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Los Angeles Times – May 07, 2018

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$2.75 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER
© 2018 WSCE
latimes.com
MONDAY, MAY 7, 2018
Trump
could
plead
5th in
probe
Attorney Giuliani says
president would not
‘have to’ obey special
counsel subpoena in
Russia investigation.
By Laura King
Bruce Omori Paradise Helicopters
KI L AU E A’S F I E RY B R E AT H
Volcanic activity continues along Mt. Kilauea’s East Rift Zone on Hawaii Island. A robust fissure eruption in the Leilani Estates
neighborhood sends a massive lava flow into the subdivision, consuming everything in its path near Pahoa, Hawaii. NATION, A5
2018 ELECTIONS: GOVERNOR’S RACE
Chiang vs. ‘Governator’
2008 clash over state
worker pay is central
to candidate’s story.
By Melanie Mason
Al Seib Los Angeles Times
BARBARA FERRER of L.A. County’s health de-
partment says youth aren’t to blame for STD rates.
Can overcoming
the stigma of sex
help curb STDs?
Experts say cultural
changes — not just
individual behavior —
can improve health.
By Soumya
Karlamangla
The teenagers tucked
their hands into their sweatshirt pockets as they shuffled to form a circle. Some
gazed at the asphalt, trying
to avoid the game they had
been drafted to play.
“It’s like hot potato/musical chairs, but with a penis,”
said the girl leading the
group.
The kids gathered on a
spring morning in South Los
Angeles were about to get a
hands-on lesson in sex education.
Many health experts say
that public health problems
are best tackled outside the
doctor’s office — that fixing
the culture that perpetuates
them is more effective than
changing a single patient’s
behavior. For sexual health,
that means combating the
stigma around sex.
The teenagers, the girl
explained, would pass a
plastic,
life-size
penis
around the circle. Whoever
was holding it when the music stopped would have to
unroll a condom onto it,
completing each of the eight
steps they had been taught a
few minutes earlier.
The music started, and
the teens looked up.
The recent all-day event,
called Spring Into Love, was
intended to get high schoolers more comfortable talking about sex. The hope is
that an open dialogue will
make them more likely to
seek out condoms and STD
testing, and eventually reduce the spread of disease.
The focus on stigma is
just one of many ways Los
Angeles County health officials are trying to think outside the box as they struggle
to curb rising STD rates. It’s
clear that the traditional
[See STDs, A12]
L.A.’s most
valuable arm
is sidelined
Allen J. Schaben L.A. Times
UC workers
are set to strike
Campuses plan to stay
open during a three-day
walkout by 50,000.
Dodgers ace Clayton
Kershaw lands on 10-day
disabled list with biceps
tendinitis as the team
limps through finish of
11-game trip. SPORTS, D1
Weather
Clouds to sunshine.
L.A. Basin: 78/58. B6
SACRAMENTO — As
political matchups go, it was
an incongruous one: the
bodybuilder-turned-Terminator-turned-governor
against the bespectacled
numbers geek. One of the
most famous men in the
world versus — um, what’s
that guy’s name again?
The 2008 showdown
pitted then-Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger
against
John Chiang, California’s
Democratic state controller
at the time. The governor,
facing a budget logjam, ordered a hefty cut in state
worker pay to the federal
minimum wage — then $6.55
an hour — but Chiang refused to comply.
That touched off a signa-
ture moment in Chiang’s
two decades of elected office
in California. His defiance
set off a protracted legal battle, irked the Republican
Schwarzenegger administration and won Chiang fans
among powerful public sector unions.
It was a defining episode
in Chiang’s political career,
and one that suggested bigger political ambitions for
the son of Taiwanese immigrants who once worked as
[See Chiang, A11]
WASHINGTON — President Trump’s attorney
Rudolph W. Giuliani, who
has already roiled the White
House’s legal tussle with
adult film actress Stormy
Daniels, asserted Sunday
that the president would not
“have to” respond to a subpoena in the special counsel’s wide-ranging Russia investigation.
Giuliani, who joined the
president’s legal team two
weeks ago, also said that if
Trump does agree to be
questioned, he might invoke
his 5th Amendment right to
guard against self-incrimination by refusing to respond to some queries.
Speaking on ABC’s “This
Week,” Giuliani said Trump
was under no obligation to
obey a subpoena, saying “we
don’t have to comply” with
one.
“He’s the president of the
United States,” Giuliani
said. “We can assert the
same privilege that other
presidents have.”
He was referring to former President Clinton’s
choice to resist a subpoena
[See Giuliani, A9]
White
House’s
scandal
scholar
Lawyer Emmet Flood
helped Clinton and
worked for George W.
Bush, but will his new
client listen to him?
By Chris Megerian
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
ADDYSSON “ADDY” SOLTAU, shown at the NRA convention on Sat-
urday, started shooting three years ago. Her parents weren’t into guns.
LITTLE BIG SHOT
She’s a sharpshooter, a YouTube sensation and
a favorite at NRA convention — and she’s 9
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
DALLAS — The gaptoothed 9-yearold girl walked the floor of her first National Rifle Assn. convention, her blond
ponytail bobbing above earrings fashioned from bullet casings.
When Addysson “Addy” Soltau arrived at the Smith & Wesson booth, she
gravitated to a sleek silver .22 semiautomatic Victory pistol, a James Bond-
style gun with a silencer attached. It
was just out of reach. So her godfather
lifted it from the wall and handed it to
the girl, who gripped and sighted along
the gun like a pro. She already shoots an
M&P 15-22 rifle hanging nearby.
“That’s actually your next gun,” her
godfather, Johnny Campos, said of the
pistol. Addy gaped, overjoyed.
“Alpha Addy” became a YouTube
[See Girl, A7]
sensation
and
CALIFORNIA, B1
FACES OF NRA: A meeting, exhibition and political act all in one. A6
WASHINGTON — As a
postdoctoral fellow in 1988,
Emmet Flood burnished his
academic credentials when
International Philosophical
Quarterly published his
lengthy paper on “The Confessions of St. Augustine,”
the 13-volume, deeply introspective autobiography of
the early Christian saint who
saw himself as a sinner.
“God cannot be persuaded by rhetorical appeals,” Flood wrote. “He already knows the ‘facts’ of
Augustine’s
case;
and
furthermore, He has perfect
knowledge of all the possibilities of their presentation.”
Flood may find solace in
that perspective as President Trump’s newest lawyer.
He joins a White House
under siege from special
counsel Robert S. Mueller
III’s investigation into Russian political interference,
and a legal team buffeted by
resignations and a shootfrom-the-id client.
There’s also a potential
threat from Congress if
Democrats win back the
House in November and regain the power to blanket
the Oval Office with subpoenas, or even start impeachment hearings. Activists
such as billionaire donor
Tom Steyer are already
pushing to remove Trump
from office.
[See Lawyer, A8]
A2
MON DAY , MAY 7, 2018
LAT IMES. C OM
BACK STORY
Trump wants to scrap Iran
deal. What does that mean?
A deadline looms for a nuclear pact other world leaders say is working
By Tracy Wilkinson
President Trump long
has railed against the Iran
nuclear accord as “insane”
and the “worst ever,” even
though it has successfully
curbed Iran’s ability to
develop or build a nuclear
weapon since it went into
effect in early 2016.
Despite strong support
for the deal from all of
America’s major allies except Israel, Trump has set a
May 12 deadline to declare
whether he will withdraw —
or that the deal can be
“fixed” to his liking. He has
several options, so the fallout either way is not yet
clear.
Here are some things to
know about the accord —
and what is expected if
Trump decides to pull out.
Remind me: What is the
Iran nuclear deal and what
are Trump’s concerns?
In 2015, Iran negotiated
an accord with six world
powers: the United States,
Britain, Russia, France,
China and Germany. The
deal lifted crippling economic sanctions on Iran in
exchange for strict limits on
its nuclear development
program, which the international community feared
Tehran could use to build a
bomb.
The deal required Iran to
disable most of the centrifuges it used to enrich uranium, to ship out most of its
uranium stockpile, to ensure a heavy water reactor
could not produce weaponsgrade plutonium, and to
submit to monitoring and
verification by international
inspectors. The International Atomic Energy
Agency, the United Nations’
nuclear watchdog agency,
has issued 11 reports confirming Iran’s compliance
with the deal.
Critics say the deal gives
too much leeway to Iran by
setting time limits, called
sunset clauses, on key restrictions. Tehran can install more centrifuges after
10 years, for example, and
can resume research and
development after eight
years.
Trump has gone further,
slamming the deal because
it doesn’t also stop Iran’s
production of ballistic missiles or its support for militant groups in the Middle
East. The U.S. and its allies
maintain separate sanctions on Iran for those problems.
What is the May 12 deadline?
Congress requires the
president to recertify every
four months that Iran is
Jean-Christophe Bott European Pressphoto Agency
IRANIAN Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, right, shown with other
diplomats in 2015, said last week that Tehran would not renegotiate the deal.
complying with the deal, or
it could reimpose sanctions.
Trump has vowed not to
sign another sanctions
waiver, and May 12 is the
next deadline for that.
If he doesn’t renew the
waiver, Congress probably
would restore U.S. sanctions on Iran’s Central
Bank. Trump would have to
sign additional executive
orders, and take other legal
steps, to renew U.S. sanctions on about 400 other
formerly blacklisted Iranian
entities and individuals.
Some of that could happen within days. Some may
legally require new evidence
against the targets, and that
could take months.
Trump can do that without announcing that he is
withdrawing from the deal.
That would give wiggle
room for European allies to
negotiate restrictions on
Iran’s ballistic missiles
program and support for
regional militant groups.
It’s possible that Trump
could waive sanctions again,
to give diplomats a few more
months to “fix” the deal. But
judging from his harsh
criticism, that seems unlikely.
What would the impact be
if the president declined to
recertify the deal?
In a nutshell, it would
make it more difficult for
countries and companies to
do business with Iran.
Those who work through
the Central Bank, especially
importers of Iranian oil, risk
violating U.S. sanctions.
If Trump reimposes all
U.S. sanctions, many other
Iranian banks and sectors,
including the country’s
crucial petrochemical and
automotive industries,
would probably lose international partners.
Rejoining global markets
and banking systems and
rebuilding its economy were
major incentives for Iran to
give up its nuclear program.
Tehran already complains
that Washington is not
meeting its commitments
under the accord by blocking the country’s full participation in international
finance and commerce.
What would Iran do?
Here lies the most serious potential repercussion.
If the United States pulls
out completely, Tehran
could declare the deal dead,
blame Washington and
eventually resume its nuclear program.
Iranian Foreign Minister
Mohammad Javad Zarif
posted a five-minute video
on YouTube on Thursday to
restate his country’s opposition to Trump’s position,
saying Tehran would not
“renegotiate or add on to a
deal which we have already
implemented in good faith.”
In New York last month,
Zarif said that if the U.S.
withdrew, Tehran would
seriously consider “resuming at much greater speed
our nuclear activities,”
though he stopped short of
threatening to produce
weapons.
Iran also could respond
by ending or limiting the
inspections of its nuclear
facilities by the International Atomic Energy
Agency. “If the IAEA is
expelled, we will no longer
have eyes and ears on what’s
happening and may well
face Iran starting back on
the road to nuclear weapons,” said Wendy Sherman,
a former U.S. diplomat who
helped lead the U.S. negotiating team on the Iran deal.
What about the other countries that signed the deal?
All say they still support
the agreement and will try
to keep it alive if Trump
pulls out. That could be
tricky, because those governments and their companies would risk violating
U.S. sanctions. One possibility would be for Trump
to order “carve-outs” to
exempt the other signatories, especially the Europeans, from repercussions.
U.S. and European diplomats have met several
times to consider supplemental agreements or other
potential improvements to
meet Trump’s demands.
French President Emmanuel Macron and German
Chancellor Angela Merkel
made back-to-back visits to
the White House last month
to lobby Trump in person.
Macron told reporters there
was “no Plan B” if the deal
collapsed.
Russia has echoed the
European warnings. Trump
already is fighting China
over trade tariffs and wants
Beijing to help pressure
North Korea to give up its
nuclear arms. By opposing
China on the Iran deal,
Trump could weaken his
hand.
The U.N. Security Council
endorsed the deal unanimously. Would a withdrawal put the U.S. in violation
of a U.N. resolution?
Probably not. The
Trump administration
could claim that Iran has
violated the deal and that
other U.N. sanctions ought
to be reinstated. Although
the Security Council might
not agree, the U.S. would
veto any resolution saying
Iran is in compliance. The
U.S. also would veto any
attempt to condemn its
action.
tracy.wilkinson
@latimes.com
1,000 WORDS: MADRID
Felipe Dana Associated Press
RESCUE AT SEA
Spain’s maritime rescue service said Sunday that it saved 476 migrants who were attempting the perilous
crossing of the Mediterranean Sea from African shores. The migrants were pulled from 15 small boats on
Friday and Saturday, officials said. There were no reported casualties. Separately, a Spanish nonprofit
dedicated to helping migrants at sea rescued 105 more of them in waters near Libya during a mission Sunday. The aid group Proactiva Open Arms found the migrants, from Bangladesh, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria and
other countries, drifting at sea in a motorless boat. The migrants told an Associated Press photographer
aboard who documented the rescue that human smugglers sailing in a separate boat removed their boat’s
engine halfway through the dangerous Mediterranean crossing and left.
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
L AT I ME S . CO M
A3
THE WORLD
A ‘non-starter’ mission to China
Trump team’s visit
ends with little word.
Extent of demands on
trade baffles experts.
By Don Lee
WASHINGTON — Even
by President Trump’s unpredictable and bare-knuckles style of negotiating, his
economic team’s visit to Beijing in recent days to confront China on trade was
both bewildering and, for
many in both countries and
beyond, worrisome.
Worrisome because the
two-day meeting that concluded Friday showed that
the U.S. and China are miles
apart, making the threat of a
trade war very real. There
was no joint communique
afterward or any official
word on when, or whether,
they would meet again.
And bewildering because
the indications are that the
two sides talked past each
other, with Trump’s highlevel emissaries presenting
an eight-point set of demands that analysts called
so far-fetched that no country would accept it, let alone
China — a rising superpower
whose national pride is
wrapped up in a historical
narrative of overcoming
century-long subjugation by
foreign powers.
The
U.S.
demands,
spelled out as a draft framework for negotiations, not
only call for China to cut its
$337-billion trade surplus
with America by more than
half, $200 billion, and immediately halt state support
for President Xi Jinping’s
signature Made in China
2025 industrial policy. But
also, they say that Beijing
must refrain from retaliating or filing legal challenges
should the United States
slap tariffs or investment restrictions on China.
“That’s a non-starter for
any leader,” said Andy Rothman, an investment strategist at San Francisco-based
Matthews Asia and former
economic officer at the U.S.
Embassy in Beijing.
Then why would Trump’s
delegation of Cabinet members, including Treasury
Secretary
Steven
T.
Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and the
U.S. trade representative,
Robert Lighthizer, present
such an unrealistic set of
demands?
Neither Rothman nor
other analysts had an easy
answer, except to say that it
AFP/Getty Images
A STEELWORKER in China, which has been hit by U.S. tariffs on solar panels, steel and aluminum and may incur additional ones.
has become standard operating practice for Trump
to keep allies and adversaries alike guessing, with
surprising demands and
threats of severe actions.
Some of them, like Trump’s
campaign promise to label
China a currency manipulator right away, turned out to
be bluster.
“It is hard to assess
whether this was a kind of
‘fire and fury’ message intended to signal to the Chinese that they are dealing
with a very serious situation,” said Claire Reade, a
former assistant U.S. trade
representative for China
affairs.
“It is also possible that
the U.S. side knew it was a
complete non-starter, but
used the proposal to detail
China’s sins, demonstrate
China won’t fix them and
thereby further justify U.S.
actions against China.”
The outlook is muddied
by the president’s repeated
praise of Xi, especially for
ratcheting up economic
pressure on North Korea
and its leader, Kim Jong Un.
Trump plans to meet with
Kim by early June to discuss
a denuclearization of the
Korean peninsula, and the
president would not want
China to stand in the way of
his achieving a historic
breakthrough.
At the same time, the
Trump administration — if
not the president — has publicly cast China as an economic and military threat, an
adversary like Russia. And
to Beijing’s chagrin, the administration has taken steps
to draw closer to Taiwan, an
island that Beijing considers
a renegade province.
On Saturday, the White
House press secretary issued an unusually caustic
statement denouncing as
censorship and “Orwellian
nonsense” Beijing’s recent
demand that U.S. and other
foreign airliners change how
Taiwan, Hong Kong and
Macau are identified on
their websites, to make clear
they are not independent
entities.
On trade with China,
Trump has been consistent
in denouncing the Asian
giant’s huge trade surplus
with the United States and
its mercantilist economic
behavior. The administration has slapped tariffs on
Chinese solar panels, steel
and aluminum, and has
prepared a list of other Chinese products worth about
$50 billion that could be hit
with tariffs as punishment
for intellectual property
theft and the forced transfer
of technology to China by
U.S. companies as a condition of doing business there.
After Beijing responded
by proposing counter-tariffs
of commensurate value on
U.S. goods including soybeans, airplanes and cars,
Trump immediately called
for a possible tripling of the
potential duties against
Chinese goods.
“Trump is operating in
ways no other president has
in the past where there was a
coherent strategy,” Rothman said.
That includes diplomatic
protocol.
In a break from previous
high-level meetings with the
Chinese on trade and security matters, the Trump administration did not send an
advance team to do ground-
French President Francois
Hollande and former Prime
Minister Manuel Valls — in
office at the time of the attacks — expressed outrage.
“The shameful comments and obscene antics of
Donald Trump say a lot
about what he thinks about
France and her values,” Hollande wrote in a statement
in French. “The friendship
between our peoples will not
be stained by this disrespect
and outrageousness. My
thoughts are all for the victims of the Nov. 13 attacks.”
“Indecent and incompetent. What more is there to
say?” Valls tweeted.
Bernard Cazeneuve, who
was the interior minister at
the time of the attacks,
tweeted: “Indignation and
disgust after the statements
made by Donald Trump
about the November 13 attacks. Solidarity with the
victims ... the French are
shocked. This transgression, it’s disrespect.”
Philippe Duperron, president of the survivors association 13onze15 (named for
the date of the attack), told
television channel France 24
that victims were “outraged
by this level of indecency.”
“Alas, no weapon would
have altered the outcome
because they were suicide
bombers wearing explosive
belts who were going to blow
themselves up in the places
they attacked,” Duperron
said.
imports, ease up on some
joint-venture requirements
and open up its financial
services sector. But during
the talks, analysts said, Beijing apparently presented
its own hard-line demands,
that the U.S. relax restrictions on selling certain hightech goods to China and
drop
recent
sanctions
against the Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE.
The post-meeting reaction from both sides may
reflect a desire not to inflame tensions, but also
spoke volumes about how
far apart they are. Xi had
been expected to meet with
the delegation, but did not
do so.
“We give them a list of
things they will never do and
they give us a list of things we
will never do,” said David
Loevinger, a former Treasury official on China affairs.
For the Trump administration, the reticence could
also reflect the internal division among the president’s
top economic and trade officials. Mnuchin, who the
White House statement said
led the delegation, and Ross
are thought to be more pragmatic. Lighthizer and trade
advisor Peter Navarro, a
China hawk, have been
pushing a harder protectionist line against a country
they regard as out to supplant American economic
power.
Nobody was expecting a
breakthrough or easy negotiations, but analysts say it’s
still unclear what the administration’s primary goals are
— whether to bring the trade
deficit down, a near-obsession for Trump that would
probably take years to
achieve; to secure shortterm market access in
China; or to get Beijing to
change its behavior and its
policies — including Xi’s
Made in China 2025 strategy
— intended to achieve dominance in strategic technology and other high-value
sectors.
Given Trump’s “America
first” agenda to get tough
on trade, the president is
certain to want tangible results that he can hold up to
his political base as fulfillment of his campaign promise. But just what he will
deem acceptable is anybody’s guess.
Analysts and business
people are betting that
Trump may take China to
the precipice of a trade war
but not go over, to avoid
hurting the U.S. economy
and, in turn, his own political
standing.
Rothman said he could
see Trump just getting on
the phone with Xi and saying, “Let’s do a deal.”
Said Reade: “I suspect
the U.S. delegation left
China with next steps totally
up in the air because Trump
will call the shots here, and
no one can predict what he
wants.”
Willsher is a special
correspondent.
don.lee@latimes.com
Twitter: @dleelatimes
work before the delegation
arrived. The White House
did not hold the customary
news briefing ahead of the
trip. And administration
officials left Beijing quietly,
with the White House
issuing a short statement
saying they had “frank
discussions.”
Late Friday, Trump
tweeted that he would be
conferring with his team
Saturday “to determine the
results, but it is hard for
China in that they have become very spoiled with U.S.
trade wins!” On Saturday, at
an event in Ohio ostensibly
to promote his tax cuts, the
president spent much time
attacking trade with China.
The Chinese, for their
part, did not publicly mention the U.S. demands. The
state-run New China News
Agency reported that the
two sides “reached consensus in some areas” but that
“major
differences”
remained.
Chinese officials, led by
Vice Premier Liu He, were
expected to reiterate previously signaled offers from
Beijing to cut tariffs on auto
France recoils at Trump’s remarks
Looser gun laws could
have staved off 2015
massacre, president
says, inflaming many.
By Kim Willsher
PARIS — President
Trump was accused of showing “shameful” disrespect
for the victims of a 2015 series
of terrorist attacks by
suggesting the bloodshed,
which left more than 130
dead, might have been prevented if the French carried
guns.
In a statement, France’s
Foreign Ministry expressed
its “firm disapproval” of the
president’s remarks and demanded “respect of the
memory of the victims.”
“Each country can freely
decide its own legislation on
gun control. France is proud
to be a country where the
purchase and possession of
firearms are strictly controlled,” the statement said.
“The statistics on gun crime
victims do not make us want
to change this choice.”
The
November
2015
attacks in Paris, carried out
by militants claiming loyalty
to Islamic State, killed more
than 130 and injured hundreds. The coordinated attacks took place at a soccer
stadium, several restaurants and during a concert
at the Bataclan theater. It
was the worst bloodshed in
France since World War II.
In Trump’s address to
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
PRESIDENT TRUMP speaks Friday at an NRA meeting in Dallas, where he said
armed citizens would have made the 2015 Paris attacks “a whole different story.”
the National Rifle Assn. in
Dallas on Friday, in which he
also claimed London was a
knife-crime “war zone,” the
president said: “Nobody has
guns in Paris, and we all
remember more than 130
people, plus tremendous
numbers of people that were
horribly, horribly wounded.
You notice nobody ever talks
about them.”
He spoke about the attack at the Bataclan concert
hall, where the American
band Eagles of Death Metal
was playing when a terrorist
commando group armed
with automatic weapons
and wearing suicide vests
killed nearly 90 people.
“If one employee or just
one patron had a gun — or if
one person in this room had
been there with a gun, aimed
at the opposite direction —
the terrorists would have
fled or been shot, and it
would have been a whole
different story,” Trump said.
He added: “They were
brutally killed by a small
group of terrorists that had
guns. They took their time
and gunned them down one
by one.” Trump then mimicked the gunmen shooting,
saying: “Boom. Come over
here. Boom. Come over here.
Boom.”
Trump’s
comments
came just a week after
French President Emmanuel Macron visited Washington, where the two leaders
seemed spirited and hailed a
new “special relationship.”
Though Macron and the
Elysee Palace refused to
comment
directly
on
Trump’s speech, former
A4
M ON DAY , MAY 7, 2018
WSCE
LAT IMES. C OM
Lebanon vote draws low turnout
The poor showing
reflects widespread
apathy over state of
affairs. Clashes erupt
at polling stations.
associated press
BEIRUT — Lebanon’s
first national elections in
nine years were marked by a
tepid turnout Sunday, reflecting voter frustration
over endemic corruption
and a stagnant economy.
Politicians urged citizens to
vote, and security forces
struggled to maintain order
as fights broke out in and
around polling stations.
President Michel Aoun
appealed to voters to cast
ballots in a televised address
an hour before polls closed.
“If you want change, you
should exercise your right”
to vote, he said in a tweet.
The elections are the first
since war broke out in
neighboring Syria in 2011,
sending more than a million
refugees to Lebanon, a small
country with an estimated
population of 4.5 million.
The war has divided Lebanon, pitting parties supporting the Iran-sponsored militia Hezbollah’s intervention
in Syria to aid President
Bashar
Assad
against
Saudi-aligned groups opposed to it.
But low turnout — between 30% and 40% in Beirut
precincts according to the
country’s National News
Agency — revealed widespread voter apathy for the
main political currents in
the country and left open the
possibility that outside candidates could win seats in
Hussein Malla Associated Press
A WOMAN waits to cast her ballot in Beirut. More than 500 candidates are run-
ning for 128 parliamentary seats in Lebanon’s first national elections since 2009.
parliament.
“These leaders are destroying homes, not building them,” said Ahmad
Khashouq, 43, a private security guard in Beirut.
Khashouq, from the town of
Zahle in the country’s Bekaa
Valley, said he was not voting
in the elections after feeling
his vote was wasted in 2009,
the last time elections were
held.
More than 500 candidates are running for 128
seats in Lebanon’s National
Assembly.
Fistfights broke out in
and around polling stations
across the country, as rival
partisans accused one another and election officials of
ballot stuffing and illegal
campaigning. In the Chou-
eifat district, a crowd in a
polling station accused the
site’s supervisor of illegal
voting
practices
and
smashed a ballot box,
spilling its contents across
the floor. The army ordered
the media to turn off their
cameras.
In Zahle, politician Myriam Skaff blamed members
of the right-wing Lebanese
Forces party of beating up
her supporters in polling
stations.
The voting is unlikely to
change the existing balance
of power among the major
political factions in Lebanon, but many hope new
contenders from civil society
groups can challenge the
decades-old sectarian political system.
Sarah Brjawi, 33, said she
was voting for Nouhad
Yazbek, a woman running
on a coalition list of political
independents and activists
in Beirut.
Brjawi, who was walking
the streets of Beirut’s Ras el
Nabaa neighborhood with a
clown troupe before voting,
said she was perplexed by
voters who said they supported their satirical act,
poking fun at the country’s
endemic corruption and political stagnation, while saying they’d vote for establishment parties again.
“This country is really
bipolar,” Brjawi said.
The main race is between
a pro-Western and Saudibacked coalition headed by
Prime Minister Saad Hariri
and the Iranian-backed
Hezbollah group, part of a
regionwide power struggle
that is tearing apart the
Middle East.
“This shows Lebanon’s
democracy and the importance of democracy. This is a
democratic wedding, and as
we said from the start, congratulations to whoever
wins tonight,” said Interior
Minister Nouhad Machnouk, who is running on
Hariri’s list, after casting his
ballot in Beirut.
As Hariri entered a public school in Beirut to vote, a
woman in a wheelchair complained that polling stations
were not equipped for disabled voters.
“We are human beings. It
is not fair that we have to be
carried like bags of potatoes,” Silvana Lakkis said.
The prime minister promised to address the problem in
the next elections.
“When we see what is
happening in countries
around us and Lebanon is
holding democratic elections, this shows that Lebanon is fine,” Hariri said after
waiting in line about 20 minutes to cast his ballot. “Order is nice,” he quipped.
Hezbollah has sent thousands of fighters to Syria
to back Assad’s forces, a
move that has been criticized by many Lebanese,
mainly Sunni Muslims and
Christians, who see the militia group as dragging the
country into regional conflicts.
Leading Hezbollah legislator Ali Ammar defended
his group’s involvement in
Syria, saying it protected
Lebanon from the “evil powers” of the militant groups
Islamic State and Al Qaeda.
In Hezbollah strong-
Study puts lid on theory
of King Tut tomb’s secret
associated press
CAIRO — New radar
scans have provided conclusive evidence that there
are no hidden rooms inside
King Tutankhamen’s burial
chamber, Egypt’s Antiquities Ministry said Sunday,
bringing a disappointing
end to years of excitement
over the prospect.
Mostafa Waziri, secretary-general of the Supreme
Council of Antiquities, said
an Italian team conducted
extensive
studies
with
ground-penetrating radar
that showed the tomb did
not contain any hidden,
man-made blocking walls as
was earlier suspected.
Francesco Porcelli of the
Polytechnic University of
Turin presented the findings
at an international confer-
ence in Cairo.
“Our work shows in a conclusive manner that there
are no hidden chambers, no
corridors adjacent to Tutankhamen’s tomb,” Porcelli
said.
In 2015, British Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves proposed, after analysis of highdefinition laser scans, that
Queen Nefertiti’s tomb
could be concealed behind
wall paintings in the famed
boy king’s burial chamber.
The discovery ignited massive interest, with officials
first rushing to support the
theory but then later distancing themselves and ultimately rejecting it.
The ministry says two
previous scans by Japanese
and American scientists had
proved inconclusive, but it
insists this latest groundpenetrating radar data close
the lid on the tomb having
such hidden secrets.
“It is concluded, with a
very high degree of confidence, said Porcelli, the hypothesis concerning the existence of hidden chambers
or corridors adjacent to
Tutankhamen’s tomb is not
supported by the GPR
data,” the ministry said in its
statement.
The ministry has been
gradually moving King Tut’s
belongings to a new museum outside Cairo near the
Giza pyramids to undergo
restoration before they are
put on display.
The transfer of the priceless belongings has become
a particularly sensitive issue; in 2014 the beard attached to the ancient Egyptian monarch’s golden mask
was accidentally knocked off
and hastily reattached with
holds in south Beirut, there
was a steady flow of voters
Sunday. Streets were festooned with candidates’
posters and Hezbollah’s signature yellow flags. Outside
polling stations, Hezbollah
supporters displayed a replica of the ballot on a big board
and explained to voters
which among the colorcoded lists is theirs, and how
they can vote for it. They
wore yellow shirts bearing
the slogan “We protect and
build.”
“We love the resistance,”
said Amira Sidani, 85, after
casting her ballot.
This year’s vote takes
into account a new election
law that is based on proportional representation for the
first time. Voters will choose
one list of allied candidates,
as well as a preferred candidate from among them. In
the past, the winning list
took all the seats in the electoral district.
That has cracked open
the door for more outsiders,
challenging political titans
who have long ruled the
country based on a sectarian
and family patronage system.
At midday, after casting
his ballot in south Beirut,
Aoun, the president, described the process as “successful.” Wary of voters’ apathy toward a vote unlikely to
change much, he urged people to turn out in large numbers.
Mohammed Ali, 30, riding his scooter to the beach,
said he’s not voting because
there are no choices. He says
his family members will vote
for whoever pays them, but
he’s not interested in the
money.
The legislature’s term
was supposed to expire in
2013, but lawmakers have approved several extensions
since then, citing security
concerns linked to the spillover from Syria’s war. Lebanese who support opposing
sides in the war have clashed
on a number of occasions,
and Sunni Muslim extremists have carried out several
bombings.
There are about 3.6 million eligible voters and 586
candidates, including 86
women, running for the parliament, which is equally divided between Muslims and
Christians.
RADAR scans have proved King Tut’s tomb has no
FOR THE
RECORD
an epoxy glue compound,
sparking uproar among
archaeologists.
The fourth International
Tutankhamen Conference
in Cairo where Porcelli presented the findings, the
most extensive radar survey
of the site to date, was attended by a wide range of
Egyptologists and archaeologists from around the
world.
During the conference,
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Amr Nabil Associated Press
hidden rooms, Egypt’s Antiquities Ministry said.
Antiquities Minister Khaled
Anani said that the first
phase of the new museum,
including King Tut’s halls,
will be completed by the end
of this year but that the date
for the museum’s “soft opening” has yet to be decided.
The museum currently
hosts more than 43,200 artifacts, of which more than
4,500 belong to King Tut,
and its grand opening is
planned for 2022.
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MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
L AT I ME S . CO M
A5
THE NATION
Pushing tech to Trump country
A Silicon Valley
congressman is selling
his vision to Middle
America as a means to
redefine its economy.
By Evan Halper
BECKLEY, W.Va. — Congress was off, and in these
days of mounting uneasiness over calls for more
technology regulation, the
representative from Silicon
Valley might have had good
reason to stick around his
district, soothing nerves.
But Ro Khanna had
other plans.
He was not on the West
Coast, but deep in the mountains of West Virginia, holed
up in a remote college laboratory where an unlikely experiment in social change
and economic transition
was underway. The Stanford
scholar-turned-lawmaker
looked surprisingly at home
in the far-off burg on the
doorstep of coal country.
Joking to a roomful of
mostly white faces, Khanna
(D-Fremont), the son of immigrants, noted that the
area’s scarcity of decent Indian takeout might be its
biggest obstacle to attracting technology firms.
Khanna that day was
confronting a much bigger
challenge for Silicon Valley
than his irritated fellow lawmakers clustered in Washington. A wide swath of
Americans have been left
out of the innovation economy and are growing increasingly resentful of it. So
Khanna is trying to spread
the opportunity by urgently
searching out ways to get
tech invested in the so-called
flyover states and vice versa.
The future of the Democratic Party could hinge on
whether he and a handful of
other Silicon Valley and
Washington types, with limited exposure to distressed
Rust Belt and coal communities, can convince those
places that they are well po-
Michael Meador West Virginia University Tech
STUDENTS and faculty members at West Virginia University Tech, on the doorstep of coal country, tout their
artificial intelligence projects and other technology-oriented work to Rep. Ro Khanna, right, during his visit.
sitioned to compete in the
new economy, and help seed
investment crucial to their
success.
The visit to West Virginia
University Tech, where a
campus churning out coders
and engineers was eager for
Khanna’s help luring potential tech employers to the
state, was not billed as a political event. But politics
hung heavy in the air.
“If the political dynamic
were different, perhaps this
visit would not be happening,” local entrepreneur Patrick
Farrell
told
the
congressman, talking of the
drubbing Democrats took in
the presidential election in
regions like this one. “But we
need you to tell our story. If
you are going to carry a message back, it should be that
when [tech] companies have
opportunities to bring prosperity back, they should consider us. We can do it. We
have shown we can do it. It
would go a long way in lessening the resentment.”
Khanna, a quiet maverick among Democrats, is an
unconventional
ambassador for his party. He rejects both the platforms of
the party establishment and
the
politics
of
the
“Berniecrats.” His trilliondollar blueprint for reviving
distressed regions defies
ideology, melding ideas that
resemble Clintonomics with
others that excite techfunded think tanks, with still
others that might be defined
as a 21st century New Deal.
He has no reservations
about prodding the tech
CEOs who propelled his unlikely rise in politics, calling
for an “internet bill of rights”
packed with transparency
and consumer protection
provisions that make the
firms bristle. He crossed
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-
Calif.) by publicly announcing he would like to see her
knocked out of office by any
more forward-thinking Democrat. The “Antitrust Caucus” that Khanna helped
launch seeks to refocus regulators on the damage threatened to wages, local economies and even mom-andpop businesses in big corporate mergers.
“When I got to Washington, people said, ‘Don’t talk
about tech and innovation
outside
the
district,’ ”
Khanna said during his visit
to Beckley. “I said, ‘You are
not getting America. People
in this country love innovation.’ ... But they want to
know how they can have the
opportunities, how it can liberate their economic possibilities and give them
hope.” He launched into a
story about John F. Kennedy’s visit to West Virginia,
when coal miners excitedly
chanted, “Go to the moon!”
Khanna’s visits to Trump
country have invited some
predictable eye-rolling. Silicon Valley’s promises to connect with Middle America —
made most urgently amid
the valley’s shock after
Trump’s election — have not
always
been
followed
through on. Executives returned from their postelection bus tours and barbecues in flyover land and
went back in their bubbles.
There have been spurts of investment, but not gamechanging investment: certainly not the kind of investment that has voters in
Trump country reconsidering their enthusiasm for the
president’s far-fetched plans
to reopen enough coal mines
and steel mills to bring economies roaring back.
“There is plenty tech
companies can do, but I
don’t think they are doing
Lava flow intensifies from Kilauea
With added fissures,
as many as 21 homes
have been destroyed
by ongoing volcanic
eruptions on Hawaii.
By Rong-Gong Lin II
and Heidi Chang
HILO, Hawaii — The flow
of lava intensified Sunday
from ongoing eruptions at
Hawaii Island’s Kilauea volcano, and molten rock is
pouring from fissures that
opened overnight, farther
from the original eruptions.
As many as 21 homes
have now been destroyed as
residential destruction rapidly accelerated Sunday,
Hawaii County officials said.
Toxic sulfur dioxide gas
spewing near the fissures is
at lethal concentrations,
said U.S. Geological Survey
volcano scientist Wendy
Stovall. Lava fountains
emerging from the cracks in
the ground are producing
even more gas than previously observed.
The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said Sunday afternoon that since the
overnight hours, eruptions
of lava from cracks in the
ground have been continuous. A flow of lava has advanced northward for about
0.6 miles.
Residents have been
evacuated from two remote,
rural neighborhoods on the
eastern edge of Hawaii Island where the lava is emerging from the fissures. An estimated 1,800 people live in
the affected area, and many
have sought housing in shelters, with friends or on surrounding islands.
“Scientists on the ground
are reporting that lava flows
are traveling through the
forest, power lines are coming down, and a few explosions have been heard —
likely from propane tanks or
methane explosions,” Stovall said.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images
POLICE OFFICERS and the National Guard check the identification of drivers
before allowing evacuees to return home at the Leilani Estates in Pahoa, Hawaii.
As lava inundates the
heavily forested area, organic matter burns and releases methane. “That methane gas can get trapped in
pockets beneath lava flows
or underground, and explode out violently, throwing
rocks and debris in every direction,” Stovall said.
Eruptions of lava fountains continued throughout
the night. Because lava by
Sunday morning was flowing farther than it did in the
first days of the eruption,
“that means the magma
supply is still present and
shows signs of continuing,”
Stovall said.
By Sunday morning on
Hawaii, the overall number
of total cracks that have at
one point spewed or sputtered lava had risen to 10.
On Saturday night, a new
crack erupted between fissures No. 2 and No. 7, spewing lava fountains as high as
230 feet.
The flows are still moving
quite slowly, however — scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey monitoring
them can walk away from
the hot lava easily.
On Sunday, a lava flow
was moving away from Fissure No. 8 at significantly
less than 1 mph, Stovall said.
A statement by the
USGS volcano observatory
said the lava flow northward
from Fissure No. 8 began
around 5 a.m. Sunday.
Images posted by the
USGS showed red-hot lava
rising higher than the
tops of trees. Other photos
showed cracks in the ground
and lava pouring over
the asphalt of rural roads.
On Friday, lava spatter was
being launched over power
lines.
Local government officials said that if conditions
permit, residents in Leilani
Estates, the neighborhood
where the eruptions have
been occurring, would be allowed to enter the neighborhood to complete the evacuation of pets, medicine and
key documents, but only
during daylight hours.
Authorities warned that
the air quality remained
troublesome and that the
roads were still under very
unstable conditions, and
residents could be required
to leave the area if conditions became more hazardous.
Another neighborhood,
Lanipuna Gardens, remains
under a mandatory evacuation order because of the
high levels of toxic gases in
the air.
The volcanic instability
at Kilauea, one of the world’s
most active volcanoes and
Hawaii Island’s youngest,
began April 30 underneath
the eastern flank of the volcano, an area known as the
East Rift Zone.
It was the collapse of a
lava-filled crater in the East
Rift Zone that day that set
off last week’s eruption. The
contents of the crater
seeped into a network of
underground channels and
flowed downhill — and on
Thursday started gushing
out of cracks that had
opened in Leilani Estates.
There have been more
than 1,000 earthquakes over
the last week in the area of
Kilauea, produced by the
volcano making room for
new flows of magma occurring inside it.
The largest so far was a
magnitude 6.9 earthquake
that hit midday Friday in the
zone of volcanic activity. Although the earthquake
could be felt across much of
the archipelago, the worst
shaking occurred in an area
with no neighborhoods or
businesses.
It is not unheard of for
strong earthquakes — even
those bigger than magnitude 6.9 — to follow volcanic
activity. As molten rock
moved underground from
the collapsed lava-filled
crater in the East Rift Zone
to a lower elevation, the
moving magma increased
pressure in the entire area,
Stovall said.
When that pressure built
up, the surface around that
had to move — producing
sudden earth movement on
a fault plane that separates
the ancient sea floor and Kilauea volcano.
Hawaii tourism officials
emphasized that the volcano threat was limited to a
remote region of eastern
Hawaii Island and no flights
to any airports in the state
are being affected.
“The closest resort areas,
in Kona and the Kohala
Coast on the island of Hawaii’s west side, are more
than 100 miles away from
where the lava flow is occurring and shielded by the
massive
mountains
of
Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa.
