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The Boston Globe – May 09, 2018

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Wednesday, May 9, 2018
Legislature
still hesitant
to talk sex ed
Bill to modernize guidance
for schools is stalled again
By Stephanie Ebbert
GLOBE STAFF
At a time when everybody, everywhere, seems
to be talking about sexual misconduct, Massachusetts is still having a hard time talking about
sex ed.
A bill that would modernize sex education in
Massachusetts schools appears ready to die a quiet death for the fourth legislative session in a row
— despite its timely attention
to healthy relationships and
affirmative consent.
of Mass.
Massachusetts is one of 26
high school
states
where there is no reseniors have
quirement to teach sex educahad sexual
tion in public schools — and
intercourse.
no way of knowing whether
the schools that are teaching it are using unbiased, medically accurate information.
“This seems like a no-brainer,” said Gina Scaramella, executive director of the Boston Area
Rape Crisis Center.
“They deserve to learn the rules of engagement as designed by our laws and our norms,”
she said. “We can see that what we’re doing now
doesn’t work.”
60%
SEX EDUCATION, Page A8
No easy road
to a Partners,
insurer merger
State would look at added
costs, lost competition
By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
GLOBE STAFF
Even in the rapidly changing world of health
care, Partners HealthCare’s potential acquisition
of one of Massachusetts’ major insurers has some
industry experts scratching their heads.
The state’s largest hospital network confirmed
last week that it is discussing a range of options
with Harvard Pilgrim, including a possible acquisition of the Wellesley-based provider of employer and individual insurance plans.
A merger, which would create a formidable
new health care company, could result in higher
costs for consumers and reduced competition,
several industry experts said, ensuring tough
scrutiny from state regulators who are focused on
containing the growth in medical spending.
“My guess is that regulators would not like
this,” said David E. Williams, president of the
MERGER, Page A8
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
“It didn’t bring calm, it didn’t bring peace, and it never will,” the president said as he reinstated sanctions on Tuesday.
‘A horrible, one­sided deal’
Trump pulls out of Iran nuclear agreement, rattling
US allies and raising questions on Mideast stability
By Matt Viser
GLOBE STAFF
WASHINGTON — President Trump said
Tuesday that he is pulling the United States
out of the landmark agreement to curb Iran’s
nuclear weapons program, leaving European
allies to try to salvage the deal and shaking up
international efforts to bring stability to the
Middle East.
Under Trump’s order, the United States
will immediately restore tough economic
sanctions on Iran.
The moves are seen by foreign policy specialists as isolating the United States from its
Equity program boosts groups targeted in war on drugs
By Dan Adams
From Wall Street to Silicon Valley, industries
across America are struggling to redress decades
of discrimination and boost the ranks of minorities and the disenfranchised in their workforces.
But what if you could design an industry
from scratch? Could you somehow bake in diversity and fairness?
past marijuana convictions, or to residents of
low-income neighborhoods with high arrest
rates for drug crimes. All other companies that
grow, process, or sell pot, meanwhile, are required to help those communities, and are limited in the size of their operations. The Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission will also
launch a training program for inexperienced pot
entrepreneurs.
The provisions spring from a simple premise:
MARIJUANA, Page A9
The truth? It’s way out there
A UFO marker materialized with
a sheepish assist from town and
state. Its future isn’t looking up.
By Dugan Arnett
Nothing to sneeze at
GLOBE STAFF
Wednesday: Partly sunny.
High 61-66. Low 45-50.
Thursday: More of the same.
High 63-68. Low 52-57.
Complete report, C10.
Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. of Japan finalized
a deal to buy Shire PLC, the second-largest
VOL . 293, NO. 129
With Seaport gridlock getting worse, columnist Shirley Leung offers five fixes. B10.
$2.50
We’re about to find out.
Last month, Massachusetts rolled out the
country’s first statewide marijuana industry
“equity” program, giving preferential treatment
to people who are typically marginalized by the
business world.
One key to the effort: giving a head start in
the rush for cannabis licenses to companies that
are led by or employ minorities, to people with
GLOBE STAFF
TAKING WING —
Suggested retail price
IRAN, Page A7
ª Iran will begin negotiations with
other parties of the deal — Britain,
Germany, France, China, and Russia — to see whether the agreement will remain intact.
ª US immediately imposes sanctions on Iran, blocking any new
business contracts. Any existing
contracts will have to wind down
within 90 to 180 days.
ª Trump says he will attempt to
deny Iran any path to a nuclear
weapon, even without the diplomatic deal.
Law aims to ensure diversity in pot industry
The landmark neon sign
for the long-closed
Fontaine’s restaurant in
West Roxbury is coming
back to life as part of an
art installation on the
Greenway. B1.
*
allies who remain in the nuclear pact, and
stoking fears that the pullout could put Iran
back on course to pursue a nuclear weapon.
Iran said after Trump’s announcement that it
would begin talks with European leaders
while also taking preliminary steps toward resuming uranium enrichment.
“This was a horrible, one-sided deal that
should have never, ever been made,” Trump,
in announcing perhaps his most consequential decision since taking office, said from the
Diplomatic Room at the White House. “It
didn’t bring calm, it didn’t bring peace, and it
WHAT’S NEXT
biotech employer in Massachusetts. B10.
Michael Cohen used a shell company tied to
a Russian oligarch to pay hush money. A3.
The Red Sox fell, 3-2, to the red-hot Yankees
and the teams are now tied for first. C1.
SHEFFIELD — Once again in this era of civic selfreflection, an American town finds itself wrestling
with the future of a monument commemorating a
controversial piece of its history.
Unlike in other towns, the history in question concerns the extraterrestrial.
The monument, a 5,000-pound trapezoid of white
concrete, is in a small clearing near the center of this
tiny Berkshires town, overlooking the Housatonic River. It bears a large state seal and a plaque with the signature of Governor Charlie Baker certifying the event
it memorializes as “true and historically significant.”
The historical moment in question? An “off-world
incident” that supposedly took place here some 50
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UFO MEMORIAL, Page A9
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
The monument to a supposed alien encounter in
1969 was erected in Sheffield three years ago.
T h e
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B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Ex­convict Blankenship rejected by W.Va. voters
In Ohio, ex­CFPB
chief tops Kucinich;
Pence wins in Ind.
By Steve Peoples
and John Raby
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Republican voters rejected ex-convict Don Blankenship Tuesday
in a West Virginia Senate primary in which he sold himself
as ‘‘Trumpier than Trump’’ but
was vigorously opposed by the
president. GOP voters in Indiana, meanwhile, chose wealthy
businessman Mike Braun over
two sitting congressmen to lead
the party’s charge against a vulnerable Democratic senator in
the fall.
In a possible sign of party
unrest, Representative Robert
Pittenger lost the Republican
primary for his seat in North
Carolina to the Rev. Mark Harris, a Baptist pastor he narrowly
beat two years ago. Both men
campaigned as evangelical
Christians who would outdo
the other to support Donald
Trump.
In a hard-fought battle between two liberal Democrats,
Richard Cordray, the former
head of the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau, won the
party’s nomination in the Ohio
governor’s race on Tuesday
night over former congressman
and presidential hopeful Dennis Kucinich.
The victory by Cordray, who
was endorsed by Massachusetts
Senator Elizabeth Warren and
drew strong labor support,
came as a relief to many Democrats who saw Kucinich as unelectable, given his sharply leftwing views and ties to a group
sympathetic to Syrian President
Bashar Assad. Cordray will
compete this fall against Mike
DeWine, the state attorney general, who claimed the Republican nomination after an aggressive challenge from Lieutenant
Governor Mary Taylor.
These were among a slate of
elections, kicking off the prima-
KIRK IRWIN/GETTY IMAGES
Democratic gubernatorial
nominee Richard Cordray
celebrated in Ohio (top,
center), and Republican
Senate nominee Mike Braun
(left) thanked supporters in
Indiana.
JOHN MINCHILLO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ry season, that tested the limits
of the anti-establishment fervor
that has defined the Trump era.
Hopelessly behind in West
Virginia, Blankenship conceded defeat in the state’s GOP Senate primary election. That was
welcome news for Trump and
his allies who had fought aggressively to undermine Blankenship, an ex-convict who
they feared would have little
chance of defeating Democratic
Senator Joe Manchin this fall.
State Attorney General Patrick Morrisey won the nomination, promoting his record of
challenging policies of the administration of former president Barack Obama and deflecting criticism of his roots in
New Jersey, where he lost a
2000 congressional race.
There was less drama in Indiana, where Republican voters
nominated businessman Braun
to take on Democratic Senator
Joe Donnelly in November.
Braun, a one time crit ic of
Trump, has more recently declared that the president should
be nominated for the Nobel
Peace Prize.
The West Virginia Republican Senate contest in particular
headlined a slate of primary
elections across four states on
Tuesday that will help shape
the political landscape in this
fall’s midterm elections. Control of Congress is at stake in
addition to state governments
across the nation.
In most cases, the Republican candidates on the ballot
Tuesday had competed to be
seen as the most conservative,
the most anti-Washington, and
the most loyal to the Republican president.
In Indiana, Democrat Donnelly will face off in November
against Braun, a multimillionaire owner of a national auto
parts distribution business who
was highly critical of Trump
throughout the 2016 general
election. He has since come
around, voicing praise for the
‘‘Trump agenda’’ — if not always the president’s inflammatory rhetoric and tweets.
Another Indiana contest was
less contentious: Greg Pence
won the primary for the congressional seat his younger
brother, Vice President Mike
Pence, once held. Greg Pence is
a Marine veteran and owner of
two antique malls who once ran
the now-bankrupt chain of Tobacco Road convenience stores.
He'll be the favorite to win the
seat in November.
And on the local level, a
woman who accused Trump of
sexually harassing her more
than a decade ago claimed the
Democratic nomination in a
race to represent an area southeast of Toledo, Ohio, in the state
House of Representatives.
Democrat Rachel Crooks, a 35year-old university administrator, ran unopposed, but must
win a November general election to become the first Trump
accuser to hold elected office.
A bright spot for Republicans in swing-state Ohio: GOP
turnout was stronger than
Democratic voting in the open
governor’s race. With nearly
two-thirds of the vote counted,
567,000 Republicans cast votes,
to 412,000 Democrats.
US Representative Jim Renacci, with Trump’s support,
won the Republican primary to
challenge Democratic Senator
Sherrod Brown in November.
Yet none of Tuesday’s other
contests was expected to have
more impact on the midterm
landscape than West Virginia,
where Blankenship embraced
Trump’s tactics — casting himself as a victim of government
persecution and seizing on xenophobia, if not racism — to
stand out in a crowded Republican field that included Attorney
General Morrisey and congressman Evan Jenkins.
Material from The New York
Times was used in this report.
Daily Briefing
Newtown parents’ suit dismissed
A grisly search resumes in Michigan
HUD sued over delay of antisegregation rule
HARTFORD — A Connecticut judge has cited government immunity in dismissing
a lawsuit by the parents of two
children killed in the 2012
Newtown, Conn., school massacre against the town and its
school district over alleged inadequate security measures.
Superior Court Judge Robin
Wilson, in a decision released
Tuesday, granted the town’s request to dismiss the lawsuit,
agreeing school officials were
immune from being sued and
the security procedures in
place were discretionary.
‘‘Emergencies, by their very
nature, are sudden and often
rapidly evolving events, and a
response can never be one
hundred percent scripted and
directed,’’ Wilson wrote.
‘‘To say that the faculty and
staff of the school were to act
in a prescribed manner in responding to an emergency situation would likewise be illogical and in direct contradiction
to the very purpose of govern-
MACOMB TOWNSHIP,
Mich. — Authorities excavating woods in southeastern
Michigan for the remains of a
12-year-old girl last seen in
1979 also could be looking for
the bodies of up to half a dozen others who have been reported missing over the years.
Digging resumed Tuesday
in Macomb Township, about
30 miles from downtown Detroit. The search started Monday for the remains of Kimberly King, but Warren Police
Commissioner Bill Dwyer told
WJBK-TV that there could be
others buried in the area.
‘‘We have probable cause
to believe that [Kimberly] is
buried there,’’ Dwyer said.
‘‘We also believe that there’s
maybe four to six other girls
that have been reported missing that are buried there. We
certainly are convinced we
have the right area. It’s just a
sad type of situation.’’
In 2008, the remains of
13-year-old Cindy Zarzycki
were found near the same area. She had disappeared in
1986 after being lured to a
Dairy Queen.
Arthur Ream was convict-
WASHINGTON — A group
of advocacy organizations filed
a lawsuit Tuesday against the
Department of Housing and
Urban Development and its
secretary, Ben Carson, over his
decision to delay an Obamaera rule intended to ensure
that communities confront
and address racial segregation.
The suit filed by the National Fair Housing Alliance, Texas
Appleseed, and Texas Low Income Housing Information
Service argues that Carson illegally suspended the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing
Act when he abruptly announced this year that cities
and counties receiving federal
funds won’t be required to an-
mental immunity: allowing for
the exercise of judgment without fear of second-guessing,’’
she wrote.
The shooting killed 20 firstgraders and six educators at
Sandy Hook Elementary
School on Dec. 14, 2012. Gunman Adam Lanza, 20, fatally
shot his mother at their home
before going to the school,
where he killed himself as police arrived. Lanza shot his
way through a locked glass entryway to get into the building.
The parents of two firstgraders killed in the shooting,
Jesse Lewis and Noah Pozner,
sued the town on several
claims, including that school
officials didn’t follow security
procedures including immediately ordering a school lockdown after Lanza shot his way
in. They also said the school’s
classroom doors could only be
locked from the hallway.
Their lawyer said they will
appeal the ruling.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trump sends Congress a rescission plan
WASHINGTON — President Trump on Tuesday sent
lawmakers a plan to wipe
more than $15 billion in unused spending off the books. It
wouldn’t have much practical
impact on targeted programs
such as the popular Children’s
Health Insurance Program,
but it would take away leftover
money that could be used to
pay for other budget priorities.
House Republican leaders
hope to pass the measure this
month, but it faces resistance
in the Senate, despite being
tailored to leave this year’s
$1.3 trillion catchall spending
bill alone. Many GOP conservatives blasted that ‘‘omnibus’’
measure as bloated, but some
said they would oppose any efforts to cut from it.
Trimming back previously
allocated funding used to be
common. But the so-called
‘‘rescissions’’ process hasn’t
been used since the Clinton
administration.
‘‘Washington has a spending problem,’’ said White
House budget director Mick
Mulvaney. ‘‘By utilizing a tool
deployed by every president
from Ford to Clinton, today’s
historic $15.4 billion rescissions package is an obvious
step toward reducing unnecessary spending and protecting
the American taxpayer.’’
If approved, the tactic
would have only a tiny impact
on the budget deficit, which is
on track to total more than
$800 billion this year.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Investigators searched in
Macomb Township, Mich.,
for the remains of a
murder victim.
ed of first-degree murder in
her slaying. He later was temporarily released from prison
to lead police to her body. He
drew a map of the site and
spent about an hour at the
search scene with authorities
before being returned to prison.
Zarzycki had been dating
Ream’s son at the time of her
disappearance. Authorities
said Ream tricked her by telling her that he was planning
a surprise party for his son.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pa. priest accused of abusing at least two boys
A Roman Catholic priest
was arrested and charged
Tuesday with sexually abusing
at least two boys during his
four decades in the Erie, Pennsylvania, diocese, and making
one of them go to confession
after the alleged assaults.
State Attorney General Josh
Shapiro announced the arrest
of the 64-year-old Rev. David
Poulson, of Oil City, as part of a
statewide grand jury investigation. According to court records, Poulson is facing at least
eight charges, including indecent assault and child endangerment, for incidents dating
to 2002. He was being held
Tuesday on $300,000 cash
bail. He faces a maximum of
64 years, if convicted, and
$135,000 in fines.
Prosecutors said Poulson
resigned from the diocese in
February after a phone call
was received from an military
chaplain in Fort Hood, Texas,
saying a 23-year-old had disclosed he was abused by Poulson when he was 8 years old.
Poulson allegedly abused
one of his victims in church
rectories more than 20 times
while he served as an altar boy.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
alyze housing data and submit
plans to HUD for addressing
segregation until after 2020.
Asked for comment, a HUD
official sent a copy of its announcement of the rule delay.
Finalized in 2015, the rule
for the first time required
more than 1,200 jurisdictions
receiving HUD block grants
and housing aid to analyze
housing stock and come up
with a plan for addressing patterns of segregation and discrimination. If HUD determined that the plan, called a
Fair Housing Assessment,
wasn’t sufficient, the city or
county would have to rework it
or risk losing funding.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
New guidance issued on prostate screening
CHICAGO — Whether to
get screened for prostate cancer is a question that men
aged 55 to 69 should decide
themselves in consultation
with their doctors, according
to finalized guidance issued
Tuesday by an influential panel of health care experts.
New evidence suggests that
PSA blood tests can slightly
reduce the chances of dying
from the disease for some
men, so those decisions may
be a little easier. Though
screening can sometimes lead
to drastic, needless treatment,
the panel says that can sometimes be avoided with close
monitoring when cancer is detected.
The government-appointed
US Preventive Services Task
Force had earlier opposed
routine screening. Its new
guidance was published Tuesday in the Journal of the
American Medical Association.
The guidance says it’s important to weigh the potential
benefits and harms of screening. The test looks for elevated
levels of a protein in the blood
that may signal cancer but can
also be caused by less serious
prostate problems.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the record
R Correction: Because of a reporting error, a story in the Metro
section Tuesday misstated when the oldest cars currently operating on the Green Line were built. They were built in 1986. The
Globe regrets the error.
The Globe welcomes information about errors that call for
corrections. Information may be sent to comments@globe.com or
left in a message at 617-929-8230.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A3
After a swift fall, investigations begin Firm tied to Russian
oligarch sent money
to Michael Cohen
Ex­New York AG
facing 4 women’s
abuse claims
By Renae Merle
and Mark Berman
By Mike McIntire
and Ben Protess
WASHINGTON POST
NEW YORK TIMES
N E W YO R K — A tt o r n e y
General Eric Schneiderman on
Tuesday ended nearly 10 years
as New York’s top law enforcement officer under investigation after four women said he
had physically assaulted them.
The investigation caps a remarkably swift fall for Schneiderman, a high-profile Democrat who had been a public advocate for women but who was
accused of repeatedly slapping
and choking multiple women.
Schneiderman denied the allegations, but three hours after
they were published in a New
Yorker magazine article on
Monday evening, he said he
would leave office the following
day.
The Manhattan and Long Island district attorneys offices
said they had both opened investigations. Governor Andrew
Cuomo said Tuesday that multiple district attorneys may become involved.
‘‘These women should have
their day in court,’’ Cuomo said.
‘‘They should have the opportunity to tell a district attorney
the facts and circumstances
and then let the district attorney or district attorneys make a
decision as to whether they was
any criminal liability.’’
New York City Mayor Bill de
Blasio said that he was happy
that Schneiderman resigned
quickly, and that he hopes others who believe they were victims of Schneiderman will contact police. ‘‘Rest assured, you
will be believed, and that information will be important to
protecting others,’’ he said.
Michelle Manning Barish
and Tanya Selvaratnam told the
New Yorker that Schneiderman
had choked and slapped them,
leading them to seek medical
treatment. A third woman, who
A shell company that Michael D. Cohen used to pay
hush money to a pornographic
film actress received payments
totaling more than $1 million
from an American company
linked to a Russian oligarch
and several corporations with
business before the Trump administration, according to documents and interviews.
Financial records reviewed
by The New York Times show
that Cohen, President Trump’s
personal lawyer and longtime
fixer, used the shell company,
Essential Consultants LLC, for
an array of business activities
that went far beyond what was
publicly known. Transactions
totaling at least $4.4 million
flowed through Essential Consultants starting shortly before
Trump was elected president
and continuing to this January,
the records show.
Among the previously unreported transactions were payments last year totaling about
$500,000 from Columbus Nova, an investment firm in New
York whose biggest client is a
company controlled by Viktor
Vekselberg, the Russian oligarch. A lawyer for Columbus
Nova, in a statement Tuesday,
described the money as a consulting fee that had nothing to
do with Vekselberg.
Other transactions described in the financial records
range from hundreds of thousands of dollars in payments by
Fortune 500 companies with
business before the Trump administration, as well as smaller
amounts he paid for luxury expenses including a MercedesBenz and private club dues.
References to the transactions first appeared in a document posted to Twitter on Tuesday by Michael Avenatti, the
SASHA MASLOV/NEW YORK TIMES/FILE 2017
Eric Schneiderman had been known as an advocate for women’s rights.
was not identified, made similar accusations of nonconsensual physical violence, while a
fourth — who was not identified but was described as an attorney who has held high positions in the New York legal
sphere — told the magazine
that when she rejected one of
Schneiderman’s advances, he
‘‘slapped her across the face
with such force that it left a
mark that lingered the next
day.’’ All four women said the
physical abuse was not consensual.
Schneiderman denied the allegations. ‘‘In the privacy of intimate relationships, I have engaged in role-playing and other
consensual sexual activity. I
have not assaulted anyone. I
have never engaged in nonconsensual sex, which is a line I
would not cross.’’
The allegations were stunning, given Schneiderman’s record of advocating for women,
including pursuing a case
against movie producer Harvey
Weinstein, who has been accused of repeated assaults and
attacks on women.
Manning Barish, an activist
and writer, replied on Twitter to
a message from actress Rose
McGowman, who has accused
Weinstein of rape, ‘‘Because
you, my sister, @rosemcgowan
because of your braver y to
speak truth to power and face
your perpetrator, you have given so many women the strength
to use their own voices. Bravery
is contagious; but truth is unstoppable.’’
Schneiderman was first
elected attorney general in
2010 and was expected to easily
win a third term in November,
with no Democratic primary
challenger. He was widely believed to be preparing to eventually run for governor.
‘‘The guy’s future was limitless,’’ said Douglas Muzzio, a
political science professor at
Baruch College. Now ‘‘he is going to be known for the hypocrisy of his private life versus his
public life. That becomes the
story more than his substantive
accomplishments.’’
Schneiderman was also an
outspoken foe of President
Trump, filing more than 100
lawsuits challenging the administration on immigration,
environmental standards, and
taxation. Last month, Schneiderman sought to expand his
powers to prosecute people
who have received a presidential pardon. Those efforts are
likely to be slowed, if not significantly hampered, as New York
scrambles to replace Schneiderman, Muzzio said.
‘‘In fact, it may be backward
steps in terms of the issues he
fought for,’’ Muzzio said. ‘‘It’s a
setback, at least temporarily.’’
Schneiderman, 63, was temporarily replaced by Solicitor
General Barbara Underwood, a
former Yale Law School professor. The State Senate and the
Assembly will choose a permanent successor by joint ballot.
‘‘Our office has never been
stronger, and this extraordinarily talented, dedicated, and
tireless team of public servants
will ensure that our work continues without interruption,’’
Underwood said in a statement. But as the state’s Democrats huddled in meetings Tuesday, no clear timeline emerged.
An earlier investigation of
Manhattan District Attorney
Cyrus Vance over his handling
of a sexual-assault allegation
against Weinstein highlights
the sea change facing Schneiderman. Cuomo had tasked
Schneiderman with investigating the matter. Now, a spokesman in Vance’s office said in a
statement that the district attorney’s office ‘‘has opened an
investigation into the recently
reported allegations concerning Mr. Schneiderman.’’
lawyer for Stephanie Clifford,
the pornographic film star who
was paid $130,000 by Essential
Consultants to keep quiet about
her alleged affair with Trump.
The lawyer’s seven-page document, titled “Preliminary Report of Findings,” does not explain the source of his information but describes in detail
dates, dollar amounts, and parties involved in various dealings
by Cohen and his company.
The Times’s review of financial records confirmed much of
what was in Avenatti’s report.
In addition, a review of e-mails
and interviews shed additional
light on Cohen’s dealings with
the company connected to Vekselberg, who was stopped and
questioned at an airport earlier
this year by investigators for
Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel examining Russian
interference in the 2016 presidential election.
Federal prosecutors in Manhattan are investigating Cohen
for possible bank fraud and
election-law violations, according to people briefed on the investigation.
Clifford, whose stage name
is Stormy Daniels, is suing Cohen and Trump to break her
nondisclosure agreement related to the $130,000, and Avenatti has asserted that Cohen’s use
of Essential Consultants to
make the payment potentially
violated banking laws.
Among the other payments
to Cohen’s company described
in the financial records were
four for $99,980 each between
October 2017 and Januar y
2018 by Novartis Investments
SARL, a subsidiary of Novartis,
the multinational pharmaceutical giant based in Switzerland.
Novartis spent more than $10
million on lobbying in Washington, D.C., last year and frequently seeks approvals from
federal drug regulators.
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B o s t o n
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W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
The World
Pompeo off to
N. Korea for
meeting ahead
of summit
Daily Briefing
Trump discloses
existence of trip
Kim may decide
to free prisoners
By Carol Morello and
David Nakamura
WASHINGTON POST
THANASSIS STAVRAKIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHANGE AT TOP
Tens of thousands of supporters of Nikol
Pashinyan celebrated in the central square
of Armenia’s capital of Yerevan on Tuesday
after the protest leader was elected the
country’s prime minister. Many of the
supporters wore white clothes, symbolizing
their hopes that Pashinyan’s election will
bring a new era to Armenia. At left,
Pashinyan waved to supporters after the
election results were reported.
SERGEI GAPON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
US calls on Venezuelan leader to resign
WASHINGTON — The
Trump administration called
Tuesday for President Nicolas
Maduro of Venezuela to step
down.
‘‘For the safety and security
of all the peoples of Latin
America, it is time for Maduro
to go,’’ US Ambassador to the
United Nations Nikki Haley
said during a speech on Latin
America.
‘‘I am not sure how we will
make that happen, but I know
that we can’t stop,’’ she said
right after her speech during a
conference organized by the
Council of the Americas. ‘‘We
have to continue to isolate Maduro until he gives in.’’
Haley said that the people
of the South American country
are ‘‘unwilling victims of a
criminal narco-state,’’ and that
the May 20 elections in which
Maduro is seeking reelection
will be fraudulent if independent observers are absent.
Quoting numbers from the
United Nations, Haley said 1.5
million Venezuelans have fled
the country since 2014 and described the exodus as ‘‘the
largest displacement of people
in the region’s history.’’
The Venezuelan government has refused to allow international aid, alleging that
would amount to foreign intervention. It also denies there
is a humanitarian crisis.
At the same event, US Deputy Secretary of State John
Sullivan announced an additional $18.5 million in funding
to support displaced Venezuelans in Colombia.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hungary prime minister recommended
BUDAPEST — Hungary’s
president recommended Tuesday that lawmakers re-elect
Prime Minister Viktor Orban
to what would be his third
consecutive term as he focuses
on pushing through constitutional changes.
Hundreds of demonstrators
gathered outside parliament to
protest against what they believe is Orban’s growing authoritarianism, and widespread corruption.
Orban’s Fidesz party and its
small ally, the Christian Democratic People’s Party, won 133
of 199 seats in the national assembly in the April 8 election,
securing a two-thirds majority
which will allow them to
amend the Constitution un-
challenged. Lawmakers are expected to vote on Orban’s new
term on Thursday afternoon.
‘‘I asked Prime Minister
Viktor Orban to form the new
government and he accepted
the request,’’ President Janos
Ader said. Once again in command of a supermajority, Orban’s selection is virtually automatic and it would be his
fourth term overall leading
Hungary. He has vowed a constitutional amendment to give
parliament final say over any
efforts to settle foreigners in
the country.
Laws which would curb
groups working with refugees
and asylum-seekers is also a
legislative priority.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Facebook bans foreign ads in abortion vote
Facebook on Tuesday said
it would stop accepting advertisements related to an upcoming referendum on abortion in Ireland from groups
based outside of the country.
The announcement, which
comes less than three weeks
before Irish voters go to the
polls, testifies to the depths of
concerns that foreign advertising could skew the vote.
And it marks the latest chapter in the technology company’s attempt to move past
criticism that it has helped
subvert democratic decisionmaking, primarily surrounding issues of data protection
and user targeting.
‘‘We understand the sensitivity of this campaign and
will be working hard to en-
sure neutrality at all stages,’’
the company said in a statement. ‘‘We are an open platform for people to express
ideas and views on both sides
of a debate. Our goal is simple: to help ensure a free, fair,
and transparent vote on this
important issue.’’
The referendum will decide the fate of the Eighth
Amendment to the Irish Constitution, one of the most severe prohibitions on abortion
in the Western world. Approved by Irish voters in
1983, the law gives the mother and the unborn an equal
right to life and proscribes
termination even in cases of
rape, incest, and fatal fetal
abnormality.
WASHINGTON POST
German hate crime down, anti­Semitism up
BERLIN — Germany saw a
drop in hate crimes in 2017
amid an overall decrease in
criminal activity, but statistics
released on Tuesday showed
an increase in anti-Semitic incidents, primarily from farright perpetrators.
Interior Minister Horst
Seehofer noted that Chancellor Angela Merkel had called
an attack last month on an Israeli wearing a Jewish skullcap
in Berlin a ‘‘new form of antiSemitism’’ and said his office
was taking the issue seriously.
‘‘For the fight against antiSemitism, we need the widest
possible commitment,’’ he
said.
According to the new report, anti-Semitic crimes in
Germany rose 2.5 percent in
2017 to 1,504. Overall hate
crimes fell from 10,751 in
2016 to 7,913 to 2017.
In the Berlin attack, the 21year-old victim, an Arab Israeli
who said he wore the kippa in
a show of solidarity with his
Jewish friends, the suspect has
been identified as a 19-yearold Syrian asylum-seeker. But
Seehofer told reporters ‘‘imported anti-Semitism’’ accounted for few of the crimes.
Some 95 percent, he said, were
attributed to the far right.
The number of right-wing
attacks on asylum-seeker
homes, another cause for concern, dropped 68 percent to
300 in 2017 from 929 in 2016.
Overall offenses dropped
nearly 10 percent in 2017
compared with the previous
year to nearly 5.8 million cases
from 6.4 million cases, the
lowest figure since 1992.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
China sends ex­politician to jail for life
BEIJING — A Chinese
ty was confiscated.
State broadcaster CCTV
court sentenced former political high flyer Sun Zhengcai to
showed Sun in court accepting
life in prison Tuesday for takthe sentence and stating that
ing more than $26
he would not appeal.
million in bribes,
Sun had been elemaking him one of
vated to the party’s
the biggest names to
elite 25-member Pofall in President Xi
litburo and was the
Jinping’s campaign
top official in
against corruption
Chongqing before beand disloyalty.
ing removed in July.
Sun’s sentence,
He pleaded guilty
handed down by the
to the charges and exintermediate court in Sun Zhengcai
pressed repentance.
was a member
the northern port
In return for the
of China’s
city of Tianjin, apbribes, Sun allegedly
pears to end a career
provided assistance
Politburo.
that had once been
to unspecified orgaseen as propelling him to the
nizations with engineering
apex of power. In addition to
contracts, business operations,
being imprisoned, Sun was deand other matters, the court
prived of political rights for life said.
and all of his personal properASSOCIATED PRESS
New Ebola outbreak confirmed in Congo
KINSHASA, Congo — Congo’s government on Tuesday
declared a new outbreak of
Ebola in the country’s rural
northwest, after two cases of
the deadly virus were confirmed in Bikoro.
Congo’s Health Ministry
said that of the five samples
sent to the National Institute
of Biological Research in Kinshasa, two came back positive
for the Zaire strain of Ebola in
the country’s Equateur Province.
The samples were gathered
after the Equateur Province
Health Ministry notified Kinshasa on May 3 of some 21
cases of a hemorrhagic fever in
the Ikoko Impenge area, including 17 deaths, according
to the World Health Organization and Congo’s government.
There are various hemorrhagic
fevers.
A team was sent by the
World Health Organization
and Doctors Without Borders
over the weekend to investigate and strengthen coordination. The five new cases were
then identified and sent to the
laboratory, Congo’s government said.
Since that time, no deaths
have been reported among
those hospitalized or among
health workers, it said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan
— US Secretary of State Mike
Pompeo was traveling to North
Korea on Tuesday in preparation for an upcoming summit
between President Trump and
North Korean leader Kim Jong
Un.
Trump disclosed the trip,
which was not announced
ahead of time by the State Department, during remarks
Tuesday at the White House on
his intention to withdraw the
United States from the Iran nuclear deal.
The news about Pompeo
came as anticipation is building over the planned summit to
discuss the Kim regime’s nuclear weapons program that could
take place by the end of June.
‘‘Plans are being made, relationships are building,’’ Trump
said. ‘‘Hopefully, a deal will
happen and with the help of
China, South Korea, and Japan
a future of great prosperity and
security can be achieved for everybody.’’
Trump made no mention,
however, of the three American
prisoners in North Korea. Two
people with knowledge of the
trip told The Washington Post
that Pompeo was expected to
bring them home.
‘‘We’ll all soon be finding
out,’’ Trump replied after a reporter asked him about the
prisoners.
Three Korean-Americans —
K i m D o n g C h u l , K i m Ha k
Song, and Kim Sang-duk —
have been accused of various
acts considered hostile to the
government. Trump and his
lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, have
dropped hints recently that
they could be freed very soon.
One of the prisoners, Kim
Dong-chul, a former Virginia
resident in his mid-60s, was
detained in October 2015,
while the other two were detained after Trump took office.
In an interview with two reporters traveling with him
aboard his plane, Pompeo said
he plans to raise again the US
desire that the three men be
freed, adding, ‘‘It’d be a great
gesture if they’d agree to do so.’’
The main purpose of
Pompeo’s visit to North Korea
is to finalize an exact time and
location for the summit between Trump and the North
Korean leader, how long their
talks will last and to clarify expectations.
‘‘We also want to make sure
what our expectations are not,’’
Pompeo said. ‘‘We are not going to head down the path we
headed down before. We will
not relieve sanctions until such
time as we have achieved our
objectives.’’
In his second visit to North
Korea in as many months, and
his first as secretary of state,
Pompeo is flying into one of the
world’s most reclusive countries with no assurances of exactly who he will meet. During
his last visit over Easter, when
he was CIA director, Pompeo
met with Kim Jong Un in an effort to assess what a summit
might accomplish.
Just before he landed in Japan for refueling, Pompeo said
he doesn’t know exactly who he
will see this time. ‘‘We’re prepared to meet anyone who can
speak on behalf of the North
Korean government and give
us solid answers so we’re prepared.’’
Pompeo’s return to North
STR/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
Secretary of State Mike
Pompeo met with North
Korean leader Kim Jong Un
over Easter.
Korea comes in what it only his
second week as the administration’s top diplomat. He has
promised to ‘‘bring back the
swagger’’ to a State Department that has been sidelined in
some foreign policy debates.
His high-profile visit appears to
be a splashy step in that direction.
Pompeo may get an earful of
complaints from the officials
he meets. Pyongyang has been
disgruntled over what it called
‘‘misleading’’ assertions from
some US officials that North
Korea is considering denuclearization because of its fear of
US military prowess and to alleviate punishing sanctions — a
‘‘maximum pressure campaign’’ laid by Pompeo’s predecessor, Rex Tillerson, who was
fired by Trump in March.
North Korea made its displeasure clear on Sunday, the
day before Pompeo departed
Washington. A spokesman for
its foreign ministry labeled the
US claims of credit for the apparent shift in North Korean
policy a ‘‘dangerous attempt’’ to
upset a detente between two
nations whose leaders only a
few months ago were threatening nuclear war.
US officials have sought to
tamp down expectations that
Pompeo will be able to secure
the release of the prisoners
who were recently transferred
from a labor camp to a hotel
outside Pyongyang, further
raising hopes their release is
imminent
Now, with a high-level summit only weeks away, US officials have increasingly urged
North Korea to release the
three American prisoners in
advance.
At least 16 US citizens have
been arrested in North Korea
since the 1990 s. Several of
them have been subjected to
show trials and forced to make
public confessions to crimes
against the state before being
sen tenc ed to brutal labor
camps. Most served part of
their sentences before being released, usually after visits from
high-profile Americans such as
former presidents Bill Clinton
and Jimmy Carter.
Last summer, North Korea
turned over custody of American college student Otto Warmbier, who returned home to
Cincinnati in a coma after 17
months in captivity after being
detained during an organized
tour of Pyongyang. Warmbier
d i e d a f e w d ay s l at e r, a n d
Trump has highlighted his
death in several major speeches, including the State of the
Union address in January and
remarks to the South Korean
general assembly last fall.
Warmbier’s parents have
sued North Korea in federal
court, charging that the regime
‘‘brutally tortured and murdered’’ their son. Trump spoke
with the family on Friday to offer support ahead of his summit, sources said.
The North Korean regime
has long been one of the most
brutal in the world, sentencing
tens of thousands of its own
people to brutal labor camps
and killing political rivals.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
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W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Old-school diplomacy no match for ‘America first’
Deal was built on
talking — lots
and lots of talking
By Matt Viser
GLOBE STAFF
John Kerry hobbled on
crutches, perhaps the only
thing slowing him down, as he
shuttled to and
NEWS
from marathon
ANALYSIS negotiation sessions in an ornate 19th-century palace in Vienna.
It was the summer of 2015.
Donald Trump had just announced his candidacy for
president, and Kerry, then secretary of state in the Obama
administration, was slogging
through excruciatingly detailed
talks to curb Iran’s nuclear ambitions.
This was old-school diplomacy.
The days stretched into
weeks, and my editors teased
me, only half in jest, about my
mounting bills in a luxury hotel
in Vienna (the fact that it was
called the Grand Hotel didn’t
exactly help my cause). As the
tedium of waiting for a breakthrough wore on, those involved took to cataloging the
talks by the numbers: This was
at least the 17th time that Kerry’s team had been in Vienna
for negotiations — long enough
to celebrate almost everyone’s
birthday at least once. One
team member calculated they
had traveled 400,000 miles,
enough to circumnavigate the
globe 16 times, over the 18
months of intense negotiations
with Iran.
The US negotiating team in
Vienna chewed through 10
pounds of Twizzlers, 20 pounds
of string cheese, and more than
CARLOS BARRIA/REUTERS/FILE
CAROLYN KASTER/AFP/GETTY IMAGES/FILE
200 Rice Krispies Treats. On
Twitter, those mundane facts
went viral. For the general public, they were a lot easier to
grasp than speculation about
the number of Iranian uranium
centrifuges that had been disclosed to international inspectors.
But the drama over the future of Iran’s nuclear program,
a dire threat to Israel and the
rest of the Middle East, was
real.
Talks grew so tense that
Kerry and his Iranian counterpart, Javad Zarif, shouted loudly at one another, prompting
an aide to rush into the conference room tell them to quiet
down. The mood of negotiators
whipsawed between “packyour-bags-we’re-leaving” and
“we’re on the cusp of a deal
with global implications.”
In the end, neither side got
everything it wanted, and both
would have problems selling
the compromise in their home
countries. But with exhausted
looks on their faces, both Kerry
and Zarif projected a sense that
something historic had taken
place.
If that was the old version of
diplomacy, the new version revealed itself Tuesday.
President Trump, with a few
utterances, unraveled the years
of talks that produced the Iran
nuclear deal. Trump’s approach
to world affairs relies more on
gut instinct and improvisation,
and a distaste for compromise.
Kerry believed in engaging
the world, while Trump says
he’s tired of the world taking
advantage of the United States.
Kerry could be long-winded
and wonky as he explained the
intricacies of the deal, while
Trump is blunt and plain-spoken but seems to lack a clear
understanding of all of its details.
The old style of diplomacy
that Kerry relied upon seemed
to recognize that, yes, you and I
are from different backgrounds, from different coun-
tries, and have different interests. But we’ll trust each other
enough to come to terms.
Trump’s philosophy: America first. His political rise depended on nationalism, nativism, isolationism. He downplays the idea that national
interests might actually be
linked to something happening
half a world away. How do you
engage in diplomacy when you
can’t make a concession and
you have to win?
Trump vowed that if elected
he would rip up the Iran deal —
and on Tuesday he did. It remains to be seen if Trump can
create a new nuclear agreement with Iran, or if he can
bring North Korea into a separate deal to end its nuclear
threat. There is some irony in
that while the Iran deal was
once deeply unpopular, new
polling now shows that twothirds of Americans want to
keep it in place.
The story of the Obama
White House era was tightly
John Kerry, at left with
Catherine Ashton of the EU
and Iran’s Foreign Minister,
Javad Zarif, stayed in
Vienna throughout the
negotiations — even with a
broken leg.
controlled and scripted, each
moment choreographed. There
wasn’t much suspense, with
briefings and arguments carefully laid out. The Iran deal was
different. It had fluidity and
uncertainty. Hundreds of reporters gathered outside the
Palais Coburg hotel to await
the next sign of progress or retreat.
Before leaving for Vienna, I
interviewed Energy Secretary
Ernest Moniz, who was an integral part of the negotiating
team. He offered some advice.
“Pack a lot of underwear,” he
said.
I didn’t pack enough.
The talks dragged on so
long that the Iranian delegation had to leave the nearby
Marriott after their reservations ran out and other guests
were ready to check in. American reporters, staying at a hotel
nearby, could tell that negotiations were continuing when
the State Department extended
reservations for another three
or four days.
We all missed the Fourth of
July. My family was gathering
in the mountains of North Carolina. Kerry, whose family
gathered in Nantucket, apologized profusely that everyone
was missing the holiday, and
hosted a party at the hotel.
Some had suggested that
Kerry was too willing to complete the deal, to the point
where he gave away too many
concessions. Trump took advantage of those concerns during the election, and again
called the deal weak Tuesday,
without mentioning Kerry by
name.
But whatever you say about
Kerry now, his commitment
and determination to cut a deal
were clear: He was the only negotiator who stayed in Vienna
throughout the 18-day flurry of
negotiations. Following surgery
on a broken femur — which he
got falling down while preparing for a bike ride in the French
Alps — he was undergoing
physical therapy in his hotel
room between negotiating sessions and using crutches to get
before global microphones.
On the way back to the
United States, triumphant negotiators huddled on their
plane. Moniz broke out a bottle
of fine Madeira wine, which
had been given to him during a
jaunt to Portugal to receive an
award in the middle of the
talks. It seemed a fitting drink
for a historic moment: Madeira
is what the Founding Fathers
drank after signing the Declaration of Independence.
Those same officials may
break out something stiffer
now, and they’ll be drinking for
a different reason.
Matt Viser can be reached at
matt.viser@globe.com.
Iran will negotiate with other signees
By Erin Cunningham
WASHINGTON POST
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ISTANBUL — Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said
Tuesday that his government
remains committed to a nuclear
deal with world powers, despite
a decision by the United States
to withdraw from the accord,
but is also ready to step up its
uranium enrichment.
Rouhani, who spoke following President Trump’s speech
announcing the US withdrawal,
said he has directed Iranian
diplomats to negotiate with the
deal’s remaining signatories, including European countries,
Russia, and China.
But he also warned that
Iran would resume enriching
uranium at higher levels if the
benefits of remaining a part of
the pact were unclear.
‘‘If in the short-term, we
conclude that we can achieve
what we want’’ from the nuclear deal, the agreement will survive, Rouhani said in a televised
address.
If not, he continued, ‘‘I have
asked [Iran’s] Atomic Energy
Organization to prepare the
necessary orders to start unlimited enrichment,’’ which had
been curtailed as part of the
deal.
The decision could trigger
renewed US sanctions on Iran’s
oil sales and Central Bank, potentially disrupting Iran’s global financial transactions and
putting further pressure on its
already volatile economy. It also
could put European allies in a
bind over whether to continue
the economic dealmaking they
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launched with Iran since the ac- government to continue to
cord was implemented in early work with Europe to salvage
2016. The allies have stood the accord, which lifted key infirmly behind the accord, which ternational sanctions in exwas negotiated between Iran change for curbs on Iran’s nuand six world powers: the Unit- clear program.
‘‘If the Europeans are willed States, Russia, China, Briting to give us sufficient guaranain, France, and Germany.
The allies could also suffer tees, it makes sense for us to
penalties under renewed US stay in the deal,’’ the deputy
sanctions, removing incentives speaker of Iran’s parliament, Ali
Motahari, said in remarks carto continue to invest in Iran.
In his speech, Trump also ried by the Iranian Students’
accused Iran of destabilizing News Agency.
Motahari said Iran should
the Middle East through its
support of militant groups such wait several months to see
as Lebanon’s Hezbollah, and he whether Europe plans to resist
charged that Tehran seeks to US pressure to disengage from
build ‘‘nuclear-capable’’ ballistic the Iranian economy, where European companies
missiles.
have invested in sec‘‘If I allowed this
tors ranging from audeal to stand, there
to manufacturing to
would soon be a nucleoil exploration and
ar arms race in the
tourism.
Middle East,’’ Trump
If Europe sucasserted. ‘‘We cannot
ceeds, ‘‘this is a victoprevent an Iranian nury for Iran, because it
clear bomb under the
will have created a
decaying and rotten
gap between the Unitstructure of the cur- Hassan
ed States and Europe,’’
rent agreement,’’ he Rouhani,
he said.
added. ‘‘The Iran deal president of
But others have
is defective at its core.’’ Iran
been less forgiving,
As part of the nuclear deal, Iran pledged never urging Iran’s leaders to immedito ‘‘seek, develop or acquire any ately withdraw and restart susnuclear weapons.’’ Iran’s su- pended elements of the counpreme religious and political try’s nuclear program if the
leader has declared nuclear United States left the deal. Fliweapons to be un-Islamic, say- ers circulating online called for
ing that its nuclear program is a rally in Iran’s northeastern
aimed solely at producing ener- city of Mashhad to ‘‘set the
gy and conducting medical re- JCPOA on fire.’’ The nuclear
deal is also known as the
search.
Iranian leaders said Tues- JCPOA, or Joint Comprehenday that the country would sive Plan of Action.
The Iranian parliament’s
stand united in the face of any
new sanctions or threats from Nuclear Committee published
three actions that the governthe United States.
Iran ‘‘could face some prob- ment could take if Trump leaves
lems’’ if Trump restores sanc- the deal, including installing
tions, Rouhani said at a petro- more centrifuges and enriching
leum conference in the capital, uranium beyond the levels alTe h ra n , be f o re Trum p an- lowed under the accord. Enriched uranium can be used as
nounced his decision.
‘‘If we are under sanctions fuel for power plants or as fisor not, we should stand on our sile material for weapons.
If Trump confronts Iran,
feet,’’ the Reuters news agency
‘‘we will not remain passive,’’
quoted him as saying.
Rouhani’s first vice presi- the head of the National Securident, Eshaq Jahangiri, said the ty Council, Ali Shamkhani, said
government has ‘‘a plan for Tuesday in an interview with
managing the country under the Hamshahri newspaper.
He said Europe made a misany circumstances.’’
In remarks reported by take when its leaders appeased
Iran’s Tasnim News Agency, Ja- Trump by attempting to extract
hangiri, a popular reformist, further concessions from Iran,
said it would be ‘‘naive’’ to enter including a potential halt to its
into negotiations with the Unit- ballistic missile program. The
nuclear deal was the result of
ed States again.
The comments underscored painstaking negotiations over
a growing debate among politi- two years between the Rouhani
cal factions in Iran over what to administration and the world
do after the US withdrawal. powers, including the Obama
Some politicians have urged the administration.
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President Trump said on Tuesday that he was “ready, willing, and able” to negotiate a new deal with Iran.
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uIRAN
Continued from Page A1
never will.’’
The announcement was in
keeping with Trump’s campaign promises to terminate US
participation in the deal, which
backers admitted was not perfect but which they said offered
the best hope of at least delaying Iran’s nuclear ambitions.
Trump has long called the
agreement weak and ineffective because it did not constrain
Iran’s support for terrorists or
its ballistic weapons programs.
“It is clear to me that we
cannot prevent an Iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying
and rotten structure of the current agreement,” he added.
“The Iran deal is defective at its
core.”
Trump’s decision undermines a major initiative of former secretary of state John Kerry, who was the driving force
behind the Obama administration’s deal and who has met
with foreign leaders in recent
months to try and preserve it.
Kerry criticized Trump’s decision and expressed hope that
Europe will lead where the
United States won’t.
“Instead of building on unprecedented nonproliferation
verification measures, this decision risks throwing them away
and dragging the world back to
the brink we faced a few years
ago,” Kerry said in a statement.
“The extent of the damage will
depend on what Europe can do
to hold the nuclear agreement
together, and it will depend on
Iran’s reaction. America should
never have to outsource those
stakes to any other country.”
Former president Barack
Obama, who has largely refrained from commenting on
his successor’s decisions, released a lengthy statement calling Trump’s announcement
“misguided” and a “serious
mistake” that will erode American credibility on the global
stage.
“In a democracy, there will
always be changes in policies
and priorities from one Administration to the next,” he said.
“But the consistent flouting of
agreements that our country is
a party to risks eroding America’s credibility, and puts us at
odds with the world’s major
powers.”
The decision follows a furious lobbying effort from European allies urging Trump to remain a part of the deal. Coming
a year after Trump also withdrew the United States from
the Paris climate accords, it will
raise inevitable questions, critics say, about any commitments
made by the United States —
even as the administration enters new negotiations to halt
North Korea’s nuclear program.
Trump announced on Tuesday that Secretary of State Mike
Pompeo would be landing in
North Korea to negotiate with
Kim Jong Un.
Tr u m p s a i d t h at h e w a s
“ready, willing, and able” to negotiate a new deal with Iran,
which the United States lists as
a state sponsor of terrorism.
“Great things can happen
for Iran,” he said. “And great
thin gs can ha pp en fo r th e
peace and stability that we all
want in the Middle East.”
But many in the international community saw Trump’s
May
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
National security
adviser John Bolton,
above, left, with Vice
President Mike Pence,
was a strong opponent
of the Iran agreement
and told reporters,
“We’re out of the deal.”
At left, protesters on
both sides of the issue
argued outside the
White House.
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move as eroding a key avenue
of stability. Leaders from the
United States’ top allies — Britain, Germany, and France — issued a joint statement expressing “regret and concern” over
Trump’s decision and urging
Iran “to show restraint in response to the decision by the
US.”
“France, Germany, and the
UK regret the U.S. decision to
leave the JCPOA,” French President Emmanuel Macron, who
recently pleaded with Trump to
remain in the deal, wrote on
Twitter. “The nuclear non-proliferation regime is at stake.”
Iranian president Hassan
Rouhani, in an address shortly
after Trump spoke, said that
the deal could still survive, and
that negotiations would begin
with Europe. But in the meantime, he was ordering the country’s atomic energy agency to
prepare to start enriching uranium.
“This is a psychological war
— we won’ t allow Trump to
win,” Rouhani said. “I’m happy
that the pesky being has left”
the agreement.
“We had already come to the
conclusion that Trump will not
abide by international commitments,” he added.
The pact was reached in
2015, when the United States
and five other world powers —
B r i t a i n , C h i n a , G e r m a n y,
France, and Russia — agreed to
lift crippling economic sanctions on Iran.
The deal was aimed at reshaping the relationship with
an avowed American adversary
and pushing off any efforts the
country had at obtaining a nuclear weapon.
Under the terms, Iran had to
agree to reduce its stockpiles of
uranium and allow more intrusive inspections that would enable the world to better detect
any efforts to build a bomb. International inspectors were also given access to military sites
if needed.
Most of the terms would last
15 years — a timeframe that
Trump argues is not nearly long
enough.
The sanctions relief pumped
tens of billions of dollars into
the Iranian economy. American
sanctions dating back to the
1979 Iranian revolution, when
American diplomats were taken hostage in Tehran, were removed. One of the big gest
boons for Iran was allowing the
country to further open its oilrich country to the international market.
Foreign accounts were unfrozen, and the lifting of sanctions against Iranian banks allowed the country’s financial
system to tap into the global
markets.
‘I’m happy that
the pesky being
has left’ the
agreement.
HASSAN ROUHANI
Iran’s president
Iran remained on the list of
state sponsors of terrorism, and
sanctions related to its support
for terrorism and human rights
violations remained in place.
Now, the United States is
immediately imposing sanctions on Iran that had been lifted as a result of the deal. Those
sanctions will block any new
business contracts with Iran,
while existing contracts will
have to be wound down within
90 or 180 days.
The Iran deal was initially
unpopular — and was never
ratified by Congress, which
would have made it harder for
Trump to leave the deal — but
over time it has gained support,
according to public polling. A
CNN poll released on Tuesday
found that 63 percent of Americans believe the United States
should remain in the agreement, while 29 percent said it
should withdraw.
Several times since taking
office, Trump has agreed to extend the agreement’s relief of
sanctions. But in recent weeks,
he has appointed new top offi-
cials — including Pompeo and
national security adviser John
Bolton — who have been adamantly opposed to the deal.
“We’re out of the deal,” Bolton told reporters during a
briefing. “ We’re out of the
deal.”
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who has
been one of the most ardent opponents of the deal, praised
Trump for his “courageous
leadership.”
“The deal didn’t push war
f u r t h e r a w a y, i t a c t u a l l y
brought it closer,” he said. “The
deal didn’t reduce Iran’s aggression, it dramatically increased
it, and we see this across the entire Middle East.”
Republicans largely hailed
Trump’s decision, calling the
Obama-era agreement “deeply
flawed” as they expressed confidence that Trump could help
negotiate a new deal, and, in
the absence of one, prevent
Iran from obtaining a nuclear
weapon. But Democrats — even
those who were initially skeptical of the Iran deal — criticized
Trump for ge tting out of a
deal that they viewed as successfully curbing any nuclear
ambitions.
“I’d rather the United States
— together with our allies —
counter Iran’s bad behavior
with the nuclear deal than
without it,” Senator Elizabeth
Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat, said in a statement. “. . .
This isn’t a strategy. It’s a recipe
for disaster.”
Senator Edward J. Markey, a
Massachusetts Democrat, said
the deal should have been improved upon, not scrapped.
“You don’t burn down the
house to remodel the kitchen,”
he said. “Instead of committing
to an agreement that strengthened America’s position against
Iran, President Trump just
threw away a deal that was our
road map forward toward engagement and peace and have
again turned toward confrontation and war.”
Matt Viser can be reached at
matt.viser@globe.com.
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W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Legislators remain wary of sex ed bill Long road ahead for
uSEX EDUCATION
Continued from Page A1
The “Healthy Youth Act,”
passed by the state Senate,
would require schools that
choose to teach sex ed to use a
curriculum that’s medically accurate, age-appropriate, comprehensive in covering contraception, and LGBTQ-inclusive.
It also calls for sex ed to cover
“relationship and communication skills to form healthy, respectful relationships free of violence, coercion and intimidation,” as well as “affirmative and
voluntary consent to engage in
physical or sexual activity.”
“What does consent mean?
What does that sound like?
What does that look like when
it’s being retracted?” said Representative James O’Day, a
Worcester Democrat and onetime social worker, who has
tried to get a sex education bill
passed in the House since 2011.
“Those are really the bigger
pieces of this bill that get completely lost as soon as the word
‘sexuality’ is conjured up.”
The bill still wouldn’t make
sex ed mandatory; districts and
individual families could opt
out, as they can now.
Still, Andrew Beckwith,
president of the Massachusetts
Family Institute, asserted that
the legislation would give too
much control to the state Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education, which
would set rules, ensure compliance with the law, and could
recommend favored curricula.
“It’s a very intimate personal
topic that touches on families,
relationships, faith and it’s in
the realm of the rights and responsibilities of parents,” Beckwith said. “Unlike math or geography or foreign languages,
it’s a very controversial, sensitive topic. You want to make
sure you have parental buy-in
and cooperation.”
And while “age-appropriate”
and “medically accurate” may
sound innocuous, he suggested
they may mean different things
to different parents.
“I don’t think we should be
imposing one definition of
those terms,” Beckwith said.
For years, legislators have
seemed wary of the sex ed bill,
grouping it in with other “controversial bills” — like the transgender antidiscrimination bill
that passed last session, said
guard against sexually transmitted diseases through oral or
“oral-anal sex.” Dental dams are
referenced in the “Get Real”
middle-school curriculum,
which was designed by Planned
Parenthood and taught in 244
Massachusetts schools and programs. Nationwide, Get Real is
one of the programs that the US
Department of Health and Human Services lists as effective
for teen pregnancy prevention.
Johanna Kaiser, media relations manager for the Planned
Parenthood Advocacy Fund of
Massachusetts, said that programs that teach people how to
‘What does consent mean?
What does that sound like?’
JAMES O’DAY, on modernizing sex education
L GBTQ advocate Deborah
Shields of MassEquality.
“We literally had legislators
telling us, ‘Well, you can have
that bill or you can have some
of the other ones,’ ” Shields said.
After the bill passed the Senate, a legislative committee
eliminated the language requiring that sex ed cover sexual orientation and consent. A dozen
Republicans had launched a
bill that would have backed off
even further, letting teachers
opt out of instruction that conflicts with their religious beliefs
and requiring parents to opt in
to sex ed for children, rather
than bowing out if they object.
Skittishness only increased
when the bill was targeted by
opponents on Beacon Hill last
month. The Massachusetts
Family Institute, which championed the fight against gay
marriage for years, objects to
teaching middle schoolers
about “dental dams,” which
protect themselves from sexually transmitted infections have
to cover information about oral
sex, anal sex, and vaginal sex.
T h e H e a l t h y Yo u t h A c t
would require schools that
teach sex ed to cover contraception, in addition to the benefits
of abstinence and delaying sexual activity. Advocates think
that would better inform Massachusetts students at a time
when the national trend is
headed in the opposite direction. Last month, the Trump
administration signaled it
would no longer fund teen prevention programs that cover
contraception, in favor of abstinence-only programs. That concerns advocates who say that
comprehensive sex ed has proven effective. The teen birth rate
dropped 41 percent from 2010
to 2016, Kaiser noted.
I t ’s u n c l e a r h o w m a n y
schools in Massachusetts teach
only abstinence — or how many
address sex education at all.
The Department of Education
would not provide data on
which school distric ts are
teaching sex ed. However, the
state does report what students
are saying about sex, through a
survey of students at randomly
selected schools. According to
the 2015 Massachusetts Youth
Risk Behavior Survey, just 14
percent of ninth-graders report
that they have had sexual intercourse. By senior year, 60 percent of students had.
At the same time, most students aren’t having conversations about sex with their parents, the survey found.
“One of the huge arguments
that you hear from people is
that this is a topic that really
needs to be addressed at home,”
O’Day said. “Well, guess what?
It’s not being addressed at
home.”
Beckwith said that children
could be taught about appropriate physical boundaries in
school, but suggested that a sex
ed curriculum should have
boundaries, too.
“I think most parents would
agree that you don’t need to get
into the intricate details of oral
to anal sex in order to send a
message that we don’t force
people to do things against
their will,” he said.
Those who work in sexual
education and with victims of
sexual violence, however, say
that not talking about se x
doesn’t protect teens from it.
“We teach about all kinds of
things that we don’t want them
to do,” Scaramella said. “It’s
about being knowledgeable in
this really complicated world.”
Stephanie Ebbert can be
reached at
Stephanie.Ebbert@globe.com.
Partners, insurer
uMERGER
Continued from Page A1
Boston consulting firm Health
Business Group. “There’s no
compelling logic for a merger
here. There would be a lot of resistance to it.”
Williams said he doesn’t see
a good business reason for a
merger since Partners and Harvard Pilgrim, one of the largest
health insurers in Massachusetts, could choose to work together more closely while remaining independent.
Boston-based Partners, the
parent company of Massachusetts General and Brigham and
Women’s hospitals, and Harvard Pilgrim, which has 1.2 million members, said they’re discussing how to work together
to contain costs and better
serve patients, but haven’t specified how they would do that.
Health care providers and
insurers have typically been at
odds — hospitals want to maximize the amount they are paid
for their services, while insurers try to contain those payments — making the strategy
behind a Partners-Harvard Pilgrim deal difficult to discern,
said David L. Rosenbloom, professor at the Boston University
School of Public Health.
The companies may be able
to cut their costs by combining
some functions if they merge.
But “I don’t see any savings going back to consumers from any
of this,” Rosenbloom said.
The talks between Partners
and Harvard Pilgrim — both
nonprofits — are happening at
a time of accelerating consolidation that has brought together some companies that even a
year ago would have seemed
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unlikely pairs. For example,
CVS Health, the big Rhode Island-based drug store chain,
has agreed to buy insurer Aetna. Meanwhile, new players
like Amazon threaten to disrupt
the market.
If Partners and Harvard Pilgrim pursue a merger, the deal
would require several regulatory approvals. They could settle
on a looser partnership, which
would face a lower bar — or
they could cancel the talks
without reaching any deal.
“We’re exploring a number
of options that could improve
the patient experience, and reduce cost and administrative
burden,” Partners spokesman
Rich Copp said.
Officials from Partners and
Harvard Pilgrim indicated that
even if they merge, they expect
to continue doing business with
other major health care provide r s a n d i n s u r e r s . In o t h e r
words, patients won’t need a
Harvard Pilgrim insurance plan
to access Partners doctors and
hospitals, and those with Harvard Pilgrim insurance will
have the option of going to nonPartners doctors and hospitals.
But some are skeptical.
“When you’re owned by a health
system, it gets kind of dicey to
keep your independence and
keep a wide network at the lowest cost,” said Nancy Kane, professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan
School of Public Health.
Experts described the possible deal as a vertical merger, or
a combination of two different
types of businesses in the same
industry. This is different from
a horizontal deal, in which a
hospital acquires another hospital, for example.
It’s harder to predict the potential negatives of a vertical
merger, noted Leemore S. Dafny, a professor at Harvard Business School. Such a deal could
harm competition, or it could
help some consumers access
more affordable coverage.
Either way, Dafny said, “It’s
very risky for Partners. Taking
on an insurance business is a
big, messy task.”
Partners already owns a
smaller insurance company,
Neighborhood Health Plan,
which struggled with heavy financial losses for several years.
Neighborhood’s finances improved last year as it reduced its
share of Medicaid patients.
In other parts of the country,
some health care providers
have been successful at running
their own insurance business,
such as the California-based
Kaiser Permanente system.
But at Kaiser, the provider
side of the business and the insurance side “grew up together,”
noted Robert I. Field, a Drexel
University professor who follows the health care market.
“Partners and Harvard Pilgrim
have grown up independently,
so they don’t have that common
cultural bond,” he said.
While Partners is the largest
hospital network in Massachusetts, executives are constantly
looking to expand, including in
other states and countries —
particularly after they were
forced in 2015 to give up on acquiring three local hospitals because of cost and antitrust concerns.
Partners is facing a new
competitive threat as two Massachusetts rivals, Beth Israel
Deaconess Medical Center and
Lahey Health, prepare to merge
and form their own large new
health system.
T he s tate Health Po lic y
Commission, a watchdog agency that monitors health care
costs, and Attorney General
Maura Healey’s office are likely
to play critical roles in the review of a possible merger of
Partners and Harvard Pilgrim.
“If there’s any state this
merger gets the attention it deserves, it’s probably Massachusetts,” said Erin C. Fuse Brown,
an associate professor at Georgia State University College of
Law who studies the health
care market.
“It’s really critical for antitrust authorities, the state attorney general, the Health Policy
Commission to really study the
effects of this merger,” she said,
“because once a merger happens, it’s very hard to break it
up.”
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
can be reached at priyanka.
mccluskey@globe.com.
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A9
In this case, the truth is way out there
uUFO MEMORIAL
Continued from Page A1
years ago, when a family claims
to have encountered an alien
vessel in the shape of an inverted Hershey’s Kiss.
The town is now quietly
looking into whether the monument must be moved from
what is believed to be public
property, and the governor’s office is walking back its imprimatur, saying the state certification was “issued in error.”
Naturally, perhaps, all this
has triggered an incensed backlash — both from the man
whose name adorns the monument, who claims to have witnessed the close encounter as a
9-year-old boy, and an ardent
international community of
UFO believers.
“We want it to be known definitely that this isn’t going to
happen,” said Beth Wiegand, of
the International UFO Museum
and Research Center in Roswell, N.M., referring to any
plans to move the marker.
“We’re not going to hold still on
this.”
This is the town’s second review of the monument since its
arrival three years ago. The first
time, it was moved a short distance, but now the town is concerned it rests upon public land
near a town pathway.
“No one decided it could go
there,” Rhonda LaBombard,
Sheffield’s town administrator,
told the Berkshire Eagle last
month. “If we let one place put
something up, then why can’t
someone else?”
These comments have not
been well received by Thom
Reed, a 58-year-old former
Sheffield resident now living in
Tennessee. He claims town officials approved the monument’s
current spot and is threatening
legal action. Any effort to move
the monument, he says, is a
slap in the face to his family,
whose decades-old encounter,
he insists, helped put the town
of Sheffield on the map.
“ We basically made this
town famous, in a lot of ways,”
Reed said.
Reed was 9 and living in
Sheffield when, on a hot night
in the late summer of 1969, he
and his family were driving
home from a restaurant they
owned in town.
As their station wagon
crossed a bridge just off Route
7, Reed said, he noticed a light
glow coming from between the
bridge’s slats, and when he
turned in his seat to peer out
the car’s back window, he saw a
vessel rise from below the riverbank.
PHOTOS BY JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Thom Reed (left), a former resident of
Sheffield, said his UFO story helped put
the town on the map. His case secured
formal recognition from the Great
Barrington Historical Society (below,
materials on the supposed sighting).
Reed said he’s preparing for several
lawsuits in connection with the UFO
memorial (above).
STEPHANIE ZOLLSHAN/THE BERKSHIRE EAGLE VIA AP/FILE 2015
Suddenly, he said, he found
himself in a room resembling
an airplane hangar, and the
next thing he remembers, he
and his family were back in the
station wagon, though his
mother and grandmother were
in different seats.
As an adult — and in what
he calls an effort to preserve the
facts of his family’s case — Reed
began speaking publicly about
the incident, traveling to UFO
conventions and appearing on
a variety of TV programs deal-
ing with the paranormal. He
won a following among UFO
believers, his family’s case getting its own display at the UFO
Museum in Roswell. Then, in
2015, he secured formal recognition by the Great Barrington
Historical Society.
In a decision she now labels
a “mistake” and a “professional
embarrassment,” then-society
director Debbie Oppermann
penned a short letter of testimonial on behalf of the historical society declaring the off-
world event as “true” and “historically significant.”
“I have to say that me writing that letter really put it into a
whole other arena,” Oppermann said.
O n N o v. 3 , 2 0 1 5 , n i n e
months after the historical socie ty ’s e n d o r s e m e n t , B a ke r
signed a state citation — a kind
of ceremonial honor issued by
the hundreds for birthdays, anniversaries, retirements, and
“other outstanding achievements” by state residents who
request them — honoring the
Reed family’s claim.
Text from Oppermann’s letter wound up on the certificate
and, ultimately, on the plaque
affixed to the monument.
“On behalf of the citizens of
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, I am pleased to confer
upon you this Governor’s Citation in recognition of the offworld incident on September 1,
1969,” reads the certificate.
“Your dedicated service to the
incident was factually upheld,
founded, and deemed historically significant and true by
means of Massachusetts Historians.”
Reed said he’s unsure how
the governor came to certify his
claim, but according to a gubernatorial staffer, a request for
the citation was sent to the governor’s constituent services office.
Responding to inquiries
from the Globe, Baker spokeswoman Lizzy Guyton said in an
e-mail that the citation was “issued in error and was not authorized by Governor Baker.”
So what, exactly, will become of the current monument?
Tough to say.
Perhaps unsurprisingly, officials here have been in no hurry
to discuss the controversy publicly.
Multiple messages left last
week for LaBombard, the town
administrator, went unreturned. Reached at the local
Gulotta’s Mobil service station,
Andrew Petersen, who represents one-third of the town’s
three-person Board of Selectmen, had little desire to delve
into the particulars. “All I’m going to say is it’s in the hands of
the surveyors and lawyers,” he
said.
In a recent interview, Mark
Reich, Sheffield town counsel,
said the town is reviewing
whether the recent land survey
is accurate in its determination
that the monument encroaches
on town property.
“The town’s concern here is
not content-based,” Reich said
of the idea that some in Sheffield might not be thrilled with
the idea of a UFO monument.
“It’s based upon the protection
of public property and the use
of public property.”
Reed said he’s gearing up for
what he says could be multiple
lawsuits. He has demanded
apologies from the town, for
smearing his family’s name in
the press, and from a local columnist he says has made the issue personal by deriding the
white concrete monument as
ugly.
And while he acknowledges
that he’s unsure what will ultimately happen to the monument, there is at least one consequence of this episode that he
can guarantee.
“This,” Reed said, “is going
to change the whole ending to
my book.”
Dugan Arnett can be reached at
dugan.arnett@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@duganarnett.
Pot law offers a plan to make amends to once­targeted groups
uMARIJUANA
Continued from Page A1
People of color were disproportionately prosecuted and jailed
am id t he natio n’s “ w ar on
drugs,” even though whites had
similar rates for using or selling
marijuana. It would be unfair,
proponents argued, to allow the
windfall of a now-legal cannabis industry to flow only to the
already privileged, while those
who suffered the most under
pot prohibition remain frozen
out.
“We’re going to use this moment to try to rebalance the
scales — or, at the very least, to
stop creating new unbalanced
scales,’’ said state Senator Sonia
Chang-Diaz, who helped to
write the so-called equity provisions into state law.
While it may seem radical to
give previously incarcerated
people the right to sell a product that was illegal until recently, the equity provisions so far
haven’t been particularly controversial. Even Walpole Police
Chief John Carmichael, a fierce
critic of legal marijuana, is on
board.
“It’s going to open the door
for people who just wouldn’t
otherwise have the ability and
financial background to break
in,” Carmichael said. “We have
to give them a chance.”
As the commission developed its regulations this year,
county prosecutors asked the
agency to bar people convicted
of trafficking certain still-illegal
drugs such as heroin or fentanyl from even working at a cannabis company. “This is not an
area for permissiveness,” the
Massachusetts District Attor-
neys Association warned in a
letter. The cannabis commission partially acquiesced, restricting such people to administrative positions that don’t involving handling marijuana
products.
For owners of cannabis businesses, the bar is higher than
for their employees. People convicted of serious crimes, including nonmarijuana drug felonies, firearm violations, and sex
offenses, cannot own licensed
pot companies. However, businesses can hire people with records for possessing opioids, for
example, and receive preferential treatment
if they employ
enough people with criminal records.
People convicted of largescale marijuana trafficking may
qualify under the rules, though
some might have related convictions that would automatically disqualify them anyway.
The commission also has discretion to reject any applicant.
Marijuana equity programs
elsewhere operate only on the
local level, and have a limited
track record.
Oakland, Calif., for example,
this year adopted a policy that
reserves more than half of the
city’s licenses for equity applicants, and most of the rest for
large companies that agree to
host and mentor them. The system has indeed helped people
of color break into the business
— but it’s also drawn sharp
backlash from smaller companies that do not qualify.
Massachusetts has taken a
less restrictive approach. The
primary initiative underway
provides expedited review to
applications from companies
that meet certain criteria —
those owned by people from
places with high rates of poverty and drug arrests, for example, or that employ mostly people with drug-related convictions. It’s an important benefit,
as many Massachusetts communities limit the number and
locations of pot businesses, giving a big advantage to the first
stores.
Later this year, the commission will work with community
ficers calling him “homeboy”
and telling him of the other
crime, “You’re from Roxbury,
we know you did this.”
White, whose business partner was convicted of marijuana
trafficking, plans to hire others
with drug convictions, and
plow any proceeds back into
the community, including providing college scholarships.
“Getting some support to
come up with a business plan
and get funding is so critical to
having a successful company,”
White said.
Entrepreneurs who do not
have drug convictions or arrests
‘We’re going to use this moment to try to
rebalance the scales.’
SENATOR SONIA CHANG-DIAZ
groups to develop a crash
course in business planning
and fund-raising for entrepreneurs who were arrested or live
in so-called communities of disproportionate impact. Those
entrepreneurs will also be exempt from many state fees and
will be allowed to open pot-delivery services and lounges
ahead of other companies if the
commission decides to issue
those licenses.
One candidate is Armani
White, a community organizer
planning to open a retail pot
shop in Boston. While a college
fr esh man in Conne c tic ut ,
White was arrested when campus police investigating an unrelated crime found one gram
of marijuana in his dorm room.
The only black student in his
building, White recalled the of-
can still qualify if they show
their business will benefit poorer communities with high arrest rates. For example, Dishon
Laing dreams of opening an alternative health center in his
native Dorchester that would
offer yoga, vegan food, and cannabis. He, too, wants to hire
people with criminal records,
and also plans to run drug education programs for teenagers.
“Everything we do is connected to giving back,” said Laing, a city public health worker.
“I know my partners and I will
face stigma based on being people of color and the industry
we’re in, but we want to show
that we’re actually improving
our communities.”
Another requirement is intended to recruit marijuana
companies that don’t qualify for
t h e e q u i ty p r o g ra m t o t h e
cause: All applicants must show
how their businesses will benefit communities hurt by the
drug war. For example, Sira
Naturals, a larger medical marijuana operator that’s seeking
recreational licenses, plans to
host an incubator for equity applicants at its growing facility in
Milford.
Licensed marijuana businesses must also write and adhere to a diversity plan that promotes gender equity and the
employment of veterans, LGBT
people, and people with disabilities.
The commission also offers incentives:
Companies
that provide
money and
mentoring to
entrepreneurs from “areas of
disproportionate impact” can
get the cannabis equivalent of a
Good Housekeeping seal of approval: a “social justice leader”
label affixed to their product
packaging.
State officials also have
moved to protect smaller equity
businesses by banning larger
companies from holding more
than three licenses of any type
and capping each company’s
cultivation area at 100,000
square feet.
All these advantages, however, may not help applicants
overcome the biggest hurdle:
winning approval from local officials for the location and
opening of their businesses.
Somerville and other municipalities are considering local
versions of the equity program,
but none have been adopted
yet. Advocates are worried that
established companies — such
as medical dispensaries, which
are nearly all white-owned —
can outbid smaller players by
offering communities generous
financial packages.
“Cities and towns need to
step up, or in a few years we’ll
see we had this opportunity to
put diversity into action and we
failed,” said Ross Bradshaw,
who hopes to open a pot business in a Worcester neighborhood designated as an area of
di sprop or tion at e i mp a c t .
“There are going to be municipalities that only allow three licenses, and two are going to
medical marijuana companies.
That’s less opportunity for people of color.”
Cannabis commissioner
Shaleen Title, who championed
the equity initiatives, acknowledged they are hardly a cure-all.
But Title is heartened by the
early numbers: 68 applicants
have cleared a first hurdle in
the process for licensing, and
more than 100 more under review. Those people would have
their applications reviewed
ahead of others.
“We’ll never be able to repair
the damage caused by drug prohibition, but these programs at
least begin to help provide a fair
shot,” Title said.
“Think about having a conviction that was based on unfair
enforcement, and how that
holds you back in so many different ways — we want to make
that right.”
Dan Adams can be reached at
daniel.adams@globe.com.
A10
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
Racist graffiti a call to action for METCO
MILLY ARBAJE-THOMAS
CEO, METCO
Boston
Yes, get UMass Boston ‘out of its hole’
Yes, the state should help UMass Boston “out of its hole,”
and it should allocate money for a long promised space for
the College of Nursing and Health Sciences (CNHS). Since
it was first constructed, the building occupied by the CNHS
has been an awful work space, plagued with leaking
ceilings, poor ventilation, and mold buildup. When the
university’s infrastructure was declared unsafe, in 2010,
this was the one building on campus slated to be
demolished. Now, as the campus nears completion of a
major building and campus restructuring, CNHS learns the
university has a budget deficit, halting plans for
construction of the final building, the one planned for
CNHS. University administration has informed the CNHS
that it will be relocated to Healey Library building’s eighth
and 11th floors — space vacated by others being relocated
to new buildings. Healey is less suitable than the current
space, with a history of the same problems, compounded
by limited room, windowless offices, and access only by
climbing 11 flights of stairs or waiting to ride two slow,
creaky elevators built in the ’60s. Yes, the state should
definitely help UMass Boston and the CNHS “out of its
hole”.
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Opinion
Inbox
Unfortunately, racism is alive and real in our schools and
communities. A few days after a heartwarming
multicultural celebration of METCO’s 50 years in the
Wayland schools, an African-American history display at
Wayland High was defaced by racist graffiti. (“Racist graffiti
found on high school’s black history display,”
BostonGlobe.com, May 4) That vandalism saddens the
METCO community and reinforces METCO’s commitment
to support school districts in fighting racial bias and
discrimination, to collectively find ways to combat
prejudice and racism.
The Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity
was created to address issues of racial segregation and
isolation for urban and suburban schools and
communities. It gives students of different colors and
backgrounds the opportunity to learn together, to strive
toward common goals, to participate in the same afterschool activities, to play on the same teams. As a result,
stereotypes are diminished, and lasting friendships formed,
among students, parents, and community members.
We thank the Wayland school leaders for their strong
stance against the forces of hate and bigotry. METCO —
supporting 3,300 students in 37 school districts and 190
schools — is committed to working tirelessly with our
schools and communities to bring people together and to
reduce the divisions plaguing communities across our state
and nation.
G l o b e
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
T
How to build a bridge
he Walsh administration
recently took steps forward
on its plan to rebuild the
Long Island Bridge and
create a new addiction recovery campus on the city-owned island
in Boston Harbor. The news arrived
amid ramped-up opposition to the proposal from the mayor of Quincy and
other elected officials. Officials there
cite concerns about construction traffic
on Quincy’s streets and lack of community input, and are even floating threats
to ban construction trucks. They proclaim they are ready “to do what we
need to do to fight this ill-conceived
project.”
Those objections are overwrought —
but they do underscore the work that
Walsh will need to do to convince Boston and Quincy residents alike of the
merits of his project.
The old bridge, which allowed the
city to access the island through Quincy
streets, was shut down in 2014, after
engineers discovered urgent structural
problems. The island used to house a
homeless shelter and other services. It
was a source of friction between Quincy
and Boston even then: Not only did the
vehicles serving the island annoy neighbors, but Boston blocked any public access to the island.
It’s tempting to dismiss Quincy’s objections as just NIMBYism — and
there’s definitely plenty of that goint
around — but critics have exposed the
city’s failure to articulate just what it
envisions for Long Island, and why it is
the right place to realize those visions.
Right now, it’s a proposed bridge to a
vague idea, not a full plan.
Bostonians deserve more details in
exchange for committing nearly $100
million for a structure. What is the opportunity cost for Boston of the new
bridge? Where are the viability studies
showing that Long Island is the best locale for a new recovery center in the area? Will there be further development
on the island? If so, what kind? After a
major expenditure of their tax money,
what sort of public access will Boston
residents have to their island?
In a briefing with reporters last
week, the Walsh administration said it
still has no answers to such questions.
Essentially, the mayor is asking Boston’s
taxpayers to take a big leap of faith.
The data is clear that demand for
treatment beds is higher than the supply, but for $100 million just to build the
bridge, are there other sites that would
yield more bang for the buck? The city
has resisted the sort of analysis of alternatives that normally accompanies big
projects, saying that to study other potential sites would only mean more delays. “For us, it’s about access and equity.
We can’t wait for us to do an assessment
of whether we could find a place [on the
mainland],” said Marty Martínez, Boston’s chief of health and human services.
The concept of a recovery campus is
a good one. Walsh deserves credit for
recognizing that fighting the opioid epidemic requires much more than the
outdated 28-day treatment model. Substance-use disorders, particularly opioid abuse, are chronic and progressive
illnesses. A recovery campus that offers
a chain of services — detox, rehab treatment, work and training opportunities,
supportive housing programs — elevates the probability of success tremendously. Long Island has potential.
But asking taxpayers to cough up
$100 million for a bridge — plus whatever the recovery center will cost —
without due diligence and consideration of alternatives is unwise. Because
the island housed social services before
doesn’t mean it’s the best or most costeffective place to put them now. Walsh
will find his sales pitch much easier, in
both Boston and Quincy, if his administration does the legwork to demonstrate
that it has a fully formed plan, and that
Long Island is the best place for it.
CAROL HALL ELLENBECKER
Newton
The writer is a professor emerita of the UMass Boston
College of Nursing and Health Sciences.
Open up the discussion of Long Island
Bridge
The ongoing conflict over the rebuilding of the Long Island
Bridge seems much too narrow to me. Long Island is a
sprawling property with abundant resources: woodlands,
wildlife, beaches, historical sites, and spectacular
scenic views of Boston Harbor. Why are these factors
never mentioned in the coverage of this issue? Why
does Boston seem to have no plan for the area other than
the recovery campus? Long Island could and should be a
public park, open to all, with a portion of the land reserved
for the much-needed treatment facility. No plan for the
bridge should go forward without a guarantee that all these
questions will be on the table.
JOSEPH F. CARROLL
Dorchester
When members of the Mass. GOP
looked the other way on Scott Lively
As a Catholic and a former Republican (now unenrolled), I
am horrified by the 28 percent who actually chose to put
Scott Lively on the GOP primary ballot (“A bigot gets a
warm hug from the Mass. GOP,” Editorial, May 7). Read his
comments about homosexuals being responsible for
Nazism and other worldly scourges; check out his decidedly
un-Christian stance of hating the sin and the sinner.
Are these the same people who were more than willing
to look the other way when their (then) presidential
candidate talked about how to treat women? When his vice
president rails against the LGBTQ community? What is
“Christian” about that level of hate and intolerance? Jesus
preached tolerance and compassion . . . remember Mary
Magdalene?
Charlie Baker is going to pummel Scott Lively . . . thank
the Lord!
SUE HOY
Taunton
What qualifies as a ‘warm hug’?
How can the Globe say that the Mass. GOP gave a “warm
hug” to a bigot (Editorial, May 7) when over 70 percent of
the delegates gave him the cold shoulder? Your anti-GOP
bias is showing.
BOB DUMONT
GOP Convention Delegate
Sterling
Define ‘Christian’
It is hardly Christian for sanctimonious so-called Christians
to denounce as un-Christian those who believe the poor are
better served by a tax policy designed to create jobs for
them (“Paul Ryan’s un-Christian agenda,” Opinion, May 7).
One source of more money for the poor might be eliminating the nearly million dollars a year spent on chaplain’s offices in the US House and Senate. Congressmen and senators should consult their own clergy and let this money go
to the poor.
BRIAN R. MERRICK
West Barnstable
SCOT LEHIGH
G
The tangled tales
from Trumpland
ood evening, Mr. and Mrs.
North and South Pole and all
the wireless-free ships at sea,
as a modern-day Walter
Winchell might say. Just to
catch you up on the latest, another emissary from rationality, UK Foreign Minister
Boris Johnson, came to the United States
this week to urge President Trump to stay
in the Iran deal. Boris did it in the most direct way possible: He went on Official
Trumpland TV’s morning show. That is,
“Fox & Friends.”
Johnson is the Jack Black of British politics. Think: Trump without hair spray, but
with more command of the facts. He talked
with Foxcaster Brian Kilmeade, who once
opined that the problem with America is
“we keep marrying other species” — that explains those damn centaurs that keep trampling my garden! — “and other ethnicities.”
(No wonder Trump likes the show.) Anyway,
having Brian as his interlocutor gave Boris
an excuse for explaining the Iran deal dynamics as though tutoring a sixth-grader.
But alas, to no avail; on Tuesday, Trump
abandoned the deal. If only Boris had
pitched it at a fourth-grade level.
The other big administration-related
news: Trump has hired Rudy Giuliani to
host a new Netflix show called “Apprentice Attorney.” Kidding, kidding. Actually,
Giuliani was hired pursuant to the notion
that he was a savvy legal point man who
could go on TV and explain away messes
like the election-eve hush money paid to
keep Stormy Daniels from revealing that
she and Donald had once allegedly made
the beast with two backs.
Such was the plan, anyway. But Rudy
has changed. Like, say, Randle McMurphy
at the end of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s
Nest.” The official fable had been that Cohen paid Stormy $130,000 to stay silent
even though she had nothing to speak up
about, and that Trump, who knew nothing
about the payment, had not reimbursed Cohen.
In short order, Rudy said just the opposite: Trump had known at least generally
Welcome to the United
States of insanity.
about the payment and had repaid Cohen.
That news surprised not just the White
House inner circle but even chief
Trumpswab Sean Hannity. Rudy thinks he’s
been a big success, because everyone is talking about him. Of course, by that measure,
the Titanic’s maiden voyage was also a
smash.
But Rudy’s revision may have vexed
Trump, who sent this advice his political
pettifogger’s way: “Learn before you speak.
It’s a lot easier.” Translation: Get your lies in
line.
Of course, Rudy may have thought they
were. The Wall Street Journal reports that
he and Trump devised the latest strategy together. Anyway, the official fable evolves
day by day, but the latest version seems to
be this: Trump repaid Cohen for the hush
dollars in $35,000 installments (what a
novel lay-away plan!), but without knowing
what he was paying for.
Here’s the silver lining in the Stormy
cloud: 24 percent of Trump’s supporters believe his denial of an affair, so you really can
fool some of the people all of the time!
Meanwhile, others are enfolding Trump
in their own passionate embrace. Like Don
Blankenship, the West Virginia coal baron
and US Senate aspirant, who spent a year in
the crowbar hotel on mine-safety violations.
“I am Trumpier than Trump,” he has
declared.
And with a Trumpian knack for
nicknames! He’s tagged Mitch McConnell
“Cocaine Mitch” because . . . well, honestly,
it’s too convoluted to explain. But speaking
of conspiracy theorists, Lyndon LaRouche
and his compeers say the nefarious “City of
London Imperial Oligarchs” are using
Robert Mueller to defenestrate Trump so
they can use Iran, Syria, Korea, and
Ukraine to unleash war on Russia and
China.
Look for it soon on Hannity. Oh, I forgot, you’re out of range of Official Trumpland TV.
Oh well, until next time, then, that’s your
report from the United States of Insanity.
Scot Lehigh can be reached at
lehigh@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter at
@GlobeScotLehigh.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A11
Shredding diplomacy for spite, not gain
P
resident Trump’s decision to withdraw from the
Iran nuclear deal reveals a fundamental
misunderstanding of the diplomacy leading to
the agreement.
His potshots at former secretary of state John
Kerry for negotiating it also display a personal animosity
explaining much about the underlying motivation for his
decision.
I watched Kerry not only complete the agreement during
19 long days in Vienna, but also across thousands of miles
while he marshaled both Iran and the international
community toward a deal and the successful
implementation of it.
After nearly three decades as
a reporter, I accepted Kerry’s
offer to join him at the State Department as he became the
nation’s 68th secretary of state. It was tough to leave the only
profession I had known, but I knew I’d regret it for the rest of
my life if I turned down an opportunity available to so few
people.
During the next four years, in which we traveled over 1.4
million miles to 91 countries and all seven continents, I
came to appreciate not only the scope and reach of the
nation’s first Cabinet agency, but the structure and history of
diplomacy and its practice in the modern era.
I glimpsed some of the foibles in Kerry I had seen as a
reporter, but I also gained fresh insight into his creativity,
energy, and, most of all, his patience. Each of them served our
national interest as he negotiated on behalf of our country.
President Obama believed the development of Iran’s
nuclear program could result in a nuclear weapon, which
B y G l e n Jo h n s o n
would have a tremendously destabilizing effect on the
Middle East. Not only could it inspire Islamic opponents
such as Saudi Arabia to seek nukes of their own, but it might
prompt Israel to stage a preemptive military strike against a
country that refuses even to acknowledge its existence.
The Israelis had already launched an attack on an Iraqi
nuclear facility in 1981.
In 2011, Obama endorsed Kerry as the then-senator
traveled to Oman to feel out Iranian emissaries about the
possibility of limiting their program to civilian purposes. In
return, the United States would work with the international
community to lift sanctions that had crippled Iran’s
economy.
In the fall of 2013, after hard-liner Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad had been replaced by the more moderate
Hassan Rouhani as president of Iran, Kerry, as secretary of
state, began negotiations with the Iranian foreign minister,
Javad Zarif, on the outlines of a potential deal. During
numerous days and nights in Geneva, the two inched toward
an interim agreement, the Joint Plan of Action.
Just before Thanksgiving, they reached a deal. For the
first time, Iran enacted curbs on its nuclear program. And an
array of nations, including the United States, began the
phased lifting of $7 billion worth of sanctions in return.
The agreement was set to last just six months, but as
negotiations dragged, it was continually renewed —
meaning Iran maintained the limits on its program even
without a final agreement.
When that was reached, in July 2015, the Joint
Comprehensive Plan of Action was not just with the United
States, but with all of the permanent members of the United
Nations Security Council, as well as Germany and the
leadership of the 28-nation European Union.
When most people hear about the UN Security Council
today, it’s because the United States, Russia, or China has
vetoed one of the other’s resolutions. In this instance,
though, there was rare unanimity.
In vowing to go alone, Trump is turning our country
against an agreement it negotiated. The others will remain
parties to the deal, selling the Iranians their cars, airplanes,
and weapons systems.
He will also buttress Iranian hard-liners, who argued the
United States couldn’t be trusted, and gut the moderates
who hoped that economic recovery would allow Iran’s
burgeoning youth population to seek integration with the
West, rather than being ostracized from it.
And the president will do so just before sitting down with
Kim Jong Un of North Korea, a country that already has
nuclear weapons, and asking him to dispose of them in
exchange for promises of military and economic relief.
Along the way, Trump has tweeted about Kerry’s
negotiating skills and even mocked him for breaking a leg
while biking during a recess in the negotiations.
As someone who was present at the creation, I argue it
does a disservice to the United States to abrogate an
agreement we made to stave off a potential war, against the
objection of our closest allies, and with spite toward a man
who didn’t let a broken femur — far worse than a bone spur
— keep him from serving his country.
Glen Johnson served as deputy assistant secretary of state for
strategic communications from 2013-2017.
INDIRA A.R. LAKSHMANAN
Nixing it
won’t fix it
S
LESLEY BECKER/GLOBE STAFF; AP
crapping a deal that cuts off for at least a
decade Iran’s path to a nuclear weapon is
arguably the most consequential
decision of Donald Trump’s presidency
thus far — with so many winning acts to
choose from, I don’t say that lightly.
Making good on his vows to “rip up”
the “worst ever” Obama-era deal, Trump
yanked us out of an imperfect (but farbetter-than-any-alternative) accord that has so far averted a
military confrontation by curbing Iran’s nuclear ambitions.
Trump announced he would immediately reimpose all
economic sanctions on Iran, its oil buyers, and commercial
and investment partners — in other words, on virtually
every major economy in the world. While Trump surely
believes this will force Iran and our negotiating partners to
their knees, crawling back to beg for mercy from the world’s
greatest dealmaker, nothing could be further from the truth.
Among many unforced errors, Trump has allowed Iran to
fashion itself as the aggrieved party and put us on a path to
unravel the only thing stopping Iran from becoming another
nuclear-armed rogue state in the mold of North Korea.
The president deludes himself in believing he can exact
better terms than a united United States, Europe, China, and
Russia could wrest from Iran after three years of crippling
sanctions and hard-fought diplomacy. At the precipice of his
Hamlet moment, Trump seems blind to the consequences of
leaping into the void. So let me lay out the likely
consequences: a rift with allies, a tit-for-tat battle if we
penalize global banks and businesses, near-certainty Russia
and China will ignore US sanctions, an excuse for Tehran to
abcde
Fo u n d ed 1 8 7 2
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President
ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
JENNIFER PETER
Managing Editor
resume nuclear fuel production (and secretly seek weapons)
— or a costly war to try to stop them.
“The deal is toast. And there’s no viable Plan B,” said
Richard Nephew, who was a US sanctions negotiator at the
talks.
I covered the nuclear talks from an unpromising start in
Almaty, in February 2013, to shouting matches between
Secretary of State John Kerry and Iran’s Javad Zarif in
Vienna days before the deal was reached, in July 2015. An
accord looked unlikely until the bitter end. The notion
Trump could magically renegotiate a hard-fought deal that’s
being enforced is delusional and dangerous. Few people
understand the complex 159-page deal — and the president
is apparently not among them.
A quick review: The deal blocks Iran from making
nuclear weapons in exchange for lifting sanctions that cost
Tehran $5 billion a month in lost oil sales alone. Iran agreed
to ship out 97 percent of its enriched uranium, mothball 70
percent of its uranium-enriching centrifuges, and disable a
heavy water reactor that could produce plutonium.
Critics complain provisions lapse after 10, 15, or 25
years, simply postponing Iran’s path to a weapon. Mark
Dubowitz, of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies,
hopes Trump will push Europe to “fix the nuclear deal on
the terms he demanded” and add more sanctions on
missile and terrorist activities. Defenders say the accord
extended Iran’s “breakout time” to make a nuclear
weapon from a month or two to a year, and that many
provisions never expire, binding Iran to disavow nuclear
weapons forever.
Trump “decertified” the deal last October, saying Iran had
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
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violated it. But International Atomic Energy Agency
inspectors — who have 24/7 surveillance at nuclear facilities
and the right to demand access anywhere — have certified
Iran’s compliance every quarter since it took effect. If Iran
cheats, complaints go to a Joint Commission that polices the
deal. In 2016, Iran was accused of having too much heavy
water, which could be used to produce plutonium — and it
sold the excess to come into compliance. Thanks to the deal,
Iran couldn’t make plutonium in any case, because it
disabled its heavy water reactor.
Britain, France, and Germany have tried to reason with
Trump, to little avail. “Fix it or nix it,” is Israeli Prime
Minister Netanyahu’s refrain. Trump thinks he can nix it as a
way to fix it, but that belief is either naive or arrogant. With
UN inspectors backing Iran, the world won’t take our side —
and our penalties won’t have the same impact, especially if
countries flout them or do the bare minimum.
Former Obama aide Colin Kahl gamed out military
scenarios to stop Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon
when he worked at the Pentagon. The military option, he
said, is “not a solution.” An Israeli strike would set back Iran
by a year or two; a US hit might double that — but a strike
would stiffen Iran’s resolve to get a weapon by any means
possible. “Even the biggest critics admit the deal buys us 10
to 15 years,” Kahl said. “Every option we and Israel have
today to stop them, we’ll still have in 2030. So why give up a
deal that buys time? It’s literally crazy.”
Yet crazy is where we are.
Indira A.R. Lakshmanan’s column appears regularly in the
Globe. Follow her on Twitter @Indira_L.
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T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D N ES DAY, M AY 9 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N GL OB E .C O M / M E T RO
Nestor Ramos
A gun law that
can save lives
When we talk about gun violence these days, we picture
madmen on rampages and
gangs doing drive-bys. We
conjure images of home invasions and random robberies
gone wrong.
We talk about fear.
But most who die by gun
violence are not killed by a mass murderer or
a violent gang, and fear plays little part. Most
gun deaths are suicides, and the person pulling the trigger is the victim. These shootings
aren’t random or unpredictable or terrifying;
quite the opposite. To those of us who have
loved someone who has died by suicide, the
loss feels frustratingly, painfully preventable.
That’s the familiar story that motivates
Reed Shafer-Ray, a 22-year-old Harvard senior
from Oklahoma who lost a close family friend
to suicide in 2016. Shafer-Ray is one of the
key advocates behind a bill, now making its
way through the Legislature, that would give
families a better chance to save the lives of
their loved ones.
These “red flag” laws, also known as Extreme Risk Protective Orders, create a legal
avenue by which families and law enforcement can take guns out of the hands of people
who a court deems are dangerous to others or
— more often — themselves.
Joseph, the brother of one of Shafer-Ray’s
close friends and classmates in Oklahoma,
had dealt with mental health issues for years.
“It was kind of an open secret,” Shafer-Ray
said, but because Joseph had no criminal record, he was repeatedly able to go to a local
store and buy a gun. Twice, family members
talked him down or Joseph was able to stop
himself. His family called the gun shop and
begged the people there not to sell Joseph a
firearm. But the third time Joseph bought a
gun, he used it to take his own life in a motel
room, Shafer-Ray said. After talking with Joseph’s family about what could have been
done to save him, Shafer-Ray contacted state
Representative Marjorie Decker, a Cambridge
Democrat, whose office drafted the bill.
Around the country, stories like these are,
if not common, then familiar. In 2014, the
Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence sued a
Missouri gun dealer who allegedly sold a gun
to a severely mentally ill woman — over the
explicit pleading and warning of the woman’s
mother.
The woman was allowed to buy a gun anyway and promptly shot her father, killing him.
The Brady lawsuit ended in a $2.2 million settlement.
In Massachusetts, police chiefs already
have discretion over who can legally own a
firearm. But depression can strike at any time,
including affecting people who already own
guns. At that point, depression can immediately turn deadly, and getting the gun away
from someone in crisis can be lifesaving. The
bill also provides for a quick decision from a
judge and avenues for appeal.
“One of the reasons it’s so important is that
it provides a channel for families,” said Jack
Torres, a 16-year-old sophomore at Somerville
High School. Torres is one of the founders of
Students Against Gun Violence, which organized a phone campaign that recently inundated the State House — including the office
of House Speaker Robert A, DeLeo. Last week,
DeLeo announced his support, which should
go a long way toward turning this bill into
law.
Red flag law proposals have become popular in the wake of the violence in Parkland,
Fla., pitched as a way to potentially intervene
before a would-be mass murderer carries out
another massacre. But the truth is that preventing the next Parkland will rely not just on
laws, but on luck.
There are so many guns in circulation in
America, and such a patchwork of state laws,
that some path to terrible violence will always
be available.
Connecticut enacted a red flag law in 1999
after a mass shooting. Whether it worked to
prevent others is impossible to know, but it
didn’t stop Newtown. It did, however, appear
to save lives, according to a 2016 study led by
Duke University researchers, who estimated
that the law averted one suicide for every 10
to 20 gun removals. Even conservatively,
that’s about 40 lives over the 14-year period of
the study.
Suicide doesn’t draw the same attention
that mass murder does, of course, even
though it accounted for about 60 percent of
gun deaths in 2016. News organizations that
dissect every aspect of the latest mass shooting are rightly reluctant to report on suicide,
both for privacy and for fear of sparking copycats. (This may be the only area in which
something that disproportionately affects
white men receives comparatively little attention.)
RAMOS, Page B4
Jury clears former inmate of rape
O’Loughlin found
innocent in ’83 case
By Jenifer McKim
NEW ENGLAND CENTER
FOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING
More than 35 years after Kevin
O’Loughlin was convicted of raping
an 11-year-old girl in Framingham,
a jury on Tuesday found the gourmet food salesman did not commit
the crime and awarded him $5 million in damages.
The 14-member jury determined
that O’Loughlin was innocent by
“clear and convincing” evidence after an emotional weeklong trial in
Suffolk Superior Court that pitted
the divorced father of two against
the rape victim, now in her 40s, who
still maintains she identified the
right man.
O’Loughlin had sought compensation under a 2004 law that allows
plaintiffs to seek damages from the
state if they can prove their innocence.
He filed suit three years ago after
a Superior Court judge vacated his
1983 conviction and prosecutors decided not to retry him, citing evidence of another possible suspect
that cast “real doubt on the justice of
the conviction.”
O’Loughlin said Tuesday that he
could barely believe the jury ruled in
his favor.
“I really didn’t feel it was going
my way at all because nothing really
has,’’ he said. “I’ve always said I’ve
been innocent, and I finally got that
proven in court.’’
During the trial, O’Loughlin deO'LOUGHLIN, Page B4
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Kevin O’Loughlin sought
compensation for his 1983
wrongful conviction.
SJC eyes
motels
for the
homeless
Will rule on effort
to end the practice
By Joshua Miller
GLOBE STAFF
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Workers installed an old GE neon sign on the Rose Kennedy Greenway on Tuesday.
Lighting the way
Public art installation downtown to feature old neon
It’s not a mirage: That really is the long-gone
demographics and gentrification,” The Greenway
Fontaine’s sign going up on the Rose Kennedy
Conservancy said in a statement. “By exhibiting
Greenway. Unfortunately, it does not signal a rethese signs together ... the Conservancy is creatturn of the famed West Roxbury restaurant
ing a new geography of light.”
known for its Southern fried chicken.
Waller and his wife own a visual effects comThe sign is part of the latest public art instalpany in Malden called Brickyard, where the signs
lation on the Greenway that will feature eight
are restored and housed. Waller began collecting
historic neon signs from the mid-20th century
the signs when he was a boy digging through the
owned by Malden collector Dave Waller. The exlocal dump. The collection grew as Boston’s urhibit, which is beban landscape
ing installed this
changed dramatiweek near the
cally.
Rings Fountain, is
Now, the signs
part of an ongoing
remind him of anseries of lightother time.
themed exhibits to
“For a long
go up on the Greenwhile they were reway this year.
garded as an eye“Many of the
sore,” Waller said.
signs in the exhibit
“But now people
were once iconic
really seem to enlandmarks in comjoy their warm
munities that have
glow again.”
changed dramati— LANEY
cally due to urban
The Fontaine’s chicken took flight over the Rose
Kennedy Greenway.
RUCKSTUHL
renewal, shifting
PAUL J. MCMANUS 1959­2018
Judge meted out compassion with justice
By Aimee Ortiz
GLOBE STAFF
In 1989, Paul J. McManus told
The Boston Globe that “what you
devote yourself to says an awful lot
about your priorities. If it’s inconsequential, it speaks volumes.”
Judge McManus, a Boston Municipal Court judge known for his
compassion and keen sense of justice, lived by those words, family
and friends said.
“So much of his focus and his
life was working on making the system work for people who were disadvantaged,” said his brother, Jim
McManus.
Paul McManus died Sunday at
his home in Wellesley after fighting
a rare, aggressive form of cancer for
16 months. He was 59.
Judge McManus was appointed
to the bench in 2015. During his interview for the court, he said he
“wanted everyone who entered his
courtroom to be treated with dignity and that he wanted to bring redemption and mercy to an often
unfair justice system,” according to
his family.
“He did really believe in social
justice and helping the poor,” said
Carolyn Ryan, assistant managing
editor at The New York Times and
Judge McManus’s sister-in-law. “It
was real with him.”
Trial Court Chief Justice Paula
Carey described Judge McManus as
“the real deal.”
“He was a compassionate and
dedicated jurist and equally dedicated to social and community justice issues,” she said.
After graduating from the College of the Holy Cross in 1981,
Judge McManus joined the Jesuit
Volunteer Corps, teaching low-income students and coaching soccer
in Houston.
According to his brother, the
The Supreme Judicial Court
grappled with emotional arguments Tuesday about whether
Governor Charlie Baker’s efforts to end the practice of
housing homeless families in
motels at state expense have
gone too far.
Last year, a Superior Court
judge ruled that they had, ordering the state housing department to place homeless
families with recognized disabilities in a motel if available
shelters couldn’t accommodate
their circumstances and the
motel could.
The Baker administration
appealed, saying the ruling
would thwart years of hardearned progress toward phasing out the use of motels, which
rarely have kitchens, a safe
place for kids to play, or easy access to public transportation.
When Baker took office in January 2015, there were 1,500 families in motels at state expense;
as of Tuesday night, there were
32.
The state’s highest court
probed the balance between the
essence of the program — emergency housing — and the legal
obligation to reasonably accommodate people’s disabilities.
In Boston on Tuesday, Justice Scott Kafker appeared
skeptical of the Superior Court
judge’s ruling that would expand the use of motels.
“He’s returned to the past.
He’s decided he doesn’t like this
policy change,” Kafker said.
Lawyer Ruth Bourquin, representing the homeless family
plaintiffs, disagreed.
She pointed to the state budget, which says the housing department must use its emergency shelter money for motels
“due to the unavailability of
contracted shelter beds.”
“You and the judge have a
different definition of ‘unavailable’ than the Commonwealth
does — ” Kafker said.
“But we have the same definition as the Legislature does, if
I might,” Bourquin interjected.
“I don’t think you’re right,”
Kafker shot back.
Beyond the interpretation of
law, there were moral and political questions at the heart of
this case — about giving destitute and disabled families shelHOMELESS, Page B3
Tainted evidence
Judge McManus was devoted to
making the system work for the
disadvantaged, his brother said.
team was so good it might have
won the championship if allowed
to compete, but most of the players
were ineligible because they were
MCMANUS, Page B5
The SJC heard arguments over
dismissing up to 11,000 more
cases linked to an Amherst
drug lab. B3.
Woman released
A federal judge chastised immigration officials for their
careless handling of the case
of a Brazilian mother. B3.
B2
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W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
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FOLLOWING INSTINCTS AND ARROW
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KENNETH LU/FLICKR
The story behind
this Castle
By Zipporah Osei
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Back Bay steakhouse Smith & Wollensky
said earlier this week that it would be moving
on from its spot in the Park Plaza Castle. Fifteen years at that location was a good run but
only a blip in time for an architectural curiosity with a history that stretches back over a
century.
The Castle was built as an armory for the
Massachusetts First Corps of Cadets, initially
a Colonial militia unit. After a membership
boom during the Civil War, the corps lacked
adequate training space for its growing numbers and in 1880 announced it would raise
the funds for an armory through public donations.
Half the money used to construct the
building was made through fund-raising and
the other half was raised by corps-sponsored
operettas, which were very popular in Boston.
The armory was designed by famous Boston-born architect William Gibbons Preston,
who also designed the Hotel Vendome, among
other local buildings. Construction ran from
1891to 1897.
Designed to withstand the perceived threat
of mob violence from the Irish and other new
immigrant communities, the building had the
advantage of being in a central location that
had a clear view of the Common and allowed
for easy communication by signal flag with
the State House.
The four-story granite structure, with its
six-story tower, was built in the same Romanesque Revival style that inspired other
iconic Boston buildings, including Trinity
Church and the Grain Exchange.
The corps decided to sell the building in
1965. At the time, it was being used as a headquarters for two units of the Massachusetts
National Guard and a museum for Civil War
memorabilia.
It was bought by Boston resident William
J. Fitzgerald and for a short time was leased
by the University of Massachusetts for a library, student lounges, and faculty rooms.
In 1977, it was designated as a landmark
by the Boston Landmarks Commission. Following the designation, the owners of the Boston Park Plaza Hotel bought the building and
used it as an extension of their hotel across
the street. It was at this time that it became
known as the Park Plaza Castle.
The Castle continued to be used as the
Park Plaza’s banquet facility from 1980 until
Smith & Wollensky took over in 2003.
The Castle, a fixture in the Back Bay for
121 years, has seen many changes. Now as the
current owners pack up to leave, it heads into
the next chapter in its long history.
Zipporah Osei can be reached at
zipporah.osei@gmail.com.
BY THE NUMBERS
After several furtive attempts at waddling through traffic, this fowl family had a straight shot across a Waltham road to get to a
watering hole on Monday.
Communication + numbers = success
By Elise Takahama
In his classroom, Siddiqui approaches math — which he refers
to as “the language of love” — a little differently than other teachers might, telling them to forget about the numbers and “think
An East Bridgewater high school math teacher was named
about the process.”
the state’s Teacher of the Year during a ceremony on Tuesday,
“I think it’s important that students understand that math is a
marking the first time the school district has had a winning canlanguage,” said Siddiqui, who has also taught algebra and geomedidate, officials said.
try. “Once you know what the symbols mean and how they fit toJamil Siddiqui, who teaches advanced placement calculus
gether, it makes it easier, so we talk about communication a lot in
and pre-calculus, has been a part of the East Bridgewater Junior/
my classes.”
Senior High School faculty for 24 years, he said.
Students in eighth to 12th grade attended the Tuesday celebra“It’s a great honor,” Siddiqui said. “You don’t get into teaching Jamil Siddiqui,
the top teacher
tion in the school’s auditorium, bringing a lot of excitement and
for the accolades, but when it happens, it’s really, really satisfyin the state.
pride to the room, said East Bridgewater Public Schools Superining.”
tendent Elizabeth Legault.
A Maine native and Boston University graduate, Siddiqui said
“He’s very dedicated to his own personal and professional practice,”
he always tries to work with his students in a variety of roles.
Legault said. “The atmosphere in his room is all about math, and the desire
He oversees the Student Senate club at the high school, works with kids
to be a mathematician.”
to organize activities and events — such as blood drives and class competiThe Massachusetts Teacher of the Year program is the state’s top award
tions — provides mentorship and support to other teachers on instructionfor educators. Siddiqui is the 57th recipient of the award and will be Masal practices, and travels frequently to speak with various educators around
sachusetts’s candidate for the national Teacher of the Year contest. The rethe state, said Brian Duffey, the school’s principal.
cipient of the national competition will be announced next year.
“He’s very involved in the culture and climate throughout the school,”
Duffey said. “A number of his former students have gone on to become
Elise Takahama can be reached at elise.takahama@globe.com.
mathematics teachers, which is a real testament to the work he’s done.”
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
AROUND THE REGION
BOSTO N
Walsh to host global
climate summit in June
Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced that the International Mayors Climate Summit is scheduled
for June 7 at Boston University. The one-day
meeting will “focus on best practices and steps
city leaders can take to address climate change
globally and in their communities,” according to
a statement from Walsh’s office. The event will
feature a discussion with former secretary of
state John Kerry and Bank of America Vice
Chairman Anne Finucane. Gina McCarthy, a former Environmental Protection Agency administrator, will also deliver remarks. During the program, mayors will “convene on strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, such as the
acceleration of renewable energy, and how to
prepare for the impacts of climate change, including discussions on climate migration,” according to Walsh’s office. The summit be held a
day before he hosts the annual meeting of the US
Conference of Mayors, June 8-11.
B R O O KL I N E
Voters back tax increase
for school expansion
Voters at the annual Town Election on Tuesday
approved overrides of Proposition 2 1/2 to pay
for the expansion of the town’s high school and
to add more than $6.5 million in funding to the
school and town budgets. A question to pay for
the bulk of the $205.6 million expansion and
renovation of Brookline High School was approved 5,664 in favor to 2,040 against, according
to unofficial results from the town clerk’s office.
The question to approve the override to increase
the tax levy by more than $6.5 million was approved 5,400 in favor to 2,367 opposed, according to the office. The new revenue will be used
for more staff and equipment, with $5.8 million
earmarked for the schools and the remaining
$701,000 reserved for the town, officials said.
SA L E M
Firefighters revive
overdosing prisoners
Salem firefighters revived two prisoners who
were overdosing on opioids in the back of a Middlesex Sheriff’s van Tuesday afternoon, officials
said. A correctional officer knocked on the door
to a fire station on North Street at about 2:45
p.m. seeking help, said Salem Fire Captain Scott
Austin. The firefighters quickly administered
Narcan, which is used to reverse opioid overdoses. After the prisoners were revived, they were
taken to Salem Hospital for examination, Austin
said. It is unclear how the prisoners obtained the
opioids. Salem fire and police officials said they
did not know how the drugs were obtained. A
statement issued by the sheriff’s office did not
address the opioids. The office is “investigating a
medical incident involving three detainees who
had court appearances out of Malden District
Court,” the statement said. They were expected
to return later in the day to the Middlesex Jail
and House of Correction, the statement said.
Kevin Maccioli, a spokesman for the sheriff’s office, would not comment further.
B A RN STA B L E
Snowy owl saved after
being found at roadside
An injured snowy owl is on the mend. The owl is
being treated at the Cape Wildlife Center in
Barnstable after being spotted on the side of a
busy road two weeks ago, the Cape Cod Times reported. The owl was rescued by New Bedford Animal Control and has a broken wing and a damaged joint. A veterinarian at the center said the
bird was likely hit by a car. The owl is otherwise
healthy and has been eating on its own but will
need another month to heal, and more time to
fly properly. When the owl is healthy enough for
release, the center will work with state officials to
find the best possible site as far north as possible
to give him a “nice, clear shot home,” Zak Mertz,
executive director of the wildlife center., told the
Times. Snowy owls spend summers hunting
north of the Arctic Circle. (AP)
F R E E P O RT, M A I N E
State’s oldest resident,
born in 1906, dies
Dorris Farrar, Maine’s oldest person, has died at
111. Farrar was born in 1906, the same year of the
great San Francisco earthquake and of President
Theodore Roosevelt being awarded the Nobel
Prize for helping end the Russo-Japanese war. An
official at the Hawthorne House in Freeport said
she died Monday. The Bar Harbor native had said
that sass was her key to a long life. Her advice:
‘‘Take pride in it, and holler, and whistle.’’ (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
31
The number of Massachusetts families living in motels or hotels at state expense. At the beginning of
2015, that figure stood at 1,500. The state’s highest court on Tuesday weighed whether the Baker
administration has gone too far in its efforts to reduce those numbers.
R DOUBLE FATAL Two people were killed in
car crash on Plain Street in Stoughton just before 5 p.m.Tuesday, according to the Norfolk
district attorney’s office. The victims’ identities
were not released, pending notification of kin,
said David Traub, a spokesman for the DA’s office. The crash closed several roads. Spokesmen
for Stoughton fire and police were not available
for comment. The crash remains under investigation by Stoughton and State Police.
R EMBEZZLEMENT CHARGE A 66-year-old
Westport woman who had power of attorney
over 80-year-old Cecile Fairhurst stole more
than $100,000 from the stroke victim and let
her die of neglect, prosecutors contend. The accused embezzler, Charlotte Medeiros, allegedly
transferred the purloined funds to her son, Clifford Medeiros, 47, and his wife, Kristin Medeiros, 43, according to the Bristol district attorney’s office. Charlotte Medeiros and her son
and daughter-in-law were arraigned last week
in Bristol Superior Court on charges related to
Fairhurst’s death in January 2017, prosecutors
said in a statement. None of the defendants
could immediately be reached for comment.
Charlotte Medeiros is charged with involuntary
manslaughter, neglect of an elderly person,
trustee embezzlement, and larceny over $250,
prosecutors said. Her son and his spouse are
both charged with receiving stolen property
and larceny over $250, the statement said. The
trio pleaded not guilty. They’re due back in
court May 29.
R STABBING DEATH A man in his 50s was
stabbed to death after an argument on a South
End street on Tuesday afternoon, Boston police
said. Commissioner William B. Evans said the
man was found about 12:07 p.m. at the corner
of Southampton and Atkinson streets, suffering
from a stab wound to the leg. Evans said the victim suffered a wound to a main artery. He was
pronounced dead at Boston Medical Center. Police said an officer on a walking beat gave first
aid before the victim was put into an ambu-
lance. The stabbing occurred across the street
from Boston Fire Department headquarters. A
witness, who would not give his name because
he feared for his safety, said a man chased the
victim around the corner from a shelter, stabbed
him several times, and fled on a scooter.
R HATE SYMBOL A swastika was discovered
near an entrance to Needham High School early
Tuesday and the school’s principal denounced
the “hateful act” in a letter sent to parents after
the third time racist symbols or words were discovered this school year. Principal Aaron Sicotte, in the letter to parents, wrote that the
symbol of Nazi Germany was found “near the
door entering our lobby” from Admiral Gracey
Drive. He wrote that the person who left the
symbol of anti-Semitism acted between late
Monday night and early Tuesday. “We do not
know the exact time or who was involved,’’ he
wrote. “I know you share my disgust at the offensive and hateful act.” He said Needham police have been notified.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
Judge says Homeland Security broke own detention policy
Lawyers agree to
release woman
By Maria Cramer
GLOBE STAFF
Immigration officials Tuesday agreed to release a Brazilian woman from custody after a
federal judge accused the Department of Homeland Security
of breaking its own policies on
detained immigrants facing deportation.
A lawyer for the government
told Judge Mark Wolf that US
Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials had agreed
to release Lucimar de Souza,
who had been held in jail since
Jan. 30.
During a three-hour hearing
in Boston’s US District Court
Tuesday, Wolf sharply criticized
immigration officials for detaining de Souza, the Everett
mother of an 11-year-old boy,
for so long, then telling her she
would remain in jail even
though they had not given her
or her lawyer time to contest
her detention.
Under federal regulations,
immigrants who have been arrested and detained for living in
the country illegally must be
given 30 days’ notice that their
case is up for review. De Souza
was given less than a week’s notice, Wolf said.
“Let me just take a deep
breath,” Wolf said. “This is a
profoundly human thing where
people are being separated
from their spouses and their
children . . . these are people
who disobeyed the law by coming to the United States illegall y, b u t t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f
Homeland Security . . . violated
the law by not following their
own regulations.”
After a lunch break, Mary
Larakers, a lawyer for the Department of Justice’s Office of
Immigration Litigation, told
Wolf that ICE would release de
Souza that night.
De Souza, who had been
brought into the courtroom in
handcuffs along with two men
detained by ICE, beamed at her
lawyer, Adriana Lafaille, after
the hearing.
Wolf noted that it was the
fourth time in a year ICE had
decided to release an immigrant it had detained after he
questioned the agency’s decision-making.
“I’m concerned about the
people who don’t get their cases
into federal court,” Wolf said. “I
would have thought that the
Department of Homeland Security would be the most likely to
fastidiously follow the requirements of the law . . . that causes
me concern about whether
they’re ignoring them in every
other case.”
Wolf ordered the government to provide the names of
immigration officials involved
in the decisions around the detentions and said they may
have to provide testimony as
soon as next week.
Officials say ICE is allowed
by law to hold any immigrant
with a removal order. The immigrants in the case were all ordered to be removed from the
country years ago.
Lawyers representing the
Department of Justice have argued that ICE can keep people
with removal orders in custody
for 90 days. Lawyers for the immigrants said their clients were
wrongly detained because the
90-day detention limit begins
from the date of the original removal order.
Ralph Junqueira, the father of
two boys in Connecticut who is
married to an American woman. Both immigrants had already been held for 90 days
when they were told they would
remain in custody, even though
their lawyers were not given
proper notice to prepare for
their cases to be reviewed.
The wife of Junqueira, in
custody since February, had
been told her husband would
be released last week. But when
she drove four hours to Massachusetts to meet him, she was
told he would remain in jail.
Larakers said she could not
explain why Junqueira’s wife
was given contradictory information. Wolf said he expected
he would be released by the
weekend.
John Mohan, a spokesman
for ICE, declined to comment
on the case because it involves
pending litigation. “However,
lack of comment should not be
construed as agreement with or
stipulation to any of the allegations,” Mohan said.
The case stems from complaints by at least a half dozen
people who were detained by
immigration officials when
they showed up at government
offices for interviews meant to
determine the validity of their
marriages to Americans.
Lawyers for the American
Civil Liberties Union have
asked Wolf to set limits on arresting people who are trying to
gain lawful status through their
American spouses.
Wolf said he was particularly troubled to hear about de
Souza and another Brazilian
immigrant in the case, Eduardo
Maria Cramer can be reached
at mcramer@globe.com.
Court may toss 11,000 more drug cases
By Shawn Musgrave
GLOBE STAFF
The Massachusetts Supreme
Judicial Cour t on Tuesday
heard arguments over dismissing up to 11,000 more cases
connected to the Amherst drug
lab and potential punishments
in the mishandling of the drug
lab case, including the possibility of substantial fines for the attorney general’s office.
“This is the most significant
record of harm as a consequence of prosecutorial misconduct that this court has ever
seen,” said Matt Segal, legal director for the American Civil
Liberties Union of Massachusetts.
Chief Justice Ralph D. Gants,
who called the Amherst drug lab
scandal “a nightmare,” grilled
prosecutors on whether his
court should take drastic steps
to ensure misconduct of this
magnitude ne ver happens
again.
The court expressed particular concern over how prosecutors investigated Sonja Farak,
the former Amherst lab chemist
arrested in January 2013 for
stealing from the evidence locker. Gants said prosecutors
working under former attorney
general Martha Coakley
showed a problematic “lack of
curiosity” about the scope of
Farak’s crimes, and suggested
prosecutors “put blinders on”
despite having evidence Farak
used drugs for more than a year
prior to her arrest.
Two state prosecutors —
Anne Kaczmarek and Kris Foster, both of whom now work in
other government agencies —
hid that evidence. And when defense attorneys unearthed it,
prosecutors failed to flag the evidence for courts, including the
SJC.
“In retrospect, we could
have done things better,” Assistant Attorney General Thomas
Bocian conceded.
The state’s 11 district attorneys have already agreed to dismiss more than 8,000 cases in
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2013
Former Amherst lab
chemist Sonja Farak.
which Farak analyzed samples
of suspected narcotics during
her nine years at the Amherst
lab.
But defense advocates want
the court to dismiss every case
that passed through the Amherst lab during Farak’s tenure.
Because Farak confessed to
stealing from other chemists’
samples and tampering with
the lab’s evidence tracking systems, public defender Rebecca
Jacobstein of the Committee for
Public Counsel Services argued
the court must presume she
tainted additional cases. But
because prosecutors didn’t test
samples again, there’s no way of
telling which samples Farak
tampered with and which she
didn’t, Jacobstein said.
Prosecutors disagree on
whether the court should toss
more cases. The district attorneys said the court should consider only cases in which Farak
conducted the analysis herself,
while Healey’s office proposed
dismissing all Amherst lab cases
back to June 2012.
The attorney general’s office
suggested this time period
based on Farak’s testimony that
she only started taking from coworkers’ samples in summer
2012, Bocian told the court.
Her labmates noticed declines
in her productivity and appearance during this six-month period, according to grand jury
testimony.
Some of the justices seemed
skeptical of what Justice David
A. Lowy called the “magic date”
of June 2012.
Berkshire County Assistant
District Attorney Joseph Pieropan, speaking on behalf of all
the district attorneys, pointed
to previous findings by a judge
that Farak’s colleagues’ analysis
should still be considered reliable. Pieropan also argued
there was no evidence Farak
falsely reported that samples
contained narcotics, unlike former Hinton lab chemist Annie
Dookhan.
“With Farak, we have questions about her reliability because of the nature of her addiction and, more importantly, because of the fact she was under
the influence while testing,”
Pieropan said. “But nonetheless
she was never motivated to
turn negatives into positives.”
Segal asked the court to impose monetary sanctions on the
attorney general’s office as a deterrent against future prosecutorial misconduct. Prosecutors
said fines against the state were
both unprecedented and unnecessary.
The referral of Kaczmarek
and Foster to the state bar is adequate deterrent, Bocian said.
Beyond possible disbarment,
Pieropan said indictment could
be appropriate for prosecutors
who intentionally withhold evidence.
Gants said he had a “real dilemma” in considering not only
whether to order sanctions, but
if so, how steep.
“If we impose a sanction
which you say is commensurate
with the extent of the harm, it’s
a very large sanction,” Gants
told Segal. “If we do one which
is purely symbolic, which is relatively small, are we viewed as
understating the significance of
the problem?”
“MEREDITH IS HILARIOUS,
SMART, AND—
AS YOU WILL LEARN—
GIVES EXCELLENT ADVICE
WITHOUT JUDGMENT.”
—ALYSSA MASTROMONACO, New York Times bestselling author of
Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?
Shawn Musgrave
can be reached at
shawnmusgrave@gmail.com.
Reporting for this story was
supported by the Fund for
Investigative Journalism.
“HILARIOUS AND
HEARTWARMING.”
—FAITH SALIE,
author of Approval Junkie
SJC to rule on using motels for homeless
uHOMELESS
Continued from Page B1
ter beds far away from their
medical providers when there
is a motel room closer; about
balancing the expansion of a
$180 million entitlement program with easing the life of a
sick child; and about whether
Baker will fulfill his pledge,
made before he took office, to
reduce the number of families
in motels to zero by the end of
his term.
The class-action plaintiffs
argued that a Superior Court
judge was correct to issue the
preliminary injunction mandating that homeless families
with a recognized disability be
placed in a motel by the state if
no shelter that would accommodate them is available.
Represented by Greater Boston Legal Ser vices and the
American Civil Liberties Union
of Massachusetts, the plaintiffs
pointed to several instances in
which they say disabled kids
needlessly suffered because the
state didn’t want to put their
family in a motel that could accommodate their needs — being closer to their medical providers at Boston Children’s Hospital, for instance.
And, they say, an autistic
child or a person with a mental
health issue might have their
conditions exacerbated by a
crowded, chaotic shelter with
shared common spaces, whereas a motel might be a more suitable fit for their disabilities.
But the Department of
Housing and Community Development made the case in filings that the law does not require the state to expand the
scope of the program “to a more
amorphous entitlement to cure
a broader set of ills associated
with homelessness.” Its statutory obligation is to place families
in motels if every shelter bed is
full, not if a motel would better
accommodate or be more convenient for the disabled family,
it argues.
The government says that
the housing department works
hard to accommodate every disabled family’s needs, addressing many requests immediately
and triaging others — like being
close to a doctor — because of
limited resources in the Emergency Assistance program.
“The core part of the problem, unfortunately for some of
these families, is that it is not
the role of the EA program to
facilitate access to a medical
provider in a specific location,”
A disarmingly honest
memoir about giving
advice when you’re
not sure what you’re
doing yourself.
said Assistant Attorney General
Samuel Furgang, who represents the housing department.
A state appeals court stayed
the lower court injunction in
December, meaning the administration hasn’t had to follow it
since then.
Bourquin asked the high
court to put it back in place.
“Time presses even more
sharply on families struggling
not only with destitution and
homelessness, but the extra
burdens that disabilities bring,”
she said.
But the housing department
says if the court does, it is likely
to mean more than 180 families
would have to be moved from
shelters to motels, with the additional expense exceeding $8
million per year.
On Tuesday night, in addition to the families in motels,
there were 3,445 families in
shelters at state expense.
Massachusetts is the only
right-to-shelter state: When
poor families can show they are
homeless for an eligible reason
like domestic violence or nofault eviction, the state is mandated to provide housing.
Joshua Miller can be reached at
joshua.miller@globe.com.
Photo credit: Alex Teng
Available in
hardcover, ebook,
large print,
and audio, read by
the author
LoveLettersBook.com
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G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
OUT OF THE BLUE
A sailboat plied
through early morning
fog off Cape Cod
Tuesday.
Gun law that
can work
Former inmate cleared of 1983 rape charge
uRAMOS
Continued from Page B1
Continued from Page B1
The result is that misconceptions about suicide abound.
For one thing, studies show
that most people who attempt
suicide and survive do not
eventually take their own lives
— so the notion that people
seeking to kill themselves will
find a way regardless of access
to a gun isn’t based in fact.
But firearms are by far the
most common method by
which people take their own
lives, and the most lethal.
Those who attempt to take
their own lives with a gun are
less likely to survive. Their
chance at recovery is gone.
“There are lots of people
who try once and never try
again,” said Shafer-Reed. “You
can literally save thousands of
lives if people who want to
commit suicide don’t have access to a firearm.”
The hard truth is that we
may not be able to stop the next
shooter firing into a crowd, or
save the people who will be
killed at random. But we might
be able to save someone like Joseph.
Nestor Ramos can be reached at
nestor.ramos@globe.com.
uO'LOUGHLIN
scribed being beaten and
threatened during a four-year
stint in state prison, considered a “child molester” by inmates and guards, and a lifetime trying to escape the
shame of his conviction.
Despite the $5 million verdict, O’Loughlin will be getting
far less. In April, Governor
Charlie Baker increased the
maximum compensation a
plaintiff can win from
$500,000 to $1 million and
added attorneys fees, but it is
unclear whether the changes
are retroactive.
O’Loughlin is only the second person since the erroneous-conviction law was passed
to win a judgment after a jury
trial, state officials say.
The amendments to the
2004 law were added after defense attorneys and former inmates complained it set an unreasonably high bar to get
compensation, forcing many
plaintiffs to settle rather than
fight a timely and costly legal
battle. As of last fall, 67 people
had filed for compensation
and less than half had received
any money, according to state
data.
The Office of the Attorney
General, which represented
the state in this case, has argued that O’Loughlin’s suit
was “moot” because he recently received a $900,000 settlem e n t f r o m t h e To w n o f
Framingham for its role in his
‘The attorney
general’s office has
been so hostile to
these cases that it
was important to
get a verdict.’
MICHAEL KENDALL,
Kevin O’Loughlin’s attorney, on
the difficulty of getting his
wrongful conviction overturned
c o nv i c t i o n , c o u r t r e c o r d s
show.
O’Loughlin’s attorney, Michael Kendall, criticized the attorney general’s office for aggressively fighting O’Loughlin’s case, despite findings
from prosecutors that they
may have gotten the wrong
man.
“The attorney general’s office has been so hos tile to
these cases that it was impor-
tant to get a verdict and impor tant to ge t a judgment
from a jury,’’ he said Tuesday
after the ruling.
Emily Snyder, a spokeswoman for Attorney General
Maura Healey, said in a statement that wrongful conviction
cases are among the most difficult matters the office handles.
“For 35 years, the survivor
has never wavered in her identification of Mr. O’Loughlin,
and she showed great courage
in testifying,” Snyder said. “We
respect the jury’s decision.”
O’Loughlin’s case was first
detailed in a 2016 story by the
New England Center for Investigative Reporting in The Boston Globe. His conviction was
vacated after a Framingham
police detective, now retired,
found evidence several years
ago that another man with a
history of sexual offenses who
looked like O’Loughlin may
have committed the crime.
The detective, Kevin Slattery, took his findings to the
Middlesex district attorney’s
office, who reopened the case.
They had found evidence
pointing to another suspect
they described as bearing “a
striking facial resemblance” to
O’Loughlin and who told Slattery in an interview that he
Waitress at a Chelsea restaurant slashed after unpaid bill
By John R. Ellement
and Emily Sweeney
the time of the assault and was
heading out on foot to go to a
party when he was stopped by
police. His attorney Kendall
argued that Slattery and the
Middlesex district attorney’s
office supported O’Loughlin’s
quest to reopen his case after a
deep-dive investigation, coming to the conclusion they may
have erred. “Is that tunnel vision or is that integrity?” he
asked.
On Tuesday, O’Loughlin
said he can hardly imagine a
life without worrying about a
knock on the door or a phone
call reminding him of his past.
He said he was sorry the victim had to explain her ordeal
again and that, he believes,
she wasn’t given the correct information about what really
happened.
“I don’t know what tomorrow is going to be like,’’ he
said. “I’m going to fully embrace a life of not being a convicted sex offender.”
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A waitress at a Chelsea restaurant was slashed in the neck
Monday night when she chased
a patron who failed to pay his
bill outside the restaurant and
confronted him at his car, according to the city’s police chief.
The woman, who is in her
30s, was working at Las Pupusas Del Chino restaurant on
Washington Avenue around 11
p.m. when the incident took
place, Chief Brian Kyes wrote in
a n e - m a i l . “A m a l e p a r t y
skipped out on his bill and she
chased him outside,’’ he wrote.
The waitress confronted the
man as he was entering his vehicle, Kyes wrote. “He subsequently pulled out a knife and
sliced her in the neck and right
hand,” he wrote.
Restaurant manager Gilberto Ramos said it was a slow
night, typical for a Monday. “It
was pretty calm,” he said. There
were a handful of customers in
the place, which was about to
close. Ramos was making his
usual rounds, when someone
told him one of the waitresses
had gone outside to chase down
a customer who hadn’t paid.
Ramos went outside to see
what was going on, and saw the
waitress confronting the man
in the driver’s seat. “When I got
out, it was already an argu-
was “99 percent sure” he had
committed the crime.
The man, identified in
court as Jeffrey Bartley, is currently incarcerated on other
charges. Bartley was convicted
of rape in 1985, of open and
gross lewdness in 1980 and
1981, and of charges related to
child pornography in 2012, according to the Sex Offender
Registry Board.
During closing arguments
on Monday, Assistant Attorney
General Joshua Jacobson said
that Slattery suffered from
“tunnel vision,’’ choosing to
consider only evidence that
would fit his hypothesis that
O’Loughlin had been misidentified.
The victim was still sure
who raped her, Jacobson said.
He described how the victim
identified O’Loughlin after police found him walking on the
side of the road after the rape.
She said she wasn’t sure
about who he was by his looks
but was convinced after asking
police to have him speak.
“What he said was so horrible and memorable,’’ Jacobson
said, that she “immediately
knew that was the voice of the
man who raped her.”
O’Loughlin had insisted he
was at home with his sister at
Customer service
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customerservice@globe.com
The New England Center for
Investigative Reporting is a
nonprofit news center based
out of Boston University and
WGBH public radio. McKim
can be reached at
jenifer.mckim@necir.org or on
Twitter @jbmckim
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Gilberto Ramos, the manager of Las Pupusas Del Chino, said the restaurant was about to
close at the time of the incident.
ment,” he said. The driver’s
door was wide open, and the
driver suddenly put the vehicle
in reverse. Then he “rapidly put
it in forward and took off,” with
the waitress in the vehicle, Ramos said.
