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The Times - 9 May 2018

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daily newspaper of the year
Wednesday May 9 2018 | thetimes.co.uk | No 72530
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Security firms face ban on helping EU in row over satellites
Sam Coates Deputy Political Editor
The government is investigating ways
to ban technology companies from
transferring sensitive information to
Europe if Brussels carries out its threat
to block the UK from the Galileo
satellite navigation system.
There is growing alarm in Westminster that Britain’s future defence and
security co-operation treaty could
suffer if the EU presses ahead with its
approach to Galileo. It has prompted
the Treasury to look into how it can
change the licences of UK-based companies that specialise in satellite and
encryption technology to halt the use
of intellectual property overseas, The
Times has learnt.
Galileo is the €10 billion EU rival to
the global positioning system developed and controlled by the US and used
by millions of consumer devices globally. It was commissioned in 2003 and is
due for completion by 2020.
Last month the EU suggested that it
may demand that key components are
made on the Continent after Brexit. In
response, Britain is looking at blocking
the Galileo system from using British
overseas territories as monitoring
bases. Plans for Galileo rely on ground
bases in the Falklands, Ascension
Island and Diego Garcia in order to
ensure that the positioning system has
global reach. Experts are split over
whether the use of such ground stations
would scupper the project entirely or
just push up the cost significantly.
Some ministers worry that the hard-
line approach to Britain’s involvement
in Galileo after Brexit, which is being
pushed by the European Commission
and backed by France, means that
Britain is edging closer to a no-deal
scenario and jeopardising the future
defence and security treaty.
A Whitehall source said: “There is
concern about what this means for the
Continued on page 2, col 3
SAUL LOEB/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Filling up? Pay
for petrol at
the pump to
avoid obesity
Chris Smyth Health Editor
President Trump signed a White House order yesterday pulling the US out of the Iran nuclear deal and calling the country the world’s leading sponsor of terrorism
Trump ditches ‘rotten’
nuclear deal with Iran
6 Dismay among allies as sanctions reimposed 6 Tehran may restart programme within weeks
Rhys Blakely Washington
President Trump withdrew from the
Iran nuclear deal last night and vowed
to impose “the highest level of
economic sanctions” against Tehran in
a high-stakes move that broke from his
European allies.
The US president said that the international pact had only made the regime’s “bloody ambitions more brazen”
and that all sanctions that had been
lifted through it would be reimposed.
“It’s clear to me that we cannot prevent
an Iranian nuclear bomb under the
decaying and rotten structure of the
current agreement,” he said.
The Israeli military went on high
alert and mobilised reservists after
observing “irregular activity” by Iranian forces in Syria. Hours later, explosions rocked a Syrian army base south
of Damascus. A pro-Assad commander
said the base had been hit by Israeli jets.
Mr Trump’s decision fulfilled one of
his central campaign pledges but is set
to exacerbate tensions with Britain,
France and Germany, all of which had
urged him to stick with the deal. In a
joint statement last night Theresa May,
Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, and President Macron of France
expressed “regret and concern”.
The three countries said: “Our
governments remain committed to
ensuring the agreement is upheld and
will work with all the remaining parties
to the deal to ensure this remains the
case, including through ensuring the
continuing economic benefits to the
Iranian people that are linked to the
agreement.” Boris Johnson, the foreign
secretary, tweeted: “Deeply regret US
decision to withdraw from the Iran
nuclear deal.” Mr Johnson was in
Washington on Sunday and Monday in
an attempt to persuade US officials to
save the deal.
Yet Mr Trump maintained the
mantra he has deployed since declaring
his intention to run for the White
House. “The Iran deal is defective at its
core,” he said. “If we do nothing we
know exactly what will happen. In a
short period of time the world’s largest
Continued on page 2, col 3
Paying for petrol at the pump can help
to stop people getting fat, one of the
country’s leading obesity experts said
as she warned that shops were tempting
people to buy chocolates and sweets.
Susan Jebb, an Oxford University
professor and adviser to Public Health
England on obesity, said that banning
junk items at checkouts would work
alongside restrictions on promotion
and advertising being considered by
ministers to bring a shift in Britain’s
relationship with food.
Professor Jebb told MPs on the health
select committee yesterday: “What
we’re trying to do is change the food
environment. One of the things that
really strikes me is the sheer availability
of food everywhere: DIY shops, clothes
shops, goodness knows what, that now
have sweets on the checkout. I think
those impulse purchases do matter . . .
when I do talks on obesity, one of my top
ten tips is pay at the pump, don’t go into
the kiosk, and people really get that.”
She conceded that while this would
not have a huge impact on obesity, “we
can’t throw away policies that have
small impact because, frankly, we don’t
have policies that have big impacts”.
MPs were told that junk food adverts
on YouTube and Facebook rendered
industry claims of tight restrictions a
“shocking sham”.
Dan Parker, an advertising executive
turned obesity campaigner, said rules
that prohibited online advertising for
junk food on sites where more than a
quarter of the audience were children
were useless. “This code does not include Google, or any search engine. It
does not include YouTube, it doesn’t
include Facebook, Twitter or any other
social networks.” he said. “It is a shocking sham . . . If I type My Little Pony into
Google, do I see junk food ads? Yes.”
Stephen Woodford, chief executive of
the Advertising Association, said: “My
view, which is in line with a consensus of
academics, is that advertising has a
small impact on food preference. It has
even less impact on overall diet and
even less on overweight and obesity.”
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
News
T O D AY ’ S E D I T I O N
PM’s portrait
back at Oxford
Johnson attacks ‘Forensic errors’
customs plan
in rape cases
A portrait of Theresa
May is to be reinstated
at Oxford University
after it was removed
amid student protests.
The row has fuelled a
debate about campus
free speech. Page 5
Boris Johnson has
challenged the prime
minister to sack him as
foreign secretary after
he branded her plan
for post-Brexit
customs arrangements
“crazy”. Page 8
Mishandled
examinations by a
Scotland Yard forensic
scientist may have
compromised more
than 30 investigations
into cases including
rape. Page 11
70 YEARS OF THE NHS
Record care: your memories of the
National Health Service
We want to hear your experiences, good and bad. Call 020 3856 3150
to leave us a message. Please include your name, age and location
Pompeo flies in
for Korea talks
Vodafone close
to £16bn deal
Wimbledon
woe for Murray
Mike Pompeo, the US
secretary of state, flew
to North Korea to
finalise the summit
between President
Trump and Kim Jongun, the time of which
has been set. Page 30
Vodafone was poised
to announce a
£16.7 billion deal last
night to buy a
significant part of
Liberty Global’s
European cable
business. Page 35
Andy Murray has
suffered a setback in
his recovery from hip
surgery that has raised
doubts over his grass
court tennis season
and participation at
Wimbledon. Page 68
COMMENT 23
LETTERS 26
LEADING ARTICLES 27
WORLD 28
BUSINESS 35
REGISTER 51
SPORT 58
CROSSWORD 68
TV & RADIO TIMES2
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thetimes
timesandsundaytimes
DINNER
TONIGHT
Pineapple carpaccio
with mint and chilli
This is one of my goto dinner party puds,
ideal when I want
something fresh and
light that is quick and
easy, could be made at
the last minute or
hours in advance. It is
only worth making
with a really ripe,
sweetly honeyed
pineapple. But that is
hard to tell and we
have to hope that if a
leaf can be pulled
without resistance, it’s
ready. The slices and
copious juices are
enhanced by scraps of
fresh mint. Another
very good addition, a
combination I learnt to
love in Mauritius but is
popular in Thai cuisine,
is tiny scraps of red
chilli. You don’t need
much and the heat is
subdued by the sweet
fruit. Do try it.
Serves 4-6 Prep
20 min, chill 30 min
Ingredients: 1 very ripe
pineapple; 1 small red
chilli; about ten tender
mint leaves.
Trim and quarter the
pineapple lengthways.
Slice off the skin in
long sweeps. Carefully
dig out any hairy
“eyes”. Slice off the
thetimes
woody core. Use
a mandoline or
a very sharp
knife held by a
steady hand to
slice across the
quarters in wafer-thin
slices. Pile into mixing
bowl. Split the chilli,
scrape out the seeds,
slice into skinny
batons and then into
tiny dice. Add to the
pineapple. Shred or
tear mint over the top.
Mix together with your
hands, leave like this or
spread out on a platter
or in a shallow serving
bowl catching any
juices. Cover with
clingfilm and chill for
at least 30 minutes
before serving. It will
be very juicy. You will
not need cream.
Lindsey Bareham
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Patchy rain in Ireland and much of
Britain, but dry and bright in the
southeast. Full forecast, page 57
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Clash over threat to prosecute
soldiers for Troubles murders
Oliver Wright Policy Editor
Sam Coates Deputy Political Editor
Theresa May faces a cabinet rebellion
over plans for a Northern Ireland historical murders unit that could lead to
former members of the armed services
being prosecuted.
Four ministers spoke out in cabinet
yesterday against plans put forward by
Karen Bradley, the Northern Ireland
secretary, to set up a unit that would
investigate all unsolved murders committed during the conflict. The ministers demanded that members of the
army who served in Northern Ireland
be excluded from the unit’s scope.
The rebels, who include Boris Johnson, the foreign secretary, and Gavin
Williamson, the defence secretary, are
calling for a consultation on the issue to
be delayed until the government brings
in a statute of limitations bill. This, they
say, would prevent ex-servicemen from
being hounded into old age by “bogus”
Iraq War-style legacy cases.
Supporters of Ms Bradley have
warned, however, that any attempt to
exclude the armed forces from the
unit’s work would be illegal and risk
jeopardising attempts to restore power
sharing in Northern Ireland.
Getting the power-sharing executive
up and running is a priority for the
continued from page 1
Trump ditches Iran deal
state sponsor of terrorism will be on the
cusp of acquiring a nuclear weapon.”
He added: “The US no longer makes
empty threats. When I make promises,
I keep them.”
US officials said that sanctions on
Iran’s central bank would be revived —
a move designed to halt sales of Iranian
oil but which large buyers such as
China are likely to try to skirt.
President Rouhani of Iran said that
he would open talks with the deal’s
other signatories to explore whether it
was possible to continue trade between
them. If those talks failed, Mr Rouhani
said that Iran would resume nuclear
activities again “within weeks”.
The two other signatories, China and
Russia, had also called on Mr Trump
not to weaken the nuclear deal, which
was finalised in 2015 and had been
endorsed by the UN security council
and the European Union.
The Russian foreign ministry rebuked Mr Trump for a “gross violation
of international law”.
Mr Trump said that any country that
supported Iran’s nuclear programme
“could also be strongly sanctioned”,
adding: “We will not be held hostage to
nuclear blackmail.”
US officials said that European companies that do business with Iran would
have up to six months to wind down
dealings with the country. That demand
could affect orders worth tens of billions
continued from page 1
Security row over EU satellite
future of our security partnership. The
government said we were not going to
make it a bargaining chip but the commission turning round and branding
the UK a security threat has left us with
concerns about what that means.”
Ministers have said that “nothing is
off the table” as they fight to stay part of
Galileo. They have begun a feasibility
study into a rival British system that
they believe will cost £3.7 billion over
ten years to build, with running costs of
around £200 million per year, the same
as the UK would contribute to Galileo.
government as it attempts to break the
deadlock surrounding Brexit negotiations on the Irish border.
Allies of Mr Williamson said that he
had grave concerns about the contents
of a consultation presented yesterday
on plans to establish the historical
investigations unit that was part of the
Stormont House agreement of 2014.
They said Mr Williamson feared that
the unit would be under pressure to
produce quick results and would prioritise cases involving the armed forces,
which kept better records, over terrorist
atrocities that were not solved at the
time.
He is also concerned that creating
the unit could lead to lawyers making
false claims, as happened in relation to
historical investigations in Iraq. “This
would open the door to false allegation
being pursued against old men who
have done nothing wrong and have
dedicated their life to serving their
country,” one senior source said.
“He made the point to the cabinet
that it was politicians sitting around
that table in the past who had sent those
soldiers to Northern Ireland in the first
place. Now, he said, they were being
asked to authorise their potential prosecutions for doing the job that the government asked them to do.”
They added that Mr Williamson had
the backing of Sir Michael Fallon, the
former defence secretary, and Liam Fox
and David Davis, the trade and Brexit
secretaries, as well as Mr Johnson.
However, a source in the Northern
Ireland Office disputed that the cases
involving the army would become a priority, saying that investigations would
follow strict chronological order.
The source added that, as things
stood, former British soldiers were
being pursued by families through the
inquest system, which has the power to
recommend prosecutions, while terrorist atrocities, which made up 90 per
cent of the deaths during the Troubles,
were not.
“Soldiers are unjustly pursued,” the
source said. “This will end that and ensure that all cases are dealt with fairly.”
The source added that any attempt to
exempt soldiers through legislation
would almost certainly be successfully
challenged in the European Court of
Human Rights. “Not a single government lawyer who has looked at this has
come to any other conclusion.”
Mrs May is understood to have put
off making a decision on publishing the
consultation before further cabinet
discussions.
A Northern Ireland Office spokesman said it was expected that the consultation would be published soon.
of dollars booked by companies such as
Airbus, the aircraft manufacturer.
Mr Trump’s apparent “hard exit”
from the deal was set to be welcomed by
Israel and Saudi Arabia. The US president cited a large cache of Iranian
documents recently recovered by
Israeli intelligence as proof that Iran
had lied about a bid to build a bomb in
the 1990s. Binyamin Netanyahu, the
Israeli prime minister, produced the
documents last week. Speaking
immediately after Mr Trump, Mr Netanyahu said: “Israel fully supports President Trump’s bold decision today to reject the disastrous nuclear deal with the
terrorist regime in Tehran.”
The US president identified what he
said were numerous flaws in the deal,
including an inspections regime that
allows only delayed access to military
facilities, and “sunset clauses” under
which restraints on Iran’s civilian nuclear programme would begin to expire
in 2025. He also demanded restraints
on Iran’s ballistic missile development,
its military interventions in countries
including Syria and Yemen, and its
support of groups such as Hezbollah.
In a statement, Barack Obama, the
US president who negotiated the deal,
said: “Walking away from the [deal]
turns our back on America’s closest
allies and an agreement that our country’s leading diplomats, scientists and
intelligence professionals negotiated.”
No Windrush
arrivals forced
out of Britain
Leading article, page 27
Trump’s gamble, pages 28-29
Oil prices turn volatile, page 43
How it works
A Galileo
satellites
send
improved
radio
frequencies
from higher
altitudes
B Can
track
any device
to within
30cm
Total satellites: 30
Orbit radius: 29,500km
10 satellites on
each plane
A
B
Richard Ford Home Correspondent
A “handful” of people have been
wrongly deported from Britain in the
past six years, the Home Office’s head
of immigration enforcement admitted
yesterday.
Hugh Ind told MPs that “up to five”
people had been brought back after
their removal was questioned.
The department’s top civil servant
announced an inquiry into advice given
to Amber Rudd, the former home secretary, by officials around the select
committee hearing that led to her resignation over the Windrush scandal.
Mr Ind said that a review had failed to
find any member of the Windrush
generation who had been deported.
Some of the Windrush generation had
been detained and one person linked to
Windrush is in detention having committed a serious criminal offence.
6 Fifty-three vulnerable Syrian refugees were brought to Britain under a
scheme intended to help churches and
community groups offer support. In the
first 14 months of the community sponsorship scheme fewer than 20 sponsors
had been approved, inspectors said.
Britain has already paid £356 million
towards Galileo, and a number of British companies are involved in the
design. The European Commission has
said that Britain could be locked out of
the secure military capabilities after
Brexit because of rules that prohibit
sharing sensitive information with
non-EU states. Government sources
said that blocking full British access to
Galileo was a “litmus test” for the kind
of security relationship that the EU will
have post-Brexit.
A government spokesman said: “It is
in our mutual interest to remain in
[Galileo] as part of a strong security
partnership with Europe.”
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
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News
OLIVER PRINCE
Island’s birds
return after
rat invaders
are killed off
Ben Webster Environment Editor
When Captain Cook brought
home reports of bountiful numbers of seals and whales around
South Georgia 240 years ago, he
unwittingly triggered a plague of
rats and mice that devastated the
island’s seabird population.
Rodents escaped from the many
seal-hunting and whaling vessels
that sailed to the South Atlantic
island over the following decades.
Buenos Aires
ARGENTINA
Falkland
Islands
CHILE
200 miles
South
Atlantic
Ocean
South
Georgia
South
Sandwich
Islands
The rodents preyed on the eggs
and chicks of millions of groundnesting birds, which had evolved in
the absence of natural predators.
The South Georgia pipit, the
world’s most southerly songbird,
was among the species severely
damaged by the rodents, along
with the South Georgia pintail and
several species of albatross, prion,
skua, tern, sheathbill and petrel.
Fur sealing ended in 1912 after
almost all had been killed and
South Georgia’s whaling stations
closed in 1965 after processing
172,000 whales, but the rodents
were left behind and thrived. The
birds
became
increasingly
confined to small offshore islands.
Now the main island has been
officially declared rodent-free for
the first time since the arrival of
humans after a ten-year, £10 million operation to poison the invaders. More than 300 tonnes of bait
laced with rodenticide were
dropped from helicopters in three
phases across the island, which is
just over 100 miles long and up to
23 miles wide.
Members of “Team Rat”, employed by the South Georgia Heritage Trust, also visited former
whaling stations to place bait by
ait-layhand. The trust finished bait-layded to
ing in March 2015 but needed
check that no rats or mice had
survived.
It employed three terrierss
from New Zealand — Wai,
Will and Ahu — which
were trained to sniff out
rodents. With their two
female handlers they
have spent the past six
months walking more
than 1,000 miles around
the island searching for any
0
survivors. More than 4,600
es
rodent-detecting
devices
were also deployed, such as
nnels
chewsticks and small tunnels
which record footprints.
None of these methods found
gesting
any sign of rats or mice, suggesting
that the island has been rodentfree since the last round of poisoning ended three years ago.
Mike Richardson, chairman of
the project’s steering committee,
said that there had been “an explosion” in the number of pipits and
pintails, with numbers increasing
at least tenfold in the past three
years. “We received a recent
description from one of our trustees that the sound of the calling
Terriers were brought in from New Zealand to make sure South Georgia was clear of rodents for the first time in more than 200 years
pipits was crowding out the normal noise of bellowing elephant
seals,” he said, adding that slowerbreeding birds, such as storm petrels and diving petrels, would take
longer to recover.
Professor Richardson said that
the project, which received almost
£900,000 of government funding
with the rest from donations and
charities, had helped to demonstrate that Britain was a good cus-
todian of
o South Georgia and the
South Sa
Sandwich Islands, which are
Britis Overseas Territory but
a British
claim by Argentina.
claimed
T trust is calling for measThe
ure to prevent shipborne
ures
ro
rodents
getting on to the
is
island,
including the const
struction
of a rodent-proof
fe
fence
around the jetties. A
s
sniffer
dog is employed on
th Falklands, 900 miles to
the
th west, to check supply
the
sh
ships before they depart for
Sou
South
Georgia. Professor
Rich
Richardson
said: “We only
need one pregnant rat to get
back on to South Georgia and we
back
could re
restart the whole cycle.”
The p
project’s success has raised
hopes fo
for similar action on other
remote islands, including Gough
Island, another British Overseas
Territory in the South Atlantic
where mice have been filmed eating the flesh of albatross chicks.
Lord Gardiner of Kimble, the
environment minister, said: “The
rodent eradication work completed by the South Georgia Heritage
Trust is undoubtedly among the
most remarkable of recent island
conservation efforts.”
Welsh reputation as land of music falls flat
.
Nicola Woolcock
Education Correspondent
With performers such as Sir Tom
Jones, Dame Shirley Bassey and
Katherine Jenkins — not to mention 1,000 years of harp history
— Wales is known as the land
of song and music. But a survey indicating the geographical spread of musical abilities in Britain suggests that
the Welsh are out of step with
their reputation.
Wales has the joint
lowest proportion of
adults in the UK that
can play a musical
instrument.
The survey of 1,000
adults and 1,000 young
people found that an
average of 15 per cent of
adults in Britain could
play a musical instru-
ment. This varied greatly by
region, from 8.3 per cent in Wales
and the northeast, to 21.4 per cent
in East Midlands, with London a
close second at 21.3 per cent.
Critics said that the survey did
not take singing into account. The
Welsh Association of Male
Choirs represents 97 groups, of
which 80 are based in Wales.
About 800 singers from
Wales has a
grand musical
heritage, with
singers such
as Shirley
Bassey
28 choirs belonging to the association will be performing at the
Royal Albert Hall when Prince
Harry and Meghan Markle marry
this month. Arthur Brady, the
association’s general secretary,
said: “Choirs are still very strong in
Wales and still a big feature. We’ll
be at the hall singing traditional
male-voice pieces.”
A source close to Eisteddfod
Wales said that there was no shortage of performers at its annual
national events, with about 10,000
people competing across the week
in music, singing and dance.
A generational divide was also
exposed by the survey, with an
average of 25 per cent of people
aged 11 to 18 able to play an instrument. School was the biggest
source of inspiration — a little
more than 60 per cent saying a
teacher had encouraged them to
play — while 54 per cent credited
parents and 10 per cent their
friends.
The study suggested that platforms such as YouTube performed
a role. Twenty per cent of young
people said they learnt to play by
watching online tutorials.
Older people who had quit playing blamed work pressures and
time constraints, with half of
adults giving one of these excuses.
The piano was the most popular
instrument, the choice of 42 per
cent of those who played an instrument, followed by the guitar, on 25
per cent. Twelve per cent named
the violin and 7 per cent the drums.
Lucy Noble, artistic director at
Royal Albert Hall, said: “This
research highlights the important
role teachers play in inspiring
young people to learn life skills
such as playing a musical instrument, which can help to improve
overall confidence and creativity.”
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
News
MATT CARDY/GETTY IMAGES
Quintagram®
No 58
Solve all five clues using each
letter underneath once only
1 Beehive product (5)
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2 Legendary cursed king (5)
-----
3 Warm hooded anorak (5)
----4 Free from captivity (8)
-------5 Attractive garden bird (9)
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A
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Solutions MindGames in Times2
Cryptic clues every day online
Police database ‘racist’
In step Couples prepare for the Flora Dance at Lismore House in Helston, Cornwall. The town holds dances throughout the day to mark the arrival of spring
Plan to muzzle press ‘will
usher in legal Dark Ages’
Matthew Moore Media Correspondent
Francis Elliott Political Editor
Labour’s plans to muzzle the press
would return Britain to the legal Dark
Ages and make it easier for wealthy
people to suppress negative stories,
according to a senior lawyer who represented phone-hacking victims.
Mark Stephens, an expert in media
law, warns in a letter to The Times today
that a “small and affluent privacy
lobby” is trying to hijack data protection legislation to impose tighter regulation on newspapers.
MPs will vote today on two opposition amendments to the Data Protection Bill that opponents say pose a chilling threat to media freedom. The outcome is thought to be on a knife-edge.
The proposals will impose costs sanctions on newspapers that refuse on
principle to join a state-recognised
press regulator, and force ministers to
establish a new Leveson-style inquiry
into the media.
Yesterday, Theresa May urged MPs
not to back the measures, warning that
Labour’s plans would “undermine our
free press”. One of the amendments,
tabled by Tom Watson, Labour’s deputy
leader, would mean that newspapers
that declined to join an approved regulator would have to pay claimants’ legal
fees even if the newspapers won in court.
The Watson amendment contains an
exemption for regional publishers
owned by companies with annual revenues under £100 million, but would still
affect 85 per cent of local titles.
An amendment tabled by Ed Miliband, the former Labour leader, would
require the government to open a new
inquiry into “allegations of data protection breaches committed by or on behalf of national news publishers and
other media organisations”.
Julian Smith, the chief whip, is understood to have briefed Mrs May that
uncertainty over the SNP and DUP
positions made it hard to know whether
either amendment could be defended.
Some Labour MPs plan to oppose the
amendments. John Grogan said that
threatening newspapers with punitive
damages unless they signed up to a
state regulator was “deeply troubling”.
Mr Stephens, who has represented
victims of tabloid phone-hacking,
warned that the proposals would undermine the Defamation Act 2013,
brought in to defend public interest
journalism and reduce trivial actions
brought by wealthy individuals.
“We are now seeing a new rash of
data protection claims brought by
those who would prefer not to see their
names in the press,” he writes in a letter
to The Times published today. “Punishing some publishers with cost sanctions
when they fight an increasing number
of legal battles is taking us back to the
Dark Ages.”
Lord Pannick, QC, the crossbench
peer, also writing in The Times, warns:
“Freedom of the press is too important to
be undermined by unlawful punishment
for the past wrongs of some newspapers.”
David Dinsmore, chairman of the
News Media Association and chief operating officer of News UK, publisher of
The Times, said yesterday that MPs
backing the amendments were voting
to “cripple” local and national papers.
Thunderer, page 24
Letters, page 26
Leading article, page 27
Sir Cliff case is threat to media, say lawyers
Matthew Moore
The right of the press to report the truth
about police investigations would be
undermined if Sir Cliff Richard won his
legal action against the BBC, the corporation’s lawyers claimed yesterday.
The 77-year-old singer is suing the
BBC over coverage of a police raid on
his home in 2014. He has told Mr Justice
Mann that the coverage, which
involved use of a helicopter, was a “very
serious invasion” of his privacy.
The BBC disputes his claims, saying
that its reporting of the search of the
apartment in Sunningdale, Berkshire,
was accurate and in good faith.
Police were investigating an allegation that Sir Cliff sexually assaulted a
boy in 1985. He denied the claim and
the case was ultimately dropped.
Gavin Millar, QC, for the BBC, said
that the case raised issues “arguably of
constitutional importance”.
In closing legal arguments, he said
that a ruling in favour of Sir Cliff could
make it more difficult for the press to
report the allegations of sex-assault
victims. “All the people who tweeted
#MeToo and all the women who talked
about their allegations against Harvey
Weinstein were exercising their rights
under freedom of expression,” he said.
“Legal restrictions on the right of the
media to report on criminal investigations . . . should be a matter for parliament rather than the court.”
Sir Cliff’s legal team are seeking damages of £175,000 and £250,000, plus the
costs of a book deal being dropped after
the police raid, the High Court was told.
The hearing continues.
Facebook to
ban foreign
election ads
Ben Hoyle Los Angeles
Facebook is using Ireland’s abortion
referendum to test policies meant to
prevent foreign meddling in elections.
The company, which was heavily
criticised for failing to stop Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential
election, announced yesterday that it
had banned advertisements relating to
the sensitive referendum that did not
originate inside Ireland.
Irish voters will decide on May 25
whether to repeal a constitutional
amendment that amounts to a near
total ban on abortions, including in
cases of rape and incest.
The vote has drawn international
attention and last month Helen Dixon,
the Irish data protection commissioner,
said it was possible that foreign actors
could try to tilt the outcome. The Times
previously reported that a US-based
anti-abortion group had paid to target
Irish voters through Facebook with
posts campaigning against the repeal of
the Irish Eighth Amendment, which
acknowledges “the right to life of the
unborn”.
Ireland forbids foreign groups from
advertising in domestic elections and
referendums, but as political spending
moves online keeping track of it has
become more difficult.
“Today, as part of our efforts to help
protect the integrity of elections and referendums from undue influence, we will
begin rejecting ads related to the referendum if they are being run by advertisers based outside of Ireland,” Facebook’s
Dublin office wrote in a blog post.
The company will use artificial intelligence and reports from campaign
groups on both sides of the debate to
identify problematic material. Facebook has not yet applied such a policy
to British elections or referendums, but
has said that similar tools will eventually be rolled out to other countries.
A police gangs database is under
investigation after a report by
Amnesty International concluded
that it breaches international
human rights law. Scotland Yard’s
Gangs Matrix holds information
on about 3,800 people. Amnesty
said: “The entire system is racially
discriminatory, stigmatising
young black men for the type of
music they listen to or their social
media behaviour.” The
Information Commissioner’s
Office is examining whether it
breaks rights and data laws.
Burning question
Researchers at King’s College
London say that DNA tests will
soon be able to gauge a person’s
susceptibility to sunburn and skin
cancer. Their analysis of 121,000
Britons and 55,000 other
Europeans, published in Nature
Communications, has doubled
from 10 to 20 the number of
genes known to influence how
skin responds to sunlight.
Doctor smuggled drugs
A doctor who smuggled drugs
said he bought them to cope with
the stress of working in an A&E
unit. Michael Condon, 40, had a
history of drug abuse and in 2005
faked prescriptions to get drugs
for himself, Bolton crown court
was told. He admitted ordering
amphetamine-related drugs to his
house last year and was told to
complete 200 hours’ unpaid work.
Parents’ ashes found
The ashes of a couple that were
kept by an undertaker for 17 years
have been returned to their
daughter. Robert Loveridge hid
the ashes of Joan Hook, who died
in 2001, and her husband, Snowy,
who died in 2010. He was jailed
for fraud last year and they were
found in a search of his business.
They will be interred at the
family plot in Shaldon, Devon.
Helicoptering won’t fly
“Helicopter” mothers who correct
every error in their children’s
homework may inhibit their
ability to work independently,
according to researchers at the
University of Eastern Finland and
the University of Jyvaskyla. A
study of 2,000 pupils suggested
that the mothers sent a message
to the children that they did not
believe in their abilities.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
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News
Army to appoint ex-special forces officer as new chief
Deborah Haynes Defence Editor
A former director of Britain’s special
forces will be named as the new head of
the army today, The Times understands.
Lieutenant-General Mark CarletonSmith, 54, will take over from General
Sir Nick Carter as chief of the general
staff next month when the latter is promoted to head of the armed forces. The
appointment was made after interviews with Gavin Williamson, the defence secretary, this month.
The shortlist also included Lieutenant-General Patrick Sanders, comman-
der field army, and General Sir James
Everard, Britain’s top officer at Nato.
“Carleton-Smith has the job,” a military source said. A second source described Lieutenant-General CarletonSmith as “incredibly intelligent, urbane
and polished. He’s also a career long
special forces officer and war fighter.”
It was speculated that LieutenantGeneral Sanders would win because he
is well-liked by General Carter, 59, heralded from the same regiment and had
spent his career in the regular army unlike the special forces background of
Lieutenant-General Carleton-Smith.
At 52, however, Lieutenant-General
Sanders would have made a particularly young army chief and will still have a
shot at the post next time.
Lieutenant-General Carleton-Smith
was primed to leave his present job as
the senior officer in charge of military
operations at the Ministry of Defence.
He will be made a four-star general
when he moves into the new post.
He takes over as the army is more
than 4,000 soldiers short of its target
strength of 82,000 and a defence review
is due to conclude in early July. He will
need to fight to ensure that the army is
Lieutenant-General
Mark CarletonSmith has an
SAS background
fully equipped to deal with warfare in
the information age when being able to
control messages online, combat electronic warfare and deal with cyberthreats are as important as having the
most powerful guns and tanks.
Lieutenant-General Carleton-Smith
Oxford vows to
reinstate PM on
its geographers’
wall of fame
Nicola Woolcock
Education Correspondent
Josh McStay
A portrait of Theresa May taken down
after a protest at Oxford University is
set to be reinstated.
Mrs May was one of 12 alumnae
whose pictures were put up last week to
celebrate successful female graduates
from the school of geography and the
environment. It was swiftly targeted by
students and academics opposed to her
policies, who surrounded it with angry
messages and lobbied on social media
for its removal, under the hashtag
#NotAllGeographers. They celebrated yesterday morning
after the picture was taken
down, but the university insisted that it would re-hang it.
The protest reignites the row
over freedom of speech on campus. Sam Gyimah, the
universities minister,
ridiculed the decision
to remove the picture,
tweeting:
“Now even portraits
are being no-platformed.
Politics
aside,
Theresa
May is only our
second female
PM & an inspiration to many.
The
faculty
should get a grip
& put the portrait back in a
more prominent place — I’ll be happy
to unveil it.”
Messages posted around the portrait
before it was removed included “School
of geography and hostile environment?” and “Let in every refugee,
throw the Tories in the sea”. Protesters
described it as a “creative intervention”.
It was claimed on Twitter last night
that 21 academics had signed a letter
expressing concerns because of Mrs
May’s record, saying her political
actions were “antithetical” to the aim of
geography to create citizens of the
world.
One protester said: “There was
no consultation (at least with
students) about the placing of
Theresa May. Clearly at a
time when there are issues
with the Windrush scandal
and the handling of Brexit [she
is] a contentious figure in a department with many EU
citizens and decolonial scholars.
“The main, and
most basic, issue
comes with the celebration of a sitting
prime
minister.
Should a department align itself
with the power of
the day, when
there are those
who
actively
challenge it?”
Campaigners
admitted that con-
A portrait of Theresa May has been removed from a display of notable female
geography graduates after protests by students. Below left, in her Oxford days
Campus iconoclasm
6 St Hugh’s College,
Oxford, removed a
portrait of its alumna
Aung San Suu Kyi last
September as the
Rohingya crisis
deepened. The portrait
of the Burmese leader
had hung near the
college’s main entrance
since 1999.
6 The Rhodes Must Fall
movement, which
began at the University
of Cape Town,
campaigned for the
“decolonisation” of
education. Spreading to
Oxford, students
wanted the statue of
Cecil Rhodes removed
from Oriel College. Oriel
decided it should stay.
6 King’s College London
swapped portraits of its
founding fathers in July
last year for a “wall of
diversity”. Professor
Patrick Leman, dean of
the Institute of
Psychiatry, Psychology
and Neuroscience, said
the faculty would no
longer be filled with
“busts of 1920s bearded
men”.
6 In 2015 the university
removed a picture of
the former Archbishop
of Canterbury, Lord
Carey of Clifton,
because his opposition
to same-sex marriage
was deemed offensive.
6 University of
Pennsylvania students
pulled down their
English department’s
portrait of William
Shakespeare in
December 2016 and
replaced it with one of
the African-American
author Audre Lorde.
was educated at Eton and was commissioned into the Irish Guards in 1982. In
the coming years, he passed selection
into 22 Special Air Service Regiment.
He was made its commanding officer in
2002 when the SAS was heavily committed to the war in Afghanistan.
He returned to the regular army and
after promotion to brigadier was sent
back to Afghanistan as the commander
of 16 Air Assault Brigade in 2008. He
was made director of special forces in
2012. He has been deputy chief of the
defence staff (military strategy and
operations) since April 2016.
versations were needed to “bring the
school back together after some intense
and upsetting conversations”.
Others had supported the picture.
The subjects of the 12 portraits were
nominated by current and former
members of the department.
Claire Hann, the school’s equality
and diversity officer, came up with the
idea for the display to “inspire the next
generation of women geographers”.
She told the Cherwell student newspaper: “The aim is to show that the
achievements of the few selected
women represent and are linked with
the achievements of a much wider
group of women geographers. We’re
keen to celebrate the successes of our
women students and staff as much as
those of men.”
Edward Howell, a scholar in international relations, said: “Whilst some of
the policies of Mrs May and her party
may be at odds with the perspectives of
many of those involved in the discipline
of geography, this is no reason to
remove [the portrait].”
The university suggested that the
picture was removed for its safety. A
spokesman said: “The portrait was
being increasingly obscured by posters
bearing mainly humorous satirical
messages. It has now been taken down
and will be re-displayed so it can be
seen as intended.
“We remain proud of [Mrs May’s]
success and that of all the graduates
celebrated in the display.”
Elite universities have been criticised
for the preponderance of portraits of
elderly, white, male figures.
The other women in the school of
geography and the environment’s display included Dame Helen Alexander,
the first female head of the Confederation of British Industry.
University suspends students who joked about ‘raping 100 girls’
Rosemary Bennett Education Editor
Eleven students have been suspended
from Warwick University after sending
misogynistic, racist and antisemitic
messages in a group chat.
Screenshots of the Facebook
exchanges show the male students
joking about raping female students
they know and boasting about having
“surprise sex” with freshers.
Three separate formal complaints
were made to the university at the end
of April. The students were suspended
and an investigation started. Almost
100 screenshots of the group chat were
submitted as evidence.
The messages included one saying:
“Sometimes it’s fun to just go wild and
rape 100 girls.” The next message read:
“Rape the whole flat to teach them all
[a] lesson.” A member of the group then
gives a racist reply using the term
“p***”. In another chat, another racist
term is used.
The story was reported in The Boar,
the Warwick University student newspaper. It said that the Facebook chat
group included senior and executive
office holders of academic and sporting
societies.
The University of Warwick confirmed that an investigation was under
way but said that it would not comment
further until “any subsequent disciplinary processes are concluded”. The
screenshots date back about a year and,
according to The Boar, for a period the
chat was named “F*** Women, Disrespect them all”. Members’ nicknames
included “Grenfell” and “Taxi Jew”.
Last week the University of Exeter
expelled several law students who sent
racist and misogynistic messages on
WhatsApp.
Universities are under pressure to act
swiftly when students are involved in
racist behaviour, in particular, after
being accused of dragging their heels.
Shakira Martin, president of the
National Union of Students, has said
that universities are so concerned
about protecting their reputation they
do nothing beyond logging reports of
incidents until they are forced to act.
Two teenagers will appear in court
after a video of alleged racist chanting
in student halls went viral. Rufaro Chisango, a Nottingham Trent University
student, posted footage she recorded on
social media last term which included
chants of “We hate the blacks”.
Joe Tivnan, 18, from Birmingham,
and Lauren Leigh, 18, from Nottingham, will face charges of racially or
religiously aggravated harassment at
Nottingham magistrates’ court on May
24. An investigation into the students’
behaviour by the university has been
suspended temporarily.
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
News
Tax on over-40s ‘could end elderly care crisis’
Chris Smyth Health Editor
Greg Hurst Social Affairs Editor
People over 40 should pay a tax of hundreds of pounds a year because this
helped Japan to solve an elderly care
crisis, experts have said.
Separate proposals to bridge a generational divide by giving £10,000 to all
25-year-olds have already provoked a
backlash from older people.
A commission on intergenerational
fairness set up by the Resolution Foundation think tank proposed that the
“citizen’s inheritance” could be used to
help those aged 25 to buy a home or pay
for education but Simon, from North-
umberland, spoke for many older Twitter users when he wrote: “Have my
body crippled by military service, have
my pension taxed, but now millennials
want me to fund ‘their’ NHS when I am
a pensioner and also find them a
£10,000 ‘bonus’ at 25!”
The commission also proposed extending national insurance to people
who work beyond the state pension age
to raise a £2.3 billion “NHS levy”. It also
said that a property tax could raise
£2 billion to fund social care
A report released today by the Nuffield Trust think tank argued that
people entering middle age would be
willing to pay a care levy because of
worry about ageing parents. Paying for
decent home visits, care homes and
exercise classes for the over-65s is possible under the system Japan created to
deal with an ageing population, the
report said. However, rising demand
has meant that costs to the average Japanese over 40 have more than doubled
since 2000, to £444 a year.
A report by the Commons public
accounts committee said that the government had “no credible plan” for the
care system as low-paid staff deserted
it. Ministers are due to present reform
plans this year but are nervous of radical changes after Theresa May’s election campaign was derailed last year by
Lend a helping hand?
For
“The older generation do not
understand the financial troubles for
the younger generation. Houses
today are not given away like they
were in the Eighties by the Tories!”
“I would hate to think this will ruin
anyone’s pension, but if you were
under 40, you wouldn’t even be sure
when you qualify for a pension.”
Against
“I’ve worked hard over the years so
the younger generation have to too.”
“Millennials want it all: latest phones
and gadgets; designer gear; gap
years; daily Costa fix . . . I could go
on. We saved and scrimped to afford
17 per cent mortgage interest rates.”
plans to make elderly people contribute
more to their care, which was dubbed a
“dementia tax”.
Japan introduced compulsory longterm care insurance in 2000. “In terms
of its demographics it’s 20 years ahead
of us, so it’s like looking into the future,”
Natasha Curry, author of the Nuffield
Trust report, said.
She said that a levy on the over-40s
“gives a clarity that makes it more
acceptable to people. You pay in a certain amount each month and you can
see exactly what you’re going to get
out.”
General taxation contributes half the
cost of care homes while people must
pay 10-30 per cent of their own costs
and “hotel” charges. About 3 per cent of
the care fund is ring-fenced for day centres, classes and other activities that
help to keep the elderly socially active.
Letters, page 26
SIENNA ANDERSON/SOUL PHOTOGRAPHY
Shoot the breeze A little egret at Hersey Nature Reserve on the Isle of Wight, one
of the places colonised by the birds since they arrived from France in the 1980s
Mental healthcare failing
young people, MPs warn
Greg Hurst Social Affairs Editor
Hundreds of thousands of young
people with mental illnesses will be left
without good quality care and support
because the government’s plans for
them lack ambition, MPs say.
Mental health care will “fail a generation” unless more is spent on vulnerable
people, according to a report by the
Commons select committees on education and health and social care.
The criticism is in response to a green
paper published in December that delayed plans for a maximum four-week
waiting time for children with anxiety,
depression and other mental illnesses
so that the government could consult
on local trials.
By 2025, every school is to have a
member of staff trained in mental
health and schools will be linked to
NHS teams of nurses, educational psychologists, counsellors, social workers
and voluntary organisations.
However, MPs on the two commit-
tees said that hundreds of thousands of
children would not benefit without
faster improvements and that staff in
schools were already under great strain.
They also called for evidence about the
impact of exam stress on pupils’ mental
health and on the needs of children
who had been excluded from school.
Sarah Wollaston, Conservative
chairwoman of the health and social
care committee, said: “The green paper
is just not ambitious enough and will
leave so many children without the care
they need. It needs to go much further
in considering how to prevent mental
health difficulties in the first place.”
The MPs’ report was welcomed by
many organisations working with
young people. Anne Longfield, the
children’s commissioner for England,
said that the government needed to
close the gap between spending on
adult and children’s mental health
services, and invest more in early intervention to deal with problems before
they became critical.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
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News
JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; ARTHUR EDWARDS
I share your pain,
prince tells Greeks
T
he Prince of
Wales touched
on his ancestral
connections to
Greece on the
eve of a landmark visit,
saying that the nation
was in “my blood” as he
expressed sympathy for
the millions affected by
the country’s economic
woes (Anthee Carassava,
in Athens, writes).
Prince Charles, whose
father was born Prince
Philip of Greece and
Denmark, will travel to
Athens with the
Duchess of Cornwall
today, on their first
official visit to the
country as a couple.
They were due to travel
from France, where they
visited Les Halles de
Lyon Paul Bocuse food
market in Lyons
yesterday.
Clarence House said
that Charles had
accepted the invitation
to Greece — a rare
move because of the
country’s fraught history
with the British
monarchy — despite its
proximity to the
wedding of Prince Harry
and Meghan Markle this
month. “Apart from
anything else, Greece is
in my blood and I have
Prince Charles and the
Duchess of Cornwall tried
local delicacies at a food
market in Lyons yesterday
before travelling to Athens
long had a fascination
for her ancient culture
and history, not to
mention the fact that I
have been so fortunate
to have visited some of
Greece’s many beautiful
and unique places,”
Charles told Kathimerini,
the Athens newspaper.
The Queen, the most
widely travelled head of
state, has shunned
Greece because of its
traumatic impact on the
life of the Duke of
Edinburgh. Prince
Philip and his family
fled the country in 1922,
fearing execution after
Philip’s uncle, King
Constantine I, was
forced to abdicate.
Philip renounced his
Greek royal titles before
his marriage to the
Queen. Charles’s three-
day visit to Greece
comes as the Prince’s
Trust International
expands its operation to
the country, eight years
into a devastating debt
crisis. “Knowing that
Greece, and so many
Greeks, have been going
through such a very
difficult time in recent
India rejects illegal migrants deal
amid fears of mass deportations
Hugh Tomlinson Delhi
Richard Ford Home Correspondent
India has backed out of an agreement
on the return of illegal immigrants from
Britain amid fears of mass deportations, according to a local report.
Narendra Modi, the prime minister,
visited London for a summit of Commonwealth leaders last month, signing
investment deals and holding talks with
the Queen, Theresa May and cabinet
ministers. One agreement tabled on the
trip was left unsigned, however, as his
government cited concerns about a
British proposal to speed up the removal of Indian illegal immigrants.
Up to 100,000 people of Indian origin
are thought to be living in Britain illegally, the highest number by nationality. The number removed either forcibly
or voluntarily from the UK fell by 45 per
cent from 7,724 in 2014 to 4,254 last
year, according to the Home Office.
Britain’s proposal would have stream-
lined and accelerated that process but
Mr Modi balked at the last minute.
Indian government officials told the
Hindustan newspaper that Delhi’s concerns included a “fear of mass deportation, a consent clause and possible
security breaches”. The Commonwealth summit was under way as the
Windrush scandal broke. Although it is
unclear if this influenced Mr Modi’s decision, it may cloud future negotiations.
India has been frustrated by the British government’s stance on immigration as it holds exploratory talks about
a free trade agreement when Britain
leaves the European Union. Talks have
foundered on India’s demand for a
relaxation of immigration targets,
particularly for students, and the confusion around Britain’s Brexit strategy.
British officials said that the agreement on illegal immigration had been
very close and were hopeful that a deal
could be done once Indian fears were
allayed. The UK said the agreement
only codified existing immigration
rules and that several countries with
the highest number of illegal immigrants, including China, Pakistan and
Nigeria, had signed similar deals.
A spokesman for the British high
commission in Delhi said that the UK
had made clear that immigration was
Narendra Modi did
not sign the deal in
London last month
negotiable but that Britain wanted
more consistency from India on taking
back illegal immigrants in return. “The
government wants discernible progress
on returns . . . It is not clear to us what
they want,” the spokesman said.
One Indian official said that Delhi
was worried that a large number of
Indians could be returned “without any
humanitarian consideration”.
Under the proposal, tabled before the
Windrush scandal, the Home Office
would process the cases of Indians with
a passport within 17 days, before determining whether they faced removal.
Those without documentation would
be processed within 70 days. India also
wants a “consent clause” that would
give migrants the right to approve UK
efforts to ascertain their nationality.
Delhi did not respond to a request for
comment on Mr Modi’s decision. A
memorandum
of
understanding
(MoU) was initialled in January and no
date had been set for a formal signing.
The Home Office said: “The agreement paves the way for a quicker and
more efficient process for documenting
and returning Indian nationals who are
in the UK illegally. We look forward to
further discussions with the government of India on this MoU and hope it
will be ratified and implemented soon.”
Police twice returned weapons to shotgun killer
Gabriella Swerling
Northern Correspondent
A man who shot another man dead and
tried to blame his 14-year-old son had
had his shotguns returned by police
twice before the attack.
Matthew Moseley, 50, was sentenced
at Preston crown court yesterday to at
least 26 years in prison for killing Lee
Holt, 32, last October. He shot Mr Holt
in the chest at close range when Mr
Holt confronted him on his doorstep in
Oswaldtwistle, near Accrington in
Lancashire, over a dispute between
their sons.
Moseley, a clay pigeon-shooting
enthusiast, legally owned 24 weapons,
but had twice handed them over to
police after threatening his neighbours.
The guns were returned both times.
Neighbours said that Mr Holt might
still be alive if they had not been. Lancashire police has referred itself to the
Independent Office for Police Conduct.
Richard Slater blamed police blun-
ders for the murder on October 25. He
wrote on Facebook: “You had many
many chances over the years . . . to stop
this happening. But you still kept giving
the guns back after incidents.”
Another neighbour, who did not
want to be named, said: “Matt is an
absolute lunatic and made his neighbours’ lives hell for years . . . If the police
had been tougher on him, he would
have had his guns taken from him and
Lee Holt would still be alive.”
After shooting Mr Holt, Moseley
handed his Beretta shotgun to his son,
Thomas, saying: “Tell them you done it,
’cos you can’t get done for it.”
Moseley denied the charge in court,
and Thomas at first accepted the blame
“out of love and loyalty”, Mr Justice
Bryan said. Passing sentence, the judge
told Moseley: “How any father could do
that to their son is difficult enough to
comprehend, but what is truly incomprehensible is the cynical way in which
you sought to manipulate and pressurise [him] into accepting responsibility.”
years, I wanted to find a
way — however small
and inadequate — to
help the young people of
Greece achieve their full
potential, whether
through skills training
or by assisting them to
set up their own
enterprises,” he said.
Matthew Parris, page 24
Old transplant
drug may have
a fringe benefit
Tom Whipple Science Editor
What mattered to the first patients who
took cyclosporine A was that it made
their bone-marrow transplants work;
few thought to mention the lustrousness of their hair and renewed vigour of
their scalp. Now, though, scientists
have investigated — and believe the
drug may hold the key to a truly
effective baldness treatment.
Patients began using cyclosporine A
in the Eighties and it is now prescribed
for dozens of conditions, including
rheumatoid arthritis. Like all immunosuppressants it has serious side-effects,
so hirsutism was never considered a big
downside. Neither, though, was it seriously considered an upside.
Increasing your vulnerability to infection to reverse hair loss is not a risk
many would take. But a team at the University of Manchester think they have
found a way to mimic the effect without
the serious consequences.
Nathan Hawkshaw, at the time of the
research a PhD student, found that the
drug decreased production of the protein SFRP1, which acts as a brake on the
growth of some tissues, among them
hair follicles. He and his colleagues
then learnt that another compound
already existed that was designed to
target SFRP1 — and not do much else.
In a paper in Plos Biology they wrote
that the compound enhanced follicle
growth better than cyclosporine A, and
Dr Hawkshaw believes that it could
work as a topical hair treatment.
However, since the test follicles were
healthy, it is not known whether balding could be reversed.
If the compound turns out to be safe
and effective, it will still take several
years to make it onto the market.
8
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
News
News Politics
Johnson dares May to
fire him over customs
Sam Coates, Francis Elliott
Boris Johnson has challenged the
prime minister to sack him by indicating that he has no intention of quitting
the cabinet despite branding her
favoured customs plan “crazy”.
Downing Street tried to sidestep a
confrontation with the foreign secretary yesterday after he said that
Theresa May’s proposed customs partnership would create a “whole new web
of bureaucracy”. Friends of Mr Johnson
said he would not resign. “Why should
he?” asked one. “He knows it’s better to
fight for this on the inside.”
No 10 said that Mrs May continued to
have full confidence in Mr Johnson but
declined to say whether she had spoken
privately with him about his comments.
The prime minister’s spokesman
added that the entire cabinet had
signed up to the two customs models
put forward by the government last
August. “Following last week’s subcommittee meeting, it was agreed that
there are unresolved issues in relation
to both models and that further work is
needed,” he said. “The prime minister
asked officials to take forward that
Boris Johnson
arrives at No 10
yesterday after
making his views
known
work as a priority.” Mr Johnson faced
Mrs May across the cabinet table yesterday, hours after making his comments. Two weeks ago he attacked her
customs partnership in a cabinet meeting but the issue was not raised again.
While Mrs May has not entirely
given up on her favoured plan — under
which the UK would collect Brussels’s
tariffs on its behalf — there were signs
last night of a shift towards the alternative “max-fac” proposal, which
would rely on technology to minimise
checks at the border. Plans for an entirely new option are also said to be in
progress. The issue has been postponed
until next week to allow more time for
officials to develop proposals.
Mrs May’s team is trying to engage
David Davis, the Brexit secretary,
rather than Mr Johnson in the search
for a solution. Tensions within the Con-
Where cabinet stands on partnership plan
Boris Johnson
The most vehement
critic of the customs
plan has been
complaining about it in
private for weeks.
Chance of being
swayed in favour 0/5
David Lidington
A former Europe
minister, he
understands the
complexities of Brexit
and as Mrs May’s defacto deputy, he will be
loyal to her.
Chance of being
swayed against 1/5
Philip Hammond
In last week’s meeting
he led the propartnership debate.
Chance of being
swayed against 0/5
Sajid Javid
The key voter that
turned the tide against
Mrs May after he
rejected her plan on the
basis that he thought it
was so complex as to be
unworkable. However,
some believe he could
be persuaded to turn.
Chance of being
swayed in favour 3/5
David Davis
Some around the prime
minister think he is
open to persuasion if
the proposals are
tweaked and rebranded,
letting him take some of
the credit.
Chance of being
swayed in favour 3/5
Liam Fox
The trade secretary
fears implementation of
the partnership would
prevent the UK from
striking free trade deals
for at least five years
after Brexit.
Chance of being
swayed in favour 2/5
Greg Clark
The business secretary
warned the cabinet last
week that even
streamlined customs
checks could lead large
servative Party have been rising sharply. Prominent MPs such as Sir Nicholas
Soames tweeted over the weekend that
hardline Brexiteers such as Jacob ReesMogg should stop their campaign
against the customs partnership.
Dominic Grieve, the former Conservative attorney-general, said yesterday that Mr Johnson’s decision to speak
out was “regrettable” but that he could
understand why Mrs May was willing
to put up with his “outbursts”. Mr
Grieve told the BBC: “I can well understand that seeing the difficult issues
that we are having to confront, which
are very divisive, the prime minister
should accept these rather extraordinary bursts of misbehaviour by Boris.”
An unnamed cabinet minister told
the Conservative Home website that
Mrs May should ignore pro-Remain
Tory MPs who claim that they could
foreign investors such
as Toyota and Nissan to
move their operations
to the Continent.
Chance of being
swayed against 2/5
Michael Gove
Seen by some in No 10
as potentially swayable
if changes are made.
Chance of being
swayed in favour 3/5
Gavin Williamson
The defence secretary
voted remain but has
become increasingly
Eurosceptic. Likely to
change positions if
others move as well.
Chance of being
swayed in favour 4/5
Karen Bradley
The May loyalist and
Northern Ireland
secretary is in favour of
the partnership and is
likely to back any other
plan put forward by
Downing Street.
Chance of being
swayed against 2/5
defeat her and force her to stay in the
customs union. “We have managed to
let this narrative establish that the
Commons doesn’t support customs
union exit and frankly we have only
ourselves to blame. I think we will need
to vote on it, and we have a very decent
chance of winning but it will be tight.”
Mr Johnson returned to London for
the weekly meeting of the cabinet after
a visit to the United States. In an interview with the Daily Mail, he said that
the customs partnership plan would
not comply with promises to take back
control and would hamper the UK’s
ability to strike trade deals. “It’s totally
untried and would make it very, very
difficult to do free trade deals. If you
have the new customs partnership, you
have a crazy system whereby you end
up collecting the tariffs on behalf of the
EU at the UK frontier,” he said.
EU students
put off British
universities
Nicola Woolcock
Education Correspondent
Thousands of EU students plan to avoid
studying at British universities because
of Brexit and do not realise that tuition
fees for the next academic year are protected, according to a global study.
The annual International Student
Survey found that Brexit had deterred
almost two fifths of prospective EU students but had put off only one in ten of
potential students from outside Europe.
Nearly a third of EU respondents
were not aware that students starting
degrees in Britain in 2018-19 will pay
the same fees as domestic students for
the duration of their course.
The survey by QS Enrolment Solutions questioned 67,000 students, of 191
nationalities, of whom 28,000 had considered studying in the UK. It found
that students from countries outside
the EU — including Pakistan, Sudan,
Ethiopia and China — were more likely
to be interested in studying in the UK as
a result of Brexit, largely because of the
drop in the value of the pound.
Giving international students a
strong sense that they were welcome
was crucial to maintaining the UK’s
status as a top international study
destination, the researchers said, with
69 per cent of respondents saying it was
an important consideration.
The sixth annual report added: “Now
is the time for the UK government to
work with the higher education sector
to develop a programme of engagement in key target markets to help
promote one of the UK’s greatest
exports — higher education.”
Sir Keith Burnett, vice-chancellor of
Sheffield University, said: “The power
of the [#WeAreInternational] campaign comes from its central truth, that
education and knowledge at its best
transcends borders and talent speaks to
talent across the world.
“Yet for this to be the case, international
students and scholars must know that
they are welcome.”
Rebels all round as Lords vote to stay in single market
Sam Coates Deputy Political Editor
Bruno Waterfield Brussels
The House of Lords voted to keep
Britain in the single market last night,
causing headaches for both Theresa
May and Jeremy Corbyn.
The government was defeated on an
amendment that would have forced
Britain to remain a member of the
European Economic Area (EEA) by 247
votes to 218, with rebels from both
parties. Mr Corbyn had ordered his
peers to abstain but 83 ignored him and
17 Tories abstained to deliver one of
four defeats last night on the government’s Brexit legislation, amid signs of
growing discord in the Lords.
Ministers must now decide whether
to undo 14 amendments to the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill when the
legislation returns to the Commons.
The House of Lords backed a move to
allow Britain’s continued participation
in EU agencies by 298 votes to 227, a
majority of 71. The measure will ensure
that future EU laws can be replicated
on the UK statute book.
The Lords also defeated the government by voting to remove the Brexit
date of March 29 next year from the bill.
This passed by 311 to 233.
The fourth defeat was on calls to
strengthen scrutiny of secondary legislation made by ministers after Brexit. A
cross-party amendment was backed by
225 votes to 194. There were signs of
strain in the Lords, which is dominated
by peers who supported Britain remaining in the EU. The division lists
showed that Lord Heseltine, the former
deputy prime minister, and Lord Patten
of Barnes, the former cabinet minister,
rebelled against the government.
Lord Forsyth of Drumlean, the Tory
former cabinet minister and prominent
Brexiteer, said it sometimes felt as if
“one has wandered into the film
Groundhog Day”, hearing the same
arguments over and over again.
“It is true that it’s the job of this House
to ask the House of Commons to think
again,” he said, “but to think again
about the legislation that we are actually debating, not to think again about
policy matters which members of this
House do not agree with.”
He accused Lord Alli, the Labour
peer, Lord Mandelson, the former
European trade commissioner, and
other supporters of the amendments of
“seeking to undermine” the government’s negotiating position. “There are
a number of people in this House who
wish to reverse the decision of the
British people,” he said.
A former Labour minister offered a
wager that Britain would not leave the
EU on March 29. Lord Foulkes of Cum-
nock said that he was prepared to put
up at least £10 and challenged Lord
Callanan, the Brexit minister, to accept
the bet. He refused, saying that he was
unsure the Lords’ rules allowed “gambling across the floor”.
Lord Mandelson told peers not to be
bullied and to do what was right for the
country, saying it was not possible to
achieve the trade agreement the
government wanted.
Lord Alli said that continued membership of the EEA was vital to ensure
the future profitability of Britain’s
export business.
6 EU leaders are demanding “very substantial progress” on the Irish border at
a meeting next month or trade talks will
be stopped. An EU ambassador said the
bloc would trigger an “anti-backsliding” clause unless Theresa May tabled a customs plan which is acceptable
by Brussels to avoid a hard border.
Corbyn critic
quits to be
deputy mayor
T
he Labour MP Heidi
Alexander has announced
that she is stepping down
from parliament to take
up a role at City Hall as
Sadiq Khan’s deputy mayor for
transport (Lucy Fisher writes).
Her departure will start a fierce
battle for the Labour candidacy in
her safe seat of Lewisham East,
where she won a majority of 21,123
votes last year.
Ms Alexander, 43, first entered
parliament in 2010 and served as
shadow health secretary under
Jeremy Corbyn before she quit
Tory MP
Lucy Fisher
The pressure on John Bercow grew last
night after a select committee chairwoman called on the clerk of the House
of Commons to intervene in the dispute
over the Speaker’s behaviour.
Maria Miller, who leads the women
and equalities select committee, revealed that she had written to David
Natzler to request an update about the
process that Mr Bercow would face in
response to bullying allegations made
against him.
The Conservative MP first asked the
Speaker to make a personal statement
responding to the claims last Wednesday. Using a point of order in the House,
Ms Miller also raised the issue of
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
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News
News
TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER RICHARD POHLE
Heidi Alexander at
the Labour party
conference in 2015.
She later quit the
front bench,
describing it as a
dysfunctional team
Labour councillor
rejected definition
of antisemitism
Lucy Fisher
Senior Political Correspondent
during the cascade of frontbench
resignations in 2016. In the aftermath
she accused him of running a
dysfunctional team and said she had
“hated being part of something so
inept, so unprofessional, so shoddy”.
She has come under intense pressure
from hard-left activists in her
southeast London seat since.
A former deputy mayor of
Lewisham, Ms Alexander will
replace Val Shawcross, who is set to
retire in the summer, at City Hall.
Ms Alexander said yesterday that
it was important all Londoners had
“access to a high-quality and
affordable public transport network,
with safe cycling routes across the
capital”. “London is a fantastic city,”
she said. “I know Sadiq wants its
transport system to be the envy of
the world and I am looking forward
to playing my part in making that
happen.”
Mr Khan thanked Ms Shawcross
for her “exceptional service” and
said that his new deputy was
respected across the political divide
as a parliamentarian and
campaigner. He also called for more
investment in London’s young
people as soaring violence
continued in the capital. A 13-yearold boy was among two teenagers
injured by a shotgun blast in
Wealdstone, northwest London, at
the weekend.
Since quitting the front bench, Ms
Alexander has campaigned against a
hard Brexit, tabling a motion to stop
the Article 50 letter triggering the
UK’s EU withdrawal.
Mr Corbyn thanked Ms Alexander
for her service to her constituents
and in the shadow cabinet. He
wished her well in her new role,
adding: “I know she will put her
talents and knowledge to great use
for the people of London.”
Labour’s national executive
committee (NEC), which is
dominated by Corbyn loyalists, will
now draw up a shortlist for the byelection for the seat. Moderates,
who control the local party
executive, are set to battle
Momentum activists and trade
unionists for the nomination. Local
party sources expressed concern
that centrist candidates could be
kept off the shortlist by the NEC.
Mr Corbyn’s former political
secretary, Katy Clark, Nadine
Houghton of the GMB union, and
the Momentum-backed NEC
member Claudia Webbe have been
tipped as possible candidates.
Several Labour MPs have
stepped down to take jobs outside
Westminster since Mr Corbyn won
the leadership, including Andy
Burnham and Steve Rotheram
who are now the metro mayors of
the Manchester and Liverpool city
regions respectively.
piles more pressure on Bercow
clauses being used in settlement agreements which served to silence former
employees from speaking out about
potential wrongdoing.
Angus Sinclair, the Speaker’s former
private secretary, has accused Mr Bercow of physically intimidating, demeaning and mimicking him before he
took “compulsory early retirement” in
2010. He was paid almost £90,000 on
condition that he signed confidentiality
clauses which barred him from speaking out. He has since broken the terms
of the agreement.
Mr Bercow has denied all allegations
of bullying.
Yesterday Ms Miller told The Times
that Mr Bercow’s response to her intervention in the Commons had been
“wholly unsatisfactory” and she
accused him of evasion. Ms Miller has
written to Mr Natzler to record her “disappointment” and “unhappiness” with
the Speaker’s reply. She also asked for
clarity on the process for triggering
investigations against senior Commons figures in future. She said: “We
need to ensure that allegations like
these [against Mr Bercow] do not rely
on backbenchers to raise them. It cannot be left to individual backbenchers
to have the courage to speak out.”
Andrew Bridgen, the Conservative
backbencher, reported Mr Bercow to
the parliamentary standards watchdog
last week. The MP for North West
Leicestershire accused the Speaker
yesterday of “political manoeuvring” in
hosting an event for Grenfell survivors
in Speaker’s House. Mr Bridgen said of
the event: “This is nothing less than a
cynical attempt by the Speaker to use
the ashes of the Grenfell tragedy to
wipe away the bullying allegations
against him.”
The Speaker’s spokeswoman said:
“Mr Speaker was invited to an event on
December 12, 2017, to mark the sixmonth anniversary of the Grenfell
Tower tragedy. At that event, he offered
the survivors and the families of victims
the use of state rooms in Speaker’s
House to meet parliamentarians — and
that was the reception we held today.
The event was very well attended and
Mr Speaker’s address was very warmly
received.”
The Haringey councillor backed by
Labour members to lead the party
group in the north London borough
refused to back a motion last year to
adopt the international definition of
antisemitism.
Zena Brabazon, who is Jewish,
declined to support the attempt led by
the local party to adopt the definition
last July. The motion was passed unanimously, but Ms Brabazon abstained
and instead went up to the public gallery where activists, understood to be
linked to Momentum, heckled the Labour council leader who introduced it.
Ms Brabazon told The Times that she
objected to the motion because she felt
it confused two separate issues: legitimate concerns about Israeli government policies and condemnation of
antisemitism.
The definition, from the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, states: “Antisemitism is a certain
perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of antisemitism are directed toward Jewish
or non-Jewish individuals and/or their
property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.”
It has been adopted by the British
government and other official bodies.
The chief whip accepted her viewpoint on the grounds of conscience, Ms
Brabazon said. “I went to the gallery for
no more than 30 seconds and left. I did
not, and would not, participate in any
heckling,” she added.
Ms Brabazon is said to have accused
another Jewish councillor of “bagelbarrel politics” in the past. Two sources
told The Times they once witnessed her
direct the phrase at Joe Goldberg. In addition, the two Labour insiders accused
her of comparing the forced academisation of a school to Nazi stormtroopers
smashing synagogues during Kristallnacht. She was alleged to have made the
comment during a Labour group meeting about five years ago.
Ms Brabazon denied accusing Mr
Goldberg of bagel-barrel politics and
claimed she had not spoken to him
more than once in the past eight years.
Zena Brabazon, with Jeremy Corbyn,
is set to be Haringey council leader
She also denied the alleged reference to
Kristallnacht, adding: “I have never
made any reference to Kristallnacht,
not in any debate or discussion in any
meeting.” She was the frontrunner to be
elected council leader last night.
Separately, as Labour seeks to contain the fallout from the row about its
handling of antisemitism in its ranks, a
Jewish activist yesterday complained
about his apparent last-minute exclusion from a party meeting on the issue.
Adam Langleben lost his council seat
in the borough of Barnet last week. He
claimed that the party had been punished by voters locally for the failure to
stamp out anti-Jewish behaviour.
He tweeted yesterday: “Just before
the election I was invited with others
from @JewishLabour to attend the
@UKLabour NEC Working Group on
Antisemitism meeting today at 4. I have
just been uninvited along with others.
Apparently a ‘misunderstanding’.”
Party insiders claimed he had been
disinvited because he had criticised
Jeremy Corbyn.
A Labour source said: “Jennie
Formby has written to Adam Langleben to clarify that the invitation was
only extended to people with a role in
Labour’s disciplinary process.”
6 Yesterday it emerged that Keith Vaz,
the Labour MP, had written a letter of
support in February for an activist who
was expelled from the party last month
after a confrontation with a Jewish MP.
Mr Vaz defended Marc Wadsworth, a
veteran black rights campaigner, and
said it would be a “horrible injustice” if
he were punished beyond the suspension he had already received.
Shadow minister sacked
for bullying her advisers
Georgie Keate
Labour sacked its welfare chief last
night after a party investigation upheld
complaints that she had bullied staff.
Debbie Abrahams, shadow secretary
of state for work and pensions since
2016, was asked to stand aside in March
after the complaints emerged. Margaret Greenwood, the MP for Wirral
West, was appointed to take over her
role in the interim.
The inquiry into the allegations
against Ms Abrahams identified a pattern of bullying by the Oldham East &
Saddleworth MP towards her staff, employed by the party. Her political advisers were found to have been particular
targets. She has denied the allegations.
It is thought that the complainants
were supported by witnesses.
A spokesman for Labour said: “After
a thorough party investigation into
allegations of workplace bullying,
Debbie Abrahams has been referred to
the NEC disputes committee. She has
been relieved of her post.”
In March, Ms Abrahams, 57, said she
had been given no details about the
claim against her, and that she had not
agreed to step aside. She accused “certain individuals” in Jeremy Corbyn’s
office of “aggressive, intimidating” behaviour. “My treatment . . . has shown a
bullying culture of the worst kind,” she
said. “I am making a formal complaint
to both the Labour Party and parliamentary authorities.”
Last night, Ms Abrahams said: “I
strongly refute the allegations of bullying made against me. I believe the investigation was not thorough, fair or independent. I will continue to represent
the people of Oldham East & Saddleworth, and to hold this government to
account from the back benches.”
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
11
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News
Times writer’s haunting tale of tsunami wins literature prize
Jack Malvern
The story of the survivors of the 120ft
tsunami that smashed into the
Japanese coast in 2011, told by a Times
journalist, has won the Rathbones
Folio Prize.
Ghosts of the Tsunami, by Richard
Lloyd Parry, was the second non-fiction
book to receive the £20,000 prize.
The judges described the book as “a
work of literary non-fiction that travels
deep into the grief, the trauma and the
mysteries of the remote communities
that lived through the Japanese earthquake and tsunami”.
Lloyd Parry, Asia editor for The
Times, spent six years reporting in the
disaster zone left by the wave, which led
to the deaths of at least 18,000 people. It
was the highest single loss of life since
Nagasaki was destroyed by an atomic
bomb in the final days of the Second
World War.
The Folio Prize, first awarded in 2014,
is open to all forms of literature written
in English and published in the UK. The
judging panel, led by the novelist Jim
Crace, said that Lloyd Parry’s book was
“a piece of heightened reportage about
the 2011 Japanese earthquake and its
devastating aftermaths, rendered as
great literature”.
He added: “It is both harrowing and
inspiring. Here is a book which not only
interprets for a non-Japanese reader
the subtleties and complexities of that
nation’s life, especially its family life and
how it copes with grief, but also has the
depth and reach to close the gaps
between other nations, other cultures.
Read it and you will be changed for the
better.” The book’s title comes from
Lloyd Parry’s encounters with reports
of ghosts and hauntings caused by the
shock of the disaster.
The New York Times described the
book as the story of people trying to
find consolation amid the ruins of their
homeland in a “fractured portrait of a
country we’re more accustomed to
seeing as a polished whole”.
Crace, who was nominated for the
Man Booker Prize for Harvest and
Quarantine, said that he wished to judge
the prize because it considered fiction
and non-fiction for the same award.
“Anybody who writes or reads fiction or
poetry is bound to recognise their dependence on the facts of the observed
world — non-fiction, in other words,”
he said. “So it is immensely satisfying to
play a part in judging a literary prize
that recognises and celebrates that
close connection and considers works
in all three genres. What matters is
depth of insight and magnificence of
expression, no matter whether they
have been occasioned by a real world or
an imagined one.”
BASÝLICA DE LA SAGRADA FAMÝLIA; BRUCE ADAMS/DAILY MAIL/SOLO SYNDICATION
Sandstone from Brinscall
Quarry, far left, is being
used to complete and
restore the towers and
statues of Antoni Gaudí’s
cathedral in Barcelona
Made in Chorley: stone
gives Familia face a lift
I
t attracts millions of
tourists from all
over the world and
is revered as an
architectural
wonder, despite being
incomplete (Gabriella
Swerling writes).
Yet the Sagrada
Familia cathedral in
Barcelona is less exotic
than sightseers may
think. The stone being
used to complete Antoni
Gaudí’s modernist
structure — on which
construction began in
the 1880s — was hewn
from just outside the
market town of Chorley
in Lancashire.
When Gaudí died in
1926 his cathedral was
only a quarter complete
but work has continued
since. Its completion is
set to coincide with the
centenary of its
architect’s death.
Brinscall Quarry is
one of seven in the world
chosen as a supplier: its
sandstone is hardwearing and the right
light brown. Emma
Armstrong, whose
family company,
Armstrongs Aggregate,
owns the quarry, said:
“It all started when we
just had a call out of the
blue. You have to pinch
yourself that you’re
involved in something
millions of people visit
every year. We’re quite
modest in our own way,
with five quarries and a
workforce of 170 local
people. We supply stone
for architectural
projects locally,
including a few
footballers’ houses,
and we made a seven-metre obelisk for
Bolton council to
commemorate the
centenary of Gallipoli . . .
It’s very humbling to be
involved in something as
famous as Gaudí’s
cathedral.”
The company was
approached five years
ago. The stone, which is
particularly resistant to
pollution and
weathering, is cut on
two sides to check its
quality before being
taken in five to 20-tonne
loads by road.
The Lancashire stone
has replaced some of the
cathedral’s oldest
masonry and is also
being used on the
towers, some of which
will be more than 550ft
high.
“The
“There’s
still a lot to
an we’re due to
do and
sup
supply
them for
an
another
five years,”
M Armstrong told
Ms
M Online.
Mail
Building has
b
been
slow because
th cathedral relies
the
on private
do
donations.
Con
Construction
was
also interrupted by the
Spanis civil war.
Spanish
Rape cases at risk after ‘forensic errors’
Fiona Hamilton Crime Editor
More than 30 criminal investigations
into cases including rape and sexual
assault could have been compromised
after a forensic scientist allegedly mishandled examinations at Britain’s biggest police force.
Scotland Yard said that a member of
its forensic services unit had been
suspended and an urgent review was
being carried out into whether anyone
had been wrongly convicted or escaped
conviction on the strength of flawed
evidence.
A spokeswoman for the Metropolitan Police said that the scientist did
not complete the requisite forensics
tests and in some cases “wrongly informed investigators about the
progress of forensic examinations”.
An internal review found that 33
separate criminal investigations were
affected, 21 relating to rapes and other
sexual assaults. The remaining 12 were
investigations into violence, burglary
and drugs offences.
The cases related to crimes where
Behind the story
I
t will take some
time to get to the
bottom of the
alleged forensics
failures but
yesterday’s
announcement raises
more concerns about
the quality of
investigative work at
Scotland Yard (Fiona
Hamilton writes).
The revelation that
33 criminal cases may
have been
compromised by
inadequate forensics
work comes hot on
the heels of the
review of all open sex
abuse cases after two
court cases collapsed
in a week. Both
related to failure to
disclose material that
assisted the defence.
Mistakes were also
made in Operation
Midland, the Met’s
disastrous inquiry
into false allegations
of a historical
paedophile ring. A
retired judge said that
the inquiry was
“riddled with errors”,
including a failure by
detectives to make
basic inquiries to
corroborate wild
claims of abuse.
Budget cuts have
stretched the force
and the cut in officer
numbers is
undoubtedly a
contributing factor.
However, some of the
mistakes are quite
basic and cannot be
blamed on austerity.
It is vital that the
public have
confidence that police
will carry out
investigations fairly
and properly, to
ensure that victims
and witnesses come
forward and to
maintain public trust.
Cuts mean that, in
some circumstances,
the Met will no longer
take on lower level
inquiries such as
shoplifting and public
order offences. It is
more important than
ever that when the
Met does investigate,
it gets it right.
items were submitted for forensic examination between 2012 and last year.
The staff member was suspended on
March 26 after performance concerns
were raised and a review of cases
showed anomalies. It is understood
that the scientist is accused of misleading superiors in relation to the progress
that had been made on specific cases.
There are allegations that some sample
analysis was not carried out when it
should have been.
The spokeswoman said: “We are
urgently conducting a review to understand whether there is any risk to the
criminal justice process and to take
remedial action where necessary. All
victims in the affected cases have been
contacted, where it has been deemed
appropriate to do so.”
The force was unable to say how
many of the cases had been concluded
and how many resulted in convictions.
The review will seek to determine if any
innocent people were wrongly convicted or if any parties have escaped conviction on the strength of flawed evidence. The Met has carried out a full
audit of scientists’ workloads within the
department and said that it was “satisfied that there are no other instances of
undeclared casework”.
The case will raise more concerns
about the quality of forensics services
after the government’s decision to close
the state-run Forensic Science Service
in 2012. Police forces either outsourced
their work to private companies or took
the work in-house, as the Met did.
There is a separate investigation into
alleged manipulation of data at Randox, a private forensics firm, amid fears
that thousands of convictions for
crimes including murder, rape and
assault may be ruled unsafe. About
10,000 cases were affected across 42
police forces. Three quarters of cases
related to drug-driving while the rest
were violent crime, sexual offences and
unexplained deaths.
The Met case has been referred to the
Forensic Science Regulator. In the case
of the rape and sexual assault investigations, victims have been contacted by a
sexual offences investigative techniques officer, the Met said.
12
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
News
TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER JAMES GLOSSOP
Overworked
GPs mean fewer
patients can see
their first choice
Kat Lay Health Correspondent
Patients’ ability to see the GP they want
has declined by 27 per cent over five
years, despite government pledges to
improve continuity of care.
Researchers from the University of
Leicester said that the fall was an inevitable casualty of mounting workload.
The study, published in the British
Journal of General Practice, was based
on responses to the national GP patient
survey at 6,243 surgeries in England
with more than one doctor.
People were asked whether they had
a preferred GP and, if so, whether they
saw that GP always or almost always, or
a lot of the time. The researchers used
the answers to calculate a “continuity”
score, which fell from 37.5 per cent in
2012 to 27.2 per cent last year. They said
that the decline was widespread and
“not linked to areas of poverty; it is
slightly better for non-white ethnicity
and slightly worse if elderly, living in the
north or having a long-term condition”.
All NHS patients in England are
supposed to have a named GP responsible for their care at the surgery where
they are registered, under a contract
introduced in 2015. However, the researchers said that this had failed to
halt the decline.
Where patients are able to develop a
relationship with a chosen GP, it has
been linked to better health outcomes
and fewer hospital admissions.
Louis Levene, who led the research,
said: “Being able to see a preferred GP
helps many patients, but it has declined
markedly in the last five years, an unintentional and inevitable casualty of the
mounting workload pressures faced by
general practices across England.”
He added that there needed to be
sufficient resources to tackle the causes
behind the lack of continuity.
A shortage of family doctors is caus-
ing widespread pressures in primary
care, with patients having to wait, on
average, two weeks for an appointment.
Kamila Hawthorne, vice-chairwoman of the Royal College of GPs,
said: “It’s disappointing but understandable to read that, according to this
paper, continuity of care is reducing,
but GPs across the country are striving
to provide continuity, even if not in the
traditional sense. Some practices are
using innovative approaches whereby
patients might not always see the same
GP, but they will see, and build relationships with, one of a small team who will
all have access to their medical
records.”
The Department of Health and
Social Care said: “We want to ensure
that everyone has access to GP
services, including routine appointments at evenings and weekends . . .
We’re investing an extra £2.4 billion a
year into general practice by 2021 and
will recruit an additional 5,000
doctors.”
6 Pharmaceutical companies charge
far too much for new cancer drugs, say
researchers who have proposed an
algorithm to determine prices. The calculation by scientists from Erasumus
University Rotterdam, published in the
journal Nature Reviews, takes account
of research and development costs,
manufacturing, sales, marketing and a
fair profit margin. Under this model the
prostate cancer drug enzalutamide
would cost about £2,300 a treatment; it
costs about £26,900 at present.
However, the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry said that
only a small fraction of treatments in
development reached patients and the
costs of those that did not work had to
be considered. Astellas, which makes
enzalutamide, said that it tried to address affordability by taking account of
socioeconomic and other factors.
Which is the fairest? Colourist works due to be sold by Sotheby’s next month can be viewed at Glasgow Art Club today
Pressure on NHS to give prostate screening
Chris Smyth Health Editor
Men aged 55 to 69 should have the right
to be screened for prostate cancer,
according to revised US guidance that
highlights a difficult decision faced by
millions in Britain.
Screening prevents 1.3 deaths from
prostate cancer for every 1,000 men
checked, but at a cost of between 20 and
50 men who have needless surgery or
radiotherapy for abnormalities that
would never have caused problems, an
expert review has concluded.
Men who opt for screening die on
average no later than men who do not,
suggesting that the unnecessary treatments may shorten lives, the review of
evidence found. The NHS has never
recommended screening because interventions for the high numbers of
false positives can make men impotent
or incontinent. Six years ago, the US
Preventive Services Task Force turned
against screening, saying that the
harms outweighed the benefits.
However, in the light of growing
evidence that screening can prevent
deaths, it has now softened its stance.
“For men aged 55 to 69 years, the decision to undergo periodic . . . screening
for prostate cancer should be an individual one and should include discussion of the potential benefits and harms
of screening with their clinician,” the
task force recommended in the Journal
of the American Medical Association.
“Screening offers a small potential
benefit of reducing the chance of death
from prostate cancer in some men.
However, many men will experience
potential harms of screening.”
The updated recommendations say
that doctors should carry out checks
only on men who actively ask for it, and
advises against it for men over 70.
British men over 50 are entitled to a
prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood
test after a discussion with a GP, but
doctors are often reluctant to offer it.
Iain Frame, of Prostate Cancer UK,
said: “Current diagnostic tests can’t distinguish early on between aggressive
cancers that could go on to kill and
those that may never cause any harm,
meaning that . . . screening has the
potential to do more harm than good.”
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
13
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News
Driverless Uber car ‘chose to hit’ woman who died
Katie Gibbons
A self-driving car operated by Uber that
killed a pedestrian allegedly detected
her as she crossed the road but “chose”
not to alter its course.
A software function meant that the
woman was categorised as a false positive to be ignored, according to an internal investigation. Company insiders
said that Elaine Herzberg, 49, and her
bicycle were acknowledged by the car’s
sensors but then dismissed, much as a
floating paper bag would have been.
The semi-autonomous Volvo SUV
drove into Ms Herzberg as she crossed
the road in Tempe, Arizona, on the
evening of March 18 and she died in
hospital that night. She was the first
person to be killed by a driverless
vehicle.
Sources told the Silicon Valley news
site The Information that the car’s
software had been tuned in such a way
that it decided that evasive action was
unnecessary. The Uber executives said
that the detection system’s threshold
may have been set to prevent constant
braking and swerving. Despite recent
technological breakthroughs that have
allowed carmakers to join Google,
Uber and other tech companies in the
race to autonomous vehicles, journeys
taken in driverless cars remain uncomfortable.
Since Ms Herzberg’s death, Uber has
suspended its tests of self-driving cars
while an investigation into safety protocols is carried out by the head of the
National Transportation Safety Board
(NTSB) in the US.
Cortica, a company that develops
artificial intelligence for self-driving
cars, analysed dashcam footage of the
incident and said that the computer
system had detected Ms Herzberg
0.9 seconds before impact, when the car
was about 50ft away.
There was a “safety driver” in the car
who was trained to take control manually if the automatic detection system
failed, but police footage revealed that
the Uber employee was looking down
moments before the crash.
A spokesman for Uber said: “We’re
actively co-operating with the NTSB in
their investigation. Out of respect for
that process and the trust we’ve built
TMS
diary@thetimes.co.uk | @timesdiary
Resigned to
the non-job
The resignation of Heidi
Alexander as MP for Lewisham
East means that the Manor of
Northstead will soon have a new
steward. The convention is that
MPs who wish to resign from the
Commons during a parliament do
so by taking one of two crown
offices, the other being Steward of
the Chiltern Hundreds. Jamie
Reed, who resigned 16 months ago
as MP for Copeland, can now lay
aside the burden of his non-job.
Reflecting on a “glorious tenure”,
he says: “Where there was discord,
I brought disinterest. Where there
was error, I tended to compound
it. Where there was doubt, I never
removed it. And where there was
despair, I positively revelled in it.”
Lewisham East, with a 21,000
majority, should be a safe Labour
hold, unless a Guardian columnist
messes it up for them again. In 1983
Polly Toynbee, the champagne
socialist par excellence, stood there
for the SDP and got more than
9,000 votes. Not enough to win but
it helped the Tories to beat Labour
by a whisker. Maybe Owen Jones
fancies testing his popularity?
too many popes
Marcus Fysh, MP for Yeovil, is
disturbed by photos of the singer
Rihanna wearing a spangly mitre
to a ball in New York, below.
“Dressing up as a sinister pearly
Pope is in bad taste and she looks
dreadful,” Fysh huffs. “At least
Madonna had style when
pushing boundaries.” The
Vatican didn’t say that about
Like a Prayer. . . My worry is
that Rihanna’s young fans,
who for once aren’t
outraged by a cultural
appropriation, will think
that she really is head
of the church. With
Francis and Benedict
XVI still alive, it
presents what Sherlock Holmes
would call a three-pope problem.
Baroness Neville-Rolfe is worried
about the effects of Brexit on her
viewing habits. Will she still be able
to watch Coronation Street, she
asked yesterday, when she goes on
holiday to the Med? Lord Ashton of
Hyde, the minister, said that the
government had bigger priorities at
the moment. They’re probably too
busy watching Deal or No Deal.
that sinking feeling
John Motson blows the whistle on
50 years as a BBC commentator
this weekend with his last Match of
the Day. Although best known for
football, Radio Times reminds us
that he has done other sports. At
the 1972 Olympics Motson
covered canoeing. As a Brit floated
past upside down, he said: “I don’t
want to be pessimistic, but British
hopes seem to be fading fast.” Four
years later, he gave wrestling a go.
It went well until he realised
halfway through a bout it was a
Russian, not a Bulgarian, in blue.
Continuing Hedgehog Awareness
Week, Jeremy Jones (and other
readers on a similar theme) wrote to
ask what is the difference between
the Houses of Parliament and a
hedgehog. Answer: a hedgehog has
its pricks on the outside.
curve ball for miliband
Ed Miliband will be delighted. The
Boston Red Sox, his favourite
baseball team, are coming to
London next year to play the New
York Yankees in the first Major
League match to be held in
Europe. Despite baseball being a
sport where, as Wodehouse
wrote, they say “at-a-boy!” when
they mean “well played, sir!”, it
is not all that bad. I am with Sir
Tom Stoppard, however, who,
comparing it with cricket, said:
“I don’t think I can take
seriously any game which
takes less than three days
to reach its conclusion.”
patrick kidd
with NTSB, we can’t comment on the
specifics of the incident.
“In the meantime, we have initiated a
top-to-bottom safety review of our selfdriving vehicles programme, and we
have brought on former NTSB chairman Christopher Hart to advise us on
our overall safety culture. Our review is
looking at everything from the safety of
our system to our training processes for
vehicle operators, and we hope to have
more to say soon.”
The report could prompt other selfdriving car companies to treat potential
false positives with more caution.
It was revealed in March that driverless cars could be on British roads by the
US safety investigators examining the
Volvo that drove into Elaine Herzberg
end of the year under plans to scrap the
requirement for a safety driver. Experts
continue to warn against the technology that relies on a human driver to
step in, however.
Christian Wolmar, a transport expert
and author, said of the report: “This
shows the limits of the technology: the
computer has to make decisions and
will get it wrong, just as humans do.”
Uber unveiled its “flying taxi” in California yesterday. The electric vehicle,
which the company hopes to introduce
within five years, is designed to fly
between 150mph and 200mph up to
2,000ft above the ground, and will
cover 60 miles on a single charge.
14
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
News
Police accused of naivety over World Cup risks
David Brown
British police are “terribly naive” about
the level of risk facing football fans who
travel to Russia for the World Cup, MPs
warned yesterday.
Ten thousand England supporters
are expected to visit Russia for World
Cup matches, two years after two were
left in comas and dozens more were
seriously injured by Russian hooligans
at the European Championship in
France. England play Tunisia in
Volgograd on June 18 in their first
World Cup game.
The British official co-ordinating the
safety of World Cup fans was among
the diplomats expelled by Russia after
the Salisbury nerve-agent attack on
Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia.
Deputy Chief Constable Mark
Roberts, national lead for football
policing, told the Commons’ foreign
affairs committee yesterday that
Russian officers had measures in place
to protect England supporters. But the
Labour MP Chris Bryant said: “There
has been plenty of evidence of the
Russian state winding up its supporters,
deliberately encouraging antagonism
towards other nationalities.
“What you are saying sounds terribly
naive,” he added.
Bob Seely, a Conservative MP, said
he was concerned that “there is an
undercurrent of significant violence,
and we have seen some of that violence
supported by the Russian state. None of
you is addressing the fact that there is
an undercurrent of political support for
extreme football violence. I don’t think
it is going to happen but if things do
turn nasty we . . . will not have the power
to protect those fans if there is organised violence against them.”
Ian Austin, a Labour MP, said that
Russian MPs had congratulated the
hooligans who attacked the England
fans in France, while Russia’s foreign
minister blamed other countries.
Mr Roberts, who will lead a team of
officers to Russia to advise local authorities and liaise with England fans, said
that the country had an “avowed intention to host a peaceful event”.
“I have every confidence that should
they deploy their security apparatus to
prevent disorder then they are perfectly able to do that,” he said. “I guess the
question is, is the desire there? Everything we have been told . . . is there is a
desire to do that?”
He said that Russian police would
have a “more paramilitary” approach
than fans in the UK were familiar with.
Kevin Miles, chief executive of the
Football Supporters’ Federation, said
that he could not recall an international
football tournament when there had
not been “dire warnings” about the
danger to supporters. He advised
lesbian, gay and bisexual fans to use
“instinct, common sense and exercise
caution” after the head of the Russian
gay football fans’ network was arrested
last week for holding a gay pride flag.
6 Police have finished gathering evidence on the Salisbury poisoning at all
sites except Mr Skripal’s home. A pub
and a restaurant were among the sites
that were cordoned off after the attack
on March 4; the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs will
oversee their decontamination. Moscow denies responsibility for the attack.
It’ll be fine . . . as long
as England make
their usual early exit
Patrick Kidd
Political Sketch
W
e have long been
used to the smell of
disappointment that
hangs over the
England football
team. Yet that feeling yesterday, as
MPs discussed the World Cup in
Russia, came not from the fear that
things could go badly on the pitch,
but from the suggestion that they
may pass without incident off it.
The foreign affairs committee had
summoned representatives of the
Football Association and the
Football Supporters’ Federation, and
the deputy chief constable in charge
of policing matches, to give evidence
on how dangerous the World Cup is
going to be for fans, and seemed put
out to be told that it will all be fine.
The Russian authorities have
given us their word that no one will
be beaten to a pulp by a policeman
for giving his horse a sideways look,
they said, nor will anyone be at risk
of having novichok smeared on their
breakfast toast instead of Nutella.
It’s all going to be OK. Chill out.
Sure, there were violent clashes with
Russians at a Euro 2016 match in
Marseilles, in which two England
fans were put in comas and 100
people were wounded, but that was
two years ago. Arsenal survived a
trip to Moscow last month, so the
World Cup will be trouble-free.
The MPs felt that this sounded
naive, and tried on several fronts to
get the witnesses to admit to
concerns. Each time, the shots were
deflected by the wall. They had been
given reassurances by Russia that
nothing will go wrong and so it
probably won’t. It reminded me of
the bit in The House at Pooh
Corner when a nervous
Piglet asks what would
happen if a tree fell down
when he was beneath it.
“Supposing it didn’t?”
Pooh replies. Chris
Bryant (Lab,
Rhondda) began
by declaring a
lack of interest.
“Wales are
boycotting the
tournament,” he
said, to the
irritation of the
two Scottish
members of the
committee who had
planned the same joke. And, indeed,
did make it when it was their turn.
Mr Bryant said there was
evidence of the Russian state
winding up its fans to be aggressive.
Ian Austin (Lab, Dudley North)
quoted a Russian MP as saying that
there’s nothing wrong with fans
fighting. Bob Seely (C, Isle of Wight)
added that “Russian politicians
think that beating the hell out of
each other is macho”. The witnesses
shrugged. Supposing they don’t beat
us up?
In any case, we will send some of
our own policemen to mingle with
the fans and act as “cultural
interpreters” to stop trouble before
it starts. Their job will be to soothe
the savage, tattooed breasts of fans
drowning their sorrows after a
no-score draw with Panama in
Nizhny Novgorod and suggest that
perhaps it isn’t a bright idea to
re-enact the Battle of Orgreave
against that line of men in riot gear.
One MP asked if these tourist
coppers will be in uniform. “Oh,
plain clothes,” the constable replied.
“It tends to wind them up if they see
a British policeman.”
The witnesses even spoke with
optimism about measures to get
supporters into Kaliningrad, the
Baltic sea port separated from the
rest of Russia by bits of Poland and
Lithuania where England will play
Belgium, in their final group match.
“They are preparing a fast track to
get across the border, cutting the
waiting time down to four hours,”
one said, explaining that it can be up
to 12 hours. “Frictionless borders
here we go,” purred Tom Tugendhat,
the committee chairman. Mr
Tugendhat did, though, get a rare
shot in near the end. Never mind the
group-stage venues, he said, “you
will be as confident as I am that we
[will] see England progress, and
presumably you’ve planned ahead
for that”. There was a pause. Then
the deputy chief constable
admitted: “I am more confident
about other things I’ve said
today.” No point wasting
time on something that
might never happen. Mr
Tugendhat had played
the Pooh tactic —
supposing we don’t get
knocked out early? —
and for once it troubled
the defence.
President Putin wants the
World Cup to present
Russia in a benign light
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
15
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News
DANNY LAWSON/PA; JAMES BELL/ALAMY; NASA
Cherry blossoms provide a splash of colour in Harrogate yesterday; a
golden end to the bank holiday weekend in Queenborough, Kent; and
a Nasa satellite image of phytoplankton formations in the North Sea
Perfectly timed heatwave is blooming marvellous for the economy
Daniel Sanderson
The record-breaking bank holiday
heatwave was perfectly timed to boost
Britain’s economy after a decidedly cool
start to the year, experts said yesterday.
Economists suggested that the hot
spell was likely to have helped businesses to recover some ground after the
Beast from the East brought heavy
snow in February.
It was particularly fortunate that the
height of the heatwave came over a
bank holiday weekend, analysts said,
because more time was available for
shopping and leisure activities. It also
lessened the impact of a decline in
workers’ output that is associated with
warm periods as workers call in sick,
take extended lunch breaks or seek to
escape early.
“If it had been in the middle of a
working week you might expect that
people would have been more tempted
to skive off work,” Anna Valero, a
research fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London
School of Economics, said. “But given
that everybody has just had a few days
of it, most of us will have had enough
sun and are happy to go back to work.”
Warm weather also increases demand
for seasonal products. A 1 per cent rise
in temperature translates to a 1.2 per
cent increase in demand for ice cream
and a 2.4 per cent rise in sales of cold
alcoholic drinks, according to Geraint
Johnes, professor of economics at
Lancaster University. A separate study
by Harvard University found that
workers’ productivity was highest on
rainy days, because they were more
likely to stay at their desks.
John Hawksworth, chief economist
at PWC, said: “Generally I would ex-
I’ve been to hell and back,
says tycoon in £17m battle
David Brown
The telecoms billionaire John Caudwell described yesterday how he had
“been to hell and back” after a judge
called his former righthand woman a
remarkably unsatisfactory witness.
Nathalie Dauriac claimed that she
was unfairly dismissed from the investment company she founded with Mr
Caudwell and was offered a nominal £2
for shares that she calculated were
worth £17 million.
A High Court judge ruled that the
French-born wine heiress should receive £471,510 compensation for the
shares she held in Signia Wealth.
Mr Caudwell, who made £1.5 billion
from the sale of his majority stake in
Phones4U in 2006, fell out with Ms
Dauriac after alleging that she had
fraudulently claimed £33,000 of expenses, including gifts and flights for
herself, her then husband and their
children and nanny. Mr Justice Smith
described Ms Dauriac, 40, as “combative, argumentative [and] prone to exag-
Nathalie Dauriac will receive £471,510
after her claim against John Caudwell
geration”. He found that she “deliberately made expense claims that she
knew were not proper claims” under
the company’s rules.
Mr Caudwell, 65, said after the judgment: “Over the last three years I have
been to hell and back as a consequence
of a series of vindictive and completely
baseless allegations made against me in
the course of high-profile legal proceedings with . . . Nathalie Dauriac.
She waged what felt like a campaign
of terror in an effort to extort £20 million from me in the clear expectation
that I would ultimately surrender and
settle out of court. She was totally
wrong in that assumption. I am delight-
ed that Nathalie has been found by the
judge to have been, in his words,
dishonest, combative, aggressive and
argumentative.”
The court was told that Mr Caudwell
had put £700 million of his fortune into
Signia Wealth. The judge described
him as emotional but clear and articulate and said he had given reliable
evidence despite suffering from Lyme
disease, which can impair memory.
Ms Dauriac said yesterday that she
had written to Lord Justice Vos, the
chancellor of the High Court, to ask
him to look into judicial attitudes towards professional women. She said:
“During the trial there was also evidence showing that I and other female
employees of John Caudwell were subject to written abuse by senior management. We were called many names,
including ‘sociopath’ and ‘nasty bitch’.
“I am shocked that Mr Justice Smith
should not consider this material to the
case and I believe the judicial system
needs to do more to ensure that women
are protected from such abuse.”
pect the good weather to have a positive
impact on areas like retail sales, hotels
and restaurants, outdoor leisure activities, agriculture and construction work,
particularly after the negative impact
of the snow in late February and March.
However, I would expect these to be
relatively small, short-term effects that
have little impact on the underlying
growth trend of the economy.”
In some areas the warm spell extended into yesterday, with 26.5C recorded
in Gravesend, although the Met Office
said that it would turn cooler today.
“Through most of the week we should
be seeing plenty of fine and bright weather but the temperatures will start to
drop off,” Sophie Yeomans, a forecaster
at the agency, said. “From Wednesday,
it will be around 22, then on Thursday
we’ll start seeing 16 or 17 as a high.”
Another consequence of the warmer
weather has been the accumulation of
large quantities of algae in the North
Sea as higher temperatures and increased sunlight led to blooms of phytoplankton, known as the “grass of the
sea”. Satellite images of the blooms
were captured by Nasa.
Weather, page 57
Woman on bus injured
in suspected acid attack
Gabriella Swerling
Northern Correspondent
John Simpson Crime Correspondent
A young woman was attacked with a
“noxious substance” believed to have
been acid while travelling on a bus
yesterday as violence in the capital
continued.
The victim, in her 20s, was treated in
Brixton, south London, close to the
Tube station, about 1.45pm.
Police believe that the attack was
“targeted” and inquiries are under way
to trace the female suspect involved.
The victim’s injuries were not thought
to be life-changing or life-threatening.
A 16-year-old boy was slashed in the
arm with a knife shortly after 3pm in
Twickenham, southwest London, and a
second teenager was stabbed in the leg
after reports of a fight near Woolwich
Arsenal station, southeast London,
during the evening rush-hour. A man
was arrested on suspicion of possessing
an offensive weapon.
It came as it emerged that crossbows
are being sold on high streets and
online without any need for a licence or
background checks. The weapons,
which fire aluminium-pointed bolts at
high velocity, are easy to get hold of.
Some have telescopic sights and are
designed to make firing them as
straightforward as possible.
The disclosure will add to concern
about violent crime after a bank holiday weekend marred by stabbings and
shootings, including that of an innocent 13-year-old boy caught in crossfire.
Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London,
invoked Tony Blair’s 1997 speech on
youth violence as he was challenged
yesterday about the rising murder rate,
which has exceeded half of last year’s
total in the first four months of this year.
Mr Khan called for more investment in
young people, telling Radio 4’s Today
programme: “There’s no culture that
should accept or condone criminality
and what we have to do is make sure we
invest in young people. The famous
lines ‘tough on crime and tough on the
causes of crime’ were accurate.”
On Saturday, pellets from a shotgun
cartridge fired during an alleged attack
on a drug dealer struck a 13-year-old
boy in the head in Wealdstone, northwest London, as he was on his way to a
wedding with his parents.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
17
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News
Cannes pans ugly selfies and critics’ vicious Twitter reviews
David Sanderson
Arts Correspondent, Cannes
Turning its guns on social media critics
and the “ugliness” of selfies, the Cannes
Film Festival has changed its schedules
this year to spare actors and filmmakers the embarrassment of
attending premieres already knowing
that their film is a flop.
Until this year, critics could see a film
in the morning before its gala premiere
in the evening. This has been brought to
an end, the organisers said, because of
critics on social media who did not
respect embargoes and subjected filmmakers to bad press before the
premiere.
“As soon as a film is screened, the
social networks turn it into confetti-like
strips of rumours,” they said. “The
principle behind the change this year is
simple: make the gala session, attended
by the team that made the film, the
veritable first screening of the film.”
The festival opened yesterday with
the premiere of Asghar Farhadi’s
Everybody Knows as Thierry Frémaux,
the festival director, attacked another
feature of modern life, selfies, which are
banned on the red carpet. “Selfies are
just a fashion,” he said. “It takes far too
long to walk the carpet and they fall,
they tumble because they’re not paying
attention. You come to Cannes to watch
the films, not yourself. In a selfie people
always look very ugly.”
The festival has drawn criticism in
the past for a perceived male bias in its
jury, film selection and red-carpet
policies. In 2015 it emerged that women
were required to wear high heels to
red-carpet screenings. Several women
claimed they were told to leave the
screening of Carol, starring Cate
Blanchett, because they were wearing
flat shoes.
ing
Blanchett, who is chairing
e,
the jury for the main prize,
the Palme d’Or, this year,
defended the focus on
glamour.
“Being
attractive does not
preclude
being
intelligent,” she said.
“This is by its very nature
c,
a glamorous, fantastic,
Cate Blanchett defended the
glamorous element of the film festival
First night
firecracker
fails to fizz
Film Kevin Maher
Everybody Knows
(Todos lo Saben)
Cannes Film Festival
HHIII
Husband and wife team Javier
Bardem and Penélope Cruz officially
kicked the Cannes Film Festival into
life last night, after several weeks of
hype and media speculation about the
potential shape of the world’s most
glamorous bun-fight in the postWeinstein era. Integrity, equality and
diversity have all been promised by
the bucketload and were a central
topic in the pre-screening press
conference of the Palme d’Or Jury,
headed by Cate Blanchett. Just a
shame then that the opening-night
movie should turn out to be such a
damp squib.
The pitch, perhaps typically, is
ridiculously enticing. Cruz and
Bardem are directed by the Iranian
filmmaker and double-Oscar winner
Asghar Farhadi (A Separation and The
Salesman won Academy Awards for
Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem, who are married in real life, play reunited childhood sweethearts in Everybody Knows
best foreign language film) in the
story about a kidnapping in a
provincial Spanish town that
decimates the bonds between a large
loving family and threatens to expose
long-hidden secrets. Great, right?
Cruz plays Laura and Bardem is Paco.
They’re former childhood
sweethearts who are reunited at a
raucous wedding, only to witness
their respective worlds shaken to the
core when Laura’s teenage daughter
Drink-driver with bossy
mother is spared prison
Kaya Burgess
An accountant who was found to be five
times over the alcohol limit while
slumped at the wheel of her car in a
layby has avoided jail after explaining
that she was trying to escape her overbearing mother.
Paulina Gancarz, 34, had been going
through a bitter divorce and said that
she decided to sleep in her car with a
bottle of wine to spend time away
from her mother, who was visiting
from Poland to help her look after
her seven-year-old daughter.
When asked by police to
take a roadside breath test
she gave a reading of
182mg in 100ml of
breath. The legal limit
is 35mg. It is an offence to be drunk
while in charge of a
motor vehicle, even if it is
Paulina Gancarz admitted
two drink-driving offences
parked. Two weeks later, on the day she
was due to attend court, she crashed the
same Mini Cooper into a bollard outside a branch of Marks & Spencer near
her home in Wilmslow, Cheshire, while
three times over the legal limit, Stockport magistrates heard.
She wept as she admitted drink driving but said that the offences arose out
of a split from her husband, which
cost her £65,000 in legal fees.
She added that her mother
had been “putting pressure” on
her and disapproved of the
divorce, which had led to her
losing her accountancy firm.
She was banned from
driving for three years and
ordered to complete a
12-month community
order. She was also
ordered to complete
60 hours’ unpaid
work, take a drinkdriver awareness course and
pay £170 in court costs.
The court heard that by
the time of the second offence, her
mother had returned home but her ill
grandmother had come to stay.
A probation report stated that Gancarz had become “overwhelmed” with
the situation in which she found herself.
“She drove out at 7am to get a bottle of
wine. She parked in the car park at
Marks & Spencer’s. Staff called the
police and by this point she was intoxicated.
Gancarz had a “difficult relationship”
with her mother, the report said. “Her
parents are quite traditional . . . when
she was married, she was in a good position financially, they were more supportive; yet when she was divorced the
attitude of her parents changed a lot.
She wasn’t coping very well.”
She had not known it was an offence
to be drunk in a parked car, but admitted that it was a “very poor” decision.
She had started to attend Alcoholics
Anonymous before the second incident
and had made an appointment with a
depression counsellor, the court was
told.
Irene (Carla Campra) is mysteriously
abducted during a suspiciously
convenient early hours power-cut.
What follows is a film that teases us
with the prospect of an intense and
involving kidnap drama on the scale
spectacular festival.” She also defended
the selection of only three films
direct by women, among
directed
i contention for the
21 in
Pa
Palme
d’Or.
“A few years ago there
w
were
only two and now
t selection committee
the
h more women than in
has
pr
previous
years, which
wi obviously change the
will
lens through which films
ch
are chosen,
but these things
are not going to happen
overnight ” she said.
overnight,”
of Denis Villeneuve’s Prisoners or
Andrey Zvyagintsev’s astounding
Loveless that won the Jury Prize at
Cannes last year.
Instead, we get a film that lurches
listlessly here and there, dipping into
sub-par Agatha Christie for a chunk,
then opting for some hugely overdone
Spanish soap opera dynamics (there
were unintended giggles at a
supposed serious revelation during
my screening), before flirting very
briefly with social-realism and the
question of who owns the land that is
farmed by migrant workers.
Unfortunately Farhadi never really
gets his teeth into any of these modes,
which leaves the narrative with an
often blank perfunctory rhythm.
The two lead actors, consequently,
are burdened with ostensibly complex
roles that are nonetheless permitted
only limited onscreen expression.
Cruz’s Laura, for instance, does crying
and wailing. A lot. There’s no scene
too small, no piece of narrative
information too insignificant that
can’t be met by some photogenic
bawling (sometimes more is just, well,
more).
Bardem fares slightly better
although, again, he repeatedly finds
himself attempting to hold entire
mildly hysterical scenes, courtesy of
Farhadi (who also wrote the script)
that no more mortal actor should
attempt. Especially in close-up.
The festival, of course, is long
(nearly two weeks) with a wealth of
heavyweights still to come. And by
the end most people will have
forgotten Everybody Knows. Probably
for the best.
Rise in road rage ‘putting
repair worker lives at risk’
Graeme Paton Transport Correspondent
Highways bosses have warned of a rise
in road rage on England’s motorways as
the number of roadworks on the network increases.
Dozens of incidents are being recorded every week involving impatient
motorists driving through cones, or
hurling abuse at road workers. Highways England, which maintains 4,300
miles of motorways and A roads, said
that workers’ lives were being put at risk
during the huge £15 billion upgrade of
the system.
The government-backed company
has started a new campaign today to
highlight the dangers posed by motorists who speed past roadworks.
At the campaign launch Adie Whiting, 33, a traffic-control safety officer
who uses cones, signs, barriers and temporary traffic signals, said: “I’ve been
sworn at a lot, physically threatened on
occasions and even had someone try to
run me over once.”
Between July 2016 and September
2017, 3,446 incidents of traffic cone
“incursions”, in which motorists drive
through roadworks, were logged. The
incursions led to 150 serious accidents,
it was reported.
Separate figures showed that, over
the past three and a half years, 341
incidents of verbal or physical abuse of
road workers have been recorded
across England.
The amount of traffic on motorways
has surged. Official figures show that
vehicles travelled 68 billion miles on
motorways in the year to the end of last
June, up by more than a third since the
mid-Nineties.
Research by the traffic data company
Inrix showed that there have been
more than 1.35 million jams on motorways and A roads in the past year,
equivalent to almost 3,700 per day.
Mike Wilson, chief highways engineer at Highways England, said: “While
we plan our maintenance and improvement works to minimise inconvenience
to drivers, some road closures are
necessary, and ultimately for the benefit of road users.
“Drivers who selfishly and illegally
ignore these traffic restrictions . . . are
putting both their lives and those of our
road workers at risk, all to save a few
minutes on their journey.”
18
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
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News
Abandon paper tickets and
barriers, train firms urged
Property prices falling at
fastest rate since 2010
Graeme Paton Transport Correspondent
House prices dropped last month by the
sharpest rate in nearly eight years as the
slowdown in the housing market continued, according to Britain’s biggest
mortgage provider.
Halifax said that house prices fell by
3.1 per cent in April compared with the
previous month — the largest singlemonth drop since September 2010 and
the second largest since the company
began publishing its data in 1983. Economists had been expecting house prices
to fall by only 0.2 per cent.
The housing market has been cooling
over the past two years, having reached
a peak in March 2016, when prices were
rising by 10 per cent a year.
The sharpest slowdown was in
London but many areas have felt a stagnation in activity as prices reach the
peak of what many people can afford,
consumer confidence becomes fragile,
foreign investors leave the UK and
landlords are affected by a series of tax
and lending changes that have put
them off buying.
The monthly drop from Halifax
comes after figures from the Bank of
England showed that mortgage
approvals fell by 10 per cent in March to
the second lowest level since the start of
2015. Estate agents said that the number of homes going up for sale each
month has reached the lowest on
record.
Analysts advised sellers not to place
too much emphasis on the monthly fall,
however, as house price changes can be
A shake-up of rail fares should lead to
the abolition of ticket barriers and
wider use of facial recognition technology, researchers have said.
A report commissioned by train
companies said that the rail industry
had to embrace digital ticketing, including pay-as-you-travel cards and smartphones.
However, it also said there would
have to be a “longer-term push” to
“open gating”, meaning the removal of
conventional barriers in favour of technology that identifies passengers and
automatically takes payment. This
should include exploring biometric
software, allowing passengers to travel
using facial recognition systems, or
fingerprint-based touch screens, it said.
The recommendations were made in
a report by the auditors KPMG into
how Britain’s hugely complicated rail
fares system could be simplified. Operators will begin a consultation next
month on an overhaul of fares, and
produce final recommendations for the
government at the end of the year.
The Rail Delivery Group, which
represents train companies, said that
reform was needed and admitted that it
was “increasingly difficult to guarantee
the right fare”.
The recommendations are expected
to address anomalies such as “split ticketing”, when rail companies charge far
more for through tickets than for a valid
Q&A
What can I do to knock
down the price?
One of the best ways to
save on long-distance
journeys is by splitting
your ticket, buying a
series of shorter fares
between stations along
a route. Websites such
as Trainsplit.com can do
the work for you.
Are there easier ways
to cut the price?
A straightforward
method is to book in
advance. Virgin Trains
East Coast offers tickets
six months in advance
and the Caledonian
Sleeper sells a year in
advance. Some advance
tickets are available on
the day of travel.
What else can I do to
bring down costs?
Two singles often beat a
series of singles available along a particular route. The review will also set out
plans for flexible season tickets that can
be purchased for two or three days a
week.
The KPMG report, which was commissioned by the group, said the fares
system had “not kept pace with the
changing needs of customers” and that
the vast majority of people were still
forced to travel using paper tickets.
“Smartcards and contactless bank
card payments have revolutionised
travel in London and smartphones are
now routinely carried by the majority
of people,” it said, “but the benefits of
these advances have not yet been fully
leveraged across all of the rail network.”
Chiltern Railways is trialling a
return when booking
longer distance
journeys and
passengers can make
savings by opting for a
slower, stopping
service. Another good
way is by investing in a
railcard. The Two
Together Railcard costs
£30 and gives couples
over 16 a third off fares.
The Family & Friends
Railcard provides
60 per cent discounts
on fares for children.
system using Bluetooth sensors that
detect passengers’ smartphones and
charge them the best price for their
journey.
The KPMG report recommended
developing a system using “biometric
tokens” using facial recognition or
touch screens in which “individuals
themselves are the ticket”.
Labour welcomed the review yesterday but insisted that proper reform
could be achieved only if Britain’s
railways were renationalised to create a
coherent network. Andy McDonald,
the shadow transport secretary, said:
“This consultation is long overdue, and
the fact is that the fares system cannot
be fixed under the current disjointed
rail industry structure.”
Tom Knowles Property Correspondent
volatile from month to month. Nationwide said that its mortgage data
suggested that prices had risen by
0.2 per cent in April.
“The Halifax index is by far the most
volatile measure of house prices, even
though it is supposed to be seasonally
adjusted, so it would be a mistake to
sound the alarm over April’s huge fall in
prices,” Samuel Tombs, chief UK
economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, said.
The state of the economy and jobs
market suggests that house prices will
not tumble. “Prices will fall rapidly only
when a large proportion of homeowners are forced to sell up,” he said. “With
unemployment and borrowing costs
low and credit freely available, few
people are being forced to sell their
homes quickly. A period of broadly flat
house prices, therefore, remains the
most likely outcome.”
In the year to April Halifax said that
prices rose by 2.2 per cent, down from a
2.7 per cent annual rise in March and
below the 3.2 per cent rise economists
had been expecting. On the basis of the
past three months compared with three
months earlier, prices were down by
0.1 per cent. The average price of a
house last month was £220,962.
Brian Murphy, head of lending for
the Mortgage Advice Bureau, said that
some buyers in early April may have
been influenced by the expectation that
the Bank of England would raise
interest rates this week, compounded
by late wintry weather and an early
Easter break.
Out this weekend.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
19
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News
TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER RICHARD POHLE
Police dogs
learn to fight
terrorists
Fiona Hamilton Crime & Security Editor
Bowing out The Queen’s horse, Barbers Shop, will be retired at the Royal Windsor Horse Show, which is held in the private grounds of Windsor Castle and starts today
Big broadcasters seek to rival
Netflix with streaming service
Matthew Moore Media Correspondent
The BBC, Channel 4 and ITV have held
early talks about the possibility of
setting up a united British streaming
service to take on Netflix.
The discussions focused on how Britain’s biggest broadcasters could work
together to create an on-demand service
to rival US competitors that also include
Amazon Prime Video, sources said.
At present the broadcasters offer
separate on-demand and catch-up
platforms — BBC iPlayer, ITV Hub and
All 4. A unified service could benefit all
the broadcasters as they seek to attract
viewers tempted away by the big-budget dramas and comedies offered by
global subscription companies.
In March the BBC released figures
showing that young people spent more
time watching Netflix than all BBC
television, including the iPlayer.
Talks between the British broadcast-
ers are at an early stage and “no direction is firm yet”, a source told The
Guardian. The conversations are also
said to have involved NBC Universal,
the American television company
One option would be to create an
expanded version of “Britbox”. This
on-demand service, a joint project
between the BBC and ITV, already
enables American viewers to pay to
watch programming.
Another idea, which is understood to
be under discussion, would be to launch
an entirely new brand offering subscription on-demand programming.
The BBC, ITV and Channel 4 each
declined to comment on the reports
yesterday. One media industry source
said that no active discussions were
taking place but pointed out that the
broadcasters already collaborated on
commercial partnerships.
A significant impediment to any deal
could be the broadcasters’ unwilling-
ness to marginalise their existing
online services. Yesterday the BBC reported that iPlayer had achieved its
most successful quarter, driven by the
popularity of the crime drama series
The Assassination of Gianni Versace.
It is unclear whether any new service
would feature adverts or charge viewers to access archive content.
The proposals appear to be a revival
of Project Kangaroo, a proposed online
video tie-up between the BBC, ITV and
Channel 4 that was blocked by the
Competition Commission in 2009.
Since then the media landscape has
changed significantly, with Netflix and
Amazon Prime Video signing up
millions of British subscribers, creating
unprecedented competition.
Last year Lord Hall of Birkenhead,
the BBC director-general, said that the
amount spent on making programmes
in Britain could fall by £500 million a
year over the next decade as Netflix,
Amazon and Apple focused on global
series. “The reality is that their investment decisions are likely to focus increasingly on a narrow range of very
expensive, very high-end content — big
bankers that they can rely on to have
international appeal and attract large,
global audiences,” he said.
Pauline Robson, a media expert at
Mediacom, one of the world’s largest
media agencies, said that it would be
difficult but not impossible for a group
of competitors to create a successful
joint service. “For this new streaming
partnership to reap any kind of success,
it needs to create compelling content to
rival the likes of Westworld and
Stranger Things,” she said.
6 Radio 4 is dramatising six of Maya
Angelou’s autobiographies in what
would have been the late author’s 90th
birthday year. The acclaimed American author, poet and civil rights activist
died in 2014 aged 86.
Guns N’ Roses drop racist song from album re-release
Jack Malvern
Guns N’ Roses appear to have censored
themselves by reissuing an album without a song that refers to “n***ers” selling gold chains and “immigrants and
faggots” who “spread some f***ing
disease”.
Leading members of the rock band
have previously defended One in a Million, but the song is absent from a
reissue of their 1987 album Appetite for
Destruction. The band was unavailable
for comment on the omission but the
most plausible explanation is that they
have accepted that the song is offensive.
The second verse of the song begins:
“Police and n***ers, that’s right/ Get
outta my way/ Don’t need to buy none
of your/ Gold chains today.”
The next verse includes the lyrics:
“Immigrants and faggots/ They make
no sense to me/ They come to our country/ And think they’ll do as they please/
Like start some mini-Iran/ Or spread
some f***ing disease/ And they talk so
many God damn ways/ It’s all Greek to
me.” The song was controversial at the
time of its release but Axl Rose, the lead
singer, refused to apologise. He said
that the references to black people
came from scammers in Los Angeles
who engaged people by offering them
gold chains.
In an interview with Rolling Stone
magazine at the time he said: “Why can
black people go up to each other and
say ‘n***er,’ but when a white guy does
it all of a sudden it’s a big put-down? I
used the word ‘n***er’ to describe
somebody that is basically a pain in
your life, a problem. The word ‘n***er’
doesn’t necessarily mean black.”
He said that the lyric about immigrants came from an experience of
going to a mini-supermarket. “When I
use the word immigrants, what I’m
talking about is going to a 7-Eleven . . .
They treat you like you don’t belong
here.” He said that he had had “some
very bad experiences with homosexuals” including an attempted rape.
The Metropolitan Police spent more
than £1 million on a pilot programme
training two Belgian malinois dogs to
accompany officers to the scenes of
terrorist attacks.
The scheme, which began in April
last year, involved familiarising the
dogs with the sound of gunfire and the
sensation of being parachuted into
dangerous areas, the Daily Mail reported. They have also been trained to bite
suspects to stop them fleeing.
The US Secret Service uses malinois
to patrol the White House and the
breed is routinely used in operations by
French counterterrorism forces. US
Navy Seals used Cairo, a malinois, in
the raid in Pakistan in which Osama bin
Laden was killed.
The Met has long used dogs for its
firearms operations but its two new
recruits have been trained to a far
higher level. Each has its own handler
and a dedicated vehicle.
Matt Twist, the deputy assistant
commissioner who leads the Met’s
armed response programme, said: “It’s
really important that we constantly
look for ways to develop our response
to terrorists. That includes looking at
what new tactics and training we can
use. While it’s very difficult to provide
specific examples because of the nature
of the work the dogs are deployed on,
they have been used successfully in a
number of firearms operations.”
Space sensor
can sniff out
iffy meat
Didi Tang Beijing
It was developed as part of China’s
secretive missile programme to detect
gas leaks in space. Now the sensor that
furthered Beijing’s might in the heavens is being put to a different use:
detecting rotten meat.
Chinese consumers, long sceptical
about the freshness of products sold in
markets, will soon have a hand-held
gadget that will help to detect meat that
has gone bad.
The China Aerospace Science and
Industry Corporation has developed
the “freshness sniffer”, which measures
ammonia and volatile organic compounds that are given out by decaying
meat. The technology has also been
tested for use in the mining and energy
industries.
The Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement said that users
of the device could view its findings
through a mobile phone app for a variety of meats including pork, beef, lamb,
poultry and fish.
“It can tell you whether the meat is
fresh or not so fresh and needs to be
cooked well, or if it has already become
spoilt,” Niu Ye, an engineer who
developed the product, told the
English-language newspaper China
Daily.
Food safety is a big public concern in
China, where supermarkets have been
caught altering use-by dates on their
products.
Commercial testers are expensive
and cumbersome, but Mr Niu said that
the freshness sniffer was the size of a
flash drive and had an accuracy greater
than 90 per cent. It is expected to go on
sale in a month or two, with a suggested
retail price of about 400 yuan (£46.50).
20
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
News
I N T H E T I M E S T O M O R ROW
TIMES2
THE TABLE
How to win the fast-food war
PULLOUT
SPORT
MIKE
ATHERTON
All you need
to know
about the
latest team
to play
Test cricket
BUSINESS
RETAIL WARS
Robin Pagnamenta
reveals the next
battleground and who
is desperate to win
MAIN PAPER
MAIN PAPER
COMMENT
David Aaronovitch The new loony left
taking over Labour’s town halls
MAIN PAPER
LEEMCLEAN/BNPS
Boy, five, concussed
by stray cricket ball
A boy aged five was left with
concussion, hearing and vision
problems and two black eyes
after a cricket ball flew over a
school fence and hit him on
the forehead. Harry Butt was
on a friend’s driveway in Poole,
Dorset, when he was struck on
Thursday. His mother,
Michelle, said: “He was
violently sick and had really
bad concussion. The
consultant said that if it had
hit him anywhere else he
wouldn’t be here. I want
something done.” She said that
the school, Poole Grammar,
had told her that it could not
raise the height of its fence for
health and safety reasons but
that it would move its matches
to another field.
Twitter messages
could be encrypted
Twitter users may soon be able
to hold secret conversations
with encrypted messages
similar to those of messaging
apps such as WhatsApp,
Telegram and Signal. Direct
messages on Twitter are at
present sent in plain text, so
anyone who has access on
Twitter’s internal network can
read them. Jane Manchun
Wong, a student at the
University of Massachusetts
Dartmouth, unearthed signs of
the feature in unactivated code
while analysing the Android
application package (APK) for
Twitter. Twitter declined to
comment on the discovery.
Harry Butt was standing in a friend’s driveway when he was hit
DNA reveals first Roman family burial plot
Researchers have
found evidence of a
Roman family
burial site in
Britain for the first
time. Analysis of
DNA from the
bones of 29
skeletons
discovered at a
site in Colchester,
hey
Essex, showed that they
were all related. The fourthcentury plot is notable for
spanning the period between
Roman paganism, where
burials were north-south
facing, to the adoption of
Christianity, after which graves
were oriented from east to
ández who
west. Nelson F
Fernández,
led a team from Essex
University, said: “In recent
years DNA analysis has
breathed new life into
archaeology.” The team’s study
was published in Frontiers in
Genetics.
Parkinson’s disabled
child ‘left destitute’
The disabled daughter of the
late Conservative Party
chairman Cecil Parkinson is
living in serious financial
hardship, the High Court was
told yesterday. Flora Keays, 34,
the child of Lord Parkinson
and Sara Keays, his former
secretary and mistress, was
excluded from his will and
quarterly £5,000 payments
ended after his death in 2016.
The judge, Master Clark of the
chancery division, said that Ms
Keays, 70, had been unable to
meet mortgage payments and
“other essential and pressing
needs, including repairing the
central heating”. The judge
turned down a request by the
executors to remove Ms Keays
as Flora’s litigation friend.
Boom is a badge of
honour for scouts
Y
Young people are joining the
sscouts in record numbers. The
Scout Association said that
10,699 young people joined in
Britain in the year to January
31. This marked the 13th
consecutive year of growth, the
longest period since the 1930s,
and takes the total to 475,000
members aged between six and
25 Britain. More people have
also volunteered to lead groups
but Tim Kidd, UK chief scout
commissioner, said that
employers should still give staff
more flexibility to serve their
communities. Almost 60,000
people are on waiting lists
because of a lack of leaders.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
2G M
21
RM
News
DR MOSTAFA NABAWY/SWNS
Spider could
offer a leap
forward in
robot design
T
he hard bit
about training
spiders isn’t
telling them
what to do, it’s
finding one that respects
your authority enough
to do it (Tom Whipple
writes).
Now scientists have
found one that responds,
and she has transformed
our understanding of
spider biomechanics.
The regal jumping
spider pounces to catch
Kim, a regal jumping spider, was trained to leap between platforms while scientists recorded her on high-speed video. The results could be used to improve robotic design
food in the woodlands of
North America. For a
paper in the journal
Scientific Reports,
Mostafa Nabawy, from
Manchester University,
built one spider, Kim, a
take-off platform and a
landing one and
transferred her by hand
between the two. Then,
Dr Nabaway said, “when
you leave her on the
platform, she thinks,
‘Why have I not
transferred across? OK,
I’ll transfer myself.’ ”
He and his team were
able to test her jumping
ability to its limits and
record the results using
high-speed videos,
gaining crucial insights
that Dr Nabawy, an
engineer, said could be
used to improve the
design of miniature
robots. He said it also
showed how underrated
spiders were. “They are
intelligent, smart and
capable of assessing the
surroundings around
them. It’s just a question
of if they are willing to
do it.”
Father punched after spying on daughter’s party kiss
Kaya Burgess
A father who spied on his daughter’s
house party was punched in the face
after rushing home to confront a teenage boy who had been kissing her.
James Shaw, 50, a company director
and engineer, used a smartphone app to
monitor his home’s CCTV system while
his teenage daughter threw what was
supposed to be a girls-only party.
Mr Shaw, who is the father of Ella
Shaw, a Britain’s Got Talent semi-finalist
from 2015, had gone out for the night
with his wife when he spotted four boys
at the party hosted by Ms Shaw’s
younger sister. He rushed home when
he saw her kissing one of the boys.
On arriving back at the family home
in Langho, a village in Lancashire, Mr
Shaw confronted Cameron Hull, 18, a
part-time labourer. He cornered him
before pushing him out of the house
and ordering the other three young
men to leave, Blackburn magistrates’
court was told this month. Hull left the
premises but realised that he had forgotten a £200 jacket given to him by his
mother the day before.
Hull tried to regain entry to the
house but Mr Shaw barred him and
there was an altercation in the doorway.
Mr Shaw was punched in the face by
Hull and is believed to have suffered a
broken nose and black eye.
Hull admitted assaulting Mr Shaw.
He added that he had been invited to
the party in March by a friend of Mr
Shaw’s daughter and said he did not
Cameron Hull was
caught on CCTV
kissing the girl
know the name of the girl he had been
kissing.
Damien Pickup, for the defence, said
that Hull had never been in trouble
with police before. “It is clear [Mr
Shaw’s daughter] had been told she
could have a small party but it appears
they didn’t expect males to be there,” he
said. “My client says the girl’s parents
went mad and much of their anger was
directed towards him because he had
been kissing their daughter.”
Mr Pickup claimed there was an
element of provocation because Mr
Shaw was allegedly being aggressive.
Hull was given a conditional discharge for eight months and ordered to
pay £100 compensation.
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the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
23
2G M
Sometimes it takes a
prince to get things done
Matthew Parris
Page 24
Comment
Beware zealots who lack the human touch
From Ayn Rand on the right to Karl Marx on the left, politicians should steer clear of gurus who loathe compromise
Daniel
Finkelstein
@dannythefink
O
ne morning in 1926, a
young Russian was
leaving a movie studio in
Hollywood. She was
downcast, having been
told by its publicity department that
there was no work for her. Then, at
the gate, she stopped to let a car go
by and fell into conversation with its
driver.
This was how Ayn Rand, as Alyssa
Rosenbaum called herself on
emigrating to America, met the film
director Cecil B DeMille. And the
jobs he gave her were her first steps
on the road to an extraordinary
career as novelist, screenwriter and
political guru.
It emerged last week that Sajid
Javid, the home secretary, twice a
year reads aloud the courtroom
speech of Howard Roark, hero of
Rand’s novel The Fountainhead.
The same week saw the 200th
birthday of Karl Marx. Perhaps, like
me, you celebrated quietly at home,
but the shadow chancellor John
McDonnell made more of a fuss,
telling a conference about Marx’s
influence on Labour’s future while
standing in front of a banner of the
great man.
In many ways, Marx and Rand are
complete opposites. Rand came to
the US largely to escape Bolshevism
and, through her books, promoted a
vision of free people fighting against
socialism. Yet, for all that, I think
Rand and Marx made a common
error. Understanding it can help us
make sense of politics.
It is hard to see why anyone would
regard Marx’s birthday as an
occasion to bake a cake and light
candles. For all his intelligence, his
analysis of capitalism led him to a
series of predictions (for example
that workers would only be able to
earn subsistence wages or that
independent producers would be
forced into the proletariat) that have
all proved wrong.
Every time a country has
attempted to follow Marx, it has
ended in disaster. His defenders
argue that this is not his fault but it
most certainly is. Marx asserted that
we can’t be free or human until we
eradicate private property and the
trade of goods. Doing this, however,
results in massive state power and
incredible economic inefficiency.
Some argue that this criticism is
unfair because European social
democracy owes a lot to Marx. In
1948, for instance, the Labour Party
It replaces the study of
psychology with an
Ali Bongo magic trick
published a centenary edition of
Marx and Engels’s Communist
Manifesto, the introduction to which
acknowledged the party’s debt. Yet in
each case, as western European
parties contemplated moving from
some intervention and planning (an
idea that preceded Marx) to a proper
Marxist view (the abolition of
capitalism), they realised that fiasco
would follow, and disowned him.
Another defence of Marx is that he
didn’t prescribe a particular system,
so can’t be held accountable for the
ways his ideas were put into practice.
But this is hardly a defence. Indeed,
quite the contrary. What it accepts is
that Marx wanted (strictly speaking
it is what he predicted, but he
predicted it because he wanted it) to
smash the current system without a
clue about what would replace it. To
suggest that this absolves him of
responsibility for the subsequent
disasters is ridiculous.
To the question of what comes
after capitalism, Marx provided an
airy hand wave. The problem of how
to organise society will disappear.
Our behaviour is the result of our
economic relationships and so, when
we stop trading under capitalism we
will have complete abundance, no
problems distributing goods and the
interests of the individual will be the
same for everyone.
It is the study of economics and
psychology replaced by one of Ali
Bongo’s magic tricks. It is hard to
understand why it has won the
allegiance of so many apparently
intelligent people.
Set against this, Ayn Rand’s novels
at least present a concrete idea of the
sort of society she is after, even if it is
flawed. She supports laissez-faire
capitalism.
Rand’s books celebrate reason and
creativity. Her philosophy,
objectivism, argues that the basis for
everything is fact, not superstition or
emotion. Our duty is to express our
own beliefs and wishes as selfishly
(which she argues is a good word) as
possible. We may regard looking
after others as a good but this makes
caring a selfish act. Beyond that we
should never have to sacrifice
ourselves.
The passion of her belief in reason
and knowledge makes her novels
occasionally inspiring. I must admit I
find them quite strange and
contrived, but in one poll of literary
influence, Rand’s Atlas Shrugged
came second only to the Bible. It isn’t
Ayn Rand‘s novel Atlas Shrugged came
second to the Bible in one literary poll
hard to see what Javid gets from
reading Roark’s speech. It is a hymn
to inventiveness and to sticking to
one’s principles.
Yet here’s the problem. Rand
suggests that from each individual
pursuing their own interests without
compromise comes the greater good.
Individual interest and the public
interest will harmonise (completely;
this is well beyond Adam Smith’s
observations). Rand says this can
happen with capitalism, Marx
believes this will happen only after
capitalism. This is the same error. A
rudimentary understanding of
human nature tells you there will
always be conflict.
Let me give you an example. Javid
amusingly said he reads Roark’s
speech to himself having read it once
to his wife who told him not to do it
again. Now Rand would argue that if
you wanted to read the book out
loud to someone you must do so, to
fulfil your vision and to be true to
your essence. But what if your
partner’s vision is that she didn’t
want to listen to it again? She has to
be true to that. Rand’s answer would
be that in that case you shouldn’t be
together. Which is ludicrous: nobody
would be with anybody based on
that logic.
This is what eventually happened
to Rand. She felt that if someone
preferred Strauss to Rachmaninov
they couldn’t be in her circle. She
had an affair with her “intellectual
heir”, both of them telling their
spouses that it made objective sense
for the two greatest brains to be
together. Then when her lover had
an affair with someone else she
expelled him and his wife for
behaviour “grossly contradictory to
objectivist morality”.
The common error of Rand and
Marx was to fail to understand that
individual interests, ideas and values
clash and always will. It is the job of
politics, sometimes acting through
the state, to come up with
compromises that allow us to live
together in some degree of peace
and harmony.
The moderates and placaters, the
negotiators and split-the-difference
people, may not be one of Rand’s
heroes or Marx’s irresistible forces,
but we do at least grasp human
nature.
daniel.finkelstein@thetimes.co.uk
red box
For the best analysis
and commentary on
the political landscape
thetimes.co.uk
24
1G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Comment
China’s move on Arctic is a threat to the West
As the polar ice melts the race is on to secure new shipping routes between Asia and Europe
Roger
Boyes
@rogerboyes
I
magine digging 2,500 miles of
tunnels underneath the Arctic ice
to hide a batch of nuclear missiles
targeted on northern Russia.
That was Project Iceworm, an
ambitious but ultimately abandoned
American scheme to build a Cold
War base in Greenland. The complex
was supposed to include railway
lines, a shop, a cinema and,
appropriately given its apocalyptic
intent, a chapel. Only an unstable
glacier forced the US to abandon the
project in 1967 and it was assumed
that two years of northern snows
would cover its traces. Global
warming put paid to that idea and
there are fears some of the buried
waste will be swept to the surface in
the great melt.
Such is the geopolitical reality of
Greenland, defined not just by its
vastness — 800,000 square miles,
much of it covered by an icecap —
and its remoteness but also by its
proximity to the US and Russia. It
has the potential to be a front line if
not in a nuclear exchange then at
least in an extraordinary face-off
between two Nato states, the US and
Denmark (which still has sovereign
control over Greenland), and the
two countries that stand to gain
most from the warming of the
Arctic, Russia and China.
Barely 56,000 people inhabit
Greenland and many of them resent
Danish dominance over the territory
established in the 19th century. The
long polar night, blanketing it
between November and February,
the lack of jobs for young Inuits, the
dependency on subsidies from an
indifferent Copenhagen: all this has
created a specific kind of melancholy.
“We sold all we had at the end of the
rainbow,” sing the south Greenland
rock band the Small Time Giants,
“we lost all we have when the sun
set.” Alcoholism, drug abuse abound;
the suicide rate is among the highest
in the world.
Now climate change is shifting
politics as surely as it is shifting ice.
The meltdown will make the
extraction of rare earth metals that
much easier. China, for example,
accounts for 95 per cent of the world
demand for tantalum (vital for
Greenlanders could
swap the Danish yoke
for a deal with Beijing
nuclear reactors) and zirconium
(used for cladding in the nuclear
industry). Moreover, as the Arctic
warms up so does the racing
certainty that China will want to
exploit the northern sea route to ship
goods quickly from Asia into Europe.
The Chinese have become a very
visible presence in Greenland, and
not just in the mining business. The
Danes and the US are nervous.
When a Chinese company showed
interest in buying a former US naval
base, Copenhagen rapidly withdrew
the property. What could be more
symbolic of the geopolitical fast-shoe
shuffle than a rising, ambitious
China buying up a US naval
station that was once designed to
monitor Russia?
The weave has just become even
more tangled. Last month Greenland
(which has home rule apart from
Danish control of foreign and
security affairs) held an election
fortifying the separatist component
in parliament. One party, Naleraq, is
pushing for full independence as
early as 2021. China, so allergic to
Taiwan’s quest for diplomatic
recognition, seems to see this as an
opportunity. And so do the
Greenlanders: they could exchange
the Danish yoke for a no-politicalstrings-attached commercial
relationship with Beijing.
If that happens, there won’t be
many tears shed in Greenland. The
US base in Thule, established in 1951,
has been seen as making Greenland
a potential target. A year after
Project Iceworm was shut down, a
B-52 crashed near Thule. One of its
four hydrogen bombs was never
recovered in an operation
nicknamed “Dr Freezelove”.
China by contrast advertises itself
as an avuncular investor, one ready to
build ports in Pakistan, a naval base in
Djibouti. Its interest in Greenland is
presented in similar terms, as part not
of the re-invented Silk Road but of a
Frozen Road, linking communities,
setting up Confucius Institutes to
spread the word and create new
networks. In truth, it is building up
credentials as a naval power capable
of protecting the sea routes on which
Chinese trade depends, if necessary
by positioning cruise missiles on the
Spratly Islands in the South China
Sea.
China needs outposts like
Greenland to extend its global reach
but cannot do so without raising the
hackles of its rivals and potential
enemies; everything it does
challenges the status quo in some
way. Western policy has for years
sought to lever apart Moscow and
Beijing yet they are working closer
together than ever before. They
exchange intelligence on North
Korea; they almost always
co-ordinate voting on the UN
Security Council. Russia’s Gazprom
sells gas relatively cheaply to China;
there is a vibrant arms trade between
the two. Chinese officers study
Russia’s hybrid warfare techniques.
The Arctic is turning into the big
test case for this 21st-century
partnership. The receding ice will
boost the efficiency of Chinese
exports to Europe while the new
maritime traffic will modernise the
Russian north. The group of
business, defence and intelligence
cronies around Vladimir Putin is
setting its sights on the oil and gas
deposits of the Arctic.
Greenland, then, is part of the
great game in the high latitudes, the
battle for the Arctic. We know
Greenlanders can handle whales.
Can they, though, deal with the
political sharks circling their waters?
Time for the West — the US,
Canada and the Nordic states — to
pay attention. New partnerships are
being formed and their aim
ultimately will be to weaken the
clout and coherence of the Atlantic
alliance, to splinter and confound.
among guests, he in flannel and she in
floral frock, flanked by four beefy sixfooters in trilbys. He came up to me at
a garden fete in Nicosia. Having just
fallen off a cliff I was all bandaged up.
Shaking my unplastered left arm he
said “Been in the wars, little man?”
There and then I formed the
ambition to be a governor, later (aged
ten) writing to the Colonial Office to
apply. They replied kindly, suggesting
I aim for an ambassadorship instead.
Which I did. Which led me to the
Conservative Research Department.
My whole career has turned upon
that left-hand handshake with
General Harding. And I still want
to be a governor.
once been almost caught in the
crossfire as one llama prepared to
spit at another. Then she mimicked
with total accuracy the cheek and
jaw movements of a camelid
gathering saliva.
It was so realistic I almost ducked.
And thought I might need to as I
confessed disappointment that her
interviewer hadn’t asked her about
the impersonator Tracey Ullman’s
priceless sketches of Dame Judi (and
other stars) as imagined shoplifters.
“Oh,” she said, “if only he’d asked.
Hilarious! Isn’t Ullman brilliant!”
Matthew Parris My Week
It takes an
autocrat like
Charles to get
things done
U
ntil last weekend my closest
encounter with Prince
Charles had been more
than 50 years ago. Along
with hundreds of other
Cambridge students he and I were
inspired by George Steiner, a lecturer
whose canvas was really the whole of
human experience. A stirring speaker
(I remember thrilling to “the anarchic
mystery of the human soul”), his
lecture series packed the hall with
undergraduates, so of course was
sneered at by fellow academics.
Charles would arrive on a bike,
followed, in stately procession, by
two hefty security men, pedalling in
V-formation just behind his right and
left shoulders, giving the appearance
of a flight of bicycling ducks. It made
the young prince an easy target for
any sniper.
He just smiled when I mentioned
this to him on Friday. He and Dame
Judi Dench were guests at a grand
dinner at the Boswell Book Festival
where my partner and I were
speaking. It took place at Dumfries
House which the prince has rescued
from ruin and is now the biggest
employer in a lovely but deprived area
of lowland Scotland. Charles has
established there a thriving centre for
visits, walks, arts, skills, whiskytasting, education and charities, close
to the birthplace of Dr Johnson’s
biographer, the diarist James Boswell.
What I did not say (how could
one?) was that this project at
Dumfries House demonstrates the
benefits of caprice, and a bit of
autocracy, in public life. You’d never
get this expensive dream for the
rescue of a stately home past
even the National Trust, let
alone a government department.
Somebody has to snap their
fingers. A prince can.
Aiming high
N
or could I tell him
how, just as I’d seen
his protection
officers make him a sitting
duck at Cambridge, so as
a six-year-old during the
terrorist insurgency in
Cyprus I’d seen our
British governor, General
Sir John Harding, with a
virtual red ring encircling
himself and his wife at
public functions. Both were
tiny. Both would move
Spitting image
W
hat a trouper Judi
Dench is! Before dinner
at Dumfries House she’d
been interviewed on a
marquee stage for more
than an hour. The event
having sold out, they’d
filmed it for a screening
the following morning.
But as the second
audience waited, the
recording wouldn’t play.
Panic! Dame Judi
abandoned her breakfast and
did it all over again. She’s 83.
She can also impersonate
llamas. Discussing mine,
she described how she’d
Just hit delete
P
inging into my inbox comes one
of those blanket emails that
parties send supporters. “From”
Tory chairman Brandon Lewis, it
starts “Dear Matthew, Thank you so
much for your hard work during this
campaign . . . we all know how hard
you worked, Matthew . . .”
I didn’t lift a finger during that
campaign, confining myself to a
column churlishly complaining that
the party is being supported by the
wrong kind of voters. Tory members,
mostly inactive, will have pressed the
delete key with ferocity at the false
intimacy. When will communications
professionals understand that
professional communications
that feel like professional
communications are worse than no
communications at all?
MPs must protect
the free press —
we all depend on it
Jodie Ginsberg
B
efore she was murdered by a
car bomb last October, there
were 47 libel suits
outstanding against Daphne
Caruana Galizia. Her crime?
Three decades of crusading
investigative journalism that exposed
corruption and political collusion in
Malta, her home country.
Caruana Galizia refused to be
silenced by such threats. For her
defiance, she was murdered. Few of
us would be as brave. Faced with
the prospect of ruinously expensive
legal action many journalists
choose silence.
Such self-censorship is disastrous
for democracy. It is an outcome that
is almost certain if the House of
Commons votes to accept
amendments to the Data Protection
Bill. The bill is not focused on
journalists; it is designed to regulate
the way in which our personal
information is processed, and how
companies use our data should be of
concern to all of us. But we run the
risk of bolstering one protection only
to eliminate another vital bulwark of
democracy: a free press.
This is because proposed
amendments to the bill would force
any publisher who refuses to join a
state-backed press regulator to pay
all the legal costs of any case brought
against them, even if they win.
Consider this for a moment. Such
a measure would mean anyone could
bring a lawsuit to prevent the
publication of stories they wanted
suppressed. Where would that leave
public interest journalism?
When I wrote about this earlier
this week, one of my Twitter
followers argued that the mainstream
media no longer held the powerful
and the dishonest to account. But
this is simply not true. The Windrush
scandal was exposed by persistent
and clear-sighted reporting by a
journalist at The Guardian. The
MPs’ expenses scandal was
uncovered by an independent
journalist and then exposed in The
Daily Telegraph. Further back, it was
the dogged campaigning journalism
of Harold Evans, editor of The Sunday
Times, that helped bring justice for
thalidomide victims.
It is undeniable that media
organisations have made terrible
mistakes but it is wrong to think that
the way to achieve redress for those
wronged by inaccurate or malicious
reporting is to threaten anyone not
part of a state-backed regulator with
crippling financial penalties.
To hold the media to account,
individuals must have access to swift,
low-cost redress through selfregulation mechanisms that are free
from the whiff of state involvement.
And for us to be able to hold those in
power to account, we all need a free
press. The House should therefore
reject these amendments.
Jodie Ginsberg is chief executive of
Index on Censorship
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
25
1G M
Comment
Buy prints or signed copies of Times cartoons from our Print Gallery at timescartoons.co.uk or call 020 7711 7826
The show about sex every parent should see
Genderquake, a Channel 4 series about today’s turbulent sexual politics, is the first to let the young speak for themselves
Alice
Thomson
@alicettimes
W
e could have guessed
what Channel 4’s
Genderquake was
going to be like
before we even
watched it this week. Bring together
11 emotional young people exploring
their sexuality and gender in the
Sussex countryside with a Jacuzzi
and cows and you will get lots of
pictures of crotches and cleavages
and talk of “fanny flutter”. Clearly,
this was going to be a Big Brotherstyle reality show about freaks living
on the edge.
Only it wasn’t. It was an incredibly
moving documentary — which every
parent could usefully watch on
catch-up — about individuals across
the gender spectrum working out
their place in the world and wanting
acceptance. Like most people, they
are looking for relationships,
satisfying jobs and families. Only
their lives are tougher because they
don’t fit into any straightforward
stereotypes and are frightened of
bullying, bigotry and loneliness. An
old man in the pub dismissed their
gender fluidity as a “fashion” but, as
Saffron said, no one would put
themselves through their pain just to
seem cool. Or as Romario admitted:
“I’m not proud to be trans . . . At what
point can I just be ‘that guy’?”
The intensity of the debate around
gender now feels seismic. I
remember writing about it a few
years ago when it hadn’t yet become
a divisive issue. A family court judge
mentioned that there were an
increasing number of cases of
teenagers wanting to transition
against their parents’ wishes. At the
time it seemed like a legal and
medical conundrum.
‘I’m not proud to be
trans . . . At what point
can I just be “that guy”?’
Now it has become a faultline.
Feminists debating on Woman’s Hour
or Mumsnet seem trans-fixed. When
Germaine Greer suggests trans
women can’t join the girls’ club, she
sounds more like an intolerant,
regressive Ukip member than the
author of The Female Eunuch.
Others think the trans debate is all
about metropolitan, middle-class,
millennial narcissists. It’s not: I know
more people who have transitioned
in Devon than in London. The local
transgender tree surgeon scales the
branches in a long dress with glittery
nail varnish and no one comments
even for health and safety reasons.
Yet at the Hampstead swimming
ponds in north London some women
are furious that they are sharing
their water with men who are
transitioning into women. More
than 300 Labour members have
quit the party over the inclusion of
transgender women on all-women
shortlists and men at one Oxford
college urinated over the floors in
protest at gender-neutral toilets.
Many of those protesting are
liberal in almost every other area of
their lives. Their feuding does little to
help people like those in
Genderquake who are trying to come
to terms with their sexuality or
gender. We need to become more
accepting, rather than feel
threatened by others’ lives; by
obsessing over gender identity we are
doing exactly what we should avoid,
putting everyone into smaller and
smaller boxes.
Not every child sits easily at their
appointed end of the blue for boys,
pink for girls spectrum and the
children in the middle have
increasingly struggled. The answer is
to talk less about gender. We
shouldn’t need all-women shortlists
in politics. Everyone has unisex loos
at home, why not in public places?
Changing rooms should all have
cubicles so that they can also be
unisex. Calling friends of my children
“they” rather than he or she has
been surprisingly easy. It’s the same
with uniforms: all pupils should be
allowed to choose between skirts and
trousers. Swimming pools shouldn’t
be segregated. I swim in the
Serpentine in Hyde Park and it’s
Obsessing over gender
identity puts people
into ever smaller boxes
never bothered anyone that both
sexes are diving in together.
In some sports where strength and
speed are involved, gender is an issue
at a competitive level but many
schools can have mixed teams and
pupils shouldn’t be forced into
playing netball or rugby just because
of their chromosomes.
This gender obsession has perhaps
driven more young people towards
feeling the need to say they are
gender-queer or non-binary. One
surgeon privately explained that he
is now removing nipples from some
twentysomethings who want to
become androgynous.
An increasing number of children,
particularly teenage girls, are binding
their breasts, taking drugs and
preparing for surgery to allow
them to transition. Perhaps if they
weren’t categorised when young
they might not feel the need to
make such a drastic, potentially
irreversible decision.
Instead of asking people whether
they use one of a multitude of titles,
no one should have to state their
gender, whether on their passport or
their Facebook page. Eventually the
information shouldn’t be necessary
for applications to university or
work, where everyone should be paid
according to their job description.
Even Playboy has already taken a
step, changing its tag from
“Entertainment for Men” to
“Entertainment for All”. Now it just
needs to change its name.
In Rooms of their Own, a new book
about the Bloomsbury set, Nino
Strachey looks at the inspirations for
Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, the heroheroine who evades the
categorisations of sex and time.
A century later we need to
complete the discussion. Tom, the
only straight guy on Genderquake,
begins by saying, “You’ve got a penis
or a vagina. There’s no in-between,
is there?” Within six hours he’s
explaining that everyone should
be themselves and no one should
be labelled.
26
1G M
Letters to the Editor should be sent to
letters@thetimes.co.uk or by post to
1 London Bridge Street, London SE1 9GF
Letters to the Editor
Taxing pensioners and the generation gap
Press freedom
Sir, The Data Protection Bill seems
overly preoccupied with press
regulation matters (“Labour press
plans ‘will harm democracy’ ”, May 8).
This country already suffers from
“libelitis”, with defamation claims
costing so much that they have
become the preserve of the wealthy.
We are now seeing a new rash of data
protection claims brought by those
who would prefer not to see their
names in the press. Punishing some
publishers with cost sanctions when
they fight an increasing number of
legal battles is taking us back to the
Dark Ages, and makes the reform
that came with the Defamation Act
2013 — which was intended to protect
public interest journalism and cut
down “libel tourism” — redundant.
Even more worrying are the calls
for a public inquiry into data use,
which could pull in small media
organisations to account for
themselves. This is all driven by a
small and affluent privacy lobby, not
the average punter, and would fix
nothing and yet cost the public a
packet. The review of media coverage
of police inquiries — the “Cliff
Richard clause” — seems to show the
real intention behind this lobby: more
regulation for the British press.
The information commissioner’s
powers of review will be extended by
this bill. That is a better way forward
if this country is to stay away from
interfering with free speech.
mark stephens
Solicitor, London E11
Sir, MPs will not only be endangering
local newspapers if they vote tonight
to support Labour amendments to the
Data Protection Bill. To impose costs
sanctions on newspapers that refuse
to sign up to Impress, the regulator
approved under the royal charter,
would also be a plain breach of the
right to freedom of expression under
Article 10 of the European Convention
on Human Rights read with Article 14
on the prohibition of arbitrary
discrimination. Freedom of the press
is too important to be undermined by
unlawful punishment for the past
wrongs of some newspapers.
lord pannick, qc
House of Lords
Sir, Rachel Sylvester (May 8) quotes
the Intergenerational Commission
idea that “wealthy” pensioners should
have their pensions taxed. They are
taxed already. I pay 45 per cent of my
state pension in tax. Does the
commission really believe I should
pay more? I have two other pensions,
one of them a very good one; the 45
per cent tax applies to most of their
payments. I paid national insurance
for 48 years. Should I now pay more
for social care? My wife needs care
yet the NHS is unable to help her
beyond a risible two 30-minute visits
a day. I am thus compelled to pay for
private live-in care, which costs a
staggering £61,000 a year. This wipes
out the belief that I am “wealthy” and
could afford to pay NI again as well as
an increased council tax so as to fund
the inadequate social care system that
exists already and to give £10,000 to
25-year-olds (a ludicrous idea that
tackles symptoms, not causes).
They used to call David Willetts,
the chairman of the think tank that
set up the commission, “two brains”. I
think he must have mislaid them on
the way to the House of Lords.
joe haines
Press secretary to Harold Wilson,
Tunbridge Wells, Kent
Sir, The Resolution Foundation knows
that older generations genuinely care
what happens to their children and
grandchildren. But where a policy
agenda includes changes that are seen
to be retrospective or unfair, this will
seriously undermine that goodwill.
For those coming up to retirement,
finding out that they will have to pay
national insurance on their wages and
pensions, will have part of their state
pension frozen and face draconian
limits on tax-free pension lump sums,
could fatally undermine their carefully
constructed financial plans. Each of
these policies might be defensible in
isolation if introduced in a phased way
but not if imposed suddenly. Political
consensus to tackle problems of
intergenerational unfairness that have
grown up over decades will be hard to
come by unless the legitimate
expectations of those close to
retirement are treated with respect.
sir steve webb
Director of policy, Royal London, and
pensions minister 2010-15
Exams take a hike
refugees in Jordan. Good non-formal
education doesn’t happen only in
prestigious institutions, it happens
wherever enlightened educationalists
recognise a simple truth: that not all
learning happens in the classroom.
john may
Secretary-general, Duke of Edinburgh’s
International Award Foundation
Sir, The principal of Gordonstoun
school is not the only head who has
recognised the importance of
supplementing academic education
with other learning opportunities
(“Pupils thrive when exams take a
hike”, May 8). More than 60 years ago
Kurt Hahn, Gordonstoun’s founding
principal, worked with Prince Philip
(his former pupil) and John Hunt,
who managed the expedition that led
to the first successful ascent of
Everest, to create the Duke of
Edinburgh’s international award.
The award challenges young people
to develop the character, skills and
confidence they need to improve
themselves and their communities. A
total of 1.3 million young people in
more than 130 countries and territories
are taking part. Participants can be
found in schools, Scout groups and
football clubs as well as in prisons and
secure units. The award has been used
to rehabilitate former child soldiers in
Uganda and to provide support for
School homework
Sir, Further to your report on Ian
McEwan (May 7, and letter, May 8),
when my children were at prep school
and it was obvious that homework had
been done by a parent, the teacher
marked it “WDM” — well done Mum.
john robinson
London NW7
Corrections and
clarifications
The Times takes
complaints
about editorial
content
seriously. We are committed to abiding
by the Independent Press Standards
Organisation (“IPSO”) rules and
regulations and the Editors’ Code of
Practice that IPSO enforces.
Requests for corrections should be sent
by email to feedback@thetimes.co.uk
or by post to Feedback, The Times, 1
London Bridge Street, London SE1 9GF
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
on this day may 9, 1918
LORDS’
DEBATE ON
PACIFISM
In the House of Lords today Lord
Denbigh called attention to pacifist
activities in the country, and Lord
Beaverbrook explained the steps
which the Government had taken to
counteract them. In a vigorous
speech, Lord Denbigh laid special
emphasis on the ignorance displayed
in the country about the Eastern
aspect of German ambitions. He
showed how this had been steadily
exploited by pacifist agencies, and
Sir, Making older people who work
pay national insurance to plug holes
in NHS and care services raises
questions over the fairness of
targeting this particular group. People
Going up to uni
Sir, I cannot understand why students
should be encouraged to study at their
local universities rather than spreading
their wings, exploring the world and
distributing their skills and knowledge
(“Cancel tuition fees for local students,
says vice-chancellor”, May 7). I grew
up in Surrey but moved to Nottingham
to study philosophy. I am nearing the
end of my degree and have learnt
more about the world through living in
a new city than I have through
studying an ancient subject. I chose
Nottingham based on the standard of
the course it offered — something that
Surrey could not offer me. Moving
moved a resolution regretting that
stronger measures had not been
taken to combat the agencies in this
country which were serving the
interests of the enemy. Lord
Beaverbrook set a fine example to
both Houses by speaking so
distinctly that the Press Gallery
enjoyed the unusual experience of
hearing every word of a Ministerial
statement. He agreed that up to the
time of the German offensive,
pacifist activities had been assuming
considerable proportions. There was
now, according to the Ministries of
Labour and Munitions, very little
industrial unrest. That, he explained,
was largely due to the offensive.
Dealing with the Press, Lord
Beaverbrook pointed out that the
supply of paper, which before the
war amounted to 8,000 tons of
newsprint a week, had fallen to
2,000 tons. He announced, however,
that the Ministry of Information had
invited the Government to increase
the supply. It was hoped that, if
anything could be done in that
direction, the newspapers would use
the additional supply to bring our
who work into their late sixties and
beyond are certainly not all well off
and we do not know whether this
measure might dissuade some from
working at all, defeating the purpose
of this proposal and undoing some
recent progress.
We should not forget that there are
bigger differences in affluence within
generations than between them.
Hence, any new funding settlement
for the NHS and social care must take
this reality into account.
caroline abrahams
Charity director, Age UK
Sir, We pensioners have worked hard
all our lives, saving to buy a house
and bring up a family, and not
claiming a penny from the state. I am
81. I joined the Royal Navy as an
apprentice at the age of 15 and served
in the Fleet Air Arm for 25 years.
When I resigned I worked in industry,
aiming to retire when I reached 60,
which I achieved. Does Lord Willetts
seriously expect my generation to be
filled with joy at giving 25-year-olds
£10,000, and at the prospect of paying
more taxes because we have worked
hard to achieve our retirement?
brian martin
Yeovil, Somerset
away from home has enabled me to be
independent, meet new people and
understand how life works in a
different part of the country, which I
could never have gained from living at
home while studying.
fiona kenyon
Beeston, Nottingham
Real-world needs
Sir, It seems that Dr Adam Marshall
(letter, May 7) believes that teachers
should be “better acquainted with the
real-world needs of business”. Has he
missed the human resources
revolution that has ushered in targets,
just-in-time ordering, performancerelated pay, marketing and
bureaucracy, all of which take teachers
away from their real vocation? I am
sure that teachers spending time in
retail, banking and manufacturing, as I
have during my career, will be grateful
to be operating in a less pressured
environment in “real-world business”.
yvonne williams
Ryde, Isle of Wight
war aims to the knowledge of the
country. Turning to his propaganda
work, Lord Beaverbrook stated that
the Ministry of Information had
made an agreement with the War
Aims Committee relating to cinema
and photographic exhibitions. The
Ministry had made arrangements by
which a semi-weekly cinema news
service would be seen by 6,000,000
persons this week, and by 12,000,000
persons weekly in a short time.
Lord Curzon wound up the debate
for the Government, and reminded
the House that, although there were
papers of the most contemptible
kind, the vast majority were on the
right side. In any case, he uttered a
warning against a tendency to
exaggerate the influence of pacifist
agencies, and asked the peers to take
heart from the fact that the spirit of
the population was right. In the end,
Lord Denbigh withdrew his motion.
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with extracts from
the times history of the war
ww1.thetimes.co.uk
Lynx attraction
Sir, Your article “Bringing back lynx
‘will scare off tourists’ ” (May 8) made
me smile. I am an expat and live in the
Santa Cruz mountains in Silicon
Valley. My neighbourhood is regularly
visited by mountain lions that would
consider a lynx a tasty morsel. My
backyard has rattlesnakes and black
widow spiders, and my other home, in
South Lake Tahoe, has brown bears
that sleep under the stairs at my front
door. People here in the US hike in the
hills and forests just to catch a glimpse
of such wonders. Northumberland
National Park Authority needs to put
things into perspective. Even though
the bobcat — the American equivalent
of the lynx — is prevalent across the
US, attacks on humans are extremely
rare, unlike attacks on humans by
household dogs, which number three
to five million. How many dogs does
the UK have, and how many attacks
are there on humans a year?
stephen j allen
Portola Valley, California
Gone fishing
Sir, I am sure that Bear Grylls’s advice
on using night lines (Weekend, May 5)
has some value in a true survival
scenario but it is environmentally
damaging and therefore, rightly,
illegal to set unattended fishing lines
here in the UK. Unattended lines
leave fish floundering for hours,
meaning that most die regardless of
their size or edibility. Unattended
strings of hooks can also entangle and
kill birds and water mammals and be
very nasty for wild swimmers. Anyone
who sees such a set-up should report
it to the Environment Agency.
rupert holden
Banchory, Aberdeenshire
Practical heroes
Sir, Libby Purves’s article “RNLI
sacking has a whiff of new puritanism”
(May 2) prompts me to suggest that
the manager or managers who sacked
the two lifeboat crewmen in Whitby be
assigned to serve as their replacement
for a year. It will give them an insight
into the kind of conditions these brave
men face. Plenty of garages have saucy
calendars and pictures of semi-naked
women. One can imagine the reaction
to any suggestion that these be taken
down — and it wouldn’t be a sacking.
keith tyler
Derby
Drawn out of a hat
Sir, The stability of the Citroën 2CV
across ploughed fields may have been
welcome in France (letters, May 1, 4, 7
& 8), but in this country a key
requirement of the postwar luxury
market — when most roads were
better maintained — was met by Lord
Rootes for his Humber cars. He
insisted that they be designed so that
his customers could get into the back
of the car with their top hats on.
andrew francis
Serle Court Chambers, London WC2
Football herds
Sir, It baffles Carol Midgley
(Notebook, May 7) that her husband
would happily endure being met by
police dogs, herded like livestock and
deprived of food, drink and sleep to
support Liverpool away against Roma
in the Champions League (May 7). As
a Swindon Town supporter I can only
dream of suffering such indignities.
roger foord
Chorleywood, Herts
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
27
1G M
Leading articles
Daily Universal Register
UK: Duke of Cambridge unveils a plaque for
the official opening of London Bridge Station.
Nature notes
Whinchats are on
their way to moors
in the north and
west, but they often
linger in eastern
counties that they
are passing through.
They can be seen in unexpected places,
such as on railway embankments. They are
robin-sized birds with an orange breast and
a noticeable white eyestripe. They continually
bob up and down, and flick their wings,
often on top of a bush or on bracken. They
also constantly make a “tic, tic” call. On the
moors, they make their grass-and-moss
nest in grass at the foot of a gorse bush
(“whin” is a northern name for gorse), or
even out in long grass in the open. Ground
nesting like this seems risky, but they are
generally successful in raising their brood.
Whinchats arriving now may find that early
comers have taken their former territory
and they may be seen fighting vigorously
to drive them out. derwent may
Birthdays today
Alan Bennett, pictured,
dramatist, The History
Boys (2004), 84; Candice
Bergen, actress, Murphy
Brown (1988-98, 2018),
72; James L Brooks,
film-maker, As Good as It
Gets (1997), and executive
producer, The Simpsons (since 1989), 78;
Sir Vince Cable, MP for Twickenham, leader
of the Liberal Democrats, business,
innovation and skills secretary (2010-15), 75;
Nina Campbell, interior designer, 73; Dan
Cole, rugby union player, Leicester Tigers
and England, 31; Nick Crane, geographer
and presenter, Coast (BBC Two, 2005-15),
64; Sir Andrew Dillon, chief executive,
National Institute for Health and Care
Excellence, 64; Lord (Murray) Elder, Labour
politician, 68; Albert Finney, actor, Skyfall
(2012), 82; Linda Finnie, opera singer, 66;
Dave Gahan, singer-songwriter, Depeche
Mode, 56; Paul Heaton, singer, the
Housemartins and the Beautiful South, 56;
Gary Hume, artist, Yellow Window (2002),
56; Glenda Jackson, Labour MP (1992-2015),
and actress, A Touch of Class (1973), 82; Billy
Joel, singer, Uptown Girl (1983), 69; Ruth
Kelly, Labour MP (1997-2010), education
and skills secretary (2004-06), 50; Lord
(Anthony) Lloyd of Berwick, Lord of Appeal
in Ordinary (1993-99), 89; Roy Massey,
organist emeritus, Hereford Cathedral, 84;
Sir Brian McMaster, director, Edinburgh
International Festival (1991-2006), 75;
Laura Muir, middle-distance runner,
two-time gold medallist, European Indoor
Athletics Championships (2017), 25;
Sir Andrew Nicol, High Court judge, 67;
Scott Pruitt, lawyer and politician, head of
the US environmental protection agency, 50;
Kate Richardson-Walsh, hockey player,
Olympic gold medallist (2016), former
captain of Great Britain and England, 38;
Patrick Ryecart, actor, The King’s Speech
(2010), 66; Most Rev George Stack, Roman
Catholic Archbishop of Cardiff, 72; Anne
Sofie von Otter, mezzo-soprano, 63; Lord
(Nicholas) Wilson of Culworth, Justice of
the Supreme Court, 73; Iain Wright, Labour
MP for Hartlepool (2004-17), shadow
minister for industry (2011-15), 46.
On this day
In 1945 the Channel Islands were liberated
by British forces from the Nazi occupation.
The last word
“On stage, I make love to 25,000 people, then
I go home alone.” Janis Joplin, singer, 1971.
Nuclear Option
In pulling America out of the Iran deal, Donald Trump has taken a big risk.
Europe has no choice but to rise to the challenge and work on a new agreement
There were always problems with the Iran nuclear
agreement because it did not stop enough of Iran’s
nefarious activities. Those it stopped, it did not
stop for long enough. Far from encouraging Iran
to respect the rules-based international order, the
agreement emboldened the regime to undermine
that order further. President Trump has made
those criticisms with passion, and his decision
yesterday to rip up the deal was no surprise.
It was, however, an extraordinary gamble. Mr
Trump opted for the most extreme version of
withdrawal available to him. He left the world in
no doubt that the United States intends to reintroduce the full gamut of sanctions on the Iranian
regime, and to sanction those elsewhere who
continue to do business with it. Though he did not
specify timelines in detail, he gave no sign of
contemplating a cooling off period. “The United
States no longer makes empty threats,” he warned.
“When I make promises, I keep them.”
Mr Trump believes that Tehran will now have
no choice but to return to the negotiating table
and agree to better terms. If he is right, it will be
another unexpected victory for his maverick and
bombastic diplomatic style. If he is wrong, his
decision could be remembered as the moment the
region began the descent into a wider war.
The central bargain brokered by President
Obama’s administration in 2015, in tandem with
the other permanent members of the United
Nations security council and Germany, was a
simple one. Western countries would end decades
of punishing sanctions in return for a promise
from Tehran that it would ship the vast majority of
nuclear fuel out of the country, stop producing
more and allow inspectors to monitor its compliance regularly.
Though the Israeli government claims to have
uncovered evidence of Iranian backsliding, which
Mr Trump explicitly endorsed in his remarks,
inspectors have not found any such evidence. On
its own limited terms, therefore, the deal worked.
The Trump administration’s objections go to the
heart of the agreement’s terms, however. The deal
imposed only a 15-year interdict on producing
enriched uranium. Even before that clock timed
out, there were to be other easements. After eight
years, for instance, restrictions on particular kinds
of centrifuges were set to fall away. These sunset
clauses, Mr Trump has reasonably argued, always
meant that Iranian ambitions to become a nuclear
power would persist. The agreement did nothing,
meanwhile, to curb Iran’s ballistic missile programme. The regime for inspection, too, although
uniquely intrusive, left much to be desired.
Iran got what it wanted from this deal. When
sanctions were still in place, the country was
exporting just over a million barrels of oil a day. It
now exports 2.5 million a day. Tehran has been
enriching itself, and most galling of all, it used the
proceeds of eased sanctions to bankroll Hezbollah
militias in Lebanon and Syria and arm Hamas in
Gaza. The regime has been a key sponsor of the
Syrian tyrant Bashar al-Assad. Iran’s Revolutionary Guards have built outposts in Syria and paid
militiamen to do its bidding there. It is expanding
with a view to intimidating Israel, positioning its
fighters within firing range. Binyamin Netanyahu,
the Israeli prime minister, has grown increasingly
agitated by the aggressive expansionism of a
theocratic regime whose hardline power brokers
want to see his country in ashes.
Meanwhile Iranian activities across the Middle
East have, if it were possible, made the age-old
animus between Tehran and Riyadh even worse,
and the possibility of nuclear proliferation in the
region could intensify it further. Mohammed bin
Salman, Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, has said that
if Tehran obtains a nuclear weapon, Saudi Arabia
would have no choice but to follow suit.This is not
a recipe for regional stability.
The worst case scenario is now that Tehran
doubles down. More extreme elements of the regime never liked the agreement anyway, and will
be delighted at the opportunity to reinvigorate the
nuclear programme. Indeed, one of the great longterm costs of abandoning the 2015 deal is that it
will embolden those hardliners and sideline more
sober interlocutors. Immediately after Mr Trump
spoke, President Rouhani announced that he had
ordered the Atomic Energy Organisation of Iran
to “be ready to start the enrichment of uranium at
industrial levels”. Yet he also appeared to leave the
door open to discussions with countries keen to
preserve the best of the deal. He said that Iran
would “wait a few weeks”, and speak to its allies,
along with those committed to the deal.
All eyes, then, are on Europe, which sought
desperately to avoid this outcome. For months,
France, Germany and Britain have been urging
the US to address its concerns outside the framework of the 2015 deal. President Macron of France
had proposed a “supplementary” agreement to sit
alongside the original one. Some in Washington
suspect there was a commercial logic there:
European companies such as Renault, Airbus and
Total have contracts that could be under threat.
But those countries worried, too, that the reintroduction of sanctions would lead Iran to ramp up
enrichment again.
In effect, Mr Trump has set his European allies
a challenge. Theresa May, along with Mr Macron
and the German chancellor Angela Merkel, reaffirmed the importance of the original deal in a
statement last night. Mr Rouhani also said he
wanted to continue with the deal. However, with
the threat of US sanctions hanging over businesses dealing in Iran, it seems unlikely it can survive
in its current form. The best outcome would be for
European countries to work in tandem with the
US administration to reach an agreement without
sunset clauses, covering ballistic missiles and
binding Iran to broader commitments than those
on nuclear development.
If that is possible, and Iran feels so overwhelmed
by economic pressure that it can only come back
to the table, then the return of a nuclear weapons
programme is not a foregone conclusion. Having
shown he is willing to walk, Mr Trump may now
surprise US allies and push Iran into making further concessions. His diplomatic style has been
unexpectedly successful in driving forward the
possible denuclearisation of North Korea, and
could pay dividends again. If Washington and
Tehran both dig in, however, his decision will herald the return of a volatile country with realistic
nuclear ambitions, and put western European
countries, including Britain, in a diplomatic bind.
Threat to Freedom
Amendments to the Data Protection Bill miss the most important point and
would replace an effective system of regulation with an illiberal hotchpotch
In his new book How Democracy Ends, David
Runciman suggests that it may fade away rather
than dramatically collapse. Little understanding
of the institutions necessary to bolster a democracy could slowly strangle the vitality out of a
political culture. One of those institutions is a free
press. Today amendments are tabled before
parliament to the Data Protection Bill that offer
no benefits and plenty of threats to press freedom.
One amendment seeks to impose cost sanctions
on newspapers that do not join a state-backed
regulator. A second amendment, tabled by the
former Labour leader Ed Miliband, would require
the government to establish a public inquiry into
data protection breaches by media organisations.
The first suggestion is illiberal and wrong and the
second is a waste of time, public money and
completely beside the point.
The first part of the Leveson inquiry ended in
2012 and in March of this year the government
said that a planned second part would not take
place because of significant changes to the media
landscape. There is no doubt that there was
significant wrongdoing in parts of the press but the
upshot of the Leveson inquiry was a good one.
Much has changed in the industry as a result and
there is now an effective independent regulator,
the Independent Press Standards Organisation
(Ipso), which regulates most national titles and
1,000 local newspapers. Ipso is a tough taskmaster
with the power, and the willingness, to impose
fines and prominent corrections and adjudications. It has established virtually cost-free
arbitration for complainants against the press,
thus avoiding expensive court action.
The Miliband amendment is an attempt to revisit
a series of issues that have been comprehensively
aired, investigated and settled. A thorough police
inquiry led to the arrest of 67 journalists, of whom
57 were cleared. Compensation was and is still
being paid to claimants in civil cases. The News of
the World newspaper was closed down. In 2015 the
director of public prosecutions ruled that no further action was merited either against individuals
or in respect of corporate liability. There is simply
no public interest case to reopen the inquiry.
Though the amendment tries to widen the
scope beyond what was originally planned as
Leveson 2, it does so only by reviving Leveson 1.
This seems an extraordinarily dated priority in an
era in which information and power are spread
digitally and rapidly. Surely MPs would be better
served getting to the heart of what the Data
Protection Act is actually about. The bill before
the Commons is an attempt to protect personal
data in the age of the internet and social media.
When Facebook holds the data of two billion
people with little control over where it goes, it is
astonishing that some MPs should think it more
important to change the conversation back to the
old media. The data protection laws that apply to
newspapers are already clear and effective. They
will be policed by the information commissioner,
whose powers will be increased by the new act.
The names of Google, Facebook and Amazon
were already a significant omission when
Leveson 1 reported. It would be close to absurd to
go back over the same old terrain again.
It is obvious that The Times, like all news outlets,
has a stake in this question. It also has an interest
in a vigorous public realm in which conventional
wisdoms can be questioned and wrongdoings
exposed. The people and groups backing these
amendments style themselves as acting on behalf
of the little person against the powerful establishment and certainly the curbing of power is an
important democratic principle. Yet none matters
more than that expression and speech should be
free. Truth in a democracy emerges from the
exchange of opinion and the amendments before
the Commons set that back.
28
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
World
Trump gambles that sanctions
United States
Rhys Blakely Washington
Donald Trump made the biggest foreign policy gamble of his presidency
last night as he withdrew from the Iran
nuclear deal and bet that Tehran could
be pulled back to the negotiating table.
Promising “powerful new sanctions”,
he offered a bold prediction on Tehran’s
likely reaction. “The fact is, they are
going to want to make a new and lasting
deal, one that benefits all of Iran and the
Iranian people,” he said.
“When they do, I am ready, willing,
and able. Great things can happen for
Iran. And great things can happen for
the peace and stability that we all want
in the Middle East. There has been
enough suffering, death, and destruction. Let it end now.”
Under the 2015 pact Iran agreed to
restrictions on its civilian nuclear programme in exchange for the lifting of a
complex web of international sanctions
that had been stitched together over
the course of a decade.
Mr Trump’s disdain for the deal predated his entry into politics: he was still
best known as a reality TV star when, in
2013, he took a jab at President Obama,
who had just spoken to President Rouhani for the first time. “Iran is toying
with our president,” an incredulous Mr
Trump wrote on Twitter. Tehran, he
argued, was “buying time and laughing
at the stupidity of our leadership!”
Yesterday he showed he had finally
lost patience with the pact widely regarded as Mr Obama’s most consequential diplomatic achievement.
The deal did not police Iran’s missile
programme nor curb its military interventions across the Middle East, he
said. Inspections of nuclear facilities
were not robust enough, and the longterm curbs on fuel enrichment were too
weak. “This was a horrible one-sided
deal that should have never, ever been
made,” Mr Trump said yesterday. “It
didn’t bring calm, it didn’t bring peace,
and it never will.”
But as he sought yesterday to sever
Iran from the global financial system he
ran the risk of isolating himself from
several key allies. The other signatories
to the Iran deal — China, Russia, Germany, France and Britain — had urged
him not to weaken it. Angela Merkel,
the German chancellor, and President
Macron of France had both travelled to
Washington last month in an effort to
save the agreement. Boris Johnson, the
foreign secretary, said during his own
trip to the American capital this week
that there was no credible “plan B”.
Mr Trump’s tough stance suggested
that the influence of Jim Mattis, the defence secretary who has backed the Iran
deal, has waned since the recent appointment of two Iran hawks: Mike
Pompeo, the secretary of state, and John
Bolton, the national security adviser.
Mr Trump is expected to revive sanctions originally drafted by Congress in
2012 under the National Defence Authorisation Act designed to reduce exports of Iranian oil. Under US law he
had to sign a waiver of those sanctions
Fordow
Tehran
Parchin
Arak
Natanz
Saghand
Isfahan
I R A N
Nuclear site
Military site
Bushehr
Uranium mine
every 120 days, and the next deadline
had been due this Saturday.
The act allows for foreign financial
institutions that do business with Iran’s
Central Bank for the purpose of buying
Iranian oil to be cut off from the US
banking system.
Aggressive enforcement would be
likely to increase tensions between the
US and its main trading partners, including the EU and China, who both
argue that the Iran deal was working.
Trade relationships with the EU have
already been frayed by Mr Trump’s
threat to introduce protectionist tariffs
on imported steel and aluminium.
Between 2015 and 2017 European imports from Iran rose by nearly 800 per
cent, mostly driven by oil.
A separate set of US sanctions
waivers were up for renewal on July 11,
focusing on more than 400 Iranian
companies, individuals and business
sectors. Those measures are set to be
revived later this year. Several countries are expected to resist US demands
that they “wind down” their operations
in Iran. Total, the French oil company,
has announced plans to invest $1 billion
in one of Iran’s largest offshore gas
fields.
Late last year Russia unveiled plans
to pour as much as $30 billion into Iran’s
oil and gas industries. China and India
are now the biggest buyers of Iranian
crude, and Airbus, the aerospace
company, has a contract to sell Iran Air
100 planes, at a list price of more than
$20 billion, although only three have
been delivered.
Analysts say that the White House
will also have to bring Turkey, a key hub
for previous sanctions evasions by Iran,
into line. Peter Harrell, a former
sanctions specialist at the state
department, wrote in an analysis:
“Washington’s strained ties with
Ankara make it far from clear that
Turkey would co-operate.”
Experts have suggested that Iran will
explore the option of trading in
Chinese yuan-denominated crude oil
futures on the Shanghai International
Energy Exchange, skirting restrictions
on dollar-denominated trade and US
banks. Previous sanctions, imposed in
2012, had cut Iran’s oil exports in half
and caused economic turmoil. A doubling of oil exports helped to lift economic growth to 12 per cent in 2016.
Last year, however, the growth rate
fell to 4 per cent while unemployment
rose to record highs, according to
Djavad Salehi-Isfahani, an analyst for
the Brookings think tank in Washington. According to a 2016 census, among
college-educated people aged 20 to 29,
36 per cent of men and 50 per cent of
women are unemployed.
Mr Pompeo said: “We will be working
together with partners to eliminate the
threat of Iran’s ballistic missile programme; to stop its terrorist activities
worldwide; and to block its menacing
activity across the Middle East and beyond. As we build this global effort,
sanctions will go into full effect and will
remind the Iranian regime of the
diplomatic and economic isolation that
results from its reckless and malign
activity.”
Leading article, page 27
Oil prices turn volatile, page 43
Israel launches immediate airstrike
Israel
Anshel Pfeffer
Less than two hours after President
Trump’s announcement Israeli jets
were reported to have hit targets linked
to Iranian forces in Syria.
According to Israeli sources the airstrikes were authorised after intelligence detected troop movements that
could have been preparations for
launching missiles against Israel.
Syrian spokesmen confirmed the
attack, blamed Israel and claimed that
two missiles fired at the base south of
Damascus had been intercepted by
Syrian air-defence batteries. Israel
refuses to acknowledge or deny airstrikes in Syria.
The official Syrian news agency Sana
said that the attack occurred in Kiswah,
a rural area known to have numerous
army bases. Syrian television reported
large explosions in the area. The Syrian
Observatory for Human Rights, a UKbased monitoring group, said that the
airstrikes targeted weapons stores of
Iran’s Revolutionary Guards and killed
nine fighters.
Earlier in the evening the Israeli
army said that it had detected “irregular activities of Iranian forces in Syria”.
Israeli intelligence believes that the
Revolutionary Guards Corps, together
with the Lebanese militia Hezbollah,
have been planning to launch missiles
at Israel in retaliation for Israeli airstrikes on Iranian bases in Syria.
Israeli residents in the Golan
Heights, near the Syrian border, were
instructed to prepare air-raid shelters.
A limited number of Israeli military
reservists have been called up and the
Israeli army has deployed missile
defence batteries to its northern border.
Iran has vowed to retaliate against
recent Israeli strikes in Syria targeting
Iranian outposts. They include an
attack last month on Syria’s T4 airbase
in Homs province that killed seven
Iranian military personnel. On
April 30, Israel was said to have struck
government outposts in northern
Syria, killing more than a dozen progovernment fighters, many of them
Iranians.
While not directly connected to the
Iran deal, the situation in Syria has been
mentioned by critics as one reason why
it was insufficient to confront Iran’s
plans in the Middle East. Binyamin
Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister
who has been the Iran deal’s most vocal
opponent, was among the first to
congratulate Mr Trump on his move.
“The deal didn’t reduce Iran’s aggression, it dramatically increased it, and
we see this across the entire Middle
East,” Mr Netanyahu said.
Q&A
Why does Mr Trump oppose the deal?
It was the signature foreign policy
achievement of the Obama
administration, and opposing it
became an article of faith for
Republican presidential contenders.
On the campaign trail Mr Trump called
it the worst deal in history and
threatened to tear it up. He had
particular objection to the “sunset
clauses”: in 2023 and 2028 limits on
the speed and number of Iran’s
centrifuges were to vanish, and after
2030 it would face no constraints on
its enriched uranium stockpile. Mr
Trump objected to the deal’s narrow
focus on Iran’s nuclear programme,
leaving other areas of problematic
behaviour untouched. A UN resolution
enshrining the deal urged Iran not to
advance its ballistic missile
programme for eight years but placed
no sanctions on it doing so. Iran’s
meddling in places such as Syria,
Yemen and Iraq and its sponsorship of
Hezbollah were not addressed. Mr
Trump has also, wrongly, tied the deal
to the repayment of $1.7 billion to Iran
for an unfulfilled arms deal, exploited
by hawks to underline the idea that Mr
Obama was too soft on Tehran.
Who besides the US and Iran is
involved?
Britain, Russia, China, France and
Germany. The deal is backed up by a
UN security council resolution that
enshrined it in international law. Mr
Trump’s decision to pull out puts him
in breach of that resolution. European
leaders tried desperately to convince
him not to withdraw, and to hammer
out a compromise agreement on other
issues. His rebuffal now risks a crisis in
relations between the US and Europe.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
29
2G M
The World at Five
The unlikely return
of Oliver North
In depth and online today at 5pm
thetimes.co.uk
will drag Iran back for new deal
ALAMY; IRANIAN PRESIDENT’S OFFICE/AP
Tehran ready to start
enriching in weeks
if trade breaks down
Iran
Richard Spencer
Middle East Correspondent
P
President
Trump
delivering his verdict
d
on the deal yesterday.
o
President
P
Ahmadinejad backed
A
Iranian nuclear
Ir
projects at Arak, main
p
picture, and
p
elsewhere before he
e
was ousted in 2013
w
Does the deal now collapse?
Britain has said it remains committed
to the deal even without the US being
part of it and has urged the other
parties to continue as before. Much
depends on how Iran reacts. At present
allowed to possess 300kg of uranium
enriched to below 5 per cent, it says it
is in a position to begin enriching
uranium to 20 per cent purity within
48 hours of cancelling the deal. That is
a higher purity than required to
produce nuclear energy, but lower
than the 90 per cent purity needed to
fuel a nuclear weapon. Tehran said that
it would be used to make medical
isotopes that it now receives from
abroad. Iranian officials have also said
that they could swiftly resort to the old
safeguarding agreement with the UN
atomic watchdog that is common to all
member states, with minimal
inspections and the right to unlimited
uranium enrichment. President
Rouhani, however, suggested that Iran
might not immediately abandon the
deal, although the decision ultimately
rests with the Supreme Leader.
Was the deal working?
Yes, within its narrow scope. The UN
atomic watchdog has certified Iran’s
compliance 11 times, despite Mr
Trump’s claims of violations. In the
past two months Mr Trump’s director
of national intelligence, secretary of
state and secretary of defence have all
confirmed that Iran was complying
with the deal. The 2015 agreement
resulted in Iran shipping out 98 per
cent of its enriched uranium and
unplugging 13,000 centrifuges, two
thirds of the total. It also filled its
plutonium production reactor with
concrete, shuttered its underground
enrichment facility at Fordow and
submitted to rigorous international
inspections of 18 nuclear sites. In
return, crippling economic sanctions
were lifted. Critics, however, insist the
inspections are inadequate as they do
not include non-nuclear military bases.
Will Iran now build a bomb?
Iran has denied it was ever seeking to
do so, claiming that its nuclear
programme was for civilian energy
generation. However, it has repeatedly
deceived the outside world on the
issue: international inspectors reported
in 2003 that it had failed to declare
uranium enrichment as required. It was
ordered to halt those activities but
refused. Iran also secretly carried out
technical work on weapons production
that convinced the international
community that it was nearing nuclear
breakout capability. Experts say there
is no evidence that Iran has ever taken
the political decision to build a bomb
but was clearly seeking to reach the
point of nuclear breakout, dramatically
increasing its leverage before the deal
was struck.
Catherine Philp
President Rouhani insisted last night
that Iran would do its best to keep itself
and America’s European allies inside
the nuclear deal, an act of defiance
aimed at both President Trump and
hardliners in the regime.
It was also a mark of the problems his
government is facing from a weakening
economy, collapsing currency and popular protests against corruption and
unemployment. Mr Rouhani referred
to Mr Trump’s announcement as “psychological warfare”.
He said he would open talks with the
European Union, Russia and China to
see if trade could continue as before.
However, Richard Grenell, the new US
ambassador to Germany, said that German companies should wind down operations in Iran.
Mr Rouhani warned that if talks failed, Iran would resume nuclear activities “within weeks”. Hardliners had previously made clear that they were keen
to scrap the deal altogether. They hinted at other forms of retaliation also,
with Israel last night on high alert for
attack from Iran-backed forces in
neighbouring Syria.
Ari Larijani, the influential speaker of
the Iranian parliament, told a visiting
Brazilian delegation yesterday that the
US had been taking “wrong actions”
since the day the deal was signed.
“Apparently one should speak with
the Americans through the language of
force and there is no other solution,” he
said, according to Fars news agency.
The failure of the deal will isolate and
even humiliate Mr Rouhani, whose
lieutenants negotiated it in the face of
vicious backbiting from hardline
elements of the regime. He has been its
strongest supporter in Iran and has
promoted himself as a pragmatist who
puts good relations with the West
before narrow interpretations of the
anti-Western tenets of the Islamic
Revolution.
In the months after the deal
came into effect in 2015 that
approach appeared to pay off
as confidence surged into the
economy. Renewed oil sales
sent GDP soaring by 12.5 per
cent in the first year. Non-oil
exports also rose, and there
was some relief to Iran’s
long-term
unemployment.
However, that initial
boost was not sustained,
as companies that had
wanted to invest in the
Iranian economy found
President Rouhani is
eager to keep a
dialogue going with
US allies in Europe
Economic impact
Iranian trade balance
Exports
Imports
320
Jul 2015:
nuclear US$m
240
deal
2011: new
sanctions
160
80
2010
12
14
16
0
2018
Iranian GDP (annual % change)
Projections
2015-16 17-18
19-20
21-22
15%
12
9
6
3
0
-3
themselves stymied, partly by continuing fear of American sanctions. Airbus
and Boeing have both signed outline
deals to sell about 200 new aircraft to
Iran’s ageing and decrepit fleet, for
example, but only three of those jets,
from Airbus, have so far been delivered.
In other cases, companies found that
doing business in Iran meant engaging
with companies linked to regime
figures, particularly those connected to
the Islamic Revolutionary Guard
Corps, which remained under individual US sanctions.
Economic growth sank back to 4 per
cent last year, and by December there
were protests across Iranian cities
against the regime’s failure to lift poorer
provinces out of poverty. Officials were
accused of widespread corruption.
In recent weeks the value of the rial
has been in freefall as the middle classes
seek to buy dollars and euros.
Mr Trump’s new team of foreign
policy advisers, led by John Bolton,
his national security adviser, and
Mike Pompeo, the secretary of state —
both Iran hawks — may believe that
another push on sanctions will bring
the regime down.
In Iran, analysts say that renewed
American hostility, and what they say is
confirmation that America can never
be trusted, will unite the leadership
more tightly.
Mr Rouhani was putting on
a positive face right up until
the announcement. Yesterday he told oil industry executives that Iran could
weather the storm.
“It is possible that we will
face some problems for two
or three months, but we will
pass through this,” he said.
However,
even
he
warned that if the US
abandoned the deal
altogether “they will
regret it like never
before in history”.
30
2G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
World
JU PENG/XINHUA/AP; MINORU IWASAKI/KYODO NEWS/AP
Pompeo flies in
to prepare for
summit with Kim
North Korea
Daniel Hurst Tokyo
Didi Tang Beijing
Mike Pompeo, the US secretary of
state, was flying to North Korea last
night to finalise President Trump’s
summit with Kim Jong-un.
Without giving details, Mr Trump
revealed that the time and location of
the first meeting between the leaders of
the two countries had been set.
Speaking at the White House, Mr
Trump said: “We think relationships
are building with North Korea, we will
see how it all works out. Maybe it will,
maybe it won’t. But it can be a great
thing for North Korea, South Korea,
Japan and the entire world and we hope
it all works out.”
Earlier Mr Kim travelled to China for
the second time in two months as
Beijing sought to reassert its influence
over Pyongyang. The North Korean
leader flew to the coastal city of Dalian
for what was described as two days of
constructive talks with Xi Jinping, the
Chinese
president.
He
was
accompanied by his sister, Kim Yojong, and Ri Su-yong, a senior aide.
According to Chinese state media,
Mr Kim told President Xi that it was a
consistent and clear goal of North Ko-
rea to have a nuclear-free Korean peninsula. He is also reported to have said
that “as long as relevant sides abandon
the hostile policy toward North Korea
and make no security threat, North Korea has no need to possess nuclear
weapons”.
In addition to the talks, Mr Xi hosted
a banquet in Mr Kim’s honour. The two
also took a seaside stroll, with the
atmosphere reported to have been
friendly and warm. South Korean and
Japanese media had speculated about
the arrival of a high-level North Korean
official after an aircraft usually reserved for the regime’s VIPs was seen in
Dalian. However, just as with
Mr Kim’s journey to Beijing
n in
by armoured train
ate
March, China’s state
media
did
nott
confirm the visit
until after he left.
Ri Chun-hee, a
North Korean television announcer, read out a 20minute
report
about the trip
yesterday.
ey
The train journey
had been Mr Kim’s first
ince he
international trip since
K Jong-un’s summit with President Xi was made public
Kim
only
after it ended — a VIP aircraft had created speculation
o
took power nearly
to
se
seven
years ago. He
is not known to
sha
share his late father
Kim Jong-il’s fear of
flying, b
but until recently
h
ad opted to stay in the
had
country, possibly to forestall any perceived threats to his rule.
Mr Xi praised Mr Kim for valuing
North Korea’s relationship with China
and expressed pleasure that bilateral
ties had prospered since Mr Kim’s previous visit. He said that Beijing would
do its part in promoting peace and prosperity on the Korean peninsula.
China is North Korea’s only significant ally and its biggest trading partner,
but the relationship has soured in
recent years over Beijing’s support for
sanctions against the Kim regime for its
nuclear and missile tests. The new
flurry of diplomacy follows last month’s
historic meeting between the leaders of
North and South Korea, at which Mr
Kim backed a nuclear weapons-free
peninsula and agreed to work towards
achieving a peace treaty.
Mr Kim said he hoped his summit
with Mr Trump would establish trust
with the US. He said that both sides
should take phased, in-tandem measures, pushing for a political process to
achieve the goal of a nuclear-free peninsula that enjoys lasting peace.
American officials have argued
against an incremental approach, saying that they had learnt lessons from
previous encounters with North Korea,
when the country was granted economic relief too early. Mr Kim has suggested that denuclearisation is conditional on the US ending its “hostile
policy” towards the North, but the
comments illustrate the differences
that remain to be thrashed out.
Expectations rose last week that
North Korea was preparing to release
three American prisoners, but there
have been no official updates since
reports that they had been moved to a
hotel on the outskirts of Pyongyang.
Last night Mr Pompeo said he would
raise their plight during his trip.
Mr Trump spoke to Mr Xi by phone
yesterday. According to the White
House, the two leaders agreed to maintain sanctions on North Korea “until it
permanently dismantles its nuclear
and missile programmes”.
Roger Boyes, page 24
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
31
2G M
World
WXCHASING; KEITH BROCK
Newsreaders
wear black in
bias protest
Spain
Graham Keeley Madrid
Presenters on the Spanish equivalent
of the BBC have been dressing in black
to mourn the death of impartial news
coverage amid claims of conservative
bias.
Journalists at Radio Television
Española (RTVE) said that they would
wear black every Friday to protest
against the alleged manipulation of
news in favour of the ruling Popular
Party.
The television network, which is financed by taxes, not a licence fee, comRTVE presenters
mourn the “death”
of impartial news
No parking
ki L
Lava ffrom H
Hawaii’s
ii’ Kil
Kilauea volcano
l
consumes a car. A crater collapse has pushed magma towards residential areas causing it to erupt through the streets
Record fall in German offending
belies fear of migrant crime wave
Germany
David Charter Berlin
Germany recorded an almost 10 per
cent drop in crime last year to its lowest
level since the early 1990s despite perceptions that the arrival of more than a
million asylum seekers would lead to a
rise in offences.
In fact crimes committed by immigrants from outside the EU fell sharply,
the government said, mainly because of
a dramatic cut in asylum seekers crossing the border illegally.
The fall came against a backdrop of
German angst about Angela Merkel’s
refugee policy, which contributed to the
anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany (AfD) party taking 12.6 per cent
of the vote in last September’s election.
Some AfD supporters linked Muslim
immigration to rising crime, citing as
evidence hundreds of sexual assaults in
Cologne on New Year’s Eve 2016, mainly carried out by men of North African
appearance, leading campaigners to
demonise refugees as “rapefugees”.
Overall, violent crime was down by
The key points
German crime figures for 2017 as
compared with the previous year,
split between German and
non-German suspects.
V 1.7%
Overall violent crime down; the fall
in violent crime perpetrated by nonGermans was higher, at 1.9 per cent
U 5%
Rise in murder. The number of nonGerman suspects rose 5.5 per cent
V 46.4%
Fall in sexual harassment. Total of
non-German suspects 47.6 per cent
V 9.9%
Fall in burglary. Total of non-German
suspects down by 12.9 per cent
1.7 per cent last year, the Interior Ministry said, although refugees and asylum
seekers were proportionately over-represented in sexual assault cases. The
figures showed that 10.6 per cent of
cases involving serious bodily harm
and 15.9 per cent of rape and serious
sexual assault cases were carried out by
suspects who were refugees, asylumseekers or non-EU illegal immigrants.
The German population was
82.7 million last year, including 5.9 million residents from non-EU countries,
or 7.2 per cent.
Among all non-German suspects,
rape and serious sexual assault fell last
year to 2,421 cases from 2,512 in 2016.
Overall crime reported fell by 9.6 per
cent to its lowest level since 1992.
“Despite all the challenges the clear
fact is that Germany is more secure —
though there is still a lot to do,” Horst
Seehofer, the interior minister, said.
There were significant drops in
break-ins, shoplifting and pickpocketing but increases in drug offences, economic and weapons crimes. Far-right
attacks on asylum-seeker hostels
dropped sharply to 300 last year, from
929 in 2016. Hate crimes fell from 10,751
to 7,913, but there was a 2.5 per cent rise
in antisemitic crimes, to 1,504.
“It is not surprising that the so-called
‘imported antisemitic crimes’ are
rising, even if at a lower level. But I want
to make clear that almost 95 per cent of
antisemitic crimes in 2017 had a rightwing motive,” Mr Seehofer said.
Christian Pfeiffer, a leading criminologist, said that asylum-seekers and refugees were over-represented because
many came from the young male demographic most likely to commit crime.
“Young men between 14 and 30 were
the most problematic group even
before 2014, ” Mr Pfeiffer said. “Then
they made up half of suspects but only
9 per cent of the general population.”
One in four of the refugees and asylum-seekers in recent years are young
men. “The lack of women is noticeable,”
Mr Pfeiffer told Deutsche Welle, the
public broadcaster. “Women make a
point of solving issues civilly. When
they are not there, macho behaviour
gets out of hand.”
Coastguard stand-off leaves refugees adrift for days
Italy
Tom Kington Rome
More than 100 migrants rescued off the
Libyan coast were marooned at sea for
three days as the Italian authorities
“put lives at risk” by refusing to take
responsibility for them.
The stand-off over the fate of the
group rescued by British-flagged charity vessels came as Italy ended its policy
of automatically allowing migrants
rescued by charities to land at its ports,
and threw up bureaucratic obstacles to
discourage requests. Nick Romaniuk,
an official on board the Aquarius rescue
ship which billeted the migrants on its
decks, said: “This is creating extra confusion in a confused situation which
puts lives at risk.”
The UK-flagged Astral, operated by
the Spanish charity Proactiva Open
Arms, rescued the 105 migrants on
Sunday after the Italian coastguard
issued an alert. The small rescue vessel
asked Rome for permission to transfer
the migrants, who included a child
vomiting blood, to the larger Aquarius,
which is Gibraltar-flagged and run by
the French charity SOS Méditerranée.
The rescuers, who had assumed that
Italy was supervising the operation and
that Rome would allow the transfer,
were told to deal with the British
authorities. The Italian coastguard
finally gave permission for the transfer
late on Monday night, but by yesterday
afternoon it had not given authorisation for the Aquarius to dock in Italy.
Yesterday evening it said it had decided to allow it to dock given worsening
weather conditions at sea. Rome said
that the migrants would be granted a
“safe place to disembark”.
Luigi Manconi, an Italian former
senator, said: “What we are seeing is a
desperate move by Italy to denounce
the lack of collaboration from other
countries. If left alone it is obvious it will
use the rules anyway it can.”
Mr Romaniuk said: “It is not ideal to
keep these people on the deck of the
Aquarius. These people need to be
landed somewhere as soon as possible.”
More than 600,000 migrants have
arrived on Italian shores in the past four
years, creating anger among voters and
prompting Italy to help train the Libyan
coastguard to intercept migrants —
19,000 last year — and return them.
mands the biggest audience share in
Spain. The journalists claim that protests against Manuela Carmena, the
left-wing mayor of Madrid, were given
great prominence but when Mariano
Rajoy, the Spanish prime minister and
leader of PP, faced booing crowds the
segments were cut.
Xabier Fortes, a member of the news
council of journalists at RTVE, said:
“We want a broadcaster which reports
for all Spaniards.” He and colleagues
have called for the sacking of José Antonio Sánchez, the RTVE president,
who has denied any suggestion of political bias.
Court to rule
on carving in
Luther church
David Charter
A court is to decide the fate of an antisemitic medieval “Jew’s sow” carving on
the façade of the church of Martin
Luther after a Jewish campaigner sued
for its removal.
Dating from 1305, the “Judensau” at
St Mary’s in Wittenberg depicts a Rabbi
holding up the tail of a large pig to inspect its rear while two Jewish children
suckle underneath it. The sandstone
relief is one of many similar antisemitic
images installed at German churches
during the Middle Ages.
Councillors at the town in eastern
Germany voted last summer to retain
the carving after a petition to remove it
gained more than 5,000 signatures.
The court case, which has been referred
to the Saxony-Anhalt state court, was
brought by Michael Düllmann, a
member of a synagogue in Berlin. Mr
Düllmann said Jews were degraded by
the carving, and proposed that it be sent
to a museum where it could be viewed
with explanations of its origins.
The church and the town argued that
the carving should stay as a reminder of
historical prejudice of the kind that led
to the Holocaust, which is also commemorated at the church.
Johannes Block, pastor at St Mary’s,
said the church was “appalled and
affected” by this part of its heritage.
“We must weigh up how to treat this
history,” he said. “So far we are convinced: we should show history, not
hide history, and deal with the negative
so that something positive comes of it.”
32
2G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
World
Strongman moves in on jihadists
Libya
Richard Spencer
Middle East Correspondent
Bel Trew
Forces loyal to the anti-Islamist strongman Marshal Khalifa Haftar have
begun an assault on the last jihadistheld town in eastern Libya.
Troops from the self-styled Libyan
National Army (LNA), based in Benghazi, have been involved in fierce
fighting on the outskirts of Derna, with
both sides suffering casualties.
“Zero hour for the liberation of
Derna has struck,” Marshal Haftar said.
“Our army forces are now targeting
their hideouts.”
Marshal Haftar was an officer in the
army of Colonel Gaddafi before he
defected to the United States.
He returned to Libya after
the 2011 uprising and now
has the firm support of
Egypt and the United Arab
Emirates.
He is in an uneasy truce
with the UN-backed
Marshal Haftar is
backed by Egypt
and the UAE
TUNI
TU
NISIA
NI
NIS
IS
Mediterranean Sea
Benghazi
Tripoli
Derna
Tobruk
LIBYA
Sebha
100 miles
authorities in Tripoli, the Government
of National Accord (GNA), pending
elections that the UN wants to
take place this year.
Derna, which is entirely surrounded by LNA forces, is run by
E X C L U S I V E R E WA R D S F O R S U B S C R I B E R S
the Mujahidin Shura Council, a coalition of Islamist groups. The campaign
to subdue it began with airstrikes. The
LNA has its own jets but has also received support from the Egyptian air
force.
The latest attack was condemned by
Tripoli-based opponents of Marshal
Haftar who are loyal to the GNA.
Mohammed Amari Zayed, a presidential council member, was quoted by The
Libya Observer as saying: “This military
escalation will deepen Libya’s crisis and
undermine peace and reconciliation
efforts.” He condemned the siege as
“inhuman”.
A spokesman for Marshal Haftar
said: “The city is under the control of
al-Qaeda and some Isis. No civilians
can leave or carry on with normal life.”
The LNA had tried in vain to persuade local tribal leaders to arrange a
surrender, he added. “Our troops are
slowly moving into the city. We have
slowed down the advance because we
want the civilians to leave the terrorist
locations.”
Marshal Haftar was speaking at a
parade to mark the fourth anniversary
of the founding of his “Operation
Dignity” campaign, which aims to drive
Islamists out of Libya and in particular
Benghazi, the main city in the east.
His speech also served to emphasise
that he was fully in control of the LNA
after returning from medical treatment
in Paris. Speculation had been growing
that he had suffered a severe stroke or
even that he had died.
Emergency
in Congo as
ebola returns
Democratic Republic of Congo
Jane Flanagan
Understanding the
future of technology
Join us on Monday, May 21 to consider the big questions regarding
the future of technology. Red Box editor Matt Chorley and an expert
panel including Matt Hancock MP and Timandra Harkness will
discuss the politics, ethics and probability of a tech takeover.
Book tickets today at mytimesplus.co.uk
mytimesplus.co.uk
Two people have died from ebola in the
Democratic Republic of Congo, and
symptoms of haemorrhagic fever are
being observed in 21 others.
Seventeen people have also died in
the town of Bikoro, in the northwest of
the central African country, although
the cause of their death has yet to be
established. Specialists have arrived to
try to stop the virus spreading. The government referred to the outbreak, the
country’s ninth, as “an international
public health emergency”.
Medical teams supported by the
World Health Organisation took five
samples from suspected sufferers last
Saturday, of which two have tested positive for the Zaire strain of the virus, the
health ministry said.
Congo has recorded more outbreaks
of ebola than any other country. Its
most recent ended almost a year ago
after killing four and infecting four
others. When the fever spread through
Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia
between 2014 and 2016, it claimed more
than 11,300 lives. Without preventive
measures the virus can spread quickly
and it is fatal in up to 90 per cent of
cases.
Congo, whose Ebola river gave the
deadly virus its name when it was discovered there in the 1970s, has been engulfed in a constitutional crisis since
President Kabila refused to stand down
two years ago at the end of his second
five-year term in office.
The political impasse has led to a flare
up in the conflict, which has fuelled
what the United Nations described as a
“catastrophic humanitarian crisis”. Up
to 13 million people are in need of
emergency support.
Abandoned newborns
found to be sisters
Berlin Three baby girls found
abandoned in and around the
German capital in recent years
are siblings, police said. The first
newborn was discovered in Berlin
in September 2015, the second in
August the following year and the
third in the nearby village of
Schwanebeck in August 2017.
Michael Maass, a police
spokesman, said DNA tests
showed that the girls have the
same mother and probably also
the same father. Police are
appealing for information that
might help them to find the
mother, because she endangered
the infants’ lives by not using one
of Berlin’s baby boxes, which
allow women to give up their
babies anonymously while
alerting the authorities to their
presence. All three babies now
live with foster families. (AP)
Medvedev stays on
Moscow Dmitry Medvedev won a
new term as prime minister of
Russia as the lower house of
parliament voted overwhelmingly
for President Putin’s long-term
ally to retain his post. A total of
374 MPs backed his candidacy
and 56 voted against. The
Communist and Just Russia
parties opposed it. Mr Putin
praised him in a speech before
the vote. Mr Medvedev, 52, said
his government would work
towards fulfilling new national
targets announced this week by
Mr Putin. (AFP)
Attorney-general quits
New York Prosecutors are
investigating claims by four
women that Eric Schneiderman,
who resigned yesterday as
attorney-general for the city,
slapped, choked, verbally
assaulted and threatened them.
Mr Schneiderman, 63, a
Democrat, was a thorn in the side
of President Trump and had
promised to hold others to
account for abusing their power.
“I have not assaulted anyone,” he
said. “I have never engaged in
non-consensual sex, which is a
line I would not cross.” (AP)
Protest leader now PM
Yerevan The leader of a “velvet
revolution” that swept through
Armenia in weeks has been
installed as prime minister. Nikol
Pashinyan’s candidacy was
approved in parliament after MPs
in the ruling Republican party,
which blocked his candidacy last
week, changed their stance. The
MP and former newspaper editor,
42, led peaceful demonstrations
that forced Serzh Sargsyan to
resign last month. Mr Sargsyan,
who had been president since
2008, had become prime minister
after increasing the role’s powers.
Arrest over antiquities
Athens A man aged 32 has been
arrested after ancient artefacts
were found decorating his
restaurant in Parga, a seaside
town in northwestern Greece.
Police confiscated fragments of
about 90 pots and jars that
archaeologists identified as late
medieval and ancient Greek. The
owner is not suspected of trying
to sell the artefacts, police said,
and he claims to have inherited
them from his grandfather, who
found them at sea. By law all
antiquities found in Greece
belong to the state. (AP)
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
2G M
33
RK
World
Shops drop mohair over cruelty to goats
South Africa
Jane Flanagan Cape Town
Some of the world’s biggest fashion
labels have said they will stop selling
clothes containing mohair after an
undercover investigation into the
“unspeakable suffering” of angora
goats bred to supply the industry.
South Africa produces most of the
world’s mohair, which is coveted for its
silky softness and used to make sweaters, coats and accessories.
Covert filming at a dozen farms by
the animal rights charity Peta showed
goats suffering “painful, horrifying
deaths”. Workers, who were paid by volume not by the hour, “worked quickly
and carelessly” as they handled the
goats roughly by their legs, tails and
horns, causing them to “cry out in pain”.
Several animals froze to death in
extreme desert temperatures after
their coats were removed, the charity
reported. Animals that were dirty were
plunged into tanks of poisonous chemicals to clean them before they were
sheared. At one business, a worker was
filmed with a hidden camera as he used
a blunt knife to cut the throats of
conscious goats that were not wanted
because their coats were not of sufficient quality.
Zara, H&M, Gap and Topshop are
among the global brands that have
promised to order no new lines
containing mohair, and to remove all
related products from their shelves
within two years.
Helena Johansson, from H&M
Group, said: “The supply chain for
mohair production is challenging to
control — a credible standard does not
exist — therefore we have decided to
ban mohair fibre from our assortment
by 2020 at the latest.”
Zara’s Spanish parent company,
Inditex, said it would stop selling
mohair products across all seven of its
brands by the end of its winter 2019
season.
The head of South Africa’s mohair
industry expressed his shock at the Peta
findings, which he called “a gross
misrepresentation of the mohair industry”, and said he had ordered an inquiry
into the farms that were featured in the
graphic film.
“Some isolated issues have been
raised and we have launched an investigation to address these issues directly
and swiftly,” Deon Saayman said. In the
meantime, all mohair products from
producers that were shown in the charity’s footage had been suspended from
trading, he added.
South Africa has had a mohair industry for 180 years and it employs 30,000
people at 1,000 farms, mostly in the
impoverished Karoo desert. Foreign
exports are worth $120 million a year
and the price of the wool, considered a
luxury fibre, has soared. The move
against mohair is the latest example of
the increased scrutiny of high-street
supply chains, and another victory for
Peta, whose 2013 campaign against the
use of angora rabbit prompted similar
commitments from Zara, Gap, H&M
and others.
Within a year of the organisation
releasing a film that showed factory
workers in China hand-plucking
squealing rabbits, exports of the fur fell
by 85 per cent.
Last year, Gucci banned the use of
animal fur in its clothing, joining a
number of other brands including
Armani, Versace and Michael Kors in
going “fur free”.
LUCIE STEPNICKOVA/CATERS NEWS AGENCY
Trump’s lawyer ‘given
$500,000 by oligarch’
United States
Boer Deng Washington
A Russian oligarch paid President
Trump’s personal lawyer $500,000 just
after the 2016 election, allegedly to help
to cover payments to silence a porn star,
it was claimed last night.
Michael Avenatti, the lawyer who is
representing Stephanie Clifford, the
porn actress also known as Stormy
Daniels, claimed that his team had uncovered evidence of the payments.
CNN reported that the Russian businessman had been questioned by prosecutors investigating election meddling. Ms Clifford claims she had an
affair with Mr Trump before he was
president, which Mr Trump denies.
In an unverified report published last
night, Mr Avenatti alleged that a
company controlled by Viktor Vekselberg, a Russian businessman with links
to President Putin, made eight transactions beginning in January 2017 to
Michael Cohen, Mr Trump’s personal
lawyer.
Mr Cohen had paid Ms Clifford
$130,000 in exchange for her silence
about an alleged affair with Mr Trump.
He was also alleged to have been
involved in so-called “hush money”
payments to other women.
“After significant investigation, we
have discovered that Mr Trump’s attor-
ney Mr Cohen received approximately
$500,000 in the months after the election from a company controlled by a
Russian oligarch with close ties to Mr
Putin,” Mr Avenatti tweeted yesterday.
“These monies may have reimbursed
the $130k payment. Mr Trump and Mr
Cohen have a lot of explaining to do.”
Rudy Giuliani, who joined Mr
Trump’s legal team last month, said: “I
have no idea how he would know that.
I have no reason to believe that anything he says is true.” Last month, federal prosecutors raided Mr Cohen’s home,
office and hotel room looking for documents in connection with any payments. Investigators were said to have
been interested in the source of the
money used to pay Ms Clifford.
Prosecutors working for Robert
Mueller, the special counsel leading the
investigation into alleged Russian
meddling in the US election, also
stopped Mr Vekselberg as he stepped
off a plane in New York. His computer
and personal effects were searched and
he was questioned by Mr Mueller’s
team, CNN reported. Investigators
were reported to have asked about
donations the head of his US affiliate is
said to have made to Mr Trump’s inaugural fund and campaign funds.
Mr Cohen’s lawyer, Stephen Ryan,
would not comment on the alleged
money from Mr Vekselberg.
Mass desertion
by troops is new
blow to Maduro
Venezuela
Stephen Gibbs Caracas
Ready for his close-up Richard, a 26-year-old western lowland gorilla, moved to
Prague Zoo in 2003 and has dazzled visitors with photogenic poses ever since
Mass desertions from the army have
forced Venezuela’s government to call
up reservists and retired officers to
provide security during this month’s
much-criticised presidential elections.
According to Control Ciudadano, a
Caracas-based military watchdog, in
the past two years at least 10,000 soldiers have asked to retire early.
The Venezuelan military has long
been partially protected from the
collapse of the country’s economy;
some senior officers have even profited
from the chaos by supervising illegal
activities such as drug trafficking, unsanctioned mining and petrol smuggling. However, as the situation worsened the lower ranks have criticised
their wages and lack of food and even
uniforms, Control Ciudadano reported.
The presidential election on May 20
is being boycotted by Venezuela’s main
opposition after the pro-government
electoral council banned several senior
leaders from taking part, and refused to
agree basic provisions to guarantee a
fair vote. Henri Falcón, a former soldier
turned state governor, has defied the
opposition boycott and is standing
against President Maduro. He said the
army would not vote for Mr Maduro.
Money is not the only way to be rich
The Alternative Rich List is
a celebration of people who
are wealthy, not in terms of
money, but in less-measurable
qualities, such as integrity,
wisdom, courage, altruism or
the search for self-fulfilment.
The poet Lemn Sissay featured on
last year’s list. Brought up in foster
and care homes around Wigan, Sissay
self-published his first volume of
poetry while cleaning gutters for a
living. Now 50, he’s chancellor of the
University of Manchester and a
trustee of the Foundling Museum,
as well as an actor, playwright and
champion of education for all.
“I got calls from people I haven’t
spoken to for years,” he says.
“ ‘You’re in the rich list,’ they’d say.
I’d correct them: ‘The Alternative
Rich List.’ Then I’d leave a pause. . .
‘sponsored by Skoda’.
“It’s a gutsy idea and not before
time. I was over the moon to be on the
first Alternative Rich List. I wondered
if it would continue, and I’m glad it has.
We need more of this type of thing.”
Who will be on this year’s list?
Find it inside
The Sunday Times
Rich List on May 13
Brought to you by
34
1G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
World
PETER RAE/EPA
Turnbull defies protests with
£26m Captain Cook memorial
Australia
Bernard Lagan Sydney
Head of steam A photo opportunity goes wrong for Malcolm Turnbull, Australia’s
prime minister, as he announces a A$400 million rail upgrade plan for Sydney
Malcolm Turnbull’s government will
reaffirm Britain’s significance to Australia’s past by spending A$50 million
(£26 million) on celebrations to mark
Captain Cook’s landing in Botany Bay
in 1770.
Memorials to the British explorer,
who mapped lands from Hawaii to New
Zealand, will be built to commemorate
his landing in Australia and his first
encounter with Aboriginal people — a
rare example of a colonial figure being
honoured rather than removed. They
are due to be completed in time for
2020, the 250th anniversary, and will
include an aquatic monument in Botany Bay, Sydney, opposite where Cook’s
ship, HMS Endeavour, was moored.
Ray Minniecon, an Aboriginal activist, described the proposals as upsetting. He said that Cook’s landing was
“still an unwanted invasion”.
There was a heated public debate last
year after Bill Shorten, the Labor Party
leader, called for plaques to be included
on historical monuments to serve as “a
postscript”, recounting the treatment of
Aboriginal people after the
Europeans arrived. “I am not
proud of the way they have
been treated since 1770
70
and we need to close thee
gap,” he said. “Let’s own
the fact that we are a
very lucky country
and have done very
well but First Australians haven’t shared
the success that
many other Australians have enjoyed.”
Existing statues of
Cook and Lachlan
n
Macquarie, the 19thhcentury governor of New
ew
South Wales, have been
n defaced. The words “No pride
ride in
genocide” and “Changee the date”
Captain Cook landed in Botany Bay in
1770 and claimed the land for Britain
were painted on them, calling for the
date of Australia Day to be changed
from January 26, when the First Fleet of
British ships
p arrived at Port Jackson in 1778.
177
The Cook memorial was
announced on budget
anno
day. Scott Morrison, the
treasurer, said that
tre
Cook’s achievements
Co
could
not be ignored.
co
“We
“W can do that in a
way
which is very
w
sensitive
to the many
s
other
parts of this
o
story,”
he said. Elest
ments
of Aboriginal
m
culture
would be incu
cluded
in the memorial.
clu
Mr
Morrison also
M
lowered
lower taxes for middle
and lower-income
earners
low
by
by up to
t A$530 a year.
Australia’s
deficit will be
Australia’s budget
bu
A$18.2
A$18 2 billion this year and return to
surplus in 2019-20. Refugees will have to
wait longer for some welfare payments.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
1G M
35
RM
Business
world markets (Change on the day)
commodities
FTSE 100
7,565.75 (-1.39)
Gold
$1,314.70 (+0.83)
Dow Jones
24,360.21 (+2.89)
17
25
$
$
£/$
$1.3520 (-0.0045)
$
£/€
€1.1395 (+0.0018)
¤
7,800
26,500
1,500
78
1.450
1.200
7,400
24,500
1,400
70
1.400
1.150
7,000
22,500
1,300
62
1.350
1.100
20,500
6,600
Apr 9
currencies
Brent crude (6pm)
$73.68 (-2.05)
May 3
Apr 10
18
26
May 4
1,200
Apr 10
18
26
May 4
54
Apr 10
18
26
May 4
1.050
1.300
Apr 10
18
26
May 4
Apr 10
18
26
May 4
1,000 jobs at risk in Virgin Money deal with CYBG — starting at top
Patrick Hosking Financial Editor
A thousand jobs or more would be axed
if Virgin Money were to accept a merger offer from CYBG, the group behind
Clydesdale Bank and Yorkshire Bank,
analysts have estimated, while JayneAnne Gadhia, the high-profile Virgin
Money chief, would also go.
Shares in Virgin Money and CYBG
rose by 10 per cent and 1 per cent respectively yesterday as shareholders
gave a cautious welcome to the proposal, announced late on Monday.
The proposal was overshadowed as
the Financial Conduct Authority began
a preliminary investigation into possible insider dealing ahead of the announcement. Virgin shares rose 15 per
cent in the six trading days before the
proposal was confirmed.
Newcastle-upon-Tyne based Virgin
Money is a credit cards and mortgages
group founded by Sir Richard Branson
in 1995, which boasts 3.3 million customers. CYBG, based in Glasgow, is the
holding company for Yorkshire Bank
and Clydesdale Bank offering a wider
range of retail banking products as well
as current accounts.
CYBG is offering 1.1297 new CYBG
shares for every Virgin Money share in
an all-paper proposal, valuing the combined group at more than £4.4 billion,
which would place it outside, but within
striking range of the FTSE 100. Virgin
said it was “in the process of reviewing
this proposal”. The offer would create a
substantial small bank with £78 billion
of assets and more than six million personal customers.
Ian Gordon, banking analyst at Investec, estimated that the merger
would enable the combined group to
cut costs by between 10 and 20 per cent.
One area for a serious cull would be
online banking. CYBG has been investing heavily in its B platform, while Vir-
gin Money is pressing ahead with its
digital offering. There could also be
back office savings and branch closures.
Ms Gadhia, one of the few bankers to
appear on Desert Island Discs, is expected to be asked to go, as David Duffy,
chief executive of CYBG, wants no confusion about who would be in charge.
Under Takeover Panel rules, CYBG
has until June 4 to make a firm offer or
walk away for six months.
Deal may seal success, pages 36-37
PATRICK HAAR/GETTY IMAGES
Vodafone ‘to
buy Liberty
cable assets’
€19bn deal for European business faces hostility
James Dean US Business Editor
Vodafone was on the brink last night of
announcing a €19 billion (£16.7 billion)
deal to buy a significant part of Liberty
Global’s European cable business, as it
seeks to become the continent’s leading
telecommunications provider across
television, broadband, mobile and
landline telephones.
Sources said that Liberty, the American owner of Virgin Media, is to give up
its cable operations in Germany, the
Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania, markets where Vodafone already
has a foothold.
Vodafone is the world’s second largest mobile operator by subscribers behind China Mobile and, at a valuation
of £55 billion, is one of the ten largest
companies in the FTSE 100. It has operations in Europe, India and Africa.
Liberty, headquartered in Denver,
Colorado, is worth $25 billion (£18.5 billion) and has operations in 30 countries, including 12 in Europe. Its billionaire owner, John Malone, 77, dubbed
the “cable cowboy”, is known in Britain
for his $8 billion takeover of Formula
One motor racing in 2016.
A deal between the companies has
been in the works for years and Vodafone confirmed in February that it was
in talks with Liberty again.
Vodafone’s acquisition will not include any of Liberty’s assets in Britain,
such as Virgin Media, or its Irish businesses, sources said. Nonetheless, if
completed, the deal will again raise
speculation over the prospect of a tieup between Britain’s largest telecoms
company and its biggest cable TV busi-
ness. Regulators across Europe are
almost certain to scrutinise the deal
closely and it will face stern resistance
from Deutsche Telekom, the German
company that owns T-Mobile and is
Vodafone’s closest rival on the continent. After news of Vodafone’s talks
with Liberty in February, Tim Hottges,
chief executive of Deutsche Telekom,
said: “There will be no way that this deal
is going to be approved and for us it’s
completely unacceptable.”
As well as significant mobile network
operations in Germany, the Czech
Republic, Hungary and Romania,
Vodafone also owns the largest cable
business in Germany, having bought
Kabel Deutschland for €7.7 billion in
2013. Liberty owns Unitymedia, Germany’s second largest cable business,
which is expected to go to Vodafone.
Shares in Vodafone closed down by
1.4 per cent at 207½p in London before
details of the deal were revealed by the
Financial Times last night. Liberty
shares closed 5.4 per cent lower at $31.15
in New York yesterday.
Vodafone did not respond to requests
for comment. Liberty declined to comment. Vodafone has grown from a relatively niche mobile operator founded in
1991 to a multinational telecoms giant.
A deal would bolster its ambition to
become Europe’s leading “quad play”
telecoms provider, offering customers
subscriptions for mobile phone networks, pay-TV packages, landline telephones and high-speed home internet.
Telecoms companies across the
world are merging and acquiring as
they prepare for 5G, the next generation of ultra high-speed mobile data.
President Macri’s attempts to revive the ailing Argentine economy have been marked by protests as workers lost their jobs
Argentina goes cap-in-hand to IMF
Philip Aldrick Economics Editor
Argentina has requested an emergency
credit line from the International Monetary Fund after a series of dramatic
interventions failed to stop the markets
selling off the peso.
Addressing the nation from the Casa
Rosada presidential palace, President
Macri said he had spoken to Christine
Lagarde, the IMF’s managing director,
who had “confirmed we would start
working on an agreement today”.
The call for help underscored the
scale of the crisis engulfing South
America’s third largest economy. For
many Argentinians, the IMF is guilty of
forcing austerity measures on the country in return for aid that plunged it into
recession in the late 1990s. Relations on
the IMF side are scarred, too. Buenos
Aries was briefly blacklisted after it temporarily defaulted on a $3 billion loan.
Mr Macri was left with no option yesterday but to seek help after raising interest rates from 27.25 per cent to 40 per
cent and spending $5 billion of foreign
reserves to prop up the plummeting peso. Nevertheless, the peso fell 5 per cent
on Tuesday to another record low of
more than 23 pesos to the dollar.
Defending his decision to reach out
to the IMF, Mr Macri said: “This will
allow us to strengthen our programme
of growth and development, giving us
greater support to face this new global
scenario and avoid crises like the ones
we have had in our history.”
He was reported to have asked for a
$30 billion credit line, though neither
the government nor the IMF would
confirm that. Nicolás Dujovne, Treasury minister, said: “We have decided to
seek preventive financing for Argentina, to give stability to the market.”
One of the triggers for the crisis was
higher US interest rates, which sparked
capital flight from emerging markets as
investors reversed existing trades and
pulled money home. Jerome Powell,
chairman of the US Federal Reserve,
said that further planned increases
would not be derailed by concerns
about a fallout in the developing world.
Speaking before the latest Argentine
developments, he said: “I do not dismiss
the prospective risks emanating from
global policy normalisation,” he added.
Turkey and Russia have also been buffeted by global markets in recent weeks.
36
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
1G M
Business
Need to know
1
House prices fell 3.1 per cent
last month, the steepest decline
since September 2010, as the
slowdown in the housing market
continued, according to Halifax,
Britain’s biggest mortgage
provider. Economists had been
expecting house prices to fall by
only 0.2 per cent. Page 18
2
Vodafone was reportedly on
the brink of announcing a
€19 billion (£16.7 billion) deal
to buy a significant part of Liberty
Global’s European cable business,
as it seeks to become the
continent’s leading telecoms
provider across mobile, television,
broadband and landline
telephones. Sources said that
Liberty, the American owner of
Virgin Media, is to give up its cable
operations in Germany, the Czech
Republic, Hungary and Romania,
which are markets where
Vodafone has a foothold. Page 35
3
A thousand jobs or more
would be cut if Virgin Money
was to accept a merger offer
from CYBG, the group behind
Clydesdale Bank and Yorkshire
Bank, analysts have estimated,
while Jayne-Anne Gadhia, the
high-profile Virgin Money chief,
would also go. Page 35
4
Argentina has requested an
emergency credit line from
the International Monetary
Fund after a series of dramatic
interventions failed to stop the
markets selling the peso. Page 35
5
Rick Haythornthwaite, the
chairman of Centrica, the
embattled owner of British
Gas, has announced plans to step
down “within the next 12 months”
after four difficult years and amid
criticism of his multiple nonexecutive roles.
6
William Hill became the
latest quoted company to feel
the bite of shareholder
disapproval when the bookmaker
was censured over the pay of its
chief executive, Philip Bowcock.
7
Officials have revised down
the trade deficit by a quarter
and increased the estimated
size of the economy. Information
gathered by the Office for
National Statistics has revealed
that the trade deficit in 2016 was
£30.9 billion rather than the
£40.7 billion recorded. Page 38
8
Ian Rosenblatt’s net worth has
been valued at more than
£24 million after his law firm,
Rosenblatt Solicitors, became the
fourth to list on the London Stock
Exchange. Page 40
9
The boards of Shire and
Takeda, a Japanese company,
are holding a series of investor
meetings to convince shareholders
of the merits of a £45 billion
takeover of the FTSE 100
company after one of the biggest
deals in the pharmaceutical
industry was struck. Page 41
10
The government should
not contract out public
services to private
companies that are at risk of going
bust because of their exposure to
the construction industry, Phil
Bentley, of Mitie, and Rupert
Soames, of Serco, have told the
parliamentary inquiry into the
collapse of their companies’ rival,
Carillion. Page 42
Virgin deal may help seal
Twenty-three years
after it was born, the
upstart lender is on the
brink of the big time,
writes Patrick Hosking
I
t was seen as a long shot. Virgin
vodka had just bombed, Virgin cola
was running out of fizz and Virgin
wedding wear was jilted by unimpressed brides. So when, in 1995,
Richard Branson decided to try to attach
the Virgin brand to a financial services
company, no one was too excited.
Twenty-three years on, Virgin Money,
originally Virgin Direct, has expanded
into a sizeable credit cards and mortgage
business with 3.3 million customers,
mainly via the successful £747 million
purchase of a cleaned up Northern
Rock. With CYBG’s merger proposal, it
could get a whole lot bigger still.
The group behind the Clydesdale
Bank and Yorkshire Bank franchises
argues that a successful merger would
create a serious competitor to the
Big Four, with the brand, reach and
balance-sheet clout to make a difference in a world dominated by Lloyds,
Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland and
HSBC.
It would also, it says, create “substantial synergy potential” — in other
words, big cost savings for the benefit of
shareholders. The rise in both companies’ share prices yesterday suggests
the stock market has bought into the
synergies argument at least.
Whether it would seriously create a
rival big and innovative enough to prod
the Big Four into better service, products or prices is much more
doubtful. CYGB is not known
for its innovation, while it
has been a big sinner in the
mis-selling of payment
protection insurance.
Virgin has a better customer service record, but
apart from its customerfriendly lounges, is no longer
known for innovation. It
once was. Its One account, the first offset
mortgage, was a
Richard Branson
founded Virgin
Direct in 1995
huge breakthrough at the time but was
sold to Royal Bank of Scotland in 2003.
Even a combined CYBG/Virgin
Money would still be tiny compared
with, say, the industry leader in retail
banking, Lloyds Banking Group. Lloyds
would still have ten times the balance
sheet, eight times the branches and
five times the customers as the new
challenger.
Virgin Money has played a straight
bat to the approach, merely saying that
its board was in the process of reviewing the all-paper proposal. The combination would catapult it into mainstream high street banking, enabling it
to offer full-service current accounts
and accelerate its planned move into
business banking.
But CYBG is seen as one of the
weaker players on the high street. Even
if Virgin Money sees any merit in the
offer, it would almost certainly require
Key dates
1995 Virgin Direct founded by
Branson and Norwich Union to sell
tax-efficient products called
personal equity plans
1997 Launches One offset
mortgage, where savings may
reduce interest paid on the
outstanding mortgage balance
2002 Merges with virginmoney.com
and launches credit card
2004 Launches car, home and pet
insurance
2007 Failed rescue bid for
Northern Rock
2011 Buys cleaned-up Northern
Rock for £747 million
2014 Floats
Frontrunners join forces
Virgin Money/CYBG combined v
244
Branches
2,000
10,000
Employees
75,000
£78bn
Assets
£812bn
6.1 million
Personal
customers
29 million
250,000
Business
customers
1 million
£4.4bn
Market
Value
£47bn
The chairman of Centrica, the embattled owner of British Gas, has
announced plans to step down after
four difficult years and amid criticism
of his multiple non-executive roles.
The company, which is preparing to
face shareholders at its annual meeting
next week, said Rick Haythornthwaite
had “informed the board of his intention to step down as chairman within
the next 12 months”.
The 61-year-old is also chairman of
Mastercard International, QIO Technologies, and Arc International, a
French manufacturer and distributor
of household goods.
There has been increased investor unrest in recent weeks at “overboarding”
by non-executives taking on too many
roles. Pirc, the shareholder advisory
group, has recommended investors vote
against Mr Haythornthwaite’s re-election, citing his role at Mastercard.
However, a spokesman for Centrica
pointed to endorsements of the chair-
%
Rebased share performance
180
160
140
CYBG
120
Virgin Money
the terms — 1.1297 new CYBG
shares for each Virgin share — to
be sweetened, analysts believe.
Virgin Money shares have
been in the doldrums lately,
with Investec’s Ian Gordon
describing its valuation ahead
of the approach as “absurdly
low” at less than seven times
expected profits this year.
“The logic is clear;
the offer looks
inadequate,” he
added.
Gary Greenwood at Shore
Capital said
100
80
60
2016
the offer from CYBG looked “on the
lean side” and it would “have to sweeten
its offer to get this deal over the line”.
Another obstacle capable of derailing
any deal is IT. To make the deal work
properly, the two companies’ IT systems
Centrica chairman quits amid flak
Emily Gosden Energy Editor
Lloyds Bank (biggest retail bank)
man by ISS and Glass Lewis, who represent more of the company’s shareholders, and said it was not “aware of any
shareholders having raised Rick’s other
commitments as an issue”.
Mr Haythornthwaite became chairman of the FTSE 100 energy group in
January 2014 when its shares were trading at more than 340p and has presided
over their fall to less than half that level.
Britain’s biggest energy supplier has
been hit by fierce competition, political
pressure from the government’s price
cap, an accounting error and concerns
over strategy.
British Gas has suffered a customer
exodus in recent years and supplies gas
and electricity to just under eight million households. Centrica also includes
business energy supply and home services divisions in the UK and US and
some gas and power generation assets.
Centrica shares closed down 0.75 per
cent at 153½p.
The company is understood to be
keen to avoid a repeat of the board clearout seen in 2013-14 when previous
chairman Sir Roger Carr left for the
same role at BAE Systems. Sam Laidlaw,
who was chief executive, was also looking to quit but had to remain while a new
chairman was appointed to find his successor but Centrica still lost both men in
the space of a year.
Mr Haythornthwaite joined the Centrica board in October 2013 before becoming chairman and oversaw the hiring of Iain Conn, who joined as Centrica’s chief executive at the start of 2015
Mr Conn cut the dividend within
weeks of taking over and analysts fear
he may have to do so again as the price
cap threatens to squeeze profits.
Mr Haythornthwaite spent his early
career at BP, including exploration and
production roles in the North Sea,
Alaska, France and Venezuela, before
moving to Premier Oil as commercial
director in 1995.
Centrica said the search for a new
chairman would be led by Stephen Hester, its senior independent director, and
Mr Haythornthwaite would remain
until a successor was in place.
2017
2018
would one day have to be integrated —
a worrying prospect for both shareholders and regulators in light of the fiasco
at TSB.
One problem for Virgin Money as it
weighs up any deal is whether it can
Sainsbury chief
in shares deal
Robert Miller
Four days after announcing a proposed
£7.3 billion merger with Asda, the chief
executive of J Sainsbury and senior
executives exercised option awards
over £4.5 million worth of shares.
Mike Coupe exercised a total of
608,700 options worth £1.8 million and
sold £864,000 worth to pay the tax and
national insurance bill due on cashing
in the options. He retains 1.6 million
shares in Sainsbury’s, worth about
£4.7 million at the closing price of 295p
last night. A week earlier, they would
have been worth closer to £4.3 million.
The transactions were announced in
a statement yesterday. The nil-cost
options were granted in 2014 and 2015
under a long-term incentive plan, and
in May 2016 as a deferred share award.
Sainsbury’s played down suggestions
of a big payday for executives. “Mike is
not selling any shares for cash and is not
making any immediate profit,” it said.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
37
1G M
Business
success in long run
Branson will
want greater
role for his
brand name
Patrick Hosking
stimulate a competitive auction to
squeeze better terms from CYBG.
There are not many likely candidates,
analysts say: the big players would be
precluded on competition grounds,
though Santander may be able to get
a deal through if it were interested.
Foreign banks with no existing UK
operations or private equity backed
purchasers couldn’t generate the same
synergies as CYBG and so would struggle to match it on price.
Sir Richard Branson will be kingmaker
in any deal and is thought likely to push
for a greater role for his Virgin brand in
any takeover by CYBG.
Sir Richard is expected to use his
35 per cent stake to encourage CYBG to
agree to greater use of the Virgin name
and possibly less emphasis for the Yorkshire and Clydesdale franchises.
CYBG has acknowledged the need to
keep Sir Richard happy, saying: “Our
proposal would ensure the Virgin Money
brand would play a significant role in the
combined group, subject to agreement
with Virgin Group Holdings.”
VGG, Sir Richard’s company, received £8.3 million in royalty payments
from Virgin Money last year, almost as
much as the £8.4 million it received in
dividend payments from the company.
Royalty payments are determined by
the size of revenues from sales of
Virgin-branded products, so the deal
could create a dramatic increase in
income for Sir Richard if the Yorkshire
and Clydesdale names were phased out
and replaced by Virgin.
Alternatively, Sir Richard could press
for the combined small business banking franchise to be rebranded Virgin —
a brand name particularly admired by
entrepreneurial types.
Use of the Virgin brand is especially
sensitive to the billionaire now as
Alaska Airlines, which recently bought
Virgin America for $2.6 billion, is in the
process of dropping the Virgin brand.
Clydesdale traces its roots back to
1838, while the Yorkshire name goes
back to 1872.
So far CYBG has made its offer
entirely in paper, giving Sir Richard no
easy way of making an exit from his
investment in Virgin Money. If a formal
offer materialises and he accepts it, his
35 per cent stake would be diluted to a
12.8 per cent holding in the enlarged
group, based on the current terms.
Bookmaker boss faces revolt over pay
Dominic Walsh
William Hill became the latest quoted
company to feel the bite of shareholder
disapproval when the bookmaker was
censured over its chief executive’s pay.
Of the investors who voted at the
annual meeting yesterday, 30.7 per cent
were against the remuneration report.
In a statement the company acknowledged that the vote against “exceeded
the key threshold of 20 per cent of votes
cast”, but noted that all other resolutions up for debate had received overwhelming support.
Britain’s second biggest bookmaker,
which was founded in 1934, said that
the opposition to the remuneration
report appeared mostly to be in relation
to concerns over the salary increase of
Philip Bowcock, because of his promotion to the job of chief executive on a
full-time basis.
Mr Bowcock joined the bookmaker
as chief financial officer before taking
over from James Henderson two years
ago, initially on an interim basis. Last
year, his total pay rose from £606,000
to £1.3 million.
The company said that it had “engaged extensively” with the two proxy
agencies that had raised the concerns,
as well as directly with institutional
investors.
“That process confirmed that whilst
the majority of the company’s largest
£1.3m
Annual pay packet of Philip Bowcock
Source: Times research
shareholders were supportive, a significant minority agreed with the proxy
agency recommendation,” the company said.
After considering those concerns,
the company still believed that its decision to increase the pay was “appropriate and can be justified in the context of
the key events and industry challenges
of last year, many of which are ongo-
ing”. It insisted that it was still “committed to maintaining an open dialogue
with shareholders . . . on key remuneration decisions in 2018 and beyond” and
would be engaging with investors
before the granting of awards under
this year’s performance share plan.
Costain, the construction group, was
also in trouble with investors yesterday.
More than a quarter of the votes
cast opposed the re-election of David
McManus as a non-executive director.
There are concerns about the number
of roles that he has.
Mr McManus has been a board
member since 2014, and he is on the
remuneration, audit and nomination
committees.
The former Shell executive is nonexecutive chairman of Rockhopper, the
oil and gas explorer, and Flex LNG, the
shipping group, as well a non-executive
director of Hess Corporation, another
oil and gas company.
A spokesman for Costain said: “Some
think he’s too busy but Costain don’t.”
Tempus, page 46
Challenge just got
bigger for CYBG
business commentary Alistair Osborne
F
our characters in search of
a brand. That’s CYBG, for
you. Who even knows what
it is? Could it be the old
Central Electricity
Generating Board with its wires
crossed, perhaps? Or some wannabe
punk venue, like New York’s CBGB
— the former home of the
Ramones, Misfits and Patti Smith?
Neither, as it happens. No, CYBG
is one of those “challenger” banks,
what with the main challenge being
remembering what it owns: the
Clydesdale and Yorkshire lenders,
apparently. So, no wonder CYBG’s
boss, David Duffy, is so keen to buy
a business people have actually
heard of: Virgin Money.
He’s popped up with an all-paper
bid proposal, worth 359p per share
or about £1.6 billion — or at least
that’s what it was before CYBG’s
shares rose 1 per cent yesterday to
321½p and Virgin 9 per cent to
340¼p. And you know what? It
would have been a bigger premium
than the present skinny 16 per cent
if the takeover approach hadn’t
leaked into the market, so triggering
the Financial Conduct Authority’s
scrutiny of last week’s portentous
moves in Virgin Money shares.
Yet, the approach still looks lowball. Virgin Money investors are
being offered just 36.5 per cent of
the combined group. Shore Capital
analysts are not alone in reckoning
Virgin Money shares “have been
languishing on valuation multiples”
that “fail to reflect the underlying
value of the franchise”. And the
Virgin king himself, Sir Richard
Branson, has decent cards to play.
For starters, he owns 35 per cent
of Virgin Money: the lender with its
roots in Northern Rock. And, while
Sir Richard may see the attractions
of combining Virgin’s prowess in
mortgages and credit cards with
CYBG’s in current accounts and
small business lending, he also has
something that Mr Duffy hasn’t got:
a brand you can actually challenge
with.
True, Virgin Money hasn’t made
the most of it yet, but Sir Richard
will want more from Mr Duffy than
a vague promise to “ensure that the
Virgin Money brand would play a
significant role in the combined
group”. How about agreeing to
rebrand the entire business,
spanning six million personal and
business customers, Virgin Money
— complete with the royalties that
go with that? And all on top of a
sweetened offer price?
And that’s not Mr Duffy’s only
hurdle. He must persuade the Virgin
Money boss, Jayne-Anne Gadhia, to
step aside for a deal — unlikely on
these terms. He also needs to spell
out where his “substantial synergy
potential” is coming from. And,
then, there’s the issue of combining
the two groups’ systems: the caper
Paul Pester has been pulling off so
expertly at the TSB. In short, Mr
Duffy has some way to go to turn
CYBG into a proper challenger.
Takeover troubles
N
ot bad for a recommended
bid: Shire shares trading at a
21 per cent discount to the
mooted offer. Investors do seem a
bit jumpy about the great £45 billion
take-out by Japan’s Takeda. And, of
the face of it, it’s not hard to see why
(report, page 41).
Christophe Weber, Takeda’s
ambitious boss, may have taken five
attempts to convince Shire’s
chairwoman Susan Kilsby to accept
a cash and shares offer he says is at
a 64.4 per cent premium, but the
risks to the deal have hardly gone
away. Shire needs 75 per cent
shareholder approval for an offer
that’s 54 per cent in Japanese or
US-listed stock they might not be
able to hold. They’ll end up with
half a group that’s initially more
than five times geared. And Takeda
investors don’t seem to fancy the
deal, either. Its shares are down a
fifth since Mr Weber began his
Shire adventure. Takeda needs two
third of its shareholders to vote in
favour. So, no big surprise to see
Shire shares at £40.34½, somewhat
adrift of the headline £49.01 bid.
Besides, haven’t we been here
before with Shire: that abortive
Abbvie takeover, which poleaxed
the merger arbitrage funds? So, it’s
notable that a specialist in the field,
Olivetree Financial, reckons “this
transaction looks extremely clean”,
with nothing in yesterday’s
announcement, apart from the
Takeda vote, to justify “this level of
risk pricing” for an agreed bid “with
low levels of anti-trust risk”.
And would Takeda investors
really vote the deal down, so
incurring a $1.2 billion break fee? As
Olivetree notes, despite the falling
shares, only one Takeda investor,
Capital, has sold since news of the
Shire bid broke. About a fifth of the
register is quasi-government funds.
And culturally, Japanese investors
tend to follow the board’s advice.
On top of that, there’s “shareholder
overlap”: 48 per cent of Shire’s
register owns 19 per cent of Takeda.
There’s also one sure-fire way to get
the debt down quickly: selling the
haemotology business that came
with Shire’s $32 billion Baxalta buy.
True, Olivetree’s analysis could be
wrong. And one reason for Shire’s
discount to the offer is that the deal
won’t close before next year. But it
could prove generous.
Going nowhere
J
ust what investors wanted: more
journeys to nowhere with First
Group boss Tim O’Toole. The
board has sent Apollo packing with
its “two preliminary and highly
conditional indicative proposals”
that “fundamentally undervalued
the company”. The upshot? Shares
down 12 per cent to 97½p. And, the
resumption of normal service
(report, page 41).
So, what’s that exactly? Oh,
shares down from 300p-plus when
Mr O’Toole took over in 2010; no
dividend since 2013’s £615 million
rights issue at 85p; UK bus margins
down from double-digit to sub-4 per
cent; no promised US turnaround;
£1.6 billion of net debt; and two rail
franchises in Transpennine and
South Western won with top-of-themarket bids. No wonder the board’s
got such an acute sense of value.
alistair.osborne@thetimes.co.uk
38
1G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Business
ANDREW FOX FOR THE TIMES
Only way is up:
economists tell
Bank it’s time
to raise rates
shadow mpc
Philip Aldrick Economics Editor
The Bank of England should raise
interest rates tomorrow despite weak
economic data recently, according to
The Times’ shadow policy committee.
Six of the panel’s nine members
called for an immediate quarter-point
rate rise to 0.75 per cent and two said
that the Bank should start winding
down quantitative easing.
Several members also took issue with
the Bank’s confused guidance since the
turn of the year. It first suggested that
rates would rise this month and then
that policy would be held, causing wild
gyrations in the value of sterling.
The shadow monetary policy committee’s position is striking because the
panel is made up of former members of
the Bank’s committee and respected
senior economists. Although it has
been more hawkish than the official
panel, the last time a majority voted for
rates to rise was in November, just
before the Bank increased them.
The shadow panel has been running
since 2002 to provide an alternative
voice on monetary policy and to mirror
the official MPC, with nine members
making monthly decisions.
The Bank is expected to leave rates
unchanged at 0.5 per cent when it votes
tomorrow. Three weeks ago the chances of a rise were judged to be 80 per
cent, but that has fallen to less than 20
per cent because of comments by Mark
Carney, the governor, and downbeat
economic data. The pound has fallen
about eight cents against the dollar to
about $1.35 since mid-April.
Charles Goodhart and Andrew
Sentance, both former MPC members,
called for a rate rise this month, as did
Sir John Gieve, a former deputy governor. Rain Newton-Smith, chief economist of the CBI, who is thought to be a
candidate to join the MPC in August,
said that she supported an increase
because the weak data reflected the bad
weather in February and March “rather
than news on fundamentals”.
Sir Steve Robson, a former Treasury
mandarin, and Bronwyn Curtis, governor of the London School of Economics, voted for an immediate increase
and for the Bank to stop reinvesting the
£435 billion of gilts held through its
quantitative easing programme, allowing them to run off instead.
Geoff Dicks, formerly of the Office
for Budget Responsibility, Anne Sibert,
professor of economics at Birkbeck,
University of London, and Rupert
Pennant-Rea, a former deputy governor, preferred to wait.
Mr Goodhart said: “Part of the reason for sluggish consumption has been
inflation outrunning wages. With sterling falling we need to stabilise the
pound. A small rise in interest rates
could be helpful now.”
Sir John said: “The economy is at full
employment and if not now, when?”
Mr Sentance attacked “the mistaken
belief that gradual rises in rates would
be bad for economic growth. This is not
the case, and that is backed up by US
experience where annual economic
growth has risen to nearly 3 per cent
despite a series of rate rises since 2015”.
Questions were also asked about the
Bank’s communications. Mr Sentance
accused it of “flip-flopping” and
claimed that “the MPC’s credibility on
communication is now rock-bottom”.
Sir John said that the swings in the
market reflected “renewed uncertainty
over the MPC’s stance”. He added:
“They can’t give forward guidance
unless they know where they are
going.”
Retailers
face battle
on a very
cold front
T
he high street
suffered a sharp
blow last month
after retail sales
suffered their greatest fall
in more than two decades,
with analysts using the
phrase “extremely
challenging” to describe
life for retailers (Tom
Knowles writes).
Retail sales dropped by
3.1 per cent in April
compared with the same
month a year earlier,
according to figures
compiled by the British
Retail Consortium and
KPMG. This was the
sharpest drop since the
BRC began its retail
monitor in January 1995.
“April’s figures show
retail sales growth falling
off a cliff,” Paul Martin,
head of retail at KPMG,
said. “These are indeed
testing times for retailers.”
The BRC warned that
part of the slump was due
to the timing of Easter,
which fell on April 1
compared with April 16
last year, meaning
spending in preparation
for the Bank Holiday
weekend fell into March.
However, Helen
Dickinson, chief
executive of the British
Retail Consortium, said
this effect was not
enough to account for the
large fall.
“Even once we take
account of the seasonal
distortions, the
underlying trend in sales
growth is heading
downwards,” she said.
The disappointing April
only adds to what is
becoming a torrid year
for retailers, in which
several established high
street names have issued
profit warnings, closed
stores or gone into
administration. The
wintry weather in
February and March,
above, caused retail sales
to post their biggest
quarterly fall in a year,
while consumers have cut
their spending in the face
of weak wage growth and
rising inflation.
Retail sales are seen as
an important part of
economic growth because
they make up about a
third of consumer
spending. Investors see
the figure as a guide to
how confident consumers
are feeling about their
finances and whether it is
a good time to invest.
The BRC figures
showed that, over the
three months to April,
the amount spent on
items other than food in
stores fell by 3.8 per cent,
which was the lowest
since January 2013. Once
accounting for items
bought online, sales fell
1.6 per cent, the lowest
level since March 2009.
Over the period, total
food sales rose 3 per cent,
although this was below
the 12-month average
growth of 3.5 per cent.
The figures from the
BRC and KPMG are
based on responses of 80
retailers, who make up an
estimated 60 per cent of
all retail sales in the UK.
Retailers report the value
of their sales for a period
and the equivalent spell a
year earlier.
Trade deficit far lower than thought Pensions success muted by
Philip Aldrick
Britain is less reliant on the “kindness
of strangers” to pay its way than
thought after officials revised down the
trade deficit by a quarter and increased
the estimated size of the economy.
Information gathered by the Office
for National Statistics has revealed that
the trade deficit in 2016 was £30.9 billion rather than the £40.7 billion recorded. The change was because of an
improvement in the estimate of trading
margins at the banks that identified
more financial service exports.
The same “net spread earnings”
effect also increased nominal GDP by
£6.2 billion, the ONS said, which could
translate into a £2.3 billion annual
windfall for the chancellor.
The figures were disclosed by the
ONS before its complete “Blue Book”
revisions, which are due on June 29
alongside its final estimate of this year’s
first quarter growth. For the past few
years, the ONS has been publishing
provisional changes early. The full
annual revisions can alter 20 years’
worth of data.
Upgraded nominal GDP and trade
figures may be “helpful because it
means the current account and budget
deficits are smaller”, George Buckley, a
UK economist at Nomura, said.
Using the revised figures, the additional £6.2 billion on cash GDP could
£28.6bn
The published trade deficit for last year
mean £2.3 billion of higher taxes every
year of the forecast. Paul Johnson, the
director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, said that the revisions “might
explain why tax revenues have come
out better than expected”. Last year the
deficit was £7.3 billion lower than
expected in November.
The ONS said that its estimate for
last year would be published on June 29
and that higher nominal growth from
2016 would be baked into later years.
The OBR and Mr Johnson cautioned
that the effect on tax revenues depended on how the extra GDP growth was
generated.
The revisions meant that the trade
deficit was only 1.6 per cent of GDP in
2016, not 2.1 per cent. If there is a similar
£10 billion downward revision for last
year, for which the published trade
deficit is £28.6 billion, the UK will have
run its smallest trade deficit as a percentage of GDP since 1998.
The trade deficit contributes to the
UK’s overall current account deficit,
which measures how much more the
country spends than it earns. It was
4.1 per cent of GDP last year. The shortfall is plugged by foreign capital inflows,
which Mark Carney, the Bank of England governor, has described as a reliance on the “kindness of strangers” to
finance our national needs.
Mr Johnson said: “It’s striking that
just two years out, you can make a
25 per cent change to the trade deficit
numbers.”
paucity of workers’ savings
Tom Knowles Economics Correspondent
Membership of workplace pension
schemes has reached a record high,
according to official figures but there
are growing concerns that millions of
employees are failing to save enough.
The proportion of employees contributing to a company pension
reached 73 per cent in 2017, up from less
than 47 per cent in 2012, the Office for
National Statistics said.
The biggest driver of this rise was the
introduction of automatic enrolment in
October 2012, which made it compulsory for employers to automatically
place their workers into a pension
scheme and pay money into the scheme.
More than 9.5 million people have
since been automatically enrolled, with
younger workers and the low paid
benefiting most from the change.
However, the ONS said that pension
contributions had “clustered” at the
minimum levels required by law. This
minimum level was 2 per cent of an
employee’s qualifying earnings in 2017,
but rose to 5 per cent last month and
will rise to 8 per cent again in 2019. The
minimum contribution from the
employer to that total sum has risen
from 1 per cent to 2 per cent and will rise
to 3 per cent next April.
Almost half of private sector employers with defined contribution pension
schemes contributed less than 2 per
cent of employees’ pensionable earnings in 2017, compared with about 6 per
cent in 2012, the ONS said.
Sir Steve Webb, director of policy at
Royal London and the former pensions
minister responsible for introducing
auto-enrolment, added that the figures
showed “the champagne needs to be
put on ice”. He said: “A combined contribution rate of 8 per cent between
worker and firm is simply not good
enough for most people.”
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
39
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Comment Business
David Smith
Deirdre Hipwell
Intu might have been left
on the shelf but there are
still bargains to be had
‘‘
A month or so ago it
would have been
regarded as a huge
surprise if interest
rates did not go up
this week. Now it will be an equally
big surprise if they do. Financial
markets are assuming that this will be
another May in which interest rates
do not fly, and will be shocked to the
core if that assumption is wrong.
There have been bigger surprises but
not many.
For some people this is exactly as it
should be. It shows that the Bank’s
nine-member monetary policy
committee (MPC) is responsive; if the
facts change it changes its mind. The
facts of the past few weeks have
included a sharp slowdown in growth,
a bigger than expected drop in
inflation and downbeat business
surveys. To ignore all this and raise
rates against this backdrop would
look strange, perhaps even weird.
Only yesterday, with the
announcement that the Halifax house
price index plunged by 3.1 per cent
last month, was there a reminder of
the fragility of parts of the economy.
For the Bank’s critics, however, this
week’s expected decision to leave
rates on hold, again, is symptomatic
of a central bank too ready to be
buffeted by short-term events, even
as inflation remains above target, and
to be diverted from the bigger picture.
If it was right to raise rates a few
weeks ago, in other words, it should
be right now.
In its first ten years of
independence, the Bank raised rates
18 times, while also cutting them on
many occasions. Interest rates were
the policymakers’ flexible friend, able
to rise and fall as the situation
required. In those days the Bank’s
Thursday noon announcements, 12
times a year, were actionpacked.
In the following
11 years, however,
we have mainly
had to generate
our own Thursday
excitement and the
number of MPC
decisions has been
cut from 12 to eight a
year. The Bank has raised rates only
twice in this second postindependence period, once in July
2007 and, after a long wait, again in
November last year.
The big reason for that, of course, is
that recent history divides into preand post-crisis periods. Pre-crisis,
rates could and did change regularly.
Post-crisis they have not. The 0.5 per
cent Bank rate established in March
2009 is still with us more than nine
years on, broken only by a brief flurry
— down and then back up again —
after the referendum. Many things
have been extraordinary in recent
years, and this is one of them. The
Bank rate has been around for
hundreds of years but until the crisis
had never been below 2 per cent.
There has also been a behavioural
change on the part of policymakers.
We have moved from a situation in
which rate rises could be reversed
without embarrassment — one
argument for independence in 1997
was that it was easier for central
bankers to do this than politicians —
to extreme risk-aversion. Few MPC
members have wanted to be blamed
for a rate rise that falls flat on its face
and comes to be seen as a grave
post-crisis error.
Perfectly good opportunities to
raise rates have been squandered over
the past nine years. This week’s
meeting is nevertheless interesting,
and it raises two broad possibilities.
One extreme is that we go back to the
“as you were” of last summer, before
the Bank adopted a more hawkish
tone and the MPC delivered its
November rate increase, with the
understanding that this was likely to
be the first in a sequence. Before
that, the assumption was that the
Bank would look through the
post-referendum period of abovetarget inflation and sit on its hands
through a
prolonged
period of
economic
uncertainty
and weakness.
Many City
economists
thought at the
time that
Decision time: MPC
members Michael
Saunders, left,
and Ian
McCafferty
there would be no rate rise until the
2020s.
The second broad possibility, which
it seems to me remains most likely, is
that the Bank sticks closely to the
overall script it set out in its last
inflation report, in February, while
accepting that weaker data this year
has affected the timing of its decisions.
That script is that although growth in
the economy will be weak by past
standards in coming years (the
February projections were roughly 1.75
per cent a year) this is stronger than a
low-productivity economy’s capacity to
grow, 1.5 per cent a year, so inflationary
pressures will gradually build.
The MPC thinks wage pressures
will gradually build. There is also a
desire, mainly unspoken, to
“normalise” interest rates by taking
them away from the emergency rates
of the past nine years. Ultra-low rates
create distortions and, in some cases,
excessive borrowing.
So the Bank is at something of a
crossroads. One way points to
nothing much happening on rates for
years; a continuation of the pattern of
recent times. The other points
towards “limited and gradual” rate
rises, perhaps a couple a year, with
the first coming later this year.
Markets will be scouring this week’s
inflation report and MPC minutes for
evidence. Two MPC members,
Michael Saunders and Ian McCafferty,
voted for a rate rise in March. They
could legitimately decide this week
that now is not the time for a rise
while maintaining their view that
higher rates will be justified in coming
months. For markets, however, a sign
that the committee’s two most
hawkish members are having second
thoughts would be taken as an
indication that the bar for rate hikes
has been raised even higher.
There has been stronger support for
higher rates on the MPC in recent
years but never enough, until last
November, for a rise. Getting the
MPC over the line is a challenge
when there are always good reasons
not to raise rates. Whatever the
outcome this week, that is the lesson
of this year. It is a lot
easier for the Bank
to talk about raising
interest rates than to
actually do so.
’’
David Smith is Economics Editor of
The Sunday Times
david.smith@sunday-times.co.uk
Europe is Simon Nixon’s
business
Simon Nixon spent five years in investment banking before turning to journalism with
The Wall Street Journal and The Times. He uses his contacts across Europe to ensure that
you’re always well informed.
Don’t miss Simon Nixon in The Times tomorrow
W
ho is to blame for
Hammerson’s failure
to merge with Intu
Properties? The
question has been
swirling around the property market
since the proposed £3.4 billion allshare merger between the two
largest shopping centre owners
collapsed last month. And for good
reason. Mergers and acquisitions in
property are so rare that when a
proposed deal finally comes along
one assumes it should make sense
and that the management team have
some idea of how to sell it to the
market. That chapter was missing
from the Hammerson-Intu saga.
While there was logic to joining
forces with Intu, Hammerson’s
executive team and board — whose
only job is to run shopping centres
— failed to convince their own
Value of global real estate
M&A for past decade $bn
Source: Dealogic
Rate rises are easier said than done
as bankers grow cautious over risk
08
10
12
14
16
600
500
400
300
200
100
shareholders that they might know
better about what was happening in
their own industry. Possibly
Hammerson spent more time
talking up its own management
team and portfolio than explaining
to the City why gaining control of
Intu — a company it had supposedly
coveted for years — was desirable.
The City hates the retail sector
(and that pesky approach for
Hammerson from its French rival
Klépierre did not help matters) but
others have tried and succeeded.
Tesco and Booker. J Sainsbury and
Asda, possibly. Typically, market
volatility is a driver of consolidation
and not an excuse for failure.
That said, the Hammerson-Intu
fiasco is unlikely to be the only
M&A activity the UK property
industry will experience in the
coming years. After years of inaction
in a “safe and staid” sector, change
is on the way and consolidation
might become inevitable.
Tenants, be they retailers or office
occupiers, want to use and lease
space in different ways and property
companies need to adapt, cut costs
and get on the front foot. British
Land has launched Storey, a flexible
workspace brand to compete with
the likes of WeWork and
Workspace, but some change will be
through acquisition.
Smaller listed companies such as
Helical Bar, Derwent London or
Great Portland Estates, with their
London focused portfolios and sharp
management teams, could start to
look attractive to bigger rivals.
Shaftesbury, which owns Chinatown,
could easily fit inside another real
estate investment trust.
Capital & Counties, another listed
property company, feels inherently
unstable. It owns Covent Garden — a
West End property where rents have
been rising — but it is weighed on by
a proposed housing development at
Earls Court which is mired in local
politics. If it did manage to sell its
Earls Court scheme a tie-up with
Shaftesbury could make sense.
There may even be an argument
for a merger between British Land
and Land Securities — the UK’s two
largest property companies — if
scale, synergies, and cost-cutting are
considered the way forward.
As ever, valuation is all. Most
listed property companies are
trading at large discounts to net
asset value, the key for valuing a
property company. This makes it
hard to broker deals as NAVs often
bear no real relation to current
market pricing — look how
Hammerson clung to its 790p-ashare NAV (which it has never hit)
when defending itself against
Klépierre. Property companies
unable to make the case for mergers
at less than NAV might have to look
for more innovative ways to deliver
value for shareholders including the
spin-off of assets and divisions.
And what about Hammerson and
Intu? Hammerson is under pressure
to convince investors it can drive up
its value after the failed deal, while
Intu, weighed down by debt and left
on the shelf, needs a plan for the
future. Something no doubt that its
three main shareholders — John
Whittaker, Coronation Asset
Management, of South Africa, and
the Gordon family — who control
60 per cent of the company are
thinking long and hard about.
Deirdre Hipwell is Mergers &
Acquisitions Editor of The Times
Katherine Griffiths is away
40
1G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Business
Rosenblatt’s law firm float attracts £24m valuation
Tabatha Kinder, Jonathan Ames
Ian Rosenblatt’s net worth was valued
at more than £24 million yesterday as
his law firm became the fourth to list on
the London Stock Exchange.
Since starting the niche litigation
firm in 1989 Mr Rosenblatt has represented clients including Kelvin MacKenzie, the former editor of The Sun,
Terry Smith, the fund manager, and the
media tycoon Richard Desmond. The
firm worked on the sale of the Daily
Express and Mr Desmond’s other
newspapers to Trinity Mirror this year.
His law firm, Rosenblatt Solicitors,
raised £43 million from investors in-
cluding Blackrock and Fidelity Investments when it floated yesterday with a
valuation of £76 million, making it the
largest UK law firm flotation to date.
Mr Rosenblatt retained a 21.1 per cent
share in the business, valued at about
£16 million. He also cashed in on £8 million worth of stock in the firm.
The Rosenblatt Group said that it
would use much of the cash raised on
investment for growth, “including inhouse funding of litigation”. The funding arm would set the firm apart from
Gateley, Gordon Dadds and Keystone,
the other legal practices to have gone
public so far.
Mr Rosenblatt, 58, who was awarded
an OBE for philanthropic services to
music in 2016, is a big donor to the
Labour Party and co-founded the City
PR firm Redleaf with his wife, Emma
Kane. He is a council member of the
Royal Philharmonic Society and
founder of Rosenblatt Recitals, a series
of opera recitals.
Rosenblatt Solicitors will use its new
capital to fund acquisitions of teams
from rival firms and to fund litigation
claims for its clients in its first move into
the growing third-party litigation funding market.
In addition to running a litigation
fund, the business said it would use
shareholder investment to provide a
“currency for strategic acquisitions” as
well as for “retaining talent”.
Nicola Foulston, Rosenblatt’s chief
executive, pointed to the practice’s litigation pedigree as giving it a head start
in its proposed wider funding plans.
“Our commercial approach and
focus on dispute resolution mean we
are well positioned to capitalise on
opportunities,” Ms Foulston said.
“Many law firms continue to be managed by senior partners, who often have
little or no commercial management
experience,” she said. “Our structure,
combined with our admission to the
Alternative Investment Market, will
help us to be more flexible, produce
higher margins than the traditional law
firms and allow equity participation for
all staff enabling us to attract talent.”
Ms Foulston, the former boss of
Brands Hatch race track, was made
chief executive of Rosenblatt Solicitors
in 2016 to explore the opportunities
presented by a flotation. “This flotation
is an opportunity commercialise law
and the way we work,” Ms Foulston
said. “Law is very inward-focused sector. [Ian Rosenblatt] and I believe we
need to be more outward looking to the
way in which business is operating, with
more of a focus on bottom-line performance.”
The firm is presently acting for a
group of 27,000 Royal Bank of Scotland
shareholders who sued the bank over
its £12 billion cash call in 2008, and who
are fighting for their share of a
£200 million settlement.
The Birmingham-based law firm
Gateley was the first to come to market
in 2015, raising £30 million to list on the
Aim. Last year Gordon Dadds, a
London firm, raised £20 million, and
Keystone raised £15 million. Slater
& Gordon, which is listed on the
Sydney Stock Exchange, also operates
in the UK.
CITY
PEOPLE
The feuds, the faces and the farcical
Dominic Walsh @walshdominic
Business big shot
name
terry pizzie
age 57
position
ceo at
horizon
discovery
T
he biotechnology veteran
Terry Pizzie has been
parachuted into the top job
at Horizon Discovery at a time
when investors are unsure what
they will find in the distance.
He was promoted to chief
executive of the gene-editing
company yesterday, about a week
after it emerged that Horizon
had received an unsolicited
£270 million all-share takeover
approach from Abcam, a bigger
Aim-quoted rival. Horizon, which
is based in Cambridge, rejected
time’s up for the black-tie
formal after gala scandal
The CBI’s forthcoming annual
dinner has switched venues, from
Grosvenor House to The Brewery,
in the City. But that’s not the only
change: it’s also dropped black tie
in favour of “business dress”.
Perhaps a nod to the furore that
followed the Presidents Club
dinner, that most infamous of
black-tie gatherings? Not at all,
according to a CBI spokesman,
who says that Carolyn Fairbairn,
the director-general, below, took
the decision shortly after the last
annual dinner. “She’s not the
biggest fan of black tie,” he says.
if the genes fit
Move over, Jamie Oliver. Rio
Ferdinand, the former England
footballer, is teaming up with a
consumer genetics outfit called
DNAFit “as part of a shared
mission to improve the
nation’s health”. The
company, which uses
genetics to “help
individuals make better
health and diet choices”,
will today announce the
erstwhile defender as
head adviser to its
health, wellness and
sports advisory
the approach but there has been
speculation that Abcam, which is
also based in the city and has
market value of £2.6 billion, will
return with another proposal.
Horizon’s products and services
have been used by more than
10,000 customers and its gene
technology was bolstered by the
$85 million acquisition of
Dharmacon last year.
Mr Pizzie takes charge after a
slump in the share price from its
peak of 294p last August. Horizon
posted pre-tax losses yesterday of
£14.3 million, mostly down to
research and development costs.
Revenue was up 52 per cent to
£36.5 million.
Mr Pizzie, who joined Horizon
last year as head of commercial
operations, having worked in the
biotech sector for almost 30
years, replaces Darrin Disley,
who stepped down in February.
board. Given that Ferdinand has
taken “a significant undisclosed
investment stake” in the business,
it could also prove healthy to his
bank balance.
kicked when they’re down
As if being relegated in successive
seasons wasn’t bad enough,
Sunderland football club is about
to suffer a rise in its business rates
bill from £1.38 million a year to
£1.74 million, going to £1.9 million
by 2021-22. According to Colliers
International, the property
consultants, while stadium size
and ability to pay are taken into
account by the Valuation Office
Agency, it appears not to consider
relegation a “material change of
circumstances” in assessing
rateable values.
beach blunder
On the day that most
newspapers carried photos of
crowded beaches, was it really
a good idea of Haven holiday
parks to send out a press
release claiming that half of
parents haven’t been to the
beach with their kids in the
past 12 months?
That proportion
will now surely be
much lower.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
41
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Business
NIKO TAVERNISE/AP
Comcast prepares cash
bid for 21st Century Fox
T
he American
cable television
giant Comcast is
preparing a
hostile offer for 21st
Century Fox’s
entertainment assets,
which could lead to a
bidding war with Walt
Disney (James Dean
writes).
Comcast has asked for
an extension to an
existing loan by as much
as $60 billion so that it
can table an all-cash bid
for a large part of 21st
Century Fox, according
to Reuters.
Comcast, which is
valued at $147 billion, is
the world’s largest
broadcasting company.
It is vying with Disney,
the $152 billion film,
television and
theme parks
conglomerate, to
buy most of 21st
Century Fox,
the $69 billion
media
company
run by the
Murdoch
family.
In
December
21st Century Fox agreed
to sell to Disney assets
including the 20th
Century Fox film and
television studio and its
interest in Sky, the
European pay-television
operator, for
$52.4 billion. Comcast
offered $64 billion but
was rejected.
It is understood that
Brian Roberts, the chief
executive of Comcast,
would proceed with an
offer only if AT&T’s
proposed $85.4 billion
acquisition of Time
Warner was allowed.
The justice department
blocked it, a
decision the
companies
challenged in
court. A ruling is
due on
June 12.
Comcast
shares fell by
5.6 per cent
to close at
$30.59 in
New York
last night,
with 21st
Century
Fox shares
down by
21st Century Fox, the distributor of the musical The Greatest Showman and the spy thriller Red Sparrow, left, is competing with Comcast to own Sky
0.1 per cent to $37.99.
Rupert Murdoch,
chairman of News
Corporation, owner of
The Times, is
co-chairman of 21st
Century Fox with his
son Lachlan. James
Murdoch, Mr Murdoch’s
younger son, is chief
executive of 21st
Century Fox and
chairman of Sky.
21st Century Fox owns
39 per cent of Sky and
last year bid £10.75 a
share for the 61 per cent
it does not already own.
At the end of last
month Comcast offered
£12.50 a share for Sky,
which valued the
company at $22 billion,
forcing Sky’s board to
withdraw its
recommendation of 21st
Century Fox’s offer.
21st Century Fox,
Disney and Comcast
declined to comment.
6 Bob Iger, chief
executive of Disney, said
his company “made a
good deal” with 21st
Century Fox and was
“confident” it would
close. Disney reported a
first quarter profit of
$2.9 billion, up from
$2.4 billion, on revenue
that rose to $14.5 billion.
The shares rose by
0.1 per cent at $101.90 in
after-hours trading on
Wall Street.
hits
Shire in fight to persuade investors Lloyds
back in fund
about Takeda’s £45bn takeover deal contract row
Alex Ralph
The boards of Shire and Takeda are
holding a series of investor meetings to
convince shareholders of the merits of a
£45 billion takeover of the FTSE 100
company after one of the biggest deals
in the pharmaceutical industry was
struck yesterday.
The Japanese company announced
plans to buy Shire in a cash and shares
deal, a fortnight after the two sides
reached a preliminary agreement that
was subject to due diligence from both
companies.
The deal, which has now been
recommended to shareholders, values
Shire at about £48.17 per share based on
stock price and exchange rates yesterday, a 57 per cent premium, and was
unchanged from the agreement towards the end of last month.
Shire, which is based in Dublin, was
founded in 1986, when it sold calcium
supplements above an off-licence in a
village near Basingstoke. It expanded
under successive bosses to become a
neuroscience and rare disease specialist, generating $14.4 billion of product
sales, two thirds of which are in the
United States.
Takeda began in 1781 as a herbal medicines company in Osaka. It now has
interests in more than 70 countries.
The Japanese company has faced
scepticism from investors about the
takeover. There has been uncertainty
because Takeda has a smaller market
value than Shire, it is taking on significant debt to help to finance the deal and
because Shire would lose its London
listing. The combined group would be
listed in Japan and in the US.
Under the deal, Shire investors would
be taking a large amount of Takeda
paper, with about 46 per cent of the deal
in cash and Shire shareholders owning
about half of the combined group.
The 21 per cent decline in Takeda’s
share price since it went public with its
takeover approach has diluted the
value of the offer. However, the shares
rose by 4 per cent in Tokyo yesterday.
Shire’s shares rose by 178½p or 4.6 per
cent, to £40.34½ yesterday.
Analysts at Jefferies expected Shire’s
6 Bosses at Shire are in line for a
retention payment of more than
$9 million as part of the takeover.
Flemming Ornskov, chief executive,
and Thomas Dittrich, finance chief,
are entitled to receive a cash
payment worth 200 per cent of their
salaries and target bonuses this year,
which would be paid six months
after the deal is completed.
shares to trade at a “relatively wide
10 per cent to 15 per cent spread to the
offer”, given that the deal is not expected
to close until the first half of next year.
The deal needs to get the support of
three quarters of Shire’s voting share-
holders and two thirds of Takeda’s.
Asked about the apparent investor
scepticism, Christophe Weber, the boss
of Takeda, said that it was “a relatively
unusual transaction” and that yesterday was the first opportunity to sell the
deal to investors.
“A little bit of complexity, I think,
could be one of the reasons,” he said.
“Both boards are confident they will be
able to convince their shareholders.”
The deal would give the combined
companies strong positions in the US
and Japan and bolster their neuroscience and gastroenterology businesses.
To help to fund the cash part of the
deal, Takeda has secured a $31 billion
bridge facility from a consortium of
banks and plans to refinance or reduce
the funding, including with long-term
debt, before the deal completes.
Potentially between 6 and 7 per cent
of the combined 52,000 workforce
could also be cut and some Shire assets,
deemed non-core, could be sold.
First Group takes a dive as Apollo walks away
Robert Lea Industrial Editor
Shares in First Group have fallen by
nearly 15 per cent after a US private
equity firm decided against a potential
takeover offer.
Apollo Management had been stalking the train and bus group for more
than a month, with its tentative offers
for First Group understood to have
been priced between 110p and 120p a
share, valuing First at up to £1.4 billion.
The rejection of Apollo’s approach by
First’s board has put the City’s eyes
firmly on what happens next at the
company, which has struggled for the
past seven and a half years under its
chief executive, Tim O’Toole.
First Group is a transport group with
a £5.5 billion annual revenue. It runs the
Great Western Railway, South Western
Railway and Trans Pennine train franchises and buses throughout the UK as
well as some bus services in the US. It
employs 100,000 people. Apollo is one
of the giants of US private equity, with
$250 billion under management, and is
best known as the owner of the Caesars
Palace gambling empire.
Apollo’s interest in First Group was
piqued after First’s market value had
fallen to £925 million. Under City rules
to prevent potential takeovers dragging
on for months without a formal offer,
there was a “put-up or shut-up” deadline of tomorrow for Apollo to make its
plans for First Group clear after news of
its initial approach broke a month ago.
Apollo said it would “shut up” and
walk away after what were called “two
preliminary and highly conditional indicative approaches”. Shares in First fell
to 16¼p to 94¾p, back to almost where
the stock was the day before the
announcement of Apollo’s interest.
First Group had been forced to make a
statement after a near 25 per cent run
up in the shares in the days before from
a record low of 77p.
First is next scheduled to speak to the
market at the end of the month at its
annual results.
Patrick Hosking Financial Editor
The uneasy relationship between
Lloyds Banking Group and Standard
Life Aberdeen worsened yesterday
after a public squabble over a £109 billion asset management mandate.
Standard Life Aberdeen challenged
Lloyds’ reason for pulling the contract,
to which the bank responded by saying
that it was “disappointed” by the fund
management group, whose reasons for
retaining the mandate to manage the
money were “not credible”.
In February Lloyds said that it would
be withdrawing the money in a year’s
time because Standard Life Aberdeen
was a clear and material competitor of
its Scottish Widows brand, therefore
breaching the contract. The deal was
signed with Aberdeen Asset Management, which merged with Standard Life
in August last year. Standard Life Aberdeen denied that it was a material competitor and said that Lloyds did not
have the right to terminate the contract. It added that it was engaging with
Lloyds in a dispute resolution process.
Unless a compromise is reached, the
dispute is likely to go to mediation, then
arbitration and possibly to the courts.
The contract was struck as an eightyear deal in 2014. At stake is the right to
manage money on behalf of hundreds
of thousands of Scottish Widows customers. Standard Life Aberdeen makes
revenues of £129 million a year from the
contract. Lloyds has held a first round
of tendering for the contract, with
Blackrock, Schroders and JP Morgan
all thought to be interested.
Lloyds said: “Standard Life Aberdeen
is a clear and material competitor of
Scottish Widows and Lloyds in the UK.”
42
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Business
PELOTON
Peloton looks
to lead break
from spin
classes pack
A
n American
fitness company
that counts the
Hollywood
actor Hugh Jackman
and the Olympic
swimmer Michael
Phelps among its
members will today
announce plans to come
to Britain in the autumn
(Dominic Walsh writes).
Peloton, which was
recently valued at more
than $1 billion, enables
fitness enthusiasts to
take part in highintensity spin classes
run by top fitness
instructors from their
own homes.
From September,
Britons who become
members will be able to
use a Peloton indoor
bike with its own tablet
to take part in 14 live
cycling classes a day or
select from a library of
8,000 recorded classes.
Joining will not come
cheap, however. Buying
the carbon steel bike
with a multitouch
screen and stereo
speakers will cost £1,995
with a monthly fee of
£39.50 to gain unlimited
access to both live and
recorded classes.
Kevin Cornils, who
will spearhead Peloton’s
international expansion
André Rieu and
The Johann Strauss
Orchestra
CONCERT
AN U N FO RG E T TAB LE E VEN I N G WITH TH E WALT Z KI N G
THREE DAYS FROM
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A seated ticket to
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The Johann Strauss
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Maastricht
(upgrades available)
on't miss this extraordinary night
of musical entertainment in the
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Square. At this very special summer
concert you'll see André Rieu perform
live in his hometown with his Johann
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D
Three days from
Five days from
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£479pp
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A visit to Maastricht
Two or four nights'
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from its new London
base, insisted that
members would get
“more than just a class,
a cycling studio or a
bike”. He said that as
well as getting a bike
“such as you would find
in a high-end studio”,
members would receive
a “a fully engaging
experience” and a social
connection from a
real-time leaderboard
that tracked progress
against other riders.
Mr Cornils said the
company’s UK
development would
follow its US parent in
selling memberships not
only online but also
through retail sites
offering test rides. The
group aimed to open
three sites in London, in
Canary Wharf, the City
and West End, before
looking further afield.
Peloton, which was
founded six years ago by
John Foley, its chief
executive, has raised
more than £300 million
from investors including
Fidelity and Comcast
NBCUniversal en route
to what is expected to be
an eventual listing. It
has sold more than
300,000 bikes in
America since its launch
and has a total of almost
one million riders.
Mr Cornils said within
five years he hoped to
have a million members
outside America.
Peloton also works
with some US hotel
chains and gym
operators, and Mr
Cornils said he expected
to go down that route.
“We’ve just put two
bikes in the gym of the
new Soho House in
White City and we will
be talking to hotels and
gyms,” he said.
Carillion rivals warn MPs on
the risks of using contractors
Robert Lea Industrial Editor
The government should not contract
out public services to private companies that are at risk of going bust
because of their exposure to the construction industry, according to two
chief executives in the sector.
Phil Bentley, of Mitie, and Rupert
Soames, of Serco, appeared before
the parliamentary inquiry into the
collapse of Carillion yesterday. Mr
Bentley told the Commons public
administration and constitutional
affairs committee that departments
that contracted out public services
needed to work harder to understand
the contractors.
Asked what lessons the government could take from the failure of
Carillion, Mr Bentley said: “Don’t
contract with companies that have
huge construction risk.
“Carillion’s problems began with
construction cost overruns. It was
not the failure of outsourced services.
[departments] have to understand
the [business] model. An outsourcer
that has large construction contracts
alongside it is a very different model
to an outsourcer that just does, say,
security.”
Carillion was put into liquidation
by ministers in January after running
up debts to lenders and suppliers of
more than £1 billion following the
failure of four big building contracts.
About 2,300 Carillion workers have
since lost their job.
Mitie, which has annual revenues
of £2.1 billion, and Serco, with annual
revenues of £2.9 billion, are both
among the government’s biggest
public services providers, though
neither is involved in construction.
The comments of Mr Bentley and
Mr Soames raise issues over the
status of Interserve, another leading
public services provider and the
contractor most like Carillion in its
business model.
Last week Interserve, which has
£3.2 billion of annual revenues, fell
£244 million into the red and warned
that debts could rise to £680 million.
Its finances have been wrecked by a
foray into the construction of energyfrom-waste incinerator plants and it
admitted that it had 125 loss-making
contracts. There was no immediate
response from Interserve to Mr Bentley’s and Mr Soames’s comments.
At the hearing, the executives were
withering of government relations
with outsourcing contractors.
“The discouragements to do business with government are big and
have grown bigger,” Mr Soames said.
“Doing business with government is
a hard task: bidding is complex, it’s
expensive, it’s long-winded, contract
management is inflexible.
“Around £8 billion has been written
off the sector’s value [over the past
three or four years], billions of pounds
have had to be raised to recapitalise
companies, all of whom have one
thing in common: they are major
suppliers to government.
“It is not unknown for government
to behave quite badly. It is in the
position of a monopoly buyer. It is
also the regulator, the referee and the
giver-out of business.”
AA ‘withholding’ former worker’s data
Gurpreet Narwan
A former AA worker has reported the
company to the information commissioner for withholding personal
records as she prepares to sue it for
unfair dismissal and discrimination.
Lucy Burnford, a founder of the car
website Motoriety, began legal proceedings against the AA last month,
claiming that she was made redundant when she was seven months
pregnant. She has tried to access
records held about her for the case but
says that she has waited since August
for the AA to provide them. Individuals are legally entitled to receive them
within 40 days of the request.
The AA is Britain’s biggest motoring organisation, with 15 million
Lucy Burnford founded the website
Motoriety and sold a stake to the AA
members. It was listed it on the stock
market in 2014. It had revenues of
£940 million last year and employs
more than 7,400 staff.
Ms Burnford, 39, has accused the
company’s lawyers of using delaying
tactics, which she said had led to
higher legal costs.
“Trying to get this data has cost me
upwards of £10,000 in legal fees,” she
said. “No wonder so many people are
scared to stand up for their rights.”
Ms Burnford helped to set up
Motoriety in 2013, and sold a 50 per
cent stake to the AA two years later.
She began legal action against the AA
after her dismissal in July last year,
claiming that the AA directors on the
Motoriety board became hostile and
excluded her from meetings after she
told them she was pregnant.
The AA said that Ms Burnford was
made redundant after a full and fair
process. It said that her redundancy
was not linked to her pregnancy and
that it would fight her claim.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
43
2G M
Business
Oil prices reverse early losses as
Trump tears up sanctions deal
Shell shifts
$3.3bn stake
in oil sands
Emily Gosden Energy Editor
Emily Gosden
‘If everything is not fine,
it may be harder to
proceed with sanctions’
President Trump pulled America out of
the nuclear deal last night Brent immediately pared the 2 per cent-plus losses
and was trading 0.2 per cent lower at
$76.04 a barrel. West Texas Intermediate, a grade of crude oil, was off 1.4 per
cent at $69.73.
Brent crude had hit $76 a barrel on
Monday for the first time since 2014
amid concerns over the sanctions as
well as over more potential disruption
to Venezuelan production.
Iran’s production and exports fell by
more than one million barrels per day
when sanctions were previously in
place. Since then, however, Iran has
made the most of its ability to sell its
crude in international markets. By last
month exports of crude and condensate — a grade of ultra-light crude oil —
hit 2.8 million barrels a day, according
to data from Tanker Trackers. Official
Oil Price per
barrel (left)
Iran crude oil production (right)
Million barrels per day
$130
4
Jan, 2016
Most sanctions on Iran are
lifted after nuclear deal
110
Source:CEIC, Thomson Reuters
Oil prices fluctuated in a turbulent day
of trading yesterday as markets awaited
details of President Trump’s decision to
reimpose sanctions on Iran.
Before the announcement, which
came in the early evening UK time,
observers said it had the potential to be
the biggest event shaping the oil price
since the Opec cartel of oil exporters
and other leading producers agreed to
curb their output in November 2016.
Brent crude, the benchmark
global oil price, fell more than 2 per
cent to less than $75 a barrel before
the White House decision.
Iran is a big oil producer and has
boosted its exports since EU and
US sanctions were lifted in
early 2016 after its nuclear
deal with world powers in
July 2015. President
Trump had described the agreement as the
“worst deal ever”.
A reimposition of the restrictions
on trading the country’s oil now threatens to squeeze global supplies. When
Iran’s crude
calculations
90
3.75
3.5
Jun, July 2016
US and EU sanctions on
Iranian oil come into effect
70
3.25
50
3
Nov 30, 2016
Opec reached historic
agreement to curb production
30
10
2011
2012
2013
estimates from Iran’s oil ministry put
April’s figure at 2.6 million barrels a day,
the highest since implementation of
the Joint Comprehensive Plan of
Action nuclear deal.
Steven Mnuchin, US Treasury secretary, said last night that he did not anticipate a spike in the oil price after the
reimposition of sanctions. He added
that America had talked with “different
parties that would be willing to increase
oil supply to offset this. So my expectation is not that oil prices will go higher.”
The US secretary said licences for
2014
2015
2016
Boeing and Airbus to sell aircraft and
components to Iran would be revoked
as a result of the reimposed sanctions.
Ole Hansen, head of commodity
strategy at Saxo Bank, said that the
decision was a “binary event” with a
possible swing in the price of a barrel of
$5 either way.
Jack Allardyce, an analyst at Cantor
Fitzgerald, said the sanctions “would
drive a short-term increase in benchmarks, potentially towards $80 per barrel depending on the scope and timing.
Some American companies in the oil
2017
2.75
2.5
2018
sector made early moves in Iran after
sanctions were lifted. General Electric’s
oil and gas business has received millions of dollars in orders from Iran, and
Schlumberger, the energy services
company, agreed in late 2016 to study
an Iranian oil field.
By law, the United States must ensure
that the global oil market is well supplied before imposing sanctions. Kevin
Book, head of ClearView Energy Partners, an energy consultancy, said. “If
everything is not fine, it may be harder
to proceed with sanctions.”
Royal Dutch Shell is selling more of its
interest in Canadian oil sands production by offloading its shareholding
in Canadian Natural Resources for
$3.3 billion.
The Anglo-Dutch energy group sold
most of its oil sands interests to Canadian Natural last March in return for
$5.4 billion in cash and 98 million shares
in the company, valued at $3.1 billion.
It said yesterday that it was selling the
shares and would use the anticipated
$3.3 billion proceeds to help to reduce
its net debt, a key objective as it aims to
embark on promised share buybacks.
Shell, which has a global business
spanning more than 70 countries, reported profits of $12 billion in 2017 from
operations ranging from production
to fuel retailing. Oil sands mining is
a particularly carbon-intensive form
of oil production and has been
widely criticised by environmental
campaigners.
After the sale of the Canadian Natural shares, Shell will retain a 10 per cent
stake in the Athabasca Oil Sands
Project. This includes the Albian Sands
mining operation as well as a processing plant and the Quest carbon capture
and storage project, which captures
some of the emissions from the mining.
Shell is working towards a target of
selling $30 billion of assets over the
three years to the end of 2018, to help
reduce its debts from the acquisition of
BG Group, and said last month it had
completed $26 billion of these sales.
A spokesman said the share sale
would not go towards its target, since
the proceeds were counted at the time
of last year’s deal.
However, the cashflow from the disposal should help eat into its debt pile,
which stood at $66 billion at the end of
March. Jessica Uhl, its finance chief,
said it wanted to see a further reduction
in its debt level before it commenced an
eagerly anticipated $25 billion share
buyback to offset the dilution caused by
issuing shares as part of the BG deal and
through its scrip dividend scheme.
The sale of the Canadian Natural
shares is due to complete today and be
underwritten by Goldman Sachs, RBC
Capital Markets, Scotiabank and TD
Securities.
Competition inquiry for SSE merger Eon powers on after early
Emily Gosden
The proposed merger of SSE and
Npower faces an in-depth competition
inquiry after the energy giants failed to
address concerns their combination
would result in higher household bills.
The Competition and Markets
Authority said it had referred the
merger for a Phase 2 inquiry which
would take until October 22.
The watchdog had given the companies until late last week to offer “undertakings” to address its competition concerns but said they had not done so.
SSE and Npower are two of Britain’s
“Big Six” energy suppliers; SSE is part
of the FTSE 100 group of the same
name, while Npower is owned by Innogy, of Germany.
SSE and Innogy said in November
they planned to merge their UK household supply businesses into a new listed
energy supplier that would serve about
7 million households.
It would become Britain’s biggest
household electricity supplier and
second-biggest gas supplier, raising
fears about a weakening of competition
in the market.
The proposed merger comes as the
government prepares to cap standard
energy tariffs after a 2016 finding by the
CMA that weak competition had
resulted in millions of households paying too much for their energy.
The watchdog said its initial investi-
7m
Households that would be served by a
merged SSE and Innogy
gation found “that the rivalry between
the large energy companies, including
SSE and Npower, is an important factor
in how they set tariffs” and that “the
removal of such competition could
therefore lead to higher prices for some
customers”.
It said yesterday: “SSE and Npower
did not offer measures to address the
CMA’s concerns, and so it has referred
the merger for a more in-depth, Phase 2
investigation.”
Under the plans, the company will
initially be part-owned by Innogy and
part by SSE’s shareholders.
The transaction could be complicated by the fact that Innogy, which is controlled by Germany’s RWE, is due to be
sold to Eon, a rival German supplier
that already has a UK supply business.
This raises the possibility that Eon
could end up owning or having indirect
stakes in three of the Big Six suppliers.
Industry sources expect Innogy could
therefore be required to sell its holding
in the merged SSE-Npower company
before the Eon deal goes through.
Alex Neill at the consumer group
Which? said: “Mergers of big players in
essential markets such as energy risk
reducing competition and harming
consumers. As both these big suppliers
struggle with providing good customer
service, it’s only right the competition
authorities investigate further before
allowing any venture to go ahead.”
profits lifted by Germany
Gurpreet Narwan
Eon celebrated a “strong start” to the
year after posting a 41 per cent rise in
profits helped by an improvement in its
German retail business.
The German energy group reported
adjusted earnings before interest and
tax of €1.28 billion, up 24 per cent. It said
its performance was a result of growth
in its domestic retail arm, which
exceeded analysts’ expectations. Marc
Spieker, the chief financial officer, said
that Eon had achieved strong growth
by gaining more than 50,000 customers in Germany.
“The first quarter seamlessly continued our positive performance of last
year. All the key figures and developments for the group are in line with our
plan and we therefore affirm our forecast for full-year 2018 [results],” he said.
Eon is one of Britain’s biggest suppliers and generators of electricity, with
about six million customers. In March
it announced plans to do a series of
asset swaps with RWE, its domestic
rival, as part of a €20 billion deal that
would effectively mean RWE would
focus on renewable energies, while Eon
becomes a bigger energy supplier.
In its trading update, Eon said its
renewables business rose 7 per cent to
€171 million in the first quarter, but
highlighted the “countervailing effects”
in the market. Its installed capacity was
higher than in the year before because
of new wind farms, while its sales prices
for power output fell.
Eon said that its full-year forecasts
with earnings before interest and tax
was expected to come in at between
€2.8 billion and €3 billion, while net
income was forecast between €1.3 billion and €1.5 billion. The group said that
its net debt load, which was at €19.7 billion, was likely to “decrease substantially” by the end of the year.
44
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
1G M
Business Unit Trusts
The Times unit trust information service
Sell
Buy
+/-
Yld
%
For Abbey National see Santander
For Allchurches see Ecclesiastical
ALLIANZ GLOBAL INVESTORS
Inv Serv: 020 7065 1400 Helpline: 0800 317 573
Gilt Yield A ‡@
Strategic Bond Fund ‡@
UK Corp Bond C ‡@
UK Eqty C ‡@
UK Eqty Inc A ‡@
UK Gwth A ‡@
UK Index A Inc ‡@
UK Mid Cap A ‡@
177.14
148.20
104.79
6317.26
309.37
6094.29
1423.81
5304.50
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
-0.59
-0.22
-0.78
-14.91
-0.01
+8.29
-5.83
+34.70
1.26
0.50
3.87
3.28
4.07
1.13
3.01
0.13
1733.14
111.69
105.62
378.01
36.21
277.85
136.28
101.30
110.85
83.16
466.11
246.16
75.26
91.33
101.58
60.40
101.40
60.27
601.36
1810.04
643.08
+7.13
+0.28
+0.27
-0.62
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1.58
0.76
0.77
0.82
0.38
0.91
3.49
3.59
…
5.39
3.58
3.69
4.16
…
3.26
3.32
3.26
3.32
1.13
1.25
1.52
AXA FRAMLINGTON UNIT MGMT LTD
Dling: 0845 602 1952 Priv Clients: 0845 777 5511
Equity Inc ‡@
572.40
Gilt Acc @
201.30
Gilt Inc @
74.35
Health Acc ‡@
1819.00
Jap Smlr Co Ac @
62.56
Managed Inc ‡@
142.20
Monthly Inc Inc ‡@
260.50
UK Growth Inc ‡@
213.60
UK Select Opps Inc ‡@ 1956.00
UK Sml Cos Inc ‡@
299.00
…
211.80
78.24
…
66.09
…
…
…
…
…
-2.70
+0.10
-0.39
+26.00
-0.19
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1.09
…
0.30
4.12
4.37
1.48
0.21
0.04
AXA FUND MANAGERS LTD
Admin & Enq 0117 989 0808
AXA Trusts
Gen Acc ‡@
Gen Inc ‡@
2101.00
1079.00
…
…
+6.00
-2.00
2.64
2.70
UK/Global Investment Companies
Euro Acc A ‡@
Extra Inc Inc B ‡@
Global Gwth Acc R ‡@
Japan Acc A ‡@
Pac Gwth Acc A ‡@
250.70
89.90
213.80
168.70
479.70
…
…
…
…
…
155.20
584.00
578.70
226.50
1.73
0.87
1.06
1.23
1.58
157.60
…
587.50
229.90
+0.40
+5.00
+3.50
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…
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1.53
4.26
CLOSE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD
0870 606 6402
Beacon Inv ‡
84.88
…
+0.35
0.01
Dealing: 020 7426 6232
Winchester ‡
2767.28
…
+59.63
1.41
EDENTREE INV MGMT LTD
0800 358 3010
Amity European A ‡
Amity International A ‡
Amity Sterling Bond A ‡
Amity UK A Inc ‡
Higher Income A ‡
UK Equity Growth A ‡
272.50
280.60
106.00
243.00
139.70
294.50
…
…
…
…
…
…
+0.10
+3.20
…
+0.90
+0.30
+1.40
1.07
1.13
4.43
1.40
4.22
1.01
Corporate Bond ‡@
Ethical ‡@
European ‡@
Far Eastern ‡
Fund of Inv Tst ‡@
Intl Gwth ‡
Japanese ‡
North Amer ‡
Smaller Cos ‡@
Special Sits ‡@
UK Equity Inc ‡@
UK FTSE 100 IT ‡@
UK FTSE All-S IT ‡@
UK Growth ‡@
Yld
%
2283.00
27.54
3907.00
1971.00
149.50
374.20
49.69
327.60
80.63
36.47
109.77
4095.00
69.75
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327.60
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…
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14.89
…
…
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…
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35.50
82.10
88.62
105.40
115.70
88.12
63.10
88.11
120.30
49.21
88.48
61.16
69.60
81.54
…
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Amer Ind Acc ‡@
Amer Ind Inc ‡@
Euro Ind Acc ‡@
Euro Ind Inc ‡@
FTSE 100 Ind Acc ‡@
FTSE 100 Ind Inc ‡@
FTSE 250 Ind Acc ‡@
FTSE 250 Ind Inc ‡@
FTSE All-S Acc ‡@
FTSE All-S Inc ‡@
Jap Ind Acc ‡@
Jap Ind Inc ‡@
Pac Ind Acc ‡@
Pac Ind Inc ‡@
511.27
438.63
880.82
633.71
231.66
125.33
275.21
189.49
596.16
358.92
125.88
107.42
388.71
276.37
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
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+1.68
+0.97
+0.83
+0.37
+0.26
Balanced Acc ‡@
215.54
Balanced Inc ‡@
143.85
Corp Bd Acc ‡@
277.54
Corp Bd Inc ‡@
121.75
Gilt & Fd Int Acc ‡@
461.25
Gilt & Fd Int Inc ‡@
71.78
Income Acc ‡@
664.17
Income Inc ‡@
331.35
Monthly Inc Acc ‡@
302.29
Monthly Inc Inc ‡@
148.16
UK Grth & Inc Ret B Acc ‡@137.23
UK Grth & Inc Ret B Inc ‡@72.79
UK Gth & Inc Acc ‡@
137.23
UK Gth & Inc Inc ‡@
72.79
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
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+0.38
+0.72
+0.38
Buy
+/-
Yld
%
Cautious Managed A Acc ‡@423.61
Cautious Managed A Inc ‡@279.48
Diversified Growth A Acc ‡@128.12
Diversified Growth A Inc ‡@140.15
Diversified Income A Acc ‡@307.01
Diversified Income A Inc ‡@79.27
Emerging Mkts Blended Debt A Acc ‡@116.50
Emerging Mkts Blended Debt A Acc Gross ‡@125.82
Emerging Mkts Blended Debt A Inc ‡@88.86
Emerging Mkts Equity A Acc ‡@150.17
Emrg Mkts Local Curr Debt A Acc ‡@183.83
Emrg Mkts Local Curr Debt A Inc ‡@96.13
Emrg Mkts Local Curr Debt Gross I Acc ‡@220.49
Enhanced Natural Resources A Acc ‡@122.17
Global Bond A Acc ‡@
139.30
Global Bond A Inc ‡@
109.33
Global Bond I Gross Inc ‡@1167.00
Global Dynamic A Acc ‡@ 153.65
Global Energy A Acc ‡@ 203.93
Global Equity A Acc ‡@ 156.59
Global Franchise A Acc ‡@195.98
Global Free Enterprise A Acc ‡@933.87
Global Gold A Acc ‡@
125.49
Global Special Situations A Acc ‡@276.73
Global Special Situations A Inc ‡@218.50
Managed Growth A Acc ‡@230.60
Monthly High Income A Acc ‡@219.51
Monthly High Income A Inc ‡@67.73
Multi-Asset Protector A Acc ‡@173.69
Strategic Bond A Acc ‡@ 244.54
Strategic Bond A Inc ‡@ 119.47
Target Return A Acc ‡@ 101.95
Target Return A Inc ‡@ 89.54
UK Alpha A Acc ‡@
2523.71
UK Blue Chip A Acc ‡@ 770.11
UK Smaller Companies A Acc ‡@4903.91
UK Smaller Companies A Inc ‡@4445.96
UK Special Situations A Acc ‡@1228.82
UK Special Situations A Inc ‡@472.05
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
+0.34
+0.22
+0.32
+0.36
+0.63
+0.16
+0.13
+0.20
+0.10
+1.47
-0.76
-0.40
-0.05
+0.75
+4.03
+3.00
+29.78
+1.44
+1.55
+2.33
+3.53
+14.29
-0.24
+3.12
+2.46
+0.88
+0.12
+0.04
+0.49
+0.19
+0.09
-0.08
-0.07
+13.93
+3.15
+14.34
+13.00
+5.60
+2.15
…
…
0.86
0.91
2.78
4.22
4.89
4.21
6.80
0.36
5.48
7.43
5.42
0.59
0.83
0.82
1.26
0.36
1.17
0.41
1.72
0.04
…
…
…
0.08
3.54
5.02
0.15
1.94
3.31
0.90
0.89
1.55
1.67
0.89
0.90
1.46
1.49
For ISIS Asset Mgmt see F&C Fd Mgmt Ltd (OEICS)
New Europe A ‡@
Portfolio ‡@
Stg Corp Bd A Acc ‡@
Stg Corp Bd A Inc ‡@
UK Act 350 A Acc ‡@
UK Dynamic Acc ‡@
UK Dynamic Inc ‡@
UK Equity A Acc ‡@
UK Equity A Inc ‡@
UK Eqy & Bd Inc Acc ‡@
UK Eqy & Bd Inc Inc ‡@
UK Higher Inc A Acc ‡@
UK Higher Inc A Inc ‡@
UK Sm Cos A Acc ‡@
UK Str Eq Inc A Acc ‡@
UK Str Eq Inc A Inc ‡@
US A Acc ‡@
US Sm Cos A Acc ‡@
Sell
Buy
+/-
Yld
%
192.40
261.50
92.64
55.29
199.00
210.30
165.90
401.90
46.44
167.10
90.29
1115.00
580.40
501.60
194.90
114.70
1036.00
666.10
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
-0.40
+1.60
-0.16
-0.09
-2.20
+1.10
+0.90
+0.60
+0.07
-0.20
-0.48
+5.00
+2.80
+2.10
+1.30
+0.80
+25.00
+17.20
…
0.63
1.49
1.98
…
0.92
1.47
3.45
3.49
3.41
3.50
2.37
4.25
…
3.09
3.62
…
…
JUPITER UT MGRS LTD
020 7581 3020
Absolute Return ‡@
54.22
Distribution and Growth ‡@124.14
Emg Euro Opps ‡@
203.77
Euro Special Sits ‡@
424.67
European ‡@
2229.26
Financial Opps ‡@
632.58
Income Trust ‡@
585.05
Merlin Bal (Acc) ‡@
184.30
Merlin Gwth (Acc) ‡@ 407.59
Merlin Inc (Acc) ‡@
298.17
Merlin Wwide (Inc) ‡@ 291.65
UK Growth ‡@
347.45
UK Special Sits (Inc) ‡@ 196.61
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
-0.48
+0.36
-1.17
+0.71
+9.86
+8.89
+2.15
+0.49
+0.86
+0.33
+0.54
+2.82
+0.41
…
4.03
1.48
0.22
…
0.28
3.70
2.03
…
2.90
…
1.09
1.31
LEGAL & GENERAL (UT MGRS) LTD
Enquiries: 0870 050 0955 Dealing: 0870 050 0956
Equity Acc @
Equity Dist @
Euro Ind Acc @
Euro Ind Inc @
Fixed Int Acc @
2616.00
893.80
398.90
287.20
138.20
2639.00
902.00
398.90
287.20
139.00
-8.00
-2.70
+1.20
+0.80
-0.30
2.12
2.15
1.84
1.88
2.55
1.36
1.38
2.56
2.60
2.14
2.17
4.12
4.25
3.77
3.94
3.82
3.93
3.82
3.93
Sell
American Index Retail Acc ‡@511.27
American Index Retail Inc ‡@438.63
Asian Gth Acc ‡@
158.00
Asian Gth Inc ‡@
140.94
Chinese Eq Acc ‡@
580.39
Chinese Eq Inc ‡@
492.89
Euro Gth Acc ‡@
847.10
Euro Gth Inc ‡@
726.12
-0.10
+0.50
-2.00
-0.02
+2.00
+2.20
+0.01
+0.03
…
…
+8.30
+6.70
+0.20
+17.00
…
…
+4.00
2.73
…
0.83
2.91
3.21
…
5.39
3.55
3.18
3.37
…
0.92
0.50
1.07
3.25
3.34
0.32
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
+10.11
+8.68
+2.46
+2.19
+18.70
+15.88
+0.87
+0.75
1.41
1.43
0.36
0.45
0.20
0.21
1.42
1.46
322.55
262.17
393.13
99.69
403.88
475.71
331.53
83.98
275.04
49.06
130.89
71.96
95.54
498.71
756.24
628.94
340.42
276.69
414.92
…
426.26
502.07
349.90
88.64
290.28
51.78
138.15
76.96
100.84
526.34
798.14
663.79
-3.34
-0.93
-1.40
-0.89
-3.57
-4.21
-3.09
-0.29
-0.92
-0.03
-0.06
+0.17
-0.11
-2.81
+1.64
+1.36
…
1.52
1.49
4.77
2.18
2.24
0.12
4.43
4.32
0.94
0.66
1.30
0.58
1.34
0.15
0.21
INSIGHT INVESTMENT FDS MANAGEMENT LTD
Client Servs: 0800 124 314
Insight Investment Global Investment Funds
Mthly Inc Bd Inc ‡@
Mthly Inc Bd N Inc ‡@
48.44
91.99
…
…
+0.10
+0.19
Insigt Investment Portfolio Fund
Insight Investment Multi-Manager Funds (0800)
96.05
93.79
…
…
-0.32
-0.36
UK Str Inc N/Trl ‡@
537.61
…
+1.61
3.03
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
+1.09
-0.25
+1.21
+1.22
+4.67
+0.02
-0.10
+0.28
+1.36
+4.43
+0.04
2.04
2.88
3.47
3.91
3.39
0.07
4.77
2.06
1.94
0.26
…
INVESCO PERPETUAL Funds
Childrens Acc ‡@
472.89
Corp Bond Acc ‡@
201.69
High Income Inc ‡@
448.90
Income & Grth Inc ‡@
429.28
Income Inc ‡@
1709.15
Money Acc ‡@
90.45
Monthly Inc Plus Inc ‡@ 108.26
UK Aggressive Inc ‡@
205.49
UK Growth Acc ‡@
690.88
UK Sml Cos Eqty Acc ‡@ 1274.56
UK Sml Cos Gwth ‡@
82.54
American A Acc ‡@
367.94
Asia ex Japan A Acc ‡@ 661.34
Capital Accumulator A Acc ‡@237.54
…
…
0.10
0.14
0.12
INVESCO FUND MGRS LTD
Dling: 0800 085 8571 Inv Serv: 0800 085 8677
Brkr Serv: 0800 028 2121
INVESCO Funds
Amer Spec Sits ‡@
American ‡@
Euro Opps ‡@
+24.00
+60.00
+1.30
…
4.21
…
…
…
+7.82
+11.14
+0.77
…
0.52
1.13
+/-
Yld
%
-0.01
…
-0.70
-1.70
+1.30
+0.80
+0.80
+1.40
+1.70
+1.00
4.20
4.10
3.16
3.24
3.75
3.67
0.79
0.35
MANEK INVESTMENT MGMT LTD
0844 800 9401
Growth Fd Acc @
41.47
43.54
MARKS & SPENCER UNIT TRUST LTD
0808 005 5555
High Income
High Income Acc
UK 100 Comp Acc
UK 100 Cos
UK Select Pflo
UK Selection Port Acc
Worldwide Mgd Acc ‡
Wwide Mgd ‡
111.50
256.30
385.80
223.60
354.60
642.70
814.30
507.50
111.50
256.30
385.80
223.60
354.60
642.70
…
…
MORGAN STANLEY INVESTMENT MGMT LTD
Enquires: 0800 0961 962
The Morgan Stanley Funds (UK)
Class A Shares
Equity
Eur (Ex UK) Eq A Acc ‡@1310.92
Glob Brands A Acc ‡@ 8012.80
UK Eq A Acc ‡@
1184.53
…
…
…
+4.24
+112.10
-0.02
1.25
0.94
1.66
…
…
…
-4.29
-3.80
…
1.94
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
-0.30
+0.60
+0.80
+0.80
+1.00
+1.70
+1.00
2.66
1.95
5.24
2.88
2.02
1.83
2.99
+7.64
+7.46
+7.62
+0.43
+11.72
+11.52
+6.23
+5.62
-7.28
+2.70
1.37
1.03
0.23
0.56
1.36
1.02
0.24
2.98
…
3.05
Fixed Income
Stg Corp Bd A Acc ‡@
UK Ind Lnkd A Acc ‡@
UK Long Bd A Acc ‡@
Bal Pfolio Inc ‡@
Bal Port Gwth Acc ‡@
Equity Inc Inc ‡@
N&P UK Gwth Inc ‡@
Stkmkt 100 Tkr ‡@
UK Growth Acc ‡@
UK Growth Inc ‡@
106.20
204.40
223.60
190.20
221.80
408.40
251.50
SCOTTISH MUTUAL INV MNGRS LTD
0141 248 6100
European Inc
Far Eastern Inc
Intl Growth Inc
Japanese Inc
Mutual European
Mutual Far Eastern
Mutual North Am
Mutual UK Eq
Nth American Inc
UK Equity Inc
1474.11
550.86
581.15
41.85
2262.04
850.55
1983.00
1368.92
1227.65
656.02
1555.79
581.38
613.35
41.85
2387.38
897.68
2092.88
1444.77
1295.67
692.37
202.00
183.40
138.50
228.40
221.60
…
…
…
…
…
0.51
1.04
1.04
0.44
0.46
2556.00
…
+21.00
0.54
329.50
191.10
…
…
+2.70
+1.50
1.65
1.70
-0.20
…
+1.60
+0.20
+0.06
+2.20
+0.80
…
-0.60
-0.33
+1.50
+12.00
1.97
1.99
1.15
5.21
5.36
4.03
4.14
…
3.02
3.07
2.13
1.26
UK and Income Investment Funds
Corp Bond A Acc ‡@
312.10
Corp Bond A Inc ‡@
126.10
Envir Invtr A Acc ‡@
294.80
Hi Inc Bond A Ac ‡@
229.40
Hi Inc Bond A Inc ‡@
86.06
Hi Res A Acc ‡@
367.80
Hi Res A Inc ‡@
138.50
Safety Plus A Acc ‡@
40.49
Strat Inc A Acc ‡@
200.60
Strat Inc A Inc ‡@
99.66
UK Gwth A Acc ‡@
193.40
UK Sel Gwth A Acc ‡@ 1978.00
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
OEIC B Class
Tracker and Specialist Investment Funds
All Stks Credit A Inc ‡@ 132.30
Asian Div Inc U Trst Inc @107.81
Cautious Man Fd A Acc ‡@268.90
Cautious Man Fd A Inc ‡@153.30
China Opp Fund A Acc ‡@1514.00
Emg Mkts Opps Fd A Acc ‡@207.20
Erpn Grth Fund A Acc ‡@ 237.80
Erpn Sel Opps Fd A Acc ‡@1666.00
Fix Int Mnthly Inc Fd Acc @28.52
Global Equity Fund Acc @3089.60
Global Equity Income A Inc ‡@61.35
Global Tech A Acc ‡@ 1758.00
M-Asset Abs Ret A Acc ‡@141.40
M-Man Active Fd A Acc ‡@226.60
M-Man Inc Grth A Inc ‡@ 154.90
M-Man Inc Grth Fd A Acc ‡@177.00
Sterling Bond U Trst Acc @220.11
Sterling Bond U Trst Inc @ 64.71
Strategic Bond A Inc ‡@ 122.50
UK Abs Ret Fd A Acc ‡@ 158.50
UK Alpha Fund A Acc ‡@ 155.30
UK Index Fund A Acc ‡@ 638.50
UK Irsh Sm Co Fd A Acc ‡@678.90
UK Property A Acc @
238.80
UK Property A Inc @
107.45
UK Tracker Fund A Acc ‡@286.70
US Growth Fund A Acc ‡@1039.00
…
113.26
…
…
…
…
…
…
29.76
3222.68
…
…
…
…
…
…
229.60
67.50
…
…
…
…
…
251.36
113.09
…
…
-0.30
+0.95
+0.60
+0.30
+46.00
-0.50
+0.50
+6.00
-0.13
+47.58
+0.41
+49.00
-0.10
+1.20
…
…
-0.40
-0.12
…
+0.10
+0.60
+3.00
+3.90
+0.11
+0.05
+1.30
+24.00
2.46
5.71
3.20
3.27
0.46
0.30
0.85
0.57
4.53
…
3.22
…
0.81
…
2.11
2.08
2.19
2.22
3.70
…
1.80
2.04
0.41
2.58
2.63
2.06
…
JP MORGAN ASSET MGMT
OEIC
Asia A Acc ‡@
213.10
Emerging Mkts ‡@
226.20
Eur Dyn (ex-UK) A Acc ‡@225.50
Euro Smllr Cos ‡@
786.30
Europe A Acc ‡@
1483.00
Gbl Hi Yld Bd A Acc ‡@ 110.30
Gbl Hi Yld Bd A Inc ‡@
36.33
Gl ex-UK Bd A Acc ‡@ 262.00
Gl ex-UK Bd A Inc ‡@
203.30
Glb Fins A Acc ‡@
1077.00
Global A Acc ‡@
1347.00
Japan A Acc ‡@
483.20
Multi-Man Tst A Acc ‡@ 1014.00
Multi-Man Tst A Inc ‡@ 927.60
Nat Resources ‡@
641.50
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
+3.90
+3.40
+0.50
+0.10
+5.00
+0.40
+0.10
-0.30
-0.20
+1.00
+23.00
+5.50
+7.00
+6.50
+3.50
…
…
…
…
…
5.53
5.72
0.15
0.45
1.03
…
…
0.53
0.53
…
Fixed Int Dist @
Glob Gwth Acc @
Glob Health Acc @
Glob Tech Acc @
Gwth Tst Acc @
High Inc Acc @
Japan Ind Acc @
Pacific Ind Acc @
UK 100 Ind Acc @
UK Active Opps Acc @
UK Index Acc @
UK Index Dist @
US Ind Acc @
Worldwide Acc @
71.16
243.90
64.04
41.95
106.00
126.60
62.58
158.10
187.20
249.90
296.10
166.10
453.00
307.00
71.60
243.90
64.17
42.01
106.50
127.50
62.58
158.10
187.20
252.90
296.10
166.10
453.00
307.00
-0.16
-1.30
+0.10
+0.45
-1.00
…
+0.40
+0.90
+0.90
-0.10
+1.40
+0.80
+3.30
+0.80
2.59
1.15
0.72
0.24
0.17
4.81
0.83
2.19
2.92
…
3.00
3.08
0.84
0.70
M & G SECURITIES
Enq: 0800 390 390 Dealing Line: 0800 328 3196
Authorised Inv Funds
Charifund Inc ‡
1618.32
…
+12.98
4.64
+4.93
+4.62
0.20
1.82
+1.66
-0.29
+0.02
-0.75
+0.36
…
+17.71
4.40
1.25
4.84
…
3.67
1.57
2.09
-0.08
+0.22
+1.18
+1.05
3.73
4.80
2.23
2.19
Sterling Class A Investment Funds 1
Euro Smlr Cos Acc ‡@
Euro Smlr Cos Inc ‡@
441.58
412.61
…
…
Sterling Class A Investment Funds 2
Extra Income Inc ‡@
794.06
Gilt & Fxd Int Inc ‡@
97.04
Gl Hi Yd Bd Inc ‡@
49.88
Index Linked Bd Inc ‡@ 138.84
Index Trckr Inc ‡@
78.22
Short Dated Corp Bd Inc ‡@25.76
UK Select A Inc ‡@
3057.77
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
Sterling Class A Investment Funds 3
Corp Bd A Inc ‡@
Dividend Inc ‡@
Recovery A Inc ‡@
Sml Cos Inc ‡@
40.26
61.90
146.33
374.64
…
…
…
…
Sterling Class A Investment Funds 4
Episode Allocation A Inc ‡@146.44
…
+0.41
1.93
UK Trkr B Acc ‡@
UK Trkr B Inc ‡@
357.50
190.20
…
…
+3.00
+1.60
1.88
1.94
-0.20
…
+1.60
+12.00
2.18
2.20
2.47
1.50
+1.10
+13.00
3.03
1.75
UK and Income Investment Funds
Corp Bond B Acc ‡@
321.60
Corp Bond B Inc ‡@
126.00
UK Gwth B Acc ‡@
207.40
UK Sel Gwth B Acc ‡@ 2060.00
…
…
…
…
UK Gth C Inc ‡@
143.40
UK Sel Gwth C Acc ‡@ 2140.00
…
…
STANDARD LIFE INVESTMENTS
0845 279 3003
Investment Funds (OEIC) - Retail Shares
95.80
57.21
102.40
140.80
163.20
62.30
204.50
131.90
174.40
131.60
132.80
48.98
106.80
261.70
88.73
54.31
355.60
234.00
263.90
89.26
208.10
259.00
237.40
749.20
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
-0.01
…
-0.10
…
…
+1.00
+0.10
+0.10
+0.10
…
+0.01
+0.80
-0.30
+0.03
+0.02
+0.10
…
…
-0.01
…
…
…
-0.10
1.43
1.44
1.81
…
3.02
3.10
1.67
1.05
1.02
0.05
3.02
3.08
0.08
1.62
1.29
1.30
2.11
2.59
3.82
3.94
1.35
0.38
0.38
0.38
…
…
…
+0.41
+0.39
+0.24
1.59
1.60
1.80
SVS BROWN SHIPLEY FUNDS
Enquiries: 0141 222 1151
Balanced A Acc ‡@
Balanced A Inc ‡@
Cautious A Acc ‡@
Yld
%
104.00
268.93
253.92
286.54
227.39
228.70
95.92
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
+0.22
+1.25
+1.19
+1.34
+0.58
-0.26
-0.11
1.82
0.97
0.98
0.91
2.86
2.78
2.83
UK Oseas Earns ‡@
131.21
…
+0.39
1.89
116.10
156.90
81.18
…
…
…
+0.20
+0.60
+0.25
1.27
0.85
3.69
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
-0.19
-0.19
-0.11
-0.11
+0.42
+0.37
-0.16
+0.53
-0.06
-0.07
+0.62
+0.58
+0.69
1.07
3.37
2.91
2.54
3.98
3.54
4.54
1.65
3.78
4.48
1.69
1.46
0.16
715.70
219.40
+3.50
+1.00
1.50
…
Managed Funds
Def Eqty & Bd Acc ‡@
Eqty & Bd Acc ‡@
Mgd Income ‡@
121.67
115.27
111.55
Stg Bd Ret Inc ‡@
Strat Bd Ret ‡@
UK Corp Bond ‡@
UK Corp Ret ‡@
UK Eqty Inc Ret ‡@
UK Gwth & Inc Ret ‡@
UK Hi Yld Bd 1 ‡@
UK Inst Acc ‡@
UK Mnthly Extra Inc ‡@
UK Mnthly Inc Ret ‡@
UK Retail ‡@
UK Sel Retail ‡@
UK Smaller Cos ‡@
56.64
46.30
61.51
61.38
97.78
94.98
42.60
167.47
81.54
75.30
143.99
134.24
344.96
For Resolution see Ignis
TU FUND MANAGERS LIMITED
British
European
680.00
210.70
* Yield expressed as CAR (Compound Annual Return);
† Ex dividend; ‡Middle price; . . . No significant data. #
Periodic charge deducted from capital; @ Exit charge
British funds
Stock
Price
Int Yld Grs rd
(£) +/–
% yld
108.76
373.07
126.78
374.13
118.16
121.29
138.32
127.55
378.33
156.47
151.09
277.35
145.62
173.21
168.93
178.32
164.26
169.66
200.81
169.50
200.09
196.53
265.64
206.91
213.67
249.03
249.33
264.95
104.00
360.97
117.79
355.46
111.02
113.84
128.67
118.89
354.00
145.05
139.88
259.90
133.96
159.00
154.29
161.81
148.24
151.89
178.81
157.14
176.72
171.51
231.14
176.93
181.37
208.77
204.60
214.78
Tr IL 0V% 19
104.01
Tr IL 2K% 20
361.63
Tr IL 1Y% 2022 * 118.24
Tr IL 2K% 24
359.31
Tr IL 0V% 24
111.79
Tr IL 0V% 26
114.90
Tr IL 1N% 2027 * 129.97
Tr IL 0V% 29
120.20
Tr IL 4V% 30
358.49
Tr IL 1N% 2032 * 146.57
Tr IL 0O% 34
141.49
Tr IL 2% 35
264.14
Tr IL 0V% 36
135.76
Tr IL 1V% 2037 * 161.02
Tr IL 0X% 40
156.57
Tr IL 0X% 42 * 164.69
Tr IL 0V% 44
151.64
Tr IL 0V% 46
155.59
Tr IL 0O% 2047 * 182.62
Tr IL 0V% 48
160.81
Tr IL 0K% 50 * 180.92
Tr IL 0N% 52
176.38
Tr IL 1N% 2055 * 236.74
Tr IL 0V% 56
182.47
Tr IL 0V% 58 * 186.49
Tr IL 0W% 62
214.99
Tr IL 0V% 65
212.53
Tr IL 0V% 68
222.24
– .03
– .14
– .18
– .77
– .24
– .35
– .49
– .51
–1.40
– .76
– .83
–1.57
–1.02
–1.20
–1.26
–1.43
–1.45
–1.59
–1.85
–1.79
–2.08
–2.18
–2.98
–2.67
–2.86
–3.49
–3.89
–4.31
…
1.76
1.63
1.51
…
…
1.05
…
1.80
0.85
…
0.92
…
0.73
…
0.38
…
…
0.42
…
…
…
0.58
…
…
…
…
…
–2.42
–2.26
–1.95
–1.77
–1.77
–1.64
–1.64
–1.57
–1.56
–1.59
–1.55
–1.53
–1.54
–1.54
–1.54
–1.54
–1.50
–1.48
–1.47
–1.46
–1.48
–1.48
–1.47
–1.46
–1.46
–1.48
–1.49
–1.51
– .72
– .78
– .65
– .95
– .93
– .97
–1.04
– .95
–1.00
–1.14
– .83
–1.28
–1.35
–1.60
–1.16
–1.77
–1.59
–2.01
3.25
3.09
…
3.17
2.99
…
2.96
…
…
2.79
…
2.69
…
2.51
…
…
…
…
1.77
1.79
1.85
1.82
1.84
1.85
1.86
1.88
1.88
1.87
1.86
1.82
1.78
1.73
1.70
1.68
1.65
1.66
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
.13
.17
.21
.27
.34
.32
.34
.38
.45
.55
.56
.60
…
…
…
…
4.01
…
…
…
3.40
4.17
3.51
3.23
0.89
1.02
1.13
1.20
1.23
1.26
1.36
1.47
1.44
1.50
1.64
1.70
+
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
…
.01
.03
.03
.04
.06
.06
.07
.09
.13
.16
.15
.20
…
4.42
…
4.12
3.60
…
4.43
…
…
6.57
3.59
…
…
0.45
0.72
0.71
0.62
0.69
0.80
0.73
0.76
0.85
0.83
0.93
1.02
1.14
Longs (Over 15 years)
145.88
144.09
102.52
157.27
148.88
150.88
159.30
133.83
140.40
160.53
97.05
166.78
159.09
179.39
107.38
179.15
135.86
173.27
135.90
134.34
95.39
146.30
138.48
139.98
147.31
123.60
129.43
147.59
88.05
152.65
144.61
162.92
96.14
162.07
121.18
154.94
Tr 4K% 34
Tr 4N% 36
Tr 1{ }% 37
Tr 4O% 38
Tr 4N% 39
Tr 4N% 40
Tr 4K% 42
Tr 3N% 44
Tr 3K% 45
Tr 4N% 46
Tr 1K% 47
Tr 4N% 49
Tr 3O% 52
Tr 4N% 55
Tr 1O% 57
Tr 4% 60
Tr 2K% 65
Tr 3K% 68
138.61
137.34
98.34
150.01
142.33
144.17
151.88
127.75
133.77
152.49
91.97
158.05
150.34
169.54
101.35
169.46
127.69
162.72
Mediums (5-15 years)
OEIC C Class
UK and Income Investment Funds
AAA Inc CAT Acc ‡@
AAA Inc CAT Inc ‡@
AAA Income Acc ‡@
Amer Eq Gth Acc ‡@
Corp Bond Acc ‡@
Corp Bond Inc ‡@
Euro Eq Gth Acc ‡@
Glb Advtg CAT Acc ‡@
Glob Advtg Acc ‡@
Glob Eq Uncstrd Acc ‡@
Higher Inc Acc ‡@
Higher Inc Inc ‡@
Japan Eq Gth Acc ‡@
Managed Acc ‡@
Select Inc Acc ‡@
Select Inc Inc ‡@
UK Eq Gth Acc ‡@
UK Eq Hi Alpha ‡@
UK Eq Hi Inc Acc ‡@
UK Eq Hi Inc Inc ‡@
UK Ethical Acc ‡@
UK Opps Acc ‡@
UK Opps Inc ‡@
UK Smlr Cos Acc ‡@
+/-
Index-linked
+0.60
+0.20
+0.10
+1.10
+1.00
Tracker and Specialist Investment Funds
JANUS HENDERSON INVESTORS
Investors Serv: 0800 832 832 Dlng: 0845 946 4646
Buy
THREADNEEDLE INVESTMENTS
Client Serv: 0800 0683000
Intermediary Serv: 0800 0684000
Institutional Shares (Class 2) (163500,000 min)
12 month
High
Low
Overseas Growth Investment Funds
UK Trkr A Acc ‡@
UK Trkr A Inc ‡@
Cautious A Inc ‡@
Dynamic A Acc ‡@
Dynamic A Inc ‡@
Growth A Acc ‡@
Income A Acc ‡@
Sterling Bond Acc ‡@
Sterling Bond Inc ‡@
Sell
Retail Shares (Class 1)
2453.42
1350.60
1288.90
SANTANDER UNIT TST MGRS
08457 413002
Bal Port A Acc ‡@
Caut Port A Acc ‡@
Caut Port A Inc ‡@
Opps Port A Acc ‡@
Prog Port A Acc ‡@
IGNIS ASSET MGMT
Dlg: 0141 222 8282
American Gth Inc @
Balanced Growth @
Balanced Growth Acc @
Corporate Bond ‡@
European Growth @
European Growth Acc @
Glob Gwth @
Higher Yield @
Higher Yield Acc @
Japan @
Managed @
Managed Trust @
Mngd Pfolio Inc @
Pacific Grth @
Smaller Comp @
Smaller Cos @
Buy
SCOTTISH WIDOWS UNIT TRUST MGRS
0845 300 2244
Authorised Inv Funds (OEICs)
OEIC A Class
Managed Investment Funds
HSBC Specialist Investment Funds (OEIC)
INVESTEC FUND MGRS
Broker Support and Dealing: 020 7597 1900
OEIC Series i,ii,iii, & iv
…
…
…
1.41
1.43
2.31
2.36
3.35
3.38
2.29
2.35
3.24
3.36
1.41
1.43
2.36
2.42
Sell
HSBC Investment Funds (OEIC) - Retail Share Class
FIDELITY INTERNATIONAL
Private Clnts 0800 414161 Broker Dlgs 0800 414181
1521.00
3792.00
521.10
3.26
0.67
1.18
1.86
0.34
0.78
0.87
0.26
0.76
1.41
4.34
2.85
2.69
2.34
HSBC GLOBAL ASSET MGMT (UK) LTD
Enq: 0845 745 6123 Dlg: 0845 745 6126 Mon-Fri 8-6
HSBC Index Tracker Investment Funds (OEIC)
Well Bldr Bal Acc ‡@
Well Bldr Gwth Acc ‡@
F & C FUND MANAGEMENT LTD (OEICS)
Enqs: 0870 601 6183 Dealing: 0870 601 6083
Share Class 1 - Retail
Corporate Bd ‡@
57.88
Emerging Mkts ‡@
121.50
Euro Gwth & Inc 1 ‡@ 1058.00
Extra Inc Bond ‡@
48.34
FTSE All-Shr Track ‡@ 425.20
Global Gwth SC1 ‡@
208.40
High Inc Trst @
14.15
Max Inc Bond ‡@
48.16
Multi Man Caut ‡@
70.41
Multi Man Distr ‡@
60.44
North Amer ‡@
514.20
Pacific Gwth ‡@
437.50
Strategic Bd ‡@
194.30
UK Equity ‡@
3345.00
UK Gwth & Inc Acc 1 ‡@ 658.50
UK Gwth & Inc Dist ‡@ 234.70
UK Smaller Cos ‡@
1035.00
+/-
Eur Sel Gth A Acc ‡@
+0.20
-0.09
+3.00
+1.60
+5.50
CIS UNIT MANAGERS LTD
08457 46 46 46
European Gwth @
Sus Leaders ‡@
UK Growth @
UK Income @
Buy
HALIFAX INVESTMENT FUND MGRS LTD
01296 386 386
Authorised Inv Funds
Share Class `C
ARTEMIS FUND MGRS LTD
0800 092 2051
Authorised Inv Funds
Capital R Acc @
1642.07
Euro Opps R Acc @
105.80
Euro Opps R Inc @
100.05
European Growth R Acc @358.18
Global Energy R Acc @
34.28
Global Growth R Acc @ 263.41
Global Income R Acc @ 129.17
Global Income R Inc @
96.01
Global Select R Acc @
105.09
High Income R Inc @
78.35
Income R Acc @
440.17
Income R Inc @
232.47
Monthly Dist R Inc @
71.10
Strategic Assets R Acc @ 86.32
Strategic Bond R M Acc @ 95.84
Strategic Bond R M Inc @ 56.99
Strategic Bond R Q Acc @ 95.67
Strategic Bond R Q Inc @ 56.86
UK Growth R Acc @
569.14
UK Smaller Cos R Acc @ 1686.90
UK Special Sits R Acc @ 606.33
European ‡@
Extra Income ‡@
Glob Spec Sits ‡@
Global Focus ‡@
International ‡@
Japan ‡@
Moneybldr Bal ‡@
Moneybldr Glob
Moneybldr Gwth ‡@
Moneybldr Inc ‡@
Moneybldr UK Ind ‡@
Special Sits ‡@
Wealthbuilder
Sell
114.98
107.31
110.88
115.27
132.93
110.19
105.54
102.29
133.03
153.92
143.86
139.13
109.17
102.69
105.32
108.78
124.02
104.05
99.67
96.41
123.47
142.43
133.08
129.40
Tr 3O% 21
Tr 1O% 22
Tr 2N% 23
Tr 2O% 24
Tr 5% 25
Tr 2% 25
Tr 1K% 26
Tr 1N% 27
Tr 4N% 27
Tr 6% 28
Tr 4O% 30
Tr 4N% 32
109.36
103.07
105.77
109.42
124.59
105.19
101.09
98.07
125.08
143.85
135.28
131.74
Shorts (under 5 years)
101.37
114.36
103.59
108.02
108.46
105.83
113.06
111.92
104.73
131.49
117.77
100.70
101.30
100.15
111.68
101.18
103.20
104.02
102.42
107.25
106.77
101.42
121.67
111.31
97.36
…
Tr 1N% 18
Tr 5% 18
Tr 1O% 19
Tr 4K% 19
Tr 3O% 19
Tr 2% 20
Tr 4O% 20
Tr 3O% 20
Tr 1K% 21
Tr 8% 21
Tr 4% 22
Tr 0K% 22
Tr 0O% 23
100.16
113.00
101.25
103.20
104.04
102.63
107.30
106.89
101.74
121.75
111.54
97.87
98.03
* maturities as having a 3-month indexation lag and
which trade on a real clean price basis, excluding inflation
adjustment charge.
This is a paid for information service. For
further details on a particular fund, readers
should contact their fund manager.
Data as shown is
for information
purposes only. No offer is made by Morningstar
or this publication
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
45
1G M
Working Life Business
STARTING OUT One of the biggest challenges that growing young businesses face is the difficulty of raising finance for expansion, James Hurley writes
How tech giants are stealing lenders’ lunch
COMIC BOOK GUYS
W
hen Aaron Flanagan
wanted to build on
the early promise of
his start-up, which
sells collectible
comics, he hit upon a snag that will
be familiar to countless small
business owners.
The company, called Comic Book
Guys, opened in a Belfast shopping
mall in September 2014 but, with
limited free cash in the operation,
Mr Flanagan soon found himself
puzzling over how to expand.
“Unless we got a lot more stock and
gave the store a revamp, we couldn’t
grow any further. We needed funds to
do that, but our cash was tied up with
the stock we already had. It’s one of
the biggest challenges for any
growing small business. You can’t buy
your next comic with an old comic.”
While a traditional bank loan
would be the obvious way to get over
the cashflow hump, these days there
is an increasing range of alternatives.
Mr Flanagan, 29, says the relatively
high interest rates charged to very
small companies by banks put him
off, as did the thought of an “intense”
application process.
Instead he chose a fast growing
form of finance that the Bank of
England says might eventually pose a
challenge to high street banks’ hold
on the small business lending market.
Comic Book Guys borrowed
£25,000 from Paypal, the American
online payments giant. Since it
launched its “Paypal working capital”
facility in the UK in 2014, 30,000
small businesses have used it to
secure credit to pay for for everything
from car parts to fashion supplies.
Unlike a bank loan, PayPal provides
cash advances of up to £100,000
based on a company’s trading history
on its own platform. Where a bank
might ponder a request for weeks,
Paypal says it can decide if a borrower
is credit worthy, and release funds if
they are, in as little as 15 minutes.
Repayments are automatic as a
pre-agreed percentage of a company’s
Paypal takings, so companies only
make repayments as and when sales
come in. There are no late or early
payment charges, but there is a fixed,
up front fee.
Paypal told The Times that it had
Progress or a fraud risk?
Depending on who you listen to,
“open banking” is either going to be
a fraudsters’ charter or a game
changer in a small business market
that is controlled by only four banks
— RBS, Lloyds Banking Group, HSBC
and Barclays (James Hurley writes).
The rules allow consumers and
businesses to force their bank to
share their banking data with third
parties.
The banking lobby has warned
that the reforms pose a fraud risk
but Norah Coelho, director of
business financing at Paypal UK, is
optimistic: “We’re really focused on
open banking. Customers should
have control over how they manage
and move their money.”
It is hoped open banking will
herald a new era of competition by
inspiring quicker lending decisions
by a host of banking competitors
who will have access for the first
time to data that had previously
been locked inside banks.
While traditional lenders may fear
that the reforms put their customer
relationships at risk, some think they
could let banks retain relationships
with small businesses. For example,
by passing a customer on to a
specialist lender who will provide
credit when a bank won’t, the
traditional lender may be more likely
to keep the banking relationship.
Aaron Flanagan did not fancy an “intense” application for a traditional loan to expand Comic Book Guys and turned to Paypal
now advanced £625 million to small
companies in the UK, growth of
56 per cent in a year. It is not the only
technology business using customer
data as a basis for business lending.
By last year Amazon had lent more
than $3 billion to more than 20,000
small businesses in the US, UK and
Japan. China’s Ant Financial is doing
something similar on a larger scale,
using online payments data to provide
credit to households and companies.
Lending to small businesses has
traditionally been tricky to get right
partly because of the patchy credit
information that is at financiers’
disposal. Having data on every
transaction made through a trading
platform such as Amazon or eBay can
put this new breed of lenders at an
advantage.
Last month Alex Brazier, an
executive director at the Bank of
England, told MPs that credit
provision by the likes of Amazon and
Paypal was providing a “challenge to
existing business models” for
traditional finance providers.
“New competitors are able to
harness data to assess credit risks and
make profitable loans. Legacy IT
infrastructure can make it difficult for
banks to harness the full potential of
their existing data,” he said, adding
that banks were no longer the only
ones with access to payments data.
The amount of credit being
provided by the likes of Paypal and
Amazon remains tiny compared with
the small business lending of high
street banks. However, if it continues
to grow, it is likely to raise questions
over the risks of allowing technology
giants to have such influence over
traders who may rely on such
platforms for both sales and debt.
Mr Brazier also hinted at potential
concerns over data privacy. “Society
will want to consider the right balance
between that opportunity on the one
hand and privacy and data protection
on the other.”
However, he also noted this
emerging form of finance had the
potential to “open up access to credit”.
Norah Coelho, director of business
financing at Paypal UK, says that a
third of its advances have been made
“to small businesses in postcodes
where 50 or more bank branches
closed in the last four years” and
70 per cent of applications for such
loans were made outside of bank
branch opening hours.
The rise of open banking, which
allows customers to demand that
their bank shares data with third
parties, means the writing is on the
wall for traditional lenders.
“There’s an awareness [from banks]
that the landscape for business
lending is changing,” Ms Coelho says.
“Small business owners have a range
of services available to them on the
phone in their pockets, they expect
the same of their financial services.”
CURRENCY SERVICES
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46
1G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Business Markets
news in brief
Tempus
Buy, sell or hold: today’s best share tips
Mining court case halts
A legal case to dissolve a
Glencore mining subsidiary in
the Democratic Republic of
Congo has been stopped before a
decision by the nation’s Supreme
Court, the Switzerland-based
FTSE-100 miner said. Gécamines,
the state-owned mining company,
launched legal proceedings in a
dispute over a capital shortfall of
$3.9 billion in the Kamoto Copper
Company, which is a joint
venture 75 per cent-owned by
Glencore’s Katanga Mining and
25 per cent Gécamines. The
company operates one of the
country’s biggest copper projects.
Firm favourite turns into a long shot
Each way bet
william hill
Market value
£2.4bn
Chief executive’s
pay 2017 £1.3m
2,340 UK betting shops
Share price
345p 2.4m active digital customers
Annual revenues £1.7bn
T
hey say the bookmaker
always wins, but William
Hill’s trading update
yesterday proved that even
when sporting events go
the way of the men in trilbies, they
can have too much of a good thing.
The longer the run of results
favouring the bookmaker, the
lower the winnings punters have to
recycle into fresh bets — a
phenomenon evident in the 8 per
cent decline in online sports bets
reported in the first 17 weeks of
the year.
Not that one should feel too sorry
for the company. The
“unprecedented run of bookmakerfriendly sporting results” it
experienced in football and horse
racing meant stronger margins in
both online and retail, although the
group said it expected the unsual
betting trends to “normalise over
time”. Few could have predicted
Roma would defeat Barcelona in the
Champions League after the Italian
side lost the first leg 4-1.
On top of the reycling issue,
William Hill’s betting shops were
also disproportionately affected by
the higher-than-normal
abandonment of 15 per cent of UK
and Irish horseracing fixtures. Retail
net revenues were down 4 per cent
over the period, partly due to a
trimming of its shop estate. While
greencoat uk wind
Gigawatt hours
in 2017 1,457
Acquisitions cost
in 2017 £507.4m
A
debate over the investment
merits of renewable energy
can certainly generate a lot of
hot air, but for Greencoat UK Wind
its remit remains simple: to build a
portfolio of assets which can deliver
a dividend that rises in line with the
retail price index.
The FTSE 250 company, which
floated in 2013, focuses mostly on
onshore wind farms and about half
the portfolio is in Scotland. Yesterday
it announced a share placing at 117p
to raise £118.8 million. The money
325
Employees 16,000
305
Trading 17 weeks to April 24:
285
Net revenue
excluding
Australia
265
Online
-4%
245
2017
2018
225
M J J A S O ND J F MAM
Net
revenue
+1%
+3%
+12%
Retail
+45%
US
Australia
-22%
football wagering was broadly flat,
horseracing and greyhounds both
fell significantly.
Overall net revenues for the group
over the 17-week period rose by a
creditable 3 per cent, pushing the
shares up 1¾p to 280½p. Having said
that, its international was a mixed
bag. While its American betting
business lifted net revenues by a
storming 45 per cent on the back of
strong basketball and ice hockey
wagering, William Hill decided to
tear up the betting slip on its
Australian operations, selling up to
Crownbet for rather less than the
amount it had staked. Including its
Australian trading, the group’s net
revenues were up only 1 per cent.
While Philip Bowcock, the
bookie’s chief executive, felt able to
hail “a positive start to 2018”, the
reality is that the trading picture is
being overshadowed by three big
issues: the government’s triennial
review of gaming machines, the US
Supreme Court’s impending decision
will be used to increase its stake in
the Clyde wind farm in South
Lanarkshire from 19.8 per cent to
28.2 per cent. It is the latest deal as
part of its plans to expand the scale
and size of its portfolio.
Since making its debut on the
public markets its dividend has
shown steady progress, with 6.16p in
2014 and rises each year up to 6.34p
for 2017. A target of 6.49p has been
announced for 2018 and the
company’s cash generation means
that it comfortably has enough cover
to meet that growing dividend pot.
At its annual results for 2017 the
infrastructure investor said that it
had recorded a total shareholder
return of 58 per cent since its initial
flotation. Its generating capacity
then was 127 megawatts and it is
now more than 700 megawatts.
Still, investing in renewable energy
is not without risk. If the wind
doesn’t blow as much or there are
operational problems with turbines,
then generation could be lower than
expected. Yet Greencoat’s portfolio
has proved resilient, with total
generation increasing year on year to
reach 1,457 gigawatt hours in 2017.
The government has withdrawn
onshore wind from price auctions,
which guarantee a minimum level
for the power produced, although
there are tentative signs its stance
may be softening. A concession to
subsidy arrangements for wind farms
ADVICE Avoid
WHY Decisions over UK
betting terminals and US
sports betting could easily go
against the gambling industry,
leaving William Hill in a hole
on the future of sports betting, and
William Hill’s future in a fastconsolidating gambling industry.
At yesterday’s annual meeting,
Roger Devlin, the chairman,
admitted that the industry “could
and should” have handled the issue
of fixed-odds betting machines
better. However, his message to the
government in the event of the most
draconian outcome — a cut in the
maximum stake from £100 to only £2
— was blunt. It could lead to punters
opting for “more volatile products or
less protected environments”, while
4,000 shops and 20,000 jobs would
be lost, not to mention £50 million of
funding to racing.
Barring yet another unexpected
bookmaker-friendly result, his
warning looks unlikely to be
heeded, although at least some of the
fallout from a £2 stake could be
mitigated if the US Supreme Court
opts to open up sports betting in a
key case relating to New Jersey.
That would pave the way for other
states to join the fray and William
Hill’s modest but strategically
important position in America
would put it in a good position to
cash in, albeit that would involve
heavy investment.
All of which brings us to the issue
of mergers and acquisitions to
strengthen online. Although it has
held talks about buying 888
Holdings, merging with The Stars
Group and received a joint bid from
Rank Group and 888, none has
resulted in a deal and a fresh
marriage partner is not obvious.
‘Enforce’ holiday pay
The government should enforce
holiday pay and make it the law
that employers provide a
statement of rights for its staff,
according to the UK’s first
director of labour market
enforcement. Sir David Metcalf
has set out 37 recommendations
to help stop the exploitation of
workers. He also said that higher
fines should be imposed on
employers who failed to pay their
staff the minimum wage. The
present fine is up to 200 per cent
of the underpayment.
Reckitt boss sells stock
Rakesh Kapoor, the chief
executive of Reckitt Benckiser,
has sold 120,000 shares worth
almost £6.7 million, which were
vested under a long-term
incentive scheme. Mr Kapoor
retains more than 600,000 shares
in the consumer goods company,
whose brands include Cillit Bang
and Dettol. His remuneration
was cut to £12.5 million last year,
from a potential £23.7 million,
amid shareholder pressure over
high pay and a drop in Reckitt’s
performance and share price.
on the Scottish islands has already
been mooted. While Greencoat’s
portfolio already has power price
agreements in place, any loosening
of government policy in that area
could offer a clear path to new wind
farms being built.
Greencoat spent more than
£507 million to extend its asset base
last year. It won’t be afraid to spend
big again if the right sites come up.
Whitbread pick banker
Whitbread has appointed a
former investment banker as a
non-executive director and senior
independent director to replace
Adam Crozier, who became the
chairman of the company in
March. Richard Gillingwater,
who is also the chairman of SSE,
the energy group, spent much of
his career with Kleinwort
Benson, BZW and Credit Suisse
First Boston. He became head of
the Shareholder Executive, which
manages the government’s
investments, in 2003.
ADVICE Hold
WHY A reliable source of
dividend income; ambitious to
expand its portfolio
PRICES
Major indices
New York
Dow Jones
Nasdaq Composite
S&P 500
London Financial Futures
24360.21 (+2.89)
7266.90 (+1.69)
2671.92 (-0.71)
Tokyo
Nikkei 225
22508.69 (+41.53)
Hong Kong
Hang Seng
30402.81 (+408.55)
Amsterdam
AEX Index
558.51 (+0.65)
Zurich
SMI Index
8944.90 (-33.75)
DJ EURO Stoxx 50
3557.88 (-6.31)
London
FTSE 100
7565.75 (-1.39)
FTSE 250
20594.72 (+172.84)
FTSE 350
4216.16 (+5.35)
FTSE Eurotop 100
2941.12 (-2.46)
FTSE All-Shares
4164.36 (+5.72)
FTSE Non Financials
Frankfurt
DAX
Singapore
Straits
Brussels
BEL20
Paris
CAC-40
4584.81 (+56.67)
Bargains
6183.20 (+7.60)
12912.21 (-35.93)
3910.63 (+21.37)
US$
1.3538 (-0.0030)
Euro
1.1412 (+0.0044)
£:SDR
0.98 (+0.00)
78.65 (-0.10)
3-Mth Euroswiss
FTSE100
FTSEurofirst 80
Open
122.52
121.62
99.280
99.180
99.100
99.020
98.950
100.33
100.32
100.31
100.28
100.21
100.72
100.69
100.66
7546.0
7448.0
High
122.69
121.62
99.280
99.190
99.110
99.030
98.960
100.33
100.32
100.31
100.28
100.21
100.72
100.70
100.67
7557.0
7456.0
Commodities
Low
122.05
121.62
99.265
99.160
99.080
99.010
98.930
100.33
100.32
100.31
100.27
100.20
100.71
100.69
100.65
7497.0
7439.0
Sett
122.14
121.19
99.270
99.170
99.090
99.020
98.940
100.33
100.32
100.31
100.27
100.21
100.72
100.70
100.66
7522.0
7454.0
4898.0
4894.0
Vol
188458
1
81369
52633
50746
42307
46956
10123
24213
84620
30553
24270
999
2754
6466
106374
32
Open Int
804608
7933
677225
428226
526283
352894
381292
538165
555754
545511
434959
411816
66413
74764
103181
620018
5981
ICIS pricing (London 7.30pm)
Brent (9.00pm)
Crude Oils ($/barrel FOB)
Jul
Aug
Sep
Brent Physical
BFOE(Aug)
BFOE(Jul)
WTI(Jul)
WTI(Aug)
75.25
74.72
74.95
68.66
68.97
-0.23
+0.05
-0.02
-0.50
-0.61
Products ($/MT)
Spot CIF NW Europe (prompt delivery)
Premium Unld
Gasoil EEC
3.5 Fuel Oil
Naphtha
722.00
641.00
384.00
638.00
722.00
643.00
391.00
642.00
Bank of England official close (4pm)
CPI
105.00 Mar (2015 = 100)
RPI
278.30 Mar (Jan 1987 = 100)
RPIX
278.80 Mar (Jan 1987 = 100)
Morningstar Long Commodity
5521.93 (-9.48)
3-Mth Euribor
n/a
Exchange Index
3543.17 (+10.31)
3-Mth Sterling
4871.56 (+1.80)
techMARK 100
Sydney
AO
Long Gilt
Period
Jun 18
Sep 18
Jun 18
Sep 18
Dec 18
Mar 19
Jun 19
Jun 18
Sep 18
Dec 18
Mar 19
Jun 19
Jun 18
Sep 18
Dec 18
Jun 18
Sep 18
Jun 18
Sep 18
619.64 (+1.98)
Morningstar Long/Short Commod 4409.56 (+33.74)
© 2017 Tradeweb Markets LLC. All rights reserved.
The Tradeweb FTSE Gilt Closing Prices information contained
herein is proprietary to Tradeweb; may not be copied or
re-distributed; is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely; and does not constitute
investment advice. Tradeweb is not responsible for any loss or damage that might result
from the use of this information.
ICE Futures
Oct
Nov
74.30-74.27
73.82-73.72
Volume: 1782591
1880-1862
1935-1933
1975-1971
1981-1963
1961-1940
1971-1915
Jul
Sep
Dec
1951-1910
1970-1905
1876-1776
LIFFE
Cocoa
May
Jul
Sep
Dec
Mar
May
RobustaCoffee
May
Jul
Sep
Nov
1840-1800
1788-1785
1783-1776
1788-1763
Reuters
663.50-663.25
660.25-659.75
658.25-658.00
Volume: 59408
Jan
Mar
1801-1763
1816-1710
Volume: 22772
White Sugar (FOB)
Gas Oil
May
Jun
Jul
75.66-75.65
75.36-75.35
74.84-74.82
Aug
Sep
657.50-657.25
657.00-656.50
Volume: 648103
Aug
Oct
Dec
328.40-328.10
325.30-322.40
330.40-328.30
Mar
May
Aug
Oct
338.20-335.60
342.80-338.90
346.80-342.80
405.00-348.80
Volume: 31504
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
47
1G M
Markets Business
ANDREAS GEBERT/GETTY IMAGES
Grafton investors build on
big fall in house prices
Miles Costello Market report
Y
Audi applies
brake after
new scandal
A
udi said
yesterday it had
halted deliveries
of A6 and A7 diesel
models over emissions
“irregularities” in the
latest blow to its parent
company Volkswagen
(David Charter writes).
About 60,000 Audi
cars may have to be
recalled for upgrades
amid claims that the
engine software slows
pollution controls.
More than 800,000
Audis have had to be
recalled in the scandal
that emerged at
Volkswagen in 2015
over software to cheat
laboratory emission
tests.
Volkswagen
admitted fitting “defeat
device software” to
11 million diesel cars
which pumped out
illegally high levels of
polluting gases on the
road. The affair has
cost the German
carmaker €25 billion in
fines, compensation
and refits.
The latest issue at
Audi, which focuses on
the use of Adblue, a
pollution cleaner thrust
into the exhaust, came
on the eve of today’s
annual meeting when
the company had
hoped to focus on its
plans for electric cars
for the future.
The German
transport ministry said
that the motor vehicle
authority had
summoned Audi for a
formal hearing.
Rupert Stadler, Audi
chief executive, said
the company had taken
swift action “because
full disclosure lies in
our highest interest”.
Customers would be
notified and offered
a software update,
Audi said.
Results in brief
Name
Pre-tax figure
Profit (+) loss (-)
Cambria Automobiles (retailing HY)
Faron Pharma (health FY)
Horizon Discovery (health FY)
IDE Group (technology FY)
Treatt (consumer HY)
£4.5m (£5.5m)
-€21m (-€10.1m)
-£14.3m (-£12.5m)
-£12.8m (-£4.1m)
£5.7m (£4.8m)
Dividend
0.25p p Jun 15
nil
nil
nil
1.60p p Aug 16
6 Results in brief are given for all companies valued at more than £30 million. f = final p = payable
The day’s biggest movers
Company
Shire Agrees to be bought by Takeda of Japan
Ashtead Speculation that conditions in the industrial hire market have moved in its favour
IAG Expectations that it will make fresh approach to Norwegian Air
Hargreaves Lansdown Market movements in favour of its holdings
Old Mutual Deutsche Bank analysts lift their price target
J Sainsbury Worries its planned Asda takeover will be referred to competition authorities
Just Group Analysts at Deutsche Bank initiate coverage with a “hold” rating
Fresnillo Followed commodities prices lower
TBC Bank Worries about the health of the Georgian economy
First Group Potential buyer Apollo Group walks away
London Grain Futures
LIFFE Wheat (close £/t)
May
143.00 Jul
148.00
Jan
unq Mar
unq
Gold/Precious
metals (US dollars per ounce)
Nov
153.50
Volume: 646
London Metal Exchange
15mth
6721.0-6722.0
Base Rates
6758.0-6759.0
7310.0-7320.0
Smurfit upgrade boosts rival
I
nvestec put out a
bullish “buy” note
on Smurfit Kappa
but its advice gave
Mondi, a rival to the
Irish paper and
packaging group, a
bigger push.
The broker
upgraded its profit
forecast on Smurfit
Kappa for this year by
3.6 per cent to more
than €1.4 billion and
raised its price target
from €38.50 to €39.50.
It added that
International Paper,
the US rival that has
twice failed to buy the
Irish group, would
have to return with an
improved bid if it
wanted to win control
of a “standalone
Wall Street report
President Trump’s long-awaited
decision to reimpose sanctions on
Iran had indices seesawing in and
out of negative territory. The Dow
Jones industrial average was up
2.89 points at 24,360.21. The S&P
500 fell less than one point to 2671.92.
2300.5-2301.0
n/a
Zinc Spec Hi Gde ($/tonne)
3065.0-3066.0
3079.0-3080.0
n/a
Finance House 1.0
ECB Refi 0.00
US Fed Fd 1.50-1.75
Depo CDs
0.55-0.45
0.61-0.51
0.71-0.61
0.87-0.72
1.02-0.87
Palladium $973.50 (£717.89)
Eurodollar Deps
1.88-2.08
2.04-2.24
2.33-2.53
2.48-2.68
2.74-2.94
Other Sterling
European money
deposits %
Sterling spot and forward rates
Close $1314.30-1315.10 High $1316.65
Treasury Bills (Dis) Buy: 1 mth 0.379; 3 mth 0.409. Sell: 1 mth 0.320; 3 mth 0.365
1 mth
Krugerrand $1301.00-1371.00 (£959.40-1011.02)
Silver $16.49 (£12.16)
Interbank Rates
2 mth
3 mth
6 mth
12 mth
0.5073
0.5564
0.6729
0.7793
0.9489
Clearer CDs
0.55-0.45
0.61-0.51
0.71-0.61
0.87-0.72
1.02-0.87
Currency
21100.0-21125.0
20730.0-20780.0
Alum Hi Gde ($/tonne)
2382.0-2384.0
2362.0-2363.0
2280.0-2285.0
Nickel ($/tonne)
13920.0-13940.0
1mth
3mth
6mth
12mth
0.13
0.20
0.29
0.55
0.51
0.67
0.78
0.95
0.10
0.15
0.20
0.50
Dollar
Sterling
Euro
13950.0-13975.0
n/a
Mkt Rates for
Copenhagen
Euro
Montreal
New York
Oslo
Stockholm
Tokyo
Zurich
Range
8.4560-8.4979
1.1410-1.1353
1.7469-1.7562
1.3485-1.3590
10.914-11.029
11.884-11.994
147.03-148.05
1.3522-1.3617
Close
8.4979-8.4997
1.1410-1.1408
1.7562-1.7566
1.3560-1.3561
11.029-11.033
11.932-11.935
147.98-147.99
1.3575-1.3578
1 month
80ds
8pr
13pr
18pr
32pr
106ds
10ds
16ds
Premium = pr
3 month
244ds
23pr
42pr
58pr
88pr
360ds
30ds
51ds
Discount = ds
Argentina peso
Australia dollar
Bahrain dinar
Brazil real
Euro
Hong Kong dollar
India rupee
Indonesia rupiah
Kuwait dinar KD
Malaysia ringgit
New Zealand dollar
Singapore dollar
S Africa rand
U A E dirham
reassessed the FTSE
100 group. Investec’s
note also lifted DS
Smith, a fellow FTSE
100-listed paper and
packaging company,
by 7½p at 539½p.
Both groups are
riding a wave of
demand for their
products, helped by
the rise of deliveries
on cardboard-packed
online deliveries and
the worldwide move
away from polluting
plastics.
Mondi’s shares have
been volatile but they
are up more than
2 per cent since
January. DS Smith
shares have risen
more than 4 per cent
in that period.
group just days before a deadline
imposed by the Takeover Panel.
Back among the biggest companies,
IAG, owner of British Airways, flew
22¼p higher at 700¼p as speculation
mounted it would come back and have
another go at buying Norwegian, the
low-cost carrier that has snubbed two
previous approaches.
Intercontinental Hotels added 107p
to £47.74 after analysts at Natexis
lifted their price target on the hotels
group over the bank holiday break to
£46.00 from £45.00.
Back in the FTSE 250, RHI
Megnesita, which mines, produces
and sells high-grade refractory
products for industry, reported that
revenues had risen by 23 per cent to
€745 million in the first quarter and
the shares collected 440p to £49.90.
Just Group slipped 3¼p to 140½p
after analysts at Deutsche Bank
initiated coverage of the retirement
products specialist with an
unexciting “hold” recommendation
and a price target of 170p.
Dollar rates
Clearing Banks: 0.50
Halifax Mortgage Rate 3.99
Bullion: Open $1315.47
Tin ($/tonne)
21290.0-21295.0
business that is
performing even
better than expected”.
While Smurfit
Kappa picked up 40p
to £30.88, boosted by
the note, Mondi put
on more than 2 per
cent, rising 45½p to
£19.81 as dealers
at £45.3 billion. It helped Hikma
Pharmaceuticals to rise 40½p higher
on the FTSE 250 to £13.38½.
J Sainsbury, the grocer busy trying
to buy Asda, dropped 6p to 295½p on
worries about likely cost savings and
whether the deal might be referred to
the competition authorities.
Also going the other way was Sky,
the broadcaster, which lost 22½p to
£13.50 on the back of a report that
Comcast, the US company trying to
buy it, was raising money to try to
gatecrash a separate deal that might
get in the way.
On the FTSE 250 Virgin Money
surged almost 10 per cent, putting on
31p to 343¼p, after confirmation by
CYBG, owner of the Clydesdale and
Yorkshire banks, that it had made an
all-share takeover approach valuing
the smaller lender at £1.6 billion.
CYBG rose 3½p to 321½p.
Firstgroup slid 12 per cent, closing
13½p off at 97½p as Apollo, the US
private equity group, walked away
from a formal offer for the transport
likely that homeowners stayed put
but would call in the builders to
upgrade or extend their homes.
The likelihood of more work for
Grafton, which updates shareholders
at its annual meeting today, helped to
send its shares more than 6.5 per cent
higher, adding 49½p to 799½p.
Grafton was established in 1909 to
supply builder’s merchants and
contractors with cement and plaster.
It has since expanded into Belgium,
the Netherlands and last year made
pre-tax profits of £154.5 million on
revenues of more than £2.7 billion.
On the wider market, it was bids
and deals — agreed, nascent and
aborted — that drove movement in
shares. The FTSE 100 index, in and
out of positive territory for most of
the day, closed 1.39 points lower at
7,565.75, while the FTSE 250 ended
172.84 points up at 20,594.72.
Shire rose 178½p to £40.34½ after
the drugmaker finally succumbed to a
fifth takeover approach from Takeda
Pharmaceuticals of Japan, valuing it
Lead ($/tonne)
2301.0-2301.5
The shares in Mondi, up
more than 2 per cent,
may at last be on a roll
Australia
Canada
Denmark
Euro
Hong Kong
Japan
Malaysia
Norway
Singapore
Sweden
Switzerland
Platinum $916.00 (£675.49)
Copper Gde A ($/tonne)
industrials
Money rates %
AM $1310.05 PM $1306.60
3mth
4.6%
3.4%
3.3%
2.5%
2.4%
-2.0%
-2.3%
-2.4%
-3.7%
-12.2%
Low $1306.03
(Official)
Cash
Change
ou’d normally expect only
first-time buyers and
speculative investors to get
excited when house prices
fall. Yet the latest — bleak
— assessment of the property market
by Halifax helped to put a rocket
under Grafton Group.
Halifax, one of Britain’s biggest
mortgage lenders, reported a 3.1 per
cent drop in house prices in April, far
weaker than any of the forecasts and
the biggest fall since September 2010.
Grafton is a FTSE 250 supplier of
building materials, almost exclusively
to the trade, and specialises in kit for
home repair, maintenance and
improvement projects.
Canny dealers put two and two
together and concluded that falling
house prices would make it more
Exchange rates
1.3405-1.3406
1.2953-1.2953
6.2663-6.2668
0.8414-0.8414
7.8493-7.8497
109.13-109.14
3.9885-3.9935
8.1335-8.1358
1.3392-1.3393
8.7992-8.8013
1.0011-1.0011
30.401-30.415
1.8176-1.8179
0.5075-0.5143
4.8340-4.8381
1.1408-1.1410
10.643-10.645
90.839-90.852
18986-18995
0.4075-0.4098
5.4072-5.4140
1.9433-1.9438
1.8158-1.8163
17.040-17.053
4.9771-4.9785
Australia $
Canada $
Denmark Kr
Egypt
Euro ¤
Hong Kong $
Hungary
Indonesia
Israel Shk
Japan Yen
New Zealand $
Norway Kr
Poland
Russia
S Africa Rd
Sweden Kr
Switzerland Fr
Turkey Lira
USA $
Bank buys Bank sells
1.960
1.710
1.900
1.650
9.060
7.940
n/a
n/a
1.240
1.080
11.380
10.010
390.570
321.330
21649.400
17268.800
5.370
4.580
159.340
138.000
2.160
1.830
11.860
10.250
5.310
4.350
91.730
76.380
18.870
15.980
12.750
11.340
1.490
1.280
6.410
5.480
1.470
1.290
Rates for banknotes and traveller's cheques as
traded by Royal Bank of Scotland plc yesterday
Data as shown is
for information
purposes only. No offer is made by
Morningstar or this publication
48
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
1G M
Business Equity prices
12 month
High Low Company
Price
(p) +/- Yld% P/E
Banking & finance
12 month
High Low Company
21
19V EIHv
19V
…
70
65 El Oro
67
…
2K
55
14
2178
63K
25N
3
27
39O 1PMv
14 ACHPv
1784 Admiral
19K ADVFNv
9 Amedeo Resv
Y Amphion Innovsv
16O Amryt Pharmav
11229Y 9145 Aon Corpn
1525
2X
1245 Arbuthnot Bkgv‡
2 Arc Mineralsv
47O –
14
2000
+
10
…
… -2.1
…
… -0.1
1V
17X +
10408X +
1495
–
2X
18K
14O Argo Groupv
17O –
433V
332N Ashmore Gp
62V
532
2582
54K
3382
1810 Brooks Macv
46W Carador‡
+
+
2.2 11.5
221
115
K 11.3 16.0
45
176O
K
… -7.9
1.8
540
…
90
K 4.9
+
5K 5.7 11.1
…
O
+
7.6
… -2.6
…
1.1
14
3.8 11.8
4.9 10.5
1
… 55.4
3K
… 18.7
321K +
1004W –
+
6N 1.6
…
3X 4.4 11.7
81N
…
9.2 66.1
N
…
… -0.7
199X –
8Y 11.6
5.8
+
3.8 53.8
93N
70K Clarke T‡
79W –
3
2.8 16.0
254K
190V CLS Hldgs
254K +
O 2.5
6
+
6.7
2.6 32.5
13K 2.7
8.0
…
… -0.2
13
2.5 12.8
N 3.7 15.5
371K
184N
78W Countrywide
475N
261K Craven Housev
636K
2892
4W
18
2.1 14.2
…
… -0.3
5.1
9.9
7005
5580 Daejan
6100
– 100
1.5
0.2 23.6
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739K
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2511K Sun Life Can
3009K
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1530 TBC Bank Group
1682
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652K
Price
Yld Dis(-)
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310V JPM Asian‡
360
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736 JPM Elect Mg G
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106 JPM Elect Mg I
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765 JPM Em Mkts
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288 JPM Eur IT Gth
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122 JPM GEMI
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293N JPM GG&I
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…
… JPM Inc&Cap Uts
…
… JPM Inc&Cap ZDP
…
… JPM Inc&Gth Inc
…
… JPM Inc&Gth Cap
…
644 JPM Indian
720
330 JPM Jap Sml Co
425
343O JPM Japan
455
1004 JPM Mid Cap
1252K
93K JPM Mlti-Ass
94K
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492
883 JPM Smllr Co
1195
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292
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299 Jupiter Prima
332
769 Jupiter US Smlr
920
7N Juridica Invsv
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1647K Keystone IT
1760
552 Law Debenture
611
1460 Lowland
1540
270 Majedie
294K
373K M Currie Pac
394K
226 M Currie Port
243
124K Marwyn Val In
127K
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2175
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437K Mid Wynd
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772K Montanaro Eur Sml 825
724 Murray Income Trust 776
1164 Murray Inter‡
1190
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240 Pacific Assets
259
333K Perpetual In&Gr
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1196
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109K Prem Glb & Inf
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101W Renewables Inf
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367K
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840
379N Scot Mtge
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156 Secs Tst Scot
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104K Sequoia Eco‡
108
1180 Temple Bar
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667 Tplton Emg Mkt
744
331K TR Property
414
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89K
153 Utilico Ord
167K
212 Utilico Emerging Mkt 212K
154V Utilico Fin ZDP 2018 159
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…
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980 Witan
1074
306K Witan Pacific
330K
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2307 Ww Health
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270 Town Centre
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1075 Halma
215
3337
Price
Yld Dis(-)
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1530 Goodwin
1330
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545
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49K 1.7 14.8
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759K
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38K
273O Countryside Properties 369K +
148
…
52 Real Estate Invsv
1055
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…
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31K RDI REIT
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550
Price
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40K
664K
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130K Raven Russia CRP
Price
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0.8
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…
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154K
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12 month
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61K
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30Y Phaunos Timber
648K
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176
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590K Br Land
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282
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217K Billington Hldgsv
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730 Mattioli Woodsv
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297K
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17
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1.3
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254O
798 Intermediate Cap
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…
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209K
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167K
415
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369
260K Hastings Gp‡
1004
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1266 Hargreaves L
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411N
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290K +
980 Deutsche Bk
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1822N 1565V Nat Aust Bk
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340N
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…
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102K +
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861
796
341
373N City Lon Inv Gp
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6335X 5407Y Marsh McLn
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…
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454
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172K
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7Y GLI Financev
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4374
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Price
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…
… 11.5
50
12 month
High Low Company
3.6 10.6
26N
82K
4N 3.9 13.1
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322N Brewin Dolphin
2.6
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…
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13O Braveheart Invv
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176
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19
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303
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278
5
…
…
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1097K
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3226 BGEO Group
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334
+
217
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25V 1.0 92.0
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3868
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4034K + 178K 0.5 11.7
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
49
1G M
Equity prices Business
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the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
51
1G M
Sleepy-looking chairman
of Epsom Downs races
Anthony Cane
Page 52
Register
Obituaries
Larry Harvey
Burning Man founder whose creation grew into a hedonistic desert utopia attended by thousands of revellers including tech billionaires
AP
One summer’s day in 1986, when San
Francisco was still better known for
counter-cultural whimsy than for its
internet start-ups and homelessness, a
landscape gardener with an artistic
bent decided to set a man on fire. In the
process, Larry Harvey ignited a global
phenomenon.
“It began as an impulse of an
afternoon,” he later said. “I called a
friend and I said, ‘Let’s burn a man.’ He
said, ‘What? Would you repeat that
statement?’ ”
A little later, flames rose around the
8ft-tall effigy that Harvey and his
friend Jerry James had thrown together
with scrap timber after their conversation. There was no reason to suspect
that the small happening on a beach
with a view of the Golden Gate Bridge
would be remembered by more than
the few dozen people who witnessed it,
let alone that it would lead, in time, to a
chaotic, wildly creative and influential
annual gathering where billionaires
muck in with the washing-up, artists
display vast sculptures and light installations, and flamboyantly dressed and
frequently naked participants spend a
week living in a utopian temporary city
of their own creation. But it did.
The Burning Man festival now draws
about 70,000 people to the Black Rock
Desert, Nevada, every year. Each
attendee pays between $200 and $1,200
Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk
and Mark Zuckerberg
are fans of the festival
to endure scalding hot days, bitterly
cold nights, rainstorms, dust clouds and
temporary lavatories. This takes place
in a barren wilderness where there is
neither electricity nor running water,
all in pursuit of a communal experience
that those who attend believe they can
find nowhere else.
Festival-goers must carry all of their
own food, shelter, water and power,
along with anything else they think
they will need, to the lake bed where the
festival takes place. Then they must
take it all back with them when they
leave, down to the last speck of paper or
splinter of wood, so the desert, 100
miles east of Reno, is left untainted.
While there, the idea is to indulge in
whatever appeals, freed from the
conventions of normal society and
guided by a philosophy of “radical
self-expression”, self-reliance and giftgiving. Corporate logos are banned,
even on clothes, and nothing is for sale
apart from coffee and ice.
Typical diversions may include yoga,
cocktail parties, sex classes, grand opera, car races, mass raves, competing
daily newspapers and lectures on the
regrettable gentrification of Burning
Man. A towering, wooden figure looms
over the huge site, the descendant of
that first effigy dreamt up in San Francisco 32 years ago. At night on the
penultimate day of the festival, “the
Man”, as he is known, is set on fire and
becomes the centrepiece of one last
joyful and cathartic celebration.
For almost half of his life Harvey was
the guiding spirit of this extraordinary
event. He was a messianic figure, who
could be seen surveying the improvised
Larry Harvey,
Harvey top
top, at Burning Man 2011 wearing hiss trademark
tr
stetson and, above, naked festival-goers and the blazing effigy
metropolis from a viewing platform in
his camp, chain-smoking Marlboro
Lights. Until recently he sported a
pearl-grey stetson in memory of his
stoic, adoptive father, who used to wear
an identical hat. An invitation to “First
Camp”, Harvey’s compound, was the
most sought-after invitation at the
festival. Acclaimed chefs would feed
guests at long tables and Sergey Brin,
the co-founder of Google and a Burning Man enthusiast, was reportedly
spotted last year scrubbing dishes after
a meal.
“Burning Man is Disneyland in
reverse . . . Woodstock turned inside
out,” Harvey said in 1996. In the same
year a motorcyclist died at the event
after he collided with a van, and several
participants were injured when a car
drove through a tent. Everyone, he
added, is an actor in the show. “It is anything you want it to be.”
“You’re free to be you,” he said the
next year. “The only person, the only
type of person that wouldn’t like it here
ultimately, that we’d recommend not
come, are intolerant people. They get
irritated.”
Harvey preferred talking about
Burning Man to revealing much about
himself. He believed that he was conceived in the back seat of a Chevrolet by
parents who abandoned him soon after
his birth in 1948. He was adopted by Arthur “Shorty” Harvey and his much
younger wife, Katherine, farmers who
had migrated from the Dust Bowl to
Oregon during the Depression. Harvey
and his brother, Stewart, who was also
adopted, but not related, “felt like exchange students” in the small rural
community outside Portland where
they grew up. Stewart, who later became a photographer and Burning Man
regular, described their parents as “loving, though tightly corseted”. The
brothers remained extremely close. “In
some sense I was raised in the 19th
century,” Harvey once said. “As a child
I craved sophistication and culture. My
parents didn’t know what to make of
me.” At school he was “a pint-sized impresario” who put on miniature plays in
an early foreshadowing of the drive that
would later turn into Black Rock City.
At home he sought escape from his feelings of alienation in literature and by
reading Sigmund Freud and William
James, the philosopher and psychologist. He hitchhiked to San Francisco in
1967 and 1968, when the city was on the
front line of the hippy movement. In
later life, however, Harvey vehemently
denied that he was a “hippy” and said
that he was “not a big fan of revolution”.
He was drafted by the US army
during the Vietnam War and served in
Germany doing clerical work. Harvey
briefly attended Portland State University on the GI Bill before dropping
out and moving to San Francisco
permanently in 1974. He fell in with a
group of artists and supported himself
by working as a landscape gardener,
carpenter, bike messenger, cook and
taxi driver. In the 1980s Harvey was
briefly married to Patricia Johnson,
with whom he had a son, Tristan, who
was five years old and present at the
first burning.
The spark for that initial blaze on
Baker Beach has been variously attributed to a romantic break-up, the cult
British horror film The Wicker Man and
the work of Mary Grauberger, the San
Francisco artist who staged artistic
bonfires of her own.
What mattered most was that its
impact was instant, overwhelming and
transformative. “It was like a second
sun brought down to this Earth,”
Harvey said, “because at the moment it
was lit, everybody on that beach, north
and south, came running.”
He returned to burn another man on
the beach the next year and the three
years after that. By 1990 the crowds had
grown to a size where the local police
refused to let the burning go ahead.
Harvey and his co-founders drove
inland for hours to the governmentowned Black Rock Desert and torched
a 40ft man there instead.
Attendance swelled from a few
hundred to tens of thousands and the
Man grew to more than 100ft tall. Each
year the theme became increasingly
elaborate and the expansion of the site
meant that preparations gradually took
on the feel of urban planning. Harvey
and his growing team introduced new
rules after the tragic 1996 event, including a ban on firearms, the institution
of a grid system and the establishment
o a volunteer security force.
of
The reforms saved the festival, but its
b
booming
popularity caused fresh
r
resentment,
particularly over the arriv of a new breed of “plug-and-play”
val
b
billionaire
attendee, who pay up to
$
$20,000
to fly in on private jets and
c
camp
in cordoned-off air-conditioned
s
splendour.
Wealthy fans of the festival
in
include
Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk,Mark
Z
Zuckerberg
and Sir Martin Sorrell. Last
y
year
a man died after he ran into the
f
flames
of the burning effigy.
Harvey wrote The 10 Principles of
B
Burning
Man in 2004 as guidelines for
t concept’s global expansion. In 2013
the
t
the
Burning Man organisation was
t
transferred
from private ownership to
t non-profit Burning Man Project.
the
H
Harvey
held the titles of board president and chief philosophical officer.
By the time of Harvey’s death Burning Man had grown into a business
worth $30 million a year. There are 70
full-time employees at its San Francisco
headquarters, and satellite events are
staged around the world. A recent tax
return showed that Harvey was paid
about $200,000 a year. He continued to
live alone in the rent- controlled flat on
Alamo Square, San Francisco, where he
first had the idea of burning a man.
After Harvey died, having failed to
recover from a stroke on April 4, his
friend Stuart Mangrum posted a message stating that Harvey, an atheist, did
not believe “in any sort of existence”
after death.“Now that he’s gone, let’s
take the liberty of contradicting him,
and keep his memory alive in our
hearts, our thoughts and our actions,”
Mangrum wrote. “As he would have
wished it, let us always Burn the Man.”
Larry Harvey, festival founder, was born
on January 11, 1948. He died from a
stroke on April 28, 2018, aged 70
552
1G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Register
Anthony Cane
Well-connected chairman of Epsom Downs Racecourse who once had to deal with a powercut shortly after the Queen arrived
GETTY IMAGES
As chairman of Epsom Downs Racecourse, Anthony Cane would always
give his best leather shoes a good polish
a month before entertaining the
Queen. No detail could be left to chance
in preparation for her annual visit to
watch the Derby, be it the quality of the
tea, the accommodation of her staff or
the functioning of the lift in the stand
that would enable her to cast an eye
over the horses in the paddock.
One year, however, there was a
power cut soon after the Queen arrived.
Cane had to decide, swiftly, whether to
take the risk of being stuck with her in
the lift or to lead her down to the
paddock via a staircase thronged with
race-goers. Her staff then advised him
not to take her out of the stand at all.
“There was a huge security issue,” said
Cane’s wife, Susan. “I don’t expect she
was best pleased. She liked to inspect
the horses close up each year and could
remember all the winners.”
For the remainder of Cane’s eight
years as chairman, however, her visits,
which featured taking tea with the
winning jockey and the triumphant
owner and trainer, passed smoothly
enough, although there was some
amusement one year when the Duke of
Edinburgh was thought to have ogled
Katherine Jenkins’s low-cut dress.
In 2012 the Derby was run on the one
sunny day of the Queen’s diamond
jubilee celebrations. Speaking then
about the Queen’s passion for all things
equestrian, Cane said: “She’s incredibly
knowledgeable. Her knowledge of
thoroughbreds and breeding goes way
back. She’s absolutely amazing.”
Cane, who could appear sleepy-looking — “you didn’t notice how bright he
was until afterwards,” said his friend
Charlie Bailey — joined the Jockey
Club in 2004 and became chairman of
Epsom in 2008. During his eight years
he oversaw the successful completion
of the Duchess’s Stand and hotel development and the long-term sponsorship
of Investec. As senior partner of Strutt
& Parker, property had been his forte.
He sold one stud to Stanley Kubrick,
the film director, and bought another
for Prince Khalid Abdullah.
Other notable deals he was involved
in were the sale of Mentmore stud in
1977 and winning the tender for the
management of 40,000 acres for the
Church Commissioners. He masterminded Strutt & Parker’s acquisition
and integration of Lane Fox in September 2008. When he sold Sutton Place,
J Paul Getty’s former home, in 1986 for
£8 million, his firm believed this to be
the highest price paid for a residential
property in Britain.
He formed a rapport with Jim Joel, a
winner of the Derby and the Grand
National, through their love of racing,
and served as a trustee of the Childwick
Trust, acting as chairman from 2012 to
2017. This charity was established to
benefit people involved in horseracing,
healthcare, a number of Jewish charities, and education projects in South
Africa, a country where he spent a year
after leaving school and for which he
had great affection.
Anthony Richard Godwin Cane was
one of few babies born in the London
Clinic. He was the elder son of Cuthbert
On a grouse shoot he
mistook a bumblebee for
a bird — and missed it
Cane, a renowned Harley Street surgeon who had treated wounded troops
on D-Day, and Rachael (née Godwin)
who had played representative
women’s cricket for Hampshire. Dr
Cane was, according to Charlie Dent, a
family friend, “hopeless with money”
and told his son that his sole inheritance would be a pass for No 1 car park
at Royal Ascot. So it proved. Nevertheless, there were sufficient funds to send
Cane to Hawtreys preparatory school
and on to Eton, where a tendency towards rebelliousness led him to annoy
the drill sergeants in the Combined
Cadet Force by deliberately marching
in the wrong direction on parade.
Cane then went to South Africa,
where he shared a flat with nurses who
were assisting in Christiaan Barnard’s
pioneering heart surgery. He then
attended the Royal Agricultural
College at Cirencester. Sent to work on
the Leckford estate in Hampshire, he
became bored with ploughing a field,
fell asleep at the wheel of the tractor
and drove through a hedge. He realised
then that farm work was not for him. He
was to become, instead, an equity
Anthony Cane meticulously planned the Queen’s visits to Epsom for the Derby
partner of Strutt & Parker in 1987 and
senior partner in 2004, retiring at 60.
He met his wife, Susan Mortimer, at
Strutt & Parker. “Ant interviewed me
for a job at 2.30pm and he had clearly
been out for a boozy lunch,” she
recalled. She joined the staff, but left to
work for a property developer after
nine months, only to encounter him
again when he took it upon himself to
deliver a package to her in person. It
was reckoned subsequently that he had
an ulterior motive. They married and
had two children: William, who went to
Eton and works in property investment, and Oliver, who was sent to
Harrow and is an insurance broker.
Cane’s interests (horse racing, fishing, shooting, a season-ticket holder at
Chelsea FC, and membership of
Boodle’s that came through on his 21st
birthday) were salient and helpful in
terms of connections through his work.
He was known as “Veg Cane” for his
insistence on more vegetables being
served to fellow members in the St
James club.
“Mutual trust is worth a lot,” he said,
in reference to his job. “It’s a bit like it
was in the old stock market. I know selfregulation is a dirty word, but it does
work.” Yet he remained intrinsically a
private person.
Not that he was always a decent shot.
“One day in North Yorkshire, when
there appeared to be no grouse, he
shouted that he had spotted something
black and aimed at it, only to miss a
bumblebee 20 yards away,” said Bailey.
“The guns and the beaters were in
hysterics.”
Cane and his wife bought a ramshackle farm with 30 acres on a slope
near Exeter in Devon. He had always
maintained that he would never
commute into London. “If you told me
I would have a house 200 miles from
the capital, living 600ft up with views
over Dartmoor, I would have said,
‘Never in your wildest dreams.’ At least
I can’t be proved wrong this time. When
buying our last two London houses I
said there was no point in paying for a
survey and that they were perfectly all
right. They both turned out to have dry
rot. This place was in such a state it had
to have everything.”
It was, though, essentially a draughty
holiday home and cold winters drove
them back to London, to Wandsworth.
There, he would meticulously plan
ahead. Holidays would be organised
two years in advance. “Anthony did not
like people who wasted their talents,”
said Michael Verity, one of his partners
at Strutt & Parker. “He did not like
wasting his own time and he did not
suffer fools. He was quite serious, very
succinct and clear in his thinking and
formed a concise view.
“He showed interest in others. He
could be grumpy at times and did not
bring out the best in everyone, but did
so with me. He encouraged me to be
constant in who I was. He believed we
should listen more than we speak. A lot
of us can listen to other people and yet
not hear them. He could.”
Anthony Cane, chairman of Epsom
Downs Racecourse, was born on October
4, 1948. He died of motor neurone
disease on January 29, 2018, aged 69
Professor Roger Berry
Innovative American oncologist who paid for his studies by restoring cars and playing piano in churches and sleazy nightclubs
Even as a young American medical
student, Roger Berry was nothing if not
resourceful. To pay for his one-way
transatlantic passage to take up a
hospital position in Oxford, he restored
and sold a 1954 Jaguar saloon that had
been written off. He even took the
weekend night shift of a breakdown
tow-truck service, which meant that he
had full use of the garage and car parts
at trade rates.
Later he was part of a “maverick”
team of oncologists that worked on
early non-surgical methods to tackle
tumours in Britain. He acquired for his
research a sample of californium-252, a
neutron-emitting radioactive isotope,
from Berkeley University in California,
described as “tricky stuff to handle” by
a colleague. His non-UK status and
informal procurement meant that he
was summoned to the Ministry of
Health for an “are your intentions
honourable, my boy” interview.
Having begun his career during a
pioneering time in radiology, he often
recalled his first experience of treating
patients using a two-million-volt x-ray
generator: “The machine was some-
Berry was a submariner in the 1970s
what of a mechanical monster: 16ft
from nose to tail with a transformer
tank 8ft in diameter. It hung from a
massive U-yoke in the ceiling like a vast
science-fiction death-ray gun. Patients
were strapped into a rotating chair so
that they could be turned slowly during
treatment, so the tumour was always
the focus of the radiation beam. The
psychological effect on the patient
could be significant. We were engineer,
maintenance man and utter handmaiden to the machine. We had our
own workshop — no technicians, just
our own skills — and we were expected
to replace any bits that failed.”
A dandyish figure — he wore a cravat
and enjoyed jazz — he was still
innovating at the end of his career
when he created a medicinal plants
garden under the patronage of the
Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of
London at the Westlakes Research
Institute in Lancashire.
Roger Julian Berry was born in New
York City in 1935 to Sidney, a lawyer
and film director, and Beatrice, a writer.
He grew up in Manhattan and won a
scholarship to study physics at New
York University, aged 15. As a guitar
and piano-playing teenager, he
supported his studies by playing the
sleazy bars and nightclubs of New York
in the 1950s. When he became a
medical student at Duke University in
North Carolina he found fewer clubs,
but many churches needing an organist
for choir practice and Sunday services,
for which he was paid $10 a week.
He was in his element when he
reached Oxford in the 1950s. He
admired the NHS and fell in love with a
young radiographer at the Churchill
Hospital called Valerie Butler. They
married in 1960 and settled between
London and the Cotswolds.
Determined to return to Oxford,
Berry found himself in charge of a
non-existent radiobiological laboratory at Churchill Hospital, with
research conducted under the Univer-
Of an evening he liked to
play the Wurlitzer organ
on the promenade
sity of Oxford. He decided that his
future lay in the UK and applied for
naturalisation as a British subject. It
proved an interesting procedure, with
five character references required from
householders with at least 13 windows.
With ad hoc grants he expanded the
department, using prefabricated buildings and Nissen huts, until funding was
cut in 1969. Later he was elected
president of the British Institute of
Radiology in 1986 and published more
than 190 papers.
In the 1970s his love of the sea took
him for a spell into the Royal Navy
Reserve during the Cold War. He began
work in the Royal Navy’s nuclear
submarines as chief medical officer.
Although he rarely spoke on the
subject, he was soon away on tours,
where he often did not see daylight for
three months. He also undertook a
position as visiting radiotherapist at
Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town.
He retired in 1995 to the Isle of Man,
where he was an aide to a number of
lieutenant-governors. His wife died in
January; there were no children. Their
house for a time had a baby grand
piano, which he played for friends. He
was also thrilled to discover a Wurlitzer
organ on the promenade in Douglas,
the capital of the Isle of Man, and could
be found tinkling its keys of an evening.
Professor Roger Berry, oncologist, was
born on April 4, 1935. He died on March
21, 2018, aged 82
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
53
1G M
Register
Judicial announcements
The Queen has made the
following appointments on the
advice of the Rt Hon David
Gauke, MP, the lord chancellor,
and the Rt Hon the Lord
Burnett of Maldon, the lord
chief justice of England and
Wales:
6 Kevin Wyn Moses to be
a district judge. The lord chief
justice has deployed him to the
South Eastern Circuit, based
at Watford County and
Family Court with effect from
April 9, 2018.
6 Matthew James Entwistle to
be a district judge. The lord
chief justice has deployed him
to the Northern Circuit, based
at Manchester County and
Family Court with effect from
April 30, 2018.
6 Sarah Marjorie Ellington to
be a district judge. The lord
chief justice has deployed her
to the South Eastern Circuit,
based at the Court of
Protection with effect from
May 8, 2018.
6 Richard John Case to be
a district judge. The lord chief
justice has deployed him to the
South Eastern Circuit, based at
Milton Keynes County and
Family Court with effect from
April 30, 2018.
6 Ian Taylor to be a district
judge. The lord chief justice
has deployed him to the
Western Circuit, based at Truro
County Court with effect from
May 1, 2018.
The Queen has made the
following appointment on the
advice of the Right Honourable
David Gauke, MP, the lord
chancellor, and the Right
Honourable Sir Ernest Ryder,
the senior president of
tribunals:
6 Thomas Henry Church to be
a Salaried Judge of the Upper
Tribunal. The senior president
of tribunals has assigned him
to the Administrative Appeals
Chamber with effect from
May 21, 2018.
Retirements
6 District Judge Stephen
William Arnold retired from
the district bench with effect
from April 7, 2018.
6 His Honour Judge Walter
Gareth Hawkesworth retired as
a circuit judge with effect from
April 7, 2018.
6 His Honour Judge Ian
Leeming, QC, retired as a
Circuit Judge with effect from
April 11, 2018.
6 District Judge Lydia Suzanne
Stephens retired from the
District Bench with effect from
April 14, 2018.
6 His Honour Judge Anthony
Trevor Lancaster retired as a
circuit judge with effect from
April 14, 2018.
FOR the love of Christ urges us on,
because we are convinced that one has
died for all; therefore all have died. And he
died for all, so that those who live might
live no longer for themselves, but for him
who died and was raised for them.
2 Corinthians 5.14-15 (NRSV)
Bible verses provided by Bible Society
Births
BANKS On 24th April 2018 to
Charlotte (née Cross) and James, a
son, George William Frederick
Beaumont.
GREEN On 30th April 2018 to Carmel
(née Nye) and James, a son, Seth
Cameron, brother to Rafe.
LIVINGSTONE GREER On 5th May
2018 to Ella and Belinda, a son, Aari
Harrison.
SURMAN On 26th April 2018 to
Catherine (née Boyd) and William, a
son, Wilfred George, brother to Harry.
WELLS On 1st May 2018 to Emma
(née Tritton) and Frederick, a son,
Harry William Barclay, brother to
Annabel.
WHEELER On 3rd May 2018 to Alsi
(née Bowden) and Jonathan, a
daughter, Posie Imogen Michaela,
sister to Alette and Frith.
WILSON On 17th April 2018 to
Elizabeth (née Dixon) and Philip, a son,
Maximilian Caird Alexander.
Forthcoming
Marriages
MAJOR D.C.M. HOEY
AND MISS L.J. DAVIS
Court Circular
Clarence House
8th May, 2018
The Prince of Wales and The
Duchess of Cornwall today
undertook engagements in
Lyon, France.
The Prince of Wales,
accompanied by The Duchess
of Cornwall, this afternoon
attended a Victory in Europe
Commemoration Ceremony at
the War Memorial in the
Parc de la Tête d’Or and laid
a wreath.
Their Royal Highnesses later
visited les Halles de Lyon-Paul
Bocuse.
The Prince of Wales
subsequently visited the
International Criminal Police
Organization.
His Royal Highness
afterwards visited Isara-Lyon
University.
The Duchess of Cornwall
this afternoon visited a
women’s shelter.
Her Royal Highness, Patron,
Emmaus UK, subsequently
visited Emmaus Lyon.
Births, Marriages and Deaths
Lord-Lieutenant of West
Sussex (Mrs. Susan Pyper).
Her Royal Highness this
afternoon visited the
Dementia Support Centre,
Salisbury House, City Fields
Way, Tangmere.
The Countess of Wessex
later opened the Emergency
Operations Centre and
Headquarters of South East
Coast Ambulance Service,
Nexus House, Gatwick Road,
Crawley.
Kensington Palace
8th May, 2018
The Duke of Cambridge this
afternoon received Professor
Dame Sally Davies (Chief
Medical Officer).
Buckingham Palace
8th May, 2018
The Princess Royal, Prime
Warden, the Fishmongers’
Company, this afternoon
attended the Not a Master in
Sight Luncheon at Goldsmiths’
Hall, Foster Lane, London EC2.
Her Royal Highness, Patron,
Transaid, later received
Mr. Gary Forster upon
relinquishing his appointment
as Chief Executive and
Dr. Caroline Barber upon
assuming the appointment.
The Princess Royal, Patron,
Royal Geographical Society,
received Dr. Rita Gardner
upon relinquishing her
appointment as Director and
Professor Jonathan Smith
upon assuming the
appointment.
Her Royal Highness, Royal
Patron, National Coastwatch
Institution, this evening
attended a Reception at the
Corporation of Trinity House,
Trinity Square, London EC3.
Buckingham Palace
8th May, 2018
The Earl of Wessex, Royal
Honorary Colonel, Royal
Wessex Yeomanry, this
morning held a Meeting.
The Countess of Wessex this
morning opened Western
Sussex Eye Care, Southlands
Hospital, Upper Shoreham
Road, Shoreham-by-Sea, and
was received by Her Majesty’s
St. James’s Palace
8th May, 2018
The Duke of Kent, Royal
Patron, this afternoon
presented British-German
Association Medals of Honour
at St. James’s Palace.
His Royal Highness later
officially opened the Jack
Pouchot building, Westminster
City School, 55 Palace Street,
London SW1.
The engagement is announced between
Major David Hoey, 1st The Queen’s
Dragoon Guards, son of Mr and Mrs
Christopher Hoey of Newton Abbot,
and Lydia, daughter of Colonel and Mrs
Paul Davis of Petersfield.
Deaths
www.newsukadvertising.co.uk
FERRIER Hugh William Alexander,
aged 77, died peacefully at home on
3rd May, surrounded by his family.
There will be a private funeral service.
A celebration of his Life, will be held
on 15th June, 1.30pm, at St Michael
and All Angels Church, Barton Turf.
Please join the family afterwards at
the Norfolk Broads Yacht Club. In lieu
of flowers, donations welcome, made
payable to ‘Big C’ c/o Murrell Cork
Funerals, 34 High St, Stalham, NR12
9AN. ‘We cannot direct the wind, but
we can adjust the sails’.
FIRAT Şenay passed away peacefully
at home on 3rd May 2018, aged 78.
Adored wife of the late Fikri, treasured
mother to Fisun, Candan and Mete,
devoted grandmother and ‘nene’ to Elif,
Kaya, Nalân, Tolga, Daniyal and Pasha,
great-grandmother and ‘big nene’ to
Keir and mother-in-law to Kim, Bob and
Aygul. A source of love, inspiration and
laughter for us all.
FURLONGER Michael William on 1st
May 2018, aged 77, much beloved
husband of Rose, father of Pippa and
Rupert and grandpa of Jack. Service of
thanksgiving at St Andrew's Church,
Heddon on the Wall, on Thursday 10th
May, at 10.30am. No flowers, please.
Donations to Motor Neurone Disease
Association.
GREADY Richard James (Jim) on 4th
May 2018, aged 69. Loving husband of
Matthew Loughney and father of
Matthew (dec’d) and sons Stuart
Gready and Simon Gready. A secular
meeting of relatives and friends will
take place at Haycombe Crematorium,
209 Whiteway Road, Bath, BA2 2RQ,
on Saturday 19th May, at 10am. No
mourning, no black clothing, come as
colourful as you can. No flowers by
request, but donations, to Children’s
Hospice South West, may be sent to,
C V Gower Funeral Directors, The
Square, Winscombe, BS25 1BS, tel:
01934 842945.
JARRATT Lady Philomena much-loved
wife, mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother of Sir Alex Jarratt, their
three children, seven grandchildren and
great-grandchild, died peacefully on
2nd May 2018, at Grove Court Care
Home, Woodbridge, Suffolk, aged 94. A
private funeral in Ipswich, will be
followed on a date to be announced, by
internment of ashes at St Mary the
Virgin, Fryerning, Essex.
KERR Lord John died peacefully on 3rd
2018, aged 85. Beloved husband of
Juliet, father of Toby and Charlotte,
and grandfather of seven. Service of
thanksgiving at 11am, on Monday 14th
May, at St Mary’s Church, Polstead.
Family funeral private. No flowers
please. Donations if wished, to Tools
with a Mission (www.twam.uk).
May 2018, aged 90, in Oxford,
strengthened by the rites of our Holy
Mother the Church. Requiem Mass at
the church of St Hugh of Lincoln,
Hensington Rd, Woodstock,
Oxfordshire, OX20 1JH, on Monday
14th May, at 2pm. Enquiries to Jerrams
Brothers, Funeral Directors, 33 High
Street, Woodstock, OX20 1TE, tel:
01993 811491.
ALSOP Derek on 29th April 2018, aged
MASEFIELD William Herbert died
ALLERTON David Mason on 2nd May
97, peacefully in his sleep at home,
active to the last. Beloved husband of
Helen, much-loved and admired father
and grandfather. Thanksgiving service
at St Mary’s, Bathwick, Bath, on 1st
June 2018, at 2.30pm. All welcome, if
attending, please email
malsop@gmail.com. No flowers, but
any donations, would be welcomed by
Dorothy House, c/o Clarksons Funeral
Directors, tel: 01225 426822.
BARNFIELD Michael Andrew of
London, Boston and Bermuda passed
away reluctantly but peacefully, aged
67, on Sunday 29th April 2018, at The
Royal Marsden Hospital, in Chelsea,
surrounded by his loving family. Born in
Gloucestershire, he was the much
adored husband of Darlene McCarthy
Barnfield and beloved father of Freddie
and Charlie. He will be remembered at
a service on 16th May, at St Mary The
Boltons, in Kensington, at 12.30pm.
Always the gentleman, he would ask
only that you arrive stylishly and
pleased to have made his acquaintance.
Donations in Michael’s memory can be
made to, The Royal Marsden. Inquiries
to Chelsea Funeral Directors, tel: 0207
352 0008.
BELL Rev Antony Fancourt died
peacefully on 21st April 2018, aged 89
years. Funeral service at St Thomas
More Catholic Church, Bramley, on
Friday 11th May, at 10am.
BOARDALL Carolyn on 1st May 2018,
aged 58 years, calmly and quietly at
home with her family beside her. A
cherished and devoted wife, mum,
granny and daughter. All enquiries to J
G Fielder & Son, Funeral Directors,
York, tel: 01904 654460.
peacefully on 1st May 2018, aged 92,
retired solicitor. Much-loved and
respected father of Charles and
Amanda, grandfather of George,
Clementine, Kinvara and Beatrice and
great-grandfather of Alfred. Funeral
service at St Michael and All Angels
Church, Ledbury, on Wednesday 16th
May, at 2pm. Donations, if desired, to
The Alzheimer's Society and Ledbury
Church, c/o Ledbury Funeral Services,
tel: 01531 633388.
MATHIESON Colonel Alastair
Archibald Mathieson MC died
peacefully on 21st April 2018, aged 88.
MOYLE
Nicky on 27th April 2018, aged 95,
died peacefully at home. Beloved
wife of Terence (deceased),
married for 59 years. Much­loved
mother of Robert and Diana,
grandmother of Laetitia, Ben, Kate
and Lizzy and great­grandmother
of Doogie. Private family
cremation on 14th May, followed
by a thanksgiving service, at
2.30pm, at St Mary's Melton
Mowbray.
PLOWDEN Stephen Philip Chichele on
3rd May 2018, aged 85, husband of
Susan, father of Edmund and Hugo,
brother of Geoffrey. Quiet family
funeral. Memorial to follow. Any
donations to, Marie Curie Hospice, 11
Lyndhurst Gardens, London, NW3 5NS.
PRESTON
CASHIN Camilla Violet (née Sturt)
died peacefully on 1st May 2018, aged
93 years. Much-loved mother of Charles
and Mary and sister to George,
Humphrey and Richard. She will be
sadly missed. Her funeral service will
be held in The Barn, at Harbour View,
Randalls Hill, Lytchett Minster, Poole,
BH16 6AN, on Saturday 26th May, at
11am. All enquiries to Tapper Funeral
Service, tel: 01202 694449.
Michael Richard died on 3rd May
2018, aged 90. Former Head of
Exhibition (design) at the Science
Museum, South Kensington. Much
loved and sadly missed. He died
peacefully in Australia.
STILES Walter Richard (Dick) died
peacefully on 2nd May 2018, aged 72,
at home in Falmouth. Much loved by
his family and many friends. He will be
dearly missed. The family would like to
thank everyone for their kindness,
sympathy and messages of condolence.
A celebration of his life will be held
later in the year.
SUBRAMANYAM P 'Goofy' on 4th
May 2018, passed away peacefully.
Much-loved father of Sabrina,
grandfather of Sita, Rajan and
Lakshman and friend to many. Will be
sorely missed by all.
TAYLOR Bryn passed away on 28th
April 2018, aged 75, devoted husband
to Annette and much-loved father to
Sian and Gareth. He was the best
Grumpy his three grandchildren could
have wished for. He will be deeply
missed by all his family and friends.
Funeral 31st May, at 1.15pm Harwood
Park Crematorium, Stevenage. No
Flowers please, donations, in his
memory to Médecins Sans Frontières.
WILLIAMSON Marshall of the RAF Sir
Keith GCB AFC died peacefully on 2nd
May 2018, aged 90. Much-loved
husband, father and grandfather.
Private family service. Donations, if
desired, to the RAF Benevolent Fund
(www.rafbf.org).
WHARF
Elizabeth passed away peacefully
on 26th April 2018, aged 91.
Loving wife of Mick (deceased),
beloved mother of seven, granny,
aunt and friend who will be sadly
missed by all. Funeral service at
Earlham Crematorium, on
Thursday May 17th, at 3.30pm.
Details via allcockfunerals.co.uk
Specialists
THOMAS The Reverend Bryan died
peacefully on 3rd May 2018, formerly
Rector of the Yarnbury Group of
churches in the Wylye Valley, and
former Vicar of Gorslas with
Crosshands in Carmarthenshire. A
service of thanksgiving will be held at
the church of St Mary the Virgin,
Wylye, at 2.30pm, on the 16th of May.
All enquiries to Chris White Funerals
tel: 01722 744691.
WEDD
Kate 2nd July 1931 – 25th April 2018. Beloved wife, mother,
grandmother. Loved and
respected educator for over 60
years.
Kate was senior lecturer in the
Teacher Training College of Leeds
Polytechnic in the early 1970’s
and Head Teacher at King John
School, Thundersley, 1975 ­ 1983. Kate was born and raised in
Bristol and returned there to live
after her retirement. During that
time she taught languages at
Bristol Grammar School, Bristol
Cathedral School and was
Headmistress of Fairfield PNEU
Primary School, Backwell.
Between 2001 and 2005,
Chairman of the University of the
Third Age (U3A). Fellow of the
Royal Society for the Arts, and
Chair of the South West branch.
Service will take place on Monday
21st May 2018, 11am, at
Christchurch with St Ewen, 63
Broad Street, Bristol, BS1 2EJ, and
at Grand Hotel, Broad Street,
Bristol, BS1 2EL, from 12.15pm.
No flowers please. Donations, if
desired, to St Joseph’s Hospice
Bristol:
https://www.stpetershospice.org.
uk/donate/
Enquiries to Memorial Woodlands.
Tel: 01454 414 999.
Legal Notices
CR-2018-002006
IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE
BUSINESS AND PROPERTY
COURTS OF ENGLAND AND WALES
COMPANIES COURT (ChD)
IN THE MATTER OF
BANK OF GEORGIA GROUP PLC
AND
IN THE MATTER OF
THE COMPANIES ACT 2006
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Claim
Form was on 1 May 2018 issued before
Her Majesty's High Court of Justice for
the confirmation of the reduction of
share capital.
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that
the Claim Form is directed to be heard
before the ICC Judge at The Rolls
Building, 7 Rolls Buildings, 110 Fetter
Lane, London EC4A 1NL on 23 May
2018.
ANY creditor or shareholder of the said
company desiring to oppose the making
of an Order for confirmation of the
reduction of share capital should
appear at the time of the hearing in
person or by legal representative for
that purpose.
A COPY of the said Claim Form will be
furnished to any such person requiring
the same by the undermentioned
solicitors on payment of the regulated
charge for the same.
Dated the 9 May 2018
BAKER & McKENZIE LLP
100 New Bridge Street
London EC4V 6JA
(Ref: HB/TQ)
Solicitors for the Company
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
57
1G M
Weather
Weather Eye
Paul Simons
Today Patchy rain in Ireland and much of Britain, but dry and bright in the southeast. Max 21C (70F), min 1C (34F)
Around Britain
Five days ahead
Key: b=bright, c=cloud, d=drizzle, pc=partly cloudy
du=dull, f=fair, fg=fog, h=hail, m=mist, r=rain,
sh=showers, sl=sleet, sn=snow, s=sun, t=thunder
*=previous day **=data not available
Unsettled with a mix of
rain, showers and sunny
spells. Drier and brighter
in the east
Temperature
Tomorrow
Flood alerts and warnings
Temp C
Rain mm Sun hr*
midday yesterday
24 hrs to 5pm yesterday
Aberdeen
Aberporth
Anglesey
Aviemore
Barnstaple
Bedford
Belfast
Birmingham
Bournemouth
Bridlington
Bristol
Camborne
Cardiff
Edinburgh
Eskdalemuir
Glasgow
Guernsey
Hereford
Herstmonceux
Ipswich
Isle of Man
Isle of Wight
Keswick
Kinloss
Leeds
Lerwick
Leuchars
Lincoln
Liverpool
London
Lyneham
Manchester
Margate
Milford Haven
Newcastle
Nottingham
Orkney
Oxford
Plymouth
Portland
Scilly, St Mary’s
Shoreham
Shrewsbury
Skye
Snowdonia
Southend
Stornoway
Tiree
Whitehaven
Wick
Yeovilton
19
11
10
16
12
23
13
20
19
14
14
12
12
15
9
12
11
16
20
23
9
18
15
19
18
10
18
22
16
25
14
17
22
11
18
21
14
22
12
12
13
23
17
**
**
19
10
11
11
15
14
S
R
R
C
PC
S
DU
S
S
S
PC
DU
DU
PC
FG
R
PC
S
S
S
R
C
PC
C
PC
M
PC
PC
PC
S
PC
PC
S
**
PC
S
PC
PC
DU
PC
PC
S
PC
**
**
S
DU
DU
DU
C
PC
0.0
0.2
3.0
0.4
1.0
0.0
1.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.4
0.0
0.8
1.4
1.0
**
0.0
0.0
0.0
2.8
0.0
1.0
0.0
0.0
1.4
0.8
0.0
1.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.8
0.0
0.0
0.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.4
0.0
0.2
**
0.0
0.0
1.2
3.4
0.0
1.0
0.0
2.4
11.2
13.2
2.8
**
**
4.7
**
13.7
**
13.2
3.0
13.4
9.1
10.7
6.2
**
**
13.1
**
11.9
**
**
5.7
**
2.1
5.6
13.9
**
13.4
13.4
13.9
14.1
**
**
13.5
1.5
**
**
**
**
13.2
13.8
**
**
14.2
1.3
5.0
12.2
**
13.5
Patchy rain at first in eastern England
will soon clear, leaving some sunny
spells. Scatter s
in Ireland
will spread
.
Max 18C, n
12
0
Slight
Rough
12
8
39
Aberdeen
NORTH
SEA
30
Edinburgh
Glasgow
15
9
17
Londonderry
ATLANTIC
OCEAN
Belfast
Dublin
18
LLlandudno
Cork
68
15
59
10
50
5
41
0
32
-5
23
-10
14
-15
5
i h
Norwich
Birmingham
Swansea
20
0
20
Bristol
Southampton
Exeterr
Plymouth
Brighton
14
CHANNEL
2
eastwards, followed by sc
scattered
showers. Fresh to strong south or
southwesterly wind. Maximum
13C (55F), minimum 5C (41F).
NE Scotland, N Isles, Moray Firth,
Aberdeen, Edinburgh & Dundee,
Borders, NE Eng: A dry start with some
early brightness, but cloud thickening
from the west later, bringing spells of
rain. Light to moderate southerly wind,
becoming fresh over the coast and the
Northern Isles. Maximum 16C (61F),
minimum 2C (36F).
Tides
London
16
2
12
General situation: A ban o cloud and
rain in Ireland will move eastwards
across Scotland, Wales and western
England, followed by showers. Dry with
sunny intervals elsewhere.
E Eng, E Mids, E Anglia, London,
SE Eng: A dry day with sunny spells
at first, but cloud increasing later
from the west. Light to moderate
southwesterly wind. Maximum
21C (70F), minimum 7C (45F).
N Ireland, Republic of Ireland: Partly
cloudy with patchy rain moving
Cambridge
Oxford
Cardiff
CELTIC
SEA
Channel Islands
15
Nottingham
12
12
Patchy rain in eastern England will
soon clear. Showers or isolated
thunderstorms il
p later in
most region
Max 17C,
12
77
20
Sheffield
15
Shrewsbury
24
Sunday
25
Hull
18
ooo
Liverpool
IRISH
SEA
10
11
Showery rain in eastern Britain will
soon clear, leaving some sunny spells,
but followed b c
r showers or
thunderstor .
Max 16C, n
86
Yorkk
Manchester
11
15
30
16
12
25
Galway
17
F
95
Carlisle
10
12
12
C
35
Newcastle
Friday
Cloud increasing from the west with
rain in Ireland moving eastwards
across Scotlan W
d western
England, fol e b s
ered
showers. D
a te
nd.
Max 19C, in
Saturday
11
11
At 17:00 on Tuesday there was
one flood alert and no warnings
in England, and no flood alerts or
warnings in Wales or Scotland.
For further information and
updates, visit flood-warninginformation.service.gov.uk, and for
Scotland www.SEPA.org.uk
15
Shetland
Sh
11
Moderate
28 (degrees C)
16
All readings local midday yesterday
17 S
Madeira
24 F
Madrid
19 B
Majorca
25 S
Málaga
23 F
Malta
17 C
Melbourne
Mexico City 18 C
28 S
Miami
24 S
Milan
27 S
Mombasa
12 B
Montreal
23 F
Moscow
32 S
Mumbai
21 F
Munich
21 C
Nairobi
19 M
Naples
New Orleans 31 B
22 B
New York
21 S
Nice
21 R
Nicosia
20 F
Oslo
25 F
Paris
20 **
Perth
22 F
Prague
9
S
Reykjavik
20 F
Riga
Rio de Janeiro 27 B
40 S
Riyadh
21 B
Rome
San Francisco 21 S
18 S
Santiago
23 B
São Paulo
22 B
Seoul
30 B
Seychelles
32 S
Singapore
St Petersburg 15 F
22 F
Stockholm
23 S
Sydney
24 F
Tel Aviv
20 S
Tenerife
14 S
Tokyo
17 B
Vancouver
24 S
Venice
21 S
Vienna
24 F
Warsaw
Washington 22 B
21 F
Zurich
ney
Orkney
Calm
9
12
23 F
24 F
24 S
18 S
34 S
33 S
30 B
18 S
25 F
20 R
22 S
24 F
24 S
19 C
24 F
24 F
25 F
21 S
29 F
35 B
18 F
17 S
22 S
20 F
22 S
31 S
41 S
14 S
20 F
25 B
25 F
22 B
23 S
** **
17 S
26 R
25 S
20 S
24 F
20 F
32 B
21 S
22 S
21 FG
18 S
20 S
32 F
e st te
(mph)
13
The world
Alicante
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Bahrain
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bordeaux
Brussels
Bucharest
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Canberra
Cape Town
Chicago
Copenhagen
Corfu
Delhi
Dubai
Dublin
Faro
Florence
Frankfurt
Geneva
Gibraltar
Harare
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Honolulu
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kuala Lumpur
Lanzarote
Las Palmas
Lima
Lisbon
Los Angeles
Luxor
in s e d
34
15
NW Eng, Wales, W Mids, SW Eng,
Cen S Eng: A dry morning, but cloud
increasing from the west with patchy
rain spreading eastwards. Moderate to
fresh southwesterly wind. Maximum
18C (64F), minimum 5C (41F).
NW Scotland, Argyll, Cen Highland,
Glasgow, SW Scotland, Lake District,
IoM: Rather cloudy with rain moving
eastwards, heavy in places. Fresh to
strong southerly wind, becoming
near-gale force in the west. Maximum
14C (57F), minimum 1C (34F).
Noon today
Tidal predictions.
Heights in metres
13
16
14
Monday
Partly cloudy with sunny intervals
and scattered showers spreading
northeastward
Max 17C, mi
13
14
17
14
The Times weather
page is provided
by Weatherquest
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples
Today
Aberdeen
Avonmouth
Belfast
Cardiff
Devonport
Dover
Dublin
Falmouth
Greenock
Harwich
Holyhead
Hull
Leith
Liverpool
London Bridge
Lowestoft
Milford Haven
Morecambe
Newhaven
Newquay
Oban
Penzance
Portsmouth
Shoreham
Southampton
Swansea
Tees
Weymouth
09:02
01:40
06:33
01:52
00:13
06:49
07:30
00:02
07:33
07:00
05:54
01:20
10:12
06:38
08:48
05:56
01:18
06:51
06:23
00:16
01:25
12:44
06:36
06:40
05:13
01:18
11:20
00:57
Ht
3.3
9.5
2.9
9.0
4.3
5.1
3.2
4.0
2.7
3.2
4.4
5.3
4.3
7.2
5.6
2.1
5.1
7.0
4.8
5.1
2.9
4.0
3.6
4.5
3.3
7.0
4.1
1.4
22:07
14:27
19:23
14:30
13:13
19:18
20:26
12:47
20:13
19:22
18:57
13:49
22:58
19:29
21:18
17:14
14:02
19:37
19:15
13:01
14:32
--:-19:52
19:20
12:11
13:57
--:-13:58
Ht
3.3
9.4
2.8
8.9
4.1
5.3
3.2
3.9
2.7
3.2
4.2
5.6
4.3
7.0
5.5
2.1
4.9
6.7
5.0
4.9
2.7
-3.8
4.8
2.0
6.8
-1.2
6
Synoptic situation
A low pressure system
over the North Atlantic will
move eastwards towards
the British Isles, with an
occlusion bringing outbreaks
of rain eastwards reaching
eastern areas overnight. A few
showers will follow from the
west, particularly in Ireland.
Feeling cooler than recent days,
especially in England, with a
westerly flow from the Atlantic.
EI GH T D AYS FR OM
TOUR
I N C LU D E S T H E S E RV I C E S O F A N E X P E R I E N C E D TO U R M A N AG E R
£729
PER PERSON
Tours of Sorrento, Herculaneum, Pompeii
and Naples Archaeological Museum
Cruise to the stunning island of Capri
Return flights plus seven nights’
accommodation with breakfast
and dinner*
Cold front
Warm front
Occluded front
Trough
Highs and lows
Hours of darkness
24hrs to 5pm yesterday
Aberdeen
Belfast
Birmingham
Cardiff
Exeter
Glasgow
Liverpool
London
Manchester
Newcastle
Norwich
Penzance
Sheffield
Warmest: Gravesend,
Kent, 26.5C
Coldest: Cairngorm, 4.2C
Wettest: Dundrennan, 6.4mm
Sunniest: Tibenham Airfield,
Norfolk, 14.2hrs*
Sun and moon
For Greenwich
Sun rises: 05.17
Sun sets: 20.35
Moon rises: 03.11
Moon sets: 13.18
New Moon: May 15
T
he weather forecast on
this day 73 years ago was
nothing out of the
ordinary. “Weather will
continue warm and
thundery, with bright intervals in
most districts,” the Air Ministry
report stated on May 9, 1945. This
was big news, though. Throughout
the Second World War up-to-date
weather reports and weather
forecasts were top secret to prevent
the Germans drawing up their own
forecasts. Only after VE Day, on
May 8, were newspapers and the
BBC free to make weather reports
and forecasts public again. “For the
first time since the war began it is
now possible to tell the world what
weather Britain is having while it is
having it. All restrictions were
removed by the censors yesterday,”
announced The Times.
The problem for the Germans was
their lack of weather observations in
the North Atlantic and Arctic,
where much of Europe’s weather
comes from. For several months
they used U-boats in the Atlantic to
report on the weather, but that tied
up resources. They then converted
fishing trawlers into weather ships,
but they were a disaster. The British
monitored the radio transmissions
of the trawlers and the Royal Navy
hunted them down and captured or
sank them. The greatest prizes were
captured weather trawlers carrying
codebooks and parts of Enigma
cipher machines, which allowed
Britain to crack the Germans’ codes.
The loss of their trawlers forced
the Germans to set up on-land
weather stations in Greenland and
Spitsbergen, off the coast of Norway,
but the Allies discovered most of
them. One outpost that escaped
detection was an automated weather
station established on a remote
Arctic-Canadian island. The
automation was cutting-edge
technology for its time, but shortly
after the station was set up it
stopped working. The weather
station lay abandoned and derelict
until 1977, when a geologist
stumbled on it by accident. The
remains were brought back to
Ottawa and are on display in the
city’s Canadian War Museum.
21:38-04:29
21:41-04:56
21:16-04:49
21:18-04:58
21:16-05:02
21:40-04:44
21:24-04:50
21:06-04:46
21:22-04:46
21:26-04:37
21:04-04:36
21:22-05:12
21:18-04:44
he Sorrento peninsula and the Bay of Naples is simply one of the most beautiful
corners of Europe, attracting visitors for centuries in search of its outstanding
scenery, tranquillity and some of the most wondrous sights from throughout history. See
the stunning Amalfi Coast and historic Pompeii on an escorted tour to one of the most
delightful regions in Italy. Add the excellent food and wine, plus the Italians themselves
with their legendary love of life, and you have all the ingredients for a wonderful tour.
T
Selected departures up to November, 2018.
Call 0330 160 5100 and quote KM206
thetimes.co.uk/riviera-cn
*Hotel Mediterraneo is breakfast only. Prices based on two people sharing a twin room. Single rooms available at a supplement. Additional entrance costs may apply. Travel insurance is not included but is strongly recommended. This holiday is operated by and subject to booking conditions of Riviera Travel, ABTA V4744 ATOL 3430 protected,
a company independent of Times Newspapers Ltd. Subject to availability. Images used in conjunction with Riviera Travel. For further information please write to Riviera Travel, New Manor, 328 Wetmore Road, Burton upon Trent, Staffs, DE14 1SP quoting The Times. KM206.
558
2G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Sport
Racing takes measures to tackle violence
continued from back
well as of the fight last Saturday, videos
of which were shared on social media
and showed a man being kicked in the
head while lying on the ground. No one
has been arrested yet.
Trouble has flared at Royal Ascot,
Newmarket, Cheltenham and Aintree
over the past 14 months after all-day
drinking sessions have spilt over into
evening pop concerts, which are
increasingly popular as courses strive
to increase revenues.
The RCA announced the introduction of sniffer dogs last month as part of
an “end your day on the right high”
campaign. “We wanted to be proactive
in terms of drugs,” a spokesman said.
“Drink and drugs often do go hand in
hand. It’s a preventative measure.”
Racecourse behaviour and crowd
safety were serious issues, a BHA
spokesman said yesterday: “Incidents
such as those at the weekend cast the
sport in a poor light and cause understandable concern.
“We will be writing to Goodwood to
Disturbing footage appeared on social media of a man being kicked in the head
ask for their assessment of the events
that occurred at their fixture on Saturday, and what steps they will take as a
result. We will also be writing to the
RCA for their views on issues regarding
racegoer behaviour more generally.”
Crowd control, security and alcohol
policies are the responsibility of the
racecourse and the RCA. But this year
the BHA announced a review of licens-
ing procedures for participants and
racecourses, a process that will be given
added impetus by recent events.
Last summer a Little Mix concert at
Newmarket and a gig by Craig David
at Lingfield led to serious problems,
including overcrowding and fighting. A
man was attacked with a bottle at the
2017 Grand National and a brawl erupted in the picnic area at Royal Ascot this
time last year. A man’s eye socket was
fractured after the Gold Cup at Cheltenham in March.
In a letter to the Racing Post, a
racegoer who was at Goodwood said:
“There was one security guard observing the fight from a distance, with many
people asking the obvious question:
‘Where were the security or police?’ ”
Alex Eade, Goodwood’s general
manager, said: “I hope it was just a
nasty, one-off incident. It was absolutely unacceptable behaviour. It’s really
bad for our sport, it’s particularly bad
for Goodwood. No one is more shocked
than me.”
Sussex police are appealing for witnesses after what they called “multiple
altercations” at the racecourse.
6 The future of Steve Harman as
chairman of the British Horseracing
Authority is to be decided today. Harman is reportedly set to face a vote at an
extraordinary BHA board meeting in
London after allegations about his
conduct, relating to meetings he had at
the Cheltenham Festival, were aired. It
is unclear whether he will attend.
Fontwell Park
Rob Wright
5.10 Summer Getaway 7.15 Bennys Girl
5.45 Flugzeug
7.45 Pirate Look
6.15 Don Lami
8.15 Bitofblinding
6.45 It’s Got Legs
Going: good, good to firm in places
At The Races
5.10
Handicap Hurdle
(£3,119: 2m 5f 164y) (14)
3 P6/P- FORT SMITH 165 (B) O Sherwood 9-11-9 H Beswick (7)
4 6/U1- CHILL IN THE WOOD 15 D Ffrench Davis 9-11-1 M Grant
T O'Brien
5 00PP- FLUGZEUG 53 (P,CD) J Mullins 10-10-0
9-4 Royals And Rebels, 7-2 Fort Smith, In The Hold, 5-1 others.
6.15
Novices’ Hurdle
(£4,094: 3m 1f 166y) (4)
1 3203- BENECHENKO 22 F O'Brien 6-11-1 Miss B Hampson (5)
H Reed (5)
2 20P0- CINTEX 73 N Mulholland 6-11-1
A Coleman
3 1230- DON LAMI 16 (C,BF) A Honeyball 5-11-1
T O'Brien
4 P40- JUDGE JUDY 33 Mrs L Hill 5-10-8
6-5 Don Lami, 9-4 Cintex, 100-30 Benechenko, 12-1 Judge Judy.
J Davies
1 2062- PROJECT MARS 19 (V) N Gifford 6-11-12
A Johns
2 0460- ALLTIMEGOLD 18 (P) T Vaughan 5-11-12
3 040U- MINELLA STYLE 113 Dai Williams 8-11-12
Mr S Quinlan (7)
4 0P05- SUMMER GETAWAY 14 Nick Mitchell 6-11-10 S Bowen
H Teal (7)
5 0400- WAIKIKI WAVES 30 G L Moore 5-11-9
R Dunne
6 5/00- VEXILLUM 189 (P,C) N Mulholland 9-11-9
H Bannister
7 0PP6- BLACK ANTHEM 42 B Barr 6-11-7
T Garner (3)
8 P050- ROBIN DE BROOME 97 B Barr 6-11-4
9 5PP6- HOWLONGISAFOOT 24 (B,D,BF) C Gordon 9-11-2
H Reed (5)
10 P000- CHOCOLATE DIAMOND 24 (V) D C O'Brien 7-10-10
Miss B Hampson (5)
11 P060- WILLSHEBETRYING 38 (V,C) M Hoad 7-10-8 M Goldstein
Lucy Gardner (3)
12 0P50- SNAZZ MAN 25 S Gardner 8-10-5
T O'Brien
13 /444- DROPZONE 15 (B) B Forsey 9-10-4
A Tinkler
14 /066- JOHN BISCUIT 161 Jo Davis 10-10-3
7-2 Project Mars, 4-1 Summer Getaway, 6-1 Howlongisafoot, 10-1 others.
Mr J Pearce (7)
1 600- DALEELAK 24 D C O'Brien 5-11-2
2 2224- HOLRYALE 165 (T) D Skelton 6-11-2 Bridget Andrews (3)
0U33IT'S
GOT
LEGS
38
G
L
Moore
5-11-2
A Glassonbury
3
Kevin Jones (5)
4 004F- MARATT 63 (H) J Mullins 5-11-2
5 0/0- MR DORRELL SAGE 89 (W) O Sherwood 5-11-2
T Garner (3)
U- THE WINNINGTIPSTER 19 Paul Henderson 5-11-2
6
T O'Brien
J Quinlan
7 1/25- WHITE VALIANT 241 (C) J Berry 5-11-2
3- GENERAL ALLENBY 16 H Tett 4-10-12
M Grant
8
05- ZILLION 16 S Gardner 4-10-12
Lucy Gardner (3)
9
0- HONEY P 360 R Woodman 7-10-9
T Phelan
10
J Davies
11 6P0- REMEMBER ME WELL 15 R Rowe 5-10-9
A Wedge
12 1/PP- SWIFT NATIVE 19 N Gifford 6-10-9
2-1 Holryale, 9-4 It's Got Legs, 9-2 White Valiant, 10-1 others.
5.45
7.15
Handicap Chase (£4,614: 3m 2f) (5)
A Wedge
1 /P16- IN THE HOLD 58 (D) E Williams 8-11-12
2 0334- ROYALS AND REBELS 32 (T,B,D) C Mann 8-11-10
H Bannister
6.45
Maiden Hurdle
(£4,094: 2m 1f 162y) (12)
Mares’ Handicap Chase
(£4,614: 2m 5f 135y) (5)
A Tinkler
1 50/F- ATLANTA ABLAZE 12 (D,BF) H Daly 7-12-2
2 U3/P- CHANTARA ROSE 90 (T,P,D) P Bowen 9-11-12 S Bowen
Young Rascal is
the horse to beat
Rob Wright Racing Editor
Young Rascal, trained by William
Haggas, is fancied to break the
domination of Aidan O’Brien in the
Centennial Celebration-MBNA Chester
Vase (3.35) today.
Runner-up on his only start as a
juvenile, Young Rascal showed vastly
improved form when winning a maiden
at Newbury by five lengths on his
return to action last month.
O’Brien has won this prize eight
times in the past 11 years and he saddles
three in an attempt to add to that tally.
Hunting Horn, the mount of Ryan
Moore, is sure to appreciate this step up
in trip and rates the pick of the trio.
However, the way that Young Rascal
quickened clear at Newbury, having
travelled strongly, marked him down as
a class act and he can follow up.
Nothing in the Arkle Finance Cheshire Oaks (2.25) has shown anything approaching group-class form and Hazarfiya is taken to spring a surprise. A halfsister to the Derby winner Harzand, she
should relish this step up in trip.
R Dunne
3 32P4- LEE SIDE LADY 225 (C) N Mulholland 8-11-7
A Johns
4 FUP1- TARA MAC 25 (P,D) T Vaughan 9-11-1
5 4111- BENNYS GIRL 12 (D) Dai Williams 10-10-6
Mr S Quinlan (7)
15-8 Chantara Rose, 11-4 Bennys Girl, 7-2 Tara Mac, 11-2 Atlanta Ablaze,
8-1 Lee Side Lady.
7.45
Conditional Jockeys'
Handicap Hurdle
(£4,094: 2m 3f 49y) (9)
6520- ZEN MASTER 28 (H,BF) C Mann 6-11-12 A Cheleda (10)
3U11- RAMORE WILL 30 (H,C,D) C Gordon 7-11-11
H Reed
5036- JUSTIFICATION 86 (D) G L Moore 10-11-9
H Teal (3)
/020- STOLE THE SHOW 128 Dr R Newland 6-11-9
C Hammond (6)
5 F45P- PRESENT DESTINY 116 J Mullins 6-11-8 D Sansom (3)
6 /4F3- MONDAY CLUB 13 (H) D Ffrench Davis 5-11-7 A Doyle (7)
22- PIRATE LOOK 41 (P,BF) M Keighley 4-11-4 H Stock (6)
7
8 2060- WELLUPTOSCRATCH 14 (T) D Arbuthnot 7-10-9
R Patrick
9 6055- BACKINTHESADDLE 138 (T) D Steele 10-10-7 P Cowley
11-4 Ramore Will, 11-2 Stole The Show, Zen Master, 7-1 Pirate Look, 8-1
Justification, Monday Club, 9-1 Present Destiny, 10-1 others.
1
2
3
4
8.15
National Hunt Flat Race
(£2,274: 2m 1f 162y) (8)
J Davies
1 203- BLACK LIGHTNING 24 (P) N Gifford 5-10-12
DADSINLUCK T Vaughan 5-10-12
A Johns
2
00- LORD CONDI 79 M Keighley 5-10-12
A Coleman
3
4 225- SHANNON LIGHT 24 (P) B Johnson 6-10-12 H Teal (7)
BITOFBLINDING G L Moore 4-10-8
A Glassonbury
5
4- GO FORRIT 33 D Arbuthnot 4-10-8
N De Boinville
6
JOHNNY ROCCO H Whittington 4-10-8
H Bannister
7
MANNING ESTATE O Sherwood 4-10-8
T Garner (3)
8
10-11 Black Lightning, 5-1 Johnny Rocco, Manning Estate, 10-1 others.
Yesterday’s racing results
Brighton
Going: good to firm (good in places, watered)
2.00 (5f 60yd) 1, Roundabout Magic (N Mackay, 10-1);
2, Pride Of Angels (9-2); 3, Foxtrot Knight (6-5 fav).
4 ran. Sh hd, hd. S Dow.
2.30 (5f 60yd) 1, Soumei (P Cosgrave, 11-4); 2, Haylah
(9-4 fav); 3, Hedonism (5-1). 8 ran. NR: Maximum
Power. 1l, 1Kl. E Walker.
3.00 (6f 210yd) 1, Kachumba (Rob Wright’s nb,
Sebastian Woods, 9-2); 2, River Rule (12-1); 3,
Following Breeze (13-2). 11 ran. Kl, ns. Rae Guest.
3.35 (7f 211yd) 1, Ateem (S Levey, 13-8 fav); 2, Spirit
Of Belle (3-1); 3, Black Caesar (10-1). 7 ran. 2Kl, 4Kl.
R Hannon.
4.05 (1m 3f 198yd) 1, Esspeegee (D Keenan, 5-1); 2, Roy
Rocket (17-2); 3, Archimento (15-8 fav). 7 ran.
NR: Amuletum. 3Ol, 1Kl. A Bailey.
4.35 (7f 211yd) 1, Sharp Operator (William Carson,
7-2); 2, Joyful Dream (3-1 jt-fav); 3, Baby Gal (3-1
jt-fav). 8 ran. NR: Navarra Princess, Spike’s Princess.
2Nl, 1l. C Wallis.
5.05 (6f 210yd) 1, Nutini (L P Keniry, 11-8 jt-fav); 2,
Balgair (11-8 jt-fav); 3, Daring Guest (11-1). 6 ran.
NR: Duke Of North. Hd, 3l. M Saunders.
Placepot: £255.00.
Quadpot: £21.90.
Fakenham
Going: good
2.10 (2m hdle) 1, Ascendant (P Cowley, 5-6 fav); 2,
Hatem (14-1); 3, Tiger Trek (11-8). 6 ran. Ol, 22l.
J Farrelly.
2.40 (2m 5f ch) 1, Millen Dollar Man (R McLernon, 5-1);
2, Caviar D’Allen (3-1); 3, That’s The Deal (10-1). 6 ran.
NR: How About It, King Cool, Postbridge. 7l, 2Ol. A Dunn.
3.10 (2m 4f hdle) 1, Potters Hedger (J Sherwood, 7-2);
2, Hatchet Jack (5-4 fav); 3, Touchy Subject (11-1).
6 ran. NR: Flynnvincible. 1Kl, 1Ol. Mrs L Wadham.
3.45 (3m 5f ch) 1, Emerald Rose (M Grant, 14-1); 2, Set
List (6-1); 3, Court King (10-1). 13 ran. 13l, 4Kl.
J S Smith.
4.15 (2m 4f hdle) 1, Apache Song (H Bannister, 5-2); 2,
Amron Kali (9-2); 3, Northern Beau (10-1). 6 ran. 7l, Kl.
J Eustace.
4.45 (3m ch) 1, Strollawaynow (Mr B Shaw, 12-1); 2,
Can Mestret (5-1); 3, Caulkin (100-1). 9 ran. 10l, 11l.
D Arbuthnot.
Placepot: £415.30.
Quadpot: £98.80.
Thirsk
Going: good to firm
1.50 (5f) 1, Fastman (D Tudhope, 7-1); 2, Dragon Beat
(5-1); 3, Victory Command (100-30). 9 ran. 1Nl, hd.
D O’Meara.
2.20 (7f) 1, Mystic Meg (D Brock, 2-1 fav); 2, Margie’s
Choice (5-2); 3, Lady Safeara (12-1). 10 ran. NR:
Herringswell. 1Kl, 1Kl. H Palmer.
2.50 (1m) 1, Feathery (S Donohoe, 6-5 fav); 2, Yeah
Baby Yeah (5-2); 3, Palenville (9-1). 5 ran. NR: Forever
A Lady. 3Kl, ns. C Fellowes.
3.20 (1m 4f ) 1, Blazing Saddles (Rob Wright’s nap, D
Tudhope, 9-5 fav); 2, Lucky Deal (8-1); 3, Caliburn
(11-1). 7 ran. NR: Colenso. 1Nl, sh hd. R Beckett.
3.55 (5f) 1, Acclaim The Nation (J Hart, 7-1); 2, Poyle
Vinnie (15-2); 3, Computable (16-1). 14 ran. NR: Elysian
Flyer, Signore Piccolo. Kl, 1Nl. E Alston.
4.25 (5f) 1, Militia (P Hanagan, 4-5 fav); 2, Hop
Maddocks (5-2); 3, Madam Devious (7-1). 7 ran. NR:
Capla Demon, Cavendish Place, Fairy Falcon, Paco
Escostar. Ol, 1Ol. R Fahey.
4.55 (1m) 1, Whitkirk (J Garritty, 7-2); 2, Zeshov (11-4
fav); 3, Midnight Macchiato (7-1). 8 ran. NR: Planetaria.
3Ol, Ol. J O’Keeffe.
5.25 (1m) 1, Mango Chutney (P Makin, 7-2); 2, Vive La
Difference (15-8 fav); 3, Mywayistheonlyway (11-1). 8
ran. NR: Dreamofdiscovery. Nk, 1Ol. J J Davies.
Placepot: £32.60.
Quadpot: £7.90.
Exeter
Going: good (good to firm in places)
5.50 (2m 175yd hdle) 1, Tillythetank (W Hutchinson,
7-2); 2, Secret Escape (1-3 fav); 3, Mrs Miggins (10-1).
11 ran. NR: Admiral’s Sunset. 6l, 4l. A King.
6.20 (2m 2f hdle) 1, Serosevsky (N Madden, 3-1); 2,
Rockpoint (2-5 fav); 3, Beyond Supremacy (14-1). 8 ran.
NR: Buster Moon, Champ, Commodore Barry, Menapian,
Orchard Thieves, Out Of Style. 1Ol, 10l. H Fry.
6.50 (2m 7f) 1, Max Forte (Bryony Frost, 4-1);
2, Waterloo Warrior (9-2); 3, Katy P (12-1). 10 ran. NR:
Coningsby, Join The Clan, Just A Sting, Mon Palois,
Zero Grand. 3Kl, 1Nl. C Down.
7.20 (2m 3f ch) 1, Kings Lad (T Scudamore, 17-2);
2, Triple Chief (5-1); 3, Lip Service (4-1 fav). 8 ran. NR:
Above Board, Admiral’s Secret, Bredon Hill Lad, Conna
Cross. 2Kl, 3Nl. C Tizzard.
7.50 (3m 54yd ch) 1, Creative Inerta (Mr R Dingle, 9-4);
2, The Lizard King (7-1); 3, Brandy And Red (16-1).
5 ran. NR: The Two Amigos. 8l, 7l. B Clarke.
8.20 (2m 175yd flat) 1, Rhythm Is A Dancer (Bryony
Frost, 2-1 fav); 2, Earth Moor (11-2); 3, Shiroccan Roll
(25-1). 9 ran. NR: Master Card, Nifty At Fifty, Drift
Rock, Grey Diamond. Jeremiah James, Rufio. 8Kl, Ol.
P Nicholls.
Placepot: £119.60.
Quadpot: £33.30.
Ludlow
Going: good
5.30 (1m 7f 169yd hdle) 1, Diamond Guy (H Cobden, 1-4
fav); 2, Djarkevi (4-1); 3, Blackjacktennessee (100-1).
8 ran. 5l, 12l. P Nicholls.
6.00 (2m 7f 171yd ch) 1, Pembroke House (R Patrick,
11-2); 2, Gorsky Island (9-2 fav); 3, Tb Broke Her (6-1).
11 ran. NR: Amber Gambler. Ns, 1Kl. Sarah-J Davies.
6.30 (2m ch) 1, Nightfly (J J Burke, 4-1); 2, Walden
Prince (14-1); 3, Jackthejourneyman (6-1). 13 ran. 1l,
4Kl. C Longsdon.
7.00 (2m 4f ch) 1, Monbeg Legend (N de Boinville, 9-4
fav); 2, Sumkindofking (5-1); 3, Solatentif (5-1). 5 ran.
4Kl, 4l. N Henderson.
7.30 (2m 5f hdle) 1, Ayla’s Emperor (R Dunne, 20-1);
2, St John’s (25-1); 3, Samson’s Reach (6-1). 13 ran.
1Kl, 3l. J Flint.
8.00 (1m 7f 169yd hdle) 1, Equus Millar (Mr Z Baker,
7-1); 2, Nikki Steel (6-1); 3, Billy My Boy (22-1). 14 ran.
NR: Irish Hawke. 2Nl, 9l. N Twiston-Davies.
8.30 (1m 7f 169yd flat) 1, Lust For Glory (J McGrath,
10-11 fav); 2, Crackle Lyn Rosie (33-1); 3, Ruby Tiger
(16-1). 16 ran. 3Nl, ns. N Henderson.
Placepot: £200.50.
Quadpot: £191.00.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
59
1G M
Sport
Woods and Mickelson: friendly rivals
Golf
John Huggan Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida
Theirs has always been a complicated
relationship. For long enough America’s best and second-best, Tiger Woods
and Phil Mickelson, were never close,
always distant — on and off the course.
Things are changing though. Last
month, the pair played a practice round
together at Augusta before the Masters.
This week, they have been paired
together for the first two rounds of The
Players Championship in Sawgrass —
the “fifth major”.
Mickelson, who will be playing with
Woods at a Tour event for the first time
in 20 years, has never lost sight of how
remarkable his rival was at the turn of
the century. At one point during 200001, Woods held all four majors — the
Masters, US Open, the Open and
US PGA. “I don’t think we will ever see
that level of play again,” Mickelson said.
“It was the most remarkable golf in
the history of the game and, I think,
Chester
Rob Wright
1.50 No Lippy (nb)
4.05 Soldier To Follow
2.25 Hazarfiya
4.35 Last Page
3.00 Spoof
5.05 The Feathered Nest
3.35 Young Rascal (nap)
Thunderer: 2.25 Magic Wand (nap). 3.35 Hunting Horn.
Going: good to soft, good in places
Draw: low numbers best
Racing UK
1.50
Stellar Group Lily Agnes
ITV4
Conditions Stakes (2-Y-O: £14,940: 5f 15y) (11)
unrepeatable. I look at 2000 as the
greatest golf I have ever witnessed.”
Woods was more understated in his
assessment. “That was a pretty good
run back then,” he said with a smile.
When told of Mickelson’s jocular
desire to skip this week’s tournament
and go straight to “head to head” over
the weekend, Woods was quick to
agree. “I’m definitely not against that,”
he said. “We’ll play for whatever makes
him uncomfortable.”
Some things never change.
3-0 HAZARFIYA 19 (V) Sir M Stoute 9-0
59
James Doyle
4
(6)
0 HERE'S ALICE 20 C Hills 9-0
51
P J McDonald
5
(7)
1- KINAESTHESIA 182 (S) R Beckett 9-0
62
O Murphy
6
(9)
0-3 MAGIC WAND 23 (T) A O'Brien (Ire) 9-0
51
R L Moore
7
(1)
85
F Norton
8 (10) 311-53 PRINCESS YAIZA 17 G Cromwell (Ire) 9-0
78
A Atzeni
9
(2) 03231- SHAHEREZADA 186 (S) R Varian 9-0
1 SHAILENE 14 A Balding 9-0
-D Probert
10 (4)
7-2 Magic Wand, 4-1 Kinaesthesia, 11-2 Dramatically, Princess Yaiza, 13-2 Award Winning, 7-1
Shaherezada, 12-1 Forever Together, 14-1 Hazarfiya, Shailene, 25-1 Here's Alice.
Wright choice: Hazarfiya is a half-sister to Derby winner Harzand and
should appreciate this step up in trip Dangers: Magic Wand, Kinaesthesia
3.00
Boodles Diamond Handicap
Rob Wright’s choice: No Lippy showed good speed when making all the
running at Doncaster and can follow up
Dangers: Kinks, Lihou
Wright choice: Spoof went for home too soon when third at Sandown Park
and can defy top weight
Dangers: Global Academy, Looks A Million
2.25
3.35
ITV4
1
2
3
(5)
(8)
(3)
61 AWARD WINNING 10 (S) J Gosden 9-0
015-0 DRAMATICALLY 21 (S) A O'Brien (Ire) 9-0
43- FOREVER TOGETHER 199 A O'Brien (Ire) 9-0
L Dettori
J A Heffernan
D O'Brien
Kelso
Rob Wright
2.00 High Jinx
4.15 Chain Of Beacons
2.35 Bocasien Desbois 4.45 Dance Of Time
3.10 Champagne To Go 5.15 Cellar Vie
3.45 Cobajayisland
Going: good (good to firm in places)
Racing UK
2.00
Novices’ Hurdle
(£4,289: 2m 4f 189y) (9)
1/51- CALIX DELAFAYETTE 23 (H,C) J Ewart 6-11-6
B Hughes
5- CATHAL'S STAR 186 R Jefferson 5-11-0
J Hamilton
HIGH JINX 11F T Easterby 10-11-0
C King
5/P5- PAINTERS LAD 142 Alison Hamilton 7-11-0
C O'Farrell
00- REAPLEE 74 C Grant 5-11-0
C Bewley (3)
6/FP- TEMPLENABOE 115 Miss L Russell 6-11-0
D R Fox
0P0- ELLA'S DENE 31 T Reed 7-10-7
T Dowson (3)
3562- HILLS OF CONNEMARA 41 (T) S Corbett 6-10-7
S Coltherd (5)
F O'Toole (3)
9 06P6- RUSSIANTOM 14 (T) S Corbett 7-10-7
6-4 Calix Delafayette, 3-1 High Jinx, Hills Of Connemara, 12-1 others.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
2.35
Novices’ Handicap Chase
(£4,614: 2m 5f 133y) (8)
2/02- BLACK JACK ROVER 256 (D) D McCain 9-11-12 B Hughes
/50P- CHERIF DE L'ISLE 159 Miss L Russell 6-11-12
D R Fox
4244- FREE RANGE 19 (V) M D Hammond 8-11-11
A P Cawley
1UP1- ALWAYS TIPSY 23 (CD) N Alexander 9-11-10 Lucy Alexander
5323- ROMULUS DU DONJON 22 (BF) Mrs R Dobbin 7-11-8
L Murtagh (5)
J Hamilton
6 /FF6- ROBINTHEAULAD 31 (T) A Thomson 7-10-12
7 0261- BOCASIEN DESBOIS 44 (D) M Todhunter 7-10-10 H Brooke
C O'Farrell
8 3566- ROYAL MANDATE 13 (V) R Menzies 6-10-7
11-4 Always Tipsy, 7-2 Bocasien Desbois, 9-2 Black Jack Rover, 5-1 Romulus
Du Donjon, 7-1 Robintheaulad, 12-1 others.
1
2
3
4
5
3.10
Handicap Hurdle
(£4,289: 2m 6f 151y) (11)
0325- MINSTREL ROYAL 118 (T,P) P Kirby 8-12-0 T Dowson (3)
6245- DANCEINTOTHELIGHT 16 (T) D McCain 11-11-12
Miss A McCain (7)
3 1150- BENNY'S SECRET 19 (H,C) N Alexander 8-11-12
Lucy Alexander
D R Fox
4 P0/3- ELMONO 14 Miss L Russell 7-11-11
5 6433- NO SUCH NUMBER 160 (T,P) M Barnes 10-11-8 D Irving (3)
B Hughes
6 /6P5- SHEPHERD'S BIGHT 115 R Jefferson 6-11-7
7 PPP2- CHAMPAGNE TO GO 16 R Menzies 8-11-7 N Moscrop (5)
S Coltherd (5)
8 06P3- GRAYSTOWN 22 W Coltherd 6-11-7
9 F3P5- CHRISTMAS TWENTY 41 M D Hammond 8-11-2
F O'Toole (3)
Miss B Smith (5)
10 3461- WITNESS 41 M D Hammond 9-10-13
H Brooke
11 4006- CHOCOLAT NOIR 16 (P) M Todhunter 5-10-10
7-2 Champagne To Go, 4-1 Witness, 7-1 Benny's Secret, 8-1 Danceintothelight,
Elmono, Shepherd's Bight, 10-1 Graystown, 12-1 others.
1
2
3.45
Handicap Chase (£4,614: 3m 2f) (9)
/0P0- SCOTSWELL 23 (CD) Mrs H Graham 12-12-0 T Dowson (3)
2644- AMILLIONTIMES 179 (T,C) J Stephen 10-11-12 C Bewley (3)
/PP3- COBAJAYISLAND 19 M Scudamore 10-11-10
B Poste
1433- SHAKE IT UP 67 (D) M D Hammond 9-11-9 Miss B Smith (5)
/P0P- CLASSICAL MILANO 76 G Bewley 7-11-6
J Bewley (3)
4UF4- GOLDEN INVESTMENT 45 (H,T,P,C) D McCain 9-11-6
B Hughes
7 1332- PRETTY MISS MAHLER 26 (D) M Todhunter 7-10-11
R Chapman (3)
8 F13P- ATTENTION PLEASE 22 (P,D) Mrs R Dobbin 8-10-10
R Day (3)
9 5614- ACHILL ROAD BOY 22 (D,BF) W Coltherd 9-10-9 C O'Farrell
4-1 Pretty Miss Mahler, 9-2 Cobajayisland, 6-1 Golden Investment, 7-1 Achill
Road Boy, Amilliontimes, Attention Please, 8-1 Scotswell, 10-1 others.
1
2
3
4
5
6
4.15
70
v86
65
Centennial Celebration-MBNA
Chester Vase Stakes
(10) 6312-3 DEE EX BEE 14 (BF,S) M Johnston 9-0
1- FAMILY TREE 245 (S) A O'Brien (Ire) 9-0
(5)
Handicap Chase (£7,538: 2m 1f) (7)
5050- DOUBLE W'S 18 R Jefferson 8-11-12
B Hughes
51P0- BRAVE SPARTACUS 50 (D) Gillian Boanas 12-11-12
Miss E Todd (7)
3 3424- IFANDBUTWHYNOT 30 (T,D) T Easterby 12-11-3 H Brooke
4 1031- SUDSKI STAR 45 (T,B,CD) Mrs H Graham 10-11-1
T Dowson (3)
S W Quinlan
5 3413- APPLAUS 25 (P,D) M D Hammond 6-11-0
3132CHAIN
OF
BEACONS
16
(T,CD)
Katie
Scott
9-10-5
6
C Bewley (3)
7 31P1- OAK VINTAGE 16 (CD) Mrs A Hamilton 8-10-3
R Chapman (3)
4-1 Double W's, 9-2 Oak Vintage, Sudski Star, 5-1 Chain Of Beacons,
Ifandbutwhynot, 6-1 Applaus, 9-1 Brave Spartacus.
1
2
4.45
Novices’ Hunters’ Chase
(£3,120: 2m 5f 133y) (6)
1111- DANCE OF TIME 18P Miss H Reveley 11-11-12 Mr J Dawson
2U1F- ECO WARRIOR 16 N Orpwood 8-11-12 Mr N Orpwood (5)
0P3-3 SEE MORES FINALE 10P S Clark 10-11-12 Mr R Wilson (7)
6312- SHANTOU PRINCE 16 (T) Mrs G Walford 9-11-12
Mr C Furness (7)
5 1OF4- SUMMONED 16 (P) Mrs S Grant 7-11-12
Mr J M Andrews (7)
6 3P41- TAMBOUR MAJOR 11P (P) J Threadgall 11-11-12
Mr C Wood (7)
4-5 Dance Of Time, 3-1 Shantou Prince, 8-1 Eco Warrior, 10-1 others.
1
2
3
4
5.15
NH Flat Race (£2,924: 2m 51y) (14)
36- AMARONE GENTLEMAN 12 (T) S Corbett 6-11-2
Mr R Wilson (7)
BALLY CONOR R Jefferson 5-11-2
J Hamilton
0- DARRY DESBOIS 86 M Todhunter 5-11-2
R Chapman (3)
32- ENZO BARBIERI 24P Pauline Robson 5-11-2
B Hughes
HARRY THE POTTER C Grant 5-11-2
Doubtful
NEARLY THERE W Storey 5-11-2
Rachael McDonald (7)
6- ROCKET MAN RODNEY 207 Mrs H Graham 5-11-2
T Dowson (3)
03- SLADE STORM 339P A Whillans 5-11-2
Steven Fox (5)
8
THE BOO BOX D Whillans 5-11-2
C Whillans (3)
9
22- AKARITA LIGHTS 28 J J Quinn 4-10-12
C King
10
5- BIG BAD DOG 50 M D Hammond 4-10-12
F O'Toole (3)
11
CAPTAIN KURT J Stephen 4-10-12
R Day (3)
12
CELLAR VIE J Ewart 4-10-12
C O'Farrell
13
5- ROO ROO 24 I Jardine 4-10-12
H Brooke
14
5-4 Akarita Lights, 5-1 Roo Roo, Enzo Barbieri, 8-1 The Boo Box, 12-1 others.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Newton Abbot
Rob Wright
2.10 Swatow
4.25 Nabhan
2.45 Overland Flyer
4.55 Southfield Theatre
3.20 Blu Cavalier
5.25 Unsafe Conduct
3.55 Ballybolley
Going: good, good to firm in places At The Races
2.10
Mares’ Novices’ Hurdle
(£8,447: 2m 5f 122y) (8)
060- AUDORA 14 M Hill 7-10-12
J Best
1
1- DESIRABLE COURT 362P (W) A King 5-10-12
D Jacob
2
50- FRIZZLE 139 Miss E Lavelle 5-10-12
J J Burke
3
C Ring (3)
4 /143- KILCULLEN BELLAMY 48 E Williams 6-10-12
Mr M Legg (5)
5 306P- KIWI MYTH 14 (T,P) Mrs F Shaw 6-10-12
B Powell
6 310-6 OLDTOWN POLLY 3 B Powell 6-10-12
N P Madden
7 /052- ROSEMARY RUSSET 97 (T) H Fry 6-10-12
8 2/2U- SWATOW 15 (H) Miss E Lavelle 6-10-12 S Twiston-Davies
15-8 Rosemary Russet, 2-1 Desirable Court, 5-2 Swatow, 10-1 others.
2.45
Beginners’ Chase
(£9,357: 3m 1f 170y) (5)
1
2
ITV4
(Group III 3-Y-O: £56,710: 1m 4f 63y) (10)
1
2
266P- ALL KINGS 57 R Buckler 9-10-12
S Houlihan (5)
1510- MIGHTY LEADER 208 (T,C,D) F O'Brien 10-10-12 P Brennan
F Norton
D O'Brien
Wright choice: Young Rascal impressed when quickening clear of a big
field at Newbury and can strike again Dangers: Hunting Horn, Proschema
88
73
23 ARGENTELLO 20 (BF) J Gosden 9-5
v72
L Dettori
1
(3)
5-2 BARITONE 11 (BF) Sir M Stoute 9-5
71
R L Moore
2 (10)
0-4 CHIEF IRONSIDE 18 W Jarvis 9-5
67
K Shoemark
3
(6)
20- HEART OF SOUL I Williams 9-5
-James Doyle
4
(7)
3 HOWMAN 20 R Varian 9-5
66
A Atzeni
5
(5)
6
59
INFRASTRUCTURE
18
M
Meade
9-5
O
Murphy
6
(2)
55 MOON OF BARODA 63 C Hills 9-5
-P J McDonald
7
(8)
36
Jane Elliott (5)
8
(1) 006-6 ROCKESBURY 10 (P) D Loughnane 9-5
22- SOLDIER TO FOLLOW 238 (BF) A Balding 9-5
65
D Probert
9
(4)
00- SNOOP 335 D Loughnane 9-0
13
J Egan
10 (9)
2-1 Argentello, 5-2 Baritone, 5-1 Howman, 7-1 Chief Ironside, Soldier To Follow, 14-1 Moon Of
Baroda, 16-1 Heart Of Soul, Infrastructure, 100-1 Rockesbury, Snoop.
4.35
Eversheds Sutherland Handicap
(3-Y-O: £11,828: 6f 17y) (14)
1
2
3
4
(8)
(10)
(11)
(3)
0005-0
300103131-6
2312-4
NEOLA 19 (D,G,S) M Channon 9-7
ENCRYPTED 197 (D,F,S) H Palmer 9-7
CAPTAIN JAMESON 20 (D,S) J J Quinn 9-5
MR TOP HAT 19 (D,S) P D Evans 9-3
14/P- OVERLAND FLYER 87 (T) P Nicholls 7-10-12
H Cobden
06/P- THE EAGLEHASLANDED 88 (T,B,D) P Nicholls 8-10-12
S Twiston-Davies
M Kendrick (5)
5 54PP- BROWN REVEL 168 (T) S Flook 9-10-5
13-8 Overland Flyer, 15-8 The Eaglehaslanded, 5-2 Mighty Leader, 10-1 All
Kings, 100-1 Brown Revel.
Novices’ Hurdle
(£7,928: 2m 167y) (5)
H Cobden
1 4111- BLU CAVALIER 17 (D) P Nicholls 8-11-10
D Bass
2 4021- HIGGS 16 (CD) S Davies 5-11-6
1/0- PETERBOROUGH 179 E Williams 5-11-0
C Ring (3)
3
JUMBO'S BOY 30F P Bowen 4-10-10
J Bowen (3)
4
FF6- POET'S CHARM 16 (H) M Hill 4-10-10
K Edgar (3)
5
2-11 Blu Cavalier, 8-1 Higgs, 11-1 Jumbo's Boy, 14-1 others.
3.55
Handicap Chase
(£14,076: 2m 4f 216y) (8)
1S45- ALCALA 11 (T,CD) P Nicholls 8-11-12
H Cobden
3062- SIZING PLATINUM 19 (T,C) C Tizzard 10-11-11 R Johnson
5U0P- HENRYVILLE 193 (H,T,CD) H Fry 10-11-8
N P Madden
3560- BALLYBOLLEY 55 (T,D) N Twiston-Davies 9-11-7
D Jacob
1410/ ROMAN FLIGHT 8F (V,D) D Dennis 10-11-2
S Twiston-Davies
6 111P- PLAY THE ACE 123 (T,P,D,BF) P Bowen 9-11-1 J Bowen (3)
7 04P0- CASINO MARKETS 21 (D) Miss E Lavelle 10-10-10
N Scholfield
L Edwards
8 5233- CUT THE CORNER 30 (D) A Ralph 10-10-9
3-1 Alcala, 7-2 Sizing Platinum, 4-1 Ballybolley, 6-1 Roman Flight, 8-1
Henryville, Play The Ace, 10-1 Cut The Corner, 20-1 Casino Markets.
1
2
3
4
5
4.25
Handicap Hurdle
(£7,408: 2m 167y) (10)
1 2264- WATCOMBE HEIGHTS 17 (C,D) C Tizzard 8-11-12 H Cobden
2 1632- POINTED AND SHARP 19 (H,D) P Hobbs 6-11-6 R Johnson
3 5013- NELSON'S TOUCH 30 (D) J S Mullins 5-11-5 N Scholfield
C Deutsch
4 3650- CLENI WELLS 24 (H,C,D) M Hill 7-11-5
D Jacob
5 P304- ENGLISH PALE 163 (T,P) J Flint 5-11-5
C Ring (3)
6 0325- FLIGHT TO MILAN 44 E Williams 5-11-3
7 1500- TREASURE THE RIDGE 16 (B,CD) M Hill 9-11-0 J McGrath
R Williams (3)
8 0560- NABHAN 12 (T,D) B Llewellyn 6-10-11
H Skelton
9 1213- SHRUBLAND 181 (P,D,BF) D Skelton 5-10-11
10 1300- GLOBAL THRILL 12 (T,CD) B Llewellyn 9-10-8 S Houlihan (5)
9-2 Shrubland, 5-1 Pointed And Sharp, Watcombe Heights, 13-2 Nelson's
Touch, 15-2 Cleni Wells, 8-1 Nabhan, 10-1 others.
4.55
Handicap Chase
(£8,356: 3m 1f 170y) (6)
5603- DELL' ARCA 21 (T,B) D Pipe 9-11-12
T Scudamore
3PP3- SOUTHFIELD THEATRE 13 (B,BF) P Nicholls 10-11-9
H Cobden
D Bass
3 126P- SONNEOFPRESENTING 30 K Bailey 8-11-8
J J Burke
4 /202- DRUMLEE SUNSET 75 (T) T George 8-11-6
5 043P- FOURTH ACT 30 (T,B,BF) C Tizzard 9-11-0 S Twiston-Davies
R Johnson
6 PF02- LAMB OR COD 128 (T,CD) P Hobbs 11-10-11
5-2 Southfield Theatre, 4-1 Dell' Arca, 9-2 Drumlee Sunset, 5-1 Fourth Act,
Lamb Or Cod, 15-2 Sonneofpresenting.
1
2
5.25
Handicap Hurdle
(£4,159: 2m 167y) (18)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
6605- UNSAFE CONDUCT 46 (T) C Tizzard 5-12-4
H Cobden
50F0- BERRY DE CARJAC 160 (D) G Harris 7-12-4
L Heard
003- COME ON CHARLIE 48 P Hobbs 6-12-3
R Johnson
5UP4- GLIMPSE OF GOLD 32 (T,D) T Vaughan 7-11-12 D Noonan
5U00- FRANZ KLAMMER 19 C Longsdon 6-11-9
J J Burke
0060- UDOGO 30 B Powell 7-11-9
B Powell
03UP- BARON VON CHILL 275 (W) D Skelton 6-11-8
H Skelton
P660- INDIGO STAMP 17 M Gillard 7-11-8
Mr T Gillard (7)
2240- KUBLAI 24 (T) A Dunn 8-11-7
R McLernon
500P- SCORPION STAR 16 (P) M Hill 9-11-6
J McGrath
/561- ICE TRES 14 (P,CD) C Down 9-11-5
Miss P Fuller (5)
A Atzeni
Doubtful
J Hart
P J McDonald
81
T Hamilton
5
(2) 1d0-02 REQUINTO DAWN 18 (S) R Fahey 9-2
78
M Harley
6 (12) 23110- GINBAR 208 (P,CD,S) T Dascombe 9-2
v86
J Egan
7
(1) 56-214 LAST PAGE 12 (P,D) P D Evans 9-0
210- NO I'M EASY 228 (D,G) T Dascombe 9-0
78
R Kingscote
8
(7)
81
C Noble (5)
9
(4) 225122 BUNGEE JUMP 19 (D,S) G Harris 8-12
80
D Allan
10 (14) 2312-3 EXCELLENT TIMES 18 (D,S) T Easterby 8-11
83
C McGovern (5)
11 (13) 122222 MONTAGUE 5 (D) D O'Meara 8-11
84
R Hornby
12 (6) 312011 MARIETTA ROBUSTI 19 (G,S) Mrs S Barclay 8-10
23-4 GABRIAL THE SAINT 20 R Fahey 8-10
79
P Hanagan
13 (5)
76
G Lee
14 (9) 1060-3 PILKINGTON 11 J Bethell 8-10
5-1 Bungee Jump, 11-2 Requinto Dawn, 6-1 Last Page, Mr Top Hat, 8-1 Gabrial The Saint, No I'm
Easy, 12-1 Neola, 16-1 Captain Jameson, Marietta Robusti, Pilkington, 20-1 others.
5.05
Deepbridge Capital Maiden Stakes
(3-Y-O: £11,828: 1m 2f 70y) (10)
3
4
3.20
Baseball The London Stadium will be
used for two Major League Baseball
games next year — the first regularseason games to be played in Europe.
The former Olympic Stadium, now
West Ham United’s home ground, will
need reconfiguring as a baseball field
for the New York Yankees to face
Boston Red Sox on June 29 and 30.
Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London,
launched the London Series alongside
the Red Sox owner John W Henry,
who also owns Liverpool FC, and the
Yankees co-chairman Hal
Steinbrenner yesterday.
behind the leaders as the Belgian
rider Tim Wellens won the hilly
fourth stage of the Giro d’Italia.
Froome finished 21 seconds behind
Wellens, pushing the four-times Tour
de France champion down to 20th
overall, 55 seconds behind Rohan
Dennis, of Australia, who held on to
the overall leader’s pink jersey. British
rider Simon Yates finished fourth on
the 126-mile leg from Catania to
Caltagirone in Sicily, moving up from
sixth to third overall, 17 seconds
behind the leader.
v97
J A Heffernan
3
(4) 0151-3 FLAG OF HONOUR (BF,S) A O'Brien (Ire) 9-0
93
R L Moore
4
(1) 42-13 HUNTING HORN 12 (S) A O'Brien (Ire) 9-0
41-2 ISPOLINI 12 (T) C Appleby 9-0
96
W Buick
5
(3)
0-1 JETSTREAM 77 C Hills 9-0
34
R Winston
6
(6)
0 MILES CHRISTIANUS 14 R Osborne (Ire) 9-0
49
R Scott
7
(8)
11 PERFECT ILLUSION 75 (H,D,F,S) A Balding 9-0
-O Murphy
8
(7)
91
R Kingscote
9
(9) 23-11 PROSCHEMA 11 (D,S) T Dascombe 9-0
2-1 YOUNG RASCAL 18 (S) W Haggas 9-0
85
James Doyle
10 (2)
7-2 Ispolini, 4-1 Hunting Horn, Young Rascal, 5-1 Flag Of Honour, 13-2 Dee Ex Bee, 7-1 Proschema,
12-1 Family Tree, 16-1 Perfect Illusion, 25-1 Jetstream, 100-1 Miles Christianus.
4.05
v91
C Shepherd
1
(3) 105-43 SPOOF 12 (H,D,G,S) C Hills 9-7
87
O Murphy
2
(1) 5036-0 LOOKS A MILLION 19 (D,S) J Tuite 9-0
58
3
(7) 311-32 BIG TIME MAYBE 74 (T,P,D,BF,F,S) T Dascombe 8-13 P Pilley (3)
87
R Kingscote
4
(6) 1040- FORMIDABLE KITT (D,F) T Dascombe 8-11
81
G Mosse
5
(2) -14205 GLOBAL ACADEMY 12 (B,D) Miss G Kelleway 8-11
84
A Atzeni
6
(8) 320-02 BILLY DYLAN 11 (CD,S) D O'Meara 8-10
72
J Egan
7 (10) 414256 JOEGOGO 19 (D) P D Evans 8-9
86
P Hanagan
8
(4) 321-4 SHOWMETHEDOUGH 18 (S) R Fahey 8-9
86
F Norton
9
(9) 21515- PORCHY PARTY 222 (P,CD,BF,S) T Dascombe 8-7
84
N Evans
10 (5) 550-05 ANGEL FORCE 8 (D,S) D Griffiths 8-6
7-2 Formidable Kitt, 4-1 Spoof, 9-2 Showmethedough, 8-1 Big Time Maybe, Global Academy, 9-1
Billy Dylan, Looks A Million, Porchy Party, 14-1 Angel Force, 25-1 Joegogo.
Arkle Finance Cheshire Oaks
London to host baseball
Cycling Chris Froome fell farther
ITV4
(3-Y-O: £21,165: 5f 15y) (10)
021 ARTHUR'S SPIRIT 21 (D) W G M Turner 9-2
-W A Carson
1 (10)
3 DARK THUNDER 9 T Dascombe 9-2
27
R Kingscote
2
(6)
33 FIVE AMARONES 2 T Dascombe 9-2
36
M Harley
3
(7)
00 GINGERSDUNTHELOT 32 (P) D Loughnane 9-2
-Rossa Ryan
4
(1)
v58
211 KINKS 11 (D,G,S) M Channon 9-2
C Bishop
5 (11)
41 LIHOU 32 (D) P D Evans 9-2
42
Fran Berry
6
(5)
5 JENSUE 13 T Dascombe 8-11
41
A Rawlinson
7
(2)
213 LADY PRANCEALOT 10 (D) P D Evans 8-11
51
J Egan
8
(8)
1 LIGHT MY FIRE 20 (D,S) T Dascombe 8-11
51
Doubtful
9
(3)
1 NO LIPPY 11 (D,S) M Johnston 8-11
52
P J McDonald
10 (4)
602 THEGREYVTRAIN 8 R Harris 8-11
17
J Fahy
11 (9)
2-1 No Lippy, 7-2 Kinks, Lihou, 8-1 Dark Thunder, Arthur's Spirit, 12-1 Lady Prancealot, 14-1 others.
(Listed: 3-Y-O fillies: £42,533: 1m 3f 75y) (10)
Froome loses time in Sicily
77
73
78
79
Blinkered first time: Chester 2.25 Hazarfiya. Fontwell 5.10 Project Mars,
Chocolate Diamond. Kelso 2.35 Royal Mandate, Free Range.
Wolverhampton 8.55 Billy Booth, Haxby Juniors.
4002- BEE AN ARISTOCRAT 14 J Frost 9-11-4 Bryony Frost (3)
0P00- TEMIR KAZYK 14 H Oliver 4-11-2
D Crosse
4000- ICE KONIG 98 (T,C) J Frost 9-11-0
A Thorne (7)
005P- RUSSIAN SPY 62 E Williams 5-11-0
C Ring (3)
6300- THUNDERING HOME 14 (T,B,D) N R Mitchell 11-10-12
T Bellamy
17 0431- CENTREOFEXCELLENCE 18 (H,T) S Flook 7-10-9
J Bowen (3)
D Jacob
18 PP/0- AARYAM 80 (T,P) J Flint 6-10-9
13-2 Ice Tres, 9-1 Baron Von Chill, Bee An Aristocrat, Centreofexcellence, Come
On Charlie, Scorpion Star, Unsafe Conduct, 10-1 others.
12
13
14
15
16
Wolverhampton
Rob Wright
5.55 City Dreamer
7.55 Sir Lancelott
6.25 The Fiddler
8.25 Time To Reason
6.55 Ebqaa
8.55 Go Sandy
7.25 Verandah
Going: standard
At The Races
Draw: 5f-1m, low numbers best
5.55
Amateur Riders’ Handicap
(£3,619: 2m 120y) (13)
1 (7) 22-64 SHERIFF GARRETT 12 (P,C) T Easterby 4-11-7
Mr W Easterby
2 (9) 4025/ DOESYOURDOGBITE 59J (P) J-J O'Neill 6-11-6 Doubtful
Mr S Walker
3 (12) 0/24 FULL SUIT 11 A Watson 4-11-6
4 (10) 22643 BRIGADOON 13 M Appleby 11-11-6 Mr J Kendrick (5)
5 (1) 13-20 THREE COLOURS RED 25J (P,CD,BF) R Stephens 6-11-3
Mr C Dowson (5)
Mr A Edwards
6 (4) 05-24 CITY DREAMER 34 (BF) A King 4-11-3
7 (11) 3-306 HEWOULDWOULDNTHE 9 J Portman 4-10-13
Mr J Harding (3)
Mr B Carver (7)
8 (3) -6000 LADURELLI 11 (T) A Dunn 6-10-12
9 (8) 505-0 PARTY ROYAL 45 (H,P) N Gifford 8-10-12 Mr D Dunsdon
10 (5) 21-00 BALLYFARSOON 16 (V,CD) P Winks 7-10-10
Mr O Brown (7)
11 (6) 00-01 DOWN TIME 36 (B) P Midgley 8-10-9 Mr T Midgley (7)
50-24
AIR
MINISTRY
18
(B)
I
Furtado
4-10-8
Mr
A Anderson (5)
12 (2)
13(13) 033-6 CASEMATES SQUARE 18 (BF) I Williams 4-10-3
Mr C Todd (7)
11-4 City Dreamer, 7-2 Full Suit, 8-1 Hewouldwouldnthe, 10-1 others.
6.25
Handicap (3-Y-O: £3,105: 1m 1f 104y) (13)
00-06 ASTRAEA 14 (BF) M W Easterby 9-7
H Shaw (5)
-0663 PACT OF STEEL 29 H Dunlop 9-7
H Crouch
000-0 THE FIDDLER 18 C Wall 9-7
G Wood (3)
600- ENFORCEMENT 197 (H) M Keighley 9-6
L Morris
006 JENNY REN 29 S Hollinshead 9-4
P P Mathers
0-302 BELOVED KNIGHT 26 Mrs L Mongan 9-4 J Watson (5)
0-656 BE MINDFUL 92 C Hills 9-3
J Crowley
055 STAY IN THE LIGHT 11 K Burke 9-3
C Lee (3)
000-3 PERCY PROSECCO 26 N Williams 9-1
Rossa Ryan (5)
050-0 THE KNOT IS TIED 16 T Easterby 9-1
J Sullivan
5-530 WESTFIELD WONDER 10 (P) R Thompson 8-13
Nicola Currie (5)
12 (3) 5006- NAVARRA PRINCESS 141 (B,BF) D Cantillon 8-10
D Probert
K O'Neill
13(13) -0600 PAMMI 41 A Carson 8-7
3-1 Beloved Knight, 7-2 Percy Prosecco, 8-1 The Fiddler, 10-1 others.
1 (11)
2 (6)
3 (8)
4 (12)
5 (9)
6 (7)
7 (4)
8 (10)
9 (2)
10 (1)
11 (5)
6.55
Greenhous Handicap (£7,698: 7f 1y) (14)
93
1
(8) 40-020 ROARING FORTIES 20 (P,C,D,F,G,S) R Bastiman 5-9-5 M Harley
87
T Hamilton
2 (14) -51030 HEAVEN'S GUEST 45 (D,F,G,S) R Fahey 8-9-5
84
D Tudhope
3
(2) 2600-0 SULTAN BAYBARS 14 (P,D,F,S) D O'Meara 4-9-5
95
Finley Marsh (5)
4
(9) 21000- KENSTONE 181 (P,C,D,G,S) A Wintle 5-9-5
94
P Hanagan
5
(7) 33100- THE FEATHERED NEST 144 (S) R Fahey 4-9-5
W Cox (5) v103
6
(1) 2-6000 INTRANSIGENT 49 (V,C,D,F,S) A Balding 9-9-4
87
D Allan
7 (12) 020-00 STORM AHEAD 11 (D,S) T Easterby 5-9-4
79
P J McDonald
8 (11) 1-4550 TWIN APPEAL 14 (B,D,F,S) T D Barron 7-9-3
96
J Garritty
9
(6) 2-0045 RIGHT TOUCH 20 (C,D,BF,G,S) R Fahey 8-9-3
92
J Egan
10 (10) 2410-5 ROLL ON RORY 11 (V,C,D,F,G,S) J Ward 5-9-3
89
R Kingscote
11 (3) 31140- CHEERFILLY 214 (P,D,F,G) T Dascombe 4-9-3
90
R Winston
12 (4) 064-04 ALEJANDRO 86 (C,D,F,G) D Loughnane 9-9-3
81
D Muscutt
13 (13) 411340 OUTER SPACE 26 (P,D,F,G,S) J Flint 7-9-2
91
B McHugh
14 (5) 30-222 MY AMIGO 11 (T,F,G) Mrs M Fife 5-9-2
7-2 My Amigo, 6-1 Right Touch, Sultan Baybars, 8-1 Cheerfilly, Roaring Forties, 12-1 Intransigent,
Roll On Rory, The Feathered Nest, 14-1 Alejandro, Kenstone, Twin Appeal, 20-1 others.
Fillies’ Handicap (£3,752: 1m 4f) (7)
1 (3) 4152 LADY PERSEPHONE 25 (CD) A King 7-9-7 W A Carson
2 (7) 21121 SUNSHINEANDBUBBLES 25 (P,CD) J Candlish 5-9-7
J Fanning
Fran Berry
3 (5) 3-25 FIRMAGE BURG 29 (H) H Fry 4-9-4
D Probert
4 (4) 224-0 EBQAA 14 J Unett 4-9-2
5 (6) 5460- MONACO ROSE 221 (H,D) R Fahey 5-9-2 C Murtagh (5)
Rossa Ryan (5)
6 (1) 10453 FRENCH MIX 11 (D) A Dunn 4-8-13
7 (2) /0U0- OPERA BUFFA 61J (T,P) S Flook 5-8-2 Sophie Ralston (7)
9-4 Sunshineandbubbles, 11-4 Lady Persephone, 7-2 Firmage Burg, 9-2
Monaco Rose, 9-1 French Mix, 14-1 Ebqaa, 66-1 Opera Buffa.
7.25
Novice Stakes
(3-Y-O: £3,105: 1m 142y) (11)
J Fanning
1 (6) 0-1 ADJUTANT 18 B Meehan 9-9
2 (8) 31- STRANGE SOCIETY 160 H Palmer 9-9 Josephine Gordon
R Havlin
3 (2) 15- VERANDAH 256 (W,BF) J Gosden 9-4
6 DELIVERANCE 18 A Balding 9-2
O Murphy
4 (11)
Hayley Turner
5 (1) 5-0 EPAULEMENT 22 T Dascombe 9-2
P Dobbs
6 (7) 64- GARDEN OASIS 277 Sir M Stoute 9-2
7 (4) 46-05 ISLAND SOUND 5 (P) Mrs H Main 9-2 Georgia Cox (3)
4- JAHAAFEL 174 (BF) W Haggas 9-2
D O'Neill
8 (5)
00 ONE FLEW OVER 9 I Williams 9-2
G Downing
9 (3)
0- TAJARROB 188 E Dunlop 8-11
J Crowley
10(10)
2- WORTH WAITING 186 D Lanigan 8-11
S Donohoe
11 (9)
8-11 Verandah, 7-2 Adjutant, 10-1 Strange Society, 12-1 others.
7.55
Handicap (£3,105: 7f 36y) (12)
(7) 54054 PUSHKIN MUSEUM 18 (H,C) P Morris 7-9-7 Fran Berry
J Fahy
(11) 01406 VIOLA PARK 8 (P,CD) R Harris 4-9-6
Jane Elliott (5)
(3) 42053 HIPZ 28 (V,D) G Margarson 7-9-6
(6) 4640- MISCHIEF MANAGED 209 (E) T Easterby 4-9-5
D Fentiman
5 (5) 43210 LORD MURPHY 20 (T,CD,BF) D M Loughnane 5-9-5
A Mullen
6 (4) 40050 LIGHT FROM MARS 8 (P,C,D) R Harris 13-9-3 D Probert
7 (8) 03136 MOSSY'S LODGE 15 (T,B,D) A Carson 5-8-13 W A Carson
D Brock
8 (10) 44041 TASAABOQ 7 (T,P,C) Phil McEntee 7-8-13
B McHugh
9 (2) 24423 SIR LANCELOTT 11 (CD) A Nicholls 6-8-12
10 (1) 13340 RISING SUNSHINE 9 (T,B,D) J M Bradley 5-8-9
Josephine Gordon
Aled Beech (7)
11(12) 30606 RAPID RISE 9 (B) J M Bradley 4-8-7
12 (9) 05546 GO CHARLIE 14 (H,C) Mrs L Williamson 7-8-7 C Hardie
9-2 Hipz, 5-1 Sir Lancelott, 11-2 Tasaaboq, 13-2 Lord Murphy, 8-1 others.
1
2
3
4
8.25
Handicap (£3,752: 7f 36y) (8)
W A Carson
1 (7) 54503 TIME TO REASON 27 (D) C Wallis 5-9-7
2 (2) 52321 THE AMBER FORT 18 (C) M Herrington 4-9-6
Phil Dennis (3)
3 (4) 24112 CRITICAL THINKING 18 (T,P,CD) D Loughnane 4-9-6
S Donohoe
D Probert
4 (6) 522- ALQALSAR 328 J M Bradley 4-9-6
J Fanning
5 (3) 0403- HIGHLY SPRUNG 193 L Eyre 5-9-4
L Morris
6 (1) 0-000 BOUCLIER 46 (D) J Unett 8-9-3
Fran Berry
7 (5) 02354 ENERGIA FLAVIO 18 (P,C) P Morris 8-9-3
C Hardie
8 (8) 1-400 GREY DESTINY 12 (CD) A Brittain 8-8-11
11-4 Critical Thinking, 3-1 The Amber Fort, 9-2 Highly Sprung, 10-1 others.
8.55
Handicap (3-Y-O: £3,105: 5f 21y) (11)
S W Kelly
1 (2) 6-042 ELLEN GATES 19 R Hughes 9-11
P Mulrennan
2 (10) 146-5 FUNKADELIC 14 (CD) B Haslam 9-10
3 (4) 22233 FURNI FACTORS 42 (B) R Thompson 9-7 Nicola Currie (5)
J Hart
4 (11) 60-61 REVENGE 9 (B,C) T Easterby 9-7
A Jones (3)
5 (3) 50-30 BILLY BOOTH 9 (V) Miss G Kelleway 9-6
D Probert
6 (7) 54-54 GLAMOROUS ROCKET 2 R Harris 9-5
P P Mathers
7 (5) 4400 ELLIOT THE DRAGON 9 D Shaw 9-4
K Lundie (5)
8 (6) 6000- GO SANDY 251 Mrs L Williamson 8-11
J Fanning
9 (9) 0-540 SITSI 35 B Smart 8-9
10 (1) 0-543 RAISE A LITTLE JOY 46 J Jenkins 8-8 Josephine Gordon
C Hardie
11 (8) 00-00 HAXBY JUNIORS 9 (B) A Brittain 8-8
5-2 Revenge, 100-30 Ellen Gates, 13-2 Furni Factors, 10-1 others.
Course specialists
Chester: Trainers A P O'Brien, 9 from 23 runners,
39.1%; W Haggas, 9 from 30, 30.0%; J Gosden, 7
from 28, 25.0%; C Appleby, 5 from 21, 23.8%; Sir M
Stoute, 10 from 42, 23.8%; A Balding, 33 from 140,
23.6%. Jockeys W Cox, 3 from 8 rides, 37.5%; L
Dettori, 4 from 12, 33.3%; R L Moore, 14 from 45,
31.1%; R Hornby, 6 from 28, 21.4%; G Lee, 8 from 40,
20.0%; R Kingscote, 35 from 177, 19.8%.
60
2G M
RM
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Sport
PHIL SHEPHARD-LEWIS FOR THE TIMES
Murray in race
to be ready for
Wimbledon
2003
If Murray does not play
during the grass-court
season, he will be unranked
on July 16 for the first
time since July 2003,
when he was 16
years old
continued from back
running both events is estimated to be
more than £300,000.
Ironically, Murray’s team overcame
hurdles to keep the prospect open of
playing on the hard courts of Loughborough. Under the rules of the Grand
Slam Board (GSB) and ATP, pulling his
name out of the French Open entry list
on medical grounds meant that he was
not permitted to play a Challenger
event in the week leading up to the
second major tournament of the year.
Only after officials from the GSB,
ATP and French Open came together
to discuss this unprecedented situation
was Murray allowed to withdraw, providing a medical certificate with the
advice of a doctor stating that it was not
rational to play best-of-five-set matches on clay courts this soon. It appears,
though, that the efforts of all are in vain.
Having not played since the Wimbledon quarter-finals almost ten months
ago, Murray has gradually slipped
down the world rankings. If he does not
play at all by the end of Wimbledon, he
will lose his ranking completely.
Kyle Edmund beat Daniil Medvedev,
the world No 51 from Russia, 6-4, 6-0 to
set up a second-round meeting with
Novak Djokovic at the Madrid Masters
today. Johanna Konta was knocked out
in the second round, losing 6-4, 6-3 to
Bernarda Pera. She also lost to the
world No 97 from the United States at
the Australian Open in January.
301
Days since Murray’s most
recent competitive match,
the Wimbledon quarterfinal defeat by Sam
Querrey on July 12
last year
Murray suffers
pain in his hip
at Wimbledon
in going out to
Sam Querrey
Jones may pick Cipriani
for trip to South Africa
continued from back
Aviva Premiership and secure the team
a semi-final berth.
Jones has always said that he places
limited stock on Premiership form and
confirmed yesterday that he had not
changed his selection philosophy,
despite acknowledging that he missed a
trick during England’s poor NatWest
Six Nations campaign by not bringing
new players into the squad. However,
the England coach has been in regular
contact with Cipriani. “He is someone I
have been chatting to consistently,”
Jones said. “He knows where he is, he
knows what he has to do.”
Cipriani’s most recent England
appearance, against France in a World
Cup warm-up game in 2015, was a
cameo at full back and his versatility
could work in his favour, given that
Anthony Watson is out injured.
Cipriani is leaving Wasps at the end of
the season and he has delayed making
a decision over his future until Jones
names the squad. The next 24 hours
will be make or break for his international prospects.
Selection would confirm that he has
a chance of being in England’s World
Cup squad and he would then be likely
to sign for a Premiership club. If he is
overlooked again, then Cipriani is
expected to move abroad and take up
an offer in Japan or France.
Jones has confirmed that he will take
an attack coach on the tour. He will turn
to someone he has worked with before,
which could point to it being Glenn
Ella, who would be joining the England
management for a third time after
being involved in the 2016 tour to
Australia and the series win in
Argentina last year.
Sam Vesty was also involved last
summer and he would be available
before taking up his new role with
Northampton Saints. A left-field
option would be Allister Coetzee,
the former South Africa head
coach, with whom Jones worked
k
as part of the 2007 Springbok
management team. “We are
looking to take another
coach on tour and I’ve got
the right person for this
tour,” Jones said.
Rory Teague was
h
the only attack coach
d
to have been appointed
s’s
permanently to Jones’s
staff but he quit after the 20177
b
Six Nations to take up a job
with Bordeaux-Bègles, where
he is now the head coach.
Jones has otherwise been
running the attack himself,
although he encourages Farrell and Ford to take a lead as
the key on-field playmakers.
However, he has not ruled outt
a full-time addition if he finds
the right man. “It has always
been the case that we are looking for the right coach,” he said.
Hartley will not feature in thee
squad named by Jones tomord
row because he has been ordered
Hartley’s future in rugby is
uncertain after his latest
concussion, says Jones
to take the summer off after being
concussed in England’s final Six
Nations game, against Ireland. The
England captain said in 2016, after
sustaining two concussions in the
season, that he may have to consider his
future if he suffered another.
Hartley maintains that he will be
ready to start pre-season training with
Northampton Saints and be fit for the
new season, when it would be six
months since he last played. In his
absence, Jamie George is expected
to tour as the first-choice hooker, with Luke Cowan-Dickie
given more of an opportunity off the bench after
spending two years on the
f
fringes
of the squad.
Jones does not doubt
H
Hartley’s
dedication to
r
return
to action but admitted:
“
“You
never know — nature
decides when the player can
come back. He just needs to
wait and see.
“If he’s right to play, he’ll
play. He’ll come back with
i
intent
and dedication, and
he’s got to fight to get his
place back in the England
side.
“If he doesn’t come
back, he’ll be remembered as the most
successful captain England has ever had. It’s
extraordinary what he
has done for this
country,
and
it’s
extraordinary
the
c
criticism
he attracts.”
Wales rest Lions for tour
Cory Hill and Ellis Jenkins will be
co-captains for Wales’s Test matches
against South Africa and Argentina
next month after Warren Gatland
decided to rest most of his British &
Irish Lions players. The regular captain
Alun Wyn Jones, the No 8 Taulupe
Faletau, flanker Justin Tipuric, fly half
Dan Biggar, wing Liam Williams and
full back Leigh Halfpenny have been
left at home.
Gatland, the Wales head coach, has
named one uncapped player, Tomos
Williams, 23, the Cardiff Blues scrum
half, in his 31-man squad. Luke Charteris, the Bath lock, has been recalled
while it is a chance for Jenkins, who is
considered by many as a regular Wales
captain of the future, to make his mark.
“We laid out a plan a long time ago
about what we wanted to do and rest
Lions players and a few others who
have injuries,” Gatland said. “We want
to build depth and were pleased with
how the players reacted when we made
a number of changes for the match with
Italy in the Six Nations this season.
“In the past, when we’ve made
significant changes, we have tended to
struggle and it has been tough for us.”
Backs: A Davies (Scarlets), G Davies (Scarlets),
T Williams (Cardiff Blues), G Anscombe (Cardiff Blues),
R Patchell (Scarlets), H Parkes (Scarlets), O Watkin
(Ospreys), S Williams (Scarlets), J Adams (Worcester),
H Amos (Dragons), S Evans (Scarlets), G North
(Northampton Saints), T Prydie (Scarlets).
Forwards: R Evans (Scarlets), W Jones (Scarlets),
N Smith (Ospreys), T Francis (Exeter), S Lee (Scarlets),
D Lewis (Cardiff Blues), E Dee (Dragons), R Elias
(Scarlets), A Beard (Ospreys), B Davies (Ospreys),
S Davies (Cardiff Blues), L Charteris (Bath), C Hill
(Dragons, co-captain), J Davies (Scarlets), E Jenkins
(Cardiff Blues, co-captain), R Moriarty (Gloucester),
J Navidi (Cardiff Blues), A Shingler (Scarlets).
Itinerary: June 2 v South Africa (Washington DC); June 9
v Argentina (San Juan); June 16 v Argentina (Santa Fe).
Lang gets Scotland call-up
The Scotland head coach Gregor
Townsend has named six uncapped
players and a number of top names are
missing from the squad to tour Canada,
the United States and Argentina (Alasdair Reid writes).
The newcomers include James Lang,
the 23-year-old Harlequins utility back
who has been largely under the radar
since he appeared for the Scotland
Under-18 team five years ago. The other
five are Matt Fagerson, George Horne
and Adam Hastings, all of Glasgow
Warriors, and Edinburgh’s Jamie Ritchie and Lewis Carmichael.
Lang is a rabbit from Townsend’s hat,
though. Born in Middlesex, he was
raised in north Wales and represented
Welsh students as well as the Scottish
age-grade side.
His mixed heritage was reflected in a
Wikipedia page that went through a
number of hurried changes after he was
named in the squad.
Finn Russell, Scotland’s hero against
England at Murrayfield this year, is
among those rested as Townsend
explores his options at fly half, where
Lang could feature.
Backs: N Grigg (Glasgow), C Harris (Newcastle Falcons),
A Hastings (Glasgow), S Hidalgo-Clyne (Edinburgh),
A Dunbar (Glasgow), S Hogg (Glasgow), G Horne
(Glasgow), P Horne (Glasgow), R Jackson (Glasgow),
L Jones (Glasgow), B Kinghorn (Edinburgh), J Lang
(Harlequins), B McGuigan (Sale Sharks), A Price
(Glasgow), D Taylor (Saracens).
Forwards: S Berghan (Edinburgh Rugby), J Bhatti
(Glasgow Warriors), M Bradbury (Edinburgh), F Brown
(Glasgow), L Carmichael (Edinburgh), A Dell
(Edinburgh), D Denton (Worcester Warriors),
M Fagerson (Glasgow), Z Fagerson (Glasgow),
G Gilchrist (Edinburgh), R Gray (Toulouse), L Hamilton
(Leicester Tigers), M McCallum (Edinburgh), S McInally
(Edinburgh), J Ritchie (Edinburgh), T Swinson
(Glasgow), G Turner (Glasgow), B Toolis (Edinburgh).
Itinerary: June 9 v Canada (Edmonton); June 16 v US
(Houston); June 23 v Argentina (Resistencia).
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
61
2G M
Sport
Matthew Syed
Maverick deserves shot at redemption
‘W
hen his behaviour was bad,
we told him that it was bad
and that it upset us. We used
to say, ‘Come on . . . get control
of yourself, pull yourself
together.’ ”
“I remember when he was little and lost a
match, and he would try to hide behind the
umpire’s chair and would not stop crying for
more than ten minutes.”
“The number of times we would go to
tournaments and he would throw in a
substandard performance where he’d mentally
break down or he’d get emotional and throw his
rackets — he was a baby.”
“I remember the first time I practised with
him . . . he was so lazy. Usually when you
practise on the tour as a young guy you are a
little bit stressed, you want to play good, you’re
very nervous. The guy came on the court like he
didn’t care at all. I was like, ‘Wow.’ ”
The first quote is from the mother of Roger
Federer, the second from Madeleine Barlocher,
one of his first coaches. The third and fourth are
from David Law, a tennis pundit who got to
know Federer well, and Marc Rosset, a former
Swiss international. Together, they paint a
picture of a curious truth: the greatest tennis
player to have picked up a racket, a man of
sublime poise and resolve, was once lazy and
brash and had a temperament that would fray
the moment the going got tough.
A couple of years ago, I spent an hour with
Cristiano Ronaldo. With excoriating self-insight,
the Real Madrid player described a notdissimilar journey. When he arrived at
Manchester United, he would coast through
training. He enjoyed the superficial stuff:
stepovers, tricks, body swerves. He was a player
of vast potential but was not terribly interested
in taking the journey into the dark and difficult
places within in order to realise it. In big
matches, too, he often flattered to deceive.
Today — well, Ronaldo is different. He
remains idiosyncratic and, even to many of his
close friends, an enigma, but team-mates talk of
a man with heart, focus and ambition; a player
who gives it his all in training, works on his
body and mind at home and whose desire to
become the greatest player he can be, perhaps
the greatest of all time, never wavers. “He is the
model professional,” one insider told me.
This brings me to Danny Cipriani, a rugby
player who continues to divide opinion. My
colleague Owen Slot picked him yesterday as
the outstanding fly half in the country. On
Saturday, he put in another man-of-the-match
performance for Wasps, this time against
Newcastle Falcons. Many have urged Eddie
Jones to pick him for England. Indeed, Sir Clive
Woodward said recently that it would be “an
utter disgrace, in fact a tragedy” if Cipriani did
not tour South Africa this summer.
But Cipriani’s critics suggest that, while he
might bring flair to the pitch, he would also
bring disruption off it. They point to his
youthful antics — when he was often on the
front pages for what we might call “non-rugby
reasons” — and infer that he must still be like
that today. They wonder if there is anything
suspicious in his departure from Wasps. More
generally, they suggest that a leopard cannot
change its spots.
Jones, who has the next 24 hours to make up
his mind, may wish to take a look at Ronaldo
and Federer, as well as the many others who
have enjoyed a transformation in attitude.
Cipriani may not be in their calibre as a
sportsman (who is?) but he is not the man at 30
that he was at 20. He pays for his own sprinting
coach and specialised physiotherapist. He puts
in extra training sessions away from his club. “I
will do anything to find an edge,” he says.
Besides, if Jones is anything like the coach he
believes himself to be, he must surely have faith
that he can bring the best out of a maverick
such as Cipriani. Sir Alex Ferguson, a manager
who had a deep interest in human nature,
signed Eric Cantona when few others were
interested and they forged a deep friendship.
Ferguson was also pivotal to Ronaldo’s
metamorphosis at United. “He unlocked
something inside me,” Ronaldo has said.
Isn’t this the essence of great coaching or
teaching? Isn’t it, in part, that trick of getting a
player, or student, to find new inspiration?
Mia Hamm, the former United States
footballer, was coasting as a footballer until a
pivotal meeting with her then coach. He stood
up dramatically, walked over to the light and
switched it off, then asked if she was finally
going to step up. It was her lightbulb moment.
Cipriani was six when his father left home. He
was brought up by a remarkable mother, Anne,
THE HOME OF LIVE FOOTBALL
EXCLUSIVE COMMENTARIES
Righting wrongs: Cipriani
has matured having
struggled to cope with the
limelight as a youngster
who
worked 18hour days
as a black
cab driver
to partfund his
school fees.
He suffered
from depression
and suicidal
thoughts in his
early twenties after
struggling with the limelight, a time
when paparazzi were camped
outside his home. “I was only 20
and I didn’t have the emotional
maturity to cope. Everything I said,
everything I did, seemed to be
misinterpreted,” he said. “For a
time, I just didn’t see the point of
tomorrow.”
This week I’m reading
Dare to Tri by Louise Minchin
A rousing tale of how the
BBC Breakfast presenter
transformed herself into
an international triathlete
PREMIER LEAGUE
PREMIER LEAGUE
CHELSEA
WEST HAM
V
1089/1053AM • DAB Radio • App • talkSPORT.com
He faced other challenges that, even today,
are not well understood in the game. Much
of his renewed drive and focus can be traced
to his relationship with Steve Black, a
mentor who also worked with Jonny
Wilkinson. “He has been a massive
influence,” Cipriani said. “We read books
together, discuss what it means to be a man.
Today, it has turned around. I couldn’t love life
more.”
I have spent time with Cipriani over
recent weeks. Our meeting was sparked by
a column where I criticised his attitude.
He got in touch to argue that my analysis
had been unduly influenced by his media
image. A few weeks and many
conversations later, I have found him
to be fascinating and industrious, an
athlete who is still seeking selfimprovement. “I think I can get
better,” he said recently. “There is
no reason to stop giving it
everything.”
Whether or not Jones regards
Ci
Cipriani’s
attitude as the finished article, or
work in progress, he must surely relish the
chance to work with such a talent. To see if he
can add more to his game, find new methods to
inspire, and discover creative ways to integrate
him into a set-up from which he has been
excluded for too long. Kevin Pietersen is often
held up as a disruptor who never changed.
Whether you agree or disagree, Cipriani is a
very different character.
His return to the England side would
articulate the power of redemption and offer the
game an intriguing new storyline. It would also
make Anne very happy. The biggest risk for
Jones would be to overlook him.
V
HUDDERSFIELD
D
MANCHESTER UT
TD
Exclusive coverage tonight
from 7pm on talkSPORT
Exclusive coverage tomorrow
from 7pm on talkSPORT
62
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RK
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Sport Cricket
How Ireland became a Test nation
GRAHAM CROUCH/GETTY IMAGES
John Westerby speaks
to the people who made
an unlikely dream
possible as they prepare
to take on Pakistan
Among the men’s fifth XI at Malahide
Cricket Club, there had been barely
disguised disgruntlement in the buildup to their first game of the season last
Saturday, at home to Terenure third XI.
With none of the club’s other teams
playing at home that weekend, they had
hoped to open their season on the lush
carpet of the club’s main ground, located in the lovely grounds of Malahide
Castle, on the coast north of Dublin.
In spite of their protests, they were
shunted aside on to the secondary pitch
because the main ground was being
preserved for other matches later in the
week. On this occasion, the fifth XI
would have to play second fiddle to the
small matter of Ireland’s inaugural Test
match against Pakistan.
Out in the middle, surrounded by
temporary stands and the portable
buildings that will become makeshift
changing rooms, media centres and
hospitality suites when the Test begins
on Friday, Phil Frost, the former Somerset groundsman, is working alone on
the playing surface. He is due to take his
lunch shortly, but dare not stray far
from the square. A wet spring, he estimates, has left the ground two months
behind schedule for this time of year, so
the covers are off to allow some muchneeded sunshine on to the Test pitch.
In the final days of preparation, Frost
will be assisted by volunteer groundsmen from the local Leinster League. At
the moment, though, he is a one-man
operation and, if there is a sudden
downpour while he is tucking into his
sandwiches, it will take time for him to
replace the covers and the pitch will
take another soaking. “It will play OK
for the Test match, but I’m not taking
any risks,” Frost says.
For such a long time, in so many different ways, cricket in Ireland has been
a small-scale operation, a backwater
flowing quietly through the country’s
sporting landscape. This week they will
become the 11th nation to play Test
cricket, the first to make the step up to
the game’s top table since Bangladesh
in 2000, and they hope that the occasion will prove a springboard for a leap
towards the mainstream of Irish sport.
A few miles down the coast from
Malahide, at Pembroke CC, slightly
southeast of Dublin, Leinster Lightning
are playing against North West Warriors. This is the opening game of the
Hanley Energy Inter-Provincial Series,
the country’s fledgling first-class tournament, and a handful of spectators are
present, all sheltering in the pavilion.
Boyd Rankin is loping in from one
end for North West, bowling to Andy
136
One-day internationals
played by Ireland,
dating back to 2006
when they faced
England in Belfast
Balbirnie, once of Middlesex, two of the
nine members of Ireland’s 14-man Test
squad involved in this game. Huddled by
the sightscreen, hood up and watching
intently, is Graham Ford, Ireland’s experienced South African coach. Owing
to the weather and the sparse number
of first-class fixtures, this will be the only
competitive game his players will
experience before they face Pakistan.
“We’ve got to be pretty realistic,”
Ford says. “The climate doesn’t help us,
we’ve a small cricketing population and
we’re still developing the infrastructure. But these players have worked
incredibly hard for this moment, to be
able to play Test cricket for Ireland, so
let’s hope it motivates them to do some
special things.”
Opening the batting for Leinster at
Pembroke was Ed Joyce, the former
Middlesex, Sussex and England batsman, who returned home to Dublin last
year, his career path following Ireland’s
rise from such humble beginnings.
When Joyce was coming through the
ranks, the only way to pursue a career in
cricket was to move to England, but
now he is among a group of players who
have returned from county cricket on
contracts with Cricket Ireland — also
including William Porterfield and
Kevin and Niall O’Brien — and will
make their Test debuts on Friday.
“I first played for Ireland in 1997
against Scotland and, apart from a few
matches against counties each year in
the Benson & Hedges Cup, most of our
games felt like exhibition matches,”
Kevin O’Brien’s
century in the
2011 World Cup
was a catalyst
for Ireland
When did the other Test nations win their first match?
Australia
First Test:
1877, Melbourne
Beat England by 45 runs
Lost by an innings and
58 runs to England
Time until first win
2 years, 6 Tests
England
First Test:
1877, Melbourne
Lost by 45 runs to
Australia
Time until first win
2 weeks, 2 Tests
New Zealand
First Test:
1930, Christchurch
Lost by 8 wickets to
England
Time until first win
26 years, 45 Tests
South Africa
First Test:
1889, Port Elizabeth
Lost by 8 wickets to
England
Time until first win
7 years, 12 Tests
India
First Test: 1932, Lord’s
Lost by 158 runs to
England
Time until first win
20 years, 25 Tests
West Indies
First Test: 1928, Lord’s
Pakistan
First Test: 1952, Delhi
Lost by an innings and
Joyce said. “If you wanted to be a professional cricketer, you couldn’t live in
Ireland, and the idea of playing Test
cricket for Ireland was pie in the sky, it
wouldn’t even have crossed anyone’s
mind. Now suddenly we can. It will be a
special occasion to be part of.”
The idea of attempting to secure Test
status began to germinate after Ireland’s famous victory over England at
the 2011 World Cup, inspired by Kevin
70 runs to India
Time until first win
1 week, 2 Tests
Sri Lanka
First Test:
1982, Colombo
Lost by 7 wickets to
England
Time until first win
3 years, 14 Tests
Zimbabwe
First Test: 1992, Harare
Drew with India
Time until first win
3 years, 11 Tests
Bangladesh
First Test: 2000, Dhaka
Lost by 9 wickets to
India
Time until first win
5 years, 35 Tests
O’Brien’s astonishing 50-ball century.
Two years later, the Inter-Provincial
Championship began — featuring
Leinster, North West and the Northern
Knights — and last year it was elevated
to a first-class competition, a vital
precursor to gaining Test status. There
are concerns that the present golden
generation of players, who secured
victories over Pakistan, England and
West Indies at successive World Cups,
may be followed by a weaker crop, and
the new first-class tournament must
nurture the next generation.
Leinster have won every title so far,
but greater efforts are being made now
to spread some centrally contracted
international players across the teams.
Niall O’Brien, for example, Leinster
born and bred, made 165 for North
West in their first innings at Pembroke.
A fourth team may soon be created in
Munster, initially to be strengthened by
players from Leinster and Ulster, where
the club game is strong and there is
greater depth of talent. “The game
we played at Pembroke was the best
Inter-Pro match I’ve been involved in,”
Joyce said. “It’s been a bit lopsided so
far, but if the talent is spread around the
standard will continue to rise.”
A significant challenge will come at
the end of the 2019 season, when Irish
players will become overseas players in
English cricket and will therefore be
less attractive to counties. Rankin, who
played one Test for England in 2014,
remains on the books at Warwickshire,
Paul Stirling and Tim Murtagh are at
Middlesex and Gary Wilson at Derbyshire. To the more gifted players
among a younger generation, Cricket
Ireland must provide compelling financial and cricketing reasons to remain at
home, rather than follow the paths of
Joyce, Rankin and Eoin Morgan in
plying their trade in England.
“I think we’ll be able to offer an
attractive package,” Warren Deutrom,
the chief executive of Cricket Ireland,
said. “At the moment, we’re paying a lot
of money to counties in compensation
for the use of their players, so we’ll be
making a big saving there if our players
are home-based. And we’re going to
have about 60 fixtures at home over the
next five years, due to our involvement
in the ICC One-Day League, which is a
lot of international cricket.”
There are also plans to move from the
present pop-up stadium at Malahide to
a permanent structure as part of the
National Sports Campus in Blanchardstown, west of Dublin. Highlights from
every day of the Test this week will be
shown on terrestrial television by RTE
and two Twenty20 internationals at
home against India next month have
added to their commercial clout.
“We’ve come a long way in a short time,
but Test cricket is only one step,” Deutrom said. “The bigger goal is to make
cricket mainstream, which is a challenge in a marketplace dominated by
Gaelic sports, rugby and football.”
Since returning home from Sussex
last year, Joyce has noticed the difference from when he left. “I don’t think
cricket has changed its place in the
sporting pecking order, but it’s definitely attracting more new people,” he said.
“When I was growing up, you only used
to play if the game was in your family,
now people are coming from outside.
“Now it doesn’t feel like cricket’s that
strange niche sport that just a few
people play.”
Root and Stokes will not be allowed to play in ‘The Hundred’
Elizabeth Ammon
The Professional Cricketers’ Association has warned the ECB that its
disgruntled players may shun the new
100-ball tournament because “there’s
no competition without players”.
Daryl Mitchell, the chairman of the
PCA, was among a delegation of 27
players who met ECB officials yesterday at Edgbaston. They voiced their
frustration at the lack of consultation
and the “enormous amount of unanswered questions” about the details of a
tournament that many county
cricketers feel is “gimmicky”.
The ECB outlined the rationale for
“The Hundred” at the meeting and also
revealed that England stars, such as Joe
Root and Ben Stokes, would not play in
the competition because it would clash
with the international calendar. “The
likes of Root and Stokes will be allocated to a team for marketing purposes but
they won’t play,” Mitchell said. “The
ECB made the point that this new
audience won’t necessarily know who
Stokes and Root are.”
The ECB did confirm, however, that
each of the eight new teams would be
given £1 million to spend on the salaries
for a 15-man squad with leading players
likely to earn between £130,000 and
£150,000 for six weeks’ work.
The lack of information about the
100-ball competition is already having
an impact in domestic cricket. The
counties and the players are reluctant
to offer or sign deals that take them past
2020 because of the lack of information
available about what cricket will played
and what compensation counties will
receive for the 96 players who would be
absent from county duty while playing
in the tournament.
“The ECB are very keen to stress that
it is still a concept,” Mitchell said. “but
one they are very keen on. What would
it take for the 100-ball format not to go
ahead? Judging by how popular it is
with other stakeholders, probably the
players saying they don’t want it. We
have the power to do that but whether
it does happen or not, I’m not sure.”
The players made it clear that they
were not in favour of playing County
Championship cricket alongside “The
Hundred” because it would devalue the
first-class game. “We’re keen that the
pinnacle of the domestic game is the
championship and the pinnacle of the
international game is Test cricket,”
Mitchell said. “The ECB also told us
their No 1 priority was Test cricket.”
Mark Wood will return home early
from the IPL after playing one match
and will appear for Durham in their
County Championship match against
Derbyshire that starts on Friday in a bid
to retain his Test place.
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
63
2G M
Football Sport
‘Maybe when I have retired from
football I will get more respect’
City have named their
training pitch after the
departing Yaya Touré
but he tells Paul Hirst
he will still feel empty
Yaya Touré will bid farewell to the
Etihad Stadium tonight but his legacy
at Manchester City will live on for ever.
When City’s academy youngsters
walk on to the pitch at the most northerly tip of the club’s training ground
from now on, they will be reminded of
Touré and his importance to the club.
After two years on the periphery of the
first team, many outside City have
forgotten the important role that Touré
played in the most successful period in
the
club’s
history.
Khaldoon
al-Mubarak, the chairman, has not.
Last night, City announced that, on
al-Mubarak’s instruction, the training
pitch has been named after Touré in
recognition of his eight years’ service to
City. Next to the pitch now stands a
tiled mural, created by Mark Kennedy,
a City fan and artist, of Touré celebrating his winning goal against
Stoke City in the 2011 FA Cup final
— the first trophy the club won
after the Abu Dhabi takeover of
2008.
“It’s nice to have something
you can look at and see how
effective you have been for the
club,” Touré, who joined from
Barcelona for £24 million in
2010, said. “Seeing a football
club do something like that
for one player is very
special, to keep you alive
and to say thank you.”
City will show more
gratitude towards the
three-times Premier
League
champion
tonight after his final
home game against
Brighton & Hove
Albion.
The 34-yearold is expected to
captain the team
and he will be
presented with a
gift after the finall
whistle.
Thee
midfielder will bee
invited to make a speech, although
those who know him best say that it will
be a short one. Touré is not one for the
limelight.
“I don’t think I will be sad. I will be
happy,” he said. “Why? Because I’m
going to say: ‘What these fans and what
this club wants from me, I have given to
them.’
“It’s like I’m empty. I’m free to go. I
will be released, to go and assess my
duty in a different club.”
Touré’s description of his final days as
a City player is apt. His final two years
at the club have not been on a par with
his opening six.
During the first three quarters of his
City career, Touré was the midfield
powerhouse that every other Premier
League club wanted in their team. He
scored the goal that put his team into
the 2011 FA Cup final at Manchester
United’s expense; he won the final the
following month; during City’s titlewinning season of 2013-14, he scored 20
goals in 35 matches. He was named in
Touré’s City highlights
Favourite game
Manchester City 1
Manchester United 0
(FA Cup semi-final, April 16, 2011)
“At half-time we were nearly fighting
in the dressing room. I said: ‘Go out
and play like men — or we go home
again and say to Khaldoon: ‘Thank
you, we’ve eaten the money but we
move on because this club will never
achieve’.”
Favourite team-mate
Sergio Agüero
“I love Agüero. Agüero is the best. My
man . . . With his big legs, his short
[height] like that. This guy is such
a good striker. He’s complete.”
Toughest opponent
Nemanja Matic
“Matic, I hate him, this bastard!
It’s been fun to play against him,
even though it’s difficult. He’s
powerful, he’s tall, he can run
as well, he can track, he can
fight, he’s a good, good
player.”
the team of the year when City won the
league in 2012.
There is still a sense of dissatisfaction
gnawing away at Touré that his
achievements are not given the
recognition that they deserve. “Maybe
when I am retired from football, I will
have more respect,” said Touré, who
has played 315 times for a club who have
won seven trophies since his arrival.
“I’ve not the respect I deserve now with
what I have achieved.”
That tonight will be his first league
start of the season tells you everything
you need to know about where Touré
sits in the pecking order at City. “I am
very sad about it. I wanted to be more
part of it on the field, not out of the
field,” he said.
Touré is still a hugely respected
member of the squad. That much was
evident when Vincent Kompany
instructed him to lift the Premier
League trophy with him on Sunday.
Touré’s role is now more paternal. In
a briefing with national newspaper
reporters, it was telling that Touré
referred to some of his team-mates like
they were his children. “I will miss my
little Sterling, I will miss my little
[Leroy] Sané,” he said, before explaining a sense of responsibility he has
towards the youngsters in the squad.
“When Kun [Agüero] was in great
form earlier this season and Gabriel
Jesus was not happy about not being
picked, I took him to one side and gave
him a pat on the back,” Touré said.
“The manager [Pep Guardiola]
doesn’t know I’m doing that.”
Touré feels that he has one more year
left in him. “I’d like to play in the
Champions League again,” he said. His
preference is to stay in England,
meaning he would have to come up
against his old team-mates.
“I’m a big fan of the Gladiator movie,
I’d have to win, but I would never
celebrate a goal against them,” he said.
Rather than dwell on his final two
years at City, Touré wants to remember
the good times, the most significant of
which was tilting the balance of power
in Manchester away from United,
which he has done if the gap between
first and second in the league is
anything to go by.
“When I came to City, for them to be
a big club, we had to put them in their
shadow,” he said.
“That was the purpose. To come to
City, to put United in the shadow.”
Guardiola revives Mahrez’s hopes of signing for City
exclusive
Gary Jacob
Manchester City have revived talks
about trying to sign Riyad Mahrez after
a proposed deal collapsed in January
amid anger and animosity.
City ended their move for the winger
when, having offered £65 million for
him, they revealed that Leicester City
wanted £95 million. Mahrez submitted
a written transfer request in a bid to
force through the deal and then did not
turn up for training for more than a
week when he was said to have felt
depressed that Leicester priced him out
of a move on deadline day.
He was fined two weeks’ wages and
returned as a second-half substitute in
a 5-1 defeat away to City.
Pep Guardiola is aiming to sign as
many as four players including a
holding midfielder, a wide player and
centre back this summer.
Mahrez is not the only winger under
consideration and City have been
linked with Thomas Lemar, of Monaco.
The champions failed to reach agreement with Shakhtar Donetsk for Fred,
the midfielder.
Since the confrontation with
Leicester, Mahrez has withdrawn his
transfer request but also wanted a
guarantee that he would be allowed to
leave this summer and that the club
would not stand in his way if City, or
anyone else, wanted to sign him. He was
angered because he felt that it was the
fourth transfer window in which he had
been denied a move.
He signed a contract until 2020 at the
start of last season, worth about
£120,000 a week.
Gomez is out
of World Cup
Paul Joyce
Joe Gomez will miss the Champions
League final and the World Cup after
ankle surgery. His absence could now
open the door for Trent AlexanderArnold, his Liverpool team-mate, to be
selected in England’s squad for Russia.
Gomez suffered a recurrence of the
ankle injury that he sustained playing
for England against Holland in March
when returning ahead of schedule to
face West Bromwich Albion and Stoke
City.
His sacrifice to Liverpool, and Jürgen
Klopp, their manager, when they were
gearing up for the Champions League
semi-final with Roma has now cost him
the opportunity to feature against Real
Madrid in the final a fortnight on
Saturday and will preclude him from
going to the World Cup. He has had an
operation, although the timescale of his
recovery is not known.
“Gutted to confirm my season for
both club and country is over having
undergone successful ankle surgery,”
Gomez wrote in an Instagram post.
“Been a tough few weeks trying
everything possible to be available on
the pitch to help the team. I’m going to
do all I can to get back and be in the best
possible shape for pre-season.”
Gareth Southgate, the England
manager must now decide whether
Alexander-Arnold comes into his
plans after the 19-year-old’s impressive
form or whether, because he wants to
play a three-man defence, he has
enough right-back options with Kieran
Trippier and Kyle Walker.
Clubs demand
Wembley cash
Martyn Ziegler Chief Sports Reporter
The 72 clubs in the English Football
League will demand a share of the
money from the sale of Wembley
Stadium as their price for agreeing to
the deal going ahead.
Shaun Harvey, the EFL chief executive, believes that the professional
game is entitled to 50 per cent of the
proceeds from the sale. He wants
guarantees that clubs will be given
money for their own projects.
The stance is another hurdle that the
FA will have to clear if it is to cash in on
an offer worth about £900 million from
Shahid Khan, the owner of Fulham.
The governing body also needs to win
over delegates from the amateur game,
who are meeting at Wembley today to
hear details of the plan.
If the deal goes through it could leave
about £600 million once bank debt and
other repayments are covered. The FA
says that this will fund a huge programme to build artificial pitches and
grassroots facilities.
Harvey told The Times: “The creation of a fund to develop facilities for the
expansion of [clubs’ own community
schemes] along with training of young
players within each club’s academy
would be an ideal use of any funds, as
would seeing the money used to
improve stadium facilities for fans.”
Results
Football fixtures
Football
Premier League
Swansea
(0) 0
Southampton (0) 1
Gabbiadini 72
6 Table on page 66
Ladbrokes Scottish Premiership
Aberdeen 1 Rangers 1; Hamilton Academical 1
St Johnstone 2; Partick Thistle 0 Motherwell 1;
Ross County 0 Dundee 1.
P W
Celtic......................36 24
D
9
L F A GD Pts
3 73 24 49 81
Aberdeen................37
Rangers..................37
Hibernian ............... 36
Kilmarnock.............36
Hearts....................36
Motherwell ............ 37
St Johnstone..........37
Dundee...................37
Hamilton................37
Partick Thistle.......37
Ross County...........37
21
21
18
15
11
12
12
11
9
7
6
7
6
12
10
13
9
9
6
6
9
10
9
10
6
11
12
16
16
20
22
21
21
55
71
56
48
37
40
41
36
47
30
39
37
45
39
47
37
49
52
56
65
62
63
18
26
17
1
0
-9
-11
-20
-18
-32
-24
70
69
66
55
46
45
45
39
33
30
28
FA Women’s Super League: One: Liverpool 1
Man City 0. Two: Durham 3 Aston Villa 0.
European Under-17 Championship: Group C:
Ireland 1 Denmark 0; Bosnia-Herzegovina 0
Belgium 4. Group D: Serbia 0 Germany 3;
Holland 2 Spain 0.
Tennis
Cycling
Mutua Madrid Open: Men: First round: K
Edmund (GB) bt D Medvedev (Russ) 6-4, 6-0;
F Lopez (Sp) bt P Andujar (Sp) 7-6 (7-4), 6-3;
G Monfils (Fr) bt N Basilashvili (Geo) 6-2, 3-6,
6-3; R Haase (Neth) bt Hyeon Chung (S Kor) 6-2,
6-0; L Mayer (Arg) bt F Fognini (It) 6-3, 6-4;
R Bautista Agut (Sp) bt J Donaldson (US) 6-7
(3-7), 6-4, 6-4; J-L Struff (Ger) bt M Copil (Rom)
6-4, 6-4; B Coric (Cro) bt P Carreno-Busta (Sp)
6-4, 6-2; P Cuevas (Uru) bt J Sock (US) 6-7 (5-7),
6-4, 6-0; F Verdasco (Sp) bt P Lorenzi (It) 7-5,
6-4; A Ramos-Vinolas (Sp) bt P Gojowczyk
Giro d’Italia: Stage four (Catania to Caltagirone,
202km): 1, T Wellens (Bel, Lotto Fix All) 5hr
17min 34sec; 2, M Woods (Can, EFD); 3, E
Battaglin (It, LottoNL-Jumbo); 4, S Yates (GB,
Mitchelton-Scott) all at same time. Selected:
30, C Froome (GB, Team Sky) at 21sec behind.
Leading general classification: 1, R Dennis
(Aus, BMC) 14hr 23min 08sec; 2, T Dumoulin
(Neth, Team Sunweb) at 1sec behind; 3, Yates
at 17sec. Selected: 20, Froome at 55sec.
(Ger) 5-7, 6-2, 7-5. Second round: D Shapovalov
(Can) bt B Paire (Fr) 7-6 (7-5), 4-6, 6-4; D Lajovic
(Serbia) bt R Gasquet (Fr) 7-6 (7-1), 7-6 (7-1);
J M Del Potro (Arg) bt D Dzumhur (Bos-Herz)
6-3, 6-3; M Raonic (Can) bt G Dimitrov (Bul) 7-5,
3-6, 6-3. Women: Second round: B Pera (US) bt
J Konta (GB) 6-4, 6-3; Ka Pliskova (Cz) bt
V Azarenka (Bela) 6-2, 1-6; P Kvitova (Cz) bt
M Puig (P Rico) 6-3, 7-6 (10-8); Kr Pliskova (Cz)
bt S Sorribes Tormo (Sp) 7-5, 6-2; S Halep
(Rom) bt E Mertens (Bel) 6-0, 6-3; D Kasatkina
(Russ) bt S Cirstea (Rom) 6-3, 6-1; C Suarez
Navarro (Sp) bt E Svitolina (Ukr) 2-6, 7-6 (7-3),
6-4; A Kontaveit (Est) bt A Sasnovich (Bela)
6-2, 4-6, 6-2.
Kick-off 7.45 unless stated
Premier League: Chelsea v Huddersfield;
Leicester v Arsenal; Man City v Brighton (8.0);
Tottenham v Newcastle (8.0).
Ladbrokes Scottish Premiership: Celtic v
Kilmarnock; Hearts v Hibernian. Championship:
Play-off final, first leg: Alloa v Dumbarton.
League One: Play-off final, first leg:
Stenhousemuir v Peterhead.
FA Women’s Super League: One: Chelsea v
Birmingham (7.0); Everton v Yeovil (7.0). Two:
Sheffield v Doncaster (7.30); Watford v
Brighton.
64
2G M
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Sport Football
TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER BRADLEY ORMESHER
Allardyce’s job is under
threat from Porto coach
exclusive
Matt Hughes, Gary Jacob
Everton have identified the Porto
coach Sérgio Conceição as a candidate
to replace Sam Allardyce should he
leave Goodison Park this summer. The
former England manager is under
pressure because of discontent among
fans, who have booed him at away
matches throughout the season and
called for his dismissal during the final
home game against Southampton last
weekend. The club’s board have yet to
offer him any public backing.
Allardyce has 12 months left on the
contract he signed in November and
would be due his final year’s salary in
full if he were to be dismissed. Everton
had initially sought to appoint him on a
contract until the end of the season
after sacking Ronald Koeman and
failing to secure the appointment of
Marco Silva but, with the club in a
difficult position and battling against
relegation, the 63-year-old successfully
held out for a longer deal.
Allardyce has succeeded in guiding
Everton away from relegation trouble
and they will finish eighth in the table,
but his style of football does not appeal
to supporters, who have also taken
issue with his public statements.
Since Silva’s star has faded after his
sacking by Watford in January, Everton
have been considering other options
and Conceição is viewed as a leading
contender. The former Portugal winger
has enjoyed an outstanding first season
with Porto after joining them from
Nantes last summer, leading them to
their first league championship for four
years. His side are on course to break
a club points record held by José
Mourinho and a goals record held by
Sir Bobby Robson with the final round
of fixtures this weekend.
Conceição has managed six clubs in
the past six seasons since spending two
years as an assistant coach at Standard
Liège and is likely to welcome Everton’s
interest. The club would comfortably
Rooney linked to MLS
Wayne Rooney could move to the
American side DC United if he
decides to leave Everton at the end
of the season. The 32-year-old
striker has a year remaining on his
contract with Everton, but
reportedly is frustrated with his role
at his boyhood club under the
manager Sam Allardyce. Rooney
has held talks with the Major
League Soccer side, according to
the Washington Post. DC United
would have to pay a transfer fee or
have the former England captain
negotiate a free move.
be able to double his £1.7 million salary
and pay the release clause on the year
that remains on his contract.
The 43-year-old’s success at Porto is
all the more notable as he has had little
money to spend because of financial
restrictions imposed after the club were
found to have breached Uefa’s financial
fair play regulations before his appointment last summer. Porto were only permitted to register 22 players in their
Champions League squad but still qualified for the knockout stages, where
they lost 5-0 to Liverpool in the last 16.
Farhad Moshiri, Everton’s majority
shareholder, has been eager to appoint
a continental coach committed to
attacking football and wants to speak to
Conceição to see if he fits the bill.
Another manager in demand is
Arsène Wenger, 68, who has said that
clubs should not be put off employing
him because of his age. Wenger, who
leaves Arsenal at the end of the season,
said that he had had more offers than
expected and did not want to retire
from football.
“I will work as long as I want to, but
people look at your age and make an
issue of it,” he said. “It becomes a bit of
discrimination.”
Laurent Koscielny, who ruptured an
achilles tendon in last week’s Europa
League semi-final second leg with Atletico Madrid, has been told that he will
be out for about six months.
Managers
walk out on
Class of ’92
T
he jointmanagers of
Salford City, the
club owned by the
Manchester United
Class of ’92, have left
the club because of
“irreconcilable
differences around
personal terms”.
Anthony Johnson,
above with the coowner Gary Neville,
and Bernard Morley
took Salford into the
National League this
season with their
third promotion in
four years. The other
owners are Nicky
Butt, Phil Neville,
Ryan Giggs, Paul
Scholes and Peter
Lim, a businessman.
Gary Neville said:
“The last four seasons
have been the most
successful in the
club’s history and a
huge part of that is
down to Anthony and
Bernard, so this
announcement is
regrettable. However,
after a meeting this
morning between
myself, senior
management and the
managers it was clear
there were differences
between us that could
not be resolved and it
was therefore decided
to part ways.”
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
65
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Sport
Pochettino: we must die for two wins
MICHAEL REGAN/GETTY IMAGES
Gary Jacob
Dele Alli scores
against Chelsea
on April 1 but
Spurs have lost
their way since
Three weeks ago the race for the
Champions League looked done and
dusted. Only the order of the final placings was in doubt.
Tottenham Hotspur and Liverpool
were level on points and challenging for
second place, but any more slip-ups
from those sides over the next five days
will give Chelsea the chance to sneak in
above them. While this may appear a
relatively trivial battle to many outsiders, the outcome has sizeable consequences for all three clubs.
Qualifying for the Champions
League brings significant sums of
money, bigger budgets, kudos and the
prospect of attracting top players. In
Tottenham’s case, they may also be able
to stave off pressure from those wanting to leave after enjoying a taste of the
competition this season. For Chelsea,
How Spurs have struggled
since they won at the Bridge
When Tottenham claimed a 3-1
victory at Stamford Bridge in April,
they moved eight points clear of
their London rivals. But their recent
form (below) has been only the
ninth-best in the Premier League.
Chelsea
Crystal Palace
West Brom
Man City
Arsenal
Everton
Man Utd
Burnley
Tottenham
Liverpool
P
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
5
5
W
4
3
3
3
3
2
3
2
2
1
2
1.2
0.8
1.2
Shots
Lloris
Sánchez
Wanyama
17
Vertonghen
Eriksen
Lamela
5.9
Davies
11.7%
Alli
4.2
Shot conversion rate
8.6%
Shots faced
8.6
Joselu
11.4
On target faced
Pérez
Hayden
14
Shots on target
Kane
3
Ritchie
Merino
competing in Europe’s elite competition may mean that they attract a
better manager to succeed Antonio
Conte should he depart, as expected.
Their equation for qualification is
simple: beat Huddersfield Town
tonight and Newcastle United on
Sunday and pray that Liverpool or
Tottenham drop points, which is
entirely possible.
Tottenham have dropped eight
points from a possible 12 and the club’s
glass is half-full or half-empty depending on your viewpoint. They would fin-
ish in third place by beating Newcastle
United tonight and Leicester City, also
at Wembley, on Sunday, or fifth if things
go horribly wrong.
When Mauricio Pochettino’s side
won 3-1 at Stamford Bridge last month,
it seemed they had killed off Chelsea’s
Champions League hopes. But Pochettino will have sore memories of a 5-1
defeat on the last day by an already relegated Newcastle two seasons ago that
allowed Arsenal to leapfrog their north
London rivals into second place.
“The difference is massive and the
second thing is money, but the first is
that to win the Champions League is a
dream for me,” the Argentinian said.
“It’s impossible to not give your best in
the last two games to win.
“We need to die to try to achieve that.
If we cannot, we cannot, and we need to
analyse why. But now we have to fight
with Liverpool and Chelsea. That was
our dream — to have the possibility of
fighting with this kind of club. It is
fantastic.”
The Tottenham manager has tried to
play down the importance of qualifying
by contending that he is ahead of
schedule and the potential money is
not factored into the budget, but rather
a nice bonus on top.
Yet he has also admitted that missing
out would be harder to take having
done the running all season and got so
close. Pochettino is also sensitive to
accusations that his team run out of
steam after tailing off in his first two
campaigns in charge.
Chelsea were crowned champions a
year ago, spent a net £75 million in the
summer and have different expecta-
Albrighton’s season over
Grayson leaves Bradford
Marc Albrighton will miss the rest of
the season after being banned for two
matches as a result of his red card
against Crystal Palace. The Leicester
City winger was dismissed during the
5-0 defeat at Selhurst Park last month
and reacted angrily towards Mike
Dean, the referee. The FA said that
Albrighton, 28, accepted a misconduct
charge that “relates to his behaviour
towards the referee” after the straight
red card. He was also fined £25,000.
Simon Grayson has left Bradford City
after deciding not to extend his
short-term deal at the Sky Bet League
One club. The former Leeds United,
and Sunderland manager joined in
February after the dismissal of Stuart
McCall. Grayson oversaw three wins
in 14 matches and Bradford failed to
make the play-offs. “I have decided to
turn down the option to extend my
contract,” he said. “This was an
extremely difficult decision.”
How they line up for tonight’s matches
Dummett Lascelles
A GD Pts
4 4
13
5 7
11
3 3
11
5 9 10
7 7
9
2 3
9
5 2
9
10 -4
8
6 0
7
3 2
6
Goals conceded
Tottenham (3-4-2-1)
Kenedy
F
8
12
6
14
14
5
7
6
6
5
Up to and Since
including Chelsea Chelsea
Goals per game
Wembley Stadium kick-off 8pm
Goal updates on The Times phone app
Referee N Swarbrick
Trippier
L
0
0
0
1
2
0
2
2
2
1
How Spurs have slipped
Tottenham v Newcastle
Alderweireld
D
1
2
2
1
0
3
0
2
1
3
Lejeune
Yedlin
Dubravka
Newcastle (4-2-3-1)
Play-offs to use Hawk-Eye
Oldham chairman departs
Goalline technology will be used in
the English Football League play-offs
this month. Hawk-Eye technology
will be used in the Championship,
League One and League Two
matches, having been deployed in the
regular Championship campaign.
Shaun Harvey, the EFL chief
executive, said: “We are extremely
aware of the difficult decisions facing
match officials on any given match
day.”
Oldham Athletic have announced
that Simon Corney is “no longer
chairman of the club”. The news
comes three days after Oldham were
relegated to League Two. They will
play in the bottom tier of the Football
League for the first time since 1971. In
January, Corney sold the club he
bought in 2004 to Abdallah
Lemsagam, a Moroccan businessman,
but stayed in his post to aid with the
transition.
tions. There was talk that Conte might
even be pushed before the end of the
campaign when home supporters
showed their unhappiness with him
after a 1-1 draw with West Ham United
that left them ten points behind Tottenham in the fourth and final qualification spot.
A week later they were abject and
trailed Southampton 2-0 after 70 minutes. Even a miraculous turnaround,
with three goals inside eight minutes,
seemed just a footnote to the season.
But the 1-0 victory over Liverpool on
Sunday means that Conte’s side can
draw level on points with Jürgen
Klopp’s team tonight.
Liverpool have dropped seven points
from a possible nine and finish against
a Brighton & Hove Albion side with
their tails up after beating Manchester
4.2
United last Friday. Should they slip up,
Chelsea could go above them and
Liverpool could have to beat Real
Madrid in the Champions League final
to be granted a place as holders in the
competition next season.
“We are doing our job in the best way
to put a bit of pressure on Liverpool and
Tottenham but the situation is not in
our hands,” Conte said. “We dropped
many points in a stupid way. We must
be disappointed but now there is not
time to regret.”
The Italian was coy about his future
at Stamford Bridge yesterday, saying:
“There are only two weeks and this
season will finish and you will know if
there is a different situation or if you see
me again next season and we start
again from the first game with speculation about my future.”
Chelsea v Huddersfield Town
Leicester City v Arsenal
Manchester City v Brighton
Kick-off 7.45pm Television Live,
Sky Sports PL Radio talkSPORT. Goal
updates on Times app Referee L Mason
Kick-off 7.45pm
Goal updates on Times app
Referee G Scott
Kick-off 8pm
Goal updates on Times app
Referee P Tierney
Chelsea (3-4-3)
Leicester (4-2-3-1)
Man City (4-3-3)
Courtois
Azpilicueta
Zappacosta
Hamer
Cahill
Kanté
Rüdiger
Bakayoko
Maguire
Choudhury
Iborra
Benalouane
Alonso
Mahrez
Willian
Giroud
Mounié
Mooy
Malone
Kongolo
Hadergjonaj
Smith
Schindler Jorgensen
Lossl
Huddersfield (5-3-2)
Fuchs
Walker
Otamendi
B Silva
Vardy
Jesus
Aubameyang
Welbeck
Monreal
Mkhitaryan
Laporte
De Bruyne Fernandinho
Gray
Silva
Hazard
Ince
Hogg
Ederson
Morgan
Mendy
Touré
Sané
Murray
Iwobi
Xhaka
Maitland-Niles
Mavropanos
Mustafi
Gross
Izquierdo Stephens
Bellerín
Cech
Bong
Pröpper
Knockaert
Duffy
Bruno
Dunk
Ryan
Arsenal (4-2-3-1)
Brighton (4-4-1-1)
66
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Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
Sport Football
Saints alive: late
Gabbiadini strike
is key to survival
Oliver Kay
How they stand
Chief Football
Correspondent
Swansea City
Southampton
Gabbiadini 72
Premier League
0
2
1
It was time, as Carlos Carvalhal would
say, to put all the meat on the barbecue.
Except that on this occasion it was his
rival manager, Mark Hughes, who was
piling it on. As the tension and anxiety
grew inside the Liberty Stadium, the
Southampton manager sent on a
second striker, Shane Long, and then a
third, Manolo Gabbiadini, in the space
of three minutes. Desperate times call
for desperate measures.
Southampton needed a hero and, in
Gabbiadini, they found one. The
substitute struck within five minutes of
his arrival, his goal confirming West
Bromwich Albion’s relegation and
pushing Swansea City closer to the
brink.
As for Southampton, they are not yet
guaranteed to stay up, but this victory
at Swansea’s expense, allied to their
goal difference, left them feeling that it
was mission accomplished. The celebrations with their supporters at the
final whistle were followed by raucous
singing and dancing in the dressing
room, even if Hughes called it “pure
emotion” rather than certainty that
they were safe.
Hughes deserves praise for the turnaround. Southampton may have the
strongest squad of those teams who
have been toiling in the lower reaches
of the Premier League, but their predicament was serious when he took over in
mid-March and even worse after they
lost his first three games in charge.
They were five points adrift of safety
after losing 3-2 at home to Chelsea on
April 14, but since then they have
played four Premier League matches,
winning two and drawing two, redis-
P
Man City (C) ........ 36
Man United.........36
Liverpool..............37
Tottenham...........36
Chelsea.................36
Arsenal.................36
Burnley.................37
Everton.................37
Leicester..............36
Newcastle............36
Crystal Palace....37
Bournemouth.....37
Watford.................37
Brighton...............36
West Ham............36
Southampton.....37
Huddersfield......36
Swansea...............37
West Brom (R)....37
Stoke (R)...............37
W
30
24
20
21
21
18
14
13
11
11
10
10
11
9
9
7
9
8
6
6
D
4
5
12
8
6
6
12
10
11
8
11
11
8
13
11
15
9
9
13
12
L F
2102
7 67
5 80
7 68
9 61
12 72
11 35
14 43
14 49
17 36
16 43
16 43
18 44
14 33
16 45
15 37
18 27
20 27
18 31
19 33
A
26
28
38
32
34
48
37
55
54
46
55
60
63
47
67
55
56
54
54
67
GD Pts
76 94
39 77
42 72
36 71
27 69
24 60
-2 54
-12 49
-5 44
-10 41
-12 41
-17 41
-19 41
-14 40
-22 38
-18 36
-29 36
-27 33
-23 31
-34 30
Relegation permutations
6 Swansea will go down unless they
win at home to Stoke
6 Huddersfield will go down if
Swansea win and they fail to get a
point or more from either of their
games against Chelsea or Arsenal
6 Southampton will go down if
Swansea win, Huddersfield get a
point or more and there is a ten-goal
swing in their goal difference with
Swansea)
Remaining fixtures
Today Chelsea v Huddersfield (7.45);
Leicester City v Arsenal (7.45);
Manchester City v Brighton (8.0);
Tottenham v Newcastle (8.0).
Tomorrow West Ham United v
Manchester United (7.45).
Sunday (all 3pm): Burnley v
Bournemouth; Crystal Palace v West
Bromwich Albion; Huddersfield
Town v Arsenal; Liverpool v
Brighton; Manchester United v
Watford; Newcastle United v
Chelsea; Southampton v
Manchester City; Swansea City v
Stoke City; Tottenham v Leicester;
West Ham United v Everton.
covering a doggedness and a fighting
spirit that has helped their talent to
shine through at last.
Gabbiadini was one of those who fell
from favour under Mauricio Pellegrino,
Hughes’s unlamented predecessor, but
opportunity knocked for him when he
was sent on midway into the second half
after an injury to Jan Bednarek. It was a
risky substitution, a change of system as
Hughes quickly switched from 3-4-2-1
to 3-5-2 to something closer to 4-2-4,
but it paid off, Gabbiadini pouncing on
a loose ball to score the decisive goal
with 18 minutes remaining.
“There was no leeway tonight,”
Hughes said. “We had to win the game
to give ourselves any prospect of staying in the Premier League. The celebrations shouldn’t be misinterpreted. They
were just emotion; it wasn’t the case
that we were celebrating staying up. But
it’s a win that’s significant. There were
so many things riding on it.”
For Southampton, this was not just a
much-needed win. It had been the classic six-pointer, a game on which so
much would hinge for both teams at the
bottom of the table. Swansea seemed to
have pulled themselves out of the mire
when Carvalhal led them to five wins in
his first nine Premier League games in
charge, but their momentum has
stopped just as others, such as Southampton, have found theirs. A miserable
tally of two goals in their past eight
matches tells its own story. Carvalhal
insisted afterwards that they had
created enough chances to win the
game. It simply was not the case.
From the start, the tension inside the
Liberty Stadium was palpable. It was
one of those nights when any flicker of
attacking intent from the home team
brings a surge of excitement and any
hint of a mistake provokes anxious
yells. There are occasions when such a
pressurised atmosphere breeds fear on
both sides, but that did not seem to be
the case in the early stages. It was only
as the game wore on that Swansea, in
particular, showed signs of feeling the
pressure.
Swansea threatened with some
Gabbiadini’s close-range effort finds its way beyond Fabianski at the Liberty
astute deliveries into the penalty area,
but Alex McCarthy and the Southampton defence dealt well with them. The
closest Swansea came in the first half
was when Sam Clucas sent a header just
wide and when Andre Ayew wriggled
into the penalty area, only to be frustrated by Bednarek’s excellent sliding
challenge.
Hughes was in a familiar state of
agitation throughout the first half, but
he took encouragement from Southampton’s counterthrusts. Charlie Austin was finding space. On one occasion
he was thwarted by an excellent tackle
from Federico Fernández. On another,
he seized on a moment’s hesitation by
Ki Sung-Yueng but failed to find the
target with his shot. Then came a perceptive pass from Pierre-Emile
Hojbjerg and this time Austin’s aim was
better, but Lukasz Fabianski dived to his
right to make the save.
Austin’s threat was growing. Two
minutes before half-time Dusan Tadic
combined on the right-hand side with
Cedric Soares, whose cross was flicked
on by Oriol Romeu. This time Austin
struck a volley, but again Fabianski was
equal to it. Jordan Ayew forced an
excellent save from McCarthy early in
the second half, but Southampton
Lack of passion and desire sent West Brom down
John Wile
Played 619 games
for West Brom
I
t’s a sad day because the hard
work of a lot of people went into
pushing West Brom forward into
the Premier League. To see them
slip back, with all the perils in the
Championship, is very disappointing.
The club had established
themselves — they had got into a
position where they looked secure in
the Premier League, even if they were
not doing fantastically. But it has all
slipped away very quickly. There
wasn’t enough reaction to stop us
getting to the position where we are
now. The gulf between the Premier
League and the Championship is
massive now compared with what it
was years ago. If you don’t make it
back at the first attempt, it becomes
increasingly hard. This is a big blow
to the club.
There was a time this year, and
perhaps last year, when the
supporters lost faith. The team didn’t
produce enough enthusiasm and
endeavour to get the supporters on
their side, and we’ve seen in the past
five matches — and particularly on
Saturday — just how important a role
the supporters play in the destiny of a
club. But the initial impact has to
come from the players — they have
to get the crowd going. In my
experience, the crowd respond to
what they see on the pitch.
In my playing days, if it was a bit
quiet, one or two of the players would
say, “Somebody needs to put a tackle
in, just to get the temperature up.” On
Saturday, the crowd almost pushed
the players over the line, but we’d lost
that for most of the season.
Darren Moore has done brilliantly,
and instilled in the players the
passion that you need to win football
games. Even if you haven’t got the
best individuals, you can achieve so
much with a group of players who are
really giving it their all. You’ve only
got to look at Leicester or Burnley for
examples of what you can achieve
with a squad who really get on well.
Some of that commitment has been
sorely missing. We wouldn’t be in this
position if even nine players had
given it everything each week. There
have been far too many games where
it hasn’t been good enough, and it’s a
great shame that it’s taken so long to
turn that around. I played in teams
that got relegated from the old First
Division, and we would have heated
discussions if we thought team-mates
weren’t pulling their weight. A lot of
players don’t realise the danger of
relegation until it’s too late, I’ve seen
it myself in the dressing room.
I don’t think there’s an outstanding
managerial candidate. All you can do
is make all the possible inquiries, and
try to appoint someone who fits the
club’s ethos. But Darren Moore must
have put himself forward a few places
with what he’s accomplished over the
past few weeks. The matches since he
took over have shown how important
it is to bring the supporters with you.
If nothing else, I hope that the club
build on that cohesion.
Darren Moore, West Brom’s caretaker
the times | Wednesday May 9 2018
67
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Sport
NICK POTTS/PA
McCarthy’s three identical
saves earn five vital points
Hughes points finger
after switching hotels
“We were made aware late last week
of a small number of associates and
Mark Hughes was involved in a war of guests becoming ill,” the spokesperson
words with a Swansea hotel after said. “As per our normal procedures,
Southampton’s dramatic victory at the we notified large group bookings in
Liberty Stadium. The Marriott hotel order for them to find alternative
dismissed the Southampton manager’s accommodations, should they choose
bizarre claim that “over-zealous
to do so. The Environmental Health
Swansea City supporters” had
Organisation were also notified
been behind the cancellation
at this time.
of his squad’s reservation
“However, the cause of
in the build-up to last
the illness remains unconOf
Southampton’s
past
night’s crucial Premier
firmed. There have been
11 away Premier League no further reports of illLeague game.
victories
have
been
It emerged yesterday
ness this week and the
that Southampton had against sides starting hotel therefore remains
the day in the
been forced to switch their
operational.”
base in south Wales from the relegation zone
Hughes was also aggrieved
Marriott hotel, less than three
that his Southampton squad were
miles from the Liberty Stadium, to the held up in their bus outside the stadium
Vale of Glamorgan Hotel, 33 miles before last night’s game, being told
away and much closer to Cardiff than that they would have to wait until their
Swansea, after being informed of con- opponents were inside the ground.
cerns over the possible threat of a virus. After being told to wait, Hughes and his
Hughes and some of his staff were players opted to get off the bus and
suspicious of a possible dirty-tricks finish the journey on foot.
campaign, with the Southampton
“We had already been on the bus for
manager speculating that “it may be an hour by then,” Hughes, whose side
over-zealous Swansea City supporters all but secured their Premier League
in a position to affect our hotel book- status with victory last night, said.
ing”. A spokesperson for the hotel ”Those sort of things, you can use as a
made clear that the cancellation was in motivating factor. We weren’t to be
line with protocol.
denied and messed about tonight.”
Oliver Kay
2-1 win v Bournemouth April 28
McCarthy uses his top hand stop Ryan Fraser’s last-minute
strike and ensure Southampton pick up a crucial victory
1-1 draw v Everton May 5
McCarthy again goes with his right hand to stop a Leighton
Baines free kick, tipping the ball, circled, over the bar
7
Carvalhal: we need miracle
miracle to happen. I don’t want to see
that game [Chelsea v Huddersfield]. We
Carlos Carvalhal has conceded that will look at the score at the end. My
his Swansea City team now require a feeling is one of frustration.
miracle to survive.
“It’s very difficult to talk about this
The Portuguese, who talked about game because my players did the
achieving the miraculous when he maximum. We created chances and
arrived in south Wales in December, they made some fantastic saves. My
now needs some assistance from
team ran and fought and played with
Chelsea or Arsenal to keep his
commitment and heart. We put
club in the Premier League.
more players in attack, but we
Huddersfield
Town
didn’t achieve the goal.”
would be safe if they take a
When Carvalhal took
point off either London Swansea have failed to over, Swansea were five
club in their final two score in eight different points adrift of safety but
fixtures, which would Premier League home hard-fought victories over
leave Swansea requiring a
Arsenal and Liverpool liftgames this season,
big win at home to Stoke
ed them to 13th in March.
more than any
City and hoping SouthampBut as the points and goals
other side
ton suffer a huge defeat at home
have dried up — they have
to Manchester City.
scored twice in 12 hours — so have
“It’s horrible not to depend on Carvalhal’s memorable metaphors.
ourselves any more, but let’s see
Carvalhal was more prosaic when he
what will happen tomorrow,” Carvalhal defended his refusal to adapt his fivesaid after seeing his team fail to win man defensive shield. “We played with
for the eighth successive league three attackers,” he said. “It was not
game.
exactly five at the back. But that’s not
“We will wait for some kind of why we are not scoring goals.”
Graham Thomas
Stadium, where Southampton all but secured their survival
looked the more likely to break the
deadlock. Soares, Jack Stephens and
Austin all went close.
Carvalhal decided it was time to
change things, sending on Tammy
Abraham in place of Olsson and
switching to a 3-4-3 formation, with
Clucas moving to left wing back. By
contrast, Hughes, having replaced Nathan Redmond with Shane Long, introduced Gabbiadini, switching to 4-2-4,
with Long moving to the right wing.
It looked counterintuitive from
Hughes, but it worked. From another
Tadic corner, Long rose at the far post,
Romeu did likewise near the penalty
1-0 win v Swansea Last night
In the second half he denied Jordan Ayew, again tipping
the ball, circled, over. Three saves that have helped his side
spot, Austin swivelled to shoot and,
although Fabianski made a smart
reaction save, Gabbiadini responded
quickest to convert the loose ball. The
Southampton celebrations, among the
players, the coaching staff and fans, reflected the significance of the moment.
What followed at the final whistle
was even more joyous as several Southampton players tore off their shirts,
tossing them into the away end. “We are
staying up,” the supporters chanted.
Once this miserable season is behind
them, they will hope that they can build
again, most likely under Hughes. Swansea’s supporters will hope that they are
the ones celebrating on Sunday, but
after another serious setback last night,
they must surely fear the worst — as if
there is no meat left to put on the barbecue.
Swansea City (3-5-2): L Fabianski 8 — K Naughton 6
(sub: L Narsingh 75min), F Fernández 7, A Mawson 7 —
C Roberts 6, A King 6 (sub: T Carroll 82), Ki Sung-yueng
6, S Clucas 6, M Olsson 5 (sub: T Abraham 62, 6) —
A Ayew 5, J Ayew 6. Substitutes not used K Nordfeldt,
M van der Hoorn, R Sanches, N Dyer. Booked Ki,
Fernández.
Southampton (3-4-2-1): A McCarthy 7 — R Bednarek 7
(sub: M Gabbiadini 69, 7), J Stephens 7, W Hoedt 7 —
C Soares 7, P-E Hojbjerg 7, O Romeu 7, R Bertrand 7 —
D Tadic 6 (sub: S McQueen 83), N Redmond 6 (sub:
S Long 64, 6) — C Austin 7. Substitutes not used J Sims,
F Forster, J Ward-Prowse, G Carrillo. Booked Romeu.
8
GETTY IMAGES
Players want Moore to stay
Gary Jacob
manager, was named manager of the month yesterday and was keen to point out that the success had been a club effort
West Bromwich Albion players have
put pressure on the club to appoint
Darren Moore as permanent manager.
As caretaker he has steered the side
to victories over Manchester United
and Tottenham Hotspur and drawn
with Liverpool in his five games
without defeat, achievements that
earned him the manager of the month
award yesterday. He was appointed by
West Brom when Alan Pardew left after
a run of nine defeats that meant the
club were ten points adrift of safety with
six matches remaining.
The players have been impressed by
Moore’s tactical work and how he
manages them. They want club
officials, who will hold talks with
Guochuan Lai in China after the season
ends, to persuade the owner to give
Moore the chance. Some senior players
have made clear that, should that
happen, they will not seek a move if the
club are relegated.
Moore will speak to the chairman
and directors about his future after the
final game against Crystal Palace on
Sunday. He called for unity when he
stepped up from his role as first-team
coach last month.
“I’ve got to pay big respect to Darren
Moore,” Ben Foster, the goalkeeper,
said. “The last couple of weeks he has
been a real breath of fresh air.”
Moore could face competition from
managers including Dean Smith,
Bristol City’s Lee Johnson and Chris
Wilder. Smith, however, has hinted that
he will stay at Brentford. Wilder, the
Sheffield United manager, has been
linked with Sunderland and has
declined to talk about his future.
Wednesday May 9 2018 | the times
2G M
Sport
European nerves
Tottenham and Chelsea face
crucial games in top-four race
Sports newspaper of the year
Page 65
JAMES MARSH/BPI/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Murray may
not be fit for
Wimbledon
Stuart Fraser Tennis Writer
Andy Murray’s participation at
grass-court tournaments, including
Wimbledon, this summer is in doubt
after suffering a setback during his
rehabilitation from hip surgery.
The initial stages of his recovery in
the gym this year went well enough for
Murray to target a return to competitive action this month, but that
optimism has faded since the 30-yearold stepped back on to the court in the
south of France at the end of March.
Murray continued practising at his
favoured base of the All England Club
when he returned to the United Kingdom but then brought a halt to training
sessions about a fortnight ago. He has
barely been seen at the club since and it
is understood that he has also withdrawn from a number of recent sponsor
commitments.
There is next to no hope that he will
take up a late wild card for the Loughborough Challenger, which begins in 12
days’ time. The lack of progress is such
that there is a growing realisation that
the start of the grass-court season,
which for Murray was due to begin at
the Libema Open in the Netherlands
from June 11, is likely to come too soon
for him.
Murray’s management team were
not prepared to issue a comment yesterday. In fact, the only official update
of any form in the past five weeks came
on April 21 when Murray admitted to
The Washington Post, during an interview to promote his commitment to
August’s Citi Open, that this was the
toughest fitness fight of his career.
“This time’s been harder,” Murray
said. “There’s been a lot more ups and
downs this time. It’s been longer and a
lot more complex than the back issue
[in 2013]. Having been through a back
injury and a difficult surgery before
helps, but the back injury was easier
because I was back on the court
competing quite soon afterwards.”
Murray has been noticeably silent on
social media recently, barring a picture
of him painting and the odd comment
here and there on the images of other
Instagram users. There has not been
a tennis-related post since the first
few days of his training block at the
Mouratoglou academy in Nice.
While Murray’s name did appear on
yesterday’s entry list release for next
month’s Fever-Tree Championships at
Queen’s Club, it should not be regarded
as confirmation that he is going to play
there. Tournament entry lists are
always released six weeks in advance
and a withdrawal can be made at any
point before the draw on June 16.
Had all gone well with Murray’s
rehabilitation, he would have made his
competitive comeback at last week’s
ATP Challenger event in Glasgow. A
doubles partnership with Aidan
McHugh, the Scottish 17-year-old who
is part of his 77 Sports Management
stable, was on the cards, but it did not
come to fruition.
The Lawn Tennis Association
(LTA) put on the new Challenger
tournaments
in
Glasgow
and
Loughborough this year because
Murray had indicated that he hoped to
play in them. The combined cost of
Continued on page 60
Times Crossword 27,033
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Jones considers
Cipriani recall
Alex Lowe
Deputy Rugby Correspondent
Danny Cipriani is believed to have
played himself into contention for a
place in the England squad for the tour
to South Africa. Eddie Jones, who is
unsure whether Dylan Hartley will
play for England again after his latest
concussion, names his 34-man squad
for the three-Test series tomorrow.
Cipriani has not played for England
since 2015 and has been consistently
overlooked by the head coach, who has
implied that he was not enough of a
team man to get a place in the squad as
back-up for George Ford and Owen
Farrell. But Cipriani is now back
under consideration after a string of
eye-catching performances, capped by
a man-of-the-match display against
Newcastle Falcons on Saturday that
helped Wasps to finish third in the
Continued on page 60
Racing to act
after brawl
Mark Souster Racing Writer
Southampton’s golden goal
Gabbiadini sinks Swansea to all but ensure his team’s safety, pages 66-67
across
down
1 Instrument in vessel about to go on
fire (7)
5 Dance classes for poet and priest
(7)
9 Escape, having left before noon (3)
10 Number joining party for Africans
in US state care (11)
11 Refuse a course of action after
shock (4,4)
12 Cold criminal heading off to be a
fellow down under (6)
15 What was busted in war with power
— having a bit of water! (4)
16 Element of clue, one I’d fit in
deviously (10)
18 Players are outside entrance
getting rebukes (10)
19 Last one of the tribe to give
utterance of surprise (4)
22 Wrongly gaoled when one could be
in a home? (3,3)
23 A knight leaving birthplace
somewhere in France (8)
25 PM put down by house of
legislature (11)
27 Extract sulphur out of earth (3)
28 Artists taken aback by male painter
noted for portraits (7)
29 Horse has calm expression after
losing its tail (7)
1 Formally acknowledged something
played entering grave (7)
2 Made a deal and embraced, having
taken up little time (11)
3 Renamed city business
qualification lad possesses (6)
4 Having several sides subsequently
participating in test (10)
5 African university given superior
temporary accommodation (4)
6 Attack malevolent little creature
that’s got rid of black mammal (8)
7 Boozer liked being heard (3)
8 What could be nastier component
of fat (7)
13 Encouraging action at end of round
in fight (8,3)
14 Roughly what we do as presents
are handed out? (4,2,4)
17 Like many a tune coming from evil
Hollywood star (8)
18 Picks confectionery treats: second
about to go (7)
20 Resident embarrassed, upset about
non-mains water supply (7)
21 Approach a planet without second
source of energy (6)
24 Cricketer accumulating runs, a
spoilt youngster? (4)
26 Beautiful female lacking expression
(3)
Measures to tackle excessive drinking,
drug-taking and other antisocial
behaviour will be stepped up at Britain’s
racecourses after a brawl involving 50
people at Goodwood on Saturday left
four men in hospital.
Sniffer dogs will be introduced at
leading Flat meetings this summer, and
crowd control and security levels are
being reassessed to tackle the sort of
trouble that has blighted racing in the
past year.
“The incident over the weekend
clearly has absolutely no place
in society, let alone on a racecourse,”
Stephen Atkin, chief executive of the
Racecourse Association (RCA), said.
The British Horseracing Authority
(BHA), the RCA and Goodwood have
all announced reviews of the issues, as
Continued on page 58
Yesterday’s solution 27,032
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