Resort areas located on
Oahu and Kauai, and in
Maui County, are located
hundreds of miles from Kilauea volcano,” said a statement by the Hawaii Tourism
Authority.
ron.lin@latimes.com
Twitter: @ronlin
Times staff writer Lin
reported from San
Francisco and special
correspondent Chang
from Hilo.
much of it,” said Larry
Downes, a Berkeley-based
innovation scholar with the
Georgetown Center for
Business and Public Policy.
“After the election, they got
in private planes and flew to
places like Oklahoma for a
day for a listening tour. It
was a lot of hyperbole.”
Some economists boring
into the stagnation in places
like West Virginia worry the
think tank and political
class is paying too little attention to pursuing ideas
that actually create new local industries and opportunities.
“We are not giving workable solutions to these communities, and the folks in
them know it,” said Steve
Glickman, co-founder of the
Economic
Innovation
Group, an advocacy group
bankrolled by Silicon Valley
entrepreneur Sean Parker.
The group recently successfully lobbied Congress to
create “Opportunity Zones”
that create incentives for
companies to locate in distressed areas ripe for
growth.
But the concentration of
the nation’s prosperity into a
handful of regions, Glickman said, is accelerating at a
more alarming pace than
most politicians comprehend. As America pulled out
of recession in the early
1990s, half the new businesses created were spread
across 125 counties. When
the most recent recession
ended, that same share of
new businesses were clustered within just 20 counties,
the group found.
“It is rare to see a firstterm congressman from Silicon Valley criticizing the
tech industry for not doing
enough to help Middle
America, where he has no
skin in the game,” Glickman
said. “But this is the issue of
our generation to fix.”
Khanna was drawn to
Beckley by West Virginia
University President Gordon Gee, whose resume includes stints as president of
Brown, Vanderbilt, Ohio
State and the University of
Colorado. He returned to
West Virginia, the system he
was first named to lead 37
years ago, for an encore act,
dead set on making the university a springboard to
modernize the state’s economy and lure innovation-oriented investment its way.
From his vision sprouted the
new tech-oriented campus
at
Beckley,
where
enrollment has so far exceeded his expectations.
Gee does not align with
any political party. He said
he supported Republican
John Kasich in the 2016 election. But he said the local
backlash against prosperous coastal states reflected
in Trump’s election motivated him to step up his work at
the university.
“If you look at the political landscape, the arrogance
of the blue has caused an incredible backlash,” he said.
“When
I
talked
with
Congressman Khanna, my
feeling was rather than
thinking about this as a rural-urban divide, let’s think
about it as folks who have
achieved great things taking
responsibility for the overall
health of the American public. It means moving away
from the safety zones of the
coast, and thinking of investing in these smaller
communities. Politically it is
smart. In terms of learning
and service and creativity, it
makes sense.”
Gee didn’t have to make a
very hard sell. Khanna is
known to sermonize about
the silliness of industries
concentrating so many jobs
that can be done anywhere,
by anyone trained with basic
skill sets, in outrageously expensive and congested
places like the Silicon Valley
district he represents.
“People here have an extraordinary work ethic, extraordinary ideas, they have
hunger and a desire to make
it,” Khanna said. “But they
need a path.... It’s in Silicon
Valley’s self-interest to partner with you. Some of these
tech companies need more
places where they can
recruit, more places to go get
talent, more places where
they don’t have to pay sixfigure salaries to college
graduates just starting out.”
evan.halper
@latimes.com
Twitter: @evanhalper
A6
M O N DAY , MAY 7, 2018
LAT IMES. C OM
FACES OF THE NRA
As a national movement for stricter gun laws gains steam, the National Rifle Assn.’s
annual convention in Dallas becomes a meeting, exhibition and political act all in one
WADE ANDERS of Lufkin, Texas, an NRA life
member, poses with his Rhodesian ridgeback Kip,
a blood-tracking dog used to locate hunting kills.
Photographs by
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
MAJ TOURE of Philadelphia, the founder of the Black Guns Matter movement, is photographed Friday at
the first full day of the 2018 NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits inside the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention
Center in downtown Dallas. The event was expected to draw more than 80,000 attendees over the weekend.
JOHN MIKESELL , 16, of Pittsburgh wears a ghillie
suit, often used during hunting, while walking
around the exhibition floor at the NRA convention.
RICHARD LAVENDER , 82, a Marine from Parker,
Texas, supports open carry laws and says he always
wears his Smith & Wesson Model 642 on his hip.
JERRY GOOLDIN , left, of Columbus, Ohio, and his twin brother, John Gooldin of New Port Richey, Fla., 67,
have made a yearly vacation of the NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits. This year’s event was their fourth
straight convention, which is free to attend for NRA members and their families across the country.
BRENDA KING , the “Boot Baroness” of Fort Worth, shows off her “Red Carpet Ready” boot, which sells for
$195, on the exhibition floor at the NRA convention in Dallas. More than 800 exhibitors displayed their wares
— from firearms and accessories to hunting gear to clothing and items celebrating gun culture.
DEKE RIVERS of Ocala, Fla., an exhibition shooter, shows off a pistol he uses to perform tricks at the
booth of Eagle Grips, one of his sponsors.
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
L AT I ME S . CO M
A7
At 9, girl is a mighty young gun
[Girl, from A1]
NRA darling after she
started shooting three years
ago, one of many competitive girl shooters who buck
not only gun culture stereotypes, but also the youthdriven gun control movement that sprung up after
the deadly mass shooting at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas
High School in Parkland,
Fla., this year.
The NRA doesn’t track
the number of young female
shooters, a spokesman said,
but as the number of women
with guns has grown, they
are inspiring their daughters. The National Shooting
Sports Foundation says
there’s been a 77% increase
in female gun ownership
since 2005, with 5.4 million
women participating in target shooting.
All of the youth celebrities at the annual NRA convention in Dallas over the
weekend, which was expected to draw more than
80,000 people, were female.
Keystone Sporting Arms,
which sold the Crickett and
Chipmunk starter rifles at
the convention under the
banner “Never too young to
understand freedom,” sells
as many pink and turquoise
guns as the traditional colors, staff said. On Sunday,
families
with
children
flocked to the Dallas convention center for NRA Youth
Day.
Many who stopped at the
JM4 Tactical booth where
Addy was greeting fans were
parents and girl shooters
who recognized her from her
videos. A video of her rapidly
reloading at home has more
than 30 million views; she
has 14,000 Facebook followers, 5,600 on Instagram and
nearly 300 subscribers on
YouTube, where the lead video shows her target shooting to the tune of Miley
Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball.”
Addy was inspired by 17year-old Katelyn Francis, a
female competitive shooter
she saw featured on NRATV
while her godfather was
baby-sitting her in San Antonio. Then she found the
YouTube channel of Faith
and Jenna Collier, sisters in
nearby Austin who were
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
ADDYSSON “ADDY” SOLTAU poses for pictures with William Baylor of rifle maker Keystone Sporting
Arms at its booth at the NRA convention in Dallas. Addy also does karate, cheerleading and horseback riding.
about her age, and asked
whether she could shoot too.
Campos, 28, a retired
Marine, agreed to coach her.
“She had never been
around firearms. I didn’t
own any. Her parents didn’t.
This all started because
she showed an interest,” he
said.
Addy’s parents, who
work at an education company, had their doubts.
“Her mom was kind of
not for the whole firearms
thing when we first started,”
because of safety concerns,
Campos said, noting that
out of all the sports Addy
does, “shooting is the one
sport where she’s never gotten hurt. There’s just so
many checks and balances
in terms of safety.”
Campos had shot competitively when he was
younger, so he knew how to
teach Addy Olympic precision shooting positions.
They worked on a different
position each week: prone,
stationary, sitting. Addy
learned to draw a pistol from
her holster and tuck the butt
of a rifle into her cheek well.
Two years ago, Campos decided she was ready for competition.
When Addy was disqualified from a match in June for
“unsafe firearm usage” (she
left the stage with the gun
pointed incorrectly), Campos posted about it on Instagram and Facebook.
“It was a good teachable
moment for other competitive junior shooters,” he
said. “Every match she’s getting better, she gets more
confident.”
Last year, they joined the
Colliers on the Austin Sure
Shots women’s gun club
youth team. The Sure Shots
started eight years ago as a
women’s shooting club and
has grown to include 400
women (some transgender)
and a youth league. There
are a dozen spots for girls
ages 5 to 12 on the team, with
a waiting list, said founder
Niki Jones.
“It was daughters of our
current members coming
and saying, ‘Can I shoot with
you?’ ” she said. “They train
like adults, all day. One
showed up in a tutu. We were
OK with that.”
Jones,
who
started
shooting at age 5 with her father on Long Island, New
York, beamed as Addy
fielded questions from fans
at the convention, posing for
photos and signing autographs.
“She’s atypical,” Jones
said of Addy. “She trains
constantly.”
Firearms instructor Kevin Dixie of St. Louis quizzed
Addy about her favorite
guns. His 12-year-old son
shoots, and his 6-year-old
daughter wants to but is
busy with school and ballet,
he said.
Addy also does karate,
cheerleading and horseback
riding. Karate is her favorite,
followed by shooting. For
other girls, like the Colliers,
activities such as dance have
eclipsed shooting.
Eddie Wise was excited to
pose for a photo with Addy
because he said his 8-yearold daughter at home north
of Houston is itching to
shoot and has yet to see Addy’s videos.
“My little girl wants me to
show her as soon as I get
home,” said the 38-year-old
who works in the oil industry.
His wife, who started
shooting as an adult, said
their daughter can’t get a
gun until she’s 10. But the girl
already has a gun picked
out, a .22 rifle that Wise said
he plans to give her for her
birthday.
Addy’s sponsors hovered
as she sat on a stool surrounded by leather holsters,
greeting passersby. Chad
Myers, who was keeping an
eye on his 8-year-old son,
said he had been to the range
with Addy and was impressed.
“She has a keen eye,” he
said, pointing to his son, who
is not a competitive shooter.
“He can break down a Glock,
but he can’t do that.”
Sarah Ott also stopped to
snap a photo with Addy and
Ott’s 11-year-old daughter,
whom she called an “amateur shooter.”
“Aren’t we all compared
to her though? She’s amazing,” Ott said.
An 8-year-old girl from
east Texas in a Minions Tshirt and cutoffs approached Addy with her
family in tow.
“I like your earrings,” said
Gracie Priest, all smiling
cheeks sprinkled with freckles. The two started chatting.
Gracie said she also
shoots, a .22 Ruger Mark IV.
“I shoot arrows too,” she
told Addy, saying she uses a
longbow.
Addy nodded.
Both of Gracie’s parents
shoot. She said her younger
brothers are too little — ages
4 and 1.
“I started really young
with my dad,” said her
mother, Stephanie Priest,
26.
They have rules, Gracie’s
father explained: Gracie
shoots at the range, but at
home, her gun stays in the
family gun safe.
“When they get older,
guns aren’t taboo,” said Tim
Priest, 26, who designs metal
buildings for a living. Instead of warning children to
stay away from guns, he and
others at the convention
said they prefer to teach
them how to handle guns
safely.
“You live it day by day. If
you tell them don’t do this,
they’re going to want to do
it,” he said.
Some of those who visited Addy at the convention
asked about her younger sister Trystan, whom they had
seen in her videos on the
range.
The 6-year-old was too
energetic to bring to the
convention, Campos explained, but he is teaching
her to shoot, as he did with
Addy.
“We think she’s going to
be better when she starts,
because she’s been watching
me,” Addy said.
molly.hennessy-fiske
@latimes.com
Twitter: @mollyhf
A8
MO N DAY , MAY 7, 2018
LAT IMES. C OM
Top lawyer back in White House
[Lawyer, from A1]
Unlike former New York
City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and conservative lawyer Jay Sekulow, who represent Trump personally,
Flood will be responsible for
shielding the institution of
the presidency and the
White House from legal
problems.
Flood has the resume for
it, having worked for two
previous presidents. He
helped fend off Republicans
trying to remove Bill Clinton
from office in the late 1990s
and sparred with Democrats investigating George
W. Bush’s dismissal of U.S.
attorneys in 2006.
The
high-wire
work
earned Flood a reputation
as level-headed, passionate
and scholarly. He also became known for his ardent
defense of executive power
— an expertise that could
prove useful in trying to
shield Trump from the Russia investigation.
“He’s the guy that I
thought should have been
hired for this in the beginning,” said Shannen Coffin,
a partner at the Steptoe law
firm who worked with Flood
in the White House near the
end of the Bush administration.
Glen Donath, a partner
at Clifford Chance who
worked with Flood on Clinton’s legal team during the
impeachment
process,
M. Rauch Williams & Connolly
EMMET FLOOD is
known for his defense of
executive power.
praised Flood, saying he’s as
“experienced as anyone I
can imagine in taking on a
challenge of this magnitude.”
“There are plenty of
mines in this minefield,” Donath said. “But I have no
doubt he’s well aware of
them going in.”
Indeed, the explosions
began only hours after the
White House announced
Wednesday
that
Flood
would replace Ty Cobb, the
second senior lawyer to leave
Trump’s side in the last two
months.
That night, Giuliani
abruptly announced on Fox
News that Trump had reimbursed Michael Cohen, his
longtime personal lawyer,
for $130,000 in hush money
paid to the porn star known
Manuel Balce Ceneta Associated Press
PRESIDENT TRUMP, with his shifting stories, will put Flood’s expertise to the
test. “There are plenty of mines in this minefield,” an ex-colleague of Flood said.
as Stormy Daniels. Trump
confirmed it the next morning in a series of tweets.
The disclosure sent the
White House into a scramble, because Trump had
flatly denied in April that he
knew about the payoff. Critics said the payment could
represent a campaign finance violation because it
was delivered 11 days before
the presidential election to
keep Daniels quiet about her
alleged tryst with Trump
years ago.
Trump confused matters
further Friday by telling reporters with a shrug that
Giuliani still had to “get his
facts straight,” and Giuliani
issued another statement
trying to walk back some of
his comments.
The shifting stories highlight the challenge for Flood
as he seeks to counsel a president who famously doesn’t
listen to his lawyers or adhere to the truth.
Lanny Davis, who once
represented Clinton, said
Trump advisors and lawyers
privately have expressed
concerns about the president’s falsehoods and have
asked, “What do you do if
you’re not sure that you’re
getting all the facts from
your client?”
Flood grew up in the Chicago suburbs as one of 14
children and attended Catholic schools as a boy. After attending the the University of
Dallas as an undergraduate,
he was awarded a doctorate
in philosophy at the Uni-
Slain Florida teens honored at prom
Classmates at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas
school pay tribute to
four Parkland seniors.
associated press
PARKLAND, Fla. — Four
Florida high school seniors
slain in a mass shooting were
honored by their classmates
celebrating their senior
prom.
The main ballroom at the
Westin Fort Lauderdale
Beach Resort was transformed Saturday into an enchanted forest for 850 Marjory Stoneman Douglas
High School students.
In the hallway was a giant
ice sculpture proclaiming
“#MSDSTRONG.” Butterflies were released from the
rooftop, and a room was set
aside for anyone needing
quiet reflection.
Broward Sheriff ’s Office
deputies also stood guard at
the front entrance.
“The senior class is going
to be missing some of its
members — we don’t forget that, none of us,” said
senior Rebecca Schneid,
who wore a black gown for
the event.
The Parkland school had
considered canceling the
prom after the Feb. 14 massacre that killed 17 students
and faculty, but local businesses donated items and
services, helping to reduce
the event’s costs and ticket
Pedro Portal Miami Herald
CARLEY OGOZALY chose a dress befitting her friend Meadow Pollack. With her is Pollack’s father, Andrew.
prices.
The victims included four
seniors: Meadow Pollack,
Nicholas Dworet, Joaquin
Oliver and Carmen Schentrup.
One of Pollack’s closest
friends, Carley Ogozaly,
wore a pink tulle gown with
a halter neckline and an
open back in the slain teen’s
honor.
She also got a pearly pink
French manicure for the occasion.
The girls had discussed
shopping for their prom
dresses in the hours before
the shooting, she said.
“I would have just worn a
simple black dress. But I
know Meadow would have
argued with me that it would
be too plain,” Ogozaly said.
“Me wearing this pink sparkly thing and me doing my
nails the way Meadow would
have is my way of making
sure Meadow doesn’t miss
prom.”
Ogozaly and another
friend, Nicolette Miciotta,
also drew Pollack’s name
under a small crown on their
left shoulders. On Miciotta’s
wrist were pink bangle
bracelets with “Princess
Meadow” written across
them.
Pollack’s father came to
see the girls off in their magenta limousine. The windows were covered in fuchsia
paint with the words, “We
love you Meadow.”
“I could barely get myself
to come here,” Andrew Pollack said. “I’m here, though.”
Neo-Nazi heads to trial in 2009 killing
Travis Ricci, 36, faces
death if convicted in
drive-by attack on an
interracial couple.
associated press
PHOENIX — An interracial couple was walking
near a Phoenix park when,
authorities say, a shirtless
neo-Nazi began yelling a racial slur and harassing the
black man over dating a
white woman.
Authorities say the men
exchanged tense words before Travis Ricci rushed
back to a home where other
white supremacists were
partying, grabbed a shotgun
and returned in a sedan driven by an associate.
Ricci leaned out the car
and fired two blasts, missing
the black man — his target —
and killing his girlfriend, investigators said.
Lawyers are picking a
jury to decide whether Ricci
should be convicted of murder and sentenced to death
in the 2009 attack, which
prosecutors say was a hate
crime. Opening statements
are scheduled for June 6.
The case has offered several unexpected turns.
Ricci claims his greatgrandfather was a member
of the French Resistance
killed by Nazis during World
War II.
Authorities are seeking
the death penalty, saying 39year-old Kelly Ann Jaeger’s
killing was meant to further
the interests of the Vinlanders Social Club, a neo-Nazi
group with a reputation for
violence that was later targeted in a law enforcement
crackdown.
Because
prosecutors
have called the attack a hate
crime, they can seek as many
as 11 additional years in prison — above the maximum
penalty — if Ricci is convicted of other charges, such
as attempted murder, driveby shooting, aggravated assault and assistance to a
criminal gang.
Ricci pleaded not guilty,
and his lawyers have raised
questions about the ability
of Jaeger’s boyfriend, Jeffery
Wellmaker, to identify him as
the shooter. They note that
nearly two years after the attack, Wellmaker was jailed in
an unrelated case and
played chess with Ricci behind bars without recogniz-
ing him.
Aaron Levi Schmidt, who
authorities say was driving
the car used in the shooting,
pleaded guilty to murder in
Jaeger’s death. He is already
serving 11 years for assisting
a criminal gang. It’s unclear
whether he’s been sentenced
on the murder conviction.
Lawyers for Ricci and
Schmidt, both 36, have said
their clients weren’t members of the Vinlanders.
Police reports say Ricci
told associates before the attack that he saw black men
hitting a white woman,
though it’s unclear if that
claim was accurate.
Rebecca
Wilder,
a
spokeswoman for the Maricopa County attorney’s office, which is prosecuting
Ricci, declined to comment
on the case. The Phoenix Police Department, which investigated the attack, also
declined to comment.
Prosecutors said in court
records that Wellmaker, who
was unarmed, tried to help
his girlfriend after she was
shot. They say Wellmaker
didn’t provoke the attack
and tried to push Jaeger out
of the path of the shotgun
blast, according to court records.
Ricci’s attorneys declined to answer questions
about the allegations.
“He is a very sensitive
person who cares about people in general,” lawyer Jennifer Willmott said.
Bruce Blumberg, another attorney for Ricci, said his
client’s team has records
that document the arrest
and execution of Ricci’s
great-grandfather during
his involvement with the
French Resistance. Blumberg said the relative’s experience may be brought up
during trial, but it’s unclear
what it would demonstrate.
The attack started after
Ricci left his friend’s home
angry and drunk, making
his way into the neighborhood where he noticed Jaeger and Wellmaker, according to a police report.
Prosecutors say Ricci
hurled a racial slur at Wellmaker and yelled, “What are
you doing with a white girl?”
He also told Wellmaker
he was going to get “something for him,” prosecutors
said.
Sometime later, Jaeger
and Wellmaker were near a
pay phone when the sedan
pulled up. Ricci fired two
shells, hitting Jaeger in the
stomach, prosecutors said.
Ricci’s attorneys have
said Wellmaker could not
identify Ricci in a photo lineup after the shooting, and he
failed to recognize their client in 2011 when the two
served time in the same
Maricopa County jail pod.
Court records filed in Ricci’s
case didn’t specify the
charge on which Wellmaker
was jailed, and a records
check didn’t provide a definitive answer.
Ricci ended up telling
Wellmaker he was the person accused of killing his
girlfriend, a judge wrote in a
pretrial ruling.
The judge said Wellmaker’s identification of the
shooter was reliable because
he would have been able to
identify Ricci independent
of the jail encounter. While
working with a police artist
after the shooting, Wellmaker described a unique
tattoo across the attacker’s
stomach, the judge wrote.
Months after Jaeger’s
death, police say, Ricci
stabbed two men who tried
to stop him from attacking
his girlfriend. He is serving a
22-year sentence for assault
and weapons misconduct
convictions.
versity of Texas at Austin.
He continued postgraduate
studies at Wesleyan University
in
Connecticut,
where he wrote his erudite
paper on St. Augustine.
But instead of pursuing a
life in academia, he headed
to Yale Law School. His work
there was stellar enough
that after he graduated in
1991, he landed a clerkship
with Supreme Court Justice
Antonin Scalia, the conservative stalwart who died two
years ago.
Flood was driven more by
the law than ideology, however. After working in private practice at the Washington firm Williams & Connolly, he joined Clinton’s legal
team
during
the
impeachment proceedings
in 1998 and 1999. Clinton was
impeached in the Republican-led House but acquitted
in the Democratic-led Senate and served out his term.
Flood brought a scholarly approach that helped
shape Clinton’s legal strategy. Although he wasn’t well
known, Flood became “one
of the principal architects of
President Clinton’s defense,” Donath said.
“Emmet feels that we
should respect the results of
valid elections and not use
the impeachment process as
another partisan tool when
the opposing party doesn’t
get the candidate they want
in office,” Donath said. “He
believes that in respect to
President Clinton, and I suspect he believes that in respect to President Trump.”
It’s a view that probably
appeals to Trump, who
regularly accuses Democrats of supporting a “witch
hunt” on the “hoax” that his
advisors conspired with
Russians trying to meddle in
the campaign.
Flood would be prepared
to face off with a hostile Congress if Democrats regain
power in November. He
joined the White House
counsel’s office under Bush
after Republicans lost the
House and the Senate in
2006.
“He was at the point of
the spear in our relations
with Congress,” said Coffin,
who worked for Vice President Dick Cheney at the
time. Despite the heavy demands, “Emmet had it
under control,” Coffin said.
Flood handled the controversy after the White
House fired several U.S. attorneys and Democrats accused the Bush administration of forcing out law enforcement officials to push a
political agenda.
Flood’s opponents recall
him as talented but stubborn, traits made clear in a
closed-door questioning of
Karl Rove, Bush’s top political advisor, according to a
transcript that was released
later.
Flood often stepped in to
say certain inquiries were
out of bounds. At one point
he said he’d allow a question
only because there was
“no sense my wasting any
more time than you are
wasting.”
Elliot Mincberg, a lawyer
who worked for Democrats
running the House Judiciary
Committee, said Flood
stonewalled the panel’s attempts to obtain internal
White House documents.
“Most people felt like
we would be able to work
something out. And we weren’t,” Mincberg said. “He
just didn’t yield. Even an
inch.”
It’s a very different approach than that of Cobb,
who sought to cooperate
with the special counsel in
the Russia investigation.
Trump’s legal team said in
January that the administration had provided more
than 20,000 pages of documents and allowed more
than 20 White House officials to be interviewed by
Mueller’s team.
It’s still unclear whether
Trump will sit down with the
special counsel’s office. He
appears to be laying the
groundwork to reject an interview request — or even to
fight a possible grand jury
subpoena — although he
said again Friday that he
would like to testify if he
thought he would be
“treated fairly.”
“I would love to speak. I
would love to go. Nothing I
want to do more, because we
did nothing wrong,” Trump
told reporters outside the
White House.
Then he made a promise
that might unnerve Flood.
“If I thought it was fair,”
Trump said, “I would override my lawyers.”
chris.megerian
@latimes.com
Twitter: @chrismegerian
WSC E
L AT I ME S . CO M
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
A9
Trump could
plead 5th in
Russia probe
[Giuliani, from A1]
in connection with the Monica Lewinsky investigation,
though Clinton ultimately
agreed to voluntarily submit
to questioning.
The combative former
New York City mayor, having
emerged as a key catalyst in
the separate Daniels case
with his unexpected disclosures and changing narratives about the president’s
involvement in a preelection
hush-money payout to the
porn actress, was somewhat
more circumspect in addressing the investigation of
Russia’s election interference and possible Trump
campaign complicity.
Questions over whether
special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III might seek to
compel Trump to testify before a grand jury intensified
last week after the Washington Post reported that the
special counsel had broached the possibility this spring
in talks with the president’s
lawyers about whether
Trump would agree to a sitdown interview with investigators.
A subpoena confrontation could substantially up
the constitutional ante related to Trump’s dealings
with — and his possible attempts at obstruction of —
the Russia investigation,
which the president has repeatedly termed a “witch
hunt.”
Trump reiterated last
week he would “love to” sit
and answer Mueller’s questions. But he said he would
do so only if he was convinced that investigators
were treating him fairly.
Giuliani said he would
strongly advise against such
an in-person encounter,
however.
“I’m going to walk him
into a prosecution for perjury like Martha Stewart?”
he asked rhetorically, alluding to the high-profile 2004
conviction of the “domestic
goddess” entrepreneur on
charges of obstruction and
lying to investigators in connection with an insidertrading case.
Joseph diGenova, a lawyer who is in the Trump orbit
although not part of the
president’s legal team, said
he also would argue against
an interview with Mueller.
DiGenova, who said a business conflict prevented him
from joining Trump’s team,
on Sunday echoed the president’s recent attacks on the
special counsel.
“The president will not
sit down for an interview because this investigation has
now reached a level of bad
faith [that] this is no longer a
good-faith investigation,”
the onetime prosecutor said
on “Fox News Sunday.”
Giuliani’s addition to the
president’s legal team was
part of an overhaul that not
only involved the departures
and arrivals of several important players, but also
pointed to a far more aggressive
pushback
against
Mueller’s investigative authority.
The challenges faced by
Trump in connection with
the Russia inquiry are being
steadily amplified by the
separate but parallel Daniels case.
Trump’s onetime legal
fixer Michael Cohen faces a
criminal investigation after
having acknowledged making a $130,000 payment to her
shortly before the 2016 election that was intended to
buy the porn actress’ silence
about an alleged tryst with
Trump more than a decade
ago.
Giuliani and Trump each
have offered inconsistent
and contradictory explanations about when and
whether the president was
aware of the payment, and
the underlying motives for
the agreement with Daniels,
whose real name is Stephanie Clifford.
Tasos Katopodis Getty Images
RUDOLPH W. GIULIANI , shown at the Conference on Iran on Saturday in Washington, says President
Trump “can assert the same privilege that other presidents have,” in reference to complying with a subpoena.
The former mayor offered yet another glimpse
into the netherworld of what
the president’s surrogates
have characterized as nuisance
claims
against
Trump.
In the ABC interview,
Giuliani casually acknowledged that Cohen could
have made payoffs to other
women
under
circumstances similar to those surrounding Daniels’ allegations.
“I have no knowledge of
that,” Giuliani said. “But I
would think if it was necessary, yes.”
Seeking to explain why
the president would authorize Cohen to make payments at his own discretion,
without Trump’s knowledge, Giuliani suggested
that sums such as the
amount paid to Daniels were
inconsequential to Trump
as a way of brushing false accusations aside.
“I know this sounds
funny to people there at
home — I never thought
$130,000 was a real payment,” he told ABC, adding:
“People don’t go away for
$130,000 with a meritorious
claim.”
Appearing on the same
program, Daniels’ attorney
Michael Avenatti said he
was flabbergasted by Giuliani’s freewheeling round of
television appearances on
Trump’s behalf, including
the one on Sunday just before his own, in which Giuliani said he did not know
when Trump became aware
of the Daniels payment.
Last week, Giuliani, supported by Trump, said the
president had reimbursed
Cohen.
The
president
subsequently said Giuliani did
not have the facts straight,
but Trump did not specify
what was wrong with Giuliani’s account or what the
truth is.
Avenatti said Giuliani
“now expects the American
people to believe that he
doesn’t really know the facts
— this guy’s all over the map
over the last 72 hours on
some very simple facts that
should be very straightforward.”
“They are making it up as
they go along,” he said.
“They don’t know what to
say because they’ve lost
track of the truth.”
On another Sunday
show, presidential advisor
Kellyanne Conway defended
her boss’ credibility when
she was asked about docu-
mented
falsehoods
by
Trump.
“The president doesn’t
lie,” she said on CNN’s “State
of the Union.”
Giuliani, in the ABC interview,
posited
that
Trump’s comments to the
news media, and by extension to the public, were irrelevant to the legalities of the
case.
“I don’t know when the
president learned about it,”
he said, referring to the payment to Daniels. “These are
not facts that matter to me
as a lawyer. Those don’t
amount to anything, what’s
said to the press — that’s political.”
laura.king@latimes.com
Twitter: @laurakingLAT
A10
MO N DAY , M AY 7, 2018
LAT IMES. C OM
MONDAY BUSINESS
THE AGENDA: U.S. ECONOMY
Spencer Platt Getty Images
Era of easy growth is waning
TRADERS work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange last week. After peaking in late January, the Dow Jones industrial average is roughly flat on the year.
The rare trifecta of soaring stocks, cheap loans and low inflation is coming to an end
washington post
For most of the last decade, as the U.S. economy
marched through the second-longest expansion in its
history, Americans enjoyed
a rare trifecta: soaring stock
values, cheap loans and consumer prices that rarely
rose.
That favorable climate
benefited everyone from
people nearing retirement
to those buying their first
homes or just filling their gas
tanks.
But suddenly, the good
fortune is melting away, imperiling the props that have
supported American economic confidence and incomes
and intensifying pressure on
President Trump to deliver
the faster growth and higher
wages he has promised.
Consumer prices by a key
measure are now rising at
their fastest point in seven
years, with mass consumer
companies such as McDonald’s and Amazon.com increasing prices on some of
their popular offerings.
Mortgages and business
loans are becoming more expensive. And after peaking
in late January, the Dow
Jones industrial average is
now roughly flat on the year.
The result is that Americans have to spend more
money on staples and pay
more to borrow money to
buy big-ticket items such as
cars and homes, and are also
seeing less growth in their investments. These factors
will probably pinch Americans particularly during
spring and summer, when
home-buying and driving
peak.
Overall, the economy is
still doing well today, and
many economists don’t expect any major disruption
this year. But the rise in consumer prices and interest
rates — and the stagnating
stock market — are seen by
many as warning signs that
this period of easy growth
could be ending.
“You’re moving from being benign to biting. It is a
fundamental shift from the
world we’ve known,” said
economist Diane Swonk of
Grant Thornton. “I fear
we’re seeding a boom-bust
cycle.”
That fear, experts say, explains why the stock market
has had such a difficult year.
“The markets always
lead the economy,” said
David Rosenberg, chief
economist and strategist at
Gluskin Sheff.
The transition to a lessforgiving era was underscored when the yield on the
10-year Treasury note, a bor-
David Goldman Associated Press
CREDIT CARD delinquency rates are inching up. Above, a credit card ad in a bank’s window in Atlanta.
rowing benchmark, touched
3%, a level it hadn’t seen
since 2013. Investors say interest rates will probably
continue to rise, especially
with the Federal Reserve
poised to further tighten
monetary policy.
From its March 2009 low
to its peak in late January,
the Dow roughly quadrupled, making millions of
Americans wealthier. But
now as bonds begin offering
investors a better rate of return without the risk of
losses that stockholders
face, stock performance is
down. Higher interest rates
will also push up corporate
borrowing costs and erode
profits, another negative for
stocks. Already, investors in
four of the last five weeks
pulled money from mutual
funds investing in domestic
stocks and added to their
bond funds, according to the
Investment Company Institute, an industry group.
The recent combination
of falling stock prices and
rising bond yields troubled
some financial market veterans. “It raises the risk of a
deep and disruptive drop by
share prices. A good analogy? 1987,” said John Lonski, chief economist for
Moody’s Analytics, referring
to the stock market crash of
1987. “This is not a favorable
portent. It’s an ominous development.”
Borrowing costs for ordinary Americans are on the
way up, too.
To battle the financial
crisis in 2008, the Fed
pushed short-term interest
rates to near zero and left
them there for years. Easy
money helped consumers
and businesses afford new
purchases and aided in the
healing of the economy.
Rising interest rates will
inflate borrowing costs for
consumers and companies
alike, adding $100 billion to
annual debt-servicing costs,
Rosenberg said. That is
money that consumers otherwise could spend on
houses, clothes and cars, or
that businesses could devote to new machinery.
But today’s rising bor-
rowing costs will hit an economy loaded with debt,
meaning that people and
businesses will have to
spend even more on interest
payments.
Corporations
outside the finance industry
at the end of last year owed
creditors more than $49 trillion.
That debt burden has
grown since 2004 at a rate
four times faster than the
economy, according to the
Federal Reserve.
Despite progress in paying off mortgage balances
since the housing collapse,
American households still
owe more in debt than they
make in disposable income.
Credit card delinquency
rates have begun inching up.
Interest payments (not
including mortgages) now
take as big a bite out of the
typical American’s income
as in mid-2008, when the crisis was gathering force, according to the Federal Reserve.
With
interest
rates
headed higher, some experts worry that consumer
borrowing no longer will be
able to power the economy.
“You still needed that
growth ... to drive the meager expansion that we’ve
seen,” said Daniel Alpert,
managing partner of Westwood Capital. “How much
on the household side was
that debt being increased in
order to make ends meet, i.e.
sustain existing levels of
spending?”
Americans already must
pay more for mortgages,
though that is not yet influ-
encing home-buying. Average rates on a 30-year fixed
rate mortgage hit 4.5% last
week, up from about 4% at
the beginning of the year.
That change would add
about $88 to the monthly
cost of a $300,000 mortgage,
yet applications for new
loans held steady last week,
according to the Mortgage
Bankers Assn.
“As rates rise over the
next couple of years, they
will weigh on housing demand,” said Alan Levenson,
chief economist for T. Rowe
Price.
Rising consumer prices
have not been a significant
problem for years. That may
be about to change. Recently, the Commerce Department reported that
prices, excluding food and
energy products, rose at a
2.5% annual clip in the first
three months of 2018.
Oil prices are nearing $70
a barrel, up roughly 50%
since August, and Trump’s
tariffs on steel, aluminum
and Chinese goods will raise
costs. The boost in spending
coming from the big tax cut
passed in December could
further push up prices.
That, in turn, may lead
the Fed to more quickly
move rates higher.
“The economy will run
hotter than it would have because of the tax cuts and
spending increases,” said
economist Michael Strain of
the American Enterprise Institute. “That will push the
Fed to increase interest
rates a little faster than they
otherwise would have.”
After topping $4 per gallon in 2008, gas prices have
remained below $3 for more
than three years.
But they have been
creeping higher for several
months. With the nationwide average now at $2.80,
filling up will cost the average household an additional
$190 this year, according to
the U.S. Energy Information
Administration.
While financial conditions are tightening, they remain comparatively easy.
The Fed’s benchmark interest rate — hovering between
1.5% and 1.75% — would need
to reach 3% before it begins
slowing
the
economy,
William Dudley, president of
the New York Federal Reserve Board, said in a recent
speech.
The Fed is expected to increase short-term borrowing rates three more times
this year, in quarter-of-apercentage-point
increments. If it does, and continues the trend into next year,
rates will reach the 3% level
by mid-2019, according to
Capital Economics.
L AT I ME S . CO M
WSC E
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
A11
Chiang touts fight for state labor
[Chiang, from A1]
an IRS tax lawyer.
The face-off in his second
year of what would be two
terms as controller is now a
central selling point in
Chiang’s campaign to be
California’s next governor, in
which he has lagged in the
polls. In an online ad, titled
“Underdog,” Chiang, now
state treasurer, touts his refusal “to let the governor cut
the pay of hardworking Californians.”
The message to voters,
Chiang said in an interview,
is that he would similarly do
battle for them.
The
clash
revealed
Chiang’s canny ability to
grab headlines while in a decidedly low-wattage post.
“Nobody has ever said
that, ‘Since the age of 4, I always wanted to be state controller or state treasurer.’ It’s
not normally a high-profile
office,” said Daniel J.B.
Mitchell, a state labor expert
and professor emeritus at
UCLA Anderson School of
Management. “There are
few moments where the opportunity comes along.”
Schwarzenegger’s plan to
cut state worker pay was one
such opportunity.
News of the proposal first
surfaced in July 2008 when
the Schwarzenegger administration floated a draft executive order that would temporarily pare back pay for
about 200,000 state workers
to the federal minimum
wage. With a new state
budget nearly a month overdue, the governor’s office
said the move, which would
have saved an estimated
$1 billion each month, would
keep the state solvent until a
new spending plan was in
place. At that point, the administration said, the workers would be repaid their lost
wages.
Chiang, who issued state
workers’ paychecks in his
role as state controller,
quickly lambasted the plan
as cruel and illegal when it
was first leaked to the news
media. He said the state had
plenty of cash to cover payroll, and he refused to go
along, arguing in part that
his office’s ancient computers would not be able to
process the temporary salary adjustments.
The governor’s proposal
was greeted with outrage
from public employees and
skepticism even from conservative corners, including
the right-leaning editorial
page of the Orange County
Register, which called it a
“minimally smart idea.”
But Schwarzenegger dug
in, signing the order a week
later and threatening to sue
Chiang if necessary. The
controller didn’t budge. Less
than two weeks later, the
governor took him to court.
The administration argued that, in the times of crisis, everyone had to feel the
pain, including public employees. Others said the
move had less to do with saving money and more to do
with using public pressure to
force legislators to agree on a
long-delayed spending plan.
“What he was trying to do
was force a budget settlement. That was his leverage,” Mitchell said. “Legislative Democrats would not
want to see state workers cut
to the minimum wage.”
Chiang says now he similarly saw the move as a
budget negotiating tactic.
“It was a morally bankrupt act to get a Democratic
Legislature to conform to
the governor’s wishes,” he
said.
Chiang’s refusal won
praise from public employee
groups, who allied with him
in the court battles. Bruce
Blanning, then the executive
director of the Professional
Engineers in California Government, said Chiang distinguished himself from other
Democrats by challenging
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
GUBERNATORIAL candidate John Chiang, shown at the California Democratic Party convention this year, has campaigned on his refusal
to follow then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s order to cut state worker pay during a fiscal crisis in 2008, his second year as state controller.
‘Nobody has ever
said that, “Since
the age of 4, I
always wanted to
be state controller
or state treasurer.”
It’s not normally a
high-profile
office.’
— Daniel J.B.
Mitchell,
UCLA state labor expert
Christina House Los Angeles Times
CHIANG’S battle with Schwarzenegger was hailed by state workers groups, but
California’s largest public employees union hasn’t endorsed his bid for governor.
the governor.
“Schwarzenegger intimidated a lot of people. He did
not
intimidate
John
Chiang,” said Blanning, who
still consults for the state engineers union, which has
supported Chiang’s campaign.
Inside the administration, the view of Chiang was
negative.
One
former
Schwarzenegger
official,
who requested anonymity to
speak candidly, said he was
seen as brown-nosing to a
powerful Democratic interest group, hardly qualifying
as political courage.
“It’s like saying someone
in Congress is standing up
for pharmaceutical companies,” said the official, who is
no longer in state government. Public employee
unions “are the most powerful political player in the
state. It’s not like standing
up for widows and orphans
here.”
Chiang rejected that
characterization, instead focusing on the low-wage
workers who would have
been affected by the plan.
“I don’t think the administrative assistant or the student intern or all these individuals feel attached to a politically powerful institution,” he said. “These are
individuals who are trying to
pay for their electricity bill,
their tuition.”
The standoff was rendered moot by September,
when
Schwarzenegger
signed a new state budget
deal — 85 days late. Still, the
issue lingered undecided in
the courts.
The two men would soon
clash again over a new order
by the governor mandating
that state workers take two
unpaid furlough days a
month to save money.
Chiang, again siding with
labor unions, said he would
not comply. He later argued
the furloughs should not apply to his office and those of
other statewide elected officials, because they are independent of the governor.
Schwarzenegger once again
sued. The liberal-leaning
Sacramento Bee accused
Chiang of “pandering to employee unions.”
The California Supreme
Court ultimately upheld the
furloughs but said future
governors would not have
unilateral authority to impose unpaid days off. A separate appeals court ruling
found that Schwarzenegger
did have the power to furlough the workers of elected
statewide officers.