Ramos ran back inside the
restaurant, wrote down the license plate number, and called
police. Ramos said at that point
“all kinds of things” were going
through his mind, and he
feared the worst.
T he waitress was found
about two blocks away, at the
intersection of Blossom and
Spruce streets, he said.
Ramos said he spoke with
the waitress this morning.
“She’s back home,” he said.
“She’s got a nasty cut on her
neck.” She sounded “a little bit
tired” but didn’t sound upset,
he said.
The woman was rushed to
Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston where she was
treated and released. “She is doing OK, all things considered,’’
Kyes said.
Kyes said police are looking
for a dark-colored SUV with
Colorado plates.
John R. Ellement can be
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ellement@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.
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W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
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B5
Carman’s lawyer pushes back on boat insurer’s questions
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
A lawyer for Nathan Carman, the Vermont man at the
center of separate probes into
the murder of his grandfather
and the disappearance of his
mother, on Monday continued
to resist efforts by the insurer of
Carman’s sunken boat to question him about his grandfather’s slaying.
David F. Anderson, an attorney for Carman, went to bat for
him in a legal filing in US District Court in Providence. The
insurer of Carman’s boat, which
sank in September 2016 with
Carman and his mother on
board, is suing Carman in
Rhode Island in an effort to
quash his insurance claim on
the vessel.
The insurer wants Nathan
Carman to answer
questions about the death
of his grandfather in 2013.
Anderson argued Monday
that the insurer hasn’t established a connection between
the death of Carman’s grandfather and presumed death of his
mother to warrant questioning
about the former.
“Despite an opportunity to
do so . . . nowhere within any of
these pleadings do the Plaintiffs
allege that Mr. Carman sank his
boat with the intent to murder
his Mother or that the death of
his mother is in anyway related
to the murder of Mr. Carman’s
grandfather years ago,” Anderson wrote in Monday’s filing.
The document was a memorandum in support of Carman’s
previously filed objection to
Judge Patricia A. Sullivan’s
March ruling in the lawsuit.
She had ordered Carman to
answer the insurer’s questions
about his ownership of a firearm associated with his grandfather’s slaying; whether he was
the last person to see his grandfather alive; questions related
Judge Paul J. McManus, at 59
uMCMANUS
Continued from Page B1
undocumented immigrants.
After graduating from law
school, Judge McManus taught
for about a year in the Worcester schools.
“He liked being with kids,”
his brother said. “He liked
helping them make the right
choices in their lives.”
Sarah Bagley, Judge McManus’s oldest niece, recalled
the time her uncle took her to
the courthouse when she was a
young girl, knowing she was
interested in the law. A judge
invited her to sit on the bench,
and Judge McManus delighted
in the sight of her presiding
over the courtroom.
“ To me it embodies how
things with him were always
f u n n y a n d l i g h t h e a r t e d ,”
Bagley said.
“But he was totally thinking
of me and giving me this experience of showing me what life
in law could be like.”
After teaching, Judge McManus joined the public defenders office, where he
worked for 25 years in the
Worcester, Framingham, and
Boston offices.
Judge McManus fought vig-
orously to ensure his clients
had a fair chance with juries,
even if that meant rubbing cigarette ashes on his forehead,
relatives recalled.
One year on Ash Wednesday, Judge McManus noticed
that the prosecutor had ashes
on his forehead, Ryan recalled.
Concerned that such a show of
religion, particularly Catholicism, could sway a Boston jury,
Judge McManus objected, but
was overruled.
In r e s p o n s e , Ju d ge Mc Ma n u s s t e p p e d o u t o f t h e
courtroom and found an ashtray.
“He was very resourceful,
and he really advocated for his
clients,” Ryan said.
Becoming a judge was the
c u l m i n at i o n o f Ju d ge Mc Manus’s career, his brother
said.
Outside the courtroom,
Judge McManus ran in the
Boston Marathon just to say he
did, hiked portions of the App a l a c h i a n Tra i l , a n d o n c e
drove from Boston to Cape Cod
to fix a flat tire for his wife,
Elizabeth, whom his family repeatedly warned him “not to
lose.”
“There was something that
seemed kind of destined about
their match,” Ryan said. “They
both had a real idealism and a
sense of mission and compassion. They just seemed made
for one another.”
After being diagnosed with
m e s o t h el i o ma , Ju d ge Mc Manus underwent experimental clinical trials, chemotherapy, and surgery. He was able to
return to the bench last year,
but after Christmas felt himself slowing down.
This time, the treatments
failed.
“Paul was a gift taken a little bit too soon,” Bagley said.
“A total joy.”
In addition to his wife, Elizabeth, Judge McManus leaves
two sons, Bobby of Fargo, N.D.,
and Jack of New York City; a
sister, Mary Bagley of Worcester; and two brothers, Richard
of Potomac, Md., and James of
Southborough.
A funeral Mass will be said
at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. Paul
Church in Wellesley.
The burial will be private.
Aimee Ortiz can be reached at
aimee.ortiz@globe.com.
Follow her on twitter
@aimee_ortiz.
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
OUTPOURING OF ANGER — University of Massachusetts Boston students, faculty,
and staff walked out on Tuesday afternoon to protest the acquisition of Mount Ida
College by UMass Amherst, as a $32.9 million deficit continues to plague the
Dorchester campus. The noontime rally drew about 100 people.
Trooper’s arraignment continued
He could be sent
to vets program
By Danny McDonald
GLOBE STAFF
A judge continued the arraignment for the off-duty state
trooper charged with drunken
driving in Lynnfield over the
weekend to next month while
the trooper is evaluated for a
program designed to help veterans, according to the Essex
district attorney’s office.
Alfred G. Burgos, 35, faces
charges of operating under the
influence of liquor, negligent
operation of a motor vehicle,
and committing a marked
lanes violation.
Burgos’s arraignment was
scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, but a judge continued it
to June 20 so that he can be
evaluated for the state’s Valor
Act diversion program, according to the district attorney’s of-
fice.
The Valor Act gives judges
the discretion to send veterans
accused of criminal charges to
rehabilitation or counseling
programs, among other measures intended to support veterans.
Under the act, a judge can
opt to divert defendants to a
program instead of arraigning
them on charges, according to
the district attorney’s office. In
order to be eligible, the defendant must have military service, no prior record, and no
outstanding cases or warrants,
according to prosecutors.
State Police stopped Burgos
in the Goodwin Circle rotary
around 11:40 Saturday night,
after they received reports
about his white SUV being driven erratically on Interstate 95.
Troopers “observed several
alleged indicators of impairment” in Burgos, who was arrested and taken to the State
Police barracks in Danvers,
where he was booked, according to a statement from that
agency.
According to Burgos’s driving record provided by the
Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles, Burgos refused a
breath test Saturday night, resulting in his license being suspended until Nov. 1.
Burgos, according to authorities, was immediately relieved of duty until State Police
can conduct a duty status hearing.
Messages left with Burgos’s
attorney were not immediately
returned Tuesday evening.
Stephanie Ebbert of Globe staff
and Globe correspondent
Laney Ruckstuhl contributed to
this report. Danny McDonald
can be reached at
daniel.mcdonald@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@Danny__McDonald.
to a 2014 search warrant in the
murder investigation; and
questions about a Coast Guard
document quoting a relative
who told authorities after Carman’s boat sank that she believes he killed his grandfather
and then “may have killed his
mother” so “he can have the [$5
million] home to be left to her.”
On Monday, Anderson wrote
that Sullivan’s order is “inconsistent with the transcript of
the deposition of Mr. Carman”
and “relies upon information
outside of the court record (media & internet) and unsupported factual claims” that aren’t
supported in the record.
The filing was the latest salvo in a legal saga spanning lawsuits in Rhode Island and New
Hampshire, where Carman’s
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& more
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LEGAL NOTICES
Notice of Petition for
Termination of Parental
Rights G.L. c. 210 § 3
Docket No. NO18A0021CW
Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court
Norfolk Probate and Family
Court, 35 Shawmut Road,
Canton, MA 02021 (781)
830-1200 In the matter of:
Lilly Sophia McMenamin
To:
any unknown or unamed father, parent(s) of
the above named child.
*A putative father will not
have standing as a party
to this case without a voluntary acknowledgment of
parentage or an adjudication of paternity. A petition
has been presented to said
court by Bethany Christian
Services of New England,
Franklin, MA 02038 representing that the parent(s)
of the child lack(s) current
ability, capacity, fitness and
readiness to assume parental responsibility for the
child; that the petitioner’s
plan for the child will serve
the child’s best interests;
and, requesting that this
Honorable Court enter a
decree under the provisions
of the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 210,
Section 3, that shall have
the effect of terminating
the rights of the person(s)
named herein to receive
notice of or to consent to
any legal proceeding affecting the custody, guardianship, adoption or other disposition of the child named
herein. IF YOU DESIRE TO
OBJECT THERETO, YOU OR
YOUR ATIORNEY MUST FILE
A WRITTEN APPEARANCE IN
SAID COURT AT: Canton ON
OR BEFORE TEN O’CLOCK IN
THE MORNING (10:00 AM)
ON: 06/06/2018. YOU ARE
ENTITLED TO THE APPOINTMENT OF AN ATTORNEY IF
YOU ARE AN INDIGENT PERSON. An indigent person is
defined by SJC RULE 3:10.
The definition includes but
is not limited to persons
receiving AFDC, EAEDC,
poverty related veteran’s
benefits,
food
stamps,
refugee resettlement benefits, medicaid, and SSI.
The Court will determine if
you are indigent. Contact
an Assistant Judicial Case
Manager/Adoptions Clerk of
the Court on or before the
date listed above to obtain
the necessary forms. WITNESS, Hon. John D. Casey,
First Justice of this Court.
Date: April 18,2018. Patrick
W. McDermott, Register of
Probate
Public Notice Language:
WirelessCo, L.P. dba Sprint
(SPRINT) proposes to upgrade equipment and antennas at the following
structures/buildings in Massachusetts: 2 Elmwood Ave
in Winchester, Middlesex
County (Job# 38180.01); 353
Great Rd in Stow, Middlesex
County (Job# 38180.02);
7 Concord Rd in Billerica,
Middlesex County (Job#
38180.03); 207 Main St in
Spencer, Worcester County
(Job# 38180.04); 18 Park St
in Belchertown, Hampshire
County (Job# 38180.05);
19 Steel Rd in Hopedale,
Worcester County (Job#
38180.06); 1 Hart St in Beverly, Essex County (Job#
38180.07); 414 Main St in
Wakefield, Middlesex County (Job# 38180.08); 1180
Main St in Holden, Worcester County (Job# 38180.09);
7 Pleasant St in Westford,
Middlesex County (Job#
38180.10); 11S Main St in
Natick, Middlesex County
(Job# 38180.12); 320 Main
St in Hyannis, Barnstable
County (Job# 38180.20);
362 Washington St in Boston, Suffolk County (Job#
38180.21); 50 Water St in
Williamstown,
Berkshire
County (Job# 38180.38); and
91 Esmond St in Dorchester,
Suffolk County (Job# 38737).
In accordance with the National Historic Preservation
Act of 1966 and the 2005
Nationwide Programmatic
Agreement, SPRINT is hereby notifying the public of
the proposed undertaking
and soliciting comments on
Historic Properties which
may be affected by the
proposed undertaking. If
you would like to provide
specific information regarding potential effects that
the proposed undertaking
might have to properties
that are listed on or eligible
for listing in the National
Register of Historic Places
and located within 1/2 mile
of the site, please submit
the comments (with project number) to: RAMAKER,
Contractor for SPRINT, 855
Community Dr, Sauk City, WI
53583 or via e-mail to history@ramaker.com within
30 days of this notice.
aunts are suing him in a separate case in an effort to block
him from collecting millions of
dollars from the estate of his
grandfather, John Chakalos.
Chakalos was found shot to
death in December 2013 inside
his Windsor, Conn., home.
Police have labeled Carman
a person of interest in the case,
but he hasn’t been charged
criminally and has repeatedly
denied any involvement in the
murder.
In the Rhode Island lawsuit,
lawyers for the insurer of Carman’s boat have alleged that he
made suspicious alterations to
the vessel before setting off
with his mother, Linda Carman, from Point Judith, R.I.,
for a fishing trip in September
2016.
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
By virtue of and in execution of the Power of Sale
contained in a certain mortgage given by Richard Gleicher
to Citicorp Mortgage, Inc., dated February 25, 1988 and recorded in Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 14517,
Page 169 (the “Mortgage”) of which mortgage Wilmington
Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a Christiana Trust, as trustee for Normandy Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2015-1 is the
present holder by assignment from CitiMortgage, Inc., (CitiMortgage, Inc. was formerly known as Citicorp Mortgage,
Inc.) to Christiana Trust, a Division of Wilmington Savings
Fund Society, FSB, as Trustee for Stanwich Mortgage Loan
Trust, Series 2012-14 dated December 13, 2012 recorded
in Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 50679, Page
294 and assignment from Christiana Trust, a Division of
Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, as Trustee for Stanwich Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2012-14 its successors
and assigns to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a
Christiana Trust, as trustee for Normandy Mortgage Loan
Trust, Series 2015-1 dated June 11, 2016 recorded in Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 56687, Page 185, for
breach of conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose
of foreclosing the same, the mortgaged premises located
at Unit E, of the 116 Commonwealth Condominium, 116
Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02116 will be sold at
a Public Auction at 1:00 PM on May 25, 2018, at the mortgaged premises, more particularly described below, all and
singular the premises described in said mortgage, to wit:
Condominium Unit Number E (“Unit”) in the Condominium
known as 116 Commonwealth Condominium, 116 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, established by Master Deed dated July 28, 1978,
recorded August 2, 1978, with Suffolk Registry of Deeds
Book 9081, Page 1 (“Master Deed”) in accordance with and
subject to the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws,
Chapter 183A, which Unit is shown on the Master Plans
filed simultaneously with the Master Deed with said Deeds
and the Unit Plan recorded with said Deeds Book 9083,
Page 590 and the verified statement of a Registered Architect in the form required by Massachusetts General Laws,
Chapter 183A, Sections 8 and 9 is affixed to said Master
Plans and Unit Plan.
Said Unit is conveyed together with:
1.
An undivided 24% interest in the common areas and
facilities of the Condominium attributable to the Unit as set
forth in the Master Deed and its undivided 24% interest in
the 116 Commonwealth Condominium Trust established by
Declaration of Trust dated July 28, 1978, recorded with said
Deeds Book 9081, Page 33.
2.
An easement for the exclusive use of parking space
Number 2 as shown on the Master Plans.
3.
An easement for the exclusive use of storage cubicle Number D on the ground floor of the Condominium as
shown on the Master Plans.
Said Unit is also conveyed together with and subject to all
other easements, rights, provisions and uses set forth or
referred to in the deed from Phaeton Corporation to Verdi
J. DiSesa and Susan C. Day dated August 4, 1978, and recorded with Suffolk Registry of Deeds Book 9083, Page 590.
For mortgagor’s title see deed recorded with the
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 12670, Page 93.
The premises will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes and other municipal assessments and liens, and
subject to prior liens or other enforceable encumbrances
of record entitled to precedence over this mortgage, and
subject to and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, reservations and conditions of record and subject to
all tenancies and/or rights of parties in possession.
Terms of the Sale: Cash, cashier’s or certified check in
the sum of $10,000.00 as a deposit must be shown at the
time and place of the sale in order to qualify as a bidder
(the mortgage holder and its designee(s) are exempt from
this requirement); high bidder to sign written Memorandum of Sale upon acceptance of bid; balance of purchase
price payable in cash or by certified check in thirty (30)
days from the date of the sale at the offices of mortgagee’s
attorney, Korde & Associates, P.C., 900 Chelmsford Street,
Suite 3102, Lowell, MA 01851 or such other time as may be
designated by mortgagee. The description for the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event
of a typographical error in this publication.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a Christiana
Trust, as trustee for Normandy Mortgage Loan Trust,
Series 2015-1
Korde & Associates, P.C.
900 Chelmsford Street
Suite 3102
Lowell, MA 01851
(978) 256-1500
Gleicher, Richard, 16-025662
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LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS – M.G.L. C. 30, sec. 39M
CONSTRUCTION ADVERTISEMENT OF
INVITATION FOR BIDS
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND RECREATION
251 CAUSEWAY STREET, SUITE 600,
BOSTON, MA 02114-2104
PHONE: 617-626-1250
FAX: 617-626-1449
www.mass.gov/dcr
Contract No.: P18-3243-C1A
Title:
Tolland State Forest,
Wastewater Improvements
Location:
410 Tolland Road, East Otis, MA
Sealed proposals submitted on a form furnished by the Department will be received until 11:00 AM on Wednesday,
June 6, 2018 at the Boston address above, and will be, at
that time and place, publicly opened and read.
“Individual sets of contract documents, in the form of Compact Discs (CDs), which include specifications, are available
at the Boston address above, free of charge. Other interested parties may also receive an informational copy of the
CD containing plans and specifications, free of charge. All
parties who wish to have the CDs shipped to them must
send a email to Carol.A.Bernardi@state.ma.us along with
providing a completed mailing label with the approved carrier account number for overnight mail service (i.e. – Federal Express) to the address above.
In the event that any addenda are issued throughout the
open period for this project, DCR will distribute these addenda via email to the email identified by the prospective
bidders to DCR at the time the CD of plans and specifications is issued. PLEASE NOTE: All bidders must confirm
receipt of any DCR email communication by sending a return email stating: “(name of bidder) confirms that we have
received Addendum # for Project No.
and Title
”. The email must show the name and
phone number of the bidder’s responsible contact person.
A pre-bidding conference for prospective bidders will be
held on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 at 10:00 AM at the
Tolland State Forest Headquarters, 410 Tolland Road,
East Otis, MA.
Project Scope: The construction of a new septic system
for the Tolland State Forest Campground, including new
19,000 gallon tank, 10,000 gallon tank, 14,000 gallon pump
chamber, and a pressure distribution soil absorption system; construction of a new Recreational Vehicle Sanitary
Dump Station; the installation of approximately 1,470 l.f.
of 6-inch PVC Force Main; upgrades to the existing wastewater Pump Station No. 1; installation of two new standby propane generators; demolition of the existing campground Wastewater Treatment Facility; and abandonment
of an existing drinking water supply well.
The estimated project cost is $1,250,000.00
The work is to be accomplished within 365 calendar days
of a notice to proceed. Liquidated damages in the amount
of $100.00 per day will be assessed if the work has not
been completed in accordance with the provisions of the
contract within the time specified (as extended by any authorized extension of time granted in accordance with the
contract provisions).
Bidders must be pre-qualified by the Massachusetts Dept.
of Transportation (Mass DOT) Highway Division in the Sewer
and Water category to bid on the above project. An award
will not be made to a Contractor who is not pre- qualified
by Mass DOT Highway Division prior to the opening of Proposals. In addition, the contractor will have five years of
experience in Septic System and Site Utility Construction.
The proposed contract includes a combined participation
goal of 10.4% of the bid price for minority-owned business enterprises and women-owned business enterprises.
Proposed MBE/WBE participation plans that include solely
MBE or solely WBE participation, or do not include a reasonable amount of participation by both MBE and WBE
firms to meet the combined goal, will not be considered
responsive.
The applicable local minority workforce utilization percentage is a minimum goal of 15.3%. The applicable local women workforce utilization percentage is a minimum goal of
6.9%.
The Commonwealth encourages the participation of Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprises (“SDVOBE”) on its construction projects. The Service-Disabled
Veteran-Owned Business Enterprise participation benchmark for this contract is 3.0%.
Each bid must be accompanied by a bid deposit, in the
form of a bid bond, cash, certified check, or a treasurer’s
or cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust
company, payable to the Department of Conservation and
Recreation in the amount of 5% of the bid.
NOTICE OF ACTIVITY AND USE LIMITATION
Each bid must be enclosed in a sealed envelope on which
the bidder’s return address, including the bidder’s name, is
listed, and be addressed as follows:
COMMERCIAL STREET PROPERTY
47-61 COMMERCIAL STREET
GLOUCESTER, MA 01930
RTNs 3-30901 AND 3-32005
John Clarkeson, Director of Contract Administration
and Procurement Department of Conservation & Recreation, 251 Causeway Street, 6th Floor, Boston, MA
02114
A release of oil and/or hazardous materials has occurred at
this location, which is a disposal site as defined by M.G.L.
c. 21E, § 2 and the Massachusetts Contingency Plan, 310
CMR 40.0000. On April 27th, 2018, Beauport Gloucester,
LLC recorded with the Southern Essex District Registry of
Deeds a NOTICE OF ACTIVITY AND USE LIMITATION on
the disposal site, pursuant to 310 CMR 40.1074.
The NOTICE OF ACTIVITY AND USE LIMITATION will limit
the following activities and uses on the portion of the property:
♦ Free standing single or two-family residence;
♦ Kindergarten, pre-school, elementary or secondary
school, or day care facilities for children as defined by 310
CMR 40.0006;
♦ Active recreational uses, such as athletic fields or
playgrounds involving more than casual contact with the
ground and which could reasonably be expected to result
in human exposure to Site soils;
♦ Use of Site soils from the Portion of the Property subject
to the AUL for cultivation of fruits and vegetables destined
for human consumption; and
♦ Use of the Portion of the Property subject to the AUL for
other activities and uses which, in the opinion of an LSP,
are reasonably likely to create a Significant Risk of harm to
health, safety, public welfare or the environment.
Any person interested in obtaining additional information
about the NOTICE OF ACTIVITY AND USE LIMITATION may
contact James Halliday, Beauport Gloucester, LLC, 221
North Beacon Street, Brighton, MA, 02135.
The NOTICE OF ACTIVITY AND USE LIMITATION and
the disposal site files can be can be can be viewed at
MassDEP website using Release Tracking Numbers (RTNs)
3-30901 AND 3-32005 at http://eeaonline.eea.state.ma.us/
DEP/SearchableSites or reviewed at MassDEP Northeast
Region, 205B Lowell Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts
01887, 978-694-3200.
INVITATION FOR BID
SCHOOL BUS PURCHASE
The Concord Public Schools
and Concord-Carlisle Regional School District (“School
System”) is seeking bids for
the purchase of four new
81+ Passenger Type D Front
Engine School Buses, for the
purpose of transporting students.
Bid specifications will be
available from the School
System, through email to
mmartel@concordps.o rg,
after 10:00 a.m. on Monday
May 7, 2018.
Sealed bids should be submitted in the format requested to the Concord Public
Schools and Concord-Carlisle
Regional School District, 120
Meriam Road, Concord, MA
01742, marked on the outside lower, left-hand corner
of the Bidder’s envelope “Bid:
School Bus Purchase” and
received no later than 10:00
a.m., Wednesday May 23,
2018, at which time bids will
be publicly opened and read.
No bid shall be accepted after this deadline.
Now place your
want ads
whenever you
want ads.
LEGAL NOTICES
The insurer alleges that Carman made the alterations, including removing trim tabs and
bulkhead halves from the vessel, “with the intention of sinking his boat.”
Nathan Carman was rescued
on a life raft a week after his
b o at s a n k, b u t h is m o t h e r
hasn’t been found. His boat is
still missing as well. Carman
has denied intentionally harming his mother.
With Linda Carman missing
and presumed dead, her share
of Chakalos’s $44 million estate
would eventually go to Nathan,
her only child.
The Concord Public Schools
and Concord-Carlisle Regional School District is exempt
from state sales tax and adheres to MGL Chapter 30B
bidding requirements.
The Concord Public Schools
and Concord-Carlisle Regional School District reserve the
right to waive any informality
in any or all bids or to reject
any or all bids, or any portion thereof, as may be in the
best interest of the School
System.
Prior to the issuance of a
contract or purchase order,
the School System reserves
the right to request any Bidder to submit appropriate
information regarding equipment covered in the bid
specifications.
MALDEN BOARD OF
APPEAL PUBLIC HEARING
The Malden Board of
Appeal will hold a public
hearing at the John and
Christina Markey Malden
Senior Community Center, 7 Washington Street,
Malden, at 6:30 P.M. on
Wednesday, May 16, 2018
on the petition of Kimngan
Nguyen-Vo, for a variance of Section 400.1.2.1,
Chapter 12, of the Revised
Ordinances of 1991 as
Amended of the City of Malden, dimensional controls
for a single family dwelling
namely, to construct a two
story addition violating setback requirements of single
family dwelling as per plans,
as the property known as
and numbered 20 Summit
Tr., Malden MA, and also
known by City Assessor’s
Parcel ID # 115-722-207.
Petition and plans are available for public review in
the office of the City Assessor, 3rd floor, 110 Pleasant
Street, Malden, MA
James O’Brien, Chair
Malden Board Of Appeal
The Malden Board of Appeal
will hold a public hearing
at the John and Christina
Markey Malden Senior Community Center, 7 Washington
Street, Malden, at 6:30 P.M.
on Wednesday, May 16, 2018
on the petition of John Matthews for a variance of section 400.1.2.2.1, Chapter 12,
of the Revised Ordinances
of 1991 as Amended of the
City of Malden, dimensional
controls for residential dwellings namely, to convert single
family to two family and violating the minimum lot size
requirement as per plans, at
the property known as and
numbered 1332 Eastern Avenue, Malden MA, and also
known by city Assessor’s
Parcel ID # 165-500-017.
Petition and plans are available for public review in the
office of the City Assessors,
110 Pleasant Street, 3rd floor,
Malden, MA.
SEALED BID/PROPOSAL ENCLOSED
Contract No.: P18-3243-C1A
Contract Title: Tolland State Forest, Wastewater
Improvements, 410 Tolland Road,
East Otis, MA
Bids are subject to the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 30, Sect.
39F, G, H and M inclusive. Wages are subject to minimum
wage rates as per M.G.L. Ch. 149, sections 26 to 27D inclusive. The Department reserves the right to waive any
informalities in or to reject any and all bids if it be in the
public interest to do so.
Leo P. Roy, Commissioner
Massachusetts Department of Conservation
and Recreation
SECTION 00030
BOSTON HOUSING AUTHORITY (BHA)
INVITATION FOR BID
The BHA invites sealed bids for Exterior Metal Stair-Pan
Replacements at Alice Taylor Development, BHA Job
No.: 1577-02, prepared by Boston Housing Authority,
52 Chauncy Street, Boston, MA. The work is estimated
at $150,000.00 and includes: replace exterior metal
stair-pans. Bids will be received and publicly opened at
the BHA’s Contract Office, 52 Chauncy Street, 6th fl, Boston, MA, 02111. Bids must be received by the general
bid opening: 6/1/18 @ 11:00 a.m. Bids must include: a
DCAM update statement, a Certificate in Miscellaneous
Metals & Ornamental Iron and a 5% bid deposit by a bid
bond, cash, certified, treasurer’s, or cashier’s check. The
successful bidder must furnish 100% Performance and
Payment Bonds. All bids are subject to MGL c. 149, Sections 44A-J. The minimum wage rates of the US Department of Labor apply. All general bids must follow the BHA’s
Provisions for Minority and Women Participation and Resident Employment. For complete data, see the Contract
Documents on 5/9/18 at the BHA for a refundable $50.00
(checks only) or mailed upon receipt of an additional nonrefundable $15.00 (checks only) payable to the BHA. This
deposit will be refunded for the set for each bidder upon
return of the set in good condition within thirty (30) calendar days after the opening of general bids. Otherwise,
the deposit shall become the property of the Boston Housing Authority. Additional sets may be purchased at the
same office for $50.00 (non refundable.) The site visit is on
5/17/18, 11:00 a.m., Alice Taylor Development Management Office, 260M Ruggles Street, Roxbury, MA. The
contact is Mauori Stavenson at 617-593-0390. The BHA
reserves the right to waive any informalities or to reject
any or all general bids in the public interest.
BOSTON HOUSING AUTHORITY
May 2018
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BARRA, Isabelle M. “Nonny”
BY CITY AND TOWN
ABINGTON
WISE, Richard A.
ACTON
CASS, Joan (Brodie)
ARLINGTON
CAPEN, Ruth M. (McClafferty)
ASHLAND
FRAZIER, Dawn L. (McCormick)
BASS RIVER
PHELAN, Rosemary E.
FETCHERO, James V.
MARIANI, Gisella (Nicolo)
McMANUS, Paul J.
TANNY, Travis Murtha
NORTH ANDOVER
CIANCIARUSO, Vincent A.
NORTH BILLERICA
SHDEED, George J.
BEVERLY
GILBRIDE, Mary L. (Susi)
TANNY, Travis Murtha
SOUZA, George W. “Georgie”, Jr.
NORTH READING
NORWOOD
BLACKSTONE
PITLER, Elaine (Zides)
MAINI, Anne Margaret (Welsh)
BOSTON
COULOPOULOS, Constance
DONOVAN, Jane F. (Graffam)
FLANNERY, Francis X.
GOODMAN, Louis James
HOLBROOK, G. Leland, Jr.
HURLEY, Rita (Marra)
JOHNSON, William P.
MAINI, Anne Margaret (Welsh)
McMANUS, Paul J.
PHELAN, Rosemary E.
RIPLEY, Mary E. (Donnelly)
PEDROLI, Marguerite L.
WIGGIN, Joan E.
PEABODY
DONOVAN, Jane F. (Graffam)
TOCCI, Ruth M. (Carnes)
PLAINVILLE
PECKHAM, Spencer Eugene
RANDOLPH
PITLER, Elaine (Zides)
BRAINTREE
BARRA, Isabelle M.
READING
BRIDGEWATER
REPPUCCI, Joseph C.
SOUZA, George W. “Georgie”, Jr.
SHDEED, George J.
BRIGHTON
TEMPESTA, Pompea (Leone)
REVERE
BROOKLINE
CASS, Joan (Brodie)
FLANNERY, Francis X.
HARSFIELD, Shirley Irene (Hoberman)
PITLER, Elaine (Zides)
BURLINGTON
BOUDROT, Edward T.
CAMBRIDGE
CAPEN, Ruth M. (McClafferty)
GOODMAN, Louis James
WASHBURN, Harold G.
CANTON
HARSFIELD, Shirley Irene (Hoberman)
CHESTNUT HILL
FLANNERY, Francis X.
COHASSET
FLANNERY, Francis X.
CONCORD
COOK, Kathleen G. (McGrory)
DEDHAM
MAINI, Anne Margaret (Welsh)
DORCHESTER
BRESNAHAN, Sallyann (Gallery)
NOLAN, Thomas J.
DOVER
MacKAY, Donald
WISE, Richard A.
EAST BOSTON
GILBRIDE, Mary L. (Susi)
EVERETT
GOODMAN, Louis James
TOCCI, Ruth M. (Carnes)
FALL RIVER
PHELAN, Rosemary E.
CIANCIARUSO, Vincent A.
ROSLINDALE
JOHNSON, William P.
ROXBURY
PEDROLI, Marguerite L.
STONEHAM
FRAZIER, Dawn L. (McCormick)
MARQUIS, Doris J. (Record)
STOUGHTON
RIPLEY, Mary E. (Donnelly)
TAUNTON
REPPUCCI, Joseph C.
TEWKSBURY
MARQUIS, Doris J. (Record)
TEMPESTA, Pompea (Leone)
UXBRIDGE
BRESNAHAN, Sallyann (Gallery)
WALPOLE
MAINI, Anne Margaret (Welsh)
PECKHAM, Spencer Eugene
BOUDROT, Edward T.
HURLEY, Rita (Marra)
BOUDROT, Edward T.
KELLY, Margaret V. (Durrigan)
FRAMINGHAM
FRAZIER, Dawn L. (McCormick)
HOLBROOK, G. Leland, Jr.
McCAFFREY, David A.
MOORE, Paul T.
PITLER, Elaine (Zides)
SULLIVAN, Joseph Richard
McCAFFREY, David A.
POISSON, Rene J.
WELLESLEY
FETCHERO, James V.
FRAZIER, Dawn L. (McCormick)
MacKAY, Donald
McMANUS, Paul J.
TANNY, Travis Murtha
WEST ROXBURY
HURLEY, Rita (Marra)
FLANNERY, Francis X.
JOHNSON, William P.
PEDROLI, Marguerite L.
WEST YARMOUTH
MARIANI, Gisella (Nicolo)
HUDSON
POISSON, Rene J.
WESTON
JAMAICA PLAIN
HURLEY, Rita (Marra)
JOHNSON, William P.
MacKAY, Donald
LINCOLN
COOK, Kathleen G. (McGrory)
MALDEN
DONOVAN, Jane F. (Graffam)
MANSFIELD
REPPUCCI, Joseph C.
RIPLEY, Mary E. (Donnelly)
SLATTERY, James F.
MARBLEHEAD
DONOVAN, Jane F. (Graffam)
MEDFIELD
FETCHERO, James V.
MEDFORD
BRESNAHAN, Sallyann (Gallery)
METHUEN
GRILLO, Carmela M.
MILLIS
POISSON, Rene J.
MISSION HILL
PEDROLI, Marguerite L.
NATICK
FRAZIER, Dawn L. (McCormick)
HOLBROOK, G. Leland, Jr.
MacKAY, Donald
POISSON, Rene J.
NEEDHAM
COPPINGER, Janice M. (Watson)
FETCHERO, James V.
MacKAY, Donald
TANNY, Travis Murtha
WISE, Richard A.
NEWBURYPORT
COLBY, Dorothy Lee (Curtis)
BERNARD, Francis X.
“Frank”
COPPINGER, Janice M. (Watson)
HOLBROOK
GOODMAN, Louis James
LEXINGTON
COOK, Kathleen G. (McGrory)
KELLY, Margaret V. (Durrigan)
TOCCI, Ruth M. (Carnes)
WISE, Richard A.
BRESNAHAN, Sallyann
“Sally” (Gallery)
WAYLAND
COPPINGER, Janice M. (Watson)
HUBBARDSTON
KELLY, Margaret V. (Durrigan)
CASS, Joan (Brodie)
POISSON, Rene J.
HINGHAM
HERZIG, Frederick J., Jr.
HOLLISTON
MOORE, Paul T.
TEMPESTA, Pompea (Leone)
Of Arlington, passed away peacefully at
her home on May 2nd, 2018, surrounded by her loving family. Beloved mother
of Lauren Murphy and her husband
Stan of Milford, ME, Douglas Capen of
Dunedin, FL, Jane Bliss of Pasadena,
CA, and the late Eileen M. Dean.
Cherished grandmother of Sarah Bliss
of CA, Andrea Witham and her husband Steven of NY, Billy Bliss of MA,
Drew Murphy and his wife Jen of ME,
Michael Dean of MA, Caitlyn Dean of
NY, and Daniel and Annaliese Capen of
FL. She is also survived by three greatgrandchildren. Former wife of the late
Walter Capen and longtime companion
of the late George Lucas. Devoted sister
of Mary Fitzpatrick of Lexington, James
McClafferty of Woburn, John McClafferty of Saugus, Gail Foley of Saugus,
Stephen McClafferty of Weymouth, and
the late Ellen Weiss, Paul McClafferty,
Janet Leonard, and Ann Kelly. Also survived by many loving nieces, nephews,
and great nieces and nephews. Her
Funeral Mass will be celebrated Saturday, May 12th in St. Agnes Church, 30
Medford Street, Arlington, at 10am.
Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers,
donations in her memory may be made
to CareGroup Parmenter Home Care
& Hospice, Inc., 1 Arsenal Market Pl.,
Watertown, MA 02472. For directions
or to send an online condolence visit
www.keefefuneralhome.com.
MARIANI, Gisella (Nicolo)
WATERTOWN
HAVERHILL
PITLER, Elaine (Zides)
RYAN, Sylvia M.
Of Belmont, passed away
peacefully on May 7, 2018
lovingly surrounded by his
five children. Born October 5, 1932, Ed
was the son of Edward N. and Mary A.
(Kenney) Boudrot. Raised in Cambridge, he graduated from Cambridge
Latin High School and enlisted in the
Air Force, serving in Germany. Ed was
predeceased by his loving wife Frances
(Pat) Connors Boudrot. Devoted father
of Sylvia Martin and husband James
of Reading; Patricia Ann Boudrot and
husband Harry Bedig of Watertown;
Suzette Rielly and husband Thomas
of Burlington; Christine Winn and
husband Robert of Waltham; and
son Edward Boudrot of Magnolia.
Proud grandfather of Lisa Gallini and
husband Michael; Patrick Bedig, Casey
Bedig, Patrick Rielly, Erin Rielly, Robert
Sullivan Winn, Alicia Winn, and Mary
Winn. Devoted great-grandfather of
Emily Gallini and Andrew Gallini.
Survived by sisters Jacqueline Buckley;
Annette Carroll and husband Robert;
and Richard Boudrot and wife Paulette.
Predeceased by sisters Mary Murphy
and Jean Cleary and brother Stephen
Boudrot. Caring brother-in-law of Dorothy Boulanger and husband William, as
well as uncle to many nieces and nephews. Devoted Patriots fan. A private service for extended family will be held at
10 a.m. on Friday, May 11, at Joyce Funeral Home, 245 Main Street, Waltham,
with burial following at Belmont
Cemetery. A Gathering for family and
friends at the Oakley Country Club in
Watertown will take place at 12:30pm
also on Friday. Memorial donations
may be made to the Juvenile Diabetes
Research Foundation, 60 Walnut Street,
Wellesley Hills, MA 02481.For complete
obituary and guestbook please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
KELLY, Margaret V. (Durrigan)
FOXBORO
SLATTERY, James F.
GLOUCESTER
BOUDROT, Edward T.
MARQUIS, Doris J. (Record)
Age 95, of Braintree, formerly of
Quincy, died Sunday, May 6 at Sunrise
Assisted Living in Braintree, peacefully
surrounded by the love, comfort and
care of her family and Hospice. Isabelle
was born during the Depression and
survived as did many of those hearty
people of that era. She married Gus
Barra during the mid 40’s and went on
to lead a wonderful and prosperous life.
Originally from Dorchester, they moved
to Quincy and spent the rest of their
lives there. She was blessed with two
daughters, Kathleen McAndrew, Denise
Barra and one son, William Barra and
his wife Eileen. She leaves behind
her only grandson, Mark Tolini, his
wife Elizabeth and her two wonderful,
great-grandchildren, Marissa and Kyle,
who were dearly loved. Isabelle loved
crocheting, painting, and just about
any kind of craft she could master. She
spent many years crocheting baby afghans for the Project Linus Foundation.
She volunteered for several years at a
preschool in Quincy and enjoyed being
around children. Her husband died
in 1982 and she stayed in her home
by herself until she turned 93. In her
North Quincy neighborhood she was
known as the pool lady and summers
kept her busy with children and friends
enjoying that pool. Although she did
not care for swimming she spent many
years tending to the pool, even when
she was in her early 90’s. Family wishes
to thank the many aides and managers
at Sunrise Assisted Living in Braintree
and her dedicated aide Marcia, who
has been with her for several years. A
Funeral Mass will be celebrated on
Friday in Sacred Heart Church, 386
Hancock St., Quincy at 10 AM. There
are no visiting hours. Interment will be
private. In lieu of flowers, expressions
of sympathy may be made in Isabelle’s
memory to Beth Israel Deaconess –
Milton Hospital, Milton, MA. See www.
Keohane.com or call 1-800-Keohane for
directions and online condolences.
PEDROLI, Marguerite L.
WALTHAM
FALMOUTH
HARSFIELD, Shirley Irene (Hoberman)
GEORGETOWN
RYAN, Sylvia M.
CIANCIARUSO, Vincent A.
CAPEN, Ruth M.
(McClafferty)
NEWTON
BELMONT
BOUDROT, Edward T.
COULOPOULOS, Constance
BRADFORD
RYAN, Sylvia M.
BOUDROT, Edward T.
FETCHERO, James V.
McMANUS, Paul J.
TANNY, Travis Murtha
WESTWOOD
WIGGIN, Joan E.
WILMINGTON
SHDEED, George J.
WINTHROP
ESPINOLA, Alvan A.
GILBRIDE, Mary L. (Susi)
TALLENT, Barbara Anne (Sullivan)
WOBURN
BERNARD, Francis X.
MARQUIS, Doris J. (Record)
WORCESTER
Of Woburn, May 7th.
Beloved husband of 65
years to Brenda E. (Beatty)
Bernard. Devoted father of Brenda E.
Bernard of North Andover, Monica A.
Dattilo, her husband Joseph of Woburn
and Andrea M. Bernard of Woburn.
Dear brother of Barbara Hamilton
of Woburn, John “Jackie” Bernard of
Billerica and the late Mary McGondel,
Ruth Lennon, and Elizabeth Borgeson.
Cherished grandfather of Amy Dattilo,
her husband Victor Pozzani, Anthony
Dattilo, his wife Erin Mahoney,
Michael Dattilo, and Kara Dattilo, her
companion Bronlette DaRosa. Loving
great-grandfather of Ivana and Thomas
Dattilo, as well as survived by many
loving nieces, nephews, cousins and
friends. A Funeral will be held from the
Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home, 263
Main Street, WOBURN, MA, Friday,
May 11th at 11 a.m., followed by his
Funeral Mass in St. Charles Church,
280 Main Street, Woburn at 12 noon.
Interment in Woodbrook Cemetery.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to call at the Funeral
Home, Thursday, May 10th from 3-7
p.m. Remembrances may be made in
Francis’ name to St. Charles School, 8
Myrtle St., Woburn, MA 01801 or to
the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation,
230 East Ohio St., Suite 304, Chicago,
IL 60611. For directions or to leave an
online condolence, please visit www.
lynch-cantillon.com or Facebook under
Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home.
Of Medford, formerly of Dorchester,
May 5. Beloved wife of the late Francis
X. “Jack” Bresnahan. Devoted mother
of Patricia Millington and her husband
Layne of Randolph, VT, formerly of
Medford, and the late Kevin Bresnahan. Loving grandmother of Erik and
Ryan Millington. Dear sister of Arthur
Gallery, Rosemary Sheeran and her
husband Jack of Uxbridge, and the late
Patrick Gallery. Also survived by many
loving nieces, nephews and friends. A
Funeral Mass will be celebrated in St.
Raphael Church, 512 High St., Medford, Friday, May 11 at 11 AM. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited
to attend and may visit with the family
in the Dello Russo Funeral Home, 306
Main St., MEDFORD 9:30-10:30 AM.
Services will conclude with burial at
Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford. In lieu
of flowers, contributions may be sent in
Sally’s name to Windrose; 857 Main St.,
Woburn 01801 or Ascend Hospice; 100
Locke Dr., Marlborough, MA 01752.
To leave a message of condolence visit
www.dellorusso.net.
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
Funeral Services
SWEENEY BROTHERS
HOME FOR
FUNERALS, INC.
Born July 18, 1924 in Brooklyn, New
York; passed away aged 93 on May 2,
2018 in Boston, Massachusetts.
Joan was the beloved wife of the late
George Cass. Joan is survived and will
be sorely missed by her daughter, Deborah Ashman and significant other William Ashman, and her son David Cass
and his wife Linda Cass. She also leaves
behind a loving extended family of 7
grandchildren, 4 great-grandchildren,
nieces, nephews and their children
including Peter and Karen Miller, Toni
Miller Dunleavy, and Stephen Miller.
An author, dancer and dance
teacher, Joan was a dance critic for
many years for the Boston Globe, Jewish Advocate and Boston Herald, and
her writings in the field include “Dance:
A Handbook for the Appreciation of the
Choreographic Experience” and “Dancing Through History”.
She also wrote “Another Beginning:
Through the Israeli Looking Glass”,
her memoir of the family’s emigration
to Israel which was used by the Israeli
government to encourage other American families to similarly make Aliya.
Since 2009 Joan lived at Hebrew
Senior Life’s independent living Danesh
residences at 100 Centre Street in
Brookline where, among other activities, she taught memoir writing, edited
the residents’ Journal, and acted in numerous in-house musical productions.
The family invites donations in
Joan’s name to Hebrew Senior Life/
Families and Friends of 100 Centre St.
( give.hebrewseniorlife.org/tribute –
designate the gift as “other”, and list
“F&F 100” ). There will be an open
memorial service at 100 Centre Street
in the Skyline Cafe on May 22, 2018 at
1:45 p.m.
Beloved father, husband, son and
brother, Vincent “Vinny” Cianciaruso,
45, passed away suddenly from a heart
attack, on Tuesday, May 1.
Vinny’s quick wit, and one-liners
brought smiles to all, whether a longtime friend, or a new acquaintance.
He was passionate about everything
in life; his buddies, the beach, family
vacations and youth sports where he
was a dedicated coach and enthusiastic
fan. Nothing rivaled the passion and
dedication for his family, which was his
entire world.
Vinny was from Revere, and attended Revere High School, and was
a graduate of Salem State College.
He resided in North Andover. He is
survived by his beloved wife Amy,
much adored children Alex and Abby
of North Andover; his parents, Vincent
and Pamela Cianciaruso of Revere;
his brother William and nephew TJ of
Revere, as well as many aunts, uncles,
cousins and numerous friends. He
was also the loving brother of the late
Trystan Cianciaruso.
His Funeral Mass will be held on
Wednesday, May 9 at 10 AM at St.
Michael’s Church, North Andover. In
lieu of flowers, donations in Vincent’s
Cianciaruso’s memory can be made to
Saint Michael’s School, 80 Maple Ave.,
North Andover, MA 01845 or to St.
John’s Prep, Memorial Gifts, 72 Spring
St., Danvers, MA 01923; to donate
online, visit
www.stjohnsprep.org/giving.
COLBY, Dorothy Lee
(Curtis)
85, died April 3, 2018 at High Pointe
Hospice House in Haverhill.
She was born in 1932 in Pittsfield,
NH to the late Albion A. Curtis and
Mildred (Hillsgrove) Curtis Adams.
Dorothy was first and foremost a
strong, Godly woman who loved her
Lord Jesus with all her heart and soul.
She was also a wonderful wife and
mother who deeply loved and was
fiercely protective of each one of her
family. She spent the first 17 years of
her marriage focusing only on her role
as a wife and mother, and in later years
held various roles as personal assistant
to a number of senior managers and
executives, retiring at the age of 60
after serving over 15 years in that role
at Gordon College in Wenham, MA.
She was married in 1952 to her
beloved husband, Kenneth Charles
Colby. They celebrated 65 wonderful
years together, and after retiring in
1992 they traveled extensively across
the United States, Canada, and to many
places around the world, with a trip to
the Holy Land and two caravan trips
to Alaska among their highlights. They
also attended a number of churches in
retirement, including Oxford Advent
Christian Church in Oxford, ME (where
they also served as Deacon and Deaconess); Byfield Parish Church in Byfield;
Advent Christian Church in Haverhill;
and the South Eliot Advent Christian
Church in Eliot, ME.
In addition to her husband, Dorothy
is survived by her children, Kenneth
Colby, Jr. (Cheryl) of Danvers; Cindy
Miller (Jim) of Byfield; Robert Colby of
Peabody; Thomas Colby of Burlington; a brother Robert Curtis (Judy) of
Leesburg, FL; five grandchildren, James
Miller, Catelyn Reed (Vincent), Robert
Colby, Casey Colby and Brenden Colby;
and three great-grandchildren, Caileigh, Vincent and Julia Reed. She was
preceded in death by her parents and
her brother Donald Curtis (Priscilla).
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are respectfully invited to attend Dorothy’s life celebration on Saturday, May
12, 2018 from 11:00AM until 1:00PM
at Byfield Parish Church, 132 Jackman
Street, Byfield. Contributions may be
made in her memory to the Alzheimer’s
Association, P.O. Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090-6011 or http://alz.org/
join_the_cause.asp Arrangements are
by the Kevin B. Comeau Funeral Home,
486 Main Street, HAVERHILL. Please
visit Comeau Funeral Home on Facebook or www.comeaufuneral.com.
One Independence Ave., Quincy
617-472-6344
McMANUS, Paul J.
Serving Quincy & The South Shore
OUT OF STATE
CONNECTICUT
COULOPOULOS, Constance
MAINE
CAPEN, Ruth M. (McClafferty)
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home
www.lynch-cantillon.com
781-933-0400
Announcements
SOUZA, George W. “Georgie”, Jr.
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
VERMONT
BRESNAHAN, Sallyann (Gallery)
OUT OF COUNTRY
ITALY
TEMPESTA, Pompea (Leone)
Honor your loved ones
Honor your loved ones with a photo in The Boston
Globe. Ask your funeral director for details.
HEAT & FROST
INSULATORS
UNION LOCAL 6
We regret to announce the death
of Brother Brother Roger Klinzing (retired) on May 5, 2018.
Visiting hours will be Thursday
May 10th, 4:00-6:00 PM at Lambert Funeral Home, 1799 Elm St,
Manchester, NH. A Funeral Mass
will be celebrated at 10:00 AM
on Friday in St. Pius Church, 575
Candia Rd, Manchester, NH.
Francis C. Boudrow, Bus. Mgr.
James R. Lister, Bus. Agent
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
Every life is a story
worth sharing
Share theirs in The Boston Globe
The Boston Globe’s new Featured Life offering
lets you honor your loved one with a professionally
written narrative about their life and achievements.
For more details, contact Boston
Globe Classifieds at 617-929-1500
or deathnotices@globe.com.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
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Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
COOK, Kathleen G. “Kay”
(McGrory)
Formerly of Concord, Lincoln, and
Lexington, May 7. Beloved wife of the
late Harry Cook. Mother of Elizabeth
Cugini and her husband Richard of
Natick, Patricia Sweeney of Maynard,
Kathleen Mulligan of Tewksbury,
Christine Tower and her husband Bruce
of Glen Allen, VA and the late Maureen
Cook and Peter Cook. Grandmother of
the late Meghan Cugini and sister of the
late Edward McGrory. Also survived
by 9 grandchildren and 17 greatgrandchildren. Relatives and friends
are invited to attend visiting hours
Friday, May 11th from 4 to 7 pm at the
Dee Funeral Home, 27 Bedford Street,
CONCORD CENTER. Funeral Saturday,
May 12th from the Dee Funeral Home
at 9 am, followed by a Funeral Mass in
Holy Family Parish, Monument Square,
Concord Center, at 10 am. Interment
St. Bernard’s Cemetery, Concord. Contributions in her memory may be made
to Jesuit Community, Campion Center,
319 Concord Road, Weston, MA 02493.
For obituary and online guest book
please visit www.deefuneralhome.com
Dee Funeral Home of Concord
Caring for families since 1868
978-369-2030
COPPINGER, Janice M.
(Watson)
Of Needham, March 25, 2018. Beloved
mother of Hope and her husband Todd
Steadman of New Jersey. Devoted
grandmother of Peter Steadman. Sister
of Joan Cunningham and her husband
John of Wayland. Also survived by
her nieces Janice Bartholomae, Kara
Hayden and Lynn O’Connor. Former
spouse of Daniel Coppinger. A Funeral
Mass will be celebrated in Holy Name
Church on Friday, May 11th at 10
o’clock. Relatives and friends respectfully invited. Interment St. Joseph
Cemetery. Janice was a graduate of
Holy Cross Academy in Brookline and
Catherine Laboure Nursing School and
a long time nurse working at the V.A.
Hospital in West Roxbury and nursing
homes in the Boston area.
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
617-323-8600
COULOPOULOS, Constance
DONOVAN, Jane F.
(Graffam)
Of Danvers, formerly of Malden, May
7th. Devoted wife of the late Edward P.
Beloved mother of Nancy Novack and
her husband John of Peabody, Michael
Donovan of Boston, Mary-Jo Dow and
her husband William of Marblehead
and Kathleen Donovan of San Diego,
CA. Daughter of the late Lewis and
Mary (Torpey) Graffam. Sister of Mary
Mauriello and her late husband Mario
“Red” of Naples, FL and sister-in-law
of the late Margaret and Robert Baker
of Malden. Cherished grandmother of
Alison and Rachel Novack and Jack
and Grace Dow. Also lovingly survived
by many nieces and nephews. Family
and friends are kindly invited to attend
a Funeral from the Carroll Funeral
Home, 721 Salem Street, (Maplewood
Square) MALDEN on Friday, May 11th
at 9 AM followed by a Funeral Mass
celebrated in St. Joseph’s Church, 770
Salem St., Malden at 10 o’clock. Visiting
Hours in the Carroll Funeral Home on
Thursday from 4-8 PM. Services will
conclude with interment at Forest Dale
Cemetery, Malden. It is Jane’s wish that
in lieu of flowers, memorial contributions be made to St. Jude Children’s
Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis,
TN 38105.
Carroll Funeral Home
781-322-6322
www.carrollfh.com
ESPINOLA, Alvan A.
Of Winthrop, May 3,
devoted husband of the late
Mary (DeLauritis). Loving
father of Susan Bruno and her husband
Steven of Winthrop and Jeannie Van
Hoof and her husband Thomas of CT.
Dear brother of Kay Espinola of Lawrence and the late Josephine Richardi,
Evelyn Cardin and Edward Espinola.
Cherished grandfather of Michael and
Matthew Bruno and Rebecca and Emily
Van Hoof.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially to attend the visitation
from the Ernest P. Caggiano and Son
Funeral Home, 147 Winthrop St., WINTHROP, on Thursday, May 10, 2018
from 5:00 to 8:00 PM. The funeral will
be conducted from the funeral home on
Friday, May 11, 2018, at 9:00 AM followed by a funeral mass in St. John the
Evangelist Church, Winthrop at 10:00
AM. Interment to follow the mass in
the Cross Street section of Winthrop
Cemetery. Memorial donations may be
made to the Jimmy Fund, Dana-Farber
Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 849168,
Boston, MA 02284-9168 or go to:
www.jimmyfund.org. For directions
or to sign the online guestbook, visit
www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
FETCHERO, James V.
Of North Hill, Needham, formerly of
Wellesley, May 7, 2018. Devoted husband of his beloved late wife Ruth E.
(Matheson) Fetchero. Complete Notice
on Sunday.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley (781) 235-4100
Constance Coulopoulos, Esq. passed
away on May 5, 2018 at her home in
Belmont, MA. at the age of 92. Connie
was the daughter of the late Theodore
Coulopoulos and Ankeleke (Angela)
Coulopoulos and was predeceased by
her brothers Peter, Paul and John. She
leaves behind her devoted sister Dr.
Diane Coulopoulos as well as her niece
and nephews, many great nieces and
nephews. Connie grew up in Norwich,
Connecticut and moved to Boston
where she studied law, became a member of the Massachusetts Bar in 1954
and opened her law offices at 6 Beacon
Street. She later moved her offices to
127 Tremont Street overlooking the
Boston Common and the State House.
Connie loved the law and was a strong
advocate for her clients, friends and
family. She was a true trailblazer establishing an independent solo practice
in the early 1950’s. She was a mentor
to many young lawyers who worked in
her office. Connie had many talents and
enjoyed being with people whom she
engaged with her positive personality
and warm smile which she maintained
until the day she passed away. She was
was a very positive, generous and kind
person who was never motivated by
material gain and was always available
to help others. Visiting hours will be
held in the Brown & Hickey Funeral
Home, 36 Trapelo Road, BELMONT on
Wednesday, May 9th from 4:00 - 7:00
PM. A funeral service will be held at the
Taxiarchae / Archangels Greek Orthodox Church 25 Bigelow Ave Watertown
on Thursday at 10:00 AM. Interment
at Mt Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge. In
lieu of flowers, donations in Connie’s
memory may be made to the Dr. Diane
Coulopoulos and Attorney Constance
Coulopoulos Scholarship Fund, NFA
Foundation (Norwich Free Academy)
321 Broadway, Norwich, CT. 06360 or
Alzheimer’s Association, 309 Waverley
Oaks Rd, Waltham, MA 02452. Online
guest book at brownandhickey.com
Funeral Services
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323-3690
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
Of Chestnut Hill and
Marshfield, formerly of
Brookline, passed away
peacefully at home at age 85 on May 5,
2018. Frank was born on April 6, 1933,
in Boston to Patrick and Mary Flannery.
He was predeceased by his wife Mary
(Kelly) Flannery, and his brothers John,
Joseph and Paul Flannery. Loving
brother of Mary Sullivan of Brighton.
Loving father of Thomas and his wife
Gina Flannery of Cohasset and West
Harwich, Paul Flannery of Boston,
Maryellen Pease and her husband
Cameron of West Roxbury and Joan
Golden and her husband Timothy also
of West Roxbury. Loving grandfather
to Brendan, Sean, Stephen and Patrick
Flannery; Connor, Kelly, Katelyn and
Ryan Pease; and MaryKate, Allison and
Matthew Golden. Frank is also survived
by numerous nieces and nephews.
Frank grew up in Brighton and attended St. Columbkille High School.
He then attended Boston College,
graduating in the class of 1954 with
a degree in Accounting. A CPA, Frank
started his career at Ernst & Ernst in
Boston. In 1958, he married the love
of his life, Mary Kelly from Brookline.
They made their home in Brookline.
Frank attended night School at Suffolk
University and obtained his MBA. He
started his career at Suffolk University
as assistant treasurer in 1964, the day
after he received his MBA degree. He
was named treasurer in 1970 and vice
president in 1972. He was also a member of the Board of Trustees. He retired
in 2011 after 47 years serving the
University. During his years at Suffolk,
he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of
Commercial Science degree in 1991 and
The Centennial Heritage Medallion in
2006. He loved serving the University
and assisted many students in the
pursuit of their education and degrees.
His able leadership in matters of
finance made possible the expansion of
academic programs and the addition of
academic buildings and residence halls.
Frank retired from Suffolk in 2011 and
spent more of his time with his children
and grandchildren who spent summers
with him at his summer home on
the beach in Marshfield. He enjoyed
the sun, and sound of the waves and
his family around him. Frank was a
deeply religious man. He attended Mass
regularly at Holy Name Church in West
Roxbury. He was also past President of
the Parish Council at St. Mary of the
Assumption Church in Brookline. Former Trustee at St. Sebastian’s School,
Member of the Boston College Alumni
Board of Directors and the Clover Club
of Boston. Funeral from the William J.
Gormley Funeral Home, 2055 Centre
St., WEST ROXBURY, Friday morning
at 10:30 followed by a Funeral Mass in
Holy Name Church at 11:30. Relatives
and friends are kindly invited. Visiting
hours in the funeral home on Thursday
from 4:00 – 8:00. Interment Holyhood
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations
to the Mary and Francis Flannery
Scholarship Fund at Suffolk University
would be appreciated. For guestbook
and directions gormleyfuneral.com
FRAZIER, Dawn L.
(McCormick)
Of Natick, May 6, 2018. Beloved wife
of the late William J. Frazier. Visiting
hours on Thursday May 10 from 5:00
to 8:00 P.M. in the John Everett and
Sons Funeral Home, 4 Park Street at
Natick Common. Funeral Mass Friday
10:00 A.M.in St Linus Church. Interment Woodlawn Cemetery, Wellesley.
Complete Notice to follow.
GILBRIDE, Mary L. (Susi)
Of East Boston, passed
away on May 5, at the age
of 90. Beloved wife of the
late Robert Gilbride. Devoted mother of
Robert Gilbride and his wife Nancy of
East Boston and Richard Gilbride and
his wife Judy of Beverly. Dear sister of
the late Anna Pelligrino, Amelia
Zagarella, Rose Susi, Rita Pennachio
and Frank Susi. Adored grandmother of
Richard, Jillian, Jonathan, Serena and
Robert. Also survived by many loving
nieces and nephews. Family and friends
will honor Mary’s life by gathering at
the Ruggiero Family Memorial Home,
971 Saratoga St., East Boston, on
Thursday, May 10th from 5:00 P.M. to
8:00 P.M. and again on Friday moring
at 8:30 A.M before leaving in funeral
procession to St. Joseph - St. Lazarus
Church, Ashley St., East Boston, for a
10:00 A.M. Funeral Mass in celebration
of Mary’s life. Services will conclude
with Mary being laid to rest beside her
beloved husband, Robert, at Winthrop
Cemetery. For more information or to
send an online condolence, please visit:
ruggieromh.com
Massachusetts Funeral
Directors Association
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617)
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
FLANNERY, Francis X.
East Boston
(617) 569-0990
Share a memory
Funeral and Memorial
Information Council
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
GOODMAN, Louis James
Avid New England
Patriots Fan
Of Port Charlotte, FL, unexpectedly,
April 2. Beloved husband of Margaret
“Margo” (McCabe) Walsh. Dear and
devoted father of Michael Goodman
of Cambridge, Lauren Rissala and
her husband, Shawn of Saco, ME and
Ethan Goodman of Jamaica Plain.
Step-father of John Walsh and Kaitlin
Walsh of Holbrook. Brother of David
Goodman and his wife, Connie of Brennan, TX and Sandy Goodman of NJ.
Louis is also survived by several loving
nieces and nephews. Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited to attend
Louis’ visitation and funeral service in
the Cafasso & Sons Funeral Home, 65
Clark St. (Corner of Main St.) EVERETT, Friday, May 11 from 11 a.m. until
2 p.m. Contributions in Louis’ memory
to the charity of one’s choice would be
sincerely appreciated. Parking with
attendants on duty.
Cafasso & Sons Funeral Home
Everett
617.387.3120
GRILLO, Carmela M.
“Nellie”
HERZIG, Frederick J., Jr.
Age 78, of Hingham, passed away
peacefully on May 3, 2018.
Survived by his wife of 51 years,
Sarah “Sally” A. (Tosney) Herzig, his
daughter Kathleen “Katie” Herzig,
Ph.D. and her husband Calvin O.
Anderson, his sister Barbara and her
husband Bob SanClemente and several
nieces and nephews.
Fred graduated from Arlington High
School and Northeastern University.
He studied engineering, and worked
as a purchasing agent in electronics.
An avid bibliophile, he belonged to the
Ticknor Society, and was often seen gregariously discussing the best way to acquire a certain rare book with his local
reference librarian. Fred was a longtime
amateur “ham” radio aficionado and
enjoyed bird watching on Cape Cod.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend the visiting hours on
Thursday, 4-8 in the Pyne Keohane Funeral Home, 21 Emerald St. (off Central
St.), HINGHAM. A Celebration of Life
Service will be held in the funeral home
at 9 AM on Friday prior to the Funeral
Mass in St. Paul’s Church, Hingham at
10 AM. Burial in St. Paul’s Cemetery,
Hingham. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made, in Fred’s memory, to the
Hingham Public Library, 66 Leavitt
Street, Hingham, MA 02043. See www.
Keohane.com or call 1-800-Keohane for
directions and online condolences.
HOLBROOK, G. Leland, Jr.
“Lee”
Carmela M. “Nellie” (DeLucia) Grillo,
93, of Methuen, MA, passed away Monday, May 7, 2018, at Merrimack Valley
Hospice House in Haverhill. Nellie was
born in Stoneham, MA on February
12, 1925. She was the daughter of the
late Luigi DeLucia and Maria (Girardi)
DeLucia.
Nellie was raised and educated in
Lawrence, MA. She met the love of her
life, Leo, while he was on a “rest and relaxation” leave from the Army, and was
married on June 8, 1947. She and Leo
built a home in Methuen in 1953 and
have lived there since. She retired from
working at the IRS in North Andover.
Nellie enjoyed to sew, bake, cook, but
mostly loved being surrounded by her
family.
Nellie was predeceased by her husband of sixty-six years, Leo F. Grillo, Sr.,
and three siblings.
She is survived by her children, Leo
F. Grillo, Jr., Robert J. Grillo and his
wife, Debbie, Marie (Grillo) Caruso and
her late husband, Joe, Patricia Holland
and her husband, James, and Darlene
Peters and her husband, Gary; and
loving niece, Claire Campagnone. She is
also survived by thirteen grandchildren
and twelve great-grandchildren, many
nieces, nephews, cousins, friends, and
her cat, Noel.
Visiting Hours: Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited to attend
visiting hours Thursday, May 10, 2018
from 4:00 – 8:00 PM at Cataudella Funeral Home, 126 Pleasant Valley St. in
METHUEN. Her Funeral Mass will be
celebrated at 10:00 AM on Friday, May
11th at Corpus Christi Parish at Holy
Rosary Church, 35 Essex St. in Lawrence. Burial will follow at Immaculate
Conception Cemetery in Lawrence.
In lieu of flowers, donations in
Nellie’s memory may be made to Merrimack Valley Hospice, 360 Merrimack
St., Bldg. 9, Lawrence, MA 01843. For
directions and online condolences
please visit www.cataudellafh.com.
Cataudella Funeral Home
126 Pleasant Valley Street
Methuen, MA 01844
HARSFIELD, Shirley Irene
(Hoberman)
Of Canton, MA formerly of Brookline
and Falmouth, MA. Entered into
rest on May 7, 2018 at the age of 95.
Beloved wife of the late Raphael Edwin
Harsfield. Devoted mother of Jeff &
Karen Harsfield, Deborah & Steven
Epstein and Judith & Gary Horblitt.
Loving sister of Miriam Brandes,
Tobias & Judith Hoberman and Sumner
& Mickey Hoberman. Cherished
grandmother of Beth & Jay Goldfarb,
Scott & Wendy Harsfield, Craig & Leah
Harsfield, Jason & Chloe Epstein,
Gregory & Sondra Epstein, David &
Thalia Epstein, Ali & Stephen Berkley,
Andrea Horblitt, Adam & Kristina
Horblitt and Chelsea Horblitt and
great-grandmother of sixteen. Funeral
services will be held at the Stanetsky
Memorial Chapel, 475 Washington
Street, CANTON, MA on Thursday, May
10, 2018 at 2pm, followed by burial at
Roxbury Lodge Cemetery, Baker Street,
West Roxbury. Memorial observance
will be at the home of Jeff and Karen
Harsfield on Thursday following burial
until 8pm and Friday from 1pm to
4pm. Expressions of sympathy in her
memory may be donated to a charity of
your choice.
Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
(781) 821-4600
www.stanetskycanton.com
74, of Framingham, passed away Friday,
May 4, 2018. Born on July 3, 1943
in Natick, he was the son of Goldwin
Leland and Phyllis (Wilson) Holbrook.
He was raised and educated in Natick
and graduated from Grahm Junior
College of Radio and TV Broadcasting. Mr. Holbrook worked as a TV and
Radio Technician for WBZ-TV Boston
for over 40 years until his retirement.
Throughout his life, Lee was a devoted
Boston sports fan and car enthusiast.
He enjoyed spending time with friends
and family, especially his grandchildren.
Beloved husband of the late Jean Leslie
(Randall) Holbrook; devoted father of
Jeffrey and his wife Jo-Ellen (Paradise)
of Pound Ridge, NY, Christopher and
his wife Emily (Eng) of Burlingame, CA;
proud grandfather of Mia and Nicholas
of NY, Olivia and Stanley of CA; loving
cousin of Carolyn Scott and Mary Dean
of New Hampshire. Funeral services will
be held at 11AM on Saturday, May 12,
2018 at the Plymouth Church, 87 Edgell
Road, Framingham. Interment will follow at Dell Park Cemetery in Natick. Visitation will be held Friday, May 11 from
5-7:30PM at the MetroWest Funeral &
Cremation Service of Wadsworth-Chiappini, 318 Union Avenue, FRAMINGHAM. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Impact Melanoma
at mfne.org. For additional information
and guestbook please visit: WadsworthChiappini.com
MetroWest Funeral
& Cremation Service
Wadsworth-Chiappini
Framingham (508) 875-8541
JOHNSON, William P. “Bill”
Age 88, passed away peacefully on
May 6, 2018 in his home in Jamaica
Plain. A devoted husband, Bill leaves
his wife of 68 years, Beatrice (Dumont)
Johnson. Proud father to his children,
Diane Hechavarria and her husband
Joe of Nashua, NH, Kim O’Connell
and her husband Kevin of Roslindale,
Nancy McCarthy and her husband Paul
of Roslindale and Daniel Johnson and
his wife Jacqueline of Medway. Son of
the late Paul W. and Anna (MacPherson) Johnson. Beloved grandfather of
Melissa, Michael, Kevin, Adam, Kelly,
Nicole, Jacqueline, Kristopher and the
late Lorraine McCarthy. A proud Great
Grandfather of 7. Visiting hours will
be held at the Brady & Fallon Funeral
Home, 10 Tower St., (Opp. Forest Hills
MBTA Station) JAMAICA PLAIN, on
Thursday, May 10 from 4-8 PM. A
Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St.
Thomas Aquinas Church, Jamaica
Plain, on Friday, May 11 at 10 AM.
Relatives and friends are invited to attend. Interment Gethsemane Cemetery.
Bill retired in 2000 from the Boston
Gas after 40 years of service and was
a member of Union Local Gas Fitters
12003. He was a communicant and
usher at Saint Thomas Aquinas Church
since the age of 15. He was a loyal
member of the Knights of Columbus.
He was an original member of the
Stony Brook Foundation. For guestbook
condolences visit www.bradyfallon.com
Brady & Fallon Funeral Home
617 524 0861
KELLY, Margaret V. “Peg”
(Durrigan)
Of Lexington formerly of Waltham,
April 29, 2018. Beloved wife of the late
Edward H. Kelly. Devoted mother of
Nancy Robbins of Hubbardston & the
late Maureen A. Kelly. Cherished grandmother of Jacqueline O’Connor, Sandra
Hobbs & Kelly Cato. Adored great
grandmother of Jacob Allan, Samantha
O’Connor, Addison & Collin Cato. Sister
of the late Kathleen T. Vincent, Agnes
“Liz” Durrigan & Mary F. White. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Funeral Mass in St. Patrick’s Church,
212 Main St., Watertown on Saturday
May 12, 2018 at 9 A.M. Relatives and
friends respectfully invited to attend.
Visitation in the Stanton Funeral
Home, 786 Mt. Auburn St. (Rt16)
WATERTOWN on Saturday prior to the
Mass 8:00–8:30 A.M. Interment Mt.
Feake Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions in Peg’s memory to AETC,
6515 Holt Rd, Nashville, TN 37211
www.autismetc.org/support/ would be
appreciated.
MacKAY, Donald
Of Dover, formerly of
Grosse Pointe, MI, May 8th.
Beloved husband of Mary
Louise (Beyer) MacKay. Uncle of
Bonnie Scarlett of Grand Rapids, MI.
Donald was a retired employee of the
Ford Motor Company. Graduate of the
University of Michigan, 1950. Former
member of the Longwood Club of
Brookline and The Country Club of
Detroit in Grosse Pointe, MI. WWII
Army veteran. Services private. For
guestbook www.gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781-235-4100
HURLEY, Rita (Marra)
MAINI, Anne Margaret
(Welsh)
Of Waltham, MA (formerly of Holyoke,
Jamaica Plain and West Roxbury, MA)
died peacefully, surrounded by her
beloved family on May 7, 2018. Rita,
who recently celebrated her 100th
birthday, was born on January 25, 1918
in Holyoke, MA. She was daughter
of Peter and Clara Marra, and sister of
late John Marra of Florida, formerly
of Holyoke. She was the devoted wife
of her late husband, Dr. Paul Daniel
Hurley of Jamaica Plain.
Rita is survived by eight of her nine
children: Patricia (late Gerard) DeBiasi,
late Mary (Ronald) Johnston, Paul Daniel (Sue) Hurley, Carolyn (Bob) Evans,
Peter (Lorna) Hurley, Thomas, Andrea
(Robert) Hurley-Voss, Gary (Nancy)
Hurley, Gregory (Lisa) Hurley. Rita is
also survived by her 16 grandchildren,
12 great grandchildren, a niece and a
nephew.
Relatives & friends are respectfully and
warmly invited to join Rita’s family
in the celebration of her life. Visiting
hours are 4 to 8 pm, Friday, May, 11,
2018 at the Robert J. Lawler & Crosby
Funeral Home, 1803 Centre Street,
WEST ROXBURY, MA. Funeral procession begins from the Funeral Home
at 9:00 am, Saturday, May 12th. The
Funeral Mass will begin at 10:00 am at
Holy Name Church, 1689 Centre St.,
West Roxbury, MA. Burial to follow
at Mount Benedict Cemetery, West
Roxbury.
In lieu of flowers kindly make a memorial donation in Rita’s name to the Special Olympics, an organization close to
Rita’s heart. For complete obituary go
to www.lawlerfuneralhome.com
Lawler & Crosby Funeral Home
617-323-5600
Of Norwood. She was a caring and
devoted mother of Deborah Maini,
Karen Maini, Diane & Allan MainiGray. Loving daughter, sister, aunt and
friend. Kindness, Love and Courage
guided Anne throughout her beautiful
life. Born in Norwood, her heart will
live forever in Ireland where she visited
many times and fulfilled a lifelong
dream of becoming an Irish citizen.
Anne loved all children, music, travel,
taking pictures and spending time with
her family. With the Grace of God one
of her proudest accomplishments was
her 48 years of sobriety in AA. Family
and friends will celebrate Anne’s life
by gathering for visiting hours at St.
Susanna Parish, 262 Needham Street,
Dedham, MA 02026 on Friday May
11th from 5-8pm. A Funeral Mass will
be held 9am on Saturday, May 12,
2018 at St. Susanna Parish, Dedham.
Arrangements by the Kraw-Kornack
Funeral Home, NORWOOD, MA. Burial
will be at Highland Cemetery Norwood.
Although Alzheimer’s tried to steal her
away, Anne’s Spirit will always shine
brightly. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to the 2018 Walk to End
Alzheimer’s http://act.alz.org/goto/
AnnesKindnessForAll
Kraw-Kornackfuneralhome.com
Family Owned and Operated
781-762-0482
T h e
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G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
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MARIANI, Gisella (Nicolo)
Of Waltham & West Yarmouth, passed
away peacefully Friday evening, May
4th, 2018, with her loving family by her
side, at Briarwood Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Needham, at the age
of 92. Beloved wife for 71 years of the
late Giulio Mariani. Gisella is survived
by her devoted & loving sons Nicola
Mariani and his late wife Mary Lou
(Bonica) and Gilberto Mariani and his
wife Adrienne (Zuppe) all of Newton,
her cherished grandchildren Annamaria Frabizio and her husband Bill,
Christina Abele and her husband Karl,
Juliana Zurawski and her husband Jon,
Antonia Mariani, Michael Mariani and
his wife Kaitlin, and her adoring greatgrandchildren William & Gisele Frabizio, Enzo, Lucy & Trescott Abele, Jack
and Vincent Zurawski, Noelle & Julian
Mariani. In addition, she is survived
by many nieces & nephews in New
York, Georgia, Italy & Canada. She was
predeceased by her dear siblings Luisa
Venditti, Antonietta Perciballi, Ann
Cortina, Gina Rea, Giuseppe, Michele,
Vincenzo, & Angelo Nicolo. Relatives
& friends are respectfully invited to
attend Funeral Services in celebration
of Gisella’s life from the Brasco & Sons
Memorial Funeral Home, 773 Moody
Street, WALTHAM, on Friday morning,
May 11th @ 9:30 a.m. with a Mass of
Christian Burial at Our Lady Help of
Christians Church, 573 Washington
Street, Newton @ 10:30 a.m. Entombment will follow at Calvary Cemetery
Chapel Mausoleum in Waltham. Visiting Hours will be held in the Funeral
Home on Thursday, May 10th from 4 8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can
be made in memory of Gisella Mariani
to the Massachusetts General Hospital,
Alzheimer’s Research, 125 Nashua St.,
Suite 540, Boston, MA 02114. For complete obituary guestbook & additional
information please refer to:
www.brascofuneralhome.com
Waltham (781) 893-6260
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
MARQUIS, Doris J. (Record)
74, of Stoneham, May 7, 2018. Beloved
wife of the late Douglas E. Marquis.
Cherished mother of Kathleen D.
Marquis and her partner Daniel Hunt
of Stoneham, Kimberly Boucher
and her fiance Randy McCarty of
Woburn and Douglas Marquis Jr. and
his wife Roberta of Stoneham. Sister
of seven; grandmother of four, great
grandmother of two and an aunt to
many. Funeral from the AndersonBryant Funeral Home, 4 Common St.,
Stoneham, Friday at 9 A.M, followed
by a funeral service at 10 A.M. in the
First Congregational Church, 1 Church
St., Stoneham. Visitation at the funeral
home, Thursday, 2-4 PM and 6-8 PM.
Burial in Lindenwood Cemetery,
Stoneham. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial gifts be made to
the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 450
Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215.
McCAFFREY, David A.
94, of Framingham and
Stuart, FL, died peacefully
on May 6, 2018. Born in
Waltham, the son of the late Patrick &
Mary Edith (MacPhee) McCaffrey, he
was the cherished husband of the late
Helen (Gavin), and the late Evelyn
(Gibson).
David proudly served his country
during WWII in the US Navy aboard
the USS Andromeda. A longtime
Watertown resident, he worked for
many years as a firefighter with the
Watertown Fire Department, retiring as
a Captain.
David was a devout Catholic, and a
devoted family man who loved spending time with his four daughters, Judith
Miles & her husband Ronald Tribuna
of Dennis Port, Janice Mandile & her
husband John of Watertown, Joan
Ryan & her husband Gerald of Quincy,
and Karen Hanley & her husband Leo
of Framingham, his step children, Michelle Miller, and Steven Allain, his 13
grandchildren, 20 great grandchildren,
and his beloved friend Glennice Smiley
of FL. Besides his parents and wives,
David was predeceased by his siblings
Marion Fenderson, Owen McCaffrey,
and Jean Godfrey.
An avid traveler and reader, David
enjoyed his home in FL where he loved
golfing, playing shuffleboard and cards,
and socializing with his many friends
at Kingswood. He swam daily at the
YMCA well into his 90’s. He took great
pleasure in lunches with his friends
from the Fire Department, Friday
morning poker games at the Callahan
Center, and being an active member of
the Brookdale Senior Living Community.
Family and friends will honor and
remember David’s life by gathering
for visiting hours in the McCarthy,
McKinney & Lawler Funeral Home, 11
Lincoln St., Framingham on Thursday,
May 10th from 4-8 P.M. His Funeral
Mass will be celebrated Friday morning
in St. George Church, 74 School St.,
Framingham at 10 o’clock. Interment
in MA National Cemetery, Bourne at
2:15 P.M.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances
may be made in David’s name to: The
Watertown Firefighter’s Relief Assoc.,
99 Main St., Watertown, MA 02472, or
to: Honor Flight New England, P.O. Box
16287, Hooksett, NH 03106. For directions and online tributes, kindly visit
www.mccarthyfh.com
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McMANUS, Paul J.
A judge, longtime law school teacher
and public defender who brought
compassion and a deep commitment
to justice to the court room, died on
May 6, 2018, at age 59, at his home in
Wellesley, MA after a lengthy illness.
McManus, born in Worcester, MA
was among the last judges appointed
by Governor Deval Patrick and began
serving on the district court in Massachusetts in 2015. During his interview
for the appointment with the Governor,
McManus said he wanted everyone
who entered his court room to be
treated with dignity and that he wanted
to bring redemption and mercy to an
often unfair justice system.
He was sworn in on Governor Patrick’s last day in office.
A questioner of the status quo from
an early age, McManus developed an
affinity for the Green Bay Packers when
his brothers became fans of the Dallas
Cowboys in the late 1960s. Throughout
his life, while living deep inside Patriots’ nation he remained unwavering in
his loyalty to the Packers, and traveled
to Green Bay on a football pilgrimage
where he proudly wore a cheesehead
hat to show his support.
He grew up as one of six children
with a powerful sense of social justice,
after graduating from the College of
the Holy Cross in 1981 he moved to
Houston where he taught low income
students as part of the Jesuit Volunteer
Corp. He then studied law at Catholic
University in Washington D.C., and
upon graduation joined the public defenders office in Massachusetts where
he served for 25 years in the Worcester,
Framingham and Boston offices.
McManus had a knack for befriending people from all walks of life, in any
situation, whether it was waiting in
line at an ice cream stand on Cape Cod,
hiking on trails in New England, or at
Massachusetts Continuing Legal Education seminars, where he frequently
presented.
McManus was a “Commissioner”
of the Wellesley Little League baseball
while his sons, Bobby and Jack, played
ball. He was intensely proud of the
professional and personal accomplishments of his wife, Elizabeth Ryan, an
attorney at Bailey & Glasser in Boston.
McManus spent many active summers with his extended families, the
Ryans and Shields, on Cape Cod, debating politics and sports, swimming,
cycling, parasailing and visiting Captain
Frosty’s for seafood.
He was an avid hiker and camper,
hiking sections of the Appalachian Trail
with his two brothers. McManus hiked
to the top of Mt. Monadnock on January 1 each year with two high school
friends. He ran the Boston Marathon
in 2001.
Beloved and respected by his colleagues at the Committee for Public
Counsel Service, McManus also taught
the Mock Trial Program at Boston College Law School for nearly two decades.
He was the son of the late Charles
and Martha (Driscoll) McManus of
Worcester. He was predeceased by two
brothers, Charles and Stephen.
In addition to his wife Elizabeth
and sons Bobby of Boston and Jack
of New York City, he leaves his sister
Mary Bagley and her husband William
of Worcester, two brothers, Richard of
Potomac, MD and his wife Natalie, and
James of Southborough and his wife
Louise, sister in law, Elizabeth Deal of
Lake Kiowa, TX. He also leaves extended family members Bill and Lisa Ryan
of River Forest, IL, Mary Ryan of Prince
Frederick, MD, Chris Ryan of Billerica,
Carolyn Ryan of New York City, Bob
and Leigh Ann Ryan of Greenwich, CT,
and his dear nieces and nephews Sarah,
Steve and Billy, Claire, Daniel, Erin and
Drew, Maija, James and Laila, Stephen
and James, Ann, Henry and Billy, Carolyn and Gus, Lucy, Robert, Maggie and
John William, a grandniece Lucy Feldman and grandnephew Teddy Feldman,
cousins and his beloved dog Max, an
undocumented Canadian bichon, who
arrived in the country 10 years ago.
Funeral from the George F. Doherty
& Sons Funeral Home, 477 Washington
St. (Rt.16) WELLESLEY, on Saturday
May 12 at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Paul Church, Wellesley at
10 a.m. Relatives and friends kindly
invited. Visiting hours on Friday, May
11, from 4-8 p.m. Interment Private. In
lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy
may be made in Paul’s memory to Pine
Street Inn, 444 Harrison Ave., Boston,
MA 02118. For directions and guestbook, gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781-235-4100
Celebrate
their lives
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with a photo in the
Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
MOORE, Paul T.
PECKHAM, Spencer Eugene
Age 65, of Framingham, died peacefully, Monday, May 7, 2018, surrounded
by his devoted family. Raised in
Holliston, he was the son of the late
Gerald and Mary (Kiely) Moore. Paul
graduated from Marian High School in
1971, received a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from Northeastern University
in 1976 and a M.S. in Occupational
Safety from the University of New
Haven in 1992. Paul was a Senior Loss
Control Consultant and worked for
ADP Total Source for the past 10 years.
His career spanned over 35 years having also worked for Arbella Insurance,
Fireman’s Fund Insurance, the Roman
Catholic Archdiocese of Boston and
several other private industry insurance
carriers. Later in life, Paul met and fell
in love with Karen Waugh. They were
devoted to each other and truly enjoyed
life together. His treasured and rewarding gift is his cherished daughter,
Caeley. He loved so much being her
father and creating memories together
that will forever be in their hearts.
Paul enjoyed music and the outdoors
and was an avid bicyclist, playing
basketball, tennis and interested in
anything sports. Besides his daughter,
Caeley Moore of Framingham, Paul
is survived by his life partner, Karen
Waugh of Framingham and her family
Brandon, Shannon, Bret, Brock and
Colton; his former spouse and friend,
Robin (Greisdoff) Moore of Framingham; siblings, Kathleen Moore of
Milton, Stephen Moore of Wakefield,
Barry Moore of Waltham; nephew and
niece Justin and Meredith Sterritt and
many friends. Relatives and friends
are invited to attend his funeral service
on Friday, May 11, 2018 at 12:30 PM
in the Edgell Memorial Chapel at
Edgell Grove Cemetery, 53 Grove St.,
Framingham. Following his burial,
memorial observance will be held at the
home of Robin Moore until 8:30 PM.
Arrangements are entrusted to the care
of Norton Funeral Home, 53 Beech St.,
FRAMINGHAM. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy in Paul’s memory
may be made to Dana-Farber Cancer
Institute, c/o The Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dept. of Medical
Oncology, P.O. Box 849168, Boston, MA
02284-9168 www.dana-farber.org. For
online guestbook or to leave a message
of condolence please visit
www.nortonfuneralhome.com
WWII US Army
Veteran
Norton Funeral Home
Framingham, MA
NOLAN, Thomas J.
Of Dorchester, on May 6, 2018. Beloved
husband of Mary F. (Gildea). Loving father of Paul Francis & his wife
Mary Nolan of FL, Eileen Marie Kelley
& her husband Robert of Quincy,
Kevin Thomas & his wife Jil Nolan
of Duxbury, Brian Richard & his wife
Terrie Nolan of Pembroke. Cherished
grandfather of Amanda, Emily, Robert
Nolan, Elizabeth, Michael, Jacquelyn,
Andrew, Thomas, Julia, Kristen, and
Timothy. Caring brother of Caroline Nolan of Hingham. Visiting hours in the
John J. O’Connor & Son Funeral Home,
740 Adams St. (near Gallivan Blvd.)
DORCHESTER, Thursday from 4-8pm.
Funeral Mass in St. Ann’s Church,
Neponset, Friday morning at 10 o’clock.
Relatives & friends are respectfully
invited. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made in Thomas’ name
to Boys Town, 300 Flanagan Blvd. PO
Box 7000, Boys Town, NE 68010. Interment in Cedar Grove Cemetery. For
directions & expressions of sympathy,
www.oconnorandson.com.
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Of East Walpole and New
Port Richey, FL, January
29, 2018, age 91. Beloved
husband of Helen B. (Kremer) Peckham. Loving father of Paul E. Peckham
and his wife Rose of Plainville, Lynne
M. Peckham of East Walpole, the late
Michael Peckham, and the late Janet
Peckham. Cherished grandfather of
Juliette Peckham Guddat of Hicksville,
New York and Jason M. Peckham of
Bellingham and great grandfather of
Miles, Everly, Vanessa, and Jackson.
Brother of James Peckham of Prudence,
Rhode Island, Irving Peckham of North
Carolina, and Walter Peckham of Wrentham. Relatives and friends are kindly
invited to gather in the James H. Delaney & Son Funeral Home, 48 Common
Street, Walpole on Saturday from 10:30
to 11:30 AM. A Funeral Home Service
will follow at 11:30 AM. Interment will
be private. In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to: Disabled
American Veterans (DAV), State House,
Room 546, Boston, MA 02133.
Delaney Funeral Home
www.delaneyfuneral.com
PEDROLI, Marguerite L.
Of Walpole, formerly of Roxbury,
passed away peacefully on May 8, 2018
at age 94 after a lengthy illness. Beloved
daughter of the late Josephine and
Angelo Pedroli. Sister of Walter Pedroli
and late wife Frances of Bedford, MA
and the late Louis Pedroli and late wife
Norina and late Charles Pedroli and
late wife Angelina. Also survived by her
loving nieces: Carol and her husband
Walter Redznak of Norwood, Marjorie
and her husband William Meehan
of Walpole, Janice and her husband
Charles Hoar of Foxboro, Eleanor
and her husband Edward Alessi of
Westford, Virginia and her husband
James Downing of Norwood; nephews
John Pedroli and his wife Kathleen of
Belmont, NC and Richard Pedroli and
his wife Paula of Milford and many
grandnieces and grandnephews. Marguerite was employed her entire career
with the Boston Tow Boat Co., Inc. until
her retirement in 1986-1987 as Vice
President. She enjoyed reading, knitting, gardening, oil painting and loved
going to New York City on the train to
see all the Broadway Musicals, walking
with a Walpole walking group and was
very active in the Walpole Senior Center. She traveled extensively throughout
the world. A Funeral Mass will be held
in St. Mary’s Church, 176 Washington
St., East Walpole on Friday, May 11th
at 10am. A visitation will occur prior
to the Mass from 9:30-10:00am in
the church. Relatives & friends kindly
invited. A private burial will be held in
New Calvary Cemetery, Mattapan on
Monday at 12 Noon. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be sent in Marguerite’s
memory to the Old Colony Hospice &
Palliative Care, 321 Manley Street, West
Bridgewater, MA 02379. For online
guestbook pemurrayfuneral.com.
P.E. Murray - F.J. Higgins
George F. Doherty & Sons
West Roxbury 617 325 2000
PHELAN, Rosemary E.
Greatly Loved
Formerly of Boston and Fall River,
passed peacefully on May 7, 2018.
Loving and caring daughter of the
late Joseph P. Phelan and Rose Phelan
(Dunn) of Fall River; sister of the late
Joseph P. Jr. and his wife Elaine, John
L., James L., William L. and Robert E.
Phelan. Aunt of Jeff Allmon, Maureen
Pate, Kathleen Proctor, Joseph Phelan,
Michael Phelan, David Phelan and
Michelle Frain and many grand and
great-grand nieces and nephews. A
graduate of Smith College and a retiree
of Jordan Marsh and Bank of Boston.
She loved her family and friends, her
parents and her brothers especially; she
loved Highland Ave, Fall River and Bass
River on Cape Cod. She loved to travel,
ski, participate in road races (winning
many medals), cook, and entertain; and
she loved to talk and laugh and loved
reading, especially the New York Times
which she did on a daily basis, cover
to cover. She will be sorely missed.
The family will receive visitors on
Thursday, May 10, 2018 from 5PM to
8Pm in the Boston Harborside Home,
580 Commercial Street, BOSTON, MA
02109. A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated in St. Leonard Church,
320 Hanover Street, Boston, MA 02113
on Friday, May 11, 2018 at 10:30 AM.
Interment will be on Saturday, May 12,
2018 at 10am in St. Patrick’s Cemetery,
2233 Robeson Street, Fall River. For
guest book, and/or directions, please
visit: www.bostonharborsidehome.com
Boston Harborside Home of
J.S. Waterman & Sons
Waring-Langone
617-536-4110
PITLER, Elaine (Zides)
Matriarch
of the First
Congregational
Church of Revere
Of Revere, on May 5th, at 90 years.
Loving mother of James P. Pitler &
his wife Robyn of Blackstone, Martin
A. Pitler & wife Linda of Randolph &
Maureen L. Pasek-Tourville & husband
James of Haverhill. Cherished grandmother of Rachel Greenberg of Port
Charlotte, FL, Michael Pitler of Blackstone, U.S. Army Master Sgt. Adam B.
Pitler & wife Carissa of Germany, Tova
Pitler & companion Jonathan Burton of
Weymouth, Joshua Sandals & companion Kim Troung, of Brooklyn, NY, Marc
S. Pitler of Somerville & Luke Pasek of
Haverhill. Adored great grandmother
of David J. “D.J.”, Hannah, Nathan,
Joseph, Zachary, Abbey, Elijah, Aiden,
Ellie & Shoshannah. Dear sister of
Lillian “Libby’ Tarr & husband Ralph of
Framingham & Rosalyn “Rozie” Track
of Ft. Lauderdale, FL. She is also lovingly survived by many nieces, nephews,
grandnieces and grandnephews. Family
& friends are invited to attend the funeral on Friday, May 11th at 11:00 a.m.
in the First Congregational Church, 230
Beach St., Revere. Please meet directly
at Church. Services will conclude with
interment in Greenview Cemetery, Everett. Visiting Hours will be held in the
Vertuccio and Smith, Home for Funerals, 773 Broadway (Route 107) Revere
on Thursday, May 10th from 4:00 p.m.
to 8:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to The Food Pantry at First Congregational Church, 94
Central Ave. Revere, MA 02151. Elaine
was a published poet. As a young girl,
she was on the radio reciting some
of her poems and later in her life her
works were published in newspapers
and magazines. Elaine was also known
as the matriarch of the First Congregational Church of Revere. For more visit
www.vertuccioandsmith.com.
POISSON, Rene J.
Rene J. Poisson, 91, of Wayland, formerly of Waltham,
died on May 8, 2018.
Beloved husband for 70 years of
Rose M. (Marino) Poisson.
Devoted father of Diane M. Erich
and her husband Thomas W. Erich
of Millis; Mary Ann Walsh and her
husband James Walsh of Hudson;
Michael G. Poisson and his wife Lynn
F. Poisson of Wayland and Steven
M. Poisson of Wayland. Brother of
Francis J. Poisson and his wife Patricia
Poisson of Wayland; Annette Lazili of
Warren and Irene Mailhiot of Hull.
Also survived by 11 grandchildren, 15
great-grandchildren and several nieces
and nephews. Brother of the late Leo
J. Poisson; Lucille Mercurio and Henry
Poisson. Brother-in-law of the late
Norma Poisson; Julie Poisson; Rabah
Lazili and Francis Mailhiot.
Visitations will be held on Friday,
May 11, 2018 from 5:00 to 8:00 pm
at the John C. Bryant Funeral Home,
56 Pemberton Road (off Rte. 30),
WAYLAND.
Friends are invited to go directly to
Good Shepherd Parish at St. Zepherin Church, 99 Main Street (Rte. 27),
Wayland on Saturday, May 12, 2018
at 10:00 for Rene’s Mass of Christian
Burial.
At the request of his family, interment will be private.
For condolences and directions
please visit
www.johncbryantfuneralhome.com.
Talk
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from day-to-day details to
big events. Sharing stories
with those who matter most
isn’t just important today;
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when it’s time to honor and
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T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
B o s t o n
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G l o b e
Obituaries
George Deukmejian, fiscal hawk in Calif.
By Kathleen Ronayne
REPPUCCI, Joseph C. “Joe”
Army National
Guard
Age 80 of Bridgewater, died
Monday May 7, 2018 at
Brigham & Women’s
Hospital after a brief illness. He was the
devoted husband of Rosemarie (DiPesa)
Reppucci.
He is survived by three children
James Reppucci of Taunton, Lisa
DeSimone and her husband of Daniel
of Mansfield and Laura Reppuci of
Raynham; three stepchildren Lisa
Sprague of Whitman, Nicole Caccavo
of Bridgewater and John Casarano of
Whitman; his siblings Cheryl Schnidlin
of NH; Mark Reppucci of CT, Frank
Downes of Avon and David Boyd of
AZ; and 4 grandchildren. He was the
brother of the late Claire Smith.
Visiting hours will be held in the
Conley Funeral Home, 138 Belmont St.
(Rte. 123), BROCKTON on Thursday
4-8pm. The procession will gather at
the funeral home on Friday at 8am for
a funeral Mass at 9am in St. Edith Stein
Church, Brockton. Burial in Knollwood
Memorial Park, Canton. For online
condolences and directions please visit
www.conleyfuneralhome.com or on
Facebook at Conley Funeral & Cremation Service.
RIPLEY, Mary E. (Donnelly)
Of Stoughton, formerly of Norwood,
May 6, 2018, age 83. Wife of the late
Charles G. Ripley, Jr. Mother of Kathleen M. Rowe and her husband Robert
of Mansfield and Charles G. Ripley, III
and his wife Yunely of AZ. Grandmother of Meghan, Kathryn, Elizabeth and
Daniel Rowe and Charles and Julian
Ripley. Sister of James F. Donnelly of
Norwood and the late Robert Donnelly.
Also survived by several nieces and
nephews.
A Funeral Mass will be held in the
St. James Church, 560 Page St., Stoughton on Friday at 11:30 AM. Visiting
Hours will be held in the Farley Funeral
Home, 358 Park St., (Rt. 27) STOUGHTON prior to the Mass from 10-11 AM.
Interment will take place at Highland
Cemetery, Norwood. Donations in
Mary’s memory may be made to the Joe
Andruzzi Foundation, 49 Plain St., Suite
500, North Attleboro, 02760. Directions and obit at www.farleyfh.com.
RYAN, Sylvia M.
Registered
Nurse For Many
Years With
The Pentucket
Medical
Associates
85, of Georgetown, MA peacefully
passed away on May 3, 2018 at the
High Pointe Hospice House in Haverhill, MA with her family at her side.
She was born in Portland, Maine, the
daughter of the late Harry and Natalie
(Harmon) Jensen. Raised in York,
Maine, she graduated from York High
School and obtained her R.N. from the
Beverly Hospital School of Nursing.
She worked at the Hale Hospital in
Haverhill, MA and for the majority of
her career at Pentucket Medical Associates with Dr. Drew Niccolini. She was
a member of the St. Mary’s Church in
Georgetown, MA. She loved gardening
and returning to the beaches of Maine
whenever possible. In retirement, she
enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren. She was the wife of the late
Dr. William J. Ryan Jr. of Georgetown,
MA and is survived by her children,
William J. Ryan III and his wife Susan,
Michael T. Ryan and his wife Pamela,
Karen (Ryan) Flynn and her husband
Michael, her grandchildren, great
grandchild, nieces and nephews. She
was pre-deceased by her sisters, Melody
Knipshild of Ohio and Helen Stewart
of Alabama and brother-in-law Arthur
Stewart.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are warmly invited to attend her
Funeral Mass on Saturday, May 12th at
10 a.m. in St. Mary’s Church, Andover
Street, Georgetown. Interment will be
private for the family. All are invited to
visit with the Ryan Family on Friday
from 4 to 8 p.m. in the Conte - Giamberardino Funeral Home, 14 Pleasant
Street, GEORGETOWN. For those
who wish, in lieu of flowers, the family
suggests a donation to a charity of your
choosing. For funeral home directions
or to sign the family guestbook, please
visit cgfuneralhomegeorgetown.com
SHDEED, George J.
Age 85, of Wilmington,
passed away peacefully on
May 7th, surrounded by his
loving family. Beloved husband of the
late Priscilla (Cahoon) Shdeed. Loving
father of Barbara Bosco of Reading
and James Shdeed & his wife Lisa of
Billerica. Cherished “Grampa” of Joe &
Taylor Bosco and Julia & Lilly Shdeed.
Son of the late John and Anne Shdeed.
George is survived by his long-time
significant other, Margaret DuBois of
Reading, as well as many nieces and
nephews. Family and friends will gather
at the Nichols Funeral Home, Inc., 187
Middlesex Ave. (Rt. 62) WILMINGTON,
for a funeral on Friday, May 11th, at
11:00 a.m., followed by a Funeral Mass
at St. Thomas of Villanova Church, 126
Middlesex Ave., Wilmington, at 12:00
noon. Visiting hours will be held on
Thursday, May 10th, from 3-7 p.m. In
lieu of flowers, memorial donations
in George’s name can be made to the
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, P.O. Box
849168, Boston, MA 02284. George
proudly served in the U.S. Army.
Nichols Funeral Home, Inc.
978-658-4744
www.nicholsfuneralhome.com
SLATTERY, James F.
Age 72, of Foxboro, formerly of
Mansfield, May 6, 2018. Husband of
Martha P. (Pignato) Slattery. Father of
Joanna Jarvis and her husband Todd of
Foxboro, Deborah Cunniff and her late
husband Christopher of Foxboro, James
Slattery and his wife Tricia of Foxboro,
Diana Griffin and her husband Matthew of Foxboro, and Francis Slattery
and his wife Leah of Braintree. Brother
of Patricia Reynolds and her husband
William of Wareham, and William
Slattery and his wife Beverly of Norfolk.
Also survived by 9 grandchildren, and
many nieces and nephews. A Funeral
Mass will be celebrated on Saturday,
May 12th at 10:00 A.M. in St. Mary’s
Church, 58 Carpenter St., Foxboro.
Relatives and friends are cordially
invited to attend. Visiting hours on
Friday, May 11th from 4:00-8:00 P.M. at
the Sherman & Jackson Funeral Home,
55 North Main St., MANSFIELD. Burial
will be in St. St. Mary’s Cemetery,
Foxboro. In lieu of flowers, donations
in Jay’s may be made to the Friends of
Foxboro Recreation, 40 South St., Foxboro, MA 02035. For complete obituary,
please visit www.shermanjackson.com
SOUZA, George W., Jr.
“Georgie”
Of Reading, May 4th. Beloved husband
of Karen (Leonardo). Loving father
of Nicholas, Daniel, Catherine and
Michael Souza of Reading. Son of the
late George Sr. and Lorraine Souza. Son
in law of Theresa Leonardo and Henry
Murphy of Reading. Brother of Lynda
Sousa and her husband Joseph of Reading and John Souza of NH. Relatives
and friends are invited to attend a
Funeral Mass in St. Athanasius Church,
300 Haverhill St., Reading at 10:30am.
Visitation in the Cota Funeral Home,
335 Park St. (corner of Park St. and Rte.
28), NORTH READING, at Reading
line, on Thursday from 4-8pm. Interment private. Please omit flowers and
make donations in George’s name to
the Children’s Hospital, 300 Longwood
Ave., Boston, MA 02115 and http://
gofundme.com/georgesouza. For detail
obituary information please vist www.
cotafuneralhomes.com
Cota Family Funeral Home and
Cremation Service
North Reading
781-944-1765/ 978-664-4340
Every life
is a story
worth
sharing
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with a professionally written
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achievements.
For more details, contact
Boston Globe Classifieds
at 617-929-1500 or
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Or add a condolensece
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SULLIVAN, Joseph Richard
Age 83, of Framingham, passed away
peacefully surrounded by his family on
Saturday, May 5, 2018. Joe was born in
Framingham on December 23, 1934 to
the late George and Eugenia (Slattery)
Sullivan. He grew up on Dennison
Avenue along with his sister Mary and
his brothers John and “Skippy” Sullivan
who preceded him in death. Hockey
played a major role in Joe’s life. His love
for the game was fostered on the ponds
of Framingham where his passion led
him to Boston College High School. In
addition to playing four years of varsity
hockey there, Joe also participated in
theatrical productions and wrote for
the school newspaper. After graduating
in 1952, he attended Boston College,
played on a semi-pro hockey team, and
went on to coach many future hockey
players. Joe married Joanne Faulkner
and raised three children together
in Framingham. He began his career
as a land surveyor with the Town of
Framingham before moving on to MacCarthy Engineering, where he worked
until he took over the company in 1974
and renamed the company MacCarthy
& Sullivan Engineering. For over four
decades, Joe served his community
with professionalism and integrity, and
left a lasting impact on all he served.
Joe and Joanne shared 30 years of marriage prior to her death in 1986. They
enjoyed spending time at the beach and
traveling together. After Joanne’s passing, he married Cynthia (St. Jean) Sullivan. He is predeceased by his son, Paul
Sullivan and is survived by his daughter
Rhonda Connery and her husband Sean
of Lunenburg, his son Mark Sullivan
and his wife Heidi of Natick; and stepsons Kevin (Tammy), Peter (Amy), and
Michael (Laura) St. Jean. Joe was loved
by his grandchildren Brittany (James),
Kayla Johnson (Doug), Derek (Stephanie), and Devin Connery; Zoe, Zachary
and Mia Sullivan; Kimberly Raya and
Christopher Sullivan; Heather, Justin,
Jillian, Stephen St. Jean and greatgrandchild Landon Johnson. Joe is also
survived by his sisters-in-law, Gerry and
Jean Sullivan as well as many nieces,
nephews, and friends. Joe will always
be remembered for his honesty, strong
work ethic, and humility. Relatives and
friends are invited to attend his funeral
Mass on Friday, May 11th at 10 AM
at St. Bridget’s Church, 830 Worcester
Road, Rt. 9 at Framingham Ctr. Burial
will follow at Edgell Grove Cemetery
in Framingham. Visiting hours at the
Norton Funeral Home, 53 Beech Street,
(corner of Union Ave.) FRAMINGHAM,
will be Thursday from 5-8 PM. In lieu
of flowers, donations in his memory
may be made to The Friends of DanaFarber, 450 Brookline Avenue, SW 120,
Boston, MA 02215. To leave a message
of condolence, sign the online guestbook or for directions, please visit www.
nortonfuneralhome.com.
Norton Funeral Home
Framingham, MA
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Two-term
California governor George
Deukmejian, whose antispending credo earned him the nickname ‘‘The Iron Duke,’’ died
Tuesday of natural causes, a former chief of staff said. He was
89.
The Republican spent three
decades in California politics as
an assemblyman, senator, state
attorney general, and governor.
He was elected as the state’s
35th governor in 1982, when a
massive absentee voting campaign edged him ahead of Los
Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley.
As governor from 1983 to
1991, Mr. Deukmejian ran a
law-and-order administration,
expanding the state prison sys-
Maurice W. Kirby Funeral Home
Winthrop 617-846-0909
tem, bringing the left-leaning
California Supreme Court to
the center, and supporting
tough, anticrime legislation.
S t e v e M e r k s a m e r, w h o
worked with Mr. Deukmejian
as his gubernatorial chief of
staff, described the former governor as ‘‘decent, humble, and
gracious’’ and someone who
‘‘demanded honesty and integrity.’’
Mr. Deukmejian’s greatest
moment, he said, was his advocacy for California to divest
from South Africa during apartheid, a move that was controversial at the time. ‘‘This was an
act of enormous political courage,’’ Merksamer said.
Despite a few notable exceptions, Mr. Deukmejian made
his opposition to new taxes and
increased government spending a focus of his career. His favorite phrase was ‘‘commonsense,’’ which in many cases
translated into ‘‘cut’’ or ‘‘stop.’’
He earned the nickname
‘‘The Iron Duke’’ from his Republican supporters in the Legislature for his willingness to
veto spending proposals.
‘‘He had a very short agenda,
which in terms of a governor is
not all that bad,’’ said Sherry
Bebitch Jeffe, a political scientist at the University of Southern California. ‘‘Basically, to not
increase taxes and to deal with
law enforcement, and he did it.’’
After he eliminated a $1.5
billion deficit, Deukmejian declared in a State of the State address that he had ‘‘taken California from I-O-U to A-OK.’’
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
TANNY, Travis Murtha
TOCCI, Ruth M. (Carnes)
Of Weston, born September 21, 1996,
was the beloved son of Cindy and Craig
Murtha Tanny, brother of Brandon and
Griffin Murtha Tanny, tragically passed
away on Sunday, May 6, 2018. From an
early age Travis had an incredible curiosity in how things worked and why.
He had a brilliant mind and a gentle
soul that would do anything for anyone
in need. He was most at home in the
wilderness, hiking or skiing a mountain
or boating across the open sea. After
years as a hardy Boy Scout, he earned
the highest rank of Eagle Scout. He
attended the Weston public schools
from Pre-K to 10th and graduated from
Landmark High School in Beverly, MA.
A visitation will be held on Thursday,
May 10th from 4 - 8pm at the George
F. Doherty & Sons Funeral Home, 477
Washington St., (Rt.16) Wellesley. A
funeral service will be held on Friday,
May 11th at the Congregational Church
of Weston, 130 Newton St, Weston, MA
from 11:00am - 12:00pm, followed by
a reception. Interment Private. Travis
is survived by his Grandmother, Julie T
Murtha of Wethersfield, CT and Brenda
Schlegel of Bonita Springs, FL. Uncles
and Aunts as follows: Steven Murtha,
Mary Murtha Susan Murtha, all from
CT. Mark + Tracey Tanny from VT and,
Keith + Elizabeth Tanny of NY. as well
as nine cousins. We are in the process
of establishing the Travis Murtha Tanny
Foundation in his memory. In lieu of
flowers, a contribution can be mailed
to PO Box 264, Weston, MA 02493
and will be appropriated to Brain and
Behavior research. Checks can be made
payable to Travis Murtha Tanny Foundation Trust. Online guestbook and
directions at gfdoherty.com.
Age 89, of Peabody formerly of Lexington died May 5, 2018 at her home.
Married to the late Valentino Tocci,
who died in 2015. Born in Everett,
MA, she was the daughter of the late
Frederick and Barbara Carnes. She is
survived by her six sons, John and his
wife, Lila Tocci of Lexington, Michael
and his wife, Barbara Tocci of Newburyport, William Tocci of Seabrook,
NH, Daniel Tocci of Long Beach, CA,
Valentino Tocci Jr. and his wife, Joanne
of Boxford, MA, and Rev. Laurence
Tocci of Hudson, MA; two daughters,
Valerie and her husband, Paul Notartomaso of Palm Beach, FL, and Cynthia
Tocci of North Hollywood, CA; sister,
Belle Cosgrove of Peabody, MA; 23
grandchildren; 11 great grandchildren
and many nieces and nephews. She was
the sister of the late Robert Carnes of
Peabody. Visiting hours will be Thurs.
3 to 7 P.M. at the Dolan Funeral Home,
106 Middlesex St., CHELMSFORD,
MA. A Mass of Christian burial will be
Fri. at 11am at St. Brigid Church, 2001
Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington, MA.
Meet at Church. Burial in the Westview
Cemetery, Lexington. Memorials may
be made in her name to Project Rachel,
5 Wilson St, Natick, MA 01760.
Dolan Funeral Home
978-251-4041
www.dolanfuneralhome.com.
WASHBURN, Harold G.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781 235 4100
TEMPESTA, Pompea
(Leone)
TALLENT, Barbara Anne
(Sullivan)
A resident of Winthrop for 85 years,
May 6, 2018. She was 93 years old.
Beloved wife of the late James W.
Tallent Jr. Cherished daughter of the
late Thomas J. and Lillian M. (Neal)
Sullivan. Devoted mother of Robert J.
Tallent and his wife Susan, James W.
“Jim” Tallent III and Elena Todisco,
David N. Tallent and his wife Sharon
all of Winthrop, Nancy Aliberti and
her husband Roger of Deerfield, N.H,
Mark R. Tallent and his wife Kathleen,
Beth Tallent and her husband Mark
Wallace and Kevin S. Tallent and
Maria Rosati, all of Winthrop. Adored
grandmother of 16 grandchildren and
21 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of
the late Mary Louise Lawlor and her
late husband Thomas. Sister-in-law of
Eleanor (Tallent) Smalley and her husband Robert of West Bridgewater, the
late Herbert Tallent and his wife Sheila
(DeVito) Tallent of Kennebunkport, ME
and the late Constance (Rutledge) Tallent. Also survived by many nieces and
nephews. Funeral from the Maurice W.
Kirby Funeral Home, 210 Winthrop
St., WINTHROP, on Friday, May 11, at
10:30am. A Funeral Mass will be held
in St. John the Evangelist ChurchWinthrop, at 11:30am. Relatives and
friends are invited. Interment will
follow in Winthrop Cemetery. Visiting
hours will be held in the funeral home
on Thurs, from 4-8pm. In lieu of flowers, donations in her name can be made
to the Viking Pride Foundation, PO Box
520037, Winthrop, MA, 02152; or to
Sawtelle House, Gift Processing Ctr.,
41 Mall Rd., Burlington, MA, 01805.
Prior to his death, James and Barbara
enjoyed 59 years of marriage. She was
a member of the Winthrop Catholic
Women’s Club, homemaker, avid reader
and enjoyed living by the ocean. For
many years, Barbara was a volunteer
for the Winthrop School System and
the library. After retirement, she spent
her winters in West Palm Beach, FL,
for over 25 years and she was one of
the first residents of the Arbors in
Winthrop, since opening in 2015. For
directions and guestbook, please visit:
www.mauricekirbyfh.com.
B9
In Brighton, formerly of San Donato,
Italy May 8, 2018. Beloved wife of
Raffaele Tempesta. Devoted mother
of Franca Roffo and her husband Raffaele of Holliston and Viviana Ferriero
and her husband Frank of Tewksbury.
Sister of the late Donata Lombardozzi,
Gino and Gerardo Leone Loving grandmother of Paolo Roffo and his wife
Bianca, Niccolo Roffo and his fiancee
Alison, Dino Roffo, Dina Solis and her
husband Jeffrey, Michael Ferriero and
his fiancee Briana. Great grandmother
of Carlo and Sabrina Roffo. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Funeral from the Lehman Reen &
McNamara Funeral Home, 63 Chestnut
Hill Ave., (nr. Brighton Courthouse)
BRIGHTON, Friday May 11th at 9:30
am. Followed by a Funeral Mass in
St. Columbkille Church, 321 Market
Street, Brighton at 10:30 am. Relatives and friends are kindly invited to
attend. Visiting Hours Thursday May
10th from 4-8 pm. Interment Newton
Cemetery. Funeral Home Handicapped
accessible. For directions and guest
book please visit www.lehmanreen.com
Lehman Reen McNamara
617 782 1000 Brighton
Beloved husband, Harry Washburn of
Cambridge and Brooklyn, NY passed
away on May 3 after a courageous
battle with Alzheimer’s disease. A
huge Brooklyn Dodger’s fan, that was
heartbroken and may not have ever
gotten over their move to LA some 60
years ago. Dartmouth ‘59 and Harvard
Business School ‘65, he was reserved
and thoughtful allowing one safety
when giving their own less thoughtful
opinions. Harvard professor, marketing maven telling us “Why People Don’t
Buy Things” suggesting you are either
a Commander, Thinker or Visualizer.
Harry was all three. He served in the
Army stateside in the early 60’s becoming a huge World War II buff. Never
one to mock, if one tempered their
words with a bit of hesitancy, Harry
could sense this and guide you to a
conclusion he thought you might want.
His knowledge was power and he used
this to help you. That is a good person.
Harry’s ability to guide a conversation
was taken away in his later years, but
we all know what a formidable conversationalist he was in his heyday. An
eclectic art collector with a penchant
for vintage cameras and his amazing
photographs that he blew up to life size
prints, his artists’ eye was ever present.
Harry’s affinity for Jazz was blown
through many a reed with his Baritone
Sax, playing with “The Mid-life Crisis
Jazz Band” and “Jazz at Noon,” back
in the day. A motorcycle enthusiast, he
remains the only biker we know riding
with a passenger and hitting a cow!
Harry had a Zen of sorts to motorcycles
that may have been forced on him in
bovine sanctimony. Harry was fond of
saying “If I knew where I was going I’d
be there by now”. Harry always knew
where he was going and he is there
now! He will be sorely missed by his
devoted wife Diane of 33 years.
Honor your loved
one with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director for details.
WIGGIN, Joan E.
Of Westwood, died May 7, 2018.
Joan was born on January 25, 1933
to the late D. Edward and Rose E.
(Kelley) Wiggin. In addition to her
parents, Joan was predeceased by
her siblings Dorothy M. Conger, J.
Herbert Wiggin, and Mary E. Goode.
She leaves her nieces and nephews
Elinor M. Albright and her husband
Fred of Rutledge, TN, Dorothy Cawley
of Mashpee, Brother David E. Wiggin
CFX of Danvers, John J. Wiggin and his
wife Jane of Westwood, Katherine F.
Wiggin of Gloucester, Ann M. Wiggin
of Reston, VA, Mary E. Spears and her
husband John of Ipswich, Frederick J.
Goode of Westwood, James E. Goode
of South Royalton, VT, and Emily A.
Goode of Westwood. She also leaves 13
great nieces and nephews and six grand
nieces and nephews.
Joan was a graduate of Northeastern University and worked for many
years as a benefits manager at GTE.
She was a familiar face on Hartford
Street in Westwood as she faithfully
walked her beloved dogs many times
daily. Joan volunteered at Glad Rags in
Westwood for several years. She was an
enthusiastic member of the Westwood
High School Class of 1950 and enjoyed
many reunions with her friends and
classmates.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend visiting hours in the Holden,
Dunn and Lawler Funeral Home, 55
High Rock St., WESTWOOD, on Friday,
May 11th from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.,
followed immediately by a Funeral
and Mass of Christian Burial at 11:00
a.m. at St. Margaret Mary Church, 845
High St., Westwood. Interment Old
Westwood Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Joan’s
memory to the Westwood Historical
Society, P.O. Box 2575, Westwood, MA
02090 or the Animal Rescue League, 10
Chandler St., Boston, MA 02116.
Holden-Dunn-Lawler
www.hdlfuneralhome.net
WISE, Richard A. “Dick”
Of Dover, MA on Apr 28,
2018. Beloved husband
for 42 years of Geraldine
(Callahan) Wise and father of the late
Andrew Douglas Wise. Dear “Papa” of
Andrea DeLucia and father in law of
Rosalie DeLucia of Medford. He was
the brother of the late Barbara Ryan
and is survived by his brother in law
William Ryan of St. Helena CA and
many nieces, nephews, grand nieces
and nephews. His Funeral Service will
be held on Fri., May 11 at 10 AM in St.
Dunstan’s Episcopal Church, 18 Springdale Rd., Dover, followed by interment
with Military Honors in Highland
Cemetery. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited. Visiting hours will be
in the Eaton Funeral Home, 1351
Highland Ave., NEEDHAM, on Thurs
4-8 PM. In lieu of flowers, a donation
to the Andrew Douglas Wise Memorial
Fund c/o Records & Gifts Processing,
Memorial Hall, UMass Amherst, 134
Hicks Way, Amherst, MA 01003, please
list on memo Andrew Douglas Wise
Memorial Fund or online www.umass.
edu/giving. Late WW II US Army Air
Corps veteran. For full obituary, or to
share a memory of Dick, please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
Needham 781-444-0201
T h e
B10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Business
Open Bypass Road and Silver
Line ramp to general public.
Opening the
ramp (left) to
the Silver Line
would give
buses direct
access to the
Massachusetts
Turnpike. The
South Boston
Bypass Road
is authorized
for commercial
use only, but
could improve
access from the
waterfront to
South Bay.
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Ideas to help
ease Seaport
traffic web
There’s been progress but as area
grows, let’s consider 5 fixes now
Their adoption in Everett
(above) resulted in a
30-percent reduction in
travel time.
Experiment with bus-only
lanes on Summer Street.
Shirley Leung
Five years ago, I wrote a column
about how the Seaport District may
choke on its own traffic if we didn’t
do something about it.
And that was before General Electric, Amazon, and a bunch of other
companies decided to set up shop in
the South Boston Waterfront.
Back then, we were already complaining about the bumper-to-bumper traffic along the main spine of
Seaport Boulevard during rush hour. Now, other main arteries
such as A Street get clogged as well, and the Silver Line continues
to struggle to handle the evening commute.
What have city and state officials been doing about any of this?
Well, this being Boston, we have studied the matter, and we’re going to study it again.
I don’t want to leave the impression officials, employers, and
developers have been sitting on their hands. There has been a lot
of activity behind the scenes and some real progress. Highlights
include: consolidation of private shuttles, more regular bus service, and the impending launch of ferry service between North
Station and Fan Pier.
But is this enough?
I’ve spent the past week talking to transportation advocates,
city and state officials, and those in the private sector about what
more can be done to battle Seaport gridlock. Here are five fixes to
consider now:
LEUNG, Page B13
Create a business
improvement district.
Property owners in Downtown Crossing
(above) and abutters to the Rose
Kennedy Greenway opted to pay higher
taxes to help maintain neighborhoods.
Walk or bike.
Really.
More than 70 signs have been
put up to encourage walking
and protected bike lanes are
being built.
Hiawatha Bray
Takeda’s
takeover
of Shire
looms
Together, they have
5,000 Mass. staffers
Deal is worth $62b
By Jonathan Saltzman
GLOBE STAFF
Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. of Japan has finalized an agreement to buy
Shire PLC, the second-biggest biotech
employer in Massachusetts, for $62
billion in the largest-ever international
takeover by a Japanese company.
The boards of both companies announced Tuesday morning that they
had reached a deal after Takeda raised
the amount of cash in the offer it made
two weeks ago. The deal, which still
needs approval from shareholders,
would take effect in the first half of
2019.
The final deal is about 46 percent
cash and 54 percent stock, leaving
Shire shareholders owning about half
of the combined company.
Takeda will pay $66.56 per Shire
share: $30.33 in cash, with the rest in
the form of 0.839 of a new Takeda
share. Shire is based in Ireland and
listed on the London Stock Exchange.
That’s a 60 percent premium to the
price before Takeda first said it wanted
to take over Shire, on March 28.
Susan Kilsby, chairwoman of Shire,
said the takeover of her company —
which is best known as the maker of
Adderall, a treatment for ADHD, but
has become one of the world’s biggest
makers of medicines for rare diseases
— is in the best interest of shareholders.
“ With this combination, Shire
helps create an even stronger biopharmaceutical company, with a robust
R&D pipeline and expanded global
footprint,” she said in a statement.
Dr. Andrew Plump, Takeda’s chief
medical and scientific officer since
2015, said acquiring Shire will raise
from three to 10 the number of latestage clinical drugs that Takeda has in
its pipeline. Having Shire also will inTAKEDA, Page B13
MORE
GOVERNMENT
Amazon, Seattle at odds on
tax to curb homelessness. B12.
MANAGEMENT
Five more Nike executives
out in harassment probe. B12.
TECH LAB
Google says, ‘Put
down the phone’
M
BOSTON PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT AGENCY
Seeing the skyline from a new perspective
By Tim Logan
GLOBE STAFF
For years, the Boston Planning &
Development Agency has kept a wooden scale model of downtown in a room
on the ninth floor of City Hall. It’s a
way for officials to see what proposed
buildings would look like in context.
Now the BPDA is bringing that concept into the 21st century, and making
it public.
The agency on Tuesday unveiled a
The Boston
Planning &
Development
Agency
digitized its 3-D
model of the
city and made
it publicly
available.
new digital 3-D model of Boston on its
website, the latest step in the BPDA’s
push to be more transparent, and to
spark conversations about planning
for the city’s future.
It’s a model of the entire city, with
129,000 buildings from East Boston to
Mattapan. The map is pannable and
scannable, and detailed enough to capture backyard sheds, rooftop furniture,
and lots of trees. And it comes with
3­D CITY, Page B12
y wife thinks I
spend too much
time with my
smartphone. And
now, the people at
Google agree with her.
I didn’t see that coming.
After all, Google’s parent company, Alphabet Inc., took in $110 billion in revenue last year, most of it
from ads Google pumps into smartphones. The typical American adult
spends about three hours looking at
a smartphone every day, according
to the market research firm comScore. For Google, each of those
hours is money in the bank.
Yet Google now wants us to put
down the phone and pick up something else — a good book, perhaps,
or our kids. On Tuesday, the company announced a new version of its
Android phone software that includes features designed to curb
our screen time. Google calls this
If history
is any
indicator,
we are
very
unlikely
to listen
more balanced lifestyle “digital
well-being.”
Up to now, smartphones goaded
us to stay connected; we dreaded
being the last to know about breaking news or celebrity gossip. But
the new Android P software, chief
executive Sundar Pichai said, is
meant to teach users “the joy of
missing out.”
Android P, due for release later
this year, will include an enhanced
mobile version of Dashboard, the
service that reveals all the data
Google collects about each user.
Now we’ll be able to see how much
time we spend using particular
apps, broken down by day or by
week. At a glance, you’ll know
you’ve spent two hours on Facebook today. You’ll also be able to set
up a daily quota for each app.
When you reach it, the app icon
will turn a colorless gray to remind
TECH LAB, Page B13
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
TALKING POINTS
LEGAL
FORMER BELMONT
MAN CONVICTED
IN MORE THAN
$6 MILLION PONZI
SCHEME
Agenda
A former Belmont man from a prominent local family was convicted Tuesday by a federal
jury for his role in a decadelong Ponzi scheme that defrauded 15 investors of more than $6
million, according to the US Attorney’s Office. John William “Jack” Cranney, 76, now of El
Paso, was convicted after a two-week trial on three counts of wire fraud, 12 counts of mail
fraud, and three counts of money laundering. The mail and wire fraud charges carry a federal prison sentence of up to 20 years, while the money laundering charges carry a sentence
of up to 10 years. Cranney was released with an electronic monitoring device while he
awaits sentencing scheduled for Aug. 2. Cranney’s travels will be restricted to El Paso County in Texas. Cranney was once a respected figure in Belmont who lived in a $3.8 million
home and rubbed elbows with the Romneys, who also lived in the town just northwest of
Boston. He made his money as a top distributor of Shaklee Corp. vitamins and nutritional
supplements, reportedly earning an estimated $45,000 to $60,000 a month. From 2001
through 2012, Cranney convinced a number of Shaklee associates, family members, old
friends, and former employees to invest their savings and transfer their IRA and 401(k) retirement money into a fund and plan he said he managed, but that were actually shell companies, according to federal authorities. Instead, Cranney stole millions of dollars that were
entrusted to him and spent them on his own bills and debts to fund his declining health
and nutrition products distributorship. In 2012, Cranney’s scheme collapsed after initial investors began demanding a return to their funds and he could not obtain new investment
money. He was sued that year by several of his alleged victims, including his own son.
— KATHELEEN CONTI
Thursday, May 10
GOVERNMENT
MBTA DROPS
SANTANDER BANK
FOR CITIZENS
ENERGY
HEALEY TELLS
LAWMAKERS TO SHUT
DOWN ELECTRICITY
MARKETING INDUSTRY
PHARMACEUTICALS
VALEANT CHANGES
ITS NAME
The MBTA has dropped Santander
Bank in favor of Providence-based Citizens Bank to handle the agency’s commercial banking accounts, according
to MBTA officials. They say the new
three-year contract will generate
roughly $3,000 more interest income
per day, or roughly $1 million a year.
The T expects to finish moving roughly
$70 million in deposits over to Citizens
by the end of the week. One plus about
the new contract: The interest rate on
the deposits will rise automatically
with the federal funds rate. Ten banks bid on the job, including Santander, T officials said.
They also said Citizens’ stronger Community Reinvestment Act rating factored into the decision. A spokeswoman for Santander said the bank, a Boston subsidiary of Spain’s Banco
Santander, will still provide lockbox services to the T and is “proud of our longstanding,
meaningful relationship with the MBTA, and we look forward to many opportunities to
work together in the future.” — JON CHESTO
➔ PANEL DISCUSSION
Branding and design
Attend a panel discussion hosted by the
Poppin furniture company featuring
industry experts speaking about
transforming businesses through
branding and design. Thursday, 6 to 8
p.m., MOO office, 109 Kingston St., third
floor, Boston. Free. Register online or go
to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Attorney General Maura Healey made her case to the state Legislature on Tuesday, arguing
during a State House committee hearing that lawmakers should completely shut down the
industry that markets electricity choices to consumers. Instead of offering savings, Healey
said her staff has found that Massachusetts consumers have been collectively paying millions more than if they had stayed with their utilities — overcharges that totaled $176 million over two years. Healey said she is particularly unhappy that people who could least afford the higher utility bills were apparently targeted. No bill has been filed yet, but Healey
said she hopes to work with lawmakers to come up with a ban on competitive electricity
sales to individuals. The Retail Energy Supply Association fought back with its own study,
saying the majority of competitive providers offer lower rates than the utilities, proving consumers can achieve savings if they shop around. — JON CHESTO
Valeant Pharmaceuticals, which came under heavy scrutiny for acquiring the rights to
drugs and then drastically raising their prices, is changing its name. The Canadian company said Tuesday that it will now be called Bausch Health Cos. CEO Joseph Papa said in a
prepared statement that the name change is ‘‘a major step forward’’ in the company’s transformation. Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc. fell into the crosshairs of Washington after an extended acquisition spree of other companies, followed by triple-digit price
hikes on critical heart drugs and other medicines. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ PANEL DISCUSSION
Diversity in the
workplace
Join media company Allen & Gerritsen
and the Mass. Cultural Council for a panel
discussion on the importance of diversity,
equality, and inclusion in the workplace.
The event is part of an ongoing series
ADVERTISING
R.I. CHAPTER OF ACLU
OBJECTS TO NEW AD
POLICY AT AIRPORTS
RETAIL
KOHL’S BENEFITS
FROM AMAZON
RETURN PARTNERSHIP
The Rhode Island chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union says a proposed rule to ban
political or controversial advertising at T.F. Green Airport may violate the First Amendment. The organization said Monday it is strongly opposed to the Rhode Island Airport
Corp.’s proposed regulations, which would apply to all airports in the state. The ACLU said
the new rules would expand the quasi-public agency’s ability to ban advertising with political positions and religious symbols, among other subjects. The rule would allow the agency
to bar anything it does not deem ‘‘family advertising.” — ASSOCIATED PRESS
For Kohl’s Corp., a partnership with Amazon.com Inc. seems to be paying off. Since the
launch of an October pilot program to accept
Amazon returns in some stores, traffic at participating Chicago Kohl’s stores has been about
8.5 percent higher than others, according to geolocation data analyzed by Gordon Haskett Research Advisors. About 56 percent of those who
returned Amazon goods to a Kohl’s location were new Kohl’s shoppers — or they hadn’t visited Kohl’s at least since July 1, according to the study. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
called UNITE, hosted by the Design
Museum Foundation. Thursday, 6:30 to
8:30 p.m., Allen & Gerritsen, 2 Seaport
Lane, Boston. Tickets are free for
members and $20 for nonmembers.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
➔ ADVICE
Ongoing help for
small­business
owners
SCORE Boston, a nonprofit focused on
entrepreneur education, invites owners of
local small businesses to take advantage
of complimentary hourlong counseling
and advice sessions with mentors.
ENTERTAINMENT
SPOTIFY TO OFFER
AUDIOBOOKS THAT
DOCUMENT MAKING
OF ICONIC ALBUMS
EMPLOYMENT
6.6 MILLION JOBS
ADVERTISED
IN MARCH
Spotify Technology SA will begin offering audiobooks that document the making of some of
the world’s best-known albums, including Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the USA.” The
world’s largest streaming-music service cut a deal with Britain’s Bloomsbury Publishing
PLC, whose 33‚ series also documents the backstories behind David Bowie’s “Low” and
Metallica’s “Black Album.” The publisher is perhaps best known for releasing the Harry Potter novels, but for now the Spotify deal focuses on books that document popular music
rather than J.K. Rowling’s wizarding world. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
US employers advertised 6.6 million open jobs in March, the most on records dating
back to December 2000, suggesting businesses want to staff up to meet strong demand. The Labor Department said that job openings rose 7.8 percent in March from
6.1 million in February. Yet overall hiring slipped, while quits increased. The number
of open jobs in March matched the number of unemployed. That’s historically unusual: Typically there are more unemployed than openings. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thursday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Newton Free
Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. Free. No
registration required.
➔ SEMINAR
Pollution prevention
seminar
Attend a discussion hosted by the Center
for Student Coastal Research, a nonprofit
focused on environmental education.
Speaker Mary Dever-Putnam from the
Environmental Protection Agency will
discuss how communities and businesses
can prepare for natural disasters and
prevent pollution. Thursday, 7 to 8 p.m.,
RETAIL
WALMART DROPS
UBER FOR GROCERY
DELIVERIES
Walmart can’t call an Uber anymore. Uber Technologies Inc. is ending a two-year-old pact
to have its drivers handle grocery deliveries for Walmart Inc. across four US cities, Walmart
spokeswoman Molly Blakeman said Tuesday. Uber’s final day will be June 30 and deliveries
in those markets will be handled instead by Walmart’s other providers including Deliv,
DoorDash Inc., and Postmates Inc. The defection is a hiccup for Walmart’s online grocery
service, which is expanding this year from six cities to more than 100 markets to battle Amazon.com Inc., Instacart Inc.’s network of grocers, and Target Corp. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
Center for Student Coastal Research, 40
Parker Ave., Cohasset. Free. Register
online or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
B12
Business
Seattle
proposes
tax to aid
homeless
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Five more
top Nike
executives
forced out
FIGHTING FOR WORKERS
By Julie Creswell
and Kevin Draper
Amazon, other
businesses balk
NEW YORK TIMES
By Phuong Le
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — Seattle’s latest
tax proposal to combat homelessness takes aim at large businesses such as Amazon that
have helped drive the city’s economic boom.
But the measure has
sparked intense debate — even
shouting matches in otherwise
reserved Seattle — over who
should pay to solve the housing
crisis e xacerbated by that
growth.
The City Council is proposing a tax on employee hours to
raise about $75 million a year
for affordable housing and
homelessness services. Nearly
600 large employers making at
least $20 million in gross revenues would pay about $500 a
year per worker.
Amazon, the city’s largest
employer, would take the biggest hit.
Supporters insist the online
retailer and others that have
benefited from Seattle’s prosperity and contributed to growing income inequality and skyrocketing rents can and should
pay.
Businesses and others say
the so-called head tax is misguided and potentially harmful.
Amazon raised the stakes
last week when it halted construction planning on a 17-story tower near its hometown
headquarters as it awaits a tax
vote. It is also rethinking filling
office space in another leased
building.
