close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Boston Globe – May 07, 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
abcde
Monday, May 7, 2018
Shots echo in complex, and two bystanders lay dying
Police cite gangs in deaths of student, father
By John Hilliard
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
and Cristela Guerra
GLOBE STAFF
Gunshots rang out Friday night, and
Josefina Osorio ran downstairs from her
home to find a horrific scene: Two men,
with bullet wounds, lay dying on the
ground outside the Mildred C. Hailey
Apartments in Jamaica Plain.
Police officers who responded performed CPR in an effort to save their
lives. But it wasn’t enough — and all the
53-year-old woman could do was cry.
“We feel powerless watching two
people die without being able to do anything,” she said in Spanish to a Globe reporter. “At night, I had nightmares.”
The violence claimed the lives of
Christopher Joyce, 23, who was set to
graduate from Salem State University
on May 19, and Clayborn Blair, 58, of
Boston, police said on Sunday.
Both men were innocent victims in a
gang-related shooting, Boston Police
Commissioner William Evans told reporters at the apartment complex Sunday.
“The two victims here had nothing to
do with gangs,” said Evans.
The violence shook a neighborhood
already disgusted with crime that resi-
‘It’s devastating what’s happened to us, and other businesses here.’
TOR BENDIKSEN, manager of Reidar’s Manufacturing, a New Bedford marine supply company
dents said has them feeling vulnerable.
“We’re united, though there’s a lot of
violence,’’ said Wendy Polanco, president of the Mildred C. Hailey Tenant Organization, in Spanish. “We do a lot for
the community, but all that’s covered is
the bad, not the good. It’s not fair.”
Joyce was proud that he was about to
earn his accounting degree at Salem
State and looked forward to sharing
what he learned with others, according
JAMAICA PLAIN, Page A6
Christopher Joyce was
set to graduate from
Salem State University.
Moves shroud
Healey’s calls
for openness
Her work to keep records secret irks
advocates for transparent governing
By Todd Wallack
GLOBE STAFF
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Iced pollock was in bins inside BASE New England, the largest seafood auction house on the East Coast.
Left high and dry
New Bedford feeling the sting of broad penalties from ‘Codfather’ case
By David Abel
GLOBE STAFF
NEW BEDFORD — In the harbor
off Leonard’s Wharf, the large steel
boats with their signature green hulls
are rusting in the salt air, their dormant nets still coiled as if ready to
scoop up schools of cod or haddock.
In the parking lot behind Reidar’s
Manufacturing, more than a dozen
trawls molder in the dirt, their floats
and cables weathered and waiting.
From the icehouse to the auction
house, a pall hangs over the fabled
wharves in New Bedford.
As the new fishing season begins,
many of the city’s fishermen are unemployed, their suppliers stuck with
excess inventory, and local officials
are questioning whether the millions
of dollars in lost revenue will cost the
port its ranking as the nation’s most
valuable, as it has been for the past 17
years.
Carlos Rafael, the disgraced fishing mogul known as “The Codfather,”
is now in prison. But the consequences of his crimes are still being felt
throughout New Bedford.
“It’s devastating what’s happened
to us, and other businesses here,” said
NEW BEDFORD, Page A10
10%
Reidar’s Manufacturing’s quota of the
region’s cod, flounder, and other bottomdwelling species, around 20 million pounds
500,000
Estimated gallons of fuel sales lost by Bay
Fuels as a result of the NOAA ban, about
$1.3 million
In this raffle, the giveaway
may be your privacy
Sean P. Murphy
THE FINE PRINT
The booth promised a chance at a grocery gift card.
In the news
Even restored sections of Puerto Rico’s power grid remain
nightmarishly unreliable. A2.
VOL . 293, NO. 127
*
Suggested retail price
$2.50
The Boston Police Department
resumed using license plate
readers, a practice that has
been a point of contention for
civil liberties groups. B1.
Boston’s effort to strengthen
oversight of tenant evictions
has been derailed by the Legis-
lature’s tough home rule process. B1.
A pipeline firm sued Weymouth in its attempt to build a
For breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
BostonGlobe.com
Linda Abrams’s eye caught
the familiar green-and-white
logo of Whole Foods Market,
one of her favorite grocery
stores. It was plastered on a big
sign at the front of a tent where
passersby were being urged to
enter a raffle for a $500 shopping card.
She did. But there was a
catch.
By filling out the paper entry form at a spring festival in
Waltham, she and scores of
others had unwittingly opened
the door to a telemarketing
firm — completely unrelated to
Whole Foods — intent on bombarding them with mailings, emails, and cellphone calls touting time-share packages.
“It looked like a simple promotion for Whole Foods,”
THE FINE PRINT, Page A10
John P. Harty Sr. had long
been haunted by the death of
his friend, a State Police trooper gunned down on a rural
highway in Central Massachusetts in 1951.
Though police suggested
the likely killer died in prison
decades ago, Harty was never
convinced. So last year, Harty
and his granddaughter asked
to see the records of Alje Savela’s murder themselves.
But the Worcester district
attorney’s office refused — insisting the 67-year-old investigation was still ongoing — even
after the secretary of state’s office found the DA didn’t offer
good enough reasons to withhold the files.
That’s when Attorney General Maura Healey ’s office
stepped in — on the side of secrecy. It is one of a number of
recent cases in which Healey
has sided with agencies to keep
records closed, despite her repeated calls for more transparency in government.
In Harty’s case, instead of
helpi ng him ge t the doc uments, Healey’s office spent
seven months reviewing the
case and then decided the DA
had every right to withhold the
documents. By then it was too
late for Harty, a 92-year-old
best known for building a massive cross in the town where
Savela was murdered. Harty
died in August waiting for the
ruling.
“It’s ridiculous,” said Harty’s
granddaughter, Amy Grandone, who helped him with the
request. “Everyone is dead
now.”
Healey, a popular Democrat
running for reelection this
year, initially won praise from
open government advocates after she took office three years
HEALEY, Page A6
Giuliani says Trump
can rebuff subpoena
President urged
not to cooperate
By Noah Weiland
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — Rudy Giuliani, who recently joined President Trump’s legal team, said on
Sunday that Trump would not
have to cooperate with a subpoena if one were issued by the special counsel investigating Russian interference into the presidential election.
Giuliani added that the president could invoke his Fifth
Amendment right against selfincrimination.
“We don’t have to” comply,
Giuliani said on ABC’s “This
Week.” “He’s the president of
the United States. We can assert
the same privileges other presidents have.”
Giuliani, who was hired by
Trump to help manage communication between the special
counsel, Robert S. Mueller III,
and the White House, met with
the special counsel’s office late
last month, shortly after being
hired.
Giuliani said he and Jay
Sekulow, another lawyer for
Trump, were in agreement that
the president should avoid
speaking with Mueller.
“Not after the way they’ve
acted,” he said, referring to a list
of questions that the special
counsel would like to ask
Trump. Those questions were
repor ted by T he Ne w York
Times.
But he said he did not know
whether Trump would invoke
the Fifth Amendment.
“How can I ever be confident
of that?” Giuliani said. “When
I’m facing a situation with the
TRUMP, Page A7
SAD SKATE OF AFFAIRS
compressor station near the
Fore River. B9.
Lava from Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano destroyed at least 31
homes as 1,700 evacuees pre-
pared for a long stay away. A5.
Lebanon held its first election
in almost a decade, but voters
expressed pessimism over the
country’s future. A3.
Primaries in four states Tuesday showcase races in which
GOP candidates are jockeying
to be seen as the most conservative. A7.
Good for the sol
Monday: Clearing, cool.
High 56-61, low 43-48.
Tuesday: Dry, sunny. High
58-63, low 47-52.
High tide: 5:04, 5:46.
Sunrise: 5:32. Sunset: 7:50
Complete report, B13.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
A dejected David Pastrnak passed Tampa Bay’s
celebration after the Lightning sealed their win, 3-1,
ending the playoffs and the season for the Bruins. C1.
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Missteps delayed Puerto Rico power grid repairs
Overlap, poor
coordination
found in review
By James Glanz
and Frances Robles
NEW YORK TIMES
YABUCOA, Puerto Rico —
Rafael Surillo Ruiz was on the
way to San Juan when he noticed all the traffic lights had
gone out.
Surillo is the mayor of Yabucoa, among the first communities struck by Hurricane Maria
in September, and for months
he had been lobbying federal officials, local officials, utility officials — anyone who might help
the thousands of his constituents still waiting to get their
power back.
Now, as he headed north for
yet another meeting, phone
calls from home confirmed the
worst: Not only was his city totally powerless again; the entire
island was blacked out.
“ You have to understand
that half our population still
does not have power,” Surillo
said the day after the April 18
blackout, recalling the morning
after Maria, when he emerged
from his operations center to
see Yabucoa City Hall devastated, houses smashed, and
downed power lines littering
the streets and countryside.
Even now, while officials say
the $2.5 billion reconstruction
effort has restored power to 98
percent of the grid’s customers,
swaths of hilly country across
the island are still pitch black
after dark, punctuated by lights
run on private generators.
Even restored sections of the
grid are nightmarishly unreliable, as evidenced by last
month’s outage, the second major power failure in a week and
the fourth since early February.
On the mainland, much of
the coverage of the recovery has
focused on the struggles of the
JOSE JIMENEZ/GETTY IMAGES
Old San Juan was in darkness April 18 — along with the rest of Puerto Rico — after a power failure knocked out the
island’s electricity — nearly seven months after Hurricane Maria hit.
island’s beleaguered power authority and its politically disastrous hiring of Whitefish Energy Holdings, a tiny and inexperienced Montana contractor
linked to the Trump administration’s interior secretary.
In Puerto Rico, the perception of a condescending and under-responsive government in
Washington has been fed by the
enduring image of President
Trump seeming to minimize
the catastrophe while tossing
paper towels into a crowd.
But an examination of the
power grid’s reconstruction —
based on a review of hundreds
of documents and interviews
with dozens of public officials,
utility experts, and citizens
across the island — shows how
a series of decisions by federal
and Puerto Rican authorities
sent the effort reeling on a
course that would take months
to correct.
When the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, known as
PREPA, hired Whitefish for the
reconstruction, it also declined
to request direct assistance
from mainland utilities that for
decades had routinely dispatched workers to help one
another recover from disasters.
At the same time, the Federal Emergency Management
Agency made a highly unusual
decision of its own. Rather than
advise Puerto Rico to accept aid
from mainland utilities, FEMA
abruptly called in the Army
Corps of Engineers — never
mind that the corps had never
rebuilt a major grid after a
storm and by its own account
had not made preparations to
take on the task in Puerto Rico.
The result was a chaotic tangle of overlapping missions and
fumbling coordination.
Compounding those problems, the grid was decrepit,
and PREPA — which, like Puerto Rico as a whole, is effectively
bankrupt — had failed to keep
sufficient stocks of replacement
parts. Shipments from the
mainland languished in battered ports.
“I’ve never seen anything
like that — not in a developed
nation,” said Ed Muller, a former energy executive whose
generation and transmission
equipment was flooded by Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey.
It took more than a month
for PREPA’s decision on aid
from utilities, known as mutual
assistance, to be undone. In late
October, with the reconstruction seemingly stalled, Governor Ricardo A. Rosselló of Puerto Rico met with Governor Andrew M. Cuomo of New York, a
veteran of Hurricane Sandy and
other natural disasters. Cuomo
strongly recommended invoking mutual aid.
Weeks more would pass but
beginning in November, the
first of some 3,000 utility work-
ers from across the country began pouring in.
PREPA’s new chief, Walter
Higgins, said he was communicating with unhappy municipalities, but the catastrophic
damage in mountainous terrain
made the job “more difficult
than any other restoration ever
experienced in Puerto Rico,
perhaps anywhere.”
FEMA said its effort moved
rapidly, though it conceded the
final pieces — the “last mile” —
were especially challenging.
In Puerto Rico, “mutual aid
should have been one of the
first things they did,” said
James Lee Witt, who ran FEMA
in the Clinton administration.
Puerto Rico has 2,400 miles
of high-voltage transmission
lines, 342 substations, and
30,000 miles of lower-voltage
distribution lines, according to
PREPA. Maria damaged 80 percent of that system.
But on Sept. 28, eight days
after Maria made landfall, two
parallel decisions drove the
monumental rebuilding into
uncharted territory.
In a conference call with
PREPA, government and utility
officials delivered a collective
offer of mutual aid: “We stand
ready to help you,” they said, according to Mike Hyland, a senior vice president at the American Public Power Association,
who was on the call. But the
PREPA officials, he recalled,
said they were hiring Whitefish
to restore the entire system.
With that, PREPA placed its
chips on a tiny company with
hardly any full-time employees.
At the same time, FEMA
made its own request, enlisting
the Army Corps to provide
emergency repairs to the grid.
FEMA had already given the
corps a task it routinely performed: bringing in emergency
generators for hospitals, clinics,
town centers, and other facilities. By all accounts, that was
carried out successfully.
Daily Briefing
McCain: Don’t demonize each other
Most of historic
church to close 2
years for upgrade
NEW YORK — Trinity
Church, a tourist attraction
loved for its ties to Colonial
America and links to the
Broadway hit “Hamilton,” will
be largely closed to visitors during a two-year renovation.
The neo-Gothic church, surrounded by skyscrapers, embarks Monday on a $98 million
renovation that will put its
nave, with its 66-foot vaulted
ceiling, off limits. The upgrade
is intended to brighten the
church and improve access for
the disabled.
A chapel in the northwest
corner will remain open, as will
the picturesque graveyard,
where luminaries like Alexander Hamilton and his wife, Eliza, are buried. ‘‘We’re trying to
create much more accessibility
and much more capacity to
welcome people,’’ said the rector, William Lupfer.
An estimated 1.9 million
people visited Trinity in 2017.
The numbers are swollen by
fans of the musical ‘‘Hamilton,’’
who often leave flowers or oth-
KATHY WILLENS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trinity Church survived the destruction of the nearby World Trade Center in the Sept. 11,
2001, terror attacks. It is the parish where George Washington worshiped.
er mementos on the founding
father’s memorial stone.
The church’s stained-glass
windows will be restored and a
new one will be installed at the
front of the church facing
Broadway. A new organ with
more than 7,500 pipes is being
built in Germany at a cost of
$11.4 million. The renovations
will add a wheelchair ramp,
lower the pews, which are now
a 4-inch step up from the
aisles, and increase seating capacity to 652 from 514. New
gender-neutral bathrooms will
be added, as well.
The building is the third
Trinity Church to occupy the
site at the head of Wall Street.
The first was built in 1698 and
burned in 1776. The second
was built in 1790 and torn
down after beams bucked in
1838. The current church was
consecrated in 1846.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Air crash kills seminary president
Gun­owner sanctuaries declared
NEW YORK — The president of a leading Jewish seminary, Rabbi Aaron D. Panken,
53, of Hebrew Union CollegeJewish Institute, died Saturday
after the small plane he was
piloting crashed 70 miles
northwest of Manhattan, the
seminary said. The Federal
Aviation Administration said
the Aeronca 7AC crashed just
after takeoff from Randall Airport in Orange County, N.Y.
Seminary spokeswoman
Jean Bloch Rosensaft said
Panken was a “highly skilled
pilot” on a routine flight check
with an instructor. The Times
Herald-Record of Middletown,
N.Y., said the second person on
the plane had non-life-threat-
CHICAGO — Rural Illinois
counties have taken a stand for
gun rights by co-opting a word
conservatives associate with
liberal immigration policy:
sanctuary.
At least five declared themselves sanctuary counties for
gun owners — a reference to
so-called sanctuary cities, such
as Boston and Chicago, that
don’t cooperate with aspects of
federal immigration enforcement.
The resolutions are meant
to put the Democratic-controlled Legislature on notice
that if it passes a host of gun
bills, including age restrictions
for certain weapons, a bump
stock ban, and a size limit for
ening injuries.
Panken was elected 12th
president of the institute in
2013 and installed the next
year. He led its four campuses
— in Cincinnati, Los Angeles,
New York City, and Jerusalem.
They provide academic and
professional training programs in Reform Judaism.
Panken is credited with adding
technology, strengthening recruitment, and bolstering ties
between the four campuses.
A New York City native, he
graduated from Johns Hopkins University’s electrical engineering program and earned
his doctorate in Judaic studies
at New York University.
NEW YORK TIMES
gun magazines, the counties
might bar their employees
from enforcing the new laws.
‘‘It’s a buzzword, a word
that really gets attention,” said
David Campbell, of the Effingham County Board.
‘‘We’re just stealing the language that sanctuary cities
use,’’ explained the Effingham
County’s top prosecutor, Bryan
Kibler, who had the idea.
‘‘They are trying to make a
point that they really resent
how the city of Chicago treats
the rest of the state and how
they’re treated as gun owners,’’
said Richard Pearson, executive director of the Illinois
State Rifle Association.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Senator
John McCain’s son-in-law said
Sunday that the Arizona Republican was ‘‘talking, he’s
chatty, and he’s walking
around’’ after brain cancer
treatment and recent surgery
for an intestinal infection.
McCain, 81, left Washington in December. Ben Domenech, his son-in-law, said on
CBS’s ‘‘Face the Nation’’ that
the senator was ‘‘very grateful
for the chances and fortune
that he’s experienced in life.
He’s reflecting at the end on a
lot of different things.’’
Domenech publishes the
online magazine The Federalist. He’s married to McCain’s
daughter Meghan.
McCain was diagnosed in
July with glioblastoma, the
same brain cancer that felled a
friend, Democratic Senator
Edward M. Kennedy, at age 77
in 2009, and former Vice Pres-
ident Joe Biden’s son Beau at
46 in 2015.
Biden sat with McCain for
90 minutes a week ago, said
people close to both men.
Biden followed McCain’s closest friends, Senator Lindsey
Graham of South Carolina and
former Connecticut senator
Joe Lieberman, who visited
McCain in Phoenix.
McCain had hoped to return to the Senate, where he
has served since 1987. He has
been unable to but has finished a book being released
May 22, ‘‘The Restless Wave,’’
and continues to advocate for
a return to the days when partisans could disagree without
demonizing each other.
‘‘I'd like to see us recover
our sense that we’re more alike
than different,’’ McCain said in
audio excerpts from National
Public Radio.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Safety risks seen in SpaceX plan
WASHINGTON — Some
NASA safety advisers say a
rocket propellant technology
proposed by SpaceX carries a
major risk.
When Elon Musk and his
team were looking to make
their Falcon 9 rocket more
powerful, they came up with a
creative idea: Keep the propellant at super-cold temperatures to shrink its size, and
pack more of it into the tanks.
But propellant would have
to be loaded just before takeoff, with astronauts aboard.
An accident during this ‘‘loadand-go’’ maneuver could set
off an explosion, safety analysts said. The proposal has
raised alarms in Congress and
at NASA as the agency and
SpaceX prepare to launch humans into orbit as early as this
year. A NASA advisory group
warned the method was ‘‘contrary to booster safety criteria
that has been in place for over
50 years.’’
In 2016, a SpaceX Falcon 9
rocket blew up while being fueled. No one was hurt, but a
multimillion-dollar satellite,
was lost. Musk is reigniting interest in space but his sensibilities have collided with a bureaucratic system at NASA,
which has been accused of being overly conservative.
SpaceX supporters say old
ways of thinking could thwart
the efforts to open the frontier
of space.
WASHINGTON POST
Reporting corrections
The Globe welcomes information about errors that call for
corrections. Information may be sent to comments@globe.com or
left in a message at 617-929-8230.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A3
The World
Lebanon holds its first
election since 2011
Refugee crisis,
corruption afflict
troubled nation
By Louisa Loveluck
and Suzan Haidamous
WASHINGTON POST
BEIRUT — Lebanese voters
cast ballots Sunday in the country’s first election in almost a
decade, hoping for change but
expecting little.
As polling booths filled up,
voters spoke of a country that
was stuck. A political class riven
by corruption, a refugee crisis,
without end, a hobbled economy — Lebanon’s short-term
prognosis is not rosy.
‘‘But if you don’t try, you’ll
never know what might have
changed,’’ said Jehan Kansa, 53,
as she watched voters stream
toward a polling station in the
Hezbollah-dominated suburb
of Dahiye.
Sunday ’s parliamentary
elections were governed by a
complex new voting law that is
intended to allow for the entry
of new political players while
preserving the country’s sectbased political system.
The makeup of the Parliament could have significant implications for the country’s future path, and for the balance
of power in the Mideast.
The main race was between
a coalition headed by the country’s Sunni prime minister,
Saad Hariri, and the Iranian-
backed Hezbollah, a Shi’ite
paramilitary group. Hariri’s
government is backed by the
West and Saudi Arabia.
Hezbollah, which has risen
to become a key political player
in Lebanon, hoped that the vote
would return its parliamentary
alliance’s first majority, and
with it, the power to veto decisions on security and foreign
policy that it did not agree with.
‘‘If it fails to get a majority,
then we are likely to see a reproduction of the status quo,’’ said
Mohanad Hage Ali, director of
communications for the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut.
The elections were the first
since war broke out in neighboring Syria in 2011, sending
over one million refugees to
Lebanon, a small country with
a population es timated at
around 4.5 million.
The war has divided the
country, pitting parties supporting the Iran-sponsored
Hezbollah’s intervention in to
aid President Bashar Assad
against Saudi-aligned parties
opposed to it.
Although rival political leaders had used their final hours of
campaigning to urge supporters to vote in high numbers, the
Interior Ministry put the national turnout at 49 percent,
the Associated Press reported.
Analysts said the low number
was an indication of voter frustration, as well as confusion
over the new electoral system.
But for those who did turn
out, many crowding polling stations in the early morning, the
election was seen as a rare
chance to push incremental
change in a country that badly
needed it.
For anyone younger than 30,
Sunday’s vote marked the first
chance to cast a national ballot
in their lifetimes. ‘‘Lebanon has
a lot of issues but I love this
country. People still hold onto
hope, it’s a hope that a better
day is coming,’’ said one 22year-old, who gave only her first
name, Mariam.
Although the Lebanese Parliament’s term expired in 2013,
it has been renewed several
times with officials citing security concerns linked to the Syrian war.
The Lebanese army moved
to secure the streets of Beirut
overnight; military vehicles
rolled through a usually crowded street of bars and clubs as
soldiers controlled the flow of
traffic.
Anticipation had built for
w e e k s a s c a n d i d at e s c a m paigned vociferously, their faces
looming over the city from billboard posters and banners
plastered across shops and residential buildings. At polling
stations across Beirut, the
mood was upbeat throughout
the morning as families turned
out with their children and loyalists blared music from loudspeakers.
But as the day wore on, the
ANWAR AMRO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Prime Minister Saad Hariri marked his ballot as he voted at a polling station in Beirut on
Sunday. It was the first election in Lebanon in almost a decade.
stream turned into a trickle at
many polling places.
Voters interviewed Sunday
said they were worried about
corruption throughout Lebanon’s political elite. But few believed that the candidates and
parties that had promised to
tackle it would look closely at
their own.
In an interview with leading
Hezbollah candidate Ali Ammar Sunday morning, a Lebanese journalist grilled him on
corruption allegations against a
political ally.
He immediately changed the
subject.
One Uber driver, who spoke
on condition of anonymity, said
he was not voting because he
expected the ‘‘same faces’’ to return to Parliament.
‘‘I’m driving today; I’m just
carrying on with my job,’’ he
said. ‘‘ The candidates who
stood in our district will disappear again as soon as they get
the votes. I think it’s best to
stick with something a little
more stable than voting — like
my job.’’
Hezbollah has sent thousands of fighters to back Syrian
government forces, a move that
has been criticized by many
Lebanese, mainly Sunni Muslims and Christians, who see
the group as dragging their
country into regional conflicts.
Leading Hezbollah legislator
Ali Ammar defended his
group’s involvement in Syria,
saying it is protecting Lebanon
from the ‘‘evil powers’’ of the Islamic State and Al Qaeda, the
AP reported.
In Hezbollah strongholds in
southern Beirut, there was a
steady flow of voters. Streets
were filled with candidates’
posters and Hezbollah’s yellow
flags.
Outside polling stations,
Hezbollah supporters displayed
a replica of the voting ballot on
a big board and explained to
voters which among the colorcoded lists was theirs and how
to vote for it. They wore yellow
shirts with the slogan ‘‘We protect and build’’ written on
them.
Daily Briefing
Putin foe arrested for role in protest
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Damaged vehicles were pushed against a wall after being washed away during flooding in a district of Ankara Saturday.
Heavy rain causes flash flooding, sweeps away vehicles in Turkey’s capital
ISTANBUL — A torrential
flood swept through a district
in the Turkish capital of Ankara over the weekend, sending
scores of vehicles downstream,
damaging businesses and terrifying residents.
A Turkish official said the
rain had been forecast to last
three hours Saturday afternoon but instead came down
in nine minutes, causing
flooding in Ankara’s Mamak
district.
Julide Sarieroglu, Turkey’s
minister of labor and social security, said at least four people
were injured in the floods.
She said the government
was working to assess and alleviate the damage.
Preliminary estimates
found that more than 160 cars
and 25 businesses were damaged.
Video showed cars and
trucks being swept away in the
floods.
One man escaped being
submerged by climbing on top
of a car caught in the flood,
riding on the hood as the vehicle was carried downstream.
Other people had to swim to
safety.
The Turkish Red Crescent
deployed a team of volunteers
to assist victims.
Last week, the Red Cross
and Red Crescent estimated
that 100 had been killed in
weeks of flooding in 29 counties.
In Kenya, at least 80 people
have been killed and 244,000
people displaced from their
homes by the heavy rains since
March, the majority of them in
Tana River, Kilifi, and Mandera
counties, according to the UN
humanitarian agency.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
No hidden rooms in King Tut’s tomb
Spain rescues 476 migrants at sea
CAIRO — New radar scans
have provided conclusive evidence that there are no hidden
rooms inside King Tutankhamun’s burial chamber, Egypt’s
antiquities ministry said Sunday, bringing a disappointing
end to years of excitement over
the prospect.
Mostafa Waziri, secretary
general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, said an Italian team conducted extensive
studies with ground-penetrating radar that showed the
tomb did not contain any hidden, man-made blocking walls
MADRID — Spain’s maritime rescue service said Sunday that it saved 476 migrants
who were attempting the perilous crossing of the Mediterranean Sea from African shores.
The migrants were pulled
from 15 small boats on Friday
and Saturday, officials said.
There were no reported casualties.
Separately, a Spanish nonprofit dedicated to helping migrants at sea rescued 105 more
migrants in waters near Libya
during a mission on Sunday.
The aid group Proactiva
as was earlier suspected.
Francesco Porcelli of the
Polytechnic University of Turin
presented the findings at a
conference in Cairo.
In 2015, Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves proposed, after
analysis of high-definition laser scans, that Queen Nefertiti’s tomb could be concealed
behind paintings in the famed
boy king’s burial chamber.
The discovery ignited massive interest, with officials first
rushing to support the theory
but ultimately rejecting it.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Open Arms found the migrants, from Bangladesh,
Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, and other countries, drifting at sea in
a motorless boat.
The migrants told an Associated Press photographer onboard who documented the
rescue that human smugglers
sailing in a separate boat removed their boat’s engine halfway through the dangerous
Mediterranean crossing and
left. Favorable weather appears to have sparked the
surge in sea crossings.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — Alexei Navalny, the leader of protests
against President Vladimir Putin that resulted in the arrests
of more than 1,500 demonstrators including himself, said
Sunday that the actions were
worthwhile even though he
faces more jail time.
Navalny was released from
detention Sunday, a day after
he was arrested in Moscow’s
Pushkin Square along with
hundreds of other demonstrators protesting Putin’s upcoming inauguration Monday for a
new term.
He said he has been
charged with organizing an
unauthorized meeting and of
resisting police. Each of those
charges can carry a jail sentence of 15 days.
OVD-Info, an organization
that monitors Russian political
arrests, said at least 1,575 people were arrested in demonstrations in 26 cities across
Russia on Saturday protesting
Putin’s upcoming inauguration Monday for a new term.
It was not clear Sunday
how many remained in custody, although the presidential
human rights council said
about 80 percent of 658 detainees in Moscow had been
released.
Amnesty International
called the arrests and beatings
K. KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Opposition leader Alexei
Navalny spoke at an antiPutin rally on Saturday.
of some Russian protesters
‘‘outrageous.’’
Despite the arrests, Navalny termed the protests ‘‘a great
success.’’
‘‘Putin is coming into a fifth
term and wants to demonstrate to all that ‘I am the owner of this country and I will eat
everything here; those who do
not support me sit quietly and
do not dare to make a
squeak,’ ’’ Navalny said on his
website. ‘‘But we showed that,
no, it won’t be this way for
you; you are not the only one
here and you will not frighten
us,’’ he said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bodies of 2 Polish miners found
WARSAW — Polish rescue
workers on Sunday found the
bodies of two miners after an
earthquake hit a coal mine in
southern Poland.
Three other miners remain
missing some 3,000 feet below
ground since the quake hit
Saturday morning at the mine,
in the town of JastrzebieZdroj, close to Poland’s border
with the Czech Republic.
The head of the Jastrzebie
Coal Co., Daniel Ozon, said a
doctor confirmed the fatalities,
and identification of the victims was underway.
The first victim, initially
identified by Ozon as a 38year-old man, had been
trapped under some metal. He
said the identification still
needed to be confirmed by
DNA tests.
The second miner was
found a few hours later,
trapped in rubble, he added.
More than 200 workers
were involved in the rescue operation. Ozon said emergency
workers were pumping air into the affected area to lower
the level of methane gas before
they can safely move ahead.
After the quake hit, four
miners were rescued quickly
but seven others went missing.
Two of the missing were later
found alive and have been hospitalized.
Prime Minister Mateusz
Morawiecki and President Andrzej Duda travelled to the
town, visiting the hospitalized
miners and meeting with their
families and some of the rescuers. Duda extended his condolences to the victims’ families.
Authorities have launched
an investigation into the accident.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A4
The World
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Israel, Iran clash
over nuclear deal
Deadline looms
for Trump to act
on withdrawal
By Josef Federman
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Israel on
Sunday stepped up its calls for
world powers to end the 2015
nuclear deal with Iran, and Tehran warned that nations would
face consequences if the agreement is abandoned.
President Trump faces a selfimposed deadline of Saturday
to decide whether to withdraw
from the accord.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Sunday
that the world would be better
off without any deal than with
what he called the ‘‘fatally
flawed’’ accord.
‘‘I say that a deal that enables Iran to keep and hide all
its nuclear weapons know-how
is a terrible deal,’’ Netanyahu
told foreign reporters. ‘‘It has to
be either fully fixed or fully
nixed.’’
Otherwise, he said, ‘‘you will
end up with Iran with a nuclear
arsenal in a very short time.’’
Iran’s president, Hassan
Rouhani, warned Sunday that if
the United States leaves the
deal “it will quickly see that this
decision will be a regret of historic proportions.” Rouhani
said his country has been preparing for months for the possibility that Trump will pull out,
without offering details.
Britain’s ambassador to the
United States said Sunday his
country believes it is still possible to address Trump’s concerns
in time to prevent him from
pulling out of the deal.
Kim Darroch said Britain
has ideas for dealing with those
concerns, which involve Iran’s
ballistic missile program and its
involvement in Mideast conflicts, issues that aren’t part of
the international agreement.
Trump also objects to the accord’s sunset clause, which allows Iran to resume part of its
nuclear program after 2025.
‘‘We think that we can find
some language, produce some
action that meets the president’s concerns,’’ Darroch said
on CBS’s ‘‘Face the Nation.’’
Britain’s foreign secretary,
Boris Johnson, has scheduled
talks with US officials in Washington this week. His trip follows visits in recent weeks by
the leaders of France and Germany, who also tried to persuade Trump to stick with the
agreement. All three European
DONATE YOUR CAR
Wheels For
Wishes
x
% Ta
100 tible
uc
Ded
Benefiting
Make-A-Wish®
Massachusetts
and Rhode Island
*Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE
*We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not
*We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs
*Fully Tax Deductible
WheelsForWishes.org
Call: (857) 220-8288
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
US comments putting
peace chances at risk,
North Korea declares
By Eric Talmadge
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JIM HOLLANDER/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said the world
would be better off with no nuclear deal than a bad one.
countries signed the accord,
along with Russia and China.
The chairman of the House
Armed Services Committee also
advised against pulling out of
the accord without a clearer
idea of the consequences and
urged Trump to give the Europeans time to address his concerns.
‘‘So maybe the best thing is
for the president to delay a bit
more his deadline of this month
and put the French and the
British up to the test about
whether it is possible to get this
other sort of agreement,’’ Representative Mac Thornberry,
Republican of Texas, said on
‘‘Fox News Sunday.’’
Netanyahu said Israel is
sharing a trove of confiscated
Iranian nuclear documents
with the six world powers that
signed the deal, as well as other
countries, in hopes of mounting
further opposition.
He will head to Moscow later this week for a meeting with
President V ladimir Putin,
where talks will focus on the
Iranian nuclear program and
Iran’s involvement in neighboring Syria.
“If you do nothing to this
deal, if you keep it as is, you will
end up with Iran with a nuclear
arsenal in a very short time,’’
Netanyahu said.
Netanyahu was a vocal opponent of the deal when it was
reached during the Obama administration. The agreement
lifted painful economic sanc-
tions against Iran in exchange
for curbs on its nuclear program.
Netanyahu has repeatedly
argued that the deal will not
prevent Iran from gaining nuclear weapons capability after
its restrictions expire in the
next decade or so. Trump has
voiced similar objections and
hinted he will withdraw unless
it is renegotiated.
Netanyahu did not accuse
Iran of violating the deal. Instead, he said the deal, reached
by the Obama administration,
was so weak that Iran has no
need to break it. He said the
flaws include permission for
Iran to continue some low-level
enrichment of uranium and its
continued development of longrange missiles capable of delivering a bomb.
He said the nuclear documents unveiled by Israel last
week prove that Iran also pursued the know-how on how to
develop and detonate a bomb.
Netanyahu last week
showed off what he said was a
‘‘half ton’’ of Iranian nuclear
doc uments dating back to
2003.
A senior Israeli intelligence
official said there were more
than 100,000 pages of documents that gave Israel new insight into how far the Iranian
nuclear program progressed.
The official said the program
was more ‘‘comprehensive and
robust’’ than previously
thought.
PYONGYANG, North Korea
— With just weeks to go before
President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are
scheduled to meet, Pyongyang
on Sunday criticized claims that
Trump’s policy of maximum political pressure and sanctions
drove the North to the negotiating table.
A Foreign Ministry spokesman warned that the claims are
a ‘‘dangerous attempt’’ to ruin a
budding detente on the Korean
Peninsula after Kim’s summit
late last month with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, the
North’s official news agency
said.
At the summit, Kim agreed
to a number of measures aimed
at improving North-South ties
and indicated he is willing to
discuss the denuclearization of
the peninsula, though exactly
what that would entail and
what conditions the North
might require have not yet been
explained.
Trump and senior US officials have suggested repeatedly
that Washington’s tough policy
toward North Korea, along
with pressure on its main trading partner China, have played
a decisive role in turning
around what had been an extremely tense situation.
Just last year, as Kim was
launching long-range missiles
at a record pace and trading
vulgar insults with Trump, it
would have seemed unthinkable for the topic of denuclearization to be on the table.
But the North’s statement on
Sunday seemed to be aimed at
strengthening Kim’s position
going into his meeting with
Trump. Pyongyang claims Kim
himself is the driver of the current situation.
‘‘The US is deliberately provoking the DPRK at the time
when the situation on the Kore-
an Peninsula is moving toward
peace and reconciliation,’’ the
spokesman was quoted as saying. DPRK is short for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, the North’s formal name.
Kim and Trump are expected to meet later this month or
in early June.
Trump has indicated the
date and place have been chosen and said he believes the Demilitarized Zone that divides
the Koreas might be a good venue. Singapore was also believed
to be a potential site.
Analysts are split over
whether Kim’s statement made
with Moon at the DMZ marks a
unique opening for progress or
a rehash of Pyongyang’s longstanding demand for security
guarantees.
Sunday’s comments were
among the very few the North
has made since Trump agreed
in March to the meeting.
The spokesman warned the
United States not to interpret
Pyongyang’s willingness to talk
as a sign of weakness. He also
criticized Washington for its ongoing ‘‘pressure and military
threats’’ and its position that
such pressure won’t be eased
until North Korea gives up its
nuclear weapons completely.
Before Trump meets Kim,
Washington is hoping to gain
the release of three KoreanAmericans accused of antistate
activities. Trump hinted the release of Kim Dong Chul, Kim
Hak Song, and Tony Kim was in
the offing.
There was no sign of an imminent release on Sunday,
though the men had reportedly
been moved to the capital.
The White House, meanwhile, has announced a separate meeting between Trump
and Moon at the White House
on May 22 to ‘‘continue their
close coordination on developments regarding the Korean
Peninsula.’’
* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.
s
’
t
r
a
he
t
n
e
t
con
o
t
n
e
t
s
Li
your
FARID ZAHIR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
The wounded were rushed to a hospital after Sunday’s blast in Khost Province.
Afghan voter registrations turn deadly
By Fahim Abed
NEW YORK TIMES
ne w
full, the
r
o
d
e
r
d by
f ra c t u
. Inspire
hear t is
it
r
o
u
t
o
k
y
a
r
h
e
W he t he
, Meredit
s t will sp
e
a
b
c
d
lo
o
G
p
te r s
oston
d
L ove L e t
in The B
n
m
ships, an
lu
n
o
c
io
t
r
la
la
e
u
r
nce,
her pop
les roma
k
time.
c
a
t
in
tion at a
s
e
u
Golds te
q
ig
eb
eak— on
h ear t br
p?
breaku
a
r
e
v
o
do I get
w
o
H
:
1
Season
BOSTON GLOBE MEDIA
1 Exchange Place, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02109-2132
The Boston Globe (USPS 061-420)
is published Monday-Saturday.
Periodicals postage-paid at Boston, MA.
Postmaster, send address changes to:
Mail Subscription Department
1 Exchange Place, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02109-2132
Stitcher
tters.s
e
L
e
v
o
L
or visit
KABUL — A bomb blast
killed at least 14 Afghan civilians on Sunday as they lined up
in a mosque to register to vote
in coming national elections,
according to officials.
The explosion was at least
the sixth attack on voter registration activities in Afghanistan
how
YEARLY MAIL SUBSCRIPTION
RATES FOR NEW ENGLAND
Seven days $886.08
Daily (6 Days) $599.04
Sunday only $390.00
For all other mail subscription rates and
information, call 1-888-MYGLOBE or
visit www.bostonglobe.com/subscribe
A NEW PODCAST FROM
Presented by
Free newspaper reading service for
the visually impaired: Contact Perkins
Braille & Talking Book Library at
800-852-3133 or
www.perkinslibrary.org
since the authorities last month
began requiring citizens to register to vote in person at centers
across the country.
According to Bashir Khan, a
spokesman for the police in
Khost province, explosives apparently had been hidden in the
mosque in advance of the voter
registration session and were
detonated while some people
were praying and others registering.
He said that at least one
woman was among those
killed, and that 33 others had
been wounded.
Mohammadin Mangal, deputy head of the health department for Khost, said that at
least 12 bodies and the wounded had been taken to the hospital after the attack. Some Afghans take the dead directly to
funerals rather than retrieving
them from hospital morgues.
The attack occurred two
weeks after a suicide bomber
struck a voter registration office
in Kabul, the capital, killing at
least 57 people. The Islamic
State in Afghanistan claimed
that attack; Taliban insurgents
denied any responsibility for it.
The Taliban also denied any
role in the attack on Sunday.
Voter registration began
April 14, after voting cards issued in previous elections were
invalidated because of widespread forgery.
Citizens must now go to registration centers to have their
national identity documents
stamped to show that they can
vote in the elections for the national Parliament, planned for
October.
The elections are three years
behind the schedule mandated
by the Afghan Constitution. A
disastrous and disputed presidential election in 2014 led to
widespread disagreement
among political parties about
how to conduct elections, both
for Parliament this year and for
the presidency in 2019.
Voter registration has proceeded slowly, officials say. In
addition to the attack on a registration center in Kabul April
22, there have been at least four
other attacks reported since the
voter drive began. Registration
ends June 15, which, at the current rate, would leave most Afghan voters unregistered.
Abdullah Abdullah, Afghanistan’s chief executive, has
blamed the slow pace on “insecurity, lack of trust in the government.”
Elsewhere in Afghanistan, a
vehicle carrying shopkeepers to
a market struck a roadside
bomb in Faryab province, killing seven, the AP reported.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A5
As earth opens and spews lava, more homes destroyed
1,700 evacuees
prepare for long
wait in Hawaii
By Caleb Jones
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PA H O A , H a w a i i — T h e
number of homes destroyed by
lava shooting out of openings
in the ground created by Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano climbed
to 31 Sunday, as some of the
more than 1,700 people who
fled prepared for the possibility the y may not re turn for
quite some time.
‘‘I have no idea how soon
we can get back,’’ said Todd
Corrigan, who left his home in
Leilani Estates with his wife
o n Fr i d ay a s l ava b u r s t
through the ground four
blocks from their home.
They spent the night on the
beach in their car and began
looking for a rental home.
Hawaii officials said the
decimated homes were in Leilani Estates, where molten
rock, toxic gas, and steam have
been bursting through openings in the ground created by
the volcano. Officials updated
the number of lost homes after
an aerial survey.
‘‘That number could
c h a n g e ,’ ’ H a w a i i C o u n t y
spokeswoman Janet Snyder
said. ‘‘This is heartbreaking.’’
Civil defense officials said
tw o m o r e f i s s u re s o p e n e d
overnight, bringing the total to
nine in that neighborhood.
US Geological Survey volcanologist Wendy Stovall said
that lava was spewing as high
as 230 feet into the air.
Amber Makuakane, 37, a
teacher and single mother of
two, said her three-bedroom
house in Leilani Estates was
destroyed. The dwelling was
a c r o s s f r o m a f i s s u r e t h at
opened Friday, when ‘‘there
was some steam rising from all
parts of the yard, but everything looked fine,’’ Makuakane
said.
On Saturday morning, she
received alerts from her secu-
US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lava shot more than 200 feet into the air in Pahoa, Hawaii. Officials said the number of volcanic vents continues to increase on the Big Island.
rity system that motion sensors throughout the house had
been triggered. She later confirmed that lava had covered
her property.
‘‘They don’t really understand,’’ she said about her children. ‘‘My son keeps asking
me, ‘Mommy when are we going to go home?'’’
Scientists said Kilauea was
likely to release more lava
through additional vents, but
they were unable to predict
where.
Authorities ordered more
than 1,700 residents to leave
from Leilani Estates and nearby Lanipuna Gardens.
Hundreds of small earthquakes continued to rumble
through the area Saturday, one
day after a magnitude 6.9 temblor hit — the largest earthquake to hit Hawaii in more
than 40 years. Magma moving
through Kilauea set off the
earthquakes, said geologists,
who warned of aftershocks.
Authorities cautioned sulfuric gas pouring out of the
vents also posed dangers, par-
ticularly to elderly and people
with respiratory problems. Hawaii County civil defense officials said conditions permitting, some residents will be
able to return home briefly to
pick up medicine and vital
doc uments or take care of
pets.
Tesha ‘‘Mirah’’ Montoya,
45, said the threat of toxic
fumes wasn’t enough to make
her family evacuate, but the
tipping point was the earthquakes.
‘‘I felt like the whole side of
our hill was going to explode,’’
she said. ‘‘The earthquake was
what made us start running
and start throwing guinea pigs
and bunnies in the car.’’
Montoya, her husband, and
daughter don’t know how long
they will be away from the
three-story octagonal house
they built nearly 20 years ago
in a patch of ‘‘raw jungle.’’
‘‘My heart and soul’s there,’’
she said in a phone interview
from a cabin on the north side
of the Big Island, where the
family had hunkered down.
‘‘I’m nothing without the land.
It’s part of my being.’’
Kilauea, continuously
erupting since 1983, is one of
the world’s most active volcanoes. In 2014, lava burned a
house and smothered a cemetery as it approached Pahoa,
the town closest to Leilani Estates.
The earthquakes also
prompted the rare closure of
Hawaii Volcanoes National
Park after they damaged some
of the park’s trails, craters, and
roads.
Imagine your home, totally organized!
Custom Closets
Garage Cabinets Home Offices
Pantries
Laundries
Hobby Rooms
40% Off
Plus
Free Installation
40% off any order of $1000 or more. 30% off any order of $700 or
more. Not valid with any other offer. Free installation with any
complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time
of purchase only.
Call for a free in home design consultation and estimate
855-275-2507
www.closetsbydesign.com
MA Lic #119162 and Insured 2015 © All Rights Reserved. Closets by Design, Inc.
BG
Follow us
A6
The Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
Healey’s actions shroud her calls for open government
uHEALEY
Continued from Page A1
ago. She publicly embraced efforts to update the public records law and became the first
attorney general in memory to
file a lawsuit against agencies
that withheld records.
But some public records attorneys have become increasingly disenchanted with her record. Healey has repeatedly
gone to court to defend agencies trying to withhold documents.
“I would expect more based
on the promises she has made
about open government,” said
Robert Ambrogi, a media lawyer and director of the Massachusetts Newspaper Publishers
Association.
Healey defended her commitment to open government.
She boasted that she has
pushed to make more records
available online and worked
with Secretary of State William
F. Galvin’s office to better enforce the state public records
law.
“I think that we have a
strong track record that shows
we are committed to transparency in government and enforcement of public records
laws,” she said in an interview
on Friday.
But Healey said her office
has an obligation to defend
state agencies that may have legitimate reasons to withhold
public records — fighting one
lawsuit all the way to the state’s
high court last year.
In that case, the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources refused to give the
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals records related to research monkeys, invoking an exemption passed after
the September 11 terrorist attacks to keep sensitive building
blueprints and security plans
out of the hands of terrorists.
The attorney general’s lawyers argued agencies should
have broad discretion to use
the post- Sept. 11 rule to withhold all sorts of records — including animal health certificates — they thought could potentially be misused to harm
people. The Supreme Judicial
Court, however, ruled that the
exemption was intended to be
far narrower, and the department ultimately agreed to turn
over almost all the documents.
“The attorney general’s interpretation of the exemption
would have been a disaster for
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
Amy Grandone rested on a bench that her grandfather, John P. Harty Sr, dedicated to State Trooper Alje Savela in Barre.
the public records law,” said
David Milton, the Boston attorney who represented PETA.
And Healey has twice appealed Suffolk Superior Court
decisions that would have
forced the State Police and other law enforcement agencies to
turn over records related to
government employees.
In February, Healey decided
to appeal a ruling requiring police to release mug shots and
rest records, and to check
whether officers were on the
payrolls of multiple government departments.
The issue has not been settled, but an appeals court said
that the police ultimately face a
“weighty burden” in attempting to keep the birth dates confidential.
Healey said the police lawsuits raise thorny legal questions, such as how depart-
ly on Healey’s office to go to
court to enforce its rulings.
For instance, in April, Healey’s office said the Board of
Registration in Medicine could
charge the Globe as much as
$16,800 for a copy of its electronic database of licensed
physicians, despite an order
from Galvin’s office to significantly reduce the fee. Healey’s
office says it did advise the
board, however, that it must
‘I think that we have a strong track record that
shows we are committed to transparency in
government.’
MAURA HEALEY, attorney general
incident reports about public
employees who are accused of
a crime. The Globe filed the
lawsuit after state and local police withheld records about officers caught drunk driving.
Healey also appealed a ruling ordering the State Police to
give the Globe dates of birth for
state troopers, which would
have enabled the Globe to look
up the driving records for officers involved in crashes, to verify whether officers were the
same people mentioned in ar-
ments can best balance privacy
laws with the public’s right to
know.
“We need to get clarity from
the court,” Healey said.
Healey’s office has also frequently sided with state agencies when Secretary of State
Galvin’s office asked for help
enforcing orders to provide records or reduce fees, essentially
rendering those rulings meaningless. Though Galvin’s office
is charged with handling public records appeals, it has to re-
consider ways to make it easier
for the public to obtain electronic records the next time it
updates its computer system.
Last year, Healey’s office
ruled that the governor’s office
didn’t have to turn over records
because it was completely exempt from the public records
law — even after Galvin’s office
questioned that claim. And in
March, it refused to enforce an
order requiring the Executive
Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs to provide a for-
mer worker’s browser history,
saying it was unclear whether
the data was covered by the
public records law because that
part of the statute “pre-dates
the Internet.”
In one case, Healey’s office
even forced Galvin to hire his
own attorneys when the City of
Somerville went to court to
challenge an order requiring it
to provide data on parking permits to the Globe.
The attorney general’s office
argued in court documents
that there is a significant privacy interest in safeguarding
Somerville’s parking permit data, even though the Globe used
similar data to show that hundreds of households in Boston
amassed at least five or more
parking permits.
“We just have to make the
calls as we see fit,” Healey said.
“It all depends on the facts and
the law.”
Healey noted she also sued
three district attorney offices
for refusing to provide the
Globe with a list of cases they
have prosecuted, the first time
in recent memory an attorney
general has filed a suit to enforce the public records law. A
hearing in the case is set for
June 13.
And in several other cases,
Healey’s office has successfully
nudged government agencies
to provide records or lower
their fees without going to
court. In 2015, for example, it
successfully pushed the Fall
River Police Department to reduce a $179 bill for records by
more than $100.
But John Harty’s request for
records about Alje Savela’s
murder in Barre shows the impact her office can have when it
sides with government agencies that want to keep records
secret. The decision may have
ultimately prevented an elderly
man from ever resolving painful questions about who killed
his friend 67 years ago.
Over the years, police have
repeatedly suggested the main
suspect was George Heroux, a
bank robber who later killed a
Florida state prison official and
died in prison in 1960. Another
suspect was found dead in
1954. State Police said they
were not chasing any new or
active leads in the case as recently as 2014.
A spokeswoman for Worcester District Attorney Joseph D.
Early Jr.’s office said the state is
now conducting forensic testing in Savela’s homicide, however, though she declined to
provide details or disclose the
last time the DA’s office interviewed anyone in the case.
“Our unresolved case unit
works hard to bring all cases to
justice and provide closure to
families no matter the age of
the case,” said Lindsay Corcoran, spokeswoman for the district attorney’s office.
Healey’s attorneys said they
are just trying to help protect
the DA’s investigation in case
anyone is ever charged in the
crime. New DNA technology
has increasingly allowed detectives to solve long-forgotten
cold cases, including recent examples in New Hampshire and
California.
But Grandone, the granddaughter who tried to help
Harty obtain the records, said
she wanted to ask Healey the
reasons for withholding the records when everyone she
knows connected to the case is
dead.
“Who are we protecting?”
she asked. “Who is going to be
harmed by all these records going public?”
Todd Wallack can be reached at
twallack@globe.com.
Jamaica Plain gunshots kill
two bystanders, police say
uJAMAICA PLAIN
Continued from Page A1
to a biography he posted to his
LinkedIn profile.
“I will be the first person in
my family to have graduated
college, and that’s extremely
important to me,” he wrote.
Joyce’s parents devoted
time and love to their son,
whom they remember as ambitious, funny, and encouraging to others, they said in a
statement Sunday.
“You were humble, loving,
and smar t . As parents, we
should be able to congratulate
you on all of your accolades
and hard work. Unfortunately,
we can’t, because a coward decided to cut your legacy short,”
they said in the statement.
“We will miss you beyond belief.”
At Salem State University,
students said Joyce was wellknown on campus, an uplifting presence.
“In my eyes, it feels unreal,”
said Alex De La Rosa, a freshman at Salem State who had
known Joyce since their time
growing up in Jamaica Plain
together. “I don’t feel like it’s
real. I wish it was a dream.”
De La Rosa teared up as he
said Joyce had “always been a
good friend.”
Jerilin Mejia, 20, of Dorchester, who went to school
with Joyce at Cristo Rey High
School, remembered him as
someone who inspired people
to do their best.
“He was always supportive
of everybody,” she said. “I remember him having a talk
with me about college.”
Shari Frazier, Joyce’s cousin, told WCVB-TV that Blair
was a family friend.
Blair was the father of three
grown children, according to
Blair’s aunt, Juanita Blair, who
lives in Boston.
“He was good person, he
was a funny guy. He loved to
laugh and to talk to people,”
said Juanita Blair in a phone
interview.
She said one of his sons was
at the complex when Blair was
shot and told another relative
that his father had been hit in
the chest during a drive-by
shooting.
She learned of the shooting
in a phone call from one of
Blair’s nieces.
“I was very shocked, I
couldn’t believe it,” Juanita
Blair said.
During the weekend, police
continued their investigation
into the shootings, and no arrests had been made by Sunday evening, said police
spokesman Officer James Kenneally.
On Sunday afternoon, Evans, Boston Mayor Martin J.
Walsh, and state Representat i v e Je ff e r y S a n c h e z w e r e
among local leaders who came
to the apartments to speak
with residents about their concerns following the shootings.
Nearby, two groups of lighted candles, many with religious figures on them, had
been placed on the ground as
memorials to the victims.
Osorio, who has lived at the
apartments for 21 years and
serves as treasurer for the tenant organization, said residents at the complex face a “really difficult situation.”
“We’ve lived here for many
years and it’s frustrating to not
feel safe in your own community. Because this is my com-
munity. I’ ve lived here for
more than 20 years. But we
don’t feel safe, we don’t bring
our kids outside to play,” said
Osorio.
T here were moments of
lightheartedness as residents
gathered with Evans, Walsh,
and Sanchez.
Polanco’s young son, Eli,
raced Evans for a few short
laps. A few children played
with toys and some wandered
up to a man who was walking
his dog.
Progress in improving life
at the apartments is being
made, said Walsh.
A task force of residents has
been working closely with the
city and police during the past
six months to improve conditions and help residents feel
more comfor table in their
homes, Walsh said.
The mayor said that, despite what happened over the
past few days, incidents of
crime and violence have
dropped as a direct result of
the task force’s work.
“The majority of the people
that live here, they’re good citizens that go to work and do
their jobs and raise their families, and they’re trying to earn
a living and put food on the table,” Walsh said. “There’s a stereotype that’s happening of the
people who live here . . . that if
you live in a housing development, you must be bad. And
we have to change that.”
The deaths Friday night
shook Catherine Pognon, 57,
who has lived in the apartments for 10 years with her 17year-old daughter. Pognon was
not home when the violence
erupted and recalled receiving
her daughter’s frantic phone
JOHN HILLIARD/GLOBE STAFF
Police Commissioner William Evans raced a young resident of the Hailey housing project.
call after hearing the shots.
“It is terrible. My daughter
can’t sleep, she’s scared, I’m
scared,” said Pognon. “I don’t
want to stay here.”
One man seated on a bench
at the apartments declined to
speak to the Globe out of concern for his safety.
“People will think I’m talking to the police. You put me in
danger,” he said, getting up to
walk away. “I’m sorry.”
A 70-year-old Jamaica Plain
resident walking along Centre
Street said violence in the area
has worsened due to the availability of illegal guns on the
street.
“There are too many guns
in the streets,” said the man,
who gave his name as Jann.
“Who’s bringing them in? You
don’t know.”
The two fatal shootings Friday marked the 17th and 18th
homicides this year in Boston,
according to police.
T h e S u n d ay v i s i t o f t h e
mayor and commissioner
came after two tense encounters between residents and police, one Friday night and a
second Saturday. The Saturday
incident came as police were
arresting a 17-year-old on firearms charges at the apartments.
Police said the 17-year-old
had run from an area near 277
Centre St., where another teen,
18-year-old Aryana Wilson,
was arrested on firearms
charges Saturday.
Officers chased the 17-yearold into the apartment complex, police said.
Video of the fracas that followed was recorded by a
WCVB-TV crew and posted to
social media. It showed some
residents shouting at officers;
one officer can be seen and
heard ordering people to stay
back as the arrest is made.
The 17-year-old, who was
not identified, faces firearms
and resisting arrest charges.
Anthony Upchurch, a 34year-old Brockton man, was also arrested after police said he
physically assaulted officers
and interfered with the arrest
of the teenager.
Evans on Sunday said the
arrests were unrelated to the
fatal shooting on Friday.
The commissioner said his
officers acted appropriately
during the arrest and said the
department has worked to create deep ties with residents.
“ There are a lot of great
people here in this development, and we are going to continue to build a strong relationship,” Evans said.
Globe correspondent J.D.
Capelouto contributed to this
report. John Hilliard can be
reached at
john.hilliard@globe.com.
Cristela Guerra can be reached
at cristela.guerra@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@CristelaGuerra.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Primaries could pull GOP
further right in four states
Some leaders say
trend might hurt
party in fall vote
By Bill Barrow
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — As primary season kicks into high gear,
Republicans are engaged in
nomination fights that are pulling the party to the right, leaving some leaders worried their
candidates will be out of step
with the broader electorate in
November.
Primaries in four states on
Tuesday, all in places Donald
Trump carried in 2016, showcase races in which GOP candidates are jockeying to be seen
as the most conservative, the
most anti-Washington, and the
most loyal to the president.
It’s evidence of the onetime
outsider’s deepening imprint
on the Republican Party he
commandeered less than two
years ago.
Primaries will be held Tuesday in Indiana, Ohio, North
Carolina, and West Virginia.
In Indiana, Republicans will
pick from among three Senate
candidates who have spent
m u c h o f t h e r a c e p ra i s i n g
Trump and bashing each other.
In Ohio, Republicans are expected to nominate someone
more conservative than outgoing GOP Governor John Kasich,
a 2016 presidential candidate,
moderate, and frequent Trump
critic. Even Kasich’s former
running mate, Lieutenant Governor Mary Taylor, has pledged
to unwind some of Kasich’s centrist policies, including the expansion of the Medicaid government insurance program.
North Carolina Republicans
will weigh in on Republican
Representative Robert Pittenger, who is facing a primary
challenger who almost upset
him two years ago. Pittenger
features Trump prominently in
his campaign. Challenger Mark
Harris, a prominent Charlotte
pastor, has tried to turn the table, saying Pittenger is a creature of Washington who refuses
to help Trump ‘‘drain that
swamp.’’