Meanwhile, the workerpay fight continued in the
courts, with Schwarzeneg-
ger initially prevailing. The
governor again tried to reduce state workers’ salaries
to the federal minimum
wage in 2010. The cuts were
never put into place, although an appellate court
also sided with Schwarzenegger.
When Gov. Jerry Brown
took office in 2011, he decided
to drop the lawsuit, arguing
it would be too costly, according to news accounts.
“It was a close call on the
furloughs and on the minimum wage, legally,” Blanning said. “But he said,
here’s what I think is best for
California, and here’s what
my job is as controller.”
The state engineers
union issued a dual endorsement in this year’s governor’s race to Chiang and to
Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, an-
other Democrat who is the
front-runner in the race, according to numerous polls
ahead of the June 5 primary.
The group, which represents
13,000 workers, contributed
just under $15,000 to
Chiang’s and Newsom’s respective campaigns.
Despite Chiang’s fight for
state workers, the state’s
largest public employees
union has not backed his gubernatorial bid.
Alex Arnone, spokesman
for Service Employees International Union Local 1000,
called Chiang’s stance in the
minimum-wage tussle “the
right thing to do at the right
time,” but the group, along
with the statewide SEIU
council, instead endorsed
Newsom — the result of
what Arnone called a “thorough member engagement
process” of all SEIU members statewide.
Chiang maintains that he
has “widespread support”
from that union’s members.
And as for his old sparring partner? Chiang said
that despite the friction, he
wishes
Schwarzenegger
well.
“I disagreed with him
passionately and vehemently on issues,” Chiang
said. “But I do have respect
for people who give portions
of their life for the betterment of our state and our humanity.”
melanie.mason
@latimes.com
Twitter: @melmason
A12
MON DAY , M AY 7, 2018
WSCE
LAT IMES. C OM
L.A. battles the stigma of STDs
[STDs, from A1]
ways of preventing disease
— patients seeing a doctor
regularly to get screened
and treated — have not been
working, said Dr. Jeffrey
Gunzenhauser, L.A. County’s interim health officer.
“If that really happened,
this problem could be taken
care of,” he said.
The county recently created a Center for Health
Equity to evaluate the way
certain public health issues
are intertwined with social
factors such as income and
education, as well as racial
discrimination.
High STD rates are at the
top of the center’s list of priorities. In just the last five
years, the number of gonorrhea cases in Los Angeles
County doubled, with minorities suffering more than
most.
“The numbers are only
going up,” Gunzenhauser
said. “What’s going on is unacceptable.”
Breaking the silence
around sex for teens
The church auditorium
was decked out in streamers
and balloons. Kids chatted
around tables with piles of
Mardi Gras beads and condoms at the center.
Spring Into Love, which
began five years ago, is the
brainchild of a coalition of
L.A. County health advocates trying to bring down
STD rates. This year’s event,
held in late March, included
workshops on healthy relationships and body image,
as well as free STD testing.
Ashley Deras, 18, showed
a group of students how to
safely open a condom wrapper. She said her family almost never talked to her
about sex.
“Sexual health was something in my household that
was taboo,” Deras, a high
school senior, said in an interview. “All I heard was,
‘Don’t get pregnant.’ ”
Other teens at Spring
Into Love sought practical
information they hadn’t
learned in health class. One
boy said he hadn’t known he
could get STDs from anal
sex. Many said their parents
Francine Orr Los Angeles Times
DR. JEFFREY GUNZENHAUSER , L.A. County’s interim health officer, says fighting the stigma around sex
is just one of several ways health officials are trying to curb the rising rates of sexually transmitted diseases.
‘This is such a
natural human
interaction, and
yet it’s so
stigmatized.
People are having
sex? Yeah.’
— Valerie
Coachman-Moore,
who oversees the coalition
WeCanStopSTDsLA
would be mad at them for
asking questions about sex
at all.
“This is such a natural
human interaction, and yet
it’s so stigmatized,” said Valerie Coachman-Moore, who
oversees WeCanStopSTDsLA, the coalition of advo-
cates that put on the event.
“People are having sex?
Yeah.”
Many say the silence
around sex plays a big role in
young people’s high rates
of STDs. Many feel uncomfortable walking into an
STD clinic or talking to their
partners about safe practices.
In L.A. County, half of
chlamydia cases and a third
of gonorrhea cases diagnosed each year are among
people ages 15 to 24.
“The one thing I never do,
and I hope others don’t as
well, is blame these young
people for not taking care of
themselves,” said Barbara
Ferrer, head of L.A. County’s
Department
of
Public
Health.
Researchers increasingly
view public health problems
as shaped by the environments in which people live.
Neighborhoods where people of color reside, for example, are more likely to be pollution-ridden and have
fewer parks and doctors —
factors that directly affect
people’s health.
“This is not just their
problem, it’s a community
problem,” said Jim Rhyne of
WeCanStopSTDsLA.
Is systemic racism
to blame for woes?
Los Angeles County
launched a Center for
Health Equity in October to
address the idea that
“health predominantly happens outside the healthcare
setting,” said its director,
Heather Jue Northover, at a
recent meeting. “It happens
where we live, work, play and
pray.”
The center will target five
health disparities, including
high rates of STDs among
certain minority groups.
Nationwide, STD rates
have been climbing for the
last five years. More people
were diagnosed with syphilis, chlamydia or gonorrhea
in 2016 than ever before.
Some blame underfunding of STD prevention programs, as well as falling condom usage. There’s also
speculation that people are
having sex with more partners because of hookup
apps.
But the picture is more
complicated when it comes
to the high STD rates among
minorities. Gay and bisexual
men make up the vast majority of new syphilis cases.
In L.A. County, syphilis rates
among African American
women are six times higher
than white women and three
times higher than Latina
women.
Northover said that officials need to evaluate what’s
called structural or systemic
racism, the way housing or
education policies may
negatively affect people and
their health. Studies have
found, for example, that people with HIV who had low
levels of literacy were less
likely to follow their treatment, and that poorer
Americans were more likely
to engage in risky sexual behavior, increasing their risk
of STDs.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention released a white paper in 2010
saying the country could not
close disparities in STD
rates without addressing
“the interpersonal, network,
community, and societal influences of disease transmission and health.”
But that’s a tall order given how entrenched many social problems are.
Poverty or a lack of opportunity may be forcing
women to exchange sex for
resources, leading to the
spread of STDs, Northover
said.
There also tends to be a
mistrust of the medical system among African Americans, making them reluctant to seek care. Certain
neighborhoods may be excluded from access to
healthcare because of geography or finances, she said.
“We need to take a wider
lens,” said Northover, who
added that she’s still trying
to get to the bottom of what’s
driving STD rates.
County Supervisor Mark
Ridley-Thomas, who represents South Los Angeles,
convened several community groups in 2012 to try to
bring down STD rates
through collaboration. But
the still-growing case numbers suggest the approach
needs to be reimagined, said
Dr. Michael Hochman, a
senior health deputy for the
supervisor.
“If you keep doing the
same thing and expect a different result, then that’s insanity,” Hochman said.
soumya.karlamangla
@latimes.com
Twitter: @skarlamangla
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
L AT I ME S . CO M/ OP I N IO N
A13
OPINION
EDITORIALS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will this bill
make it illegal
to sell Bibles?
Probably not. But the effort to ban
gay ‘conversion therapy’ needs
clarifying just to make sure.
I
n 2012 California enacted a law that
bars licensed mental health providers
from engaging in therapy designed to
change the sexual orientation of patients under the age of 18. Now the state
Senate is considering a sequel of sorts. But
this new legislation is broader in its application — so broad that some critics are claiming that it could be used to interfere with the
sale of religious books, even the Bible.
Such fears may be farfetched. But AB
2943, which was passed by the Assembly last
month, contains ambiguities that need to be
cleared up if the legislation is to become law.
Like the 2012 statute, AB 2943 is inspired
by research showing that so-called conversion therapy is not only ineffective but harmful. Unlike the earlier law, however, this legislation targets “sexual orientation change efforts” aimed at adults as well as minors.
AB 2943 would expand the definition of
“unfair or deceptive acts or practices” in the
Consumer Legal Remedies Act to include
“advertising, offering to engage in or engaging in sexual orientation change efforts with
an individual.” Anyone who engaged in that
practice could be sued under the bill.
Would that include religious groups that
sold or even recommended books that propagated the idea that believers can use prayer
to overcome “same-sex attraction”? That’s
what several conservative organizations and
commentators are arguing. The 1st Amendment clearly protects their right to preach,
and encourage adherents to follow, religious
doctrine on sexual morality.
The Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative legal group, notes: “Numerous
books have been written to help those struggling with unwanted same-sex attraction or
gender identity confusion. Selling such
books, which ‘seek to change an individual’s
sexual orientation,’ would potentially be a
banned practice under AB 2943.”
Supporters of the bill scoff at this. A fact
sheet provided by Assemblyman Evan Low
(D-Silicon Valley), the sponsor of AB 2943,
asserts that the bill “does not apply to the
sale of books or any other kind of goods” and
that the Bible “would absolutely not be
banned.” Yet the bill itself makes no such
declaration. And the existing Consumer Legal Remedies Act clearly applies to the sale
of goods such as books, videos and other
educational materials.
Another complaint by critics is that, while
the bill permits therapies that “do not seek
to change sexual orientation,” it defines “sexual orientation change efforts” to include attempts to alter not only romantic attractions
but also “behaviors or gender expressions.”
Under this broad definition, wrote David
French in the National Review, if “a sexually
active gay man or woman sought counseling
not to change their orientation but rather to
become celibate, then the services and goods
provided in that effort would violate this
statute.”
Many Californians obviously reject the
idea that gays and lesbians shouldn’t engage
in sexual activity. But many religious groups
(including the Roman Catholic Church)
teach that sex is permissible only within heterosexual marriage. The 1st Amendment
protects their right to counsel adherents to
live by those teachings.
Granted, the 2012 law banning conversion
therapy for minors by licensed professionals
also included efforts to change “behaviors or
gender expressions.” But that law regulated
only the conduct of licensed professionals.
Now, the state would be going further, including trying to regulate nonprofessionals.
In upholding the 2012 law against a 1st
Amendment challenge, the U.S. 9th Circuit
Court of Appeals emphasized that the statute didn’t prevent mental health providers
from referring minors to unlicensed counselors “such as religious leaders.”
Finally, it’s true that AB 2943 covers only
sexual orientation change efforts that result
in the “sale or lease of goods or services” and
thus wouldn’t affect a lot of religious communications in which no money changes hands.
But what if a minister urged someone he or
she was counseling to buy a book or enroll in
a religious seminar that charged a fee?
Treating that activity as consumer fraud
would raise serious constitutional questions.
It’s possible that the critics of this bill are
being alarmist, but the language is ambiguous enough to justify at least some of their
concerns. The Senate can allay them by
amending the bill to make it clear that it
can’t be used against books or religious
preaching or counseling about sexuality.
OP-ED
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Selective outrage won’t do
By Lev Golinkin
N
othing stays
above politics
forever, not even
the Holocaust.
Last week,
Palestinian leader Mahmoud
Abbas was caught spewing
anti-Semitic vitriol, including
the notion that Jews were responsible for the Holocaust.
The denunciations from American Jewish leaders were swift
and unequivocal. But they also
rang hollow.
In February, Polish Prime
Minister Mateusz Morawiecki
publicly said there were “Jewish
perpetrators” of the Holocaust.
Morawiecki’s remark — which
scholars condemned as a form
of Holocaust denial — came in
the wake of Warsaw’s new memory law, which made it illegal to
claim that Poland had participated in the Holocaust. The law
triggered a wave of anti-Semitism in Poland that shows few
signs of abating. Indeed, just
last month a senior Polish lawmaker tweeted that “the Jews
are not humans, they are animals!”
Yet American Jewish leaders’ reaction to Morawiecki’s
remark was exponentially more
muted than the outrage over
Abbas. Their responses were
cushioned with words such as
“unfortunate” and “misstatement,” stunning euphemisms
considering Morawiecki is the
prime minister of a nation
where 60,000 people took the
streets in November chanting,
“Pure blood.”
This strangely restrained
response of U.S. Jews is, unfortunately, all too common when
it comes to the Holocaust distortion surging across Eastern
Europe. On April 28, a thousand
Ukrainians marched in honor of
a local SS unit. The demonstration, which included Nazi
salutes, capped off a week in
which a Holocaust memorial
was firebombed, the tomb of a
rabbi was desecrated, and
neo-Nazis conducted antiRoma pogroms in the heart of
Kiev. Surely these events deserve denunciation too, yet once
again, American Jews were
mostly silent.
There is an explanation for
this reticence. American Jewish
organizations spent decades
campaigning for the liberation
of Soviet Jews who, like the
Poles and dozens of other national groups, were trapped in
what President Reagan called
the Evil Empire. “For your
freedom and ours!” was the
Efrem Lukatsky Associated Press
ULTRA-rightists rally in Kiev. Illiberal nationalism is surging through Eastern Europe.
American Jews
must mobilize
against the wave
of Holocaust denial
sweeping through
Eastern Europe.
battle cry of those fighting
communism. It was obvious
that the success of any liberation movement — Jewish, Polish, Baltic — was a blow to Moscow and a victory for everyone
yearning to cast off the Kremlin
yoke. A lingering nostalgia for
that common struggle is what
keeps U.S. Jewish leaders and
lawmakers from speaking out
now.
My Jewish family came to
America as political refugees
from the Soviet Union in 1990, so
I can certainly relate to the
sentiment. I was in Estonia
during the 1989 Singing
Revolution, when hundreds of
thousands took to the streets
there and in Lithuania and
Latvia, peacefully demonstrating for freedom. I remember the thrill of hearing news of
the communist bloc falling
apart, and the fierce joy later of
visiting cities like Prague and
marveling at how democratic
nations had risen out of decades
of communist oppression.
But the 1990s are gone. An
illiberal ultra-nationalism is
replacing that democratic
impulse across Eastern Europe,
particularly Poland, Hungary
and my homeland, Ukraine.
Nearly every week, some new
outrage emanates from the
region. Lithuania is considering
a draconian book ban aimed at
whitewashing its Nazi collaborators. And with the resounding
victory last month of Hungary’s
prime minister, Viktor Orban,
and his anti-Semitic, antiMuslim Fidesz party, we can be
sure Budapest will redouble its
own campaign of glorification of
Nazi collaborators.
In this disturbing climate,
nostalgic equivocation and
selective outrage are dangerous.
When Holocaust denial is
treated differently depending
on which world leader utters it,
politics has trumped history
and remembrance. And when
people who should know better
are more upset about how much
time an African American city
councilman (Trayon White of
the District of Columbia) spent
in a Holocaust museum than
they are about Europeans
celebrating Nazi collaborators,
something has gone terribly
wrong.
On April 19, 1985, Elie Wiesel,
the voice and soul of Holocaust
survivors, demonstrated the
meaning of righteous chutzpah.
Wiesel was at the White House
to receive the Congressional
Gold Medal from Reagan, who
was about to commemorate VE
Day by visiting a German military cemetery where members
of the SS were among the dead.
“That place, Mr. President, is
not your place,” Wiesel publicly
admonished the leader of the
free world. “Your place is with
the victims of the SS.”
Wiesel died in 2016, and the
number of survivors of the Nazi
camps wanes every year. But as
the Holocaust transitions into
history, the battle over victims
and perpetrators of World War
II is only heating up. Indeed,
one of Wiesel’s last major public
acts was to renounce an award
he had received from Hungary
in protest of Budapest’s whitewashing of its collaboration
with the Germans. That was in
2012; since then, Holocaust
denial and Nazi whitewashing
has only spread.
Your place in that battle,
American Jews and especially
American Jewish leaders, is still
with the victims, the ones who
never got the chance to walk the
halls of Congress, and sit on
boards of foundations, and
thrive in the United States. Your
place is not on the sidelines, and
it’s not alongside those defiling
the memory of the Holocaust.
Lev Golinkin is the author of
the memoir “A Backpack, a
Bear, and Eight Crates of
Vodka.”
Do we really want Amazon’s HQ2?
The winner’s curse in
economics suggests that
winning bids are very
often too high.
By Amihai Glazer
T
wenty American
cities, including Los
Angeles, have been
busy in recent weeks
wooing visiting executives from Amazon, hoping to
become the location for the
company’s
second
headquarters. Amazon has promised that up to 50,000 jobs and
$5 billion in investment will flow
to the new HQ2 city.
The winner of this competition, however, may find itself a
big loser.
Despite the long list of requirements — including a “a
compatible cultural and community environment,” a skilled
workforce and close access to
transportation options — Amazon has essentially pitted these
cities against one another in an
auction. The cities are bidding
with tax incentives, infrastructure investments and the like
hoping to win HQ2 and presumably the jobs and riches that will
flow from it. A city that estimates, for example, that HQ2
will produce $5 billion in new tax
revenue from all the economic
activity may be willing to spend,
say, $4.5 billion to get the headquarters. Another area may assess the benefits are even
higher, and so offer $7 billion in
incentives. (That's what the
state of New Jersey is offering
for the Newark location.)
Each city, however, does not
really know what the benefits of
the headquarters will be; it can
only ask various experts to estimate them. Even with deliberation, some guesses will be too
high, and some too low. But the
city that offers the greatest incentives, and gets the headquarters, is likely one that overestimated the benefits.
This problem, called the
winner’s curse, was well described by Nobel Prize-winning
economist Richard Thaler
some years ago. He was building on work by engineers from
Atlantic Richfield Oil Co. showing why the winner of an auction
for drilling rights may, on average, bid more than the value of
the drilling rights. Follow-up
studies found that oil firms
really do suffer from the winner's curse. For example, in auctions for oil tracts in the Gulf of
News
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Mexico, oil companies earned
profits so low they would have
been better off taking their
money to the local credit union.
Today state and city officials
hope to land Amazon’s HQ2. In
the 1970s the big prize was the
first automobile assembly plant
in the United States by a foreign
carmaker, Volkswagen. States
competed to get the factory,
which VW promised would create as many as 20,000 jobs.
States didn’t have to believe
that number, but the most
credulous states would be the
ones willing to offer the richest
incentives.
The state of Pennsylvania
provided $75 million (more than
$300 million in today’s dollars)
to land the plant in Westmoreland County. The state also
spent $30 million ($135 million
in today's dollars) building a
railroad spur and a highway to
serve the plant. It spent smaller
sums helping to screen 45,000
job applicants. In addition, the
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency compromised on air
pollution enforcement, and local governments granted fiveyear property tax breaks.
But the Volkswagen plant
never hired anywhere near
20,000 people; the peak was
about 6,000 jobs. By 1984 em-
ployment dropped to 1,500. The
plant shut down in 1988.
As another example of overestimates, General Electric
moved its headquarters to Boston in 2017, after looking at 40
cities. Boston and the state of
Massachusetts offered an incentives
package
totaling
$145 million, expecting to get
800 jobs and an investment of
$200 million. But a few months
afterward, GE delayed opening
its new building by two years
and announced layoffs.
When Amazon announces
its HQ2, 19 cities are likely to, at
first, feel the sting of disappointment. But they should
pause and consider that the
winning city probably gave
away excessively high tax
breaks and incentives, and their
own city officials did not.
Amihai Glazer is an
economics professor at UC
Irvine, where he directs the
Program in Corporate Welfare.
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MONDAY, MAY 7, 2018 WSCE
LOS ANGELES TIMES
CALIFORNIA
B
M O N D A Y , M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
State GOP
endorses no
candidate
for governor
Division around the
top race could lead to
down-ticket fallout.
By Seema Mehta
and Phil Willon
Photographs by Tomas
Ovalle For The Times
VISALIA POLICE SGT. Damon Maurice walks along Evans Ditch, which police believe was used by Gold-
en State Killer suspect Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. to access homes that he would break into and ransack.
‘This is the ghost
we’ve been chasing’
SAN DIEGO — The California Republican Party did
not agree on an endorsement Sunday in the governor’s race, a development
that could stifle the chances
that GOP voters will coalesce behind a candidate
before the June 5 primary
election.
Businessman John Cox
received 55.3% of the vote,
short of the 60% required for
the party nod. Assemblyman Travis Allen received
40.5%, while 4.1% voted for no
endorsement at the party’s
convention in San Diego.
The lack of a party endorsement in the gubernatorial contest could have significant political ramifications. Cox and Allen are not
well known to California voters, and backing from the
party stood to provide a
powerful signal to unde-
cided voters. If voters split
between the two men, the
state GOP risks a repeat of
the 2016 U.S. Senate contest,
when no Republican advanced to the general election, leaving voters with a
choice between two Democrats on the November ballot.
But the stakes are higher
this year — if the Republicans fail to launch a candidate to the top of the ticket,
Republican voter turnout
could be dampened in November, posing a threat to
the party’s ability to hold on
to several congressional
seats that are key to the
GOP retaining control of
Congress.
“It’s absolutely necessary
that we as a party are united
around the top race in the
state,” Karen Roseberry, a
Los Angeles County delegate, said as she unsuccessfully urged the party to reconsider the endorsement
vote. “Every down-ticket
race is counting on this.”
Despite losing out on an
endorsement from their
party, Cox’s and Allen’s campaigns both predicted top[See Republicans, B5]
Suspected killer’s arrest gives Visalia police a ‘jolt’
By Sarah Parvini
A PISTOL stolen from Pat Monno’s Visalia home in 1975 was later used to
kill a local journalism professor. Authorities believe the thief was DeAngelo.
VISALIA, Calif. — Visalia
Police Det. Bill McGowen sat in
the garage of the single-story
home on West Kaweah Avenue
and waited for the man who had
stalked these streets for more
than a year.
That night in December
1975, McGowen watched as a
shadowy figure prowled between the home he was hiding
in and the house next door. McGowen ran outside and ordered
the man to stop, according to
media reports at the time. The
man ran, and after McGowen
fired a warning shot, he begged
the officer not to shoot.
As McGowen shined his
flashlight at him, the unmasked
man reached for a gun in his
jacket and took a shot, police
said. The bullet hit McGowen’s
flashlight, and shards rico[See Arrest, B4]
UC workers are set to strike
Campuses plan to stay
open amid a three-day
walkout by 50,000.
By Teresa Watanabe
More than 50,000 workers
across the University of California are set to strike this
week, causing potential disruptions to surgery schedules, food preparation and
campus maintenance.
The system’s 10 campuses and five medical centers are to remain open, with
classes
scheduled
as
planned.
UC’s largest employee
union, the American Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employees Local
3299, plans to begin a threeday strike Monday involving
25,000 workers, including
custodians,
gardeners,
cooks, truck drivers, lab
technicians and nurse aides.
The union and university
reached a bargaining impasse last year, and subsequent mediation efforts
have failed to produce an
agreement over wage increases, healthcare premiums and retirement terms.
Two other unions have
Luis Sinco Los Angeles Times
A RALLY at UCLA in 2015. UC and its largest em-
ployee union reached a bargaining impasse last year.
approved sympathy strikes
Tuesday and Wednesday.
About 14,000 members of the
California Nurses Assn., who
work at UC’s medical centers and student health clinics, are set to walk off their
jobs, along with 15,000 members of the University Professional & Technical Employees, who include phar-
macists, clinical social workers, physical therapists,
physician assistants and researchers.
In addition, members of
UAW Local 2865, which represents graduate students
who teach, tutor and grade
assignments, may support
the strike, which could result
in some canceled classes,
said Garrett Strain, a union
official and UC Berkeley
graduate student.
Strain said his union did
not authorize a strike because members are under
contract but individuals are
legally allowed to honor the
picket lines.
UC officials said they
have made plans to minimize disruptions. At UCLA
for instance, some eateries
will be closed but other dining halls will remain open
with extended hours. UCLA
has hired temporary healthcare professionals to fill in
for striking workers, and UC
San Diego has rescheduled
some elective surgeries at its
medical center.
AFSCME has assembled
a voluntary “patient protection task force” whose members will leave the picket line
to respond to life-threatening emergencies if needed,
said union spokesman John
de los Angeles. At UC’s request, a Sacramento County
Superior Court judge issued
a temporary restraining order Friday barring certain
essential employees, such as
pharmacists and respiratory therapists, from participating in the planned strike
in order to protect the public
[See UC, B5]
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
GOP DELEGATES could not unite behind a candi-
date at the party’s weekend convention in San Diego.
CAPITOL JOURNAL
Shooting down
Newsom claim
to NRA ‘first’
GEORGE SKELTON
in sacramento
You’ve got to
wonder what
goes through a
candidate’s
head when his
first TV ad
contains an
indisputable,
major falsehood.
Maybe nothing goes
through it. Maybe he
doesn’t recognize the falsehood and it’s not an intentional lie.
Maybe he didn’t even see
the ad — just overly relied
on handlers who got sloppy
or thought no one would
notice what they regarded
as a typical, within-thebounds political exaggeration.
Whatever. It’s not the
kind of tactic that builds
public confidence in a gubernatorial candidate’s
A sudden shift
in the nation’s
opioid crisis
Overdose deaths are
tied to synthetic drug
surge, surpassing
those that involve a
prescription. B2
credentials to lead the nation’s most populous state
and, because of his relative
youth — 50 — and charisma,
automatically become a
potential contender for
president.
Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom,
front-runner in the race to
succeed termed-out Gov.
Jerry Brown, ran a TV ad
claiming he was “the first to
take on the National Rifle
Assn. and win.”
Hardly.
This is the relevant ad
text, read by a pleasantsounding female narrator:
“The L.A. Times called
Gavin Newsom ‘Ahead of
the pack, from gay marriage
to gun control.’ The first
mayor to recognize marriage equality. The first to
provide healthcare to every
resident. The first to take on
the National Rifle Assn. and
win. The one candidate with
[See Skelton, B6]
Volunteers keep
eyes on border
Exercise is a response
to recent immigrant
caravan, group says, as
well as a warning to
state leaders. B3
Lottery ......................... B2
B2
M O N DAY , MAY 7, 2018
Lottery results
For Saturday, May 5, 2018
SuperLotto Plus
Mega number is bold
1-15-36-38-43—Mega 26
Jackpot: $11 million
Winners per category:
5 + Mega
5
4 + Mega
4
3 + Mega
3
2 + Mega
1 + Mega
Mega only
No. of
winners
0
0
6
260
399
10,927
5,653
28,359
44,419
Amount
of prize(s)
—
—
$2,911
$111
$65
$11
$12
$2
$1
Powerball
Powerball number is bold
14-29-36-57-61—Powerball 17
Jackpot: $215 million
California winners per category:
5 + P-ball
5
4 + P-ball
4
3 + P-ball
3
2 + P-ball
1 + P-ball
P-ball only
No. of
winners
0
0
6
82
166
3,899
3,404
26,107
64,583
Amount
of prize(s)
—
—
$8,940
$327
$167
$8
$8
$5
$4
Winning jackpot ticket(s) sold in other
states: None
For Sunday, May 6, 2018
Fantasy Five: 7-20-23-35-39
Daily Four: 1-4-0-8
Daily Three (midday): 9-5-9
Daily Three (evening): 2-7-7
Daily Derby:
(12) Lucky Charms
(9) Winning Spirit
(5) California Classic
Race time: 1:45.04
Results on the internet:
www.latimes.com/lottery
General information:
(800) 568-8379
(Results not available at this number)
S
LAT IMES. C OM
SCIENCE FILE
A sudden shift in opioid crisis
Overdose deaths tied
to a synthetic surge,
topping those that
involve a prescription.
KAREN KAPLAN
The U.S. opioid crisis has
passed a dubious milestone:
Overdose deaths involving
synthetic opioids like illicit
fentanyl have surpassed
deaths involving prescription opioids.
This switch occurred in
2016, according to data published last week in the Journal of the American Medical
Assn. And it seemed to happen pretty suddenly.
Data from the National
Vital Statistics System show
that there were 42,249 opioid-related overdose deaths
in 2016. That includes 19,413
that involved synthetic opioids, 17,087 that involved prescription opioids and 15,469
that involved heroin. (In
some cases, more than one
type of drug was implicated
in the death.)
That means synthetic
opioids were a factor in 46%
of all fatal opioid overdoses
in 2016, compared with 40%
for prescription opioids.
Just one year earlier, in
2015, 29% of all opioid-related overdose deaths involved a synthetic opioid
(9,580 out of 33,091 deaths).
The year before that, in
2014,
synthetic
opioids
played a role in just 19% of all
opioid-related
overdose
deaths (5,544 out of 28,647
deaths).
From 2010 to 2013, the percentage of fatal opioid overdoses that involved a synthetic opioid held relatively
steady, ranging from 11% to
14%.
“We have been very focused on the threat of prescription opioid overdose
deaths, and this paper
shows us that we need to remain vigilant about the ever
shifting nature of the crisis,”
said Emily Einstein, a health
science policy analyst at the
National Institute on Drug
Mexican Secretariat of National Defense
FENTANYL appears to be fueling the surge in synthetic opioids. Above, pills containing the powerful narcotic.
Abuse and co-author of the
Journal of the American
Medical Assn. study.
The drug that appears to
be fueling the explosion in
synthetic opioids is fentanyl,
a narcotic that is “about 100
times more potent that morphine,” according to the
Drug Enforcement Administration.
Medical versions of fentanyl have been in use since
the 1960s, and about 6.5 million prescriptions for the
drug were filled in 2015, the
DEA says.
The problem with fentanyl is that it works too well.
“A very small amount of
fentanyl can provide the
same number of highs” as a
larger amount of heroin or
other street drugs, Einstein
said.
“For an opioid user, it’s a
very fast-onset high, and so
it’s very rewarding,” she
explained. “It’s also incredibly dangerous for the same
reason. Its potency causes it
to suppress respiration very
quickly, and sometimes people will overdose with the
needle still in their arm.”
Illicit fentanyl is not only
being sold on its own. It’s
also being combined with
other street drugs, said Dr.
Wilson Compton, deputy director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and
another of the study’s authors.
“We’re seeing fentynl being included in cocaine,
we’re seeing it included in
methamphetamine, we’re
seeing it included in many
classes of drugs sold on the
street,” Compton said. “This
toxic poison is now being
seen both in fake pills as well
as in the powders that are
sold on the street, almost no
matter what type of drugs
people think they’re getting.”
It’s possible that illicit
fentanyl and other synthetic
opioids are doing even more
damage than these new figures suggest, the researchers wrote.
The National Vital Statistics System relies on information that coroners and
medical examiners include
on death certificates. But in
15% to 25% of fatal overdoses, the death certificate
doesn’t specify the type of
drug involved.
It’s also possible that synthetic opioids may have
played a bigger role in previous years, but medical examiners didn’t see it then because there was less testing
for these types of drugs at
the time, they said.
Regardless, the new figures make clear that the
surge in synthetic opioids
“poses substantial risks to
individual
and
public
health,” the researchers
wrote. “Clinicians, first responders, and lay persons
likely to respond to an overdose should be trained on
synthetic opioid risks and
equipped with multiple
doses of naloxone,” a medication that can reverse
the effects of anopioid overdose.
karen.kaplan@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATkarenkaplan
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
L AT I ME S . CO M
B3
CITY & STATE
Hayne Palmour IV San Diego Union-Tribune
VOLUNTEERS , some from the Minuteman patrol movement, gather Saturday in San Diego County to prepare for a 24-hour exercise to assist border authorities.
Border volunteers keep watch
Exercise is a response to recent migrant caravan, group says, as well as a warning to state leaders
By Bradley J. Fikes
SAN DIEGO — Pledging
to report unauthorized entries into the United States
— and shame any state leaders who welcome them —
about 20 border security
supporters assembled Saturday morning near Jamul.
The group, including
members of the Minuteman
patrol movement, coordinated volunteers to watch
over designated border regions for 24 hours.
Their vigil, starting at 9
a.m. Saturday, was meant to
help federal officers, Minuteman leader Tim Donnelly said.
By reporting unauthorized border crossings, the
observers hope to help outnumbered border officers,
Donnelly said. He is a Republican candidate for the
8th Congressional District,
which covers much of the
desert area north of Imperial County.
The border-watching exercise was in part a reaction
to the caravan of Central
Americans who recently
traveled through Mexico to
enter the U.S. at the border
between San Diego and Tijuana, said Donnelly, a former assemblyman. The
roughly 200 migrants are
seeking political asylum in
the U.S.
It was also meant as a
warning to Gov. Jerry
Brown, who signed the California Values Act, which lim-
its law enforcement in the
state from certain kinds of
cooperation with federal immigration officials. The law
has been criticized as an effort to make the state a sanctuary for immigrants in the
country illegally.
“My hope is that we will
reignite the [Minuteman]
movement and that people
will again be aiding [border
agents] for longer periods of
time, longer musters,” Donnelly said.
The camouflage-dressed
volunteers were instructed
on safety before heading out
from Pio Pico campground.
Volunteers were told to avoid
confrontations with border
crossers if possible, and to
help those in distress.
“There is no animus
toward those who are crossing desperate, you know, to
escape oppression,” Donnelly said. “But at the same
time, among those people
come through wolves, people who mean harm people
like Luis Bracamontes, who
was just recently sentenced
to death here in California
for executing two sheriff ’s
deputies up in Sacramento.”
While expressing sympathy for plight of border
crossers, Donnelly and others criticized Brown, who
they said has violated his
oath of office.
“This is not about waving
American flags,” Donnelly
said. “This is about actually
securing the border and
sending a message to the political authorities.
“I dare Jerry Brown to
come down and arrest me,
because you might get arrested down here for being a
tyrant, for being a traitor, for
aiding and abetting illegal
aliens and harboring them
in violation of federal law,
which is the supreme law of
the land when it comes to
immigration, ” he said.
Lisa Collins of Orange
County said she had been a
member of the Minuteman
group since 2005, when illegal immigration surged.
“There were so many illegals that were coming
across the border, and I’m
one that believes you can’t
complain about a subject
unless you’re willing to do
something about it,” Collins
said.
Supporter
Ben
Bergquam said he was there
to show solidarity with the
group, although not taking
part in the border watch. He
is co-founder and spokesman for the Fight Sanctuary
State Movement.
“I represent the angel
parents who’ve lost their
loved ones to criminal illegal
aliens that are protected by
the lawless politicians like
Jerry Brown,” he said.
The group is preparing to
launch a statewide initiative
to repeal California’s “sanctuary state” legislation,
Bergquam said.
bradley.fikes
@sduniontribune.com
Fikes writes for the San
Diego Union-Tribune.
Fatal dog attack
a ‘true tragedy,’
authorities say
Family’s three canines
are removed from
Sherman Oaks home
after 3-month-old
girl is mauled.
By Hailey
Branson-Potts
Mark Boster Los Angeles Times
A PROPOSED ballot measure would shift the cost of lead paint cleanup from three companies to taxpayers.
Paint firms seek voter help
By Liam Dillon
SACRAMENTO — As
three national paint companies move closer to getting a
measure on California’s November ballot that would
wipe out a court ruling
against them, state lawmakers are pushing the companies to back down from some
of their claims.
ConAgra, NL Industries
and Sherwin-Williams announced Thursday that they
have started to submit more
than 680,000 signatures to
ensure their initiative appears on the ballot. The
companies’ plan would
eliminate a court order for
them to pay an estimated
$700 million to clean up lead
paint. It would replace it
with $2 billion in taxpayerfunded bonds to finance the
cleanup of lead, mold and
other hazardous materials.
The companies have also
started a digital ad campaign asking Californians to
persuade their lawmakers to
propose bills that would
overturn the court ruling.
The companies’ contend
that the court ruling “red
tags” millions of homes and
makes homeowners potentially liable for lead paint
cleanup.
The problem is that none
of those claims are true,
eight state legislators say in
a letter sent to the companies’
chief
executives
Wednesday.
“It is offensive that after
decades of deceiving the
public and fighting to shirk
your court-ordered responsibilities, you would again attempt to mislead California
homeowners,” the letter
said.
Lawmakers have received thousands of emails
from homeowners via the
companies’ site, Assemblyman David Chiu (D-San
Francisco) said in a conference call with reporters
Thursday. Chiu and his colleagues want the companies
to take the site down.
The companies don’t
plan to do so, said Antonio
Dias, an attorney representing Sherwin-Williams, and
contend that legislators
should work with them to
mitigate the effects of the
court ruling.
Instead, Chiu and his colleagues have introduced a
package of bills aimed at further holding the companies’
liable for lead paint-related
cleanup.
The eight legislators who
signed the letter asking the
companies to stop their ad
campaign are Chiu, Assemblywomen Monique Limón
(D-Santa Barbara) and
Wendy Carrillo (D-Los Angeles); Assemblymen Mark
Stone (D-Scotts Valley),
Richard Bloom (D-Santa
Monica), Rob Bonta (D-Alameda) and Kevin McCarty
(D-Sacramento); and state
Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San
Francisco).
liam.dillon@latimes.com
Animal control officers
have taken custody of three
dogs after at least one of
them fatally mauled a 3month-old girl in a Sherman
Oaks home, according to the
Los Angeles Police Department.
The attack was reported
at 3:25 p.m. Saturday in the
14400 block of Benefit Street,
and the girl died at a hospital, authorities said. The
dogs were family pets, the
LAPD said.
“This is a horrible case,”
said Capt. Lillian Carranza
of the LAPD’s Van Nuys Station. “It has touched all involved family, friends and
first responders. Our hearts
go out to the family and
friends. As I understand,
next Sunday would have
been the mother’s first
Mother’s Day.”
Carranza said the case is
a “true tragedy” with no indication of neglect or criminal intent. The family, she
said, is distraught.
It is unclear which, or
how many, of the dogs attacked the baby.
The dogs at the home
were a 98-pound Rottweiler,
an 89-pound Labrador and a
10-pound terrier, Carranza
said.
A grandmother was
baby-sitting and stepped
away “for a few seconds” to
get the infant’s bottle, Carranza said. The dogs were
able to sneak into the room.
The Mayor’s Crisis Response Team has been in
contact with the family, and
the LAPD is offering resources to them and to those
who responded to the home,
authorities said.
hailey.branson
@latimes.com
Twitter:
@haileybranson
B4
MON DAY , MAY 7, 2018
WSCE
LAT IMES. C OM
Connecting a ransacker and a killer
[Arrest, from B1]
cheted into his eye. The man
fled.
The shooting was the final crime attributed to the
Visalia Ransacker, Visalia
Police Sgt. Damon Maurice
said.
Between April 1974 and
December 1975, the Visalia
Ransacker slinked through
this small town’s streets and
alleys and burglarized about
100 homes, police said. The
burglaries turned deadly in
September
1975,
when
Claude Snelling, a journalism professor at the College
of the Sequoias, was shot
outside his home on South
Whitney Lane.
Although police never recovered the weapon, they
later discovered that the gun
used to shoot Snelling was
the same one that was stolen
from a nearby home.
After last month’s arrest
of the suspected Golden
State Killer, Joseph James
DeAngelo Jr., the Visalia Police Department said it believes the ransacker and the
killer are the same man. But
in the absence of crime scene
Tomas Ovalle For The Times
SGT. DAMON MAURICE looks at a map showing homes that had been burglarized by the Visalia Ransacker.
DNA, police are working to
use fingerprints found at the
burglary scenes, as well as
items that were left behind,
to prove the connection.
DeAngelo’s arrest has
provided a “jolt” to Visalia
police’s investigation, Mau-
rice said. Police are working
with the Sacramento Sheriff ’s Department to determine whether any of the
items stolen in Visalia were
found in DeAngelo’s Citrus
Heights home.
“This is the ghost we’ve
been chasing,” he said.
The ransacker’s pattern
was unique, Maurice said,
because most burglars enter
a home, grab what they want
and leave as quickly as possible. But the ransacker
would linger. In some cases,
he would stay for an hour,
maybe two. He would ignore
valuable items, like jewelry,
and take trinkets or photos
instead.
“This guy was completely
different,” Maurice said.
“This is a small town. We
didn’t have serial criminals.”
The burglar had rifled
through Pat Monno’s home
while he and his family were
away in Fresno, Monno recalled. When he pulled into
his garage that day, he saw
the screen had been removed from a window facing
the backyard, near his swimming pool.
He walked into his bedroom and saw that someone
had taken every pair of his
underwear and placed them
down the hallway and into
the family room “like stepping stones.”
“Everything
in
that
house was out,” Monno, 83,
said as he sipped on a cup of
green tea. “Every kitchen
drawer, everything, dumped
on the floor.”
The ransacker didn’t
take anything of value, he
said, except for his pistol —
the one used to kill Snelling.
His wife’s jewelry remained
untouched, but the burglar
had taken pieces of costume
jewelry from his daughter’s
room — one earring from
each set and a bracelet —
and photos of her that sat in
frames in her room.
“I was wondering what
the heck happened,” Monno
said.
About 130,000 people live
in Visalia, but at the time the
ransacker prowled through
this town near Sequoia National Park, it was home to
about 30,000 people.
Most of them knew one
another, leaving their doors
unlocked and their windows
open when they went to
work. The streets the burglar hit near the community
college and high school were
lined by single-story homes
with perfect lawns. The freeway abutting part of the
neighborhood was a simple
two-lane road.
“This was Any Town,
USA,” Maurice said. “You
could run across the freeway
if you wanted to.”
Driving through the
streets the ransacker once
plundered, Maurice explained that the burglaries
fell into two clusters on ei-
ther side of South Mooney
Boulevard.
Back then, many of the
homes were poorly lighted.
Most didn’t have fences surrounding the property. The
alleys that still run along the
homes had no lights, either
— a prowler could easily
sneak by unnoticed, Maurice said.
“If you’re the Visalia Ransacker, these are your
streets,” he said. “He could
come and go as he pleased.”
Some of the houses the
ransacker hit backed into a
canal called Evans Ditch.
The canal, filled with rocks
and weeds, provided an easy
path for the burglar to follow
undetected.
Maurice turned onto
South Whitney Lane and
stopped his car. As he stood
outside the home where
Snelling was killed, he explained that the shooter had
fled on a stolen bike. The
street looked different then,
he said — the brick wall
separating the neighborhood from the freeway didn’t
exist, and the freeway was
street-level.
The house, which now
has an iron screen on the
front door and motion sensors on the corner, has been
repainted cream.
Michelle Goans, an artist
who moved into the home a
few months ago, said neither
she nor her landlord knew
the house’s history. They
found out only after reporters began knocking at the
door recently.
“It’s surreal,” Goans, 29,
said. “It doesn’t bother us,
but I always thought we’d
know if we were in this situation, not that we would find
out about it six, seven
months later.”
Goans walked through
her living room and into the
backyard where Snelling
was killed. The carport
where the shooting occurred
is now gone, but Goans said
she believes it used to stand
near the garage, where there
is now a laundry room.
The house has seen a lot
of turnover in the last few
years, she added, with new
tenants moving in and out.
“I’m not a superstitious
person,” she said. “Most
places you live probably
have had something happen
in it. I just happen to know
now.”
sarah.parvini@latimes.com
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
L AT I ME S . CO M
B5
Neither wins party’s backing Workers
at UC
[Republicans, from B1]
two finishes in June to compete against Democratic
front-runner Gavin Newsom
in the general election.
“As someone who worked
hard on this, I’m obviously
disappointed,” Cox spokesman Matt Shupe said.
“However, this does not stall
our campaign one bit. We
have the resources to move
forward and take the fight to
the Democrats. Travis Allen
has no pathway without this
endorsement.”
Allen framed the vote as a
success because his supporters blocked an endorsement for Cox, a wealthy
businessman who has donated more than $4 million
to his campaign.
“We’re ecstatic. The bottom line is John Cox with his
Chicago money tried to buy
California votes,” Allen said,
adding that he has more
than 13 million mailers hitting GOP voters’ mailboxes
next week. “We are going to
go and take our message
across the state of California, and we’re going to take
our state back and I’m going
to win.”
Both men face formidable challenges. The last time
a Republican was elected to
statewide office was more
than a decade ago, and the
party’s share of voter registration has plummeted
since.
One possible bright spot
for the party is a proposed
initiative to repeal increases
to the state gas tax. The effort is likely to qualify for the
November ballot, and party
leaders hope it will boost
GOP turnout and appeal to
Democratic and independent voters.
“This is unbeatable,”
Carl DeMaio, a leader of the
repeal effort, said to party
activists Saturday. “All we
have to do is connect the
dots.”
Recent polling shows
Cox competing for the second spot in the run-up to the
June primary, and some
polls show Allen in striking
distance. But the surveys
took place before wealthy
charter school backers contributed more than $12.5 million to an independent expenditure committee for a
barrage of ads promoting
former Los Angeles Mayor
Antonio Villaraigosa, a Democrat.
Among
Republicans,
Allen has enjoyed grassroots support, notably from
many county GOP clubs,
while Cox has more money
and backing from establishment Republicans, including House Majority Leader
Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield.
The statewide endorsement process is new for the
California GOP, enacted in
October as an attempt to
blunt the effect of the rela-
to strike
Photographs by
RECENT polling shows Cox competing for the second
spot in the run-up to the June 5 primary election.
tively new top-two primary,
in which the top two votegetters advance to compete
in the general election regardless of party. It was also
prompted by the 2016 U.S.
Senate race, when GOP voters splintered among three
candidates.
The party’s delegates did
vote to endorse retired
Judge Steven Bailey for attorney general, Cole Harris
for lieutenant governor and
Mark Meuser for secretary of
state.
No candidate challenging Sen. Dianne Feinstein
qualified to compete for an
endorsement. A neo-Nazi
Republican candidate who
is challenging California’s
senior senator was barred
from attending the convention, condemned by party
leaders and escorted off the
property Saturday morning
as he kicked an Israeli flag.
The three-day gathering
of nearly 1,000 delegates and
their guests on Harbor Island was otherwise a largely
quiet affair, with the greatest
focus on the gubernatorial
candidates as they wooed
delegates. Flanked by signwaving supporters, the candidates greeted delegates,
delivered speeches and
threw cocktail parties for
their backers.
Allen campaign volunteers Laura and Craig Nelson, retirees from Rancho
Cucamonga, said they were
lifelong registered Democrats until they voted for
President Trump in 2016.
Though they couldn’t vote
on an endorsement because
they’re not delegates, they
spent Saturday afternoon
waving signs and chanting
at passing motorists at a
park between the convention hotel and the airport.
“Travis Allen is the people’s choice,” said Laura Nel-
son, 66, noting that Cox had
unsuccessfully run for office
multiple times and was
funding his own campaign.
“Cox is a carpetbagger from
Chicago.”
Cox’s rivals frequently
criticized his wealth.
“You have a guy with $5
million and dishing out
beaucoup political favors
versus a guy basically running on T-shirt sales and donations,” said Stephen
Hockenbury, a psychiatrist
and Allen supporter from
Newport Beach. “Travis
Allen doesn’t have a lot of
money. What he has is a lot of
people backing him.”
Hockenbury and others
accused Cox of ripping off
the assemblyman’s campaign themes. Cox threw a
surfing-themed party for his
supporters and volunteers
Saturday night, drawing
snarky comments from supporters of Allen, an avid surfer.
Cox supporters painted
the businessman as the only
viable candidate.
GOP
delegate
Jack
Frost, a member of the Sacramento County Republican Party central committee, said he initially backed
Allen but cooled on the assemblyman as the campaign
progressed. Allen had failed
to raise campaign money,
and to qualify his own gastax repeal initiative for the
ballot.
“I feel he’s more interested in advancing his own
personal standing than getting someone into the top
two,” Frost said, adding that
he was impressed by Cox’s
willingness to spend his own
J O H N ‘JAB ’O’ STARKS, 1938 – 2018
Drummer for ‘Godfather of Soul’
washington post
J
ohn “Jab’o” Starks, a
drummer whose crisp,
disciplined
grooves
propelled some of
James Brown’s biggest
hits and helped define the
offbeat rhythmic style of
early funk and hip-hop, died
Tuesday at his home in
Mobile, Ala. He was 79.
His manager, Kathie
Williams, said he had
myelodysplastic syndrome,
a bone marrow disorder, and
was recently diagnosed with
acute leukemia.
A mostly self-taught musician, Starks modeled himself after the blues and R&B
drummers he watched as a
child in Mobile, where he
avoided age restrictions at a
local club by sitting on a milk
crate with his eye glued to a
hole in the wall.
He played with the electrifying rhythm-and-blues
singer Bobby “Blue” Bland
before joining Brown, “the
Godfather of Soul,” in 1965.
While Brown howled and
marched his mic stand
across the stage, Starks
played it cool, laying down
steady beats on songs such
as “Super Bad (Part 1 & Part
2)” and “The Payback,”
which both reached No. 1 on
Billboard’s R&B chart.
“If I can sit down behind
the drums and get you to tap
your feet or shake your butt,”
Starks
told
Alabama’s
Mobile Bay Magazine, “I’ve
got you.”
Few songs induced more
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
ASSEMBLYMAN Travis Allen, in front, framed the delegates’ vote as a victory against his rival, John Cox.
Deirdre O’Callaghan Los Angeles Times
MOSTLY SELF-TAUGHT
John “Jab’o” Starks propelled some of James
Brown’s biggest hits, including “The Payback.”
tapping or shaking than
“Get Up (I Feel Like Being a)
Sex Machine,” built around
a swinging high-hat groove
by Starks. In that 1970 track,
and in nearly every other on
which he played, the groove
was uninterrupted, with
hardly any of the flourishes
that define much of contemporary rock drumming.
“I’m not trying to outplay
anybody else,” Starks once
said. “The only thing I want
to do is keep that heartbeat
going, as they call it.… The
bass player or the guitar
player or the horn player
could do whatever he wants
to do because he knows that
that solid foundation is back
there behind him.”
Starks was one of several
drummers for Brown, who
reportedly hired multiple instrumentalists — doubling
the standard number of
guitars, bass players and
drummers — after a dispute
with his backing band nearly
forced him to go onstage
without musicians.
For much of his decadelong
association
with
Brown, Starks played alongside, or in rotation with,
Clyde Stubblefield, a more
funk-inclined performer.
“Their styles were totally
different,” drummer Frank
“Kash” Waddy said in the
2001 book “The King of All,
Sir Duke.” “Jab’o’s forte was
to play very clean, very
straight ahead. Clyde was
like fire, he just burned!”
The two men became
close friends (they later performed together as the
FunkMasters), and in 2016
were ranked together at No.
6 on a Rolling Stone list of
greatest drummers.
John Henry Starks was
born in tiny Jackson, Ala., on
Oct. 26, 1938. When he was an
infant, Williams said, “his
brother looked at him and
said, ‘That’s Jab’o’ ” — a
nickname that stuck for life.
He was raised in the
Mobile area, where his
mother had a food service
job with the public school
system and his father
worked at a sawmill.
In seventh grade, Starks
recalled, a drummer marching in the city Mardi Gras parade inspired him.
“I was listening to the
band march past, and you
could tell when that drummer stopped playing and
when he started playing, he
had that much command
over the band,” he said. “I
must have walked two miles
with that band, watching
and listening to him. And I
made up my mind and said,
‘I’d sure like to be able to play
just like that.’ ”
Starks is survived by his
wife of 58 years, Naomi Taplin, two children and two
grandchildren.
news.obits@latimes.com
wealth on the race. “And we
really need to get someone in
the top two. That’s really important to get Republicans
to come out and vote.”
Allen also faced criticism
from some conservatives for
using $300,000 raised to repeal the gas tax on advertisements promoting himself, rather than on signature gathering for the surviving initiative. After Allen’s
initiative effort failed, he announced his support for a
campaign for a similar ballot
measure led by DeMaio and
chaired by Cox.
“He stole funding,” said
DeMaio, a former San Diego
City Council member.
Allen denies the charge.
Cox has contributed
$250,000 to the petition campaign to put the repeal on
the November ballot.
“John Cox is the only one
who helped us. Travis Allen
was a detriment to the effort,” DeMaio said.
Some party members
called for unity among the
two factions, arguing that
the focus must be on beating
Democrats and winning
elections.
“There is clearly a divide,” said Jennifer Beall, a
delegate
from
Orange
County. “Let’s shake hands,
move on and go walk
precincts.”
seema.mehta@latimes.com
Twitter: @LATSeema
phil.willon@latimes.com
Twitter: @philwillon
[UC, from B1]
health and safety.
AFSCME is pressing for a
multiyear contract with an
annual wage increase of 6%,
no increase in healthcare
premiums and a continued
retirement age of 60 to qualify for full pension benefits.
Workers were angered by
a study showing a growing
income gap between UC’s
highest-paid
employees,
who are disproportionately
white men, and the lowestpaid workers, who are
mostly women and nonwhites, De los Angeles said.
The union study, which officials say is based on previously unpublished UC data,
showed starting wages of
blacks and Latinos were
about 20% lower than white
workers in comparable jobs.
“Their concern can be boiled
down to one word: inequality,” he said.
The university offered
workers an annual increase
of 3% over four years and an
annual cap of $25 for any
monthly premium increase,
said UC spokeswoman
Claire Doan. A proposal to
raise the retirement age to
65 to qualify for full benefits
would apply only to new employees who choose a pension instead of a 401(k) plan,
she said. UC would sweeten
the pot by reducing employees’ retirement contribution
from 9% to 7%.
Doan said she could not
confirm the accuracy of the
union pay study but that any
employee who feels unfairly
treated can bring such concerns to UC officials.
She added that union
leaders rejected the offer
without a vote by members.
However, 97% of members
voted to authorize a strike
last month. UC then unilaterally imposed terms on
workers, including a 2%
raise for the next fiscal year,
further angering the union.
Doan said the union is demanding pay raises that are
twice as high as those given
to other UC employees.
“The university cannot
justify to taxpayers such an
excessive raise, no matter
how much we appreciate our
service workers,” she said in
an email. “A strike will only
hurt the union’s own members who will lose pay for
joining this ill-advised threeday walkout, while negatively affecting services to
patients and students.”
teresa.watanabe
@latimes.com
B6
M O N DAY , MAY 7, 2018
LAT IMES. C OM
NRA claim reflects on his caliber
[Skelton, from B1]
the record of bold leadership and bold results....” Etc.
The Times did publish a
column by Cathleen Decker
about Newsom under an
“ahead of the pack” headline in December 2015. But
the article didn’t say he was
the first to take on the NRA
and win.
It’s true that in 2016,
Newsom sponsored Proposition 63, a ballot initiative that strengthened
California’s already toughest-in-the-nation gun controls. It passed overwhelmingly with 63% of the vote.
It’s also true that the
NRA waved a white flag
early and didn’t spend
money fighting the measure. But after the vote, it
sued and won a preliminary
injunction blocking a key
provision that banned possession of large-capacity
ammunition magazines.
After Newsom’s TV ad
was released April 23, it was
assailed in several news
media outlets. PolitiFact, a
nonpartisan organization
that referees political ads,
rated Newsom’s claim of
being the first to fight the
NRA and win as “false.”
There’s a long list of
California politicians who
have triumphed over the
NRA.
Start with Sen. Dianne
Feinstein. When she was
San Francisco’s mayor in
1983, the NRA tried to recall
her for supporting a failed
state initiative to ban handgun sales. She beat back the
recall attempt.
Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times
GAVIN NEWSOM’S ad says he was “the first to take on the National Rifle Assn. and win.” Not quite.
Then, after being elected
to the Senate, the Democrat
pushed through a nationwide ban on assault weapons sales in 1994. She dismissed the counsel of thenJudiciary Committee Chairman Joe Biden that her
cause was hopeless. Congress let the ban expire in
2004.
Republican Gov. George
Deukmejian, whose narrow
election in 1982 was significantly helped by gun owners, bucked the NRA by
signing California’s first
assault weapons ban. He
acted after a young, racist
drifter armed with an AK-47
shot up a Stockton schoolyard in 1989, killing five
Southeast Asian immigrant
children and wounding 30
other kids.
Years later, Deukmejian
told me: “My thoughts were
that regardless of what
argument somebody might
make about having the right
to own and possess a gun,
there was no common sense
reason for someone to have
an assault weapon.”
The legislation he embraced was written by two
Los Angeles Democrats,
state Senate leader David A.
Roberti and Assemblyman
Mike Roos. The NRA tried
to recall Roberti, but he
survived at great cost. The
fight crippled his political
future.
The assault weapons
ban sprouted loopholes that
were tightened in 1999 with a
bill signed by Democratic
Gov. Gray Davis.
That same year a future
L.A. mayor, then-Assembly
Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa, used his leadership
clout to ensure narrow
passage of a bill limiting
handgun purchases to one a
month. Villaraigosa now is
running against Newsom for
governor.
There’s a long list of
Sacramento politicians who
have triumphed over the
NRA, including former state
Senate leader Kevin de
León (D-Los Angeles),
who’s currently running
against Feinstein as she
seeks a fifth full term.
In 2016, De León pushed
through legislation similar
to Newsom’s initiative and
Brown signed it. In fact, De
León called Newsom’s measure “irrelevant” because
“we [legislators] have taken
care of business.” But De
León later endorsed the
ballot proposition.
This column would not
have been written if the
Newsom camp had just
admitted “we screwed up”
and dropped the ad. But the
ad kept running and the
candidate’s spokesman,
Nathan Click, tried to justify
the spot.
What the ad intended to
say, Click told me, was that
Newsom is “the first to take
the NRA to the ballot box
and win.” But that’s not
what the ad says.
“When you’re trying to
convey something in 30
seconds,” he replied, “you’re
limited by the format.”
Not an excuse.
A separate Newsom ad
began running simultaneously that voiced a similar message without claiming he was “the first.” But it
didn’t bump the untruthful
ad.
“When you exaggerate in
a political commercial, it’s
always going to come back
to bite you,” said Democratic consultant David
Townsend, who’s not involved in the gubernatorial
race. “People ask, ‘What else
is he exaggerating about?’
Words matter. You have to
be careful not to overreach.
“Sometimes consultants
don’t even notice it. Everyone is running around like
chickens with their heads
cut off.”
Sometimes they act
headless and get sloppy.
george.skelton
@latimes.com
D
SPORTS
M O N D A Y , M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
Boos
don’t
bother
Ohtani
Angels pitcher was
determined to earn
victory against team
that courted him.
ANGELS 8, SEATTLE 2
By Jeff Miller
Azael Rodriguez Getty Images
ERIC HOSMER handles the throw to first and keeps his foot on the bag to retire Enrique Hernandez in the Padres’ shutout victory.
YOU’RE OUT!
Kershaw joins other Dodgers All-Stars on DL
to cap trip marked by losses on and off field
SAN DIEGO 3, DODGERS 0
By Andy McCullough
MONTERREY, Mexico — On the final morning of a hellish, 10-day trip, pitcher Clayton Kershaw left the Dodgers on Sunday to travel to Los
Angeles after complaining of discomfort in his
prized left arm. He underwent an examination
from team doctor Neal ElAttrache that revealed
biceps tendinitis, with an undetermined recovery time.
The team placed Kershaw on the 10-day disabled list in the morning. Kershaw had dealt with
less severe bouts of this condition in the past. He
cut short a session of catch Saturday afternoon
because his arm “just wasn’t feeling right,” manager Dave Roberts explained.
Kershaw has spent time on the DL in each of
the last three seasons, and four of the last five.
This is his first stint involving an arm injury. A biceps injury can be the precursor to something
more severe with the elbow or shoulder, but the
Dodgers insisted there was no evidence of structural damage.
“There are no indications that this is any-
thing serious, anything beyond biceps tendinitis,” president of baseball operations Andrew
Friedman said before Kershaw’s exam.
The latest blow came before the team
wrapped up a three-city, 11-game trip in which
Corey Seager, Yasiel Puig and Hyun-Jin Ryu also
were shut down with injuries. The trip started
with Pedro Baez falling off a mound and costing
his team a game. It got only worse from there,
culminating in Sunday’s 3-0 loss to the San Diego Padres.
Kershaw became the fourth Dodgers All-Star
to land on the disabled list. Seager underwent a
season-ending operation on his throwing elbow
Friday. Puig, who bruised his left foot and hip,
could be reactivated Wednesday. Justin Turner
has yet to appear in a game since fracturing his
wrist March 19, but he took batting practice with
his teammates this weekend.
The calamities are not limited to the stars.
Second baseman Logan Forsythe has yet to begin a rehab assignment for his sore shoulder.
Ryu will sit out until after the All-Star break because of a torn groin muscle. Rich Hill has not
pitched since April 14 while dealing with a
cracked fingernail and a subsequent infection in
the finger.
[See Kershaw, D5]
Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
CLAYTON KERSHAW , out with biceps
tendinitis, has given up seven homers and
hasn’t pitched beyond the seventh inning.
SEATTLE — By this
point, it’s clear that he possesses the tools, both physically and mentally, to dominate a baseball game.
Now everyone knows
what it looks like when
Shohei Ohtani has the motivation, too.
Pitching against one of
the teams that courted him
this past winter — and Seattle, at one time, was considered a front-runner — the
rookie produced six sterling
innings as the Angels beat
the Mariners 8-2 on Sunday.
Ohtani thanked Seattle
for its interest after their
first face-to-face encounter
since the right-hander opted
to become an Angel in December. He even dismissed
the boos he received from
fans at Safeco Field.
“I want to pitch well not
just against this team but
every other team that was
pursuing me to show them
that they weren’t wrong with
their scouting,” Ohtani said
through an interpreter.
“I wanted to show them a
good game.”
Through six innings, he
showed them something
better than good. Ohtani
gave up four singles and a
walk while striking out six.
Seattle had only one at-bat
with a runner in scoring position.
He failed to retire any of
the three men he faced in the
seventh, but by then, thanks
to Mike Trout and the rest of
the offense, Ohtani was well
on his way to improving to
3-1.
The Angels cruised to another series win with Albert
Pujols getting the day off,
Luis
Valbuena
batting
cleanup and Felix Hernandez starting for Seattle.
True, Hernandez isn’t
quite “the King” he once
[See Angels, D5]
Justify’s
best may
be yet
to come
From playoffs to
layoffs, Redick’s
been through it
Triple Crown talk
intensifies after colt’s
commanding victory
at Kentucky Derby.
Dumped by Clippers,
he found a fit showing
76ers how to handle
success — and failure.
By John Cherwa
By Dan Woike
LOUISVILLE, Ky. — A
few minutes after 8 a.m., the
morning after Justify won
the Kentucky Derby, trainer
Bob Baffert came wheeling
out of the Barn 33, leading
the colt by his rein for what
was clearly a photo opportunity.
The sound of at least 30
cameras buzzing and clicking broke the silence of the
backstretch as Baffert tried
to steady his horse.
Justify was frisky and
Baffert was seemingly having trouble controlling his
horse.
“You better get used to
this,” the five-time Derby
winner said to his colt.
Baffert was foreshadowing just what an upside
awaits Justify.
“He came out of it really
well,” Baffert said of the
Derby. “I mean he’s full of
himself. … Today he’s been a
[See Justify, D6]
PHILADELPHIA — In
the corner of the Philadelphia 76ers’ locker room
where J.J. Redick neatly
hangs his designer clothes,
the 33-year-old slid white
leather shoes onto his feet in
a bit of a hurry.
His team had just lost to
Boston in overtime on Saturday in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinals,
and Redick committed a key
turnover near the end of
regulation. He was angry —
and he knew he’d stay that
way for hours.
“Then, you just got to
come back ready to be the
one,” he said as he slid to the
back.
Down 3-0 to the Celtics,
Redick and the 76ers know
that no team has recovered
from such a deficit to win a
series in NBA playoff history.
But the ability to take the
lows, pain that feels like an
[See Redick, D3]
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
ROBERT MEEUWSEN , left, and Alexander Brouwer, of the Netherlands, cele-
brate their win in the men’s final match at the FIVB Huntington Beach Open.
Dutch duo digs FIVB win
Brouwer-Meeuwsen
captures men’s title;
Seixas-Alves of Brazil
takes women’s event.
By Curtis Zupke
The playing of the Dutch
national anthem is not one
of the sights and sounds associated with the Huntington Beach Open.
But this is a new event
and perhaps a new era.
Gone from the winner’s
podium were local fixtures
such as April Ross and
Casey Patterson, previous
champions
synonymous
with Southern California
beach volleyball. Enter Alexander
Brouwer
and
Robert Meeuwsen, a longtime Netherlands duo who
have been to California only
a handful of times and had
never played in Huntington
Beach.
They stood proudly, and
in wonder, as their anthem
was played following their
triumph in the men’s final, a
21-16, 21-15 win against Evandro Goncalves and Andre
Loyola of Brazil. On the
women’s side, the Brazilian
team of Barbara Seixas and
Fernanda Alves won the
women’s final with a 16-21, 2115, 15-9 win against countrywomen Maria Antonelli and
Carolina Salgado.
That combination of
FIVB, staging the event in
partnership with the AVP
for the first time in Huntington Beach, made victory all
the more sweeter.
“We were so looking [forward] to playing in AVP, because it’s such a special
event,” Meeuwsen said. “And
now the first time ever we
[See Volleyball, D2]
Mitchell Leff Getty Images
J.J. REDICK sparked
the 76ers, but they’re one
loss from being swept.
NBA PLAYOFFS
Warriors, Rockets
take 3-1 leads
Golden State bounces
back against New Orleans 118-92. Houston
handles Utah 100-87. D3
TONIGHT’S GAMES
East semifinals
Boston at Philadelphia
Celtics lead 3-0
TV: 3 PDT, TNT
Toronto at Cleveland
Cavaliers lead 3-0
TV: 5:30 PDT, TNT
D2
M ON DAY , MAY 7, 2018
S
LAT IMES. C OM/ SP ORT S
Brains with, without a lot of brawn
Scholar-athletes
recognized for their
performance in the
classroom.
ERIC SONDHEIMER
ON HIGH SCHOOLS
A picture is worth a
thousand words, and to see
6-foot-7, 330-pound lineman
Tommy Brown of Santa Ana
Mater Dei dressed in a
tuxedo with his left arm
wrapped around 5-7, 150pound Justin Simpson of
Orange El Modena offers a
glimpse at the competitive
spirit of Simpson.
“Not an ounce over 150
pounds,” Simpson deadpanned. “It’s been that way
my whole life. It’s crazy
someone with my size can
hang with people three
times my size.”
The photo, taken at the
scholar-athlete awards
banquet for the Orange
County chapter of the National Football Foundation
and College Hall of Fame,
showed both smiling.
Brown is headed to Alabama. Simpson, who caught
69 passes and was the defensive MVP of the North
Hills League in football, is
now involved in baseball. As
El Modena’s starting shortstop, he’s batting .407 with
33 hits and one error in 24
games. He also has a 4.0
grade-point average and
uses his smarts in sports.
“I guess I used my speed
to try not to get hit and stay
away from the big guys,” he
said.
He said he’s looking for a
college to give him a chance
to play baseball. It’s a good
year for players with high
GPAs. Mission Viejo Capistrano Valley was honored
at Angel Stadium for having
the highest baseball team
GPA . There are so many 4.0
students playing for the
Cougars that they could
start their own SAT tutorial
service.
At Oak Park, pitcher
Jonah Scott announced
that he’s headed to MIT
after earning a 4.58 GPA.
“I’ve always enjoyed
building stuff,” he said. “I
want to learn how to make
an impact. I see kids coming
out of there and doing
amazing stuff. There’s
something there because
they’re turning out great
thinkers, and I want to
become one of those people.”
At San Fernando,
pitcher/center fielder
Steven Villagran is a fouryear starter with a 4.3 GPA,
including A’s in AP calculus
and AP chemistry. His
pitching, hitting and fielding have the Tigers on the
PRO CALENDAR
MON.
7
TUE.
8
WED.
9
THU.
10
FRI.
11
ARIZONA
7
SNLA
ARIZONA
7
SNLA
CINC.
7
SNLA
CINC.
7
SNLA
MINN.
7
FS1
MINN.
7
FSW
PREP BASEBALL TOP 25
By Eric Sondheimer
Sean Simpson
TOMMY BROWN of Santa Ana Mater Dei wraps
his arm around El Modena’s 5-foot-7 Justin Simpson.
verge of locking up the Valley Mission League title.
He’s batting .565 with 39 hits
and has 63 strikeouts in 462⁄3
innings.
At Crescenta Valley,
pitcher Trevor Beer has a 4.4
GPA and is headed to UC
Santa Barbara. He’s 8-2
with an 0.81 ERA going into
a showdown against unbeaten Arcadia (23-0) on
Tuesday night.
At Studio City HarvardWestlake, standout outfielder R.J. Schreck will
announce his college deci-
sion this week. He’s narrowed it down to Duke and
MIT. His mother and an
older brother went to Duke.
Another brother went to
MIT. He has a 4.43 GPA and
both parents are doctors.
Baseball is easy compared
with trying to have the
highest GPA in this family.
“It’s a lot of late nights
and my teachers and friends
helped me with time management,” he said.
He said he wants to
study computer science and
engineering. Duke will be
Rk. School (W-L)
Comment (last week’s ranking)
1 ARCADIA (23-0)
Showdown vs. Crescenta Valley on Tuesday (1)
2 HARVARD-WESTLAKE (23-3)
Closing in on No. 1 seed in Division 1 (2)
3 HUNTINGTON BEACH (24-4)
Finishes league with two-game series vs.
Edison (4)
4 ORANGE LUTHERAN (19-7)
Top sophomore pitchers in Max Rajcic,
Christian Rodriguez (3)
5 LA MIRADA (23-3-1)
Matadores are 10-0 in Suburban League (5)
6 MIRA COSTA (26-2)
Plays Redondo to decide Bay League title (7)
7 EL TORO (20-6-1)
Erik Tolman continues to star on mound, at
plate (6)
8 BECKMAN (20-3-1)
One-game lead in Pacific Coast League (8)
9 PALM DESERT (21-4)
Has won 10 straight league titles (9)
10 SOUTH HILLS (19-6)
Palomares League champs (10)
11 YUCAIPA (22-4)
One-game lead in Citrus Belt League (12)
12 SERVITE (17-10)
Took two of three from St. John Bosco (14)
13 CORONA (20-7)
First place in the Big VIII League (15)
14 ALEMANY (17-11)
Ready for Division 2 playoffs (16)
15 ST. JOHN BOSCO (14-10)
In second place in Trinity League (13)
16 CAPISTRANO VALLEY (19-8)
El Toro series is like playoff preview (18)
17 SOUTH TORRANCE (23-4)
Pioneer League champs (22)
18 HART (17-11)
Clinched share of Foothill League title (23)
19 CYPRESS (20-7-1)
Faces Pacifica for league title (25)
20 CAMARILLO (21-5)
In position to win Coastal Canyon League (20)
21 DAMIEN (15-8)
Nine-game winning streak (NR)
22 ETIWANDA (17-7)
Three-game series this week vs. Damien (NR)
23 TESORO (20-8-1)
Sea View League champs (NR)
24 JSERRA (16-11)
Battling for D1 playoff spot (21)
25 CORONA DEL MAR (18-5)
Junior Tommy Wilcox is 8-1 with 1.48 ERA (NR)
the school if he wants to
focus on baseball, but don’t
count out MIT. He got a
perfect score of 36 on the
ACT. Of the 1.8 million who
take the test each year,
about 1,000 earn a perfect
score. He has the kind of
brain power to thrive at
MIT.
These are the kind of
student-athletes coaches
seek at any level. As Simpson has proved, don’t assume anything until you see
their competitiveness on
and off the field.
eric.sondheimer@latimes.com
Twitter: @latsondheimer
DODGERS
at Colorado at Colorado
5:30
Noon
FSW
FSW
ANGELS
NEXT: SATURDAY AT DALLAS, 12:30 PDT, UNIMAS
GALAXY
LAFC
MINN.
7
UniMas,
YouTube TV
Shade denotes home game
SPARKS: Today at Connecticut, 4 (exhibition)
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
BASEBALL
5 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis
8 p.m.
Houston at Oakland (joined in progress)
HOCKEY, NHL PLAYOFFS
4 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh
6:30 p.m. Nashville at Winnipeg
PRO BASKETBALL, NBA PLAYOFFS
3 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia
5:30 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland
SOCCER
11:45 a.m. Spain, Leganes vs. Levante
TENNIS
11a.m.
WTA Mutua Madrid Open
3 a.m.
WTA Mutua Madrid Open
(Tues.)
ON THE AIR
TV: ESPN, ESPND
TV: MLB
TV: NBCSN
TV: NBCSN
TV: TNT
TV: TNT
TV: beIN2
TV: beIN1, Tennis
TV: beIN1, Tennis
Photographs by
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
FERNANDA ALVES , left, of Brazil goes up for a block against Maria Antonelli of Brazil during the women’s
final match at the FIVB Huntington Beach Open on Sunday.
Open has international flair
[Volleyball, from D1]
were allowed to play here —
finally. The atmosphere —
people just love the game,
and you can see it everywhere. It’s really living here,
and you can really feel that.”
Seixas and Alves also
beamed in their victory in
front of a packed stadium
court even though it was a
non-American final.
“Americans also know
how to make a show,” Seixas
said. “We feel appreciated
here, so it was nice to have all
this atmosphere, all the people coming to watch, the
venue, this is really a party
for us.”
Brouwer and Meeuwsen
became the first European
men’s team to win an FIVB
event on American sand
since 1996. The 2016 Olympic
bronze medalists were able
to neutralize the big serve of
the 6-foot-11 Goncalves.
They led the match from 5-4
in the first set. Brouwer’s ace
made it 16-11 in the second
set, which ended, appropriately, on a Brazilian service
error.
Brouwer and Meeuwsen
had to go through the losers
bracket after a third-round
loss and played their eighth
and ninth matches of the
tournament. Brouwer had 15
kills and 15 digs in the final.
“My legs, you don’t want
to be in my place right now,”
Brouwer said. “I think I’m
going to need help stepping
up to the podium. It’s the
adrenaline.
But
nine
matches? It’s not easy, but
we had wings in this final.”
BRAZIL’S ANDRE LOYOLA , right, gets a ball past the Netherlands’ Robert
Meeuwsen during the men’s final match at the FIVB Huntington Beach Open.
If Seixas looks familiar to
U.S. fans, it’s because she
was part of a team that beat
Ross and Kerri Walsh-Jennings in the semifinals of the
2016 Olympics. Her partnership with Alves has produced 12 straight wins and a
14-1 record this season.
They got organized after
the first set and led for good
at 3-2 in the second set, with
Seixas’ impressive array of
shots and the 6-foot-2 Alves’
blocking presence. They got
four straight blocks to end
the match.
“Their blocker is very tall,
intimidating a lot for our
team, not only for [Salgado]
but for me, too, and Barbara
is a very good defender,” Antonelli said.
Alves and Seixas admitted they didn’t start with the
right hunger but got better
as the match progressed,
and the crowd helped.
“I think the energy here is
really good,” Alves said.
“The American people, they
like beach volleyball. I feel
that inside the court.”
Adrian Gavira and Pablo
Herrera of Spain won the
men’s bronze-medal match
against
Aleksandrs
Samoilovs
and
Janis
Smedins of Lativa. Chantal
Labourer and Julia Sude of
Germany won the women’s
bronze, against Sarah Pavan
and Melissa-Humana Paredes of Canada.
The double-elimination
format and the huge field
made for a busy but entertaining week.
Donald Sun, managing
partner for AVP, said nothing is finalized for next year
but the intention is to stage
it this way again.
Even the losing team was
up for it.
“It’s always good to come
back here and play beach
volleyball,” Goncalves said.
“But in the next one, I want
to come back and win.”
curtis.zupke@latimes.com
Twitter: @curtiszupke
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
L AT I ME S . CO M/ S P O RT S
D3
NBA PLAYOFFS ROUNDUP
Warriors bounce back
making. Moments later, Durant was taking a crosscourt pass from Green in
transition and throwing
down a soaring one-handed
jam.
Andre Iguodala and
Curry followed with threes
soon after, and in a mere two
minutes, the Warriors’ lead
had ballooned to 15.
The Warriors continued
to pull away and led 94-71 after Iguodala hit Golden
State’s ninth three of the
game late in the period. The
gap never narrowed closer
than 19 points after that.
associated press
Marcio Jose Sanchez Associated Press
GOLDEN KNIGHTS players celebrate their 3-0 win
over San Jose during Game 6 of second-round series.
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS ROUNDUP
Vegas beating
odds, advances
associated press
Lightning 3, Bruins 1
Boston.....................................1
Tampa Bay ...............................0
Marc-Andre Fleury made
28 saves in his fourth shutout of the playoffs and the
expansion Vegas Golden
Knights are headed to the
Western Conference finals in
their inaugural season after
beating the San Jose Sharks
3-0 in Game 6 of their second-round series Sunday.
Jonathan Marchessault
opened the scoring, Nate
Schmidt added an insurance goal that was only detectable by replay and Cody
Eakin sealed it with an
empty-netter to help Vegas
become only the third team
in NHL history to win multiple series in its first season.
The Toronto Arenas won
the Stanley Cup in the first
postseason in league history
in 1918 and St. Louis won two
rounds to win the all-expansion West Division in 1968.
The Golden Knights relied on a crew of castoffs, led
by a goalie who was part of
three Stanley Cup-winning
teams in Pittsburgh before
headlining a new team.
Fleury posted shutouts in
Games 1 and 6 against the
Sharks and was also spectacular in an overtime win in
Game 3.
Next up for Fleury and
Vegas will be the Western
Conference finals against either Winnipeg or Nashville.
The Jets lead that series 3-2
heading into Game 6 on
Monday night.
The Sharks had numerous opportunities all night
but were thwarted by a couple of shots that hit the iron,
some acrobatic saves from
Fleury and other chances
that trickled just wide. This
marked the fourth straight
postseason for the Sharks
that ended with a loss on
home ice.
at Tampa Bay 3, Boston
1: Brayden Point and J.T.
Miller scored second-period
goals, helping the Lightning
advance to the Eastern Conference finals for the third
time in four years.
Andrei
Vasilevskiy
stopped 27 shots — 14 in the
final period — for the Lightning, who rebounded from
losing the series opener at
NHL PLAYOFFS:
CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
WESTERN CONFERENCE
1 Vegas vs. 3 San Jose
Golden Knights win series 4-2
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Vegas 7, San Jose 0
San Jose 4, Vegas 3 (2 OT)
Vegas 4, San Jose 3 (OT)
San Jose 4, Vegas 0
Vegas 5, San Jose 3
Vegas 3, San Jose 0
1 Nashville vs. 2 Winnipeg
Jets lead series 3-2
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Winnipeg 4, Nashville 1
Nash. 5, Winnipeg 4 (2 OT)
Winnipeg 7, Nashville 4
Nashville 2, Winnipeg 1
Winnipeg 6, Nashville 2
Today at Winnipeg, 6:30
Thursday at Nashville, 5*
EASTERN CONFERENCE
1 Tampa Bay vs. 2 Boston
Lightning win series 4-1
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Boston 6, Tampa Bay 2
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 2
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 1
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 3 (OT)
Tampa Bay 3, Boston 1
1 Washington vs. 2 Pittsburgh
Capitals lead series 3-2
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7
Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2
Washington 4, Pittsburgh 1
Washington 4, Pittsburgh 3
Pittsburgh 3, Washington 1
Washington 6, Pittsburgh 3
Today at Pittsburgh, 4
Wed. at Washington, 4:30*
* if necessary All times PDT, p.m.
0
2
0 — 1
1 — 3
FIRST PERIOD: 1. Bos., Krejci 3 (Bergeron, McAvoy),
19:12 (pp). Penalties—McAvoy, BOS, (cross checking),
7:09. Backes, BOS, (interference), 11:52. Hedman, TB,
(holding), 12:04. Marchand, BOS, (unsportsmanlike
conduct), 12:04. Girardi, TB, (interference), 17:02. Paquette, TB, (tripping), 18:06. .
SECOND PERIOD: 2. Tam., Point 4, 10:43. 3. Tam.,
J.Miller 2 (Stamkos, Kucherov), 14:00 (pp).
Penalties—Bergeron, BOS, (tripping), 13:31. .
THIRD PERIOD: 4. Tam., Stralman 1 (Hedman),
18:31. Penalties—McDonagh, TB, (tripping), 15:42. .
SHOTS ON GOAL: Bos. 9-5-14—28. T.B. 7-7-8—22.
Power-play Conversions—Bos. 1 of 3. T.B. 1 of 3. .
GOALIES: Bos., Rask 5-7 (21 shots-19 saves). Tam.,
Vasilevskiy 8-2 (28-27). Att—19,092 (19,092). T—2:37.
Golden Knights 3, Sharks 0
Las Vegas.................................0
San Jose..................................0
2
0
1 — 3
0 — 0
FIRST PERIOD: None. Penalties—Haula, VGK, (tripping), 1:01; McNabb, VGK, (delay of game), 9:23; Kane,
SJ, (tripping), 11:35.
SECOND PERIOD: 1, Vegas, Marchessault 4 (Smith,
W.Karlsson), 6:33. 2, Vegas, Schmidt 2 (Haula, Perron),
15:38. Penalties—None.
THIRD PERIOD: 3, Vegas, Eakin 3 (Carpenter,
Schmidt), 18:09. Penalties—None.
SHOTS ON GOAL: Vegas 12-5-16—33. San Jose 11-710—28. Power-play Converisons—Vegas 0 of 1; San Jose
0 of 2.
GOALIES: Vegas, Fleury 8-2 (28 shots-28 saves).
San Jose, Jones 6-4 (32-30). Att—17,562 (17,562).
T—2:32.
home to eliminate the Bruins in five games.
David Krejci scored in the
final minute of the first period to give Boston a 1-0 lead
that Point erased with his
unassisted goal at 10:43 of
the second.
Miller’s power-play goal
broke the tie less than four
minutes later, and Anton
Stralman added an emptynetter with 1:29 remaining to
end any chance for a Boston
comeback.
