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The Washington Post - 15 January 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 31/26 • Tomorrow: Snow 41/26 B8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
. $2
Bitter
sniping
imperils
DACA
Prospect of
Democratic
wave trips
GOP alarm
Retirements, recruitment
and Trump could pose
threats in Nov. elections
TRUMP SAYS HE
IS ‘NOT A RACIST’
M ICHAEL S CHERER,
J OSH D AWSEY
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
BY
Harsh accusations
between key senators
A raft of retirements, difficulty
recruiting candidates and President Trump’s continuing pattern
of throwing his party off message
have prompted new alarm among
Republicans that they could be
facing a Democratic electoral
wave in November.
The concern has grown so
acute that Trump received what
one congressional aide described
as a “sobering” slide presentation
about the difficult midterm landscape at Camp David a week ago,
leading the president to pledge a
robust schedule of fundraising
and campaign travel in the coming months, White House officials
said.
But the trends have continued,
and perhaps worsened, since that
briefing, with two more prominent Republican House members
announcing plans to retire from
vulnerable seats and a would-be
recruit begging off a Senate challenge to Democrat Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota despite
pressure from Trump to run.
And by the end of last week,
many Republicans were scrambling to distance themselves from
the president after he spoke of
“shithole countries” during an
Oval Office meeting with lawmakers about immigration policy. Rep. Mia Love (R-Utah), a
rising star in the party who faces a
strong Democratic challenge this
year, quickly denounced Trump
for apparently denigrating Haiti,
the birthplace of both her parents, during the Oval Office discussion.
“The president must apologize
to both the American people and
the nations he so wantonly maligned,” Love demanded — creat-
BY M IKE D E B ONIS
AND A NNE G EARAN
PRESTON GANNAWAY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A neighborhood turned to ash
Devastated by wildfire, a California city weighs rebuilding amid a housing crunch
BY S COTT W ILSON
IN SANTA ROSA, CALIF.
5 MILES
A
Christmas tree stands in what
was once Jeff Okrepkie’s foyer
in Coffey Park, a few red and
gold ornaments hanging from
its damp branches.
Once a picture of planned suburbia,
the neighborhood is barren now. All
1,300 homes burned during a few overnight hours in October, a firestorm
sweeping through with a mix of high
winds and flame so violent that it
pushed parked cars blocks away.
But in a gesture of resilience, the
neighborhood threw a houseless holiday party last month, trucking in snow
from Lake Tahoe, displaying a Santa’s
sleigh and dangling battery-powered
lights from utility poles. It was a sign
the starter-home neighborhood would
return from a fire that destroyed more
property than any other in California
Pocket fire
Tubbs fire
36,807 acres burned,
Oct. 8-31
Detail
Sacramento
101
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Coffey Park
Santa Rosa
S
Nuns
fire
101
Sources: USDA,
USDA Cal Fire
Fire, NOAA
THE WASHINGTON POST
“We need to help 3,000 people get back
to where they want to be, but we also need
to concentrate on making sure that five
years from now we’re not back to 2017,”
Santa Rosa Mayor Chris Coursey says.
Calif. mudslides: Death toll rises to 20. A12
history and left 22 people dead.
The bittersweet gathering of the Coffey Park diaspora also had a more practical purpose: to bring together community members who, before the fire,
hardly knew one another.
Those neighboring strangers are
uniting, believing that a strength-innumbers approach to negotiating with
builders, lobbying City Hall and settling
with insurance companies will revive
the place they once lived in a way that
everyone will still be able to afford.
“I didn’t know many people beyond
my own street here,” said Okrepkie, who
had lived with his wife in a gray, singlestory home on Espresso Court for six
years. “And now we don’t even know
where our neighbors are.”
Coffey Park is emblematic of
many aging suburban neighborhoods
in California. Its cul-de-sacs are populated by students, recent graduates in
Facing his image: Trump confronts
growing views that he’s racist. A15
Trump to ‘get involved’
over Hawaii missile alert
Both sides in a case call process of handling harassment claims unfair, abusive
On Hill, a high cost to accusers, accused
Winsome Packer had a plum
overseas assignment, an apartment in Vienna and a six-figure
salary as an adviser to a Washington congressman when it all came
crashing down.
Her boss, Rep. Alcee L. Hastings (D-Fla.), suggested that he
should stay with her when he was
visiting Austria, she claimed. He
made comments she considered
sexually suggestive and hugged
her in a way she felt inappropriate.
Hastings denies that he harassed her, and one of his attorneys claims Packer created “a fiction” with her accusations, which
were made under a process Congress set up to handle sexual
SHUTDOWN CONTINUED ON A15
SANTA ROSA CONTINUED ON A12
GOP CONTINUED ON A5
BY K IMBERLY K INDY
AND M ICHELLE Y E H EE L EE
President Trump said Sunday
that he is “not a racist” and denied
that he had spoiled chances for an
immigration overhaul in Congress by using a vulgarity to describe poor countries.
His remarks came as relations
between key Republican and
Democratic lawmakers turned
poisonous as they debated whether Trump had referred to “shithole
countries” in an Oval Office meeting last week with the fate of
hundreds of thousands of young
immigrants brought to the United
States illegally as children hanging in the balance. Trump blamed
Democrats for fouling chances for
a deal and, in an extraordinary
statement, called himself “the
least racist person.”
Sens. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and
David Perdue (R-Ga.), who attended the meeting Thursday at which
Trump reportedly used the vulgar
term, had previously said they
could not recall whether Trump
said it, but on Sunday they denied
outright that he had. They suggested that a Democrat who publicly confirmed the remarks, Senate Minority Whip Richard J.
Durbin (Ill.), could not be trusted.
“This is a gross misrepresentation. It’s not the first time Senator
Durbin has done it, and it is not
productive to solving the problem
we’re having,” Perdue said Sunday
on ABC’s “This Week.”
The accusations prompted
Democrats to blast the GOP sena-
harassment claims against its
members.
The contentious case dragged
on for four years, and in the end
Packer was awarded $220,000 in
one of the largest secret settlements paid out in recent years by
the congressional Office of Compliance.
But both sides say the process
is unfair and abusive to the accuser and the accused. Packer said
she has not recovered from the
harrowing legal fight, and Hastings said his reputation was damaged. As lawmakers prepare to
unveil bipartisan legislation as
early as this week that would alter
the current system for handling
such claims, both Packer and
Hastings said their dispute reveals a broken law that must be
CLAIMS CONTINUED ON A4
BY T ODD C . F RANKEL
AND A MY B W ANG
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Former congressional staffer Winsome Packer made a sexual
harassment claim against her boss, Rep. Alcee L. Hastings. Packer
was awarded a $220,000 secret settlement in the years-long case.
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
Stunner in Minneapolis Stefon Diggs scored
on a 61-yard play as time ran out, leading the
Vikings over the Saints and into the NFC
Championship next week against the Eagles.
The Jaguars upset the Steelers and will face
New England in the AFC Championship. D1
When Phil Murphy, is
sworn in as governor on
Tuesday, New Jersey
will become one of just
eight states where Democrats run every branch
of government. A6
Former Interior Department officials who
served under eight presidents are pressing the
Trump administration
to reconsider its move to
ease restrictions against
killing birds. A15
THE WORLD
The Philippines raised
the alert level at a volcano after detecting lava
flow and indications of
activity that could lead
to eruptions. A8
The death of a leading
Syrian opposition figure
has left his allies shaken
and appears to have poisoned an already fractious peace process. A10
THE REGION
National Republican
groups are weighing
major election spending
in 2018 in deeply blue
Maryland, where they
hope the popularity of
Gov. Larry Hogan can
insulate the party from
the backlash against
President Trump. B1
Cold weather sparked
power outages, heating
woes and damage to
campus buildings at
Howard University. B1
THE WEEK AHEAD
MONDAY
Secretary of State Rex
Tillerson meets with
Canadian officials on
Korean stability.
TUESDAY
Kazakhstani President
Nursultan Nazarbayev
visits President Trump
at the White House.
WEDNESDAY
The Senate Banking
Committee votes on the
nomination of Jerome
Powell to be chairman of
the Federal Reserve.
Bob Dole (R-Kan.), the
The Trump administration
Sunday pointed to the state of
Hawaii for answers about a panicinducing false alert of an incoming missile attack but said it
would now get involved after an
incident that raised broader questions about the national state of
nuclear preparedness at a time of
escalating tensions with North
Korea.
Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen
called the Saturday panic an “unfortunate incident” during her
appearance on “Fox News Sunday,” indicating the problem must
be handled by Hawaii state officials. And Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit
Pai reported that a full investiga-
former Senate majority
leader, receives the Congressional Gold Medal.
Industrial production
for December is expected to rise 0.4 percent.
tion was “well underway,” adding
that “it appears the government
of Hawaii did not have reasonable
safeguards or process controls in
place to prevent the transmission
of a false alert.”
President Trump, off for a golf
weekend at Mar-a-Lago, told reporters that he was pleased that
Hawaii officials “took responsibility.” Although he said the federal
government would now “get involved,” he did not say how.
“That was a state thing, but we
are going to now get involved with
them. I love that they took responsibility. They took total responsibility. But we are going to get
involved. Their attitude and their
— I think it is terrific. They took
responsibility. They made a mistake.”
Tensions have been high in
FALSE ALERT CONTINUED ON A11
Inside
ST YLE
Forgotten dream
of Dr. King
Decades before Occupy
Wall Street promoted the
notion of encampment
as protest, the nation’s
Mall was the site of
Resurrection City, an
antipoverty gathering
with its own Zip code. C1
THURSDAY
Human Rights Watch
releases its 2018 World
Report on rights issues.
December housing
starts are expected to
total 1,280,000 on an
annual basis.
FRIDAY
Vice President Pence
departs for a trip to
Egypt, Jordan and Israel.
The U.S. government
faces a deadline to extend funding authority
and prevent a shutdown.
BUSINESS NEWS........................A13
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A16
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS .............................. A8
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 41
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
7 6 2 1
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
Soaring during national anthem, bald eagle hits the high notes
Challenger, a rescue bird,
has been thrilling crowds
for the past two decades
BY
S AMANTHA D RAKE
philadelphia — The first big
cheer at Lincoln Financial Field
occurred when the Philadelphia
Eagles ran onto the field.
The second roar came during
“The Star-Spangled Banner” —
when an actual eagle swooped
around the stadium.
The feathered one was a bald
eagle named Challenger, and he
is a big deal. The 28-year-old
rescue bird is trained to free-fly to
the national anthem, a feat he has
performed at more than 350 public events over the past two decades.
Among them: more than 80
National Football League regular
season games, three NFL Pro
Bowl all-star games, the College
Football Playoff national championship game, 11 World Series
games, dozens of regular season
Major League Baseball games
and the Indianapolis 500.
When bald eagles were removed from the endangered species list in 2007, Challenger was
there. When Presidents George
W. Bush and Barack Obama were
each inaugurated for the first
time, Challenger — a firmly nonpartisan patriot — appeared at
the concerts held afterward.
“We don’t pick between Democrats and Republicans,” said his
trainer, Al Cecere, the president
and chief executive of the American Eagle Foundation. “Challenger represents all Americans.”
Keeping up with all this demand requires an impressive entourage and a strict schedule.
Cecere and four other people travel with the bird to care
for him, coordinate with organizers and film his flights. The
Tennessee-based team is on the
road nearly every week except in
the summer, when Challenger
is molting and is not looking
his best. Sometimes they drive,
but often they fly — always
on Southwest Airlines, which
allows Challenger in the cabin
and occasionally lets Cecere commandeer the pilot’s microphone
to offer an in-flight education
session on eagles.
“Challenger is an uplifting part
of our game-day experience,” said
Anne Gordon, a senior vice president for the Philadelphia Eagles,
a team that enlisted the bird for
four games in 2017 — and that,
she noted, took its name in 1933
from the emblem of the New
Deal’s National Recovery Act.
“Having Challenger at our games
today not only reminds us of our
team history, but also of the
history of our nation. That really
resonates with our fans.”
Challenger’s assignments last
just a few minutes, but they are
preceded by plenty of preparation. A few hours before the
Eagles played the Dallas Cowboys
on New Year’s Eve, the bird practiced his flight twice. The team
members, all wearing headsets,
inspected the premises to ensure
that no cables or other obstacles
would impede his soaring. One
measured the wind velocity to
make sure it was below 17 mph,
because stiff gusts can blow the
six-pound eagle off course. As
usual, two GPS trackers were
clipped to Challenger’s tail feathers just in case the bird decided to
seek freedom beyond the stadium; Cecere said they have never had to be used.
Cecere and his daughter, Laura
Sterbens, the foundation’s director of operations, walked onto the
field as a boys’ choir began singing the national anthem. Fireworks exploded at the line “And
the rockets’ red glare . . .” and
when the last spark dissipated, it
was Challenger’s moment. Sterbens blew a whistle and started
swinging a leather lure on a long
cord, while Cecere held up his
gloved hand. Both the lure and
the glove tell the eagle to “come
here” and that a tasty reward will
be waiting.
Only one variable was left, and
that was Challenger himself.
The eagle decides how he will
get from where he is released to
where he lands. Sometimes he
flies straight from one point to
the other. Other times, Challenger opts to circle once or twice
before landing.
On this day, Challenger’s image
flashed on the stadium’s big
screen as the eagle was released
from an upper level of the stadium. He sailed straight down to
the field and settled on Cecere’s
glove. The trainer, 70, held the
eagle aloft for a moment and then
headed to the sideline, where
Challenger showed his media
savvy by majestically spreading
his wings as people held up
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
Martin Luther King Jr. Day is observed. Federal
government offices and stock and bond markets are
closed. For details, visit washingtonpost.com/national.
All day
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will be in Canada for
the Vancouver Foreign Ministers’ Meeting, which he will
co-host with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland,
through Wednesday. Visit washingtonpost.com/politics for
developments.
9 a.m.
2 p.m.
At the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, FBI Director
Christopher A. Wray, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and
Martin Luther King III, co-founder of the Drum Major
Institute, attend the Memorial Foundation’s seventh
annual wreath laying and “day of reflection and
reconciliation” to honor the slain civil rights leader. For
details, visit washingtonpost.com/national.
The Washington Wizards host the Milwaukee Bucks at
Capital One Arena. Follow the game at postsports.com.
KLMNO
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release him three times, but he
had become conditioned to handouts and could not fend for himself in the wild. So they placed the
bird with Cecere’s group, which
named him in honor of the crew
of the NASA space shuttle that
exploded after liftoff in 1986.
But unlike many of his injured
peers at the eagle foundation,
Challenger was in perfect shape
and could fly. That ability and his
laid-back disposition gave Cecere
an idea: Why not train the eagle
to free-fly, without a lead line
attached, at events during the
national anthem? The dramatic
spectacle would help raise awareness about protecting bald ea-
Boy, 10, used as shield
during standoff
A sheriff said an armed man
used a 10-year-old boy as “a
shield” during a hostage standoff
of about 30 hours that ended
peacefully Sunday morning.
Butler County authorities said
that the boy was taken to a
hospital as a precaution but that
no injuries were reported. The
man, Donald Gazaway, 31,
surrendered and was jailed. He
had recently served prison time
for felonious assault.
“Everywhere he moved, he was
using the child as a shield,”
Sheriff Richard Jones told
reporters. “He wouldn’t allow
that 10-year-old to leave his sight.
That was his protection.”
Jones said the event began
following a late Friday night
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smartphones to take his picture.
Challenger’s path to stardom
was not quite so direct. He came
to the eagle foundation in 1990,
five years after Cecere decided to
leave a career in the entertainment industry to try to help save
a species that was then near
extinction in 48 states. The organization now breeds bald eagles for release and rehabilitates
and cares for injured raptors,
owls and other kinds of birds.
A storm had blown Challenger’s nest out of a tree in Louisiana
when he was just a few weeks old,
and his initial rescuers fed him by
hand before handing him over to
wildlife authorities. They tried to
OHIO
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D! BY POP
UL AR
TOP: Challenger, a bald eagle, flies to trainer Al Cecere during a
practice flight on Dec. 31 at Phildelphia’s Lincoln Financial Field.
ABOVE: Spencer Williams is splashed as Challenger drinks water
after his flight at the stadium during the national anthem.
gles, he figured, and be a patriotic
tribute to boot.
Cecere researched training
techniques and decided on those
used in falconry because they are
based on positive reinforcement
and food-based rewards.
“Everything you do is designed
to gain the bird’s trust,” he said.
First, Cecere started feeding
Challenger from a glove he wore
during training. Then he trained
the bird to fly short distances and
return to land on the glove for a
treat, usually a piece of fish.
Cecere also introduced Challenger to new situations, showing him
off at schools and small motorcycle rallies.
By 1995, Challenger was ready
for his first flight at a big event —
a professional fishing tournament in North Carolina. He gave
a flawless performance.
Today, event organizers who
want to book Challenger must
cover travel expenses for him and
his team, as well as make a
donation to the American Eagle
Foundation. And after all these
years, the bird still appears to
enjoy being in the spotlight and
tends to perk up whenever he
hears the national anthem, because to him the tune means treat
time.
“It’s his favorite song,” Cecere
said.
Challenger could live to age 50,
and Cecere said he will work for
as long as he’s healthy.
“Performing is enrichment for
him,” the trainer said. “He gets to
do what he was born to do — fly.”
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
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E XTENDE
EILEEN BLASS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
AMIR LEVY/REUTERS
Kwabina Mensah, right, mourns his son Emmanuel Mensah in New
York on Saturday. Emmanuel Mensah, 28, rescued several people
from a Dec. 28 Bronx apartment building fire before dying of smoke
inhalation. The fire, which was caused by a 3-year-old boy playing
with stove burners, was one of the city’s deadliest in decades.
Chicago-bound Greyhound bus.
Margarito Vargas-Rosas, 33, has
been charged with making
terrorist threats, a felony, and
disorderly conduct. He had been
deported to Mexico and came
back to the United States, where
he lived in Chicago and worked at
a restaurant in Milwaukee,
Racine County Sheriff
Christopher Schmaling told
reporters Saturday. The bus was
traveling southbound on
Interstate 94 in Milwaukee just
before 10 p.m. Central time
Friday when authorities received
at least two 911 calls from
passengers. Schmaling said
Vargas-Rosas had gotten into an
argument with two other
passengers and later, for reasons
still unclear, threatened to shoot
everyone on board as he dug into
his waistband. No one was hurt.
Couple killed after trying to
cross tracks in North Carolina:
altercation inside an apartment
in the northern Cincinnati
suburb of Liberty Township. He
said the initial call came from the
child’s mother, saying a man with
a gun was demanding money. She
got away from the apartment.
Authorities said the man fired
as many as 30 shots, hitting an
armored vehicle. Jones said
police also believe the man shot a
robot that was sent into the
apartment.
The gunman later barricaded
himself with the child inside a
vehicle in a garage. The child is
not related to him.
Gazaway was taken to Butler
County jail on charges of
kidnapping, felonious assault
and inducing panic. No attorney
was listed for him.
— Associated Press
Man allegedly threatened to kill
Chicago-bound bus passengers:
A man who has been living in the
country illegally was arrested
after authorities say he
threatened to kill passengers on a
Authorities say two people are
dead after their vehicle tried to
cross railroad tracks ahead of an
oncoming Amtrak train in rural
North Carolina. Multiple media
organizations reported that a
couple, who appeared to be in
their 60s, were killed Sunday
afternoon near Whitakers, about
70 miles east of Raleigh. Amtrak
spokeswoman Kimberly Woods
said that no one near the
southbound train was injured
and that service was suspended
as law enforcement officials
investigated. The train originated
in New York City and was bound
for Savannah, Ga. The dead were
not identified.
Man, girl die in New York
apartment fire: A man and a
Mr. Parvizian’s
granddaughter and her dog
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teenage girl were killed in an
apartment building fire in New
York City. It happened just after
noon Sunday at a seven-story
apartment building in the Bronx.
Police say a 61-year-old man and
a 13-year-old girl were found
unconscious and unresponsive.
They were taken to a hospital,
where they were pronounced
dead. It took firefighters about an
hour to get the blaze under
control.
— From staff reports
and news services
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
A family of physicians puts the medical in marijuana
Founders of Ore. clinic
emphasize guidance over
prescriptions for the drug
BY
J USTIN W M. M OYER
The Knoxes are a clan of four
doctors living in Oregon and California who specialize in medical
marijuana. They seem to be doing
quite well selling something that
is illegal in many states, working
with those they know best.
“We’re all fighting the same
fight,” said Janice Knox, the founding doctor behind American Cannabinoid Clinics in Portland, Ore.
— and the mother of two fellow
physicians and the wife of the
other. “I think when they do see us
they’re surprised at who we are,”
she said of her patients. The family
aims for something not always
associated with medical marijuana: professionalism.
Knox led the family’s move into
medical marijuana in 2012, when
she retired from a decades-long
career in anesthesiology. One of 15
children, she grew up in the San
Francisco Bay area and went north
for medical school in the 1970s.
“There were not very many
black women or men, at least not
at the University of Washington,”
she said. “It felt like a cultural
shock when I went there.”
Knox stuck it out, choosing a
career as an anesthesiologist because she thought — wrongly — it
would give her more time to raise
children. (A lot more on them in a
minute.) After 35 years, however,
she got tired of working up to
seven days a week. And she got
tired of being mistaken for a
nurse. “Patients would say, ‘I want
a white male doctor,’ ” Knox said.
After she stepped away from
the job, she got a call from a “card
mill” — a practice known more for
writing prescriptions for medical
marijuana quickly than for close
attention to patients’ needs. One
of the doctors couldn’t be found.
Could she fill in?
Knox wasn’t sure. One of her
colleagues, a marijuana enthusi-
ast, had been sent to rehab. And
despite attending the University
of California at Berkeley, she was a
square — Knox had never seen or
smelled marijuana “at a time
when drugs were everywhere,” she
said.
But she had always been interested in natural treatments, and
she agreed to fill in — and was
pleasantly surprised to see that
the patients were not a bunch of a
reprobates.
“I was shocked to see the people
that came into card mill,” she said.
“Grandmothers,
grandfathers,
people with Seeing Eye dogs. They
weren’t at all who I expected. . . .
These were people who conventional medicine had failed.”
Nor was Knox content to sign
prescriptions and send patients
on their way. Some had questions,
as anyone would when told to take
any drug. What strain was best?
What about dosage? And was
smoking pot better than a cannabis edible or a cannabis oil or a
cannabis hand cream?
Knox didn’t know.
“I was embarrassed because
they expected me, a physician, to
tell them how to use this medicine,” she said. “I couldn’t answer
them. I did not know anything
about cannabis.”
Undaunted, she delved into research of what is called the “endocannabinoid system” — a network
of receptors in the body and brain
that respond to cannabis and regulate, among other things, immune response, liver function and
the production of insulin.
This is not just something discussed in parking lots at Phish
concerts.
“It’s very, very real,” said Nora
Volkow, director of the National
Institute on Drug Abuse at the
National Institutes of Health.
Volkow pointed out that understanding of the endocannabinoid system suffers from what
she called a “circular problem.”
Even though more states are moving to legalize medical marijuana,
there is insufficient evidence
about how it works, partly because the drug, a federally controlled Schedule 1 substance purportedly of no medical use, is
AMANDA LUCIER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
From left are David Knox, Rachel Knox, Janice Knox and Jessica Knox. Janice Knox’s first pot patients
“weren’t at all who I expected,” she said. “Grandmothers, grandfathers, people with Seeing Eye dogs.”
restricted and not easy to study.
The American Medical Association considers cannabis “a dangerous drug and, as such, a serious
public health concern,” according
to a policy statement. And while it
thinks the drug should not be legalized for recreational use, a policy updated last year urged further
study, saying the drug’s Schedule 1
status should be reviewed “to facilitate grant applications and the
conduct of well-designed clinical
research involving cannabis and
its potential medical utility.”
Knox has read all the studies
she could, attended conferences
and been certified as a cannabis
specialist. She learned, for example, the difference between THC,
the cannabis compound, or cannabinoid, that gets people high,
and CBD, a cannabinoid that offers therapeutic effects sans psychedelia.
Knox’s husband, David Knox,
an emergency room physician for
38 years, kept his day job but also
started working at the clinic. He
knew nothing about the endocannabinoid system but quickly saw
the potential of cannabis as a
treatment for epilepsy, cancertherapy side effects and pain, particularly in the middle of an opioid
epidemic.
He also said President Richard
M. Nixon’s decision to sign the Controlled Substances Act, which categorized marijuana as a Schedule 1
drug in 1970, was “one of his biggest crimes.”
“I think a majority of establishment medicine still is not on board”
with medical marijuana, he said.
“That’s the way we were taught.”
Meanwhile, some other Knoxes
were getting in on the game.
Rachel Knox, 35, and Jessica
Knox, 31, seem closer than many
siblings. After leaving Portland,
where they grew up, they lived
together in Boston while Jessica
finished her undergraduate degree at Harvard University and
Rachel did a post-baccalaureate
program in preparation for medical school at Tufts University.
Then both entered Tufts medical
school, graduating in 2012 from a
dual-degree program that also offered MBAs.
“If we were alone, we might
have gotten discouraged and
changed our minds,” Jessica Knox
said. “Instead, we thought, ‘Oh, my
sister’s doing it, I could do it, too.’ ”
After they completed their residencies, Rachel Knox ended up
back in Portland, while her sister
moved to San Francisco. But telemedicine allowed Jessica Knox to
work with her sister and her mom
at the American Cannabinoid
Clinics, where the family battles
the card-mill mind-set. Instead of
seeing as many patients as possible as quickly as possible — a
model that led to “doctors becoming millionaires,” Rachel Knox
said — the family would actually
practice medicine with cannabis.
This demands more than teaching patients not to spill the bong
water. Every client is different.
Some don’t want to get high or
might have anxiety that does not
respond well to products high in
THC. Those new to marijuana use
— “naive users,” as Rachel Knox
puts it — might turn to edibles. But
marijuana edibles are notoriously
easy to overdo, especially if a patient takes them on an empty
stomach.
Veteran pot smokers, meanwhile, might wish to turn to vaporizing, which Jessica Knox said “is
certainly cleaner, often less harsh,
and definitely less stigmatic than
smoking.” And all patients should
be made aware of the possible side
effects of any medication. Like the
beneficial effects of marijuana,
there is still a lot to be learned
about its dangers, such as the risk
of lung cancer, cognitive impairment or impaired driving.
“If you’re trying something new
for the first time, maybe do that at
home on a Saturday when you
don’t have to go anywhere and
don’t have any responsibilities at
home to worry about,” Jessica
Knox wrote in an email.
But whatever the chosen remedy, the Knoxes aren’t going to
sign a prescription and send patients on their way. “We want our
patients to come to us for guidance, not this card,” Rachel Knox
said. “We’re not here to see a patient every five minutes.”
After a year of the Trump administration, the future of patients
seeking medical marijuana still
isn’t clear. Attorney General Jeff
Sessions sought the ability to prosecute medical marijuana providers
in states where the practice is legal.
Such providers have been protected by federal law since 2014, but
those protections expire Friday.
The Knoxes, however, aren’t
that worried. While Janice Knox
acknowledged that physicians are
“in a precarious position” working
with a federally controlled substance, 29 states and the District of
Columbia have legalized medical
marijuana; eight have legalized
recreational use by adults. With so
many benefiting from the once
verboten drug, it’s hard to imagine
going back.
“We’re going to plow ahead and
do what it’s right for us to do,” she
said.
justin.moyer@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
A congressional sexual harassment case
illustrates high cost to accuser and accused
CLAIMS FROM A1
fixed.
Packer lost her job and is unemployed. She had to agree not to
discuss her case, but she recently
broke the pledge, calling it “a
license to abuse and demoralize
the victim completely.”
Hastings believes Packer
should never have received a settlement, which he said he played
no role in negotiating.
“The way it is being framed is I
participated in something secret,”
Hastings said in a recent interview. “I wasn’t in the mediation
session. I wasn’t part of the settlement negotiations. I secreted
nothing. We need greater transparency. I personally have no objections to releasing any and all
information.”
House Employment Counsel
lawyers, who represented Hastings, declined to discuss the case
because of the confidentiality
agreement. However, a June 12,
2014, memo from that office
shows the lead attorney on the
case believed the system allowed
for “manufactured legal extortion.”
The attorney said Packer took a
“kernel of truth” about Hastings’s
sexually tinged comments but
“grossly distorted events and circumstances in order to create a
fiction that she experienced sexual harassment and intimidation,” the document says. For example, the attorney alluded to an
incident in which Hastings told
Packer he had trouble sleeping
after sex, which Hastings said he
shared only because he believed
they were friends, not because he
was pursuing her sexually.
In the end, Packer’s doggedness played an outsized role in
her securing a larger-than-average settlement, documents and
interviews show. She refused to
settle early, pressed forward with
a lawsuit and represented herself
when she could no longer afford
an attorney.
A flawed process
Settling sexual harassment
cases on Capitol Hill is risky for
members, whose careers can derail if allegations become public,
and for accusers confronting a
system that victims’ advocates argue protects the powerful.
The process may run up tens of
thousands of dollars in private
legal bills for both parties and
consume months or years of staff
time.
And there is no accountability
for the use of taxpayer funds to
settle cases. Strict confidentiality
required under the law keeps secret the names of members and
terms of settlement agreements.
Congress is now considering
amending the 1995 Congressional
Accountability Act, the law governing how harassment cases are
handled on Capitol Hill, after seven members have either resigned
or said they would not seek reelection in the wake of sexual
harassment allegations. Attorneys who handle these cases say
most staffers take no action because they fear it could hurt their
careers.
The claim Packer brought
against Hastings in 2010 illustrates flaws in the process and the
bitter aftereffects it can have on
both the accuser and the accused.
Packer said running up
$20,000 in legal bills caused her
to lose her Virginia home to foreclosure as the case wound its way
through the congressional Office
of Compliance, two House ethics
inquiries and a federal court.
Hastings said he was also damaged by what he called a “ludicrous” claim. His defense cost
him $40,000, he said.
The Democratic member hired
Packer, a Republican with foreign
policy expertise, in May 2007
when he chaired the Commission
on Security and Cooperation in
Europe. Located on Capitol Hill,
the commission is a federal agency run by Congress and promotes
human rights, military security
and economic cooperation in Europe, Eurasia and North America.
For nine months, Packer was
Hastings’s policy adviser on the
commission staff. Then he promoted her to a foreign post in
Vienna. Her salary more than
doubled, to $165,000 from
$80,000, court records show.
Packer claimed that the sexual
harassment began in January
2008, shortly after her promotion. She said Hastings told her
many times that he wanted to stay
with her in Vienna. Hastings denied the conversations.
“I ignored him at first, hoping
he would see I wasn’t interested,”
Packer said in an interview.
Packer said that within months
Hastings’s advances became
more overt. During a July 2008
business trip to Kazakhstan,
PHOTOS BY MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Former Capitol Hill staffer Winsome Packer is interviewed in Florida about her sexual harassment case against Rep. Alcee L. Hastings. “I
lost my career,” Packer said. “I lost one-third of my pension. Lost my security clearance. And I lost many of my friends.”
How one sexual harassment complaint was handled
Settling sexual harassment cases on Capitol Hill involves a multi-step
process that can take months, even years, if the accuser chooses to
take the case to federal court. Here’s a look at how one case, filed by
ONE
MONTH
Winsome Packer against Rep. Alcee L. Hastings (D-Fla.), dragged on.
2010
AUG. 2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
OFFICE OF COMPLIANCE
Packer files
complaint
MARCH 2011
MAY 2014
Counseling and
mediation required
before lawsuit
Office pays
settlement
D.C. DISTRICT COURT
JUNE 2014
Packer files
lawsuit
Case
dismissed
OFFICE OF CONGRESSIONAL ETHICS
MARCH 2011
OCT. 2011
Case opened
Referred to House
HOUSE ETHICS COMMITTEE
DEC. 2014
Hastings
cleared
2010
2011
JAN. 2012
Investigation
begins
Sources: Staff reports,
House Ethics Committee documents
Packer said, she was instructed to
report to a hotel hospitality suite
shortly after she landed at 4 a.m.
Hastings was waiting for her, she
said.
“I went up there, and the first
thing he did was grab me and
press himself up against me. Then
he pressed his face against mine,”
Packer said in an interview. “I
reminded him that this was inappropriate. It was the first time I
told him explicitly.”
Her lawsuit claims that the
harassment continued over two
years and that she reported numerous incidents to Hastings’s
chief of staff, Fred Turner, asking
him to intervene. In her lawsuit,
she said Turner spoke with Hastings but the harassment continued. When she continued to complain, she said Turner retaliated
against her by marginalizing her
at work, including limiting travel
and reassigning much of her
work. Turner did not respond to
requests for comment, but he previously denied to congressional
investigators that he retaliated or
2013
MARCH 2014
First time Packer
was interviewed
by committee
KEVIN UHRMACHER/THE WASHINGTON POST
that he received early reports of
Packer’s complaints, according to
a House Ethics Committee report.
In February 2010, Packer said
she sought help from the office of
Rep. Christopher H. Smith,
(R-N.J.), who served with Hastings on the commission, and was
referred to the Office of Compliance. The office was established
by the Congressional Accountability Act as a place for legislative branch employees to file
workplace claims, including sexual harassment allegations.
Packer filed a formal complaint
against Hastings on Aug. 9, 2010.
Under the law, she had to agree to
up to 30 days of confidential
counseling to get advice on her
rights and options for pursuing a
complaint. Counselors in the Office of Compliance are forbidden
under the law from advocating
for the victim in sexual harassment cases, including making
lawyer referrals.
Smith said he is legally prohibited from discussing most details
of Packer’s case but acknowl-
edged his office helped ensure
Packer’s case was fairly handled.
House lawyers at first argued
that Packer’s claim was not covered by the Congressional Accountability Act. Because Packer’s
employer was an independent
federal agency led by Congress,
rather than a member office or a
congressional committee, House
lawyers said she did not have
standing to file a claim under the
law that protects legislativebranch employees. Smith said he
successfully argued otherwise,
pointing to a law that says commission staff members should
have the same “rights and privileges” as congressional employees.
“My job was to make sure due
process was real,” Smith said. “I
think (House lawyers) thought
they could wear her down.”
Smith said Packer still faced
unfair odds. At this stage, taxpayers were funding Hastings’s legal
representation through the Office
of House Employment Counsel.
Packer had to hire her own attorney, George Chuzi, to represent
her in the next phase under the
process — mandatory mediation.
Smith said that needs to
change. “Part of any reform needs
to include providing competent
counsel to the accuser, at no cost
to them,” he said.
Mutual dissatisfaction
Mediation is not mandatory for
most federal or private sector
employees who bring harassment
complaints. But congressional
employees must agree to 30 days
of mediation if their case is handled by the Office of Compliance.
The goal, congressional officials
say, is to amicably resolve conflicts and keep them out of court.
Officials say they have worked
to make the process easier for
employees.
“It is not required that the
employee attend,” said Barbara
Childs Wallace, chair of the Office
of Compliance Board of Directors,
at a congressional hearing in November. “It is not required that
they sit in the same room with the
person they are accusing, of sexual harassment, for instance.”
But Packer and one of her attorneys described her confidential
Rep. Alcee L. Hastings enters a November meeting of Congressional Black Caucus members to discuss
whether Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) should step down amid sexual harassment allegations.
Conyers resigned last month. Hastings says that his accuser should not have received a settlement.
meetings as bullying sessions in
which House attorneys urged her
to drop her claim or accept a low
settlement.
At her first session, she said,
Turner, Hastings’s chief of staff,
was seated beside two House Employment Counsel attorneys for
the congressman. Packer said
that she protested Turner’s presence but that he was allowed to
remain. Hastings did not attend.
Presiding over the session was
a professional mediator, hired by
the Office of Compliance.
Mediation discussions and materials are confidential under the
law. But Packer and Chuzi broke
the confidentiality agreement to
discuss their first mediation session, which they described as
combative.
“Their opening line to my at-
“The way it is being
framed is I participated
in something secret. . . .
I wasn’t in the
mediation session.”
Rep. Alcee L. Hastings (D-Fla.)
torney was, ‘I want you to know
your client is a liar and an extortionist,’ ” Packer said of the House
lawyers.
Chuzi said the meeting ended
as Packer abruptly stood up and
collapsed.
“It was shocking,” Chuzi said.
“They just unloaded on her. The
verbal assaults on her integrity,
the threats to expose her went on
for 20 minutes. This was supposed to be a mediation meeting,
mind you, where both sides came
together to discuss a possible resolution. That is not what happened.”
House Employment Counsel
attorneys Ann Rogers and Russell
Gore did not respond to phone
calls and emails seeking comment. Gloria Lett, the lead attorney in the Office of House Employment Counsel (OHEC), said
she was bound by confidentiality
and could not discuss the case.
However, Lett said in a statement, “In getting to a resolution,
it is not unusual for employees to
blame OHEC’s attorneys for
merely offering a view of the facts
that do not support the employee’s claims.”
The Office of Compliance declined to comment on Packer’s
case.
Debra Katz, who represented
Packer during subsequent mediation sessions, would not discuss
the meetings, citing the confidentiality agreement she signed.
However, Katz said in general
the system is “stacked against”
victims and tends to “re-traumatize them.” Katz said attorneys for
the lawmakers use intimidation
tactics to get accusers to drop
their claims, including threats to
prolong the process.
“They point out that they have
endless resources to defend the
members,” she said. “And they are
quick to point out that they cannot go toe-to-toe with those resources. It’s a very disempowering message by design and is
made to make victims feel they
have no option but to settle their
case at an early junction and what
is less than what is fair.”
Hastings said he also felt
wronged. He was limited in what
he could say to defend himself
publicly because it appeared the
matter was headed to litigation.
And, he said, House Employment
Counsel attorneys aggressively
grilled and investigated him to
prepare for a possible lawsuit.
It soon became clear, he said,
that he needed his own attorney
to ensure that his interests were
protected.
“I did not have all the power,”
he said. “You feel like your life is
not in your hands.”
Although Hastings was not in
mediation sessions, he said in a
recent interview that he told
House attorneys he opposed settling with Packer: “I did not and
do not feel Ms. Packer should be
paid a dime.”
But House attorneys offered a
$20,000 to $25,000 settlement,
Packer said, on the condition she
resign from her job. Packer said
she rejected the offer and filed a
lawsuit on March 7, 2011, in D.C.
District Court against Hastings,
Turner and the commission.
Attorneys with Judicial Watch
— a conservative watchdog group
— took Packer’s court case, representing her pro-bono for the first
year. Jim Peterson, the lead attorney, said House attorneys used
“scorched-earth tactics” to try to
intimidate them and Packer. They
also said that the House lawyers
could drive up costs because their
funds were limitless.
“They weren’t just lawyers defending their client. They were
hyperaggressive,” he said. “They
threatened to drive up the costs.
They threatened to do discovery
in places around the world. It was
extraordinary.”
The case’s resolution
Packer’s case then proceeded
on two tracks: ethics reviews in
Congress and a federal lawsuit.
Both processes took twists and
turns that dragged on until the
end of 2014 — nearly six years
after the alleged harassment began.
Along the way, Hastings acknowledged some of the behavior
Packer found objectionable, including a crude barroom conversation with Packer and other staff
members about underwear worn
by members during marathon
sessions. He also conceded to congressional investigators that he
told Packer he “had difficulty
sleeping after sex,” according to
the ethics report.
However, he denied making
overt sexual overtures to Packer.
Meanwhile, a judge hearing
Packer’s case dismissed charges
against Hastings and Turner on a
technical issue, leaving only the
commission as a defendant, court
records show.
By spring 2014, the discovery
phase of the case was ramping up,
meaning both sides would be
forced to hand over emails and
other documents that might be
critical in the case. Key witnesses,
including Hastings and Packer,
would be required to testify under
oath.
Negotiation points and decision-makers had changed. The
commission by then was led by
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin (D-Md.),
so the case switched over to be
handled by Senate lawyers. Hastings says he was cut out of the
process after it went to the Senate. Cardin and the Senate Chief
Counsel Office of Employment
declined to comment.
Ultimately, the Senate Employment Counsel handled Packer’s
out-of-court settlement with the
commission in May 2014. The
congressional Office of Compliance signed off on the payment.
Six months later, the House
Ethics Committee closed its investigation, clearing Hastings of
wrongdoing but admonishing
him for “certain conduct that is
less than professional.” It cited his
comments at the bar and about
insomnia and sex.
Now, nearly 10 years since the
alleged harassment began, both
Packer and Hastings said the
process was life-altering.
“I’m still answering questions,”
Hastings said. “Here is the conundrum: I have to live with these
accusations whether they are true
or not.”
Packer is still seeking work,
living with her sister in her rented
duplex, about 40 miles from Hastings’s Florida district offices.
“I lost my career,” Packer said.
“I lost one-third of my pension.
Lost my security clearance. And I
lost many of my friends.”
kimberly.kindy@washpost.com
michelle.lee@washpost.com
Alice Crites and Julie Tate contributed
to this report.
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
ANDREW HARNIK FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Rep. Mia Love (R-Utah), who took office in 2015, denounced President Trump after comments he made
last week during an Oval Office meeting on immigration. “The president must apologize,” she said.
GOP has a favorable map, but
warning signs are flashing
GOP FROM A1
ing a model, perhaps, for Republicans in competitive races to try to
separate from Trump as a survival
strategy.
In the Camp David presentation, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) described
scenarios to the president ranging from a bloodbath where Republicans lost the House “and lost
it big,” in the words of one official,
to an outcome in which they keep
control while losing some seats.
McCarthy outlined trends over
recent decades for parties in power and spotlighted vulnerable Republican seats where Hillary
Clinton won in 2016. Eight years
ago, before the 2010 midterms
swept the GOP to power, he had
drafted a similar presentation
with the opposite message for his
party.
Republicans hold the advantage of a historically favorable
electoral map, with more House
seats than ever benefiting from
Republican-friendly redistricting
and a Senate landscape that puts
26 Democratic seats in play, including 10 states that Trump won
in 2016, and only eight Republican seats.
But other indicators are clearly
flashing GOP warning signs.
Democrats have benefited from
significant recruitment advantages — there are at least a halfdozen former Army Rangers and
Navy SEALs running as Democrats this year, for example — as
Republicans struggle to persuade
incumbents to run for reelection.
At least 29 House seats held by
Republicans will be open in November following announced retirements, a greater number for
the majority party than in each of
the past three midterm elections
when control of Congress flipped.
The president’s own job approval, a traditional harbinger of
his party’s midterm performance,
is at record lows as he approaches
a year in office, according to
Gallup. Polls asking which party
Americans want to see control
Congress in 2019 show a doubledigit advantage for Democrats.
“When the wave comes, it’s
always underestimated in the
polls,” said a conservative political strategist who has met with
GOP candidates. “That is the reason that Republicans are ducking
for cover.”
Amid the onslaught, Republican strategists say they continue
to pin their party’s electoral
hopes on the nation’s still-rising
economic indicators, the potential effects of the recent tax-overhaul bill and Trump’s ability to
rally the conservative base.
“The monthly metrics are bad,
from the generic ballot to the
Republican retirements to the
number of Democratic recruits
with money,” said one Republican
political consultant, who works
with major conservative donors
involved in the midterms and
asked for anonymity to speak
frankly. “The big question is: Is
everything different with Trump?
Because the major metrics point
to us losing at least one house of
Congress.”
That sliver of optimism extends to the top of the Republican
leadership who are hopeful that
Trump’s disruptive effect on the
political landscape can once
again surprise the nation this fall.
“Who knows what 2018 will be
like? Nobody called 2016, right?”
said Sen. John Cornyn of Texas,
the second-ranking Republican
in that chamber. “Everybody
thought Hillary Clinton was going to get elected and that Chuck
Schumer was going to be the
majority leader. And none of that
turned out to be true.”
In private conversations,
Trump has told advisers that he
doesn’t think the 2018 election
has to be as bad as others are
predicting. He has referenced the
2002 midterms, when George W.
Bush and Republicans fared better after the Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks, these people said.
But his ability to shape the
midterm field has repeatedly
been frustrated.
Trump worked hard to recruit
two 2018 Senate candidates, Rep.
Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.) and incumbent Sen. Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah), both of whom announced in recent weeks that
they would not run.
Those decisions strengthened
the hopes of Heitkamp, who is
running for reelection in a state
that Trump won by 36 points in
2016, and provided an opportunity in Utah for a Trump antagonist, former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney,
to launch a Senate bid of his own.
In other cases, Republicans
have struggled to narrow their
Senate fields, with big and sometimes-nasty primary fights shaping up in Indiana, Montana and
Arizona. The recent announcement that former Phoenix-area
sheriff Joe Arpaio would run for
the Senate has raised some Republican concerns about holding
onto the seat of retiring Sen. Jeff
Flake.
“It’s certainly not like
running with Ronald
Reagan, that’s for sure.”
Political adviser Dave Hansen,
on campaigning during
the Trump presidency
Republican leaders feel better
about Trump’s ability to elevate
Missouri candidate Josh Hawley,
the state attorney general, who
greeted the president on a recent
visit. The White House is also
pushing Florida Gov. Rick Scott to
run against Sen. Bill Nelson (DFla.), although associates of Scott
are of mixed opinions on the
likelihood that he will do it. In a
move White House aides described as unrelated, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke recently granted Florida an exemption from the
president’s new plan to open the
nation’s coastlines to offshore
drilling.
In Ohio, state Treasurer Josh
Mandel also made a surprise announcement on Jan. 5 that he
would abandon his own Senate
campaign, which had broad national support, because of his
wife’s health. The White House
political operation helped push
Rep. James B. Renacci (R-Ohio),
who had launched an outsider
bid for governor, to instead challenge Sen. Sherrod Brown (D).
Trump continually reminds
advisers that he remains popular
in a number of states, including
West Virginia, Montana and
North Dakota, according to aides.
But slow fundraising and anemic
candidate recruitment have
caused tensions between the
White House and the National
Republican Senatorial Committee, White House advisers said.
Still, two people with direct
knowledge of that relationship
said it has improved considerably
in recent months. One person
said “there is an active effort to
professionalize the operation,”
and “coordination has improved.”
A Republican familiar with
NRSC operations said there was a
noticeable fundraising uptick in
December, when the GOP tax bill
passed, which helped smooth out
relations after a rough period that
included a stinging special elec-
tion defeat in Alabama that cost
the party a Senate seat. These
days, the Republican said, White
House aides are in frequent contact with committee officials and
the favorable map is a main driver
of hope. An NRSC representative
declined to comment.
White House officials said they
expect a full plunge in upcoming
weeks into a special House race in
Pennsylvania, with trips from
Trump, Vice President Pence and
Cabinet members. The race has
taken on a larger-than-life role in
the White House because officials
want to stem the tide of the losses
they suffered last year in Virginia
and Alabama.
White House officials also said
they are interested in progress on
infrastructure, which polls well
across the country, particularly in
swing districts. And they have
begun exploring ways to inject
“wedge issues” that could trouble
Democrats in more conservative
states. Those could include immigration votes, requirements for
welfare, sanctuary-city reform
and revisions to the guest-worker
program.
Despite all that, political handicappers have gradually increased the odds that Democrats
will retake the House, where they
need to pick up 24 seats to do so.
Democrats must net two seats to
take control of the Senate, a harder task given the number of competitive states where Trump won
election.
Among the recently announced Republican retirements
are Rep. Darrell Issa (Calif.) and
the surprise decision by Rep. Edward R. Royce (Calif.), who had
previously told party leaders that
he was committed to reelection.
Both seats are now seen as potential Democratic pickups.
Hopes of recruiting other toptier candidates have been frustrated. In Tennessee, Democrats
recruited former governor Phil
Bredesen to run for the Senate
seat left open by the retirement of
Sen. Bob Corker (R). But Republican efforts to recruit the current
governor, Bill Haslam, fell short.
One prominent GOP donor
said rumors that former Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty
would jump into the race there
are unfounded. “He’s told me unequivocally he’s not going to run
for the Senate,” the donor said.
Pawlenty did not respond to a
request for comment.
Republican strategists said
they want to spend the next eight
months talking about the economy.
“I think it’s far less challenging
now that we’ve got tax reform
behind us,” said Sen. Thom Tillis
(R-N.C.), the vice chairman of the
National Republican Senatorial
Committee, echoing the hopeful
line. “The discussion we were
having with candidates last year
is we’ve really got to produce a
result. We’ve got to have something to run on.”
But maintaining that message
can be a challenge, as the president showed recently when his
vulgar comments about some developing countries sparked international outrage.
Dave Hansen, a political adviser to Love, the Utah congresswoman, said such conflicts are
unavoidable during the Trump
presidency.
“It’s certainly not like running
with Ronald Reagan, that’s for
sure,” Hansen said. “What a candidate has to do in a situation like
this is, you can’t be all in for the
guy. Basically, you support him
when you think he’s right and
oppose him when you think he’s
wrong.”
michael.scherer@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
RE
MACY’S
JOINS THE
WORLD IN
HONORING
THE LIFE AND
LEGACY OF
DR. MARTIN
LUTHER
KING, JR.
A5
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
Incoming N.J. governor hopes swing to left will resonate
GOP is ready to put
Democrat Phil Murphy’s
liberal agenda to the test
BY
D AVID W EIGEL
trenton, n.j. — Days before his
inauguration as New Jersey’s
56th governor, Phil Murphy had
Hollywood on his mind. The 60year old Democrat had just read a
headline about reshoots on “All
the Money in the World,” which
had been done in a hurry to
remove disgraced actor Kevin
Spacey from the movie.
“They paid Michelle Williams
$1,000 and Mark Wahlberg
$1 million for the same work,”
Murphy said in an interview.
“That’s just outrageous. Equal
pay is one thing we want to get to
early. We want to say to everyone:
New Jersey’s a place where gender does not play a role in how
much you get paid.”
Murphy, a former Goldman
Sachs financier and ambassador
to Germany, had a relatively
smooth path to the governor’s
office. Outgoing Gov. Chris Christie (R) was deeply unpopular and
New Jersey’s Democratic establishment rallied around Murphy,
who spent $20 million of his own
money to win the June primary.
In November, while Virginia’s
statewide races became a referendum on President Trump’s administration, Murphy’s 14-point
victory was a national afterthought.
Murphy is ready to end his
obscurity. On Tuesday, when he is
sworn in, New Jersey will become
one of just eight states where
Democrats run every branch of
government. If Murphy has his
way, New Jersey will become a
proving ground for every liberal
policy idea coming into fashion,
from legalized marijuana to a $15
minimum wage, from a “millionaire’s tax” to a virtual bill of rights
for undocumented immigrants.
Undergirding all of it: automatic voter registration, early
voting and the right to register
with a political party as late as
Election Day.
Murphy’s moves could resonate in other states. Republicans,
who control 33 governor’s mansions, are defending 26 of them in
this year’s midterm elections.
The prospect of New Jersey shifting to the left, smack in the
middle of the nation’s largest
media market, strikes Republicans as an opportunity to warn
voters in swing states of what
could happen if Democrats take
power.
“Residents are leaving high-tax
blue states in a mass exodus and
taking billions of their dollars
with them,” said Jon Thompson, a
spokesman for the Republican
Governors Association. “If Phil
Murphy and other Democrat governors embrace the toxic [Connecticut Governor] Dan Malloy
model of an anti-business, taxand-spend agenda, their states
will soon serve as a lesson in
fiscal failure and Republicans
will continue to dominate control
in the states.”
Murphy is raring to prove that
wrong.
“Somebody said to me at one
point, ‘Hey, how come you haven’t moved to the middle since
you won the primary?’ ” Murphy
said. “I said, ‘Let me tell you the
secret: I believed what I said in
the primary.’ ”
No one believes Murphy will
get his way on everything. He will
take office in the middle of several fights with the Trump ad-
JULIO CORTEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ministration. Like Murphy,
Christie opposed the Republican
tax overhaul for its effect on New
Jersey residents’ ability to deduct
state and local taxes on their
federal returns, then opposed the
administration for allowing offshore drilling and carving out a
special exception for Florida.
Christie endorsed Trump for
president; Murphy compared
Trump’s rise to the ascent of Adolf
Hitler. Asked how he would negotiate with the administration
where Christie could not, Murphy said “it would be great if
Governor Christie, if he’s got that
relationship, to use it,” and if the
impasse continues, he is ready.
“We’re going to stand our
ground on anything we find unacceptable, and unfortunately
that list is long, whether it’s
immigration policy, it’s offshore
drilling, or it’s an awful tax plan,”
Murphy said. “We’re not going to
compromise on American values
and our constitution over here” —
he spread out his arms — “just to
get a deal over here. That won’t
happen.”
Murphy will face a different
kind of resistance from his fellow
Democrats, who easily held their
majorities in November — albeit
with leaders more conservative
than the new governor. State
Senate President Steve Sweeney
and incoming state House Speaker Craig Coughlin have called
themselves “fiscal conservatives.”
Sweeney, who said in November
that a “millionaire’s tax” was
doable, said after the passage of
the GOP-backed tax bill last
month that it might need rethinking.
“I don’t blame people for
having sticker shock in reaction
to the federal tax plan,” Murphy
said. “We still think that millionaire’s tax makes sense, particularly given the very wealthy
among us will do the best, almost
by any definition, based on this
tax plan.”
In the short term, Murphy
endorses an idea popular in blue
states with high taxes — allowing
taxpayers to write off their state
taxes as charitable deductions.
Before taking office, he has been
working with towns and cities to
create charitable organizations
for that purpose. “It’s not clear
that you actually need laws
passed for towns to do it,” he said.
None of it, Murphy said, will
impede the agenda that he ran
on. Eight years earlier, Christie
took power at the height of the
Great Recession; the budget
crunch set him up for years of
confrontations
with
labor
unions; his first budget proposed
an $820 million cut in funds to
school districts and 1,300 state
worker layoffs, and kicked off a
battle over the state’s contribution to public pensions.
“I think what I did here in 2010
gave [Wisconsin Gov.] Scott
Walker permission to do what he
did in 2011, and gave him the
political courage to do what he
did,” Christie told the New York
Times this month.
Murphy, inheriting a stronger
economy, wants to create a new
model — a “fair” state, where the
rich pay more and the poor have
less far to fall.
“How do you jack up the number of incubators? How do you
get venture money to be jazzed
about this state?” Murphy said.
“How do you make sure millennials find the communities they
want to live in and use public
transportation? How do you
make sure the public schools
remain some of the best in the
country? We’re the most diverse
state in the nation — that’s a huge
leg up in that economy.”
He praised California and Minnesota, two states that got
through the recession by raising
taxes instead of cutting services,
as his models.
OFF OF THE
SALEM
ORIENTAL RUGS
New Jersey Gov.-elect
Phil Murphy (D) speaks
during a prayer service
at the Cathedral Basilica
of the Sacred Heart in
Newark on Friday. On
Tuesday, when he is
sworn in, New Jersey
will become one of eight
states where Democrats
run every branch of
state government. If
Murphy has his way, the
state will become a
proving ground for
liberal policy ideas.
“We’re going to
stand our ground
on anything we
find unacceptable,
and unfortunately
that list is long,
whether it’s
immigration
policy, it’s offshore
drilling, or it’s an
awful tax plan.”
Phil Murphy,
New Jersey governor-elect
“We are America’s number one
turnaround story; that’s how I
think about this,” Murphy said.
“Eight years ago, that story was
California. A state is below par,
and new leadership is coming in
to turn that around.”
One of the first “turnaround”
priorities is equal-pay legislation,
as Murphy has been saying, along
with paid sick leave. Another
turnaround priority is marijuana, which Murphy wants to legalize as soon as possible, as one way
to fight a racial gap in criminal
sentencing.
He skirted the details — the
main legislative vehicle for legalization may lack votes — but said
that U.S. Attorney General Jeff
Sessions has not changed any
minds by saying that federal law
enforcement could once again
crack down on state marijuana
businesses.
“It doesn’t deter us,” Murphy
said. “The one gratifying thing
about what Sessions did is that
the reaction to it has been bipartisan.”
Murphy ran on legalization,
and on making New Jersey a
“sanctuary state.” Saying so had
hurt him politically; polls that
had Murphy winning by a landslide tightened in late October, as
Republicans warned that “sanctuary” status would make the
state a haven for crime. Some
Democrats, facing tighter races,
distanced themselves from Murphy.
This week, Murphy conceded
that “sanctuary” was a “buzzword” that probably did more to
confuse than enlighten. He preferred a new word — “welcoming” — for more or less the same
policy of making it easy for undocumented immigrants to live
in the state. That would mean
state IDs, driver’s licenses and
eligibility for college financial aid
— “not just in-state tuition.”
It would also mean an Office of
Immigrant Defensive Protection,
which if Murphy has his way
would become a government
agency that undocumented immigrants could trust.
“It would be a place where
everybody could call with questions about their status,” Murphy
said. “Our guess is it’s going to be
legal-services-oriented. One remarkable thing, and you probably have seen this, the rumors
that swirl around communities
are extraordinary, and it’s literally hard to get, particularly if
you’re undocumented, the right
answer to your question. That’s
when people go back into the
shadows.”
Some of the policies might be
stymied. There is not, right now, a
suggestion of a full-bore legislative battle such as the one Walker
began when he attacked Wisconsin’s budget deficit by curtailing
unions. Murphy wanted to prove
that all of this worked, in tandem.
“This state, under the current
leadership, has gotten into the
belief that if I give something to
you, it comes at my expense,”
Murphy said. “That’s a myth.
Raising the minimum wage does
not take from growth, it adds to
growth. Earned sick leave gives
workers a lot more confidence
and adds to their participation in
the economy. Equal pay for equal
work isn’t, ‘Here, I’ll give this to
you.’ It’s confidence, it’s participation.”
Murphy rejected the idea that
he, like Christie, will ramp up his
media profile. At the end of the
interview, standing up in the
sneakers he wore when he
danced onto the stage on election
night, he suggested that national
politics will take care of itself.
“This state used to be a progressive beacon,” he said. “In
many respects, that soul has been
ripped out of us. We can put it
back.”
david.weigel@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
The World
Alert level
is raised at
volcano in
Philippines
An archive of painful memories
Beirut’s bullet-ridden civil war museum is haunting, but few Lebanese want to disturb the ghosts
BY
L OUISA L OVELUCK
R EUTERS
IN BEIRUT
V
iewed from some angles, the yellow house
appears a restatement
of Ottoman elegance,
its high arches and elevated terraces overlooking a district of tower blocks.
From others, it is an eyesore, its
crumbling sandstone walls riddled with bullets and saved from
collapse by gray steel girders.
It is supposed to be a symbol of
remembrance and reconciliation.
“If the architects think that
thing is meant to represent me,
then they’re wrong,” said Saad
Youssef, looking up at the building
last week. “It’s ugly. They should
tear it down.”
His friend Mustafa Khattib disagreed. “It has to stay. The Lebanese need to see this every day,
because they need to remember
what they did.”
During Lebanon’s 15-year year
civil war, the building commanded
a crossroads known then as the “intersection of death.” The Christian
militia that occupied the house
turned it into a sniper’s nest.
Funded with an $18 million
grant from Lebanese and French
authorities, Beit Beirut was envisioned by its architects as the first
memorial of its kind: a museum,
archive and visitor center to commemorate the country’s civil
war. The renovation has merged
the building’s skeleton into a lightfilled glass one, adding archive
space for a raft of documents and
pods in which research staff could
examine them.
Inside the old apartment building, ceilings are scorched black and
a barrier of sandbags divides a
room on the second floor. In makeshift bunkers — one of them formerly a blind woman’s bedroom
that was reinforced with concrete
— slits have been gouged into the
stonework, offering killers a view of
the surrounding streets. They left
graffiti, too. One just reads, “Hell.”
The questions of memory and
forgiveness that Beit Beirut’s
founders hope to raise are far from
abstract in a country that remains
heavily divided and without a common understanding of the war
years.
It is not taught in history books.
There is no official death toll, and
thousands of families remain without answers over the fate of disappeared husbands, brothers or
daughters.
“The idea was to create a space
that finally allows people to come
together. We have a lot of monuments in this country. Every community has its own martyrs and
statues that they visit a few times a
year with flowers,” said Youssef Haidar, the architect who oversaw the
renovation.
But although Beit — or
“house of” — Beirut has officially
been open for months, visitors
only trickle in and the gate remains closed for weeks at a time.
The city’s municipal authority has
yet to appoint a management
committee or recruit staffers, and
some wings are closed off even to
the architects, now that their jobs
are done.
PHOTOS BY DIEGO IBARRA SANCHEZ/MEMO/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Beit Beirut was envisioned by its architects as the first memorial of its kind: a museum, archive and visitor center to remember the
country’s civil war. A renovation has merged the skeleton with a light-filled glass one, adding archive space. BELOW LEFT: Youssef
Haidar is the architect who oversaw the renovation. BELOW RIGHT: A Lebanese man walks in front of the yellow house.
For the project’s supporters, the
delays reflect the unwillingness of
the political establishment to interrogate painful memories. The municipality’s cultural office says the
building is in a “transitional period” while officials establish a legal
framework for its operations.
Stretching from 1975 to 1990,
Lebanon’s civil war pitted sectarian
militias against one another as outside powers fueled the violence. By
the end, Beirut was a shattered city
and the country’s social fabric had
been tattered. No community escaped the war’s massacres.
“The people who carried out the
war are still the ones in power, and I
wonder if they are ready for this,”
Haidar said.
High-ranking members of the
current government — which reflects a delicately balanced confessional system shaped through a
postwar accord — have links to the
Christian and Muslim militias
that slugged it out across the city’s
front line.
“This is a building that tells the
real story of what we did,” Haidar
said.
Perched on the edge of downtown Beirut, the Barakat building
became a home for both Christians
and Muslims — many of their faces
immortalized in the negatives of a
destroyed photo studio downstairs.
Construction began in 1924,
and it was the architecture that
brought the place to life. Highceilinged balconies were arranged
around a central atrium so neighbors could lean out and chat. Wide
windows opened views over the
bustling city.
It was that openness that would
later make the building deadly, offering snipers a panoramic view.
The area they had presided over
is barely recognizable today. Once
the heart of the city, downtown
Beirut was largely leveled during
the war, and the multibillion-dollar
renovation is sterile by comparison
and empties out when night falls.
Only in Beit Beirut have the
traces of destruction been intentionally preserved. At the base of
the building, stones are still piled
up where its occupiers destroyed
the lower stairwell to prevent attackers from entering. Steel girders maintain the structural integrity in places, making clear where
the original stonework was lost to
shelling, bullets or fire.
“Although the properties in
downtown Beirut are so expensive
that you can’t keep hundreds of
buildings for this purpose, you can
keep one to remind of what happened here,” said Reina Sarkis, a
psychoanalyst and researcher on
the trauma of the Lebanese war.
How the building will be used in
the future is uncertain. In the surrounding blocks this week, residents voiced a mix of bemusement
and frustration.
“It’s not even got proper signs,”
said Najat Moubarak, sitting surrounded by stone angels in her family’s hardware store. “If it’s not advertised widely, then how can it
have an impact?”
She had guided three foreign
tourists in Beit Beirut’s direction
earlier that morning. “They came in
here asking for the yellow house, so
of course I showed them.” Pulling
out a recent tourist map, she
searched the pages for Beit Beirut —
it was not marked.
Too often, the projects of dedicated individuals and organizations
like the museum fail to win crucial
backing from politicians, said Sarkis, who has worked extensively on
her own initiatives to rehabilitate
war survivors.
“Right after the war, the first
people to reflect were the artists,
and they have produced a lot. Journalists, writers, historians,” Sarkis
said. “The problem is that if you
want to take it to a different level,
you need a political decision and a
political will.”
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
Suzan Haidamous in Beirut
contributed to this report.
manila — The Philippines
raised the alert level at its rumbling Mayon volcano to “level 3” Sunday after detecting
lava flow and indications of
activity that could lead to
eruptions of magma.
More than 900 families
were evacuated from villages
near Mayon, a tourist attraction because of its cone shape,
after a “steam-driven eruption” Saturday.
Authorities advised people
to cover their noses and
mouths with a damp, clean
cloth or dust mask if they are
exposed to ash. They also said
that aircraft must avoid flying
close to the volcano’s summit.
Two similar “phreatic”
eruptions occurred Sunday at
the volcano in central Albay
province, unleashing more
ash. “Mayon’s summit crater is
now exhibiting bright crater
glow that signifies the growth
of a new lava dome and beginnings of lava flow towards the
southern slopes,” the Philippine Institute of Volcanology
and Seismology said.
Renato Solidum, who leads
the institute, said the volcano
appears due for another major
eruption, as it has been displaying abnormal behavior
since late last year.
“Alert level 3 is what we
considered critical, 4 is when
eruption is imminent, and 5 is
eruption in progress,” Cedric
Daep, head of the Albay Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office,
said in a radio interview.
Mayon’s most destructive
eruption was in February 1841,
when lava buried a town and
killed 1,200 people. It last
erupted in 2014, spewing lava
and forcing thousands of people to evacuate.
The latest eruptions began
Saturday, unleashing ash,
rocks and sulfur fumes, and
were accompanied by rumbling sounds.
The Institute of Volcanology and Seismology had earlier
raised the alert to “level 2,”
saying the activity was “probably of magmatic origin,
which could lead to more phreatic eruptions or eventually to
hazardous magmatic eruptions.”
The institute said that since
the first eruption Saturday, it
had recorded 158 rockfall
events. It urged people to
avoid a 3.7-mile-radius permanent danger zone and a 4.3mile expanded danger zone.
Landslides and sudden explosions, or a dome collapse
that could generate hazardous
volcanic flows, also are possible, it said.
People within the slope of
the volcano but outside the
danger zones were told to take
precautionary
measures
against possible roof collapses,
resulting from accumulated
ash and rainwater, and “lahar,”
an Indonesian term for a volcanic mudflow.
DIGEST
EAST CHINA SEA
No survivors expected
as oil tanker explodes
A burning Iranian oil tanker
exploded and sank Sunday after
more than a week listing off the
coast of China.
The collision and disaster
involving the Sanchi, which
carried 30 Iranians and two
Bangladeshis, had transfixed Iran,
which is still reeling from
demonstrations and unrest that
swept the country this month.
State TV quoted Mahmoud
Rastad, the chief of Iran’s
maritime agency, as saying that
“there is no hope of finding
survivors.”
The cause of the Jan. 6 collision
between the Sanchi and the
Chinese freighter CF Crystal
160 miles off the coast of Shanghai
in the East China Sea is unclear.
All 21 crew members on the CF
Crystal were reported to be safe.
But the Sanchi, carrying nearly
1 million barrels of a gassy,
ultralight oil bound for South
Korea, burst into flames.
About noon Sunday, Chinese
state media reported that a large
explosion shook the Sanchi. The
ship then sank into the sea.
Officials said a 3.8-square-mile
area was contaminated with oil.
However, the condensate oil
readily evaporates or burns off in
a fire, reducing the chance of a
major spill.
State media said the ship’s
voice data recorder, which
functions like the “black boxes”
on aircraft, had been found. Three
bodies have been recovered from
the sea.
PERU
7.1-magnitude quake
kills 1, injures dozens
the tunnel threat a top priority
since its 2014 war, when Hamas
militants on several occasions
made their way into Israel using
such tunnels.
Sunday’s operation marked
the third tunnel Israel has
destroyed in two months.
A powerful earthquake struck
off Peru’s coast early Sunday,
tumbling adobe homes in small,
rural towns, killing at least one
person and injuring dozens,
officials said.
The earthquake destroyed 63
homes and injured 65 people,
Chief of Civil Defense Jorge
Chávez said.
The sole fatality was a man
crushed by a rock, officials said.
They added that many of those
injured were in Chala district, a
coastal area dependent on fishing
and mining.
The U.S. Geological Survey said
the quake had a magnitude of 7.1
and was centered 25 miles from
Acari in the Arequipa department
of southwestern Peru.
The quake was felt as far away
as the capital, Lima, about 350
miles from Acari.
The U.S. Pacific Tsunami
Warning Center initially said that
hazardous waves could hit Peru
and Chile, but it later reported
that there was no longer a tsunami
threat.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
ISRAEL
Hamas tunnel under
Gaza crossing is struck
The Israeli military said
Sunday that it destroyed an
attack tunnel built by the
Hamas militant group that
stretched from the Gaza Strip
through Israel and into Egypt
and that ran past Israeli
military posts and gas and fuel
pipelines.
A military spokesman, Lt.
Col. Jonathan Conricus, said the
mile-long tunnel ran
underneath the Kerem Shalom
border crossing, Gaza’s main
point of entry for humanitarian
aid.
He said that Israeli jets struck
OLEG PETRASYUK/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Costumed locals with painted faces celebrate the traditional
Ukrainian folk holiday Malanka in the western village of Krasnoilsk.
Marking New Year’s in accordance with the Julian calendar, people
stroll from house to house, singing and performing short plays.
part of the tunnel and that a
new set of sophisticated “tools”
destroyed the rest. Conricus
said forces had been monitoring
its construction for some time
and feared an imminent attack
on Israelis. The crossing has
been closed until further notice.
Israel has made neutralizing
Tunisians mark revolution
anniversary with protest: After
nearly a week of sometimes
violent protests, hundreds rallied
peacefully against austerity
measures in Tunisia’s capital on
the seventh anniversary of the
ousting of Zine el-Abidine Ben
Ali. The unrest had been
triggered by tax and price hikes as
the government seeks to reduce a
budget deficit to meet conditions
imposed by international donors.
Tunisia has been hailed as the
only democratic success of the
Arab Spring, but it has had nine
governments since Ben Ali’s exit.
Plane skids off Turkish runway,
toward Black Sea: A commercial
plane that skidded off a runway
after landing in northern Turkey
dangled precariously off a cliff
with its nose just yards from the
sea. All 168 people aboard were
evacuated safely. Images showed
the aircraft on its belly and at an
acute angle just above the water. If
it had slid any further, the plane
probably would have plunged into
the Black Sea in the Turkish
province of Trabzon. Flights were
suspended at Trabzon Airport for
hours after the incident. An
investigation is underway.
— From news services
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
Trump’s deal is ‘the slap of the century,’ Palestinian leader says
BY
L OVEDAY M ORRIS
jerusalem — In a combative,
two-hour speech brimming with
colorful insults, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas denounced President Trump
on Sunday, calling his forthcoming peace proposal “the slap of the
century.”
He said Palestinians were being
offered the Jerusalem suburb of
Abu Dis as the capital of their
future state, rather than East Jerusalem, which most of the international community considers illegally occupied by Israel. The area
sits outside Israel’s security barrier and has been floated but rejected as a capital for a Palestinian
state in previous negotiations.
“We said no to Trump,” Abbas
said. “We won’t accept his project;
his deal of the century is the slap of
the century, and we will respond.”
Trump has charged his son-inlaw, Jared Kushner, and Middle
East envoy Jason Greenblatt with
working out “the deal of the century” — a peace agreement between Israelis and Palestinians. They have not formally presented a plan.
Abbas was addressing members of the Palestinian Central
Council as they began to discuss
their response to the U.S. decision
to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s
capital. Proposals include rescinding Palestinian recognition of Israel, pursuing Israel for war
crimes at the International Criminal Court and advancing efforts
for a Palestinian state to be recognized internationally.
While Trump said at the time
that the Jerusalem decision would
have no impact on the final status
of the contested city, he later
tweeted that it had been taken “off
the table” for negotiations, from
MOHAMAD TOROKMAN/REUTERS
Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas condemned President Trump for recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and said he won’t deal with him.
which he accused the Palestinians
of walking away.
Discussing the tweets, Abbas
said there were no negotiations to
walk away from.
“I see a tweet,” he said. “We will
not give Palestinians money because they refuse to negotiate.”
His frustration was evident.
“May your house be destroyed,” he
said, aiming a common Arab insult at Trump.
He questioned where Trump
had offered negotiations. “On the
phone? On television?”
Abbas has said that the United
States can no longer be a fair arbiter for negotiations, but that the
Palestinians are open to talks in
line with the Arab Peace Initiative,
a framework endorsed by the Arab
League in 2002.
Abbas also had sharp barbs for
U.S. Ambassador to Israel David
Friedman, whom he criticized for
his support of Jewish settlements,
and the U.S. envoy to the United
Nations, Nikki Haley. The pair are
an “insult” to any self-respecting
U.S. administration, he said.
Haley, he said, wears high heels
“not for elegance but to use to hit
anyone who attacks Israel.”
“I say to her, and let her hear me,
our reaction will be worse,” he
said. Haley last month said she
would be “taking names” of countries that voted for a U.N. resolution that criticized the recognition
of Jerusalem, as Trump threatened aid cuts to those that did.
Abbas said the Palestinians are
at a “critical moment.”
Some Palestinian officials say
they also plan to request that the
United Nations come up with a
detailed peace proposal as a basis
for negotiations and bypass using
the United States as a sole broker.
There is some skepticism that
the Palestinians will go as far as
rescinding recognition of Israel.
Ashraf al-Ajrami, a senior Palestinian official, said there may be
a decision to add a caveat that it
will continue only if Palestinian
rights are recognized. However,
Abbas said that the 1993 Oslo
peace agreement, in which the
Palestinian Liberation Organization recognized Israel, was already
dead. Israel had destroyed it, he
said.
Officials will continue their
meeting on Monday. “The issues
that are going to be discussed are
primarily new strategic orientations: our relationship with Israel
and the United States,” said Hanan
Ashrawi, a member of the Palestinian Liberation Organization’s
executive committee.
Abbas’s rebukes were not limited to U.S. officials. He also hinted
at less than full-hearted support
from regional countries more interested in normalizing ties with
Israel, and he lambasted Hamas,
the Palestinian faction that controls Gaza, for not turning up at
the meeting.
He pledged to continue payments to families of those imprisoned, killed or wounded by Israel,
including those who carry out attacks. In a comment widely reported by Israeli media, he quoted
an Egyptian philosopher who had
said that Israel’s quest for a national home for the Jewish people
is a “colonialist project” that has
“nothing to do with Jews.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Hazem Balousha contributed from
Gaza City.
Syrian opposition negotiator dies
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peace process.
Mounir Darwish, 80, was a
leading member of Syria’s internationally backed opposition
movement and a familiar figure
at peace talks brokered by the
United Nations. He was struck by
a car Thursday and died Friday
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night after surgery on his ankle.
Friends who visited him after the
operation said he appeared to be
recovering well and was looking
forward to going home the next
day.
The United Nations’ special
envoy for Syria, Staffan de Mistura, called for “those involved to
be identified and brought to justice,” apparently referring to the
hit-and-run and not Darwish’s
treatment afterward. No official
cause of death was announced.
De Mistura said late Saturday
that Darwish had stayed in Da-
mascus, rather than seek exile, “as he sought peace and a
better future for his country.”
The death did not appear
to have been mentioned in progovernment media, and a representative of the Information Ministry could not be reached for
comment.
Colleagues said friends and
family members who had visited
the dissident in the hospital on
Friday reported that he was in
good spirits and was waiting to be
discharged.
“He even called me to tell me
that he’d need to stay in bed for a
month but that he was ready to
receive any documents I needed
him to read,” said Firas al-Khalidi,
who heads the Cairo section of
Syria’s political opposition, of
which Darwish was a part.
The Cairo bloc is one of three
that have signed on to an opposition platform as a way to present a united front at the
U.N.-brokered talks in Geneva.
The delegates have dropped all
preconditions to the peace negotiations, relinquishing a demand
that President Bashar al-Assad
step down.
Darwish had been concerned
that the Syrian government was
growing increasingly hostile to
his activities, Khalidi said.
“When I called recently to ask
about a meeting in Riyadh, he
said he didn’t want to leave because he was worried,” Khalidi
said. “He would tell me, ‘Be careful, Firas.’ ”
Six years into Syria’s war, a
coalition of pro-Assad forces has
reestablished control over most
of the country, with rebel forces
hemmed into pockets of the north
and south.
Although hopes for an opposition breakthrough at the negotiating table are low — the two
sides do not sit in the same room
— Western officials say efforts to
unify Syria’s opposition would
increase pressure on Assad’s government.
“It is about removing the argument that the regime kept on
making that it had no opposition
to negotiate with,” one diplomat
said.
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
Heba Habib in Stockholm contributed
to this report.
Does this page look familiar?
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MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
Pentagon is seeking new nuclear weapons to ‘enhance deterrence’
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
A leaked draft of the Pentagon’s
forthcoming nuclear weapons review shows that senior defense
officials are keen to not only modernize the aging U.S. arsenal, but
also add new ways to wage nuclear
war as Russia, China and other
adversaries bolster their own arsenals.
Among the new weapons proposed are “low-yield nukes” that
could be mounted to existing Trident ballistic missiles launched
from submarines. Despite the
nickname, the warheads would
still probably pack a punch larger
than the explosions that leveled
the Japanese cities of Hiroshima
and Nagasaki during World
War II.
The draft, first published by
HuffPost, states that the smaller
nuclear weapons are necessary because of the “deterioration of the
strategic environment,” a nod
toward existing tensions with Rus-
In leaked review, agency
says threat from Russia
warrants arsenal boost
sia in particular. The Pentagon’s
thesis: If an adversary has an
arsenal of nuclear weapons that
are not controlled by existing treaties, the United States should have
weapons to match and retaliate
with if necessary.
“These supplements will enhance deterrence by denying potential adversaries any mistaken
confidence that limited nuclear
employment can provide a useful
advantage over the United States
and its allies,” the draft said.
The concept seems especially
focused on Russia, which the Pentagon has accused of violating the
1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear
Forces Treaty by building and deploying a new nuclear cruise mis-
sile that is seen as a threat to
Europe. The Pentagon alleges in
the draft that Russia thinks that
launching a limited nuclear strike
first may offer an advantage, in
part because it has a variety of
small nuclear weapons at its disposal.
“Correcting this mistaken Russian perception is a strategic imperative,” the draft said.
The Pentagon also calls for a
new nuclear submarine-launched
cruise missile, typically called a
SLCM (“slick-em”) in the military.
The Obama administration sought
to phase out a similar cruise missile in a nuclear review it released
in 2010, but defense officials now
argue that it is necessary.
The new weapons could add
further costs to what already
promised to be a very expensive
bill to modernize the nuclear arsenal, most of which is decades
old. An assessment by the Congressional Budget Office released
last fall found that it will cost
$1.2 trillion over the next 30 years
to build and maintain new weapons.
President Trump directed Defense Secretary Jim Mattis early
last year to launch the review to
assess the state, flexibility and
resiliency of the existing arsenal to
deter modern adversaries. In a
statement Friday, the Pentagon did
not deny that the draft document
is legitimate but said it is Defense
Department policy not to comment on “pre-decision” documents.
“Our discussion has been robust
and several drafts have been written,” the statement said. “However,
the Nuclear Posture Review has
not been completed and will ultimately be reviewed and approved
by the President and the Secretary
of Defense.”
The Pentagon is expected to
release the nuclear review after
Trump’s State of the Union address
on Jan. 30, though it is not clear if
the timeline has been altered by
the draft’s leakage. A variation of
the review was carried out by the
past two administrations and typically informs strategy for years
going forward.
Michaela Dodge, a defense analyst for the conservative Heritage
Foundation, declined to comment
on the document, citing its unauthorized leakage. Broadly, however, she said some nuclear analysts
have said that adding new ways to
deliver nuclear weapons could
launch a new arms race.
“But my sense is that there
already is a nuclear arms race,” she
said. “It’s just that the United
States is not racing. It’s actually
standing by and observing while
the Russians and the Chinese are
building new nuclear capabilities,
and the North Koreans are advancing their nuclear weapons capabilities and expanding them.”
But others argue that the United
States should not build new weapons. Jon Wolfsthal, a former
Obama administration official
who worked on nuclear issues on
the National Security Council, said
the Trump administration is on
solid ground in sending a strong
message that the United States will
tolerate the use of nuclear weapons, but “runs off the rails” in
arguing that new capabilities are
needed.
Congress has rejected previous
Pentagon efforts to add new
submarine-launched warheads, in
part because it is not clear how
Russia would react if a missile is
launched at it and the size of the
warhead on it can’t be determined,
Wolfsthal said.
“These are familiar debates for
people in the nuclear community,”
Wolfsthal said. “We’ve had them
for many, many years, and some of
them were considered and rejected under the Obama administration. Some of them were considered and pursued. But they now
have the opportunity to push their
agenda.”
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
Alert’s retraction was slow because FEMA permission was needed
FALSE ALERT FROM A1
Hawaii over the president’s
charged exchanges with Kim Jong
Un, the leader of North Korea, as
it builds and tests its nuclear
capabilities.
A North Korean missile launch
would pose dire threats to Hawaii
and take about 30 minutes to
reach the islands, experts have
predicted.
Regarding the North Korea
threat, Trump said: “Well, we’ll
see what happens. They have got a
couple of meetings scheduled,
couple of additional meetings
scheduled, we’re going to see
what happens. Hopefully, it’s all
going to work out.”
Hawaii Emergency Management System officials said the
incident was caused by human
error — an employee pressing the
wrong button during a training
exercise.
Hawaii officials said the problem occurred about 8:05 a.m. Saturday when a worker faced two
options from a drop-down computer menu: “Test missile alert”
and “Missile alert.”
“In this case, the operator selected the wrong menu option,”
agency spokesman Richard Rapoza said.
The result was a terse warning
of a “missile threat” sent to mobile
phones, televisions and radios
across Hawaii. Reports from the
scene suggested that many residents panicked, scrambling to
seek shelter.
A White House official said
Trump was quickly briefed by
deputy national security adviser
Ricky L. Waddell, who accompanied Trump from Washington to
the president’s Palm Beach club.
He later discussed the episode
with national security adviser
H.R. McMaster and White House
Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, the
official said.
The federal government tracks
North Korean missile launches
through several means, including
satellite surveillance, and officials
around Trump would have known
that no missile was detected.
Trump issued no statements
about the incident Saturday. The
only public mention came from
deputy White House press secretary Lindsay Walters, who was
with Trump in Florida and made
clear that the federal government
was not involved.
“The president has been
briefed on the state of Hawaii’s
emergency management exercise. This was purely a state exercise,” Walters said.
While there is no protocol that
applies directly to such a mistake,
past presidents have often
weighed in to reassure the public
at times of stress or threat.
The situation in Hawaii was
made worse by the 38-minute gap
between the initial alert and a
follow-up message stating that
the missile warning was a mistake.
GEORGE F. LEE/THE HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vern Miyagi of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, left, and Gov. David Ige address the media
Saturday. When a worker had two options in a drop-down computer menu — “Test missile alert” and
“Missile alert” — he picked “Missile alert.” He has been reassigned.
Wireless emergency alerts are
dispatched during critical situations — to warn the public of
dangerous weather, missing children and security threats — and
are a partnership of the FCC,
Federal Emergency Management
Agency and the wireless industry.
Responsibility for sending those
messages typically falls to emergency management officials.
Part of what worsened the situation Saturday was that there was
no system for correcting the error,
Rapoza said. The state agency has
standing permission through
FEMA to use civil warning systems to send out the missile alert
— but not to send out a subsequent false-alarm alert, he said.
The state agency posted a follow-up tweet at 8:20 a.m. saying
there was “NO missile threat.” But
it was not until 8:45 a.m. that a
cellphone alert was sent telling
people to stand down.
“We had to double back and
work with FEMA [to craft and
approve the false-alarm alert],
and that’s what took time,” Rapoza said.
The agency said it has also
suspended all internal drills until
the investigation is completed. It
will issue a preliminary report
and corrective actions next week.
The employee in question has
been temporarily reassigned,
Rapoza said, but there are no
plans to fire him.
Mistakes with the emergency
alert system are not uncommon.
In May, a training exercise in
New Jersey led to a dire “NUCLEAR POWER PLANT WARNING” being broadcast to two
counties near the Hope Creek
nuclear power plant in Salem
County. State officials blamed “a
coding error” for that mishap.
In August, Guam residents
were shocked by an alert of a “civil
danger warning” broadcast by radio stations late at night. Guam is
the closest U.S. territory to North
Korea, and the country has explicitly threatened to attack Guam
with missiles.
But Guam Homeland Security
said the alert was a mistake and
blamed human error.
todd.frankel@washpost.com
amy.wang@washpost.com
Brian Fung and Anne Gearan
contributed to this report.
When prepping for doomsday, build a kit and get underground
BY
T ODD C . F RANKEL
So what should you do in a
nuclear missile attack?
That key bit of advice was mostly missing from the mistaken alert
sent out Saturday to mobile
phones across Hawaii. All it said
was,
“BALLISTIC
MISSILE
THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII.
SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER.
THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”
A more detailed message
scrolled across television screens
in Hawaii, suggesting, “If you are
indoors, stay indoors. If you are
outdoors, seek immediate shelter
in a building. Remain indoors well
away from windows. If you are
driving, pull safely to the side of
After mistaken alert,
there’s curiosity about
surviving nuclear attacks
the road and seek shelter in a
building or lay on the floor.”
The alerts were quickly withdrawn, but widespread curiosity
about how to increase the odds of
surviving a nuclear attack remains.
That’s why Troy Jones, owner of
Nukepills.com, which sells $180
family radiation emergency kits,
was rushing into his office and
calling in three workers on Sun-
day. Orders have been flooding in
for potassium iodide pills, fineparticulate face masks and radiation wipes.
“It’s amazing,” Jones said.
The U.S. government has a
wealth of suggestions for staying
safe — or at least safer — in a
nuclear attack.
And the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention had been
scheduled to hold a teaching session on the public health response
to a nuclear blast this Tuesday. The
agency postponed it last week —
just before the Hawaii scare. The
session will now be on the flu.
But the CDC does have ideas for
how to protect yourself in a radiation emergency.
And the Department of Homeland Security offers ideas on
Ready.gov.
Here are steps you can take in
the event of a nuclear strike:
Get underground. A basement
offers more protection from nuclear fallout particles than a building’s first floor. Close windows and
fireplace dampers. Turn off heating and cooling units. And the
thicker the walls, the better. Dense
materials — even books — provide
more protection. This helps explain why some people in Hawaii
apparently decided to lift manhole covers and climb into the
sewers in anticipation of a missile
attack.
Before a nuclear blast, build
an emergency supply kit. The Federal Emergency Management
Agency has a printable checklist
for assembling a kit. The CDC has
its own list. The list is long. Most of
the items are obvious — first-aid
supplies, radio, flashlight. Other
items include a manual can opener, baby wipes and a whistle for
calling for help.
Make a plan for contacting
family and friends in an emergency and for meeting up after a disaster.
Ask local officials where designated fallout shelters are in your
community. If there are none
nearby, consider potential makeshift shelters, such as basements,
subways or tunnels.
Expect to stay inside for
24 hours after a nuclear blast. In
areas with the heaviest fallout, it
might be necessary to shelter in
place for up to a month.
If you are outside when the
blast strikes, do not look at the
fireball. It can blind you. Lie flat on
the ground and cover your head. If
the explosion is far away, it could
take 30 seconds or more for the
blast wave to reach you.
Take shelter as soon as possible. Remove clothing to keep radioactive material from spreading. This step alone can remove up
to 90 percent of the contamination.
todd.frankel@washpost.com
Ex-Interior o∞cials protest move to ease bird-killing restrictions
BY D INO G RANDONI
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
A group of former Interior Department officials from both major parties who served under the
past eight presidents are pressing
the Trump administration to reconsider its move to ease restrictions against killing birds.
The 17 former political appointees and career officials, who include Senate-confirmed members
of the Nixon, Ford, Carter, George
H.W. Bush, Clinton, George W.
Bush and Obama administrations, sent a letter last week to
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke asking him to reverse the department’s new interpretation of a
century-old law used to prosecute
oil firms and other companies for
killing migratory birds. Career officials who served under President
Ronald Reagan also signed the
letter.
“This legal opinion is contrary
to the long-standing interpretation by every administration (Republican and Democrat) since at
Administration is urged
to reverse agency’s new
interpretation of 1918 law
least the 1970s,” the group wrote in
the letter, which was also sent to
members of Congress.
“It’s phenomenal to see this
list,” said Paul Schmidt, assistant
director of migratory birds at the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from
2003 to 2011. Schmidt started
gathering signatures shortly after
Interior’s principal deputy solicitor, Daniel Jorjani, issued the legal
interpretation three days before
Christmas. “There wasn’t any
hesitation on anyone’s part. We
finalized that letter in short order.”
The Migratory Bird Treaty Act,
which dates to 1918, is one of the
nation’s oldest environmental laws.
The broadly worded law made it
illegal to “pursue, hunt, take, [or]
capture” any migratory bird “by
any means whatever . . . [and] at
any time, or in any manner.”
In the new solicitor’s opinion,
Interior said applying the law “to
incidental or accidental actions
hangs the sword of Damocles over
a host of otherwise lawful and
productive actions, threatening
up to six months in jail and a
$15,000 fine for each and every
bird injured or killed.”
Under the new interpretation, a
company would be in violation of
the law only when it is “engaged in
an activity the object of which was
to render an animal subject to
human control.”
The letter from the former Interior officials calls that “a new,
contrived legal standard that creates a huge loophole” in the existing act, “allowing companies to
engage in activities that routinely
kill migratory birds so long as they
were not intending that their operations would ‘render an animal
subject to human control.’ ”
The question of how to define
what sort of actions should be
grounds for prosecution has vexed
previous administrations, and the
Fish and Wildlife Service worked
near the end of Obama’s second
term to craft a regulation that
would provide more specific permitting guidelines. But that effort
failed to come to fruition, and
Interior issued a solicitor’s opinion on Jan. 10, 2017, to lay out some
parameters for violations of the
law.
Interior did not respond to requests for comment last week. But
in late December, deputy communications director Russell Newell
said in an email that the opinion
issued just days before President
Trump’s inauguration “criminalized all actions that killed migratory birds, whether purposeful or
not.”
The new opinion, issued
Dec. 22, “returns to the intent of
the law — Interior’s action on the
[Migratory Bird Treaty Act] is a
victory over the regulatory state,”
Newell said.
The law was prominently
wielded by the federal government against major oil companies
after spills following the crash of
the Exxon Valdez in 1989 and the
explosion of the Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling rig in 2010,
accidents that each killed hundreds of thousands of birds.
In practice, federal prosecutors
tended to bring cases against companies that failed to take precautionary measures aimed at averting bird deaths.
“Discretion,” Schmidt said, “has
been successfully used to change
corporate behavior to minimize
takes” — meaning kills. In the
letter, he and the others cite as an
example of the law’s good use Interior’s work with oil producers to
ensure that exposed crude oil
waste pits were covered with nets.
The law has often been used as
leverage in negotiations between
government officials and private
companies, and some prosecutions under the law have stirred
controversy. In a 2011 case in
North Dakota involving Continental Resources and five other oil
companies, Fish and Wildlife
asked the U.S. attorney there to
press criminal charges because
the firms had been previously ticketed for not installing netting over
their oil waste pits. However, a
federal judge dismissed the criminal charges against three of the
companies the following year and
vacated the settlements that the
others had reached with federal
authorities.
The Natural Resources Defense
Council, which is among the many
environmental groups challenging the Trump administration’s
environmental rollbacks in court,
said it expected to take legal action
regarding the Interior’s latest action.
“The administration has rolled
back decades of precedent, and
we’re exploring all avenues to
challenge the move,” senior attorney Katie Umekubo said. “There’s
no question there will be legal
challenges, given how extreme
this new interpretation is.”
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
A12
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
A California neighborhood tries to rise from the ashes
SANTA ROSA FROM A1
low-paying jobs and other housesharing transients living next to
busy young families with two incomes and little time. Now California’s urgent task of expanding
affordable housing for a squeezed
working class is shared by this city
about 55 miles north of San Francisco.
The barriers to achieving that
goal here among the ashes are
extraordinarily high as the neighborhood rebuilds from a historic
tragedy.
Residents in nearly half of the
Coffey Park homes at the time of
the wildfire — 43 percent — were
renters. The majority are not expected to return, and many underinsured landlords who never
imagined that all their properties
would burn at once are selling off
vacant lots to developers with
company profit in mind.
How many homeowners rebuild will determine the character
of the Coffey Park that emerges
from the taped-off plots — some
cleared, some still a jumble of
burned-out cars, melted garbage
cans and charred trees. An estimated 8,000 residents of Sonoma
County, where this city is the government seat, are simply planning
to leave.
Much of the expected exodus is
the result of housing costs. The
flames destroyed 3,000 homes
and apartments in Santa Rosa
alone, or 5 percent of the city’s
housing stock. The sudden loss
has rippled across a region that
already had some of the nation’s
highest costs of living. Since the
October fire, median home prices
and rents, driven largely by the
thousands of displaced residents,
have spiked in counties across the
North Bay region, some by as
much as 30 percent.
“I hope that we can get the vast
majority of these residents to stay
in Santa Rosa, but we had a huge
housing problem even before
this,” said Chris Coursey, the city’s
mayor. “This has created a kind of
a two-pronged problem for the
city: We need to help 3,000 people
get back to where they want to be,
but we also need to concentrate on
making sure that five years from
now we’re not back to 2017.”
expect to get.
Okrepkie organized Q&A sessions, attended by hundreds, at
the local community college, and
he helped form an elected board
that plans to vote on how to spend
donated money.
The group is building a website
that will list each Coffey Park
homeowner’s insurance company,
settlement amount and builder
quotes — leverage that has already
helped some neighbors get better
deals. But it will be months before
he has a sense of who is staying.
His neighbor has sold her lot
and moved to Costa Rica. The
family across the street is planning to rebuild, but their lot is still
in ruins, their son’s torched basketball hoop standing sentinel in
the driveway.
“Nobody knows what this place
is going to look like,” he said. “But
it’s going to look very, very different externally.”
TOP: How many homeowners rebuild will determine the character of the Coffey Park that
emerges from the taped-off plots. ABOVE: Jeff Okrepkie, center, helped organize a group
to help residents who want to stay navigate the rebuilding process. Many who lived there
were renters. “It was the heartbeat of the city,” he says of the starter-home neighborhood.
eucalyptus exploded, casting off
embers the size of basketballs that
the heavy winds blew hundreds of
yards away. The fire jumped the
highway, unimaginable before
that night.
A Kmart burned to the ground.
So did the extended-stay hotel
next to it. Then the flames cut an
aimless path through a business
district before sweeping into
working-class suburbia.
“We never thought it would
reach this far,” Okrepkie said.
Since its construction in the
mid-1980s, Coffey Park has been a
place where families sought starter homes or affordable rentals,
which filled with firemen, police
officers, teachers, diner owners,
government workers and insurance salesmen.
Now the easiest way to find it is
to follow the dump trucks. They
pass the “Coffey Park Rises” sign at
the four-way stop and the one next
to it that reads, “Want to rebuild
your home or sell your lot?”
“It was the heartbeat of the city,”
said Okrepkie, a commercial insurance salesman and now president of the neighborhood’s postfire Coffey Strong advocacy group.
Like his neighbors, Okrepkie
lost everything: his 2-year-old son
Tillman’s school projects and
Christmas presents, the family’s
ornaments and photographs,
keepsakes and computers.
He and his wife, Stephanie,
were married in April, and when it
came time to begin tallying what
had been lost and what would be
needed again, they pulled up their
three-month-old online wedding
registry for reference.
Okrepkie began organizing the
neighborhood group after he saw
so much social media misinformation from Coffey Park residents,
many of whom he had never met.
They didn’t understand the rebuilding process. Some were getting wildly different settlements
from the same insurance companies, and others were being quoted various prices from the same
developers. Many had not had
their property appraised in years
and had no idea what they should
The original builders
More than 30 years ago, those
who bought in the new Coffey
Park development could choose
from eight floor plans, and since
the fire, the planning department
and some of the original builders
have pulled those out of filecabinet drawers.
Some builders are offering to
reconstruct those homes with
some changes, ideally if streets
and blocks sign up together. Doing so in bulk could shave as much
as 30 percent off construction
costs.
John Allen, a project manager
for APM Homes, said the company
built 500 of Coffey Park’s original
houses. The firm brought the original draftsman out of retirement
to update those floor plans, which
are being offered to those looking
to rebuild.
On a rainy recent morning, the
neighborhood was busy with
churning backhoes and Environmental Protection Agency inspec-
T ODD C . F RANKEL
The death toll from Southern
California’s devastating mudslides has reached 20 after
another body was discovered,
authorities said Sunday. No
information about the victim’s
identity was provided.
Four people remain missing
after last week’s flash floods in
coastal Montecito, said Santa
1-800-753-POST
Barbara County spokesman
Justin Cooper, according to the
Associated Press.
Search-and-rescue missions
are continuing, although large
amounts of mud and debris
have made searches difficult.
Several areas in Santa Barbara
County remain under mandatory evacuation orders, with
most of Montecito still shut off
from natural gas service.
The mudslides destroyed 65
homes and damaged 462 others, fire officials said. Many
commercial properties were
damaged, as well. Twenty-eight
people were injured.
todd.frankel@washpost.com
SF
While you’re
reading this,
someone else
could be finding
your dream job.
MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A work crew cleans up an area of Highway 101 in Montecito, Calif., on Friday after flash floods caused
destructive mudslides. Several nearby areas remain under mandatory evacuation orders.
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Home delivery
makes good sense.
Death toll in California
mudslides up to 20
4 people remain missing
after flash floods
last week in Montecito
tors pulling asbestos out of some
sites. Along Hopper Street, a Coldwell Banker “For Sale” sign stood
in one lot, which Allen’s company
is negotiating to buy.
“It’s a business opportunity,” he
said, explaining that buying lots
and building one-off homes is
more profitable. “But we prefer
not to do it this way, not here.”
At the corner of Hopper and
Scarlet, a makeshift sign says,
“Miss U Guys.”
Jodi Curtis, who works for the
county transit department, lives a
few blocks away, on the far side of
Coffey Park from the Okrepkie
family, whom she had never met.
The house she learned was hers
while on her honeymoon at Disneyland more than a dozen years
ago burned to the ground, along
with the Mickey Mouse ears that
her husband traced in their back
yard with lava rock.
The loss of the house remains
raw, especially to the couple’s 13year-old daughter, Madison, who
would not visit the site for a
month afterward. The family has
been living in a two-bedroom
apartment, which Curtis says flatly “is not home.”
Who returns matters to Curtis.
It will determine who attends
Madison’s charter school, which
never shut down after the fire.
“She’s been in class with those
kids since preschool,” Curtis said.
“So they had each other, and they
had all gone through this same
thing.”
Curtis has picked a new design
to replace the lost home, and she is
excited. It will be her choice rather
than a fixed plan. A few others on
her street have done the same, and
she believes the neighborhood
that emerges will be stronger than
the one that burned.
“The community already has
come out a lot closer,” she said.
“Now we just want to get our
routine back to normal.”
WashingtonPostJobs.com
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202-334-4100
J15311x3.5
Avoiding 250 piles of ash
The Tubbs Fire flashed to life
overnight on Oct. 8, and it burned
with stunning speed, pushed by
80-mph winds over a series of
ridgelines into eastern Santa
Rosa.
The flames raced through
canyons and into the Fountaingrove neighborhoods large hillside houses, wine-country resort
hotels, weekend homes and thickly wooded yards. The same area
burned in the last major fire here
— the 1964 Hanley Fire — but at
the time no one had yet built in the
dry hills.
Local officials have questioned
whether Fountaingrove should be
restored. But given the extreme
housing shortage, the City Council
voted last month to approve 250
new homes for the neighborhood
in addition to any that residents
rebuild. Coursey voted against the
project.
“I’m not ready to say that we’re
just going to go ahead and pretend
nothing happened,” he said.
“We’ve got to put housing up
there. But in addition we need to
think about how to do it differently to make sure we don’t end up
with 250 piles of ash.”
After the fire burned through
Fountaingrove, a cascade of
sparks began hitting the timberlines on the east side of six-lane
Highway 101. Then the oaks and
PHOTOS BY PRESTON GANNAWAY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
capital business
Venture capitalists
gave $1.55 billion
to area start-ups
Despite being at a 6-year
high, the region still lags
behind others for funding
BY
A ARON G REGG
Venture capitalists poured
$1.55 billion into D.C.-area technology start-ups last year, an industry report found, as a handful
of “megadeals” propelled the region to a six-year high for technology investing in 2017.
The influx of money is seen as
encouraging to local technology
entrepreneurs, who have long
complained that they are held
back by a relative dearth of investment dollars.
The District’s 2017 investment
haul was still dwarfed by other
technology hubs. According to
data compiled by the National
Venture Capital Association and
PitchBook, start-ups in Boston
collectively took in $8.7 billion
last year, for example. The money
that is flowing into the Washington area is going to fewer and
fewer companies each year, making life hard for promising earlyand mid-stage tech start-ups.
Still, the latest numbers suggest the area is starting to close
the funding gap with competing
technology hubs, with the total
amount of funding 25 percent
above what it was in 2016.
The new companies attracting
funding come from a remarkably
“Fundamentally, we’re
just not a very
compelling venture
capital market right
now.”
Jonathan Aberman, Va.-based
technology investor
diverse range of industries, suggesting the regional economy
could one day grow beyond its
storied dependence on the federal government.
The report’s authors say they
see no signs of a bubble.
“While the figures are comparable to the dot-com era, the
[venture capital] ecosystem appears healthy and driven by different dynamics,” John Gabbert,
CEO and founder of PitchBook,
said in a release.
The largest new funding round
was $164 million for Washingtonbased MapBox, a start-up that
provides data analysis and visualization for mapping services.
That money came from a cadre of
technology venture funds including SoftBank, the massive investment group owned by Japanese
billionaire Masayoshi Son.
Also in the District, a credit
card and lending start-up called
FS Card brought in $40 million to
fuel its efforts to expand lending
to a broader pool of recipients.
In Bethesda, a health-care consulting group called Aledade led
the charge among the city’s longthriving community of health
technology firms, raising just
over $63 million. Aledade partners with a growing industry of
“accountable care” organizations,
health-care organizations that
blur the lines between those who
pay for health care and those who
provide it.
The legal marijuana industry
also took its place in the Maryland start-up community, more
than four years after the state
legalized the drug for medical
purposes.
Gaithersburg-based
Green Leaf Medical, one of 14
cultivators licensed to grow marijuana in the state, raised
$9.45 million from angel investors as it ramps up cultivation.
Northern Virginia’s start-up
scene was led by a $30 million
raise for the cybersecurity analytics firm ThreatQuotient,
which got funding from software giant Cisco and Marylandbased venture fund New Enterprise Associates.
There was also a $20 million
funding round for Arlingtonbased Axios, the new media company started by Politico founders
Mike Allen and Jim VandeHei.
But the influx of money in the
region is being captured primarily by a few late-stage start-ups,
meaning it’s still very difficult for
budding entrepreneurs to find
backing. In terms of the total
amount of start-up funding for
the region, the most recent quarter was the best in recent memory; in terms of the number of
companies getting funded, it was
one of the worst.
Dan Woolley, who was a founding partner at the Mach37 cybersecurity incubator in Herndon,
said he noticed investors starting
to move upstream in 2011, a trend
that he expects to continue. “I
think it’s going to be much harder
for very early-stage companies to
find money because investors are
going to be looking for a different
multiple,” Woolley said.
Jim Hunt, a technology investor who teaches an investment
course at Georgetown University’s business school, said investors are flocking to more mature
start-ups because doing due diligence on a lot of smaller companies can be overly time-consuming.
Betting on an untested company isn’t always seen as worth the
risk, he said.
Venture capitalists “have figured out that there’s only so much
they can manage . . . it’s hard to do
a ton of smaller deals,” Hunt said.
Jonathan Aberman, a Virginiabased technology investor, said
the tendency toward megadeals
could be a problem for the region
if early- and mid-stage companies
don’t get the fuel they need to
grow.
“Fundamentally, we’re just not
a very compelling venture capital
market right now,” Aberman said.
“Our business community is likely going to have to be more actively involved in mentoring companies in order to fill that void.”
Others say it might not be such
a bad thing that investors are
favoring more established startups, even if it means younger
entrepreneurs have a harder time
getting help.
“Our companies are growing
up,” said Woolley. “I think that’s a
really good thing for the region.”
aaron.gregg@washpost.com
MANU FERNANDEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Leading tech companies are increasingly nudging consumers to use their own fingers, faces and eyes as digital keys to unlock phones and
other gadgets. But where do they place the fingerprint scanner on an all-screen smartphone?
New spot for phone fingerprint reader: In the screen
las vegas —
On I.T.
As smartphones
go all-screen, one
design problem
has bedeviled
everyone from Samsung to Apple:
Where to put the fingerprint
scanner?
Last week at the big consumer
electronics show known as CES, a
big tech-component maker
showed the first phone to try
something new: putting the
fingerprint scanner inside the
screen.
Other all-screen Android
phones such as the Galaxy S8 and
Pixel 2 moved the fingerprint
sensor to the back of the phone,
which some find awkward. Apple
dropped the fingerprint-reading
home button entirely with its
iPhone X, opting for a face
scanner that some — like me —
GEOFFREY A.
FOWLER
find fails just often enough to
annoy.
That’s why I was curious to try
out the new Clear ID technology
that maker Synaptics has been
demonstrating at CES. It embeds
the reader inside the screen, and
is coming first to a phone from
big Chinese device maker Vivo
early this year.
Using it was as natural as you’d
want it to be: I held my finger over
a lit-up area on the Vivo phone’s
screen, and the phone unlocked
quickly and consistently. (I also
had success with a colleague’s
finger.) There’s always a bit of the
screen on, so you can find the
right spot.
The inside-the-screen
technology reportedly has a
rejection rate of about 2 percent
and a false acceptance rate of 1 in
50,000, both typical for the
industry. Synaptics chief
executive Rick Bergman said it
took 18 months to turn the
technology from a demo into a
real product that could handle
challenges such as dry fingers and
sunlight.
This optical fingerprint-sensor
technology works only behind
OLED screens because they are
sufficiently thin and transparent.
Synaptics rival Qualcomm has
announced it is also developing a
behind-the-screen reading
technology, but that has yet to
arrive in a finished product.
Developing the technology to
put a scanner inside the screen
has not been easy. If Synaptics
and Qualcomm develop such
technology on a wide scale, it
could address one of the biggest
complaints about Apple’s
iPhone X.
COMPANIES
EverFi of the District
appointed Lisa Mayr chief
financial officer.
LeadingAge of the District
appointed Steve Fleming
chairman.
Navigant Consulting of the
District appointed Clay Porter
managing director and head of
investigations.
Ruppert Landscape of
Laytonsville appointed Mike
Felts corporate administrative
manager and Sean Davitt
branch manager.
St. Regis of the District
appointed Sébastien Giannini
executive chef.
ASSOCIATIONS
AND NONPROFITS
Land Trust Alliance of the
District appointed Robert
Schwartz ambassador program
manager.
National Alliance for
Caregiving of Bethesda
appointed C. Grace Whiting
president and chief executive.
We the Action of the District
appointed Jacek Pruski
managing director and general
counsel and Katie Waldo chief
operating officer.
REAL ESTATE
Long & Foster of Chantilly
appointed Camille Mims vice
president of the corporate real
estate services division.
FINANCE
National Capital Bank of
Washington appointed Tricia
Ostrander executive vice
president.
LAW AND LOBBYING
Alston & Bird of the District
appointed Kelley Connolly
Barnaby, Thomas Davison,
Joyce Gresko, Steven Mindy
and Adam Swain partners.
Blankingship & Keith of
Fairfax appointed Olivia Bean
associate in the family law
practice.
Dickinson Wright of the
District appointed Jomy
Methipara member attorney.
Glen Echo Group of the
District appointed Amy Schatz
director.
Holland & Knight appointed
Eric Lee and Taite McDonald
partners in the District office
and Todd Burski and Eric
Crusius partners in the Tysons
office.
Hughes Hubbard of the
District appointed Benjamin
Britz and Elizabeth Solander
partners.
Michael Best & Friedrich of
the District appointed Victoria
Maguire Sendek managing
director.
Gladstone Commercial
Maximus
NII Holdings
RLJ Entertainment
Walker & Dunlop
Insider
Title
General counsel
Director
Director
President
Director
Beneficial owner
Beneficial owner
Chief executive
General counsel
Chief executive
Date
Action
Shares
Jan. 2
Jan. 4
Jan. 2
Jan. 9
Jan. 2
Jan. 8
Jan. 5
Jan. 2
Jan. 5
Jan. 8, Jan. 9
Sold
Sold
Sold
Bought
Sold
Bought
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
47,729
6,361
3,000
500
1,000
56,132
678,095
22,000
20,000
54,574
Price
Perkins Coie of the District
appointed Shannon Bloodworth
firm-wide co-chair of the
intellectual property practice.
Venable of the District
appointed Hirsh Ament, Jessica
Braun, Nichole Cohen, Logan
Elliott, Diana Krevor, Julia
Lane Mooney, Sarah Park and
Adam Possidente counsels.
Vinson & Elkins of the
District appointed Josh Johnson
and Sarah Mitchell counsels.
Whiteford, Taylor & Preston
of Bethesda appointed Erek
Barron partner.
Winston & Strawn of the
District appointed Ruth Wimer
partner.
— Compiled by Aaron Gregg
Send information about promotions,
appointments and personnel moves
in the Washington region to
appointments@washpost.com.
WE GET
IT DONE:
Trading as reported by companies’ directors, presidents, chief financial officers, general counsel, chief executives,
chairmen and other officers, or by beneficial owners of more than 10 percent of a company’s stock.
John G. Finneran Jr.
Ann Fritz Hackett
Bradford H. Warner
Robert G. Cutlip
Russell A. Beliveau
Joseph D. Samberg
JH Evergreen Management
Miguel Penella
Richard M. Lucas
William M. Walker
geoffrey.fowler@washpost.com
A P P O I N TM E N TS
TRANSACTIONS
Company
Capital One Financial
The $999 smartphone — the
company’s most expensive phone
ever — got rid of the home button,
which also acts as a fingerprint
reader. That enabled the phone to
have a bigger screen.
The iPhone X requires you to
hold the phone up to your face
and a phalanx of sensors buried
in the notch at the top of its
screen will recognize you and
unlock the phone. But some users
have complained that it does not
work consistently, and others say
it is far less convenient than
simply putting a thumb on a
scanner.
Not surprisingly, Berman’s
innovation received a lot of
interest at CES.
“You can certainly say every
phone maker has been stopping
by,” Berman said.
Now holds
100.02 to 99.19
164,443
102
63,017
100.08 to 99.42
50,225
20.62
38,700
71.73
39,079
0.52 11,000,000
4.25
-3.68
283,405
45.78 to 47.95
140,918
47.89 to 48.59
1,352,524
Thomson Financial
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
Data shows Mars hides thick sheets of ice below surface, scientists find
medication Discovery could mean a
source of water
abortions valuable
for future explorers
are safe
BY
A RIANA E UNJUNG C HA
Ever since the abortion pill
RU-486 began to hit the market in
the 1980s, questions have lingered
about its safety, especially for
women who take it in countries
where terminating an unwanted
pregnancy is restricted and they
cannot openly seek help from a
medical professional if something
goes wrong.
As reports of deaths and injuries
grew in the early 2000s and the pill
became a big political issue, studies were launched to get more data
on the safety question. The results
are starting to come out.
Last May, the BMJ, a British
medical journal, reported on the
use of the pill in Ireland and Northern Ireland — which have some of
the most restrictive laws on surgical abortions — and found that
medication abortions done at
home with drugs sent via the mail
were about as safe as those administered in a clinic.
Of 1,000 women who were
tracked, using data from a nonprofit group that helps women
seeking abortions in 140 countries,
95 percent reported that they had
successfully ended their pregnancies. Though seven women had
serious complications requiring
blood transfusions, less than 10
percent had symptoms such as
heavy bleeding, fever or pain —
similar to the percentage reported
at clinics where the pill can legally
be given.
The latest research, published
last week in PLOS One, focuses on
the experience of 220 women in
the Peruvian cities of Lima and
Chimbote. They were evaluated by
nurses, given information about
how to use the drug misoprostol
and encouraged to return to a clinic for follow-up. The rates of success and adverse events were similar to those in the previous study,
with 89 percent of women having a
complete abortion. Only two had a
major complication, which in both
cases was an infection.
“Our findings corroborate those
from a growing number of studies
indicating that women can safely
and effectively use medication
abortion on their own with minimal clinical supervision,” Daniel
Grossman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California at San Francisco,
said in announcing the results.
Grossman and his colleagues
described the clinic counseling as a
type of “harm reduction model”
that may lower the risks associated
with improperly conducted surgical abortions and self-induced alternatives.
In the United States and many
European countries, RU-486, or
mifepristone, is typically used with
misoprostol to terminate pregnancies. But the pill is not readily
available in some parts of the
world, and in those situations, as
in the Peru research, doctors recommend using misoprostol alone.
“Worldwide, unsafe abortion is
estimated to account for 8-18% of
maternal deaths as well as a large
number of medical complications,” the authors of the latest
study write. Liberalization of restrictive abortion laws appears to
result in improved health outcomes, but in the interim or absence of such changes, giving
women information about misoprostol may save lives, they conclude.
ariana.cha@washpost.com
BY
B EN G UARINO
The slope rises as high as London’s Big Ben. Beneath its ruddy
layer of dirt is a sheet of ice 300 feet
thick that gives the landscape a
blue-black hue. If such a scene
sounds otherworldly, it is. To visit it,
you will have to travel to Mars.
Planetary scientists located
eight of these geological features,
called scarps, on the Red Planet. An
analysis of the scarps revealed that
thick ice hides just below the surface. This ice, the researchers say,
could be a tempting target for future exploration — as well as a
valuable resource for Earthlings
camped out on Mars.
“We’ve found a new window into
the ice for study, which we hope will
be of interest to those interested in
all aspects of ice on Mars and its
history,” said Colin Dundas, a member of the U.S. Geological Survey’s
Astrogeology Science Center in Arizona and an author of a report
published Thursday in the journal
Science.
It is not news that Mars is icy. In
2001, the Mars Odyssey spacecraft
arrived at the planet and began
snooping for chemical signatures
of ice. The craft’s gamma-ray spectrometer found telltale hydrogen,
which indicated that Mars had
enormous amounts of ice. As much
as one-third of the Martian surface
contains shallow ice. But remotely
sensing elements such as hydrogen
could not reveal the depth and
makeup of the ice.
The newer Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mapped the surface
in greater detail. Dundas and his
colleagues used its pictures to locate exposed ice in small craters,
glaciers and ice sheets. “The highresolution data has greatly improved our understanding of vari-
NASA/REUTERS
A thick sheet of underground ice is exposed at the steep slope that appears bright blue in this enhanced-color view of Mars.
ous ice-related land forms,” he said.
These cliffs are “rare peeks into
the subsurface of Mars, giving
us access to an undisturbed
slice through Mars’s ice in the midlatitudes — a fantastic find!” said
Susan Conway, a planetary scientist at the University of Nantes in
France who was not involved with
this research.
Open University’s Matt Balme, a
planetary scientist in Britain who
did not participate in this study,
said the key findings were the color
images of a bluish tint. That indicates a sublayer that is “somehow
compositionally different” than the
red dirt. It is unlikely that the frozen
sheets are a mix of water and soil.
“If the conclusions of the paper are
directly into water vapor. Boulders
and dust that rested on the ice
suddenly had their foundation vanish into the atmosphere.
These slopes are unusually steep,
Balme said, though he imagines
that the scarps look similar to glacial moraines on Earth.
The sheets’ proximity to the surface makes them accessible, in theory, to robot explorers.
“This subsurface ice could contain valuable records of the Martian
climate, just like the Greenland and
Antarctic ice cores,” Conway said.
In August, geochemists obtained
2.7-million-year-old ice samples
from Antarctica — the oldest ever —
and they plan to study air bubbles
trapped within them to learn about
Earth’s prehistoric atmosphere.
Flesh-and-blood
explorers
might benefit, too (though the middle latitudes of Mars appear to be
colder, less welcoming terrain than
regions closer to the equator).
“If we were to send humans to
live on Mars for a substantial period
of time, it would be a fantastic
source of water,” Balme said. Astronauts living in the pits would have a
vital raw material next door. All a
thirsty astronaut would have to do
would be to go at the scarp with a
hammer and, presto, fresh Martian
ice chips.
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
Administration moves to strip Canada lynx of protected status
BY
D ARRYL F EARS
The Trump administration has
announced that it is moving to
strike the Canada lynx from the
endangered species list, despite a
2016 assessment concluding that
the species will die out in its northern range by the end of the century
without federal protection.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had initially said it was “very
unlikely” that resident lynx populations would survive until 2100
“in all of the geographic units that
currently support them.” The assessment, made in the waning
weeks of the Obama administration, warned that “resiliency will
be substantially diminished because of reduced population sizes
and distributions.”
In October, the Trump administration came to a somewhat different conclusion. It expressed confidence that the animals would survive through 2050 — although officials said they could not be
certain of the lynx’s fate in its
sprawling range across Maine,
Minnesota, Montana, Colorado,
Idaho and Washington.
“Resident lynx populations,”
the administration said, “are very
likely to persist in [the territories]
that currently support them in the
near-term,” which the 2016 document identified as seven years
away.
“Given the outcome of this
analysis,” a statement issued
DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Canada lynx stalks the Rio Grande National Forest in Colorado in 2005. The Trump administration
said last week that it is moving to remove the animal from the federal endangered species list.
Thursday said, “the service will
not at this time be completing a
recovery plan for the Canada
lynx.”
Although the statement said
the delisting recommendation
“does not remove or negate the
Endangered Species Act protections currently in place for the
Canada lynx,” the decision does
trigger a process to end them. The
first step would be for the Fish and
Wildlife Service to publish a pro-
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posed rule in the Federal Register.
Then the agency would take public comments and draft a final
decision.
Canada lynx, cousins of the
bobcat, were listed as threatened
in 2000 as logging, motorized vehicles and development invaded
their habitat at a time when there
were no federal regulations protecting them. In addition, the animals were being trapped for their
fur. In the 18 years since, federal
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and state officials have worked to
increase populations through
land management.
Maine has the largest population of Canada lynx, and it’s “growing and expanding,” Chandler
Woodcock, the state’s Department
of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife
commissioner, said in a statement
provided Thursday by the Denver
office of the Fish and Wildlife
Service. “Not only are lynx found
in more places, but signs of lynx
are found more frequently during
our surveys.”
Numerous
environmental
groups that observe Canada lynx
disagree, noting the abrupt
change in the two federal assessments in less than a year.
“This is a political decision —
pure and simple,” said Matthew
Bishop, an attorney with the Western Environmental Law Center.
“This administration is throwing
science out the window. The best
science tells us that lynx are worse
off than they were when originally
listed in 2000.”
In contrast with the Fish and
Wildlife Service report, Bishop
said that “we’re seeing lower numbers.” Nongovernment conservationists say climate change looms
as a future threat that will fragment the lynx’s habitat and scatter
the snowshoe hares they rely on
for food.
“The service’s abrupt aboutface is an obvious attempt to abandon the good work toward recovering this climate-impacted species because saving lynx from extinction is not aligned with the
Trump administration’s climate
denial and emphasis on maximizing resource extraction on our
public lands,” said Bethany Cotton, wildlife program director for
WildEarth Guardians.
darryl.fears@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
FDA: Don’t give kids opioids for colds
Agency warns against
prescription drugs with
codeine, hydrocodone
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correct,” he said, “you’re looking at
something that’s almost pure ice.”
The scarps exist along the planet’s middle latitudes, ruling out glaciers that migrated from the poles.
The study’s authors propose that
these ice sheets formed when thick
snows blanketed Mars. Balme
agreed that snowfall probably created the ice over a period of a few
thousand years.
“We considered the possibility
that we were seeing surface frost,”
Dundas said, “but the ice signatures persist through the summer.”
The buried ice revealed itself after
the structures became unstable
and expanded. Those cliffs formed
through a process called sublimation, in which exposed ice turned
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
The Food and Drug Administration has warned that children
and adolescents should not be
prescribed cough and cold medicines containing codeine and hydrocodone because of serious
safety risks posed by the opioid
ingredients.
The agency said it is requiring
manufacturers to change the
wording on their labels to make
clear that such products should
not be used for anyone younger
than 18. Common side effects of
opioids include headache, dizziness and vomiting. Greater dangers include breathing difficulties and death.
The FDA also said it is requiring manufacturers to add safety
warnings for adult use — includ-
ing an expanded box warning, the
most prominent kind — spelling
out the risks of using medications
with codeine and hydrocodone.
The warnings are consistent
with the labels on other drug
products with opioids, including
painkillers.
The FDA’s action Thursday expands a previous warning issued
by the agency in April against the
use of prescription medications
containing codeine and tramadol
for children younger than 12. At
the time, officials expressed concerns that some children are “ultrarapid metabolizers” who process such drugs very quickly, resulting in dangerously high levels
that can depress breathing and
lead to death.
The latest caution follows an
extensive FDA review of data and
a meeting of the agency’s Pediatric Advisory Committee in September. The panel declared that
the risks of using certain opioids
in children’s cough medications
outweigh the benefits.
According to the agency, outside experts said that while some
children’s coughs require treatment, many get better on their
own — including ones that are
the result of respiratory infections.
FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, who has made battling the
opioid epidemic a top priority,
said in a statement Thursday that
it is critical “to protect children
from unnecessary exposure” to
prescription cough medicines
containing codeine or hydrocodone. “At the same time, we’re
taking steps to help reassure parents that treating the common
cough and cold is possible without using opioid-containing
products,” he said.
The agency urged parents to
read the labels on prescription
bottles.
“If the medicine prescribed for
your child contains an opioid,
talk to your child’s health-care
professional about a different,
non-opioid medicine,” it said.
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
SU
Sniping escalates as Congress faces crucial decisions
SHUTDOWN FROM A1
tors for impugning a colleague’s
integrity, while also slamming
Trump and his remarks as unabashedly racist.
The only administration official
to speak publicly this weekend
about the meeting was Homeland
Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, who attended the session. She
said in an interview with “Fox News
Sunday” that she did not “recall
him using that exact phrase” but
acknowledged that Trump “did use
and will continue to use strong
language.”
Vacationing in Florida, Trump
spoke to reporters before a dinner
in West Palm Beach at his Trump
International Golf Club with House
Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy
(R-Calif). The question of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was on the agenda,
Trump said. He denied making the
“shithole countries” remark and
said he is not a racist.
“Nah, I’m not a racist,” he said.
“I’m the least racist person you have
ever interviewed, that I can tell
you.”
Trump accused Democrats of
spoiling chances for a deal on immigration legislation and DACA.
“Honestly, I don’t think the Democrats want to make a deal,” he said.
“I think they talk about DACA, but
they don’t want to help the DACA
people.”
Asked what was standing in the
way of a deal, Trump again blamed
Democrats. McCarthy said nothing. “I think we have a lot of sticking
points, but they are all Democrat
sticking points,” Trump said. “Because we are ready, willing and able
to make a deal, but they don’t want
to. They don’t want security at the
border, there are people pouring in.
They don’t want security at the
border, they don’t want to stop the
drugs. And they want to take money away from our military, which
we will not do.”
The White House did not dispute
Trump’s use of the vulgarity when
The Washington Post first reported
it Thursday. Trump offered a vague
denial in a tweet Friday, and not
until Cotton and Perdue spoke Sunday did another participant challenge whether Trump had used the
word “shithole.”
International
reaction
to
Trump’s comments was strong, and
U.S. diplomats in Haiti and other
nations have been called to host
government offices to hear the
complaints directly.
“One of the great things about
being president is that you can say
whatever you want,” Undersecretary of State Steven Goldstein said
in an interview. “We have advised
our ambassadors . . . to indicate
that our commitment to those
countries remains strong.”
The developments together
stand to undermine bipartisan
talks aimed at shielding from deportation immigrants brought illegally to the United States as children, including the roughly
800,000 who secured work permits
under the DACA program, created
under President Barack Obama.
Democrats have suggested that
they could force a government
shutdown Saturday unless an
agreement
protecting
those
“dreamers” is reached.
“I don’t know if there will be a
shutdown,” Trump said Sunday.
“Both sides now are destroying the setting
in which anything meaningful can happen.”
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.)
NICHOLAS KAMM/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Supporters of President Trump cheer the motorcade as the president travels from Trump International
Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Fla., to his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach on Sunday.
“There shouldn’t be, because if
there is our military gets hurt very
badly. We cannot let our military be
hurt.”
Conservative hard-liners who
want tighter immigration policies
and the pro-immigrant and business groups opposing them have
long mistrusted one another, but
the sniping in recent days has been
unusually fierce.
“Both sides now are destroying
the setting in which anything
meaningful can happen,” Sen.
Rand Paul (R-Ky.), a conservative,
said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”
A tentative deal worked out
Thursday by a small bipartisan
group of senators crumbled in an
Oval Office meeting in which, according to multiple people involved, an angry Trump asked why
the United States should accept immigrants from “shithole countries”
such as Haiti, El Salvador and African nations over those from European countries such as Norway.
In a Sunday morning tweet,
Trump declared the immigration
talks to be failing: “DACA is probably dead because the Democrats
don’t really want it, they just want
to talk and take desperately needed
money away from our Military.”
Democrats have tied the immigration talks to spending negotiations being held ahead of a shutdown deadline at midnight Friday.
Republicans are seeking a military
spending increase; Democrats
want a DACA deal and a matching
increase in nondefense funding.
Durbin, the sole Democrat to
attend the Oval Office meeting, told
reporters Friday that Trump had
used the vulgar word “not just once
but repeatedly.” A Republican attendee, Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(S.C.), issued a statement that did
not specifically confirm the words
used but backed up Durbin’s account.
Cotton and Perdue issued a joint
statement Friday saying that they
did “not recall the President saying
these comments specifically.” But
Perdue told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos definitively Sunday that
Trump did not refer to “shithole”
countries: “I’m telling you he did
not use that word, George,” he said
on “This Week.”
Cotton said much the same in an
interview with CBS’s “Face the Nation”: “I didn’t hear it, and I was
sitting no further away from Donald Trump than Dick Durbin was.”
Both senators pointed to a statement Durbin had made in 2013
about comments allegedly made by
an unnamed GOP leader during a
private White House meeting that
were later denied by an Obama
administration spokesman. “Senator Durbin has a history of misrepresenting what happens in White
House meetings,” Cotton said.
Ben Marter, a Durbin spokesman, tweeted a rebuke early Sunday: “Credibility is something that’s
built by being consistently honest
over time,” he said. “Senator Durbin
has it. Senator Perdue does not. Ask
anyone who’s dealt with both.”
Senate Minority Leader Charles
E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) forcefully
backed Durbin, who has written a
bill to grant young illegal immigrants a citizenship path and is the
leading Democratic negotiator on
the DACA issue.
“To impugn [Durbin’s] integrity
is disgraceful,” Schumer said on
Twitter.
Accounts of the meeting have
not fallen neatly along party lines.
Besides Graham’s endorsement of
Durbin’s account, Sen. Jeff Flake
(R-Ariz.) said Sunday on “This
Week” that he had spoken to meeting participants immediately afterward — before The Post reported
Trump’s use of the vulgar term.
“They said those words were
used before those words went public,” Flake said.
Nielsen is scheduled to testify
under oath Tuesday at a Senate
Judiciary Committee oversight
hearing. Both Durbin and Graham
sit on the panel and could press her
for details of the Oval Office session.
The “shithole countries” remark
has vexed Republicans, compelling
many to make statements critical of
Trump. “I can’t defend the indefensible,” Rep. Mia Love (R-Utah),
whose parents are Haitian immigrants, said Sunday on CNN’s
“State of the Union.”
Democrats see the comment as
evidence of malicious intent in
Trump’s policymaking.
“I think he is a racist,” Rep. John
Lewis (D-Ga.) said on “This Week.”
“We have to stand out; we have to
speak up and not try to sweep it
under the rug.”
But Paul called the racism accusations “unfair” and said the “bonkers” outcry over Trump’s remarks
could scuttle a deal.
“I do want to see an immigration
compromise, and you can’t have an
immigration compromise if everybody out there is calling the president a racist,” Paul said.
While Democrats have expressed openness to a deal that
would combine legal status for
dreamers with funding for border
security measures, Republicans
have tried to broaden the talks.
They have targeted the abolition of
a special program allowing citizens
of some countries to apply for visas
distributed by lottery, as well as
rules allowing naturalized U.S. citizens to sponsor family members for
legal status — a system that Republican critics refer to as “chain migration.”
The tentative deal unveiled
Thursday would give legal status
and a pathway to citizenship to
dreamers while also providing
$2.7 billion for border security —
some of which could be used to
construct the border wall Trump
has proposed. The visas now offered under the lottery system
would be reallocated to other immigration programs, such as one
offering temporary status to citizens of nations in crisis — such as
the ones Trump referenced in his
Oval Office remarks.
Trump said in a second tweet
Sunday that he wanted more aggressive measures in any deal. “I, as
President, want people coming into
our Country who are going to help
us become strong and great again,
people coming in through a system
based on MERIT. No more Lotteries!” he wrote.
Echoing dozens of Democrats,
Lewis said he would not vote for
any government spending measure
until the dreamer issue is settled.
“We must not give up or give in,” he
said.
Republicans cannot pass a government funding bill without Democratic votes. There are 51 Republicans in the Senate, where 60 votes
are needed to pass major legislation. And GOP leaders are facing
problems in the House, as well,
where some Republican members
have balked at the prospect of passing another stopgap that does not
increase military funding.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
anne.gearan@washpost.com
Todd Frankel and Amy B Wang
contributed to this report.
Trump
repeatedly
says he’s
not racist
BY
A NNE G EARAN
palm beach, fla. — President Trump said Sunday that
he is “not a racist,” and he
denied that he used the term
“shithole countries” to describe
Haiti and some African nations. “No, I’m not a racist,” he
told reporters. “I’m the least
racist person you have ever
interviewed.”
The president spoke before
having dinner with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy
(R-Calif.) at his Trump International Golf Club. His remarks
were an extraordinary statement about the president’s
mind-set at a time when his
views on race and immigration
are under widespread attack.
He spoke evenly, without
obvious anger, when asked how
he responds to charges that he
is a racist. He did not appear
surprised by the question,
which came during an exchange about a potential immigration overhaul in Congress.
Trump was asked about the
“shithole” comment, allegedly
made during an Oval Office
meeting Thursday and first
reported by The Washington
Post, and whether it had
harmed chances for a legislative deal on immigration.
“Did you see what various
senators in the room said
about my comments? They
were not made,” Trump said.
Rep. John Lewis (Ga.) is
among Democrats who have
called Trump’s vulgarity reprehensible. On Sunday, he said he
thinks Trump is a racist.
“We have to stand up. We
have to speak up and not try to
sweep it under the rug,” Lewis
said on ABC’s “This Week.”
On the issue of immigration,
although Trump disputes the
reported wording, he has not
disavowed the underlying argument that the United States
accepts too many people from
poor nations.
anne.gearan@washpost.com
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After
Flake blasts Trump’s media-bashing
In planned speech,
senator compares words
of president to Stalin’s
BY
E D O ’ K EEFE
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) plans
to give a speech in the coming
days that compares President
Trump’s public criticism of the
news media to similar comments
once made by Soviet dictator
Joseph Stalin.
A spokesman said that Flake,
who will retire after this year
amid intense political pressure
stirred by his criticism of the
president, plans to deliver the
speech Wednesday before Trump
announces the winners of his
self-described
“fake
news”
awards.
Trump announced via Twitter
that he would hand out awards
Wednesday to news outlets he
thought unfairly covered him.
Flake continues to be one of
Trump’s most frequent critics,
often speaking out to warn that
the president’s words and actions could be detrimental to the
future of the Republican Party
and the nation’s standing worldwide.
In recent days, he was among
the lawmakers who denounced
Trump for describing certain African nations and Haiti as “shithole countries” during an Oval
Office meeting on immigration
policy. Flake has been negotiating a bipartisan deal on immigration with Sens. Richard J. Durbin
(D-Ill.) and Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.). In an interview with The
Washington Post on Friday, Flake
said that he was not at the
meeting but heard about Trump’s
comment “before it went public.
And what I’ve heard reported is
consistent about what I heard
about the meeting.”
“I’m not surprised at the sentiment expressed — it’s consistent
with what he’s said — but that he
would do that knowing the fury it
would cause,” Flake added.
Flake plans to use his upcoming speech to denounce Trump
for calling the news media “the
enemy of the American people”
last year.
In excerpts provided by his
office, he is poised to blast
Trump’s “unrelenting daily assault on the constitutionally-protected free press” that he will call
“as unprecedented as it is unwarranted.”
“It is a testament to the condition of our democracy that our
own president uses words infamously spoken by Joseph Stalin
to describe his enemies,” Flake
will say, according to the excerpts. “It bears noting that so
fraught with malice was the
phrase ‘enemy of the people,’ that
even Nikita Khrushchev forbade
its use, telling the Soviet Communist Party that the phrase had
been introduced by Stalin for the
purpose of ‘annihilating such
individuals’ who disagreed with
the supreme leader.”
Flake will add that Trump “has
it precisely backward — despotism is the enemy of the people.
The free press is the despot’s
enemy, which makes the free
press the guardian of democracy.
When a figure in power reflexively calls any press that doesn’t suit
him ‘fake news,’ it is that person
who should be the figure of
suspicion, not the press.”
On MSNBC Sunday night,
Flake said that in addition to
Stalin, Mao Zedong, the former
leader of the Chinese Communist
Party, also referred to the media
as “enemy of the people.” And he
repeated his point that Khrushchev later forbade the use of the
term.
“I don’t think that we should
be using a phrase that’s been
rejected as too loaded by a Soviet
dictator,” Flake said on “Kasie
DC.”
Flake was elected to the Senate
in 2012 and announced last year
that he would not seek a second
term this November. The Republican contest to succeed him now
includes former Maricopa County sheriff Joe Arpaio, Rep. Martha McSally and former state
senator Kelli Ward. The winner is
expected to face Rep. Kyrsten
Sinema (D) in the general election.
Flake has declined to endorse
a potential successor.
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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letters@washpost.com
Don’t bury the WWI memorial
EDITORIALS
Words to remember
Sayings of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. remind America of what matters.
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weak by the strong. In his exhortations to his fellow
Americans, he spoke in a voice that is not often heard
in our capital today. There was no Twitter then, and
even if there had been, it would have been difficult to
reduce to 140 or 280 characters the thoughts of a man
given to quoting Jesus, Matthew, Paul and poets such
as James Russell Lowell and Ovid, as well as a host of
other thinkers.
Nevertheless, here are some tweetable quotations
from King especially apt for transmission by Americans seeking to counter the debased and often juvenile
abuse being spewed from high places in Washington
50 years after the death of the man we honor today:
“We must meet hate with love. We must meet
physical force with soul force. There is still a voice
crying out through the vista of time, saying: ‘Love your
enemies, bless them that curse you, pray for them that
despitefully use you.’ ”
“God is not interested merely in freeing black men
and brown men and yellow men, but God is interested
The slippery slope
in Honduras
in freeing the whole human race.”
“We must act in such a way as to make possible a
coming together of white people and colored people
on the basis of a real harmony of interest and understanding. We must seek an integration based on
mutual respect.”
“When you rise to the level of love, of its great beauty
and power, you seek only to defeat evil systems. Individuals who happen to be caught up in that system, you
love. ”
“I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional
love will have the final word in reality. This is why
right, temporarily defeated, is stronger than evil triumphant.”
That last one is on the South Wall of the Martin
Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, part of a
tribute to a national leader who sought to appeal to the
best that is in us. Engraved in stone, maintained by the
National Park Service, it is a message of hope that will
long outlive the discord and disrespect of these days.
TOM TOLES
U.S. backing for a contested
election’s winner does not bode well.
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S IN much of the rest of the world, democracy is on the defensive in Latin America, in
part because it has few principled defenders. A simple comparison of two ongoing
political crises, in Venezuela and Honduras, illustrates the problem. After Venezuela’s populist antiAmerican government rigged state gubernatorial
elections in October, the United States led a campaign of condemnation and stepped up sanctions.
But when Honduras’s rightist pro-American president suspiciously reversed what looked like an upset
loss in a presidential election a month later, the
Trump administration congratulated him.
It was not alone in its hypocrisy; a number of
Latin American countries have been critical of
Honduras while ignoring the abuses in Venezuela.
But as the hemisphere’s oldest and largest democracy, the United States has an obligation to stand up for
free and fair elections even when it is not convenient. Not only did it not do so in Honduras, but it also
undercut an effort by the Organization of American
States (OAS) to document and correct the problems
with the vote.
The trouble in the impoverished Central American state began when authorities announced surprising initial results from a Nov. 26 presidential
contest: Incumbent Juan Orlando Hernández was
trailing challenger Salvador Nasralla with more
than half of the vote counted. An upset seemed in the
making that would oust Mr. Hernández, who has
cooperated with U.S. efforts to control drug trafficking and migrant flows from Honduras. The apparent
victor was a television personality backed by a
former leftist president.
Then the vote count slowed to a crawl. When
electoral authorities next issued a report, 36 hours
later, Mr. Hernández was back in contention. He was
eventually proclaimed the winner by a margin of
about 1.5 percentage points.
Mr. Nasralla’s supporters cried foul, and protests
erupted around the country in which more than
30 persons were killed. At the same time, an OAS
delegation sent to monitor the election reported
significant irregularities. OAS Secretary General
Luis Almagro said on Dec. 17 that the organization
could not vouch for the outcome of the election and
urged a new vote.
Rather than get behind that demand, the State
Department issued a statement on Dec. 22, the
Friday
before
Christmas,
congratulating
Mr. Hernández. The announcement noted the reports of irregularities and called for “a significant
long-term effort to heal the political divide in the
country and enact much-needed electoral reforms.”
But the practical effect was to confirm Mr. Hernán-
dez’s control over a government that depends on
hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. aid.
The badly flawed process could deepen instability
in the country; if so, more Honduran migrants will
head for the United States. Meanwhile, the chances
that independent monitors from the OAS will be able
to check abuses in the 18 elections scheduled in the
Western Hemisphere this year have been damaged. If
an anti-American candidate is proclaimed the winner in some other Latin nation, and other governments refuse to respect evidence of irregularities, the
Trump administration will have only itself to blame.
Apple shareholders are right to call on the company to help reduce harm from excessive screen time.
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ence of tech devices and social media. Among the
troubling effects cited in studies: decrease in the
ability to focus on educational tasks, difficulty with
social interactions, loss of empathy, links to stress,
and higher risks of depression and suicide.
Without question, there are many benefits to
devices such as smartphones and tablets. They
engage, entertain and educate in new and accessible
ways. Mastering technology is key to living in an
ever-changing world, and parents rightly worry
about their children lagging behind. Unplugging
completely is not an option. What, though, is the
right balance? And who should be most responsible
for the amount of screen time children are exposed
to? Do makers of the devices need to do more to build
in protections? Or do parents need just to do their job
in setting limits for their children?
The Jan. 6 letter from the Apple shareholders
offered thoughtful suggestions, including creating a
committee of child-development experts to study the
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
There’s too much salt in our arteries
Mary C. Massey, Silver Spring
Finding alternatives to salt is something I hope
to see in my lifetime. Meanwhile, I hope road crews
can spread salt more sensibly.
After the “bomb cyclone” storm, there was a
issue and developing better ways for parents to limit
screen time. Parents, of course, are the ones who have
to establish and enforce parameters; they would do
well to reflect on the fact that two of the biggest tech
figures in recent history — Bill Gates and the late
Steve Jobs — strictly limited the technology use of
their own children. That Silicon Valley moguls understand better than the general public the addictive
powers of smartphones and social media — particularly on young brains — gives them added responsibility to take the lead in coming up with solutions.
Good then that Apple, responding to the shareholders, said it is working on new tools and features
to strengthen existing controls. And it’s worth noting
that Facebook is overhauling its news feed in a way
that may lower engagement — even though it could
hurt the company’s bottom line. These are promising
signs that tech companies are beginning to engage
with the social problems their inventions have
spawned.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
Regarding the Jan. 9 Politics & the Nation article
“Nation’s rivers are getting dangerously saltier,
researchers say”:
Year after year, snow after snow, I am dismayed by
the amount of salt spewed on roads in this area.
After a Jan. 4 snow, barely half an inch, way too
much salt was dumped on the streets. More than a
week later, piles of salt remained on the side
roads. Much of this salt will find its way to our
streams and rivers.
What a waste of resources and municipal dollars.
When the World War I Centennial Commission
dug shovels into dirt at Pershing Park late last year, it
was digging a grave burying the honor of World War I
veterans.
A 30-minute walk from the other war memorials,
this location will likely seldom be seen. As planned
now, the National World War I Memorial will be
submerged 15 feet below street level and behind the
nearly impenetrable earthen berms in the bottom of
an abandoned ice rink. The cloak of darkened history
will tightly wrap the memorial, shielding it from the
sweeping light of honor that is deserved. It is baffling
that this is the planned location to honor 5 million
veterans and 116,561 slaughtered American heroes.
The commission was created by Congress and has
the most powerful veterans organizations on its
team. There is no excuse to not try for the Mall.
Last year a commissioner on the National Capital
Planning Commission pointed out that the plan for
restoring Pershing Park for a World War I memorial
is on a “collision course for disaster.” It is.
The commission should listen to the nation and
put this memorial alongside the others on the Mall.
David DeJonge, Washington
The writer is co-founder, with Frank Buckles, of the
World War I Memorial Foundation.
To keep our honor clean
I am stunned that retired Marine Col. Scott Jensen
and at least three Marine generals are trying to
eliminate “misogynistic behavior” in the Marine
Corps [“Marine who tried to stop misogyny in the
Corps will fight it from the outside,” news, Jan. 10].
Bad behavior online is basically a civilian problem,
well beyond the reach of military officers, regardless
of rank. Bad behavior by actual Marines at various
posts and stations, however, can be minimized and,
in most cases, prevented if commanding officers
merely implement four rules for men and women
assigned to their units:
• No dating between officers and enlisted.
• No dating if one Marine is assigned to work
directly under another.
• No closed-door sessions unless a third person is
present.
• Prosecute sexually hostile comments under
Article 134 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice
(covering activities or conduct contrary to good
order and discipline).
I commanded a Marine battalion that had more
than 100 women in the ranks, both officers and
enlisted. We followed the four rules listed above, and
the unit never had a single case of sexually hostile
behavior by either the men or the women.
Grant G. Jacobsen, Woodbridge
Patterns of inequality
Helping children unplug
WO MAJOR shareholders of Apple have
called on the company to take the lead in
countering the harm that excessive screen
time can do to children. Mounting evidence
about the long-term physical and mental effects
caused by overuse of the iPhone and other devices
hasn’t been enough to get the industry to take the
matter seriously. So let’s hope the stir created by
these shareholders — including their warning about
the company’s financial health being linked to the
well-being of its young customers — prods not just
Apple but also other tech and social media companies to figure out effective ways to work with parents
in curtailing abuse.
An open letter to Apple’s board of directors this
month from Jana Partners and the California State
Teachers’ Retirement System, which together control $2 billion worth of Apple stock, summarized
scientific research showing the negative consequences to young people from the ubiquitous pres-
JANUARY 15 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
OOKING EAST from Dupont Circle, an apartment dweller could peer out at dusk each night
and see a red-orange glow that filled the horizon. This was early in the spring of 1968, and it
seemed as if the nation’s capital was burning. It wasn’t
— only parts of it, in neighborhoods to the east of the
city’s invisible dividing line somewhere around
14th Street NW. Shops were being looted and set afire,
a curfew was in effect, and a dozen people were killed,
mostly by smoke and fire. The wave of arson and
looting was the response, in our city and elsewhere, to
the murder of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in
Memphis. It was a spasm of anger and despair at the
loss of a seemingly irreplaceable leader, and it would
have made King weep.
For one of the greatest of his contributions to the
nation was his elevation of the national dialogue on
the subject that has haunted the country almost since
its earliest days as a scattered bunch of settlements on
these shores: the enslavement and exploitation of the
. MONDAY,
speed-bump-size pile of salt near my office. The pile
was next to a storm drain that leads to Muddy
Branch Creek. I have been monitoring the creek’s
chloride levels for six months. Sure enough, chloride
levels jumped four to five times from what they had
been two months prior.
I don’t advocate eliminating road salt (Interstate
270 is bad enough without accidents), but common
sense can be used moving forward. I was told by both
Gaithersburg and Montgomery County that the salt
was spread by the other. A call to the Maryland
Department of the Environment seemed to speed
the cleanup efforts. Wouldn’t it be nice if government acted on problems without arm-twisting?
Scott Maxham, Gaithersburg
The writer is a clean water fellow at the
Izaak Walton League of America.
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The Jan. 7 Business article “The rich are getting
richer — and the working class will never catch up”
had an interesting graph on “The rate of return on
everything.” It is difficult to miss the pattern that
when inequality gets high enough, and the rate of
return is near 8 percent, thereafter there is a plunge
in return, and in total wealth, because of some
catastrophe. Cause and effect? Of course, correlation
is not causation. And of course, the argument would
be made that all four of the plunges shown had
different causes and are unrelated.
I also see, however, that causal arguments can be
made that extreme inequality could lead to behaviors and actions that do cause catastrophic effects. I
noticed this trend when I read Thomas Piketty’s
charts, and it is more pronounced here. We now
seem headed for extreme wealth differences again,
so we will have another chance to observe any
impact.
John Hrastar, Silver Spring
A clarifying act of patriotism
The decision by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) to
release the full transcript of the testimony before the
Senate Judiciary Committee by Glenn Simpson of
Fusion GPS last August was courageous, patriotic
and long overdue.
Last summer, following this interview, Sen.
Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa), when asked by his
constituents at a town-hall meeting, said that he saw
no reason not to vote for its release. How things have
changed since. Mr. Grassley and Sen. Lindsey O.
Graham (R-S.C.) now want the Justice Department
to open a “criminal investigation” into former
British spy Christopher Steele’s work for Fusion GPS,
apparently because it strikes too close to President
Trump’s dealings with Russia.
Nothing sheds light on a subject like full disclosure, and in this case it appears to show the
hypocrisy of the many Trump protectors among the
Republicans, who cherry-picked a few things from
the interview to support their bogus request for a
criminal investigation of a friend of the United
States who was attempting to bring to the attention
of the FBI the possibility of blackmail by the
Russians.
If the investigating committees of the House and
Senate were serious in their search for the truth
about how the Russians interfered with our election,
they would have welcomed Mr. Simpson’s information. Instead, they have been circling the wagons
around the White House and the president in an
attempt to distract and divert. It is a disgrace made
all the more evident by Ms. Feinstein’s act of
patriotism.
Douglas A. Heydon, Washington
Nonlethal weapon
The Post deserves high commendation for so
doggedly tracking the number of deaths at the hands
of police nationwide. The suggestion in the Jan. 9
editorial “Almost 1,000 killed — by police” for better
mental-health care seems warranted but at best
palliative. What is needed is the large-scale replacement of guns by nonlethal means of incapacitation.
True, the technology we have is not perfect, but there
are enough methods out there that, in the hands of
those with proper training, most threatening situations could be defused without taking life.
There should be a serious push to improve in this
area and restrict even the possession of guns to a
select few or to very unusual circumstances.
Alan H. Dorfman, Bethesda
Letters and Local Opinions: letters@washpost.com
Op-eds: oped@washpost.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
JOSH ROGIN
E.J. DIONNE JR.
China’s reach
into U.S.
campuses
The
conversation
ender
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P
s part of a broad effort to interfere
in U.S. institutions, China tries to
shape the discussion at American
universities, stifle criticism and influence academic activity by offering funding, often through front organizations
closely linked to Beijing.
Now that aspect of Beijing’s foreign
influence campaign is beginning to face
resistance from academics and lawmakers.
A major battle in this nascent campus war
played out over the past six months at the
University of Texas in Austin.
After a long internal dispute, a high-level
investigation and an intervention by Sen.
Ted Cruz (R-Tex.), the university last week
rejected a proposal by the leader of its new
China center to accept money from the
China United States Exchange Foundation
(CUSEF). The Hong Kong-based foundation and its leader, Tung Chee-hwa, are
closely linked to the branch of the Chinese
Communist Party that manages influence
operations abroad.
The University of Texas debate erupted
after the China Public Policy Center at the
university’s LBJ School of Public Affairs
opened in August. Executive Director David Firestein proposed making CUSEF a
principal funder of the initiative. Firestein,
a former Foreign Service officer, had
worked with the foundation before.
After several professors and university
officials raised concerns about ties among
CUSEF, Tung and the Communist Party,
university President Gregory Fenves
launched an investigation. Over several
weeks, Fenves met with intelligence officials and experts to gauge the risk that
accepting CUSEF money could compromise the university’s academic integrity or
give China undue access to and influence
over academic products.
While the investigation was ongoing,
Firestein held an event in November that
was hosted by CUSEF and featured a
former Chinese vice foreign minister.
Shortly afterward, multiple reports highlighted that Tung is vice chairman of the
Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, a party organ that self-identifies as
“a united front organization.” The CPPCC
and the Communist Party’s United Front
Work Department collaborate on China’s
influence operations abroad.
“The party’s united front activities are
intended — still described in Maoist terms
— to mobilize the party’s friends to strike at
the party’s enemies,” said Peter Mattis, a
China fellow at the Jamestown Foundation
and former U.S. intelligence analyst. “That
has no place on a university campus in
America.”
Tung was also the first chief executive of
Hong Kong after the territory returned to
Beijing’s control. His foundation has funded research at many leading academic
institutions and think tanks, including the
Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies and the
Brookings Institution. A CUSEF spokesman told me the foundation is not an agent
of the Chinese government and is supported by private donors who believe a positive
U.S.-China relationship “is essential for
global well-being.”
Before UT-Austin could become next on
its list, Cruz weighed in. On Jan. 2, he
warned Fenves in a letter that accepting
CUSEF money could allow China to spread
propaganda and compromise the university’s credibility.
CUSEF and the United Front are the
“external face” of the Communist Party’s
“internal authoritarianism,” and giving
them access to UT-Austin’s education system could lead to “undue foreign influence
and exploitation,” Cruz wrote.
On Friday, Fenves told Cruz in a response
that UT-Austin will not accept any funding
from CUSEF for its China center. Before the
senator’s warning, the university had decided to reject “programmatic funding,”
Fenves wrote. After receiving the letter and
inquiries from The Post, the university
decided to ban all CUSEF funding.
Fenves shares Cruz’s concerns that accepting CUSEF money “could create potential conflicts of interest or place limits on
academic freedom and the robust exchange
of ideas,” he wrote. A Cruz aide said Fenves
had preserved the integrity of the institution through his decision.
UT-Austin’s decision has implications
not only for the future of Chinese money in
higher education but also for the greater
effort to counter Chinese interference in
free societies, known as “sharp power.”
“This is one of the first examples of a
university turning down money because it
is tied to the Chinese Communist Party’s
united front activities,” said Mattis, adding
that the university’s deliberative and informed process should be a model for other
institutions.
Universities still face broader challenges
in dealing with China. The Chinese government has sponsored hundreds of Confucius
Institutes on college campuses that operate
under opaque contracts and often stand
accused of interfering in China-related
education activities. Increasing numbers of
Chinese students in the United States have
come under pressure from their government when they have spoken against the
party’s narrative. Some have begun challenging professors who speak critically
about Beijing’s policies.
Due to the growing efforts of academics,
government officials, lawmakers and journalists, the thin veil protecting organizations that do the Chinese Communist Party’s bidding abroad is being peeled back.
But the greater struggle to expose and then
counter Chinese foreign interference in
free societies is just beginning.
josh.rogin@washpost.com
LEAH L. JONES/SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE
Volunteers build a structure for the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington in 1968.
King’s most ambitious dream
BY
L ONNIE G . B UNCH III
I
was 14 when my parents took my
brother and me to Washington to
witness the masses gathering
there. It was the spring of 1968,
and thousands of African Americans,
American Indians, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Asian Americans
and poor whites from across the country had made their way to the Mall to
protest the thing they all had in common: poverty.
They came by train, bus and car
caravans. Some traveled by mule carts.
They came from farm towns, big cities,
the Appalachian hills and Native
American reservations. It was the start
of the Poor People’s Campaign.
Once they reached the Mall, they
built Resurrection City. It became
home for more than 6,000 people; they
were there for six weeks. They built
540 tents that resembled wooden
shanties, where they lived, worshiped,
held meetings, set up Head Start classes and received medical care.
And they brought the nation’s attention to the crippling effects of poverty
— and issued a demand for jobs, training, health care and affordable housing. This was the mission of Resurrection City — the final vision of the
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and, perhaps, his most ambitious dream.
King’s commitment to economic reform is often overshadowed by his
broader civil rights work and his assassination. He characterized America’s
socioeconomic schism as an “enormous, entrenched evil,” one analogous
to “strangulation.”
What King could not know was that
this economic divide would long outlive him. Though there has been a
decline in the percentage of people
trapped in poverty, people of color are
still disproportionately affected.
There is something to be gained,
then, from revisiting King’s final
dream — one that cuts across borders
and boundaries to illuminate the
cracks in the nation’s veneer of abun-
dant prosperity.
This month, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American
History and Culture is exploring King’s
final vision in a new exhibition, “City of
Hope: Resurrection City and the 1968
Poor People’s Campaign.” The exhibition, bringing together rare oral histories, posters and photographs, lays
bare the distance traveled, the stories
shared and the history made by Americans with seemingly little in common
except the dream to overcome poverty.
The legacy of the six-week Poor People’s Campaign is mixed. Some argue
that it achieved only isolated gains in
education, labor and limited housing
subsidies for the poor. Others point to
the fact that mere months later, President Richard Nixon, on May 6, 1969,
presented a major speech on hunger to
Congress. Nixon recommended several programs to end hunger in America, including the Food Stamp program
and the food program for women,
infants and hildren. The Poor People’s
Campaign planted the seeds for many
safety-net programs that flourished
for a while but have demonstrably
declined over the years. The movement stands apart in its interethnic
organization, the crucial role women
played in its coalition and the profound truth it laid bare.
Writing in “The Trumpet of Conscience,” King explained that the problem is international in scope: “Disinherited people all over the world are
bleeding to death from deep social and
economic wounds.”
For King, it was only through nationwide reconciliation that a “beloved community” could be formed,
and, with it, economic injustice overcome.
Women, in particular, played a key
role in advocating for the nation’s poor.
Coretta Scott King led the Poor People’s
Campaign’s first rally, on Mother’s Day.
Marian Wright Edelman championed
the need to bring the weight of the
movement to illuminate the pain and
paralysis of poverty. Like many in-
volved, Edelman continued to fight for
fairness long after Resurrection City
was disbanded, by founding the Children’s Defense Fund — an organization
that reminds us that one way to judge a
nation is by how it treats its children.
For all its pioneering work, the Poor
People’s Campaign failed to realize its
aims, in part because there is no simple
solution to the nation’s economic ills.
Resurrection City brought to light the
country’s poverty problem but, befitting its muddy ground, found itself in a
social and political quagmire — one
that failed to design and construct a
strategy for addressing poverty decades into the future.
Today we find ourselves in another
pivotal moment in our history — one in
which poverty is pervasive and knowledge of its scope scarce. Revisiting the
Poor People’s Campaign offers a new
vantage point into our shared story, a
rich body of knowledge to inform our
debates and a model for exposing injustice.
One of my favorite photographs in
the exhibition is of Ralph Abernathy,
King’s successor as leader of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
Abernathy is hammering a last nail
into one of the Resurrection City buildings. Like others there, he wasn’t constructing just buildings but also collaborations, not just structures but also
guideposts — towering testaments
that said to the nation: We want to be a
different America, and we are willing
to work to make that happen.
Those six weeks in Washington did
not bring permanent systematic
change but hinted at how to do so.
Today, in South Side Chicago or Southeast Washington, economic injustice is
as real as it has ever been. Poverty
plagues us all, regardless of race, religion or region, and it can be addressed
only when we stand together in a city,
and a nation, of hope.
The writer is director of the Smithsonian’s
National Museum of African American
History and Culture.
ROBERT J. SAMUELSON
Does the Fed need a new playbook?
T
he record of economists, including those at the Federal Reserve,
over the past half-century has
been discouraging. The two
greatest blunders are well known: policies that fed double-digit inflation in the
1970s, reaching a peak average of 13.5 percent in 1980; and the more recent failure
to prevent the 2008-2009 financial crisis
and Great Recession, which saw unemployment reach 10 percent.
Unfortunately, there are many other
lapses. Economists generally have been
unable to predict the onset of recessions.
Since at least the 1970s, they have routinely missed turning points in productivity,
for better or worse (“productivity” is
economist jargon for “efficiency”). More
recently, they’ve been surprised by the
plunge in long-term interest rates and by
a lengthy stretch of low inflation.
The dirty secret of economics is how
much economists don’t know. Their ignorance is increasingly relevant, because
there is growing agitation among economists to stage a grand debate over the role
of monetary policy — how the Fed influences interest rates, credit conditions and
the money supply.
“Fed Is Urged to Rewrite Its Playbook,”
headlined a recent New York Times article. It explained: “A growing number of
experts, including some Federal Reserve
officials, say it is time for the Fed to
consider a new approach to managing the
economy.”
What would that be? One proposal
would have the Fed create 4 percent
inflation, roughly double the present rate,
by pumping more money into the economy. This approach, the argument goes,
would stimulate spending and give the
Fed greater latitude to cut interest rates in
case of recession. (Higher inflation generally leads to higher interest rates.)
It’s an awful idea. The purported advantages are mostly academic; they make
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Jerome Powell, President Trump’s
nominee for Federal Reserve chair.
for good scholarly discussions but are of
dubious value in the real world. The truth
is that economists hardly have a clue what
the short- and long-term consequences of
raising inflation to 4 percent would be.
Indeed, they don’t even know whether
they could hit that target. Markets might
keep inflation lower; or an overzealous
Fed might unleash so much money that
inflation spurted higher.
Proposals such as these constitute
busywork for economists. They can write
research papers, organize conferences
and, of course, implement new policies.
Luckily, not all economists have drunk
the Kool-Aid. “The Fed is not going to
adopt a 4 percent inflation target,” former
chairman Ben S. Bernanke recently told a
conference. “It’s just not going to happen.”
Since World War II, the central bank’s
finest hours have involved undoing its
own mistakes. Under Paul A. Volcker, the
Fed crushed double-digit inflation in the
early 1980s. Under Alan Greenspan, a
quarter-century of solid economic
growth followed. Bernanke’s quick response to the financial crisis (along with
Treasury Secretaries Henry M. Paulson
and Timothy Geithner) arguably averted
a second Great Depression. That, obviously, was a big deal. In the 1930s, unemployment peaked at 25 percent.
No one denies that the Fed’s goals are
ambitious and not always compatible. By
law, it’s supposed to pursue “stable prices”
and “maximum employment” — terms
undefined by Congress. (The Fed has defined price stability as 2 percent inflation;
maximum employment is reckoned as an
unemployment rate of about 4.6 percent.)
In addition, as Harvard University
economist Martin Feldstein argued recently in the Wall Street Journal, the
financial crisis emphasized the importance of preventing crashes in financial
markets: those for stocks, bonds and
other instruments.
“The combination of overpriced real
estate and equities [stocks] has left the
financial sector fragile and has put the
entire economy at risk,” Feldstein wrote.
If prices crashed, they could weaken confidence, slow spending and cause a recession, he warned. The contradictions are
clear. Low interest rates may boost job
creation, but they may also fuel financial
speculation.
Perhaps some brilliant economist will
devise a theory that reconciles all the
Fed’s potentially contradictory goals. But
it hasn’t happened yet, and we should
resist the seductive notion that there’s
some superior system that, as the Times’s
article put it, would constitute “a new
approach to managing the economy.”
The Fed is not omnipotent. The best it
can do under the present state of knowledge is to muddle along, selecting its
priorities and embracing new policies —
such as low interest rates and bond purchases — that respond to what seems the
most urgent need of the moment. This is
essentially what the Fed has been doing
for the past decade, and for all its shortcomings, it has contained inflation and
worked reasonably well.
What we should fear is some overambitious economic program that promises to
make us better off but does the opposite.
olitical leaders in democracies
have a few core obligations.
They are charged with solving
today’s problems and preparing their nations for the future. They
are responsible for creating some
sense of shared purpose and mutual
respect among their citizens — above
all a common commitment to preserving the very freedoms on which democracy depends.
Within this context, citizens exercise their right to argue about how to
define the public interest, how to
identify the central problems and how
to choose among competing values.
Given my social democratic leanings I would assert, for example, that
equal opportunity — including the
opportunity to participate fully in
self-government — demands a far
greater degree of economic security
and equality than we currently enjoy.
This is particularly true when it comes
to access to health care, education,
family time away from paid labor, and
the chance to accumulate wealth.
You might push back and say that
my proposals toward these ends impinge more than they should on individual freedom and require higher
levels of taxation than you are willing
to put up with. Or you might insist
that I am focusing too much on economics and that promoting better
personal values society-wide is more
conducive to the nation’s well-being
than any of my programs for greater
equity.
And, yes, we might quarrel about
who has a right to join our political
community and become part of our
nation. We should not pretend that
our current battles about immigration
are unique to our time. In the United
States, we have been wrangling over
immigration since at least the 1840s. I
suspect (and may God preserve our
republic) we will be having at least
some contention around this subject
in the 2140s as well.
Such debates can be bitter, but
democracy’s health depends on our
ability to hold our passions against
each other in check and to offer each
other at least some benefit of the
doubt.
As the political scientists Steven
Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt emphasize
in their timely new book, “How Democracies Die,” democracy requires
“mutual toleration,” which is “the understanding that competing parties
accept one another as legitimate rivals,” and “forbearance,” which means
that politicians “exercise restraint in
deploying their institutional prerogatives.”
Which, alas, brings us yet again to
President Trump, who (no matter how
much we want to) cannot be avoided
at this moment because he threatens
the conditions under which democracy can flourish.
Our current debate is frustrating,
and not only because Trump doesn’t
understand what “mutual toleration”
and “forbearance” even mean. By persistently making himself, his personality, his needs, his prejudices and his
stability the central topics of our
political conversation, Trump is blocking the public conversation we ought
to be having about how to move
forward.
And while Trump’s enablers in the
Republican Party will do all they can to
avoid the issue, there should now be
no doubt (even if this was clear long
ago) that we have a blatant racist as
our president. His reference to immigrants from “sh--hole countries” and
his expressed preference for Norwegians over Haitians, Salvadorans and
new arrivals from Africa make this
abundantly clear. Racist leaders do not
help us reach mutual toleration. His
semi-denial 15 hours after his comment was first reported lacked credibility, especially because he called
around first to see how his original
words would play with his base.
But notice also what Trump’s outburst did to our capacity to govern
ourselves and make progress. Democrats and Republicans sympathetic to
the plight of the “dreamers” worked
out an immigration compromise designed carefully to give Trump what he
had said he needed.
There were many concessions by
Democrats on border security, “chain
migration” based on family reunification, and the diversity visa lottery that
Trump had criticized. GOP senators
such as Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.) and
Jeff Flake (Ariz.) bargained in good
faith and were given ample reason by
Trump to think they had hit his sweet
spot.
Trump blew them away with a
torrent of bigotry. In the process, he
shifted the onus for avoiding a government shutdown squarely on his own
shoulders and those of Republican
leaders who were shamefully slow in
condemning the president’s racism.
There are so many issues both more
important and more interesting than
the psyche of a deeply damaged man.
We are capable of being a far better
nation. But we need leaders who call
us to our obligations to each other as
free citizens. Instead, we have a president who knows only how to foster
division and hatred.
ejdionne@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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KLMNO
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MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
20 27 30 30°
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Precip: 10%
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JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
Customers can go to
extreme, imaginative
lengths when they return
stores’ merchandise. B3
Terry McAuliffe carries on
a tradition, pulling a prank
on his successor,
Gov. Ralph Northam. B5
The campaign of John V.
Tunney, a senator from
California, inspired the
film “The Candidate.” B6
Drawn by Hogan’s popularity, GOP groups take rare interest in blue Md.
BY
J OSH H ICKS
National Republican groups
are weighing major election
spending in 2018 in deeply blue
Maryland, where they hope the
popularity of Gov. Larry Hogan
could insulate the party from
backlash
against
President
Trump.
The Republican National
Committee and the Republican
Governors Association, which sat
out much of the 2014 election
cycle in Maryland, are eager to
help Hogan become the first GOP
governor reelected in the state in
more than 60 years. Whoever
controls the governor’s mansion
will oversee redistricting after
the 2020 Census, potentially
shifting the political balance of
power in the state for years to
come.
Other
groups,
including
GOPAC and the Republican State
Leadership Committee, want to
help the state party flip five
Senate seats to break a Democratic supermajority in that
chamber, a goal that appeared
possible a year ago based on
Hogan’s coattails but now seems
more daunting in light of major
GOP losses in Virginia and elsewhere.
Republicans also will make a
major push in 2018 to capture
Maryland’s 6th Congressional
District seat held by outgoing
Rep. John Delaney (D). A victory
there — which political analysts
so far say would be an upset —
would double the number of GOP
members of Congress from the
state.
“Having Governor Hogan at
the top of the ticket is a huge
boon to Republican candidates
because of the positive, popular
way he has governed,” RSLC President Matt Walter said. “That
allows people to talk about issues
of their district rather than some
nationwide
liberal
agenda
against Trump.”
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee,
who chairs the Democratic Governors Association, recently
questioned Hogan’s electability
in an interview with The Washington Post, and DGA spokesman
Jared Leopold said the group will
spend heavily to defeat the governor, whom he said will be vulnerable if Marylanders associate him
with Trump.
The DGA spent about $2 million on the 2014 governor’s race,
in which then-Lt. Gov. Anthony
G. Brown lost to Hogan after
ELECTION CONTINUED ON B5
D.C. region
gets a 2nd
Catholic
basilica
Vatican honor goes
to Alexandria’s St. Mary
BY
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Jefferson Keel, a Native American Vietnam veteran who was awarded a Bronze Star, visited the grounds of the Museum of the American Indian in
December. That’s where the memorial, first approved by Congress in 1994, will be placed. It’s scheduled to be unveiled on Veterans Day 2020.
M ICHELLE B OORSTEIN
The D.C. area is already home
to the country’s largest Catholic
church, the dramatic Basilica of
the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. Now the Vatican has designated for the region
a second basilica, this time a 223year-old congregation in Northern Virginia whose first donor
was George Washington.
The Rev. Michael Burbidge,
bishop of the Diocese of Arlington
— which covers northeastern Virginia, including Washington’s
busy suburbs — announced the
news at 8:30 a.m. Mass on Sunday
at the historic St. Mary Catholic
Church.
The parish will now be called
“The Basilica of St. Mary” and will
probably attract Catholic tourists
as a result of its new designation
and seal.
St. Mary is now the 84th “minor basilica” in the United States,
structures honored for special attributes that can be architectural,
historical or geographical. It
means that in the eyes of the
Vatican, St. Mary has the same
standing as the National Shrine,
CATHOLIC CONTINUED ON B4
A memorial
on the Mall
long fought for,
‘long overdue’
Native American veterans to be honored
BY
T ARA B AHRAMPOUR
The Mall is studded with monuments to
iconic people and events, from presidents to
wars to civil rights leader Martin Luther King
Jr. Later this month, finalists will be announced for a memorial to a group with less
name recognition: Native American veterans.
In the 20th century, Native Americans
served in the United States military at a
higher per capita rate than any other ethnic
group, and their service stretches back to the
Revolutionary War. This might sound surprising, given their fraught history with the
U.S. government. Why would so many choose
to fight and sacrifice for a country that has
often treated native tribes so badly?
The answer lies in the way many see their
patriotism, as inextricably connected with
the land itself, said Rebecca Trautmann,
project curator of the National Native American Veterans Memorial at the National
Museum of the American Indian, upon whose
land the memorial will be built.
“They have described an inherited responsibility to protect their homeland, their
families, their communities and their traditional way of life,” she said.
Or as Debra Kay Mooney, a Choctaw who is
a veteran of the Iraq War, put it: “Our
ancestors are the very groundwork of the
United States because we died here first. It’s
our ancestors’ bones and marrow that has
degraded into the ground that is actually in
the roots and the tops of the tallest trees. . . .
We needed to protect our ancestors’ bones.”
While Congress approved the erection of
the memorial in 1994, it did not authorize
fundraising for it until 2013. (It is scheduled
Howard U.
deals with
cold snap’s
damage
Classes restart Tuesday
on hard-hit campus
VETERANS CONTINUED ON B8
BY
Drawing lessons from King and Malcolm X met just once.
largely forgotten history The photo haunts with what was lost.
Educators want more stress on Reconstruction
BY
A VIS T HOMAS- L ESTER
In August, Michigan history
teacher James Gorman watched
televised images of torch-bearing
white supremacists marching on
the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and decided to use the
incident to teach his students
about similar events that happened in a divided United States
150 years earlier.
He would compare race-based
protests by white nationalists, like
those in Charlottesville, to segregationists’ efforts during the
Reconstruction era to roll back
civil rights advances made after
the Civil War. During Reconstruction — which historians date from
roughly 1865 to 1877 — enslaved
people were freed, former slaves
and free blacks gained citizenship
rights, and black men were granted the right to vote. As a result,
African Americans made huge
strides in education, entrepreneurship and political power. Historians estimate that as many as
2,000 blacks were elected to local,
state and federal offices during
Reconstruction.
Most of those gains were lost
after 1877, when the federal government pulled troops out of the
South. A backlash began. Racist
legislators effectively stripped
blacks of their constitutional
rights by passing laws mandating
segregation and restricting voting.
The post-Reconstruction attacks on black advancement
“were motivated by the same
mentality as Charlottesville —
The Rev.
Martin Luther
King Jr. and
DENEEN L.
Malcolm X met
BROWN
only once. On
March 26, 1964,
the two black
leaders were on Capitol Hill,
attending Senate debate on the
Civil Rights Act of 1964.
King was stepping out of a
news conference when Malcolm
X, dressed in an elegant black
overcoat and wearing his
signature horn-rimmed glasses,
greeted him.
“Well, Malcolm, good to see
you,” King said.
“Good to see you,” Malcolm X
replied.
Cameras clicked as the two
men walked down the Senate
hall together.
“I’m throwing myself into the
TEACHING CONTINUED ON B2
MEETING CONTINUED ON B4
Retropolis
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X greet each other
on Capitol Hill during debate on the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
S ARAH L ARIMER
Nina Brown returned to Washington last week primed to start
her second semester as a biology
major at Howard University. Instead, she learned something
about the biology of buildings beset by an arctic blast.
“The first day, it was cold
throughout the building,” Brown
said. “And then the second day, the
heat started working in our room.
But in different rooms on my floor,
some are cold, some are hot.”
Amid the frigid start to the new
year, Howard found itself facing
concerns about the state of its facilities. The cold weather sparked power outages, heating woes and damage to campus buildings. Undergraduate classes were postponed.
And the school was still making
repairs even as it prepared to start
the delayed semester Tuesday.
“I don’t really know how it happens,” said Brown, 18. “D.C. is a
cold city, so I don’t know how they
weren’t prepared. But all the students are safe.”
Jade Agudosi, president of the
Howard University Student Association, said last week that the
organization received worried
DAMAGE CONTINUED ON B3
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. MONDAY,
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education
Too many students can’t write well. Perhaps some volunteer tutors could help?
Okay. I confess.
My wife and I
send a chatty
letter to friends
and relatives at
the end of each
Jay
year. Many people
Mathews
loathe such
missives. Ours
may be particularly lame. But
the letters we get in return are
often well-crafted and suggest a
way to improve the awful state
of writing instruction in
America.
Many of the people who send
these letters have done much
writing in their lives. They know
how to communicate clearly and
effectively, with verve and
humor. And the existence of
these extracurricular letters
suggests they have some free
time on their hands.
I think they could help relieve
the two greatest obstacles to
teaching students how to write:
not enough writing teachers and
not enough time to give students
the attention they need.
Without the needed time and
teachers, schools keep
instruction in writing to a
minimum. A study of 1,876
literacy assignments in six
urban middle schools by the
nonprofit Education Trust
showed 18 percent required no
writing at all. About 60 percent
demanded just some notetaking, short responses, or a
sentence or two. Fourteen
percent required students to
write a single paragraph, and
only 9 percent went beyond
that.
Almost no U.S. high school
students are required to do long
research papers, except students
in private schools or public
schools with International
Baccalaureate programs. The
best instruction in writing
happens on school newspapers,
which usually have talented
faculty advisers and smart
seniors willing to help untrained
freshmen, but that activity is
often underfunded or missing
altogether.
The painful jargon of
secondary school English
department classes still rules,
despite attempts by talented
teachers to change it. Here is
guidance from the Common
Core State Standards for ninthand 10th-graders trying to write
an argument: “Introduce precise
claim(s), distinguish the
claims(s) from alternate or
opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes
clear relationships among
claim(s), counterclaims, reasons
and evidence.”
I didn’t learn to write well
enough to get paid for it until
college. The more experienced
staffers on the daily student
paper ripped apart my overlong
sentences and vague summaries.
To learn writing, you need a
tough editor with the time to
show you what’s wrong and how
to fix it.
Six years ago, I made this
suggestion for a different way to
teach writing in high school:
“Require students to take at
least one semester of reading
and writing instead of their
regular English class. A paper is
due each Monday. In class,
students read whatever they like
or work on next week’s essay
while the teacher calls them up
in turn and edits their papers as
they watch.”
Each student would get about
10 minutes of live editing a
week, much more than the zero
minutes usually allotted. A few
teachers told me they were
doing something like that, but I
realize it is too radical a reform
for most places.
So what can we do? How can
Teaching
about
change,
backlash
TEACHING FROM B1
limiting progress,” said Gorman,
who teaches in Tawas City, a hamlet of about 2,000 on the Lake
Huron coast of Michigan’s Lower
Peninsula. “It’s important for students to learn about that period,
especially as it relates to what is
happening today.”
To inform his lessons, Gorman
chose a curriculum called “Teach
Reconstruction” that was created
by the Zinn Education Project, a
collaboration between social justice education nonprofits Teaching
for Change, based in Washington,
and Rethinking Schools, of Milwaukee. The creators of the Teach Reconstruction project are campaigning for the inclusion of lessons
about Reconstruction in history
and social studies classes. The project provides educational materials
and teaching guides for teachers.
The 150th anniversary of the
Reconstruction era has gone
largely unheralded, said Deborah
Menkart, executive director of
Teaching for Change and co-director of the Zinn Education Project,
named after the late historian and
social activist Howard Zinn, author of the best-selling “A People’s
History of the United States.”
“It is not getting anywhere near
the attention of the Civil War anniversaries,” Menkart said. “In order
to make a better path forward, we
need to know about the eras when
the country made a real effort to
make change. That’s what Reconstruction was. It was a short window in which people worked
across racial lines to make change.
. . . As a colleague said, it is the
only period in U.S. history when
RICK REINHARD FOR THE HECHINGER REPORT
Students at a middle school in the District work on a lesson about Reconstruction.
black lives mattered.”
Many states require lessons on
the Civil War. Some states, such as
Mississippi and Michigan, also require teachers to include Reconstruction in those lessons. But
Menkart and others said most
school districts do little to ensure
the era is presented to students.
Several educators called Reconstruction one of most pivotal periods in the nation’s history. It has
long been controversial because it
was an effort by the federal government and others to create a
successful biracial society, but it
failed in the face of a white supremacist backlash.
“Here was this moment at the
end of the Civil War when the
country has been engaged in this
bloody conflict where all the old
structures have been destroyed,”
said Zinn Education Project codirector Bill Bigelow. “There is
this question posed about what
kind of country we are going to
live in. Reconstruction is the answer to that question. So, it is
incredibly important for us to
think about and teach about because this was a chance to really
remake the kind of United States
that we were going to be.”
Several organizations are providing information to help educators teach about Reconstruction.
The National Endowment for the
Humanities is sponsoring “American Reconstruction: The Untold
Story,” a summer institute for
teachers in grades K-12 next July
at the University of South Carolina
at Beaufort. The program was also
offered in 2016 and 2017.
This past July, the National
Park Service’s National Historic
Landmarks Program published
“The Era of Reconstruction 18611900,” a 165-page guide for educators, students and others. The
guide can be downloaded free
from the Park Service’s website.
The nonprofit Facing History and
Ourselves is offering “The Reconstruction Era and the Fragility of
Democracy,” described as an “archive of lessons, videos and primary sources to teach about one of
the most tumultuous periods in
U.S. history and its legacy today.”
The materials can be downloaded
free.
Bigelow said more than 72,000
teachers have registered on the
Zinn Education Project’s website
to download materials, including
Reconstruction teaching activities and lesson plans. The free
curriculum features a variety of
components, including “Reconstructing the South: A Role Play,”
in which students consider what
black people needed to survive
and to achieve real freedom after
the war.
Cristina Tosto, who teaches Reconstruction to a diverse group of
students in Gulfport, Miss., said
the curriculum offers an alternative to the “victim-based” presentation of blacks in history. She
makes sure her students know
that despite their state’s history of
Jim Crow oppression, Mississippi
elected the first African American
to serve a full term in the U.S.
Senate, Blanche K. Bruce, during
Reconstruction.
“Often the history can be de-
we add time and teachers to the
meager writing instruction we
have now?
How about a once-a-month
editing bee with volunteers who
know what good writing is,
including the many retired or
semiretired wordsmiths in our
communities?
After judging our
qualifications by looking at a
writing sample, the school could
sit us in the cafeteria with a few
snacks and drinks. (I like apple
juice.) Students would spend
their English class period with
us, getting at least 10 minutes of
editing on whatever writing they
were doing. (This would force
schools to have regular writing
assignments, which they often
don’t.)
It would be fun for the
volunteer editors and
invigorating for the kids.
Education reform expert Marc
Tucker has suggested teacher
candidates also be required to
write long papers. The
volunteers could edit those, too.
This would take time away
from doing the annual family
letter, but that’s okay. To those of
you who have gotten the
Mathews letter in the past and
think we are very late this year,
we can only say, vaguely, that it’s
in the mail.
pressing, but there was a lot of
progress made, and that’s what I
teach my students,” Tosto said. “I
want them to know that African
American history included progress, triumph and victory, as well
as struggle.”
Educators who teach Reconstruction said teachers who don’t
may be motivated by more than a
lack of knowledge of the era. Bigelow said many teachers avoid it
because of the controversy surrounding the subject. Others may
feel they’ve covered the material
while teaching about slavery, slave
resistance and the roots of the
Civil War.
Julian Hipkins III, a former
staff member at Teaching for
Change who is global studies coordinator at Theodore Roosevelt
High School in Washington, said
the subject of Reconstruction is
ideologically uncomfortable for
many historians and educators.
“U.S. history is often taught in
this continuous arc of improvement, but post-Reconstruction
kind of destroyed that myth,” he
said.
Hipkins said the period reminds people that race-related advancements have often been followed by backlash. “If you don’t
teach that, then every generation
thinks that the things they are
going through are new,” he said.
“When President Trump won, I
wasn’t surprised at all because it
fell in line with the way U.S. history has gone since the beginning.
You have the election of the first
black president followed by a
president who supports white supremacy. That is actually how the
United States works.”
Educators said learning about
Reconstruction can help children
understand the current racial conflicts in the country. Statistics
from the Southern Poverty Law
Center, a nonprofit watchdog that
tracks hate groups, show that
race-related attacks and membership in racist organizations increased in 2017. Teachers said such
incidents are especially disturbing for young people who have
lived much or all of their lives with
a black president in the White
House.
Incidents such as “the white
supremacist rally in Charlottes-
ville and the protest against it can
be difficult for young people to
fully comprehend,” said Amrita
Wassan, who teaches about Reconstruction as part of her U.S.
history course at the Capital City
Public Charter School in Washington. “I often hear students voice
questions like, ‘Why is no one
stopping white supremacists?’
and ‘Why was this rally allowed?’ ”
It is important for students to
see the connection between Charlottesville and similar protests by
some of those who want to “make
America great again” and previous political fights to reverse the
progress of people of color, said
Adam Sanchez, a Zinn Education
organizer.
Gorman said that is the connection he hopes his students will
make in Michigan. He said the
Michigan educational content
standards require educators to
teach about the Civil War and
Reconstruction, but Reconstruction often gets short shrift. He
wanted his students — 90 percent
of whom are white and many of
whom have never ventured to a
big city — to learn about the racist
motivations for the actions that
were taken by Southern segregationists to neutralize black advancement after the Civil War and
by those who marched recently in
Charlottesville.
He also wants the students to
understand those conflicts aren’t
a world away. There are Confederate flags flying in many areas of
Michigan, he said.
“Even though the protests are
not happening here, these kids
don’t live under a rock,” he said.
“They see these protests. Those of
us who have lived in other places
and have had friends who have
shared experiences [about oppression] are more likely to understand. Those who haven’t, often
don’t have a clue. You hope to
share something with the students that will help them understand and empathize.”
jay.mathews@washpost.com
Education by the numbers
6,857
Number of charter schools in
the United States during the
2015-2016 academic year. That
was a 1.6 percent increase from
the year before, according to
recently released federal data.
local@washpost.com
This article was produced by the
Hechinger Report, a nonprofit,
independent news organization
focused on inequality and innovation
in education. Sign up for the
Hechinger newsletter.
VIRGINIA
Under McAuliffe, an emphasis on science and technology education
BY
D EBBIE T RUONG
When Terry McAuliffe entered
office as Virginia’s governor four
years ago, expectations for high
school students were outdated, he
said. Schoolchildren were credited for “seat time,” not how well
equipped they were to enter the
workforce.
So his administration set out to
create opportunities and establish expectations for students, he
said. As McAuliffe left office, he
touted education initiatives intended to steer Virginia students
into high-paying technical jobs.
“You want jobs — you create a
tax income. You cannot get that if
you don’t have a great workforce.
You cannot have a great workforce
if you don’t have the best education system in the country,” the
Democrat said in an October interview reflecting on education
during his tenure.
One initiative set a goal of graduating 50,000 Virginians each
year from training programs in
science, technology, engineering,
math and health fields — known
as STEM-H.
The state reached that benchmark in fiscal 2017 when, according to the governor’s office, 50,361
STEM-H credentials were awarded statewide.
McAuliffe also sought to position Virginia as a leader in cybersecurity, with training camps for
educators, programs for veterans
and state-funded cyber camps for
high school students.
More recently, the state’s Board
of Education voted in November
to adopt computer science standards for students after lawmakers directed the board to do so.
Virginia also has overhauled
the way it measures student
THE DAILY QUIZ
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correct response.
achievement.
Lawmakers in 2014 eliminated
five Standards of Learning tests in
elementary and middle school, reducing the number from 22 to 17.
Instead of the standardized tests,
students are assessed on their
knowledge of the material by project-based assessments.
The
McAuliffe-appointed
Board of Education also voted to
do away with statewide history
exams required for graduation.
Critics doubt schools will be able
to adequately measure students’
understanding of the history curriculum without the statewide
exam.
But supporters say having fewer standardized tests is a welcome
shift from an extreme reliance on
testing, and they note that students’ mastery of the curriculum
will be measured in other ways.
The Board of Education also
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where her sister has commandeered wedding planning duties. See details at
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
revamped the accreditation system used by the state to hold
schools accountable. Credit will
be given to schools that show improvement on state tests and other signs of progress, such as narrowing achievement gaps. That is
a departure from the current system, which relies almost entirely
on student pass rates on standardized tests to determine accreditation.
Jennifer Parish, past president
of the Virginia Association of
School Superintendents, said
graduation standards scheduled
to go into effect in the fall for
incoming ninth-graders encourage “deeper learning.”
The new standards — developed with input from superintendents, principals and other educators — require students to demonstrate critical thinking, creativity
and communication.
“We’ve got to continue that momentum and sustain what we’ve
started so we can make sure it all
comes to fruition,” said Parish, the
superintendent of Poquoson city
schools.
Del. R. Steven Landes (R-Augusta) said those changes reflect
bipartisan cooperation between
the Republican-led legislature
and McAuliffe.
Landes, chairman of the House
Education Committee, said common ground was found on issues
such as redesigning the state’s
high school graduation requirements and curtailing a persistent
teacher shortage.
McAuliffe said the teacher
shortage will be the steepest education challenge faced by his successor, Gov. Ralph Northam (D).
The state is beset with an aging
workforce, and McAuliffe said
bolstering the supply of Virginia
educators depends on attracting
millennials.
The dearth of educators
prompted McAuliffe to take emergency steps in December. He directed the Board of Education to
implement a measure allowing
the state’s public colleges and universities to offer undergraduates a
major in education by March 1,
streamlining education requirements to get aspiring teachers
into classrooms faster.
Jim Livingston, president of the
Virginia Education Association,
one of the state’s teacher alliances,
credited McAuliffe with restoring
some funding for schools hit hard
by the recession — the first steps
in a recovery that Livingston said
will require much more.
“Under his leadership, we’ve
put into place some of the building blocks,” Livingston said.
debbie.truong@washpost.com
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MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Bricks, bones, tuna cans. The odd world of retail returns.
“Everybody lies.”
That was the
mantra of
Gregory House,
the brilliant and
crotchety doctor
John
played by Hugh
Kelly's
Laurie on the TV
Washington show of the same
name.
Of course, not
everybody lies. But enough
people do to keep things . . .
interesting.
Last week I asked readers to
share anecdotes of retail
scofflaws who tried to return
bogus merchandise. Their
stories illustrate how
imaginative humans can be.
Jeanette Reynolds of
Manassas, Va., has a friend who
used to work in retail. Back in
the VHS days, a customer
brought back a VCR.
Wrote Jeanette: “The
customer said it was new, never
had been out of the box. But
store policy was to check out
everything. As the sealed box
was being opened, the customer
ran out of the store. Inside were
a few bricks and wood so it
appeared heavy enough to be a
VCR.”
Sometimes it’s customers left
holding the box — er, bag. On a
Black Friday a few years ago,
Jane Holmes of Silver Spring,
Md., hurried to the Target at
Wheaton Plaza (“It will always
be Wheaton Plaza to me,” Jane
wrote of what is now Westfield
Wheaton) to snag a hard-to-find
rose-gold iPad.
“To my surprise, when I
opened the sealed package I
found three cans of tuna taped
inside the box,” Jane wrote. “I
called Target right away and
fortunately they believed me.”
Jane went back to the store
with all the packaging — and
the tuna. She was able to
exchange the tuna iPad for a
real iPad. Jane figured it must
have been an inside job, so
perfect was the wrapping.
Steve Mona’s son — also
named Steve — once sold some
old video games on eBay. The
buyer claimed they were broken
and demanded a refund. So
back came the games, return
receipt at Steve’s cost. When
they opened the package, they
discovered not the video games
but a stack of paper, cut into the
shape of the games and
weighted accordingly.
Wrote Steve, who lives in
Brooklyn: “eBay refunded his
money and we had a stack of
paper that they were
unconcerned with. I kept that
dude’s address for years,
convinced I was somehow going
exchange the item. I had to
wait weeks while they
conducted an investigation.
Eventually, they apologized and
refunded my purchase, but it
was an annoying
inconvenience.”
When Amela Nau of Silver
Spring opened her new electric
toothbrush, she noticed it had
bite marks on it. It was someone
“To my surprise, when I opened the sealed package
I found three cans of tuna taped inside the box.”
Jane Holmes of Silver Spring, regarding a Target purchase
to get him back. But alas.”
Back in the days of Circuit
City, Bill Oliver of Kensington,
Md., bought a new VCR. When
he got home and opened the
box, he discovered that what
was inside was someone else’s
old beat-up VCR.
“Of course, I returned
immediately to the store,”
wrote Bill. “But, trying to get
them to believe they stuck me
with a ‘sneaky sale’ proved a
challenge. They refused to
else’s old toothbrush.
Wrote Amela, “Gross!”
Speaking of gross, the first
job that Sallie Bell of Waldorf,
Md., had as a teenager was at a
Gino’s Burgers. “One day a
customer came in complaining
that the eight-piece chicken he
bought was not good and
wanted his money back,” Sallie
wrote. “When the manager
opened the box, it was full of
bones! After much back and
forth (which got pretty heated),
the manager did refund the
customer’s money.”
As a teen, Jack Toomey of
Poolesville, Md., worked part
time at a Kroger grocery store,
where he soon became a very
fast cashier. “One day an
unkempt man placed a big circle
of Kroger soda cans, costing a
nickel each, on the belt and
helpfully counted them for me,”
Jack wrote. “There were
probably 20 cans on the outside
of the circle and at least 25 more
on the inside.”
The total cost was a bit over
$2. (Soda was cheap in those
days.)
Another cashier asked Jack if
he had actually checked the
cans in the center of the
phalanx of “sodas.” He hadn’t.
The next time the customer
came through and tried to count
the cans himself, Jack reached
inside. All of the cans in the
center of the mass were beer
cans costing about 25 cents.
Wrote Jack, “He feigned
ignorance as I charged him the
correct price.”
From 1970 to 1972, Bruce
Shulman of Silver Spring was a
supervisor in Woodward &
Lothrop’s merchandise
adjustment (i.e., complaint)
department. In that time, he
saw all sorts of drama.
For example, there was the
woman who brought back a
small Karastan wool rug
depicting a multicolored fish
against a tan background. She’d
paid about $30 for the wall
hanging and came in
complaining that it had been
ruined after she’d washed it. She
demanded a full refund.
Bruce thought she had only
herself to blame — “Who would
ever put a rug in a washing
machine?” he asked — but here’s
the real kicker: The woman had
owned the rug for 10 years.
Wrote Bruce, “My superiors
ordered that she be given a
refund check.”
The customer, it seems, is
always right. Even when she’s
trying to rip you off.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/johnkelly.
LOTTE R I E S
L O C A L D I GE S T
Results from Jan. 14
VIRGINIA
Trump congratulates
new governor
SARAH LARIMER/THE WASHINGTON POST
Steam billows outside a winter-damaged Howard University building on Tuesday.
Howard low on heat in winter ‘crisis’
DAMAGE FROM B1
calls from students: They had
heating problems. There was no
hot water for showers.
“So, it’s pretty much chaos right
now . . . from the student perspective in terms of just coming back
and then experiencing all the
wrath of the winter,” she said.
“Overall, people are just trying to
stay warm, and I think that’s the
biggest thing.”
Howard’s president, Wayne A.I.
Frederick, weighed in on the mess
in a video, calling the damage
“very serious” and explaining that
the cold caused ruptures in the
university’s steam pipes. That led
to flooding and water damage, he
said.
In the video, Frederick called
the issues Howard was facing a
“priority of my entire administrative team.”
Some of Howard’s boilers —
which deliver heat to residence
halls and other campus buildings
— also stopped functioning properly, although Howard University
Hospital
maintained
heat
throughout the emergency, Frederick said.
He mentioned the three build-
ings with the most serious damage
and said they were “offline” as
personnel workers dehumidified
and repaired the sites.
“Because of the severe damages, these buildings will likely remain offline for quite some time,”
he said.
To understand the crisis at
Howard, it is necessary to dive into
the nitty-gritty of the university’s
infrastructure.
As the temperature fell, pipes
froze, compromising steam distribution, said Tashni-Ann Dubroy,
Howard’s chief operating officer.
Even though boilers were pumping steam toward buildings, the
heat was escaping through ruptures in pipes.
“It worsened because the temperatures never let up,” she said.
There was no easy fix, Dubroy
said. “It was probably one of the
most unfortunate circumstances
we could have experienced,” she
said of the boiler malfunctions.
“That failure certainly put us in a
significant crisis.”
The university does not have an
estimate for the cost of repairs.
“But from the looks of it — this is
me being an unofficial estimator
— it’s multimillion-dollar damage
that has been done to the campus,”
Dubroy said.
Howard freshman Jamen Rollins, 19, said he was a bit nervous
returning to campus.
He returned to a dorm that had
heat and hot water. But he knew of
others who had come back to campus earlier and were more affected.
“Howard just needs to do better,” Rollins said. “It’s pretty much
unacceptable, I think. I’m supposed to be in class right now, but
they pushed it all back because of
the problems we’ve been having.”
Last week, Howard alumni and
students’ family members got in
touch with the school to offer help,
said Agudosi, the student association president. And Howard students who had heat and hot water
opened their doors to those who
needed a warm refuge.
“That is the Howard spirit,”
Agudosi said. “Even in spite of all
the different challenges that we
are facing, we are a resilient campus, and we have a resilient student body. . . . No matter what
hardships come our way, we’re
always able to weather the storm,
literally and figuratively.”
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
President Trump called newly
inaugurated Virginia Gov. Ralph
Northam (D) on Sunday to
congratulate him on his
swearing-in, the White House
said.
Trump and Northam
committed to working together
closely on many issues,
including support of the
military, the White House said.
Northam, who was
inaugurated Saturday in
Richmond, has served in the
Army as a medical officer. In
addition, Virginia is home to
major defense installations.
During the Virginia primary
campaign, Northam called
Trump a “narcissistic maniac”
but later said he would work
with him. Democratic resistance
to Trump apparently
contributed to Northam’s
November win.
— Martin Weil
KKK fliers found
in Loudoun County
Ku Klux Klan propaganda
fliers were found in Leesburg
and other parts of Loudoun
County over the weekend, and
police believe the timing was
connected to the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. holiday
weekend.
“The fliers appear to contain
propaganda material and were
most likely distributed due to
the close proximity of the day
the nation honors the legacy of
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s
birthday,” said a statement from
Leesburg police.
The first report of the fliers
was on Friday about 10 p.m.
Leesburg police got a call that a
resident found the fliers outside
a home on Aurora Court NE.
Leesburg police also got
reports of people claiming Klan
membership distributing fliers
in the town’s northeast
quadrant.
Then at noon Saturday, a
person reported seeing the
fliers on a running trail near
Smith Creek Circle and
Scotland Heights Road in the
Round Hill area of Loudoun,
according to the county sheriff ’s
office.
Those fliers were held down
with a hard candy, police said,
which is similar to other KKK
materials that were discovered
in Leesburg in October and
November, also weighed down
with candy.
Police ask anyone with any
information about the fliers to
contact the sheriff ’s office at
703-777-1021 or through the
office’s app. Or contact Leesburg
police at 703-771-4500.
— Allison Klein
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
President Trump plans to nominate to the federal bench in
Virginia a state appeals court
judge who was blocked by Democrats from a seat on the state
Supreme Court, the judge’s chambers confirmed.
Judge Rossie D. Alston Jr., 60, if
formally nominated and confirmed, would replace U.S. District Judge Gerald Bruce Lee, who
retired in the fall.
He would be Trump’s second
African American nominee to the
federal bench. Sen. Bryce E.
Reeves (R-Spotsylvania) announced the news from the floor
of the state Senate on Friday
morning.
“Judge Alston is very honored
and humbled by this announcement and thanks the President
and the two Virginia Senators for
their endorsements,” his judicial
assistant, Meggie Holson, said in
an email.
In 2015, Republicans in the
Virginia legislature attempted to
elevate Alston to the state Supreme Court, to block then-Gov.
Terry McAuliffe (D)’s choice for
the bench. After a standoff with
Democrats that lasted nine
months, Republicans chose another candidate.
That scuffle did not appear to
hurt Alston’s standing with Virginia’s two Democratic U.S. senators; he was one of two candidates
they recommended to the White
House for Lee’s seat. The other
was Patricia Giles, an assistant
U.S. attorney in the Eastern District.
Alston attended Averett College, now a university, and North
Carolina Central University’s
School of Law. He worked at the
National Labor Relations Board
under President Ronald Reagan
and then at the National Right to
Work Legal Defense Foundation.
He spent several years as a private
attorney before his nomination to
the bench in Prince William
County, first as a juvenile and
domestic relations court judge
and then as a Circuit Court judge.
He joined the state Court of Appeals in 2009.
“He’s extremely competent at
what he does. He knows the law
well,” said Sally Hook Merchak,
who hired Alston as an intern
early in his career and has since
appeared before him many times.
“He thoroughly enjoys being on
the bench and a good legal argument.”
Alston is also an active member of Good Shepherd United
Methodist Church of Dale City,
Va., and a youth football coach.
Paul Nichols, an attorney who
has known Alston since the
1990s, said he has long admired
the judge.
“He’s always a fair-minded person with a big heart, always trying to come up with a sensible
resolution,” Nichols said. “He
doesn’t curse. He doesn’t step out
of line. He has no real vices except
for maybe a little extra golfing.”
Nichols said Alston was tough
on violent criminals and those he
thought had squandered second
chances: “If you deserve the hammer, you’re getting the hammer.”
But Alston is compassionate,
he said, citing a difficult case
involving a man whose 21-monthold child died in a sweltering van.
A jury recommended a one-year
prison sentence. Alston instead
ordered the father to spend a day
in jail for seven years on the
anniversary of his daughter’s
death and run an annual blood
drive in her name.
Alston told The Post in 2007
that he prayed on that decision
and many others.
“I’m not ashamed to say it,”
Alston said. “There is not a day
that goes by that I don’t say a
prayer about some case I’m doing.”
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Sat.):
Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
DC-4 (Sat.):
DC-4 (Sun.):
DC-5 (Sat.):
DC-5 (Sun.):
6-8-5
6-4-2-1
7-5-3-6-6
7-3-3
4-2-5
7-2-3-7
7-7-0-4
7-6-6-5-6
9-3-4-7-7
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
7-8-0
Mid-Day Pick 4:
9-3-6-6
Night/Pick 3 (Sat.):
9-4-7
Pick 3 (Sun.):
2-1-2
Pick 4 (Sat.):
7-7-5-3
Pick 4 (Sun.):
2-0-8-9
Match 5 (Sat.):
11-17-23-27-30 *29
Match 5 (Sun.):
8-10-19-29-35 *26
5 Card Cash:
6C-QC-4H-AC-5C
VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
5-5-6
Pick-4:
5-2-4-7
Cash-5:
10-14-15-24-26
Night/Pick-3 (Sat.):
2-3-9
Pick-3 (Sun.):
5-1-1
Pick-4 (Sat.):
9-8-7-0
Pick-4 (Sun.):
4-2-0-8
Cash-5 (Sat.):
3-10-17-26-32
Cash-5 (Sun.):
2-16-28-30-33
Bank a Million:
13-14-24-27-32-37 *4
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Powerball:
Power Play:
14-25-35-58-69 **24
2x
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**Powerball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
Martin Luther King Jr. Day closings
CLOSED EVERYWHERE
Banks
Most
Federal
government
offices
Post offices
Courts
No mail delivery except
for Express Mail
Except for adult arraignments
and new juvenile referrals in the
District
VARIED RESTRICTIONS
DISTRICT
MARYLAND
VIRGINIA
Traffic,
parking
No city parking enforcement
except along the D.C.
Streetcar route.
No parking enforcement in
Montgomery and Prince
George’s except at National
Harbor, New Carrollton lots
and the Prince George’s
Department of Corrections.
HOV restrictions lifted on
Interstate 66 and I-395.
Meters not enforced in
Arlington and Alexandria.
Trash,
recycling
No collections; pickups slide
one day to end of the week.
Transfer stations closed.
Regular county collections in
Anne Arundel and Howard. In
Montgomery, collections slide
one day to the end of the
week. In Prince George’s, yard
waste collections only.
Landfills open in Calvert,
Frederick, Howard, Prince
George’s and St. Mary’s;
closed in Anne Arundel and
Charles. Montgomery Transfer
Station closed.
Regular county collections in
Arlington and Fairfax. No
collections in city of Fairfax.
Pickups are delayed one day
in Alexandria. Landfills open.
Liquor
stores
Open at owner’s discretion.
Montgomery ABC stores
open; elsewhere at owner’s
discretion.
ABC stores open.
Schools
Closed.
Closed.
Closed.
Libraries
One library in each ward will
be open. For information, go
to dclibrary.org.
Closed.
Closed.
Closed.
Closed.
VIRGINIA
Judge Alston likely to be nominated
DISTRICT
Local
Closed.
government
offices
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
·Metrorail is on a Saturday schedule from 5 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. with off-peak fares. Metrobus is on a Saturday
supplemental schedule with some post-midnight trips canceled. MetroAccess has regular service but subscription
trips are canceled.
·Ride On is on a special modified holiday schedule.
·DASH has Saturday service.
·CUE has modified weekday service.
·Fairfax Connector is on a holiday weekday schedule.
·ART is running Routes 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 77 and 87 only on a Saturday schedule.
·PRTC Omniride and VRE are not running.
·Loudoun Bus has limited service to the Wiehle-Reston Metro station only.
·MARC is running the Penn Line only on an “R” schedule.
·MTA Commuter Bus is running Route 201 only on a weekend/holiday schedule.
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Alexandria
church gets
basilica
designation
CATHOLIC FROM B1
which attracts thousands to
Northeast Washington each year.
“It’s a huge honor for Alexandria, which isn’t known as a Catholic town. This certainly puts us
on the map,” said Ken Wolfe, a
parishioner at St. Mary.
Each Catholic diocese has a
cathedral, which is like its headquarters church. But not all dioceses have basilicas. The Catholic
Church’s four “major” basilicas
are all in Rome.
St. Mary is large for a U.S.
Catholic church, with 7,500 members. It has a school and sits near
the Potomac River, which makes
the historic parish popular for
weddings.
In a region mad for history,
congregants have noticed that
there are signs around Alexandria
directing tourists to other landmark churches — but not theirs,
said the Rev. Edward Hathaway,
St. Mary’s pastor. “This is a recognition of the parish’s role in the
community, and among Catho-
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Father Andrew Haissig stands at the altar before Mass on Sunday at St. Mary Catholic Church, a newly named basilica in Alexandria, Va.
“It’s a huge honor for Alexandria, which isn’t known as a Catholic town. This certainly puts us on the map,” parishioner Ken Wolfe said.
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
lics, for almost 225 years,” he said.
According to the Arlington Diocese, St. Mary was founded in
1795, the first Catholic parish in
the commonwealth.
George Washington made the
first financial contribution to the
parish in the late 1700s, giving an
amount equivalent to $1,200 today, the diocese said in a statement. Washington wasn’t Catholic, but his close aide, Lt. Col. John
Fitzgerald, was Catholic and an
early supporter of the parish.
Washington was in social circles
with and hosted at Mount Vernon
the Rev. John Carroll, the first
Catholic bishop in America and
founder of Georgetown University.
Initially built at the south end
of Alexandria, the parish moved
in 1810 to its current location at
310 S. Royal St.
Discrimination against Catholics was fierce in Virginia. They
were forbidden from holding office and voting, among other inequities.
“Prior to American independence, Catholics in Alexandria often worshiped in fear, in a hidden
way, because the Roman Catholic
Church was greatly restricted in
Virginia, as it was throughout
most of the English colonies,”
Hathaway told parishioners on
Sunday, according to a transcript.
“As the nation grew, so did the
influence of St. Mary’s Parish,
solidly establishing Catholicism
throughout this region.”
michelle.boorstein@washpost.com
RETROPOLIS
Men shared goal of equal rights and justice for black people
MEETING FROM B1
heart of the civil rights
struggle,” Malcolm X told
King.
King would say later: “He is
very articulate, but I totally
disagree with many of his
political and philosophical
views — at least insofar as I
understand where he now
stands.”
The exchange would last
only a minute, but the photo
remains a haunting reminder
of what was lost. They would
never meet again before each
was assassinated, first
Malcolm X and then King.
That moment on Capitol
Hill would continue to be
analyzed by scholars for its
import and its potential.
Every word would be
scrutinized. Some would call
it the moment the two leaders
reconciled. Others would say
they were never that far
apart. They both had the
same goal: equal rights and
justice for black people in
America.
King and Malcolm X were
often seen as adversaries in
the black freedom struggle.
Malcolm X, who advocated a
nationalist approach to equal
rights for black people, often
taunted King, criticizing him
for subjugating blacks to their
white oppressors and teaching
them to be “defenseless in the
face of one of the most cruel
beasts that has ever taken a
people into captivity.”
In one interview, Malcolm X
dismissed King as “a 20thcentury or modern Uncle Tom.”
King ignored the criticism.
“We still advocate nonviolence,
passive resistance, and are still
determined to use the weapon
of love,” he had said during a
March 22, 1956, news
conference in Montgomery,
Ala. “We are still insisting
emphatically that violence is
self-defeating, that he who
lives by the sword dies by the
sword.”
Although the two men held
what appeared to be
diametrically opposing views
on the struggle for equal
rights, scholars say by the end
of their lives their ideologies
were evolving. King was
becoming more militant in his
views of economic justice for
black people and more vocal in
his criticism of the Vietnam
War. Malcolm X, who had
broken with the Nation of
Islam, had dramatically
changed his views on race
during his 1964 pilgrimage to
Mecca.
Eight months before their
HENRY GRIFFIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X approached civil
rights issues differently, but they knew the power of unity.
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brief meeting on Capitol Hill,
Malcolm X sent a letter to
King, requesting a meeting.
The letter was dated July 31,
1963. The return address was
“MUHAMMAD’S MOSQUE
NO. 7, 113 Lenox Avenue, New
York 26, New York.”
Malcolm X opened the letter
with the greeting “Dear Sir.”
He called for a united front
against racial oppression in
the country.
“The present racial crisis in
this country carries within it
powerful destructive
ingredients that may soon
erupt into an uncontrollable
explosion,” Malcolm X wrote.
“The seriousness of this
situation demands that
immediate steps must be taken
to solve this crucial problem,
by those who have genuine
concern before the racial
powder keg explodes. A United
Front involving all Negro
factions, elements and their
leaders is absolutely
necessary.”
Malcolm X warned that a
“racial explosion is more
destructive than a nuclear
explosion,” citing a recent
meeting between President
John F. Kennedy and Soviet
Premier Nikita Khrushchev.
“Despite their tremendous
ideological differences,”
Malcolm X wrote, “it is a
disgrace for Negro leaders not
to be able to submerge our
‘minor’ differences in order to
seek a common solution to a
common problem posed by a
Common Enemy.”
Malcolm X invited King to a
rally that August in Harlem to
analyze the race problem and a
solution. He promised to
moderate the meeting and
guarantee courtesy for each
speaker. He requested that if
King could not attend to send a
representative, closing the letter
with an endearment: “Your
Brother, Malcolm X.”
King declined the invitation
and did not send a
representative, according to
the book, “Malcolm and the
Cross: The Nation of Islam,
Malcolm X, and Christianity,”
by Louis A. DeCaro Jr.
On Aug. 28, 1963, King
would lead more than 250,000
people in the March on
Washington and deliver his “I
Have a Dream” speech.
Malcolm X attended the
march but called it “the Farce
on Washington.”
“Yes, I was there,” he wrote.
“I observed that circus. Who
ever heard of angry
revolutionists all harmonizing
‘We Shall Overcome . . . Suum
Day . . .’ while tripping and
swaying along arm-in-arm
with the very people they were
supposed to be angrily
revolting against? Who ever
heard of angry revolutionists
swinging their bare feet
together with their oppressor
in lily-pad park pools, with
gospels and guitars and ‘I
Have A Dream’ speeches? And
the black masses in America
were — and still are — having
a nightmare.”
The Nov. 22, 1963,
assassination of Kennedy led
to a push for the Civil Rights
Act, a major piece of
legislation that the president
had supported.
In Washington, as King
presided over a news
conference, Malcolm X sat
quietly in the back of the
conference room.
When the news conference
ended, King left through one
door and Malcolm X exited
another. Malcolm X stopped
King in his path. The two
shook hands.
In 1965, Malcolm X went to
Selma, Ala., where he had a
cordial meeting with Coretta
Scott King and other civil
rights leaders. King was in jail
at the time but recalled later:
“He spoke at length to my
wife, Coretta, about his
personal struggles and
expressed an interest in
working more closely with the
nonviolent movement. He
thought he could help me
more by attacking me than
praising me. He thought it
would make it easier for me in
the long run. He said, ‘If the
white people realize what the
alternative is, perhaps they
will be more willing to hear
Dr. King.’ ”
Only a few days after his
visit to Selma, on Feb. 14, 1965,
someone firebombed Malcolm
X’s house in New York, while
he and his family slept inside.
A week later, on Feb. 21, 1965,
Malcolm X was assassinated
by black Muslim extremists
during a rally in New York
City’s Audubon Ballroom.
In his Amsterdam News
column, King mourned him.
“Like the murder of [Congo
Prime Minister Patrice]
Lumumba, the murder of
Malcolm X deprives the world
of a potentially great leader. I
could not agree with either of
these men, but I could see in
them a capacity for leadership
which I could respect.’’
In a telegram to Malcolm X’s
widow, Betty Shabazz, King
wrote: “While we did not always
see eye to eye on methods to
solve the race problem, I always
had a deep affection for
Malcolm and felt that he had a
great ability to put his finger on
the existence and root of the
problem.”
Three years later, on April 4,
1968, Martin Luther King was
assassinated in Memphis. He
was the same age as Malcolm
X: just 39.
browndl@washpost.com
“It is a disgrace for Negro leaders not to be able to
submerge our ‘minor’ differences in order to seek
a common solution to a common problem
posed by a Common Enemy.”
Malcolm X, in a 1963 letter to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
MARYLAND
VIRGINIA
To keep cars from hitting kids, more police will be near school I-95 to get
10 more
miles of
toll lanes
BY
A LLYSON C HIU
Neon yellow signs indicating a
school zone and automated message boards telling drivers to
slow down and be aware of
pedestrians mark roads near
Seneca Valley High School in
Germantown.
Despite the signs, vehicles still
have hit students walking to
school. On Friday, a car brushed
a 15-year-old boy in a crosswalk
and did not stop, police and
school officials said.
Because of that, at least two
Montgomery County police officers will now be present near the
school to remind motorists to
obey traffic laws, said Lt. Jae
Hwang, deputy commander with
the 5th District.
“It’s going to be high-visibility
enforcement when they see two
uniformed officers in cars,”
Hwang said. “There will be situational awareness from the motorists and also the pedestrians that
the police are out there.”
Police are still looking for the
driver of the vehicle that brushed
the teen on Middlebrook Road on
Friday morning, Officer Rick
Goodale, a spokesman, said in an
email. The student was taken to a
hospital as a precaution, said
Derek Turner, a spokesman for
Montgomery County Public
Schools.
Since 2012, when a 10th-grader was killed as she tried to cross
a road near the school, cars have
injured at least three students,
Turner said. One was hit this past
PEGGY MCEWAN/THE GAZETTE
October. The area around Seneca
Valley has “raised several concerns” because it sits beside a
pair of major roads that each
have three lanes in both directions, Turner said.
“On single-lane roads, where
people are familiar with driving
slowly, the drivers are more
attentive or at least more familiar with it,” Turner said. “As you
get onto bigger thoroughfares,
the concern is raised because
drivers aren’t paying as much
attention, traffic is moving faster, there’s a greater chance of an
accident.”
The school is bordered by
Middlebrook Road, which has a
speed limit of 40 miles per hour
and Great Seneca Highway. During school hours, the speed limit
on Middlebrook is lowered to
30.
Turner said students have
been observed crossing the busy
roads, which “causes extra concern.”
Already, there are safety signals, law enforcement presence
and other precautions to help
protect pedestrians. But Turner
said the high school’s new building — under construction and
A year after her 15-year-old
daughter was killed in 2012,
Gwen Ward paused at the spot
near Seneca Valley High.
“It’s unfortunate that
it takes an injury to
get the attention
that is needed.”
Jeri Crist, Seneca Valley High School
PTSA president
expected to open in the fall of
2020 — may yield more permanent remedies.
“This is an opportunity for us
to rethink how we do the road
and access to the school so there’s
less of the desire to cross the
street in unsafe places, or we’ll
help divert traffic in a way that
drivers aren’t in the path of
children,” he said.
For the past three years, the
school system has been part of a
countywide campaign to raise
awareness about pedestrian safety, with messages aimed at students and the wider school community, Turner said.
“You can’t remind kids enough
that drivers aren’t necessarily
paying the best attention,” he
said. “While the driver is responsible for hitting a child, the child
has to subconsciously know
there are drivers who aren’t paying great attention, so they need
to be particularly mindful of
their surroundings because they
can’t rely on drivers to do the
right thing always.”
Students are continually reminded to use crosswalks, obey
signals, stay off electronics and
be alert coming or leaving, the
school’s PTSA president, Jeri
Crist, said in an email.
The school will continue to
work with police to increase
safety awareness in the community, Crist wrote.
“It’s unfortunate that it takes
an injury to get the attention that
is needed,” Crist wrote.
PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republicans are eager to help Larry Hogan become the first GOP governor reelected in Maryland in
over 60 years. Whoever wins the gubernatorial race this year will oversee redistricting after the 2020
Census, potentially shifting the political balance of power in the state for years to come.
provide a different kind of blueprint than that used in Virginia’s
election, when Republican Ed
Gillespie lost to Democrat Ralph
Northam after defending Confederate monuments and tying
undocumented immigrants to
criminal gangs.
“We encourage our governors
to make the tough decisions to fit
the mold of their states,” RGA
spokesman Jon Thompson said.
“If you have a brand that fits your
state, you can get elected.”
The RGA largely ignored
Maryland during the early stages of the 2014 election, although
it made a late $1.2 million push
for Hogan when his poll numbers shot up. Thompson said the
RGA is dedicated to ensuring
that Hogan wins reelection, and
officials familiar with the
group’s planning say it will increase its spending in Maryland
for 2018.
Additionally, the RNC is transferring $16,000 a month to help
the state GOP hire field staff and
pay for databases that guide canvassing efforts. In 2014, the RNC
waited until the last week of the
election to give money in Maryland, forking over $100,000 for
voter-turnout efforts.
Democrats have held seven of
Maryland’s eight congressional
seats since then-Gov. Martin
O’Malley (D) redrew the voting
maps in 2011. The nonpartisan
Cook Political Report considers
the 6th District seat — whose
gerrymandered boundaries are
being challenged in the U.S. Supreme Court — solidly Democratic in 2018.
But GOP leaders say political
groups probably will spend heavily on the race, especially if 2016
nominee Amie Hoeber, who lost
to Delaney by 15 points, wins the
June 26 primary. (She is competing against first-time candidate
Lisa Lloyd.)
The Democratic candidates so
far are David J. Trone, who spent
a staggering $13.4 million of his
own cash in 2016 on a losing U.S.
House primary in an adjacent
district; Del. Aruna Miller (Montgomery); state Sen. Roger Manno
(Montgomery); Nadia Hashimi, a
pediatrician and novelist; and
retired intelligence officer Andrew Duck.
“All the national Republican
folks I’ve talked to believe District 6 is a winnable race and that
Amie is someone who would
seem to be able to mount a
serious challenge,” Maryland Republican Party chair Dirk Haire
said. “I expect the national Democratic and Republican parties
and their campaign affiliates to
be playing in that race as we get
closer to the general election.”
As for the state Senate races,
some national GOP groups view
breaking the Democratic supermajority as a significant opportunity — and one of the best ways to
boost Hogan’s power, because
Democrats would lack enough
votes to override vetoes.
Democrats have held vetoproof majorities in both cham-
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
luz.lazo@washpost.com
bers of the legislature since 1922.
But outside organizations say
they are buoyed by Hogan’s popularity and by recent success in
Kentucky, where they in 2016
helped the GOP seize control of
the Bluegrass State’s House of
Representatives for the first time
in nearly 100 years.
“Maryland is of high interest,”
GOPAC chairman David Avella
said. “Given the dynamics in the
state now and the fact that Republicans have majorities in
nearly two-thirds of state legislatures, we can start playing offense in areas where we haven’t
played before.”
Haire said that despite the
Democrats’ dominance — in voter registration, the State House
and the congressional delegation
— Republicans believe that the
electorate is politically moderate
in key districts and that voters
will respond well to legislative
candidates who are strongly
backed by Hogan.
“The RNC believes Maryland is
a middle-temperament state,” he
said.
Maryland Republicans have
targeted six Democratic Senate
seats in districts Hogan won
overwhelmingly in 2014, where
they believe voters have moved to
the right in recent years.
They would have to win five of
the races and hold their other
Senate seats to break the Democratic supermajority.
GOP officials noted that Democrats in Virginia picked up seats
almost exclusively in districts
that Democratic presidential
nominee Hillary Clinton won in
2016. But Clinton also won three
of the districts the Maryland GOP
is targeting, suggesting Trump
could be a drag on their candidates, too.
“The climate isn’t great out
there politically, but it’s nowhere
near what I thought it was the
day after the [Virginia] election,”
said Senate Minority Leader J.B.
Jennings (R-Baltimore County).
“It just means that the candidates we’re running have to
work even harder and do a great
job campaigning.”
josh.hicks@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Pranking the new governor continues a bipartisan tradition
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — The peaceful trans-
fer of power in Virginia would not
be complete without a prank
pulled by the outgoing governor
on his successor.
So it was that as newly inaugurated Gov. Ralph Northam (D) hit
the sack Saturday night, he found
something special on his pillowcase — and it was not one of those
hotel good-night chocolates.
An image of former governor
Terry McAuliffe (D) was plastered
on his pillowcase, emblazoned
with one of the go-go-go ex-governor’s favorite sayings: “Sleep
when you’re dead.”
And yes, Virginia’s 73rd gover-
Tricks include ringing
alarm clock, images of
Northam’s predecessor
nor spent his first night in the
mansion with his head resting on
the 72nd’s governor’s grinning
mug. His wife, first lady Pam
Northam, let him use her McAuliffe-covered pillow, too, opting for
a plain pillowcase for herself.
“Let me show you the picture,”
Northam said, pulling out his cellphone after a brunch hosted by the
first lady Sunday at Richmond’s
Jefferson Hotel.
PHOTO BY GOV. RALPH NORTHAM
This pillow greeted Gov. Ralph
Northam on his first night.
The pillowcases are not the only
reminders McAuliffe left behind.
“There are pictures of the governor all over the mansion that he
left for me,” Northam said. “Also,
at 3 o’clock this morning an alarm
clock went off, which I have yet to
find. I texted him and thanked
him, and he said there was more to
come.”
The alarm clock trick is not a
new one, but certain pranks are
bound to get recycled in the only
state where the governorship
changes hands every four years.
Departing governor Robert F. McDonnell (R) set one to go off at
4 a.m. four years ago, giving
McAuliffe a jolt on his first weekend in the Executive Mansion.
L UZ L AZO
Another surprise awaited the
newly sworn-in McAuliffe when he
got to his office: a huge stuffed bear
in the private bathroom. It was no
teddy bear. It was the real, taxidermied thing, poached from the
office of McDonnell’s natural resources secretary, Doug Domenech.
On his way out of the governorship, in 2010, now-Sen. Tim Kaine
(D) hid cellphones in the mansion
elevator shaft and periodically
called them as a trick on McDonnell. It took a few days for McDonnell’s team to locate them.
And before that, now-Sen. Mark
R. Warner (D) left a life-size cutout
of himself in the shower for Kaine.
GOP groups want to aid Hogan, flip Senate seats
what was widely considered a
lackluster campaign.
Maryland Democrats have repeatedly tried to link Hogan to
the president, even as the governor refused to vote for Trump and
has denounced Trump’s rhetoric
and Republican actions on
health care and climate change.
State party chair Kathleen Matthews said Democrats will continue to “remind every voter in
this state that Governor Hogan
failed to stand up and fight for
them,” citing his lack of criticism
of the massive tax overhaul and
other federal actions that are
unpopular in the state.
But Hogan has maintained
historically high approval ratings, garnering 71 percent support in a Gonzalez poll this week,
and high popularity even in
Democratic strongholds. Other
polls have shown a growing number of Maryland Democrats —
who outnumber Republicans in
the state by a ratio of 2 to 1 —
reluctant to support Hogan for a
second term at a time when the
GOP controls both the White
House and Congress.
Democratic leaders in Maryland note that the state’s last GOP
governor, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.,
had strong approval ratings in
2006 — although not as high as
Hogan’s — but lost that year amid
widespread backlash against
President George W. Bush.
And GOP candidates in the
state watched November’s elections in Virginia with more than
a little unease.
“It definitely gives you some
heartburn as a Republican when
you see what just happened,”
said Del. Christian J. Miele (Baltimore County), who is challenging state Sen. Katherine A.
Klausmeier (D-Baltimore County). “We’re all wondering if 2018
is going to be a continued referendum on the president.”
National Republican officials
say Hogan and other GOP governors who have built distinctly
non-Trump brands — such as
Charlie Baker (Mass.), Phil Scott
(Vt.) and John Kasich (Ohio) —
BY
Then-Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D)
announced a deal Wednesday
that will add 10 more miles of
express lanes to the Interstate 95
corridor, expanding the system of
high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes
to Fredericksburg by 2022.
As part of the agreement, the
private company building the
lanes will give the state
$277 million upfront to cover
the costs of a bridge over the
Rappahannock River and other
improvements along the corridor, Virginia transportation officials said.
The deal essentially moves
forward a 10-mile extension
from Garrisonville Road (Route
610) in Stafford County to
Route 17 in the Fredericksburg
area. It also builds on McAuliffe’s transportation legacy,
greatly focused on expanding
tolling facilities to relieve traffic
in some of the state’s most
congested corridors and generating funds for other transportation projects.
McAuliffe’s four-year term
ended Saturday.
“This deal will not require any
upfront taxpayer investment for
construction and will provide
$277 million by the time the
express lanes are open that will
be invested in the corridor to
advance critical transportation
projects,” McAuliffe told the
Commonwealth Transportation
Board on Wednesday.
About 45 miles of express lanes
have opened on Interstates 495
and 95 within the past five years,
and the state last month opened
10 more miles of high-occupancy
toll (HOT) lanes on Interstate 66,
inside the Capital Beltway.
On Interstate 66 outside the
Beltway, construction is set to
begin this year on a $2.3 billion
expansion that will add 22.5
miles of toll lanes by 2022, from
the Beltway to University Boulevard in Gainesville in Prince
William County. And construction is also underway this year
along an eight-mile stretch of
Interstate 395, where high-occupancy vehicle lanes are being
converted to toll lanes.
With the addition of the Fredericksburg extension, these projects will deliver the next major
milestone in the state’s vision to
create a network of more than 90
miles of HOT lanes in Northern
Virginia by 2022. In the I-95/395
corridor alone, there will be
50 miles of toll lanes from the
Washington line to Fredericksburg.
“When I took office four years
ago, I made a commitment to
radically change how we do
transportation in Virginia,”
McAuliffe said.
By growing its network of toll
lanes, officials say, the state is not
only increasing the capacity of its
transportation network but also
giving drivers more options. Solo
drivers willing to pay can use the
toll facilities, they say, while the
lanes are free to drivers who
carpool.
Construction on the 10 miles to
Fredericksburg is expected to begin in spring 2019 and be completed in fall 2022. The plan is to
add two reversible lanes.
Transurban, the company that
operates the 495 express lanes
and 95 express lanes, is slated to
pay the state the $277 million by
the time the express lanes are
open, McAuliffe said.
Transportation Secretary Aubrey Layne, who is taking a new
role as finance secretary in the
incoming administration of Gov.
Ralph Northam (D), said that
after the construction of the
northbound bridge over the
Rappahannock, the state will
have $232 million left. The Commonwealth
Transportation
Board will need to decide how to
spend the rest of the funds in the
corridor, he said.
“This project addresses an
area that traffic data company
INRIX named ‘worst traffic hot
spot’ in the nation,” Layne said.
“Expanding the express lanes 10
miles south will bring muchneeded relief from the existing
bottlenecks along the I-95 corridor, improve reliability for commuters and freight, enhance
road safety and set up the regional economy for future
growth.”
allyson.chiu@washpost.com
ELECTION FROM B1
Project builds
on McAuliffe’s
transportation legacy
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
obituaries
JOHN V. TUNNEY, 83
Calif. lawmaker’s campaign inspired Redford movie
BY
M ATT S CHUDEL
John V. Tunney, a congressman and U.S. senator from California once hailed for his
Kennedyesque manner and
whose 1970 Senate campaign
inspired the Oscar-winning film
“The Candidate,” starring Robert
Redford, died Jan. 12 in Los
Angeles. He was 83.
The cause was prostate cancer,
his brother, Jay Tunney, told the
Associated Press.
Mr. Tunney was the son of
Gene Tunney, a heavyweight boxing champion of the 1920s, and
was a law school classmate and
close friend of the late Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.).
Standing 6-foot-3, with a
shock of blond hair, Mr. Tunney
was a compelling figure on the
campaign trail, first winning
election to the U.S. House as a
Democrat in 1964. After three
terms representing a district
south of Los Angeles, he ran for
the Senate in 1970, defeating
Republican incumbent George
Murphy. At 36, Mr. Tunney was
the youngest member of the
Senate at the time and seemed to
have a golden political future.
In 1972, one of his campaign
workers, Michael Ritchie, directed “The Candidate,” a dark comedy about a Senate election in
California, in which Redford
played a long-shot candidate
running against an aging incumbent. The film’s screenplay, by
Jeremy Larner — a former campaign worker with 1968 presidential candidate Eugene J. McCarthy — won an Academy
Award.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Then-congressional candidate John V. Tunney stands between his father, Gene Tunney, left, and Jack
Dempsey, both retired boxing heavyweight champions, in 1964. The ex-fighters campaigned for him.
Redford’s character grows increasingly disillusioned by the
internal pressures and machinations of the political world — a
point of view that Mr. Tunney
later came to share.
During his six years in the
Senate, Mr. Tunney was unusually active for a first-term lawmaker, sponsoring more than threedozen bills that were enacted
into law. He helped lead efforts
for antitrust reform and was a
primary sponsor of the Noise
Control Act of 1972. In 1975, he
helped expand the Voting Rights
Act.
Mr. Tunney was seen as a
possible vice-presidential contender in 1972 and had a liberal
voting record that included opposition to the Vietnam War and
support for abortion rights and
gun control. Yet when he ran for
reelection in 1976, he was challenged from the left in the California Democratic primary by
Tom Hayden, a onetime student
activist and the husband of actress Jane Fonda.
Mr. Tunney prevailed, but in
the general election he faced a
political newcomer, S.I. Hayakawa, a 70-year-old former college
president. Hayakawa won a narrow victory with support from
conservative voters who applauded the way he stood up to
campus demonstrators at San
Francisco State University.
Mr. Tunney returned to California to practice law and never
ran for elective office again.
“There is nothing sadder,” he
said, “than a 42-year-old former
senator hanging around Washington.”
John Varick Tunney was born
June 26, 1934, in New York City
and grew up on an estate near
Stamford, Conn. His father defeated Jack Dempsey to claim
the world heavyweight title in
1926 and won a controversial
rematch a year later. He retired
from boxing in 1928, went into
business and married Polly
Lauder, an heiress to the fortune
of industrialist Andrew Carnegie.
The younger Mr. Tunney studied anthropology at Yale University, graduating in 1956. He then
attended law school at the University of Virginia, where he met
Kennedy on the first day of
class. They were roommates in
their second and third years and
won a law-school moot-court
competition together. Mr. Tunney received his law degree in
1959 and later served in the Air
Force Judge Advocate General
Corps.
Mr. Tunney, who grew up as a
Republican, developed an interest in politics while working on
Kennedy family campaigns and
changed his party affiliation to
Democrat. When he first ran for
office in 1964, his father and
Dempsey campaigned for him in
precincts populated by Dust
Bowl refugees of the 1930s.
“The Okies and Arkies, who
had settled in [the] Coachella
Valley and Imperial Valley, they
didn’t like guys from Yale or
Harvard, but they did like prize-
fighters,” Mr. Tunney said in a
2007 oral history interview with
the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the American Senate.
“They loved Jack Dempsey and
Gene Tunney.”
Mr. Tunney practiced law until
1987 and, in later years, took up
other interests, including poetry
and the study of cosmology. He
had homes in Los Angeles, New
York and Sun Valley, Idaho.
His first marriage, to Mieke
Sprengers, ended in divorce. Survivors include his wife of 40
years, the former Kathinka Osborne of Los Angeles; three children from his first marriage; a
daughter from his second marriage; two stepchildren; a brother; and two grandchildren.
Mr. Tunney remained close to
Kennedy, who died in 2009, and
occasionally spoke out against
what he considered the deteriorating quality of political discourse in recent decades.
He recalled, in the 2007 oral
history interview, that he was
one of seven senators to vote for
a nationwide ban on handguns,
except for the police and military. Mr. Tunney, who was close
to both John F. Kennedy and
Robert F. Kennedy before they
were felled by assassins’ bullets,
said he was proud of putting
principle ahead of political expediency.
“I knew it was politically unpopular but I didn’t care,” Mr.
Tunney said. “I said to myself,
‘I’m never going to vote for a bill
that I think would allow again a
guy like Bobby Kennedy to be
assassinated.’ ”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
BRUCE COLE, 79
Renaissance scholar led the National Endowment for the Humanities
BY
B ART B ARNES
Bruce M. Cole, a Renaissance
scholar who chaired the National
Endowment for the Humanities
for much of the George W. Bush
administration and proselytized
for the teaching and meaning of
civilization in the wake of the
Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks,
died Jan. 8 at a vacation residence
in Cancun, Mexico. He was 79.
The cause was a heart attack,
said a son, Ryan Cole.
Dr. Cole, who retired from
Indiana University as a distinguished professor emeritus of
fine arts and professor emeritus
of comparative literature, became chairman in December
2001 — less than three months
after the 9/11 attacks on the
World Trade Center in New York
and the Pentagon in Washington.
He said he saw his role as NEH
leader as an element in the newly
declared war on terrorism.
“Defending our homeland requires not only successful military campaigns,” he told Humanities magazine in 2002. “It also
depends on citizens understanding their history, their institutions, and their ideals. The humanities show us what it means
to be an American, and why
America’s ideals are worth fighting for.”
He added: “I see works of art as
primary documents of a civilization. The written document tells
you one thing, but a painting or a
sculpture or a building tells you
something else. They are both
primary documents, but they tell
you things in different ways.”
Dr. Cole, a former art history
professor at Indiana University,
was the longest-serving chairman of the NEH since its founding in 1965. He stepped down in
January 2009. Its current annual
budget is $150 million, up from
$124 million at the start of his
tenure.
Under his leadership, the NEH
worked to broaden its traditional
role as a provider of grants to
artists and art projects. It re-energized its public outreach, promoting programs to reinvigorate the
teaching of humanities, especially history and culture, in American public schools.
There were workshops for
teachers and a distribution of
American-themed books to public libraries. There was a program
called “Picturing America,” in
which 36,000 reproductions of
American artworks were distributed to Head Start centers,
schools and public libraries.
That project was Dr. Cole’s
personal favorite. “By using masterpieces of American art, we are
teaching in a more direct way
with images,” he told The Washington Post shortly before leaving
the NEH. “We are introducing
people to art and the great gift
that art can give them.”
Bruce Milan Cole, whose father
was a salesman, was born in
Cleveland on Aug. 2, 1938. He had
been to that city’s art museum
with his aunt, but a transformational moment in his life occurred as a freshman at what
then was Western Reserve University in Cleveland. In a Western-civilization book, he found
HARAZ N. GHANBARI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bruce Cole speaks at a 2008 White House event, where President
George W. Bush presented him with the Presidential Citizens Medal.
“The humanities show us what it
means to be an American, and why
America’s ideals are worth fighting for.”
Bruce Cole, former chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities
himself mesmerized by Sassetta’s
Italian Renaissance painting
“The Meeting of Saint Anthony
and Saint Paul.”
“It was an epiphany,” he told
The Post. It sparked an interest in
Italian Renaissance history and
later, more specifically, in Florentine history and art.
He graduated in 1962 and received a master’s degree from
Oberlin College in 1964 and a
doctorate from Bryn Mawr College in 1969, both in art history.
In his youth, he was a motorcycle enthusiast, an activity he returned to later in life. Asked by
Humanities magazine if he rode
without a helmet, he said: “No,
given the way that I drive the
motorcycle, a helmet is advisable.” By the time he came to
Washington, his motorcycle had
been “gathering dust” in his garage, he said.
In 1966, Dr. Cole was a graduate student in Florence when the
rain-swelled Arno River flooded
the city. He participated with a
corps of “Mud Angels” in helping
protect the vast collection of
priceless Renaissance artworks
in the city.
He taught art history at the
University of Rochester from
1969 to 1973, then at Indiana
University until he became NEH
chairman. In 2008, Bush awarded him the Presidential Citizens
Medal, one of the country’s highest civilian honors, for having
“inspired Americans to have a
deeper commitment to the teaching, study, and understanding of
American history and culture.”
His books included “Giotto and
Florentine Painting, 1280-1375”
(1976), “The Renaissance Artist at
Work: From Pisano to Titian”
(1983) and “The Informed Eye:
Understanding Masterpieces of
Western Art” (1999).
In 1962, he married Doreen
Luff. Besides his wife, of Fairfax
County in Virginia, survivors include two children, Ryan Cole of
Bloomington, Ind., and Stephanie Whittaker of Chantilly, Va.;
and two grandchildren.
After leaving the NEH, Dr. Cole
was president and chief executive
of the American Revolution Center in Valley Forge, Pa., until 2011.
He served on the board of trustees of Indiana University and was
a senior fellow at the Ethics and
Public Policy Center in Washington.
Shortly before he left the NEH,
Dr. Cole gave an extended interview to Humanities magazine in
which he talked about the current concept of “the artist as a
loner, a bohemian, somebody
who lives in a garret, devotes his
life to art.”
“Art was a trade,” he continued.
“Artists had shops, just like the
butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker, and the art trade
was really indistinguishable from
other trades. Most people got into
these shops not because they
showed talent, but because they
were related to somebody, or it
was their father’s or their brother’s or their uncle’s shop.”
“People of the Renaissance,” he
concluded, “had this idea that
artists are made, not born. We
have the opposite idea.”
newsobits@washpost.com
STAN HINDEN, 90
Financial writer for The Post later became a ‘retirement guy’ columnist
BY
B ART B ARNES
Stan Hinden, a former editor
and financial journalist for The
Washington Post who reinvented
himself in retirement as a personal-finance writer and adviser focused on the concerns of retirees,
died Jan. 9 at a care center in
Mission Viejo, Calif. He was 90.
The cause was dementia and
heart ailments, said a son, Alan
Hinden.
During his 23 years at The Post,
Mr. Hinden wrote about stocks,
bonds, mutual funds and the
intricacies of high finance. After
retiring in 1996, he produced a
monthly column for The Post’s
business section, called “Retirement Journal,” which centered on
the struggles of living on retirement income.
The column grew into a book,
“How to Retire Happy,” the most
recent edition of which was pub-
lished in 2013. He wrote of his
own ill-preparedness when his
wife was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2007, at 78.
“Needless to say, Sara’s condition dramatically changed both
her retirement and mine,” he
wrote. “Until then, we had been
poster children for a happy, upbeat retirement. My experience
with Alzheimer’s disease has given me a new perspective on how
one prepares for serious illness
during retirement.”
He advised readers to purchase
long-term-care insurance, as the
Hindens had done years earlier
and which helped defray the cost
of her care.
“The chapter on long-term
care is scary and depressing,” Post
financial columnist Michelle Singletary wrote. “Yet it is a mustread.”
Mr. Hinden also produced a
regular column for AARP’s web-
BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Stan Hinden, in his Silver Spring, Md., home in 1997, retired in
1996 from The Post and wrote the book, “How to Retire Happy.”
site, “Social Security Mailbox,”
which he continued writing until
he was 89. His columns addressed such issues as: “Am I
ready to retire?” “What will I do
when I retire?” “Can I afford to
retire?” and “How do I cope with
the downside of retirement?”
“He made a brand for himself
as the ‘retirement guy,’ ” said
David Ignatius, one of Mr. Hinden’s Post editors, adding that he
was adept at writing about financial matters in everyday language.
Stanley Jerome Hinden was
born in New York City on Jan. 27,
1927. After Army service, he graduated from Syracuse University
in 1950.
He spent his early career at
Long Island’s Newsday, where he
became editorial page editor and
a Washington-based national correspondent. In the early 1970s, he
was editor of the National Jour-
nal, a publication that covers
federal policymaking.
His wife of 60 years, Sara
Leapold Hinden, died in 2013.
Survivors include three children,
Alan Hinden of Gaithersburg,
Md.; Lawrence Hinden of Mission Viejo; and Pamela Hinden of
the Bronx; four grandchildren;
and four great-grandchildren.
Mr. Hinden moved to California from Chevy Chase, Md., in
May 2017.
“I like to compare retirement
to taking a long trip abroad,” Mr.
Hinden said in a 2013 NPR interview. “And you wouldn’t take a
trip like that without doing a lot
of research, finding out what the
weather is, where you’re going,
what you’re going to see, what the
currency exchange is. . . . In fact, I
think many people do more work
to plan a trip than they do to plan
their retirements.”
newsobits@washpost.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
ALLEN
EUSTICE
GRANDON
ELEANOR G. ALLEN
"Sandy"
Sandy Allen passed away peacefully at the age
of 89 on January 12, 2018. She was the beloved
wife of Command Sergeant Major Richard
M. Allen. She is survived by her daughters,
Rexann Dubiel-Shanahan, Jacqueline Robinson, and Christine Consroe. She is also survived
by her five grandchildren, Heather, David,
Joseph, Jane, and Thomas, and her five greatgrandchildren, Savannah, Justin, Lilly, Cassy,
and Skylar.
A memorial service will be held at St. Paul's
United Methodist Church, 10401 Armory
Avenue, Kensington, Maryland, 20895 on January 18 (Thursday) at 1:30 p.m. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be made in her name
to St. Paul's United Methodist Church.
BAILEY
MATILDA MORSA BAILEY
"Tillie"
On Saturday, January 6, 2018 at Holy Cross
Hospital, Silver Spring, MD. Of Ft. Washington,
MD and proceeded by her husband, Walter E.
Baily and three brothers, Jonathan D. Morse,
Ernest L. Morse and Solomon Williams; three
sisters, Celestine M. Jones, Evelyn M. Jenkins
and Ethel M. Bing. She is survived by her
sister, Annie M. Johnson of Willington, DE;
three daughters, Karen Bailey, Karmen Walker
Brown and Karla A. Bailey Cooper; three grandchildren, Anthony Walker, Michaela Blow and
Sienna Miller; sisters-in-law, Pearl Temple and
Ernestine Bailey, sons-in-law, Anthony Brown
and Richard Cooper and 17 nieces and
nephews. Visitation Tuesday, January 16, 2018
from 10 a.m. until service 11 a.m. at Fort
Foot Baptist Church, 8310 Fort. Foot Rd., Ft
Washington, MD. Interment Ft. Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD. Arrangements by JB.
Jenkins Funeral Home Inc.
DEATH NOTICE
BERGER
DEATH NOTICE
TURRYANN WELDEN EUSTICE
Of Chevy Chase, Maryland, passed peacefully on December 19, 2017. She was born
in Pontiac, Michigan on September 18,
1929. She graduated from Pontiac High
School in 1947, and from the University
of Michigan in 1951 with a Bachelor of
Arts degree from the School of Education.
While at the University of Michigan, she
was a proud member of the Delta Delta
Delta sorority. After graduation, she taught
at the high school level briefly, and also
worked in her father’s sporting goods store,
Welden Sporting Goods. She married Edwin
J. Eustice on December 27, 1957, who
predeceased her in March 2005. She is
survived by her son and daughter-in-law,
Bob and Katherine, and her grandsons,
Scott and Michael. Per her wishes, she
will rest in peace in the White Chapel
Memorial Cemetery in Troy, Michigan, near
her parents, Charles Dexter Welden and
Elizabeth Monroe Welden. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made
payable to the Tri Delta Foundation, which
is located at 14951 North Dallas Parkway,
Suite 500, Dallas, TX 75254. Please note on
the check or on a separate note that the
donation should be earmarked “In memory
of Turryann Welden Eustice, for the Virginia
Stewart Nicklas Scholarship,” which provides scholarship monies for deserving Tri
Delt undergraduates attending the University of Michigan. Please view and sign the
family guest book at:
www.PumphreyFuneralHome.com
FRIEDMAN
JANET NORMA BYERS FRIEDMAN
June 14, 1933 ~ January 11, 2018
Beloved partner of Chuck
French; loving mother to
Henry (Laurie) Friedman of
Bethesda, MD and Cynthia
(Mark) Mellman of Tampa,
FL; loving grandmother of
Noah and Sadie Friedman,
Aaron and Alissa Mellman; loving aunt to
Phyllis Robinson and many other family
and friends.
Janet was a long time resident of Lexington, MA, having lived in the same
house since 1958. She was an exceptional
psychiatric nurse at Waltham Hospital for
many decades. Her love of theater included her wonderful community Arlington
Friends of the Drama.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made
to Arlington Friends of the Drama
www.AFDtheater.org; Jewish Family and
Children’s Services of Boston www.jfcsboston.org; Jewish Federation of Greater
Washington www.shalomdc.org.
Service at Douglass Funeral Home, 51
Worthen Road, Lexington, MA, Sunday,
January 14.
Shiva observed Sunday after Service and
Monday evening Janet’s Home, 17 Oxbow
Road, Lexington, MA
Shiva observed: Sunday, January 21 at The
home of Laurie and Henry Friedman 5910
Lone Oak Drive, Bethesda, MD.
Kindergarten teacher and early childhood
development specialist in life, passed peacefully Thursday, January 4, 2018 at her home
in Annandale, Virginia. Phyllis was the beloved
mother of three sons, Doug, Kent, and Dan.
She leaves behind six grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren. She also leaves behind
hundreds of her past students that will remember her fondly as their first teacher.
The theme and focus of her life was teaching
young children. She taught Kindergarten for
Fairfax County Schools during her entire teaching career. After retiring, she continued her
work with the newly formed non-profit, Infant
Toddler Family Daycare in Fairfax, working with
daycare providers for children with working
parents. Her goal was to make learning fun for
the providers and the kids.
As for her recreational activities, she loved a
good yard sale as much as anyone. She spent
most of her free time working with her friends
in the Annandale Treasure Trove Thrift Shop.
Buying and selling treasures was a very special
activity for her. She also worked in the Lucky
Frog Game Card store helping kids get the
cards they would need to be successful in the
gaming tournaments. Her family, friends and
all her students will miss her helping nature
and fun approach to learning and life.
A small service will be scheduled at a later
date. In lieu of flowers, she would have preferred that we donate to the ASPCA to fight
animal cruelty.
GRANDY
MILDRED KRAVETZ GOLDSTEIN
On Saturday, January 13, 2018, of
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife of
66 years to William E. Burgess,
Jr.; loving mother of Sandra (Chris)
Schulz, William Burgess, Jennifer
(Matt) Penniman, James Burgess
(Patty), John (Pam) Burgess, Cara
(John) Lowry. Also survived by 14 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren and all her loving
relatives and friends who were a special part of
her extended family. Relatives and friends may
call at Collins Funeral Home, 500 University
Boulevard West, Silver Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), Wednesday, January 17, 2018, from 3 to 5
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial
at Our Lady of Grace Church, 15661 Norbeck
Blvd, Silver Spring, MD, on Thursday, January
18, at 11 a.m. with visitation from 10:30 to
11 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to The Marty Lyons Foundation, Inc.
354 Veterans Highway Commack NY 11725
www.martylyonsfoundation.org or Pulmonary
Fibrosis Foundation, 230 East Ohio Street,
Suite 500,Chicago, IL 60611 www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
HILTY
MARK T. HILTY (Age 55)
Of Linden, Virginia passed away Sunday,
December 24, 2017, at his home.
A Celebration of Life service will be held
at 12 p.m., Saturday, January 20, 2018, at
Millwood Station Banquet Hall, 252 Costello
Drive, Winchester, Virginia.
Please view obituaries and tribute wall at:
www.ompsfuneralhome.com
JENCKES
to become Senior Vice President of the
Health Insurance Association of America as
their chief lobbyist and spokesperson.
In 1995, she founded Linda Jenckes and
Associates, a legislative, media and consulting firm. She represented groups in both
the private and public sectors. Her primary
focus was in biotech, pharmaceutical, the
insurance industry and patient advocacy
groups.
Linda served on a number of corporate,
philanthropic and association boards including: The Ripon Society, ICAN, NABI, John
Alden Financial Corporation, VIVUS, and the
National Polycystic Kidney Disease Research
Foundation. She was also a founding member of Health on Wednesday, the first
women’s health lobbying group.
LINDA JENCKES (Age 70)
Of McLean VA, passed away on January
12, 2018 while battling complications from
lung cancer. She is survived by her husband,
Joseph Sherburne Jenckes V, her son Joseph
Sherburne Jenckes VI and her sisters Carolyn
Purdy and Patricia Crowley of Chicago, Illinois.
Linda was born to a strong Lithuanian family
on the south-side of Chicago in 1947. She
attended Arizona State University and in her
freshman year was the first woman ever to
have the honor of being the Arizona State
Sun Devil mascot. Following College, Linda
answered an ad for “men only,” a managerial
position at Arizona Blue Cross Blue Shield.
She got the job and rose to Vice President of
PR and Advertising.
Linda married Joseph Sherburne Jenckes V
on the 8th of April 1972 in Phoenix, Arizona
where they lived shortly before moving to
Washington DC. In 1973, Linda became Director of Government Relations at the Blue
Shield Association. She served in the Reagan
administration as Principal Deputy Assistant
Secretary for Legislation for the Dept. of
Health and Human Services. Linda then left
LORA D. SIMKUS
On Friday, December 29, 2017, Lora D. Simkus
of Fairfax, Virginia. A beloved mother and
grandmother, Mrs. Simkus was a truly beautiful, loving and faithful person. She served under
Henry Kissinger, and was a Special Assistant to
Secretary of State George Shultz. She went on
the historic first U.S. Presidential trips to Russia
and China. An amazing gourmet chef, Lora was
also an avid fan of the D.C. professional sports
teams, especially her Washington Nationals.
She will be laid to rest at Fairfax Memorial Park.
Lora was very caring and extremely charitable.
Contributions in her memory may be made
to St. Jude's Children's Hospital, The Macular
Degeneration Society and The American Red
Cross.
MARLOWE
SIPE
ANNIECE RECTOR MARLOWE
Mrs. Anniece R. Marlowe, of Hyattsville, MD,
entered into her eternal rest on Monday, January 8, 2018. She leaves a daughter, Yvette
Laurie-Johnson; son, Andrew Laurie III; grandson, Roy J. Johnson; brother, Leonard Rector;
and a multitude of nieces, nephews, grandnieces, and grandnephews to celebrate her
life. She was predeceased by her husband,
James G. Marlowe, Jr., five sisters and three
brothers. Visitation will be on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 from 10 a.m. until time of service,
11 a.m., at McGUIRE FUNERAL HOME, 7400
Georgia Ave. NW, Washington, DC. Interment
at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
www.mcguire-services.com
McGUIRE
HOFFMAN
BURGESS
SIMKUS
On Wednesday, January 3, 2018, Kelvin L.
Lewis, of Ledroit Park. Beloved husband of
Adrienne Coleman-Lewis; loving father of Jessica Nelson and step father to Jasmine Duckett;
cherished grandfather of Madalynn Nelson;
adored brother of Delmost Lewis, James Lewis,
Sr., Darlene Swope, Cotilder Marshall, Beatrice
Alston and the late Billy Sherman Philpot and
Albert Lewis. He also leaves to cherish his
memory a host of nieces, nephews, cousins,
and friends. Visitation will be held on Tuesday,
January 16, 2018 from 10 to 11 a.m. at Mount
Pleasant Baptist Church, 215 Rholde Island
Avenue, NW, Washington DC, where funeral
services will follow. Interment in Resurrection
Cemetery, Clinton, MD.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
JOHN P. McGUIRE
HAROLD JEROME HOFFMAN
IRENE EVELYN BURGESS (Age 84)
On Friday, December 22, 2017, beloved mother,
grandmother and great-grandmother, Elizabeth Bernice Scott, age 89, was called home
to be with the Lord. She is survived by her
three children, David Proctor, Judy Scott and
Johnnie Scott, III; eight grandchildren, 11 greatgrandchildren, great-great- grandchildren and
a host of loving relatives and friends. On
Tuesday, January 16, 2018, the viewing will
begin at 10 a.m. and the Home Going Celebration at 11 a.m. at Johnson & Jenkins Funeral
Home, 716 Kennedy Street NW, Washington,
DC. Interment immediately following at Quantico National Cemetery.
Suddenly entered rest on Tuesday, January
2, 2018. Devoted son of June and William
May, Sr.; loving father of Gregory May, Jr.
(LaTosha); cherished grandfather of Tyren. Also
survived by sister, Lillian Staten (Anthony) and
a host of other relatives and friends. Services
will be held on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at
Rock Creek Baptist Church, 6707 Woodyard
Rd., Upper Marlboro, MD, Visitation 9:30 a.m.,
Service 11 a.m. Interment Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, DC. Services by FREEMAN.
On January 12, 2018, at the age of 81, of
Riverdale Park, MD. Husband of Frances B.
Hoffman; father of Harold (Judy) Hoffman,
Chris (Lori) Hoffman, Laurie (Scott) Pletsch,
Jody (Tammy) Hoffman, and Michael Hoffman. Daughter-in-law Norma Hoffman, 15
grandchildren, and 10 great grandchildren
also survive. A son, Jeff Hoffman, preceded
him in death. Friends may call at Gasch's
Funeral Home, P.A., 4739 Baltimore Avenue,
Hyattsville, MD on Wednesday, January 17
from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m., where a service
will be held on Thursday, January 18 at
11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made in his name to the American
Cancer Society, 405 Williams Court, Suite
20, Baltimore, MD 21220.
www.gaschs.com
DEATH NOTICE
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, December 9, 2017. She is survived by three daughters,
Brendell Kinney Howard, Sheila Ann Forte
and Sharon Lee Kinney Johnson; four sons,
Stanley C. Kinney, Franklin E. Kinney, Howard G.
Kinney (Rose C.) and Zachery Z. Kinney (Wanda
E.); 18 grandchildren; 20 great-grandchildren;
two brothers, Charles Greene, Sr. and Lonnie
Greene; and a host of other relatives and
friends. Mrs. Kinney may be viewed at Stewart
Funeral Home, 4001 Benning Rd. NE. on
Wednesday, January 17 from 11 a.m. until
service at 12 p.m. Interment Arlington National
Cemetery at 3 p.m.
MAY
Her philanthropic spirit began with the Arizona Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) in 1971. She became
a trustee of the National Capital Chapter
of NMSS and then served as its chair from
1995-1997. She was elected to the National
Advisory Council for The National Women’s
History Museum and was instrumental in
its forthcoming construction on the Mall in
Washington, DC. Linda’s zest for life was truly
contagious, her spirit lives on through all that
knew her.
We regret to inform our members
of the passing of John P. McGuire,
Book #654998 on January 9, 2018.
Brother McGuire became an Iron
Worker in May 1960. Memorial Service will be held Saturday January
27 at 11 a.m. at First Baptist
Church, 7415 Southwest Crain Hwy., Upper
Marlboro, MD 20772. Brother McGuire will be
greatly missed by all.
Official Death # 151
RAY
KENNETH ROLAND RAY (Age 81)
On Wednesday, January 3, 2018, Kenneth
Ray passed away peacefully, surrounded
by family. He was preceded in death by
his parents, Pheelus R. Ray and Katheryn
E. Webb Ray. Survivors include his wife
of 60 years, Joan Allen Ray; sister-in-law,
June Rue; brothers-in-law, Ronald Allen and
Robert Allen; daughters, Katheryn Ray
Brewington, and Karla Ray Thompson
(Tony); his beloved grandchildren; TaKhari
and Kristina Thompson, nieces, nephews
and a host of family and friends.
A Memorial Mass will be held on Monday
January 22, 2018 at 11 a.m. at St. John
Baptist de la Salle Church, 5706 Sargent
Road, Chillum, Maryland 20782. In lieu
of flowers, memorial donations may be
made to the Sepsis Alliance [sepsis.org]
or Lung Cancer Foundation of America
[lcfamerica.org]. As his final wish, Kenneth's body was donated to the Anatomical
Gift Program at the Uniformed Services
University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. Internment at Quantico
National Cemetery is planned for a later
date. Arrangements provided by Harman
Funeral Service, Glen Burnie, Maryland.
BARBARA H. SIPE
(Age 87)
Died peacefully on January 11, 2018, in Arlington, VA. Dear Mother to Steve and Scott
Sipe; Loving Grandmother to Jonathan Sipe
and Casie Sipe Mockabee; Beloved Aunt to
numerous nephews and nieces and extended
family. She was predeceased by her husband,
Jack Sipe, and her brothers, Richard and Robert
Syring of Bridgeton, NJ. A longtime resident
of Falls Church, VA, Barbara was a bookkeeper
at Guiffre Beer Distributors in Springfield, VA
before retiring in 1997. Relatives and friends
are welcome to attend the memorial service,
to be held at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, January
18, 2018 at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home on
Braddock Road in Fairfax, VA.
On Tuesday, January 9, 2018, beloved husband
of the late Martha M. Teel; devoted father of
Thereasa Lyles, Alfreda Teel, Alfonza Teel, and
the late Brenda Williams. He is also survived
by eight grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren,
two brothers, Ronald Teel and Leotha Teel and
a host of other relatives and friends. Mr. Teel
will lie in state at Ebenezer Baptist Church,
909 Queen St., Alexandria, VA on Wednesday,
January 17 from 10 a.m. until service at 11
a.m. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery,
Cheltenham, MD on Friday, January 19 at 10
a.m. Online condolences may be made:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
WATSON
MERLE VERNON WATSON SR.
"Bubba"
On Friday, January 5, 2018, the son of the late
James Watson and Margaret Jackson-Watson
departed this life at Providence Hospital. He is
survived by his devoted wife, Annette Watson,
seven children, Sheila Watson-Beard, Merle Jr,
Brenda, Kevin, Vernon and Jeanette Watson
and Michelle Fleming, one sister, Margaret
Ida Watson, two brothers, Ellis Watson and
Lecount Moore. One sister-in-law, Grace Peterson and one daughter-in-law, Bridgette Watson, 11 grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren
and a host of family and friends. Viewing
Tuesday January 16, 2018 from 9 to 11 a.m.
with service to follow at Marshall's Funeral
Home, 4308 Suitland, MD. 20747. Interment
Washington National Cemetery.
On Saturday, January 6, 2018 in New Carrollton, MD. Father of Brian (Juanita), Christopher (Tonya), Jonathan (Danielle), Melissa, Dondre', Jayla, Randell and Aaron; grandfather of
Jordan,
Kristen, Blair, Bryson, Chelsea,
Christopher Jr.; brother of Frank. Mourned by
a host of relatives and friends. James was
a maintenance supervisor for many years in
the USPS. Visitation at 10 a.m., services at 11
a.m., on Saturday, January 20 at 10 a.m. at
Capital Christian Fellowship, 10411 Greenbelt
Rd., Lanham, MD 20706. Interment private.
Arrangements by McGUIRE.
mcguire-services.com
Of Silver Spring, Maryland, passed away on
December 27, 2017, after a brief illness,
while traveling with her family to Los Angeles, CA to meet her youngest great-granddaughter. Jeanne was born in New York
City, NY on March 14, 1932, and had been
a long-time resident of Towson, Maryland.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
John Sterling Young, and is survived by
her son John Sterling Young, Jr., (Karen
Young); her daughter Carol Jeanne Young
(Dan Phythyon); her grandchildren Matthew
Young (Hilary Siegel), Jessica Hausburg (Phil
Hausburg) and Sara Phythyon; her greatgranddaughters Sadie Young and Layla
Hausburg, and her beloved Havanese, Holly.
Jeanne most recently was a member of the
Circle Fellowship Church at the Riderwood
retirement community and had been a
volunteer at the Gilchrist Center hospice in
Towson. She was a realtor in the Towson
area of Maryland, and carried on her love
of matching families to their new homes
as a resident ambassador at Riderwood.
Jeanne’s memorial service will be held at 11
a.m. on January 20, 2018 at Riderwood in
the Maryland Room at Montgomery Station
Clubhouse, 3120 Gracefield Road, Silver
Spring, Maryland, 20904, and will be followed by a brief reception. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in her memory to
Gilchrist at www.gilchristcares.org.
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
GILBERT
nephew, Mark Gilbert and grandnephew,
Julian Arthur Dos Santos.
JULIANA M. GILBERT
(Age 82)
MERRICK
OLOUISE SARAH MERRICK
(Age 80)
Peacefully on Tuesday, January 2, 2018 Devoted wife of Sherman Merrick, Sr.; loving mother
of Pastor Lucretia Dawson (Amos), Shirlene
Wilson, Veronica Foxx, Gwyndolyn Merrick
(Clarence)
and
Sherman
Merrick, Jr.
(Claudette); 11 grandchildren; a host of greatgrandchildren; seven great-great-grandchildren; other relatives and friends. Service will
be held on Wednesday, January 17, at Peace
Baptist Church, 712 18th St. NE. Visitation
10 a.m. celebration of life service 11 a.m.
Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD. Services by Freeman.
SHARP-RICHARDSON
WOOD
YOUNG
On Friday, January 5, 2018 of Adamstown,
MD., formerly of Potomac, MD, beloved wife
of 60 years of Gerald Gilbert. Dear Mother
of Joy (Michael) Sappington, of Tuscarora, MD
and Bruce (Stacia) Gilbert, of Danville, PA;
beloved grandmother of four grandchildren,
Ryan and Larissa Sappington, Jake and Darby
Gilbert; loving sister of Dr. Penny HauserCram and Dr. Bruce Hauser. Juliana is also
survived by many other loving relatives and
friends. She was especially close to her
Family and friends are invited to attend Lottie’s
Celebration of Life at New Macedonia Baptist
Church, 4115 Alabama Ave. SE, Washington,
DC 20019 on January 16, 2018, viewing at 10
a.m. and service at 11 a.m. Burial at Cedar Hill
Cemetery, 4111 Pennsylvania Ave., Suitland,
MD 20746.
JAMES WOOD
JEANNE DESOUSA YOUNG
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
in Linda’s memory to the National Multiple
Sclerosis Society and The Linda Jenckes
Health Care Policy Program at the International Cancer Advocacy Network (ICAN).
She was preceded in death by 11 siblings and
two of her children, Shirley M. Gilchrist Hill and
Elvin Gilchrist, Sr. She is survived by five sons
and one daughter, Alvin Gilchrist of King
George, VA, Irvin Gilchrist (Jean) of Washington,
DC, Georgia L. Gilchrist Singleton of Hagerstown, MD, Carlverstri Clark of Washington,
DC, Curtis Clark of Capitol Heights, MD and
Anthony Peterson of Capitol Heights, MD;
Robert Parker, her friend and companion; and
many grandchildren, nieces, nephews and
other relatives and friends.
TEEL
ROSS
Born November 10, 1920, passed away
peacefully on January 11, 2018. She was
surrounded by her loving family. Elizabeth
was raised in Brownsville, PA, and became
a loyal Washingtonian in 1946. For 56
years, she was the beloved wife of the late
Daniel M. Ross, a former Marine, defense
contract attorney, and Washington area
real estate developer. She was a devoted
mother of three children, Daniel A. Ross
of Vienna, VA, Robert M. Ross of San
Diego, CA and Janet Jensen of Potomac,
MD. She was the grandmother of seven,
great-grandmother of six, and a cherished
sister of Irene Chupella of Silver Spring,
MD. She was known for her kindness,
generous heart and her special kindred
spirit towards animals. The Ross family will
be receiving friends on January 15, 2018
from 6 to 8 p.m. at Joseph Gawler's Sons,
5130 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Washington,
DC 20016. Mass of Christian Burial will
be held January 16 at 10:30 a.m. at The
Church of the Little Flower 5607 Massachusetts Avenue Bethesda, MD 20816.
LOTTIE EVA GILCHRIST CLARK
(Age 91)
Of Capitol Heights, MD, passed away on January 2, 2018. She was born in Edgefield, SC on
May 21, 1926 to Bishop D. Peterson and Rosa
L. Senior Peterson.
FRED TEEL, JR.
ELIZABETH ANN ROSS
Services will be held at St. Luke Catholic
Church, 7001 Georgetown Pike, McLean VA
on Saturday, January 20 at 1 p.m. There will
be a separate Celebration of Life following
the service.
A native of Detroit, MI, Julie was a graduate of Kingwood School Cranbrook; Denison
University., B.S. with Honors, and University.
of Virginia, M Ed. She taught 6th grade and
later was a high school guidance counselor.
Julie and Jerry moved to the Washington area
when he graduated from law school in 1962.
They lived in several areas ultimately settling
in Potomac for more than 40 years. Julie
was honored by the Montgomery County
Executive for her distinguished service for
many years in the abused persons program.
She also hosted a gift giving reception for
the toys for tots in her Potomac home for
almost two decades. Her fondest memories
included teaching 6th grade in Charlottesville,
and spending time at her favorite place,
their Bethany Beach, DE house which she
designed.
A memorial service will be held on January 16
at 11 a.m. at St. Francis Episcopal Church in
Potomac followed by a reception. Interment
will be at Arlington National Cemetery at
a later date. In lieu of flowers donations
may be made in her memory to the Marine
Toys for Tots Foundation, Gifts Processing
Administrator, 18251 Quantico Gateway Dr.,
Triangle, VA 22172. Please view and sign
online family guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
DELORES VIVIAN SHARP-RICHARDSON
Of Bowie, MD, was born on March 30, 1936 to
the parents of Lloyd Sharp and Rosalyn KelleyMcCoy; and was the eldest of a blended family.
She transitioned on December 30, 2017 in a
local hospital after a long illness.
Delores was an alumna from Hampton Univ.
(1958) in Nursing and Master Degree from West
Michigan University. She had a rich career with
the Government until 1996. Delores spent her
recent few remaining years in the company of
her niece, R. Nicole Sharp, and family.
Delores Richardson was an active member
of St Matthias Catholic Church. She will be
remembered by her family and friends. Funeral
January 17 at St. Matthias, 9475 Annapolis Rd.,
Lanham, MD 20706. Visitation 10 a.m. until the
time of service. Interment Roosevelt Memorial
Cemetery in VA. Arrangements by JB Jenkins.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
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name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
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2" - $339 (text only)
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Additional plaques start at $26 each
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Visit today.
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To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
C. SAM BERGER
1928 ~ 2018
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018,
Clarence Sam Berger peacefully
entered into eternal life. Devoted
husband of Emma Berger Restovic;
loving father of Jennifer Berger and
the late Jocelyn Berger (1961-2012)
and Andrew Berger (1962-2005). For
60 years, Sam shared his wonderful life with his
best friend and wife, Emma. After growing up
in Pottsville, PA he served in the U.S. Air Force
and then went to Drexel University where
he earned a B.S. in 1955 and furthered his
education earning his MBA at Loyola University
in 1974 and his Master of Science from Johns
Hopkins University in 1987. His 40+ year engineering career as a NASA contractor took him
on projects all over the world including Canada,
Germany, Japan, Korea, Australia, Mexico and
Chile. Highlights include working on the first
manned space flight programs, Mercury where
he was stationed in Antofagasta Chile and met
the love of his life, Gemini and Apollo and
continued through the Space Shuttle missions
that launched the Hubble Space Telescope
and set up the International Space Station.
Sam was a great gardener, world traveler,
loved exploring science, culture, music and the
natural world and was known to break into
dance with his lovely wife, daughters or any
lady friends who could keep up.
Family and Friends are invited to call at the
Witzke Funeral Home, 5555 Twin Knolls Rd.,
Columbia, MD 21045 on Sunday from 3 to 5
p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on
Monday at 10 a.m. at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center,
10431 Twin River Rd., Columbia 21044 followed
by interment at Columbia Memorial Park,
12005 Clarksville Pike, Clarksville, MD 21029.
In lieu of flowers, donate to Catholic Relief
Services via www.support.crs.org to make contribution in memory of Sam Berger (please click
‘notify family’ option). On-line condolences
may be made at:
www.witzkefuneralhomes.com
On Sunday, January 14, 2018, Mimi
(Mildred) Kravetz Goldstein of
Rockville, MD, beloved wife of the
late Hank (Herman) Kravetz and
Sidney Goldstein, devoted mother
of Lynn Brooks and Scott Kravetz;
cherished grandmother of Mallorie David and Brett David; great-grandmother
of Aubrey David; step-mother of Jerry (Joan)
Goldstein and Lee Goldstein; step-grandmother of Jordan (Laurie) Goldstein, Abby Goldstein, Lisa (Steve) Hacker, Ally (Jordan) Salberg,
Gracie Goldstein; and step-great-grandmother
of Alexa Goldstein, Sari Goldstein, Lena Hacker,
Sydney Hacker. Graveside service will be held
on Wednesday, January 17, 11 a.m. at King
David Memorial Gardens, 7482 Lee Highway,
Falls Church, Virginia, 22042. Family will
observe shiva at the residence of Scott Kravetz
starting Wednesday, January 17 through 3 p.m.
Friday, January 19. Arrangements by HINESRINALDI FUNERAL HOME, LLC., under Jewish
Funeral Practices Committee of Greater Washington Contract.
CLARK
SCOTT
ELIZABETH BERNICE SCOTT
GREGORY CHARLES MAY, SR.
Peacefully transitioned on January 7, 2018.
He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Grandy;
two sons, Carnell Grandy, Jr. and Kevin
Grandy; a daughter-in-law, Vanessa Grandy;
five sisters; three brothers; eight grandchildren; and 17 great grandchildren. He was
preceded by his son and Mason Brother
Raymond Grandy. Funeral Service will be
held on Wednesday, January 17, 2018, at
J.B. Jenkins Funeral Home, 7474 Landover
Road, Landover, MD, 20785, Viewing will
be at 9:30 a.m., Masonic Service held at
10:30 a.m. and Regular Service at 10:45
a.m.
DEATH NOTICE
KINNEY
LEWIS
PHYLLIS DIANE GRANDON
DEATH NOTICE
LIZZIE MAE (Green) KINNEY
KELVIN L. LEWIS
CARNELL GRANDY, SR., PM “1983”
GOLDSTEIN
B7
RE
GHI
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B8
EZ
RE
. MONDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
JANUARY 15 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
A cold morning
A cold start to the holiday, with
morning temperatures in the teens.
Temperatures recover to the low 30s
by the afternoon under partly sunny
skies. Clouds will increase
throughout the day, and we can’t rule out a stray
snow shower or two in the late afternoon. No
accumulation is expected. Winds will be light out
of the north at 5 mph. It will be mostly cloudy
and not as cold at night, with lows in the mid-20s.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Snow
Wednesday
Cloudy
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Sunny
Friday
Sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Saturday
Sunny
Temperatures
31° 26
41° 26
31° 21
39° 25
45° 29
51° 39
FEELS*: 30°
FEELS: 41°
FEELS: 20°
FEELS: 31°
FEELS: 46°
FEELS: 50°
CHNCE PRECIP: 10%
P: 55%
P: 25%
P: 0%
P: 10%
P: 10%
WIND: NE 4–8 mph
W: S 4–8 mph
W: NNW 8–16 mph
W: W 8–16 mph
W: SSE 4–8 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Harrisburg
27/24
Hagerstown
30/24
Davis
29/19
Th
F
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
32/27
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
30/25
Dover
34/27
Washington
31/26
ACTUAL
FORECAST
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
28° 2:00 p.m.
17° 7:00 a.m.
43°/28°
76° 1932
–13° 1912
26° 3:00 p.m.
14° 7:00 a.m.
42°/24°
72° 1995
5° 1970
27° 3:43 p.m.
14° 7:39 a.m.
41°/24°
79° 1932
–2° 1912
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –6.5° yr. to date: –6.5°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Cape May
34/27
Annapolis
29/25
OCEAN: 44°
Charlottesville
35/23
Ocean City
37/29
OCEAN: 34°
Lexington
34/21
Richmond
36/21
Norfolk
34/27
Virginia Beach
35/29
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 39°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
36/30
OCEAN: 39°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.64"
1.26"
0.64"
1.26"
0.0"
2.7"
0.00"
1.49"
1.16"
1.49"
1.16"
0.0"
4.7"
0.00"
0.60"
1.37"
0.60"
1.37"
0.0"
5.2"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, clouds and sunshine, cold. High 23–27.
Wind southwest 6–12 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy. Low
16–20. Wind southwest 6–12 mph. Tuesday, mostly cloudy,
snow at times, coating to 1 inch. High 26–30. Wind west–
southwest 7–14 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly cloudy, cold. High 34–39.
Wind north–northeast 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy.
Low 27–31. Wind north 4–8 mph. Tuesday, cloudy, warmer.
High 40–44. Wind west 3–6 mph. Wednesday, mostly
cloudy, a little snow at times. High 32–36.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, clouds and sunshine, cold.
Wind northeast 3–6 knots. Wind waves 1 foot. Visibility unrestricted.
• Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, clouds and sunshine,
cold. Wind north 5–10 knots. Wind waves 1–2 feet. Visibility
unrestricted.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be
around 4.2 feet, remaining nearly steady Tuesday. Flood stage at
Little Falls is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
W
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
1:40 a.m.
6:59 a.m.
1:34 p.m.
7:13 p.m.
Annapolis
3:29 a.m.
9:49 a.m.
4:45 p.m.
10:52 p.m.
Ocean City
6:15 a.m.
12:44 p.m.
6:25 p.m.
none
Norfolk
1:54 a.m.
8:25 a.m.
2:40 p.m.
8:37 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:32 a.m.
12:42 p.m.
7:31 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Camarillo, CA 86°
Low: Ely, MN –41°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
22/15/pc
51/21/s
32/26/sf
48/30/s
65/26/s
30/25/pc
10/–4/pc
51/30/s
–5/–24/s
48/33/pc
23/19/sf
24/17/sn
15/4/pc
49/29/s
40/26/c
42/25/s
22/3/sn
26/11/sn
31/5/sn
28/12/sn
56/23/s
25/5/sn
Tomorrow
31/18/sn
42/26/pc
36/33/sn
50/17/c
32/20/sn
39/24/sn
25/17/s
37/13/sn
7/–3/s
44/31/r
32/28/pc
24/13/sn
28/16/c
57/35/pc
28/8/sf
52/28/pc
33/16/s
24/6/sn
15/7/pc
17/8/pc
32/16/pc
36/15/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
4/–6/pc
25/15/sn
63/30/s
20/9/i
–6/–21/pc
24/17/pc
82/70/s
64/38/s
27/0/sn
56/29/s
55/36/s
15/–5/c
66/45/pc
46/17/pc
74/54/pc
33/8/sn
43/19/pc
72/64/pc
27/17/sn
7/–4/pc
45/15/pc
58/42/s
28/25/pc
34/27/c
9/–3/s
20/10/sf
42/26/s
24/19/i
1/–3/s
32/24/sn
82/70/pc
41/23/r
13/6/pc
32/14/sn
62/39/pc
10/1/s
62/44/pc
27/12/s
71/53/c
17/8/pc
23/10/sn
76/62/pc
25/5/sn
7/–3/s
22/9/sn
49/24/c
37/27/sn
44/29/c
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
35/10/pc
8/–6/pc
65/45/pc
32/27/pc
74/48/s
29/21/sn
19/9/pc
54/42/r
25/19/c
41/22/s
57/36/c
36/21/pc
57/49/c
28/3/sn
83/74/pc
44/27/pc
70/52/pc
60/54/c
84/74/pc
57/44/c
41/29/c
22/16/pc
67/47/pc
28/2/sn
24/8/s
11/–2/s
69/46/s
40/27/sn
72/50/c
24/2/sf
27/21/pc
52/42/r
35/30/c
51/28/pc
55/33/r
47/28/pc
61/44/r
16/7/s
83/74/sh
44/29/c
68/51/c
59/49/r
83/74/sh
52/42/r
37/29/r
32/9/sn
71/50/s
16/2/s
World
High: Julia Creek, Australia 112°
Low: Agayakan, Russia –75°
Jan 16
New
Jan 24
First
Quarter
Jan 31
Full
Feb 7
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:25 a.m.
6:10 a.m.
7:36 a.m.
2:49 a.m.
2:29 a.m.
5:56 a.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
94/76/pc
78/46/s
55/45/pc
80/60/pc
79/52/c
39/26/sn
44/27/pc
61/49/s
82/71/c
31/30/c
76/66/s
76/59/s
54/33/s
55/40/pc
23/19/sn
32/26/pc
26/19/s
Set
5:10 p.m.
4:12 p.m.
5:13 p.m.
12:56 p.m.
12:44 p.m.
3:27 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
74/41/s
Amsterdam
46/38/r
Athens
52/48/c
Auckland
77/68/pc
Baghdad
66/43/s
Bangkok
85/69/pc
Beijing
35/21/c
Berlin
37/34/pc
Bogota
65/45/r
Brussels
46/39/r
Buenos Aires
81/63/pc
Cairo
68/49/s
Caracas
73/63/pc
Copenhagen
37/35/c
Dakar
77/64/pc
Dublin
45/33/sh
Edinburgh
43/32/c
Frankfurt
44/40/r
Geneva
45/42/pc
Ham., Bermuda 71/68/sh
Helsinki
24/18/c
Ho Chi Minh City 88/75/c
Tomorrow
76/42/pc
43/37/sh
60/49/sh
75/66/sh
66/43/s
88/71/pc
42/18/s
42/31/r
66/46/r
45/36/sh
84/69/pc
66/53/pc
73/64/pc
40/34/r
72/62/s
39/34/sn
38/32/sn
46/36/r
48/40/r
70/67/pc
24/19/pc
86/75/c
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
68/59/s
71/42/pc
44/40/pc
53/44/pc
90/62/s
55/23/s
84/75/pc
73/51/pc
87/75/c
78/68/c
54/45/s
52/39/r
48/32/pc
88/75/c
69/40/s
5/–1/pc
26/18/sf
93/76/pc
83/53/pc
72/45/pc
31/29/sn
9/1/c
49/46/r
33/30/pc
71/61/s
72/43/pc
50/47/sh
55/45/pc
85/57/s
53/27/s
83/75/pc
73/52/pc
87/75/c
78/68/pc
60/49/sh
45/37/c
54/35/pc
87/76/c
68/37/pc
14/5/sn
22/13/pc
92/75/pc
84/56/s
73/43/pc
32/25/sn
15/4/sn
49/40/r
42/31/sn
93/78/s
69/41/s
59/53/pc
82/64/pc
81/54/s
46/37/sh
41/29/r
60/43/sh
84/75/c
35/29/sn
73/64/pc
77/61/s
45/33/s
55/47/s
25/13/c
40/34/sn
33/29/sn
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
Tribes’ wide diversity makes designing Native American memorial a challenge
VETERANS FROM B1
to be unveiled on Veterans Day in
2020). Museum staff and members of an advisory committee
traveled around the country,
meeting with tribal leaders and
veterans, and came back with a
few directives: Be inclusive of all
tribes and traditions; don’t leave
out women; remember the sacrifices of family members; and
include an element of spirituality.
The design must be broad
enough to encompass the vast
array of tribes (567 are federally
recognized) yet specific enough
that veterans and their families
will recognize themselves and
their stories.
That will not be easy for the
panel of experts tasked with
selecting the design. For example, some tribes’ history of service goes back longer than others;
to some, horses were integral,
while others never rode them.
“What an intriguing memorial
this will ultimately be if it is able
to encompass for the casual observer and for Native Americans
the oddities of where we stand
today as Native Americans in the
21st century,” said Kevin Brown,
chairman of the Mohegan tribe,
who along with Mooney is on the
advisory committee. “You have
native scouts who were on both
sides in the Indian Wars, you
have the first Native American to
die in the defense of what would
be called the U.S.A., in the Revolutionary War,” a relative of
Brown.
The placement of the memorial is significant, said Jefferson
Keel, lieutenant governor of the
Chickasaw Nation, who is cochair of the committee. “Anyone
who goes out of the Capitol,
down those steps, that will be the
first thing they see. To me, that’s
exciting.”
Keel acknowledged the contradictions inherent in serving a
government that did not always
serve its native population fairly.
“I think it’s in the warrior tradition to protect the freedoms that
we have, even though we were
not allowed to be citizens in
general until [the 1920s]. Even
before they were allowed to vote,
they served.” The memorial, he
said, is “long overdue.”
“It’s intended to
welcome these vets and
be a healing experience
for them.”
Rebecca Trautmann, project curator
Many Americans don’t know
the extent of the more painful
history of Native Americans, as
well as many of their accomplishments, he said. “We’re not what
they learned about in public
school systems.”
That history includes the forcible removal of native children
from their families to be educated in boarding schools — which
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in some ways helped prepare
them for service. “Students were
taken from homes, their hair cut
short, put into military uniforms
and made to lead regimented
lifestyles — so, often, the military
recruited them,” Trautmann
said.
Among the best-known Native
American veterans are the Choctaw, who passed messages in
their own language during World
Wars I and II — a code the enemy
was unable to break. And Ira
Hayes, one of six U.S. servicemen
to raise the flag at Iwo Jima,
became the subject of a Johnny
Cash song.
Even among Native Americans
there is a knowledge gap about
their contributions, said Wayne
Don, an Alaska Native who is a
colonel in the National Guard. “I
didn’t know that my two grandfathers were Alaskan territorial
guardsmen until I picked up a
book,” he said.
Over 31,000 Native American
men and women are on active
duty, and more than 140,000
veterans identify as Native
Americans or Alaska Natives.
Typically, they are celebrated in
their own communities, with ceremonies and warrior societies
that help them when they return
from service. In 2004, a powwow
was held in a combat zone near
Fallujah, for which family members sent clothes and other items
from the United States.
But despite the high status of
warriors in many tribal traditions, Native Americans often
have a harder time than the
general population gaining access to veterans’ benefits, Trautmann said.
“On the one hand, they have
this support from the community that other vets don’t, and on
the other hand, it can be harder
for them to access medical and
social services,” she said. “Many
of them turn to traditional healing to deal with some of the
PTSD from combat.”
An important aspect of the
memorial is that “it’s intended to
welcome these vets and be a
healing experience for them,
whether it’s for vets who served
many years ago, vets just returning from service or families who
lost members in service,” Trautmann said.
One of those is Allen Hoe, a
Native Hawaiian and Vietnam
veteran whose 27-year-old son
U.S. ARMY NATIONAL GUARD
Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble, a Sioux who served in World
War II and Korea, received the Medal of Honor posthumously.
Nainoa was killed in Iraq in
2005.
“He was very proud of the fact
that his ancestors for 100 generations were warriors,” said Hoe,
who has another son in the
military. “He wanted to step
forward and provide the gratitude to his ancestors and conduct himself the way they would
want him to.”
Hoe said he was originally
shocked and disappointed to
learn there was not already a
memorial
honoring
Native
American veterans.
“I was puzzled as to why not,”
he said, adding that he has since
become active in veterans’ initiatives such as the memorial.
“There’s not a lot you can do to
change the past, but you can do
your best to set the way forward.”
While many served with distinction, recognition was not always accorded to them in their
lifetime.
Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson
(“Woody”) Keeble, a full-blooded
Sioux, served in World War II
and later in Korea. He was recommended for a Medal of Honor,
but the paperwork was lost; he
was finally given the award posthumously, in 2008.
“He would be very honored”
to see the memorial, said Keeble’s stepson, Russell Hawkins.
“He comes from a warrior culture that epitomized all the
values of honor and bravery, and
he would want the story to be
told.”
Hawkins also hopes the memorial, by highlighting Native
Americans’ service and sacrifice,
will do something else.
“I think the most bigoted
white supremacist, when he
reads what Woody did, saving the
lives of his fellow soldiers, he’ll
say, ‘Gee, maybe these guys aren’t
so bad after all. Maybe they
deserve a little bit more understanding, a little bit more compassion.’
“I think even the hardest heart
will soften.”
tara.bahrampour@washpost.com
KLMNO
Style
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
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CAROLYN HAX
MUSIC REVIEW
A bevy of guests
decadently dined, waltzed
and twirled at the annual
Russian Ball. C2
Christopher J. Yates’s
“Grist Mill Road” explores
the aftermath of a
childhood crime. C3
A mother grapples with
how to support her teen
daughter, who is pregnant
and angry with her. C5
Europa Galante
uncovered the drama of
Vivaldi at the Library of
Congress. C8
ON PARENTING
38 minutes of
nuclear fear
for a mother
BY
A LLISON W ALLIS
We knew there was a big swell coming
in, so when the alarm blared on my phone
at 8 a.m., my first sleepy thought was that
we were flooding and needed to evacuate.
It’s the waves, I thought drowsily. Then I
read the notice on my phone.
“Emergency Alert BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII.
SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS
NOT A DRILL.”
We’re not really disaster preppers on
Oahu. Most of us grab our hurricane
provisions in a mad rush to Costco and
Walmart in the days before a storm hits.
And we have a long history of pulling
together during crisis. Aloha is a state of
mind, but it’s also shown through actions.
Our sense of community, known as ohana, is strong. We all sink or swim together.
So that was the excuse I had given myself
for not ensuring that we were prepared as
a family to shelter in place during a
nuclear strike. That and a big fat case of
denial that the country I love has devolved to such a place.
I was home with my daughter; my
service dog, Pono; and Rosie the chinchilla, who belongs to my daughter, Abby.
When I read the alarm, I jump out of bed
Robert Houston’s
photos of
Resurrection City
have seldom been
seen. A new exhibit
in Washington aims
to change that.
PARENTING CONTINUED ON C2
Conveying
Trump’s words
is no easy task
From Harry Truman’s
“dumb son of a b----”
assessment of Gen.
Douglas MacArthur to
Richard B. Cheney’s rude
suggestion about what
Margaret
Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (DSullivan
Vt.) should do to himself,
foul language from
politicians skips across the aisle and
leaps through the decades.
President Trump and his
administration, though, have added a
turbocharge.
Who can forget Anthony Scaramucci’s
description of Stephen K. Bannon’s
ability to give himself sexual pleasure
through contortion? Or Trump’s own
bragging about sexual misconduct that
surfaced during the campaign?
Despite all this, the profanity used by
the president to describe poor
countries — “shithole,” to be precise —
still shocked. And news organizations
had to grapple with whether and how
prominently to use his words.
But the real issue wasn’t the language
at all, disgusting as it was.
What mattered much more was what
ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
FAR LEFT: One of
Houston’s rarely
seen photos from
the Poor People's
Campaign.
Demonstrators got
creative with their
plywood-andplastic tents.
SULLIVAN CONTINUED ON C2
FASHION
Lovely clothes
let story shine
in ‘Thread’
BY
An aerial view of
the 1968 campsite.
“They had nothing
to lose and
everything to gain,”
Houston said of the
demonstrators who
stayed there for
several weeks.
R OBIN G IVHAN
In “Phantom Thread,” Daniel DayLewis plays an imperious and eccentric
fashion designer named Reynolds Woodcock in 1950s London in the years after
World War II. His character approaches
fashion as a religion that requires silence
and solitude. His various self-indulgences masquerade as near-sacraments. DayLewis’s character is not meant to represent any real designer, living or dead, but
the ecclesiastical nature of his atelier
takes inspiration from Cristobal Balenciaga and his personal quirks call to mind
the fastidiousness of Karl Lagerfeld.
Woodcock’s designs, however, have a
look all their own. They are gently beautiful guideposts. But they are not outre,
distracting or referential. That is thanks
to costume designer Mark Bridges.
Because this is a story that revolves
around a designer’s creative and emotional impulses, one might presume the
film would feature any number of extraordinary and memorable ensembles.
But there are none. Which doesn’t mean
there aren’t plenty of gorgeous clothes in
FASHION CONTINUED ON C4
ROBERT HOUSTON
ROBERT HOUSTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
BY
The lost
city for
the poor
Martin Luther King Jr.
imagined a camp on Mall
M ANUEL R OIG- F RANZIA
I
n that fraught and unsettled spring of 1968, Kenneth Jadin had a problem.
The 25-year-old architecture professor at Howard University needed a chunk of land. A
big, big chunk of land.
Jadin and others had been tasked with the difficult challenge of figuring out how and
where to house thousands of activists who would be flooding into Washington for an
antipoverty demonstration so grand in scale and so ambitious in scope that no one had ever
seen anything like it.
Decades before Occupy Wall Street mainstreamed the notion of protest as semi-permanent
encampment, Washington was about to become the scene of a demonstration so fixed in place
that it would have its own Zip code: 20013.
The demonstration was to be the centerpiece of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Poor
People’s Campaign, which he envisioned as a bold call to action to pressure the government to
do more to address poverty. Jadin had a meeting scheduled with King, a man he admired but
had yet to see in person, to discuss the difficult logistics of his plan to occupy Washington. That
meeting was set to take place the first week of April.
But first, King would travel to Memphis, where an assassin’s bullet took his life.
The shots fired by James Earl Ray did not, however, halt King’s vision for a nonviolent show
PHOTOGRAPHS CONTINUED ON C3
C2
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RE
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
A night of
flamboyant
decadence
W
hile past years had
moments mired in
pomp, this year’s
Russian Ball was decidedly
looser and just plain fun. The
usual cast of Wes Andersonesque characters flamboyantly
waltzed, shot vodka and
compared family lineages at the
annual fete held in what is said
to be the most beautiful
ballroom in the city, at a private
downtown social club on
Saturday.
The guest list included princes
and princesses, counts and
countesses, ambassadors and
socialites. The decadent evening
offered an escape from current
affairs through a bar so open that
more than one indecent proposal
was murmured with a wink.
Guests listened raptly as the
Women twirl on the dance floor in the gilded ballroom at the Russian Ball in Washington on Saturday. Guests
danced to the stylings of the Richard Bray Orchestra after dinner.
The guest list included princes, countesses,
ambassadors and socialites.
Washington Balalaika Society
played the Imperial Russian
anthem, “God Save the Tsar!”
and other traditional songs
before a seated dinner that
featured not one but two bottles
of vodka per table.
Gala dinners are often dry,
repressed affairs but the Richard
Bray Orchestra had no trouble
coaxing the decadent masses
back to the ballroom post-dinner
for dancing, ballgowns sweeping
dramatically around the gilded
ballroom. Guests caught their
breath during a stunning
performance by concert pianist
Hyperion Knight before taking
to the dance floor well past
midnight. No drink was too
strong, neckline too low or
jewelry too expensive at what is
one of the most eclectic and overthe-top balls of the season.
— Kate Warren
PHOTOS BY KATE WARREN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Guests enjoy a formal seated dinner at the Russian Ball at a private downtown
social club. Each table featured two bottles of vodka.
Partygoers get down on the dance floor. They also enjoyed a performance by
concert pianist Hyperion Knight.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
A mother’s
unease after
missile alert
Bringing
context to
foul words
PARENTING FROM C1
SULLIVAN FROM C1
and grab my glasses. I run to
Abby’s room. “Get up, honey. You
have to get up right now. Right
now. Grab your pillow. Go to the
bathroom. Turn on the tub and
run it. Turn it off when it’s full. Sit
in the corner. Wait for me. Be
brave. I’ll be right there.” I give her
a hug and a kiss and run off.
I run past Rosie in her huge
cage and make a calculated decision that she won’t come into the
bathroom with us. The cage
wouldn’t fit, and I am not about to
have a loose chinchilla running
around during a nuclear disaster.
I think about how my daughter
will never trust me again if I tell
her this. I shoot Rosie a look of
sympathy and go to search for the
dog.
I run to the backyard. It is such
a stunningly typical, beautiful Hawaiian morning. Blue sky and
bird song.
“Brandon?” I try my husband
on his cellphone, but the line is
dead. I send a text to tell him we
love him and that we would shelter in the bathroom. I pray he’s
somewhere a missile wouldn’t go,
and that wherever he is has thick
walls and water. I grab my medications, quickly fill a jug of water,
and run to drop it off and check on
Abby.
“Mom? What’s happening?”
She’s not crying, she’s pale, terrified, wide-eyed and wearing pajamas with cartoon characters on
them.
“Stay there, baby. I’ll be right
back.” Off again to find the dog. I
grab chocolate bars that are sitting in a drawer on the way, thinking they’re quick calories.
I scan the house for Pono in a
panic and realize he’s outside. I
hesitate at the doorway, wondering what people will say if they
learn I was nuked while trying to
get the dog. I think of Dorothy
chasing after Toto while the tornado is bearing down. Then I think
of what a very good service dog he
is, and how he wakes me up when
I faint, and I run outside.
The neighborhood is silent.
Pono comes running when he
hears the tone of my voice. When
he sees Abby, he puts his head
right next to her.
I grab pillows and quilts off the
beds and run back to the bath-
Trump’s words really meant, and
what the responsibilities of journalists were in conveying that meaning
in some sensible way.
In the first hours of coverage,
some rose to the challenge well.
Lisa Mascaro of the Los Angeles
Times provided meaningful context
in her immediate news story: “While
cruder and blunter than his past
public statements, the president’s
comments were in keeping with his
long-standing position that the
United States should shift its immigration policy away from poorer, developing countries, and instead focus on carefully selecting educated
immigrants, especially from Europe.”
She added that Trump “has frequently characterized Muslims as
terrorists and opened his presidential campaign calling Mexican immigrants ‘rapists.’ ”
By evening, some cable newscasters had become far more blunt. Don
Lemon of CNN flatly declared: “The
president of the United States is racist.” His colleague Anderson Cooper
went there, too: Trump’s words were
not just “racially charged” but simply racist.
David Leonhardt of the New York
Times quickly wrote a well-argued
opinion piece, “Just Say It: Trump Is
a Racist.”
Predictably, though, Trump’s regular media defenders were responding in two appalling ways.
First, they did it by noting that
countries like Haiti are indeed poor
and troubled, implying that the
president was therefore right to disparage them.
Fox’s Tomi Lahren, never deeper
than a coffee saucer, put it this way:
“If they aren’t shithole countries,
why don’t their citizens stay there?
Let’s be honest. Call it like it is.” (Her
tweet prompted Washington Post
Africa bureau chief Kevin Sieff to
aptly note that nearly 9 million
Americans live overseas, and CNN’s
Andrew Kaczynski to wonder, “Why
do you live/work in California/NYC
instead of your native South Dakota?”)
And second, they did it by positing that Trump’s racism will play
well with his base, which somehow
makes it acceptable. Jesse Watters,
a Fox host, paid tribute to what he
called America’s “forgotten men
and women” who surely would ap-
SOCIAL MEDIA/REUTERS
On Saturday, an emergency alert warning of an imminent missile strike on Hawaii was inadvertently
sent out. Above, a highway media sign in Kaneohe, Hawaii, broadcast a response that day.
room. The tub is nearly overflowing because Abby is too scared to
move and turn it off.
I settle in next to my daughter
and the dog, and see a text from
my husband: “On my way home.” I
write back, “No. Find a place to
stay.” He was on a rural road with
no shelter on the way to town, so
he has turned around. “Be there in
two minutes.”
I pray whatever is about to hit
us is going to take longer than two
minutes.
I spread the quilt out on the
floor, hand Abby a pillow, and
calmly ask her if they talked about
duck and cover in school. I realize
that I don’t know much about
duck and cover because I’m only
36 years old and I grew up in a
world without nuclear threats. I
fake the confidence and teach my
fourth-grader how to pull her
knees up to her chest, lean her
head down into them and cover
her neck with her arms.
“Mom, why are we doing this?
Please? What’s going on?” We
don’t talk about our president
with our daughter very much. I
don’t have many good things to
say about him, and I don’t want
her to feel the pressure of very
grown-up problems.
When she asks, I try to answer
her judiciously. We have never
discussed the fact that for the last
year we have lived in a state under
nuclear threat. “Well, honey, you
know that sometimes countries
pick fights with each other and
that’s what a war is?” “Yeah . . .”
“Well, our president has been
picking a fight with another country, and they have missiles. Do you
know what a missile is?” She nods.
“So we just got a warning that
the other country sent a missile to
Hawaii. Until our military can
blow it up, we need to shelter
somewhere safe, just in case.” Another nod. Another group hug
with the dog.
“Where’s Daddy?” Abby asks,
and I note that she never calls him
Daddy anymore. “On his way,
baby. He’ll be here any minute.”
For the first time, I wonder why
the civil defense sirens haven’t
gone off. We’re supposed to have
sirens — the state has been testing
them for the past two months. The
fear I felt the first time I heard the
nuke test siren, it turns out, is only
a modicum of the fear I feel now,
cowering in a bathroom with my
child.
I berate myself for not having a
go-bag ready, for not having a box
of emergency supplies stored in
the bathroom, in the cars, in my
husband’s office. I pray our failing
to prepare won’t mean our deaths.
I let go of Abby and tell her I
need to check my phone. My
browser is open to Twitter, so I
refresh the page. I scroll past
tweets about the missile alert in
Hawaii. Warnings to seek shelter.
Inappropriate jokes made out of
stress.
I refresh the page and see that
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii)
has tweeted that it was a false
alarm. I keep scrolling because I
need more evidence. Major news
outlets and elected government
figures are saying it’s a false alarm.
I hear my husband, Brandon,
drive up, and I shakily stand. I tell
Abby to stay where she is and run
out to Brandon and we hug. He
doesn’t know it’s over yet and
we’re both shaking.
“I always thought if this happened I would be with my family,”
he said later, as we were sitting
outside decompressing.
We lead Abby out of the bathroom, but we’re still uneasy. We
live close to a firehouse and haven’t heard trucks go out on a
single call. There has been no
public response from our state or
federal government. Twitter is our
only source.
“Is my friend still having her
birthday party today?” Abby asks.
Thirty minutes after the alert
and still no all-clear. Thirty-five
minutes. Finally, 38 minutes after
the false alarm, we receive emergency text alerts stating the allclear. It takes even longer for the
state to send notices out over the
radio and television. Both
firetrucks leave, sirens blaring, on
calls.
It has been only a few hours, but
the sense of unease is still there.
Brandon and I have decided to
make emergency kits and go-bags,
and I’ll be researching how to buy
iodine in bulk. We’ll have a conversation with Abby and have
drills as a family.
Not right now, though.
Right now, we’re sitting on the
lanai, enjoying being together,
dog snoring at our side, while our
kid runs in and out of the yard,
wearing a unicorn headband,
helping her friend get ready for
her birthday party.
style@washpost.com
Wallis is a disability studies graduate
student at the University of Hawaii.
She lives on the North Shore of Oahu
with her family.
prove. (Big eyeroll here: Anyone
who’d like to forget these hardcore
fans would find it impossible, given
the media’s endless explorations of
their Trumpian fealty.)
It all made for a tremendous
uproar, one sure to be swept aside
as the next horror show replaces it.
Can we learn anything from
this one? Maybe.
Most news organizations handled the use of a profane word
with professionalism: If the president says it, it’s news. They used it,
mostly verbatim or in some thinly
veiled form.
Fewer, though, were successful
at getting beyond the shock of the
word and exploring the racist —
yes, racist — thinking behind it.
Should the news media be using
that charged word for the president of the United States? Only
when absolutely warranted.
Which it clearly is.
A similar debate raged last year
about whether to use the word
“lie” in describing Trump’s constant falsehoods. Again, it’s not a
word one wants to use lightly, but
one that is sometimes necessary.
And it’s one that is not limited to
the president. Consider the Republican senators who said they
couldn’t remember whether they
heard Trump use his atrocious
words in the meeting they attended, or denied he said them. If they
weren’t lying, what other explanation might there be?
This is the kind of “call it like it
is” that’s needed. I didn’t notice
much of it.
And improvement is desperately
needed on another media front, too.
Somehow, the familiar cycle of
freakout — shock-reaction-insultrejoinder — has to stop.
Those reporters who provided
useful context within news stories
helped right away.
And those commentators and
opinion writers who made logical,
principled arguments did, too. But
that kind of thoughtfulness was
far from universal.
Context, clarity, reason? We
need much more of this.
Excusing racism on political
grounds? Justifying the disparagement of people because their
countries are troubled? Making
cynical arguments to encourage
their audience’s worst instincts?
Media figures who do that —
and there are far too many of them
— dump buckets of kerosene on
the flames.
To use House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan’s (R-Wis.) weak word of dissent, that’s unhelpful. Calling it
like it is: It’s vile.
margaret.sullivan@washpost.com
For more by Margaret Sullivan visit
wapo.st/sullivan
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
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A horrific
crime and
its twisty
aftermath
BY
ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
King’s
dream city,
in photos
PHOTOGRAPHS FROM C1
of civil disobedience — featuring
a diverse array of African Americans, as well as Latinos, Native
Americans, Asians, and Appalachian and rural whites — intended to rattle the capital and its
powerful inhabitants. Jadin and
other volunteers kept planning.
They had been considering staging the demonstration site —
which would take the name “Resurrection City” — at an abandoned airfield or on undeveloped
land owned by a cemetery. But
now they pressed for approval for
their first choice.
“We’re going to get the National Mall,” Jadin, now a professor
emeritus at Howard, remembers
telling colleagues. “They can’t say
no now.”
And he was right. In the weeks
to come, a city grew on the
expanse of land between the
Capitol and the Lincoln Memorial. At its height, 3,000 people
would take up residence there in
tents that Jadin designed.
But in a sense, what they did
there has been lost to time,
wedged as it was amid the anguish of two of the signal tragedies of 20th-century America:
the assassinations of King and
Robert F. Kennedy, who was shot
less than a month after Resurrection City was erected and three
weeks before riot police forced
the demonstrators out of their
camp.
“It’s a forgotten part of our
history,” Marc Steiner, a Baltimore radio host and longtime
activist who lived at Resurrection
City during its six-week run, said
in an interview.
A protest in living color
The assassinations of King and
Kennedy drew so much attention
that dozens of images captured
by a freelance photographer on
assignment for Life Magazine,
Robert Houston, were pushed
aside for bigger news — and
never published.
An enlarged version of one of
Houston’s photos greets visitors
to a new exhibition commemorating the 50th anniversary of
Resurrection City and the Poor
People’s Campaign in space dedicated to the National Museum of
African American History and
Culture at the National Museum
of American History. Half a century on, Houston’s photographs
have a special resonance: While
many of the images of the civil
rights era were taken in blackand-white, Houston often shot
with color film.
His image of a striking yellow
school bus ferrying demonstrators from Newark pulls visitors
into the exhibit, serving as a kind
of beacon of brightness in a space
where the lighting and the mood
are more subdued. Houston’s
photos have seldom been seen in
public, but they came to the
attention of the Smithsonian after an exhibition of his work was
held at Morgan State University,
Houston said.
On a recent morning, Houston
— now 82 and still active as a
photographer in Baltimore —
stood beneath the school bus
photograph looking up at the
faces: young black men wearing
pins bearing the image of a slain
civil rights leader, but with expressions that could only be read
as optimism.
“You heard that four-letter
word a lot: H-O-P-E,” said Houston, who lived in a tent throughout the demonstration. “Never
before had I met a group of
people who had absolutely nothing to lose. They had nothing to
lose and everything to gain.”
Jadin, the Howard University
professor who was one of many
sympathetic whites who joined
the cause, drew up diagrams on
how to assemble the plywoodand-plastic A-frame tents where
Houston and the rest of the
demonstrators would live. The
parts were assembled at a Catholic brotherhood facility north of
the city, he said, and trucked in
by volunteers. But once the
young demonstrators got ahold
of them, they let their creativity
flow.
“I was amazed at the inventiveness of people,” Jadin recalled.
“These high school kids . . . made
two-story units. One of them told
me he’d never held a hammer
before!”
He thought to himself, “If
they’re an example of the youth
of today, we’re in good shape.”
Some painted peace signs on
the plywood. A people’s university was erected so demonstrators could attend classes, and a
culture tent was set up. A Washington Post headline awkwardly
declared a “City of Huts Started
Near Mall; Leaders Vow a Long
Camp-in.”
In May 1968, demonstrators
began arriving in bus caravans
and in mule carts. They were
determined to make their presence known. Among those who
had been vocally supportive was
Kennedy, who was in the midst
of his campaign for president
and seemed to be on a path to
the White House. Peter Edelman, a Georgetown law professor and the husband of civil
rights leader Marian Wright
Edelman, recalled talking to
Kennedy one afternoon. Kennedy told him activists should
go to the capital determined “to
stay and to stay and keep on
staying until people in Washington get sick of it and decide to do
the right thing.”
Tear gas and flying rocks
The goals of the Poor People’s
Campaign included an “economic bill of rights” and more
money for housing and jobs programs. Folk singer Pete Seeger
spent time there, as did Bill
Cosby and Robert Culp, who had
recently starred on one of the
biggest shows on television, “I
Spy,” Steiner recalled.
But the means of achieving
their goals weren’t universally
agreed upon. Steiner, the longtime radio host who lived at
Resurrection City for weeks, and
many of the demonstrators advocated a boisterous, disruptive
approach that was sometimes in
conflict with the movement’s
leaders, he said.
One day, Steiner said, he and
others stormed into a hotel
where the Rev. Ralph David Abernathy, who had assumed a more
prominent leadership role after
King’s assassination, was staying
with other leading lights of the
ROBERT HOUSTON
movement. Steiner, who had
been slogging through mud
brought on by heavy rains that
swamped Resurrection City,
didn’t like the optics of some of
the movement’s leaders staying
in more comfortable digs.
“There was clearly a split between those of us in the camps
and the leadership,” Steiner said.
But others saw the movement’s leaders as galvanizing
forces. Jadin marveled at the
daily speech the Rev. Jesse Jackson delivered while breakfast
was distributed.
“I hadn’t ever heard such
preaching” Jadin said.
Three weeks into the demonstration, the nation was rocked
by the assassination of Kennedy
during a campaign event in Los
Angeles. His funeral procession
stopped at Resurrection City, and
the crowd broke into song.
“It was one of the most emotional moments you’ve ever experienced with that number of
people,” Steiner recalled. “Black,
white, Latinos, spontaneously
breaking into the ‘Battle Hymn of
the Republic.’ His death in many
ways was as profound as the
death of Martin Luther King. He
was someone who identified with
poor people and wanted to do
something about poverty.”
As the days dragged on, the
resolve of the demonstrators
waned and the population living
in the more than 500 tents plummeted. By late June, the city’s
TOP: Kenneth
Jadin, 75, is one of
the architects who
designed and
oversaw
construction of
Resurrection City.
At the time, he
taught at Howard
University.
ABOVE: Robert
Houston captured
this image of a
school bus ferrying
demonstrators from
Newark to
Resurrection City.
Houston shot his
photos in color,
which was rare in
the civil rights era.
BELOW: John
Wiebenson, a local
architect, and
others build a
structure to use
during the 1968
Poor People’s
Campaign on the
Mall.
tolerance for the demonstration
was also gone. The demonstration permit was expiring, and
protesters and police were trading accusations. Law enforcement officials were accusing
demonstrators of throwing rocks
at officers, and Poor People’s
Campaign leaders were arguing
about alleged police brutality
and saying riot forces were provoking camp residents by lobbing tear gas canisters.
On June 24, teams of riot
police descended on Resurrection City firing tear gas. Houston,
the freelance photographer, can
remember leaping into the Reflecting Pool to wash the chemicals from his skin. More than 340
demonstrators, including Abernathy, were arrested. It was a
demoralizing moment, as the
demonstration came to an end
without having achieved major
tangible results.
“At the time I thought they’d
crushed us. It was just dispersing
all the energy of people who were
coming in the beginning,” Steiner
said. “That’s why people thought
it was a failure.”
But, looking back, Steiner has
begun to reassess. Yes, poverty
persists as a huge problem —
there were 35 million people, or
about 17 percent of the total
population, living in poverty in
1968, according to the Census
Bureau, and there were 40.6 million, or about 12 percent, in the
same condition in 2016.
Steiner noted how many of the
activists returned to their communities and organized programs that helped countless people, a spirit that he believes
lives on.
“The success is now — that
50 years later people are saying,
‘What? What happened?’ ” he
said.
He was talking recently with a
young activist who crowed that
the protest movements of today
are different.
“This is not your grandmother’s revolution,” the activist told
him. “I said, ‘You’re part of a
continuum.’ ”
manuel.roigfranzia@washpost.com
City of Hope, the National Museum
of African American History and
Culture exhibition at the National
Museum of American History, will be
on display through December 2018.
nmaahc.si.edu.
D ENNIS D RABELLE
At the beginning of Christopher J. Yates’s fine second novel,
“Grist Mill Road,” Patrick “Patch”
McConnell looks back on the
summer of 1982 and what he took
for an “ideal childhood . . .
growing up in the best place on
earth, probably still [believing] in
ghosts, UFOs, tarot cards and the
purity of major league baseball.”
His “best place” is a town in the
mountains 90 miles north of New
York City. There, day after day,
you would have
found the 12year-old Patch
and his intimidating 14-yearold friend Matthew running
wild without
adult supervision.
Then came
an event that
GRIST MILL
changed three
ROAD
lives. It can be
A Novel
By Christopher J. encapsulated
in a tabloid
Yates
—
Picador. 352 pp. headline
BOY SHOOTS
$26
OUT
GIRL’S
EYE — but
there was much more to it than
that.
For one thing, the shooting
was no accident. The perpetrator,
Matthew, first tied 13-year-old
Hannah to a tree, then picked up
a BB gun and pumped pellet after
pellet into her, 37 of them in all.
Patch was there, too, having his
Lord Jim moment — standing by,
watching the attack in horror, but
making no attempt to stop it, not
even a verbal protest. With blood
all over herself and one eye a
pulpy mess, Hannah was left for
dead. Later Patch sneaked back,
found her still alive, untied her
and sought help. In the aftermath, Matthew confessed to the
crime, and the three young people went their separate ways.
Ever since, Patch has been looking for a chance to redeem himself.
Lord Jim fled to the jungles of
Southeast Asia, but Patch settled
for Manhattan, where 26 years
after the fact, the shooting takes
on new meaning. By now Patch
and Hannah are husband and
wife — they met by chance in
Grand Central Terminal some
years back and eventually fell in
love. (In case you’re wondering,
she has a prosthetic eye that
looks more real than the old glass
ones.) Matthew reenters their
lives first via the Internet, then in
person; as before, he, Patch and
Hannah make a volatile mix.
Yates now turns to questions
that hark back to the summer of
’82. For example, why wasn’t
Patch charged as an accomplice?
And how could Hannah possibly
marry someone who let her down
so badly, second thoughts or not?
The answer, in each case, is that
her perception of the attack is
quite different from Patch’s. He
lives in fear of the day when she
stumbles upon “the monstrous
secret that paces the perimeter of
our marriage, like something that
prowls in the shadows, a dangerous creature awaiting its moments, the right time to strike.”
Eventually, Patch will set out to
disarm that “monstrous secret”
— with disastrous results.” Another question — not fully answered until the book’s final pages — is how Matthew could have
done something so heinous.
Shuffling and reshuffling one’s
narrators has become almost a
sport among suspense novelists,
some of whom take it to excess.
This reader, for one, balked when
Paula Hawkins in effect brought
one of her characters in “The Girl
on the Train” back from the dead,
out of temporal sequence, to
supply crucial information. Yates
eschews such highhanded artifice, tacking back and forth in
time, and from one narrator to
another, with extraordinary skill.
Some manipulators, you might
say, are less manipulative than
others.
Yates, who was born and raised
in England and now lives in New
York City, set his first novel,
“Black Chalk,” mostly in his
homeland. This time around, he
demonstrates impressive knowledge of and affection for his
adopted country while telling an
even more compelling tale. Not
least among his new book’s
strengths is the light it sheds on
the phenomenon of an otherwise
law-abiding male giving in to
volcanic rage.
bookworld@washpost.com
SMITHSONIAN'S NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE
Dennis Drabelle is a former
mysteries editor of Book World.
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
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JANUARY 15 , 2018
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Sorry, deal includes boyfriend’s 2 kids
Ask Amy
AMY
DICKINSON
Dear Amy: Do I
and his kids are a package deal,
and you must either accept the
package, or leave the
relationship, because it isn’t
what you want.
have a say if I
don’t want my
boyfriend’s two
children to live
with us?
I am childless at the moment
(going to college), and do not
want this to affect my budget.
I am supportive, and he has
joint custody. I just cannot
commit to being a full-time mom
to other children when I don’t
even have my own.
I know what I signed up for,
but I’ve seen great fathers that
don’t live with their children
(like my dad).
Wondering Woman
Dear Amy: I’ve been
communicating with an old
friend, “Jonas,” over Facebook.
About 10 months ago, he
asked me to a movie. We also
attended another event together,
which I planned and paid for. I
thought we both had fun.
He continued to contact me
with small talk, but didn’t ask me
out again. In the summer, he
posted pictures of himself posed
with another woman on
Facebook.
I didn’t initiate contact after
that, but he would regularly
contact me, asking how I was, or
make some other small talk.
About a month ago, he asked if
I wanted to date him, making
some inference about not feeling
good enough for me to consider
him as more than a friend. He
said it’s been a long time since he
has dated and that he is unsure
of how to proceed. He is
introverted, very nice, successful
in business and quite a catch.
Like me, his spouse has died.
I invited him to dinner to talk
about it. We managed to talk
about everything but dating.
Again, I thought we had a great
time, but his communication
since then has been more small
talk with no follow-up plans to
do anything together.
I haven’t dated for a while, but
don’t remember it being so
confusing. Is this how dating is
in this day and age — and what
do I do about the small talk?
Perplexed
Wondering Woman: No, you
don’t have a say. What I mean is
that you simply don’t have the
right to ask a committed parent
to give up shared custody of his
children for you. And if you think
the main impact of having these
children in your life will be on
your budget, then you are simply
not equipped to take this on.
If these children lived with the
two of you half the time, then
you wouldn’t be a full-time
mother. He would be the primary
parent; you would be the
backstop parent when they were
with you. Most important — and
really the only thing that matters
— is that you obviously do not
want to do this. It is completely
valid at your stage in life to make
a choice not to have children.
This is the essence of a person’s
right to choose.
You are correct that many
wonderful parents do not have
custody of their children.
However, your guy’s choice is to
share custody of his children. He
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Perplexed: Dating has always
been confusing. It’s not just you
— everyone feels this way — in
every era and at every age.
Because “Jonas” is an
introvert, he might be taking
things as far as he is able. Small
talk might be his conversational
wheelhouse, but he has managed
to actually ask you if you want to
be his steady gal. You followed
through appropriately, but then
you both chickened out when
you were faced with the inperson awkwardness.
Posting a picture with another
woman on Facebook means
nothing. It quite literally means
that he was standing next to
someone when someone else
took a picture.
He is waiting for you to take
the lead. You seem capable of
this, and so I hope you will seize
this opportunity. You seem to
communicate mainly via writing,
so you should write him a short,
plainly stated note: “I know we
said we would talk about dating,
but then I think we both
chickened out. Do you want to
talk about it? I find this aspect of
the world very confusing these
days, and I assume you do, too.”
Dear Amy: “Confused Girl” is a
nurse dating a cop, long
distance. He wants to see her
only once a month. She wants
more.
Although I thought you gave
decent advice, you missed the
obvious: His preferences
indicate that he is probably
married.
Been There
Been There: A definite
possibility.
Amy’s column appears seven days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Write to askamy@amydickinson.com
or Amy Dickinson, Tribune Content
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© 2018 by Amy Dickinson distributed by
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ANNETTE
BENING
TIMOTHÉE
CHALAMET
BASED
E ON THE NOVEL BY
FASHION FROM C1
this film.
In a particular moment of exasperation and frustration, Woodcock laments to his sister about a
horrible little word: chic. Woodcock spits it out with incredible
disdain. The fashion world has
gone in search of “chic,” he says,
and satisfying that obsession has
become his burden. But Woodcock has no interest in chasing
chic and delivering it to his clients, because chic implies that
something has been shaped by a
fleeting moment or an ephemeral
mood. It suggests an aesthetic
that has been culturally vetted
and agreed upon. Woodcock is
aiming for lasting beauty.
And so the clothes that he
creates have a soothing elegance.
VANESSA
REDGRAVE
-Rex Reed, NEW YORK OBSERVER
MICHAEL
STUHLBARG
SCREENPLAY BY
AMIRA
CASAR
DIRECTED BY
ESTHER
GARREL
ANDRÉ ACIMAN JAMES IVORY LUCA GUADAGNINO
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JULIE
WALTERS
The fashion
is beautiful,
but don’t
call it chic
“ONE OF THE YEAR’S
BEST FILMS!”
A FILM BY
LUCA GUADAGNINO
ARMIE
HAMMER
JAMIE
BELL
FOCUS FEATURES
Vicky Krieps stars as Alma in “Phantom Thread,” and Daniel Day-Lewis’s eccentric designer finds her
a disruptive presence. In the film, complicated emotions are conveyed in her clothing.
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They are a lovely resting place for
the eye as the narrative unfolds.
The genesis of each dress is written into the script, Bridges says.
“Instead of a lightbulb going
off and you’re creating something,” he says, “things in the
script dictated what would be
made.”
But a good part of the script
speaks to Woodcock’s inner turmoil, his blossoming love for
Alma (Vicky Krieps), his fear and
anger over her disruptive presence, and other notions that are
felt but not necessarily seen.
Woodcock invests incredible time
and mental energy in creating a
wedding gown for a longtime
client. But in a moment of both
physical and mental pain, he declares what looks to be a perfectly
elegant gown, ugly.
“Things in the script
dictated what would
be made.”
Mark Bridges, costume designer
How do you convey those complicated emotions in a dress? By
making an especially beautiful
gown but one that has subtle
references to a garment that
Alma has worn earlier in the film.
It’s not the dress that he hates but
the way in which Alma has become enmeshed with the most
sacred part of his life — his
professional world.
“We are our own worst critic.
You see that in Reynolds. No one
else is feeling the weight of Alma
in his life,” Bridges says. The
audience looks at that wedding
dress, and “we’re like, ‘You’re crazy, man!’ ”
During an exchange between
Alma and Woodcock while he is
fitting a dress on her, she notes
her dislike of his chosen fabric.
The designer doesn’t flinch. He
simply tells her that she is wrong.
That her taste is wrong and that
she should change her taste. He is
domineering. She is quietly determined to make her point.
“That dress is supposed to be
part of the spring collection, and
you think pastel, silk and cotton
voiles, not black and purple and
cobalt blue,” Bridges says. “She’s
coming in as a young girl with a
fresh eye in this May-December,
May-November relationship.”
The heaviness of the dress reflects the way in which Woodcock
relates to fashion and to life.
There is no lightness and air in
his atelier. It’s oppressively grave.
Alma is right about the dress; she
is also right about his life.
The relationship between
Alma and Woodcock evolves into
a torturous, strange love story.
But it begins as an example of
how a designer leans on a muse.
As Bridges created clothes for the
film, he inhabited the mind of
Woodcock. And what he learned
was that, as a technical matter,
Alma would be “a dream to dress
because of her physical attributes
— the long neck, slim stature,
fairly minimal bosom. She really
has an ideal figure for the period,
for those fashions.”
“She really took to them well,”
Bridges adds, referring in a way to
both the character and the actress who plays her. “Once the
underpinnings are on, she really
takes on this air.”
Which is to say that a muse is
not simply a mannequin. An actress eerily becomes her character. And a dress, chic or not, can
still tell a story.
robin.givhan@washpost.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
Her teen is
pregnant.
Now what?
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn:
I’m literally
shaking as I type
this. My 15-yearold daughter is
pregnant. I can’t
believe it. We had many good
discussions about waiting until
she was ready, using birth
control when she was, but it all
did no good. She’s furious at me
Carolyn
Hax
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
that I told her father! Of course,
I had to tell my ex-husband, but
her stepmother, whom she
doesn’t like, offered to adopt the
baby, so now my daughter is
furious at all of us. She wants to
keep the baby, can you imagine?
I don’t know where to turn.
She’s forbidden me to tell
anyone else, so I’m left crying
alone at night. I want to march
her right down to the nearest
clinic for an abortion, but I can’t
force that. What do I do? I’m
going to be a grandmother at 45.
How can this be real?
— My Daughter Is Pregnant
My Daughter Is Pregnant: It
can be real because stuff just
happens sometimes. Even adult
self-control is imperfect at best.
And immediately after your
own family story gets an
unwelcome new twist, that’s
when it feels the worst. You will
eventually — soon — adjust to
this situation as part of your
reality, because that’s also just
what happens. Whether
something is great or awful or
weird, we eventually process it
and get used to it and absorb it
into our day-to-day lives.
You don’t have the luxury of
waiting for absorption, though,
before you help your daughter.
You must act now. So, since
there’s a “nearest clinic” for you
to “march her right down to,”
that means there’s a clinic you
can call to inquire about their
counseling resources. And when
you learn what they offer, get
both you and your daughter on
the counseling schedule. Your
daughter is 15, she doesn’t get
the last word on what you tell
other people. You need to be
discreet and respectful of her
privacy, yes, but you have license
to share information with
people helping you. So do that.
While this is a serious
situation with significant
potential consequences, there
are three adults on the scene
and you have time to figure out
how to make the best of it. And
your daughter has decided she’s
old enough to take this on, so
you can — judiciously, of course
— start holding her to that. It’s
also a baby, not a terminal
diagnosis. Calm yourself down,
figure out your options, weigh
them carefully and show your
daughter how this parent thing
is done.
DISTRICT
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4:30
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Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:05- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
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Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:35-3:45Landmark West End Cinema 7:05-10:25
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11115 Mall Circle
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(PG-13) CC: 10:15-2:15-5:00Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin 6:15-10:00
IMAX Theater
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
601 Independence Avenue SW
CC: 11:45-1:15-3:45-7:45-10:15
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR) Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:152:40
2:00-4:45-7:30-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
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Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:30-12:453:00-5:15-7:15-9:45
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:10-1:50-4:40-7:20-10:10
The Shape of Water (R) 9:40-12:303:30-6:40-9:30
The Post (PG-13) 10:40-1:30-4:507:40-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:30-1:204:10-7:10-10:00
Molly's Game (R) 9:30-12:40-3:506:50-9:50
I, Tonya (R) 10:50-1:40-4:30-7:3010:20
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Ferdinand (PG) 12:20-3:10-6:009:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:45-3:35-6:25-9:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:05-1:50-3:40-7:00-8:50-10:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:30-3:206:00-8:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:15-1:15-3:10-4:15-5:107:10-9:15
Coco (PG) 11:05AM
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:05-11:45-12:40-1:45-2:353:15-4:25-5:25-6:10-7:25-8:159:00-10:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:55-1:40-4:207:00-9:40
The Shape of Water (R) 11:00-2:155:35-8:55
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Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:25-2:255:40-8:40
Molly's Game (R) 12:05-3:256:35-10:00
Proud Mary (R) 11:30-1:10-2:003:45-4:30-6:15-7:00-8:45-9:30
All the Money in the World (R)
10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:55-6:20
The Post (PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:407:30-10:20
I, Tonya (R) 11:35-2:30-5:30-8:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) 2:10-8:10
Along With the Gods: The Two
Worlds 12:10-3:30-6:50-10:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:15-5:10
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
11:15-3:00-6:40-10:25
Ang Panday (2017)11:40-3:106:30-9:45
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(PG-13) 5:20
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Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:15-4:157:15-10:30
Molly's Game (R) 11:45-3:006:15-9:30
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 Proud Mary (R) 12:00-2:15-4:307:00-9:15
1591 West Nursery Road
All the Money in the World (R)
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 12:30
12:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:301:20-4:05-6:35-9:05
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Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) I, Tonya (R) 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30
CC: 12:30-4:00-7:00-10:00
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 2:45- 3:30-7:00-10:30
5:05-7:25-9:45
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Stadium 14
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-1:30-3:15-4:156505 America Blvd.
6:15-7:15-9:00-10:15
Ferdinand (PG) 11:45-2:30-5:10Coco (PG) CC: 12:30
7:50
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 1:45-3:00-4:25-5:25-7:00-8:00- The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:30-3:15-5:50-8:25-11:00
9:30-10:30
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:15-4:10- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:30-3:50-7:15-10:30-10:45
6:45-9:15
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 1:50- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:30-2:10-3:30-5:00-6:304:40-7:20-9:50
8:00-9:30-11:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:10Coco (PG) 11:00-1:35-4:15
4:00-6:50-9:40
Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:50-4:00- Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:45-2:20-5:00-7:45-10:20
7:05-10:10
Wonder (PG) 6:55-9:45
Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:45-1:45Paddington 2 (PG) 11:15-2:00-4:453:15-4:30-5:30-6:50-7:50-9:207:30-10:15
10:20
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:30- The Commuter (PG-13) 11:15-2:004:35-7:15-10:15
6:30-9:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:45-3:45Landmark
6:45-9:45
Bethesda Row Cinema
Molly's Game (R) 1:00-4:15-7:307235 Woodmont Avenue
10:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:30- Proud Mary (R) 11:30-1:45-4:001:30-4:20-7:20-10:00
6:15-8:30-10:45
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:00-10:50- All
the Money in the World (R)
1:00-1:40-3:50-4:30-6:50-7:3011:15AM
9:40-10:05
Three
Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
Missouri (R) 11:00-1:45-4:3010:20-1:20-4:10-6:55-9:50
7:30-10:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:25-12:50The Post (PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:003:20-5:40-7:50-9:55
8:00-10:50
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:00Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
12:50-3:40-7:00-9:50
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:201:10-4:00-7:10-9:50
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 11:00-1:40-4:20-7:05-10:10
Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:40- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7:25-10:00
11:30-2:55-6:30-10:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:10-3:30Old Greenbelt Theatre
6:15-9:00
129 Centerway
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Post (PG-13) 5:30-8:00
(PG-13) 12:00-3:35-6:35-9:35
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
3899 Branch Avenue
11:20-2:00-4:50-7:30-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Paddington 2 (PG) 10:55-1:35-4:157:00-9:45
(PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:25-8:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:10-1:50Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
5:10-8:00-10:45
1:10-3:40-5:55-8:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:05-2:10Paddington 2 (PG) 12:30-3:004:35-7:45-10:40
5:30-8:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:55-2:35- Molly's Game (R) 12:40-3:507:15-10:30
5:05-7:35
Proud Mary (R) 12:00-1:00-2:30- Proud Mary (R) 12:25-3:00-5:308:10-10:35
3:30-5:00-6:00-7:30-8:30
The Post (PG-13) 12:15-3:20Regal Bowie Stadium 14
6:55-9:50
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
Ferdinand (PG) 12:55-3:35-6:15
12:45-4:30-8:20
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
12:15-3:00-6:00-9:10
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:10-3:30-6:55-10:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:45-3:10- 10:45-2:15-4:45-8:15-10:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
5:45-8:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 10:45-1:15-4:45-7:15-10:45
(PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:00-10:25 Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:15-1:304:00-7:00-9:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
12:20-3:20-6:20-9:20
(PG-13) 11:00-1:45-5:00-8:00-10:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 2:00-4:40Coco (PG) 10:45AM
7:20-9:55
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:15-4:00- Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:45-2:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
6:40-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:40-3:50- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:15-3:456:45-9:45
6:50-9:50
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30-2:00Molly's Game (R) 12:30-3:454:30-7:15-9:45
7:00-10:15
Proud Mary (R) 12:05-1:25-2:40- The Shape of Water (R) 1:15-4:157:30-10:30
3:55-5:10-6:25-7:40-8:55-10:10
Molly's Game (R) 12:00-3:30All the Money in the World (R)
6:45-10:15
4:10-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 1:30-4:30-7:30- Proud Mary (R) 10:45-1:15-3:306:00-8:15-10:45
10:30
The Greatest Showman Sing-A- The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:00-5:007:45-10:30
Long (PG) 1:00-7:30
I, Tonya (R) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:30Stadium 20 & IMAX
7:30-10:00
900 Ellsworth Drive
Regal Waugh Chapel
Ferdinand (PG) 12:10-3:35-6:20
Stadium 12 & IMAX
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:10-2:501419 South Main Chapel Way
5:30-8:15-10:50
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Justice League (PG-13) 9:20
12:30-3:20-6:30-9:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:20-3:25-6:15-9:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 11:45-3:15-6:45-10:15
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:35-2:0012:00-4:00-6:05-7:30-9:45-11:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:00-3:00- 5:10-7:35-9:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
5:40-8:15-10:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG-13) 11:10-2:00-4:50-7:40-10:35
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
(PG-13) 1:15-4:05-6:00-7:0011:50-2:40-5:30-8:15-10:55
9:00-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:20Coco (PG) 11:05-12:20-3:15
7:00-9:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:10-2:4512:15-2:50-5:45-8:25-11:00
5:20-7:55-10:30
Wonder (PG) 11:40-2:25
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:20-1:55-4:30- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:25-3:306:50-9:50
7:25-10:10
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30-2:15- Proud Mary (R) 12:00-2:30-5:208:00-10:20
4:50-7:50-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:00-3:30- The Post (PG-13) 12:20-3:407:10-10:15
6:25-9:35
Call Me by Your Name (R) 11:55- I, Tonya (R) 11:10-2:30-4:30-7:303:05-6:15-9:25
10:20
Molly's Game (R) 11:50-3:10The Commuter: The IMAX 2D
6:30-9:50
Experience (PG-13) 11:30-2:10Proud Mary (R) 12:05-2:35-5:15- 4:40-7:10-10:00
7:45-10:10
Regal Westview
All the Money in the World (R)
Stadium 16 & IMAX
11:45AM
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Condorito: The Movie (Condorito:
La película) (PG) 11:00-2:10-4:35- Ferdinand (PG) 10:00-12:303:15-6:00
6:55-9:15
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-1:30-4:30- The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:15-1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
7:25-10:45
I, Tonya (R) 12:25-3:45-6:40-9:45 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) 11:00-2:30-6:00-9:00-9:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:30-1:152:50-6:45-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3:45-6:15-9:00
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:00-1:00-2:30-4:00-5:3011:10-2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
7:00-8:15-10:00-11:15
Regal Germantown Stadium 14 Coco (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:45
20000 Century Boulevard
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
10:45-1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Ferdinand (PG) 12:45-3:45
Wonder (PG) 6:30-9:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-2:15-5:0012:15-3:00-5:45-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 7:45-10:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:15-2:0012:30-4:00-7:30-11:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:15-2:45- 4:45-7:30-10:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:45-1:455:15-7:45-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 4:45-7:45-10:45
(PG-13) 11:00-2:00-5:00-6:45-8:00- The Shape of Water (R) 11:00-2:005:00-8:00-11:00
9:45-11:00
Molly's Game (R) 12:00-3:15Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
6:30-9:45
11:30-2:15-5:00-8:00-10:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:15-2:00-4:45- Proud Mary (R) 11:30-2:15-5:007:30-10:15
7:45-10:30
15 Years Later: Excellent, thank
you.
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
chooses to keep the baby, your
best-case scenario for 10 years
from now is a happy, healthy,
hilarious 9-year-old grandchild
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Dream Big: Engineering Our World: The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:45An IMAX 3D Experience 12:25
12:30-3:15-6:00-9:45
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25AMC Magic Johnson
11:50-2:05-3:30
Capital Ctr 12
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
800 Shoppers Way
2D Experience (PG-13) 4:10-9:55
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 1:00-3:40-6:20
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:35-2:50-6:10-9:05
8633 Colesville Road
The Shape of Water (R) 2:15-7:05 Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:20Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 1:45-4:10-6:25-8:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Missouri (R) 4:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-1:50-4:10- CC: 10:40-1:10-3:45-6:30-9:25
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:35-1:156:45-9:10
3:45-6:30-9:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:15-9:30
Phantom Thread 70mm (R) 2:30- The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 10:451:30-4:15-6:45-9:15
5:10-7:45
Downsizing (R) CC: 9:10
King: A Filmed Record From
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:25AM
Montgomery to Memphis (NR)
All the Money in the World (R)
11:00AM
CC: 5:05
AMC Academy 8
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:30-12:306198 Greenbelt Road
1:45-2:45-4:00-5:00-6:15-7:15Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:50-1:258:30-9:30
4:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:30-12:30Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 3:15-6:00-9:00
CC: 12:35-3:55-7:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 1:20- The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
3:45-6:10-8:25
12:15-3:00-6:00-9:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:10-1:55-4:50-7:45 (PG-13) 2:15-8:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
ArcLight Bethesda
CC: (!) 10:45-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:30The Disaster Artist (R) 9:40
2:00-4:30-7:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:30-2:40-5:05-7:05-10:20
10:45-12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:30
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:00-1:15- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:25-1:05-4:15-7:30-10:40
3:35-5:50-7:00-8:00-9:15
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:25-2:40AMC Center Park 8
4:50-7:00-10:50
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: (PG-13) 10:25-1:55-4:35-7:20-10:00
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
Coco (PG) 11:20-3:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 11:30-2:50-6:30-10:00
11:00-2:55-5:50-8:10-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:35-2:15(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:455:00-7:45-10:30
7:30-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) 11:45-2:35Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
5:20-8:05-10:15
CC: (!) 12:15-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30 Molly's Game (R) 11:10-2:10-5:10Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 1:008:15-10:35
3:30-6:00-8:45
All the Money in the World (R)
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
1:50-4:05-7:10-9:25
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:45-2:00- Missouri (R) 12:10-5:25
4:30-7:00-9:30
The Post (PG-13) 11:55-2:30-5:15The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:307:00-8:00-10:10
3:15-6:15-9:00
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:30AMC Columbia 14
1:25-4:20-7:15
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Ferdinand (PG) 1:40
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Paddington 2 (PG) 12:35-9:10
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:50-2:2010:40-1:20-4:00-6:50-9:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 4:40-7:35-10:05
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:20-1:1011:10-6:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- 4:45-7:55
I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:5513) 2:40-9:45
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:30- 7:40-9:55
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 9:00
2:00-4:30-7:05-9:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Paddington 2 (PG) 11:05-1:304:00-6:30
(PG-13) CC: 12:00-6:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
CC: 10:50-1:40-4:20-7:20-9:55
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:30-1:30- Father Figures (R) 11:00
4:25-7:00-10:00
Ferdinand
10:00-12:40-3:25
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:00-1:40- Star Wars: (PG)
The Last Jedi (PG-13)
4:15-6:55-9:35
The Commuter (PG-13) (!) 10:50- 2:30-6:00-9:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:10-1:501:30-4:10-7:00-9:50
4:40-7:20-9:50
The Shape of Water (R) 3:00Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
6:05-9:00
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:25-2:50- (PG-13) 11:00-2:00-4:50-7:50-10:45
Coco (PG) 11:20AM
6:20-9:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Marshall (PG-13) 11:50AM
10:20-12:50-3:20-5:45-8:10-10:35
All the Money in the World (R)
Wonder (PG) 10:30-1:20-4:05
CC: 3:00
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:30-1:50- Paddington 2 (PG) 10:10-1:20-4:006:40-9:20
4:20-6:50-9:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30-2:205:10-6:50-8:00-9:40-10:40
3D (PG-13) 9:15
Proud Mary (R) 10:40-1:00-3:10The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:105:30-7:40-10:00
1:55-4:40-7:30-10:20
I, Tonya (R) 10:45-1:40-4:35-7:30- All the Money in the World (R)
10:50-1:55-5:00-8:00
10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Lady Bird (R) 6:00-8:20-10:40
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
10:30-1:20-4:20-7:15-10:10
whom you love and adore, and a
good relationship with your
daughter, who will be gracious
enough to understand why you
were in a panic and cut you
some slack . . . but who will also
never exactly forget how you
acted when she came to you
with the toughest thing in her
young life. This is not to say you
have to do whatever she wants
or that you can’t have feelings;
it’s just to say: Think carefully
before you speak and act. Make
sure that’s really what you want
to say and do.
— 15 Years Later
Re: Daughter: If your daughter
MOVIE DIRECTORY
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
C5
RE
All the Money in the World (R)
10:30AM
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:15-5:158:15-11:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Dr
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:05-12:40-3:20-6:00-8:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:15-2:50-6:30-9:50
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:45-1:103:50-6:15-8:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:10-1:00-4:00-7:15-10:10
Coco (PG) 10:00-12:50-3:30-6:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
10:15-12:40-3:10-5:45-8:15-10:40
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:30-1:20-4:157:00-9:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:0012:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:30-2:306:00-9:00
The Shape of Water (R) 10:50-1:504:50-7:45-10:35
Molly's Game (R) 10:40-12:353:40-6:45-10:00
Proud Mary (R) 10:05-12:20-2:405:15-8:00-10:20
The Post (PG-13) 10:20-1:30-4:307:30-10:15
I, Tonya (R) 10:00-1:40-4:40-7:4010:30
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile
(NR) 9:15
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 9:55-12:553:40
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:05-12:40-3:20-6:00-8:40
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 10:451:15-3:45-6:50-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:10-5:00-8:00
Paddington 2 (PG) Open Caption;
CC: (!) 10:40-12:30-1:10-3:50-5:406:40-9:10
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 9:5012:20-2:50-5:20-7:50-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:1012:50-3:30-6:30-9:20
Molly's Game (R) CC: (!) 9:45-1:004:15-7:30-11:00
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 9:40-12:102:40-5:10-7:40-10:10-10:50
All the Money in the World (R) CC:
(!) 10:30AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:00-2:20-7:20-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:45-7:45-10:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:10-1:504:20-6:10-9:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:00-3:10-8:10-10:40
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:004:30-6:20-7:00-8:50-9:30
iPic Pike & Rose
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Ang Panday (2017)1:15-4:257:25-10:20
The Greatest Showman Sing-ALong (PG) 11:35-6:50
Proud Mary (R) 10:00-12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:15
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:15-1:50
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:40-2:15-4:50-7:40-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:20-2:50-6:10-7:10-9:4010:40
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 2:104:35; 11:00-7:35-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:50-4:50-7:40-9:50
Coco (PG) CC: 11:15-1:55
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 11:50-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:35-2:20-5:10
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:00-1:454:30-7:15-9:50
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 10:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:304:25-7:25-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 2:155:10-8:00-10:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:50-3:006:20-9:25
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:00AM
All the Money in the World (R)
CC: 4:35
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:30-2:004:20-6:45-9:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 8:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:10-2:004:45-7:45-10:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:50-4:35
I, Tonya (R) 11:15-1:20-4:10-7:0010:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
11:45-2:50-5:40-8:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:00-1:454:30-7:15-10:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 7:00
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-4:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: 1:00-7:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:451:45-4:45-7:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:151:15-4:15-7:00
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:00-1:004:00-7:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:15-1:154:15-7:15
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:301:30-4:30-7:30
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:35-1:104:00-7:00
Ferdinand (PG) 12:15-3:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 11:10-1:50-4:45-7:25-10:00
11:00-3:00-6:45-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle CC: 11:35-2:55-6:25-9:50
(PG-13) 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:10
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 10:25Paddington 2 (PG) (!) 11:30-2:45- 12:45-3:25-5:50-8:10-10:40
6:15-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Commuter (PG-13) (!) 1:15(PG-13) CC: 9:40
4:30-7:45-10:40
Coco (PG) CC: 10:45-1:40-4:30-7:05
Molly's Game (R) 11:45-3:45Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
7:30-11:00
CC: (!) 12:50-3:20-5:55-8:25-10:55
Proud Mary (R) (!) 11:15-2:00-5:00- Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:008:00-10:50
1:35-4:15-6:55-9:30
The Post (PG-13) (!) 12:45-4:00The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
6:30-7:15-9:45-10:20
11:15-1:55-4:40-7:30-10:05
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:101:05-4:05-7:15-10:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:15-1:30AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
4:35-7:45-10:50
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:05AM
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:20-12:5510:45-1:15-5:00-7:30-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 3:15-5:35-8:00-10:25
All the Money in the World (R)
CC: 10:30-1:45-3:45-7:00-10:45
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:00- CC: 9:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:30-12:001:30-4:15-6:45-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 1:15-2:45-4:10-5:30-7:10-8:159:55-11:00
(PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:15-5:00I, Tonya (R) (!) 10:00-1:00-4:207:45-10:30
7:35-10:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
CC: 10:30-1:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:15-2:30- 2D Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:255:00-8:30
3:45-6:45-10:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:30- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:50-2:00-4:50-7:55-10:45
7:15-10:15
I, Tonya (R) 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00AMC Worldgate 9
10:45
13025 Worldgate Drive
The Post (PG-13) 11:00AM
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:00-12:30-3:10-6:00-9:00
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
CC: 11:30-3:00-6:20-9:50
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:20-1:55Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
4:40
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 10:20 (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:50-4:45Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:25 7:35-10:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 10:25 Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: CC: 12:00-2:40-5:15-7:45-10:30
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 10:3010:10-12:45-3:20-6:05-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 1:20-4:00-6:40-9:20
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:40-2:50CC: 11:10-12:00-3:30-5:30-7:006:10-9:25
10:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:05- Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:40-1:003:20-5:40-7:55-10:10
1:25-3:45-6:30-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:50(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:30-2:30-4:15- 1:40-4:30-7:20-10:15
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
7:30-9:00-10:15
(!) 12:05-3:30-7:05-10:30
Coco (PG) CC: 10:50-1:35
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema CC: 11:10-1:45-2:20-4:15-5:15-6:45One Loudoun
7:45-9:30-10:15
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:50-3:40
To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:15-1:15- (NR) 3:00
4:00-6:45-9:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 10:45- 11:40-3:20-7:00-10:40
1:30-4:00-7:15-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:20- 10:35-1:40-4:45-8:30-11:20
1:10-4:05-6:55-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:20- (PG-13) 12:00-3:35-6:20-9:25-10:45
4:20-7:20-10:10
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:50-2:00-5:10Downsizing (R) CC: 4:10-7:10
8:15-11:05
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:40-3:00- Molly's Game (R) 12:20-3:506:20-9:40
7:25-10:50
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:25AM
The Commuter (PG-13) 8:40-11:40
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:30-2:00I, Tonya (R) 11:10-2:20-5:30-8:004:30-7:00-9:30
11:20
All the Money in the World (R)
The Post (PG-13) 10:15-1:20-4:25CC: 7:25
7:40-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, The Greatest Showman Sing-AMissouri (R) CC: 6:20-9:05
Long (PG) 12:30-6:40
Condorito: The Movie (Condorito:
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
La película) (PG) CC: 11:05-1:202911 District Ave
3:40-6:00-8:20-10:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:15- Downsizing (R) 2:00
Phantom Thread (R) (!) 11:00-1:005:00-7:45-10:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:00-2:05-4:25 4:00-5:00-7:00-10:00
I, Tonya (R) 11:25-2:10-4:55-7:40- Blade Runner: The Final Cut
10:25
(R) 7:00
VIRGINIA
Call Me by Your Name (R) 11:152:15-5:15-8:15-10:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:15-1:003:55-6:45-9:35
All the Money in the World (R)
10:35
The Shape of Water (R) 10:45-1:304:35-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:10-8:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:25-12:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-1:15-4:30-7:45-10:55
I, Tonya (R) 11:15-2:00-4:50-7:3010:30
Bow Tie
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:10-2:30-5:10-8:10-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:20-2:00-6:00-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:20-3:10-6:00-9:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:20-2:10-4:507:30-10:10
The Shape of Water (R) 10:505:00-8:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:40-11:00
The Post (PG-13) 10:40-12:00-1:303:00-4:40-6:10-7:50-9:10-10:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:00-1:504:20-7:00-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:10-1:004:00-6:50-9:40
Molly's Game (R) 10:00-1:10-4:307:40-10:50
I, Tonya (R) 11:30-2:20-5:20-8:2011:10
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
9:55-12:10-2:25-4:40-7:00-9:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:4012:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:001:00-4:00-7:10-9:35
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:10-1:154:15-7:20-10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:15-2:405:10-7:50-10:05
The Post (PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:052:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:35-2:10-4:45-7:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:50-2:205:00-7:30
Proud Mary (R) 12:15-2:45-5:157:55
All the Money in the World (R)
CC: 7:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:25-2:05-4:50-7:45
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:10-2:405:10-7:40
The Post (PG-13) 11:20-2:004:40-7:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-3:20-7:00
Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:454:00-7:05
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Monday, January 15, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:307:15-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:10-2:556:15-9:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:00-1:354:10-6:45-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) 7:30-10:25
Call Me by Your Name (R) 12:253:50-7:35-10:40
Proud Mary (R) 12:30-3:15-6:008:30-10:55
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:05-5:007:45-10:35
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile
(NR) 9:50
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:45-3:20-5:50-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:40-3:00-6:20-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:50-3:40-6:30-9:40
Coco (PG) 11:45-4:45-9:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:10-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
Wonder (PG) 12:35-3:25-6:05
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:00-4:107:00-9:55
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:50-2:30-5:107:45-10:15
Tiger Zinda Hai (NR) 12:30-4:358:15
The Shape of Water (R) 11:40-2:355:30-8:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:05-4:00-6:45-9:35
Lady Bird (R) 12:20-2:40-5:007:30-9:50
Proud Mary (R) 12:40-2:50-5:057:20-9:30
Sketch (Tamil) (NR) 12:05-3:306:50-10:10
The Post (PG-13) 12:55-3:356:15-9:25
Thaanaa Serndha Koottam (Tamil)
(NR) 3:10-9:20
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
11:55-3:15-6:35-10:05
The Brawler (Mukkabaaz) (NR)
12:25-3:55-7:05-10:20
Jai Simha (Jaisimha) (NR) 11:453:05-6:25-9:45
Okka Kshanam (NR) 9:15
Parchi (NR) 12:00-2:55-5:45-9:00
The Greatest Showman Sing-ALong (PG) 2:15-7:15
Thaanaa Serndha Koottam (Tamil)
(NR) 12:15-6:00
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
21100 Dulles Town Circle
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:15-2:455:20-7:50-10:30
Molly's Game (R) 1:25-2:556:20-9:30
All the Money in the World (R)
12:20
Proud Mary (R) 12:55-3:05-5:458:00-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:2010:05
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
12:50-3:25-6:30-9:50
Parchi (NR) 4:10-7:15-10:15
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:50-2:30-5:00-7:40-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:30-4:00-7:30-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:50-2:20-5:10-8:00-10:50
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:45-3:10-5:40-8:15-10:45
Wonder (PG) 11:50-3:45-6:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:20-4:107:00-9:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:40-3:155:50-8:30-11:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:00-2:506:15-9:10
Molly's Game (R) 12:15-3:206:30-9:50
Proud Mary (R) 12:20-2:40-5:207:45-10:10
All the Money in the World (R) 9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:00-3:50-6:45-9:40
The Post (PG-13) 1:10-4:20-7:1010:00
The Commuter: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:50-4:307:15-9:45
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
12:10-3:30-6:50-10:15
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Ferdinand (PG) 11:00-1:30-4:05-6:40
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:15-2:05-4:45-7:35-10:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:20-3:00-6:30-9:35-9:55
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:50-2:154:35-7:20-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:05-12:30-2:00-3:204:55-6:15-7:45-9:10-10:30
Coco (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:25-7:05
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 12:10-3:05-6:00-8:55
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:45-2:20-5:05-7:50-9:20-10:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:207:00-9:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30-2:105:00-7:30-10:20
Molly's Game (R) 11:35-2:556:10-9:25
Proud Mary (R) 11:00-12:00-1:152:25-3:35-4:50-5:55-7:15-8:159:50-10:30
All the Money in the World (R)
3:40-9:15
The Post (PG-13) 11:10-1:55-4:407:40-10:30
The Greatest Showman Sing-ALong (PG) 1:00-6:35
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:40-3:30-6:15-8:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-6:45-10:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:00-2:155:45-8:15-10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:15-3:45-6:30-9:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:00-4:307:00-9:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:30-4:157:15-9:45
Molly's Game (R) 12:50-2:456:00-9:15
Proud Mary (R) 11:50-3:15-5:30Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
7:45-10:15
6500 Springfield Town Ctr
Manassas 4 Cinemas
The Post (PG-13) 12:20-3:00-4:45- The Greatest Showman (PG)
8890 Mathis Ave.
7:30-10:30
11:35-2:10-5:20-8:00-10:40
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
1:45-4:00-6:10
11:20-2:40-6:10-9:45
4110 West Ox Road
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:30-2:30(PG-13) 1:50-4:10-6:30-8:50
The Greatest Showman (PG)
5:10-7:50-10:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:45-4:00-6:10 12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
The Post (PG-13) 1:50-4:10-6:30 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 12:00-1:00-3:25-6:50-10:15
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:05-2:30- Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
6201 Multiplex Drive
11:15-2:00-4:40-7:40-10:20
4:55-7:20-9:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:20Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:05-2:35-5:05-7:35-10:40
7:00-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 12:15-2:50-5:30-8:15-10:50
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:10-1:50Paddington
2
(PG)
12:05-2:45-5:2510:05-1:15-4:25-7:50-11:00
4:30-7:10-10:00
8:05-10:40
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:15Proud Mary (R) 12:55-3:15-5:35- The Shape of Water (R) 12:2012:35-2:55-5:20-8:00-10:25
3:20-9:20
7:55-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Molly's Game (R) 12:10-3:40All the Money in the World (R)
(PG-13) 10:35-4:15-7:20-10:15
6:50-10:15
12:20
Coco (PG) 10:00-12:55-3:50The Post (PG-13) 12:00-3:00The Post (PG-13) 12:45-3:506:45-9:45
6:00-9:00
6:40-9:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
I, Tonya (R) 11:50-2:50-5:50-9:10
I,
Tonya
(R)
12:40-3:40-6:30-9:30
11:40-2:10-4:40-7:15-9:50
The
Shape of Water (R) 6:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:50-1:45- Along With the Gods: The Two
Proud Mary (R) 11:40-2:20-4:50Worlds 3:35-7:05-10:15
5:15-8:05-10:55
7:20-9:50
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-2:00-4:30- 1987: When the Day Comes (NR)
Regal Virginia Gateway
4:25-7:30-10:30
7:00-9:30
Stadium 14 & RPX
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:55-2:25- Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
22875 Brambleton Plaza
4:55-7:30-10:00
Ferdinand
(PG) 10:50-1:20-3:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Ferdinand (PG) 12:45-3:15-5:45The Greatest Showman (PG)
3D (PG-13) 1:30
8:15
11:30-2:40-5:35-8:30-10:55
Proud Mary (R) 10:00-12:15-2:30- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
4:45-7:05-9:20
12:00-3:30-5:30-7:00-9:00-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 11:25-2:15-5:00- The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:30- 10:35-1:50-5:15-8:45
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:55-1:157:45-10:30
4:15-6:45-9:30
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 1:15-3:30- 3:45-6:45-9:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
11:50-3:20-6:50-10:10
6:00-8:15-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:15
Rave Cinemas
Coco (PG) 11:10-2:10-5:10
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme (PG-13) 1:30-3:00-4:30-5:45-7:15Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
8:30-10:00
11900 Palace Way
11:20-1:55-4:35-7:25-10:05
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:35-9:55 Coco (PG) 12:15-2:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:40-1:35Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Greatest Showman (PG)
4:40-7:45-10:40
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:15
11:25-2:05-4:40-7:25-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) 8:00-10:50
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:20-1:40- Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:00- The Commuter (PG-13) 10:307:30-10:00
4:20-7:20-10:10
12:55-3:25-6:00-9:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Commuter (PG-13) 12:30-3:00- Molly's Game (R) 11:30-2:50(PG-13) 10:40-1:25-4:15-7:05-10:05 5:30-8:00-10:30
6:15-9:30
Darkest
Hour
(PG-13)
12:15-3:15Coco (PG) 10:55-4:35-7:10
Proud Mary (R) 11:50-2:20-4:25The Shape of Water (R) 11:30-2:20- 6:15-9:15
7:00-9:35
Molly's
Game
(R)
12:45-4:005:05-7:55-10:50
The Post (PG-13) 11:05-1:40-4:207:15-10:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
7:35-10:20
Proud Mary (R) 12:30-2:45-5:15- Jumanji:
11:15-1:45-4:25-7:15-10:15
Welcome to the Jungle
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:50-1:30- 7:45-10:00
(PG-13)
12:05-2:45-5:30-6:30All the Money in the World (R)
4:10-7:30-10:00
8:15-9:15
12:00
Molly's Game (R) 10:45-1:50-4:55Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:00The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:008:00-11:00
7:30-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:05-2:00- 6:45-9:30
Smithsonian - Airbus
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
4:50-7:40-10:25
IMAX Theater
The Post (PG-13) 11:00-1:55-4:45- 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
14390
Air and Space Museum Pkwy
Jumanji:
Welcome
to
the
Jungle
7:35-10:30
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
Lady Bird (R) 11:40-2:10-4:301:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
11:10AM
7:45-10:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Regal Kingstowne
3D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
(PG-13) XD: 11:35-2:15-5:00Stadium 16 & RPX
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
7:50-10:45
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) Ferdinand (PG) 1:30-6:40
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
11:10-2:40-6:10-9:40
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
The Post (PG-13) XD: 11:45-2:35- 12:40-3:30-6:05-9:20
IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
5:25-8:10-10:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) An
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Regal Ballston Common
12:25-3:45-7:05-9:15-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
Stadium 12
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 1:10-3:35- 2D Experience (PG-13) 4:10-9:55
671 N. Glebe Road
5:50-8:15-10:30
University Mall Theatre
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10659 Braddock Road
(PG-13) 1:30-4:35-6:00-7:35-9:0011:05-1:40-4:15-6:50-9:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 1:00Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 10:20; 12:45-4:05-7:00-9:45
Coco (PG) 12:30-4:00
4:00-7:00-9:35
12:00-3:25-7:00-10:20
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:20-2:10-5:05-8:00-10:50 12:15-2:45-4:45-7:30-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:20- (PG-13) CC: 7:15-9:40
Coco (PG) 11:30-2:00-4:40
7:55-10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:05-2:40Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:25-3:20- 4:55-7:30
11:40-2:30-5:15-8:15-11:00
Wonder (PG) 12:15-3:30-6:30
6:15-9:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 9:50
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
E-W VULNERABLE
NORTH
Q6
K86
KQ95
A 10 4 3
WEST
KJ843
92
762
Q72
EAST
A 10 9 7 2
QJ754
84
5
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
5
A 10 3
A J 10 3
KJ986
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass
2 NT
3
Dbl
Pass
5
All Pass
Opening lead — 4
EAST
Pass
Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
E
ntering the last set of the
Senior Teams final at the
2017 World Championships,
the United States (Jeff
Wolfson-Neil Silverman, Mike
Becker-Allan Graves, Dave
Berkowitz-Alan Sontag) had a
slim lead over Italy. Italy had
just gone down in two poor
slams, else they would have
been well ahead.
With the match still tight,
North-South for Italy got to
five diamonds in today’s
deal, a safe contract even
if declarer lost a club to the
queen. He could pitch a
heart on the fifth club, losing
only a spade and a club.
In the replay, Berkowitz
landed at five clubs, where
picking up the trumps looked
crucial. Declarer ruffed the
second spade, and when
he took the A-K of trumps
next, he was faced with three
losers.
Berkowitz didn’t give up.
He took the A-K of hearts,
then ran the diamonds.
When West refused to ruff,
Berkowitz exited with a
trump. West had to yield
a ruff-sluff, and declarer’s
heart loser went away.
Making five, a tied deal,
and the U.S. went on to win.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
KJ84392
762Q72
The dealer, at your left,
opens one diamond. Your
partner doubles, you bid one
spade and he raises to two
spades. What do you say?
ANSWER: Partner has a
huge hand. He is willing to
undertake an eight-trick contract, and for all he knows,
you have no points and four
poor spades. Since you actually have a good five-card
suit and a useful queen as
well, bid four spades. Partner
may hold A Q 7 2, A 8 6 3, 9
3, A K 6.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | JANUARY 15
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you will want
to use your natural
abilities to head in the
direction you want.
You could be more seriousminded than you realize. If
you are single, the person
you choose to date today
could be a lot different from
the person you choose to be
with three years from now. If
you are attached, the two of
you need to learn to adjust to
each other’s preferences. As
a result, you both will be a lot
happier. A fellow Capricorn
could be demanding.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Take charge of your day. You
might want to clear out some
time for a personal matter.
Opportunities come through
a partner or associate. This
person can deal with a close
friend in both of your lives. Let
others call the shots for now.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Listen to your inner voice for
inspiration. A close friend
could pop in and out of
your day. This person might
decide to share an unusual
perspective on a situation. You
are likely to act on this idea
later in the day.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Deal with a partner directly.
You could feel overwhelmed
by everything that lands on
your plate. The good news is
that you have the energy to
WEINGARTENS & CLARK meet these demands. You
might have difficulty turning a
situation around until you tap
into your imagination.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Your ability to connect with
a loved one and others in
general is highlighted. If a
challenging situation arises,
tap into your imagination to
transform the matter more to
your liking. You also might get
a partner’s agreement.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You might want to head down
a different path. Brainstorm
with someone who knows
you well and with whom you
feel free. What the two of you
come up with might be more
appropriate for you in the
stage of life that you are in.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Whatever comes down your
path forces you to tap into
your dynamic energy. How you
see a personal matter could
change substantially after a
talk with the people involved.
Your imagination carries you
through any problems you
encounter.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You could be frightened by
someone else’s message and
lack of clarity. You like inspiring
ideas, but you need to know
that there is a practical path
to that end. Be willing to
revise your thinking around a
concept that could affect your
home life.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Keep conversations moving
and open. Do not consider
anyone’s comment as being
final. What is happening is
that a process is taking place.
You might adjust your ideas
and feelings several times in a
simple discussion.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You are full of fun. You seem
to be on a more conservative
path than you thought
possible. How you view
a personal matter could
dramatically change as a
result.
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Your imagination carries you
to faraway places. Your more
practical side needs to be
appeased in order to act on a
risky hunch. A friend or loved
one might encourage you to
get past this mindset.
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
A lot is going on behind the
scenes that you are not aware
of. You might not be as clear
as you would like to be on the
details surrounding a financial
matter. A deal that comes your
way really could be too good to
be true.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You have inspired others to
perform to their max. You
could be driven by a long-term
goal. Patience is a virtue, and
you will be more comfortable if
you relax and go with the flow.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
On this day in 2001, Wikipedia launched on the
Internet. The online encyclopedia, where anyone can
edit and contribute, has become one of the most
popular sources of information in the digital age.
The springlike weather you felt last
week will keep the sun out, but it’s
changing back to wintry chills.
Check out the cool robots
that were at last week’s CES
technology convention in
Las Vegas, Nevada.
CLASS OF KIDSPOST
B IRT H D AY S OF TH E W EEK
MONDAY, JANUARY 15
Singer Grace VanderWaal (2004).
Civil rights activist the Reverend Martin
Luther King Jr. (1929).
TUESDAY, JANUARY 16
McGuckin
Composer Lin-Manuel Miranda (1980).
Singer Sade (1959).
Inventor Frank Zamboni (1901).
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17
Stalfort
Burke’s Paige McGuckin (2009).
Centreville’s Amanda Stalfort (2005).
Animator Genndy Tartakovsky (1970).
Boxer Muhammad Ali (1942).
Singer Eartha Kitt (1927).
Actress Betty White (1922).
THURSDAY, JANUARY 18
Actor Karan Brar (1999).
Harpist Joanna Newsom (1982).
Actor/professional wrestler Dave
Bautista (1969).
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19
Murchison
Washington’s Khalil Murchison
(2011).
Actor Logan Lerman (1992).
Singer Dolly Parton (1946).
Poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809).
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20
D. Handy-Recio
M.Handy-Recio
Paley
Washington’s Daniel Handy-Recio and
Marisa Handy-Recio (2012).
Rockville’s Adyn Rose Paley (2008).
Actor Evan Peters (1987).
United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley
(1972).
Drummer Questlove (1971).
Video game designer Will Wright (1960).
SUNDAY, JANUARY 21
Actor Jeremy Shada (1997).
Golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940).
Birthday announcements are for ages 6 to 13 and are
printed on a first-come, first-served basis. They do
not appear online. A parent or legal guardian must give
permission. We need photos at least two months
ahead of publication. We need names (if photos are
not desired) at least two weeks before publication.
Include name, address and birth date (with year of
birth). Fill out the online form at kidspost.com or send
the information to KidsPost, The Washington Post,
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071.
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
1
5
9
13
14
15
16
18
19
20
21
22
26
28
29
30
31
35
36
40
41
43
44
46
48
49
53
54
55
58
59
62
ACROSS
Ear part
Hamper load
Blow in a dojo
Former Twitter
CEO Williams
Actress Sommer of “A Shot
in the Dark”
Pickle juice
NAACP
co-founder
One who lassoes dogies, say
Martini order
Sgt. or cpl.
Military zone
division
Pioneer
suffragist on
some dollar
coins
Hindu
community
Open the faucets onstage, so
to speak
“Who’s Afraid of
Virginia __?”
Rocky peak
Celebratory cry
two days after
hump day
Cry at the
World Cup
“Stuart Little”
author
Prefix with
cycle
Red ink
Singer Peggy
or comic-book
writer Stan
Winner’s
gesture
Warrior on the
court, for short
Given
temporarily
“The Greatest
Show on Earth”
producer/
director
Bolts and ties
the knot?
Ltr. holder
Cleo’s killer
Talks like Daffy
Apiculturist
... and, playfully, what
16-, 22-, 36- or
49-Across is
__ Park,
Colorado
ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL TUNGALAG, 5, ARLINGTON
Boy, do these
kids have
goooooalls!
BY
C HRISTINA B ARRON
MISSY ALDEN AND DAMARYS RIOS’S
FOURTH-GRADE CLASS at Oyster-Adams
Bilingual School in Washington is the
January Class of KidsPost. These 23 students, who spend part of the day learning
in Spanish, often don’t follow the crowd.
But they do share a love of soccer, videos
and travel destinations far, far away.
We will publish a Class of KidsPost
each month of the school year. If you
would like your class considered, ask
your teacher to download our questionnaire at wapo.st/classofkidspost2017,
have students fill it out, and send it,
along with a class picture, to kidspost@
washpost.com. Classes chosen receive a
KidsPost Chesapeake Bay poster, books
and KidsPost pencils.
10
11
12
15
17
21
23
Favorite birthday food: Tradition won in
this category, with pizza in first place, taking six votes. Cake, a close second with
four votes, edged out ice cream and ice
cream cake. The most-surprising response
was fruit.
Do you like to hear from friends by text,
photo, video or postcard? Video rules. It
was the class’s clear favorite with 15 firstplace votes. Text was second with five.
fourth-graders read so broadly that no one
book or author could be called a favorite.
The authors receiving more than one vote
were Jeff Kinney, Rick Riordan, J.K. Rowling and Louis Sachar. Kinney’s “Diary of a
Wimpy Kid,” Rowling’s Harry Potter and
“Wonder” by R.J. Palacio had two votes
apiece for favorite book or book series.
Do you have a pet or pets? Thirteen stu-
dents, or more than half the class, own
no pets (but one would like to). Six kids
have dogs at home, and two have either
fish or a cat.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Favorite singer or musician: The kids had
trouble picking just one name in this category, too. The preferred performers were
almost all pop musicians, with Fifth Harmony, Luis Fonsi, Imagine Dragons and
Taylor Swift getting two votes each. Most
amusing choice: “me.”
Favorite game, sport or hobby: Soccer
had a runaway victory here, with eight
votes. Video games and basketball claimed
four votes each for a distant second place.
In this photo from 1967,
above, the Reverend
Martin Luther King Jr.
speaks about racism in
Berkeley, California. The
civil rights activist won
five votes for the mostadmired person from the
fourth-graders in Ms.
Alden’s and Ms. Rios’s
class.
Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. as their
most-admired person (perfectly timed for
MLK Day). Young activist Malala Yousafzai,
George Washington, “my sister,” and “Mom
and Dad” had two votes each.
Favorite website or app: Several kids had
no favorite. Of those sites mentioned,
YouTube and Musical.ly edged out Clash
Royale and Roblox.
If you could go on a trip anywhere, where
would you go? Long plane trips don’t
bother these students. Australia received
three votes, and Spain, France, Canada and
Texas each got two. One student would like
Person, living or dead, you admire most:
Five students picked civil rights leader the
What do you want to be when you grow
up? Doctor and soccer player were the
top careers mentioned, with four votes
each. Singer earned three votes, and engineer, two. Other interesting professions included pizza chef, economist,
journalist and someone who helps dolphins.
What would you invent to help others?
Three kids aimed to create a machine that
makes any food they wanted. Two aimed
to invent a device that would stop disease.
The funniest idea probably could be put to
use immediately by these young athletes:
“automatic expanding soccer goals.”
kidspost@washpost.com
By John Lampkin
63 Ultimatum close
64 Marathon
segment
65 Top of the line
66 Bound with
rope
67 “This could
get __”
6
7
8
9
to go to the final frontier: space.
Favorite author and favorite book: These
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
1
2
3
4
5
OYSTER-ADAMS BILINGUAL SCHOOL
DOWN
Bawdy
(See other side)
Bootees
Close or complete
Selfie video
device
Crazy as __
Enjoy the slopes
Guys
Make bootees,
perhaps
Aware of
Situation before
a two-run
homer
Actor Luke or
Matthew
Quarterback
Favre
Hazardous
Bull’s sound
Clickable
address
1/15/18
24 Start of a party
invitation
phrase
25 Mine, to Marcel
26 GI gone missing
27 Piano recital
piece, e.g.
32 Recipe tester,
facetiously
33 “Picnic”
playwright
34 Discovery
37
38
39
42
45
47
48
49
50
Says too much
Lawn intruder
Develop slowly
Bit, as of news
Cantina
condiment
“God __
America”
Like chain rings
Hollywood VIP
Beethoven
dedicatee
51 Expenses
52 1980s attorney
general Edwin
56 Wall Street
bear’s
suggestion
57 Mice, to owls
59 One placed in
Vegas
60 Yale alum
61 Grounded
Aussie bird
SATURDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
The period instrument ensemble Europa Galante performs Friday at the Library of Congress. Fabio
Biondi’s group — nine strings plus lute and harpsichord — uncovered the drama of Vivaldi’s concertos.
MUSIC REVIEW
Europa Galante scores with Vivaldi
BY
T OM H UIZENGA
As it turns out, the popular
composer of “The Four Seasons”
wasn’t so popular near the end of
his life when he moved from his
native Venice to Vienna. It’s a
thread that connects much of the
music that violinist Fabio Biondi
and his period instrument group
Europa Galante performed in a
Vivaldi-centric program Friday at
the Library of Congress.
It seems that Vivaldi, in 1740,
harbored a dream wherein Emperor Charles VI might subsidize
his operas in Vienna. But any
hope was shattered when the
emperor died in October, shortly
after Vivaldi arrived. Without a
royal safety net, Vivaldi went
broke. He sold concertos for peanuts and died a pauper the following summer.
Among the concertos he sold
were those for Violin in C Major
(RV 189) and B-flat Major (RV
371), both given exuberant performances by Biondi and his orchestra of nine strings plus lute
and harpsichord. These concertos, with their propulsive energy
and opportunities for virtuosic
display, were cut from similar
cloth as the additional Vivaldi
concertos on the program, those
in D (RV 222) and A minor for two
violins (RV 522), music that inspired Bach to make a transcription.
Although one could carp about
the sameness of the concertos,
Biondi and his band uncovered
the music’s drama, occasional
quirks and surprising juxtapositions. The ensemble moved instantly from a whisper to voluminous warmth, deploying myriad
colors. Biondi, playing the Library’s 1730 Guarneri del Gesu
once owned by Fritz Kreisler,
soloed expressively, if not always
pitch perfectly.
Along with a Vivaldi Sinfonia
(RV 149) and a sparkling overture
by Baldassare Galuppi, Biondi
offered music by two Viennese
composers from a generation later. Ignaz Holzbauer’s Flute Concerto in D, with fluent, buttery
soloing by Marcello Gatti, fell
pleasantly on the ear but short on
substance. Georg Reutter’s runof-the-mill Sinfonia in D Minor
was unmemorable. These pieces
are no match for music made at
the time by, say, C.P.E. Bach, who
blazed a new path, or of course
for the wonders soon to be heard
in the Vienna of Vivaldi’s dreams
by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.
Europa Galante accepted spirited applause, further amplified
after a sizzling “Four Seasons”
encore sent the cheering audience to its feet.
style@washpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
PRO BASKETBALL
PRO BASKETBALL
HOCKEY
TENNIS
Wizards center Marcin Gortat has been
pondering life after the NBA. D5
The Warriors visit the Cavaliers as their
rivalry has become one-sided. D5
Capitals’ Chandler Stephenson goes
way back with an assistant coach. D7
Venus Williams, Sloane Stephens lose
on first day of Australian Open. D7
Simply stunning
KEVIN C. COX/GETTY IMAGES
Rematch dashed: Jacksonville advances
JAGUARS 45, STEELERS 42
BY
M ARK M ASKE
pittsburgh — It was inevitable, it
had seemed, that the AFC’s spot in
the Super Bowl would be determined by a rematch next weekend
between the Pittsburgh Steelers
and New England Patriots. They
met in last season’s AFC championship game. When they played last
month in Pittsburgh, the No. 1 seed
in the AFC playoffs and home-field
advantage for their expected return engagement appeared at
stake. There was talk in the Steelers’ locker room that day that they
would see the Patriots again with
the stakes raised.
No one got the Jacksonville Jaguars on board with that plan.
The upstart Jaguars crashed the
AFC championship game with an
impressive performance Sunday
that yielded their second victory of
the season at Heinz Field. The
Jaguars used three rushing touchdowns by rookie tailback Leonard
HANNAH FOSLIEN/GETTY IMAGES
Minnesota outruns its tortured history
Sunday’s conference
championship games
VIKINGS 29, SAINTS 24
AFC: Jaguars at Patriots, 3:05 p.m., CBS
NFC: Vikings at Eagles, 6:40 p.m., Fox
BY
B ARRY S VRLUGA
minneapolis — Let’s be clear about
Leonard Fournette, left, had three
touchdowns for the Jaguars in
Pittsburgh, while Stefon Diggs sent
the Vikings past New Orleans with
a miraculous last-second score.
JAGUARS CONTINUED ON D3
this from the get-go. This wasn’t just
unlikely or improbable or all the
labels we will assign to it. We will
leave it to Stefon Diggs because the
moment is and forever will be his,
and he deserves the right to put it in
context.
“Things like this,” Diggs said,
“just don’t happen.”
No, they do not. They don’t happen to franchises with the best of
fortune because with 10 seconds remaining, with no timeouts, with
leads of 17 points and six points and
two points already frittered away
and with 61 yards still to cover, well,
this game was over. Add another
chapter to the Minnesota Vikings’
horror novel, place it back on the
shelf and wrap yourself in another
wool blanket to shield against the
unrelenting, frigid air. It’s always
cold here in January. The Vikings —
so beloved yet so prone to causing
VIKINGS CONTINUED ON D3
Ever-stingy
Cavaliers run
past Wolfpack
Niumatalolo
stays, and all’s
well for Mids
VIRGINIA 68,
NORTH CAROLINA STATE 51
the past two months and reinforced with stories of his time as
a player at Maryland.
Winning in the Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference is especially
difficult. Dixon’s team traveled
more than 12,000 miles to play
its 15 nonconference games, all
losses by an average margin of
22.9 points. When Coppin State
finally made it to the MEAC
opener, an eight-point loss at
Norfolk State, its four-hour return bus trip was doubled and
became an all-nighter because of
Long before the teams
lined up for Sunday’s
Army-Navy men’s
basketball game, it had
already been a very good
day on the Yard, as the
John
Naval Academy campus
Feinstein
is called.
The Navy women’s
team had routed Army, 70-44. That was
nice, especially for the 700 midshipmen
who responded to various incentives
offered by the administration and
showed up at Alumni Hall for the 11 a.m.
start.
But the women’s score paled in
importance next to the news that began
circulating in the building shortly after
tip-off: Football Coach Ken Niumatalolo
was staying put. He had turned down a
chance to make a lot more money at
Arizona, a Power Five school in a place
where Sunday’s temperature was about
50 degrees warmer than it was in
Annapolis.
“We’re 2-0 already,” Navy Athletic
Director Chet Gladchuk said with a huge
smile shortly before the men tipped off.
“In the end, I think Ken understood that
this is where he belongs.”
Gladchuk and Niumatalolo spent
about an hour Saturday night talking in
Niumatalolo’s office. This was the
second time that Niumatalolo had
seriously considered leaving Navy,
where he not only is the winningest
coach in school history but an icon.
DIXON CONTINUED ON D4
FEINSTEIN CONTINUED ON D4
BY
G ENE W ANG
charlottesville — Unranked at the
start of the season, Virginia remained the
lone men’s basketball program without a
conference loss in the tradition-rich ACC
following Sunday night’s 68-51 victory
over North Carolina State.
The No. 3 Cavaliers won their eighth in
a row to move into first place by themselves in a conference with six schools
ranked in the top 25. They claimed their
11th consecutive regular season victory
over the Wolfpack and their eighth
straight in the series at John Paul Jones
Arena.
In extending its best start in the ACC
since it opened 7-0 in 2014-15, Virginia
(16-1, 5-0) held the conference’s fourthbest scoring offense 32 points below its
average. The Cavaliers have held three of
the top five scoring offenses in the ACC —
Virginia Tech and North Carolina are the
others — at least 30 points below their
average.
“They’ve taken care of business, so
they’re in this spot,” Virginia Coach Tony
Bennett said of his players. “Our pillar in
our program is all about humility. It just
means knowing who you are. I’ve said this
before. They’re very clear on how they
have to play. They do it together.”
CAVALIERS CONTINUED ON D4
MITCHELL LAYTON/GETTY IMAGES
Juan Dixon earned an NCAA title as a Maryland player. Now he’s just trying to win games as Coppin State’s coach.
With this start,
scheduled to lose
For historically black programs,
guarantee games equal defeats
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
baltimore — Juan Dixon won
his first career game as a Division
I men’s basketball head coach a
week ago, leading his Coppin
State Eagles to a double-overtime victory over Florida A&M.
Just 48 hours earlier, after his
team had blown a late lead
against Savannah State to lose its
17th straight game to open the
season, Dixon rubbed the bags
under his eyes and stayed on
message. He reminded his group
how difficult it is to win in
college basketball, a sermon he
has repeated on loop for much of
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
Question for NBA players: What’s so funny about peace, love and understanding?
NBA players and
NBA referees are
at loggerheads.
(Boy, I love the
NORMAN
word
CHAD
“loggerheads.”
This is why it’s great to be a
sports columnist — in what
other walk of life can you use the
word “loggerheads” from time to
time and make good money?)
Players are upset at the
officiating.
Referees are upset that
players keep grousing about the
officiating.
There is a simple solution
here: Either find better
officiating or stop whining about
it.
The Golden State Warriors’
Draymond Green actually
proposed the former, recently
suggesting the NBA replace all
referees. “They can get a whole
new crop,” he said. “Too many
personal things going on. Too
much me against you.”
(As an alternative, I might
suggest that the Orlando Magic,
Atlanta Hawks and Sacramento
Couch
Slouch
Kings consider replacing all of
their players.)
How bad is it right now?
Last month, a referee,
Courtland Kirkland, and a
player, the Warriors’ Shaun
Livingston, went forehead-toforehead; essentially, they headbutt each other. Wow.
Old-timers out there, can you
imagine Mendy Rudolph headbutting, say, George Mikan or
Nate Thurmond? That’s some
pretty aggressive officiating —
it’s something you don’t expect,
like a surgeon trash-talking a
patient on the operating table
just before a triple bypass.
Of late, players are
particularly agitated that when
they approach an official to say
something, refs are holding up a
hand — like a stop sign. Heck,
Toni does this to me four or five
times a day before lunch.
Just grow up, you
multimillionaire crybabies. Or
do what I now do with Toni — if
I have a beef, I just write a note
and leave it on her nightstand.
(Speaking of which, it seems
somewhat obvious that the
players and referees need
couples therapy. Ah, but trust
me, couples therapy is no cureall; from my multiple
experiences over two disparate
centuries, the biggest benefit of
couples therapy was when they
validated parking.)
Even stars aren’t getting star
treatment anymore. Kevin
Durant has been ejected three
times this season. LeBron James
was ejected from a game in
November for the first time in
his 15-year career; some people
treated this as the equivalent of
throwing the president out of
the country.
Hmm.
(By the way, let me ask Durant
and the Warriors this: How can
you be the best team and lead
the league in technical fouls? My
goodness, life is good. WHAT’S
THE PROBLEM? Bad calls didn’t
prevent Napoleon from
annexing much of Western
Europe; bad calls aren’t going to
prevent you fellas from winning
another NBA title.)
All the player-referee
contretemps are being
exacerbated by a couple of
factors — replay and something
called the “last-two-minute
report.”
Note: My New Year’s
resolution was not to publicly
bemoan the descent into the
abyss that replay has caused
more than 37 times. This is my
second offense this year.
With Mark Cuban constantly
harping on bad officiating, with
replay stoppages cluttering the
end of games, all the focus turns
to the referees. It hurts the
health of the game to
continually shine a light on
officiating.
The worst manifestation of
this is that last-two-minute
report, which assesses officials’
calls in games within five points
from the two-minute mark until
the final buzzer. This
transparency causes more harm
than good — the best thing to do
is make a call and move on, not
look back.
(Can you imagine other walks
D I G ES T
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Sumlin is selected
as Arizona’s new coach
Arizona tabbed former Texas
A&M coach Kevin Sumlin as its
football coach.
Sumlin is expected to sign a
five-year contract, pending
approval by the Arizona board of
regents. An introductory news
conference is scheduled for
Tuesday.
Sumlin replaces Rich
Rodriguez, who was fired Jan. 2
amid sexual harassment
allegations.
Sumlin, 53, was fired after six
seasons at Texas A&M in
November.
The Aggies went 51-26 and
made it to a bowl game every
season under Sumlin, but they
were 25-23 in Southeastern
Conference play and never
matched his first season in
College Station, when they were
11-2 with Heisman Trophy
quarterback Johnny Manziel.
Texas A&M hired former
Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher
to replace Sumlin.
A former linebacker at Purdue,
Sumlin also spent four years at
Houston, going 35-17, including
12-1 his final season in 2011. . . .
Washington star running back
Myles Gaskin will return to
school for his senior season
rather than enter the NFL draft.
Gaskin announced his decision
on Twitter on Sunday night, the
day before the NFL deadline for
eligible underclassmen to declare
for the draft.
WINTER SPORTS
Marcel Hirscher is unbeatable
in slalom, and his latest World
Cup win finally gave him a victory
at Wengen, Switzerland.
The Austrian star extended his
first-run lead to finish
0.93 seconds ahead of Norway’s
Henrik Kristoffersen.
Hirscher’s fifth straight success
in slalom was the 53rd World Cup
victory of his career yet a first at
the storied Swiss course.
Hirscher stretched his lead
over second-place Kristoffersen
in both the overall and slalom
season-long standings. Hirscher
is the six-time defending overall
champion. . . .
Sofia Goggia led an Italian
sweep of the podium at a
women’s World Cup downhill in
Bad Kleinkirchheim, Austria.
Racing from a lowered start
because of fog, Goggia timed
1:04.00 to beat Federica
Brignone by 1.10 seconds and
Nadia Fanchini by 1.35 for her
third career victory.
American standout Lindsey
Vonn placed 27th.
MISC.
Free agent first baseman
Adrian Gonzalez and the New
York Mets reached agreement on
a one-year contract.
Gonzalez, 35, needs to pass a
physical to complete the deal. He
was limited to 71 games last
season because of a herniated
disk in his back and was left off
the Los Angeles Dodgers’
postseason roster. . . .
Doug Harvey, one of
10 umpires enshrined in the
baseball Hall of Fame, died. He
was 87.
The Hall said Harvey had been
in hospice care in Visalia, Calif.
He died Saturday of natural
causes. . . .
Ethiopians Bazu Worku and
Biruktayit Degefa won the
Houston Marathon, while twotime Olympian Molly Huddle
broke the record for the fastest
half-marathon run by an
American woman.
Worku won his third Houston
Marathon with a time of 2 hours
8 minutes 30 seconds.
Degefa captured her second
Houston Marathon title, finishing
in 2:24:51.
Huddle crossed the halfmarathon finish line in 1:07:25.
Her time broke the previous U.S.
record, set by Deena Kastor in
2006, by nine seconds. . . .
Dan Gurney, the first driver to
win in Formula One, IndyCar and
NASCAR, died of complications
of pneumonia. He was 86. . . .
Dakar Rally defending
champion Stephane Peterhansel
recovered from a crash the day
before to win the race’s eighth
stage.
The Frenchman won after
309 miles between Uyuni to
Tupiza in Bolivia, with the
Peugeot driver holding a 49second advantage over teammate
Cyril Despres.
Spaniard Carlos Sainz was
fifth in the stage but still leads the
overall classification.
— From news services
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of life using a last-two-minute
report — Congress, dentists,
honeymoons, paleontologists,
tax accountants, morticians?)
The way out of all this is for
players to dial back their oncourt bellyaching. Complaining
about the officiating in the
middle of a game is like
complaining about the rain
while standing in the rain —
there’s nothing you can do about
it other than buy a $5 street
umbrella that will break within
five minutes.
So stop bitching and moaning.
Be happy in your work.
Besides, life is too short to
argue a block/charge call.
Ask The Slouch
Q. You wrote an entire piece on
LeBron James without telling us
why he is so good. What type of
commentary/analysis is that?
(William Lee; Chicago)
A. You want to know why he
is so good? Because he’s
unguardable. What do I mean by
unguardable? He cannot be
guarded. Is that clear enough for
you? Now get out of my column.
Q. Al Michaels mentioned last
week that replay stoppages were
taking too long. Does The Slouch
have a solution? (Jonathan
Levine; Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)
A. Other than putting the
genie back in the bottle? But he’s
absolutely right — heck, I
remember the interminable
delay when my marriage
proposal to Toni was under
review.
Q. Have Bill Belichick and
Steve Bannon ever been seen in
the same room at the same time?
(John Keeling; Boerne, Tex.)
A. Pay the man, Shirley.
Q. Should the Raiders
interview Marvin Lewis and
claim compliance with the
Rooney Rule because he should
have been fired? (Seth Hieken;
Duxbury, Mass.)
A. Pay this wise soul, too.
You, too, can enter the $1.25 Ask The
Slouch Cash Giveaway. Just email
asktheslouch@aol.com, and if your
question is used, you win $1.25 in
cash!
soccer insider
Camp looms,
and United is
still looking
for a scorer
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
D.C. United failed to score in half of
its matches last season, so it seemed
reasonable to think its primary aim
this winter would be to acquire a trusty
striker with a goal-pocked portfolio.
But with training camp a week away,
United has not landed a high-end scorer and, barring a big move before the
March 3 opener, will enter the MLS
season with three forwards who have
never recorded more than eight goals
in one year.
The club did obtain one front-line
candidate in a trade with the Portland
Timbers: Jamaican forward Darren
Mattocks. But instead of a major upgrade at that position, Coach Ben Olsen
said United will rely on Mattocks’s
athletic skills, a fortified midfield and a
collective scoring effort to rebound
from last year’s last-place finish in the
Eastern Conference.
“It’s always going to be by committee
with us,” he said during a recent interview. “We design our team in that way,
and everybody has to help from a goal
standpoint. Why? Because David Villa
is not on our team.”
Villa, the Spanish national team’s
all-time scoring leader, has posted
63 goals and 21 assists in three seasons
for New York City FC. He also earns
$5.6 million, five times more than any
D.C. player. While a player like Villa is
out of reach for most MLS teams, the
league’s leading scorer last year, Chicago’s Nemanja Nikolic, scored 24 times
while earning a more reasonable base
salary of $1.7 million.
With revenue-generating Audi Field
opening this summer, United has
pledged to increase spending after
years of thrifty decisions. In the past six
months, the club has added six players
with national team experience: Mattocks, Bruno Miranda (Bolivia), Paul
Arriola (United States), Zoltan Stieber
(Hungary), Ulises Segura (Costa Rica)
and Junior Moreno (Venezuela). It also
traded for David Ousted, one of the
league’s better goalkeepers, and veteran defender Frederic Brillant.
The MLS Players Association will
not post salaries until the spring, so it’s
unclear how much more the organization has committed to the payroll.
United remains in the market for
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. United scored in just half of the team’s matches last year. Lamar
Neagle is now in Seattle, and Ben Olsen’s team is still searching for goals.
depth at wide midfield and outside
back, but there’s unlikely to be a blockbuster signing before the summer
transfer window. It also has the No. 3
pick in Friday’s MLS draft, but such
players are primarily for depth.
Asked whether United pursued a
high-priced, proven scorer this winter,
Olsen said: “Yes. We’re always looking
— and we will continue to look for —
competition up there. It’s a vital position, but they are all vital.”
Mattocks, 27, has scored 24 goals in
136 regular season appearances. His
career high was seven in his 2012 rookie season with Vancouver. Last season,
he scored just four times, but thrust
into Portland’s lineup because of
Fanendo Adi’s injuries, he was influential late in the season.
Returning to the roster is Patrick
Mullins, who was terrific upon arriving
in the summer of 2016 with a careerbest eight goals but poor last year; four
of his five goals came in one game. Also
back is Miranda, who turns 20 next
month. Last year, he appeared in five
late-season matches, all as a substitute,
and didn’t score.
“Mattocks is a potential starting forward in this league,” Olsen said. “Of
course, there is a leap of faith with him
taking his game up to where it needs to
be. . . . I have a lot of faith in Mattocks’s
ability to show he is a starting striker in
this league. I have faith in Patrick
Mullins that he will rebound this year
and make it very difficult for Mattocks
to get on the field.”
Marked improvement in the midfield, Olsen said, will lift overall production. Last year, United tied its own
MLS record for scoreless performances
(17 in 34 matches) and finished level
with Colorado for fewest goals (31).
“This isn’t just about forwards,” he
said. “We need goals, but we also need
providers just as much as we need guys
to score goals. We need people around
them to provide. If you don’t have that,
it’s very, very difficult unless you have
someone on a different level who can
create their own shot.”
Olsen said he expects starting wings
Arriola and Stieber to find their way
after joining the team midstream last
year. He also will count on creative
midfielder Luciano Acosta, 23, who
was engaging and electrifying at times
but absent and petulant at others.
“A lot of what was good coming from
us last year was coming through him,
and we put a lot of responsibility on a
young kid who came into this league
[in 2016] as a 60-minute or 30-minute
player,” Olsen said. “All of a sudden, he’s
in this role with much greater responsibility, and that takes some time.”
Olsen is also high on the other four
young candidates in central midfield:
Segura (24), Moreno (24), Russell Canouse (22) and Ian Harkes (22). The
latter two, along with Arriola, 22, are in
U.S. national team training camp.
Olsen, who is entering his eighth full
season as head coach, said he is not
locked into one formation.
“We will be tactically flexible because you have to be: As soccer evolves,
you have to be more flexible,” he said.
“We’re going to ask our guys to come
out of their comfort zones at times —
that’s on us to define their roles. We
have a group that is excited for it and
open to it.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
NHL
7:30 p.m.
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ROUNDUP
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9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
Butler at Providence » Fox Sports 1
Maryland at Michigan » Fox Sports 1, WTEM (980 AM)
Duke at Miami » ESPN
Florida State at Boston College » ESPNU
Minnesota at Penn State » Big Ten Network
Bucknell at Colgate » CBS Sports Network
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Illinois at Nebraska » Big Ten Network
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WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
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2:50 p.m.
3 p.m.
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NBC Sports Network
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3 a.m.
9 p.m.
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11 a.m.
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
5 p.m.
Hudson Catholic (N.J.) vs. John Carroll (Md.) » ESPNU
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University School (Fla.) vs. Oak Hill (Va.) » ESPNU
Westtown (Pa.) vs. IMG Academy (Fla.) » ESPNU
Man City loses
first of season
Manchester City’s
quest to be the latest
“Invincibles” of
English soccer ended
thanks to nine
minutes of mayhem
Sunday.
Hounded and
harassed by
Liverpool’s high press
inside a raucous
Anfield, City fell apart
through a series of
defensive mistakes
and went from being
level after 59 minutes
to trailing by three in
the 68th minute.
City defender Kyle
Walker rubbed his
face in disbelief. Pep
Guardiola, City’s
manager, looked at
the ground in shock.
City recovered
admirably to lose, 4-3,
but its five-month, 22match unbeaten start
to the league is over.
Arsenal’s undefeated
Premier League
season in 2003-04
won’t be emulated for
at least another year.
Preston was the other
team to go through a
top-flight season
unbeaten in 1888-89.
“We lost a little bit of
our control,”
Guardiola said of the
atmosphere.
The win moved
Liverpool level on
points with Chelsea
and second-place
Manchester United,
with all three teams
15 points behind City.
Elsewhere, Arsenal
lost, 2-1, at
Bournemouth and fell
to sixth place, eight
points off the
Champions League
qualification
positions.
Streak ends
Luis Suarez scored
twice before Lionel
Messi completed
Barcelona’s 4-2
comeback win at Real
Sociedad in the
Spanish league,
breaking its winless
streak at the Basque
Country club.
Barcelona reached
the halfway point of
the league season
unbeaten and with a
nine-point lead over
second-place Atletico
Madrid. Valencia
trails by 11, and
defending champion
Real Madrid faces a
massive 19-point
deficit with a game in
hand.
The comeback gave
Barcelona its first win
in La Liga at Anoeta
Stadium since 2007
— ending a run of five
losses and two draws.
Foul play?
A bizarre foul
committed by the
referee
overshadowed Paris
Saint-Germain’s 1-0
win at Nantes, which
moved the leaders 11
points clear at the top
of the French league.
In a highly unusual
end to the game,
referee Tony Chapron
sent off Nantes center
half Diego Carlos in
the last minute —
although the official
was the culprit.
Carlos was running
behind Chapron near
the halfway line and
trying to catch up with
play when he
inadvertently clipped
the referee’s heels as
their paths crossed.
Chapron tumbled
forward onto the turf
and then, in what
appeared to be a
blatant act of
retribution, swiped his
right leg at Carlos.
An irate Chapron got
up and brandished a
second yellow card
for Carlos.
— Associated Press
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Jaguars start strong, stun Steelers to reach the AFC title game
JAGUARS FROM D1
Fournette and some clutch
throws by much-maligned quarterback Blake Bortles to beat the
Steelers, 45-42, in a compelling
conference
semifinal
that
seemed to leave Pittsburgh in
stunned disbelief.
It matched the most points
scored against the Steelers in a
postseason game. And it will be
the third-seeded Jaguars, not the
second-seeded Steelers, who will
be in Foxborough, Mass., to face
the top-seeded Patriots on Sunday in the AFC championship
game.
The Jaguars, a season after
they went 3-13, are one win from
their first Super Bowl appearance. They lost in their two
previous appearances in the AFC
championship game, both with
Tom Coughlin — now their frontoffice czar — as coach, in the 1996
and 1999 seasons.
“Blake Bortles, Fournette, our
offensive line — they controlled
the game,” Jaguars defensive end
Calais Campbell said. “That was
huge. It’s inspiring. Those guys,
when they play like that, nobody
can beat us.”
The Jaguars will face a Patriots
dynasty appearing in its seventh
straight AFC championship
game. But the Patriots must be
wary: If they underestimate the
defense, ground game and toughness of these Jaguars, they could
meet the same fate as the Steelers.
Jacksonville got a pair of firstquarter touchdowns by Fournette and a second-quarter score
by its defense. The Jaguars had
first-half leads of 21-0 and 28-7,
but the Steelers clawed back into
JARED WICKERHAM/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
The Jaguars’ Blake Bortles, who threw for 214 yards, escaped a sack by the Steelers’ T.J. Watt.
the game behind the passing of
quarterback Ben Roethlisberger.
He threw for 469 yards and five
touchdowns, two of them to wide
receiver Antonio Brown.
But it wasn’t enough. After the
Steelers pulled within 42-35 on
running back Le’Veon Bell’s
touchdown run, via a lateral from
Roethlisberger, with 2:18 remaining, an onside kick failed,
and the Jaguars sealed the outcome with Josh Lambo’s 45-yard
field goal before the Steelers
scored a meaningless touchdown
in the final seconds.
The Steelers head into an offseason of uncertainty. Roethlisberger contemplated retirement
after last season. There was room
to wonder in the immediate aftermath of this defeat whether he
had played his final NFL game,
even after he said Sunday he was
looking forward to next season.
“We didn’t get it done,” Steelers Coach Mike Tomlin said. “We
didn’t play well enough today. We
didn’t coach well enough today.
The effort was there. The resolve
was there. But just not enough
detail, execution to win versus
good people in January football.
And that’s about the only way to
cut it.”
The Jaguars won, 30-9, in early
October in Pittsburgh when
Roethlisberger threw five interceptions — two of which were
returned for touchdowns — and
then wondered aloud afterward
whether he still had it.
Campbell and other Jaguars
players pointed to comments
made by the Steelers, including a
Twitter remark by Bell hinting at
a rematch with the Patriots next
weekend. But Tomlin said his
team had not been looking past
the Jaguars.
“This team whacked us good in
October,” Tomlin said. “Are you
kidding me? We realized this was
a good football team. They played
better than we did today.”
Roethlisberger expressed similar sentiments: “I don’t think so.
Everybody I talked to, I mean, we
were dialed in. . . . A lot of the
distractions, if you will, were
outside. They were created by us.
But they kind of were magnified
outside our locker room. And
inside the locker room, it never
really was an issue. I know I
wasn’t looking forward. I know a
lot of guys I talked to weren’t. I
don’t think that was as big a deal
as it was probably made to be.”
The Jaguars’ big day on offense
came after they had managed
only 10 points in their first-round
playoff triumph over the Buffalo
Bills, a game in which Bortles
had more yards rushing than
passing.
His passing was much more
reliable Sunday: He threw for 214
yards and a touchdown.
“I always had faith in them,”
Campbell said. “We take turns
making plays. They made plays
throughout the whole year. I
know at times it was the defense
that made more. But there were
times the offense made huge
plays. The thing about it is a good
team needs to be able to count on
each other. We gave up 42 points
on defense. That’s a lot of points.”
mark.maske@washpost.com
Vikings shock Saints on Diggs’s 61-yard TD reception on final play
Mike Mularkey is returning as
Tennessee Titans head coach and
is discussing a contract extension
that would keep him with the team
beyond next season, a league
source confirmed to ESPN.
The Titans finished 9-7 and
made the playoffs for the first time
since the 2008 season. Tennessee
rallied to beat Kansas City in the
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Lexie Brown, held scoreless in
the first half, had nine of her
14 points in the fourth quarter, and
No. 16 Duke ended Virginia’s eightgame winning streak with a 55-48
victory Sunday in Durham, N.C.
The Blue Devils (14-4, 3-2)
moved to 11-0 home and knocked
the Cavaliers (12-7, 5-1) out of a
first-place tie with Louisville atop
the ACC.
Brown, a senior guard, played
her first two seasons at Maryland
before she transferred to Duke.
The Blue Devils earned their 26th
straight victory over the Cavaliers.
Aliyah Huland El had 14 points
for Virginia.
FLORIDA STATE 107, VIRGINIA TECH 62: Shakayla Thom-
as scored 21 points as the No. 13
Seminoles (16-2, 4-1 ACC) beat the
Hokies (13-5, 2-3) in Tallahassee.
Taylor Emery had 17 points for
Virginia Tech.
SETON
HALL
GEORGETOWN 65:
70,
Senior
guard Mikayla Venson scored a
career-high 28 points, but the
Hoyas (7-10, 2-5 Big East) lost to
the Pirates (11-8, 3-5) in South
Orange, N.J.
GEORGE
MASON
92,
RHODE ISLAND 53: Nicole Car-
dano-Hillary scored 22 points,
and the Patriots (14-4, 3-1 Atlantic
10) rolled past the Rams (2-16, 0-5)
in Kingston, R.I.
AMERICAN 82, LEHIGH
64: Cecily Carl had 27 points and
NATIONAL WOMEN
Irish rebound
from blowout
to top Eagles
NOTRE DAME 89,
BOSTON COLLEGE 60
A SSOCIATED P RESS
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
Minnesota’s Case Keenum, above, walked off as a winner after his desperation pass to Stefon Diggs resulted in a 61-yard touchdown.
the NFL creating a neutral atmosphere for its signature event. It’s
difficult to envision. These people,
they may have been burned by
their Vikings time and again. But
they are of good faith and hardy
stock. They keep coming back.
“I’ve been excited a lot of times,”
said Bud Grant, the 90-year-old
legend of a Vikings coach, in the
hours before kickoff. “But we haven’t won yet. We’ve got to win.
There’s a couple of steps along the
way.”
Digesting that first step, the victory over New Orleans, will take
more time than we have between
now and the kickoff in Philadelphia. But follow along.
Most fan bases, when their
team takes a 17-0 halftime lead,
might make plans for the following week. Check flights to Philadelphia? What are the hotel rates?
Can I even get tickets?
This one, though, gnawed on its
fingernails. And with good reason.
Minnesota’s opponent Sunday
wasn’t just its own past, which
doesn’t much affect the players in
the locker room. Its opponent was
Saints quarterback Drew Brees.
“That’s a Hall of Fame quarterback,” Vikings safety Harrison
Smith said.
Indeed, much of the second half
seemed built to help Brees enhance
his legend rather than designed to
allow the Vikings to turn around
theirs. He started with an 80-yard
drive that finished with a touchdown pass to Michael Thomas in
the third quarter. After Keenum
made his only mistake of the day —
an ill-advised prayer that was easily picked off by Saints safety Marcus Williams (whom we will return
to) — Brees again found Thomas
early in the fourth quarter.
With 3:01 remaining, Brees
found rookie running back Alvin
Kamara for the touchdown that
put New Orleans up 21-20. Even
when Kai Forbath boomed a 53yard field goal to give the Vikings
the lead again, the prevailing
thought had to be, “Man, they left
Brees 89 seconds.”
Brees didn’t need them all —
and it cost New Orleans in a way
no one could foresee. The clutch
play on what appeared to be the
Saints’ winning drive was a
fourth-and-10 throw to wide re-
ceiver Willie Snead IV. From there,
it was a formality to set up Wil
Lutz’s 43-yard field goal, the kick
that gave the Saints a 24-23 lead,
the kick that killed the Vikings.
Except 25 seconds remained.
Twenty-five seconds and 75 yards.
The Vikings responded by drawing a false start penalty.
And yet you know what’s funny?
The fans, they stayed. Maybe
they’re masochistic. But when that
final drive — a drive that was sure to
be futile — started, the fans stayed.
So Keenum found Diggs for 19
yards. But that was it. Two incompletions followed. And then, from
his 39-yard line, with those 10
seconds left, Keenum made one
last play-call: Seventh Heaven.
The Vikings had practiced this
play, by Diggs’s estimation, “a million times.”
Keenum sent his receivers out
to the line with one final message:
“I’m going to give someone a
chance.”
The someone was Diggs, the
Vikings’ most explosive playmaker. He found himself on the right
sideline when the most astonishing series of events unfolded. Not
only did Keenum’s pass find his
hands, not only did he time his
leap perfectly, but Williams, the
New Orleans safety, made an inexplicable judgment call. Instead of
going for Diggs’s body, instead of
making sure of a tackle he had no
alternative but to make, he dove
for Diggs’s legs. He missed.
“The safety,” Minnesota defensive tackle Linval Joseph said, “he
missed, whiffed — however you
want to put it.”
However you want to put it.
That’s just about right. Talk about
it till the NFC championship game
and beyond. Cast it against all the
plays that had happened here in
the past. But distill it to its most
simplistic possible interpretation.
“Case threw a great ball,” Diggs
said. “The rest is history.”
It’s history, for sure. Maybe it
will lead only to more pain in a
week or three. But what happened
Sunday night does not happen in
the NFL and especially doesn’t
happen to the Minnesota Vikings.
Maybe the history that was forged
here actually changed a franchise’s
future by putting its past to rest.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
Tennessee’s Mularkey reportedly discussing contract extension
NEWS SERVICES
DUKE 55,
VIRGINIA 48
American men fall
Pat Andree scored 19 points and
James Karnik had a career-high
16 points with 12 rebounds in leading the Lehigh men over American, 76-66, in Bethlehem, Pa.
Sa’eed Nelson scored 16 points
to pace the Eagles (4-13, 1-5). The
Mountain Hawks improved to
8-9, 3-3.
NFL NOTES
F ROM
Cavs women’s
win streak
ends at eight
12 rebounds, and the first-place
Eagles (13-4, 6-0 Patriot League)
defeated the Mountain Hawks
(10-7, 4-2) at Bender Arena.
VIKINGS FROM D1
first heartburn, then heartbreak
— somehow can make the chill cut
directly to the bone.
But not Sunday night. Not for
once. The franchise lore changed
in those 10 seconds, changed over
those 61 yards, changed because
quarterback Case Keenum told his
receivers he was going to give
someone a chance and changed
because Diggs took that opportunity, leaped and then ran. One of
the most dramatic endings in the
history of the NFL playoffs ended
with that combination, with
Keenum-to-Diggs, with no time on
the clock, with the Vikings somehow beating the New Orleans
Saints, 29-24, on a play and a situation that will never be forgotten.
“It’s a turning point,” Diggs
boldly declared, speaking for a
state and a region that spent much
of the evening bracing for what the
Vikings had inevitably caused in
the past: pain. “People have a way
of saying history repeats itself. It
didn’t repeat itself tonight.”
So put away the misery from the
past. Put away Drew Pearson from
Roger Staubach out at old Metropolitan Stadium, before a building
as majestic as this new U.S. Bank
Stadium could even have been
fathomed. That was the original
Hail Mary, and it not only crushed
the Vikings’ hope in 1975 — “I think
I was still swimming at the time,”
Diggs said — but it set the path for a
franchise and its fan base that has
endured for generations. There
have been infamous field goal
misses from Gary Anderson and
Blair Walsh. There have been four
losses in Super Bowls. And now
there is this: a trip to the NFC
championship game Sunday in
Philadelphia on the back of a play
that will be shown in these parts
till the cows’ children and the cows’
children’s children come home.
“That didn’t look like a curse
out there today,” Vikings Coach
Mike Zimmer said. “It looked like
a Hail Mary.”
So have your moment, Minnesota. This fundamental shift in a
franchise’s fortune keeps alive a
dream the people here have shuddered even to allow themselves to
think about: the possibility of playing the Super Bowl in their home
stadium. Any of the 66,612 here
Sunday could look around, listen
to the headache-inducing chants
of “Skol! Skol!” and try to imagine
AREA ROUNDUP
first round before losing Saturday
to New England.
Mularkey has a 19-15 record,
including playoffs, in two seasons
as the Titans’ coach.
In other team news, Mularkey
said offensive tackle Jack Conklin
tore his left anterior cruciate ligament in Saturday’s loss and probably will start training camp on the
physically unable to perform list.
Mularkey said Conklin will
have surgery to repair the ACL
within the next two weeks.
Conklin, the eighth pick overall out of Michigan State in 2016,
was an all-pro as a rookie.
Also, Jonnu Smith hurt his
right medial collateral ligament,
but Mularkey said the tight end
will not need surgery.
BILLS: Buffalo hired Alabama
assistant coach Brian Daboll as its
offensive coordinator.
Coach Sean McDermott announced Daboll’s hiring Sunday,
two days after firing Rick Dennison.
Daboll, 42, was most recently
the offensive coordinator for national champion Alabama. It was
the sixth time he was part of a
national title-winning team’s
coaching staff.
Before joining the Crimson
Tide last season, Daboll was the
tight ends coach for the Super
Bowl-champion New England Patriots. He has 17 seasons of NFL
coaching experience, including
stints as the offensive coordinator
for Cleveland (2009-10), Miami
(2011) and Kansas City (2012).
Daboll has previous ties to
McDermott, serving as an assistant at William & Mary when
McDermott was a senior safety in
1997.
Jessica
Shepard
scored
24 points in 22 minutes Sunday as
No. 2 Notre Dame bounced back
from its most lopsided loss in
16 seasons by routing Boston College, 89-60, in South Bend, Ind.
Coming off a 33-point defeat at
No. 3 Louisville, the Irish ran out
to a 9-0 start against the Eagles.
Arike Ogunbowale added
18 points for Notre Dame (16-2,
5-1 ACC). Freshman Danielle Patterson matched her season high
with 11 points.
MISSISSIPPI STATE 75,
ALABAMA 61: Victoria Vivians
scored 21 points and Teaira McCowan added 19, leading the No.
4 Bulldogs in Starkville, Miss.
Mississippi State (19-0, 5-0
Southeastern Conference) earned
its 11th straight win by double
digits and now gets a week of rest
to prepare for a showdown at No.
6 Tennessee next weekend.
TENNESSEE 86, SOUTH
CAROLINA 70: Jaime Nared
scored 19 points as the No. 6 Lady
Vols bounced back from their first
loss of the season with a victory at
No. 9 South Carolina, which
played without injured all-American A’ja Wilson.
With Wilson sidelined for the
Gamecocks (14-3, 3-2 SEC), Tennessee (16-1, 4-1) took advantage,
building an 18-point lead late in
the third quarter.
BAYLOR
74, OKLAHOMA
52:
Dekeiya Cohen scored
16 points, and the No. 5 Bears won
in Norman, Okla.
Baylor (15-1, 5-0 Big 12) rolled
despite getting just nine points
from leading scorer Kalani
Brown. The 6-foot-7 junior played
just 15 minutes because of foul
trouble.
OREGON 74, ARIZONA
STATE: Sabrina Ionescu scored
26 points and Ruthy Hebard added 20 to lead the No. 8 Ducks to a
victory over the No. 18 Sun Devils
in Eugene, Ore.
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
Niumatalolo plans to remain at Navy
BY
ZACK WAJSGRAS/CHARLOTTESVILLE DAILY PROGRESS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia’s Devon Hall had a career-best 25 points as the Cavaliers defeated North Carolina State.
Cavaliers improve to 5-0 in ACC play
CAVALIERS FROM D1
Devon Hall led Virginia with a
career- and game-high 25 points
in front of an announced crowd of
14,317. The redshirt senior guard
made 4 of 5 from three-point
range, 7 of 7 from the free throw
line and 7 for 9 from the field
overall for his fourth game in a
row in double figures. Backcourt
mate Kyle Guy added 17 points.
Virginia’s lead expanded to 4525 with 12:10 to play on the heels of
a 15-5 run out of halftime. Senior
forward Isaiah Wilkins (10 points,
six rebounds) got it going with a
jumper, Guy scored on a layup,
and Hall sank a three-pointer for a
37-20 buffer. Guy’s and Hall’s field
goals came off assists from sophomore guard Ty Jerome.
The end of the surge featured a
two-handed dunk from redshirt
junior center Jack Salt and Hall’s
last three-pointer, leading to a
timeout by N.C. State (12-6, 2-3).
“I feel confident every single
day when I let the ball go,” Hall
said. “If I’m open, I’m going to
shoot with confidence.”
Virginia’s advantage never
dipped below double digits in the
second half. The Cavaliers held
N.C. State to 41.1 percent shooting
and allowed just two Wolfpack
players, Torin Dorn (16 points)
and Lavar Batts Jr. (12), to score in
double figures. N.C. State entered
with five players who averaged at
least 10.2 points.
Virginia also permitted just
12.5 percent three-point shooting
and made 11 more free throws
than the Wolfpack, who attempted just five. The Cavaliers went 14
for 16 (87.5 percent) from the foul
line.
“I knew coming in they had
won 15 games and what a great
defensive team [they are],” Wolfpack first-year Coach Kevin Keatts
said. “I thought we played hard on
both ends of the floor, but going
into the game, I said in order for us
to have a chance to win the game,
especially here at U-Va., we had to
do a great job of sharing the basketball. And when you look at it,
obviously seven assists wasn’t
good enough for us.”
N.C. State arrived seeking a
third consecutive win against a
ranked opponent. The Wolfpack
beat No. 19 Clemson, 78-77, on
Thursday, five days after upsetting
then-No. 2 Duke, 96-85. Both of
those games were in Raleigh, N.C.,
where the Wolfpack is 11-1.
It also defeated then-No. 2 Arizona, 90-84, on Nov. 22 in the
Battle 4 Atlantis tournament in
Paradise Island, Bahamas. This
season’s team is the first in N.C.
State history to collect two regular
season wins against teams ranked
in the top two.
Picked 12th in the ACC in pre-
season voting, N.C. State has implemented full-court pressure
with encouraging results. The
Wolfpack entered first in the ACC
in turnovers forced per game
(16.1) and second in steals (141).
Ball security was not much of
an issue for Virginia for most of
the first half. It committed four of
its 15 total turnovers in the first
17 minutes, with Jerome responsible for three in that time. Clean
possessions helped Virginia to a
double-digit lead for the first time
at 17-6 with 9:22 to play.
The lead expanded to 28-12 following an 11-2 surge that ended
with the first four-point play of
Wilkins’s career, courtesy of a
three-pointer from the left corner
and a foul on Wolfpack center
Omer Yurtseven. Wilkins made
the bonus for the Cavaliers’ largest
first-half lead, but Virginia was
unable to pull away because of a
short spell of uncharacteristically
sloppy ballhandling and went into
halftime ahead 30-20.
“We felt we would have to fight
to get catches, come off screens,
use the dribble a little more, use
some ball screens,” Bennett said.
“Again, thankfully, the way Devon
was getting to the paint and shooting it, it loosened it up a little bit,
but that was a fight, even though
the score might not suggest that it
was.”
A VA W ALLACE
Days’ worth of frenzied speculation over Navy football Coach
Ken Niumatalolo’s future at the
Naval Academy was all for
naught. Niumatalolo sent two
text messages Sunday morning
announcing his plan to stay in
Annapolis despite having interviewed for the vacant head
coaching job at Arizona.
“Let me just tell you so you
know where I am at TODAY . . .
so you will know exactly my
future plans — BEAT ARMY!!!
“After much prayer and pondering . . . it has become crystal
clear the USNA is a special place
with special people and I LOVE
IT HERE!!! Plus I have unfinished business to finish . . . ”
Niumatalolo, 52, returns for
his 11th season heading the Midshipmen. Navy opens its 2018
season with a trip to Niumatalolo’s home state to play his alma
mater, Hawaii.
Niumatalolo’s announcement
follows a Saturday night meeting
with Navy Athletic Director Chet
Gladchuk. Niumatalolo had traveled to interview at Arizona late
last week, and Gladchuk told The
Washington Post in a text mes-
Coach interviews
for Arizona job but opts
to stay in Annapolis
sage Saturday that before their
evening meeting, Niumatalolo
and Gladchuk had only texted
about the situation with little
detail.
Gladchuk commented on Niumatalolo’s announcement with a
text Sunday: “First of all the
Coach never mentioned to me he
was going anywhere. . . . I don’t
believe he told anyone he was
leaving. My conversation last
evening was centered around
what a special place the Naval
Academy is and how fortunate
we are to have the opportunity to
work with [and] influence some
of the finest young men and also
women at any university in the
country. Dialogue in this context
is quite convincing Navy is a
pretty special place to be.”
Niumatalolo had been unexpectedly absent from the Navy
football offices Thursday and
Friday as reports swirled that he
was a leading candidate for Ari-
zona’s head coaching job. The
position was left open when Rich
Rodriguez was fired Jan. 2 amid
sexual misconduct allegations
brought by a former athletic
department employee.
Niumatalolo’s return is welcome news in Annapolis.
This is the second time in
recent years the coach has flirted
with an outside job opportunity.
In 2015, Niumatalolo, who is
Mormon, interviewed for the
head coaching position at
Brigham Young that was left
open when Bronco Mendenhall
left for Virginia, but ultimately
he decided to stay at Navy.
The former quarterback is the
winningest coach in Navy football history, compiling an 84-48
record and nine bowl appearances in a decade-long tenure. He
led Navy to victories over archrival Army in each of his first eight
seasons and is beloved among
the fan base both for his team’s
performance and for his reputation as an affable, highly principled leader.
As for the unfinished business
Niumatalolo referred to in his
text messages, Navy has lost the
past two Army-Navy games.
ava.wallace@washpost.com
gene.wang@washpost.com
Di∞cult starts challenge HBCU teams
DIXON FROM D1
a snowstorm in Virginia. In
Game No. 17 — the Eagles’ third
home contest of the season —
they played in front of 624 fans.
“We just haven’t been in
enough close games to know how
to win,” Dixon said.
It is a shared struggle for
Division I programs at historically black colleges and universities
(HBCUs), where resources continue to be severely limited and
upward mobility for coaches remains almost nonexistent. Most
schools have no choice but to
stack their nonconference schedules with “guarantee games”
against cash-rich Power Five
schools, essentially trading losses
for money that will help keep
their programs and athletic departments afloat.
All six of the 351 Division I
teams to go winless in nonconference play, including half of the
10-team Southwestern Athletic
Conference, were HBCUs. No
team from the SWAC or MEAC
entered league play with a winning record; their combined nonconference record was 64-259.
Through Sunday’s games, one
team, Mississippi Valley State,
remains winless at 0-17.
Those struggles have led to
differing philosophies on nonconference scheduling among
HBCU coaches. Dixon, who inherited his schedule when he
took over at Coppin State last
spring, said he will not play so
many Power Five schools in the
future after facing eight this
season. But at other schools, such
as Texas Southern, whose nonconference schedule was rated
the toughest in the country, guarantee games are not just cash
grabs but also viewed as opportunities to fully prepare for conference play.
“It’s worked for us the last
three or four years because we’ve
gone 16-2 in league and we’ve
won our league the last two years
in a row. That’s why we do it,” said
Texas Southern Coach Mike Davis, who has led the Tigers to the
NCAA tournament in three of his
four seasons at the school. “I
think a lot of teams are losing the
money. We make the money, but
at the same time, we keep all the
money. We don’t give money to
volleyball or track or any other
sports unless they ask for some
money. But it’s not designed for
that.”
After Davis loaded this season’s nonconference schedule
with heavyweights — including
Gonzaga, Kansas, Syracuse,
Clemson, Ohio State, Oregon,
Baylor and TCU — his team
opened 0-13 with all of its games
on the road. That decision was
essentially made five years ago
when Davis, the former Indiana
coach who lost to a Maryland
team led by Dixon in the 2002
national title game, arrived at
Texas Southern in 2012 and
watched his players endure poor
attendance turnouts for nonconference home games.
“We ended up losing money
because you had to pay the officials, scorer’s table, cleanup crew,
security,” Davis said, so he started
seeking out as many road games
as he could and found as many
silver linings as he could, even if
it meant losses. He took his teams
to Toledo and Oakland this season because both returned most
of their players from last season.
He took his team to Wyoming
because he thought the high
altitude might somehow help his
team for conference play. After
the 0-13 start, Texas Southern has
opened SWAC play with three
victories in four games.
For another HBCU team, success has made scheduling tougher in a different way. LeVelle
Moton, considered a rising star
in coaching circles but who has
now been at North Carolina Central for nine seasons, used to
routinely field multiple calls a
day from coaches who wanted to
play his team. After the Eagles
achieved some success in nonconference play — including an
overtime win over North Carolina State in 2013 — it became
increasingly difficult to find Power Five coaches who would take
them on.
“I’ve always said that one of
the best things that happened for
our program is that we defeated
N.C. State. At the same time, that
was one of the worst things
because since then we can’t
schedule,” said Moton, who has
two NCAA tournament appearances and three seasons with at
least 25 wins since ushering the
program back into Division I
after more than three decades in
Division II. “If you look at our
schedule, we’re everywhere.”
North Carolina Central, which
finished with the best nonconference record of any MEAC or
SWAC school at 6-8, opened the
season with four games at four
different sites in eight days. It
played a home-and-home with
Southeast Missouri State in a
six-day span, with another game
in between. A day after losing at
George Mason on Dec. 9, the
team flew roughly 2,000 miles
the next morning to Phoenix to
play Grand Canyon on one day of
rest.
“Why? Because that was the
only game we could get,” said
Moton, whose team also lost that
game, 64-59. “We all have the
guarantee games. [Dixon] just
happened to play a little more. . . .
I probably can’t give him any
advice, other than what I’ve already told him: Just fight your
way through it.”
That’s what Dixon intends to
do, even though losing so much
in college basketball mostly remains a foreign concept. His
name alone has helped attract
talent to Coppin State — “Him
being an ex-NBA player played a
factor in my decision,” said guard
Karonn Davis, a graduate transfer from Niagara. Dixon, 39, has
tried to leverage his time at
Maryland to jump-start a struggling program. His top assistant
is former Terrapins player John
Auslander, whose younger brother Kent is a graduate-transfer
player on the Eagles’ roster.
Dixon often has spoken about
his success at Maryland, first as a
player who led the Terrapins to a
national title and lost only
31 games during his four-year
career. He also began his coaching career as a special assistant
under Mark Turgeon in 2013 and
was part of the program’s revival
before he left in 2016 and spent a
season as the women’s basketball
coach at the University of the
District of Columbia.
He knew the move to Coppin
State would be difficult; there are
no charter plane rides for his
team or any shortcuts to landing
recruits. There is also no clearcut philosophy on nonconference
scheduling as leader of an HBCU
program.
“It’s not going to be easy,”
Dixon said. “It’s not something
that is going to happen overnight.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
GAIL BURTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ken Niumatalolo is in line to coach his 11th season at Navy after rebuffing interest from Arizona.
JOHN FEINSTEIN
Decision by ‘Coach Ken’ is win for Mids
FEINSTEIN FROM D1
Two years ago, it was Brigham
Young. Niumatalolo flew to
Provo, Utah, on the Monday after
his eighth straight victory in the
Army-Navy game, almost certain
that he was going to take the job.
A devout Mormon, Niumatalolo
thought BYU was the place he
was meant to be.
But when the BYU
administrators interviewing him
began trying to dictate who
would be on his staff,
Niumatalolo became less sure.
After talking to his wife, Barbara,
he decided to stay.
Arizona was different. Money
might have been a factor —
Niumatalolo probably would
have been able to command
north of $3 million a year,
considerably more than the
$2 million Navy is reportedly
paying him. Beyond that, though,
was the sense that there wasn’t
much left to accomplish at Navy.
Under Niumatalolo, Navy has
won the Commander-in-Chief’s
Trophy five times, has gone to
nine bowls in 10 seasons and,
even after heartbreaking losses
the past two seasons, is 8-2
against Army.
When Niumatalolo dropped
off the radar Thursday and
Friday and word came out of
Arizona that he had been offered
the job there, many at Navy
believed this was the time he was
going to pull the trigger and
leave.
Gladchuk didn’t know what to
believe. That’s why he went to see
his coach late Saturday after
Niumatalolo had returned to
campus and met with his staff to
discuss the recruits on campus
for the weekend.
“We talked for about an hour,”
Gladchuk said. “I was happy he
didn’t simply announce to me he
was leaving. We talked about
how much he loved this place,
how right he was for this place.
Then I brought something else
up — the Hall of Fame. I honestly
believe, if Kenny stays here until
the end of [his] career, he’s going
to be in the Hall of Fame. You
look at his record, at who he is
and the person he is, I think it
will happen — should happen. If
he goes to Arizona, he’d win
because he’s a great coach. But
let’s face it: Winning there isn’t
as special as winning here.”
Whether Gladchuk’s talk
swung Niumatalolo or the coach
simply needed confirmation that
he was making the right decision
is hard to know, but Gladchuk
got the call he wanted Sunday
morning. By noon, word had
spread that Niumatalolo — or
“Coach Ken,” as he is known on
the Yard — was staying put.
“I was in the locker room
when I saw it on my phone,” said
Shawn Anderson, Navy’s best
player, who finished the men’s
64-62 loss to Army with 24 points
and eight rebounds even though
he took nine stitches on the
bridge of his nose after catching
an elbow late in the first half.
“When we saw it, we were all
really happy. I know a lot of the
football players, and they all
speak very highly of Coach Ken.”
Even Jimmy Allen, Army’s
men’s basketball coach — who
was once a Navy assistant — was
aware of the drama playing out.
“We were all talking about it
on the bus coming down here,”
Allen said. “I’ve been part of the
Army-Navy rivalry on both sides,
and I know what Ken means to
this place. I’m glad he stayed.
He’s an important part of Navy.”
A year ago, Army came from
25 points down with 13 minutes
to go to beat Navy, a devastating
loss for the Mids. This time was
different: Army scored the first
basket of the game and never
trailed. The Black Knights led by
15 in the first half before a late
Navy rally gave the sold-out
crowd of 5,710 hope.
A three-pointer by Cam Davis
with two seconds left trimmed
the margin to 64-62, but Army
managed to get the ball inbounds
to leading scorer Jordan Fox,
who was fouled with somewhere
between a half-second and a
second left — except the officials
decided the game was over and
headed for the door without
checking the clock while both
coaches, Allen and Navy’s Ed
DeChellis, stood in front of their
benches, palms in the air,
convinced there was time on the
clock.
“There was time left,” Fox said.
“Actually, I wanted to shoot the
free throws because I’d just
missed two. But I’m not
complaining. We got the win.”
Fox is the kind of player who
makes this rivalry special,
regardless of the sport. He comes
from Jackson City, Ky., a tiny
town of about 2,000 people, and
says if he hadn’t been recruited
to play basketball at Army, he
would have enlisted.
“I just want to serve,” he said.
“Not a lot of people from my
town go to college, so when
basketball gave me this chance, I
jumped at it. I love every aspect
of being a cadet.” He grinned.
“And I love being part of this
rivalry. I didn’t know anything
about it until I got recruited. I
watched the football game as a
kid, but I thought it was the real
Army against the real Navy.”
Fox is a junior, and now he’s
3-0 in Alumni Hall.
So the day wasn’t perfect for
Navy. But the most important
outcome turned out the way
everyone had hoped. Army and
Navy will meet in Philadelphia
on Dec. 8. Coach Ken will be on
the sideline.
That’s a good thing. For
everyone — on both sides.
sports@washpost.com
For more by John Feinstein, visit
washingtonpost.com/feinstein.
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Gortat contemplates life after the NBA
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Marcin Gortat can see the end.
It grows closer every day the
33-year-old center plays in a
league that no longer celebrates
players with his gifts: traditional,
back-to-the-basket big men.
On Friday, before the Washington Wizards defeated the Orlando
Magic, 125-119, Gortat considered
his basketball mortality. In the
morning, Gortat told the Orlando
Sentinel that he could see himself
retiring when his Wizards contract expires after the 2018-19
season and that he “would love to
join” the Magic, which launched
his NBA career in 2007. That
evening, Gortat explained how
his station in life will play a role in
his decision.
“The way I’m feeling right now,
probably yes,” Gortat responded
when asked whether he would
like to retire at the end of his
contract. “About why I want to do
that, it’s not because I hate basketball or I hate the Washington
Wizards or I hate the city or I hate
the NBA. No. I want to retire
because I’m old, first of all.
“Two, if I retire . . . and there
would be an opportunity for me to
be with the Magic, I would love to
do that because I live in Orlando.
That’s the only reason. If I have an
opportunity, I could be there, but
I want to fulfill my contract here
— [another] year and a half. Unless they say, ‘[Screw] it. We don’t
like you. You got to go!’ ”
Sunset comes for every professional athlete, but Friday night,
Gortat looked fresh and rejuvenated as he made his first four
shots. He finished with his
10th double-double of the season
(12 points, 11 rebounds), then
added his 11th (16 points, 13 rebounds) in Saturday night’s 119113 overtime win over the Brooklyn Nets.
For the seventh consecutive
game Saturday, Gortat logged
more than 25 minutes. Gortat
boasts the third-longest consecutive games streak in the NBA at
125, but he had fallen out of favor
in the rotation the previous
month while the Wizards closed
games with a smaller lineup.
The dwindling minutes, compounded by the team’s up-anddown performance, led to frustration. This month, Gortat, the only
Polish player in the NBA, was
quoted in a publication from his
home country, Przeglad Sportowy
(which translates as Sports Review). In the interview, Gortat
revealed, “I no longer feel that joy
and fire that I felt even just a few
years ago.”
However, by Friday night, Gortat said that despair had subsided.
“A month ago, I was different. I
was in a different place than
where I am right now completely,”
Gortat said. “A month ago, I felt
Anthony Davis scored a seasonhigh 48 points and grabbed 17 rebounds, leading the New Orleans
Pelicans back from 19 points down
in the third quarter to a 123-118
overtime win over the Knicks in
New York on Sunday.
Jrue Holiday added 31 points,
and DeMarcus Cousins had
15 points, 15 rebounds, seven
steals and five assists for the Pelicans. They were down 16 after one,
even further back late in the third
and still down nine with 41/2 minutes left in regulation.
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marcin Gortat: “Money’s not the most important thing for me in life. I want to have a family.”
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Milwaukee Bucks
Today
2 NBCSW
at Charlotte Hornets
Wednesday
7 NBCSW
at Detroit Pistons
Friday
8 NBCSW Plus,
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Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
bad because, first of all, the team
was losing, but who didn’t freaking feel bad? Bottom line. A
month ago, I felt bad. I feel much
better now.
“The joy of the game was completely different when you play 15
minutes a game and you’re sitting
on the bench constantly and
you’re trying to help the team.
Then all of a sudden, a month
later you are on the court and you
are actually playing the games. So
it’s a completely different story.
The joy of the game is different
now.”
Longtime teammates recognize this as the Gortat experience
after playing alongside a passionate person who always speaks his
mind. John Wall has teamed with
Gortat since the center was traded to Washington from the Phoenix Suns right before the 2013-14
season. So Wall tried to understand any frustration Gortat may
have felt — or may continue to feel
— through the prism of his current role.
“It’s very tough — being paid,
then seeing other guys getting
paid,” Wall said of Gortat while
motioning toward backup Ian
Mahinmi’s locker. “It’s kind of
frustrating at the time. I mean,
not calling anybody out, but you
come and get paid more, it’s kind
of frustrating. And then the way
the league is evolving: He’s not an
athletic big. He’s not really a rim
runner, but he does a great job of
setting screens and getting us
open and catching the ball. So it’s
kind of tough because the league
is evolving into another way, and
he’s getting older.”
Gortat recognizes that the end
is near for his role as a traditional
6-foot-11 big man. The timeline of
his 11-year NBA career as a sturdy
center has coincided with a great
evolution in the game. Gortat
came into the NBA as the understudy to Dwight Howard during
an era when centers would battle
in the low post. Now big men
follow the analytics in driving for
dunks or shooting three-pointers.
Gortat refuses to assimilate —
even though he recently ended a
practice by nailing a game-winning three-pointer from the corner — and wants to go out on his
own terms. He will be screening,
pick-and-popping, rebounding
and taking charges until the end,
when he decides to stop playing.
“He’s always been a great teammate for us,” Wall said. “He has
times when he’s very emotional
and he expresses himself to the
media, but everybody expresses
themselves in different ways.
Sometimes you got to talk to him
like a baby. Sometimes you can
yell at him. But it goes different
ways. Sometimes you can yell at
me, or I ain’t dealing with the
yelling today. And I think he’s just
a very emotional guy that’s up and
down, but he’s been a person you
can count on every night, that’s
going to play just about every
game.”
Wizards Coach Scott Brooks
doesn’t think the curtain should
fall anytime soon.
“He’s improved his pick-androll defense,” Brooks said. “I
didn’t think that he was going to
be as good as he is now, [but] I
don’t see him as a three-point
shooter. You never know. It’s not
like his career is over after this
season. He’s not even 34 yet, so
there’s still some basketball. I
don’t think he should be thinking
about retiring yet.”
But the thought is there, coming up every now and then as
Gortat recognizes the reality of
being closer to the end of his
career than the beginning. Before
pulling up his blue “13” wristbands Friday, then collecting his
double-double, Gortat spoke
about his future and how there
will be life after basketball.
“I know it’s a story for everybody that all of a sudden a guy
who doesn’t miss games and I feel
pretty young and I don’t look that
old, all of a sudden he wants to
finish his career,” Gortat said.
“That’s how I am; that’s how I feel.
I know I have at least four more
years in my tank. I can go for four
more years and sign another good
contract. Money’s not the most
important thing for me in life. I
want to have a family. I’m thinking about family. I’m thinking
about children, about different
things in life.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Zofia Smardz contributed to this
report.
But they kept coming. Holiday
made three baskets and a couple
free throws in OT to help them
finish it off.
Kristaps Porzingis and Tim
Hardaway Jr. each scored
25 points for the Knicks, who lost
their third straight and 10th in
their past 12 games. Jarrett Jack
had a season-high 22 points, and
Enes Kanter finished with
18 points and 10 rebounds.
It was a miserable way to finish
a rare January home game for the
Knicks, who begin a seven-game,
coast-to-coast trip Monday.
Holiday put New Orleans ahead
for good with 1:52 to play, and
Davis had the next basket, making
it 120-117.
HEAT 97, BUCKS 79: Goran
Dragic scored 11 of his 25 points in
the fourth quarter, and Miami ran
its winning streak to seven games
by topping Milwaukee at home.
Josh Richardson scored 16 and
Hassan Whiteside finished with
15 points and 10 rebounds for Miami. The Heat trailed 43-41 at the
half, then took control by outscoring the Bucks 41-21 in the first
16 minutes of the second half.
Giannis
Antetokounmpo
scored 22 for Milwaukee, which
started 1 for 14 from the floor in the
second half and shot 32 percent
for the game.
The Heat turned the ball over
15 times, but Milwaukee converted those into only two points.
PACERS 120, SUNS 97: Darren Collison scored 19 points to
lead seven Indiana players in double figures, and the Pacers won in a
Hahn, who won both his PGA
Tour events in playoffs at Riviera
and Quail Hollow, had birdie
putts from 10 feet and six feet on
the par-5 18th hole at Waialae
Country Club in Honolulu that
would have won it. He made a
six-foot birdie another time to
extend the playoff.
Kizzire had to get up-anddown from a bunker for par on
the first extra hole, making a
seven-footer to stay alive.
This was the longest playoff on
the PGA Tour since Bryce Molder
won the Frys.com Open in 2012 in
eight extra holes.
Defending champion Justin
Thomas closed with a 68 and tied
for 14th. Jordan Spieth finished
with eight straight pars for a 66
and tied for 18th.
It nearly was the most exciting
tournament of the year (it’s only
the second week) that no one saw.
Union workers for video and audio production at Golf Channel
events walked out Sunday over a
labor dispute, and the network
had to scramble to provide limited coverage. They had enough
cameras at least to cover the final
three holes and the entire playoff,
with commentary coming from
headquarters in Florida.
CHAMPIONS TOUR: Scott
Parel beat fellow PGA Tour Champions player Scott Dunlap on the
first hole of a playoff to complete a
wire-to-wire victory in the Diamond Resorts Invitational.
The 52-year-old Parel won the
32-player professional division
with a par on the extra hole, the
203-yard 18th at Tranquilo Golf
Club in Orlando. Dunlap hit a fat
have battled each other in three
straight NBA Finals will square
off Monday in their second meeting in less than a month. This
time, though, the Golden State
Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers
find themselves farther apart
than at any time since this rivalry
was born 31/2 seasons ago.
The Warriors are flying high,
with the league’s best record and
wins in 20 of their past 23 games.
The Cavaliers, meanwhile, are
struggling, with losses in three
straight and seven of nine.
“You could win a hundred
straight games and face the Warriors and there are still challenges,” LeBron James told reporters
Friday night.
That may be true. But if the
Cavaliers don’t improve their play
Monday night, the challenge
might be impossible.
How bad has Cleveland been in
the days leading up to this grudge
match with Golden State? A demolition at the hands of the Minnesota Timberwolves on Jan. 8 was
followed by a 34-point shellacking
in Toronto on Thursday before the
Cavaliers blew a 22-point lead and
lost to the Indiana Pacers on Friday
night.
Along the way, Cavaliers Coach
Tyronn Lue made a cryptic comment about his players having
“agendas” after the Toronto loss
that he had to clean up the next
night; J.R. Smith and Jae Crowder
have continued their season-long
slumps; and the comeback of
Isaiah Thomas has hit some sizable speed bumps. None of that
even accounts for the biggest red
flag of all: Cleveland’s completely
inept defense, which ranks 29th
out of the 30 NBA teams.
The Cavaliers squad that had
won 18 of 19 heading into the first
meeting between these two
teams, the Christmas Day game
in Oakland, Calif., that Golden
State won, has been replaced by
the same disinterested group that
began the season 5-7 and was
blown out multiple times by awful teams.
Cleveland will wake up Monday closer in the Eastern Conference to the ninth-place Philadelphia 76ers (51/2 games ahead) than
the East-leading Boston Celtics
(seven games behind).
“I don’t know where it kind of
went wrong or what happened,”
James said after losing to the
Raptors. “We’ve got to try to pick
it back up and find it.”
While Cleveland is still trying
to find itself, Golden State has no
such problem. The Warriors are
on a 12-game road winning streak
after completing a road back-toback with victories over the Milwaukee Bucks on Friday and the
Toronto Raptors on Saturday.
After the Warriors used a
fourth-quarter surge to pull away
from Milwaukee in Friday’s win,
they welcomed back Stephen Curry, who sat out two games with a
sprained right ankle, by scoring
81 points in the first half against
Toronto in 24 minutes of basketball that saw them commit almost
zero mistakes.
And while Golden State fell
asleep in the second half, allowing Toronto to storm all the way
back from a 27-point halftime
deficit and nearly take the lead,
the Warriors managed to make
just enough plays — including a
crucial Kevin Durant pullup
jumper at the top of the key to put
Golden State up three with
21.8 seconds left — to ensure that
road winning streak stayed intact
heading to Quicken Loans Arena.
“Obviously our history with
Cleveland, you want to get a win.
You want to try to send a message,” Curry said. “It’s just a regular season game, but it’s an opportunity in front of us.
“That’s an interesting building,
and I’ve had some ups and downs
in there, so I’m looking forward to
the battle.”
A year ago, the Warriors hosted
the Cavaliers on Martin Luther
King Jr. Day and had lost four
straight games to Cleveland dating back to the final three games
of the 2016 NBA Finals. The Warriors won that game and now
have taken six of their past seven
against the Cavaliers.
That’s just one of many things
working against Cleveland in this
matchup. Ironically, it was this
Cleveland team’s greatest triumph — a full recovery after
trailing 3-1 in those 2016 NBA
Finals — that set up Golden State
to make the move that has turned
the Warriors into a dominant
juggernaut: the signing of Durant.
Though Golden State set a regular season record with 73 wins in
2016, doing so as a team with one
MVP-level player in Curry, the
Warriors played essentially one
style. The Durant pursuit was conducted with that in mind, to provide cover if there was ever another instance like Curry’s medial
collateral ligament sprain during
the 2016 playoffs and to give them
another style of play if their preferred version gets bogged down.
That happened in the fourth
quarter against the Raptors. With
the Warriors struggling throughout the second half, Golden State
went to its fail-safe down the
stretch: Give Durant the ball in
the midrange and let him rise up
over the defense.
That delivered Golden State its
final two baskets of Saturday’s
win — just enough to hold off
Toronto in a two-point win.
As one scout succinctly put it
while watching the action, “This
is why the Warriors are frustrating. Durant is a cheat code.”
That cheat code not only has
put the Warriors further out of
reach for normal NBA teams, but
it has created a far wider gulf
between them and their biggest
rival.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
TIMBERWOLVES
120,
TRAIL BLAZERS 103: Jimmy
Butler scored 24 points, Jeff
Teague added 22 and Minnesota
wrapped up a perfect homestand
with a victory in Minneapolis.
Karl-Anthony Towns had
20 points and 11 rebounds for his
NBA-leading 37th double-double
of the season. The Timberwolves
had their first 5-0 homestand
since 2001, winning each game by
double figures against New Orleans, Cleveland, Oklahoma City,
New York and Portland.
Kizzire tops Hahn to capture Sony Open in playo≠
Patton Kizzire outlasted James
Hahn in six extra holes to win the
Sony Open to become the first
multiple winner on the PGA Tour
this season.
Kizzire, who won the OHL
Classic in Mexico last fall, closed
with a 2-under-par 68.
James Hahn shot 62 in the final
round Sunday and got into a playoff with Kizzire at 17-under 263.
They matched two pars and
two birdies on the par-5 18th.
They matched pars when they
went to the par-3 17th. It ended on
the par 3 along the Pacific Ocean
when Hahn putted from right of
the green to about eight feet, and
his par putt caught the lip.
“It wasn’t pretty,” Kizzire said.
“I’ll take it any way I can get it.”
Warriors at Cavaliers
Today, 8 p.m., TNT
rout at Phoenix.
Victor Oladipo scored 13 of his
17 points in the first half for the
Pacers, who were coming off a
home victory over Cleveland and
have won four of five after a fivegame losing streak.
GOLF ROUNDUP
A SSOCIATED P RESS
T IM B ONTEMPS
cleveland — The teams that
Davis dominates as New Orleans makes huge rally
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Warriors visit Cavaliers
in now-lopsided rivalry
BY
NBA ROUNDUP
PELICANS 123,
KNICKS 118 (OT)
D5
M2
shot short into water and made a
double bogey.
EUROPEAN TOUR: Chris
Paisley beat home favorite Branden Grace to win the South African Open by three shots and claim
his first European Tour title.
Ahead by one overnight, Paisley increased the gap at the top
with a final-round 6-under 66 at
Glendower Golf Club in Johannesburg to finish 21 under overall.
The Englishman made six birdies
and didn’t drop a shot in the final
round on the way to his breakthrough win on the tour.
EURASIA CUP: Europe retained the EurAsia Cup in Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia, after putting
on a sensational showing on the
final day to tame Asia 14-10, courtesy of eight wins in the 12 singles
matches.
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D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. MONDAY,
JANUARY 15 , 2018
scoreboard
FO O T B A LL
BASKETBALL
H OC K E Y
NFL playoffs
NBA
NCAA men
No. 8 Oregon 74, Arizona St. 64
NHL
WILD CARD
SATURDAY, JAN. 6
EASTERN CONFERENCE
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Arizona St. (13-5)
Ibis 9-14 3-3 22, Johnson-Chapman 6-8 0-0 12, Ekmark
4-9 3-4 15, Richardson 1-7 2-2 4, Ryan 1-8 0-0 2, Elenga
1-4 0-0 2, Russell 2-4 2-2 7, Sanders 0-1 0-0 0, 24-55
Totals 10-11 64.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Tennessee 22, at Kansas City 21
Atlanta 26, at Los Angeles Rams 13
SUNDAY, JAN. 7
at Jacksonville 10, Buffalo 3
at New Orleans 31, Carolina 26
DIVISIONAL ROUND
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
at Philadelphia 15, Atlanta 10
at New England 35, Tennessee 14
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................34
Toronto ......................................29
Philadelphia ...............................19
New York ...................................19
Brooklyn.....................................16
L
10
12
20
24
27
Pct
.773
.707
.487
.442
.372
GB
—
31/2
121/2
141/2
171/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Miami.........................................25
Washington ...............................25
Charlotte....................................16
Orlando ......................................12
Atlanta.......................................11
L
17
18
25
31
31
Pct
.595
.581
.390
.279
.262
GB
—
8
13
14
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................26
Detroit .......................................22
Indiana .......................................23
Milwaukee .................................22
Chicago ......................................16
L
16
19
20
20
27
Pct
.619
.537
.535
.524
.372
GB
—
31/2
31/2
4
101/2
L
11
15
20
29
28
Pct
.732
.659
.524
.341
.317
GB
—
21/2
81/2
161/2
17
1/
2
1/
2
1/
2
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Jacksonville 45, at Pittsburgh 42
Minnesota 29, at New Orleans 24
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
SUNDAY’S GAMES
AFC
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Jacksonville at New England, 3:05 (CBS)
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 6:40 (Fox)
PRO BOWL
SUNDAY, JAN. 28
AT ORLANDO, FLA.
AFC vs. NFC, 3 (ESPN/ABC)
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................29
Oklahoma City ...........................23
Portland .....................................22
Denver........................................22
Utah ...........................................17
SUPER BOWL
SUNDAY, FEB. 4
AT MINNEAPOLIS
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 (NBC)
Jaguars 45, Steelers 42
JAGUARS ............................... 14
STEELERS ................................ 0
14
14
0
7
17 — 45
21 — 42
FIRST QUARTER
Jacksonville: Fournette 1 run (Lambo kick), 10:40.
Jacksonville: Fournette 18 run (Lambo kick), 5:26.
SECOND QUARTER
Jacksonville: Yeldon 4 run (Lambo kick), 11:31.
Pittsburgh: A.Brown 23 pass from Roethlisberger (Boswell kick), 8:20.
Jacksonville: Smith 50 fumble return (Lambo kick),
2:20.
Pittsburgh: Bryant 36 pass from Roethlisberger (Boswell kick), :25.
THIRD QUARTER
Pittsburgh: Bell 19 pass from Roethlisberger (Boswell
kick), 9:09.
FOURTH QUARTER
Jacksonville: Fournette 3 run (Lambo kick), 10:34.
Pittsburgh: A.Brown 43 pass from Roethlisberger (Boswell kick), 9:05.
Jacksonville: Bohanon 14 pass from Bortles (Lambo
kick), 4:19.
Pittsburgh: Bell 8 run (Boswell kick), 2:18.
Jacksonville: FG Lambo 45, 1:45.
Pittsburgh: Smith-Schuster 4 pass from Roethlisberger
(Boswell kick), :01.
Attendance: 64,524.
JAGUARS
First Downs .......................................... 22
Total Net Yards ................................... 378
Rushes-Yards ............................... 35-164
Passing ................................................ 214
Punt Returns ....................................... 0-0
Kickoff Returns ................................. 3-47
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 1-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 14-26-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 0-0
Punts .............................................. 4-32.8
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 1-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 3-40
Time Of Possession ......................... 28:50
STEELERS
28
545
18-83
462
0-0
4-104
0-0
37-58-1
2-7
2-39.5
1-1
4-25
31:10
RUSHING
Jacksonville: Fournette 25-109, Bortles 5-35, Yeldon
5-20.
Pittsburgh: Bell 16-67, Roethlisberger 2-16.
PASSING
Jacksonville: Bortles 14-26-0-214.
Pittsburgh: Roethlisberger 37-58-1-469.
RECEIVING
Jacksonville: Yeldon 3-57, Lee 3-28, Fournette 2-10,
Cole 1-45, Koyack 1-21, O’Shaughnessy 1-19, Bohanon
1-14, Hurns 1-12, Westbrook 1-8.
Pittsburgh: McDonald 10-112, Bell 9-88, A.Brown 7132, Rogers 5-42, Smith-Schuster 3-5, Bryant 2-78,
James 1-12.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
L
16
20
21
21
25
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................35
L.A. Clippers...............................21
Phoenix ......................................16
L.A. Lakers .................................15
Sacramento ...............................13
Pct
.644
.535
.512
.512
.405
L
9
21
28
27
29
GB
—
5
6
6
101/2
Pct
.795
.500
.364
.357
.310
GB
—
13
19
19
21
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 119, Brooklyn 113, OT
L.A. Lakers 107, Dallas 101, OT
L.A. Clippers 126, Sacramento 105
Oklahoma City 101, Charlotte 91
Golden State 127, Toronto 125
Chicago 107, Detroit 105
San Antonio 112, Denver 80
SAINTS ..................................... 0
VIKINGS ................................. 10
0
7
7
0
17 — 24
12 — 29
FIRST QUARTER
Minnesota: McKinnon 14 run (Forbath kick), 9:45.
Minnesota: FG Forbath 20, 4:42.
SECOND QUARTER
THIRD QUARTER
New Orleans: Thomas 14 pass from Brees (Lutz kick),
1:18.
FOURTH QUARTER
New Orleans: Thomas 3 pass from Brees (Lutz kick),
13:09.
Minnesota: FG Forbath 49, 10:12.
New Orleans: Kamara 14 pass from Brees (Lutz kick),
3:01.
Minnesota: FG Forbath 53, 1:29.
New Orleans: FG Lutz 43, :25.
Minnesota: Diggs 61 pass from Keenum (run failed),
:00.
Attendance: 66,612.
SAINTS
First Downs .......................................... 23
Total Net Yards ................................... 358
Rushes-Yards ................................. 24-80
Passing ................................................ 278
Punt Returns ....................................... 1-1
Kickoff Returns ................................. 2-50
Interceptions Ret. ............................. 1-12
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 25-41-2
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 2-16
Punts .............................................. 4-48.0
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 1-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 7-97
Time Of Possession ......................... 26:43
VIKINGS
24
403
29-95
308
1-19
0-0
2-18
25-40-1
2-10
4-31.8
0-0
4-30
33:17
RUSHING
New Orleans: Kamara 11-43, Ingram 10-25, Ginn 1-11,
Brees 2-1.
Minnesota: Murray 19-50, McKinnon 8-34, Ham 1-7,
Keenum 1-4.
PASSING
New Orleans: Ginn 8-72, Thomas 7-85, Kamara 4-62,
J.Hill 3-54, Snead 2-18, Ingram 1-3.
Minnesota: Diggs 6-137, Thielen 6-74, Rudolph 5-28,
Wright 3-56, McKinnon 3-6, Murray 2-17.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
New Orleans: Lutz 58.
Minnesota: Forbath 49.
T RA NSA C T I ONS
MLB
New York Mets: Agreed to terms with 1B Adrian
Gonzalez on a one-year contract.
San Diego Padres: Agreed to terms with LHP Brad Hand
on a three-year contract.
NBA
New Orleans Pelicans: Signed G Mike James to a
two-way contract.
New York Knicks: Signed G Trey Burke.
NFL
N.C. State (12-6)
Abu 2-5 0-0 4, Yurtseven 3-8 0-0 6, Dorn 7-12 1-2 16,
Beverly 2-8 0-0 4, A.Freeman 0-5 0-0 0, L.Freeman 4-8
1-2 9, M.Johnson 0-2 0-0 0, Hunt 0-0 0-0 0, Batts 5-8 1-1
12. 23-56 Totals 3-5 51.
Virginia (16-1)
Wilkins 3-4 3-3 10, Salt 1-3 0-0 2, Guy 7-11 0-0 17, Hall
7-9 7-7 25, Jerome 3-7 2-2 8, Diakite 0-2 0-0 0, N.Johnson
2-4 0-0 4, Hunter 0-1 2-4 2. Totals 23-41 14-16 68.
Halftime: Virginia 30-20. Three-point goals: NC State
2-16 (Dorn 1-2, Batts 1-3, A.Freeman 0-2, M.Johnson
0-2, Yurtseven 0-2, Beverly 0-5), Virginia 8-14 (Hall 4-5,
Guy 3-6, Wilkins 1-1, N.Johnson 0-1, Jerome 0-1). Fouled
out: None. Rebounds: NC State 25 (Yurtseven 6),
Virginia 26 (Wilkins 6). Assists: NC State 7 (M.Johnson
5), Virginia 16 (Jerome 6). Total fouls: NC State 18,
Virginia 10.
MONDAY’S GAMES
Halftime: Army 35-23. Three-point goals: Army 7-18
(King 3-4, J.Fox 3-9, Morrison 1-2, Grayson 0-1, Blackwell 0-2), Navy 4-22 (Anderson 2-4, Pearson 1-1, Davis
1-5, Lacey 0-1, Dulin 0-3, Kiernan 0-3, Abdullah 0-5).
Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Army 23 (Thiombane 6),
Navy 37 (Lacey, Kiernan 9). Assists: Army 14 (Funk 5),
Navy 11 (Abdullah 5). Total fouls: Army 22, Navy 16. A:
5,710 (5,710).
Milwaukee at Washington, 2
Charlotte at Detroit, 12:30
Toronto at Philadelphia, 1
New York at Brooklyn, 3
San Antonio at Atlanta, 3
Miami at Chicago, 3:30
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 5:30
Golden State at Cleveland, 8
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8
Indiana at Utah, 9
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
Lehigh 76, American 66
American U. (4-13)
Iorio 1-6 0-0 2, Motuzis 4-12 4-7 14, Diallo 4-11 1-2 13,
Nelson 4-13 7-8 16, Bragg 3-5 1-2 10, Little 1-1 1-2 3,
Beckton 1-2 0-0 3, Washington 2-5 0-0 5, Brown 0-0 0-0
0. 20-55 Totals 14-21 66.
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Minnesota at Orlando, 7
New Orleans at Boston, 7:30
Dallas at Denver, 9
Phoenix at Portland, 10
Lehigh (8-9)
Andree 6-12 4-4 19, Karnik 6-9 4-6 16, Leufroy 3-10 3-3
10, Tejada 4-10 4-4 13, Ross 2-8 2-2 6, Sedore 0-0 0-0 0,
Cohen 1-3 4-4 6, Bennett 2-3 0-0 4, Wilson 1-2 0-0 2.
Totals 25-57 21-23 76.
Pelicans 123, Knicks 118 (OT)
NEW ORLEANS ............. 13
NEW YORK .................... 29
35
28
34
39
27
13
14 — 123
9 — 118
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 6-14 0-0 16, Davis 17-30 12-15
48, Cousins 4-16 7-12 15, Rondo 2-7 0-0 4, Holiday 12-19
4-5 31, Cunningham 0-0 0-0 0, Miller 2-4 0-0 4, Clark 2-5
1-2 5. Totals 45-95 24-34 123.
NEW YORK: Thomas 2-5 2-2 7, Porzingis 10-24 1-2 25,
Kanter 9-14 0-0 18, Jack 9-14 2-2 22, Lee 3-10 0-0 7,
Beasley 0-4 0-0 0, McDermott 3-4 0-0 8, O’Quinn 2-3 2-2
6, Ntilikina 0-2 0-0 0, Hardaway Jr. 8-17 7-10 25. Totals
46-97 14-18 118.
Three-point Goals: New Orleans 9-32 (Moore 4-7,
Holiday 3-7, Davis 2-6, Miller 0-1, Clark 0-3, Rondo 0-3,
Cousins 0-5), New York 12-34 (Porzingis 4-10, McDermott 2-2, Jack 2-3, Hardaway Jr. 2-10, Thomas 1-1, Lee
1-5, Beasley 0-1, Ntilikina 0-2). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: New Orleans 47 (Davis 17), New York 44
(Kanter 10). Assists: New Orleans 19 (Rondo, Cousins
5), New York 28 (Jack 8). Total Fouls: New Orleans 17,
New York 27. Technicals: New York coach Knicks
(Defensive three second). A: 19,812 (19,812).
Heat 97, Bucks 79
MILWAUKEE ...................... 23
MIAMI ................................ 21
20
20
16
30
20 — 79
26 — 97
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 3-16 9-10 16, Antetokounmpo
6-12 10-10 22, Henson 2-5 0-0 4, Bledsoe 4-16 2-3 10,
Brogdon 7-12 0-0 15, Snell 1-4 0-0 3, Maker 0-5 2-2 2,
Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Dellavedova 1-2 0-0 2, Kilpatrick 0-2
2-2 2, Brown 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 25-79 25-27 79.
Three-point Goals: Milwaukee 4-28 (Brogdon 1-3, Brown
1-3, Snell 1-4, Middleton 1-8, Maker 0-1, Henson 0-1,
Kilpatrick 0-2, Bledsoe 0-6), Miami 11-29 (Dragic 4-6,
T.Johnson 3-8, Richardson 2-2, Winslow 1-1, Ellington
1-7, J.Johnson 0-2, Olynyk 0-3). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Milwaukee 40 (Henson 9), Miami 49 (Whiteside 10). Assists: Milwaukee 9 (Bledsoe 4), Miami 23
(J.Johnson 8). Total Fouls: Milwaukee 23, Miami 18. A:
19,600 (19,600).
Pacers 120, Suns 97
INDIANA ............................. 30
PHOENIX ............................ 16
NCAA women
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
American U. 82, Lehigh 64
Bucknell 77, Colgate 57
Delaware 51, Towson 49
Drexel 68, UNC Wilmington 42
George Mason 92, Rhode Island 53
Hofstra 65, Coll. of Charleston 60
Lafayette 65, Loyola (Md.) 54
Navy 70, Army 44
Pittsburgh 68, Georgia Tech 62
Seton Hall 70, Georgetown 65
St. John’s 70, Villanova 64
Arkansas 68, Auburn 58
Davidson 68, Richmond 65
Duke 55, Virginia 48
Florida St. 107, Virginia Tech 62
Fordham 64, VCU 54
LSU 66, Florida 59
Miami 72, Clemson 60
Mississippi St. 75, Alabama 61
N.C. State 60, Syracuse 56
North Carolina 79, Wake Forest 76
South Florida 62, UCF 45
Tennessee 86, South Carolina 70
William & Mary 81, Elon 75
MIDWEST
Dayton 101, Saint Louis 76
DePaul 87, Butler 65
Drake 107, Evansville 66
Illinois St. 49, S. Illinois 46
Marquette 88, Xavier 67
Missouri St. 71, Bradley 65
N. Iowa 59, Indiana St. 53
Notre Dame 89, Boston College 60
Penn St. 69, Wisconsin 62
SOUTHWEST
34
28
32
22
24 — 120
31 — 97
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 4-10 4-4 14, T.Young 4-7 0-0 10,
Sabonis 2-5 0-0 4, Collison 8-14 2-2 19, Oladipo 6-11 3-4
17, Leaf 4-6 0-0 9, Poythress 0-1 0-0 0, Anigbogu 1-1 0-0
2, Jefferson 5-9 0-0 10, J.Young 4-7 2-2 10, Joseph 7-11
0-0 16, Stephenson 3-6 2-2 9. Totals 48-88 13-14 120.
PHOENIX: Jackson 7-16 5-5 21, Bender 0-7 0-0 0,
Chandler 3-5 3-4 9, Ulis 5-9 0-0 10, Booker 5-16 4-4 15,
House 0-3 1-2 1, Dudley 0-1 0-0 0, Peters 1-4 0-0 3,
Monroe 0-0 0-0 0, Len 6-7 0-2 12, Canaan 3-6 5-7 13,
Daniels 5-9 0-0 13, Reed 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 35-85 18-24 97.
Three-point Goals: Indiana 11-23 (T.Young 2-3, Joseph
2-3, Oladipo 2-4, Bogdanovic 2-5, Leaf 1-1, Stephenson
1-2, Collison 1-4, J.Young 0-1), Phoenix 9-37 (Daniels
3-5, Canaan 2-4, Jackson 2-6, Peters 1-4, Booker 1-6,
Dudley 0-1, Reed 0-1, Ulis 0-2, House 0-2, Bender 0-6).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 42 (Sabonis 14),
Phoenix 45 (Chandler 14). Assists: Indiana 20 (Joseph
6), Phoenix 20 (Booker 7). Total Fouls: Indiana 22,
Phoenix 16. Technicals: Booker. A: 17,091 (18,055).
Timberwolves 120,
Trail Blazers 103
PORTLAND ......................... 33
MINNESOTA ...................... 31
Halftime: Lehigh 35-23. Three-point goals: American U.
12-32 (Diallo 4-9, Bragg 3-5, Motuzis 2-7, Beckton 1-1,
Nelson 1-3, Washington 1-3, Iorio 0-4), Lehigh 5-15
(Andree 3-5, Leufroy 1-2, Tejada 1-3, Wilson 0-1, Karnik
0-1, Ross 0-1, Cohen 0-2). Fouled out: Little, Iorio.
Rebounds: American U. 27 (Motuzis 12), Lehigh 36
(Karnik 12). Assists: American U. 14 (Nelson 6), Lehigh
16 (Ross 8). Total fouls: American U. 19, Lehigh 22. A:
1,358 (6,000).
SOUTH
10
26
31
34
29 — 103
29 — 120
PORTLAND: Turner 2-6 4-4 8, Aminu 3-7 0-0 6, Nurkic 3-6
2-2 8, Lillard 7-14 5-6 21, McCollum 7-15 1-1 18, Layman
0-0 0-0 0, Harkless 0-1 0-0 0, Leonard 4-4 0-0 8, Davis 0-1
0-2 0, Collins 3-5 0-0 7, Vonleh 0-2 0-0 0, Napier 3-5 2-2 9,
Connaughton 7-13 0-0 18. Totals 39-79 14-17 103.
Baylor 74, Oklahoma 52
Georgia 92, Texas A&M 84
WEST
California 66, Washington St. 60
Oregon St. 88, Arizona 48
Southern Cal 58, Utah 47
No. 13 Florida State 107,
Virginia Tech 62
Virginia Tech (13-5)
Jean 0-8 0-0 0, Magarity 4-12 1-1 10, Brooks 2-6 0-0 6,
Camp 4-8 2-2 10, Emery 6-17 3-3 17, Berry 1-8 1-2 3,
Brooks 0-0 0-0 0, Hicks 3-6 4-5 10, Sheppard 2-7 0-0 6,
22-72 Totals 11-13 62.
Florida St. (16-2)
Degbeon 4-6 2-2 10, White 4-7 2-2 10, Alix 5-9 0-0 11,
Ekhomu 5-6 6-6 16, Wright 7-14 1-2 18, Lopez 0-1 1-2 1,
Thomas 8-14 5-7 21, Wilkinson 2-2 0-0 6, Woolfolk 6-9
0-0 14, 41-68 Totals 17-21 107.
VIRGINIA TECH .................... 8 18 17 19
—62
FLORIDA ST. ....................... 28 25 20 34 —107
Three-point goals: Virginia Tech 7-25 (Jean 0-3, Magarity 1-3, Brooks 2-6, Camp 0-1, Emery 2-7, Sheppard 2-5),
Florida St. 8-14 (Alix 1-3, Wright 3-6, Wilkinson 2-2,
Woolfolk 2-3). Assists: Virginia Tech 13 (Hicks 6),
Florida St. 18 (Alix 7). Fouled out: None. Rebounds:
Virginia Tech 30 (Emery 6), Florida St. 48 (Degbeon 13).
Total fouls: Virginia Tech 17, Florida St. 11. A: 4,983.
No. 16 Duke 55, Virginia 48
MINNESOTA: Wiggins 8-11 1-2 17, Gibson 6-11 0-0 12,
Towns 6-11 6-7 20, Teague 8-15 5-6 22, Butler 7-11 9-11
24, Georges-Hunt 0-0 2-2 2, Muhammad 0-2 2-2 2,
Bjelica 2-4 0-0 5, Dieng 1-2 0-0 2, Brooks 0-1 0-0 0, Jones
2-3 0-0 4, Crawford 3-9 2-3 10. Totals 43-80 27-33 120.
Virginia (12-7)
Aiyeotan 1-3 0-0 2, Huland El 6-13 0-0 14, Tinsley 2-4 0-0
6, Toussaint 2-8 0-0 6, Willoughby 4-11 0-0 11,
Jablonowski 1-1 0-0 2, Moses 0-2 0-0 0, Brown 3-9 0-0 7,
19-51 Totals 0-0 48.
Three-point Goals: Portland 11-25 (Connaughton 4-8,
McCollum 3-4, Lillard 2-6, Collins 1-1, Napier 1-2, Turner
0-1, Aminu 0-1, Harkless 0-1, Vonleh 0-1), Minnesota
7-19 (Towns 2-3, Crawford 2-7, Butler 1-1, Teague 1-1,
Bjelica 1-2, Wiggins 0-1, Dieng 0-1, Gibson 0-1, Brooks
0-1, Jones 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Portland
38 (Davis 8), Minnesota 38 (Towns 11). Assists:
Portland 19 (Lillard 8), Minnesota 21 (Teague 8). Total
Fouls: Portland 27, Minnesota 17. Technicals: Portland
coach Trail Blazers (Defensive three second), Portland
coach Terry Stotts, Crawford. A: 14,739 (18,798).
Duke (14-4)
Mathias 3-7 6-7 12, Williams 2-5 0-0 4, Brown 3-13 6-8
14, Gorecki 3-9 1-2 8, Greenwell 2-5 2-2 7, Odom 3-4 1-2
7, Adams 1-1 0-0 3, 17-44 Totals 16-21 55.
VIRGINIA ............................ 18
5 13 12
—48
DUKE .................................. 11 13 16 15
—55
Three-point goals: Virginia 10-25 (Huland El 2-5, Tinsley
2-2, Toussaint 2-8, Willoughby 3-5, Brown 1-5), Duke
5-16 (Brown 2-7, Gorecki 1-5, Greenwell 1-3, Adams
1-1). Assists: Virginia 14 (Huland El 3), Duke 12 (Brown
4). Fouled out: Virginia Moses, Rebounds: Virginia 32
(Willoughby 10), Duke 30 (Odom 9). Total fouls: Virginia
20, Duke 10. A: 3,856.
NBA INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Entering Sunday’s games
POINTS
Harden, HOU .....................
Antetokounmpo, MIL .......
James, CLE ........................
Durant, GOL ......................
Davis, NOR ........................
Cousins, NOR ....................
G
35
39
42
36
35
41
SATURDAY
REBOUNDS
Drummond, DET ...............
Jordan, L.A.C. ....................
Cousins, NOR ....................
Howard, CHA ....................
Towns, MIN .......................
Capela, HOU ......................
G OFF. DEF. TOT. AVG.
39 194 392 586 15.0
41 180 429 609 14.9
41
85 429 514 12.5
41 145 358 503 12.3
44 122 406 528 12.0
36 120 283 403 11.2
At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Errol Spence
Jr. vs. Lamont Peterson, 12, for Spence’s IBF welterweight title; Robert Easter vs. Javier Fortuna, 12, for
Easter’s IBF lightweight title; Marcus Browne vs. Francy
Ntetu, 10, light heavyweights; Adam Kownacki vs. Iago
Kiladze, 10, heavyweights; Anthony Peterson vs. Luis
Florez, 10, super lightweights.
ASSISTS PER GAME
Westbrook, OKC ..............................
Wall, WAS .......................................
Harden, HOU ...................................
James, CLE ......................................
Green, GOL ......................................
Fight schedule
No. 3 Virginia 68, N.C. State 51
Miami 97, Milwaukee 79
New Orleans 123, New York 118, OT
ndiana 120, Phoenix 97
Minnesota 120, Portland 103
NHL
B O X ING
WEST
Navy (12-7)
Lacey 4-11 1-2 9, Wieck 0-4 0-0 0, Dulin 1-8 0-0 2,
Anderson 6-12 10-10 24, Abdullah 1-7 2-2 4, Riemersma
1-1 0-0 2, Kiernan 3-9 7-8 13, Pearson 1-1 0-0 3, N.Fox 0-0
0-0 0, Davis 2-6 0-0 5. Totals 19-59 20-22 62.
Buffalo Bills: Named Brian Daboll offensive coordinator.
NHL: Suspended Anaheim F Andrew Cogliano two
games, without pay, for an interference penalty against
Los Angeles F Adrian Kempe on Saturday night.
Buffalo Sabres: Assigned G Jonas Johansson from
Rochester (AHL) to Cincinnati (ECHL).
Calgary Flames: Placed F Jaromir Jagr on injured reserve,
retroactive to Dec. 31. Recalled F Ryan Lomberg from
Stockton (AHL).
Carolina Hurricanes: Reassigned F Lucas Wallmark to
Charlotte (AHL).
Indiana 66, Northwestern 46
Missouri St. 76, Indiana St. 73
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
New Orleans: Brees 25-40-2-294, Snead 0-1-0-0.
Minnesota: Keenum 25-40-1-318.
RECEIVING
MIDWEST
Army (11-6)
Morrison 1-3 0-0 3, Wilson 2-5 1-2 5, Kessler 0-0 2-2 2,
J.Fox 4-10 0-2 11, Funk 4-6 4-4 12, Thiombane 1-3 0-1 2,
King 7-10 0-3 17, Miller 1-1 0-0 2, Grayson 2-3 0-0 4,
Blackwell 1-3 4-6 6, Emezie 0-0 0-0 0. 23-44 Totals 11-20
64.
MIAMI: Richardson 6-9 2-2 16, J.Johnson 2-8 0-0 4,
Whiteside 5-6 5-7 15, Dragic 9-17 3-4 25, T.Johnson 5-11
1-1 14, Winslow 1-4 0-0 3, Olynyk 3-7 1-1 7, Adebayo 2-6
2-2 6, Ellington 2-8 2-3 7. Totals 35-76 16-20 97.
Minnesota: Murray 1 run (Forbath kick), 9:58.
Houston 65, East Carolina 49
Virginia 68, N.C. State 51
Army 64, Navy 62
None.
Vikings 29, Saints 24
SOUTH
Oregon (17-2)
Hebard 9-9 2-3 20, Sabally 4-8 2-2 10, Bando 0-1 0-0 0,
Cazorla 6-11 0-0 15, Ionescu 11-15 2-4 26, Gildon 1-1 0-0
2, McGwire 0-2 1-2 1, Ayuso 0-0 0-0 0, Maley 0-0 0-0 0,
31-47 Totals 7-11 74.
ARIZONA ST. ...................... 12 22
5 25
—64
OREGON ............................. 22 16 21 15
—74
Three-point goals: Arizona St. 6-18 (Ibis 1-2, Ekmark
4-8, Richardson 0-4, Ryan 0-3, Russell 1-1), Oregon 5-12
(Sabally 0-2, Cazorla 3-6, Ionescu 2-4). Assists: Arizona
St. 12 (Russell 4), Oregon 15 (Cazorla 5). Fouled out:
None. Rebounds: Arizona St. 23 (Elenga 6), Oregon 25
(Hebard 6). Total fouls: Arizona St. 16, Oregon 14. A:
4,416.
FG
334
410
436
343
335
358
FT
319
275
189
168
218
249
G
43
32
35
42
38
PTS.
1132
1112
1140
945
912
1058
AST.
428
297
318
371
288
AVG.
32.3
28.5
27.1
26.2
26.1
25.8
AVG.
10.0
9.3
9.1
8.8
7.6
No. 6 Tennessee 86,
No. 9 South Carolina 70
Tennessee (16-1)
Davis 5-8 1-2 11, Nared 5-13 11-12 21, Russell 7-9 2-2 16,
Jackson 2-5 0-2 6, Westbrook 6-11 0-4 14, Dunbar 2-2 0-0
6, Green 0-0 1-2 1, Hayes 4-7 3-4 11, 31-55 Totals 18-28
86.
South Carolina (14-3)
Herbert Harrigan 3-9 0-2 6, Jennings 5-7 2-3 12, Cliney
4-13 1-2 9, Harris 9-21 7-10 28, Spann 1-4 0-0 3, Grissett
4-5 2-4 10, Williams 0-0 0-0 0, Jackson 0-4 2-2 2, Patrick
0-1 0-0 0, 26-64 Totals 14-23 70.
TENNESSEE ....................... 21 22 25 18
—86
SOUTH CAROLINA ............. 14 21 22 13
—70
Three-point goals: Tennessee 6-12 (Davis 0-1, Nared
0-2, Jackson 2-5, Westbrook 2-2, Dunbar 2-2), South
Carolina 4-15 (Cliney 0-1, Harris 3-8, Spann 1-4, Jackson
0-1, Patrick 0-1). Assists: Tennessee 16 (Westbrook 5),
South Carolina 4 (Harris 4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds:
Tennessee 41 (Russell 12), South Carolina 28 (Grissett
8). Total fouls: Tennessee 17, South Carolina 20. A:
14,763.
Late Saturday
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Columbus ......................
New Jersey ...................
Pittsburgh .....................
N.Y. Rangers .................
Philadelphia ..................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
Carolina .........................
W
28
25
22
24
22
20
22
20
L
14
18
12
19
17
15
18
17
OL PTS. GF GA
3
59 140 127
3
53 124 129
8
52 133 130
3
51 135 141
5
49 132 129
8
48 128 125
4
48 153 160
8
48 126 140
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Detroit ..........................
Florida ...........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
31
24
25
18
18
18
15
11
L
10
10
17
18
19
20
18
24
OL PTS. GF GA
3
65 161 112
7
55 135 105
3
53 146 131
7
43 117 131
6
42 122 141
5
41 111 133
9
39 117 149
9
31 99 151
WESTERN CONFERENCE
GOLF
Hawaii 77, UC Santa Barbara 76
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................30
San Antonio ...............................29
New Orleans ..............................22
Dallas .........................................15
Memphis ....................................13
NFC
Army 64, Navy 62
Boston U. 54, Holy Cross 40
Canisius 94, Monmouth (N.J.) 79
Davidson 75, Fordham 45
Iona 91, Rider 64
Lehigh 76, American U. 66
Loyola (Md.) 83, Lafayette 77
Niagara 73, St. Peter’s 70
Ohio St. 68, Rutgers 46
U-Mass. 72, Saint Joseph’s 69
Avalanche 4, Stars 1
PGA Tour
SONY OPEN
At Waialae CC; In Honolulu
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,044; Par: 70
(x-won on sixth playoff hole)
FINAL
$1,116,000
x-Patton Kizzire (500) ............. 67 64 64 68
$669,600
James Hahn (300) .................... 67 69 65 62
$421,600
Tom Hoge (190) ....................... 65 65 64 70
$256,267
Webb Simpson (115) ............... 67 70 63 65
Brian Stuard (115) ................... 67 66 67 65
Brian Harman (115) ................. 64 63 68 70
$193,233
Gary Woodland (85) ................. 67 67 68 64
Ben Martin (85) ........................ 69 66 66 65
Ollie Schniederjans (85) .......... 66 65 67 68
$148,800
Ryan Blaum (68) ...................... 66 68 68 65
Chris Kirk (68) .......................... 63 67 67 70
Russell Knox (68) ..................... 69 64 65 69
Kyle Stanley (68) ..................... 64 67 65 71
$108,500
Daniel Berger (54) .................... 67 68 69 64
Zach Johnson (54) .................... 63 67 71 67
Jerry Kelly (54) ........................ 66 67 69 66
Justin Thomas (54) .................. 67 67 66 68
$75,463
Austin Cook (43) ...................... 67 71 65 66
Jason Dufner (43) .................... 69 65 69 66
Daisuke Kataoka, ..................... 65 68 69 67
Chez Reavie (43) ...................... 68 69 65 67
Jordan Spieth (43) ................... 69 68 66 66
Talor Gooch (43) ....................... 64 66 70 69
Cameron Smith (43) ................. 66 67 66 70
$46,323
Jonathan Byrd (31) .................. 68 68 67 67
Brandon Harkins (31) ............... 67 68 69 66
Kevin Kisner (31) ..................... 68 64 71 67
Keith Mitchell (31) ................... 70 66 67 67
Xinjun Zhang (31) .................... 72 65 66 67
Scott Piercy (31) ...................... 69 67 65 69
Sam Saunders (31) .................. 67 67 66 70
$33,569
Charles Howell III (21) ............. 67 68 69 67
Wesley Bryan (21) ................... 68 66 70 67
Stewart Cink (21) ..................... 70 64 69 68
Tony Finau (21) ........................ 70 67 67 67
Nicholas Lindheim (21) ............ 66 70 67 68
Rory Sabbatini (21) .................. 71 65 65 70
Xander Schauffele (21) ............ 68 64 72 67
$23,560
Ryan Armour (14) .................... 67 67 67 71
Dominic Bozzelli (14) ............... 70 67 67 68
Keegan Bradley (14) ................ 70 68 67 67
Corey Conners (14) .................. 70 66 67 69
Matt Jones (14) ....................... 67 68 68 69
Nate Lashley (14) ..................... 68 67 66 71
Jonathan Randolph (14) .......... 69 68 69 66
Adam Schenk (14) .................... 70 65 69 68
$15,925
Marc Leishman (9) ................... 68 66 71 68
John Peterson (9) .................... 66 64 74 69
Roberto Diaz (9) ....................... 70 67 70 66
Emiliano Grillo (9) .................... 68 67 67 71
Jason Kokrak (9) ...................... 67 70 68 68
Conrad Shindler (9) .................. 66 72 67 68
J.J. Spaun (9) ........................... 67 70 70 66
$14,198
Shugo Imahira, ......................... 67 71 70 66
Stephan Jaeger (6) .................. 68 70 70 66
Seamus Power (6) .................... 68 68 71 67
Hudson Swafford (6) ............... 68 66 73 67
$13,578
Brian Gay (5) ............................ 70 68 67 70
Lanto Griffin (5) ....................... 67 70 66 72
Si Woo Kim (5) ......................... 67 71 70 67
Ryan Palmer (5) ....................... 71 64 71 69
Sam Ryder (5) .......................... 68 70 68 69
Tyrone Van Aswegen (5) ......... 68 68 69 70
$13,144
Harris English (4) ..................... 69 65 70 72
$12,958
Scott Brown (4) ........................ 69 67 66 75
William McGirt (4) ................... 66 72 72 67
$12,710
Blayne Barber (4) ..................... 68 69 72 69
John Oda, .................................. 68 70 69 71
$12,338
Steve Allan, .............................. 68 70 72 69
Colt Knost (3) ........................... 68 70 73 68
Andrew Putnam (3) ................. 71 66 71 71
Kevin Tway (3) ......................... 71 66 71 71
$11,966
Joel Dahmen (3) ....................... 68 70 74 68
D.A. Points (3) .......................... 68 70 72 70
$11,780
Matt Every (3) .......................... 65 71 71 74
$11,656
Vaughn Taylor (2) .................... 64 73 72 73
— 263 -17
— 263 -17
— 264 -16
— 265 -15
— 265 -15
— 265 -15
— 266 -14
— 266 -14
— 266 -14
—
—
—
—
267
267
267
267
-13
-13
-13
-13
—
—
—
—
268
268
268
268
-12
-12
-12
-12
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
269
269
269
269
269
269
269
-11
-11
-11
-11
-11
-11
-11
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
270
270
270
270
270
270
270
-10
-10
-10
-10
-10
-10
-10
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
271
271
271
271
271
271
271
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
272
272
272
272
272
272
272
272
-8
-8
-8
-8
-8
-8
-8
-8
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
273
273
273
273
273
273
273
-7
-7
-7
-7
-7
-7
-7
—
—
—
—
274
274
274
274
-6
-6
-6
-6
—
—
—
—
—
—
275
275
275
275
275
275
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
CENTRAL
Winnipeg ......................
Nashville .......................
St. Louis ........................
Minnesota .....................
Dallas ............................
Chicago .........................
Colorado ........................
W
26
25
26
24
24
22
23
L
13
11
17
17
17
17
16
OL PTS. GF GA
7
59 153 127
6
56 131 114
3
55 134 122
5
53 133 131
3
51 133 122
6
50 136 123
3
49 139 125
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
Calgary ..........................
Los Angeles ..................
San Jose ........................
Anaheim .......................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
Arizona .........................
W
29
25
24
22
20
20
18
10
L
10
16
14
13
15
23
21
28
OL PTS. GF GA
3
61 145 116
4
54 131 125
5
53 128 103
6
50 116 111
9
49 121 122
3
43 126 147
6
42 119 147
7
27 105 160
— 276
-4
-3
-3
— 278
— 278
-2
-2
—
—
—
—
279
279
279
279
-1
-1
-1
-1
— 280
— 280
E
E
— 281 +1
— 282 +2
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
At Glendower Golf Club; in Gauteng, South Africa
Purse: $1.21 million
Yardage: 7,594
Chris Paisley, England.................. 66-65-70-66
Branden Grace, South Africa ....... 65-71-66-68
JC Ritchie, South Africa............... 72-70-65-65
Scott Vincent, Zimbabwe ............ 70-66-71-67
Jacques Kruyswijk, South Africa. 68-67-71-68
Jacques Blaauw, South Africa ..... 68-70-66-70
Renato Paratore, South Africa .... 71-67-69-68
Adrien Saddier, France................. 68-63-73-71
Darren Fichardt, South Africa...... 70-71-64-70
Chase Koepka, United States ...... 65-71-68-71
Charlie Ford, England ................... 71-72-67-66
Hennie Otto, South Africa ........... 71-72-70-64
Marcus Kinhult, Sweden.............. 70-72-66-69
Jorge Campillo, Spain .................. 70-70-67-70
Neil Schietekat, South Africa ...... 70-72-69-67
Ryan Evans, England.................... 74-67-68-69
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa ... 69-70-69-70
a-Kyle McClatchie, South Africa.. 68-71-68-71
Trevor Fisher Jnr, South Africa ... 69-70-67-72
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLORADO .............................. 6
9
8 — 23
DALLAS .................................... 9
5
14 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Colorado 0 of 1; Dallas 0 of 4.
Goalies: Colorado, Bernier 10-7-1 (28 shots-27 saves).
Dallas, Bishop 19-12-2 (22-19). A: 18,532 (18,532). T:
2:36.
Oilers 3, Golden Knights 2 (OT)
Late Saturday
EDMONTON ....................... 0
VEGAS ............................... 0
1
2
1
0
1 — 3
0 — 2
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Edmonton, Maroon 11 (McDavid, Nurse),
8:01. 2, Vegas, Smith 12, 9:56. 3, Vegas, Karlsson 23
(Marchessault), 19:53.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Edmonton, Caggiula 6 (McDavid, Maroon),
3:29.
OVERTIME
0
0
2 —
2 —
4
2
THIRD PERIOD
Dallas at Boston, 1
Anaheim at Colorado, 3
San Jose at Los Angeles, 4
N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 7:30
Scoring: 3, Anaheim, Kase 11 (Ritchie), 2:10. 4, Los
Angeles, Shore 3 (Folin, Lewis), 8:32. 5, Los Angeles,
Kopitar 18 (Iafallo, Forbort), 13:46. 6, Anaheim, Perry 7
(Lindholm), 18:32.
TUESDAY’S GAMES
SHOTS ON GOAL
St. Louis at Toronto, 7
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Dallas at Detroit, 7:30
Vegas at Nashville, 8
San Jose at Arizona, 9
ANAHEIM ................................ 5
7
10 — 22
LOS ANGELES .......................... 7
8
10 — 25
Power-play opportunities: Anaheim 1 of 2; Los Angeles 0
of 2. Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 14-13-5 (25 shots-23
saves). Los Angeles, Quick 19-14-2 (21-18). A: 18,443
(18,230). T: 2:26.
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
NHL INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Montreal at Boston, 7:30
Pittsburgh at Anaheim, 10
Flames 4, Hurricanes 1
CALGARY ................................. 2
CAROLINA ............................... 0
0
0
2 —
1 —
4
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Calgary, Stajan 1 (Lazar), 6:01. 2, Calgary,
Hamilton 7 (Gaudreau, Ferland), 18:47.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Calgary, Hamilton 8 (Tkachuk, Gaudreau),
3:17. 4, Calgary, Tkachuk 13 (Brouwer, Backlund), 12:08
(pp). 5, Carolina, Stempniak 1 (McGinn, Rask), 15:29
(pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
CALGARY ............................... 12
12
6 — 30
CAROLINA ............................. 10
16
13 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 1 of 2; Carolina 1 of 6.
Goalies: Calgary, Smith 20-13-3 (39 shots-38 saves).
Carolina, Darling 9-12-6 (30-26).
Red Wings 4, Blackhawks 0
DETROIT .................................. 2
CHICAGO .................................. 0
0
0
2 —
0 —
4
0
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Larkin 7 (Bertuzzi, Athanasiou),
4:08. 2, Detroit, Green 5 (Nyquist, Mantha), 6:18.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Detroit, Mantha 15 (Athanasiou, Zetterberg),
5:46. 4, Detroit, Bertuzzi 1 (Frk, Jensen), 13:37.
SHOTS ON GOAL
DETROIT .................................. 7
11
8 — 26
CHICAGO ................................ 10
5
12 — 27
Power-play opportunities: Detroit 0 of 4; Chicago 0 of 3.
Goalies: Detroit, Mrazek 4-5-1 (27 shots-27 saves).
Chicago, Glass 3-2-1 (26-22). A: 21,830 (19,717). T: 2:18.
Penguins 5, Rangers 2
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 2
PITTSBURGH ........................... 1
0
2
0 —
2 —
2
5
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Pittsburgh, Crosby 17 (Oleksiak, Kessel),
12:33. 7, Pittsburgh, Hagelin 3 (Oleksiak), 18:01.
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. RANGERS ....................... 13
7
8 — 28
PITTSBURGH ......................... 13
18
16 — 47
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Rangers 0 of 1; Pittsburgh 0 of 3. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 19-11-4
(46 shots-42 saves). Pittsburgh, Jarry 9-3-2 (28-26). A:
18,647 (18,387). T: 2:31.
Entering Sunday’s games
POINTS
GP
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ................ 44
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ................. 43
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado ............... 42
Blake Wheeler, WPG ............................ 46
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ................ 43
John Tavares, N.Y. Islanders ................ 44
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ............... 44
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ................. 46
Johnny Gaudreau, CGY ......................... 44
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh ......................... 45
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islanders ................... 42
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ................. 45
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh .................... 41
4 tied with 45 points
G
27
14
19
14
8
22
17
15
15
19
12
28
19
A PTS
33 60
40 54
34 53
39 53
45 53
30 52
35 52
37 52
37 52
31 50
38 50
21 49
27 46
GOALS
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 45
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 44
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ........................... 43
Anders Lee, N.Y. Islanders
... 44
William Karlsson, Vegas
... 42
Brock Boeser, Vancouver ................................. 41
John Tavares N.Y. Islanders
... 44
Sean Monahan, Calgary ................................... 44
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 44
Patrik Laine, Winnipeg ..................................... 46
Nikolaj Ehlers, Winnipeg .................................. 46
Micheal Ferland, Calgary .................................. 43
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 45
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 42
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 41
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................. 35
Eric Staal, Minnesota ....................................... 45
Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis
... 46
James van Riemsdyk, Toronto ......................... 44
Michael Grabner N.Y. Rangers
... 43
G
28
27
25
25
23
22
22
21
21
20
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
18
ASSISTS
GP
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 43
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ............................. 43
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg ................................ 46
Josh Bailey N.Y. Islanders
... 42
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ............................... 44
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 46
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 44
John Klingberg, Dallas ..................................... 44
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 42
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 44
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 45
John Carlson, Washington ............................... 45
John Tavares N.Y. Islanders
... 44
Mathew Barzal N.Y. Islanders
... 44
Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh ............................... 45
Taylor Hall, New Jersey ................................... 40
Henrik Sedin, Vancouver .................................. 44
Nicklas Backstrom, Washington ..................... 44
Jonathan Huberdeau, Florida ........................... 43
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ...................... 45
A
45
40
39
38
37
37
35
34
34
33
31
30
30
29
29
29
29
28
28
28
PLUS/MINUS
GP
Victor Hedman, Tampa Bay ............................. 44
Jaden Schwartz St. Louis
... 30
William Karlsson, Vegas
... 42
Zdeno Chara, Boston ........................................ 41
Brayden Point, Tampa Bay ............................... 44
Reilly Smith, Vegas
... 42
Anton Stralman, Tampa Bay ............................ 42
Patrice Bergeron, Boston ................................. 36
Drew Doughty, Los Angeles ............................. 43
Josh Manson, Anaheim .................................... 44
Brad Marchand, Boston .................................... 33
Jonathan Marchessau, Vegas
... 39
Matt Niskanen, Washington ............................ 31
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 44
+/24
23
22
21
21
21
21
20
20
20
19
18
18
18
H I GH S C HOOLS
Canucks 3, Wild 2 (OT)
VANCOUVER ..................... 1
MINNESOTA ...................... 1
0
0
BOYS' BASKETBALL
1
1
1 — 3
0 — 2
Scoring: 1, Minnesota, Zucker 17 (Mi.Granlund, Koivu),
4:59 (pp). 2, Vancouver, Eriksson 6 (Edler, Sedin), 16:57.
THIRD PERIOD
At Sandals Emerald Bay GC; In Great Exuma, Bahamas
Purse: $600,000
Yardage: 7,001
Scoring: 3, Minnesota, Winnik 5 (Staal), 12:14. 4,
Vancouver, Vanek 13 (Tanev, Gagner), 16:48.
136
137
137
138
138
138
139
139
139
140
140
140
140
140
141
141
141
141
142
142
142
142
142
143
143
143
143
143
143
143
143
143
144
144
144
144
144
145
145
145
146
146
146
146
146
146
146
Scoring: 3, Colorado, MacKinnon 19 (Kerfoot, Zadorov),
6:33. 4, Colorado, Comeau 8 (Zadorov), 18:20. 5, Colorado, Barberio 3 (Bernier, Nemeth), 19:47 (sh).
Scoring: 1, Anaheim, Kase 10 (Getzlaf, Rakell), 6:14. 2,
Anaheim, Kesler 2 (Kase, Montour), 18:50 (pp).
BAHAMAS GREAT EXUMA CLASSIC
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
THIRD PERIOD
FIRST PERIOD
MONDAY’S GAMES
Web.com Tour
Dan McCarthy..................... 70-66
Rhein Gibson ...................... 69-68
Mark Anderson ................... 66-71
Sungjae Im.......................... 69-69
Augusto Nunez................... 66-72
Billy Kennerly ..................... 68-70
Brandon Matthews ............ 71-68
Bo Hoag .............................. 67-72
Lee McCoy........................... 67-72
Albin Choi ........................... 68-72
Justin Lower....................... 67-73
Wes Roach.......................... 69-71
Curtis Luck.......................... 68-72
Jamie Arnold ...................... 67-73
Erik Compton ...................... 70-71
Tim Wilkinson .................... 73-68
Derek Ernst......................... 74-67
Casey Wittenberg .............. 69-72
John Chin ............................ 71-71
Brendon de Jonge ............... 69-73
Cameron Champ ................. 69-73
Julian Etulain...................... 69-73
Carlos Ortiz......................... 71-71
Robby Shelton .................... 69-74
Josh Teater......................... 72-71
Luke Guthrie ....................... 72-71
Sam Burns .......................... 70-73
Adam Svensson.................. 72-71
Gerardo Ruiz....................... 70-73
Dawie van der Walt............ 71-72
Samuel Del Val ................... 68-75
Patrick Newcomb ............... 71-72
Matt Harmon...................... 69-75
Taylor Moore ...................... 68-76
Brock Mackenzie ................ 72-72
Tag Ridings......................... 71-73
Sepp Straka ........................ 70-74
Brady Schnell...................... 74-71
Shaun Micheel .................... 69-76
Ryan Brehm ........................ 71-74
Max Rottluff....................... 73-73
Eric Axley............................ 77-69
Adam Long.......................... 73-73
Frank Lickliter II ................. 72-74
Tyler Aldridge ..................... 73-73
Roger Sloan ........................ 69-77
Brian Campbell ................... 72-74
Scoring: 2, Dallas, Benn 18 (Klingberg, Radulov), 15:43.
ANAHEIM ................................ 2
LOS ANGELES .......................... 0
FIRST PERIOD
PARTIAL SECOND ROUND
SECOND PERIOD
Late Saturday
Detroit 4, Chicago 0
Calgary 4, Carolina 1
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Rangers 2
Vancouver 3, Minnesota 2 (OT)
Scoring: 4, Pittsburgh, Simon 1 (Dumoulin, Sprong),
13:15. 5, Pittsburgh, Kessel 20 (Sheary), 14:30.
267
270
272
274
274
274
275
275
275
275
276
277
277
277
278
278
278
278
278
Scoring: 1, Colorado, Kerfoot 11 (Greer, Girard), 14:09.
Ducks 4, Kings 2
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
SECOND PERIOD
FINAL
4
1
EDMONTON ..................... 12
11
6
1 — 30
VEGAS ............................... 8
13
15 — 36
Power-play opportunities: Edmonton 0 of 3; Vegas 0 of 6.
Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 16-16-2 (36 shots-34 saves).
Vegas, Fleury 9-2-2 (30-27). A: 18,351 (17,367). T: 2:30.
Scoring: 1, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 13 (Hagelin, Letang),
3:14. 2, N.Y. Rangers, Grabner 19, 15:17. 3, N.Y. Rangers,
Smith 1 (Carey, Lettieri), 19:06.
SOUTH AFRICAN OPEN
3 —
0 —
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. Islanders 7, N.Y. Rangers 2
Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 1
Boston 4, Montreal 3 (SO)
Philadelphia 5, New Jersey 3
Minnesota 4, Winnipeg 1
Colorado 4, Dallas 1
Edmonton 3, Vegas 2 (OT)
San Jose 6, Arizona 5 (OT)
Anaheim 4, Los Angeles 2
FIRST PERIOD
European Tour
0
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Edmonton, Nurse 6 (Caggiula, Draisaitl),
0:53.
x-late game
FIRST PERIOD
— 277
— 277
COLORADO .............................. 1
DALLAS .................................... 0
OVERTIME
PRIVATE
Flint Hill 63, Bishop Ireton 58
Paul VI 79, St. Mary's Ryken 68
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
PRIVATE
McNamara 72, Monsignor Scanlan 53
St. John's 56, Bishop Ireton 41
GI R LS ’ BA S K E TBALL
Scoring: 5, Vancouver, Sutter 3 (Eriksson, Edler), 2:50.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ..................... 7
9
7
2 — 25
MINNESOTA ...................... 7
6
8
2 — 23
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 0 of 1; Minnesota
1 of 1. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 12-14-5 (23
shots-21 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 17-9-3 (25-22). A:
18,927 (18,064). T: 2:26.
Late Saturday
0
1
2
1
NO. 1 ST. JOHN'S 56, BISHOP IRETON 41
SJ (14-1) Cowan 19, Fudd 15, Tshitenge-Mutombo 15,
Scott 9 Totals 17 6-8 56.
BI (12-2) Konkwo 14, Jewett 9, Shacklford 8, Kennard 4,
Peters 3, Napper 2, irondi 1 Totals 9 8-9 41.
Halftime: St. John's, (32-15).
Three-point goals: BI 5 (Shacklford 2, Jewett 1, Peters 1,
Konkwo 1); SJ 6 (Cowan 5, Scott 1).
NO. 10 MCNAMARA 72,
MONSIGNOR SCANLAN 53
Sharks 6, Coyotes 5 (OT)
ARIZONA ........................... 3
SAN JOSE .......................... 3
TOP 20
0 — 5
1 — 6
FIRST PERIOD
MS (1-1)Totals 0 0-0 53.
BM (12-2) Brown-Turner 44, King 14, Matharu 7, Gibson
4, Scott 3 Totals 22 10-15 72.
Halftime: McNamara, (44-25).
Three-point goals: BM 6 (Matharu 1, Brown-Turner 5).
Scoring: 1, San Jose, Thornton 9 (Pavelski), 5:53. 2,
Arizona, Stepan 9 (Panik, Perlini), 9:01. 3, San Jose,
Pavelski 9 (Burns, Thornton), 10:59 (pp). 4, Arizona,
Goligoski 5 (Stepan), 12:16. 5, San Jose, Couture 17
(Burns, Donskoi), 13:37. 6, Arizona, Fischer 12 (Connauton), 14:01.
TOP 20
SECOND PERIOD
NO. 3 PAUL VI 79, ST. MARY'S RYKEN 68
Scoring: 7, San Jose, Donskoi 9 (Dell, Boedker), 17:07.
SMR (4-7) Kurnaz 25, Tabbs 15, Tang 7, Bikoy 6, Eackles
6, Tull 5, Jasper 4 Totals 20 10-15 68.
PVI (13-2) Slater 22, Roach 15, Harris 15, Latimer 12,
Oduro 7, Keels 4, Robinson 4 Totals 26 15-18 79.
Halftime: Paul VI, (43-34).
Three-point goals: PVI 4 (Harris 1, Slater 1, Latimer 2);
SMR 6 (Bikoy 1, Tull 1, Tabbs 1, Kurnaz 3).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 8, Arizona, Ekman-Larsson 7 (Keller, Dvorak),
3:31. 9, Arizona, Archibald 3 (Chychrun, Dvorak), 6:22.
10, San Jose, Donskoi 10 (Burns, Tierney), 19:44.
B OY S ’ B A S K E TB A L L
OVERTIME
Scoring: 11, San Jose, Vlasic 5 (Pavelski, Thornton),
2:42.
SHOTS ON GOAL
ARIZONA ........................... 9
5
7 — 21
SAN JOSE ........................ 16
11
13
4 — 44
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 0 of 1; San Jose 1 of 1.
Goalies: Arizona, Wedgewood 4-7-4 (44 shots-38
saves). San Jose, Dell 9-3-2 (15-13), Jones 13-10-4
(6-3). A: 17,562 (17,562). T: 2:36.
NONLEAGUE
FLINT HILL 63, BISHOP IRETON 58
FH (9-4) Wahab 25, Moore 19, Taylor 8, Ellison 6, Jioklow
5 Totals 12 21-31 63.
BI (2-7)Totals 0 0-0 58.
Halftime: Flint Hill, (26-24).
Three-point goals: FH 6 (Taylor 1, Moore 4, Ellison 1)
MONDAY, JANUARY 15 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
For Stephenson, NHL is a small world after all
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Lane Lambert was still playing
overseas when he returned home
and bought a house in a new neighborhood in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Two doors down lived a young
Chandler Stephenson, constantly
riding around in his electric toy
truck.
“We lived in a cul-de-sac, so he
was always driving around with his
rubber boots on,” Lambert said. “I
think he was probably 3 or 4 years
old. It was pretty funny.”
Before Lambert was a Washington Capitals assistant coach and
Stephenson was one of his players,
the two were neighbors, an example of just how small a world professional hockey can be. Lambert
has monitored Stephenson’s career
from the beginning, when he was
the kid no other player could seem
to stop. Then Stephenson was the
prospect who got beaten out for a
roster spot with Washington. Now
Stephenson is a reliable NHL regular, and Lambert is a proud coach.
Still a rookie getting comfortable,
Stephenson has a little reminder of
home with Lambert around.
“The relationship is there,” Stephenson said. “Knowing him and
sharing that connection helps, just
him kind of knowing me as a little
kid and knowing kind of what I’m
like. That helps a lot, for sure, having that close bond.”
Even before Lambert and Stephenson were neighbors, their
families were friends. Washington
ROB CARR/GETTY IMAGES
Capitals rookie Chandler Stephenson has a “bond” with assistant
coach Lane Lambert, a neighbor of his when Stephenson was a child.
selected Stephenson in the third
round of the 2012 draft, and when
Lambert joined Coach Barry
Trotz’s staff in 2014, Stephenson’s
parents phoned to remind him of
the connection. It would have been
hard for Lambert to forget Stephenson. The memory that has always stayed with him was when he
saw a 9-year-old Stephenson play
at a tournament in Moose Jaw.
“He was by far and away the best
player in the tournament,” Lambert said. “It was clear that something was going to happen with
him. It wasn’t even close, actually,
how good he was then. He could
have went through the whole team
every time he got the puck.”
Stephenson was so good and
scoring so much that his parents
started encouraging him to pass
more. Perhaps it taught Stephenson about sportsmanship and being a good teammate while developing his playmaking, but it also
fostered a bad habit — occasionally
passing too much. On the Capitals’
roster, Stephenson’s 2.24 evenstrength shots per 60 minutes trail
only defenseman Brooks Orpik for
fewest on the team, according to
Natural Stat Trick.
“I think that’s always kind of
carried into my game now from
being little,” Stephenson said. “I
just always kind of thought passfirst.”
The Capitals penciled in Stephenson to make the team out of
training camp, but in a competitive
preseason, he was beaten out by
other forwards. Washington
waived him and risked one of the
other 30 teams swiping him, but
they all passed, and he was sent
down to the American Hockey
League for a fourth straight season.
That might have been the wake-up
call Stephenson needed because
when injuries cleared the way for a
late October recall, he played his
way into a permanent role and was
told to get an apartment in Washington.
Trotz has called him a “Swiss
Army knife,” versatile because he
can play at center or at left wing, in
the top-six forward corps or in the
bottom six, on the penalty kill and
on the power play. Through
32 games, he has two goals and
eight assists, and his speedy skating is an asset deep in the Washington lineup.
“Our conversation when he left
here before he went on waivers and
was told he was going on waivers, I
said, ‘If you get a chance to come
back, make sure you never go
back,’ ” Trotz said. “That’s really on
him. I think the message was
heard, and he took it to heart, and
he’s come back, and he’s played
very well. . . . And when he plays to
his ability, Chandler is a really good
C AP I TAL S ’ N E X T TH R E E
at New Jersey Devils
Thursday
7 NBCSW
vs. Montreal Canadiens
Friday
7:30 NBCSW,
NHL Network
vs. Philadelphia Flyers
Sunday
12:30 NBC
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
hockey player. He’s just starting to
scratch the surface at this level, and
it’s nice to see.”
Lambert saw it long ago, and as
Stephenson had his bumps getting
here, Lambert was around, his
coach and also a familiar face from
home he could trust.
“I talk to him a lot and just try to
help him a little bit with direction,
but also at the same time, it’s about
him finding his own way, too,”
Lambert said. “I think that’s really
important for a young player to
understand that — learn and kind
of find his way with the guidance.
So I’m not overbearing whatsoever,
just there to help him get his game
to the level it needs to be to be an
everyday player here and to be a
strong contributor here. Because I
think there’s no question about it,
with the talent he has, that’s what
in the future for him as long as he
finds it within himself.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
WCAC GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
Battle of the bigs ends
in favor of No. 1 Cadets
ST. JOHN’S 58,
BISHOP IRETON 41
BY
CAMERON SPENCER/GETTY IMAGES
Venus Williams was beaten, 6-3, 7-5, by Belinda Bencic. Sloane Stephens and Coco Vandeweghe also fell.
AUSTRALIAN OPEN
Venus, six other U.S. women ousted
A SSOCIATED P RESS
melbourne, australia — Last
year’s finalist Venus Williams is
out of the Australian Open, beaten, 6-3, 7-5, by Belinda Bencic in
the opening round at Rod Laver
Arena.
The turning point in the match
came late in the first set when
play was stopped to allow for the
roof to be closed because of rain
at Melbourne Park. After already
saving five break points at 4-3,
Bencic returned from an almost
30-minute suspension to win six
consecutive points to take the
first set.
Bencic broke Williams’s serve
in final game of the match, winning the last four points. She
clinched it when Williams, who
had slipped on the far side of the
court, couldn’t get to a ball in the
open corner.
Bencic, 20, warmed up for the
Australian Open by combining
with Roger Federer to win the
Hopman Cup for Switzerland.
Williams, 37 and seeded fifth,
joined fellow seeded American
women Coco Vandeweghe and
Sloane Stephens in defeat among
seven U.S. women to lose early on
the opening day of the tournament.
Williams lost to her younger
sister, Serena, in last year’s Australian final. Serena is not defending her title after giving birth
to her first child in September.
Among U.S. men, 16th-seeded
John Isner lost, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3
to Matt Ebden, his first loss to the
Australian veteran in four career
meetings.
Ebden broke Isner’s serve in
the last game, clinching the
match when Isner netted an attempted backhand half-volley.
Shortly after Williams lost,
No. 10 seed Vandeweghe was upset in the first round by Hungary’s Timea Babos, 7-6 (7-4), 6-2, a
year after upsetting defending
champion Angelique Kerber on
the way to her first Grand Slam
semifinal.
The American was assessed a
code violation for taking too
much time to return to the court
— she was eating a banana. Then
she screamed an obscenity while
trailing 5-1 in the second set.
Vandeweghe converted only
one of 10 break points in the
match and hit 28 unforced errors
to 18 for Babos, who was 0 for 16
against top-10 players coming
into the match.
In an earlier match, the woes of
Stephens since she won her first
Grand Slam title at the U.S. Open
continued with a first-round loss
to China’s Zhang Shuai. Stephens,
seeded 13th, was serving for the
match in the 10th game of the
second set but dropped her serve.
She was outplayed in the tiebreaker and in the third set, with
Zhang winning, 2-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-2.
It always shaped as a tough
opener for Stephens, who hasn’t
won a tour-level match since her
triumph at the U.S. Open last
year. She was facing a player
ranked No. 34, two spots off being
seeded for the first major of the
season.
Stephens didn’t play last year’s
Australian Open because of a left
foot injury that kept her out of
action until Wimbledon. Since
beating Madison Keys in the U.S.
Open final, Stephens has lost
eight consecutive matches.
“Sloane, she plays so well, won
the U.S. Open — everyone knows
— she’s a great player,” Zhang
said. “I know how hard I’m working. . . . Coming to Australia, I’m
ready for every match, every player. That’s why I won today.”
There were two first-time major winners last year, and both
were in action first-up on adjoining show courts.
French Open champion Jelena
Ostapenko made a positive start
with a 6-1, 6-4 win over 37-year-
old Francesca Schiavone.
Ostapenko, 20, saved two
break points in the third game of
the opening set and clinched the
set with an ace. After an exchange
of service breaks in the second,
Ostapenko got the decisive break
in the ninth game, then served
out the match after double-faulting on her first match point.
The seventh-seeded Ostapenko is playing her third Australian
Open — she advanced to the third
round at Melbourne Park last
year. Schiavone was playing in
the Australian Open main draw
for the 17th time.
In other early first-round results, 12th-seeded Julia Goerges
of Germany extended her winning streak to 15 matches with a
6-4, 6-4 win over American Sofia
Kenin; Alize Cornet of France
beat Chinese wild-card entry
Wang Xinyu, 6-4, 6-2; No. 19
Magdalena Rybarikova of the Slovak Republic beat American Taylor Townsend, 6-0, 7-5; Kirsten
Flipkens of Belgium beat American Alison Riske, 2-6, 7-6 (8-6),
6-3; and Kiki Bertens of the Netherlands rallied past Catherine
Bellis of the United States, 6-7
(7-5), 6-4, 6-2.
In the men’s draw, U.S. Open
finalist Kevin Anderson of South
Africa lost in five sets to Kyle
Edmund.
The 11th-seeded Anderson
twice led by a set but couldn’t
fend off Edmund, who got the
decisive break in the seventh
game of the fifth set and served
out at love for a 6-7 (7-4), 6-3, 3-6,
6-3, 6-4 win.
Edmund, the only British man
in the draw after Andy Murray
withdrew to have surgery on his
injured right hip, had won just
once in his previous 12 matches
against top 20 opposition.
Top men’s seed Rafael Nadal
was slated to play Monday’s first
evening match against Victor Estrella Burgos.
M ICHAEL E RRIGO
Agile, strong and skilled, Bishop Ireton center Akunna Konkwo
is a nightmare matchup. All season she has punished opponents
inside, averaging 19.7 points and
leading the Cardinals to the best
start in school history. Most
teams simply don’t have anyone
who can rival the 6-foot-3 junior.
But No. 1 St. John’s does, and
she helped the Cadets contain
Konkwo and defeat No. 16 Ireton,
58-41, on Sunday afternoon in
Northwest Washington. Malu
Tshitenge-Mutombo, a 6-3 junior, spent the game fronting
Konkwo inside, with every pass
and rebound turning into a tangle of long arms. She also proved
to be a handful on the other end,
finishing feeds from her teammates with poise and efficiency.
“Malu has had three unbelievable games against Akunna since
last year,” St. John’s Coach Jonathan Scribner said. “Akunna’s a
great player, and Malu is a great
player, and we know who won
that matchup today.”
Tshitenge-Mutombo finished
with 15 points as the Cadets (14-1,
6-0 Washington Catholic Athletic Conference) looked comfortable from start to finish despite
the absence of injured senior
forward Sydney Wood. But dynamic freshman guard Azzi Fudd
was silenced early, scoring no
points in the first quarter while
facing double-teams on every
touch.
“We knew they were going to
try to take Azzi out of the game
and Syd wasn’t here, so every-
body else had to step up, and
that’s what we did,” St. John’s
junior guard Alex Cowan said.
Cowan provided a spark, hitting five three-pointers as part of
a 19-point performance.
“It’s a game-changer,” Scribner
said of Cowan’s shooting. “If she’s
going to hit those shots consistently, which she is definitely
capable of, it opens a lot of other
things up.”
Senior Asha Scott added nine
points, including six straight in
the fourth quarter to finish off
the Cardinals.
Fudd
eventually
fought
through the double-teams and
finished with 15 points. But it
was as quiet as a 15-point performance can be, save for a
sidestepping fast-break and-one
she had in the third quarter that
brought much of the home crowd
to its feet.
Upset-minded Ireton (12-2,
3-2) got 13 points from Konkwo
but never established itself on
offense. It only took two minutes
for Coach Jason Harris to whip
off his suit jacket; he was clearly
frustrated by his team’s inability
to handle the Cadets’ pressure.
The Cardinals faced a 17-point
deficit at halftime.
But in the second half, they
continued to scrap for the ball
and make some plays. Their
three-point shooting finally arrived in the fourth quarter, but
the Cadets never let their lead
shrink to fewer than 16.
Holding a sizable second-half
lead against a team fighting for a
signature win is nothing new for
St. John’s.
“We know [to] just keep the
energy up and stay in the game,”
Tshitenge-Mutombo said. “That’s
how you hold on to a lead.”
michael.errigo@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
Pittsburgh
extends
win streak
to four
PENGUINS 5,
RANGERS 2
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Dominik Simon and Phil Kessel
scored milestone goals to lead the
Pittsburgh Penguins to a 5-2 victory against the visiting New York
Rangers on Sunday night.
Simon got the first goal of his
NHL career, and Kessel scored his
20th of the season for his
700th point on back-to-back goals
that put the Penguins ahead for
good. Sidney Crosby, Patric Hornqvist and Carl Hagelin also scored
as the Penguins matched their
season high with their fourth
straight win. They also have won
five of six.
Rookie Tristan Jarry, making
his fourth straight start, stopped
26 shots to pick up his career-best
fourth straight win.
Michael Grabner and Brendan
Smith scored for the Rangers, who
were coming off a 7-2 loss at home
to the Islanders the previous day.
New York has lost four of five and
seven of its past 10 (3-5-2). Henrik
Lundqvist had 42 saves.
Simon scored on a rebound
from the slot to tie the score with
6:45 left in the second period.
“It feels unbelievable to score
the first one,” said Simon, who
said he’s keeping the milestone
puck for himself. “It’s even better
with the win.”
Kessel then put the Penguins
ahead for good 1:15 later with a
wrist shot from the faceoff dot,
becoming the 26th Americanborn player to reach 700 career
points and the 11th with 20 or
more goals in 10 different seasons.
RED WINGS 4, BLACKHAWKS 0: Tyler Bertuzzi and
Anthony Mantha each had a goal
and an assist, and visiting Detroit
beat Chicago.
Dylan Larkin and Mike Green
also scored for Detroit, which had
dropped two in a row after a
four-game winning streak. Petr
Mrazek made 27 saves in his second shutout of the season and
12th of his career.
Chicago had won three of its
previous four games, including a
2-1 victory against Central Division-leading Winnipeg on Friday
night.
FLAMES 4, HURRICANES
1: In Raleigh, N.C., Dougie Hamil-
ton scored twice, Mike Smith
made 38 saves, and Calgary defeated Carolina to extend its winning streak to seven games.
CANUCKS
3, WILD 2 (OT):
Brandon Sutter scored 2:50 into
overtime to lift Vancouver past
Minnesota in St. Paul, Minn.
Ducks’ Cogliano suspended
Anaheim Ducks forward Andrew Cogliano was suspended for
two games without pay by the
NHL, ending the fourth-longest
consecutive games streak in
league history.
Cogliano had the longest active
games streak at 830. Doug Jarvis
holds the record of 964. Florida
defenseman Keith Yandle takes
over the NHL’s longest active
streak at 676.
Cogliano was suspended for an
interference penalty against Los
Angeles forward Adrian Kempe
on Saturday night in the Ducks’
4-2 victory.
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Bids & Proposals
840
Bids & Proposals
FOR
DODGE
DC CLEAN RIVERS PROJECT
INVITATION FOR BID NO. 170140 –
GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE
MAINTENANCE
Dodge 2002 Intrepid SE - silver, 4 door
automatic, 64k miles, MD inspected,
AC, stereo, heat, clean and runs well.
asking $1950 OBO 240-645-6767
FORD
FORD 2008 TAURUS - runs good,
no rust, no dents, clean car, MD
inspect guar, 118k miles, $3,600
OBO Call 202-705-1723
Ford 2006 500 SEL LMT EDITION- auto,
95k mi, MD inspect, all power,
leather int, CD changer,exc cond.
Asking $3300 OBO 240-347-5362
HONDA
The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC
Water) requests the submittal of a Proposal for IFB No.
170140: Green Infrastructure Maintenance. This Contract is
part of the DC Clean Rivers Project for controlling combined
sewer overflows (CSOs) to the District’s receiving waters.
Green infrastructure (GI) maintenance is required to comply
with the requirements of various permits issued by regulatory agencies. The GI facilities are designed to reduce runoff
volumes currently discharged to the collection system by
temporarily storing, infiltrating and evapotranspiration of
stormwater. The RFQ/P package provides all the required
information about the GI facilities that are included in the
scope of this Contract.
2007 Honda Accord LX- $7995/BO
57K Miles, Black w/Beige
1 Owner Sold w/MD Inspect
Exc Cond / 301-761-2265
The duration of this Contract is from June 1, 2018 to
September 30, 2020 with an option of extension for additional period of two (2) years if approved by DC Water.
The Contract is estimated to cost $1,500,000 to $3,000,000.
HONDA 2001 ACCORD EX, blue,
moonroof, 184K miles, good/ fair
cond. $700/obo. Priced to sell. Call
202-510-6851
Detailed information on the scope of work, procurement
process, required content in the proposal, submittal requirements, and evaluation process are contained in the RFQ/P
document.
1447
Autos Wanted
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AIRLINES ARE HIRING
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888-896-7869
JOBS
American Lawn Brothers Inc
(Leesburg, VA) is hiring laborers to plant, mow, trim,
water, dig/spread dirt, rake,
prune, mulch, & load/unload
materials. Liftg req’d up to
50lbs. On job training. No
edu or exp req’d. $14.70hr.
$22.05 OT. 8a-5p M-F. Some
OT & Wknd may be avail.
24 positions avail for temp FT
work 4/1-12/12/18. Loudoun
Cnty area. Trans provided
to/frm sites from Loudoun
Cnty
Shop.
Call
Terra
703.327.0583 or email Terra
@AmericanLawn
Brothers.com. Apply @
Leesburg Office 703.777.0150
JO#1252323. Assistnc securing lodging avail if needed at
no additl cost. Opt’l advncs
against pay up to $75day
at end of ea workday for
boarding at 0 interest for
2wks if needed. Trans provided to Shop if completes
50% of job pd. Return Trans
provided if complete
Job pd or dismissed early. No
cost tools, supplies, equipmt
req’d to perform job.
JOBS
Blue Sky Landscaping, LLC,
43107 John Mosby Highway,
Chantilly, VA 20152is hiring
laborer for sod laying, planting,
mowing, trimming, watering,
digging, spreading dirt, raking,
pruning, mulching, and loading
and unloading materials. Lifting required up to 50lbs. On
the job training. No education
or
experience
required.
$14.70/hr. $22.05 O.T. 7am4pm, M-F, Some O.T. & weekends may be available. 11
positions available for temporary, fulltime work. 04/01/1812/14/2018. Loudoun County
area jobsites. Transportation
provided to and from area jobsites from a central Loudoun
County area pick up location.
Contact Jimmie by calling
(703)957-3105
or
email
resume to blueskylandscaping
@gmail.com. Apply for or
inquire about job at the Prince
William office @ (703) 8970407 (Job Order #1245632).
Assistance finding and securing lodging is available.
Employer will advance against
pay up to $75.00/day at the
end of each work day for room
and board at no interest for
the first 2 weeks, if needed.
Workers will be provided
transportation
(including
meals & necessary lodging) to
the place of employment if the
worker completes 50% of the
employment period. Return
transportation will be provided
if the worker completes the
employment period or is dismissed early by the employer.
Employer will provide, at no
charge, all tools, supplies and
equipment required to perform the job. EOE
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
Proposers are on notice that the Contract resulting from
this procurement will be subject to the contracting and
hiring goals outlined in the Memorandum of Agreement
between DC Water and the Government of the District of
Columbia Regarding Job Opportunities for District Residents
and Contracting Opportunities for District Businesses for
Designing, Constructing, Inspecting, and Maintaining Green
Infrastructure (Green Jobs MOA). Complete details on the
Green Jobs MOA and the GI Certification program can
be found at www.dcwater.com/green-infrastructure in the
Resources Section of the webpage.
Firms wishing to submit proposals should contact Ms.
Kimberly Isom by email at Kimberly.Isom@dcwater.com
to obtain the RFQ/P document. It will be available for
distribution on January 16, 2018, and will be distributed
electronically. Access will be limited to one (1) individual
from each firm. E-mails must use the following in the
Subject Line: DC Water DCCR GI Maintenance IFB No.
170140, and provide the full name, contact email address
and telephone number for the designated individual.
An Outreach Meeting will be held on January 25, 2018, from
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm (EST) in the Conference Room located
at DC Water’s Blue Plains Visitor Center, 5000 Overlook Ave
SW, Washington, DC 20032. All attendees are required to
make reservations for this meeting by sending an email to
Ms. Isom, providing the name, title and firm name of the
attendee(s), by 3:00 pm (EST) on January 19, 2018.
Proposals are due on February 15, 2018 by 2 pm (EST).
Submissions shall consist of qualifications, technical proposal and cost proposal in a separate sealed envelope. Persons
submitting proposals must obtain a visitor’s pass at the
Visitor’s Center located at the plant entrance. The proposals
shall be directed to:
Ms. Kimberly Isom
DC Clean Rivers
Central Maintenance Facility (CMF), 2nd Floor
Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant
5000 Overlook Avenue SW
Washington DC 20032
ESC-Region 19 Allied States Cooperative is accepting
proposals for the following Request for Proposals:
RFP 18-8275 entitled Skilled Labor - closes on 2/20/2018,
2:00 PM MST
Electronic documents must be submitted on or before
closing date. Proposals can be obtained by registering
to become a vendor at alliedstatescooperative.ionwave.net
Proposals received after date and time stated will not be
considered.
F
L
JOBS
Front End Express, Owings,
MD. Daily transp will be provided to/from worksite in the
following counties: Loudon,
Prince
William,
Fairfax,
Fauquier,
Arlington
(VA),
Prince George's, Baltimore,
Calvert, Frederick, Anne Arundle (MD). 3 Plumbers pos available. Temp, FT pos from 4/1/18
through 11/30/18, 5:00-5:00,
40 hrs/wk, OT varies, MonSat, schedule varies, rotating
schedule. Workers will be paid
Weekly at $26.74/hr, $40.11/hr
OT, Bonuses at employers discretion, Opportunity for additional pay with incentive program. Read blueprints, plan
designs, sound knowledge of
all motorized pumps, filters,
drains, returns, fittings used
during the installment. Repair
or renovation of swimming
pools. Concrete knowledge of
installing infloor systems,
pressure system, return system, loops, spa plumbing with
more than 8 jets, valves. Must
be able to determine cause
of problems and provide and
carry out solution. Drug testing
during employment for cause,
Able to lift 75lbs, 12 months
exp req’d as plumber. Employer may make payroll deductions at employee's request.
The employer will provide
workers at no charge all tools,
supplies and equip req’d to
perform the job. Initial transp
(including meals &, to the
extent necessary, lodging) to
the place of employment will
be provided, or its cost to
workers reimbursed, if the
worker completes half the
employment period. Return
transportation will be provided
if the worker completes the
employment period or is dismissed early by the employer.
Please inquire about the job
opportunity or send applications, indications of availability, and/or resumes directly to
(817)932-2782,
dana5224@reagan.com or to
the nearest MD SWA, Southern Maryland JobSource, 175
Post Office Road Waldorf,
Maryland 20602, (301) 6458712.
Home delivery
is convenient.
JOBS
Landscaping
Sunrise Landscape & Design,
Sterling, VA. Daily transp will
be provided from a central
location to/from worksite in
the following counties: Fairfax, Loudoun. 12 Landscape
Laborer positions available.
Temp, full time position from
4/1/18 through 12/16/18,
7:00am-5:00pm, 40 hrs/
week, OT varies, Mon-Fri,
Some
Saturdays
Req’d,
Schedule varies. Workers will
be paid Weekly at $14.70/hr,
$22.05/hr OT, Raises/bonuses at employers discretion.
Mow, trim, edge, weed,
plant, mulch, water; remove
leaves & debris; clean up;
move soil, equipment such
as blowers, weed eaters and
mowers, dig holes for plants;
install
plants,
flowers,
shrubs, assist installers by
carrying pavers by hand and
wheelbarrows. Pre-employment drug testing req’d;Post Accident Drug Testing;Random drug testing during
employment, Able to lift
50lbs, Must be able to work
in all types of weather conditions, No exp req’d, will train.
Employer may make payroll
deductions at employee's
request. The employer will
provide workers at no charge
all tools, supplies and equipment req’d to perform the
job. Initial transportation
(including meals &, to the
extent necessary, lodging) to
the place of employment will
be provided, or its cost to
workers reimbursed, if the
worker completes half the
employment period. Return
transportation will be provided if the worker completes
the employment period or
is dismissed early by the
employer. Please inquire
about the job opportunity or
send applications, indications of availability, and/or
resumes
directly
to
mhayek@sunriseland
scapeanddesign.com, fax:
703-544-0048 or to the nearest VA SWA, VEC Workforce
Center - Alexandria, 5520
Cherokee Ave. Alexandria,
VA, 22312-2319, (703) 8131300.
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
LANDSCAPING
McFall & Berry Landscape
Management, Inc., Potomac,
MD. Daily transportation provided from central location
to/from worksites in Montgomery County. 85 Landscape
Laborers, TEMP, FT pos:
4/1/18 - 11/21/2018, 7a-4p, 40
hrs/wk, OT varies, M-F, some
Sats req’d. Bi-Weekly pay:
$13.64-$14.50/hr,
$20.46$21.75/hr OT. Raise at employer's discretion. Mow, trim,
edge, water lawns, flower
beds; clean up, weed, plant,
spread mulch; rake, blow
leaves. Post-Accident Drug
Testing. Able to lift 50lbs. No
exp req’d, will train. Employer
may make payroll deductions
at
employee's
request.
Employer provides workers at
no charge all tools, supplies,
equip req’d to perform job.
Initial transportation (including
meals &, to extent necessary,
lodging) to place of employment provided, or its cost to
workers reimbursed, if worker
completes half of the employment period. Return transportation provided if worker
completes employment period or is dismissed early by
employer. Inquire about job
opportunity or send applications, indications of avail, &/or
resumes directly to:
Fax:
(301) 365-7230, rob.brown@
mcfallandberry.com or the
nearest MD SWA, Montgomery Cty Works One-Stop
Center (Wheaton), 11002 Veirs
Mill Rd, South Bldg 1st Floor,
Wheaton, MD 20902, (301)
929-4350. Refer to JO#773162.
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SF
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
L JOBS
L JOBS
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1-800-753-POST SF
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Artistic Landscaping Inc (Lanham, MD) is hiring landscape
laborers to landscape/maintain property grounds using
hand/power
tools/equipment, lay sod, plant, mow,
trim, edge, water, dig, spread
dirt, rake, prune, mulch, blow,
weed, install mortarless segmental concrete masonry
wall units, load/unload materials. Lift up to 50lbs. On the
job training. No education/experience
req’d.
$14.70/hr. $22.05 OT. 7am4pm, M-F. Some OT & weekends may be avail. 18 positions avail for temporary, full
time work 4/1/18-11/30/18.
Prince George’s, Anne Arundel, Montgomery County area
jobsites. Transportation provided to/from jobsites from
Prince Georges County pickup location. Call Marta: 301805-9222 or email resume:
marta@rtisticlandscaping.
com. Apply at Prince Georges
American Job Center @ 301618-8400, JO#776222. Assistance finding/securing lodging avail if needed at no add’l
charge to worker. Opt’l
advances against pay up to
$75/day at end of each workday for room/board at no
interest for 1st 2 wks if necessary. Paid holiday on Labor
Day. Workers reimbursed for
transportation to work place
if worker completes 50% of
job period. Return transportation provided if worker completes job period or is dismissed early by employer. No
charge all tools/supplies/
equipmnt req’d to perform job
MAINTENANCE
Applicant must have exp in
apartment maint & have
your own transp & tools.
Good refs & pass criminal
bckgr chk. Fax resume:
703-567-4063
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M
SF
850
Official Notices
“Notice is hereby given that the
following named company at the
address listed herewith has made
application to engage in the business of loaning money for the
license year ending December
31,2018 as provided by the Act
of Congress, approved February
14,1913. Anyone desiring to protest
against the issuance of this license
should do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
Insurance, Securities and Banking,
810 First Street, NE, Suite 701,
Washington, DC 20002, in the manner prescribed by said Act: See
DCCode Title 26, Chapter 9 and 16
DCMR 2.”
LendingPoint LLC
1201 Roberts Blvd., Suite 200
Kennesaw, Georgia 30144
Notice is hereby given that the
following named company at the
address listed herewith has made
application to engage in the business of loaning money for the
license year ending December 31,
2018 as provided by the Act of
Congress, approved February 14,
1913.
Onslow Bay Financial LLC
1211 Avenue of the Americas, 41st
Floor, New York, New York 10036
Anyone desiring to protest against
the issuance of this license should
do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of Insurance,
Securities and Banking, 810 First
Street, NE, Suite 701,Washington,
DC 20002, in the manner prescribed
by said Act: See DC Code Title 26,
Chapter 9 and 16 DCMR 2.
825
Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DC Water Sol # 170170 –
Public Space Restoration Contract
for FY18-FY21. email – bids@capitolpaving.com ; call – 571.277.1022
or fax – 202.832.5126 – Bid Opening
11/01/2017
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SF
850
Montgomery County
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. Cohen
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
V.
Eva Karlsson
Tamika Josephs and
Vinette Josephs
Defendant(s)
Civil No. 406578V
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, Maryland, this 10th day of January,
2018, that the foreclosure sale
of the property described in the
deed of trust docketed herein and
located at 1604 Angelwing Drive,
Silver Spring, Maryland 20904,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian
Thomas, Erin M. Cohen, Hugh J.
Green, and Patick M. A. Decker,
Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 9th day of February,
2018; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three
(3) successive weeks before the
9th day of February, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount
of
the
sale
at
$1,135,509.29
BY THE COURT:
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Md.
MATL540506
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
12154246
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Civil No. 435309V
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, Maryland, this 29th day of December,
2017, that the foreclosure sale
of the property described in the
deed of trust docketed herein
and located at 3210 N. Leisure
World Blvd., Unit 311, Silver Spring,
Maryland 20906,
made and
reported by James E. Clarke,
Renee Dyson, Hugh J. Green,
Shannon Menapace, Christine M.
Drexel, and Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and
CONFIRMED, unless cause to the
contrary be shown on or before
the 29th day of January, 2018; provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 29th day of
January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $156,000.00
BY THE COURT:
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Md.
MATL578279
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
Jan 8, 15, 22, 2018 12152973
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Richard Michael Hixon
201 Watkins Pond Boulevard
Rockville, MD 20850
Defendant(s)
Case No. 436310V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 9th
day of January, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 201
Watkins Pond Boulevard, Rockville,
MD 20850, made and reported,
will be ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 8th day of February, 2018,
provided a copy of this notice
be inserted in a daily newspaper
printed in said County, once in
each of three successive weeks
before the 8th day of February,
2018. The Report of Sale states
the amount of the foreclosure
sale price to be $603,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Jan 15, 22, 29, 2018
12154153
852
Anne Arundel County
870
12150727
Arlington County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5521 15TH STREET NORTH,
ARLINGTON, VA 22205
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $755,900.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.500000% dated
March 6, 2013, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF ARLINGTON as Deed Book 4662, Page
1613, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the COUNTY
OF ARLINGTON, at the front of
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Arlington located at
1425 N. Courthouse Road, Arlington, Virginia on February 14, 2018
at 12:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 09034016
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: VA. Reference Number 16258914.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Jan. 15, 22, 2018
12154347
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John E. Driscoll, III, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
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Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
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Trustees Sale - DC
1240 18TH STREET NE, UNIT #1, WASHINGTON, DC 20002
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 003150 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1240 18TH STREET NE, UNIT #1, WASHINGTON,
DC 20002 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY
WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite
440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23,
2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2001 in
Square 4445, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on MARCH 16, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007037385.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 506944
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
850
SF
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840
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
V.
Marilynn P. Faust
Defendant(s)
1-800-753-POST
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Trustees Sale - DC
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
840
Trustees Sale - DC
1-800-753-POST
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840
Trustees Sale - DC
Jan 15, 22, 29,2018
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF A PARTIALLY DEMOLISHED COMMERCIAL BUILDING
known as 1547-1549 7th St., NW, Washington, DC 20001
By virtue of a certain Deed of Trust and Security Agreement duly recorded January 7,
2015 as Instrument No. 2015001174 (the "Deed of Trust") among the Land Records of the
District of Columbia (the "Land Records"), and in accordance with Public Law 90-566 notice
recorded December 21, 2017, a default having occurred in the payment of the indebtedness
secured thereby and the covenants contained therein, and at the request of the party
secured thereby (the "Noteholder"), the undersigned Substitute Trustees, will sell, at public
auction, within the office of ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.,4910 MASSACHUSETTS
AVENUE, N.W., SUITE 100, WASHINGTON, D.C. on
THURSDAY, January 25, 2018 at 12:00 Noon
the following described land and premises. All that certain land situate in the District of
Columbia and being more particularly described as follows:
Lot Numbered One Hundred Ninety-seven (0197) in Square numbered Four Hundred Fortyfive (0445) in the subdivision made by James Murray, as per plat recorded in the Office of
the Surveyor for the District of Columbia in Liber 39 at folio 181.
Subject to covenants, conditions, restrictions, agreements, easements and rights of way of
record.
TOGETHER WITH any and all buildings, structures, improvements or appurtenances
now erected on the above-described land, including, without limitation, all equipment,
apparatus, machinery and fixtures of any kind or character forming a part of said buildings,
structures, improvements or appurtenances, and any furniture, furnishings, equipment,
machinery and other personal property owned and located in, upon or about the abovedescribed land and any buildings thereon all as more particularly described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust (the "Property").
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. The bid which yields the highest price for the Property will be
accepted by the Substitute Trustees (unless the sale is postponed or cancelled) and all bids
will be provisional until acceptance. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Substitute Trustees
absolutely reserve the right to postpone the sale and/or cancel the sale at any time until the
auctioneer announces that the Property is "sold" and the deposit in the required amount
and form is received by the Substitute Trustees. A deposit in the amount of $100,000.00
will be required at the time of sale.
Such deposit must be by Local or National Bank Cashier's Check payable to Futrovsky,
Forster & Scherr, Chartered or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine
in their sole discretion. The Noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust (or any related party)
shall be exempted by the Substitute Trustees from submitting any bidding deposit. The
Substitute Trustees will, as a condition of the sale, require all potential bidders except
the Noteholder to show their deposit before any bidding begins. The retained deposit of
the successful purchaser shall be applied, without interest, to the successful purchaser's
credit at settlement, provided, however, that in the event the successful purchaser fails
to consummate the purchase in accordance with the terms of sale as herein provided,
such deposit, at the option of the Substitute Trustees, will be forfeited. The terms of sale
must be complied with and settlement consummated thereon within 30 days from day of
sale unless extended at the sole discretion of the Substitute Trustees. TIME IS OF THE
ESSENCE. The balance of the purchase price over and above the retained deposit, with
interest thereon at a rate of 10.25% per annum from the date of sale through the date of
receipt of the balance of the purchase price, will be due at settlement in certified funds; and
if not so paid, the Substitute Trustees reserve the right to retain the deposit and resell the
Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser, after such advertisement and on
such terms as the Substitute Trustees may deem proper, and to avail themselves and the
Noteholder of any legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser.
The Property is sold subject to the rights, if any, of parties in possession, if such rights
have priority over the Deed of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions,
easements, rights of way, and limitations of record.
The Grantor of the Deed of Trust executed a lease with 1547 7th Ventures, LLC (dba El Centro
D.F.), a District of Columbia limited liability company, in 2013, as subsequently amended (the
“El Centro Lease”). A copy of the El Centro Lease and all exhibits, amendments and related
correspondence in Noteholder’s possession are available for inspection upon request at
the office of Maxwell A. Howell, Jr., Esq. prior to foreclosure at the auction. Request for
inspection should be made in advance with Mr. Howell at 301-251-8500(x20).
The Property will be sold "WHERE IS" and in "AS IS" condition without any warranty as
to condition, express or implied, and without any representation or warranty as to the
accuracy of the information furnished to prospective bidders by the Substitute Trustees or
any other party and without any other representations or warranty of any nature. Without
limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation or
warranty as to (I) title to the Property, (ii) the nature, condition, structural integrity, or fitness
for a particular use of any improvements, fixtures or personal property included within the
Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property or the compliance of the Property
with federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of
hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Property with the Americans with Disabilities
Act or any similar law, or (v) compliance of the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances
and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the Deed to the Property by the
successful purchaser shall constitute a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees
or the Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters.
The successful purchaser recognizes that any investigation, examination or inspection of
the Property is within the control of the owner or other parties in possession of the Property
and not within the control of the Substitute Trustees or the Noteholder.
Conveyance shall be by Substitute Trustees’ Deed, without covenant or warranty, express
or implied. The risk of loss or damage by fire or other casualty to the Property from and
after the date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Real property taxes will be
adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter be assumed by the purchaser. The property is
otherwise being sold subject to any and all unpaid special assessments, ground rents, public
charges, sewer, water, drainage and other public improvements whether assessments have
been levied or not through date of closing. The Noteholder and Substitute Trustees assume
no liability for fuel, gas, electricity, utilities and other operating charges accrued before
or after the sale and shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser. All costs incident
to the settlement and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination of title,
conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all transfer taxes and charges, title
insurance premiums, notary fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey
title, the purchaser's sole remedy is a return of deposit. Further particulars may be
announced at the time of sale. For further information, please contact Maxwell A. Howell,
Jr., Esq. at 301-251-8500(x20)
Leonard A. Greenberg
Stuart D. Schooler
Substitute Trustees
Washington Post
Jan. 15, 17, 19, 22, 24, 2018
12153788
JOBS
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12150742
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.,
4910 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE, N.W., SUITE 100
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20016
202-364-0306
www.alexcooper.com
820
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840
Trustees Sale - DC
1206 INGRAHAM STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 006237 R (RP), the
undersigned Trustee will offer for sale the property known
as 1206 INGRAHAM STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 10:45 AM, the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0073 in Square
2930, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on July
6, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007089216.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court.
Property is subject to a prior mortgage of $108,097.07 as of
December 29, 2016 plus interest, costs and fees that may
accrue, and conditions.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $25,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in cash
or certified funds. The deposit required to bid at the auction is
waived for the Noteholder and any of its successors or assigns.
The Noteholder may bid up to the total debt on credit and may
submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be announced
at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be paid in
cash within 60 days of final ratification of the sale by the Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid sixty (60) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Trustee
reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court, plus all costs
incurred, if the Trustee have filed the appropriate motion with
the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal
service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with
such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and
expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by
certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by
the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by
the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed
effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the
United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser
that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service
to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the
deposit shall be forfeited to the Trustee and all expenses of
this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the
gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid
from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting
purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or
profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of
any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 12% from
the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office
of the Trustee. In the event that the settlement is delayed for
ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that
upon notification by the Trustees of such event the sale is null
and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without
interest.
Trustee File No. (15-0056 )
Allan P. Feigelson, P.A.
8337 Cherry Lane
Laurel Lakes Executive Park
Laurel, Md 20707
301-362-2900
SF
SF
840
Trustees Sale - DC
M
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Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WATER AND
SEWER AUTHORITY (DC WATER)
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATION
STATEMENT AND PROPOSALS (RFQ/P)
CHEVROLET
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A
D8
SF
Stephen L. Wise, Jr.
Defendant
No . C-02-CV-16-003298
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
December 29, 2017, that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Robert A. Jones, Substitute Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 29th day
of January 2018 next, provided a
copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 29th day
of January 2018 next. The report
states the amount of sale of the
property at 657 CADBURY DRIVE,
ODENTON, MD 21113 to be
$135,962.00
Robert P Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County, MD
Jan 8, 15, 22, 2018
12152962
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MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
OPQRS
EZ
Trustees Sale - DC
2100 FENDALL ST, SE UNIT #4, WASHINGTON, DC 20020
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2016 CA 002967 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 2100 FENDALL ST, SE UNIT #4, WASHINGTON, DC
20020 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On FEBRUARY 6, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2004 in Square
5778, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
AUGUST 3, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006105469.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 563660
JAMES E. CLARKE, RENEE DYSON
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
4324 ALABAMA AVENUE SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 006300 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 4324 ALABAMA AVENUE SE, WASHINGTON, DC
20019 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On FEBRUARY 6, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0004, 0003,
0005 & 0006 in Square 5381, and more particularly described
in the Deed of Trust recorded in the Land Records of the
District of Columbia, on MAY 9, 2005 as Instrument Number
2005063100.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 516308
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 Rockville Pike, Suite 100
Rockville, MD 20852
301-804-3400
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2153 California Street, Unit 205
WASHINGTON, DC 20008
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 10, 2006, as Instrument
No. 2006031435, and in accordance with the Foreclosure
Default Notice filed on May 11, 2017 as Instrument number
2017052134 and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public
auction, within the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS,
INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC
20015-2034 on,
JANUARY 23, 2018, at 3:30 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
designated as and being Lot 2166 in Square 2528, and more
particularly described in said Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale, except from secured
party. The balance of the purchase price with interest on the
unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the
Deed of Trust Note (8.125% per annum) from the date of sale
to the date funds are received by the Trustees, payable in cash
or certified funds within 30 DAYS. There will be no abatement
of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds
are tendered before settlement. Adjustment of current year’s
real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and
thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other public and/or
private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground
rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are to be paid by
the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to title examination, conveyancing, city revenue stamps,
transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to
settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser is
responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property,
and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from date
of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within thirty days of sale, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence. The defaulted purchaser shall not
be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale
even if such surplus results from improvements to the property
by said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale
audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. Purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit
without interest.
Loan Type: CONV. Trustee file No. 400.00005.
Deena L. Reynolds, or John E. Driscoll, III,
Substitute Trustees
JANUARY 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 2018
JANUARY 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018
68 FORRESTER STREET SW, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 009777 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 68 FORRESTER STREET SW, WASHINGTON, DC
20032 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On FEBRUARY 6, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0058 in Square
6239, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
NOVEMBER 23, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005169413.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 513283
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
1767 U STREET, NW UNIT 3, WASHINGTON, DC 20009
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 007954 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1767 U STREET, NW UNIT 3, WASHINGTON, DC
20009 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0150 in Square
2020, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
JULY 8, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005094689.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 561853
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 006905 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 5007 D STREET SE, UNIT 302 P-15 P-15,
WASHINGTON, DC 20019 at public auction within the offices
of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue NW Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567
On FEBRUARY 6, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises
situated in the District of Columbia, and designated as and
being Lot 2016 & 2042 in Square 5321, and more particularly
described in the Deed of Trust recorded in the Land Records
of the District of Columbia, on DECEMBER 26, 2006 as
Instrument Number 2006174443.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 563135
JAMES E. CLARKE, RENEE DYSON
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
5222 KARL PLACE NE,
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbiaâ ™s Decree of Sale in Case # 2017 CA 001272 R (RP),
the undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the
property known as 5222 KARL PLACE NE, WASHINGTON, DC
20019 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On FEBRUARY 6, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0037 in Square
5203, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
APRIL 12, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007050794.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 543934
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SHANNON MENAPACE AND HUGH GREEN
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
JANUARY 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018
JANUARY 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018
12153279
840
Trustees Sale - DC
438 KENYON STREET NORTHWEST,
WASHINGTON, DC 20010
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 010001 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 438 KENYON STREET NORTHWEST, WASHINGTON,
DC 20010 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY
WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite
440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23,
2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0044 in
Square 3049, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on DECEMBER 02, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005172808.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 564328
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
1902 GOOD HOPE ROAD SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 008302 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1902 GOOD HOPE ROAD SE, WASHINGTON, DC
20020 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0019 in Square
5618 S, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
APRIL 13, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007051283.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 561811
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12153280
Trustees Sale - DC
12150920
12153278
5007 D STREET SE, UNIT 302 P-15,
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
840
12151126
12153281
JANUARY 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018
JANUARY 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018
D9
Trustees Sale - DC
12152441
12150914
830 XENIA STREET SOUTHEAST, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 007566 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 830 XENIA STREET SOUTHEAST, WASHINGTON, DC
20032 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0015 in Square
6123, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
NOVEMBER 15, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006155201.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 558154
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150916
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12150917
D10
840
Trustees Sale - DC
OPQRS
840
Trustees Sale - DC
4047 GAULT PLACE NORTHEAST, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 002012 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 4047 GAULT PLACE NORTHEAST, WASHINGTON, DC
20019 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0045 in Square
5077, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
DECEMBER 08, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006165633.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 563429
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
412 EVARTS STREET NE, #4, WASHINGTON, DC 20017
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2017 CA 005491 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 412 EVARTS STREET NE, #4, WASHINGTON, DC
20017 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2006 in Square
3638, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
JUNE 10, 2008 as Instrument Number 2008062486.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 537295
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150772 DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
4137 4TH STREET SOUTHEAST, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 007752 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 4137 4TH STREET SOUTHEAST, WASHINGTON, DC
20032 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0801 in Square
6167, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
NOVEMBER 9, 2011 as Instrument Number 2011113250.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 564437
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
EZ
Trustees Sale - DC
320 V STREET NE, UNIT A, WASHINGTON, DC 20002
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2016 CA 008873 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 320 V STREET NE, UNIT A, WASHINGTON, DC
20002 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2016 in Square
3562, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
AUGUST 4, 2008 as Instrument Number 2008083474.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 563134
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150758 DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
4240 BLAGDEN AVENUE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 007774 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 4240 BLAGDEN AVENUE NW, WASHINGTON, DC
20011 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0026 in Square
2659, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on OCTOBER 13, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005147157.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $15,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 501777
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150905 DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
1312 MONTELLO AVENUE, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2016 CA 000636 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1312 MONTELLO AVENUE, NE, WASHINGTON, DC
20002 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0083 in Square
4064, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
APRIL 2, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007045010.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 552461
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150723 DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
PUBLIC AUCTION SALE
SHARES OF CAPITAL STOCK OF
Capitol Hill Tower Housing Cooperative, Inc.
a cooperative housing corporation, entitling the owner
thereof to possession of a dwelling unit
KNOWN AS
1000 New Jersey Ave, S.E.
Unit 412
Washington, DC 20003
SALE ON
January 23, 2018 at 11:00AM
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a certain
Security Agreement from David B. Kuhns, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and in execution of the
Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s Decree of Sale in
Case No. 2016 CA 002624 R(RP), the secured creditor, by
its undersigned attorney, will sell at Public Auction AT THE
OFFICE OF HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., LOCATED AT
5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, Suite 440, WASHINGTON,
DC 20015:
All the capital stock described in said Security Agreement
being three hundred and sixty five (365) shares of capital
stock in Capitol Hill Tower Housing Cooperative Inc. allocated
to 1000 New Jersey Ave., S.E., Unit 412, together with all
rights, duties and obligations under the terms of a certain
Proprietary Lease between David B. Kuhns and Capitol Hill
Tower Housing Cooperative, Inc. Subject to the terms, provisions
and conditions contained in the Articles of Incorporation,
By-Laws, Proprietary Lease and House Rules of Capitol Hill
Tower Housing Cooperative, Inc.. These shares are being sold
“as is” without any covenant, expressed or implied, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior thereto, and subject to ratification by the
Court.
The capital stock will be sold subject to its proportionate
share of certain underlying purchase money mortgages, and
subject to all conditions, liens restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same, and subject to any priority amounts due
Capitol Hill Tower Housing Cooperative, Inc.as established in the
Recognition Agreement between the secured party and Capitol
Hill Tower Housing Cooperative, Inc. filed in Case No. 2016
CA 002624 R(RP). The capital stock will be sold subject to
the terms, restrictions and obligations set forth in the Articles
of Incorporation, ByLaws, Proprietary Lease and House Rules of
Capitol Hill Tower Housing Cooperative, Inc.
THE CAPITAL STOCK ENTITLES THE PURCHASER TO THE
USE AND OCCUPANCY OF UNIT 412 IN THE CAPITOL HILL
TOWER HOUSING COOPERATIVE, INC. THE PURCHASER
MUST BE AN INDIVIDUAL WHO WILL OCCUPY THE COOPERATIVE UNIT. THE SALE OF STOCK TO A THIRD PARTY
PURCHASER IS CONTINGENT ON THE APPROVAL OF THE
PURCHASER BY CAPITOL HILL TOWER HOUSING COOPERATIVE, INC. IF APPROVED, THE PURCHASER WILL BE
REQUIRED TO EXECUTE A PROPRIETARY LEASE FOR UNIT
412. IF THE PURCHASER IS NOT APPROVED, THE PURCHASER’S SOLE REMEDY SHALL BE RETURN OF THE DEPOSIT.
TERMS OF SALE: A cash deposit, certified check or cashier's
check in the amount of 10 % of the sales price will be required
of the purchaser at the time and place of sale, except that the
Secured Party will not be required to give a deposit. Balance
to be paid in cash 30 days following the Court’s ratification
of the sale. Interest to be charged at the rate of 6.375% per
annum on the unpaid purchase price from date of sale to date of
settlement. All costs incident to the transfer of the capital stock
shall be borne by the purchaser. All adjustments of cooperative
fees and assessments will be made as to date of sale, and to
be assumed by thereafter by the purchaser. In the event that
the purchaser fails to go to settlement as required, the capital
stock shall be re-sold at purchaser’s risk and expense and the
deposit is forfeited. If the seller is unable to convey the capital
stock to the purchaser for any reason, purchaser's sole remedy
is return of the deposit. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
JAMES E. CLARKE, ATTORNEY
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD SE
SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150765 DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
225 JEFFERSON STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 001760 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 225 JEFFERSON STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC
20011 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0029 in Square
3329, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
APRIL 20, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006051549.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 563190
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150717 DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
3169 APPLE ROAD, NE, UNIT 6, WASHINGTON, DC 20018
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 006923 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 3169 APPLE ROAD, NE, UNIT 6, WASHINGTON, DC
20018 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2121 in Square
4326, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
JULY 20, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007095740.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 561846
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150728 DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
840
12150709
2477 ALABAMA AVENUE SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 005900 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 2477 ALABAMA AVENUE SE, WASHINGTON, DC
20020 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0199 in Square
5730, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on AUGUST 26, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005120388.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 520595
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12150716 DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12150714
MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
OPQRS
EZ
Trustees Sale - DC
1331 TALBERT TERRACE SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2016 CA 004922 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1331 TALBERT TERRACE SE, WASHINGTON, DC
20020 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 1057 in Square
5869, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on AUGUST 13, 1998 as Instrument Number 9800006346.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $8,200.00 or 10%
of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 551666
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12150500
718 19TH STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 006870 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 718 19TH STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0041 in Square
4513, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
JULY 19, 2013 as Instrument Number 2013084848.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 561258
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
850
Montgomery County
850
D11
850
Montgomery County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3347 BLAINE STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
20413 Meadow Pond Pl, Gaithersburg, MD 20886
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
Decree of Sale in Case # 2017 CA 002334 R (RP), the premises known as 20413 Meadow Pond Pl, Gaithersburg,
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property MD 20886. By virtue of the power and authority contained
known as 3347 BLAINE STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC in a Deed of Trust, dated August 30, 2005, and recorded
20019 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST in Liber 31307 at Page 371 among the land records of the
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440, COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018 of $337,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0018 in Square Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
5000, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 31, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
on JANUARY 28, 2010 as Instrument Number 2010008282.
not limited to:
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without Tax ID# 09-01767868
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
subject to ratification by the Court
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.25% per annum
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
Court.
association dues and assessments that may become due after
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court, are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to Trustee's File No. 17-266200.
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
www.hwestauctions.com
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
12151789
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled JANUARY 15, 22, 29, 2018
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
TRUSTEE'S SALE
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
3700 Flintridge Court, Brookeville, MD 20833
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner premises known as 3700 Flintridge Court, Brookeville, MD
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on 20833. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district a Deed of Trust, dated January 26, 2007, and recorded in
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date Liber 33779 at Page 99 among the land records of the
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary of $700,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 31, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered not limited to:
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid Tax ID# 01-01970532
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
returned without interest.
affect same, if any.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 563581
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
C/O ORLANS PC
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
Leesburg, VA 20175
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
(703) 777-7101
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12150253 are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-254812.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
5307 JAY STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 008290 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 5307 JAY STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
www.hwestauctions.com
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUC12151788
TIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440, JANUARY 15, 22, 29, 2018
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 23, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0004 in Square
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5206, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
221 W Deer Park Rd, Gaithersburg, MD 20877
MAY 5, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006059011.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without premises known as 221 W Deer Park Rd, Gaithersburg,
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject MD 20877. By virtue of the power and authority contained
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded in a Deed of Trust, dated August 31, 2006, and recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and in Liber 33145 at Page 518 among the land records of the
subject to ratification by the Court
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or of $372,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 17, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be not limited to:
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be Tax ID# 09-02256942
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
Court.
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days affect same, if any.
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court, or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the association dues and assessments that may become due after
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled Trustee's File No. 17-265082.
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
www.hwestauctions.com
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12148913
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 517460
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
1. Coffee
2. Paper
3. Bills
DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12150265
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
S0833-2 2x3
12150499
850
Montgomery County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2202 Seminary Road, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 2202 Seminary Road, Silver Spring, MD
20910. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated June 16, 2004, and recorded in
Liber 28119 at Page 781 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
of $352,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 17, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-00984921
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-259883.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
12140091
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
13405 Moran Drive, North Potomac, MD 20878
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 13405 Moran Drive, North Potomac,
MD 20878. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated August 10, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 32949 at Page 532 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
of $940,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 17, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-01684604
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-257397.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
861
861
Trustees Sale
Trustees Sale
Other MD Co.
Other MD Co.
ABSOLUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018 @ 1:00 PM
12304 COASTAL HIGHWAY,
OCEAN CITY, MD
INSPECT: SATURDAYS, FEBRUARY 17, FEBRUARY 24,
& MARCH 3 FROM 2:30 PM TO 4:00 PM
GREAT HIGHWAY FRONTAGE SUITABLE FOR
SIX THREE BEDROOM UNITS AND ONE
FOUR BEDROOM UNIT. FOUR EXISTING
APT UNITS IN NEED OF REPAIR.
2% BROKER PARTICIPATION.
TERMS: 4% BUYERS PREMIUM. 40,000 DOWN
IN CASH, CERTIFIED FUNDS OR METHOD
APPROVED BY TRUSTEE.
FOR COMPLETE TERMS & DESCRIPTION VISIT:
WWW.PRAUCTIONS.COM
PETE RICHARDSON AUCTION SALES JOSEPH E MOORE, ESQ
410 546 2425
GEOFFREY WASHINGTON,
PETE@ PRAUCTIONS.COM
TRUSTEE
870
872
Arlington County
856
Frederick County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6104 LARSTAN DRIVE,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22312
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $525,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.810000% dated
June 23, 2008, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF ARLINGTON as Deed Book 4212, Page
1522, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the COUNTY
OF ARLINGTON, at the front of
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Arlington located at
1425 N. Courthouse Road, Arlington, Virginia on February 14, 2018
at 12:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 31016066
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $413,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.425500% dated
November 9, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18909,
Page 0192, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on February 14, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 072-2-09-0078
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-270582.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Jan. 8, 15, 2018
872
12149979
Frederick County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7815 Old Receiver Road, Frederick, MD 21702
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7815 Old Receiver Road, Frederick, MD
21702. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated July 2, 2003, and recorded in Liber 3959 at Page
224 among the land records of the COUNTY OF FREDERICK,
in the original principal amount of $94,500.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
FREDERICK, at 100 W. Patrick Street, Frederick, Maryland, on
January 31, 2018 at 9:30 AM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 21-408468
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-254035.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-271635.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Jan. 15, 22, 2018
12154348
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
8524 BAUER DRIVE,
SPRINGFIELD, VA 22152
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14479 FOUR CHIMNEY DR,
CENTREVILLE, VA 20120
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $328,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.500000% dated
October 20, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17892,
Page 696, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on February 14, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 079-3--29-0019-B
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-271650.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Jan. 15, 22, 2018
12154349
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
12148902
856
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2148 SOUTH OAKLAND STREET,
ARLINGTON, VA 22204
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $113,100.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
May 28, 1998, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book 10415, Page
0571, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the COUNTY
OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse
steps at the front of the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Fairfax located at 4110 Chain
Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on
February 21, 2018 at 2:30 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 054-3-10-0840
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-271383.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
1/15/2018, 1/22/2018 12151450
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6925 KENFIG DR,
FALLS CHURCH, VA 22042
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $151,200.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.625000% dated
March 26, 1998, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 10326, Page 1040,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on February 14,
2018 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 060-2-/02/J/0018
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-270986.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec. 19, 2017, Jan. 8, 15, 2018
12149686
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Membership is rewarding.
PostPoints takes you
out to the game.
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JANUARY 15, 22, 29, 2018
12152428
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
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DECEMBER 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
Montgomery County
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C054E 2x3
S2935 2x6
D12
873
Prince William County
OPQRS
876
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13907 Gullane Dr # 106
Woodbridge, VA 22191
Towne #: 5000.0747
12153838
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
8682 Carlton Drive
Manassas, VA 20110
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $82,700.00, dated August 16,
2004, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on August
20, 2004, as Instrument Number
200408200143000, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on February 2,
2018 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: LOT 87, Section 2, Point of Woods East, as
the same is duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 1323,
page 27 among the land records of
Prince William County, Virginia. Tax
ID: 111-16-00-87.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $8,200.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
567134)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0745
1/15/2018, 1/22/2018
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $290,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.850000% dated
November 14, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 20061130-0099215, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
February 7, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 584397154001
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266502.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
January 8, 15, 2018
12152463
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
22803 ANGELIQUE DR,
ASHBURN, VA 20148
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $636,446.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.500000% dated
August 4, 2016, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 20160805-0050217, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
February 14, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 159471550000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-267579.
1-800-753-POST
877
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust dated October 2, 2015, in the original
amount of $1,275,000.00, Instrument Number 150017336 in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom may act, will on January 23, at
11:00 a.m., at 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia 22553, offer
for sale at public auction to the highest bidder the following property
(“Property”) with improvements thereon:
All that certain tract or parcel of land, lying and being in
Chancellor District, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, and consisting
of approximately 1.005 acres, more or less, and designated as
Parcel 8A on that certain “Plat Showing Subdivision of Parcel
8 in Harrison Crossing Place, Chancellor Magisterial District,
Spotsylvania County, Virginia” made by Fairbanks & Franklin,
dated April 3, 2014 and recorded May 5, 2014 in the Clerk’s Office
of the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania County, Virginia as Instrument
Number 201400006467.
Tax Map ID: 12-24-8A
In addition to the real property, the personal property and non-real estate
rights and interests to be offered for sale by the Substitute Trustees
consist of all forms of personal property if any, and all the following
fixtures, personalty, located upon or related to the Property and owned by
the owner of the Property, as more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust. The Property also includes all leases and other rights and interests
as defined and described in the Deed of Trust. No representations
or warranties are made as to the existence or condition of any such
items, it being the sole responsibility of the purchaser to make such
determination. The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to exclude
certain personal property from inclusion in the foreclosure sale of the
Property. Such excluded items will be announced at the time of the sale.
Deposit of $45,000.00 by cashier's check shall be required to qualify as a
bidder prior to the sale, except from the Noteholder.
The deposit, without interest, is applied to the purchase price at settlement. Settlement will be held on or before thirty (30) days after sale;
time being of the essence. Upon purchaser's default, the deposit shall
be forfeited and the Property shall be resold at the risk and costs of the
defaulting purchaser. After any such default and forfeiture, the Property
and any and all personal property applicable thereto may, at the discretion
of the Substitute Trustees, be conveyed to the next highest bidder on the
Property and any and all personal property applicable thereto whose bid
was acceptable to the Substitute Trustees.
Conveyance of the Property shall be with special warranty and shall be
subject to all recorded and unrecorded liens, encumbrances, security
interests, easements, rights-of-way, covenants, agreements, conditions,
restrictions, leases, occupancy agreements and mechanics and materialmen’s liens, to the extent any of the foregoing may lawfully apply to the
Property being sold, or any part thereof, and take priority over the liens
and security interests of the Deed of Trust.
The Property and all personal property applicable thereto shall be sold
“AS IS” and “WITH ALL FAULTS.” Neither the Substitute Trustees nor the
Noteholder, nor their respective agents, successors, and assigns, make
any representations or warranties with respect to the Property including,
without limitation, representations or warranties as to the zoning,
structural integrity, physical condition, construction, workmanship, materials, habitability, fitness for a particular purpose or merchantability of all
or any part of the Property or personal property applicable thereto. The
purchaser recognizes and agrees that any investigation, examination, or
inspection of the Property and personal property applicable thereto being
sold is within the control of the owner or other parties in possession and
their agents and not within the control of the Substitute Trustees, the
Noteholder, or their successors or assigns.
Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Property will be sold
without representation or warranty as to the environmental condition of
the Property or the compliance of the Property with federal, state, or local
laws and regulations concerning the purchase or disposal of hazardous
substances. Acceptance of the deed to the Property shall constitute a
waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees, the Noteholder,
and their respective agents, successors, and assigns, concerning the
environmental condition of the Property including, but not limited to,
claims arising under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, and/or state or local
law, ordinances or regulations. The purchaser shall be required to sign a
sale memorandum waiving any cause of action it may have against the
Substitute Trustees or the Noteholder for any condition of the Property
that may not comply with any federal, state or local law, regulation
or ruling including, without limitation, any laws, regulations and rulings
relating to environmental contamination or hazardous wastes. Such
agreement shall also provide that if, notwithstanding such agreement, a
court of competent jurisdiction should permit such a claim to be made
against the Substitute Trustee and/or the Noteholder, such agreement
shall serve as the overwhelming primary factor in any equitable apportionment of response costs or other liability. Nothing in this paragraph
shall release, waive or preclude any claims the purchaser may have
against any person in possession or control of the Property.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Risk of loss or damage to the Property and personal property applicable
thereto shall be borne by the purchaser from and after the strike down of
the bid at the foreclosure sale. The purchaser shall pay all settlement fees,
title examination charges and title insurance premiums, and all recording
costs (including the State Grantor’s Tax). Real estate taxes prorated to the
date of the foreclosure will be paid by the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser
shall be responsible for all real estate taxes due on the Property from
and after the date of the sale. The Substitute Trustees will not deliver
possession of all or any part of the Property being sold.
The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to amend or supplement the
terms of sale by verbal announcements during the sale, to modify the
requirements for bidders’ deposits, to withdraw all or part of the Property
from the sale prior to the commencement of bidding, to postpone the
sale, and to conduct such other sales as the Substitute Trustees may
determine in their discretion.
1-800-753-POST
At the time of sale, the successful bidder shall be required to execute a
memorandum of sale (the “Memorandum of Sale”) which shall include,
by reference, all the terms and conditions contained herein. The form
of Memorandum of Sale is available from the Substitute Trustee upon
request and will be available at sale time.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec. 18, 2017, Jan. 15, 22, 2018
12149677
SF
877
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
11603 Enchanted Woods Way,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
EZ
878
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57522)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Jan 8, 15, 2018
12152886
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$268,637.00, dated April 11, 2013
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania
County, Virginia, in Document No.
130009445,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the undersigned Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at the
entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
January 30, 2018 at 12:00 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 16, Section 1, Mineral Springs
Forest, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (59261)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Jan 8, 15, 2018
12152890
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $226,773.00, dated September
17, 2015 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. 150016631, default having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on January 30,
2018 at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 140, Section 3, Spring Valley,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (58224)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Jan 8, 15, 2018
12152893
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
876
SF
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
MARYLAND
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
BETTSVILLE - No pets, nr bus, 2
rooms avail., $600/mo. all util incl.
each, Call: 301-346-9518
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
COLLEGE PARK - Furn room in pvt
home. $570/mo, Den pvt entrance &
prvt BA $875/mo. sec dep req. No
smoking. Pref male. 240-423-7923
876
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
SF
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
MOUNT RAINIER/ CHEVERLY- large
room $150/week + $150 security
deposit Call 240-615-6596
Silver Spring-Female pref. furn/unrfurn. utils incl. $550/800 Close to
bus. Deposit req. Call 703-914-5555
610
Dogs for Sale
K
i
SILVER SPRING - Large room, near
Glen Metro. All utils. Fem pref. WiFi.
N/S. $600 + dep. Call 301-460-2883
SILVER SPRING - House to share,
furnished room, male pref, no smoking, near Sligo Creek Park & Venice
Ave. $750 utils incl. 240-462-3790
TEMPLE HILLS- Single family
senior home, rooms available.
$650 & up. W/D, all utils included.
Call 202-607-9538
Temple Hills- 1 BR, unfurn, $600 util
incl, nr metro, N/S, M or F 301-2370380
UPPER MARLBORO/PERRYWOOD1 BR, BA, cbl, N/S, F pref, $725. $350
SD. Call 301-390-5608
UPPER MARLBORO-2 BR in lovely
home, $600 ea/ $700 both + 1/3
util. free pkng. Carla 240-355-9525
VIRGINIA
Roommates
German Shepherd—Beautiful Black & Red Pups from
top European Imported
parents. Vet Checked,
AKC, Health/Hips Guar.
804-895-0022 www.Vom
BrandonHaus.com
German Shepherd—8wks, $600, 301675-6880, Purebred, s/w, hip/elbow
guar. health chkd, Parents on site.
DMV owners 1yr free board, training
GERMAN SHEPHERD- AKC registered
puppies. Working blood lines.
Grandfather is an import. 12 weeks.
$1,000.
Call 757-593-1974
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS Pure
bred, shots, vet checked.11 wks
Males & females. $500/$900.
Call 240-398-6312 or 301-728-6171
GERMAN SHEPARD PUPSAKC registered.ready 2/18 4 M, 2 F.
taking deposits now.
703-953-8404
GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN /
LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
Alexandria— $215.00, 1 bedrm, 1 ba, on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
2 1/2ba, 1514 stonewall road, 772W www.VictoriasPups.com W
332-0327, EIK, Nr Pub Transp, AC,
Elec, garbage, Heat
ANNANDALE - Pvt Bedroom in Single
family home, Female preferred, Full
Bathroom. Exc. location. Util. incl.
Fios Internet. $600 703-256-2584
FAIRFAX CENTREVILLE - Basement.
No furniture, no cable. $520/mo.
Pref Male. Call 571-426-1629
MANASSAS, VA-Bsmt, sep entr, FBA,
W/D. Quiet area 2 mi. to I66. $675/mo
all incl. int. also. Call Raj 571-247-6908
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
WOODBRIDGE - Responsible person
to share 3 bedroom house.
$630 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
Golden Retriever—Puppies, AKC, Vet
checked, both parents on site, family
raised, $1000, 434-724-7217
Golden Retriever—AKC Wormed first
shots $900, male/femal, will be 8
wks old- ready 1/26 443-404-6968
Huskys Cavapoos & more—Puppies
for Sale 304-904-6289, Cash, CC,
Easy Finance, www.wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit16E
Lab Pups—Yellow, AKC, guaranteed,
wormed/1st shots. Socialized with
kids. 703-203-0702. Check out my
website: www.belgianwayfarm.com
Labrador Retriever—AKC, English Yellow and Black Puppies, Males and
Females, Generations of Champ.
Bloodlines & Health Clearances,
Family Raised, Blocky, 8 wks, $1500,
410-374-3774 or 443-421-7127
WOODBRIDGEBsmnt
room,
$850/mo., and 1 regular room for
$650/mo., Call 571-276-6883
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
Lost
Jordanian passport- #N260933
DOI: 8/31/2015 Place of issue:
Irbid/Jordan. lost on Jan 5, 2018. Call
ali hani saleh zayid 313-338-7373
265
Home & Garden
Labrador Retriever farm raised puppies,AKC, 3/4 english, black, yellow,
chocolate 1st shots, vet checked
and dewormed. Ready 1-17-18.
$800 cash only. 1-540-879-2713
Mini Poodle—$800, AKC Black
Males, 16 wks, raised w/children,
beautiful, playful, 540-905-0365
Min Schnauzer—AKC vet checked w/
certificate vaccines hair cut tails
dewclaws removed puppy
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian docked
kit 443-684-0664 raised in home
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
POMERPANIAN PUPPPIES- 8 WEEKS
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pay CASH for cylinders and cases
of cans. 312-291-9169
358
Moving Sale
CENTREVILLE - 14506 Smithwood Dr.
Sat 1/13-Mon 1/15, 9:30-5:30. Furn,
dining table w/ chairs, beds, mattresses, lthr sofa/love seats, paintings, office furn, treadmill, hoverboard, bicycles, sleds, grill & more
610
HYATTSVILLE- House to shr. 1BR for
$650. Share bath & kitchen. All
utils incl & cable. Call 240-396-7926
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Roommates
Merchandise Wanted
FORT WASHINGTON - furnished
rooms for rent with pvt BA &
Kitchenette. Vets welcome. Nr
MGM. Inc cable/internet. Starts
@ $875. Call 301-292-6147
Loudoun County
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018
MARYLAND
110
Capital Hgts-Clean rm in pvt home, nr
Metro. No Smoke. Refs. M pref. Cable
ready. No dep. $675. 301-925-1242
HYATTSVILLE- 1 unfurn. room in a
clean & quiet home, , $550 all util.
incl.Call 240-832-3995
Loudoun County
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3234941.
January 8, 15, 2018
12152900
BELTSVILLE - Lg BR w/ shr BA w/ 1
person in big 4BR, 3BA SFH. Cable,
W/D. $450 + utils. Call 301-538-8575
12153247
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 11, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $406,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Orange County, Virginia as Instrument No. 060013387 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Orange County, 109 W. Main
Street, Orange, Virginia on February 8, 2018, at 10:00 AM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: LOT 54, SECTION 5, LAKE OF THE WOODS SUBDIVISION, AS THE SAME APPEARS
DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND
RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 216,
AT PAGE 418 AND IN MAP BOOK
1 AT PAGE 35, OF THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA. REFERENCE IS HEREBY MADE TO SAID
PLAT FOR A MORE PARTICULAR
DESCRIPTION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY.
Roommates
Immediately upon delivery of the deed for the Property by the Substitute
Trustees, all duties, liabilities, and obligations of the Substitute Trustees, if
any, to the purchaser with respect to the Property shall be extinguished.
For Information contact:
Jeremy B. Root
BLANKINGSHIP & KEITH, PC
4020 University Drive #300
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 691-1235
January 8, 15, 2018
Orange County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
2801 LAKEVIEW PARKWAY,
LOCUST GROVE, VA 22508
TRUSTEE SALE
3 Ridgemore Circle,
Fredericksburg, VA 22405
Stafford County
14007 Campaign Court,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$204,232.00, dated April 10, 2015
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania
County, Virginia, in Document No.
150005520,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on February 13, 2018
at 12:00 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 108, Section 1, Enchanted
Woods, with improvements thereon.
881
Stafford County
Jeremy B. Root
William H. Casterline, Jr.
James R. Meizanis
Wake up to
home delivery.
12153824
Wake up
to home delivery.
877
Spotsylvania County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE
5621 PLANK ROAD
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 22407
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
10 HAMPTON RD,
ROUND HILL, VA 20141
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$342,713.00, dated July 13, 2015,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on July 14, 2015, as
Instrument
Number
201507140056684, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on February 9,
2018 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 106, PHASE 7, ''BELMONT BAY GOLF VILLAS'', A CONDOMINIUM, AND THE LIMITED
COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO ESTABLISHED
BY CONDOMINIUM INSTRUMENTS
RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT NUMBER 200503210043406 WITH PLAT
RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT NUMBER 200503210043407 AND ANY
SUPPLEMENTAL DECLARATIONS
AND/OR AMENDMENTS RECORDED
SUBSEQUENT
THERETO,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA. Tax ID: 8492-22-0163.02.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $12,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: VA (Trustee # 580553)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
The Vendor Auction.com will be
used in conjunction with this sale
1/15/2018, 1/22/2018
877
Loudoun County
Dogs for Sale
Doberman pups—$1,200, Black &
Rust, 8 wks, 865-278-4491, Open
contract for breeding. Dalsty's very
last litter. $200 off if bought by 1/17
SHOTS DEWORMED, ADORABLE,
HEALTH GUARANTEE $800.
540-538-1037, Fredericksburg, VA
SHELTIE Puppies AKC for sale, tri
colored females, male and female
sable. 7 weeks old, Chambersburg,
PA. Call 717-816-5161
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC registered,
very small parents, 2 sable white
males available. brown and blue eye
color. 9 wks. Call 540-560-5132
Standard Poodle — AKC, $1500, M/F,
11 wks , Black/ Brown,
solid,abstract, sable, phantom
240-417-8316
DOODLES - M&F, shots, wormed,
4 months old, house breaking
started, super friendly, family raised.
$750 & up. Call 301-639-8636
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
FROM
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
TO
"HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?"
C3748 6x10.5
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