close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The New York Times - 8 May 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
Late Edition
Today, partial sunshine, seasonable,
high 72. Tonight, mostly clear, low
54. Tomorrow, a good deal of sunshine, milder in the afternoon, high
74. Weather map is on Page A20.
VOL. CLXVII . . . No. 57,956
$3.00
NEW YORK, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
© 2018 The New York Times Company
REPORTS OF ABUSE
SPUR RESIGNATION
OF SCHNEIDERMAN
Women Say New York Attorney General
Struck and Choked Them
By DANNY HAKIM and VIVIAN WANG
MERIDITH KOHUT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
A Village Ravaged by an Epidemic
In the remote Orinoco Delta region of eastern Venezuela, AIDS is leaving behind widows and threatening an entire people. Page A8.
European Allies Say Trump Is Likely to Scrap Iran Nuclear Deal
By DAVID E. SANGER
and STEVEN ERLANGER
WASHINGTON — President
Trump is expected to announce on
Tuesday that he is withdrawing
the United States from the Iran
nuclear deal, European diplomats
said after concluding that they
had failed to convince him that reneging on America’s commitment
to the pact could cast the West into
new confrontation with Tehran.
If the diplomats are correct, the
announcement will be the most
consequential national security
decision of Mr. Trump’s 15 months
in office — though it could be
eclipsed in coming weeks by his
direct negotiation with North Korea’s leader over surrendering its
nuclear arsenal.
One senior European diplomat
who has been deeply involved in
trying to persuade Mr. Trump to
stay in the deal told reporters on
Monday the chance that the president would keep the agreement
intact was “very small.”
At the heart of the deal to limit
Iran’s nuclear program, which
was reached in July 2015 after
more than two and a half years of
negotiation, lay a bold trade.
The West would end three decades of sanctions and isolation of
Tehran that had crippled the country’s economy and fueled domestic impatience with its clerical
leaders. In return, Iran agreed to
ship roughly 97 percent of its nuclear fuel out of the country, and
DIGGING UP DIRT Two advocates
of the Iran deal were targets of a
private investigation. PAGE A6
forgo production of nuclear fuel,
even for ostensibly peaceful purposes.
The negotiation with Iran was
the signature foreign policy
achievement of the Obama administration, and throughout the 2016
campaign Mr. Trump called it a
“disaster” and “insane.”
But for more than a year, he was
reluctantly persuaded by advisers that it was better than any alternative, and that the United
States had no Plan B if it was the
Continued on Page A6
Mr. Schneiderman, 63, denied
abusing the women, saying in a
statement: “In the privacy of intimate relationships, I have engaged in role-playing and other
consensual sexual activity. I have
not assaulted anyone. I have
never engaged in nonconsensual
sex, which is a line I would not
cross.”
But not long after the allegations were made public, many of
his allies, including Gov. Andrew
M. Cuomo, who like Mr. Schneiderman is a Democrat, called for
him to step down.
“My personal opinion is that,
given the damning pattern of facts
and corroboration laid out in the
article, I do not believe it is possible for Eric Schneiderman to continue to serve as attorney general,” Mr. Cuomo said.
The call was echoed by Senator
Kirsten E. Gillibrand, who led the
charge to oust Al Franken from
the Senate. “The violent actions
described by multiple women in
Continued on Page A23
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Eric T. Schneiderman said he
contested the allegations.
Lavish Security
Deeply Versed
In Spy Agency, To Shield Pruitt
And Dark Era From Questions
Coming Soon:
Bitcoin Trades
On Wall Street
By NATHANIEL POPPER
SAN FRANCISCO — Some of
the biggest names on Wall Street
are warming up to Bitcoin, a virtual currency that for nearly a decade has been consigned to the unregulated fringes of the financial
world.
The parent company of the New
York Stock Exchange has been
working on an online trading platform that would allow large investors to buy and hold Bitcoin,
according to emails and documents viewed by The New York
Times and four people briefed on
the effort who asked to remain
anonymous because the plans
were still confidential.
The news of the virtual exchange, which has not been reported before, came after Goldman Sachs went public with its intention to open a Bitcoin trading
unit — most likely the first of its
kind at a Wall Street bank.
The moves by Goldman and Intercontinental Exchange, or ICE,
the parent company of the New
York Stock Exchange, mark a dramatic shift toward the mainstream for a digital token that has
been known primarily for its underworld associations and status
as a high-risk, speculative investment.
The new interest among Wall
Street power brokers also represents a surprising new chapter in
Continued on Page A17
Eric T. Schneiderman, the New
York State attorney general who
rose to prominence as an antagonist of the Trump administration,
abruptly resigned on Monday
night hours after The New Yorker
reported that four women had accused him of physically assaulting
them.
“It’s been my great honor and
privilege to serve as attorney general for the people of the State of
New York,” Mr. Schneiderman
said in a statement. “In the last
several hours, serious allegations,
which I strongly contest, have
been made against me.
“While these allegations are unrelated to my professional conduct or the operations of the office,
they will effectively prevent me
from leading the office’s work at
this critical time. I therefore resign my office, effective at the
close of business on May 8, 2018.”
His resignation represented a
stunning fall for a politician who
had also assumed a prominent
role in the #MeToo movement.
Two of the women who spoke to
the magazine, Michelle Manning
Barish and Tanya Selvaratnam,
said they had been choked and hit
repeatedly by Mr. Schneiderman.
Both said they had sought medical
treatment. Another woman, a lawyer, said she was slapped violently
across the face. A fourth woman
also said she had similar experiences.
All the women in the article,
who had been romantically involved with Mr. Schneiderman,
said the violence was not consensual.
DAMON WINTER/THE NEW YORK TIMES
‘Heavenly Bodies’ Appear at the Met
The singer Rihanna wore an outfit inspired by Catholicism to the Costume Institute Gala. Page A22.
Trump Wades Into a Race, at McConnell’s Urging
By JONATHAN MARTIN
WASHINGTON — President
Trump intervened Monday in the
West Virginia Republican Senate
primary, pleading with voters a
day before the election to oppose
the former mine operator Don
Blankenship, and signaling Republican anxiety over the
prospect of forfeiting yet another
red-state Senate race.
Mr. Trump’s decision to speak
out came after Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, whom Mr.
Blankenship has targeted with
deeply personal attacks against
his wife’s ethnicity, urged the
president to weigh in against Mr.
Blankenship’s candidacy, according to Republican officials familiar
with the conversation.
Mr. Trump quickly agreed, suggesting in a tweet that a victory by
Mr. Blankenship would lead to a
reprise of the embarrassing loss
Roy S. Moore suffered last year in
Alabama, a reliably Republican
stronghold.
“Don Blankenship, currently
Continued on Page A14
By PETER BAKER
and MATTHEW ROSENBERG
By ERIC LIPTON
and LISA FRIEDMAN
When President Trump picked
Gina Haspel to run the Central Intelligence Agency, he opted for a
seasoned veteran of the nation’s
spy apparatus, a career professional removed from the partisan
skirmishes of recent years who
had the respect of many fellow intelligence officers.
But Ms. Haspel’s greatest
strength as a nominee, her extensive record, has become her greatest weakness as critics pick apart
her role in some of the agency’s
darkest chapters involving torture and secret prisons, a history
that will be front and center at her
much-anticipated confirmation
hearing on Wednesday before the
Senate Intelligence Committee.
Her nomination nearly unraveled last week because of that
record when White House aides
examined for the first time C.I.A.
message logs that made clear just
how accepting she had been of
since disavowed interrogation
techniques. Ms. Haspel briefly
contemplated withdrawing for
fear that the president’s team
would not give her its full support,
according to current and former
officials. She changed her mind
only after Mr. Trump and top aides
reassured her.
In a Twitter post on Monday, Mr.
Trump signaled his eagerness to
Continued on Page A16
WASHINGTON — It was supposed to be a town hall meeting
where Iowa ranchers could ask
questions directly of Scott Pruitt,
the head of the Environmental
Protection Agency. But when the
agency learned that anyone
would be free to ask anything, officials decided to script the questions themselves.
“My sincere apologies,” an
E.P.A. official wrote to the rancher
who would be moderating the
event. “We cannot do open q&a
from the crowd.” She then proposed several simple questions
for him to ask Mr. Pruitt, including: “What has it been like to work
with President Trump?”
Details about the December
event, and dozens of other official
appearances from Mr. Pruitt’s
scandal-plagued first year at the
E.P.A., have until now been hidden
from public view as a result of an
extraordinary effort by Mr. Pruitt
and his staff to maintain strict secrecy about the bulk of his daily
schedule.
But a new cache of emails offers
a detailed look inside the agency’s
aggressive efforts to conceal his
activities as a public servant.
The more than 10,000 documents, made public as part of a
Freedom of Information lawsuit
by the Sierra Club, show that the
Continued on Page A15
NATIONAL A12-18
SPORTSTUESDAY B6-10
ARTS C1-8
SCIENCE TIMES D1-6
EDITORIAL, OP-ED A24-25
Soaring Economy’s Sore Spots
Cheered Despite His Past
The Nudes Weren’t on Pedestals
Ships Unearthed in Virginia
Michelle Goldberg
California’s economy has skyrocketed,
but not without inflicting pain. Paralyzing traffic and high housing costs are
among the drawbacks.
PAGE A12
Luke Heimlich, one of the best pitchers
in college baseball, pleaded guilty to
molesting his 6-year-old niece — but he
says the crime never happened. PAGE B6
In association with a nudist group, the
Palais de Tokyo in Paris held a tour of
exhibits for nude visitors only. (Actually,
they did keep their shoes on.)
PAGE C1
Excavation for a development in
Alexandria’s Old Town district revealed
the bones of ships that had been scuttled to expand the coastline.
PAGE D6
PAGE A24
U(D54G1D)y+=!;!$!#!{
A2
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
A. G. SULZBERGER
Publisher
NEWS
EDITORIAL
DEAN BAQUET Executive Editor
JAMES BENNET Editorial Page Editor
JOSEPH KAHN Managing Editor
JAMES DAO Deputy Editorial Page Editor
Founded in 1851
Likike mo
mother, lilike da
daughter
REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN Deputy Managing Editor
ADOLPH S. OCHS
Publisher 1896-1935
KATHLEEN KINGSBURY Deputy Editorial Page Editor
TOM BODKIN Creative Director
CLIFFORD LEVY Deputy Managing Editor
BUSINESS
ARTHUR HAYS SULZBERGER
Publisher 1935-1961
MATTHEW PURDY Deputy Managing Editor
REBECCA CORBETT Assistant Managing Editor
ROLAND A. CAPUTO Chief Financial Officer
ORVIL E. DRYFOOS
Publisher 1961-1963
SAM DOLNICK Assistant Managing Editor
MEREDITH KOPIT LEVIEN Chief Operating Officer
MONICA DRAKE Assistant Managing Editor
DIANE BRAYTON General Counsel and Secretary
ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER
Publisher 1963-1992
STEVE DUENES Assistant Managing Editor
NICK ROCKWELL Chief Technology Officer
MATTHEW ERICSON Assistant Managing Editor
ELLEN C. SHULTZ Executive V.P., Talent and Inclusion
MICHELE M C NALLY Assistant Managing Editor
WILLIAM T. BARDEEN Senior V.P., Strategy and Development
ALISON MITCHELL Assistant Managing Editor
R. ANTHONY BENTEN Senior V.P., Treasurer and Controller
CAROLYN RYAN Assistant Managing Editor
STEPHEN DUNBAR-JOHNSON President, International
ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER JR.
Publisher 1992-2017
MARK THOMPSON Chief Executive Officer
LAURA EVANS Senior V.P., Data and Insights
TERRY L. HAYES Senior V.P., Real Estate and Facilities
Inside The Times
The Newspaper
And Beyond
THE STORY BEHIND THE STORY
Eclisse and
d Mini Eclisse rings
in 18K rose go
old and mother of pearl
CORRECTIONS A23
CROSSWORD C3
OBITUARIES B11
OPINION A24-25
TV LISTINGS C6
WEATHER A20
783 Madison Avenue
55 Wall Street
CLASSIFIED ADS B9
800 640 5558 | VHERNIER.COM
© Verdura. All rights reserved.
VIDEO
NICOLAS ORTEGA
Skeletal remains. Bomb remnants. An empty vault that used
to hold money. This is what’s left
of Marawi after it was seized by
pro-ISIS fighters nearly a year
ago. Go inside the Philippine city
as families begin returning home.
nytimes.com/video
Dropping Our Monocles
When it comes to writing accessibly, some beats make it tougher than others.
By MELINA DELKIC
CAGED R I NG
25 rock c r yst al s of 15 dif fe re nt cut s,
lo ose in an 18k gol d cage, $ 9,850
74 5 F I F T H AV E N U E , 12 T H F LO O R
212 .758 . 33 8 8 • V E R D U R A .CO M
Original gouache by Duke Fulco di Verdura
P L AT I N U M K E S H I P E A R L &
DIA MON D BRIOLET TE CHAIN
The New
Luxury
The front page of The New York Times has
been home, in the past, to its fair share of
articles for the wealthy and privileged
reader. Among them, news of jewel thefts
and jewel misplacements, inheritances,
socialite misadventures, the more than
occasional obituary of the “eccentric and
wealthy gentlewoman,” and seemingly
endless news about Harvard and Yale
(including games, races, debates and, in
1908, a student’s elopement at the top of
the page).
When it comes to writing accessibly,
some beats make it tougher than others.
Though more than a century removed from
any of the aforementioned articles, Times
reporters still write about topics that range
from the expensive and luxurious (see:
$8,000 dresses) to the fanciful (see: royal
wedding) to the blatantly impractical (see:
tiaras). On one level, journalism means
taking readers to rooms they may never
have access to. On another level, an excess
of such coverage can feel impenetrable, or
even exclusionary — what the former
public editor Margaret Sullivan might have
once included in her “Monocle Meter.”
Many editors today grapple with that
balance.
As Choire Sicha, editor of the Styles
desk, explained, “Some of the things Styles
historically covers” — perfume, expensive
furniture, paintings, tiaras and antiques
were his examples — “are de facto exclusionary because of their price, and some
are exclusionary because not everyone
wears a tiara to work.”
Styles is one example of a desk endlessly
adjusting its scope and its audience. One
goal for the desk in the near future is to
cover more of how normal people “get
gussied up to go out on the street” all over
the world, as Mr. Sicha put it. At the same
time, he added: “We don’t cover opera or
high fashion just for the people who can
buy a $12,000 dress. We cover this so that
everyone can have a window into it.”
Monday’s Met Gala was one example.
“The Met Gala is out of reach for everyone,
except the 550 or so people that are carefully selected by Anna Wintour to attend or
have $30,000 to spend on a ticket,” said
Joanna Nikas, an editor for Styles. But, she
added, Styles brings readers inside with
live briefings, Instagram posts, photos and
more “to give people access to a world that
so few inhabit.”
Covering theater can often work the
same way, according to Jesse Green, a
theater critic for The Times. He doesn’t
include price in his reviews. “I spent a lot
of my younger years reading reviews of
things I was highly unlikely to see and
found the experience enjoyable and educational,” Mr. Green said. “I trust that readers still feel that way today.”
On the Travel desk, practicality and
mass appeal are baked into most recommendations. While wider travel reporting
can certainly skew expensive and luxurious, the Travel editor Dan Saltzstein said
that the team mostly leaves that arena to
its competitors, especially amid a growing
focus on the online audience.
“The average print reader is more affluent than the average online reader, and
now that we’re focusing on our online
audience, it makes you think a little harder
about who is actually going to be reading
this,” Mr. Saltzstein said.
Columns like Frugal Traveler, Luxury
for Less and 36 Hours focus on recommendations that are affordable and offer a
nuanced, yet generalist, introduction to a
destination. The desk also makes it a point
not to frown upon tourist hot spots.
“There are people who really like the
touristy stuff,” Mr. Saltzstein said. “There’s
nothing wrong with it.”
And, as with any beat, the language
around the story can feel exclusionary.
The language of wine, as Eric Asimov,
The Times’s wine critic, has long argued, is
unnecessarily pretentious. Wine should be
a staple in all households, by his philosophy, and a good bottle needn’t cost more
than $15; but the complex vocabulary
around the American wine market makes
that difficult. “It’s the notion that we have
to describe wine with this esoteric grocery
list of aromas and flavors,” he said.
Why is it important for things like tiaras,
travel and Burgundy to be accessible?
“It’s not,” Mr. Asimov said. “Certainly
not on a survival level, but wine is one of
the pleasures of life. Like good food, good
cooking, good friends and good art, it helps
make life more enjoyable.”
AUDIO
The invisible tasks most women
exclusively do in heterosexual
relationships include remembering grocery lists, coordinating
with babysitters and more. The
“Dear Sugars” hosts, Cheryl
Strayed and Steve Almond, discuss with the writer Gemma
Hartley. nytimes.com/podcasts
PHOTO
More than six months after Hurricanes Maria and Irma, Puerto
Rico is still rebuilding its power
grid. The Times photographer
Todd Heisler discusses his recent
reporting trip there and the obstacles, physical and otherwise, that
stand in the way of normalcy for
the island. nytimes.com/lens
EVENT
Join Rukmini Callimachi and the
audio producer Andy Mills as the
two discuss the new podcast
“Caliphate,” for which they embedded with troops, slept on roofs
of abandoned buildings and uncovered invaluable ISIS documents. San Francisco; May 31.
timesevents.nytimes.com
Contact the Newsroom
nytnews@nytimes.com
On This Day in History
A MEMORABLE HEADLINE FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES
Share a News Tip
tips@nytimes.com or nytimes.com/tips
POLL FINDS INFIDELITY A LESSER EVIL
THAN OTHERS IN PICKING CANDIDATE
Newspaper Delivery
customercare@nytimes.com
or 1-800-NYTIMES (1-800-698-4637)
May 8, 1987. As Gary Hart, the Colorado senator-turned-front-runner for the Democratic
presidential nomination, prepared to leave the race after reports of an extramarital affair,
The Times dedicated three front-page articles to the news. One, a poll, found that most
Americans deemed other acts more troubling than infidelity — cheating on income taxes,
lying about one’s war record and being hospitalized for psychiatric treatment.
PA U L M O R E L L I .C OM
N YC : 8 95 M A D I S O N ( 7 2 N D & M A D I S O N )
P H L : 1118 WA L N U T S T R E E T
212. 5 8 5 . 42 0 0
THE NEW YORK TIMES COMPANY 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018-1405
The New York Times (ISSN 0362-4331) is published
daily. Periodicals postage paid at New York, N.Y., and
at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to The New York Times, P.O. Box 8042,
Davenport, IA, 52808-8042.
Mail Subscription Rates*
1 Yr.
6 Mos.
Daily and Sunday .........................$910.00
$455.00
Monday-Saturday ......................... 524.16
262.08
Sunday only ................................... 447.20
223.60
Times Book Review.................................. 1 Yr. $208.00
Large Print Weekly .................................. 1 Yr.
114.40
Higher rates, available on request, for mailing outside the U.S., or for the New York edition outside the Northeast: 1-800-631-2580.
*Not including state or local tax.
The Times occasionally makes its list of home delivery subscribers available to marketing part-
ners or third parties who offer products or services that are likely to interest its readers. If you
prefer that we do not share this information, please
notify Customer Service, P.O. Box 8042, Davenport,
IA, 52808-8042, or e-mail help@nytimes.com.
All advertising published in The New York Times is
subject to the applicable rate card, available from the
advertising department. The Times reserves the right
not to accept an advertiser’s order. Only publication of
an advertisement shall constitute final acceptance.
© 2018, The New York Times Company. All rights
reserved.
A.G. Sulzberger, Publisher
Mark Thompson, President and Chief Executive Officer
R. Anthony Benten, Treasurer
Diane Brayton, General Counsel and Secretary
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
©TIFFANY & CO. SWISS WATCHES SAGL 2018
Of Interest
NOTEWORTHY FACTS FROM TODAY’S PAPER
One year into his presidency,
Emmanuel Macron is routinely
referred to in the French media as
Jupiter or Napoleon Bonaparte.
This week’s inauguration ceremony
for Russia’s president, Vladimir V.
Putin, unfolded in a Kremlin hall used
to crown three czars — Alexander II,
Alexander III and Nicholas II.
Widening Feud With Macron,
Airline Unions Call for Strike B1
For Putin’s Fourth Inauguration, Russia Blends
Czarist Pomp With Reality TV A4
•
Gas chambers have existed as an
American execution method since
the 1920s. The last case was in
1999, when Arizona used clouds
of hydrogen cyanide to execute an
inmate. Coughing and hacking,
he took 18 minutes to die.
•
In 2017, California had the fastest
growth in its homeless population
of any state (14 percent), and also had
the highest proportion of them
unsheltered (68 percent).
TIM LAHAN
In the Last Breath D1
•
The oldest New York City subway
cars, known as R-32s, arrived in the
1960s. While newer cars can travel
nearly 500,000 miles between
failures, the R-32s go only about
33,000 miles between failures.
Of all the genes in the human
genome, 55 percent were already
present in the first animal, which
likely lived over 650 million years ago.
Diversity Came in a Burst of DNA D3
The Pleasure and Pain of Being California,
The World’s 5th-Largest Economy A12
•
“Gotham” was adopted as a name
for New York City in the early 19th
century, after the English village
whose inhabitants had feigned
madness to fool the king’s tax collectors.
Edwin G. Burrows, 74, Who Wrote Definitive
New York City History, Dies B11
Skepticism Over M.T.A.’s Grand Promises A19
A TIFFANY MOTHER’S DAY
TIFFANY METRO WATCH
The Conversation
Spotlight
THREE OF THE MOST READ, SHARED AND DISCUSSED POSTS
FROM ACROSS NYTIMES.COM
ADDITIONAL REPORTAGE AND REPARTEE
FROM OUR JOURNALISTS
1. 96-Year-Old Secretary Quietly Amasses Fortune,
Then Donates $8.2 Million
Katie Rogers, a White House correspondent for The Times,
spent Monday — incidentally, her fourth anniversary working
here — in the Rose Garden, where Melania Trump rolled out
her official initiative, Be Best, which focuses on issues of
well-being, social media use and opioid abuse among young
people. She posted on Twitter throughout, complete with a
photo of the special Be Best cookie handed out at the event.
An edited selection of her posts follows.
Monday’s top story was a heartwarmer: the tale of Sylvia
Bloom, a legal secretary from Brooklyn who observed the
investments made by the lawyers she served, mimicked them
to build her own fortune, then left sizable charitable donations
upon her death in 2016. Most of the hundreds of comments on
nytimes.com and on social media expressed admiration for
Ms. Bloom: “Humility, quiet grace and taking the long-term
view — that’s how you win,” one Facebook commenter wrote.
800 843 3269
|
TIFFANY.COM
The first lady is unveiling her program, Be Best, in the
Rose Garden momentarily.
In addition to the president and vice president, at
least four cabinet secretaries are here. Jared, Ivanka,
Kellyanne also in attendance. Here is POTUS standing
up and clapping for his wife.
This is one of the longest public speeches Melania
Trump has given and one of the most confidentsounding I’ve heard. She came up with the program
name on her own and drew the logo. Anyway, I wonder
how surreal this feels for her.
2. Giuliani Says Trump Would Not Have to Comply
With Mueller Subpoena
After a chaotic first week as President Trump’s lawyer, Rudolph W. Giuliani asserted during a rambling 22-minute interview on ABC’s “This Week” program Sunday morning that
the president could invoke his Fifth Amendment right against
self-incrimination to avoid testifying in the special counsel’s
investigation. Nearly half of the Facebook reactions to this
article called up the “LOL” emoji.
3. At His Ranch, John McCain Shares Memories
And Regrets With Friends
Among those who shared this article on social media were the
NBC News correspondent Andrea Mitchell and Senator Jeff
Flake of Arizona, who wrote on Twitter, “Great read by NYT
Jonathan Martin. Cheryl and I had a good visit with Cindy
and @SenJohnMcCain at the Ranch yesterday.”
The president is now signing a proclamation calling
today Be Best Day. “Mr. President?” she asked, calling
him to the stage.
POTUS says: “That was truly a beautiful and heartfelt
speech. America is truly blessed to have a first lady who
is so devoted to our country.”
“I think you all know who is going to get the pen.” And
Eric Clapton plays them out.
Katie Rogers @katierogers
Babies in black patent calfskin,
DIOR signature in “Antique Gold” metallic finishing, 3cm heel.
Read Ms. Rogers’s report about the Be Best initiative on Page A16.
57th Street & Soho
800.929.dior (3467) Dior.com
“The feeling at Oregon State right now is that our team is
winning, so they’ve moved on. What does that say to the little
girl in this case? What does it say to all survivors?”
Quote of the Day
A STAR SHADOWED
BY A SEX CRIME B6
BRENDA TRACY, a victims’ rights activist, on fans who cheer for Luke Heimlich, a star college pitcher who
pleaded guilty to sexually molesting his 6-year-old niece when he was 15, but now denies wrongdoing.
The Mini Crossword
Here to Help
BY JOEL FAGLIANO
VANESSA FRIEDMAN ANSWERS YOUR STYLE QUESTIONS
1
2
Q: Like kudzo, viscose is everywhere. Pricey carpets made of viscose are labeled “art silk,” but what about fashion? A Piazza Sempione dress I bought for
mucho dinero is viscose; Akris Punto dresses are made of viscose. It looks and
feels like silk, but it isn’t, and the high prices associated with these formerly
silk dresses remain high. What’s the story with viscose? GLORIA, MASSACHUSETTS
3
4
5
6
7
5/8/2018
EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ
ACROSS
1
4
5
6
7
Subway scamperer
Attract
Gossip spreader
Has wings, for example
Question after a pointless stunt
DOWN
1
2
3
4
5
R + 5-Down + N + 3-Down + 7-Across
The “A” of M.F.A.
Brewed beverage
Jacob’s first wife, in the Bible
Conifer with red berries
SOLUTION TO
PREVIOUS PUZZLE
C
A
R
A
L
B
U M
R
O
U
N
D
F
U
J
I
S
D
A
N
A: Well, first: like silk or
pretty much any fabric, not all
viscoses are created equal —
which makes sense when you
realize the official name for viscose is
viscose rayon, and it is one of the oldest
man-made fibers, first patented in 1884 by
Hilaire de Bernigaut.
Just because it is man-made, however,
does not mean it is synthetic (though it’s
not exactly all-natural either): Viscose is
made from wood pulp that has been chemically treated. Its name comes from a
viscous — get it? — solution used during
the process. The end product can have, as
you point out, the feel of silk, though it can
also mimic cotton and velvet. And just
because it is man-made also does not
mean it equates to cheap — especially if a
designer is involved, when what you are
paying for is in part the creativity and
brand attached to the garment. So toss
that idea in the scrap pile.
As to why designers like it, according to
Joseph Altuzarra, who founded an eponymous brand that is favored by Meghan
Markle: “I think viscose is misunderstood
because it isn’t a completely natural fiber,
and natural fibers are usually thought-of
more highly. I find that viscose drapes
really beautifully, and I like viscose’s hand.
It also sews and wears really nicely. In the
past few years, I’ve noticed mills have
developed a lot more interesting viscose
fabrications, and pushed the limits of what
you can do with it, and I have been really
inspired by that.”
So there you go. From his email to your
closet.
Every week in the Open Thread newsletter — a
look from across The Times at the forces that
shape the dress codes we share — chief fashion
critic Vanessa Friedman answers a reader’s
fashion-related question. Sign up for Open
Thread at nytimes.com/newsletters.
A3
A4
TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
Two Centuries
Of Suspicion
Chinese Australians Again Having
To Defend Their Place Down Under
By ISABELLA KWAI
SYDNEY, Australia — Out of a
pile of papers on her dining table,
Man-Yee Leanfore, 70, pulled out
one: a copy of an old immigration
document from 1907.
A young woman in a traditional
Chinese dress stared out from the
attached photos. Age: 29. Build:
Thin. Hair: Dark. Nationality:
Chinese.
The document permitted Mrs.
Leanfore’s
great-grandmother,
Yuck Land Hing, to come and go
from Australia at a time when the
White Australia Policy kept out
most Asian immigrants. It was a
limited reprieve — a three-year
exemption to the dictation test
commonly used to exclude nonwhite immigrants.
“We suffered,” Mrs. Leanfore
MATTHEW ABBOTT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
The document that allowed
Ken Leanfore’s great-greatgrandmother to enter Australia.
said as she looked at the photo, recalling the first in a long line of her
relatives who emigrated to Australia. “But we didn’t do anything
wrong.”
This year commemorates 200
years of Chinese migration to Australia. The anniversary comes at a
time when Australia is once again
conflicted about its relationship
with the region’s biggest, most
powerful country, and many Chinese Australians are digging into
their families’ archives to share
their history with audiences from
both China and Australia.
February’s Lunar New Year
celebrations in Sydney featured
talks from local historians. Chinese-Australian history museums
are planning new exhibitions that
connect the story of Australia’s
earliest Chinese immigrants to its
newest, and community organizations are hosting regular talks
around Chinese figures in Australian history.
Even in smaller towns and cities like Bendigo, where the Golden Dragon Museum has successfully raised money to replace its
historic ceremonial Qing dynasty
dragon, Chinese Australians are
actively seeking ways to keep
their culture alive.
Those who are involved say
these activities are an effort to de-
fine their community on its own
terms, separate from debates
over the influence of the Chinese
Communist Party in Australia,
and to ensure that the public understands that not everyone who
looks Chinese in Australia is a new
arrival.
“I think people, especially white
people, lump us all as Chinese, as
if everybody is the same,” said
Teik Hock Lim, 67, an ethnic Chinese, retired social worker, who
grew up in Malaysia under British
rule. “It’s like if people would call
all white people the same.”
Australia’s relationship to Chinese immigration has always
zigzagged between rejection and
acceptance.
In 1818, Mak Sai Ying, a young
man from Guangdong, stepped off
a ship in Port Jackson, becoming
one of the first recorded Chinese
immigrants to the continent. Given the Anglicized name John Shying, he became a well-known pub
owner in Sydney’s west.
When gold was discovered in
the 1850s, a wave of new migrants
from around the world arrived to
try their luck, including thousands of Chinese men from Canton.
Out on the goldfields, competition for riches meant tension simmered between European and
Chinese miners. Riots broke out;
in one instance, a mob of 3,000 European miners burned a Chinese
camp.
To discourage immigration, Victorian ports levied a heavy tax on
Chinese miners. But the most resolved disembarked at South Australian ports and made the 500 km
(310 mile) trek to the goldfields on
foot. Not all survived.
Australia’s first federal parliament went on to pass legislation in
1901 that would require all immigrants to pass a 50-word dictation
test to enter the country. Because
the test was enacted to keep nonwhite immigrants out, there was
an insidious twist: officials could
test applicants in any European
language.
After a while, “there was never
a Chinese person who could pass
it,” said Daphne Lowe Kelley, a
community leader and former
President of the Chinese Heritage
Association of Australia. Unable
to enter Australia in the 1920s, Ms.
Lowe Kelley’s father sailed to
New Zealand instead, paying a tax
to settle there.
Those of Chinese descent who
were already in the country, like
Mrs. Leanfore’s great-grandmother, could apply for an exemption from the test in order to travel. But many, with families still living in China, simply gave up and
returned home, including Mrs.
MATTHEW ABBOTT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
The Leanfores and their friend
Daphne Lowe Kelley, back
right, are Chinese Australians
in Sydney. Left, a display at the
Golden Dragon Museum in
Bendigo depicting a shop front
in the Gold Rush era.
ASANKA BRENDON RATNAYAKE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Leanfore’s grandmother who returned to Guangzhou.
In the decades following 1901,
the Chinese population declined.
Race-based policies remained
in place until 1973, when the government heralded a policy of multiculturalism.
Now there are about 1.2 million
people in Australia with Chinese
ancestry.
For years, older Chinese Australians have nursed the painful
legacy of the White Australia Policy. Now, after 200 years, they see
their community as a patchwork
of experiences.
It includes the descendants of
Cantonese and Hakka migrants
from the Gold Rush era, ethnic
Chinese refugees who fled the
Vietnam War, migrants from
Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and
mainland China who have arrived
steadily since the 1980s, and most
recently — an influx of Chinese international students.
Nick Shying, 22, is one of many
Chinese Australians whose roots
reach back to that first Chinese
settler — despite his pale skin and
blue eyes. He said people often
laugh when he brings up his Chinese heritage. Australians still
use appearance as a basis for ethnic assumptions, he said, “but
here I am as an example of the potential flaws of taking that approach.”
Many community leaders say
these nuanced identities are once
again being overlooked and oversimplified as the public focuses on
new waves of immigration.
Part of the reason may be that
Australia still considers itself a
white nation, said Kate Bagnall, a
historian at the University of Wollongong. “That’s a really powerful
image that’s really difficult to
shift,” she said.
And with the Australian government fending off allegations of
political interference from the
Chinese government, some worry
this ignorance of history will spur
an anti-Chinese backlash.
“There are some of us in the
community who feel this is shades
of the White Australia Policy coming back again,” said Ms. Lowe
Kelley, a former president of the
Chinese Heritage Association.
She added that when she reads
news singling out Chinese political donations and investment,
she worries that it will filter down:
“What happens is it tars the whole
of the Chinese community.”
Of the many Chinese Australian
historical organizations she has
been involved with, none receive
funding from the Chinese government, she said.
Others involved in the revival of
Chinese Australian history also
said they steer clear of Chinese officialdom.
Mark Wang, the deputy chairman of the Museum of Chinese
Australian History in Melbourne
said the goal is to remain impartial, relying on state government
funding, ticket sales and community donations.
“We don’t want to be distorted
by a political undercurrent,” Mr.
Wang said. “We’re about Australian history. We’re not about Chinese history.”
For families closest to that history, the past is a bittersweet mystery that should never stop being
reinterpreted and retold.
Mrs. Leanfore’s son, Ken, 31 is a
photographer. Tired of fielding
questions about his unusual last
name, he recently curated an exhibition using stories of Chinese
Australians with names that were
Anglicized by immigration officers.
On a recent afternoon, in the
family home her ancestors bought
in 1928, Mrs. Leanfore sipped tea
with her husband and son, as a
pack of grandchildren chased
each other through the house.
“None of them are pure Chinese,” said Mrs. Leanfore, smiling. “But that’s what the future is
going to be.”
For Putin’s Fourth Inauguration, Russia Blends Czarist Pomp With Reality TV
By ANDREW E. KRAMER
MOSCOW — Vladimir V. Putin
took the oath of office on Monday
for a fourth term as Russia’s president, in a ceremony staged in a
gilded Kremlin hall once used to
crown czars and replete with
pageantry, highlighting his vast
accumulation of authority after
nearly two decades in power.
Mr. Putin, a former KGB agent,
has ruled Russia as prime minister or president for more than 18
years, and in that time has crafted
an image as a steely nerved leader
and the man best qualified to rebuild his country after the collapse of the Soviet Union.
In a theatrical touch, a televised
ceremony began on Monday with
Mr. Putin sitting at his desk in the
Kremlin, suit jacket looped over
his chair, as if hard at work until
moments before the ceremony. A
phone rang, letting him know it
was time for his fourth term; he
donned his jacket and walked
alone through the red-carpeted
Kremlin corridors and into a hall
packed with about 6,000 invited,
cheering guests.
In a short speech, Mr. Putin suggested his focus had now turned to
domestic matters and improving
Russia’s economy for the “well-being of every family,” though there
were no words of reconciliation in
the country’s tense relations with
the West.
“The country’s security and defense capabilities are reliably ensured,” Mr. Putin told the audience
of government ministers, lawSophia Kishkovsky contributed reporting.
POOL PHOTO BY ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO
Vladimir V. Putin’s televised inauguration began with him at his
desk. A phone rang, and Mr. Putin headed out to take the oath.
makers, religious leaders and celebrities.
“Now we will use all the possibilities we have first of all for the
resolution of internal, and most
essential, tasks of development,”
he said. “A new quality of life, wellbeing, security and health for the
people, that is what is important
today.”
Mr. Putin won re-election in
March with nearly 77 percent of
the vote, the largest margin for
any post-Soviet leader. It was a result that his backers said showed
widespread support, but one his
critics dismissed as illustrating
the stifling of any real opposition.
While lower key than Mr.
Putin’s inauguration in 2012, the
ceremony’s regal themes nevertheless gave it the air of a coronation.
The honor guard and flag bearers wore uniforms with tall military caps, of a style dating from
Russia’s war with Napoleon in
1812. The ceremony itself unfolded
in a Kremlin hall used to crown
three czars — Alexander II, Alexander III and Nicholas II — as
well as previous presidential inaugurations. And later, Patriarch
Kirill, head of the Russian Orthodox Church, gave Mr. Putin an
18th century icon while blessing
him for his new term.
Abroad, Mr. Putin has sought to
restore Russia’s sway in world affairs. During his third term as
president, he intervened militarily in Ukraine and Syria, putting
him at loggerheads with the West.
And, according to U.S. intelligence
agencies, he directed Russia to
meddle in the 2016 presidential
election to aid Donald J. Trump.
At home, he has presided over
the restitution to power of the security agency he once served,
with many high officials and corporate executives now former officers like Mr. Putin. But the domestic economy has continued to
lag, only recently emerging from a
painful recession. He has also
clamped down on critics, arresting scores of opposition activists
and restricting the media.
“The symbolic Putin is omnipotent, like St. George slaying the
Western dragon, but the fleshand-bones Putin is barely capable
of solving Russians’ everyday
problems or preventing tragedies,” Andrei Kolesnikov, an associate at the Carnegie Moscow
Center, wrote in a commentary on
Mr. Putin’s continued popularity
despite the economic slump.
Underscoring that point, two
days before the inauguration, the
police arrested about 1,600 people
at protest actions called “He is not
our czar.” Demonstrators wore paper crowns to mock Mr. Putin’s
long rule, now running longer
than any Russian leader since
Stalin.
The arrests added images of
swinging nightsticks and shoving
matches with the police to the inaugural events. The repression,
Vedomosti, a business newspaper,
wrote, risked “spoiling the upcoming inauguration more even than
the protest.”
The violence included a throwback to an earlier era of crowdcontrol tactics in Russia. Men
wearing Cossack uniforms and
carrying a type of traditional
leather whip known as a nagaika
had mingled in the crowd, occasionally lashing out. The Echo of
Moscow radio station reported
Monday that the Cossack group
had won municipal contracts to
train for and help with crowd control, though it remained unclear
whether they acted in an official
capacity on Saturday.
Mr. Putin signed decrees on
Monday outlining his goals, such
as reducing poverty and, by the
end of his six-year term, raising
Russian life expectancy to 78
years, from 72 now. He signaled
After two decades in
power, a vow to focus
on internal problems.
political continuity by nominating
a longtime ally, Dmitri A.
Medvedev, as prime minister.
Whether Mr. Putin shifts gears
on economic policy hinges on the
possible appointment of a liberal
economist, Aleksei L. Kudrin, a
former finance minister, to a new
post as economic adviser, analysts said. Kremlin hard-liners oppose Mr. Kudrin for advocating an
easing of tensions with the West,
as well as efforts to revive trade.
Mr. Kudrin has also argued for
raising taxes and the retirement
age to shore up the budget.
Mr. Putin first became president on Dec. 31, 1999, when Boris
Yeltsin, ailing from heart troubles,
resigned. Mr. Putin was then
elected in 2000 and served twice,
the constitutional limit for successive terms. He then became prime
minister for one term, before returning to the presidency in 2012.
For his third and now fourth spells
as president, the term was extended to six years from four.
While not short on pomp, the
ceremony on Monday was less
elaborate than his inauguration in
2012.
In 2012, the police cordoned off
much of the city center to allow
Mr. Putin’s motorcade to glide
through quiet streets toward the
Kremlin. Eerie images of the
leader in an empty city sparked
criticism that Mr. Putin had lost
touch with the people.
This year, he stayed on the
Kremlin grounds. He walked from
his office to a motorcade that
drove from one Kremlin building
to another.
In the ceremony, Mr. Putin
strode through gilded and chandeliered halls before arriving at Andreyevsky Hall, where guests
waited. Few foreign dignitaries attended. Among those in the hall
were Gerhard Schröder, the former German chancellor and longtime supporter of Mr. Putin.
Dozhd, an opposition television
station, cited Kremlin officials
saying they sought a lower-key
ceremony this time. While not exactly calling it routine, Mr. Putin’s
spokesman, Dmitri S. Peskov, told
reporters that the inauguration
was less significant this year because Mr. Putin was just beginning a new term, not shifting from
the prime minister’s office to the
presidency.
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
A5
N
A f i rst look a t th e se a son's be st sa le
SNEA K PEEK
S A L E
40% OFF
UP TO
*
I NCR EDI BL E SEL ECT IONS
DOUBLE POINTS ** for SaksFirst members and
BONUS POINTS *** with your Beauty or Jewelry purchase
Now th rou gh Su n d ay, May 13
*SALE IS 30% TO 40% OFF SELECTIONS FOR HER AND HIM.
This sale represents percentage off original prices. Select merchandise only. Not all departments included in sale. Not all departments are in all Saks Fifth Avenue stores. Intermediate markdowns may have occurred prior to this sale. No adjustments to prior purchases unless merchandise is marked down
within 7 days of being purchased at full price. Excludes Saks Fifth Avenue OFF5TH Stores and saksoff5th.com. Prices at saks.com already reflect reduction. Sale ends for select merchandise in stores 5/13/18 and on saks.com on 5/13/18 at 11:59pm (ET). Men’s not available in Greenwich.
**Valid on full priced merchandise only. Select designers and leased department exclusions apply. For approved purchases made with the SaksFirst Credit Card in Saks Fifth Avenue stores, catalogs and at saks.com. During this event, SaksFirst members will earn 2 base points plus 2 bonus points per eligible
dollar spent from $1 to $4999, 4 base points plus 4 bonus points per eligible dollar spent from $5000 to $9999, and 6 base points plus 6 bonus points per eligible dollar spent thereafter, based on your calendar year-to-date net purchases. Sale merchandise, sales tax, delivery charges, beauty salon products
and services, restaurants, alterations, fur storage, gratuity, repairs at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH stores, saksoff5th.com, corporate gifts, gift card purchases, services and Cartier, Graff, Christian Louboutin Beaute are not eligible for this bonus points event. Offer valid in Saks Fifth Avenue stores from 5/8/18 to
5/13/18 and on saks.com from 5/6/18 at 12:01 am (ET) through 5/13/18 at 11:59 pm (ET).
***Select designers and leased department exclusions apply. Please allow 4-6 weeks for bonus points to be credited to your account. To receive 3000 bonus points offer for beauty purchases, total spend must be at least $300 in beauty or fragrance with the SaksFirst Credit Card. To receive 30,000 bonus
points offer for watch and/or jewelry purchases, total spend must be at least $3000 in watch and/or jewelry purchases with the SaksFirst credit card. Total spend excludes taxes and delivery charges. Bonus points are valid only once per category, and maximum 33,000 bonus points allowed per customer for
this offer. Not valid for purchases made at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF5TH stores or on saksoff5th.com . Offer valid in Saks Fifth Avenue stores from 5/8/18 to 5/13/18 and on saks.com from 5/6/18 at 12:01 am (ET) through 5/13/18 at 11:59 pm (ET).
A6
THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
Opponents of Iran Deal Hired Investigators to Dig Up Dirt on Obama Aide
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR
and RONEN BERGMAN
WASHINGTON — For years,
opponents of the nuclear deal with
Iran have accused Benjamin J.
Rhodes, a top national security
aide to President Barack Obama,
of scheming to sell the diplomatic
agreement on false pretenses to
the American people.
Now, just as President Trump
appears likely to announce his decision to withdraw from the deal,
evidence has surfaced that the
agreement’s opponents engaged
in a sophisticated effort to dig up
dirt on Mr. Rhodes and his family
that continued well after the
Obama administration left office.
A detailed report about Mr.
Rhodes, compiled by Black Cube,
a private investigations firm established by former intelligence
analysts from the Israeli Defense
Forces, contains pictures of his
apartment in Washington, telephone numbers and email addresses of members of his family,
as well as unsubstantiated allegations of personal and ethical transgressions.
In a separate case in 2017, the
same firm was hired to gather dirt
on women accusing Harvey Weinstein, the movie mogul, of multiple
instances of sexual misconduct.
Michael D. Shear reported from
Washington, and Ronen Bergman
from Israel. Mark Mazzetti contributed reporting from Washington.
It is unclear who hired Black
Cube to prepare the report on Mr.
Rhodes and a similar report on
Colin Kahl, the national security
adviser to Vice President Joseph
R. Biden Jr., which were obtained
by The New York Times from a
source with knowledge of their
provenance.
The Guardian, which first published the existence of the reports
on Mr. Rhodes and Mr. Kahl, said
aides to Mr. Trump hired the firm,
but there is no evidence in the documents that indicate any connection to anyone in Mr. Trump’s administration. A spokesman for the
company vehemently denied any
connection to the president.
“Black Cube has no relation
whatsoever to the Trump administration, to Trump aides, to anyone close to the administration or
to the Iran nuclear deal,” said Ido
Minkowski,
the
company’s
spokesman. “Anyone who claims
otherwise is misleading their
readers and viewers.”
One person with knowledge of
the reports suggested that the
company had been hired by a
commercial client with an interest
in opposing the nuclear deal.
The reports appear to be aimed
at undermining public support for
the agreement by finding ways to
discredit Mr. Rhodes and Mr.
Kahl, who have been staunch advocates of the deal on social media
and in television appearances. In
an interview on Monday, Mr.
STEPHEN CROWLEY/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Ben Rhodes, center, national security adviser to President
Barack Obama, with the president on Air Force One in 2016.
Rhodes said he was surprised that
ferocious criticism directed at him
continued after he left government.
“I never imagined that upon
leaving government, that not only
would that information campaign
continue, but that it would be supplemented by investigations into
me and my family by shadowy international operations, involving
foreign entities,” Mr. Rhodes said.
The deal to curtail Iran’s nuclear weapons program was signed
by the United States, Iran and several European countries in 2015.
Its critics, including Mr. Trump
and Benjamin Netanyahu, the
prime minister of Israel, have said
it does nothing to curtail the danger posed by Iran and will not curtail Iran’s ability to develop nuclear weapons. The president said
Monday that he will announce on
Tuesday whether he will formally
withdraw the United States from
the deal, as he has repeatedly signaled he would.
While there is no evidence directly linking Trump officials to
the preparation of the reports,
several current or former members of the Trump White House
have repeatedly attacked Mr.
Rhodes and Mr. Kahl for their support of the Iran agreement.
Sebastian Gorka, a Trump supporter who served briefly in the
White House as an adviser, has repeatedly attacked both men on social media and in conservative
news outlets, accusing Mr.
Rhodes and Mr. Kahl of working to
undermine Mr. Trump and defend
the Iran deal from its critics.
Current and former Trump administration officials have also
targeted John Kerry, the former
secretary of state who negotiated
the Iran deal for the United States.
Even Mr. Trump himself said in a
Twitter post on Monday that recent efforts by Mr. Kerry to save
the deal amounted to “possibly illegal Shadow Diplomacy.”
Unlike Mr. Kerry, Mr. Kahl and
Mr. Rhodes were not part of the
nuclear deal negotiating team for
the United States. But even before
he left the White House, Mr.
Rhodes was the target of criticism
for his efforts to help build support
for its approval.
“Why did whoever did this conjoin Ben and me? Why the two of
us?” Mr. Kahl said. “Being vocal
on Twitter would make me a target. But why would it bring down
the Iran deal?”
A New York Times Magazine
profile of Mr. Rhodes in May 2016
described a White House “war
room” in which he tried to manage
news coverage of the Iran nuclear
negotiations. In the article, Mr.
Rhodes was quoted as saying:
“We created an echo chamber.
They were saying things that validated what we had given them to
say.”
Critics of the Iran deal have
seized on the article to insist that
Mr. Rhodes — and by extension,
the entire Obama administration
— were secretly manipulating
public opinion by misrepresenting the implications of the nuclear
deal.
The report on Mr. Rhodes by
Black Cube notes that “in the article, he boasts about the creation of
an ‘echo chamber’ in which he told
journalists what to say and they
repeated it back over and over as
original thoughts.”
The reports also provide a list of
several Washington journalists
who have had “extensive contact”
with Mr. Rhodes. Among those
listed under the heading “contacts
to investigate” are Jeffrey Goldberg, now the editor of The Atlantic; Mark Landler, a White House
correspondent for The Times who
often writes about foreign policy;
Andrea Mitchell, now NBC
News’s chief foreign affairs correspondent; and Glenn Thrush, a
Times reporter who covered the
Obama White House for Politico.
On Monday, reporters asked
Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the
White House press secretary,
whether anyone at the White
House had knowledge of whether
aides to Mr. Trump had hired
Black Cube to dig up dirt on former Obama officials.
“I’m not aware of anything on
that front,” Ms. Sanders said, adding that “if something comes up,
we’ll let you guys know.”
FACT CHECK
Trump Lobs Legal Threat
At Kerry. Scholars Shrug.
By LINDA QIU
TOM BRENNER/THE NEW YORK TIMES
President Trump used Twitter on Monday to declare he would be announcing his decision at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the White House.
Allies Say Trump Is Likely to Scrap Iran Accord
From Page A1
first to breach the arrangements.
Those advisers — Rex W. Tillerson and Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster
— were ousted in recent months
and replaced with two of the Iran
agreement’s most vociferous critics, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and John R. Bolton, the national security adviser.
In the 28 months since the arrangement went into effect, international inspectors have said they
have found no violations — apart
from minor infractions that were
quickly rectified.
Under the deal, the restrictions
on research and development in
Iran’s nuclear program would begin to lift after a decade. After 15
years, Iran would be able to
produce as much fuel as it wanted
— though never for the purpose of
making weapons.
Mr. Trump has insisted that
“sunset clause” simply put off the
day when Iran would become a
nuclear-armed state. The agreement, he has said, failed to address Tehran’s growing missile capability and expanding influence
in the Middle East — all funded, he
insisted, from cash that was returned to the Iranians as a part of
the deal, as well as its resumed oil
trade.
The senior European diplomat,
who spoke on the condition of anonymity when meeting with a
group of reporters on Monday,
called it “pretty obvious” that Mr.
Trump would no longer waive
American sanctions against Iran,
as he has done since the start of
his presidency to uphold the deal.
Rather than push the issues off
for another decade, Mr. Trump is
betting he can force Iran into a
new negotiation.
It is unclear whether the president might mollify three major allies — Britain, France and Germany — by allowing them to
maintain economic relations with
Tehran without penalizing any of
their firms. But European officials
David E. Sanger reported from
Washington and Steven Erlanger
from Brussels. Emily Cochrane
contributed reporting from Washington.
said that was not clear.
Mr. Trump issued two tweets on
Monday about the coming decision. The first berated John Kerry,
the former secretary of state, for
his “possibly illegal Shadow Diplomacy on the very badly negotiated Iran deal.” It was an apparent
reference to Mr. Kerry’s calls to
leaders around the world looking
for ways to save an accord that he
dedicated much of his term to negotiating during the Obama administration.
A few hours later, Mr. Trump
turned to Twitter again to declare
that he would be announcing his
decision at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the
White House.
However the White House engineers the specifics of the announcement, diplomats say they
are now adjusting to a new reality
in which the fundamental trade
with Iran is dead.
“It can’t be saved,” said Aaron
David Miller, a longtime former
diplomat now at the Wilson International Center for Scholars.
“Whatever Trump decides, it’s the
beginning of the end of the accord,
either death by one, or 1,000, cuts.”
Over the past three weeks, senior officials from France, Britain
and Germany flew to Washington
to make a case that ditching the
accord was a diplomatic mistake.
On Sunday, Boris Johnson, the
British foreign secretary, was the
last to make those arguments,
writing in The New York Times
that “now that these handcuffs are
in place, I see no possible advantage in casting them aside.”
By the middle of Monday, his
visit seemed a last gasp: He was
told that the decision was all but
preordained, officials said.
President Emmanuel Macron
of France and Chancellor Angela
Merkel of Germany similarly argued that the Iran accord was
flawed but could be built upon.
The allies had suggested that the
West could impose new sanctions
against Iran’s ballistic missile development and armed support for
the Syrian regime, for Hezbollah,
for Hamas and Islamic Jihad in
the Palestinian territories — but
keep the nuclear deal intact.
“My view — I don’t know what
your president will decide — is
that he will get rid of this deal on
his own, for domestic reasons,”
Mr. Macron told a group of reporters in Washington during his visit
last month.
But it has been difficult for Europeans to answer Mr. Trump’s
demands because it is clear that
Iran will not agree to reopening
the terms of the accord itself. And
if it were to be reopened, Iran had
a series of demands of its own.
Should Mr. Trump withdraw
from the accord, Iran could accurately claim that Washington was
the first to violate it — a propaganda win. And Iran would be free, if it
chose, to resume fuel production,
according to diplomats who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
discuss the sensitive negotiations.
The mantra of the European negotiators toiling to retain the nuclear deal has been “to fix it, not
A belief that the deal
simply postpones a
nuclear-armed Iran.
nix it.” But Mr. Trump has come at
the problem from a different perspective: He argues that the only
solution is a clean slate.
Mr. Trump has told visitors he
believes that once the current
agreement is destroyed, Iran will
come to the table to negotiate a
new one. Iran’s foreign minister,
Mohammad Javad Zarif, who negotiated the initial accord with Mr.
Kerry for more than two years,
has said Tehran will not participate in such negotiations since it
already spent years doing so.
The narrow decision Mr. Trump
will have to announce on Tuesday
is whether he is willing to once
again waive American sanctions
on Iran, holding up America’s
commitments under the deal.
Yet even if Mr. Trump reimposes those sanctions, Europeans note that there are some delays built into the accord — a reconciliation period of about a
month, and delays of 120 to 180
days before renewed American
sanctions bite.
In a world of Trump brinkmanship, all that could allow time for
further negotiations.
Iran can go to the brink as well,
however, and anticipating its response is difficult. Hard-liners are
already arguing to resume uranium enrichment and plutonium
production. But it is entirely possible Iran will choose to abide by the
deal for now, to make sharper the
split between the United States
and its European allies.
That may not be sustainable,
European officials said. Over
time, pressure will grow inside
Iran to leave, since many there believe the sanctions relief has not
led to the kind of national economic revival that the country’s
public was told to expect.
Iran’s leaders have been cryptic
about its potential response.
“If America leaves the nuclear
deal, this will entail historic regret
for it,” President Hassan Rouhani
of Iran said in a speech broadcast
live on state television in recent
days.
“If we can get what we want
from a deal without America, then
Iran will continue to remain committed to the deal,” Mr. Rouhani
said.
The Europeans are also worried
that abandoning the deal will embolden Israel in its own struggle
with Iran in Syria and Lebanon.
That could lead to another bloody
war, as Iranian troops and proxies
move closer to the occupied Golan
Heights and Tehran continues to
ship missiles into Syria and southern Lebanon.
Oddly, while Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel has
led the charge to persuade Mr.
Trump to abandon the deal, his top
military advisers have dissented.
The commander of the Israeli Defense Forces, Gadi Eizenkot, has
repeatedly said that the agreement “is working” and delaying
Iran’s efforts to obtain a weapon
by a decade to 15 years. Former
military officials have largely
agreed.
But Mr. Trump’s base of supporters has insisted that the deal
essentially sold out long-range
American interests. After hesitating, Mr. Trump appears to have
decided to make good on his past
promises.
WASHINGTON — President
Trump on Monday accused John
Kerry, the former secretary of
state, of engaging in “possibly
illegal Shadow Diplomacy” — a
charge disputed by some legal
scholars who say the same characterization could have applied
to Mr. Trump when he was a
candidate.
Mr. Trump is set to announce
on Tuesday whether he will
withdraw the United States from
the 2015 deal that limited
Tehran’s nuclear program in
exchange for lifting international
sanctions against Iran. A parade
of diplomats, including Foreign
Minister Boris Johnson of Britain
on Monday, have in recent weeks
urged the Trump administration
not to abandon the agreement.
Mr. Kerry, who helped broker
the deal during the Obama administration, has also been trying to save it. He has strategized
with Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif of Iran, met
with European officials and
lobbied members of Congress.
Mr. Trump did not specify
what was illegal about Mr. Kerry’s actions, and the White
House would not comment. But
Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, accused
Mr. Kerry of “violating the Logan
Act,” adding, “And nobody seems
to care.”
As The New York Times’s
Charlie Savage has previously
explained:
The Logan Act is a 1799 statute
that bars private citizens from
interfering with diplomatic relations between the United States
and foreign governments. It
makes it a felony, punishable by
a fine or imprisonment of up to
three years, if an American citizen, without government authorization, interacts “with any foreign government or any officer
or agent thereof, with intent to
influence the measures or conduct of any foreign government
or of any officer or agent thereof,
in relation to any disputes or
controversies with the United
States, or to defeat the measures
of the United States.”
A spokesman for Mr. Kerry
declined to comment on Mr.
Trump’s charges of illegality. A
statement released by Mr. Kerry’s office said he “stays in touch
with his former counterparts
around the world just like every
previous secretary of state.”
“Like America’s closest allies,”
the statement said, “he believes
it is important that the nuclear
agreement, which took the world
years to negotiate, remain effective as countries focus on stability in the region.”
It appears that whether Mr.
Kerry violated the law is a matter of legal interpretation.
Since the Iran deal is still in
place — as of Monday — Mr.
Kerry has not undermined or
opposed American foreign policy,
said Daniel Rice, a fellow at the
Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection at Georgetown University.
“Because the Trump administration has not yet decided to
reimpose sanctions on Iran, the
existing nuclear deal framework
— and not its repudiation — is
currently a ‘measure of the
United States,’” Mr. Rice said.
“By attempting to salvage the
deal, Kerry plainly did not intend
to ‘defeat’ a measure of the
United States.”
But it also depends on exactly
what Mr. Kerry said to the foreign officials, said Eric Posner, a
law professor at the University of
Chicago.
“If he has gone further than
merely expressing his opinion,
and tried to influence the actions
of foreign governments by, for
example, making promises on
behalf of a future Democratic
president or Congress, and these
promises are credible, there is an
arguable Logan Act violation,”
Mr. Posner said.
The legal scholars interviewed
by The Times all stressed that
the law is a paper tiger that has
never been seriously enforced.
(Two said it may be unconstitutional.)
Still, the Logan Act has occasionally resurfaced as a political
cudgel.
While it’s “perfectly plausible”
to argue that Mr. Kerry violated
the Logan Act, “it’s been violated
hundreds of times” with no repercussions, said Michael McConnell, a law professor at Stanford University.
Accused violators include
Henry A. Wallace, the former
Even if there are
violations of the
Logan Act, the law
is a paper tiger.
vice president who lobbied
against the Truman Doctrine;
Jane Fonda, the actress who
traveled to Hanoi during the
Vietnam War; the Rev. Jesse L.
Jackson, the civil rights activist
who visited Cuba during a presidential campaign against Ronald
Reagan; and 47 Republican
senators who wrote to the government of Iran in 2015 to oppose
the nuclear deal before it was
struck.
The law resurfaced again last
year, when it was revealed that
Michael T. Flynn, Mr. Trump’s
first national security adviser,
had discussed sanctions with the
Russian ambassador in late 2016
— before the president’s inauguration.
And Mr. Trump himself may
have committed the same offense as Mr. Kerry when, during
the 2016 campaign, he invited
Russia to hack Hillary Clinton’s
emails, said Timothy Zick, a law
professor at the College of
William and Mary. (The suggestion of a Logan Act violation did
emerge at the time.)
But given that there have been
no prosecutions under the Logan
Act in its history, scholars said
it’s hard to predict whether Mr.
Kerry would be convicted —
even if a case was brought
against him.
The Logan Act has “been a
dead letter for hundreds of
years,” Mr. McConnell said. “Its
only function is mischief.”
Books of The Times:
Monday through Friday,
The New York Times
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
Now there’s a faster way
to treat strokes:
Take the hospital to the patient.
The Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit
It’s a stroke treatment center—complete with a CT scanner and access to an expert neurologist
—that can travel straight to the patient, saving them precious time and precious brain cells. If you
suspect someone’s having a stroke, call 911. Available in Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn.
Learn more about the MSTU at nyp.org/mstu
N
A7
A8
N
THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
PHOTOGRAPHS BY MERIDITH KOHUT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Armando Beria and family members setting out to harvest taro, a staple of the indigenous Warao people, in Jobure de Guayo, Venezuela. This remote settlement has been hit hard by AIDS.
‘My People Are Dying’: AIDS Imperils an Ancient Culture
sought work in far-off Venezuelan cities
as house cleaners, security guards, laborers, street vendors and prostitutes.
A study published in 2013 warned of a
burgeoning epidemic. It found that
nearly 10 percent of Warao adults living
in eight villages in the lower delta region
tested positive for H.I.V. — “a dramatic
high prevalence,” the researchers wrote.
In one community, about 35 percent of
those tested were H.I.V. positive.
By comparison, H.I.V. prevalence
among the adult population in South and
Central America was 0.5 percent.
Worsening matters, the type of virus
that had entered the population was particularly aggressive, with the potential to
generate AIDS more quickly than other
strains — within several years of infection.
The epidemic, the researchers
warned, could be “devastating” for the
Warao.
Shortages Worsen Crisis
In Crumbling Venezuela
By KIRK SEMPLE
JOBURE DE GUAYO, Venezuela —
After the other villagers had drifted
away to do chores, Rafael Pequeño finally found himself alone with the headman and opened the hardcover notebook
on his lap. The men were sitting in a
palm-thatched hut perched on stilts on
the edge of a branch of the Orinoco River.
It had been two years since Mr. Pequeño, a nurse, had visited this poor indigenous village in the remote Orinoco
Delta region of eastern Venezuela. His
notebook contained a registry of patients
who had been part of an H.I.V. treatment
program that, like the rest of the nation’s
public health system, had fallen apart.
Mr. Pequeño took a roll call of the infected.
“Armando Beria,” he said, reading
from the top of the list.
“Still here,” replied the headman,
Ramón Quintín.
“Ebelio Quinino,” the nurse continued.
“Still here.”
“Mario Navarro.”
“Dead.”
“Wilmer Medina.”
“Dead.”
Of the 15 villagers who had been part
of the treatment program, five had died
of AIDS, the disease caused by H.I.V. In
all, more than 40 residents of this village
had died of AIDS or AIDS-like symptoms
in the past several years — in a settlement of only about 200.
“I’m very worried,” Mr. Pequeño said
quietly. He looked stunned. “It’s wiping
out this community.”
In recent years, amid profound shortages of medicine coupled with widespread ignorance, H.I.V. has spread rapidly throughout the Orinoco Delta and is
believed to have killed hundreds of the
Warao indigenous people who live in settlements like Jobure de Guayo along the
serpentine channels winding through
this swampy, forested landscape.
Even under the best of circumstances,
it might be difficult to control the disease’s spread in such an isolated and deprived area. But the government has ignored the issue, medical specialists and
Warao community leaders say, leaving
the population to face a profound existential threat alone. Already, deaths and
the flight of survivors have gutted at
least one village.
Dr. Jacobus de Waard, an expert on infectious diseases at the Central University of Venezuela, who has worked and
traveled among the Warao for years, said
that nothing less than the future of the
ancient culture was at stake.
“If there’s no intervention, it’s going to
affect the existence of the Warao,” he
warned. “A part of the population is going
to disappear.”
The epidemic plaguing the Warao is a
crisis within a crisis, a dramatic example
of how Venezuela is failing to grapple
with a resurgent AIDS emergency even
as the annual numbers of new H.I.V. infections and AIDS-related deaths around
the world continue to decline.
Under President Hugo Chávez, Venezuela’s H.I.V./AIDS prevention and
treatment program was world class and
the country seemed to have the disease
under control.
But during the presidency of Nicolás
Maduro, which began in 2013, VenezueIsayen Herrera contributed reporting
A Government in Denial
Top, Rafael Pequeño, a nurse, bemoaned the lack of medicine: “I’m like a soldier without a weapon.” Above, Eleuterio González, a wisidatu, or shamanic
healer, performed a ritual on a villager who has had headaches for months.
la’s economy has crumbled, causing crippling shortages of medicine and diagnostic tests, and compelling many of the
country’s best doctors to emigrate.
The government has even stopped distributing free condoms, which can help
prevent the spread of H.I.V., activists say.
The price for a pack can cost the equivalent of several days’ pay at minimum
wage.
The government’s inaction, the activists say, is especially egregious considering that President Maduro — like his
predecessor — has cast himself as a
champion of the nation’s indigenous people.
The Maduro administration did not respond to requests for interviews with officials of the national H.I.V. prevention
program, the health ministry and the
ministry of indigenous affairs.
The government has released health
statistics only sporadically in recent
years, and doctors often dispute their accuracy. But AIDS activists and specialists say that H.I.V. infection rates and the
number of AIDS-related deaths have
skyrocketed. So, too, has the number of
once stable H.I.V. patients whose health
has collapsed for lack of a regular supply
of antiretroviral drugs and medicines to
treat opportunistic diseases.
“It’s a humanitarian emergency — we
have to be very emphatic,” insisted
Jhonatan Rodríguez, president of
StopVIH, a Venezuelan activist group.
Among the most disadvantaged Venezuelans, he said, are the Warao.
“It’s a population that has been totally
neglected.”
An Isolated People
The Warao, Venezuela’s second-largest indigenous group, have made their
home for many centuries in the soggy
delta region where the muddy waters of
the Orinoco River fan out into distributaries that merge with the Atlantic
Ocean.
Numbering about 30,000, they now
live in hundreds of impoverished settlements in open-sided stilt homes perched
at the edge of the region’s streams and
rivers.
The area is hard to reach. There are no
roads, so travel is restricted to boats,
mostly dugout canoes. There are no telephone landlines, and nearly the entire region is without cellphone signal. Only the
largest villages have electricity, though
usually only at night — and the generators that provide it often run out of fuel or
break down.
It can take several hours traveling by
high-speed powerboat to reach the settlements from the state capital, Tucupita,
but a fuel mafia now controls the distribution of gasoline in the region, driving
costs beyond the reach of nearly every
resident. River pirates make access to
the delta even harder.
H.I.V. was first detected among the
Warao in 2007 and is thought to have
been introduced by a returning migrant,
one of many young Warao who have
The disease was also spreading in an
information vacuum among the Warao.
“Some of them simply never believed
me or paid attention to me,” recalled Dr.
Julian A. Villalba, a Venezuelan who led
the investigation and is now a clinical fellow at Harvard Medical School.
He also ran up against government intransigence. As officials became aware
of his alarming discoveries, he said,
some tried to intimidate him and impede
his work.
“They didn’t want to show that the
politics were failing,” Dr. Villalba said, referring to the Maduro government.
Since then, the absence of prevention
programs and severe language barriers
— many Warao are illiterate and do not
speak fluent Spanish — have allowed ignorance about the disease to flourish.
Msgr. Ernesto José Romero, the apostolic vicar of Tucupita, said he has repeatedly spoken with the state governor and
other officials about the crisis, to little effect.
“We have a government that wants to
silence everything,” Monsignor Romero
said in an interview in San Francisco de
Guayo, a town in the lower delta region.
“They say it will be resolved. But more
and more people die.”
Dr. Villalba estimates that more than
80 percent of the Warao he diagnosed between 2010 and 2012 are now dead.
Mr. Pequeño, the nurse, knew all of
those victims. They were his friends,
neighbors and relatives. Many were also
his patients. Born and raised in San
Francisco de Guayo, Mr. Pequeño has
worked for 15 years at a small medical
clinic there. He has also served as the
state’s point person in the lower delta region for the distribution of antiretroviral
medicine.
Not that there has been much to hand
out.
From time to time, he said, officials in
Tucupita send boxes of medicine downriver, sometimes with visiting medical
students from the Central University of
Venezuela. But it is never enough to ensure a steady supply for all the H.I.V.positive patients in the area, he said, and
most of the time he has none to give.
“I’m like a soldier without a weapon,”
Mr. Pequeño, 34, lamented. “I can’t do
anything.”
Stranded in San Francisco de Guayo
for most of the past couple of years, Mr.
Pequeño lost touch with many of the
H.I.V. patients in villages he had been
monitoring. But on a recent morning, he
hitched a ride with me to go check in on
some of them.
Approaching Jobure de Guayo and
clutching his notebook with the patient
registry, Mr. Pequeño pointed the boat
toward the compound of Mr. Quintín, the
headman. As the boat puttered along the
waterfront, people warmly hailed the
nurse from their homes.
Mr. Pequeño took a seat on the floor of
the Quintín family’s communal kitchen,
an open-sided platform made from handhewn wood planks and protected by a
palm-thatched roof. The air sung with
sounds of a preindustrial society. The
crackle of a wood fire. A guacamaya’s
squawk. The swish of an oar pulling
through the water. The knock of a machete against raw taro.
No family in Jobure de Guayo had
been hit as hard by the epidemic as the
headman’s extended clan, which had lost
at least 12 people to AIDS or AIDS-like
symptoms in the last two years. Men,
women and children died in their palmfiber hammocks, slung in six houses
clustered around the communal kitchen.
“There is no medicine in the hospital.
Why?” Mr. Quintín asked. “In the past, if
you were sick, they did everything possible to hospitalize you. Now, no,” he said.
“My people are dying.”
Armando Beria, 25, a resident of
Jobure de Guayo, was on Mr. Pequeño’s
patient list. He said he first heard about
AIDS when a doctor visited the settlement in 2013 and tested people for the virus. “I did the examination and he said,
‘You have it, too,’” Mr. Beria recalled.
He believes he may have contracted it
through having sex with other men when
he was younger — a common practice
among young Warao, especially before
they are married. Researchers believe
that men having sex with men was an important means of early dissemination of
H.I.V. among the Warao. But the virus is
now rampant in the broader population,
and heterosexual sex and breast milk
now appear to be other common forms of
transmission.
Mr. Beria has dealt with recurring
bouts of diarrhea, headaches and muscle
pain, and has begun to lose weight,
though he continues to have enough energy to fish and harvest taro for his wife
and four young children.
His wife has twice tested negative for
H.I.V., most recently a year ago. But telltale lesions have started to appear on her
body. “I think she has it now,” he said,
though he is powerless to know for sure
in the absence of tests.
Medication adherence among the
Warao — when there is medication available — is poor, Mr. Pequeño said. Patients abandon their medicine because it
makes them feel nauseated, or because
they start to feel better.
And in the absence of antiretroviral
drugs, many Warao have sought solutions in traditional medicine, turning to a
key figure in Warao society, the wisidatu,
a kind of shamanic healer. The sickness,
many Warao believe, is the result of
witchcraft.
Some in Mr. Quintín’s family say they
have fallen victim to a curse inflicted on
them by a former village resident whom
others accuse of being a hoarotu, a
darker kind of shaman.
Mikaela Perez, 33, a granddaughter of
Mr. Quintín, said the conflict originated
in a dispute between her father and another villager. She said the villager put a
hex on her father, whose death from
AIDS-like symptoms was followed by a
rash of others in the family.
“A family that’s coming to an end,” Ms.
Perez said, her expression plain. “Before
we all lived together very happily. But
now it’s coming to an end.”
THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
A9
A Newspaper Is Sold in Cambodia, Silencing the Last Voice of a Free Press
By JULIA WALLACE
and MIKE IVES
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia —
A newspaper widely seen as the
last bastion of a free press in Cambodia has been sold to a Malaysian investor with ties to Cambodia’s strongman prime minister,
a move that critics say further
highlights the country’s slide toward outright authoritarianism.
The English-language newspaper, The Phnom Penh Post, reported the sale on Sunday. The investor, Sivakumar S. Ganapathy,
is the chief executive of a public
relations firm that has worked on
behalf of Prime Minister Hun Sen.
Intervention in the paper’s editorial decision making came almost immediately after the sale
was announced. Several senior
editors resigned or were fired after they refused to excise a story
from the paper’s website about
the relationship between Mr.
Sivakumar’s firm and the Cambodian government.
The sale comes about seven
months after the government
forced The Post’s longtime rival,
The Cambodia Daily, to close over
allegations that it had not paid
millions of dollars in taxes, and
two months before a general election. The Post itself had owed $3.9
million in taxes, but that bill was
settled as part of the sale, The Post
reported.
“Someone wanted to make sure
the message was crystal clear:
The Post’s days as a proud, independent local English-language
newspaper
are
numbered,”
Sophal Ear, a Cambodia expert at
Occidental College in Los Angeles, said in an email. “And if one
stake isn’t enough through The
Post’s heart, a second one awaits.”
That second blow to the paper’s
independence came quickly.
Hours after it published online an
article about Mr. Sivakumar’s
company, Asia PR, representatives of the publisher appeared in
The Post’s newsroom and demanded that the article be removed.
“The first thing they said was to
take the article down, right now,”
said Ananth Baliga, one of the article’s authors.
Stuart White, the managing editor; Brendan O’Byrne; the business editor; Jenni Reid, the web
editor; and Mr. Baliga all refused
to comply and resigned.
The paper’s editor in chief, Kay
Kimsong, also refused and was
dismissed.
In a statement, Mr. Sivakumar
blasted The Post’s editorial staff
as “careless and vicious” and
called the article a “disgrace,”
adding that it “smells of malice.”
For a quarter-century, as the
United States and Europe helped
Cambodia rebuild from the ravages of the genocidal rule of the
Khmer Rouge, they tied billions of
dollars in aid to an effort to transform Cambodia into a liberal democracy. But Mr. Hun Sen has relied increasingly in recent years
on China’s political and financial
Julia Wallace reported from Phnom Penh, and Mike Ives from
Hong Kong.
ADAM DEAN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
The printing presses of The Phnom Penh Post in the Cambodian capital. The country’s leader has shuttered dissenting news outlets and jailed dozens of critics.
An investor with ties
to the strongman
prime minister.
support.
The country is nominally democratic, but Mr. Hun Sen, the longest-ruling leader in Asia, has recently shuttered dissenting news
outlets, jailed dozens of critics and
dissolved the main opposition
party, the Cambodia National Rescue Party, or C.N.R.P. — apparently with Beijing’s blessing.
“With or without the sale, press
freedom in Cambodia is close to
nonexistent,”
said
Kem
Monovithya, the opposition party’s deputy director general of
public affairs and the daughter of
its leader, Kem Sokha, who was
detained in September and accused of plotting a United Statesfunded coup — a charge he denies.
Sam Rainsy, the former leader
of the opposition party, who
abruptly quit last year in the face
of government pressure, said that
The Post had recently published
two of his letters to the editor, but
that he did not expect the new
management to continue the practice.
“The prospects were already
very bleak for a free and fair election” in July, Mr. Sam Rainsy added in a telephone interview from
Paris, where he lives in exile. “But
the disappearance of The Phnom
Penh Post as an independent
newspaper
makes
those
prospects even worse.”
More than 20 members of The
Post’s staff issued a statement expressing “disgust for this decision
made in contradiction to the values of a free press that our hardworking staff have upheld since
1992.”
“Our article was written in an
attempt to maintain the transparency and integrity of our paper as
we have done for more than 25
years,” they wrote.
The Post’s sale may indicate
that Mr. Hun Sun’s administration
has decided that it no longer
needs to allow a free media to operate in the country as a concession for getting Western aid, said
Shawn Crispin, the Bangkokbased Southeast Asia representative for the Committee to Protect
Journalists, a nonpartisan advocacy group based in New York.
“Now China is its main patron,
and they have no such interests,”
he said.
Mr. Crispin said he worried that
the tax bill The Post was facing
might have been a pressure tactic
used to force the newspaper’s pre-
vious owner, Bill Clough, to sell,
rather than fight the bill in court.
In a video uploaded by The Phnom Penh Post last year, Mr.
Clough said that the newspaper’s
independence and loyal following
were its “major distinguishing
factor” and that his staff was “remarkably free” from government
interference.
Huy Vannak, an Interior Ministry official, said that the prime
minister was “too busy doing the
affairs of the nation” to concern
himself with the sale of a newspaper, adding that he was unaware
of any prior business relationship
between Mr. Hun Sen and Mr.
Sivakumar’s company.
The newspaper’s new owner,
Mr. Sivakumar, is the chief executive of Asia PR, a Malaysian firm
based in Kuala Lumpur. Its website says, without elaborating,
that Mr. Hun Sen’s “entry into the
government seat” was among its
government-related projects.
The website for Asia PR offers a
service to political clients it calls
“covert PR,” in which it promises
to “exploit and explain an issue to
prove that the politician is good.”
The paper’s new ownership
said on Sunday in a statement that
it was “fully committed” to upholding the 26-year-old newspaper’s “principles/independence
without infringing any relevant
laws and regulations of the Kingdom of Cambodia,” The Post re-
ported.
But Mr. Sophal Ear, the analyst,
said he saw the language about
obeying laws as “a signal to the
authorities” about the newspaper’s future. “I think the odds are
greater than 50/50 the paper’s
coverage will change — and for
the worse,” he said.
Asia PR’s website calls Mr.
Sivakumar “a journalist by discipline and training from the United
Kingdom and Australia” who was
previously editor in chief of The
Eastern Times, a newspaper in
the Malaysian state of Sarawak.
His personal assistant said Monday that he was unavailable for
comment and would be out of the
office for about two weeks.
Bandits Kill 45 in a Nigerian Village
By EMMANUEL AKINWOTU
ABUJA, Nigeria — Heavily
armed men killed 45 people and
wounded 12 in an assault on a village in northwestern Nigeria on
Saturday, the latest in a wave of
mass killings that have shocked
the country, exposed serious gaps
in its security and shaken its political foundations.
The gunmen, described by officials as bandits, entered the village of Gwaska, a rural community in Kaduna State, at around 2:30
p.m., killing indiscriminately before armed vigilantes drove them
off. According to local residents,
the nearest state police force,
based far from the remote village,
arrived hours after the killings
had ended.
Attacks in northern and central
Nigeria have left more than 1,500
people dead this year, according to
human rights groups, undermining
President
Muhammadu
Buhari, who was elected in 2015
on a vow to improve stability and
security. Instead, conditions have
deteriorated, but despite serious
health problems, growing criticism and calls for him to step
down, Mr. Buhari, 75, announced
last month that he planned to run
for a second term.
The country has been plagued
by gangs of armed bandits preying on villagers, clashes between
herdsmen and farmers and the
continuing Islamist insurgency of
Boko Haram.
Witnesses described the attack
on Saturday as the worst in the
area in years. The village of
mostly farmers, potters and herders is surrounded by thick forest,
and it borders a national park that
has been a haven for bandit
groups that are accused of kidnappings, armed robbery and stealing livestock from isolated communities like Gwaska.
Austin Iwar, the police commissioner in Kaduna, said the killings
were part of a reprisal attack, af-
ter armed vigilantes who protect
the village had attacked the bandits in their hide-outs.
“Over the years there have
been problems between these
bandits and the vigilantes who
consistently try to prevent these
bandits from operating,” Mr. Iwar
said. “Two weeks back, the vigilantes attacked the bandits in the
thick of the forest, but because it
happened in the forest we only
learned of this recently.”
According to Mr. Iwar, the police had released 200 mobile units
A wave of mass
killings has shocked
a country.
to increase security in areas vulnerable to banditry.
On Monday, the president’s office released a statement describing the attacks as regrettable and
promising added security, including more troops and police officers for the area.
Mass killings by armed herdsmen, amid clashes with farming
communities in the central-belt
region of Nigeria, have claimed
the lives of hundreds of people.
The government had increased
security in affected states, but the
military spokesman, Gen. John
Agim, admitted last month that
there was no military presence in
Benue, the state most affected by
the clashes.
Chidi Odinkalu, a human rights
activist in Abuja, said there had
been a significant collapse of security in Nigeria.
“The government’s response in
these killings in Kaduna, as in Benue, as in all these affected regions, has been to deploy soldiers,” he said. “But the military is
stretched already so it is making
other security challenges worse.”
Moreover, officials are not trying
to understand or resolve “the root
causes of the problems,” he added.
Mr. Odinkalu said that the
killings by bandits could only happen because of government failings. “Banditry occurs in ungoverned territory,” he said. “It’s in
these rural areas with little or no
cover. The territory is completely
exposed, so at the heart of the issue is a crisis of governance.”
Mr. Buhari came to power
promising to end the Boko Haram
insurgency, which has left more
than 20,000 dead, and millions displaced and in need of humanitarian aid. He and the military have
repeatedly claimed to have defeated the terrorist group, but it
has stepped up its attacks this
year, killing hundreds of people at
mosques, markets and other gathering places.
Last week, at least 27 people
were killed when a suicide bombing ripped through a mosque and
market area in Adamawa State. In
February, Boko Haram militants
kidnapped 110 schoolgirls from
Dapchi Town, though they returned 104 of the girls less than a
month later; five other girls died,
and they continued to hold one,
Leah Sheribu, a Christian who refused to convert to Islam.
On Monday afternoon, the Nigerian Army said that it had rescued more than 1,000 people,
mostly women and children, who
had been held captive by Boko
Haram militants in the Bama area
of Borno State. The military has in
the past announced numerous
rescues of people kidnapped by
Boko Haram, but it generally offers few details about the operations and provides limited access
to journalists seeking to independently verify the claims.
According to Amnesty International, thousands of men women
and children have been abducted
by Boko Haram during its insurgency.
The Glory of Venice
Antoine Bouvard
Gifted artist. Captivating composition.
Architectural beauty. The master of
the Venetian genre, Antoine Bouvard
presents the grandeur of the Grand
Canal in this dynamic, original oil
painting. His gifted use of light and
atmospheric effects make his works
forever synonymous with the majesty
and mystique of the legendary
“City of Water.” Signed “Marc Aldine”
(pseudonym, lower right). Circa 1910.
Canvas: 253/4”h x 361/4”w; Frame: 3111/16”h x 425/8”w. #30-7709
630 Royal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana • 888-988-5248 • info@rauantiques.com • rauantiques.com
Since 1912, M.S. Rau Antiques has specialized in the world’s finest art, antiques and jewelry.
Backed by our unprecedented 125% Guarantee, we stand behind each and every piece.
A10
THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
Elections in Lebanon Lift Hezbollah’s Clout and Undercut the Prime Minister
By BEN HUBBARD
and HWAIDA SAAD
BEIRUT, Lebanon — Hezbollah and its political allies expanded their share of seats in Lebanon’s Parliament, increasing
their political clout at the expense
of the country’s Western-backed
prime minister, according to preliminary election results released
on Monday.
The outcome of Lebanon’s first
parliamentary elections in nine
years shored up Hezbollah’s position in a way that is likely to alarm
the United States, Israel and Gulf
Arab nations like Saudi Arabia.
Iran backs Hezbollah, a political
party and militant group that
maintains Lebanon’s most powerful military force and is considered a terrorist organization by
the United States. Iran has also invested in allies in Syria, Yemen
and Iraq, whose parliamentary
elections on Saturday could hand
victories to groups aligned with
Iran.
While the number of seats held
by Hezbollah itself remained
largely unchanged at around 13,
victories by political allies who
support its maintenance of a vast
arsenal increased the chances the
group would play a key role in a
coalition government and diminished the prospects for legislation
that would challenge its status.
The election’s biggest blow was
to the movement lead by Prime
Minister Saad Hariri, the coun-
AZIZ TAHER/REUTERS
Hezbollah supporters on Monday in Marjayoun, Lebanon, celebrated the gains the group and its allies made in Parliament.
try’s most prominent Sunni Muslim politician and an ally of the
West.
His group, the Future Movement, saw its parliamentary share
shrink by about one-third, to 21
seats from 33 seats, in the 128member body, Mr. Hariri told reporters on Monday.
In Lebanon’s complex, sectbased political system, the prime
minister must be a Sunni, while
the speaker of Parliament is a Shiite and the president is a Maronite
Christian.
While Mr. Hariri’s movement
lost ground to rival Sunnis, he still
appeared poised to keep his job as
prime minister.
It remained unclear late Monday when the Lebanese government would release the official results for the poll, which was held
on Sunday. That would begin negotiations to form a government, a
process that could drag on for
weeks or months.
Lebanon’s unique sectarian
make up and place in the region
make its politics about local issues
like jobs, infrastructure and
garbage collection as well as
about regional rivalries and alliances. In general, the country’s
politics have long broken down
between a camp affiliated with
Iran and one oriented toward
Saudi Arabia and the United
States.
Mr. Hariri, the leader of the latter camp, appears to have lost
ground because his supporters
were disappointed by his performance and because of the concessions he had to make to rival
parties to secure his post as prime
minister, said Emile Hokayem, an
analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, who
was in Lebanon for the vote.
The strong showing by Hezbollah and its allies could jeopardize
the country’s regional and international standing at a time when
its leaders are counting on international support to prop up the
economy, support the military and
deal with the burden of nearly 1
million refugees from neighboring
Syria.
“Lebanon is very exposed to the
Iran-centered turmoil in the region, so Hezbollah and the others
are going to have to navigate carefully if they want to avoid the consequences of that,” Mr. Hokayem
said.
Hezbollah’s leader, Hassan Nasrallah, said in a televised speech
on Monday that the results would
give “protection” to what his supporters call “the resistance,” or
the regional alliance opposed to
Israeli and American influence.
Kassem Qassir, a Lebanese political analyst close to Hezbollah,
said that the elections represented a victory for “the Iranian
axis” but that Hezbollah’s leaders
would seek to make decisions that
were good for the country as a
whole.
“They don’t want to control
Lebanon,” Mr. Qassir said. “The
country is facing many challenges, and Hezbollah is in need of
international and outside support.”
Other regional dynamics affected the vote.
Mr. Hariri has long been close to
Saudi Arabia, although that relationship has been under strain
since a bizarre episode last year
when he was summoned to the
Saudi capital, Riyadh, and forced
to announce his resignation.
While Mr. Hariri appears to
have mended his ties to the kingdom and its powerful crown
prince, Mohammed bin Salman,
the Saudis did not provide generous financial support for his campaign as they have in the past.
In recent years, Saudi Arabia
and Israel have become increasingly alarmed about Iran’s growing influence in the Arab world,
and they are likely to see further
evidence of this in the election results.
On Monday, a member of Israel’s security cabinet said that
the Lebanese state had become
indistinguishable from Hezbollah,
which he said would change Israel’s calculus should it wage a
new war against the militant
group.
“The State of Israel will not dif-
ferentiate between the sovereign
State of Lebanon and Hezbollah,
and will view Lebanon as responsible for any action from within its
territory,” Naftali Bennett, the education minister in Israel’s conservative coalition government,
wrote on Twitter on Monday.
The Lebanese government reported voter turnout at 49 percent, down from 54 percent the
last time legislative elections
were held in 2009. In Beirut, home
to about half of the country’s estimated 4.5 million people, turnout
was between 32 and 42 percent,
depending on the district.
While returning many of Lebanon’s power brokers to office, the
elections also brought in new
faces. An unprecedented number
of women candidates ran, and the
number in Parliament appeared
to rise to seven from four, which is
low compared to other states in
the region.
The campaign also saw the participation of dozens of independent candidates who said they represented “civil society” and who
focused on services like water and
electricity and criticized the established parties for corruption
and their inability to address the
country’s pressing problems.
At least one was reported to
have won, a female journalist.
Also winning a seat was Jamil
al-Sayyed, a retired general and
former intelligence chief who is a
close friend of President Bashar
al-Assad of Syria.
GHAZNI JOURNAL
A Government in Name Only in an Afghan City on the Brink
By JAWAD SUKHANYAR
GHAZNI CITY, Afghanistan —
What does it feel like to live in an
Afghan city on the brink of falling to the Taliban?
The residents of Ghazni, a
provincial capital of 280,000
people about 110 miles south of
the capital, Kabul, on a main
highway, can hardly tell anymore
who’s in charge, and fear has
become an everyday companion.
With the Taliban controlling
some of the road network around
Ghazni, citizens have long felt
vulnerable. But during a recent
visit, I kept hearing an even
greater sense of defenselessness.
Many here fear a full-on effort by
the Taliban to seize the city could
come at any time.
Not content to merely control
access to the city of 280,000, the
insurgents have begun attacking
police posts within it. The Taliban methodically extort money
— they say it is taxation — from
businesses in the city center,
including those near the government headquarters, and an increasing number of insurgents
live openly in the city. Their
fighters regularly kill officials,
security personnel and even
traffic police officers.
A Taliban court claims jurisdiction over the city and its outskirts, and carries out floggings,
and even, sometimes, stonings.
I have been to several Afghan
provinces influenced by the
Taliban, including Kunduz Province and its provincial capital
before it fell to the insurgents. In
those cities, the outskirts would
seem dodgy but there was always some sense of reassurance
of government control upon
entering the city center.
Ghazni, just a two-hour drive
from Kabul, felt edgier. Many
residents and even officials wondered out loud what the idea of a
city’s collapse even meant anymore, and whether they were not
living it already. The city is not
far from Khost, where 14 people
were killed Sunday in a bombing
as they lined up to register to
vote.
Just getting to Ghazni can be a
challenge.
Highway 1, the road that connects Kabul to the south of Afghanistan, has always been
dangerous. When American
military convoys were common
here, it was a frequent target for
roadside bombs. Now, with the
Americans mostly gone, its defense rests with Afghan troops,
and the Taliban have grown
bolder, often setting up surprise
checkpoints not far from governMujib Mashal contributed reporting from Kabul, Afghanistan.
UZBEK.
TURKMEN.
TAJIK.
KUNDUZ
A F G H A N I STA N
Ghazni
GHAZNI
100 MILES
Kabul
Khost
PAKISTAN
THE NEW YORK TIMES
The aftermath of a bomb that
exploded near an Afghan
Army vehicle in December in
Ghazni, a provincial capital of
280,000 people about 110
miles south of Kabul.
SAYED MUSTAFA/EPA, VIA SHUTTERSTOCK
ment outposts.
As a precaution, on a recent
trip, in case we ran into an insurgent checkpoint, I left in Kabul
my reporter’s badge and my
smartphone, which had government and foreign contacts in it.
The road is safe to travel only
during daylight, preferably 8
a.m. to 4 p.m., when soldiers
patrol. On my drive back to Kabul, I took the SIM card out of
my simpler cellphone — on
which I had received several
Feeling helpless before
an expected Taliban
siege.
calls from the office during our
trip — and held it in my fingers,
ready to throw it away if we
sensed danger.
One of my first interviews in
the area was with the family of a
traffic police officer, Ali Ahmad
Jalali, who was killed on April 20,
shot eight times. Their village,
Tauhidabad, is about six miles
from the center of Ghazni, down
a bumpy dirt road. His cousin,
Ishaq Bahrami, quickly ushered
me, for tea and conversation, to
premises where he had a property dealership.
Mr. Jalali, who had three children, had been a regular police
officer, but had shifted to the
traffic force. That was no protection. He was shot around 10 a.m.
when leaving his wife’s family’s
house.
“Where he was shot was not
100 meters away from the Afghan Army check post,” Mr.
Bahrami said.
Mr. Bahrami said he paid
about $40 to the Taliban last
year, but had not yet been approached for a further payment
this year.
The authorities in Ghazni
Province say the killings of security force personnel are usually
carried out by young men on
motorcycles, often using pistols
with silencers. While about 50
government employees were
killed in the city last year, the
count for one 30-day stretch in
March and April alone this year
stands at 10 dead.
Mohammad Arif Noori, the
spokesman for the provincial
governor, said that on May 1, an
Afghan soldier had been shot
and killed at midday in the Hadae-Qandar neighborhood of
Ghazni.
To get a better sense of the
security, I drove with a senior
police official into the heart of the
city. The commander, who asked
not to be named because he was
not authorized to brief the news
media, climbed a hill with me to
survey the area.
“The Taliban are present in the
city,” he said, pointing out a
particular neighborhood where
they were most prevalent. “They
have their homes here and can
do whatever they want to.”
“Most of them have guns in
their homes,” he continued, “and
we can’t do anything because we
do not have the ability. Even if
we arrest them, they will be out
of jail soon and will come after
the police to seek revenge.”
The commander bluntly acknowledged that his men were
outnumbered. For that Talibanheavy area, he had four police
officers, he said; a maximum of
three would be on duty at any
one time.
He suggested that they had
reached an accommodation with
the insurgents there to keep his
men from being targeted. He did
not specify the nature of the
arrangement because of the
sensitivity involved.
Across the city of Ghazni, store
owners and other businesspeople
said they had no choice but to
pay the Taliban representatives
who say they are imposing taxes.
The insurgents come once a year
and take the money they gather
to Mongur, an area outside the
city, officials said.
A private radio and television
station, next to a police station,
had to pay about $1,700, employees said. A small shop on a main
road not far from the governor’s
office paid a little less than $200,
its owner, Hajji Fateh, revealed.
“The agent came and took the
money,” Mr. Fateh said. “He said,
‘If you don’t pay, I will put this
pistol to your head.’ So how can I
not pay?”
The governor of Ghazni, Abdul
Karim Matin, acknowledged the
practice. “The Taliban collect
money from the people, unfortunately, be it shopkeepers or
anyone, in the name of tax,” he
said. “This is extortion, not tax.”
Before the interview, Mr. Matin was busy with security meetings, uniformed men going in
and out of his office. When he
moves from one building to another inside the governor’s compound, he drives in an armored
S.U.V., sometimes escorted by
security forces in Humvees.
Things got particularly bad at
the end of April, when the central
government in Kabul expressed
fear that the Taliban had made it
a priority to overrun Ghazni. A
late-night call from the authorities in the capital to the regional
army commander sent forces
rushing to the city.
The attacks turned out to be
less severe than expected, although at least four police officers were killed in an outpost in
the Khasheek neighborhood of
the city. The army has been
keeping more troops than usual
in Ghazni, and an outright Taliban takeover has seemed unlikely.
On Sunday, though, Mr.
Bahrami said by telephone that
fierce fighting was underway in
Ghazni and that all the police
checkpoints in the Khasheek
neighborhood had fallen to the
Taliban.
At the end of my trip to
Ghazni, as we drove back to
Kabul, my heart beat faster until
we entered the relative safety of
the capital city. I thought about
the shrinking government control in the province I had just left.
When the Taliban infiltrate at
will, shoot officials in broad
daylight, and run a vast taxcollection system up to the gates
of the governor’s compound, how
strong can the central government’s authority be, even in its
own backyard?
I recalled one resident of
Ghazni, Mohammad Anwar, 60,
who said his son, Mujtaba, a
22-year-old policeman, was
gunned down on the street by a
Taliban assassin this year. He
despaired about how frequent
open killings were becoming in
the city.
“The government is very
careless about the ordinary
people of Ghazni,” he said.
“Losing a child is so painful,”
he added, beginning to weep.
“You endure a lot of hardship to
raise a son, and then someone
simply takes him from you.”
The arrest of five
Taliban militants,
far left, in April in
Ghazni province.
Middle, a government compound
after an overnight
attack by Taliban
militants. Near left,
a Facebook photo of
a traffic police officer, Ali Ahmad
Jalali, who was
killed on April 20.
ZAKERIA HASHIMI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
SAYED MUSTAFA/EPA, VIA SHUTTERSTOCK
THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
A11
N
Italy’s President Seeks to End Impasse
By JASON HOROWITZ
ANTHI PAZIANOU/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
The cleared Spanish firefighters, from left, Manuel Blanco, José Enrique Rodríguez and Julio Latorre.
Migrant Rescuers Cleared in Greece
By NIKI KITSANTONIS
ATHENS — Five volunteers for
European aid groups who worked
in Greece at the height of the migrant crisis were cleared of
charges of illegally bringing migrants into the country by a Greek
court on the Aegean island of Lesbos on Monday.
The case had been closely
watched by migrant relief and rescue groups, especially in Denmark and Spain, where the volunteers were from, because their defense lawyers and supporters said
it was an attempt to criminalize
humanitarian action.
The issue has taken on broad
importance across Europe and especially in the Mediterranean as
the migrant crisis has continued,
if at a lower level than when the
defendants in Greece volunteered
two years ago. The political divisions stoked by migration have
left the line between humanitarian intervention and criminal interaction increasingly treacherous to navigate in many countries
for nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs.
“This is a strong signal to other
NGOs and just people working for
humanity,” said one of the Danish
defendants, Salam Aldeen, the
founder of Team Humanity,
speaking by telephone after the
verdict. “Saving lives is not a
crime, rescuing people is not a
crime.”
Mr. Aldeen said he was now eager to return home after nearly
two years in Greece — his pretrial
conditions included being barred
from leaving the country. He continued working as a rescuer during that time, he said.
“I lost everything but I did not
lose my humanity,” he said.
Along with Mr. Aldeen and another Dane, Mohammed elAbassi, who also worked for Team
Humanity, three Spanish firefighters who volunteered for the Spanish group Proem-Aid faced as
many as 15 years in prison.
The five were arrested on Jan.
14, 2016, just a few hours after successfully rescuing 51 migrants, according to Mr. Aldeen, the owner
of the boat on which the five were
working.
Not long after their operation,
the men said, they had alerted the
Greek authorities to another migrant boat in trouble, without approaching it. They were arrested
soon after. “We didn’t even see the
boat,” Mr. Aldeen had contended.
The prosecution drew condemnation from some Spanish officials and aid and advocacy
groups, including Amnesty International, as Team Humanity and
Proem-Aid sought to raise public
awareness about the case.
“Since when is it a crime to save
lives?” Team Humanity’s website
asked.
Last month, the three Spanish
firefighters — Manuel Blanco,
José Enrique Rodríguez and Julio
Latorre — held a news conference
alongside Spain’s foreign minister,
Raphael Minder contributed reporting from Madrid, Martin
Selsøe Sørensen from Copenhagen,
and Gaia Pianigiani from Rome.
Alfonso Dastis, and the volunteers
received backing from politicians,
particularly in Andalusia, their
home region.
Before the verdict, Cristina
Morata, an official from the city
hall of Seville, the capital of Andalusia, said she hoped that “common sense” would prevail after
the men had already waited two
years for a ruling.
A delegation of politicians from
Andalusia traveled to Lesbos to
show support for the defendants.
Verónica Pérez, a Socialist politician who joined the delegation,
said, “Humanitarian aid should
never be condemned or sentenced
but instead the opposite: It should
be valued.”
In Denmark, Team Humanity
had raised money to help cover
Mr. Aldeen’s legal fees, accusing
the Greek government of treating
him like a criminal for trying to
Supporters see an
attempt to criminalize
humanitarian action.
help refugees.
Mr. Aldeen has been met with
great sympathy in Denmark. Yet
other well-meaning Danes have
similarly faced legal jeopardy. After the 2015 refugee crisis, hundreds of Danes were convicted of
human trafficking for offering
asylum seekers a meal or a ride
from towns near the German border to train stations and ports with
connections to Sweden.
Mr. Aldeen, the son of an Iraqi
father and a Moldovan mother, is
himself a former asylum seeker
who left Moldova at the age of 9
and grew up in Denmark. He said
he traveled to Greece in September 2015 after televised images of
a drowned Syrian child, Alan
Kurdi, who washed up on a Turkish beach, inspired him to help.
The Kurdi family, like thousands of others who crossed or
tried to cross the Aegean, were
refugees from the war in Syria.
Many, including children like
Alan, continue to die.
“It changed my life,” Mr. Aldeen
said, noting that he gave up plans
to set up a small construction
company and instead founded
Team Humanity.
His lawyers called the case politically motivated. “I believe the
defense we’ve put together is
rather strong,” Mr. Aldeen’s Danish lawyer, Christian Dahlager,
told Politiken, a Danish daily.
“But it’s obvious that from the
side of the Greek authorities
there’s a colossal interest in establishing that it is human trafficking
or attempt of trafficking, as it deters others from doing the same,”
he said.
The case joined an increasing
number in Europe that have
placed migrant rescue groups in
the legal cross hairs. Italian authorities have searched and sometimes seized rescue boats over the
past year, accusing them of abetting human smuggling and illegal
immigration.
Earlier this year, Italian authorities seized the boat of a Spanish group, Proactiva Open Arms,
that had picked up migrants in international waters and took them
to Italy, instead of letting Libya’s
coast guard take them back to
North Africa.
In recent months, the often rapid intervention of the Libyan
Coast Guard when migrant boats
ran adrift has complicated the scenario at sea. Aid workers have reported threats, including gunfire
that has been aimed at their vessels.
At the peak of the refugee crisis
in late 2015 and early 2016, thousands of asylum seekers were arriving on the islands of the Aegean
from Turkey every day.
Lesbos bore the brunt of that influx, prompting volunteers from
all over the world to visit the island in a bid to help Greece’s
strained coast guard officers.
Greek authorities occasionally expressed concern, however, about
the difficulty of coordinating with
voluntary workers.
Arrivals from Turkey have increased in recent weeks with the
improved spring weather, though
the influx is far smaller than that
at the peak of the crisis.
Greek authorities are now
warning of a new potential crisis
at the country’s land border with
Turkey, where arrivals have increased threefold compared with
last year, according to Greece’s
migration minister, Dimitris Vitsas.
SERGEY PONOMAREV FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
A volunteer directing a migrant boat arriving at Lesbos, Greece,
in 2016. Such interventions are not welcomed by some officials.
Inventor Won’t Appeal Murder Conviction
By MARTIN SELSOE SORENSEN
COPENHAGEN — Peter Madsen, a Danish inventor, will not appeal his conviction for killing a
journalist aboard the submarine
he built, prosecutors said, in a new
twist to one of the most-watched
— and most gruesome — criminal
cases in recent European history.
Mr. Madsen will appeal the life
sentence a court imposed on him
— a rare penalty in Denmark,
even in murder cases — but he
will not challenge the verdict delivered on April 25 that he was
guilty of sexually assaulting and
killing Kim Wall, and desecrating
her body. “The appeal case will
only concern the sentencing, and
not the issue of guilt,” the Copenhagen District prosecutor’s office
wrote on Twitter.
Peter Madsen’s lawyer, Betina
Hald Engmark, said in a text message that the move was “certainly
no recognition” of guilt.
Even with a life sentence, Mr.
Madsen could be considered for
release in as little as 12 years.
Ms. Wall, 30, who was Swedish,
was last seen alive on Aug. 10,
when she boarded the vessel,
planning to interview Mr. Madsen, 47. Mr. Madsen, who had designed submarines and founded a
company to build spacecraft, sank
the sub and was rescued the next
day.
Ms. Wall’s torso later washed
up on a beach south of Copenhagen, while other body parts were
found by police divers.
Mr. Madsen admitted to dismembering Ms. Wall’s body, but
insisted that she had died in an accident, though his accounts
changed repeatedly. But evidence
presented at trial showed that he
had planned the killing in detail —
even discussing it with people —
but had struggled to find a victim;
three other women had declined
his invitations.
“It was not premeditated
against Kim Wall, but against the
next women who wanted to go
along with him on the submarine,”
the prosecutor Jakob BuchJepsen said after the verdict.
Ms. Wall was a successful freelance journalist who had reported
from far-flung parts of the globe
for a number of publications, including The New York Times. Paradoxically, she died a violent
death not in some distant, dangerous place, but in one of the safest
societies in the world, about 45
minutes from where she grew up.
Her death, and the investigation and trial of Mr. Madsen, drew
worldwide media attention.
On the night of her disappearance, Ms. Wall was set to host her
own farewell party, as she and her
boyfriend were days away from
moving to Beijing. Her family,
friends and international organizations have established grants
and awards in her name.
ROME — President Sergio
Mattarella took Italy’s gridlocked
politics into his own hands on
Monday night.
Two months after inconclusive
elections created a political stalemate, Mr. Mattarella asked his
country’s bickering political leaders to support a neutral caretaker
government of his own choosing.
It would last until they got their
act together and formed a sustainable parliamentary majority or
until new elections, as early as
this summer but no later than
early next year.
Speaking at the Quirinal Palace
on Monday night after a third, and
apparently final, round of fruitless
consultations with party leaders,
the mild-mannered Mr. Mattarella
seemed a bit vexed as he called
the situation “anomalous” and admonished the politicians for their
lack of progress.
“It would be the first time in the
history of the republic,” he said,
that the Parliament elected by
Italians was dissolved before it
even went to work and selected a
cabinet and prime minister.
Mr. Mattarella, 76, with fluffy
white hair and discretion honed
during his years as a Christian
Democratic politician, is motivated most by a search for stability. A
Sicilian, he entered politics after a
Mafia gunman in 1980 shot and
killed his brother, then the region’s
president, at point-blank range.
Mr. Mattarella made clear that
Italy, facing critical issues such as
the euro and migrant policies in
Europe, and needing to approve a
budget and prevent automatic tax
increases at home, could no longer wait while the right-wing
League party, the anti-establishment Five Star Movement or others ironed out an agreement.
“The unwillingness of all of
them was confirmed this morning,” he said, adding that there
wasn’t “any possibility to form a
majority government.”
Mr. Mattarella, who usually has
a ceremonial role but is imbued by
the Italian Constitution with great
power during moments of political
chaos, said the government led
until this point by Prime Minister
Paolo Gentiloni was appreciated,
but no longer viable. “It’s necessary to give life to a new government,” he said. “One can no longer
wait.”
More than half of Italians gave
their support to the League and
the Five Star Movement on March
Gaia Pianigiani contributed reporting.
ANDREAS SOLARO/A.F.P. — GETTY IMAGES
“One can no longer wait,” Sergio Mattarella said.
4, but neither won enough votes to
win a majority in Parliament. Mr.
Mattarella argued that the parties
would have more time to work out
their disagreements while a “neutral” government did the actual
governing.
Mr. Mattarella, a former member of Parliament, a defense and
education minister and a judge on
Italy’s constitutional court, became president in 2015 and since
then has sought to stay above the
political fray.
In keeping with his trademark
aversion to drama, Mr. Mattarella
sought to avoid a return to the
polls in the summer or fall, which
could produce the same impasse.
He said he hoped the parties could
reach an agreement by the end of
December, when his caretaker
government would expire. If not,
he said, elections should be held in
the new year.
Italy’s leading politicians did
not want to wait that long.
The leaders of the Five Star
Movement, Luigi Di Maio, and the
League, Matteo Salvini, met on
Monday for the first time since the
elections to pick a date for new
elections.
“July 8 is the first possible date
to vote, and Di Maio also agrees,”
Mr. Salvini told reporters.
On Monday morning, Mr.
Salvini, whose party won the most
votes in a center-right coalition
with former Prime Minister Silvio
Berlusconi, urged Mr. Mattarella
to give his alliance a mandate to
seek enough support in Parliament to form a government. But
with the coalition about 50 seats
short of a majority, Mr. Mattarella
did not bother.
Mr. Salvini then rejected the
president’s offer on Monday
evening.
“Mattarella wants a ‘neutral
government’?
Please,”
Mr.
Salvini, a gifted campaigner,
wrote on Twitter, adding that Italy
needed a government “that defends in Europe the principle
ITALIANS FIRST.”
Mr. Salvini seemed to anticipate
the president’s decision, taking to
Facebook earlier to prepare his
base for coming elections. He told
them that more migrants were already coming and that if the negotiations failed, “we will come to
ask you for that 2, 3, 4 percent
more votes which would give us
the chance to govern alone for five
years, without asking permission
of anyone.”
Mr. Mattarella had given the
Five Star Movement time and
space to find support on the right,
with the League, and with the center-left Democratic Party that it
spent much of the last few years
insulting. But after 65 days of negotiations, he apparently had had
enough.
Early in the morning, the president met with Mr. Di Maio, 31,
who, to reinforce his anti-establishment appeal, drove to the
meeting in a small white Citroën.
Speaking to reporters afterward, Mr. Di Maio said, “We are
not willing to support a confidence
vote for a technical government.”
Arguing that he was not to blame
for the stalemate, he said, “I was
never the impediment.”
Over months of talks, Mr. Di
Maio, who is facing his party’s
self-imposed term limits, failed to
peel Mr. Salvini away from his
center-right coalition partner, Mr.
Berlusconi, with whom the Five
Star Movement refuses to join
forces. Late last month he
slammed the door shut on any
deal with the League.
“Now I want to say it officially,”
he said at the time. “For me, any
talks with the League end here. It
is clear that a government with
the center-right is no longer a pursuable hypothesis.” But on Monday, with the president’s decision
only hours away, he scrambled to
reopen the door to talks.
In what he called a “new phase”
of the talks, Mr. Di Maio said he
was still willing to find an agreement with Mr. Salvini on a prime
minister they could both support
and who would push their priorities, including a universal basic income, anti-corruption laws and a
rollback of pension reforms.
After the president’s remarks,
Mr. Di Maio reiterated on Twitter
that he would vote “No confidence
in a ‘neutral’ government.”
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To some, sunglasses are a fashion accessory…
Studies by the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration (NHTSA) show that most (74%) of
the crashes occurred on clear, sunny days
But When Driving,
These Sunglasses
May Save Your Life!
Drivers’ Alert: Driving can expose you to more
dangerous glare than any sunny day at the beach
can…do you know how to protect yourself?
T
he sun rises and sets at peak travel periods, during
the early morning and afternoon rush hours and
many drivers find themselves temporarily blinded
while driving directly into the glare of the sun. Deadly
accidents are regularly caused by such blinding glare
with danger arising from reflected light off another
vehicle, the pavement, or even from waxed and oily
windshields that can make matters worse. Yet, motorists
struggle on despite being blinded by the sun’s glare that
can cause countless accidents every year.
Sometimes it does take a rocket scientist.
A NASA rocket scientist. Some ordinary sunglasses
can obscure your vision by exposing your eyes to
harmful UV rays, blue light, and reflective glare.
They can also darken useful vision-enhancing light.
But now, independent research conducted by scientists
from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has brought
forth ground-breaking technology to help protect
human eyesight from the harmful effects of solar
radiation light. This superior lens technology was
first discovered when NASA scientists looked to
nature for a means to superior eye protection—
specifically, by studying the eyes of eagles, known
for their extreme visual acuity. This discovery
resulted in what is now known as Eagle Eyes®.
The Only Sunglass Technology Certified by the
Space Foundation for UV and Blue-Light Eye Protection. Eagle Eyes® features the most advanced eye
protection technology ever created. The TriLenium®
Lens Technology offers triple-filter polarization to
block 99.9% UVA and UVB—plus the added benefit of
blue-light eye protection. Eagle Eyes® is the only optic
technology that has earned official recognition from the
Space Certification Program for this remarkable technology. Now, that’s proven science-based protection.
Eagle Eyes®
Lens
Navigator™ Black
Stainless Steel
Sunglasses
Receive the Navigator™ Gold
Sunglasses (a $59.95 value) FREE!
just for trying the Navigator™ Black
Navigator™ Gold Stainless
Steel Sunglasses
Certified EAGLE EYES® was developed
from original NASA Optic technology
and was recently inducted into the
Space Foundation Technology Hall of Fame.
Fit-ons available for $39 +S&H
Black or Tortoise-Shell design
The finest optics: And buy one, get one FREE!
We are so excited for you to try the Eagle Eyes® breakthrough technology that we will give you a second pair
of Eagle Eyes® Navigator™ Sunglasses FREE––a
$59.95 value! That’s two pairs to protect your eyes
with the best technology available for less than the price
of one pair of traditional sunglasses. You get a pair of
Navigators with stainless steel black frames and the
other with stainless steel gold, plus one hard zipper
case and one micro-fiber drawstring cleaning pouch
are included.
Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed. If you are not
astounded with the Eagle Eyes® technology, enjoying
clearer, sharper and more glare-free vision, simply
return one pair within 30 days for a full refund of the
purchase price. The other pair is yours to keep. No one
else has such confidence in their optic technology.
Don’t leave your eyes in the hands of fashion designers,
entrust them to the best scientific minds on earth. Wear
your Eagle Eyes® Navigators with absolute confidence,
knowing your eyes are protected with technology that
was born in space for the human race.
Two Pairs of Eagle Eyes® Navigator™
Sunglasses $119.90†
Offer Code Price $49 + S&P
simulation
Slip on a pair of Eagle Eyes® and everything
instantly appears more vivid and sharp.
You’ll immediately notice that your eyes are
more comfortable and relaxed and you’ll
feel no need to squint. The scientifically
designed sunglasses are not just fashion
accessories—they are necessary to protect
your eyes from those harmful rays produced by the sun during peak driving times.
Offer includes one pair each Navigator™ Black
and Navigator™ Gold Sunglasses
1-800-333-2045
Your Insider Offer Code: EEN763-06
You must use this offer code to get our special price.
Stauer
®
14101 Southcross Drive W.,
Ste 155, Dept. EEN763-06
Burnsville, Minnesota 55337
www.stauer.com
Rating of A+
† Special price only for customers using the offer code versus the
price on Stauer.com without your offer code.
A12
TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
Lava Flows
Take Homes,
Stirring Awe
And Dismay
Hawaiians Are Tested
By Volcano and Quakes
By AMY HARMON
and AUSTIN RAMZY
The texts and calls to John Tarson, a
tour operator in Hawaii who has taken
thousands of visitors to see lava flowing
from the Kilauea volcano over the years,
began soon after last week’s spectacular
eruptions.
There were expressions of concern for
the residents on the island’s eastern edge
who were forced to flee their homes, and
about his own safety. There were exclamations of fear and awe at the lava
spreading across the land. And then,
some version of the question: “Can we go
watch?”
To those, Mr. Tarson, 37, had an easy
response. He was as compelled as anyone by the sight of lava, which he captured on video Saturday night spurting
230 feet into the air. There was something inescapably primal about it, he
liked to say, a thrilling reminder that civilization sits on the crust of a planet made
of molten rock.
But for now, business was closed, he
replied to the avalanche of queries: “At
this point our efforts are all going to be to
help the community that is suffering
losses.”
The natural wonder that is the Kilauea
volcano is the main attraction of Hawaii’s
Big Island, with nearly all of its two million annual visitors making a stop in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. But as the
volcano and the surrounding area transformed into a natural disaster, leaving almost three dozen structures destroyed,
residents, officials and tourists alike
wrestled with its dual nature.
“On the one hand, it’s a once-in-a-lifetime thing you’re seeing in person,” said
Ryan Finlay, an island resident and the
administrator of the Hawaii Tracker
Facebook group.“And then 10 minutes
later, that lava is going into a person’s
yard and burning their house down.” The
Facebook group tracks lava flow and has
been a home for videos taken by island
residents in recent days.
Twelve fissures have emerged, sending lava into the Leilani Estates and Lanipuna Gardens subdivisions, where
about 1,800 people live. Last week, Hawaii County ordered the subdivisions
evacuated. Thirty-five structures have
been destroyed, according to the Hawaii
County Civil Defense Agency. No deaths
or injuries have been reported.
The authorities began allowing residents of Leilani Estates to retrieve their
belongings on Sunday, while Lanipuna
Gardens remained closed because of
dangerous volcanic gases. Several nonresidents were turned away at a checkpoint, according to Richard D. Rapoza, a
spokesman for the Hawaii Emergency
Matt Stevens contributed reporting from
New York.
BRUCE OMORI/EPA, VIA SHUTTERSTOCK
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY/EPA, VIA SHUTTERSTOCK
Clockwise from top: lava from a fissure on the Kilauea volcano consuming one home and heading toward another; a resident of Leilani Estates reported a flow
that was 10 feet high; residents were allowed back to gather their belongings from homes not yet destroyed. Almost three dozen homes have burned down.
Management Agency.
“People want to go down and get close
it,” Mr. Rapoza said. “It’s an interesting
experience standing next to red hot lava,
to some people.”
In several statements, the Hawaii
County Civil Defense Agency stressed
that outsiders should steer clear: “This
is not the time for sightseeing.” The
agency added: “The residents of Leilani
Estates are going through a very difficult
time. We ask for your understanding.”
Although volcanic activity has subsided, hazardous fumes continued in the
Leilani Estates subdivision, according to
the Hawaii Volcano Observatory on
Monday. The civil defense agency had
also previously warned about the threat
of high levels of deadly sulfur dioxide gas
in the area.
The island has been hit by hundreds of
earthquakes in recent days, including
one Friday that had a magnitude of 6.9.
More aftershocks from that earthquake
were expected, officials said.
Some residents who were able to return have found their homes in flames.
Heath Dalton, who lives in Leilani Estates and was evacuated on Friday, returned to his home on Sunday morning.
He drove a truck and trailer, planning to
pick up boxes of his family’s possessions
that he had packed earlier. Instead, he
found his home engulfed.
“I couldn’t go up my road,” he said. “It
had huge, huge coverage of lava, proba-
bly close to 10 feet tall.”
He called two neighbors to tell them
their houses were gone. “I look at mine
and I can see my house burning,” said
Mr. Dalton, who was unharmed, as was
his wife, Denise, and their young children. “At that point I called my wife and
said, ‘There’s no reason for you to come;
there’s nothing to get.’”
Fountains of lava have reached
heights of 330 feet, the Hawaiian Volcano
Observatory said. One video posted by
the observatory showed orange and
black lava belching smoke and flames as
it crawled down a residential street.
Other images taken by helicopter
showed molten rock inching across a
subdivision, setting fire to the structures
it touched.
Kilauea, one of the world’s most active
volcanoes, has been in constant eruption
for 35 years, according to the United
States Geological Survey. Its lava flows
have covered 48 square miles. Mr. Tarson, who started a touring business, Epic
Lava Tours, three years ago, on Saturday
performed what he described as a “recon
mission” to help a friend retrieve a dog
that had been left behind in the scramble
to evacuate.
Just as he was turning to leave, he
said, the earth unzipped in front of him,
as a new fissure, the eighth of ten, ripped
open the ground.
“It’s like our lives,” he said. “Every day,
it moves and changes.”
The Pleasure and Pain of Being California, the World’s 5th-Largest Economy
By THOMAS FULLER
SAN FRANCISCO — When a transportation agency said two years ago that
rush hours were a thing of the past on a
major highway in the San Francisco Bay
Area, it was not good news.
“For the first time on record, the morning and evening peak periods have
merged,” said a spokesman for the
agency, the Metropolitan Transportation
Commission, “creating a continuously
congested freeway from 5:30 in the
morning until nearly 8 o’clock at night.”
It has only gotten worse.
California’s economy has soared into
the stratosphere, but not without inflicting some pain. Paralyzing traffic is one
symptom; the increasingly absurd price
of putting a roof over one’s head is another.
One person from the Midwest devised
a quick formula to calculate the price of a
house in the Bay Area: See how much a
similar house would cost in Minnesota
and then add a million dollars.
Every few weeks there seems to be another story in the California news media
about a dilapidated shack in an ordinary
neighborhood selling for seven figures,
just to be torn down. It has become common enough to lose its shock value.
California recorded another milestone
last week, one reflecting a prouder facet
of the state’s success. If the state were an
independent country, its economy would
rank as the fifth-largest in the world,
ahead of Britain’s (which has been crawling lately). California held that spot once
before, but it slipped a bit during the
Great Recession a decade ago.
As the state has blossomed, outpacing
many others, it has reinforced a liberal
narrative about growth, that a state can
have big government and a booming
economy, too. (Texas is the conserva-
tives’ counterexample: a big, fast-growing economy under laissez-faire government.)
California has strict environmental
protections, a progressive tax system
and an ascendant minimum wage, now
$10.50 an hour and set to rise in stages to
$15 in 2023. The state welcomes immigrants, celebrates ethnic and linguistic
diversity, and actively tries to combat climate change. And with all that, its economy continues to soar.
“We have raised income taxes and imposed increasingly high fees to reduce
greenhouse emissions,” said Stephen
Levy, director of the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.
“None of that has overridden the attrac-
tiveness of this state for talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.”
California’s economic success underpins the state’s audacity and its defiance
of President Trump. It is an invisible buttress when the governor and attorney
general harangue the Trump administration, as they did recently at a news conference in Sacramento, for “basically going to war against the state of California.”
California is not the only state doing
well, of course. The federal Bureau of
Economic Analysis produced a map last
week showing a somewhat lopsided pattern of prosperity in America. The economies of states like Kansas and Louisiana
shrank slightly last year, while those in
the West thrived: Nevada grew by 3.5
JIM WILSON/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. The company made $229 billion in
revenue during its last fiscal year, five times as much as the state of Wyoming.
percent, Washington by 4.4 percent, Arizona by 3.2 percent.
Even among its booming neighbors,
though, California, which saw 3 percent
growth last year, stands out for the diversity and sheer size of its economy.
Every sector contributed to the state’s
growth last year except agriculture, according to Irena Asmundson, the chief
economist of the California Department
of Finance. Financial services and real
estate led the pack, and even manufacturing, often said to be in decline in
America, grew significantly, contributing $10 billion in output to the $127 billion
the state added over all.
“Most of this is a lot of relatively small
firms that are very specialized,” Ms. Asmundson said of the growth in manufacturing.
Another barometer of growth is the
surge in people using California’s airports, especially the regional ones. Airports in Long Beach, San Jose, San Luis
Obispo and Sonoma all saw double-digit
percentage increases in passenger traffic in 2017.
Unsurprisingly, Silicon Valley is a big
part of California’s success. One of the
state’s technology giants, Apple, brought
in more revenue in its latest fiscal year —
$229 billion — than the entire economic
output of Wyoming, five times over.
All of that money pouring in to California’s tech and entertainment industries
produces a big wealth effect, ballooning
what the state’s workers can spend —
and not just those who work directly in
those fields.
Facebook revealed last month that the
median pay of its employees was
$240,430 a year. But the fire chief in San
Ramon has been doing pretty well, too,
with total pay and benefits of $516,344 in
2016, according to the website Transpar-
ent California. And nearly 200 police officers across the state make more than
$300,000 a year, when overtime and
benefits are included.
Like many states, California has persistent worries about how it will cover its
pension obligations down the road, and
those high rates of pay for public sector
workers do not help matters. But in these
boom times, California’s bright fiscal position is a world away from the federal
government’s. The state treasury is flush
with cash, and is socking billions away in
a rainy-day fund.
When Gov. Jerry Brown returned to office in 2011, he faced a budget deficit of
$27 billion. Now, after eight years of economic expansion, the state has a surplus
of $6 billion, and its tax revenues are running well ahead of projections.
Yet it is hard to overlook the pain that
prosperity has brought: traffic, property
prices, homelessness.
Those last two issues are increasingly
seen as sides of the same coin. In 2017,
California saw the fastest growth in its
homeless population of any state (14 percent), and also had the highest proportion of them unsheltered: 68 percent of
the state’s 134,000 homeless people sleep
outdoors.
All economic booms run out of steam
sooner or later, and some Californians
say they might welcome a little relief
from this one. William Yu, an economist
with the Anderson Forecast at the
U.C.L.A. Anderson School of Management, recalls a panel discussion a month
ago with real estate developers.
“One developer was asked, ‘Are you
worried about a recession coming?’” Mr.
Yu said. “The developer said, ‘I’m not
worried at all. I’m waiting for it.’”
Why? So he can snap up some properties at cheaper prices.
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
May 30–31, 2018
New York City
Navigating
New Challenges
For the presidents, chancellors and provosts of our nation’s colleges
and universities, issues on campus grow more urgent and complex
every day — from student success and affordability to free speech,
diversity and inclusion; from campus unrest to new technologies to
the potential impacts of the Trump administration. Given the demands
on these decision-makers — and the many constituents they must
serve — how can they best navigate their leadership challenges?
Hosted by
Frank Bruni
Op-Ed Columnist,
The New York Times
This spring, The New York Times will bring together the most
influential leaders in higher education to explore powerful ways to
address these issues. Our journalists will lead candid discussions with
subject-matter experts to uncover innovative solutions. We will look
ahead and illuminate the dynamic forces likely to disrupt education
in the future. And through provocative onstage debates, revealing
interviews and collaborative breakout sessions, we will examine the
art of effective leadership and how to foster a successful culture
within the unique environments of higher ed.
Speakers include
Michael R.
Bloomberg
Sen. Lamar
Alexander (R-Tenn.)
Margaret
Spellings
Wes
Moore
Founder,
Bloomberg LP and
Bloomberg Philanthropies
Chairman,
Health, Education, Labor
and Pensions Committee
President,
University of North
Carolina System
C.E.O.,
Robin Hood
David
Axelrod
Eloy
Ortiz Oakley
Alan
Dershowitz
Ruth
Simmons
Director,
University of Chicago
Institute of Politics
Chancellor,
California Community
Colleges
Felix Frankfurter Professor
of Law, Emeritus,
Harvard Law School
President,
Prairie View
A & M University
Simon
Sinek
Sara
Goldrick-Rab
Bob
Kerrey
Barry
Schwartz
Optimist and Best-Selling
Author
Professor of Higher
Education Policy
and Sociology,
Temple University
Executive Chairman,
Minerva Institute for
Research and Scholarship
Emeritus Professor
of Psychology,
Swarthmore College
Managing Director,
Allen & Company
Visiting Professor,
Haas School of Business,
University of California, Berkeley
108th Mayor, New York City
Apply to attend
nythigheredleaders.com
For sponsorship opportunities, please email sponsorship@nytimes.com
Sponsored by
A13
A14
THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
The 45th President The Midterm Elections
Battle to Control the Senate Begins in the Trump Heartland
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
and DENISE LU
Tuesday is decision day for
contested Republican Senate
primaries in Indiana, Ohio and
West Virginia — three states
that broadly supported President Trump in 2016.
The candidates’ strategies
have often boiled down to an
extended presidential hug, with
unsubtle efforts to attach their
cause to Mr. Trump’s.
The winners will all face Democratic incumbents in November, in races that could determine the balance of the Senate:
The Democrats up for re-election in those three states are
vulnerable, if only Republicans
can avoid sabotaging themselves.
WEST VIRGINIA
Can Trump’s Criticism
Stop an Ex-Convict?
Mr. Trump has made his choice.
Sort of.
He knows, at least, whom
West Virginians should not vote
for, starting his week with a
Monday morning tweet urging
them against supporting Don
Blankenship, a former coal
mining executive who spent a
year in prison for his role in a
fatal mining explosion.
The president did not say Mr.
Blankenship was unqualified,
despite this history and a campaign premised at times on
largely baseless attacks against
Mitch McConnell, the Senate
majority leader whom Mr.
Blankenship has labeled “Cocaine Mitch.” Instead, Mr.
Trump’s argument was electoral: Mr. Blankenship, he said,
“can’t win” in a general election,
even in a state that gave the
president 68 percent of its vote
in 2016.
“Vote Rep. Jenkins or A.G.
Morrisey!” Mr. Trump wrote,
plugging the two more conventional Republican candidates,
Representative Evan Jenkins
and Attorney General Patrick
Morrisey. They are hoping to
take on Senator Joe Manchin III,
a Democrat who has aligned
himself at times with Mr. Trump.
But Mr. Trump’s tweet speaks
to the challenge of stopping an
insurgent like Mr. Blankenship:
The others can become almost
indistinguishable, leaving room
for an upset.
A recent Fox News poll
showed Mr. Blankenship in third
place in a fluid race, with many
voters still undecided. Republicans in Washington have taken
no chances, fearful that a victory
by Mr. Blankenship could doom
their chances to claim an eminently winnable seat. A “super
PAC” linked to the party establishment has attacked Mr.
Blankenship as a “convicted
criminal” and a hypocrite.
Mr. Blankenship has held up
his own deeply checkered background — and the establishment
forces arrayed against him — as
evidence that he is even
“Trumpier than Trump.”
How Three States Shifted Toward Trump in 2016
Senate primaries will be held on Tuesday in Indiana, Ohio and West Virginia,
which all swung toward Republicans in the last presidential election.
These Appalachian precincts,
along the Ohio-West Virginia
border, shifted sharply to the
right in 2016.
Cleveland
C
Cle
Cl
lle
e
eve
vve
ela
el
e
la
la
an
nd
nd
INDIANA
OHIO
Columbus
C
Co
olum
ol
olum
umbu
u
umb
m
mb
bu
b
u
us
IIndianapolis
nd
dian
nap
n
ap
ap
pol
ol
o iss
Cincinnati
Ci
Cin
C
in
ncccin
n
ciiin
nna
nn
n
na
n
atti
ati
a
INDIANA
WEST
VIRGINIA
A Vicious G.O.P. Primary
Could Help a Democrat.
Senator Joe Donnelly, an endangered Democrat in a solidly red
state, has surely enjoyed this
Republican primary.
Political reporters have exhausted their quota of boxing
metaphors — “bruising,”
“bloody,” full of debate-night
“jabs” — to describe a three-way
Republican campaign (no, a
fifteen-round brawl) that includes
two congressmen, Representatives Luke Messer and Todd
Rokita, and a business executive
named Mike Braun.
They are not getting along
royally. And there is at least
some fear among Republican
strategists that the wounds will
not heal fully by November.
Mr. Messer and Mr. Rokita
have been rivals since college,
rising in state politics on parallel
tracks. Mr. Rokita’s campaign
has labeled Mr. Messer a “Never
Trump lobbyist.” Mr. Messer has
accused Mr. Rokita of “trying to
make things up,” insisting he has
never wavered in his support for
the president.
Mr. Braun, pitching himself as
the Trump-like businessman in
the bunch, has dismissed his
rivals as professional politicians
— lawyers who “never practiced.”
The result, for several weeks
now, has often been a free ride
for Mr. Donnelly, who certainly
should be vulnerable, given the
state’s electoral drift. Barack
Obama won the state in 2008, but
Shift in margin from Romney to Trump
–60
–40 –20
0
+20 +40 +60 pct. pts.
Source: Precinct-level results compiled by Ryne Rohla.
Note: Shift is the change between Trump’s presidential vote margin in 2016 and Romney’s presidential vote margin in 2012.
The Senate’s Most Competitive Races
Primaries for three of the most contested Senate seats are on Tuesday.
LEAN DEM.
MT
OH
TOSSUP
WI
AZ
FL
LEAN REP.
IN
MO
ND
NV
WV
TN
Sources: Race ratings are an average of ratings by Cook Political Report, Inside Elections With
Nathan L. Gonzales and the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics.
lost by double digits in 2012. Mr.
Trump won Indiana by 19 points.
OHIO
Trump’s Blessing Comes
With Risks in This Race.
In this state, at least, Mr. Trump
has cleared up the matter of
which candidate gets to credibly
trade on his name. That would be
Representative Jim Renacci, a
wealthy auto dealer, whose campaign the president blessed last
month. “I need Jim very badly to
help our agenda,” Mr. Trump
tweeted.
Mr. Renacci’s chief competition
in the primary is Mike Gibbons,
a Cleveland-area businessman.
But while Mr. Trump carried the
state by eight points in 2016,
Ohio is regarded as far more of a
bellwether than West Virginia or
Indiana — a state where a full
embrace of Mr. Trump carries at
least some risk in a general
election.
Senator Sherrod Brown, the
Democrat seeking re-election, is
the only member of his party
holding high office in the state. A
longtime critic of pacts like the
North American Free Trade
Agreement, Mr. Brown has negotiated the state’s recent rightward tilt, in part, with an appreciation for Mr. Trump’s instincts
on trade.
But he has been far less inclined than Mr. Manchin or Mr.
Donnelly, the Democratic incumbents in West Virginia and Ohio,
to side with the president on key
personnel selections, like Justice
Neil Gorsuch or Secretary of
State Mike Pompeo, prompting
Republican attacks that Mr.
Brown is in league with his party’s most obstructionist wing.
A Race for Governor
With Close Primaries.
Ohio’s most-watched contest on
Tuesday is elsewhere on the
ballot. The state’s governor, John
R. Kasich, is term-limited. And
both parties have seen competitive, rollicking primaries to suc-
DENISE LU/THE NEW YORK TIMES
ceed him.
On the Democratic side, it’s
Richard Cordray — a former
director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau with the
endorsement of Senator Elizabeth Warren — against Dennis
Kucinich, the eccentric septuagenarian former “boy mayor” of
Cleveland, who later became a
congressman and presidential
candidate. The party establishment has lined up behind Mr.
Cordray, though several allies of
Senator Bernie Sanders are with
Mr. Kucinich.
For Republicans, the favorite
is Mike DeWine, the state’s attorney general, but he has faced a
formidable challenge from Mary
Taylor, the lieutenant governor.
Despite her current office, Ms.
Taylor has taken care not to
associate too closely with Mr.
Kasich, whose criticisms of Mr.
Trump have made him largely
toxic in a Republican primary.
At McConnell’s Urging,
President Weighs In
On West Virginia Race
From Page A1
running for Senate, can’t win the
General Election in your State . . .
No way!” Mr. Trump wrote on
Monday morning, before referring to other Republican candidates in the primary. “Remember
Alabama. Vote Rep. Jenkins or
A.G. Morrisey!”
The maneuvering by party
leaders comes before a handful of
states — including Indiana, Ohio
and West Virginia — hold primary
contests on Tuesday. Increasingly
nervous Republican leaders want
to nominate candidates who can
help the party keep control of Congress in this fall’s midterm elections.
Mr. Trump warned that if Mr.
Blankenship prevails in the primary it would all but ensure the
re-election of the incumbent, Joe
Manchin III, whom Republicans
view as one of the most vulnerable
Senate Democrats. Mr. Blankenship, the former chief executive of
Massey Energy, served a year in
federal prison after being convicted of conspiring to violate
mine safety rules in connection
with the Upper Big Branch mining
disaster in 2010 that claimed 29
lives.
The tweet on Monday was a political gift to Representative Evan
Jenkins and Attorney General
Patrick Morrisey, Mr. Blankenship’s two Republican rivals, in a
state Mr. Trump won overwhelmingly in 2016 and where he remains popular.
Both men swiftly seized on Mr.
Trump’s comments, weaving
them into their final stump
speeches, crafting last-minute
digital ads and recording new automated phone calls.
”President Trump just announced this morning his support
for Evan Jenkins,” a Jenkins robocall declared, taking some liberties with the president’s tweet,
which did not favor him over Mr.
Morrisey. The recording began
with the phrase “This is a Trump
voter alert” as it sought to further
align Mr. Jenkins with the president.
In a statement responding to
Carl Hulse and Matt Flegenheimer
contributed reporting from Washington, and Trip Gabriel contributed from New York.
Mr. Trump, Mr. Blankenship said
the president “is a very busy man
and he doesn’t know me and he
doesn’t know how flawed my two
main opponents are in this primary.” He added that the “establishment is misinforming him because they do not want me to be in
the U.S. Senate and promote the
president’s agenda.”
That Mr. Trump would step into
the contest at all underscores how
alarmed party officials are about
the prospects of a Blankenship
victory.
The president has felt burned
by Republicans when he injected
himself into other races only to
see his preferred candidates fall
short. A victory by Mr. Blankenship would be highly embarrassing to Mr. Trump, coming on the
heels of his inability to lift party
nominees in Pennsylvania this
year and in Alabama in December.
But the race may be close
enough that Mr. Trump’s lastminute
intervention
proves
enough to derail Mr. Blankenship,
a power play that would only underscore his clout with the party
base.
White House aides and Senate
Republicans have been discussing for the last week whether
the president should comment on
the primary, and agreed he should
do so if it became clear Mr.
Blankenship could win, three officials familiar with the deliberations said.
By Friday, when party officials
received internal polling showing
that Mr. Blankenship was still in
the hunt, they ratcheted up pressure on Mr. Trump to speak out
against the former coal executive,
who was imprisoned until last
year and remains on probation.
White House officials had already begun considering potential language for a tweet over the
weekend. In a wide-ranging call
with Mr. McConnell on Sunday
that was initiated by Mr. Trump,
the president indicated he was
willing to weigh in on the race.
The president’s aides said he may
record an automated call of his
own against Mr. Blankenship.
Still, Mr. Trump has been intensely focused in the last week
on the special counsel’s investigation into Russia and the uneven
defense of a payment to a porno-
AL DRAGO FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Don Blankenship campaigning for Senate last month in Keyser, W.Va. He remains a viable contender in the Republican primary.
graphic film actress offered by his
new lawyer, Rudolph W. Giuliani,
a former mayor of New York. As a
result, administration officials
were not fully certain what Mr.
Trump would do about the West
Virginia race until the early morning tweet.
Though Mr. Trump willingly intervened in the primary contest,
some West Wing aides believe
that the fight is more about Mr.
McConnell, the majority leader,
than the president. And they
grumbled in the hours after the
tweet that some Republican lawmakers, in particular Mr. McConnell, are inconsistent when it
comes to what Mr. Trump’s policy
should be on engaging in primaries.
Mr. Blankenship has faced a series of attacks from Republican
groups aligned with Mr. McConnell for his role in the Upper Big
Branch mining tragedy. He has
also been criticized for keeping his
official residence in Las Vegas and
refusing to fully disclose his extensive financial holdings.
The attacks sent Mr. Blankenship’s poll numbers tumbling, but
with Mr. Jenkins and Mr. Morrisey dividing votes, he has remained in contention. Internal
surveys taken by his rivals indicate that Mr. Blankenship is near
the top of the field.
That is partly because he has
framed his conviction as a persecution by President Barack Obama’s Justice Department, a strategy aimed at tapping into the deep
animus toward a former president
who many in the state believe
waged a “war on coal.”
In recent weeks Mr. Blankenship dipped into his personal
wealth to air a series of incendiary
ads targeting the family of Mr. McConnell, who is married to Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao.
“Swamp captain Mitch McConnell has created millions of jobs for
China people,” Mr. Blankenship
said in one commercial, alluding
to the shipping business of Mr.
McConnell’s father-in-law. Mr.
Blankenship has also referred to
Mr. McConnell’s father-in-law, an
American citizen, as “a wealthy
Chinaperson.”
Mr. Blankenship also called Mr.
McConnell “Cocaine Mitch” for
far-fetched claims that a ship connected to Ms. Chao’s father once
smuggled drugs.
Mr. McConnell, who is deeply
unpopular among Republican primary voters, has largely avoided
wading into the feud, but has been
privately fuming about the attacks on his wife’s family.
He has, though, been able to
find some amusement in his new
nickname, jokingly answering the
phone “Cocaine Mitch,” according
to one of his advisers.
Last week, he emailed an ally in
evident wonder: “I never even
smoked cigarettes.”
Until Monday, the closest the
president had come to weighing in
on the race was when he brought
Mr. Jenkins and Mr. Morrisey to a
roundtable focused on the tax
overhaul and sat between them.
(He even polled the audience to
gauge who had more support.)
Part of the challenge for the Republican establishment has been
that Mr. Jenkins and Mr. Morrisey
have largely targeted each other,
most recently during a bitter Fox
News debate last week. Neither
has been able to emerge as the
clear front-runner, and Republican leaders do not have a strong
preference between the two.
Mr. Jenkins is a former Democrat who represents the coal-producing part of the state, having
upset a veteran incumbent in
2014, while Mr. Morrisey is a New
Jersey transplant who made a
name for himself suing the Obama
administration.
They each hoped Mr. Trump’s
late intervention could help them
persuade undecided voters less
than 24 hours before polls open.
In an interview, Mr. Morrisey,
who until this weekend had largely ignored Mr. Blankenship, said
the president’s statement “sends
a message that West Virginia voters should reject the criminal convict Don Blankenship.”
Reflecting how tight the race
has become in its final hours, Mr.
Morrisey aimed withering criticism at Mr. Blankenship.
“This is someone whose whole
career demonstrates he believes
he is above the law,” he said, asserting that Mr. Blankenship
would be “crushed” in the general
election against Mr. Manchin.
Mr. Blankenship, though, said
“no one, and I mean no one, will
tell us how to vote,” and seemed to
suggest that Mr. Trump had
drifted from the spirt of his own
candidacy by not embracing the
hard-edge campaign he had
waged.
”As some have said, I am
Trumpier than Trump, and this
morning proves it,” he claimed.
THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
A15
N
The 45th President Inside the E.P.A.
As Aides Urge Firing of Pruitt, Trump’s Support Is Said to Be Waning
By CORAL DAVENPORT
and MAGGIE HABERMAN
WASHINGTON — Senior
White House staff members are
encouraging President Trump to
fire Scott Pruitt, his embattled Environmental Protection Agency
chief, according to two top administration officials. While Mr.
Trump has until now championed
Mr. Pruitt, the officials say the
president’s enthusiasm may be
cooling because of the ongoing
cascade of alleged ethical and legal missteps.
Over the past few months, as
Mr. Pruitt’s problems have
mounted — he is now the subject
of at least 11 federal investigations
and some Republicans have called
for his resignation — Mr. Trump
has continued to support his
E.P.A. chief on Twitter and in public and private remarks.
But that is likely to change in
the coming weeks, the two officials said.
Since last month’s confirmation
of Mr. Pruitt’s deputy, the former
coal lobbyist Andrew Wheeler,
White House staff members say
they believe that if Mr. Pruitt is
fired or resigns, Mr. Wheeler will
continue to effectively push
through Mr. Trump’s agenda to
help the coal industry and roll
Michael D. Shear contributed reporting.
back environmental regulations.
Some Republicans have said
that Mr. Wheeler, a former Capitol
Hill and E.P.A. staff member —
known as a low-key but highly experienced Washington insider —
would quite likely be as effective,
and possibly more so, than Mr.
Pruitt at undoing regulations,
without drawing the embarrassing headlines of his boss.
At the White House on Monday,
Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the
press secretary, expressed confidence in Mr. Wheeler but declined
to say whether Mr. Trump intended to fire Mr. Pruitt in the
near future.
“I don’t have any personnel announcements on that front,” Ms.
Sanders said. “Certainly we have
confidence in the No. 2, otherwise
the president wouldn’t have asked
him to serve at such a senior level
position within the E.P.A.”
Meanwhile, as the negative media reports about Mr. Pruitt continue, Mr. Trump is now likely to
pay more attention, the officials
said.
One official said there was recognition now that Mr. Pruitt’s
problems were “a bottomless pit.”
But the White House doesn’t know
how much more there is or what
direction it could take.
Newly revealed emails detail
how Mr. Pruitt operated the
agency in unprecedented secrecy.
Privately, even many in Mr.
Pruitt’s inner circle at the E.P.A.
have expressed frustration with
their boss’s actions.
In the past month, at least five
of his senior staff members have
resigned, including Samantha
Dravis, his senior policy adviser;
Pasquale Perrotta, his chief of security; Albert Kelly, a business associate from Mr. Pruitt’s home
state of Oklahoma whom Mr.
Pruitt had appointed to a top policy position at the E.P.A.; Liz Bowman, his communications direc-
A succession plan
that the White House
is comfortable with.
tor; and John Konkus, a senior
press office official. As many as a
dozen more senior political staff
members are said to be considering resigning, according to three
current staff members and one
former one.
Mr. Pruitt’s actions have tried
the patience of even his staunch
supporters, including some Republicans.
“Republicans like what he’s
done, but they don’t like how he’s
done it,” said John Feehery, a Republican strategist who worked
for the former House Speaker
Dennis Hastert and the former
majority leader Tom DeLay. “He
has made some major mistakes
and doesn’t seem to care that
much about them. They have a lot
of tolerance, but it has its limits.”
Other administration officials
have resigned over similar ethics
and spending controversies.
Tom Price, the former secretary
of health and human services, was
forced to resign last year after
racking up nearly $400,000 in
travel bills for chartered flights.
Mr. Trump fired David J. Shulkin,
the veterans affairs secretary, after an inspector general’s report
concluded that he had spent too
much time sightseeing on official
trips and had improperly accepted Wimbledon tickets as a
gift.
Some of the 11 federal investigations into Mr. Pruitt’s behavior
span a far wider range of ethics
questions. The House Oversight
Committee, led by Representative
Trey Gowdy, Republican of South
Carolina, has opened an inquiry
into Mr. Pruitt’s actions at the
E.P.A., the first Republican-led investigation of a Trump administration cabinet member. On May 2,
Mr. Gowdy’s staff began conducting transcribed, closed-door interviews with Mr. Pruitt’s closest
aides.
A government watchdog office
has concluded that Mr. Pruitt
broke the law with the $43,000 installation of a secure telephone
booth. He remains under investigation for several ethics concerns,
including his condominium-rental
agreement with the wife of an energy lobbyist, and the accusations
that he demoted or sidelined
E.P.A. employees who questioned
his spending. He has been criticized for lavish expenditures on
foreign travel, including a trip to
Morocco — a country where the
E.P.A. has no policy agenda — that
was arranged by a lobbyist. His
domestic travel also came under
scrutiny after a former Pruitt staff
member told Congressional investigators that Mr. Pruitt often
sought to justify travel home to
Oklahoma, directing his employees to “find me something to do”
there.
Still, Mr. Pruitt’s supporters, including some of Mr. Trump’s most
prominent friends in the coal and
oil industries, note that the E.P.A.
administrator, perhaps more than
any cabinet member, has pushed
through a policy agenda that allows Mr. Trump to claim that he is
fulfilling a core campaign promise: stripping away regulations
that he says stymie the growth of
the American economy.
Some of those rollbacks have
come at the direct request of
Robert E. Murray, the chief executive of Murray Energy, one of the
nation’s largest coal producers,
who is a longtime Trump supporter and donated $300,000 to the
president’s inauguration.
“Administrator Pruitt has been
the star of the Trump Administration,” Mr. Murray said in a statement. “He is taking the actions
necessary to reverse the illegal
and destructive regulations of the
Obama Administration.”
Harold Hamm, the chief executive of Continental Resources, an
Oklahoma-based oil and gas company, who has advised Mr. Trump
and championed Mr. Pruitt, has
told people close to the White
House that he continues to support the E.P.A. leader.
During an April 26 appearance
before a Congressional committee, at which Mr. Pruitt had been
expected to come under fire for
his alleged ethical lapses, conservative Republicans from farm and
rust belt states lavishly praised
Mr. Pruitt for his policy work.
Representative Kevin Cramer
of South Dakota, who advised the
Trump campaign and is running
for Senate, told Mr. Pruitt, “I think
the greatest sin that you’ve committed, if any, is that you have actually done what President Trump
ran on, what he won on, and what
he has commissioned you to do in
finding some balance in both carrying out the mission of environmental protection, while at the
same time looking over economy
and jobs creation.”
Emails Show E.P.A.’s Security Was Intended to Shield Pruitt From Questions
From Page A1
agency’s close control of Mr.
Pruitt’s events is driven more by a
desire to avoid tough questions
from the public than by concerns
about security, contradicting Mr.
Pruitt’s longstanding defense of
his secretiveness.
Time and again, the files show,
decisions turn on limiting advance public knowledge of Mr.
Pruitt’s appearances in order to
control the message. The emails,
many of which are communications with Mr. Pruitt’s schedulers,
show an agency that divides people into “friendly and “unfriendly”
camps and that on one occasion —
involving a secret visit to a Toyota
plant last year — became so focused on not disclosing information that Mr. Pruitt’s corporate
hosts expressed confusion about
the trip.
“The security aspect is smoke
and
mirrors,”
said
Kevin
Chmielewski, Mr. Pruitt’s former
deputy chief of staff for operations, who is one of several former
E.P.A. officials who have said that
they were fired or sidelined for
disagreeing with Mr. Pruitt’s management practices. “He didn’t
want anybody to question anything,” Mr. Chmielewski said, adding that Mr. Pruitt “just doesn’t
understand what it’s like to be a
public figure.”
Mr. Pruitt testified before Congress last month that Mr.
Chmielewski had resigned.
Three other current and former
agency officials, who asked not to
be identified because they still
work for the government, expressed similar views.
The E.P.A. did not respond to requests for comment about the
documents, which detail Mr.
Pruitt’s plans for travel and appearances nationwide. In the past,
E.P.A. officials have said that Mr.
Pruitt has faced an unprecedented number of death threats, which
account for the size of his security
force and the agency’s refusal to
make public his daily schedule.
All politicians are attuned to image-building, of course, and employ staffs whose job is to control
the environments in which they
appear. Mr. Pruitt, though, has
carried the practice to an extreme.
Breaking with all of his predecessors at the E.P.A. for the last 25
years, as well as other members of
President Trump’s cabinet, he
does not release a list of public
speaking events and he discloses
most official trips only after they
are over. Mr. Pruitt doesn’t hold
news conferences, and in one
episode, journalists who learned
of an event were ejected from the
premises after an E.P.A. official
threatened to call the police.
The E.P.A. also declined to
make public Mr. Pruitt’s detailed
calendar until the agency was
sued by The New York Times and
other organizations.
More recently, the agency
moved to require that any documents related to Mr. Pruitt that
are gathered as a result of Freedom of Information requests be
provided to his political aides 48
hours in advance for an “awareness review” before they are
made public, “to insure that leadership is aware of public disclosures,” a June email said.
Mr. Pruitt currently faces 11 investigations into his spending and
management at the E.P.A., many
of which stem from the appetite
for secrecy. He is under investigation for first-class travel at taxpayer expense, his elaborate security detail and the installation at
a cost of $43,000 of a soundproof
GENE J. PUSKAR/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scott Pruitt, the head of the E.P.A., with coal miners last month in Sycamore, Pa. His office normally makes his speaking appearances public only after they are over.
booth for making telephone calls.
Separately, a New York Times
investigation found that, in 2003
when he served as a legislator in
Oklahoma, Mr. Pruitt bought a
home in a transaction that involved two lobbyists with business before the state, and disguised the purchase by using a
shell company.
The emails document Mr.
Pruitt’s top aides taking steps to
block the public from his appearances.
For example, at the Nevada,
Iowa, event for ranchers, organizers of the event informed the
E.P.A. that they had already announced that it would be open.
The gathering, to celebrate Mr.
Pruitt’s plans to repeal an Obamaera water regulation that many
ranchers dislike, “has been sold as
a town hall meeting” — meaning
anyone could ask questions —
wrote Bill Couser, an Iowa cattle
farmer who was helping to organize the event, in an email to the
E.P.A.
In Washington, E.P.A. officials
objected.
“With a crowd of 300 people
plus open press, we have to stick
with the questions we currently
have,” Millan Hupp, Mr. Pruitt’s
scheduling director, replied.
The agency prevailed. Mr.
Pruitt answered questions presented to him by Mr. Couser that
were written by E.P.A. officials,
according to the emails and a video recording of the event.
Efforts like these to prevent reporters from attending events
were not a part of the playbook for
past E.P.A. administrators, according to spokeswomen for
Christine Todd Whitman, who
served in the George W. Bush administration, and Lisa Jackson
and Gina McCarthy, who served
under President Barack Obama.
“They didn’t selectively inform
the press or take any steps to keep
things secret,” Heather Grizzle, a
spokeswoman for Ms. Whitman,
said.
Mr. Pruitt takes a different approach. The emails show agency
officials defining prospective
guests at events as friendly or unfriendly, and reorganizing events
at the last minute if there were
concerns that people who are considered unfriendly might show up.
“Sixteen friendly Industry leaders will be invited to attend they
will arrive at 8:30 with the Administrator expected to arrive at 9:00
a.m.,” said one memo, shared
among top E.P.A. officials last
September, in advance of a visit by
Mr. Pruitt to Colorado Springs,
Colo., where he was scheduled to
speak to the National Association
of Homebuilders. The event was
closed to the public and not announced publicly ahead of time.
Gerald M. Howard, the organization’s top executive, “will moderate Q&A on Industry issues set
forth in advance and possibly
from the audience — who are all
industry friendly and supportive
of Mr. Pruitt and his efforts,” the
description said.
In another instance, after a Missouri news outlet discovered, and
tweeted, that Mr. Pruitt was planning to speak to about 150 representatives of electric cooperatives
and power-plant owners last
April, E.P.A. staff went into damage-control mode.
The meeting had not been publicly disclosed. Tate Bennett —
who, as associate administrator at
the E.P.A., is in charge of environmental education — asked
Barry Hart of the Association of
Missouri Electric Cooperatives if
the news organization, Missouri
Network Television, was “the
friendly outlet.”
Mr. Hart replied, “It is, but since
it’s a public tweet you have to assume the world now knows including all news media . . . even
unfriendly.”
Shaun Kober, founder of Missouri Network Television, said
“we just try to lay out the facts.”
A public relations consultant for
the Association of Missouri Electric Cooperatives, in consultation
with the E.P.A., had already discussed a strategy to counteract
any negative comments that appeared on social media.
“Our plan will be to promote the
feel-good activity and news from
the event,” Gus Wagner, a public
relations executive working with
organizers, wrote in one email
An official’s public
appearances were
carefully scripted.
shared with the E.P.A. “Comments that are positive will be
liked and possibly shared,” he
wrote. “Comments that are derogatory and/or abusive will be hidden from public view. Commenter
receives no notification this hiding
has happened.”
Sometimes the E.P.A.’s approach to public relations — issuing announcements only after
events were over — confused its
hosts. Among them was Stephen
Ciccone, a vice president for government affairs at Toyota Motor
North America, which organized a
visit by Mr. Pruitt to its Texas auto
plant in August.
“I thought you all did not want
any press coverage?” Mr. Ciccone
wrote, unsure as to why the E.P.A.
would issue a news release at all.
An email back from the E.P.A.
explained the plan. The agency
welcomed coverage as long as it
was on the agency’s terms.
A release would be made “highlighting all the stops Administrator Pruitt makes during his visit to
Texas,” the email said. As planned,
government-issued photos of a
smiling Mr. Pruitt and executives
from Toyota were posted on the
E.P.A.’s website soon after the
event was over, describing it as an
“action tour.”
The effort to control the event
almost fell apart when one journalist caught wind of the trip.
“We just received an inquiry
from a CBS News reporter in Dallas about the visit,” Mr. Ciccone
wrote to the E.P.A. on the day of
the event. “We won’t reply until
the visit is over.”
One of Mr. Pruitt’s early events
described in the files, held just a
month after he had started his
new job as E.P.A. administrator,
was an invitation-only breakfast
at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in
Washington before some 250 executives from the nation’s largest
electric utilities. Mr. Pruitt had
spent the previous six years as
Oklahoma’s attorney general attacking E.P.A. regulations in
court, often in coordination with
energy giants.
“Whoever said you can’t have
your cake and eat it too, doesn’t
know what to do with cake,” Mr.
Pruitt told the energy executives,
according to a speech prepared
for the March 2017 event.
His remarks, which have not
previously been made public, indicated that utilities had gained an
ally with his appointment. He intended to expand energy production, he said, while protecting the
environment. But, among other
things, he described his effort to
repeal the Obama-era Clean
Power Plan, which was designed
to slow climate change by reduc-
ing carbon dioxide emissions from
coal-fired power plants.
“The future ain’t what it used to
be,” Mr. Pruitt said, invoking a
Yogi Berra line that he would return to in speeches.
In another instance not previously made public, Mr. Pruitt last
June aided one of his longtime
supporters, Richard Smotkin,
who at that time was a Comcast
lobbyist and who later helped organize Mr. Pruitt’s trip to Morocco. (A month after that December
trip, Mr. Smotkin became a
$40,000-a-month foreign agent
promoting Morocco’s interests
abroad.)
Mr. Smotkin’s June request ran
into ethics questions within the
E.P.A.: He had invited Mr. Pruitt
to a fund-raiser for a nonprofit
group that Mr. Smotkin helps run,
the American Council of Young
Political Leaders, which offers foreign-exchange programs for
emerging political leaders. At the
event, Mr. Pruitt would be presented with an award in the form
of a globe engraved with his name.
“The Ethics department is asking me these questions about the
event,” wrote Sydney Hupp, a
scheduler for Mr. Pruitt who is the
sister of Millan Hupp, the scheduling director. (Both are former
Pruitt campaign aides.) The questions had to do with the appropriateness of receiving an award at a
fund-raising event.
After a series of emails, Millan
Hupp wrote back to the staff at the
nonprofit group with a solution:
Don’t refer to Mr. Pruitt’s job during the presentation.
“Yes, the Administrator may attend the event, and yes, he may receive the globe. But please do ensure that they refer to him as the
Honorable (as opposed to the EPA
Administrator)” Ms. Hupp wrote.
“So, yay! It’s been approved
through ethics.”
A16
THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
The 45th President The Agenda
First Lady’s Plan Aims to Ease Pressure on Youth Operative Plays Down
Links to Manafort Aide
By KATIE ROGERS
WASHINGTON — Hours after
President Trump took to Twitter
on Monday to denigrate the special counsel’s investigation as a
“Phony Witch Hunt” and the Iran
deal as a “MESS,” Melania Trump
stepped into the Rose Garden and
said she would focus her official
effort as first lady on teaching
children to put kindness first in
their lives, particularly on social
media.
In a speech delivered in front of
her husband, Vice President Mike
Pence, at least five cabinet secretaries and other senior officials,
Mrs. Trump unveiled a program
called “Be Best,” which she said
would tackle opioid abuse, social
media pressures and mental
health among young people.
“Children deserve every opportunity to enjoy their innocence,”
Mrs. Trump said.
Like the first lady herself, the
full details of the plan were mysterious. Mrs. Trump’s program will
primarily repackage projects that
already exist, including an initiative by the National Safety Council to encourage people to be proactive with talking to their doctors
about opioid abuse, and guidelines distributed by the Federal
Trade Commission on children’s
social media activity.
Mrs. Trump’s staff plans to continue to solicit ideas from places
the first lady has visited, including
a West Virginia clinic that treats
infants born with opioid addiction
and a Michigan school where students participate in a program to
stress the importance of emotional intelligence and kindness.
Kellyanne Conway, counselor to
the president, has been a help
briefing Mrs. Trump on the opioid
crisis, a White House official said.
“We can and should teach children the importance of social and
self-awareness, positive relationship skills and responsible decision making,” Mrs. Trump said.
“Let us teach our children the difference between right and wrong,
and encourage them to be best in
their individual paths in life.”
Recent first ladies have poured
their efforts into focused programs. Michelle Obama was an
advocate for nutrition and fitness,
Laura Bush championed literacy,
Hillary Clinton pushed for health
care, Barbara Bush promoted
reading, Nancy Reagan started a
“Just Say No” antidrug campaign
and Rosalynn Carter sought to lift
the stigma of mental illness. But
Mrs. Trump has not narrowed her
interests down to one issue and is
instead broadly focused on helping children.
“There are too many critical issues facing children today for her
to choose just one,” her spokeswoman, Stephanie Grisham, said
in an email about the first lady’s
plans. “She wants to use her platJulie Hirschfeld Davis contributed
reporting.
By MAGGIE HABERMAN
DOUG MILLS/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Melania Trump, the first lady, unveiled her “Be Best” initiative on Monday in the Rose Garden.
form as first lady to help as many
children as she can.”
In her speech, Mrs. Trump, who
has remained media shy, delivered some of the longest public remarks she has as first lady. The
event had a festive air: Under a
sweltering afternoon sun in the
Rose Garden, a military band
played “I Wish” by Stevie Wonder
before Mrs. Trump’s remarks and
“Change the World” by Eric Clapton afterward. Guests snacked on
cookies emblazoned with “Be
Best” in red and blue.
Mrs. Trump came up with the
logo and program name herself,
her aides said.
Observers on social media
seized on the event, noting that
the link the White House sent out
for the “Be Best” website initially
delivered an error message, and
that Mrs. Obama, Mrs. Trump’s
immediate predecessor, had delivered a speech last year urging
men to “be better.” During the
2016 campaign, Mrs. Trump took
flack for a speech that appeared to
be sourced, in part, from remarks
Mrs. Obama made in 2008.
Initially, Mrs. Trump had
backed away from her original
promise to combat cyberbullying
after the criticism leveled at Mr.
Trump for his online insults.
Knowing she would get criticized
if she pursued anything related to
social media, Mr. Trump suggested she take an easier path.
But Mrs. Trump ultimately decided to make good online behavior a part of something broader, an
East Wing official said.
Mr. Trump appeared pleased.
“That was truly a beautiful and
heartfelt speech,” he said in remarks in the Rose Garden after
Mrs. Trump spoke. “It’s the way
she feels, very strongly. America
is truly blessed to have a first lady
who is so devoted to our country.”
In her brief time at the White
House — Mrs. Trump moved to
Washington with her son, Barron,
last June — she took her time establishing her own profile, with
only a stilletoed misstep or two,
literally: She piqued the public’s
interest by wearing high heels on
a trip to Texas after it was hit by
Hurricane Harvey. She also drew
positive attention for speaking
against the racial violence in
Charlottesville, Va., that left one
woman dead.
In January, after news broke
that Stephanie Clifford, the pornographic film actress known as
Stormy Daniels, was paid
$130,000 before the 2016 election
to keep quiet about a sexual en-
A focus on opioids,
social media and
mental health.
counter with Mr. Trump, Mrs.
Trump cut back her public appearances. Her office dismissed her
absence as a coincidence, while
others close to the president said
that Mrs. Trump had been angered by the news reports.
In recent months, Mrs. Trump
has emerged more often without
Mr. Trump by her side, although
she has twice been seen avoiding
or swatting the president’s hand
away during public appearances.
She is rolling out her platform
even as Mr. Trump and his legal
team have added new, confusing
contours to the story surrounding
Ms. Clifford.
If Mrs. Trump remains something of an enigma to most Ameri-
cans, there is at least some evidence that the public has warmed
to the wife of a president whose
popularity remains at historic
lows. In a CNN poll conducted
May 2 to May 5, 57 percent of respondents said they held a favorable view of Mrs. Trump — up 10
percentage points from January
— while 27 percent had a negative
view.
One person close to Mrs. Trump
said that, like other modern first
ladies, she has chafed against
some of the boundaries of living in
the White House. But, that person
said, she has begun to embrace
the possibilities of her role, particularly because she has been
touched by letters she has received from children who have
been bullied. According to two
others who know her, she has adjusted to the role primarily because her 12-year-old son is happy
in Washington.
“She’s a devoted mother,” Hilary Ross, the wife of Wilbur Ross,
Mr. Trump’s commerce secretary
and a frequent dinner guest of the
Trumps’, said in an interview.
“And if her son is happy, she is
happy.”
Her son, who attends school in
Maryland, was not in the Rose
Garden as Mrs. Trump delivered
her remarks. At the close of her
speech, Mrs. Trump called her
husband to the podium to sign a
proclamation declaring May 7 “Be
Best” day.
“Mr. President?” she asked.
Mr. Trump took the stage and
signed the proclamation. After
proudly showing off his scrawled
presidential order to the crowd,
the president reached for his wife
and kissed her on the cheek. Mrs.
Trump accepted the kiss, then automatically turned her head and
offered him her other cheek.
Roger J. Stone Jr., the self-described political dirty trickster
who has served as an informal adviser to President Trump, sought
on Monday to portray his contact
with a Trump campaign aide as
minimal in response to a report
that the special counsel is scrutinizing their ties.
Mr. Stone made the comments
after a CNBC report that the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III,
is focusing on links between him
and Rick Gates, the deputy campaign chairman. Mr. Gates
pleaded guilty in February to financial fraud and lying to investigators in the Russia inquiry and is
cooperating with the special counsel.
Those links included dinners
before and after the campaign, according to CNBC, which cited unnamed people with direct knowledge of the matter, but Mr. Stone
said in an interview that he recalled eating only one meal with
Mr. Gates in 2016.
“The Gates story is somewhat
perplexing,” said Mr. Stone, who
spoke by phone from his New
York apartment, where he had
downtime as he promoted a new
book.
“I only have a record of one dinner with Rick Gates,” he said, adding that the guest list included two
other political operatives: Michael Caputo, a former Trump
campaign aide who was recently
interviewed by Mr. Mueller’s investigators, and Paul Manafort,
who soon after took over as chairman of Mr. Trump’s campaign. But
Mr. Manafort canceled at the last
minute, and Mr. Gates, his deputy,
attended in his place.
Mr. Stone said the conversation
during the dinner, which fell soon
after the New York primary in
April 2016, was about the New
York State delegate selection for
the Republican National Convention. The operatives expressed
concern about whether delegates,
at a time of deep division among
Republicans, would be loyal to Mr.
Trump’s vision for the party, Mr.
Stone said.
Mr. Mueller has tried to ascertain what, if anything, Mr. Stone
knew in advance about a cache of
stolen Democratic emails posted
by WikiLeaks, according to people
familiar with what Mr. Mueller’s
investigators have asked witnesses. In a speech during the
summer of 2016 and in Twitter
messages before the emails were
made public in October, Mr. Stone
appeared to foreshadow their release.
Those emails were made public
within hours of a Washington Post
report revealing the existence of a
tape of “Access Hollywood”
footage featuring old audio of Mr.
Trump speaking in vulgar terms
about women.
But Mr. Stone has insisted that
he had no prior knowledge and
that he was acting off what the
WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, had said publicly that summer, as well as information from
his longtime associate Randy
Credico, who had contacts close to
Mr. Assange.
“Did I want to know what WikiLeaks had? Of course I did,” Mr.
Stone said on Monday, adding, “I
still never had any advance
knowledge of the content, or the
form, or the exact timing” of when
the emails would be leaked.
“I never got any material including allegedly hacked emails
from WikiLeaks or Assange and
passed them on to Donald
Trump,” Mr. Stone said. “I never
got anything from the Russians,
whoever that is.”
Mr. Caputo was among those
who was questioned about Mr.
Stone’s connection to the campaign, as well as text messages he
and Mr. Stone exchanged, according to two people briefed on the
questions.
Mr. Stone said he never had any
relationship with Mr. Assange.
And he said that his lawyer had
written to House Intelligence
Committee officials asking for a
correction to testimony he gave in
the panel’s own investigation into
Russia’s election interference.
The testimony addressed one of
Mr. Stone’s tweets about the
hacked emails, which were stolen
from the account of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman, John
Podesta. Two months before the
emails were released, Mr. Stone
predicted on his since-suspended
Twitter account that it would soon
be “Podesta’s time in the barrel.”
The tweet, his lawyer said, contained a grammatical error — the
apostrophe. Mr. Stone had meant
that to write that it would soon be
“the Podestas’ time in the barrel”
and was attempting to refer to Mr.
Podesta and his brother, Tony, a
major lobbyist, his lawyer said.
Mr. Stone, a veteran political operative, has spent years weaving
narratives about himself, and others — a talent he acknowledges
may have succeeded too well this
time, harming him in the process.
“I put it this way — I’m a showman, and the only thing worse in
politics than being wrong is being
boring, and I have dramatized
some of what I believe to be true,”
Mr. Stone said.
He was adamant that he had not
changed his story. “But I have
clarified things, when questioned,” he said.
One person who has yet to question him is Mr. Mueller; Mr. Stone
said he still had not heard from the
special counsel’s office. He
sounded a hopeful note about the
lack of contact, but it could mean
that Mr. Mueller is instead focused on compiling as full a picture as possible about Mr. Stone’s
activities.
A C.I.A. Nominee Deeply Versed in the Agency, but Also in Its Darker Era
From Page A1
fight for Ms. Haspel, casting the
congressional debate over her
nomination as a question of
whether she or her adversaries
were more devoted to protecting
national security.
“My highly respected nominee
for CIA Director, Gina Haspel, has
come under fire because she was
too tough on Terrorists,” he
tweeted. “Think of that, in these
very dangerous times, we have
the most qualified person, a woman, who Democrats want OUT because she is too tough on terror.
Win Gina!”
Ms. Haspel’s opponents said the
Senate should not approve her
nomination until questions about
her record are answered. “If Gina
Haspel were to be confirmed with
these allegations unanswered and
the truth obscured by secrecy and
obstruction, it would be yet another demonstration of the U.S.
government turning a blind eye to
torture committed in the program,” Amnesty International
USA said Monday in a statement.
Friends and supporters said
Ms. Haspel understood that she
was in for a rough ride this week.
“It’s going to be a living hell,” said
Michael V. Hayden, a C.I.A. director under President George W.
Bush.
But he added that he participated in a “murder board” session
last week in which she rehearsed
for the hearing and she handled
herself well. “We were coming at
her with every stupid question we
could think of,” he said. “She was
calm, collected, fact-based and
what I would say is at peace with
herself and her personal history.”
A 33-year C.I.A. veteran, Ms.
Haspel currently serves as the
agency’s deputy director and has
the support of former directors
and acting directors from the adReporting was contributed by
Maggie Haberman, Adam Goldman, Eric Schmitt and Nicholas
Fandos.
ministrations of both parties, including Mr. Hayden, George J.
Tenet, John O. Brennan, Leon E.
Panetta, John E. McLaughlin and
Michael J. Morell, as well as the
former director of national intelligence, James R. Clapper Jr. —
most of them unstinting critics of
Mr. Trump.
Critics, however, are focused on
the period after the Sept. 11, 2001,
attacks, when Ms. Haspel ran a secret “black site” C.I.A. prison in
Thailand where detainees were
subjected to brutal interrogation
techniques. She was also involved
in approving the destruction of
videotapes of interrogation sessions at the Thailand prison. The
agency has since closed such prisons and renounced the techniques, including waterboarding,
sleep deprivation and confinement in boxes.
Among the materials handed
over to the Senate are logs of internal chats from a C.I.A. instant
messaging system in which Ms.
Haspel appeared to raise no objections to the interrogation program
or the methods employed against
Qaeda suspects, according to an
American official, who like others
declined to be identified discussing confidential matters.
The official said Ms. Haspel
seemed completely comfortable
with what was being done to the
prisoners. Her allies said she
hardly relished the task but was
carrying out a program approved
by policymakers and lawyers.
Although the Senate has had
the chat logs for some time, the
White House appeared to learn of
them only late last week. Meeting
with Ms. Haspel at the White
House on Friday, some officials
appeared unsatisfied with how
she planned to address questions
about the interrogation program
and the destruction of videotapes,
according to current and former
officials.
The officials asked pointed
questions and appeared skeptical
that Ms. Haspel would be able to
rebut critics on the Intelligence
Committee. Ms. Haspel left the
TOM BRENNER/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Gina Haspel, with the White House aide Marc Short, visited senators on Capitol Hill on Monday.
meetings concerned that the administration might not vigorously
defend her and that the C.I.A. as a
whole was at risk of being abandoned by a president who has previously excoriated the nation’s intelligence agencies.
She was acutely aware of what
happened to Dr. Ronny L. Jackson, the White House physician
who withdrew his nomination for
secretary of veterans affairs amid
allegations about his workplace
conduct, the current and former
officials said.
Ms. Haspel did not want to be
the next performer ushered onto
the set of the Trump show, humiliated and then sent packing, they
said. She agreed to the nomination out a sense of loyalty to the institution, they added, but would be
just as happy to step back into her
role as deputy.
She recommitted to the nomination after several White House of-
ficials, including Marc Short, the
legislative director, and Sarah
Huckabee Sanders, the press secretary, rushed to C.I.A. headquarters in Langley, Va., on Friday to
make clear they would defend her.
Mr. Trump also called to pledge
Questions about
involvement in a
torture program.
his support. Officials said Ms.
Haspel underwent another murder board on Sunday that went
well.
Ms. Haspel ignored questions
from reporters on Monday on
Capitol Hill, where she met with
senators on the Intelligence Com-
mittee.
“Looking forward to Wednesday,” Ms. Haspel said as she
ducked into a meeting with Senator Dianne Feinstein of California,
a senior Democrat who has been
one of the most persistent critics
of the C.I.A.’s use of torture.
Ms. Sanders seemed to obliquely confirm Monday that Ms.
Haspel had briefly entertained
second thoughts. “She wants to do
everything she can to make sure
the integrity of the C.I.A. remains
intact, isn’t unnecessarily attacked,” she said. “If she felt that
her nomination would have been a
problem for that and for the
agency, then she wanted to do everything she could to protect the
agency.”
“At the same time,” Ms. Sanders
added, “she wants to do everything she can to protect the safety
and security of Americans, which
is why she is 100 percent commit-
ted to going through this confirmation process and being confirmed as the next leader of the
C.I.A.”
One factor working in Ms.
Haspel’s favor is who would be
nominated if she were rejected, a
question weighing on Democrats
who fear a more political choice.
Mr. Hayden, the author of a new
book called “The Assault on Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies,” said Ms.
Haspel was an independent voice
who could say no to a volatile president and should not be sacrificed
over past decisions made above
her pay grade.
“I’m worried about the now. I’m
worried about tomorrow,” Mr.
Hayden said. “And who else are
you going to get who’s going to
have the character and the experience that Gina has?”
Democrats, though, pressed for
more of an accounting. The C.I.A.
has slowly declassified materials
about Ms. Haspel’s career. The latest cache came on Monday in a
single cardboard box.
Senator Mark Warner of Virginia, the top Democrat on the Intelligence Committee, wrote to Ms.
Haspel on Monday calling the lack
of transparency “unacceptable”
and urging her to use her declassification authority as acting director to make public additional information about her career.
Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat
of Oregon, accused the administration of overseeing a “cover-up
from A to Z” of Ms. Haspel’s career
by selectively declassifying only
information favorable to the nominee.
“At every step of the way, the
administration has tried to stonewall and kind of cloud this debate
with something extraneous,” he
said in an interview. “I’m really
concerned about the prospect of
this setting a precedent for what
amounts to secret confirmations.
Because if they can continue to do
what they have done so far, this
won’t be the last secret confirmation you’ll see.”
THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
A17
The 45th President The Agenda
New ‘Zero-Tolerance’ Policy for Immigrants Crossing Illegally
By MIRIAM JORDAN
and RON NIXON
LOS ANGELES — The Trump
administration announced Monday that it is dramatically stepping up prosecutions of those who
illegally cross the Southwest border, ramping up a “zero tolerance”
policy intended to deter new migrants with the threat of jail sentences and separating immigrant
children from their parents.
“If you cross the Southwest border unlawfully, then we will prosecute you. It’s that simple,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in
announcing a policy that will impose potential criminal penalties
on border crossers who previously faced mainly civil deportation proceedings — and in the
process, force the separation of
families crossing the border for
months or longer.
The new policy could flood the
immigration courts, already suffering severe backlogs, and create
new detention space shortages for
federal agencies that even now
have been forced to release many
undocumented immigrants until
their cases can be heard. Mr. Sessions said he has dispatched 35
additional prosecutors and 18 immigration judges to the Southwest
border region to help handle expanding caseloads.
The stepped-up enforcement
strategy marks the Trump administration’s toughest move yet to
stem the flow of migrants into the
United States, though officials
said the category of migrants accounting for much of the recent
surge, those seeking asylum from
violence in Central America, will
be able to apply for legal refuge.
“Today we’re here to send a
message to the world that we are
not going to let the country be
overwhelmed. People are not going to caravan or otherwise stampede our border,” Mr. Sessions
said in announcements in Arizona
and California.
The new policy strikes squarely
at parents who have traveled with
their children, some apparently
with the expectation that they
would face shorter periods of detention while their cases were
heard.
“If you are smuggling a child
then we will prosecute you, and
that child will be separated from
you as required by law,” Mr. Sessions said at a law enforcement
conference in Scottsdale, Ariz. “If
you don’t like that, then don’t
smuggle children over our border.”
The new initiative will result in
referring all illegal Southwest border crossings to the Justice Department for prosecution, Mr. Sessions said, and federal prosecutors will file charges in as many
cases as possible “until we get to
100 percent.”
Under current law, anyone
crossing illegally into the country
can be prosecuted, and the penalties are even stiffer if they attempt
to enter the country after they
have been deported. In most
cases, though, first-time offenders
are simply put into civil deportation proceedings. While it is unlikely that Mr. Sessions’ goal of 100
percent prosecutions will be
achieved, officials at the Department of Homeland Security say
they want to significantly increase the number of people referred for criminal prosecution.
“What is notable about this is
that they are taking into criminal
proceedings first–time crossers,
which has generally not been the
case in the past,” said Doris MeissMiriam Jordan reported from Los
Angeles and Ron Nixon from
Washington.
Oliver North
To Take Helm
At the N.R.A.
By NIRAJ CHOKSHI
LOREN ELLIOTT/REUTERS
Border Patrol agents apprehended immigrants who illegally crossed the border from Mexico into the U.S. last month near McAllen, Tex.
ner, senior fellow at the Migration
Policy Institute, who served as immigration commissioner during
the Clinton administration.
A similar zero-tolerance policy
was attempted in 2005 in parts of
Texas and Arizona under the
George W. Bush administration,
which ordered criminal prosecutions of immigrants in those areas
who entered the country illegally.
The policy lasted into the Obama
administration before it was
scaled back.
Another
pilot
prosecution
project was implemented in the El
Paso area at the beginning of the
2017 fiscal year. The number of illegal crossings of families
dropped by 64 percent, according
to Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials, who said entries began rising again after the
initiative ended.
During the first six months of
the fiscal year 2018, there were
35,787 criminal prosecutions for
immigration violations, according
to data from the Transactional
Records Access Clearinghouse, a
research group at Syracuse University. If prosecutions continue
at that pace for the rest of the year,
it would be a 19.5 percent increase
in prosecutions compared to fiscal
2017, the American Immigration
Council said.
The proposal has been in discussion for some time by top officials at the Department of Homeland Security.
Under the directive, undocumented immigrants who are
stopped by the Border Patrol or
customs officers will be sent directly to a federal court by the
United States Marshals Service.
Children will be placed in the custody of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement, administration officials
said.
The adult immigrants would be
sent to detention centers to await
trial. If convicted, they would be
imprisoned for the duration of
their sentences, after which time
they could be returned to their
countries of origin. First-time illegal entry is a misdemeanor that
carries up to a six-month prison
sentence. Repeat entry consti-
tutes a felony and carries a penalty of up to two years imprisonment.
After a lull, the number of women and children making the perilous journey over land from Central America to the United States
has spiked. Many of them are fleeing gangs, which often try to recruit their children. Honduras, the
source of many of the migrants,
has among the world’s highest
murder rate.
The number of border apprehensions totaled 50,924 in April
2018 compared with 15,766 the
same month last year. But the 2018
figure was roughly the same as
that of April 2016, suggesting that
2017 was an outlier.
Last month, nearly 10,000 people traveling in families were apprehended at the border, and almost 50,000 have been arrested
since October, the start of the fiscal year.
But the overall flow of undocumented immigrants remains low
compared to previous years.
In fiscal year 2017, the Border
Patrol apprehended 303,916 people compared to 408,870 in fiscal
2016, 331,333 in 2015 and 479,371 in
fiscal 2014.
“Yes, we have this spike in Central Americans. But the overall
undocumented flow is at historic
lows,” said Seth Stodder, a former
assistant secretary of Homeland
Security in the Obama administration who also served as policy
director for Customs and Border
Protection during the Bush administration.
“We are not facing a ‘massive
influx’ of undocumented migrants
coming across the US-Mexico border. In fact, the opposite is true —
undocumented migrant crossings
are at historic lows, with border
apprehensions around 20 percent
of what they were around the time
of the 9/11 attacks,” Mr. Stodder
said.
Under United States and international law, asylum seekers are
afforded the opportunity to seek
protection, and the overloaded immigration courts are not up to the
challenge, he added. “Brutally
separating young children from
their parents is not a response
worthy of a great and humane nation,” Mr. Stodder said.
The Trump administration already had hinted that a policy of
separating migrant children from
their parents was under consideration as a means of deterrence.
Officials have insisted no such
policy is in place, though about
700 children, including 100 children four years old and younger,
have been separated from their
parents since October, according
to the Department of Health and
Human Services refugee office.
The new policy will surely in-
DAVID MAUNG/EPA, VIA SHUTTERSTOCK
“If you cross the Southwest border unlawfully, then we will prosecute you,” said Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
crease this number.
Leaders of a caravan of migrants that recently arrived at the
California-Mexico border and that
President Trump has vowed to
keep from entering the country
were critical of the new policy.
“The U.S. Government is waging a war on refugee families that
has reached a new level of heartlessness and hate,” said Alex
Mensing, a spokesman for the organizing group, from Pueblo Sin
Fronteras.
“Sessions’ attack on the rights
of refugees violates both U.S. law
and international agreements, not
to mention the spirit of welcoming
those fleeing violence and in need
of refuge,” he added. “Refugee
parents aren’t smuggling their
children, they’re saving their
lives.”
Jenna Gilbert, a managing attorney in Los Angeles for Human
Rights First, a nonprofit that represents asylum seekers and other
immigrants, accused the administration of attempting to frighten
people out of seeking a safe haven
in the United States.
“Separating mothers and children at the border is just another
example of the administration’s
cruelty and attempts to scare or
deter people from seeking asylum, “ Ms. Gilbert said.
However, immigrants seeking
asylum still could be protected,
the officials said. The new policy,
meant to deter illegal immigration, would not apply to people
who present themselves at ports
of entry seeking asylum.
In cases where migrants who
have illegally entered the United
States express fear of returning to
their home country because of political prosecution or other dangers, Customs and Border Protection officers can refer them to asylum interviews.
Other critics warned that the
new policy is logistically unworkable.
“If they try to prosecute all
these folks for illegal immigration
it will overwhelm the federal
courts,” said Royce Murray, policy
director at the American Immigration Council, a nonprofit group
in Washington.
Oliver L. North, who became a
household name in the 1980s for
his role in the Iran-contra scandal,
will become the next president of
the National Rifle Association, the
gun rights organization said Monday.
“Oliver North is a legendary
warrior for American freedom, a
gifted communicator and skilled
leader,” Wayne LaPierre, the organization’s chief executive, said
in a statement. “In these times, I
can think of no one better suited to
serve as our President.”
Mr. North, 74, a former Marine
Corps lieutenant colonel and aide
to President Ronald Reagan, said
he would take the helm of the organization in a few weeks. He will
succeed Pete Brownell, who was
elected last year and announced
Monday morning that he would
not seek election to a second term.
“I appreciate the board initiating a process that affords me a few
weeks to set my affairs in order,
and I am eager to hit the ground
running as the new NRA President,” Mr. North said in the statement.
Mr. North emerged in 1986 as a
central figure in the Iran-contra
affair, in which the Reagan administration used the proceeds from
the secret sale of arms to Iran to
aid rebel forces in Nicaragua. The
nationally televised testimony Mr.
North provided to Congress the
following year transfixed the nation.
In 1989, Mr. North was convicted of destroying government
documents, accepting an illegal
gratuity and aiding and abetting
in the obstruction of Congress. He
successfully fought those convictions, getting them reversed in
1991 after prosecutors concluded
they could not prove that the witnesses who testified against him
weren’t influenced by his congressional testimony, for which he was
granted immunity.
In recent years, Mr. North has
been active as a political commentator, author and television host.
He said Monday that he would retire immediately from Fox News,
where he was a contributor and
hosted a documentary series titled “War Stories With Oliver
North.”
On Sunday, the N.R.A. concluded its 147th annual meeting, a
four-day event that was hosted in
Dallas and drew about 75,000 attendees from across the country.
The meeting came at a sensitive
time for the group, which has been
a focus of criticism after a string of
recent mass shootings, including
one of the deadliest in the nation’s
history: the massacre in Las Vegas in which 58 people were killed.
Mr. North was one of the first
political figures to address the
crowd at the annual meeting, leading thousands of N.R.A. members
in an unapologetically patriotic
and Christian opening invocation.
The prayer received enthusiastic
applause in the arena.
“Lord, we ask you to deliver us
from our enemies, for your forgiveness for those things that we
have done and that which we
failed to do, when we stray from
your word,” Mr. North said. “We
beseech you for godly, enlightened leaders.”
Manny Fernandez contributed reporting.
New York Stock Exchange Is Building an Online Platform for Bitcoin Trading
From Page A1
the renegade history of Bitcoin.
The virtual currency was created after the 2008 financial crisis
by a still-anonymous programmer
who used the name Satoshi
Nakamoto. The idea was to replace the existing banking structure with an online alternative
that couldn’t be controlled by a
handful of powerful organizations.
But instead of being replaced,
the old banks are beginning to assert their own role in the unorthodox world of virtual currency,
sometimes called cryptocurrency.
While Bitcoin was originally intended to be used by consumers
for all sorts of transactions —
without any financial institutions
getting involved — it has mostly
become a virtual investment,
stored in digital wallets and
traded on mostly unregulated exchanges around the world. People
buy Bitcoin in the hope that its value will go up, similar to the way
they purchase gold or silver.
Details of the platform that Intercontinental Exchange is working on have not been finalized and
the project could still fall apart,
given the hesitancy among big
Wall Street institutions to be
closely associated with the Wild
West of virtual currencies. A
spokesman said that the company
had no comment.
Many corporations and governments have expressed interest in
the technology that Bitcoin introduced, particularly a form of database known as the blockchain.
Some large financial exchanges, including the Chicago
Mercantile Exchange, have already created financial products
linked to the price of Bitcoin,
known as futures. But the new operation at ICE would provide
more direct access to Bitcoin by
putting the actual tokens in the
customer’s account at the end of
the trade.
ICE has had conversations with
other financial institutions about
setting up a new operation
through which banks can buy a
contract, known as a swap, that
will end with the customer owning
Bitcoin the next day — with the
backing and security of the exchange, according to the people
familiar with the project.
The swap contract is more complicated than an immediate trade
of dollars for Bitcoin, even if the
end result is still ownership of a
certain amount of Bitcoin. But a
swap contract allows the trading
to come under the regulation of
the Commodity Futures Trading
Commission and to operate
clearly under existing laws —
something today’s Bitcoin exchanges have struggled to do.
The chief executive of Nasdaq,
Adena Friedman, recently said
her company could also create a
virtual-currency exchange if regulatory issues are ironed out.
While several hedge funds have
been buying and selling Bitcoin,
most large institutional investors,
Old banks assert their
own role in the world
of virtual currency.
such as mutual funds and pensions, have avoided it largely as a
result of regulatory concerns.
Bitcoin still faces plenty of skepticism in the mainstream financial
world. Over the weekend, Warren
E. Buffett of Berkshire Hathaway,
who has long been critical of virtual currencies, said Bitcoin was
“probably rat poison squared” in
an interview with CNBC. The
Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates
added his own skepticism, saying
he’d “short” Bitcoin if he could.
And the new efforts to trade Bit-
coin don’t help answer basic questions about what makes the virtual currency useful in the real
world. Most attempts to use Bitcoin for everyday commerce haven’t gained traction, and investors have treated it as a speculative
commodity like gold or silver.
Some Bitcoin enthusiasts have
said that its increasing integration
into the financial system has
pulled it away from its founding
ideals. Paul Chou, a former trader
at Goldman Sachs who set up
LedgerX, a regulated Bitcoin exchange that would compete with
Intercontinental Exchange, said
his company has made a point of
focusing on large Bitcoin holders,
rather than financial institutions.
“The reason we got into crypto
was not to partner with a bank,
but to replace them,” Mr. Chou
said, using the shorthand for cryptocurrencies. “We deal with
crypto holders directly in a way
that really takes advantage of Bitcoin’s strengths, while avoiding
brokers, banks and other institutions that take multiple cuts of the
transaction.”
Goldman will initially only be
trading futures contracts linked to
Bitcoin’s price. But Goldman executives said they were looking at
moving in the direction of buying
and selling actual Bitcoins.
NEXT UP, FEDCOIN?
An ex-Fed governor says the bank
should consider its own digital
currency. Business Day, Page B2.
Intercontinental Exchange’s effort, if it pans out, could make Bitcoin available to a much wider and
more influential customer base,
including other financial firms.
Several big corporate names,
including the giant technology investor SoftBank, which has stakes
in Sprint and Uber, have been in
discussions about being involved
with the exchange in some way,
the people familiar with the
project said. But a spokesman for
SoftBank said this week that it
was no longer involved.
LedgerX,
the
exchange
founded by Mr. Chou, is the only
exchange that now offers the kind
of swaps that ICE has discussed.
LedgerX has experienced increasing trading volume in recent
months, but ICE would start with
an edge because essentially every
large financial institution is already hooked into it.
The interest in Bitcoin trading
illustrates how the reputation of
the virtual currency has, after a
rocky start, improved.
Regulators are looking at
whether many virtual currencies,
including the second most widely
used digital token, Ether, have
been issued and traded in violation of securities regulations. Institutional investors believe that
because of the way Bitcoin was
created and structured — without
any one company or organization
behind it — it would be on safer
ground with regulators.
ICE was considering launching
a swap contract linked to Ether,
but backed away from that because of regulatory uncertainty,
the people briefed on the effort
said.
Mr. Chou, at LedgerX, said he
made a similar decision and has
delayed creating any products
linked to Ether.
With Bitcoin, on the other hand,
Mr. Chou said that road seems to
be clear for big institutions to get
involved.
“The industry is seeing unprecedented institutional interest for
the first time in Bitcoin’s history,”
he said. “I’ve been amazed that
the strongest believers in cryptocurrency often start out the
most skeptical. It’s a healthy skepticism. But at some point the perception shifts, and for many institutions — I think we’re finally
there.”
A18
THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
In Scrutinized Case,
Court Absolves M.I.T.
In Suicide of Student
By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — In a legal case closely watched for its potential implications for universities nationwide, Massachusetts’s
highest court ruled Monday that
M.I.T. could not be held responsible for the 2009 suicide of one of its
students.
Broadly, the Supreme Judicial
Court said in its 44-page ruling,
“there is no duty to prevent another from committing suicide.”
There may be special relationships where this duty exists, the
court said, but for universities,
that duty applies only in limited
circumstances, such as when its
employees know of a student’s expressly stated plans to commit
suicide.
Universities “are not responsible for monitoring and controlling
all aspects of their students’
lives,” the court wrote, and there is
“universal recognition” that the
age of “in loco parentis,” where
universities stand in for parents,
is long over.
The ruling will bring relief to institutions of higher education. A
group of 18 Massachusetts colleges and universities, including
Harvard, Amherst, Smith and
Boston University, had filed a
brief supporting the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology in
the lawsuit brought by the student’s family.
While M.I.T. has had an unusually high rate of student suicides,
the problem affects universities
across the country, with an estimated 1,100 college students a
year taking their own lives, according to court documents. Preventing them from doing so has
become increasingly complex,
universities say, in part because of
expanded student expectations of
privacy and autonomy.
Courts generally have been reluctant to rule that faculty and administrators — who are rarely
clinically trained in suicide prevention — are responsible if students end up killing themselves.
In this case, the student, Han
Nguyen, was 25 and a Ph.D. candidate at M.I.T.’s Sloan School of
Management when he jumped to
his death from a campus building.
His family’s lawyers said in
court papers that they believed
that M.I.T., two of its professors
and a dean of student life were legally bound to care for Mr.
Nguyen and to prevent the suicide. They even suggested that
one of the professors, Birger
Wernerfelt, had caused it, noting
that Mr. Nguyen had leapt to his
The court wrote that
the days of ‘in loco
parentis’ are over.
CHARLES KRUPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eighteen colleges filed a brief backing the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, above, in a lawsuit.
death just moments after the professor had harshly criticized him.
Lawyers for the student’s father said that M.I.T. was well
aware of Mr. Nguyen’s fragile
mental state, noting that Professor Wernerfelt had even taken
steps to ease the stress on the student because he did not want the
institute to have “blood on its
hands.”
Lawyers for the family also said
that M.I.T.’s student support services were inadequate and that
while some campuses — notably,
the University of Illinois — had
long ago put in place programs
that reduced the rate of suicides,
the rate at M.I.T. remained disturbingly high.
M.I.T. argued that Mr. Nguyen
had been dealing with mental
health issues long before he came
to M.I.T., including two previous
suicide attempts, and that while at
M.I.T. he received care from nine
different mental health professionals — none of whom had any
affiliation with the university and
none of whom deemed him at “imminent risk” of killing himself.
Moreover, the university said,
Mr. Nguyen “repeatedly declined
to avail himself of support resources M.I.T. offered.” Mr.
Nguyen had written in an email to
the university that he wanted to
keep his mental problems separate from his academic issues.
M.I.T. said that if the court sided
with the family, it would “transform the relationship between faculty and their students.”
The 18 universities that filed a
brief on behalf of M.I.T. warned
that requiring nonclinical faculty
to prevent potential suicides could
have disastrous effects. Professors, in seeking to protect themselves from liability, they said,
might go overboard in monitoring
students, which could drive students underground and dissuade
them from talking to anyone about
their problems.
In its ruling Monday, the high
court affirmed a lower court’s decision. It noted that the university
could do little when Mr. Nguyen
repeatedly refused offers of help.
“In these circumstances, as a matter of law, a twenty-five-year-old
graduate student’s rights to privacy, autonomy, and self-determination were properly respected,”
the court wrote.
The court also exonerated the
professor who warned that M.I.T.
could have “blood on its hands.”
The judges said the remark was
“stated metaphorically” and in a
different context, not based on explicit statements by Mr. Nguyen
that he intended to take his life.
As More States Legalize Marijuana, Let’s Talk About Its Potential Risks
By AARON E. CARROLL
The benefits and harms of
medical marijuana can be debated, but more states are legalizing
pot, even for recreational use. A
new evaluation of marijuana’s
risks is overdue.
Last year, the National Academies of Sciences, Medicine and
Engineering released a comprehensive report on cannabis use.
At almost 400 pages long, it
reviewed both potential benefits
and harms. Let’s focus on the
harms.
CANCER The greatest concern
with tobacco smoking is cancer,
so it’s reasonable to start there
with pot smoking. A 2005 systematic review in the International Journal of Cancer pooled
the results of six case-control
studies. No association was
found between smoking marijuana and lung cancer. Another 2015
systematic review pooled nine
case-control studies and could
find no link to head and neck
cancers.
Another meta-analysis of three
case-control studies of testicular
cancer found a statistically significant link between heavier pot
smoking and one type of testicular cancer. But this evidence was
judged to be “limited” because of
limitations in the research (all of
which was from the 1990s).
There’s no evidence, or not
enough to say, of a link between
pot use and esophageal cancer,
prostate cancer, cervical cancer,
non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, penile
cancer or bladder cancer. There’s
also no evidence, or not enough
to say, that pot has any effect on
sperm or eggs that could increase the risk of cancer in any
children of pot smokers. (Using
marijuana while pregnant does
pose other risks, as discussed
below.)
HEART DISEASE Another major
risk with cigarettes, heart disease, isn’t clearly seen with pot
smoking. Only two studies quantified the risk between marijuana
use and heart attacks. One found
no relationship at all, and the
other found that pot smoking
may be a trigger for a heart
not of humans out in the world.
As for risk of a “contact high,”
the amount of THC detectable in
secondhand smoke is negligible.
Almost all agree that children
should not use pot, but concerns
are legitimately raised about
whether children might have
increased exposure or access
after legalization. Although this
issue has not been studied
widely, it’s possible that pot —
the THC and the metabolites
from smoke — could have an
effect on the developing brains of
children. These concerns are
more applicable to adolescents
who use pot regularly, however,
not the accidental ingestion
reported in the news once in a
while.
The Upshot provides news,
analysis and graphics about
politics, policy and everyday life.
nytimes.com/upshot
attack in the hour after smoking.
But this finding was based on
nine patients, and may not be
generalizable.
LUNG FUNCTION It also makes
sense to think about the risk of
respiratory disease. In the short
term after smoking pot, a 2007
systematic review found, lung
function actually improved. But
these benefits were completely
overtaken by evidence that lung
function may degrade with
chronic use. Lung function, however, is a laboratory measure and
not necessarily a clinical outcome, and what we really care
about is lung disease. Once you
control for tobacco use, the links
between marijuana and chronic
obstructive pulmonary disease
appear minimal. Almost no evidence is available to link pot use
to asthma.
IMPAIRED DRIVING Driving while
impaired is a major cause of
injury and death in the United
States. Six systematic reviews
were considered of fair or good
quality by the national academies, and the most recent one
pooled three of the others. It
contained evidence from 21 studies in 13 countries representing
almost 240,000 participants.
For people who reported marijuana use, or had THC detected
through testing, their odds of
being involved in a motor vehicle
accident increased by 20 to 30
percent, the study found. This is,
of course, a relative increase, and
shouldn’t be confused with the
overall percentage chance of
getting in an accident, which is
much smaller.
Regardless, driving while
impaired is a terrible idea. Although we have good tests to
determine if people are under the
influence of alcohol, no such tests
are currently available for mari-
NEW QUESTIONS Almost all the
harms the medical literature
focuses on involve smoked
cannabis. We know little to nothing about edibles and other
means of administration. Nor do
we have any consistent manner
of measuring the level of exposure.
ELIJAH NOUVELAGE/REUTERS
A marijuana vape lounge in Oakland, Calif. A new report reviews the possible benefits and harms.
juana, making enforcement more
difficult.
PREGNANCY EFFECTS Babies
born to women who smoke pot
during pregnancy are more
likely to be underweight, delivered premature and admitted to
a neonatal intensive care unit,
according to a 2016 systematic
review. But there were no links
seen for changes in birth length,
head circumference or congenital
malformations. There’s limited
evidence for pregnancy complications for mothers, and there’s
not enough evidence to comment
on much else about babies and
their outcomes.
MEMORY AND CONCENTRATION
There’s moderate evidence, from
many studies, that learning,
memory and attention can be
impaired in the 24 hours after
marijuana use. There’s limited
evidence, however, that this
translates into worse outcomes
in academic achievement, em-
ployment, income or social functioning, or that these effects
linger after the pot has “worn
off.”
MENTAL HEALTH The possible
relationship between marijuana
use and mental health is complicated. The most recent metaanalysis found that there’s a
significant connection between
heavy marijuana use and a diagnosis of psychosis, specifically
schizophrenia. This mirrored the
findings of previous reviews that
sought to cover only high-quality
studies. Another systematic
review highlighted a potentially
small but statistically significant
link between marijuana use and
the development of bipolar disorder. Heavy users of pot are
also more likely to say they have
suicidal thoughts.
What makes this complicated
is that it’s hard to establish the
arrow of causality. Are people
who smoke pot more likely to
develop mental health problems?
Or are people with mental health
problems more likely to smoke
pot?
There’s a similar issue when
talking about the relationship
between using pot and other
substances. Some see marijuana
as a “gateway” drug, leading to
other substance use or abuse.
Others see this as only a correlation in which people who are
likely to use or abuse substances
are more likely to use pot as well.
SECONDHAND SMOKE As states
legalize the drug for general use,
more cannabis users feel freed
from secrecy. They smoke more
in public, raising worries about
secondhand smoke. A two-yearold study made news recently by
arguing that one minute of exposure to pot smoke impaired how
vessels responded to blood flow
for at least 90 minutes, a greater
impairment than from tobacco.
This was a study in rats, though,
WEIGH PROS AND CONS Many of
the harms we’ve discussed are
statistically significant, and yet
they are of questionable significance. Almost all the increased
risks are relative risks. The
absolute, or overall, risks are
often quite low.
We haven’t focused on the
potential medical benefits here.
But many people use pot — even
rationally — for benefits they
perceive to be greater than the
harms we’ve listed.
We unquestionably need more
research, and more evidence of
harms may emerge. But it’s
important to note that the harms
we know about now are practically nil compared with that of
many other drugs, and that
marijuana’s effects are clearly
less harmful than those associated with tobacco or alcohol
abuse.
People who choose to use
marijuana — now that it’s easier
to do legally — will need to weigh
the pros and cons for themselves.
She Thought Governor Was ‘Perfect Guy,’ but Now He’s Charged With a Crime
By JULIE BOSMAN
As Gov. Eric Greitens of Missouri faces a criminal trial next
week for a felony charge of
invasion of privacy, he has
sought to prevent the woman at
the center of the case from testifying in open court.
A judge in St. Louis denied the
request on Monday, saying that
he would not bar her testimony
— an account that could be
crucial to prosecutors’ contention that Mr. Greitens took an
explicit photograph of the woman without her consent.
Mr. Greitens’s legal and political fate could hinge on the
account from the woman, who
had sexual encounters with Mr.
Greitens in 2015, before he was
governor. So far, she has remained anonymous, though she
has revealed details of her relationship with Mr. Greitens under
oath to legislators in Missouri.
Here is what we know about
the woman, who is identified in
court filings only by her initials,
K.S.
How did K.S. and Mr. Greitens
meet?
K.S. is a resident of the St. Louis
area who works as a hairdresser.
A mother of two, she was separated from her husband when
she had her first sexual encounter with the governor. She is now
divorced.
She first met Mr. Greitens in
2013 when he began visiting her
salon and became a regular
client. “I thought he was this
perfect guy,” she told a legislative
committee in March. “I knew
that he was an author, I knew he
was a motivational speaker, I
knew he was a Navy SEAL.”
What happened between them?
Mr. Greitens, who is married, has
been unambiguous about his
relationship with K.S.: They had
a brief affair before he was governor, and it came to an end.
K.S. has described it as something more complicated.
In her testimony to lawmakers
in March, K.S. described her
initial relationship with Mr. Greitens as friendly and flirty. In
March 2015, it took a sexual turn
when Mr. Greitens moved his
hand “all the way up” between
her legs during his hair appointment, she told the committee.
They met at his home at his
urging, an encounter that began
strangely — when she walked
into his house, he searched her
purse, patted her down and
looked outside to make sure her
arrival had not been noticed.
In her account, she said they
went to the basement, where Mr.
Greitens took her photo while
she was undressed and blindfolded, before threatening to
make sure the photograph would
be “everywhere” if she ever
mentioned his name to anyone.
She felt the only way she could
leave his home was if she performed oral sex, she told the
House investigative committee.
The two had several more
sexual encounters over a period
of months. Then in October 2015,
she told Mr. Greitens she didn’t
want to see him or hear from him
again, and he complied.
He continued his Republican
bid for governor, touting his
background as a military veteran, family man and philanthropist. In November 2016, Mr.
Greitens won the race by six
percentage points, handing Republicans, who already dominated the State House and Senate, full control of Jefferson City,
the state capital.
After the release of the legislative report detailing K.S.’s account, some lawmakers said they
saw her as a victim of abuse.
What does Mr. Greitens say about
K.S.?
The governor has denied threatening K.S. and says that they had
a completely consensual relationship. He and his wife, Sheena,
have “emerged stronger” after
the affair, the two said in a joint
statement in January.
When Missouri lawmakers
released their report about the
woman’s testimony, Mr. Greitens
sharply dismissed it, saying it
contained “explosive, hurtful
allegations of coercion, violence,
and assault,” which he flatly
denied. He said that the claims
would be refuted by depositions
and other evidence once he was
able to have his case heard in
court. “A court of law and a jury
of my peers will let every person
in Missouri know the truth and
prove my innocence,” he said.
How did her story become public?
For more than two years, the
relationship remained out of
public view.
In December 2017, K.S.’s ex-
husband approached media
outlets in St. Louis with a recording he had made — in secret — of
a conversation he and K.S. had
about Mr. Greitens.
On the tape, K.S. tearfully
admitted the affair and told her
then-husband that Mr. Greitens
had photographed and threatened to blackmail her.
Since then, she has said that
she was horrified by her exhusband’s actions and struggled
to keep the story from being
publicized. A reporter from a St.
Louis television station booked a
hair appointment at K.S.’s salon
under a fake name, then used the
appointment to ask her for an
interview. K.S. cried and begged
the reporter not to run the story.
The broadcast ran on Jan. 10.
Her lawyer released a statement asking for privacy, saying
in part: “It is very disappointing
that her ex-husband betrayed her
confidence by secretly, and without her knowledge, recording a
private and deeply personal
conversation and then subsequently released the recording to
the media without her consent.”
Mr. Greitens admitted that he
had an extramarital affair, but
denied any suggestion of blackmail.
Why is she anonymous?
In court filings, she is identified
by only her initials, K.S., a request granted by the judge in the
case. She is considered a crime
victim by the state.
Will she testify at trial?
At the moment, she is expected
to testify. She has been cooperating with the prosecutor’s office
and is on the state’s witness list.
Mr. Greitens faces up to four
years in prison if found guilty;
the Missouri House could begin
impeachment proceedings
against him at any time, and
lawmakers have called a special
session for May 18, after the trial.
Mr. Greitens also faces a separate criminal charge that will not
be heard during the trial next
week. He is charged with tampering with computer data in
connection to an accusation that
he misused the donor list for a
charity he founded during his
2016 campaign for governor.
The Magazine. Sundays.
A19
TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
K
N
PHOTOGRAPHS BY KARSTEN MORAN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Inside one of 32 new subway cars built by Bombardier, a Canadian company, as it rumbled into the Myrtle Avenue Station in Brooklyn. The company still owes the city 268 cars.
Skepticism Over M.T.A.’s Grand Promises
Significant delays in unfinished
projects exacerbate the plodding
transit agency’s troubles.
By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS
An order of 300 new subway cars
should have arrived in New York City by
January 2017, months before the system
was officially declared to be in crisis.
Instead, only 32 of those cars are now
on the tracks. The order is at least two
years behind schedule.
The new subway cars may not have
averted the current emergency, but they
sure could have helped. Deploying some
of the oldest trains in the world, the subway has been plagued by an increase in
breakdowns.
In an effort to save the subway, officials at the Metropolitan Transportation
Authority are promising ambitious plans
that will cost billions of dollars. But two
key projects — the train order and a plan
to modernize the signals on the No. 7 line
— are significantly behind schedule.
The delays raise a central question:
How can subway officials tackle a soup to
nuts overhaul of the system when they
cannot finish what they have already
started?
Any hope that subway riders will see
better service in the near future will depend on sweeping changes at an agency
that is not known for its nimbleness.
“The M.T.A. doesn’t have to do it two or
three times faster — they have to do it
five or 10 times faster in order to stick to a
timeline that would make a noticeable
difference in people’s lives,” said John
Raskin, the executive director of the Riders Alliance, an advocacy group.
Instead, the authority has a reputation
for finishing projects late and far over
budget. The latest embarrassment came
last month when the authority acknowledged that a project to build a new train
station deep beneath Grand Central Terminal will now cost over $11 billion and
will not open until 2022 — about 13 years
past the original estimate.
The delayed subway cars, known as
R-179s, are being built by Bombardier, a
Canadian company that so poorly managed the contract that it was blocked
from winning a different order for as
many as 1,612 subway cars that could be
worth nearly $4 billion. The $740 million
contract for the R-179s, which was
awarded in 2012, has had problems, including malfunctioning door lights.
Bombardier must produce one car
each day to meet its current promise to
deliver all of the subway trains by early
next year.
At the same time, a plan to install modern signals on the No. 7 line, which connects Manhattan to densely populated
neighborhoods in Queens, appears to be
delayed again, until the end of this year.
The signal work by Thales, a French
company, has already taken more than
seven years and is at least two years
overdue.
The No. 7 line would be the second
route to have its signals modernized under a timetable that would not see all of
the system’s signals updated for almost
50 years and that officials are striving to
accelerate. The L line, which runs between Manhattan and Brooklyn, was the
To meet its current promise to deliver all of the subway
trains by early next year, Bombardier must produce one
of the new R-179 cars each day.
first to receive the new signal system,
which is known as communicationsbased train control, or C.B.T.C.
The subway’s new leader, Andy Byford, said he has spoken frequently with
executives from the two companies involved in the overdue projects — Mario
Péloquin at Thales and Benoit Brossoit
at Bombardier — and had stressed the
urgency of finishing the work.
“They’re both on my speed dial,” Mr.
Byford said. “I’m all over both projects.”
The two projects promise to bring
some relief to frustrated riders, though
more comprehensive overhauls are still
years away. The new signals on the No. 7
line will allow two or three additional
trains to run each hour, reducing wait
times and alleviating overcrowding. The
new subway cars should break down less
frequently, improving reliability.
But with software problems plaguing
the new signal system, Thales wants to
push back the completion date. The signals were supposed to be installed by
April 2016 under a $588 million contract
the company won in 2010. Queens residents who live along the No. 7 line have
grown exasperated over recurring station closings necessary for the work.
Mr. Byford said he would push for the
signals to be finished in the next few
months.
“They may be saying the end of 2018 —
I’m saying no, this summer,” Mr. Byford
said. “I’m insisting they get to the bottom
of these software problems.”
Mr. Péloquin, president of Thales’
transportation business in the U.S., said
he would work with the transit agency to
determine whether the project could be
finished earlier.
“It is our goal to deliver a safe system
which everyone can be proud of and provides better reliability and on-time performance,” Mr. Péloquin said in a statement.
The transit agency’s most important
task now is to regain its credibility so that
the public believes it is capable of pulling
off a rescue plan, Mr. Raskin said.
“We know that it’s possible to modern-
ize a transit system much more quickly
because it’s happened in other places,”
Mr. Raskin said, pointing to London,
where the subway is older than New
York’s and officials have upgraded the
signals far more rapidly.
Mr. Byford, who cut his teeth on the
transit systems in London and Toronto,
plans to release a comprehensive plan to
modernize the subway this month. Gov.
Andrew M. Cuomo, who controls the authority and is running for re-election this
year, has pressed him to upgrade all of
the subway signals in under a decade,
though Mr. Cuomo has touted a new technology that has not been used on a major
transit system.
As for the setbacks on the subway car
order and signal work, Mr. Byford
blamed the suppliers for failing to meet
their deadlines. He is eager to set a new
tone.
“I can’t turn the clock back, but I’m determined going forward that we will deliver on our promises,” Mr. Byford said.
The first R-179 cars started to appear
on New York’s subway in January. But
four months later, with only 32 cars,
there are just four, eight-car trains running on the J and Z lines. An additional 21
cars are still being tested.
Bombardier plans to deliver all of the
cars by the first quarter of 2019, according to Maryanne Roberts, a spokeswoman for the company. The workers at their
factory in Plattsburgh, N.Y., about 300
miles north of the city, are working to finish the cars “as quickly as possible while
maintaining the highest standards of
quality,” Ms. Roberts said in a statement.
The oldest subway cars, known as
R-32s, arrived in the 1960s. They break
down more frequently than other cars
and should have been retired years ago.
While newer cars can travel nearly
500,000 miles between failures, the
R-32s go only about 33,000 miles between failures.
Andrew Albert, an M.T.A. board member who represents riders, said the system desperately needs the new Bombardier cars as soon as possible.
“It’s way past time,” Mr. Albert said.
“Subway cars are not meant to be kept
this long.”
One of the new trains leaving Marcy Avenue in Brooklyn. The city’s subway system still has some of the oldest trains in the world.
A20
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
Joyous Homecoming for Officer Thrown Off Suspect’s Car in Brooklyn
and cheers from dozens of officers
and medical workers who had
gathered outside.
Dressed in jeans, sneakers and
a baseball cap — his 3-year-old
daughter, Darshee, seated on his
lap — Detective Veve paused a
moment as Mr. O’Neill, several
top chiefs and Patrick J. Lynch,
the president of the Patrolmen’s
Benevolent Association, looked
on and clapped.
“It’s just such a great day for his
family and for the N.Y.P.D,” said
Mr. O’Neill, as the officers, in a
mix of dress blues and windbreakers, broke ranks to return to their
own vehicles, vans and a bus, for
the trip back to New York City.
“He’s whispering,” the commissioner said of Detective Veve, recalling how irreversible his injuries first appeared. “He just gave
us the thumbs up. We’re hoping he
continues to progress and I think
he will.”
It has been a long road from the
life-threatening episode on June 3
on Tilden Street in East Flatbush
to Monday’s joyous milestone.
That Saturday, at around 11:50
p.m., Officer Veve and other plainclothes officers from the 67th
Precinct responded to 911 calls reporting gunshots. Officer Veve
turned his attention to a black
Honda sedan parked in front of a
By AL BAKER
WEST ORANGE, N.J. —
Nearly a year ago, a New York
City police officer, Dalsh Veve,
was flung from a fleeing car in
Brooklyn and injured so grievously his family and colleagues
did not know whether he would
live or die.
But the officer hung on, despite
a catastrophic brain injury and a
grave prognosis. For his bravery,
the police commissioner, James P.
O’Neill, promoted him to detective
in October.
Months passed. Detective
Veve’s medical condition slowly
improved as he was transferred
from Kings County Hospital Center in Brooklyn to the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in West
Orange, N.J. In time, he began to
recognize visitors.
On Monday, his wife, Mathes
Esther Veve, a nurse, escorted
him out of the picturesque rehab
facility and into a minivan for a
trip home to continue his recovery
at their house on Long Island,
where the neighbors always
hoped to see him again.
At 2:30 p.m., under a blue sky
marked only by a New York Police
Department helicopter, Detective
Veve, 36, was taken in a wheelchair out Kessler’s front doors and
into the rising sounds of bagpipes
VICTOR J. BLUE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Detective Dalsh Veve exited a rehabilitation facility in West Orange, N.J., on Monday to the sounds of cheers and bagpipes.
fire hydrant, about half a block
east of East 53rd Street. A 15-yearold, Justin Murrell, was at the
wheel, officials said, and as Officer
Veve tried to question him he hit
the gas and sped off.
Officer Veve tried to hang on to
the driver’s side of the car, but he
was thrown off as Mr. Murrell
wove through the residential
blocks at speeds as fast as 56
miles per hour, Eric Gonzalez, the
“rolling walker,” talks and eats
three meals a day. “This is beyond,” Dr. Jasey said.
Dr. Jasey said Detective Veve’s
injury was similar to what a rock
climber might suffer after a violent fall. He said a mix of factors
helped Detective Veve survive:
the quick work of emergency
medical workers the night he was
hurt; the skill of the neurosur-
— an immigrant child came here,
joined the greatest police force in
the country and has been an exemplary officer,” Mayor Bill de
Blasio said in the hours after the
shooting.
One of the bullets hit Mr. Murrell in the mouth and lodged in his
jaw. He sought treatment at Kings
County, but ran off after seeing officers massed in front. He then
took a car service to Brookdale
University Hospital and Medical
Center. The police later determined that he had been the driver
of the Honda, which had been reported stolen in Valley Stream on
Long Island.
The case against Mr. Murrell,
now 16, who has pleaded not guilty
to charges of attempted murder
and assaulting a police officer, has
yet to be resolved, Oren Yaniv, a
spokesman for the Brooklyn district attorney’s office, said on
Monday. Two passengers in the
car pleaded guilty to hindering
prosecution, Mr. Yaniv said.
On Monday, Dr. Neil N. Jasey,
the center’s director of brain injury rehabilitation, said Detective
Veve’s injuries were so severe
when he arrived that doctors did
not initially anticipate he would
recover as quickly as he has.
Though he has a slow gait and
some problems with balance, Detective Veve now walks with a
Brooklyn district attorney, later
said.
Officials said Officer Veve fired
two shots into the car before falling off. His colleagues carried him
to their car and drove him to Kings
County Hospital Center. He had
severe brain injuries, a broken
shoulder and other trauma.
A Haitian immigrant, he had
joined the police force in 2011. “He
represents the American dream
Medical skill, support
and ‘internal drive’
spurred recovery.
geons who first treated him; support from his family and fellow officers; and “his own internal
drive.” His wife visited almost every day, Dr. Jasey said, and his colleagues have retrofitted his house
in North Baldwin, N.Y., adding
ramps, a chairlift to a second-floor
bedroom and a new bathroom.
Still, the officer has a long way
to go.
“This is kind of the first step,”
said Dr. Jasey. “It’s a marathon
and not a sprint. This recovery’s
going to go on for the rest of his
life.”
Weather Report
Vancouver
Winnipeg
eg
g
Seattle
le
5 s
50s
Helena
70s
Bismarck
Billings
60ss
Bo
oise
o
L
Milwauke
ee
Las
Vega
Vegas
Fresno
Fre
no
o
90ss
Kansas
Sp
Springfield
e
City
St. Louiiis
Topeka
Colorado
C
Springs
70s
Pho
Ph
hoe
oenix
100+
Albuquerq
erq
erque
D
Dallas
Ft. Worth
Honolulu
90s
San
n Antonio
Hou
ouston
80s
70s
30s
40s
40
Fairba
ba s
banks
M
Mo
Mobile
N
New
Orleans
An approaching cold front will cause
some sunshine to give way to cloudiness.
Showers or thunderstorms will pass
through in the evening. Temperatures will
be more seasonable.
Or
Orlando
90s
0s
Tampa
a9
Miami
Nassau
Monterrey
FRIDAY
Weather patterns shown as expected at noon today, Eastern time.
60
0s
0
TODAY’S HIGHS
<0
50s
0s
10s
Anchorage
An
ge
20s
H
Juneau
au
COLD
60s
WARM
70°
Normal
highs
60°
THURSDAY .....Some sunshine, then clouds
J
Jacksonville
Corpus Christi
C
9
90
90s
80°
Jackson
so
9
90s
Baton
o Rouge
80s
0s
TOMORROW ............................Mostly sunny
High 74. Another dry day is expected with
periods of cloudiness and sunshine and
high pressure still overhead. Away from
the beaches, afternoon temperatures will
climb several degrees above normal.
L
Atlanta
80s
80
70
70s
70ss
60
60s
gh
70s Raleigh
Charlotte
Colum
mb
m
bia
Birmingham
m
Lubbock
Tucson
son
on
N
Norfolk
Memphis
his
Little
tle
eR
Rock
9
90s
El Paso
80s
0ss
60s
60
0s Hilo
0s
60ss
Louisville
Nashville
Okla
ahoma City
a
San
San
an Diego
Washington
Wash
ash
hii
h
Rich
chmond
hm
Charleston
harles
e
Wic
Wi
Wichita
Sant
nta
nt
aF
Fe
Los An
Lo
ngele
ngel
eles
Philadelphia
Ph
hi
h
Indianapolis
a
Denv
env
enver
90ss
TONIGHT ..............................................Clear
Low 54. Dry weather will continue as the
area of high pressure remains in the
region. Temperatures will not drop much
below typical lows for this time of year.
New York
N
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
lan
Chicag
go
g
Omaha
Salt Lake
City
San Francisco
Sa
ranc
anci
H
Bos
Boston
Record
highs
90°
Har
Hartford
a
60s
0ss
Dess Mo
Moi
Moines
Cheyenne
B
Buffalo
60s
Detroit
Sioux
ou Falls
Casper
Reno
Manchester
he t
Alban
ny
Toronto
To
St. Paul
S
High 72. An area of high pressure will
make for a dry day as cloudiness mixes
with sunshine. Air flowing in from the
Atlantic Ocean will keep coastal areas
cooler than the northern and western
suburbs.
B ng
Burlingt
Burlington
Bu
Bur
g o Portland
Por
Ottaw
wa
Fargo
50s
H
Halifax
60s
Montreal
TODAY ......................................Partly sunny
Pierre
70
70s
H
80s
70
70s
70s
70
0s
Minneapolis
inneapolis
nneapoli
n
50s
70
70s
Quebecc
70s
Spokane
Spokan
e
Portlan
and
an
Eugen
ne
ne
Metropolitan Forecast
40s
Regina
60s
Meteorology by AccuWeather
STATIONARY COMPLEX
COLD
FRONTS
30s
40s
50s
60s
70s
80s
90s
100+
SNOW
ICE
L
HIGH LOW
PRESSURE
MOSTLY
CLOUDY
SHOWERS T-STORMS
RAIN
FLURRIES
PRECIPITATION
SATURDAY ................................Partly sunny
Friday will be drier and partially sunny.
The high will be 74. Cloudiness will mix
with sunshine on Saturday with a high of
72.
Normal
lows
50°
TODAY
40° T F S S M T W T F S
Actual
High
Low
Highlight: Severe Thunderstorm Risk Tomorrow
National Forecast
Metropolitan Almanac
Thunderstorms are
expected to form across
portions of the Midwest
tomorrow afternoon as a
disturbance moves across
the region. Thunderstorms
may be locally severe,
especially from eastern
Missouri to southwestern
Indiana. Any thunderstorm
may produce brief wind
gusts in excess of 50 mph,
small hail and torrential
downpours. Thunderstorms
will weaken tomorrow
night.
Low clouds and rain showers are forecast to linger along the North Carolina
coast and South Florida because of a
storm offshore today. Spotty showers and
thundershowers will affect areas from
northern Pennsylvania to northern Georgia.
A storm system will bring rain showers
and locally severe thunderstorms over the
central and northern Plains. The storm’s
greatest threats will be from strong wind
gusts, hail and flash flooding.
Dry and warm conditions will affect the
southern Plains. While runoff from rapidly
melting snow and flooding will continue in
parts of the northern Rockies, most other
areas in the West can expect sunshine
and very warm conditions. The dry
weather and heat will increase the risk of
wildfires.
In Central Park for the 16 hours ended at 4 p.m. yesterday.
Chicago
Indianapolis
AREA
AT RISK
Kansas City
St. Louis
Nashville
WARM AND
HUMID
Cities
High/low temperatures for the 16 hours ended at 4
p.m. yesterday, Eastern time, and precipitation (in inches)
for the 16 hours ended at 4 p.m. yesterday.
Expected conditions for today and tomorrow.
C ........................ Clouds
F............................. Fog
H .......................... Haze
I............................... Ice
PC ............. Partly cloudy
R ........................... Rain
Sh ................... Showers
S .............................Sun
Sn ....................... Snow
SS .......... Snow showers
T............ Thunderstorms
Tr ......................... Trace
W ........................ Windy
–............... Not available
N.Y.C. region
New York City
Bridgeport
Caldwell
Danbury
Islip
Newark
Trenton
White Plains
Yesterday
75/ 54 0
67/ 51 0
73/ 52 0
69/ 48 0
69/ 51 0.01
73/ 55 0.01
73/ 53 0
70/ 51 0
Today
72/ 54 PC
64/ 49 PC
73/ 49 PC
71/ 45 PC
68/ 49 PC
71/ 53 PC
74/ 50 PC
70/ 48 PC
Tomorrow
74/ 56 S
67/ 49 PC
76/ 51 S
74/ 46 PC
71/ 49 PC
75/ 54 S
77/ 51 S
73/ 49 PC
United States
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Baton Rouge
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington
Casper
Charlotte
Chattanooga
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colorado Springs
Columbus
Concord, N.H.
Dallas-Ft. Worth
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fargo
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Key West
Las Vegas
Lexington
Yesterday
Today
67/ 44 0.05 74/ 51 S
88/ 61 0
89/ 59 S
49/ 36 0
53/ 44 C
82/ 60 0
81/ 61 PC
65/ 52 0
62/ 53 F
89/ 59 0
89/ 63 S
75/ 52 0
76/ 54 S
89/ 65 0
91/ 64 S
86/ 59 0
85/ 61 S
78/ 52 0
86/ 58 PC
59/ 46 0
63/ 48 PC
62/ 40 0.01 72/ 51 S
62/ 40 0
74/ 50 S
80/ 42 0.02 74/ 40 S
80/ 57 0
79/ 59 PC
83/ 56 0.02 81/ 58 PC
72/ 53 0
79/ 58 S
71/ 49 0.09 77/ 55 S
61/ 45 0.03 69/ 54 S
80/ 53 0
79/ 51 PC
71/ 48 0.05 77/ 57 PC
68/ 40 0.05 73/ 45 S
92/ 68 0
92/ 67 PC
82/ 53 0
78/ 50 S
82/ 58 0
81/ 60 C
67/ 46 0
74/ 51 S
96/ 71 0
98/ 69 PC
83/ 56 0
64/ 51 R
72/ 47 0
75/ 48 PC
81/ 72 0.04 82/ 69 PC
90/ 65 0
90/ 67 S
73/ 48 0.02 76/ 53 S
87/ 60 0
89/ 61 S
88/ 58 0
84/ 62 PC
83/ 61 0
83/ 61 T
84/ 76 0
85/ 75 S
99/ 73 0
100/ 76 S
72/ 52 0.18 76/ 58 PC
Tomorrow
78/ 53 S
90/ 61 PC
54/ 45 C
84/ 62 S
64/ 53 PC
88/ 63 PC
78/ 55 S
90/ 62 PC
88/ 64 S
80/ 50 PC
64/ 47 PC
76/ 61 PC
77/ 57 S
79/ 44 PC
81/ 59 S
85/ 61 PC
75/ 59 T
81/ 65 PC
80/ 63 PC
82/ 52 PC
82/ 65 PC
75/ 43 S
89/ 65 PC
81/ 54 PC
82/ 57 C
78/ 63 PC
99/ 69 S
73/ 37 R
78/ 47 PC
82/ 71 PC
89/ 66 PC
77/ 62 PC
88/ 62 PC
83/ 62 S
87/ 62 PC
84/ 75 PC
103/ 76 S
81/ 66 PC
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Mpls.-St. Paul
Nashville
New Orleans
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, Me.
Portland, Ore.
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Rochester
Sacramento
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
San Juan
Seattle
Sioux Falls
Spokane
St. Louis
St. Thomas
Syracuse
Tampa
Toledo
Tucson
Tulsa
Virginia Beach
Washington
Wichita
Wilmington, Del.
89/
78/
77/
87/
86/
67/
85/
80/
90/
64/
89/
84/
89/
73/
102/
68/
62/
77/
65/
73/
84/
73/
60/
86/
82/
89/
69/
69/
77/
86/
70/
81/
70/
79/
84/
64/
89/
66/
101/
89/
63/
74/
89/
74/
62
56
55
60
72
52
61
55
68
57
66
61
62
51
74
53
41
55
45
55
53
54
37
53
56
63
57
53
54
75
52
57
51
56
77
38
66
41
65
65
57
58
66
53
0.02 89/ 66 PC
0
79/ 60 PC
0.04 79/ 60 PC
0.02 85/ 66 S
0
86/ 70 PC
0
78/ 53 S
0
72/ 60 R
0.04 79/ 56 PC
0
90/ 71 S
0.03 64/ 59 F
0
88/ 65 PC
0
80/ 58 T
0
87/ 64 PC
0
75/ 52 S
0
103/ 73 S
0.07 74/ 55 PC
0.09 64/ 44 S
0
77/ 56 C
0
71/ 46 PC
0
73/ 56 C
0
89/ 54 S
0.12 72/ 54 PC
0.01 73/ 50 S
0
83/ 55 S
0
81/ 58 S
0
89/ 63 S
0
70/ 59 PC
0
68/ 56 S
0
77/ 57 S
0.05 85/ 74 Sh
0
75/ 54 PC
0
77/ 56 T
0.04 77/ 55 PC
0
79/ 62 S
0.03 86/ 76 PC
0
72/ 49 S
0.01 90/ 69 PC
0
74/ 48 S
0
101/ 66 S
0
89/ 69 PC
0.07 63/ 57 F
0
76/ 57 S
0
88/ 59 PC
0
75/ 54 S
88/
79/
82/
85/
85/
67/
73/
83/
89/
68/
88/
84/
87/
77/
104/
78/
66/
67/
72/
77/
81/
76/
77/
80/
85/
87/
72/
66/
72/
85/
63/
79/
66/
85/
86/
77/
90/
81/
101/
90/
66/
78/
91/
76/
66
61
69
66
71
56
53
67
68
56
64
56
65
54
75
62
43
49
46
56
50
54
60
52
59
63
60
53
53
75
50
49
46
65
77
58
69
62
67
67
56
59
64
53
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
T
R
PC
PC
C
S
PC
S
S
S
PC
PC
C
PC
PC
S
PC
PC
S
PC
S
PC
PC
PC
PC
Sh
PC
Sh
T
PC
S
S
PC
S
S
C
S
S
S
Africa
Algiers
Cairo
Cape Town
Dakar
Johannesburg
Nairobi
Tunis
Yesterday
69/ 52 0
83/ 67 0
68/ 57 0.05
73/ 66 0
74/ 46 0
66/ 59 0.14
74/ 56 0
Today
69/ 53 PC
83/ 66 S
63/ 55 Sh
75/ 67 S
72/ 47 S
75/ 59 R
74/ 58 C
Tomorrow
72/ 53 S
89/ 79 PC
64/ 48 PC
76/ 67 S
74/ 50 S
74/ 60 T
73/ 59 C
Asia/Pacific
Baghdad
Bangkok
Beijing
Damascus
Hong Kong
Jakarta
Jerusalem
Karachi
Manila
Mumbai
Yesterday
90/ 71 0
95/ 79 0.07
81/ 53 0
73/ 60 0.12
91/ 77 0.82
93/ 78 0
71/ 59 0.44
93/ 82 0
97/ 80 0.02
91/ 79 0
Today
86/ 66 C
95/ 80 PC
81/ 51 PC
67/ 48 W
85/ 74 T
90/ 79 PC
70/ 56 PC
95/ 82 PC
96/ 81 PC
91/ 82 PC
Tomorrow
86/ 65 S
94/ 79 T
85/ 61 C
75/ 52 W
80/ 75 Sh
93/ 76 PC
70/ 56 S
95/ 81 S
96/ 81 C
92/ 83 PC
New Delhi
Riyadh
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
106/
101/
77/
75/
91/
76/
91/
84/
68/
77
79
53
64
79
57
79
60
59
0
94/ 75 T
0
107/ 83 S
0
73/ 48 PC
0.11 76/ 56 PC
0
91/ 82 PC
0
76/ 59 PC
0.20 83/ 70 T
0
82/ 66 PC
0.96 61/ 53 R
98/
100/
70/
73/
90/
76/
77/
79/
61/
76
75
48
59
79
60
69
61
55
PC
Sh
S
S
T
S
C
C
Sh
Europe
Amsterdam
Athens
Berlin
Brussels
Budapest
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Helsinki
Istanbul
Kiev
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Moscow
Nice
Oslo
Paris
Prague
Rome
St. Petersburg
Stockholm
Vienna
Warsaw
Yesterday
77/ 53 0
72/ 62 0.69
73/ 47 0
79/ 52 0
75/ 53 0
64/ 48 0
66/ 50 0
72/ 49 0
79/ 51 0
77/ 54 0.04
70/ 42 0
66/ 59 0.11
70/ 54 0.06
81/ 59 0.06
81/ 52 0
75/ 52 0.20
70/ 45 0
70/ 62 0.06
70/ 46 0
79/ 54 0
73/ 44 0
70/ 57 Tr
65/ 43 0
72/ 48 0
75/ 51 0
73/ 46 0
Today
79/ 56 S
78/ 63 T
77/ 56 S
80/ 55 S
76/ 54 T
68/ 51 PC
60/ 43 R
62/ 43 R
80/ 56 S
73/ 55 T
63/ 40 PC
70/ 60 Sh
82/ 58 PC
72/ 55 PC
78/ 49 T
78/ 54 T
73/ 50 PC
71/ 61 T
69/ 45 PC
81/ 54 S
73/ 53 PC
71/ 59 T
60/ 41 PC
72/ 46 PC
72/ 53 T
78/ 55 S
Tomorrow
76/ 53 PC
78/ 62 PC
80/ 58 T
78/ 51 PC
79/ 57 T
68/ 52 S
53/ 41 R
55/ 42 R
79/ 56 T
70/ 55 T
59/ 41 S
70/ 60 R
81/ 58 PC
66/ 53 PC
69/ 45 PC
79/ 54 PC
66/ 41 PC
68/ 60 T
70/ 48 PC
77/ 50 PC
71/ 51 T
71/ 57 PC
59/ 42 S
67/ 43 S
73/ 54 T
81/ 59 PC
North America
Acapulco
Bermuda
Edmonton
Guadalajara
Havana
Kingston
Martinique
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Nassau
Panama City
Quebec City
Santo Domingo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg
Yesterday
92/ 79 0
75/ 70 0
68/ 45 0
83/ 59 0.04
82/ 66 0.10
82/ 73 0.32
84/ 74 0.05
71/ 54 0
84/ 60 0
56/ 40 0.02
85/ 75 0.28
86/ 74 0.39
55/ 36 0.03
82/ 72 0.27
60/ 41 0
59/ 52 0
85/ 46 0
Today
87/ 77 PC
75/ 71 PC
74/ 38 PC
78/ 56 PC
85/ 70 PC
85/ 77 T
84/ 75 Sh
73/ 54 PC
88/ 60 S
69/ 48 S
86/ 73 Sh
89/ 74 PC
68/ 46 S
88/ 71 PC
68/ 47 S
66/ 50 C
71/ 48 C
Tomorrow
86/ 75 PC
76/ 71 PC
52/ 36 R
82/ 58 PC
86/ 69 PC
86/ 77 T
84/ 74 PC
74/ 51 PC
88/ 62 S
72/ 53 S
85/ 74 T
88/ 73 PC
63/ 48 PC
88/ 71 PC
70/ 57 PC
62/ 46 PC
65/ 31 PC
South America
Buenos Aires
Caracas
Lima
Quito
Recife
Rio de Janeiro
Santiago
Yesterday
73/ 64 0
85/ 75 0.34
74/ 64 0
62/ 51 0.38
84/ 75 0.02
82/ 73 0.08
70/ 46 0
Today
71/ 62 T
85/ 74 PC
72/ 66 PC
63/ 53 Sh
84/ 73 C
79/ 69 Sh
70/ 45 PC
Tomorrow
73/ 63 C
85/ 75 PC
74/ 64 S
66/ 53 Sh
82/ 74 C
80/ 68 PC
66/ 44 PC
Temperature
Precipitation
Record
high 93°
(2000)
90°
75°
4 p.m.
80°
SUN.
70°
YESTERDAY
Normal
high 68°
60°
50°
Normal
low 51°
54°
6 a.m.
40°
12
a.m.
6
a.m.
Avg. daily departure
from normal
this month ........... +11.7°
Reservoir levels
Record
lows
Low
(in inches)
Yesterday ............... 0.00
Record .................... 3.82
For the last 30 days
Actual ..................... 4.80
Normal .................... 4.29
For the last 365 days
Actual ................... 44.41
Normal .................. 49.94
LAST 30 DAYS
Air pressure
Humidity
High ......... 30.10 11 a.m.
Low ............ 29.96 1 a.m.
High ............. 86% 6 a.m.
Low .............. 35% 4 p.m.
Cooling Degree Days
An index of fuel consumption that tracks how
far the day’s mean temperature rose above 65
Record
low 37°
(1891)
4
p.m.
Forecast
range
High
12
p.m.
4
p.m.
Avg. daily departure
from normal
this year ................ +0.5°
(New York City water supply)
Yesterday..................................................................... 0
So far this month ........................................................ 46
So far this season (since January 1) .......................... 54
Normal to date for the season ................................... 16
Trends
Last
Temperature
Average
Below
Above
Precipitation
Average
Below
Above
10 days
30 days
90 days
365 days
Chart shows how recent temperature and precipitation
trends compare with those of the last 30 years.
Yesterday ............. 100%
Est. normal ............. 99%
Recreational Forecast
Sun, Moon and Planets
New
First Quarter
Mountain and Ocean Temperatures
Full
Last Quarter
Today’s forecast
May 15
7:48 a.m.
Sun
RISE
SET
NEXT R
Jupiter
S
R
Saturn
S
R
May 21
5:46 a.m.
7:59 p.m.
5:45 a.m.
6:03 a.m.
7:52 p.m.
9:11 a.m.
11:49 p.m.
May 29
10:19 a.m.
June 6
Moon
R
S
R
Mars
R
S
Venus
R
S
2:18 a.m.
12:48 p.m.
2:51 a.m.
1:08 a.m.
10:28 a.m.
7:19 a.m.
10:27 p.m.
Boating
From Montauk Point to Sandy Hook, N.J., out to 20
nautical miles, including Long Island Sound and New York
Harbor.
Wind will be from the northeast, then southeast at 5-10
knots. Waves will be 3-5 feet on the ocean, where a small
craft advisory remains in effect, and a foot or less on Long
Island Sound and New York Harbor.
White
60/42 Plenty of sunshine
Green
51/36 Sunshine
Adirondacks
66/35 Sunny
Berkshires
67/45 Plenty of sunshine
Catskills
65/44 Mostly sunny
Poconos
64/48 Mostly sunny
50s
Southwest Pa.
69/51 A p.m. thunderstorm in spots
60s
West Virginia
68/49 A p.m. thunderstorm
High Tides
Atlantic City .................... 2:05 a.m.
Barnegat Inlet ................. 2:12 a.m.
The Battery ..................... 2:55 a.m.
Beach Haven .................. 3:43 a.m.
Bridgeport ...................... 6:03 a.m.
City Island ....................... 5:38 a.m.
Fire Island Lt. .................. 3:11 a.m.
Montauk Point ................ 4:09 a.m.
Northport ....................... 6:07 a.m.
Port Washington ............. 5:45 a.m.
Sandy Hook .................... 2:25 a.m.
Shinnecock Inlet ............. 2:18 a.m.
Stamford ........................ 5:55 a.m.
Tarrytown ....................... 4:44 a.m.
Willets Point .................... 5:38 a.m.
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
2:52 p.m.
3:02 p.m.
3:45 p.m.
4:24 p.m.
6:41 p.m.
6:47 p.m.
3:52 p.m.
4:51 p.m.
6:47 p.m.
6:32 p.m.
3:06 p.m.
2:59 p.m.
6:33 p.m.
5:34 p.m.
6:50 p.m.
40s
Blue Ridge
72/51 A p.m. thunderstorm
70s
Color bands
indicate water
temperature.
High pressure will result in abundant
sunshine and milder weather across the
northern mountains. It will be cloudier
from the Catskill Mountains to West
Virginia, where lingering moisture will
bring spotty showers and thunderstorms
in the afternoon and evening. Highs will
range from the 60s to the 70s.
THE NEW YORK TIMES NEW YORK TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
A21
Man Who Killed Actress While on PCP
Is Found Guilty of Manslaughter
Lamar Davenport with E’Dena
Hines in 2005 after a party at
the Rainbow Room. Mr. Davenport was convicted on Monday of manslaughter.
The prosecution countered that
Mr. Davenport’s supernatural delusions and use of PCP could not
excuse the killing. His deadly actions had been “unquestionably
intentional,” the assistant district
attorney, Christopher Prevost,
told the judge.
Just before noon on Monday,
Justice Biben announced that she
Davenport was stabbing E’Dena
Hines he was trying to release
demons.”
In his summation, Mr. Prevost
told Justice Biben that even
though Mr. Davenport had ingested PCP, he had still acted with
a “conscious objective” to kill Ms.
Hines.
Mr. Davenport had been focused “on the task at hand,” Mr.
Prevost said, knocking Ms. Hines
to the ground, pinning her and
stabbing her 14 times in the back
before turning her over and continuing the onslaught.
“He knew it was a human body
he held down and he knew it was
E’Dena Hines,” Mr. Prevost told
the judge, adding, “He must have
perceived what the knife was inflicting, the blood, the struggle for
life.”
After Justice Biben delivered
the verdict, Mr. Davenport
showed no visible emotion. Ms.
Costanzo bent down and rubbed
his shoulder before he was led
from the room in handcuffs. Ms.
Hines’s mother, Deena Adair, left
the courtroom a moment later,
clutching the arm of a companion
and silently declined to comment
with a shake of the head.
By COLIN MOYNIHAN
A man who fatally stabbed his
girlfriend during a drug-fueled
frenzy was convicted on Monday
of manslaughter after a bench
trial, but acquitted of the top
charge of murder.
Lamar Davenport, 33, ingested
the drug phencyclidine, known as
PCP, the night of the attack, in August 2015. He then used a hunting
knife to stab his girlfriend, E’Dena
Hines, 25 times as he raved about
demons on the street near her
apartment
in
Washington
Heights.
Mr. Davenport’s bizarre pronouncements and his use of the
potent hallucinogen were a key
part of the four-week trial in front
of Justice Ellen N. Biben of State
Supreme Court in Manhattan. He
waived his right to a jury and let
Justice Biben decide his fate.
During closing arguments last
week, a defense lawyer, Annie
Costanzo, said that her client had
become convinced under the influence of the drug that Ms. Hines’s body was inhabited by a demon. He was too addled, she argued, to form the intent to harm
her.
A judge acquitted
Lamar Davenport of
murder in the death.
had found Mr. Davenport not
guilty of murder but guilty of firstdegree manslaughter. She offered
no insight into her verdict. The
first-degree manslaughter conviction carries a penalty of up to
25 years in prison. Mr. Davenport
is scheduled to be sentenced on
May 29.
Ms. Hines, 33, was related by
marriage to Morgan Freeman, the
Academy Award-winning actor.
She played the part of a reception-
ist in one of his movies, “5 Flights
Up.” Prosecutors said that she had
a “passionate, turbulent and volatile” relationship with Mr. Davenport.
Defense lawyers said that the
two had a history of using PCP,
also called angel dust. On the
night of the killing, Ms. Costanzo
said, the two had returned to Ms.
Hines’s apartment on West 162nd
Street after an outing downtown
and “did what they always did —
got high together.”
Shortly before 3 a.m. Mr. Davenport left the apartment, followed by Ms. Hines. Video cameras captured parts of what happened next. Witnesses said that as
he stabbed Ms. Hines, Mr. Davenport shouted “release the
demons” and “I love you, I always
loved you, God would want this.”
Police officers said that Mr.
Davenport appeared to be praying when they arrived. While in
custody in the hours after the
stabbing, Mr. Davenport told the
police that he did not know why he
was at a precinct and later stated:
“Jesus Christ is the savior. The
devil is evil. The devil is full of lies.
Repent for your sins.” Court documents added that at one point Mr.
PATRICK MCMULLAN, VIA GETTY IMAGES
Davenport awoke after sedation
and shouted: “Oh no, God. Why
God? Why did this happen?”
Ms. Costanzo said that her client had suffered a psychotic break
and was experiencing a “religious-themed delusion,” in which
he believed demons were inside
Ms. Hines. He was not cognizant
enough to have had a conscious intent to kill her, she said, and so
could not be found guilty of murder. But, she said, he had made a
“reckless decision to get high,”
which led to Ms. Hines’s death.
“The death of Ms. Hines was
not an intended consequence of
his acts,” she said. “When Lamar
In Video, Nixon Pushes Cuomo to Debate: ‘What’s It Going to Be, Andrew?’
By SHANE GOLDMACHER
Cynthia Nixon looked straight
into the camera and issued a challenge to Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo:
Debate me, if you’re brave
enough.
“So, what’s it going to be, Andrew?” she taunted the incumbent governor in a video released
by her campaign on Monday. “Just
you and me, on a stage.”
Demanding debates is a triedand-true tactic for challengers,
but few seem to issue such demands with the particular glee
that Ms. Nixon displayed, especially with the Democratic primary for governor of New York still
four months away.
“No huge multicandidate freefor-all like you always insist on.
One-on-one,” Ms. Nixon said in
the short video. “No distractions,
and nowhere to hide.”
“Your move,” she added with a
mischievous smile.
In the video, Ms. Nixon said
that WABC and its partners had
offered to stage a televised debate
between her and Mr. Cuomo.
“I accept their invitation,” she
said.
Lis Smith, a spokeswoman for
the Cuomo campaign, said that
they were “receiving invitations
and reviewing the various opportunities.”
“We look forward to a robust debate,” she said.
Four years ago, Mr. Cuomo
avoided debating or even sharing
a stage with his then Democratic
primary
challenger,
Zephyr
Teachout, who was trying to
mount a long-shot bid. By the
numbers, Ms. Nixon, at the moment, is also facing long odds: The
most recent survey, from Quinnipiac University, showed her trailing
Mr. Cuomo 50 percent to 28 percent, though that was a smaller
lead than in previous other public
polls.
But those margins have belied
what is already an intense contest, with both sides dueling over
public policies and personal tax
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Cynthia Nixon has challenged Gov. Andrew Cuomo to accept an
offer by WABC to participate in a one-on-one debate.
returns.
Ms. Nixon released her taxes
for 2017 on Friday (they showed
$1.3 million in earnings) as Mr.
Cuomo’s campaign demanded she
make public 10 years of personal
tax returns. “If you have something to hide, this is the wrong
business to get into,” Mr. Cuomo
told reporters.
Allies of Mr. Cuomo at the state
Democratic Party soon echoed
the governor, announcing a resolution to require 10 years of tax
disclosures for statewide candidates.
Ms. Nixon’s campaign noted
that Mr. Cuomo did not release his
tax return in his first successful
2010 bid for governor, calling him
a hypocrite. Mr. Cuomo released a
summary that year before the
election and aides said he had released his taxes in many prior
years.
Ms. Nixon’s allies on Monday
were also quick to pounce on her
challenge to the governor.
Jonathan Westin, director of
New York Communities for
Change, a progressive group that
endorsed Ms. Nixon’s bid for governor a month ago, suggested in a
Twitter post that it would be “really weird for him to act like a coward,” given that the governor “is
running a completely chauvinistic
campaign.”
Susan Lerner, the executive director of Common Cause New
York, said her group is consider-
ing pushing for legislation in Albany this year that would force all
statewide candidates in New York
to debate.
“This is the ultimate transparency,” Ms. Lerner said. “Tell the
voters directly — not through advertising — what your position is.”
The jousting comes ahead of the
state party convention later this
The challenger is
trailing the governor
50-28 percent.
month, where Ms. Nixon could
win an automatic spot on the primary ballot if 25 percent of the delegates, weighted through a formula, support her.
Ms. Nixon can also circulate petitions, which she has signaled is
her more likely route.
A22
THE NEW YORK TIMES NEW YORK TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
Justice for 2 Men Falsely Accused of Rape
After Years in Prison,
Men Are Exonerated
By JAN RANSOM
The woman, dirty, disheveled
and in tears, ran over to a patrol
car parked along a Harlem street
in the early morning of Jan. 18,
1991. She told police officers she
had been kidnapped at knife point
near her home in Queens and
raped by three black men, whom
she identified.
Before the end of the month, the
police arrested two of the men she
had named — Gregory Counts,
then 19, and VanDyke Perry, then
21. They were charged with rape,
sodomy, kidnapping and criminal
possession of a weapon, according
to court records. The third man
was never caught.
Investigators had no physical
evidence. Semen recovered from
the woman did not match the two
accused men. The prosecution’s
case relied heavily on her testimony, which was inconsistent.
The defense argued the woman, a
recovering crack addict, fabricated the story to protect her
boyfriend, who had shot Mr. Perry
two months earlier and was
wanted by the police, court
records show.
Yet, in 1992, a jury convicted Mr.
Counts and Mr. Perry on all counts
except for the weapons charges.
Mr. Perry ended up serving 11
years in prison, Mr. Counts 26.
On Monday, both men walked
into a packed courtroom to hear
the Manhattan district attorney,
Cyrus R. Vance Jr., ask a judge in
State Supreme Court to vacate
their convictions based on newly
discovered DNA evidence and the
woman’s decision to recant her
testimony.
“This wrongful conviction destroyed my life,” Mr. Perry said,
wiping away tears. “But I never
gave up my fight.”
Mr. Counts broke down in tears
as he entered court and hunched
over a railing. “I can’t be angry,”
Mr. Counts said, referring to his
accuser. “If I waste a minute being
angry it’s a waste of time. That’s a
minute I could have been happy.”
Last month, the woman, who
has not been identified, told investigators from the district attorney’s office and the Innocence
Project the rape “never happened.” Her admission came after
DNA testing connected the semen
found on her body to another man
through an F.B.I. database.
“At the end of the day, nothing
will give these men back the years
away from family, or the years
spent in prison,” Mr. Vance said.
“No apology can make them
whole.”
The exonerations were the result of a collaborative investigation started in 2017 by the Manhattan district attorney’s Conviction
Integrity Program, the Innocence
Project and the Office of the Appellate Defender’s Reinvestigation Project. The three entities
filed a joint motion on Monday
By ALAN FEUER
PHOTOGRAPHS BY JEENAH MOON FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
asking Justice Mark Dwyer to vacate the convictions and dismiss
the original indictments.
“This was a particularly dark
time in New York City during the
crack epidemic,” said Barry
Scheck, co-founder of the Innocence Project, a nonprofit that
uses DNA evidence to exonerate
wrongly convicted prisoners. “At
this point in time in New York City,
people were scared of teenagers
who looked like my clients.”
These were the eighth and ninth
convictions to be vacated since
the creation of the Conviction Integrity Program in Manhattan in
2010. Similarly, the Brooklyn district attorney’s office overturned
24 convictions since 2014, and the
Bronx district attorney’s office vacated three since 2016.
Lawyers for Mr. Perry and Mr.
Counts said the case was flawed
from the start. When the trial began in 1992, the woman testified
that she lived in a house in Queens
with her boyfriend, who was a recovering addict, and their two
children. Mr. Perry was dating a
teenage girl who lived in the same
house, and he eventually moved
in, according to court records. The
woman’s boyfriend began using
drugs again and selling them from
her home along with Mr. Perry,
Mr. Counts and a third man. But in
September 1990, the men assaulted the boyfriend for failing to
pay back a debt.
Two months later, the she said,
her home was burglarized and she
told the police she believed it was
the three men. Sometime after
that incident, the woman testified
that Mr. Perry confronted her
boyfriend at their home and that
he shot Mr. Perry.
She told a jury that on Jan. 18,
1991, she was leaving her home in
Queens when Mr. Counts, Mr.
VanDyke Perry, above,
third from left, leaving a
courtroom in Manhattan on Monday. He was
convicted of rape and
served nearly 11 years
in prison before being
released in 2001. At
left, Gregory Counts,
who was in prison for
26 years, speaking
outside court.
Perry and a third man forced her
into a car at knife point and demanded to know where her
boyfriend was. When she refused
to tell them where he was, she testified that they drove around and
raped her multiple times in the vehicle and in Central Park.
During the trial, the defense argued that she was not a reliable
witness, and that her stories
shifted often.
They defense also argued that
the woman had a motive to retaliate against the men and to help
her boyfriend avoid charges that
he had shot Mr. Perry.
Mr. Counts and Mr. Perry spent
years fighting their convictions
despite a number of failed appeals.
While in solitary confinement,
Mr. Counts read “Actual Innocence: Five Days to Execution,
and Other Dispatches From the
Wrongly Convicted,” and then
wrote to the Innocence Project
asking that it conduct a DNA database check of the samples collected in his case, according to
Seema Saifee, a senior staff law-
yer with the nonprofit.
“He never gave up,” she said.
In 2012, attorneys with the Innocence Project contacted the district attorney’s office requesting
physical evidence in the case. In
2015, the DNA was retested. It
matched the profile of a man who
had been about 40 years old in
1991 and died in 2011, according to
court records.
Investigators with the prosecutor’s office interviewed the woman in 2016 with a photo of the person who may have been the attacker, but the woman told them
she did not recognize him. She explained to investigators that she
had used drugs at that time and
that she would sell herself to support her habit. She refused to talk
further.
In February, investigators
found and interviewed the third
man, who denied the rape and explained that the car in which the
woman said she was attacked was
not running at the time, court
records show.
Investigators returned to the
woman, who this time admitted
that the story was a lie. She told
investigators that her boyfriend
forced her to make the fake accusations and that she had been
haunted by what she had done.
After his release, Mr. Perry
moved to Portland, Ore., married
and had six children. He struggled
with the label of “sex offender,”
but found work building houses
and cars, and started a landscaping business to support his family.
“He didn’t want to go back to the
place where he had been treated
so
unfairly,”
said
Mandy
Jaramillo, senior staff lawyer with
the Office of the Appellate Defender. He returned to New York City
for the first time on Monday.
Since his release, Mr. Counts
has struggled to find a job — many
employers were put off by his
record — but he said he has the
support of his family.
“This case is a tragedy for everyone involved,” Mr. Vance said
in an interview. “It is every district attorney’s nightmare that
any innocent man or woman
would go to jail.”
At the Met Gala: Vestments, Chain Mail and a Miter or Two
By JONAH ENGEL BROMWICH
and VALERIYA SAFRONOVA
Each spring, a gala serves as
the opening of the annual blockbuster show at the Metropolitan
Museum’s Costume Institute.
Hundreds of celebrities arrive in a
frantic seasonal migration for that
party.
This year, that exhibition is
“Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and
the Catholic Imagination” — and
the choice of a religious theme
gave a number of gala attendees a
hot chance to tee off to the line of
reporters on the event’s packed
red carpet on Monday night.
“I’m a pagan,” said the actress
Frances McDormand. “Aren’t
you?”
“This is like my skin, I’m proud
to be in it,” said Lena Waithe, the
actress and writer, who was regally dressed in a black suit and
cape that became a broad rainbow. “I’ve got the community on
my back to make sure they know
I’ve got them all the time.”
“The theme to me is like be
yourself,” Ms. Waithe said. “You
were made in God’s image,
right?”
Not every outfit was political.
“I’m the back wall of the Sistine
Chapel,” said Ariana Grande, the
singer, whose dress was a mass of
papal conclave color. “I feel fairly
important in this outfit, I have to
say.”
Building a relationship with the
Catholic Church took significant
work by the Costume Institute curator Andrew Bolton. Eventually,
the church lent more than 40
items to the exhibition, which encompasses an enormous 58,600
square feet and extends to the
Cloisters. A papal tiara, with
18,000 diamonds, was flown to
New York with a bodyguard.
The Met Gala may be the
world’s fanciest party. The ceremonial red carpet procession was
to be followed by cocktails, then
dinner (lobster with gold flakes
was on the menu), then a dessert
buffet. President Trump proposed
to his wife, Melania, there in 2004.
Lawyer Asks
To Relocate
‘Circus’ Trial
Of El Chapo
PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAMON WINTER/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Clockwise from above: The
singer Katy Perry in head-totoe angel wings; Ariana
Grande, the pop singer, whose
gown pays homage to the Sistine Chapel; the model Bella
Hadid in a dramatic veil.
Tickets are $30,000, but you can’t
just buy one — Anna Wintour, the
artistic director of Condé Nast
who is one of the chairwomen, approves attendees.
And its red carpet entrance is
one of the premier showcases of
celebrity brands, for musicians,
actors and fashion folks alike.
“This carpet is one of the most
important carpets of the year,” the
model Bella Hadid said.
A staff member dipped to adjust
the train of the designer Ariana
Rockefeller, David Rockefeller
Jr.’s daughter.
“Leave her alone, she’s perfect,”
a photographer shouted.
“We based the dress on a tap-
estry from the Cloisters museum,”
Ms. Rockefeller said. “And of
course my great-grandfather
John D. Rockefeller Jr. founded
the museum, so we really wanted
to incorporate family history as
well as honor the theme tonight.”
Unlike in the Crusades themselves, there was very little blood
shed this evening. “They had to
sew me in on the way here,” said
Olivia Munn, who was bleeding
very slightly. Her dress was inspired by Crusade-era chain mail,
by H&M.
“It’s sewn into my head,” Ms.
Hadid said of her veil. She was
wearing Chrome Hearts. “The
things we do, darling.”
And, in what has become something of a tradition, one attendee
used the night to seize attention.
While all these celebrities
flirted with the theme of Catholicism this year, none took it on as
fearlessly as Rihanna, a chairwoman for the event who dressed
like the female pope the Vatican
has never had.
Rihanna’s hat was reminiscent
of the papal tiaras worn by popes
from the medieval era until the
mid-1960s.
Others were ready to take the
evening less seriously.
Favorite part of the night? “Eating a vegan cheeseburger right
before,” said the poet Cleo Wade.
Eva Chen wore an outfit inspired by Joan of Arc and said the
bathroom was the place to be.
“The secret is that is where people
are partying,’’ she said. “No, I’m
joking.”
Where were his kids, George
Clooney was asked? “They’re under the dress,” he said, waving toward the enormous train on the
outfit worn by his wife, Amal, one
of the event’s chairwomen.
“I forgot my ticket, do you think
they’ll let me in?” asked the performer Rita Ora as she approached the entrance to the Met.
They might, if they know who you
are!
But a feeling of religiosity did
suffuse the evening.
Katy Perry arrived in enormous
white feathered wings. “I feel very
angelic, celestial, ethereal,” Ms.
Perry said on the red carpet.
“Yeah, I love God,” said the comedian Tiffany Haddish. “God
love me — look at my career.”
The event is underwritten by
Christine
and
Stephen
A.
Schwarzman, and by Versace. In
addition to Rihanna, Ms. Wintour
and Ms. Clooney, Donatella Versace is also a chairwoman.
Ms. Wintour has led the gala
since 1999. The event, said Michael R. Bloomberg, the former
mayor of New York City, “has gotten better and better each year.”
At this early stage of his criminal prosecution, Joaquín Guzmán
Loera, the Mexican drug lord
known as El Chapo, does not appear in court that often. But when
he does, getting him there requires a remarkable rerouting of
New York City traffic.
Since last January, Mr. Guzmán
has been held in a high-security
jail in Lower Manhattan, and every three months or so, when he is
called to the Brooklyn courthouse
where his case is being heard, the
Brooklyn Bridge is closed and he
is swept across the East River in a
motorcade of armored cars, police
cruisers and an ambulance or two
— most of them with their lights
and sirens blaring.
On Sunday, Mr. Guzmán’s lawyer, A. Eduardo Balarezo, sought
to put an end to this vehicular parade. In court papers, he asked the
judge who is handling the case to
move it out of Brooklyn altogether,
claiming that “the spectacle of Mr.
Guzmán’s transportation” violated his right to a fair trial.
“The unprecedented, highly
visible, and disruptive security
measures taken by the government every time it transports Mr.
Guzmán are likely to be seen or
heard about by innumerable potential and seated jurors,” Mr.
Balarezo wrote. The conspicuous
process of getting his client to the
courthouse was, Mr. Balarezo
added, “Akin to driving a sign”
that said “‘dangerous man inside.’”
Scheduled for trial in September in Federal District Court in
Brooklyn, the Guzmán case has,
so far, had a little bit of everything.
There have been gory accounts of
Mindful of prejudicing
jurors, the defense
seeks a venue change.
murders Mr. Guzmán is said to
have committed, highly technical
arguments about his extradition,
and endless descriptions of his
harsh conditions of confinement.
But until now, there has been no
public mention of the eye- (and
ear-) catching way in which he
has been moved from jail to court
and back. As Mr. Balarezo noted,
the bridge closings, which will
only become more frequent once
the trial begins, could not only
prejudice the jurors in the case,
but also annoy thousands of New
York drivers.
To solve the problem, Mr.
Balarezo suggested moving the
trial either to Manhattan (where
the federal courthouse is connected to the Metropolitan Correctional Center, the jail where Mr.
Guzmán is being held) or to Philadelphia (where the local courthouse is near another jail that
could safely hold his client).
Such concerns are foremost in
the minds of the authorities, given
that Mr. Guzmán twice escaped
from prison while in Mexico, the
first time in a laundry cart and the
second time by way of a mile-long
tunnel dug into the shower of his
cell.
The United States attorney’s office in Brooklyn declined to comment on Mr. Balarezo’s request for
a change of venue, which will now
be considered by Judge Brian M.
Cogan, who has already issued
several rulings that have disappointed Mr. Guzmán.
And while Mr. Balarezo acknowledged that turning a traffic
jam into a constitutional argument was a novel legal tactic, he
also said that Mr. Guzman’s situation was untenable.
“It’s a circus every time he goes
to court,” he said.
THE NEW YORK TIMES NEW YORK TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
0N
A23
Music College
Faces a Sale,
And Risks
By DAVID W. CHEN
PRINCETON, N.J. — Two decades ago, Rider College was
hailed as a savior in the music
world when it acquired neighboring Westminster Choir College, a
beloved but struggling institution
in downtown Princeton. It was vital, Rider officials said, to sustain
a storied history replete with students who had sung on the original “Fantasia” soundtrack, and
worked with Bernstein and
Toscanini.
Rider’s latest plan for Westminster has struck a far more discordant note.
Facing what it says are daunting fiscal challenges, Rider, now a
university, hopes to sell Westminster to a for-profit Chinese company for $40 million. Under the
proposal, the buyer, Beijing Kaiwen Education Technology, would
maintain the choir college’s programs and staff in Princeton,
while seeking to franchise the
Westminster name.
“It’s like passing on your child
to the next parent and saying they
Westminster Choir
College could be sold
to a Chinese firm.
can give them a better future than
we can give them,” said Gregory
G. Dell’Omo, Rider’s president.
“Yes, it’s sort of a tough, sad decision, but it’s almost tough love.”
But some Westminster and
Rider professors, armed with
fresh financial data, question Kaiwen’s experience in higher education. Many have also lost confidence in Dr. Dell’Omo, a former
human resources executive in the
retail industry, who took office in
August 2015.
“Rider is not in crisis: that is a
pure scare tactic to justify what he
wants to do, which is get a windfall
of money,” said Jeffrey R. Halpern,
a sociology professor and longtime official with the Rider chapter of the American Association of
University Professors. “He really
epitomizes what we’d call the corporatization of American higher
education.”
The existential battle over
Rider and Westminster, eight
miles apart, comes as many colleges, especially those with only
local or regional reputations, conJavier C. Hernandez and Chloe
Dempsey contributed reporting
from Beijing.
front shrinking demographics and
declining government support.
Outside Boston, Mount Ida College, a private college founded in
1899, closed in April. In Pennsylvania, the RAND Corporation just
urged major changes or even consolidation at state colleges. In
northern New Jersey, Drew University, reeling from credit rating
downgrades, slashed tuition by 20
percent last fall, in hopes of boosting enrollment.
For Westminster and its 439
students, the next few months
could be the most pivotal yet.
A group of Westminster alumni
sued Rider in Federal District
Court in Manhattan in June 2017,
arguing that a sale would violate
the Rider-Westminster merger.
The Princeton Theological Seminary contended in state court in
February that the sale would
break a promise made by the original donor of the land, to which it
could lay claim. Meanwhile, another group of alumni, faculty,
parents and donors, concerned
about the Kaiwen transaction, just
established a new nonprofit, The
Westminster Foundation, Princeton, N.J., “to ensure the continued
existence” of Westminster.
The uncertainty has already
chilled interest in Westminster,
where annual tuition is $37,650:
the incoming class of freshmen
and graduate students is expected
to be half the normal size of
roughly 110, faculty members estimate.
“It’s tough — I know what the
college is going through, and there
are not a lot of alternatives right
now,” said former New Jersey
Gov. Thomas H. Kean, who served
as Drew’s president from 1990 to
2005, and has been active in efforts to preserve Westminster.
“This is one of the best schools of
its kind — not just in the state, but
the country and the world. To lose
it would be a tragedy.”
Founded in 1920 in a Presbyterian church in Dayton, Ohio, Westminster relocated to Ithaca, N.Y.,
before settling in Princeton in
1932. While it lacks the cachet of
New York’s Juilliard School or
Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute of
Music, Westminster has trained
many singers affiliated with the
Metropolitan Opera, as well as
scores of choral directors and music teachers.
In the early 1990s, though, the
college nearly closed in the face of
mounting debt, declining enrollment and deteriorating facilities.
Along came Rider, a private college which hoped to expand into
the arts.
After the 2008 recession, however, Rider’s enrollment fell by 12
PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRYAN ANSELM FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Westminster Choir College, in Princeton, N.J., has trained opera
singers, choral directors and music teachers, but now it has been
put up for sale. Jeffrey Halpern, right, a sociology professor at
Rider University, which is selling Westminster, opposes the plan.
percent,
before
rebounding
slightly in 2016. Now, with 88 percent of its revenue coming from
students, the university relies
more on tuition than its peers, according to Moody’s Investor Service, which revised its outlook for
Rider to negative in November,
citing the potential impact of the
Westminster sale.
“As part of our financials, and
our strategy going forward, we
cannot make the kind of investments that Westminster needs,”
said Dr. Dell’Omo, who previously
served as president of Robert
Morris University, outside Pittsburgh.
Dr. Dell’Omo has pushed to incorporate more “higher-demand
career” programs, such as computer science and sports management into Rider’s offerings. When
he revived a proposal to move
Westminster to Rider’s main Lawrenceville, N.J., campus, and sell
the 23-acre Princeton parcel, irate
faculty, students and alumni said
the acoustics and intimate milieu
could not be replicated.
Rider then approached other
colleges — Princeton, Juilliard,
Oberlin, and the like — about taking over Westminster, but no offers materialized because the
choir school may have been “too
much of a niche market,” Dr. Dell’Omo said. The only viable offers
came from overseas, he said, and
Kaiwen, a publicly traded company on the Shenzhen stock exchange, had the most impressive
plan.
Kaiwen runs two international
K-12 schools in Beijing, and has
partnered with the Manchester
City soccer club and Major
League Baseball on sports education. So the company was particularly interested in the Westminster Conservatory of Music, which
gives music lessons to children
and adults, and Westminster Continuing Education, which primarily runs on-campus summer programs.
“They understand the idea of
branding,” Dr. Dell’Omo said. One
thought is that Kaiwen would
start new Westminster schools in
other places.
Under the deal, Rider would
still run Westminster for the next
academic year, and Kaiwen, operating as a nonprofit locally, would
honor Rider’s student aid packages. Two consultants based in
the United States with experience
in accreditation and music education are aiding the transition, and
PwC, formerly known as PricewaterhouseCoopers, is vetting
Kaiwen, Dr. Dell’Omo added.
One of Kaiwen’s top shareholders is Badachu Holdings, a statecontrolled enterprise. One person
listed as a director at both Kaiwen
and Badachu is Xu Huadong, who
held leadership positions within
the Chinese People’s Liberation
Army from 1978-2000.
Kaiwen declined an interview
request, saying it was “inappropriate for Kaiwen Education to
comment on any pending transactions.”
But in an interview with Chinese media in March, Xu
Guangyu, Kaiwen’s chairman, a
choral singer in college, talked
about how Westminster would be
“an important part” of a globalization strategy to offer a broad
“quality education.” Mr. Xu also
said that “whether it is our music
education resources or our sports
resources, everything is shared.”
Chinese companies are increasingly eying education-related
mergers following the early,
though not sustained, success of
Qtone Education Group in 2015.
But for Kaiwen, “the prospects of
profit are not optimistic” because
of the company’s weak revenues.
Rider faculty are even more dubious. In a new report, three current and retired professors, relying on public data, flag Kaiwen’s
high debt and negative cash flow,
and criticize Dr. Dell’Omo and
Rider’s board of trustees for “a
failure to perform due diligence
and carry out fiduciary responsibilities.”
New York Attorney General, Accused of Abusing Women, Quits
From Page A1
this story are abhorrent,” she said
in a statement. “Based on this extensive and serious reporting, I do
not believe that Eric Schneiderman should continue to serve as
attorney general.”
Under New York’s Constitution,
Mr. Schneiderman’s replacement
will be selected by the State Assembly and Senate by joint ballot
— effectively placing the decision
in the hands of the Assembly,
which has far more members.
The Assembly speaker, Carl E.
Heastie, planned to discuss possible replacements on Tuesday, according to Michael Whyland, a
spokesman for Mr. Heastie. Whoever is chosen to fill out Mr.
Schneiderman’s term could then
seek election in November.
No Democrat had declared an
intention to challenge Mr. Schneiderman, who was up for re-election this year, in the primary;
Manny Alicandro, a corporate
lawyer from New York City, is running as a Republican and officially
declared his candidacy on Monday.
Since 2017, Mr. Schneiderman
had raised his profile nationally
by taking on President Trump’s
agenda repeatedly in the courts.
He was pushing to change state
law so that his office could prosecute Mr. Trump’s aides even if
the president pardoned them; his
resignation makes the status of
that effort less certain.
Women’s issues had also been a
focal point for Mr. Schneiderman,
who had announced, for instance,
a lawsuit against the company
once run by the former filmmaker
Harvey Weinstein, who was accused of decades of sexual misconduct. “We have never seen
anything as despicable as what
we’ve seen right here,” Mr.
Schneiderman said then.
Ms. Manning Barish, in The
New Yorker account, described
being slapped by Mr. SchneiderReporting was contributed by
Ellen Gabler, Shane Goldmacher,
Jesse McKinley and William K.
Rashbaum.
SETH WENIG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eric T. Schneiderman, New York’s attorney general, took a major role in the #MeToo movement.
man after they had both been
drinking; she and Ms. Selvaratnam said several of the attacks occurred after alcohol had been consumed.
“It was horrendous,” she said.
“It just came out of nowhere. My
ear was ringing. I lost my balance
and fell backward onto the bed. I
sprang up, but at this point there
was very little room between the
bed and him. I got up to try to
shove him back, or take a swing,
and he pushed me back down. He
then used his body weight to hold
me down, and he began to choke
me. The choking was very hard. It
was really bad. I kicked. In every
fiber, I felt I was being beaten by a
man.”
Debra S. Katz, a lawyer for Ms.
Manning Barish, said that it was
Mr. Schneiderman’s “fantasy and
his fantasy alone that the behavior was welcome.”
Mr. Schneiderman, she continued, “has made a career railing
against this type of abuse. Yet apparently he intends to revictimize
these courageous women who
have come forward by pulling out
that age old sexist trope that they
wanted it.”
Ms. Selvaratnam told the magazine that Mr. Schneiderman routinely drank to excess during their
relationship, and that the physical
abuse in bed got worse the longer
she was with him. “We could
rarely have sex without him beating me,” she said.
The abuse was also verbal and
emotional, she said. “He started
calling me his ‘brown slave’ and
demanding that I repeat that I
was ‘his property.’”
Both Ms. Manning Barish and
Ms. Selvaratnam have in recent
days repeatedly declined to comment when reporters for The
Times asked them to address the
allegations.
“After I found out that other
women had been abused by Attorney General Schneiderman in a
similar manner many years before me, I wondered, who’s next,
and knew something needed to be
done,” Ms. Selvaratnam said in a
statement released Monday
night. “So I chose to come forward
both to protect women who might
enter into a relationship with him
in the future but also to raise
awareness around the issue of intimate partner violence.”
Ms. Manning Barish also followed the article’s publication
with a post on Twitter, saying that
she “could not remain silent and
encourage other women to be
brave for me.”
Mr. Schneiderman’s former
wife said she was taken aback by
the allegations being leveled
against him.
“I’ve known Eric for nearly 35
years as a husband, father and
friend,” said Jennifer Cunningham, his ex-wife and frequent political strategist. “These allegations are completely inconsistent
with the man I know, who has always been someone of the highest
character, outstanding values and
a loving father.”
Mr. Schneiderman has long
been regarded as one of the state’s
most progressive politicians, even
before his 2013 lawsuit against
Trump University and his subsequent suits against the Trump administration made him the darling
of the political left. Last fall, Mr.
Schneiderman’s office proudly
pointed to a segment on the latenight comedy show “Full Frontal
with Samantha Bee,” in which the
attorney general was described as
“a hero who stood up to democracy’s nemesis,” a Superman-like
character known as Schneiderman.
His credentials as an advocate
for women, in particular, had gone
unquestioned.
In 2010, as a state senator from
Manhattan, he introduced a bill to
make intentional strangulation to
the point of unconsciousness a violent felony. That same year, the
National Organization for Women’s New York branch endorsed
him in his successful bid for attorney general, citing his “unmatched work” in “protecting
women who are victims of domestic abuse.”
For several years, his office has
published a “Know Your Rights”
brochure for victims of domestic
violence. “We must recognize that
our work keeping New Yorkers
safe from domestic violence is far
from over,” Mr. Schneiderman
said in the announcement for the
2016 brochure.
At the direction of Governor
Cuomo, he was reviewing the 2015
decision by the Manhattan district
attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., not to
prosecute Mr. Weinstein after an
Italian model accused him of groping her.
Some national Republicans
were gleeful at the allegations.
The Republican research shop
America Rising quickly packaged
Mr. Schneiderman’s ties to other
prominent national Democrats.
And on Monday evening, Mr.
Trump’s son, Donald Trump, Jr.,
dug up an old tweet from Mr.
Schneiderman in which he said
“No one is above the law” and
tweeted at him, “You were saying???”
By night’s end, Mr. Schneiderman had retained a criminal defense lawyer from the law firm of
Lankler Siffert & Wohl, a person
with knowledge of the matter said.
“To claim that Rider is likely to
fail or collapse is an absurd characterization of the financial situation of Rider University,” wrote
Howard J. Bunsis, a professor of
accounting at Eastern Michigan
University, in a 28-page analysis
of Rider’s finances, commissioned
by the faculty union.
On campus, where Westminster’s motto is “spectemur
agendo,” or “let us be judged by
our deeds,” many students said
that they were skittish, particularly if future enrollment plummets.
But Ingrid Clarfield, a longtime
professor of piano, said she was
cautiously upbeat. After attending
a recent Music Teachers National
Association conference, she was
heartened by educators with experience in China.
“I said, give it to me straight,
and they felt this would be a very
beneficial move for both Westminster and Kaiwen,” she said. “I really need to believe strongly in
this.”
Corrections
SPORTS
An article on Sunday about Albert Pujols’ three thousandth hit
erroneously included Roberto
Clemente among the list of foreign-born players to get 3,000 hits.
Clemente, who was born in Puerto
Rico, was not “foreign-born.”
ARTS
Because of an editing error, an
article on Monday about a traveling exhibition centered on the
show “Hamilton” misspelled the
name of that musical’s director. He
is Thomas Kail, not Kale.
An article on Sunday about
summer movie releases, using information from the film’s representatives, misstated the release
date for “McQueen.” It is July 20,
not July 13.
WEEKEND ARTS
A review on Friday about an exhibition of pre-Columbian art at
the
Metropolitan
Museum
misidentified
the
institution
where the curator Joanne Pillsbury worked before joining the
Met. She was with the Getty Research Institute, not the Getty
Museum.
OBITUARIES
An obituary on Saturday about
Ninalee Allen Craig, the subject of
the
well-known
photograph
“American Girl in Italy,” misstated
how her marriage to R. Ross Craig
ended. It ended with his death, not
in divorce.
Errors are corrected during the
press run whenever possible, so
some errors noted here may not
have appeared in all editions.
Contact the newsroom:
nytnews@nytimes.com or call
1-844-NYT-NEWS
(1-844-698-6397).
Editorials: letters@nytimes.com
Newspaper Delivery:
customercare@nytimes.com or call
1-800-NYTIMES (1-800-698-4637).
Get more on NYTimes.com.
A24
TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
LETTERS
EDITORIAL
The Fates of Those Accused of Assault
TO THE EDITOR:
Re “What Do We Do With These
Men?” (Sunday Review, April 29),
about the “men felled by #MeToo”:
Katie J. M. Baker’s article raises
important questions, but I take one
exception to her approach. She
continues to ask what to do about
these “bad men.” To call them bad
men skews the conversation.
There are bad men, and there are
men who do bad things. Bad men
worry about their comeback TV
show. Good men who do bad things
worry about the impact they have
on others. They partake in selfreflection and want to make repairs
and amends to those they harmed.
Maybe that distinction is a key to
how we begin a new conversation
about these men.
LAURIE KAHN, EVANSTON, ILL.
The writer is the author of “Baffled by
Love: Stories of the Lasting Impact of
Childhood Trauma Inflicted by Loved
Ones.”
TO THE EDITOR:
CHIARA GHIGLIAZZA
New York’s Uber Problem
New Yorkers who can afford to avoid their dysfunctional
subway system are spoiled for choice these days. In addition
to long-established taxis, livery cabs, black cars and limousines, they can summon rides through Uber, Lyft, Via, Juno
and other app-based ride-hailing and ride-sharing services.
While this new surfeit of options has been a boon to people
trying to get around town, it has also helped lay waste to the
livelihoods of taxi drivers and turn New York’s already busy
streets into glorified parking lots — and leaders like Mayor
Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Albany and the City
Council have yet to come up with an effective strategy to
deal with these problems.
Ride-hailing
Cities have a long history of interapps are
vening to impose order on their streets.
convenient for
No large metropolis can accommodate
residents but
everyone who would like to drive or be
have had
privately driven around — street space
devastating
is a limited resource, especially in the
effects on taxi
densest neighborhoods and at the busidrivers’ pay and est times of the day. In the 1930s, during
on the streets.
the Great Depression, New York created its taxi medallion system because
drivers looking for work flooded the streets, far outstripping
demand and driving down wages for drivers. With the rise
of Uber, Lyft and the like, the city is again confronting a tragedy of the commons.
Many other thriving cities, including London and Paris,
are also struggling to figure out how to respond to these new
business models. A big part of the problem is that elected officials have not updated regulations written for a bygone era
in which each type of car service tended to stay in its lane,
so to speak — in New York, taxis primarily plied the streets
of Manhattan and the city’s airports, liveries took care of
residents of the other boroughs, and black cars chauffeured
the denizens of Wall Street. While the city has issued just
13,587 taxi medallions — a small fraction of the more than
60,000 cars Uber commands — it gave freer rein to the liveries and black cars under the assumption that these specialized services would never become dominant.
Ride-hailing apps have shattered those boundaries by
signing up drivers with livery or black-car licenses. These
companies cast themselves as filling big gaps in the transportation system, and it’s true that they have been great for
people in mass-transit-starved parts of the city. But their
growth has also led to many veteran taxi and black-car drivers seeing a devastating decrease in take-home pay. That’s
largely because they are completing fewer trips than before.
As a result, the value of the taxi medallions that drivers
must either buy from the city or rent from taxi companies
has crashed in recent years, going from a high of about $1.3
million in 2014 to less than $200,000 today. Over the past five
months, four drivers who were financially strained have
killed themselves, and many others have lost their medallions to foreclosure.
At the same time, traffic has slowed to a crawl, to just
8.2 miles per hour south of 60th Street in Manhattan in 2015,
down from 9.4 miles per hour in 2010, according to the city’s
Department of Transportation.
It makes little sense for the city to regulate the old and
new guard of for-hire cars differently when many New Yorkers use them interchangeably — as do some drivers, who
have been known to switch between traditional cabs and
app-based services. While it would be impractical for the
city to get rid of its existing regulations in one fell swoop, it
could phase in new regulations. A more thoughtful regime
would ensure that all drivers make a living wage by establishing a minimum fare for riders, and a standardized share
of that fare for drivers, regardless of what kind of car they
drive. Or as Brad Lander, a City Council member from
Brooklyn, has proposed, the city could require companies
like Uber to pay drivers a minimum wage. Further, the city
ought to standardize regulations like those requiring that a
certain number of cars be accessible to people with disabilities.
The city and state also need to create a smart congestion pricing plan to reduce traffic while raising money
for upgrades to the subway and bus system, which would
encourage fewer people to get into cabs and Ubers. The
Legislature recently added a surcharge on taxi trips below
96th Street in Manhattan: 75 cents for pooled trips, $2.50 for
yellow taxis and $2.75 for black cars and Uber and Lyft
rides. This charge is flawed. It does not vary by the time of
day, and lawmakers failed to impose fees on private cars
and trucks. A smart pricing scheme would discourage use of
all vehicles when traffic is at its worst and encourage car
travel and deliveries at off-peak times.
Over time, the city should consider whether it owes
something to drivers who sunk their savings into taxi medallions. Many drivers went into debt to buy these permits
because the city promised them a monopoly on picking up
passengers, a promise it has not been able to keep. No doubt
any compensation plan would be controversial, and working
out the details would be tricky — the city, for example,
should not compensate investors, like Michael Cohen, President Trump’s lawyer-cum-fixer, who should have known
that they were taking big risks by buying up dozens of medallions. Governments in Quebec and Australia have compensated or are proposing compensating taxi drivers for the
lost value of such licenses.
The city needs to make its transportation system fairer
to paid drivers, responsive to the needs of commuters and
more environmentally sustainable. If the mayor and other
elected officials put their minds to that task, they might also
help set a model that cities around the world could follow.
pelled from school. Before we decide what to do with the “bad men,”
we need to determine which men
are bad. Ms. Baker notes the spectrum of bad behavior from Bill
Cosby to “handsy” salesmen, but
we must also acknowledge the
spectrum of certainty.
In some cases (like Harvey Weinstein), the evidence is so overwhelming that there can be no
doubt about his badness. In contrast, most sexual misconduct cases
against students provide little
evidence, some of it ambiguous or
contradictory.
Institutions must make findings
based on half-remembered stories
of partly consensual encounters,
months or years after the fact.
Surely many of the accused are
guilty of wrongdoing, but which
ones?
If we are labeling some people as
“trash,” we ought to have a lot of
confidence about who belongs in
the bin. In many cases, we just
don’t know.
HANNA STOTLAND, CHICAGO
In response to “What Do We Do
With These Men?,” sweeping these
problems under the rug doesn’t
work well. Just ask the Catholic
Church, whose leadership created a
secret system for passing along
their tainted priests from one
parish to another, until that blew
up, tarnishing the church forever.
If men like Matt Lauer, Charlie
Rose and Harvey Weinstein are
capable of getting therapy and
paying back to society for the harm
they’ve done, I hope they do so.
Frankly, I’m skeptical. I think
they’re probably too set in their
ways. Maybe I’m wrong, and they’ll
prove it by donating millions of
dollars to domestic violence shelters, pronto.
Sexual assault behavior has to be
nipped at an early age. Let’s start
raising our boys and girls to not
accept this behavior.
MOIRA SAUCEDO, ALEXANDRIA, VA.
TO THE EDITOR:
I am the college admissions consultant Katie J. M. Baker refers to
who works with young men ex-
TO THE EDITOR:
As a mental health professional
who has been treating sex offenders for almost two decades, I have
developed a three-step process
leading to a reintegration of offenders into the community.
This involves a) a convincing,
thorough explanation of motivation; b) recognition and regret of
the impact on victims; and c) a
pledge that there will be no further
incidents.
The most important step is the
first, requiring confrontational
probing to cut through failure to
take responsibility and facile rationalizations. An honest explanation in
a public forum (for well-known
offenders) or to the relevant community is an essential step in
achieving both individual behavioral change and a deeper understanding of this issue in the broader
community.
Still, when dealing with human
beings, there are no guarantees.
WALTER SIMMONS
PORT CHESTER, N.Y.
Would President Trump Really Plead the Fifth?
TO THE EDITOR:
Re “President May Plead Fifth to
Mueller, Giuliani Says” (news article, May 7):
As a former federal prosecutor
and then a longtime defense lawyer,
I believe that there is a unanimity
of lawyers mentioned in various
articles that the president should
not talk with the special prosecutor.
A lawyer’s duty is to advise, but
the ultimate decision is the client’s.
How it will look for a president to
take the Fifth may be more important than any other consideration,
especially a president who says
that only the guilty take the Fifth.
ROBERT LERNER, MILWAUKEE
TO THE EDITOR:
Regarding the acknowledgment
that Donald Trump funded the hush
payment to Stormy Daniels, Mr.
Trump has always claimed to be a
fighter and to hit back “10 times
harder.” He has said this about the
American military response to ISIS,
and his wife, Melania, has indicated
that he has the same philosophy in
his personal life. But now we see
him capitulating to what he claims
is a false accusation.
The lesson to be learned from
this is that President Trump is not
the fighter he pretended to be during the campaign, but that he’s
actually someone who folds when
credibly accused. His base, who
thinks that he will fight for it,
should realize that he’s not going to
fight for it if he won’t fight for himself.
GREG BELCAMINO, NEW YORK
An Extraordinary Bequest
TO THE EDITOR:
“Thrifty Brooklyn Secretary
Leaves $8 Million for Needy Students” (front page, May 7), about
Sylvia Bloom’s philanthropy,
warmed my heart.
What a joy in the midst of the
greed we read and hear about
every day!
KATHLEEN RICHARDSON
COLUMBUS, OHIO
ONLINE: MORE LETTERS
For New York City co-op boards
in conflict, there is an underlying fear: “loss of a lifestyle versus
loss of an investment.”
nytimes.com/opinion
MICHELLE GOLDBERG
Why Did a Creepy Israeli Intel Firm Spy on Obama Alums?
ON SATURDAY, the British newspaper The
Observer published an article that, if
true, should rocket into the top tier of
Donald Trump scandals. Aides to the
president, it said, “hired an Israeli private intelligence agency to orchestrate a
‘dirty ops’ campaign against key individuals from the Obama administration who
helped negotiate the Iran nuclear deal.”
The Israeli agents, said The Observer,
specifically targeted Ben Rhodes, who
had been one of Barack Obama’s national
security advisers, and Colin Kahl, a deputy assistant to Obama and national security adviser to Joe Biden. The idea, apparently, was to smear them as corrupt in order to discredit the Iran deal as a whole.
The Observer did not identify the Israeli intelligence firm. But on Twitter,
Kahl described a strange overture made
to his wife last year, when she was serving on the fund-raising committee for
their daughter’s elementary school. A
woman claiming to represent a British
private equity firm interested in donating
to the school emailed his wife and insisted that they meet. (Kahl and his wife
were suspicious, and the meeting never
happened.)
As Laura Rozen, a foreign policy journalist, reported, the woman who emailed
Kahl’s wife claimed to work for Reuben
Capital Partners. That’s the same fake
firm that a female operative for the Israeli intelligence firm Black Cube used as
a cover when she spied on the actress
Rose McGowan for Harvey Weinstein.
Sure enough, on Sunday, The New
Yorker’s Ronan Farrow confirmed that it
was Black Cube that targeted Kahl and
Rhodes. (The company had also tried to
get to Rhodes through his wife.) Additionally, wrote Farrow, Black Cube “compiled a list of more than 30 reporters who
it believed were in touch with Obama administration officials, annotated with instructions about how to seek negative information.”
In a remotely normal America, Congress would immediately plan hearings
into Black Cube. Of course, that’s not the
America we live in. “We’re in an era right
now in which there’s so many scandals
that it’s impossible to appropriately react
to all of them because we would just be
completely emotionally drained,” said
Trita Parsi, head of the National Iranian
American Council and author of “Losing
an Enemy: Obama, Iran, and the Triumph of Diplomacy.”
During the transition between the
Obama and Trump administrations,
Parsi, who was an informal adviser to
Obama during negotiations with Iran,
said that an American intelligence source
warned him, through a third party, that
Trump would try to discredit him and
We need a congressional
investigation into the
Black Cube scandal.
other supporters of the Iran deal. Parsi
recently discovered, thanks to a reporter
covering the Black Cube story, that he
had been interviewed last year by a Black
Cube operative posing as a journalist.
Speaking of the warning and the Black
Cube encounter, he told me, “I have little
reason to believe that they’re not linked.”
There are still a great many unknowns
in this story, which, like so much of this
administration, has a wild, dystopian im-
plausibility. Contrary to the Observer’s
reporting, a source told Farrow that
Black Cube was working on behalf of a
private-sector client, not the Trump administration. Black Cube itself denied
working for Trump or anyone close to
him. A report in the Israeli media said the
operation was related to a dispute between shipping companies.
But at a minimum, it’s outrageous that
Black Cube, a company of former Israeli
intelligence agents, appears to have
spied on Americans to undermine the
Iran nuclear agreement, which Trump
seems poised to pull out of on Tuesday.
It’s grotesque that Black Cube did so by
targeting the spouses of former Obama
administration officials. And if Trump’s
team had any role at all in using foreign
spies against American citizens, it should
end his presidency, even if it probably
won’t.
When I spoke to Kahl on Monday, he
described the shipping company explanation as “laughably implausible.” Kahl
emphasized that he has no idea who was
behind the approach to his wife. But he
points out that Trump officials were obsessed with him and Rhodes; on Fox
News, the former Trump aide Sebastian
Gorka spoke darkly about the “Ben
Rhodes-Colin Kahl nexus.”
“In the spring of last year, there was a
group of senior aides at the White House
who, maybe because of Ben and my social media presence on Twitter, were convinced that somehow we were the puppet-masters that were pulling all the
strings of the deep state,” he said. “I know
that sounds crazy. It is crazy.” But to Kahl,
it’s hard to imagine why someone who
wasn’t caught up in conspiracy theories
about him and Rhodes would single out
the two of them for surveillance.
“I have zero — zero — evidence that
Trump aides did this,” Kahl told me.
“None. But it needs to be explained, this
weird coincidence of this strange fixation
on Ben and me by a handful of White
House aides at the exact same moment in
time that this Israeli firm gets hired to dig
into us and our families.”
Parsi believes it will be. “I think this is
just the beginning,” he said. “I think we’re
going to find out more about what this
firm has done, and what this administration has done.” If so, it will be up to the
rest of us to make sure that it matters. 0
THE NEW YORK TIMES OP-ED TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
PAUL KRUGMAN
Gnawing
Away at
Health Care
of 2017, Republicans
promised to release the kraken on Obamacare — to destroy the program with
one devastating blow. But a funny thing
happened: Voters realized that repealing
the Affordable Care Act would mean taking health insurance away from tens of
millions of Americans. They didn’t like
that prospect — and enough Republicans
balked at the backlash that Obamacare repeal fizzled.
But Republicans still hate the idea of
helping Americans get health care. So instead of releasing the kraken, they’ve
brought on the termites. Rather than trying to eliminate Obamacare in one fell
swoop, they’re trying to undermine it with
multiple acts of sabotage — while hoping
voters won’t realize who’s responsible for
rising premiums and falling coverage.
Which is why it’s important to place the
blame where it belongs.
The first thing you need to understand
is that Obamacare has been a highly successful program. When the legislation was
passed, Republicans insisted it would fail
to cut the number of uninsured and would
blow a huge hole in the federal budget. In
fact, it led to major gains in coverage, reducing the uninsured rate to its lowest level in history, at relatively low cost.
It’s true that the coverage expansion
was somewhat less than originally preAT THE BEGINNING
Obamacare repeal failed,
so now Republicans have
unleashed the termites.
dicted, although the shortfall was much
less than you may have heard. It’s also
true that after initially offering surprisingly cheap policies on the Obamacare exchanges, insurers found that the people
signing up were sicker, on average, than
they expected, leading to higher premiums. But as of last year, the markets appeared to have stabilized, with insurers
generally profitable.
Nobody would claim that Obamacare is
perfect; many Americans remain uninsured, and too many of those with coverage face troublingly high out-of-pocket expenses. Still, health reform delivered most
of what its advocates promised and
caused none of the disasters its opponents
predicted.
Yet Republicans still want to destroy it.
One reason is that much of the coverage
expansion was paid for with taxes on high
incomes, so repeal would be a way to cut
taxes on the wealthy. More broadly, conservatives hate Obamacare precisely because it works. It shows that government
actually can help tens of millions of Americans lead better, more secure lives, and in
so doing it threatens their low-tax, smallgovernment ideology.
But outright repeal failed, so now it’s
time for sabotage, which is taking place on
two main fronts.
One of these fronts involves the expansion of Medicaid, which probably accounted for more than half the gains in
coverage under Obamacare. Now a number of Republican-controlled states are
trying to make Medicaid harder to get,
notably by imposing work requirements
on recipients.
What is the point of these work requirements? The ostensible justification —
cracking down on able-bodied Medicaid
recipients who should be working but aren’t — is nonsense: There are very few people meeting that description. The real goal
is simply to make getting health care
harder, by imposing onerous reporting
and paperwork requirements and punishing people who lose their jobs for reasons
beyond their control.
The other front involves trying to reduce the number of people signing up for
private coverage. Last year the Trump administration drastically reduced outreach
— the effort to let Americans know when
and how to get health insurance.
The administration is also promoting
various dodges that would in effect let insurance companies go back to discriminating against people in poor health. And
when Congress passed a huge tax cut for
corporations and the wealthy, it also eliminated the individual mandate, the requirement that people sign up for insurance
even if they’re currently healthy.
Preliminary evidence suggests that
these efforts at sabotage have already
partially reversed the coverage gains
achieved under Obama, especially among
lower-income Americans. (Curiously, all
the coverage losses seem to have happened among self-identified Republicans.) But the worst is yet to come.
You see, G.O.P. sabotage disproportionately discourages young and healthy people from signing up, which, as one commentator put it, “drives up the cost for
other folks within that market.” Who said
that? Tom Price, President Trump’s first
secretary of health and human services.
Sure enough, insurers are already
proposing major premium hikes — and
they are specifically attributing those
hikes to G.O.P. actions that are driving
healthy Americans out of the market,
leaving a sicker, more expensive pool behind.
So here’s what’s going to happen:
Soon, many Americans will suffer
sticker shock from their insurance policies; federal subsidies will protect most
of them, but by no means everyone.
They’ll also hear news about declining
insurance coverage. And Republicans
will say, “See, Obamacare is failing.”
But the problem isn’t with Obamacare,
it’s with the politicians who unleashed
this termite infestation — who are doing
all they can to take away your health coverage. And they need to be held accountable.
0
N
The Mother’s Day Trap
Margaret Renkl
NASHVILLE
W
HEN I was a girl, I often
imagined the profession I
would practice when I grew
up. Being a librarian would
mean getting paid to read books. Being a
veterinarian would mean getting paid to
love animals. Was there a job where people got paid to walk around in the woods?
I would probably find out in college.
I’m not sure how I got this idea of myself as a professional woman. I was a
child of the small-town South of the early
’60s, and all the women I knew stayed
home with their children, whether they
cared to or not. (This was true of white
women, I should say; the African-American women of my Alabama childhood
were mostly working in the homes of
white women who didn’t work at all.)
I also expected to get married and
have children. Of course I would; that’s
what little girls did. I would finish high
school and then college. I would go to
work and get married and have a baby.
The baby — and someday that baby’s
siblings — would be the crowning glory
of it all. I would love my work, but my
work would be merely something I did,
not something I was. What I would be
was a mother.
It’s not such a retro idea when you
grow up in a family like mine. My mother
chafed mightily at stay-at-home motherhood, but I asked her once what she felt
she had been born to be, and without
hesitation she said, “I was born to be a
mother.” My father felt the same way
about being a father. Everything my parents did, they did to support the family.
We children were their role in the world.
So how surprising is it that I grew up
believing that everything in my own life
was only a preparation for the day my
first child was born, a circle I was drawing that would not be closed until the last
child arrived? It did not occur to me that
each of my imagined babies, the ones
who represented the completion of my
life, was born to draw a different circle. In
the Venn diagram of our lives, the overlap was barely an instant. The second my
own circle was complete, it was already
cracking open.
Mother’s Day, with its hothouse flowers and its restaurant brunches, is only a
visible manifestation of the persistent
cultural belief that motherhood is the climax of female life. A man who is not a father is assigned no special designation at
all, but a woman without children is too
often thoughtlessly called “childless,” as
though she’s lacking something, as
though she is diminished, incomplete.
But God help the woman who believes this message too wholeheartedly,
who feels too acutely that motherhood
truly defines her. The very culture that
insists that raising a child is the single
most important thing a woman can do
with her life also maintains that she must
be willing to surrender that identity the
instant her child leaves home. The notorious “helicopter parent,” the meddling
mother, the critical mother-in-law —
these are all tropes at least as pervasive
and unchallenged as any Madonna and
Child image of manifest womanhood. A
God help the woman
who feels too acutely that
motherhood defines her.
DAVID BROOKS
mother who can’t “let go” is a grasping,
desperate creature, entirely to be pitied
if not openly reviled.
Laments about helicopter parents
who can’t let go miss the point for rankand-file moms like me. How many of us
really have time to micromanage a
grown child’s life? Even if I had the time,
I wouldn’t be tempted: The oldest of my
three sons is fully on his own, and my
other two, now in college, manage their
affairs perfectly well themselves. Their
lives, I know, will inevitably include me
less and less.
It wasn’t always this way. When the
house my grandparents lived in burned
down during the Depression, the whole
family moved in with my great-grandparents. When my other great-grandmother became widowed, she joined
them in the farmhouse. No one questioned the wisdom of this arrangement
or suspected any of them of being emotionally stunted, unable to let go. They
simply expected to spend the rest of their
lives together, sitting on the porch in the
cool of the evening, talking to one another.
I love the symmetry of a life like that,
love the idea of Sunday dinner after
church, the whole family gathered
around one big farmhouse table — but
I’m also grateful to live in my own time
and place. And I have always been too
busy to feel sad when my children passed into new stages of competence and
independence, even knowing that this
very independence would one day take
them away from me.
But I struggle with the constant reminders that my sons share their lives
primarily with people I’ve never met,
that they do work I know only in its
broadest outlines. They love me; I
know that. They call often to chat, and
they don’t hesitate to ask for advice if they’re unsure of
something. But they have
also created lives in which
my husband and I are on
the margins. Peripheral.
Almost obsolete. Even a
house fire would not send
them back to live with us
forever.
I will love having
them all home for Mother’s Day, but in one tiny little corner of my mind I will
also be missing the days
when they were still so small
and so needy, when the family
circle was still close and
closed. I will miss the smell of
their sweaty little-boy necks
and the feel of their damp fingers clutching my blouse as I
bounced them on my hip. And
I will remember all the years
when Mother’s Day meant
crayoned cards and plaster-of-Paris handprints
and weedy bouquets
made of clover and henbit and creeping Charlie and dandelion. The
most beautiful flowers
in all the world.
0
is a
contributing opinion
writer.
MARGARET RENKL
LINDA YAN
Money and Culture Are Inseparable
Andrew J. Cherlin
W
HY did white workingclass voters shift toward
Donald Trump in the 2016
election? Was it about
money or culture — their struggles in the
new economy or their prejudices?
A recent article in Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences by Diana
C. Mutz comes down on the side of culture. Dr. Mutz studied the responses of
voters who were interviewed in October
2012 and October 2016, focusing on those
who switched their support from Barack
Obama to Mr. Trump. She argues that
these white voters turned to Mr. Trump
not because their economic situation had
deteriorated but because they were increasingly anxious about whether they
could hold on to their dominant social position.
Other scholars have made similar
claims. A report based on a 2016 national
survey concluded that the white-working-class tilt toward Mr. Trump occurred
because of fears of “cultural displacement” rather than economic hardship.
Three political scientists argued that the
shift represented an “identity crisis”
among whites without college educations that was rooted in their fear that African-Americans and immigrants were
undermining their position as the majority group.
These conclusions, faithful as they
may be to the survey data that underlie
them, exemplify a misguided debate
about whether culture or economics was
the driving force in Mr. Trump’s win. To
be sure, racism is a corrosive part of
American culture and politics. Nevertheless, those who try to distinguish between the explanatory power of stagnant
wages and a declining industrial base on
the one hand, and anxieties about the ascent of minority groups on the other,
miss the point: These are not two different factors but two sides of the same coin.
College-educated Americans speak
about the economic problems of the
working class in terms of trends that can
be seen in tables and graphs. Those on
the left criticize the federal minimum
wage as being too low, while those on the
right bemoan the erosion of work incentives. But the people who are experiencing these adverse economic trends express themselves differently, using a
moral language that is often rooted in attitudes about work and race.
This was first noted by the sociologist
Michèle Lamont in her book “The Dignity of Working Men.” She found that
white working-class men often define
their self-worth through their ability to
lead disciplined, responsible lives. They
take pride in going to work every day to
support their families. Many of them
view African-Americans as not wanting
to work hard. They rarely consider that
their own advantages rest on the privileged position of whites in the labor market.
In this way, they construct a positive
sense of self despite the limits of their
economic class. Perched precariously
above the poor, they talk not about their
Both economic hardship
and prejudice played a
role in Trump’s election.
modest incomes but rather about their
superior work discipline. In prosperous
times, they can take pride in their success compared with minorities.
But when that prosperity is threatened, they complain about blacks or immigrants who are, in their minds, usurping their place in the economy. In a 2017
survey, 24 percent of whites without college degrees responded that they had
been personally discriminated against in
applying for jobs because they were
white — although strong evidence exists
that it is actually blacks who are discriminated against.
The economic distress of the white
working class has been building since
the 1970s. What was new in 2016 was a
candidate, Mr. Trump, who spoke about
that distress not in the language of a college graduate but as a working-class person might. He exploited voters’ feeling
that they were being left behind by a
Democratic Party that seemingly fa-
A25
vored blacks and immigrants.
In addition, when white working-class
individuals do talk about their standard
of living, it’s not necessarily those with
the lowest incomes who speak the loudest. More important than how much they
earn is their sense of how they are doing
compared with the standard of living of
their parents’ generation. Those who see
themselves as downwardly mobile are
the unhappiest.
The debate over why the white working class supported Mr. Trump raises a
question: Why do we care so much about
determining precisely how much political upheaval is due to economics and
how much is due to culture?
Perhaps we are drawn to this futile
quest because economic problems seem
more tractable — more easily dealt with
through the levers of government policy
— while cultural issues seem more resistant to change. Perhaps it is because
people’s economic troubles are often said
to reflect larger, structural problems beyond their control, whereas their cultural
deficiencies are sometimes seen as their
own fault.
When academics and journalists want
to express affinity with the working
class, in other words, they focus on poverty, and when they don’t, they focus on
prejudice.
But astute scholars do not see a wall
between economics and culture. They
acknowledge that financial hardship affects the daily lives of working-class
Americans, but they add that how they
respond is based on cultural beliefs that
may lead them to scapegoat minority
groups.
People with unstable or insufficient incomes may express their fears by talking
about race because that is the way they
have learned to interpret the world. People who are frustrated by their lack of
progress may still try to defend the dignity of their work. It is a mistake to see
economics and culture as distinct forces.
Both propelled Mr. Trump to victory. 0
is a professor of sociology and public policy at Johns Hopkins
and the author of “Labor’s Love Lost:
The Rise and Fall of the Working-Class
Family in America.”
ANDREW J. CHERLIN
The Man Who
Changed the
World, Twice
THIS COLUMN IS about a man who changed
the world, at least twice. I want to focus
less on the impact of his work, which is all
around us, and more on how he did it, because he’s a model of how you do social
change.
Stewart Brand was born in Rockford,
Ill., in 1938, the son of an advertising executive. By the early 1960s, he felt alienated
from boring, bourgeois suburbia and concluded that Native Americans had a lot to
teach the rest of us about how to lead a
more authentic way of life.
In 1965, he created a multimedia presentation called “America Needs Indians,”
which he performed at the LSD-laced,
proto-hippie gatherings he helped organize in California.
Brand then had two epiphanies. First,
there were no public photos of the entire
earth. Second, if people like him were going to return to the land and lead natural
lives, they would need tools.
He lobbied NASA to release a photograph of the whole earth, which became
an iconic image for the environmental
movement. Then he slapped the picture
on the cover of what he called the “Whole
Earth Catalog.”
The catalog was an encyclopedia of useful items for people heading to a commune
— home weaving kits, potter’s wheels,
outdoor gear. But it was also a bible for
what would come to be known as the counterculture, full of reading lists and rich
with the ideas of Buckminster Fuller and
others.
“Whole Earth Catalog” sold 2.5 million
copies, won the National Book Award and
defined an era.
When a culture changes, it’s often because a small group of people on society’s
margins find a better way to live, parts of
which the mainstream adopts. Brand
found a magic circle in the Bay Area counterculture. He celebrated it, publicized it,
gave it a coherence it otherwise lacked
and encouraged millions to join.
The catalog featured an iconic central
character, the Cowboy Nomad, who
served as symbol and role model. Brand
took influences from different parts of
America — the New York art world, farmers, academic visionaries like Marshal
McLuhan — and synthesized them into
one ethos. He crowdsourced later editions, asking readers to recommend other
cool products to feature.
The communes fizzled. But on the other
side of the Bay Area, Brand sensed another cultural wave building. Back in the
1960s, computers seemed like the ultimate
establishment device — IBM and the government used them to reduce people to
punch cards.
But Brand and others imagined them
launching a consciousness revolution —
personal tools to build neural communities that would blow the minds of mainstream America. As Fred Turner says in
“From Counterculture to Cyberculture,”
“What the communes failed to accomplish, the computers would complete.”
Brand played cultural craftsman once
again, this time first as a celebratory journalist. In 1972 he wrote a piece for Rolling
Stone announcing the emergence of a new
outlaw hacker culture. The hackers were
another magic circle on the cutting edge of
the future, a circle Brand would publicize
and inspire others to join.
As my Times colleague John Markoff,
who is writing a biography of Brand,
notes, Brand is a talented community architect. In the 1970s, he was meshing
Menlo Park computer geeks with cool hippie types. The tech people were entranced
by “Whole Earth,” including Steve Jobs
and Frederick Moore, co-creator of the
celebrated Homebrew Computer Club.
Brand meshed the engineers with the
Merry Pranksters and helped give tech a
Portrait of a cultural
craftsman.
moral ethos, a group identity, a sense of itself as a transformational force for good.
In 1985, Brand and Larry Brilliant
helped create the Well, an early online
platform (like Usenet) where techies
could meet and share. He helped Kevin
Kelly organize hacker conferences, which
attracted media attention. As Silicon Valley became more corporate in the 1980s
and 1990s, he also helped form the Learning Conferences, Worldview Meetings,
the Global Business Net and other convenings that gathered the multidisciplinary theorists and journalists who
would define the wired culture: Kelly, Esther Dyson, Tim Berners-Lee and Nicholas Negroponte.
Brand’s gift, Frank Foer writes in
“World Without Mind,” is “to channel the
spiritual longings of his generation and
then to explain how they could be fulfilled
through technology.” Innovations don’t
just proceed by science alone; as Foer
continues, “the culture prods them into
existence.”
Turner argues that Brand has always
craved a sensation of wholeness, a feeling
of belonging and authenticity. He has
found communities that gave him that
sensation and has encouraged millions to
love what he has loved. He synthesized a
cultural ethos, and then tried to embody
and spread that ethos through festivals,
conferences and organizations.
Brand vehemently disagrees with me,
but I’d say that, more recently, the computer has also failed as a source of true
community. Social media seems to immiserate people as much as it bonds them.
And so there’s a need for future Brands,
young cultural craftsmen who identify
those who are building the future, synthesizing their work into a common ethos and
bringing them together in a way that satisfies the eternal desire for community and
wholeness.
0
A26
N
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
Money Without a Mint
Tech Turnaround
SportsTuesday Pages 6-10
Imagining FedCoin
Microsoft’s Moral Role
Cheered Despite His Past
A former Fed governor says the
central bank should consider
issuing its own cryptocurrency. 2
The giant, once villainized, now
seems to be trying out for a new
role: industry conscience.
3
A pitcher who pleaded guilty to
a sex crime as a teenager is now
6
a star at Oregon State.
N
B1
TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
U.S. Oil Tops
$70 a Barrel
As Deadline
Nears on Iran
By MATT PHILLIPS
and STANLEY REED
Drive.ai makes the first debut
of driverless vehicles since
an Uber car hit a pedestrian.
COOPER NEILL FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
After Fatal Crash, a Return to the Road
By CADE METZ
FRISCO, Tex. — On Monday, an orange and blue car with the words “SelfDriving Vehicle” prominently displayed
on both sides drove itself through the
streets of this rapidly growing city north
of Dallas, navigating across four lanes of
traffic and around a traffic circle.
The car, operated by the Silicon Valley
start-up Drive.ai, will eventually become
part of a fleet of autonomous taxis that
will ferry locals along a predetermined
route between the Dallas Cowboys facility in Frisco and two other office, retail
and apartment complexes.
While other companies have tested
self-driving cars for years and some are
in the early stages of offering a taxi service, Drive.ai’s autonomous vehicle debut
on Monday was still notable. It was the
first new rollout of autonomous cars in
the United States since a pedestrian died
in Arizona in March after a self-driving
car operated by Uber hit her.
The fatal crash renewed a debate
about driverless technology safety, casting a chill over the industry. Uber immediately halted its testing program, which
remains at a standstill. Other big players,
including Toyota, also paused their selfdriving tests.
Drive.ai, a Silicon Valley
start-up that plans to
operate a fleet of selfdriving taxis in a limited
area of Frisco, Tex., starting in July, conducted a
product demonstration
on Monday in Frisco.
But Drive.ai’s announcement that it
will officially begin its taxi service in July
showed that the industry is starting to
get back on track.
“You don’t succeed by staring in the
rearview mirror,” said Andrew Ng, a
board member of Drive.ai, who helped
found the artificial intelligence labs at
Google and the Chinese internet giant
Baidu.
Drive.ai said it was moving ahead
even as questions about the cause of
Uber’s crash remained unanswered. Sarah Abboud, an Uber spokeswoman, deContinued on Page B3
Mogul on a Contrarian Mission
To Fill In Buffett’s Sacred Moat
OMAHA — Elon Musk is taking on
Warren Buffett, and their differences
run deeper than jokes about candy and
medieval fortifications.
At Berkshire Hathaway’s annual
meeting over the weekend, I relayed a question
from a shareholder to
Mr. Buffett about a
comment Mr. Musk had
DEALBOOK
made a couple days
earlier.
“I think ‘moats’ are lame,” Mr. Musk
had said during a Tesla earnings call. It
was a criticism of economic principle
Mr. Buffett that coined in 1999 and that
has become something of a mantra for
his faithful: Invest in businesses “that
have wide, sustainable moats around
them.”
Such moats, Mr. Buffett has said, are
made of the competitive advantages
that benefit major brands and companies, like distribution networks, pricing
power and brand reputation.
ANDREW
ROSS SORKIN
But to Mr. Musk, they are a metaphor
for being stuck in the past. “If your only
defense against invading armies is a
moat, you will not last long,” he said.
“What matters is the pace of innovation
— that is the fundamental determinant
of competitiveness.”
At a time when technology is upending even old-line industries that once
seemed impenetrable to competition,
might Mr. Musk be right?
“Elon may turn things upside down
in some areas,” Mr. Buffett said. “I don’t
think he’d want to take us on in candy,”
suggesting Berkshire’s See’s Candies
division enjoyed an unassailably wide
moat. The quip elicited laughter from
the 20,000 shareholders who packed
the CenturyLink Center.
Mr. Musk answered the challenge
immediately, saying he was starting a
candy company. “And it’s going to be
amazing,” he wrote on Twitter.
Continued on Page B2
WALKER PICKERING FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
At Berkshire Hathaway’s shareholders’ meeting, Warren E. Buffett
playfully challenged Elon Musk’s criticism of an investment mantra.
A cutback in world oil output, engineered by some of the biggest producers,
has more than doubled prices from their
ebb two years ago. Now, a looming decision by President Trump on the Iran nuclear agreement is pushing them even
higher.
Benchmark prices for American crude
oil closed above $70 a barrel on Monday
for the first time since 2014 as traders
factored in a prospective United States
withdrawal from the accord, which eased
international sanctions on Iran in exchange for restrictions on its nuclear
program.
Investors fear that a withdrawal
would lead to new sanctions on Iran, the
world’s fifth-largest producer of crude oil
last year, further curtailing a global supply that is already relatively tight.
Mr. Trump has threatened to pull out
unless Britain, France and Germany
agree to make wholesale changes to the
agreement. Late Monday, the president
said he would announce his decision on
Tuesday afternoon.
“The market is watching nervously,”
Ann-Louise Hittle, an oil analyst at the
market research firm Wood Mackenzie,
said of the deadline.
Analysts estimate that reimposing
sanctions on Iran could reduce the country’s daily oil sales by 300,000 to 600,000
barrels, or perhaps as much as one million barrels. But imposing new sanctions
would most likely take time. And if prices
stay high, Iran could increase its earnContinued on Page B4
Widening Feud
With Macron,
Airline Unions
Call for Strike
By LIZ ALDERMAN
PARIS — In the first year of his presidency, Emmanuel Macron has pushed
business-friendly labor laws through
Parliament, made it easier for companies to hire and fire, cut the wealth tax
and decentralized collective bargaining.
Through it all, France’s most militant unions have resisted.
His changes, which set out to reshape
the way France’s economy and society
work, are now facing increasing pushback from labor groups. For weeks, unions have staged a series of strikes to oppose efforts to make the nation’s main
railway system, the SNCF, more competitive. And unions representing Air
France-KLM staff on Monday called for
new strikes after rejecting a pay proposal.
The discontent is emerging as a test of
his ability to stick with pledges to enhance France’s economic competitiveness and global leadership, which helped
usher him to an electoral victory last
May.
While Mr. Macron’s economic changes
do not take aim at the nation’s flagship
air carrier, his administration has inserted itself directly into the fight, warning labor leaders that they risked driving
Air France to the brink of calamity.
France’s finance minister, Bruno Le
Maire, warned that the company might
“disappear” if unions persisted in their
demands for an immediate 5 percent
wage increase and continued rolling
strikes that have already affected tens of
Continued on Page B4
OYSTER PERPETUAL
lady-datejust 28
rolex
oyster perpetual and datejust
are ® trademarks.
B2
THE NEW YORK TIMES BUSINESS TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
A Tech Mogul on a Contrarian Mission to Fill In Buffett’s Sacred Moat
From First Business Page
Not only that, Mr. Musk said,
he planned “to build a moat and
fill it with candy” — making it
impossible for Mr. Buffett to
resist sinking his money into the
venture.
The repartee was good for
some chuckles and clickbait
headlines, but the mini-spat
masked a more serious and
significant debate taking place
across corporate America: Have
the traditional moats shrunk?
When direct-to-consumer
brands like Dollar Shave Club
have been able to take on consumer giants like Procter &
Gamble’s Gillette — so much so
that Unilever bought Dollar
Shave Club for $1 billion — are
any businesses still safe? Mr.
Buffett owns Kraft Heinz, for
example, but could upstart food
companies one day overtake it,
breaking through the substantial
network of distribution and marketing arrangements — and
brand loyalty — that Kraft Heinz
has built up over decades?
Mr. Buffett acknowledged that
times had changed. “There have
been more moats that have become susceptible to invasion
than seemed to be the case earlier,” he said.
To a large degree, Mr. Musk is
a living embodiment of a gleeful
invader. With Tesla, he is trying
to prove that what was long
thought of as a substantial moat
around the automobile industry
could be overcome. He has gone
direct to consumer with Tesla
vehicles, bypassing the traditional car dealers that were once
considered a barrier to entering
the automotive business. He
even had what seemed like his
own moat: a network of Supercharger stations around the
country that he recently opened
WALKER PICKERING FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Mr. Buffett at the meeting, left, a cutout of Mr. Buffett wearing a Pampered Chef apron and a BNSF Railway car. Both companies are Berkshire Hathaway subsidiaries.
up to competitors. (His initial
panning of the “moat” idea followed a question about why he
was willing to cede the advantage that the closed charging
network provided.)
But, in truth, Mr. Musk’s experience — and challenges — at
Tesla may demonstrate just how
much a moat remains a powerful
deterrent to competitors.
In the case of the automobile
industry, perhaps the biggest
barrier is the huge amount of
capital needed — Tesla has already raised more than $12 billion. But even with huge
amounts of money, Tesla’s recent
production struggles — it has
repeatedly missed its targets for
making the new mass-market
Model 3 — show the immense
value of manufacturing experience.
Mr. Musk’s willingness to
challenge convention has clearly
pushed the automobile industry
forward, but his progress has
lately been bumpier than he
initially expected. That’s not to
say he won’t succeed, but if he
does, he may be the exception,
not the rule.
There are still huge swaths of
our economy that have dauntingly wide moats, many of them
protected by regulatory walls.
Banks, which have been speculated about as ripe for disruption
by financial technology companies, seem more likely to buy
start-ups than compete against
them. Airlines — which Mr. Buffett once called “a death trap for
investors” — have consolidated,
and enormous corporations
control virtually all the landing
slots at airports around the
globe. Before it could get off the
ground, any insurgent hoping to
challenge them would have to
find a spot to come down.
Even many digital businesses
have a moat: Google and Facebook control so much of the
advertising market that it is hard
to see how a kid in a garage with
an idea could usurp them anytime soon. Amazon has itself has
become so powerful that virtually every seller feels it has to go
through it. And Mr. Buffett has
convinced himself that Apple’s
deep relationship with its
customers through its ecosystem
of products and iCloud mean the
business has a defensible moat.
“There are
some pretty
good moats
around,” Mr.
Buffett said.
“Being the
low-cost
producer, for
example, is a
terribly important moat,” he
Elon Musk
said, citing
Geico, the low-cost insurance
company Berkshire owns.
Saturday night, after the Berkshire meeting ended, Mr. Musk
was still tweeting: “Saying you
like ‘moats’ is just a nice way of
saying you like oligopolies.”
For better or worse, the limited competition that oligopolies
face is usually good for investors
— even if consumers might disagree.
But whether they have been
dug by a company’s experienced
hand, the good will of its
customers or the heavy machinery of governmental regulation, moats remain a formidable
form of protection, even from the
most willing of raiders.
Perhaps Charlie Munger, Berkshire’s vice chairman, put it best:
“Elon says a conventional moat
is quaint. And that’s true of a
puddle of water.”
STOCKS & BONDS
Rebounding Oil Prices Put
Investors in Buying Mood
By The Associated Press
POOL PHOTO BY ALASTAIR GRANT
Kevin Warsh, a former Fed governor, in London in 2014. He says virtual currencies could help central banks control monetary policy.
Should the Fed Create Its Own Bitcoin? Hear Him Out
By NEIL IRWIN
Many enthusiasts of Bitcoin
and other cryptocurrencies are
motivated by deep skepticism of
the central banks that control the
world’s money supply.
But what if central banks
themselves entered the game?
What would happen if the Federal Reserve, or the European
Central Bank or the Bank of
Japan used blockchain technology to create their own virtual
currencies? Besides, that is,
having some cryptocurrency
fans’ heads explode?
A former Fed governor — who
was also a finalist to lead the
Miscellaneous
3454
DOWNOLDTRUMP.com .net .org
Domain names for sale. For info:
727-458-3049 or petijozsa@yahoo.com
$$$$$$$$
The Upshot provides news,
analysis and graphics about
politics, policy and everyday life.
nytimes.com/upshot
central bank — thinks the idea
deserves serious consideration.
“Most central banks have a
view that these crypto-assets are
clever, like guys in the garage did
it and it’s kind of cool, or risky,”
given the potential investor
losses and widespread fraud,
said Kevin Warsh, who was a
governor at the Fed from 2006 to
2011 and was a top contender to
become its chairman late last
year when President Trump
instead appointed Jerome Powell.
If he had returned to the Fed,
Mr. Warsh said, he would have
appointed a team “to think about
the Fed creating FedCoin, where
we would bring legal activities
into a digital coin.”
“Not that it would supplant
and replace cash,” he said, “but it
would be a pretty effective way
when the next crisis happens for
us to maybe conduct monetary
policy.”
He added that blockchain
technology, which allows reliable,
decentralized record keeping of
transactions, could be useful in
the payment systems operated
by the Fed, which enable the
transfer of trillions of dollars
between banks.
“It strikes me that a central
bank digital currency might have
a role to play there,” Mr. Warsh,
who is now a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford, told several
reporters Thursday evening.
Some central banks are already doing work in this vein,
including the Monetary Authority of Singapore and the Bank of
England. And Mr. Powell acknowledged the potential applications in his confirmation hearing for the Fed chairmanship in
November, saying, “We actually
look at blockchain as something
that may have significant applications in the wholesale payments part of the economy.”
It would be quite a twist if a
technology whose most ardent
fans are motivated by distrust of
central banks became a key tool
for those banks.
But it would address some of
the concerns connected to Bitcoin and its many privately
created rivals. To the degree that
the value of existing cryptocurrencies fluctuates wildly, they are
ill-suited as a medium of exchange. Central banks have
spent hundreds of years learning
how to keep the value of money
stable.
And to the degree Bitcoin and
the like facilitate tax evasion,
money laundering and fraud,
they will be a target of global law
enforcement. Central banks are
used to building systems that
allow enforcement of those laws.
It’s clear that central banks
weighing use of blockchain technology don’t share the more
anarchist impulses of some of the
most die-hard cryptocurrency
enthusiasts. But there may be
more commonality than it might
seem. As Mr. Warsh argues, if
people really do believe that
digital currencies in some form
are the future of money, it would
behoove central banks to treat
them as more than a novelty.
“Congress gave the Fed a
monopoly over money,” Mr.
Warsh said. “And if the next
generation of cryptocurrencies
look more like money and less
like gold — and have less volatility associated with them so they
would be not just a speculative
asset but could be a reliable unit
of account — as a purely defensive matter I wouldn’t want
somebody to take that monopoly
from me.”
In other words, if cryptocurrency enthusiasts are correct
that this technology could become a better way of carrying
out even routine transactions,
the Fed and its counterparts are
the institutions that have the
most to lose.
Stocks closed modestly higher
on Monday, extending the market’s gains from last week.
Technology companies and
banks accounted for much of the
latest increase, outweighing
losses among beverage makers
and other consumer goods companies.
Energy stocks got a lift from
American crude oil prices, which
closed above $70 a barrel for the
first time since November 2014.
“Geopolitical risk has cooled a
little bit, and economic data, even
if it isn’t accelerating as fast as it
was a month ago, is still accelerating,” said Karyn Cavanaugh, senior markets strategist at Voya Investment Management. “The last
couple of days are showing that investors are getting their sea legs
back.”
The Standard & Poor’s 500stock index rose 9.21 points, or 0.4
percent, to 2,672.63. The Dow
Jones industrial average gained
94.81 points, or 0.4 percent, to
24,357.32. The Nasdaq composite
index added 55.60 points, or 0.8
percent, to 7,265.21. The Russell
2000 index of smaller-company
stocks picked up 13.34 points, or
0.9 percent, to close at 1,578.95.
Trading got off to a solid start
early Monday, as investors
weighed the big move in energy
futures.
Crude oil prices have been rising as investors weigh increased
geopolitical risks in the Middle
East, a push by the Organization
of the Petroleum Exporting Countries to slash oil production, and
strong worldwide demand amid a
global economic expansion.
On Monday, oil futures climbed
to their highest levels since November 2014 as a May 12 deadline
approached for the United States
to decide whether to remain in a
nuclear agreement with Iran.
Benchmark United States
crude rose $1.01, or 1.4 percent, to
settle at $70.73 a barrel in New
York. Brent crude, the international standard, gained $1.30, or
1.7 percent, to close at $76.17 a bar-
rel in London.
The pickup in oil prices helped
lift energy company shares.
Range Resources rose 3.7 percent
to $14.12.
“Concern about Iran has oil up,
taking energy stocks up and helping out the whole market,” said
Erik Davidson, chief investment
officer at Wells Fargo Private
Bank.
Technology companies accounted for a big slice of the S.&P.
500’s gains. Nvidia led the sector,
rising 4 percent to $248.68. Financial stocks also racked up solid
gains. Morgan Stanley added 2
percent to $52.39.
After a couple of weeks of
choppy trading, the market got a
strong boost on Friday from government data showing that hiring
continued at a solid clip in April.
Corporate earnings have also
been a source of good news for investors.
Roughly 80 percent of the companies in the S.&P. 500 have reported results so far this earnings
season, and some 62 percent of
those have delivered both earnings and revenue that exceeded financial analysts’ expectations, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence.
“The market doesn’t seem quite
as skeptical about the future
prospects as maybe it was a couple of weeks ago,” Mr. Davidson
said.
Investors also had their eyes on
the latest company deal news.
Starbucks slipped 0.4 percent to
$57.45 after Nestlé paid $7.15 billion for the rights to sell the company’s coffee products around the
world. Nestlé gained 1.4 percent to
$77.35.
Bond prices were little changed,
and the yield on the 10-year Treasury held at 2.95 percent.
The dollar fell to 109.04 yen
from 109.11 yen on Friday. The
euro weakened to $1.1924 from
$1.1962.
Gold slipped 50 cents to
$1,312.20 an ounce. Silver dropped
2 cents to $16.50 an ounce. Copper
lost a penny to $3.08 a pound.
The S. & P. 500 Index
Position of the S.& P. 500 index at 1-minute intervals on Monday.
2,690
2,680
2,670
2,660
Previous close
2,663.42
10 a.m.
Source: Reuters
Noon
2,650
2 p.m.
4 p.m.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
THE NEW YORK TIMES BUSINESS TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
0N
B3
Microsoft, Long Seen as Villain, Tries On Role as Moral Leader
A Diminished Giant
Seeks the High Road
By NICK WINGFIELD
SEATTLE — Facebook and
Google are under the microscope
for the ways their technologies
can spread misinformation, while
Amazon’s growing market power
is a regular target of President
Trump. And Apple pioneered the
modern smartphone, a device increasingly seen as too addicting.
Then there’s Microsoft, a giant
that spent most of the 1990s and
early 2000s as tech’s biggest company and villain. It now seems to
be auditioning for a different role:
the industry’s moral conscience.
Among the five most valuable
tech companies, Microsoft is the
only one to avoid sustained public
criticism about contributing to social ills in the last couple of years.
At the same time, Satya Nadella,
its chief executive, and Brad
Smith, its president, have
emerged as some of the most outspoken advocates in the industry
for protecting user privacy and
establishing ethical guidelines for
new technology like artificial intelligence.
On Monday, the conscientious
side of Microsoft was on display
again at Build, a three-day conference for developers in Seattle. Mr.
Nadella announced a program,
A.I. for Accessibility, that will
award $25 million over five years
to researchers, nonprofits and developers who use artificial intelligence to help people with disabilities. Mr. Nadella, whose adult son
was born with cerebral palsy, has
written about how his son’s disability helped make him more empathetic.
Echoing a theme he talked
about at the conference last year,
Mr. Nadella said the industry had
a responsibility to build technology that empowered everyone.
“We need to ask ourselves not
only what computers can do but
what computers should do,” he
said.
Microsoft’s new role is partly
due to the fact that the company
isn’t a major player in social media, video streaming and smartphones — the products behind the
current dark mood around tech. It
no longer squeezes the oxygen out
of markets as Amazon can.
But while the company’s power
has diminished since a couple of
decades ago, when it controlled
computing through Windows,
Microsoft remains an influential
voice. On Monday, its market capitalization of $733 billion made it
the third most valuable technology company, behind Apple and
Amazon and ahead of Google parent company, Alphabet, and Facebook.
“The irony for Microsoft is that
they lost in search, they lost in social networks and they lost in mobile, and as a consequence, they
have avoided the recent pushback
from governments and media,”
said David Yoffie, a professor at
the Harvard Business School.
“This has given Microsoft the
freedom to take the high road as
the ethical leader in technology.”
Since taking the reins at Microsoft in 2014, Mr. Nadella has
brought a more sensitive style of
leadership to the company than
his two predecessors, Steve
PHOTOGRAPHS BY KYLE JOHNSON FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Satya Nadella, Microsoft’s chief, left, has written about how having a son with cerebral palsy helped make him more empathetic.
Microsoft has created software for people with disabilities, including Seeing AI, above, which audibly describes images.
Ballmer and Bill Gates. That shift
has proved to be more suitable for
Microsoft in this era.
Two decades ago, Microsoft
was depicted as a bully that ran
roughshod over competitors in a
landmark antitrust suit brought
by the federal government, followed by similar cases brought by
the European Union and private
companies. Mr. Smith was
brought in to make peace in
Microsoft’s antitrust battles, and
Mr. Nadella was the company’s
first chief executive to start in the
job since those suits were settled.
In a phone interview, Mr. Smith,
who is also Microsoft’s chief legal
officer, called its legal problems in
past decades a “gut-wrenching
experience” that had shaped
Microsoft in its current form. “It
made Microsoft a better and more
responsible company,” he said.
This year, Microsoft published a
book that outlined some of the
harmful effects that could come
from artificial intelligence, such
as bias in job recruiting. It has litigated four lawsuits against the
United States government over
the past five years in efforts to defend customers’ privacy rights.
One of them, a fight over law enforcement access to data stored in
an overseas Microsoft data center,
went to the Supreme Court, which
dropped the case after Congress
enacted a law that mooted it.
“Not only did Microsoft learn
from its mistakes, Satya is a
unique and caring individual,”
said Tim O’Reilly, a tech industry
publisher and conference organizer. “He understands deeply that
Microsoft must help others to succeed.”
The closest analog among Mr.
Nadella’s peers is Timothy D.
Cook, the chief executive of Apple,
who has painted Apple as a
staunch
defender
of
its
customers’ privacy. He has jabbed
at Facebook and Google, both ad-
vertising-supported businesses
that profit from the personal data
they collect from their users, a
contrast to Apple’s business model of selling devices.
Facebook and Google, which
owns YouTube, have defended
their advertising businesses for
allowing them to deliver services
free. They’ve promised to add
more human moderators and invest in software tools that can
screen out misinformation and
other prohibited content.
Mr. Cook has not turned his ire
toward Microsoft, which gets
most of its revenue from software,
hardware and cloud computing
services. The company has investments in internet services
that are supported in part by advertising, including its Bing
search engine and LinkedIn, the
social network for professionals it
acquired in 2016.
Mr. Nadella has been more hesitant than Mr. Cook to publicly criticize other technology companies,
turning to more subtle types of
persuasion. A low-key leader, Mr.
Nadella peppers his speeches and
interviews with references to literature, warning that careless
creators of technology could contribute to a dystopian world of
George Orwell’s “1984” or Aldous
Huxley’s “Brave New World.” His
lieutenant, Mr. Smith, has become
a ubiquitous ambassador for
Microsoft on the big social issues
facing technology in Washington,
in Brussels and on the conference
circuit.
Microsoft is still occasionally
cast in the role of villain. A California man who sold recycled electronic waste recently pleaded
guilty for creating thousands of
unauthorized discs that helped
people restore the Windows operating system on refurbished PCs.
The recycler, who has been sentenced to 15 months in prison, has
said Microsoft supported the case
against him, which was brought
by federal prosecutors, because
he threatened part of its business.
Microsoft published a long blog
post that portrayed his actions unfavorably.
Still, the Microsoft of 2018 is a
long way from the company that
was once portrayed as a corporate
predator.
“Microsoft lived through negativity that these companies are experiencing now, and it doesn’t
want to go back to those days,”
said Vivek Wadhwa, a distinguished fellow with Carnegie Mellon University’s Silicon Valley
campus.
Mr. Smith of Microsoft said the
greater scrutiny on the tech sector would not always fall on the
same companies.
“At any given moment, there
may be one or two companies in
the spotlight,” he said. “I don’t
think one should assume the same
one or two are always going to be
in the spotlight or always on the
defensive.”
Autonomous Vehicles Make a Debut for the First Time Since a Fatal Uber Crash
From First Business Page
clined to comment on specifics,
citing an continuing investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board. But she said
the company had initiated a “topto-bottom safety review” and had
brought on Christopher A. Hart, a
former chairman of the safety
board, as an adviser on its “overall safety culture.”
Tarin Ziyaee, until recently the
chief technology officer of the
self-driving start-up Voyage, said
he hoped the Uber crash would
push companies to openly discuss the powerful but still limited
technologies inside their test
cars.
“We need to talk about the
nitty-gritty — what these systems are really doing and where
their weaknesses are,” said Mr.
Ziyaee, who also worked on autonomous systems at Apple.
“These companies are putting secrecy over safety. That has to
change. The public deserves to
know how things work.”
Mr. Ng said the Uber crash had
not affected Drive.ai’s rollout
plans. “We’re focused on the path
forward,” he said.
Drive.ai was founded in 2015
by Mr. Ng’s wife, Carol Reiley, a
roboticist, and several students
who worked in a Stanford University A.I. lab overseen by Mr. Ng.
The start-up specializes in a rapidly progressing type of artificial
intelligence called deep learning,
Daisuke Wakabayashi contributed reporting from San Francisco.
which allows systems to learn
tasks by analyzing vast amounts
of data.
Venture capital firms including
New Enterprise Associates have
since invested in the start-up.
Based in Mountain View, Calif.,
Drive.ai has raised $77 million
and has more than 100 employees.
Waymo, the autonomous vehicle company that was spun out of
Google, is already running a pri-
vate taxi service outside
Phoenix, in a state that is a popular destination for self-driving
car experiments. Drive.ai chose
to begin its trials in Frisco, where
the streets are clean and wide,
pedestrian traffic is light and the
sun is out for 230 days a year, on
average. A Texas law passed in
the fall also lets companies operate self-driving services with no
restrictions from municipal governments.
When Drive.ai’s free, daytimeonly service begins this summer,
it will be open to 10,000 people
who live or work in the area. The
cars will travel along a few miles
of road where the speed limit
does not exceed 45 miles an hour,
with passengers being picked up
and dropped off at only a few specific locations.
Backup drivers will be behind
the wheel, taking control when
needed. But as the program ex-
Joe Fey, a Drive.ai technician, worked on the sensors that are part of a retrofit kit on top of a car in
August. They are used to gather data and document the landscape in which the vehicle drives.
pands, Drive.ai plans on moving
drivers into the passenger seat
and out of the cars entirely by the
end of the year.
Though pedestrians are scarce
in the area, the cars will drive
through parking lots where they
are likely to encounter foot traffic. So Drive.ai equipped its cars
with digital displays designed to
communicate with pedestrians
and other drivers. While an autonomous vehicle cannot make
eye contact with a pedestrian or
respond to hand signals, it can
display a simple message like
“Waiting for you to cross” or
“Picking up.”
Because the cars are equipped
with sensors that gather information about their surroundings by
sending out pulses of light — as
well as radar and an array of
cameras — the cars could potentially operate at night as well. But
the start-up decided to keep a
tight rein on its service before
gradually expanding the route
and exposing the cars to new conditions. Drive.ai said it would suspend operations during a downpour and in the rare event of
snow.
There will still be situations
where the cars are slow to make
decisions on their own — in the
face of extremely heavy traffic,
for instance — but remote technicians employed by Drive.ai will
send help to the cars over the internet. The cars will include connections to three separate cellular networks.
Drive.ai said it was working
closely with Frisco officials. The
city of 175,000 can keep the com-
pany abreast of construction
zones and other road changes,
Mr. Ng said, and signs identifying
the area where the cars will drive
have been installed.
Thomas Bamonte, a senior
program manager for automated
vehicles with the North Central
Texas Council of Governments,
which handles planning for Dallas and surrounding areas, said
such work would become increasingly important as the metropolitan area added roughly a
million new people every 10
years.
“We want to invest in new technology rather than the physical
expansion of roadways,” he said.
Asked if the Uber crash gave
him pause, he said state law allowed companies like Drive.ai to
operate without interference
from local governments. The
companies, he said, must be cautious.
Noah Marshall, a financial analyst with Jamba Juice, which is
based in Frisco, said the new autonomous taxi service would be a
“great thing” for the town. His office is along Drive.ai’s route, and
he said he hoped to try the service.
Other Frisco residents were
warier.
“This might be a good idea, but
there is so much traffic here, and
Texans aren’t very patient,” said
Mark Mulch, a local real estate
agent. Referring to one Arizona
city where self-driving cars are
being tested, he added: “Scottsdale is laid back. But Dallas is too
fast.”
B4
THE NEW YORK TIMES BUSINESS TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
U.S. Crude Tops $70 a Barrel as Trump’s Deadline on Iran Nears
From First Business Page
ings from oil sales in the short run.
“Our base case is the rollout of
sanctions will be quite slow and
messy,” said Ben Cahill, an analyst
at the market research firm Energy Intelligence.
“In the very short term,” he
added, “the price run-up could
benefit” Iran.
That threat of a reduction in
supply coincides with production
cuts by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and
Russia, one of the world’s largest
oil producers, that have helped
drain a glut that was depressing
prices. Their deal was reached in
2016 and began to take effect last
year.
OPEC, led by Saudi Arabia, has
a spotty track record of carrying
out production cuts, but compliance has been strong this time. “I
Airline stocks fell by
more than 1 percent
over fuel concerns.
think we are where we are because OPEC got their groove
back,” said Helima Croft, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets.
The flow of oil to the global market has been further constricted in
recent years as a result of the political and economic crisis plaguing
Venezuela,
another
major
producer of crude.
The reduced global supply —
combined with the solid global
economy — has helped push oil
prices higher since they fell below
$30 a barrel in early 2016. The rising tide has lifted the price of the
international benchmark, Brent
crude, above $75.
“It is mostly a fundamentalsdriven market, but the icing on the
cake is the worry about Iran,” said
Michael Lynch, president of Strategic Energy and Economic Research, a consulting firm.
A boom in production in the
United States has helped offset
some of the tightening in supply in
recent months. But higher prices
elsewhere have prompted American producers to sell on the global
market, driving oil exports to
record highs and pulling domestic
oil prices higher.
That has benefited energy companies, as well as and oil-pro-
EDDIE SEAL/BLOOMBERG
An offshore platform in Texas. Oil and gas projects started during the four-year price crash have sharply lower costs than those begun during the $100-a-barrel era.
ducing states like Texas. Chevron
and Royal Dutch Shell recently reported quarterly profits comparable to what they generated four
years ago, when prices topped
$100 a barrel.
But for large swaths of corporate America, the higher prices
mean a hit to profits. Airline
stocks fell by more than 1 percent
Monday as investors took fuelprice pressures into account.
Likewise, consumer incomes
will be pinched by elevated gasoline prices. The national average
price for unleaded regular has risen above $2.80 in recent days, according to AAA, and is up roughly
20 percent over the last 12 months.
That far outstrips the 2.6 percent
year-over-year growth in average
hourly earnings through April.
As a larger chunk of workers’
paychecks goes to fuel, less disposable income is left to be spent
elsewhere, a potential problem for
an economy heavily reliant on
consumer spending. Consumer
spending slowed sharply in the
first quarter, when it inched up at
a 1.1 percent annual clip.
Much of that had to do with a
slowdown in auto sales after a
surge in car-buying late last year
to replace vehicles damaged by
Hurricane Harvey.
Higher fuel prices could also
weigh on auto sales. Low gasoline
prices have shifted car purchases
heavily toward pickup trucks and
sport-utility vehicles, which tend
to be less fuel-efficient than passenger vehicles.
Automakers have adjusted
their offerings to match the market, with Ford recently announcing it was phasing out the Focus,
the Fusion and other sedans from
its North American business.
Ford’s decision suggests that
some carmakers think demand
for S.U.V.s and pickups — which
are far more profitable — is unlikely to be shifted by any short-
term move in gas prices.
“I think you have to get $4 to $5
per gallon before you start having
a psychological impact,” said Joseph Amaturo, who covers the automotive industry for Buckingham Research.
Oil companies responded to the
price crash that began in 2014 by
cutting exploration and other
spending and negotiating sharply
lower rates from drillers and other
contractors, who do much of the
work in the oil industry.
As a result, oil and gas projects
that are going forward tend to
have sharply lower costs than
those begun in the $100-a-barrel
era. Jessica Uhl, Shell’s chief financial officer, said recently that a
United States oil field in the Gulf of
Mexico that Shell was developing
would break even at less than $35
a barrel thanks to a 70 percent reduction in its original projected
capital costs. “By applying industry-standard designs, we simplified the scope,” she said.
Lower costs, combined with
higher oil prices, are likely to raise
profits as long as these conditions
hold. Of course, cost inflation may
return to the industry, and the
cash rolling in may eventually
loosen spending discipline, as it
did a few years ago.
Widening Labor’s Feud With Macron, Air France Unions Call for Strike Over Pay
From First Business Page
thousands of fliers worldwide.
The French government, which
owns a minority stake in Air
France, would not ride to the rescue with a taxpayer bailout if the
airline faltered, Mr. Le Maire
said.
The standoff, which has already cost the airline an estimated 300 million euros, or $360 million, in lost revenue, prompted
the abrupt resignation of the airline’s chief executive. Shares of
the company were down 13 percent on Monday.
“I am not taking the money of
the French and putting it in a
company that isn’t at the re-
A president holds
dozens of meetings to
try to sway opponents.
quired competitive level,” Mr. Le
Maire said.
The battle is an outgrowth of
Mr. Macron’s effort to remake the
French economy.
He has rammed a series of controversial changes to France’s
notoriously rigid labor laws
through a Parliament stacked
with members of his En Marche
party, starting with a measure
this year to make it easier for private companies to fire workers.
Mr. Macron is also tilting at the
unemployment and pension systems with controversial changes
to reduce costs.
In the midst of his drive, he is
also challenging France’s most
time-tested
institutions.
In
March, he began negotiations for
an overhaul of the heavily subsidized, debt-laden French rail system,
targeting
jobs-for-life
schemes and benefits that are
among the most generous of any
profession in France in a bid to
open the system to competition
by 2020.
Mr. Macron’s moves have been
cheered by businesses and investors. It has encouraged drawn
companies like Facebook and
Amazon to step up their presence
in France.
But they have also sparked
fear and anger among swaths of
French society. Many workers
worry that the financing of the
STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
Air France-KLM planes at Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris,
above. Unions protested changes to the French railway system
last month at the Gare du Nord train station in Paris, right.
country’s cherished safety net
will be plucked away and transferred to business, for the profit
of shareholders.
Even some analysts warn that
the government may be going too
far, by shifting the balance of
power toward employers and
greatly eroding the power of labor. The unions have been spoiling for a fight.
In many ways, that has been
Mr. Macron’s point. Although
only around 8 percent of the nation’s workers are unionized, organized labor has long held outsize clout at the negotiating table
with employers. In France, even
small changes tend to agitate unions, which have historically
sought to secure workplace protections through protests and
strikes.
Before
pushing
through
changes to the labor laws, Mr.
Macron held more than 50 meetings with unions shortly after his
election in an effort to get them
onboard with his program.
The General Confederation of
Labor, known as the C.G.T., has
largely resisted, seeing an effort
to repeal hard-won labor rights.
The union has been at the forefront of mobilizing actions that in
recent weeks have led hundreds
of thousands of people into the
streets, and encouraged regular
strikes at the nation’s railway
system that are scheduled to last
until July.
The more moderate French
Democratic Confederation of Labor, France’s largest union after
GERARD JULIEN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
recently overtaking the C.G.T. in
membership, has pushed for a
more flexible approach as the
forces of globalization change the
competitive landscape.
At Air France, the government
pushed back against labor
groups over the weekend after
the chief executive, Jean-Marc
Janaillac, resigned abruptly on
Friday. Mr. Janaillac had failed to
win workers over in a contentious internal referendum
that proposed a 7 percent pay in-
crease for pilots and staff over
four years.
Air France’s hard-line pilots’
union had demanded an immediate 5 percent raise to make up for
wages that have been frozen for
nearly five years. The company
has recorded record profits
thanks to lower oil prices since
2016, prompting the union to insist that Air France could afford
the pay increase.
The tensions were at least a far
cry from a clash between employees and managers in 2015, when a
mob of angry workers stormed a
meeting on job cuts and ripped
the shirts off two top executives,
who escaped over a chain-link
fence for safety.
Still, it has set up a dangerous
game of brinkmanship between
unions and the French government, which has hinted that it is
willing to let Air France go under.
“If it doesn’t make the necessary efforts to be at the same
competitive level of Lufthansa
and other major airlines, it will
disappear,” Mr. Le Maire said on
the French television station
BFM on Sunday. He added that
the union’s salary demands were
“unjustified” and urged employees to show “responsibility.”
Such talk is reminiscent of Mr.
Macron’s broader approach to
overhauling the economy. Some
analysts have criticized the way
he has pushed through changes
to the labor laws, most of which
have been done by the equivalent
of executive order, raising questions about how democratic — or
not — his methods have been.
One year into his presidency,
Mr. Macron is routinely referred
to in the French media as Jupiter
or Napoleon Bonaparte, when he
is not being compared to French
kings. This weekend, thousands
of demonstrators amassed in
Paris to express anger at what
they called a “soft dictatorship,”
while brandishing a portrait of
King Louis XVI with Mr. Macron’s face Photoshopped in.
“Emmanuel Macron is walking
a fine line between the rehabilitation of a certain presidential authority and authoritarianism,”
Jean-Claude Monod, a specialist
in political philosophy, said in an
interview published Monday in
the French daily Le Monde. “One
has the impression of a deafness
in front of forms of protest or political experimentations, of a will
to use force for his reforms.”
THE NEW YORK TIMES BUSINESS TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
B5
N
MARKET GAUGES
2,672.63
+9.21
S.&P.
500
24,357.32
+94.81
DOW
INDUSTRIALS
Standard & Poor’s 500-Stock Index
7,265.21
+55.60
NASDAQ
COMPOSITE
2.95%
UNCH.
10-YEAR
TREASURY YIELD
Nasdaq Composite Index
3-MONTH TREND
$70.73
+$1.01
CRUDE
OIL
$1,312.20
–$0.50
GOLD
(N.Y.)
Dow Jones Industrial Average
3-MONTH TREND
$1.1924
–$0.0026
THE
EURO
3-MONTH TREND
7,800
2,900
27,000
7,600
+ 5%
+ 5%
+ 5%
7,400
2,800
26,000
7,200
0%
0%
0%
25,000
2,700
7,000
– 5%
2,600
6,800
– 5%
24,000
– 5%
–10%
23,000
–10%
6,600
2,500
–10%
Feb.
March
Apr.
Feb.
March
Apr.
Feb.
March
Apr.
When the index follows a white line, it is changing at a constant pace; when it moves into a lighter band, the rate of change is faster.
STOCK MARKET INDEXES
Index
Close
MOST ACTIVE, GAINERS AND LOSERS
%
Chg
Chg
52-Wk
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
Index
Close
%
Chg
Chg
52-Wk
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
NASDAQ
DOW JONES
Industrials
Transportation
Utilities
Composite
24357.32
10361.75
700.34
8147.02
100 Stocks
500 Stocks
Mid-Cap 400
Small-Cap 600
1174.26
2672.63
1907.92
966.49
+ 94.81 + 0.39 +
◊ 8.48 ◊ 0.08 +
◊ 4.04 ◊ 0.57 ◊
+ 9.69 + 0.12 +
15.95
12.75
0.38
12.40
◊
◊
◊
◊
1.46
2.36
3.18
1.97
+ 4.62 +
+ 9.21 +
+ 10.47 +
+ 7.57 +
0.40
0.35
0.55
0.79
+
+
+
+
10.65
11.39
9.74
13.84
◊
◊
+
+
0.75
0.04
0.39
3.23
+
+
+
+
+
0.21
0.15
0.22
0.42
0.08
+
+
+
+
+
7.78
2.08
13.19
9.72
7.55
◊
◊
+
◊
◊
2.26
1.78
3.96
2.85
0.59
Nasdaq 100
Composite
Industrials
Banks
Insurance
Other Finance
Telecommunications
Computer
NYSE Comp.
Tech/Media/Telecom
Energy
Financial
Healthcare
12519.75
8375.42
11924.75
8000.80
14136.26
26.40
12.33
26.64
33.16
10.68
+
+
+
+
+
6821.87
7265.21
5809.01
4181.73
8182.60
8148.27
364.57
4357.10
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
52.76
55.60
43.32
14.39
44.27
59.91
2.49
40.25
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
0.78
0.77
0.75
0.35
0.54
0.74
0.69
0.93
+
+
+
+
◊
+
+
+
20.82
19.09
16.24
12.10
2.97
18.92
15.73
26.10
+
+
+
+
◊
+
+
+
6.65
5.24
5.35
4.87
5.07
2.56
7.69
7.31
%
Chg
Chg
Volume
(100)
2665.17
27815.67
6109.54
1578.95
81.99
1308.48
107.07
156.73
+
+
+
+
◊
+
+
+
10.61
116.60
31.45
13.34
0.41
11.75
0.57
0.82
+
+
+
+
◊
+
+
+
0.40
0.42
0.52
0.85
0.50
0.91
0.54
0.53
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
5.42
11.37
10.68
13.02
2.13
29.42
15.58
3.35
+
+
+
+
◊
+
+
+
0.14
0.08
0.28
2.83
3.85
4.42
0.34
4.80
Close
Stock (TICKER)
%
Chg
Chg
Volume
(100)
Stock (TICKER)
20 TOP GAINERS
11.59
29.64
185.16
27.50
48.48
14.07
11.34
32.04
5.24
10.74
96.22
34.93
53.33
7.17
19.77
32.39
31.33
6.71
177.97
45.73
AMD (AMD)
BoFAML (BAC)
Apple (AAPL)
Gramercy Prpt (GPT)
Micron Tech (MU)
GE (GE)
Ford Motor (F)
AT&T (T)
Sprint Corp (S)
Snap (SNAP)
Microsoft (MSFT)
Pfizer (PFE)
Intel (INTC)
Pandora Media (P)
Marathn Oil (MRO)
Comcast (CMCSA)
Twitter (TWTR)
Sirius XM Ho (SIRI)
Facebook (FB)
Cisco System (CSCO)
OTHER INDEXES
American Exch
Wilshire 5000
Value Line Arith
Russell 2000
Phila Gold & Silver
Phila Semiconductor
KBW Bank
Phila Oil Service
NEW YORK
STOCK EXCHANGE
Close
Stock (TICKER)
20 MOST ACTIVE
+0.31
+0.34
+1.33
+3.68
+0.90
◊0.03
◊0.02
◊0.10
◊0.04
◊0.05
+1.06
+0.09
+0.55
+0.28
+0.05
+0.43
+0.29
+0.04
+1.36
+0.43
+2.7
+1.2
+0.7
+15.4
+1.9
◊0.2
◊0.2
◊0.3
◊0.8
◊0.5
+1.1
+0.3
+1.0
+4.1
+0.3
+1.3
+0.9
+0.6
+0.8
+0.9
Twin Disc (TWIN)
28.86
8.75
Evolus (EOLS)
athenahealth (ATHN)
146.75
ACM Rsrch (ACMR)
12.51
27.50
Gramercy Prpt (GPT)
NCM (NCMI)
6.43
CohBar (CWBR)
6.29
7.33
Turtle Beach (HEAR)
Obseva (OBSV)
11.52
Gannett Co (GCI)
10.89
Sorrento The (SRNE)
7.15
Boston Omaha (BOMN)
23.99
Emmis Commns (EMMS)
5.16
E. W. Scripps (SSP)
12.37
9.87
Agm Grp Hldg (AGMH)
Jerash Holdi (JRSH)
9.46
Sapiens Intl (SPNS)
9.70
15.78
OraSure Tech (OSUR)
ITI (ITCI)
19.64
scPharma (SCPH)
12.99
539377
466579
425407
352604
338951
328456
274971
261674
254483
240355
235603
204706
202520
192488
189400
185519
184897
183613
182754
177956
%
Chg
Close
Chg
16.82
126.89
37.40
20.82
7.43
25.00
7.50
25.63
6.06
13.80
31.75
15.65
60.45
18.95
5.78
6.90
10.56
20.80
14.91
8.17
◊3.29
◊15.26
◊4.30
◊2.14
◊0.76
◊2.54
◊0.69
◊2.35
◊0.55
◊1.25
◊2.70
◊1.30
◊4.95
◊1.55
◊0.47
◊0.53
◊0.78
◊1.50
◊1.07
◊0.58
Volume
(100)
20 TOP LOSERS
+5.65
+1.47
+20.67
+1.70
+3.68
+0.85
+0.81
+0.93
+1.36
+1.19
+0.70
+2.31
+0.49
+1.17
+0.91
+0.87
+0.83
+1.32
+1.64
+1.07
+24.3
+20.2
+16.4
+15.7
+15.4
+15.2
+14.7
+14.5
+13.4
+12.3
+10.9
+10.7
+10.5
+10.4
+10.2
+10.1
+9.4
+9.1
+9.1
+9.0
Integrated M (IMTE)
Intl Flavors (IFF)
Intersect EN (XENT)
Boingo Wirel (WIFI)
Evofem (EVFM)
TowerJazz (TSEM)
iPic (IPIC)
Willdan Grou (WLDN)
ID Systems (IDSY)
Kornit Digit (KRNT)
Benefitfocus (BNFT)
Del Frsco Rs (DFRG)
Nv5 Global (NVEE)
Allianc One I (AOI)
Atomera (ATOM)
Computer Us (CTG)
Frontier Comm (FTR)
Reis (REIS)
Zymeworks (ZYME)
Comm Veh Grp (CVGI)
2519
4919
44076
358
352604
28921
879
18403
256
26100
27516
868
683
10137
2608
3623
567
10681
4209
3289
◊16.4
◊10.7
◊10.3
◊9.3
◊9.3
◊9.2
◊8.4
◊8.4
◊8.3
◊8.3
◊7.8
◊7.7
◊7.6
◊7.6
◊7.5
◊7.1
◊6.9
◊6.7
◊6.7
◊6.6
2436
32464
23109
10039
182
145840
147
1911
346
7484
3652
14151
2706
3717
672
573
44637
218
605
5981
S.&P. 100 STOCKS
Stock (TICKER)
52-Week Price Range
1-Day
1-Yr
YTD
Low Close (•) High Close Chg %Chg % Chg
Stock (TICKER)
52-Week Price Range
1-Day
1-Yr
YTD
Low Close (•) High Close Chg %Chg % Chg
Stock (TICKER)
52-Week Price Range
1-Day
1-Yr
YTD
Low Close (•) High Close Chg %Chg % Chg
3M (MMM)
Abbott (ABT)
AbbVie (ABBV)
Accenture (ACN)
AIG (AIG)
Allergan (AGN)
Allstate (ALL)
Alphabet (GOOGL)
Alphabet (GOOG)
Altria Gro (MO)
Amazon.com (AMZN)
American E (AXP)
Amgen (AMGN)
Apple (AAPL)
AT&T (T)
BoFAML (BAC)
Berkshire (BRKa)
Biogen (BIIB)
BlackRock (BLK)
Boeing (BA)
BONY Mello (BK)
Bristol-My (BMY)
Capital On (COF)
Caterpilla (CAT)
Celgene (CELG)
191.44
42.88
64.61
119.10
49.57
142.81
83.11
915
895
54.23
927
75.97
152.16
142.20
31.61
22.07
242180
244.28
377.85
175.47
46.06
50.56
76.05
97.74
84.21
200.26
59.32
99.63
152.30
53.28
147.09
95.06
1059
1055
55.71
1600
98.58
168.06
185.16
32.04
29.64
295600
269.70
523.60
340.43
55.59
51.32
88.92
149.82
84.57
Charter Co (CHTR)
Chevron (CVX)
Cisco Syst (CSCO)
Citigroup (C)
Coca-Cola (KO)
Colgate (CL)
Comcast (CMCSA)
ConocoPhil (COP)
Costco Who (COST)
CVS Health (CVS)
Danaher (DHR)
DowDuPont (DWDP)
Duke Energ (DUK)
Emerson El (EMR)
Exelon (EXC)
Exxon Mobi (XOM)
Facebook (FB)
FedEx (FDX)
Ford Motor (F)
Fox (FOXA)
Fox (FOX)
GE (GE)
General Dy (GD)
Gilead Sci (GILD)
GM (GM)
250.10
102.55
30.36
59.10
41.52
62.79
30.55
42.27
150.00
60.14
78.97
61.27
72.93
57.24
33.30
72.16
144.42
186.00
10.14
24.81
24.30
12.73
190.31
63.76
31.92
278.10
124.94
45.73
68.50
42.14
62.82
32.39
66.77
193.06
61.75
99.58
64.92
79.50
69.30
41.30
77.74
177.97
243.12
11.34
38.04
37.48
14.07
196.45
64.88
36.34
Goldman Sa (GS)
Halliburto (HAL)
Home Depot (HD)
Honeywell (HON)
IBM (IBM)
Intel (INTC)
Johnson&Jo (JNJ)
JPMorgan (JPM)
Kinder Mor (KMI)
Kraft Hein (KHC)
Lilly (LLY)
Lockheed (LMT)
Lowes (LOW)
Mastercard (MA)
McDonalds (MCD)
Medtronic (MDT)
Merck & Co (MRK)
MetLife (MET)
Microsoft (MSFT)
Mondelez I (MDLZ)
Monsanto (MON)
Morgan Sta (MS)
Nextera En (NEE)
Nike (NKE)
Occidental (OXY)
209.62
38.18
144.25
129.00
139.13
33.23
121.28
81.64
14.69
54.11
73.69
266.01
70.76
115.55
142.58
76.41
52.83
43.38
67.14
37.42
114.19
40.43
133.42
50.35
57.84
259.77
64.60
125.86
165.58
67.30
256.80
105.36
1198
1187
77.79
1638
102.96
201.23
187.67
39.80
33.05
326350
370.57
594.52
371.60
58.99
70.05
106.50
173.24
147.17
+ 0.90
+ 0.58
◊ 0.54
◊ 1.14
+ 0.44
◊ 2.21
+ 0.54
+ 8.46
+ 6.58
◊ 0.55
+ 19.19
+ 0.23
+ 0.08
+ 1.33
◊ 0.10
+ 0.34
+3000.00
◊ 0.64
+ 3.20
+ 6.00
+ 1.10
◊ 0.01
◊ 0.14
+ 3.45
◊ 2.32
+
+
+
+
◊
◊
+
+
◊
+
+
+
+
◊
+
+
+
+
+
+
◊
+
+
◊
0.43
32.89
48.72
25.33
15.04
39.95
11.25
11.49
N.A.
21.45
71.29
25.87
2.59
24.30
16.91
24.85
18.24
2.88
36.44
84.01
16.66
6.94
8.08
50.36
30.91
◊ 14.9
+ 3.9
+ 3.0
◊ 0.5
◊ 10.6
◊ 10.1
◊ 9.2
+ 0.6
N.A.
◊ 22.0
+ 36.8
◊ 0.7
◊ 3.4
+ 9.4
◊ 17.6
+ 0.4
◊ 0.7
◊ 15.3
+ 1.9
+ 15.4
+ 3.2
◊ 16.3
◊ 10.7
◊ 4.9
◊ 19.0
408.83
133.88
46.16
80.70
48.62
77.91
44.00
68.64
199.88
84.00
104.82
77.08
91.80
74.45
42.67
89.30
195.32
274.66
13.48
39.14
38.56
29.47
230.00
89.54
46.76
+
◊
+
+
◊
◊
+
◊
◊
◊
◊
+
◊
+
+
+
+
◊
◊
+
+
◊
+
◊
◊
2.03 ◊ 16.93 ◊ 17.2
0.59 + 18.10 ◊ 0.2
0.43 + 32.97 + 19.4
0.56 + 13.71 ◊ 7.9
0.22 ◊ 3.55 ◊ 8.2
0.89 ◊ 12.52 ◊ 16.7
0.43 ◊ 16.97 ◊ 19.1
0.09 + 42.76 + 21.6
2.13 + 11.47 + 3.7
1.35 ◊ 23.82 ◊ 14.8
0.62 + 18.75 + 7.3
0.45 N.A. ◊
8.9
0.38 ◊ 4.19 ◊ 5.5
0.88 + 17.58 ◊ 0.6
0.22 + 20.27 + 4.8
0.84 ◊ 5.22 ◊ 7.1
1.36 + 18.46 + 0.9
1.82 + 26.35 ◊ 2.6
0.02 + 2.94 ◊ 8.2
0.38 + 30.54 + 10.2
0.32 + 31.14 + 9.9
0.03 ◊ 51.85 ◊ 19.4
1.38 + 0.24 ◊ 3.4
0.54 ◊ 4.31 ◊ 9.4
0.37 + 7.61 ◊ 11.3
237.20
52.03
183.56
144.16
143.22
53.33
123.59
109.37
16.21
58.83
78.63
317.71
83.85
189.10
165.00
84.82
57.38
46.95
96.22
38.69
125.05
52.39
163.35
69.34
77.28
275.31
57.86
207.61
165.13
171.13
55.79
148.32
119.33
21.25
93.88
89.09
363.00
108.98
189.52
178.70
89.72
66.41
56.58
97.90
47.23
126.80
59.38
165.15
70.25
79.31
+
◊
◊
+
◊
+
◊
+
+
+
+
+
◊
+
◊
+
◊
+
+
◊
+
+
◊
+
◊
2.26
0.16
1.47
0.27
0.69
0.55
0.60
0.94
0.10
0.82
0.23
6.27
0.38
0.93
0.03
3.74
0.37
0.72
1.06
0.21
0.22
0.99
0.74
1.24
0.43
+
+
+
+
◊
+
+
+
◊
◊
◊
+
◊
+
+
+
◊
+
+
◊
+
+
+
+
+
4.55
14.15
17.87
9.70
7.63
44.84
0.06
25.71
19.71
34.36
4.70
16.36
2.50
60.94
14.62
0.98
10.30
0.12
39.45
13.70
7.62
21.61
21.60
28.53
27.95
◊
+
◊
◊
◊
+
◊
+
◊
◊
◊
◊
◊
+
◊
+
+
◊
+
◊
+
◊
+
+
+
6.9
6.5
3.2
6.0
6.7
15.5
11.5
2.3
10.3
24.3
6.9
1.0
9.8
24.9
4.1
5.0
2.0
7.1
12.5
9.6
7.1
0.2
4.6
10.9
4.9
Stock (TICKER)
52-Week Price Range
1-Day
1-Yr
YTD
Low Close (•) High Close Chg %Chg % Chg
Oracle (ORCL)
PayPal Hld (PYPL)
PepsiCo (PEP)
Pfizer (PFE)
PMI (PM)
Procter Ga (PG)
Qualcomm (QCOM)
Raytheon (RTN)
Schlumberg (SLB)
Simon Prop (SPG)
Southern C (SO)
Starbucks (SBUX)
Target (TGT)
Texas Inst (TXN)
Time Warne (TWX)
Union Paci (UNP)
UPS (UPS)
UnitedHeal (UNH)
US Bancorp (USB)
UTC (UTX)
Verizon (VZ)
Visa (V)
Walgreens (WBA)
Walmart (WMT)
Walt Disne (DIS)
Wells Farg (WFC)
43.60
48.40
96.70
31.67
79.71
70.73
48.56
155.84
61.02
145.78
42.38
52.58
48.56
75.92
85.88
101.06
101.45
166.65
49.03
109.10
42.80
91.36
61.74
73.13
96.20
49.27
53.48
86.32
122.51
39.43
123.55
94.67
69.28
229.75
80.35
173.02
53.51
64.87
78.70
120.75
103.90
143.05
135.53
250.79
58.50
139.24
54.77
129.52
86.42
109.98
113.19
66.31
46.07
74.67
98.23
34.93
81.51
71.98
53.01
205.17
69.21
159.77
45.45
57.45
69.33
104.51
92.56
134.90
112.12
233.78
50.36
120.89
47.73
129.26
62.30
85.47
102.48
52.66
+
+
◊
+
◊
◊
+
+
+
+
◊
◊
◊
◊
◊
+
+
◊
+
+
◊
+
◊
◊
+
+
0.36
0.68
0.76
0.09
0.36
0.45
0.52
2.63
0.42
0.43
0.58
0.23
1.72
0.18
0.58
0.77
0.81
2.12
0.02
1.38
0.46
1.10
1.51
2.06
1.33
0.25
+
+
◊
+
◊
◊
◊
+
◊
◊
◊
◊
+
+
◊
+
+
+
◊
◊
+
+
◊
+
◊
◊
1.08
51.46
13.24
4.33
27.39
16.79
3.50
28.71
3.83
2.89
9.23
5.74
20.95
31.24
5.91
21.84
4.37
34.26
2.72
0.38
2.23
40.36
27.47
11.73
8.49
4.45
◊
+
◊
◊
◊
◊
◊
+
+
◊
◊
+
+
+
+
+
◊
+
◊
◊
◊
+
◊
◊
◊
◊
2.6
1.4
18.1
3.6
22.9
21.7
17.2
9.2
2.7
7.0
5.5
0.0
6.3
0.1
1.2
0.6
5.9
6.0
6.0
5.2
9.8
13.4
14.2
13.5
4.7
13.2
– indicates stocks
Prices shown are for regular trading for the New York Stock Exchange and the American Stock Exchange which runs from 9:30 a.m., Eastern time, through the close of the Pacific Exchange, at 4:30 p.m. For the Nasdaq stock market, it is through 4 p.m.
Close Last trade of the day in regular trading. +
· or ·
that reached a new 52-week high or low. Change Difference between last trade and previous day’s price in regular trading. „ or ‰ indicates stocks that rose or fell at least 4 percent. ” indicates stocks that traded 1 percent or more of their outstanding shares. n Stock was a new issue in the last year.
GOVERNMENT BONDS
FINRA TRACE CORPORATE BOND DATA
Yields
52-Week Total Returns
FINRA-BLOOMBERG
CORPORATE BOND INDEXES
FINRA-BLOOMBERG
CORPORATE BOND INDEXES
8%
+ 5%
high yield +5.97%
high yield +2.77%
+ 4
+ 3
+ 2
+ 1
2
0
0
2017
invest. grade +4.23%
2018
– 1
invest. grade +0.26%
2018
2017
Yest.
All
Investment High
Issues
Grade
Yield
6
4
Yield Curve
Market Breadth
Total Issues Traded
Advances
Declines
Unchanged
52 Week High
52 Week Low
Dollar Volume*
7,626
3,488
3,727
120
88
757
20,454
5,565
2,501
2,829
55
30
591
14,088
Conv
1,881
875
839
60
40
160
5,623
180
112
59
5
18
6
743
End of day data. Activity as reported to FINRA TRACE.
Market breadth represents activity in all TRACE eligible
publicly traded securities. Shown below are the most
active fixed-coupon bonds ranked by par value traded.
Investment grade or high-yield is determined using
credit ratings as outlined in FINRA rules. “C” – Yield is
unavailable because of issue’s call criteria.
*Par value in millions.
Source: FINRA TRACE data. Reference information from
Reuters DataScope Data. Credit ratings from Moody’s® &
Standard & Poor’s.
Most Recent Issues
Key Rates
1-mo. ago
1-yr. ago
4%
10-year Treas.
2-year Treas.
6%
Prime Rate
Fed Funds
Mat.
3
4
2
2
1
Maturity
0
3
6
2
Months
5 10
2017
2018
Years
Issuer Name (SYMBOL)
Coupon%
Credit Rating
Moody’s
Maturity
S&P
Price
High
Low
Last
Chg
3.600
3.500
2.950
5.012
4.650
4.450
2.625
5.250
3.125
4.250
May’25
Nov’26
Jan’23
Apr’49
Mar’26
May’25
Jul’22
Mar’37
Jan’23
May’28
Baa2
A3
Baa3
Baa1
Baa1
A3
A2
Baa1
A3
A3
A–
BBB+
BBB+
BBB+
BBB–
BBB+
A–
BBB+
BBB+
4.750
7.375
6.500
2.800
4.375
6.500
4.875
4.875
3.950
8.125
Feb’28
Jan’27
Jan’24
Jul’23
Nov’18
Jan’26
May’23
Nov’20
May’28
Apr’22
Ba2
Ba2
Ba2
Ba2
Ba1
Ba2
Ba2
Ba1
BB+
BB–
BB+
BB
BBB–
BB+
BB+
BBB–
Caa1
CCC+
2.375
4.000
2.375
1.625
4.250
1.625
1.625
1.250
1.500
0.250
Mar’22
Jul’20
Mar’24
Feb’25
Mar’45
Feb’27
Oct’19
Mar’25
Mar’19
Mar’19
Ba3
CCC+
B+
97.155
95.943
96.711
98.313
98.933
100.687
97.274
103.217
99.001
100.193
96.493
94.665
96.585
97.676
98.037
100.384
96.037
102.257
97.598
99.902
96.493
94.768
96.585
98.313
98.749
100.687
96.199
102.356
97.703
99.966
–0.519
–0.187
0.160
0.274
–0.059
0.119
–1.371
–0.692
–0.097
0.145
4.182
4.238
3.751
5.121
4.842
N.A.
3.607
5.054
3.660
4.254
95.650
107.575
104.906
86.500
100.445
106.375
101.114
102.500
99.900
106.250
94.500
105.600
104.258
85.200
100.345
104.963
100.375
102.200
98.559
105.500
94.630
107.575
104.813
86.500
100.430
105.340
100.625
102.250
98.569
106.000
–0.245
2.000
0.162
0.870
0.230
0.555
0.775
–0.180
–0.137
0.235
5.468
6.231
4.017
5.847
2.497
5.394
4.650
3.814
N.A.
6.358
112.193
59.000
85.923
173.382
80.250
118.492
101.150
104.394
104.822
103.906
109.970
58.625
85.000
172.246
78.775
117.420
101.000
103.125
104.254
103.545
112.115
59.000
85.655
172.789
80.000
118.362
101.050
104.157
104.254
103.545
4.056
–6.250
–0.348
2.989
0.528
1.527
0.195
0.535
–0.362
0.945
–0.722
31.273
5.255
–6.699
5.715
–0.428
0.886
0.629
–3.389
–4.006
HIGH YIELD
T-mobile Usa Inc (DTEGF)
Petrobras Global Fin B V (PTRB)
T-mobile Usa Inc (DTEGF)
Teva Pharmaceutical Fin Neth Iii B V (TEVA)
Glp Cap L P / Glp Fing Ii Inc (GLPI)
T-mobile Usa Inc (DTEGF)
Aes Corp (AES)
Glp Cap L P / Glp Fing Ii Inc (GLPI)
Republic Svcs Inc (RSG)
Tenet Healthcare Corp (THC)
Foreign Currency
in Dollars
Yld%
INVESTMENT GRADE
Abbvie Inc (ABBV)
Goldman Sachs Group Inc (GS)
Canadian Nat Res Ltd (CNQ)
Verizon Communications Inc (VZ)
Lloyds Bkg Group Plc (LYG)
Lloyds Bkg Group Plc (LYG)
Wells Fargo & Co Medium Term Sr Nts Book (WFC)
Verizon Communications Inc (VZ)
Morgan Stanley (MS)
Transcanada Pipelines Ltd (TRP)
Tesla Inc (TSLA)
Ascent Capital Group, Inc. (ASCMA)
Dish Network Corp (DISH)
Microchip Technology Inc (MCHP)
Cheniere Energy Inc (BX)
Microchip Technology Inc (MCHP)
Rti Intl Metals Inc (AA)
Guidewire Software Inc (GWRE)
Vipshop Hldgs Ltd (VIPS)
Tesla Inc (TSLA)
CONSUMER RATES
B–
B+
B–
ECONOMIC INDICATORS
Yesterday
AMERICAS
Argentina (Peso)
Bolivia (Boliviano)
Brazil (Real)
Canada (Dollar)
Chile (Peso)
Colombia (Peso)
Dom. Rep. (Peso)
El Salvador (Colon)
Guatemala (Quetzal)
Honduras (Lempira)
Mexico (Peso)
Nicaragua (Cordoba)
Paraguay (Guarani)
Peru (New Sol)
Uruguay (New Peso)
Venezuela (Bolivar)
EUROPE
Britain (Pound)
Czech Rep (Koruna)
Denmark (Krone)
Europe (Euro)
Hungary (Forint)
Monday
Friday
Year
Ago
1.70%
4.75
3.84
4.58
4.41
4.65
4.29
4.32
3.94
0.91%
4.00
3.13
4.11
3.93
4.44
3.20
3.63
3.10
3.46%
3.46
4.92
4.92
0.43%
0.33
0.55
0.94
1.07
1.88
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10
5-YEAR HISTORY
Real Economic Growth
+6%
Change from previous quarter,
annualized; seasonally adj.
1st quarter ’18 +2.3%
4th quarter ’17 +2.9
.0456
.1458
.2815
.7765
.0016
.0004
.0202
.1143
.1348
.0423
.0514
.0320
.0002
.3054
.0343
.00001
1.3555
.0467
.1600
1.1924
.0038
Dollars in
Foreign Currency
21.9150
6.8600
3.5524
1.2879
629.27
2820.1
49.4900
8.7497
7.4160
23.6354
19.4610
31.2300
5571.0
3.2745
29.1400
69825
.7377
21.4050
6.2486
.8386
263.65
Future
Corn
Soybeans
Wheat
Live Cattle
Hogs-Lean
Cocoa
Coffee
Sugar-World
Monetary
units per
Exchange quantity
CBT
CBT
CBT
Foreign Currency
in Dollars
1.84
2.03
99.76
99.82
98.30
97.63
99.77
99.83
98.31
97.64
+0.01
–0.01
◊
◊
2.51
2.79
2.95
3.12
99.81
+0.05
0.69
97.44
+0.08
0.79
117.47
+0.09
0.82
101.55
+0.07
0.95
Source: Thomson Reuters
One Dollar in Euros
0.95 euros
$1 = 0.8386
0.90
0.85
0.80
0.75
2018
2017
Norway (Krone)
Poland (Zloty)
Russia (Ruble)
Sweden (Krona)
Switzerland (Franc)
Turkey (Lira)
.1239
.2798
.0159
.1132
.9976
.2344
8.0688
3.5739
62.8680
8.8340
1.0024
4.2659
Dollars in
Foreign Currency
ASIA/PACIFIC
Australia (Dollar)
China (Yuan)
Hong Kong (Dollar)
India (Rupee)
Japan (Yen)
Malaysia (Ringgit)
New Zealand (Dollar)
Pakistan (Rupee)
Philippines (Peso)
Singapore (Dollar)
So. Korea (Won)
Taiwan (Dollar)
Thailand (Baht)
Vietnam (Dong)
.7516
.1571
.1274
.0149
.0092
.2536
.7015
.0087
.0193
.7488
.0009
.0335
.0314
.00004
1.3305
6.3640
7.8496
67.1300
109.08
3.9430
1.4255
115.55
51.9290
1.3355
1079.0
29.8110
31.8500
22767
MIDDLE EAST/AFRICA
Bahrain (Dinar)
Egypt (Pound)
Iran (Rial)
Israel (Shekel)
Jordan (Dinar)
Kenya (Shilling)
Kuwait (Dinar)
2.6534
.0566
.00002
.2774
1.4104
.0100
3.3223
.3769
17.6700
42000
3.6051
.7090
100.20
.3010
CME
CME
NYBOT
NYBOT
NYBOT
COMX
COMX
COMX
NYMX
NYMX
NYMX
Lifetime
High
Low
Date
Open
Settle
Change
Open
Interest
431.75 353.75
1082.50 890.00
609.75 423.75
121.53
96.40
81.35
59.40
3011.00 1812.00
189.20 113.05
19.41
10.93
May
May
May
Jun
May
May
May
Jun
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
397.25 397.50 393.25 393.25
1025.00 1025.00 1001.25 1002.25
515.00 515.00 515.00 514.00
106.05 106.28 104.85 105.18
66.78
66.90
66.03
66.08
2821.00 2822.00 2821.00 2870.00
119.55 119.55 118.45 118.20
11.56
11.57
11.30
11.32
◊ 5.50
◊ 25.00
◊ 13.50
◊ 0.88
◊ 1.00
+ 71.00
◊ 2.25
◊ 0.19
2,680
2,028
151
128,391
2,346
45
143
516,406
$/oz
$/oz
$/lb
$/bbl
$/gal
$/mil.btu
1365.80 1303.40
18.95
15.70
3.33
2.22
87.02
39.19
2.19
1.25
6.40
2.44
May 18
May 18
May 18
June 18
May 18
May 18
1310.60 1312.50 1310.20 1312.20
16.49
16.51
16.39
16.41
3.06
3.08
3.05
3.06
69.85
70.84
69.51
70.73
2.15
2.19
2.15
2.19
2.71
2.77
2.70
2.74
◊
◊
◊
+
+
+
364
718
3,153
506,546
132,453
265,657
March ’18 +2.4%
Feb. ’18
+2.2
4
5
6
7
8
9 10
% Total Returns
+3%
–1
’13
’18
+6%
Change from
previous year
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
0
’13
’18
9 10
Unemployment
3.32%
3.22
8%
Percent unemployed
Seasonally adjusted
0% 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10
0.31%
0.29
0.39
0.62
0.78
1.52
*Credit ratings: good, FICO score 660-749; excellent, FICO score 750-850.
Apr. ’18
March ’18
3.9%
4.1
110
105
100
2018
Lebanon (Pound)
Saudi Arabia (Riyal)
So. Africa (Rand)
U.A.E (Dirham)
.0007
.2667
.0798
.2723
3
’13
’18
Housing Starts
Prices as of 4:45 p.m. Eastern Time.
Source: Thomson Reuters
High
Low
0.50
0.02
0.01
1.01
0.03
0.03
Crude Oil
$80
$70.73 a barrel
70
60
50
40
’18
2017
2.0
Type
YTD
1 Yr
DFA Emerging Markets Core Equity I(DFCEX)
DFA Emerging Markets Value I(DFEVX)
Oppenheimer Developing Markets Y(ODVYX)
Fidelity Series Emerging Markets(FEMSX)
Vanguard Emerging Mkts Stock Idx Adm(VEMAX)
American Funds New World A(NEWFX)
Lazard Emerging Markets Equity Instl(LZEMX)
T. Rowe Price Emerging Markets Stock(PRMSX)
DFA Emerging Markets Small Cap I(DEMSX)
Virtus Vontobel Emerging Markets Opps (HIEMX)
DFA Emerging Markets I(DFEMX)
Vanguard European Stock Index Admiral(VEUSX)
Baron Emerging Markets Institutional(BEXIX)
Fidelity Emerging Markets(FEMKX)
Matthews Asia Dividend Investor(MAPIX)
Parametric Tax-Managed Emerg Mkt Instl(EITEX)
Matthews Pacific Tiger Investor(MAPTX)
T. Rowe Price New Asia(PRASX)
Vanguard Pacific Stock Index Admiral(VPADX)
Matthews Japan Investor(MJFOX)
T. Rowe Price Instl Emerging Mkts Eq(IEMFX)
Parametric Emerging Markets Instl(EIEMX)
Hartford Schroders Emerging Mkts Eq I(SEMNX)
Average performance for all such funds
Number of funds for period
% Total Returns
Exp. Assets
5 Yr* Ratio
(mil.$)
LARGEST FUNDS
Fund Name (TICKER)
Type
YTD
1 Yr
Exp. Assets
5 Yr* Ratio
Source: Bankrate.com
0.0
’13
’18
(mil.$)
LEADERS
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
ES
EM
EM
DP
EM
PJ
PJ
DP
JS
EM
EM
EM
◊1.3
+0.8
+0.6
◊1.7
◊1.3
+0.2
◊3.9
◊0.8
◊0.8
◊2.6
◊1.2
+1.1
◊1.4
◊2.2
◊0.5
◊1.1
◊3.0
◊0.4
+0.9
+1.9
◊0.8
◊1.2
◊1.1
+16.2
+17.6
+17.9
+18.0
+15.6
+15.4
+9.6
+20.6
+15.4
+11.3
+16.6
+10.5
+18.5
+20.6
+18.4
+12.5
+16.5
+18.8
+17.2
+24.0
+20.8
+12.7
+19.4
+4.1
+3.5
+4.7
+5.6
+3.2
+5.6
+2.1
+6.2
+5.4
+2.6
+3.9
+6.3
+7.2
+6.0
+7.2
+2.5
+7.5
+7.0
+6.4
+10.8
+6.3
+2.3
+4.6
◊1.2
160
+16.6
160
+5.3
158
0.55
0.57
1.06
0.56
0.14
1.04
1.08
1.23
0.73
1.33
0.50
0.10
1.10
0.96
1.02
0.95
1.06
0.93
0.10
0.94
1.10
1.12
1.25
29,688
19,889
18,467
14,624
14,121
13,491
11,197
8,936
7,822
7,498
6,288
4,939
4,451
4,247
3,886
3,566
3,347
2,762
2,534
2,526
1,907
1,874
1,864
Neuberger Berman Greater China Eq Inst(NCEIX)
Matthews China Investor(MCHFX)
Columbia Greater China A(NGCAX)
Oberweis China Opportunities(OBCHX)
Fidelity China Region(FHKCX)
Guinness Atkinson China & Hong Kong(ICHKX)
Matthews Asia Growth Investor(MPACX)
Matthews Asia Innovators Investor(MATFX)
Eaton Vance Greater China Growth A(EVCGX)
Templeton China World Adv(TACWX)
American Century NT Emerging Markets G(ACLKX)
Fidelity Japan Smaller Companies(FJSCX)
CH
CH
CH
CH
CH
CH
DP
PJ
CH
CH
EM
JS
+4.4
+5.5
+1.6
+3.0
+1.8
+0.3
+4.3
+1.2
◊0.2
+4.7
◊1.1
+1.2
+46.4
+43.9
+40.1
+38.1
+30.5
+30.1
+29.6
+28.9
+28.0
+27.0
+25.3
+24.9
NA
+11.1
+12.5
+12.0
+10.6
+8.9
+8.7
+14.3
+9.8
+4.9
+6.9
+10.2
1.51
1.09
1.55
1.91
0.99
1.64
1.12
1.24
1.82
1.69
0.69
0.94
97
958
79
96
1,399
75
632
228
78
84
449
831
LAGGARDS
Franklin India Growth A(FINGX)
Matthews Asian Growth & Inc Investor(MACSX)
Invesco European Growth C(AEDCX)
Franklin Mutual European C(TEURX)
Invesco Developing Markets C(GTDCX)
Morgan Stanley European Equity B(EUGBX)
Lazard Emerging Markets Multi Asset In(EMMIX)
Macquarie Pooled Emerging Markets(DPEMX)
T. Rowe Price European Stock(PRESX)
State Street Disciplined Em Mkts Eq N(SSEMX)
Dreyfus Emerging Markets A(DRFMX)
EP Emerging Markets Small Companies A(EPASX)
EI
PJ
ES
ES
EM
ES
EM
EM
ES
EM
EM
EM
◊7.1
◊3.7
◊3.3
+3.1
◊7.1
◊0.1
◊4.0
◊3.0
+1.9
◊4.4
◊3.4
◊5.9
+3.4
+4.9
+5.4
+5.5
+5.7
+6.1
+6.9
+8.1
+8.3
+8.4
+8.7
+8.7
+10.6
+1.6
+5.2
+4.7
+0.2
+3.5
+0.3
◊0.3
+5.7
◊0.9
+2.5
+0.4
1.65
1.07
2.13
2.04
2.16
1.39
1.23
1.22
0.96
1.25
2.00
1.75
80
1,233
93
166
80
99
139
119
1,148
73
54
74
*Annualized. Leaders and Laggards are among funds with at least $50 million in assets, and include no more than one class of any fund. Today’s fund types: CH-China Region. DP-Divers.
Pacific Asia. EI-India Equity. EM-Divers. Emerging Mkt.. ES-Europe Stock. JS-Japan Stock. LS-Latin America Stock. PJ-Pacific Asia ex-Japan. NA-Not Available. YTD-Year to date. Spotlight tables
rotate on a 2-week basis.
Source: Morningstar
Annual Rate, in millions
Seasonally adjusted
March ’18 1.32
Feb. ’18
1.30
1505.0
3.7501
12.5374
3.6728
MUTUAL FUNDS SPOTLIGHT: REGIONAL AND EMERGING MARKETS
Retail Sales
March ’18 +4.5%
Feb. ’18
+4.1
115
Key to exchanges: CBT -Chicago Board of Trade. CME-Chicago Mercantile Exchange. CMX-Comex division of NYM. KC-Kansas City Board of Trade. NYBOT-New York Board of
Trade. NYM-New York Mercantile Exchange. Open interest is the number of contracts outstanding.
Source: Thomson Reuters
’18
Change from
previous year
3
$1 = 109.04
–2
’13
Consumer Price Index
2
One Dollar in Yen
120 yen
2017
¢/bushel
¢/bushel
¢/bushel
¢/lb
¢/lb
$/ton
¢/lb
¢/lb
Fund Name (TICKER)
0% 1
4.42%
4.33
2
4.88%
4.62
4.63
4.63
CD’s and Money Market Rates
Money-market
$10K min. money-mkt
6-month CD
1-year CD
2-year CD
5-year IRA CD
0% 1
0% 1
Auto Loan Rates
36-mo. used car
60-mo. new car
Yield
–.00
+0.01
FUTURES
Gold
Silver
Hi Grade Copper
Light Sweet Crude
Heating Oil
Natural Gas
Change from last week
Up
Flat
Down
1-year range
Home Equity
$75K line good credit*
$75K line excel. credit*
$75K loan good credit*
$75K loan excel. credit*
Chg
1.83
2.03
Source: Thomson Reuters
CONVERTIBLES
Federal funds
Prime rate
15-yr fixed
15-yr fixed jumbo
30-yr fixed
30-yr fixed jumbo
5/1 adj. rate
5/1 adj. rate jumbo
1-year adj. rate
◊
◊
◊
◊
Ask
1.84
2.04
FOREIGN EXCHANGE
Most Active
Home
Mortgages
Bid
◊ ◊
◊ ◊
TREASURY INFLATION BONDS
| ◊ 99.77
5-yr. Apr 15
ø ◊ 97.34
10-yr. Jan 15
2ø ◊ 117.28
20-yr. Jan 15
1.000 ◊ 101.36
30-yr. Feb 15
0
30
Rate
BONDS & NOTES
2-yr. Apr 30
2]
5-yr. Apr 30
2}
10-yr. Feb 15
2}
30-yr. Feb 15
3.000
3
1
Date
T-BILLS
3-mo. Aug 02
6-mo. Nov 01
5
ONLINE: MORE PRICES AND ANALYSIS
Information on all United States stocks, plus bonds, mutual funds, commodities and foreign stocks along
with analysis of industry sectors and stock indexes: nytimes.com/markets
B6
TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
SCORES
ANALYSIS
COMMENTARY
N
A Star Shadowed by a Sex Crime
Questions Surround a College Pitcher Who Now Denies Molesting a 6-Year-Old Niece
PHOTOGRAPHS BY RUTH FREMSON/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Oregon State’s Luke Heimlich, who pleaded guilty to molestation as a teenager, left the team last season but returned this year. Heimlich, 22, hopes to reach the majors.
‘The people
around me
know who
I am. That
is what
matters.
Everybody
else can say
what they
want.’
LUKE HEIMLICH,
Oregon State
pitcher
By KURT STREETER
CORVALLIS, Ore. — Luke
Heimlich, one of the best players
in college baseball, and certainly
its most controversial, strode to
the mound, dusted away a patch
of dirt with his cleats and lined up
for his first pitch.
The home crowd of nearly
3,000, most in orange and black,
the colors of Oregon State,
cheered, “Luke! Luke! Luke!”
They wanted a victory against
Arizona State, one of their biggest
rivals.
More than that, they wanted a
performance that would hark
back to a different time — the
time before anyone had heard
that Heimlich, 22, their hero, had
pleaded guilty to a felony: sexually molesting his 6-year-old
niece when he was 15.
Otherwise, this game in Goss
Stadium seemed completely normal, as has been true all season,
which has unfolded in a surprisingly ordinary way. The Beavers
are again among the elite. They
have a good chance of making it
back to the College World Series
in June. They might win the national championship.
But given his past, the question
remained: Why was Heimlich
even on the mound?
In a series of interviews with
The New York Times over the
weekend, Heimlich flatly denied
committing the crime he had ad-
mitted to, saying he pleaded
guilty to quickly dispense with
the case and for the sake of family
relations.
“Nothing ever happened,” he
said, when asked for specifics
about what might have occurred
between him and his niece.
The girl’s mother, whose name
is being withheld to protect the
identity of the victim, said her
daughter’s account was the truth.
“There is no way he didn’t do it,”
she said in an interview with The
Times in which she described her
daughter’s descriptions of abuse
as “very specific.”
Heimlich’s assertion of his innocence is not likely to stop the
questions that surround Oregon
State and its baseball team —
questions that both Heimlich’s
critics and his fans have been asking for months.
Should the fact that he has fulContinued on Page B8
‘The feeling
at Oregon
State right
now is that
our team is
winning,
so they’ve
moved on.’
BRENDA TRACY,
a victims’ rights
activist, on fans who
cheer for Heimlich
FROM LEFT: DERICK E. HINGLE/USA TODAY SPORTS, VIA REUTERS; SEAN GARDNER/GETTY IMAGES; SEAN GARDNER/GETTY IMAGES; GERALD HERBERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS; SEAN GARDNER/GETTY IMAGES
Golden State’s “Hamptons Five,” from left: Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, Andre Iguodala and Kevin Durant.
Deep Into Playoff Season, Warriors Reach for Not-So-Secret Weapon
NEW ORLEANS — It was a first in
Steve Kerr’s career on the bench —
regular season or playoffs. Never before had the Golden State Warriors
coach sent out his socalled Hamptons Five
lineup for the opening tip.
In another first, Kerr
would later break his own
ON PRO
BASKETBALL rule about withholding
the identity of his starters
for as long as legally possible. He announced after Golden State’s 118-92
trouncing of the New Orleans Pelicans
in Game 4 of the Western Conference
MARC
STEIN
semifinals that he would start the same
five players in Game 5 back home at
Oracle Arena on Tuesday night.
The struggle for Kerr remains referring to the fivesome — Stephen Curry,
Klay Thompson, Draymond Green,
Andre Iguodala and, of course, Kevin
Durant — by their increasingly popular
nickname without immediately laughing at himself.
“I still am amused that we just matter-of-factly call them the Hamptons
Five,” Kerr said of Durant and the four
Warriors mainstays who famously
traveled with team officials to the
Hamptons in July 2016 to recruit Durant in free agency.
Kerr continued: “I just feel really
strange as a coach to say, ‘The Hamptons Five played really well tonight.’ I
can’t say that, but you can.”
You could certainly say all of that
here Sunday afternoon at the Smoothie
King Center. Durant rumbled for 38
points, nine rebounds and five assists to
outduel Anthony Davis (who needed 22
shots to record 26 points) and staked
Golden State — with the help of unmistakably fast starts in both halves and
stout team defense — to a 3-1 series
lead.
“I told you right from the start, you’re
not going to beat them if you’re not
going to score 115 points,” said Pelicans
Coach Alvin Gentry, who brought up
how “locked in” Durant looked defensively before even touching his devastating shotmaking.
Warriors players and coaches, meanwhile, were almost universally unaware
that the unit Kerr so often turns to
when it comes to closing games had
never actually started one together. But
the Pelicans, after inflicting one rout
upon the defending champions Friday
night, had Golden State spooked. To
counter New Orleans’ fast pace and
copious amounts of Davis, Kerr saw
little alternative than to go smaller and
start with his best lineup.
Kerr has always preferred to save the
group for crunchtime as opposed to
first quarters — even in the days when
it was Harrison Barnes in Durant’s
place. Concerns about the physical
demands of playing so small — both on
Green as a 6-foot-7 center and on Iguodala at age 34 — have long been his
primary worries. But Sunday’s gambit
Continued on Page B9
THE NEW YORK TIMES SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
B7
0N
BASEBALL
Yankees, Riding High, Welcome Red Sox, Riding Slightly Higher
The Yankees are a very good
team. That is no surprise. But
the most encouraging part of
their best start in 15 years — 24
wins, 10 losses — is the killer
instinct that shows
up repeatedly, even
after they have proven the point.
The best teams
ON
are the greediest.
BASEBALL
They enjoy the meal,
but won’t savor it until they grab
the last slice of cake off your
plate. As the Boston Red Sox
arrive for a three-game clash
starting Tuesday, the Yankees
have been on a merciless tear.
They played 18 games in 18
days, in three time zones, and
won all five series. They staged
ninth-inning comebacks to finish
three of them, all against playoff
teams from last season. Gleyber
Torres joined the party in
progress, on April 22, and the
Yankees have lost only once
since he arrived.
No everyday player since 1900
had ever started and won 14 of
his first 15 games before Torres,
a 21-year-old shortstop who is
shining at second base. He is not
surprised.
“Not really,” Torres said on
Sunday. “I mean, that team is
super awesome. The bullpen, the
starting pitchers, everybody is
super good. Any opportunity we
have, everybody helps do the
job.”
It was Torres’s turn on Sunday,
and he ushered out the Cleveland
Indians with a three-run homer
in the bottom of the ninth inning.
It was the second home series in
a row to end with a three-run
blast by a young Yankee cornerstone that sealed a series sweep.
Gary Sanchez did it to the
Minnesota Twins on April 26. In
between — with no travel days —
the Yankees swept the Angels in
Anaheim, Calif., and took three of
four in Houston from the World
Series champion Astros.
“When we started on this, I
looked at it as this 18-game snapshot, because we knew we didn’t
have an off-day so we knew it
was going to be a grind against a
lot of great teams,” Manager
Aaron Boone said.
TYLER
KEPNER
WENDELL CRUZ/USA TODAY SPORTS, VIA REUTERS
The Yankees have won 14 of 15 since calling up Gleyber Torres, above, who hit a game-winning
homer on Sunday. Next up are the Red Sox, who scuffled with the Yankees the last time they met.
“What’s been cool about it is
we’ve shown we can win in a lot
of different ways. We’ve won
pitchers’ duels. We’ve won when
we’ve had to scratch against the
other team’s closer. We’ve won
when we’ve really swung the
bats in a massive way and run
away with something. The starting pitchers have been incredibly
consistent, the bullpen’s been
strong, and I feel like our defense
has continued to get better.”
That about covers it: close
games and blowouts, hitting and
pitching and defense. The only
cause for concern is that, while
the Yankees have a better record
than 28 teams, they trail the Red
Sox. The Yankees are 18-3 since
the teams last tangled at Fenway
Park, but still looking up in the
standings.
The Red Sox are 25-9, and they
seem like themselves again.
Remember last season, when
they won the American League
East but finished last in the
league in home runs? Now they
lead the majors in slugging percentage. Mookie Betts bruised
his right shoulder on Sunday, but
that should not slow his Willie
Mays impersonation: a .355
average with 13 homers. Boston’s
five-year, $110 million investment
in J.D. Martinez (.349, 8 homers)
looks like a steal.
The ace Chris Sale, who
pitched on Sunday, will miss this
series. The left-hander Drew
Pomeranz faces the Yankees’
Luis Severino on Tuesday, with
David Price against Masahiro
Tanaka on Wednesday and Rick
Porcello versus C.C. Sabathia on
Thursday.
The more anticipated
matchup, if it happens, is Joe
Kelly against the Yankees’ Tyler
Austin. Kelly, the hard-throwing
Red Sox reliever, plunked Austin
at Fenway on April 11, payback
for Austin’s spiking Brock Holt
with a slide at second base.
The brawl that followed has
made Kelly a hero in Boston —
he got a standing ovation at a
Bruins game a few days later —
and inspired a promotion at the
Class AAA Pawtucket Red Sox
series with the Yankees’ affiliate
over the weekend. Fans named
Joe or Kelly got in free, and the
team auctioned an autographed
Joe Kelly boxing glove, among
other items, for his charity.
Austin, for his part, had little to
say on Sunday about the rematch.
“I don’t want to get into all that
right now,” he said. “I just want
to enjoy this day off. But I think
we’re all excited to play Boston. I
feel like we’re taking every day
like that: we’re coming out to
compete and win ballgames,
whether it’s Boston or whoever it
is.”
On Sunday it was Cleveland,
and a top closer, Cody Allen, who
CHARLES KRUPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
could not protect a four-run lead.
Mike Clevinger had one-hit the
Yankees through seven shutout
innings, but he walked Neil
Walker to start the eighth. With
one out, he walked Austin and
left the game.
Walker, a 10-year veteran, is
new to the team, a mid-March
signing whose price dropped so
steeply on the open market (one
year, $4 million) that the Yankees
could not resist. They were already covered in professional
hitters and versatile infielders,
but they got greedy. They got
better.
Walker’s double tied the score
in the ninth, and he scored when
Torres’s homer won it. Walker
loved how Torres did it: falling
behind in the count, taking three
balls, running a full count and
then hammering the sixth pitch
of his at-bat over the center-field
fence. It is the same approach
Walker sees in Miguel Andujar,
the rookie third baseman who
singled to end Friday’s win.
“Guys are in there trying to do
something to keep the ball
rolling, not just hoping to get a
hit but taking what’s coming,”
Walker said. “That’s a hard lesson to learn as a player, so it’s
really interesting to see guys like
Gleyber and Miguel putting
together really good at-bats —
not just in the first inning and
middle innings, but in the late
innings. It’s easy to get caught
up in the moment, and you’re not
seeing guys do that.”
They are not getting caught up
in the moment. They are making
the moment theirs. Now the
Yankees face the only team that
has done it better this season,
the one rival who always matters
most.
Bruce, Feeling at Home in Cincinnati, Leads Mets Out of a Six-Game Slump
DAVID KOHL/USA TODAY SPORTS, VIA REUTERS
Jay Bruce, who was traded by Cincinnati in 2016, is still beloved
by Reds fans, who cheered his two-run homer on Monday night.
CINCINNATI (AP) — Jay
Bruce started circling the bases
and heard the roughly 15,000 fans
chant his name again in that familiar way. Yes,
“BruuuuuMETS
7
uce”
was
REDS
6
back, and so
was the Mets’
struggling offense.
Bruce hit a two-run homer in
the ballpark that’s the scene of his
best moment in baseball, and
Adrian Gonzalez connected twice,
powering the Mets to a slumpending 7-6 victory on Monday
over the Cincinnati Reds.
It was a nostalgic moment for
Bruce, who was traded in 2016. He
considers his top moment in
sports the walk-off homer he hit at
Great American Ball Park in 2010
to clinch a division title. Reds fans
chanted his name in unison as he
circled the bases for the 136th
time there, trailing only Joey
Votto (144) for the ballpark
record.
“Obviously every Reds fan
wants the Reds to win, but we
went through a lot together,”
Bruce said. “We had a lot of time
together here and a lot of experiences.”
His third homer of the season
was part of a Mets resurgence.
They hit the road after getting
swept during a six-game homestand that included three shutout
losses and 11 runs total by their offense. Michael Conforto got it going with a leadoff homer against
Homer Bailey (0-5), and Bruce
had a two-run shot off his former
teammate in the third for a 4-0
lead.
“We’re excited as hitters to
come here,” said Conforto, who
was in an 0-for-13 slump and had
gotten the last couple days off.
“We talked about it. Here it’s a
small park.”
Gonzalez had a pair of solo
shots as the Mets set a season
high with four home runs.
P. J. Conlon lasted three and
two-thirds innings in his major
league debut, filling in with Jacob
deGrom on the disabled list because of a hyperextended elbow.
Conlon also had a single off Bailey,
and it wound up costing him. He
hurt his thumb on the hit, and it
contributed to his early exit.
“I went back on the mound and I
didn’t really have feeling on that
thumb,” Conlon said. “I didn’t
have a guide on any of my
pitches.”
Robert Gsellman (4-0) gave up
only a solo homer in two and twothirds innings for the win. Jeurys
Familia retired the side in order in
the ninth with two strikeouts for
his 10th save in 13 chances.
Billy Hamilton, Eugenio Suarez
and Scooter Gennett hit solo
homers for the Reds. Cincinnati
fell to 8-27, matching the worst 35game start in franchise history
along with the 1931 and 1934
teams. It’s the worst start in the
majors since the Tigers had the
same record in 2013.
EXTRA BASES
The Reds honored Mets third
baseman TODD FRAZIER on his return to Great American Ball Park,
where he won the All-Star Home
Run Derby in 2015 before being
traded. It was his first time back
since the trade. “Me and Jay, for
the last couple of months, have
talked about it a lot,” Frazier said,
referring to JAY BRUCE. “This is
where we started.”
TENNIS
In a Season of Career Breakthroughs,
An American Hits a Clay Milestone
By BEN ROTHENBERG
CASCAIS, Portugal — Frances
Tiafoe looked ready for big-time
success on the tennis court in this
suburb of Lisbon — until he was
handed a celebratory Champagne
bottle after the final on Sunday.
Tiafoe, the runner-up, struggled to open it for several minutes
before being helped by a tournament emcee.
“Terrible,” Tiafoe said of his uncorking effort in an interview after the final. “That needs work.
That definitely needs work.”
Tiafoe, 20, was the youngest
American man to reach a tour final on European clay in 28 years;
Andre Agassi was two months
younger when he reached the final of the 1990 French Open.
Tiafoe fell, 6-4, 6-4, in the final of
the Estoril Open to João Sousa,
who was the first Portuguese
champion of a tour-level event in
Portugal.
“He’s a great guy and he’s improving a lot,” Sousa, 29, said of
Tiafoe. “He’s going to reach a lot of
finals.”
Playing in front of a crowd vociferously and unanimously supporting his opponent was a new
experience that “didn’t feel great,”
Tiafoe said, but there were plenty
of positives to draw from the
week. His semifinal performance,
a 6-2, 6-3 thrashing of 11th-ranked
Pablo Carreño Busta, was espe-
cially impressive. He also saved
three match points in an openinground victory over Tennys Sandgren.
“It was an unbelievable week,
and I hope I can just keep it going,”
Tiafoe said.
He has been considered one of
the greatest prospects in his generation from a young age, but
since turning pro in 2015 he has
achieved relatively little at the
tour level.
He drew some attention for fiveset losses in the first round of the
United States Open against John
Isner in 2016 and Roger Federer in
2017, but coming into the 2018 season, Tiafoe had won only nine of
his 38 career main-draw matches
on the ATP Tour. Only one of those
victories came against a top-30
opponent.
Tiafoe has 15 wins already this
season, including six against
top-30 opponents. He reached his
first tour quarterfinal at the New
York Open in February, and won
his first title in Delray Beach, Fla.,
one week later.
The surge seemed unlikely after the first month of the season.
After going winless in two tournaments in Australia, Tiafoe returned home to Maryland downtrodden.
“You get a lot of things going in
your head when you’re young and
you haven’t really experienced it,”
said Tiafoe, who is ranked 56th, a
career-high. “It’s not like you can
just turn it on.”
Going back to his roots allowed
Tiafoe to reorient his mind-set and
his season.
“I went home and really recuperated,” he said. “Being back
home is a great thing for me, being
with my family, being with friends,
being with people that have got
your back no matter what. I had
some deep talks with everyone,
and their support meant a lot to
me and it was something that I
needed to hear.”
Tiafoe decided to take part of
his support system with him on
the road full-time, adding his
friend Zack Evenden, a 26-yearold Briton who played collegiate
tennis at Florida A&M, to his traveling team to complement the
work of his primary coach, Robby
Ginepri.
“It’s the best thing I’ve done,
the best decision I’ve made, having him here,” Tiafoe said. “He
keeps it real with me. He keeps the
tour fun for me.
“At first we were just friends,
but now he’s definitely taken on a
coaching role under Robby. Robby
comes to the bigger events, but
Zack’s there each and every day. I
credit all my success to him.”
That stability has helped
ground Tiafoe, who admits he has
“had a lot of things going on” pre-
JOSE SENA GOULAO/EPA, VIA SHUTTERSTOCK
By reaching Sunday’s championship round in Portugal, Francis Tiafoe became the youngest American man to reach a tour final on European clay in 28 years. It was Tiafoe’s second final this year.
viously, including changing agencies twice in his young career.
Evenden said that a key for
Tiafoe had been learning to take
“ownership” of his tennis and
measure his own gifts.
“He’s understanding that he
doesn’t have to play his best tennis, highlight-reel tennis, in every
match just to get wins,” Evenden
said. “He’s starting to get comfortable on the tour and realized that
he doesn’t have to have the match
of his life just to get a win.”
Tiafoe’s comfort level on the
tour shows itself in other ways.
As he returned to the clubhouse
after the final Sunday, Tiafoe
turned up the stereo in a tournament car and gave a brief impromptu performance of OutKast’s “The Way You Move” to an
audience of charmed volunteers.
“It’s good to bring a different
feel to tennis, and that’s what I feel
like I bring,” he said. “I bring a different feel, a different swagger to
tennis. I’m very easygoing, and
very nonchalant, it looks like,
when I’m out there — I’ve got a little strut, and I like that.
“There’s no reason trying to fit
in: Just be you,” he added. “That
was the biggest thing for me, just
being me, and finding what works
for me. I have that balance of having fun — because I can need to
have a ton of fun — but also locking it in at times. I’ve found the
perfect balance for me right now,
and I’m being mature and growing as a tennis player.”
B8
N
THE NEW YORK TIMES SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
Shadowed by a Sex Crime, but Now a Fan Favorite in College
From First Sports Page
filled his court obligations be enough,
or was the nature of the crime so
egregious he should never be let
back on the team?
What, now, to make of his denial
and the insistence of the victim’s
mother that it did occur?
And how does the victim’s enduring anguish figure into a quest for redemption and a new beginning?
The Past Goes Public
Last June, when The Oregonian
first reported Heimlich’s guilty plea,
it said he had originally faced two
charges stemming from incidents between 2009 and 2011. The victim is
the daughter of one of Heimlich’s older brothers. She has not been identified by name.
According to court records, the
newspaper said, she told investigators that she was in Heimlich’s bedroom at his home south of Seattle
when he pulled her underwear down
and “touched her on both the inside
and outside.” The Oregonian quoted
the documents as saying, “She told
him to stop, but he wouldn’t.”
As part of a plea deal, reached
when Heimlich was 16, one of the
charges was dropped and he was
placed on two years’ probation, took
court-ordered classes and had to register for five years as a Level 1 sex
offender, a designation the state of
Washington uses for someone considered low risk to the community
and unlikely to become a repeat offender.
Heimlich also had to write a letter
apologizing to his niece.
Heimlich’s case might never have
been made public if not for the fact
that years later, while pitching for Oregon State, he failed to update his
whereabouts for a state registry of
sex offenders, which led to a police citation, which in turn tipped reporters
to his case.
Heimlich’s court records were
sealed last August, two months after
the first news stories broke. That
month, five years after the date of his
plea, he said, the records were expunged. He no longer has to register
as a sex offender.
The news of the case roiled the Oregon State campus and made national headlines. Heimlich left the
baseball team, saying he did not
want to be a distraction. Other than a
brief statement in which he said he
had taken responsibility for his conduct as a teenager, he declined to
comment.
Now, on Saturday, in the interviews with The Times, he spoke
about what he called his “unique situation.” Asked about the critics who
have demanded that Oregon State
refuse to let him rejoin the team, he
was succinct.
“I don’t have anything to tell
them,” he said. “They can have their
opinions of me. Ultimately the people
around me know who I am. That is
what matters. Everybody else can
say what they want.”
The case, he said, is “a delicate
family situation,” though he declined
to go into the details.
Did he abuse his niece?
Heimlich insisted he did not.
“I always denied anything ever
happened,” he said. “Even after I
pled guilty, which was a decision me
and my parents thought was the best
option to move forward as a family.
And after that, even when I was going through counseling and treatment, I maintained my innocence the
whole time.”
There was no interaction with his
niece that he could imagine would
have been misinterpreted, he said,
adding, “Nothing ever happened, so
there is no incident to look back on.”
Heimlich said he had written an
apology to the victim because “there
were certain requirements when going through counseling that had to be
done to finish.”
He suggested the idea that his
niece would face aggressive questioning in a trial factored into his decision to plead guilty.
“Trials aren’t fun things, and as I
said before, it is a delicate situation
within a family,” he said. “We didn’t
want to do anything to complicate
things.”
Pleading out held the promise that
“five years from the date, everything
would go back to normal.”
Heimlich said he was ready to play
in the major leagues. After spending
much of this season trying hard to
PHOTOGRAPHS BY RUTH FREMSON/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Oregon State’s Luke Heimlich pitching in April against Arizona State. Heimlich, once projected as a high draft pick, is 11-1 this season.
“prove people wrong” with his pitching, he said that he was feeling comfortable again, on the mound and off.
He said that he had talked to several big league general managers,
even to owners, and that he had been
contacted by most teams.
Officials with major league baseball teams declined to speak on the
record about Heimlich.
The girl’s mother, who began divorce proceedings around the time
the allegations surfaced and is now
divorced from Heimlich’s brother, is
adamant in her belief that Heimlich’s
dream never be fulfilled. “My opinion
is that he should not be able to play,”
she said, not in college or the pros.
For her daughter, she said, the
case “will only go away when Luke is
out of the light. If he makes it to the
big leagues, he will be in the light forever. Any accomplishment he makes
will shine the light on her. It could be
50 years from now and he gets inducted into the Hall of Fame — they
will bring up this story.
“I don’t think he is a terrible person,” she added. “I think he did a terrible thing.”
A Coach Backs His Player
Although Heimlich has begun to
talk about his troubles, the silence
around him among Oregon State officials has not cracked.
Last year, after Heimlich’s guilty
plea had been made public, the
team’s coach, Pat Casey, a two-time
national title winner, denied knowing
about Heimlich’s past while he was
recruiting him to come to Corvallis.
This season, Casey has said little
more than that he supports his star.
“He’s a fine young man,” Casey told
reporters last summer, “and for every second that he has been on this
campus, on and off the field, he has
been a first-class individual — someone his family should be proud of, our
community should be proud of and
his team is proud of.”
Citing confidentiality laws, university officials have refused to say what
they knew about Heimlich’s background. Coach Casey and Steve
Clark, a university spokesman,
would not grant interviews with The
Times, nor would the Oregon State
president, Ed Ray. (Ray was chairman of the N.C.A.A.’s executive committee in 2012 when it leveled unusually stiff penalties against Penn State
over the sexual abuse of children by
Jerry Sandusky, a former Nittany Lions football coach.)
Ray had issued a statement after
the university reviewed the case,
saying in part that it would “welcome
all educationally qualified students,
including those rehabilitated from
past crimes.”
In his interviews with The Times,
Heimlich said that he had not talked
about his case with Casey before his
plea went public. “It is my job to report to the local law enforcement,” he
said. “If that didn’t get conveyed to
the university, then I would not
know; I was not a part of that.”
Heimlich was described by his coach, Pat Casey, as “a first-class individual” while at Oregon State.
When the initial report about
Heimlich was published, the immediate question was whether he would
stay on the team, which was advancing in the N.C.A.A. tournament.
Ray, the Oregon State president,
supported Heimlich’s voluntary
withdrawal from the team last season. He also left the door open for a
return. “If Luke wishes to do so,” he
said in a written statement at the
time, “I support him continuing his
education at Oregon State and rejoining the baseball team.”
Heimlich would have turned professional if he could have. More than
1,200 players were chosen in last
summer’s major league draft, but
Heimlich, who was eligible for selection, was not one of them — though
he had once been projected to be a
high pick.
So, with the goal still to make the
majors, he returned to the Oregon
State team this year.
He has dominated the mound, but
not quite as overwhelmingly as before. Last year his pitches were
nearly unhittable: His 0.76 earned
run average was among the lowest in
college baseball. This year, though he
is 11-1, that number hovers around
3.00.
Cheers in Corvallis
In Corvallis, where baseball players are treated with the reverence
many universities save for football
players, Heimlich remains deeply respected among fans.
At Goss Stadium, as Heimlich
pitched in the game against Arizona
State, support was obvious. Most
fans stood adamantly behind him.
Some said they had quit paying attention to the Heimlich story after
February, when the university announced a policy some called the
Heimlich Rule. It requires recently
accepted and continuing students to
reveal any felony convictions, or sex
offender status. Those with criminal
backgrounds will have their admissions reviewed.
Others said they had given lengthy
consideration to the case and had decided juvenile crimes should be forgiven — even the most heinous —
once justice, and in some instances
prison time, had been served.
Still others said the news media
should not have written about Heimlich’s past. “He was doing everything
he was supposed to do, everything
the courts asked,” said Raymond
Brooks, a retired Oregon State professor. “Why even dig it up?”
In the ninth inning of the game
against Arizona State, Heimlich was
taken off the mound after a sudden
string of off-the-mark pitches. He
walked toward his teammates with a
grimace. The crowd gave him another ovation.
That kind of support doesn’t sit
well with everyone.
“Even after all the heightened attention about abuse since last year,
it’s a bubble in Corvallis when it
comes to this case,” said Brenda
Tracy, 44, one of Oregon’s most prominent victims’ rights activists.
A registered nurse, Tracy received
national attention in 2014 when she
said that she had been raped in the
late 1990s by a group that included
two members of the Oregon State
football team. After going public with
her story, she spent time as a consultant for the school on assault prevention and policy. Ray, the Oregon State
president, hailed Tracy for her efforts to highlight the problem of oncampus sexual abuse.
But he and Tracy don’t agree about
Heimlich. Playing sports at any level
is a privilege, not a right, Tracy said,
and Heimlich should not be on the
team. Let him stay in school, she
said; let him graduate and move on.
But just like the mother of Heimlich’s
niece, she said she did not think anyone who had pleaded guilty to molestation should be wearing a university sports uniform, or should be
cheered.
“What kind of message does that
send our kids?” she asked. “We have
now normalized this behavior. The
feeling at Oregon State right now is
that our team is winning, so they’ve
moved on. What does that say to the
little girl in this case? What does it
say to all survivors?”
Madeline Gorchels, 24, said that
she was a sexual abuse survivor. She
said she was molested as a child. She
is also an Oregon State baseball season-ticket holder.
Last June, when she heard the
news about Heimlich, she said, she
walked into a closet, crumpled to the
floor and shook for hours.
But she has found ways to be loyal
to Oregon State. When she heard
Heimlich had left the team, she traveled to Omaha for the College World
Series last year.
When he returned to the team this
year, she said, she felt nauseated. But
she shows up for every game she
can. She applauds for the offense, but
she sits stone quiet when Heimlich
pitches.
“I feel like it is important to be
there to represent my point of view,”
she said.
“Even if I am not actively saying
something, it is good for me to be
there to say that I don’t think what
has happened is right. Part of it is I
don’t want what he did affecting my
behavior. But part of it is being there
as a witness to the fact that this is
wrong.”
THE NEW YORK TIMES SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
B9
0N
PRO BASKETBALL
Deep Into Playoffs, Warriors Reach for Not-So-Secret Weapon
From First Sports Page
came with the added risk that
failure could have dented the
Warriors’ confidence in what has
been a longstanding strategical
cure-all.
To Kerr’s relief, going away
from the vast array of big men
Golden State has stockpiled for
this playoff run and starting
Iguodala instead inspired a noticeable zip and sharpness at the
start of the first and third quarters. Golden State zoomed to a
20-8 edge before Iguodala took
his first rest. They hiked the lead
to 18 points at the first-half peak
and ultimately snuffed out the
Pelicans’ spirit with a dominant
response after New Orleans had
clawed to within 4 points shortly
before intermission.
Durant was the biggest beneficiary of the Warriors’ increased
focus and force, but Green (nine
rebounds, nine assists and four
steals) and Iguodala (29 turnover-free minutes and highly
effective defense against the
Pelicans’ Nikola Mirotic) were
huge difference-makers, too.
“They do all the utility stuff,”
Durant said.
Speaking specifically about
Iguodala and how much he keeps
the Warriors organized — at both
ends — Kerr resurrected his pet
praise for the veteran swingman
by saying: “He reminds me a lot
of Scottie Pippen.”
Ever the contrarian, Iguodala
welcomed the lineup change and
flattering comparison only to a
degree. He was more interested
in advancing the idea that the
19-point humbling that the Warriors endured in Game 3 actually
might have benefited them, with
Curry still working his way back
from the knee sprain that sidelined him from March 24 until
Game 2 of this series.
“We’ve been doing this for a
long time and people can say,
‘How do you get bored of winning?’” Iguodala said. “But with
everything that comes with it, it
can be a mental drain. So sometimes it’s good for us to lose.
“It was good for us to kind of
get punched in the mouth and
see how we responded.”
The numerical response: Kerr
kept his Game 4 starters on the
floor for 18 minutes, during
which the group posted a cumulative plus/minus of +26.
“Any time we’ve been in danger over the years, we’ve gone to
this group,” Kerr said at the
postgame podium. “You’re on the
road, you’re threatened, you put
your five best players out there.”
Yet Kerr insisted after his
victorious news conference, in a
hallway outside the visitors’
locker room, that he would continue to be judicious with how
much he leans on his most feared
five-man combination — for its
own good.
“You can’t play that way the
whole season,” Kerr said. “You’ll
blow those guys out — and I
mean blow them out physically.”
For long stretches of the season, of course, injuries (especially Curry’s) didn’t even make
it an option to trot out Curry/
Thompson/Iguodala/Durant/
Green as much as the Warriors
would have liked. Expect to see
more and more of that alignment
as the prospect of a third championship in four seasons dribbles
closer into view for Golden State.
“We’re always going to get to
that lineup eventually,” Kerr said
as he headed for the team bus.
Some of the principles even
embrace the “Hamptons Five”
concept coined by the longtime
Bay Area columnist Tim
Kawakami.
“Hell yeah,” Green said.
“That’s where it all started.”
GAME 4 STARTERS
KEVIN DURANT
36
38
9
5
STEPHEN CURRY
32
23
1
2
By The Associated Press
lead the exasperated Raptors. Toronto’s frustration hit its peak late
in the third when DeMar DeRozan
was ejected for a flagrant foul.
Cleveland will be appearing in
its fourth straight conference finals despite a turbulent regular
season and a bumpy start to the
playoffs. The Cavaliers needed
seven games to get past Indiana
before tormenting Toronto —
again.
The Cavs had one of their best
all-around games of these playoffs
after so many tight ones. They
won Games 1 and 3 over Toronto
by a combined 3 points, needing a
buzzer-beater to outlast the Raptors on Saturday night.
Cleveland took control on Monday with a 12-0 run over the final
two minutes of the first half. The
Cavs didn’t let up, pushing their
lead to 30 as their fans finally got a
MINUTES
POINTS
REBOUND
ASSISTS
KLAY THOMPSON
37
13
7
0
MINUTES
POINTS
REBOUNDS
ASSISTS
DRAYMOND GREEN
37
8
9
9
MINUTES
POINTS
REBOUNDS
ASSISTS
ANDRE IGUODALA
29
6
7
6
MINUTES
POINTS
REBOUNDS
ASSISTS
SEAN GARDNER/GETTY IMAGES
Kevin Durant, right, started on Sunday with the four teammates who helped recruit him in 2016.
Once Again, Cavs Brush Past Raptors to Advance
LeBron James sent Toronto to
its summer vacation for the third
straight season as the host Cleveland Cavaliers completed a series
sweep of the Raptors on Monday
with a 128-93 win in Game 4 to advance to the Eastern Conference
finals.
James finished with 29 points
and 11 assists, and spent some of
the final seven minutes dancing
near the bench during Cleveland’s
10th straight playoff win over Toronto, which changed its system,
its roster and its approach but still
can’t beat the game’s best player.
Kevin Love added 23 points and
J. R. Smith 15 for the Cavs, who
can now rest while waiting for the
Boston-Philadelphia semifinal series to end.
Jonas Valanciunas scored 18
and Kyle Lowry had 10 assists to
MINUTES
POINTS
REBOUNDS
ASSISTS
chance to relax and start making
plans for the next round.
After James dropped a fadeaway baseline jumper to give
Cleveland a 27-point lead, he
stared at Toronto’s bench.
It’s back to the drawing board
for Toronto. The Raptors had the
league’s second-best record, the
No. 1 seed in the playoffs, a deeper
bench and, in Lowry and
DeRozan, enough firepower to offset James. But after blowing a big
lead and giving away Game 1 on
their home floor, the Raptors
never recovered and now face an
off-season full of questions and
second-guessing.
Raptors Coach Dwane Casey,
looking for a push to save the season — and maybe his job —
switched starting lineups for the
second straight game. He gave
C. J. Miles his first start and put
TONY DEJAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Cavaliers’ LeBron James working against the Raptors’ Pascal Siakam on Monday. Toronto was
tormented by James, who had 29 points and 11 assists as Cleveland completed a four-game sweep.
PRO FOOTBALL
Serge Ibaka back with the first
five after using him in a reserve
role in Game 3.
But Miles picked up two quick
fouls, and the Cavs’ offense was in
gear from the start as Cleveland
opened 12 of 15 from the floor
while building a 26-17 lead.
76ERS 103, CELTICS 92 T. J. Mc-
Connell turned a surprise start
into the save of the season, and
Dario Saric scored 25 points to
help Philadelphia stave off elimination in a win over visiting Boston in Game 4.
The 76ers still face daunting
odds as they head into Game 5
trailing by 3-1 in the Eastern Conference semifinal series. No
N.B.A. team has ever recovered
from a 3-0 hole to win a series.
McConnell had 19 points, 7 rebounds and 5 assists in only his
second start of the season, and
meshed well in the backcourt with
Ben Simmons. The crowd chanted
“T. J.! T. J.!” each time he touched
the ball in the fourth, and he
proved why he has been so valuable even as bigger stars have
sliced his playing time.
He was just what Coach Brett
Brown needed in a must-win
game. “I can tell you the Philadelphia 76ers’ spirit is just fine,”
Brown said.
Joel Embiid had 15 points and 13
rebounds, and Simmons had 19
points and 13 boards. Jayson Tatum led the Celtics with 20 points,
and Marcus Morris had 17.
The big zero in the box score:
confetti pieces fired into the sky.
The Sixers scrapped their traditional confetti cannon celebration
after it was prematurely shot at
the end of regulation in a Game 3
overtime loss.
The Sixers were in control in
what might have been their final
home game of the season.
Boston’s Jaylen Brown and
Coach Brad Stevens received
technicals late in the third, and the
Sixers capitalized with two free
throws and an Embiid dunk.
Embiid chirped at Celtics forward Marcus Morris, who flashed
a “3-0” with his hands.
McConnell buried a 3-pointer
for a 14-point lead that would soon
make that combination obsolete.
DAVID J. PHILLIP/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eric Reid (35) with his then-teammates on the San Francisco
49ers during the playing of the national anthem in December.
Anthem Protester Gets Lift
From N.F.L. Players’ Union
By VICTOR MATHER
The N.F.L. Players Association
filed a grievance against the
league on behalf of Eric Reid on
Monday.
Reid, a former San Francisco
49ers safety who has knelt during
the national anthem at games for
the past two seasons, filed a grievance of his own last week against
the N.F.L., saying the league had
blackballed him because of his actions. After becoming a free agent
following the 2017 season, he has
yet to find a new team.
The former 49ers quarterback
Colin Kaepernick, who led a wave
of
sideline
demonstrations
against social injustice and police
brutality against African-Americans, filed a similar grievance last
season. It is still being adjudicated.
The players association said in
a statement that the collective
bargaining agreement had been
violated in Reid’s case. It contended that “A club appears to
have based its decision not to sign
a player based on the player’s
statement that he would challenge the implementation of a
club’s policy prohibiting demonstration.”
It also claimed that “at least one
club owner has asked pre-employment interview questions about a
player’s intent to demonstrate.
We believe these questions are
improper, given league policy.”
The union did not identify the
teams involved. Reid is known to
have met with the Bengals.
The N.F.L. did not immediately
reply to a request for comment. It
had declined to comment after
Reid filed his grievance last week.
C A L E N DA R
TV Highlights
Baseball
Baseball / College
Basketball / N.B.A.
Playoffs
Soccer
1:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis
MLB
Mets at Cincinnati
SNY
Boston at Yankees
YES
Nebraska at Creighton
CBSSN
Utah at Houston
TNT
New Orleans at Golden State
TNT
Premier League, Southampton at Swansea City NBCSN
This Week
HOME
AWAY
METS
YANKEES
RED BULLS
TUE
5/8
WED
5/9
THU
5/10
CINCINNATI CINCINNATI
7 p.m.
SNY
BOSTON
BOSTON
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
YES
ESPN, YES
COLORADO
9 P.M. SATURDAY
SAT
5/12
SUN
5/13
MON
5/14
PHILADELPHIA PHILADELPHIA PHILADELPHIA
12:30 p.m.
SNY
FRI
5/11
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
SNY
CH. 11
SNY
BOSTON
OAKLAND
OAKLAND
OAKLAND
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
CH. 11
MSG
YES
N.Y.C.F.C.
YES
2600
PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT
Prestigious Medical Oncology office,
NYC seeks Physician Assistant.
Salary Negotiable. Mon-Fri. Please Fax
resumes to: Wanda Eden: 212-628-8736
NOTICES &
LOST AND
FOUND
(5100-5102)
The annual report of the Asher Pelkis
Foundation, Inc, is available at P.O.
BOX 7958, Delray Beach, FL 33482 for
inspection by any citizen who so requests, by mail, within 180 days after
publication of this notice.
YES
L.A.F.C.
8:30 P.M. SUNDAY
Help Wanted
FS1
B10
0
THE NEW YORK TIMES SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
S C O R E B OA R D
Capitals Eliminate the Penguins for a Change
PITTSBURGH (AP) — Evgeny
Kuznetsov’s breakaway goal in overtime gave the Washington Capitals a
2-1 win over the Pittsburgh Penguins
in Game 6 on Monday night, and a
berth in the
CAPITALS
2
Eastern Conference finals
PENGUINS
1
for the first
Overtime
time in 20
years.
Washington wins
Kuznetsov
series, 4-2
took a lead
pass from Alex Ovechkin and tucked
the puck underneath Matt Murray at
5 minutes 27 seconds, ending Pittsburgh’s two-year reign as Stanley Cup
champion and propelling the Capitals
into the N.H.L.’s final four for just the
third time in franchise history.
Braden Holtby stopped 21 shots for
the Capitals, who will face Tampa Bay
in the Eastern Conference finals. Alex
Chiasson scored his first playoff goal in
four years during a tight contest
through regulation.
Kris Letang scored for the Penguins, and Murray finished with 28
saves but couldn’t close his legs fast
enough to stop Kuznetsov’s forehand
flick from in close as Pittsburgh’s bid at
becoming the first team in 35 years to
win three consecutive Cups came to an
abrupt end.
The Capitals played without center
Nicklas
Backstrom,
who
was
scratched because of a right hand injury. Forward Tom Wilson sat for a third
straight game, serving a suspension
for an illegal hit on Pittsburgh’s Zach
BASEBALL
PRO BASKETBALL
A.L. STANDINGS
East
W
Boston
GREGORY SHAMUS/GETTY IMAGES
Pct
GB
9 .735
—
Yankees
24
10 .706
1
Toronto
19
16 .543
6{
Tampa Bay
15
17 .469
9
Baltimore
8
26 .235
17
Central
Lars Eller (20) and the Capitals will face the Lightning in the East finals.
L
25
W
L
Pct
GB
Cleveland
17
17 .500
—
Minnesota
14
17 .452
1{
Detroit
14
20 .412
3
Kansas City
11
23 .324
6
Chicago
9
23 .281
West
W
L
7
Pct
GB
—
Los Angeles
21
13 .618
Houston
21
15 .583
1
Seattle
19
14 .576
1{
Oakland
18
16 .529
3
Texas
14
23 .378
8{
MONDAY
Aston-Reese in Game 2.
Washington spent the series saying
its forgettable playoff history littered
with squandered leads and blown opportunities — particularly against the
Penguins — was not a factor. That this
time was different. That this team was
different. Twice the Capitals rallied in
the third period to stun Pittsburgh, including a four-goal outburst in Game 5
that pushed them to the brink of the
Eastern Conference finals.
That last step, however, has always
been tricky. Four times previously
during the Ovechkin era, the Capitals
won three games in the second round
only to come up short in Game 7.
The Penguins, by contrast, had been
impossible to finish off since Coach
Mike Sullivan took over in December
2015. Pittsburgh came in 4-0 in elimination games under Sullivan, including a 2-0 victory in Game 7 in Washington last spring.
The stakes led to an unusually slow
start for both before the Capitals broke
through 2:13 into the second when
Walker held off Pittsburgh’s Derick
Brassard behind the Pittsburgh net
and fed Chiasson in the right circle.
Chiasson’s shot slipped under Murray’s left arm for his second career
playoff goal and first in more than four
years, when he played for Dallas.
Texas 7, Detroit 6
Minnesota 6, St. Louis 0
Houston at Oakland
TUESDAY
Boston (Pomeranz 1-1) at Yankees
(Severino 5-1), 7:05
Minnesota (Odorizzi 2-2) at St. Louis
(Martinez 3-1), 1:15
Kansas City (Duffy 0-4) at Baltimore
(Bundy 1-4), 7:05
Seattle (Paxton 1-1) at Toronto (Stroman 0-4), 7:07
Atlanta (Newcomb 2-1) at Tampa
Bay (Snell 4-1), 7:10
Cleveland (Kluber 5-1) at Milwaukee
(Miley 1-0), 7:40
Detroit (Fiers 2-2) at Texas (Minor
3-1), 8:05
Pittsburgh (Nova 2-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Giolito 1-4), 8:10
L.A. Angels (Heaney 1-1) at Colorado
(Gray 3-4), 8:40
Houston (McCullers 4-1) at Oakland
(Manaea 4-3), 10:05
WEDNESDAY
Boston at Yankees, 7:05
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 1:10
Detroit at Texas, 2:05
Pittsburgh at Chicago White Sox,
2:10
L.A. Angels at Colorado, 3:10
Houston at Oakland, 3:35
Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05
Seattle at Toronto, 7:07
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 7:10
N.L. STANDINGS
East
NOEL CELIS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
Hafthor Julius Bjornsson in the atlas stones contest at the World’s Strongest Man competition on Sunday.
Pct
GB
Atlanta
19
W
14 .576
—
Philadelphia
19
15 .559
{
Mets
18
15 .545
1
Washington
18
17 .514
2
Miami
13
21 .382
6{
Central
W
St. Louis
L
L
Pct
GB
20
13 .606
—
Milwaukee
20
15 .571
1
Pittsburgh
19
16 .543
2
Chicago
2{
17
15 .531
Cincinnati
8
27 .229
West
W
L
Pct
13
GB
Arizona
23
11 .676
—
Colorado
20
15 .571
3{
San Francisco
19
16 .543
4{
Los Angeles
15
19 .441
8
San Diego
13
22 .371 10{
MONDAY
PRO B ASK ETBALL
Van Gundy and Playoff-Starved Pistons Split
Stan Van Gundy will not return to the Detroit Pistons as
coach or as president of basketball operations.
The Pistons announced Van Gundy’s departure Monday, with the owner Tom Gores saying in a statement that
the team had not progressed in the past two seasons. Gores
said Van Gundy had wanted to return for a fifth season.
The Pistons went 39-43 this season, missing the playoffs for the third time in four years under Van Gundy. They
have made the postseason just once in the past nine years,
and even a blockbuster trade for Blake Griffin was not
enough to salvage 2017-18.
ST RO NGMAN CO N T EST
From ‘Game of Thrones’ to Strongest Man
Hafthor Julius Bjornsson of Iceland took a break from
playing Gregor Clegane, the brutal warrior known as the
Mountain, on “Game of Thrones” and won the long-running
World’s Strongest Man competition on Sunday in Manila.
Bjornsson, 29, has been a regular in the competition
and had three second- and three third-place finishes over
the years, but had never previously won. Bjornsson checks
in at 6 feet 9 inches and 400 pounds.
Among the events Bjornsson contested were the car
dead lift, the truck pull and a loading race in which he
hauled anchors, anvils and other objects. VICTOR MATHER
B AS EB AL L
White Sox’ Farquhar May Pitch Again
White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar was released from
a Chicago hospital where he had been receiving treatment
for a brain hemorrhage caused by a ruptured aneurysm,
and a doctor said Farquhar might pitch again.
Farquhar, a 31-year-old right-hander, collapsed in the
dugout on April 20 during a home game against Houston.
He had surgery the following day.
Demetrius Lopes, a neurosurgeon, said that he expected that Farquhar would be able to pitch again but that
he would not give him a medical release to throw in a game
this season.
PHILLIES TROUNCE GIANTS Odubel Herrera homered twice and
drove in five runs, helping Zach Eflin and the Philadelphia
Phillies rout the visiting San Francisco Giants, 11-0.
NO SURGERY FOR CUETO San Francisco pitcher Johnny Cueto
will be sidelined for six to eight weeks because of a strained
right elbow but will not have Tommy John surgery, the Giants said.
TENNI S
Djokovic Defeats Nishikori in Madrid
Novak Djokovic beat 20th-ranked Kei Nishikori, 7-5,
6-4, in the first round of the Madrid Open, Djokovic’s highest-ranked victory in 10 months.
Coming back from an injury to his right elbow, Djokovic
has not made it to the quarterfinals in his previous five
tournaments this year.
Top-ranked Rafael Nadal will make his tournament debut on Wednesday against Gaël Monfils, who defeated the
qualifier Nikoloz Basilashvili, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3.
All news by The Associated Press unless noted.
Maria Sharapova, who won in Madrid in 2014, made it
to the final 16 by defeating Irina-Camelia Begu, 7-5, 6-1, in
only her second match since the Australian Open. She has
been dealing with an injury to her left forearm.
F IG U R E S K AT ING
Russian Star Parts Ways With Her Coach
The two-time Olympic silver medalist Evgenia
Medvedeva is leaving her longtime coach, Eteri Tutberidze, to work with Brian Orser, the Canadian coach who
has guided Yuna Kim and Yuzuru Hanyu to Olympic titles.
Medvedeva, 18, had been favored to win gold at the
Pyeongchang Games this year after capturing the last two
world titles. But despite flawless routines in the short program and the free skate, she was edged by her close friend
and then-training partner Alina Zagitova.
PR O FO OT BAL L
Giants Release Five Before Minicamp
Four days before the start of a rookie minicamp, the Giants released five players, but only one who saw action in
regular-season games last season.
The players released were safety Ryan Murphy, guard
Damien Mama, receiver Canaan Severin, running back
Terrell Watson and punter Austin Rehkow. Murphy played
in the final three games in 2017.
FORMER CHIEFS LINEBACKER JOINS RAIDERS The Oakland
Raiders signed the free-agent linebacker Derrick Johnson
to a one-year contract. Johnson, 35, spent his first 13 N.F.L.
seasons with the Raiders’ rivals, the Kansas City Chiefs,
and is likely to fill the role at middle linebacker that NaVorro Bowman played in the second half of last season.
L AC R O SS E
Maryland Men and Women Are Top Seeds
Maryland, the defending champion, is the top seed for
the men’s N.C.A.A. lacrosse tournament.
The first round starts Saturday, and the Terrapins
(12-3) will host the winner of Wednesday’s play-in game between Robert Morris and Canisius. The other seven seeds
are, in order, Albany (14-2), Yale (13-3), Duke (13-3), Johns
Hopkins (11-4), Loyola Maryland (12-3), Notre Dame (9-5)
and Syracuse (8-6).
The Maryland women, also defending champions, are
the top seed in their tournament, which begins Friday.
HOCKEY
U.S. Extends Unbeaten Streak at Worlds
The United States defeated Germany, 3-0, and remained unbeaten, and Russia routed Belarus, 6-0, its third
consecutive shutout, at the world ice hockey championship
in Herning, Denmark.
The United States captain Patrick Kane broke the deadlock against Germany on a power play midway through the
game and assisted on the other two goals, by Derek Ryan
and Alex DeBrincat. United States goalie Keith Kinkaid
stopped 24 shots for his second straight shutout.
Canada defeated Denmark, 7-1, and defending champion Sweden kept cruising with a 4-0 victory over France.
Mets 7, Cincinnati 6
Philadelphia 11, San Francisco 0
Chicago Cubs 14, Miami 2
Minnesota 6, St. Louis 0
Washington at San Diego
TUESDAY
Mets (Vargas 0-2) at Cincinnati
(Castillo 1-4), 7:10
Minnesota (Odorizzi 2-2) at St. Louis
(Martinez 3-1), 1:15
San Francisco (Holland 1-3) at
Philadelphia (Nola 4-1), 7:05
Atlanta (Newcomb 2-1) at Tampa
Bay (Snell 4-1), 7:10
Cleveland (Kluber 5-1) at Milwaukee
(Miley 1-0), 7:40
Miami (Urena 0-5) at Chicago Cubs
(Darvish 0-3), 8:05
Pittsburgh (Nova 2-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Giolito 1-4), 8:10
L.A. Angels (Heaney 1-1) at Colorado
(Gray 3-4), 8:40
Arizona (Godley 4-2) at L.A. Dodgers
(Hill 1-1), 10:10
Washington (Hellickson 0-0) at San
Diego (Richard 1-4), 10:10
WEDNESDAY
Mets at Cincinnati, 12:35
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 1:10
Pittsburgh at Chicago White Sox,
2:10
Miami at Chicago Cubs, 2:20
L.A. Angels at Colorado, 3:10
San Francisco at Philadelphia,
7:05
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 7:10
Washington at San Diego, 9:10
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10
METS 7, REDS 6
New York
Conforto cf-lf
Cespedes lf
Reyes pr
Familia p
Bruce rf
Cabrera 2b
Frazier 3b
Gonzalez 1b
Lobaton c
Conlon p
Sewald p
Gsellman p
Lagares cf
Rosario ss
Totals
Cincinnati
Winker rf
Peraza ss
Votto 1b
Suarez 3b
Gennett 2b
Duvall lf
Iglesias p
Barnhart c
Bailey p
Blandino ph
Stephens p
Schebler ph
Hughes p
Herrera lf
Hamilton cf
Totals
New York
Cincinnati
ab
5
4
0
0
3
5
5
4
4
2
1
1
0
3
37
ab
5
4
3
4
4
4
0
4
1
0
0
0
0
1
4
34
r h bi bb so avg.
1 2 1 0 0 .198
1 2 1 0 0 .254
0 0 0 0 0 .139
0 0 0 0 0
--1 2 2 2 0 .248
0 0 0 0 3 .320
0 0 0 0 2 .237
3 3 2 0 1 .256
0 1 0 0 1 .163
1 1 0 0 0 .500
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .319
0 2 1 0 1 .243
7 13 7 2 9
r h bi bb so avg.
0 0 0 0 1 .273
0 0 0 0 0 .285
0 0 0 1 0 .282
2 2 1 0 0 .290
2 2 2 0 0 .289
1 1 0 0 0 .164
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 2 1 0 1 .247
0 0 0 0 0 .083
0 0 0 1 0 .241
0 0 0 0 0
--0 0 1 0 0 .273
0 0 0 0 0
--0 0 0 0 1 .143
1 1 1 0 0 .206
6 8 6 2 3
113
001
110 000—7 13 0
202 010—6 8 0
LOB—New York 7, Cincinnati 4. 2B—
Cespedes 2 (6), Lobaton (2), Rosario 2
(7), Suarez (5), Gennett (9), Barnhart (6).
HR—Conforto (2), off Bailey; Bruce (3), off
Bailey; Gonzalez (4), off Bailey; Gonzalez
(5), off Stephens; Hamilton (2), off Conlon;
Suarez (5), off Sewald; Gennett (3), off
Gsellman. RBIs—Conforto (7), Cespedes
(27), Bruce 2 (14), Gonzalez 2 (19),
Rosario (10), Suarez (21), Gennett 2 (16),
Barnhart (9), Hamilton (10), Schebler (12).
SF—Cespedes, Rosario, Schebler. DP—
Cincinnati 1
New York
ip h r er bb so np era
Conlon
3Î/¯ 4 3 3 2 1 56 7.36
Sewald
1Î/¯ 3 2 2 0 0 28 3.72
GsellmanW4-0 2Î/¯ 1 1 1 0 0 22 3.92
FamiliaS10-13 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 1.59
Cincinnati
ip h r er bb so np era
BaileyL0-5
4 8 6 6 1 3 86 5.61
Stephens
2 3 1 1 1 1 43 9.00
Hughes
2 0 0 0 0 4 25 1.71
Iglesias
1 2 0 0 0 1 11 1.84
T—2:47. A—15,187 (42,319).
PRO HOCKEY
N.B.A. PLAYOFF SCHEDULE
N.H.L. PLAYOFF SCHEDULE
All Times EDT
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Cleveland 4, Toronto 0
Tuesday, May 1: Cleveland 113, Toronto
112, OT
Thursday, May 3: Cleveland 128, Toronto
110
Saturday, May 5: Cleveland 105, Toronto
103
Monday, May 7: Cleveland 128, Toronto 93
Boston 3, Philadelphia 1
Monday, April 30: Boston 117, Philadelphia
101
Thursday, May 3: Boston 108, Philadelphia
103
Saturday, May 5: Boston 101, Philadelphia
98, OT
Monday, May 7: Philadelphia 103, Boston 92
Wednesday, May 9: Philadelphia at Boston,
8 p.m.
x-Friday, May 11: Boston at Philadelphia,
8 p.m.
x-Sunday, May 13: Philadelphia at Boston,
TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Houston 3, Utah 1
Sunday, April 29: Houston 110, Utah 96
Wednesday, May 2: Utah 116, Houston 108
Friday, May 4: Houston 113, Utah 92
Sunday, May 6: Houston 100, Utah 87
Tuesday, May 8: Utah at Houston, 8 p.m.
Thursday, May 10: Houston at Utah, TBA
x-Monday, May 14: Utah at Houston, TBA
Golden State 3, New Orleans 1
Saturday, April 28: Golden State 123, New
Orleans 101
Tuesday, May 1: Golden State 121, New
Orleans 116
Friday, May 4: New Orleans 119, Golden
State 100
Sunday, May 6: Golden State 118, New
Orleans 92
Tuesday, May 8: New Orleans at Golden
State, 10:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 10: Golden State at New
Orleans, TBA
x-Monday, May 14: New Orleans at Golden
State, TBA
All Times EDT
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Washington 4, Pittsburgh 2
Thursday, April 26: Pittsburgh 3,
Washington 2
Sunday, April 29: Washington 4,
Pittsburgh 1
Tuesday,
May
1:
Washington
4,
Pittsburgh 3
Thursday,
May
3:
Pittsburgh
3,
Washington 1
Saturday, May 5: Washington 6,
Pittsburgh 3
Monday, May 7: Washington 2, Pittsburgh
1, OT
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 1
Saturday, April 28: Boston 6, Tampa Bay 2
Monday, April 30: Tampa Bay 4, Boston 2
Wednesday, May 2: Tampa Bay 4, Boston 1
Friday, May 4: Tampa Bay 4, Boston 3,
OT
Sunday, May 6: Tampa Bay 3, Boston 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Winnipeg 3, Nashville 2
Friday, April 27: Winnipeg 4, Nashville 1
Sunday, April 29: Nashville 5, Winnipeg
4, 2OT
Tuesday, May 1: Winnipeg 7, Nashville 4
Thursday, May 3: Nashville 2, Winnipeg 1
Saturday, May 5: Winnipeg 6, Nashville 2
Monday, May 7: Nashville at Winnipeg
x-Thursday, May 10: Winnipeg at
Nashville, 8 p.m.
Vegas 4, San Jose 2
Thursday, April 26: Vegas 7, San Jose 0
Saturday, April 28: San Jose 4, Vegas
3, 2OT
Monday, April 30: Vegas 4, San Jose 3,
OT
Wednesday, May 2: San Jose 4, Vegas 0
Friday, May 4: Vegas 5, San Jose 3
Sunday, May 6: Vegas 3, San Jose 0
76ERS 103, CELTICS 92
BOSTON (92)
Tatum 7-16 4-4 20, Horford 4-6 2-2 10,
Baynes 2-7 3-4 9, Rozier 4-11 2-4 11, Smart
5-12 3-4 14, Ojeleye 0-0 0-0 0, Nader 0-0
0-2 0, Morris 6-15 2-3 17, Yabusele 0-0 0-0
0, Monroe 1-2 1-1 3, Larkin 0-0 0-0 0, Brown
2-6 2-2 8. Totals 31-75 19-26 92.
PHILADELPHIA (103)
Redick 3-11 0-2 7, Saric 9-17 6-6 25,
Embiid 6-15 1-2 15, Simmons 6-15 7-8 19,
McConnell 9-12 0-1 19, Covington 1-7 0-0
3, Ilyasova 2-7 2-3 6, Anderson 0-0 0-0 0,
Belinelli 2-10 4-4 9. Totals 38-94 20-26 103.
Boston . . . . . . . 22 21 22 27—92
Philadelphia. . . . 21 26 29 27—103
3-Point Goals—Boston 11-32 (Morris 3-6,
Brown 2-5, Baynes 2-6, Tatum 2-6, Smart
1-2, Rozier 1-6, Horford 0-1), Philadelphia
7-26 (Embiid 2-5, McConnell 1-1, Saric
1-3, Belinelli 1-3, Covington 1-5, Redick
1-7, Ilyasova 0-2). Fouled Out—None.
Rebounds—Boston 43 (Horford 10),
Philadelphia 53 (Embiid, Simmons 13).
Assists—Boston 16 (Tatum 4), Philadelphia
24 (McConnell, Simmons 5). Total Fouls—
Boston 28, Philadelphia 23. Technicals—
Rozier, Brown, Boston coach Brad Stevens,
Embiid. A—20,936 (21,600).
CAVALIERS 128, RAPTORS 93
TORONTO (93)
Miles 5-11 3-4 13, Anunoby 1-3 0-0 2, Ibaka
5-8 0-0 12, Lowry 2-7 0-0 5, DeRozan 5-11
3-4 13, Powell 2-5 1-2 5, Siakam 3-4 3-3
9, Nogueira 0-0 0-0 0, Poeltl 0-3 0-0 0,
Valanciunas 7-14 4-6 18, Wright 4-7 2-2 10,
Brown 0-1 1-2 1, VanVleet 2-5 0-0 5. Totals
36-79 17-23 93.
CLEVELAND (128)
Smith 6-6 0-0 15, James 12-19 5-8 29, Love
8-13 5-6 23, Hill 5-8 2-2 12, Korver 6-8 0-0
16, Nance Jr. 4-4 0-0 8, Green 3-7 0-0 8,
Osman 2-5 0-0 5, Zizic 0-3 0-0 0, Thompson
2-3 1-1 5, Calderon 0-0 2-2 2, Clarkson 2-8
1-1 5. Totals 50-84 16-20 128.
Toronto . . . . . . . 26 21 25 21—93
Cleveland . . . . . 30 33 37 28—128
3-Point
Goals—Toronto
4-15
(Ibaka
2-3, VanVleet 1-3, Lowry 1-4, Anunoby
0-1, Wright 0-1, Powell 0-1, Miles 0-2),
Cleveland 12-26 (Korver 4-5, Smith 3-3,
Love 2-4, Green 2-6, Osman 1-3, Hill 0-1,
Clarkson 0-1, James 0-3). Fouled Out—
None. Rebounds—Toronto 32 (DeRozan,
Valanciunas 5), Cleveland 37 (James 8).
Assists—Toronto 19 (Lowry 10), Cleveland
29 (James 11). Total Fouls—Toronto
24, Cleveland 21. Ejected—DeRozan.
A—20,562 (20,562).
TENNIS
MADRID OPEN
Caja Magica
MADRID, SPAIN
Singles
Men
First Round
Benoit Paire, France, d. Lucas Pouille
(15), France, 6-2, 6-3. Diego Schwartzman
(13), Argentina, d. Adrian Mannarino,
France, 6-1, 6-3. Milos Raonic, Canada,
d. Nicolas Kicker, Argentina, 6-3, 6-2.
Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina,
d. Julien Benneteau, France, 6-4, 6-2.
Novak Djokovic (10), Serbia, d. Kei
Nishikori, Japan, 7-5, 6-4. Dusan Lajovic,
Serbia, d. Karen Khachanov, Russia, 6-3,
6-2. Federico Delbonis, Argentina, d.
Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-1, 2-6, 7-6
(6). Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan,
d. Roberto Carballes Baena, Spain,
6-3, 6-2. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, d.
Pablo Andujar, Spain, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Gael
Monfils, France, d. Nikoloz Basilashvili,
Georgia, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3.
Women
Second Round
Caroline Garcia (7), France, d.
Petra Martic, Croatia, 6-3, 7-5. Maria
Sharapova, Russia, d. Irina-Camelia
Begu, Romania, 7-5, 6-1. Kristina
Mladenovic, France, d. Zhang Shuai,
China, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki
(2), Denmark, d. Ashleigh Barty, Australia,
6-2, 4-6, 6-4. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands,
d. Anastasija Sevastova (15), Latvia, 6-1,
6-4. Julia Goerges (11), Germany, d.
Lara Arruabarrena, Spain, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Sloane Stephens (9), United States, d.
Sam Stosur, Australia, 6-1, 6-3. Karolina
Pliskova (6), Czech Republic, d. Victoria
Azarenka, Belarus, 6-2, 1-6, 7-5.
Doubles
Men
First Round
Robin Haase and Jean-Julien Rojer,
Netherlands, d. Santiago Gonzalez,
Mexico, and Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi,
Pakistan, 7-5, 6-3. Pablo Cuevas,
Uruguay, and Marcel Granollers, Spain,
d. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, and
Dominic Thiem, Austria, 6-3, 7-6 (8).
Women
First Round
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, and
Olga Savchuk, Ukraine, d. Elise Mertens,
Belgium, and Demi Schuurs, Netherlands,
walkover. Latisha Chan, Taiwan, and
Bethanie Mattek-Sands (5), United
States, vs. Christina McHale, United
States, and Peng Shuai, China, 6-4, 6-1.
Andreja Klepac, Slovenia, and Maria
Jose Martinez Sanchez (7), Spain,
d. Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, and
Alize Cornet, France, 6-2, 6-4. Johanna
Konta, Britain, and Zhang Shuai, China,
d. Anabel Medina Garrigues and Arantxa
Parra Santonja, Spain, 2-6, 6-3, 10-3.
Nicole Melichar, United States, and
Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, d.
Irina-Camelia Begu and Simona Halep,
Romania, 2-6, 6-3, 11-9.
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Sent 2B Jonathan
Schoop to Frederick (Carolina) for a rehab
assignment.
SEATTLE MARINERS — Signed RHP Tucker
Healy to a minor league contract.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Assigned LHP
Luis Santos outright to Buffalo (IL).
National League
CINCINNATI REDS — Optioned RHP
Shackelford to Louisville (IL). Recalled RHP
Jackson Stephens from Louisville.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Optioned RHP
Nick Kingham to Indianapolis (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Sent RHP Adam
Wainwright to Springfield (TL) for a rehab
assignment. Recalled RHP John Gant
from Memphis (PCL). Optioned RHP Mike
Mayers to Memphiss.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Signed C
Ryan Hanigan to a minor league contract.
N.B.A.
DETROIT PISTONS — Fired coach and director
of basketball operations Stan Van Gundy.
KNICKS — Named David Fizdale coach.
PRO FOOTBALL
USA FOOTBALL — Named Mike Krueger
director of coaching.
N.F.L.
GIANTS — Waived S Ryan Murphy, G
Damien Mama, WR Canaan Severin, RB
Terrell Watson and P Austin Rehkow.
CAPITALS 2, PENGUINS 1
Washington . . . . . . . . . 0 1 0 1—2
Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . 0 1 0 0—1
FIRST PERIOD—None. Penalties—Maatta,
PIT, (high sticking), 4:11; Kempny, WSH,
(tripping), 11:25.
SECOND
PERIOD—1,
Washington,
Chiasson 1 (Beagle, Walker), 2:13. 2,
Pittsburgh, Letang 3 (Dumoulin, Crosby),
11:52. Penalties—None.
THIRD PERIOD—None. Penalties—None.
OVERTIME—3, Washington, Kuznetsov 7
(Ovechkin, Orlov), 5:27. Penalties—None.
Shots on Goal—Washington 7-8-96—30. Pittsburgh 6-9-5-2—22. Powerplay opportunities—Washington 0 of 1;
Pittsburgh 0 of 1. Goalies—Washington,
Holtby 8-3 (22 shots-21 saves). Pittsburgh,
Murray 6-6 (30-28). A—18,621 (18,387).
T—2:50. Referees—Eric Furlatt, Kelly
Sutherland. Linesmen—Scott Cherrey,
Matt MacPherson.
N.H.L. PLAYOFF LEADERS
Goal Scoring
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh . . . .
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh . . . .
Mark Scheifele Winnipeg . . . . .
Alex Ovechkin Washington. . . .
Patrice Bergeron Boston . . . . .
Jake DeBrusk Boston . . . . . . .
Tomas Hertl San Jose . . . . . .
Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay . . .
Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington .
David Pastrnak Boston . . . . . .
Sean Couturier Philadelphia . . .
Filip Forsberg Nashville . . . . . .
Patric Hornqvist Pittsburgh . . .
Ryan Johansen Nashville . . . . .
T.J. Oshie Washington . . . . . .
Austin Watson Nashville . . . . .
William Karlsson Vegas . . . . . .
Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh . . . . .
Patrick Marleau Toronto . . . . .
Alex Tuch Vegas . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
GP G
.11 10
.11 9
.10 9
.11 8
.11 6
.12 6
.10 6
.10 6
.11 6
.12 6
. 5 5
.11 5
. 9 5
.11 5
.11 5
.11 5
.10 4
. 8 4
. 7 4
.10 4
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
GP
.12
.12
.11
.11
.11
.11
.10
.10
.11
.10
.11
.10
.11
.11
.11
.11
Assists
David Pastrnak Boston . . . . . .
Brad Marchand Boston . . . . . .
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh . . . .
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh . . . .
Nicklas Backstrom Washington .
Patrice Bergeron Boston . . . . .
Reilly Smith Vegas . . . . . . . . .
Blake Wheeler Winnipeg . . . . .
Torey Krug Boston . . . . . . . . .
Dustin Byfuglien Winnipeg . . . .
John Carlson Washington . . . .
Logan Couture San Jose . . . . .
Phil Kessel Pittsburgh . . . . . . .
Kris Letang Pittsburgh . . . . . .
Mattias Ekholm Nashville . . . . .
Filip Forsberg Nashville . . . . . .
A
14
13
11
11
10
10
10
10
9
8
8
8
8
8
7
7
SOCCER
M.L.S. STANDINGS
EAST
Atlanta United
N.Y.C.F.C. . . .
Orlando City .
Red Bulls . . .
Columbus . . .
New England .
Montreal . . . .
Chicago . . . .
Philadelphia . .
Toronto FC . .
D.C. United . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
W
.7
.6
.6
.5
.4
.4
.3
.2
.2
.2
.1
L
1
2
2
3
3
3
6
4
4
4
4
T Pts GF GA
1 22 23 10
2 20 19 14
1 19 19 14
0 15 21 10
3 15 13 10
2 14 15 12
0
9 14 23
2
8 12 14
2
8
6 13
1
7
9 13
2
5
8 13
WEST
W L
T Pts GF GA
Kansas City . . . . 6 2
2 20 21 12
Los Angeles FC . 5 2
1 16 18 14
Vancouver . . . . . 4 5
1 13 10 18
FC Dallas . . . . . 3 1
4 13 11 7
Minnesota . . . . . 4 5
0 12 12 16
Houston . . . . . . 3 3
2 11 18 13
Portland . . . . . . 3 3
2 11 13 14
LA Galaxy . . . . . 3 5
1 10 12 16
Real Salt Lake . . 3 5
1 10 10 19
Colorado . . . . . . 2 4
2
8 10 11
San Jose . . . . . 1 5
2
5 12 16
Seattle . . . . . . . 1 4
2
5
5
9
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Saturday, May 5
Red Bulls 4, N.Y.C.F.C. 0
Montreal 4, New England 2
Minnesota 1, Vancouver 0
FC Dallas 1, Los Angeles FC 1, tie
Columbus 0, Seattle 0, tie
Atlanta United 2, Chicago 1
Houston 3, LA Galaxy 2
Kansas City 1, Colorado 0
Portland 1, San Jose 0
Sunday, May 6
Orlando City 3, Real Salt Lake 1
Wednesday, May 9
Philadelphia at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle at Toronto FC, 7:30 p.m.
Kansas City at Atlanta United, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Los Angeles FC, 10 p.m.
Friday, May 11
Houston at Vancouver, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 12
Red Bulls at Colorado, 9 p.m
San Jose at Minnesota, 2 p.m.
Philadelphia at Montreal, 3 p.m.
LA Galaxy at FC Dallas, 3:30 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at New England, 7:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m.
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE
Team
GP W D L
*Man City . . . . 36 30 4 2
Man United . . . 36 24 5 7
Liverpool . . . . . 37 20 12 5
Tottenham. . . . 36 21 8 7
Chelsea . . . . . 36 21 6 9
Arsenal . . . . . . 36 18 6 12
Burnley . . . . . . 37 14 12 11
Everton. . . . . . 37 13 10 14
Leicester. . . . . 36 11 11 14
Newcastle . . . . 36 11 8 17
Crystal Palace . 37 10 11 16
Bournemouth . . 37 10 11 16
Watford . . . . . 37 11 8 18
Brighton . . . . . 36 9 13 14
West Ham . . . . 36 9 11 16
Huddersfield . . 36 9 9 18
Southampton . . 36 6 15 15
Swansea. . . . . 36 8 9 19
West Brom . . . 37 6 13 18
Stoke . . . . . . . 37 6 12 19
*clinched title.
Saturday, May 5
Crystal Palace 2, Stoke 1
Bournemouth 1, Swansea 0
West Ham 2, Leicester 0
Watford 2, Newcastle 1
West Brom 1, Tottenham 0
Everton 1, Southampton 1
GF
102
67
80
68
61
72
35
43
49
36
43
43
44
33
45
27
36
27
31
33
GA
26
28
38
32
34
48
37
55
54
46
55
60
63
47
67
56
55
53
54
67
Pts
94
77
72
71
69
60
54
49
44
41
41
41
41
40
38
36
33
33
31
30
Sunday, May 6
Huddersfield 0, Man City 0
Arsenal 5, Burnley 0
Chelsea 1, Liverpool 0
Tuesday, May 8
Swansea vs. Southampton
Wednesday, May 9
Chelsea vs. Huddersfield
Leicester vs. Arsenal
Tottenham vs. Newcastle
Man City vs. Brighton
Thursday, May 10
West Ham vs. Man United
EUROPA LEAGUE
All Times EDT
(Home teams listed first)
CHAMPIONSHIP
At Lyon, France
Wednesday, May 16
Atletico Madrid (Spain) vs.
(France), 2:45 p.m.
Marseille
THE NEW YORK TIMES OBITUARIES TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
Deaths
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Professors Edwin G. Burrows, right, and Mike Wallace wrote two histories of New York City.
Edwin G. Burrows, 74, Who Wrote
Definitive New York City History, Dies
By SAM ROBERTS
Edwin G. Burrows, a Brooklyn
College professor who shared the
Pulitzer Prize for the magisterial
narrative “Gotham: A History of
New York City to 1898,” died on
Friday at his home in Huntington,
N.Y., on Long Island. He was 74.
The cause was Parkinson’s disease, his daughter, Kate Burrows,
said.
In 1999, Professor Burrows and
Mike Wallace, a fellow professor
at the City University of New
York, won the Pulitzer Prize for
history for their 1,424-page
doorstop, which was instantly acclaimed a definitive, populist and
novelistic account of the city’s first
three centuries.
Professor Burrows, who taught
at Brooklyn College for 41 years,
was the author of two other books,
both delving into neglected chapters of the city’s history: “Forgotten Patriots: The Untold Story of
American Prisoners During the
Revolutionary War” (2008) and
“The Finest Building in America:
The New York Crystal Palace,
1853-1858” (2018).
Professor Burrows’s passion
for history was piqued when he
was in college. (At least he found it
more penetrable than his original
major, physics).
While he was not a New York
native, at Columbia he developed
a fervor for “Gotham” — the name
for New York adopted in the early
19th century by Washington Irving, after the English village
whose inhabitants had feigned
madness to fool the king’s tax collectors.
During graduate school, Professor Burrows explored Upper
Manhattan, including the 18thcentury Dyckman Farmhouse
Museum, whose board he later
joined. He also collaborated with
Professor Wallace, a classmate,
on “The American Revolution:
The Ideology and Psychology of
National Liberation,” an article
published in the 1972 volume of
the annual “Perspectives in
American History,” edited by Donald Fleming and Bernard Bailyn.
“The history of the city provides
a framework for grasping the
whole of the American experience,” Professor Burrows said in a
2012 interview with The Junto, a
blog devoted to early American
history. “You really can’t say that
about any other place in the coun-
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
“Gotham,” a 1,424-page history of New York to 1898, took
nearly 20 years to complete.
Teamed up with Mike
Wallace on a doorstop
that won a Pulitzer.
try.”
He added: “Careerwise, New
York City has given me so many
fascinating subjects for historical
research as well as an unequaled
array of libraries and archives.
The only downside is that colleagues in other fields get to travel
to exotic places like Paris or Cairo.
“Me,” he said, “I get to ride the
subway.”
Edwin Gwynne Burrows, who
was known as Ted, was born on
May 15, 1943, in Detroit to Edwin
Gladding Burrows, a radio broadcaster and poet, and Gwenyth
(Lemon) Burrows, a social
worker.
He earned a bachelor’s degree
from the University of Michigan in
1964 and a doctorate from Columbia University, where he studied
under the historians Eric McKitrick, who chronicled the evolution
of the American republic, and
Richard Hofstadter, who won the
Pulitzer Prize twice.
He began teaching at Brooklyn
College in 1972. In 1978 he married
Patricia Adamski, who is now the
senior vice president for planning
and administration at Hofstra
University on Long Island and a
law-school professor there. In ad-
JULIANA THOMAS
Professor Burrows taught at Brooklyn College for 41 years.
Though a Detroit native, he harbored a lifelong love of New York.
dition to his wife and daughter, he
is survived by their son, Matthew,
and two brothers, David and Daniel.
Professor Burrows’s first book,
drawn from his doctoral dissertation on Albert Gallatin, the treasury secretary under Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, was titled “Gallatin and the Political
Economy of Republicanism”
(1986).
Well before that, he and Professor Wallace, who teaches at John
Jay College of Criminal Justice
and the City University Graduate
Center, began writing a history of
American capitalism.
“We had written hundreds of
pages, but had barely gotten out of
the 17th century,” Professor Wallace told The New York Times last
year. “That’s when we decided to
make it more manageable and tell
the story through New York City.”
Even the more manageable version, with Professor Burrows focusing primarily on the 16th and
17th centuries, took them nearly
two decades to complete.
“ ‘Gotham’ ended in 1898 if for
no other reason than because we
had surpassed the limits of bindery technology,” Professor Wallace said. (The year also provided
a natural endpoint; 1898 was
when a consolidated five-borough
New York City, including Brooklyn, was born.) “Ted delivered his
part, and I just kept going garrulously,” he added.
In an email on Monday, Professor Wallace wrote, “Ted fashioned
a masterful synthesis of New
York’s colonial and revolutionary
history, webbing together a generation’s worth of economic, political, social and cultural studies,
into an engaging and mellifluous
narrative, hailed by scholars and
citizens alike.”
Last year Professor Wallace, on
his own, published a sequel,
“Greater Gotham: A History of
New York City From 1898 to 1919.”
Professor
Burrows
never
viewed history as a dead discipline to be dredged up episodically for anniversary commemorations. Rather, he considered it
living, relevant and contextual.
Recalling the thousands of
Americans who died on British
prison ships in New York Harbor
during the Revolutionary War, he
wrote in “Forgotten Patriots”:
“I have refrained from drawing
parallels to contemporary events,
but I will not be sorry if readers
find themselves thinking about
Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo Bay,
about the evasion of habeas corpus, about official denials and
cover-ups, about the arrogance
and stupidity that can come with
the exercise of great power.”
He added, “I hope they will also
see that once upon a time, when
the country was young, our own
experience with prisoner abuse
led us to believe that we are supposed to do better.”
In 2000, Professor Burrows was
elected a fellow of the Society of
American Historians.
After he retired from Brooklyn
College in 2013, he was asked what
he had enjoyed most about teaching there.
“That’s easy,” he replied. “My
students. Most of them are the
first in their families to attend college, many are first- or secondgeneration immigrants from all
over the world, and they all approach college with well-placed,
street-savvy skepticism.
“From them,” he added, “I
learned everything I know about
teaching.”
Blumenthal, Nancy
Gluck, Claire
Siegel, Joyce
Bonanno, Philip
Leiber, Judith
Trombetti, Steven
Cole, Jerry
Panken, Aaron
Trott, Donald
Denmark, Muriel
Press, Joseph
Vidaver, John
Eichwald, Bernard
Rosenbloom, Harvey
Glassman, David
Schlacter, Regina
BLUMENTHAL—Nancy H.
On May 6, 2018, Nancy, 91, for
61 years the loving and devoted wife of Edwin (deceased),
wonderful mother to Peter,
Andrew and Amy Desmond;
beloved mother-in-law to Deborah (deceased), Cheryl and
Peter Desmond; proud and
cherished grandmother of
Karen Huber and husband,
Andrew, Jennifer and Eric
Blumenthal, Lesley Malakoti
and husband, Dan, and Lynne
and Marc Desmond; adoring
great-grandmother of Elise,
Grace and Kevin Huber, and
Donovan Malakoti. Nancy
loved her siblings, Bob Hausman and Dorothy Kahn (both
deceased). Nancy ran a successful commercial real estate business with her brother, enjoyed tennis, dinner parties, and traveling, and above
all appreciated every opportunity to get together with family. Services at the BallardDurand Funeral Home at 2
Maple Ave., White Plains at
12:30pm on May 10, 2018. In
lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to March of
Dimes.
BONANNO—Philip Carl,
died peacefully at his home
on May 5th at the age of 80.
Born on March 5, 1938 in
Brooklyn, Phil led a truly extraordinary life that in many
ways embodies the American dream. His father, Peter,
immigrated to the United
States from Sicily as a boy in
1918 and later married Rose
Castoro and settled in Brooklyn. Through his teenage
years, Phil lived in Brooklyn
and later on Long Island with
his parents and older sister,
Kathryn. After attending New
York Military Academy and
graduating from Hofstra University, Phil attended Albany
Medical College and later
trained at Kings County Hospital Center. He ultimately
entered the field of plastic
and reconstructive surgery,
first serving as Chief Resident at the NYU Institute of
Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and then establishing his
practice in Mt. Kisco and
White Plains, NY. Over the
years, Phil emerged as one of
the true pioneers in his field
and established a national reputation as one of the leading
cosmetic and reconstructive
surgeons in the country. Phil
later founded the Institute of
Aesthetic Surgery and Medicine and The Breast Institute,
both at Northern Westchester
Hospital. Through Phil's vision, The Breast Institute,
which is designed to provide
comprehensive and compassionate care for breast cancer patients, has had a profound impact in the community in helping cancer patients through their most difficult times. Beyond these
achievements, Phil also took
great pride in serving as a
mentor to an entire generation of doctors and medical
professionals, a legacy that
will long be felt throughout
the medical community. In
parallel to his incredible accomplishments in the medical profession, Phil was also a
founding partner of the Pawling Mountain Club in Dutchess County, NY. In a true illustration of his vision, Phil and
his partners purchased an entirely undeveloped parcel of
land in 1979 and over the
years transformed it into one
of the leading sporting clubs
in the world. Through his passion for the sporting world
and his desire to establish an
environment
to
promote
strong relationships and a truly warm and collegial atmosphere, Phil succeeded in
achieving
what
many
thought was impossible when
he set out in this mission over
30 years ago. Phil is survived
by his loving wife, Rosemary,
and
children,
Dominique
(Mark) Mannix, Peter (Jennifer), and Philip, Jr. (Louise),
his grandchildren, Sarah, Caroline, Matthew, Philip, and
Max, and his step-daughters,
Nicole (Dan) Russo, Victoria
Casson (Lowell Thompson),
and Lindsay (Peter) Brosens.
He was predeceased by his
sister, Kathryn and his beloved wife of forty-seven
years, Diane. In lieu of flowers, donations in Phil's memory may be made to The
Breast Institute at Northern
Westchester Hospital, 400
East Main St. Mt. Kisco, NY
10549. Family and friends will
be received at his home at 47
Haights Cross Road, Chappaqua, NY, on Saturday, May 12
from 2-6pm. A memorial service will be held on Saturday,
September 8, 2018.
COLE—Jerry Julian,
known to one and all as J.J.,
passed away on May 5, 2018
at the Calvary Hospital in the
Bronx. He was 93 years old.
He was born in New Rochelle,
New York, on January 21,
1925. A graduate of New
Rochelle High School and
composer of A school anthem, he served in the U.S.
Army in Europe as a member of the 104th Timberwolf
Division during World War II.
J.J. received a B.A. in music
from Williams College in 1949,
where he served as captain
of the undefeated golf team.
He went into business with his
father, Harry D. Cole, a prominent Westchester real estate
broker. J.J., who owned and
managed Rosedale Liquor
Store
on
Mamaroneck
Avenue in White Plains, was
a member of Fenway Golf
Club for 50 Years and a resident of White Plains for over
60 years. He is survived by his
wife of 67 years, Martha Irvin
Cole, three children, Reb
Cole, Tom Cole and Nancy
LaCava, seven grandchildren, Jordey, Evan and Emily
LaCava; Benjamin and Nina
Cole; Calen and Garth Cole
and a sister, Marilyn Feinberg. The memorial service
will be held privately. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be
made to Calvary Hospital.
B11
N
GLASSMAN—David,
age 97 died peacefully at
home on May 1. Beloved husband of Eva for 70 years.
Loving father of Jean Donnelly (Bob) and Toni Taterka
(Jim). Papa to his grandchildren, Sara, Louis, Sam, Ben,
and Charlie. Predeceased by
brothers, Arnold and Mervin.
Physician, Korean War veteran, music lover, and lifelong
philosophy scholar. MuckiLove leaves behind much
more than death takes away.
Your Mucki
GLUCK—Claire, 92, passed
away on May 6, 2018. Devoted wife of the late Joseph.
Beloved mother of Carolyn
and Peter Koslow. Loving
grandmother of Jennifer and
Michael Zaslansky and Rebecca and Julian Singer.
Adoring great-grandmother
of Matilda, Teddy, Charlotte
and Sophie. A beautiful woman inside and out. Services
will be held Wednesday, May
9, at 11:30am, at Riverside
Memorial Chapel, 180 W. 76th
St., NY, NY 10023.
GLUCK—Claire. We shared
our beautiful family together
for over 40 years. You will be
in my heart forever.
Joyce Koslow
LEIBER—Judith and Gerson.
Judith Leiber (97), famed
handbag designer, and her
husband, modernist artist
Gerson Leiber (96) died hours
apart on April 28, 2018. The
Leibers married in 1946. Her
handbags and his paintings
are in numerous museum
and private collections. Artists and companions forever,
in death as in life. Memorial
celebration to be held later
this summer. Donations may
be made to the Gerson and
Judith Leiber Foundation, 446
Old Stone Highway, East
Hampton, NY 11937.
PANKEN—Aaron, Rabbi Dr.
The Board of Governors,
Boards of Overseers, administration, faculty, students,
and alumni of Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion mourn the tragic
and untimely death of our beloved President, inspiring
teacher, exemplary leader of
Reform Judaism, and champion of the State of Israel and
the Jewish people. Ordained
by HUC-JIR in New York in
1991, Rabbi Panken joined the
HUC-JIR faculty in 1995, and
served as Dean of Students
(1996-1998), Dean of the New
York Campus (1998-2007),
and Vice President for Strategic Initiatives (2007-2010), before being becoming the 12th
President in HUC-JIR's 143year history on January 1,
2014. As HUC-JIR President,
Rabbi Panken implemented
his transformative vision by
embedding new technology
in support of student learning
and administration, renovating and transforming the Jerusalem campus into a dynamic educational and cultural
center for the larger public,
strengthening recruitment to
yield the largest incoming
classes in the U.S. and Israel
in a decade, launching new
Jewish education, nonprofit
management, and entrepreneurship
programs
and
academic partnerships, and
invigorating the ties linking
HUC-JIR's four campuses in
Cincinnati, Jerusalem, Los
Angeles, and New York and
their larger communities and
regions. A staunch advocate
for religious pluralism in Israel, he ordained the 100th Israeli Reform rabbi graduating from HUC-JIR's Israeli
Rabbinical Program on November 16, 2017. His enormous contributions will endure as a sacred legacy. Our
heartfelt sympathy to his
wife, Lisa Messinger, their
children, Eli and Samantha,
his parents, Beverly and Peter, his sister, Rabbi Melinda
Panken (Glenn Cohen) and
their family, his father-in-law,
Martin E. Messinger, and his
sisters-in-law, Daryl Messinger (Jim Heeger), Rabbi Sarah Messinger (Rabbi Jeff
Eisenstat), and Alice Messinger and their families. Funeral services on Tuesday, May
8, at 1:00pm at Westchester
Reform Temple, 255 Mamaroneck Road, Scarsdale, NY.
Memorial services to be announced. Rabbi Aaron Panken's family requests donations in his memory be made
to help fulfill his vision for his
beloved Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion at HUC-JIR, One West
Fourth Street, New York, NY
10012 or huc.edu/memorial
Deaths
Deaths
PANKEN—Rabbi Aaron,
Ph.D., 53, cherished husband
of Lisa Messinger, father of
Eli and Samantha, son of
Beverly and Peter, brother to
Rabbi Melinda Panken and
Glenn Cohen, uncle to many
nieces and nephews. Aaron
had a profound curiosity for
all things and an excitement
for life. He was creative, prolific, sensitive; a passionate
student and teacher, and an
advocate for social justice.
He had a voracious appetite
for adventure and learning,
and was constantly honing
new skills, from technology
to Talmud. He balanced a
mastery of science and spirituality. He loved to travel and
was proud of his explorations,
including 50 states and six
continents. Aaron was humbled and honored to be a
leader of the Reform Jewish
community. He was a champion for progressive change
and impact in the world. He
approached all relationships
with the same care and generosity. Aaron Panken loved to
laugh. His most sacred gift
was his family. He celebrated
every
moment
that
he
shared with his children,
parents, sister, and his beloved wife. We will forever
miss his warmth, his humor,
and his love. May his memory be for a blessing.
SCHLACTER—Regina,
on May 6, 2018. Loving wife of
the late Arthur. Cherished
mother of Arlene (Benedict)
Morelli and Jeffrey (Rita)
Saks. Adoring grandmother
of Justin, Alexander and
Oliver.
PANKEN—Rabbi Aaron D.
The entire American Jewish
World Service (AJWS) community mourns the tragic loss
of Rabbi Aaron D. Panken, a
visionary leader of progressive American Jews who
gave voice to our deepest
values and worked tirelessly
to build a world in which the
dignity of every person is
guaranteed. As President of
Hebrew
Union
College Jewish Institute of Religion,
Rabbi Panken was a teacher
of teachers who inspired a
generation
of
rabbis—
including many in the AJWS
community—to repair the
world. At this incomprehensibly difficult time, we extend
our deepest sympathies to
Rabbi Panken's wife, Lisa
Messinger, his children, Eli
and Samantha, his parents
Beverly and Peter, and his
sister, Rabbi Melinda Panken
of
Congregation
Shaari
Emeth in Manalapan, NJ.
May Rabbi Panken's memory be a source of inspiration
for each of us to work toward
a more just and equitable
world.
Robert Bank,
President and CEO
Monte Dube, Board Chair
American Jewish
World Service
PANKEN—Rabbi Aaron D.
The
Wexner
Foundation
mourns the tragic death of
Rabbi Aaron Panken, Ph.D.
z”l, President of HUC-JIR, a
beloved Wexner Graduate
Fellow and Wexner Heritage
Program faculty. “Rabbi Panken was a scholar, a visionary and mensch who embodied the very best in the Jewish leadership we teach,” said
Rabbi Abrahamson. He was a
friend, counselor, mentor and
source of wisdom for many in
the Jewish world and beyond.
A determined optimist and
pluralist, he boldly pursued
global justice. We extend our
heartfelt sympathies to his
wife, Lisa, children, Eli and
Samantha, his parents and
his extended family. His legacy will be carried forward by
those he inspired. May his
memory be only a blessing.
Abigail and Leslie Wexner,
Chairmen
Rabbi B. Elka Abrahamson,
President
PANKEN—Aaron, Rabbi.
UJA- Federation of New
York mourns the tragic passing of Rabbi Aaron Panken,
beloved husband of Lisa
Messinger. Rabbi Panken's
legacy lives on through his family, his students, his colleagues, and his remarkable
leadership at the HUC-JIR.
Aaron's vision with our partner the JDC will continue to
impact worldwide Jewry. We
extend our condolences to Lisa; his children, Eli and Samantha; his parents, Beverly
and Peter Panken; his fatherin-law, Martin Messinger; and
the entire family.
Jeffrey A. Schoenfeld,
President; Robert S. Kapito,
Chair of the Board;
Eric S. Goldstein, CEO
PANKEN—Rabbi Aaron.
Central Synagogue, along
with the whole House of Israel, mourns the tragic and
untimely death of Rabbi Aaron Panken. He was truly Gadolei haDor, one of the Greatest Rabbis of our generation,
and a brilliant champion of
progressive Judaism in North
America and Israel. The clergy team will remember him
for his gifted teaching, joyful
sense of humor, genuine care
and deep friendship. The
Jewish world has lost a visionary leader. Zichrono Livracha.
Rabbi Angela Buchdahl,
President Abigail Pogrebin,
Central Synagogue
of New York City
PANKEN—Rabbi Aaron D.,
Congregation Emanu-El of
the City of New York mourns
the tragic death of our teacher and friend, Rabbi Aaron D.
Panken, Ph.D., President of
the Hebrew Union CollegeJewish Institute of Religion.
Like his biblical namesake,
he loved our people and was
beloved by them. “And when
all the congregation saw that
Aaron was dead, they wept
for Aaron, all the house of
Israel.”
DENMARK—Muriel.
Wife of 74 years to Bernie.
Mischievous, loving mother,
grandmother
and
greatgrandmother. Private funeral.
PRESS—Dr. Joseph.
The members of the Department of Surgery mourn the
loss of Dr. Joseph Press beloved father of our esteemed
and long time faculty member, Dr. Robert Press and his
brothers, Steve and Mark. Dr.
Press was a legend on the
NYU Medical Center Campus. He's clinical acumen was
an object of envy only to be
outdone by the compassionate care he provided to his
patients. He was just as sharp
at the age of 95 when he
made daily rounds at 5am as
he was in years past. If you
cannot shed a tear on his behalf, shed one because you
never had the opportunity to
know him. We extend our
deepest condolences to Dr.
Press and his family on their
loss.
H. Leon Pachter M.D., F.A.C.S
The George David Stewart
Professor and Chair
Department of Surgery
NYU Langone Health
EICHWALD—Bernard.
Standard Security Life Insurance Company of New York
mourns the death of its esteemed former Board Member of many years. Our sincerest condolences to the entire Eichwald family. Standard Security Life Insurance
Company of New York
ROSENBLOOM—Harvey.
High Ridge Country Club acknowledges with sorrow the
passing of our esteemed
member,
Harvey
Rosenbloom. We extend our deepest sympathy to his beloved
family.
Alan Osofsky, President
Barbara Dilsheimer,
Secretary
Andrew R. Berger,
Chair,
Board of Governors
Sue Neuman Hochberg,
Chair-Elect,
Board of Governors
PANKEN—Aaron,
The Board of Governors and
members of Beach Point
Club note with deep sorrow
the passing of our fellow
member, Aaron Panken and
extend sincere condolences
to his family.
Amy Lemle,
President
SIEGEL—Joyce.
Born April 2, 1932 passed May
6, 2018 surrounded by her family after a vigilant battle
with cancer. She is survived
by her husband of 65 years,
Sidney and her identical twin,
Sylvia Weinfeld. Mother to
Steven, Mindy and Lisa,
mother-in-law to Andrea, Joe
and Chris and beloved grandmother of Matthew, Daniel,
Aaron and Mitchell. She was
devoted to not only her immediate family but also to
her extended family. A resident of New York and Boca
Raton, FL she was an active
member of The Muttontown
Country Club for 40 years.
Funeral services will be held
on Wednesday, May 9 at
1:30pm at Gutterman's Woodbury, NY.
TROMBETTI—Steven E.,
October 23, 1954 - May 3, 2018,
passed away unexpectedly
on May 3. A longtime resident of Asharoken, NY with
his life partner of 33 years
Eric Maffei, Steve was formerly Vice President of Communications for the New
York Convention and Visitors
Bureau (now NYC & Co.).
Previously he was Communications Director of the American Hotel & Motel Association. Steven was a longtime
member of the Society of
American Travel Writers.
Steve received his BS in Business Management from Fairleigh Dickinson University.
Also survived by his mother,
Frances,
siblings,
Lauren
Kennedy (Neil), and Ronald
(Celeste), and nephews, Neil
Patrick and Kyle. Visiting
Wednesday, May 9, 2-5pm
and 7-9pm at Nolan & TaylorHowe Funeral Home, 5 Laurel Avenue, Northport, NY
11768. www.nthfh.com
TROTT—Donald I.
Passed away at home in
Wayne, NJ on Friday, May 4,
a casualty of pancreatic cancer. He was born in Brooklyn,
NY on May 15, 1935, the son
of Barnet S. Trott and Madeline Gluck Trott. He graduated from Brown University in
1956 and earned an M.S. degree from the Columbia University School of Business in
1957.
After
serving
six
months active duty in the U.S.
Army Finance Corp (under
the Reserve Forces Act), Don
began a 50 year career on
Wall Street. Career highlights
included Chairman and Director of Research of Jas. H.
Oliphant & Co., Director of
Research and then Chairman
of the Investment Policy
Committee of A.G. Becker
and head of Individual Investor Research at Blyth Eastman Dillon. In the early
1960's, he became the first
Wall Street analyst to specialize in the restaurant industry
and later was an Institutional
Investor all-star retail trade
analyst. In 1964, he founded
the Consumer Analyst Group
of New York (CAGNY), the
premier forum bringing top
executives of the consumer
packaged goods industry and
financial community analysts
together. A Morgan Stanley
pensioner (by way of Dean
Witter) and a Jefferies retiree, he mentored many men
and women who went on to
successful careers. He was a
generous, kind, gracious man
with great integrity and a
wonderful sense of humor.
He organized a crew at Dean
Witter to work regular shifts
at St. Bartholomew's soup
kitchen in Manhattan. He saw
that Oliphant placed the first
woman on the floor of the
American Stock Exchange.
He strongly supported college basketball, especially Seton Hall. He loved theatre,
books, nature, Nantucket, and
most of all, time with family
and friends. He is survived by
his beloved wife of 54 years,
the former Frances Schantz,
daughter, Marjory Trott (of
Nantucket, MA), and daughter, M. Holly Trott and granddaughters, Samantha and
Phoebe Baskin (of Hampstead, NH). Memorial gifts
may be made to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network,
Hospice of New Jersey, or the
charity of your choice. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, May 8 at 11am at Rosedale Cemetery, Montclair,
NJ. The family will be sitting
shiva at home Wednesday,
May 9 from 6-8:30pm, Thursday, May 10 from 6-8:30pm,
and Friday, May 11 from
3-6pm. Services by Louis Suburban Chapel.
VIDAVER—John E., age 70, of
Oradell, NJ passed away on
Monday, May 7, 2018. Cherished husband of Jo-Ann (nee
Siegel). Beloved brother of
Robert Vidaver and his wife,
Virginia. Dear uncle of Mary,
Robert, Patrick and John.
John was a longtime broadcaster
for
WCBS - FM,
WNEW - FM,
WYNY - FM,
WNCN-FM, WQXR-FM, CD
101.9 and ABC-TV. Family
and friends are welcome to
visit today from 4-8pm at
Volk Leber Funeral Home,
268 Kinderkamack Rd., Oradell. Graveside service will
be on Wednesday at 11am at
Wellwood
Cemetery,
150
Wellwood Avenue, Farmingdale, NY. In lieu of flowers,
please make a donation in
John's name to the American
Lung Association, 55 W.
Wacker Drive, Suite 1150, Chicago, IL 60601, www.lung.org.
To view John's tribute page,
and for more information,
please visit volkleber.com
In Memoriam
CHARNELLE—Phyllis
and
Leonard, MD. Loved, missed,
remembered.
Susan and Marshall
RAUCH—Peter.
As Irving Berlin wrote,
“The song is ended, but the
melody lingers on.” We miss
you and will always love you.
SEIDEMAN—Abby Rachel.
Nov. 18, 1974 - May 15, 2012.
We are taught not to mourn
excessively, however, tears
fill our eyes thinking of the
lost years without you. Love,
never forgotten.
Mom, Dad and Wendy
B12
N
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
The future of wealth since 1818.
7 MUSIC
5 THEATER
There’s no shame in
dozing off during
this performance.
A workers’
revolution is stymied
by betrayal and
hardship. BY JESSE GREEN
BY JOSHUA BARONE
NEWS
TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
CRITICISM
C1
N
REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK
Exposed to Art,
From Head
To . . . Ankles
OWEN FRANKEN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
A Paris museum held a tour
for visitors wearing only shoes.
By THOMAS ROGERS
PARIS — The most uncomfortable thing
about being naked in a museum, it turns
out, is the temperature. A half-hour into the
first nudist tour of the Palais de Tokyo, a
contemporary art museum in Paris, I had
gotten used to the feeling of exposure, but I
hadn’t acclimatized to the cold air circulating through the cavernous galleries.
Standing in a politically themed exhibition by the French-Algerian artist Neïl Beloufa, I began shaking my arms for warmth.
Museums, I was discovering, are not temperature-controlled for people wearing only
sneakers.
In drawing this conclusion, it seemed, I
wasn’t alone. Jacqueline Bohain, a 65-yearold retiree who had taken an eight-hour bus
trip from the Alsace region of eastern
France to attend the event on Saturday,
tried to warm herself in a sliver of sunlight.
Other members of the group jiggled around
to heat up. “Maybe we should walk around
the corner, so we can stand in the sun,” Mar-
A section of the
exhibition at the Palais
de Tokyo art museum
features Japanese suits
of armor.
CONTINUED ON PAGE C2
DWIGHT GARNER
BOOKS OF THE TIMES
A Mother Keeps
Wartime Secrets
GEORGE ETHEREDGE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
At the site of a music video shoot, the rapper Valee had brought in a sewing machine from home. “I put stuff together,” he explained.
Valee, Kanye West’s signee, can fix electrical
outlets, build a koi pond or hem pants.
MICHAEL ONDAATJE’S EARLY BOOKS had
struction and electrical work, and builds koi
ponds, too. He customizes fast cars — fullsize and remote control — and cooks. He’s
tattooed others, as well as his own arms and
legs.
“I talk to a lot of rappers and people in the
industry,” said Andrew Barber, Valee’s
manager and an influential fixture in Chicago rap music. “Nobody else has ever offered to come build a bar in my house.”
Valee, obviously, is not your typical rapper.
such evocative titles, one had to pick them
up and hold them for a while.
“The Collected Works of Billy the Kid”
(1970) is a black-powder mix of poetry and
prose, history and myth. His novel “Coming
Through Slaughter” (1976) — for my
money, Ondaatje’s masterpiece — is a surround-sound tour of the troubled New Orleans cornet player Buddy Bolden’s life. His
1979 book of collected poems is called
“There’s a Trick With a Knife I’m Learning
to Do.”
As Ondaatje’s titles have settled — recent
ones include “Anil’s Ghost” and “Divisadero” — his prose has settled as well. By
now we know what we are going to get from
an Ondaatje novel: A moody, murky, lightly
pretentious and mostly nonlinear investigation of lives and stories that harbor tantalizing gaps.
There will be disquisitions on arcane topics including, frequently, mapmaking.
CONTINUED ON PAGE C7
CONTINUED ON PAGE C4
He Raps What He Sews
By JOE COSCARELLI
Earlier this year, on the set of his first major
music video, the rapper Valee was hemming his own clothes.
The shoot for “Miami,” featuring the hiphop godfather Pusha T, who doubles as the
president of Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music,
was meant to announce Valee, a 29-year-old
from Chicago, as the latest addition to the
tastemaking label. But instead of acting like
a newly minted star, leaning into a world of
stylists and on-demand everything, he
brought a sewing machine from home.
“I put stuff together,” Valee said with a
shrug during a recent trip to New York. It
was an understatement, but also an all-purpose job description, one that hinted at the
motivations of a man who is less a born rapper than a detail-obsessed D.I.Y. aesthete,
always looking for a fresh creative angle.
While honing his music, which he often
self-produces and records at home, Valee
has turned odd hobbies into odd jobs, toeing
the line between eccentric and modern-day
Renaissance man. He does carpentry, con-
Parents leave two teenagers
behind for mysterious reasons.
“Engrossing.” —THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW “Addictively readable.”
Warlight
By Michael Ondaatje
—THE BOSTON GLOBE
C2
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK
Exposed to Art, From Head to . . . Ankles
CONTINUED FROM PAGE C1
ion Buchloh-Kollerbohm, the tour guide,
suggested, and maneuvered us to another
area of the exhibition.
The Palais de Tokyo’s “Visite Naturiste”
— the first of its kind in France — has garnered a remarkable amount of public interest since it was announced in March. More
than 30,000 people indicated on Facebook
that they were interested in the tour, and,
according to Laurent Luft, 48, president of
the Paris Naturist Association, more than
two million people visited the group’s Facebook page in recent weeks.
“I was imagining about 100 or 200 people
might want to come, not 30,000,” he said in a
telephone interview before the tour.
At 10 a.m., I joined the 161 people who had
managed to get one of the limited tickets,
and we undressed in an ad hoc changing
room on the second floor of the museum.
For the next two hours, we took part in one
of six tours by (clothed) museum guides of
“Discord, Daughter of the Night,” a series of
exhibitions spread across the museum,
which is the largest in France for the presentation of contemporary art. The shows
consist of one large, suspended sculpture
and five separately curated but thematically related exhibitions in different parts of
the museum, dealing mostly with issues of
political strife and resistance.
Mr. Beloufa’s contribution — “The Enemy of My Enemy” — consisted largely of artifacts related to war and to other horrific
historical events, like the My Lai massacre
and the bombing of Hiroshima, arranged on
platforms that were constantly moved
around the space by small robots, similar to
those used by Amazon in its warehouses.
Ms. Buchloh-Kollerbohm, who is also the
‘Today, nudism is seen as
a statement, but really
it’s the opposite; it should
be seen as a pure state.’
VINCENT SIMONET,
A TEACHER
PHOTOGRAPHS BY OWEN FRANKEN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
museum’s head of education, told me that
she was mindful of the potential awkwardness of combining nudism with the exhibition’s serious subject matter.
“We didn’t want to make this into a conference on the postcolonial subject, because
that would really kill the atmosphere,” she
said. Nevertheless, she added, “I am hoping
the experience of leaving their clothes at
the door will help them leave some part of
their identity with it, and experience it with
more openness.”
Other museums have organized similar
tours for temporary shows thematically
connected to nakedness, including a Robert
Mapplethorpe exhibition in Montreal and a
show of male nudes at the Leopold Museum
in Vienna. Mr. Luft said that it was “actually
more pleasing to me to find something that
had nothing to do with nudity.”
Mr. Luft and I walked into a small room in
one corner of the exhibition where Mr. Beloufa displayed an Iranian propaganda video
from the Holy Defense Museum in Tehran
that showed a simulation of a bomb attack
on a marketplace. It felt insensitive to be
watching a video of an atrocity (albeit a
staged one) while standing in nothing but
my running shoes, but Mr. Luft saw it differently. In his view, the exhibition confirmed
his belief that nudity was a great social and
political equalizer. “If world leaders had
their meetings naked,” he said, “they’d stay
a lot calmer.”
Mr. Luft said that he had proposed the
tour to the Palais de Tokyo at a meeting in
December. The idea, he said, was to expand
the activities of the nudist association beyond sports — the group, he pointed out,
held the world record for the largest number of people participating in nude tenpin
bowling. He expressed hope that cultural
events like the one at the museum would
Above and right, for the
Palais de Tokyo’s “Visite
Naturiste” visitors removed
their clothes for a tour of the
exhibition, “Discord,
Daughter of the Night.”
lead to an influx of more diverse members.
In a one-time concession, the Palais de
Tokyo closed its doors to non-nude visitors
on Saturday morning. Ms. Buchloh-Kollerbohm said the museum saw the event as being part of its mandate of cultural and social
outreach.
The results seemed promising: The attendees were slightly more male than female, but there was a broad mix of ages, and
there were many newcomers to public nudity — like Junyu Deng, a 29-year-old Parisian — who seemed thrilled by the tour. She
said that being nude had allowed her to
have a more “intimate” interaction with the
art.
Our group moved into a space created by
ANTHONY TOMMASINI
the British artist George Henry Longly,
where several suits of armor used by the
daimyo, feudal lords who reigned over Japan from the 10th to the 19th centuries,
were exhibited. It felt oddly poignant to
stare at an exhibition of ornate battle armor
while being so physically vulnerable. Ms.
Buchloh-Kollerbohm explained that the
suits of armor had been crafted to look like
aggressive animals, such as wasps, and
that they consisted of a kind of exoskeleton.
“Putting on clothing, or armor, it’s a statement,” said Vincent Simonet, a 42-year-old
singing teacher who offers naked classes,
as we left the room. “Today, nudism is seen
as a statement, but really it’s the opposite; it
should be seen as a pure state.”
The final section of the tour, by the French
artists Kader Attia and Jean-Jacques Lebel,
was described partly as an “archaeology of
fear,” and included a room filled with newspaper and magazine coverage of grim historical events primarily connected with colonialism.
Ms. Buchloh-Kollerbohm crowded the
group into a small corner to show us some
“sickness masks” from Nigeria, with distorted features that gave them the appearance of someone who has leprosy or had a
stroke.
“These are not about a concept of perfect
and symmetrical beauty,” she said to the
hushed group, “but about accepting difference and its worth and power.” Ms. Bohain,
the retiree from Alsace, said to another tour
member that it was an emotional note to
end on, especially for people in a group committed to accepting and celebrating their
own bodies.
A few minutes later, we were ushered
onto a patio with a view of the Eiffel Tower,
where Ms. Bohain warmed herself in the
sun. Mr. Luft said that he was extremely
happy with the day’s event, adding that he
was already in discussions with several
other museums to conduct similar tours.
As for me, I was inclined to revisit the exhibition, especially its more political works,
in a clothed context, when I wouldn’t have
to worry about feeling insensitive.
Ms. Buchloh-Kollerbohm said that she
had enjoyed leading the group, but that the
Palais de Tokyo was undecided about doing
another nudist tour.
Standing on the patio, Ms. Bohain told me
that although she had not enjoyed all the
art, she had enjoyed the experience. “I’m
standing in the sun, naked, staring at the
Eiffel Tower,” she said. “Life is great.”
MUSIC REVIEW
A Star Pianist Finally Lets Us See Him Sweat
Surveying the 20th century
proves a herculean feat of
musical and physical stamina.
AUDIENCES ARE NOT USED to seeing the pianist Daniil Trifonov sweat. Whatever intensity he brings to daunting pieces by
Rachmaninoff or Liszt, he never appears
pushed to his limits. Everything seems to
come so easily.
That changed on Friday, when Mr. Trifonov performed the seventh and final program of his ambitious Perspectives series
for Carnegie Hall, a recital called “Decades.” The idea was to survey the 20th century by playing something from each decade — not short stopover pieces, but arduous, seminal works. He wanted, he said in
an interview on Saturday, to dramatically
show the “evolution of piano writing,” which
was “so rapid in the 20th century.”
Mr. Trifonov, also a composer, does play
his own works, full of Romantic fervor and
Scriabin-like colorings. But Daniil doing
Stockhausen?
Despite (and perhaps because of ) its implausibility, the recital was a triumph. That
it was clearly a herculean effort requiring
tremendous mental focus and physical
stamina — you could sometimes hear him
breathing heavily — made it all the more
impressive. I have seldom heard an artist
put so much effort into a single concert.
The audience in Zankel Hall was asked to
refrain from applauding between pieces,
which allowed Mr. Trifonov to create a spell,
a continuous flow of shifting musical experiments. Of course, it also meant that he could
not take a little breather after even the most
Daniil Trifonov
Performed on Friday at Zankel Hall
JENNIFER TAYLOR
exhausting works.
He began with Berg’s single-movement
sonata, completed in 1908, which blends the
last embers of late Wagnerian style with
bursts of early-20th-century expressionist
angst. Mr. Trifonov brought striking clarity
to the wandering lyrical lines that thread
through the music and savored the pungent
sonorities of dense, chromatic chords.
He played Prokofiev’s “Sarcasms” with
pummeling energy and steely sound, and
then conveyed the crunchy, pulsing brutality of Bartok’s “Out of Doors” suite. He emphasized the flinty harmonic writing and
Daniil Trifonov’s recital on
Friday at Zankel Hall was
meant to dramatically show the
“evolution of piano writing.”
jagged edges of Copland’s 1930 Piano Variations, this composer’s most modernist work
for the instrument. Mr. Trifonov may not
have caught the echoes of bebop in passages where piano lines dart around nervously. Still, I loved his stern, chiseled take
on the music.
He then turned to a contemplative selection from Messiaen’s “Vingt Regards sur
l’Enfant-Jésus” and the music’s mystical,
tart beauties provided a welcome contrast
— that is, until the piece broke into ecstatic
wildness, exhilaratingly played by the tireless Mr. Trifonov.
After intermission — yes, he gave himself
(and us) an intermission — he teased out
the brash humor in selections from Ligeti’s
“Musica Ricercata,” which led effectively
into Stockhausen’s “Klavierstück IX,” with
its mix of biting clusters and jittery flights.
I’ve never heard John Adams’s gurgling
“China Gates” played with such delicacy
and subtle colorings.
Mr. Trifonov ended with John Corigliano’s inventive, mercurial “Fantasia on an
Ostinato,” from 1985. In a last-minute decision, Mr. Trifonov dropped the 10th piece
that had been announced, the representative of the 1990s: Thomas Adès’s “Traced
Overhead.” (He said that the original second half was disproportionately long and
that the Corigliano made a more dramatic
ending.)
The enthusiastic audience seemed more
than grateful for a riveting nine-decade
journey.
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
C3
N
Arts, Briefly
N E W S F R O M T H E C U LT U R A L W O R L D
Post Malone’s Album
Sets Streaming Record
Post Malone, the 22-year-old
rapper who can’t stop making
sing-songy hits, has topped the
Billboard album chart with his
second LP, “Beerbongs & Bentleys,” earning both the largest
sales week of the year so far and
the most streams ever in a week
(though the streaming era is, of
course, only a few years old).
His album, released by Republic Records, moved a total of
461,000 units by the industry’s
math, combining 153,000 in traditional sales and a gobsmacking
431 million plays on streaming
services, according to Nielsen.
That easily cleared the previous
benchmark of 385 million
streams, set by Drake’s “More
Life” last year, and dwarfed last
week’s blockbuster, “KOD” by J.
Cole. (Post Malone, right, might
want to celebrate while he can;
Drake will be back with the
album “Scorpion” next month.)
The digital dominance was so
thorough that out of the 10 moststreamed songs tallied by
Nielsen for the week, eight came
from Post Malone’s album. The
other two? Drake, whose Hot
100-topping “Nice for What”
remained the most popular.
Rounding out Post Malone’s
monster week, his debut album,
“Stoney,” from December 2016,
jumped back into the Top 10 with
40 million streams of its own,
good enough for No. 9.
At No. 2 on the chart is a more
old-school model: “Graffiti U” by
the country singer Keith Urban
sold a total of 145,000 copies,
including just eight million
streams. “KOD” fell to No. 3
(21,000 in sales, 123 million in
streams) and Cardi B’s “Invasion
of Privacy” is No. 4 in its fourth
week out. The soundtrack for
“The Greatest Showman,” a
persistent chart presence for
nearly half a year, fell to No. 5.
LAURA ROBERTS/INVISION, VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
opment,” the absurdist saga of
the Bluth clan, will return for its
fifth season, nearly 15 years after
the show debuted on television.
Everyone in the extended Bluth
family, which includes Jeffrey
Tambor, Alia Shawkat, Portia de
Rossi, Will Arnett, Michael Cera,
Jason Bateman (below, right)
and David Cross (below, left), is
returning for the new season.
“Arrested Development” originally ran on Fox from 2003 to
2006, the quintessential cult
show that never found an audience large enough to stay on
network television. But interest
in the series remained high as
clips and catchphrases flourished
online and its stars went on to
thriving careers.
When Netflix brought it back
in 2013, an early example of the
platform’s strategy of rebooting
beloved old series, fan anticipation was feverish. But the season, which used a fractured
structure to tell the story from
the different characters’ points of
view, puzzled and ultimately
disappointed many viewers.
The creator Mitchell Hurwitz
recut that season, turning the
original 15 episodes into 22 more
conventionally edited ones. Netflix released those on Friday,
presumably to fuel enthusiasm
for the new season.
Season 5 will also come with
JOE COSCARELLI
The Hard-Luck Bluths
Get Another Season
The story of a wealthy family
who lost everything will resume
on May 29, Netflix announced
Monday.
That’s when “Arrested Devel-
controversy thanks to Mr. Tambor, three months after being
fired from Amazon’s “Transparent” amid allegations of sexual
harassment from two women
who worked on the show. Mr.
Tambor, who has denied the
accusations, will be involved in
promoting the new season of
“Arrested Development,” according to Netflix.
JEREMY EGNER
Skirball Center Wants
A Few Days of Your Time
Taylor Mac isn’t the only one
doing 24-hour shows. A group of
marathon performances will
arrive at N.Y.U.’s Skirball Center
next season that will test the
endurance of both the performers and the audience.
The longest is “Mount Olympus: to glorify the cult of tragedy,” which runs for a full 24 hours
starting on Nov. 10. Jan Fabre’s
production features 38 performers portraying characters from
Greek tragedy such as Oedipus,
Agamemnon and Medea; they
fight, engage in orgies, dance,
sing operatic arias and take naps
onstage. This is the work’s North
American premiere — it first ran
in Berlin in 2015.
“It’s probably the most compli-
MIKE YARISH/NETFLIX
cated thing Skirball has ever
done,” Jay Wegman, the center’s
artistic director, said in a phone
interview. “We’re going to have
to rent some semis for showers
and things like that.” He said the
production has also rented out
rooms upstairs in the Kimmel
Center, where audience members
will be able to eat, nap on cots
and even take yoga classes.
Other distance challenges
include “Gatz,” Elevator Repair
Service’s word-for-word reading
of Fitzgerald’s “The Great
Gatsby,” from Jan. 23 through
Feb. 3; the experimental British
theater company Forced Entertainment’s “And On the Thousandth Night,” a storytelling
session that begins at midnight
and continues until dawn, on
Sept. 8; and a two-week festival
dedicated to Karl Marx, called
“On Your Marx,” arriving on Oct.
17, which will offer dance parties,
marathon readings from “Das
Kapital” and a choral adaptation
of “The Communist Manifesto.”
In the museum world, there is an
increasing sense of emergency
about how few curators of color
are coming up through the ranks.
Now two institutions are trying
to do something about it.
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is teaming up with
the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona
State University to establish a
three-year program that combines academic training and
work experience to develop a
new generation of diverse curators, directors and other museum
professionals.
The Lacma-A.S.U. Masters
Fellowship in Art History, announced Tuesday at the American Alliance of Museums Conference in Phoenix, will combine
master’s-level coursework and a
thesis with on-the-job work experience at Lacma or the Herberger’s art museum.
The fellowship aims to address
the hurdles aspiring curators
face because of a lack of resources or the amount of time it
takes to earn a graduate degree
and accumulate sufficient work
experience.
LONDON LANDMARKS
ART
Edited by Will Shortz
1 Bunch
of wolves
5 Book composed
of 10-Across
10 See 5-Across
14 Word after
computer or
fashion
15 Port-au-Prince’s
land
16 Satan’s doings
17 “What’s there to
lose?”
19 Ankle-length
dress
20 Sleep disorder
21 Patriotic fingerpointer
23 Way to run or ski
26 Sauce in a
Bloody Mary
29 Radiate
30 Tortilla sandwich
31 Bunny action
33 Wastes time,
with “off”
37 Not feeling well
38 Band with the
12x platinum
album “Slippery
When Wet”
41 2016 Olympics
locale
42 “I kid you not!”
44 Pronoun for a
ship
46
49
51
55
56
60
61
64
65
66
67
68
69
Concert venue
Singer McEntire
Board game with
black-and-white
pieces
Like some
August sales
Comment made
while covering
someone’s eyes
67-69, gradewise
West Coast gas
brand
Ignite something
… or what the
first words of
17-, 23-, 38- and
51-Across do?
Seriously wound
___ point
(concise)
Sch. that plays
home football
games at the
Rose Bowl
“Legally Blonde”
girl
Satirical news
site, with “The”
Minus
J I
E N
N D S
E A
W E D
A P E
T
T O O
S U P
S T
E T
S
S
T U N
E M I
R A P
1
2
3
DOWN
1 City
with a noted
tower
2 “And we’ll tak’
___ o’ kindness
yet”: Burns
D
O
C
S
A
P
L
E
A
O
A
T
S
A T A
W E N
R E W
Y
A E
O R L
C H
S
A N E
B O X
P A
Y S A W
E T T A
A R
S
S A S H
T A I
I G N
G
O
R
G
O
N
Z
O
L
A
A
L
V
I
N
A
I
L
E
Y
L
E
S
S
K
I
L
O
A
M I
O R
R E
P
T
A
S
4
5
14
6
17
9
10
18
27
24
ANGELIKA FILM CENTER
www.angelikafilmcenter.com
Corner of Houston & Mercer (212) 995-2000
RBG
Unpublished
Black History
From The New
York Times
Photo Archives
TULLY
10:00AM, 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:40PM
DISOBEDIENCE
10:00, 11:20AM, 12:20, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00,
5:40, 7:20, 8:20, 10:00, 10:55PM
13
34
35
36
22
29
30
31
37
32
38
46
33
39
43
52
12
40
41
44
47
53
BUILT IN THE 1990s, IT’S
THE ONLY PERMANENT
STRUCTURE PERMITTED
IN LONDON WITH
A THATCHED ROOF
SINCE THE GREAT FIRE
OF 1666
YOU10:20
WERE
NEVER REALLY HERE
, 12:35, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:45
nytimes.com/store
PM
THE RIDER
11:30 , 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
AM
PM
25
28
42
11
19
21
23
51
8
16
20
26
7
15
48
45
49
50
FOR THE CORRECT
RESPONSE, WATCH
JEOPARDY! TONIGHT
OR LOOK IN THIS
SPACE TOMORROW
IN THE TIMES.
Yesterday’s Response:
What Is Fargo?
54
55
56
62
57
60
61
64
65
66
67
68
69
58
59
63
Watch JEOPARDY!
7 p.m. on Channel 7
5/8/18
3 Ears
that can’t
hear
24
25
4 Patella
5 Sound
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
M T F U
P O L L
G R O U
E E L
A
E A T
A S S E
S P H
T A B
I D L E
R O G
R I N G
O L D
A L E
D E S
Featuring Nikolaj Znaider.
7:30 p.m. at David Geffen
Hall.
212-721-6500, nyphil.org
AM
PUZZLE BY ORI BRIAN
45
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
10:00AM, 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40PM
CLUE OF THE DAY
ACROSS
FRED HERSCH This pianist
plays along with the
clarinetist Anat Cohen. 9:30
p.m. at the Jazz Standard.
212-576-2232,
jazzstandard.com
ROBIN POGREBIN
Mother’s Day
Crossword
‘THE BIRDS’ Nikos
Karathanos and Yiannis
Asteris’s adaptation of
Aristophanes’ classic
political comedy. 7:30 p.m.
at St. Ann’s Warehouse.
stannswarehouse.org
A Museum Fellowship
Aims to Boost Diversity
—MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN
President, Children’s Defense Fund
The perfect gift this
T
YOUR DAILY ARTS FIX
ANDREW R. CHOW
“A treasure.”
# 1 N e w Yo r k T i m e s b e s t s e l l e r
Ready, Set, Go
of
contentment
6 Scotland’s Firth
of ___
7 “Peanuts” boy
with a blanket
8 Immediately
9 “Parks and
Recreation,” e.g.
10 Keepsake
11 Sailor’s cry
12 Animation studio
with a lamp
mascot
13 Morally
reprehensible
18 Hawks push
them
22 Nintendo brother
26
27
28
32
34
35
36
38
39
40
Tres y cinco
Procrastinator’s
promise
Certain bed size
Folk singer
Guthrie
Event for
Cinderella
Nighttime attire,
briefly
Kind of exam
Occupy
completely
Han who’s the
title role of a
2018 film
Borscht
ingredients
“Pick me! Pick
me!”
Presidential
prerogative
43
Irritating
45
Lending a hand
47
Greets
respectfully
48
Kutcher of “That
’70s Show”
50
“Today” co-host
Kotb
51
Not one’s best
effort, in sports
52
Hearing-related
53
The “C” of C. S.
Forester
54
Relative of a
raccoon
57
Canine woe
58
Web addresses
59
Wet septet
62
Letter after pi
63
Full count
Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 9,000 past puzzles,
nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).
Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.
Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords.
KenKen
Answers to
Previous Puzzles
Fill the grid with digits so as not to repeat a digit in any row or column, and so that the digits within each
heavily outlined box will produce the target number shown, by using addition, subtraction, multiplication or
division, as indicated in the box. A 4x4 grid will use the digits 1-4. A 6x6 grid will use 1-6.
For solving tips and more KenKen puzzles: www.nytimes.com/kenken. For feedback: nytimes@kenken.com
KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. Copyright © 2018 www.KENKEN.com. All rights reserved.
C4
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
DWIGHT GARNER
LAUREL GRAEBER
BOOKS OF THE TIMES
THEATER REVIEW
A Mother Keeps Wartime Secrets
It hooks you in ways that make its quiet
storm of bombast (“He always knew the
layered grief of the world as well as its
pleasures”) almost possible to bear.
The novel commences in bombed-out
London, directly in the wake of World War
II. Cans of beans are heated on gas rings.
The parents of two teenagers break a bit of
bad news: For a year the parents are leaving the children, Nathaniel and Rachel, behind to live in Singapore, where the father
has been promoted to run a Unilever office.
This book’s resonant first sentence puts
the situation this way: “In 1945 our parents
went away and left us in the care of two men
who may have been criminals.”
One of these two men is Walter, whom the
kids nickname “The Moth” because he is
said to be “moth-like in his shy movements,”
a description I never entirely understood.
(He flies into candles?) He has a large nose,
keeps curious hours and knows disreputable characters.
The other man, Norman, is nicknamed
the Pimlico Darter. He uses a mussel boat to
smuggle greyhounds at night into London
for racing, and Nathaniel becomes a willing
accomplice. These men’s friends begin appearing in the house as well, all of them eccentric and accomplished in unpredictable
ways, like a houseful of Ricky Jays.
“The house felt more like a night zoo,” Nathaniel says, “with moles and jackdaws and
shambling beasts who happened to be
chess players, a gardener, a possible greyhound thief, a slow-moving opera singer.”
Nathaniel relishes his time with this Dickensian band of misfits. The Moth and the
Darter are rough-hewn father figures to
him. Rachel, however, is bereft. She will
never forgive her parents for abandoning
her.
When the teenagers find that Rose, their
mother, has left her steamer trunk behind —
she had ostentatiously packed it in front of
them — they become suspicious about her
whereabouts.
It slowly leaks out that she’s not in Singapore but apparently doing dangerous postwar intelligence work. The men in the house
are men she trusts, having worked beside
them during the war.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE C1
Wartime and/or criminality will feature in
the foreground or background. The nature
of storytelling will be weighed and found
fascinating. The spine of the plot, unlike the
spine of a steamed fish, will be nearly impossible to remove whole.
Ondaatje, who is from Canada by way of
Sri Lanka, is best known for “The English
Patient” (1992), which won the Booker
Prize. The novel’s story was tidied up considerably by the director Anthony Minghella, whose film version won the 1997 Academy Award for best picture.
Ondaatje’s new novel, “Warlight,” is his
best since “The English Patient.” That
sounds like a publicist’s dream quote, but
perhaps it isn’t exactly. I was among that sodality of readers who didn’t cotton to “The
English Patient,” finding it merely moody,
murky and lightly pretentious, a tone poem
in search of a whetstone.
“Warlight” reads, at its not-infrequent
best, like a late-career John le Carré novel.
DANIEL MORDZINSKI
Warlight
By Michael Ondaatje
289 pages. Alfred A. Knopf.
$26.95.
Follow Dwight Garner on Twitter:
@DwightGarner.
MayThrough
27 O
nly!
Stephen Joseph
Theatre
presents
“Enduring
& infectious”
The New York Times
A Brief Hist
or y
“Everything
fits together
beautifully”
Time Out New York
of Women
Written and Directed by
Alan Ayckbourn
The teenagers’ lives may be in danger.
There’s a kidnapping scene. People will try
to kill Rose as well. Later in life, Nathaniel
will work in intelligence himself, in part to
try to tease out Rose’s many wartime secrets, what he calls “the obscure rigging of
our mother’s life.”
“Warlight” moves at a clip that, in Ondaatje terms, can be said to be breakneck.
He writes well about all sorts of things, from
British private schools to river navigation
to how large restaurants operate. He’s a
devotee of curious detail.
This story is, however, told at a distance
— from Nathaniel’s perspective, years after
the action. About almost everything, there
is more telling than showing.
There’s an unpleasant sense that Ondaatje is regaling us rather than simply
putting across a story. In his overweening
interest in secrets and tall tales, in his relish
for how stories are told, he’s taken the
Salman Rushdie exit off the Paul Auster
turnpike.
Novels about storytelling are nearly always the ones to avoid, the way that one
learns to steer clear of Martin Scorsese
movies (“Hugo”) that are more or less explicitly paeans to the movies.
Everything in this novel seems to be lit by
amber light, rather than the flat light of sober observation. Humor is scarce. The disreputable characters invariably have
hearts of gold. Words like “magical” and
“wondrous” and “sacred” pop up more often than you wish they would.
People utter things like “You have a quiet
heart” and “There are always miracles
here” and “He knew the real and urgent
world was the sea.” It is as if your oysters
have arrived not with lemon quarters but
with a squeezable bear of honey.
Ondaatje loves people who are incorrigible, who know how to live slightly outside
the law and who have, in Lester Bangs’s
phrase, some Looney Tunes in their souls.
Yet his burnished, lukewarm sentences
don’t snap to life like the people he enjoys.
Reading him on these scruffy men and
women is like listening to someone try to
play “Long Tall Sally” on solo cello. It’s not
awful, but it’s weird.
59E59.ORG
212–279–4200
A Garden
Is Sown,
And Hope
Takes Root
A child planting lima
beans helps draw a
community together.
IT ALL BEGINS with a 9-year-old
Vietnamese immigrant and a
handful of lima beans. But what
grows from that modest start
seems to fill not only a vacant lot
in a fictionalized Cleveland, but
also the whole of the New Victory
Theater and the rapt hearts of its
audience.
This ragged but unstoppable
garden is the setting of “Seedfolks,” the New Victory’s latest
family theater production. It tells
the story of a community plot in a
blighted urban neighborhood, and
of all that takes root there: not just
vegetables, but hope, trust, camaraderie and a commitment to
change.
Presented by the Children’s
Theater Company of Minneapolis,
“Seedfolks” derives its characters
and most of its script from Paul
Fleischman’s 1997 young-adult
novel of the same title. Its themes
DAN NORMAN
An engaging Sonja Parks in the
one-woman “Seedfolks,” which is
based on a young-adult novel.
BROADWAY
New York Times CRITICS' PICK!
“A MUST-SEE MUSICAL!”
-NPR
“JERSEY BOYS meets
WEST SIDE STORY.” - amNY
TONIGHT AT 7
A BRONX TALE
ABronxTaleTheMusical.com
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
Groups 10+ 877-536-3437
Tu, Th 7; We 2 & 7; Fr 8; Sa 2 & 8; Su 3
LONGACRE THEATRE (+), 220 W. 48TH
TONIGHT AT 7
COME FROM AWAY
A New Musical
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
ComeFromAway.com
Tu, Th 7; Fr 8; We, Sa 2 & 8; Su 3
Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre (+)
“Exactly What You Wish For!” - NBC-TV
DISNEY presents
6 TONY AWARD
The Hit Broadway Musical
BEST REVIVAL OF A PLAY
ALADDIN
GREAT SEATS NOW AVAILABLE
Tonight at 7
T 7; W 1 & 7; Th 7; F 8; Sa 2 & 8; Su 3
AladdinTheMusical.com
866-870-2717
New Amsterdam Theatre (+) 214 W. 42 St.
BEST ACTRESS
IN A PLAY
GLENDA JACKSON
IN A PLAY
Tonight at 7
BEAUTIFUL
THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL
Tu 7; We 2; Th 7; Fr 8; Sa 2&8; Su 2&7
Telecharge.com/212-239-6200
Groups of 10+ 1-800- BROADWAY ext. 2
www.BeautifulOnBroadway.com
Stephen Sondheim Theatre 124 W 43rd St
INCLUDING
LAURIE METCALF
BEST DIRECTOR
OF A PLAY
JOE MANTELLO
7 WEEKS ONLY
TONIGHT AT 7, TOM'W AT 2 & 8
BEST REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL
“A MUSICAL COMEDY DREAM.
WOW, WOW, WOW INDEED.”
Peter Travers, Rolling Stone
Book by Harvey Fierstein
Music & Lyrics by Cyndi Lauper
Direction/Choreography by Jerry Mitchell
Ticketmaster.com or 877-250-2929
Groups (10+): 1-800-BROADWAY X2
Tu/Th 7, Fri 8, Wed/Sat 2 & 8, Sun 3
KinkyBootsTheMusical.com
Al Hirschfeld Theatre (+), 302 W. 45th St.
TONIGHT AT 7, TOMORROW AT 2 & 8
BERNADETTE
PETERS
HELLO,
DOLLY!
11 TONY AWARD
nominations including
BEST REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL
12 DRAMA DESK AWARD
nominations including
BEST REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL
6 OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD
nominations including
BEST REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL
3 DRAMA LEAGUE AWARD
nominations including
BEST REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL
VICTOR
GARBER
Based on The Matchmaker by
THORNTON WILDER
Book by
MICHAEL STEWART
Music & Lyrics by
JERRY HERMAN
Original Production
Directed & Choreographed by
GOWER CHAMPION
JOSHUA HENRY
JESSIE MUELLER
RENEE FLEMING
RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN'S
CAROUSEL
CHOREOGRAPHED BY
JUSTIN PECK
12 TONY AWARD NOMINATIONS
INCLUDING BEST MUSICAL
MEAN GIRLS
Book by TINA FEY
Music by JEFF RICHMOND
Lyrics by NELL BENJAMIN
Directed & Choreographed by
CASEY NICHOLAW
Groups: 1-800-BROADWAYx2
MeanGirlsOnBroadway.com
August Wilson Theatre (+), 245 W. 52 St.
Choreographed by
WARREN CARLYLE
DISNEY presents
FROZEN
The Broadway Musical
10 Tony Award Nominations including
Best Musical Revival!
TONIGHT AT 7, WEDNESDAY AT 2 & 8
Lincoln Center Theater Presents
Lerner & Loewe's
BETTE IS BACK!
Directed By Bartlett Sher
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
Groups: 212-889-4300
MyFairLadyBway.com
Vivian Beaumont Theater (+), 150 W. 65th
(AND DAVID AND GAVIN ARE, TOO!)
BETTE
MIDLER
CHILDREN OF
A LESSER GOD
BEST ACTRESS LAUREN RIDLOFF
Tony Award Nominee
TONIGHT at 7, TOMORROW at 2 & 8
CHILDREN OF
A LESSER GOD
ChildrenOfALesserGodBroadway.com
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
Studio 54 (+), 254 West 54th Street
PART ONE TOMORROW AT 2PM
PART TWO TOMORROW AT 7:30PM
HARRY POTTER
AND THE CURSED CHILD
PARTS ONE AND TWO
Based on an original new story by
J.K. ROWLING, JACK THORNE
& JOHN TIFFANY
A New Play by JACK THORNE
We, Sa, Su 2 & 7:30pm; Th & Fr 7:30pm
HarryPotterThePlay.com
Lyric Theatre (+), 214 W. 43rd St.
877-250-2929 or Ticketmaster.com
Groups 10+: 866-302-0995
BookOfMormonBroadway.com
Tue - Thu 7; Fri 8; Sat 2 & 8; Sun 2 & 7
Eugene O'Neill Theatre (+), 230 W 49th St
“BROADWAY'S FUNNIEST AND
LONGEST-RUNNING PLAY!” - NY Post
THE PLAY THAT
GOES WRONG
OLIVIER WINNER! BEST NEW COMEDY
Tonight at 7
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
BroadwayGoesWrong.com
LYCEUM THEATRE (+), 149 W. 45TH ST.
Tonight at 7
Mo 8; Tu 7; We 2&7; Th & Fr 8; Sa 2&8
BoysInTheBand.com
Booth Theatre (+) 222 W 45th Street
8 TONY AWARD
nominations including
BEST REVIVAL OF A PLAY
also starring DAVID
HYDE
PIERCE
6 WEEKS ONLY
JULY 17 THROUGH AUGUST 25
NO CHANCE OF EXTENSION
BEST DIRECTOR OF A PLAY
TONY NOMINEE - BEST PLAY REVIVAL!
TONIGHT AT 7
Tom Hollander
TRAVESTIES
By Tom Stoppard
Directed by Patrick Marber
Roundabouttheatre.org/212.719.1300
Group Sales: 212.719.9393
American Airlines Theatre (+), 227 W 42 St
Now Starring KATHARINE McPHEE
Tonight at 7; Tomorrow at 2 & 7
WAITRESS
Music and Lyrics by Sara Bareilles
Book by Jessie Nelson
Directed by Diane Paulus
WaitressTheMusical.com
Ticketmaster.com / 877-250-2929
Tue, Thu 7; Wed 2&7; Fri 8; Sat 2&8; Sun 3
Brooks Atkinson Theatre (+), 256 W 47 St
GEORGE C. WOLFE
TONY AWARD NOMINATIONS
BEST ACTRESS
LaChanze
BEST FEATURED ACTRESS
Ariana DeBose
8 WEEKS ONLY
TONIGHT AND TOMORROW AT 7
BEST AVAILABILITY WEEKNIGHTS
NEW YORK TIMES CRITIC'S PICK
“DENZEL WASHINGTON AND
GEORGE C. WOLFE ARE A MATCH
MADE IN THEATER HEAVEN.”
- Roma Torre, NY1
TONIGHT AT 7PM
SUMMER:
The Donna Summer
Musical
Ticketmaster.com or 877-250-2929
Groups (12+) 1-877-536-3437
Tu, Th 7; We 2 & 7; Fr 8; Sa 2 & 8; Su 3
TheDonnaSummerMusical.com
Lunt-Fontanne Theatre (+), 205 W. 46th St
DENZEL
WASHINGTON
EUGENE O'NEILL'S
THE ICEMAN
COMETH
“BROADWAY'S BIGGEST
BLOCKBUSTER”
-The New York Times
Tonight at 7
WICKED
WickedtheMusical.com
Tu & Th 7; We 2&7; Fr 8; Sa 2&8; Su 3
Ticketmaster.com or 877-250-2929
Groups: 646-289-6885/877-321-0020
Gershwin Theatre(+) 222 West 51st St.
OFF−BROADWAY
DIRECTED BY
GEORGE C. WOLFE
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
IcemanOnBroadway.com
Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre(+)242 W 45 St
HelloDollyOnBroadway.com
10 TONY AWARD NOMINATIONS
incl. BEST PLAY
THE BOOK OF MORMON
BEST ACTOR IN A PLAY
SO LONG DEARIE
JACK O'BRIEN
OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD
DENZEL WASHINGTON
DIRECTED BY
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
Groups 10+: 866-302-0995
CarouselBroadway.com
Imperial Theatre (+) 249 W 45th St
DRAMA DESK AWARD
MY FAIR LADY
BEST MUSICAL NOMINEE
FrozenTheMusical.com
866-870-2717
St. James Theatre (+) 246 W 44th St.
THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA
Mon 8; Tue 7; Wed - Sat 8; Thu & Sat 2
Grps: 800-BROADWAY or 866-302-0995
Majestic Theatre (+) 247 W. 44th St.
WINNER! BEST MUSICAL
Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto,
Matt Bomer, Andrew Rannells,
Charlie Carver, Robin de Jesus,
Brian Hutchison, Tuc Watkins,
Michael Benjamin Washington
By Mart Crowley
Directed By Joe Mantello
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
Groups 10+: 866-302-0995
HelloDollyOnBroadway.com
Shubert Theatre (+), 225 W. 44th St.
TONY, OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE,
DRAMA LEAGUE
Tonight at 8
T 8; W 2 & 8; Th 8; F 8; Sa 2 & 8; Su 3
WINNER! BEST MUSICAL
THE BOYS IN THE BAND
Directed by JERRY ZAKS
HELLO,
DOLLY!
SPECIAL ACTORS FUND PERF
MONDAY, MAY 14 AT 3
OLIVIER AWARD
“THE BEST MUSICAL
OF THIS CENTURY.”
- Ben Brantley, The New York Times
JOE MANTELLO
TONIGHT AT 7, TOMORROW AT 2 & 8
NEW YORK TIMES CRITIC'S PICK
WINNER! BEST MUSICAL
Tonight at 7
Celebrating 30 Years on Broadway
Visit Telecharge.com; Call 212-239-6200
GRAMMY AWARD
DIRECTED BY
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
ThreeTallWomenBroadway.com
Golden Theatre (+), 252 W 45th St
TONY AWARD
TONIGHT AT 7, TOMORROW AT 7
SPECIAL ACTORS FUND PERF
THURSDAY, MAY 17 AT MIDNIGHT
GLENDA JACKSON
LAURIE METCALF
ALISON PILL
EDWARD ALBEE'S
THREE TALL WOMEN
KINKY BOOTS
WINNER! BEST MUSICAL
WINNER! BEST MUSICAL ALBUM
NEW YORK TIMES CRITIC'S PICK
WINNER! PULITZER PRIZE FOR DRAMA
THE MOST NOMINATED SHOW
OF THE YEAR
The Tony-winning BEST MUSICAL
Tonight at 7, Tomorrow at 2 & 8
TYLER GLENN
NOMINATIONS INCLUDING
BEST FEATURED ACTRESS
“OUT OF CONTROL AMAZING!”
- The Wall Street Journal
WINNER! 4 TONY AWARDS
BAND’S VISIT
FINAL 7 PERFORMANCES
“CAPTIVATING! Undeniably
entertaining!”- TheaterMania
11 TONY AWARD NOMINATIONS
INCLUDING BEST MUSICAL
TONIGHT AT 7
THE BAND'S VISIT
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
TheBandsVisitMusical.com
Tue - Thu 7; Wed, Sat 2; Fri, Sat 8; Sun 3
Ethel Barrymore Theatre (+), 243 W. 47th
Billy Crudup
HARRY CLARKE
DISNEY presents
THE LION KING
The Award-Winning Best Musical
Tonight at 7
This Week:T7; W2&7; Th7; F8; Sa2&8
Next Week: T7;W2&7;Th7;F8;Sa2&8;Su3
lionking.com
866-870-2717
Minskoff Theatre (+), B'way & 45th Street
BILLY CRUDUP
HARRY CLARKE
By David Cale
Directed by Leigh Silverman
Ticketmaster.com 1-800-982-2787
Minetta Lane Theatre(+), 18 Minetta Ln
HarryClarkePlay.com
Seedfolks
Through Friday at the New
Victory Theater, Manhattan;
646-223-3010, newvictory
.org. Running time: 1 hour.
could not be more topical in today’s fractured, and fractious,
America. When Ana, an aged resident of Gibb Street, sees Kim, the
Vietnamese child, digging in the
lot, she assumes that the girl must
be burying drugs or a gun. When
Ana’s investigation turns up only
beans, she enlists Wendell, a retired janitor, to help save the tiny
seedlings.
Soon others get involved, including Gonzalo, a mischievous
boy whose family comes from
Central America; Sam, a transplanted 78-year-old New York
Jew; Sae Young, a Korean woman
emotionally scarred by a vicious
robbery; and Curtis, a youth hoping to win back his tomato-loving
ex-girlfriend, Lateesha.
These neighbors, and others, all
come to vivid life in the person of
Sonja Parks. Instantly changing
ages, accents and ethnicities, this
actress illuminates a nearly
empty stage, embellished only by
video projections (designed by
Jorge Cousineau) and a soundscape (by Sean Healey) that captures the inexorable drip of water,
the shrill squeak of rats.
While playing the garrulous
Sam, Ms. Parks even leaps into
the audience, exhorting theatergoers to do what we humans find
so hard: engage with a stranger.
When the characters do, they’re
surprised. A homeless 15-year-old
becomes “not just some black
teenage boy. He was Royce.”
Occasionally, such transformations happen a little too easily. And
you can’t help wondering why this
moving adaptation, briskly directed by Peter C. Brosius, eliminates the novel’s most anguished
character, Maricela, a pregnant
16-year-old. Why is adolescent
pregnancy a social problem family theater so rarely confronts?
This omission, however, does
not undermine the impact of the
production or of Ms. Parks, whose
tour de force embodies the small
miracle of Gibb Street: how people so disparate, distant and divided can find, in every sense, common ground.
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
C5
N
Theater
JESSE GREEN
THEATER REVIEW
Betrayal and Hardship as the Revolution Falters
‘The army is as great a tyrant as
the king was,’ a soldier says
after the English Civil War.
THEATER IS A COLLABORATION but not usually a commune. That may help explain why
Caryl Churchill’s “Light Shining in Buckinghamshire” — which she wrote, in 1976, after
a three-week workshop with actors helping
to develop the characters and scenes — is
the first of her plays I’ve found indulgent
and leaden. However wonderful it may be to
perform, it’s a hard slog to sit through.
I say this as a longtime admirer of Ms.
Churchill’s work, including, most recently,
“Escaped Alone,” “Love and Information”
and “A Number.” I also appreciate how the
match of method and content seems, on paper, propitious. “Light Shining in Buckinghamshire” is, after all, a play about equity
and representation among people usually
powerless over their lives. I don’t mean actors, but rather the masses of landless laborers who took up arms against King
Charles I of England in the mid-1600s.
The revival that opened on Sunday at
New York Theater Workshop, which also
produced the play’s American premiere in
1991, certainly gets the shiver of civil disorder right.
Directed by Rachel Chavkin (“Hadestown,” “Natasha, Pierre & the Great
Comet of 1812”), the evening is nothing if not
true to the themes of confusion and foreboding. Riccardo Hernández’s lowering set,
Isabella Byrd’s gloomy lighting and Mikaal
Sulaiman’s rumbling sound design together
create the feeling that, in the words of Isaiah
that open the play, “the foundations of the
earth do shake.”
But it’s an anticlimax built into the aftermath of the English Civil War, and into Ms.
Churchill’s construction, that all the shaking ends up changing little. The men who
fought to help the gentry supplant the
throne wind up no better off than when they
started. “The army is as great a tyrant as
the king was,” one of the soldiers (Gregg
Mozgala) complains, only neglecting to include the church in his disappointment.
That’s true of history but taxing as dramaturgy. As much as Ms. Churchill meant
to portray (as she writes in a preface to the
script) “the amazed excitement of people
taking hold of their own lives,” what we actually see onstage is an endless cycle of betrayal and hardship.
When that bleak vision arises from characters interacting, it is sometimes beautifully crystallized. We get a big dose of Ms.
Churchill’s withering sarcasm, for instance,
in a scene between a vicar (Rob Campbell)
and his servant (Mikéah Ernest Jennings).
While savoring his wine, the vicar tells the
servant, whose newborn child is dying, “It
must have been a comfort this morning to
have the bishop himself encourage you to
suffer.”
Later, having stolen a shard of mirror
from an abandoned manor house, a woman
(Evelyn Spahr) marvels that the rich “must
know what they look like all the time!” How
wrong she is.
More often, though, the arguments aren’t
Follow Jesse Green on Twitter: @JesseKGreen.
SARA KRULWICH/THE NEW YORK TIMES
LIGHT SHINING IN
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
Tickets Through June 3 at New
York Theater Workshop,
Manhattan; 212-460-5475,
nytw.org. Running time: 2
hours 40 minutes.
Credits By Caryl Churchill;
directed by Rachel Chavkin;
sets by Riccardo Hernández;
costumes by Toni-Leslie James;
lighting by Isabella Byrd; sound
by Mikaal Sulaiman; props by
Noah Mease; original music
and music direction by Orion
Stephanie Johnstone; stage
manager, Jhanaë K-C Bonnick.
Presented by New York Theater
Workshop.
Cast Vinie Burrows, Rob
Campbell, Matthew Jeffers,
Mikéah Ernest Jennings, Gregg
Mozgala and Evelyn Spahr.
dramatized so much as transcribed. In the
long scene that ends the first act, Ms.
Churchill presents the actual content
(much condensed, of course) of the Putney
Debates of 1647, in which representatives of
the newly victorious army considered what
to do with their victory. Designated “agitators” like Edward Sexby (Mr. Jennings)
sought legal changes that would grant commoners (though not their women) suffrage;
proponents of Parliament like Henry Ireton
(Matthew Jeffers) and Oliver Cromwell
(Ms. Burrows) were less enthused by the
idea.
Ms. Chavkin, who has gradually been introducing contemporary touches throughout the play, stages the debate as if it were a
zoning committee meeting in a modern metropolis. One participant swigs from a bottle
of Diet Coke; another surreptitiously
checks his iPhone. Droll as this is, it neither
leavens the bureaucratic heaviness of the
scene nor deepens it as drama.
Not that the issues aren’t important and
timely; what could be a more powerful
question to ask today than how to create
fairness when people in power fundamentally don’t want it? Over and over, representatives of the gentry assert that giving
ordinary men the vote will result in the
seizure of property; over and over, the others ask what they have staked their lives for
if their lives are not to be made better for it.
JESSE GREEN
Clearly, Ms. Churchill wants the audience
to endure in real time the inertia that stifled
change in 1647 and so much human potential over the centuries. That’s a bit of forcefed spinach, but not the only bit. As written,
“Light Shining in Buckinghamshire” aims
to keep the audience at a Brechtian distance
so that sentiment won’t cloud its politics. To
that end Ms. Churchill recommends that every actor play several characters and that
many characters be played by several actors, thus preventing us from becoming attached to anyone.
Being too good a playwright, she sometimes fails; a scene in which one woman
(Ms. Burrows) convinces another (Ms.
Spahr) to give her baby to the rich lest it die
of malnutrition is both polemical and heartbreaking.
Though Ms. Chavkin does not follow all of
the playwright’s recommendations — some
roles are played by the same actors
throughout — she doubles down on the
alienation. Characters pull hand mics from
their doublets and scream accusations of
gluttony at the audience; I often found myself reading the prominently placed live
captioning board even though I could hear
the actors just fine. The overall effect is forbidding, the opposite of the broad welcome
Ms. Chavkin intended.
Where she has been more successful in
realizing her vision is in casting actors who,
Mikéah Ernest Jennings, foreground,
plays multiple roles in a very dark
revival of Caryl Churchill’s 1976 play
“Light Shining in Buckinghamshire,”
which is running at New York Theater
Workshop.
as she told The New York Times, “reflect
and embody” the play’s spirit of collective
liberation “as powerfully as possible.” Indeed, it is hard to imagine a more diverse
group of performers — by age, race, stature
and physical ability — than the six who
cover the two dozen roles here.
That would hardly matter if they were not
all excellent, but they not only master Ms.
Churchill’s dense representation of 17thcentury English, they also find ways to undermine her alienation. Certainly, it’s hard
to feel distanced when they sing Orion
Stephanie Johnstone’s thrilling choral music.
I am not sure their warmth is fully authorized, but I was glad of it. It is only in such
moments that you feel Ms. Churchill’s mature temperament at work: political, to be
sure, but a politics distilled into much greater pungency by wit and love and indirection. It seems fitting that a play developed
with the help of actors should be, in this way,
rescued by them, to the extent rescue is possible.
THEATER REVIEW
A Secret History of Gay Life Is Uncovered
Three characters are extracted
from a psychiatrist’s archives.
THE SAILORS DON’T SHOW UP for Fleet Week
until the end of the month, but right now
we’ve got the shrinks. Yes, the American
Psychiatric Association is in town; you may
have noticed the gangs of tweedy, chinstroking men and women wandering the
side streets in search of discounted Eames
lounge chairs.
If they are drama minded, they already
know about Ain Gordon’s “217 Boxes of Dr.
Henry Anonymous,” which opened on
Thursday at the Baryshnikov Arts Center in
conjunction with their 2018 annual meeting.
It is, after all, a play about a psychiatrist —
and not only that, but one who made history
at an earlier annual meeting, in Dallas.
It was there, in 1972, that Dr. John Fryer,
wearing a joke-store rubber mask and an
oversized tuxedo to disguise his identity, began a brief speech to his colleagues by saying, “I am a homosexual.” A year later, the
organization’s pernicious diagnosis of homosexuality as a mental disorder — a diagnosis that had harmed innumerable men
and women, and made Fryer fear that using
his own name would ruin him — was
stricken from the psychiatric bible.
Mr. Gordon’s play, which he also directed,
does not try to explain how things moved so
fast. (Much more was involved than Fryer’s
testimony.) Nor is it the kind of self-congratulatory uplift you expect to find on the program at a convention. Rather, “217 Boxes” is
an important work of documentary theater
about a man who is a footnote to gay history,
as well as a powerfully moving abstract of
the decades of suffering and change that his
life and attachments encompassed.
I use the word “abstract” advisedly. Mr.
Gordon is a three-time Obie award winner
who often focuses on the “also pictured”
characters at the edge of photographs and
fame. Even within that aesthetic, “217
Boxes” is unusually indirect and conceptual. Fryer himself does not appear in this
play named for him except in projections
behind the set, and mostly in the hideous
Derek Lucci plays Alfred A.
Gross in “217 Boxes of Dr.
Henry Anonymous,” and Laura
Esterman portrays Katherine
M. Luder.
217 BOXES OF DR.
HENRY ANONYMOUS
Tickets Through Friday
at the Baryshnikov Arts
Center, Manhattan;
866-811-4111, 217boxes.com.
Running time: 1 hour 10
minutes.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY SARA KRULWICH/THE NEW YORK TIMES
disguise that paradoxically brought him his
moment of notoriety.
Instead of Fryer what we mostly see are
the gray, flip-top archival boxes from which
the play draws its title. Arranged in piles
and lanes to form a kind of graveyard, they
represent similar boxes housed at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, which acquired Fryer’s papers upon his death in
2003. There, Mr. Gordon immersed himself
in notes, letters, diaries and other documents, eventually extracting three characters from them: three lives lived at tangents
to Fryer’s that together triangulated him
and his times.
Footnotes to a footnote, they nevertheless become, in a series of beautifully
shaped 25-minute monologues, avatars of
gayness in America during the whole of the
20th century. This even though only the
first is gay: Alfred A. Gross, a “high-swish”
pre-Stonewall homosexual (he was born in
1895) who sought Fryer’s professional help
in assisting “men like himself” when they
got into trouble with the law.
A self-described warrior for his people
(“Well, warrior behind the drapes”), Gross
(Derek Lucci) attests to the terrible oppression of the closet but also to its compensations: “May I be a little understood for reveling in how that oppression did also make
me spectacular?” he asks. Mr. Lucci gives
Gross immense dignity without shrinking
at all from his flamboyance; he italicizes
italics and turns sibilance into music.
The second ghost from the archives is
Katherine M. Luder, who, starting at age 67
and continuing until her death 24 years lat-
Credits Written and directed by
Ain Gordon; lighting and
projections by Nick Ryckert;
production stage manager, Ed
Fitzgerald; associate producer,
Meredith Boggia; producers,
Ain Gordon and Alyce Dissette.
Presented by Equality Forum,
Malcolm Lavin, executive
producer.
Cast Derek Lucci (Alfred A.
Gross), Laura Esterman
(Katherine M. Luder) and Ken
Marks (Ercel Fryer).
er, was Fryer’s secretary and something
more. (“The doctor and myself were a little,
intensely, utterly platonically, very married,” she says with typical tartness. “Ha,
chew on that.”) Luder recapitulates in her
relationship with Fryer the arc of the
world’s growing acknowledgment, toleration and embrace of gay people, or at least a
quicker form of it.
She also connects the dots to feminism,
ageism and, most powerfully, AIDS, which
she came to comprehend as Fryer’s young
patients showed up for appointments in
ever more ill-fitting clothes. In what is perhaps the play’s highlight, Luder, played by
Laura Esterman, a New York stage treasure who has never been better, memorializes those patients, whose names she of
course can’t divulge, in a way that is no less
concrete for being totally abstract.
That’s the play’s method, too, coming at
us with its cool cred thrust out like a business card but still, when you shake its hand,
warm to the touch. By the final monologue,
in which Ken Marks plays Fryer’s father,
Ercel, Mr. Gordon risks even sentimentality. In reality, Ercel died, at home in Kentucky, two years before his son’s speech; it’s
the play that gives him posthumous knowledge of it. And though he still has trouble
saying the word “homosexual,” Ercel wants
us to know he is proud that he signed all
nine letters he wrote to his son — they’re in
the boxes — “Love, Daddy.”
From where I sat among the psychiatrists, that bit of schmaltz, beautifully tempered in Mr. Marks’s performance, paid off.
It pays off because “217 Boxes” tells us
something real about the world whether or
not it is archivally true. Liberation, the play
demonstrates, is not just necessary and
beneficial to the oppressed but also to society as a whole. “This is the greatest loss, our
honest humanity,” Fryer said on that hot
Dallas day in 1972, “and that loss leads all
those others around us to lose that little bit
of their humanity as well.”
That he said this while sweating behind a
rubber mask does not make it any less true.
And that “217 Boxes” turns it into something moving does not make it any less fine.
C6
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
EVENING
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
11
WPIX
13
WNET
21
WLIW
25
WNYE
SciTech Now (G)
31
WPXN
Criminal Minds “The Tribe.” (14)
41
WFUT2
La Rosa de Guadalupe (N) (14)
El rico y Lázaro (N)
Papá a toda madre (N)
Por amar sin ley (14)
Noticias 41
Noticiero Uni
Deportivo
47
WNJU
Caso Cerrado: Edición Estelar (N)
Mi familia perfecta (N)
Al otro lado del muro (N)
El señor de los cielos (N) (14)
Noticiero Tele
Titulares y más
Al otro lado
48
WRNN
Skin Secrets
Plastic Surgery
Credit?
Paid Program
Facelift in Min.
WCBS
4
WNBC
5
WNYW
7
WABC
9
WWOR
Inside Edition (N) Entertainment
(PG)
Tonight (N)
10:00
NCIS “Two Steps Back.” A team mem- Bull “Death Sentence.” A client is
ber is a hit man’s target. (N) (14)
found guilty of murder. (Season Finale) (N) (14)
Extra (N) (PG)
Access Fashions The Voice “Live Top 10 Eliminations.” Rise “Totally Hosed.” Gordy volunteers
from this year’s
Charlie Puth and 5 Seconds of Sum- in the theater. (N) (14) (9:01)
Met Gala. (N) (PG) mer. (N) (Live) (PG)
Page Six TV Guest Modern Family
l Lethal Weapon “One Day More.”
New Girl “Godparents; Mario.” Winhost Bob Harper. “The Cover-Up.” Riggs’ life may be threatened. (Season ston reunites with his long-lost dad.
(PG)
(PG)
Finale) (N) (14)
(N) (14)
Jeopardy! (N) (G) Wheel of Fortune Roseanne “Go
The Middle “The black-ish “Collat- Splitting Up
“Spa Getaway.”
Cubs.” (N) (PG)
Royal Flush.” (N) eral Damage.” (N) Together “Letting
(N) (G)
(PG)
(PG)
Ghost.” (N) (PG)
Family Feud (N) The Big Bang The- The X-Files “Dreamland.” Mulder and The X-Files “Dreamland II.” (Part 2 of
(PG)
ory (PG)
Scully visit Area 51. (Part 1 of 2)
2) (14)
The Goldbergs
The Goldbergs
The Flash “Harry and the Harrisons.” The 100 “Sleeping Giants.” Bellamy
(PG)
“Magic Is Real.”
(N) (PG)
investigates a way home. (N) (14)
PBS NewsHour (N)
Civilizations “Encounters.” Art brings First Civilizations “Cities.” The Middle
cultures together. (N) (PG)
East and the first cities. (N) (PG)
MetroFocus
N.Y.C. Arts
The Doctor Blake Mysteries (PG)
Father Brown (PG)
2
Science Movies
Ultimate Restorations (G)
In the America
Criminal Minds “A Real Rain.” (14)
Criminal Minds (PG)
Food for the Poor
Dr. Ho Relieves Back Pain
Blueprint: N.Y.C.
NCIS: New Orleans “The Assassination CBS 2 News at
of Dwayne Pride.” A journalist posts a 11PM (N)
scathing article. (N) (14)
Chicago Med “Crisis of Confidence.” A News 4 NY at
boy has life-threatening flu. (N) (14) 11 (N)
The Late Show With Stephen Colbert
Michael B. Jordan; Matt Walsh. (N)
(PG) (11:35)
The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy
Fallon Trevor Noah; Gabrielle Union;
Chromeo. (N) (14) (11:34)
The Big Bang The- Modern Family
The Simpsons
ory (PG)
“Express Yourself.” “Simpsorama.”
(PG)
(PG)
Eyewitness News Jimmy Kimmel Live Woody Harrelson;
at 11 (N)
Sara Gilbert; Bazzi. (N) (14) (11:35)
Fox 5 News at 10 (N)
PIX11 News at Ten (N)
Frontline “Myanmar’s Killing Fields.”
Efforts to kill Rohingya Muslims. (N)
EastEnders (PG) EastEnders (PG)
Secrets
Neighborhood
Varicose Veins
American War Stories: Vietnam
Sauti: Refugee
Private Eyes “The Six.” (PG)
Private Eyes
CPTV
PBS NewsHour (N)
Civilizations “Encounters.” (N) (PG)
Secrets of the Dead (PG)
The Price of Peace: A Personal
NHK Newsline
WNJN
One on One
NJTV News
Father Brown (PG)
Unforgotten on Masterpiece (Part 3 of 3) (14)
Pioneers: Regin
NJTV News
Due Process
World News
55
WLNY
2 Broke Girls
2 Broke Girls
Dr. Phil (N) (14)
WLNY News at 9PM (N)
Judge Judy (N)
Judge Judy (N)
Mike & Molly
Mike & Molly
Ent. Tonight
63
WMBC
Credit?
Cook Fast
Foot Pain
Credit?
Conture Kinetic
Paid Program
Age Spots
Balding
Perfect Squats!
LifeLock
68
WFUT
Drug Wars (PG)
Drug Wars (PG)
La tierra prometida (14)
FLIX
HBO
HBO2
MAX
SHO
SHO2
STARZ
STZENC
TMC
El Chavo (G)
Laura (14)
PREMIUM CABLE
. The Illusionist (2006). Edward Nor- Lions for Lambs (2007). War embroils senator, reporter, . A Beautiful Mind (2001). Russell Crowe, Ed Harris. Math prodigy with paranoid schizophrenia. The Great Debatton, Paul Giamatti. (PG-13) (6)
professor, students. Redford’s big-screen lecture. (R)
Oscar winner, including best picture. (PG-13) (9:35)
ers (2007).
Real Time With
VICE News To2018 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Inductees include Bon Jovi and the Cars. (14)
Boxing Gennady Golovkin vs. Vanes Martirosyan. From
Bill Maher (6:30) night (N)
Carson, Calif.
Lady Macbeth (2016). Florence Pugh, Real Time With Bill Maher Historian Last Week ToWyatt Cenac’s
A Dangerous Son Children with serious mental illnesses. Wonder Woman (2017). Gal Gadot,
Cosmo Jarvis. (R) (6:30)
Jon Meacham. (MA)
night-John Oliver Problem Areas
(14)
Chris Pine. (PG-13)
Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang (2005). Robert Never Been Kissed (1999). Drew Barrymore. Reporter poses as high school Orange County (2002). Colin Hanks, Rellik “Before.” The killer sets sights Knight and Day
Downey Jr. Val Kilmer. (R) (6:15)
student. Bottom of the barrel. (PG-13)
Jack Black. (PG-13) (9:50)
on Gabriel. (MA) (11:15)
(2010). (12:15)
. Children of Men (2006). Clive
Shameless “The Fugees.” Frank’s busi- I’m Dying up Here “Gone With the
Billions “Not You, Mr. Dake.” Axe and The Circus: Inside Man on a Ledge (2012). Sam WorthOwen, Julianne Moore. (R) (6)
ness sends him on a run. (MA)
Wind.” (MA)
Chuck face mounting evidence.
the Wildest
ington, Elizabeth Banks. (PG-13)
. Apollo 13 (1995). Astronauts in per- Bad Moms (2016). Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell. Three
Shaquille O’Neal Presents: All Star Comedy Jam: I’m Still Laughing Bruce Shaquille O’Neal Presents: All Star
il. Spellbinding true story. (PG) (5:30) stressed-out moms go wild. ?Hangover? rewarmed. (R) Bruce; Huggy Lowdown. (MA) (9:45)
Comedy Jam
Kiss the Girls
Sweetbitter “Salt.” 28 Days (2000). Sandra Bullock, Viggo Mortensen. New York writer goes to Sweetbitter “Salt.” The Shallows (2016). Capable surfer battles hungry
Redemption
(1997). (R) (5:46) (MA) (7:43)
rehab. Scatterbrained seriocomedy. (PG-13) (8:13)
(MA) (9:59)
shark. Lively is a worthy opponent. (PG-13) (10:29)
(2013). (R) (11:57)
. Groundhog Day . WALL-E (2008). Animated. Garbage-collecting robot
Planet 51 (2009). Animated. Astronaut finds aliens stuck Deep Impact (1998). Morgan Freeman, Tea Leoni. Comet heading for earth.
(1993). (PG) (5:43) falls in love. Cinematic poem of wit and beauty. (G) (7:27) in 1950s. Flagrantly unoriginal. (PG) (9:08)
Doom and sensitivity. (PG-13) (10:41)
Becoming Cary Grant (2016). Suave . G.I. Jane (1997). Demi Moore. Navy Seals recruit endures rigorous train- Snowden (2016). Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Shailene Woodley. Dramatization of Edward Snowden
star’s life and career. (6:30)
ing. Ferocious and suitably spare. (R)
story, via Oliver Stone. Crisply drawn. (R) (10:05)
CABLE
7:00
A&E
AHC
AMC
APL
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
The First 48 “Officer Down.” A killer
The First 48: Love Kills “Missing; Deadly Obession; The Killer You Know.” A
Grace vs. Abrams “Laci Peterson.”
The First 48 “Deadly Rap.” Shootings The First 48: Love
targets the law. (14)
single mother disappears. (N) (14)
(Season Finale) (N) (14) (10:01)
in an Atlanta rap studio. (11:03)
Kills (12:03)
Hitler’s Empire
World War II: Witness to War (14)
Hunting Nazi Treasure (PG)
Hunting Nazi Treasure (N) (PG)
World War II: Witness to War (14)
Nazi Treasure
Jaws 2 (1978). Roy Scheider. For those who didn’t gasp . Jaws (1975). Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw. Spielberg’s beach-resort shark. You won’t doze. (PG) (8:35)
Jaws 2 (1978). Roy Scheider, Murray
the first time. Water fresher then, shark too. (PG) (6)
Hamilton. (PG) (11:35)
River Monsters “Bone Crusher.”
River Monsters (PG)
River Monsters
Life After Chernobyl (PG) (10:02)
River Monsters (PG) (11:02)
River Monsters
CBSSN
Star Trek: The Next Generation
Underworld: Evolution (2006). Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. (R)
Underworld: Awakening (2012). Kate Beckinsale, Stephen Rea. (R)
Underworld: Ev
The Fighting Temptations (2003). Cuba Gooding Jr. Beyonce Knowles. Unemployed man forms gospel choir. Strenu- In Contempt “Necessary Force.” Gwen In Contempt “Necessary Force.” Gwen Martin “I’ve Got a
ously uplifting comedy. (PG-13)
and Tracy defend a mother. (N)
and Tracy defend a mother.
Secret.” (PG)
Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia (N) (Live)
Bloomberg Markets: Asia (N) (Live) (G)
Bloomberg Technology
New Bissell
The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Sell It Like Serhant “In Big Tub-ble.” Watch What Hap- The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills
“Reunion Part 1.” (14)
“Social Edition.” (N) (14)
“Reunion Part 3.” (N) (14)
(14)
pens Live
“Reunion Part 3.” (14)
Sides of Story
College Baseball Nebraska vs. Creighton.
Poker Night Live From The Gardens Casino in Los Angeles.
CMT
Last-Standing
CN
Wrld, Gumball
Wrld, Gumball
King of the Hill
American Dad
Cleveland Show American Dad
Shark Tank All-natural dog treats. (PG) Shark Tank A reality interface for video Shark Tank A protein-filled pancake
gamers. (PG)
mix. (PG)
Erin Burnett OutFront (N)
Anderson Cooper 360 (N) (PG)
Anderson Cooper 360 (N) (PG)
BBCA
BET
BLOOM
BRV
CNBC
CNN
Last-Standing
Last-Standing
Last-Standing
Last-Standing
Bob’s Burgers
Bob’s Burgers
Family Guy (14) Family Guy (14) Rick and Morty
Shark Tank Fitness apparel line. (PG) Shark Tank Nick Woodman; a healthi- Shark Tank (PG)
er tortilla chip. (PG)
CNN Tonight With Don Lemon (N)
CNN Tonight With Don Lemon (N)
Anderson Cooper
360 (PG)
Tosh.0 (N) (14)
The Jim Jefferies The Daily Show
The Opposition-Jor- South Park (14)
Show (N) (14)
dan Klepper
(12:01)
Secret Eats
Secret Eats
Good Eats (G)
Good Eats (G)
Greatest Food
COOK
CSPAN
U.S. House of Representatives (N) (3:30)
CSPAN2
U.S. Senate (N)
CUNY
Arts in the City
DuckTales (G)
E!
Classic Arts Showcase (G)
Bunk’d “Xander
Bunk’d “Luke Out
Says Goodbye.”
Below.” (G)
Holmes Makes It Right (PG)
Deadliest Catch “Dead in the Water.”
(PG)
E! News (N)
CUNY TV Presents ABNY
Italics
Gravity Falls
Bunk’d “Can You Bunk’d (G)
“Headhunters.”
Hear Me Now.”
Holmes: Next Generation (G)
Holmes: Next Generation (N) (G)
Deadliest Catch: On Deck “Salt
Deadliest Catch “Collision Void.” (N)
Wounds.” (N) (14)
(PG)
Botched (14)
Botched Fixing a collapsed nose.
Puerto Rican
College
Stuck in the Mid- Stuck in the Middle (G)
dle (G)
Holmes: Next Generation (G)
Last Outpost “School Bus Sawmill &
Float Plane Gator.” (N) (PG) (10:01)
Botched “Man Boobs.” (14)
ELREY
Kickboxer (1989). (R) (6)
Kickboxer 2: The Road Back (1991). Sasha Mitchell, Peter Boyle. (R)
Kickboxer 3: The Art of War (1992). Sasha Mitchell, Dennis Chan. (R)
Kickboxer 4
ESPN
College Football College players competing in a number of skills contests.
Welcome/N.F.L.
SportsCenter
SportsCenter
ESPN2
N.B.A.: The Jump
N.F.L. Live
Around the Horn
ESPNCL
College Basketball From 1/23/95.
FOOD
Chopped “T.G.I. Fry-Day.” (G)
Tucker Carlson Tonight (N)
Chopped “Hearty Party.” (G)
Hannity (N)
FREEFRM
Chopped “Amateurs’ Brawl.” (G)
The Story With Martha MacCallum
(N)
Grown Ups (2010). (PG-13) (5:30)
Shadowhunters (N) (14)
. The Lion King (1994). Voices of Matthew Broderick. (G) (9:01)
Chopped “Fat Chance.” (G)
Fox News at Night with Shannon
Bream (N)
The 700 Club
Chopped (G)
Tucker Carlson
Tonight
Mr. Poppers
FS1
M.L.B.’s Best
U.F.C. Reloaded From Las Vegas.
M.L.B. Whiparound (N) (Live)
TMZ Sports
FUSE
FXX
Malcolm, Middle Malcolm, Middle Sister, Sister (G) Sister, Sister (G) Sister, Sister (G) Sister, Sister (G) Social Fabric (N) I Got the Hook-Up (1998). Master P, Anthony Johnson. (R)
Star Trek Into
Jurassic World (2015). Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard. Dinosaurs at the amusement park,
Legion “Chapter 14.” Madness visits Legion “Chapter 14.” Madness visits Trust “KodaDarkness (4:30) again. Galumphing. (PG-13)
Division Three. (N) (MA)
Division Three. (MA) (11:05)
chrome.” (12:10)
. Captain Phillips (2013). Tom Hanks, Catherine Keener. Somali pirates take U.S. freighter hos- . Captain Phillips (2013). Tom Hanks, Catherine Keener. Somali pirates take
2 Guns (2013).
FXM Presents
(R) (5:30)
(7:42)
tage. Shattering. (PG-13)
U.S. freighter hostage. Shattering. (PG-13) (10:45)
Ted (2012). Mark Wahlberg. (R) (5:30) The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
Archer (MA)
FYI
Shipping Wars
GOLF
Live From THE PLAYERS
GSN
Family Feud
Family Feud
Family Feud
Family Feud
Family Feud
HALL
Last-Standing
Last-Standing
Last-Standing
Last-Standing
The Middle (PG)
DIS
DIY
DSC
FOXNEWS
FX
FXM
Politics and Public Policy Today
Politics-Public
Public Affairs Events (G)
Public Affairs
Welcome/N.F.L.
Welcome/N.F.L.
Women’s College Beach Volleyball Florida State vs U.C.L.A.
U.F.C. Top Ten
Shipping Wars
Welcome/N.F.L.
Spikeball Invitational.
Stoler Rpt
Black America
Raven’s Home (G) Bunk’d (Part 1 of
2) (G)
Holmes: Next Generation (G)
Deadliest Catch “Collision Void.” (PG)
(11:01)
E! News
Democracy
DuckTales (G)
Holmes: Next
Last Outpost (PG)
(12:01)
Sex and the City
College Basketball From March 12, 2009.
Shipping Wars
Shipping Wars
Chopped “Hush Puppy Love.” (N)
The Ingraham Angle (N)
U.F.C. Countdown
Shipping Wars
Shipping Wars
Shipping Wars
Shipping Wars
Shipping Wars
Shipping Wars
Shipping Wars
Family Feud
Family Feud
Family Feud
Cash Cab (PG)
Cash Cab (PG)
Family Feud
The Middle (PG)
The Middle (PG)
The Middle (PG)
Golden Girls
Golden Girls
Golden Girls
Live From THE PLAYERS
Fixer Upper (G)
Fixer Upper (G)
Good Bones (N) (G)
House Hunters
Hunters Int’l
The Housleys
House Hunters
Good Bones (G)
Forged in Fire “The Naginata.” Two
Forged in Fire: Cutting Deeper “The Forged in Fire “The Navaja.” Making Forged in Fire: Knife or Death “Super Forged in Fire “The Navaja.” Making Forged in Fire:
HIST
smiths must forge a Japanese blade. Zande Spear.” (N) (PG)
blades using coal forges. (N) (PG)
Smash Bros.” (N) (10:03)
blades using coal forges. (11:03)
Cutting Deeper
HLN
Crime & Justice
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forbidden: Dying for Love “Fruit of the The Killer Beside Me “Target on Her Web of Lies “Be Right Back.” Text
Forbidden: Dying for Love “A Mother’s The Killer Beside Me “Target on Her Web of Lies “Be
ID
Family Tree.” (14)
Back.” (14)
messages lead to a killer. (N) (14)
Nightmare.” (N) (14)
Back.” (14)
Right Back.” (14)
Transporter 2 (2005). Jason Statham, . Batman Begins (2005). Christian Bale, Michael Caine. The boy who saw his parents murdered grows into Gotham Inception (2010). Leonardo DiCaprio. Thieves enter peoIFC
Amber Valletta. (PG-13) (6)
City’s masked avenger. Smashingly original. (PG-13)
ple’s dreams. Lots to see, little to think about. (PG-13)
Grey’s Anatomy “I Am a Tree.” Cristina Two Weeks Notice (2002). Sandra Bullock, Hugh Grant. Millionaire confronts Marley & Me (2008). Owen Wilson, Jennifer Aniston. A dog and his couple.
Two Weeks Notice
LIFE
meets Burke’s parents. (14)
feelings for his lawyer. Vague and undernourished. (PG-13)
Bland and obsequious. (PG) (10:02)
(2002). (12:01)
Mistress Hunter (2018, TVF). Laurelee Bell, Lydia Look. Woman hires profes- Escaping Dad (2017, TVF). Sunny Mabrey, Jason Wiles. Suburban mom goes Mistress Hunter
LIFEMOV My Daughter’s Secret (2007, TVF).
Jennifer Grant, Nina Dobrev. (6)
sional to end husband’s affair.
into hiding with children.
(2018, TVF).
HGTV
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
MLB
MSG
Beginnings
Beginnings
30 for 30 Shorts
KNX Gaming (N)
MSGPL
U.F.C. Event
Focused
Fight Sports From Feb. 18, 2012.
U.F.C. Unleashed
U.F.C. Countdown
Fight Sports
MSNBC
Hardball With Chris Matthews (N)
The Rachel Maddow Show (N)
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
Rachel Maddow
MTV
Jersey Shore: Family Vacation
Jersey Shore: Family Vacation
Jersey Shore: Family Vacation
The Challenge (N) (14)
Teen Mom 2 (PG) (11:01)
NBCS
To be announced
N.H.L. Live
N.H.L. San Jose Sharks vs. Vegas Golden Knights.
NGEO
. Zero Dark Thirty (2012). The C.I.A.’s hunt Osama bin Laden. Difficult, urgent, brilliantly directed. (R) (6:30)
NICK
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
. The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (2004). Voices of Tom Kenny. (PG)
Fresh Prince
NICKJR
Bubble Guppies
Shimmer, Shine
Nella, Princess
Peppa Pig (Y)
NY1
Inside City Hall (N)
OVA
I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997). Jennifer Love Hewitt. (R)
I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (1998). Jennifer Love Hewitt. (R)
OWN
Undercover Boss (PG)
The Haves and the Have Nots (14)
The Haves and the Have Nots (N)
Black Love “Motherly Love.” (N)
The Haves and the Have Nots (14)
The Haves, Nots
OXY
Chicago P.D. “The Three Gs.” (14)
Chicago P.D. (14)
Chicago P.D. “There’s My Girl.” (14)
Chicago P.D. (14)
Chicago P.D. (14)
Chicago P.D.
PARMT
Friends (PG)
Friends (PG)
Friends (PG)
Ink Master: Angels (N) (14)
Salt (2010). Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber. (PG-13)
SCIENCE
Mysteries of the Abandoned (PG)
Mysteries of the Abandoned (PG)
Mysteries of the Abandoned (N)
Mysteries of the Abandoned (PG)
SMITH
America’s Lost Submarine (G)
Air Disasters “Fight to the Death.”
Concorde: Flying Supersonic (PG)
SNY
M.L.B. New York Mets vs. Cincinnati Reds.
STZENF
Rookie of the Year (1993). (6:15)
Open Season (2006). Voices of Martin Lawrence. (PG)
Step Up 2 the Streets (2008). (PG-13) (9:28)
. Braveheart (1995). Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau. 13th-century Scots in revolt against England. Won best picture Oscar. Spectacular. (R)
All In With Chris Hayes (N)
Sunny Day (Y)
News All Evening
Friends (PG)
Peppa Pig (Y)
Peppa Pig (Y)
News All Evening
Friends (PG)
KNX Gaming
Genius “Picasso: Chapter Four.” (N)
Genius “Picasso: Chapter Four.”
Zero Dark Thirty
Fresh Prince
Friends (PG)
Friends (11:35)
Friends (12:10)
Zoofari (10:27)
Rusty Rivets (Y)
Top Wing (11:22) Blaze, Monster
NY1 Live At Ten (N)
Friends (PG)
Inside City Hall
News All Night
I’ll Always Know What You Did Last Summer (2006).
Mysteries of the Abandoned (PG)
Mysteries of the
Smallest Planes
Air Disasters “Fight to the Death.”
Concorde: Fly
Mets Postgame
SportsNite
SportsNite
SportsNite
TRU
Carbonaro Effect Carbonaro Effect Impractical Jokers Impractical Jokers Impractical Jokers Impractical Jokers Impractical Jokers Impractical Jokers The Chris Gethard Show (N) (14)
Impractical Jokers
TVLAND
M*A*S*H (PG)
M*A*S*H (7:36) Everybody Loves Raymond (8:12)
Love-Raymond
Love-Raymond
Chrisley Knows
Chrisley Knows
W.W.E. SmackDown! W.W.E. Backlash PPV results.
Best (14) (6:54) Best (14) (7:24)
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (14)
Dear Mama: Love Letter
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (14)
Mom (14)
Mom (14)
Chrisley Knows
The Cromarties
Best (N) (14)
(N) (14) (10:32)
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (14)
King of Queens
King of Queens
Modern Family
Modern Family
(PG) (11:04)
(PG) (11:34)
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (14)
King of Queens
Modern Family
(PG) (12:04)
Black Ink Crew
WGN-A
It’s Suppertime! Always Sunny
Law & Order “Soldier of Fortune.” Diamonds link to two murders. (14)
Cops (PG)
Cops (PG)
Always Sunny
Ice Cream
Law & Order “Myth of Fingerprints.”
(14)
Cops (PG)
Cops (PG)
Desus & Mero
Desus & Mero
Law & Order “The Fire This Time.” Arsonists torch a high-rise. (14)
Cops (PG)
Cops (PG)
That’s Delicious
Law & Order “3
Dawg Night.” (14)
Cops (PG)
YES
M.L.B. Boston Red Sox vs. New York Yankees.
New York Yankees Postgame
Homegrown
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
USA
VH1
VICE
WE
Always Sunny
Always Sunny
Law & Order “Possession.” A woman is
found murdered. (14)
Cops (PG)
Cops (PG)
Always Sunny
Always Sunny
Law & Order “Formerly Famous.” A
singer’s wife is found shot to death.
Cops (PG)
Cops (PG)
CRACKLE
A scene from “SuperMansion.”
SUPERMANSION on Crackle. Dr. Devizo
(voiced by Chris Pine) and the rest of the
Injustice Club become honorary members
of the League of Freedom in this stopmotion animated series. In the Season 3
opener, the heroes must welcome the villains into the mansion, and Titanium Rex
(Bryan Cranston) orders Robobot (Zeb
Wells) to search for Swine Kampf (also Mr.
Pine), a telekinetic monster created by
Adolf Hitler. In his review for The New
York Times, Neil Genzlinger warned parents that the “brilliant” adult cartoon is the
kind that would send a young child to therapy. “It features lots of erections, absurd
couplings and R-rated language,” he wrote.
“But it’s also smart and deliriously unpredictable.” The first episode is available to
stream, and episodes debut each Monday.
KEEPING FAITH on Acorn TV. This production
from BBC Wales and Acorn TV has gripped
audiences in Britain since its release this
year. Now it’s available for American viewers. The drama series stars Eve Myles as
Faith, a Welsh lawyer who cuts short her
extended maternity leave after the disappearance of her husband and business
partner, Evan (Bradley Freegard). As Faith
snoops around in her signature yellow
raincoat, she realizes she may not know
Evan as well as she thought.
What’s on TV
Catfish: The TV
N.H.L. Overtime (11:45)
TRAV
SYFY
(2018) on Netflix. The comedian, writer and
podcaster Hari Kondabolu has long mined
racial and political issues for his material.
“Warn Your Relatives” is no exception. In
this stand-up special, Mr. Kodabolu, a
Queens-born comic, talks terrorism and
family matters, and revisits the time Tracy
Morgan jeered at him. Mr. Kondabolu was
recently thrust into the spotlight when
“The Simpsons” responded to the criticism
of its character Apu, an Indian convenience-store owner, that was laid out in Mr.
Kondabolu’s documentary THE PROBLEM
WITH APU. Stream the film on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play or Vudu.
DAY OF WRATH (1948) on iTunes and FilmStruck. Set in a 17th-century Danish village,
this drama is about an older pastor and his
young wife, who falls in love with her stepson. When she confesses her feelings to her
husband, the shock takes his life and leads
to her demise. The film’s witch-hunt theme
has been described as an allegory for the
Nazi occupation of Denmark.
30 for 30 Shorts
Grease 2 (1982). Maxwell Caulfield. (PG) (11:07)
. Braveheart (1995). 13th-century Scots in revolt
against England. Won best picture Oscar. Spectacular. (R)
The Last Witch Hunter (2015). Vin
Faster (2010). Dwayne Johnson, Billy Bob Thornton. Ex-con races to avenge Futurama “Bend Futurama (PG)
Futurama (PG)
Futurama (Part 1 Futurama (Part 2
Diesel, Elijah Wood. (PG-13) (6)
brother’s murder. As muscle-bound as its hero. (R)
Her.” (PG)
of 4) (14)
of 4) (14)
The Big Bang The- The Big Bang The- The Big Bang The- The Big Bang The- The Big Bang The- The Big Bang The- The Last O.G.
The Last O.G. (N) Conan Eva Longoria; Luke
The Last O.G.
ory (PG)
ory (14)
ory (14)
ory (PG)
ory (14)
ory (PG)
“Tray-ning Day.”
(MA)
Hemsworth. (N) (14)
“Tray-ning Day.”
. The Thing From Another World
. Tarzan, the Ape Man (1932). Johnny Weissmuller, Maureen O’Sullivan.
Tarzan and His Mate (1934). Johnny Weissmuller, Maureen O’Sullivan. Tarzan Tarzan Escapes
(1951). Dewey Martin. (6:30)
Johnny’s debut, when Tarzan acquired class. Grand old adventure.
and Jane’s jungle idyll disturbed by hunters. Fantastic adventure.
(1936).
Little People, Big World “Back to the Farm: Trying Not to Freak Out.” (N)
Little People, Big World (N) (PG)
My Little Life (N) (14) (10:03)
Little People, Big World (11:03)
My Little Life
Safe House (2012). Denzel Washing- N.B.A. Utah Jazz vs. Houston Rockets. Western Conference semifinal, Game 5.
N.B.A. New Orleans Pelicans vs. Golden State Warriors. Western Conference
ton, Ryan Reynolds. (R) (5:30)
semifinal, Game 5.
Bizarre Foods America (PG)
Delicious
Delicious
The Zimmern
The Zimmern
Delicious
Delicious
Delicious
Delicious
The Zimmern
SUN
HARI KONDABOLU: WARN YOUR RELATIVES
12:00
Three’s Company Three’s Company Three’s Company . The Color Purple (1985). Whoopi Goldberg, Danny Glover. Black woman in rural South over the years. Beautifully played. (PG-13) (8:45)
(PG) (7:06)
(PG) (7:39)
(PG) (8:12)
M.L.B. Regional Coverage.
M.L.B. Tonight
LOGO
NETFLIX
Hari Kondabolu
. Fight Club (1999). Brad Pitt, Edward Norton. Underground club based on violence. Visionary and disturbing. (R)
The Office “Wel- The Office “Angry Tosh.0 (14)
Tosh.0 “Atheist in Tosh.0 “IceJJFish.” Tosh.0 (14)
come Party.” (PG) Andy.” (14)
a Foxhole.” (14)
(14)
Iron Chef Eats
Iron Chef Eats
Man’s Greatest Food “Pizza.” (G)
Brew & ’Que
Brew & ’Que
COM
What’s Streaming
Anger Management (14)
Seinfeld “The
Friends (PG)
Beard.” (PG)
Beyond 100 Days MetroFocus
(N)
World News
Frontline (N) (PG)
50
La tierra prometida (14)
Frontline (N) (PG)
Seinfeld (Part 1 of
2) (PG)
Amanpour on
PBS (N)
MetroFocus
49
Caught on Cam.
Hari Kondabolu gets his first Netflix comedy
special. And the risqué animated series
“SuperMansion” returns on Crackle.
For the People “Flippity-Flop.” Kate
gets an animal smuggling case. (N)
(PG)
Family Feud (PG) Family Feud (PG) Chasing News (N) Top 30 (N)
Criminal Minds “Machismo.” (PG)
New Bissell
What’s On Tuesday
M.L.B. Red Sox vs. Yankees
FOX
Clayne Crawford, left, and Damon Wayans.
LETHAL WEAPON 8 p.m. on Fox. Inspired by
the 1987 film of the same name, this procedural drama stars Clayne Crawford as
Riggs, a Texas police officer who relocates
to Los Angeles and is partnered with Murtaugh (Damon Wayans), a detective recovering from a heart attack. In this Season 2
finale, a death threat against Riggs puts the
squad on high alert, and Murtaugh takes on
more responsibilities, shifting the balance
of the duo’s relationship. The series has
done relatively well for Fox, but Mr. Crawford’s behavior on the set (for which he
posted a lengthy apology) has left the
prospect of a third season up in the air.
SARA ARIDI
ONLINE: TELEVISION LISTINGS
Daily television highlights, recent reviews by
The Times's critics, series recaps and what to
watch recommendations. nytimes.com/tv
Definitions of symbols used in
the program listings:
★ Recommended film
✩ Recommended series
● New or noteworthy program
(N) New show or episode
(CC) Closed-caption
(HD) High definition
Ratings:
(Y) All children
(Y7) Directed to older children
(G) General audience
(PG) Parental guidance
suggested
(14) Parents strongly cautioned
(MA) Mature audience only
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
C7
As the Band Played On (and On), Zzzzs
Heads hit pillows for ‘Sleep,’
Max Richter’s 8-hour lullaby,
complete with mattresses.
By JOSHUA BARONE
My first mistake was waking up early to get
groceries.
Then it was a long Friday at work, followed by a piano recital and finally a sprint
downtown — where, exhausted, I was in the
worst possible shape to take in one more
concert. Except that the performance was
“Sleep,” Max Richter’s eight-hour soundtrack engineered, with the help of scientific
consultants, to provoke a relaxing night.
By dozing off, I’d be doing my job.
“Our lives are very data-saturated now,”
Mr. Richter said in an interview last week.
“We’re always on our screens, and mostly
we’re being sold stuff. It squeezes out a lot of
richness of what we are.”
A calm, relaxing, very, very long work
like his, he added, “could act as a sort of protest song.”
But “Sleep,” which unfolded on Friday
and Saturday at Spring Studios in Manhattan after recently being released on streaming platforms for easy home consumption,
was perhaps not the most robust protest
against rampant materialism. For one
thing, tickets cost $250. For another, the
show ended up looking like a prolonged ad
for Beautyrest, which provided the audience’s mattresses — to be donated later to a
charity for children who have trouble sleeping, Mr. Richter said — and stamped its
brand on everything: linens, sleep masks,
swag bags.
The space, in a corner of TriBeCa
bristling with new high-rises, was tricked
out like an upscale disaster shelter. Marina
Abramovic’s “Goldberg,” a high-end sensory-deprivation treatment of Bach’s
“Goldberg” Variations at the Park Avenue
Armory a few years ago, came to mind.
But before that Bach performance, all belongings — even watches — were shut into
lockers so that audience members could be,
in theory, fully “present.” At “Sleep” there
were no such restrictions, and the data-saturated listeners, ostensibly approaching
Mr. Richter’s Magic Mountain to briefly
shun modernity, often had their phones out,
busily documenting the night in text messages and posts on social media.
Some people stood in the center aisle to
pose for photos, with the band — comprising Mr. Richter, members of the American
Contemporary Music Ensemble and the soprano Grace Davidson — visible behind
them. Spring Studios’ floor-to-ceiling windows offered the cityscape as an alluring
backdrop for pajama-clad selfies. For some
reason, water wasn’t available at the bar.
I put away my notebook and tried to listen to “Sleep” as Mr. Richter intended. For
the first half-hour, it was just him at the piano, playing a slow, pulsing lullaby. His
rhythmic precision was admirable, given
that his score was just stretches of whole
notes; he played with the focus of a dyed-inthe-wool Minimalist.
Composers from that movement were
Mr. Richter’s earliest inspirations. As a boy
in small-town Britain in the 1970s, he would
get records from his family’s milkman, an
artist who was tapped into the music of La
Monte Young, Terry Riley and Philip Glass.
He fell in love with Satie’s furniture music,
PHOTOGRAPHS BY VINCENT TULLO FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Spring Studios in TriBeCa
looked like an upscale
disaster shelter over the
weekend for “Sleep.” The
composer Max Richter
played the piano at the
performance.
The show ended up
looking like a prolonged
ad for Beautyrest, whose
name was on everything.
and, eventually, the ambient soundscapes
of Brian Eno.
All of this factored into “Sleep,” which
was first released in 2015. But the piece is
also a homage to Bach’s “Goldberg” Variations. (The two works have the same number of sections.) While aware that the
piece’s origin story is apocryphal, Mr.
Richter was intrigued that the “Goldbergs”
were supposedly written for a count with insomnia.
Bach, it needs be said, this ain’t. “Sleep” is
rife with the hallmarks of Mr. Richter’s
style: a clarity that can seem like superficiality; an earnestness and emotionality that
often come off as more ersatz and manipulative than personal. And it’s difficult to buy
into an eight-hour exercise in mindfulness
when, against Mr. Richter’s best intentions,
it opened itself to being more of a social media sensation.
Asked whether the performance could
fall victim to the very thing it was trying to
resist, Mr. Richter said, “It’s fraught with
ironies.” But he said he also hoped that the
piece could help a community build toward
“a silence.”
Silence did reign in the middle of the
night, when the piece reached its enchanting apex. Around me people slept, or lay
awake as if in a trance. The lofts and office
towers of TriBeCa rested, too. There were
no stars in the sky, but the lights twinkled in
the choppy waves of the Hudson River.
I fell asleep, and dreamed that someone
was walking among the mattresses, handing out water.
Around 5:30 in the morning, the sun began to rise, gradually filling the room with
light as the “Sleep” orchestra played obvious music to match it: an increasingly loud,
radiant major chord. If the earlier lullaby
music had been purposefully low and
mantralike, based on scientific research
into what puts us to sleep, this gentle reveille also had an experimental basis: Higher
frequencies wake us up.
As people awoke, they grabbed their
phones to capture the sunrise. A couple
kissed and said good morning, as if at home
and not surrounded by 100 strangers.
“Sleep” ended with a fade-out, immediately followed by the voice of a Beautyrest
staff doctor, guiding the audience through
meditation with the phlegmatic voice “Saturday Night Live” actors use to parody
NPR.
“Our motivation resets over the course of
the symphony of the night,” she said. “What
will you do today? What will you achieve today?”
It was difficult not to feel cynical as I
walked out of the performance — the break
from being sold stuff that I’d been promised
— to have Beautyrest representatives
handing me branded energy drinks.
But then I met John Carl and Mary VandeRiet, two 30-something filmmakers. They
had been awake most of the night, thinking
it a waste to sleep through something so
transcendental and peaceful. Ms. VandeRiet said that she had never seen musicians onstage “so entirely connected to the
music.”
“It was just perfect,” she said.
Indeed, during the performance Mr. Carl
had asked Ms. VandeRiet to marry him.
“We’ve listened to this album as we’ve
slept,” he said. “We’ve listened to it at important moments in our lives. I had to do
this.”
Valee, Kanye West’s Signee, Raps What He Sews
CONTINUED FROM PAGE C1
At a time when lines have blurred between viral jester and professional musician, especially in hip-hop, and a new generation of stars has come to prominence via
extracurricular antics (and, sometimes,
heinous crimes), Valee is a low-key anomaly. He has only a perfunctory social media
presence, no scandals or performative
beefs to his name and, as a bit of a loner,
comes unaffiliated with any existing movements or microgenres. At nearly 30, with
two children and three dogs (Furrari, Ravioli and Sophia), he is basically ancient
among those to spawn from YouTube and
SoundCloud.
“All these people that go extremely viral,
I can’t name you one damn song they’ve
made,” Valee said, in reference to his disruptive contemporaries like 6ix9ine and
XXXTentacion. “You just know them
through being silly.”
“I’m real easygoing,” he added. “I don’t
look at the view counts, I don’t look at the
comments — it’s a distraction. I would just
rather be busy waiting on the next beat, so I
can say something better than I just said.”
That head-down, music-first work ethic
has paid off gradually. Valee’s first commercial project, the “GOOD Job, You Found Me”
EP, was released in March and executive
produced by Mr. West, who before his recent theatrics, brought Valee into the
G.O.O.D. fold.
“I just felt proud of being able to tell my
mom that ’Ye reached out,” Valee said, adding, “He saw that I built on my own with a
small team.”
In keeping with the times, Valee has continued to release a steady stream of new
songs and distinct, minimalist music videos
as he builds toward a body of work worthy
of a proper debut album. “I have probably
250 songs in the chest,” he said, “but I want
to increase the quality.”
Valee had been quietly releasing music
online for a few years, developing a taste for
murky, mid-tempo beats with blown-out
bass, before he found a plugged-in booster
in Mr. Barber early last year. The proprietor
of the blog Fake Shore Drive, an early
megaphone for breakout Chicago acts for
the last decade, Mr. Barber was initially
struck by Valee’s video for “Shell,” which, at
one minute and 49 seconds, said it all.
“He had a fully formed thing,” Mr. Barber
said. “It wasn’t something that you hear in
‘I talk to a lot of rappers
and people in the
industry. Nobody else
has ever offered to come
build a bar in my house.’
ANDREW BARBER
VALEE’S MANAGER
GEORGE ETHEREDGE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
this era, but it sounded current. And he just
looked cool as hell.”
And while Chicago’s musical reputation
has bifurcated into the hyperaggressive
drill sound popularized by Chief Keef and G
Herbo or the theatrical positivity of Chance
the Rapper and his acolytes, Valee was neither. Yet he “was being embraced by both
scenes,” Mr. Barber said — as likely to be
played at a downtown hipster club or a strip
club on the far South Side.
Nonchalant on a track, in a way that indicates casual mastery, not laziness, Valee
might mumble in tight, clipped flashes of
melody or unleash a tumble of sly tongue
twisters, as on his budding cult favorite
“Two 16’s.” (As one Twitter user memorably
put it, “valee raps like an old-timey tiptoeing burglar.”) Though his songs only sometimes clear two minutes — “There’s so
many choices,” Valee said, referring to the
streaming economy, “so you’ve got to put
people’s favorite part in that little amount of
time” — his vivid writing in impressionistic
bursts keeps standard fare (cars, clothes,
women, guns) sounding fresh and often hilariously specific.
“Spent $1,200 on a Yorkie,” he raps, “fed it
Benihana’s food.” Elsewhere, an airport salad functions as a hiding place for marijuana
and a custom vehicle (“Super Sport with
frog eyes”) winds up “double-parked at
Five Guys.”
Paul Rosenberg, the new chief executive
at Def Jam, which oversees G.O.O.D., and
Eminem’s longtime manager, called Valee
“an authentic and infectious standout,” citing “his immediately recognizable voice
and melodic cadences.”
The rapper, he said, is “exactly the type of
artist we are excited to help build a fan base
and career with.”
Valee, tortoiselike, said he is chasing stability. Still, one of the downsides of not jumping up and down for attention in an oversaturated field is that, well, sometimes you
The Chicago rapper Valee
isn’t concerned with social
media and extracurricular
drama: “I would just rather
be busy waiting on the next
beat, so I can say something
better than I just said.”
don’t get attention.
While the Lil Pumps of the world are
clocking nine-digit view counts on YouTube,
Valee has yet to hit a million with a music
video. “I feel like I’m still developing,” he
said, invoking his constant “we’re-notthere-yet-type feeling.” In what might be
seen as a market concession, the recent
Valee video for “Skinny” was directed by
Cole Bennett, the Hype Williams of the
SoundCloud boom.
Mr. Barber said that a big part of his job
was to get Valee to come “out of his shell and
be a celebrity.” Backstage at a private show
for New York University students, Valee’s
D.J. and producer Rio Mac got in on the
cheerleading, too, urging his friend to hype
up the college crowd. “I want you to stick
your chest out,” he said. “You’re like a sex
icon.”
Valee demurred. “I’m an old man,” he
said. “A big weekend for me is Home Depot
and a Caesar salad.”
Earlier, touring the vintage seven-figure
merchandise at Cooper Classic Cars in the
West Village, he was similarly fixated on the
little things, earning affection from the shop
owner for his appreciation of obscure details and his poetic longings.
Referring to the new, ground-level warehouse apartment he has been building for
himself, Valee said wistfully, “I’ve always
wanted to pull my classic car up directly to
my kitchen, get out and leave the groceries
right there.”
But press him long enough, and he will
admit to less elegant ambitions, as well. “I
want chart-topping records — all of that,”
Valee said, leaving the luxury cars as his
friend played the breakout hit “Look Alive,”
by Blocboy JB, featuring Drake. “I would
love to one day have 100 million views on
something.
“What’s the song, what’s the beat? I don’t
know,” he added. “But I can’t wait.”
C8
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
40+ itineraries, 100+ departure dates, 5 continents
Book now 844 208 3517
Travel Differently, Discover More
Whether on our land-based journeys, limited to
26 guests, or world-renowned cruise lines, you’ll
travel with like-minded individuals and stay in
luxury or boutique hotels, as available.
TIMES-SELECTED EXPERTS
DESTINATIONS THAT TELL
EXCLUSIVE ACCESS
A journalist or subject matter
specialist joins every tour,
from Pulitzer Prize winners
to Middle East intelligence
analysts, and provides a mix of
lectures and informal Q&As.
A STORY
Escape the crowds with
tours that include after-hours
entrance to museums and
access to attractions normally
closed to the public.
Visit locations as diverse as
Iran, Cuba and Provence. Each
Times Journey helps unravel
a geological, political or
sociological enigma.
HISTORY & CONTEXT | EUROPE
FOOD & WINE | EUROPE
ARTS & CULTURE | NORTH AMERICA
A Walk in
Provence
The Fall and Rise
of Berlin
Behind the Scenes of
New York Theater
Itinerary 8 days
Departs Sept. 16 and Oct. 7, 2018
Travelers 22
Itinerary 6 days
Departs Aug. 19 and Oct. 21, 2018
Travelers 24
Itinerary 6 days
Departs Dec. 13, 2018
Travelers 20
In a week that celebrates the world-renowned
gastronomy of Provence, go behind the scenes and
have access to unique experiences. From a Michelinstarred restaurant to a home-cooked meal, this
journey is packed with the flavors of Provence. With a
little walking to literally take you off the beaten path,
this is a trip you won’t find in any guidebook.
In the past century, Berlin survived defeat in World War
I, raging inflation in the ’30s, the rise and fall of the
Nazi party, 40 years as a divided city, and the fall of
the Berlin Wall and Communism itself. On this six-day
journey accompanied by New York Times experts, trace
the epic story of Berlin from the rise of Hitler to the
amazing city it is today.
When you go to the theater, you probably don’t think
about all the hours, conversations and details that went
into that production. On this six-day backstage journey,
meet with the creators of New York theater, visit some
Broadway hangouts and learn about the inner workings
that come together only when the curtain rises.
From
$5,595
From
$6,995
From
$5,495
FEATURED EXPERT
FEATURED EXPERT
FEATURED EXPERT
Elaine Sciolino
Former Times Paris Bureau Chief
Terence Smith
Former Times Editor
Scott Heller
Times Theater Editor
Elaine Sciolino is a writer and former Paris
bureau chief for The New York Times. Her
most recent books are “The Only Street
in Paris: Life on the Rue des Martyrs,” a New York
Times best seller, and “La Seduction: How the French
Play the Game of Life.” In 2010 she was decorated a
chevalier of the Legion of Honor, the highest honor of
the French state. She joins our September tour.
In the course of a four-decade career with
The New York Times, CBS News and PBS,
Terence Smith has reported from Germany
at key moments in its modern history: before and
after the fall of the Berlin Wall and during and after
the reunification of East and West Germany. He joins
our August tour.
Scott Heller is the deputy editor of Arts &
Leisure and the theater editor of The New
York Times. He joined The Times from The
Boston Globe, where he had served as arts editor.
Mr. Heller was a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow
at the University of Michigan.
Paid Partnership
From
$5,150
Québec City: A
Modern City With
Old-World Charm
JOURNEY HIGHLIGHTS
Discover hidden treasures
through the eyes of a local
historian with special access to
sites like Cathedral of the Holy
Trinity and the Séminaire de
Québec.
This itinerary was developed in partnership with Times Journeys and Canada
Keep Exploring.
Explore the history and culture of Québec
City on this itinerary designed in partnership
with Québec City Tourism. See how this
provincial capital has redeveloped its
landscape. Experience the provincial capital
city and its surrounding region as few can.
Itinerary 6 days
Departs Aug. 23, 2018
Travelers 25
Savor the range of Québécois
cuisine, from trendy eateries
to indigenous fare to local
specialties like maple syrup.
Meet with a range of local
people, from architects and
museum curators to military
personnel and community
leaders, to gain a multifaceted
perspective on Québécois
culture.
Learn more about the city’s
ability to adapt and redevelop
colonial buildings to meet the
needs of the 21st century.
Gain a deeper understanding of
Québec politics with a visit to the
Parliament Building.
FEATURED EXPERT
David Mendel
Author
David Mendel moved to Québec City in
1976. After completing a master’s thesis in art history
and undertaking doctoral studies at Laval University,
he is often called upon to give talks about the history of
Québec at international conferences. David is the author
of a best-selling series of guide books devoted to Québec
City and its surrounding region.
See how First Nations people
keep traditions alive while
addressing modern challenges
and opportunities.
The news and editorial staffs of The New York Times had
no role in this itinerary’s preparation.
View all of our departures nytimes.com/timesjourneys
Follow us facebook.com/timesjourneys
Book now 844 208 3517
Quoted tour prices are per person, double occupancy except where indicated and subject to availability. Excludes internal and international air. Programs subject to change. All terms and conditions can be found at nytimes.com/timesjourneys or you can call 855-NYT-7979 and
request a copy be sent to you. Abercrombie & Kent CST#2007274-20, Mountain Travel CST#2014882-10, Academic Travel Abroad CST#2059002-40, Insight Cruises CST#2065380-40, Judy Perl Worldwide Travel LLC CST#2122227-40.
3 NEUROSCIENCE
3 MATTER
4 PHYS ED
A childhood of
hostility may lead
to an adulthood
of suspicion.
The very first animal
appeared amid an
evolutionary burst
of new genes.
Cheer up?
A workout (any
workout!) can help
make you happier.
SCIENCE
MEDICINE
TECHNOLOGY
HEALTH
TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
D1
N
JONATHON ROSEN
In the Last Breath
Three states are planning to test an unproven method for executing prisoners: nitrogen gas.
By DENISE GRADY and JAN HOFFMAN
Hamstrung by troubles with lethal injection — gruesomely botched attempts, legal battles and growing difficulty obtaining the drugs — states
are looking for alternative ways to carry out the death penalty. High on
the list for some is a method that has never been used before: inhaling
nitrogen gas. ¶ Oklahoma, Alabama and Mississippi have authorized
nitrogen for executions and are developing protocols to use it, which rep-
resents a leap into the unknown. There is no
scientific data on executing people with nitrogen, leading some experts to question
whether states, in trying to solve old problems, may new ones.
“If and when states begin carrying out
executions with nitrogen, it will amount to
the same type of experimentation we see in
the different variations of lethal injection,”
said Jen Moreno, a lawyer who is an expert
CONTINUED ON PAGE D6
High Deductibles, Deferred Treatment
Breast cancer patients with
big out-of-pocket costs put off
testing, a study shows.
By REED ABELSON
A Colonial Past
The remains of buried ships
were found in Virginia. Page 6.
When Pam Leonard felt a lump in her breast
last November, she hesitated, debating
whether to get testing to see if she had
cancer.
She thought of her insurance policy,
which carries a deductible of $2,600. She
knew she would also have to spend as much
as $5,700 on medical bills that would not be
covered by an individual policy she bought
under the Affordable Care Act. “I went back
and forth for a couple of weeks,” Ms. Leonard recalled.
“I had to do something,” she said. “It didn’t go away.”
She eventually got a mammogram and
ultrasound, confirming a cancer diagnosis.
That led to a lumpectomy and weeks of chemotherapy. Ms. Leonard, 58, a teacher in
Kenosha, Wis., will soon begin radiation
treatment.
High-deductible plans have become commonplace, a deterrent used by companies
to lower health care costs by discouraging
unnecessary tests or treatments. Evidence
for that link has mounted since the Great
Recession 10 years ago, when deductibles
began to soar: People increasingly deferred
medical care, putting off elective surgeries
and doctors’ visits. National health care
CONTINUED ON PAGE D5
SARA STATHAS FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Pam Leonard, a teacher, also works nights to pay for cancer treatments.
D2
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
Observatory
FINDINGS, EVENTS AND MORE
ESA/GAIA/DPAC
N AV I G AT I N G A G A L A X Y
Planning a Trip Through the Milky Way? Put This Map in Your Luggage
Call it a galaxy in a bottle.
Last month, astronomers in Europe released a
three-dimensional map of the Milky Way, containing
the vital statistics of some 1.3 billion stars — about 1
percent of the whole galaxy. Not to mention measurements of almost half a million quasars, asteroids
and other flecks in the night.
Analyzing all these motions and distances could
provide clues to the nature of dark matter. The gravity
B LU B B E RY C A LV E S
Near Antarctica,
A Big Bump in Births
Of Humpback Whales
In a rare piece of good news for
whales, humpbacks who live and
breed in the southern oceans near
Antarctica appear to be making a
comeback, with females in recent
years having a high pregnancy
rate and giving birth to more
calves.
Humpback whales were nearly
hunted out of existence in the late
of that mysterious substance is said to pervade space
and sculpt the arrangements of visible matter. The
data could also reveal information about the history
of other forces and influences on our galaxy. And it
could lead to a more precise measurement of a troublesome parameter called the Hubble constant,
which describes how fast the universe is expanding.
The map, above, is the latest result from the European Space Agency’s Gaia mission, launched into an
19th and most of the 20th centuries until treaties were signed
to stop killing them and protections were put in place for the
world’s coldest, least accessible
continent.
The end of hunting has fostered
the recovery of the school-bussize animals whose life spans are
roughly comparable to ours,
according to Ari Friedlaender, an
associate researcher at the University of California, Santa Cruz,
who led the new study.
orbit around the sun in 2013. It was built by an international collaboration of European astronomers and
universities as the successor to the Hipparcos satellite, which charted the positions of two million stars.
Gaia’s cameras find the distances to stars by triangulation, measuring how their images shift against
background stars and quasars as the spacecraft
swings from one side of its orbit to the other.
DENNIS OVERBYE
GILDING LILIES
By Any Other Genome,
A Rose Might Smell
Even Sweeter
KAREN WEINTRAUB
EITAN ABRAMOVICH/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
The scent of a rose fades over
time, and has for hundreds of
years.
For centuries, generations of
breeding in the quest for longer
blooms and petals in shades of
nearly every hue have dulled the
sweetest smells that once perfumed gardens all around the
world.
French researchers have now
figured out precisely which genes
make a rose smell so sweet, and
where to tinker in the genome to
enhance its distinctive scent.
Although the rose genome has
been mapped before, a newly
published version is far more
complete, indicating which genes
tend to travel together — scent
and color, for instance — and
which genes are responsible for
continuous blooming, among
other traits.
The study, published in the
journal Nature Genetics, also
reveals a detailed family tree of
the rose, and how it differs from
its closest cousin, the strawberry,
and its more distant apple and
pear relations.
KAREN WEINTRAUB
FAU LT L I N E S
Pouring Gas
Onto a Quake Threat
Istanbul straddles one of the
world’s most active seismic fault
lines. That fault, below the Sea of
Marmara south of the city, will
likely rupture in coming decades.
Now, a research team has shown
that the fault shook gas reservoirs
— a result that could help scientists better assess earthquake
risks. The finding follows aftershocks that hit after an earthquake struck the western part of
the Marmara Sea in 2011. (Left, a
1999 quake near the sea.)
The team noticed tremors did
not occur at the same depth as
the main earthquake deep in the
hard bedrock, but at shallower
depths. When the larger quake hit
a nearby gas reservoir, it released
gases that moved upward and
triggered weaker quakes.
SHANNON HALL
PIERRE VERDY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
ONLINE: TRILOBITES
Daily nuggets of science for mobile
readers: nytimes.com/trilobites
ST R I K I N G O U T
When Lightning Bolts
Zap Brain Implants
In a new study, doctors are suggesting that lightning strikes be
added to the list of things patients
with electrodes implanted in their
brains should watch out for. The
recommendation follows a case in
Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia,
in which a pacemaker-like stimulator that powered the electrodes
that had been implanted into a
woman stopped working after a
PASCAL HEITZLER
‘Their eyes are
white. Their skin
is frosty. They’re
like little rocks.’
lightning strike.
Some patients with diagnoses
like epilepsy and obsessive compulsive disorder spasms who
don’t respond to other treatments
have surgery to implant electrodes on either side of the brain.
The electrodes are attached to
wires running down to a stimulator implanted in the chest or
torso. The stimulator provides
electrical impulses to keep symptoms in check.
Jon Costanzo, a zoologist at
Miami University in Ohio, on
wood frogs that survive freezing
during Alaskan winters by
recycling their own urine.
VERONIQUE GREENWOOD
PETER KOMKA/EPA, VIA SHUTTERSTOCK
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
MATTER
Global Health
CARL ZIMMER
Diversity Came in a Burst of DNA
Examining 1.5 million genes, a
new study reveals some of the
origins of the animal kingdom.
THE ANIMAL KINGDOM is one of life’s great
success stories — a collection of millions of
species that swim, burrow, run and fly
across the planet. All that diversity, from ladybugs to killer whales, evolved from a
common ancestor that likely lived more
than 650 million years ago.
No one has found a fossil of the ur-animal,
so we can’t say for sure what it looked like.
But two scientists in Britain have done the
next best thing. They’ve reconstructed its
genome.
Their study, published in Nature Communications, offers an important clue to how
the animal kingdom arose: with an evolutionary burst of new genes. These may have
played a crucial part in transforming our
single-celled ancestors into creatures with
complex bodies made of many kinds of
cells.
The new genes also proved to be remarkably durable. Of all the genes in the human
genome, 55 percent were already present in
the first animal.
“The big surprise was how many of them
there were,” said Jordi Paps, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Essex and
co-author of the new study.
Dr. Paps and Peter W. H. Holland, a zoologist at the University of Oxford, began by
drawing an animal family tree.
Our own species belongs to one branch,
the vertebrates (animals with spines),
along with birds, reptiles and fish. Genetic
studies have shown that our closest invertebrate relatives include creatures like
starfish, while jellyfish and sponges are
among our most distant cousins.
Researchers have also identified the single-celled species that are the closest relatives to the animal kingdom — tiny aquatic
protozoans that prey on bacteria.
From all these tree branches, the scientists picked 62 species, including our own, to
study closely. They searched the DNA of the
organisms, cataloging all the genes that encode proteins, the molecules that carry out
countless chemical reactions in our bodies
and give it structure. (Humans have about
20,000 protein-coding genes.)
Dr. Paps and Dr. Holland toted up nearly
1.5 million genes in all, and then estimated
when they first evolved. It makes for a wideranging genetic history.
Humans and sharks, for example, make
hemoglobin using nearly identical genes.
That means hemoglobin genes were already present in their common ancestor.
But hemoglobin genes can’t be found in
more distantly related animal species, such
LEFT, MICHAEL SALE; RIGHT, AARTHI NARAYANAN
The humpback whale and the ladybug both descend from the very first animal.
The researchers found
6,331 genes that were
present in the common
ancestor of all living
animals.
as sponges. So the gene evolved in early
vertebrates — long after the origin of the
animal kingdom.
While some genes like hemoglobin are
young, others are old. The researchers
found 6,331 genes that were present in the
common ancestor of all living animals.
Many of those genes appeared long before animals themselves. Some are essential to the basic workings of all living things
— such as copying DNA — and first evolved
billions of years ago. Other genes arose
more recently and can be found today in our
close single-celled relatives.
These findings confirmed earlier studies,
which had been carried out on fewer
species. When animals arose, evolution
gave old genes new jobs.
Single-celled protozoans, for example,
use some genes to make proteins that let
them cling together in tiny colonies. In animals, these genes helped cells to glue themselves permanently together — a requirement for building a body.
But 1,189 of the genes in the ancestral animal can’t be found in our closest known single-celled relatives. These new genes must
have evolved in proto-animals.
Dr. Paps said there were at least two ways
for that to have happened. Sometimes a random string of DNA with no function mutates
and begins producing a protein.
Alternatively, an existing gene may be accidentally duplicated. One copy may accumulate mutations until it produces a new
kind of protein, even as the other copy
keeps doing the original gene’s original job.
The newly acquired DNA turns out not to
be involved in a random assortment of jobs.
Instead, many of these genes play crucial
roles in building and running animal bodies
— for example, making proteins that cells
use to send signals to other cells.
Dr. Paps and Dr. Holland also found that a
number of the genes developed by proto-animals are implicated in cancer. Many of
these genes keep cells working together
harmoniously, and when they mutate, cells
may multiply out of control.
Iñaki Ruiz-Trillo, a biologist at the Instituto de Biología Evolutiva in Barcelona,
Spain, who was not involved in the new
study, said that the flowering of new genes
might represent a fundamental characteristic of the animal kingdom.
They “could be used to define what an animal is,” he said.
Dr. Paps speculated that the burst of new
genes might have appeared in early animals because the environment somehow
triggered many mutations. But another
possibility is that proto-animals gradually
accumulated all these new genes over hundreds of millions of years — a stretch of evolutionary history that scientists cannot yet
document by studying living species.
Does Everyone Seem Angry at You?
Growing up with parents
who fought a lot can
mean having a hard time
reading neutral faces.
THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH
The facial expressions in the left column are considered neutral. That may not be evident to some.
The ability to interpret some
facial expressions may be tied
to childhood experiences.
By HEATHER MURPHY
Why do you look so angry? This article
hasn’t even begun and already you disapprove. Why can’t I ever win with you? I see
it in your face.
If this sounds unfamiliar, good for you.
You don’t need this.
For the rest of us, it may be helpful to
know that some people seem to have outsize difficulty with reading neutral faces as
neutral, even if they are accurate at interpreting other facial expressions. Over the
past decade psychologists have been fitting
together the pieces of this puzzle.
A study published in March in the Journal
of Social and Personal Relationships suggests that some people who grew up with
parents who fought a lot never learned to
properly read those in-between faces, perhaps because they spent so much time
watching out for signs of conflict.
“Angry interactions could be a cue for
them to retreat to their room,” said Alice
Schermerhorn, a developmental psychologist at the University of Vermont and the
author of the study. “By comparison, neutral interactions might not offer much information, so children may not value them and
therefore may not learn to recognize them.”
These findings build on previous research indicating that depression, anxiety
and irritability can affect how a person perceives other people’s faces. It has also been
shown that adults who were exposed to violence, neglect or physical abuse in childhood are more likely to see hostility where
there is none. This can create a self-reinforcing cycle.
“If you think they look angry then you
may respond angrily,” said Abigail Marsh,
the director of the Laboratory on Social and
Affective Neuroscience at Georgetown University.
What interested Dr. Schermerhorn was
whether an even more common issue —
conflict between parents — might also take
a toll.
She tested this by gathering 99 children,
ages 9 to 11, who lived in households with
their two married biological parents. After
the children completed a questionnaire
with statements such as, “My parents get
really mad when they argue,” she tested
their ability to gauge emotions in a series of
photos.
Her original hypothesis was that children
with higher interparental conflict scores
would be worse at reading happy, angry and
neutral faces. What she found instead was
that children in high-conflict households
fared just as well as the other children in
discerning happy and angry expressions.
“They just couldn’t identify neutral accurately,” she said.
The study has limitations: The children
were reacting to posed photos of the same
youthful white actors. In real life, of course,
faces are moving — something that limits
the applications of numerous studies in this
area. The children also misread neutral as
happy about as often as they misread it as
angry, a finding different than some other
studies in this area. And it’s possible that
they will grow out of the tendency as they
age, she acknowledged.
Still, the findings support a point other researchers in this field sometimes make:
Those most in need of a benign interaction
often have the hardest time recognizing
one.
A parallel phenomenon has been shown
to sabotage people suffering from depression and anxiety.
“People with anxiety disorders are likely
to see fear when it’s absent,” and to “misclassify neutral expressions as angry, fearful, or just generally negative,” said Dr.
Marsh, the Georgetown professor, who recently published a book, “The Fear Factor:
How One Emotion Connects Altruists, Psychopaths, and Everyone In-Between.”
Depression, similarly, has been found to
function almost like distortion goggles, filtering out signs of joy and happiness while
magnifying signs of sadness or anger.
The good news is that there is some evidence that people can learn to see ambiguity in a more positive light.
Melissa Brotman, a clinical neuroscientist at the National Institute of Mental
Health who develops treatments to help
chronically irritable children, has found
that they have a tendency to “perceive neutral or ambiguous faces as more hostile and
fear-producing than typically developing
youth.”
But after a week of training with a computerized feedback tool in a small early pilot study, not only did the children stop seeing so much hostility in ambiguous faces,
but parents and clinicians also noticed that
their moods improved considerably.
So what do you do if you’re an adult who
often thinks friends and colleagues are upset with you? Dr. Schermerhorn advised
trying to remember that just because a face
is not brimming with positivity, it does not
mean that it is conveying something negative.
Also remember that what you’re picking
up on might just be a person’s eyebrows.
Low brows and brows that slope in like a V
have a tendency to telegraph anger, researchers have found, even when none is
present.
D3
N
DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.
New Nets Protect Children From Malaria
Mosquito nets infused with two
pesticides work much better
against malaria than those with
only one, reducing prevalence in
children by 44 percent, according
to a recent study.
As a result of the report, published in The Lancet last month,
the World Health Organization
has recommended that the twochemical nets be used in areas
where mosquitoes have developed resistance to the first-line
insecticide.
The new nets contain pyrethroids, a class of chemicals used
in nets for over a decade, along
with the newer compound, piperonyl butoxide, which blocks mosquitoes’ ability to break down
pyrethroids. (It is sometimes
called a “pesticide synergist.”)
The Vestergaard company,
which introduced pyrethroidinfused nets in 2004, later developed a two-chemical version that
the W.H.O. began evaluating in
2014. Now many companies have
similar nets awaiting W.H.O.
approval.
It is hard to find new insecticides suitable for nets, because
they must kill or repel mosquitoes
and yet be safe for the babies and
youngsters who sleep under
them. The insecticides also must
be able to stand up to washing
and intense sunlight.
Piperonyl butoxide largely
fades away after two years. In the
study’s second year, protection by
nets with piperonyl butoxide had
diminished, and malaria prevalence in children was reduced by
only 33 percent.
Insecticide-impregnated nets
are considered an important
factor in the world’s recent success against the disease: Malaria
deaths dropped 60 percent between 2000 and 2015.
Other factors included coating
walls inside homes with longlasting pesticides, prophylactic
treatment of pregnant women and
young children during malaria
seasons, new rapid malaria tests
and treatment using compounds
based artemisinin, which comes
from wormwood plants.
LEGNAN KOULA/EPA, VIA SHUTTERSTOCK
Q&A Buffeted Butterflies
Q. How do butterflies survive
severe storms?
A. Some butterflies and moths
ride out storms with high winds,
heavy rain and falling temperatures by seeking shelter. Refuges
include the underside of leaves
and tree limbs, leaf debris, crevices in rocks and clumps of tall
grass. Winter storms will send
some species climbing higher in
tree limbs for added protection
from cooler temperatures closer
VICTORIA ROBERTS
to the ground.
In 2016, a single severe storm in the Mexican wintering ground of
the monarch butterfly wiped out as much as 40 percent of the population there. Adding to the mortality was the thinning of forest canopy in
a microclimate that had previously offered shelter.
Last year, a study of the storm’s aftermath, published in the journal
American Entomologist, reported that the intact microclimate had
acted “as a blanket that holds heat beneath the forest canopy” and “as
an umbrella that reduces wetting of the butterflies clustering on the
tree boughs.” The tree trunks, too, radiated warmth that protected the
butterflies from freezing.
The trees also provided some protection from severe winds. The
results of the canopy loss showed the potential danger of climate
change to the butterflies, the researchers concluded.
C. CLAIBORNE RAY
TAKE A NUMBER
2.7%
There are many more gorillas and
chimpanzees than previously believed, new research finds. Nonetheless, their numbers are rapidly
declining.
All great apes are protected species under national and international
conventions; it is illegal to kill or capture them, or to buy and sell their
body parts. But they are threatened by illegal poaching and the destruction of their habitats. And various diseases, particularly Ebola,
have been devastating for the animals.
Gorillas and chimpanzees are found in western and central Africa.
About 12 percent of their habitat is legally protected from development.
In an 11-year project, the Wildlife Conservation Society, in collaboration with other organizations, surveyed nests at 59 sites in five countries. The results appear in the journal Science Advances.
As of 2013, the researchers concluded, there were 361,919 weaned
gorillas and 128,760 weaned chimpanzees in the region. Previous estimates had ranged as low as 150,000 gorillas and 70,000 chimpanzees.
Sixty percent of gorillas and 43 percent of chimpanzees live in
Congo; Gabon is home to 27 percent of gorillas and 34 percent of chimpanzees. Most of these animals live outside protected areas.
Ape populations declined where human populations increased, near
communities that consume apes as food, and where forests are thinned
out. Mortality in Ebola outbreaks, which occurred before the current
survey was undertaken, has ranged as high as 95 percent.
Fiona Maisels, a co-author of the study and a conservation scientist
at the conservation society, said that while older estimates provided a
range, these new numbers have “statistically robust precision.”
Chimpanzee numbers are declining, although it is difficult to specify
how fast. With gorillas, the rate of decline is known: 2.7 percent a year
since 2013. Dr. Maisels said that if this rate continues through 2020,
only 300,000 gorillas will remain.
“Apes are us,” Dr. Maisels said. “They’re part of a system that we
have damaged quite badly, and it’s our responsibility to try and stop
that damage.”
NICHOLAS BAKALAR
TERENCE FUH NEBA/WWF
A gorilla mother with her twins in Dzanga-Sangha, Central African Republic.
D4
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
Well
PHYS ED
Ask Well
Are there any downsides
to the sweetener stevia? Is
it associated with negative
effects or gastrointestinal
symptoms? Does it cause
sugar cravings if you’ve
given up sugar?
Major health and food safety
organizations generally regard
stevia, a sweetener made from a
plant native to South America, as
safe. But some researchers warn
that we don’t have enough evidence to fully understand how
products like stevia, so-called
nonnutritive sweeteners that
have no calories, affect the body.
Ounce for ounce, stevia is 200
to 400 times sweeter than table
sugar, so a small amount can add
a lot of sweetness. Stevia is found
in products like soda and iced tea,
sweetener packets with names
like Truvia and Pure Via, and
foods marketed as low sugar, such
as ice cream and yogurt.
Stevia sweeteners are purified
extracts of one type of constituent, called steviol glycosides,
found in the leaves of the stevia
plant. The European Food Safety
Authority and the World Health
Organization both say these compounds are safe in the amounts
typically used. This conclusion is
based on studies — mostly industry funded — in bacteria and
rodents that generally show that
stevia doesn’t cause damage to
DNA or cancer, as well as several
human studies that found no
effect on blood pressure or blood
glucose.
The Center for Science in the
Public Interest, a food advocacy
group that has often been critical
of sugar substitutes, initially
raised concerns about stevia
sweeteners when they came onto
the market in 2008, saying the
Food and Drug Administration
should have required more testing. However, the group ranked
stevia as one of the safest of the
sugar substitutes in a 2014 report,
in part because it has a long
history of use in Japan.
Stevia sweeteners are broken
down by bacteria in the large
intestine, but gastrointestinal
symptoms like bloating and diarrhea haven’t been reported in
studies. However, some products
containing stevia also include
sugar alcohols like erythritol,
which can cause digestive complaints if consumed in large
amounts.
Using stevia is a reasonable
strategy to reduce the amount of
sugar we consume, said Marina
Chaparro, a registered dietitian
and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “It
has the flavor without adding the
extra sugar and affecting your
blood sugar,” which is especially
useful for those with diabetes, she
said.
It’s uncertain, though, whether
using calorie-free sweeteners like
stevia can reduce caloric intake. A
recent small study found, for
example, that when participants
had a drink sweetened with stevia
instead of sugar in the morning,
they compensated by eating more
at lunch, along with bigger
lunchtime spikes in blood glucose
and insulin.
And some researchers worry
that long-term use of nonnutritive
sweeteners could have unintended metabolic effects that might
not be detected using standard
toxicological tests or other measures. “Over all, for nonnutritive
sweeteners, we lack evidence, but
that’s especially true for stevia,”
which has not been extensively
studied, said Meghan Azad, assistant professor of pediatrics and
child health at the University of
Manitoba.
Dr. Azad was the lead author of
a recent review of long-term use
of nonnutritive sweeteners that
concluded that they may not be
helpful for weight loss and, in
some studies, were associated
with increased incidence of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.
She and her co-authors, however,
found no long-term studies of
stevia in particular to include in
that review.
Additional research is questioning how these sweeteners might
affect our gut microbes or if the
taste of sweetness without the
reward of calories could alter
regulation of energy intake and
response to sugar consumption.
These concerns are preliminary, Dr. Azad says, and we need
more research. But, she said,
“Just blindly assuming that these
are a healthy alternative to sugar
is probably not a wise move without the evidence to back it up.”
ALICE CALLAHAN
ISTOCK
In Brief
GRETCHEN REYNOLDS
A Little Exercise Might Bring Cheer
People who work out even
once a week or for 10 minutes
a day tend to be more upbeat
than those who never do.
SMALL AMOUNTS of exercise could have an
outsize effect on happiness.
According to a new review of research
about good moods and physical activity,
people who work out even once a week or
for as little as 10 minutes a day tend to be
more cheerful than those who never exercise. And any type of exercise may be helpful.
The idea that moving can affect our
moods is not new. Many of us would probably say that we feel less cranky or more relaxed after a jog or visit to the gym.
Science would generally agree with us. A
number of past studies have noted that
physically active people have much lower
risks of developing depression and anxiety
than people who rarely move.
But that research centered on the relationships between exercise and psychological problems like depression and anxiety.
Fewer past studies explored links between
physical activity and upbeat emotions, especially in people who already were psychologically healthy, and those studies often looked at a single age group or type of
exercise.
On their own, they do not tell us much
about the amounts or types of exercise that
might best lift our moods, or whether most
of us might expect to find greater happiness
with regular exercise or only certain groups
of people.
So for the new review, which was published in March in The Journal of Happiness
Studies, researchers at the University of
Michigan decided to aggregate and analyze
multiple past studies of working out and
happiness.
They began by combing research databases for relevant studies and wound up
with 23 published since 1980. Most of those
were observational, meaning that the scientists simply looked at a group of people, asking them how much they worked out and
how happy they were. A few of the studies
were experiments in which people started
exercising and researchers measured their
happiness before and after.
The number of participants in any one
study was often small, but together, they
represented more than 500,000 people
ranging in age from adolescents to the very
old and covering a broad range of ethnic
and socioeconomic groups.
And for most of them, the Michigan researchers found, exercise was strongly
linked to happiness.
“Every one of the observational studies
ISTOCK
‘There are indications
that social factors could
mediate the effects of
exercise on happiness for
some people.’
WEIYUN CHEN
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
showed a beneficial relationship between
being physically active and being happy,”
said Weiyun Chen, an associate professor of
kinesiology at the University of Michigan,
who, with her graduate student Zhanjia
Zhang, wrote the review.
The type of exercise did not seem to matter. Some happy people walked or jogged.
Others practiced yoga-style posing and
stretching.
And the amount of exercise needed to influence happiness was slight, Dr. Chen said.
In several studies, people who worked out
only once or twice a week said they felt
much happier than those who never exercised. In other studies, 10 minutes a day of
physical activity was linked with buoyant
moods.
But more movement generally contributed to greater happiness. If people exercised
for at least 30 minutes on most days, which
is the standard American and European
recommendation for good health, Dr. Chen
said, they were about 30 percent more likely
to consider themselves happy than people
who did not meet the guidelines.
“I think the indications are strong that exercise can contribute to happiness and,
while anything helps, a bit more is probably
better,” she said.
But because most of the studies in this re-
view were observational, she said, it is not
possible yet to establish whether exercise
directly causes changes in happiness or if
the two just happen to occur together often.
It could be that happy people are more
likely to take up exercise and continue with
it than people who feel sad. In that case, exercise would not have helped to make people happy; rather, their happiness would
have helped to make them exercisers.
Happiness is also an inherently subjective, squishy concept. The studies analyzed
in the review asked people how happy they
felt. But one person’s happiness could be another’s relative gloom, making it difficult to
generalize about how any of us might react,
emotionally, to starting an exercise routine.
And, of course, the review did not delve
into how exercise could be influencing happiness.
“There are indications that social factors
could mediate the effects of exercise on happiness for some people,” Dr. Chen said. In
other words, the social interactions that occur during an exercise class or trip to the
gym might help to elevate people’s moods.
Or exercise could more directly change
the body, including the brain.
“We know that exercise improves
health,” Dr. Chen said, “and feeling healthier might make people feel happier.”
Exercise might also remodel the brain,
for example, by prompting the creation of
new brain cells or inducing changes in brain
chemicals, in ways that contribute to positive emotions.
Dr. Chen hopes that future experiments
will explore these issues. But for now, she
said, “I think that we can safely say that
people who exercise are probably going to
be happier than people who don’t.”
The Power of a Meaningful Moment
The chances that the
chemotherapy and
transplant would work
were slight.
NI CHO L AS BAKAL AR
BODY
Saunas May Cut Risk of Stroke
Taking saunas may
reduce the risk for
stroke.
Researchers studied
1,628 men and women ages 53 to
74, free of stroke at the start. They
had data on body mass index,
alcohol consumption, smoking,
blood pressure and other health
and behavioral characteristics
that affect cardiovascular health.
The participants reported how
often they took traditional Finnish
saunas and how long they stayed
in the sauna, and the researchers
followed them for an average of 15
years. There were 155 strokes
over the period. The study is in
the journal Neurology.
After adjusting for other variables, they found that compared
with people who took saunas once
a week, those who took them two
to three times weekly were 12
percent less likely to have a
stroke. People who took saunas
four to seven times a week cut
their risk for stroke by 62 percent.
The study was observational
and cannot prove causality. Still,
there are plausible reasons
saunas might be protective.
“Temperature increases, even of 1
or 2 degrees Celsius, can limit
inflammatory processes in the
body and reduce arterial stiffness,” said the senior author, Dr.
Jari A. Laukkanen, a professor of
medicine at the University of
Eastern Finland. “It’s possible
that steam rooms or hot tubs
could produce similar results.”
VIVIEN MILDENBERGER
A doctor sees the curative
potential in letting a patient
with persistent leukemia leave
the hospital to keep a promise
he made to his daughter.
By MIKKAEL A. SEKERES, M.D.
AGIN G
5 Behaviors for a Longer Life
Five behaviors could
extend life expectancy
at 50 by more than a
decade, even without
the discovery of a single new
drug or medical treatment.
Researchers analyzed two large
databases with 34 years of detailed health and lifestyle information on more than 123,000 men
and women. Over the years, there
were 42,167 deaths.
The study, in Circulation, looked
at five behaviors: eating a healthy
diet, not smoking, getting regular
physical activity, moderate alcohol consumption and maintaining
a normal weight.
The scientists calculated that,
on average, a 50-year-old man
who adopted all of these would
live 12 years longer than a man
who took on none. A woman with
the same five habits would live an
average of 14 more years than a
woman with none of them.
The more low-risk factors a
person had, the longer his or her
projected life span. For example,
a 50-year-old woman with four
healthy factors could expect to
live, on average, to around 89,
those with three to 87, and those
with two to 84.
Unfortunately, less than 2 percent of the people studied had all
five low-risk factors, and a third
had two or fewer.
At the age of 28, my patient was already a
war-weary veteran of leukemia.
When his cancer was diagnosed, we
treated him with a multidrug cocktail of
chemotherapy over months, first with more
intensive regimens that sidelined him from
being able to work, and then with milder
medicines.
His leukemia came raging back, though,
so we treated him again, this time with one
of the new, expensive immunotherapies
that has been recently approved by the
Food and Drug Administration. These are
not curative, but in his case they eliminated
enough of the leukemia to enable him to receive a bone-marrow transplant, which did
have the potential of curing him.
But when he called my office six months
after his transplant complaining of excruciating back pain, we feared the worst. The
vertebrae are the major site of bone-marrow production in the body. Cells that grow
too rapidly within the rigid confines of the
bones can actually hurt, and it was the same
symptom he had when we first met.
A bone-marrow biopsy confirmed that
the leukemia had returned, and he was
quickly admitted to the hospital, both to
manage his pain and treat his cancer.
When I walked into his hospital room
early the next morning, he was lying comfortably in bed. It had been a long enough
time since the transplant that he now had a
full head of hair and beard to boot. We had
started him on steroids the previous day,
which at high enough doses can actually
treat his type of leukemia, and the resulting
pain, temporarily.
We smiled and nodded, the way people do
when they know each other well and are acknowledging the difficult task they are
about to undertake together.
I sat at the edge of his bed and described
the chemotherapy we would initiate, a regimen of drugs that would minimize major
side effects that might compromise the efficacy of another transplant, his only shot at
cure.
“I guess we should get started,” he said,
though hesitantly as he looked quickly over
to his wife, who wore a sweatshirt printed
with the message, “This is what I wear
when I don’t feel like getting dressed up.”
She was pragmatic like that. She also divined what was troubling him.
“Can he be treated as an outpatient?” she
asked.
This time I hesitated, as I considered the
toxicities of the drugs we would be using
and the frequency with which we would
have to monitor his blood counts.
“He could,” I said, softly. “There would be
some risks, particularly of developing a fever and of bleeding as his white blood cells
and platelets drop. But this isn’t exactly
your first rodeo.” They both grimaced in acknowledging this truth.
“I know you’ll contact me if he gets sick,” I
continued. “Is there a particular reason
you’d like to be discharged?”
His wife answered for him: “He has a
daddy-daughter dance tonight, with our 4year-old. She’s been looking forward to it for
weeks.”
She paused. “If he can’t leave the hospital, we understand,” she went on. “We have
a backup plan. His friend could take her to
the dance. But it would mean a lot.”
My patient gave her a broad smile, as if
thanking her for saying what he couldn’t.
His eyes were misty.
My own breath caught at the poignancy
of the request. I remembered the first time I
danced with my daughter, when she was
only days old and I hugged her tight to my
body, and the weddings we attended when
she was the same age as my patient’s
daughter. I would escort her to the dance
floor as she carefully placed her pink
sparkle shoes atop my staid black leather
ones, while I raised and lowered them to the
beat of the music. With the memory, I felt
the gentle pressure of her weight on my
toes.
The chances that the chemotherapy and
transplant would work, with a leukemia
that refused to be extinguished, were slight.
The chances that he would get another opportunity to dance with his daughter were
smaller still.
“I can’t imagine a better reason to be
treated as an outpatient than a daddydaughter dance,” I told them. “Whatever it
takes, we’ll find a way to make it happen.”
As we get older and spend more years
practicing medicine, doctors and nurses
tend to get better at identifying the subtleties of illness, and our decisions and recommendations become more accurate. But
more important than that, because we’ve
lived more of our own lives, I hope we also
recognize when what’s meaningful to our
patients trumps anything medical that we
can offer.
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
N
D5
Well
PERSONAL HEALTH
JANE E. BRODY
How to Avoid Burnout in Youth Sports
Parents too often get in the
way of their children’s best
interests, some experts say.
FEW WOULD DISPUTE the value to children
of participating in sports, organized or otherwise. Being physically active and engaged in friendly competition is widely acknowledged to be good for children’s physical, mental and social well-being. It can foster discipline, cooperation and camaraderie
as well as a good time.
When I was growing up in Brooklyn in the
1940s and ’50s, we were free to play games
and sports that we chose or devised. We
picked teams, made the rules and enforced
them ourselves. No officials monitored our
activities, and no adults commented on how
well or poorly we played. Sure, there were
occasional spats, but we learned to resolve
them on our own and get back to having fun.
But the concept of free play has since
yielded to adult-controlled games and
hopes for glory among many of today’s parents. The way youth sports is promoted in
many parts of the country these days can be
anything but good for the children who engage in them, according to leading experts
who described their findings at the annual
meeting of the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons in March.
Today, adults are most often the organizers and enforcers of youth sports, and too
often they get in the way of their children’s
best interests, these experts say.
Many parents encourage specialization
in a given sport in which their children, often at very young ages, seem to show an interest or aptitude. Notions of college scholarships or professional glory often dance in
the backs — or fronts — of parental minds,
with some uprooting the entire family to
give their kids a leg up.
As Dr. Charles A. Popkin, pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Columbia University Medical Center, said at the meeting, “Sadly, what
parents want and what parents hope to gain
from their children’s participation in youth
sports is often at a significant extreme to
what the kids actually want.”
“Healthy competition is becoming unhealthy,” the orthopedics organization
maintains. “More and more young athletes
under the age of 12 are focusing on just one
sport, and training year-round.” The American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine
defines specialization in youth sports “as
engaging in a sport for at least three seasons a year at the exclusion of other sports.”
Too often, Dr. Popkin and his associates at
Columbia and medical centers elsewhere
. ......................................................................................
This is the first of two columns on youth sports
safety.
CAROLINE GAMON
find themselves treating the fallout from
early sports specialization when the participants develop overuse injuries.
Dr. Mininder S. Kocher, pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Children’s Hospital Boston
and another of the conference’s speakers,
told me, “I’ve been doing Tommy John
surgery” — an elbow reconstruction procedure often associated with professional
baseball players — “on more and more
kids” who pitched for too many hours in too
many games and practices.
In a prospective study of nearly 12,000
youngsters with highly accurate histories of
sports-related injuries, Dr. Kocher and colleagues found that early specialization in
baseball, cheerleading and gymnastics increased the risk of injury among boys, and
specialization in running, swimming, soccer, volleyball, cheerleading and gymnas-
‘Healthy competition is
becoming unhealthy,’
according to the
American Association
of Orthopedic Surgeons.
tics, increased the injury risk among girls.
The injuries, reported by their mothers,
all of whom are registered nurses, included
stress fractures, tendinitis and knee injuries like tears of the anterior cruciate ligament that require surgical repair.
“Intense and repetitive training can lead
to pediatric trauma and may require
surgery to young shoulders, knees, elbows
and wrists,” the orthopedic surgeons’ organization reported. It noted that in children
whose bodies are still growing and developing, excessive training in a single sport does
not give them enough time to heal properly.
Dr. Kocher said in an interview that children who grow up in the northern United
States are more likely to become major
league baseball players than kids from the
South because they can’t play their sport
year-round and are less likely to be injured.
But even when not injured, youngsters
pressured to become star athletes often
burn out and drop out, sometimes from
sports altogether, Dr. Kocher said.
“Children who specialize in one sport
early in life were found to be the first to quit
their sport and ended up having higher inactivity rates as an adult,” Dr. Popkin reported, based on findings of the American
Medical Society for Sports Medicine.
He emphasized that “parental influence
on sports specialization can be profound”
and counterproductive if it doesn’t mesh
with the child’s goals and interests.
“If they lack an intrinsic drive, if they’re
not having fun, they’ll likely become frustrated and quit,” he said. “When parents
hire personal trainers and coaches, there’s
an expectation of success that can create a
pressure-cooker scenario and lead to burnout.” In a survey of 201 parents, 57 percent
hoped their children would play in college
or professionally, Dr. Popkin reported.
In his study of 303 college athletes, 98
percent had previously played another organized sport before college. They didn’t
begin to specialize until they were nearly 15,
on average. He noted that Mariano Rivera,
considered the best closing pitcher in baseball history, had played soccer before focusing on baseball in his late teens.
“You want kids playing sports through
life,” Dr. Popkin said. “The more sports kids
play, the better they learn adaptability.”
Cross-training is also important, he said, so
that “they develop whole-body skills like
balance, quickness and core strength” that
can enhance their overall athletic ability.
Dr. Popkin said that with the exception of
a few individual sports like gymnastics, tennis and fencing, kids do better if they specialize later. In his study of college athletes,
only 18 percent reported specializing by age
12. Forty-five percent played multiple
sports up to age 16, and there were no early
specializers among those who played football, lacrosse or field hockey.
It’s a myth, Dr. Popkin said, that athletes
who got college athletic scholarships or became professionals in most sports began
specializing at early ages. “Early sports
specialization is uncommon among
N.C.A.A. Division I athletes for most team
sports,” he reported.
His suggestions to parents: “Expose
your children to as many activities as possible and support what they like. But if
they’re doing more hours of a sport a week
than their age in years, they’re overdoing it.
“A couple of months of the year, encourage them to do something else. If they play
soccer, they could switch off to tennis; if
they play hockey, they could try the track
team. Cross-training helps their bodies and
can keep them from burning out.”
High Deductibles, Deferred Treatment
CONTINUED FROM PAGE D1
spending slowed as a result.
But a recent study of women with insurance plans that carried deductibles of at
least $1,000 underscores the danger to consumers required to shoulder a greater
share of those costs.
Women who had just learned they had
breast cancer were more likely to delay getting care if their deductibles were high, the
study showed. A review of several years of
medical claims exposed a pattern: Women
confronting such immediate expenses put
off getting diagnostic imaging and biopsies,
postponing treatment.
And they delayed beginning chemotherapy by an average of seven months, said Dr.
J. Frank Wharam, a Harvard researcher
and one of the authors of the study, published earlier this year in the Journal of
Clinical Oncology.
“Slight delays added up to long delays,”
Dr. Wharam said.
While the study did not look at how the
women fared after treatment, cancer doctors warn that even short gaps between diagnosis and treatment can affect the outcome. Survival rates are higher for patients
with some cancers if they are treated early.
“What we see here is an unintended consequence of sharing costs,” said Dr. Ethan
Basch, the director of cancer outcomes research at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive
Cancer Center, who was not involved in the
study.
As an oncologist, Dr. Basch said he frequently sees patients making decisions
based on financial considerations. If they
face high out-of-pocket costs, “they’re of a
mind-set to avoid visits, expensive treatments,” he said. “They have a fear.”
At Susan G. Komen, a breast cancer charity, more than half of the questions to the
group’s help line are about financial assistance, said Susan Brown, senior director of
education and patient support. The organization and its affiliates provide modest
grants, including one to Ms. Leonard to help
pay for a test not covered by her insurance,
and refer patients to other resources for aid.
“They have people all the time talking
about stopping their treatment or delaying
treatment,” even when an individual has
had an abnormal screening and needs a
work-up for a final diagnosis, Ms. Brown
said.
When Ms. Leonard tried to talk with the
hospital where she was getting treatment
about her medical bills, she found the staff
largely unsympathetic. “Because I had insurance, I was told I didn’t need a financial
advocate,” she said. Instead, she relied on
her contacts at Susan G. Komen and extensive research to find other sources of help.
About half of all covered workers in the
United States are now enrolled in plans with
a deductible of at least $1,000, and many
must pay several thousand dollars in medical bills before their plans even start to
cover their care. About 11 percent of covered workers have a deductible of at least
$3,000, according to a survey of employer
benefits by the Kaiser Family Foundation.
Employers are increasingly offering these
plans — and more frequently giving their
workers no other option.
While high-deductible plans are meant to
encourage people to think twice about
whether a test or treatment is necessary
and if it can be done at a lower price, “it’s
also frankly to impede their use of these
services,” said Dr. Peter Bach, the director
of the Center for Health Policy and Outcomes at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer
Center.
The plans are succeeding in reducing the
use of care. “The question is, at what cost?”
Dr. Bach said.
High-deductible plans pose a problem,
say researchers who have studied them, because patients do not always distinguish between the care they should get and what
they can do without.
Nir Menachemi, a health policy professor
at Indiana University who recently published an analysis of high-deductible plans
in Health Affairs, said numerous studies
show people are more likely to forgo preventive care when they have a high deductible — even if that care is free. Highdeductible plans also depress the number of
doctor’s office visits, according to several
studies.
The study of breast cancer patients is
among the first to look at the behavior of
people suddenly facing a life-threatening
disease, where the recommended treatment tends to be straightforward and not
overly subjective, Dr. Wharam said.
Unlike people with chronic illnesses,
these women did not expect to have significant expenses and may not be as prepared
to navigate the systems. “Diabetes patients
are used to getting bills in the mail,” he said.
Some employers try to help by funding
special savings accounts, but many people
don’t have the income to set aside money.
“For most Americans, the lack of savings
combined with higher deductibles makes it
really difficult,” said Stacie Dusetzina, an
associate professor of both health policy
and cancer research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.
The plans make care least accessible to
those with the least amount of savings and
income, Dr. Bach said: “We treat health
care as a luxury good.”
At the Samfund, a charity that provides
financial assistance to young people with
JENN ACKERMAN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
cancer, “we see a lot of people who aren’t
getting the care they need,” said Samantha
Eisenstein Watson, the organization’s
founder and chief executive.
Many approach the charity only when
they’re close to being evicted from an apartment or awash in medical bills. “The cost
has wreaked such havoc on their life,” she
said.
Two years ago, when Rochelle Ness was
37, with three children under 6 years old,
she learned she had breast cancer. The policy she had through her husband’s job had a
deductible of $2,250 and required she pay a
total of $11,500 toward her yearly medical
bills.
She did not know how she would come up
with the money, but having lost two family
members to breast cancer, she did not consider delaying treatment. “That was scarier
to me,” she said.
Now saddled with medical debt, Ms. Ness
Rochelle Ness is fighting
to get her insurer to pay
for the injections needed
to help prevent infections
during chemotherapy. She
owes about $25,000 in
medical bills.
‘We see a lot of people
who aren’t getting the
care they need.’
SAMANTHA EISENSTEIN WATSON
SAMFUND, CHIEF EXECUTIVE
is also fighting to get her insurer to pay for
the six Neulasta injections needed to help
prevent infections during chemotherapy.
Her husband’s employer did not offer a
savings account to accompany the highdeductible plan, and they still owe about
$25,000. “We have maxed out our credit
cards trying to pay medical expenses,” she
said.
Ms. Ness, who received financial assistance from the Samfund, said she is now trying to come up with the money for additional treatments, including physical therapy and a hearing aid for the hearing loss
resulting from chemotherapy.
Living paycheck to paycheck, the family
is struggling to find any extra money to pay
for their children to go camping or join a
sports team.
“We were able to manage our medical
bills back then,” she said. “It’s nearly impossible right now.”
D6
N
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 2018
What Goes in the Last Breath
CONTINUED FROM PAGE D1
on lethal injection at the Berkeley Law
Death Penalty Clinic.
With some 2,750 inmates on death row in
31 states and in federal and military prisons,
any jurisdiction that tries something new
will be scrutinized as a test lab.
The push for change comes because lethal injection, introduced 40 years ago as
more efficient and humane than the electric
chair or gas chamber, has not met that
promise. Indeed, it has sometimes resulted
in spectacles that rival the ones it was
meant to avert.
Problems With Procedures
One pitfall is that execution teams must find
a vein to infuse, a process that can be excruciating. In February, an Alabama execution
team gave up after trying for more than two
hours on an inmate whose blood vessels
had been damaged by chemotherapy and
drug abuse. His lawyer accused the team of
opening an artery and puncturing the prisoner’s bladder. The state later said it would
not try again to execute him.
Lethal injection also involves drugs that,
if given incorrectly, can result in suffering.
One is a paralyzing agent, and the other
stops the heart. The paralyzing drug was included in the original plan for lethal injection partly to make the process look peaceful and less disturbing to witnesses, by preventing the prisoner from thrashing
around. Both it and the heart-stopping drug
are supposed to be given after a powerful
sedative has rendered the person unconscious, but if the sedative does not work
properly, the other two drugs can cause significant pain.
Barbiturates were originally used for sedation, but manufacturers began refusing
to sell them for executions. So states tried
substituting other drugs. Some were ineffective and left prisoners moaning in what
appeared to be prolonged agony.
Nebraska and Nevada hope to soon start
using the opioid fentanyl as a sedative. Illegal use has made it a scourge of national
death statistics, but medically it is an important painkiller and anesthetic. Defense lawyers in Nebraska have argued that fentanyl
comes under a federal law that limits its distribution to lifesaving purposes, and that it
is therefore illegal for a prison clinic to distribute it for an execution. A trial seeking information about the source of the fentanyl is
scheduled for Monday.
In March, Oklahoma’s attorney general,
Mike Hunter, said that using nitrogen was
“the safest, the best and the most effective
method available.”
There is scant scientific data to back up
that statement. What little is known about
human death by nitrogen comes from in-
dustrial and medical accidents and its use in
suicide. In accidents, when people have
been exposed to high levels of nitrogen and
little air in an enclosed space, they have
died quickly. In some cases co-workers who
rushed in to rescue them also collapsed and
died.
Nitrogen itself is not poisonous, but
someone who inhales it, with no air, will
pass out quickly, probably in less than a
minute, and die soon after — from lack of
oxygen. The same is true of other physiologically inert gases, including helium and
argon, which kill only by replacing oxygen.
A report from the United States Chemical
Safety and Hazard Investigation Board said
that breathing “an oxygen-deficient atmosphere” can knock a person unconscious after just one or two breaths, and that “the exposed person has no warning and cannot
sense that the oxygen level is too low.”
(Although nitrogen itself would be novel,
gas chambers have existed as an American
execution method since the 1920s. The last
case was in 1999, when Arizona used clouds
of hydrogen cyanide to execute an inmate.
Coughing and hacking, he took 18 minutes
to die.)
Death from nitrogen is thought to be
painless. It should prevent the condition
that causes feelings of suffocation: the
buildup of carbon dioxide from not being
able to exhale. Humans are highly sensitive
to carbon dioxide — too much brings on the
panicky feeling of not being able to breathe.
Somewhat surprisingly, the lack of oxygen
doesn’t trigger that same reflex. Someone
breathing pure nitrogen can still exhale carbon dioxide and therefore should not have
the sensation of smothering.
Before passing out, a person may feel
lightheaded, dizzy or maybe even a bit euphoric, and vision may dim.
Dr. Charles D. Blanke, who has studied
data on physician-assisted dying, said it
was not at all clear that nitrogen inhalation
would bring a peaceful death. Dr. Blanke, a
medical oncologist and professor at Oregon
Health and Science University, said he had
consulted colleagues in pulmonary medicine and anesthesiology, and they had concerns that carbon dioxide actually could
build up and cause feelings of suffocation.
Nitrogen is not used in states where medically assisted dying is legal; those patients,
who are terminally ill, usually drink a huge
dose of barbiturates.
Veterinary experts generally do not recommend nitrogen or other inert gases for
euthanizing mammals. Responses to the
gas vary according to species, and in its
2013 guidelines, the American Veterinary
Medical Association said, “Current evidence indicates this method is unacceptable because animals may experience dis-
tressing side effects before loss of consciousness.”
Unlike lethal injection, the use of nitrogen
would not require that the execution team
dig around for a vein. An anesthesiologist,
who requested anonymity because medical
societies bar members from participating
in executions or providing information to
encourage them, said that nitrogen inhalation was less cruel than lethal injection. And
since it presumably would involve no paralytic agent, witnesses would be able to see
whether the person seemed to be suffering,
he said.
Seizures might occur from inhaling nitrogen, he said. But if the technique appears to
go smoothly, he predicted that other states
would quickly adopt it.
In fact, according to state documents, in
May 2016, an Arizona company sent a salespitch letter for nitrogen gas executions to
Nebraska corrections officials. Among the
standout features of its Euthypoxia Chamber: It “produces calm and sedation followed by inebriation and euphoria;” it “requires no medical expertise;” and it guarantees “the demise of any mammalian life
in 4 minutes.”
In passing along the letter to another official, a state corrections department executive hand-wrote: “I’m not intending to respond — just thought it was an odd correspondence.”
Ms. Moreno, of the Berkeley Law Death
Penalty Clinic, said that implementing nitrogen gas is not as simple as states suggest. There are different grades of nitrogen,
including medical and industrial, she said,
with commensurate purities and regulations. Observers of the execution would
need protection. Officials would have to figure out how to safely clear nitrogen from the
room before a physician could declare
death and the staff could remove the body.
Supporting a Method
The Final Exit Network, a volunteer organization that supports the rights of people
with terminal illness or intractable suffering to end their lives, considers nitrogen inhalation a reasonable method, and directs
people to information about it. The technique involves putting a plastic bag over
one’s head and pumping in nitrogen.
Janis Landis, president of the network,
said: “The science behind inert gases is
quite well settled. Any inert gas, one can
breathe it in, in place of oxygen. You don’t
have air hunger. You can keep breathing.
You pass out and you die.”
She said that in the past, many people had
used helium to end their lives, from tanks
they purchased at party-supply stores that
stock them to inflate balloons.
JONATHON ROSEN
But some suppliers, realizing their product was being used for suicide, began mixing in air, making the helium less effective,
so nitrogen became the preferred choice.
Ms. Landis said, “People opposed to the
death penalty, scratching their heads about
how this could work, I think they’re mixing
up their views about whether this should be
done versus whether it can be done.”
Experts on state-sanctioned execution
methods suggest that the search for a palatable means of carrying out death sentences
is itself uniquely American. Aside from the
United States, the relatively few countries
who execute prisoners typically do so by
hanging, beheading or firing squad — methods which most Americans find repugnant.
Robert Dunham, executive director of the
Death Penalty Information Center, said that
such a reaction exemplifies the collision between two contradictory traits that streak
through the national identity.
“One is a tradition of tenderness, with us
being the safeguard of human dignity and
decency,” he said. “The other is a culture of
violence. And when you’re concerned about
human rights and dignity, that carries an
aversion to gruesome killings by the state.
But the death penalty is inherently violent
— so those traditions now are really at loggerheads.”
Nitrogen itself is
not poisonous, but
someone who
inhales it, with no
air, will pass out
quickly, probably
in less than a
minute, and die
soon after — from
lack of oxygen.
Unearthed Ships Offer Glimpse of Colonial Era
Excavation finds vessels buried
to expand a Virginia port’s land.
By EMILY COCHRANE
ALEXANDRIA, VA. — Nestled in centuries of
dirt and debris, several well-preserved
ships and artifacts have been unearthed
that offer a glimpse of life at what was once
one of the busiest ports in the North American colonies.
At the site for Robinson Landing, a new
townhouse and condominium development
in the Old Town neighborhood along the Potomac River here, excavations have uncovered the protruding, curved wooden bones
of the ships. Three ships were scuttled and
buried here centuries ago as Alexandria
sought to expand its land into the deeper
waters of the river.
“It tells us a lot about the resourcefulness
of our predecessors, how pragmatic they
were,” said Dan Lee, the city historian in the
Office of Historic Alexandria. “They don’t
put ships in there because they’re sentimental, but because they needed something and they found a way to do it.”
The three ships, buried just feet apart,
were an unusual find in a neighborhood
where residents have fought for decades to
preserve the remains of everyday artifacts
unearthed in construction since the 1960s.
In 2015, a ship’s remains were found a block
away in the construction site for a hotel, but
archaeologists were shocked this year to
find the three ships so close to one another.
“It’s a microcosm for the development of
maritime-related cities,” Eleanor Breen, the
acting chief city archaeologist, said. “It
shows that the efforts to build out the land
and try to make Alexandria an economically viable town were fairly successful.”
The ships, she said, are by far the most
striking discovery for the local community.
But the urban archaeologists, who are required by city law to be present on any construction site, also found a trove of ordinary
items that highlight what colonial residents
were using, discarding and trading.
In the rubble of privies and the crumbled
foundations of buildings, they found seeds,
beads, pins, animal bones and a few pieces
of jewelry. There were tokens from Newgate Prison in London and Spanish and
Irish coins, signaling the beginnings of international trade. And steps from what is
possibly the earliest discovered bakery,
they found a ship biscuit: an indestructible
combination of flour, salt and water designed to sustain sailors on their voyages.
“It’s difficult to imagine a dig that wouldn’t bring up an artifact from some point in
time in Alexandria’s history,” Mr. Lee said.
The city and its residents initially established an archaeological commission and a
formal city archaeologist position in the
1970s to preserve and protect the history
dug up by modern construction. Since then,
the city has excavated multiple sites
throughout its boundaries, including a
privy from a Civil War hospital support
complex, a slave household, 18th-century
kitchenware and Native American sites.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX WROBLEWSKI FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
The first ship found in 2015 is undergoing
conservation at Texas A&M University, and
the others will most likely be preserved in a
similar manner.
The three ships found together in Robinson Landing are still partly buried. The
last one found, in April, seems to be the
most complete so far. Archaeologists believe that it was an ocean vessel based on its
thick hull, while the other ships are probably river crafts that sailed on the Potomac
and the Chesapeake.
Founded in the late 17th century in Virginia, which was one of the earliest American colonies, Alexandria initially thrived as
a trading port for tobacco and other crops.
By the end of the 18th century, it served as a
major point of entry for foreign ships and
became one of the 10 busiest ports in the colonies. George Washington shipped wheat
and other crops from his Mount Vernon estate through Alexandria merchants.
As the tobacco industry waned, Alexandria maintained its economic foothold as a
center for the slave trade in the early 19th
century and a supply center for the federal
army during the Civil War.
The 18th-century ships — derelict and
past their prime — had been filled with soil
as part of the planned extension of city land.
It was a common practice at the time, with
other ships found buried along the coast
and, in one instance, under the site of the
World Trade Center in 2010.
“We were impressed by the size of it,” Ms.
Breen said, tracing the ship’s curves as she
spoke. “You literally start to see it emerge.”
It is unlikely that any more ships will be
found on this particular site, Ms. Breen said,
because excavation is nearly complete.
Evan Goldman, the vice president for acquisitions and development at EYA, the developer, said that the company had expected
there might be a need for excavation before
the $185 million construction project could
be finished by its completion date of 2020.
“It’s part of the fabric of working here,”
Mr. Goldman said. “It’s hard to understand
how exciting it is until you see it and how
complete it is. It’s incredible.”
The ships, he acknowledged, have a
unique appeal among researchers and history enthusiasts. But more than 100,000 artifacts painstakingly found elsewhere at the
site — international coins, broken glassware, straight pins and more, all carefully
separated by trowels and shovels, sifted
through soil and sprayed with water —
carry their own significance.
Extracting the ships is a bit tricky. They
have to be stored in water to maintain the
state of the uncovered wooden cribbing,
and to prevent further decay.
The Conservation Research Laboratory
at Texas A&M has been working on the ship
found under the Indigo Hotel for nearly
eight months, documenting the pieces of
timber and painstakingly removing water
as well as iron from fastenings that permeated the ship’s wood over time. Tree nails,
the few iron spikes left in there and other
stray parts, will be pulled out as part of an
in-depth investigation.
Once the iron has been drawn out, the
wood pieces will be dehydrated and vacuum-frozen for six months.
The timbers — an estimated 220 large
pieces — are each photographed, scanned
and reproduced with a 3-D printer. There
will be a 3-D model, nearly 4 feet long, and a
virtual model created before the ship is reconstructed and returned to Alexandria.
The community is still working to raise
funds for completion of the 2015 ship’s conservation.
“Whenever somebody finds a ship, it has
An 18th-century ship was
discovered last month in the
Old Town neighborhood of
Alexandria, Va., the fourth
found in recent years within a
two-block radius. Items
unearthed include, from top:
an ax with a handle; a fork
with a bone handle and brass
tines, and a spoon made of
pewter; and a biscuit.
incredible magnetism for the public,” said
Dr. Peter Nix, the research specialist leading the conservation team at Texas A&M. In
the last 50 years, he said, there’s been a significant interest in heritage and the preservation of artifacts as ships are discovered
underneath seaport towns in the United
States.
“They’re the same as the Ryder trucks,
pickup trucks and 18-wheelers of today,” he
said. “They were everywhere.”
Dan Baicy, an associate archaeologist at
Thunderbird Archaeology, which has been
investigating the Robinson Landing site for
more than a year, said that the ships are just
one aspect of the excavation.
“The level of preservation has been unprecedented,” he said of the site, where he
has worked on at least 19 buildings and their
contents. “You don’t get that very often, and
particularly in Alexandria, this is a rare
chance to gain data and investigate and research day-to-day life in the beginnings of
Alexandria.”
More than 100,000 artifacts painstakingly found elsewhere are being moved to a
lab for dating and preparation, and then will
be categorized and identified based on material, age and usage. Archaeologists will
establish a time period based on the layers
of soil before looking at where the artifacts
were manufactured, their usage and how
they were assembled.
City officials and archaeologists hope
that from there, the artifacts can be paired
with the trove of documents and records
meticulously preserved in city museums
and archives.
“You can do cross-comparative analysis,
this house with this house with this house,
with tax records, who was living there, how
they were presenting themselves,” Mr.
Baicy said, adding that some of the remaining buildings don’t have corresponding documents.
“You can piece together industry, who’s
working where,” he added.
The artifacts and ships will eventually be
returned to Alexandria, where they will become part of exhibits and continued research for the city, curated in air-controlled
conditions.
“Alexandria can come here and look at
what we’re doing,” Ms. Breen said.
And in Alexandria, each excavation has
been met with enthusiasm from residents.
More than 3,200 people toured the site last
month, when researchers opened it to
showcase the ships before removal and
preservation began, pausing on their way to
the wharf on a sunny spring day.
“I love it,” said Steve Woyicki, 43, who
stopped with his daughter on their bicycle
ride so Kate, 7, could see the ship. “She’s going to grow up with all this living history
around her.”
Kate, still wearing her sparkly bicycle
helmet as she peered through the chain-link
fence, agreed that the ship, still partly buried in sand and dirt, was an exciting sight.
“When you dig, you never really find
stuff, just rocks,” she said. “But here, you
dig, and you find ships.”
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
2
Размер файла
26 495 Кб
Теги
The New York Times, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа