moved up—Upton, Gordon.
GIDP—Kinsler, Gordon 2.
DP—Los Angeles 2 (Simmons, Kinsler, Valbuena), (Kinsler, Simmons, Valbuena); Seattle 1
(Romine, Cano, Healy).
Los Angeles
ip h r er bb so np era
Ohtani, W, 3-1 6 6 2 2 2 6 98 4.10
Alvarez
2 0 0 0 1 0 19 1.10
1
Bedrosian
⁄3 0 0 0 3 0 18 4.02
2
Ramirez
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.06
Seattle
ip h r er bb so np era
2
Hernandez, L, 5 ⁄3 7 5 5 4 5 101 5.28
4-3
1
Bradford
⁄3 1 1 1 0 1 7 2.51
Pazos
1 1 0 0 0 1 24 1.46
Lawrence
2 3 2 2 1 2 37 10.12
Inherited runners-scored—Alvarez 1-0, Ramirez
3-0, Bradford 2-2.
HBP—Ohtani (Cruz), Pazos (Valbuena), Lawrence (Cozart).
WP—Hernandez.
Umpires—Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Ryan
Blakney; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, D.J. Reyburn.
T—3:11. A—40,142 (47,943).
Marlins 8, Reds 5
Miami
Realmuto c
Prado 3b
Castro 2b
Anderson rf
Bour 1b
Tazawa p
Ziegler p
Maybin lf-cf
Brinson cf
Wittgren p
b-Dietrich ph
Guerrero p
Barraclough p
d-Rojas ph-1b
Rivera ss
Straily p
Shuck lf
Totals
Cincinnati
Peraza ss
Winker lf
Votto 1b
Gennett 2b
Suarez 3b
Schebler rf
Barnhart c
Finnegan p
Floro p
Hernandez p
a-Duvall ph
Shackelford p
Garrett p
Brice p
c-Mesoraco ph
Peralta p
Hamilton cf
Totals
ab
4
6
4
3
4
0
0
4
3
0
1
0
0
1
3
2
3
38
ab
5
4
5
4
5
4
4
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
2
36
r h
2 2
1 0
2 2
2 0
1 1
0 0
0 0
0 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
0 1
0 1
0 0
8 10
r h
1 1
1 0
1 4
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 1
5 9
bi bb so avg
0 2 1 .328
0 0 1 .152
3 0 1 .315
0 2 2 .258
0 1 1 .240
0 0 0 --0 0 0 --2 0 1 .227
1 0 1 .164
0 0 0 --0 0 1 .233
0 0 0 --0 0 0 --1 0 0 .240
0 2 1 .148
0 0 1 .500
1 0 2 .224
8 7 13
bi bb so avg
0 0 0 .293
1 1 0 .287
4 0 1 .289
0 1 2 .282
0 0 0 .277
0 1 2 .273
0 0 1 .236
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 --0 0 1 .161
0 0 0 --0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .220
0 0 0 .000
0 2 0 .204
5 5 8
Miami
410 000 102 — 8 10 2
Cincinnati
002 000 102 — 5 9 2
a-struck out for Hernandez in the 6th.
b-struck out for Wittgren in the 7th.
c-flied out for Brice in the 8th.
d-singled for Barraclough in the 9th.
E—Rivera 2 (2), Gennett (5), Suarez (2).
LOB—Miami 12, Cincinnati 10.
2B—Realmuto (2), Maybin (7), Peraza (8), Votto (5), Gennett (8), Hamilton (3).
HR—Votto (5), off Straily.
RBIs—Castro 3 (16), Maybin 2 (6), Brinson (11),
Shuck (1), Rojas (10), Winker (10), Votto 4 (19).
SF—Castro.
S —Floro.
Runners left in scoring position—Miami 7 (Prado 2, Castro, Brinson, Straily, Shuck 2); Cincinnati 6 (Peraza, Gennett, Suarez 3, Schebler).
RISP—Miami 5 for 19; Cincinnati 2 for 11.
Runners moved up—Bour, Brinson, Prado,
Winker.
Miami
ip h r er bb so np era
Straily
4 3 2 2 4 2 77 6.75
Wittgren, W,
2 1 0 0 0 4 29 1.00
1-0
Guerrero
1 2 1 1 0 1 19 4.41
Barraclough,
1 1 0 0 0 0 17 1.84
H, 2
1
Tazawa
⁄3 2 2 2 1 0 18 7.80
2
Ziegler
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 14 6.28
S, 4-4
Cincinnati
ip h r er bb so np era
Finnegan, L, 3 1⁄3 4 5 5 3 2 63 8.27
0-3
2
Floro
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.69
Hernandez
2 0 0 0 1 4 38 3.00
1
Shackelford
⁄3 2 1 1 1 1 14 9.00
2
Garrett
⁄3 0 0 0 1 2 16 1.96
Brice
1 0 0 0 0 2 11 4.26
Peralta
1 3 2 2 1 1 37 5.06
Inherited runners-scored—Ziegler 1-0, Floro
1-0, Garrett 2-0.
HBP—Hernandez (Maybin).
PB—Barnhart (1).
Umpires—Home, Mark Carlson; First, Brian
Knight; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Pat Hoberg.
T—3:36. A—19,800 (42,319).
C8
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
FOR THE RECORD
sptletters@chron.com
Lottery winning numbers
TEXAS
Lotto: 5/5
15-19-24-27-42-51
Estimated jackpot
$28 million
Winning tickets:
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Next jackpot 5/9
$28.75 million
Pick 3 morn.: 5/5
4-7-9 Sum: 20
Pick 3 day:
8-2-3 Sum: 13
Pick 3 even.:
0-2-7 Sum: 9
Pick 3 night:
6-5-3 Sum: 14
Daily 4 morn: 5/5 8-3-7-8 Sum: 26
Daily 4 day:
5-8-6-7 Sum: 26
Daily 4 even:
8-9-0-5 Sum: 22
Daily 4 night:
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Two Step: 5/3
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Bonus Ball:
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MEGA: 5/4
Mega Ball:
Megaplier:
Estimated jackpot
Winning tickets:
Next jackpot 5/8
14-29-36-57-61
17
$215 million
None
$233 million
4-5-10-12-18
21
4
$143 million
1, in Ohio
$40 million
Latest line
Television
Col. baseball
Florida St. at Clemson
Pro baseball
Minnesota at St. Louis
Pro baseball
Detroit at Texas
Pro baseball
Astros at Oakland
Pro baseball
Washington at San Diego
Pro basketball
Boston at Philadelphia
Pro basketball
Toronto at Cleveland
Pro hockey
Washington at Pittsburgh
Pro hockey
Nashville at Winnipeg
*—joined in progress
Radio
Pro baseball
Astros at Oakland
Astros in Spanish
G4: Tampa 4..............................Boston 3 (OT)
G5: Tampa Bay 3................................Boston 1
Washington vs. Pittsburgh
Capitals lead series 3-2
G1: Pittsburgh 3 .........................Washington 2
G2: Washington 4 .........................Pittsburgh 1
G3: Washington 4.........................Pittsburgh 3
G4: Pittsburgh 3.........................Washington 0
G5: Washington 6.........................Pittsburgh 3
G6: at Pittsburgh ........................6 p.m. today
G7*: at Washington ......6:30 p.m. Wednesday
Western Conference
Vegas vs. San Jose
Knights win series 4-2
G1: Vegas 7......................................San Jose 0
G2: San Jose 4...........................Vegas 3 (2OT)
G3: Vegas 4.............................San Jose 3 (OT)
G4: San Jose 4 .....................................Vegas 0
G5: Vegas 5 .....................................San Jose 3
G6: Vegas 3 .....................................San Jose 0
Nashville vs. Winnipeg
MLB
Today
National League
Favorite
Line Underdog
@Phillies
-112 Giants
@Reds
-110 Mets
@Cubs
-235 Marlins
Nationals
-160 @Padres
American League
Favorite
Line Underdog
Tigers
-115 @Rangers
Astros
-140 @Athletics
Interleague
Favorite
Line Underdog
@Cardinals
-135 Twins
Line
+102
+100
+215
+150
Line
+105
+130
Line
+125
NBA
Today
Favorite
@76ers
@Cavaliers
Pts
6 1⁄2
5 1⁄2
Underdog
Celtics
Raptors
Baseball
Atlantic League
Freedom Division
W
L Pct. GB
—
Sugar Land
7
2 .778
Lancaster
6
4 .600 1 1⁄2
York
5
5 .500 2 1⁄2
Southern Maryland
2
7 .222
5
Liberty Division
W
L Pct. GB
Somerset
7
2 .778
—
Long Island
5
4 .556
2
Pennsylvania
3
6 .333
4
New Britain
2
7 .222
5
Sunday’s results
York 4, Lancaster 0
Pennsylvania 3, New Britain 2
Southern Maryland 3, Long Island 0
Somerset 13, Sugar Land 10
Tuesday’s games
Pennsylvania at Somerset, 5:35 p.m.
York at Southern Maryland, 5:35 p.m.
Long Island at New Britain, 5:35 p.m.
College
Texas A&M 7, Florida 3
N. Colorado 3, UT Rio Grande Valley 2
Houston 6, Central Florida 3
UTSA 7, Rice 0
TCU 11, Lamar 0
Grambling St. 7, Texas Southern 6
Southeastern Louisiana 6, Sam Houston St. 0
Arkansas St. 2, Texas St. 1
Dallas Baptist 7, Evansville 1
Appalachian St. 6, Texas-Arlington 4
Central Arkansas 16, Abilene Christian 4 (8)
McNeese St. 11, Texas A&M-C.C. 6
Northwestern St. 9, Incarnate Word 8
Texas 7, Texas Tech 5
New Orleans 2, Houston Baptist 1
Golf
PGA Tour
Wells Fargo Championship
Sunday’s final round
At Charlotte, N.C.
Jason Day, $1,386,000 ........69-67-67-69—272
Nick Watney, $677,600 ......72-67-66-69—274
Aaron Wise, $677,600 ........68-68-70-68—274
B. DeChambeau, $369,600 .75-65-66-70—276
Paul Casey, $281,050 ..........69-68-69-71—277
Phil Mickelson, $281,050 ....72-72-64-69—277
Peter Uihlein, $281,050 .......72-72-62-71—277
Patrick Reed, $238,700 .......71-71-67-69—278
Emiliano Grillo, $200,200 ....68-71-71-69—279
Luke List, $200,200 ............70-72-67-70—279
Sam Saunders, $200,200 ...70-69-68-72—279
Charl Schwartzel, $200,200 70-67-70-72—279
Talor Gooch, $148,867 .........71-72-66-71—280
Kyle Stanley, $148,867 .......67-72-71-70—280
Johnson Wagner, $148,867 .67-71-69-73—280
Joel Dahmen, $115,500 .......70-71-70-70—281
Chesson Hadley, $115,500 ...70-74-66-71—281
Adam Hadwin, $115,500 .....73-71-65-72—281
Rory McIlroy, $115,500 ........68-76-66-71—281
Francesco Molinari, $115,500 70-72-68-71—281
Greg Chalmers, $77,000 ......71-70-70-71—282
Tony Finau, $77,000 ...........69-76-71-66—282
Rickie Fowler, $77,000 .......72-69-68-73—282
Charles Howell III, $77,000 ..71-68-71-72—282
Webb Simpson, $77,000 .....72-70-71-69—282
Justin Thomas, $77,000 .....73-69-70-70—282
Jonas Blixt, $52,360 ............71-71-69-72—283
Alex Cejka, $52,360 .............70-71-71-71—283
Graeme McDowell, $52,360 71-73-67-72—283
Ted Potter, Jr., $52,360 ......72-71-69-71—283
Seamus Power, $52,360 .....74-71-68-70—283
Rory Sabbatini, $52,360 ......71-71-73-68—283
Cameron Tringale, $52,360 .70-70-70-73—283
Austin Cook, $37,249 ..........71-72-69-72—284
Beau Hossler, $37,249 ........68-76-69-71—284
Tom Lovelady, $37,249 ......68-76-72-68—284
Shane Lowry, $37,249 ........74-70-71-69—284
Peter Malnati, $37,249 .......67-68-75-74—284
Keith Mitchell, $37,249 ......67-74-75-68—284
Patrick Rodgers, $37,249 ....71-73-72-68—284
O. Schniederjans, $37,249 .68-73-73-70—284
Jhonattan Vegas, $22,389 ..70-74-72-69—285
Corey Conners, $22,389 ......75-69-69-72—285
Jason Dufner, $22,389 ........68-72-73-72—285
Tyrrell Hatton, $22,389 ......67-73-72-73—285
J.B. Holmes, $22,389 .........71-73-69-72—285
Martin Kaymer, $22,389 .....73-67-73-72—285
Brooks Koepka, $22,389 .....72-72-71-70—285
Troy Merritt, $22,389 ..........72-69-70-74—285
John Peterson, $22,389 ......65-77-72-71—285
Shawn Stefani, $22,389 .....71-69-73-72—285
Robert Streb, $22,389 ........73-72-69-71—285
Vaughn Taylor, $22,389 ......74-68-71-72—285
M. Thompson, $22,389 ......68-73-69-75—285
Daniel Berger, $17,479 .......73-69-69-75—286
Sam Burns, $17,479 ............69-70-73-74—286
Harold Varner III, $17,479 ...72-72-68-74—286
Tiger Woods, $17,479 .........71-73-68-74—286
Texas Classic
LPGA Tour
Sunday’s final round
At Irving
Sung Hyun Park, $195,000..............65-66—131
Lindy Duncan, $118,649..................68-64—132
Yu Liu, $86,072...............................67-66—133
Ariya Jutanugarn, $60,088 .............68-66—134
Sei Young Kim, $60,088 .................67-67—134
Aditi Ashok, $40,275 ......................69-66—135
Jenny Shin, $40,275 .......................65-70—135
Mi Hyang Lee, $27,933 ...................70-66—136
Lydia Ko, $27,933...........................69-67—136
Jackie Stoelting, $27,933 ...............69-67—136
Jin Young Ko, $27,933 ....................67-69—136
Brittany Lincicome, $19,098 ...........71-66—137
Jacqui Concolino, $19,098 ..............70-67—137
Celine Boutier, $19,098...................70-67—137
Mo Martin, $19,098 ........................67-70—137
In Gee Chun, $19,098......................67-70—137
Nicole Broch Larsen, $19,098 .........67-70—137
Jane Park, $19,098 .........................67-70—137
Hockey
NHL playoffs
Second round
Eastern Conference
Tampa Bay vs. Boston
Houston Chronicle Sports
AROUND SPORTS
SCOREBOARD
Powerball 5/5
Powerball:
Estimated jackpot:
Winning tickets
Next jackpot 5/9
@chronsports
Lightning win series 4-1
G1: Boston 6................................Tampa Bay 2
G2: Tampa Bay 4 ...............................Boston 2
G3: Tampa Bay 4................................Boston 1
Jets lead series 3-2
G1: Winnipeg 4................................Nashville 1
G2: Nashville 5 ....................Winnipeg 4 (2OT)
G3: Winnipeg 7 ...............................Nashville 4
G4: Nashville 2 ...............................Winnipeg 1
G5: Winnipeg 6 ...............................Nashville 2
G6: at Winnipeg .....................8:30 p.m. today
G7*: at Nashville .......................TBA Thursday
* - if necessary
Motor sports
NASCAR-Monster Energy
AAA 400 Drive for Autism
Sunday at Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 mile
Starting position in parentheses
1. (2) Kevin Harvick
F
2. (12) Clint Bowyer
F
3. (7) Daniel Suarez
T
4. (3) Martin Truex Jr.