One day after he was put
on notice by the NHL for
licking Lightning forward
Ryan Callahan during Friday night’s overtime loss in
Game 4, there were no more
such incidents involving
Bruins winger Brad Marchand, who also made headlines after appearing to lick
Toronto’s Leo Komarov in
the first round.
Kevin Durant had 38
points and nine rebounds
and Golden State soundly
defeated the host New Orleans Pelicans 118-92 on Sunday to take a commanding
3-1 lead in their Western Conference semifinal series.
“I just try to tell myself
that I’m at my best when I
don’t care what happens after the game, the outcome or
anything,” Durant said.
“That’s when I’m free and
having fun out there, and
forceful.
The Warriors responded
to their 19-point loss in
Game 3 with a resounding
effort that produced a wireto-wire win with leads as
large as 26 points.
Durant made 15 of 27
shots. Stephen Curry scored
23, Klay Thompson added 13
and Quinn Cook, who was a
Pelicans reserve earlier this
season,
contributed
12
points.
Anthony Davis had 26
points and 12 rebounds for
New Orleans, but the Pelicans hit only 36% (32 for 88)
of their shots, missing 22 of
26 three-point attempts.
E’Twaun Moore scored
20 and Jrue Holiday 19, but
New Orleans reserves combined for only 14 points after
scoring 32 two nights earlier.
Rajon Rondo finished with 11
rebounds, but the Pelicans
also committed 19 turnovers,
which led to 21 Warriors
points.
After shooting poorly for
much of their loss on Friday
night, the Warriors were eager to regain their rhythm
and did so immediately.
They hit six of their first
eight shots, with Durant
making his first three, and
Thompson and Curry each
making threes. That, and
solid defense that included
Draymond Green’s block of
Rondo’s layup, helped Golden State open up a 10-point
lead before the game was
four minutes old.
The Pelicans, meanwhile,
Warriors 118, Pelicans 92
Rockets 100, Jazz 87
GOLDEN STATE
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Durant ..............36 15-27 6-6 1-9 5 1 38
Iguodala............29 2-7 0-0 1-7 6 3 6
Green ...............37 3-9 0-0 1-9 9 3 8
Curry ................31 8-17 3-3 0-1 2 1 23
Thompson..........36 5-13 2-2 0-7 0 2 13
Looney ..............20 3-4 1-2 1-3 1 3 7
Cook.................17 5-8 2-3 0-4 0 1 12
Livingston ..........11 2-5 0-0 0-1 2 2 4
Bell ....................4 0-0 0-0 0-1 1 1 0
Young .................4 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
West...................3 2-2 0-0 0-0 2 2 4
Pachulia..............3 0-0 1-2 1-1 0 1 1
McGee ................3 1-2 0-0 0-2 0 0 2
Totals
46-95 15-18 5-45 28 20 118
Shooting: Field goals, 48.4%; free throws, 83.3%
Three-point goals: 11-33 (Curry 4-9, Green 2-4, Durant 2-5,
Iguodala 2-5, Thompson 1-6). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 11 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Green 2, Durant, Iguodala,
West). Turnovers: 11 (Green 3, Curry 2, Durant 2, Cook, Looney,
Pachulia, Thompson). Steals: 11 (Green 4, Iguodala 3, Cook,
Durant, Looney, Pachulia). Technical Fouls: Green, 1:10 second.
Gerald Herbert Associated Press
GOLDEN STATE’S Kevin Durant, right, shoots
against New Orleans’ Anthony Davis in Game 4.
HOUSTON
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Ariza .................31 2-7 0-0 0-4 0 3 6
Tucker ...............34 3-6 2-2 1-7 1 2 11
Capela ..............37 6-11 0-0 5-15 2 2 12
Harden..............36 8-22 7-8 0-4 3 3 24
Paul..................35 12-23 2-2 2-12 6 3 27
Gordon..............25 3-10 2-2 0-2 2 3 9
Mbah a Moute....16 1-3 1-1 0-2 0 0 3
Green ...............12 2-5 0-0 0-1 0 2 6
Nene ................10 0-1 2-2 1-2 1 3 2
Totals
37-88 16-17 9-49 15 21 100
Shooting: Field goals, 42.0%; free throws, 94.1%
Three-point goals: 10-38 (Tucker 3-5, Green 2-5,
Ariza 2-7, Gordon 1-6, Paul 1-6, Harden 1-7, Mbah a
Moute 0-2). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 13 (11
PTS). Blocked Shots: 9 (Capela 6, Mbah a Moute, Paul,
Tucker). Turnovers: 13 (Harden 8, Gordon 2, Mbah a
Moute, Nene, Paul). Steals: 11 (Harden 4, Capela 2,
Mbah a Moute 2, Paul 2, Nene). Technical Fouls:
Capela, 8:08 fourth
UTAH
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Mirotic ..............31 1-7 5-5 2-11 2 3 7
Moore ...............36 8-14 3-4 0-1 1 2 20
Davis ................39 8-22 10-10 2-12 1 4 26
Holiday..............39 8-16 2-4 2-7 3 3 19
Rondo...............31 2-10 1-4 2-11 6 1 6
Clark.................24 4-14 3-3 1-2 3 4 11
Miller ................14 0-2 0-0 0-3 0 0 0
Hill ...................12 1-2 0-0 1-3 1 2 3
Diallo..................4 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 2 0
Liggins ................4 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0
Totals
32-88 24-30 10-51 17 21 92
Shooting: Field goals, 36.4%; free throws, 80.0%
Three-point goals: 4-26 (Hill 1-2, Rondo 1-2, Holiday 1-4,
Moore 1-4). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 19 (21 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 5 (Davis 2, Mirotic 2, Holiday). Turnovers: 19
(Davis 6, Rondo 4, Clark 2, Holiday 2, Mirotic 2, Hill, Liggins,
Moore). Steals: 7 (Clark 3, Davis, Diallo, Holiday, Miller).
Golden State
37 24 33 24— 118
New Orleans
22 32 19 19— 92
Min FG-A FT-A OR-T A P T
Crowder.............33 1-11 2-2 0-5 2 2 5
Ingles ...............40 6-13 1-2 0-8 4 3 15
Gobert ..............32 5-7 1-2 4-10 0 1 11
Mitchell.............38 8-24 7-7 1-9 2 6 25
O’Neale.............28 3-7 2-2 0-5 1 3 8
Neto .................17 3-10 1-1 1-2 2 1 9
Favors ...............15 2-2 1-2 1-1 1 1 5
Jerebko .............14 0-1 0-0 0-1 2 1 0
Exum ................10 4-6 1-2 0-0 1 3 9
Burks..................9 0-2 0-0 1-4 1 0 0
Totals
32-83 16-20 8-45 16 21 87
Shooting: Field goals, 38.6%; free throws, 80.0%
Three-point goals: 7-29 (Neto 2-3, Ingles 2-7, Mitchell 2-7, Crowder 1-7, Exum 0-1, Jerebko 0-1, O’Neale
0-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 16 (17 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 5 (Gobert 3, Crowder 2). Turnovers: 16
(O’Neale 4, Gobert 3, Mitchell 3, Ingles 2, Neto 2,
Burks, Favors). Steals: 8 (Mitchell 4, Crowder, Favors,
Gobert, Ingles). Technical Fouls: Mitchell, 8:08 fourth.
Houston
30 28 21 21— 100
Utah
23 25 17 22— 87
A—18,513. T—2:17. O—Zach Zarba, Tom Washington, Bennie
Adams, James Capers
A—18,306. T—2:23. O—James Williams, Ken Mauer,
Bill Kennedy
NEW ORLEANS
missed eight of their first 10
shots, and trailed 20-6 after
Green made Golden State’s
fourth three of the game’s
first six minutes.
The Warriors led by as
many as 18 in the first half
when Cook’s floater made it
33-15 late in the first quarter.
The Pelicans shot 37% in
the first half, but with good
rebounding and free-throw
shooting, they managed to
slowly grind the Warriors’
lead down to a seemingly
manageable seven by halftime, only to have Golden
State storm out of the gate in
the third quarter.
Rondo’s bounce pass uncharacteristically
handcuffed Davis as he cut to the
hoop for what looked like a
thunderous dunk in the
Houston 100, at Utah 87:
Chris Paul had 27 points and
12 rebounds while James
Harden scored 24 points to
power the Rockets to a win
over the Jazz, taking a 3-1
lead in the Western Conference semifinal series.
Paul, playing the sidekick
to Harden for most of his
first season in Houston, took
center stage, controlling the
tempo and getting to his favorite spots as the Rockets
led from start to finish.
Donovan Mitchell scored
25 before fouling out and Joe
Ingles had 15 for the Jazz.
Mitchell started finding
lanes to the basket late and
got the Jazz within 85-80 after he fueled a 10-2 run. But
Paul, who matched his scoring high for this playoff run,
hit a pull-up jumper and
found Trevor Ariza for a
three-pointer to put the
Rockets back up by double
digits and they never looked
back.
Houston, which has been
known for their offensive
firepower, put forth a disruptive defensive effort.
Clint Capela, the anchor
of the Houston defense, had
12 points, 15 rebounds and
six blocks.
NBA PLAYOFFS SCHEDULE:
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
WESTERN CONFERENCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
1 Houston vs. 5 Utah
Rockets lead series 3-1
1 Toronto vs. 4 Cleveland
Cavaliers lead series 3-0
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 4
Gm 5
Houston 110, Utah 96
Utah 116, Houston 108
Houston 113, Utah 92
Houston 100, Utah 87
Tuesday at Houston, 5
Thursday at Utah, TBA*
May 14 at Houston, TBA*
Cleve. 113, Toronto 112 (OT)
Cleveland 128, Toronto 110
Cleveland 105, Toronto 103
Today at Cleveland, 5:30
Wed. at Toronto, TBA*
Friday at Cleveland, TBA*
Sunday at Toronto, TBA*
2 Golden St. vs. 6 New Orleans
Warriors lead series 3-1
2 Boston vs. 3 Philadelphia
Celtics lead series 3-0
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 4
Gm 5
Golden St. 123, N.O. 101
Golden St. 121, N.O. 116
N.O. 119, Golden St. 100
Golden St, 118, N.O. 92
Tuesday at Golden St., 7:30
Thursday at N.O., TBA*
May 14 at Golden St., TBA*
* if necessary
Boston 117, Phil. 101
Boston 108, Phil. 103
Boston 101, Phil. 98 (OT)
Today at Philadelphia, 3
Wednesday at Boston, TBA*
Friday at Phil., TBA*
Sunday at Boston, TBA*
All times PDT, p.m. unless noted
Joining 76ers ‘revitalized my spirit’
[Redick, from D1]
unexpected boot to the gut,
and respond? That’s what
professionals do.
“It’s the difference between guys who can survive
in the NBA and those who
can’t. And it’s the thing most
people don’t understand
about the NBA. It’s just a series of highs and lows,”
Redick said. “There’s not
much middle ground. And
when you have these incredible lows, you have to be able
to get up the next day, go to
work and do what you need
to do. It requires some mental fortitude. ...
“It’s a … emotional roller
coaster,” he added, using an
expletive.
Redick, as much as anyone in the NBA, should know
about those extreme swings.
After all, he came to Philadelphia after four seasons
with the Clippers.
Not long after the 2016-17
Clippers season ended,
Redick and other key pieces
who helped turn the franchise from a punchline to a
postseason player were on
their way out.
Chris Paul was dealt to
Houston after he informed
the team he wouldn’t be
signing a long-term deal.
Redick got what he characterized as a “break-up call”
from the Clippers days before the start of free agency,
confirming what he had already known. Jamal Crawford was shipped out, too.
Redick had played the
best basketball of his professional career with the Clippers, becoming a full-time
starter for the first time in
the NBA. But the team
made four straight exits
from the playoffs thanks to a
Drew Hallowell Getty Images
J.J. REDICK averaged a career-high 17.1 points this
season, his first in Philadelphia after four in L.A.
combination of bad luck and
bad decisions, squandering
precious chances to break
through and win a title — or
at least compete for a conference championship.
An emotionally spent
group flamed out after Paul
literally turned a game over
to Oklahoma City in 2014. An
overconfident team saw the
Rockets come back from a
3-1 series deficit the following year. Then there were injuries to Paul and Blake Griffin that helped lead to firstround exits in Redick’s last
two seasons in L.A.
The experience dragged
on Redick, who spoke of
boredom with the regular
season and regularly wondered why the team wasn’t
playing with life or joy. And
then, with the highs coming
less frequently, the lows
seemed more and more inevitable.
While the Clippers ran
into walls, Philadelphia was
embarking on a taboo
basketball experiment.
In the four years Redick
played in Los Angeles, the
76ers lost 253 games as they
stockpiled top draft picks
through defeats and trades.
The talent they amassed
through “The Process” netted them young stars Joel
Embiid, Ben Simmons and
Dario Saric.
And they were ready for
help.
“I identified Philly as the
place I really wanted to be
because I thought they had
the potential to be really
good because of Joel and
Ben and because of how they
played and passed the ball,”
Redick said. “Whether I
started or came off the
bench, it’s why I wanted to
come here.
“And in parentheses, you
can write, ‘And the one-year,
$23-million [contract].’ ”
The deal made Redick
the 27th-highest-paid player
in the league this season
(paying him only $1.3 million
less than Paul) and allowed
him to be close to the home
he and his wife designed in
Brooklyn.
Philadelphia, well under
the salary cap, was able to
pay for Redick’s experience
and mentoring — and more.
“Everyone said, ‘veteran
leadership, veteran leadership, veteran leadership.’ I
was like, ‘I still feel like I can
play,’ ” Redick said.
He’s the team’s secondleading scorer in the postseason at 20.1 points a game,
a hair behind Embiid (21.5),
following a career-best 17.1
points a game in the regular
season.
According to BasketballReference.com’s Play Index,
only 48 players in league history played in enough games
to qualify and averaged 17.1
points or more at Redick’s
age. And, of those 48, all except for Redick had previ-
ously averaged more.
“It’s been a pretty simple
formula. Being very diligent
in season and out of season,
being in situations where I
was afforded opportunities
to let it fly and because of
that, I think, you just get better,” he said. “You can say,
‘Well I got better every year,’
but why? That’s because of
the work, the diligence — every year I’m getting smarter.
I’m getting better because
I’m getting smarter.”
His play helped reinvigorate Philadelphia’s love of
basketball, which had been
tested through all the losing
and processing.
“Don’t let me minimize
his impact. He’s just come in,
doing what he does and doing it very well. He’s a veteran. He’s a man, a dad. He’s
been around the league for a
while,” 76ers coach Brett
Brown said. “He lives an elite
lifestyle. He’s in incredible
shape. He’s very prideful of
his preparation. I can go on
and on and on. He’s A-plus.”
Regardless of how things
go Monday in Game 4, regardless of another round of
free agency to come,
Redick’s exit from Los Angeles helped him find joy in his
work again. He went
through a down and it was
time for an up.
“It’s not even close. Not
even close,” he said. “This
was a much-needed year for
me. I think it revitalized my
spirit. It was truly a pleasure
just to go to work every day
and just clock in …
“Sometimes, you just
need fresh scenery. You need
something new.”
dan.woike@latimes.com
Twitter: @DanWoikeSports
D4
MO N DAY , MAY 7, 2018
LAT IMES. C OM/ SP ORT S
BASEBALL
PADRES
DODGERS
West
W
L
Pct.
Arizona
23 11 .676
Colorado
San Francisco
GB
L10
—
6-4
20 15 .571
1
3 ⁄2
7-3
19 15 .559
4
8-2
DODGERS
15 19 .441
8
4-6
San Diego
13 22 .371 101⁄2
4-6
Central
W
L
Pct.
GB
L10
St. Louis
20 12 .625
Milwaukee
20 15 .571 11⁄2
4-6
Pittsburgh
19 16 .543 21⁄2
5-5
Chicago
16 15 .516 31⁄2
5-5
Cincinnati
8
3-7
East
26 .235
W
L
Pct.
—
7-3
13
GB
L10
—
6-4
ANGELS
MARINERS
8
2
Streak
Lost 2 This month
3-3
Home
7-8 Road
8-11
Division
11-15 Interleague
1-1
Next: Tuesday vs. Arizona, Dodger Stadium, 7 p.m.
TV/Radio: SportsNet LA/570, 1020
Streak
Won 1 This month
Home
8-10 Road
Division
12-4 Interleague
Next: Tuesday at Colorado, 5:30 p.m. PDT
TV/Radio: FS West/830, 1330
5-1
13-3
1-2
Dodgers
AB R H BI Avg. San Diego AB R H BI Avg.
4 2 2 0 .316
Taylor ss
5 0 0 0 .238 Jnkwski rf
Hrnndz 2b
3 0 0 0 .220 Hosmer 1b 2 1 1 2 .297
c-Utley 2b
2 0 0 0 .257 Vllnva 3b
4 0 0 0 .265
4 0 3 1 .272
Kemp rf
5 0 2 0 .333 Cordero lf
4 0 1 0 .250
Bellinger 1b 4 0 2 0 .283 Pirela 2b
0 0 0 0 .000
Barnes c
4 0 1 0 .196 Hand p
Farmer 3b
3 0 1 0 .231 Galvis ss
4 0 2 0 .240
d-Pdrsn cf
1 0 1 0 .278 Margot cf
3 0 0 0 .169
Verdugo lf
4 0 0 0 .286 Ellis c
4 0 2 0 .250
2 0 0 0 .200
Locastro cf
2 0 1 0 .286 Lauer p
1 0 0 0 .000
e-Muncy 3b 0 0 0 0 .211 b-Guerra
Stripling p
2 0 0 0 .000 Asuaje 2b 1 0 0 0 .194
33 3 11 3
a-Grandal
1 0 0 0 .272 Totals
Baez p
0 0 0 0 .000
f-Valera
1 0 0 0 .000
Totals
37 0 8 0
Atlanta
19 14 .576
Philadelphia
18 15 .545
1
3-7
Dodgers
San Diego
New York
17 15 .531 11⁄2
2-8
Washington
18 17 .514
2
7-3
Miami
13 20 .394
6
7-3
Walks—Dodgers 3: Bellinger 1, Locastro 1, Muncy 1. San Diego 3:
Hosmer 2, Margot 1. Strikeouts—Dodgers 12: Taylor 2, Hernandez 1,
Utley 1, Kemp 1, Bellinger 2, Barnes 1, Farmer 1, Verdugo 1, Locastro
1, Valera 1. San Diego 8: Jankowski 1, Villanueva 1, Cordero 1, Pirela
1, Margot 2, Lauer 1, Guerra 1. E—Jankowski (1), Villanueva 2 (7).
LOB—Dodgers 13, San Diego 9. 2B—Kemp (6), Ellis (1).
3B—Jankowski (2). HR—Hosmer (5), off Cingrani. RBIs—Hosmer 2
(12), Cordero (14). Runners left in scoring position—Dodgers 7
(Taylor 2, Bellinger, Barnes 3, Stripling); San Diego 4 (Ellis, Lauer 2,
Asuaje). RISP—Dodgers 0 for 9; San Diego 1 for 8. LI DP—Pirela.
GIDP—Villanueva. DP—Dodgers 2 (Hernandez, Bellinger), (Taylor,
Utley).
Dodgers
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Stripling ......................4 4 0 0 2 5
68 1.93
Cingrani, L, 0-2 ............1 3 2 2 0 1
21 6.23
Baez...........................1 2 1 1 1 2
32 4.02
Garcia.........................1 1 0 0 0 0
12 0.00
Stewart .......................1 1 0 0 0 0
16 3.38
San Diego
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lauer, W, 1-1 ...............6 7 0 0 1 5
102 5.79
Stammen, H, 7.............1 0 0 0 1 1
22 2.50
Yates, H, 4...................1 1 0 0 1 3
20 0.87
Hand, S, 9-11 ..............1 0 0 0 0 3
17 2.70
Baez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored—Garcia 2-1. WP—Lauer.
U— Alfonso Marquez, Ramon De Jesus, Jim Reynolds, John
Tumpane. T—3:10. Tickets sold—21,789 (26,999).
Sunday’s results
San Diego 3, DODGERS 0 at Monterrey, Mexico
Colorado 3, at N.Y. Mets 2
San Francisco 4, at Atlanta 3
at Washington 5, Philadelphia 4
Pittsburgh 9, at Milwaukee 0
at Arizona 3, Houston 1
Miami 8, at Cincinnati 5
at St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 14 innings
AL STANDINGS
West
W
L
Pct.
GB
L10
—
5-5
ANGELS
21 13 .618
Houston
21 15 .583
1
4-6
Seattle
19 14 .576 11⁄2
6-4
Oakland
18 16 .529
3
5-5
Texas
13 23 .361
9
4-6
GB
L10
—
3-7
Central
W
L
Pct.
Cleveland
17 17 .500
Minnesota
13 17 .433
2
5-5
Detroit
14 19 .424 2 ⁄2
4-6
1
Kansas City
11 23 .324
Chicago
9
23 .281
W
East
L
Pct.
6
6-4
7
3-7
GB
L10
—
6-4
Boston
25 9
.735
New York
24 10 .706
Toronto
19 16 .543 61⁄2
5-5
Tampa Bay
15 17 .469
9
6-4
Baltimore
8
17
2-8
26 .235
1
9-1
Sunday’s results
ANGELS 8, at Seattle 2
at N.Y. Yankees 7, Cleveland 4
Toronto 2, at Tampa Bay 1
Minnesota 5, at Chicago 3
at Kansas City 4, Detroit 2
Boston 6, at Texas 1
at Oakland 2, Baltimore 1
at Arizona 3, Houston 1
TODAY’S GAMES
NATIONAL LEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
SF/Samardzija (R)
PHI/Eflin (R)
NY/Conlon (L)
CIN/Bailey (R)
MIA/Garcia (L)
CHI/Hendricks (R)
WAS/Strasburg (R)
SD/Ross (R)
ERA
5.27
1.50
—
4.81
1.09
3.19
3.47
3.28
TIME
4 p.m.
W-L
1-2
1-4
1-5
0-0
ERA
2.80
7.67
3.98
2.84
TIME
5 p.m.
W-L
1-0
1-0
ERA
0.00
0.00
TIME
5 p.m.
ESPN
W-L
1-1
0-0
—
0-4
1-0
2-2
3-3
2-2
7 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
DET/Fulmer (R)
TEX/Moore (L)
HOU/Keuchel (L)
OAK/Anderson (L)
7 p.m.
MLB*
INTERLEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
MIN/Romero (R)
STL/Gant (R)
000 000 000 —0
000 020 10x —3
*joined in progress at 8 p.m.
NOTES
Molina out at
least a month
The St. Louis Cardinals say
catcher Yadier Molina has undergone surgery and is expected to
miss a month after being hit in the
groin by a foul tip.
The Cardinals placed Molina on
the 10-day disabled list Sunday.
They said the eight-time All-Star is
projected to miss at least four
weeks with what the team called a
“pelvic injury with traumatic
hematoma.”
Molina left Saturday’s game
against the Chicago Cubs in the
eighth inning after being hit when
Kris Bryant tipped a 102-mph
pitch from reliever Jordan Hicks.
Molina immediately fell to the
ground in pain and was replaced
by Francisco Pena.
The 35-year-old Molina is hitting .272 with six home runs and 17
RBIs this season. He was replaced
on the active roster by catcher Carson Kelly, who was called up from
triple-A Memphis.
Etc.
The Mets reversed course and
put right-hander Jacob deGrom
on the 10-day disabled list with a
hyperextended elbow in his pitching arm. The 29-year-old was hurt
while batting Wednesday against
Atlanta, and after an MRI exam
and scan New York said he had
been given the OK to make Monday’s start at Cincinnati. He is eligible to be activated May 13. ... Lefthander Amir Garrett was reinstated from the bereavement list by the
Cincinnati Reds, who optioned
right-hander Tanner Rainey to
Louisville of the triple-A International League.
— associated press
8
11
0
3
AB R H BI Avg.
Angels
AB R H BI Avg. Seattle
5 0 1 0 .343
Kinsler 2b 5 1 0 0 .198 Gordon cf
4 0 0 0 .290
Trout cf
4 1 3 3 .336 Segura ss
0 0 0 0 .056
Upton dh
5 0 1 0 .237 Romine ss
4 0 0 0 .283
Vlbna 1b
3 0 1 0 .265 Cano 2b
3 0 0 0 .245
Smmns ss 5 0 1 0 .350 Cruz dh
4 0 2 0 .240
Cozart 3b
4 2 2 1 .237 Seager 3b
3 1 1 0 .297
Blash rf
4 1 1 0 .250 Haniger rf
3 1 1 2 .246
Young lf
3 2 1 1 .167 Healy 1b
2 0 0 0 .180
Rivera c
5 1 2 3 .279 Zunino c
Gamel lf
2 0 1 0 .167
Totals
38 8 12 8
a-Heredia lf 0 0 0 0 .286
Totals
30 2 6 2
Baltimore AB R H BI Avg.
Gentry cf
3 0 0 0 .179
Peterson lf
4 0 1 0 .204
Machado ss 3 0 0 0 .346
C.Davis 1b
4 0 0 0 .171
Trumbo dh
3 0 0 0 .292
Alvarez 3b
3 1 1 1 .205
Santander rf 3 0 0 0 .202
Joseph c
3 0 0 0 .148
Vielma 2b
2 0 0 0 .143
a-Mancini
1 0 1 0 .258
Totals
29 1 3 1
Oakland
Semien ss
Joyce lf
Canha cf
K.Davis dh
Olson 1b
Chapman 3b
Pinder 2b
Piscotty rf
Lucroy c
Totals
Angels
Seattle
Baltimore
Oakland
010 000 000 —1
000 200 00x —2
020 004 002 —8
000 000 200 —2
12
6
0
1
Walks—Angels 5: Kinsler 1, Trout 1, Valbuena 1, Blash 1, Young 1.
Seattle 6: Haniger 1, Healy 1, Zunino 2, Heredia 2.
Strikeouts—Angels 9: Trout 1, Upton 2, Valbuena 1, Blash 2, Young 1,
Rivera 2. Seattle 6: Segura 1, Cruz 1, Haniger 2, Zunino 1, Gamel 1.
E—Romine (1). LOB—Angels 11, Seattle 8. 2B—Cozart (8), Rivera
(3). HR—Cozart (4), off Hernandez; Young (2), off Hernandez; Trout
(12), off Bradford; Healy (5), off Ohtani. RBIs—Trout 3 (24), Cozart
(12), Young (5), Rivera 3 (8), Healy 2 (15). SB—Trout (6). S—Young.
Runners left in scoring position—Angels 6 (Kinsler, Valbuena,
Simmons 3, Young); Seattle 2 (Segura, Zunino). RISP—Angels 2 for
14; Seattle 0 for 4. Runners moved up—Upton, Gordon.
GIDP—Kinsler, Gordon 2. DP—Angels 2 (Simmons, Kinsler,
Valbuena), (Kinsler, Simmons, Valbuena); Seattle 1 (Romine, Cano,
Healy).
Angels
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Ohtani, W, 3-1..............6 6 2 2 2 6
98 4.10
Alvarez ........................2 0 0 0 1 0
19 1.10
Bedrosian ................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 3 0
18 4.02
Ramirez ...................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
1 3.06
Seattle
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Hernandez, L, 4-3.......52⁄3 7 5 5 4 5
101 5.28
Bradford ..................... 1⁄3 1 1 1 0 1
7 2.51
Pazos..........................1 1 0 0 0 1
24 1.46
Lawrence.....................2 3 2 2 1 2
37 10.12
Ohtani pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored—Alvarez 1-0, Ramirez 3-0, Bradford
2-2. HBP—Ohtani (Cruz), Pazos (Valbuena), Lawrence (Cozart).
WP—Hernandez.
U— Sam Holbrook, Ryan Blakney, Jim Wolf, D.J. Reyburn. T—3:11.
Tickets sold—40,142 (47,943).
DIAMONDBACKS 3
ASTROS
1
Matt Koch outpitched Justin Verlander
to become the first pitcher to beat
MVPs in consecutive starts in at least
71 years. Koch outlasted the Dodgers’
Clayton Kershaw in his previous start.
Houston
AB R H BI Avg. Arizona
Springer cf
5 0 0 0 .264 Peralta lf
Altuve 2b
4 0 1 0 .322 Descalso 3b
Correa ss
3 0 1 0 .299 Gldschmt 1b
Reddick rf
3 0 0 0 .229 Pollock cf
Bregman 3b 4 1 1 1 .254 Souza Jr. rf
McCann c
3 0 0 0 .260 Marte 2b
Gnzlz 1b-lf
4 0 2 0 .234 Avila c
Fisher lf
2 0 0 0 .179 Ahmed ss
a-Gurriel 1b 2 0 1 0 .280 Koch p
Verlander p 2 0 1 0 .500 c-Owings
b-Gattis
1 0 0 0 .186 Marrero 3b
d-Stassi
1 0 0 0 .239 Totals
Totals
34 1 7 1
Houston
Arizona
AB
4
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
1
1
0
27
R
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
010 000 000 —1
000 002 01x —3
H
1
2
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
BI
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
Avg.
.295
.253
.225
.306
.000
.213
.143
.217
.200
.233
.196
7
5
1
1
Walks—Houston 2: Reddick 1, McCann 1. Arizona 3: Descalso 1,
Pollock 1, Avila 1. Strikeouts—Houston 7: Springer 1, Reddick 1,
Gonzalez 1, Fisher 1, Verlander 1, Gattis 1, Stassi 1. Arizona 10:
Peralta 2, Pollock 1, Marte 2, Avila 1, Ahmed 2, Koch 1, Owings 1.
E—Bregman (5), Descalso (2). LOB—Houston 9, Arizona 4.
2B—Correa (12), Descalso (6). 3B—Altuve (1), Pollock (3).
HR—Bregman (2), off Koch. RBIs—Bregman (13), Pollock 2 (29).
S—Koch. RISP—Houston 1 for 10; Arizona 1 for 6. GIDP—Bregman.
DP—Arizona 1 (Ahmed, Marte, Goldschmidt).
Houston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Verlander, L, 4-1...........6 3 2 1 3 8
92 1.17
Rondon .......................1 0 0 0 0 2
17 2.08
8 4.63
Harris .........................1⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
4 8.44
Smith ......................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Arizona
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
77 2.13
Koch, W, 2-0..............61⁄3 6 1 1 0 3
De La Rosa..................0 0 0 0 0 0
5 1.59
10 3.00
Hirano, H, 8................. 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Bradley, H, 12 ..............1 0 0 0 1 0
16 1.42
Boxberger, S, 11-11 ......1 1 0 0 1 3
25 1.80
Inherited runners-scored—Smith 1-1, De La Rosa 1-0, Hirano
2-0. HBP—Koch (Correa).
U— Roberto Ortiz, Brian Gorman, Dan Iassogna, Mike DiMuro.
T—2:55. Tickets sold—35,632 (48,519).
YANKEES
INDIANS
Cleveland AB R H BI Avg.
Lindor ss
4 1 1 1 .283
Kipnis 2b
3 0 0 1 .184
Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 .285
Brantley lf
4 0 0 0 .323
Encrncn dh 3 0 0 0 .198
Alonso 1b
3 0 1 0 .210
1-Davis
0 1 0 0 .214
Gonzalez 1b 1 0 0 0 .375
Gomes c
3 1 1 0 .256
Naquin rf
3 1 1 1 .319
G.Allen cf
3 0 0 0 .000
Totals
30 4 4 3
New York
AB R H BI Avg.
Gardner lf
4 1 1 1 .203
Judge rf
3 0 1 2 .296
Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 .311
Sanchez c
4 0 0 0 .198
Hicks cf
4 1 2 0 .240
Walker 1b
2 2 1 1 .189
Andujar 3b
4 0 0 0 .274
Austin dh
2 1 0 0 .254
a-Stntn dh
0 1 0 0 .227
Torres 2b
4 1 1 3 .327
Totals
30 7 6 7
Cleveland
New York
000 000 040 —4
000 000 034 —7
4
6
1
0
Walks—Cleveland 2: Ramirez 1, Encarnacion 1. New York 6: Judge
1, Gregorius 1, Walker 2, Austin 1, Stanton 1. Strikeouts—Cleveland
13: Kipnis 2, Ramirez 1, Brantley 2, Encarnacion 2, Alonso 1,
Gonzalez 1, Gomes 2, Naquin 1, G.Allen 1. New York 10: Judge 2,
Sanchez 3, Andujar 1, Austin 2, Torres 2. E—Alonso (2).
LOB—Cleveland 2, New York 4. 2B—Lindor (10), Judge (9), Hicks (4),
Walker (3). HR—Torres (2), off Otero. RBIs—Lindor (20), Kipnis (13),
Naquin (6), Gardner (10), Judge 2 (23), Walker (8), Torres 3 (11).
SB—Davis (7). SF—Kipnis. Runners left in scoring position—New
York 3 (Sanchez 2, Austin). RISP—Cleveland 2 for 3; New York 4 for
10. Runners moved up—Andujar. GIDP—Andujar. DP—Cleveland 1
(Lindor, Alonso).
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Clevinger ...................71⁄3 1 2 2 4 10
116 2.76
C.Allen, L, 2-1, BS, 1-6 .2⁄3 4 3 3 1 0
32 3.60
Otero.......................... 1⁄3 1 2 2 1 0
8 5.52
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
German.......................6 0 0 0 2 9
84 2.66
Betances.....................1 3 3 3 0 2
32 5.79
Holder.........................1 1 1 0 0 0
17 6.23
Shreve, W, 2-0 .............1 0 0 0 0 2
18 3.46
Betances pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. C.Allen pitched to 2
batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scored—C.Allen 2-2, Otero 1-1, Holder 2-2.
PB—Sanchez (6).
U— Lance Barrett, Lance Barksdale, Tim Timmons, Tony
Randazzo. T—3:05. Tickets sold—40,107 (54,251).
PIRATES
BREWERS
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
R
1
0
1
2
1
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
9
H
2
0
1
1
3
1
0
1
3
0
1
0
13
BI
1
1
0
1
2
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
8
Avg.
.261
.207
.279
.238
.315
.301
.385
.278
.239
.000
.200
.208
Milwaukee AB R H BI Avg.
Cain cf
3 0 0 0 .267
Perez lf
1 0 1 0 .215
Yelich lf
3 0 0 0 .281
c-Aguilar
1 0 0 0 .350
Braun 1b
4 0 0 0 .243
Shaw 3b
3 0 0 0 .230
Santana rf
2 0 1 0 .271
Sgrd 2b-ss
3 0 0 0 .100
Arcia ss
2 0 0 0 .222
Phillips lf-cf 1 0 0 0 .091
Bandy c
3 0 0 0 .196
Anderson p 1 0 0 0 .083
Villar 2b
1 0 0 0 .274
Totals
28 0 2 0
210 004 110 —9
000 000 000 —0
R
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
8
H
1
3
1
1
4
2
3
1
0
0
1
17
BI
0
0
2
1
1
0
3
1
0
0
0
8
Avg.
.210
.322
.238
.256
.357
.228
.333
.152
.263
.263
1.000
Angels
Seattle
13
2
0
1
Walks—Pittsburgh 4: Frazier 1, Bell 1, Moran 2. Milwaukee 2:
Santana 1, Villar 1. Strikeouts—Pittsburgh 9: Polanco 3, Marte 1,
Bell 1, Cervelli 1, Diaz 1, Rodriguez 1, Moroff 1. Milwaukee 14: Yelich
1, Aguilar 1, Braun 3, Santana 1, Sogard 2, Phillips 1, Bandy 3,
Anderson 1, Villar 1. E—Barnes (1). LOB—Pittsburgh 8, Milwaukee 3.
2B—Dickerson (10). 3B—Marte (4). HR—Frazier (2), off Anderson;
Mercer (1), off Anderson; Bell (2), off Lopez. RBIs—Frazier (5),
Polanco (18), Bell (17), Dickerson 2 (24), Moran (15), Mercer 2 (8).
SF—Polanco. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 5
(Polanco 2, Marte, Cervelli, Rodriguez); Milwaukee 1 (Braun).
RISP—Pittsburgh 5 for 12; Milwaukee 0 for 2. GIDP—Sogard.
DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Frazier, Mercer, Bell).
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Kuhl, W, 4-2 ................7 1 0 0 2 8
108 4.12
Rodriguez ....................2 1 0 0 0 6
28 0.79
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Anderson, L, 3-3 ........51⁄3 5 5 5 2 3
95 3.97
Barnes........................ 2⁄3 4 2 1 0 1
29 2.12
Lopez..........................2 3 2 2 1 2
34 5.40
Williams ......................1 1 0 0 1 3
26 2.38
Inherited runners-scored—Barnes 1-1.
U— Marvin Hudson, James Hoye, Quinn Wolcott, Jeff Kellogg.
T—3:02. Tickets sold—38,285 (41,900).
Seattle
AB R H BI Avg.
Segura ss
6 1 3 0 .299
Haniger rf
5 1 1 0 .296
Cano 2b
5 1 1 2 .293
Cruz dh
3 1 1 0 .253
1-Grdn dh 1 0 0 0 .349
Seager 3b 6 1 1 1 .232
Healy 1b
6 1 3 2 .241
Zunino c
5 1 2 2 .188
Heredia cf 3 1 1 0 .286
b-Gamel lf 1 1 1 0 .150
Rmine lf
4 0 1 0 .056
Totals
45 9 15 7
100 003 002 11 —8
000 002 040 12 —9
17
15
2
2
One out when winning run scored. a-flied out for Rivera in the 9th.
b-singled for Heredia in the 10th. 1-ran for Cruz in the 9th.
Walks—Angels 3: Trout 1, Upton 1, Pujols 1. Seattle 5: Haniger 1,
Cano 1, Cruz 2, Heredia 1. Strikeouts—Angels 11: Kinsler 2, Upton 3,
Pujols 1, Marte 1, Young 2, Rivera 2. Seattle 12: Segura 1, Haniger 2,
Cruz 1, Seager 2, Healy 2, Zunino 2, Romine 2. E—Marte (1), Ramirez
(1), Bradford 2 (2). LOB—Angels 10, Seattle 11. 2B—Trout 2 (8),
Cozart 2 (7), Marte (4), Haniger (7), Cano (8), Seager (9), Romine
(1). HR—Marte (2), off Gonzales; Upton (6), off Diaz; Zunino (4), off
Anderson. RBIs—Upton 2 (21), Pujols (20), Simmons (21), Marte 3
(8), Young (4), Cano 2 (18), Seager (16), Healy 2 (13), Zunino 2
(10). SB—Heredia (1). CS—Simmons (1), Segura (1). SF—Pujols.
S—Romine. Runners left in scoring position—Angels 6 (Kinsler 2,
Pujols, Cozart 2, Rivera); Seattle 7 (Haniger 2, Cano, Zunino 3,
Romine). RISP—Angels 5 for 21; Seattle 4 for 13. Runners moved
up—Pujols, Seager. GIDP—Pujols, Simmons. DP—Seattle 2 (Seager,
Cano, Healy), (Cano, Healy).
Angels
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
93 3.08
Skaggs .....................51⁄3 6 2 2 1 7
Bedrosian, H, 2............ 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
6 4.11
16 3.18
Ramirez, H, 2............... 2⁄3 0 0 0 1 2
Alvarez, H, 3 ................2⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
8 1.26
Anderson.....................0 2 3 3 1 0
13 4.26
32 3.71
Parker.......................12⁄3 2 0 0 1 1
Johnson, L, 2-1 ..........11⁄3 3 3 2 1 1
31 3.79
Paredes.......................0 1 0 0 0 0
2 9.95
Seattle
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Gonzales .....................6 9 4 4 1 7
100 5.19
Bradford......................1 0 0 0 0 2
17 1.93
Vincent .......................1 1 0 0 0 1
18 5.11
Diaz............................1 2 2 2 0 1
21 1.96
Nicasio .......................1 4 1 1 0 0
15 4.08
Goeddel, W, 1-0 ...........1 1 1 1 2 0
22 3.38
Anderson pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited
runners-scored—Bedrosian 2-0, Alvarez 2-0, Anderson 1-1, Parker
1-1, Paredes 1-1. WP—Ramirez, Parker.
U—D.J. Reyburn, Sam Holbrook, Ryan Blakney, Jim Wolf. T—4:29.
Tickets sold—36,977 (47,943).
BLUE JAYS
RAYS
Toronto
Hernandez rf
Dnldsn 3b
Solarte 2b
Smoak 1b
Pillar cf
Morales dh
Alford lf
Maile c
Diaz ss
1-Grrl Jr. ss
Totals
Toronto
Tampa Bay
AB
4
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
2
1
34
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
2
H
0
0
1
1
2
0
1
0
1
1
7
BI
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
Avg.
.258
.224
.270
.257
.316
.152
.250
.294
.216
.236
Tampa Bay
Span lf
Cron dh
2-Rfsndr dh
Duffy 3b
Miller 1b
Ramos c
Wendle 2b
Robertson ss
Smith cf
Gomez rf
Totals
AB
4
2
0
4
3
4
4
4
2
4
31
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
H
0
0
0
2
0
2
0
1
0
3
8
000 010 001 —2
000 000 010 —1
BI
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
Avg.