In West Virginia, a former
federal convict and coal baron
has taken aim at Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky, with racially charged accusations of
corruption.
With Trump’s job approval
hanging around 40 percent and
the GOP-run Congress less than
half that, the abandonment of
the middle has some Republicans raising alarms.
‘‘The far left and the far right
always think they are going to
dominate these elections,’’ said
John Weaver, a Trump critic
and top strategist to Kasich,
who has been become a nearpariah in the primary to succeed him.
‘‘You may think it’s wise in a
primary to handcuff yourself to
the president,’’ Weaver said.
‘‘But when the ship goes down,
you may not be able to get the
cuffs off.’’
Tough primaries certainly
don’t have to be disastrous.
They often gin up voter attention and engagement, and can
signal strong turnout in the
general election.
Dallas Woodhouse, who
runs the North Carolina Republican Party, said candidates benefit because voters become
more aware of the election.
Few national Republicans
look at West Virginia and see
helpful enthusiasm.
Former coal executive Don
Blankenship has accused McConnell of creating jobs for
‘‘China people’’ and charges
that the senator’s ‘‘China family’’ has given him millions of
dollars. McConnell’s wife is
Trump’s transportation secretary, Elaine Chao, who was
born in Taiwan.
Indiana Senate candidates
are trying to appeal to Trump
voters by adopting the president’s harsh immigration rhetoric and penchant for personal
insults. The candidates have
even channeled Trump by assigning derisive nicknames to
one another: ‘‘Lyin’ ’’ Todd
Rokita, Luke ‘‘Missing’’ Messer
and ‘‘Tax Hike’’ Mike Braun.
In several of the Tuesday primaries, Democrats are watching with delight, and having
less trouble aligning behind
nominees. The chief beneficiaries would be Democratic Senators Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Joe Donnelly of Indiana, both sitting on healthy
campaign accounts after avoiding their own primary fights.
The leading Democrat for
the North Carolina seat, Marine
veteran Dan McCready, has
raised almost $2 million, slightly more than Harris and Pittenger combined, in a district
Trump won by about 12 percentage points.
In the Ohio governor’s race,
liberal former representative
Dennis Kucinich and former
state attorney general Richard
Cordray have managed to avoid
open warfare. Cordray is the favorite.
Democrats must flip about
two dozen Republican-held
seats to reclaim a House majority, and they must do it with Republican-run legislatures having drawn many districts to the
GOP’s advantage.
Senate Democrats are just
two seats shy of a majority, but
must defend 26 incumbents, 10
in states where Trump won, including Ohio, Indiana, and
West Virginia. Republicans are
defending nine seats, just one
in a state Trump lost.
G l o b e
The Nation
A7
Diverse. Distinguished. Dependable.
Boston’s premier assisted living community is
a tapestry of smiling, friendly faces that reflect
the diversity of our area.
Steps from Symphony Hall, we’ve earned a reputation for delivering
a more catered, independent lifestyle filled with exceptional services,
vibrant amenities, and peace of mind...all for the most affordable rates.
Call 617-247-1010
or SusanBailisAL.com
Susan Bailis
Personalized Assisted Living
352 Massachusetts Ave at St Botolph Street, Boston
Giuliani against Trump testifying
uTRUMP
Continued from Page A1
president and all the other lawyers are, in which every lawyer
in America thinks he would be
a fool to testify, I’ve got a client
who wants to testify.”
Giuliani’s television interview on Sunday was his first extended appearance since being
criticized by Trump for not having his “facts straight” about
payments made to a pornographic actress, Stephanie Clifford.
Giuliani said on Sunday it
was possible Trump’s personal
attorney, Michael D. Cohen,
made additional payments to
other women on the president’s
behalf.
“I have no knowledge of
that, but I would think if it was
necessary, yes,” Giuliani said.
Cohen “made payments for
the president, or he conducted
business for the president,
which means he had legal fees,
moneys laid out and expenditures,” Giuliani said, giving his
explanation for why Cohen
would have made payments to
Clifford, who goes by the stage
name Stormy Daniels.
On Wednesday, Giuliani
contradicted the president
when he said on Fox News that
Trump reimbursed Cohen for a
$130,000 payment that Cohen
has said he made to keep Clifford from making public a story
about an affair she claims she
had with Trump.
When asked in April by reporters traveling on Air Force
One whether he knew about the
payment, Trump said he did
not.
The Wednesday admission,
which caught Trump’s White
House staff off guard, caused an
uproar and prompted Trump to
attempt to clarify the nature of
payments he made to Cohen.
The morning after Giuliani’s
comments, Trump said on Twitter that Cohen “received a
monthly retainer, not from the
campaign and having nothing
to do with the campaign, from
which he entered into, through
reimbursement, a private contract between two parties,
known as a nondisclosure
agreement, or NDA.”
Just 24 hours later, he told
reporters gathered outside the
White House that Giuliani did
not in fact know the particulars
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
‘Every lawyer in
America thinks he
would be a fool to
testify.’
RUDY GIULIANI
Trump attorney
of the case, even after Giuliani
told The New York Times on
Wednesday night that he had
spoken with the president before and after his interview on
Fox News and that Trump and
other lawyers on the team were
aware of what he would say.
“Virtually everything said
has been said incorrectly, and
it’s been said wrong, or it’s been
covered wrong by the press,”
Trump said Friday. “He’ll get his
facts straight.”
Seeming to chastise Giuliani, Trump added: “You know
what? Learn before you speak.
It’s a lot easier.”
Some of Trump’s legal and
political advisers believe Giuliani’s comments could put the
president in legal jeopardy,
since federal officials are required to report liabilities of
more than $10,000 during the
preceding year.
Trump’s last disclosure,
which he signed last June, does
not mention any debt to Cohen.
On Sunday, Giuliani tried to
clarify what Trump called a retainer. “The retainer agreement
was to repay expenses, which
turns out to have included this
one,” Giuliani said on ABC.
Giuliani also referred to the
sum Clifford received as a “nuisance” payment.
“I never thought $130,000
was a real payment,” Giuliani
said. “People don’t go away for
$130,000.”
On the same show Sunday
morning, Clifford’s lawyer, Michael Avenatti, called Giuliani’s
interview an “absolute, unmitigated disaster” and “one of the
worst TV appearances by any
attorney on behalf of a client in
modern times.”
“He now expects the American people to believe that he
doesn’t really know the facts,”
Avenatti added. “I think it is obvious to the American people
that this is a coverup, that they
are making it up as they go
along.”
In a separate development,
four senior US officials said Gina Haspel, Trump’s nominee to
become CIA director, sought to
withdraw her nomination Friday after some White House officials worried that her role in
the interrogation of terrorist
suspects could prevent her confirmation by the Senate, The
Washington Post reported.
Haspel told the White House
that she was interested in stepping aside if it avoided the spectacle of a brutal confirmation
hearing and potential damage
to the CIA’s reputation and her
own, the officials said. The
hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee is scheduled
for Wednesday.
She was summoned to the
White House on Friday for a
meeting on her history in the
CIA’s controversial interrogation program — which employed techniques such as waterboarding that are widely
seen as torture — and signaled
that she was going to withdraw
her nomination.
Senior White House aides,
including legislative affairs
head Marc Short and press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, later went to Langley, Va.,
to meet with Haspel at her office.
The White House was not
entirely sure she would stick
with her nomination until Saturday afternoon, according to
the officials who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.
Trump learned of the drama
Friday, calling officials from his
trip to Dallas. He decided to
push for Haspel to remain as
the nominee.
“MEREDITH IS HILARIOUS,
SMART, AND—
AS YOU WILL LEARN—
GIVES EXCELLENT ADVICE
WITHOUT JUDGMENT.”
—ALYSSA MASTROMONACO, New York Times bestselling author of
Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?
“HILARIOUS AND
HEARTWARMING.”
—FAITH SALIE,
author of Approval Junkie
A disarmingly honest
memoir about giving
advice when you’re
not sure what you’re
doing yourself.
Photo credit: Alex Teng
Available in
hardcover, ebook,
large print,
and audio, read by
the author
LoveLettersBook.com
A8
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
I
A bigot gets a warm hug from the Mass. GOP
f the Massachusetts Republicans who voted to
put anti-gay crusader Scott Lively on their gubernatorial primary ballot didn’t do their homework,
then shame on them.
And if they did do their homework and thus
knew of his noxious views?
Well, then the shame quotient doubles, for those
who supported him gave a vehement homophobe the
ballot blessing of their party.
Lively’s strategy at the GOP convention in Worcester
was to go silent on his anti-gay hate-mongering and instead cast himself as the real conservative in the race,
declaring himself “100 percent pro-life,” “100 percent
Second Amendment,” and “100 percent pro-Trump.”
If he were honest, he would also have added: and
virulently anti-gay, as well.
After all, Lively, an evangelical minister based in
Springfield, isn’t just your run-of-the-mill homophobe.
He’s an especially poisonous breed, one who has made
it his calling to travel to other countries to encourage
campaigns to persecute homosexuals there. And who
blames gays, ridiculously, for a wide range of social pathologies.
In a 2017 court decision — one that went in Lively’s
favor on jurisdictional ground — US District Court
Judge Michael Ponsor chronicled some of his scurrilous
assertions:
“Defendant’s positions on LGBTI people range from
the ludicrous to the abhorrent,” Ponsor wrote. “He has
asserted that ‘Nazism was in large part an outgrowth of
the German homosexual movement,’ and that ‘[i]n
seeking the roots of fascism we once again find a high
correlation between homosexuality and a mode of
thinking which we identify with Nazism.’ He has tried
to make gay people scapegoats for practically all of humanity’s ills, finding ‘through various leads, a dark and
powerful homosexual presence in . . . the Spanish Inquisition, the . . . French ‘Reign of Terror,’ the era of
South African apartheid, and the two centuries of
American slavery.’ ”
Ponsor added: “This crackpot bigotry could be
brushed aside as pathetic, except for the terrible harm
it can cause. The record in this case demonstrates that
Defendant has worked with elements in Uganda who
share some of his views to try to repress freedom of expression by LGBTI people in Uganda, deprive them of
the protection of the law, and render their very existence illegal.”
After his surprising showing at the GOP’s convention on April 28, Lively, in some epic understatement,
conceded that he is “guilty of some hyperbole” about
gays and lesbians, at least in his speeches. “On LGBT issues . . . I have some fence mending that I need to do
with people in the LGBTQ community,” Lively told re-
porters. “Mea culpa. I have overstated some things —
not so much in my writings, I can defend just about
anything I’ve written — but sometimes, giving a speech
. . . I’m guilty of some hyperbole.”
The idea that someone as bigoted as Lively could
erase or even mitigate his record with “some fencemending” is unintentionally hilarious. Governor Charlie Baker had it right in his own comments about Lively
at the convention.
“There is no place and no point in public life, in any
life, for a lot of the things Scott Lively says and believes,” Baker said. “And that’s why I’m pleased that seven of 10 delegates at the convention chose us as their
nominee.”
Unfortunately, the nearly 28 percent of convention
delegates who cast their convention votes for Lively
carried him easily over the 15 percent threshold required for a candidate to appear on the primary ballot.
His remaining ballot burden is submitting 10,000 certified signatures of registered Massachusetts voters eligible to vote in the GOP primary. That is, Republicans
and unenrolled voters.
If Lively does end up on the ballot, those Republican
delegates who voted for him will bear much of the responsibility for the stain his candidacy brings to their
party — a stain that not even a resounding Baker primary victory will fully eliminate.
RENÉE LOTH
Injecting life — and color — into
the Seaport through the arts
‘D
oes Boston believe in equity?” That’s the
provocative
question posed
by Daniel Callahan, a member of the
Cross-Cultural Collective, one of four finalists in a competition to program 13,000
square feet of insanely valuable cultural
space on the Fan Pier in the Seaport. The
group proposes to build “a hub for black
creatives” and an art gallery “rooted in the
African diaspora” on the first two floors of
50 Liberty, a sleek luxury condominium
that fairly epitomizes the exclusivity of the
neighborhood.
If this group’s proposal seems incongruous for one of the most segregated districts
in the city, consider Medicine Wheel Productions, another finalist. This gritty group
promotes the healing power of art by working with drug abusers, former prisoners,
court-involved young people, victims of gun
violence, and AIDS patients. The organization, located on K Street, worked to include
gay and lesbian marchers in the St. Patrick’s Day parade. “We are the true face of
South Boston,” said founder Michael Dowling.
At a public hearing last week that was
more like a rally, presenters emphasized
their work with communities of color and
their plans to “close the cultural equity
gap,” as Dowling put it. They liberally quoted from the recent Boston Globe Spotlight
Team report on race, which found that the
Seaport is the richest, and probably the
whitest, ZIP code in the city. Julie Burros,
Boston’s arts and culture chief, mostly kept
order as supporters cheered proposals to
inject life — and color — into a neighborhood many Bostonians see as soulless and
corporate. It was a striking display of frustration and hope: that communities long
shut out of the city’s development boom
might at last get a piece of the action, while
enriching the emerging district with a new
spirit of diversity and inclusion.
The local writers’ organization Grub
Street offered its proposal, in partnership
with Mass Poetry and the Harvard Book
Store, to create a Narrative Arts Center in
the space. They cited their work with Boston public schoolchildren, hip-hop Shake-
abcde
Fo u n d e d 1 8 7 2
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President
ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
JENNIFER PETER
Managing Editor
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
speare performances, and writing classes
offered in Spanish and Haitian Creole.
Grub Street has secured a $2 million challenge grant from the Calderwood Foundation to help build out the space into a bookstore/café/performance stage and creative
writing classrooms. (I have worked with or
served on boards with several different bidders, their partners, or their supporters.)
The fourth finalist, the Boston Center
for the Arts, proposes to build a maker
space and workshop for multi-disciplinary
craftspeople and short-term studios for a
revolving group of artists. The center, with
an impressive group of sponsors and partners, is well established and might be the
expected choice. But it also seems clear that
Mayor Martin Walsh and the Fallon Company, developers of 50 Liberty, want to
make a statement about opening doors. Or,
as Burros put it, creating “a vibrant, popular, year-round public destination for a diverse demographic.” The prize for the winning group is enormous — rent of just $1,
plus taxes, maintenance, utilities, and insurance costs — and the city must walk a
fine line, choosing a bidder that offers inclusion while having a long enough track
record to succeed. A decision is expected by
the fall.
The Globe’s Spotlight report found that
of 660 mortgages issued for the Seaport’s
main census tracts in the past decade, only
three have gone to black buyers. That is a
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Mark S. Morrow
Jason M. Tuohey Digital Platforms and Audience Engagement
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Janice Page Arts and Newsroom Innovation
Marjorie Pritchard Editorial Page
David Dahl Print and Operations
Dante Ramos Ideas
Larry Edelman Content Coordination
Felice Belman Local News and Features
testament to the dizzying prices in the district (50 Liberty’s units sell for well over
$1,000 a square foot) but also to a serious
lack of urban planning foresight as the city
and developers rushed to take advantage of
a hot real estate market. “Space: it matters,”
said Tiffany Cogell, a member of the CrossCultural Collective. “Being on the water’s
edge matters. It signals the values of the
city.”
It is a heavy lift to expect one cultural
center to overturn a neighborhood’s character once it starts to gel. But that’s the surprising power of art.
Renée Loth’s column appears regularly in
the Globe.
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Peter M. Doucette Chief Consumer Revenue Officer
Jane Bowman Vice President, Marketing & Strategic
Partnerships
Doug Most Director, Strategic Growth Initiatives
Dan Krockmalnic General Counsel
Dale Carpenter Senior Vice President, Print Operations
Charles H. Taylor Founder & Publisher 1873-1921
William O. Taylor Publisher 1921-1955
Wm. Davis Taylor Publisher 1955-1977
William O. Taylor Publisher 1978-1997
Benjamin B. Taylor Publisher 1997-1999
Richard H. Gilman Publisher 1999-2006
P. Steven Ainsley Publisher 2006-2009
Christopher M. Mayer Publisher 2009-2014
Laurence L. Winship Editor 1955-1965
Thomas Winship Editor 1965-1984
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A9
Inbox
Hand of government
shouldn’t be lopped off
Regulations’ costs must be weighed
against their abundant value
MARGERY EAGAN
Paul Ryan’s un­Christian agenda
GETTY
Ryan backed down from the House chaplain fight.
D
onald Trump has made it harder and harder
for so-called Christian Republicans to trample Christian values and get away with it.
Now it’s House Speaker Paul Ryan’s turn.
What a gratifying development.
Last month two dozen Christian leaders issued a manifesto declaring that supporters of Trump’s policies against
the poor and marginalized can’t claim to be Christians.
Just days ago we learned that Ryan, a former altar boy
who’s repeatedly claimed that Catholicism shapes his sacred views — no abortion, no Planned Parenthood, no gay
marriage and no help for the “undeserving poor” — had
quietly fired the House chaplain, a Jesuit priest.
Father Patrick Conroy’s major sin? Reportedly, praying
for the poor. Tame stuff, really.
Solidarity with the poor is a typical emphasis for
priests. In normal times, it’s government’s focus too. And
Conroy didn’t even use the “p” word.
But apparently even an oblique reference got under Ryan’s skin when Conroy said this on the House floor in the
midst of debate over Ryan’s beloved tax bill: “May (congressional) efforts these days guarantee that there are not
winners and losers under new tax laws, but benefits balanced and shared by all Americans.”
Unfortunately, benefits of the bill were neither balanced nor shared. They skewed heavily toward millionaires, billionaires and mega-corporations.
Soon after the prayer, Conroy said Ryan told him, “Padre, you just got to stay out of politics.” Conroy, with no
cause cited, quietly got the ax last month. But when news
circulated, uproar followed, and mounted. Accusations
swirled: Ryan had caved to extreme GOP evangelicals sick
of this pesky priest! Anti-Catholicism reigns in the House!
Order was restored Thursday when Conroy rescinded
his resignation and the speaker, denying all, backed down.
Conroy will stay until his term ends at year’s end.
But the Conroy fiasco is just the latest in a long line of
seemingly un-Christian moves by Ryan, the self-proclaimed Catholic culture warrior who’s said his stands are
required by his faith. Unfortunately for him, the president
he supports embraces policies completely at odds with a
faith that demands much more in the age of Pope Francis.
Trump calls climate change a hoax and has adopted the
cruelest stance on refugees and immigrants in memory —
both views at odds with Francis. Francis has repeatedly
called out Catholic conservatives as he’s pushed his church
away from Ryan’s brand of a narrow, nasty, shaming, and
exclusionist Catholicism.
Trump, said Ryan, “made the right call” to try to end
DACA, the program protecting from deportation the undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as
children. “Reprehensible” and “heartbreaking,” said the
US Conference of Catholic Bishops under Francis.
Ryan’s tax plan is “economic corruption,” said Simone
Campbell in an interview. She’s the leading nun from
Nuns on the Bus, which has spent years chastising Ryan
for scorched-earth budgets and attacks on health care. “It
all makes me want to weep, not that I have strong feelings
about it,” she deadpanned.
The pope just delivered the worst blow yet to Catholic
conservatives. Caring for migrants and “those already
born, the destitute, the abandoned,” he said, is every bit as
holy and sacred as opposing abortion.
In other words, mercy all around, for everyone, everywhere, from womb to tomb.
All this has plopped Ryan right next to the so-called
Christians for Trump, the ones declared imposters by
those two dozen Christian leaders and their manifesto.
What a gratifying development.
A final scene: this Easter, Church of St. Ignatius Loyola,
Manhattan, a Jesuit parish. The Jesuit pastor’s rousing
homily tells Catholics what they can’t support. Building
walls. Giving tax breaks to billionaires. Gutting health
care. Trashing planet earth. Trump’s agenda, basically,
though he mentioned no name. Yet one name screamed
out from the Mass program, atop the list of parishioners
donating to the service: the Honorable Judge Maryanne
Trump Barry, the president’s sister. She’d donated $2,500,
more than anyone. Turns out she’s given millions to the
very same Jesuits who disdain most every position that
Ryan, those so-called Christian Republicans, and her baby
brother push.
It just doesn’t get more gratifying than that.
Margery Eagan is cohost of WGBH’s “Boston Public
Radio.”
How Trump can fix the Iran deal
P
By Matthew Bunn
resident Trump faces a fateful
deadline on May 12: to decide
whether to keep waiving nuclear-related sanctions on Iran or
to rip up the Iran nuclear deal.
Fortunately, there is a path that would allow him to fix many of the problems he
sees with the deal while keeping Iran
hemmed in by the deal’s restraints.
Whatever one thinks of the nuclear deal
with Iran, the fact is that, under its terms,
Iran has cut its uranium-enrichment centrifuges by two-thirds; eliminated 98 percent of the stock of enriched uranium that
could otherwise have given it a major headstart on producing nuclear bomb material;
poured cement into the core of the reactor
it could have used to produce bomb plutonium; and accepted far broader international inspections than had been in place
before. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis has
accurately described the inspections and
other provisions designed to limit cheating
as “pretty robust.”
If Trump is determined to stop Iran
from getting a nuclear bomb, as he says he
is, he should make sure that, as he pushes
on other issues, he does not let this progress — for US security, for Israeli security,
and for world security — go down the
drain. A two-part plan can help him do
that — acting in part with the Europeans
and in part on his own.
First, Trump can complete the current
talks with the Europeans to put together a
joint effort to pressure Iran to stop testing
long-range ballistic missiles and stop supporting terrorists like Hezbollah. Such an
effort could also include pushing back on
Iran’s support for regional actors that
threaten Western interests, such as Syrian
dictator Bashar al-Assad and Houthi rebels
in Yemen. Those talks were a major focus
of his recent meetings with President Emmanuel Macron of France and German
Chancellor Angela Merkel, and on those issues an agreement is reportedly close.
GETTY
If President Trump leaves the deal, the
United States will be isolated.
Fixing the nuclear deal itself has proved
more contentious, since, as the Europeans
point out, a negotiated agreement cannot
be rewritten by just a few of its parties.
This is where Trump’s unilateral power can
come into play. Trump, who has the authority to reimpose US sanctions at any
time, could make clear that if Iran ever
comes substantially closer to the bomb —
whether by violating the deal or by taking
advantage of its sunset provisions, which
mean key restraints expire in 2025-2030 —
the United States would respond. That response could include measures ranging
from sanctions to military strikes.
Such a statement would amount to a US
threat to violate the deal in the future if
Iran came too close to a bomb capability.
Iran would certainly react furiously, but it
probably would not want to pull out of the
deal and be blamed for its collapse — including having global sanctions (far more
powerful than unilateral US sanctions) reimposed. And Iran cannot realistically expect, even after the enrichment restraints
expire, that any US president would sit
back and watch as Iran edged up to the
precipice of a nuclear weapons capability.
Waiving the sanctions again on May 12
would be a key part of such a strategy.
Without that, Iran would be freed immediately from the deal’s restraints — in effect
changing the deal’s sunset provisions from
10-15 years to zero — and the Europeans
would likely be unwilling to join in pressuring Iran on other issues.
Once such a framework is in place, Congress should modify the legislation that
currently requires Trump to waive sanctions every few months (avoiding future
crises over the deal), while incorporating
some of the approaches agreed upon with
the Europeans, to reinforce the message to
Iran.
With such a mix of joint and unilateral
action, Trump can keep Iran’s nuclear program far from a nuclear bomb. Over time,
Trump might be able to convince Iran to
come back to the table to discuss a bigger
deal, like the one he is pursuing with North
Korea, that would demand more of Iran
while offering more in return. (Presumably,
in such talks, Iran would also want to raise
its own concerns, including about US and
Israeli threats and sanctions and the parts
of the nuclear deal Iran dislikes.)
By contrast, if Trump walks out of the
deal on May 12, the United States will be
isolated. Few others will join the US sanctions, diluting the pressure that could be
brought to bear on Iran. And in Iran’s internal debates, the advocates for engagement with the West would be discredited,
probably making any new or better deal
impossible for years to come. Iran would
be freed from the deal’s nuclear limits and
could begin building up its capability to
produce nuclear bomb material. That
could leave Trump with few choices between accepting an Iran on the edge of nuclear weapons or launching yet another
war in the Middle East.
Matthew Bunn is professor of practice at
Harvard Kennedy School and coprincipal
investigator with the Project on Managing
the Atom at the Kennedy School’s Belfer
Center for Science and International Affairs.
Jeff Jacoby says that regulation is costing businesses and
consumers $1.9 trillion a year (“At long last, the regulatory
juggernaut slows,” Opinion, April 26), but he does not say
where he got this figure. Is this the gross cost before considering the countervailing gains in lower health care costs, a
healthier work force, improved quality of life, and benefits
by some businesses because of appropriate regulation of
other businesses?
Although Jacoby writes, “No reasonable person denies
the need for wise and well-crafted regulation,” he appears
to think all the regulations eliminated so far do not fall into
that category. He is thrilled that the government will no
longer try to protect citizen privacy on the Internet. He is
glad to let banks force their customers to submit disputes
to arbitration, despite the fact that studies have shown
overwhelmingly favorable judgments for the banks through
arbitration compared with the judgments handed down by
courts.
Certainly some regulations can be eliminated and some
can be improved. But most of the administration’s slashing
of regulations favors a government for businesses, not a
“government for the people.”
MICHAEL BIALES
Acton
Sure, trim bureacracy,
but with a clipper, not a scythe
There are regs and there are regs. Lauding the reduction of
regulations by number and attributed economic cost is misleading. Eliminating redundant reporting forms that a
business must file, for example, is not on par with
limiting the volume of
noxious emissions that
businesses can generate.
I would be thrilled to
see a reduction in the type
of bureaucratic idiocy
that requires me to report
the same data to multiple
agencies on multiple
forms. But all regulations
are not created equal, and to go after them equally is dangerous to the health and well-being of our country.
All regulations are
not created equal,
and to go after
them equally is
dangerous.
DAVID KAPLAN
Boston
For fortunate few, retiring is a lifestyle
choice. What about the rest of us?
Re “Turns out boomers aren’t the retiring type” (Page A1,
May 3): It’s very nice for people who have the option of deciding whether or not to retire. I want to see more reporting on the millions of baby boomers who still work, as
greeters at Walmart or newspaper deliverers, because they
lost good-paying jobs — along with their homes and savings
— in the Great Recession, or lost pensions they had earned
as a result of a corporate merger, or worked at lower-level
jobs all their adult lives without being able to save enough
to retire on, or lost the savings they did have to medical expenses.
Such people’s Social Security rarely covers rent and food,
let alone medical copays. They continue working past 65,
often at unrewarding jobs, because they have no other
choice.
CHARLES QUIGLEY
Braintree
It’s about time illustrations
of old people entered this century
Re “Feel bad about getting old? You may be hurting yourself” (Thursday Scene, May 3): I see the Globe is doing its
hypocritical best to strike a blow against ageism in the media. However, the accompanying artwork perpetuates the
old, familiar, cutesy but demeaning portrayal of the elderly
that belongs in a 1950s edition.
I mean, suspenders on the old guy? Come on. Outside of
maybe Cambridge (or a holiday-themed gathering), I doubt
you’d find a single gent of the over-60 persuasion sporting
them. And the illustration of the old gal as plump, poorly
coiffed, and wearing a housedress — ouch. With granny
glasses, yet.
Next time you’re out and about, put away your devices
and look around. You’ll see that real old people dress a lot
like their younger counterparts: Patagonia puff vests, sleek
running togs and shoes, designer sneaks and sundresses.
Many look as fit and fashion-forward as the young people
around them, if not more so.
So how about illustrating old people as they really appear, not as some defunct, lawn jockey-ish stereotype? And
maybe have them playing “Fortnite” instead of hopscotch
and hula-hoop?
LISA ZAHN
Beverly
Hard to miss this chance
to rename Yawkey Station
Regarding what to call the Yawkey commuter rail station,
now that Yawkey Way has been changed to Jersey Street: I
would suggest calling it Buckner Station, but then, as we all
know, everyone would miss their stop.
ELGIN GRIMES
Brighton
Letters should be written exclusively to the Globe and
include name, address, and daytime telephone number.
They should be 200 words or fewer. All are subject to
editing. Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, 1 Exchange
Pl, Ste 201, Boston, MA 02109-2132; letter@globe.com
A10
The Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
New Bedford reeling after ‘Codfather’ penalty
uNEW BEDFORD
Continued from Page A1
Tor Bendiksen, the manager of
Reidar’s, a marine supply company.
Rafael, whose commercial
fishing company was among
the nation’s largest, pleaded
guilty last year to flouting federal quotas and smuggling
cash out of the country.
Six months ago, officials at
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration responded with an unprecedented punishment, temporarily
banning 60 fishing permitholders in the area from allowing their boats to operate and
halting all operations by the
fishing sector that failed to
properly account for their
catch.
That decision grounded 22
fishing boats, nearly all owned
by Rafael and bearing his initials on their green-painted
bows.
Many of the boats’ captains
and crews, who collectively
held a quota of 20 million
pounds — or 10 percent — of
the region’s cod, flounder, and
other bottom-dwelling species,
thought they would be back to
work by the start of the fishing
season, which began last
week.
But despite their pleas for
relief, NOAA has yet to lift the
ban. That has left many fishermen wondering whether their
boats will ever ply the waters.
Manny Magalhes, a captain
who has worked for Rafael for
the past two decades, feels as if
he’s in purgatory.
“It’s been a struggle, and a
lot of people are suffering,”
said Magalhes, 45, the father
of two young children. “It just
feels unfair to us that there’s
still no resolution to this.”
The longer the boats remain idle, the less likely many
of the fishermen will stay in
New Bedford, he said.
“ We’re just waiting and
waiting,” he said. “If a lot of
guys give up and leave, I don’t
know what will happen.”
PHOTOS BY JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Sarah Forton worked on a
dragging net at Reidar’s
Trawl-Scallop Gear and
Marine Supply. Scalloper
Zachary Couto (left), the
grandson of Carlos Rafael,
displayed his tattooed
forearm.
NOAA officials acknowledge the fishermen’s woes, as
well as the wider losses across
New Bedford. But they said
they have no choice but to enforce the law, even if it has
wrought significant collateral
damage.
“We understand these impacts are real,” said Michael
Pentony, NOAA’s regional administrator.
Pentony said the blame extends beyond Rafael, who was
sentenced in September to
nearly four years in prison for
tax evasion and violating fishing quotas. Rafael was also required to forfeit his interest in
four vessels and their permits,
which have been valued at
nearly $2.3 million.
Sharing responsibility for
his crimes is the Northeast
Fishery Sector IX, one of the
region’s 19 federally permitted
cooperatives that share fishing
quotas, Pentony said. Sector
officials are obligated to ensure their boats comply with
federal rules.
“The sector failed to meet
the requirements, and its own
standards of compliance,” he
said. “We simply can’t not take
enforcement actions when
they have a wider impact, because then the regulations
would have no teeth.”
Without enforcement,
there would be little means of
preventing overfishing, which
could cause greater economic
damage, he noted.
NOAA has been working
with sector officials, Petony
said, to find a way for its fishermen to get back on the water. But the sector first has to
make restitution on the fish it
landed fraudulently by leasing
quota from another sector, offsetting the overfishing.
The sector then has to submit a new operations plan for
NOAA’s approval, a process
that could take several more
months and requires public input.
Pentony blamed the delays
in returning to active operations, in part, on the sector,
noting that many of its boats
surprised NOAA by announcing that they were transferring
to other sectors. Those boats,
however, will have to be sold
to independent owners before
they can return to sea.
For businesses that rely on
the fishing industry, the resumption of operations can’t
come soon enough.
At Bay Fuels, which supplies diesel to boats in New
Bedford, the owners of the
company estimate they’ve lost
about 500,000 gallons of fuel
sales since the ban took effect
last November, costing them
about $1.3 million.
“I’ve never seen it this bad
before,” said Virginia Martins,
president of Bay Fuels, who
took over from Rafael as president of Sector IX. “Enough is
enough.”
She added: “Next year, this
isn’t going to be the No. 1 port
in America.”
Over the past six months at
BASE New England, the largest seafood auction house on
the East Coast, company officials say they have sold 2.7
million fewer pounds of fish
than during the same period
last year.
Ma k i n g m a tt e r s w o r s e ,
groundfish prices plummeted
as buyers stocked up on product from elsewhere, they said.
At Reidar’s Manufacturing,
Bendiksen estimated that his
business has lost about onethird of its revenue over the
past six months. He has also
had to lay off one of his employees.
“This has been like a gut
punch,” he said. “A substantial
amount of our income vanished instantly.”
Dan Georgianna, an economics professor at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, estimated that the
fishing ban has cost the re-
g i o n’s e c o n o my n e a r l y
$500,000 a day.
Georgianna, who also sits
on the board of the fishing sector, called NOAA’s punishment
“unfair” to New Bedford.
“It affects people who have
committed no crimes,” he said.
“None of the captains or suppliers were charged.”
New Bedford’s mayor, Jon
F. Mitchell, has also urged NOAA to lift the ban as soon as
possible. But he said he is less
worried about the health of
the city’s overall economy, noting that groundfish now represent less than 10 percent of the
port’s overall catch. Most of
the earnings come from scallops.
He also called Georgianna’s
figures “overstated,” as did
Pentony, who cited an internal
NOAA analysis that suggested
the ban’s impact was less than
Georgianna suggested.
“Regardless of the precise
loss, the closure has had a significant impact on a number
of businesses and commercial
fishermen, so it’s incumbent
upon NOAA to resolve the
matter with all deliberate
speed,” Mitchell said.
NOAA officials are reviewing plans that would allow the
permit-holders to begin leasing their quotas to other fishermen.
But that would have little
bene fit for fishermen and
those like Pedro Jose Cabral,
who rely on the boats to keep
sailing.
Cabral, a welder who still
works for Rafael’s company,
has had a lot less work in recent months to keep the green
boats seaworthy. The 31-yearold father said he has been
struggling to provide for his
three young children.
“It’s a terrible feeling when
your kids ask you for something, and you can’t provide
for them,” he said. “I hope
things change soon.”
David Abel can be reached at
dabel@globe.com.
Taking your chances in raffles
HOW TO
BOSTON
STEP 1: TAKE OUR ADVICE
Want to know how to best spend your weekend?
Or how to make the most of a trip downtown?
The How To Boston newsletter is an essential
guide to the city, emailed weekly.
Sign up for the FREE newsletter
uTHE FINE PRINT
Continued from Page A1
Abrams told me. “But it was totally deceptive.”
The entry forms came attached to a dozen small clipboards spread across a table under the tent. It never occurred
to Abrams to unclip the form
and look at the back. She simply filled it out and handed it
back.
But the back of the form revealed the true nature of the
raffle. By signing , she had
agreed to be contacted by the
telemarketing firm JC Swain
Enterprise LLC and its partners.
And here are the words that
really sent Abrams over the
edge when a friend pointed
them out to her: “I understand
that this form’s permission supersedes my listing on any state
and/or federal ‘Do Not Call’ or
‘Do Not Contact’ list.”
It’s legally questionable
whether signing a raffle form
can waive such rights, but at a
minimum it allows a company
like Swain to test whether anyone will actually challenge it.
Like millions of others,
Abrams has tried to safeguard
her privacy — her right to be
left alone — by getting on the
federal government’s “Do Not
Call” list, which prohibits telemarketers from contacting her
(though countless purveyors of
robocalls have found a way
around it).
Why would Whole Foods get
involved in something so deceptive?
Turns out, it hadn’t.
I called the company to ask
about the drawing. A spokeswoman said she had checked it
out and “there is no connection
between Whole Foods Market
and the company you asked
about.”
“I am assuming this is a situation where they just came in
and independently purchased a
gift card and made the decision
to use it at their event,” she said.
I asked whether the company intended to take steps to
protect the use of its logo, but
the spokeswoman declined to
comment.
I also called John Swain.
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
“It was totally deceptive,’’
Linda Abrams said of the
raffle booth in Waltham.
He’s the owner and chief executive of the telemarketing firm,
which is based in Laconia, N.H.
And I e-mailed him a picture of
the tent his company had set up
at the festival. (Abrams had
wisely taken the picture and
sent it to me after she was alerted to the fine print.) Swain
called back to say it was all a big
mistake on the part of his company, and offered an apology to
Abrams.
Swain said he couldn’t explain how the Whole Foods sign
wound up at his company’s
tent, but promised to continue
to look into it. (I’m not holding
my breath waiting for an answer.)
“I can’t tell you how that
happened, but I can say that it’s
not our intent to upset or mislead anyone,” he said, adding
that he expected people signing
up for the raffle to familiarize
themselves with all of its terms,
including those about being
contacted.
Swain said his company is
hired by resort owners to find
people to purchase time-share
vacation packages. One important way for it to get the names
and numbers of people who
may be interested is to set up
raffles at home shows, auto
shows, and other big gatherings. (Raffle entrants beware.)
His company does about a
dozen shows every weekend, he
said.
Whether a mistake or not,
Swain’s use of the Whole Foods
logo certainly attracted a lot of
attention at the annual sheep-
shearing festival at Gore Place,
the 50-acre jewel of a historic
farm and house in Waltham.
Thousands of adults and children attend every year.
The banjo-playing Abrams
has performed there for decades with the Moody Street
String Band. During a break,
she wandered over to the tent
f e s t o o ne d w i t h t h e W h o l e
Foods Market logo, next to the
ice cream truck. For years,
Whole Foods has enjoyed a reputation for social responsibility,
which may have contributed to
the large number of people like
Abrams who signed up for the
raffle.
So excited was Abrams
about the raffle that she led
friends to it after signing up.
And that’s when one of her
friends noticed exactly what
they were signing up for.
“I looked around and there
were no disclosures on display
on the table or on the tent,”
Abrams said. “We are all inundated daily with fake calls . . .
and I don’t want to invite more
of them.”
Abrams insisted on getting
back her entry form. “I must
have looked ridiculous sifting
through all those entry forms in
the big box,” she said. “It took a
long time, but I found mine and
tore it up.”
Abrams then took it upon
herself to issue a warning.
“I informed everyone who
approached what they were really signing up for, and everyone turned away,” she said with
a smile. “Everyone was surprised when I told them to read
the other side.”
The organizers of the sheepshearing festival said they may
tighten their procedures to vet
vendors who pay a couple hundred dollars for a booth.
The festival doesn’t allow aggressive sales techniques, one
of the organizers said.
But it’s too late for those
whose phones may now be
ringing with pitches for that
time-share they don’t want.
Sean P. Murphy can be reached
at smurphy@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter
@spmurphyboston.
Business
PAGES B9­11
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Crime investigators fret
as cellphone encryption
technology moves forward
STAT: Investors fear Biogen’s glory days may be over
Canadian pipeline firm files suit against Weymouth
Talking points: Robocall volume reaches a new high
Metro
B
T H E BOS T ON G L OB E M O N DAY, M AY 7, 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
Housing­crunch measure stalls Police
Boston’s
Doing good in
resume
effort to get
Yawkey’s name
a handle on
scanning
evictions
runs into
of plates
the state’s
Adrian Walker
By Milton J. Valencia
GLOBE STAFF
The Yawkey Way signs
outside Fenway Park
came down last week
— removed at the
crack of dawn, like
when they take down
Confederate statues in
the South.
The Yawkey commuter rail station nearby will eventually get
a new name, too.
The Yawkey Foundation has reportedly
asked for the street signs bearing the
names of its benefactors. Not content with
that act of petulance, its leaders have also
requested the plaques of Tom and Jean
Yawkey that hang inside Fenway Park. The
foundation has also threatened to move its
philanthropy outside the city limits, in an
apparent effort to punish Mayor Martin J.
Walsh for not stopping the renaming.
In essence, the foundation says it will
pick up its ball and go home.
Throughout the controversy, Walsh
seemed like a man caught in the middle —
neither for it nor against it. In recent
weeks, he has been doing his best to keep
the Yawkey Foundation from making good
on its threats to take its money outside Boston.
He pretty much admitted as much in an
interview on WCVB’s “On The Record” program Sunday morning. He argued that he
doesn’t believe it will play out that way.
“There should be no carry-over by the
Yawkey Foundation in any way,” Walsh
said. He said there are hurt feelings, but he
believes they will eventually be set aside.
That’s far from clear.
I won’t pretend to comprehend what
this defeat feels like for stewards of the
Yawkey legacy. But walking away from
some of the foundation’s most important
accomplishments would be a tragic response to changing the name of (part of) a
city street.
For proponents — I was prominent
among them — renaming Yawkey Way was
an important step that ends the city’s tacit
endorsement of the deeply troubled racial
history of one of its signature institutions.
Opponents have argued that the renaming
unfairly tarnished the name of significant
philanthropists, and that the whole thing is
a just a “symbolic gesture.”
That debate may never be settled. But
now is the time for the two sides — which
both claim to care about race in Boston —
to find common ground about where to go
from here.
My feelings about the Yawkey Way name
have been stated more than once. I initially
called for the name to be removed in late
2015, and have revisited the subject on several occasions, including during the Globe
Spotlight Team’s series on race last December.
But, of course, the real force behind the
renaming was the Boston Red Sox — specifically, principal owner John W. Henry (also
the owner/publisher of the Globe). Once
the team put its organizational muscle behind the idea last summer, it immediately
went from an interesting idea to one that
was likely to happen. It is now called Jersey
Street, its original name.
Opponents of renaming the street stress
that the Yawkey Foundation has done good
throughout the city. That’s beyond dispute.
Much of that philanthropy was done long
after the death of Tom Yawkey in 1977, but
that doesn’t diminish its impact.
The foundation has maintained that the
name has been irreparably tarnished, going
so far as to argue that other organizations
will be under pressure to remove the
Yawkey name. The evidence for that pressure is scant at best.
The move to rename Yawkey Way was
always about the team’s history as the last
Major League team to integrate. It was never about the foundation, or its philanthropy. It does great work for a broad spectrum
of people who need it, honoring the Yawkey
name in the process. Punishing the people
in Boston who benefit from that help would
dishonor the foundation’s mission.
Renaming Yawkey Way is part of a necessary coming to terms with the role race
has played in this city. The Yawkey Foundation could play a vital role in that process.
That would be one of the best things ever
done in Tom Yawkey’s name.
Adrian Walker is a Globe columnist. He can
be reached at adrian.walker@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter @adrian_walker.
The housing advocates began to descend on the State House early Wednesday afternoon for one last push for the
Jim Brooks Stabilization Act — a Bostonbacked measure they say could help prevent tenant displacement amid the city’s
housing crunch.
But then, as advocates prepared to
hoist their banner, word began to spread:
A legislative committee had just killed
the proposal.
“Shame, shame,” the protesters shouted. “Whose side are you on?”
The defeat served as a blow to the advocates’ hopes, but it also illustrated the
tough home
rule process
reality of how some local matters are addressed on Beacon Hill:
Home rule petitions — even with
widespread support from local advocates, the City Council, and Mayor Martin J. Walsh — can be rejected by a legislative committee whose members are
mostly from outside of Boston.
“This bill could have helped thousands of residents stay in their homes
and in their neighborhoods,” Darnell
Johnson, of the Right to the City alliance
of housing advocates, told protesters at
the rally Wednesday.
“Our trust in our elected officials to
do the right thing and protect all our resHOME RULE, Page B8
TED GARTLAND
The 76ers’ Julius Erving (left) and Boston’s Larry Bird briefly squared off during a November
1984 game at the old Garden, a moment captured in a famous photograph.
PHOTOGRAPHER
DIDN’T CHOKE
With camera at the ready, Gartland
froze a classic Celtics­76ers moment
I
By Eric Moskowitz
GLOBE STAFF
t’s the photo the two Hall of Famers refuse to sign, a single image that captures a
rivalry and still stirs fans a generation later. Among the barrooms near TD Garden, it hangs at The Fours and again at Sullivan’s Tap, where a 16-by-20-inch
print resides squarely above the center of the bar, bathed by the light of Budweiser neon.
It is Larry Bird and Julius Erving choking each other, locked in an arm’slength clench, each gouging his fingers into the other guy’s neck. Over the years,
it has appeared on album art for a Boston rapper and T-shirts for a punk band, caught the
eye of a German street-wear designer, and
adorned screen-printed torsos all over the
Garden.
Though the 1984 photograph has never really receded, it pops to the foreground again
whenever the Boston Celtics and Philadelphia
76ers play. And it has crackled with particular
intensity this postseason, ricocheting all over
the Internet, with the two teams in the conference semifinals.
Not that the photographer who owns the Photographer Ted Gartland, now retired,
rights has collected for all this — or even had in his Belmont home.
much of an inkling. He owns no smartphone
and last saw the Celtics in person at the old Garden (1928-1995), though he has been to
the new place a few times to shoot or see Springsteen and the Stones.
“There are T-shirts?” he said, eyes widening as he took a seat before a laptop in his
kitchen, preparing for a guided tour of the online wares.
He is Ted Gartland, closing in on 70, retired six years, and late of The Boston Globe,
PHOTOGRAPH, Page B5
GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY
— Two women did lunges
to stretch out as they
took part in the 50th
annual Walk for Hunger
on Sunday. The walk, a
major fund-raiser for
Project Bread, covered 20
miles, starting from
Boston Common and
heading west on Beacon
Street to Newton Centre,
before returning to the
Common via the
Watertown/Cambridge
side of the Charles River.
B2
Paused devices’ use
on vehicles in 2013
By Shawn Musgrave
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
The Boston Police Department
has resumed using license plate
readers, which can scan thousands of passing vehicles per minute, after it accidently released a
database of scanned vehicles in
2013 and then stopped the practice, according to documents obtained through a public records request.
The technology, which is used
by law enforcement across the
country to find wanted felons,
missing persons, or even get unpaid tickets resolved, has been a
point of contention between police
and civil liberties groups, who say
collected data can invade privacy
and potentially chill free speech.
In December 2013, after accidentally releasing the database of
scanned vehicles, Boston police
took their scanners offline while
Police Commissioner William B.
Evans reviewed the program.
The database, released in response to a public records request,
showed the location, date, and
time of each scan of more than
60,000 vehicles over a six-month
period.
Soon after halting the license
plate scanner program, Evans told
the City Council that the “license
plate readers, obviously, weren’t
being used the way that we had
committed to use them.”
“We were collecting so much
data that we weren’t even sure
what we were collecting, honestly,”
Evans said at a City Council meeting in April 2014.
Evans told the City Council at
the same meeting that he would
work with the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts to
address privacy concerns and revise the Boston Police Department’s license plate reader protocols.
The Police Department invited
the ACLU to review its draft policy
READERS, Page B4
4 races
could get
national
attention
By James Pindell
GLOBE STAFF
With legislative sessions wrapping up and candidate filing periods coming to a close, New England’s political
GROUND
season is now in
GAME
full swing.
Let’s be honest: This year’s political races are
mostly boring affairs, at least
comparatively speaking. The region always tends to vote Democratic, and this year’s incumbents
seem to be even safer than usual.
But there are a handful of New
England races that are generating
considerable buzz, enough so that
they could draw national attention and money.
Here is a look at four of those
races and the dynamics at play.
Connecticut’s Fifth
Congressional District
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
The sudden downfall of US
Representative Elizabeth Esty, a
Democrat, after she admitted
mishandling a sexual harassment
complaint against her former
chief of staff just last month led to
GROUND GAME, Page B8
B2
Metro
GET SMART
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
WEEK AHEAD
JOHN HILLARD FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Brookline votes
on tax hikes
By Leslie Anderson
GLOBE STAFF
Brookline voters will decide on a pair of
proposed property tax increases when they
cast their ballots Tuesday in the annual Town
Election.
One would help pay for a high school expansion and the other would raise more money for the town and schools.
Town officials have proposed a $205.6 million expansion and renovation of Brookline
High School, the bulk of which would be
funded by voters if they approve a Proposition
2½ debt exclusion on the ballot. A separate
override proposal asks voters to increase the
property tax levy by more than $6.6 million to
support the school and town budgets.
So what if the only bird you can recognize
is a robin. Grab your binoculars (or borrow a
pair) and join Mass Audubon’s annual Bird-athon fund-raiser this
weekend.
Teams of birders of
all abilities will fan out
across Massachusetts
from 6 p.m. Friday to 6
p.m. Saturday in a contest to identify the most
species statewide over a
24-hour period.
While more than two
dozen teams traipse
MASS AUDUBON
through fields, forests,
and salt marshes in
hopes of spying an unusual feathered visitor,
backyard enthusiasts can get into the act as
well. “Bird-a-thon Boosters” can fund-raise for
their favorite team, bird non-competitively, or
simply rally support.
Last year’s participants raised more than
$230,000 in support of Mass Audubon’s mission to connect people and nature. To learn
more, go to www.massaudubon.org/birdathon.
Birds aren’t the only ones singing this time
of year. More than 250 musical acts ranging
from Bollywood funk to clawhammer banjo to
American space rock will gather in Somerville
for the annual PorchFest on Saturday. (Raindate is Sunday.)
The music begins in West Somerville (noon
to 2 p.m.), picks up in central Somerville between Willow Avenue and Central Street (2 to
4 p.m.), and wraps up in East Somerville (4 to
6 p.m.). There’s also Porch-ioke for amateur
warblers who would like to sing with a live
band. The event is free and open to the public.
Visit somervilleartscouncil.org/porchfest.
And what about the fairies? Francis William Bird Park in Walpole invites families to
collect leaves, bark, sticks and other natural
materials to make “fairy houses” and magic
wands. Park at 135 Polley Lane and head to
the playground on Friday from 3 to 4:30 p.m.
The price is $5 for member families, $10 for
nonmember families. For more information,
call 508-668-6136 or e-mail mogara@thetrustees.org.
Leslie Anderson can be reached at
leslie.anderson@globe.com.
BY THE NUMBERS
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Brooklynne Mitchell-Arno, 17, a junior at Ayer-Shirley Regional High School, was trading high-fives at the one-mile mark Sunday.
Walk for Hunger hits 50th year
U
By Lucas Phillips
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
nder cloudy skies, thousands of runners and walkers celebrated the 50th annual Walk for Hunger, the oldest continuously
running pledge walk in the country, according to organizers.
“We would love to not keep walking, for this issue to be
solved” said Liz Greenhalgh, vice president of marketing and
development at Project Bread, the organization behind the walk.
“It’s a bittersweet event, celebrating our project but not blind to the fact
that we’ve had to do this for 50 years, that these issues haven’t been solved,”
she said in a phone interview.
Organizers estimated about 10,000 people tackled the 20-mile western
walking loop and 5k run beginning and ending on Boston Common Sunday, though a precise number was not available Sunday evening.
In 1969, a local priest was inspired by Robert F. Kennedy’s tour of Appalachia to test the idea of a fund-raising walk in Quincy. The original event
was a big success, according to Greenhalgh, rasing $26,000 with about
2,000 participants.
This year, raising money to fund programs addressing issues of food insecurity in the Bay State, Project Bread president Erin McAleer said they
were “on track” to collect $2.4 million as of Saturday, and were expecting
cash donations at the walk itself.
But although the goals of the walk have been mostly the same over the
years, McAleer said this is a difficult moment for hunger issues.
“We are at risk right now with a Republican Congress and President
Trump looking to severe cuts” in programs like SNAP, McAleer said.
“We’re fighting right now to protect status quo,” she said. “Just trying
not to move backwards.”
For one walker, 46-year old Melinda Jones, who is currently staying at
the Boston Rescue Mission, the issue of hunger is personal.
“I know what it’s like to not have enough, stretching that dollar,” she
said, recalling times when she’s lived on ramen noodles. “Food is sometimes the last priority.”
And money raised by the walk benefits programs Jones depends on,
since Project Bread helps fund programs combating hunger.
The problem of hunger can be forgotten amid so many political debates,
said Jones, who moved to Boston six weeks ago on the merit of the movie
“Good Will Hunting.”
“It can get be missed, but this [walk] shows we care.”
Lucas Phillips can be reached at lucas.phillips@globe.com.
AROUND THE REGION
NEW HAMPSHIRE
2 dead, 2 hurt in crash
on Piscataqua River
Two women are dead and two men injured after
a boat crash on the Piscataqua River in New
Hampshire, Saturday shortly before 8:15 p.m
when the operator of the boat, a 59-year-old
man, hit a buoy near Eliot, Maine, which is just
across the border from New Hampshire, at a
high rate of speed, the New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol said in a statement. The four
were the only people on board at time of the
crash One passenger, a woman who was wearing
a life jacket, was thrown into the river and
knocked unconscious, police said. The operator
called 911 and was able to report the location of
the passenger in the water to authorities before
he maneuvered the vessel back to the Eliot Boat
Landing, which was within sight of where the
crash took place and, according to police. Responders retrieved the woman from the river
and all three passengers were taken to Portsmouth Hospital in Portsmouth, N.H., where the
two women were later pronounced dead. The
other passenger was transported to a Boston hospital for further treatment, police said. The oper-
ator was taken to York Hospital in York, Maine,
where he was treated for bruising and a back injury, police said. Operator inattention may have
been a factor in the crash, but the crash remains
under investigation, according to police. Police
are withholding the identities of those involved
until their families have been notified, police
said. Multiple agencies responded to the crash
including the New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol, Maine Marine Patrol, and the U.S.
Coast Guard, according to police.
BOSTO N
Court asked to toss
more lab scandal cases
Massachusetts’ highest court is set to hear arguments in the case sparked by the misconduct of a
former chemist who authorities say was high almost every day she worked at a state drug lab for
eight years. The American Civil Liberties Union
of Massachusetts and the state’s public defender
agency will ask the Supreme Judicial Court on
Tuesday to order the dismissal of all convictions
that relied on evidence from the drug lab during
Sonja Farak’s tenure. Prosecutors have already
agreed to dismiss thousands of cases tainted by
Farak, who pleaded guilty in 2014 to stealing cocaine from the lab and was sentenced to 18
months behind bars. The ACLU and Committee
for Public Counsel Services are also asking the
court to establish protocols for instances of misconduct. (AP)
BOSTO N
‘Star Trek’ actor George
Takei to speak at library
‘‘Star Trek’’ actor George Takei is set to speak at
the Boston Public Library on Tuesday. Takei is to
discuss his experience during World War II spent
in US internment camps for Japanese-Americans. Takei used his family’s story as the inspiration for the Broadway musical ‘‘Allegiance.’’ The
show tells the narrative of the fictional Kimura
family, whose lives are upended when they and
120,000 other Japanese-Americans are forced to
leave their homes following the 1941 attack on
Pearl Harbor. The cast of the SpeakEasy Stage
Company’s production of Takei’s musical also
will perform during the event at the library’s
main branch at Copley Square. Seating will be
available on a first-come, first-served basis after
ticket-holders are seated. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
NEW BEDFORD WHALING NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK
$539m
The amount visitors to national parks in Massachusetts spent in the state in 2017, according to the
National Park Service. It said 10.5 million visitors
explored the 14 national parks located entirely or
partially in Massachusetts. They include the Boston
Harbor Islands, the Boston African American National Historic Site, Cape Cod National Seashore,
the New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park,
the Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site, and
the Springfield Armory National Historical Site.
R MOTORCYCLE FATALITY A Brockton man died
after crashing his motorcycle on Interstate 93 in
Boston early Sunday, State Police said. Jose
Lopes, 49, was driving his 2017 Suzuki GSXR
northbound, just south of exit 13 between the
Neponset Street on-ramp and the Freeport Street
off-ramp, at about 1:59 a.m. when he lost control, State Police. Lopes was pronounced dead at
the scene, according to State Police spokesman
Dustin Fitch. The cause is under investigation.
R GUN IN YARD A Mattapan resident who was
getting ready to mow the lawn Saturday afternoon found a handgun in the backyard, according to Boston police. The unidentified resident,
who lives near Mattapan Street and Fottler Road,
called police around 2:10 p.m. after finding the
silver .380-caliber pistol on the ground while doing yard work, officials said. Detectives removed
the gun, police said. In a statement, police commended “the citizen who prevented a dangerous
weapon from falling into the wrong hands.”
R PEDESTRIAN STRUCK A 68-year-old man has
multiple life-threatening injuries after he was
struck by a car while walking in Haverhill Sunday, police and fire officials said. An SUV struck
the Haverhill resident as he was walking west
across Main Street near 18th Avenue around
4:45 p.m. Sunday, police said. “I don’t know
what events lead up to this incident but the driver did stop and remained on the scene,” said
Haverhill Fire Chief William Laliberty in an email to the Globe Sunday. Laliberty said the unidentified victim was flown via MedFlight helicopter to a trauma center. “A firefighter from Engine 3 drove the ambulance to Lawrence General
Hospital so ambulance crews could continue
their patient care,” Laliberty said. The man was
then taken to a Boston-area hospital, where he
was listed in critical condition, according to
Haverhill police. The driver of the SUV remained
at the scene of the incident, where police said the
investigation was ongoing. No criminal charges
have been filed at this time, police said.
R CAR AND DOG THEFT A lifelong East Boston
resident suffered a dog owner’s worst nightmare
Sunday after a quick stop at an Orient Heights
convenience store ended with the theft of her
SUV and yellow labrador sitting inside. The theft
occurred around 8:45 a.m. in the parking lot between Royals Roast Beef and Saratoga Market on
Trident Street in East Boston, according to Rosa
Nese. Nese said she had just visited her mother’s
grave with her 8-year-old lab, Chief, when she
stopped at the market. She parked her SUV and
left Chief inside with the windows cracked and
air conditioning running, then entered the shop.
“I ran into this convenience store at 8:45, and
then at 8:51 I called the police,” Nese said. “My
car was gone, I started screaming ‘Chief, Chief,
Chief,’ and I called the police.” A Boston police
spokesman said that as of Sunday night, Chief —
and the car — had not yet been found. A surveillance photo shows a man with grey hair wearing
black pants, a jean jacket, and a neon backpack
entering Nese’s car.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
Friends
pray for
Arroyo’s
recovery
City official was
hospitalized Friday
By Jeremy C. Fox
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Friends, family, and colleagues from more than three
decades in public service gathered Sunday afternoon at a
South End church to bow their
heads, join hands, and pray for
Felix D. Arroyo, the Suffolk register of probate, who was hospitalized Friday after a medical
emergency.