T
5. (9) Kurt Busch
F
6. (8) Brad Keselowski
F
7. (10) Denny Hamlin
T
8. (14) Ryan Blaney
F
9. (19) Jimmie Johnson
C
10. (1) Kyle Larson
C
11. (13) Aric Almirola
F
12. (6) Chase Elliott
C
13. (18) Joey Logano
F
14. (17) William Byron
C
15. (5) Ricky Stenhouse Jr. F
16. (23) Jamie McMurray C
17. (25) Kasey Kahne
C
18. (11) Erik Jones
T
19. (22) Trevor Bayne
F
20. (16) Chris Buescher
C
21. (28) AJ Allmendinger C
22. (29) Michael McDowell F
23. (15) Alex Bowman
C
24. (30) Ty Dillon
C
25. (26) Darrell Wallace Jr. C
26. (27) Austin Dillon
C
27. (32) David Ragan
F
28. (31) Ross Chastain
C
29. (24) Matt DiBenedetto F
30. (35) Gray Gaulding
T
31. (33) Landon Cassill
C
32. (34) Reed Sorenson
C
33. (21) Ryan Newman
C
34. (20) Paul Menard
F
35. (4) Kyle Busch
T
36. (37) Cody Ware
C
37. (36) Derrike Cope
C
38. (38) Corey LaJoie
C
ESPN2
ESPN
FSSW
ATTSW
MLB
TNT
TNT
NBCSN
NBCSN
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
10 p.m.*
5 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
790 AM
850 AM, 101.7 FM
9 p.m.
Los Angeles, Kamara, 3 (Dos Santos, Ibrahimovic), 85th. 5, Houston, Rodriguez, 1, 91st.
Goalies — Los Angeles, David Bingham; Houston, Joe Willis.
Yellow cards — Kitchen, Los Angeles, 20th; Ciani, Los Angeles, 34th; Cole, Los Angeles, 36th.
Referee — Alan Kelly.
Assistant referees — Jeremy Hanson, Danny
Thornberry.
4th official — Ismail Elfath.
A — 22,320 (22,320).
Los Angeles — David Bingham; Michael Ciani
(Chris Pontius, 84th), Ashley Cole, Dave Romney, Jorgen Skjelvik; Giovani Dos Santos, Perry
Kitchen, Sebastian Lletget (Emmanuel Boateng, 75th); Romain Alessandrini (Jonathan
Dos Santos, 64th), Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Ola
Kamara.
Houston — Joe Willis; DaMarcus Beasley, Alejandro Fuenmayor, Adolfo Machado (Leonardo, 65th); Eric Alexander (Memo Rodriguez,
87th), Darwin Ceren, Tomas Martinez, Andrew
Wenger; Alberth Elis, Mauro Manotas (Boniek
Garcia, 68th), Romell Quioto.
NWSL
Saturday’s results
Seattle 3, Portland 2
Houston 3, Sky Blue FC 2
Utah 2, Washington 0
Sunday’s result
Chicago 1, North Carolina 1
Wednesday’s games
Portland at Houston, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Utah, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s late game
Dash 3, Sky Blue FC 2
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
399
399
399
399
399
398
398
397
397
397
396
396
395
395
393
392
386
385
382
377
354
Drivetrain
Accident
Accident
Engine
Key: C-Chevrolet; D-Dodge; F-Ford; T-Toyota
NHRA
Sunday’s final eliminations
At Commerce, Ga.
Final Finish Order
Top Fuel
1. Leah Pritchett. 2. Blake Alexander. 3. Mike
Salinas. 4. Steve Torrence. 5. Doug Kalitta. 6.
Clay Millican. 7. Brittany Force. 8. Bill Litton. 9.
Scott Palmer. 10. Tony Schumacher. 11. Terry
Haddock. 12. Richie Crampton. 13. Audrey
Worm. 14. Antron Brown. 15. Pat Dakin. 16.
Terry McMillen.
Final: Leah Pritchett, 3.874 seconds, 322.42
mph def. Blake Alexander, Foul - Red Light.
Funny Car
1. Courtney Force. 2. Matt Hagan. 3. Jack Beckman. 4. Cruz Pedregon. 5. Bob Tasca III. 6. Tim
Wilkerson. 7. Tommy Johnson Jr.. 8. Ron
Capps. 9. Jonnie Lindberg. 10. John Force. 11.
Robert Hight. 12. Shawn Langdon. 13. Jeff
Diehl. 14. Jim Campbell. 15. J.R. Todd. 16. John
Smith.
Final: Courtney Force, Chevy Camaro, 4.046,
313.73 def. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 4.148,
291.13.
Pro Stock
1. Vincent Nobile. 2. Tanner Gray. 3. Drew Skillman. 4. Greg Anderson. 5. Jeg Coughlin. 6. Bo
Butner. 7. Chris McGaha. 8. Deric Kramer. 9.
Erica Enders. 10. Alex Laughlin. 11. Kenny Delco. 12. John Gaydosh Jr. 13. Wally Stroupe. 14.
Alan Prusiensky. 15. Jason Line. 16. Val Smeland.
Final: Vincent Nobile, Chevy Camaro, 6.599,
209.72 def. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.614,
209.52.
Soccer
MLS
Saturday’s results
Montreal 4, New England 2
New York 4, New York City FC 0
Minnesota United 1, Vancouver 0
FC Dallas 1, Los Angeles FC 1
Columbus 0, Seattle 0
Atlanta United FC 2, Chicago 1
Houston 3, LA Galaxy 2
Sporting Kansas City 1, Colorado 0
Portland 1, San Jose 0
Sunday’s result
Orlando City 3, Real Salt Lake 1
Wednesday’s games
Philadelphia at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.
Seattle at Toronto FC, 6:30 p.m.
Sporting KC at Atlanta United FC, 6:30 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota United at Los Angeles FC, 9 p.m.
Saturday’s late game
Dynamo 3, Galaxy 2
Los Angeles
1 1 — 2
Houston
1 2 — 3
First half — 1, Houston, Fuenmayor, 1 (Quioto), 3rd minute. 2, Los Angeles, Dos Santos, 2,
39th.
Second half — 3, Houston, Quioto, 2, 47th. 4,
Sky Blue FC
0 2 — 2
Houston
1 2 — 3
First half — 1, Houston, Prince , 1 (Agnew 1),
24th.
Second half — 2, Sky Blue FC, Johnson, 1
(Groom 1), 57th; 2, Houston, Sheridan 1, 60th;
2, Sky Blue FC, Johnson 1 (Killion 1) 73rd; 3,
Houston, Latsko 1 (Kgatlana 1) 79th.
Yellow Cards — Daly, Houston, 84th.
Referee — Christina Unkel
Assistant Referee 1 — Trent Vanhaitsma
Assistant Referee 2 — Amilcar Sicaju
Fourth Official — Luis Arroyo
A —2,065.
Sky Blue FC — Kailen Sheridan; Mandy Freeman, Rebekah Stott, Erica Skroski, Chrsitina
Gibbons (Jennifer Hoy 87th); Raquel Rodriguez
(Shea Groom 46th), Sarah Killion, Carli Lloyd;
Janine Beckie, Katylyn Johnson (Madison Tiernan 87th), Savannah McCaskill
Houston — Jane Campbell; Rachel Daly, Amber Brooks, Janine Van Wyk, Kristie Mewis,
Lindsay Agnew (Veronica Latsko 71st); Kimberly Keever, Haley Hanson, Kyah Simon; Kealia
Ohai, (Thembi Kgatlana 76th), Nichelle Prince.
Tennis
ATP TEB BNP
Paribas Istanbul Cup
Sunday at Istanbul
Singles
Championship
Taro Daniel, Japan, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia,
7-6 (4), 6-4.
ATP World Tour Millennium
Estoril Open
Sunday at Estoril, Portugal
Singles
Championship
Joao Sousa, Portugal, def. Frances Tiafoe,
United States, 6-4, 6-4.
ATP World Tour BMW Open
Sunday at Munich
Singles
Championship
Alexander Zverev (1), Germany, def. Philipp
Kohlschreiber (6), Germany, 6-3, 6-3.
Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Sent 2B Jonathan
Schoop to Norfolk (IL) for a rehab assignment.
CLEVELAND INDIANS: Optioned RHP Ben Taylor to Columbus (IL). Recalled OF Greg Allen
from Columbus.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS: Optioned RHP Eduardo Paredes to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled OF Jabari Blash from Salt Lake.
MINNESOTA TWINS: Transferred RHP Ervin
Santana to the 60-day DL.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS: Optioned RHP Jake Petricka and SS Richard Urena to Buffalo (IL). Reinstated 1B Justin Smoak from the 10-day DL.
Recalled OF Anthony Alford from Buffalo.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS: Optioned RHP Kris
Medlen to Reno (PCL). Recalled RHP Braden
Shipley to Reno.
ATLANTA BRAVES: Optioned RHP Lucas Sims
to Gwinnett (IL). Recalled RHP Luke Jackson
from Gwinnett.
CINCINNATI REDS: Optioned RHP Tanner Rainey to Louisville (IL). Reinstated LHP Amir Garrett from the bereavement list.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS: Placed LHP Clayton
Kershaw on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Brock
Stewart from Oklahoma City (PCL). Signed SS
Danny Espinosa to a minor league contract.
NEW YORK METS: Placed RHP Jacob deGrom
on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Thursday. Selected the contract of LHP P.J. Conlon from Las
Vegas (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES: Sent RHP Mark Leiter Jr. to Clearwater for a rehab assignment.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES: Sent RHP Joe Musgrove to Altoona (EL) for a rehab assignment.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS: Placed C Yadier Molina
and RHP Dominic Leone on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Mike Mayers and C Carson Kelly
from Memphis (PCL).
WASHINGTON NATIONALS: Sent RHP Shawn
Kelley to Potomac for a rehab assignment.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CLEVELAND BROWNS: Signed TE Julian Allen,
DL Lenny Jones, OL Austin Corbett, WR Damion
Ratley and DB Simeon Thomas.
NEW YORK JETS: Signed CB Parry Nickerson
and DL Folorunso Fatukasi.
OAKLAND RAIDERS: Signed DT P.J. Hall.
Day hangs on to capture
Wells Fargo title by 2 shots
CHARLOTTE, N.C. —
Jason Day fought
through some wayward
tee shots to card a 2under-par 69 on Sunday
and win the Wells Fargo
Championship by two
strokes over Aaron Wise
and Nick Watney.
After squandering a
three-shot lead on the
back nine, Day’s tee shot
on the difficult 230-yard
par-3 17th hole crashed
into the pin and settled
less than 3 feet away. He
made the putt to take a
two-shot lead.
Day finished at 12under 272 to win for the
second time this season.
He missed more than
half the fairways — including an ugly hook into
the water on the par-4
14th — hit just eight
greens in regulation and
made four bogeys on the
day. But he toughed it out
on the final three holes at
Quail Hollow, nicknamed
the “Green Mile,” playing
them in 2 under.
Wise, 21, had the best
finish of his career. He
was alone in second before Watney drained a
59-foot putt on the 18th.
Phil Mickelson finished five shots back after
a 69, and Rory McIlroy
concluded an up-anddown week with a 71 to
finish at 3 under.
Tiger Woods shot a 74
to finish 14 shots back
In other golf news:
• Sung Hyun Park
chipped in from behind
the green for birdie on
the final hole for a 5under 66 and a one-shot
victory in the LPGA Texas Classic at The Colony.
Because of the rain delays
and stop-and-start nature
of the tournament, which
was cut to 36 holes, Park
was part of a five-way tie
for the lead going into the
second and final round.
However, she finished 90
minutes before the tournament ended because
groupings were not
changed from the opening round. Park finished
at 11-under 131. Lindy
Duncan birdied her last
three holes for a 64 to
finish one shot behind.
MOTOR SPORTS
Harvick prevails
for 4th Cup win
Kevin Harvick dominated a race interrupted
by rain and drove to his
Monster Energy Cup
Series-high fourth victory
of the season at Dover
International Speedway.
Harvick swept the first
two stages and easily
chased down StewartHaas Racing teammate
Clint Bowyer in the
third for the lead after a
41-minute delay.
Once it resumed, Harvick waltzed his way into
Victory Lane in the No. 4
Ford. He led 201 of 400
laps and stormed past
Bowyer, taking the lead
for good with 62 laps left.
Bowyer was second.
Harvick's 41st career
Cup victory gives him
nine top-10 finishes and
eight top-fives in 11 starts
this season.
In other news:
• Leah Pritchett collected her first Top Fuel
victory of the season in
the NHRA Southern
Nationals at Atlanta
Dragway. Pritchett drove
her FireAde dragster to a
pass of 3.874-seconds at
322.42 mph to defeat
Blake Alexander in the
final round of eliminations. Pritchett is the first
of Don Schumacher Racing's Top Fuel drivers to
win this season. Courtney Force (Funny Car),
Vincent Nobile (Pro
Stock) and Eddie Krawiec (Pro Stock Motorcycle) won their respective
categories
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Williams goes
from A&M to UT
Danni Williams, who
played three seasons at
Texas A&M, has signed
with Texas as a graduate
transfer and will be eligible to play for the Longhorns in the 2018-19 season.
Williams, a 5-10 guard,
earned second-team AllSoutheastern Conference
honors in 2016-17 and set
the Aggies’ single-season
record with 71 3-pointers
this past season.
BASEBALL
Kubitza’s HRs
wasted in loss
The Skeeters’ Kyle
Kubitza homered twice
and drove in five runs,
but his day at the plate
was wasted in a 13-10
Atlantic League loss to
Somerset at Constellation
Field in Sugar Land.
Kubitza hit a basesempty homer in the fifth
inning after the Patriots
scored six runs in the top
of the inning to make it
9-3. After Somerset
scored two more runs in
the sixth, Kubitza hit a
grand slam in the bottom
of the inning to make it
11-8.
The Patriots, who ended the Skeeters’ sevengame win streak to open
the season Saturday
night, had 18 hits and
took advantage of five
Sugar Land errors.
From staff and wire reports
PEOPLE’S
PHARMACY
Raw onion
eases pain
of wasp stings.
Page D2
Houston Chronicle
@HoustonChron
STAR
TELEVISION
Christina Aguilera
compares ‘Voice’ stint
to ‘churning
hamster wheel.’
Page D3
Houston Chronicle | Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and Chron.com
Section D HH
‘Terminal Lance’
and life in the Corps
What’s the craziest thing a teen can do?
Join the Marines during war on terror
By Mike Glenn
M
Graham Walzer / New York Times
Maximilian Uriarte is the illustrator behind “Terminal Lance,” a cartoon inspired by
his years in the Marine Corps.
aximilian Uriarte,
creator of the
“Terminal Lance”
comic strip, which
enjoys a cult-like
following among the most
junior U.S. Marines, admits
he drew a blank when people first began comparing
him to legendary World
War II cartoonist Bill Mauldin.
Like Mauldin’s long suffering front-line infantryTerminal Lance:
men “Willie and Joe,” the
The White Donkey
two primary characters in
“Terminal Lance” — Abe
Little, Brown and Company;
and Garcia — try to carry
288 pp.; $25
out their mission as Marines while enduring the
many petty indignities that
come with being low men
end. (“Terminal Lance”
on the military totem pole.
refers to the lance corporal
“I had never read Bill
rank in the Marines. Uriarte
Mauldin’s work at all. I had
was discharged before being
no idea who he was,”
promoted to corporal.)
Uriarte said in a telephone
Though his army of fans
interview to promote the
often send him ideas for
release of “Terminal Lance:
strips, Uriarte said much of
Ultimate Omnibus,” a col“Terminal Lance” is inlection of his comic strips
formed by his own service
published by Little Brown
in the Corps. While the
last month.
character Jesus Garcia is a
Uriarte, who served two
generally good-natured
tours in Iraq as a MaMarine who takes
rine, has since familitary life in stride,
miliarized himself
Abe (full name
with Mauldin’s
Abraham BelatGRAPHIC
“Willie and Joe”
zeko) is a smartass
NOVELS
comics and is honwho often comored by the compariplains when he’s not
son.
drunk or playing video
“He had that unique exgames in the barracks.
perience of being a World
“He (Abe) is a fictional
War II veteran,” Uriarte
representation of me,”
said from his Los AngelesUriarte said.
area home. “His comics —
Rudyard Kipling famousjust like ‘Terminal Lance’ — ly said, “Single men in (baridentified and resonated
racks) don’t grow into plaswith the ‘real guys.’ He was
ter saints” and what was
not concerned with how the true for the British Army in
military wanted to portray
the days of the Raj also is
itself.”
true for today’s post-9/11
Uriarte enlisted in 2006
enlisted troops. The characwhile the global war on
ters of “Terminal Lance”
terror was in full swing. He
aren’t likely to show up on
always considered himself a any Corps recruiting poster.
storyteller and was looking
They binge drink to make
for stories to tell. He chose
up for the boredom; they
the infantry, though his
chase bar flies because of
enlistment test scores were
the loneliness; they harass
high enough to get him a
Marines just out of basic
more comfortable job in the
training — the hated
Marine Corps. “I needed to
“Boots” — because finally
go experience some crazy
someone is lower ranking
life. What’s the craziest
than they are. Their lanthing I could do as a 19guage is frequently filthy,
year-old male? Join the
because that’s how teenagMarines.”
ers talk when they are exHe started publishing the
pected to risk their lives for
strip on his website, as his
their fellow countrymen.
four-year enlistment in the
For those unfamiliar with
Graphic continues on D2
Marines was coming to an
Stratford High graduate is a hometown hero of ‘Hamilton’
‘Hamilton’
By Wei-Huan Chen
The Hobby Center for
the Performing Arts is
currently lighting up
from one of Houston’s
own — Stratford High
School grad Dorcas
Leung.
Leung is a standby for
the national tour of
“Hamilton,” Lin-Manuel
Miranda’s iconic musical
about the Founding Fathers that runs in the
Hobby Center through
May 20. That means she
needs to master not only
the Eliza Hamilton role
that she performed dur-
When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 8 p.m. Fridays, 2
and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays through
May 20. The final performance is at 2 p.m. on May 20
Where: Hobby Center, 800 Bagby
Details: hamiltonmusical.com/lottery
ing the musical’s media
preview night last month,
but also the roles of Angelica Schuyler and Peggy Schuyler/Maria Reynolds — three vital parts
with substantial vocal
performances. And she
has to be ready to go
onstage any night.
Case in point, the April
28 “Hamilton” perfor-
mance at the Hobby: Julia
Harriman, who plays the
role of Eliza, became ill
during the performance.
So after intermission,
Dorcas took over the role
for the second act, an
emotional tempest for the
character of Eliza.
It’s a marquee opportunity, but for Leung the
Coming continues on D3
DEAR ABBY: Best friend’s invitation loses appeal when details are revealed. PAGE D5
HINTS FROM HELOISE: Stash emergency diapers in the glove box. PAGE D5
Dorcas
Leung
recently
made her
Broadway
debut in the
“Miss
Saigon”
revival.
Courtesy photo
D2
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
STAR
HH
Senior Editor, melissa.aguilar@chron.com
@MelissAguilar
Houston Chronicle Life & Entertainment
Four simple ways to keep the pounds off
DRS. MICHAEL ROIZEN
AND MEHMET OZ
Drs. Oz and Roizen
American adults are in crisis: Despite a flood of targeted,
good advice on healthy weight
management, an endless supply of calorie- and nutritioncontrol food services (recommended by those who’ve tried
them — think Marie Osmond
and Oprah Winfrey), and an
almost daily dose of info on the
health risks of being overweight, it’s estimated that over
39 percent of Americans 18 and
older are obese.
And that’s not just 5 or 10
pounds overweight; it’s being 5
feet, 6 inches tall and weighing
186 pounds or more. That’s an
increase from 33.7 percent just
10 years ago, according to a
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention study published recently in JAMA.
Makes you wonder what’s
triggering this, despite all the
effort people put into weight
management. Approximately 45
million Americans go on a diet
each year and spend around
$33 billion annually on weightloss products.
Well, we know you’ve heard
about the importance of eating
7-9 servings of fruits and veggies a day, getting 10,000 steps
daily (or the equivalent), even
how enough good-quality sleep
influences weight management,
but clearly that isn’t making
enough of a difference.
We want to offer you four
surprises that will boost your
efforts to maintain a healthy
weight so you don’t become one
of the ever-increasing number
of Americans who are obese.
Surprise No. 1: Eat a proteinrich breakfast every day.
In two studies, teens who
were overweight and regularly
skipped breakfast saw that
making the switch reduced
hunger, helped them shed
pounds and gave them a mea-
Getty Images
You can control your hunger by drinking a full glass of water
first thing in the morning and then before every meal.
surable boost in “hormonal and
neural signals that control
food-intake regulation.”
What to have? You might
have lean animal protein, such
as skinless chicken (4 ounces
has 36 grams!) or salmon (4
ounces has 23 g) and spinach
wrapped in an egg white omelet (2 eggs’ worth delivers 7 g)
and one slice of 100 percent
whole-grain toast topped with
vegan “butter.”
Surprise No. 2: Take a probiotic daily.
Exposure to antibiotics, eating gut-altering processed
foods with emulsifiers, added
sugars and lousy sat and trans
fats kills off bacteria in your
gut that regulate weight, insulin and blood glucose. That
makes you much more likely to
gain weight. We like Culturelle
and Digestive Advantage, loaded with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and a proprietary blend
of Bacillus Coagulans GBI-30,
6086, respectively, and both
make it through the stomach
acid to your intestines.
Surprise No. 3: Drink plenty
of water. You can control your
hunger by drinking a full glass
of water first thing in the
morning and then before every
meal. Plus, you boost your
metabolic processes by helping
food and liquid move through
your system. Water can replace
calorie-laden sugary beverages!
However, avoid water in
plastic bottles. Filtered tap
water from your home in a
non-plastic bottle is your best
bet; a recent study found that
93 percent of 11 popular brands
of bottled water contained
micro-bits of plastic in the
water! The risks to you, say the
researchers, may be that “some
particles might lodge in the
intestinal wall … Particles
around 110 microns in size (0.11
millimeters) can be taken into
the body’s hepatic portal vein,
which carries blood from the
intestines, gallbladder, pancreas and spleen to the liver.”
Surprise No. 4: Make your
main food choices products
that come from the ground
(fruits and veggies), but if you
must choose packaged foods,
choose only those with fewer
than five ingredients (not including spices or herbs). That’ll
help you avoid highly processed foods.
Unfortunately, say researchers in a 2015 paper published in
BMJ Open, almost 60 percent
of Americans’ calorie intake
comes from ultra-processed
foods. Not only does that deliver empty calories, it increases
cancer risk.
The researchers (British)
defined “ultra-processed” as
“flavours, colours, sweeteners,
emulsifiers and other additives
used to imitate sensorial qualities of unprocessed or minimally processed foods and
their culinary preparations or
to disguise undesirable qualities of the final product.”
Some examples include soft
drinks, sweet or savory packaged snacks, packaged baked
goods, chicken or fish nuggets
and other reconstituted meat
products, and instant noodles
and soups.
Q: I hear that people who
are night owls aren’t as
healthy as morning people.
My mom rarely went to sleep
before 1 a.m. and died at 65. I
have the same biorhythms.
I need a better sleep
schedule. I have a demanding job, two young kids and
am tired all the time.
Is there any hope for me?
Wendy, B., Atlanta
A: You’re right to want to get
on a better sleep cycle — and
you can do it! What you probably heard about were the results of a recent study done by
U.S./U.K. researchers. They
looked at data on more than
433,000 adults in the U.K. ages
38 to 73 to see if there’s a link
between sleep cycles and illnesses or death.
First, they identified four
chronotypes: definite morning
types, moderate morning types,
moderate evening types and
definite evening types. Then
they examined participants’
health issues. The researchers
found that definite evening
types had a higher risk of psychological problems and cardiovascular disease, plus a 10
percent jump in all-cause mortality (most significantly among
63- to 73-yearolds) at their sixand-a-half-year followup.
Clearly, there is evidence that
morning people are healthier.
What can you do if you’re a
night owl? Make changes to
your environment and even
your genetic predisposition!
Although a study found that a
specific gene mutation is common among folks who have
delayed sleep phase disorder,
which throws off circadian
rhythms, one of the things
epigenetics has taught us is that
you can modify genetic tendencies and learn a new behavior that doesn’t come naturally.
If you’re a night owl and
want to become a morning
person, you need a plan.
• Start by making sure you
get 60 minutes of exercise daily,
but not within three hours of
bedtime (no eating then, either).
• Choose a reasonable bedtime, say 11 p.m., and stick to it.
• Avoid digital light (smartphones, tablets, TV) for an
hour before bed; soak in the
tub instead. Keep the bedroom
dark, quiet and cool.
• Practice progressive relaxation as you lie there.
Contact Drs. Roizen and Oz at
youdocsdaily@sharecare.com.
Use raw onion to ease the pain of bee and wasp stings
JOE AND THERESA GRAEDON
The People’s Pharmacy
Q: My daughter was pulling weeds and vines from
around a tree when something flew up and stung her.
I remembered reading about
raw onion for stings. It
seemed to help immediately.
Thank you for writing about
this!
A: We have heard from numerous readers who have applied raw onion to a bee or
wasp sting and gotten relief.
Decades ago, we spoke with Dr.
Eric Block of the State University of New York. This worldrenowned chemist told us that
fresh-cut onions have ingredients that can break down the
chemical in insect venom that
causes pain and inflammation.
Not all stings respond to
onion, although it seems to
work pretty well on bee and
wasp stings. A serious sting
reaction requires immediate
medical attention, since sting
allergies can be deadly.
Q: I go to an integrative
oncologist to maintain a
durable remission against
prostate cancer. He recommended turmeric and blackseed oil. I also take aspirin
for both its anti-cancer activity and its heart attack
protection. I have read that
this combination might increase my risk for bleeding.
Is there any credibility to
this concern?
A: Aspirin has anti-platelet
activity, which is why doctors
may recommend that high-risk
heart patients take low-dose
aspirin. It can inhibit blood
clots, but it may make some
people more susceptible to
bleeding.
The active component of
turmeric, curcumin, also has
anticlotting activity (Journal of
Cellular Physiology, June 2018).
We have received reports from
readers who found that adding
turmeric or curcumin to their
anticoagulant regimen changed
their INR values. (INR is a
measurement of blood anticoagulation.) Some people found
that they bled far more easily.
With respect to blackseed oil
(Nigella sativa), laboratory tests
demonstrate that its active
ingredient, thymoquinone,
“had minimal effects on normal
blood coagulation” (International Journal of Molecular
Sciences, March 30, 2016). On
the other hand, it can reverse
cancer-associated blood clots,
and the scientists suggest that
thymoquinone might be useful
“as a preventative anticoagulant
and/or as a supplement to existing chemotherapies and
anticoagulant therapies.”
Q: Could you please explain the differences between popular over-thecounter pain relievers? How
is Advil different from
Aleve, and how are these
NSAIDs different from aspirin? What makes Excedrin
different? I haven’t needed
pain relievers before, but
now I do.
A: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
include both prescription medicines and the OTC drugs ibuprofen and naproxen. Aspirin
also is considered an NSAID,
though it has heart benefits
rather than risks. Advil is the
brand name for ibuprofen, and
Aleve is the brand name for
naproxen. They are similar in
terms of their pain-relieving
activity and their side effect
profile. Excedrin contains both
aspirin and acetaminophen (the
ingredient in Tylenol), along
with caffeine.
Q: I read that some people
become hoarse when taking
Advair. I had this problem
too. My doctor switched me
over to Singulair, an oral
medication, to control my
asthma. My hoarseness went
away, and my asthma is now
under control. Perhaps this
will help someone else.
A: Montelukast (Singulair) is
used to treat asthma and allergies. It works differently
from corticosteroids such as
fluticasone (found in Advair
and Flonase). Singulair blocks
inflammatory compounds
called leukotrienes. Because it
is not inhaled, it is much less
likely to cause hoarseness.
Contact the Graedons at
peoplespharmacy.com.
Graphic novel intentionally ‘disturbing’
Graphic from page D1
military life, it could be
horrifying. But for those
who have been there,
“Terminal Lance” is true
and vital and hilarious.
Though the famously
spit-and-polish Gen.
George S. Patton hated
Mauldin’s unshaven and
unsightly “Willie and
Joe,” Uriarte has had
better luck regarding his
characters with the top
brass in the Marine
Corps. He said Gen. Robert Neller, the Commandant of the Marine Corps,
has been supportive.
“He likes ‘Terminal
Lance.’ It’s honest,”
Uriarte said.
Uriarte went beyond
mere military joke-telling with “The White
Donkey,” a searing
graphic novel about
Marines under fire in
Iraq — and later attempting and sometimes
failing to readjust to
civilian life — using the
same main characters.
He did not include easy
laughs.
“The story was supposed to be upsetting. I
felt the book was sup-
posed to be disturbing.”
Uriarte is currently
working on his second
graphic novel, which will
be based on the Marine
Corps’ experience in
Afghanistan.
He dedicated “Terminal Lance: Ultimate Omnibus” to the lance corpo-
rals in the Marine Corps.
“I didn’t do this for the
Marine Corps — I did it
for the Marines,” Uriarte
said. “I honestly think
that active duty Marines
are the funniest people on
the planet.”
mike.glenn@chron.com
Illustration, above, from “The White Donkey” and
“Terminal Lance” strip, left, by Maximilian Uriarte.
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
D3
STAR
ENTERTAINMENT
Hudson stays busy without doing concerts
High-profile projects
include Franklin
biopic, new album
By Jon Bream
T R I B U NE NEWS SE RVIC E
MINNEAPOLIS —Jennifer
Hudson doesn’t do many concerts these days. She has only
three shows listed online for all
of 2018.
But when an issue matters to
Hudson, she gets involved.
Hudson’s most recent public
appearance was six weeks ago
at the March for Our Lives in
Washington, D.C. At this massive rally for gun control, Hudson — who lost her mother,
brother and nephew to gun
violence in 2008 — interpreted
a famous Bob Dylan song with
a mighty gospel choir.
“My mother always taught us
the importance of helping others and giving back. More than
anything, we need to support
our youth as they truly are the
future,” wrote Hudson, a 36year-old mother.
“I was so proud to stand
with all the students at March
for Our Lives. They are making
sure their voices are heard in
an incredibly important movement. I performed ‘The Times
They Are A-Changin’?” — and
I really think they are.”
The latest news from the
House of Hudson is that she
will star in an Aretha Franklin
biopic. She declined to go into
specifics — the director, costars, schedule or how she’ll
approach interpreting those
definitive songs. She simply
gushed about the project.
“It is an incredible honor
that Aretha Franklin would
choose me to play the legacy
that is her life on film,” Hudson
Colleen Hayes / NBC
With an Oscar and multiple Grammys under her belt, Jennifer Hudson has a career full of accolades.
said in her email response to
questions. “I have always
looked up to her and her career.”
Hudson’s answers did not
make it clear which project will
arrive next. There is an album
in the works — her first since
2014’s “JHud.” Last year, she
released two singles, “Burden
Down,” a gospelly piano ballad
about pain and strength, and
“Remember Me,” an ebullient
scorcher that evokes Adele.
What can we expect on the
new album?
“You’ll have to wait and see!”
she responded coyly.
Between the album and the
film, Hudson keeps busy
working a variety of highly
visible projects. She even
sings in a television commercial for American Family Insurance.
Actually, she’s been all over
the tube in recent years — acting on “Hairspray Live,” playing recurring characters on
“Empire” and “Smash,” and
coaching on talent shows.
“Working on ‘The Voice’ and
‘The Voice UK’ has been such
an amazing experience, because
I get to spend my days with
musicians who have shaped the
world of music, while helping
to discover incredible new
talent,” she explained. “I had
the best time with Adam (Levine), Blake (Shelton) and Miley
(Cyrus). I looked forward to
work every day.”
But the versatile Hudson has
no preference for film, where
she won an Oscar for her work
in “Dreamgirls,” over music or
TV.
“I am never able to choose
just one! They all fulfill me in
different ways. Each outlet of
expression speaks to my soul. I
thank God that I am able to live
out my dreams every day and
that I don’t have to choose just
one. I love to perform and be
onstage, but I also love to see
people living out their dreams
and help them on their journey.”
Aguilera compares her ‘Voice’ stint to a ‘hamster wheel’
Original coach
says she longed
for ‘freedom’
By Cicero Estrella
T RI B UNE NEW S E RVIC E
“The Voice,” as its title
implies, is supposed to be
about singing and nothing else. That’s why
“blind auditions” are
employed with the coaches’ rotating chairs turned
away from the stage as
contestants are chosen
strictly from what the
coaches hear.
Not so, said former
coach Christina Aguilera
in an interview with Billboard.
“It became something
that I didn’t feel was what
I had signed up for in
season one,” she said.
“You realize it’s not about
music. It’s about making
good TV moments and
massaging a story.
“I didn’t get into this
business to be a television
show host and to be given
all these (rules). Especially as a female: You can’t
wear this, can’t say that. I
would find myself on that
show desperately trying
to express myself through
Getty Images
Christina Aguilera will release her first new album in six years in June.
clothing or makeup or
hair. It was my only kind
of outlet.”
Aguilera, 37, was part
of the original cast along
with fellow coaches Adam Levin, CeeLoo Green
and Blake Shelton and
host Carson Daly. She
appeared from 2011-16, but
said she has no desire to
return to the show, which
she described as an “energy sucker” and a “churn-
Coming home is empowering
Coming from page D1
musical means a lot more
than just a big role for
the Broadway actor and
singer. The story’s proimmigrant themes, she
says, speak to her own
story.
“My parents made a
decision to come to
America because they
took an opportunity for
themselves,” Leung says.
“I would not be able to be
here if they didn’t work
so hard. I’m lucky to tell
this story.”
Leung was born in
Hong Kong, but her family immigrated to the
States when she was 3.
They moved to Waco,
then Houston, where
Leung attended Wilchester Elementary , Memorial Middle School and
Stratford High of Spring
Branch ISD.
She was deeply in-
volved in Stratford’s
theater program and,
after graduating, majored
in musical theater at the
University of Oklahoma.
Her dream to be onstage
has been working out —
Leung joins the “Hamilton” cast hot off of her
debut Broadway performance as Gigi in the
recent revival of “Miss
Saigon.”
But coming back to her
hometown means remembering the opportunities that not only her
parents gave her, but her
mentors as well — teachers at Stratford like
Christian Holmes, Peter
Steinmetz and David
Clayton.
“(David) was always
there for me when I
wanted to talk,” Leung
says.
Leung says being back
in Houston performing
“Hamilton” has felt like a
form of empowerment.
Acting, for example, is
not often considered a
typical profession for an
Asian-American. Leung
admits acting can be seen
as a selfish pursuit
among some parents,
who believe “you’re not
thinking about your family or how you can provide.”
And as an actor, she
doesn’t often see the
immigrant experience
reflected onstage. But
“Hamilton” has given her
a way to give back to the
Asian-American community — by showing it off
to the rest of the world.
“I do bring my parents
a lot of pride,” she says.
“It’s turning the immigrant experience into art,
having a say,” Leung
says. “It’s saying, ‘this is
where I come from.’ ”
wchen@chron.com
ing hamster wheel.”
“I was longing for
freedom,” she said.
She added that coming
home from the set she
“would just take everything off — the makeup,
all of it — and would
blast hip-hop, or Nirvana,
‘Creep,’ Slayer. Anything
like that to get me out of
that zone, that TV mode.”
Now that she’s been
able to shed “The Voice,”
Aguilera is free to concentrate on her own, big
voice. She’ll be dropping
“Liberation,” her first
album in six years, in
June and then embark on
her first tour in a decade.
Aguilera, mother to
10-year-old son Max and
3-year-old daughter Summer Rain, says she’s
ready to step out of her
comfort zone.
“Touring is so frightening to me, because I am a
mom first,” she said. “It’s
part of why I stayed in
the position I was (at The
Voice). It’s easy to get
comfortable and cushy in
the same place and not
have to worry about uprooting your kids. I’ve
been putting myself on
the back burner.”
Billboard said Aguilera
is as excited as she has
been about her career for
years, and is looking into
possibly recording a Latin album, acting in more
movies and perhaps a
Broadway stint.
D4
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
PUZZLES & TV
HH
NEW PUZZLE BOOK ON SUNDAYS. GO TO CHRON.COM/BRAINBLITZ
word sleuth
Jumble
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions — forward,
backward, up, down and diagonally. ©2018 King Features Syndicate Inc.
“QUE” WORDS
Saturday’s unlisted
clue: PICTURE.
Monday’s unlisted
clue hint: PROVINCE
OF CANADA.
Albuquerque
Antique
Applique
Aqueduct
Aqueous
Arabesque
Banquet
Baroque
Basque
Bequeath
Bequest
Bouquet
Briquette
Clique
Conquer
sudoKu
cryptoquip
Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains
the numbers 1 to 9. ©2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter
stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal
O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and
words using an apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels.
Solution is by trial and error.
©2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
saturday’s answers
ACROSS
1 “I’m all __ it”:
“Yes”
4 Pennies: Abbr.
7 “Later, dude”
10 Mil. strongholds
13 Long Island
university
15 Demonic laugh
17 *Official
emergency status
18 Month that once
was eighth
19 Walked (on)
20 *Angler’s skill
22 One getting
private lessons
24 Go down to defeat
25 __ Martin: Bond’s
car
28 Garlicky sauce
32 Frozen over
33 *#1 hit
39 Venue for exercise
swimming
41 Old golf club
named for its
copper alloyplated face
42 *One who rats to
the cops
44 Spanish Mrs.
45 Selassie
worshiper
46 Type in
48 Arduous journey
51 In style again
54 *Floater in a
luxurious bath
58 “__ end up”
62 Existing
independent of
experience, in
logic
63 List including
nachos, sliders,
wings, etc. ... and
what the starts
of the answers
to starred clues
comprise?
65 Another year of
Time, say
66 “Canyon With
Crows” artist
Georgia
67 ’60s radical gp.
68 Antlered beast
69 Opposite of ENE
70 Birthday gift for a
tot
DOWN
1 Almanac item
2 Smell often funky
3 Decorate anew
4 Basic technique in
EMT training
5 Stealing
6 Move laterally
7 Coll. hotshot
8 Female leadership
org.
9 Grub
10 One-named
Milanese model
11 If-__: conditional
statements
12 NCO nickname
14 Resulted in
WINDOW TYPES
By Lila Cherry
TV TONIGHT
NBC
(2)
PBS
(8)
CBS (11)
ABC (13)
TBN (14)
MyTV (20)
KLTJ (22)
FOX (26)
CW
(39)
Uni. (45)
Tel. (47)
ION (49)
KUBE (57)
55
M movie (S) sports (N) new programming (P) premiere (SP) season premiere (F) finale (SF) season finale (CC) - closed caption
6 PM
6:30
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
KPRC Channel Ent. Tonight The Voice Live Top 10 Performances (N) (CC)
12 2 News (N)
(CC)
PBS NewsHour (N) (CC)
Antiques Roadshow Green Antiques Roadshow (CC)
8
Bay (Hour Three) (N) (CC)
KHOU 11
Wheel of
Kevin Can Man With a Superior
Big Bang
11 News at 6 (N) Fortune (N) Wait (N) (SF) Plan (N)
Donuts (N) Theory (CC)
13 News at 6 p.m. (N) (CC) Dancing With the Stars The eight remaining athletes
13
perform. (N) (CC)
Potter Touch Praise (CC)
Sacred Slow J. Duplantis
14 Samuel
Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Law & Order: S.V.U. Chat
4 (CC)
(CC)
(CC)
(CC)
Room (CC)
20 Perry Stone John Hagee Gospel Truth Table Talk Marcus and Joni Lamb
Modern
Modern
Lucifer Quintessential
The Resident Run, Doctor,
9 Family (CC) Family (CC) Deckerstar (N) (CC)
Run (N) (CC)
The
The
Supergirl Trinity (N) (CC) iZombie Yipee Ki Brain,
5 Goldbergs
Goldbergs
Motherscratcher! (N) (CC)
Papa a Toda Madre
10 La rosa de Guadalupe (CC) El Rico y Lazaro
Mi Familia Perfecta (N)
Al Otro Lado del Mur (N)
6 Caso cerrado (N) (CC)
Criminal Mind (CC)
Criminal Mind (CC)
7 Criminal Mind (CC)
FunnyAsk
53 Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers King of Hill King of Hill Funny (N)
05/07/18 COM
16 “MASH”
nickname
21 Wine label
number
23 7-Up nickname
25 Afflicts
26 Ella’s style
27 Wrong-key error
29 Beatles’ “Let __”
30 Other, in Oaxaca
31 Car borrowed
from a dealer
34 One-footed jumps
35 Landed
36 Whispered “Hey!”
37 The Auld Sod
38 Stern area
40 Trademark Buster
Keaton hat with a
culinary name
43 Clothing
47 “I didn’t do it”
48 Nicholas II was
the last of them in
Russia
49 Caught, as dogies
50 Gets by working
52 “Funny bone”
spot
53 Hardwood trees
55 Boxer Riddick
56 It borders Siberia
in the game of
Risk
57 Defraud
59 Strain to lift
60 Recon collection
61 Chop __
64 Remote button
with left-pointing
arrows: Abbr.
ANSWER: Dessert that’s scrumptious if it’s kept in a
room in the attic after being baked: garret cake.
©2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
daily crossword
9 PM
9:30
10 PM 10:30
Running Wild Joseph
Local 2 News :35 The
Gordon-Levitt (N) (SP) (CC) at 10pm (N) Tonight Show
The Roosevelts: An Intimate History The Storm (19201933) Ken Burns covers FDR's battle with polio. (CC)
Elementary Once You've
KHOU 11
:35 The Late
Ruled Out God (N) (CC)
News at 10 Show (N)
The Crossing LKA (N) (CC) 13 News at :35 Jimmy
10 p.m. (N) Kimmel (CC)
BillyGraham Greg Laurie Praise (CC)
Law & Order: S.V.U.
Big Bang
Big Bang
Remorse (CC)
Theory (CC) Theory (CC)
J. Duplantis Carpenter K.Hagin
K. Copeland
FOX 26 News at 9 (N) (CC) FOX 26: News Fox26NewsIs
Edge (N)
iahFactor (N)
NewsFix at 9 (N)
Two and a Two and a
Half Men
Half Men
Por Amar Sin Ley
Noticias 45 NoticieroUn
Enemigo Intimo (N)
Noticiero (N) :35 Titular.
Criminal Mind Broken (CC) Criminal Mind (CC)
The Game The Game King-Queens King-Queens
A&E
AMC
ANPL
AT&TSN
BBC
BET
BRAVO
CNBC
CNN
COM
DISC
DISN
E!
ESPN
ESPN2
FNC
FOOD
FREE
FSN
FX
HALL
HGTV
HIST
LIFE
MSNBC
MTV
NGEO
NICK
OWN
OXY
PRMT
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TOON
TRAV
TVLAND
USA
WE
WGN
23 OzzyandJack'sDetour (CC) OzzyandJack'sDetour (CC) OzzyandJack'sDetour (CC) OzzyandJack'sDetour (CC) :05 OzzyandJack'sDetour
The Terror (N) (CC)
:05 Cameron-Sci-Fiction (N) :05 The Terror (CC)
57 5:00 < Jaws +++ (‘75) Roy Scheider. (CC)
Alaska: Frozen Edge
Alaska: Frozen Edge
Alaska: Frozen Edge
I Was Prey (CC)
42 Alaska: Frozen Edge
(S) Astros
(S) Pre-game (S) MLB Baseball Houston vs Oakland (Live)
39 5:00 (S) The Dan Patrick Show (N) (CC)
The X-Files (CC)
The X-Files The End (CC)
226 The X-Files Mind's Eye (CC) The X-Files All Souls (CC) The X-Files (CC)
< To Be Announced (CC)
46 < To Be Announced (CC)
Vanderpump R. Reunion Part 1 South-CharmNewOrlean Watch (N) Vanderpump
65 Vanderpump R. Reunion Part 3 Vanderpump R. (CC)
Shark Tank (CC)
Shark Tank (CC)
American Greed: Scam
45 InvestorTeacher Icon (CC) Shark Tank (CC)
Anderson Cooper 360 (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC) CNN Tonight (CC)
CNN Tonight (CC)
25 OutFront (CC)
The Office The Office The Office The Office The Office The Office Daily S. (N) Oppositi (N)
59 5:50 Office :25 Office
Fast Loud Revved Up (CC) Fast N' Loud (CC)
American Chopper (CC)
Fast N' Loud (CC)
29 Fast N' Loud (CC)
Bunk'd (CC)
41 Bunk'd (CC) Bunk'd (CC) DuckTales Gravity Falls Bunk'd (CC) Bunk'd (CC) StuckMid. StuckMid. Raven's.
RealPrincessDiaries (N)
RealPrincessDiaries
E! News
Red Carpet
44 5:30 E! Live/Red Carpet The 2018 Met Gala (Live)
33 (S) SportsCent. (N) (CC) (S) MLB Baseball Minnesota Twins at St. Louis Cardinals - St. Louis, Mo. (CC) (Live) (S) SportsCent. (N) (CC)
(S) E:60 (CC)
(S) NFLLive (CC)
34 (S) NCAA Baseball Florida State at Clemson - Clemson, S.C. (CC) (Live)
Tucker Carlson (CC)
Hannity (CC)
Ingraham Angle
Fox News @ Night
38 The Story (CC)
DallCake (N) Vegas Ca (N) Vegas Cakes
52 Best Baker America (CC) Best Baker America (CC) Best Baker America (N) (SP) Cake
32 4:50 < Just Go With It +++ (‘11) (CC) < Grown Ups ++ (2010, Comedy) Kevin James, Adam Sandler. (CC) The 700 Club (CC)
(S) Rangers (S) Insider
37 (S) Pow.Spo. (S) Pre-game (S) MLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at Texas Rangers - Arlington, Texas (CC) (Live)
31 4:30 < Everest ++ (CC) < Star Trek Into Darkness The crew searches for a man bent on mass destruction. < Oblivion +++ (CC)
24 Last Man St. Last Man St. Last Man St. Last Man St. The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle Golden Girls Golden Girls
Love It or List It (CC)
Love It or List It (N) (CC) H.Hunt (N) House (N) House Hunt. House
47 Love It or List It (CC)
American Pickers (CC)
American Pickers (N) (CC) :05 Pawn (N) :35 Pawn (N) :05 Pawn S. :35 Pawn S.
58 American Pickers (CC)
40 The First 48 Last Fare (CC) 48 Deadly Misfortune (CC) 48 Deadly Misfortune (CC) 48 Deadly Misfortune (CC) 48 Deadly Misfortune (CC
All in With C. Hayes (N)
Rachel Maddow (N) (CC) The Last Word (N) (CC)
The 11th Hour (N) (CC)
80 Hardball (N) (CC)
Teen Mom OG (CC)
Teen Mom OG (CC)
Teen Mom: Young and
TeenMom
:35 TeenMom
30 Teen Mom OG (CC)
One Strange Rock (CC)
One Strange Rock (CC)
One Strange Rock (N) (CC) One Strange Rock (CC)
335 One Strange Rock (CC)
43 Sponge (N) SpongeBob < The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water (CC) Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends (CC) :35 Friends
Dateline (CC)
Dateline
Dateline
Dateline (CC)
66 Dateline (CC)
Secrets Uncovered (N)
In Ice Cold Blood (CC)
In Ice Cold Blood (CC)
Killer (N)
Snapped
327 Secrets Uncovered (CC)
:05 Cops
:35 Cops
Cops (CC)
Cops (CC)
48 Friends (CC) Friends (CC) Friends (CC) Friends (CC) It Was Him (N) (CC)
:15 < Backtrack (‘15) Sam Neill, Adrien Brody. (CC)
60 4:00 < National Treasure < The Last Witch Hunter ++ (‘15) Vin Diesel. (CC)
51 Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Am.Dad (N) Space (N) Conan Natasha Lyonne (N)
:15 < Inn of the Sixth Happiness +++ (‘58) (CC)
169 5:30 < The Magnificent... < The Winslow Boy +++ (‘48) Neil North. (CC)
Little People (CC)
Little People Trying Not to Freak Out (CC)
Little People (CC)
63 Little People (CC)
(S) NBA Basketball Toronto Raptors at Cleveland Cavaliers (CC) (Live) (S) Inside the NBA (CC)
36 5:00 (S) NBA Basketball (Live)
Steven (N) King of Hill Amer. Dad Cleveland
Amer. Dad Bob Burgers Bob Burgers Family Guy Family Guy
22 Craig (N)
Bizarre Food Bizarre Food Bizarre Foods (CC)
Bizarre Foods (CC)
Bizarre Food Bizarre Food
62 Bizarre Foods (CC)
:50 Ray
:25 Everybody Loves Ray Mom (CC)
Mom (CC) King-Queens King-Queens
346 M*A*S*H :35 MASH :10 Ray
:05 American Ninja (N)
21 Modern Fam Modern Fam (S) WWE Monday Night Raw (CC)
Criminal Mind (CC)
Criminal Mind (CC)
Criminal Mind (CC)
Criminal Mind (CC)
117 Criminal Mind (CC)
54 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H
HBO
MAX
SHO
STARZ
STZ ENC
SUND
TMC
A Dangerous Son (N) (CC)
Westworld (CC)
Wyatt Cenac Barry (CC) Movie
444 Last Week News (N)
< The Royal Tenenbaums +++ (CC)
:50 < Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates ++ (CC) Movie
425 4:45 < Invictus ++++
TheCircus
I'm Dying Up Here (CC)
Billions (CC)
I'm Dying Up Here (CC)
Billions (CC)
474 Movie
:35 Sweetbit :05 < Amityville: The Awakening (CC)
:35 Sweetbit :05 Vida
Movie
410 5:15 < Rough Night (CC) Vida (CC)
< Primary Colors +++ (‘98) Emma Thompson, John Travolta. (CC)
Movie
400 5:45 < Urban Cowboy ++++ (‘80) (CC)
< Midway ++ (‘76) An account of the Battle of Midway during WWII. (CC)
398 4:00 < The Longest Day ++++ (‘62) (CC)
< The Legend of Ben Hall (‘17) Jack Martin. (CC)
488 5:25 < Punch-Drunk Love < The Illusionist +++ (‘06) Edward Norton. (CC)
©2018 Tribune Content Agency
5/7/18
aces on bridge
By Bobby Wolff
With both North and South
having five hearts and a
decent hand, it’s easy to
imagine them going overboard, or at least to the
five-level. However, at the
table, both players exercised
restraint, South down-valuing his hand out of a strong
no-trump, and North merely
inviting game. So now all
South needs to do is make
10 tricks.
On the passive diamond
lead, South should expect
to lose a trump trick, so he
must limit the loss in the
black suits to two tricks.
If he is not careful, he will
also lose two clubs and one
spade. The way to make sure
of the contract is to force the
opponents to lend their assistance and open up those
suits to his advantage.
Declarer starts by winning
the diamond ace and leading the heart jack, perhaps
intending to let it run, but
hoping East will incautiously
cover from a doubleton honor. When the queen appears,
South wins and cashes the
diamonds before taking the
spade ace and putting the
defense in with a spade.
If East wins, he will have
to open up clubs sooner
or later. As it is, West wins
and cashes the heart king,
but must then lead clubs.
lead with the aces
Dummy plays low, and East
can win the first club, but he
must now concede.
If South had exited in hearts
at trick five, West would
have won and broken up the
endplay by leading clubs. If
declarer instead takes the
spade finesse, either a club
or the heart king followed by
a second spade from West
should suffice to set the
hand.
answer: Even though the
opponents’ auction here
would tend to get you to look
at majors rather than minors,
jack-fourth is hardly the most
attractive of options. So I
would lead from my five-card
suit as being a far more
promising line of attack than
a four-card suit.
©2018 Dist. By Andrews McMeel Syndication for UFS
LOOKING BACK
BIRTHDAYS
1915: A German Uboat torpedoed and sank
the British liner RMS
Lusitania off the coast of
Ireland, killing 1,198 people, including 128 Americans.
1945: Germany signed
an unconditional surrender at Allied headquarters in Rheims, France.
1998: The parent company of Mercedes-Benz
agreed to buy Chrysler
Corp. for more than $37
billion.
Rock musician Bill
Kreutzmann (Grateful
Dead) is 72. Actor Michael E. Knight is 59.Actress Traci Lords is 50.
Singer Eagle-Eye Cherry is 47.
JOKES ON US
Q: What did the tie say
to the hat?
A: You go on ahead,
and I’ll hang around!
Mike Ganis
HH
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
D5
HOROSCOPES, ADVICE & COMICS
Bizarro
JaCQueline Bigar
Your Horoscope for Monday, May 7
aries (march 21-april 19) HHHH
Pressure builds around communication.
News you hear could be informative yet
confusing. What you realize is that you
speak a different language. You might
have worked too hard to get involved in a
power play. Relax and let go.
taurus (april 20-may 20) HHHH
Reach out to someone you care about
who seems to make a difference. Focus
on a long-term goal and on the person
who inspires you to go for it. Your expenses could spin out of control. Be more
serious-minded, if possible.
gemini (may 21-June 20) HHHHH
Reach out to someone at a distance. You
might want to come to an understanding
with this person. Extremes come to the
forefront, as others might be extremely
pushy. Be willing to let go of what no
longer works. Detach, and you will be successful.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) HHHH
You might not know what to do with all
the responsibility that drops on you. A
power play could backfire. Understanding
evolves between you and another person,
but only as long as you don’t try to force
him or her to act a certain way.
leo (July 23-aug. 22) HHHH Understand that not everything is under your
control, as much as you might like to
think it is. When someone else has a keen
imagination and a strong drive, you can
voice your opinions only so much. Make it
OK to turn down someone’s offer.
Virgo (aug. 23-sept. 22) HHHH
Defer to others, rather than carry all the
responsibility yourself. Your friends might
have different ideas for how to make an
adjustment to handle these tasks. Pressure builds. Be gracious for all the help,
and then make fun plans.
mother goose and grimm
hagar the horriBle
liBra (sept. 23-oct. 22) HHHH Your
creativity emerges when you open up
to new possibilities. Still, you have a lot
of energy focused on completing what
must be done. It becomes obvious that a
co-worker or family member seems to be
distorting what is happening.
sCorPio (oct. 23-nov. 21) HHH Stay
close to home and remain anchored. Your
sense of self helps you to walk an untraditional path. Brainstorm with others, and
you might be surprised by the results. Try
not to negate a good idea.
sagittarius (nov. 22-dec. 21)
HHHH Speak your mind and say what you
feel. It will be nearly impossible to change
your feelings, though you could step back
and allow someone else the luxury of
finishing up a project. Know that nothing
has to be your way or the highway.
CaPriCorn (dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH
Understand what is going on around you.
You might be stuck on a key issue that
could be setting you up for a power play.
Try to walk in someone else’s shoes and
understand where he or she is coming
from. Flow with the moment.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-feb. 18) HHHHH
You are in your element. You feel empowered and ready to handle the impossible.
Your sense of humor comes through in
an odd way, and others react to you in an
equally odd way. Don’t allow your imagination to get carried away.
PisCes (feb. 19-march 20) HHH Do
exactly what you feel is right, and you will
learn to stay on target. Your sense of direction takes you to a new level of understanding; however, there is an element of
confusion around you that could discourage you from making any decisions.
haPPy Birthday (may 7) This year
you break patterns and open up to better
relationships. You won’t mind being challenged by others.
King Features Syndicate
Blondie
Brewster rockit: space Guy!
Beetle Bailey
garfield
Curtis
sherman’s lagoon
B.C.
DEAR ABBY
Dear Abby:
My boyfriend’s best
friend asked if we could
drive an hour to visit
them and their children
on Saturday. I’ve met her
twice, and we have chatted a bit online. I have
met her fiance only once.
My boyfriend just told
me she wants to take off
with him to a bar for a
birthday drink — or two
— while I stay at home
with her fiance. When I
heard about it, I said I am
not OK with being excluded. He understood
and agreed they would
take a walk around the
block instead.
When I texted her
saying I didn’t want to be
ditched, she insisted that
I need to share him, and
her fiance is looking forward to getting to know
me better. She also tried
to guilt me, saying it’s her
birthday weekend.
I think she’s rude. Can
you please weigh in on
the etiquette?
Unexpected Plans
Dear Unexpected:
You appear to be the
“new kid
on the
block,”
while your
boyfriend,
his best
ABBY
friend and
the fiance
have known one another
a long time. The purpose
of getting together is for
all concerned to have an
enjoyable time. If you
wouldn’t feel comfortable
in the situation as it was
described, you shouldn’t
have been pressured to
agree, regardless of
whether it’s her birthday
weekend. She was wrong
to do that, and yes, it was
rude.
Dear Abby:
My son was in a serious accident, which left
him with a head injury as
well as other physical
problems. Since then he
has also had anxiety
attacks, paranoia and a
profound dislike of me.
We went from a close
relationship to a shattered one.
We have had no contact
for three months, and I
won’t initiate it. I love
him and this is breaking
my heart. Please advise
me.
Unhappy Mama in the West
Dear Unhappy Mama:
Although HIPAA regulations prevent you from
speaking with his doctors, nothing prevents
you from writing them a
letter if you think there’s
something they need to
know.
You’d be wise to seek
professional counseling
for yourself now. No one
can predict whether your
son will regain his emotional balance, and it’s
important you have all
the emotional support
you need for your loss. In
a very real sense, it is a
loss, the loss of the son
you knew. A licensed
therapist can give you
insight on how to move
forward.
DearAbby.com
Dear Abby
P.O. Box 69440
Los Angeles, CA 90069
Andrews McMeel Syndication
HINTS FROM HELOISE
Dear Heloise:
I did it again: I ran out
of diapers! I think nearly
every parent has, at one
point or another. I started
storing diapers and wipes
in the glove compartment, to be used only in
an emergency. It has been
a lifesaver on more than
one occasion.
Pam L., Beaverton, Ore.
Dear Heloise:
I tried a scrub for my
face, and it’s wonderful!
My skin is
smoother
and brighter-looking.
One tablespoon of
HELOISE
sugar and
2 tablespoons of olive oil —
that’s all it took!
Jane, Dorset, England
Dear Heloise:
As a makeup artist, I
see many women on the
street who do not blend
their makeup properly.
Don’t just apply blush;
get a clean, soft brush
and blend it out toward
the hairline. If you’ve
applied too much blush,
lightly powder over it
with your face powder.
No more harsh lines.
Joanna N., Burbank, Calif.
Heloise.com
Heloise
P.O. Box 795000
San Antonio, TX 78279
King Features Syndicate
rex MorGan, M.D.
phantoM
argyle sweater
hoCus foCus
D6
| Monday, May 7, 2018 | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Houston Chronicle
HH
COMICS
famiLy CiRCus
Ziggy
Zits
mutts
dustin
PeaRLs BefoRe sWine
BaBy BLues
diLBeRt
Peanuts
BReaking Cat neWs
Luann
RHymes WitH oRange
HeaRt of tHe City
Wumo
Hi & Lois
CRanksHaft
BaLdo
funky WinkeRBean
Red & RoveR
saLLy foRtH
f minus
e tra
Houston Chronicle
PERSONAL FINANCE
May 7, 2018
WHAT’S
IT TAKE
TO RECRUIT
MILLENNIALS?
Tammy Ljungblad/
Kansas City Star
Perks. Lots of perks: Workout rooms.
Massages. Help with student loans.
Pages 4-5
Car subscriptions offer drivers an alternative. Page 3
How ‘imposter scams’ ensnare the elderly. Page 8
Z2 | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com x x x
Personal finance
T
How to build your ‘Oh, crap!’ fund
he emergency fund is a
bust.
Millions of Americans
don’t have one, and some
of those who do resist
tapping what they’ve saved. I’d
like to propose an alternative
for both sets of people: The “oh,
crap!” fund, a savings account
for not-quite-emergency expenses.
One of the reasons people
don’t have emergency funds is
misplaced optimism. People
think that if they’re healthy,
they’ll stay healthy. If they’re
employed, ditto. The car will
keep running, the roof will never
need to be replaced and, since
everybody’s a better-than-average driver, there won’t be any
accidents. Behavioral scientists
call that “recency bias,” which
is the delusion that whatever
happened in the recent past
will continue into the indefinite
future.
Everyone, though, has experienced “oh, crap!” moments: the
no-parking sign they didn’t see,
the crown the dentist says they
need, the smartphone dropped
in the toilet. A relatively small
amount in such a fund can keep
people from turning to expensive credit cards or payday
loans.
“The power of just a few
hundred dollars of savings can
really help reduce the use of
short-term, high-cost lending,”
says John Thompson, chief
program officer for the Center
for Financial Services Innovation, a nonprofit that promotes
financial health.
Having a cushion is particularly important if you’re a
homeowner. In a recent Harris
Poll survey commissioned by
NerdWallet, nearly two-thirds
of homeowners say they’ve
experienced anxiety about their
LIZ WESTON
Nerd Wallet
home, with unexpected home
repair costs the top cause of
anxiety.
The “oh, crap!” fund is designed to be spent, not hoarded.
Emergency funds are meant to
be spent, too, but people are often reluctant to part with money
labeled as savings, says financial
literacy expert and Rutgers
University professor Barbara
O’Neill.
“People hate to experience
losses, (and) pulling money out
of a savings account feels like a
loss,” O’Neill says.
Many people also give up on
the idea of an emergency fund
because any money they manage
to put aside is quickly wiped out
by unexpected expenses. They
don’t realize that the emergency
fund did its job by keeping those
expenses from going on a credit
card, or that saving for unexpected expenses is a “rinse and
repeat” deal. You don’t just hit
a savings goal and you’re done.
You save, you spend, and then
you save again.
The “oh, crap!” fund can help
people build that muscle. It can
be viewed as a transactional
account with constant additions
and subtractions as life unfolds.
The fund also can help people
who already have savings they
don’t want to touch except in big
emergencies, such as a job loss.
The first “oh, crap!” goal can
be pretty modest, say $500. For
AUTOMATE IT,
IF YOU CAN
Those with regular paychecks
and bank accounts can set up
automatic transfers, so $10 or
$20 or whatever amount you
like gets swept into a savings
account each pay period. Or you
can use technology that automatically rounds up your purchases to the nearest dollar and
deposits the money in savings.
Bank of America’s Keep the
Change debit card and Chime, a
mobile bank account, both offer
this option. Or try Digit, an app
that analyzes your spending and
moves unneeded funds to a savings account.
IF YOU CAN’T AUTOMATE,
MAKE A RULE
Decide to put aside a set dollar amount or percentage from
every check or other income
you receive. Examples: “I’ll save
$10 from every paycheck and 10
percent of any windfalls.”
Hector Casanova / Kansas City Star
those new to saving, here’s how
to get there.
SET UP A DEDICATED
ACCOUNT
Consider using an online
bank, since most don’t have
minimum balance requirements
or account fees and they’ll let
you name the account almost
anything you’d like (although
anything stronger than the
word “crap” might get you a
“tut tut — let’s keep it clean”
auto-response from the bank).
Some prepaid cards, such as
American Express Bluebird and
WalMart MoneyCard, have a
savings feature if you don’t use
bank accounts.
DON’T STOP
Once you’re in the habit of
saving, keep going. Your next
goal can be $2,000, which is
the median cost of the largest
financial shock experienced by
households studied by the Pew
Charitable Trusts. After that,
you can shoot for the traditional
emergency fund recommendation of building a fund equal to
three months’ worth of expenses.
Even as you do, though, you
may still want to keep a separate
fund for those everyday mishaps. Because crap happens.
Liz Weston is a columnist at
NerdWallet, a certified financial
planner and author of “Your
Credit Score.”
xxx
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Z3
Personal finance
Car subscriptions offer an alternative
By Carroll Lachnit |
Edmunds
P
eople use monthly subscriptions to pay for lots
of things they used to
buy: music, smartphones,
books and even clothes.
Why not cars?
That’s the thinking behind car
subscription services that are
cropping up in Los Angeles, San
Francisco, the New York metro
area, Atlanta, and several other
cities in the South and Midwest.
For a monthly fee and a minimal commitment, you get a car
with a warranty, maintenance,
roadside assistance, a prescribed
mileage allowance and, typically,
insurance.
Several carmakers have
launched subscription services:
Access by BMW, Book by Cadillac, Porsche Passport, Care
by Volvo, and Canvas, which
offers Ford and Lincoln models.
Mercedes-Benz’s Collection
service starts in June.
Car dealership groups and
startup companies also are
latching onto the idea. With the
exception of Volvo, the cars are
not brand new, but with a few
exceptions, they are from the
current or just-prior model year.
Only Care by Volvo is available nationally. But companies
are expanding their service
areas, so if there isn’t a program
near you now, there might be
soon.
All the services stress convenience and freedom. But none
claim to be the cheapest way to
have a car. (That would be buying a used car and driving it until
the wheels fall off.) Most services
also restrict how you can use
their vehicles. In many programs, for example, pets must
ride in crates. To track mileage,
and to get the car back if someone defaults on payment, some
BMW of North America via AP
The 2018 BMW M5, one of the cars that BMW is making available in the $3,700-per-month tier of
its Access by BMW car subscription service.
services install GPS trackers.
HOW SUBSCRIPTIONS
WORK
Most often, you apply via an
app or a website, agree to a check
of your driving record, and enter
credit card information. Some
services also do a “soft” credit
check.
If you’re approved, you pay
a startup fee of around $500.
The monthly fees range from
$250 to $3,700, depending on the
program and the car. Almost
always, a concierge delivers the
vehicle you’ve selected, freshly
detailed.
SUBSCRIPTION
VARIETIES
There are variations, but here
are three common subscription
models:
“Flip” services: These allow
car changes, sometimes unlim-
ited, within a month. When the
programs are run by a carmaker,
such as BMW, Cadillac, Porsche
or Mercedes-Benz, you choose
from that company’s vehicles.
When they’re run by a dealership group or startup, you have
access to cars from different
makers. Monthly costs range
from $800 or more in dealership
programs to $3,700 for BMW’s
highest tier: its M performance
vehicles.
One-car services: This is Care
by Volvo’s approach. It offers
an all-inclusive two-year lease
for the forthcoming 2019 Volvo
XC40 at a cost of $600 or $700
per month, depending on the
trim level. That includes insurance and maintenance. When
the redesigned 2019 Volvo V60
debuts, it also will be available
through a subscription. Lexus
has said it will offer its UX subcompact crossover SUV through
a subscription when the car
debuts later this year.
“Stay awhile” services:
Canvas and Fair, two Californiabased startups, offer pricing
that makes cars more affordable if you stay in them longer.
Monthly prices start at around
$400 for Canvas, assuming a
one-year subscription. If you
picked a shorter duration for
your subscription, the monthly
price goes up. Fair’s cars start at
around $235 per month with a
start-up fee that’s about 2.5 times
that of the monthly fee, making a
subscription more cost effective
if the start-up fee is spread over a
longer period of time.
COMPARING COSTS
Since services and users vary
so much, there’s no universal
answer as to whether subscriptions are cheaper than buying or
leasing.
Take, for instance, the difference between subscribing and
leasing a 2017 Cadillac Escalade.
Book by Cadillac charges $1,800
a month to its subscribers plus
a $500 sign-up fee. For that,
you’d get 2,000 miles a month
and could change cars up to 18
times a year. If you were to lease
the same vehicle, your monthly
payment would be $1,500 plus
the $500 sign-up fee, assuming
the same 2,000 miles per month.
But you would also have to pay
for insurance, which by one
Edmunds’ estimate would add
another $375 to your monthly
tab.
The winner? Book by Cadillac.
Now take the difference
between subscriptions versus
buying used. We chose a 2015
Ford Escape in the Titanium
trim level from Canvas, with
1,250 miles allotted per month.
For a one-year subscription, the
monthly cost worked out to $580,
including taxes. That compares
with $461 per month to buy a
comparable certified pre-owned
2015 Escape, assuming a fiveyear, zero-down loan, plus $240
per month for insurance by one
Edmunds’ estimate, for a total
monthly cost of $701.
The winner in this scenario
in terms of monthly payments
is Canvas. On the other hand,
if you had financed the Escape,
you’d own it at the end of five
years.
EDMUNDS SAYS
If you want a car with a minimal commitment, a subscription can make sense. Run the
numbers and read the fine print
before you sign up.
Carroll Lachnit is a senior
consumer advice editor at
Edmunds.
Z4 | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com x x x
xxx
Personal fi
What companies want: millennials. What th
By Rick Montgomery |
The Kansas City Star
I
t’s a culinary school and a fitness
complex. On some days, it’s a farmers
market.
“This is the culmination of everything you’ve been waiting for,” pitches
Cerner Corp.’s website dedicated to
the upcoming crop of college graduates.
In its nonstop hunt for young talent,
what Kansas City’s medical-data giant
does not pitch very hard is that it’s a
corporation.
Employers everywhere know that millions of millennials favor independence
and choice. On laptops they can launch
start-ups from a couch. Famous for
protesting the ways of Wall Street, many
are drawn to Uber, eBay, freelancing and
other parts of a burgeoning gig economy
that lets them earn a living without answering to The Man.
But their skills are needed.
So companies seeking young proCerner’s Innovations Campus in Kansas City.
Tammy Ljungblad / Kansas City Star
Pavani Gioranth, a software engineer a
fessionals are crafting benefits to help
class alongside other employees over t
employees be purposeful, proud and
campus. The fitness facility, which is fr
At Pro Athlete Inc., a Northland-based James Taylor.
tant Intuit, that number will more that
personal.
As for that free breastonline retailer of sporting goods, unlimdouble by 2020.
Not minions.
milk delivery, fellow music major Jelica
ited paid time off - so long as your tasks
The challenge for conventional emHuman resource managers say benefit
organically grown pr
Montelongo was not impressed.
are done - is part of its “empowerment
ployers is to coax this generation into the
options should integrate job life, home
financial planning.
“If I had a newborn and was off on
culture.”
office 9 to 5.
life and social life to address the “whole
Elders might grum
a business trip, I’m not sure I’d trust a
Besides creating an environment
For some time, the Grant Thornton acperson” rather than just the one in the
tion who grew up pam
company delivering my milk,” Montein which Pro Athlete workers wish to
counting firm has been among the more
cubicle.
and participation trop
longo said. “I’d just rather an employer
innovative of major employers rolling out stay - most are in their 20s or 30s - plum
This is the year to do it. The 2018
be coddled in their ca
have a policy that I don’t have to travel
benefits make sense from a practical
appealing perks.
graduation season ushers into the workployers see it differen
far if I’m breastfeeding. Maybe that’s the
standpoint: Today’s techies can be be
Here’s the latest: free breast-milk
force the tail end of the largest American
“Millennials are ex
better benefit.”
tomorrow’s competitors.
delivery.
generation of all time. And they’re facing
work experience, and
Debt, pets, ID theft
After all, “anyone these days can
New moms at Grant Thornton can
arguably the best job market that the
workers positively,” s
Many companies have buffed up
download Shopify and be running
pump while on business trips and have
under-35 demographic has ever known.
director of global tale
packages to include assistance to relieve
their own online (stores) in a matter of
the milk shipped overnight to their baThough this generation’s bookend
the Kansas City head
crushing student loans, free gym memmonths,” said chief operating officer
bies in Kansas City.
ages have always teetered, the nonprofit
Veatch engineers.
berships, smartphone discounts, protecAndrew Dowis, himself a millennial at
The company has a deal with a CaliPew Research Center set the years of
Some ideas have co
tion against identity theft and paid time
age 33.
fornia outfit called Milk Stork to address
birth between 1981 and 1996. That places
company calls its “yo
off for staff to attend charity causes.
Pro Athlete perks that older workers
a practical dilemma for young working
more than 56 million millennials in the
employees resource g
“There’s a social aspect to the work
would likely never expect include no-cost
mothers. That’s in addition to benefits
job market, now outnumbering baby
larly meets and swap
environment that we think is important”
such as unlimited days off and $100 reim- health coverage, weekly massages and
boomers.
Newer benefits acr
to younger employees, said Julie Wilson,
bursements for adopting rescue animals. free meals all day at work.
The youngest are about 21 and are
include:
executive vice president and “chief
Still, newfangled benefits may not be
Workplace recruits anymore “want
wrapping up four-year degrees.
- Help with studen
people officer” at Cerner Corp.
the ticket to get young, creative profesemployers to recognize all those imporIn 2015, the U.S. workforce’s “onIn 2013, the Society of
The social aspect includes Cerner
sionals in the door.
tant aspects of their lives and not just
demand” revolution lured 3.2 million
Managers reported on
campuses offering monthly cooking
“The thing that draws me the most is
their life at work,” said Jessica Robino,
people, mostly millennials, to Uber,
employers offered ass
classes, dog-walking services, days
making decent money,” said University
human resources manager at Grant
Amazon Flex and other app-driven gig
debt repayment. It’s s
in which local farmers bring in their
of Missouri-Kansas City music student
platforms. According to software consul- Thornton’s downtown office.
the hotter trends in b
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Z5
xxx
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Z5
l finance
By Rick Montgomery |
The Kansas City Star
hey’re offering: massages, student loan help
gineer at Cerner’s Innovations Campus, takes a Zumba
er the lunch hour at the Healthy Fitness center on the
h is free to employees, is a benefit to young workers.
financial planning.
roduce and personal
mble that a generampered with praise
ophies must now
areers. But many emntly.
xpecting a different
d that’s affecting all
said Chris Gould,
ent acquisition at
dquarters of Black &
ome from what the
oung professional
group,” which regups emails.
ross the region
nt loan obligations.
f Human Resource
only 3 percent of
sistance for collegesince become one of
benefit packaging.
Plans vary, but the idea is to help new recruits reduce student debt quicker either
through outright payments or professional management.
According to a recent survey by the
Boston-based nonprofit American
Student Assistance, 76 percent of college
students said such offers would be a
deciding factor in accepting a job, as the
average debt on a bachelor’s degree is
around $30,000.
- Identity theft protection. Last year,
a surge of well-publicized cybersecurity
breaches prompted employers to jump
on this inexpensive benefit - one especially relevant to workers whose lives
have revolved around digital devices and
social media.
Nearly seven out of 10 human resources departments in a 2017 poll reported
evaluating identity theft coverage for
employees, whether on or off the job. “A
hacked employee is a distracted employee,” says the website of the security
vendor CyberScout.
Lokesh Ravichandran works out over his lunch hour at the Healthy Fitness
Center at Cerner’s Innovations Campus. Ravichandran, an associate senior
software engineer, said the workout re-energizes him.
The Federal Trade Commission has
found that some theft victims can spend
more than 1,200 hours putting their lives
back in order - time spent not working.
For a few bucks a month, companies are
providing apps that monitor and alert
subscribers to unusual credit and data
activity.
- Backup child care. For parents in
an unexpected pinch - on school days or
when a sitter is ill - “backup child care
can provide care the day of the need,”
said Grant Thornton’s Robino, who is
president of the Kansas City-area chapter
of SHRM. “There are options for centerprovided care or in-home care.”
- Flexibility. Working from home is
old-school, but unlimited vacation time?
“They have to get their work done on
time,” explained Pro Athlete’s Dowis.
“But millennials don’t like to be micromanaged. So long as they get their work
done, we don’t care when they ask for
time off.
“They don’t want to abuse the unlim-
ited PTO benefit (paid time off) because
they know they’re fortunate to have it.”
Black & Veatch offers a plan called
9-80, which allows employees to complete two weeks of work in nine business
days so they can take every other Friday
off.
Increasingly, flexibility applies as well
to the entirety of benefit packages.
“You’re not in a one-size-fits-all model
anymore,” said Cerner’s Wilson, noting
that younger employees especially expect
to pick and choose.
At all hours inside the 17,000-squarefoot fitness center at Cerner’s new south
Kansas City campus, employees mostly
in their 20s or 30s work up a sweat. They
dance to Zumba. Company-issued apps
offer personalized exercise regimens,
addressing the worries of many recruits
that desk jobs could affect their posture
and overall wellness. The center is also
available for free to family members and
dependents.
Younger employees also seem more
eager than their elders to attend company
classes. A 2014 Metlife study found that
51 percent of millennials “strongly value”
educational programs directed at managing their personal finances and even
planning their retirement. Only 39 percent of boomers valued those programs.
“When millennials hit the workforce, they hit in such large numbers,”
said Robino. “They had the negotiating
power.”
Do benefits matter?
At a UMKC cafeteria, three freshman
friends recently cramming in a light meal
said nice benefit packages weren’t so
important. They just seek secure, wellpaying jobs.
Pet insurance?
“I’m not a pet person,” said Ryan
Milanovich, 19.
Super-flexible time off? Meh.
Let’s say you can take as much vacation whenever you want provided you’ve
fulfilled your work duties.
“When is anyone’s work really done?”
replied Montelongo, also 19.
The one benefit trend that grabbed
these students was assistance in paying
off student loans.
For Kansas City start-up founder
Benten Woodring, 28, the best benefit is
being able to work at his own pace and
enjoy time with his two toddlers.
Eight months ago, the Benten Design
owner left a company that offered decent
benefits but needed him to work nights
and weekends.
“Now I have a ton of flex time,” said
Woodring, a graphic artist.
But to launch a business in your 20s is
not easy, nor inexpensive. And the Ewing
Marion Kauffman Foundation, which
tries to help entrepreneurs do it, says
college debt is driving more people to a
conventional workplace.
U.S. Census data show new business
creation - including one-person startups - dropping to about 450,000 in 2015,
down 25 percent from the peak years of
the early 2000s.
The foundation’s Larry Jacob said
corporate benefits help attract graduates,
but the greater desire is to start paying off
their debts.
Z6 | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com x x x
Personal fi
Sharon Hallback, 65, left her job to care for her
mother in 2009. Since re-entering the job market, she
has found it hard to find work. She found help with
the AARP job training program in Hollywood, Fla.
Her plight is common among baby boomers.
Taimy Alvarez / Ft. Lauderdale Sun Sentinel
xxx
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Z7
l finance
For some boomers, delaying
retirement isn’t worth it
By Paul Gores |
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
F
our months into retirement, Jim
Guenther has no regrets.
An accountant, he carefully calculated how much money he and his
younger wife — who is still working
— would need when he called it a career
in January, a couple of days after his 66th
birthday.
Guenther, of New Berlin, Wis., felt like
he was running out of energy as the head
of Economics Wisconsin, an agency that
helps schools and teachers instruct kids
about economics and money.
He said it was possible that he could
become bored with retirement, and want
to work again.
“But I sure don’t feel that way now,”
Guenther said. “I don’t want to do anything. This is pretty cool.”
Guenther is among the first wave of
baby boomers — Americans born between 1946 and 1964 — who have reached
traditional retirement age and wasted little
time before saying goodbye to the working
world.
It’s a group that a new study by MetLife
Inc says so far has defied the popular belief
that baby boomers will be working longer
than planned because their retirement
savings got trashed in the stock market
downturn.
“Despite the conventional wisdom that
boomers are ready to ‘work forever’ and
significantly extend their formal working
career, many of the oldest boomers are
already well into the retirement phase,” the
study says.
The MetLife study is a follow-up to a
2008 report that looked at the same segment of boomers at age 62, and includes
450 of the same interview subjects from the
original study.
The study says 59 percent of the first
boomers to turn 65 are at least partially
retired. Forty-five percent are completely
retired, and 14 percent are retired but
working part-time.
Of those still working, 37 percent say
they will retire in the next year and, on average, plan to do so by the time they’re 68.
Almost 63 percent already are collecting
Social Security retirement benefits.
Almost all of the retirees — 96 percent —
said they like retirement at least somewhat, and 70 percent like it a lot.
Kelli B. Send is not surprised by the apparent eagerness of baby boomers to retire.
“I just don’t see a lot of people stay beyond 65, even though they say that’s going
to be the trend,” said Send, who as senior
vice president for Pewaukee, Wis.-based
Francis Investment Counsel talks regularly with individual workers about managing their 401(k) plans at companies that are
clients of her firm.
She said workers insist they want to
retire by 65 — even those who wouldn’t appear to have enough money saved up for it.
“I think what they’re saying to themselves is, ‘You know, I may not have the
standard of living that I once could, but I’m
going to retire anyway because I’m sick of
working, and I’ll just figure out a way to
make it work,’ “ she said.
She said many people seem to believe
that once they become eligible for Medicare at 65 and start getting Social Security
payments, they’ll “make the rest of the
math work.”
It’s too soon to know whether that
optimistic approach will be successful in
reality for the first boomer retirees, but
there’s reason to be skeptical.
A survey last year by the mutual fund
company Vanguard found that the average
401(k) retirement plan balance for those 65
and older was about $163,000.
“There’s a rule of thumb that you can
pull out about 5 percent of your money
a year — some advisers will tell you 4
percent — but in the range of 4 percent to 5
percent,” Send said. “So for every $100,000
you’ve got put away, it buys you an income
of $5,000.”
Even with Social Security and a pension
payment — if there is one — that seems
likely to mean some serious lifestyle
adjustments for those who haven’t saved
enough.
Last year, a study done for The Wall
Street Journal found that the median
household headed by a person 60 to 62
with a 401(k) account has less than onequarter of what is needed in that account to
maintain its standard of living in retirement.
Nonetheless, Send said a recurring
theme she hears during her sessions with
rank-and-file employees is that many
yearn for “life after work.”
“I think so much of it is that people have
worked their whole life and they’ve got
things they want to do, and they’d like to
hurry up and get doing them,” she said.
Among retired respondents in the
MetLife study, which surveyed 1,012 people
born in 1946 and had a 3 percent margin
of error, the biggest reason by far given for
retiring was simply, “Reached retirement
age/wanted to.”
J. Bernard Fiedler, president of wealth
management services for Waukesha (Wis.)
State Bank, said saving for retirement is “a
20- or 30-year hitch,” and it takes planning
to make the post-working years comfortable.
“You’ve got a division between people
who have planned and they’re set, and
those who flat-out just stick their head in
the sand,” Fiedler said.
Fiedler said one unfortunate surprise
for those who haven’t saved enough and
expect to keep working beyond 65 — or
realize they need to go back to work after
they retire — is that employers don’t necessarily want them back.
The unemployment rate remains high,
and many companies have spent the past
few years offering buyouts to entice older
or higher-paid employees to quit.
In the MetLife survey, a third of those
still working said they have decided to
delay retirement, mainly because they
need to continue receiving a salary to pay
for day-to-day expenses.
The study also says the average age at
retirement for those who have already
stopped working was 59.7 for men and 57.2
for women.
Send says she’s found that for many
boomers, the delay in retirement has been
not so much putting it off to 67 or later, but
rather, putting it off until 65 from 62, which
is when they really had hoped to hang it
up.
“They say, ‘My goal before the market
tanked and before everything happened
was to be done at 62,’ “ Send said. “The
goal, for the most part, is being recalibrated
to 65.
“It’s really much more about that.”
Z8 | Monday, May 7, 2018 |
Houston Chronicle | HoustonChronicle.com and chron.com x x x
Personal finance
Nearly fell for an ‘impostor scam’
By Erin Arvedlund |
Philly.com
I
f you’ve ever feared your elderly
mother or father might be scammed
over the phone, then consider the story
of Arthur Halprin, 82, retired physics
professor living in Newark, Del.
A “sharp cookie” and a brilliant teacher, say friends and family, Halprin was
swayed by a flimflam aimed at the elderly,
known as the “impostor scam.”
One morning last month, he got a
horrific call from a strange number. It
was a man who claimed he’d kidnapped
Halprin’s adult son, who resides on the
Main Line. The man said he was holding Halprin’s son at gunpoint and was
demanding $5,000 in ransom.
“Dad, please help me!” was the first
thing Halprin heard.
“I’ve never been taken (in) by any computer or other scams like the Microsoft or
the IRS. I knew those were phony,” Halprin said. “This one I’d never heard about.
It’s one that you can’t take a chance on. A
voice called my cellphone, and the person
sounded enough like my son to me, it was
believable. That’s the way it started.”
“Then someone else got on the phone,
asked me, ‘Is there anyone else around
you?’ I said ‘no.’ ”
In truth, his companion, Shelley Sarsfield, was listening from the other room.
But Halprin didn’t want to lose contact.
For the next hour, the caller kept
Halprin on the line. “I wrote down on a
piece of paper that ‘criminals have Dan,’
and gave it to her. I left the house in my
slippers still and got in the car” to drive to
the bank.
From her telling, Shelley Sarsfield, 68,
was instantly suspicious.
“I was there when the phone call
came in. We’d had breakfast and I heard
Arthur talking loudly. He’s normally very
soft-spoken, but he’d been concerned
about the stock market, so I thought perhaps he was talking to his broker about
Tesla’s stock price.”
Halprin handed her a crumpled piece
of paper.
Eric Chapman / Bradenton Herald
“I knew it was a scam,” she recalled.
“I’d heard about the ‘grandparent scam,’
when con artists pretend to be someone’s
grandchild and call up asking for bail
money. But his son is 47 years old! I knew
it was wrong, but I couldn’t get Arthur to
listen. It was his son’s life at stake. And
they wouldn’t let him put down the phone
— that’s part of the con.”
Halprin’s son works for a nonprofit in
Philadelphia, so Sarsfield called his son
immediately. Luckily, he answered and
told her he was at work and perfectly fine.
“I insisted he call me back on Facetime
to prove he wasn’t under duress. Then I
called the police,” she said.
Halprin, meanwhile, drove to the bank
and withdrew $5,000 in cash — without
any questions from his bank teller. Then
the caller directed him to the closest
Walmart to wire the money to Puerto Rico.
Sarsfield couldn’t get Halprin on the
line, but she asked the Philadelphia police
to connect with their local counterparts,
aided by Halprin’s license plate number
and a physical description. She also heard
the scammers demand he wire money
from the nearest Walmart.
Halprin, indeed, made it to the Walmart
nearest his house, and while standing in
line, “I did finally see a text message from
Shelley, saying ‘Dan is OK.’ I wasn’t sure
how she knew this. But even while on the
phone with the scammers, it made me
pause just long enough at Walmart for a
policeman to come up to me in line. He
asked if I was Arthur Halprin, and said
‘Your son is OK; this is a scam.’ I breathed
a sigh of relief. I still had the scam artist on
the phone. The cop got on and said ‘this is
sergeant so-and-so. Go ahead and shoot
Dan if you want.’ They hung up.”
Halprin was minutes away from wiring $5,000 to a stranger. So why did he fall
for the flimflam after hanging up on so
many others?
“This was one where potentially
someone’s life was on the line. It wasn’t
the threat of jail or taxes. It was my son’s
life. There was just — I couldn’t risk it.
Whatever suspicion I had, I had to bury,
I couldn’t be sure. They knew my son’s
name. They figured out who my kids are.
It was a very close call.”
Financial advisers such as Dan Roccato at Quaker Wealth Management in
Moorestown say the root of the crimes
“is love or loneliness. Imagine you’re an
80-year-old widow or widower, and you
don’t have a lot of human interaction.
You get a phone call from your grandson
you haven’t seen or talked to in a long
time and you love them, so you send the
money.”
About 550,000 people who gave their
age reported fraud to the FTC in 2017,
a fraction of the true victims. Of those,
more than 107,000 were age 60 to 69; more
than 62,000 were 70-79, and more than
28,000 were older than 80. Among the top
frauds? Impostor scams.
To prevent such crimes, Roccato
advises friends and family members to
make sure the elderly person in your life
“isn’t on his own or her own all day every
day. Even just a phone call, a text, a visit is
important so that person feels a connection is still there.”
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