The company has more than
45,000 workers, meaning it
would pay more than $20 million a year under the tax. It
would likely owe even more
when the tax switches to a 0.7
percent tax on business payroll
in 2021.
Councilwoman Kshama
Sawant, a socialist, said affordable housing is critically important and the council should
‘‘stand up to Amazon and Jeff
Bezos’s bullying.’’ Construction
workers chanted ‘‘no head tax’’
and disrupted a news conference she held last week on Amazon’s campus.
Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan
hasn’t taken a position on the
tax but said she’ll work to find
common ground.
The proposal’s four sponsors
said in a joint statement last
week that the tax doesn’t target
one company, though they noted Amazon’s record quarterly
profits.
‘‘It seems only fair that as so
many struggle to make their
way through a tax system that’s
rigged in favor of large corporations, that we ask those same
corporations to financially contribute to the public health and
housing solutions designed to
address those consequences,’’
they wrote.
A council committee could
vote this week and the full
council may take it up Monday.
Amazon’s threat to pause its
expansion in Seattle comes as
20 cities vie to lure the company’s second headquarters and
as it expands its workforce in
Boston and Vancouver, British
Columbia. Some see it as a
warning to those contenders.
While criticized for being
slow to contribute, Amazon in
recent years donated two buildings on its campus to house the
homeless. It also plans to build
a shelter for homeless women,
children, and families within
one of its new buildings.
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INDUSTRIAL
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incl utils & parking. Great loc.
near I-93 & I-95 & Woburn
Mall, Contact Ed, 781-9830113, eas@cummings.com
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
Hundreds rallied inside the State House on Tuesday calling on legislators to pass a paid family and medical leave
program for Massachusetts workers and an increase in the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2022. The Raise
Up Massachusetts coalition rally featured speakers and a march by House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo’s office.
Neighbor calls police on black Airbnb guests
By Daniel Victor
NEW YORK TIMES
It was an entirely routine
moment: Four people exited
the home they had rented on
Airbnb in Rialto, Calif., and
loaded suitcases into their car.
Within minutes, several police cars had arrived and the
group was being questioned as
a helicopter flew overhead. A
neighbor who didn’t recognize
them had called the police, suspecting they were burglars.
They were in fact four creative professionals in town for
an event. Now the three black
people in the group are suing
the Rialto Police Department,
saying they were unfairly treated in the April 30 encounter.
“Got surrounded by the police for being black in a white
neighborhood,” one of the
guests, Donisha Prendergast, a
filmmaker and a granddaughter of Bob Marley, wrote on Instagram. “I’m sad and irritated
to see that fear is still the first
place police officers go in their
pursuit to serve and protect, to
the point that protocol supersedes their ability to have discernment.”
“We have been dealing with
different emotions and you
want to laugh about this but it’s
not funny,” Kelly Fyffe-Marshall, another filmmaker, wrote
on Instagram. “The trauma is
real. I’ve been angry, frustrated,
and sad. This is insanity.”
Komi-Oluwa Olafimihan, an
artist, pointed out that “over
700 people that look just like
me did not walk away alive
from a situation like this last
year.”
The police and the renters
offered different versions of
events, but both recorded video: The police through their
body cameras, the renters
through their phones.
Fyffe-Marshall said the officers came out of their cars, de-
manding that the group put
their hands in the air. At first,
the renters “joked about the
misunderstanding,” she said,
but the situation escalated after
20 minutes when a sergeant arrived.
The sergeant didn’t know
what Airbnb was, “insisted that
we were lying about it and said
we had to prove it,” Fyffe-Marshall said. She showed the officers their booking confirmations and called the landlord,
and the group was detained for
45 minutes, she said.
She said the neighbor called
the police because they had
failed to wave at her.
Fyffe-Marshall and Prendergast declined interview requests.
The Rialto Police Department said in a statement that
the group was questioned for
22 minutes and that officers
had not used restraints on
them. The officers learned they
were Airbnb guests “through
reasonable inquiry,” and they
were “immediately released
without incident,” the police
said.
“The Rialto Police Department is confident officers treated the involved individuals
with dignity, respect, and professionalism,” the police said.
Many people of color have
reported that police have been
called on them while going
about their everyday business,
a fact of life that has seen several prominent examples in recent weeks. National outrage
followed the arrest of two black
men in a Philadelphia Starbucks; a group of black women
had police called on them for
golfing too slowly in York County, Pa.; and two Native American brothers had a college visit
in Colorado cut short when a
parent told a 911 dispatcher
that their behavior and clothing
was suspicious.
Audi halts deliveries over latest emissions woes
By Christoph Rauwald
and Birgit Jennen
BLOOMBERG NEWS
Volkswagen AG’s Audi unit
suspended deliveries of some of
its popular sedans and coupes
after informing German authorities of irregularities in
emissions systems, embroiling
the luxury brand further in the
carmaker’s diesel scandal.
An internal review revealed
abnormalities in the enginemanagement software of current A6 and A7 models with V-6
diesel motors, Audi said in a
statement on Tuesday. That
prompted a halt in deliveries
pending an inquiry by regulators in Germany and Luxembourg, where the models were
certified.
The problem relates to diesel
engines with the latest Euro-6
standard, rather than older versions generally affected in the
past. The issue raises questions
about Audi’s handling of emissions irregularities and will
likely increase pressure on Rupert Stadler, the brand’s chief
who has been a frequent target
of criticism in the aftermath of
the scandal. The carmaker, 99.6
percent-owned by Volkswagen,
holds its annual shareholders
meeting on Wednesday.
The inquiry affects about
60,000 vehicles worldwide, including 33,000 in Germany, according to Germany’s Transport
Ministry. Audi said no US customers are affected. The A6 sedan starts at $68,900 in Ger-
many, while the A7 costs from
$78,685. Audi is the biggest
contributor to the German auto
giant’s profit.
As Germany’s automotive
watchdog continues to scrutinize Volkswagen’s diesel portfolio, Audi said in February that it
is recalling top-of-the line Audi
A8 sedans with 4.2-liter V8 diesel motors. The carmaker said
in March that additional recalls
are likely as it undertakes more
tests on combinations of engines and transmissions.
VW chief executive Herbert
Diess has pledged to intensify
compliance as the world’s largest automaker wrestles with the
fallout from the diesel emissions scandal uncovered by US
authorities in September 2015.
VW has largely restored profit,
and vehicle deliveries are at a
record high, but thousands of
lawsuits from disgruntled customers and investors are set to
drag on for years. VW has earmarked more than $29.67 billion so far for fines, recalls, and
other related expenses.
The A6 contains software
that artificially reduces the injection of urea — used to neutralize smog-causing emissions
— to extend the range of the refill tank, according to Der Spiegel magazine, which first reported about the issue. Audi,
which didn’t elaborate on the
nature of the irregularities, said
it would provide a software update in coordination with authorities.
A sweeping investigation into workplace behavior at Nike
has resulted in the departures
of five more top-level executives, raising to 11 the number
of senior managers to leave the
company as it continues to
overhaul its upper ranks amid
widespread allegations of harassment and discrimination
against female employees.
Together, the departing executives oversee some of the
most important business categories and high-profile departments at the world’s largest
sports footwear and apparel
company.
Nike confirmed Tuesday
morning that four managers
were leaving: Steve Lesnard,
the head of running in North
America; Helen Kim, who oversaw Eastern North America; Simon Pestridge, a head of marketing for the company’s perf o r m a n c e c at e go r i e s ; a n d
Tommy Kain, Nike’s director of
sports marketing.
L at e r i n t h e d ay, a N i ke
spokeswoman also confirmed
the departure of Ibrahem
Hasan, a senior creative director who former employees said
had been involved with the
company’s marketing campaigns with British female
singer FKA Twigs.
None of the five departing
executives responded immediately to requests for comment.
In a companywide address
last week, Mark Parker, Nike’s
chief executive, apologized to
employees and said that departures related to the company’s
broad investigation into workplace behavior would be completed by this week.
Six executives had already
left the company or said they
would leave in connection with
the inquiry. That group included Trevor Edwards, president
of the Nike brand and a potential successor to Parker.
Those departures came after a group of female Nike employees began an informal survey that sought input on sexual
harassment and discrimination
against women. The survey
was presented to Parker on
March 5. Ten days later, the executive shake-up began with
the announcement that Edwards was resigning.
For Wall Street, the turmoil
could be worrisome and
prompt questions about
whether Nike will have the
leaders it needs in place to execute its aggressive business
strategy.
Parker, who has been chief
executive since 2006, has set a
goal of increasing Nike’s revenue from around $36 billion to
$50 billion by 2022. Achieving
that will involve transforming
the company ’s business by
shifting away, in part, from its
traditional sports-athlete focus
to the women’s and so-called
athleisure markets. It also
plans to sell more of its products in its own retail stores and
through its website.
Boston makes 3­D map of the city available to public
u3­D CITY
Continued from Page B10
tools that allow anyone to layer
on zoning maps, schools, MBTA stops, and even flood-prone
areas.
“This allows the public to
see what we’re seeing,” said BPDA director Brian Golden. “It
helps us with community engagement and allows us to step
up our ability to communicate
with people about their city.”
The map was inspired, in
part, by the debate over shadows cast on the Boston Common and Public Garden by the
proposed skyscraper at Winthrop Square. City officials
found themselves supporting
complex changes to state law to
permit the tower based only on
snapshots of shadows supplied
by developer Millennium Partners. This new system allows
anyone to look at shadows anywhere in the city, any time of
day, any day of the year.
“We didn’t have the internal
ability to assess that before,”
Golden said.
Golden and BPDA planning
director Sara Myerson said they
envision making good use of
the digital model at community
meetings for upcoming zoning
plans in Downtown Crossing
and other neighborhoods, and
for planning around Climate
Ready Boston, the city’s road
map for dealing with rising sea
levels and other effects of climate change.
As of now, the publicly available map only includes buildings that are built or under construction — not those proposed
or still in permitting. But an inhouse model includes planned
buildings, too, and agency staff
said they’ll likely be incorporated into the review of new proposals. Staff members also are
developing tools to show
BOSTON PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT AGENCY
The map has 129,000 buildings from Brighton to Mattapan.
where, for instance, you could
see a proposed building from
ground level, and how many
floors of a building would have
views of the Public Garden, or
Boston Harbor.
“ This is not just about a
building in isolation, it’s about
a building in context,” said
Corey Zehngebot, a senior urban designer at the BPDA.
“This can be really useful to understand a building in the fabric of the city.”
This sort of sophisticated
geographic information sys-
tems technology has long existed in the domain of planners
and architects, but relatively
few cities make it available to
the public. The BPDA said Boston will be among the first to
combine 3-D mapping with
two-dimensional layers — like
of zoning districts and areas
with 1 percent annual flood risk
— and post it for all to see.
In a city where development
debates can become fierce, and
where the BPDA often finds itself in the crossfire between developers and the community,
the agency hopes that making
more information accessible
will improve communication.
“The more we explain ourselves,” Golden said, “the better.”
Tim Logan can be reached at
tim.logan@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at
@bytimlogan.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B13
Ideas to
help ease
Seaport
gridlock
uLEUNG
Continued from Page B10
Markets
Stocks end the day mostly flat
The major stock indexes partially recovered from a daylong
slide in the final minutes of trading Tuesday to finish essentially flat after investors weighed the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw from a 2015 nuclear deal with
Iran and reinstate sanctions on the country. The change
had been largely expected by traders, who sent crude oil
prices sliding more than 2 percent a day after crude went
above $70 a barrel for the first time in more than three
years. Health care, utilities, and consumer-goods companies were among the biggest decliners. Banks, technology
stocks, and industrials posted gains. Energy sector companies also eked out a gain after being in a slump much of the
day on lower oil prices. Benchmark US crude fell 2.4 percent to $69.06 per barrel in New York. Uncertainty over
whether the United States would pull out of the Iran pact
helped lift the price of crude on Monday above $70. Deal
news also helped move the market. Comcast fell 5.6 percent
on a report it aims to make a new offer for the entertainment businesses Twenty-First Century Fox agreed to sell to
Disney. Fox slipped 0.1 percent; Disney fell 0.7 percent.
DOW JONES industrial average
1. Experiment with bus­on­
ly lanes on Summer Street.
When a 2016 transit study espoused the virtues of bus-only
l a n e s i n Ev e r e tt , t h a t w a s
enough for Mayor Carlo DeMaria to get on board. “Put up the
cones,” he told his transportation planner, Jay Monty. A
month later, orange cones were
out on a section of Broadway,
where only buses could travel
between 5 a.m. and 9 a.m.
The benefits were immediate: a 30 percent reduction in
travel time. Last September the
bus-only lane was made permanent with paint, and Everett
has been hailed as a model for
bus rapid transit in the region.
The city of Boston launched
a monthlong pilot on Washington Street in Roslindale this
week. But what about the Seaport District? I have a feeling
we will have to wait as the city
launches another transportation study this summer. Perhaps DeMaria could lend Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh a
few of his traffic cones.
2. Free the South Boston By­
pass Road and Silver Line
ramp. In the name of journalism, I once drove down the 1.1mile restricted South Boston
Bypass Road to the Southeast
Expressway, avoiding a packed
stretch of Interstate 93 just
south of downtown. It took less
than three minutes. It was magical.
The state road is authorized
for commercial trucks that ferry goods in and out of the working port. Since my 2013 trip
down the Forbidden Road, the
state opened it up to general
traffic for six months to see
what would happen. The answer: Commuters and truckers
could both use the road without
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2016
A test to open the restricted Bypass Road to all traffic for six months was successful.
getting in each other’s way.
So what’s the holdup?
“It’s a question of getting everyone to the table,” said Tom
Glynn, who as the head of the
Massachusetts Port Authority
has been involved in fixing the
Seaport’s transportation bottlenecks.
The other restricted route is
a ramp down into the Ted Williams Tunnel that provides a
much quicker access than the
one used by Silver Line buses to
get to Logan Airport. The state
says the ramp was constructed
for public safety and highway
maintenance vehicles.
The good news is that state
transportation officials are
looking into opening up the
ramp to give Silver Line buses
faster access to I-90. The holdup: assessing whether the 60foot-long buses can use the
ramp safely.
Here’s an idea, and it doesn’t
cost a dime: Let Silver Line buses use the ramp for a month
during rush hour and see what
happens. The buses were allowed onto the ramp in 2006 after other exits were closed after
a piece of the Williams Tunnel
ceiling fell and killed a woman
traveling in a car below it.
3. Create a business im­
provement district in the
South Boston Waterfront. Developers and landowners will
probably howl at this idea because they already pay enough
in property taxes, but the creation of business improvement
district, or BID, not only can
provide focus, but also the ability to generate revenue for ambitious projects that benefit the
entire district.
Otherwise we might end up
with pet projects like the $100
million aerial gondola between
South Station and the marine
industrial park that might only
help one development.
We have two local BIDs –
one in Downtown Crossing and
one made up of abutters to the
Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy
Greenway. Property owners in
those districts have opted to
pay higher taxes to spruce up
those neighborhoods.
Last year the Downtown
Boston BID generated about
$6.2 million in revenue collected from about 350 property
owners.
“I am a huge proponent of
BIDs. They are all created for
different reasons, but whenever
they are, they make a BIG impact,” Rosemarie Sansone, president of the Downtown Boston
BID, wrote in an e-mail to me.
“They cannot do everything
and cannot solve social problems. But what they do best is
communicate and bring people
together to create a collective
voice.”
4. Battle for the curb. Anyone who has taken an Uber or
Lyft, you probably are guilty of
t h i s : g e tt i n g p i c ke d u p o r
dropped off in the middle of a
busy street instead of at the
curb. Then the cars behind you
have to wait, and before you
know it you’re the source of a
traffic jam. Now let’s multiply
that by 100,000. That’s close to
the average number of ridehailing trips that take place in
Boston daily.
City officials are working
with ride-hailing companies
and developers to designate areas for pickup or drop-off akin
to loading zones rather than the
current free-for-all system. The
city tried this successfully during the Boston Marathon, and
it’s something done at Logan
Airport and the South Boston
convention center to reduce
congestion and confusion.
We ride-hailing customers
can also do our part. Insist on
pickups or drop-offs at the
curb.
5. Don’t forget to bike or
walk. This one is also on us. The
city has started to build protected bike lanes along Seaport
Boulevard and Summer Street,
and they should be done by the
end of the year. Over the winter,
the city, state, and the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority put up more than 70 pedestrian wayfinding signs, complete with their own hashtag,
#WalkSBW. Visitors might not
realize how close they are to the
waterfront, but locals also
needed to be reminded that the
Seaport can be walked even if it
doesn’t yet have the human
scale of the Back Bay.
Shirley Leung is a Globe
columnist. She can be reached
at sleung@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @leung.
Layoffs could follow Takeda­Shire deal
uTAKEDA
Continued from Page B10
crease Takeda’s focus on geneoriented treatments rather
than traditional chemical compounds.
“We can now go after targets
and diseases that we couldn’t
previously,” said Plump, who
oversees Takeda’s research and
development operations, which
are based in Massachusetts.
The Shire name, he said, will
disappear when the company
becomes part of Takeda.
The takeover would give
Takeda a foothold in the market for rare-disease drugs. The
US government gives drug
makers financial incentives to
develop medicines for disorders that afflict 200,000 or few-
er patients.
And the acquisition would
catapult Takeda, which has few
late-stage experimental drugs
in its own pipeline, into the
ranks of the world’s biggest
pharmaceutical companies.
Takeda was already Asia’s largest drug maker.
Although based in Ireland,
Shire has most of its operations
in Lexington and Cambridge
and more than 3,000 workers
in Massachusetts.
Only Sanofi Genzyme, the
rare-disease unit of the French
drug giant Sanofi, is bigger
than Shire; it has about 5,000
employees, according to the
Massachusetts Biotechnology
Council.
Analysts and business pro-
fessors recently predicted that
the takeover will almost certainly result in layoffs of several
hundred Shire employees over
the ne xt couple of years —
mostly among administrative
employees whose duties could
be filled by workers for Osakabased Takeda.
The combined firm would
be the eighth-biggest drug maker in the world.
The two companies currently have more than 50,000 employees between them worldwide and more than 5,000 in
Massachusetts, making it potentially the biggest pharmaceutical employer in the state.
Japanese drug makers have
pursued growth abroad as sales
slow at home. Their drug pipe-
lines are running dry, and their
portfolios of patent-protected
medicines shrinking. In addition, the Japanese government
is increasingly pressuring drug
companies to limit or cut prices
of blockbuster medicines.
Shire has faced pressures of
its own. The company was saddled with debt from its $32 billion acquisition of Baxalta in
2016, a widely criticized deal,
while generic drug makers have
stepped up competition. Last
month it announced the sale of
its oncology business to French
drug maker Servier for $2.4 billion.
Jonathan Saltzman
can be reached at
jsaltzman@globe.com.
Google offers tools to trim your phone use
NASDAQ Composite index
uTECH LAB
Continued from Page B10
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
you you’ve hit your limit.
The new Android will offer
a Do Not Disturb mode that
turns off all contact with the
outside world; it turns off the
phone ringer, vibrator, and onscreen notifications. Android
P will activate Do Not Disturb
if you simply place the phone
face-down on a table, a feature
called “shush mode.” (You can
program in exceptions, such
as the numbers of your spouse
or kids.)
Finally, there’s Wind Down,
which is designed to do just
that: Punch in your bedtime,
and the phone screen goes
monochrome at the appointed
hour.
So why is Google suddenly
so interested in our well-being? I’m guessing the backlash
against social networks Facebook and Twitter over the past
year has alerted corporate
management that the public
isn’t as well disposed toward
giant Internet companies as it
once was. Offering tools to
help us manage our Internet
usage may buff up Google’s
corporate image. “Message: I
care,” as the first President
Bush once clumsily put it.
Besides, it’s a safe bet that
these features will barely
erode our smartphone usage.
We barely use the Internet
control tools already available
to us.
For instance, how many
parents
know
about Family Link?
It’s an app
Google
rolled out
last year to
let parents
set limits
on the Android phones used
by their children. With Family
Link, an adult can check out
where the youngsters are going online and how much time
they spend there. It sounds
like just the thing for the responsible parent.
But the app has been
downloaded only 1 million
times, according to Google
Play Store — this in a country
with about 50 million households with children. Many of
us just hand smartphones to
our youngsters and then step
aside. So why expect people to
activate these new digital
well-being tools to manager
our own phone habits?
Jay Winsten, an associate
dean at the Harvard School of
Public Health, is as skeptical
as I am. Winsten helped devise the nationwide
designated
driver campaign that
helped reduce deaths
caused by
drunken
driving. The
campaign helped slash alcohol-related car crash deaths by
30 percent between 1988 and
1994.
But traffic accident deaths
have been rising in recent
years. Winsten said much of
the blame is not to alcohol,
but to drivers distracted by
their mobile devices. So he’s
glad Google is urging users to
cut down. “They’re on the
right track,” he said, “but it’s a
small step for mankind.”
We barely use the
Internet control tools
already available to
us.
What’s needed, said Winsten, is a shift in cultural attitudes toward smartphone use,
similar to how American attitudes toward drinking and
driving changed. The movie
and TV industries donate the
equivalent of $100 million a
year in free advertising to
pound the drunken driving
lesson home, Weinstein said,
and even the liquor industry
helps out in a bid to boost its
public image.
Winsten said that Google
could easily afford $100 million a year for a similar campaign touting responsible
smartphone use. “Without
that kind of a massive cultural
effort,” he said, “it’s not going
to change very much, certainly not very quickly.”
So while Google’s digital
well-being tools may be well
intentioned, it’ll take a lot
more to make us cut back on
using our phones. A dead battery, for instance.
Hiawatha Bray can be reached
at hiawatha.bray@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeTechLab.
B14
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“He’s a poodle-Larry mix.”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
8
3
2
1
9
7
4
6
5
9
1
5
8
4
6
7
3
2
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
6
4
7
2
5
3
1
9
8
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
4
9
6
5
7
8
3
2
1
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
7
2
3
9
6
1
5
8
4
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
5
8
1
4
3
2
6
7
9
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
1
7
4
3
8
9
2
5
6
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
2
6
8
7
1
5
9
4
3
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
3
5
9
6
2
4
8
1
7
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
ZIPPY “Brave New Whirled” by Bill Griffith
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
A plugger doesn’t wait for special occasions to buy
chocolates for his wife. Of course, he doesn’t expect
her to eat all of them herself, either.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
5 6
8
4
8
7
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
LOOSEY-GOOSEY BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 “Concert”
attachments
6 Burns and
Shakespeare
11 X2 automaker
14 Rip out stitches
15 Square,
in the ’60s
16 Cheer syllable
17 Lady of rhymes
19 Swing or disco
time?
20 True tires
21 Easily
influenced
23 Like many wild
creatures
26 Didn’t pass
27 Frat boy
wannabe
28 Harmless
ammo
29 Stomach
problem
30 Thing to
punch
31 Boy Scot
34 Herd member?
35 Maine’s state
animal
36 Act like a
model
37 Mine yield
38 Clownish fools?
39 “As we
forgive ___ ...”
40 Cautioned
42 Rented
43 Way-rowdy
youngster
45 Some servers
46 Consecrate, oily
47 Hub by the Loop
48 Lion sign
49 Valuable nugget
maker
54 Crammed duo?
55 Workers’ dues
collector
56 IRS project
57 Common grain
58 Dish in a lab
59 Aerobic units
DOWN
1 Dubble Bubble,
for one
2 Musician born
2/18/33
3 Intensifying
suffix
4 Like recurring
arguments
5 Suffer in
August
6 Horse-led
transport
7 Way-old soon
8 P, to Greeks
9 Supplant
10 Explore caves
11 Escapes
restraints
12 River in France
13 “___ I miss?”
18 Aggravate
22 Squid defense
23 Magli of shoes
24 Swiss
mathematician
Leonhard
25 What a daft
carpenter has?
26 Bit of dental
advice
28 Type of bank
30 String along
32 Plus column
listing
33 Documents in
safes
35 Dull delivery
36 Gradually
discontinue
38 Introduce,
as a subject
39 Canister at a riot
41 Will Smith role
42 Like some
meats
43 More fit
44 War opponent
45 “If you won’t, ___
will!”
47 Dump feature
50 Activated, as a
Christmas tree
51 Poetic work
52 U-turn from gulp
53 UFO passengers
5
4
2
2
4
3 6 7
8
8
1
7
3
9
5
8
4
6 3
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Store in Maine pulls Junot Diaz’s books
If questionable character is sufficient to ban an author’s work, the
shelves at most bookstores would be
pretty thin. Nonetheless, a bookstore
in Westbrook, Maine, has removed all
titles by Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and MIT professor Junot Diaz,
who’s been accused of forcibly kissing
a fellow writer.
Allison Krzanowski, co-owner of
Quill Books & Beverage, told the Portland Press Herald that she doesn’t
want to support writers accused of
sexual misconduct. (She said her store
previously pulled titles by David Fos­
ter Wallace and Sherman Alexie, who
have faced similar if more numerous
allegations.)
“There are plenty of authors who
aren’t sexually assaulting and sexually
harassing people, so we make more
space for them by removing the ones
who are,” Krzanowski said. “Some
people thanked us in person and commented that it can be really triggering
for survivors of sexual assault to see
those names out there,” Krzanowski
said. “There have been some people
who think we are banning books, and
to that, I say it is our choice not to carry products. . . . We have a ‘safe space’
commitment and that extends to our
shelves.”
So far, Boston bookstores aren’t removing works by Diaz, but an informal survey of area stores found that
novelist Zinzi Clemmons’s claim that
Diaz made an unwanted sexual overture several years ago may affect how
prominently they promote or display
his books.
Harvard Book Store said it typically
doesn’t ban books, but it has removed
a display of Diaz’s latest, a children’s
book titled “Islandborn.” Likewise,
Brookline Booksmith said it will let
consumers decide if they want to buy
Diaz’s books, but it may not feature Diaz’s work in the store.
At Papercuts J.P., owner Kate Layte
said she’s “still formulating opinions”
in the wake of the allegations, but
she’s inclined to leave it up to customers, some of whom may want to judge
Diaz’s books independent of questions
about the author’s conduct.
Porter Square Books owner Dina
Mardell said the store will continue to
stock Diaz’s books, just as it has continued to sell Alexie’s books and “Giant
of the Senate,” a book by Al Franken,
the Minnesota senator who was forced
to resign over allegations he acted inappropriately toward women.
At the New England Mobile Book
Fair, owner Tom Lyons said removing
Diaz’s books “makes no sense at all.”
He said the accusations against the author have “turned into guilty until
proven innocent.”
Diaz, who won the Pulitzer Prize in
2008 for “The Brief Wondrous Life Of
Oscar Wao,” hasn’t denied the allegations made by Clemmons and others.
In an essay published in The New
Yorker before Clemmons made her
claims, Diaz detailed sexual abuse he
suffered at the age of 8, and said it led
him to treat women in his life poorly.
Diaz has since issued this statement: “I take responsibility for my
past. That is the reason I made the decision to tell the truth of my rape and
its damaging aftermath. This conversation is important and must continue. I am listening to and learning from
women’s stories in this essential and
overdue cultural movement. We must
continue to teach all men about consent and boundaries.”
Patrons and supporters turn out for Gardner Gala
The annual Gardner Gala is a chance for patrons and supporters of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum to
get gussied up for an evening at the museum. This year’s to-do included Ayodele Casel tap dancing in the Dutch
Room, actress/writer Obehi Janice reciting Shakespeare soliloquies in the Raphael Room, the Attacca Quartet
performing classical music in the Gothic Room, and the Zorn Trio playing contemporary music in the Titian
Room. This year’s gala was co-chaired by Katherine Chapman Stemberg, Richard and Lucy Lim, and Howard
and Fredericka Stevenson. From left: the Stevensons, Chapman Stemberg, Bill Schnoor, and the Lims.
David Boeri signs off at WBUR — for now
Paltrow attends
funeral in Newton
for fiancé’s dad
Actress Gwyneth Paltrow joined fiancé Brad Falchuk at his father’s funeral in Newton over the weekend.
Paltrow was among the mourners
at Temple Emanuel. Dr. Kenneth Fal­
chuk, who died May 3, was a professor
at Harvard Medical
School and the founder and onetime chairman of Best Doctors
Inc., a medical information services company that connects people with doctors.
The actress and Falchuk have not
said when they’re getting hitched, but
they did recently throw a celeb-heavy
party to celebrate the occasion. Guests
included Jennifer Aniston, Cameron
Diaz, Kate Hudson, and Chelsea Han­
dler.
Falchuk, the co-creator of “Glee”
and “American Horror Story” with Ry­
an Murphy, was previously married to
MICHAEL BLANCHARD
AFP/GETTY IMAGES/FILE
Actress Gwyneth Paltrow is
engaged to Brad Falchuk (inset).
Suzanne Bukinik, with whom he has
two children. Paltrow, an Oscar winner for “Shakespeare in Love,” was
married for 13 years to Coldplay singer Chris Martin, with whom she also
has two children.
Something new?
A fond farewell to reporter David
Boeri, who retired this week after 50
years in the news business.
The longtime former WCVB and
WGBH television reporter had worked
for the past decade at WBUR, reporting on crime, politics, corruption, and,
of course, the case of James “Whitey”
Bulger. (Boeri authored the e-book
“Bulger on Trial: Boston’s Most Notorious Gangster and the Pursuit of Justice” in 2013.)
In recent years, in addition to his
work related to the South Boston mobster, about whom he possessed an encyclopedic knowledge, Boeri won particular praise for a 2011 series of stories he did about Nga Truong, a 16year-old Worcester girl who spent
nearly three years in jail based on a
bogus confession coerced by police.
While at WBUR, Boeri won a National
Edward R. Murrow Award for investigative journalism, a New England Edward R. Murrow Award for investigative journalism, the New England Associated Press Award for hard news
reporting, and the ACLU Defender of
Freedom Award.
Earlier in his career, Boeri had written a book about the problems faced
by commercial fishermen in Boston,
titled “ ‘Tell It Good-bye Kiddo’: The
Decline of the New England Offshore
Fishery,” and
another about
Eskimo hunters in Northwestern Alaska, called “People of the Ice
Whale.”
In an interview with
BILL BRETT/FILE
WBUR, Boeri,
who lives in the Central Massachusetts
town of Petersham — a slog that takes
five hours a day (and about 40,000
miles a year) — said he’s looking forward to spending time at home. “I live
in the sticks by choice,” he said. “But
there are some consequences. My
backyard requires help.”
Reached Tuesday, Boeri said his
first foray into journalism was, while a
student at Wesleyan, covering Hubert
Humphrey’s 1968 presidential campaign. “I was one of the boys on the
bus, and I was literally a boy,” he said,
a reference to Timothy Crouse’s book
detailing life on the road for reporters
covering the 1972 presidential campaign.
No less memorable was another
story he wrote the same year.
“I interviewed Janis Joplin, who
was playing at the Psychedelic Supermarket,” he said. “My knees were
knocking.”
For now, Boeri said he’ll busy himself tending to the 40 or so fruit trees
in his yard, where one of his two
daughters will get married this summer. He didn’t rule out returning to
WBUR at some point, but not immediately.
“They can’t miss you if you don’t go
away, so I’m going away,” he said.
Read local celebrity news at
www.bostonglobe.com/names. Names
can be reached at names@globe.com
or at 617-929-8253.
‘I adore Beyoncé. I would never do anything malicious like that.’
SANAA LATHAN, actress, responding to the rumor that she once bit Beyoncé at a party
A moving journey in Zeitgeist’s ‘Love! Valour! Compassion!’
By Don Aucoin
S TA G E R E V I E W
GLOBE STAFF
History was made on May 1 when
the Broadway revival of “Angels in
America’’ earned a whopping 11 Tony
Award nods, establishing Tony Kushner’s drama about AIDS and gay life in
the 1980s as the new record-holder for
the play with the most Tony nominations ever.
To get a sense of what a watershed
moment that was, it’s worth reading
Terrence McNally’s 2015 “Selected
Works: A Memoir in Plays,’’ wherein
McNally addresses the rampant homophobia in the world of theater —
very much including critics — that
forced prominent gay playwrights to
conceal their sexuality for decades,
limiting their subject matter in the
process.
Then came Stonewall and the AIDS
crisis, which McNally describes as
both “a call to arms and an urgent,
painful wake-up call to reality’’ that
gave rise to “Angels in America,’’ “The
Normal Heart,’’ and other dramas that
put gay characters and concerns front
and center. The result, in McNally’s
view: “For the first time since ‘Death of
a Salesman,’ it felt as if the theatre and
real life in America were in conversation again.’’
McNally, of course, has made his
own significant contributions to that
conversation and to cultural consciousness regarding the lives of gay
people. One of them is “Love! Valour!
Compassion!’’, a sprawling, humane,
LOVE! VALOUR! COMPASSION!
Play by Terrence McNally. Directed
by David J. Miller. Presented by
Zeitgeist Stage Company at Plaza
Theatre, Boston Center for the Arts,
through May 19. Tickets: $20­$30,
617­933­8600,
www.zeitgeiststage.com
and incisive 1994 play that is laced
with both humor and sorrow. It’s now
at Zeitgeist Stage Company in a warmly empathetic production directed by
David J. Miller.
In “Love! Valour! Compassion!’’,
eight gay men who range in age from
their early 20s to their late 40s gather
at a farmhouse near a lake in upstate
New York over three eventful weekends (Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, and Labor Day). The shadow of
AIDS is inescapable for all eight, but
director Miller and his able cast manage to fulfill both parts of McNally’s aspirations for the play, spelled out in
“Selected Works.’’ McNally notes: “I
didn’t want to write about AIDS when
I began the play but of course there
was no way I could avoid it. It was
what was happening to us. But I also
wanted to write about what else we
were doing while so much of our world
seemed to be burning. Life went on for
us, not just death.’’
As indeed it does in in “Love!
RICHARD HALL/SILVERLINE IMAGES
From left: Brooks Reeves, Jeremy Johnson, Joey C. Pelletier, Keith
Foster, Michael J. Blunt, David Anderson, and Cody Sloan in Zeitgeist
Stage Company’s production of “Love! Valour! Compassion!”
Valour! Compassion!’’ There is betrayal and loss along the way, as well as
clashes between different generations
and sensibilities. The trifecta of noble
qualities in the play’s title is evident
amid the series of complex interactions among the eight men, and so is
the human temptation toward less noble behavior, such as infidelity. Ultimately, the goals of these men are as
simple as they are universal: to lead
fulfilling lives and to figure out whom
to live them with. That may involve
starting new relationships or renewing
existing commitments or both.
The farmhouse is owned by Gregory (a very good David Anderson), a
choreographer and impresario of a
dance company in his 40s who is tormented by the pain in his joints as he
starts to confront the price of his physically demanding profession. Gregory
also has reason to worry about the loyalty of his blind lover, Bobby (Cody
Sloan), an ethereal figure who is half
the choreographer’s age. A sensuous
dancer named Ramon (a charismatic
Michael J. Blunt) who is Bobby’s age
harbors amorous designs on him.
Brooks Reeves, whose stellar work
at Zeitgeist has included “Bent’’ and
“The Boys in the Band,’’ delivers another standout performance . . . make that
two standout performances. Reeves
shoulders the dual roles of twin brothers with markedly divergent personalities: peevish sourpuss John and sweetnatured James, who is deep into a losing battle with AIDS.
Domestic stability is embodied by
Perry (Joey C. Pelletier) and Arthur
(Keith Foster), who have been a couple
for a decade and a half. Breezy wisecracks consistently emanate from Buzz
(Jeremy Johnson, excellent), a costume designer for Gregory’s company
and a devotee of musical theater who
is HIV-positive.
In the play’s extended, deeply moving coda, we are pulled deep into the
future.
For all his freewheeling demeanor,
it is Buzz who reveals surprising
depths, entering into an unexpected
relationship despite his fear of intimacy and further loss. It is Buzz, too, who
asks the fraught question that’s always
lurking there, for the eight friends and
for all of us: “Who’s gonna be there for
me when it’s my turn?’’ That we believe
the reassuring answer he receives is a
testament to the quality of this fine
production.
Don Aucoin can be reached at
aucoin@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter@GlobeAucoin
Sports
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Baseball: Red Sox-Yankees, 7 p.m., NESN, ESPN
NBA playoffs: 76ers-Celtics, 8 p.m., TNT
Baseball: Diamondbacks-Dodgers, 10 p.m., MLB
Listings, C8
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D N ES DAY, M AY 9 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
They slipped right into it
Faux pas results in
Rozier­Bledsoe link
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
An odd yet endearing byproduct of
these NBA playoffs has been the accidental friendship sparked between
two Boston sports figures who have
still never even met.
It was started by a harmless slipup, and after three weeks of showing
mutual admiration via social media
posts and shirt choices, Celtics point
guard Terry Rozier says he is eager to
NBA PLAYOFFS
Celtics vs. 76ers
Boston leads series, 3-1
share a glass of wine with Drew Bledsoe at one of the former Patriots quarterback’s vineyards in Walla Walla,
Wash.
The story is at once a bit silly and
lovably organic, and it has turned into
something of a sensation in the Boston sports landscape, with Patriots
owner Robert Kraft, a frequent guest
at Celtics games, even texting Bledsoe
about how much he has enjoyed it.
“It’s kind of like it was meant to be
this way, because it worked out perfectly,” Rozier said. “Drew, that’s my
guy now.”
The tale begins at the interview podium in the bowels of TD Garden following the Celtics’ April 15 win over
the Bucks in Game 1 of their firstround playoff series. Rozier, when referring to Bucks point guard Eric
Bledsoe, mistakenly called him “Drew
Bledsoe.”
Some people chuckled, and it
seemed to be an honest mistake, because that was really no way to lob an
CELTICS, Page C3
NBC SPORTS BOSTON (ROZIER); INSTAGRAM (BLEDSOE)
After mistakenly invoking the name of Drew Bledsoe (right), Celtics
guard Terry Rozier (left) represented the ex-Patriot QB at the podium.
Tied at the top
Tara Sullivan
Cassidy
is reason
for hope
Streaking
Yankees hold
off Red Sox
Recycling head
coaches is standard operating
procedure in
the pro sports
world, where
experience —
even failed experience — can
trump so much else on a candidate’s
résumé.
For Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy,
however, the wait for a second
chance in the NHL took 12 long and
circuitous years. From an abbreviated stint with the Washington Capitals that ended back in 2004 to his
promotion to interim Bruins coach
midway through last season, Cassidy
put in both the hours and the miles
necessary to traverse the difficult
road back behind a professional
bench.
And though this Bruins season is
still fading in the shadow of a second-round playoff loss to Tampa Bay,
what Cassidy accomplished in his
first full season stands as one of the
many reasons for belief that a deeper
postseason run is in the offing.
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
Yankees 3 NEW YORK — Alex Cora has only been manRed Sox 2 aging the Red Sox for a
few months now. But he knows the
drill.
Asked whether it was special to be
facing the Yankees, Cora did his duty
before the rivals played on Tuesday
night and insisted it was not.
“It’s fun for the fans. But at the end
of the day it’s just another series,” he
said.
The same words were repeated, almost verbatim, by players in both clubhouses. It’s just another series.
Don’t you believe it.
In a game befitting their records,
the Red Sox and Yankees played nine
compelling innings. The Yankees held
on for a 3-2 victory before a crowd of
45,773 in the Bronx.
Giancarlo Stanton hit two home
runs and Aaron Judge drove in the goahead run in the seventh inning for the
Yankees. The Red Sox out-hit their rivals, 8-6, but left four runners stranded in scoring position and struck out
14 times.
Both teams are 25-10, tied atop the
American League East and for the best
record in baseball. The Red Sox have
outscored their opponents by 66 runs,
the Yankees by 63. They’re that close.
“It was a good baseball game,” Cora
said. “They made some plays, they put
good at-bats. We did the same. They
just were one run better than us.”
T h e Ya n k e e s h av e w o n s e v e n
straight and 16 of their last 17.
The second game of the series is
RED SOX, Page C6
SULLIVAN, Page C4
KATHY WILLENS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Drew Pomeranz needed a new baseball after allowing Giancarlo Stanton’s second home run of the game.
Rivalry torch burns bright
Dan Shaughnessy
MIKE STOBE/GETTY IMAGES
Mookie Betts hits a game-tying triple to left field in
the seventh inning Tuesday in Yankee Stadium.
NEW YORK — The
Red Sox and Yankees
at this hour are the
two best teams in
baseball. They have
the most stars and
the most history.
The torch is
passed. From Joe and
Ted, to Thurman and Carlton, to Derek and Nomar . . . to Didi and Mookie.
And they are tied for first place
with identical 25-10 records in the
wake of Tuesday’s 3-2 Yankees victory
in the Bronx. It was New York’s 16th
781-749-1950
29
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$
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Bruce Cassidy knows when to
light a fire under his team.
I N S I DE
The time is now
Celtics need to finish off 76ers on
Wednesday. On basketball, C3
It’s a date
Red Sox will play Yankees in two
games next season in London. C5
Paxton no­hits Jays
Mariner the first Canadian to accomplish feat in home country. C7
SHAUGHNESSY, Page C6
COLLISION
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NLY
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win in 17 games. The Yanks have
made up 7½ games in the AL East
standings since April 20.
Oh, and now David Price is hurt
again and Boston must face Masahiro
Tanaka and Sox hater CC Sabathia in
the final two games of the series.
Gulp. Imagine fearing a fall from
first place after winning 25 of your
first 35 games?
Game 1 of this spring showdown
was a treat. Giancarlo Stanton introduced himself to the rivalry with a
pair of homers off Drew Pomeranz in
the first four innings. Bronx fans have
been pretty rough on the 59-homer
guy, but it all sounded good for him
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W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Double talk from
McCourty twins
is not convincing
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
FOXBOROUGH — Oh,
brother.
The McCourty twin hijinks
are officially
PATRIOTS
under way.
NOTEBOOK
New Patriots cornerback
Jason McCourty was scheduled
for a press conference Tuesday
at Gillette Stadium. When McCourty came onto the field to
talk with reporters, there were
two of him.
“Feels good,” said one.
“Going into, what, my ninth
year here,” said the other. “Excited. Happy to be here.”
Jason McCourty was pretending to be Devin McCourty
and Devin was pretending to be
Jason, but no one was fooled.
To be honest, it’s easy to tell
them apart up close. They’re
identical twins, but their faces
are distinct enough to know
who is who. Jason estimated
their lifetime record in twin
pranks is 0 for 10.
Where they are indistin-
guishable is in their willingness
to banter.
“Anything you think about
Dev, just think of better and
you think of me,” Jason said.
Devin said that he is faster
and better looking.
The Patriots didn’t trade for
Jason in March because they
wanted a comedy duo, though.
They needed a cornerback, and
when Jason was about to be released by the Browns, they realized they could get a solid starter who intercepted three passes
and deflected 14 more last year
for just a seventh-round pick.
So now, though the twin
novelty shouldn’t wear off given the personalities, they have
jobs to do. Jason said he has relied on Devin as he learns his
playbook, especially when
questions come up as he studies film on his iPad at home.
“It’s one thing to look over a
playbook,” Jason said. “It’s another thing to talk to somebody
that’s been in the system for the
past eight years, so it’s definitely an advantage for me to be
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Saints’
Ingram
suspended
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FILE/JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Devin McCourty (above) has been joined in the Patriots secondary by twin brother Jason.
able to lean on him and be able
to ask him questions and learn
just from a playing experience.”
The two brothers played
sports together growing up and
at Rutgers and always hoped
that one day they’d play together in the NFL. Now that they’ve
attained that, one’s success now
depends on the other in a much
more concrete way.
Devin said his draft stock
improved after Jason made the
Titans roster as a sixth-round
pick, but now each will have
the chance to make a direct impact on the other on a play-toplay basis. (About any draft
bump Devin got because of
him, Jason said, “Did you? Because I still haven’t seen a
check or anything.”)
For Jason, who has never
made the playoffs, it would be
nice to taste the type of success
his brother has had with the
Patriots over the years.
“Sometimes if he’s complaining I can say, ‘Hey, remember I was 0-16 last year,’ or
whatever the case may be,” Jason said. “I think it’s just more
of us talking about it, acknowledging, or just maybe talking
about some different things
they do, or maybe that’s what it
takes to get there.
“For me it’s been exciting to
be here in the offseason just to
see kind of how they train,
what things they do, and from
talking to him over the years
for me to actually go through it
and kind of just show everybody I’m just as good as him.
I’ve been excited to do so.”
now No. 88.
Patriots rookies will get
their jersey numbers later in
the week once they arrive in
New England. Some players
may change their numbers
again when the season starts.
The numbers game
Profit and loss
Duron Harmon has worn
No. 30 for years, but Jason McCourty said it was an easy sell
getting his fellow Rutgers
alumnus to switch numbers.
“He actually was on the
verge of wanting to switch
numbers, as well,” Jason said.
“So, just in our Rutgers way, we
were able to work it all out and
everybody walks away happy.”
Harmon will wear No. 21,
previously worn by Malcolm
Butler. McCourty will wear No.
30 (Devin wears No. 32).
A few other Patriots, new
and old, made number switches. The newcomers: Jeremy Hill
will wear No. 33, Trent Brown
No. 67, Danny Shelton No. 71,
Adrian Clayborn No. 94, Jordan
Matthews No. 80, Cordarrelle
Patterson No. 84, Troy Niklas
No. 86, and Luke Bowanko No.
72.
Along with Harmon, another former Rutgers player who
was already on the team, Kenny
Britt, switched numbers. Britt
wore No. 85 last year but is
Patriots season ticket-holders will be able to make a profit
reselling their tickets next season.
Previously, season ticketholders were able to resell tickets at face value to people on
the season ticket wait list. This
gave wait-list members the
perk of being able to buy facevalue tickets, but limited the
options season ticket-holders
had when reselling tickets.
The Patriots have a longstanding partnership with
Ticketmaster, which is now operating the new NFL Ticketing
Network, where season ticketholders can put tickets up for
resale without a price cap.
Season ticket-holders will be
able to turn a profit on the secondary market, but wait-list
members will lose access to
face-value tickets.
Nora Princiotti can be reached
at nora.princiotti@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter at
@NoraPrinciotti.
The NFL says New Orleans
Saints running back Mark In­
gram has been suspended for
the first four
NFL
regular-season
NOTEBOOK games of 2018
because of a violation of the league’s performance enhancing drug policy.
The league has not released
details about whether Ingram
has tested positive for a performance-enhancing drug or simply a banned masking agent.
The league says Ingram, 28,
will be eligible to participate in
all offseason and preseason
practices and games, and will
be eligible to play in his first
regular-season game after the
Saints visit the Giants on Sept.
30.
Last season, Ingram’s seventh in the NFL, he rushed for
a career-high 1,124 yards and
12 touchdowns to go with 416
yards receiving.
Foster hearing set
San Francisco linebacker
Reuben Foster pleaded not
guilty to charges stemming
from allegations that he attacked his then-girlfriend in
their Los Gatos, Calif., home.
A preliminary hearing has
been scheduled for May 17, at
which point Elissa Ennis may
testify under oath. She has recanted the allegations that led
to the domestic violence case.
Ennis initially told police
that Foster dragged her by her
hair, threw her out of their
house, and punched her in the
head 8-10 times. She later issued a statement through her
attorney saying her injuries
were the result of a fight with
another woman.
Chiefs add TE Ellis
The Chiefs were awarded
tight end Alex Ellis off waivers
from the Saints and cut defensive tackle Stefan Charles.
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C3
NBA Playoffs
Celtics better bring their game faces
Gary Washburn
ON BASKETBALL
This was already a tenuous
series before Game 4. The Celtics had won two games against
the Philadelphia 76ers in nailbiting fashion.
They responded from a 22point second-quarter deficit
and 5-point fourth-quarter deficit to take Game 2. And they
made plays while the 76ers
made gaffes in the fourth quarter and overtime of Game 3.
Game 4 was a legitimate Philadelphia win.
The 76ers were able to feed
Dario Saric, who punished the
Celtics in the post. Point guard
T.J. McConnell, who has pestered the Celtics for three years
with his relentlessness, did it
again in an expanded role and
scored a career-high 19 points.
And inasmuch as he has
struggled with his decisionmaking, Ben Simmons is still
14 for 29 from the field in the
past two games and canned 7
of 8 free throws in Game 4. The
Celtics’ defense again slowed
Joel Embiid, but allowed the
other 76ers to flourish.
So they were able to force
Game 5. And the complexion of
this series has changed because
of one Philadelphia win. If the
76ers are able to sneak another
victory Wednesday, then they
head back to Philadelphia with
all the momentum, a raucous
crowd, and nothing to lose.
As we have learned, NBA
playoff series take drastic momentum swings after each
game. A few days ago, Utah
won at Houston and was headed home for two games with
the series tied, 1-1. All the pressure was on the favored Rockets and Utah had a chance to
pull off the impossible — until
the Rockets won the next two
games.
Same situation when the
New Orleans Pelicans blew out
the Golden State Warriors in
Game 3 and entered Game 4
with a chance to even the series. The Warriors restored order with a blowout.
So the momentum is on the
76ers’ side. Although their win
was aided by a litany of Celtics
fouls, Aron Baynes attempting
a ridiculous six 3-point attempts, and the trio of Al Horford, Terry Rozier, and Jayson
Tatum making a combined two
shots in the fourth quarter, it
was still a well-earned win.
Philadelphia coach Brett
Brown made the needed adjustments — starting McConnell, trapping half court, posting Saric for easy scoring op-
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Marcus Morris, Al Horford, Terry Rozier, Aron Baynes, and Marcus Smart (from left) wait as the final seconds ticked off the clock in Game 4.
portunities — and the 76ers
resembled the team that beat
up the Miami Heat in the previous round.
Such adjustments and Philadelphia’s increased confidence should alert the Celtics
that it’s time to end this series
— like now. The players appeared angry after Game 4,
frustrated at the officiating
(but not surprised), annoyed
they couldn’t match Philadelphia’s physicality (and not be
penalized), and bewildered
they couldn’t finish the series.
Wednesday will be the
toughest game of the series,
close-out games usually are
(unless you’re playing Toronto).
The Celtics have worked too
hard in this series. They have
outexecuted the 76ers when it
has mattered, deflated the image of Simmons, and neutral-
ized Embiid. All the while,
Brad Stevens has coached circles around Brown.
So to lose Wednesday, and
turn this into a competitive series again, would be damaging.
It would infuse even more
swagger into a 76ers team that
came into this series with perhaps a little too much already.
It’s time for the Celtics to
take care of business, and they
can’t just rely on Game 5 being
at TD Garden as a salve for
their Game 4 issues.
“Things didn’t go our way
[in Game 4], we’re not going to
complain, we’re not going to
make excuses for it,” forward
Jaylen Brown said. “We’ve got
to come out in Game 5 and do
what we’ve got to do. They
were the more physical and
more aggressive team and usually that’s us. We’ve got to correct that.”
Despite losing many players
to injuries over the past several
months, the Celtics have not
lost any of their confidence.
They were shaky favorites in
their first-round series against
the Bucks, but won the first
two games, struggled in Milwaukee, but were able to win
Game 7.
With less than two days of
preparation, the Celtics came
back and smacked the 76ers in
Game 1 and then rallied in
Games 2 and 3. They seem offended by the Game 4 loss,
with several players openly saying they were looking forward
to the quick turnaround for
Game 5.
Philadelphia is a talented
team with a load of shooters,
most of who have misfired
through the first four games.
The 76ers are shooting 29.6
percent from the 3-point line
and just 41.3 percent from the
field. If the Celtics keep messing around, there’s going to be
a game where the 76ers are on.
Toying with a young team, a
team in which most of the players have never reached this
playoff level, could be dangerous.
The Celtics don’t want to extend this series. They need to
win Wednesday.
They’d like to get some rest
after getting a day after the
Milwaukee series. They did not
practice Tuesday, taking a day
off to rest and reflect. It’s their
biggest game of the season.
They need to come focused
and prepared, expecting that
the 76ers will be the same.
Gary Washburn can be reached
at gwashburn@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GwashburnGlobe.
Celtics vs. 76ers
Boston leads series, 3­1
GAME 1 — Monday, April 30
At Boston 117 ....... Philadelphia 101
GAME 2 — Thursday, May 3
At Boston 108 ....... Philadelphia 103
GAME 3 — Saturday, May 5
Boston 101... at Philadelphia 98 (OT)
GAME 4 — Monday, May 7
At Philadelphia 103........... Boston 92
GAME 5
Philadelphia at Boston
Wednesday, May 9, 8 p.m., TNT
GAME 6*
Boston at Philadelphia
Friday, May 11, 8 p.m., ESPN
GAME 7*
Philadelphia at Boston
Sunday, May 13, TBA
* If necessary
Faux pas resulted in most unlikely Rozier-Bledsoe link
uCELTICS
Continued from Page C1
insult if that’s what Rozier intended to do. When Eric Bledsoe was asked about it the next
day, he was clearly perturbed,
though, using an expletive to
say that he did not even know
who Rozier was.
The awkward tiff between
the point guards became one of
the main story lines of the series, and Rozier embraced it,
particularly as Celtics fans dir e c t e d “ W h o i s B l e d s o e? ”
chants at Eric.
Drew Bledsoe, the No. 1
pick of the 1993 NFL draft who
spent nine seasons with the Patriots, was back home in Washington and watching with
amusement as this was all unfolding, with his name thrust
back into Boston’s sports consciousness.
Then a member of the Celtics’ game operations staff asked
Bledsoe if he would record a
brief video to show on the TD
Garden video board during
Game 7 against the Bucks.
Bledsoe used his iPhone to
film a few messages and sent
them to the Celtics to edit and
use as they pleased. The video
was shown during the fourth
quarter.
“Hey, Boston, it’s the original Drew Bledsoe,” he said on
the message. “Come on, Boston, get out of your seats.”
The crowd went wild. Kraft
was at the game, and he sent
Bledsoe a message afterward
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
When push came to shove, Terry Rozier (right) outplayed the Bucks’ Eric Bledsoe.
telling him about the reaction.
Others sent Bledsoe videos of
the fans, too.
“I mean, it did look like it
got pretty loud,” Bledsoe said
with a chuckle.
At TD Garden, it suddenly
became vogue to wear Bledsoe’s old No. 11 Patriots jersey
to games, improbably revitalizing interest in the man who
will someday be most remembered as the quarterback who
was once backed up by Tom
Brady.
“It is kind of cool,” Bledsoe
said. “I’m just glad those jerseys hadn’t gone in the rag pile.
I’m glad people still had them
in their closets instead of tossing them out.
“So it is cool, man. I always
feel really appreciated when I
come back to Boston. It’s really
fun to come back and I have a
lot of friends and fans out
there.”
Rozier then wore a Drew
Bledsoe jersey to Game 1 of the
Eastern Conference semifinals
against the 76ers last Monday
before tallying 29 points, 8 rebounds, and 6 assists in the
win. He put the Bledsoe jersey
back on for his postgame podium interview, the same location where this all started two
weeks earlier.
Rozier and his marketing
team have been selling “Scary
Terry” shirts that show a cartoon version of Rozier wearing
a horror movie mask. Before
Game 1 of the 76ers series,
Drew Bledsoe posted a picture
on Instagram of himself wearing one, with a caption that
said, “Go get ’em kid!!” There is
even a new version of the Scary
Terry line in which cartoon Rozier is wearing a Bledsoe jersey.
“I’ve got to lay my hands on
a couple of those,” Bledsoe said.
“Those are pretty classic.”
Rozier has thrived in these
playoffs in place of the injured
Kyrie Irving, averaging 18.3
points, 6.1 assists, 5.5 rebounds, and just 1.3 turnovers
per game. Bledsoe, who attended Boston’s Nov. 10 win over
the Hornets at TD Garden and
is hoping to go to an upcoming
playoff game, was a Celtics fan
before this unusual link was
formed. He has enjoyed seeing
his new friend’s career blossom
from afar.
“One of the biggest things I
respect and appreciate in
watching him play is he doesn’t
make a lot of mistakes,” Bledsoe said. “You’re a point guard.
You’re kind of the quarterback
for the basketball team, and
the most important thing when
you’re the quarterback in football is you don’t turn the ball
over.
“So to see him continue to
make plays and deliver without
making mistakes, that’s something I truly respect.”
Rozier, who grew up in football-crazed Youngstown, Ohio,
always hoped to play in the
NFL, and he is convinced he
would have had he tried. Bledsoe played for his varsity basketball team at Walla Walla
Hi g h S c h o o l , a n d s a i d t h e
squad made the Washington
state tournament several times.
Bledsoe said he does not
play competitive basketball
anymore (“I’ve seen too many
friends my age rupture an
Ac hille s’ ”) but he was in trigued to learn that Rozier had
a gridiron background.
“We’ll have to get the football out,” he said, “and sling it
around a little bit.”
But Rozier was more interested in spending some time
with Bledsoe at his vineyards in
Walla Walla.
“I think after the season I’ll
be able to go to his place, taste
some wine with him,” Rozier
said. “I really think we’ ll be
friends.”
. . .
Celtics coach Brad Stevens
said Tuesday that he did not
have an update on the health
status of Shane Larkin. The
backup point guard injured his
shoulder when he collided with
76ers center Joel Embiid in the
second quarter of Boston’s
Game 4 loss Monday. Larkin
left the game and did not return.
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
C4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Rockets
eliminate
Jazz
Cassidy a big reason
for hope with Bruins
uSULLIVAN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rockets 112 HOUSTON —
Chris Paul
Jazz
102 s c o r e d a c a -
NBA playoffs
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Cavaliers beat Raptors, 4­0
Tuesday, May 1
Cleveland 113...........at Toronto 112 (OT)
Thursday, May 3
Cleveland 128....................at Toronto 110
Saturday, May 5
At Cleveland 105....................Toronto 103
Monday, May 7
At Cleveland 128......................Toronto 93
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Warriors lead Pelicans, 3­1
Saturday, April 28
At Golden St. 123......... New Orleans 101
Tuesday, May 1
At Golden St. 121......... New Orleans 116
Friday, May 4
At New Orleans 119......... Golden St. 100
Sunday, May 6
Golden St. 118............at New Orleans 92
Tuesday, May 8
New Orleans....................at Golden State
Schedule
*Thu., May 10 at New Orleans.........TBA
*Mon., May 14 at Golden State........TBA
Rockets beat Jazz, 4­1
Sunday, April 29
At Houston 110..............................Utah 96
Wednesday, May 2
Utah 116............................at Houston 108
Friday, May 4
Houston 113..............................at Utah 92
Sunday, May 6
Houston 100..............................at Utah 87
Tuesday, May 8
At Houston 112............................Utah 102
* If necessary
ROCKETS 112, JAZZ 102
UTAH
FG
FT
Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T A F Pt
Crowder .....33 2­11
1­2
2­8 0 0
6
Ingles ..........32 5­10
0­0
1­5 6 4 12
Gobert.........34
5­9
2­4
4­9 0 2 12
O'Neale.......37 6­10
4­4
0­3 1 5 17
Mitchell ......34 9­17
4­5
1­4 9 3 24
Jerebko.........6
1­1
0­0
0­2 0 0
3
Neto ............17
0­5
0­0
1­1 3 2
0
Favors.........14
3­3
0­1
1­6 0 1
6
Burks...........32 7­15
5­5
1­3 5 1 22
Totals.......... 38­81 16­21 11­41 24 18 102
FG%: .469, FT%: .762. 3­pt. goals: 10­28, .357
(Crowder 1­5, Ingles 2­6, O'Neale 1­2, Mitchell 2­7,
Jerebko 1­1, Neto 0­2, Burks 3­5). Team rebounds:
6. Team turnovers: 12 (19 pts.). Blocks: 5 (Gobert
5). Turnovers: 12 (Crowder 3, Ingles 2, O'Neale,
Mitchell 3, Neto, Burks 2). Steals: 5 (Crowder,
Gobert, O'Neale, Mitchell, Burks).
HOUSTON
FG
FT
Reb
Min M­A M­A
O­T A F Pt
Ariza............25
1­4
0­0
1­6 1 2
2
Tucker.........36
7­9
0­0
1­6 2 4 19
Capela.........31
1­2
3­4
1­5 0 4
5
Harden........35 7­22
3­4
1­4 4 3 18
Paul .............38 13­22
7­8
0­7 10 1 41
Gordon........31
2­8
0­0
0­3 2 1
5
Mbh a Mt ...20
3­5
1­1
0­2 2 1
8
Nene............11
3­4
0­0
1­2 0 0
6
Green ..........13
3­7
0­0
1­5 0 2
8
Totals.......... 40­83 14­17 6­40 21 18 112
FG%: .482, FT%: .824. 3­pt. goals: 18­39, .462
(Ariza 0­2, Tucker 5­7, Harden 1­7, Paul 8­10, Gor­
don 1­5, Mbah a Moute 1­2, Green 2­6). Team re­
bounds: 7. Team turnovers: 10 (14 pts.). Blocks: 8
(Tucker 3, Capela 5). Turnovers: 9 (Ariza, Tucker,
Harden 3, Gordon 2, Mbah a Moute 2). Steals: 10
(Ariza, Capela 3, Harden 2, Paul, Mbah a Moute,
Nene, Green).
Utah ................................ 16 30 32 24 — 102
Houston.......................... 21 33 21 37 — 112
A — 18,055 (18,023). T — 2:11. Officials — Mike
Callahan, John Goble, Eric Lewis.
coaching gave him a new calling, and stints in Jacksonville,
With a deft touch at manag- Indianapolis, Trenton, and
ing a crowded and talented G r a n d R a p i d s g o t h i m t o
roster, with a confident voice Washington, before stops in
ready and willing to communi- C h i c a g o ( a s a n a s s i s t a n t
cate with players young and coach), Kingston, and Proviold, with years of decision- dence (for eight years) finally
making from his time leading paved his way to Boston.
Providence informing his in“I have a long history with
g a m e d e c i s i o n s , C a s s i d y Bruce,” said Bruins general
emerged as one of the bright- manager Don Sweeney. “He’s
est Bruins lights this year, even taken a long road to get back
before he was named a finalist for his second opportunity to
for the Jack Adams Award as be a head coach. I think he’s
NHL Coach
earned it.
of the Year.
“ To m e I
Gerard
think the
Gallant has
whole series
of jumping in
already won
that contest
last year and
this year has
out in Vegas,
been an exeven before
tension of the
he took the
expansion
work that he’s
G o l d e n
done. I think
Knights to
our players
have respondthe Western
Conference
ed.”
finals. But
C a s s i d y,
C a s s i d y NOEL ACCIARI,
52, has shown
a willingness
m o r e t h a n on Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy
earned his
to stand up
place in the
for his guys
conversation, proving that yes, publicly when needed, such as
patience is often worth it and calling out officials for the nogood things can indeed come call on Brad Marchand’s breakto those who have it.
away opportunity in Game 2 in
“For sure, he’s put his time Tampa, or to call them out
in,” veteran Rick Nash, a trade- publicly, such as insisting that
deadline acquisition, said dur- Marchand rein in his errant
ing the thick of the playoff run. tongue.
He will make tough deci“He’s put his work in. You can
just tell how prepared he is sions in a game, such as pullthat this is where he belongs, ing goalie Tuukka Rask back in
the situation he’s in. You know Game 5 of the opening Toronto
what you’re going to do every series, or between games too,
night. He gets the guys going. such as sitting rookie Danton
It’s a situation where he de- Heinen for Game 6 of that seserves it, to be here.”
ries. That Rask and Heinen
Coaches are forged by many would then help power the
fires, from those who studied dramatic Game 7 win at TD
the game as outsiders growing Garden — Rask with stellar
up to those who emerged from work in net and Heinen with a
their own stellar skill sets. For key goal — speaks to what
Cassidy, a road that started out Cassidy does to maintain his
as the latter took him through players’ confidence. He mainthe former, building a leader tains confidence in them.
who seems to understand the
“ You have a tough shift
heralded star and journeyman maybe, take a shift off, but he
trusts guys enough, knows that
grinder in equal measure.
After he was a first-round not everyone is perfect, you’re
pick and the 18th overall play- going to make mistakes, so
er taken in the 1983 draft, why punish them, it’s a game
Cassidy’s expected career as a of mistakes,” Noel Acciari said.
stalwart Blackhawks defense- “So I think that he’s good in
man never panned out, multi- that aspect where you make a
ple reconstructive knee surger- mistake, OK, get back out
ies curtailing what had been there. You’re not going to learn
high hopes for a kid who made if you’re not back out there.”
Delivering such messages
his NHL debut at age 19. But
can be tricky business when
dealing with athlete egos, but
Cassidy’s approach has been
described by players as direct
EASTERN CONFERENCE
and professional.
“I think the hardest part as
Capitals beat Penguins, 4­2
a coach is being able to handle
Thursday, April 26
personalities — 1 through 23,
Pittsburgh 3...........at Washington 2
they’re all different, right?” RiSunday, April 29
ley Nash said. “I think he does
At Washington 4..........Pittsburgh 1
Tuesday, May 1
a good job of understanding
Washington 4...........at Pittsburgh 3
what each guy needs, what he
Thursday, May 3
brings, how they react to difAt Pittsburgh 3..........Washington 1
ferent situations, when you
Saturday, May 5
can push buttons.
At Washington 6..........Pittsburgh 3
Monday, May 7
“You can’t get on a guy 40 to
Washington 2. at Pittsburgh 1 (OT)
50 times a year and expect him
to respond each time. He does
WESTERN CONFERENCE
a good job of assessing that
Jets, Predators tied, 3­3
and knowing what each guy reFriday, April 27
sponds to.”
Winnipeg 4.................at Nashville 1
“He’s straight up with guys,
Sunday, April 29
honest with guys,” said Acciari.
At Nashville 5......Winnipeg 4 (2OT)
“He’s not hiding anything and
Tuesday, May 1
I think guys respect that. It
At Winnipeg 7.................Nashville 4
Thursday, May 3
helps their game and they
Nashville 2.................at Winnipeg 1
know what he expects in the
Saturday, May 5
game. Bring your game. Not
Winnipeg 6.................at Nashville 2
every guy is going to bring
Monday, May 7
Nashville 4.................at Winnipeg 0
your game every night, but he
Schedule
always preaches bring your B
Thu., May 10 at Nashville...............8
game, bring something to help
Knights beat Sharks, 4­2
the team in some way.”
Thursday, April 26
“He holds guys accountAt Vegas 7........................San Jose 0
able, not only after games, but
Saturday, April 28
during games,” Rick Nash said.
San Jose 4.............at Vegas 3 (2OT)
“I think that’s a good trait to
Monday, April 30
Vegas 4...............at San Jose 3 (OT)
have. He communicates well.
Wednesday, May 2
You always know where you
At San Jose 4........................Vegas 0
stand as a player. He’ll grab
Friday, May 4
you after practice, in the dressAt Vegas 5........................San Jose 3
Sunday, May 6
ing room, that’s sometimes all
Vegas 3........................at San Jose 0
you ask for, is communication.
* If necessary
“I’ve had a lot of coaches
over my career. I definitely
PREDATORS 4, JETS 0
have had guys not like that,
where it’s like a game — you
Monday night game
Nashville ............................... 1
1
2 —
4
never know where you stand
Winnipeg............................... 0
0
0 —
0
and you’re trying to figure it
First period — 1. Nashville, Arvidsson 4 (Josi,
Johansen), 1:02. Penalties — Ekholm, Nsh (delay
out yourself.”
of game), 8:54. Watson, Nsh (hooking), 14:58.
Weber, Nsh (tripping), 17:26.
Cassidy probably never figSecond period — 2. Nashville, Forsberg 6
(CSmith, Johansen), 8:16. Penalties — None.
ured it would take 12 years to
Third period — 3. Nashville, Forsberg 7
(Arvidsson, Josi), 5:55. 4. Nashville, Arvidsson 5
get back,but give him credit for
(Forsberg), 15:58 (en). Penalties — Subban, Nsh
making it count.
(tripping), 2:39. Byfuglien, Wpg (roughing),
Continued from Page C1
By Kristie Rieken
reer-playoff-high 41 points with
eight 3-pointers to finally reach
the conference finals, helping
the Houston Rockets eliminate
the Utah Jazz, 112-102, in
Game 5 on Tuesday night.
It will be Houston’s second
trip to the Western Conference
finals in four years and the first
ever for Paul. The point guard
has been panned for failing to
get past the second round in his
nine previous trips to the postseason.
Paul, a nine-time All-Star
playing in his first season with
Houston after an offseason
trade from the Los Angeles
Clippers, also had 10 assists
and seven rebounds. His previous career best in the playoffs
was 35 points, which he accomplished three times.
Star rookie Donovan Mitchell had 22 of his 24 points for
Utah in the third quarter before
leaving with about seven minutes left with a left leg injury.
The top-seeded Rockets led
by 8 after a 3-pointer by Paul
with about six minutes left. The
Jazz scored the next 7 points,
highlighted by a 3-pointer from
Royce O’Neale, before Paul
made 8 quick points to push
Houston’s lead to 105-96 with
about three minutes left.
Joe Ingles made a basket for
Utah before Paul added another
basket to make it 107-98.
P.J. Tucker scored a careerplayoff-best 19 points, and
James Harden added 18 points.
Mitchell’s huge third quarter
left the Jazz up by 3 to begin the
fourth. Derrick Favors made a
layup for Utah to start the final
quarter before Paul and P.J.
Tucker hit consecutive 3-pointers to put Houston back on top,
81-80, with 10 minutes left.
Utah regained the lead on a
basket by O’Neale before Houston used an 11-5 spurt, with the
firs t 5 points fro m G erald
Green, to take a 92-87 lead with
about seven minutes left. Harden capped the run with a dunk
after stealing the ball from
Mitchell. Mitchell was injured
on that play and grabbed his
left leg.
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
‘He trusts guys
enough, knows
that not everyone
is perfect, you’re
going to make
mistakes, so why
punish them, it’s a
game of mistakes.’
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Joel Embiid of the 76ers needs to be careful went it comes to on-court antics.
At least Game 4 put
a little fire into rivalry
By Chad Finn
GLOBE STAFF
So this is how a classic rivalry is renewed, folks.
With a team down, three
games to one,
ANALYSIS
in a series
carrying itself
with the brashness of a team
up, 3-1, and the inevitable just
ahead.
With the home team’s refusal to release the usual post-victory confetti from the rafters,
as if there will be another opportunity to let it fall later in
the series.
With a brief confrontation
between opposing players carrying the ominous edge of
something that was a swing
away from turning to chaos.
With familiarity turning opponents once admired into enemies despised.
The Philadelphia 76ers defeated the Celtics, 103-92, in
Game 4 of the Eastern Conference semifinals Monday night.
In a short time, we’ll know
whether it was the first step in
an unprecedented comeback
from a 3-0 deficit, or a brief delay of the inevitable.
It will be the latter. The Sixers don’t really have a chance.
Monday night, the Cavaliers
became the 130th team in
NBA history to win a series
when up, 3-0. No team has ever blown a 3-0 lead. But in winning Game 4, the 76ers at least
have the inkling in their minds
that it is possible.
Frankly, it’s what I expected
to happen in Game 3. But the
Celtics stole an all-timer of a
win in overtime when Al Horford turned one of the worst
games in his two seasons into a
clutch performance we’ll never
forget.
That didn’t make Monday’s
loss any less frustrating. The
Celtics played poorly by their
usual standards. They were a
step behind too many passes
on defense. They were pummeled on the boards (the Sixers had 16 offensive rebounds,
53 overall; the Celtics finished
at 5 and 43). The Sixers
seemed to win all of the 50-50
balls, and a few that were
probably 60-40 in the Celtics’
favor.
The Sixers were not ready
to let their season end. The officials, notably Scott Foster and
Tony Brothers, apparently
weren’t either, calling a multitude of ticky-tack fouls on the
Celtics in the first half while allowing the Sixers to mug Jayson Tatum of all of his valuables every time he went to the
hoop. I imagine the officials
will cater to the home crowd in
Game 5 — the ultimate makeup call — since this is how it all
seems to work.
This series doesn’t yet have
the white-hot intensity of a
1980s Celtics-Sixers showdown — or really, even the Paul
Pierce-Allen Iverson duel from
2002. There isn’t a Sixer who
demands the utmost respect
like Julius Erving, or one who
absolutely terrifies you like Andrew Toney. But those story
lines are being built for a rivalry that appears destined to last
for years.
We’re getting to know the
burgeoning enemy. Here is
what we’ve learned about the
Sixers so far:
Joel Embiid: The NBA has
more lively, diverse, and enjoyable personalities now than at
any point I can remember, and
I go back to John Havlicek’s coda. Embiid, funny and savvy
on social media and the closest
thing I’ve seen to Hakeem Olajuwon on the court (though
he’s not all that close yet), is
one of those players who enhances the league.
But the more you see of him
in a short span, the more obvious it becomes that he needs to
be careful, because he’s dipping into the Dwight Howard
Starter Kit of obnoxious antics.
He ignited the brief scrap
with Terry Rozier by trying to
steal the ball from him immediately after a whistle. After his
dunk put the Sixers up, 73-62,
with a pivotal run in the third
quarter, he yapped in Marcus
Morris’s face while Morris
countered with the perfect response: He raised three fingers, then formed a zero. Talk
when you’ve accomplished
something, kiddo.
Embiid doesn’t seem to lack
self-awareness, but he is camera-aware, and it would be a
bummer if he chooses that
look-at-me route at the expense of his likeability.
T.J. McConnell: He sure
picked a fine time to submit
his career-best performance
(19 points on 9-of-12 shooting,
7 rebounds, 5 assists). McConnell was sort of the avatar for
the Sixers’ struggles during
The Process — look at this
scrappy little guy! He probably
wouldn’t even be in the league
if they weren’t so terrible! —
but the reality is he’s a nice
find by the Sixers, someone
who has earned the role he has
in the league. I do wish the announcers (Brian Anderson and
some guy named McHale, who
shows no favoritism to his former colors) would stop David
Ecksteining him up by talking
about his grit and scrappiness
so often when he makes an excellent play. In a performance
like that, it feels like a backhanded compliment.
Dario Saric: He’s a skilled,
versatile offensive player who
unexpectedly tormented the
Celtics in the paint (24 points
Monday). Saric doesn’t say
much, and looks like a Color
Me Badd member four years
after the record company
dropped the group. He’s OK
with me.
J.J. Redick: As a college star
in the early 2000s, he was the
most beloved player in the
country — if and only if you
were a Duke fan. Otherwise,
you loathed him as if he were a
Laettner. He’s become an admirable NBA player, a quintessential pro and respected
teammate who is more than
just the spot-up shooter he was
expected to be when he entered the league in 2006. But
right now, in this series, he’s
back to being as aggravating as
he was during his Dukie days.
He’s Grayson Allen with a podcast.
Robert Covington: He’s
playing in this series? Are you
sure? I see his name there on
the stat sheet, and there is an
array of unimpressive digits to
the right of his name, but on
the court he’s apparently a
ghost incapable of haunting.
Ben Simmons: Though he’ll
collect the hardware that says
he is, he’s not a rookie. He’s
just playing like one most of
the time in this series. Maybe
he has more in him that he’s
about to unleash. But so far, I
imagine this is what LeBron
played like when he was 17.
As well as some of those
new enemies played, the Celtics still had their chances in
spite of themselves. They led
after first quarter and were
down just 4 at the half. But the
Sixers built a double-digit lead
in the third, and the Celtics’
hopes of a comeback were
thwarted near the five-minute
mark in the fourth quarter,
when multiple shots to cut the
Sixers’ lead to less than 10 refused to cooperate.
It was such a frustrating
night for the Celtics that even
Brad Stevens — for whom it
would be slightly hyperbolic to
describe as mild-mannered —
picked up a technical foul, presumably a calculated attempt
to jostle awake his team.
So the Sixers won a game.
It’s a semi-series now. There
will be no brooms necessary in
TD Garden Wednesday night.
They got their mulligan. Now
it’s time to get serious. Adjust
to the Sixers’ adjustments.
Feed off the crowd. And definitely comp Kevin Hart some
fine tickets in the 300 section.
The Sixers? They should
have dropped the confetti
Monday. It’s the last chance
they are going to have until
next season, when the rivalry
returns at full boil, no rehashed reminiscence of the old
days necessary.
This is how it used to be.
This is how it is going to be, for
years to come. It feels right for
Celtics fans to loathe the Sixers
again. It will feel even better
when the Celtics wrap this up,
end the Sixers’ hopeful season,
and force Philly to loathe them
even more.
Chad Finn can be reached at
finn@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @GlobeChadFinn.
NHL playoffs
15:58.
Shots on goal — Nashville 10­7­12 — 29. Win­
nipeg 10­9­15 — 34.
Power plays — Nashville 0­1; Winnipeg 0­4.
Goalies — Nashville, Rinne 7­5­0 (34 shots­34
saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 7­4­0 (28 shots­25
saves).
Referees — Marc Joannette, Wes McCauley.
A — 15,321 (15,294). T — 2:33.
Tara Sullivan is a Globe
columnist. She can be reached
at tara.sullivan@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@Globe_Tara.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
Long-term injury would be costly
Nick Cafardo
ON BASEBALL
NEW YORK — The fact is
until doctors come to a conclusion on what’s ailing David
Price, if anything, we’re merely
speculating on the recurring
condition of numbness in his
throwing hand. But if it’s bad
then it’s not good news for the
Red Sox. And the fact that the
32-year-old lefthander will miss
Wednesday’s scheduled start
against the Yankees wasn’t the
best way to start this threegame series against their biggest rivals.
Price always has his detractors — just take a look at social
media. But if you’re a fan of the
team a major injury should
concern you because there is no
comparable replacement in the
system, and certainly no one
the Red Sox could acquire given their payroll is already at an
MLB-high $234 million.
There are certainly questions about this injury. First of
all, why didn’t the Red Sox do
the battery of tests on Price after he left his April 11 start
against the Yankees after one
inning complaining of similar
symptoms?
And why did the Red Sox
announce Tuesday’s news in
such a matter-of-fact manner?
Near the end of his pregame
news conference manager Alex
Cora was asked about Price and
his rebound from a poor outing
against the Rangers in which
he gave up seven earned runs
in 3„ innings.
Cora then proceeded to reveal that Price had returned to
Boston to undergo testing on
his hand. Cora said Price’s fingers went numb during a bullpen session Sunday. When
Price experienced numbness in
Boston on April 11 he attributed the problem to the cold
weather, but on Sunday it was
84 degrees at Globe Life Park in
Texas.
“We’re going to gather all
the information tomorrow and
FILE/JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
David Price lost his touch April 11, exiting after one inning because of hand numbness.
we’ll get back to you guys,” Cora
said. “Hopefully he’ll be back
with us throughout the trip. To
be honest we talked a little bit
about it, the feeling is he’s going to be back with us during
the trip.”
To pitch?
“I’ve got to talk to Brad
[Pearson, the trainer] after
this,” is all Cora would say.
So clearly this numbness
isn’t a result of cold weather.
Price said previously that he
has had this problem periodically for his whole career. But
the recurrence just one month
later is a red flag. Could it be a
sign of something affiliated
with the forearm/triceps issue
that sidelined him for a major
portion of last season?
People have lost their minds
when it comes to Price. I had a
guy tell me even before Tuesday’s news that Price should be
replaced by PawSox lefthander
Jalen Beeks. Seriously?
When Price is right he’s one
of the best pitchers in baseball.
Sorry, no offense to Beeks, but
he’s no David Price. If you truly
understand the construction of
the 2018 Red Sox roster you’ll
note that this team is built
around Chris Sale and Price.
Having two ace lefthanders at
the top of the rotation was Red
Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski’s master plan.
The good Price cannot be
duplicated.
Would it be a waste of a lot
of money on the Red Sox’ part
if this injury is serious? Absolutely, because he’s just three
years into a seven-year, $217
million contract and there’s no
way he would exercise the optout of the deal after this season.
If he’s OK — something as a
fan you should wish for — then
he’ll miss his one start and get
back on the saddle. As it is,
Rick Porcello will start on
Wednesday and Eduardo Rodriguez on Thursday.
Something has been amiss
with Price lately. He opened the
season with 14 scoreless innings. Then came the short
outing against the Yankees, but
he rebounded with a quality
win over the Angels and then
seven strong innings against
Oakland before giving up a
three-run homer to Khris Davis
in the eighth in a 4-1 loss.
In his April 28 start against
Tampa Bay he had poor command, walking four and giving
up five earned runs in 5„ innings. Cora said he thought
Price wasn’t getting much velocity separation between his
pitches. Price insisted after the
game that physically he was
fine. But now, you wonder.
The naysayers are accusing
him of purposely missing a
start against the hard-hitting
Yankees because he doesn’t like
to pitch against them. They will
insist he’s faking it — a similar
chorus after his April start
against the Bombers.
After last season’s incident
with Dennis Eckersley, Price
can’t seem to win in Boston
anymore. It doesn’t matter that
teammates — despite the Eckersley controversy — think he’s
great. It doesn’t matter that the
“bad guy” comments you hear
associated with Price have no
merit whatsoever.
Can you say that this hasn’t
been the best use of free agent
money for the Red Sox? Sure,
that’s fair. Especially when you
consider they could have
signed lefthander Jon Lester
for significantly less. If Price is
going to dodge one injury after
another, it’s going to be a long
four more years and a lot of
dead money.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
Join us Tuesday, May 22, as we celebrate the people who are leading the way in diversity and inclusion.
Keynote Speaker
Champion of Change
Visionary
Emcee
Vocalist
Haben Girma
Disability Rights Lawyer, Author, Speaker
Andrew Dreyfus
President & CEO,
Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA
Aida Sabo
Vice President for Diversity
& Inclusion, Parexel
Tru Pettigrew
Founder & CEO,
Tru Access
Nnenna Ukwu
Program Associate,
Marketing Operations, Biogen
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
2018 ROSOFF AWARD NOMINEES
Join us Tuesday, May 22, as we announce the winners at the event.
COMPANIES
Aetna
Bank of America
Bauer Hockey
Bison
Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA
Boston Scientific
Cummings Foundation
CVS
Google Cambridge
Grads of Life
Harvard Pilgrim Health Care
Harvard University
Hubspot
INPHANTRY
JLL
John Hancock
Liberty Mutual
Massachusetts Port Authority
Mass General Hospital
Novartis
Partners HealthCare
Philips
Pine Manor College
Rockland Trust
Scholarjet
The Massachusetts Gaming Commission
The Rising Tides
TJX
Wheelock Family Theatre
INDIVIDUALS
Mohamad Ali // Carbonite
Mohammad Anwar // Software Technology
Mark Brown // John Hancock
Monica Cannon // Violence in Boston, Inc.
Lea Coligado // Women of Silicon Valley
Sheena Collier // Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce
Jada Hebra // SNHU
Dr. Avery Earl // Bentley University
Sandra Sims-Williams // Digitas
Peter Markell // Partners HealthCare
Jessica Lander // Lowell Public Schools
Darryl Owens // Boston Police Department
Leon Noel // Resilient Coders
Colette Phillips // Colette Phillips Communications
Mike Grandinetti // Reduxio
Michael James // Old Colony YMCA
Andrew Dreyfus // BCBS of MA
Corey Spinney // Digitas
James E. Ryan // Harvard Graduate School of Education
Drew Faust // Harvard University
Debra Wojnarowski // Harvard Pilgrim Health Care
Blake Winfree // MullenLowe
Erin Swenson Gorrall // MullenLowe
Fabrice Erna Torchon // Winchester Community Access
Wallys Sosa-Picard // Northeastern University
David Delmar // Resilient Coders
Hannah Grove // State Street
Mia Roberts // Big Sisters Association of Greater Boston
John Asher Johnson // Harvard University
Dr. Jack Pierce // The Washington D.C. VA Medical Center
20-SOMETHINGS
Prabha Dublish // Womentum
Lucas Escobar // Hill Holliday
Tania Fabo // Harvard University
Sam Greenberg // YtoY
Veronica (Roni) Polsgrove // NYU Student
Sarah Rosenkrantz // YtoY
Semi Spahillari // New York Life
Yulkendy Valdez // Project 99
Bayla Werman // MullenLowe
Presenting Sponsor
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C5
Sox­Yanks
is a go for
London
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
NEW YORK — Red Sox
manager Alex Cora is a proponent of international baseball
and is looking forward to his
team playing two games in
London against the Yankees in
2019.
“ Whenever you can play
overseas and expand the game,
it’s always fun,” Cora said Tuesday after the announcement.
“The family’s going to go and
we’re going to have a blast.
“Everybody knows about the
rivalry and how much it means
over here. They’re going to have
a taste of the rivalry over there.”
The Red Sox players were
not quite as enthusiastic.
J.D. Martinez was among
those who mentioned the fivehour time difference and wondered about jet lag.
“Travel’s going to be kind of
tough,” Brock Holt said.
The games will be June 2930 at London Stadium, the facility built for the 2012 Olympics. The 66,000-seat stadium
is primarily used for soccer and
track and field but will be reconfigured for baseball and
seat approximately 55,000.
MLB plans to give the teams
two days off ahead of the series
and a day off afterward. Red
Sox representative Jackie Bradley Jr. said the players had to
approve playing the series.
“It should be interesting,” he
said. “I think we all understand
this is important.”
The Red Sox will be the
home team for the series,
which will be the first-ever regular-season games in Europe.
Baseball has conducted regular-season games in Australia,
Japan, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. Oakland and Seattle are
scheduled for a two-game series
in Tokyo to open next season.
There will be a second London Series in 2020 with the
teams to be determined.
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Streaking Yankees
grab a share of first
uRED SOX
Continued from Page C1
MIKE STOBE/GETTY IMAGES
Yankees slugger Giancarlo Stanton tracks the path of his home run in the fourth inning, his second solo shot of the night.
Numb hand puts Price on bench
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
NEW YORK — David Price
will miss his start against the
Yankees on Wednesday night,
having been
RED SOX
sent back to
NOTEBOOK Boston by the
Red Sox for
medical tests to determine the
cause of numbness in his left
hand.
Price’s bullpen session in
Texas on Sunday was stopped
because of the issue. He tried
throwing again at Yankee Stadium on Monday and the decision was made to scratch him
from the start.
Rick Porcello will start on
Wednesday and Eduardo Ro­
driguez on Thursday. Price has
not yet been placed on the disabled list.
After a 3-2 loss to the Yankees on Tuesday, manager Alex
Cora said the team was still
gathering information. He expects Price to rejoin the team
on the road trip, but not necessarily to pitch.
Price first mentioned the issue April 11 after he allowed
four runs in one inning against
the Yankees at Fenway Park,
saying his hands have long had
a circulation problem and that
the cold weather exacerbated
the issue and made it difficult
to grip the ball.
Price has made every start
since but has not pitched well,
allowing 17 earned runs on 26
hits and 11 walks over his last
22 innings. He lasted only 3„
innings against Texas on
Thursday, giving up seven
earned runs.
Before Sunday, Price had
not mentioned any physical issues since the start against the
Yankees.
“We decided it was better
for him to go back to Boston,
check it out and go from
there,” Cora said. “For me,
we’ve taken care of these guys
from Day 1 in spring training
[and] the first month of the
season.
“As soon as I heard what
was going on, I think we’re better off for him to see what’s going on, do more tests and go
from there and make a decision.
“I’m not saying he will miss
the next start or there’s a DL
situation here. But obviously
want to make sure what’s going on with him.”
Price was on the disabled
list twice last season with arm
injuries, the first a flexor muscle strain in his elbow and the
second a triceps strain. It’s unclear whether this latest issue
is related.
“As of now, no,” Cora said.
For pitchers, numbness can
be symptomatic of a nerve issue. It was 84 degrees at Globe
Life Park on Sunday when
Price started throwing in the
bullpen, so weather was not a
factor.
Now it’s uncertain what the
problem is.
“Everybody thought, everybody agreed, that it was just
something that happened that
night,” Cora said. “We actually
felt it wasn’t going to happen
[again]; it was just a one-day
thing.
“It came up on Sunday, now
we’re taking that route. He was
tested [before] and now it’s
something else.”
If Price does land on the
disabled list, the Sox have potential replacements in
lefthander Brian Johnson,
righthander Hector Velazquez,
and Triple A lefthander Jalen
Beeks.
The Sox will need a starter
by Saturday.
“The more we know about
this situation the better it’s going to be for [Price] and obviously for the team,” Cora said.
Holt returns
The Sox activated Brock
Holt off the disabled list and
optioned Tzu­Wei Lin to Triple
A Pawtucket.
Holt had been out since
April 27 with a left hamstring
strain. He played six innings
for Pawtucket on Monday and
was 1 for 3.
“I felt fine playing, so there
was no reason not to come
back,” Holt said. “I’m ready to
go.”
Holt had a .920 OPS in 16
games before the injury and
Cora plans to use him at second base, shortstop, and third
base on a semi regular basis.
“He’s going to help us
throughout the week,” Cora
said. “That’s the goal.”
Wright pitches in
Steven Wright has started a
rehab assignment with Pawtucket and pitched in relief
against Lehigh Valley. He allowed one run on eight hits
over six innings and 88 pitches. Wright’s 15-game suspension for violating MLB’s domestic violence policy ends
Monday. Because he is out of
minor league options, the Sox
will have to then the knuckleballer to the roster. Wright was
1-3 with an 8.25 ERA in five
starts last season before undergoing surgery on his left knee
. . . Yankees outfielder Jacoby
Ellsbury will not be in the
Bronx for the series. After playing six spring training games,
Ellsbury landed on the disabled list with an oblique
strain. He has since had hip
soreness and plantar fasciitis
in his right heel. Yankees manager Aaron Boone said Ellsbury missed a workout Monday at the team facility in Florida because he was sick.
Ellsbury has hit .264 over four
seasons with the Yankees . . .
New Knicks coach David
Fizdale threw out the first
pitch . . . Tickets for the Red
Sox Hall of Fame and Fenway
Honors gala are available at
redsoxfoundation.org/fenwayhonors. The May 24 event benefits the Red Sox Foundation
and will recognize Derek Lowe,
Mike Lowell, and Kevin Youki­
lis, among the honorees.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at peter.abraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@peteabe.
This rivalry is alive and very well
uSHAUGHNESSY
Continued from Page C1
Tuesday. The Sox trailed most
of the night, but tied it, 2-2, on
Mookie Betts’s triple in the top
of the seventh.
And then we got to see Fight
Club Joe Kelly trot in from the
bullpen to face Aaron Judge in
a bases-loaded, one-out jam
with the score tied in the bott om o f t h e s e v e n t h . Ju d ge
cracked a single to left to give
the Yanks a 3-2 lead. New York’s
bullpen did the rest.
In the ninth we got a rematch of Rafael Devers vs. Aroldis Chapman.
Last August, Devers hit a
two-strike, opposite-field homer off a 102.4-mile-per-hour
Chapman fastball on ESPN’s
“Sunday Night Baseball.” Tuesday he grounded out to Chapman on a 101-m.p.h. heater.
Chapman fanned Eduardo
Nunez, then hit poor Jackie
Bradley Jr. (three more strikeouts) with a 103-m.p.h. fastball
— tops in MLB this year — before getting Christian Vazquez
on a grounder to end it.
It’s hard to imagine a better
May baseball series as Hub fans
keep living the dream of our
sports High Renaissance.
Some day maybe we’ll look
back at April/May 2018 and remember it as the spring in
which several of Boston’s ancient rivalries were renewed.
We’ve already had a sevengame playoff with the Bruins
and Maple Leafs, and the Celtics and 76ers are in the throes
of an emotional conference
semifinal. All four of those
teams have rosters brimming
with young talent and there’s a
likelihood we’ll see more showdown series in the coming
years.
And then there is baseball,
where the Red Sox and Yankees
have again emerged simultaneously as baseball’s most fashionable franchises. Just like the
good old days.
There has not been a single
day this season in which the
Yankees and Sox both lost. All
three of the games here this
week are being nationally televised.
“It’s awesome that the baseball world is watching,’’ acknowledged Sox manager Alex
Cora.
Next year the Sox and Yanks
will take it to London for the
first big league games played in
Europe. Prince Charles meets
Dr. Charles. Too bad Wes and
Joba (no relation to Wilt or
Neville) Chamberlain are no
longer part of the rivalry.
When we last saw these two
teams there were a couple of
bench-clearing episodes and a
Kelly-Tyler Austin dustup that
made Kelly a Hub cult hero.
There was none of that action
Tuesday.
“I think what happened is
behind us,’’ said Yankees manager Aaron Boone.
America saw a dose of Yankees power when Stanton hammered a Pomeranz pitch into
the left-field seats in the second
inning. As a rule, I’m not into
exit velocity, but I had to know
after watching this rocket
launch. The Globe’s intrepid Alex Speier told me it was 111.5
miles per hour, which was
somewhat disappointing. Stanton hit one to the opposite field,
on a 2-1 pitch in the fourth.
As good as the game was,
the Price news may turn out to
be the Sox’ lasting memory of
this series.
Cora dropped the bombshell
news late in his daily afternoon
press briefing when he casually
mentioned that Price had been
sent back to Boston for medical
tests due to more numbness in
the fingers of his pitching hand.
It was weird. It was as if the
manager didn’t think anybody
would notice. One minute he
was talking about Brock Holt’s
reinstatement and Bradley’s
slump (why is he still playing
every day?), and then he took a
question about Price and said
something that sounded like,
“Oh, yeah, glad you mentioned
him. David’s not pitching tomorrow. We sent him back to
Boston.’’
The news set Twitter on fire
as angry fans suggested that
Price was faking an injury so he
wouldn’ t have to face New
York’s fearsome lineup.
The Yankees and Yankee
Stadium have not been good for
Price in the last 12 months. It
was here last June that his troubles started when he insulted a
pack of reporters just a few
hours after telling me he wasn’t
going to speak to the media except on the days he pitches.
Price was routed by the Yankees
in a 9-1 loss the next night,
went on the shelf with elbow
woes, and spent the rest of the
summer pretending to be a
badass leader for a talented
team devoid of leadership and
character.
It was all going to be better
for Price this year . . . and it was
better . . . right up until the Yankees came to Fenway April 11.
Price had pitched 14 scoreless
innings in his first two starts,
but the Yankees cuffed him
around for four runs in the first
inning of a Sox loss. Price left
the game after one due to a tingling sensation in his fingers.
We shrugged it off as a cold
weather thing, but Price hasn’t
pitched well since that night
(19 runs in 17 innings of his last
three starts) and now he’s back
in Boston undergoing tests.
Rick Porcello will make Price’s
start Wednesday.
“I was concerned about it
when I heard about it on Sunday,’’ Cora acknowledged.
Sox owners must also be
concerned. The team owes
Price $127 million (over four
years) after this year and there
is no way Price is going to opt
out of that kind of dough, especially now that it’s obvious no
teams are going to offer him a
big contract given his elbow
and hand woes.
All in all, it was not a good
day in the Big Apple for Club
Cora.
Dan Shaughnessy is a Globe
columnist. He can be reached at
dshaughnessy@globe.com.
Wednesday night with Rick
Porcello facing Masahiro Tanaka.
The game turned on, of all
things, a balk.
It was 2-2 in the seventh inning when pinch-hitter Neil
Walker doubled with one out
off Heath Hembree. Gleyber
Torres then walked.
With Brett Gardner at the
plate, the Sox wanted to change
signs and that’s when Hembree
moved his back leg while standing on the rubber and was
called for a balk.
“I think the balk was a
game-changer right there,” Cora said. “Going from first and
second, one pitch away from
getting out of the inning to second and third, infield in.”
Cora didn’t disagree with the
call and Hembree acknowledged his mistake.
“I was kind of stuck in the
middle of seeing the pitches
and stepping off. I knew I did
it,” he said. “Mental lapse.”
Hembree walked Gardner.
With the bases loaded, Cora
went to Joe Kelly.
Yankees fans, cognizant of
the brawl Kelly sparked in April
by hitting Tyler Austin with a
pitch, booed loudly. With the
infield in, Judge bounced a
singe into left field to score
Walker but Andrew Benintendi
threw Torres out at the plate.
Kelly ended the inning but
the Sox were down by a run.
Jackie Bradley Jr. was hit by
a 103-mph fastball with two
outs in the ninth inning to extend the game. But Aroldis
Chapman got Christian
Vazquez to ground out for his
eighth save.
Red Sox starter Drew Pomeranz pitched well, allowing
two runs over six innings. He
walked two and struck out six.
Both runs were on home
runs by Giancarlo Stanton, one
to left field in the second inning
and one to right field in the
fourth.
Stanton previously had one
home run in 33 career at-bats
against the Sox, that in 2012 off
Daisuke Matsuzaka.
“Both bad pitches,” Pomeranz said.
Pomeranz survived a bloody
fingernail issue in the second
inning that required the attention of head athletic trainer
Brad Pearson on the field. The
nail split throwing a curveball
and had to be cut down.
Pomeranz threw more cutters than he planned but was
able to throw a curveball.
Yankees starter Luis Severino faced the Sox on April 10 at
Fenway Park and didn’t have
command of his slider. He allowed five runs on eight hits
and three walks over five innings and took the loss in a
game the Sox won, 14-1.
With his slider intact and his
fastball sitting in the upper 90s,
Severino carved up the Sox this
time, striking out 11 without a
walk. But he did allow two
runs.
Severino was the first Yankees pitcher since Mike Mussina to strike out at least 11 Red
Sox without a walk since Mike
Yankees 3, Red Sox 2
At Yankee Stadium, Bronx, N.Y.
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Betts rf
4 0 2 1 0 1 .360
Benintendi lf
4 0 1 1 0 2 .244
Ramirez 1b
4 0 1 0 0 0 .295
Martinez dh
4 0 1 0 0 2 .346
Bogaerts ss
4 0 0 0 0 1 .316
Devers 3b
4 0 0 0 0 2 .252
Núñez 2b
4 2 2 0 0 2 .238
Bradley cf
3 0 0 0 0 3 .173
Vázquez c
4 0 1 0 0 1 .196
Totals
35 2 8 2 0 14
NY YANKEES
Gardner lf
Judge rf
Gregorius ss
Stanton dh
Sánchez c
Hicks cf
Andújar 3b
Austin 1b
a­Walker ph­1b
Torres 2b
Totals
AB
3
4
4
3
3
3
4
2
1
2
29
R
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
3
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 2 .198
1 1 0 2 .295
0 0 0 0 .301
2 2 1 0 .237
0 0 1 1 .193
0 0 1 0 .231
1 0 0 2 .273
0 0 0 1 .247
1 0 0 0 .198
1 0 1 0 .333
6 3 5 8
Boston............................... 000 010 100 — 2 8 1
NY Yankees......................010 100 10x — 3 6 1
a­doubled for Austin in 7th. E—Devers (9), Tor­
res (2). LOB—Boston 7, NY 7. 2B—Martinez (9),
Núñez (8), Walker (4). 3B—Betts (1). HR—Stanton
2 (9), off Pomeranz, off Pomeranz. SB—Núñez (2),
Stanton (2). Runners left in scoring position—
Boston 5 (Benintendi, Ramirez 2, Devers, Brad­
ley), NY 3 (Gregorius, Hicks, Torres). RISP—Bos­
ton 2 for 7, NY 1 for 8. GIDP—Bogaerts, Gardner.
DP—Boston 1 (Bogaerts, Ramirez); NY Yankees 1
(Torres, Gregorius, Walker).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Pomeranz
6 4 2 2 2 6 107 5.23
Hembree L 2­1
‚ 1 1 1 2 0 20 4.24
Kelly
1‚ 1 0 0 1 1 22 2.30
Smith
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 4 4.09
NY Yankees
Severino
Robertsn W 3­1
Green
Chapman S 8
IP
6
1
1
1
H
6
1
1
0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
2 2 0 11 109 2.21
0 0 0 2 22 2.95
0 0 0 0 11 1.96
0 0 0 1 15 1.69
Severino pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherit­
ed runners­scored—Kelly 3­1, Smith 1­0, Robert­
son 1­1. HBP—by Chapman (Bradley). Balk—
Hembree. WP—Kelly, Severino. Umpires—Home,
Gary Cederstrom; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Stu
Scheurwater; Third, Eric Cooper. T—3:29.
A—45,773 (47,309).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
SECOND INNING
YANKEES — Stanton homered to left. Sánchez
walked. Hicks walked, Sánchez to second. Andú­
jar struck out. Austin struck out. Torres popped
out to short.
FOURTH INNING
YANKEES — Stanton homered to right. Sánchez
grounded out to second. Hicks lined out to cen­
ter. Andújar hit an infield single to shortstop.
Austin popped out to center.
FIFTH INNING
RED SOX — Núñez struck out, safe on wild
pitch. Bradley struck out. Vázquez struck out.
Betts singled to center, Núñez to second. Benin­
tendi singled to center, Núñez scored, Betts to
third. Benintendi to second. Ramirez grounded
out to second.
SEVENTH INNING
RED SOX — Núñez hit an infield single to short­
stop. Robertson pitching. Bradley struck out.
Vázquez flied out to center. Núñez stole second.
Betts tripled to left, Núñez scored. Benintendi
struck out.
YANKEES — Andújar grounded out to short.
Walker ,pinch­hitting for Austin, doubled to right.
Torres walked. On a balk, Walker to third, Torres
to second. Gardner walked. Kelly pitching. Judge
singled to left, Walker scored, Torres to third,
Gardner to second. Torres out advancing, left
fielder to catcher. Gregorius grounded out to
pitcher.
Mussina on Sept. 2, 2001, at
Fenway Park.
That was the night Mussina
lost a perfect game with two
outs in the ninth inning on Carl
Everett’s pinch-hit single.
Severino did not allow a run
until the fifth inning. Eduardo
Nunez struck out but reached
first on a wild pitch when Gary
Sanchez could not smother a
slider in the dirt.
Severino struck out Bradley
and Vazquez before singles by
Mookie Betts and Benintendi
drove in a run.
With runners at second and
third, Hanley Ramirez had a
chance to change the game, but
grounded out.
Severino was at 99 pitches
when he went back out for the
seventh inning. He got ahead of
Nunez 0 for 2 but could put him
away. Nunez fouled off four
pitches before reaching on an
infield single on the 10th pitch
of the at-bat.
David Robertson replaced
Severino and got two outs. But
Betts also came back from an 0and-2 count and lined a triple
to left field to tie the game.
“Put it in play there and see
what can happen,” Betts said.
Robertson came back to
strike out Benintendi.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
MIKE STOBE/GETTY IMAGES
Christian Vazquez dives to tag Giancarlo Stanton before he
can score an insurance run in the eighth inning Tuesday.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C7
Baseball
AL
Mariners’ Paxton fires no­hitter
EAST
Boston
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
W
25
25
19
15
8
L
10
10
17
18
27
Pct.
.714
.714
.528
.455
.229
GB
—
—
6½
9
17
Div. Last 10
14­6
6­4
10­8
9­1
7­10
5­5
7­10
5­5
4­8
2­8
Streak
L1
W7
L1
L2
L7
CENTRAL
Cleveland
Minnesota
Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
W
17
15
15
12
9
L
18
17
20
23
24
Pct.
.486
.469
.429
.343
.273
GB
—
½
2
5
7
Div. Last 10
7­2
3­7
5­2
6­4
7­10
4­6
9­11
7­3
6­9
2­8
Streak
L4
W5
W1
W2
L4
WEST
Los Angeles
*Houston
Seattle
*Oakland
Texas
W
21
22
20
18
14
L
14
15
14
17
24
Pct.
.600
.595
.588
.514
.368
GB
—
—
½
3
8½
Div. Last 10
12­4
5­5
11­7
5­5
8­8
6­4
9­15
5­5
7­13
3­7
Streak
L1
W1
W1
L1
L1
NL
EAST
Atlanta
Philadelphia
New York
*Washington
Miami
W
20
20
18
19
13
L
14
15
16
17
22
Pct.
.588
.571
.529
.528
.371
GB
—
½
2
2
7½
Div. Last 10
14­7
6­4
7­13
4­6
10­7
2­8
7­8
8­2
3­6
6­4
Streak
W1
W2
L1
W2
L2
CENTRAL
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Cincinnati
W
20
21
20
18
9
L
14
15
16
15
27
Pct.
.588
.583
.556
.545
.250
GB
—
—
1
1½
12
Div. Last 10
14­7
5­5
10­13
5­5
10­3
5­5
9­8
5­5
3­15
3­7
Streak
L2
W1
W2
W2
W1
WEST
*Arizona
Colorado
San Francisco
*Los Angeles
*San Diego
W
23
21
19
15
13
L
11
15
17
19
23
Pct.
.676
.583
.528
.441
.361
GB
—
3
5
8
11
Div. Last 10
15­7
6­4
7­6
7­3
11­12
7­3
11­15
4­6
11­15
4­6
Streak
W2
W6
L2
L2
L1
* — Not including late game
RESULTS
TUESDAY
At NY Yankees 3
Boston 2
Minnesota 7
at Texas 4
At Chi. Cubs 4
at Baltimore 7
Pittsburgh 10
at Chi. White Sox 6
San Francisco 2
At Colorado 4
LA Angels 2
Kansas City 15
At Philadelphia 4
Detroit 7
at St. Louis 1
Seattle 5
at Toronto 0
Atlanta 1
at Tampa Bay 0
At Cincinnati 7
NY Mets 2
At Milwaukee 3
Cleveland 2
Miami 3
Houston
at Oakland
Arizona
at LA Dodgers
Washington
at San Diego
MONDAY
At Philadelphia 11
San Francisco 0
Minnesota 6
at St. Louis 0
NY Mets 7
at Cincinnati 6
Houston 16
at Oakland 2
At Texas 7
Detroit 6
At Chi. Cubs 14
Miami 2
Washington 8
at San Diego 5
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
By Ian Harrison
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mariners 5 T O R O N T O —
James Paxton of
Blue Jays 0 the Seattle Mari-
ners became the first Canadian to
pitch a no-hitter in his home
country, shutting down the Toronto Blue Jays, 5-0, Tuesday
night.
Paxton joined Dick Fowler of
the 1945 Philadelphia Athletics
as the only Canadians to throw a
no-hitter.
Paxton, who’s from British Columbia, pointed to a giant tattoo
on his right forearm of a maple
leaf — a national symbol of Canada — as he celebrated to a standing ovation at Rogers Centre.
‘‘Of all places, to do it in Toronto, it’s pretty amazing,’’ he
said.
‘‘The fans were great. They
were giving me some trouble in
the seventh inning, but once I got
past that, they started kind of
cheering me on. It was cool,’’ he
said.
The 29-year-old lefthander
nicknamed ‘‘ The Big Maple’’
threw 99 pitches in tossing the
third no-hitter in the majors this
year — all three have come in different countries.
O a k l a n d ’s S e a n M a n a e a
pitched one against Boston on
April 21 in California. Four Los
Angeles Dodgers combined to nohit San Diego in Mexico last Friday.
Coming off a career-high 16
strikeouts in his last start, Paxton
(2-1) was electric once again, hitting 100 miles per hour with his
fastball while retiring Josh Donaldson on a grounder to end it.
Pa x t o n s t r u c k o u t s e v e n ,
walked three, and benefited from
an outstanding play by third
baseman Kyle Seager. With two
outs in the seventh, the former
Gold Glover made a full-length
diving stop on speedy Kevin Pillar’s grounder down the line,
then slung an off-balance throw
that first baseman Ryon Healy
snagged on one hop.
TOM SZCZERBOWSKI/GETTY IMAGES
Mariners lefty James Paxton is congratulated by Mike Zunino after no-hitting the Blue Jays.
Russell Martin led off the Toronto eighth with a long drive
that left fielder Ben Gamel
caught near the wall.
‘‘What a defense tonight. That
was amazing. Those guys were
making every play,’’ Paxton said.
Anthony Alford fouled out on
the first pitch to begin the ninth
and Teoscar Hernandez struck
out swinging. Donaldson ended
it with a hard one-hopper to Seager.
Healy pumped his fist after
catching Seager’s throw, and the
Mariners streamed out of the
dugout, dousing their pitcher
with a cooler as the crowd of
20,513 cheered.
After teammates had left the
field, Paxton came back out and
waved to the fans as they clapped
in appreciation of his feat.
‘‘The balls that were hit hard
went right to people, and then we
had the defense making amazing
plays like Kyle’s last play,’’ he said.
‘‘And he had another diving play
in the seventh inning, it was just
ridiculous.’’
Paxton’s season has taken off
since a bald eagle mistakenly
landed on his shoulder before a
start last month. He’s 2-0 with a
2.51 ERA over seven starts since
the bird stuck its talons into his
back before the Minnesota Twins’
home opener.
Fowler threw his no-hitter on
Sept. 9, 1945, against the St. Louis Browns. He had recently returned from serving in the Canadian military during World War
II, missing two full seasons, and
pitched his gem in his first start
of the year.
This was the sixth no-hitter
for the Mariners franchise, and
the first since Hisashi Iwakuma
did it against Baltimore in 2015.
Felix Hernandez threw a perfect
game in 2012, and Randy Johnson tossed Seattle’s first no-hitter
in 1990.
Mariners 5, Blue Jays 0
SEATTLE
Gordon cf
Segura ss
Canó 2b
Cruz dh
Seager 3b
Haniger rf
Healy 1b
Zunino c
Gamel lf
Totals
At Rogers Centre, Toronto
AB R H BI BB SO
5 1 3 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0 2
4 1 2 1 1 0
4 0 2 1 1 0
5 0 1 0 0 2
3 0 0 1 0 0
4 1 2 0 0 1
4 1 1 2 0 0
3 1 1 0 1 0
37 5 12 5 3 5
TORONTO
TeHernández rf
Donaldson 3b
Solarte 2b
Smoak 1b
Pillar cf
Martin c
Morales dh
Gurriel Jr. ss
Alford lf
Totals
AB
4
4
3
2
3
3
2
3
2
26
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
BI BB SO
0 0 2
0 0 2
0 0 1
0 1 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 1
0 1 1
0 3 7
Avg.
.353
.280
.290
.255
.239
.289
.262
.185
.178
Avg.
.247
.211
.264
.252
.309
.139
.148
.224
.167
Seattle.....................................002 210 000 — 5 12 0
Toronto................................... 000 000 000 — 0 0 1
E—Smoak (1). LOB—Seattle 9, Toronto 2. 2B—Gor­
don (8). HR—Zunino (5), off Stroman. SB—Gordon
(15). SF—Haniger. Runners left in scoring position—
Seattle 4 (Segura, Cruz, Zunino 2), Toronto 1 (Don­
aldson). RISP—Seattle 2 for 10, Toronto 0 for 2. Run­
ners moved up—Gordon, Segura, Canó. GIDP—Pillar.
DP—Seattle 1; Toronto 1.
Seattle
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Paxton W 2­1
9 0 0 0 3 7 99 3.40
Toronto
Stroman L 0­5
Mayza
Petricka
Loup
Axford
IP
5
„
1‚
1
1
H
9
1
0
1
1
R ER BB SO NP ERA
5 5 2 2 88 7.71
0 0 1 0 20 4.15
0 0 0 2 15 3.38
0 0 0 1 13 4.61
0 0 0 0 12 1.56
Umpires—Home, James Hoye; First, Quinn Wol­
cott; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Marvin Hudson.
T—2:19. A—20,513 (49,286).
........2018 ........ Team ........2017 vs. opp........ ........Last 3 starts........
Odds
W­L
ERA
rec.
W­L
IP
ERA
W­L
IP
ERA
BOSTON AT NY YANKEES, 7:05 p.m.
Porcello (R)
Tanaka (R)
Off
Off
5­0
4­2
2.14
4.39
6­1
5­2
1­3
2­2
25.0
28.2
3.24
2.83
1­0
2­0
20.2
18.2
3.05
2.41
5.79
4.21
3­2
3­4
0­0
1­0
0.0
11.0
0.00
4.09
1­1
2­1
15.0
16.0
8.40
2.25
NY METS AT CINCINNATI, 12:35 p.m.
Wheeler (R)
Romano (R)
Off
Off
2­2
2­3
CLEVELAND AT MILWAUKEE, 1:10 p.m.
Carrasco (R)
Guerra (R)
Off
Off
4­1
2­2
3.95
2.33
4­3
3­2
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­1
1­2
15.2
16.0
6.32
3.38
3­1
1­1
2.97
3.29
3­3
2­3
0­1
1­0
7.2
6.1
8.22
1.42
1­0
1­1
18.2
19.2
3.38
5.03
DETROIT AT TEXAS, 2:05 p.m.
Liriano (L)
Colon (R)
Off
Off
PITTSBURGH AT CHI. WHITE SOX, 2:10 p.m.
Williams (R)
López (R)
4­2
0­2
Off
Off
2.63
2.43
4­3
2­4
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­1
0­0
17.2
18.0
3.57
3.50
4.82
4.99
1­1
4­2
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­1
2­1
9.1
16.1
4.82
2.20
3.46
3.78
2­1
5­2
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
2­1
2­0
13.0
14.1
3.46
2.51
1.42
4.30
6­1
4­3
0­0
0­0
0.0
6.0
0.00
3.00
1­1
0­1
22.2
13.2
1.99
3.95
3­2
1­6
0­0
0­0
0.0
6.0
0.00
0.00
1­0
0­2
16.2
14.2
5.40
7.98
3.99
4.76
5­2
5­2
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
2­1
0­2
14.0
12.1
7.07
8.76
3.57
6.60
1­0
4­2
0­0
0­0
2.0
0.0
9.00
0.00
0­0
0­2
4.0
13.2
0.00
8.56
3.65
—
5­2
0­0
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­0
0­0
17.0
0.0
1.59
0.00
4­3
3­4
1­0
0­0
6.2
0.0
0.00
0.00
2­1
1­2
17.0
15.2
2.12
5.17
MIAMI AT CHI. CUBS, 2:20 p.m.
Wei­Yin (L)
Quintana (L)
Off
Off
1­1
3­2
LA ANGELS AT COLORADO, 3:10 p.m.
Barria (R)
Anderson (L)
Off
Off
2­1
2­0
HOUSTON AT OAKLAND, 3:35 p.m.
Cole (R)
Mengden (R)
Off
Off
3­1
2­3
KANSAS CITY AT BALTIMORE, 7:05 p.m.
Skoglund (L)
Cashner (R)
Off
Off
1­2
1­4
6.84
4.89
SAN FRANCISCO AT PHILADELPHIA, 7:05 p.m.
Stratton (R)
Pivetta (R)
Off
Off
3­2
1­2
SEATTLE AT TORONTO, 7:07 p.m.
LeBlanc (L)
García (L)
Off
Off
0­0
2­2
ATLANTA AT TAMPA BAY, 7:10 p.m.
Teheran (R)
TBA
Off
Off
2­1
—
WASHINGTON AT SAN DIEGO, 9:10 p.m.
Gonzalez (L)
Lucchesi (L)
Off
Off
4­2
3­2
2.33
3.13
Corbin (L)
Off
4­0
2.15
5­2
0­2
10.2
Wood (L)
Off
0­3
3.83
3­4
3­0
21.0
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season
5.06
2.57
1­0
0­1
18.2
17.0
2.89
3.71
LEADERS
AL LEADERS
R
36
21
22
22
17
16
11
30
15
22
NL LEADERS
H
41
49
43
45
46
48
30
42
35
48
MINNESOTA
Morrison 1b
Dozier 2b
Kepler cf
Escobar 3b
Rosario lf
Grossman rf
Garver c
Adrianza ss
Odorizzi p
Pressly p
LaMarre ph
Rogers p
Hughes p
Totals
AB
5
5
4
5
5
3
3
3
1
0
1
0
0
35
ST. LOUIS
AB
Carpenter 2b
4
DeJong ss
4
JMartínez 1b­rf
3
Ozuna lf
3
Fowler rf
3
Brebbia p
0
Bader cf
3
Garcia 3b
2
Peña c­1b
3
CMartínez p
0
Gyorko ph
1
Tuivailala p
0
Lyons p
0
Kelly c
1
Totals
27
PHILLIES 4, GIANTS 2
Avg.
.360
.353
.350
.346
.346
.345
.330
.328
.324
.322
HOME RUNS
Betts, BOSTON..................................................13
Gallo, Texas.......................................................12
Trout, Los Angeles...........................................12
Gregorius, New York.......................................10
Haniger, Seattle................................................10
Moustakas, KC..................................................10
Ramirez, Cleveland..........................................10
8 tied.....................................................................9
RUNS BATTED IN
Lowrie, Oakland...............................................31
Davis, Oakland..................................................30
Gregorius, New York.......................................30
Haniger, Seattle................................................28
Moustakas, KC..................................................28
Sanchez, New York..........................................28
Betts, BOSTON..................................................27
Machado, Baltimore........................................27
Martinez, BOSTON...........................................27
Correa, Houston...............................................25
Gallo, Texas.......................................................25
Rosario, Minnesota..........................................25
RUNS
Betts, BOSTON..................................................36
Springer, Houston............................................32
Trout, Los Angeles...........................................30
Gregorius, New York.......................................27
Lindor, Cleveland.............................................27
Judge, New York..............................................26
Stanton, New York...........................................26
Gardner, New York..........................................25
Semien, Oakland..............................................25
Correa, Houston...............................................24
BATTING
AB
Herrera, PHI................. 127
Dickerson, Pit. ............. 129
Markakis, Atl. .............. 135
Cabrera, NY ................. 132
Pham, StL..................... 99
Arenado, Col................ 111
Freeman, Atl. ............... 130
Pollock, Ari................... 124
Posey, SF...................... 108
Castro, MIA.................. 131
R
19
20
21
23
24
19
24
22
14
20
H
44
43
45
43
32
35
40
38
33
40
Avg.
.346
.333
.333
.326
.323
.315
.308
.306
.306
.305
HOME RUNS
Harper, Washington........................................12
Blackmon, Colorado........................................11
Adams, Washington........................................10
Albies, Atlanta..................................................10
Baez, Chicago...................................................10
Pollock, Arizona................................................10
Villanueva, SD.....................................................9
Arenado, Colorado.............................................8
8 tied.....................................................................7
RUNS BATTED IN
Baez, Chicago...................................................32
Pollock, Arizona................................................29
Harper, Washington........................................28
Cespedes, New York....................................... 27
Dickerson, Pittsburgh......................................26
Franco, PHI........................................................26
Freeman, Atlanta............................................. 25
Markakis, Atlanta.............................................25
Suarez, Cincinnati............................................25
Albies, Atlanta..................................................24
RUNS
Albies, Atlanta..................................................33
Blackmon, Colorado........................................29
Harper, Washington........................................29
Hernandez, PHI.................................................25
Marte, Pittsburgh.............................................25
Baez, Chicago...................................................24
Freeman, Atlanta............................................. 24
Pham, St. Louis.................................................24
Taylor, Los Angeles.........................................24
Bellinger, Los Angeles.....................................23
Cabrera, New York..........................................23
REDS 7, METS 2
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 1 1 0 0 .183
1 1 0 0 1 .225
1 1 0 1 1 .274
1 2 2 0 0 .313
3 2 0 0 0 .291
0 1 2 2 0 .213
0 1 0 0 0 .256
1 1 1 0 0 .211
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 1 .324
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0
—
7 10 6 3 4
SAN FRAN
Blanco lf
McCutchen rf
Posey c
Belt 1b
Longoria 3b
BCrawford ss
Hanson 2b
Jackson cf
Holland p
Gearrin p
Sandoval ph
Smith p
Totals
AB
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
2
0
1
0
32
R
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
H BI BB SO
1 0 0 2
1 0 1 1
0 0 0 2
2 0 0 2
1 0 0 2
0 1 0 2
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 3
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
6 2 1 17
R
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
PHILADELPHIA AB
CeHernándz 2b
4
Hoskins lf
3
Herrera cf
4
Altherr rf
3
Santana 1b
4
Franco 3b
4
Kingery ss
4
Alfaro c
2
Nola p
2
Williams ph
0
Ramos p
0
Hunter p
0
Neris p
0
Totals
30
R
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 0 .273
0 0 1 2 .274
2 1 0 0 .346
1 1 1 0 .209
1 1 0 0 .173
1 0 0 1 .278
1 0 0 2 .213
1 1 1 1 .222
0 0 0 0 .067
0 0 0 0 .219
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .000
8 4 3 6
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 0 .152
0 0 0 2 .250
1 1 1 0 .287
0 0 0 0 .246
0 0 0 2 .151
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .250
0 0 1 1 .211
1 0 0 0 .176
0 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 .324
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 1 .000
2 1 2 7
Avg.
.263
.248
.306
.297
.238
.242
.286
.224
.000
—
.255
—
H BI BB SO
0 0 0 1
2 0 0 1
0 0 2 1
0 0 1 2
0 1 1 1
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
2 1 0 0
6 2 4 11
ROYALS 15, ORIOLES 7
NY METS
Conforto cf
Cabrera 2b
Céspedes lf
Bruce rf
González 1b
Rosario ss
Lugo p
Nimmo ph
Sewald p
Lagares ph
Nido c
Mesoraco ph
Reyes 3b­ss
Vargas p
Flores 3b
Totals
AB
4
4
2
3
3
2
0
1
0
1
3
1
4
1
3
32
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
Avg.
.188
.326
.250
.241
.247
.248
.000
.250
.000
.333
.135
.214
.125
.000
.234
CINCINNATI
Peraza ss
Schebler rf
Votto 1b
Suárez 3b
Gennett 2b
Blandino 2b
Duvall lf
Barnhart c
Castillo p
Garrett p
Herrera ph
Peralta p
Brice p
Hamilton cf
Totals
AB
5
5
3
4
4
0
2
4
2
0
1
0
0
4
34
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 0 0 .282
2 2 0 0 0 .282
1 0 0 1 1 .276
2 3 4 0 0 .315
1 1 2 0 0 .288
0 0 0 0 0 .241
0 1 0 2 0 .169
0 3 1 0 0 .268
0 0 0 0 0 .308
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 1 .125
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 1 0 0 1 .208
7 12 7 3 3
Minnesota ................010 121 200 — 7 10 0
St. Louis ....................100 000 000 — 1 2 3
E—Garcia (2), JMartínez (5), Ozuna (2).
LOB—Minnesota 8, St. Louis 2. 2B—Kepler
(11), Grossman (7). HR—Escobar (7), off Ly­
ons, JMartínez (4), off Odorizzi. SB—Adrianza
(2). CS—Garcia (1). S—Odorizzi 2, CMartínez.
SF—Adrianza. DP—St. Louis 1.
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Odorizzi W 3­2
5 2 1 1 2 3 3.83
Pressly
2 0 0 0 0 2 0.92
Rogers
1 0 0 0 0 2 6.75
Hughes
1 0 0 0 0 0 7.00
San Francisco ..........010 000 010 — 2 6 1
Philadelphia .............012 001 00x — 4 8 0
E—Jackson (2). LOB—San Francisco 4, Phil­
adelphia 6. 2B—Longoria (10), CeHernández
(7). HR—Sandoval (2), off Ramos, Altherr (4),
off Holland, Santana (5), off Gearrin, Alfaro
(4), off Holland. SB—Belt (2), Herrera (2).
DP—San Francisco 2.
San Francisco
Holland L 1­4
Gearrin
Smith
IP
5
2
1
H
6
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 2 3 5.66
1 1 0 2 3.95
0 0 1 1 0.00
NY Mets ....................000 002 000 — 2 6 1
Cincinnati .................202 000 30x — 7 12 0
E—Cabrera (1). LOB—NY Mets 7, Cincinnati
8. 2B—Schebler (4), Suárez (6). 3B—Barnhart
(1). HR—Flores (3), off Castillo, Gennett (4),
off Robles. S—Peralta. DP—NY Mets 1; Cin­
cinnati 1.
NY Mets
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Vargas L 0­3
4 6 4 4 2 1 13.86
Lugo
1 0 0 0 0 1 2.66
Ramos
1 3 1 1 0 1 3.46
Blevins
‚ 0 0 0 0 0 5.63
Robles
‚ 3 2 2 1 0 5.23
Sewald
1‚ 0 0 0 0 0 3.48
St. Louis
IP
CMartínez L 3­2 5
Tuivailala
1
Lyons
1
Brebbia
2
Philadelphia
Nola W 5­1
Ramos
Hunter
Neris S 7
IP
7
„
„
„
H
5
1
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 0 12 2.05
1 1 1 2 1.20
0 0 0 1 3.86
0 0 0 2 3.95
Cincinnati
Castillo W 2­4
Garrett
Hernandez
Peralta
Brice
H
4
2
2
2
R ER BB SO ERA
4 2 3 2 1.62
1 1 0 0 3.86
2 2 0 0 6.17
0 0 0 2 0.00
HBP—by CMartínez (Garver). NP—Odorizzi
93, Pressly 25, Rogers 11, Hughes 8,
CMartínez 85, Tuivailala 18, Lyons 13, Brebbia
25. Umpires—Home, Tim Timmons; First, Rob
Drake; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Mike Win­
ters. T—2:54. A—39,253 (44,494).
PIRATES 10, WHITE SOX 6
ARIZONA AT LA DODGERS, 10:10 p.m.
BATTING
AB
Betts, BOS. ................... 114
Gordon, Sea. ................ 139
Simmons, LA................ 123
Martinez, BOS.............. 130
Machado, Bal............... 133
Lowrie, Oak.................. 139
Smith, TB...................... 91
Trout, LA....................... 128
Soler, KC....................... 108
Altuve, Hou. ................. 149
TWINS 7, CARDINALS 1
PITTSBURGH
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Frazier 2b
4 1 0 0 1 0 .250
SeRodríguez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .157
Polanco rf
4 1 2 1 1 0 .216
Marte cf
5 1 3 1 0 2 .291
Bell dh
4 2 2 1 1 0 .246
Dickerson lf
5 1 4 2 0 1 .333
Cervelli c
3 2 1 0 1 0 .302
Moran 3b
5 1 2 2 0 1 .284
Osuna 1b
5 0 1 1 0 1 .333
Mercer ss
5 1 1 2 0 1 .237
Totals
40 10 16 10 4 6
CHICAGO
AB
LGarcía 2b
5
YolmSánchz 3b
5
Abreu 1b
4
Delmonico lf
3
Castillo c
4
Narváez c
0
Palka rf
4
Davidson dh
3
Anderson ss
4
Thompson cf
4
Totals
36
R H BI BB SO
1 1 0 0 1
2 3 1 0 1
0 2 2 0 1
1 0 0 1 1
2 2 3 0 1
0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 1
0 1 0 1 0
0 1 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 2
6 11 6 2 10
Avg.
.269
.306
.270
.234
.237
.176
.222
.260
.254
.120
Pittsburgh ................ 040 032 010 — 10 16 0
Chicago .....................410 000 010 — 6 11 0
LOB—Pittsburgh 8, Chicago 5. 2B—Polanco
(9), Dickerson (11), Moran (7), Abreu (6). 3B—
Bell (2), YolmSánchez (4). HR—Castillo 2 (5),
off Nova, off Kontos. SB—Marte (9). CS—
Dickerson (1). DP—Pittsburgh 2; Chicago 1.
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Nova
2 6 5 5 2 2 4.84
Glasnow W 1­1 2‚ 1 0 0 0 3 6.75
Santana
1„ 2 0 0 0 1 3.45
Feliz
1 1 0 0 0 1 3.00
Kontos
1 1 1 1 0 1 4.41
Vázquez
1 0 0 0 0 2 3.21
Chicago
Giolito
Volstad L 0­2
Avilán
Beck
Soria
Santiago
IP
4
1
‚
1„
1
1
H
7
4
2
1
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 2 3 7.25
3 3 0 1 5.19
2 2 1 1 5.23
0 0 1 0 1.69
1 1 0 0 4.38
0 0 0 1 5.76
Inherited runners­scored—Santana 1­0,
Beck 1­0. HBP—by Giolito (Cervelli). NP—No­
va 77, Glasnow 41, Santana 29, Feliz 14, Kon­
tos 17, Vázquez 16, Giolito 98, Volstad 20, Avi­
lán 19, Beck 23, Soria 11, Santiago 16. Um­
pires—Home, Jim Reynolds; First, John
Tumpane; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Ben
May. T—3:53. A—12,871 (40,615).
Inherited runners­scored—Hunter 1­0.
HBP—by Gearrin (Williams). NP—Holland 79,
Gearrin 27, Smith 19, Nola 109, Ramos 19,
Hunter 6, Neris 9. Umpires—Home, Gerry Da­
vis; First, Pat Hoberg; Second, Mark Carlson;
Third, Brian Knight. T—2:53. A—22,456
(43,035).
BRAVES 1, RAYS 0
ATLANTA
Albies 2b
Acuña Jr. lf
FFreeman 1b
Markakis rf
Suzuki c
Bautista dh
Inciarte cf
Camargo ss
Culberson 3b
Totals
AB
4
4
3
4
3
2
4
4
4
32
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 2 .284
1 1 0 1 .320
1 0 1 1 .308
0 0 0 0 .333
0 0 1 0 .299
0 0 2 1 .250
0 0 0 2 .246
0 0 0 1 .200
1 0 0 1 .184
4 1 4 9
TAMPA BAY
AB
Gómez rf
4
Cron 1b
4
Duffy 3b
3
Ramos dh
3
Smith pr­dh
0
Robertson 2b
1
Span ph­lf
1
Hechavarria ss
3
Miller 2b
0
Sucre c
4
Refsnyder lf
2
Wendle 2b­ss
1
Field cf
3
Totals
29
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 2 .202
1 0 0 1 .256
0 0 1 3 .286
1 0 1 0 .316
0 0 0 0 .330
0 0 1 0 .291
0 0 1 0 .242
1 0 0 0 .262
0 0 1 0 .233
0 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .172
0 0 0 0 .282
1 0 0 1 .270
5 0 5 8
Atlanta ......................001 000 000 — 1 4 0
Tampa Bay ...............000 000 000 — 0 5 0
LOB—Atlanta 8, Tampa Bay 7. 3B—Culber­
son (1). HR—Acuña Jr. (3), off Snell. SB—Al­
bies (4). DP—Atlanta 3.
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Newcomb W
6 2 0 0 3 6 2.88
3­1
Carle
1 0 0 0 1 0 0.87
Minter
„ 1 0 0 0 1 2.40
Winkler
‚ 1 0 0 0 1 1.15
Vizcaíno S 5
1 1 0 0 1 0 1.72
Tampa Bay
Snell L 4­2
Stanek
Venters
IP
6‚
1„
1
H
4
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 5 2.40
0 0 2 4 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Winkler 1­0.
WP—Stanek. NP—Newcomb 108, Carle 10,
Minter 9, Winkler 8, Vizcaíno 16, Snell 105,
Stanek 40, Venters 7. Umpires—Home, Phil
Cuzzi; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Chris Se­
gal; Third, Tom Hallion. T—2:55. A—15,382
(31,042).
IP
5„
‚
„
1‚
1
H
3
0
1
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 1 7 6.47
0 0 2 1 1.93
0 0 0 0 2.70
0 0 1 2 4.67
0 0 0 1 4.05
Ramos pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inher­
ited runners­scored—Blevins 1­0, Robles 1­1,
Sewald 2­0, Garrett 2­1, Peralta 1­0. HBP—by
Vargas (Votto). NP—Vargas 75, Lugo 11, Ra­
mos 21, Blevins 8, Robles 19, Sewald 5, Castil­
lo 81, Garrett 16, Hernandez 8, Peralta 25,
Brice 12. Umpires—Home, Jerry Meals; First,
Gabe Morales; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Ron
Kulpa. T—2:55. A—14,804 (42,319).
BREWERS 3, INDIANS 2
CLEVELAND
AB
Lindor ss
4
Kipnis 2b
3
Ramírez 3b
4
Brantley lf
3
Encarnacion 1b
4
Gomes c
4
Guyer rf
4
Davis cf
3
Kluber p
2
Alonso ph
1
Totals
32
R
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO
2 1 0 0
0 0 1 1
1 1 0 1
0 0 1 0
1 0 0 2
0 0 0 2
1 0 0 2
1 0 0 1
0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
6 2 2 10
MILWAUKEE
Cain cf
Yelich lf
Braun 1b
Shaw 3b
Santana rf
Franklin 2b
Villar pr­2b
Piña c
Arcia ss
Miley p
Suter p
Jennings p
Phillips ph
Hader p
Totals
R
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 2 .267
3 0 0 0 .301
1 0 0 1 .243
1 2 0 0 .230
0 0 2 1 .266
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .268
0 0 0 1 .174
0 0 0 0 .216
0 0 0 0 .500
1 1 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 1.000
1 0 0 0 .167
0 0 0 0 1.000
8 3 2 5
AB
4
4
4
4
2
2
2
4
3
0
2
0
1
0
32
Avg.
.289
.180
.284
.323
.200
.244
.179
.220
.000
.208
Cleveland ..................001 010 000 — 2 6 3
Milwaukee ................201 000 00x — 3 8 0
E—Encarnacion (1), Guyer (2), Kipnis (3).
LOB—Cleveland 5, Milwaukee 7. 2B—Lindor
(11), Braun (8). HR—Lindor (9), off Suter,
Ramírez (10), off Suter, Shaw (7), off Kluber,
Suter (1), off Kluber. DP—Cleveland 2; Mil­
waukee 1.
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Kluber L 5­2
6 5 3 3 1 4 2.62
Marshall
1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Olson
„ 2 0 0 1 0 6.75
McAllister
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 8.76
Milwaukee
Miley
Suter W 2­2
Jeffress
Jennings
Hader S 5
IP
‚
4„
1‚
„
2
H
1
5
0
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 0 1.42
2 2 1 5 4.86
0 0 0 2 0.45
0 0 0 0 1.84
0 0 0 3 1.64
Inherited runners­scored—McAllister 3­0,
Suter 2­0. IBB—off Olson (Santana). NP—Klu­
ber 95, Marshall 15, Olson 15, McAllister 15,
Miley 19, Suter 81, Jeffress 18, Jennings 4, Ha­
der 26. Umpires—Home, Manny Gonzalez;
First, Andy Fletcher; Second, Jeff Nelson;
Third, Laz Diaz. T—2:49. A—35,314 (41,900).
TIGERS 7, RANGERS 4
KANSAS CITY
Jay lf
Soler rf
Moustakas 3b
Perez c
Butera c
Duda 1b
Merrifield dh
Gordon cf
Escobar ss
Goins 2b
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
6 3 3 0 0 1 .279
4 2 3 3 1 0 .324
6 2 3 5 0 1 .300
3 1 1 2 0 1 .276
1 0 0 0 0 0 .172
4 1 0 0 1 1 .230
4 1 2 0 1 1 .259
5 2 4 3 0 0 .321
5 2 2 0 0 0 .236
5 1 2 2 0 1 .273
43 15 20 15 3 6
DETROIT
Jones cf
Candelario 3b
Castellanos rf
Martinez dh
Reyes pr­dh
Hicks 1b
McCann c
Goodrum lf
Iglesias ss
Machado 2b
Totals
BALTIMORE
Mancini lf
Jones cf
Peterson ss
Machado ss
Gentry cf
Schoop 2b
Trumbo dh
Davis 1b
Valencia 3b
Santander rf
Joseph c
Totals
AB
5
3
0
3
1
5
5
5
4
4
5
40
TEXAS
AB
DeShields cf
5
Choo dh
4
Mazara rf
3
Beltré 3b
4
Gallo lf
4
Profar ss
4
Kiner­Falefa 2b
4
Guzman 1b
4
CaPérez c
3
Rua ph
1
Totals
36
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 1 0 0 1 .256
0 1 0 1 1 .246
1 0 0 1 0 .204
0 1 0 1 0 .346
1 1 0 0 0 .193
1 1 2 0 1 .227
1 2 0 0 1 .310
1 1 1 0 2 .172
1 3 2 0 0 .250
0 1 1 1 0 .204
1 2 1 0 2 .167
7 14 7 4 8
Kansas City ............1000 032 000 — 15 20 0
Baltimore ..................010 000 024 — 7 14 0
LOB—Kansas City 6, Baltimore 11. 2B—
Gentry (1). HR—Soler (5), off Bundy, Mousta­
kas 2 (10), off Bundy, off Araujo, Perez (3), off
Bundy, Gordon (3), off Bundy, Davis (3), off
Duffy, Valencia (4), off Smith, Joseph (1), off
Smith. SF—Soler, Perez, Valencia. DP—Balti­
more 2.
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Duffy W 1­4
5‚ 6 1 1 2 5 5.15
Smith
2„ 4 2 2 1 3 4.96
Boyer
1 4 4 4 1 0 15.32
Baltimore
Bundy L 1­5
Wright Jr.
Araujo
Bleier
Givens
IP
0
4„
2‚
1
1
H
5
8
4
2
1
R ER BB SO ERA
7 7 2 0 5.31
5 5 0 1 8.38
3 3 1 3 6.20
0 0 0 0 0.44
0 0 0 2 3.79
Bundy pitched to 7 batters in the 1st. Inher­
ited runners­scored—Smith 1­0, Araujo 1­1.
WP—Araujo. NP—Duffy 101, Smith 46, Boyer
36, Bundy 28, Wright Jr. 80, Araujo 52, Bleier
13, Givens 19. Umpires—Home, Carlos Torres;
First, Paul Nauert; Second, Kerwin Danley;
Third, Scott Barry. T—3:21. A—10,863
(45,971).
CUBS 4, MARLINS 3
AB
4
4
4
2
4
3
4
4
2
1
32
R
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1
1 0 0 2
1 2 2 1
2 0 0 1
1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 1
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0
6 3 2 10
CHICAGO
Zobrist rf­lf
Schwarber lf
Bryant 3b­rf
Rizzo 1b
Caratini c
La Stella 2b
Russell ss
Happ cf
Bote ph
Cishek p
Almora Jr. ph
Báez ph­3b
Totals
AB
4
4
2
4
4
4
4
3
1
0
1
1
32
R
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 2 .293
1 0 0 1 .268
0 0 1 1 .284
2 0 0 0 .190
1 2 0 0 .288
1 0 0 1 .289
0 0 0 1 .241
1 0 0 1 .241
1 2 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 .500
0 0 0 0 .275
1 0 0 0 .290
8 4 1 7
Avg.
.309
.232
.305
.236
.268
.237
.234
.167
.077
.216
Miami ........................300 000 000 — 3 6 0
Chicago .....................020 001 01x — 4 8 0
LOB—Miami 5, Chicago 6. 2B—Anderson
(8), Dietrich (5), Schwarber (4), Bote (2). HR—
Bour (7), off Tseng. DP—Miami 1.
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Ureña
5‚ 7 3 3 0 6 4.37
Steckenrider
„ 0 0 0 0 1 1.08
Guerrero
1 1 0 0 0 0 4.15
Barraclgh L 0­2
1 0 1 1 1 0 2.30
IP
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
H
4
1
0
1
0
0
0
R
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
7
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 1 .235
2 1 1 0 .287
1 1 0 1 .321
1 2 0 0 .255
0 0 0 0 .136
0 1 0 1 .268
1 0 1 1 .276
1 0 0 0 .193
1 2 1 0 .228
2 0 0 1 .210
9 7 3 5
R H BI BB SO
2 2 0 0 2
1 2 1 0 0
0 1 0 1 0
0 3 2 0 0
0 0 0 0 2
1 1 1 0 1
0 1 0 0 1
0 1 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 1
4 11 4 1 11
Avg.
.301
.245
.288
.330
.217
.226
.245
.197
.000
.200
Detroit .......................320 000 011 — 7 9 0
Texas .........................000 011 020 — 4 11 1
E—Beltré (4). LOB—Detroit 6, Texas 6. 2B—
Candelario (11), McCann (5), Choo (9). HR—
Candelario (5), off Minor, Martinez (3), off
Minor, Iglesias (1), off Minor, Profar (2), off
Fiers. CS—Iglesias (2). SF—Hicks. DP—Detroit
2; Texas 2.
Detroit
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Fiers W 3­2
5‚ 6 2 2 0 5 4.73
Stumpf
‚ 1 0 0 1 0 3.46
Farmer
1‚ 0 0 0 0 2 4.00
Jiménez
‚ 3 2 2 0 0 3.71
Hardy
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 6.75
Greene S 7
1‚ 1 0 0 0 3 4.11
Texas
Minor L 3­2
Cláudio
Jepsen
IP
7
1
1
H
7
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 0 4 4.73
1 0 1 0 5.71
1 1 2 1 4.70
Inherited runners­scored—Stumpf 1­1,
Farmer 2­0, Hardy 1­0, Greene 1­0. HBP—by
Minor (Iglesias), by Cláudio (Castellanos).
WP—Fiers. PB—CaPérez. NP—Fiers 79,
Stumpf 12, Farmer 16, Jiménez 18, Hardy 5,
Greene 20, Minor 97, Cláudio 24, Jepsen 29.
Umpires—Home, Bill Miller; First, Angel Her­
nandez; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Alan
Porter. T—3:04. A—18,634 (48,114).
ROCKIES 4, ANGELS 2
MIAMI
Realmuto c
Maybin rf
Castro 2b
Bour 1b
Anderson 3b
Dietrich lf
Rojas ss
Brinson cf
Ureña p
Shuck ph
Totals
Chicago
Tseng
Zastryzny
Cishek
Wilson
Strop
Edwar Jr W 1­0
Morrow S 8
AB
5
4
4
4
1
3
3
4
2
4
34
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 0 3 13.50
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 0 0 2.16
0 0 0 1 4.05
0 0 0 1 1.80
0 0 1 3 0.53
0 0 0 0 1.38
Inherited runners­scored—Steckenrider
2­0. HBP—by Ureña (Bryant), by Zastryzny
(Dietrich). WP—Barraclough. NP—Ureña 87,
Steckenrider 6, Guerrero 8, Barraclough 25,
Tseng 39, Zastryzny 38, Cishek 7, Wilson 19,
Strop 8, Edwards Jr. 18, Morrow 5. Umpires—
Home, Will Little; First, Ted Barrett; Second,
Nic Lentz; Third, Lance Barksdale. T—2:38.
A—40,051 (41,649).
LA ANGELS
Kinsler 2b
Trout cf
Upton lf
Pujols 1b
Simmons ss
Cozart 3b
Blash rf
Ohtani ph
Young rf
Calhoun ph
Maldonado c
Heaney p
NoeRamírez p
Valbuena ph
Parker p
Totals
AB
4
3
4
4
3
4
2
1
0
1
3
2
0
1
0
32
R
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 0 .189
0 0 1 0 .328
2 2 0 2 .245
1 0 0 2 .255
1 0 1 0 .350
1 0 0 1 .238
0 0 0 1 .167
0 0 0 0 .333
0 0 0 0 .167
0 0 0 0 .165
1 0 0 0 .218
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 .263
0 0 0 0
—
6 2 2 8
COLORADO
LeMahieu 2b
Blackmon cf
Arenado 3b
Story ss
Desmond 1b
Parra lf
Cuevas rf
Wolters c
Gray p
Dahl ph
Ottavino p
Davis p
Totals
AB
4
2
3
3
4
4
3
4
1
1
0
0
29
R
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 0 .288
0 0 2 0 .284
1 0 1 1 .315
2 2 1 0 .225
0 0 0 3 .182
1 1 0 2 .263
1 0 0 0 .333
1 0 0 0 .146
0 0 0 1 .214
0 0 0 0 .293
0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0
—
7 4 4 7
LA Angels .................000 000 020 — 2 6 0
Colorado ...................001 001 20x — 4 7 0
LOB—LA Angels 5, Colorado 7. 2B—Story
(6). 3B—Story (2). HR—Upton (7), off Ottavi­
no. SB—Trout (7). S—Gray. DP—LA Angels 1;
Colorado 1.
LA Angels
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Heaney L 1­2
6 5 2 2 3 5 4.78
NoeRamírez
1 2 2 2 1 1 3.86
Parker
1 0 0 0 0 1 3.50
Colorado
Gray W 4­4
Ottavino
Davis S 14
IP
7
1
1
H
4
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 8 4.24
2 2 1 0 1.35
0 0 0 0 2.35
HBP—by Heaney (Cuevas). NP—Heaney 86,
NoeRamírez 22, Parker 15, Gray 99, Ottavino
18, Davis 12. Umpires—Home, Jordan Baker;
First, Jerry Layne; Second, Greg Gibson;
Third, Jansen Visconti. T—2:42. A—33,144
(46,897).
C8
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Melrose boys shake up Middlesex
Scoreboard
By Nate Weitzer
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
WINCHESTER — T he Melrose
boys’ lacrosse team has been trending
in the right direction since Matt James
took over as head
SCHOOL
coach in 2011 and apROUNDUP
pear to be hitting their
stride in May.
After getting off to a program-record 9-0 start, the Red Raiders suffered their first loss of the season April
30 at Wellesley, but quickly recovered
with a huge win over conference foe
Reading on Friday.
On a sunny Tuesday afternoon at
Knowlton Stadium, visiting Melrose
dominated Winchester from start to
finish for a 12-3 victory to move into
first place in the Middlesex League
standings, an unfamiliar feeling for
some of the elder statesmen on the
team.
“To actually be in [first place] . . . it
hasn’t really sunk in yet,” said senior
defenseman Louis Izzi. “It feels like all
your hard work in the offseason is finally paying off.”
Melrose (12-1, 8-0 Middlesex) has
already equaled its win total from last
year with five regular-season games
remaining.
While Winchester (9-2, 6-1) entered the game averaging 10.3 goals
per game, the Sachems found very few
openings against an organized Melrose defense. Junior goalie Matt Roche
made 11 saves as Melrose went on a
10-0 run over 38 minutes to take a
12-2 lead late in the fourth quarter.
“I thought [the defense] did a good
job of playing their matchups, playing
conservatively, and not getting beat,”
James said. “That’s what we wanted
and that’s what we got.”
Youth led the way for Melrose offensively, as sophomore Chris Cusolito
(2 goals, 2 assists) and freshman Brendan Fennell (3 goals, 1 assist) tallied
four points apiece and sophomore Andrew Calvert added a goal and an assist.
“Cusolito and Andrew [Calvert] are
not sophomores,” James said. “They’re
second-year varsity players. That’s the
way they think and act and it’s infectious.”
Sitting atop not only the league but
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
TUE
NYY
7:05
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NESN
NYY
7:05
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TOR
7:07
NESN
TOR
4:07
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TOR
1:07
NESN
OAK
7:10
NESN
OAK
7:10
NESN
5/9
5/10
PHI
8:00
TNT
Gronkowski the horse apparently
takes after his human namesake. He’s
going through some trainer drama.
The 3-year-old colt was one of a
group of horses owned by the Dubaibased Phoenix Thoroughbreds who
were taken away from Jeremy Noseda’s Shalfleet stables Tuesday, leaving
the English racehorse trainer in a
state of confusion.
“The Phoenix-owned horses have
left Shalfleet,” Noseda wrote on Twitter. “I am shocked and surprised by
their decision. I have no reason or explanation for the decision.”
Phoenix CEO Amer Abdulaziz told
the Globe that Gronkowski is being
5/11
5/12
PHI
(if nec.)
8:00
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5/13
5/14
Y
5/15
PHI
(if nec.)
TBA
TOR
7:30
NBCSB
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
BASEBALL
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
7:05 p.m.
10 p.m.
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
Marshfield’s Molly Shaw was on the move Tuesday, scoring five goals —
including the 100th of her career — in a 14-13 victory over Falmouth.
all of Division 2 North is uncharted
territory for many of the Red Raiders.
According to Izzi, their early-season
success might have led to some missteps in a loss to Wellesley, but now
Melrose appears to be locked in at the
right time.
Lincoln­Sudbury 10, Acton­Boxbor­
ough 6 — Brian Vona earned his 300th
win as the coach at L-S as his secondranked Warriors (8-3) clinched a berth
in the Division 1 tournament.
Falmouth 7, Marshfield 6 — The Clippers clinched their third straight Atlantic Coast League title.
Baseball
East Bridgewater 13, Abington 0 —
Kevin Lindsay fired a one-hitter with
nine strikeouts to lift the Vikings (9-3).
Brimmer & May 7, Boston Trinity 3 —
Senior Grant Iuliano (3-1) had 17
strikeouts — including the first 12 —
for Brimmer & May.
Lexington 7, BC High 3 — Junior righthander Madison Dina (102 pitches)
limited the top-ranked Eagles (7-4) to
three hits and no earned runs while
fanning 11 for the No. 12 Minutemen
(9-3).
Softball
Middleborough 12, Mashpee 0 — Senior Laura Hatch picked up her 11th
win for the No. 20 Sachems (11-1),
tossing a no-hitter with six strikeouts.
Apponequet 10, Seekonk 1 — The
Lakers (3-5) cruised behind freshman
pitcher Jillian Rogers, who gave up
just two hits and was 4 for 4 with three
doubles and two RBIs.
Rockland 13, Hull 1 — Junior Molly
Grass went 4 for 5 with a home run,
six RBIs, and two runs scored to lead
the Bulldogs (6-4).
King Philip 14, Mansfield 0 — In a
five-inning contest, senior Elise Pereira tossed a one-hitter with nine strikeouts for the No. 8 Warriors (10-2).
Girls’ lacrosse
Marshfield 14, Falmouth 13 — Junior
Molly Shaw scored five goals for the
Rams (8-5), bookending the performance with the 100th goal of her career and the game-winner in overtime.
For more highlights, go to
bostonglobe.com/schools. To report
scores, call 617-929-2860/3235 or
email hssports@globe.com.
New trainer for equine Gronkowski
GLOBE STAFF
Y
WED
Cleveland at Milwaukee
LA Angels at Colorado
Boston at NY Yankees
Arizona at LA Dodgers
shipped to the US this Friday and will
begin training with New York-based
trainer Chad Brown as he prepares for
a start in the Belmont Stakes June 9.
Gronkowski qualified for the Kentucky Derby but dropped out because
of a fever he spiked the week before
he was se t to travel to C hurchi ll
Downs.
Brown is a “great trainer,” according to Abdulaziz, and won the 2016
Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer. Brown got his first Triple Crown
win last year with Preakness champion Cloud Computing. Like the (Rob)
Gronkowski family, Brown is from upstate New York.
As for the for-now split with Noseda, it’s another twist in Phoenix’s op-
erations. In March, the firm fired Kerri Radcliffe, a bloodstock agent who
had been buying horses for the group
since it set up shop in 2017. Radcliffe
and Noseda used to be married.
“It’s unfortunate but sometimes
decisions have to be made,” Phoenix
vice president of equine operations
Tom Ludt told The Racing Post. “We
felt it was a change that was necessary
for Phoenix to take on the next step of
its plan. We’ll continue to buy, continue to race, and hopefully continue to
win. This does not preclude us from
having horses with Jeremy again.”
Nora Princiotti can be reached at
nora.princiotti@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter at @NoraPrinciotti.
SportsLog
Blue Jays’ Osuna is charged with assault
Major League Baseball placed Blue Jays closer Roberto
Osuna on administrative leave Tuesday after he was charged
with assault. Toronto police declined to say whether Osuna
was accused of domestic assault. Constable Jenifferjit Sidhu
said the charge is for one count of assault but gave no other
details. Osuna, 23, is scheduled to appear in court June 18.
Administrative leave lasts seven days and is not considered
discipline. Osuna goes on the restricted list and continues to
receive his $5.3 million salary, but can’t play. Major League
Baseball said in a statement it ‘‘takes all allegations of this nature very seriously’’ and is investigating. The Blue Jays said
they ‘‘fully support’’ MLB’s decision to place Osuna on leave
but won’t comment further because of the ongoing police investigation. Last June, Osuna cited anxiety issues as the reason for his unavailability to pitch for a few days.
Mets trade ex­ace Harvey to Reds
Before the two teams took the field for their game in Cincinnati, the New York Mets traded former ace Matt Harvey to
the Reds for catcher Devin Mesoraco in a swap of former AllStars with careers sidetracked by injuries. New York designated Harvey for assignment last Saturday after he lost his
spot in the rotation after four starts and was hit hard in four
relief appearances. Mesoraco was originally in the Reds’
starting lineup but was on the Mets bench for the first pitch.
NBA
Sources: Hornets hire Borrego as coach
The Hornets finalized a deal to hire Spurs assistant James
Borrego as their next coach, people familiar with the situation said. The sources spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because Charlotte hasn’t announced the hiring. Borrego, 40, has spent 15 years as an NBA assistant, including
10 under San Antonio’s Gregg Popovich. He replaces Steve
Clifford, who was fired in April. This will be Borrego’s first
head coaching job . . . Timberwolves assistant Rick Brunson
abruptly resigned, the team saying he had fallen short of
meeting its ‘‘high standards of conduct’’ amid reports he had
acted improperly toward women. The Star Tribune reported
Brunson, 45 and a Salem, Mass., native, had been the subject
of complaints of improper conduct toward women. In 2014,
he was arrested in suburban Chicago and charged with sexually assaulting a massage therapist, but he was acquitted.
NHL
Hurricanes name Brind’Amour coach
The Hurricanes promoted their ex-captain and current
assistant Rod Brind’Amour to head coach. The team also said
team president Don Waddell will be the full-time general
manager after serving as the acting GM. Brind’Amour, who
captained the Hurricanes to their only Stanley Cup title in
2006, was an assistant with the team since 2011. He replaces
Bill Peters, who opted out of his contract last month and was
then hired by the Flames . . . The Devils said forwards Taylor
Hall and Patrick Maroon, and goaltender Cory Schneider
had recent surgeries. Hall (torn ligaments, left hand) and
Maroon (herniated disk, back) are expected to be ready for
training camp, while Schneider (torn cartilage, left hip) may
need five months to recover.
MISCELLANY
No. 1 Halep beats Mertens at Madrid
Top-ranked women’s tennis player Simona Halep reached
the third round of the Madrid Open by beating Elise
Mertens, 6-0, 6-3. Halep converted her fifth match point to
win her 14th straight match in Madrid and stay on track for
a third consecutive title in the Spanish capital. Halep next
faces Kristyna Pliskova, who beat Sara Sorribes Tormo, 7-5,
6-2. In the men’s second round, Milos Raonic upset third
seed Grigor Dimitrov, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3, and fourth seed Juan
Martin del Potro ousted Damir Dzumhur, 6-3, 6-3 . . . The
Washington Post reported that D.C. United is in “serious
talks” with English star Wayne Rooney about joining the Major League Soccer team in the upcoming summer transfer
window . . . Toronto FC forward Jozy Altidore had surgery to
remove bone fragments from his foot and is out 4-6 weeks . . .
Defending champ Jordan Spieth committed to play in the
Travelers Championship June 21-24 at TPC River Highlands
in Cromwell, Conn., a week after the US Open.
MLB
MLB
ESPN, NESN
MLB
NBA PLAYOFFS
8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston
TNT
SOCCER
2:45 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN
FS1
Premier: Huddersfield at Chelsea
MLS: Seattle at Toronto
BASEBALL
BAY STATE
Newton North 7...............Framingham 0
BOSTON CITY
Fenway 22.................................... Burke 2
S. Boston 7........................Boston Int'l. 1
CAPE & ISLANDS
St. John Paul II 8.............Sturgis West 0
CAPE ANN
Georgetown 13......................Rockport 3
Ham.­Wenham 7......................Ipswich 0
Lynnfield 6................................... Triton 4
EIL
Portsmouth Abbey 9..........Beaver CD 3
MBIL
Brimmer & May 7........ Boston Trinity 3
MERRIMACK VALLEY
N. Andover 4...........................Methuen 1
MIDDLESEX
Melrose 11..........................Watertown 0
PREP­PRIVATE
Dexter Southfield 10..................Rivers 2
SOUTH SHORE
E. Bridgewater 13..................Abington 0
Norwell 6.....................................Carver 2
Rockland 12.....................................Hull 1
TRI­VALLEY
Hopkinton 6.............................Medway 5
NONLEAGUE
Card. Spellman 4......Coyle & Cassidy 1
Dennis­Yarmouth 6...Plymouth North 5
Lexington 7...............................BC High 3
Maimonides 15......S. Shore Christian 0
Nashoba 7..........................Middleboro 3
New Mission 8......................Cathedral 7
GOLF
GIRLS
MASS. BAY
Cohasset 3½.......................Hingham 2½
Duxbury 4............................Barnstable 2
NONLEAGUE
Braintree 5..........................Weymouth 1
BOYS
ATLANTIC COAST
Falmouth 7...........................Marshfield 6
BAY STATE
Braintree 8.............................Brookline 4
Needham 22.....................Framingham 2
Newton North 15................Weymouth 6
Walpole 8...................Wellesley 7 (2OT)
CAPE ANN
Ipswich 12....................................Triton 3
N. Reading 11..................Masconomet 9
DUAL COUNTY
Lincoln­Sudbury 10.... Acton­Boxboro 6
HOCKOMOCK
King Philip 3.............................Franklin 2
MIDDLESEX
Melrose 12..........................Winchester 3
Wakefield 16............................Belmont 6
PATRIOT
Duxbury 20...........................Pembroke 2
Hingham 15..............................Scituate 4
NONLEAGUE
Bp. Guertin 18..........................Reading 6
Pope John 9Lynn English/Lynn Clssicl 5
GIRLS
ATLANTIC COAST
Marshfield 14.............Falmouth 13 (OT)
Nauset 20.................Dennis­Yarmouth 7
BAY STATE
Brookline 14...........................Braintree 3
Needham 16.....................Framingham 3
Walpole 13...........................Wellesley 11
CAPE ANN
Manchester 19............Ham.­Wenham 9
Newburyport 6...................... Lynnfield 1
Pentucket 14.................... Georgetown 9
DUAL COUNTY
Concord­Carlisle 15............Westford 12
MIDDLESEX
Winchester 22........................Melrose 12
PATRIOT
Duxbury 18...........................Pembroke 5
SOUTH COAST
Apponequet 11.....................Fairhaven 2
SOFTBALL
ATLANTIC COAST
Dennis­Yarmouth 6.............. Falmouth 5
COMMONWEALTH
Essex Tech 11.......................Northeast 5
Mystic Valley 15................Minuteman 2
HOCKOMOCK
King Philip 14........................Mansfield 0
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Methuen 8...........................N. Andover 3
Methuen 8...........................N. Andover 3
NORTHEASTERN
Peabody 13..........................Somerville 1
SOUTH COAST
Apponequet 10....................... Seekonk 1
Digh.­Rehoboth 1.................Fairhaven 0
SOUTH SHORE
Middleboro 12......... Mashpee 0 (5 inn.)
Rockland 13.....................................Hull 1
NONLEAGUE
Bp. Feehan 8............Bridge.­Raynham 7
E. Boston 21...........................Randolph 1
Notre Dame (H) 30.................Scituate 3
Shawsheen 11..................Bp. Fenwick 4
W. Bridgewater 6.......Card. Spellman 2
TENNIS
BOYS
ATLANTIC COAST
Falmouth 5..............Dennis­Yarmouth 0
BAY STATE
Wellesley 4..................................Milton 1
DUAL COUNTY
Wayland 4.................................Bedford 1
HOCKOMOCK
King Philip 3.............................Franklin 2
Milford 4............................Oliver Ames 1
MIDDLESEX
Arlington 5...........................Burlington 0
Belmont 4.................................Melrose 1
Reading 5............................Watertown 0
NORTHEASTERN
Marblehead 3......................Somerville 2
Winthrop 4...................................Salem 1
PATRIOT
N. Quincy 3..............................Duxbury 2
SOUTH COAST
Bourne 3...................................Seekonk 2
Old Rochester 4...............Apponequet 1
SOUTH SHORE
Middleboro 4..........................Mashpee 1
TRI­VALLEY
Medfield 5...............................Holliston 0
NONLEAGUE
Hanover 4...............................Rockland 1
N. Andover 3......................Austin Prep 2
O'Bryant 4.........................Mt. Alvernia 1
Weymouth 4...............................Quincy 1
GIRLS
BAY STATE
Wellesley 5..................................Milton 0
BIG THREE
New Bedford 3...........................Durfee 2
HOCKOMOCK
Taunton 4..........................Oliver Ames 1
MIDDLESEX
Burlington 5..........................Wakefield 0
NORTHEASTERN
Marblehead 4......................Somerville 1
SOUTH COAST
Fairhaven 5....................................Case 0
Seekonk 3...................................Bourne 2
SOUTH SHORE
Cohasset 5.............................Randolph 0
Norwell 5.....................................Carver 0
NONLEAGUE
Bp. Fenwick 5..............................Salem 0
Hopedale 5..........................Bp. Feehan 0
Natick 5...................................Waltham 0
O'Bryant 4.........................Mt. Alvernia 1
Weston 4............................Austin Prep 1
TRACK
BOYS
DUAL COUNTY
Acton­Boxboro 87............Cambridge 58
Lincoln­Sudbury 83.. Acton­Boxboro 62
Lincoln­Sudbury 93......... Cambridge 52
Latest line
NBA
Wednesday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Phila.......................1 ..........At BOSTON
National Hockey League
Thursday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Nashville....­148 Winnipeg.......+138
Baseball
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
Schools
LACROSSE
By Nora Princiotti
Y
HOCKOMOCK
Oliver Ames 105....................Taunton 31
Stoughton 87...........................Sharon 49
MAYFLOWER
Diman 93........................ Bp. Connolly 43
Diman 74.......................Southeastern 62
PATRIOT
Silver Lake 79.............. Whit.­Hanson 57
SOUTH COAST
Wareham 69.........Somerset Berkley 67
Wareham 69.........Somerset Berkley 67
TRI­VALLEY
Dedham 91..................................Millis 45
GIRLS
HOCKOMOCK
Stoughton 93...........................Sharon 42
MAYFLOWER
Bp. Connolly 64........................ Diman 61
Southeastern 95.......................Diman 39
MIDDLESEX
Reading 98..........................Lexington 38
PATRIOT
Whit.­Hanson 73.............. Silver Lake 63
VOLLEYBALL
BOYS
COMMONWEALTH
Malden 3.........................................PMA 0
DUAL COUNTY
Acton­Boxboro 3...................Westford 0
Wayland 3..............................Arlington 0
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Central Cath. 3.......................Methuen 0
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
Transactions
BASEBALL
MLB: Placed Toronto P Roberto Osuna
on administrative leave after being
charged with assault.
Baltimore (AL): Activated 2B Jonathan
Schoop from 10­day DL. Optioned INF
Engelb Vielma to Norfolk (IL).
Boston (AL): Reinstated OF­INF Brock
Holt from 10­day DL. Optioned INF Tzu­
Wei Lin to Pawtucket (IL).
Cleveland (AL): Activated P Oliver
Drake. Optioned P Alexi Ogando to Co­
lumbus (IL).
Los Angeles (AL): Optioned C Juan
Graterol to Salt Lake (PCL). Reinstated
C Martin Maldonado from the bereave­
ment list.
Texas (AL): Activated 3B Adrian Beltre
from 10­day DL. Optioned OF Eliezer
Alvarez to Frisco (Texas).
Toronto (AL): Recalled P Jake Petricka
from Buffalo (IL).
Chicago (NL): Placed RF Jason Hey­
ward on the seven­day concussion DL.
Recalled P Jen­Ho Tseng, INF David
Bote and P Rob Zastryzny from Iowa
(PCL). Optioned P Cory Mazzoni to Io­
wa.
Colorado (NL): Reinstated INF DJ
LeMahieu from 10­day DL. Optioned
INF Pat Valaika to Albuquerque (PCL).
Los Angeles (NL): Reinstated P Rich
Hill from 10­day DL. Optioned P Brock
Stewart to Oklahoma City (PCL).
Milwaukee (NL): Selected the contract
of UTL Nick Franklin from Biloxi (SL).
Assigned INF Eric Sogard to Colorado
Springs (PCL). Transferred C Stephen
Vogt to 60­day DL.
New York (NL): Traded P Matt Harvey
to Cincinnati for C Devin Mesoraco. Re­
called P Corey Oswalt from Las Vegas
(PCL). Optioned P P.J. Conlon to Las
Vegas. Placed 3B Todd Frazier on 10­
day DL.
Pittsburgh (NL): Recalled INF­OF Jose
Osuna from Indianapolis (IL).
St. Louis (NL): Recalled P John Brebbia
from Memphis (PCL). Optioned P Ryan
Sherriff to Memphis.
San Francisco (NL): Optioned P D.J.
Shelton to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled
P Derek Law from Sacramento.
BASKETBALL
Minnesota (NBA): Announced the res­
ignation of assistant coach Rick
Brunson.
WNBA: Promoted Bethany Donaphin to
head of league operations.
FOOTBALL
NFL: Suspended New Orleans RB Mark
Ingram the first four regular season
games of 2018 because of a violation of
the league’s performance enhancing
drug policy.
Cincinnati (AFC): Claimed WR Ka'Raun
White off waivers from Seattle.
Cleveland (AFC): Named David Jenkins
executive vice president­chief operat­
ing officer.
Detroit (NFC): Waived LB Brandon
Chubb.
Indianapolis (AFC): Signed DE Chris
McCain. Waived­injured TE Randall
Telfer.
Kansas City (AFC): Claimed TE Alex El­
lis off waivers from New Orleans. Re­
leased DT Stefan Charles. Waived RB
Akeem Hunt. Signed DB Step Durham,
TE Tejan Koroma, DE Robert McCray,
CB Malik Reaves and WR Jordan Small­
ward. Waived CB Prince Charles Iwo­
rah, OT Devondre Seymour and WRs
Brandon Shippen and Nelson Spruce.
Washington (NFC): Re­signed G Shawn
Lauvao.
HOCKEY
Carolina (NHL): Named Rod
Brind'Amour coach. Announced presi­
dent Don Waddell will become the full­
time general manager.
Edmonton (NHL): Signed F Tyler Vesel
to a one­year contract.
New Jersey (NHL): Re­signed D Brian
Strait to a two­year, two­way contract.
NY Islanders (NHL): Signed F Travis St.
Denis on a two­year, two­way con­
tract.
SOCCER
Atlanta United (MLS): Signed G Paul
Christensen to a short­term agree­
ment.
Dallas (MLS): Loaned F Jesus Ferreira
to Tulsa (USL).
COLLEGE
Clemson: Announced men’s junior bas­
ketball F Jonathan Baehre has trans­
ferred from UNC Asheville.
Ohio State: Senior QB Joe Burrow will
transfer.
South Carolina: Announced men’s
graduate G Tre Campbell has trans­
ferred from Georgetown.
MLS
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9
Philadelphia at Columbus................7:30
Seattle at Toronto FC.......................7:30
Sporting KC at Atlanta Utd FC........7:30
Montreal at Chicago.........................8:30
Minnesota United at Los Angeles FC10
FRIDAY, MAY 11
Houston at Vancouver....................10:30
SATURDAY, MAY 12
San Jose at Minnesota United............. 2
Philadelphia at Montreal.......................3
LA Galaxy at FC Dallas.....................3:30
Chicago at Columbus....................... 7:30
Toronto FC at NEW ENGLAND.........7:30
D.C. United at Real Salt Lake...............9
New York at Colorado...........................9
SUNDAY, MAY 13
Seattle at Portland.................................4
Atlanta United FC at Orlando City......6
NYC FC at Los Angeles FC...............8:30
North Division
W
L
Lehigh Valley..........16 14
Rochester ................14 13
Pawtucket ...............15 14
Syracuse..................15 14
Buffalo .....................11 12
Scranton/W­B.........14 17
Pct. GB
.533 —
.519
½
.517
½
.517
½
.478 1½
.452 2½
South Division
W
L
Norfolk .....................17 12
Durham....................17 13
Charlotte .................13 17
Gwinnett..................11 18
Pct. GB
.586 —
.567
½
.433 4½
.379
6
West Division
W
L
Toledo ......................19 11
Indianapolis ............15 14
Columbus ................15 15
Louisville .................10 18
Pct. GB
.633 —
.517 3½
.500
4
.357
8
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Norfolk 13.................................Durham 0
Toledo 2.................................Columbus 0
Rochester 2................................Buffalo 1
Indianapolis 5........................Louisville 2
Syracuse 4.....................Scranton/W­B 1
Gwinnett 8..............................Charlotte 1
Lehigh Valley 4...................Pawtucket 1
Lehigh Valley 4, Pawtucket 1
at Coca­Cola Park, Allentown, Pa.
PAWTUCKET AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
RCastillo cf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .322
De Jsus Jr. 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .218
JBetts dh
4 0 1 0 0 1 .286
Olt 1b
4 1 1 0 0 0 .257
RFlores lf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .193
DButler c
3 0 0 1 0 1 .212
ATavarez rf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .212
MMiller ss
4 0 0 0 0 0 .231
Witte 3b
3 0 0 0 0 1 .171
Totals
33 1 6 1 1 3
LEHIGH VALL AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Anna ss
3 1 1 0 1 0 .253
Cowgill cf
4 0 0 1 0 0 .179
Ortiz dh
2 0 1 0 2 0 .284
Plouffe 1b
3 0 2 0 1 1 .237
Cozens rf
4 1 1 1 0 1 .275
Walding 3b
4 0 1 0 0 1 .289
Pullin lf
4 1 2 1 0 0 .176
LMoore c
4 1 1 0 0 0 .122
Amarista 2b
4 0 1 1 0 0 .290
Totals
32 4 10 4 4 3
Pawtucket 000 000 001 — 1 6 1
Lehigh Valley121 000 00x — 4 10 2
E—Olt (3), Walding 2 (4). LOB—Paw­
tucket 7, Lehigh Valley 8. 2B—JBetts
(5), Amarista (1), Pullin (3). SB—Coz­
ens (7), Pullin (1). SF—DButler. GIDP—
RFlores, Amarista, Cowgill. DP—Paw­
tucket 3, Lehigh Valley 1.
PAWTUCKET IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Walden L 0­1 1„ 2 3 2 3 1 9.82
RoScott
‚ 0 0 0 1 1 2.45
SWright
6 8 1 1 0 1 4.61
LEHIGH VALL IP H R ER BB SO
Lbrndt W 2­0 5 3 0 0 1 1
JaThompson
2 1 0 0 0 2
Windle
1 0 0 0 0 0
Casimiro
„ 2 1 0 0 0
Beato S 9
‚ 0 0 0 0 0
ERA
0.00
9.00
3.78
3.60
2.63
WP—SWright. T—2:38. A—7,085.
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Charlotte at Gwinnett...................10:35a
Pawtucket at Lehigh Valley........10:35a
Indianapolis at Louisville..................11a
Rochester at Buffalo.........................1:05
Columbus at Toledo..........................6:35
Scranton/W­B at Syracuse..............6:35
Norfolk at Durham............................ 7:05
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Charlotte at Gwinnett...................10:35a
Columbus at Toledo..........................6:35
Pawtucket at Syracuse.................... 6:35
Rochester at Scranton/W­B............6:35
Indianapolis at Louisville...................... 7
Buffalo at Lehigh Valley...................7:05
Norfolk at Durham............................ 7:05
EASTERN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W
L
Trenton ....................19 10
New Hampshire .....18 10
Hartford...................17 13
Binghamton ............14 13
Reading....................10 17
Portland.....................8 19
Pct. GB
.655 —
.643
½
.567 2½
.519
4
.370
8
.296 10
Western Division
W
L
Akron........................20 11
Altoona ....................16 13
Richmond ................16 14
Bowie .......................14 16
Erie ...........................11 19
Harrisburg...............11 19
Pct. GB
.645 —
.552
3
.533 3½
.467 5½
.367 8½
.367 8½
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Altoona 2......................................Bowie 1
Erie 3.....................................Harrisburg 0
Akron 6..................................Richmond 5
Portland 5.................. New Hampshire 3
Reading at Trenton................................ 7
Binghamton at Hartford...................7:05
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Akron at Richmond.......................12:05a
Bowie at Altoona...........................10:30a
Reading at Trenton.......................10:30a
Binghamton at Hartford...............10:35a
Harrisburg at Erie......................... 11:05a
Portland at New Hampshire............6:35
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Binghamton at Portland...................TBD
Binghamton at Portland........................5
Erie at Akron...................................... 6:35
Hartford at Bowie..............................6:35
Trenton at Richmond........................6:35
Altoona at Reading........................... 6:45
New Hampshire at Harrisburg.............7
Portland 5, New Hampshire 3
at Northeast Delta Dental Stadium,
Manchester, N.H.
PORTLAND
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
JRivera ss
5 1 2 1 0 0 .224
Renda 3b
5 0 1 1 0 0 .292
Sturgeon rf
5 0 1 0 0 1 .369
Ockimey 1b
5 0 1 1 0 3 .210
Matheny cf
4 1 1 0 1 2 .301
Tendler dh
3 1 2 0 1 1 .207
Rei c
3 0 0 0 1 1 .128
Lovullo 2b
4 1 0 0 0 2 .073
Mars lf
4 1 2 1 0 0 .217
Totals
38 5 10 4 3 10
N HAMPSHIR AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Davis cf
4 0 1 0 1 3 .279
BBichette ss
5 0 0 0 0 3 .288
Guerrero 3b
4 0 1 0 0 0 .392
Biggio 2b
4 0 0 0 0 1 .295
Pentecost dh 3 2 1 0 1 0 .227
JKelly 1b
4 0 0 1 0 1 .200
HRamirez rf
4 1 2 0 0 2 .299
Panas lf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .191
Cantwell c
4 0 2 1 0 1 .341
Guillotte pr
0 0 0 0 0 0 .218
Totals
36 3 8 2 2 11
Portland
000 500 000 — 5 10 1
New Hampshire000 100 101 —
3 8 1
E—Ockimey (4), Zeuch (1). LOB—
Portland 9, New Hampshire 8. 2B—
Mars (5), HRamirez (4), Pentecost (3).
GIDP—Matheny. DP—New Hampshire
1.
PORTLAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Lakins
3 3 0 0 0 5 0.00
Stankiewicz
5„ 5 3 1 2 5 6.00
W 2­4
Weems S 1
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
N HAMPSHIR IP H R ER BB SO
Zeuch L 0­1
4 9 5 4 1 3
Young
2 1 0 0 1 3
Jackson
1 0 0 0 1 2
JFernandez
2 0 0 0 0 2
T—2:39. A—3,644.
ERA
9.00
3.07
0.75
3.07
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C9
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Kelly Chrysler*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Audi Shrewsbury
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Honda Village*
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Infiniti of Hanover
2060 Washington St, Hanover
781-570-5200
infinitiofhanover.com
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
Quirk Ford*
540 Southern Artery, Quincy
617-770-0070
quirkford.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
107 Andover Street, Route 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Route 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
175 Pelham St, Exit 47 on I-93, Methuen
978-683-8775
kellyauto.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
smart center Lynnfield
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Cityside*
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
VillageSubaru.com
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St,
Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95,
Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Herb Chambers RAM of Danvers*
smart center Boston
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Kelly Maserati*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
Boch Maserati*
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Herb Chambers RAM of Millbury*
Kelly Jeep*
Mirak Genesis
Mirak Chevrolet*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Kelly Ford*
Best Chevrolet*
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
Kelly Infiniti*
Framingham Ford*
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
Mirak Hyundai
Ferrari Of New England*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Kelly Honda*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, Ram
of Methuen*
Land Rover Sudbury*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
340 Mystic Ave, Medford
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
New 2018
Audi
A4
$
399
2.0 Quattro
Premium Package
*
Lease
per mo/
36 mos.
$1,899 down
Stock# J056255, MSRP: $41,475
*Leases are 36 months offered to qualified customers by A
Audi
di Financial
Fi
i lS
Services
i
(AFS).
(AFS) At
A llease end,
d llessee responsible
ibl ffor $0
$0.25/
2
mile over 10,000 miles/year, for damage, excessive wear and a disposition fee of $495. Leases are with A3 Quattro $2,299 down,
A4 Quattro $1,899 plus tax, title, registration, $895 acquisition fee and documentation fee. Offers expire 5/31/18.
Audi Brookline
308 Boylston St., Route 9,
Brookline, MA 02445
855-889-0843 • AudiBrookline.com
Audi Burlington
62 Cambridge Street (Exit 33B Off I-95)
Burlington, MA 01803
855-845-0576 • AudiBurlington.com
The Herb Chambers Companies
T h e
C10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Areas of low clouds and
fog along the coast to
start; otherwise, partly
sunny and pleasant.
Mostly cloudy at night with
some rain on the Cape.
FRIDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Clouds and some sunny
breaks; becoming breezy
in the afternoon. There
can be a shower or
thunderstorm late in the day or
at night.
HIGH
61-66
LOW
45-50
HIGH
63-68
LOW
52-57
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Any morning clouds give
way to some sunshine
with a pleasant, but cool
afternoon. Increasing
clouds at night with a couple of
showers later on.
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
HIGH
68-73
LOW
47-52
HIGH
63-68
LOW
56-61
40
3
7
6 P.M.
Cloudy with some
showers lingering in the
morning, clouds giving
way to some sunshine
with a more pleasant afternoon.
Clear and cool at night.
Plenty of clouds and
breezy with some showers likely to start the
weekend as a cold front
moves in from the northwest.
Showers at night.
HIGH
60-65
LOW
46-51
2
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
5
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
THURSDAY
TODAY
18
48
13
9
6
12
2
60
9
Difficulty Level
5/09
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: Pleasant for May with sunshine and some clouds.
Cooler right along the coast with more clouds; especially
in the southeast.
TOMORROW: Clouds and some sunny breaks
with a few showers and a thunderstorm, mainly
PRESQUE ISLE
during the afternoon across the west.
66/44
EXTENDED: Breezy Friday with sunshine
and clouds; quite cool across the north.
MILLINOCKET
Plenty of clouds with some showers
71/43
Saturday.
BURLINGTON
80/56
MONTPELIER
75/47
MT. WASHINGTON
48/34
LEBANON
79/45
RUTLAND
77/50
Wind
Boston Harbor
E 7-14 kts.
Seas
Temp
1 ft.
63/48
East Cape
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
6:40 7:24
6:54 7:38
7:12 7:49
6:39 7:23
Yesterday
High/low
59/45
Mean
52
Departure from normal -4
Departure for month +68
Departure for year +98
5 p.m. rel. humidity 69%
BAR HARBOR
58/44
PORTLAND 63/43
LACONIA
74/44
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 63/44
BRATTLEBORO
76/48
78/46
NASHUA 74/44
PITTSFIELD
76/47
BOSTON 63/47
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
71/46
78/46 PROVIDENCE
61/46
BEDFORD
70/45
74/48
HYANNIS 64/46
HARTFORD
79/49
NEWPORT
63/48
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 59/46
61/47
67/51
New England marine forecast
High tides
6:53 7:31
9.0 8.8
12:41 1:12
2.0 1.4
Wind
Seas
2-4 ft.
65/47
58/47
Buzzards Bay
E 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
66/49
Provincetown
E 6-12 kts.
1-3 ft.
61/47
Cool
0
27
0
27
0
19
Normal Temperatures
May readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
73.8
52.6
38.8
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 59°
100
Record
high
48
Record
low
20
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
April
2.0"
1.57
1.5"
1.0"
0.72
T
FULL
May 29
Evening stars – A. MacRobert
LAST
June 6
Arcturus is the brightest star high in the east at
dusk. Look to the lower right of it, by three fists at
arm’s length, for Spica, less bright. Arcturus is pale
yellow-orange. Spica is pale blue-white.
HOROSCOPE
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
hush-hush, yet it could affect
your professional life. Try not to
be weighed down by this issue,
and do your best to bypass it or
put it to bed. Your demeanor
could be serious and worrisome
to others. Tonight: Take some
much-needed personal time.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Once you decide to get moving,
you'll be able to handle a problematic situation. Read between
the lines in a conversation. What
is not said could be more significant than what is said. Emphasis
is on friendship and on a longterm mutual goal. Tonight: Be
where your friends are.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
What has been occurring lately
needs to be kept quiet for now.
You might not understand the
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Candice Bergen is 72. Singer
Billy Joel is 69. Blues singermusician Bob Margolin is 69.
Cheap Trick bass guitar player
Tom Petersson is 68. Actor
John Corbett is 57. Depeche
Mode singer Dave Gahan is 56.
Actress Sonja Sohn is 54. EPA
Administrator Scott Pruitt is
50.
ºIn 1754, a political cartoon in
34
1956
May
0.06 T
0.04
0.23
0.54
0.21
0.05
0.2
0.09 T
0.19
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
FIRST
May 21
1964
64
Moon phases
NEW
May 15
Norm.
62.3
46.5
37.9
87
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Today is Wednesday, May 9, the
129th day of 2018. There are
236 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Actor-writer Alan
Bennett is 84. Actor Albert
Finney is 82. Actress-turnedpolitician Glenda Jackson is 82.
Producer-director James L.
Brooks is 81. Singer-guitarist
Richie Furay of Buffalo Springfield and Poco is 74. Actress
Heat
13
38
88
5226
5454
5000
Yesterday’s low 45°
2-4 ft.
You might sense that a matter is
8:32
7:44
3:52
3:45
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Martha’s
E 6-12 kts.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
7:51
7:09
3:17
3:10
Temp
NE 7-14 kts.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, May 9, 2018:
This year you become more involved with a set group of acquaintances and/or friends. You
also are more likely to embody
this group's ideas and patterns.
Be aware of this change. If you
are single, you are able to meet
more people than in the recent
past. You could meet someone
who is very special. If you are attached, the two of you work together to make this year quite
special. As a couple, you take on
a new commitment and are able
to realize a long-term desire. PISCES might not be logical, but
he or she certainly is creative.
5:43 6:20
6:37 7:15
8:35
8:26
7:45
7:37
40
Vineyard
Mostly sunny
80 miles
west at 26 m.p.h.
48/32
0.0”
6:46 7:25
7:53
7:42
7:07
7:02
Normal
low
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Nantucket
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
60
64/48
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
High tides
7:31
7:31
7:37
7:40
7:40
Normal
high
1-3 ft.
5:29 a.m.
7:52 p.m.
14:22
2:42 a.m.
6:53
6:53
6:56
7:01
7:03
80
E 6-12 kts.
Almanac
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
Cod Canal
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
A.M. P.M.
Boston’s recent climate
AUGUSTA
71/44
BERLIN
76/41
A.M. P.M.
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
BANGOR
73/45
NEWPORT
76/47
Tides
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
April
0.0"
May
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
Precip days in May
0.5"
0.00”
3
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
0.28”
Norm. month to date 0.85”
Year to date
18.66”
Norm. year to date 15.52”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
West dealer — Both sides vulnerable
North
♠ 9763
♥ 8752
♦ 98
♣J62
West
East
♠ 10 8 5 4 2
♥ 10 3
♦ 10 7
♣ Q 10 8 4
♠J
♥K J 9 6 4
♦A652
♣K 7 5
South
♠ AKQ
♥AQ
♦ KQJ43
♣A93
West
North
Pass
1♥
Pass
1♠
All Pass
Opening
East
Pass
Pass
South
Dbl
3 NT
lead — ♥ 6
“I’ll never live it down,” Cy the Cynic moaned. “Millard
made a game, and I went down.”
Millard Pringle, a regular at my club, is a quiet little
man who gets lost in the maze of bridge “rules.” In a
team match, Cy and Millard both raced into 3NT after
West opened the bidding. Both Wests led a heart, perhaps
unwisely, and Cy and Millard won with the queen.
“I led the king of diamonds next,” Cy said, “and West
ducked, won the next diamond and led a second heart to
my ace. When I took the jack of diamonds, East discarded.
All I could do was lose a fourth diamond — West’s six was
high — and he cashed three hearts for down one.”
“How did Millard operate?” I asked.
“He believes in cashing winners, not setting them up,”
the Cynic growled. “After he won the first heart, he took his
high spades. West had to discard twice, and he naturally
threw a club and ... a diamond. Then Millard started the
diamonds and had no trouble making 3NT.”
Cy was outdone. Millard’s play had nothing to lose.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ J ♥ K J 9 6 4 ♦ A 6 5 2 ♣ K
7 5. Your partner opens one spade, you bid two hearts, he
rebids two spades and you try 2NT. Partner next bids three
clubs. What do you say?
ANSWER: This case is close. Partner has six spades, four
clubs and minimum values. Your 2NT was conservative;
some players would have committed to game. Though your
heart honors may face a singleton, bid four spades. Partner
will have a chance if he has K Q 10 8 6 4, 7, 4 3, A Q 10 6.
whole extent of what you are
hearing. A friend could be keeping his or her thoughts and ideas
quiet. Allow yourself to be more
aware of your surroundings. Tonight: Till the wee hours.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Reach out to a loved one at a distance. You could be unusually
exhausted from all the recent socializing. An associate's demanding attitude could draw you out
of a low-key stance. Detach,
rather than dive right into a difficult disagreement. Tonight: Try
a power nap first.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You could be very concerned
about a work-related matter. You
also might need to schedule a
checkup with your doctor. You
need to maintain a healthy lifestyle, especially when you are
under pressure. Expect to come
out on top. Tonight: A partner
wants to share some news.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You could be unusually creative
and full of unique ideas. Stay on
top of an important personal
matter. You tend to take this area of your life very seriously. You
know when you have had
enough of others interfering in a
personal aspect of your life. Tonight: Say "yes" to living.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Ignore a negative situation for
now. Be as clear and direct as
possible. Avoid playing into
someone else's control games.
You could be unusually tired of
going over the same issue with
this person. Avoid pushing so
hard to have things go your way.
Tonight: At a favorite spot.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Be as clear as possible when
dealing with a loved one. You
might not be as expressive as
you need to be. You have the
unique ability to examine a situ-
ation and express your thoughts
clearly and concisely. Many people around you appreciate your
ideas. Tonight: Switch gears.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21)
Stay anchored when dealing
with a family member. You
might not be able to coerce a
loved one into making a certain
decision. Be more direct in how
you deal with a personal matter.
Less emphasis on your part
could lead to better results. Tonight: Happiest close to home.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Speak your mind, but try not to
express any negativity. Fatigue
drags you down much more
than you realize. You might not
have the right response for
someone, but it works for you.
Make sure that others understand where you are coming
from. Tonight: Meet up with a
friend.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Make decisions from an intuitive
point of view, as doing so generally works well for you. Use logic
when looking at a certain set of
facts. You could be more prone
to negativity at this time. Try relaxing and getting down to the
basic issues. Tonight: Pay bills
before going out.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Your ability to relate to others on
a one-on-one level emerges. You
could feel as if you have no
choice but to let go of a problem,
especially as the other person involved seems determined not to
change his or her mind. Do not
keep hitting the same wall; walk
around it. Tonight: Where the
action is.
Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette depicted a snake
cut into eight pieces, each section representing a part of the
American colonies; the caption
read, ‘‘JOIN, or DIE.’’
ºIn 1914, President Wilson,
acting on a joint congressional
resolution, signed a proclamation designating the second
Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.
ºIn 1918, CBS newsman Mike
Wallace was born Myron Leon
Wallace in Brookline.
ºIn 1936, Italy annexed Ethiopia.
ºIn 1961, in a speech to the
National Association of Broadcasters, Federal Communications Commission Chairman
Newton N. Minow decried the
majority of television programming as a ‘‘vast wasteland.’’
ºIn 1978, the bullet-riddled
body of former Italian prime
minister Aldo Moro, who had
been abducted by the Red Brigades, was found in an automo-
bile in the center of Rome.
ºIn 1980, 35 people were
killed when a freighter rammed
the Sunshine Skyway Bridge
over Tampa Bay in Florida,
causing a 1,400-foot section of
the span to collapse.
ºIn 1994, South Africa’s newly
elected Parliament chose Nelson Mandela to be president,
the country’s first black leader.
ºIn 2012, President Obama declared his unequivocal support
for same-sex marriage in a his-
toric announcement that came
three days after Vice President
Joe Biden spoke in favor of
such unions.
ºLast year, President Trump
abruptly fired FBI Director
James Comey, ousting the nation’s top law enforcement official in the midst of an FBI investigation into whether
Trump’s campaign had ties to
Russia’s meddling in the election that sent him to the White
House.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2018 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
WednesdayFood
G
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D NE S DAY, M AY 9 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / F O O D
THE MOROCCAN BOWL chickpeas,
tomatoes, currants, olives, preserved lemon,
and cilantro with kale, tomato-cucumber
salad, freekeh, and yogurt.
THE LATIN BOWL chicken, black beans,
cabbage slaw, corn, radish, and avocado
crema over brown rice.
THE HEARTH BOWL Balsamic-glazed
Brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes with
kale, quinoa, and freekeh, topped with yogurt
and chopped Granny Smith apples.
Robots made me lunch
BY D E V RA F I R ST | G LO B E STA F F
AND I ENJOYED IT. IS THAT SO WRONG?
THE AUTOMATED KITCHEN AT SPYCE OFFERS A TASTE
OF COOKING’S POSSIBLE FUTURE.
I have eaten the future, and it is made by our robot overlords. It
tastes of the world’s great civilizations, thousands of years of human preference, meaning, hand labor, and history distilled into
bowls named for the cultures that first wove these flavors together
— Moroccan, Latin, Indian, Thai. Before we invented robots, we
invented cooking. Which creation is more complex?
The robots don’t care about any of that. They are just here to
make us lunch. They don’t invent new dishes (yet). They (still) do
what they are told. This is the lay of the land at Spyce, a new fast-
casual restaurant that eliminates the middleperson, literally. Humans prep the ingredients, and humans garnish the finished dishes. But in between, the machines run the show.
On opening day last week, I line up with the other customers in
the Downtown Crossing space to see how it works. There’s a row
of screens where we place our orders and pay — much like the selfcheck aisle at the grocery store, only without the option of a cashier. It’s a misanthrope’s perfect setup. There’s no need to talk to
anyone. Just order up a beet bowl, say, or a take on halal-cart
chicken and rice, then customize it as you wish with add-ons like
soft-boiled eggs and smoked salmon. There are vegetarian, vegan,
and gluten-free options, too.
I proceed to the front of the room and lo! Before me is the robotic kitchen, which does all the cooking: A bright orange, oblong
SPYCE, Page G7
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
The robotic kitchen displays show what is cooking and for whom at Spyce in Boston. Marcos Lemus retrieves finished bowls.
Inside
WHAT SHE’S HAVING
CRUISE AUTOMILE
FOR TURKISH FOOD
Outstanding cuisine at an
out-of-the-way spot: Gyro
& Kebab House in Norwood
G4
SEASONAL RECIPES
A SWEET TREAT
AND A SAUCY DISH
How to make chocolate-chip
walnut blondies, stir-fried
beef and sugar snap peas
G2
For many, it’s their last plastic straw
By Kara Baskin
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
In 1967, “The Graduate” proclaimed: “There’s a great future in
plastics.”
A generation later, a video of an
injured turtle called that into question.
In 2015, an eight-minute clip of
an olive ridley sea turtle with a
plastic drinking straw stuck up its
nostril went viral. Researchers off
the coast of Costa Rica spotted the
reptile, and the extraction was
chronicled in a painful short film.
Those images lingered, and a backlash began.
“It was eight minutes of [researchers] pulling this straw out.
That was it. That was my last plastic straw,” says Jackie Nunez, who
founded The Last Plastic Straw
movement to eliminate single-use
plastic, in conjunction with the
Berkeley, Calif.-based Plastic Pollution Coalition. Naturally, restaurants are prime sources of straws.
She urges them to use metal or paper versions — or not to offer them
at all.
Nunez will be in Newport, R.I.,
this month for a screening of
“Straws,” a documentary by Linda
Booker, narrated by Tim Robbins,
spotlighting the environmental implications of plastic straws.
“They’re nonrecyclable, so they
STRAWS, Page G7
EMMA COHEN
FinalStraw is a portable, stainless steel,
washable, reusable straw.
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Insider
Ingredients
dancing in
broth
Guazzetto di mare, seafood cooked in broth, is a favorite dish of Marisa Iocco’s
from her native Abruzzo region in Italy. Inspired by this
“little stew,” Iocco, executive
chef and co-owner of Spiga
Ristorante in Needham, has
created a half-dozen guazzetti (gwah-ZET-tee) using
various meats, seafood, and
vegetables, along with aromatic herbs and spices. The
arts-trained Italian chef says
she “imagines the ingredients dancing in the broth.”
Iocco’s self-styled guazzetti include Roman artichokes with potatoes, shallots, and mint in a sunchoke
broth; veal shoulder with
porcini mushrooms, blueberries, and smoky coffee
dust; salted cod in a seafood
broth with sauteed tomatoes, red peppers, and garlic;
and braised short rib with
caramelized onions, tomato,
and sweet and sour celery.
The chef says she uses only
the best ingredients to make
these and the other dishes
on the menu because her
goal is “to have customers
come back craving the food.”
About 10 years ago Iocco
helped restaurateur Carmelo Iriti open Spiga; she returned last summer to help
revitalize the restaurant,
both renovating the decor
and creating a new, attractive menu. She added the selection of comforting little
stews for guests to order
as an appetizer (about $15)
or meal ($19 to $22). She also likes their musical-sounding name. “Guazzetti: It’s a
happy word.” Spiga Ristorante, 18 Highland Circle,
Needham, 781-449-5600;
www.spigaristorante.com
LISA ZWIRN
Fashion meets function —
on a countertop
F
ashion and fantasy are not archetypical descriptors for small kitchen
appliances. But add function, and you have the brightly colored and
whimsically painted toasters, blenders, mixers, and more created by
Italian appliance manufacturer Smeg with Milan fashion house Dolce &
Gabbana. The two companies collaborated on this new line they’ve
named Sicily Is My Love. The products are the canvas for vivid paintings with lemons, pears, cherries, floral motifs, and decorative symbols
of Sicilian folklore. Last year, they collaborated to produce a limited edition of hand-painted refrigerators; this year the focus is on small appliances. The first collection released, the
Breakfast Set, includes three items — a citrus juicer, 2-slice toaster, and an electric kettle.
Whether it’s art or a fashion statement for the kitchen, it comes at a lavish cost — each is
$600. Later in the year, expect a stand-up mixer, blender, and espresso machine, and they
will likely cost more. Available at Williams-Sonoma locations and by special order through
Neiman Marcus, www.neimanmarcus.com.
ANN TRIEGER KURLAND
Tea and chocolate for Mom
T
his year, when you
bring mom her
breakfast in bed
(or wherever she
prefers to have it
served) set the tray with a special collection of tea-infused
chocolates. The collection includes five offerings made by
Newton-based Emmy Awardwinning children’s media producer-turned-chocolatier Beth
Kirsch, of Beth’s Chocolate,
who worked in collaboration
w i t h Te a H i v e ’s R e b e c c a
Sgouros, of Brookline. An archeologist who has traveled the
world and “collected tea leaves
wherever I traveled,” Sgouros
founded Tea Hive, a subscription-based company that offers
teas and related products, in
2017.
When Kirsch and Sgouros
met at a gathering for food entrepreneurs, Sgouros was impressed by the way Kirsch talked about her craft. “I think [tea
and chocolate] are a great pairing,” she says. “When you have
a cup of tea, very often you
want something sweet with it.”
The women’s first collaboration, included in the collection,
was a chai-infused chocolate
that Kirsch developed for Tea
Hive’s “Chai Society” box. She
infused cream with a blend of
chai spices and let it sit overnight, giving “all the flavors a
chance to reveal themselves,”
she explains. The resulting bon
bon, Masala Chai, was so popular that the women wanted to
collaborate again. “We thought
Mother’s Day would be a good
opportunity,” says Kirsch.
Fo r t h e n e x t c o l l a b o r a tion, Sgouros brought six rooibos samples, including a spiced
Mexican chocolate organic rooibos. That one really spoke to
Kirsch, who paired it with a single-origin Valrhona milk chocolate from Peru, dubbing the result ¡Mexican Fiesta! It is sort of
a play on Mexican drinking
chocolate, which has come a
long way since its inception as a
bitter beverage consumed by
ancient tribes. “Mixing tea
with bonbons was a fun direction to go in,” Kirsch says. Adds
Sgouros, “I rely on [Kirsch] to
use her chocolate expertise.”
Rounding out the collection,
which Kirsch says “is intended
to be international,” are a matcha white chocolate, combining
high-grade ceremonial Japanese green matcha and organic
white chocolate; pomegranate,
with white Chinese pomegranate tea, Lebanese pomegranate
molasses, and dark chocolate;
and jasmine, with floral jasmine tea and dark chocolate.
Sgouros will add any teas to
the chocolate collection to
make a complete gift box. She
recommends the springtime
Garden Party or Chai Box and is
also happy to advise gift givers
on customizing their selections.
Order online at bethschocolate.com or call to arrange pickup; or myteahive.com or call to
arrange delivery.
ANDREA PYENSON
SEASONAL
RECIPES
WHAT TO COOK THIS WEEK
Stir­fried beef
and sugar snap peas
Serves 4
Soy sauce and sherry make a sauce
for a weeknight stir-fry of skirt steak
and sweet, crunchy sugar snap peas.
Use a very hot skillet (or wok) so the
beef browns properly and cook the
snap peas quickly so they retain
their satisfying bite. Toasted white
sesame seeds are in the Asian section of your local market, but substitute traditional white sesame seeds,
if you have them. Add bowls of
white or brown rice.
1
1
3
3
2
2
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
pound skirt steak, cut into thin
strips
Salt and black pepper, to taste
tablespoon cornstarch
tablespoons soy sauce
tablespoons sherry
teaspoons sesame oil
tablespoons canola oil
pound sugar snap peas (about
5 cups), ends trimmed and
strings pulled off
small red bell pepper, cored
and thinly sliced
cloves garlic, chopped
piece (2 inches) fresh ginger,
peeled and cut into match­
sticks
small chile pepper (such as
fresno), sliced into thin rings
scallions, chopped
tablespoon toasted white
sesame seeds
SHERYL JULIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Chocolate­chip walnut blondies
Makes 20 large or 40 small bars
Made in a bowl with a spoon, these blondies, one of
America’s most popular bar cookies, begin with melted
butter and both dark brown and granulated sugar.
They have plenty of miniature semisweet chips and
walnuts for crunch. Blondies are brownies without
melted chocolate or cocoa in the batter ( just chips),
with the same dense, chewy, appealing texture.
KAROLINE BOEHM GOODNICK FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
1. In a bowl, toss the steak with salt,
4. Add the sugar snaps, bell pepper,
black pepper, and cornstarch.
2. In a small bowl, stir together the
soy sauce, sherry, and sesame oil.
3. In a very large skillet over high
heat, heat the canola oil. Add the
beef in one layer. Cook for 2 to 3
minutes, without stirring, or until
the first side is well browned. Stir
and cook 1 minute more. Transfer
beef to a bowl.
garlic, ginger, and chile pepper.
Cook, stirring, for 3 minutes. Return
beef to pan with any juices in the
bowl. Stir in the soy sauce mixture
and cook, stirring, for 1 to 3 minutes
or until the sauce thickens slightly.
5. Stir in scallions and sesame seeds.
Spoon onto plates and serve with
rice. Karoline Boehm Goodnick
Butter (for the pan)
Flour (for the pan)
1
cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into chunks
2¼ cups flour
1
teaspoon baking soda
¼
teaspoon baking powder
½
teaspoon salt
1
cup dark brown sugar
‚
cup granulated sugar
2
teaspoons vanilla extract
3
eggs, lightly beaten
2
cups miniature semisweet chocolate chips
1½ cups walnuts, coarsely chopped
Confectioners’ sugar (for sprinkling)
1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Butter a 9-by-13-inch
baking pan. Dust the pan with flour, tapping out the
excess.
2. In a saucepan over medium-low heat, melt the butter. Remove from the heat. Scrape it into a large mixing bowl; set aside for 5 minutes or until the butter is
cool but still liquid.
3. In another bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt to blend them.
4. Use a wooden spoon to blend the brown sugar and
granulated sugar into the butter. It may not blend thoroughly. Stir in the vanilla and eggs until thoroughly
mixed. Stir in the flour mixture, mixing just until the
dry ingredients are absorbed. Stir in the chips and walnuts.
5. Transfer the batter to the baking pan, spreading it
evenly and smoothing the top. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the top is just set. Transfer the pan to a
wire rack to cool.
6. Make 3 vertical cuts and 4 horizontal cuts in the pan
to form 20 bars. If you like, cut each in half to make 40
bars. Use an offset spatula to remove the pieces from
the pan. Store in an airtight container for up to 4 days.
Before serving, sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar.
Lisa Yockelson
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G3
passion. taste it.
MERLOT
A T
CABERNET
SAUVIGNON
3 5 0 +
SAUVIGNON
B LA N C
L O C A T I O N S
C H A R D O N N AY
N E A R
Y O U
S E E T H E F U L L L I S T AT A R I A S W I N E . C O M
T h e
G4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
WHAT SHE’S HAVING
Come to the Automile for the
cars, stay for the Turkish food
By Sheryl Julian
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
NORWOOD — The Automile isn’t known for its cuisine. It’s where you pass dealerships for every car you’ve ever
bought because it’s practical, or
dreamt about buying because
it’s not (Maserati! Porsche! Alfa!). And there among the auto-
mobile showrooms is Gyro &
Kebab House, where Levent
Akyol is making the Turkish
food of his homeland (he’s from
Izmir), with his wife, Valentina
(she’s from Siberia).
Gyro & Kebab House, which
they opened in 2015, looks like
a spiffed-up pizzeria, with a
counter for ordering, walls the
Where T
Stay
MAINE
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coral color of red lentil soup,
hanging light pendants, terra
cotta tile flooring, and the requisite large photograph of Istanbul on the Bosporus. The
place holds 100 and though
there are seats outside (facing a
VW dealership), they’re not for
dining.
Your meal comes to the table
when it’s ready, warm homemade bread first, with a bottle
of spicy red pepper sauce — an
intense brick-red mixture you’ll
add to everything — and a mild
yogurt sauce seasoned judiciously with garlic.
Red lentil soup, served all
over Turkey, isn’t overly thick
like many soups made from legumes. It might contain chicken stock but the little orange
rounds are usually simmered
with water and always with
dried mint (every Turkish family dries its own supply); lemon
is added at the table. There’s an
onion in it, tomatoes, and often
bulgur or rice to thicken it,
since the red lentils aren’t as
starchy as other varieties. Levent Akyol says he uses neither
grain. His bowl is garnished
with big pumpernickel croutons, which is one of the only
items the couple purchases
ready-made, says Valentina.
They also make the dough
for their exceptional lahmacun,
which they call “Turkish-style
PHOTOS BY BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Above: Adana kebab, a thin, flat log of ground lamb and spicy peppers char-grilled on a
skewer. served with salad at Gyro & Kebab House in Norwood. Below: Red lentil soup.
pizza.” These big, slightly floppy, rounds are really nothing
like pizza — they have so much
flavor and no cheese, but instead ground lamb mixed with
finely chopped peppers.
Levent buys half a lamb (all
the meat is Halal), says Valentina, and butchers it himself.
Some of that goes onto the lahmacun, some on the gyro (the
“The Sound of Music...
delivers on its legacy
of enchanting each
new generation.”
vertical rotisserie that holds
meat carved for plump lavash
rolls with salad vegetables), and
some into Adana kebab, a thin,
flat log of ground lamb and
spicy peppers char-grilled on a
skewer. It’s one of those dishes
you can’t make at home because the skill required to get
the meat to stay on the skewer
is inherited. If Adana kebab is
FINAL WEEK!
MUST CLOSE SUNDAY!
NOW THRU MAY 13
WANG THEATRE
- The Patriot Ledger
on the menu, someone from its
region of origin is in the kitchen. This wonderful plate comes
with rosy bulgur and a salad.
Turkish cuisine appears simple. You’re never wondering
what’s on your plate, but flavors
and spices add layers of tastes.
“It’s very time consuming,” says
Valentina. It began as court cuisine, where there were hundreds of hands in the kitchen.
And there it is, on the Automile, where you can celebrate
your pragmatic approach to
buying a car or your crazy, wild
splurge.
1275 Boston Providence
Turnpike (Route 1), Norwood,
781-352-2277, www.gyrokebabhouse.com.
Sheryl Julian can be reached at
sheryl.julian@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@sheryljulian.
BUY TICKETS AT
BOCHCENTER.ORG
BOCH CENTER BOX OFFICE
800.982.2787
GROUPS OF 10+ CALL
617.532.1116
Boch Center is a trademark of The Wang Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.
THEATER
THEATER
THEATER
MUSIC
MUSIC
MUSIC
cooking with
the caLamari SiSterS
trinity rep
april 26 - May 27
A CLASSIC TALE RETOLD WITH
A BLAST OF CREOLE MAGIC!
saturday, May 19 at 7:30pM
cary hall in lexington
Mother’s Day by the sea
The Good SonG
MozarT/Fauré/SchuberT
Two over-the-top plus-size Italian Sisters from
Brooklyn, Cook, Sing & Dance outrageous musical numbers that get a bit naughty as they share
their saucy secrets that will leave you rolling in
the aisles
April 12- May 20th
Thurs 2 & 7, Fri 8, Sat 2 & 8, Sun 2
REGENT THEATRE
7 Medford Street, Arlington, MA 02474
Box off 855-448-7469 Groups 888-264-1788
PlayhouseInfo.com
The music will move you.
The story will surprise you.
Trinity Rep’s re-imagining of this Tony Awardwinning musical brings the story to life in
unexpected and fascinating ways.
TrinityRep.com - (401) 351-4242
Best Play 1995 tony award
& drama desk awards
the interactiVe
SoLVe-the-crime comeDY
“Downright Hilarious!” - Huffington Post
8 gay male friends, 3 summer weekends,
flirtations, infidelities, AIDS, truth-telling, and
soul-searching mix with skinny dipping and Swan
Lake in drag. April 27 - May 19, Boston Center
for the Arts, Wed - Sun, Tickets: 617.933.8600,
BostonTheatreScene.com, Zeitgeist Stage Co
“RADIATES SO MUCH ENERGY YOU
CAN HARDLY SIT IN YOUR SEAT! – NY Post
Combines fairy-tale fantasy with New Orleans
street smarts to make THE WIZ sparkle anew!
Starts May 18 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
FaScInaTInG unToLd STorY STarTS MaY 18!
Renowned reporter Bernard Weinraub explores
the marriage of Arthur Miller and Inge Morath
and the son they kept secret from the world.
A Huntington Theatre Company production
South End / Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
OPERA
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3 & 7
Join Lexington Symphony for Music from the
Movies featuring Broadway Goes to the Movies
on Saturday, May 19 at 7:30pm at Cary Hall in
Lexington. Enjoy selections from legendary Tony
Award winners Richard Rodgers and Leonard
Bernstein, as well as highlights from Les
Misérables, Phantom of the Opera and much
more! Featuring a special guest appearance by
the New World Chorale.
Tickets On Sale Now!
LexingtonSymphony.org | 781-523-9009
coMing to light
CHORAL MUSIC RARELY HEARD.
AND WORTH HEARING.
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Music by:
Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Amy Beach,
Gerald Finzi, Ludwig Senfl, Franz Biebl
PARTY WITH US!
Perfect for Bdays, Anniversaries, Graduations
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
By seth roZin
aPril 28-may 20
A hilarious Vaudeville-inspired comedy
about the last two Jews in Afghanistan.
Featuring Joel Colodner and Jeremiah Kissel,
and directed by Will LeBow.
New Repertory Theatre | Watertown, MA
617-923-8487 | newrep.org
MerriMack repertory
theatre
A new comic book comedy about one
super-mom, a new baby, and a lot of villains.
Written by Lila Rose Kaplan
Directed by Sean Daniels
Apri 25 - May 20 • Lowell, MA
mrt.org/villains
Trouble in Tahiti provides popular songs, familiar
tunes, and a good dose of humor that deliver a
candid and profound portrait of a couple longing
Directed by Walter Chapin
SAT MAY 12, 8 pm, First Lutheran Ch Boston
Regular admission $20; Seniors/Students $15
Info & advance tix: www.orianaconsort.org
for love and intimacy amidst The American
Dream. Poignant, intimate and real,
BLO combines two of Bernstein’s most personal
Don’t miSS toP girLS
thru maY 20 onLY!
“TOP-NOTCH! Exceptional cast! There’s never
been a dinner gathering quite like this one.”
- THE BOSTON GLOBE
“Excellent! Top Girls is top-drawer!” - WBUR
“VERY POWERFUL!” - JARED BOWEN, WGBH
“Superbly acted and brilliantly directed.
A MIND-BLOWER!” - JOYCE KULHAWIK
“STELLAR!” - BROADWAY WORLD
“SUPERB! A fun ride!” - SOUTH SHORE CRITIC
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
a storyline everyone
can relate to!
works in a setting unlike any we’ve ever created.
Trouble in Tahiti/Arias | MAY 11-20 | DCR Steriti
Memorial Rink | BLO.ORG | 617.542.6772
June 7 - 17
781-891-5600
MUSIC
Winner of Nine Tony Awards
Music by Marvin Hamlisch
Directed by Leslie Woodies ~ National Tour
Original Broadway Costumes
Robinson Theatre ~ 617 Lexington St., Waltham
ReagleMusicTheatre.com ~ FREE PARKING
a grand night for Music
BrahMs to Bernstein
new england Premiere
now thru June 2!
“See It and Cheer!” - NY Observer / From $25
Based on the life of actor George Takei, this
acclaimed musical tells the powerful story of a
Japanese-American family whose lives are
upended after the events at Pearl Harbor.
www.SpeakEasyStage.com / 617-933-8600
Commonwealth Chorale, David Carrier, Director
and Mark Feldhusen, piano.
Come experience songs of exceptional beauty
ranging widely across time and place including
Brahms, Bernstein, Elder, Paulus, and
new NEC composers: Bosba and Tarver.
Saturday, May 12, 2018 at 8 pm.
Second Church in Newton
60 Highland Ave, Newton, MA 02460
Tickets: $35/30/25 for seniors and students
www.CommonwealthChorale.com
A Newton Festival of the Arts concert
Jonathan Miller, cello, Lucia Lin, violin,
Marc Ryser, piano
Bach Cello Suite No 4,Frescobaldi Toccata,
Kodaly Duo,Prokofiev Cello Sonata
“Songs Without Words” by Scott Wheeler
tix at door , or at rockportmusic.org
$30, $25 Sn,$10 Stu with ID
the sly Voxes spring sing
eclectic a cappella
Added Shows: Thu 5/10 @ 5; Thu 5/17 @ 4:30
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Sunday, May 13, 3 PM, Shalin Liu hall
lavaZZa chaMBer enseMBle
May 13 at 7:30pM
String Quartets: Jennifer Higdon’s Impressions
and Joseph Leonard’s Romanza
Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in d minor
Paula Oakes and Kristina Nilsson, violins
Frances Pfeiffer-Rios, viola
Jan Pfeiffer-Rios, cello
Christopher Dwyer, piano
St. Paul’s Church, 15 St. Paul St., Brookline
FREE concert and reception
www.LavazzaChamberEnsemble.org
Last concert of our season on 6/10
Thursday, May 10 at 7:30 p.m.
The Roxbury Latin School
101 St. Theresa Ave., West Roxbury
For one night only, enjoy music by
Praetorius and Mendelssohn,
Vaughan Williams and The Beatles,
performed by one of Boston’s popular male
singing groups. All are welcome. Parking &
admission are free.
The Roxbury Latin School is located
near the West Roxbury/Needham Line
Commuter Rail.
boston.com/tickettothearts
POLISH MAGNIFICAT FOR
CHOIR & ORCHESTRA
The exquisite voices of Exsultemus will bring
Zebrowski’s gorgeous Baroque Magnificat to
life along with 18th-c. music from Warsaw &
Dresden. 5/19 in Newton and 5/20 in Boston.
Visit exsultemus.org or call 857-998-0219.
DANCE
Succumb to the Power of
a kiSS
One of Boston Ballet’s trademark works, The
Sleeping Beauty returns to the Boston Opera
House with brilliant choreography, sumptuous sets and costumes, and soaring music by
Tchaikovsky. Based on the quintessential fairy
tale you know and love, our iconic production is
MASTERWORKS CHORALE
SATURDAY, MAY 12 AT 8 P.M.
Baroque instrumentalists and sparkling soloists
join conductor Kevin Leong for the Magnificat,
two Bach motets, and the secular cantata “Tönet,
ihr Pauken! Erschallet, Trompeten!” Tickets start
at $20 at boxoffice.harvard.edu 617-496-2222
and masterworkschorale.org
ESSENTIAL VOICES:
RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS
Dona Nobis Pacem & other works, with
soloists Christina Pier & Sumner Thompson.
At Sanders Theatre, Cambridge
Sunday May 13, 3:00 pm
Free Parking. Info & Tickets (from $15)
at www.bbcboston.org, 617-648-3885
Boston Globe
Ticket to the Arts
Order Online through our Self
Serve Order Entry System.
24/7 from anywhere.
Sun. 5/13, 7:30p @ Sanders Theatre
Mozart Quintet in E-flat for piano & winds
Fauré La Bonne Chanson for tenor & ensemble
Schubert Octet for winds and strings in F
$25, $38, $50, $62; Sr: $4 off; Student: $8
617.349.0086/www.bostonchambermusic.org
back for a short time. Tickets at 617-695-6955
or bostonballet.org. May 11-19.
Boston
Globe
Ticket to
the Arts
Order Online through
our Self Serve Order
Entry System.
24/7 from anywhere.
JOIN CANTATA SINGERS ON
MOTHER’S DAY WEEKEND!
Celebrate with Arvo Pärt’s Berliner Messe,
Tomás Luis de Victoria’s Officium defunctorum,
and William Harris’ Faire is the Heaven.
MAY 11 | 8PM | FIRST CHURCH, CAMBRIDGE
MAY 13 | 3PM | CHURCH OF THE COVENANT
$25-$75 | 617.868.5885 | cantatasingers.org
boston.com/tickettothearts
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
THE CONFIDENT COOK
G l o b e
G5
Q&A
GOOD FOOD AND KITCHEN KNOW­HOW
LIDIA BASTIANICH
Coming to America
fed her love of Italy
By Michael Floreak
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
SHERYL JULIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Ham, tomatoes, chiles,
and eggs go into this
one­pan breakfast
Anyone can make this one-pan weekend breakfast, which requires zero skill. Pull out a big skillet and saute slices of deli ham.
Push them to the sides and cook sliced tomatoes in the middle of
the pan. Add chile pepper and lots of dill, make pockets in the tomatoes, and drop in some eggs. Then cover until the whites are
set. You’ve just made a glorious breakfast in a pan. This is a recipe
for kids with a helper. There’s only a little prep, things that go into
the pan stay there, and the only other element is toast. Make it for
mom on her day. Then make it a regular weekend routine. You can
do a lot of things to please mom but she’ll never tire of a beautiful
breakfast she loves and didn’t make.
SHERYL JULIAN
One­pan breakfast
Serves 4
3
8
6
1
3
4
2
4
tablespoons olive oil, or more
as needed
thin slices baked ham (such as
Black Forest)
small tomatoes (larger than
cherry tomatoes), thickly sliced
Salt and black pepper, to taste
jalapeno or other small hot
chile pepper, thinly sliced
scallions, thinly sliced
eggs, each broken into a cup
tablespoons chopped fresh dill
thick slices bread, halved and
toasted
1. In a large skillet, heat 2 table-
ute on a side. Move to the sides of
the pan, folding them in half with
tongs to make space in the middle.
2. Add the tomatoes to the pan and
sprinkle with salt and black pepper.
Cook 2 minutes more, turning gently. Sprinkle them with jalapeno or
chile pepper and scallions.
3. With the back of a spoon, make 4
indentations in the tomatoes. Tip an
egg into each indentation. Sprinkle
with salt and pepper and cover with
a lid. Cook for 5 minutes, or until
the whites are set and the yolks are
still runny. Sprinkle with dill. Tuck
spoons of the olive oil over medium-
the toast into the skillet at the edges
or serve it beside the pan.
high heat. Brown the ham for 1 min-
Sheryl Julian
Lidia Bastianich connects to
people through the food of Italy.
Her new memoir, “My American Dream: A
Life of L ove,
Fa m i l y, a n d
F o o d ,” t e l l s
how life as a
refugee and
immigrant led
to her career
celebrating the
food and cult u r e o f a c o u n t r y t h at w a s
sometimes out of reach.
The award-winning television host, author, and chef was
born in 1947 in Pola (now Pula), a former Italian city on the
Istrian peninsula that was annexed by communist Yugoslavia after World War II. It is now
part of Croatia. When she was
9, Bastianich’s family escaped
across the border to Italy, where
they lived in a refugee camp for
two years before ultimately receiving visas to emigrate to the
United States. After settling in
New York, Bastianich was free
to return to Italy and began reconnecting with family, immersing herself in the culture,
studying the country’s food.
Bastianich credits her audiences with encouraging her to
tell this story. “There seems to
be such a connection between
my viewers, my readers, my
customers. I think I took them
to a trip of their own — different ethnicities, not only Italians
— which is wonderful because
it tells you how universal this
message is,” she says.
Bastianich spoke on a recent
visit to Boston, where she hosted a book signing at Eataly Boston, the Italian marketplace in
which she is a partner.
Q. Has your experience as an
immigrant always been a story
you tell?
A. Being an immigrant, you
want to be assimilated. I remember being a young teenager, all I wanted to do is have the
bobby socks, dance the rock ’n’
roll like the rest. . . . As I began
to write books and cook, I had a
medium where I connected. My
stories were always in the background because I said nobody is
interested in that. But food reflects a culture, a topography, a
climate, and so I would slowly
put it in. I was kind of enlightened that I could release this secret, if you will, of being an immigrant. Oddly enough, it fits
into today’s situation.
A feistty Italian affair packed
with peaachy gusto, pineapple zeal
and cittrus zing finishing with
satisffying fruity freshness.
Q. How did growing up under
Yugoslavian rule affect your
Italian identity?
Continued on next page
Wet-S
Sharpening
Professional knife sharpening
service witth a 48 hour turnaround
localroot.com
Belmont Center
77 Leonard Street
Belmont, MA 02478
The Mill at Newton Lower Falls
2284 Washington Street
Newton Lower Falls, MA 02462
Buona Festa Della Mama!
Join us for
Mother’s Day
Happy Mother’s Day
From all of us at
Exchange Street Bistro
Three Course Menu
$35.99 per Person
(Tax & Gratuity not included)
COURSE I
(Choice of)
Spring Greens Salad
shaved asparagus, dried cherries, goat cheese, lemon honey vinaigrette
Corn & Crab Bisque
crostini, smoked bacon, chive oil
COURSE II
(Choice of)
Roasted Beef Tenderloin
gorgonzola au gratin potatoes
spring peas, cabernet sauvignon reduction
Pan Roasted Halibut
lobster risotto, baby spinach oven cured tomatoes, citrus beurre blanc
COURSE III
(Choice of)
Limoncello Mascarpone Cake
seasonal berries, whipped cream
Chocolate Lava Cake
vanilla ice cream, raspberry coulis
Executive Chef: Garry Payne Sous Chef: Edwin Guevara
Dinner menu still available from 11am-8pm
67 Exchange Street, Malden
Reservations 781-322-0071
exchangestreetbistro.com
T h e
G6
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
Q. When your family made it to Italy, it
was as refugees. Why was that?
A. We had no papers. They couldn’t go
and check in Yugoslavia because when
the Yugoslavians came they changed
our name. So, the only option was to
stay in the [refugee] camp and to wait
without citizenship until somebody accepted us. But the rules were such that
we weren’t immigrants, we were refugees. If we had the Italian citizenship,
we had to stay in Italy. We couldn’t
have gone anyplace else. And I think it
was a choice of my parents to just go
on. So, it’s one of those complicated decisions that one makes in life. I’m
grateful for it.
think that’s valiant. I personally think
that sometimes today there is an abuse
of the goodness of America. I really do.
There’s no place that does better, that
stands by the people in need. And, you
know, I think that things like that
should be respected. If somebody gives
you a chance and you make it and you
become something, it’s not all yours to
keep. You have to give something back.
Q. Your mother kept wanting to repay
Catholic Charities for their help after
you settled in New York.
A. She thought it was going to haunt
her. She thought it was building up. I
Q. After moving so much, when did
you finally feel like you’d found home?
A. When I turned 18, six years after I
came here, the first thing I did was I
applied for my citizenship. I just want-
Interview was edited and condensed.
Michael Floreak can be reached at
michaelfloreak@gmail.com.
INFO VALID 5/09/18 ONLY
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:00, 1:40,
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) G 1:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 4:30, 9:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 1:05, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55
()
4:30, 7:20, 10:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 3:15
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:50
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 1:20, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40
Continued from preceding page
A. We were Italian at home. To this day,
I speak Italian with my mother. In [Pola] there were the Italians, the fascists,
the Nazis came down, the Croatians,
and everybody was against each other.
It was kind of this neighbor against
neighbor, not unlike what’s happening
now. You know, you were afraid.
Q. Do you think being separated from
Italy is why it looms so large in your
life and career?
A. You know I actually never thought
of this until you brought it up. But I
have this need not to miss Italy and
what it’s up to. I need to go there and
see what the Italians are doing. I felt
like my home was beyond my reach,
our reach, our control. The forces
came and went kind of like the wind
and pushed us here. There was not the
appreciation for allowing different ethnicities to coexist like they did.
B o s t o n
ed to make sure that nobody’s going to
take me away from here. And I remember that as being one of the most joyous moments in my life, kind of a relief. . . . I have a home. I’m accepted. I
am like everybody else here. And from
then on, I just kind of grabbed on to
being an American in every single way
and [took] every opportunity that
came along. And I still do. You know
because, as strong as I am in the Italian [culture] . . . I am an American.
()
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
G
5
8
Stadium Seating
6
Hearing Impaired
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
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Rear Window Captioning
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 5:15, 7:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 3:40, 5:00, 7:00,
DISOBEDIENCE (R) AMC Independent 11:20, 1:20,
2:20, 4:00, 6:45, 8:45, 9:40
RBG (PG) AMC Independent G 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
10:00
A OR B (NR) AMC Independent 12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00
5 6 8 DIG
4:25, 7:05, 9:55
7:45, 10:30
www.nationalamusements.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00,
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:45
12:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 10:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:55, 3:05, 6:15, 9:20
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:45, 9:30
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:20
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent G 11:30, 1:30,
5 8 DIG
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 10:40
4:30, 7:30, 10:20
www.neaq.org
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
12:00, 3:00
OCEANS 3D: OUR BLUE PLANET (NR) 10:00, 2:00,
4:00
PANDAS 3D (G) 11:00, 1:00, 5:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (11:00, 12:00,
12:20) 4:00, 4:05, 8:00, 9:00, 9:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (10:05,
1:45, 3:00) 5:30, 7:00, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RPX G (2:00) 6:00
10:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (10:00, 1:00) 4:15, 7:35,
10:25
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (1:00, 3:50) 7:00, 10:10
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:50, 3:35) 6:45, 9:40
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) (12:45, 4:10) 7:50, 10:35
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (12:00, 2:30, 5:10) 8:00,
LEXINGTON VENUE
www.amctheatres.com
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 4:00, 6:45
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) Advance
3:00, 3:40) 7:10, 10:00, 10:40
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (11:45, 2:25, 5:05) 7:45,
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
1:30, 5:00, 7:30, 8:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RPX G (10:20)
12:30, 3:20, 4:00) 6:30, 6:50, 7:30, 10:20
4:50, 7:25, 10:05
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (12:10,
LEXINGTON
TULLY (R) 4:15, 7:00
I'M LOSING IT (NR) 7:40
BAD SAMARITAN (R) (12:40, 3:30) 6:40, 10:05
100 Independence Way
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 10:00, 12:15,
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (10:10, 1:25) 4:30, 7:30, 10:30
10:25
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (11:15, 2:15) 6:10, 9:55
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (10:10, 12:40, 3:30) 6:20,
10:45
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (11:05, 2:50) 10:20
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (11:30, 3:20) 10:35
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (10:45, 2:30) 6:30, 10:15
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
121 Grandview Rd.
5 6 DIG
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:30,
11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:00, 12:30, 1:00, 2:00, 2:30,
3:00, 3:15, 3:30, 4:00, 4:10, 4:30, 5:30, 6:05, 6:30,
7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:00, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:10,
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
www.REGmovies.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:15
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) G 7:00
5 DOL DSS
BAD SAMARITAN (R) (10:30, 1:35) 4:40, 7:40, 10:40
TULLY (R) (11:40, 2:20, 5:00) 7:40, 10:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) (11:30, 11:50,
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:15, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:30
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (R) 4:00, 8:15
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (12:20, 3:10) 6:20, 9:50
DANVERS
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 4:55, 7:20
Tickets Available G 7:00
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent G 2:10, 4:50,
Tickets Available G 7:00
5 6 8 DIG
TULLY (R) AMC Independent G 1:45, 4:20, 7:15, 9:45
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:00, 5:00, 8:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 6:00
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
TULLY (R) AMC Independent G 11:50
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
THE TROUGH (NR) AMC Independent 11:05, 1:45,
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) Advance
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
55 Boylston St.
4:40, 5:30, 7:20, 8:10, 9:50, 10:30
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
8:05
BELLINGHAM
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
BLOCKERS (R) 1:30, 4:15, 9:55
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:45, 12:30, 2:10, 3:00,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:35, 1:15, 3:55, 9:15
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 3:20, 9:25
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) 7:00
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 11:05, 1:40, 4:25, 7:15, 10:00
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:40, 1:25, 4:10, 6:55, 9:45
TRAFFIK (R) 10:45, 1:20, 3:50, 6:20, 8:50
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:30, 3:15,
7:00, 10:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERI-
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30
LITTLETON
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 10:50, 1:35, 5:45, 7:25, 10:00
BREAKING IN (PG-13) 7:00
ENCE (PG-13) 10:30, 6:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERI-
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
ENCE (PG-13) G 2:15, 9:30
www.oneilcinemas.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 10:40, 6:35
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
11:00, 2:45, 4:00, 6:30, 10:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 5 10:30, 1:00,
FURNITURE - READING
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:45, 1:00, 3:15, 5:30,
2:30, 7:10, 8:15, 9:30, 10:30
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) 5 4:45
58
8:00, 10:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) 5 10:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:45, 4:15, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 5 11:30, 3:15,
RAMPAGE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:30, 7:00
6:45
BLOCKERS (R) 11:00, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 10:35, 1:45, 7:35
READING
www.jordansimax.com
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:30, 1:00, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 5 10:25
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:15,
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 5 10:25, 12:45, 3:00, 5:25,
12:45, 3:45, 6:30, 9:00
8:05, 10:25
TULLY (R) AMC Independent G 11:30, 2:15, 4:45,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 5 4:55, 10:35
REVERE
7:30, 10:00
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 1:35, 4:00
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent G 11:00,
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 5 11:45, 2:15, 5:00, 7:55,
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
1:45, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
10:40
5 6 8 I K DIG
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:15, 1:15, 4:05, 6:45, 9:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 5 11:05, 1:40, 4:25, 7:25,
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent G 10:30, 1:30,
10:20
4:15, 7:00, 9:45
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 11:45, 2:30, 5:15, 8:00,
10:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:00,
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
ENCE (PG-13) 3:20, 6:40, 10:00
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:05, 6:20, 9:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:40
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:15,
11:15, 11:30, 11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:25, 1:50, 2:50,
3:10, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 5:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:05, 7:30,
10:30
www.amctheatres.com
12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:15, 2:00,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:35, 3:45) 7:20, 10:35
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:00, 1:15,
5:00, 7:30, 10:00
2:00, 3:00, 4:45, 5:30, 8:15, 9:00, 10:00
www.nationalamusements.com
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (12:15, 2:40) 10:30
THE MIRACLE SEASON (PG) AMC Independent 10:00,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:55, 3:10
4:10, 6:45, 9:10
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:35, 1:55, 2:25, 4:35, 5:05,
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:10, 4:55, 7:40
7:35, 9:55, 10:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00,
11:15, 11:30, 11:45, 12:45, 1:30, 2:05, 2:20, 2:50,
3:00, 3:20, 4:20, 5:00, 5:30, 6:05, 6:30, 6:35, 7:00,
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:05
8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 9:55, 10:15, 10:40
ACRIMONY (R) 9:15
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 3:30, 4:00, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00,
9:30, 10:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:40
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50
DEDHAM
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
8:00, 8:45, 9:30, 9:45, 10:10, 10:40
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 10:50, 1:30,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 10:35, 1:05, 3:45, 6:50, 9:40
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:55, 5:20, 7:45, 10:20
www.studiocinema.com
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:20, 1:40, 3:45, 7:30, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 4:30, 7:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:20, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent G 11:10, 1:50,
www.nationalamusements.com
4:30, 7:15, 10:00
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 11:05, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:35, 3:55, 7:05, 10:10
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 9:35
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:10
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) 7:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:55
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 9:05
TRAFFIK (R) 11:30, 2:05, 4:30, 6:55, 9:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 10:45, 2:20, 6:05,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:15,
11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:50, 3:20, 3:50,
4:20, 4:50, 6:10, 6:30, 6:45, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:20,
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:55, 1:45, 4:35, 7:15, 10:05
9:20
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:50, 2:25, 5:10, 7:45, 10:35
TULLY (R) 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:15
9:50, 10:05
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:35, 2:35, 4:55, 7:35,
MILLBURY
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) Advance
Tickets Available G 7:00
MAHANATI (NR) Advance Tickets Available 11:10,
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:50, 7:40
TRAFFIK (R) 5:15, 10:10
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
56
10:00
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 2:15, 10:45
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:10, 4:25, 6:55, 9:20
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) 7:00
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 10:25, 1:10, 4:00, 6:40
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 11:10, 1:45, 4:40, 7:20, 10:05
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:55, 1:40, 4:25, 7:15, 10:00
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:00, 1:35, 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
BREAKING IN (PG-13) 7:00
2:35, 6:00, 9:25
www.coolidge.org
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:30
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
SOMERVILLE
BAD SAMARITAN (R) (1:05) 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
RBG (PG) 11:45, 2:15, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 4:00, 6:45, 9:25
5 6 8 DSS
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (1:15) 4:10, 7:05, 10:05
TULLY (R) 11:30, 2:00, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 9:45
www.showcasecinemas.com
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
TULLY (R) (11:25, 2:00) 4:40, 7:20, 10:15
THE RIDER (R) 11:00, 1:30, 9:00
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) 7:00
ACHARI AMERICA YATHRA (NR) (12:15, 3:30) 10:00
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 1:45, 6:45, 10:15
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 3:30, 6:35, 9:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (12:00, 12:30,
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 11:15, 4:15
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 1:10, 4:15, 7:10, 9:55
3:30) 4:00, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:30
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:40, 3:15, 6:05, 9:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (11:30,
AN ACT OF DEFIANCE (NR) 7:30
CUBA'S FORGOTTEN JEWELS: A HAVEN IN HAVANA
1:00, 3:00) 6:30, 8:00, 10:00
(NR) 5:30
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 1:50, 4:45, 7:40, 10:20
BURLINGTON
FOXBORO
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
20 South Ave.
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
(11:50, 2:20) 5:00, 7:40, 10:05
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (11:45, 2:10) 4:45, 7:15,
5 6 DIG
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
9:40
TULLY (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 9:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (12:55, 3:50) 6:50, 9:35
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (11:35) 4:55, 10:20
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (2:05) 7:35
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:40, 3:35) 6:35, 10:25
HÉCTOR EL FATHER: CONOCERÁS LA VERDAD (NR)
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:20, 3:40) 6:55, 9:55
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:20, 9:20
5 6 I DIG
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:50
http://somervilletheatre.com/
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:15,
11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40,
4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30,
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
9:30, 10:00, 10:20
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) 11:50, 2:15,
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:40, 9:40
4:50, 10:05
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:25, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50,
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 1:10
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
www.nationalamusements.com
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 4:00, 7:20, 9:25
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 12:10, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:30, 7:25
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:10
10:25
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 10:00, 11:15,
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) 7:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:45,
11:05, 12:05, 12:35, 1:05, 1:35, 2:05, 2:30, 3:30,
4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:10, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00,
10:15, 10:45, 12:00, 12:30, 1:45, 3:45, 5:15, 7:15,
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 9:55, 10:25
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55
8:55, 9:20, 10:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 3:50
BLOCKERS (R) 9:05
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:15, 2:35, 4:50, 7:40,
1:00, 2:45, 3:15, 4:30, 6:15, 8:00, 9:45, 10:30
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 11:20, 2:00, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:35
NATICK
10:10
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:05
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 1:00
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
TULLY (R) AMC Independent G 10:20, 12:45, 3:15,
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 4:10, 9:45
5:45, 7:00, 8:10, 10:35
PUFFS: FILMED LIVE OFF BROADWAY (NR) 7:00
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:00, 12:35, 4:45, 6:40, 9:30
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 3:20, 6:20
58
OVERBOARD (PG-13) AMC Independent G 11:00, 1:40,
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 6:55, 9:50
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 12:00, 1:20, 3:05, 4:05, 6:05,
www.jordansimax.com
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
4:20, 7:05, 10:00
www.amctheatres.com
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 10:00
9:10
CAMBRIDGE
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:20, 2:00, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
FRAMINGHAM
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:10, 12:45, 3:50, 6:55,
10:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) 1:00, 2:15, 4:45,
5:15, 6:00, 8:30, 9:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 11:30, 3:15, 7:00, 10:45
TULLY (R) 5:15, 7:40, 9:50
TAUNTON
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 10:40
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 4:45, 7:45
10:15
www.artsemerson.org
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 7:15
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
www.applecinemas.com
11:00, 12:30, 2:45, 4:15, 6:30, 8:00, 10:15
102 NOT OUT (PG) 1:00, 5:35, 7:45, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:40, 9:50
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) G 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30
TULLY (R) 11:30, 1:55, 4:15, 7:15, 9:40
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 3:20, 6:40, 9:55
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
OVERBOARD (PG-13) (1:10, 3:40) 7:30, 10:15
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G (12:20, 12:45,
1:15, 3:20, 3:40) 4:10, 6:00, 6:40, 9:00, 9:20
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G (12:00,
3:00) 6:20, 7:00, 8:40, 9:40
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) (12:10, 3:15) 7:10, 10:00
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) (12:30, 3:50) 6:30, 9:30
BLUMHOUSE'S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) (1:00, 3:40)
6:10, 10:20
RAMPAGE (PG-13) (12:40) 4:40, 7:20, 10:05
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) (12:50) 4:10, 6:50, 10:10
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 10:45
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:05,
11:20, 11:35, 11:50, 12:05, 12:35, 1:05, 2:30, 2:45,
3:00, 3:15, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 6:05, 6:15, 6:30, 6:45,
7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:35, 9:45, 10:00, 10:15, 10:30,
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 3:55, 10:40
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) G 3:30, 9:30
www.amctheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:45, 9:20
BLOCKERS (R) 11:00, 4:00
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 11:25, 12:15, 1:50, 2:35,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 1:00, 2:00,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:45, 2:50, 6:00, 9:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:30
3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:30, 3:15,
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:30
7:00, 10:30
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent 1:30, 9:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) G 11:40, 1:00,
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:15,
11:45, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40,
4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:00,
10:45
4:10, 5:25, 6:35, 7:50, 10:10, 10:45
TULLY (R) AMC Independent 11:40, 2:10, 4:40, 7:10,
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) G 2:00, 4:25, 6:55, 9:25
3:00, 5:00, 8:30
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 4:05, 9:20
9:35
MAHANATHI (NR) G 6:30
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
9:30, 10:00, 10:30
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:20, 2:50, 5:15, 7:50,
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent 11:35, 2:25,
MAHANATHI (NR) G 9:30
12:15, 2:30, 4:00, 6:15, 7:45, 9:45
10:10
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 10:55, 1:40, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55
5:10, 10:30
NAA PERU SURYA (NR) G 6:20
AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 1:10, 6:45
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 10:50, 1:25, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40
BAD SAMARITAN (R) AMC Independent G 7:45
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 1:00
6:30, 9:50
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) 2:35, 5:05, 7:35, 10:05
TULLY (R) 11:25, 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:10
I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) 11:15, 2:00, 4:35, 7:25, 10:05
SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) G 3:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:00, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15
OVERBOARD (PG-13) 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50
BAD SAMARITAN (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:25
A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) 12:15, 2:35, 5:00, 7:25, 9:50
RAMPAGE (PG-13) 1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05
CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) 11:00, 1:30, 6:40
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
At Spyce, a
taste of the
future of
cooking?
uSPYCE
Continued from Page G1
runner darts friskily back and forth
along a track as hoppers dump ingredients into seven woks below. Above
each, there is a round screen that features reassuring sequential messages:
“Hi, Devra F,” “Now cooking Latin
bowl for Devra F,” “Devra F we’re completing cooking,” “Ready to plate.” The
woks turn, cooking the food and spilling it out into the waiting bowl. The
bowl spins forward, steaming volcanically, and a human returns to the
scene, calling out my name. The machinery is mesmerizing to watch, like
the board game Mouse Trap writ large.
The system is the invention of four
MIT graduates, Michael Farid, Brady
Knight, Kale Rogers, and Luke Schlueter, who refer to themselves collectively as “The Spyce Boys.” They say
the robots can serve up to 210 meals
an hour, with each meal completed in
three minutes or less. The kitchen runs
on nothing more than electricity and
water. In other words, it is efficient, in
a way humans will never be. The reduction of labor leads to a reduction in
costs. Each bowl is $7.50, about $2-$4
cheaper than those sold by competitors such as sweetgreen and Dig Inn.
Yeah, they taste pretty good, too.
The Moroccan bowl brings together
ingredients you might find simmering
in a tagine: chickpeas, tomatoes, currants, olives, preserved lemon, cilantro. They’re layered together with kale,
tomato-cucumber salad, the grain
freekeh, and a dollop of yogurt. That
these flavors were combined by machines doesn’t make them any less
timeless or soulful. The one issue here
is the aggressive spicing. The dish
tastes the way a candle shop in a hippie town that is home to a small liberal
arts college smells. The addition of
pomegranate seeds for an extra $1
helps offset the spice problem, however. And it’s easier to tweak a program
than it is to convince your grandmother to lay off the allspice a bit.
The Latin bowl is even better, although it deserves a more-precise
name. This is a burrito bowl: chicken,
black beans, cabbage slaw, corn, rad-
PHOTOS BY ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Customers place their orders at Spyce. Below: an automated wok cooks a customer’s order, and executive
chef Sam Benson garnishes a finished dish.
ish, and avocado crema over brown
rice. The slaw is pleasingly spicy, the
whole bowl harmonious. There’s real
flavor here.
There’s an irony in calling something made by robots in less than three
minutes the Hearth bowl; it’s like calling a television “the fireplace” because
that’s where the family gathers. Regardless, this homey combination is a
favorite. Brussels sprouts and sweet
potatoes are glazed in balsamic, served
up with kale, quinoa, and freekeh,
topped with yogurt and chopped
Granny Smith apples. It is appealingly
simple, autumnal, and nicely balanced. It’s real food, like you once
would have made yourself before robots stepped in and did it faster and
cheaper.
And here’s where I start to feel uneasy.
I’m not worried about a Kubrick
scenario wherein the robots decide
that pomegranate seeds actually don’t
belong atop my Moroccan bowl — “I’m
sorry, Devra F, I’m afraid I can’t do
that.” When it comes to matters of
taste, we (still) need people: The Spyce
inventors enlisted famed chef Daniel
Boulud, who is culinary director of and
an investor in the company. In turn, he
brought in Sam Benson, formerly at
Cafe Boulud and now Spyce’s executive
chef. Benson is the one who thinks
about the interplay of balsamic, fall
vegetables, and bright, tart apple. We
cannot (yet) grope our way to good recipes without human input. This model
For more restaurants and
diners, it’s the last straw
uSTRAWS
Continued from Page G1
wind up in landfills, litter streets, and
add to the estimated 8.5 million metric
tons of plastic debris in oceans annually,” the film warns.
Or up the noses of innocent reptiles.
Nunez considers straw-elimination
a low-hanging fruit. Customers can refuse straws; restaurants that specialize
in slurp-friendly drinks can opt for
straws made of recyclable materials.
“Straws are the gateway issue. It’s
an easy thing to change. It’s tangible,”
Nunez says.
Harvard University graduate student Emma Cohen cofounded FinalStraw to make it easier. Her newly
launched Kickstarter campaign raises
funds for a stainless steel, washable,
reusable straw that fits onto a keychain and comes with a lifetime guarantee. Cohen worked in the pollution
prevention department at Los Alamos
National Laboratories, and she got the
idea after traveling in Thailand and
spotting so many plastic straws
washed ashore. (Advocacy organization Ocean Conservancy ranks straws
as one of the top sources of litter on
beaches.)
“I think that straws have become
such a hot topic because 98 percent of
the time, you don’t ask for a straw. It
just gets put in your drink. For someone like myself, who cares about waste
reduction, it felt like an assault. It felt
like I was getting assaulted with a
straw I didn’t want, against my will,”
Cohen says. The campaign has raised
more than $800,000 in less than two
weeks.
Restaurants are taking note. Thirst
Boston, an education organization
that hosts cocktail festivals, has encouraged restaurants to pledge to transition from single-use plastic straws by
next year.
Quincy’s soon-to-open Idle Hour
won’t even offer plastic straws — or
cocktail napkins or coasters, for that
matter. (The bar is made from marinegrade teak, which owner Mathew
Freid says won’t stain as easily.)
“There was an online video with a
turtle and a straw stuck through it,
and it hit home for a lot of people,”
Freid says. “My chef and I have both
worked in restaurants for years, and
we agree that there’s so much waste.
Any incremental difference that can be
made is a difference.”
Plus, he’ll save some money: He estimates that every 5,000 straws cost
$100 or so.
At Cambridge’s Café ArtScience,
bar director Tenzin Samdo considers
himself a straw crusader. In November, he learned about the Last Plastic
Straw movement after hosting a “Last
Supper” dinner with former White
House chef and food policy adviser
Sam Kass.
“He designed a dinner around what
we’d be eating 50 years from now. It
was fascinating for me. It blew my
mind. It’s not that far away, but things
like shellfish, a lot of the species, a lot
of the animals we won’t be able to consume — we take them for granted” because of plastic pollution in oceans, he
says.
According to the Plastic Pollution
Coalition, oceans will contain more
plastic than fish by weight by 2050.
“In only the past 20 years, people
have come to expect plastic straws in
every drink, in an example of extreme
waste being generated for minimal
convenience,” Samdo wrote in a widely
shared Instagram post. In the post, he
pledged to stop using plastic straws,
switching to metal, bamboo, or recycled paper.
He carries his own metal straw
when out to eat. He also hosts seminars at his restaurant for industry colleagues eager to make the switch.
Some alcohol brands sponsor these
sessions, he says, hoping to discourage
plastic use themselves.
“We’re throwing 47 tons of garbage
per minute into the ocean,” Samdo
says. “It’s insane.”
At the South End’s Frenchie, owner
Sandrine Rossi — a former environmental engineer — will say au revoir to
her saucy pink plastic flamingo straws
this month.
“One more weekend, then it’s finished. We’re trying to be more conscious of these things. And the video of
the turtles, with the plastic straws in
their noses!” she says. “All plastic is
bad.”
Rossi hopes to eliminate straws entirely, after having implemented some
CHRIS HAYNES
This month, South End’s
Frenchie is ending its use
of saucy pink plastic
flamingo straws.
paper straws with little success.
“People were complaining all the
time about paper straws. Once they’re
in liquid for 20 to 30 minutes, they become mushy. My stance is, ‘Don’t use a
straw anymore.’ In Europe, we barely
use straws. At least in France, only kids
drink from straws. But here we like ice
a lot, which makes it difficult to drink
from a glass.”
Indeed, not all drinks lend themselves to straw-free slurping. At the
Back Bay’s Revolution Juice, which
specializes in healthy smoothies,
straws are usually essential.
“Straws are a tough thing,” says
owner Heather Costa. “Most people aren’t used to just drinking out of a cup.”
The store sells $5 metal straws ($7
with a cleaning brush) to discourage
plastic straw use.
“It’s an investment,” Costa says.
Cambridge’s ArtBar will roll out
a new drink menu this season and discontinue plastic straws entirely. Revamped cocktails are designed for sipping, not sucking. If customers request
a straw, they’ll get a biodegradable paper one.
This plan is a bit more expensive
but worth it, says beverage director Julio Henriquez.
“You get 2,000 straws for, let’s say, a
box of $30, whereas you get 500 paper
straws for the same price,” Henriquez
says. “But we believe in the movement.
We want to do our part.”
He relocated from California in late
2015, where this was already par for
the course. He says it’s time Boston
caught up and that the surcharge on
checkout bags at retail establishments
in Cambridge helped normalize the issue.
“I’m originally from San Francisco.
For quite some time, I wanted to do it
here. I tried to implement it before,
but people weren’t ready. Now, we
charge for bags in Cambridge. Now,
people are getting more into a completely green movement. . . . It’s a
movement I can easily say is moving
from the West Coast to the East Coast,”
he says.
True enough, this isn’t a completely
new idea. Back in 2011, then-9-yearold Milo Cress started the “Be Straw
Free” campaign, urging restaurateurs
in his native Burlington, Vt., to ask
customers if they wanted straws instead of reflexively providing them.
Now, though, thanks to movies like
“Straws” and that viral turtle video,
more restaurants are taking notice. On
could free people up from some of the
tasks of cookery and give them time to
focus on creativity. In Japan, according
to the Wall Street Journal, dairy farms
are starting to use robots to milk the
cows. “Installing the robot made more
time for me,” says farmer Yoshie Kato.
Now she also makes and sells cheese.
But won’t these robots take jobs
from humans? I’m not that worried
about this either. One of the biggest
challenges facing the restaurant industry right now is a labor shortage. A few
reliable robots in the kitchen might
come as a relief to restaurateurs engaged in the constant struggle to find
and retain employees.
For comparison’s sake, I went to a
sweetgreen the day after I had lunch at
Spyce. My salad was so gritty I could
barely eat it. And employees ignored
me just long enough to make me miss
Spyce’s attentive robots. Machines are
free of human bias — circuit boards
just aren’t wired to bend over backward for one subset of customer while
calling the cops on another.
So no, it’s not the robots I’m worried about. It’s the cooking, that most
human of human tasks. Spyce’s $7.50
bowls are generously portioned. I can
easily get two meals out of each, although your mileage may vary. At that
price point, why would anyone go grocery shopping, mess up the kitchen,
expend valuable time?
Because these things have meaning. Centuries of it. The real hearth is
where we come together, to chop vegetables side by side in companionable
silence, to talk while we wait for the
water to boil, to taste the sauce and
agree it needs more salt. We put what
we have made on the table, and we sit
and we eat. This is slowed-down time,
resonant time, time together, and
standing in line while we look at our
phones is no kind of replacement.
Then again, on opening day at
Spyce, the street musician Keytar Bear
stands outside, entertaining the waiting customers. Inside, people are making up funny fake names for display on
the round screens. Friendly greeters
and customers fall into conversation,
and strangers bond over their inability
to reach the cups, stored on a high
shelf.
You can take the humans out of the
equation, but the humanity isn’t going
anywhere.
241 Washington St., Downtown
Crossing, Boston, www.spyce.com.
Open daily 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
Devra First can be reached at
devra.first@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @devrafirst.
Twitter, #skipthestraw and #stopsucking have become popular hashtags.
Speaking of sucking: At the RitzCarlton, Boston’s Avery Bar, guests can
request cocktails with glassware that
have built-in straws.
“It’s also called a vampire glass,
just because you draw out the libation
the way a vampire would draw blood,”
says restaurant director Shiobanne Olivero.
But hopefully the transition won’t
be painful for most customers. The
Fenway ’s Eastern Standard just
switched to metal straws, and sibling
restaurants, such as Island Creek Oyster Bar, are now making the switch.
This feels like a happy compromise.
They use a recyclable, washable
straw introduced by restaurant supplier Cocktail Kingdom. These polypropylene straws “are a fraction of the cost
of metal straws, and not such a departure from a single-use straw,” says bar
manager Jared Sadoian. “It’s not as jarring for guests to see but different
enough to spark a conversation.”
After all, sometimes it’s just not feasible to go straw-free. Some drinks really are best slurped, not sipped.
“Tiki drinks can be challenging.
One cocktail, the Penicillin, has a float
of smoky Scotch. With a straw at the
bottom, it’s this refreshing, gingery,
honey-lemon treat, and the Scotch infuses itself through the drink. If you
sip it, you just get a shot of Scotch,” Sadoian says.
Ideally, such woes are few and far
between. And if customers can’t suck it
up?
“You’d be surprised. Sometimes
people don’t get it. . . . We do have a secret stash of straws, by request only,”
says Meghann Ward, who owns Tapestry in the Fenway. “I always think,
‘What do you need a straw for, really,
unless you have done-up lipstick?’ Other than that, there really doesn’t seem
to be a need.”
“There are perils,” Idle Hour’s Freid
admits, laughing. “The worst thing
that happens is you get hit by a little
bit of ice. The only time I use a straw is
with a milkshake.”
And if straws become outmoded,
other plastic items just might follow
suit, Nunez says.
“The great thing is that you can’t
talk about straws without talking
about other items, like utensils. It’s the
material we’re after,” she says.
Kara Baskin can be reached at
kara.baskin@globe.com.
T h e
G8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
ASK AMY
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Keeping kids away from a troubled teen
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP
Ryan Murphy’s next show is tentatively titled “Consent.”
Series to mine #MeToo movement
Here’s a sentence I’ve used many, many times before: Ryan Murphy has another anthology series in the works. And this time, the
series revolves around a timely theme.
The guy behind “Feud,” “American Crime Story,” “American
Horror Story,” and the upcoming “The Politician” is planning to
take on the #MeToo movement with a show tentatively called
“Consent.” Murphy, who talked about it in a New Yorker profile,
says “every episode would explore a different story, starting with an
insider account of the Weinstein company.” The show would also
take on the Kevin Spacey case. As with the anthology series “Black
Mirror,” each episode of “Consent” would be written and directed
by a different person.
Will the show be for “Netflix”? Murphy’s headline-making
$300 million deal with the streaming service begins July 1. He has
already committed “The Politician,” a comedy that will portray a
different campaign each season, and “Ratched,” about the “One
Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” nurse, to Netflix. And he is premiering “Pose,” an FX show about the New York drag scene, on June 3.
Q. I am a mother of two young children: a
daughter, age 4, and a 1-year-old boy.
They currently go to my husband’s cousin’s house for child care every day. My oldest has been going there for over two
years, along with our nephew and niece
(who are the same age). Our family member (along with her helpers) provides
wonderful care. I know they are safe and
well looked after.
Every summer, another family member
sends her three foster children to the same
house for child care. This was their day
care from before they were school age. Although these children are older than ours,
they are not allowed to be at home under
the supervision of the oldest child, a 13year-old boy, because he has shown behavioral issues.
He was temporarily removed from his
home once over violent threats toward his
younger brother, and has been ordered to
attend mandatory counseling, as he has
been making violent statements in his
school setting. He has also sent text messages to his female classmates stating he is
going to violate them, sexually — this very
much worries me.
I don’t know what to do if I find out he
will be going to our day care for summer
vacation again. I feel I will offend our family member by insinuating that something
could happen to my children under her
watch, and I feel the rest of the family
would think I’m being unreasonable. This
boy took a shine to my daughter last year
over these summer months. I’m now worried about him being that close to my children every day.
Am I overreacting? What is the best
7:00pm
WGBH Greater
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Recent bird sightings on Cape Cod (as
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Audubon Society.
Sightings from Race Point in Provincetown included a mix of lingering winter
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snowy owl, along with new spring arrivals
like parasitic jaegers, common terns, a roseate tern, and sooty shearwaters. Other
species included a black-headed gull, a
Thayer’s type Iceland gull, and a mew gull.
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HD TV-PG-L
(10:01) Flip Wars
HD TV-PG-L NEW
Insane Pools (CC)
HD TV-PG
Storage
Wars
Storage
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(11:05) ★★★ The
Outlaw Josey Wales
Insane Pools (CC)
HD TV-PG-L
Last Man Last Man
OutFront HD NEW
South
South
Park
Park
★★ Mr. & Mrs. Sm. (2005): Married assassins. HD TV-14-DLSV
Cooper NEW
Cooper NEW
CNN Tonight HD
South
South
South
South
South
South
Park
Park
Park
Park
Park
Park
CSPAN
CSPAN 2
Dest. America
Discovery
DIY
E!
Fit & Health
Food
(10:00) U.S. House of Live.
Politics and Public Policy Today
U.S.
Public Affairs Events: Public affairs events, congressional hearings, speeches, and interviews.
Ghost Brothers
Ghost Brothers
Ghost Brothers
Ghost Brothers
Ghost Brothers
Misfit Garage
Misfit Garage NEW Misfit Garage NEW Sticker Shock NEW Misfit Garage
Stone
Stone
Stone
Stone
Stone
Stone
WoodWork WoodWork Stone
Stone
E! News NEW
Botched HD TV-14 Botched NEW
Botched HD TV-14 E! News NEW
24/7
24/7
24/7
24/7
24/7
24/7
24/7
24/7
24/7
24/7
Iron Chef Gauntlet Iron Chef G: The
Iron Chef G (CC) HD Iron Chef America
Iron Chef America
TV-G NEW
(CC) HD TV-G
(CC) HD TV-G
chefs must adapt.
(CC) HD TV-G
Fox Movies
Fox News
FUSE
FX
Hallmark
Home &
Garden
Night at/Museum
Cloudy Chance 2 (2013) (CC) TV-PG
MacCallum NEW
Carlson NEW
Hannity HD NEW
Malcolm Malcolm Parkers Parkers Parkers Parkers
White House Down (2013): A father fights terrorists. TV-14-LSV
Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man Middle
Middle
Property Brothers
Property Bros: With Property Bros (CC)
(CC) HD TV-G
a baby on the way. HD TV-G NEW
(9:55) Cloudy Chance 2 (2013) (CC) TV-PG
Ingraham Angle HD Fox News@Night
Malcolm Malcolm Malcolm Malcolm
Americans NEW
(11:13) Americans
Middle
Middle
G. Girls
G. Girls
House H. House
Boise Boys (CC) HD
TV-G NEW
NEW
NEW
History
American Pickers
(CC) HD TV-PG
American Pickers
(CC) HD TV-PG
HD
Amer. Pickers (CC)
TV-PG NEW
(10:03) American
Pickers HD TV-PG
(11:03) American
Pickers HD TV-PG
HLN
HSN
ID
Crime & Justice
Coin Collector TV-G
Disappeared (CC): A
teen goes missing.
Forensic Forensic
Coin Collector TV-G
See No Evil (CC) HD
TV-14-V
Forensic Forensic
Home In. TV-G
See No Evil (CC) HD
TV-14 NEW
Forensic Forensic
Healthy Home TV-G
Murder Chose Me
TV-14-DLSV NEW
Forensic Forensic
Michael Todd TV-G
See No Evil (CC) HD
TV-14-V
IFC
(5:45) ★★ Evan
Almighty TV-PG-DL
(7:45) ★★ Uncle Buck (1989) (CC): Oaf
helps his brother. HD TV-PG-LSV
Brock.
NEW
Lifetime
Lifetime Mov.
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
Little Women: LA
(6:00) A Lover
Hardball Live. HD
Jersey Shore
Border Wars (CC)
HD TV-PG-L
LittleW. NEW
LittleW. NEW
Pregnant at 17 (2016) (CC) HD TV-14-DSV
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Jersey Shore
Jersey Shore
Life and Death Row Life and Death Row
(CC) HD NEW
(CC) HD
Partner NEW
Little Women: LA
Fifteen & Preg.: Parents deal with a crisis.
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Jersey Shore
Jersey Shore
America Inside Out America Inside Out
(CC) HD NEW
(CC) HD
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
Incredible Dr. Pol
National Parks
Mighty Northwest
The Take Business The Take Business necn News 9PM
I'll/Know No Reservations (CC): Mismatched chefs fall in love.
Police Women: Julie 20/20 on OWN (CC) 20/20 on OWN (CC)
goes undercover.
HD TV-14-V
HD TV-14-V
Oxygen
Paramount
QVC
Science
Sundance
NCIS (CC) TV-14
NCIS (CC) TV-14
NCIS (CC) TV-PG
NCIS (CC) TV-14
NCIS (CC) TV-14
★★ Fifth Element (1997): A cabbie races to save Earth. TV-14-V
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Molly Color. Live.
In the Kitchen With David - PM Edition (CC) Live. HD
Samsung Live. HD
BattleBots (CC) HD TV-PG NEW
(9:02) BattleBots (CC) HD TV-PG NEW
(11:06) BattleBots
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
(CC) TV-PG-LV
(CC) TV-14-DLV
(CC) TV-14-LV
(CC) TV-PG-LV
(CC) TV-PG-DLV
(6:30) Mad Max: Fury (2015) HD TV-14
The Expanse NEW
Krypton NEW
Mad Max/Thund.
Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Full Fr.
Conan NEW
★★ Lost Tribe (1949) TV-PG
★★ Mark of Gorilla
(6:30) Tarzan/Safari ★★ Jungle Jim (1948) TV-PG
600-lb NEW
My 600-lb Life (CC) HD TV-PG NEW
Skin Tight NEW
My 600-lb Life
NBA Playoff (CC): A conference semifinal. Live. HD NBA Playoff (CC): A conference semifinal. Live. HD
Expedition Unk.
Expedition Unk.
Expedit. NEW
Legendry Legendry Expedition Unk.
Carbon. Carbon. Carbon. Carbon. Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Comedy Comedy
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Mom
Mom
King/Qu. King/Qu.
Cosby
Cosby
UnSung HD TV-14
UnSung HD TV-14
UnSung HD TV-14
G. Times G. Times
Colony (CC) HD TV- (11:01) ★★★
(7:05) ★★★ Jurassic Park (1993) (CC): Engineered dinosaurs
14 NEW
Jurassic Park TV-PG
run amok on a remote island. HD TV-PG
Black Ink Crew
(6:21) Wimbledon
Law & Order TV-14
VH-1
WAM
WE
Spy Kids/Time (2011) HD TV-PG
Nella
Sunny
Peppa
Peppa
The 700 Club (CC)
HD TV-G
9:00pm
CMT
CNN
Comedy
Central
(6:00) ★★★★ Lion
King (1994) (CC) HD
Spon
SpongBob
Bubble
Shimmer
(9:01) Puss in Boots (2011) (CC): A cat
fights to save his town. HD TV-PG-V
Storage
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BASIC CABLE
Storage Storage Storage
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NEW
NEW
Real Housewives of Housewives/NYC
NYC (CC) HD TV-14 HD TV-14 NEW
Live From The Players (CC) Live. HD TV-G Live From The Players (CC): Analysis and interviews. HD TV-G
NHL Live Stanley Cup Playoff (CC) Live. HD
NHL Overtime Live. Champ.
MLB Baseball (CC): Boston at N.Y. Yankees. Live. HD
Innings
Red Sox Sports
Sports
FAMILY
Gumball Gumball King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers Burgers Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Bunk'd
DuckTale Gravity
Bunk'd
Bunk'd
Stuck/
Stuck/
Raven's Bunk'd
Bunk'd
HD TV-G HD TV-G
Falls
HD TV-G HD TV-G Middle
Middle
Home
HD TV-G
Rookie
8:30pm
Housewives/NYC:
Tensions boil over.
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
Rookie
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8:00pm
Bravo
NFL Live (CC) HD
Rookie
7:30pm
Powered by
Blue Planet II TV-G Blue Planet II TV-G Blue Planet II TV-G
Sparkle (2012) (CC): Three sisters become singers and take
Motown by storm. HD TV-PG-DV
ESPN 2
Classic College
Basketball (CC)
For more information about bird
sightings or to report sightings, call
the Massachusetts Audubon Society
at 781-259-8805 or go to
www.massaudubon.org.
BBC America
BET
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
Classic College Basketball (CC): From
2001: Notre Dame at Indiana.
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
owl in Cotuit, a continuing least bittern
and a short-billed dowitcher at Bell’s Neck
conservation area in West Harwich, 21
common murres in the center of Cape Cod
Bay, and lingering snowy owls in Wellfleet,
Provincetown, and Chatham.
Specials
Animal Planet Insane Pools (CC)
HD TV-PG-L
Classic College Basketball (CC): From
1986: Indiana at Notre Dame.
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
Newly arrived migrants included green
herons, willets, broad-winged hawks, Baltimore and orchard orioles, Eastern kingbirds, house wrens, gray catbirds, Eastern
towhees, and various warblers, including
ovenbirds, prairie warblers, Northern parulas, American redstarts, and black-andwhite warblers.
Other sightings around the Cape included a hooded warbler in Pocasset and
another at Wellfleet Bay sanctuary, snow
goose in Hyannisport, a sora and a barred
(5:25) 3:10 to Yuma ★★★ Open Range (2003) (CC): Cowboys take on a land baron
(2007) TV-14
in the 1880s. HD TV-14-DLV
ESPN Classic
Nickelodeon
Noggin
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
AMC
MLB Baseball (CC): Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees.
From Yankee Stadium. Live. HD
Famous in Love HD
TV-14 NEW
Q. “Upset Niece” was insulted because her
aunt didn’t disclose that she has cancer.
I have a chronic illness. I don’t always
keep my sisters, nieces, nephews, and extended family in the loop because it is a
very personal struggle.
In addition to the physical realities of
the illness, there are mental repercussions
to being ill, and it is an exhausting state in
which to live sometimes.
ALSO PRIVATE
A. I’ve heard from many people who say
that it is simply too exhausting to deal
with others’ feelings, questions and opinions, while they are also wrestling with serious health challenges.
Storage
Wars
ESPN
Freeform
these “I think I wanna tr y again”
thoughts, now that we’re both older and
realize what a special relationship we had.
Do you see her coming back to me
soon?
ANXIOUS
A. Sorry, but I left my crystal ball in my
other jacket. I can’t predict anyone’s behavior.
If you two decide to try to reunite, I
hope you will do so very carefully. Try
“dating” before running together at high
speed. Understand that, even though you
are both more mature, the issues that
caused you to divorce likely won’t have
gone away. Have you both changed?
Be very cautious around your son. It
would be an emotional roller coaster for
him if you two came together, only to split
again.
A&E
(6:00) Early Edition
(CC) Live. HD
SEC Storied (CC): The story of Rookie
football's Manning family. HD
Q. My ex-wife and I have been divorced for
eight years. We have a 9-year-old son together.
We both have recently been having
7:00pm
Comcast
SportsNet
Cartoon
Disney
Best of Felger &
Mazz (CC) HD
way to deal with this?
WORRIED MOTHER
A. Three additional children with this
wide age range sounds like a huge challenge for a day care provider; I can’t imagine many 13-year-olds who would do well
in an all-day environment which includes
his own siblings, as well as preschoolers
and at least one toddler. It’s an extreme
age range, and this does not sound like a
good situation for him. Given what you report, it also doesn’t sound like a good situation for the younger children. I agree
with your concern.
You should inquire about this summer.
Will the older boy be present (perhaps
they’ve found a specialized program for
him)? If the older boy is going to be present, you should express your concerns,
and all of the adults involved should put
their heads together to try to find a workable solution. You might need to find another day care for the summer.
When dealing with family members
about this, keep in mind that some people
automatically assume a defensive position, even when they’re not being attacked. Your tone should be neutral and
focused on a solution. Your foster nephew
is going through an extremely tough
patch, and you should express compassion for him. But your own children’s wellbeing is on the line, and you will have to
be stalwart, steady and focused — always
— on their safety.
BIRD SIGHTINGS
Wednesday May 9, 2018
2
W E D N E S D A Y, M A Y 9 , 2 0 1 8
The Blue Planet
Blue Planet II TV-G
★ Are We There Yet? (2005): A man takes
a road trip. HD TV-PG
Vanderpump (CC)
TV-14
HD
Real H.
★★ Mr. & Mrs. Sm.
CNN Tonight HD
Daily
Klepper
NEW
NEW
★★★ Galaxy Quest (1999): Scifi comedy. HD TV-PG-LV
Mighty Northwest
necn News 10Pm
Wine Show TV-14
20/20 on OWN (CC)
HD TV-14-V
Black Ink Crew
Black NEW
Hip Hop Hip Hop
★★★ Surf's Up (2007) TV-Y7
(9:27) ★★★ Edward Scisso.
Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14 Law & Order TV-14
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
Watch
NEW
National Parks
necn News 11PM
★★★★ Glory TV-14
20/20 on OWN (CC)
HD TV-14-V
Black Ink Crew
(11:13) This Is It
Law & Order TV-14
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