.245
.256
.185
.295
.233
.315
.286
.295
.330
.200
7
8
0
0
1-ran for Diaz in the 5th. 2-ran for Cron in the 8th.
Walks—Toronto 1: Solarte 1. Tampa Bay 5: Cron 2, Miller 1, Smith
2.
Strikeouts—Toronto 8: Hernandez 2, Donaldson 2, Solarte 1,
Smoak 1, Alford 1, Maile 1. Tampa Bay 7: Span 1, Cron 1, Duffy 1,
Miller 1, Wendle 1, Robertson 1, Smith 1.
LOB—Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Pillar 2 (15). HR—Gomez (5),
off Tepera. RBIs—Diaz (13), Gomez (8). SB—Alford (1), Smith (8).
CS—Smith (4), Gomez (1).
Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 3 (Smoak, Morales,
Alford); Tampa Bay 3 (Span 2, Ramos). RISP_Toronto 1 for 8; Tampa
Bay 2 for 7.
Runners moved up—Maile, Morales. LI
DP—Duffy. GIDP—Ramos.
DP—Toronto 2 (Donaldson, Solarte, Smoak), (Solarte, Smoak).
Toronto
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Estrada .......................6 4 0 0 4 3
96 5.21
Clippard, H, 5 ..............1 1 0 0 0 2
12 1.47
Tepera, W, 2-1, BS, 3-3..1 2 1 1 1 1
27 2.70
Osuna, S, 9-10.............1 1 0 0 0 1
19 2.93
Tampa Bay
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Archer.........................7 5 1 1 0 6
97 5.32
Andriese......................1 1 0 0 1 2
18 4.34
Colome, L, 2-4 .............1 1 1 1 0 0
14 5.17
WP—Colome.
U— Jeremie Rehak, Brian O’Nora, Fieldin Culbreth, CB Bucknor.
T—2:56. Tickets sold—14,032 (42,735).
TWINS
WHITE SOX
5
3
Minnesota broke up a no-hit bid by
James Shields in the seventh inning
and rallied for their third straight
victory. Eddie Rosario homered and
drove in two runs for the Twins.
AB
Minnesota AB R H BI Avg. Chicago
3
Mauer dh
3 1 0 0 .291 Garcia rf
Dozier 2b
3 1 0 0 .234 Sanchez 3b 4
4
Kepler cf-rf
4 0 0 1 .269 Abreu 1b
Escobar 3b 4 1 1 0 .311 Delmonico lf 3
Rosario lf
4 2 2 2 .282 Davidson dh 2
4
Grossman rf 3 0 0 0 .176 Narvaez c
LaMarre cf
1 0 0 0 .313 J.Rondon 2b 4
Morrison 1b 4 0 1 2 .182 Anderson ss 3
3
Adrianza ss 3 0 0 0 .192 Engel cf
30
Wilson c
3 0 0 0 .000 Totals
Totals
32 5 4 5
Minnesota
Chicago
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
3
000 000 311 —5
001 001 100 —3
H
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
5
BI
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
4
5
Avg.
.274
.293
.262
.242
.257
.176
.400
.254
.171
1
1
Walks—Minnesota 3: Mauer 1, Dozier 1, Adrianza 1. Chicago 2:
Delmonico 1, Davidson 1. Strikeouts—Minnesota 6: Dozier 1, Kepler
2, LaMarre 1, Adrianza 1, Wilson 1. Chicago 12: Garcia 1, Sanchez 2,
Abreu 2, Delmonico 1, Davidson 2, Anderson 2, Engel 2. E—Adrianza
(3), J.Rondon (1). LOB—Minnesota 3, Chicago 5. 2B—Morrison (4),
Sanchez (8), Engel (2). HR—Rosario (7), off Jones. RBIs—Kepler
(12), Rosario 2 (24), Morrison 2 (12), Garcia (9), Davidson (19).
SB—Rosario (4). SF—Davidson. S—Garcia, Anderson. Runners left
in scoring position—Minnesota 3 (Mauer, Escobar, Adrianza);
Chicago 1 (Anderson). RISP—Minnesota 2 for 7; Chicago 1 for 5.
Runners moved up—Grossman, Kepler, Abreu.
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
102 3.49
Gibson......................62⁄3 4 3 3 2 8
Duke, W, 2-1 ...............1⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
9 3.86
Reed, H, 6...................1 0 0 0 0 2
13 3.06
Rodney, S, 5-8 .............1 0 0 0 0 1
12 3.86
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Shields .....................62⁄3 2 3 3 2 5
91 5.14
Avilan......................... 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
9 3.60
B.Rondon, L, 1-2..........1⁄3 0 1 0 1 0
7 4.91
Bummer...................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
10 5.06
Jones..........................1 1 1 1 0 1
23 2.02
Inherited runners-scored—Duke 1-1, Avilan 2-2, Bummer 2-1.
WP—Gibson, Shields.
U— Chad Whitson, Gary Cederstrom, Cory Blaser, Stu
Scheurwater. T—2:56. Tickets sold—17,424 (40,615).
R
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H
1
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
7
BI
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
Avg.
.264
.198
.280
.215
.256
.232
.283
.243
.286
3
7
2
0
NATIONALS
PHILLIES
5
4
Miami
Realmuto c
Prado 3b
Castro 2b
Anderson rf
Bour 1b
Maybin lf-cf
Brinson cf
Dietrich
Rojas 1b
Rivera ss
Straily p
Shuck lf
Totals
AB
4
6
4
3
4
4
3
1
1
3
2
3
38
R
2
1
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
H
2
0
2
0
1
2
0
0
1
1
1
0
10
BI
0
0
3
0
0
2
1
0
1
0
0
1
8
Avg.
.328
.152
.315
.258
.240
.227
.164
.233
.240
.148
.500
.224
Miami
Cincinnati
AB
4
5
0
5
3
0
4
3
4
4
2
1
1
36
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
4
H
0
1
0
3
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
1
0
9
BI
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
4
Avg.
.273
.282
.000
.333
.205
.000
.169
.283
.226
.211
.111
.203
.210
Philadelphia
Washington
Washington AB R H BI Avg.
Harper rf
4 0 0 0 .246
Turner ss
4 0 1 0 .281
Rendon 3b
4 0 1 2 .274
Adams 1b-lf 4 1 2 1 .296
Wieters c
4 0 1 0 .211
Bautista
0 1 0 0 .000
Stevenson lf 1 0 1 0 .333
Kndrck 1b
1 1 0 0 .281
Taylor cf
2 0 0 0 .195
Scherzer p
2 0 0 0 .238
Sierra
0 1 0 0 .196
Severino
0 0 0 1 .250
Difo 2b
3 1 1 1 .289
Totals
29 5 7 5
000 000 310 —4
010 000 022 —5
9
7
2
1
Walks—Philadelphia 2: Hernandez 1, Franco 1. Washington 6:
Stevenson 1, Taylor 2, Sierra 1, Severino 1, Difo 1.
Strikeouts—Philadelphia 18: Hernandez 3, Hoskins 3, Herrera 1,
Altherr 2, Santana 1, Florimon 2, Alfaro 3, Arrieta 2, Kingery 1.
Washington 6: Harper 1, Turner 1, Adams 1, Kendrick 1, Taylor 1, Difo
1. E—Florimon (1), Neris (1), Turner (4). LOB—Philadelphia 8,
Washington 7. 2B—Hoskins (10), Herrera 2 (7), Santana (9).
HR—Franco (6), off Torres; Adams (8), off Arrieta. RBIs—Hoskins
(23), Herrera (15), Franco (26), Williams (5), Rendon 2 (6), Adams
(18), Difo (12), Severino (7). SB—Florimon (1). CS—Stevenson (1),
Taylor (1). DP—Philadelphia 2 (Hernandez, Franco, Santana),
(Morgan, Hernandez, Santana); Washington 1 (Rendon, Difo,
Adams).
Philadelphia
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Arrieta.........................6 2 1 1 2 2
75 3.15
4 0.63
Ramos, H, 3 ................ 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
9 2.45
Morgan, H, 6 ...............1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Garcia, H, 6................. 2⁄3 0 1 1 1 2
16 3.21
Hunter, H, 3.................2⁄3 2 1 1 1 2
23 4.26
Neris, L, 1-2 ................0 2 2 2 2 0
19 4.15
Washington
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Scherzer....................61⁄3 5 1 1 2 15
111 1.74
Solis...........................0 1 1 1 0 0
4 4.72
Kintzler ....................... 2⁄3 2 1 1 0 1
20 4.08
Torres..........................1 1 1 1 0 0
12 6.75
Doolittle, W, 1-1 ...........1 0 0 0 0 2
17 1.72
Inherited runners-scored—Garcia 1-0, Hunter 1-1, Solis 1-1,
Kintzler 1-1. HBP—Scherzer (Altherr), Neris (Kendrick). WP—Hunter.
U— Sean Barber, Mike Winters, Rob Drake, Mike Muchlinski.
T—3:33. Tickets sold—30,611 (41,313).
GIANTS
BRAVES
4
3
Andrew Suarez outpitched Mike
Soroka in a rookie matchup, and San
Francisco swept Atlanta for the first
time in four years. Suarez gave up only
one unearned run in 51⁄3 innings.
San Fran.
Blanco lf
McCtchn rf
Belt 1b
Hundley c
Sndvl 3b
Tomlinson
Crawford ss
Hanson 2b
Jackson cf
Suarez p
Longoria 3b
Totals
AB
4
3
4
4
4
1
4
4
3
2
1
34
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
4
H
1
1
1
1
1
0
2
2
1
0
0
10
BI
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
Avg.
.274
.246
.298
.333
.244
.250
.250
.321
.232
.000
.246
San Francisco
Atlanta
Atlanta
AB R H BI Avg.
Albies 2b
5 0 1 0 .285
Acuna lf
4 1 2 0 .326
F.Frmn 1b
4 0 1 0 .307
Markakis rf
4 0 0 0 .344
Bautista 3b 3 1 1 0 .300
Flowers c
4 0 2 1 .250
Cmrgo ss
3 1 0 0 .226
Soroka p
1 0 1 0 .250
S.Frmn p
1 0 0 0 .000
Tucker
1 0 0 0 .272
Suzuki
1 0 1 1 .310
Clbrsn
0 0 0 0 .176
Inciarte cf
4 0 0 1 .254
Totals
35 3 9 3
002 200 000 —4
100 000 002 —3
10
9
2
0
Walks—San Francisco 5: Blanco 1, McCutchen 1, Belt 1, Hundley
1, Jackson 1. Atlanta 2: Bautista 1, Camargo 1. Strikeouts—San
Francisco 8: McCutchen 1, Sandoval 1, Crawford 1, Hanson 1,
Jackson 2, Suarez 2. Atlanta 7: Acuna 1, F.Freeman 2, Markakis 1,
Flowers 1, S.Freeman 1, Inciarte 1. E—Hanson 2 (3). LOB—San
Francisco 10, Atlanta 7. 2B—Crawford (4), Hanson (3), Suzuki (5).
RBIs—Blanco (4), McCutchen (14), Hundley (11), Sandoval (8),
Flowers (1), Inciarte (12), Suzuki (15). SB—Blanco (3).
SF—McCutchen. S—Suarez.GIDP—Hundley, Crawford, Markakis,
Camargo, Inciarte. DP—San Francisco 3 (Hanson, Crawford, Belt),
(Hanson, Crawford, Belt), (Sandoval, Hanson, Belt); Atlanta 2
(Soroka, Camargo, F.Freeman), (Bautista, Albies, F.Freeman).
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
93 3.06
Suarez, W, 1-1 ...........51⁄3 7 1 0 1 6
Gearrin, H, 2................ 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
8 3.86
Dyson, H, 5 .................1 0 0 0 0 0
13 3.00
Watson, H, 7................1 0 0 0 0 0
6 0.57
Strickland, S, 8-10........1 2 2 2 1 1
20 2.87
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Soroka, L, 1-1..............4 7 4 4 3 3
84 4.50
S.Freeman ...................2 2 0 0 2 3
31 3.77
Biddle ........................ 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
13 2.00
Moylan .......................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
5 2.31
Winkler .......................1 0 0 0 0 1
9 1.17
Vizcaino ......................1 0 0 0 0 0
19 1.84
Inherited runners-scored—Gearrin 1-0, Moylan 1-0.
WP—Suarez.
U— Vic Carapazza, Jordan Baker, Jerry Layne, Greg Gibson.
T—3:09. Tickets sold—37,896 (41,149).
ROYALS
TIGERS
4
2
Mike Moustakas drove in three runs to
help Kansas City win a series for the
first time in 11 tries. Jakob Junis (4-2)
matched his career high with eight
strikeouts over seven-plus innings.
Detroit
Martin cf
Iglesias ss
Castllns
Martinez dh
Hicks 1b
Jones lf
Gdrm 3b
Mchdo 2b
Greiner c
Reyes rf
Totals
Detroit
Kansas City
AB
5
3
1
4
4
4
3
4
4
4
36
R
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
H
2
1
0
1
3
0
0
1
1
1
10
BI
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
Avg.
.287
.216
.311
.257
.292
.239
.189
.207
.250
.143
Kansas City
Merrifield 2b
Soler rf
Mstks 3b
Perez dh
Cuthbert 1b
Duda 1b
Jay lf
Almonte cf
Escobar ss
Butera c
Totals
AB
4
3
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
28
R
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
000 100 010 —2
103 000 00x —4
H
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
7
BI
0
0
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
Avg.
.252
.308
.291
.273
.200
.239
.268
.214
.220
.175
10
7
0
0
Walks—Detroit 2: Iglesias 1, Goodrum 1. Kansas City 1: Soler 1.
Strikeouts—Detroit 8: Martin 1, Iglesias 1, Martinez 1, Hicks 1,
Jones 2, Goodrum 1, Reyes 1. Kansas City 6: Merrifield 1, Soler 1,
Perez 1, Almonte 1, Escobar 1, Butera 1.
LOB—Detroit 9, Kansas City 2. 2B—Martin (7), Merrifield (7),
Moustakas (8). HR—Hicks (3), off Junis. RBIs—Hicks 2 (8),
Moustakas 3 (23), Perez (7). SB—Merrifield 3 (7), Soler (1).
SF—Moustakas.
Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 3 (Martinez 2,
Machado).
DP—Detroit 2 (Iglesias, Hicks), (Machado, Iglesias, Hicks);
Kansas City 1 (Moustakas, Merrifield, Cuthbert).
Detroit
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Boyd, L, 1-3.................7 6 4 4 1 5
102 3.00
Farmer ........................1 1 0 0 0 1
7 4.50
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Junis, W, 4-2................7 8 2 2 1 8
98 3.18
Hill, H, 3 ..................... 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
1 3.97
Keller, H, 3 ..................2⁄3 1 0 0 1 0
15 2.70
Herrera, S, 7-8 .............1 1 0 0 0 0
14 0.66
Inherited runners-scored—Hill 1-0, Keller 1-1.
U— Jansen Visconti, Manny Gonzalez, Jeff Nelson, Laz Diaz.
T—2:16. Tickets sold—18,424 (37,903).
Cincinnati AB R H BI Avg.
Peraza ss
5 1 1 0 .293
Winker lf
4 1 0 1 .287
Votto 1b
5 1 4 4 .289
Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 .282
Suarez 3b
5 0 0 0 .277
Schebler rf
4 0 0 0 .273
Barnhart c
4 0 2 0 .236
Finnegan p
1 0 0 0 .000
Duvall
1 0 0 0 .161
Garrett p
0 0 0 0 .000
Brice p
0 0 0 0 .000
Mesoraco
1 0 0 0 .220
Hamilton cf 2 2 1 0 .204
Totals
36 5 9 5
410 000 102 —8
002 000 102 —5
10
9
2
2
Walks—Miami 7: Realmuto 2, Anderson 2, Bour 1, Rivera 2.
Cincinnati 5: Winker 1, Gennett 1, Schebler 1, Hamilton 2.
Strikeouts—Miami 13: Realmuto 1, Prado 1, Castro 1, Anderson 2,
Bour 1, Maybin 1, Brinson 1, Dietrich 1, Rivera 1, Straily 1, Shuck 2.
Cincinnati 8: Votto 1, Gennett 2, Schebler 2, Barnhart 1, Finnegan 1,
Duvall 1. E—Rivera 2 (2), Gennett (5), Suarez (2). LOB—Miami 12,
Cincinnati 10. 2B—Realmuto (2), Maybin (7), Peraza (8), Votto (5),
Gennett (8), Hamilton (3). HR—Votto (5), off Straily. RBIs—Castro 3
(16), Maybin 2 (6), Brinson (11), Shuck (1), Rojas (10), Winker (10),
Votto 4 (19). SF—Castro. S—Floro.
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Straily .........................4 3 2 2 4 2
77 6.75
Wittgren, W, 1-0 ...........2 1 0 0 0 4
29 1.00
Guerrero......................1 2 1 1 0 1
19 4.41
Barraclough, H, 2 .........1 1 0 0 0 0
17 1.84
Tazawa........................1⁄3 2 2 2 1 0
18 7.80
Ziegler, S, 4-4 ..............2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
14 6.28
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Finnegan, L, 0-3.........31⁄3 4 5 5 3 2
63 8.27
Floro .......................... 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
10 0.69
Hernandez ...................2 0 0 0 1 4
38 3.00
Shackelford .................1⁄3 2 1 1 1 1
14 9.00
Garrett........................ 2⁄3 0 0 0 1 2
16 1.96
Brice...........................1 0 0 0 0 2
11 4.26
Peralta ........................1 3 2 2 1 1
37 5.06
HBP_Hernandez (Maybin). PB_Barnhart (1).
U— Mark Carlson, Brian Knight, Gerry Davis, Pat Hoberg. T—3:36.
Tickets sold—19,800 (42,319).
Max Scherzer struck out 15 in 61⁄3
innings, and Washington rallied for two
runs in the ninth. Closer Hector Neris
walked in a run before giving up the
winning hit to Wilmer Difo.
Philadelphia
Hrndz 2b
Hoskins lf
Neris p
Herrera cf
Altherr rf
Valentin lf
Santana 1b
Franco 3b
Florimon ss
Alfaro c
Arrieta p
Williams
Kingery rf
Totals
8
5
Starlin Castro drove in three runs for
the second straight game and Cameron Maybin added two RBIs for Miami. A
73-minute rain delay cost Dan Straily a
shot at his first win of the season.
a-singled for Vielma in the 9th.
Walks—Baltimore 1: Machado 1. Oakland 1: Olson 1.
Strikeouts—Baltimore 9: Gentry 2, Peterson 1, C.Davis 2, Trumbo
1, Alvarez 1, Vielma 2. Oakland 8: Semien 1, Joyce 1, K.Davis 2,
Olson 1, Chapman 2, Piscotty 1.
E—Alvarez (1), Vielma (1). LOB—Baltimore 3, Oakland 6.
2B—Joyce (7), Olson (6). HR—Alvarez (7), off Triggs. RBIs—Alvarez
(14), K.Davis (29), Olson (14). CS—Semien (1), Olson (1). S—Gentry.
Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 1 (C.Davis); Oakland
2 (Semien, Chapman). RISP_Baltimore 0 for 2; Oakland 1 for 5.
Runners moved up—Lucroy, K.Davis.
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Cobb, L, 0-4 ................6 5 2 1 1 5
103 7.61
Castro.........................1 1 0 0 0 1
17 4.35
Brach..........................1 1 0 0 0 2
13 5.40
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Triggs, W, 3-1 ...............7 2 1 1 0 9
96 4.41
Trivino, H, 2 .................1 0 0 0 0 0
6 0.84
Treinen, S, 5-7..............1 1 0 0 1 0
10 1.12
WP—Treinen.
U— Hunter Wendelstedt, Chris Guccione, Dave Rackley, Larry
Vanover. T—2:25. Tickets sold—17,112 (46,765).
2
1
Kevin Pillar scored the tiebreaking run
on a wild pitch in ninth inning to help
Toronto snap a three-game skid. The
Blue Jays’ Aledmys Diaz was carted off
the field in the fifth with an ankle injury.
9
0
Chad Kuhl and Richard Rodriguez
combined on a two-hitter for Pittsburgh. Kuhl is 3-0 with a 1.91 ERA in six
starts against Milwaukee, and the
Pirates are unbeaten in those games.
AB
4
4
5
4
5
4
1
3
4
1
3
1
39
AB
6
5
5
4
6
6
5
5
3
1
1
47
7
4
Gleyber Torres became the youngest
Yankees player to hit a walk-off homer,
a three-run shot in the ninth that gave
New York the win. Torres, 21, bettered
Mickey Mantle, who was 41 days older.
Pittsburgh
Frazier 2b
Polanco rf
Marte cf
Bell 1b
Dickerson lf
Cervelli c
b-Diaz c
Moran 3b
Mercer ss
Rodriguez p
Kuhl p
a-Moroff ss
Totals
Angels
Kinsler 2b
Trout cf
Upton lf
Pujols dh
Smns ss
Cozart 3b
Marte 1b
Young rf
Rivera c
a-Valbna
Graterol c
Totals
AB
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
31
MARLINS
REDS
2
1
Andrew Triggs had his best outing of
the season, giving up two hits over
seven innings with nine strikeouts for
Oakland. Pedro Alvarez homered for
Baltimore, which has lost six straight.
SATURDAY’S LATE BOX
4 p.m.
5 p.m.
ATHLETICS
ORIOLES
3
0
NL STANDINGS
ROCKIES
METS
3
2
Ian Desmond hit two solo home runs,
including a tiebreaking drive in the
eighth inning that helped Colorado win
its fifth straight. The Mets were
outscored 34-11 and shut out three
times during their 0-6 homestand.
Colorado
Blackmon cf
Dahl rf
Arenado 3b
Parra lf
Story ss
Desmond 1b
Castro 2b
Wolters c
Freeland p
C.Gonzalez
Totals
AB
5
5
2
3
4
4
4
1
3
1
32
R
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
3
H
1
2
0
2
0
2
1
0
0
0
8
BI
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
3
Avg.
.289
.300
.315
.263
.222
.188
.188
.136
.071
.213
Colorado
New York
New York
AB R H BI Avg.
Lagares cf
4 1 1 0 .319
Cespedes lf 1 1 1 0 .246
Nimmo lf
2 0 0 0 .256
Cabrera 2b 4 0 1 1 .333
Frazier 3b
3 0 0 1 .248
Flores 1b
2 0 0 0 .213
Reyes
0 0 0 0 .139
Bruce rf
4 0 0 0 .236
Lobaton c
3 0 1 0 .154
A.Gonzalez
1 0 1 0 .231
Syndrgrd p
2 0 0 0 .059
Conforto
1 0 0 0 .184
Nido
1 0 0 0 .147
Rosario ss
3 0 0 0 .230
Totals
31 2 5 2
011 000 010 —3
200 000 000 —2
8
5
0
1
Walks—Colorado 5: Arenado 2, Parra 1, Wolters 2. New York 3:
Nimmo 1, Flores 2. Strikeouts—Colorado 9: Blackmon 2, Arenado 1,
Story 2, Desmond 1, Freeland 2, C.Gonzalez 1. New York 13: Lagares
1, Nimmo 2, Cabrera 1, Frazier 1, Bruce 2, Lobaton 1, Syndergaard 2,
Conforto 1, Nido 1, Rosario 1. E—Syndergaard (1). LOB—Colorado 8,
New York 6. 2B—Dahl (1), Parra (6). HR—Desmond (5), off
Syndergaard; Desmond (6), off Robles. RBIs—Parra (5), Desmond 2
(16), Cabrera (21), Frazier (21). SB—Dahl (1), Wolters (1).
SF—Frazier. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 3
(Blackmon, Story, Freeland); New York 2 (Syndergaard, Nido).
RISP—Colorado 0 for 7; New York 1 for 4. Runners moved up—Bruce.
GIDP—Desmond. DP—New York 1 (Cabrera, Flores).
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Freeland, W, 2-4...........7 4 2 2 1 8
103 3.95
10 6.06
Shaw, H, 6 ..................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
McGee, H, 8 ................ 1⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
8 5.68
Ottavino, S, 1-2 ............1 1 0 0 1 3
21 0.47
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Syndergaard ................6 6 2 2 4 5
95 3.09
Blevins .......................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
12 5.87
Ramos........................ 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
5 3.00
Robles, L, 2-1 ..............2 2 1 1 1 2
27 3.60
HBP_Syndergaard (Wolters).
U— Eric Cooper, Chad Fairchild, Bruce Dreckman, Mike
Estabrook. T—3:02. Tickets sold—33,580 (41,922).
RED SOX
RANGERS
6
1
Chris Sale gave up one run over seven
innings and struck out a season-high
12 for Boston, which handed Texas its
15th home loss in 20 games. Ryan
Rua homered for the Rangers.
Boston
Betts rf
Swihart lf
Bntndi lf-cf
Martinez dh
Mrlnd 1b
Bogaerts ss
Devers 3b
E.Nunez 2b
Brdly cf-rf
Leon c
Totals
AB
2
3
5
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
36
R
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
1
1
6
H
1
1
0
2
2
1
0
1
0
2
10
BI
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
3
6
Avg.
.355
.160
.244
.349
.347
.333
.260
.229
.178
.154
Boston
Texas
Texas
AB R H BI Avg.
DeShields cf 3 0 1 0 .308
Choo dh
4 0 0 0 .245
Knr-Flfa 2b
3 0 0 0 .244
Mazara rf
3 0 0 0 .278
Profar ss
4 0 1 0 .224
R.Nunez 3b 4 0 2 0 .167
Rua lf
4 1 1 1 .203
Guzman 1b 4 0 0 0 .183
Perez c
3 0 0 0 .125
Totals
32 1 5 1
101 003 100 —6
000 000 100 —1
10
5
1
0
Walks—Boston 2: Martinez 1, Leon 1. Texas 1: Kiner-Falefa 1.
Strikeouts—Boston 7: Benintendi 2, Martinez 1, Bogaerts 1,
Devers 1, Bradley Jr. 2. Texas 14: DeShields 1, Choo 2, Kiner-Falefa 1,
Mazara 2, R.Nunez 2, Rua 2, Guzman 3, Perez 1.
E—Devers (8). LOB—Boston 6, Texas 7. 2B—Martinez (8),
Moreland (7). HR—Leon (1), off Fister; Martinez (8), off Fister; Rua
(2), off Sale. RBIs—Martinez (27), Moreland (17), Bogaerts (16),
Leon 3 (5), Rua (5). SB—DeShields 2 (6).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Sale, W, 3-1 ................7 4 1 1 1 12
103 2.02
Barnes ........................1 0 0 0 0 0
9 2.51
Smith .........................1 1 0 0 0 2
15 4.22
Texas
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
103 4.02
Fister, L, 1-3..............61⁄3 9 6 6 2 5
Chavez......................12⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
33 5.23
Barnette......................1 0 0 0 0 1
8 2.57
HBP_Sale 2 (Mazara,DeShields), Fister (Bradley Jr.).
U— Dan Bellino, Phil Cuzzi, Adam Hamari, Adrian Johnson.
T—2:33. Tickets sold—28,360 (49,115).
CARDINALS
CUBS
4
3
Dexter Fowler hit a two-run walk-off
homer in the 14th inning as St. Louis
completed a three-game sweep. Javier
Baez homered in the top of the inning
to give Chicago a brief 3-2 lead.
Chicago
AB R H BI Avg.
Contreras c 6 1 1 0 .231
Schwarber lf 4 0 1 0 .269
Bryant 3b
6 1 1 1 .272
Rizzo 1b
5 0 0 1 .177
Russell ss
4 0 1 0 .240
La Stella
1 0 0 0 .275
Caratini
1 0 0 0 .273
Happ cf
4 0 0 0 .228
Baez 2b-ss
6 1 2 1 .286
Heyward rf
6 0 1 0 .227
Lester p
2 0 1 0 .154
Almora
1 0 0 0 .279
Zobrist 2b
2 0 1 0 .299
Totals
48 3 9 3
Chicago
St. Louis
St. Louis AB R H BI Avg.
Bader cf
7 1 2 0 .261
Fowler rf
6 1 1 2 .161
Mrtnz 1b
5 0 0 0 .286
Ozuna lf
5 0 1 0 .258
Gyorko 3b 5 2 2 1 .375
DeJong ss 3 0 0 0 .241
Wong 2b
6 0 3 1 .222
Pena c
4 0 0 0 .143
Wacha p
2 0 1 0 .077
Garcia
0 0 0 0 .229
Pham
1 0 0 0 .323
Carpenter
1 0 0 0 .163
Kelly
1 0 0 0 .000
h-Mikolas
1 0 0 0 .071
Totals
47 4 10 4
100 100 000 000 01 —3
010 001 000 000 02 —4
9
10
0
1
Walks—Chicago 4: Schwarber 2, Happ 2. St. Louis 8: Fowler 1,
Martinez 1, Ozuna 1, Gyorko 1, DeJong 3, Pena 1.
Strikeouts—Chicago 10: Contreras 2, Schwarber 1, Bryant 2, Russell
2, Happ 3. St. Louis 13: Bader 3, Fowler 2, Martinez 1, Ozuna 2,
Gyorko 1, DeJong 1, Pena 2, h-Mikolas 1. E—Gyorko (1). 2B—Russell
(6), Gyorko (2). 3B—Wong (1). HR—Bryant (4), off Wacha; Baez (9),
off Mayers; Gyorko (3), off Lester; Fowler (5), off Farrell. RBIs—Bryant
(13), Rizzo (14), Baez (29), Fowler 2 (16), Gyorko (6), Wong (8).
CS—Bader (2). SF—Rizzo.
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lester .......................51⁄3 6 2 2 4 4
87 2.82
Cishek ........................ 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
15 2.30
Wilson ........................ 1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
1 4.38
Edwards....................11⁄3 0 0 0 2 2
28 0.56
Duensing...................12⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
25 0.00
Morrow .......................1 1 0 0 1 1
14 1.50
Montgomery.................3 0 0 0 1 2
44 4.41
Farrell, L, 1-2...............2⁄3 2 2 2 0 2
16 7.94
St. Louis
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Wacha ......................51⁄3 6 2 1 3 5
96 3.35
Gregerson ...................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
9 6.00
Lyons..........................1 0 0 0 1 1
18 5.06
Hicks ..........................1 0 0 0 0 0
10 1.04
Holland .......................1 0 0 0 0 1
8 5.79
Tuivailala .....................2 0 0 0 0 1
29 3.00
Mayers, W, 1-0 .............3 3 1 1 0 1
46 1.86
Inherited runners-scored—Cishek 1-1, Wilson 2-0, Duensing
2-0, Gregerson 1-0, Hicks 1-0. HBP—Cishek (Pena). WP—Hicks.
T—4:46. Tickets sold—45,438 (45,538).
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
L AT I ME S . CO M/ S P O RT S
D5
BASEBALL
Dodgers ace is
out indefinitely
with arm injury
Miguel Sierra EPA/Shutterstock
FREDDY GALVIS forces out Kyle Farmer at second in the first inning. The Dodgers went hitless in nine
at-bats with runners in scoring position and left 13 on base in losing the rubber game of the series in Mexico.
Dodgers’ slide at end of
trip adds insult to injury
They go 4-7, losing
two of three to Padres,
and limp home to face
first-place Arizona.
SAN DIEGO 3
DODGERS 0
By Andy McCullough
MONTERREY, Mexico
— At least it’s over.
At least, after 10 days
away from home, the Dodgers can return to Los Angeles on Sunday evening. They
departed Mexico with a losing record, one worsened by
this three-city trip, which
ended with a 3-0 defeat to
the Padres at Monterrey
Stadium.
The Dodgers went 4-7 on
this visit to San Francisco,
Arizona and Monterrey. The
consequences to their roster
were more severe. The team
lost Corey Seager, Yasiel
Puig, Hyun-Jin Ryu and
Clayton Kershaw to injury,
with Kershaw going on the
10-day disabled list Sunday
with biceps tendinitis. The
patchwork roster played
listless baseball throughout
the trip, save for a combined
no-hitter led by Walker
Buehler on Friday.
The Dodgers can rest
Monday. But starting Tuesday they have two more
games with the Arizona Diamondbacks, who have won
seven of 10 from the Dodgers
and lead them by eight
games in the National
League West.
“It doesn’t get any easier,” manager Dave Roberts
said. “We’ve got a team that
is smelling blood, in Arizona,
playing well. We’re chasing
those guys.”
The Dodgers (15-19) are
also chasing a winning
record. They are chasing
health for their pitching
staff. They are chasing anything resembling consis-
tency from their lineup.
On Sunday the Dodgers
went hitless in nine at-bats
with runners in scoring position. They stranded 13 runners. They were held scoreless for six innings by Padres
starter Eric Lauer, a 22-yearold left-hander making his
third career appearance in
the majors.
Thrown into the Dodgers’ rotation as an emergency option, Ross Stripling
contributed four scoreless
innings. He scattered four
hits and struck out five. He
had pitched in relief three
days ago, so his pitch count
was limited.
Stripling dealt with some
nausea before the game. It
was unrelated to the onslaught of injuries, which he
described as “a punch in the
gut.” Stripling will replace
Kershaw in the rotation for
the foreseeable future.
“Dominoes keep falling
for us,” Stripling said.
After Stripling departed,
Tony Cingrani surrendered
a two-run homer to Eric
Hosmer. He gave up a oneout
single
to
Travis
Jankowski. Up next was
Hosmer. Cingrani fell behind in the count. He fed
Hosmer a 3-1 fastball. Hosmer did not miss.
“He got a pitch center
cut,” Roberts said. “And he
did what he does.”
San Diego produced another run in the seventh. Appearing in his second inning
of relief, Pedro Baez gave up
a leadoff triple to Jankowski.
Three batters later Yimi
Garcia faced Franchy Cordero, who stroked an RBI single.
The Dodgers offered no
counter. They will have to do
better this week against Arizona.
“We’ve got our hands
full,” Roberts said. “No one is
going to feel sorry for us.”
andy.mccullough@latimes.com
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
latimes.com
/sports
No need to rush
into anything
Since the Dodgers don’t
know how long Clayton
Kershaw will be out, it’s silly
to talk about making major
moves right now, Bill
Shaikin writes.
ple ticks and his offspeed
pitches not always cooperating. Still, Kershaw has remained effective, with a 2.86
earned-run average in seven
starts. Yet he has not
pitched beyond the seventh
inning and has given up seven home runs.
Kershaw missed 10 weeks
in 2016 with a herniated disk
in his lower back. He suffered a strained muscle in
his back last season and
spent five weeks on the DL.
His latest ailment creates
another red flag if he enters
free agency, as the Dodgers
must balance concerns
about Kershaw’s health with
their belief in his ability to
extend his Hall of Fame career.
Kershaw can opt out of
his seven-year, $215-million
contract after this season.
He has not revealed his intentions, but the industry
expects him to join a freeagent class that’s expected
to include Bryce Harper and
Manny Machado. The Dodgers are expected to pursue
Kershaw with vigor — unless
their worries about his
health trump their zeal for
making him a Dodger for life.
Kershaw devised a simple solution for this situation. As the season dawned,
he expressed his hope to
take the baseball every fifth
day and make 32 starts.
That goal is no longer possible.
“I know he’s frustrated,”
Roberts said. “He’s had to
deal with some things the
last couple years. He wants
to carry the load. For each of
the players, you feel for these
guys.
“But you’re trying to still
win baseball games. It’s that
‘next man up’ mentality. It’s
not insensitive. But it’s kind
of the way it has to be.”
andy.mccullough@latimes.com
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
ANGELS REPORT
Angels
improve
road
record
to 13-3
[Angels, from D1]
was, yet he’s still plenty capable, especially in Safeco
Field, where each of his
starts remains an event.
But it was Ohtani who
stood tallest on the mound,
showing no issues with the
ankle he recently sprained
or the 11 days he had off between pitching starts because of the injury.
“Let’s focus on those first
six innings,” manager Mike
Scioscia said.
“Those
were
pretty
good.”
Ohtani struck out Jean
Segura with a slider that
short-hopped catcher Rene
Rivera’s glove.
He struck out Nelson
Cruz with a slider that could
have been classified as cruel.
He struck out Ben Gamel
with a splitter that evaporated.
Perhaps Ohtani’s most
impressive sequence ended
the fourth. He finished
Mitch Haniger with a 99mph fastball and an 85-mph
slider that was closer to hitting the plate than Haniger’s
flailing bat.
But in the seventh, with
his pitch count crossing into
the 90s, Ohtani’s gem faded
quickly yet hardly completely. He gave up a single, a
two-run homer (to Ryon
Healy) and a walk, ending
[Kershaw, from D1]
As the injuries pile up, so
do the losses. The Dodgers
left Monterrey with more defeats (seven) than victories
(four) on this trip. They salvaged a split with Arizona
during a four-game set midway through this road swing,
but still trail the Diamondbacks by eight games in the
National League West.
“It’s been tough,” Friedman said. “But injuries are
part of the game. We’ve seen
this team respond in the
past when others had written us off. We expect to do
the same thing. We haven’t
quite clicked yet with all of
our various components to
surge through that adversity. We haven’t seen that
yet. But we expect that we
will.”
The injury to Kershaw
created an awkward situation Saturday night. The
Dodgers decided to scratch
Hill as the starter for Sunday’s series finale and push
him into Kershaw’s spot on
Tuesday at home against
the Diamondbacks. But
Roberts noted only that
Stripling would start Sunday in Hill’s place. The manager said he was unsure
when Hill could pitch again.
Informed of this, reporters spoke to Hill after Saturday’s loss. Hill was aware
that Kershaw was headed to
the DL but was not authorized to tell the media. A
clumsy
tango
ensued.
“Nothing’s wrong,” Hill said.
“There’s nothing going on.
They just decided to go with
Strip.”
In the moment, Hill and
Roberts appeared to be on
separate pages. A day later,
it became clear they were
concealing the news about
Kershaw. The Dodgers
called
up
right-hander
Brock Stewart to replace
Kershaw on the roster.
The Dodgers afforded
Kershaw two days of extra
rest after his May 1 start at
Arizona. Kershaw had reported symptoms of biceps
pain to the training staff following that outing. He
played cards with teammates before Saturday’s
game with an electric muscle
stimulation
machine
strapped to his left arm.
Kershaw has been operating at slightly diminished capacity, with his fastball velocity dipping a cou-
Blash starts amid
Calhoun’s slump
By Jeff Miller
Ted S. Warren Associated Press
THE ANGELS’ Shohei Ohtani is shown during his problematic seventh inning
Sunday. He gave up a single, a two-run homer and a walk before getting pulled.
his day.
As much as Ohtani’s performance stood out, the
effort simply fit in with what
the Angels’ rotation has
done lately.
In seven games since
Garrett Richards gave up
nine runs (five earned) to
the New York Yankees, the
starters have a collective
ERA of 1.94.
On an even better roll is
Trout, who is 12 for 22 with
seven extra-base hits (including two home runs), six
RBIs and eight walks in May.
His sixth-inning homer
Sunday finished a four-run
rally that began after three
outs. The problem for Seattle was that the third out — a
swinging whiff by Chris
Young — ended as a wild
pitch.
Young reached first and
then came home on a Rivera
double. After Ian Kinsler
walked, Trout hit his threerun drive to make the score
6-0.
“This is what he can do,”
Scioscia said, “when he’s
seeing the ball well.”
The view is a good one
right now for Trout and the
Angels, who’ve won 13 of 16
on the road, with another
two-game stop still to come
in Colorado.
sports@latimes.com
Kole Calhoun’s offensive
struggles helped Jabari
Blash get back in the big
leagues.
The outfielder was recalled from triple-A Salt
Lake on Sunday and started
in right field for the Angels.
He singled and walked in five
plate appearances against
Seattle.
“These guys have been
playing great baseball,” said
Blash, 28, who appeared in
99 games with San Diego the
last two seasons.
“It’s been fun to watch. I
was just looking forward to
helping this team at some
point.”
That
point
arrived
sooner than expected. Coming off his poorest offensive
season to date, Calhoun has
been unable to find his
swing, hitting .167 with a .211
slugging percentage.
On opening day, Calhoun, batting fifth, had
three hits, including a home
run and a triple in his first
two at-bats.
He has not had an extrabase hit ever since; each of
his past 17 hits were singles.
He recently was dropped to
eighth in the order.
“It’s just not what Kole’s
about,”
manager
Mike
Scioscia said. “He understands it. This guy’s too good
of an offensive player. … He’ll
get it back.”
Through the 2016 season,
Calhoun was a .266 career
hitter, and from 2014-17 he averaged 20 home runs.
Scioscia said Calhoun
has been working on a few
mechanical
adjustments
with the team’s hitting
coaches.
“We’re trying to get Kole
right,” Scioscia said. “He’s
going to take a couple days
to just kind of clear his head.
…We’ll see where everything
fits in.”
Backup outfielder Chris
Young homered Sunday, but
he also has had problems at
the plate. The veteran is hitting .167 in 36 at-bats.
Blash, meanwhile, was
the Pacific Coast League
player of the month for April.
He was batting .350 for the
Bees, with a 1.291 on-baseplus-slugging percentage
and 10 home runs.
“It’s been fun to watch
what he’s done for a month
down there in triple A,”
Scioscia said. “It’s been incredible.”
Using a batting stance he
reworked over the winter,
Blash has been emphasizing
a high, striding leg kick while
making a conscious effort to
drive the ball into the air.
During one game in Salt
Lake, he hit two homers,
both clearing the centerfield wall 420 feet away. The
second homer almost went
over a 40-foot backdrop.
Etc.
Relievers
Keynan
Middleton (elbow inflammation) and Blake Wood
(elbow impingement) were
scheduled to throw off a
mound on Sunday. … Reliever Eduardo Paredes was
optioned to triple-A Salt
Lake to open a roster spot
for Blash.
sports@latimes.com
D6
MON DAY , MAY 7, 2018
LAT IMES. C OM/ SP ORT S
THE DAY IN SPORTS
Harvick dominates Dover in fourth win
staff and wire reports
The checkered flag collection at
Stewart-Haas Racing is growing,
as Kevin Harvick leads the way.
Harvick dominated a race interrupted by rain and drove to his
NASCAR Cup Series-high fourth
victory of the season Sunday at Dover International Speedway.
“I feel like we’re playoff-racing
on a weekly basis,” said Harvick,
who reeled off three straight wins
at Atlanta, Las Vegas and Phoenix.
Harvick swept the first two
stages and easily chased down
SHR teammate Clint Bowyer in
the third for the lead after a 41-minute delay. He led 201 of 400 laps.
“You knew he was going to be
the one that you were going to have
to beat for the win,” said Bowyer,
who was second. Kurt Busch gave
SHR three of the top five finishers.
Harvick’s 41st Cup win gives
him nine top-10 finishes and eight
top-fives in 11 starts this year. SHR
has five wins and has never won
more than six in its 10-year history.
Kyle Busch failed to finish for
the first time this year because of a
broken drive shaft. He was running
third when the part finally broke.
Pole-sitter Kyle Larson was
sent to the back of the field because
his car failed pre-race inspection
three times. He finished 10th.
Leah Pritchett collected her
first top-fuel victory of the season
in the NHRA Southern Nationals
at Atlanta Dragway.
GOLF
Day hangs on to win
Jason Day birdied two of his final three holes for a two-under 69
and a two-shot victory over Aaron
Wise and Nick Watney in the Wells
Fargo Championship in Charlotte,
N.C., his second victory this year.
After squandering a three-shot
lead on the back nine, Day rolled in
a 20-foot birdie putt on the 16th
hole and then effectively won the
tournament when his tee shot on
the 230-yard 17th hole crashed into
the flagstick and settled three feet
away. He was the only player to
birdie 17 in the final round.
“That is what I am most happy
about: When you are on call to do
something good and you pull it off,
to be clutch like that, with a lot of
heart. I’m glad I watched LeBron
James this morning,” said Day, an
Ohio resident who can be found
courtside at Cavaliers games.
Wise, a PGA Tour rookie, saved
par on his last two holes for a 68.
Watney made a 59-foot birdie putt
on the last hole for a 69 and his best
finish in three years.
Day finished at 12-under 272
and rejoins the top 10 in the world.
Tiger Woods was never a factor.
He failed to make birdie in the final
round of a PGA Tour event for only
the second time in his career.
Woods closed with a 74 and finished 14 shots behind.
Phil Mickelson shot 69 and finished five back. Rory McIlroy concluded an up-and-down week with
a 71 to finish nine back. Rickie
Fowler and Justin Thomas were
one shot behind him.
Bernhard Langer won his first
Champions Tour event of the year,
saving par on the final hole for a
two-under 70 and a one-shot victory in the Insperity Invitational at
The Woodlands, Texas. Langer
had to rally from as many as four
shots behind for his 37th victory on
the over-50 tour, which moved him
to the top of the Charles Schwab
2634-FIRST RACE. 41⁄2 furlongs. Maiden special weight.
Fillies. 2-year-olds. Purse $54,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
7 Quant Savant
Gutierrez
3.00
2.10
2.10
6 Time for Kisses
Talamo
2.20
2.10
3 Rolinga
Fuentes
2.40
8 Also Ran: Awepollonia, Derby Royalty, Great Salvation.
8 Time: 23.04, 47.51, 54.26. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Doug F.
O’Neill. Owner: Reddam Racing LLC.
8 Scratched: Merittris.
8 Exotics: $1 Exacta (7-6) paid $2.30, 10-Cent Superfecta (7-63-4) paid $1.17, 50-Cent Trifecta (7-6-3) paid $3.05.
2635-SECOND RACE. 11⁄8 mile turf. Maiden special weight.
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Purse $54,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
2 Meal Ticket
Baze
14.60
6.40
3.60
4 You Missed It
Gutierrez
4.40
2.80
5 Jazaalah
Talamo
3.00
8 Also Ran: Blossom Trail Miss, Lady Mamba, Unaffordable U,
Lady Lemon Drop.
8 Time: 22.50, 46.60, 1.10.32, 1.35.07, 1.46.78. Clear & Firm.
Trainer: Matthew Chew. Owner: Aulds, F. Chris, Jeong, Peter and
Johnston, Keith.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (7-2) paid $29.80, $1 Exacta (2-4)
paid $30.20, 10-Cent Superfecta (2-4-5-3) paid $48.72, $1 Super High Five (2-4-5-3-7) paid $1,150.50, 50-Cent Trifecta (24-5) paid $43.50.
2636-THIRD RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Maiden claiming. Fillies
and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$50,000-$40,000. Purse $29,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
1 Summer Down
Baze
15.40
3.80
2.60
Now
5 Princess Areni
Pena
2.40
2.10
4 Vinaka
Mldndo
2.40
8 Also Ran: Diamond of Value, Purdue.
8 Time: 22.75, 46.62, 1.11.93, 1.18.62. Clear & Fast. Trainer:
Thomas Ray Bell, II. Owner: Dang, Randy, Dunn, John R., Enterante,
Frank, Kawaguchi, Ken, Nassett Troy, McCormick, Donald and R.
8 Scratched: D D’s Lute.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (2-1) paid $108.20, $1 Exacta (1-5)
paid $14.30, 10-Cent Superfecta (1-5-4-2) paid $8.24, 50-Cent
Trifecta (1-5-4) paid $14.85, $1 Pick Three (7-2-1) paid $97.40.
2637-FOURTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Claiming. 3-year-olds and
up. Claiming prices $25,000-$22,500. Purse $23,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
5 Swinging Star
Franco
7.60
3.60
2.80
1 Dr. Troutman
Mldndo
3.00
2.40
7 Dark Energy
Talamo
2.80
8 Also Ran: Run Like Rhett, This Town, Topgallant, Builder, Accreditation.
8 Time: 23.18, 46.65, 1.11.32, 1.23.50, 1.35.46. Clear & Firm.
Trainer: Tim Yakteen. Owner: George Krikorian.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (1-5) paid $62.80, $1 Exacta (5-1)
paid $11.70, 10-Cent Superfecta (5-1-7-6) paid $15.06, $1 Super
High Five (5-1-7-6-2) paid $498.30, 50-Cent Trifecta (5-1-7) paid
$15.55, $1 Pick Three (2-1-5) paid $212.60.
2638-FIFTH RACE. 51⁄2 furlongs. Claiming. 3-year-olds and
up. Claiming price $12,500. Purse $20,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
6 Bargaining
Pedroza
6.80
3.60
3.20
2 Junior Gilliam
Baze
2.60
2.40
5 Van Lingle Mungo Ceballos
3.60
8 Also Ran: Rocky’s Show, He’s a Tiger, Louden’s Gray.
8 Time: 22.39, 46.23, 58.40, 1.04.75. Clear & Fast. Trainer:
David Jacobson. Owner: Angela Adam.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (5-6) paid $45.80, $1 Exacta (6-2)
paid $8.30, 10-Cent Superfecta (6-2-5-1) paid $15.37, 50-Cent
Trifecta (6-2-5) paid $22.60, $1 Pick Three (1-5-6) paid $212.40,
50-Cent Pick Four (2-1-5-6) 88 tickets with 4 correct paid
$786.35, 50-Cent Pick Five (2/7-2-1-5-6) 193 tickets with 5 correct paid $1,779.75.
2639-SIXTH RACE. about 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Allowance
optional claiming. 4-year-olds and up. Claiming price
$16,000. Purse $56,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
2 El Tovar
Franco
4.60
2.60
2.20
3 Leroy
Baze
4.60
3.00
4 Preacher Roe
Espinoza
2.40
8 Also Ran: Cool Green, Insubordination, Ibon, Taco Tuesday, Informality.
8 Time: 21.63, 44.31, 1.06.89, 1.12.83. Clear & Firm. Trainer:
Richard Baltas. Owner: Next Wave Racing, Dunn, Christopher T.
and Peskoff, Jeremy.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (6-2) paid $22.40, $1 Exacta (2-3)
paid $13.20, 10-Cent Superfecta (2-3-4-5) paid $10.70, $1 Super High Five (2-3-4-5-8) paid $142.80, 50-Cent Trifecta (2-3-4)
paid $15.65, $1 Pick Three (5-6-2) paid $57.10.
2640-SEVENTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies.
3-year-olds. Claiming price $16,000. Purse $22,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
4 Allie’s Love
Figueroa
6.60
4.00
3.00
2 Myrcella
Elliott
7.00
4.80
6 Bonneville Flats
Garcia
4.20
8 Also Ran: Mama’s Kid, Midnight Summer, All Net, Innyminniemineymoe, Chiefs Lil Pearl.
8 Time: 21.84, 45.50, 58.26, 1.11.97. Clear & Fast. Trainer:
Genaro Vallejo. Owner: Battle Born Racing Stable, Bussey, Kevin,
Cassucci, Vito, Waldner, Sam, Dorland, R.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (2-4) paid $24.00, $1 Exacta (4-2)
paid $21.50, 10-Cent Superfecta (4-2-6-1) paid $75.44, 50-Cent
Trifecta (4-2-6) paid $54.60, $1 X-5 Super High Five (4-2-6-1-7-) ,
X-5 Super High Five Carryover $2,977, $1 Pick Three (6-2-4) paid
$67.90.
2641-EIGHTH RACE. 51⁄2 furlongs. Allowance optional
claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $40,000. Purse
$56,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
5 Stone Hands
Gutierrez
4.80
2.60
2.40
2 Kidmon
Talamo
4.20
3.20
1 Grazen Sky
Espinoza
3.80
8 Also Ran: Serengeti, Argosy Fleet, Most Amusing.
8 Time: 21.98, 45.57, 57.71, 1.04.27. Clear & Fast. Trainer: Doug
F. O’Neill. Owner: Reddam Racing LLC.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (4-5) paid $28.40, $1 Exacta (5-2)
paid $10.90, 10-Cent Superfecta (5-2-1-6) paid $11.26, 50-Cent
Trifecta (5-2-1) paid $14.25, $1 Pick Three (2-4-5) paid $35.40.
2642-NINTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Maiden special weight.
Fillies. 3-year-olds. Purse $54,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
5 Pacific Strike
Gutierrez
8.60
4.20
2.60
7 Himmah (IRE)
Pereira
10.40
5.60
8 Spiel
Conner
6.80
8 Also Ran: Resolu, Chiffon, Bella Signora (IRE), Loving Moment,
Fashion Brand, Into Glamour, Aha.
8 Time: 22.87, 46.83, 1.11.33, 1.23.77, 1.36.39. Clear & Firm.
Trainer: Peter Eurton. Owner: Alesia, Sharon, Burns Racing LLC,
Ciaglia Racing LLC, Christensen, Robin and Exline-Border Racing L.
8 Scratched: Del Mar Babe.
8 Exotics: $2 Pick Six Jackpot (5-6-2-4-5-5) , Pick Six Jackpot
Carryover $234,687, $2 Daily Double (5-5) paid $25.40, $1 Exacta (5-7) paid $38.00, 10-Cent Superfecta (5-7-8-2) paid
$327.05, $1 Super High Five (5-7-8-2-10) 1 ticket paid
$26,080.70, 50-Cent Trifecta (5-7-8) paid $129.85, $1 Pick
Three (4-5-5) paid $81.90, 50-Cent Pick Four (2-4-5-5) 2992
tickets with 4 correct paid $99.95, 50-Cent Pick Five (6-2-4-5-5)
239 tickets with 5 correct paid $479.55, $2 Pick Six (5-6-2-45-5) 228 tickets with 5 out of 6 paid $68.60, $2 Pick Six (5-6-2-45-5) 11 tickets with 6 correct paid $6,767.20.
On-Track Attendance/Mutuel Handle
On-Track Attendance-4,108 Mutuel handle-$915,205
Inter-Track Attendance-N/A Mutuel handle-$2,624,265
Out of State Attendance-N/A Mutuel handle-$5,967,167
Total Attendance-4,108 Mutuel handle- $9,506,637
Justify’s next test is at Preakness
[Justify, from D1]
handful. He knows that he’s a
stud. He’s so beautiful. He’s got
the body. When he came out of
the stall, he was pulling me
around. Usually they are a little
bit tired.”
The day after the Kentucky
Derby is usually reserved for talk
of a Triple Crown. Although in
this case, it started in earnest
moments after the race Saturday.
Justify’s next step is in two
weeks at the Preakness Stakes at
Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore.
Justify’s commanding 2½length victory over one of the
toughest fields in memory has
people talking more about the
Belmont Stakes in five weeks
than the Preakness. It’s as if a win
in Baltimore is already assured
with what is expected to be a
small field that likely won’t include any of the top horses that
ran at Churchill Downs.
There’s a historical reason to
back that theory. Baffert is four
for four in winning the Preakness
after winning the Derby. It
started in 1997 with Silver Charm,
followed by Real Quiet in 1998,
War Emblem in 2002 and American Pharoah in 2015.
Baffert has been continually
asked to compare Justify to
American Pharoah, who won the
Triple Crown three years ago.
Now, after winning the Kentucky
Derby, Baffert is more confident
in comparing the horses.
He thought Justify’s win in the
Santa Anita Derby was just soso, unlike his win on Saturday. He
even went so far as to indicate
that Justify ran a better Derby
than American Pharoah.
“I don’t think Pharoah really
ran his best race [in the Kentucky
Derby],” Baffert said. “Pharoah’s
race was sort of like [Justify’s]
Santa Anita Derby. It was just
OK. But I think Pharoah came
back in the Preakness and ran
the best Preakness ever. That
was probably his best race.”
Justify has run only four races,
so it can safely be assumed that
the Kentucky Derby was his best
one.
“[Jockey] Mike [Smith] was
telling me he had trouble pulling
him up,” Baffert said. “The outrider had to help pull him up.
When the horses came to him, he
wanted to take off again. I don’t
know if he’s so strong or Mike
[age 52] is just too old to pull him
up. It was a pretty awesome performance.”
The Preakness field won’t
have the star power of the Kentucky Derby.
It’s already been declared that
ETC.
UCLA ties record
for NCAA titles
UCLA won the NCAA beach
volleyball national championship
in Gulf Shores, Ala., coming out of
the losers bracket to eliminate
Hawaii and then defeat Florida
State 3-1 in the final, delivering the
Bruins’ 116th NCAA title to tie
Stanford for the most.
It’s their first beach volleyball title in the third year of the championship. USC won the first two.
Former Sherman Oaks Notre
Dame standout Zana Muno
teamed with Savvy Simo on the
No. 3 team to give the Bruins a 2-1
lead over Florida State.
The team of Izzy Carey (Westlake Village Oaks Christian) and
Elise Zappia (Santa Ana Mater
Dei) won for the No. 5 team. The
GOLF
SANTA ANITA RESULTS
12th day of a 42-day thoroughbred meet.
Cup standings for the first time all
year. ... Sung Hyun Park birdied
the final hole for a five-under 66
and a one-shot victory in the LPGA
Texas Classic, which was cut to 36
holes because of rain.
most of the better horses are
skipping the last two legs of the
Triple Crown or are holding off
until the Belmont Stakes.
Good Magic, who ran a good
but futile second, is on the fence
for the Preakness.
“I want him back in New York
and that gives me time to decide
what’s next,” trainer Chad Brown
said. “You run a horse back in two
weeks off an effort like this — even
if he’s not going to run for a while
— it doesn’t mean it’s good for the
horse long term. That said, his
sire [Curlin] came back in two
weeks and won the Preakness.”
Wayne Lukas is expected to
take Bravazo, who finished sixth
in the Derby, and Sporting
Chance to Baltimore. Quip, who
qualified for the Kentucky Derby
but whose trainer believed he
needed more time, was also
scheduled to run in two weeks.
Diamond King, who won the Federico Tesio Stakes at Laurel, is
also possible for the race.
“We won the toughest one, the
Kentucky Derby,” Baffert said.
“To me it’s not only the toughest
one but the most important one.
He’ll run in the Preakness and after that, we’ll see. If I like the way
he comes out of that, then we’ll
take a shot at the Belmont.”
sports@latimes.com
$7.7-MILLION WELLS FARGO
CHAMPIONSHIP
At Charlotte, N.C. — Par: 71
Quail Hollow Club—7,554 yards
Final 72-Hole Scores
272 (-12)—$1,386,000
Jason Day (500) ......................69-67-67-69
274 (-10)—$677,600
Nick Watney (245) ...................72-67-66-69
Aaron Wise (245).....................68-68-70-68
276 (-8)—$369,600
Bryson DeChambeau (135) .......75-65-66-70
277 (-7)—$281,050
Paul Casey (100) .....................69-68-69-71
Phil Mickelson (100).................72-72-64-69
Peter Uihlein (100)...................72-72-62-71
278 (-6)—$238,700
Patrick Reed (85) .....................71-71-67-69
279 (-5)—$200,200
Emiliano Grillo (73) ..................68-71-71-69
Luke List (73) ..........................70-72-67-70
Sam Saunders (73) ..................70-69-68-72
Charl Schwartzel (73) ...............70-67-70-72
280 (-4)—$148,867
Talor Gooch (57) ......................71-72-66-71
Kyle Stanley (57) .....................67-72-71-70
Johnson Wagner (57) ................67-71-69-73
281 (-3)—$115,500
Joel Dahmen (49) ....................70-71-70-70
Chesson Hadley (49) ................70-74-66-71
Adam Hadwin (49) ...................73-71-65-72
Rory McIlroy (49) .....................68-76-66-71
Francesco Molinari (49) ............70-72-68-71
282 (-2)—$77,000
Greg Chalmers (38) ..................71-70-70-71
Tony Finau (38)........................69-76-71-66
Rickie Fowler (38) ....................72-69-68-73
Charles Howell III (38)...............71-68-71-72
Webb Simpson (38)..................72-70-71-69
Justin Thomas (38)...................73-69-70-70
283 (-1)—$52,360
Jonas Blixt (28)........................71-71-69-72
Alex Cejka (28) ........................70-71-71-71
Graeme McDowell (28) .............71-73-67-72
Ted Potter Jr. (28).....................72-71-69-71
Seamus Power (28) ..................74-71-68-70
Rory Sabbatini (28)..................71-71-73-68
Cameron Tringale (28)...............70-70-70-73
284 (E)—$37,249
Austin Cook (19)......................71-72-69-72
Beau Hossler (19) ....................68-76-69-71
Tom Lovelady (19) ....................68-76-72-68
Shane Lowry (19).....................74-70-71-69
Peter Malnati (19) ....................67-68-75-74
Keith Mitchell (19) ...................67-74-75-68
Patrick Rodgers (19) .................71-73-72-68
Ollie Schniederjans (19)............68-73-73-70
285 (+1)—$22,389
Jhonattan Vegas (10) ................70-74-72-69
Corey Conners (10) ..................75-69-69-72
Jason Dufner (10) ....................68-72-73-72
Tyrrell Hatton (10) ....................67-73-72-73
J.B. Holmes (10) ......................71-73-69-72
Martin Kaymer (10) ..................73-67-73-72
Brooks Koepka (10)..................72-72-71-70
Troy Merritt (10) .......................72-69-70-74
John Peterson (10) ...................65-77-72-71
Shawn Stefani (10) ..................71-69-73-72
Robert Streb (10).....................73-72-69-71
Vaughn Taylor (10)....................74-68-71-72
Michael Thompson (10) ............68-73-69-75
286 (+2)—$17,479
Daniel Berger (6)......................73-69-69-75
Sam Burns ..............................69-70-73-74
Harold Varner III (6) ..................72-72-68-74
Tiger Woods (6)........................71-73-68-74
287 (+3)—$16,863
Martin Flores (5) ......................72-73-71-71
Mackenzie Hughes (5)...............71-73-70-73
CHAMPIONS TOUR
$2.2-MILLION INSPERITY INVITATIONAL
At The Woodlands, Texas — Par 72
The Woodlands Country Club—7,002 yards
Final 54-Hole Scores
205 (-11)—$330,000
Bernhard Langer ...........................63-72-70
206 (-10)—$161,333
Paul Goydos .................................70-68-68
Bart Bryant ..................................70-67-69
Jeff Maggert .................................66-71-69
207 (-9)—$80,960
David Frost...................................68-72-67
Brandt Jobe..................................69-70-68
Tom Lehman.................................67-72-68
Tom Pernice Jr...............................68-68-71
Kenny Perry..................................73-65-69
208 (-8)—$45,886
Joe Durant ...................................68-70-70
Kevin Sutherland...........................70-69-69
David Toms ..................................70-71-67
Mark Calcavecchia.........................67-69-72
Russ Cochran ...............................68-70-70
Scott Dunlap ................................66-70-72
Miguel Angel Jimenez.....................67-69-72
209 (-7)—$33,073
Gary Hallberg ...............................70-72-67
Lee Janzen ...................................72-66-71
Jerry Kelly ....................................69-72-68
210 (-6)—$26,510
Marco Dawson..............................69-70-71
Clark Dennis.................................73-68-69
Corey Pavin ..................................70-68-72
Duffy Waldorf................................70-71-69
211 (-5)—$19,238
Glen Day......................................70-71-70
Doug Garwood..............................67-75-69
John Huston .................................72-69-70
Billy Mayfair .................................72-69-70
Steve Pate ...................................69-71-71
Jerry Smith...................................72-70-69
Kirk Triplett ...................................69-73-69
Sandy Lyle ...................................67-72-72
Colin Montgomerie ........................68-72-71
Bruins clinched the title when the
No. 2 team of Lily Justine and
Sarah Sponcil swept their sets.
— Eric Sondheimer
Two-time defending champion
Simona Halep beat Ekaterina
Makarova 6-1, 6-0 in the first round
of the Madrid Open, joining Caroline Wozniacki, Garbine Muguruza and Maria Sharapova in advancing. ... Joao Sousa beat Frances Tiafoe 6-4, 6-4 in the Estoril
Open final to become the first Portuguese-born player to win an ATP
tour event on home soil.
Lionel Messi scored and an injured Ronaldo didn’t play in the
second half as Spanish league
champion Barcelona salvaged a
2-2 draw in the “Clasico” against
Real Madrid to remain unbeaten in
35 league matches this season and
extend its record run to 42 without
a loss. Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane is confident that Ronaldo,
who hurt his right ankle, will play
against Liverpool in the Champions League final on May 26. ...
Yoshimar Yotun had a goal and an
assist to help Orlando City beat
Real Salt Lake 3-1 for its franchiserecord sixth consecutive win.
$1.3-MILLION TEXAS CLASSIC
At The Colony, Texas — Par 71
Old American Golf Club—6,475 yards
Final
131 (-11)—$195,000
Sung Hyun Park .................................65-66
132 (-10)—$118,649
Lindy Duncan ....................................68-64
133 (-9)—$86,072
Yu Liu...............................................67-66
134 (-8)—$60,088
Ariya Jutanugarn ................................68-66
Sei Young Kim ...................................67-67
135 (-7)—$40,275
Aditi Ashok .......................................69-66
Jenny Shin ........................................65-70
136 (-6)—$27,933
Mi Hyang Lee ....................................70-66
Lydia Ko ...........................................69-67
Jackie Stoelting .................................69-67
Jin Young Ko......................................67-69
137 (-5)—$19,098
Brittany Lincicome..............................71-66
Jacqui Concolino................................70-67
Celine Boutier....................................70-67
Mo Martin.........................................67-70
In Gee Chun......................................67-70
Nicole Broch Larsen ...........................67-70
Jane Park..........................................67-70
138 (-4)—$14,681
Benyapa Niphatsophon .......................70-68
Gaby Lopez .......................................68-70
Minjee Lee........................................68-70
Katie Burnett.....................................67-71
139 (-3)—$11,527
Candie Kung .....................................73-66
Brooke M. Henderson .........................71-68
Anna Nordqvist..................................71-68
Katherine Kirk....................................70-69
Ally McDonald ...................................70-69
Ayako Uehara ....................................70-69
Paula Creamer...................................69-70
Emily K. Pedersen ..............................69-70
Moriya Jutanugarn ..............................66-73
140 (-2)—$7,294
Cydney Clanton..................................73-67
Camilla Lennarth................................71-69
Maddie McCrary ................................71-69
Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras................71-69
Tiffany Joh.........................................70-70
Mariah Stackhouse.............................69-71
Perrine Delacour ................................69-71
Jaye Marie Green................................69-71
Daniela Darquea................................69-71
Laetitia Beck .....................................69-71
AUTO RACING
NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUP
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1.00 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 400 laps, 60
points 2. (12) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 40045 3. (7)
Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 40046 4. (3) Martin Truex
Jr, Toyota, 40037 5. (9) Kurt Busch, Ford, 40038
6. (8) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 40048 7. (10)
Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 40030 8. (14) Ryan
Blaney, Ford, 40033 9. (19) Jimmie Johnson,
Chevrolet, 40038 10. (1) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet,
40027 11. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, 40026 12.
(6) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 40032 13. (18) Joey
Logano, Ford, 40027 14. (17) William Byron,
Chevrolet, 39923 15. (5) Ricky Stenhouse Jr,
Ford, 39922 16. (23) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 39921 17. (25) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet,
39920 18. (11) Erik Jones, Toyota, 39919 19.
(22) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 39818 20. (16) Chris
Buescher, Chevrolet, 39817 21. (28) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 39716 22. (29) Michael
McDowell, Ford, 39715 23. (15) Alex Bowman,
Chevrolet, 39714 24. (30) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet,
39613 25. (26) Darrell Wallace Jr, Chevrolet,
39612 26. (27) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 39511
27. (32) David Ragan, Ford, 39510 28. (31)
Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 3930 29. (24) Matt
DiBenedetto, Ford, 3928 30. (35) Gray Gaulding, Toyota, 3867 31. (33) Landon Cassill,
Chevrolet, 3856 32. (34) Reed Sorenson,
Chevrolet, 3825 33. (21) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 3774 34. (20) Paul Menard, Ford, 3543 35.
(4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, garage, 27119 36. (37)
Cody Ware, Chevrolet, accident, 2440 37. (36)
Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, accident, 144138. (38)
Corey Lajoie, Chevrolet, engine, 201
RACE STATISTICS
Average Speed of Race Winner: 115.044 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 28 minutes, 37 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 7.450 seconds. Caution
Flags: 8 for 48 laps. Lead Changes: 17 among 7
drivers. Lap Leaders: K.Larson 0; K.Harvick 1-21;
A.Bowman 22-47; B.Keselowski 48-107; K.Harvick 108-121; B.Keselowski 122; K.Harvick 123153; B.Keselowski 154-199; K.Harvick 200-242;
B.Keselowski 243; K.Harvick 244-272; R.Stenhouse 273-295; C.Bowyer 296; R.Stenhouse
297; C.Bowyer 298-321; J.Logano 322;
C.Bowyer 323-337; K.Harvick 338-400 Leaders
Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): K.Harvick, 6 times for 195 laps; B.Keselowski, 4 times
for 104 laps; C.Bowyer, 3 times for 37 laps;
A.Bowman, 1 time for 25 laps; R.Stenhouse, 2
times for 22 laps; K.Larson, 1 time for 0 laps;
J.Logano, 1 time for 0 laps. Wins: K.Harvick, 4;
Ky.Busch, 3; C.Bowyer, 1; A.Dillon, 1; J.Logano, 1;
M.Truex, 1. Top 16 in Points: 1. Ky.Busch, 466; 2.
J.Logano, 444; 3. K.Harvick, 426; 4. C.Bowyer,
380; 5. B.Keselowski, 365; 6. Ku.Busch, 358; 7.
R.Blaney, 346; 8. D.Hamlin, 344; 9. M.Truex,
340; 10. K.Larson, 307; 11. A.Almirola, 304; 12.
J.Johnson, 268; 13. E.Jones, 253; 14. A.Bowman, 252; 15. C.Elliott, 241; 16. R.Stenhouse,
239.
TENNIS
$15.44-MILLION MADRID OPEN
At Madrid
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES (first round)—Denis Shapovalov, Canada, def. Tennys Sandgren, United
States, 6-1, 6-4. Richard Gasquet, France, def.
Tomas Berdych (14), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-2.
WOMEN’S SINGLES (first round)—Caroline
Wozniacki (2), Denmark, def. Daria Gavrilova,
Australia, 6-3, 6-1. Sam Stosur, Australia, def.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 6-1, 6-7 (2),
6-3. Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, def. Zarina Diyas,
Kazakhstan, 6-4, 2-6, 6-2. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic,
6-4, 2-6, 6-4. Simona Halep (1), Romania, def.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6-1, 6-0. Carla
Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Barbora Strycova,
Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3. Anastasija Sevastova,
(16), Latvia, def. Anna Karolina Schmiedlova,
Slovakia, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3. Bernarda Pena, United
States, def. Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, 6-4, 2-6,
6-3. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, def. Aleksandra
Krunic, Serbia, 6-3, 6-3. Maria Sharapova, Russia, def. Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, 6-4,
6-1. Zhang Shuai, China, def. Naomi Osaka,
Japan, 6-1, 7-5. Ashleigh Barty, Australia, def.
Sara Errani, Italy, 6-1, 6-4. Garbine Muguruza
(3), Spain, def. Peng Shuai, China, 6-4, 6-2.
Sara Sorribes Tormo, Spain, def. Madison Keys
(13), United States, 7-5, 6-2. Sloane Stephens
(9), United States, def. Silvia Soler-Espinosa,
Spain, 6-3, 6-2. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Danielle Collins, United States, 7-5,
6-2. Donna Vekic, Croatia, def. Georgina GarciaPerez, Spain, 6-2, 6-4. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech
Republic, def. Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia,
6-4, 6-4. Petra Kvitova (10), Czech Republic, def.
Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-2. Elise Mertens,
Belgium, def. Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, 6-4,
6-4. Johanna Konta, Britain, def. Magdalena Rybarikova (16), Slovakia, 6-3, 7-5.
WOMEN’S DOUBLES (first round)—Alicja
Rosolska, Poland, and Abigail Spears, United
States, def. Lara Arruabarrena, Spain, and Katarina Srebotnik, Slovenia, 7-5, 7-5. Daria
Gavrilova, Australia, and Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan,
def. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, and Johanna
Larsson, Sweden, 6-3, 6-4. Barbora Krejcikova
and Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, def.
Monique Adamczak, Australia, and Lyudmyla
Kichenok, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-2.
$516,800 ISTANBUL CUP
At Istanbul, Turkey
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES (championship)—Taro Daniel, Japan, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
MEN’S DOUBLES (championship)—Dominic
Inglot, Britan, and Robert Lindstedt, Sweden,
def. Ben Mclachlan, Japan, and Nicholas Monroe (1), United States, 3-6, 6-3, 10-8.
$608,000 ESTORIL OPEN
At Estoril, Portuga
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES (championship)—Joao
Sousa, Portugal, def. Frances Tiafoe, United
States, 6-4, 6-4.
MEN’S DOUBLES (championship)— Kyle Edmund and Cameron Norrie, Britain, def. Wesley
Koolhof, Netherlands, and Artem Sitak, New
Zealand, 6-4, 6-2.
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
ANGELS — Optioned RHP Eduardo Paredes to
Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled OF Jabari Blash from
Salt Lake.
Arizona — Optioned RHP Kris Medlen to Reno
(PCL). Recalled RHP Braden Shipley to Reno.
Atlanta — Optioned RHP Lucas Sims to Gwinnett (IL). Recalled RHP Luke Jackson from Gwinnett.
Baltimore — Sent 2B Jonathan Schoop to
Norfolk (IL) for a rehab assignment.
Cleveland — Optioned RHP Ben Taylor to Columbus (IL). Recalled OF Greg Allen from Columbus.
DODGERS — Placed LHP Clayton Kershaw on
the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Brock Stewart from
Oklahoma City (PCL). Signed SS Danny Espinosa
to a minor league contract.
Minnesota — Transferred RHP Ervin Santana
to the 60-day DL.
New York Mets — Placed RHP Jacob deGrom
on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Thursday. Selected the contract of LHP P.J. Conlon from Las
Vegas (PCL).
Philadelphia — Sent RHP Mark Leiter Jr. to
Clearwater (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
St. Louis — Placed C Yadier Molina and RHP
Dominic Leone on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP
Mike Mayers and C Carson Kelly from Memphis
(PCL).
Toronto — Optioned RHP Jake Petricka and SS
Richard Urena to Buffalo (IL). Reinstated 1B
Justin Smoak from the 10-day DL. Recalled OF
Anthony Alford from Buffalo.
Washington — Sent RHP Shawn Kelley to Potomac (Carolina) for a rehab assignment.
BASKETBALL
NBA — Fined Toronto president Masai Ujiri
$25,000 for walking onto the court at halftime
on Saturday to verbally confront game officials.
FOOTBALL
Cleveland — Signed TE Julian Allen, DL Lenny
Jones, OL Austin Corbett, WR Damion Ratley and
DB Simeon Thomas.
New York Jets — Signed CB Parry Nickerson
and DL Folorunso Fatukasi.
Oakland — Signed DT P.J. Hall.
CALENDAR
E
M O N D A Y , M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
COMEDY REVIEW
Barr
finds a
middle
ground
The comedian shares
a bit of Trump love
with Vegas crowd but
also tempers message.
By Chris Barton
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
THE SHOWRUNNER of the Netflix series, Justin Simien says many online critics are badmouthing a show they haven’t even seen.
Justin Simien is still
in a messaging mood
‘Dear White People’ creator is miffed about some online ‘trolls’
BY YVONNE VILLARREAL >>> Tap open Instagram: Justin
Simien has a message for you.
It’s the week that Season 2 of “Dear White People,” the
television continuation of the 2014 independent film, is released on Netflix, and Simien, its soon-to-be-35-year-old
mastermind, has been reviewing audience scores of the
debut season on Rotten Tomatoes.
While the series — which explores race relations, identity
and privilege at a fictional Ivy League university — received
a 100% fresh rating with critics, its audience rating was a
more dubious 65%.
Questioning how many of the low scores were given by
people who never actually watched the show, Simien has taken to the social media app to post some quickie videos to
voice his frustrations.
“I am so tired of these [expletive] having the narrative,”
Simien, seated in a car, says into his camera phone and posts
for his 17,000 followers to view. “Like, I saw this thing that
was like ‘critics love it, but audiences are divided.’ Audiences
are not divided … these people didn’t see this show. Why do
they get the narrative? Why do they get it?”
It’s something that has puzzled Simien since before the
first season was released. Written and shot as Barack Obama
was finishing his second term as president, the first season
challenged the notion that America was in a post-racial era.
After Netflix unveiled a teaser trailer of the first season
early last year, a few months after Donald Trump was
elected president, many people took to social media with
messages that labeled the satirical comedy as “racist” and
“supporting white genocide” — some even proclaimed they’d
cancel their subscriptions to the streaming service.
The vitriol (or as Simien refers to it, the “brigade of trolls
and automated hate-orade”) stung Simien then. And, judging by the present-day Instagram posts, it still stings a bit
now.
“I treat it like a game, because it is,” Simien says a few days
after posting the messages. “My therapist, of all people, has
[See Simien, E4]
the most disturbing and wonderful
LAS VEGAS — “I’m not
about making people happy,
as you might be able to tell,”
Roseanne Barr told the
crowd in her familiarly dry
drawl near the end of her
Saturday set at the Orleans
Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas.
It was a touch of comic
understatement that nodded toward a career built on
various forms of rebellion
and provocation, which of
late has grown to encompass
the embrace of some divisive
political views on Twitter,
where the comic has, among
other things, shared the occasional far-right conspiracy theory.
And yet the admission
comes at a time when the
comic has been making a lot
of people happy with the rebooted “Roseanne,” a series
that shifted the TV landscape in the ’80s and ’90s and
returned this spring to
record ratings numbers.
Though the series has been
mostly well received by critics, it too has received criticism for its occasional dips
into politics, which began in
the first episode with Barr’s
alter-ego Roseanne Conner
being revealed as a supporter of President Trump.
The resulting friction
helped establish the ABC
sitcom as another political
football on a divisive popculture
landscape,
one
where support for a show
can become the equivalent
of support for a wider ideology. And although the popularity of the reborn “Roseanne” surely contributed to
[See Barr, E2]
Bell rings for
‘School of Rock’
No, Jack Black isn’t in
the musical at the
Pantages, but you’ll
leave the show with a
smile. E2
‘Avengers’ earns
a global record
The Marvel hit
surpasses $1 billion at
the box office in only
its 11th day in
theaters. E3
TV grid ...................... E5
Comics ................... E6-7
It’s to ‘Infinity’ and beyond Goldenvoice
cancels FYF Fest
Zoe Saldana opens up
about Gamora’s big
twist and what’s after
latest ‘Avengers’ film.
The move is a setback
for the effort to bring
gender parity to the
male-heavy scene.
By Sonaiya Kelley
Warning: Major spoilers
follow for “Avengers: Infinity
War.” If you haven’t seen it
yet but plan to, you may
want to stop reading now.
In the months leading up
to the release of “Avengers:
Infinity War,” Marvel had
been billing the superhero
bonanza as something of an
end point for many of the
franchise’s current story
lines. And many fans read
that one way: Not everyone
would make it out alive.
Still, there’s a moment
deep into the drama that delivers one of the movie’s biggest shocks: ultra-villain
Thanos (Josh Brolin) sacrificing his own daughter,
Gamora (Zoe Saldana) —
[See Saldana, E3]
MIKAEL WOOD
POP MUSIC CRITIC
Tommaso Boddi Getty Images for Disney
ZOE SALDANA pauses for photo with fans during premiere of “Avengers: Infin-
ity War” in Hollywood in April. What’s next for actress? Try return to “Avatar.”
Well, this is a bummer.
FYF Fest announced
Sunday that it had canceled
this year’s edition of the annual festival, which was set
to be held July 21 and 22 at
Exposition Park with headliners Janet Jackson and
Florence + the Machine.
In a statement, the fest’s
powerful Los Angeles-based
promoter, Goldenvoice, said
its “team of many women
and men … felt unable to present an experience on par
with the expectations of our
loyal fans and the Los Angeles music community.”
Who knows what that’s
supposed to mean?
Yet Billboard provided
one interpretation when the
trade publication reported
that Goldenvoice had pulled
the plug on FYF because of
low ticket sales — a deeply
discouraging development
given that the show’s lineup
represented an important
step in the effort to bring
gender parity to an overwhelmingly
male-dominated festival scene.
In addition to Jackson
and Florence + the Machine,
FYF was to feature acts including St. Vincent, the xx,
the Breeders, My Bloody
Valentine, U.S. Girls, Kali
Uchis, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lucy Dacus. The
high proportion of female
acts put the festival significantly ahead of other big
events such as Lollapalooza
and Bonnaroo, neither of
which has a female headliner
this year.
[See FYF Fest, E4]
E2
M ON DAY , MAY 7, 2018
LAT IMES. C OM/ CALENDAR
Matthew Murphy
THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT: Rock ’n’ roll school is in session at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood.
THEATER REVIEW
Devil horns: mandatory
When Andrew Lloyd
Webber meets Axl
Rose, ‘School of Rock’
takes over Pantages.
By Margaret Gray
In one of the most entertaining numbers in the musical “School of Rock,” which
opened Thursday at the
Hollywood Pantages theater, a substitute teacher rallies his 10-year-old students
to “stick it to the man” by ignoring their stuffy prepschool curriculum and forming a rock band.
It’s fun to watch the kids
morph from grade-grubbing
fussbudgets into mini sneering, strutting Mick Jaggers
and Axl Roses over the
course of a few catchy bars.
The audience can’t help getting swept up in the rebellion. JoAnn M. Hunter’s
choreography here is mostly
in the arms — a flurry of leftright-left jabs implying,
without being too anatomically specific, that something is being stuck to a man.
A few may wonder, however: Wait, a national tour of
a Broadway hit — written by
Julian Fellowes (book),
Glenn Slater (lyrics) and
Andrew Lloyd Webber (music) — aren’t you the man?
Can “School of Rock” be
seen as a celebration of the
death of rock ’n’ roll? The
total co-opting of rock music
as a profit-generating tool
of the capitalist hegemony?
Those questions inevitably lead to another, more
chilling still: What if rock ’n’
roll has always been a profitgenerating tool of the capitalist hegemony?
“Stick it to the man!”
screamed the youth culture.
“Oh, heavens, no, don’t
do that,” replied the man.
“Just make a musical.”
At this point in the demoralizing thought process,
it was intermission and time
to file out to the lobby for
snacks and show merch.
Mike White’s 2003 film
that inspired this adaptation succeeds largely because of Jack Black’s performance as Dewey Finn,
whose wide-eyed, rhapsodic
enthusiasm for rock ’n’ roll
proves irresistible.
Black’s Dewey was so
passionate about rock that
nobody cared that his actions amounted to kidnapping and identity theft,
among other things. He
charmed man after man, as
fast as the plot could throw
men at him, until it seemed
that all men, no matter how
formidable, just hoped to
have it stuck to them. They
just wanted to rock out.
Black doesn’t star in the
musical, but his physique,
wit, excitability and wailing
tenor do — faithfully embodied by the charming Rob
Colletti. Lloyd Webber and
Slater have added 14 songs
to the film’s original handful.
With the book by “Downton
Abbey’s” Fellowes, the result
is an implausible, entertaining
facsimile
of
rock
dreamed up by people who
think they understand rock
(but don’t, quite).
Their earnest paeans to
the rock spirit might as well
be anthems about rocking
chairs. And yet the Cinderella story, ably and cheerfully
directed here by Laurence
Connor, still works its magic.
We follow along as Dewey
gets fired as guitarist of his
group, No Vacancy, as it’s rehearsing for a battle of the
bands for a cash prize. Dewey needs the cash: He’s behind on the rent, and his formerly heavy metal-loving
roommate, Ned Schneebly
(Matt Bittner), has fallen
under the influence of his
goody-goody girlfriend, Patty (Emily Borromeo), who
wants Dewey out of their
apartment and their lives.
Dewey sees a way to stave
off eviction when he intercepts a phone call from the
Horace Green School offering Ned a substitute-teaching job. Unlike Ned, Dewey
isn’t actually a sub, but he
figures he can impersonate
Ned just long enough to earn
some money. His first day
has him attracting glances
from the school’s faculty and
going out of his way to appall
the prim principal, Rosalie
(Lexie Dorsett Sharp), and
the rule-abiding students —
but not quite enough to give
away the game.
Dewey is happy to serve
in a permanent state of recess until he stumbles into
an orchestra rehearsal and
discovers that his students
have musical talent. He immediately hauls in a bunch
of instruments from his van,
and during one irresistible
number, “You’re in the
Band,” he transforms the
timid, classically trained
children into hard rockers.
It’s by far the best scene
in the show — as it is in the
movie — and not just because watching children
mimic adult affectations is
so delightful. When Katie
(Theodora Silverman) begins slapping the bass,
Freddy (Gilberto MorettiHamilton) smashes the hihat, Lawrence (Theo Mitchell-Penner) blows the roof off
with his keyboard improvisations and Zack (Vincent
Molden) shreds on the electric guitar, all looking uncannily like Van Halen in the
1980s except somehow pure,
the audience kvells like
grandparents watching a
toddler in Daddy’s tie.
But also, even the students who don’t play instru-
ments find roles in Dewey’s
band. The techno nerd is in
charge of the lighting. The
boy with an interest in fashion gets to design the costumes. The type-A girl ends
up manager. By the time
Dewey has helped shy
Tamika (Grier Burke) discover her powerful singing
voice and unlocked Zack’s
songwriting talents, he has
us in the palm of his hand.
We can barely wait for him to
get through the obligatory
plot obstacles and achieve
his inevitable triumph.
This takes a while, even
though those obstacles are
pro forma and easily dispatched: the villainous principal melted by Stevie Nicks,
the obtuse parents overwhelmed with pride, even
the screeching Patty swept
off her feet by the brutal allure of death metal. Still, the
stately unfurling of the plot
allows us plenty of time with
the quick-witted Dewey and
his adorable charges, whom
we could watch pretend to
be rock stars forever, if only
they wouldn’t grow up.
calendar@latimes.com
‘School
of Rock’
Where: Hollywood
Pantages Theater, 6233
Hollywood Blvd., Los
Angeles
When: 8 p.m. Tuesdays
through Fridays, 2 and
8 p.m. Saturdays, 1 and
6:30 p.m. Sundays; ends
May 27
Cost: $35 and up
Info: (800) 982-2787,
hollywoodpantages.com or
Ticketmaster.com
Running time: 2 hours,
45 minutes
Feisty Barr a crowd-pleaser
[Barr, from E1]
Barr’s Vegas date selling out
days in advance, there was
also a seeming hunger in the
crowd for the comic to further embrace her newfound
political profile.
Although her nearly 90minute set — one of the last
dates of a tour that started
last month — teased such a
shift with a few jabs toward
Hillary Clinton and a vague
dissatisfaction with former
President Obama (which
came in the service of a Tom
Arnold joke), Barr seemed
reluctant to embrace that
turn.
At one point, she asked
the crowd what they
thought of Trump, which
earned vigorous cheers and
applause. “You like our president, that’s wonderful,” she
said, remarking on how
much that kind of response
had changed from her previous appearances. “See? I’m
not the only one.”
Of course, a Vegas showroom doesn’t offer the kind
of statistically significant results polling data is typically
built on, especially given the
demographics of the audience, which for the most
part looked a lot like the
Conner household.
But rather than stirring
up some kind of rally, she
quickly transitioned toward
her own presidential campaign in 2012 and its more inclusive positions about marijuana legalization and poverty. “I would have been a
way better president than
any of them,” she said. “The
only time they’re telling the
truth is when they’re calling
each other liars.”
It was the kind of bipartisan message that pointed to
the more complicated political perspective of Roseanne
Barr the comedian, whose
dips into social issues may
not have always meshed
with her conservative-leaning audience. Sure, there
was the slightly encrypted
ideological red meat of references to participation trophies and Rosie O’Donnell,
but Barr didn’t seem eager
to toe anyone’s party line.
A cooler reception
To a somewhat more tepid response than the Trump
question, she touched on her
support of LGBT rights,
something she called a
“moving ahead of civilization,” and gay instructors in
public schools.
“Do we really want
straight male teachers shoving
their
heterosexual
agenda down our teenage
daughters’ throats?” she
asked in a sideways glance at
the current “#MeToo” moment. “And I think that if
lesbians were teaching our
sons, well, then our sons
might learn some valuable
life lessons. Like how to take
orders from big, bossy women who find them completely
irrelevant.”
Cheers, predominantly
female, erupted.
“It will help to prepare
them for life as it is in the
real world,” she added,
sounding onboard with a future that keeps “men’s
rights” activists up all
night on the internet. A later
joke about Caitlyn Jenner’s
transition wasn’t the most
sensitively rendered in the
setup but came in the service of the sharp perspective
that’s always been central
to Barr’s act. “They take you
in this room and they cut
your pay in half,” she said.
However, there was a
sense in her performance
that Barr shared more than
a few traits with the president, which included enjoying a similar benefit of the
doubt from fans. Some material mocked Hollywood
elites such as the Kardashians — jokes that maybe
landed
more
squarely
among conservatives before
the
Trump-supporting
tweets of Kanye West —
while other jokes drew from
one of her kids attending the
same treatment center as
Lindsay Lohan. Roseanne
Conner may be just like
them, but Roseanne Barr, a
little less so.
And, for the most part,
Roseanne Barr the comedian stuck to more far-reaching fare that helped launch
her from comedy clubs to
television networks — such
as aging, her family and the
pleasures of the McRib. Still,
the audience that came to
see the Roseanne Barr from
social media wouldn’t stay
silent.
At one point, Barr asked
a woman in the crowd if she
was a friend from Twitter.
The woman responded with
a Stormy Daniels reference,
a callback to the recent social media spat between the
comic and the alleged
Trump mistress.
Barr
cackled
but
wouldn’t take the bait. “I’ve
been silenced, I can’t say
nothing about Stormy Daniels. I’ve already been
warned,” she said with some
resignation, eliciting a few
disappointed groans as the
crowd goaded her on. But
she (mostly) held her fire.
“You guys just want me to
get fired from my TV show,”
she said.
Still, the warmth of the
connection between her and
her fans remained evident
from both sides. The crowd
gave her two standing ovations, and despite a divisive
social media presence and
earned reputation as a
provocateur, Barr struck a
predominantly genial tone
here. She opened by expressing gratitude for the
positive response to her relaunched TV series and
closed with an earnest reminder of the importance of
laughing at yourself.
See? Every now and then,
Roseanne can make people
happy.
chris.barton@latimes.com
Twitter: @chrisbarton
L AT I ME S . CO M/ CA L E N DA R
MONDAY , MAY 7, 2018
E3
Endings, new beginnings for star
[Saldana, from E1]
one of the Guardians of the
Galaxy and more than just a
friend to Peter “Star-Lord”
Quill (Chris Pratt) — to retrieve the soul stone, and
therefore coming that much
closer to completing his mission of wiping out half the
universe.
Though “Infinity War”
leaves the fate of many heroes up in the air (including
new arrivals to the Marvel
Cinematic Universe like
Black Panther, Spider-Man
and Doctor Strange), Gamora’s death feels more …
permanent.
The Times caught up
with Saldana to talk endings, “Avatar” and playing
against Brolin.
How did it feel watching
“Infinity War” for the first
time? Were you surprised
by anything?
I was surprised by all
the other stories that were
not a part of the story that I
shot. A lot of Gamora’s
involvement in this whole
event takes place with certain characters [namely, the
Guardians of the Galaxy],
so obviously, she would be
completely impervious to
whatever is going on outside
of that. So for me as an
actress, I was kind of like
that as well.
But I knew [about] and I
was very happy with the
twist that they were doing. I
just kept asking, “OK, am I
going to ... are you guys
going to, you know ... is
Gamora going to... ?”
[Laughs] Which I think is
the question so many actors
[in the picture] were having
anyway.
How did you find out about
Gamora’s fate? When did
you read that script?
I learned very early on.
The producers called me
and they told me. And, of
course, there’s a shock to
your system. I’m so grateful.
This run has been amazing,
but you’re so not even ready
for that. But then once some
of the things were discussed, I understood that it
just makes sense. In order
for you to understand the
degree of evil that lies within
the core of Thanos, you have
to circle in on his own children. So I completely understood. I loved being a part of
this unforgettable journey.
Who else knew, and who did
you talk to about it?
I think my husband, and
that’s it. [Laughs.] In the
cast, they all knew. We all
read both scripts. And even
though we know that there
are changes being made
constantly, there were
[some] solid, solid events
that had everything to do
with plot.
In many ways, the relationship between Thanos and
Gamora becomes the emotional center of “Infinity
War.” What was it like
working with Josh Brolin?
If I’m absolutely honest,
it was a little … I mean he is a
young man, he’s only like 10
Film Frame / Marvel Studios
GAMORA “is seen as a great role model for young women. And also for young boys,” Zoe Saldana says of her Marvel Universe character.
he actually is capable of
making a promise and keeping it.
Can you tell us anything
about whether Gamora will
be making an appearance
in the “Infinity War” follow-up due next year?
I don’t know. [Laughs.]
For the sake of the devoted
fans out there — we don’t
want to rob them of an
amazing experience. It’s all
for them that we do what we
do and [that] we also protect what we do.
20th Century Fox
“IT’S WONDERFUL. We’re not complaining,” the actress says of production on
the second and third “Avatar” movies, in which she plays the character Neytiri.
years older than I am. And
he’s one of the original
“Goonies,” so. ... [Laughs]
That is such a staple of my
childhood, so there was a
part of me that was childlike excited and then also
another part of me going in
my mind like, “My dad’s
handsome.” [Laughs.]
Because it is Josh Brolin.
But there’s so much respect
for his journey and how he’s
made certain choices for
himself.
He’s thought really hard
to separate himself from
being a child star and the
son of famous parents. He’s
created his own journey for
himself. I really admire him.
This is a man that has overcome adversity, and he
stands as a true gentleman, a professional in his
craft, superinvested and
committed.
Gamora asks Star-Lord to
kill her rather than let
Thanos take her. Did she
really expect Star-Lord to
deliver on his promise?
Yes, of course. If he loves
her. He tends to do what she
says a lot. [Laughs.]
I did like that emotional
beat between Star-Lord and
Gamora, because in the
“Guardians” world, she’s
the Abbott to his Costello.
He’s such a humorous character that lives off of telling
everyone that he doesn’t
take anything seriously.
And she’s the exact oppo-
site: She’s uptight, she’s
grumpy. So we get to see
this kind of levity but also
this sincere and genuine
commitment that they have
for each other that we
haven’t seen in the other
movies.
I love the fact that
[“Guardians of the Galaxy”
director] James Gunn has
always protected Gamora
and Quill’s relationship. But
I thought it was really wonderful for audiences to see
[in “Infinity War”] that the
show that they put on
[when other people are
around] is not really what
happens behind closed
doors. That they really love
each other, that they really
listen to each other. That
Was it sad to say goodbye to
Marvel after all these
years?
Yes and no. It was sad, of
course, because I think that
we all suffer from FOMO.
There is a fear always of
missing out, but I’m so
happy that I got to play a
part in the Marvel Universe,
and I also got to play a character that — it has been
brought to my attention —
is seen as a great role model
for young women. And also
for young boys. I live for
that, that’s why I do what I
do. So I guess I’m going to
cry all the way to “Avatar,”
you know?
Speaking of, how far into
production is “Avatar 2”
[due for release in 2020],
and how many sequels will
there be?
We are just about finishing motion capture production on the [second and
third] movies, and then
after that, they go straight
into pre-production for the
live-action part that will
shoot for six months in New
Zealand. So we’re kind of
only halfway done.
[Laughs.] It’s wonderful.
We’re not complaining. We
get to drive every day to
Manhattan Beach and go to
Pandora with our favorite
director and my most favorite role model in this town.
I know I can speak for
Sam Worthington right now,
we are exhilarated — we get
to be up against Sigourney
Weaver and Stephen Lang,
and we’re working with an
amazing cast who are finally
getting the opportunity to
work with James Cameron.
We are having a lot of fun.
Do you have any comment
on James Cameron’s comment about Marvel fatigue?
No. [Laughs.] My advice
for people is to read full
articles and not just believe
a soundbite. Because usually, soundbites are very
mean-spirited and they’re
just done for the intention of
getting more likes and more
views — it’s not really with
the intention of educating
and informing the public. So
for all those educated intellectuals out there that like
to stay current with news,
just read the full article and
you will understand where
James Cameron was coming from. I know that all the
Marvel producers did because they read it.
sonaiya.kelley
@latimes.com
Twitter: @sonaiyak
BOX OFFICE
More record-shattering for ‘Avengers’
The Marvel smash
becomes the fastest
film to pass $1 billion
in global attendance.
By Sonaiya Kelley
Marvel’s “Avengers: Infinity War” dominated the
box office and broke another
record in its second weekend
in theaters.
The film added an estimated $112.5 million in earnings in the U.S. and Canada,
according to measurement
firm ComScore, and is now
the fastest movie to cross $1
billion globally, accomplishing that feat in 11 days. That’s
one day fewer than “Star
Wars: The Force Awakens”
in 2015. The cumulative “Infinity War” domestic gross
stands at $450.8 million.
For films in their second
weekend of release, “Infinity
War” had the second-biggest
domestic gross of all time.
The strong turnout reflected
the film’s quality as well as
the buzz that has surrounded the film since its debut, said Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst
at ComScore.
Audiences were a combination of “repeat viewers
Diyah Pera MGM / Pantelion
ANNA FARIS as Kate and Eugenio Debrez as Leon-
ardo in “Overboard,” a retooling of the 1987 version.
who could not wait to go for
another ride on the latest
Marvel Cinematic rollercoaster,” he said, as well as
“newcomers to the party”
who didn’t want to be left out
of the water-cooler chatter.
In a ComScore audience
survey, 33% of first weekend
ticket holders said they’d see
“Infinity War” again. “This is
three times the norm, ” Dergarabedian said.
Marvel’s other entry,
“Black Panther,” has main-
tained its place in the top 10
for 12 consecutive weeks.
This weekend the film added
$3.1 million in domestic
earnings for a cumulative
$693.1 million.
MGM and LionsgatePantelion’s “Overboard” remake debuted in second
place with $14.8 million.
The romantic comedy,
starring Anna Faris and Eugenio Derbez, upends the
roles of the 1987 film with
Goldie Hawn and Kurt Rus-
sell. “Overboard” earned
mixed reviews, garnering an
A-minus rating from audiences on CinemaScore and a
30% “rotten” rating from
critics on Rotten Tomatoes.
Paramount’s “A Quiet
Place,” directed by and starring John Krasinski, performed well in its fifth weekend. It added $7.6 million for
a cumulative $159.9 million
and third-place finish.
At No. 4, STX Entertainment’s “I Feel Pretty” starring Amy Schumer, now in
its third weekend, added
$4.9 million in earnings for a
cumulative $37.8 million.
Rounding out the top
five, Warner Bros.’ “Rampage” added $4.6 million in
its fourth weekend, for a cumulative $84.8 million.
Also new this week, Focus
Features’ “Tully” earned
$3.2 million at No. 6. The Rrated dramatic comedy,
written by Diablo Cody and
starring Charlize Theron,
follows a mother of three
(Theron) who is gifted a
night nanny by her brother.
The final new wide release of the week, Electric
Entertainment’s “Bad Samaritan,” earned $1.8 million
and came in at No. 10.
Estimated sales in the U.S. and Canada:
Percentage
3-day
change from
Total
gross
(millions) last weekend (millions)
Movie
(Studio)
1 Avengers: Infinity War
$112.5
-56%
$450.8
10
(Disney)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 Overboard
$14.8
NA
$14.8
3
(Lionsgate)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------3 A Quiet Place
$7.6
-31%
$159.9
31
(Paramount)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------4 I Feel Pretty
$4.9
-40%
$37.8
17
(STX Entertainment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 Rampage
$4.6
-36%
$84.8
24
(Warner Bros.)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------6 Tully
$3.2
NA
$3.2
3
(Focus Features)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------7 Black Panther
$3.1
-34%
$693.1
80
(Disney)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------8 Blumhouse’s Truth
or Dare
$1.9
-42%
$38.2
24
(Universal)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------9 Super Troopers 2
$1.8
-51%
$25.4
17
(20th Century Fox)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------10 Bad Samaritan
$1.8
NA
$1.8
3
(Vertical Entertainment)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Industry totals
3-day gross
(in millions)
Change from
2017
Year-to-date
gross
(in billions)
Change
from
2017
-15%
$4.1
5.1%
$166
sonaiya.kelley
@latimes.com
Days in
release
Change in
attendance
from 2017
NA
Sources: comScore
Los Angeles Times
E4
M O N DAY , M AY 7 , 2 018
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
Adam Rose Netf lix
ASHLEY BLAINE FEATHERSON, left, Logan Browning and Antoinette Robertson in “Dear White People,” the Netflix series created by Justin Simien.
Simien sharpened Season 2 focus
[Simien, from E1]
saying I’ve ever heard, which
is: in another hundred years,
there’s all new people. Which
is just a really, sort of, existential way of saying really
none of this ... matters. There
will be no you for it to matter
to. All of these annoying
trolls will be gone as well. I
try not to be frustrated.”
Try or not, it certainly
made him curious. And it
prompted a storytelling
thread in Season 2 about
alt-right internet trolls. In
addition to cyberbullying,
the second season, now
available to stream on Netflix, delves deeper into racial
tensions, conscious or subconscious, after the school’s
all-black dorm, Armstrong
Parker, becomes integrated
following a fire at a nearby
dorm.
Of course, recent months
have seen racial and political
discord play out to the extreme on college campuses
such as UC Berkeley and the
University of Virginia —
something that is not lost
on Simien.
“For me, I had a sense of
urgency,” Simien says of
tackling Season 2 during
the Trump presidency.
“When I left Season 1, I certainly had a very specific experience being the target of
some alt-right trolls. And
what I found so interesting
about the experience was, it
wasn’t just being the target
of blind hate. I felt that people were using this blind hate
to kind of mobilize.
“For the first time, in my
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
‘I don’t think it’s
an educational
show, and I
don’t think it’s a
finger-wagging
show.’
— J USTIN S IMIEN,
on his Netflix series
“Dear White People”
own time, I saw this kind of
blind racial outrage being
weaponized. And the more
and more I read and looked
into the history of our country, the more I saw it. And I
saw how the ignorance of
people is step one in any kind
of takeover. This constant
erasing of our history and
telling people to just get over
things.... We have a cultural
historical amnesia in this
country, and as citizens, and
I think it’s just, honestly,
really irresponsible.”
If it feels like Simien has a
lot to say on the topic, he
does. It’s a balmy afternoon
and Simien, who has just re-
turned from a trip to Italy
with his partner, is delving
into a lot while seated at the
kitchen table of his new, not
fully moved-in English Tudor home in Silver Lake.
(Some of the decorative
flourishes include a block
print of Michael Jackson on
the living room mantle, multiple copies of Vanity Fair
with cover girl — and
Simien’s bestie — writer
Lena Waithe and a not-yethung framed art print inspired by Stanley Kubrick’s
“2001: A Space Odyssey.”)
He talks of the importance of education and
understanding our history,
shared and not shared.
“There are people in this
country who still think slavery is a volunteer program,”
Simien says, weeks before
rapper Kanye West would
make headlines with his
charged comments about
slavery being a “choice.” It
gets him talking about what
he sees as the residual
effects of slavery — everything from income inequality to housing to the school
and prison pipeline.
“If we would just all be on
the same page about that,
we could do some amazing
things,” he says.
He doesn’t expect his
Netflix show to fix the problem. But he hopes it will get
people to listen.
“I don’t think it’s an educational show, and I don’t
think it’s a finger-wagging
show,” Simien says. “The
truth is, I’m talking about
the
human
condition
through the lens of my race.
But I’m not just talking
about my race. I’m just trying to tell stories. That’s all
I’ve ever wanted to do.”
Growing up in Houston
as a “little gay, Catholic
black boy” who lost his father at a young age, Simien
says he spent much of his
childhood never quite knowing how to be in the world.
“I think it took me a while
to even realize, as an adult,
how traumatic a lot of that
was,” Simien says. “I just never felt right. I had to put on
layers of personality to be
OK in a given space. The one
thing that felt really clear to
me was movies. I remember
very early knowing that I
wanted to make stuff that
was on TV and in movie
theaters. I remember seeing
‘The Wiz’ before I could talk.
I remember how I felt coming home from ‘Beauty and
the Beast.’ ” He laughs when
he shares how, as a kid, he’d
turn up the “Jurassic Park”
soundtrack and bring out
his action figures to make
movies in his head.
He attended the High
School for the Performing
and Visual Arts in Houston
— where he became acquainted with the work of
Kubrick (his idol), Bob Fosse
and Spike Lee — and later
moved out west to attend
Chapman University in
Orange, where he studied
film.
He eventually moved to
Los Angeles after graduation and took on various positions at studios, including
as a publicity assistant at
Focus Features and a social
media manager at Sony
Television. All the while, he
would work on scripts — including what eventually
would materialize into “Dear
White People.”
The low-budget film was
shot in Minnesota in summer 2013 and premiered at
Sundance early the next
year. A combination of encouragement from an executive at Netflix, Tara Duncan,
and visiting colleges to talk
to students got Simien
thinking there was more to
cover — not as a sequel but
as a TV show.
“He’s a master of conveying a very deep thought in a
digestible way,” says Duncan, the director of original
series at Netflix. “To me, it’s
that dialogue that’s really
fresh and has a certain energy to it. The reason why I
think it really pops now and
why it’s important is he’s unapologetically black and he’s
a gay man who understands
that that’s his identity and
he’s not afraid to talk about
the way he sees the world
and tries to understand how
the world sees him.”
“He is a genius boy,” says
Waithe, who was a producer
on the 2014 movie and appears in the show’s second
season. “I am honored to live
in a time in which he is alive
and working and making art.
He is brave, he’s quiet, he’s a
student — in every sense of
the word. He’s a person that
is going to read my stuff
and challenge me and tell
me to be better and tell me to
go harder. I’m someone
that’s always going to cheer
him on and champion him
but also ... pitch him a better
joke than he may have in
there, and he’ll be like, ‘Yep,
you’re right, OK.’ There is
just a real bond there. He always likes to say we’re dust
from the same star, and I
think that’s true.”
For Simien, the thrill is
just in being a storyteller in
this moment.
“It’s a beautiful time,” he
says. “There’s Ava [Duvernay], there’s Barry [Jenkins], there’s Ryan [Coogler].
We are not in that crabs-ina-barrel mind-set. I’m just
grateful that I didn’t have to
go through the first wave,
because so many doors
are open now. So you can
Donald Trump all you want,
but Kendrick [Lamar] just
won the Pulitzer — so how
you doin’? We’re not going
back.”
yvonne.villarreal
@latimes.com
Twitter: @villarrealy
‘Dear White
People’
Where: Netflix
When: Any time, starting
Friday
Rating: TV-MA (may be
unsuitable for children
under age 17)
FYF Fest’s cancellation a setback in parity
[FYF Fest, from E1]
For FYF, the representation of women seemed particularly important as it followed Goldenvoice’s split
last year with the show’s
founder, Sean Carlson, after
he was accused by several
women of sexual abuse and
assault. The company replaced him at FYF’s helm
with Jennifer Yacoubian, a
Goldenvoice veteran who’d
previously booked shows at
the El Rey Theatre and the
Shrine Auditorium.
When I spoke with Yacoubian in March, she insisted that she hadn’t designed the 2018 edition in response to the allegations
against Carlson (or, for that
matter, to the growing demand for more balanced festival bills).
But she acknowledged
that the presence of “badass, strong women” contributed to a lineup that “felt so
perfect and right and different and unique.”
Now that vision has been
more or less rejected, at least
if ticket sales were as poor
as reported. (An FYF representative didn’t respond immediately to a request for
comment.)
And that can’t help but
register as a setback to anyone who looks to pop music
as a maker of change — and
as a place where all voices
can be heard.
Chris Pizzello Invision / AP
JANET JACKSON was
to have headlined.
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
A FAN crowd surfs during Iggy Pop’s performance at FYF Fest last summer.
Perhaps a female president was too much to ask of
America. But a music festival with two women on top in
2018?
I’d have thought we could
handle such a radical idea.
To be clear, there are
plenty of other reasons FYF
might not have appealed to
ticket buyers — reasons, I
mean, that have nothing to
do with anyone’s dragging
his knuckles into the future.
For one thing, though the
festival has improved in recent years, FYF has a long
history of user-unfriendliness: long lines to get in,
ineffective crowd control,
last-minute pull-outs like
the time Frank Ocean bailed
just days before he was due
to headline in 2015.
There’s also that Jackson, who’d been positioned
as the festival’s main attraction, isn’t exactly hard to see
this summer, with appearances at other major festi-
vals, including Essence Fest
in New Orleans, Panorama
in New York and Outside
Lands in San Francisco.
At a moment of festival
over-saturation, none of
those bookings did anything
to help establish FYF as a
must-see event, which is
how the show was rightly
perceived in 2017 thanks to
rare appearances by Missy
Elliott and Ocean, who
made up for his earlier cancellation with an unforget-
table performance.
Indeed, many of the
other acts set to play FYF
this year can easily be seen
elsewhere in the next few
months; some, including
Uchis and St. Vincent, appeared just last month at
Goldenvoice’s flagship production, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival
in Indio.
Another possibility is
that potential attendees
were put off by the idea of
patronizing FYF in wake of
Carlson’s alleged abuse. Perhaps stories of his alleged
behavior simply rendered
the brand too toxic to support — though that seems
unlikely, given the lack of
identifiable concern among
Coachella-goers over reported contributions to various conservative causes by
that festival’s co-owner,
Philip Anschutz of AEG.
In a counter-intuitive
way, that widespread apathy might be the (very meager) silver lining to the dark
cloud of FYF’s defeat.
When I wrote admiringly
a few weeks ago about the
festival’s progressive lineup,
more than a few readers got
in touch to lodge familiar
complaints about how liberals’ obsession with diversity
had infected one more cultural institution that might
be better served by a coloror gender-blind approach.
Yet the apparent disinterest in this year’s show
puts the lie to that popular
notion — it demonstrates
that the so-called thought
police on the left haven’t actually succeeded in silencing
the voice of the free market.
And that, hopefully, will
make it just a little bit
harder for anyone to haul
out that specious argument
the next time some forwardlooking presenter tries to
pass the mike to an underrepresented voice.
Assuming, of course, that
FYF’s failure doesn’t scare
off that somebody eager to
take that worthwhile risk.
mikael.wood@latimes.com
Twitter: @mikaelwood
M O N DAY , M AY 7 , 2 018
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
TV HI G HLI GHTS
SERIES
TALK SHOWS
Kevin Can Wait Kevin (Kevin James) has big hopes
when he gets his old band
get back together in the
season finale. Sal Governale guest stars as a talent
agent who could make or
break them. 8 p.m. CBS
Supergirl New information
about Lena (Katie McGrath) leads Supergirl
(Melissa Benoist) to ask a
big favor from Guardian
(Mehcad Brooks). 8 p.m.
KTLA
Lucifer During the investigation of a woman’s death,
Lucifer and Chloe (Tom
Ellis, Lauren German)
discover they might be
pursuing the wrong suspect, in this new episode. 8
p.m. Fox
Man With a Plan Hoping a
commercial might help
their business, Adam and
Don (Matt LeBlanc, Kevin
Nealon) try to shoot one
themselves. 8:30 p.m. CBS
Superior Donuts Franco
(Jermaine Fowler) finds
himself competing with
his girlfriend (Shamikah
Martinez) for an art fellowship that would let
whoever gets it spend a semester in Italy. Judd
Hirsch and Katey Sagal
also star. 9 p.m. CBS
iZombie Liv (Rose McIver)
assumes the personality
of a maverick police detective, and her new on-thejob recklessness soon
puts her in danger. 9 p.m.
KTLA
The Terror Paranoia begins
to sweep the camp after
an officer is killed, and
Capt. Crozier’s (Jared
Harris)
investigation
leads to the discovery that
a small number of the
crew may be planning a
mutiny. Tobias Menzies
and Ciaran Hinds also
star. 9 p.m. AMC
Best Baker in America
Scott Conant welcomes
nine world-class bakers to
to open the second season
of the culinary competition. In the premiere the
bakers must create a
mind-bending cake using
vanilla. 9 p.m. Food Network
Elementary Watson (Lucy
Liu) has trouble dealing
with the death of an estranged family member
and has a difficult reunion
with her half sister (guest
CBS This Morning James
and Deborah Fallows. (N)
7 a.m. KCBS
Today Gabrielle Union. (N)
7 a.m. KNBC
Good Morning America (N)
7 a.m. KABC
Good Day L.A. (N) 7 a.m.
KTTV
Live With Kelly and Ryan
John Goodman; Adam
Lambert; AJR performs.
(N) 9 a.m. KABC
The View Michael B. Jordan.
(N) 10 a.m. KABC
The Talk Carol Burnett;
Shelley Wade. (N) 1 p.m.
KCBS
The Dr. Oz Show Red meat.
(N) 1 p.m. KTTV
The Doctors (N) 2 p.m.
KCBS
Steve Faith Jenkins (“Judge
Faith”). (N) 2 p.m. KNBC
Harry Katy Mixon. (N) 2
p.m. KTTV
Rachael Ray Christina Milian dances. (N) 2 p.m.
KCOP
Dr. Phil (N) 3 p.m. KCBS
The Ellen DeGeneres Show
Adam
Levine
(“The
Voice”); Maroon 5 performs. (N) 3 p.m. KNBC
The Real Jada Pinkett
Smith. (N) 3 p.m. KTTV
To the Contrary Sen. Joni
Ernst (R-Iowa); Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton (DD.C., delegate at large).
(N) 6 p.m. KVCR
Amanpour on PBS (N) 11
p.m. KVCR; 11:30 p.m.
KOCE
The Daily Show (N) 11 p.m.
Comedy Central
Conan Natasha Lyonne; Wajatta performs. (N) 11 p.m.
TBS
The Tonight Show Michael
Shannon; Andrew Rannells; Father John Misty.
(N) 11:34 p.m. KNBC
The Late Show Jim Parsons; Alexis Ohanian;
Lake Street Dive performs. (N) 11:35 p.m.
KCBS
Jimmy Kimmel Live (N)
11:35 p.m. KABC
Late Late Show Zach Braff;
Jada Pinkett Smith; Portugal. the Man performs.
(N) 12:37 a.m. KCBS
Late Night John Goodman;
Jeffrey Wright; Rukmini
Callimachi; Aaron Spears
performs. (N) 12:37 a.m.
KNBC
David M. Russell CBS
KEVIN (Kevin James)
wants his band to reunite
on the season finale of
“Kevin Can Wait.”
star Samantha Quan).
Jonny Lee Miller and
Aidan Quinn also star. 10
p.m. CBS
Running Wild With Bear
Grylls A new season of
this adventure series
opens with Joseph Gordon-Levitt (“3rd Rock
From the Sun”) joining
Grylls on a trek to Kenya.
10 p.m. NBC
Independent Lens The 2016
standoff between federal
agents and protester occupying Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife
Refuge is recalled in filmmaker David Byars’ documentary
“No
Man’s
Land.” 10 p.m. KOCE
James Cameron’s Story of
Science Fiction The new
episode, “Space,” explores
how writers, including
Ray Bradbury, Arthur C.
Clarke and Robert A.
Heinlein, laid the groundwork for “Star Trek” and
“Star Wars.” 10:05 p.m.
AMC
Final Space An all-out battle erupts as the Lord
Commander (voice of
David Tennant) does
everything in his power to
capture Mooncake (voice
of Olan Rogers) and to
stop Gary and Quinn
(voices of Rogers and
Gina Torres). 10:30 p.m.
TBS
SPECIALS
A Dangerous Son Filmmaker Liz Garbus explores how a number of
American families struggle to cope with a mentally
ill child. 8 p.m. HBO
MOVIES
Everest (2015) 5:30 p.m. FX
Jaws (1975) 6 p.m. AMC
E5
E6
M O N DAY , M AY 7 , 2 018
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
COMICS
BRIDGE
By Frank Stewart
In January, I was in South
Florida on holiday (it was icy
cold in Alabama), and I enjoyed a game at Dan Handler’s Community Bridge
Club in North Palm Beach.
As West in today’s deal, I
muffed a tough problem on
defense. Cover the East/
South cards and try it yourself.
When South bid four
spades, I might well have
doubled again. If my partner
had then bid five hearts, he
could have made it. Against
four spades, I led the ace of
trumps to see dummy — to
see what lead would have
been better, a cynic might
say.
Any continuation looked
perilous. I tried the ace and a
low diamond, hoping East
ruffed. South won, drew
trumps and ran the diamonds to pitch his hearts.
He lost a club at the end,
making four.
At Trick Two, I could
have led a low diamond —
unlikely to cost even if South
had a singleton. East would
be sure to get in, and a heart
shift would sink the contract.
Question: You hold: ♠ A
♥ A J 5 4 ♦ A 8 6 2 ♣ K J 7 2.
You are the dealer. What is
your opening call?
Answer: This type of
hand is hard to describe. You
want to show all your suits
without getting too high in
case of a misfit. I would not
open 1NT, promising balanced pattern when I don’t
have it. Open one diamond.
If partner responds one
spade, bid two clubs. If he
then returns to two dia-
monds, bid two hearts. If he
rebids two spades, you can
try 2NT.
South dealer
Both sides vulnerable
NORTH
♠9765
♥83
♦ K J 10 7 4
♣Q3
WEST
EAST
♠A
♠J4
♥AJ54
♥ Q 10 9 7
♦A862
♦Q9
♣KJ72
♣ 10 9 8 6 5
SOUTH
♠ K Q 10 8 3 2
♥K62
♦53
♣A4
SOUTH WEST
NORTH EAST
1♠
Dbl
3♠
Pass
4♠
All Pass
Opening lead — ♠ A
2018, Tribune Media
Services
ASK AMY
Neighbors are moochers
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19)
:To extend goodwill in every
direction regardless of circumstance is to expand your
heart.
Taurus (April 20-May
20): Let no person bring unhappy or discouraging light
to your dreams. Protect
them, especially when they
are young.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
When you have to speculate
about what happened, the
stories you formulate may be
way off. Just ask.
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
Teamwork is almost everything today, and you’ll love
working with people with
different strengths and
weaknesses.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22):
You have your own definition of the good life, and it’s
different at different ages
and stages. Ask yourself
what you really want these
days.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Mystery is an invitation to
imagination and creativity.
You’ve got plenty of both.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
You’re getting better and
better at judging whether a
plan will work, which is why
you should trust yourself
now.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
People make books, and
books make people. You can
and will mold yourself
through reading in the
weeks to come.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21): You can look for any
solution on the internet, but
you still would rather interact with a live person.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Whatever gets you up
and out of yourself and your
known rhythm today will be
good for your life.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): People will always return
to the places that make
them feel welcome and the
people who make them feel
welcome. You’ll be careful to
receive each interaction
with a hospitable attitude.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): You’re not big on fantasy
these days. You’d rather be
impressed by what really
happened, which is often
more surprising than what
anyone could make up.
Today’s birthday (May
7): Some of last year’s ambitions will fall to the wayside
as you go exploring in the
next 10 weeks to come up
with a much better fit. You’ll
become happier and more
satisfied in your life, resulting in natural and effortless
improvements to your physical health. An October purchase will be a personal victory. Libra and Pisces adore
you. Your lucky numbers
are: 30, 14, 19, 33 and 27.
Holiday Mathis writes her
column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be read
for entertainment. Previous
forecasts are at
latimes.com/horoscope.
Dear Amy: My much
younger sister and her husband recently decided to
purchase the home next
door to my husband and me.
My husband was not
happy about this. He thinks
they are “cheap” and
“moochers.” (They do have
that reputation in the family.)
Within a day of them
moving into their new house,
they asked us for our Wi-Fi
password. My husband told
them no. A few days later,
they asked for a whole list of
household items. My husband said no to all of it.
My sister came to me,
saying that they were hurt
and confused by my husband saying no. Amy, I caved
and gave her everything she
asked for, including the
password.
My husband was furious
and said that I enable this
sort of behavior. My feeling is
that we are neighbors now,
so why start the relationship
off on the wrong foot?
Am I wrong here?
Big Sister
Dear Sister: Yes, I’d say
you are wrong to share your
Wi-Fi password with your
sister-neighbor. The neighbors’ internet use could
compromise the speed in
your own home, and depending on their use (and
your plan), could cause you
to have overages. Also, they
could decide to share the
password with others. So if
you have used this same
password for any other accounts, you should reset
them.
The main issue here is
not with your sister’s predictable behavior, but with your
marriage. On the one hand,
your husband seems to have
laid down the law without
discussing it with you. On
the other, you have chosen to
completely disregard his decision without telling him.
Your sister just moved in
next door, and already your
marriage has been affected.
This is mooching to the extreme, because these neighbors seem to have taken your
spousal trust in one another.
I hope you get it back.
Moochers need enablers
to thrive. You should develop some healthy parameters
soon.
Dear Amy: I have two
daughters in their 20s. When
I was going through the divorce with their father a decade ago, I received legal papers from another woman
who was suing him for child
support. Apparently, he’d
had a child with her.
I don’t know if my ex-husband is aware that I know
this.
We have both since
moved on and are remarried
to other people. My daughters don’t know they have a
sister. I always thought that
when they were old enough,
they should be told. I know
they would be thrilled to
know her. I don’t, however,
know how this other girl’s
mother feels about it.
I know my ex does not
have a relationship with this
child, who is probably a preteen now. I’m torn about disclosing this.
Torn
Dear Torn: Your daughters should be told that they
have a sister. They should be
told because it is true.
You should start with
your ex-husband. Tell him
that this has been weighing
heavily on you and that you
feel strongly that your
daughters should be told.
Give him the opportunity to
find a way to tell them. If he
declines, then you should tell
them yourself, answering as
many questions as you can.
The other child’s mother
will be in a position to either
welcome or inhibit a relationship between these siblings.
Send questions to askamy@
amydickinson.com or by
mail to Ask Amy, P.O. Box
194, Freeville, NY 13068.
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
M O N DAY , M AY 7 , 2 018
COMICS
E7
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M O N DAY , M AY 7 , 2 018
L AT I M E S . C O M / CA L E N DA R
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