Arroyo, 70, was taken from
City Hall to Massachusetts General Hospital on Friday, city officials said. A spokesman for Arroyo said Sunday that the nature of his medical condition
was not yet clear.
“We are here to celebrate
and lift up my father,” Ana Arroyo Montano said to about 100
who gathered for the prayer
service in the sanctuary of Congregation Lion of Judah.
“If you are here, it’s because
you have felt some sort of love,
power, healing, support, leadership from my father. Is that
true?” she continued moments
later, prompting cries of, “Yes,”
and, “Amen.”
CIVIC LEADER
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
PLAY BALL — Jarelis Castillo (right), 9, tried hard to catch up to tag out her brother, Jarele Castillo, 7, as they played baseball with their
father on a field covered in dandelions at Doherty-Gibson Playground in Dorchester on Sunday.
Dorchester memorial honors 2 slain law officers
Felix D.
Friends, relatives
Arroyo
recall pair killed
was the
in the line of duty
first
Latino to serve on
By Jerome Campbell
the Boston City
Two Massachusetts law enCouncil and
forcement officers who lost
lives more than a decade
School Committee. their
ago we re ho nore d Sund ay
GLOBE STAFF
Arroyo, who gre w up in
Puerto Rico and moved to Boston in 1976, was the first Latino
on the Boston City Council and
School Committee and the first
person of color to serve as the
committee’s president.
He is also the first Latino to
be elected to his position as register of probate — overseeing
court filings related to family issues — and a much-respected
member of the city’s Puerto Rican community.
Arroyo’s son, Felix G. Arroyo, another former city councilor, said in a brief interview
Sunday that his entire family
had been at his father’s bedside,
praying for him.
“We’re grateful,” he said of
the outpouring of support at
the service. “ We know that
there are a lot of people that
love him and admire him and
are praying for him.”
The Rev. Gregory G. Groover
Sr., pastor of Charles Street
AME Church in Roxbury, said
in a prayer that the faithful
were “calling for a miracle” for
Arroyo.
“It’s a miracle that Felix is
living right now. . . . You are the
God who parted the Red Sea.
You are the God who fed 5,000
people. You are the God who
can do all things,” Groover
prayed.
The crowd included many
current and former elected officials who worked with Arroyo.
The elder Arroyo was suspended as register of probate in
February 2017 amid questions
about his job performance, but
was cleared to return to work in
October after an investigation
found that he had entered an
office that long had been mismanaged and been met by a
hostile staff that opposed his efforts to diversify its ranks.
One of his sons, Ernesto
“Eroc” Arroyo-Montano, referred to the controversy Sund ay, s ay i n g h i s f at h e r h a d
cleared his name after “an entire system tried to attack him.”
“This Puerto Rican kid from
the projects stays winning
fights he’s not supposed to win,”
he said of his father, to applause
from the crowd. “And his heart
is beating, and his soul is surrounded with this love and this
aura of protection from your
prayers.”
Jeremy C. Fox can be reached at
jeremy.fox@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @jeremycfox.
with a memorial in Pope John
Paul Park in Dorchester.
Almost 200 people attende d t h e c e r e m o n y, w h e r e a
stone memorial was unveiled
in honor of State Police Trooper Mark S. Charbonnier and
Sergeant Richard T. Dever of
the Suffolk County Sheriff ’s
Department.
Charbonnier was shot in
1994 during a traffic stop by a
paro led former convic t in
Kingston. Dever was stabbed
to death in 2005 when he tried
to help remove a violent man
from a Charlestown bar.
“”They were good, decent
men,” Kathleen Dever, the
slain sheriff ’s mother, told the
crowd at the ceremony. “Both
made the ultimate sacrifice.”
Charbonnier and Dever
had known each other since
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Ann Marie Wilson (left) and Kathleen Dever placed wreaths at a memorial to slain law
enforcement officers Mark S. Charbonnier and Richard T. Dever in Dorchester on Sunday.
childhood, when they were
both growing up in Dorchester.
Steven Charbonnier, the
state trooper’s brother, said
he, his brother, and Dever
were close, playing basketball
games and hosting beach parties together in the summer.
All three went on to careers
in law enforcement, with Steven joining the Boston Police
Department. Now a detective,
Steven Charbonnier told the
Disgraced former teacher
at elite school commits suicide
By Danny McDonald
GLOBE STAFF
A former teacher fired from
an elite Cambridge school over
sexual abuse allegations in the
1980s committed suicide last
month, according to his death
certificate.
Edward “Ted” Washburn,
who pleaded guilty to raping
his 13-year-old nephew in
1987 and received a suspended sentence, killed himself on
April 6, according to the certificate.
Washburn, 75, of Lexington, had taught at Buckingham Browne & Nichols, a day
school that serves prekindergarten through 12th grade in
Cambridge.
The 1987 rape case was the
biggest scandal in the history
of that institution, which was
established in 1974 with the
merger of two schools that
were founded in the 19th century.
The school also received
multiple complaints about
sexual abuse of students by
Washburn, and, in 2008, the
school issued an apology to
alumni and the school’s community for mishandling the
complaints.
Buckingham Browne &
Nichols, through a spokesman, last week declined to
c o m m e n t o n Wa s h b u r n ’s
death.
Daniel Weinreb, a former
student at the school, has said
that he testified at Washburn’s
trial that the teacher asked
him to perform a sexual act
while he watched when Weinreb was 13 years old, a year after he was Washburn’s student.
Washburn, who held two
degrees from Harvard and was
the son of the late Bradford
Washburn, an preeminent explorer who transformed Bost o n’s Mu s e u m o f S c i e n c e ,
taught English at the school
for 23 years before he was
fired in February 1987. The
school received an anonymous
tip that Washburn had been
sexually abusing several boys
between the ages of 12 and
14 and he was fired the next
day.
Washburn also served as a
crew coach at Har vard for
more than two decades and
was dismissed from that position after he was indicted on
abuse charges in 1987.
We i n r e b , i n a n e - m a i l
Thursday night, said Washburn’s death did not bring closure “as he didn’t cause the
trauma alone.”
“The trauma will persist
until Harvard University —
Washburn’s employer — acknowledges and compensates
for Washburn grooming us —
his victims — at Harvard crew
events and overseas competitions,” said Weinreb.
Weinreb said, unlike Harvard, Buckingham Browne &
Nichols has offered “honesty
and compassion, providing
compensation for survivors to
get therapy.”
Harvard declined to comment for this story.
Mitchell Garabedian, an attorney who represented Weinreb, said in a phone interview
Thursday night that Washburn’s “sexual abuse of children has caused everlasting
pain.”
“For some victims, death by
suicide will bring a degree of
closure, but most victims will
feel cheated because they were
not able to confront Mr. Washburn face-to-face and because
Mr. Washburn did not serve
any actual jail time,” he said.
Washburn’s death certificate listed his occupation as
a director of a recording studio.
Danny McDonald can be
reached at
daniel.mcdonald@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@Danny__McDonald.
crowd that he always knew
that he would find a way to
honor his fallen brethren with
a memorial.
“The hope is that their legacy will continue long after
we’re gone,” said Charbonnier,
while wearing a pin with his
brother’s squad car number,
953. “They were both truly exceptional men.”
During the ceremony, Ann
Marie Wilson, who was Charbonnier’s wife, recounted how
he had a special connection
with each of his family members, often visiting in the early
morning to drink tea with his
mother and coming by to talk
politics with his father.
Dever’s mother said he was
the perfect son, then told a story about a time when her then13-year-old son stole a swig
out of a bottle of anisette liqueur she had won at a bowling competition the night before.
Every speaker thanked the
community, which had helped
the families after they lost
their loved ones.
“ There was a network of
people that had helped us and
supported us long before this
happened,” said Dever. “If this
tragedy hadn’t happened, we
wouldn’t have realized it. So
thank you.”
Jerome Campbell can be
reached at
jerome.campbell@globe.com.
Your job satisfaction is showing.
2018
Nominate your
workplace now.
Globe.com/Nominate
Deadline May 18th
#WorkBoston
Metro
B4
T h e
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC UTILITIES
NOTICE OF AMENDED FILING AND PUBLIC HEARINGS
D.P.U. 17-90
April 11, 2018
Petition of Aquarion Water Company of Massachusetts, Inc., pursuant to G.L. c. 164, § 94, and G.L. c. 165, § 2, for Approval
of a General Rate Increase as set forth in M.D.P.U. No. 3.
On April 13, 2017, Aquarion Water Company of Massachusetts, Inc. (“Aquarion” or “Company”) filed a petition with the Department of Public Utilities (“Department”) for approval of a general rate increase of $2,346,708, which represents an overall
increase of 14.70 percent over the Company’s currently effective rates. The Department docketed this matter as D.P.U. 17-90
and suspended the effective date of the proposed rate increase in order to investigate the propriety of the Company’s request.
The Department conducted two public hearings in the Company’s service areas on July 13, 2017, and July 19, 2017.
On March 9, 2018, the Department allowed the Company to amend its filing to propose a capital investment cost recovery
mechanism, the Water Reliability Improvement Mechanism (“WRIM”). The WRIM would accelerate main replacement
and infrastructure investment in the Company’s system including the replacement of mains, valves, customer meters, and
hydrants. The Company proposes incremental capital investment of approximately $1 million per year through the WRIM,
above the $2.1 million per year for capital additions under Aquarion’s current capital investment plan.
Aquarion proposes to recover the revenue requirement associated with the incremental capital investment under the WRIM
through a surcharge based on water usage. The surcharge would be updated annually based on WRIM-eligible capital
improvement projects placed into service during the prior twelve month period (January 1 through December 31). Aquarion
proposes an annual WRIM revenue requirement cap of five percent of annual retail water revenues for the prior calendar year,
with an aggregate cap of ten percent before the Company’s next general rate proceeding.
The Company proposes to submit its annual WRIM filing by March 1 for a surcharge effective September 1, with the first
WRIM surcharge to be effective September 1, 2019. The annual WRIM filing also would include a three-year construction
plan for WRIM-eligible projects, including input from representatives of the towns in the Company’s service territory.
The Department has scheduled the following additional public hearings to receive comment on Aquarion’s proposed
WRIM:
May 14, 2018, at 7:00 p.m.
Oxford High School
Auditorium
100 Carbuncle Drive
Oxford, Massachusetts 01540
May 23, 2018, at 7:00 p.m.
Hull High School
Auditorium
180 Main Street
Hull, Massachusetts 02045
Any person interested in commenting on Aquarion’s proposed WRIM may appear at either of the public hearings or may file
written comments by the close of business (5:00 p.m.) on May 23, 2018.
Any person who desires to participate in the evidentiary phase of this proceeding regarding the proposed WRIM must file
a written petition for leave to intervene or to participate in this proceeding no later than the close of business (5:00 p.m.) on
April 30, 2018. A petition for leave to intervene must satisfy the timing and substantive requirements of 220 CMR 1.03.
Receipt by the Department, not mailing, constitutes filing and determines whether a petition has been timely filed. A petition
filed late may be disallowed as untimely, unless good cause is shown for waiver under 220 CMR 1.01(4). To be allowed, a
petition under 220 CMR 1.03(1) must satisfy the standing requirements of G.L. c. 30A, § 10.
Written comments and petitions for leave to intervene or to participate should be addressed to: Mark D. Marini, Secretary,
Department of Public Utilities, One South Station, 5th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02110. Receipt by the Department, not
mailing, constitutes filing.
Further, in addition to paper filing with the Department, all documents must also be submitted to the Department in electronic
format using one of the following methods: (1) by e-mail attachment to dpu.efiling@state.ma.us and the Hearing Officer,
kerri.phillips@state.ma.us; or (2) on a CD-ROM. The text of the e-mail or CD-ROM must specify: (1) the docket number
of the proceeding (D.P.U. 17-90); (2) the name of the person or company submitting the filing; and (3) a brief descriptive title
of the document. The electronic filing should also include the name, title, and telephone number of a person to contact in the
event of questions about the filing. All documents submitted in electronic format will be posted on the Department’s website
(enter “17-90”) at: http://170.63.40.34/DPU/Fileroom/dockets/bynumber.
A copy of the petition and accompanying exhibits are available for inspection during regular business hours at the Department’s offices and on the Department’s website. In addition, a copy is also on file for public viewing at Hingham Public
Library, 66 Leavitt Street, Hingham, Massachusetts 02043; Hull Public Library, 9 Main Street, Hull, Massachusetts 02045;
Millbury Public Library, 128 Elm Street, Millbury, Massachusetts 01527; and Oxford Public Library, 339 Main Street,
Oxford, Massachusetts 01540. To request materials in accessible formats (braille, large print, electronic files, audio format),
contact the Department’s ADA coordinator at DPUADACoordinator@state.ma.us or (617) 305-3642.
Reasonable accommodations at public or evidentiary hearings for people with disabilities are available upon request.
Include a description of the accommodation you will need, including as much detail as you can. Also include a way the
Department can contact you if we need more information. Please provide as much advance notice as possible. Last minute
requests will be accepted, but may not be able to be accommodated. Contact the Department’s ADA coordinator at
DPUADACoordinator@state.ma.us or (617) 305-3642.
For further information regarding Aquarion’s WRIM proposal, please contact the Company’s counsel, Cheryl M. Kimball,
Esq., at (617) 951-1400. For further information regarding this notice, please contact Kerri DeYoung Phillips, Hearing Officer, Department of Public Utilities, at (617) 305-3500.
LEGAL NOTICES
(SEAL)
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
LAND COURT
DEPARTMENT OF THE
TRIAL COURT
18SM002674
ORDER OF NOTICE
To:
Rachel V. Kemp
and to all persons entitled
to the benefit of the Servicemembers Civil Relief
Act, 50 U.S.C.c. 50 §3901
et seq.:
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Company, as Trustee
for the registered holders of
Morgan Stanley ABS Capital
I Inc. Trust 2007-NC4 Mortgage Pass Through Certificates, Series 2007-NC4
claiming to have an interest
in a Mortgage covering real
property in Boston, numbered 39 Hewins Street,
given by Rachel V. Kemp
to Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc.
acting solely as a nominee
for AMCAP Mortgage, Inc.,
dated November 9, 2006,
and recorded in Suffolk
County Registry of Deeds
in Book 40749, Page 1, and
now held by the Plaintiff by
assignment, has/have filed
with this court a complaint
for determination of Defendant’s/Defendants’ Servicemembers status.
If you now are, or recently
have been, in the active military service of the United
States of America, then you
may be entitled to the benefits of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. If you
object to a foreclosure of
the above mentioned property on that basis, then you
or your attorney must file a
written appearance and answer in this court at Three
Pemberton Square, Boston,
MA 02108 on or before June
11, 2018 or you will be forever barred from claiming
that you are entitled to the
benefits of said Act.
Witness, JUDITH C. CUTLER
Chief Justice of said Court
on April 27, 2018.
Attest: Deborah J. Patterson
Recorder
10-001527
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Public Hearing
The Massachusetts Board
of Higher Education acting
under General Laws Chapter 69, Section 30, et seq.
will conduct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, May 30,
2018 at 10:00 a.m. in the
office of the Department
of Higher Education, Room
1401, McCormack Building,
One Ashburton Place, Boston, Massachusetts, concerning the closure and degree-granting revocation of
Wheelock College located
in Boston, Massachusetts,
Massachusetts Department
of Higher Education
Carlos E. Santiago, Ph.D.,
Commissioner
MASSACHUSETTS BAY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY
10 Park Plaza, Suite 5170
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02116
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Electronic proposals for the following project will be received through the
internet using Bid Express until the date and time stated below, and will be
posted on www.bidx.com forthwith after the bid submission deadline. No
paper copies of bids will be accepted. Bidders must have a valid digital ID
issued by the Authority in order to bid on projects. Bidders need to apply
for a digital ID with Bid Express at least 14 days prior to a scheduled bid
opening date.
Electronic bids for MBTA Contract No. Q09CN02-Green Line D Branch Track
& Signal Replacement – Beaconsfield to Riverside, Newton and Brookline,
Massachusetts, (CLASS 1 – GENERAL TRANSIT CONSTRUCTION $30,000,000.00, CLASS 3 – TRACKWORK - $30,000,000.00, CLASS 6A1
– TRANSIT SIGNALS AND COMMUNICATIONS - $25,000,000.00, AND
PROJECT VALUE - 66,080,000.00), can be submitted at www.bidx.com
until two o’clock (2:00 p.m.) on June 7, 2018. Immediately thereafter, in a
designated room, the Bids will be opened and read publicly.
The work is a part of the MBTA initiative to bring the track and signal
system between Beaconsfield Station and Riverside Station into a state of
good repair. This segment of the system between Beaconsfield Station and
Riverside Station is part of the Green Line’s D (Highland) Branch. The signal
improvements include replacing the existing obsolete 25Hz track circuits
and their associated distributed frequency converter network with modern
solid-state 100Hz track circuits powered locally from each control instrument
house (CIH). The signal improvements will be achieved by (1) replacing the
wayside signal cases with new CIH’s (fabricated by the MBTA, installed by
the Contractor), (2) providing two new CIH’s for the Reservoir and Grove
Street interlockings, (3) providing approximately 6.5 miles of new wayside
aerial cable and cable support system on existing catenary poles, (4)
providing all wayside signals, pushbuttons, power and hand-throw switch
machines, and (5) providing all other ancillary signal equipment and other
elements necessary for a fully functioning system as shown on the contract
plans. Track improvements consist of the renewal of approximately 24,000
feet of mainline track, replacement of special trackwork, platform edge
reconstruction, and grade crossing reconstruction.
Bidders attention is directed to Appendix 1, Notice of Requirement for
Affirmative Action to Insure Equal Employment Opportunity; and to Appendix
2, Supplemental Equal Employment Opportunity, Anti-Discrimination,
and Affirmative Action Program in the specifications. The DBE goal
associated with this contract is 14%, the Authority strongly encourages
the use of Minority, Women and Disadvantaged Business Enterprises as
prime contractors, subcontractors and suppliers in all of its contracting
opportunities.
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
ADVERTISEMENT
CITY OF BOSTON
PUBLIC FACILITIES DEPARTMENT (PFD)
Request for Qualifications (RFQ)
Project Title: Fields Corner Branch Library Study
Location: 1520 Dorchester Avenue, Dorchester, MA
02122; Project No. 7145
For information specific to this particular RFQ, please
contact PFD’s Bid Counter at Bid.Info@boston.gov
Pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 7C, §§
44-57, the City of Boston’s Public Facilities Department
(PFD) is requesting qualification statements for services including master planning, studying, programming and cost
estimating for the Fields Corner Branch Library Study
project with an estimated study cost of $100,000.
The scope of services for the Fields Corner Branch Library Study includes, but is not limited to: Designer will
prepare a study that provides a comprehensive review
of the existing Fields Corner Branch Library facility for
improved library services and potential mixed use development. Services include an existing conditions analysis
of the building, site, services and all systems. Meetings
with Boston Public Library representatives to determine
operational and service objectives to develop programmatic requirements, utilizing study team’s library services
consultant. Study will include Real Estate market evaluation of mixed use development. Scope includes fit tests
and building options, identify all building systems, including
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification check list, code review, site improvements,
furniture and equipment, detailed cost estimates and feasibility review of mixed use development. The City reserves
the right to continue design services into the design,
construction documents and construction administration
phases, if funding becomes available.
Project fees will follow the schedule as stated in the application form. Completion shall be 52 weeks after execution
of a contract. Applicants must be a registered Architect
in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts with master planning experience.
A program for this project will not be prepared beyond the
scope of services stated above.
The project will be performed under applicable M.G.L.
c.149 §§ 44A-44J.
Applicants, at a minimum, must have prior experience on
projects in the following settings: Urban, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and Public Library
Design.
Additional information and instructions on how to submit a bid are available at
The Designer Application may be obtained from the Public
Facilities Department Bid Counter, 26 Court Street, 10th
Floor, Boston, MA 02108 on May 7, 2018 and will be emailed if necessary. If interested, please call (617) 6354809 or send an email to Bid.Info@boston.gov and refer to
this advertisement. Statements of Qualifications must be
returned by May 31, 2018 no later than 2:00 P.M. LATE
QUALIFICATION STATEMENTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
http://bc.mbta.com/business_center/bidding_solicitations/current_
solicitations/
On behalf of the MBTA, thank you for your time and interest in responding to
this Notice to Bidders
Applicants, at a minimum, must have prior experience on
the following types of projects: Mixed use facilities.
May 7, 2018
Patricia M. Lyons
Director
CASE NO. 18-11
in April 2014. And among the
ACLU’s recommendations was
that police retain data for only
30 days, which the department
made part of its new policy.
Evans finalized the new policy in October 2016, according
to the documents. A Police Department spokesman said the
license plate reader program
was launched again in September 2017.
The new policy prohibits using license plate readers to harass or target people based on
race, sexual orientation, or any
other legally protected characteristic, or to infringe on First
Amendment rights, according
to the documents.
“We really limit it, and it’s
just not an overly broad capture
of data,” Evans said in a telephone interview with the Globe
last week.
The head of a technology
program at the ACLU of Massachusetts said the organization
was glad to see the data retention period shortened, but
would like to see several of its
other proposals incorporated
into the new policy, including a
ban on sharing data with other
law enforcement for noncriminal investigations and an independent audit process. The organization also expected police
to consult more with the community, said Kade Crockford,
News
CONTACTS, TIPS, COMMENTS
Switchboard: (617) 929-2000
(617) 929-7400
newstip@globe.com
comments@globe.com
SPOTLIGHT TEAM TIP LINE
(617) 929-7483
Customer service
PRINT AND DIGITAL
(888) 694-5623
customerservice@globe.com
director of the Technology for
Liberty Program for the local
ACLU.
“We were under the impression that before BPD restarted
its license plate readers, there
would be some kind of public
announcement or communication to the City Council and the
press,” said Crockford in an email last week.
A spokeswoman for Mayor
Martin J. Walsh said the Police
Department did not consult his
office before relaunching the
scanners last fall, but it was not
required to.
City Councilor Andrea
Campbell, who has advocated
for the council to play a more
significant role in overseeing
police surveillance technology,
was also unaware of the new
use of the scanners.
“We are not always looped
into Administration decisions,
especially where we have no direct oversight,” said Campbell
in an e-mail.
Germany’s best young players,
Matthias Bluebaum. It’s a miniature, where Rapport played
an ancient and long-thought
toothless Exchange Variation
of the French. Perhaps Bluebaum takes this too lightly and
thus fails to appreciate the
danger, but in any case, he loses to a very energetic attack by
Rapport.
2017–18 Bundesliga,
Berlin
Richard Rapport (2686) —
Matthias Bluebaum (2643)
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5!?
The Exchange French. Bent
Larsen made a very successful
career of resuscitating old and
Advertising
DISPLAY
(617) 929-2200
bostonglobemedia.com
CLASSIFIED
(617) 929-1500
boston.com/classifieds
City
Retail Other
7-day home delivery
$20.00 20.00 20.00
Sunday-only
home delivery
$8.00 8.00
8.00
Daily single copy
$2.00 2.00
2.50
Sunday single copy
$4.50 4.50
5.00
Lottery
SUNDAY MIDDAY
0870
Payoffs (based on a $1 bet)
All 4 digits
First or last 3
Any 2 digits
Any 1 digit
$6,091
$853
$73
$7
ANY ORDER
All 4 digits
First 3
Last 3
$508
$142
$142
7734
All 4 digits
First or last 3
Any 2 digits
Any 1 digit
All 4 digits
First 3
Last 3
May 6
$6,642
$930
$80
$8
MASS CASH
May 5
MEGABUCKS
13-25-26-34-41-44
Jackpot: $2,465,913; 0 winners
EXACT ORDER
ANY ORDER
Visit Boston.com/cars
powered by Cargurus.com
License plate readers can
scan thousands of passing
vehicles per minute.
By Chris Chase
Today’s game comes from
the concluding weekend of the
2018 German Schach Bundesliga. In a giant three-day festival, 16 professional chess
teams met in Berlin. This year,
as in most other years, the contest was really just between the
all-star-laden Baden-Baden
and the ups tar t und erdo g
Solingen teams. Baden-Baden
was led by Leon Aronian and
MVL, while Solingen rolled out
Pentala Harikrishna and Richard Rapport. On paper it’s a
true mismatch, but Solingen
showed true grit, winning their
last three matches to tie
Baden-Baden (which also won
its matches) on match points.
There will be a playoff later in
May at a location of BadenBaden’s choosing, as they had
more game points. It’s now a
question of which team can get
its best players to Germany for
this off-schedule match.
Today’s game comes from
Solingen’s last-round match
against Schachfreunde Deizisau and features Rapport, a
column favorite, against one of
EXACT ORDER
powered by
GLOBE STAFF 2013 FILES
Boston police are now using
three license plate readers in areas with high crime rates or
that might be potential terrorist
targets, such as Copley Square
and the Financial District. The
commissioner said he has no
plans to use additional plate
readers.
The technolog y is being
challenged around the country.
Last month, the top court in
Virginia allowed a lawsuit to
proceed challenging police storage of license plate reader data.
The Supreme Court of Kentucky ruled in February that the
scanners do not violate motorists’ privacy rights. And a handful of other states have passed
legislation regarding license
plate readers.
Evans declined to provide local examples of cases in which
the license plate readers have
proved useful, saying that many
such investigations might still
be ongoing given the short period during which the readers
have been operational.
But, he said, the department
is open to providing reports
about how the readers have
proved useful in solving criminal investigations, another of
the ACLU’s recommendations.
“I’ll gladly give reports,” Evans said. “We have nothing to
hide.”
Contact Shawn Musgrave at
shawnmusgrave@gmail.com.
Chess notes
Payoffs (based on a $1 bet)
ON APPLICATION FOR A
SPECIAL PERMIT
Planning Board
uREADERS
SUNDAY NIGHT
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING BY THE
PLANNING BOARD
Notice is hereby given that
the Belmont Planning Board
will hold a public hearing
on TUESDAY, MAY 15, 2018,
at 7:00 PM in the Board of
Selectmen’s Meeting Room,
Town Hall, 455 Concord
Ave., to consider the application of MICHELLE OISHI
for A SPECIAL PERMIT under
Section 1.5.4 of the Zoning
By-Laws to ALTER A NONCONFORMING STRUCTURE
(rear setback: 16.0’ allowed;
14.2’ existing and proposed)
IN ORDER TO CONSTRUCT A
TWO-STORY ADDITION at
the side of the home at 7
CHERRY STREET located in
a General Residence Zoning
District.
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
Continued from Page B1
Applicants must provide the names of key personnel and
consultants that will be utilized on this project for the following disciplines: civil, structural, plumbing and electrical
engineer; code consultant; geotechnical engineer; HVAC;
landscape architect; geoenviornmental consultant; fire
protection; cost estimator and library services consultant.
Bidders will affirmatively ensure that in regard to any contract entered into
pursuant to this solicitation, minority and female construction contractors
will be afforded full opportunity to submit Bids and will not be discriminated
against on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, age, or national origin in
consideration for an award.
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
Luis Manuel Ramirez
General Manager of the MBTA
May 7, 2018
G l o b e
notices Police resume use of devices
& more that scan, record license plates
boston.com/classifieds
LEGAL NOTICES
B o s t o n
$553
$310
$155
03-12-26-28-34
Jackpot: $100,000; two winners
PREVIOUS DRAWINGS
Saturday
Friday
Thursday
Wednesday
Tuesday
Midday
8-3-0-3
2-8-3-1
8-6-6-7
1-7-0-7
0-2-5-8
Night
8-4-5-7
9-1-4-7
4-8-6-3
9-5-5-9
6-8-3-3
WEEKEND NUMBERS
AROUND NEW ENGLAND
Sun. Maine, N.H., Vermont
Day: 3-digit 235
4-digit 4344
Eve: 3-digit 154
4-digit 5917
Rhode Island
Sunday
1287
Saturday's Powerball
14-29-36-57-61
Powerball 17
Jackpot: $214.6 million; o winners
forgotten lines. Here Bluebaum is caught unawares and
does not fully appreciate the
dangers 3...exd5 4.Nf3 Nc6
5.Nc3 Bb4 6.Bd3 Nge7 7.0–0
Bg4 8.h3 Bh5 9.a3 Bd6 10.Re1
Bxf3 Or 10...0–0 11.Bxh7+
Kxh7 (11...Kh8 12.g4 Kxh7
13.gxh5 Qd7 14.Nb5 Nf5
15.Ng5+ Kg8 16.Qg4) 12.Ng5+
Kg6 13.g4 Qc8 14.gxh5+ Kh6
15.Nb5 Qf5 16.Qg4 g6 17.Nxd6
cxd6 18.Ne6+ Kh7 19.Nxf8+
Rxf8 11.Qxf3 Nxd4?! Black has
no time for this. He is already
in a great deal of trouble due to
White’s lead in development,
two bishops, and Black’s lack of
proper king protection (there
should be a knight on f6) If
11...0–0 12.Be3 Kh8 13.Kf1 f5
14.Nxd5 Nxd5 15.Qxd5 Qh4
16.c3 f4 17.Bd2 f3 18.Kg1 Bg3
19.Be3 Rae8 20.Rf1 Bd6
21.Rae1 Nd8 22.Qg5 Qxg5
23.Bxg5 Ne6 24.Bd2 Nf4
25.Bxf4 fxg2 26.Kxg2 Bxf4
12.Qxd5! c6 If 12...0–0 then
13.Qxb7 just leaves White up a
clear pawn but may be the best
choice here 13.Qh5 Qd7 The
natural 13...g6 walks into
14.Ne4! gxh5 15.Nf6+ Kf8
16.Bh6#; 13...h6 14.Be3 Yet
another developing tempo
14...Ne6 15.Rad1 0–0 16.Bxh6
gxh6 17.Qxh6 Ng5 18.h4 Bc5
19.hxg5 Bxf2+ 20.Kxf2 Qd4+
21.Kf3 winning 14.Ne4 Ne6
14...0–0–0 15.Nxd6+ Qxd6
16.Qxf7 Rhe8 17.Bg5 Qd5
18.Rxe7 Nf3+ 19.Qxf3 Qxg5
20.Qf5+ Qxf5 21.Bxf5+ Kb8
22.Rxg7; 14...Bc7 15.Be3 Ne6
16.Nc5 g6 17.Nxd7 gxh5
18.Nf6+ Kd8 (18...Kf8
19.Bh6+ Ng7 20.Nxh5)
19.Rad1 Kc8 20.Nxh5 With a
winning position Not 15…0-0
16.Nf6+ gxf6 17.Qxh7#
15.Bh6!! Such moves are
things of beauty! 15...Qc7?!
15...0–0 16.Nxd6 Qxd6
17.Bxh7+ Kh8 18.Rxe6 Qxe6
19.Bg5 Ng8 20.Bf5+ Qh6
21.Bxh6 wins; 15...Kf8! Is required to keep playing 16.Nf6
Qc7 17.Bc4 Nd5 18.Nxd5 cxd5
19.Bxd5 gxh6 20.Bxe6 fxe6
21.Rxe6 Bh2+ 22.K h1 Bf4
2 3. Qf 5 + Kg8 2 4. R a e1 B g 5
25.f4 Qxf4 26.Re8+ Rxe8
27.Rxe8+ Kg7 28.Re7+ Bxe7
29.Qxf4 Rf8 30.Qg3+ Kh8 with
a technically winning position
for White 16.Bc4 The computer prefers 16.Ng5 Nxg5 (16...g6
17.Qh4 a5 18.Nxe6 fxe6
19.Rxe6) 17.Bxg7 Rg8 18.Qxg5
0–0–0 19.Bxh7 Rge8 20.g3
A n d W h i t e i s u p tw o c l e a r
pawns 16...Bh2+?! 16…0-0
holds for a while. 17.Kh1 Qe5
Desperation. 18.Ng5! Black resigned as he is losing lots of
material after 18...g6 (18...Qf6
19.Rxe6 Qf5 20.Bxg7 Rg8
21.Rf6) 19.Rxe5 gxh5 20.Kxh2;
1–0
Chris Chase can be reached at
BostonGlobeChessNotes
@gmail.com.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
Court papers cite plan for plane attack on mobster’s home
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
A gangster allegedly plotted
in the early 1990s to fly a remote-controlled plane packed
with explosives into the Sharon home of former New England mob boss Francis P. “Cadillac Frank” Salemme in an effort to kill the capo and his
wife, court records show.
Details of the audacious
plot were contained in court
papers filed Thursday in US
District Court in Boston, where
Salemme, 84, will stand trial
next week with codefendant
Paul Weadick on charges of
murdering Steven DiSarro in
1993 to keep him from cooperating with the FBI.
In a legal filing, Weadick’s
lawyers included a 2016 FBI
report quoting an unnamed
source who provided details of
the plane plot allegedly cooked
up by Kevin Hanrahan, a mob
enforcer killed in Providence
in 1992.
Before Hanrahan got killed,
the source said, he’d been try-
ing to purchase plastic explosives from a Boston man
named Smitty.
“Supposedly, Hanrahan was
planning on attaching some
plastic explosives to a remote
control plane where he was going to fly it into Frank Salemme’s bedroom in an attempt to kill Salemme and his
wife,” the report said. “Around
this same time, Salemme purportedly observed Hanrahan
outside the rear of his residence hiding behind a dumpster possibly dressed as a
‘woman.’ ”
But Smitty dropped a dime
on Hanrahan, according to the
source.
“A short time later, Smitty
described the [plane] plot to
Salemme and provided him
with additional information
about Hanrahan purchasing
explosives to fit inside a briefcase to blow up a restaurant/
bar,” the report said.
Sensing something amiss,
Salemme contacted Rhode Island mobster L ouis “Baby
Shacks” Manocchio to see if
Hanrahan had been frequenting Baby Shacks’ restaurant,
Euro Bistro on Federal Hill, according to the report.
Manocchio confirmed Hanrahan had been there, with a
briefcase no less.
“Supposedly, Salemme felt
that Hanrahan was conducting
a ‘dry run’ with the briefcase
before placing a ‘bomb’ in the
club and informed Manocchio
of this information and of the
information received from
Smitty,” the report said.
The source also claimed to
have heard that Manocchio later enlisted some muscle to kill
Hanrahan.
“The individual also heard
Salemme and Manocchio had
received information that Raymond Patriarca Jr., who was
incarcerated at the time, had
sent his son to pay Hanrahan
$100,000.00 to kill Manocchio
and Salemme,” the report said.
Patriarca, 73, is the son of
legendary mob boss Raymond
L.S. Patriarca, who, until his
death in 1984, controlled a
Mafia empire that stretched
from Rhode Island to Maine,
specializing in loan sharking,
illegal gambling, and profiting
on stolen goods.
The source in the report referenced by Weadick’s lawyers
also dropped the name of Boston’s most notorious gangster,
James “Whitey” Bulger, who is
serving a life sentence for 11
slayings.
“This individual heard that
Steven DiSarro was killed because the [mob] thought DiSarro was working on an investigation with [federal prosecutor] Fred Wyshak targeting
Frank Salemme, Sr.,” the report
s a i d . “ S u p p o s e d l y, Ja m e s
‘Whitey’ Bulger and Stephen
Flemmi provided this information to Salemme.”
The filing from Weadick’s
lawyers was abruptly sealed
Friday at their request.
In the document, the defense attorneys sought any remaining materials indicating
DiSarro was killed in the base-
FBI REPORT CITED
The home
of ex­mob
boss
Frank
Salemme was the
target of the
alleged attack.
ment of the Salemme home in
Sharon, not the kitchen as
Flemmi claims.
Court records indicate that
Flemmi claims he witnessed
Salemme’s now-deceased son,
Frank, strangling DiSarro in
the kitchen while Weadick
held DiSarro’s legs off the
ground and Frank Sr. watched.
But in Thursday’s filing,
Weadick’s lawyers asked a
judge to order the feds to turn
over “any and all reports which
contain any content that the
decedent in this action was
killed in the basement.”
Weadick’s attorneys cited a
2007 FBI report quoting an
unnamed source who said he
was told by Frank Jr. that the
hit went down in the basement.
“Source reported that . . .
Steve DiSarro was killed
(strangled) by Frank Salemme,
Jack Salemme, and Frank Salemme JR.,” the 2007 FBI report said. “The murder took
place in the basement of the
residence and MRS. Salemme
was in the house upstairs but
unaware of what took place.
Frank Salemme, JR. did the actual strangulation and according to Salemme it was done because DiSarro was observed
meeting with Federal law enforcement and had been bragging about being connected
with the mob.”
T he remains of DiSarro
were dug up in Providence in
2016.
Shelley Murphy and Milton J.
Valencia of the Globe Staff
contributed to this report.
Women
promote
childbirth
safety
By Jerome Campbell
GLOBE STAFF
Mothers, midwives, and other women gathered Sunday afternoon in Copley Square to
raise awareness of the number
of women dying in childbirth,
especially women of color.
About 17 women per
100,000 live births die from
pregnancy-related causes in the
United States, according to the
Centers for Disease Control.
That rate exceeds the average
collective rate of other industrialized countries, which report
about 12 per 100,000, according to the World Health Organization. Black women are four
times more likely to die from
pregnancy than white women,
according to another CDC report.
“We’re creating all these new
technologies that are supposed
to be helping women have better results, but we still have the
highest death rate of women
during pregnancy,” said Ananda Lowe, a doula, which is similar to a birthing coach.
Some states, including Massachusetts, have review committees that track deaths and
collect data to prevent mortality. Attendees at Sunday’s rally
said they hoped an upcoming
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Rebecca Zanconato of Sutton held her 7-week-old daughter Leah as she listened to a speaker in Copley Square in Boston on Sunday.
bill in the US Senate Health
Committee would help other
states create similar panels.
“Any bill which would help
women have a healthier and
safer experience during their
pregnancy, I am completely
for,” said Lucia Dos Santos,
while cradling her 7-month-old
son, Nile.
Dos Santos, who organized
the event, said she worked out a
plan for the birth of Nile that
included bringing a midwife
with her to the hospital and ultimately helped her through the
process.
Many women at the event
discussed how the experience
of giving birth can seem overwhelming and leave women
feeling out of control.
“There’s a lot of processes
which can complicate the birth-
ing process and put the mother
and baby in harm’s way,” said
Joy Kimball, a doula and midwife. “We have a culture where
we defer to doctors to do what’s
best and sometimes that
doesn’t create space for the
mother to choose what she
wants.”
The organizers want to enc o u ra ge w o m e n t o ge t t h e
knowledge they need so they
can make healthy decisions.
Contact Jerome Campbell at
jerome.campbell@globe.com.
Photographer’s image captured the Celtics­76ers rivalry
uPHOTOGRAPH
Continued from Page B1
where he was the last person remaining who consistently
shouted across the newsroom
— even when he was in a good
mood, which was almost always. As an assigning editor, he
answered the phone like this,
Hyde PAHK accent, voice a
burst of gravel: “Pick-cha desk!
Gahtland. Whaddaya know?”
But he also speaks sometimes in quiet koans that are either lyrics or should be, with an
arch sense of humor, recording
music under the name Nick
Danger. He is one part Lou
Grant, one part Keith Richards,
and one part The Dude from
“The Big Lebowski” — shoulder-length white hair and cutoff jeans, barefoot and playing
guitar on his porch.
And he has complicated feelings about what he calls “not
necessarily my favorite, but my
most notorious photograph,”
taken late in the third quarter
of a Celtics-Sixers game on Nov.
9, 1984: a single frame, 1/500th
of a second, nine frames into a
roll of 36, one of 50,000 or so
rolls shot over a lifetime.
Gartland only occasionally
shot sports, though two years
prior he’d captured a breathtaking picture of Jim Rice helping
to save the life of a little boy
struck by a ball at Fenway, the
bloodied child limp across the
outfielder’s arms. As a Herald
American staff photographer,
he shared a Pulitzer Prize for
feature photography, for the
Blizzard of ’78.
Though he spent most of his
career in newsrooms, he shot
the Bird-Erving brawl game as
an Associated Press stringer,
which is why he retained the
rights; as a staffer, pictures “belonged to the house.” But he
was reluctant to cash in on it,
having quit the Herald on principle in the early days of Rupert
Murdoch, after the newsroom
got enlisted for a sweepstakes
promotion.
Which is not to say Gartland
isn’t proud of the Bird-Erving
shot. “I kicked everybody’s ass
that night,” Gartland said. He
shot the game as an AP freelancer among a half-dozen
newspaper and wire colleagues.
Nor does he mince words
about what others have done
with his picture, calling it stealing. “Bob Dylan’s got a line,” he
said, “if something’s not right,
it’s wrong.”
That Friday night at the Garden, Gartland was already off
the clock, having filed the requisite two shots for the AP wire
at the start of the quarter, to
make the wire-service deadline.
Just before halftime, he had
scrambled up to a cramped
darkroom near the rafters to
develop his first-half shots,
make some quick prints, and
send them to New York via
drum scanner and phone line, a
process that took eight minutes
a picture.
Then he went back to the
court anyway, appreciating that
he had a seat under the basket
for Celtics-Sixers, and anything
might happen. Bird couldn’t
miss — 42 points already — but
the older Erving was scuffling,
a mere six points for the Doctor.
After a tangle away from the
ball led to a whistle on Bird at
the near end, Gartland could
four frames with one push — at
just the right time. In real life,
the choke hold was not a long
stalemate but a brief, fluid moment, before the two men started flailing, Erving began
punching, and their own fight
got absorbed in a sprawling
brawl. Many at the Garden
missed the choke in real time;
so did Gartland, because the
snapping shutter blacked out
they had that new Bird-Erving
shot. He called Gartland, offering a commission.
Gartland, who cleared it
with his AP chief in Boston, and
later filed formal paperwork to
buttress his copyright, briefly
made a nice stipend from the
photo. The New York Times
even highlighted it, recognizing
Gartland and the popularity of
the picture. But that spring he
‘Bob Dylan’s got a line, if
something’s not right, it’s wrong.’
TED GARTLAND
Photographer who shot the famous Julius Erving-Larry
Bird choke hold picture, on all the unlicensed uses of the
image
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
sense a charged moment. He
had two Nikons, fixed with long
and short lenses, switching between them whenever the ball
crossed half-court. This time he
ignored the ball, watching Bird
through his long telephoto lens,
focusing manually, knowing he
was jawing with Erving, who
was just outside the frame.
Just as Erving came into
view, they squared to fight. Had
they stopped an instant sooner,
one or both would have been
lost to the edge of the frame.
Gartland pressed the button
on his motor drive — grabbing
the viewfinder.
But his heart was racing: “I
knew I had something,” he said.
The image ran immediately
in papers all over the country —
and again days later, after the
NBA handed out steep fines.
Gartland’s name was absent, in
the days when AP photos ran
with just the agency’s tag.
At Quincy Market, former
colleague Dennis Brearley —
who had shared in the blizzard
Pulitzer — ran a gallery specializing in newspaper photos.
Now the phone was ringing
over and over, people asking if
went back to work in a newsroom, and told Brearley he was
uncomfortable selling copies of
the print at the same time.
For news and documentary
purposes, he would license the
photo for a few hundred dollars, as he did for its appearance in an HBO documentary
about Bird and Magic Johnson.
And every year or so, before the
Internet, Gartland would hear
from a friend about a gallery
somewhere or an airline catalog
selling his uncredited image; he
would reach out to them
through a lawyer, seeking a
cease-and-desist or modest licensing fees and credit.
Just as galling as the piracy,
many of the versions in the wild
were terrible — copies of copies,
printed off-center.
Occasionally, enterprising
Bird or Erving fans would call
around to Boston newsrooms
until they found out who had
taken the photo, and he made
and mailed occasional prints
for their walls, usually around
$50 a pop. “Now this is in color,
right?” one woman asked, disappointed to learn she had seen
a colorized bootleg.
Retired now, Gartland has
warmed to the idea of marketing the photo, especially after emails from friends tipped him
off to new uses this postseason.
At his home in Belmont,
where the choke hold is not displayed, his mouth opened as he
scrolled the Internet for the
first time through so many
search returns showing his repurposed photo, available on
$12 tank tops and limited-release raglans ($35), shirts with
captions (“Basketbrawl,” “Don’t
mess with Larry Bird”), and
shirts in pastel colors.
“Geez, Che Guevara and
me,” he said, thinking of the
Marxist guerrilla who appears
on so many T-shirts.
Eric Moskowitz can be reached
at eric.moskowitz@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeMoskowitz.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BY CITY AND TOWN
ABINGTON
WARHAFTIG, Andrew B.
BEVERLY
ZIGELBAUM, Joel G.
NORWOOD
DiRINO, Nicolo
SAUGUS
BOSTON
SISTER MARY ELLEN McANDREWS,
SNDdeN
WARHAFTIG, Andrew B.
MORRIS, Mary C. (Bramante)
BROOKLINE
BLOOM, Shirley (Borenstein)
FOGG, George Parsons, III
MacEACHERN, Dan M.
SWAMPSCOTT
CHESTNUT HILL
FOGG, George Parsons, III
DiRINO, Nicolo
DUXBURY
FOGG, George Parsons, III
SUDBURY
LUCENTE, Martin J.
ZIGELBAUM, Joel G.
WALPOLE
WALTHAM
KAPLAN, Wendy Roberta
GROTON
PIZZA, Patricia H. (Austin)
LUCENTE, Martin J.
HINGHAM
WARHAFTIG, Andrew B.
WELLESLEY
IPSWICH
SISTER MARY ELLEN McANDREWS,
SNDdeN
WEYMOUTH
LEXINGTON
KAPLAN, Wendy Roberta
LOWELL
SISTER MARY ELLEN McANDREWS,
SNDdeN
LYNN
ZIGELBAUM, Joel G.
MALDEN
ZIGELBAUM, Joel G.
NEWTON
KEARNS, Robert F.
LUCENTE, Martin J.
NEWTON HIGHLANDS
KEARNS, Robert F.
NORTON
KUMINS, Judy (Dickerman)
BLOOM, Shirley
(Borenstein)
Of Brookline, MA, former Head Of the
Art Department in Winthrop, MA, on
May 5, 2018. Devoted mother of Shelah
Bloom and Jonathan Bloom. Proud
grandmother of Hasan & Rehan Bhatti,
and Jacob Bloom. Loving sister of the
late Milton Borenstein. Loving Aunt to
Roberta and Jefferey Borenstein. Services at the Wilson Chapel, 234 Herrick
Rd., Newton, MA on Tuesday, May 8,
2018 at 1:30 pm. Following interment
at Montefiore Cemetery, (Woburn,
MA), memorial observance will be at
the home of Shelah Bloom until 9 pm,
continuing Wednesday & Thursday
7-9 pm. In lieu of flowers, donations in
Shirley’s memory may be made to The
United States Holocaust Museum or the
Hampshire College Farm Center.
DiRINO, Nicolo
Greatly Loved
Of Walpole, formerly of Norwood,
passed away on May 6, 2018 at the age
of 96. Beloved husband of Rachelle
(DelZoppo) DiRino. Devoted father
of Sal J. DiRino and his wife Rosa of
Walpole. Cherished grandfather of Kristina McMullen and her husband Sean,
Nicole DiRino, and Gabriella DiRino.
Great grandfather of Parker Joseph
McMullen. Brother of Gildo DiRino and
Carolina DiBattisto and brother of the
late Alfonzo. Son of the late Sal and Maria (Alfedeo) DiRino. Nicolo was born
in Poggiofiorito, Italy and attended
schools there growing up. He went on
to serve in the Italian Army during
WWII as a policeman. He also worked
his own Vineyard in Italy on his land
prior to moving to the United States in
the mid-50’s. Nicolo was a long-time
member of the Norwood Italian Social
Club, he enjoyed spending his time
with friends and family, gardening, and
watching Italian Football. Funeral from
the Kraw-Kornack Funeral Home, 1248
Washington St., NORWOOD, Wednesday May 9, 2018 at 8am followed by a
funeral mass at 9am in St. Catherine of
Siena Church, Norwood. Visiting hours
will be held on Tuesday, May 8, 2018
from 4-8pm. Burial will be at Knollwood Memorial Park, Canton, MA.
PIZZA, Patricia H. (Austin)
KEARNS, Robert F.
NATALE, Carmela J. “Milly”
Of Norton, MA, on May 6, 2018.
Beloved wife of Herbert “Skip” Kumins.
Devoted mother of Ellen Stafford, and
Mari & Jeff Lazar. Proud grandmother
of Ethan and Aaron Stafford, Zoe Lazar,
and Alexandra “AJ” Lazar. Loving sister
of Stephen Dickerman, and George
& Sherry Dickerman, and loving in
laws Carole and Richard Nelles. Dear
aunt of Mitchell & Nina Dickerman,
Douglas & Deidrie Dickerman, Lisa &
Peter Lauterbach, Robin & Rick Kiduff,
and Steven Nelles. Services at Temple
Beth Abraham, 1301 Washington St.,
Canton, MA on Tuesday, May 8, 2018
at 11 am. Following services memorial observance will be at the Kumin’s
residence, until 4 pm, Wednesday 2-5 &
7-9 pm, and Thursday 2-4 pm. In lieu
of flowers, donations in Judy’s memory
may be made to Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave.,
Boston, MA 02215.
Of South Weymouth, died May 3, 2018.
She was 92. Milly loved to travel and
with the Foreign Service; she visited
many fascinating locations, such as
Indonesia, Singapore, Cambodia and
Japan. She went on to have a career
with the IRS for many years, and
retired in 1985. In her early years,
she was a member of the Chatterbox
Club. Milly loved to sew, care for loved
ones, and surround herself with family.
Milly’s family will miss her annual
Easter egg hunt and frequent heartfelt
thank you cards.
Beloved daughter of the late Leo and
Jennie Natale. Adored sister of Florence
Frost and her late husband Jack of East
Bridgewater, Richard Natale of South
Weymouth, the late Vincent Natale and
his wife Helen, the late Lillian Evans,
the late Nicholas Natale and the late
Leo Natale, Jr. and his widow Jean of
Rockland. Also blessed with 3 generations of nieces and nephews, including
the late Michael Natale.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the visitation
on Wednesday, 8:30-930 AM in the
McDonald Keohane Funeral Home,
SOUTH WEYMOUTH, at 809 Main
Street (Rte. 18 opp. So. Shore Hospital).
Funeral Mass will follow in St. Francis
Xavier Church, Weymouth at 10 AM.
Burial in St. Michael’s Cemetery,
Boston. In lieu of flowers, donations, in
memory of Milly, may be made to St.
Francis House, P.O. Box 120499, Boston, MA 02112. See www.Keohane.com
for directions and online condolences
or call 781-335-0045.
NATALE, Carmela J.
WILMINGTON
MORRIS, Mary C. (Bramante)
OUT OF STATE
LUCENTE, Martin J.
ARIZONA
Greatly Loved
MORRIS, Mary C. (Bramante)
FLORIDA
PIZZA, Patricia H. (Austin)
OUT OF COUNTRY
ITALY
DiRINO, Nicolo
KAPLAN, Wendy Roberta
Age 48, of Nashua, NH, passed away
peacefully on Saturday, May 5, 2018,
surrounded by loved ones.
Born on July 15, 1969, in Lexington, MA. Wendy was the daughter of
Leonard and Judith (Smith) Kaplan of
Waltham, MA, and the spouse of Kristine (Blish) Wyatt of Nashua, NH.
Wendy graduated from Union College with a Bachelor of Science and
went on to earn her Master of Health
Administration from Virginia Commonwealth University. She was most
recently employed at Southern New
Hampshire University.
Wendy enjoyed hiking, playing tennis, reading and listening to Billy Joel,
but above all else, Wendy loved spending time with her family and friends
enjoying all that life had to offer.
Besides her parents and loving
spouse Kristine, survivors include one
stepson, Cody Wyatt of Nashua, NH;
two stepdaughters, Danielle Wyatt
of Nashville, TN, and Emily Wyatt of
Nashua, NH; one sister, Marcia Kaplan
and her husband Todd Fishman and
their children Sydney and Bella Fishman, all of Charlotte, NC; one brother,
Mark Kaplan and his wife Helaine, and
their children, Alexa Tanzer and Matthew Kaplan, all of Chelmsford, MA.
Services: There are no visiting hours.
A graveside service will be held Monday
at 1:00 pm at Edgewood Cemetery, 107
Amherst St., Nashua, NH 03064. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited
to attend. Memorial Donations: Community Hospice House, c/o 7 Executive
Park Dr., Merrimack, NH 03054 (www.
hhhc.org) The Davis Funeral Home,
1 Lock St., NASHUA, NH 03064 is in
charge of arrangements. An online
guest-book is available at www.davisfuneralhomenh.com. (603) 883-3401
“One Memory Lights Another”.
Davis Funeral Home
1 Lock St.
Nashua, NH 03064
(603) 883-3401
KEARNS, Robert F.
kraw-kornackfuneralhome.com
Family Owned and Operated
(781) 762-0482
FOGG, George Parsons, III
Was born August 15, 1929
and died April 28, 2018.
He was the son of the late
George P. Fogg Jr. and Frances K. Fogg.
He attended the Dexter Southfield
School, the Noble and Greenough
School and Harvard University. After
college, he served in the United States
Air Force during the Korean War
period. He then returned to work in
the automobile and financial business
fields. He was a skilled driver of his
beloved Alfa Romeo cars and enjoyed
boating, both motor and sail. He had
a good eye for the Fine Arts and a
strong taste for Italian furnishings
and sculpture, as well as an interest in
their restoration and conservation. He
was a member of The Country Club of
Brookline, the Duxbury Yacht Club and
the Vintage Sports Car Club of America.
Yet his greatest love was his family.
He leaves his wife of 56 years, Jane T.
N. Fogg, his brother, David C. Fogg of
Florida; his beloved daughters, Harriet F. Leonard and Jane F. Fogg MD
and sons in law, Charles Leonard and
Daniel Schleifer, four treasured grandchildren Bethany DeCollibus, Julia
Leonard, Maxwell Schleifer and Arthur
Schleifer and one great-grandaughter,
Emma DeCollibus.
Memorial Service to be held at the
Church of the Redeemer in Chestnut
Hill on June 2nd at 11:00 am. In lieu
of flowers, please send contributions
to Rogerson House 31 Beaufort Rd,
Boston, MA 02130.
KUMINS, Judy (Dickerman)
Of Newton, May 5th, 2018. Beloved
husband of Carol (Harrington) Lucente.
Devoted & loving father of Donna
Lucente of Newton, Gina Lucente
Cole and her husband Bob of Sudbury,
Victoria “Vicki” Bonadio and her
husband John of Newton. Cherished
grandfather of Christian, Gabriella,
Bridget and Alex. Dear brother of
Dominic A. Lucente and his wife Katie
of NH, Rosalie Suescun of Westwood,
Robert Lucente and his late wife Lois
of S. Natick, Teresa Medaglia and her
husband Emelio of NH and the late
Anthony Lucente and his wife Diane
(Campbell) Lucente of Framingham. In
addition he is survived by many nieces,
nephews, and numerous close friends.
Son of the late Anthony F. Lucente Sr.
and Mary T. (Rizza) Lucente. Relatives
& Friends are respectfully invited to
attend Funeral Services in celebration
of Martin’s Life from the Brasco & Sons
Memorial Funeral Home, 773 Moody
Street, WALTHAM on Wednesday
morning. Visiting Hours will be held in
the Funeral Home on Tuesday from 4-8
p.m. Parking attendants will be on duty.
For complete obituary, guest book & additional information please refer to;
www.BrascoFuneralHome.com
Waltham 781-893-6260
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
MacEACHERN, Dan M.
Of Brookline, passed
peacefully on May 4, 2018.
The husband of the late
Margaret A. “Peggy Ann” (Joyce).
Father of Denice MacEachern. Brother
of Alex MacEachern of Cape Breton,
Nova Scotia, Gerald B. MacEachern of
Brookline, the late Matilda MacEachern
and Mary Winter. Uncle of Alex
MacEachern, Jr. and Michelle
MacEachern. Funeral from the
Bell-O’Dea Funeral Home, 376
Washington St., BROOKLINE,
Wednesday, May 9th at 8:10, followed
by a funeral mass at Saint Mary’s of the
Assumption Church at 9 AM. Visiting
hours will be held Tuesday, May 8th
from 4-7 PM. Interment Walnut Hills
Cemetery. Veteran of Korean Conflict.
Retired employee of the Brookline
Housing Authority.
SISTER MARY ELLEN
McANDREWS, SNDdeN
Of Hingham, passed away on Sunday,
May 6, 2018 at 17 years of age. Devoted son of Elise (Sheftel) & Jeremy
Warhaftig. Loving brother of Rachel &
Ethan. Cherished grandson of Toby &
Gene Halpern, Steven & Elaine Sheftel,
and Sol & Susan Warhaftig. Temple service at Congregation Sha’aray Shalom,
1112 Main St., Hingham, MA on Tuesday, May 8th at 11 AM. Interment to
follow at Sharon Memorial Park, Sharon, MA. In lieu of flowers, donations
in his name may be made to NephCure
Kidney International (NephCure.org)
or Boston Children’s Hospital Pediatric
Transplant Center (www.ChildrensHospital.org).
.
Schlossberg Memorial Chapel
“Family Owned”
781-828-6990
www.SchlossbergChapel.com
ZIGELBAUM, Joel G.
U.S. Army Korean
War Veteran
84, of Lynn, formerly of
Malden. Entered Eternal
Rest on May 5, 2018. Retired Quality Controller for the Director
of Manufacturing Strategic Systems
U.S.A.F. Devoted husband of Sandra
(Kaplan) Zigelbaum. Beloved father
of Todd & his wife Allison Zigelbaum
and Gary & his wife Bonnie Zigelbaum.
Cherished grandfather of Jessica &
her husband Spencer Mahoney, Ryan
Zigelbaum, Zachary Zigelbaum and Sophia Zigelbaum. Dear brother of Irma &
her husband Arthur Sternburg and Ira
& his wife Beverly Zigelbaum. Services
at the Goldman Funeral Chapel, 174
Ferry St., (off Route 60) MALDEN on
Tuesday, May 8 at 12:00 Noon. Interment in North Reading. Condolence
calls may be made at his late residence
following the interment until 8PM with
a Minyan at 6:30PM; also on Wednesday and Thursday 4-8PM with Minyans
at 7PM. In lieu of flowers, expressions
of sympathy may be made to Temple
Bnai Abraham Rabbi’s Discretionary
Fund, 200 East Lothrop St., Beverly,
MA 01915. For directions and online
condolences go to:
www.goldmanfc.com
Goldman Funeral Chapel, Malden.
1-800-982-3717
Every life is a story
worth sharing
The Boston Globe’s new
Featured Life offering lets you honor
your loved one with a professionally
written narrative about their life
and achievements.
Call 617-929-1500
or email
deathnotices@globe.com
Of Saugus, formerly of the West End,
age 88, May 6th. Loving wife of George
R. Morris. Beloved mother of John
Morris & his wife Tish of Saugus, Peter
Morris & his wife Nancy of Chandler,
AZ, George Morris & his wife Wendy of
Wilmington. Cherished grandmother of
8 grandchildren. Dear sister of the late
Domenic Bramante, Frank Bramanti
& Joseph Bramanti. Relatives & friends
are invited to attend visiting hours in
the Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home, 549
Lincoln Ave., SAUGUS on Tuesday from
4-8 p.m. Funeral from the funeral home
on Wednesday at 9 a.m. followed by
a funeral mass at Blessed Sacrament
Church, 14 Summer Street, Saugus at
10 a.m. Interment Lakeside Cemetery
in Wakefield. In lieu of flowers, donations, in Mary’s memory, may be made
to www.alz.org. For directions & condolences: www.BisbeePorcella.com.
Talk
of a
Lifetime
SM
You talk about many
Henry J. Burke & Sons
BurkeFamilyFuneralHomes.com
Patricia H. (Austin) Pizza of Venice,
Florida, formerly of Groton, MA, passed
away on February 19, 2018, after a long
illness. She was born on June 19, 1938
in Waltham, MA to John and Dorothy
Austin. Pat was a retired administrative
assistant to the Advanced Technology
Group of Penn Well Publishing Co. in
Littleton, MA, and a graduate of the
Master Teacher Program from the
Archdiocese of Boston.
She is survived by her devoted husband of 57 years, Michael; son Michael
of Deltona, FL; daughters Laura Spiropoulos of Tenafly, NJ, and Linda Curll
of Groton, MA; and 5 grandchildren.
Pat is also survived by two sisters, Ellen
Sullivan of Colorado and Grace Johnson
of North Port, FL.
A memorial service and celebration
of life will be held Friday, May 11 at 11
am at the Acton Funeral Home, 470
Massachusetts Ave. (Rte 111) ACTON.
Interment of the urn will follow in St.
Bridget’s Cemetery, Great Road (Rt 117)
Maynard. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to Friedreich’s Ataxia Research Alliance, 533
W. Uwchlan Ave., Downingtown, PA
19335, also online at curefa.org. Memorial page: actonfuneralhome.com.
MORRIS, Mary C.
(Bramante)
Have the
Robert F. Kearns, of Newton
Highlands, May 4, 2018.
Beloved husband of Mary
E. Kearns (Farrey). Dear brother of the
late David W. Kearns and Judith Allen.
Survived by many nieces, nephews and
grand nieces and nephews. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be held Wednesday, May 9th at 9 AM in St. John the
Evangelist Church, 9 Glen Rd., Wellesley followed by interment in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Needham. Visiting hours
will be Tuesday from 3-6 PM at the
Henry J. Burke & Sons Funeral Home,
56 Washington St., WELLESLEY. Mr.
Kearns was a proud veteran of the US
Army, having served during the Korean
War. In lieu of flowers, donations, in
his memory, may be made to Catholic
Charities, c/o Advancement Office, 275
West Broadway, Boston, MA 02127.
PIZZA, Patricia H. (Austin)
WARHAFTIG, Andrew B.
things with your loved ones:
from day-to-day details to
big events. Sharing stories
with those who matter most
isn’t just important today;
it will be especially significant
when it’s time to honor and
commemorate your lives.
Meaningful memorialization
starts when loved ones talk
about what matters most:
memories made, lessons
learned and how they hope
to be remembered.
Download a free brochure
and Have the Talk of a
Lifetime today. It can make
the difference of a lifetime.
talkofal ifetime.org
Announcements
(Sister Eleanor Frances) of
Ipswich, formerly of Lowell,
died on Sunday morning,
May 6, 2018. She was 97 years of age,
having lived 78 of them as a Sister of
Notre Dame de Namur. Mary Ellen was
the third of six children. Walter, Tom,
Kevin, Virginia and Ed all preceded
her in death. Walter and Kevin became
priests. She also leaves her devoted
nieces, Natalie and Grace.
Sister Mary Ellen’s parents, Delia
Wall and her father Michael McAndrews, lived in Lowell, where Michael
worked in the Woolen mills. After completing her high school education in
public school, Sr. Mary Ellen worked in
retail for several years. At the age of 19,
she answered the call of the good God
to become a Sister of Notre Dame.
She earned a BA at Emmanuel
College and an MA from the Newton
College of the Sacred Heart. Throughout the years of her active ministry, Sr.
Mary Ellen was engaged in classroom
education teaching in grades four
through eight. She would say she loved
teaching “Because of the children.”
Children were blessed by her dedication
in Dorchester, Lawrence, Somerville,
Needham, Brighton and East Boston.
Visiting Hours: Her life of goodness, humor, and generosity will be
celebrated on Tuesday, May 8, 2018 at
Mary Queen Chapel in Ipswich. Wake 1
PM, Wake Service at 2 PM, and at 3 PM
Liturgy of Christian Burial followed by
burial. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the Notre Dame Retirement
Fund at Sisters of Notre Dame, 30 Jeffreys Neck Road, Ipswich, MA 01938.
Please visit www.ccbfuneral.com for
online obituary or sign condolences.
Conway, Cahill-Brodeur
Funeral Home
82 Lynn St
Peabody, MA 01960
I.U.O.E LOCAL 4
We regret to announce the death
of Brother, Richard P. Gagnon,
a 20 year member from Salem,
NH, on April 24, 2018. Burial is
private. A Celebration of Life will
take place at Salvatore’s, 354 Merrimack St., Lawrence, MA on Saturday, May 19, from 1-4pm.
Ask your funeral director
for details.
TheBostonGlobe’s new
FeaturedLifeofferinglets
youhonoryourlovedone
withaprofessionally written
narrativeabouttheir life
andachievements.
William D. McLaughlin, Bus. Mgr
Michael J. Bowes, President
Christopher T. Fogarty, Rec. Sec.
Funeral Services
Funeral Services
Formoredetailsandpricing
information,contact
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
BostonGlobeClassifieds
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
SWEENEY BROTHERS
HOME FOR
FUNERALS, INC.
One Independence Ave., Quincy
617-472-6344
Serving Quincy & The South Shore
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
Honor your loved one with a
photo in The Boston Globe.
Every life
is a story
worth
sharing
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
at617-929-1500or
deathnotices@globe.com.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
Obituaries
Randi Cohen, 75; led Northeast Animal Shelter’s expansion
By Marvin Pave
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Two months after the Northeast Animal Shelter in Salem
moved into its more spacious
headquarters in 2008, Randi
Cohen said her dream — and
that of many others — had
come true.
“We have wanted this for so
long. We can do so much more
here than in our old spot,” Mrs.
Cohen, the organization’s executive director and leader in its
transition, told the Globe then,
adding that “we really wanted
to make it a fun place for people to come and see the animals.”
Her sister, Cindi Shapiro,
had founded the no-kill, nonprofit shelter in 1976. Now located near its original location
on Highland Avenue, the shelter has placed more than
130,000 cats and dogs since its
inception. Its 272 cages and
kennels can house up to 350
animals.
“Randi’s willingness and
courage to expand the shelter
was an inspiration to everyone,” said Mrs. Cohen’s brother,
Donald Shapiro, a shelter
board member. “She was a persuasive and impassioned advocate of helping homeless animals, and we could always
count on her to make sure all
the i’s were dotted and all the t’s
crossed.”
Mrs. Cohen, a former public
school teacher in Lynn, died of
complications from a heart
condition April 26 in Lasell
House in Newton. She had suffered a heart attack in early
April. Bypass surgery had been
recommended, but she was too
weak to schedule it right away.
Mrs. Cohen was 75 and lived in
Swampscott.
“It is with tears in our eyes
that we write this message to
all our friends. Our beloved
Randi is gone,” the shelter said
on its website.
Her son Gregory of West
Newton recalled that she “was
very generous, very patient,
and the greatest listener.”
Greg, who as a youngster assigned names to newborn puppies at the shelter, added that
“her craft was listening, and
she was always there to guide
you in the right direction, while
absorbing what you were saying with an amazing, positive
energy.”
Mrs. Cohen and her late
husband, Gerry Cohen, had
both been students at Swampscott High School, from which
she graduated in 1960. They
married in 1965 and subsequently started a travel agency,
Traveler’s Choice, and another
business, Uniforms R Us.
After her husband died in
1997, Mrs. Cohen began volunteering at the Northeast Animal Shelter and was its bookkeeper, easing into the day-today operations before
becoming executive director.
While driving along Highland Avenue in 2006, Mrs. Cohen noticed that the property
that had once been the site of
Kelly Honda was for sale.
After negotiations with the
city and a $3.26 million bond
deal secured with the assistance of the Massachusetts Development Finance Agency, the
shelter moved from the
cramped space it had leased in-
Mrs. Cohen was executive director of the Salem shelter,
which has placed more than 130,000 cats and dogs.
to a brand-new 13,000-squarefoot building.
“We had to find the perfect
space, and we did,” Mrs. Cohen
told the Globe in 2007.
With other shelter staffers
and volunteers, she had previously endured not having separate administrative offices and
having to store filing cabinets,
laundry facilities, and a water
cooler in a bathroom.
Donald Shapiro said that today, the expanded shelter includes 65 paid staff — 26 full
time and 39 part time. It also
has 220 active volunteers who
work at least one four-hour
shift per week, and 30 foster
care volunteers, who take pets
into their home until they are
ready to be adopted.
Celebrities including Nancy
Kerrigan and David Ortiz have
visited the shelter as part of ongoing fund-raising efforts. The
shelter’s programs include Savi n g Ho m e l e s s Pe t s A c r o s s
America, Mother Animal Spay,
Humane Education, Foster
Care, Stray Cat Rescue, and Senior Visitation.
It has also temporarily taken
in cats and dogs whose owners
could not take care of them in
the aftermath of devastating
storms such as Hurricanes
Isaac and Irma.
“I admired the fact that Randi loved what she was doing,
and to me she was like a sister
of the heart — always there for
you,” said her longtime friend
Sue Rubin. “She told me she
never wanted to retire. I called
her the Energizer Bunny.”
Mrs. Cohen wrote fund-raising appeals and also appeared
on television promos, but her
son said she was happiest when
giving tours and showing people what had been created at
the shelter.
The shelter’s website said
that Mrs. Cohen beamed with
joy on tours as she walked from
room to room and that “she especially enjoyed showing children around and explaining to
them how important it is to
treat animals with love and
compassion.”
B o r n i n Ne w t o n , R a n d i
Lynn Shapiro was a daughter of
Samuel N. Shapiro and the former Mae Rita Sternberg. The
family moved to Swampscott
when she was young.
“At that time it was like moving to the country,” her brother
recalled. “Our back yard on Puritan Road had woods all the
way to Humphrey Street. Soon
we had new friends and a puppy Belgian sheepdog who we
named Dusty.”
Mrs. Cohen focused on early-childhood education as she
graduated from Lasell College
and from Syracuse University.
In a video produced by Lasell,
she said that her years as a
teacher in underserved schools,
as an advocate for small children, and as the face of the
Northeast Animal Shelter had
taught her patience and how to
be “independent when I needed to be.”
She was among the third
generation of the Shapiro family that founded Maryland Cup
Corp. The business began when
four immigrant brothers from
Russia sold hand-made ice
cream cones in Chelsea, and it
evolved into a Fortune 500
company, producing Sweetheart paper and plastic containers and “Eat-it-All” ice
cream cones.
M r s . C o h e n ’s h u s b a n d
worked with the company before the couple founded the
travel agency in 1984.
“It was an early example of a
concierge-style travel agency.
They would design trips right
down to what restaurants to
visit and what roads to travel,”
Greg said. “My mom and dad
loved the mountains and
beaches, and especially the
south of France. We also have a
ski house in North Conway,
which is still our family’s peaceful and quiet getaway place.”
In addition to her son Greg,
her sister, Cindi of Beverly, and
her brother, Donald of Palm
Beach Gardens, Fla., Mrs. Cohen leaves two other sons, Scott
of Lincoln and Michael of New
York City, and three grandchildren.
A service has been held.
Burial was private.
I n a e u l o g y, M i c h a e l
thanked his mother for “teaching me kindness is mandatory,
not optional, to make a life that
matters,” and for “your infectious curiosity, your wry sass,
your forgiveness given so freely,
and for your selfless love.”
Marvin Pave can be reached at
marvin.pave@rcn.com.
Joel Kovel, a founder
of ecosocialism; at 81
By Sam Roberts
NEW YORK TIMES
RUTH ORKIN PHOTO ARCHIVE/© 1952
Ruth Orkin snapped Ms. Craig, then a nursery-school teacher, walking a testosterone-charged gantlet in Florence in 1951.
Ninalee Allen Craig; at center of famous photo
By Richard Sandomir
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — On an August morning in 1951, two
American women met for the
first time in the corridor of the
Hotel Berchielli in Florence.
Ninalee Allen, who was
known as Jinx, was a vacationing nursery-school teacher.
Ruth Orkin was a freelance
photojournalist who, after
chatting with Ms. Allen, asked
if would she would pose for a
p ho t o e s say abo ut w o m e n
traveling alone.
Jinx agreed, and they set off
on what Jinx called a “photographic lark.” As they came to
the Piazza della Repubblica,
15 men were loitering. Some
were leaning on a wall. Two sat
on a motor scooter. Nearly all
were staring at the 6-foot-tall
Ms. Allen. One leered and
grabbed his crotch.
Orkin snapped Ms. Allen
twice walking that testosterone-charged gantlet. The first
time, Orkin told The New York
Times in 1979, Ms. Allen
“clutched at herself and looked
terribly frightened.”
“I told her to walk by the
second time, ‘as if it’s killing
you but you’re going to make
it,’ ” she said.
The final shot, “American
Girl in Italy,” captured Ms. Al-
len with her head tilted slightly up, her eyes cast a bit down,
and her right hand holding onto her sweater. For the rest of
her life she insisted that she
had been enjoying herself and
had not felt harassed. Indeed,
she said, she had imagined
herself as Beatrice in Dante’s
“The Divine Comedy,” striding
past the men with dignity, refusing them her glance.
“The last thing you would
in divorce — died of complications of lung cancer Tuesday in
Toronto, her stepson, Alex Passi, said. She was 90.
Ms. Craig reveled in her
starring role in the photograph, which was first published in Cosmopolitan magazine with travel tips and other
photos of her from the Florence shoot and became Orkin’s
most popular picture in a distinguished and successful ca-
‘Italian men are very appreciative, and
it’s nice to be appreciated. I wasn’t the
least bit offended.’
NINALEE ALLEN CRAIG, quoted in 2011
do would be to look them in
the eye and smile,” she said in
an interview with The Guardian in 2015. “I did not want to
encourage them. This image
has been interpreted in a sinister way, but it was quite the
opposite. They were having
fun, and so was I.”
Both women insisted they
had come upon the men at the
piazza serendipitously, and
that nothing had been posed.
Ninalee Allen Craig — as
she had been known since her
second marriage, which ended
reer, especially after it was reproduced as a poster in the
1980s.
When the photograph was
celebrated in 2011 at the Stephen Bulger Gallery in Toronto, Ms. Craig smiled at the suggestion that the men’s behavior had concerned her.
“Italian men are very appreciative, and it’s nice to be
appreciated,” she told The Toronto Star. “I wasn’t the least
bit offended.”
She was born in Indianapolis and grew up in Bronxville,
New York.
At Sarah Lawrence College,
where she studied art, she
earned a bachelor’s degree.
She then taught at a nursery
school in Manhattan.
After six years as an advertising copywriter at J. Walter
Thompson in Manhattan, she
married Achille Passi and
moved to Milan. They divorced, and she returned to
New York and to copywriting
at William Esty & Co. Her second marriage, to R. Ross
Craig, a Canadian steel executive, also ended in divorce.
In addition to her stepson,
Passi, she leaves two other
stepsons, David and Robert
Craig; a stepdaughter, Gaye
Craig; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Ms. Craig and Orkin met in
Paris soon after their earlier
encounter in Florence, and
more photographs were taken.
They remained friendly until
Orkin’s death in 1985 at 63.
Ms. Craig was also friendly
with Orkin’s daughter, Mary
Engel.
“Jinx was the kind of person who, the minute you met
her, was in your life forever,”
Engel said in a telephone int e r v i e w. “ S h e w a s j u s t a n
amazing, larger-than-life person.”
NEW YORK — Joel Kovel, a
former Freudian psychiatrist
who evolved into an apostle of
what he called ecosocialism, a
so-called green-and-red agenda against the environmental
evils of globalization and in favor of the nonviolent eradication of capitalism, died Monday in New York City. He was
81.
His death, at a hospital, was
caused by pneumonia and autoimmune encephalitis, his
wife, Dee Dee Halleck, said.
Dr. Kovel courted controversy early in his career with
his book “ White Racism: A
Psychohistory,” published in
1970.
Racism, he wrote — whether overt bigotry in the South or
cold aversion in the North — is
built into the very character of
Western civilization. “Far from
being the simple delusion of a
bigoted and ignorant minority,” he wrote, racism is “a set of
beliefs whose structure arises
from the deepest levels of our
lives.”
“White Racism,” which was
nominated for a National Book
Award, publicly heralded his
radicalization.
Dr. Kovel metamorphosed
from a conventional therapist
into a Marxist who abandoned
the medical profession as too
corporate and commercial. He
became a fierce critic of the
Vietnam War, imperialists, Zionists, and gas guzzlers, together with neoliberals and environmentalists who were insufficiently anticapitalist.
Dr. Kovel was an intellectual father of ecosocialism. A
Brooklyn-born son of Jewish
immigrants, he also experienced in his later years what
he called a Christian spiritual
conversion.
When he published his autobiography last year, after so
many metaphysical meanderings, he titled it “ The Lost
Traveller’s Dream,” a nod to
poet William Blake’s reference
to wanderers in the wilderness
seeking to distinguish between
good and evil.
Dr. Kovel rarely defined his
positions in shades of gray.
He renounced psychiatry
because, he said, he was fed up
with “the pernicious system of
diagnosis” dictated by professional associations and their
manuals, and by insurance
companies driven by statistics
and reflexive prescriptions.”
Whenever he launched an
ideological crusade, he did so
zealously — even if, as in the
case of ecosocialism, its very
definition and the collateral
demand for an appealing alternative to capitalism were not
self-evident.
Under ecosocialist theory,
income would be guaranteed,
most property and means of
production would be commonly owned, and the abolition of
capitalism, globalism, and imperialism would unleash environmentalists to vastly curtail
industrialization and development whose pollution would
otherwise cause catastrophic
global warming.
“Capitalist production, in
its endless search for profit,
seeks to turn everything into a
commodity,” Dr. Kovel wrote in
2007 on the socialist website
Climate and Capitalism. “It is
plain that production will have
to shift from being dominated
by exchange — the path of the
commodity — to that which is
for use, that is for the direct
meeting of human needs.”
Joel Stephen Kovel was
born on Aug. 27, 1936, in
Brooklyn to Louis and Rose
(Farber) Kovel. His father was
an accountant and the namesake of the Kovel Rule, a legal
doctrine that extended the
lawyer-client confidentiality
privilege to other professionals
and experts. It arose when a
federal appeals court voided
the elder Kovel’s one-year sentence for contempt after he
had refused to answer questions about a client in a case.
After graduating from Baldwin High School in Baldwin,
New York, Dr. Kovel received a
bachelor’s from Yale in 1957
and a medical degree from Columbia University College of
P hy s i c i a n s a n d S u r ge o n s .
While in medical school, he
was first exposed to extreme
poverty during field study in
Suriname. He trained at
Downstate Psychoanalytic Institute in Brooklyn.
In addition to his wife, a
filmmaker, Dr. Kovel leaves
two children, Jonathan Kovel
and Erin Fitzsimmons, from
his marriage to Virginia Ryan,
which end ed in di vor ce; a
daughter, Molly Kovel, from
his marriage to Halleck; her
sons, Ezra, Peter, and Tovey
Halleck, from an earlier marriage; his brother, Alex; and
nine grandchildren.
T h e
B8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
N.H. seeks
lessons in
boy’s near
hanging
EASY RIDER — Sang
Lee from Somerville
rode his motorcycle
down Boylston Street
in the Back Bay on
Saturday with his
dog, Mango, secured
in a backpack. With
goggles and
bandana, Mango, a
Shiba Inu breed, was
sporty and wellequipped for one of
his frequent rides.
By Stephanie Morales
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLAREMONT, N.H. — Nine
months after an 8-year-old biracial boy was nearly hanged, a
New Hampshire city is still
healing, and grappling with diversity and inclusion.
Mayor Charlene Lovett said
the August episode triggered
communitywide efforts to raise
awareness about diversity-related issues.
‘‘That wasn’t my experience
growing up in New Hampshire,
so I just couldn’t believe something like that could happen
here,’’ Lovett said Thursday
night at a “listening session”
organized by Governor Chris
Sununu’s Advisory Council on
Diversity and Inclusion.
The council is traveling
statewide to ask residents how
New Hampshire can become
more welcoming for minorities
and to share any personal experiences with discrimination.
Advisory council member
Dottie Morris said the meeting
gave her more insight into
groups that have been formed
in response to the boy’s nearhanging.
‘‘They’ve been able to examine themselves in the process of
establishing these amazing
groups,’’ Morris said. ‘‘I can tell
they’ve been working diligently
to create a different reality.’’
One example is the Racial
Healing Working Group, which
hopes to promote equality
through education and community dialogue. Group member Reb MacKenzie said it has
sponsored several events and
rallies since last year to address
white supremacy and racism.
Council chairman Rogers
Johnson said Claremont was
chosen for one of the forums
partially because of last year’s
incident, which injured the
child in what the family has
called a racially motivated
‘‘lynching.’’
Allegations surfaced that
several teenagers taunted the
boy with racial slurs and then
pushed him off a picnic table
with a rope around his neck.
He was treated at a hospital,
according to the boy’s grandmother, Lorrie Slattery.
Police Chief Mark Chase
said few details can be released
about the case because juveniles are involved. The attorney
general’s office conducted its
own investigation on whether
the alleged attack would be
treated as a hate crime or civil
rights violation. It expects to
release a report but hasn’t said
when.
The parents of one of the accused teenagers said there was
no racial motivation, just a
tragic ‘‘backyard accident.’’
The victim’s family did not
attend the forum, but the case
remained on people’s minds
and was referred to multiple
times by residents, law enforcement, and town officials.
C o r n i s h r e s i d e n t Ma r y
Boyle said that while she can’t
say for certain whether bias incidents are on the rise in the region, there is more attention
being paid to those that do
come to light. She referenced
an April incident in which racially charged fliers were
placed on cars in a Lebanon
parking lot and said that law
enforcement did not consider
it a crime, citing the Firs t
Amendment.
Another woman attending
the session said that swastikas
were drawn over her Black
Lives Matter sign in her front
yard in December.
‘‘We need to figure out a way
to prevent these incidents from
becoming hate crimes, and
that’s why I’m glad police officers were here today,’’ Boyle
said. ‘‘Nothing ever happens
when these things occur. They
just fade away.’’
Morris was surprised to
learn about some of the more
recent happenings in neighboring areas of Claremont and, as
someone who lives nearby, said
she was concerned.
‘‘That’s fear-producing for
some of the people that live in
this area,’’ Morris said.
The advisory council said it
will return to Claremont before
its statewide tour is over.
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Four New England campaigns to watch
uGROUND GAME
Continued from Page B1
a wild scramble of candidates
who have jumped in ahead of
the Aug. 14 primary. Adding to
the already short timeline is
the fact that the state Democratic Party will endorse a candidate at its convention in midMay. That has left a mere six
weeks for a mostly insider
crowd to decide who could
hold this congressional seat for
the next two years.
With just days before the
convention, there are still
Democratic candidates joining
the race. On Wednesday, a Waterbury teacher who was honored at the Obama White
House and has a number of political operatives backing her
announced she was running.
On Friday, two-time former
Democratic nominee for governor William E. Curry Jr. joined
the race, which also includes
two locally elected officials and
a rabbi.
On top of that, there are
seven Republicans also campaigning. But the Cook Political Report has rated this seat
as “likely Democrat” in the
ge n e ra l e l e c t i o n t h i s f a l l ,
meaning the race on the other
side of the aisle will be the one
to watch.
Massachusetts’ Seventh
Congressional District
The primary challenge from
Ayanna Pressley, a Boston city
councilor, to longtime Democratic inc umbent Michael
Capuano has, for many, perfectly encapsulated the larger
fight for the future of the Democratic Party nationwide. Unlike other primaries, where
voters are offered an ideological choice, this race hinges on a
more nuanced rivalry. There
are few areas where the candidates disagree on policy. Instead it’s about an AfricanAmerican woman with an inspiring background taking on
an older white man. The
choice is about gender, generation, race, and background. Also keep in mind that this district is the only minority-majority congressional district in
New England and is mostly located in Boston, an important
point when you consider that
Capuano is the former mayor
of Somerville.
It’s anyone’s guess which
way this election goes in the
Sept. 4 primary, and many of
the major Democratic players,
like US Senator Elizabeth Warren, have made the decision
not to ge t involved. At the
same time, Capuano has
racked up some key endorsements, like that of Boston’s
mayor, Mar ty Wals h, civi l
rights leader and Congressman
John Lewis of Georgia, and
most recently, former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick, the state’s most prominent African-American politi-
cian. On the other side, the
national group EMILY’s List,
which supports female candidates, is backing Pressley and
aiding with her fund-raising.
This primary will test
whether simply having a liberal voting record is good
enough anymore for Democrats, or whether the time has
come to send a more representative delegation to Washington.
Rhode Island US Senate race
No one in Rhode Island politics expected to be talking at
all about Democrat Sheldon
Whitehouse’s reelection campaign this year. After all, he
last won reelection six years
ago by 30 percentage points.
But almost out of the blue,
Lincoln Chafee, who has previously served as both governor
and US senator, said last week
that he has all but decided to
stage a Democratic primary
c h a l l e n ge t o W h i t e h o u s e .
Though Chafee has previously
been elected as a Republican
(senator) and as an independent (governor), he argues that
unlike Whitehouse, he is in
line with the Bernie Sanders
base of the local Democratic
party. Given that this is a state
where every county voted for
Sanders in 2016, it’s a potent
argument to be made. Whitehouse, it should be noted,
backed Clinton in 2016.
But the most interesting
part of this race may be that,
should Chafee make his run official, it would be a rematch of
sorts of 2006, when Whitehouse ousted Chafee. Expect a
rematch between two of Rhode
Island’s biggest names in politics to be a slugfest.
New Hampshire’s First
Congressional District
In the past decade, this has
been the “swingiest” swing
congressional district race in
the country, shifting between
parties in line with whichever
way the political winds blow
each election cycle. This year,
however, as Representative
Carol Shea-Porter, a Democrat,
retires, the open seat race
might be best marked by a
sense of chaos.
First , there is the sheer
number of candidates — nine
Democrats and three Republicans — including the two new
candidates who joined in the
past week. There is also the
fact that neither the Republican nor the Democratic primary will be marked by any large
disagreement on issues. The
scuttlebutt in the Granite State
at this point is more about who
will drop out than about who
has a leg up.
On the Republican side, the
action is less palpable. Neither
of the two Republicans has
raised much money or caught
fire in any noticeable way. The
newest Republican to get into
the race might be a political
novice, but he can write a big
check to the campaign.
Third-party analysts all expect a Democrat to win this
seat in November, given that it
is likely to be a Democratic
wave year. Which of the nine
Democrats will it be? Here is
an example to how it can be
hard to figure out the contours
of the race: There are at least
three candidates who argue
they are the so-called “Bernie
Sanders candidate.” That includes Bernie’s son Levi. But
keep in mind that even Levi
Sanders hasn’t received an endorsement from his father or
inherited much at all of his organization in the state.
Given that this race will
play out in the early days of the
New Hampshire presidential
primary fight, national candidates will no doubt be watching this race for clues as to
what matters to the electorate.
But it could be that there are
just so many candidates and so
many dynamics at play, it will
be hard to draw any major conclusions. Nevertheless, expect
a lot of interest in this one.
James Pindell can be reached
at james.pindell@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@jamespindell or subscribe to
his Ground Game newsletter
on politics:
http://pages.email.bostonglobe
.com/GroundGameSignUp
Home rule process has housing bill in limbo
uHOME RULE
Continued from Page B1
idents was damaged.”
State Senator William
Brownsberger, cochairman of
the Joint Committee on the Judiciary, which reviewed the Jim
Brooks Act, said the home rule
petition process was meant to
provide final state scrutiny of
certain municipal matters.
In the end, he said, legislators were skeptical of certain
provisions of the Jim Brooks
Act, and specifically a provision
that said the language cannot
be changed.
“That sort of tied our hands.
We would have liked to have
fixed features of it if we could
have,” said Brownsberger,
whose district includes parts of
Boston, Belmont, and Watertown.
State Representative Claire
D. Cronin, from Brockton and
Easton, who cochairs the committee, said through a spokeswoma n that “ We me t with
many stakeholders, including
the advocates, and determined
that there is a lot more work to
do on this legislation.”
Sheila A. Dillon, Boston’s
chief of housing and neighborhood development, was dissapointed that a measure with
widespread support in Boston
could not pass.
“It’s frustrating that our
good ideas are not advancing at
the State House,” she said.
The Jim Brooks Act, adopted by the council and signed by
the mayor in October as a key
part of his affordable housing
platform, would have required
landlords to notify the city
whenever they move to evict a
tenant, for whatever reason.
The city and the landlord
would then have to alert the
tenant to his or her housing
rights, such as the ability to appeal to a state Housing Court,
and seek the help of housing
advocates.
Supporters said the measure
could help the city track where
and why evictions are occurring — and who is evicting tenants the most — amid concerns
that landlords are raising rents
to levels the existing residents
cannot afford, and then evicting them when they can’t pay.
The city currently has no
way to track all evictions.
But the measure included
an enforcement mechanism
that would have vacated any
eviction not handed out in accordance with the new regulations — a provision that required legislative approval.
T he ho me rule proce s s,
which is meant to ensure state
oversight of municipal matters
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Housing advocates demonstrated at the State House last
week against evictions and for the Jim Brooks Act.
involving taxes, fees, and elections, is strict in Massachusetts, relative to other states, legal experts say.
A Harvard University law researcher described in a 2004 report how a home rule petition
can halt a minor municipal
plan, such as to regulate dog
fees.
“ We n e e d a n e w w a y o f
thinking about home rule, one
that would empower cities and
towns to work together to solve
regional problems, not just go
to the state with hat in hand —
or dig in their heels against
changes they have little power
to control,” wrote David J. Bar-
ron, the Harvard Law School
researcher, who is now a federal appeals court judge in Boston.
Typically, the Legislature
welcomes home rule petitions,
Brownsberger said, though he
added that “We endow . . . municipalities certain powers, but
we don’t endow them with all
powers, because the state is the
state.”
He added that there are
“things that require more vetting.”
The home rule process has
been used in Boston at least 46
times since 2013 for a variety of
reasons, ranging from requests
to extend tax deferments for
longtime homeowners to petitions to increase the number of
liquor licenses in the city.
In one high-profile 2017
case, a request to change the
rules about the shadows that
buildings can cast on Boston
Common — to facilitate a highprofile skyscraper development
at Winthrop Square — was approved.
A 2016 petition to increase
the term for city councilors to
four years from two has languished.
And Walsh’s 2017 proposal
to expand access to early education in Boston — using funding
from the tourism industry and
car rentals — is still pending.
Dillon said the administration pushed for the Jim Brooks
Act to be approved in recent
State House meetings, and she
was surprised that a “fairly
moderate” bill did not move
forward.
“I think we’re figuring out
what is next,” she said. “Legislation that reduces evictions remains a concern of this administration.”
Milton J. Valencia can be
reached at
milton.valencia@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@miltonvalencia.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
Business
Crime labs fret as smartphones
‘GO DARK’
Pipeline
firm sues
Weymouth
Seeks zoning override
to build pump station
By Jon Chesto
GLOBE STAFF
PHOTOS BY JOHN WILCOX FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Data stored inside personal devices seen as the final stronghold of digital privacy
Hiawatha Bray
TECH LAB
Canadian pipeline operator Enbridge has sued the Town of Weymouth in federal court, the company’s
latest effort to gain a legal path to
build a natural gas compressor station
next to the Fore River. Enbridge wants
the court to rule that federal law preempts the town’s zoning, which currently poses an obstacle to construction of the station.
The company says the compressor
station is crucial to its Atlantic Bridge
project, which is aimed at improving
the capacity of Enbridge’s Algonquin
and Maritimes & Northeast pipeline
systems, which together stretch from
New Jersey to Nova Scotia.
But Weymouth has battled Enbridge and Spectra Energy, a pipeline
company that was acquired by Enbridge last year, at almost every turn,
spending more than $700,000 on legal
costs to fight the project over the past
four years.
Federal law gives energy companies wide latitude in local disputes.
Enbridge appears to be banking on
that fact with its latest lawsuit, filed
against Weymouth on Thursday in
Boston. In it, Enbridge asks for a judgment that a local zoning ordinance is
preempted by the federal Natural Gas
Act. It also wants a permanent injunction to block Weymouth from using its
ordinance to interfere with Enbridge’s
efforts to secure state and federal approvals.
‘I’m not expecting
them to roll over, but
no one should expect
the town to roll over,
either.’
JOSEPH CALLANAN, town solicitor,
referring to Enbridge
I
n a federal building in downtown
Boston is a crime lab where agents
perform autopsies on smartphones.
Cyber investigators at the New
England Electronic Crimes Task
Force take locked iPhones and other devices seized in a criminal case,
and plug them into a black box called the
Universal Forensic Extraction Device. The
UFED tries multiple hacking techniques
to unlock a phone, and, if successful, copies the contents without tainting potential
evidence.
“There’s no iPhone we can’t get into,”
bragged Jim Grady, chief executive of Cellebrite, the Israeli company that makes
the UFED box.
Not quite. Two-and-half years after the
federal government was unable to persuade Apple to unlock the iPhone of the
husband-and-wife San Bernardino shooters, law enforcement agencies say they
still have no surefire way of accessing
smartphones they suspect contain evidence of a crime.
The Federal Bureau of Investigation
said it could not access about 7,800
phones in 2017. And despite the claims of
their manufacturers, devices such as the
UFED, and one called GrayKey that the
An agent at the
New England
Electronic
Crimes Task
Force lab used
a “Ramsey box’’
to examine a
cellphone (top).
Above, the task
force’s digital
forensics lab.
At right,
a gas pump
skimmer used
by criminals to
steal credit
card
information.
Massachusetts State Police uses, are no
match for the security features of many
phones.
“We’re running into a lot of phones
that are locked, that we can’t get access
to,” said Timothy Laham, a Boston police
detective assigned to the New England
Electronic Crimes Task Force, a federal office staffed by agents from local, state, and
federal law enforcement agencies.
In April, members of the US House of
Representatives asked FBI Director
Christopher Wray to back up his
claim that thousands of phones
remain uncrackable by the latest technologies.
Cellebrite and Grayshift,
which makes GrayKey, don’t reveal details of how their devices
work. But the encryption techniques used by phone makers are advancing at a rapid pace. Grady said that
his company’s UFED could be rendered
useless overnight, by an update to Apple
or Android software.
Fred Mitchell, a US Secret Service
agent assigned to the lab, said police can
easily search a suspect’s home once they
get a warrant. But because of smartphone
encryption, “they’ve actually now built a
house that we can’t exercise a warrant on.”
TECH LAB, Page B10
“I’m not surprised,” said Joseph
Callanan, Weymouth’s town solicitor.
“We’ve been vigorous in our defense,
and they’ve been vigorous in their offense. I’m not expecting them to roll
over, but no one should expect the
town to roll over, either.”
Callanan said the controversy has
sparked at least 10 lawsuits or administrative appeals.
At particular issue in the latest legal round is a law specific to Massachusetts that governs waterways and
filled tidelands. Enbridge needs a socalled Chapter 91 license to build the
compressor station, and Weymouth
contends that the rules for such a license require conformance with local
zoning.
Callanan said the project’s coastal
location means that zoning rules play
a much bigger factor in state and federal permits than they would for a
more inland energy project.
“There’s no compressor station in
the East and West Coast transmission
systems this close to the water,” Callanan said, noting that the town is already home to a pipeline and a gasfired power plant. “Weymouth has
PIPELINE, Page B11
As Biogen turns 40, biotech investors worry the
GLORY DAYS MAY BE OVER
By Damian Garde
STAT
It was 1978, and a group of prominent biologists had just gotten together to form a company called Biogen —
founded on the back of Nobel
STAT Prize-winning discoveries that
promised a world in which
scientists could clone just about any
molecule they could find in nature.
A year later, the Cambridge company had figured out how to clone interferon, a signaling protein that could
treat a form of leukemia. Its scientists
went on to develop a hepatitis B vaccine. And, over the intervening years,
Biogen could proudly and consistently
claim to be a pillar of American biotech.
Those were the days.
Today, many investors have soured
on Biogen. As the company celebrates
its 40th birthday this month, its
shares are trading about where they
did back in 2013. More worrying to
the company’s backers, Biogen looks
to be pressing forward with a cup-
board of aging drugs and without a
strategic plan to ensure it doesn’t end
up bare.
Its latest product to be approved, a
treatment for a rare disease called
spinal muscular atrophy, got out to a
promising start on the market, but has
since flattened.
In interviews, former employees
speak with fondness about their time
at Biogen, praising the company’s
mission to apply cutting-edge science
to help cure diseases. But they also
express frustration with management,
pointing to what they perceive as a
string of missteps and missed opportunities.
“It’s like how you love your college,
and then you see them do something
that makes you cringe,” said one former Biogen executive who spoke on
condition of anonymity.
Biogen’s future is now wedded to
pulling off a drug industry miracle —
developing a new treatment for
Alzheimer’s disease. A win would be a
BIOGEN, Page B10
‘It’s like
how you
love your
college,
and then
you see
them do
something
that
makes you
cringe.’
A FORMER
BIOGEN
EXECUTIVE,
commenting on
the company’s
recent string of
missteps
Business
B10
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
TALKING POINTS
AUTOMOTIVE
VW BOARD EYES
DAMAGE CLAIMS
AGAINST FORMER
CEO
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
ROBOCALL VOLUME
HITS A NEW HIGH
GASOLINE
AVERAGE US PRICE
JUMPS 7 CENTS,
TO $2.90 A GALLON
ENERGY
IRAN OPPOSES
HIGHER OIL
PRICES, SIGNALING
DIVIDE WITH
SAUDIS
Crime lab inspects
digital evidence
Former Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn may never see
the inside of a US courtroom in
connection with the company’s
diesel emissions scandal. But
his legal troubles are far from
over. A VW spokesman said the
German automaker’s supervisory board is reviewing whether it
can demand damages from
Winterkorn. “The investigation
has been going on for quite
some while and is conducted independently from the authorities’ investigation,’’ said Michael
Brendel. The newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung reported Sunday
that Winterkorn, 70, could lose his property in connection with the company’s investigation. He was indicted Thursday in the United States on charges of fraud and conspiracy, but Germany’s constitution forbids extradition of its citizens except to another European Union state or to an international tribunal. He could risk arrest if he travels to
another country that would be willing to send him to the United States, however. Winterkorn is also being investigated in a criminal probe by prosecutors in Braunschweig,
in Volkswagen’s home region. Volkswagen has admitted to programming its diesel engines to activate pollution controls when they were being tested and turning them off
when on the road. Winterkorn resigned in 2015, saying he was unaware of any wrongdoing. The US indictment says Winterkorn and other top VW officials were briefed in
2015 on ‘‘how VW was deceiving US regulators.’’ — ASSOCIATED PRESS
uTECH LAB
Continued from Page B9
The crime lab of the New
England Electronic Crimes
Task Force has none of the
glamour of those on TV shows
like “NCIS.’’ It’s just a large,
plain room with long tables
and tall shelves stocked with
bulky computer servers and
heavy-duty plastic tool cases.
The servers are customized to
sop up data from confiscated
computers, without altering
the contents of the copied data
in any way. The copy is then
digitally signed to certify its integrity.
The task force inspects digital evidence in all its forms:
from illicit transactions recorded on a desktop computer to
electronic “skimmers” that are
secretly installed on bank cash
machines or gas pumps to steal
credit card data.
During a recent tour provided by Boston police officials,
one server was pulling video
from a digital recorder connected to the security cameras at a
local retailer. “Gone are the days
of VHS tape,” quipped Mitchell.
Another agent was examining the contents of a suspect’s
computer he had copied. Using
virtualization software, the task
force can replicate the contents
exactly as it appeared on the
suspect’s computer, which
helps in displaying evidence to
judges and jurors during trial.
But since so many suspects
use smartphones, they get lots
of attention in the lab. Examiners take extraordinary care to
protect phone data: each one is
plugged into a special container called a “Ramsey box” that
shields the phone from outside
radio signals that might alter or
corrupt its contents. If they’re
unable to get into a locked
phone, agents have a last-ditch
option: They open the phone,
extract its memory chips and
solder them onto an external
circuit board, from which they
try to copy and read the data.
Meanwhile the law enforcement community and cellphone companies remain at an
impasse over whether all
smartphones should have a
“back door” that allows police
to view their contents.
We haven’t made progress,”
said Nathan Wessler, staff attorney at the American Civil
Liberties Union. “Various parties on this issue have continued to maintain their positions.”
Wessler said the lockedphone conundrum is a rare ex-
It’s not just you. Those pesky robocalls — at best annoying disturbances, at worst costly
scams — are getting worse. Robocallers follow people wherever they go, disrupting
business meetings, church services, and children’s bedtime stories. And the volume has
skyrocketed, reaching an estimated 3.4 billion in April, according to YouMail, which
runs a robocall blocking service. That’s an increase of almost 900 million a month,
compared with a year earlier. Federal lawmakers have noticed: The House and Senate
have held hearings, and each chamber has either passed or introduced legislation to
curb abuses. Regulators have also noticed, issuing new rules in November that give
phone companies the authority to block certain robocalls. Still, robocalls are a thorny
problem to solve. Calls can travel through various carriers and a maze of networks,
making it hard to pinpoint their origins. Regulators are working with the telecommunications industry to find ways to authenticate calls, to help unmask the callers. Consumer advocates worry the flood of calls could get even worse. A recent federal court
ruling struck down an Obama-era definition of auto-dialer, leaving it to the Federal
Communications Commission to come up with new guidance. Advocates fear that will
open up the field to even more robocallers. Business groups counter that defining autodialers too broadly would hurt legitimate businesses. — NEW YORK TIMES
The average price of regular-grade gasoline rose 7 cents a gallon over two weeks to
$2.90, the 10th consecutive increase. Industry analyst Trilby Lundberg of the Lundberg Survey said Sunday that the jump resulted in the highest average price since November 2014. Lundberg said it’s largely driven by higher crude oil costs and the phasing in of summer-grade gasoline, which is used to prevent smog. The highest average
price in the contiguous 48 states was $3.73, in the San Francisco Bay Area. The lowest
was $2.45, in Baton Rouge, La. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Iran, faced with the possible restoration of US sanctions, has come out against higher
oil prices, signaling a split with fellow OPEC member Saudi Arabia, which is showing a
willingness to keep tightening crude markets. A “suitable price” for crude is $60 to $65
a barrel, Amir Hossein Zamaninia, deputy oil minister for international and commercial affairs, said Sunday in Tehran. Oil Minister Bijan Namdar Zanganeh said earlier in
the day that Iran supports “reasonable” oil prices and is not an advocate of costlier
crude. Brent crude futures surged to almost $75 a barrel Friday as traders braced for
the possible reimposition of US restrictions on Iran. Its regional arch-rival Saudi Arabia is said to want crude closer to $80 a barrel, in part to support a stake sale in the
state energy giant Aramco. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries will
meet next month in Vienna. Together with allied producers, OPEC began reducing oil
production last year in a drive to clear a global glut; now, prices are near a three-year
high. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
ception to a
“golden age
of surveillance” for
law enforcement. With
a warrant or
subpoena,
investigaSoftware guru tors are able
Ray Ozzie
to access
logs of personal data stored on remote
networks, including phone
calls, Internet search histories,
even locations that people visit.
Data stored inside personal devices appear to be the last
stronghold of digital privacy,
often out of reach of even the
most tech-savvy investigators.
One of the technology industry’s most respected voices,
software guru Ray Ozzie, has
proposed a system that would
grant emergency access to encrypted digital devices, while
preserving security protections.
“I believe that we need to
talk frankly about these policy
issues, but we’re being distracted by a war between technologists and government,” Ozzie
said. “I want to take the technology issues off the table so we
can talk not about ‘can we,’ but
‘should we.’ ”
Under Ozzie’s plan, which
he calls “Clear,” phone makers
would adopt a system that
could generate a unique decryption key for each device upon request. The key would be
made available to investigators
only if they presented a warrant, and they would have to
have physical possession of the
phone to use it.
Ozzie is best known as one
of the lead developers of the
Lotus Notes program and is
former chief software architect
for Microsoft Corp. Ozzie has
been shopping his idea around
to technology groups, and it’s
already come under ferocious
fire. Some computer scientists
predict hackers will find ways
to steal the Clear keys and
break into phones.
Ozzie admits his scheme
isn’t foolproof. And since he
suspects phone makers would
not embrace the idea, Ozzie reluctantly believes it would have
to be imposed by federal law.
“I think it’s a sad statement
that we have such little trust in
our government,” said Ozzie,
“but that’s the way it is.”
Hiawatha Bray can be reached
at hiawatha.bray@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeTechLab.
How secure is Biogen’s future? Some fear company’s gone stale
uBIOGEN
Continued from Page B9
major boon for the company’s
stock price and a return to Biogen’s glory days.
Insiders also point out that,
when it comes to biotech,
there’s always more at stake
than just the bottom line.
“Purely from a shareholder
perspective, it looks extremely
scary,” said Samantha Truex,
who spent eight years in corporate development at the company. “But from a perspective of
making a difference in the
world, I think we have to keeping making bets on Alzheimer’s.”
The question is: What happens to Biogen if its big bet
fails?
The company did not respond to requests for comment.
The Biogen war room
To understand how Biogen
found itself in this position, a
war with a famed activist investor is a good place to start.
In 2007, Carl Icahn, whose
résumé as a corporate raider
earned as much scorn as renown, began agitating for
change at the company. He accused management of wasting
money on navel-gazing science
while ceding ground to competitors. He then mounted a public
fight and demanded Biogen sell
itself or split in two in the name
of shareholder value.
The company acquiesced,
forming a team that “spent four
months straight in a war room
tr ying to sell Biogen,” said
Truex.
When no deal emerged,
Icahn accused Biogen of dragging its feet and lying about the
process. A messy proxy fight ensued, ending with Icahn getting
his acolytes elected to Biogen’s
board and the abrupt retirement of the company’s CEO. By
2011, Biogen had installed a
new regime that promised to be
better stewards of the bottom
line, and Icahn sold off his stake
in the company.
The storm had apparently
passed, and Biogen was sitting
on a blockbuster in the making
with the multiple sclerosis drug
Tecfidera, approved in 2013
and soon to complete what was
the most lucrative product
launch in drug industry history.
But Tecfidera would face generic competition in the next
decade, and the market for
multiple sclerosis therapies was
getting increasingly competitive. The time was ripe for Biogen to make a splash in the
market, former employees said,
dealing from a position of
strength and buying something
that would write the future beyond Tecfidera.
A contingent within the
company made ambitious pro-
posals but failed to sway the
board, former employees said.
Management rejected anything
that might have a negative
short-term impact on Biogen’s
earnings and, thus, its stock
price.
To many, it felt like Biogen
was still gun-shy from its neardeath experience with Icahn.
Years later, that inaction has
left investors wondering what
Biogen has up its sleeve as Tecfidera grays. Many worry there
might not be anything at all.
“You look at the pipeline,
and it ’s like, what do the y
have?” said Salim Sayed, an analyst at Mizuho Securities. “A
lot of people think they don’t
have a ton going on.”
Competitors on the move
Biogen’s conservatism has
come in contrast to other members of its biotech generation.
Celgene, which struck gold
with the cancer drug Revlimid,
has spent the past decade buying call options on scores of
new approaches to oncology,
weaving a diversified safety net
in hopes of finding another
winning drug. By 2011, Gilead
Sciences had built a business in
HIV that rivaled Biogen’s MS
franchise, but chose to wager
$11 billion on what turned out
to be a company-defining cure
for hepatitis C.
In the meantime, Biogen has
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2015
A scene in one of Biogen’s laboratories. Analysts and
investors worry it’s too focused on Alzheimer’s research.
painted itself into a corner, former employees said. The multiple sclerosis business has since
grown stagnant, propped up by
politically risky price increases.
And it will soon begin to wane.
Biogen had a lucrative hemophilia business but spun it out
in 2017 in another effort to
please shareholders. It now belongs to Sanofi.
Biogen’s latest drug, for spinal muscular atrophy, treats a
disease that is exceedingly rare,
and the company is already
treating about half of the most
severe patients in the United
States. Analysts expect the
drug, called Spinraza, to be a
net positive for Biogen, but not
on the order of Tecfidera.
And so the future rests on
the Alzheimer’s drug.
Biogen’s treatment, called
aducanumab, showed unprecedented promise in a small, early
stage study, persuading the
company to skip right to finalstage testing, despite the metronomic failure of similar therapies.
I f t h a t A l z h e i m e r ’s b e t
doesn’t pay off — and roughly
99 percent do not — Biogen will
need to convince Wall Street
that it has a third act in the
script.
“They’re at a crossroads,”
said Ste ve Holtzman, who
spent five years as an executive
at Biogen.
The risk is unsettling to
many on Wall Street, where analysts give aducanumab a
roughly 50-50 shot of working.
Baird analyst Brian Skorney argues that Biogen’s shares are
cheaper than they ought to be
for now, but he upgraded his
rating of the company with “all
the enthusiasm that goes with
catching a falling knife.”
According to Skorney, investors might be best served if Biogen’s 40 th year of independence turns out to be its last.
“It’s no secret: Part of my hope
is that it’s gotten so beaten up
that we see it getting taken out,”
he said.
Others are more sanguine.
And some insiders say the company that grew from a science
experiment into a multinational drug maker deserves the benefit of the doubt.
“Sticking around as an independent biotech company for
40 years is on its face an amazing accomplishment,” said Michael Gilman, who spent eight
years at Biogen in two stints as
a research executive. “Despite
all of the moaning about their
business strategy or what have
you, they must be doing something right.”
Damian Garde can be reached
at damian.garde@statnews
.com. Follow him on Twitter
@damiangarde. Follow Stat on
Twitter @statnews.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
Pipeline firm sues over zoning
uPIPELINE
Continued from Page B9
had enough. Someone else can
support a compressor station.”
An Enbridge spokeswoman
said the Weymouth site is the
preferred location because it’s
an industrial property, would
not have any direct effect on
wetlands or woods, and would
not require additional pipeline
construction beyond the compressor station property.
T h e s p o ke s w o m a n s a i d
about 40 percent of the Atlantic
Bridge upgrade project’s capacity would be used in Connecticut and Massachusetts. The
rest would be used in northern
New England and in the Canadian Maritime provinces. The
compressor station would help
send gas toward those locations.
Alice Arena, a Weymouth
resident who has been helping
to lead the opposition, said she
wasn’t surprised by Enbridge’s
latest legal maneuver.
“The gas industry is just trying to run over all local and
state ordinances and regulations,” Arena said. “We’re not
exactly shocked that Algonquin
would do this.”
Jon Chesto can be reached at
jon.chesto@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @jonchesto.
JOHN BLANDING/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2016
Protests against proposed
natural gas pipeline
facilities in Weymouth have
been ongoing. These
demonstrators took to the
streets near the Fore River
Bridge in July 2016 to
oppose the plan for a
compressor plant.
()
INFO VALID 5/07/18 ONLY
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:05, 1:45,
()
4:30, 7:20, 10:20
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
G
5
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
DISOBEDIENCE (R) AMC Independent 11:20, 1:20,
2:20, 4:00, 6:45, 8:45, 9:50
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
55 Boylston St.
TULLY (R) AMC Independent G 1:45, 4:20, 7:15, 9:45
5 6 8 DIG
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent G 11:40
www.nationalamusements.com
A OR B (NR) AMC Independent 11:00, 1:40, 4:20,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00,
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent G 2:10, 4:50,
10:20
12:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 10:00
7:45, 10:30
THE TROUGH (NR) AMC Independent 11:05, 1:45,
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:20
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 11:45
4:25, 7:05, 9:55
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 10:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:45, 9:30
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent G 11:30, 1:30,
DANVERS
www.amctheatres.com
OCEANS 3D: OUR BLUE PLANET (NR) 10:00, 2:00,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:30
4:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 10:00, 12:15,
PANDAS 3D (G) 11:00, 1:00, 5:00
1:30, 5:00, 7:30, 8:30
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
100 Independence Way
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:30, 3:15,
7:00, 10:30
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERI-
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 3:40, 5:00, 7:00,
5 6 8 I K DIG
ENCE (PG-13) 10:30, 6:00
8:05
www.REGmovies.com
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 6:00
BAD SAMARITAN (R) (10:30, 1:35) 4:40, 7:40, 10:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 4:55, 7:20
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (10:10, 1:25) 4:30, 7:30, 10:30
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) 4:00, 8:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (11:00, 12:00,
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 5:15, 7:30
1:15) 4:00, 5:00, 8:00, 9:00, 9:15
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (10:05,
1:45, 3:00) 5:30, 7:00, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RPX G (2:00) 6:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RPX G (10:20)
10:00
www.REGmovies.com
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (10:00, 1:00) 4:15, 7:15,
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (12:20, 3:10) 6:20, 9:50
10:25
BAD SAMARITAN (R) (12:40, 3:30) 6:40, 10:05
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (11:15, 2:15) 6:10, 9:30
TULLY (R) (11:40, 2:20, 5:00) 7:40, 10:15
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (12:40, 3:30) 6:20, 10:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) (11:30, 11:50,
12:30, 3:20, 4:00) 6:30, 6:50, 7:30, 10:20
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (12:10,
3:00, 3:40) 7:10, 10:00, 10:40
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (11:45, 2:25, 5:05) 7:45,
10:25
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (1:00, 3:50) 7:00, 10:10
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:50, 3:35) 6:45, 9:40
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) (12:45, 4:10) 7:50, 10:35
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (12:00, 2:30, 5:10) 8:00,
10:30
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:35, 3:45) 7:20, 10:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (12:15, 2:40, 4:55) 8:10,
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (11:05, 2:50) 6:35,
10:20
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (11:30, 3:20) 6:45, 10:35
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (10:45, 2:30) 6:30, 10:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) G 2:15, 9:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
11:00, 2:45, 4:00, 6:30, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:45, 1:00, 3:15, 5:30,
8:00, 10:15
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:45, 4:15, 9:45
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:30, 7:00
BLOCKERS (R) 11:00, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:30, 1:00, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:15,
12:45, 3:45, 6:30, 9:00
TULLY (R) AMC Independent G 11:30, 2:15, 4:45,
7:30, 10:00
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent G 11:00,
1:45, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:15, 1:15, 4:05, 6:45, 9:30
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent G 10:30, 1:30,
4:30, 7:30, 10:20
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:15, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
LEXINGTON
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 4:00, 6:45
LITTLETON
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
www.oneilcinemas.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 10:40, 6:35
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 5 11:30, 3:15,
6:45
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 10:35, 1:45, 7:35
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 5 10:25
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 5 10:25, 12:45, 3:00, 5:25,
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 1:35, 4:00
5 6 8 I K DIG
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 5 11:45, 2:15, 5:00, 7:55,
10:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 5 11:05, 1:40, 4:25, 7:25,
10:20
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
8:00, 8:30, 8:45, 9:10, 10:10, 10:40
5 6 DIG
12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:15, 2:00,
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 10:50, 1:30,
www.amctheatres.com
5 6 8 DIG
4:10, 6:45, 9:20
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:00, 1:15,
2:00, 3:00, 4:45, 5:30, 8:15, 9:00, 10:00
5:00, 7:30, 10:00
THE MIRACLE SEASON (PG) AMC Independent 10:00,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 3:30, 4:00, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00,
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:20, 1:40, 3:45, 7:30, 9:45
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:50, 7:40
TRAFFIK (R) 5:15, 10:10
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:35, 3:55, 7:05, 10:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:10, 6:55
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:55
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:15,
BROOKLINE
11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:50, 3:20, 3:50,
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
4:20, 4:50, 6:10, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:20,
www.nationalamusements.com
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 11:10, 1:45, 4:40, 7:20, 10:05
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:55, 1:40, 4:25, 7:15, 10:00
TRAFFIK (R) 11:50, 2:05, 4:30, 6:55, 9:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 10:45, 2:20, 6:05,
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 9:05
9:45
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:55, 1:45, 4:35, 7:15, 10:05
TULLY (R) 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:15
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:50, 2:25, 5:10, 7:45, 10:35
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:00, 1:35, 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
10:00
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:30
5 6 8 DSS
5 6 I DIG
www.showcasecinemas.com
http://somervilletheatre.com/
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:20, 6:20, 9:20
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:50
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 7:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:15,
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 4:45, 7:45
11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40,
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:40, 9:40
RBG (PG) 11:45, 2:15, 4:30, 7:15, 9:15
TULLY (R) 11:30, 2:00, 4:00, 6:45, 9:45
THE RIDER (R) 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 1:45, 9:30
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 11:15, 4:15
WOMEN ON THE VERGE OF A NERVOUS BREAK-
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 4:00, 6:45, 9:25
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 9:45
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 3:30, 6:35, 9:15
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 1:10, 4:15, 7:10, 9:55
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:40, 3:15, 6:05, 9:00
TULLY (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 9:40
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:30, 7:25
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 10:00, 11:15,
1:00, 2:45, 3:15, 4:30, 6:15, 8:00, 9:45, 10:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
BOSTON
10:15, 10:45, 12:00, 12:30, 1:45, 3:45, 5:15, 7:15,
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
8:55, 9:20, 10:40
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 3:50
5 8 DOL
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:40
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:05
TULLY (R) AMC Independent G 10:20, 12:45, 3:15,
5:45, 7:00, 8:10, 10:35
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:00, 12:35, 4:45, 6:40, 9:30
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent G 11:00, 1:40,
4:20, 7:05, 10:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 10:00
www.amctheatres.com
5:15, 6:00, 8:30, 9:45
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 10:25, 1:10, 4:00, 6:40
www.coolidge.org
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 1:00, 2:15, 4:45,
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:55, 5:20, 7:45, 10:20
ACRIMONY (R) 9:15
56
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
10:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:35, 1:05, 3:45, 6:50, 9:40
SOMERVILLE
20 South Ave.
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:10, 12:45, 3:50, 6:55,
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:05
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 9:35
7:05, 7:35, 9:25, 9:55
MILLBURY
2:15) 4:55, 7:25, 10:10
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:05, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:35, 1:55, 2:25, 4:35, 5:05,
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:40, 3:35) 6:35, 10:25
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:10, 4:25, 6:55, 9:20
3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 5:00, 5:30, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30,
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:35, 2:35, 4:55, 7:35,
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (11:40,
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
11:15, 11:30, 11:45, 12:45, 1:30, 2:05, 2:20, 2:50,
11:15, 11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:25, 1:50, 2:50,
9:50, 10:05
FOXBORO
www.artsemerson.org
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:10, 4:55, 7:40
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:15,
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
BURLINGTON
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:20, 3:40) 6:55, 9:55
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:40
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:00,
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 1:50, 4:45, 7:40, 10:20
9:40
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:05, 6:20, 9:35
121 Grandview Rd.
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:45, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00,
DOWN (R) 7:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (11:45, 2:10) 4:45, 7:15,
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
LOWELL
4:30, 7:15, 10:00
(11:50, 2:20) 5:00, 7:40, 10:05
REVERE
10:30
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent G 11:10, 1:50,
HÉCTOR EL FATHER: CONOCERÁS LA VERDAD (NR)
ENCE (PG-13) 3:20, 6:40, 10:00
AMC BRAINTREE 10
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 4:30
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (11:35) 4:55, 10:20
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 5 4:55, 10:35
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 2:15, 10:45
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (12:55, 3:50) 6:50, 9:35
ENCE (PG-13) 12:00
8:05, 10:25
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
1:00, 3:00) 6:30, 8:00, 10:00
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
BRAINTREE
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:20, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (11:30,
FURNITURE - READING
4:15, 7:00, 9:45
www.studiocinema.com
3:30) 4:00, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:30
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 9:55, 10:15, 10:40
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (12:00, 12:30,
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 10:50, 1:35, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERI-
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) 5 10:00
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
TULLY (R) (11:25, 2:00) 4:40, 7:20, 10:15
TRAFFIK (R) 10:45, 1:20, 3:50, 6:20, 8:50
www.jordansimax.com
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50
ACHARI AMERICA YATHRA (NR) (12:50) 4:20, 7:50
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:40, 1:25, 4:10, 6:55, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) 5 4:45
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (1:15) 4:10, 7:05, 10:05
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30
58
3:00, 3:20, 4:20, 5:00, 5:30, 6:05, 6:30, 6:35, 7:00,
BAD SAMARITAN (R) (1:05) 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
4:50, 7:25, 10:05
2:30, 7:10, 8:15, 9:30, 10:30
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (2:05) 7:35
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:10,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 5 10:30, 1:00,
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:40
www.REGmovies.com
7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 11:05, 1:40, 4:25, 7:15, 10:00
TULLY (R) 4:15, 7:00
BELMONT
5 6 8 DIG
3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00,
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 3:40, 9:15
DEDHAM
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30,
5 DOL DSS
9:30, 10:30
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:30,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:35, 1:15, 3:55, 6:35, 9:10
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00,
BERLIN
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:35, 6:10
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:55, 3:10, 6:20
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:55, 3:05, 6:15, 9:20
LEXINGTON VENUE
12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30
10:30
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:00, 5:00, 8:30
12:00, 3:00
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
TULLY (R) AMC Independent G 11:50
10:00
ARLINGTON
6 I DIG
4:45, 5:30, 7:20, 8:10, 9:40, 10:30
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
RBG (PG) AMC Independent G 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:45, 12:30, 2:10, 3:00,
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
CAPITOL THEATRE
BLOCKERS (R) 2:20, 5:15, 7:50, 10:20
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:10, 6:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:45,
11:05, 11:35, 12:05, 12:35, 1:05, 1:35, 2:05, 2:30,
3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:10, 6:30, 7:00,
4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30,
9:30, 10:00, 10:20
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:50, 2:15,
TULLY (R) 5:15, 7:40, 9:50
4:50, 7:35, 10:05
TAUNTON
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:25, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50,
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
10:15
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 1:10
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 4:00, 6:40, 9:25
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:10, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45,
10:25
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 11:20, 2:00, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:35
www.REGmovies.com
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (1:10, 3:40) 7:30, 10:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (12:20, 12:45,
1:15, 3:20, 3:40) 4:10, 6:00, 6:40, 9:00, 9:20
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (12:00,
NATICK
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (12:10, 3:15) 7:10, 10:00
10:10
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (1:00, 3:40)
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 1:00
FURNITURE - NATICK
6:10, 10:20
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 4:10, 9:45
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:40) 4:40, 7:20, 10:05
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 3:20, 6:20
58
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (12:50) 4:10, 6:50, 10:10
7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 9:55, 10:25
BLOCKERS (R) 9:05
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:15, 2:35, 4:50, 7:40,
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 6:55, 9:50
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:00, 1:20, 3:05, 4:05, 6:05,
9:10
TULLY (R) 11:30, 1:55, 4:15, 7:15, 9:40
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
www.jordansimax.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:00
3:00) 6:20, 7:00, 8:40, 9:40
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (12:30, 3:50) 6:30, 9:30
WESTBOROUGH
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
WOBURN
ENCE (PG-13) 3:20, 6:40, 9:55
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
www.nationalamusements.com
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: BERNSTEIN CENTENARY
5 6 DIG
(NR) 7:00
www.nationalamusements.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 10:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
ENCE (PG-13) 11:30, 3:15, 7:00, 10:45
www.applecinemas.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
102 NOT OUT (PG) 1:00, 5:35, 7:45, 10:00
11:00, 12:30, 2:45, 4:15, 6:30, 8:00, 10:15
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) G 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30
www.amctheatres.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 7:30, 7:35, 10:40
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G 3:30, 6:30,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:45, 2:50, 6:00, 9:15
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:00, 4:55
9:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:30, 3:15,
BLOCKERS (R) 12:00, 5:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 1:00, 2:00,
7:00, 10:30
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:25, 12:15, 1:50, 2:40,
3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:40, 1:00,
4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:00,
4:10, 5:20, 6:35, 7:40, 10:10, 10:45
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:30
3:00, 5:00, 8:30
9:30, 10:00, 10:30
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 2:30, 9:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:20, 2:50, 5:15, 7:50,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 1:55, 4:35, 10:30
TULLY (R) AMC Independent 11:40, 2:10, 4:40, 7:10,
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 2:00, 4:25, 6:55, 9:25
12:15, 2:30, 4:00, 6:15, 7:45, 9:45
10:10
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 4:05, 9:20
9:40
NAA PERU SURYA (NR) G 6:20, 9:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 1:10, 6:45
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 11:00, 1:30, 6:40
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent 11:35, 2:25,
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 1:00
6:30, 9:50
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:35, 5:05, 7:35, 10:05
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 10:55, 1:40, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55
5:10, 10:30
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 3:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:00, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:50, 1:25, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent G 7:46
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) G 1:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 4:30, 9:50
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 1:05, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55
TULLY (R) 11:25, 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:10
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 2:00, 4:35, 7:25, 10:05
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 3:15
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:50, 7:15
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 1:20, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:25
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:45, 9:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:15,
11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:05,
11:20, 11:35, 11:50, 12:05, 12:35, 1:05, 2:30, 2:45,
3:00, 3:15, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 6:05, 6:15, 6:30, 6:45,
7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:35, 9:45, 10:00, 10:15, 10:30,
10:45
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:15, 2:35, 5:00, 7:25, 9:50
T h e
B12
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
ASK AMY
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Family members’ mooching
now hits close to home
Q. My much younger sister and her husband
recently decided to purchase the home next
door to my husband and me.
My husband was not happy about this. He
thinks they are “cheap” and “moochers.”
(They do have that reputation in the family.)
He feels they should’ve asked us before
making the offer on the house next to us.
My husband told me that he is not going to
start “giving them things” or “letting them
mooch” just because they are our neighbors
now, and that he wants to remain firm.
Within a day of them moving into their
new house, they asked us for our Wi-Fi password. My husband told them no. A few days
later, they asked for a whole list of household
items. My husband said no to all of it.
My sister came to me, saying that they
were hurt and confused by my husband saying
no. Amy, I caved and gave her everything she
asked for, including the password.
My husband was furious and said that I enable this sort of behavior. My feeling is that we
are neighbors now, so why start the relationship off on the wrong foot? Yes, they can be demanding, but I love my sister, and if I can help
her, I feel like we should.
Am I wrong here?
BIG SISTER
A. Yes, I’d say you are wrong to share your WiFi password with your sister-neighbor. The
neighbors’ Internet use could compromise the
speed in your own home, and depending on
their use (and your plan), could cause you to
have overages. They could decide to share the
password with others. And if/when your Internet goes down, they will come knocking on
your door to reset your router.
If you have used this same password for
any other accounts, you should reset, and
make sure it is only dedicated to the Wi-Fi.
The main issue here is not with your sister’s predictable behavior, but with your marriage. On the one hand, your husband seems
to have laid down the law without discussing
it with you. On the other, you have chosen to
completely disregard his decision without telling him.
I’m all for family members (and neighbors)
helping each other, but your sister just moved
in next door, and already your marriage has
been affected. This is mooching to the extreme, because these neighbors seem to have
taken your spousal trust in one another. I
RICHARD SHOTWELL/INVISION/AP
Jeffrey Tambor was fired from Amazon’s “Transparent” in February, after an investigation
into allegations of sexual harassment that he has denied.
Tambor part of new ‘Arrested Development’ season
Jeffrey Tambor will indeed appear as George
Bluth Sr. in the upcoming fifth season of “Arrested Development” on Netflix.
The actor was fired from Amazon’s “Transparent” in February, after an investigation into allegations of sexual harassment that he has denied.
The charges were made by his former personal
assistant, Van Barnes, as well as guest star Trace
Lysette. But Netflix, after its own investigation,
determined that Tambor would be allowed to
stay in the comedy since there were no complaints against him on the “Arrested” set.
The fifth season had been renewed and most
of it had been shot with Tambor before the
“Transparent” allegations. But Netflix still could
have cut Tambor out, if the results of the investi-
gation had been negative. Will Netflix experience
blowback for the decision? Hard to say.
By the way, “Arrested Development” creator
Mitch Hurwitz just released a new version of season 4 of the show, called “Arrested Development
Season 4 Remix: Fateful Consequences.” Because
of cast scheduling difficulties, the fourth season
originally had each episode focus on a different
character. The new version, with new voiceovers
by Ron Howard, reshuffles and interweaves the
storylines so that the entire cast is present
throughout the season, which has 22 instead of
15 episodes.
“I mean, who am I kidding,” Hurwitz wrote in
an open letter to fans. “I want this thing to syndicate eventually.”
Monday May 7, 2018
7:00pm
2
WGBH Greater
PBS Boston
4
WBZ Wheel
CBS NEW
7:30pm
8:00pm
Movies
8:30pm
Steves
Antiques Rdshow
(CC) HD TV-G
Jeopardy Kevin
Man With
NEW
NEW
NEW
9:00pm
9:30pm
Sports
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Antiques Roadshow Independent Lens: Inside a
Conclusion. TV-G
2016 standoff. TV-PG NEW
S. Donut Big Bang Elementary (CC)
News
NEW
Theory
HD TV-PG-DV NEW
Late Sh.
NEW
J Kimmel
NEW
6 WLNE ABC Daily
7
WHDH News
(CC) HD
In. Ed.
Dancing/Stars (CC) Live. HD TV-PG-L
F. Feud
News HD
Extra HD F. Feud
TV-PG
NEW
NEW
The Crossing NEW
News HD
News
News
(CC) HD
J Kimmel
(11:35)
Extra
NBC Boston
Access
TV-G
(10:01) Running
Wild TV-PG NEW
News
(CC)
J Fallon
NEW
The Crossing NEW
(10:01) Running
Wild TV-PG NEW
News
News
(CC)
J Kimmel
J Fallon
NEW
Antiques Roadshow Antiques Roadshow Independent Lens: Inside a
HD TV-G NEW
Conclusion. TV-G
2016 standoff. TV-PG NEW
Amanpour
WCVB News
ABC (CC)
News
(CC)
The Voice (CC): The Top 10 perform.
Live. TV-PG-L
9 WMUR ABC N.H. Ch.
10
WBTS News
NBC (CC)
In. Ed.
Dancing/Stars (CC) Live. HD TV-PG-L
Extra HD The Voice (CC): The Top 10 perform.
TV-PG
Live. HD TV-PG-L
11
WENH Greater
PBS Boston
Steves
12
WPRI Wheel
CBS NEW
Jeopardy Kevin
NEW
NEW
25
WFXT ET/
FOX Tonight
TMZ HD
TV-PG
27
Man With S. Donut
NEW
NEW
Big Bang Elementary (CC)
Theory
HD TV-PG-DV NEW
Resident (CC) HD
TV-14-DLV NEW
News (CC)
News
(CC)
Late Sh.
NEW
(11:35)
TMZ
WUNI Rosa de Guadalupe El rico y Lazaro
HD TV-14-D
(CC) HD
Papá a toda madre
(CC) HD
Por amar sin ley
(CC) HD
News
(CC) HD
Noticiero
Uni
36
WSBE Steves
PBS
Reaching West (CC) Pacific Heartbeat:
BBC
Students in Beijing. The story of a song. News
Upstart
Crow HD
38
WSBK Big Bang Big Bang News HD
Theory
Theory
Law & Order SVU
(CC) HD TV-14-DL
Seinfeld
TV-PG
44
WGBX British Baking:
PBS Swiss rolls. TV-PG
Silent Witness (CC) Vera (CC): The murders of two NewsHour
TV-PG
teens are investigated. TV-PG
50
56
WBIN I Survived... TV-14
Boston's Finest
Deadly Motives HD
WLVI Goldberg Goldberg Supergirl: Supergirl iZombie (CC) HD
TV-14-DLV NEW
CW
asks a favor. NEW
Lucifer: The death
of a woman. NEW
Weekends Nature (CC) HD
TV-PG
Midsomer Murder
(CC) TV-PG
Law & Order SVU
(CC) HD TV-14-DLV
Dr. G: Med/Exam
News (CC)
64
WNAC ET/
FOX Tonight
TMZ HD
TV-PG
Lucifer: The death
of a woman. NEW
Resident (CC) HD
TV-14-DLV NEW
News
68
WBPX Criminal Minds
ION (CC) HD TV-PG-LV
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-PG-DL
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-PG-LV
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-PG
Cinemax
Encore
Flix
HBO
HBO 2
Showtime
Showtime 2
Starz!
TMC
News
Seinfeld
TV-PG
Drugs Inc. TV-14-D
Modern Modern
Family
Family
(11:05)
Goldberg
Seinfeld
Criminal Minds: The
search for a sniper.
PREMIUM CABLE
★★★ The Royal Tenenbaums (2001) (CC) (9:50) Mike and Dave: Brothers Murder
(5:45) Invictus
(2009) HD PG-13
by Nos.
need wedding dates. R
Dad claims terminal illness. HD R
★★★ Primary Colors (1998): Presidential-campaign Don't
(6:43) ★★ Urban Cowboy (1980): A
country boy looks for love. HD PG
satire takes aim at a Clintonesque candidate. HD R Breathe
★★ Madea's Family Reunion (2006) (CC):
(6:05) The Mist (2007): A mist (8:25) ★ Crossroads (2002):
unleashes creatures. TV-14-LV Teens take a road trip. PG-13 Tale of a Southern matriarch. TV-14-V
Tonight/ Vice
A Dangerous Son: A profile of Westworld (CC):
Barry
(11:05) ★★★ You've
Oliver
News
three families. TV-14 NEW
Inner beauty. HD
(CC) HD Got Mail
Westworld (CC):
Being
(6:10) Paterno
Wyatt
Silicon
Barry
(10:35) Vice (CC)
Inner beauty. HD
Serena
(2018) HD TV-MA
Cenac
Valley
(CC) HD HD TV-MA
(5:30)
Circus
I'm Dying Up Here
Billions: Axe's Ice
I'm Dying Up Here
Billions: Axe's Ice
Gunman HD TV-14 (CC) HD TV-MA
Juice involvement. (CC) HD TV-MA
Juice involvement.
★★★ Children of Men (2006) (CC): Man
The Promise (2016) (CC): Love triangle during WWI.
HD PG-13
protects a pregnant woman. HD TV-14
(6:17) Rough Night Vida HD Sweetbit (9:05) Amityville (2017) (CC)
Sweetbit (11:03)
Vida
TV-MA
(2017) HD R
HD PG-13
(6:25) ★★★ PunchDrunk TV-MA-LS
★★★ The Illusionist (2006) (CC): A
magician woos a duchess. HD TV-G
I, Daniel
Blake
(11:38)
Birdcage
The Legend of Ben Hall (2016) (CC):
Biopic of Aussie outlaw Ben Hall. HD NR
SPORTS
Celtics/ Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
Plus Live.
Comcast
SportsNet
Halftime Early
Live Live. Edition
Felger & Celtics
Mazz HD Post.
ESPN
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
MLB Baseball (CC): Minnesota Twins at St. Louis Cardinals.
From Busch Stadium. Live. HD
ESPN Classic
Classic College Basketball (CC): From
1988: North Carolina State at Duke.
ESPN 2
College Baseball (CC): Florida State at Clemson. Live. HD
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
Live From The Players (CC) Live. HD TV-G Feherty NEW
Driven
Driven
Ins. PGA Learning
Stanley Cup (CC): A second-round game. Live. HD
Stanley Cup (CC): A second-round game. Live. HD
Premier League Soccer (CC) Taped. HD
Match NEW
Sports
Sports
Sports
Sports
FAMILY
Craig
Steven
King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers Burgers Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Bunk'd
DuckTale Gravity
Bunk'd
Bunk'd
Stuck/
Stuck/
Raven's Bunk'd
Bunk'd
HD TV-G HD TV-G
Falls
HD TV-G HD TV-G Middle
Middle
Home
HD TV-G
Cartoon
Disney
Classic College Basketball (CC): From
1998: Texas Tech at Oklahoma State.
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
Classic College
Basketball (CC)
E:60: Former NBA
NFL Live (CC) HD
player Royce White.
Freeform
(5:50) Just Go With It (2011): A Grown Ups (2010) (CC): Childhood friends reunite
man pretends he is married.
after their former coach dies. HD TV-14-DL
The 700 Club (CC)
HD TV-G
Nickelodeon
Noggin
SpongBob SpongBob Spongebob (2015) HD TV-PG
Bubble
Shimmer Nella
Sunny
Peppa
Friends
Rusty R.
Peppa
Fresh P.
Peppa
Fresh P.
Zoofari
Friends
Top Wing
Q. I have two daughters in their 20s. When I
was going through the divorce with their father a decade ago, I received legal papers from
another woman who was suing him for child
support. Apparently, he’d had a child with her.
I don’t know if my ex-husband is aware
that I know this.
We have both since moved on, and are remarried to other people. My daughters don’t
know they have a sister. I always thought that
when they were old enough, they should be
told. I know they would be thrilled to know
her. I don’t, however, know how this other
girl’s mother feels about it.
I know my ex does not have a relationship
with this child, who is probably a pre-teen
now. I’m torn about disclosing this.
TORN
A. Your daughters should be told that they
have a sister. They should be told because it is
true. This is not a dilemma where the knowledge of it will ruin people’s lives; this is simply
something that is true that they should know
about.
You should start with your ex-husband. Tell
him that this has been weighing heavily on
you and that you feel strongly that your
daughters should be told. Give him the opportunity to find a way to tell them. If he declines,
then you should tell them yourself, answering
as many questions as you can. The other
child’s mother will be in a position to either
welcome or inhibit a relationship between
these siblings.
Q. Shame on the nosy grandmother who discovered the grandsons’ pot stash during a visit
[”Grounded Dad”].
She has broken any confidence of the boys,
in fact the whole family, first by snooping
while a guest in the kids’ room, and second by
ignoring the request of the father to let him
handle it. She would not be welcome in our
house.
NOT A SNOOPER
A. I agree.
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
Specials
7:00pm
7:30pm
Amanpour
(10:01) Crossing HD News
Chronicle Dancing With the Stars: Athletes (CC):
(CC) HD
HD
Week 2 of competition. Live. HD TV-PG-L TV-PG-V NEW
5
News
hope you get it back.
Moochers need enablers to thrive. You
should develop some healthy parameters
soon, because you are on your way to becoming your sister’s keeper.
Powered by
8:00pm
8:30pm
A&E
Ozzy and Jack's
(CC) HD TV-14-DL
AMC
(6:00) ★★★★ Jaws (1975) (CC): A
bloodthirsty shark. HD
Animal Planet Alaska/Frontier
(CC) HD TV-14-L
9:00pm
9:30pm
BASIC CABLE
Ozzy and Jack's
Ozzy and Jack's
(CC) HD TV-14-DL
(CC) HD TV-14-DL
Alaska/Frontier
(CC) HD TV-14-L
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
(10:01) Ozzy and
(11:04) Ozzy and
Jack's HD TV-14-DL Jack's HD TV-14-DL
Terror: The death of (10:05) Cameron's
an officer. NEW
Story TV-PG NEW
(11:05) Terror: The
death of an officer.
Alaska/Frontier HD Alaska/Frontier HD I Was Prey (CC) HD
TV-14-L NEW
TV-14-LV NEW
TV-PG
BBC America
BET
X-Files HD TV-14
X-Files HD TV-14
X-Files HD TV-14
Next
(7:28) 'Til Death Do Us Part (2017): Woman flees
Friday
abusive husband. HD TV-14
Bravo
Vanderpump Rules: Vanderpump (CC)
HD TV-14
Conclusion. TV-14
CMT
CNN
Comedy
Central
Last Man Last Man O Brother Where: Comic homage to "The Odyssey." ★★ O Brother Where TV-14-LV
OutFront HD NEW
Cooper NEW
Cooper NEW
CNN Tonight HD
CNN Tonight HD
(6:50)
(7:25)
Office
Office
Office
Office
Office
Office
Daily
Klepper
Office
Office
HD TV-14 HD TV-14 HD TV-14 HD TV-14 HD TV-14 HD TV-14 NEW
NEW
CSPAN
CSPAN 2
Dest. America
Discovery
DIY
E!
Fit & Health
Food
(6:30) U.S. House of Representatives Live. Landmark Cases (CC) Live.
Politics and Public Policy
U.S. Sen Public
Commun. Public Affairs Events
Haunting HD TV-14 Haunting HD TV-14 Haunting HD TV-14 Haunting HD TV-14 Haunting HD TV-14
Fast N' Loud
Fast N' Loud NEW
Fast N' Loud NEW
American NEW
(11:01) Fast N' Loud
BigBeach BigBeach BigBeach BigBeach BigBeach BigBeach BigBeach BigBeach Big
Big
(6:30) E! Live From (CC) HD NEW
Real Princess NEW Real Princess HD
E! News E! Live
Mystery Diagnosis Mystery Diagnosis Mystery Diagnosis The Healer TV-PG-L Mystery Diagnosis
Baker (CC) HD TV-G Baker: Baking with Baker: Nine bakers Cake
Dallas
Vegas
Vegas
chocolate. TV-G
are tested. NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
Cakes
Fox Movies
Fox News
FUSE
FX
Hallmark
Home &
Garden
(5:30) Act of Valor
MacCallum NEW
Malcolm Malcolm
(5:30) Everest
Last Man Last Man
Love or List: Space
for visiting family.
300: Rise of an Empire (2014) (CC) TV-14 (9:55) 300: Rise of an (2014) (CC) TV-14
Carlson NEW
Hannity HD NEW
Ingraham Angle HD Fox News@Night
Chris
Chris
Chris
Chris
Malcolm Malcolm Malcolm Malcolm
Star Trek/Dark (2013): The crew enters a war zone. TV-14-LV
Oblivion TV-14-LSV
Last Man Last Man Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
G. Girls
G. Girls
Love It or List It: A Love or List (CC)
House H. House
House
House
ranch house. TV-G HD TV-G NEW
NEW
NEW
Hunters Hunters
History
American Pickers
(CC) HD TV-PG
American Pickers
(CC) HD TV-PG
HD
HLN
HSN
ID
Crime & Justice
Monday Night TV-G
Murder Comes (CC)
HD TV-14-V
Forensic Forensic
Monday Night TV-G
Homicide Hunter: A
cop killer is sought.
Forensic Forensic Forensic Forensic
Michael Anthony
Michael Anthony
Evil Talks (CC): Two Dead of Night (CC)
coeds vanish. NEW HD NEW
IFC
Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Two/Half Planet Terror (2007)
HD TV-MA-LSV
Lifetime
Lifetime Mov.
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
F. 48 (CC) HD TV-14
(6:00) Babynapped
Hardball Live. HD
Teen Mom 2
One Strange Rock
(CC) HD
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
Incredible Dr. Pol
Dr. K's Exotic TV-PG Dr. K's Exotic TV-PG
The Take Business The Take Business necn News 9PM
The Crow ★★ American President: The president falls in love.
Dateline on OWN
Dateline on OWN
Dateline on OWN
(CC) HD TV-14
(CC) HD TV-14-V
(CC) HD TV-14-V
Oxygen
Paramount
QVC
Science
Sundance
Dateline/Secret
Dateline NEW
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Inspired Style Live. Logo by Lori Live.
Space/Secrets: Deep-space explorers.
(5:00) ★★★★ The Longest Day (1962):
WWII Normandy invasion epic. TV-PG-V
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
National Treasure
Last Witch: A witch hunter who is cursed. TV-14
(10:15) Backtrack TV-14 NEW
Fam. Guy Family G Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Family G Am. Dad Space
Conan NEW
★★★ Winslow Boy: A family sues a naval college.
Mag. Ambersons
(10:15) ★★★ Inn of/6th Hap.
Little People TV-PG Little People TV-PG Little People: Audrey's due date passes. Little People TV-PG
(6:00) NBA Playoff Live. HD
NBA Playoff (CC) Live. HD
Inside the NBA Live.
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre
Bizarre
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre
Bizarre
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Comedy Comedy
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H (8:12) Raymond
Raymond Raymond Mom
Mom
King/Qu. King/Qu.
Fatal Attraction
Fatal Attraction
FatalAtt NEW
For My Man NEW
Fatal Attraction
Modern Modern WWE Monday Night Raw (CC): From Uniondale, N.Y. Live. HD (11:05) Ninja vs.
TV-PG-V
Ninja TV-PG NEW
Family
Family
VH-1
WAM
WE
Love & Hip Hop
(6:24) Larger/Life
Criminal Minds
Vanderpump (CC)
HD TV-14 NEW
Amer. Pickers (CC)
TV-PG NEW
First 48 HD TV-14
First 48 HD TV-14
Other Mother (2017) (CC) HD TV-14-V
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Teen Mom 2
Teen Mom 2 NEW
One Strange Rock
One Strange Rock
(CC) HD
(CC) HD
X-Files HD TV-14
X-Files HD TV-14
(10:02) ★★ Fighting Temp. (2003) (CC):
An ad exec leads a choir. HD TV-PG-D
Southern Charm
(CC) HD TV-14
Pawn Str Pawn
NEW
NEW
Watch
NEW
Pawn
Stars
V'pump
Pawn
Stars
Forensic Forensic
Wunderbrow TV-G
Homicide Hunter: A
cop killer is sought.
(10:02) First 48
(11:02) First 48
A Mother's: A woman's released from jail.
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Teen Mom NEW
Teen Mom TeenMom
One Strange Rock
One Strange Rock
(CC) HD NEW
(CC) HD
Dr. K's Exotic TV-PG
necn News 10Pm
X Company TV-14
Dateline on ID (CC):
Conclusion. NEW
Dr. K's Exotic TV-PG
necn News 11PM
★★ Dance with Me
Dateline on OWN
(CC) HD TV-14-V
In Ice Cold Blood
In Ice Cold Blood
It Takes Snapped
It Was Him NEW
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Isaac Mizrahi Live. Shawn Killinger (CC) Live. HD
(9:02) Planets and Beyond (CC) HD TV-G Space/Secrets
★★ Midway (1976) (CC): Chronicle of the Pacific battle.
Charlton Heston, Henry Fonda, James Coburn. TV-PG-LV
Love/Hip NEW
Mama NEW
Love & Hip Hop
Dear Mama/Love
Astro Boy (2009) (CC) HD
(9:35) ★★ Knight's Tale: A peasant poses as a noble.
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B13
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Low clouds and areas of
fog to start off the day
will give way to partly
sunny skies in the afternoon. Turning out clear and chilly
at night.
HIGH
56-61
LOW
43-48
WEDNESDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
High pressure will promote dry and pleasant
weather with times of
clouds and sunshine.
After a nice evening, it will be
partly cloudy at night.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Sunshine will mix with
a few clouds; another
nice afternoon. With
high pressure in control,
skies will turn out mainly clear
at night.
HIGH
58-63
LOW
47-52
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
HIGH
70-75
LOW
46-51
HIGH
66-71
LOW
53-58
7
1
3
6 P.M.
Rather cloudy with a
couple of showers, especially in the morning.
Clouds may break for
some sun later in the afternoon.
Mainly clear at night.
Pleasant with intervals
of clouds and sunshine.
As a cold front nears
from the west, clouds
will increase at night with a
passing shower late.
HIGH
61-66
LOW
47-52
1
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
2
3
6
2
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
TUESDAY
TODAY
18
6
6
5
1
1
5
9
30
6
2
Difficulty Level
5/07
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: High pressure will keep much of the area dry with
clouds and sunshine; more clouds to the south with a
spotty shower.
TOMORROW: A dry and tranquil weather pattern
will remain in place across much of the region with
PRESQUE ISLE
intervals of clouds and sunshine.
56/34
EXTENDED: More of a southerly breeze will
begin to pump milder air northward into the
MILLINOCKET
area Wednesday with some sun. Showers
60/30
in the west Thursday.
BURLINGTON
62/40
MONTPELIER
61/32
MT. WASHINGTON
37/25
LEBANON
68/34
RUTLAND
64/34
Boston Harbor
Wind
Seas
Temp
NE 8-16 kts.
1-2 ft.
59/46
 East Cape
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
4:49 5:38
5:03 5:52
5:21 6:01
4:48 5:37
Yesterday
High/low
67/55
Mean
61
Departure from normal +6
Departure for month +75
Departure for year +105
5 p.m. rel. humidity 77%
BAR HARBOR
58/38
PORTLAND 62/40
LACONIA
67/36
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 61/40
BRATTLEBORO
68/42
68/31
NASHUA 64/39
PITTSFIELD
66/36
BOSTON 58/45
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
61/42
70/41 PROVIDENCE
55/45
BEDFORD
59/43
62/44
HYANNIS 57/45
HARTFORD
70/44
NEWPORT
57/46
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 54/44
55/45
64/48
New England marine forecast
High tides
5:04 5:46
9.2 8.5
11:2711:46
1.3 2.1
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
Wind
Seas
Temp
NE 8-16 kts.
5-9 ft.
60/43
6:56
6:05
2:13
2:06
Heat
4
13
68
5201
5434
4977
Cool
0
27
0
27
0
19
May readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
78.3
55.5
38.6
58/45
Nantucket
NE 8-16 kts.
5-9 ft.
55/45
Provincetown
NE 8-16 kts.
3-6 ft.
Yesterday’s high 67°
100
Record
high
90
80
63
47
Record
low
20
57/46
0
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6
April
2.0"
1.57
1.5"
Moon phases
1.0"
0.72
0.21
0.01
T
0.06 T
0.04
0.23
0.54
0.21
0.05
0.2
0.5"
0.09 T
T
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6
NEW
May 15
FIRST
May 21
FULL
May 29
Venus in twilight – A. MacRobert
All spring, Venus shines bright white in the westnorthwest as twilight fades. Look for Capella high
to its upper right. Higher to Venus’s upper left are
Pollux and Castor.
HOROSCOPE
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Pressure builds around communication. News you hear could be
informative yet confusing. What
you realize is that you speak a
different language. You might
have worked too hard to get involved in a power play. Relax
and let go. Tonight: Where your
friends are.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Reach out to someone you care
about who seems to make a difference. Focus on a long-term
goal and on the person who inspires you to go for it. Your expenses could spin out of control.
Be more serious-minded, if possible. Tonight: Wherever you go,
others observe you.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Reach out to someone at a dis-
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
ant is 31.
ºIn A.D. 558, the original main
dome of the Hagia Sophia in
Constantinople collapsed during an earthquake; Emperor
Justinian I ordered that the
structure be rebuilt.
ºIn 1763, Pontiac, chief of the
Ottawa Indians, attempted to
lead a sneak attack on Britishheld Fort Detroit, but was
1891
May
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
LAST
May 7
Norm.
62.0
46.2
37.6
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s low 55°
58/45
Today is Monday, May 7, the
127th day of 2018. There are
238 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Rhythm-and-blues
singer Thelma Houston is 75.
Utah Governor Gary Herbert is
71.Movie director Amy Heckerling is 66. Actress Traci Lords is
50. Arctic Monkeys cofounder
Matt Helders is 32. Saturday
Night Live comedian Aidy Bry-
6:08
5:33
1:41
1:34
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Normal Temperatures
Martha’s
3-6 ft.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday,
May 7, 2018:
This year you break patterns and
open up to better relationships.
You won't mind being challenged by others; in fact, you will
enjoy the spirited interactions.
You might notice that you have
the same issues as before, but
very different approaches. If you
are single, you could meet someone with whom you want to
form a special bond. Respect this
person's differences. If you are
attached, you might experience
an innate tension between you
and your sweetie. As a couple,
you are more creative and dynamic than you are individually.
SCORPIO presents you with
many different opportunities.
7:06
6:48
6:00
5:57
33
1-3 ft.
Cloudy
4 miles
west at 5 m.p.h.
43/38
0.0”
6:14
5:52
5:18
5:18
Normal
low
NE 8-16 kts.
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
3:53 4:32
4:48 5:30
A.M. P.M.
40
NE 10-20 kts.
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
4:55 5:36
High tides
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
60
Cod Canal
5:32 a.m.
7:50 p.m.
14:18
1:33 a.m.
5:46
5:46
5:55
5:50
5:50
Normal
high
Buzzards Bay
Almanac
5:04
5:04
5:09
5:08
5:13
1930
Actual Temperatures
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Vineyard
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
A.M. P.M.
Boston’s recent climate
AUGUSTA
63/40
BERLIN
65/27
A.M. P.M.
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
BANGOR
63/39
NEWPORT
60/28
Tides
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
April
Yesterday
Precip days in May
Trace
3
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
0.09”
Norm. month to date 0.65”
West
East
♠ J4
♥ Q 10 9 7
♦ Q9
♣ 10 9 8 6 5
♠A
♥A J 5 4
♦A862
♣K J 7 2
South
♠ K Q 10 8 3 2
♥K62
♦ 53
♣A4
South
1♠
4♠
West
North
East
Dbl
3♠
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — ♠ A
In January, I was in South Florida on holiday (it was icy
cold in Alabama), and I enjoyed a game at Dan Handler’s
Community Bridge Club in North Palm Beach. As West in
today’s deal, I muffed a tough problem on defense. Cover
the East/South cards and try it yourself.
When South bid four spades, I might well have doubled
again. If my partner had then bid five hearts, he could have
made it. Against four spades I led the ace of trumps to see
dummy — to see what lead would have been better, a cynic
might say.
Any continuation looked perilous. I tried the ace and a
low diamond, hoping East ruffed. South won, drew trumps
and ran the diamonds to pitch his hearts. He lost a club at
the end, making four.
At Trick Two, I could have led a low diamond — unlikely
to cost even if South had a singleton. East would be sure to
get in, and a heart shift would sink the contract.
Kindest regards to all at the Community Bridge Club and
to my gracious hosts, Harvey and Zena Hafetz.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ A ♥ A J 5 4 ♦ A 8 6 2 ♣ K J
7 2. You are the dealer. What is your opening call?
0.0"
May
24 Hr. Precipitation
South dealer — Both sides vulnerable
North
♠ 9765
♥ 83
♦ K J 10 7 4
♣Q3
Year to date
18.47”
Norm. year to date 15.32”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
ANSWER: This type of hand is hard to describe. You want
to show all your suits without getting too high in case of
a misfit. I would not open 1NT, promising balanced pattern when I don’t have it. Open one diamond. If partner
responds one spade, bid two clubs. If he then returns to
two diamonds, bid two hearts. If he rebids two spades, you
can try 2NT.
tance. You might want to come
to an understanding with this
person. Extremes come to the
forefront, as others might be extremely pushy. Be willing to let
go of what no longer works. Detach, and you will be successful.
Tonight: Be near good music.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
You might not know what to do
with all the responsibility that
drops on you. A power play
could backfire. Understanding
evolves between you and another person, but only as long as
you don't try to force him or her
to act a certain way. Tonight:
One-on-one relating works best.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Understand that not everything
is under your control, as much
as you might like to think it is.
When someone else has a keen
imagination and a strong drive,
you can voice your opinions only
so much. Make it OK to turn
down someone's offer. Tonight:
Take a walk on the wild side.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Defer to others, rather than carry all the responsibility yourself.
Your friends might have different ideas for how to make an adjustment to handle these tasks.
Pressure builds. Be gracious for
all the help, and then make fun
plans. Tonight: Run some errands on the way home.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Your creativity emerges when
you open up to new possibilities.
Still, you have a lot of energy focused on completing what must
be done. It becomes obvious that
a co-worker or family member
seems to be distorting what is
happening. Tonight: Accept a
friend's invitation.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Stay close to home and remain
anchored. Your sense of self
helps you to walk an untradi-
tional path. Brainstorm with
others, and you might be surprised by the results. Try not to
negate a good idea. Don't allow a
self-indulgent tendency to take
over. Tonight: Time for fun.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21)
Speak your mind and say what
you feel. It will be nearly impossible to change your feelings,
though you could step back and
allow someone else the luxury of
finishing up a project. Know that
nothing has to be your way or
the highway. Tonight: Choose a
favorite pastime.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Understand what is going on
around you. You might be stuck
on a key issue that could be setting you up for a power play. Try
to walk in someone else's shoes
and understand where he or she
is coming from. Flow with the
moment. Your instincts are
right-on. Tonight: Out late.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
You are in your element no matter what occurs. You feel empowered and ready to handle the impossible. Your sense of humor
comes through in an odd way,
and others react to you in an
equally odd way. Don't allow
your imagination to get carried
away. Tonight: As you like it.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Do exactly what you feel is right,
and you will learn to stay on target. Your sense of direction takes
you to a new level of understanding; however, there is an element
of confusion around you that
could discourage you from making any major decisions. Tonight: Get a good night's sleep.
foiled because the British had
been tipped off in advance.
ºIn 1789, America’s first inaugural ball was held in New York
in honor of President George
Washington, who had taken the
oath of office a week earlier.
ºIn 1824, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op.
125, premiered in Vienna.
ºIn 1915, a German U-boat
torpedoed and sank the British
liner RMS Lusitania off the
southern coast of Ireland, kill-
ing 1,198 people, including 128
Americans.
ºIn 1939, Germany and Italy
announced a military and political alliance known as the
Rome-Berlin Axis.
ºIn 1945, Germany signed an
unconditional surrender at Allied headquarters in Rheims
(rams), France, ending its role
in World War II.
ºIn 1954, the 55-day Battle of
Dien Bien Phu in Vietnam ended with Vietnamese insurgents
overrunning French forces.
ºIn 1975, President Ford formally declared an end to the
‘‘Vietnam era.’’ In Ho Chi Minh
City — formerly Saigon — the
Viet Cong celebrated.
In 1984, a $180 million out-ofcourt settlement was announced in the Agent Orange
class-action suit brought by
Vietnam veterans who said
they’d been injured by exposure to the defoliant.
ºIn 1998, the parent company
of Mercedes-Benz agreed to buy
Chrysler Corp. for $37 billion.
ºIn 2008, President George W.
Bush, addressing the Council of
the Americas, said Cuba’s postFidel Castro leadership had
made only ‘‘empty gestures at
reform’’ as he rejected calls for
easing US restrictions on the
communist island.
ºLast year, French voters elected independent centrist Emmanuel Macron, 39, as the
country’s youngest president.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2018 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
B14
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
3
9
8
6
4
2
7
5
1
7
1
5
3
8
9
6
4
2
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
4
2
6
5
1
7
8
9
3
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
9
6
2
8
7
3
5
1
4
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
8
5
3
1
2
4
9
6
7
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
1
7
4
9
6
5
3
2
8
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
5
3
1
2
9
8
4
7
6
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
2
4
9
7
3
6
1
8
5
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
6
8
7
4
5
1
2
3
9
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
ZIPPY “Fishing Expedition” by Bill Griffith
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
A plugger seldom, if ever, washes his truck ... his
tractor, however, is another story.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
2
4
7 9
1
2
9
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
COMMON STUFF BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Big goofballs
5 Fiery gem
9 Destiny
13 Three strikes
are an out, e.g.
14 Oft-reflected
image
15 Pelvic bones
16 Crucial point
19 Instrument that
wails
20 Beans go-with
21 Reverses sinking
22 Type of support
23 Sandler in the
movies
24 “Hot” snack
27 15th president
31 Carafe
relatives
32 Pocketed bread?
33 “Aladdin” prince
34 Poll focus
38 It’s sweet after
dinner
39 Flower or eye
feature
40 Hard-to-dispute
fact
41 Badly needing
money
44 Overly precious
45 Crucifix variety
46 Expression
of woe
47 “ ... but fear ___”
50 Work the
checkout
51 Hotel offering
54 100 percent
truth
57 Ice on frigid
waters
58 Standard
59 Maryland
vis-a-vis
Arizona
60 Some conifers
61 Mug with
a mug
62 Id’s complements
DOWN
1 Tolkien creatures
2 One’s
atmosphere
3 Continuous
change
4 It sells, it’s said
5 Place of business
6 Flat tire
application
7 Prolonged pain
8 Director Spike
9 Daughter of
Muhammad
10 New Testament
book
11 Shoe structure
12 Jug grips
15 Duchess
of York
17 Ending that
threatens
18 Wacky
22 Like lemon
juice
23 They’re cranked
no more
24 Part-timers
25 Anticipate
26 Parking
regulator
27 In two lobes
28 Easily duped
29 Soothing plants
30 Foolish one
32 Like skin
35 Con
36 Large lizard
37 What fuddy-duddies
pick
42 Mountain
ridges
43 Semi-casual
shirts
44 Like sweaty
hands
46 Acidic to the
taste
47 Dubious
48 Charming story
49 Barge, e.g.
50 Word to a pest
51 Male in the woods
52 It’s tender
in Mexico
53 Crafts’ partner
55 Dynamite stuff
56 Pigskin holder
8 9
6 2
9 1 8 5
8 5 4 3
7 2
8 7
7
5
3
7 6
5
1
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Jennifer Weiner talks fiction, nonfiction,
and the #MeToo movement
Novelist Jennifer Weiner, the bestselling author of “Good in Bed” and
“In Her Shoes,” which was turned into
a movie starring Cameron Diaz and
Toni Collette, is speaking at Combined
Jewish Philanthropies’ annual Pomegranate Society & Friends event Monday. In advance, we got Weiner on the
phone for a chat about family, success,
and being that nerdy kid at school
who always had a book in her backpack.
Q. Welcome back to New England.
A. Lucky for me, I get to spend my
summers on Cape Cod. I actually
spend quite a bit of time in Boston —
sadly, quite a lot of it in Logan Airport.
. . . When I lived in Philadelphia, it
was all about the Jersey Shore, but
when I made my first trip there I was
like, “No, this is not going to work for
me.”
MICHAEL BROOK/PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND
Singing from the soul at the Perkins gala
Ellis Hall, a protege of the late, great soul singer
Ray Charles, provided the entertainment at the
13th annual Perkins Possibilities Gala.
Hall, an alum of the Perkins School for the Blind,
performed alongside the Perkins Chorus and a band
from Berklee College of Music. More than 500 people attended the event at the school’s Watertown
campus Thursday night. The gala raised more than
$1 million to support programs and services for people who are blind.
Comedian Lenny Clarke took up the role as gala
auctioneer. Perkins Board of Trustees chair Corinne
Basler Grousbeck and Perkins president and CEO
Dave Power both spoke at the event. Notable guests
included Kevin Bright, executive producer of NBC’s
“Friends” and a longtime producer of the gala, and
his wife, Claudia; Tom DiBenedetto, a partner in
the Fenway Sports Group, and his wife, Linda; Jack­
ie Liebergott, former president of Emerson College;
Hunt Lambert, Perkins board member and dean of
the Harvard Extension School; developer Steve Sam­
uels; Spaulding Rehab Network president David
Storto with senior vice president Oswald Monde­
jar; Putnam Investments president Bob Reynolds
and his wife, Laura; Simone Winston of Winston
Flowers; and Kennedy Elsey of Mix 104.1 radio.
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
‘Infinity War’ still on top
After breaking opening-weekend
records, ‘‘Avengers: Infinity War’’ continued to dominate in its second weekend in theaters, but alternative programming like the romantic comedy
‘‘Overboard’’ also found an audience in
what has historically been considered
the kickoff to the summer movie season.
The Walt Disney Co. said Sunday
that ‘‘Avengers: Infinity War’’ will
gross an estimated $112.5 million
from North American theaters over
the weekend, becoming the second
highest grossing film in weekend two
behind ‘‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’’’ $149.2 million and just slightly
ahead of ‘‘Black Panther’’ ($111.7 million). Globally, ‘‘Avengers: Infinity
War’’ has now grossed over $1.2 billion and become the first film to cross
the $1 billion mark in 11 days of release, and it has yet to open in China.
‘‘Overboard’’ came in a very distant
second but still made a splash for a
film its size. MGM and Lionsgate’s
Pantelion Films’ gender-swapped remake of Garry Marshall’s 1987 comedy took in a better-than-expected
$14.8 million. Third place went to ‘‘A
Quiet Place,’’ which has grossed
$159.9 million in five weeks, and
fourth place to ‘‘I Feel Pretty,’’ now up
to $37.8 million in weekend three.
‘‘Rampage’’ rounded out the top five
with $4.6 million, bumping its domestic total to $84.8 million. (AP)
Q. Why did this event spark your interest?
A. I especially was attracted to the
theme of the event: Women who dare.
Paying attention to the #MeToo movement and women telling their stories
and people finally starting to listen, I
think we are at a real watershed moment in America, and I think that if I
can be of any use in encouraging
women to tell their stories, to speak
up, and be brave, and know that they
are going to leave the world better
than they found it, that’s something I
want to be doing with my time.
Q. On the topic of women who dare,
has there been a moment in your career when you faced adversity because
you were a woman who dared and you
succeeded?
A. I think the dichotomy that I have
struggled with my entire career is that
men are allowed to write books that
are both critically acclaimed and totally blockbuster bestsellers. Stephen
King is considered a popular author,
but he is also in The New York Times.
With women writers, it’s always been
one or the other — either tremendously popular and people call your books
beach books or chick-lit, or you can be
a literary superstar and people respect
you and you win prizes, but maybe
your books never get a chance to become popular. Women have to pick
one or the other and that’s something
that I’ve talked a lot about.
Q. You’ve written fiction, nonfiction,
and now children’s books. Which has
been your favorite?
A. I think I’m always going to have a
soft spot in my heart for fiction. Novels were my first love and books were
the thing that saved me when I was
this lonely nerdy kid who didn’t have
any friends. I could always lose myself
in a book and be somewhere else. I
was a reader the whole time I grew up
and I loved books, so the idea that I
could grow up and write them felt really magical to me.
Fun with the ‘Food Flirts’
So sweet! The hosts of PBS’s “The Food Flirts,” Marilynn and Sheila Brass,
stopped by The Rashi School in Dedham the other day to teach students about
baking. The sisters from Winthrop chatted with the children as they baked cookies and also shared tips and recipes. Pictured are (back from left) Mallory Rome,
head of The Rashi School; Marilynn and Sheila Brass; Laura Mandel, executive
director of the Jewish Arts Collaborative; and students (front, from left) Danny,
Flora, and Elena.
The forecast
Q. How did it feel to see your characters come to life on screen in “In Her
Shoes”?
A. I think “surreal” is the word that every writer will give you because it’s
strange to be sitting there looking at
the big screen and see things that only
existed in your imagination. It’s like
someone reaching into your brain and
scooping the characters out. I’m very
lucky. There are authors that have
their books adapted and then spend a
portion of their careers going “Well,
the book was really different” and
have to apologize for what happened.
In my case, I don’t have to apologize at
all. I thought they did a wonderful job
adapting it.
TAMARA STAPLES
Q. What motivates you?
A. Obviously, making the bestseller list
is always a thrill, but for me, I told myself when I was writing my very first
book: If someone actually publishes
this book, and if I get to walk into a
bookstore and see my name on the
cover of a book that people who are
not related to me are going to pay
money to read, that will be the pinnacle of my dream. Still to this day, walking into a bookstore and seeing my
name is kind of amazing. As far as motivation, I always want to push myself
and never want to tell the same story
over and over. I want to have more layers and nuance and more depth and
richness in the stories that I’m telling,
and also have them be timely. Have
something to say about women and
the world and the way we’re living
now.
Q. Many of your books have some tie
to your own life experience. How do
you decide what part of your personal
life to incorporate?
A. If it’s funny or embarrassing, or if
it’s tragic and I can make it funny or
embarrassing. I remember my mother
used to say to me, “It’s all material.”
Whenever I would complain about my
parents’ horrible divorce or someone
dumped me, she would tell me that it
was all material and I would use it all
someday. I maintained that attitude as
I got older. Anything that feels like it’s
funny or poignant or can illustrate the
way women are in the world right
now, that’s material.
Q. As a reporter turned fiction writer,
do you still use your reporting skills?
A. There’s no better training you can
have to be a novelist than to be a reporter. You have to develop a good eye
for detail, you have to know which details to include to draw a picture, you
have to be succinct, you have to be
quick and get to the point. The most
important thing is that you have to be
comfortable being edited. If your editor tells you to cut six inches, you have
to do that. The phrase that you hear a
lot in the writing world is “kill your
darlings.” If there’s something that you
love but it’s just not serving the plot or
building the character, you have to cut
it.
Q. What’s your advice to other writers
when it comes to finding inspiration?
A. What I would say is the most important thing, especially true for women,
is to not wait for someone to give you
permission. Don’t wait until you have
earned a degree or until you publish
something in a magazine. I think that
if you can tell yourself that you’re a
writer and find the courage to get the
words on the page, that’s the important thing and you don’t need a degree
and you don’t need to have published
something.
Globe correspondents Sophie Cannon
and Maddie Kilgannon contributed.
Read local celebrity news at
www.bostonglobe.com/names. Names
can be reached at names@globe.com
or at 617-929-8253.
‘I know you don’t believe in climate change, but a storm’s a­coming, baby.’
STORMY DANIELS, adult film actress, playing herself, to Alec Baldwin, as President Trump, during a “Saturday Night Live” sketch
Aerosmith returns from hiatus with roaring set in New Orleans
By Maura Johnston
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
NEW ORLEANS — Each year, the
New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival
presents a wide-ranging lineup that salutes the roots — and the future — of
American music over two weekends.
On Saturday, the New Orleans Fair
Grounds’ many stages hosted sets by
soul belter Anita Baker, Latin rock alchemist Juanes, the well-traveled
bandleader Deacon John, and representatives from jazz, gospel, blues, and
funk, as well as a slew of other genres.
But the headliner on the main stage
represented Boston, and did so in winning fashion: Aerosmith, playing its
first public concert since canceling a
tour last September, returned from its
hiatus with a roaring set.
Jazz Fest often features rock artists;
this year’s roster includes new-guard
leaders like Beck and Jack White as
well as stalwarts like Sting and David
Byrne. But Aerosmith is a particularly
good fit for the occasion, what with its
bloozy origins and eagerness to pay
homage to those artists that came before. The band’s afternoon-closing set
started 15 minutes early, which was as
much of a sign that they were raring to
go as the reports that frontman Steven
Tyler had been popping up around the
Big Easy to surprise barflies with impromptu performances.
Opening with “Toys in the Attic,”
MUSIC REVIEW
AEROSMITH
At the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage
Festival, Saturday
the title track of their 1975 album, the
band was in fine form, with Tyler’s yelp
leading his bandmates’ insistent chug
as the crowd packed in more tightly.
From there, Aerosmith ran through a
14-song set with a couple of chestnuts
from its earliest albums — the winking
biblical allegory “Adam’s Apple,” the
wailing Brad Whitford showcase “Last
Child” — and massive ’90s hits like the
harmonica-laden “Cryin’ ” and the
schmaltz-covered power ballad “I
Don’t Want to Miss a Thing.” Lead guitarist Joe Perry took over vocal duties
on two Fleetwood Mac covers, including the locomotive “Oh Well,” while Tyler was in full-on rock-god mode, ribbing his bandmates, mugging for
hoisted smartphones, and enthusing
about the charms of playing outside.
For the encore, the band pulled out
its big guns: Tyler got behind the piano
for the anthem “Dream On,” and a fiery “Walk This Way,” with the help of
fog machines, closed out the day.
Saturday’s performance is the only
Aerosmith show on the docket for
2018. Perry, having launched his re-
cent solo album, “Sweetzerland Manifesto,” with a handful of shows (including an April gig at House of Blues) with
Whitford, is heading out on tour with
Hollywood Vampires, his project with
Alice Cooper and Johnny Depp, later
this month. Tyler and his Nashvillebased Loving Mary Band will hit the
road with the songs from his 2016
country-leaning CD “We’re All Somebody From Somewhere.” But Saturday’s set, with material from Aerosmith’s Allston days through to its ’90s
superstardom, showed that the band
remains a well-oiled machine.
Maura Johnston can be reached at
maura@maura.com.
Sports
TV HIGHLIGHTS
NBA playoffs: Celtics-76ers, 6 p.m., TNT
NHL playoffs: Capitals-Penguins, 7 p.m., NBCSN
NBA playoffs: Raptors-Cavaliers, 8:30 p.m., TNT
NHL playoffs: Predators-Jets, 9;30 p.m., NBCSN
Listings, C9
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E M O N DAY, M AY 7, 2 01 8 | B O S T O N GL O B E .C O M / SP O RT S
NHL PLAYOFFS
Bruins vs. Lightning
Tampa Bay wins series, 4-1
Lights out
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Patrice Bergeron (37) and Brad Marchand (63) were left to lick their wounds after the Bruins were eliminated from the playoffs in a 3-1 loss to the Lightning Sunday.
Ineffective in 5-on-5,
Bruins done in five
Tara Sullivan
Bitter end to season
will linger awhile
TAMPA — The last great chance to
save the season came with just over
four minutes to go in the third period
Sunday, the Bruins down only a goal
to the Lightning and going on the
power play, ready to convert on the
one area of their attack that rarely
failed them this postseason. The fans
inside Tampa’s Amalie Arena were
held in thrall, the emotions rolling through them like
waves, pulling them under with every Bruins pass near the
net, bringing them up for air with every puck cleared to the
other end of the ice, precious seconds ticking away to
someone’s joy and someone’s heartache.
These are the hockey cauldrons that give the Stanley
Cup playoffs their well-deserved reputation for redefining
intensity, and across those final, frantic minutes, these two
teams did not disappoint. But when the Bruins could not
get one past Lightning goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy, when the
Lightning would put one more in Tuukka Rask’s abandoned net, disappointment did set in for the visitors, a 3-1
loss in Game 5 of this second-round series, sending Tampa
SULLIVAN, Page C4
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Sean Kuraly draws a first-period interference call from Tampa’s Dan
Girardi, which led to the Bruins scoring the first goal of the game.
Lightning 3 TAMPA — The Bruins outperformed most
expectations in 2017-18, nearly finished
Bruins
1 No. 1 in the Eastern Conference while posting 50 wins in the regular season, and transformed low
hopes into big dreams — potentially Stanley Cup dreams —
through the fall, winter, and into the spring.
“A lot of people didn’t expect us to be a playoff team,”
team captain Zdeno Chara said when it all came to a sudden
stop here Sunday, the big man’s voice muted by disappointment. “I think there is a lot we can take, and use it as positive . . . a lot to be proud of and looking forward to next season.”
It’s back to the future now for the Black and Gold, their
present erased here in a 3-1 loss to the stubborn, thorough,
and faster Lightning, who handily erased the Bruins in four
straight games after an embarrassing 6-2 loss here at
Amalie Arena in the series opener only last Saturday.
The Bolts, who next will face Washington or Pittsburgh
in the Eastern Conference championship, sent the Bruins
crashing down by allowing only seven goals over the final
four games. It was a stretch in which they played with the
lead for an aggregate 137:10, barely allowing the Bruins to
breathe, and never once to relax. The Bruins accumulated
BRUINS, Page C5
With Sale on mound,
Sox blow away Rangers
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
Red Sox 6 ARLINGTON, Texas —
It was 84 degrees, huRangers 1 mid, and not e ven a
JIM COWSERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mitch Moreland, who went 2 for 4 and raised his average to .347,
follows through on his RBI double in the first inning Sunday in Texas.
small cloud dotted the big Texas sky
when Sunday’s game between the Red
Sox and Texas Rangers got started.
For Chris Sale, the pride of Lakeland, Fla., and Florida Gulf Coast University, it was ideal weather to pitch.
“Perfect, 100 percent,” he said.
“This is what I love; this is what I
grew up doing. I’ll take 85-plus and
muggy all day. It’s a little bit easier to
stay loose.”
It showed. Sale threw seven powerful innings as the Red Sox beat the
Rangers, 6-1.
Sale allowed one run on four hits,
walked one and struck out a seasonhigh 12.
“He’s got nasty stuff. He put a foot
down,” Texas manager Jeff Banister
said.
With one exception, every fourseam fastball Sale threw was 95-99
miles per hour. His 103rd and final
pitch was a 97.7-m.p.h. heater that
was grounded weakly to second base
by Delino DeShields.
“I was told that he’s done driving a
Suburban and moving up to a Ferrari,” pitching coach Dana LeVangie
said.
Sale’s fastball had been 93-95 for
much of the season, which is more
than enough to pitch well but not
what he usually features. He blasted
RED SOX, Page C7
I N S I DE
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
NBA PLAYOFFS
Celtics vs. 76ers
Boston leads
series, 3-0
No longer a long shot
Stevens (above) develops big man
Baynes into a 3-point shooter. C2
Yankees stay hot
Torres’s walkoff homer helps NY to
its 15th win in 16 games. C6
Changes are due
Boston Marathon mulls tweak to
women’s elite field rules. Fair Play, C9
C2
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
NBA Playoffs
He’s a good sport
Baseball great Barry Larkin impressed by son Shane’s run with Celtics
Gary Washburn
ON BASKETBALL
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Aron Baynes has made his point this postseason: Having
made 6 of 11 treys, he can be a threat from beyond the arc.
Beyond arc, Baynes
no longer a long shot
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
PHILADELPHIA — As the
Celtics wrapped up practice at
Temple University on Sunday
afternoon, center Aron Baynes
stood in a corner of the court
and patiently lofted one 3pointer after another.
It almost looked like the 6foot-10-inch, 260-pounder was
palming a baseball, but his
shots slid through the net more
often than not. Then Baynes
lumbered over to the other corner and repeated the routine
with similar results.
He was not doing it to be silly or because he was looking to
pass time until the team bus arrived. He was doing it to maintain what has become perhaps
Boston’s most improbable asset
of these playoffs.
Entering the postseason,
Baynes had made just 4 of 28 3pointers (14.3 percent) over a
total of 402 regular-season and
playoff games. But in the first
10 games of these playoffs, he is
6 for 11 from beyond the arc.
His 3-point shooting percentage of 54.5 is the highest
individual mark of anyone on
the eight remaining playoff
teams who has taken at least
five threes, a group that includes Stephen Curry, Klay
Thompson, Kyle Korver, and
J.J. Redick. Yes, they fire them
at a much higher rate and under more dangerous circumstances, but any time players
like that trail a player like
Baynes in a 3-point shooting
category, it is significant.
“That’s one of those things I
always work on,” Baynes said.
“I’m not going to go out there
and live by it. I know where my
bread is buttered and what I
need to do to help this team
succeed. But it’s one of those
things you always want to keep
getting better at.”
Celtics coach Brad Stevens
has encouraged Baynes to expand his range, and he emphasized in the playoffs that his
shooting could be an extra
weapon, particularly as Boston
faced shot-blockers such as Milwaukee’s Thon Maker and Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid. When
Baynes is not a threat from beyond the arc, those players can
stay off of him and lurk closer
to the rim to make Boston’s
drives to the hoop more of a
chore.
Now, in addition to the obvious benefit that comes from the
additional points, Baynes’s
presence as a 3-point shooter
has already had reverberations
elsewhere.
“It just puts a second
thought in that defender ’s
mind,” Celtics assistant coach
Micah Shrewsberry said. “If a
guy’s not shooting them at all,
the defender has no concerns
about just leaving him and going to block shots and protect
the rim. Now, he’s got to at least
think about it. Earlier in the series, Embiid was like a foot in
the lane, and now he’s at least
two feet out and creeping more
towards Baynes. And now our
guys are getting more toward
the basket.”
The NBA is well into its reinvention as a 3-point-centric
game, and the classic post man
is becoming a relic while the big
men who have evolved have become more valuable. Celtics
forward Al Horford, for example, made a total of just 10 3pointers over his first seven
NBA seasons, but this year he
made 97 of them at an elite
42.9 percent clip. Generally, the
big men who adopt the three
have a more skill-heavy game,
such as Horford. The burly
Baynes is viewed more as a defensive-minded enforcer.
The Celtics signed Baynes
last summer to a one-year deal,
and at that point he had made
just 1 of 7 3-point attempts in
his career. After one preseason
practice, Stevens and Baynes
were shooting together when
Baynes made 30 of 32 midrange jumpers.
“I didn’ t know he could
shoot it like that,” Stevens said.
“Then when you watch the arc
of it, and the touch.”
At practices and even at
games, Stevens consistently encouraged Baynes to keep firing
away. Initially, the results were
a bit discouraging, and Baynes
did not like that. He started this
year by going 0 for 12 from beyond the arc, and his frustration with the shot was visible.
“Some of the ones he’d shoot
in the regular season, they’d be
in and out or they’d be close,
and he’d come back to the
bench and be a little upset, like
‘Man, I almost had that one,’ ”
Shrewsberry said. “And we’d
tell him, ‘Hey, man, it’s a good
shot.’ And he’d be like ‘I should
have made that one. I thought I
had that one.’ So just having a
little bit of confidence and having the first one go for him really opened it up.”
After starting his career by
making just 1 of 19 3-pointers,
Baynes has hit 9 of 20 since
March 31, when he went 2 for 2
from beyond the arc against the
Raptors.
Baynes sought guidance
from Horford, who developed
into a 3-point shooter relatively
late in his career. Horford’s
main piece of advice was for
Baynes to take his time and relax when he catches the ball beyond the arc. There is usually
not much time for that in the
frenetic flow of a game, but it
made more sense for Baynes,
because defenses do not flock to
him.
All 32 of his attempts in the
regular season and playoffs this
year have come with his closest
defender at least 4 feet away, as
opponents try to gauge the real
value of closing out on a center
with no history of being a deep
threat.
“The other guys create so
much space that it gives me a
lot of time when I am out
there,” Baynes said. “So it’s a big
credit to the other guys on our
team and what a threat they are
offensively.”
Baynes has been particularly
effective from the slightly shorter corner threes, going 5 for 7
from those spots in these playoffs. And if teams start respecting that shot more, it will only
breed new opportunities for the
Celtics looking to attack the
basket.
“Brad’s the best at putting
guys at the best position to succeed,” Shrewsberry said. “He’s
not telling them, like, ‘Hey,
you’re going to shoot all threes
this game.’ But he says, ‘There’s
go i n g t o b e o p p o r t u n i t i e s
where you’re going to get a
chance, and you’re going to be
open and I’m comfortable with
you shooting that.’ And for
[Baynes], now he’s comfortable.
He’s like, ‘Coach has got my
back if I shoot this.’ And guys
are rallying around him, too.”
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
PHILADELPHIA — Barry
Larkin did not push his son to
play baseball. So there was
Shane on the freshman football
team at Dr. Phillips High
School in Orlando, Fla., a running back blocking for a receiver when the pile landed on his
right leg and snapped his ankle.
Larkin spent two months in
a full leg cast and missed half of
his basketball season. He then
went out for the football team
again as a sophomore. In the
middle of a practice, Larkin
had an epiphany; he no longer
loved football as much as basketball and the risk of injury
that could jeopardize another
season was too great for Larkin.
He quit football and became
a basketball star at Dr. Phillips,
with his father, who a few years
before had wrapped up a Hall
of Fame baseball career, being
more of a supporter than a critical father. The relationship between Hall of Fame baseball
player and his NBA son has
been unique.
Barry attends occasional
games, offers his son more career advice than basketball
tips, and is gleeful to watch
Shane’s journey deep into the
NBA playoffs after a rocky first
three NBA seasons. The 5-foot11-inch Shane has become a
solid backup point guard for
the Celtics, likely ensuring that
he’ll receive a contract offer
this summer after spending the
previous year overseas.
Barry remains in the background. He attended a recent
playoff game at TD Garden,
sporting a Celtics cap. The NBA
dad is not readily recognizable
among NBA fans but he played
in 12 All-Star Games, won an
MVP award in 1995, received
three Gold Gloves, and was a
nine-time Silver Slugger in 19
seasons with the Cincinnati
Reds.
Yet, he has transformed into
simply a proud father.
“Just amazing, it’s absolutely amazing,” Larkin said about
his son’s and the team’s ascension this season. “I’m proud of
the team, how the team has
played and how they’ve gone
through all the adversity in losing all the players that they’ve
lost. Brad Stevens coming in
and doing the job he’s done.
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Shane Larkin (left) and Guerschon Yabusele play it loose during Sunday’s practice.
Terry Rozier stepping up the
way he’s stepped up.
“And to have my son be part
of it, I’m proud of him for doing
what he’s been able to accomplish, especially with the vertical challenges that he has with
all these monsters. To see Brad
give him a chance to pressure
the ball and for him to fit into
his role has been fantastic.”
Sons of professional athletes
reaching the professional ranks
isn’t uncommon, but it’s generally in the same sport. Barry
watched his son develop into
one of the NCAA’s top point
guards at the University of Miami and become a first-round
draft pick in 2013. He then
played for three NBA teams in
three seasons, along with the
stint in Spain, before the Celtics
came calling.
“It was a good experience
for him,” Barry said of Shane’s
time last year with Saski Baskonia in Spain.
“He was in a situation [in
his first three NBA seasons]
where he was deferring too
much to everyone. I felt like
when he was in Spain, it was a
good time for him to reflect on
some of the things he was able
to accomplish. It was a fantastic transition to see him make.
“He went from being a top
dog in college and then went to
play with Dirk [Nowitzki in
Dallas] and Carmelo [Anthony,
in New York] and really losing
his attack for the game. Being
the size he is, that’s the only
way he’s going to be able to be
successful.”
Shane would like to have a
more expanded role. But with
the presence of Rozier and
Marcus Smart, he is the third
point guard. But he has averaged more than 15 minutes per
game during the playoffs, and
playing nearly a third of the
time in playoff games means he
has earned Stevens’s trust.
“Everybody’s playing their
role right now and I’ve just got
to take different challenges and
make things fun,” Shane said.
“I know my role in this [76ers]
series is chase J.J. Redick
around or Marco Belinelli and
don’t let them get open threes.
So I’ve got to find the joy in
that. I just tell my teammates,
I’m just playing tag the whole
game. I find that enjoyable because compared to last year, I
was in Spain. I’m thankful for
the coaching staff for believing
in me and bringing me in here.”
Barry is impressed by how
his son has seized his opportunity to return to the NBA.
“He’s a humble kid and he
certainly has to be humble in
the role he’s in,” Barry said. “I
can’t tell him anything about
the X’s and O’s of basketball,
but I can tell him about hustle.
I can tell him about humility. I
can tell him about tenacity. I
certainly have been in some
tough wars, albeit in baseball, I
don’t have to deal with 7-footers but certainly guys that
throw 100 miles per hour, so
it’s all relative.”
Shane is in a good place.
He’ll definitely draw free agent
interest this summer with a
chance to stay in the NBA long
term. He doesn’t really talk
about his famous father much,
but he appreciates his role in
his development and maturity
the past few years.
“He’s going to support anything you do. He’s never been
that kind of dad that’s on you
super hard. But the one thing
he always wants is for me to go
out there and play hard. If I do
that, regardless if I shoot well
or have many assists, he’s going
to be proud of whatever I do.
“I’ve faced a lot of odds to
get to the point where I’m at
now, broken ankle, being out of
the league. It’s been a roller
coaster. It’s been a rocky road.
I’ve rolled the highs and the
lows and I try to stay even keel
and work. I’ve got to continue
to enjoy this moment, being in
the situation I am in today
compared to last year.”
Gary Washburn can be reached
at gwashburn@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GwashburnGlobe.
Brown wants sweep — and time to rehab
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
PHILADELPHIA — The
Celtics on Monday will try to
complete a four-game sweep of
the 76ers in
CELTICS
the Eastern
NOTEBOOK Conference
semifinals.
Obviously, they would like
to conclude the series as quickly as possible just to ensure
that they advance. But Jaylen
Brown has another motivation.
The forward remains on a minutes restriction as he recovers
from a hamstring strain, and
he still does not quite feel fully
healthy. He wants to end this
series so he can get as much
rest and rehabilitation as possible before the next one.
“That’s the key, trying to
find some wiggle room for
that,” Brown said. “We just
have to continue to win games.
I’ll manage this, just continue
to win games.”
Brown injured his hamstring in the second quarter of
Boston’s Game 7 win over the
Bucks in the opening round.
He sat out game 1 against the
76ers, then played 25 minutes
in Game 2 and 29 in Game 3.
Brown sat out several portions of Sunday’s practice to
rest, and he completed some
rehabilitation in a pool.
“I’m all right,” he said. “I’m
not as healthy as I would like
to be, but it’s a continuous process of trying to get better. The
medical staff is helping us out
and Brad [Stevens] does a
good job of managing the min-
Celtics vs. 76ers
Boston leads series, 3­0
GAME 1 — Monday, April 30
At Boston 117 ....... Philadelphia 101
GAME 2 — Thursday, May 3
At Boston 108 ....... Philadelphia 103
GAME 3 — Saturday, May 5
Boston 101... at Philadelphia 98 (OT)
GAME 4
Boston at Philadelphia
Monday, May 7, 6 p.m., TNT
GAME 5*
Philadelphia at Boston
Wednesday, May 9, TBA, TNT
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Game 3 hero Al Horford works out in preparation for
Monday’s Game 4, when the Celtics can eliminate the 76ers.
ute restriction, and I’m just
trying to get better every day.”
Even if both the Celtics and
Cavaliers complete sweeps, the
conference finals cannot start
until Sunday at the earliest, so
Brown could soon get the rest
he is hoping for.
“Yesterday he looked way
better than the first game, in
my opinion,” Stevens said of
Brown. “He was probably tested more in that game as far as
his matchups, running around.
He was on [J.J.] Redick quite a
bit late in the game. I thought
he looked better running yesterday. We’re encouraged by
that.”
Baynes talks titles
Celtics center Aron Baynes
won an NBA title with the
Spurs in 2014. This Celtics
team is probably not at that
level just yet, but Baynes said
there are some similarities between the two.
“That was so fun and exciting about the 2014 team,”
Baynes said. “We moved that
ball, and it’s hard to guard. We
see flashes of that here. We’re
going to make it more often
than not when we do that. You
see the joy on everyone’s face,
and everyone enjoys going out
there every time. It’s a fun
thing to be a part of.”
Tatum no trash talker
In the fourth quarter of the
Celtics’ Game 3 win on Saturday, rookie forward Jayson
Tatum leapt for a dunk before
Joel Embiid fouled him and
GAME 6*
Boston at Philadelphia
Friday, May 11, TBA, ESPN
GAME 7*
Philadelphia at Boston
Sunday, May 13, TBA
* If necessary
stopped him from converting
the shot.
Tatum said that afterward
he told Embiid he was lucky
the dunk had not gone in.
“I don’t really talk trash and
I was just joking,” Tatum said
Sunday.
“Me and him have the same
trainer so we know each other
pretty well. We’ve joked a lot in
those games whenever we play
each other.”
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
NBA Playoffs
G l o b e
Sports
C3
NHL Playoffs
Bruins’ ride ends in traffic jam
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
SEAN GARDNER/GETTY IMAGES
Kevin Durant gets a shot off over the Pelicans’ Anthony
Davis en route to a 38-point outing in the Warriors’ win.
Durant, Warriors
roll, regain control
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kevin Durant made his approach to taking over a pivotal
NBA playoff game sound so
simple — and
PLAYOFF
look that way,
ROUNDUP
too.
‘‘I just try
to tell myself that I’m at my
best when I don’t care what
happens after the game, the
outcome or anything,’’ Durant
said. ‘‘That’s when I’m free and
having fun out there, and
forceful. That was the thing —
just try to play with force no
matter if I missed shots or not,
just keep shooting, keep being
aggressive.’’
Durant scored Golden
State’s first two baskets on
pull-up jumpers of 21 and 15
feet before a minute-and-a-half
had elapsed in Game 4 of the
Warriors’ Western Conference
semifinal series against New
Orleans on Sunday. He finished with 38 points on 15-of27 shooting to go with nine rebounds, and Golden State
pounded the Pelicans, 118-92,
to take a 3-1 series lead back to
the West Coast.
Warriors guard Stephen
Curry said it was apparent early that getting the ball to Durant would be wise.
The Warriors lost by 19 in
Game 3 on Friday and the Pelicans were looking to even the
series. Instead, the Warriors
responded with a resounding
effort that produced a wire-towire win with leads as large as
26 points. Curry scored 23,
Klay Thompson added 13, and
Quinn Cook, who was a Pelicans reserve earlier this season, contributed 12 points.
After shooting poorly Friday, the Warriors were eager to
regain their rhythm and did so
immediately. They hit six of
their first eight shots, including Durant making his first
three.
Anthony Davis had 26
points and 12 rebounds for
New Orleans, but the Pelicans
hit only 36 percent (32 of 88)
of their shots, missing 22 of 26
3-point attempts.
Rajon Rondo finished with
11 rebounds but had only six
assists after racking up 21 in
Game 3.
Rockets 100, Jazz 87 — Chris
Paul had 27 points and 12 rebounds while James Harden
scored 24 points to power visiting Houston over Utah, taking
a 3-1 lead in the Western Conference semifinal series.
Paul, playing the sidekick to
Harden for most of his first
season in Houston, took center
stage, controlling the tempo
and getting to his favorite
spots as the Rockets led from
start to finish.
Donovan Mitchell scored
25 before fouling out and Joe
Ingles had 15 for the Jazz.
Mitchell started finding
lanes to the basket late and got
the Jazz within 85-80 after he
fueled a 10-2 run, sending the
crowd into a frenzy. But Paul,
who matched his scoring high
for this playoff run, hit a pullup jumper and found Trevor
Ariza for a 3-pointer to put the
Rockets back up by double digits and they never looked back.
Houston, which has been
known for their offensive firepower, put forth a disruptive
defensive effort. Clint Capela,
the anchor of the Houston defense, had 12 points, 15 rebounds, and 6 blocks, one of
which featured a Dikembe Mutombo-like finger wag in the
fourth quarter.
NBA playoffs
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Cavaliers lead Raptors, 3­0
Tuesday, May 1
Cleveland 113....at Toronto 112 (OT)
Thursday, May 3
Cleveland 128.............at Toronto 110
Saturday, May 5
At Cleveland 105.............Toronto 103
Schedule
Mon., May 7 at Cleveland...........8:30
*Wed., May 9 at Toronto.............TBA
*Fri., May 11 at Cleveland..........TBA
*Sun., May 13 at Toronto............TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Warriors lead Pelicans, 3­1
Saturday, April 28
At Golden St. 123.. New Orleans 101
Tuesday, May 1
At Golden St. 121.. New Orleans 116
Friday, May 4
At New Orleans 119.. Golden St. 100
Sunday, May 6
Golden St. 118.... At New Orleans 92
Schedule
Tue., May 8 at Golden State.....10:30
*Thu., May 10 at New Orleans..TBA
*Mon., May 14 at Golden State.TBA
Rockets lead Jazz, 3­1
Sunday, April 29
At Houston 110.......................Utah 96
Wednesday, May 2
Utah 116.....................at Houston 108
Friday, May 4
Houston 113.......................at Utah 92
Sunday, May 6
Houston 100.......................at Utah 87
Schedule
Tue., May 8 at Houston....................8
*Thu., May 10 at Utah.................TBA
*Mon., May 14 at Houston.........TBA
* If necessary
WARRIORS 118, PELICANS 92
GOLDEN STATE
FG
FT
Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T A F Pt
Iguodala.... 29
2­7
0­0
1­7 6 3
6
Durant ....... 36 15­27
6­6
1­9 5 1 38
Green......... 37
3­9
0­0
1­9 9 3
8
K.Thmpsn . 36 5­13
0­7 0 2 13
2­2
Curry ......... 32 8­17
3­3
0­1 2 1 23
Looney ...... 21
3­4
1­2
1­3 1 3
7
Livingston. 12
2­5
0­0
0­1 2 2
4
Cook .......... 17
5­8
2­3
0­4 0 1 12
West ............ 4
2­2
0­0
0­0 2 2
4
Bell............... 5
0­0
0­0
0­1 1 1
0
Young.......... 4
0­1
0­0
0­0 0 0
0
Pachulia ...... 3
0­0
1­2
1­1 0 1
1
McGee......... 3
1­2
0­0
0­2 0 0
2
Totals ......... 46­95 15­18 5­45 28 20 118
FG%: .484, FT%: .833. 3­pt. goals: 11­33, .333
(Iguodala 2­5, Durant 2­5, Green 2­4, K.Thomp­
son 1­6, Curry 4­9, Cook 0­3, McGee 0­1). Team
rebounds: 9. Team turnovers: 11 (12 pts.).
Blocks: 5 (Iguodala, Durant, Green 2, West).
Turnovers: 11 (Durant 2, Green 3, K.Thompson,
Curry 2, Looney, Cook, Pachulia). Steals: 11 (Ig­
uodala 3, Durant, Green 4, Looney, Cook, Pachu­
lia). Technicals: Green, 1:10/2nd.
NEW ORLEANS
FG
FT
Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T A F Pt
Mirotic....... 32
1­7
5­5 2­11 2 3
7
Moore........ 37 8­14
3­4
0­1 1 2 20
Davis.......... 40 8­22 10­10 2­12 1 4 26
Rondo........ 32 2­10
1­4 2­11 6 1
6
Holiday...... 40 8­16
2­4
2­7 3 3 19
Hill.............. 12
1­2
0­0
1­3 1 2
3
Clark.......... 24 4­14
3­3
1­2 3 4 11
Miller ......... 15
0­2
0­0
0­3 0 0
0
Diallo ........... 4
0­1
0­0
0­0 0 2
0
Liggins......... 4
0­0
0­0
0­1 0 0
0
Totals ......... 32­88 24­30 10­51 17 21 92
FG%: .364, FT%: .800. 3­pt. goals: 4­26, .154
(Mirotic 0­2, Moore 1­4, Davis 0­3, Rondo 1­2,
Holiday 1­4, Hill 1­2, Clark 0­7, Miller 0­2). Team
rebounds: 9. Team turnovers: 19 (21 pts.).
Blocks: 5 (Mirotic 2, Davis 2, Holiday). Turn­
overs: 19 (Mirotic 2, Moore, Davis 6, Rondo 4,
Holiday 2, Hill, Clark 2, Liggins). Steals: 7 (Davis,
Holiday, Clark 3, Miller, Diallo).
Golden State ................ 37 24 33 24 — 118
New Orleans ................ 22 32 19 19 —
92
A — 18,513 (16,867). T — 2:17. Officials —
James Capers, Tom Washington, Zach Zarba.
ROCKETS 100, JAZZ 87
HOUSTON
FG
FT
Min M­A M­A
Ariza .......... 32
2­7
0­0
Tucker ....... 35
3­6
2­2
Capela ....... 37 6­11
0­0
Harden ...... 36 8­22
7­8
Paul............ 35 12­23
2­2
Gordon ...... 26 3­10
2­2
Nene .......... 10
0­1
2­2
Mbh Mte... 16
1­3
1­1
Green......... 13
2­5
0­0
Totals ......... 37­88 16­17
Reb
O­T A F Pt
0­4 0 3
6
1­7 1 2 11
5­15 2 2 12
0­4 3 3 24
2­12 6 3 27
0­2 2 3
9
1­2 1 3
2
0­2 0 0
3
0­1 0 2
6
9­49 15 21 100
FG%: .420, FT%: .941. 3­pt. goals: 10­38, .263
(Ariza 2­7, Tucker 3­5, Harden 1­7, Paul 1­6, Gor­
don 1­6, Mbah a Moute 0­2, Green 2­5). Team re­
bounds: 5. Team turnovers: 13 (11 pts.). Blocks:
9 (Tucker, Capela 6, Paul, Mbah a Moute). Turn­
overs: 13 (Harden 8, Paul, Gordon 2, Nene, Mbah
a Moute). Steals: 11 (Capela 2, Harden 4, Paul 2,
Nene, Mbah a Moute 2). Technicals: Capela,
8:08/4th, Coach D'Antoni, 8:08/4th. Flagrant
fouls: Tucker, 2:20/2nd.
UTAH
FG
FT
Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T A F Pt
Crowder.... 34 1­11
2­2
0­5 2 2
5
Ingles......... 41 6­13
1­2
0­8 4 3 15
Gobert ....... 32
5­7
1­2 4­10 0 1 11
O'Neale ..... 28
3­7
2­2
0­5 1 3
8
Mitchell..... 38 8­24
7­7
1­9 2 6 25
Exum ......... 10
4­6
1­2
0­0 1 3
9
Favors ....... 16
2­2
1­2
1­1 1 1
5
Burks ........... 9
0­2
0­0
1­4 1 0
0
Jerebko ..... 14
0­1
0­0
0­1 2 1
0
Neto........... 18 3­10
1­1
1­2 2 1
9
Totals ......... 32­83 16­20 8­45 16 21 87
FG%: .386, FT%: .800. 3­pt. goals: 7­29, .241
(Crowder 1­7, Ingles 2­7, O'Neale 0­3, Mitchell
2­7, Exum 0­1, Jerebko 0­1, Neto 2­3). Team re­
bounds: 8. Team turnovers: 17 (17 pts.). Blocks:
5 (Crowder 2, Gobert 3). Turnovers: 16 (Ingles 2,
Gobert 3, O'Neale 4, Mitchell 3, Favors, Burks,
Neto 2). Steals: 8 (Crowder, Ingles, Gobert,
Mitchell 4, Favors). Technicals: Mitchell,
8:08/4th.
Houston......................... 30 28 21 21 — 100
Utah ............................... 23 25 17 22 —
87
A — 18,306 (19,911). T — 2:23. Officials — Ken
Mauer, Bill Kennedy, James Williams.
Already without Ricky Rubio, the Jazz lost point guard
Dante Exum in the third quarter, also to a hamstring injury.
TAMPA — The sheet of ice
at Amalie Arena resembled
rush hour on the Southeast Expressway. There was just no
room to move. There were no
clear paths. And like a frustrated morning commuter, it took
forever for the Bruins to reach
their destination.
Every time it looked as if a
lane was opening, along
chugged a Lightning
forechecker, creating traffic
like a convoy of 18-wheelers
and bogging down the flow.
The Bruins tried to change
lanes, but every time they put
their blinker on there was a
Tampa skater mucking up the
works like an annoying cellphone checker brake-lighting it
down the fast lane.
And to make matters worse,
when the Bruins finally got to
where they wanted to go — Andrei Vasilevskiy’s doorstep —
there was a Tampa defender occupying all the prime parking
spaces.
After scoring six goals in the
opener of their Stanley Cup
playoff series with the Lightning, the Bruins managed just
seven more the rest of the way.
The ride ended for coach
Bruce Cassidy’s troops Sunday
when they dropped Game 5,
3-1.
The Bruins couldn’t consistently get through the bumperto-bumper log jams — and
there are no sneaky fast GPS
shortcuts in the postseason —
and now they’ll have a whole
summer to map out some new
routes.
Even Boston’s top line of Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand, and David Pastrnak, widely regarded as one of the top
trios in the league, was stymied.
When there was room to
move — like on the power play
— the Boston offense hummed
liked a Ferrari down the carpool lane. It was fast and furious. Five on five, however, it resembled more of a jalopy in the
breakdown lane.
Boston failed to score an
even-strength goal over the final three games of the series.
“They played a very good
system five on five, and they
were better than we were,’’ said
Marchand, who was honked at
by the crowd every time he
touched the puck Sunday. “You
can’t rely on special teams every night to win games. They
help, for sure, but you have to
score five on five, and obviously
we didn’t.’’
There was very little space
and even less time for the Bruins to get creative on the rush,
and the few times they were
able to break in cleanly, Vasilevskiy was there to collect the
shots like a cranky tolltaker.
“They’re a stingy team, and
they did a good job of taking
away those second and third
chances,’’ Bergeron said. “We
had some looks but not
enough, obviously. I also think
there were a few things we
could have done in our zone to
break out easier and generate
more offense with that. There’s
a lot of things we can analyze
afterwards, obviously.’’
Vasilevskiy (27 saves) didn’t
make every save cleanly, but
when there was some loose
change around his cage, his
protectors were always in place
to clean up the debris and clear
out the bodies.
“I think their D corps is
strong, and they moved the
puck,” Cassidy said. “The few
chances we had, we had some
good forecheck pressure, but to
get inside you really had to
work. And they did a good job
of not allowing us to get inside.
Some of our bigger bodies obviously we wanted to get there
more. But some of the other
guys were trying, but they just
got pushed around in there.’’
And it wasn’t just the defensemen who were at the ready.
The aptly named Lightning forwards (“There’s a lot of speed
there,’’ Marchand said) were
quick to get back and provide
barricades in front of the net.
“I think what they did differently [after Game 1] was
their four th and fif th guy
[kept] coming back protecting
the slot,’’ said David Krejci, the
lone Bruin to sneak one by
Vasilevskiy Sunday — a powerplay strike, naturally. “Maybe
we’d get one chance off the
rush but [no] second and third
shots because they did a really
good job of backchecking. All
five guys kept coming back.’’
The key to overcoming and
beating the traffic is to find
more efficient ways to get
around town — or around the
net. You have to keep moving
to find open spaces. In Cassidy’s estimation, that creativity
was lacking.
“I thought in the O zone we
weren’t able to separate and
create second chances,’’ he said.
“We were stubborn, we weren’t
funneling pucks. We weren’t
using our feet to get away from
their coverage enough.’’
Cassidy, who gave a ton of
credit to the Lightning (“We
were playing one of the best if
not the best team in the Nat i o n a l Ho c ke y L e a g u e , s o
they’re going to have their moments when they’re going to be
better than us,’’ he said), saw
improvement in Games 4 and
5, just not nearly enough. The
coach felt that when frustration kicked in, some of his skaters diverted from the game
plan.
“I thought we got away from
playing as a group of five, defending, getting back in position, and attacking as a group
of five,’’ he said. “We saw a little
more of that in the third period, a little more desperation,
obviously, but at times we got a
little bit individual, especially
the last few games. Because we
were having such trouble, guys
want to do a little more instead
of sticking with the program.’’
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
Vegas stays hot, eliminates Sharks
NHL playoffs
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Capitals lead Penguins, 3­2
Thursday, April 26
Pittsburgh 3.........at Washington 2
Sunday, April 29
At Washington 4.........Pittsburgh 1
Tuesday, May 1
Washington 4.........at Pittsburgh 3
Thursday, May 3
At Pittsburgh 3.........Washington 1
Saturday, May 5
At Washington 6.........Pittsburgh 3
Schedule
Mon., May 7 at Pittsburgh...........7
*Wed., May 9 at Washington..7:30
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Jets lead Predators, 3­2
Friday, April 27
Winnipeg 4................at Nashville 1
Sunday, April 29
At Nashville 5....Winnipeg 4 (2OT)
Tuesday, May 1
At Winnipeg 7...............Nashville 4
Thursday, May 3
Nashville 2................at Winnipeg 1
Saturday, May 5
Winnipeg 6................at Nashville 2
Schedule
Mon., May 7 at Winnipeg........9:30
*Thu., May 10 at Nashville......TBA
Knights beat Sharks, 4­2
Thursday, April 26
At Vegas 7......................San Jose 0
Saturday, April 28
San Jose 4...........at Vegas 3 (2OT)
Monday, April 30
Vegas 4.............at San Jose 3 (OT)
Wednesday, May 2
At San Jose 4......................Vegas 0
Friday, May 4
At Vegas 5......................San Jose 3
Sunday, May 6
Vegas 3...................... at San Jose 0
* If necessary
Knights 3 SAN JOSE, Calif.
— Shortly after
Sharks 0 t h e S a n J o s e
Sharks were denied by the iron
for the fourth time of the night,
Marc-Andre Fleury rubbed the
goal post to thank it for his
good fortune.
There’s something magical
about the ride the expansion
Vegas Golden Knights have
been on all season and now it’s
going all the way to the Western Conference final.
Fleury made 28 saves in his
fourth shutout of the playoffs
and the Golden Knights have
made it to the NHL’s final four
in their inaugural season after
beating the San Jose Sharks,
3-0, in Game 6 Sunday.
‘‘It was maybe a little bit of a
shock, but I'm proud of our
team, our organization, the
way they did things here,’’ Fleu-
ry said. ‘‘I'm proud to be where
we are right now.’’
Fleur y, who was part of
three Stanley Cup-winning
teams in Pittsburgh, is a main
reason for the success. He allowed just three goals in a firstround sweep against Los Angeles, posted shutouts in Games 1
and 6 against the Sharks, and
was spectacular in an overtime
win in Game 3.
Vegas next will play either
Winnipeg or Nashville in the
Western Conference final. The
Jets lead that series, 3-2, heading into Game 6 on Monday
night.
‘‘We deserve to be here,’’
coach Gerard Gallant said.
‘‘We’re a good team, we play
hard and we played well all season long. The two teams we
played were very good hockey
teams and we were very evenly
matched with those teams.’’
Jonathan Marchessault
o p e n e d t h e s c o r i n g , Na t e
Schmidt added an insurance
goal that was only detectable
by replay, and Cody Eakin
sealed it with an empty-netter
to help Vegas become the third
NHL team to win multiple series in its first season.
The Toronto Arenas won
the Stanley Cup in the first
postseason in league history in
1918 and St. Louis won two
rounds to win the all-expansion West Division in 1968.
The Sharks had numerous
opportunities all night but
were thwarted by a couple of
shots that hit the iron, some acrobatic saves from Fleury, and
other chances that trickled just
wide.
This marked the fourth
straight postseason for the
Sharks that ended with a loss
on home ice.
WIN A $2500
SHOPPING SPREE
From Northern New England’s
Largest Golf Selection
• Register to win in any of our four
superstores—Hudson, NH, Greenland, NH,
West Lebanon, NH, or Scarborough, ME
• Over $11,000 in total golf prizes
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 3, SHARKS 0
Vegas ................................... 0
San Jose............................... 0
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
With David Pastrnak tied up, Andrei Vasilevskiy makes a save in the third period.
2
0
1
0
—
—
3
0
First period — None. Penalties — Haula, VGK
(tripping), 1:01. McNabb, VGK (delay of game),
9:23. Kane, SJ (tripping), 11:35.
Second period — 1. Vegas, Marchessault 4
(Smith, Karlsson), 6:33. 2. Vegas, Schmidt 2
(Haula, Perron), 15:38. Penalties — None.
Third period — 3. Vegas, Eakin 3 (Carpenter,
Schmidt), 18:09 (en). Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Vegas 12­5­16 — 33. San Jo­
se 11­7­10 — 28.
Power plays — Vegas 0­1; San Jose 0­2.
Goalies — Vegas, Fleury 8­2­0 (28 shots­28
saves). San Jose, Jones 6­4­0 (32 shots­30
saves).
Referees — Kevin Pollock, Brad Watson.
Linesmen — David Brisebois, Kiel Murchison.
A — 17,562 (17,562). T — 2:32
• Try new clubs before you buy
on our outdoor driving ranges or
in our indoor fitting bays
• Receive an expert custom club fitting
• Get the best names at the best prices
Open Daily • No NH Sales Tax
Route 3A Hudson, NH 603-595-8484
Route 33 Greenland, NH 603-433-8585
Route 12A West Lebanon, NH 603-298-8282
Payne Road Scarborough, ME 207-883-4343
golfskiwarehouse.com
No purchase necessary.
Must be 18 years or older to
participate. Registration ends on
May 31, 2018. For details, visit
www.golfskiwarehouse.com.
C4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
NHL Playoffs
It’s hardly ever a vacation for Backes in Tampa
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
TAMPA — Prime vacation
country, but not a great place
for David Backes to visit, especially in seaBRUINS
son.
NOTEBOOK
The veteran
Bruins winger
suffered a deep gash to his
thigh here on St. Patrick’s Day
and was sidelined for two
weeks, and Sunday his season
ended when he was flattened
by a straight-on check from J.T.
Miller in the second period
that almost assuredly left the
34-year-old concussed.
“I don’t know,” said coach
Bruce Cassidy, asked if Backes
was concussed on the play.
“Obviously, there will be a report on him. Upper body, and
that’s the best I’ve got.”
Backes was along the wall
when he was trucked by the
hard-charging 6-foot-1-inch,
218-pound Miller, a former
New York Ranger. The seismic
blast dropped Backes at the
blue line, and he needed a
couple of minutes before he
could get propped back on his
feet — with the help of trainer
Don Del Negro — and make
his way on wobbly legs to the
dressing room.
Backes has suffered numerous concussions throughout
his 12-year career, including
one with the Bruins prior to
his first trip with them to St.
Louis, where he had been the
Blues captain for years. He
now has five months to heal,
which probably will prove
helpful because it often takes
longer for players to bounce
back from each successive
concussive blow.
Not taking a licking
Brad Marchand was informed by league bosses Saturday to mind his tongue.
Specifically, he was told he
would be exposed to potential
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Ryan McDonagh hits David Backes in the first period. Backes took an even bigger hit later.
supplementary discipline if he
again swiped his tongue on a
player, as he did in Round 1
against Toronto’s Leo
Komarov, then Friday against
the Bolts’ Ryan Callahan.
Cassidy was asked in his
pregame news conference on
Sunday if had told his talented
left winger to “zip it”.
“Well, I saw the directive
form the league,” Cassidy said.
“I talked to Marchy about it
[and said]: ‘That’s what the
league’s asked for, and we
need you on the ice. We need
you playing.’ So zip it, or whatever term you used.”
Cassidy said he would “appreciate it” if Marchand found
“something else” to agitate his
opponents.
“If part of his M.O. is to annoy people, find another way
to do it,” Cassidy said. “That’s
basically what’s in front of
him now . . . preferably by
scoring some goals. That
would be the best way, probably.”
Prior to puck drop, the inhouse cameras were trained
on the front row, where a kid
wearing a makeshift Marchand sweater (name inked on
back) also wore a large lampshade-like dog collar around
his neck, resembling those
that vets strap on canines that
have biting issues or are recovering from surgery.
Marchand attempted only
one shot on net (it was
blocked) in his 23:46 of ice
time. His center, Patrice
Bergeron, fired eight times
(three on net), and David
Pastrnak put a game-high
eight shots on net (with four
others blocked).
Tough exit for Krug
The Bruins were without
Torey Krug, their top offensive
defenseman (3-9—12), who
banged up his left ankle in an
awkward fall during Game 4
and was pronounced out of
the series Saturday by Cassidy.
Krug tumbled while in a
puck chase in the defensive
end, sliding awkwardly into
the corner with his legs
spread. He made it off the ice
under his own power, then
once at the bench required assistance to hobble his way to
the dressing room.
“It was obviously tough to
watch,” said fellow backliner
Matt Grzelcyk, who slotted into Krug’s No. 2 pairing in
Game 5 with Kevan Miller. “I
haven’t seen a slow-mo replay
after it. Those are the kind of
things you don’t like to see
happen to anyone, especially a
good friend in Torey. I saw it
pretty clear from the bench. It
was ugly.”
Cassidy said Saturday that
Krug’s condition was being
evaluated, similar to what he
said in the days after defenseman Brandon Carlo fractured
his ankle in the final game of
the regular season. A few days
later, Carlo underwent surgery
to repair the break and won’t
be back with the team until
September’s training camp.
Krug established a career
high for postseason points
(3-9—12) in the 10-plus games
before his exit. His standing
mark, which he set in the ’14
playoffs, was 2-8—10 in 12
games.
Asked if team doctors were
trying to figure out if Krug is a
candidate for surgery, Cassidy
said he was not sure and assumed an update would be
forthcoming.
“We knew [Saturday] that
it probably wasn’t going to be
great news,” he added. “I assume they’ll have a update at
some point if surgery is required.”
Nick Holden slotted into
the open roster spot on defense but was rolled out only
sparingly (6:53). Charlie Mc­
Avoy led in ice time with
26:49.
Journeyman blue liner
Tommy Cross, the former Boston College standout, was
called to duty with Krug sidelined and skated in warmups.
Cross was here in case one of
the starting six defensemen
came up ill or was dinged in
the pregame skate.
Cross, 28, has spent six seasons with AHL Providence
and suited up for the varsity in
one playoff game last season
against Ottawa.
Last shot
Over the final four games,
Bruins vs. Lightning
Tampa Bay wins series, 4­1
GAME 1 — Saturday, April 28
Boston 6 .................. at Tampa Bay 2
GAME 2 — Monday, April 30
At Tampa Bay 4 ................. Boston 2
GAME 3 — Wednesday May 2
Tampa Bay 4 .................. at Boston 1
GAME 4 — Friday, May 4
Tampa Bay 4.......... at Boston 3 (OT)
GAME 5 — Sunday, May 6
At Tampa Bay 3....................Boston 1
the Bolts outshot the Bruins,
154-133, with two of those
shots used for empty-net
goals. Overall, the Bolts fired
302 times in the four games,
and the Bruins 261 . . . Pastrnak finished the postseason
with a career high 20 points,
followed by Marchand (17)
and Bergeron (16). They collected 20 of their 53 points in
the first two games vs. the Maple Leafs . . . As of 9 p.m. Sunday, the Bruins had not announced their plans for the
next couple of days, which
typically include individual exit interviews with Cassidy and
GM Don Sweeney, as well as
the ritual farewell-to-the-media day. The next big event on
the calendar: the annual amateur entry draft, held this season in Dallas June 22-23. As
always, free agency opens July
1 . . . The Bruins gave up a
first-round pick this June to
the Rangers to acquire Rick
Nash, who contributed a modest 3-2—5 in the dozen playoff
games and was 0-1—1 in the
four straight losses to the
Bolts.
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at kevin.dupont@
globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeKPD.
Ending
was a
bitter pill
uSULLIVAN
Continued from Page C1
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
J.T. Miller (10) reacts after his power-play goal in the second gave the Lightning a 2-1 lead.
Shadow line was on Point
By Erik Erlendsson
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
TAMPA — Patrice Bergeron
sets the standard for what it
means to be a two-way center
in the National Hockey League.
Need a big goal or somebody
to help shut down the opposition late in a game to preserve a
lead?
Bergeron is called upon for
both at any point of season by
the Bruins’ brass.
But as Boston dropped
Game 5 of the second round ser i e s 3 - 1 t o t h e Ta m p a B a y
Lightning, and subsequently
the series 4-1, Bergeron was
overshadowed by the shadowing job of sophomore Lightning
center Brayden Point.
After a dominating firstgame performance by
Bergeron, along with linemates
D a v i d Pa s t r n a k a n d B r a d
Marchand, to the tune of 11
points in a 6-2 rout to open the
series, it was Point and his line,
with Tyler Johnson and Ondrej
Palat, that was on point for the
remainder of the series.
In the final four games of
the series — all won by Tampa
Bay — Point outscored
Bergeron, 3-0, at even strength,
including on Sunday with Point
tying the game in the second
period with his third goal of the
series. Bergeron’s only goal
during five-on-five play came in
Game 1, when he scored twice.
“They are three super talented players that make plays,
compete really hard, and that
was a tough battle for us all series,’’ Point said. “I think we did
a pretty good job against them.’’
It was more like an exceptional performance as Point announced to the hockey world
that he is one of the top young
two-way players in the game,
with a lot of his game mirroring that of Bergeron.
“He’s probably right out of
that Bergeron mold where he’s
going to end up playing on the
power play, end up killing penalties for you, he’s going to end
up having those assignments
where he’s going to be the shutdown guy,’’ Lightning head
coach Jon Cooper said. “In today’s game, the shutdown guy
is not the traditional shutdown
player. All those guys contribute offensively, and that’s what
he does. That’s what makes
Bergeron so effective, because
he can do it at both ends of the
ice, and that’s what Pointer can
do.’’
In the opening game of the
series, Point found an eyecatching, minus-5 next to his
name on the scoresheet. The
Lightning coaching staff never
considered a change in the
matchup and were rewarded as
Point finished the series with a
plus-2 overall rating and was
not on the ice for a goal against
at even strength for the final
four games.
“They were unreal, at times
dominant against one of the
best lines in the league,’’ said
Lightning winger J.T. Miller,
who scored the winning goal
on Sunday.
“Obviously that [Bergeron]
line had a really good game in
the first game, but [Point’s line]
response was unreal. They
played a lot of big minutes
against that line, and Pointer
leading the way with Palat and
Johnny was unreal, and they
are big part of the reason we
were moving on.’’
Even when the series shifted
to Boston for Games 3 and 4,
the Bruins hoped to get
Bergeron away from Point, but
before the end of the first period of Game 3, Boston coach
Bruce Cassidy had to abandon
that thought to limit the damage inflicted by Point’s line,
which scored twice in the opening four minutes of Game 3.
It was the play of that line
going head-to-head against
Boston’s top line that ultimatel y d i c t at e d h o w t h e s e r i es
played out, ending the Bruins
season and sending Tampa Bay
back to the Eastern Conference
finals for the third time in the
past four seasons.
“ C a n’ t r e a l l y g i v e t h e m
enough [credit], that is a very
tough matchup for them
against that Bergeron line,’’
Lightning right wing Ryan Callahan said. “Without Pointer’s
line, we are not even close in
this series. That line was huge
for us.’’
to the Eastern Conference Finals, sending Boston home for
a summer of what-could-havebeens.
Every playoff elimination
loss hurts, and every one feels
sudden and shocking, no matter what stage of the postseason
it happens or what the final
score ends up being. But some
definitely hurt more than others, and with this Bruins team,
in this unexpected breakout
season, this one hurts more.
This one had a shot to win it all.
“It was definitely a team I
believe that we could have done
really great things,” veteran
center David Krejci was saying
the quiet corner of an even quieter locker room. “It’s really disappointing right now. A team
like this doesn’t come around
often. I’ve been here a long
time, and this was one of the
best teams I was a part of. From
the coaching staff all the way to
the last guy to the guy who
wasn’t playing tonight, they
were all part of the team. We all
pulled the same rope. It’s really
disappointing.”
There are plenty of culprits
for the Game 5 loss, the same
threads that put the Bruins in
their inescapable hole despite a
dominating 6-2 win in Game 1
of this series. The inability to
generate enough offense in fiveon-five situations. The indignity of being on the wrong end of
too many questionable officials’
whistles. The insanity of earning the No. 2 overall seed yet
being forced to face the No. 3
and No. 1 seeds in the opening
two rounds of the playoffs.
Yet none of that ever seemed
to shake the belief there was a
deep playoff run in their locker
room, not for a team that had
proved so much to itself across
a regular season few of us saw
coming, a team that, over and
over again, came back from big
deficits, a team that in the thick
of the regular season, went 140-4 and joined the ranks of the
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
The Bruins leave the ice after their Game 5 loss in Tampa
brought a seemingly premature end to a breakout season.
elite.
From the early-season days
sprinkled with seeds of hope
that Bruce Cassidy’s first full
year as head coach would –
maybe — duplicate last year’s
low-seeded playoff berth to the
ongoing thrill ride that put the
Bruins among the most feared
teams in the game, this group
proved itself a rare mix of
chemistry and talent.
The top line of Brad Marchand, Patrice Bergeron, and David Pastrnak emerged as one of
the best, if not the best, in the
NHL.
Young players such as Jake
DeBrusk, Charlie McAvoy, Danton Heinen, and, late in the season, Ryan Donato proved they
could play with the big boys.
Veterans such as captain
Zdeno Chara set a tone of professionalism that everyone respected. And Cassidy balanced
it all, maneuvering his lineups
with grace and skill, managing
depth and egos with equal care.
And as much as all of that
bodes well for next season —
there’s little chance this team
will take anyone by surprise
again — it still hurts now. The
hardest thing to find in sports
is opportunity, and those notorious windows stay open only
so long. To accept that they let
this one shut before they were
ready is going to be a bitter offseason pill.
“Yeah. It’s very disappointing the way that we played all
year, the team that we have, all
along we were finding ways,
winning games, everyone kind
of contributing,” Bergeron said.
“We believed we had a great
team, and we thought we could
have done a lot more.”
This is not hyperbole. Just
listen to Lightning coach Jon
Cooper, whose team memorably edged the Bruins for home
ice advantage in the regular
season’s final game, flipping
the script on what had been
months of Boston beating up
on them.
“All right, I’ ll tell you — I
guess I can say it now,” Cooper
said. “Boston set the bar for us.
And we played them three
times late in the year, and the
first two times we played them,
they literally manhandled us.
The scores were tight, the first
one was 3-2, and then they beat
us here, and it was men
amongst boys. And we knew if
we were going to go anywhere
when we made the playoffs —
or if we made the playoffs —
that we had to be as good as
Boston. And it happened. We
beat them, 4-0, and that gave us
a little bit of confidence. Well, it
gave us a lot of confidence. But
they set a bar for us to be better.
And ultimately, we carried that
through into this playoff round.
“I’ll be honest, I’m crediting
the Boston Bruins for a lot of
this by waxing us during the
regular season. And we tried to
chase them, and we wanted to
match them. And we did.”
High praise, but cold comfort.
“Two good teams went at it,”
Krejci said. “We knew one really good team was going to be
out in the second round. We
were trying really hard to advance. It’s just disappointing.
We had a really good team. I really like the guys here. Just a
tough loss.”
They all hurt. But some hurt
a little more than others.
Tara Sullivan is a Globe
columnist. She can be reached
at tara.sullivan@globe.com.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C5
NHL Playoffs
Unable to score 5­on­5, Bruins out in five
uBRUINS
Lightning 3, Bruins 1
Continued from Page C1
a modest 17:51 lead time in the
four games, never holding more
than a tissue-thin one-goal lead,
their secondary scoring nonexistent.
“I think you have to give
[Tampa] credit,” said Bruins
coach Bruce Cassidy, his club’s
scoring confidence abruptly
evaporating over a week. “We’re
a team that scored all year with
different players in and out of
the lineup. We scored vs. Toronto [28 times in the opening series]. It’s not like after 89 games
we forgot how to score or not
play the right way.”
In short, the better team
prevailed by its hotter hand, despite the fact the Bruins were
jobbed by poor officiating in
Game 4 when a blatant penalty
went uncalled and led to a Steven Stamkos laser that helped
lift the Bolts to a 4-3 win. Tampa, after copping first place in
the East in the regular season,
proved the faster and more cohesive squad, especially during
five-on-five play nearly worthy
of a patent at NHL headquarters.
Over the final four games,
the Bruins scored only twice at
even strength, while Tampa
connected 11 times at even
strength, albeit a pair of those
came with Boston’s net empty
for an extra attacker.
“Five on five, we had no
chance,” said Bruins goaltender
Tuukka Rask. “You look at that,
and then it’s pretty easy. . . .
Power play, we scored a lot of
goals, but just couldn’t accomplish a lot five on five. They
shut us down a lot, so . . . credit
to them, a good team.”
Game 5 swung the wrong
way for the Bruins over a
stretch of less than four minutes in the second period,
which the Bruins entered holding a 1-0 lead compliments of
At Amalie Arena, Tampa
FIRST PERIOD
Penalty — Boston, McAvoy (cross check) 7:09
Penalty — Boston, Backes (interference) 11:52
Penalty — Boston, Marchand (embellishment)
12:04
Penalty — Tampa Bay, Hedman (holding) 12:04
Penalty — Tampa Bay, Girardi (interference)
17:02
Penalty — Tampa Bay, CePaquette (tripping)
18:06
Boston 1, Tampa Bay 0 — Krejci 3 (McAvoy,
Bergeron) 19:12 (pp)
SECOND PERIOD
Tampa Bay 1, Boston 1 — Point 4 10:43
Penalty — Boston, Bergeron (tripping) 13:31
Tampa Bay 2, Boston 1 — Miller 2 (Kucherov,
Stamkos) 14:00 (pp)
THIRD PERIOD
Penalty — Tampa Bay, McDonagh (tripping)
15:42
Tampa Bay 3, Boston 1 — Stralman 1 (Hedman)
18:31 (en)
SCORE BY PERIOD
Boston .................................... 1
0
0 —
1
Tampa Bay ............................ 0
2
1 —
3
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Boston .................................... 9
5
Tampa Bay ............................ 7
7
14
8
—
—
28
22
Power plays — Boston 1 of 3; Tampa Bay 1 of 3.
Goalies — Boston, Rask 5­7­0 (21 shots­19
saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 8­2­0 (28 shots­27
saves).
Referees — Gord Dwyer, Chris Rooney. Lines­
men — Brian Murphy, Michel Cormier.
Attendance — 19,092 (19,092). Time — 2:37.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Tampa Bay’s Cedric Paquette (13) launches Noel Acciari into the Bruins’ bench in a second-period board meeting Sunday.
David Krejci’s power-play goal
with 48 seconds left in the first.
The great unraveling began
at 10:43, when Brayden Point
(a sizzling 3-4—7 for the series)
potted the equalizer off a turnover he forced from Kevan Miller’s stick. Next, at 12:17, J.T.
Miller cut the Boston forward
corps back to 11 when he exploded on David Backes with a
heavy hit at Boston’s offensive
blue line. Backes exited on wob-
bly legs (likely concussed), and
only 1:43 later it was Miller
who jacked home a power-play
snipe for the 2-1 lead.
Over the remaining 26 minutes, the Bruins landed 15
chances on Andrei Vasilevskiy
(to Tampa’s seven on Rask), but
nothing found the back of the
net. There were some decent
chances among the 15 offerings, but nothing that flustered
the Bolts’ tender or overtaxed a
defensive corps that rarely had
trouble handling whatever forwards crossed their frozen turf.
“In hindsight, that was the
turning point,” Cassidy said. “At
that time, both goalies are playing well, but you want that save
[on Point’s equalizer], and then
the power play [Miller goal],
that’s a good play. I think we
had enough opportunities in
the third to win. We got behind
in the second — to state the ob-
vious — but I don’ t think it
completely broke our spirit.
“I thought we did enough in
the third to score that tying goal
— that’s all you need is one. Get
it to overtime, if need be, and
then play all night if you have
to.”
The season-end nightfall
came officially at 5:58 p.m., but
for the sake of the scoresheet it
was with 1:29 left in regulation,
only four seconds after a faceoff
deep in Tampa’s end. Patrice
Bergeron won the drop, but it
deflected directly to defenseman Anton Stralman, who
promptly fired it some 180 feet
into an empty net. Season finis
for the Black and Gold.
“Today was just a big fight,”
said Chara, 41, who has signed
on to return for one more season. “It was a war, just a battle
through the 60 minutes. We
needed that second goal. We
fought really hard but fell one
goal short. . . . I thought we deserved it. But at this moment it
is disappointing, because you
feel and you believe that it’s going to happen . . . and you have
that feeling that everyone’s digging deep and working really
hard to get that goal, but . . . ”
But one goal short, and then
two at the close. In five months,
it all begins anew, with expectations ratcheted a little higher.
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at
kevin.dupont@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeKPD.
Sports
C6
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
Baseball
AL
PIRATES 9, BREWERS 0
EAST
BOSTON
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
W
25
24
19
15
8
L
9
10
16
17
26
Pct.
.735
.706
.543
.469
.235
GB
—
1
6½
9
17
Div. Last 10
14­5
6­4
9­8
9­1
7­10
5­5
7­10
6­4
4­8
2­8
Streak
W3
W6
W1
L1
L6
CENTRAL
Cleveland
Minnesota
Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
W
17
13
14
11
9
L
17
17
19
23
23
Pct.
.500
.433
.424
.324
.281
GB
—
2
2½
6
7
Div. Last 10
7­2
3­7
5­2
5­5
7­10
4­6
9­11
6­4
6­9
3­7
Streak
L3
W3
L1
W1
L3
WEST
Los Angeles
Houston
Seattle
Oakland
Texas
W
21
21
19
18
13
L
13
15
14
16
23
Pct.
.618
.583
.576
.529
.361
GB
—
1
1½
3
9
Div. Last 10
12­4
5­5
10­7
4­6
8­8
6­4
9­14
5­5
7­13
4­6
Streak
W1
L2
L1
W3
L3
NL
Gleyber Torres became the youngest Yankee to hit a walkoff home run.
EAST
Atlanta
Philadelphia
New York
Washington
Miami
W
19
18
17
18
13
L
14
15
15
17
20
Pct.
.576
.545
.531
.514
.394
GB
—
1
1½
2
6
Div. Last 10
14­7
6­4
7­13
3­7
10­7
2­8
7­8
7­3
3­6
7­3
Streak
L3
L1
L6
W1
W2
CENTRAL
*St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
*Chicago
Cincinnati
W
19
20
19
16
8
L
12
15
16
14
26
Pct.
.613
.571
.543
.533
.235
GB
—
1
2
2½
12½
Div. Last 10
13­7
6­4
10­13
4­6
10­3
5­5
9­7
5­5
3­15
3­7
Streak
W4
L1
W1
L4
L2
WEST
Arizona
Colorado
San Francisco
Los Angeles
San Diego
W
23
20
19
15
13
L
11
15
15
19
22
Pct.
.676
.571
.559
.441
.371
GB
—
3½
4
8
10½
Div. Last 10
15­7
6­4
7­6
7­3
11­12
8­2
11­15
4­6
11­15
4­6
Streak
W2
W5
W4
L2
W2
* — Not including late game
RESULTS
SUNDAY
BOSTON 6
at Texas 1
At NY Yankees 7
Toronto 2
At Washington 5
At Kansas City 4
Detroit 2
Cleveland 4
At Oakland 2
at NY Mets 2
At Arizona 3
Houston 1
at Tampa Bay 1
LA Angels 8
at Seattle 2
Colorado 3
Philadelphia 4
San Francisco 4
Minnesota 5
at Chi. White Sox 3
Pittsburgh 9
at Milwaukee 0
Baltimore 1
At San Diego 3
at Atlanta 3
LA Dodgers 0
Miami 8
at Cincinnati 5
Chi. Cubs
at St. Louis
SATURDAY
BOSTON 6
at Texas 5
Miami 6
at Cincinnati 0
At NY Yankees 5
Cleveland 2
Minnesota 8
At St. Louis 8 (10 inn.)
Chi. Cubs 6
At Milwaukee 5
at Chi. White Sox 4
Pittsburgh 3
at Atlanta 2
Philadelphia 3
at Washington 1
San Francisco 11
Detroit 3
at Kansas City 2
At Arizona 4
At Tampa Bay 5
JIM MCISSAC/GETTY IMAGES
Toronto 3
Colorado 2
at NY Mets 0
At San Diego 7
LA Dodgers 4
Houston 3
At Oakland 2 (12 inn.)
Baltimore 0
At Seattle 9 (11 inn.)
LA Angels 8
Yankees walk off with
15th win in 16 games
By Mike Fitzpatrick
NEW YORK — Gleyber Torres became the youngest Yankees player to
hit a walkoff homer, a three-run shot in
the ninth inning that gave New York a
7-4 win over the Cleveland Indians on
Sunday for its 15th victory in 16 games.
At 21 years and 144 days, Torres
bettered Mickey Mantle, who was 21
years and 185 days when he hit threerun, ninth-inning drive off the Red Sox’
Ellis Kinder in a 6-3 win on April 23,
1953.
‘‘He’s been special,’’ smiling manager Aaron Boone said about Torres.
Domingo German pitched six hitless
innings in his first major league start
for the Yankees, who nonetheless fell
behind, 4-0, when Cleveland broke
through against relievers Dellin Betances and Jonathan Holder. Yonder
Alonso’s leadoff single against Betances
in the eighth was the first hit for the Indians.
But after managing only one hit
themselves against a stellar Mike Clevinger, the streaking Yankees fought
right back to win their sixth straight
and finish a three-game sweep.
The 15-1 stretch matches the Yankees’ best 16-game run since 1980.
New York, which is one game behind
MONDAY’S GAMES
........2018 ........ Team ........2017 vs. opp........ ........Last 3 starts........
Odds
W­L
ERA
rec.
W­L
IP
ERA
W­L
IP
ERA
YANKEES 7, INDIANS 4
SAN FRANCISCO AT PHILADELPHIA, 7:05 p.m.
Samardzija (R)
Eflin (R)
Off
Off
1­1
0­0
5.27
1.50
2­1
0­1
1­0
0­1
6.0
5.0
6.00
10.80
1­1
0­0
13.2
6.0
5.27
1.50
—
0­4
—
4.81
0­0
0­7
0­0
0­2
0.0
12.0
0.00
5.25
0­0
0­1
0.0
15.2
0.00
6.89
1­2
1­4
2.80
7.67
3­3
1­5
0­1
0­0
5.0
0.0
9.00
0.00
0­0
1­1
19.0
16.0
1.89
7.31
1.09
3.19
2­2
2­4
0­0
0­0
1.1
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­0
2­1
17.0
19.2
1.06
2.75
0.00
0.00
1­0
0­0
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­0
0­0
5.2
0.0
0.00
0.00
3.98
2.84
2­5
1­0
3­1
0­0
27.1
0.0
1.98
0.00
1­2
0­0
20.0
6.1
4.50
2.84
Strasburg (R)
Off
3.47
1­1
3­3
3­4
13.0
Ross (R)
Off
2­2
3.28
4­2
0­0
0.0
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season
1.38
0.00
1­2
0­1
20.1
17.2
3.98
3.06
NY METS AT CINCINNATI, 7:10 p.m.
Conlon (L)
Bailey (R)
Off
Off
DETROIT AT TEXAS, 8:05 p.m.
Fulmer (R)
Moore (L)
Off
Off
MIAMI AT CHI. CUBS, 8:05 p.m.
García (L)
Hendricks (R)
Off
Off
1­0
2­2
MINNESOTA AT ST. LOUIS, 8:10 p.m.
Romero (R)
Gant (R)
Off
Off
1­0
1­0
HOUSTON AT OAKLAND, 10:05 p.m.
Keuchel (L)
Anderson (L)
Off
Off
1­5
0­0
WASHINGTON AT SAN DIEGO, 10:10 p.m.
LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Not including Sunday night’s game
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
Betts, Bos ........................ 110 36 39 .355
Lowrie, Oak..................... 136 16 48 .353
Simmons, LAA ................ 120 22 42 .350
JMartinez, Bos................ 126 22 44 .349
MMachado, Bal .............. 130 17 45 .346
DGordon, Sea.................. 134 20 46 .343
Trout, LAA ....................... 125 29 42 .336
MSmith, TB ....................... 91 11 30 .330
Cabrera, Det ..................... 93 13 30 .323
Altuve, Hou ..................... 143 20 46 .322
HOME RUNS
Betts, Boston.....................................................13
Gallo, Texas.......................................................12
Trout, Los Angeles...........................................12
Haniger, Seattle................................................10
Gregorius, New York.......................................10
............................................................. 7 tied at 9.
RUNS BATTED IN
Lowrie, Oakland...............................................31
Gregorius, New York.......................................30
KDavis, Oakland...............................................29
GSanchez, New York.......................................28
Haniger, Seattle................................................27
JMartinez, Boston............................................ 27
MMachado, Baltimore.....................................27
Betts, Boston.....................................................26
Correa, Houston...............................................25
........................................................... 5 tied at 24.
PITCHING
Porcello, Boston..............................................5­0
Severino, New York........................................5­1
Kluber, Cleveland........................................... 5­1
Clippard, Toronto............................................4­0
Velazquez, Boston..........................................4­0
Morton, Houston.............................................4­0
Not including Sunday night’s game
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
Markakis, Atl .................. 131 21 45 .344
Cabrera, NYM................. 123 22 41 .333
OHerrera, Phi.................. 120 16 40 .333
Pham, StL.......................... 98 24 32 .327
Arenado, Col................... 108 18 34 .315
SCastro, Mia ................... 124 19 39 .315
Dickerson, Pit ................. 124 19 39 .315
FFreeman, Atl ................. 127 24 39 .307
Posey, SF......................... 101 14 31 .307
Pollock, Ari...................... 124 22 38 .306
HOME RUNS
Harper, Washington........................................12
Blackmon, Colorado........................................11
Albies, Atlanta..................................................10
Pollock, Arizona................................................10
Villanueva, San Diego....................................... 9
MAdams, Washington.......................................8
Arenado, Colorado.............................................8
JBaez, Chicago....................................................8
RUNS BATTED IN
Pollock, Arizona................................................29
Harper, Washington........................................28
JBaez, Chicago..................................................28
Cespedes, New York....................................... 26
Franco, Philadelphia........................................26
Markakis, Atlanta.............................................25
FFreeman, Atlanta........................................... 25
Albies, Atlanta..................................................24
Dickerson, Pittsburgh......................................24
Hoskins, Philadelphia.....................................23.
PITCHING
Scherzer, Washington....................................6­1
Mikolas, St. Louis............................................4­0
Corbin, Arizona............................................... 4­0
Wacha, St. Louis.............................................4­1
Bettis, Colorado.............................................. 4­1
Nola, Philadelphia...........................................4­1
McCarthy, Atlanta..........................................4­1
BLUE JAYS 2, RAYS 1
CLEVELAND
AB
Lindor ss
4
Kipnis 2b
3
Ramírez 3b
3
Brantley lf
4
Encarnacion dh 3
Alonso 1b
3
Davis pr
0
González 1b
1
Gomes c
3
Naquin rf
3
GAllen cf
3
Totals
30
R
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
4
H BI BB SO
1 1 0 0
0 1 0 2
0 0 1 1
0 0 0 2
0 0 1 2
1 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
1 0 0 2
1 1 0 1
0 0 0 1
4 3 2 13
Avg.
.283
.184
.285
.323
.198
.210
.214
.375
.256
.319
.000
NY YANKEES
Gardner lf
Judge rf
Gregorius ss
Sánchez c
Hicks cf
Walker 1b
Andújar 3b
Austin dh
Stanton ph­dh
Torres 2b
Totals
R
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
1
1
7
H BI BB SO
1 1 0 0
1 2 1 2
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 3
2 0 0 0
1 1 2 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 1 2
0 0 1 0
1 3 0 2
6 7 6 10
Avg.
.203
.296
.311
.198
.240
.189
.274
.254
.227
.327
AB
4
3
3
4
4
2
4
2
0
4
30
Cleveland...................000 000 040 — 4 4 1
NY Yankees...............000 000 034 — 7 6 0
E—Alonso (2). LOB—Cleveland 2, NY Yan­
kees 4. 2B—Lindor (10), Judge (9), Hicks (4),
Walker (3). HR—Torres (2), off Otero. SB—Da­
vis (7). SF—Kipnis. DP—Cleveland 1.
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Clevinger
7‚ 1 2 2 4 10 2.76
CAln BS 1; L 2­1 „ 4 3 3 1 0 3.60
Otero
‚ 1 2 2 1 0 5.52
NY Yankees
Germán
Betances
Holder
Shreve W 2­0
IP
6
1
1
1
H
0
3
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 2 9 2.66
3 3 0 2 5.79
1 0 0 0 6.23
0 0 0 2 3.46
Allen pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Be­
tances pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherit­
ed runners­scored—CAllen 2­2, Otero 1­1,
Holder 2­2. IBB—off CAllen (Gregorius), off
Otero (Stanton). PB—Sánchez. NP—Clevinger
116, CAllen 32, Otero 8, Germán 84, Betances
32, Holder 17, Shreve 18. Umpires—Home,
Lance Barrett; First, Lance Barksdale; Sec­
ond, Tim Timmons; Third, Tony Randazzo.
T—3:05. A—40,107 (47,309).
ROCKIES 3, METS 2
COLORADO
Blackmon cf
Dahl rf
Arenado 3b
Parra lf
Story ss
Desmond 1b
Castro 2b
Wolters c
Freeland p
Shaw p
McGee p
CGonzález ph
Ottavino p
Totals
AB
5
5
2
3
4
4
4
1
3
0
0
1
0
32
R
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 2 .289
2 0 0 0 .300
0 0 2 1 .315
2 1 1 0 .263
0 0 0 2 .222
2 2 0 1 .188
1 0 0 0 .188
0 0 2 0 .136
0 0 0 2 .071
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .213
0 0 0 0
—
8 3 5 9
NY METS
Lagares cf
Céspedes lf
Nimmo lf
Cabrera 2b
Frazier 3b
Flores 1b
Reyes pr
Bruce rf
Lobaton c
AGonzález ph
Syndergaard p
Blevins p
Ramos p
Conforto ph
Robles p
Nido ph
Rosario ss
Totals
AB
4
1
2
4
3
2
0
4
3
1
2
0
0
1
0
1
3
31
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO
1 0 0 1
1 0 0 0
0 0 1 2
1 1 0 1
0 1 0 1
0 0 2 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 2
1 0 0 1
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
5 2 3 13
Avg.
.319
.246
.256
.333
.248
.213
.139
.236
.154
.231
.059
—
—
.184
—
.147
.230
Colorado....................011 000 010 — 3 8 0
NY Mets.....................200 000 000 — 2 5 1
E—Syndergaard (1). LOB—Colorado 8, NY
Mets 6. 2B—Dahl (1), Parra (6). HR—Desmond
2 (6), off Syndergaard, off Robles. SB—Dahl
(1), Wolters (1). SF—Frazier. DP—NY Mets 1.
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Freeland W 2­4
7 4 2 2 1 8 3.95
Shaw
„ 0 0 0 0 2 6.06
McGee
‚ 0 0 0 1 0 5.68
Ottavino S 1
1 1 0 0 1 3 0.47
TED S. WARREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
COMING BACK — In his first start in two weeks,
Shohei Ohtani was shaky at times but pitched
well enough to get the win for the Angels.
NY Mets
Syndergaard
Blevins
Ramos
Robles L 2­1
IP
6
„
‚
2
H
6
0
0
2
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 4 5 3.09
0 0 0 1 5.87
0 0 0 1 3.00
1 1 1 2 3.60
HBP—by Syndergaard (Wolters). NP—
Freeland 103, Shaw 10, McGee 8, Ottavino 21,
Syndergaard 95, Blevins 12, Ramos 5, Robles
27. Umpires—Home, Eric Cooper; First, Chad
Fairchild; Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third,
Mike Estabrook. T—3:02. A—33,580 (41,922).
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 2 .258
0 0 0 2 .224
1 0 1 1 .270
1 0 0 1 .257
2 0 0 0 .316
0 0 0 0 .152
1 0 0 1 .250
0 0 0 1 .294
1 1 0 0 .216
1 0 0 0 .236
7 1 1 8
TAMPA BAY
AB
Span lf
4
Cron dh
2
Refsnydr pr­dh
0
Duffy 3b
4
Miller 1b
3
Ramos c
4
Wendle 2b
4
Robertson ss
4
Smith cf
2
Gómez rf
4
Totals
31
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 1 .245
0 0 2 1 .256
0 0 0 0 .185
2 0 0 1 .295
0 0 1 1 .233
2 0 0 0 .315
0 0 0 1 .286
1 0 0 1 .295
0 0 2 1 .330
3 1 0 0 .200
8 1 5 7
Toronto......................000 010 001 — 2 7 0
Tampa Bay................000 000 010 — 1 8 0
LOB—Toronto 6, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Pillar 2
(15). HR—Gómez (5), off Tepera. SB—Alford
(1), Smith (8). CS—Smith (4), Gómez (1). DP—
Toronto 2.
Toronto
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Estrada
6 4 0 0 4 3 5.21
Clippard
1 1 0 0 0 2 1.47
Tpr BS 3; W 2­1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2.70
Osuna S 9
1 1 0 0 0 1 2.93
Tampa Bay
Archer
Andriese
Colomé L 2­4
IP
7
1
1
H
5
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 0 6 5.32
0 0 1 2 4.34
1 1 0 0 5.17
Balk—Tepera. WP—Colomé. NP—Estrada
96, Clippard 12, Tepera 27, Osuna 19, Archer
97, Andriese 18, Colomé 14. Umpires—Home,
Jeremie Rehak; First, Brian O'Nora; Second,
Fieldin Culbreth; Third, CB Bucknor. T—2:56.
A—14,032 (31,042).
NATIONALS 5, PHILLIES 4
PHILADELPHIA
Hernández 2b
Hoskins lf
Neris p
Herrera cf
Altherr rf
García p
Hunter p
Valentín lf
Santana 1b
Franco 3b
Florimón ss
Alfaro c
Arrieta p
Williams ph
Ramos p
Morgan p
Kingery rf
Totals
AB
4
5
0
5
3
0
0
0
4
3
4
4
2
1
0
0
1
36
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO
0 0 1 3
1 1 0 3
0 0 0 0
3 1 0 1
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 1
2 1 1 0
1 0 0 2
0 0 0 3
0 0 0 2
1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
9 4 2 18
Avg.
.273
.282
.000
.333
.205
—
—
.000
.169
.283
.226
.211
.111
.203
—
—
.210
WASHINGTON AB
Harper rf
4
Turner ss
4
Rendon 3b
4
MAdams 1b­lf
4
Wieters c
4
Bautista pr
0
Stevenson lf
1
Kendrick ph­1b
1
Taylor cf
2
Scherzer p
2
Solís p
0
Kintzler p
0
Torres p
0
Sierra ph
0
Doolittle p
0
Severino ph
0
Difo 2b
3
Totals
29
R
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
5
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 1 .246
1 0 0 1 .281
1 2 0 0 .274
2 1 0 1 .296
1 0 0 0 .211
0 0 0 0 .000
1 0 1 0 .333
0 0 0 1 .281
0 0 2 1 .195
0 0 0 0 .238
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 1 0 .196
0 0 0 0
—
0 1 1 0 .250
1 1 1 1 .289
7 5 6 6
Philadelphia..............000 000 310 — 4 9 2
Washington...............010 000 022 — 5 7 1
E—Florimón (1), Neris (1), Turner (4). LOB—
Philadelphia 8, Washington 7. 2B—Hoskins
(10), Herrera 2 (7), Santana (9). HR—Franco
(6), off Torres, MAdams (8), off Arrieta. SB—
Florimón (1). CS—Stevenson (1), Taylor (1).
DP—Philadelphia 1; Washington 1.
Philadelphia
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Arrieta
6 2 1 1 2 2 3.15
Ramos
‚ 0 0 0 0 0 0.63
Morgan
‚ 1 0 0 0 0 2.45
García
„ 0 1 1 1 2 3.21
Hunter
„ 2 1 1 1 2 4.26
Nris BS 2; L 1­2
0 2 2 2 2 0 4.15
Washington
IP
Scherzer
6‚
Solís BS 2
0
Kintzler
„
Torres
1
Doolittle W 1­1
1
H
5
1
2
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 15 1.74
1 1 0 0 4.73
1 1 0 1 4.08
1 1 0 0 6.75
0 0 0 2 1.72
Neris pitched to 5 batters in the 9th. Solís
pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited run­
ners­scored—García 1­0, Hunter 1­1, Solís 1­1,
Kintzler 1­1. IBB—off Scherzer (Franco).
HBP—by Neris (Kendrick), by Scherzer (Al­
therr). WP—Hunter. NP—Arrieta 75, Ramos 4,
Morgan 9, García 16, Hunter 23, Neris 19,
Scherzer 111, Solís 4, Kintzler 20, Torres 12,
Doolittle 17. Umpires—Home, Sean Barber;
First, Mike Winters; Second, Rob Drake;
Third, Mike Muchlinski. T—3:33. A—30,611
(41,336).
SAN FRAN
Blanco lf
McCutchen rf
Belt 1b
Hundley c
Sandoval 3b
Dyson p
Watson p
Tomlinson ph
Strickland p
Crawford ss
Hanson 2b
AuJackson cf
Suárez p
Gearrin p
Longoria 3b
Totals
AB
4
3
4
4
4
0
0
1
0
4
4
3
2
0
1
34
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 1 1 0 .274
1 1 1 1 1 .246
0 1 0 1 0 .298
0 1 1 1 0 .333
0 1 1 0 1 .244
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 2 0 0 1 .250
1 2 0 0 1 .321
1 1 0 1 2 .232
0 0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0 .246
4 10 4 5 8
ATLANTA
Albies 2b
Acuña Jr. lf
FFreeman 1b
Markakis rf
Bautista 3b
Flowers c
Camargo ss
Soroka p
SFreeman p
Biddle p
Moylan p
Tucker ph
Winkler p
Vizcaíno p
Suzuki ph
Culberson pr
Inciarte cf
Totals
AB
5
4
4
4
3
4
3
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
4
35
R
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 0 .285
2 0 0 1 .326
1 0 0 2 .307
0 0 0 1 .344
1 0 1 0 .300
2 1 0 1 .250
0 0 1 0 .226
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 1.000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .272
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0
—
1 1 0 0 .310
0 0 0 0 .176
0 1 0 1 .254
9 3 2 7
San Francisco...........002 200 000 — 4 10 2
Atlanta....................... 100 000 002 — 3 9 0
E—Hanson 2 (3). LOB—San Francisco 10,
Atlanta 7. 2B—Crawford (4), Hanson (3), Su­
zuki (5). HR—. SB—Blanco (3). S—Suárez.
SF—McCutchen. DP—San Francisco 3; Atlan­
ta 2.
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Suárez W 1­1
5‚ 7 1 0 1 6 3.06
Gearrin
„ 0 0 0 0 0 3.86
Dyson
1 0 0 0 0 0 3.00
Watson
1 0 0 0 0 0 0.57
Strickland S 8
1 2 2 2 1 1 2.87
Atlanta
Soroka L 1­1
SFreeman
Biddle
Moylan
Winkler
Vizcaíno
IP
4
2
„
‚
1
1
H
7
2
1
0
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 3 3 4.50
0 0 2 3 3.77
0 0 0 0 2.00
0 0 0 1 2.31
0 0 0 1 1.17
0 0 0 0 1.84
Inherited runners­scored—Gearrin 1­0,
Moylan 1­0. IBB—off SFreeman (AuJackson).
WP—Suárez. NP—Suárez 93, Gearrin 8, Dyson
13, Watson 6, Strickland 20, Soroka 84, SFree­
man 31, Biddle 13, Moylan 5, Winkler 9, Viz­
caíno 19. Umpires—Home, Vic Carapazza;
First, Jordan Baker; Second, Jerry Layne;
Third, Greg Gibson. T—3:09. A—37,896
(41,084).
TWINS 5, WHITE SOX 3
MINNESOTA
Mauer dh
Dozier 2b
Kepler cf­rf
Escobar 3b
Rosario lf
Grossman rf
LaMarre cf
Morrison 1b
Adrianza ss
Wilson c
Totals
AB
3
3
4
4
4
3
1
4
3
3
32
R
1
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 0 .291
0 0 1 1 .234
0 1 0 2 .269
1 0 0 0 .311
2 2 0 0 .282
0 0 0 0 .176
0 0 0 1 .313
1 2 0 0 .182
0 0 1 1 .192
0 0 0 1 .000
4 5 3 6
CHICAGO
LGarcía rf
Sánchez 3b
Abreu 1b
Delmonico lf
Davidson dh
Narváez c
JoRondón 2b
Anderson ss
Engel cf
Totals
AB
3
4
4
3
2
4
4
3
3
30
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
3
H BI BB SO
1 1 0 1
1 0 0 2
0 0 0 2
0 0 1 1
0 1 1 2
0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 2
1 0 0 2
5 2 2 12
Avg.
.274
.293
.262
.242
.257
.176
.400
.254
.171
Minnesota..................000 000 311 — 5 4 1
Chicago......................001 001 100 — 3 5 1
E—Adrianza (3), JoRondón (1). LOB—Min­
nesota 3, Chicago 5. 2B—Morrison (4), Sán­
chez (8), Engel (2). HR—Rosario (7), off Jones.
SB—Rosario (4). S—LGarcía, Anderson. SF—
Davidson.
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gibson
6„ 4 3 3 2 8 3.49
Dke BS 1; W 2­1 ‚ 1 0 0 0 1 3.86
Reed
1 0 0 0 0 2 3.06
Rodney S 5
1 0 0 0 0 1 3.86
Chicago
IP
Shields
6„
Avilán BS 2
‚
BrRondón L 1­2 ‚
Bummer
„
Jones
1
H
2
1
0
0
1
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 2 1 1 0 .261
0 0 1 0 3 .207
1 1 0 0 1 .279
2 1 1 1 1 .238
1 3 2 0 0 .315
1 1 0 0 1 .301
0 0 0 0 1 .385
2 1 1 2 0 .278
1 3 2 0 0 .239
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 1 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 1 .208
9 13 8 4 9
MILWAUKEE
Cain cf
Pérez lf
Yelich lf
López p
TayWilliams p
Aguilar ph
Braun 1b
Shaw 3b
DoSantana rf
Sogard 2b­ss
Arcia ss
Barnes p
Phillips lf­cf
Bandy c
Anderson p
Villar 2b
Totals
AB
3
1
3
0
0
1
4
3
2
3
2
0
1
3
1
1
28
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 3
0 0 0 0
1 0 1 1
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 3
0 0 0 1
0 0 1 1
2 0 2 14
Avg.
.267
.215
.281
1.000
—
.350
.243
.230
.271
.100
.222
—
.091
.196
.083
.274
Milwaukee
IP
Anderson L 3­3 5‚
Barnes
„
López
2
TayWilliams
1
H
5
4
3
1
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 2 3 3.97
2 1 0 1 2.12
2 2 1 2 5.40
0 0 1 3 2.38
Inherited runners­scored—Barnes 1­1.
NP—Kuhl 108, RRodríguez 28, Anderson 95,
Barnes 29, López 34, TayWilliams 26. Um­
pires—Home, Marvin Hudson; First, James
Hoye; Second, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Jeff Kel­
logg. T—3:02. A—38,285 (41,900).
ROYALS 4, TIGERS 2
AB
5
3
1
4
4
4
3
4
4
4
36
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 2 0 0 1 .287
1 1 0 1 1 .216
0 0 0 0 0 .311
0 1 0 0 1 .257
1 3 2 0 1 .292
0 0 0 0 2 .239
0 0 0 1 1 .189
0 1 0 0 0 .207
0 1 0 0 0 .250
0 1 0 0 1 .143
2 10 2 2 8
KANSAS CITY
Merrifield 2b
Soler rf
Moustakas 3b
Perez dh
Cuthbert 1b
Duda 1b
Jay lf
Almonte cf
Escobar ss
Butera c
Totals
AB
4
3
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
28
R
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
2 0 0 1 .252
2 0 1 1 .308
1 3 0 0 .291
1 1 0 1 .273
0 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 .239
0 0 0 0 .268
0 0 0 1 .214
1 0 0 1 .220
0 0 0 1 .175
7 4 1 6
Detroit........................000 100 010 — 2 10 0
Kansas City...............103 000 00x — 4 7 0
LOB—Detroit 9, Kansas City 2. 2B—Martin
(7), Merrifield (7), Moustakas (8). HR—Hicks
(3), off Junis. SB—Merrifield 3 (7), Soler (1).
SF—Moustakas. DP—Detroit 2; Kansas City 1.
Detroit
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Boyd L 1­3
7 6 4 4 1 5 3.00
Farmer
1 1 0 0 0 1 4.50
Kansas City
Junis W 4­2
Hill
Keller
Herrera S 7
IP
7
‚
„
1
H
8
0
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 1 8 3.18
0 0 0 0 3.97
0 0 1 0 2.70
0 0 0 0 0.66
Junis pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherit­
ed runners­scored—Hill 1­0, Keller 1­1. NP—
Boyd 102, Farmer 7, Junis 98, Hill 1, Keller 15,
Herrera 14. Umpires—Home, Jansen Visconti;
First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Jeff Nelson;
Third, Laz Diaz. T—2:16. A—18,424 (37,903).
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 2 5 5.14
0 0 0 0 3.60
1 0 1 0 4.91
0 0 0 0 5.06
1 1 0 1 2.03
Inherited runners­scored—Duke 1­1, Avilán
2­2, Bummer 2­1. WP—Gibson, Shields. NP—
Gibson 102, Duke 9, Reed 13, Rodney 12,
Shields 91, Avilán 9, BrRondón 7, Bummer 10,
Jones 23. Umpires—Home, Chad Whitson;
First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Cory Blaser;
Third, Stu Scheurwater. T—2:56. A—17,424
(40,615).
BALTIMORE
Gentry cf
Peterson lf
Machado ss
CDavis 1b
Trumbo dh
Álvarez 3b
Santander rf
Joseph c
Vielma 2b
Mancini ph
Totals
AB
3
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
2
1
29
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 2 .179
1 0 0 1 .204
0 0 1 0 .346
0 0 0 2 .171
0 0 0 1 .292
1 1 0 1 .205
0 0 0 0 .202
0 0 0 0 .148
0 0 0 2 .143
1 0 0 0 .258
3 1 1 9
OAKLAND
Semien ss
Joyce lf
Canha cf
KDavis dh
Olson 1b
Chapman 3b
Pinder 2b
Piscotty rf
Lucroy c
Totals
AB
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
31
R
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 1 .264
2 0 0 1 .198
1 0 0 0 .280
0 1 0 2 .215
1 1 1 1 .256
0 0 0 2 .232
1 0 0 0 .283
0 0 0 1 .243
1 0 0 0 .286
7 2 1 8
Baltimore...................010 000 000 — 1 3 2
Oakland......................000 200 00x — 2 7 0
E—Álvarez (1), Vielma (1). LOB—Baltimore
3, Oakland 6. 2B—Joyce (7), Olson (6). HR—
Álvarez (7), off Triggs. CS—Semien (1), Olson
(1). S—Gentry.
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Cobb L 0­4
6 5 2 1 1 5 7.61
Castro
1 1 0 0 0 1 4.35
Brach
1 1 0 0 0 2 5.40
Oakland
Triggs W 3­1
Trivino
Treinen S 5
IP
7
1
1
H
2
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 0 9 4.41
0 0 0 0 0.84
0 0 1 0 1.13
IBB—off Treinen (Machado). WP—Treinen.
NP—Cobb 103, Castro 17, Brach 13, Triggs 96,
Trivino 6, Treinen 10. Umpires—Home, Hunt­
er Wendelstedt; First, Chris Guccione; Sec­
ond, David Rackley; Third, Larry Vanover.
T—2:25. A—17,112 (48,592).
DIAMONDBACKS 3, ASTROS 1
HOUSTON
Springer cf
Altuve 2b
Correa ss
Reddick rf
Bregman 3b
McCann c
González 1b­lf
Fisher lf
Gurriel ph­1b
Verlander p
Gattis ph
Rondón p
Harris p
Smith p
Stassi ph
Totals
AB
5
4
3
3
4
3
4
2
2
2
1
0
0
0
1
34
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 1 .264
1 0 0 0 .322
1 0 0 0 .299
0 0 1 1 .229
1 1 0 0 .254
0 0 1 0 .260
2 0 0 1 .234
0 0 0 1 .179
1 0 0 0 .280
1 0 0 1 .500
0 0 0 1 .186
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .239
7 1 2 7
ARIZONA
AB
Peralta lf
4
Descalso 3b
3
Boxberger p
0
Goldschmidt 1b 4
Pollock cf
3
Souza Jr. rf
3
Marte 2b
3
Avila c
2
Ahmed ss
3
Koch p
1
De La Rosa p
0
Hirano p
0
Owings ph
1
Bradley p
0
Marrero 3b
0
Totals
27
R
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO
1 0 0 2
2 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
2 2 1 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 2
0 0 1 1
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
5 2 3 10
Avg.
.295
.253
—
.225
.306
.000
.213
.143
.217
.200
—
—
.233
—
.196
Houston..................... 010 000 000 — 1 7 1
Arizona.......................000 002 01x — 3 5 1
E—Bregman (5), Descalso (2). LOB—Hous­
ton 9, Arizona 4. 2B—Correa (12), Descalso
(6). 3B—Altuve (1), Pollock (3). HR—Bregman
(2), off Koch. S—Koch. DP—Arizona 1.
Houston
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Verlander L 4­1
6 3 2 1 3 8 1.17
Rondón
1 0 0 0 0 2 2.08
Harris
‚ 1 1 1 0 0 4.63
Smith
„ 1 0 0 0 0 8.44
Arizona
IP
Koch W 2­0
6‚
De La Rosa
0
Hirano
„
Bradley
1
Boxberger S 11
1
H
6
0
0
0
1
LA DODGERS
AB
Taylor ss
5
Hernández 2b
3
Utley ph­2b
2
Kemp rf
5
Bellinger 1b
4
Barnes c
4
Farmer 3b
3
Pederson ph­cf
1
Verdugo lf
4
Locastro cf
2
Muncy ph­3b
0
Stripling p
2
Cingrani p
0
Grandal ph
1
Báez p
0
García p
0
Valera ph
1
Stewart p
0
Totals
37
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
SAN DIEGO
Jankowski rf
Hosmer 1b
Villanueva 3b
Cordero lf
Pirela 2b
Yates p
Hand p
Galvis ss
Margot cf
Ellis c
Lauer p
Guerra ph
Stammen p
Asuaje 2b
Totals
R H BI BB SO Avg.
2 2 0 0 1 .316
1 1 2 2 0 .297
0 0 0 0 1 .265
0 3 1 0 1 .272
0 1 0 0 1 .250
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 2 0 0 0 .240
0 0 0 1 2 .169
0 2 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 1 .200
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0 .194
3 11 3 3 8
AB
4
2
4
4
4
0
0
4
3
4
2
1
0
1
33
H BI BB SO
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
2 0 0 1
2 0 1 2
1 0 0 1
1 0 0 1
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
1 0 1 1
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
8 0 3 12
Avg.
.238
.220
.257
.333
.283
.196
.231
.278
.286
.286
.211
.000
—
.272
.000
—
.000
—
LA Dodgers................000 000 000 — 0 8 0
San Diego..................000 020 10x — 3 11 3
E—Jankowski (1), Villanueva 2 (7). LOB—LA
Dodgers 13, San Diego 9. 2B—Kemp (6), Ellis
(1). 3B—Jankowski (2). HR—Hosmer (5), off
Cingrani. DP—LA Dodgers 2.
LA Dodgers
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Stripling
4 4 0 0 2 5 1.93
Cingrani L 0­2
1 3 2 2 0 1 6.23
Báez
1 2 1 1 1 2 4.02
García
1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Stewart
1 1 0 0 0 0 3.38
San Diego
Lauer W 1­1
Stammen
Yates
Hand S 9
IP
6
1
1
1
H
7
0
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 5 5.79
0 0 1 1 2.50
0 0 1 3 0.87
0 0 0 3 2.70
P.Báez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. In­
herited runners­scored—García 2­1. WP—
Lauer. NP—Stripling 68, Cingrani 21, Báez 32,
García 12, Stewart 16, Lauer 102, Stammen
22, Yates 20, Hand 17. Umpires—Home, Alfon­
so Marquez; First, Ramon De Jesus; Second,
Jim Reynolds; Third, John Tumpane. T—3:10.
A—21,789 (26,999).
ANGELS 8, MARINERS 2
DETROIT
Martin cf
Iglesias ss
Castellanos ph
Martinez dh
Hicks 1b
Jones lf
Goodrum 3b
Machado 2b
Greiner c
Reyes rf
Totals
ATHLETICS 2, ORIOLES 1
GIANTS 4, BRAVES 3
TORONTO
AB
Hernández rf
4
Donaldson 3b
4
Solarte 2b
3
Smoak 1b
4
Pillar cf
4
Morales dh
4
Alford lf
4
Maile c
4
Díaz ss
2
Gurriel Jr. pr­ss
1
Totals
34
AB
4
4
5
4
5
4
1
3
4
1
3
1
39
Pittsburgh..................210 004 110 — 9 13 0
Milwaukee.................000 000 000 — 0 2 1
E—Barnes (1). LOB—Pittsburgh 8, Milwau­
kee 3. 2B—Dickerson (10). 3B—Marte (4).
HR—Frazier (2), off Anderson, Bell (2), off Ló­
pez, Mercer (1), off Anderson. SF—Polanco.
DP—Pittsburgh 1.
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Kuhl W 4­2
7 1 0 0 2 8 4.12
RRodríguez
2 1 0 0 0 6 0.79
Boston in the American League East,
will host the Red Sox in a three-game
series beginning Tuesday.
Clevinger went 7‚ innings in his
first start against the Yankees, setting
career highs with 10 strikeouts and 116
pitches. He issued two of his four walks
in the eighth as New York rallied.
Short in the bullpen, Cleveland
manager Terry Francona called on closer Cody Allen, looking for a five-out
save. Allen gave up a two-out RBI single
to Brett Gardner and a two-run double
to Aaron Judge before retiring Gary
Sanchez with two on.
Aaron Hicks and Neil Walker, who
began the day batting .182, opened the
ninth with consecutive doubles to tie it,
chasing Allen (2-1). One out later,
pinch-hitter Giancarlo Stanton was intentionally walked and Torres drove a
full-count pitch from Dan Otero over
the center-field fence.
Torres, who connected for his first
big league homer Friday night, raised
one arm and turned back toward the
New York dugout after rounding first
base. He was mobbed and doused by
excited teammates at home plate.
‘‘It’s like a big family right here and I
enjoy that,’’ Torres said.
Chasen Shreve (2-0) struck out two
in a perfect ninth for the win.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PADRES 3, DODGERS 0
PITTSBURGH
Frazier 2b
Polanco rf
Marte cf
Bell 1b
Dickerson lf
Cervelli c
Díaz ph­c
Moran 3b
Mercer ss
RRodríguez p
Kuhl p
Moroff ph­ss
Totals
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 0 3 2.13
0 0 0 0 1.59
0 0 0 1 3.00
0 0 1 0 1.42
0 0 1 3 1.80
De La Rosa pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inherited runners­scored—Smith 1­1, De La
Rosa 1­0, Hirano 2­0. HBP—by Koch (Correa).
NP—Verlander 92, Rondón 17, Harris 8, Smith
4, Koch 77, De La Rosa 5, Hirano 10, Bradley
16, Boxberger 25. Umpires—Home, Roberto
Ortiz; First, Brian Gorman; Second, Dan Ias­
sogna; Third, Mike DiMuro. T—2:55. A—35,632
(48,618).
LA ANGELS
Kinsler 2b
Trout cf
Upton dh
Valbuena 1b
Simmons ss
Cozart 3b
Blash rf
Young lf
Rivera c
Totals
AB
5
4
5
3
5
4
4
3
5
38
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 1 0 .198
1 3 3 1 1 .336
0 1 0 0 2 .237
0 1 0 1 1 .265
0 1 0 0 0 .350
2 2 1 0 0 .237
1 1 0 1 2 .250
2 1 1 1 1 .167
1 2 3 0 2 .279
8 12 8 5 9
SEATTLE
Gordon cf
Segura ss
Romine ss
Canó 2b
Cruz dh
Seager 3b
Haniger rf
Healy 1b
Zunino c
Gamel lf
Heredia ph­lf
Totals
AB
5
4
0
4
3
4
3
3
2
2
0
30
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 0 .343
0 0 0 1 .290
0 0 0 0 .056
0 0 0 0 .283
0 0 0 1 .245
2 0 0 0 .240
1 0 1 2 .297
1 2 1 0 .246
0 0 2 1 .180
1 0 0 1 .167
0 0 2 0 .286
6 2 6 6
LA Angels.................. 020 004 002 — 8 12 0
Seattle........................000 000 200 — 2 6 1
E—Romine (1). LOB—LA Angels 11, Seattle
8. 2B—Cozart (8), Rivera (3). HR—Trout (12),
off Bradford, Cozart (4), off Hernández,
Young (2), off Hernández, Healy (5), off
Ohtani. SB—Trout (6). S—Young. DP—LA An­
gels 2; Seattle 1.
LA Angels
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Ohtani W 3­1
6 6 2 2 2 6 4.10
Álvarez
2 0 0 0 1 0 1.10
Bedrosian
‚ 0 0 0 3 0 4.02
NRamírez
„ 0 0 0 0 0 3.06
Seattle
IP
Hernndez L 4­3 5„
Bradford
‚
Pazos
1
Lawrence
2
H
7
1
1
3
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 4 5 5.28
1 1 0 1 2.51
0 0 0 1 1.46
2 2 1 2 10.13
Ohtani pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. In­
herited runners­scored—Álvarez 1­0,
NRamírez 3­0, Bradford 2­2. HBP—by Ohtani
(Cruz), by Pazos (Valbuena), by Lawrence
(Cozart). WP—Hernández. NP—Ohtani 98, Ál­
varez 19, Bedrosian 18, NRamírez 1, Hernán­
dez 101, Bradford 7, Pazos 24, Lawrence 37.
Umpires—Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Ryan
Blakney; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, D.J. Rey­
burn. T—3:12. A—40,142 (47,715).
MARLINS 8, REDS 5
MIAMI
Realmuto c
Prado 3b
Castro 2b
Anderson rf
Bour 1b
Tazawa p
Ziegler p
Maybin lf­cf
Brinson cf
Wittgren p
Dietrich ph
Guerrero p
Barraclough p
Rojas ph­1b
Rivera ss
Straily p
Shuck lf
Totals
AB
4
6
4
3
4
0
0
4
3
0
1
0
0
1
3
2
3
38
R H BI BB SO
2 2 0 2 1
1 0 0 0 1
2 2 3 0 1
2 0 0 2 2
1 1 0 1 1
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 2 2 0 1
0 0 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 1 1 0 0
0 1 0 2 1
0 1 0 0 1
0 0 1 0 2
8 10 8 7 13
CINCINNATI
Peraza ss
Winker lf
Votto 1b
Gennett 2b
Suárez 3b
Schebler rf
Barnhart c
Finnegan p
Floro p
DHernandez p
Duvall ph
Shackelford p
Garrett p
Brice p
Mesoraco ph
Peralta p
Hamilton cf
Totals
AB
5
4
5
4
5
4
4
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
2
36
R
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
5
Avg.
.328
.152
.315
.258
.240
—
—
.227
.164
—
.233
—
—
.240
.148
.500
.224
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 0 .293
0 1 1 0 .287
4 4 0 1 .289
1 0 1 2 .282
0 0 0 0 .277
0 0 1 2 .273
2 0 0 1 .236
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .161
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .220
0 0 0 0 .000
1 0 2 0 .204
9 5 5 8
Miami.........................410 000 102 — 8 10 2
Cincinnati.................. 002 000 102 — 5 9 2
E—Rivera 2 (2), Gennett (5), Suárez (2).
LOB—Miami 12, Cincinnati 10. 2B—Realmuto
(2), Maybin (7), Peraza (8), Votto (5), Gennett
(8), Hamilton (3). HR—Votto (5), off Straily.
S—Floro. SF—Castro.
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Straily
4 3 2 2 4 2 6.75
Wittgren W 1­0
2 1 0 0 0 4 1.00
Guerrero
1 2 1 1 0 1 4.41
Barraclough
1 1 0 0 0 0 1.84
Tazawa
‚ 2 2 2 1 0 7.80
Ziegler S 4
„ 0 0 0 0 1 6.28
Cincinnati
Finnegan L 0­3
Floro
DHernandez
Shackelford
Garrett
Brice
Peralta
IP
3‚
„
2
‚
„
1
1
H
4
1
0
2
0
0
3
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 3 2 8.27
0 0 0 1 0.69
0 0 1 4 3.00
1 1 1 1 9.00
0 0 1 2 1.96
0 0 0 2 4.26
2 2 1 1 5.06
Inherited runners­scored—Ziegler 1­0, Flo­
ro 1­0, Garrett 2­0. IBB—off Finnegan (Rive­
ra), off Shackelford (Bour). HBP—by DHer­
nandez (Maybin). Balk—DHernandez. PB—
Barnhart. NP—Straily 77, Wittgren 29,
Guerrero 19, Barraclough 17, Tazawa 18,
Ziegler 14, Finnegan 63, Floro 10, DHernandez
38, Shackelford 14, Garrett 16, Brice 11, Peral­
ta 37. Umpires—Home, Mark Carlson; First,
Brian Knight; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Pat
Hoberg. T—3:36. A—19,800 (42,319).
ATHLETICS 2, ORIOLES 0
Saturday night game
BALTIMORE
AB
Mancini lf
4
Gentry pr­lf
0
Jones cf
5
Machado ss
4
CDavis 1b
5
Trumbo dh
5
Álvarez 3b
3
Valencia ph­3b
1
Sisco c
5
Santander rf
4
Peterson 2b
5
Totals
41
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO
0 0 2 3
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 2
1 0 1 2
0 0 0 3
2 0 0 0
0 0 1 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 3
2 0 1 1
1 0 0 3
7 0 5 20
Avg.
.252
.189
.245
.354
.178
.333
.200
.214
.203
.209
.200
OAKLAND
Joyce lf
Semien ss
Lowrie 2b
KDavis dh
Olson 1b
Chapman 3b
Canha cf
Piscotty rf
Maxwell c
Totals
R
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO
0 0 1 2
1 0 0 1
1 0 1 1
1 2 0 0
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
1 0 0 1
4 2 2 11
Avg.
.183
.264
.353
.221
.254
.238
.282
.250
.161
AB
4
5
4
5
4
4
4
4
4
38
Baltimore...........000 000 000 000 — 0 7 0
Oakland..............000 000 000 002 — 2 4 0
LOB—Baltimore 11, Oakland 4. 2B—Jones
(9), Trumbo (2), Santander (5). HR—KDavis
(9), off Araujo. SB—Peterson (4). CS—Gentry
(1), Machado (1).
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gausman
9 2 0 0 2 6 3.30
Givens
2 0 0 0 0 5 4.00
Araujo L 1­3
‚ 2 2 2 0 0 5.50
Oakland
Cahill
Petit
Casilla
Coulombe
Hatcher W 3­0
IP
6
2
2
1‚
„
H
4
1
1
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 12 2.25
0 0 3 4 4.00
0 0 0 0 2.57
0 0 0 4 6.57
0 0 1 0 9.00
IBB—off Petit (Machado). HBP—by Casilla
(Jones). WP—Cahill. NP—Gausman 113, Giv­
ens 29, Araujo 13, Cahill 98, Petit 42, Casilla
23, Coulombe 21, Hatcher 8..
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C7
Betts hit by throw, bruises right shoulder
By Peter Abraham
Red Sox 6, Rangers 5
GLOBE STAFF
ARLINGTON, Texas —
Mookie Betts left Globe Life
Park with a large white bandage covering
RED SOX
the right side
NOTEBOOK of his back
Sunday. It
looked like he had been hit by
something larger than a baseball.
But it was an errant throw
by Texas first baseman Ronald
Guzman that left a significant
bruise and knocked Betts out of
the game in the second inning.
Betts singled to start the
game. When Andrew Beninten­
di grounded to first base, Guzman tagged the bag and threw
to second. The throw hit Betts
on his shoulder blade.
“Not much meat there. It
got me right on the bone,” he
said.
Betts stayed in the game and
scored a run. But he flexed his
arm after lining out in the second inning and was taken out.
“It was numb,” Betts said.
“But after I came out of the
game it started to feel better.”
For manager Alex Cora, it
was an easy decision. The Sox
don’t play again until Tuesday
night against the Yankees in
New York and Betts has time to
recover.
“It’s something day-to-day,”
Cora said. “He should be, hopefully, ready for Tuesday.”
Blake Swihart went to left
field. Benintendi then shifted
to center and Jackie Bradley Jr.
to right. Swihart was 1 for 3 in
a game the Sox won, 6-1.
Betts has been arguably the
best player in baseball. He is
hitting .355 with a 1.252 OPS
and has scored 36 runs.
Moreland keeps hitting
Mitch Moreland was 2 for 4
with an RBI double. The first
baseman is 10 of 17 with five
extra-base hits and six RBIs in
his last four games.
Moreland is hitting .347
with a 1.060 OPS and 17 RBIs
over 24 games in all.
“He’s a good hitter,” Cora
said. “He proved it last year. He
had a great season and that’s
one of the reasons we brought
him back.
“You take a look at what he’s
doing right now — not only on
the field but in the clubhouse,
Saturday night game
At Globe Life Park in Arlington, Texas
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO
Betts rf
4 1 0 0 1 0
Benintendi cf­lf
5 2 3 1 0 0
Ramirez dh
4 0 1 1 0 1
Martinez lf
5 1 2 1 0 1
Bradley Jr. cf
0 0 0 0 0 0
Bogaerts ss
4 0 1 0 0 3
Moreland 1b
3 1 2 2 1 0
ENúñez 2b
3 0 0 0 0 0
Devers 3b
4 0 0 0 0 1
Vázquez c
3 1 0 0 1 0
Totals
35 6 9 5 3 6
TEXAS
DeShields cf
Choo rf
Kiner­Falefa 2b
Mazara dh
Gallo 1b
Profar ss
RNúñez 3b
Chirinos c
Rua lf
a­Guzman ph
Totals
AB
4
4
4
3
4
4
3
4
2
1
33
R
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
1
0
5
Avg.
.352
.254
.297
.344
.183
.338
.338
.228
.268
.193
H BI BB SO Avg.
2 3 0 0 .306
1 0 0 3 .252
0 0 0 0 .253
0 0 1 2 .285
2 2 0 2 .223
0 0 0 2 .223
0 0 1 2 .115
1 0 0 3 .194
0 0 1 2 .200
0 0 0 1 .196
6 5 3 17
Boston............................... 000 012 201 — 6 9 0
Texas.................................010 031 000 — 5 6 2
a­struck out for Rua in 9th. E—Hamels (1),
RNúñez (3). LOB—Boston 7, Texas 4. 2B—Benin­
tendi (9), Bogaerts (10), Choo (9). 3B—Benintendi
(3). HR—Moreland (5), off Hamels, DeShields (2),
off EduRodríguez, Gallo 2 (12), off EduRodríguez,
off EduRodríguez. S—ENúñez. SF—Ramirez. Run­
ners left in scoring position—Boston 3 (Ramirez,
Vázquez 2), Texas 2 (Profar 2). RISP—Boston 2 for
8, Texas 1 for 4. Runners moved up—Ramirez.
GIDP—Ramirez. DP—Texas 1 (Hamels, Kiner­Fale­
fa, Gallo).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
EduRodríguez
6 4 5 5 2 10 107 5.29
Hembree
1‚ 2 0 0 1 3 26 3.78
Kelly W 1­0
„ 0 0 0 0 2 16 2.51
Kimbrel S 9
1 0 0 0 0 2 11 1.23
Texas
Hamels
Leclerc
Cláudio BS 2
Jepsen
Kela L 2­2
IP
6
‚
1‚
‚
1
H
5
0
3
0
1
R ER BB SO NP ERA
3 2 2 5 103 3.94
1 1 1 0 7 2.70
1 1 0 1 24 6.06
0 0 0 0 3 4.40
1 1 0 0 15 6.55
Inherited runners­scored—Kelly 3­0, Cláudio
1­1, Jepsen 1­0. IBB—off Hembree (Mazara). Um­
pires—Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Dan Bellino;
Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Adam Hamari. T—3:18.
A—35,728 (48,114).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
JOM COWSERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A trainer comes out to help Mookie Betts, who winces in pain after being hit on the right shoulder by an errant throw.
what he brings to the equation
is great.
“He’s putting pressure on
the manager to play more. I
like that. We do feel that he can
hit lefties and righties. When
his number is called upon, we
feel very comfortable with
him.”
Bradley was 0 for 3 with two
strikeouts and is 5 of 47 in his
last 14 games. Bradley is hitting .178 and hasn’t had an extra-base hit since April 20.
Moreland’s production
could mean more games with
Hanley Ramirez as the DH and
J.D. Martinez in the outfield.
Cora is considering lineups for
the Yankees series that have
Martinez in Yankee Stadium’s
cozy right field and Betts in
center.
Thornburg impresses
Tyler Thornburg threw a
scoreless inning for Triple A
Pawtucket on Saturday night.
He hit 97 miles per hour with
his fastball according to Cora.
The righthander has pitched
three times for the PawSox on
his rehabilitation assignment.
Thornburg has given up two
hits and one unearned run with
two walks and five strikeouts.
“Everybody is happy with
his performance,” Cora said.
With Pawtucket going on
the road Thornburg could have
his assignment transferred to
Double A Portland so he can
continue to get treatment from
the major league medical staff.
Thornburg is recovering
well from thoracic outlet surgery, but the Sox still want to
see him pass a few more tests
before activating him off the
disabled list.
“Back-to-back games, coming in situations with runners
on. But we’re very happy where
he’s at,” Cora said.
Thornburg’s fastball returned in spring training. The
Sox are more concerned about
his secondary pitches, but
those have been sharper in the
minor league games.
In general, Thornburg just
needs more innings. He has not
pitched in the majors since the
end of the 2016 season. The
shoulder injury kept him out
all last season.
“We’ve been very patient
with him and he’s been very patient,” Cora said. “But the way
he’s throwing the ball, I get excited because I know how good
he was with the Brewers
[2016]. He’s another guy who
can help us out in the bullpen.”
Feel the breeze
Texas struck out 52 times
over 35 innings in the series . . .
Moreland is 13 of 24 with seven RBIs in eight games against
Texas. He played for the Rang-
ers from 2010-16 but was not
offered a contract for 2017.
That’s when the Red Sox signed
him. Moreland chose his words
carefully when asked whether
he had extra motivation against
the Rangers. “I’ll just say I
don’t like making too many
outs against them,” he said . . .
The Sox are 14-5 on the road.
They also have homered in seven straight games, the longest
streak of the season . . . Brock
Holt left the team to start what
is expected to be a two-game
rehab assignment with Pawtucket at Lehigh Valley on
Monday and Tuesday. He is
coming back from a strained
left hamstring . . . Sox starters
are 17-6 with a 3.48 earned average . . . First base umpire Phil
Cuzzi had a rough day. Two of
his safe calls were reversed by
replay in a span of three batters
. . . With Doug Fister giving up
six runs over 6‚ innings, right-
SECOND INNING
RANGERS — Mazara struck out. Gallo homered
to right on a 2­2 count. Profar grounded out, sec­
ond baseman E.Núñez to first baseman More­
land. R.Núñez walked. Chirinos struck out.
FIFTH INNING
RED SOX — Devers fouled out to left fielder
Rua. C.Vázquez walked on a full count. Betts safe
at second on fielding error by third baseman
R.Núñez, C.Vázquez to third. Benintendi singled
to center, C.Vázquez scored. Ramirez grounded
into a double play, pitcher Hamels to second
baseman Kiner­Falefa to first baseman Gallo, Be­
nintendi out.
RANGERS — Profar struck out. R.Núñez struck
out. Chirinos singled to left. Rua walked on a full
count, Chirinos to second. DeShields homered to
left on the first pitch, Chirinos scored, Rua
scored. Choo struck out.
SIXTH INNING
RED SOX — J.Martinez singled to right. Bo­
gaerts struck out. Moreland homered to right on
a 1­1 count, J.Martinez scored. E.Núñez lined out
to center fielder DeShields. Devers grounded out,
second baseman Kiner­Falefa to first baseman
Gallo.
RANGERS — Kiner­Falefa grounded out, short­
stop Bogaerts to first baseman Moreland.
Mazara struck out. Gallo homered to right on a
1­1 count. Profar flied out to center fielder Benin­
tendi.
SEVENTH INNING
RED SOX — Leclerc pitching. C.Vázquez
popped out to first baseman Gallo. Betts walked
on a full count. Cláudio pitching. Benintendi dou­
bled to left, Betts scored. Ramirez grounded out,
pitcher Cláudio to first baseman Gallo, Beninten­
di to third. J.Martinez singled to center, Beninten­
di scored. Bogaerts struck out.
NINTH INNING
RED SOX — Kela pitching. Betts fouled out to
first baseman Gallo. Benintendi tripled to center.
Ramirez hit a sacrifice fly to center fielder
DeShields, Benintendi scored. J.Martinez ground­
ed out, first baseman Gallo unassisted.
handed starters are 1-15 with a
7.48 ERA in 26 games against
the Sox.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
With Sale on mound, Sox blow away Rangers
uRED SOX
Continued from Page C1
through those issues Sunday.
Other than Jurickson Profar,
every Texas batter struck out at
least once against Sale.
Red Sox 6, Rangers 1
At Globe Life Park in Arlington, Texas
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO
Betts rf
2 1 1 0 0 0
Swihart lf
3 0 1 0 0 0
Benintendi lf­cf
5 0 0 0 0 2
Martinez dh
4 2 2 1 1 1
Moreland 1b
4 0 2 1 0 0
Bogaerts ss
4 0 1 1 0 1
Devers 3b
4 0 0 0 0 1
ENúñez 2b
4 1 1 0 0 0
Bradley Jr. cf­rf
3 1 0 0 0 2
Leon c
3 1 2 3 1 0
Totals
36 6 10 6 2 7
TEXAS
DeShields cf
Choo dh
Kiner­Falefa 2b
Mazara rf
Profar ss
RNúñez 3b
Rua lf
Guzman 1b
CaPérez c
Totals
AB
3
4
3
3
4
4
4
4
3
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
Avg.
.355
.160
.244
.349
.347
.333
.260
.229
.178
.154
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 1 .308
0 0 0 2 .245
0 0 1 1 .244
0 0 0 2 .278
1 0 0 0 .224
2 0 0 2 .167
1 1 0 2 .203
0 0 0 3 .183
0 0 0 1 .000
5 1 1 14
Boston............................... 101 003 100 — 6 10 1
Texas.................................000 000 100 — 1 5 0
E—Devers (8). LOB—Boston 6, Texas 7. 2B—
Martinez (8), Moreland (7). HR—Martinez (8), off
Fister, Leon (1), off Fister, Rua (2), off Sale. SB—
DeShields 2 (6). Runners left in scoring position—
Boston 2 (Devers 2), Texas 5 (Kiner­Falefa, Profar,
Guzman, CaPérez 2). RISP—Boston 3 for 7, Texas
0 for 8. Runners moved up—Benintendi. GIDP—
Rua. DP—Boston 1 (Sale, Bogaerts, Moreland).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Sale W 3­1
7 4 1 1 1 12 103 2.02
Barnes
1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.51
Smith
1 1 0 0 0 2 15 4.22
Texas
Fister L 1­3
Chávez
Barnette
IP
6‚
1„
1
H
9
1
0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
6 6 2 5 103 4.02
0 0 0 1 33 5.23
0 0 0 1
8 2.57
HBP—by Sale (DeShields, Mazara), by Fister
(Bradley Jr.). Umpires—Home, Dan Bellino; First,
Phil Cuzzi; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Adrian
Johnson. T—2:33. A—28,360 (48,114).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
FIRST INNING
RED SOX — Betts singled to right. Benintendi
grounded out, first baseman Guzman unassisted,
Betts to second. J.Martinez walked. Moreland
doubled to right, Betts scored, J.Martinez to third.
Bogaerts grounded into fielder’s choice, third
baseman R.Núñez to catcher C.Pérez, J.Martinez
out. Devers grounded out, second baseman Kin­
er­Falefa to first baseman Guzman.
THIRD INNING
RED SOX — Benintendi struck out. J.Martinez
doubled to left. Moreland grounded out, third
baseman R.Núñez to first baseman Guzman. Bo­
gaerts singled to left, J.Martinez scored. Bogaerts
to second. Devers flied out to center fielder
DeShields.
SIXTH INNING
RED SOX — Bogaerts struck out. Devers struck
out. E.Núñez singled to left. Bradley Jr. was hit by
a pitch, E.Núñez to second. Leon homered to right
on a 2­0 count, E.Núñez scored, Bradley Jr.
scored. Swihart grounded out, pitcher Fister to
second baseman Kiner­Falefa to first baseman
Guzman.
SEVENTH INNING
RED SOX — Benintendi struck out. J.Martinez
homered to right on a 0­1 count. Chávez pitching.
Moreland singled to left. Bogaerts flied out to left
fielder Rua. Devers grounded out, first baseman
Guzman unassisted.
RANGERS — Rua homered to right on a 3­1
count. Guzman struck out. C.Pérez flied out to
right fielder Bradley Jr. DeShields grounded out,
second baseman E.Núñez to first baseman More­
land.
“It seemed like he wanted to
s top all the talk about not
throwing hard,” manager Alex
Cora said.
Sale struck out five of the
first seven hitters and didn’t allow a run until Ryan Rua homered in the seventh. By then the
Sox had scored all they needed.
Facing former teammate
Doug Fister, Mitch Moreland
had an RBI double in the first
inning and Xander Bogaerts a
run-scoring single in the third.
Sandy L eon’s three-run
homer in the sixth inning
opened the game up and J.D.
Martinez knocked Fister off the
mound with a solo shot in the
seventh. The Sox took three of
four from the Rangers. They
have won 8 of 12 overall.
After the day off on Monday,
the 25-9 Sox start a three-game
series in New York against the
24-10 Yankees. The Yankees
have won six straight and 15 of
16. As the Yankees surge, the
Sox are seeing steady improvement from their starters. It’s
what they expected.
Cora and LeVangie cut back
on the rotation’s workload in
spring training with the idea of
having Sale and the other starters better prepared for September and what they hope will be
a long postseason run.
Sale was limited to 14„ innings against major league
teams in Florida. The Sox were
willing to cede some velocity in
April to pick up some up later
on.
“Chris knew that, too, and
he was OK with it,” LeVangie
said. “He had a plan in his mind
and he lived with it. We’re going to keep taking care of them,
too.”
Through eight starts, Sale
has thrown 49 innings and 777
pitches. That’s 9„ fewer innings and 91 fewer pitches than
through eight starts last season.
Will less mean more later
JIM COWSERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sox third baseman Rafael Devers throws to first to get an out on a grounder hit by the Rangers’ Jurickson Profar.
on? Counting the Division Series, Sale allowed four or more
earned runs in six of his final 12
starts last season.
“We think it’s going to help
over the long run,” LeVangie
said. “But, no doubt, seeing
him pitch like he did [Sunday]
was great for everybody.”
On Sunday, Sale also had his
best slider of the season along
with a reliable changeup and
sinker. The mix produced 23
swing and misses.
“He has four great pitches
today,” LeVangie said. “Chris is
who he is, we know what he can
do.”
Sale is 6-2 against Texas in
his career and in the last five
starts has allowed only six
earned runs over 35‚ innings
while striking out 54.
“ That was vintage Chris
Sale,” Moreland said. “He did a
great job controlling the game
from his first pitch. He was on
point today. He had everything
working. It’s nice to play behind him on days like that.”
That the Rangers lead the
majors in strikeouts was certainly a factor in all the flailing.
But Sale had what he thought
were his best mechanics of the
season.
“ We k i n d o f go t b a c k t o
where we want to be,” he said.
That Leon caught him for
the first time this season was
part of it, too. The backup
catcher prefers a quick tempo
for his pitchers and that suits
Sale.
“When you’re feeling good,
your catcher knows what’s going on.” Sale said.
Mookie Betts left the game
in the second inning with a
bruised right shoulder, the result of being hit by a thrown
ball while he was running the
bases. He is day-to-day and the
Sox expect he will be ready to
play on Tuesday.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
C8
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
Day reins in game just in time
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jason Day fought through
some wayward tee shots and
his own self-doubt to shoot a 2under-par 69
GOLF
on Sunday
ROUNDUP
and win the
We l l s Fa r g o
Championship in Charlotte,
N.C., by two strokes over Aaron
Wise and Nick Watney, for his
second victory of the season.
After squandering a threeshot lead on the back nine,
Day’s tee shot on the difficult
230-yard par-3 17 th hole
crashed into the pin and settled less than 3 feet away. He
made the putt to take a twoshot lead, becoming the only
player to birdie the hole in the
final round.
Day finished at 12-under
272.
‘‘One of the best wins I have
ever had,’’ said Day, who never
felt on top of his game Sunday.
He missed more than half
the fairways — including an
ugly hook into the water on the
par-4 14 th — hit just eight
greens in regulation and made
four bogeys on the day. But he
toughed it out on the final
three holes at Quail Hollow
nicknamed the ‘‘Green Mile,’’
playing them in 2 under.
‘‘ You sit there and play
mental games with yourself,
subconsciously saying, ‘You
can’t do this. You’re going to
fail, you’re going to fail,’ ’’ Day
said. ‘‘I just kept on saying to
myself, ‘Forget about it and
keep pushing.’ ’’
Day fell back into a tie with
Wise after back-to-back bogeys
on 13 and 14, but regained the
lead by draining a 10-foot birdie putt on the par-4 16th. That
set up the shot of the tournament on the 17th, a hole with
water short, left, and long of
the green that gave players fits
all day because the putting surface was so firm that it was
tough to stop the ball.
Day caught his break when
the ball bounced four times
and hit the flagstick , drawing
a huge roar from the crowd.
Day, who has had troubles
with the closing hole in the
past, then hit an iron off the
18th tee, knowing he had a
two-shot lead. He got up and
down from the rough right of
the green to finish with a par.
It was the Day’s 12th career
win on the PGA Tour. The former world No. 1 also won the
Farmers Insurance Open this
year after a winless 2017.
Tiger Woods was a non-factor, shooting 74 to finish 14
shots back. He failed to make a
birdie in the final round of a
tournament for the first time
since 2014.
‘‘I didn’t putt well again,’’
Woods said. ‘‘The chances I did
have, I missed them all. Just a
bad week.’’
L P G A — S u n g H y u n Pa r k
sprinted to the finish in the
weather-abbreviated LPGA
Texas Classic, chipping in for
birdie on the final hole to close
out a 5-under 66 in the second
and final round, good for a
one-shot victory over Lindy
Duncan.
The 24-year-old South Korean, the highest-ranked player in the field at No. 5, ended
up needing that chip to drop to
survive a charge by Duncan,
who birdied her final three
holes for a 64, the low round of
the tournament.
Park finished with a tworound total of 11-under 131 for
her third LPGA Tour victory
and first since last season,
when she won the US Women’s
Open and was named Co-Player of the Year and Rookie of the
Year.
Rookie Yu Liu closed with a
66 and finished third, two
shots back. Ariya Jutanugarn
(66) and Sei Young Kim (67)
were another shot behind.
Champions —Bernhard
Langer won his first Champions event of the year when he
saved par on the final hole for a
2-under 70 and a one-shot victory in the Insperity Invitational at The Woodlands, Texas.
JIM COWSERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
J.D. Martinez, who hit his eighth home run Sunday, was
signed in the offseason to add pop to the Red Sox’ lineup.
Long-ball hitting
a smashing success
Nick Cafardo
ON BASEBALL
ARLINGTON, Texas — The
Red Sox may be third in their
division in home runs (46) behind the Blue Jays (51) and
Yankees (48) after Sandy Leon
and J.D. Martinez both went
deep in Sunday’s 6-1 win over
the Rangers, but what a difference the ability to hit the long
ball makes in the outlook of the
team and the confidence it
gives a pitching staff.
Red Sox manager Alex Cora
found out firsthand the value
of home runs last year with
World Series champion Houston, which finished second to
the Yankees with 238 homers.
Cora wanted to emphasize an
attack style with the Red Sox
and wanted Mookie Betts to be
more like George Springer and
hit homers from the leadoff
spot. Betts leads the team with
13.
“It’s big,” Cora said. “It
seems like we’re one swing
away every day from creating a
rally. Somebody gets on. I do
care about strikeouts, but I really don’t in certain situations.
If there’s nobody on and pitch
you go for it and do damage go
for it. They’re doing it with two
strikes and two outs.
“It takes the air away from
the other dugout. You’re sitting
there and all of a sudden someone hits a home run, you’re saying, ‘Oh God. Here we go
again.’ They’re doing a good job
offensively.”
Knowing that with one
swing of the bat, the Red Sox
can tie, go ahead, or win a
game speaks volumes about the
offensive remake of the team.
The Yankees won Sunday’s
game with a walkoff homer
from rookie Gleyber Torres in
the Bronx to remain one game
behind the Red Sox. When the
teams meet this week at Yankee Stadium there’s at least the
potential for some excitement
as both teams can go deep at
any time.
Martinez has brought that
feeling back to Boston. While
he’s only second on the team
with eight homers, the mindset of the offense has changed.
Having the team sixth overall
in the majors beats 27th from
last season.
As much as the Red Sox
wanted to downplay not having
the ability to hit the long ball
last season, it likely would have
made a big difference.
The Red Sox suffered a selfinflicted wound when they
wouldn’t bring in a power hitter because they didn’t want to
go over the luxury-tax threshold.
The Red Sox made the calculation they’d be able to get
away with it, but they didn’t.
By acquiring Martinez, who
hit 45 home runs last season,
everything changed
Ask the Diamondbacks’ Torey Lovullo what Martinez did
for that team when he arrived
and hit 29 homers for them. It
made them a sudden force in
the NL West.
Martinez’s homer gave the
Red Sox a 6-0 lead in the seventh inning, and in the sixth
inning, Leon stroked a threerun homer, his first of the season, with two aboard to make it
a 5-0 game. To be able to tack
on that many runs on what was
a 2-0 lead behind Chris Sale, allowed the talented lefty to relax. The home runs eased that
burden.
Sale pretty much admitted
that the uptick in Boston’s
quick-strike offense has made a
difference.
“Kind of where I’ve been all
year,” Sale said. “I don’t get
caught up with how many runs
I might be out right there in
any given inning because this
lineup can put up six runs, easily. We get to the four, fifth, and
sixth inning and there are no
runs on the board, you just
have to trust the process. We’ve
got one of the best lineups in
the league, if not the best lineup in the league, and you have
to trust that.”
Nobody gets it more than
Martinez. Hitting home runs is
the reason Dave Dombrowski
signed him.
“Yeah, of course they’re important,” Martinez said of
home runs. “It’s a quick way to
get back into the game. Quick
way to take the lead. It definitely brings a lot of confidence to a
team.”
Martinez still isn’t completely where he wants to be
even though he went 7 for 18
(.389) in the Texas series with a
1.199 OPS.
“It comes and goes,” Martinez said of his home run
stroke. “I’m still feeling it out.”
Mitch Moreland agrees that
the whole team has been able
to hit homers. The one exception has been Andrew Benintendi, who has hit just two on
the season, but that’s expected
to improve.
“When you can hit a couple
of homers and put some quick
runs up there that just helps
everyone relax and be your
best,” Moreland said. “For
whatever reason that didn’t
happen for us last year, but to
be able to get a cushion out
there for our pitchers I think is
important.”
Hitting more homers also
makes the Red Sox more entertaining to watch.
This is a team that plays its
home games at Fenway. For so
many years the Red Sox had
sluggers who could hit the ball
out of the park. They acquired
sluggers to hit the ball over the
Wall. After David Ortiz retired,
their overall power went with
him. But it’s back and Martinez, by his own admission,
hasn’t cranked it up yet.
Home runs are a beautiful
thing. They’ve made a huge difference in the Sox offense.
That’s why last season didn’t
make sense.
No power. No glory.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
Harvick dominates the field at Dover
By Dan Gelston
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DOVER, Del. — Kevin Harvick was flanked by his Stewart-Haas Racing team on the
victory lane stage when a photographer yelled at the group,
‘‘What are you holding up?’’
‘‘Four!’’ they shouted in unison.
Harvick, team owner Tony
Stewart and the rest flashed
their fingers Four Horsemenstyle and let out a ‘‘Wooo!’’ before they uncorked the champagne and sprayed anyone in
their sights.
The checkered flag collection keeps growing at SHR,
and Harvick is leading the
way.
Harvick dominated a race
interrupted by rain and drove
to his series-leading fourth
Cup victory of the season Sunday at Dover International
Speedway.
Harvick reeled off three
straight wins at Atlanta, Las
Vegas, and Phoenix earlier this
season and now has the 60pound Miles the Monster trophy to add to his collection.
Harvick swept the first two
stages and easily chased down
SHR teammate Clint Bowyer
in the third for the lead after a
41-minute delay. Bowyer had
asked for a rain dance when
the race was stopped with 80
laps left.
Once it resumed, Harvick
waltzed his way into victory
lane in the No. 4 Ford. He led
201 of 400 laps and stormed
past Bowyer and took the lead
for good with 62 laps left.
‘‘You knew he was going to
be the one that you were going
to have to beat for the win,’’
Bowyer said.
Harvick’s 41st career Cup
victory gives him a stout nine
top-10 finishes and eight topfives in 11 starts this season.
He held four fingers out the
window as he took a victory
lap on the mile concrete track
and won at Dover for the second time.
Bowyer was second. Daniel
Suarez, Martin Truex Jr., and
Kurt Busch rounded out the
top five.
SHR had three cars in the
top five with Harvick, Bowyer
and Busch.
‘‘Three cars in the top five
says a lot about where we are
as a company,’’ Harvick said.
SHR has five wins this season and has never won more
than six in its 10-year history.
The so-called and ballyhooed youth movement that
was supposed to usher NASCAR’s rebirth continues to
fizzle.
The Dover program had a
photo of seven drivers with
one career Cup win on the cover, yet the 42-year-old Harvick
became the sixth driver over
40 to win in the last 14 races.
Justify looks to be class of Preakness, too
By Beth Harris
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The
competition isn’t exactly lining
up to take on Kentucky Derby
winner Justify in the Preakness.
Of his 19 rivals in the Derby,
it appears most will skip the
second leg of the Triple Crown
on May 19 in favor of resting
and being pointed toward other races. That leaves mostly
fresh horses to potentially fill
the maximum 14-horse Preakness field.
A day after Justify raced to a
2½-length victory in the slop
as the 5-2 favorite, trainer Bob
Baffert and his star horse drew
a horde of visitors to his barn
at Churchill Downs.
Baffert guided his fifth Derby winner out of the barn and
walked him in a tight circle for
fans who eagerly snapped photos on their phones. The chestnut colt’s coat shined in the
morning sunlight and he nibbled on a couple of baby carrots Baffert plucked from his
vest pocket.
‘‘He knows he’s a stud,’’ Baffert said.
With Justify playfully tossing his head, Baffert knew it
was best to get the champ back
in his stall where he couldn’t
inadvertently kick anyone.
‘‘When I came out of the
stall, he was pulling me,’’ the
trainer said. ‘‘Usually they’re a
little bit tired, but he was
good.’’
Baffert’s phone rang Sunday with an official invitation
to bring Justify to run in the
Preakness at Pimlico Race
Course in Baltimore.
‘‘I didn’t tell them I’d think
about it,’’ he said. ‘‘There’s no
reason to say no.’’
Baffert will be seeking his
record-tying seventh Preakness victory. His four other
Derby winners — Silver
Charm, Real Quiet, War Emblem, and American Pharoah
— all won the 1 3/16-mile race.
American Pharoah went on to
capture the Belmont and complete the sport’s first Triple
Crown sweep in 37 years.
But Baffert isn’t going there
yet.
‘‘Right now I’m thinking
just keep him healthy,’’ he said.
Baffert plans to leave Justify
at Churchill Downs until shipping the chestnut colt to Pimlico during race week.
Derby runner-up G ood
Magic, last year’s 2-year-old
champion and Breeders’ Cup
Juvenile winner, appears unlikely to run in the Preakness.
However, New York-based
trainer Chad Brown said he
would weigh his options before making a final decision.
‘‘I want to give myself a little room to really observe the
horse,’’ Brown said. ‘‘The horse
will tell us.’’
SportsLog
Dodgers’ Kershaw to DL with biceps tendinitis
Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw was placed on the 10-day disabled list with left biceps tendinitis and returned to Los Angeles
from the team’s series in Mexico on Sunday for tests. Dodgers
manager Dave Roberts said the lefthander got hurt before Saturday’s game against San Diego. “It’s little bit head-scratching, but
we have to keep moving forward,’’ Roberts said. Kershaw is 1-4
with a 2.68 ERA this season with 48 strikeouts and 10 walks in 44
innings. Kershaw will be examined by head team physician Neal
ElAttrache. It’s the three-time Cy Young Award winner’s fourth
career trip to the DL, with the previous three being for back issues.
Cardinals lose Molina for a month
The Cardinals said catcher Yadier Molina is expected to miss a
month after being hit in the groin by a foul tip Saturday and having emergency surgery to repair a ‘‘pelvic injury with traumatic
hematoma.’’ The Cardinals placed Molina on the 10-day DL on
Sunday. He is hitting .272 with 6 home runs and 17 RBIs this season . . . The Mets reversed course and put righthander Jacob de­
Grom on the 10-day DL with a hyperextended elbow in his pitching arm. DeGrom was hurt while batting last Wednesday against
Atlanta, and after an MRI and scan, the Mets said he had been
given the OK to make Monday’s start at Cincinnati. Instead, he
was put on the DL retroactive to Thursday. DeGrom is 3-0 with a
2.06 ERA in seven starts. Another Mets star, left fielder Yoenis
Cespedes, left Sunday’s game against Colorado after one inning
because of tightness in his right hip.
SOCCER
Ronaldo exits early from El Clasico
Cristiano Ronaldo was substituted because of a right ankle injury at halftime in Real Madrid’s 2-2 draw at Barcelona in the rivals’ El Clasico, but Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane is confident
that Ronaldo, who scored in the 10th minute, will play against
Liverpool in the Champions League final on May 26. Lionel Mes­
si scored for Barcelona, which played with 10 men in the second
half after Sergi Roberto was shown a direct red card . . . Arsene
Wenger watched Arsenal beat Burnley, 5-0, in his final home
match as manager before telling fans: ‘‘I will miss you.’’ Wenger is
leaving Arsenal after 22 years in charge . . . Manchester City,
which sealed the Premier League title three weeks ago, received
the trophy for the third time in six years, but couldn’t produce a
performance befitting title celebrations after being held to a 0-0
draw by relegation-threatened Huddersfield.
RUNNING
Rupp is fastest at Prague Marathon
American Galen Rupp won the Prague Marathon in the race’s
second-fastest time ever — 2 hours, 6 minutes, 7 seconds. Rupp,
from Portland, Ore., is an Olympic bronze medalist and the runner-up in the 2017 Boston Marathon. Kenya’s Bornes Jepkirui
Kitur was the fastest woman in 2:24:19.
MISCELLANY
Canada back on track at world hockey
Canada bounced back from a loss to the United States in the
opening game at the world ice hockey championship in Denmark
by demolishing South Korea, 10-0. Connor McDavid scored his
first goal of the tournament and added two assists . . . UMass will
play at No. 3 seed Yale in the first round of the men’s NCAA Division 1 lacrosse championships May 12. In Division 2, Merrimack
hosts NYIT. The Division 1 semifinal and championship games,
and the Division 2 and 3 title games, will be held at Gillette Stadium, May 26-28. In women’s Division 1, Boston College earned the
No. 4 seed and will host the winner of Princeton-Syracuse in the
second round . . . The NBA fined Raptors president Masai Ujiri
$25,000 for walking onto the court at halftime of Game 3 against
the Cavaliers on Saturday to verbally confront officials for reversing a call . . . Gennady Golovkin (38-0-1, 34 KOs) earned a secondround knockout of Vanes Martirosyan on Saturday night in Carson, Calif., for his 20th consecutive middleweight title defense,
tying Bernard Hopkins’s record. Martirosyan was a replacement
for Canelo Alvarez, who failed a drug test in March.
T h e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Boston needs to tweak
elite women’s race
Shira Springer
FAIR PLAY
Bad weather and breakthrough marathon performances usually don’t go together. Not when race day
brings freezing rain, 30-mileper-hour winds, and risk of
hypothermia.
But in exactly those conditions at this year’s Boston
Marathon, Jessica Chichester,
Veronica Jackson, and Rebecca Snelson ran personal-best
times and placed among the
top 15 women.
Cue the we’re-not-worthy
GIFs and the controversy.
Chichester, Jackson, and
Snelson weren’t eligible for
the prize money awarded the
top 15 women because of
where they started. They
weren’t part of the separate
elite women’s start at 9:32
a.m. Instead, they were
among the sub-elite women
who left Hopkinton with
Wave 1 at 10 a.m.
You’re probably wondering
why that matters. Everybody’s
competing on the same course
and racing as fast as they can,
right? Isn’t it the same race?
Actually, no.
The Boston Marathon considers the elite women’s start
and Wave 1 different races.
And that’s where things get
complicated.
If Chichester, Jackson, and
Snelson were men starting in
Wave 1, they’d be able to collect any prize money they
earned. In the view of Boston
Marathon officials, they’d be
in the same race as the elite
men who started at the front
of Wave 1.
As news spread about
Chichester, Jackson, and Snelson not receiving cash awards,
a critical chorus emerged:
There’s inequality baked into
the Boston Marathon’s prize
money eligibility rules. It’s
sexist.
To be sure, it’s not a good
look when rules dictate that
sub-elite men get rewarded
for a top-15 finish and subelite women don’t. It cries out
for change.
On Thursday, the Boston
Athletic Association announced it was doubling up
on cash prizes, sending checks
to the women who were part
of the elite women’s start and
to the women who started in
Wave 1. So, Chichester will get
$15,000 for finishing with the
fifth-fastest time. Jackson
(13th) will receive $1,800 and
Snelson (14th) will take home
$1,700.
That’s a temporary fix.
Anything more permanent
raises issues of gender equality and fair competition. And
there’s a twist.
Female marathoners are
actually better served by a system that treats men and women differently. Yep, I went
there.
Absolute equality would
mean the elimination of the
Boston Marathon’s separate
elite women’s start, something
the BAA won’t do. And it
shouldn’t. Without the elite
women’s start, you would
miss great, side-by-side competition among the world’s
best female marathoners. The
women’s race would fall back
into the shadows cast by faster male runners.
Boston went to a separate
elite women’s start in 2004.
Most, if not all, elite women
prefer the separate start because it allows them to race
openly. They don’t have to
worry about losing track of rivals while surrounded by fast
men.
Separate starts also make
the race more honest since
elite women can’t pace off fast
men. Another advantage:
More media coverage for the
women because broadcasters
can easily follow the separate
races, and the women finish
several minutes ahead of the
men’s winner.
Shalane Flanagan, the
2017 New York City Marathon
champion, said a separate
elite women’s start creates a
race that’s like “a game of
chess.”
She added: “We’re capable
of sometimes running much
faster, but we’re tactfully mak-
G l o b e
Sports
Scoreboard
Schools
MON
5/7
BASEBALL
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Austin Prep 16............Arlington Cath. 1
NONLEAGUE
Maimonides 9.......................Cathedral 4
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
Y
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
NYY
7:05
NESN
NYY
7:05
ESPN,
NESN
NYY
7:05
NESN
TOR
7:07
NESN
TOR
4:07
NESN
TOR
1:07
NESN
5/8
5/9
5/10
5/11
PHI
(if nec.)
TBA
TNT
PHI
6:00
TNT
ing moves, conserving energy.
The women behind us [starting in Wave 1] are racing,
however they’re looking at
their watches and they’re running their own race and
they’re clicking off splits.
They’re time-trialing when
they start behind us. So, it’s a
very different mind-set and
different outcome.”
The chess match versus
time trial gets to the heart of
why the elite women’s start is
considered a separate race
and why prize eligibility rules
are the way they are. The rules
are meant to promote fair
competition, not create a system that treats women unfairly. But there can be unintended consequences.
Are the current rules unfair to Chichester, Jackson,
Snelson, and any other Wave
1 female runner that has a
prize-worthy, breakthrough
performance in Boston? Absolutely.
But what if a woman from
Wave 1 finished with a faster
official time than 2018 Boston
Marathon champion Desiree
Linden — a woman Linden
never saw and never knew
posed any competition? Does
she become the women’s winner?
Is that fair? Remember
Linden and the other elite
women are playing a game of
chess, not racing the clock.
If they were part of the
elite women’s start, Chichester, Jackson, and Snelson
might have run much different races. Instead, they’ll have
a special place in race history,
though 2018 wasn’t the first
time that sub-elite women finished in the top 15.
In 2004, the year the elite
women’s start made its debut,
the 14th- and 15th-place finishers were sub-elites. Since
then, sub-elite women have
come close to a top-15 finish
on three other occasions. On
the men’s side, since 2004,
sub-elites have twice finished
in the money — 14th in 2008
and 11th in 2012.
Going forward, BAA executive director and CEO Tom
Grilk wants breakthrough
performances by sub-elite
men and sub-elite women rewarded equally. There’s no debate about that. The question
is how to make sure that happens.
The obvious solution: Increase the size of the elite
women’s start. That’s something Grilk said is “on the table.” He added that the BAA
“will model it” to see how it
might work logistically.
“I agree that is the simple
solution, on paper. Although
I’m not sure logistically if it’s
so simple,” said Linden via email.
“The BAA and John Hancock host and accommodate
the elite field for the weekend;
everything from hotel, food
stipend, buses to the start,
prerace staging in the Korean
Church, elite athlete fluids on
the course, recovery rooms,
and so on.
“You’d be blown away by
how challenging it is for organizers to get the John Hancock elite field in a line to
walk out to the start. Not lack
of competence, of course, but
nervous elites doing final prep
is like herding cats in the rain
at a circus.”
Every year, the number of
men and women given elite
status hovers around 60, including masters. The BAA has
found that number is the
sweet spot when it comes to
handling the elite field logistics.
And it’s worth noting that
some women who qualify for
the separate start actually
choose to be part of Wave 1
because they’ll run faster
times with the masses.
Still, the BAA has to realize
that no matter how many
times it explains the difference between the open racing
in the elite women’s start and
the time trialing among subelite women in Wave 1, no
matter how many times you
talk about Chichester, Jackson, and Snelson being outliers in a bad-weather year, the
status quo still smacks of
women being treated unequally and unfairly. And they
have to do something.
But if the BAA expands the
elite women’s start, how many
women should be eligible?
What should the new cutoff
time be? What kind of fluid
support will be offered to subelites who now find themselves part of the elite start?
With more runners, how
much earlier will the elite
women’s start need to take
place? And how will the race
ensure that any sub-elites who
have breakthrough performances are held to the same
anti-doping standards as their
competitors?
That’s a big one.
“I don’t think any elites
like myself who are sponsored
have any issue increasing the
size of the field,” said Flanagan. “But in order to accept
that money, you need to be
drug-tested.”
Maybe the BAA institutes a
system similar to Olympic Trials with an “A” qualifying
standard and a “B” qualifying
standard.
Maybe the “B” standard is
three hours or faster and
doesn’t come with all the
perks of the “A” standard. It’s
hard to imagine any woman
who hasn’t run under three
hours coming anywhere close
to the top 15. That would be
less a breakthrough performance and more a suspicious
performance.
As for the other numbers,
if you take the less-aberrational 2017 Boston Marathon results, there were 92 women
who finished in less than
three hours. Other years it’s
hovered closer to 130 women.
Would the elite women’s
start be manageable with 90
women, with 130? There’s
probably some number
crunchers at the BAA asking
the same thing right now. Or,
they should be.
It’d be nice to find a sweet
spot that’s a little sweeter and
a little fairer.
Fair Play is a column that
explores the challenges girls
and women face in today’s
sports world, as well as their
athletic accomplishments.
Shira Springer can be reached
at springer@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@ShiraSpringer.
5/12
PHI
(if nec.)
TBA
ESPN
Y
5/13
PHI
(if nec.)
TBA
TOR
7:30
NBCSB
LACROSSE
While Desiree Linden won the elite women’s race, three
starters from Wave 1 were able to reach the top 15.
Y
TUE
Colleges
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
C9
NCAA Championships
MEN
Division 1
Opening Round
Wednesday, May 9
Moon Township, Pa.
Canisius vs. Robert Morris.
First Round
Sunday, May 13
No. 1 Maryland vs. Canisius/Robert
Morris winner, noon; No. 2 Albany vs.
Richmond, 5; No. 3 Yale vs. UMass,
noon; No. 4 Duke vs. Villanova, 2:15;
No. 5 Johns Hopkins vs. Georgetown, 5;
No. 6 Loyola (Md.) vs. Virginia, 7:15;
No. 7 Notre Dame vs. Denver, 2:15; No.
8 Syracuse vs. Cornell, 7:15.
Division 2
First Round
Saturday, May 12
Merrimack vs. NYIT; Seton Hill vs. Le
Moyne; Lenoir­Rhyne vs. Colorado Me­
sa; Saint Leo vs. Tampa.
Division 3
First Round
Tuesday, May 8
Albion vs. New England College; Eliza­
bethtown vs. John Carroll; Merchant
Marine vs. Johnson & Wales; Eastern
vs. Morrisville St.
Second Round
Wednesday, May 9
RIT vs. Albion/New England College
winner; Gettysburg vs. Elizabethtown/
John Carroll winner; Rhodes vs. Hunt­
ingdon; Stevens Institute vs. Spring­
field; York (Pa.) vs. Western New Eng­
land; Ohio Wesleyan vs. Auora; Am­
herst vs. Keene State; Denison vs.
Illinois Wesleyan; Wesleyan (Conn.)
vs. SUNY Cortland; Dickinson vs.
Lynchburg; Cabrini vs. Colorado Col­
lege; Washington & Lee vs. Transylva­
nia; Ithaca vs. Stevenson; Roanoke vs.
Christopher Newport; Tufts vs. Mer­
chant Marine/Johnson & Wales (R.I.)
winner; Salisbury vs. Eastern/Morris­
ville St. winner.
WOMEN
Division 1
Opening Round
Wagner vs. Mercer, TBD.
First Round
Friday, May 11
Denver vs. High Point; Navy vs. Johns
Hopkins; Standford vs. Virginia; Colo­
rado vs. Jacksonville; Fairfield vs. No. 8
Loyola (Md.); Penn vs. Penn St.; Prince­
ton vs. Syracuse; No. 7 Townson vs.
Wagner/Mercer winner; Virginia Tech
vs. Georgetown.
Second Round
Sunday, May 13
No. 1 Maryland vs. Denver/High Point
winner; No. 2 North Carolina vs. Virgin­
ia Tech/Georgetown winner; No. 3
James Madison vs. Standford/Virginia
winner; No. 4 Boston College vs. Princ­
eton/Syracuse winner; No. 5 Stony
Brook vs. Penn/Penn St. winner; No. 6
Florida vs. Colorado/Jacksonville win­
ner.
Divison 2
Friday, May 11
Florida Tech vs. Limestone, 3; Adelphi
vs. LIU Post, 3; East Stroudsburg vs.
Mercyhurst, 5; Regis (Colo.) vs. India­
napolis, 6.
Saturday, May 12
Florida Southern vs. Florida Tech/
Limestone winner, 3; West Chester vs.
East Stroudsburg/Mercyhurst winner,
5; Le Moyne vs. Adelphi/LIU Post win­
ner, 3:30; Lindenwood vs. Regis (Co­
lo.)/Indianapolis winner, 6.
Division 3
First Round
Saturday, May 12
Meredith vs. Merchant Marine; Spring­
field vs. Elms; Westfield State vs. Mor­
risville State; Wesleyan vs. Messiah;
SUNY Cortland vs. Plymouth State;
Catholic vs. Johnson & Wales (R.I.);
Washington & Lee vs. Cabrini; Babson
vs. Castleton University; Tufts vs. FDU­
Florham; William Smith vs. Endicott.
Second Round
Sunday, May 13
TCJN vs. William Smith/Endicott win­
ner; Bowdoin vs. Stevens Institute;
Franklin & Marshall vs. Tufts/FDU­Flo­
rham winner; Colorado College vs. Cla­
remont Mudd Scripps; Middlebury vs.
Babson/Castleton winner; Illinois Wes­
leyan vs. Hamline; York (Pa.) vs. Wash­
ington & Lee/Cabrini winner; Rowan
vs. Catholic/Johnson & Wales (R.I.)
winner; Amherst vs. SUNY Cortland/
Plymouth State winner; St. John Fisher
vs. Wesleyan/Messiah winner; Mount
Washington vs. Mount Union; Gettys­
burg vs. Westfield State/Morrisville
State winner; Rhodes vs. Transylvania;
Trinity vs. Springfield/Elms winner;
Denison vs. Calvin; Salisbury vs. Mere­
dith/Merchant Marine winner.
Baseball
Home games shaded
ON THE AIR
BASEBALL
8:10 p.m.
11 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis
Houston at Oakland
North Division
W
L
Pawtucket ...............15 12
Buffalo .....................11 10
Syracuse..................14 13
Lehigh Valley..........14 14
Rochester ................12 13
Scranton/W­B.........13 16
Pct. GB
.556 —
.524
1
.519
1
.500 1½
.480
2
.448
3
South Division
W
L
Norfolk .....................16 11
Durham....................16 12
Charlotte .................12 17
Gwinnett..................11 17
Pct. GB
.593 —
.571
½
.414
5
.393 5½
West Division
W
L
Toledo ......................17 11
Columbus ................15 13
Indianapolis ............14 13
Louisville ...................9 17
Pct. GB
.607 —
.536
2
.519 2½
.346
7
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Rochester 6....................Lehigh Valley 1
Norfolk 2.................................Louisville 1
Buffalo 6................................. Syracuse 1
Gwinnett 4........................ Indianapolis 1
Pawtucket 2..................Scranton/W­B 0
Columbus 4............................Charlotte 3
Toledo 6....................................Durham 1
MONDAY'S GAMES
Rochester at Buffalo.........................6:05
Indianapolis at Louisville.................6:30
Columbus at Toledo..........................6:35
Scranton/W­B at Syracuse..............6:35
Charlotte at Gwinnett.......................7:05
Norfolk at Durham............................ 7:05
Pawtucket at Lehigh Valley............ 7:05
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Norfolk at Durham........................10:35a
Columbus at Toledo......................10:35a
Rochester at Buffalo.........................6:05
Indianapolis at Louisville.................6:30
Scranton/W­B at Syracuse..............6:35
Charlotte at Gwinnett.......................7:05
Pawtucket at Lehigh Valley............ 7:05
EASTERN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W
L
New Hampshire .....17
9
Trenton ....................18 10
Hartford...................17 12
Binghamton ............13 13
Reading....................10 16
Portland.....................7 18
Pct. GB
.654 —
.643 —
.586 1½
.500
4
.385
7
.280 9½
Western Division
W
L
Akron........................18 11
Richmond ................16 12
Altoona ....................15 12
Bowie .......................13 15
Erie ...........................10 18
Harrisburg...............10 18
Pct. GB
.621 —
.571 1½
.556
2
.464 4½
.357 7½
.357 7½
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Trenton 4.............................Harrisburg 0
Hartford 12..............................Portland 4
Akron 4.........................................Bowie 1
Richmond 4..............................Reading 2
Erie at Altoona.................................. ppd.
New Hampshire at Binghamton.... ppd.
MONDAY'S GAMES
Bowie at Altoona....................................6
Harrisburg at Erie..............................6:05
Akron at Richmond...........................6:35
Portland at New Hampshire............6:35
Reading at Trenton................................ 7
Binghamton at Hartford...................7:05
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Bowie at Altoona....................................6
Harrisburg at Erie..............................6:05
Akron at Richmond...........................6:35
Portland at New Hampshire............6:35
Reading at Trenton................................ 7
Binghamton at Hartford...................7:05
Latest line
ESPN
MLB
NBA
Monday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Phila..................6½ ............... BOSTON
At Cleveland.........5½ ................ Toronto
PRO BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia
8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland
TNT
TNT
PRO HOCKEY
7 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh
9:30 p.m.
Nashville at Winnipeg
NBCSN
NBCSN
National Hockey League
Monday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Pittsburgh. ­190 Washington...+175
At Winnipeg...­155 Nashville........+145
Transactions
Golf
Auto Racing
PGA-WELLS FARGO
NASCAR AAA 400
Sunday
At Quail Hollow Club
Charlotte, N.C.
Par: 71
Final
$1,386,000 (­12)
Jason Day (500)...........69­67­67­69—272
$677,600 (­10)
Nick Watney (245)......72­67­66­69—274
Aaron Wise (245)........68­68­70­68—274
$369,600 (­8)
Bryson DeChmb (135)75­65­66­70—276
$281,050 (­7)
Paul Casey (100).........69­68­69­71—277
Phil Mickelson (100)...72­72­64­69—277
Peter Uihlein (100)......72­72­62­71—277
$238,700 (­6)
Patrick Reed (85)........71­71­67­69—278
$200,200 (­5)
Emiliano Grillo (73).....68­71­71­69—279
Luke List (73)...............70­72­67­70—279
Sam Saunders (73).....70­69­68­72—279
Charl Schwartzel (73) 70­67­70­72—279
$148,867 (­4)
Talor Gooch (57).........71­72­66­71—280
Kyle Stanley (57).........67­72­71­70—280
Johnson Wagner (57).67­71­69­73—280
$115,500 (­3)
Joel Dahmen (49)........70­71­70­70—281
Chesson Hadley (49)..70­74­66­71—281
Adam Hadwin (49)......73­71­65­72—281
Rory McIlroy (49)........68­76­66­71—281
Francsco Mlinari (49).70­72­68­71—281
$77,000 (­2)
Greg Chalmers (38)....71­70­70­71—282
Tony Finau (38)...........69­76­71­66—282
Rickie Fowler (38).......72­69­68­73—282
Charles Howell III (38)71­68­71­72—282
Webb Simpson (38)....72­70­71­69—282
Justin Thomas (38).....73­69­70­70—282
$52,360 (­1)
Jonas Blixt (28)............71­71­69­72—283
Alex Cejka (28)............70­71­71­71—283
Graeme McDwell (28) 71­73­67­72—283
Ted Potter Jr. (28).......72­71­69­71—283
Seamus Power (28)....74­71­68­70—283
Rory Sabbatini (28).... 71­71­73­68—283
Cameron Trngale (28)70­70­70­73—283
$37,249 (Even)
Austin Cook (19).........71­72­69­72—284
Beau Hossler (19).......68­76­69­71—284
Tom Lovelady (19)......68­76­72­68—284
Shane Lowry (19)........74­70­71­69—284
Peter Malnati (19)...... 67­68­75­74—284
Keith Mitchell (19)......67­74­75­68—284
Patrick Rodgers (19)..71­73­72­68—284
Ollie Schnderjans (19)68­73­73­70—284
$22,389 (+1)
Jhonattan Vegas (10).70­74­72­69—285
Corey Conners (10)....75­69­69­72—285
Jason Dufner (10)........68­72­73­72—285
Tyrrell Hatton (10)......67­73­72­73—285
J.B. Holmes (10)..........71­73­69­72—285
Martin Kaymer (10)....73­67­73­72—285
Brooks Koepka (10)....72­72­71­70—285
Troy Merritt (10).........72­69­70­74—285
John Peterson (10)..... 65­77­72­71—285
Shawn Stefani (10).....71­69­73­72—285
Robert Streb (10)........73­72­69­71—285
Vaughn Taylor (10).....74­68­71­72—285
Michael Thmpson (10)68­73­69­75—285
New England players
277 (­7) — Peter Uihlein (100),
$281,050, Mattapoisett, 72­72­62­71
217 (+4) — Keegan Bradley (2),
$14,168, Hopkinton, 68­77­72
220 (+7) — J.J. Henry (1), $13,013,
Fairfield, Conn., 73­72­75
Sunday
At Dover International Speedway
(Starting position in parentheses)
1. (2) Kevin Harvick, Ford.
2. (12) Clint Bowyer, Ford.
3. (7) Daniel Suarez, Toyota.
4. (3) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota.
5. (9) Kurt Busch, Ford.
6. (8) Brad Keselowski, Ford.
7. (10) Denny Hamlin, Toyota.
8. (14) Ryan Blaney, Ford.
9. (19) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet.
10. (1) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet.
11. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford.
12. (6) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet.
13. (18) Joey Logano, Ford.
14. (17) William Byron, Chevrolet.
15. (5) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford.
16. (23) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet.
17. (25) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet.
18. (11) Erik Jones, Toyota.
19. (22) Trevor Bayne, Ford.
20. (16) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet.
21. (28) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet.
22. (29) Michael McDowell, Ford.
23. (15) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet.
24. (30) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet.
25. (26) Darrell Wallace Jr., Chevrolet.
26. (27) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet.
27. (32) David Ragan, Ford.
28. (31) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet.
29. (24) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford.
30. (35) Gray Gaulding, Toyota.
31. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet.
32. (34) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet.
33. (21) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet.
34. (20) Paul Menard, Ford.
35. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota.
36. (37) Cody Ware, Chevrolet.
37. (36) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet.
38. (38) Corey LaJoie, Chevrolet.
CHAMPIONS-INSPERITY
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5
Sunday
At The Woodlands CC
The Woodlands, Texas
Par 72
Final
$330,000 (­11)
Bernhard Langer.............. 63­72­70—205
$161,333 (­10)
Paul Goydos......................70­68­68—206
Bart Bryant........................70­67­69—206
Jeff Maggert......................66­71­69—206
$80,960 (­9)
David Frost........................68­72­67—207
Brandt Jobe.......................69­70­68—207
Tom Lehman.....................67­72­68—207
Tom Pernice Jr..................68­68­71—207
Kenny Perry.......................73­65­69—207
$45,886 (­8)
Joe Durant......................... 68­70­70—208
Kevin Sutherland..............70­69­69—208
David Toms........................70­71­67—208
Mark Calcavecchia.......... 67­69­72—208
Russ Cochran....................68­70­70—208
Scott Dunlap......................66­70­72—208
Miguel Angel Jimenez.....67­69­72—208
$33,073 (­7)
Gary Hallberg....................70­72­67—209
Lee Janzen.........................72­66­71—209
Jerry Kelly..........................69­72­68—209
$26,510 (­6)
Marco Dawson..................69­70­71—210
Clark Dennis......................73­68­69—210
Corey Pavin.......................70­68­72—210
Duffy Waldorf................... 70­71­69—210
$19,238 (­5)
Glen Day.............................70­71­70—211
Doug Garwood..................67­75­69—211
John Huston...................... 72­69­70—211
Billy Mayfair......................72­69­70—211
Steve Pate......................... 69­71­71—211
Jerry Smith........................72­70­69—211
Kirk Triplett.......................69­73­69—211
Sandy Lyle.........................67­72­72—211
Colin Montgomerie..........68­72­71—211
$14,520 (­4)
Tommy Armour III............70­71­71—212
Paul Broadhurst................70­71­71—212
Scott McCarron................67­76­69—212
$12,375 (­3)
Woody Austin................... 69­72­72—213
Olin Browne.......................70­68­75—213
Dan Forsman.....................70­72­71—213
Wes Short Jr......................72­68­73—213
$10,340 (­2)
Tom Byrum........................71­70­73—214
Carlos Franco....................70­72­72—214
Mark O'Meara...................70­73­71—214
Scott Parel.........................68­74­72—214
Esteban Toledo.................72­70­72—214
$8,140 (­1)
Jay Don Blake....................70­74­71—215
Michael Bradley................68­73­74—215
Todd Hamilton..................70­69­76—215
Rocco Mediate..................70­74­71—215
Jesper Parnevik................69­72­74—215
$6,380 (Even)
Mark Brooks......................72­77­67—216
Mike Goodes.....................68­70­78—216
Gene Sauers......................70­78­68—216
$5,390 (+1)
Barry Lane.........................73­72­72—217
Paul McGinley...................73­74­70—217
$4,840 (+2)
Len Mattiace.....................71­77­70—218
Fran Quinn.........................73­75­70—218
Scott Verplank..................69­74­75—218
$3,960 (+3)
Stephen Ames...................75­74­70—219
Bob Gilder..........................73­75­71—219
Tom Kite.............................71­73­75—219
Jeff Sluman........................74­72­73—219
Willie Wood.......................70­71­78—219
New England players
209 (­7) — Jerry Kelly, $33,073, Hart­
ford, 69­72­68
218 (+2) — Fran Quinn, $4,840,
Northborough, 73­75­70
220 (+4) — Billy Andrade, $3,080,
Bristol, R.I., 73­75­72
Soccer
Hockey
MLS
AHL PLAYOFFS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts.
Atlanta United ...... 7 1 1 22
NYC FC ................... 6 2 2 20
Orlando City.......... 6 2 1 19
New York............... 5 3 0 15
Columbus............... 4 3 3 15
NEW ENGLAND ..... 4 3 2 14
Montreal ................ 3 6 0 9
Chicago.................. 2 4 2 8
Philadelphia .......... 2 4 2 8
Toronto FC............. 2 4 1 7
D.C. United ............ 1 4 2 5
GF
23
19
19
21
13
15
14
12
6
9
8
GA
10
14
14
10
10
12
23
14
13
13
13
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Kansas City ........... 6 2 2 20
Los Angeles FC..... 5 2 1 16
Vancouver ............. 4 5 1 13
FC Dallas................ 3 1 4 13
Minn. United ......... 4 5 0 12
Houston.................. 3 3 2 11
Portland ................. 3 3 2 11
LA Galaxy .............. 3 5 1 10
Real Salt Lake....... 3 5 1 10
Colorado ................ 2 4 2 8
San Jose................. 1 5 2 5
Seattle.................... 1 4 2 5
21
18
10
11
12
18
13
12
10
10
12
5
12
14
18
7
16
13
14
16
19
11
16
9
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
SUNDAY’S RESULT
Orlando City 3..............Real Salt Lake 1
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9
Philadelphia at Columbus................7:30
Seattle at Toronto FC.......................7:30
Sporting KC at Atlanta United........7:30
Montreal at Chicago.........................8:30
Minn. United at Los Angeles FC........ 10
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Montreal 4...................NEW ENGLAND 2
New York 4.............New York City FC 0
Minnesota United 1........... Vancouver 0
FC Dallas 1..................Los Angeles FC 1
Columbus 0................................Seattle 0
Atlanta United FC 2................Chicago 1
Houston 3..............................LA Galaxy 2
Sporting Kansas City 1........ Colorado 0
Portland 1................................San Jose 0
NWSL
North Carolina ...... 5
Seattle.................... 3
Chicago.................. 2
Portland ................. 2
Orlando .................. 2
Utah ........................ 1
Houston.................. 1
Washington........... 1
Sky Blue FC ........... 0
BASEBALL
Baltimore (AL): Sent 2B Jonathan
Schoop to Norfolk (IL) for a rehab as­
signment.
Cleveland (AL): Optioned P Ben Taylor
to Columbus (IL). Recalled OF Greg Al­
len from Columbus.
Los Angeles (AL): Optioned P Eduardo
Paredes to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled
OF Jabari Blash from Salt Lake.
Minnesota (AL): Transferred P Ervin
Santana to 60­day DL.
Toronto (AL): Optioned P Jake Petricka
and SS Richard Urena to Buffalo (IL).
Reinstated 1B Justin Smoak from 10­
day DL. Recalled OF Anthony Alford
from Buffalo.
Arizona (NL): Optioned P Kris Medlen
to Reno (PCL). Recalled P Braden Ship­
ley to Reno.
Atlanta (NL): Optioned P Lucas Sims to
Gwinnett (IL). Recalled P Luke Jackson
from Gwinnett.
Cincinnati (NL): Optioned P Tanner
Rainey to Louisville (IL). Reinstated P
Amir Garrett from the bereavement
list.
Los Angeles (NL): Placed P Clayton
Kershaw on 10­day DL. Recalled P
Brock Stewart from Oklahoma City
(PCL). Signed SS Danny Espinosa to a
minor league contract.
New York (NL): Placed P Jacob deGrom
on 10­day DL, retroactive to Thursday.
Selected the contract of P P.J. Conlon
from Las Vegas (PCL).
Philadelphia (NL): Sent P Mark Leiter
Jr. to Clearwater (FSL) for a rehab as­
signment.
Pittsburgh (NL): Sent P Joe Musgrove
to Altoona (EL) for a rehab assign­
ment.
St. Louis (NL): Placed C Yadier Molina
and P Dominic Leone on thye 10­day
DL. Recalled P Mike Mayers and C Car­
son Kelly from Memphis (PCL).
Washington (NL): Sent P Shawn Kelley
to Potomac (Carolina) for a rehab as­
signment.
FOOTBALL
Cleveland (AFC): Signed TE Julian Al­
len, DL Lenny Jones, OL Austin Corbett,
WR Damion Ratley and DB Simeon
Thomas.
HOCKEY
AHL: Suspended Syracuse D Mat Bodie
two games.
0
1
2
2
2
1
3
3
3
1 16 11 4
1 10 7 5
3 9 9 8
2 8 9 9
2 8 6 6
4 7 5 4
2 5 4 9
2 5 7 10
1 1 3 6
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
SUNDAY'S RESULT
Chicago....................... at North Carolina
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9
Portland at Houston...............................8
Orlando at Utah......................................9
SATURDAY, MAY 12
Orlando at Portland..........................3:30
Wasington at Niorth Carolina..............7
Houston at Chicago................................8
Sky Blue FC at Seattle.........................10
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Seattle 3...................................Portland 2
Houston 3..........................Sky Blue FC 2
Utah 2.................................Washington 0
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE
W D L GF GA Pts
x­Man. City ....... 30 4 2 102 26 94
Man. United...... 24 5 7 67 28 77
Liverpool ........... 20 12 5 80 38 72
Tottenham ........ 21 8 7 68 32 71
Chelsea.............. 21 6 9 61 34 69
Arsenal .............. 18 6 12 72 48 60
Burnley .............. 14 12 11 35 37 54
Everton .............. 13 10 14 43 55 49
Leicester City ... 11 11 14 49 54 44
Newcastle ......... 11 8 17 36 46 41
Crystal Palace.. 10 11 16 43 55 41
Bournemouth ... 10 11 16 43 60 41
Watford ............. 11 8 18 44 63 41
Brighton ............ 9 13 14 33 47 40
West Ham......... 9 11 16 45 67 38
Huddersfield..... 9 9 18 27 56 36
Southampton.... 6 15 15 36 55 33
Swansea City ... 8 9 19 27 53 33
West Brom........ 6 13 18 31 54 31
Stoke City ......... 6 12 19 33 67 30
x­Championship Winner
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Arsenal 5...................................Burnley 0
Chelsea 1................................Liverpool 0
Man. City 0......................Huddersfield 0
TUESDAY’S GAME
Swansea City vs. Southampton......2:45
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Arsenal vs. Leicester City................2:45
Chelsea vs. Huddersfield.................2:45
Man. City vs. Brighton...........................3
Tottenham vs. Newcastle.....................3
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Bournemouth 1..............Swansea City 0
Crystal Palace 2..................Stoke City 0
Everton 1.........................Southampton 1
Watford 2.............................Newcastle 1
West Brom 1.......................Tottenham 0
West Ham 2...................Leicester City 0
Division Finals
(Best­of­7; x­if necessary)
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
Lehigh Valley 1, Charlotte 1
Lehigh Valley 2......................Charlotte 1
Charlotte 6.................at Lehigh Valley 0
Tuesday, May 8
Lehigh Valley at Charlotte....................7
Wednesday, May 9:
Lehigh Valley at Charlotte....................7
x­Saturday, May 12
Lehigh Valley at Charlotte....................6
x­Monday, May 14
Charlotte at Lehigh Valley...............7:05
x­Tuesday, May 15
Charlotte at Lehigh Valley...............7:05
North Division
Toronto 3, Syracuse 0
Toronto 6................................Syracuse 4
At Toronto 2............... Syracuse 1 (2OT)
Toronto 7...........................at Syracuse 1
Tuesday, May 8
Toronto at Syracuse...............................7
x­Saturday, May 12
Syracuse at Toronto...............................4
x­Monday, May 14
Toronto at Syracuse...............................7
x­Wednesday, May 16
Syracuse at Toronto...............................7
Western Conference
Central Division
Rockford 2, Manitoba 0
Rockford 4............................. Manitoba 2
Rockford 4............................. Manitoba 1
Wednesday, May 9
Manitoba at Rockford............................8
Friday, May 11
Manitoba at Rockford............................8
x­Saturday, May 12
Manitoba at Rockford............................7
x­Tuesday, May 15
Rockford at Manitoba............................8
x­Wednesday, May 16
Rockford at Manitoba............................8
Pacific Division
Texas 1, Tucson 1
Tucson 2..............................Texas 1 (OT)
Texas 4.......................................Tucson 1
Monday, May 7
Tucson at Texas......................................8
Wednesday, May 9
Tucson at Texas......................................8
Friday, May 11
Tucson at Texas......................................8
x­Sunday, May 13
Texas at Tucson.............................. 10:05
x­Monday, May 14
Texas at Tucson.............................. 10:05
IIHF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Russia 7......................................Austria 0
Canada 10.........................South Korea 0
Sweden 3.....................Czech Republic 2
Norway 5................................ Germany 4
Switzerland 2..........................Slovakia 0
Finland 8.......................................Latvia 1
MONDAY’S GAMES
United States vs. Germany.....10:15 am
Bulgaria vs. Russia...................10:15 am
Sweden vs. France............................2:15
Canada vs. Denmark.........................2:15
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
United States 4......................Denmark 0
Switzerland 3............................ Austria 2
Latvia 3.............................Norway 2 (OT)
France 6....................................Bulgaria 2
Finland 8...........................South Korea 1
Czech Republic 3...........Slovakia 2 (OT)
Tennis
MUTUA MADRID OPEN
Singles Men First Round
Denis Shapovalov def. Tennys
Sandgren, 6­1, 6­4.; Richard Gasquet
def. Tomas Berdych (14), 6­4, 6­2.
Singles Women First Round
Caroline Wozniacki (2) def. Daria
Gavrilova, 6­3, 6­1.; Sam Stosur def.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, 6­1, 6­7 (2),
6­3.; Monica Puig def. Zarina Diyas, 6­4,
2­6, 6­2.; Sorana Cirstea def. Katerina
Siniakova, 6­4, 2­6, 6­4.; Simona Halep
(1) def. Ekaterina Makarova, 6­1, 6­0.;
Carla Suarez Navarro def. Barbora
Strycova, 6­3, 6­3.; Anastasija Sevasto­
va, (16) def. Anna Karolina Schmiedlo­
va, 6­3, 4­6, 6­3.; Bernarda Pena def.
Aryna Sabalenka, 6­4, 2­6, 6­3.; Victoria
Azarenka def. Aleksandra Krunic, 6­3,
6­3.; Maria Sharapova def. Mihaela Bu­
zarnescu, 6­4, 6­1.; Zhang Shuai def.
Naomi Osaka, 6­1, 7­5.; Ashleigh Barty
def. Sara Errani, 6­1, 6­4.; Garbine Mu­
guruza (3) def. Peng Shuai, 6­4, 6­2.;
Sara Sorribes Tormo def. Madison
Keys (13), 7­5, 6­2.; Sloane Stephens
(9) def. Silvia Soler­Espinosa, 6­3, 6­2.;
Aliaksandra Sasnovich def. Danielle
Collins, 7­5, 6­2.; Donna Vekic def.
Georgina Garcia­Perez, 6­2, 6­4.;
Kristyna Pliskova def. Natalia Vikhly­
antseva, 6­4, 6­4.; Petra Kvitova (10)
def. Lesia Tsurenko, 6­1, 6­2.; Elise
Mertens def. Alison Van Uytvanck, 6­4,
6­4.; Johanna Konta def. Magdalena
Rybarikova (16), 6­3, 7­5.
C10
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
M O N D A Y, M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 8
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Kelly Chrysler*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
Audi Shrewsbury
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Infiniti of Hanover
2060 Washington St, Hanover
781-570-5200
infinitiofhanover.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
Quirk Ford*
540 Southern Artery, Quincy
617-770-0070
quirkford.com
Best Chevrolet*
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
Mirak Genesis
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
Mirak Chevrolet*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St,
Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
smart center Lynnfield
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95,
Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
Lev Kia of Framingham*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
VillageSubaru.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Route 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Cityside*
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
107 Andover Street, Route 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Kelly Jeep*
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Herb Chambers RAM of Danvers*
Kelly Maserati*
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
Kelly Ford*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
smart center Boston
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
Kelly Infiniti*
Framingham Ford*
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
Boch Maserati*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Herb Chambers RAM of Millbury*
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Mirak Hyundai
Ferrari Of New England*
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Kelly Honda*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Honda Village*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
Land Rover Sudbury*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
340 Mystic Ave, Medford
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Boston
525 Boston Post Rd. • Route 20 • Wayland, MA 01778
New 2017 Alfa Romeo
GIULIA
Q4 AWD
STK# A385 • MSRP: $45,190
199
$
LEASE FOR
**
/ MO. 24 MOS.
$3,999 due at signing
New 2018 Alfa Romeo
229
Q4 STELVIO $
AWD
STK# 110016, MSRP: $45,890
LEASE FOR
*
/ MO. 24 MOS.
$3,999 due at signing
Available at Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo through 5/7/18 to qualified lessees with Tier 1 approved credit through Chrysler Capital . Delivery by 5/7/18 required. Subject to availability – quantities are limited. *24-month closed-end lease for a new 2017 model
year Alfa Romeo Giulia Q4 AWD with an MSRP of $45,190 (stock # A380).**24-month closed-end lease for a new 2018 model year Alfa Romeo Stelvio Q4 AWD with and MSRP of $45,890 (stock # 110016)with an MSRP of $44,790. Lessee is responsible
for insurance, maintenance, repairs, $0.50 per mile over 10,000 miles per tear, and excess wear and tear. MA sales tax, doc, reg, acq, security deposit, and first months payment are separate. Lease payment reflects conquest cash for customers currently
leasing a competitive brand vehicle (non Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, FIAT or Alfa Romeo product) and enter into a new purchase or lease of an eligible model. Extra charges may apply at lease end. Requires Tier 1 Credit approval with Chrysler Capital.
In stock models only. Savings include all incentives and excludes taxes and all dealer fees. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales excluded from all offers.
855-806-3336
herbchambersalfaromeoofboston.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Millbury
2 Latti Farm Rd. • Route 20 • Millbury, MA 01527
855-866-0411
herbchambersalfaromeo.com
Sales: Monday-Thursday 8:30am - 8:00pm
Friday-Saturday 8:30am - 6:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
Service: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 6:00pm
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
4
Размер файла
9 839 Кб
Теги
The Boston Globe, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа