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The Washington Post - 17 October 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Sunny 63/47 • Tomorrow: Sunny 71/51 B8
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
. $2
Backlash over
drug czar pick
NOMINEE GUIDED BILL TO CURB DEA EFFORTS
President to declare opioid emergency next week
BY E D O ’ K EEFE,
S COTT H IGHAM
AND L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
GUILLERMO ARIAS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A man in Tijuana, Mexico, looks across the border at prototypes of President Trump’s wall being built near San Diego. Trump’s vision
calls for “a fence that is impenetrable . . . unscalable,” said Roy Villareal, acting chief patrol agent of the San Diego border sector.
‘Impenetrable’? Mexicans doubt it.
BY
J OSHUA P ARTLOW
san diego — The prototypes of
the Trump border wall are taking shape this month in a sunbaked swath of scrubland abutting a run-down neighborhood
of Tijuana, Mexico. Lined up
next to each other, the 30-foottall concrete and steel sample
barriers — some with extrastout reinforced bases, others
topped with metal spikes —
certainly look ominous.
The requirements established to realize President
Trump’s vision call for “a fence
that is impenetrable, it’s unscalable,” said Roy Villareal, acting
chief patrol agent of the San
Diego border sector. “They can’t
dig under it. They can’t cut
through it.”
Even these big warning slabs
Jesus keeps
a low profile
at high-tech
Bible museum
As prototypes of Trump’s wall go up, Tijuana
residents are skeptical migrants will be deterred
Border-wall prototypes
Eight prototypes are being
constructed along the border in
San Diego. Each will be 30 feet
long and up to 30 feet high.
Parts of
the current
border fence
are 10 to
18 feet high
Current
THE WASHINGTON POST
WALL CONTINUED ON A13
Baghdad retakes oil city
amid dispute with Kurds
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND K AREN D E Y OUNG
baghdad — Iraqi forces took
control of the contested city of
Kirkuk on Monday, as two U.S.
allies faced off over territory and
oil in the wake of the Kurdish
region’s independence vote last
month.
The Iraqi forces recaptured
military bases, an oil field and
other infrastructure held by the
Kurdish troops, saying their aim
was to return to positions around
Kirkuk they held before fleeing in
the face of an Islamic State push
in 2014. But in the end they went
In NAFTA talks, division is growing on the vine
Fla. tomato farmers’ bid for protection has others in agriculture worried about losing pact’s benefits
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
The Museum of the Bible, a
massive new institution opening
next month just south of the Mall,
is just as notable for what it
includes — vivid walk-through
re-creations of the ancient world,
one of the world’s largest private
collections of Torahs, a motion
ride that sprays water at you, a
garden of biblical plants — as for
what it leaves out.
The $500 million museum,
chaired and largely funded by the
conservative Christian family
that owns Hobby Lobby, doesn’t
say a word about the Bible’s views
on sexuality or contraception.
The museum doesn’t encourage
visitors to take the Bible literally
or to believe that the Bible has
only one correct form. And on
MUSEUM CONTINUED ON A16
TOMATOES CONTINUED ON A7
M ICHELLE B OORSTEIN,
J ULIE Z AUZMER
AND S ARAH P ULLIAM B AILEY
30 feet
Source: U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Tony DiMare, a third-generation Florida tomato grower, has
spent two decades contending
with cheap Mexican imports,
watching his neighbors abandon
crops in their fields and sell off
their farms when they couldn’t
match the price of incoming produce.
But emboldened by the Trump
administration’s hostility toward
foreign trade, DiMare and a group
of Southeast growers are pushing
for tough new protectionist measures against their Mexican rivals
— so tough, in fact, that their
demands threaten to wreck the
negotiations.
“I’m all about free trade, but it
has to be fair,” DiMare said.
“It’s Americans first now,
right?” he added.
As the United States, Canada
and Mexico prepare to wrap up a
fourth round of talks Tuesday
about revisions to the North
American Free Trade Agreement,
there is growing fear that the talks
BY
Prototype
30 feet
of concrete, the teeming construction site, and police and
helicopters patrolling both
sides of the border weren’t
enough to stop a half-dozen
would-be migrants from hopping the existing fence this
month and landing smack in
the middle of the project, according to U.S. border officials.
Maybe the fence-hoppers
were unlucky, or had chosen an
ill-advised hide-in-plain-sight
strategy, but either way, their
experience is suggestive of how
many Mexicans feel about
Trump’s wall: No matter how
it’s built, it’s not going to work.
“People are still going to
cross no matter what is there,”
said Kevin Ávila Rodríguez, 17,
who recycles trash and lives
near the spot where the border
least one Republican called for
modification or outright repeal of
the law. Democrats also urged
Trump to drop Marino as his pick
President Trump said Monday
to lead the Office of National
that he will declare a national
Drug Control Policy.
emergency next week to address
Speaking in the White House
the opioid epidemic and declined
Rose Garden, Trump defended
to express confidence in
Marino as “a very early
Rep. Tom Marino (R-Pa.),
supporter of mine” and
his nominee for drug
“a great guy.” He said that
czar, in the wake of revhe had seen the reportelations that the lawing in question and that
maker helped steer legisthe White House would
lation making it harder
review the information.
to act against giant drug
Trump said he would
companies.
have a “major announceTrump’s
remarks Marino
ment, probably next
came amid widespread
week” about how his adreaction across the political specministration plans to tackle opitrum to a Washington Post/“60
oid addiction in the United
Minutes” investigation that exStates, a “massive problem” that
plained how Marino helped guide
he wants to get “absolutely right.”
the legislation, which sailed
“This country and, frankly, the
through Congress last year with
MARINO CONTINUED ON A17
virtually no opposition.
Trump said “we’re going to be
Display of unity with McConnell
looking into” the investigation,
The president and the GOP leader
while many Democrats and at
play down their reported rift. A4
JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES
Workers harvest tomatoes on Tony DiMare’s farm in Florida City, Fla. Tomato growers in Florida
would like to curb competition from Mexico — but many other farmers oppose changing trade rules.
THE WORLD
THE NATION
Guilty plea Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who
spent five years in captivity, admitted to
desertion and misbehavior charges. A3
IRAQ CONTINUED ON A12
Stars collide,
bringing forth
a new era of
astrophysics
BY S ARAH K APLAN
AND B EN G UARINO
IN THE NEWS
ANDREW CRAFT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
further, entering the city itself.
Iraqi officers lowered Kurdistan’s flag and raised Iraq’s flag at
the provincial council building in
oil-rich Kirkuk, the center of a
fierce dispute between the Kurds
and Baghdad. Cars packed roads
out of the city as some residents
rushed to leave. Others who had
been unhappy with Kurdish rule
took to the streets to celebrate.
The United States, which
trained both the Kurdish and
Iraqi forces, seemed to be left in a
bind as the crisis escalated between two partners in the fight
against the Islamic State.
The Libyan man
accused of plotting the
2012 Benghazi attacks
was directly implicated
in court for the first
time. A2
Firefighters gained
ground, but blazes
continued to rage in
Northern California. A3
A New Jersey man,
Ahmad Khan Rahimi,
was found guilty of detonating a bomb in New
York’s Chelsea neighborhood last year, injur-
ing 31 people. A8
A federal judge in
Maryland launched
questions at government lawyers and those
challenging the latest
iteration of President
Trump’s travel ban. A9
Puerto Ricans, desperate for water, are drawing it from a well at a
Superfund site. A9
EPA Administrator
Scott Pruitt issued a
directive to curb settlements with groups suing
the department. A17
The deadly weekend
bomb attack in Somalia
demonstrated the resilience of al-Shabab militants. A11
A journalist who covered Malta’s “Panama
Papers” link was killed
by a bomb in her car. A12
THE ECONOMY
The Weinstein Co. is
in talks with Colony
Capital to sell the studio
after accusations of sexual assault by Harvey
Weinstein. A14
D.C. officials are pitching four of the city’s
trendiest neighborhoods
as possible homes for
Amazon.com’s second
headquarters. A14
Some 130 million years ago, in a
galaxy far away, the smoldering
cores of two collapsed stars
smashed into each other. The resulting explosion sent a burst of
gamma rays streaming through
space and rippled the very fabric
of the universe.
On Aug. 17, those signals
reached Earth — and sparked an
astronomy revolution.
The distant collision created a
“kilonova,” an astronomical marvel that scientists have never seen
before. It was the first cosmic
event in history to be witnessed
via both traditional telescopes,
which can observe electromagnetic radiation such as gamma rays,
and gravitational wave detectors,
which sense the wrinkles in spacetime produced by distant cataKILONOVA CONTINUED ON A8
Inside
HEALTH & SCIENCE
THE REGION
Fairfax County prosecutors will pursue the
death penalty against a
man accused of killing a
Muslim teenager. B1
A West Virginia county torn by the Civil War
finds itself at the center
of a dispute over a
plaque honoring Confederate soldiers. B1
Attorney general candidates in Virginia debuted attack ads before
their final debate. B1
Women’s health
What to know about hot
flashes, eye disorders,
and the link between
dementia and midlife
high blood pressure. E1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A14
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 316
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
7 1 3 1
A2
EZ
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
National Football League owners and players union
representatives meet through Wednesday in New York to
discuss the national anthem protests. Visit postsports.com
for developments.
All day
U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer holds
ministerial meetings and a news conference in
Washington on the North American Free Trade Agreement
along with Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia
Freeland and Mexican Secretary of Economy Ildefonso
Guajardo Villarreal. Visit washingtonpost.com/business for
details.
1:30 p.m.
President Trump holds a joint news conference with
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras in the White House
Rose Garden. For developments, visit washingtonpost.
com/politics.
5:08 p.m.
The New York Yankees host the Houston Astros in Game
4 of their American League Championship Series matchup
in the Major League Baseball playoffs. Follow the game at
postsports.com.
9:01 p.m.
The Los Angeles Dodgers visit the Chicago Cubs in Game
3 of the National League Championship Series. The
Dodgers lead the series, 2-0. Follow the game at
postsports.com.
KLMNO
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CO R R ECTI O N S
An Oct. 16 Page One article about
the Interior Department’s effort to
build a road in an Alaska wildlife
refuge misidentified the location of
the Frank Church-River of No
Return Wilderness. It is in Idaho,
not Montana.
Dan Steinberg’s Oct. 16 Sports
column about the Washington
Redskins’ win over the San
Francisco 49ers incorrectly said
San Francisco quarterback C.J.
Beathard spent his childhood at
Redskins training camps. It was
Beathard’s father, the son of former
Redskins general manager Bobby
Beathard, who did so.
An Oct. 15 Page One article about
a bill that restricted the Drug
Enforcement Administration’s
authority to regulate prescription
narcotics misstated, in the article
and an accompanying chart, how
much the drug industry spent on
lobbying between 2014 and 2016. It
spent $102 million, not
$106 million. Some lobbying
reports were double-counted.
An Oct. 14 Style review of the Foo
Fighters concert at the new music
venue Anthem, on the redeveloped
Wharf on Southwest Washington’s
waterfront, incorrectly said the
Anthem’s floor is gently graded.
The floor is flat.
An Oct. 7 Sports article about AllMet power forward Jermaine
Harris verbally committing to play
at the University of Rhode Island
mistakenly omitted the first name
of Christian Cole, his coach at Rock
Creek Christian Academy.
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. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
Trump’s right: No Cabinet can compare with this one
It’s about time
somebody gives
Donald Trump the
credit he deserves.
Even if that person
is Donald Trump.
Dana
“We’re doing a lot
Milbank
of great things,” the
WASHINGTON president said at
the start of a
SKETCH
Cabinet meeting
Monday. Further, he
said, “we are getting tremendous
accolades for what we’re doing.”
What’s more, “the Justice
Department is doing a fantastic job,”
while the economy is growing
“phenomenally,” except for the drag
from those hurricanes — the
handling of which, Trump would
again say Monday, earns him an “Aplus” grade. He also boasted about
his yet-to-be-passed (or even
proposed) tax cuts — the “largest tax
cuts in the history of our country.”
But the highest praise of all
came for his Cabinet — or, rather,
his own acumen in choosing this
truly exceptional group of people
seated at the table around him.
“There are those that are saying
it’s one of the finest group of
people ever assembled as a
candidate — as a Cabinet,” he said.
(Trump’s candidate-Cabinet mixup followed his Friday mishap
when he praised parents who
sacrifice for the “furniture,” rather
than future, of their children.)
“This is a tremendous amount of
talent,” Trump continued. “We
have just gotten really, really, great
people. I’m very proud of them.”
And I’m very proud of Trump
for recognizing the greatness of
his Cabinet. But he is being
modest. This isn’t just “one of the
finest” Cabinets. There has never
been a Cabinet like this before —
and there probably will never be
one like it in the furniture.
Sure, George Washington sat
around the Cabinet table with
John Adams, Thomas Jefferson,
Alexander Hamilton, Henry Knox
and Edmund Randolph. Abraham
Lincoln won the Civil War with
William Seward, Salmon Chase
and Edwin Stanton. Franklin
Roosevelt beat the Depression and
the Nazis with Henry Morgenthau,
Harold Ickes and Henry Stimson.
But Washington didn’t have a
professional-wrestling executive in
his Cabinet, nor an education
secretary foresighted enough to
warn the country about the danger
posed to schools by bears. He didn’t
even have an education secretary!
Lincoln didn’t think to hire a
Cabinet secretary who proposed
abolishing the very Cabinet agency
he runs, as Trump has found in
Energy Secretary Rick Perry. As
Lincoln would have said: Oops!
FDR never had on his Cabinet
someone he’d compared to a child
molester, as Trump has with Ben
Carson, his secretary of housing
and urban development.
No matter how you measure it
— billionaires, white men,
oddballs — this Cabinet is
extraordinary. Alexander
Hamilton’s entire treasury
probably didn’t have the amount
of money EPA chief Scott Pruitt
has spent on a soundproof phone
booth, Education Secretary Betsy
DeVos has spent on her security
detail, and Treasury Secretary
Steven Mnuchin and his wife
spent taking a government jet to
Kentucky, where they viewed the
eclipse, or tried to spend,
requesting a government plane
for their honeymoon.
They are so good that Trump
doesn’t need to be modest about it.
John F. Kennedy may have brought
Camelot to Washington, but he
thought it necessary to acknowledge
the genius of his predecessors,
declaring a White House gathering
of Nobel laureates the most
extraordinary collection of talent —
except for “when Thomas Jefferson
dined alone.”
Even Jefferson, however, would
have to tip his tricorn to the superior
accomplishments of this Cabinet.
Never before has a Cabinet been
this obsequious. Recall Trump’s first
Cabinet meeting? “Mr. President,
what an incredible honor.” “I can’t
thank you enough.” “It is just the
greatest privilege of my life.”
Never has a Cabinet incurred
so many probes and reprimands
in so little time. U.N. ambassador
Nikki Haley earned a reprimand
for improper political activity,
while Interior Secretary Ryan
Zinke’s attempted intimidation of
lawmakers has come under
review, as have actions by Pruitt
and Mnuchin.
Never has a Cabinet endured
more humiliation with more
aplomb. Two members (Reince
Priebus and frequent-flier Tom
Price) have already been sacked.
Trump publicly eviscerated
Attorney General Jeff Sessions and
contradicted Mnuchin and Defense
Secretary Jim Mattis. CIA Director
Mike Pompeo has routinely
endured Trump’s criticism of his
workers, and Transportation
Secretary Elaine Chao has watched
Trump savage her husband
(Trump’s “friend”) Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.).
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson,
recently disemboweled by Trump in
tweets and, after the “moron”
comment became public,
challenged by Trump to an IQ test,
sat at Trump’s right arm on Monday.
Like all other Cabinet members he
remained silent, seen but not heard,
as the president did all the talking
in front of the cameras.
Tillerson, clinging to his job by
his fingertips, has been so badly
undermined by Trump that Sen.
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) says he’s
been castrated. Tillerson denies
he’s a eunuch. “I checked,” he said
Sunday on CNN. “I’m fully intact.”
George Washington’s Cabinet
was pretty good. But this? Best.
Cabinet. Ever.
Twitter: @Milbank
Washington Post
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High court takes a 2nd key case on digital privacy
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
The Supreme Court on Monday
accepted a second important case
on digital privacy, agreeing to hear
a dispute between the federal government and Microsoft about
emails stored overseas.
The justices increasingly have
been called upon to settle legal battles between law enforcement and
technology companies, and to interpret laws written before the technology revolution that now raise
pertinent questions about privacy.
The justices next month will
hear a case involving prosecutors’
access to the historical data stored
in cellphone tower records.
Legal experts noted that the
court accepted both that case and
the one involving Microsoft even
though there was no split among
lower courts on the law underlying
the decisions, something that usually happens before the Supreme
Court gets involved.
“It’s plausible that the splitless
grants in both [cases] signal a recognition among the justices of the
tremendous importance of digital
evidence collection,” George
Washington University law professor Orin Kerr wrote in a blog post.
“Whatever the right answers are,
the justices need to provide them.”
The case the court accepted
Monday began in 2013 when U.S.
prosecutors got a warrant to access
emails in a drug-trafficking investigation. It was served on Microsoft
in Redmond, Wash. But the data
sought was stored on its servers in
Ireland. (The company has more
than 100 centers in 40 countries.)
Microsoft turned over information it had stored domestically but
contended that U.S. law enforce-
ment couldn’t seize evidence held in
another country. It said that if it was
forced to turn over such information,
it would lead to claims from other
countries about data stored here.
A judge upheld the warrant, but
a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 2nd Circuit overturned the
ruling. The full circuit then split
evenly on whether that decision
was correct, and one judge wrote
that the Supreme Court needed to
provide the ultimate answer.
The Justice Department asked
the justices to do just that and to
reverse the lower court. It said that
a “domestic recipient of a subpoena is required to produce specified
materials within the recipient’s
control, even if the recipient stores
the materials abroad.”
Thirty-three states also urged the
court to take the case, U.S. v. Microsoft. They said that the decision has
implications for other technology
giants such as Google and Yahoo
and that it was “remarkable” that
the 2nd Circuit had held “that a
private company has unfettered
discretion to shield evidence of
crime from law enforcement, simply by electronically sending that
evidence out of the jurisdiction.”
Deputy Solicitor General Jeffrey
B. Wall told the court that “hundreds if not thousands of investigations of crimes — ranging from
terrorism, to child pornography, to
fraud — are being or will be hampered by the government’s inability to obtain electronic evidence.”
But Microsoft contends that the
Stored Communications Act of
1986 did not imagine a world in
which “a technician in Redmond,
Washington, could access a customer’s private emails stored clear
across the globe.”
In a blog posted after the court’s
announcement, Microsoft president and chief legal officer Brad
Smith wrote that the government’s
position endangers privacy.
“If the U.S. government can unilaterally use a warrant to seize
emails outside the United States,
what’s to stop other governments
from acting unilaterally to seize
emails stored inside the United
States?” Smith wrote. “At a time
when countries are rightly worried about foreign government
hacking, the DOJ’s interpretation
would open the door to accomplishing the same thing.”
But the company had urged the
court to stay out and allow Congress to amend the law, which
Smith noted the Justice Department has asked Congress to do.
“The current laws were written
for the era of the floppy disk, not the
world of the cloud,” Smith wrote.
The justices already are scheduled
to consider in late November whether police need a warrant to access
cellphone location data held by wireless service providers, another major
case involving digital privacy.
The court accepted two other
cases Monday that touch on law
enforcement.
In one, the justices will decide
whether defendants can suppress
wiretap evidence if the warrant
that allowed collecting the data
exceeded the court’s discretion.
Brothers Los and Roosevelt
Dahda were indicted on drug distribution conspiracy charges. In
obtaining their convictions, the
federal government relied on
wiretaps authorized on several
cellphones. Some of the incriminating evidence was gathered
when the cellphones were outside
Kansas, where the authorizing
judge was located.
A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit agreed that
a federal law seemed to say such
evidence could be suppressed. But it
reasoned that the evidence from the
warrant did not violate Congress’s
“core concerns” of privacy and uniformity when it wrote the law.
Justice Neil M. Gorsuch sat on
the panel that heard the case, although he was not part of the
rendered decision. He recused
himself from the case, Dahda v.
U.S., when it got to the Supreme
Court.
The court will also decide a double-jeopardy case from Virginia.
Michael Currier was charged with
three counts arising from the theft
of a safe that contained cash and
20 guns. He was charged with
breaking and entering, grand larceny, and being a felon in possession of a firearm, which referred to
the guns inside the safe.
To keep the jury from being
prejudiced by the knowledge that
Currier was a felon, he and the
commonwealth agreed to have the
charges tried separately.
A jury found Currier not guilty
of the first two charges, which
involved stealing the safe. But over
Currier’s objections, prosectors
then tried him on the third charge
— possession of the guns — and
this time a different jury convicted
him. He was sentenced to five
years in prison.
Lower courts did not agree with
Currier that the second trial was a
violation of his constitutional protections against being tried repeatedly for the same offense.
The case is Currier v. Virginia.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
For first time, witness directly implicates Libyan in 2012 Benghazi attacks
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
The trial of Ahmed Abu Khattala in the September 2012 attacks
on U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya, has turned to a witness who for
the first time directly implicated
him in planning the assaults.
A Libyan military intelligence
commander said in recorded video
testimony played for jurors that a
year before the attacks that killed
U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher
Stevens and three other Americans, he heard Abu Khattala “inciting” others by claiming that the
U.S. diplomatic presence and a
Red Cross facility in Benghazi were
cover for intelligence operations.
“As revolutionaries, how can we
allow the presence of a foreign
intelligence entity amongst us?”
Abu Khattala asked, according to
the commander.
The commander, testifying under the pseudonym Khalid Abdullah for safety reasons, added that
days before the attacks, Abu Khattala came to his home, where the
two spoke alone.
“ ‘I want you to provide me with
military cars, armed cars,’ ” the
commander quoted Abu Khattala
as saying. “He said he wanted to
attack the American consulate.”
The officer’s testimony did not
go entirely smoothly for prosecutors, as he appeared evasive and
contradictory at times over sixplus hours of testimony played
Thursday and Monday. He defended Facebook posts that defense
attorneys said showed his bias by
endorsing extrajudicial killings of
Islamist militants, and he acknowledged that he came forward
only after his secular, Egyptianbacked Libyan National Army,
now rising and led by Gen. Khalifa
Hifter, launched an anti-Islamist
“Operation Dignity” offensive in
May 2014 and after U.S. commandos captured Abu Khattala in Libya the following month.
Abu Khattala is the sole person
to go to trial in a U.S. courtroom in
connection with a night of attacks
Sept. 11 and 12, 2012, when militants overran and burned a State
Department special mission in
Benghazi about 10 p.m. and hit a
nearby CIA annex with mortars
after 5 a.m. The four Americans
were killed in the assaults.
He has pleaded not guilty to 18
charges. Prosecutors say that
while others participated, Abu
Khattala told individuals he masterminded the attacks, directed
underlings at the mission, and delivered training and maps that
made the mortar attack possible.
Defense lawyers counter that
Abu Khattala is merely an outspoken militia leader scapegoated by
Libyan power brokers to shield
others against whom the U.S. government has evidence. They questioned the role of other Islamist
militias — such as the February 17
Brigade, which the U.S. government paid to protect its facilities —
that have contended in a violent
political power struggle with forc-
DANA VERKOUTEREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this courtroom sketch, Assistant U.S. Attorney John Crabb makes an opening statement as Ahmed
Abu Khattala listens to an interpreter through earphones in federal court in Washington.
es led by Hifter, a former CIA asset
who spent years in exile in Northern Virginia.
U.S. District Judge Christopher
R. Cooper granted prosecutors’ request to take the Libyan commander’s testimony overseas earlier this year because he could be
killed before trial. He was deposed
over seven hours July 28 at the U.S.
Embassy in Cairo, linked by video
to the court in Washington.
The commander, 44, said he
headed a military intelligence unit
formed in 2011. He testified that he
did not expect Abu Khattala to fol-
low through with an actual attack.
Under cross-examination, he
admitted that he gave shifting accounts about whether Abu Khattala said an attack was imminent
and that he told no one about the
message before the assaults.
The commander spoke directly
to Americans only in October
2014, after one of his brothers had
been killed and another wounded
by Islamist groups. About 10 relatives have been allowed to move to
the United States since, and the
U.S. government paid $170,000 in
their expenses, he acknowledged.
“How can you put a value on the
testimony that I will be giving?”
said the commander, who still
lives with his wife and five children in Benghazi.
Abu Khattala’s lawyers cited social-media posts, including one in
which the commander commented in Arabic under his real name,
“The real meaning of to tread underfoot,” next to a photograph of
an armed soldier standing on the
bodies of two dead militants.
Abu Khattala “is takfiri” and “a
leader of terrorist groups and organizations” that are “well-known
to have killed and slaughtered people,” the commander said. “Takfiri” is Arabic for a Muslim apostate, a term that extremist groups
have invoked to justify the execution of opponents and that some
mainstream leaders have adopted
to refer to armed extremist groups.
“You have decided that Mr. Abu
Khattala is a bad person before
you came in here today, didn’t
you?” defense attorney Michelle
M. Peterson said.
The commander replied: “Why
would the United States grab Abu
Khattala in Libya? Because he is a
good man?”
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Bergdahl
pleads
guilty to
desertion
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who
vanished in Afghanistan and
spent five years in brutal captivity
before the United States recovered him in a controversial prisoner swap, pleaded guilty Monday to two crimes in connection
with his disappearance.
Bergdahl, now 31, was a private
first class when he disappeared in
2009. Appearing in an Army
courtroom at Fort Bragg, N.C., he
entered guilty pleas to charges of
desertion and misbehavior before
the enemy.
The desertion charge could
yield up to five years in confinement. The misbehavior charge
carries a maximum sentence of
life in prison. Rarely used, it’s
applied when service members
run away, surrender or otherwise
endanger fellow troops’ safety
through disobedience, neglect or
intentional misconduct.
“I understand that leaving was
against the law,” he told the judge,
according to the Associated Press,
adding later, “I believed they
would notice me missing, but I
didn’t believe they would have
reason to search for one private.”
Bergdahl walked away from
his combat outpost just before
midnight June 29, 2009. The soldier was captured by armed Taliban fighters and turned over to
the Haqqani network, a group in
Pakistan that tortured him on
and off for years.
A U.S. Special Forces team recovered Bergdahl in May 2014 as
part of a deal in which the Obama
administration released five Taliban operatives held in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The move was
bitterly protested by some critics,
including Donald Trump, who
declared during his bid for the
White House that Bergdahl was a
traitor.
The nonpartisan Government
Accountability Office concluded
that the Obama administration
violated the law by failing to
provide Congress with sufficient
notice about its plans.
Bergdahl was charged in
March 2015. It is not clear what
punishment he will receive from
the case’s judge, Army Col. Jeffery
R. Nance. He is expected to be
sentenced at Fort Bragg in an Oct.
23 hearing that could include
testimony from several U.S. service members and veterans who
Nance ruled this year were injured while searching for Bergdahl.
Nance also could take into
account Bergdahl’s treatment in
Pakistan. An Army physician who
testified in the case found that
Bergdahl, who was at times kept
in a cage, suffered muscular
nerve damage in his lower legs,
degenerative back damage and a
loss of range in motion in his left
shoulder that prevents him from
lifting heavy objects. In addition
to confinement, Bergdahl could
receive a dishonorable discharge
and lose his medical benefits.
Bergdahl’s defense team has
said he was unable to receive a
fair trial because of Trump’s repeated attacks. One attorney, Eugene Fidell, accused Trump of
treating Bergdahl as “a political
chew toy.”
In an interview published by
ABC News on Monday, Bergdahl
complained about his prospects
for a fair trial, and he said it was
“insulting” that some critics accuse him of sympathizing with
the Taliban.
“The people who want to hang
me,” he said, “you’re never going
to convince those people.”
Lt. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, who
interviewed Bergdahl, testified in
2015 that a jail sentence would be
inappropriate given the circumstances. A military doctor determined that Bergdahl exhibited
symptoms of schizotypal personality disorder, considered a variant of schizophrenia that has less
frequent or intense psychotic episodes.
Retired Lt. Gen. Michael
Flynn, who briefly served as
Trump’s national security adviser,
said in the ABC News report that
he does not think that Bergdahl
deserves jail time.
“So the guy deserted his men,
his soldiers, his squad — no
doubt,” Flynn said. “[But] I don’t
think he should serve another day
in any sort of confinement or jail
or anything like that, because
frankly, even though he put himself into this situation to a degree,
we — the United States government and the United States military — put him in Afghanistan.”
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
Calif. crews gain ground, but blazes still rage
At least 41 people have
been killed as wildfires
continue for eighth day
BY
S COTT W ILSON
sonoma valley, calif. — For
eight days, Debbie Cooper has
been fighting the Adobe fire with
buckets while in bedroom slippers. As dawn broke Monday, she
was joined by hundreds of firefighters from across the state and
the Pacific Northwest.
That might not be enough. Her
shingle-roof home sits at the narrow entrance to Adobe Canyon, a
steep channel for a wildfire still
pushing its forest perimeters.
Crews have been holding it off,
crammed tight in the canyon’s
narrow walls, for several long
days.
Cooper is grateful, if defiant of
their requests to leave the house
she moved into only a month ago.
But as firetrucks packed into her
two-lane street Monday morning,
she realized that her time as a
holdout is probably up.
“Now it’s in the canyon,” said
Cooper, who is 65 and has lived in
this valley with her husband,
John, for more than three decades,
and if it rips down through there,
they’re in trouble. “They have told
me they will put everything
they’ve got on this today. They’ll
make a stand here.”
While firefighters have made
gains in containing more than a
dozen fires in Northern California
during the past week, here in the
Valley of the Moon, the burn risk is
still high. The fire’s advance from
the peaks of Sugar Loaf and Hood
mountains has been steady, despite the gentle wind.
As the sun rose Monday, exhausted firefighters changed
shifts in a thick, ground-level
smoke. California Department of
Forestry and Fire Protection officials organized lines at the edge of
the valley floor as the blaze threatened to roar down through windblown canyons. Dozens of homes
and several name-brand vineyards — Landmark, St. Francis,
La Rochelle — stand in its path.
More than 200,000 acres in a
cluster of counties north of San
Francisco have burned since fires
sparked on a blustery night eight
days ago. California officials say 41
people have died and more than
3,500 buildings have burned.
There are signs of progress.
Sonoma County officials began
lifting mandatory evacuation orders Monday for several neighbor-
JAE C. HONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A search-and-rescue team goes through the rubble of mobile homes in Santa Rosa, Calif. For photos of
residents returning to homes destroyed in the wildfires, visit wapo.st/calfirereturn.
hoods on the eastern edge of Santa
Rosa, where the deadly Tubbs fire
blew into the city more than a
week ago.
The stand being made here since
mid-Monday has displayed the tenacity of the firefighters and the
delicate planning involved in coordinating the air campaign against
the flames, an intensive effort involving jumbo jets, helicopters and
propeller planes.
But the fire’s advance also highlights the conditions working
against its containment: hillsides
of oak and pine that are dry as
tinder, a topography often unnavigable by large teams and trucks,
and a shifting wind that will decide the fate of this valley regardless of the resources in place now.
“We’re just trying to prepare
these houses as best we can with
the limited resources we have,”
said Brian Gentis, part of a fire
crew from eastern Oregon that
drove in with two engines last
week. “There’s just so much to do.”
Gentis and a dozen others
worked up through Adobe Canyon
as flames began appearing on the
ridgelines above. “Prepping”
houses means clearing the
branches, leaves and other landscaping from home sites.
Using shovels and picks, the
group dug trenches and built dirt
berms around the perimeters of
homes, Italianate mansions and
one-story ranch styles.
“There are a couple crews up
there now, but a bunch are being
chased out by the fire,” said Gary
Whatley, working alongside Gentis at the end of a 24-hour shift.
“It’s really tricky.”
Along the northern slope of this
valley, wisps of smoke from hot
spots appear for miles. Most fizzle
after a few hours, just flickering
worries for firefighters.
But during the past 36 hours,
those small flare-ups, caused mostly by embers carried from the main
blaze miles away, have connected
in lines along ridge tops from the
grand, chateau-style Ledson Winery east to Adobe Canyon Road.
Only a few holdouts remain in
the valley to watch the excruciating advance and retreat of the fire
— one minute a terrifying line of
flames 200 feet high flaring above
the vineyards, then nothing but a
churning column of smoke.
Planes, sometimes as many as five
within minutes, swoop in just above
the tree line to hit the flames with
retardant, which leaves a brilliant
pink slash across the sky as it falls.
The smoke ranges in color, offering evidence of what is burning.
There are shades of yellow and orange, whites and grays. As the fire
burned high in the valley late Sunday afternoon, the flames burned
white, then sent up thick columns
of black smoke, the telltale sign that
a house or a barn or a warehouse
full of wine casks had ignited.
Fire crews from Pasadena, Burbank and Glendale — Southern
California cities with a fire burning in Orange County not far away
— have been working along the
valley walls. Their participation
here shows the strain on state
firefighting resources.
One crew, comprising about
two dozen minimum-security inmates from a nearby detention
camp, rested between deployments in a roadside field. The voluntary program provides training, $1 a day in pay, and double the
credits toward good-behavior early release.
“We’re not as mobile as some of
the others, given the trucks we’re
using,” said a Cal Fire official supervising the crew, preparing to
head out to clear areas between
two fires to prevent them from
joining.
That kind of deployment decision has been a challenging one in
recent days for fire officials. While
allowing separate fires to unite
can amplify their power, it also
reduces the overall perimeter that
firefighters must carve out to contain the blaze.
Along Adobe Canyon Road, the
decisions Monday were less strategic and more immediately tactical: how to keep the growing fire
from reaching the flats.
For Cooper and her husband,
the day broke with a sense of decisiveness; one way or the other, the
fate of their home would likely be
determined.
Late on the night of Oct. 8, as
fire glowed in the valley above the
Cooper home, a power line blew
down outside their neighbor’s
house. A small fire immediately
blazed up, adding to a cascade of
embers arcing down from the
huge fire above them.
“It was like a waterfall,” Cooper
said. “I know what hell is. That was
hell.”
She and her husband began
dousing hot spots with five-gallon
buckets, filled from another
neighbor’s pool. She was still in
sleepwear, slippers on her feet.
But she darted around her property, stomping out flames as they
popped up.
The house of the Coopers next
door — no relation — burned to
the ground. So did the Lance home
across the street, next to the
La Rochelle vineyard. Charred
here and there, her house survived
the night, as the fire rolled back
with the wind into the hills.
Every day since, firefighters
have asked her to leave. She has
refused. But on Monday, the
smoke-clouded red sun above her
and the flames at the head of the
valley had Cooper reconsidering.
“They just came by to ask me
again,” she said. “They also know
I’ve lost it. I’m exhausted.”
scott.wilson@washpost.com
DIG ES T
NEW JERSEY
Judge won’t dismiss
Menendez charges
The judge in the Robert
Menendez corruption trial on
Monday refused to throw out any
of the charges against the
Democratic senator from New
Jersey in light of a U.S. Supreme
Court ruling narrowing the
definition of bribery.
Federal prosecutors had
warned that dismissing the
charges would torpedo nearly all
other bribery cases and open the
door wide to graft.
U.S. District Judge William
Walls rejected defense lawyers’
arguments that the allegations
against Menendez didn’t meet the
new definition of bribery
contained in the 2016 Supreme
Court ruling that reversed the
conviction of former Virginia
governor Robert McDonnell. In
recent months, the McDonnell
ruling led judges to throw out the
bribery convictions of at least
three other public officials,
including a former Louisiana
congressman.
Just days ago, Walls appeared
to be leaning toward a ruling that
could have gutted the case against
Menendez and co-defendant
Salomon Melgen. Most of the 18count indictment against them
focuses on bribery.
The senator had no comment
after the ruling.
Menendez, 63, is charged with
accepting free flights on a private
jet, luxury hotel stays and other
gifts from the wealthy Florida eye
doctor over a seven-year period.
In exchange, prosecutors say, he
pressured government officials
on Melgen’s behalf over an
$8.9 million Medicare billing
dispute and a contract to provide
port screening equipment in the
Dominican Republic.
The most serious charge
Menendez and Melgen face,
honest services fraud, is
punishable by up to 20 years
in prison.
— Associated Press
ALABAMA
Inmate’s execution
blocked over sedative
A federal judge Monday
blocked an execution scheduled
for an Alabama inmate convicted
of killing a police officer two
decades ago.
U.S. District Judge W. Keith
Watkins issued the stay for Torrey
Twane McNabb, 40, who was
scheduled to die Thursday night.
McNabb is one of several inmates
challenging Alabama’s method of
performing lethal injections.
Another Alabama inmate set to
die this month, Jeffery Lynn
Borden, received a stay, and
McNabb’s execution also should
be delayed, the judge ruled.
The state attorney general’s
office will appeal, spokesman
Mike Lewis said.
McNabb was convicted of
killing Anderson Gordon, a
Montgomery police officer,
in 1997.
The inmates have challenged
the state’s use of the sedative
midazolam at the start of
executions, saying it would not
reliably render them unconscious
before other drugs stopped their
lungs and heart.
Alabama has executed two
inmates this year.
— Associated Press
Military plane makes an
emergency landing: A military
transport plane on a mountain
training mission in Nevada made
a safe emergency landing at
Reno-Tahoe International Airport
after experiencing a problem with
its landing gear shortly after
takeoff. The U.S. Air Force C-130
with 14 people on board circled
the area for more than half an
hour to burn off fuel before
making an emergency landing
about 10:40 a.m. Monday.
— Associated Press
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
Aides apparently find creative ways to manage Trump
BY A SHLEY P ARKER
AND G REG J AFFE
During the campaign, when
President Trump’s advisers wanted him to stop talking about an
issue — such as when he attacked
a Gold Star military family —
they sometimes presented him
with polls demonstrating how
the controversy was harming his
candidacy.
During the transition, when
aides needed Trump to decide on
a looming issue or appointment,
they often limited him to a
shortlist of two or three options
and urged him to choose one.
And now in the White House,
when advisers hope to prevent
Trump from making what they
think is an unwise decision, they
frequently try to delay his final
verdict — hoping he may reconsider after having time to calm
down.
When Sen. Bob Corker (RTenn.) described the White
House as “an adult day-care center” on Twitter last week, he gave
voice to a Trumpian truth: The
president is often impulsive,
mercurial and difficult to manage, leading those around him to
find creative ways to channel his
energies.
Some Trump aides spend a
significant part of their time
devising ways to rein in and
control the impetuous president,
angling to avoid outbursts that
might work against him, according to interviews with 18 aides,
confidants and outside advisers,
most of whom spoke on the
condition of anonymity to speak
candidly.
“If you visit the White House
today, you see aides running
around with red faces, shuffling
paper and trying to keep up with
this president,” said one Republican in frequent contact with the
administration. “That’s what the
scene is.”
The White House dismissed
Corker’s suggestion that administration officials spend their
days trying to contain the president. The point was highlighted
last week in an unusual briefing
by White House Chief of Staff
John F. Kelly, who sought to tamp
down reports that he was focused on attempting to control
Trump. “I was not brought to this job
to control anything but the flow
of information to our president
so that he can make the best
decisions,” Kelly told reporters.
“So, again, I was not sent in to —
or brought in to — control him.”
Trump is hardly the first president whose aides have arranged
themselves around him and his
management style — part of a
natural effort, one senior White
House official said, to help ensure the president’s success. But
Trump’s penchant for Twitter
feuds, name-calling and temperamental outbursts presents a
unique challenge.
One defining feature of managing Trump is frequent praise,
which can leave his team in what
seems to be a state of perpetual
compliments. The White House
pushes out news releases overflowing with top officials heaping flattery on Trump; in one
memorable Cabinet meeting this
year, each member went around
the room lavishing the president
with accolades.
Senior administration officials
call this speaking to an “audience
of one.”
One regular practitioner is
Treasury
Secretary
Steven
Mnuchin, who praised Trump’s
controversial statements after
white supremacists had a violent
rally in Charlottesville and also
said he agreed with Trump that
professional football players
should stand during the national
anthem. Neither issue has anything to do with the Treasury
Department.
Especially in the early days of
his presidency, aides delivered
the president daily packages of
news stories filled with positive
coverage, and Trump began
meetings by boasting about his
performance, either as president
or in winning the White House,
according to one person who
attended several Oval Office
gatherings with him.
Some aides and outside advisers hoping to push their allies
and friends for top postings, such
as ambassadorships, made sure
their candidates appeared speaking favorably about Trump in
conservative news outlets — and
that those news clippings ended
up on the president’s desk.
H.R. McMaster, the president’s
national security adviser, has frequently resorted to diversionary
tactics to manage Trump.
In the Oval Office, he will
volunteer to have his staff study
Trump’s more unorthodox ideas.
When Trump wanted to make
South Korea pay for the entire
cost of a shared missile defense
system, McMaster and top aides
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump speaks during a Cabinet meeting at the White House on Monday.
huddled to come up with arguments that the money spent
defending South Korea and Japan also benefited the U.S. economy in the form of manufacturing jobs, according to two people
familiar with the debate.
“He plays rope-a-dope with
him,” a senior administration
official said. “He thinks Trump is
going to forget, but he doesn’t.
H.R.’s strategy is to say, ‘Let us
study that, boss.’ He tries to
deflect.”
Sam Nunberg, who worked for
Trump but was fired in 2015, said
he found him to be “reasonable”
but noted that delaying a decision often helped influence the
outcome.
“If [Trump] wanted to do
something that I thought could
be problematic for him, I would
simply, respectfully, ask him if we
could possibly wait on it and
then reconsider,” Nunberg said.
“And the majority of the time he
would tell me, ‘Let’s wait and
reconsider,’ and I would prepare
the cons for him to consider —
and he would do what he wanted
to do. Sometimes he would still
go with the decision I may have
disagreed with, and other times
he would change his mind.”
Of course, the president chafes
at the impression that his aides
coddle him or treat him like a
wayward teenager. During the
campaign, after reading a story
in the New York Times that said
Trump’s advisers went on television to talk directly to him, the
candidate exploded at his thencampaign
chairman,
Paul
Manafort, chastising his top aide
for treating him like “a baby,”
according to “Devil’s Bargain,” a
book that chronicles Trump’s
path to the presidency.
Some aides and advisers have
found a way to manage Trump
without seeming to condescend.
Perhaps no Cabinet official has
proven more adept at breaking
ranks with Trump without drawing his ire than Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, who has disagreed with his boss on a range of
issues, including the effectiveness of torture, the importance of
NATO and the wisdom of withdrawing from the Iran nuclear
deal.
The president appreciates how
Mattis, a four-star Marine general, speaks to him candidly but
respectfully and often plays
down disagreements in public. A
senior U.S. official said that Mattis’s focus has been on informing
the president when they disagree — before the disagreements go public — and maintaining a quiet influence.
Unlike his fellow Cabinet secretaries, Mattis has also gone out
of his way not to suck up to the
president — a stance made easier
perhaps by his four decades in
uniform and his combat record.
Mattis has also worked to get
on Trump’s good side by criticizing the media for putting too
much emphasis on his disagreements with Trump. “I do my best
to call it like I see it,” he told
reporters in late August. “But,
right now, if I say six and the
president says half a dozen, they
are going to say I disagree with
him. You know? So, let’s just get
over that.”
When he has broken with the
president, Mattis has done it as
subtly possible. This month he
said it was in America’s interest
to stick with the Iran nuclear
agreement — which Trump
called “the worst deal ever” —
but voiced the opinion only in
answer to questions from the
Senate Armed Services Committee.
Corker’s quip comparing the
White House to a day-care center
on Oct. 8 came in the middle of a
feud between him and Trump,
who attacked Corker by tweeting
that the retiring senator “didn’t
have the guts” to run for reelection and had begged for his
endorsement. Corker fired back
on Twitter and in a New York
Times interview, warning that
Trump was running the White
House like “a reality show” and
that his reckless threats against
other nations could put the country “on the path to World War
III.”
“I know for a fact that every
single day at the White House,
it’s a situation of trying to contain him,” Corker said, adding
later that most GOP lawmakers
“understand the volatility that
we’re dealing with and the tremendous amount of work that it
takes by people around him to
keep him in the middle of the
road.”
Trump seems to hold many
Republican lawmakers, and
some members of his own Cabinet, in similarly low regard. Several people who have met with
Trump in recent weeks said he
mocks other officials in Washington, especially fellow Republicans.
In a meeting at the White
House last month with House
and Senate leaders from both
parties, for instance, Trump upset Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) and House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) by
cutting a deal with Democrats. In
subsequent days behind closed
doors, the president mocked the
reactions of McConnell and Ryan
from the meeting with an exaggerated crossing of his arms and
theatrical frowns.
Former House speaker Newt
Gingrich, an informal Trump adviser, scoffed at the suggestion
that Trump needs to be managed
by his advisers as parents would
handle an unruly child.
“He’s the president of the United States. Period. Is he an unusual president? Sure. But so was
Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt,”
Gingrich said. “You guys in the
media would have had a field day
with them, too.”
Still, Corker’s comments underscored the uneasy dichotomy
within the West Wing, where
criticism of the president’s behavior is only whispered.
“They have an on-the-record
‘Dear Leader’ culture, and an
on-background ‘This-guy-is-ajoke’ culture,” said Tommy
Vietor, who served as a spokesman for President Barack
Obama. “I don’t understand how
he can countenance both.”
ashley.parker@washpost.com
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
Robert Costa, Damian Paletta and
Philip Rucker contributed to this
report.
Trump projects unity with McConnell, hints at coaxing Bannon to back off
BY
S EAN S ULLIVAN
President Trump and Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell sought to project unity Monday amid continuing tensions
that threaten to complicate the
Republican Party’s fall agenda
and midterm elections strategy.
But by the end of their
40-minute joint news conference
in the White House Rose Garden,
they had not resolved the most
combustible component of their
fragile alliance: Stephen K. Bannon.
In one breath, Trump praised
his former White House chief
strategist, who is determined to
wage “war” against the majority
leader and GOP senators up for
reelection in next year’s midterms. In another, he signaled
that he might persuade him to
back down.
“I like Steve a lot. Steve is
doing what Steve thinks is the
right thing,” Trump said while
standing next to McConnell
(R-Ky.). “Some of the people that
he may be looking at, I’m going to
see if we talk him out of that,
because, frankly, they’re great
people.”
The confusing appraisal of
Bannon and his controversial
tactics raised new questions
about the road ahead for Trump
and McConnell — including how
long their detente can last.
After a working lunch, the two
leaders tried to dismiss signs of a
troubled relationship and demonstrate that they are on the
same page when it comes to the
GOP’s biggest legislative undertaking of the fall: an effort to
rewrite the nation’s tax laws.
“We are probably now, despite
what we read, we’re probably
now — I think, at least as far as
I’m concerned — closer than ever
before,” Trump said. “And the
relationship is very good.”
But the question of where
Trump stands in the increasingly
hostile feud between Bannon and
Senate Republicans highlighted
the potential tensions ahead.
Since leaving the White House
in August, Bannon has dedicated
himself to attacking McConnell
and other members of the GOP
establishment, who he argues are
standing in the way of Trump
achieving the nationalist agenda
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump, gesturing during a joint news conference with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in the White House
Rose Garden, said that the “relationship is very good” between the two Republican leaders. “We have the same agenda,” McConnell said.
that swept him into the White
House. Bannon is promising to
find primary opponents for all
but one of the Senate Republicans running for reelection next
year with the stated goal of ousting McConnell from leadership.
McConnell sidestepped a question of whether he and Trump
discussed Bannon’s role in the
midterm elections during their
lunch, saying his goal is to support incumbents and maintain
Republican control of the Senate.
“The way you do that is not
complicated,” he said. You have to
“nominate people who can actually win, because winners make
policy and losers go home.”
Bannon’s effort to unseat Republican senators loyal to the
majority leader met its first test
in September’s Alabama Republican primary when he supported
controversial former judge Roy
Moore over Sen. Luther Strange.
Strange, who lost, was backed by
McConnell and Trump.
Trump said he plans to meet
next week with Moore, who has
been a fierce McConnell critic.
Moore did not meet with the
Senate leader this month during
a brief trip to Washington. He did
not meet with Trump, either.
The rare joint question-andanswer session highlighted the
stylistic differences between
Trump and McConnell that have
come into focus this year. It was
an unusual setting for the studiously on-message Senate leader,
who prefers short answers and
brief exchanges with reporters.
Trump, on the other hand, appeared to relish the chance to
field question after question
from reporters who shouted over
one another.
With McConnell standing
mostly silent by his side, Trump
eagerly fielded a volley of questions about Puerto Rico, protests
by National Football League players during the national anthem,
Hillary Clinton and special prosecutor Robert S. Mueller III’s
investigation into Russian election meddling — at times overshadowing the effort to display a
message of unity that kicked off
their appearance.
Trump and McConnell emphasized that their top priority is
passing tax cuts by the end of this
year, although they left open the
possibility that that might not
happen. They also commended
each other for their efforts to
shape the federal bench by nominating and confirming conservative judges.
“We have the same agenda,”
the majority leader said.
Still, there were surprises. The
president said he plans to release
an “economic development bill”
but that he had not briefed the
Senate leader on it.
Many Republicans view tax
overhaul as do-or-die effort, politically. They argue that it is the
last realistic chance to demonstrate to the conservative base
that Republicans can notch a
large-scale achievement after being handed complete control of
the federal government.
But their effort faces tall hurdles, not the least of which is the
friction between Trump and Republican senators, whose votes
the president will need to pass a
tax bill. Earlier in the day, those
tensions were on display at a
Cabinet meeting in which the
president empathized with Bannon and blamed Senate Republicans for the GOP’s legislative
woes, including the failure to
repeal and replace the Affordable
Care Act.
“We’re not getting the job
done,” Trump said. “And I’m not
going to blame myself, I’m going
to be honest. They are not getting
the job done.”
The president singled out Sen.
John McCain (R-Ariz.), who cast a
decisive vote in the summer
against a GOP plan to repeal and
replace the ACA.
He quickly added, “I can understand where Steve Bannon is
coming from.”
After Senate Republicans
failed to dismantle the ACA, the
relationship between Trump and
McConnell worsened. The president took to blaming the majority leader publicly for the failure.
“I’m very disappointed in
Mitch,” Trump said in August. On
Twitter, he aggressively urged
McConnell to “get back to work.”
For the most part, McConnell
has declined to publicly escalate
that war of words, preferring
instead to sidestep the attacks.
But McConnell’s allies have
grown increasingly concerned
with the level of criticism the
president and his associates are
directing at the Senate leader and
other rank-and-file GOP lawmakers.
Trump’s recent feud with Sen.
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), the chairman of the Foreign Relations
Committee, has further rattled
his relationship with Capitol Hill
Republicans. Corker is seen as a
key vote on budget and tax issues
and a leading voice on foreign
affairs.
Trump is making some efforts
to mend fences with Republican
senators with whom he has
clashed in the past. He has played
golf recently with Sens. Lindsey
O. Graham (S.C.) and Rand Paul
(Ky.), who have criticized him
sharply.
On Monday, he mixed praise
with criticism.
“I know the Republican senators,” Trump said at his Cabinet
meeting. “Most of them are really,
really great people that want to
work hard and they want to do a
great thing for the American
public.”
He added, “You had a few
people that really disappointed
us.”
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
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NFL endorses criminal justice reform bill as anthem controversy swirls
BY K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
AND B ETH R EINHARD
The National Football League,
still in political crosshairs over
whether players should take a
knee during the national anthem,
is throwing its weight behind another cause in Washington’s debate over racial inequality: criminal justice reform.
The NFL’s spokesman said on
Monday that the league has decided to endorse a bipartisan bill to
reduce mandatory minimum sentences for low-level drug offenders, eliminate “three-strike” provisions that require life sentences
and give judges more latitude to
reduce sentences for certain lowlevel crimes.
“We felt that this was an issue
over the last months, as we have
continued to work with our players on issues of equality and on
issues of criminal justice reform,
that was surfaced for us, and we
thought it was appropriate to lend
our support to it,” NFL spokesman
Joe Lockhart said Monday during
a conference call with reporters.
The owners appear to be seeking middle ground between football players and their critics during a heated national debate over
the growing phenomenon of players kneeling during the national
anthem to protest police brutality
and racial inequality. It is not clear
what effect the NFL’s effort will
have on that debate — or on President Trump, who has fueled much
of the vitriol against kneeling
players through his personal and
official Twitter accounts.
Trump has accused specific
players of insulting the American
flag and the service of troops and
called their demonstration “disgraceful.” Several veterans have
come forward to defend the players, but public opinion on the subject is divided.
Trump has gone after owners,
PATRICK SMITH/GETTY IMAGES
San Francisco’s K’Waun Williams (24), Arik Armstead (91) and Eli Harold (57) take a knee during the national anthem on Sunday.
as well, suggesting in a Fox News
interview that they are “afraid of
their players” and unwilling to
discipline those who have taken a
knee. He has called for a general
boycott of the NFL “until players
stop disrespecting our Flag &
Country,” as well as for changing
the tax law to rescind the NFL’s tax
breaks if the protests continue.
When Vice President Pence went
to an Indianapolis Colts game earlier this month, the president also
directed him to walk out of the
game if any players knelt, which
he did.
The subject of whether the NFL
should require players to stand
during the playing of the national
anthem is expected to come up for
debate at a meeting this week of
owners, who are caught between
the president’s tweets and players
determined to continue their
demonstrations.
On Capitol Hill, spokesmen for
the two main sponsors of the criminal justice bill, Sens. Charles E.
Grassley (R-Iowa) and Richard J.
Durbin (D-Ill.), declined to comment about the timing of the NFL’s
endorsement or whether it was
intended to quell the heated debate over the players’ continued
protests. Both said they welcomed
the NFL’s support.
But a spokesman for Grassley
added that the NFL had not coordinated with the bill’s congres-
sional sponsors in advance of its
decision. In the meantime, no other sports league has signed on. A
spokesman for the NFL Players
Association did not immediately
return a call for comment about
whether the football players’
union would also endorse the bill.
In Congress, it is not clear
whether the NFL’s endorsement
will help the bill’s chances of passing. The legislation has already
earned the support of some influ-
ential groups from across the political spectrum, including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the
American Civil Liberties Union,
the Charles Koch Institute and
Americans for Tax Reform.
In addition, the GrassleyDurbin bill is the result of a fiveyear, bipartisan effort. Last year,
the duo released almost identical
legislation backed by 37 co-sponsors, including 17 Republicans.
Despite that, sponsors have
struggled in years past to secure a
full Senate vote for the bill, with
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) refusing to bring it
to the floor.
One of the key senators angling
against the measure was thenSen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) — now
Trump’s attorney general.
Although the Trump administration has not taken a position on
the bill, the legislation directly
challenges Sessions’s new policy
on sentencing, which he laid out in
a memo to federal prosecutors earlier this year. In that memo, Sessions instructed them to seek
charges “that carry the most substantial guidelines sentence, including mandatory minimum sentences” — leading many to interpret the directive as the start of a
new war on drugs. Sessions has
said that his order was meant to
focus on hardened criminals.
Nonetheless, the policy is a course
change from the Obama administration’s effort to avoid pursuing
charges that would result in long
prison sentences for certain lowlevel crimes.
Bill sponsors said they have
been speaking periodically with
Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner, not Sessions,
about the legislation.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
beth.reinhard@washpost.com
Rick Maese contributed to this report.
Democrats, Trump eyeing each other over tax overhaul
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND E D O ’ K EEFE
President Trump plans to intensify his outreach to Senate
Democrats this week as he tries to
broaden support for massive tax
cuts, but the administration’s prior overtures have left key lawmakers wondering whether he is
willing to negotiate with Democrats or solely seeking to use them
as political props.
Trump on Wednesday will
meet with Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Finance
Committee, the panel that writes
tax law, as part of an effort to
curry congressional favor for his
proposal, which is still in outline
form, to cut tax rates for corporations and individuals.
The meeting comes after
Trump and other White House
officials spent months setting up
events with key Democrats to
both cajole and threaten them
into backing the tax cuts. Some
White House officials say Democrats, even centrists up for reelection in conservative states next
year, cannot be counted on. But
others argue that support from
even one or two could make the
difference between failure and
success.
Trump on Monday said it was
possible that “three or four” Democrats might end up supporting
the tax-cut plan, but he also said it
is possible every Senate Democrat votes in opposition.
“We may get no Democrat support and that’s because they are
obstructionist and they basically
want us to do badly, and that’s not
going to happen,” Trump said
after meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.).
He added that changes were
being made to the tax proposal
that appeared to be in line with
demands made by some Democrats.
“We want to make sure that the
middle class is the biggest beneficiary of the tax cuts and the tax
reform,” Trump said. Many Democrats have said the vast majority
of benefits from the GOP tax plan
would go toward the wealthiest
Americans and not the middle
class.
Republicans control 52 votes in
the 100-seat Senate, and some
GOP members have raised the
possibility that they might not
sign off on massive tax cuts that
increase the debt. Republicans
want to pass the tax plan through
a process known as reconciliation
that requires a simple majority of
support, but that could still require them to secure help from a
handful of Democrats.
The outreach comes at a pivotal time. The White House and
Democrats are lurching toward
an increasingly acrimonious
showdown over immigration,
health care and government
spending. Fights over each of
these issues are expected to trigger a showdown in early December that — if left unresolved —
could lead to a government shutdown. Senior White House officials are trying to isolate the tax
issue with several Democrats and
hope the other political brawling
does not spill into the tax discussions.
That is why the White House
has made cautious but calculated
outreach to Sens. Joe Manchin III
(D-W.Va.),
Heidi
Heitkamp
(D-N.D.), Jon Tester (D-Mont.)
and Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.), with
Heitkamp and Donnelly flying on
Air Force One and appearing with
Trump at tax-cut rallies. Each of
these Democrats comes from
states that overwhelmingly supported Trump in 2016.
“If Senator Donnelly doesn’t
approve it, because you know he’s
on the other side, we will come
here,” Trump said in a September
speech in Indiana, while Donnelly stood in the audience and
listened. “We will campaign
against him like you wouldn’t
believe. I think they’re going to
approve it . . . I think we’ll have
numerous Democrats come
across because it’s the right thing
to do.”
Senate Democratic aides said it
remains unclear how much the
White House wants to negotiate,
complaining that they so far remain cut out of discussions as
House and Senate GOP leaders
draft legislation. Democrats have
said they want to ensure the bills
help small businesses and the
middle class, as well as avoid
adding much, if anything, to the
debt. They have also raised concerns that the GOP plan as presented so far could overwhelmingly benefit the wealthy.
Heitkamp, North Dakota’s former tax commissioner, joined
Trump on stage during a tax
speech last month. She has heard
little substantive follow-up from
the White House since then, according to people briefed on the
relationship who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to discuss
the working relationship. She
wants the upcoming plan to secure tax benefits for retirement
and to make it easier for families
and companies to file tax returns,
among other agenda items.
The White House and GOP
leaders have issued a nine-page
tax framework but left out many
other details. Democrats — and
even some Republicans — have
said they are still searching for
how the tax package might work
if it is passed into law.
Heitkamp has been so eager to
reengage that, this month, she
approached a senior administration official at a separate White
House event and said she hopes
to continue working with them
on this. Her office has heard little
since.
Other Democrats have had
similar experiences.
Last month, when reports surfaced that Trump might want to
visit Montana to put pressure on
Tester to support a tax deal, he
reached out with a letter to the
White House, saying he wanted to
collaborate “in an open and transparent manner” and that he
would be happy to meet with
Trump if he opted to visit his
home state.
But Tester, like other Democrats, told Trump in his letter that
any tax plan “needs to be crafted
in the light of day through a
bipartisan process” and would
have to include input from rural
states.
In the weeks since the letter,
Tester’s aides have heard from
lower-level White House staff
members, but aides said the senator has not been approached by
the president; Vice President
Pence; Marc Short, White House
legislative affairs director; McConnell; or any other senior Republicans.
“White House staff has said
they’re interested, but it’s been
broad strokes, no dates, no specifics, just the acknowledgment that
they got our letter and they’re
interested in going to Montana
sometime but without any firm
commitments,” said one aide,
who asked for anonymity to speak
frankly about ongoing talks.
The Democrat who has had
perhaps the most engagement is
Manchin, who spoke with Pence
in August on the sidelines of an
event at the Greenbrier resort in
West Virginia. The next day, Manchin recounted “a good conversation,” as he made clear, “I want to
be involved and help in any way I
can.”
But Manchin has also stressed
that the tax cuts cannot add much
to the federal debt. Trump has
proposed lowering the corporate
tax rate from 35 percent to 20
percent, but Manchin thinks it
should be closer to 25 percent.
Wednesday’s meeting is expected to include Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), a member of the
finance committee who has been
critical of Trump’s approach so
far. McCaskill has spent weeks
pushing the White House to work
more closely with Democrats on
the tax plan, saying that a failure
to work with Democrats doomed
their efforts to make changes to
health-care rules.
But even though McCaskill is
up for reelection in 2018 and
comes from a state Trump won
handily, she is digging in against
the White House’s tax plan more
than many of her colleagues, convinced voters will see it as a big
handout for the rich.
During a meeting last week
with constituents in Washington,
Mo., McCaskill asked everyone to
put a question on a slip of paper
and drop it into a fishbowl.
The third question McCaskill
plucked from the bowl asked simply, “Will you help get tax reform
done this year?”
“I hope so. I would love to get
tax reform done,” she said. “But
here’s the issue. The issue is what
is the tax reform bill? Now, I
haven’t seen a final plan. We’ve
seen an outline and the outline is
very troubling to me.”
She explained that she is “not
interested in reducing taxes for
the [wealthiest] 1 percent. I am
very interested in reducing taxes
to the middle class and to families
that are living paycheck to paycheck . . . That’s where my focus
is.”
damian.paletta@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
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Some U.S. farmers push protectionist measures
TOMATOES FROM A1
could collapse around one of several “poison pill” provisions.
Those include the demands of
the Florida tomato growers, who
say Mexico is selling tomatoes in
the United States at artificially
low prices. With the support of
some berry, melon and pepper
producers, the Florida producers
are pushing for stronger antidumping measures — an idea that
has been soundly rejected by the
Mexicans.
The Florida growers’ highstakes campaign for special antidumping measures for seasonal
produce has also exposed sharp
divisions with the rest of America’s farmers, who are generally
strongly pro-NAFTA and whose
livelihoods are on the line if the
negotiations falter.
“There’s a lot of political power
resting with a small group of
individuals who have a lot to
gain,” said Joseph Glauber, a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute and the former chief economist at the Agriculture Department. “Unfortunately, the special
provision you carve out for one
interest group can really backfire
for others.”
Agriculture is one of the sectors
with the most to lose should NAFTA fall through — in large part
because the trade deal has given
farmers so much.
Between 1993, the year before
NAFTA went into effect, and 2016,
U.S. agricultural exports to Canada and Mexico shot up by more
than 400 percent, from $8.9billion to $38.1 billion. Mexico
and Canada are now the principal
foreign markets for such U.S.
commodities as corn and soybeans, apples and high-fructose
corn syrup.
Those benefits have generated
strong support for the trade
agreement among farmers and
ranchers over the years — and
anxiety at the prospect that it
could come to an end.
“The words we didn’t want to
hear, in farm country, were ‘terminate NAFTA,’ ” said Chad Hart, an
economist at Iowa State University who focuses on grain markets. “Maybe ‘readjust,’ maybe ‘renegotiate.’ But you’re talking
about two of our three largest
JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES
A worker carries a bucket of tomatoes at Tony DiMare’s farm in Florida City, Fla. DiMare says growers in Mexico have unfair advantages.
agricultural trading partners —
it’s never ‘terminate.’ ”
But not all farmers have seen
those gains — and some, including Florida tomato growers, argue
that they have lost out because of
competition from producers who
enjoy lower labor costs and a
better growing climate.
The problem, in a word, is humidity. Florida has a whole lot of
it. As a result, its growers can’t use
greenhouses, which better protect the vegetables, and they have
severe problems with pests and
diseases.
When you buy an industrial
Florida tomato, it has been grown
outdoors in a field, harvested
green and ripened near the grocery store with ethylene gas. Mexican tomatoes, on the other hand,
are largely vine-ripened and
grown in greenhouses.
Florida growers say these
aren’t the only things separating
them from the Mexican competition. Farmworkers’ wages in the
United States are far higher, as is
the cost of meeting government
regulations. And the Mexican
greenhouse industry has taken
off, they argue, only because the
state helped subsidize it.
As a result, growers say, dozens
of Florida farms have closed, and
the number of acres planted in
tomatoes in the state has fallen by
half since its high in 1989.
“That, to me, draws the clearest
picture,” DiMare said. “When you
look at the disadvantages we face,
how do you expect the domestic
industry to survive?”
Tomato growers have suggested a series of remedies to stem
their losses. In 1997, the countries
agreed on a minimum price for
Mexican tomatoes.
Now U.S. tomato growers’ demand to make it easier for regional producers to bring anti-dumping complaints could become a
stumbling block in the NAFTA
negotiations.
Under current rules, farmers
can file dumping cases only after
demonstrating damage to their
entire industry across multiple
seasons. The U.S. proposals would
make it possible for smaller
groups of producers to bring complaints, effectively increasing the
number of anti-dumping cases
and the chance that U.S. growers
would prevail.
“It’s about fundamental fairness,” said Mike Stuart, president
of the Florida Fruit and Vegetable
Association, which has lobbied
for the measure. “As it stands,
they’re sitting ducks for unfair
trade practices.”
But some in the industry have
described the provision as a backdoor mechanism for putting more
tariffs on Mexican produce.
Mexican officials have said
they will not consider a deal that
enhances protections for seasonal growers, criticizing the proposals as “arbitrary” and “against the
interests of free trade.”
“It’s a red line. There is no room
to negotiate,” said Bosco de la
Vega, president of the National
Agricultural Council, Mexico’s
largest farming group.
The provision has also incited
tensions across U.S. agriculture,
where the general feeling is that
Florida growers have put
everyone else’s business at risk.
The industry-wide line on NAFTA
has long been “do no harm” —
make no changes to the deal that
could lead to any agricultural
trade restrictions.
But if the seasonality provision
makes its way into the final agreement, it could be used against
American farmers and ranchers
who export to Mexico, several
industry representatives said.
Targets might include pork producers, who sold 1.6 billion
pounds of hams, legs and “offcuts” to Mexico last year.
There is also growing recognition that American farmers could
get hurt if disagreements over the
provision cause the United States
ARE YOU A
TOMORROW
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ENTER NOW
to walk away from the free-trade
pact.
In that case, tariffs for most U.S.
agricultural exports would spike
— making them more expensive
than the commodities on offer
from other countries.
Midwestern corn, oilseed and
wheat farmers would have the
most to lose, said Roman Keeney,
an agricultural economist at Purdue University.
As anxieties about the NAFTA
renegotiation build, some large
U.S. agricultural groups have
been lobbying behind the scenes
against the Florida provision, representatives told The Washington
Post.
On Friday, groups representing
the U.S. grain, produce and cornrefining industries held a joint
news conference with Mexico’s
National Agricultural Council, expressing their opposition to the
tomato growers’ measure.
“We have concerns with the
provision,” said Lesly Weber McNitt, director of public policy for
the National Corn Growers Association. “Both in terms of precedent and in terms of the overall
success of the negotiation.”
Both sides will have to wait
before they get any certainty.
The tomato growers’ provision
did not come up at this round of
NAFTA talks in Washington, according to several people familiar
with the negotiations. That will
leave the dispute for the fifth
round of talks, in late October or
November.
DiMare, for his part, isn’t terribly anxious: He says he believes
that the Trump administration
will continue to push for protections for tomato growers.
Besides, he’ll see benefits regardless of how the provision
fares.
Like the operators of most of
Florida’s largest tomato companies, DiMare doesn’t merely grow
tomatoes — he also acts as a
wholesaler, sourcing tomatoes
from different growers and reselling them to grocery stores and
food-service providers.
Some of his product, he admits,
comes from Mexico.
“It depends on what customers
want,” he said. “For whatever reason, some people want the Mexican tomatoes.”
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
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N.J. man convicted in Chelsea dumpster bombing 130 million years later,
‘kilonova’ puts on show
BY
D EVLIN B ARRETT
A jury convicted a New Jersey
man Monday in a bombing last
year that injured 31 people and
sparked a frantic two-state manhunt. The verdict means the
bomber, Ahmad Khan Rahimi, is
likely to spend the rest of his life
in prison.
A jury in Manhattan federal
court deliberated for just a few
hours between Friday afternoon
and Monday morning before
finding Rahimi guilty of all eight
counts against him for planting
bombs in the Manhattan neighborhood of Chelsea on Sept. 17,
2016. One bomb left on a sidewalk
did not explode, but another, left
inside a metal trash container,
detonated, causing the injuries.
U.S. Attorney Joon H. Kim
called Rahimi’s conviction “a victory for New York City, a victory
for America in its fight against
terror, and a victory for all who
believe in the cause of justice.’’
Rahimi chose not to testify in
his defense, and in closing argu-
ments his attorneys did not dispute some of the charges he faced
— only the ones that with convictions would trigger a mandatory
life prison sentence. His sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 18.
Prosecutors spent two weeks
presenting the mangled metal
dumpster and other evidence to
the jury. Authorities say Rahimi,
before planting bombs in New
York, left a bomb that detonated,
without injury, along the course
of a five-kilometer charity race in
Seaside Park, N.J. He also
dumped a bag of pipe bombs
outside a New Jersey train station
before trying to disappear and
evade police.
Rahimi was captured when police officers in Linden, N.J., found
him sleeping in the doorway of a
bar. Authorities say he pulled a
gun from a waist pack and started
shooting, striking one of the officers in his protective vest.
Prosecutors had a wide array of
evidence to convince the panel,
including fingerprints and records of his purchases of bomb
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parts.
Jurors watched security camera videos that showed him outside his residence on the day the
bombs were planted, then showing the same person arriving at
Penn Station in Manhattan.
There was also video of his movements in the city and of him
leaving one of the bombs on West
27th Street.
Among the most damning
pieces of evidence was a letter
written in a notebook Rahimi was
carrying during his shootout with
police. Stained by blood and torn
in places, the letter is addressed
to the U.S. government and describes his anger over U.S. foreign
policy, indicates his admiration of
Osama bin Laden and Anwar
al-Awlaki, the Yemeni American
cleric and propagandist, and ends
with the declaration: “Inshallah
the sounds of bombs will be heard
in the streets. Gunshots to your
police. Death to your OPPRESSION.”
Rahimi is a U.S. citizen born in
Afghanistan whose last name is
sometimes spelled in government
documents as Rahami. He faces
separate charges in New Jersey
for his alleged crimes there.
Counterterrorism
officials
have described Rahimi as a lone
wolf who was not part of any
broader conspiracy but was inspired by terrorist propaganda —
much of it from overseas — and
decided to act on his own. Prosecutors say a laptop in Rahimi’s
home contained 14 issues of alQaeda’s Inspire magazine, which
included various bombmaking
recipes.
The Rahimi case also highlighted how difficult it can be to
prevent such an attack, even
when authorities have some inkling a person might be dangerous. The FBI briefly looked into
Rahimi in 2014 after it learned his
father had made comments to
others indicating his son might
be involved in terrorism. But that
investigation ended after an FBI
review found no links between
Rahimi and terrorist groups.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
KILONOVA FROM A1
clysms. The detection announced
Monday, which involved thousands of researchers working at
more than 70 laboratories and
telescopes on every continent,
heralds a new era in space research known as “multi-messenger astrophysics.”
This is the breakthrough scientists have been waiting for since
the initial detection of gravitational waves two years ago. Now, for
the first time, they are able to
observe the universe using two
fundamental forces: light and
gravity. By combining traditional
visual astronomy with the Nobel
Prize-winning work of gravitational wave researchers, astronomers have new means to probe
some of their field’s most enduring
mysteries — the unknown force
that drives the accelerating
growth of the universe, the invisible matter that holds galaxies together and the origins of Earth’s
most precious elements, including silver and gold.
“It’s transformational,” said Julie McEnery, an astrophysicist at
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., who was
involved in the effort. “The era of
gravitational wave astrophysics
had dawned, but now it’s come of
age. . . . We’re able to combine
dramatically different ways of
viewing the universe, and I think
our level of understanding is going to leap forward as a result.”
The existence of gravitational
waves was theorized by Albert
Einstein a century ago. But scientists had never sensed the waves
until 2015, when a ripple produced
by the merger of two distant black
holes was picked up by two facilities of the Laser Interferometer
Gravitational-Wave Observatory
(LIGO) in Louisiana and Washington state. Since then, the collaboration has identified three more
black-hole collisions and has
brought on a third gravitational
wave detector near Pisa, Italy, to
better pinpoint the sources of
these minute distortions in spacetime. Just this month, members of
the LIGO team were awarded the
Nobel Prize in physics for their
achievement.
Because black holes emit no
light or heat, past gravitational
wave detections could not be
paired with observations by conventional telescopes, which collect signals from what is known as
the electromagnetic spectrum.
Kilonovas are swift, brilliant explosions that occur during the
merger of neutron stars, which are
ultradense remnants of collapsed
stars that are composed almost
entirely of neutrons, or uncharged
particles.
Collisions between neutron
stars are thought to be 1,000 times
as bright as a typical nova, and
they are the universe’s primary
source of elements such as silver,
platinum and gold. But kilonovas
have long been strictly theoretical.
No scientist had ever seen one.
Until this summer.
At 8:41 a.m. Eastern time on
Aug. 17, a gravitational wave hit
the Virgo detector in Italy and, 22
milliseconds later, set off the LIGO
detector in Livingston, La. Three
milliseconds after that, the distortion rippled through Hanford,
Wash.
“When we detected this event,
my feeling was, wow, we have hit
the mother lode,” said Laura Cadonati, an astrophysicist at the
Georgia Institute of Technology
and a LIGO representative.
Just 1.7 seconds after the initial
gravitational wave detection,
NASA’s Fermi Space Telescope registered a brief flash of gamma
radiation coming from the constellation Hydra. Half an hour later, McEnery, the telescope’s project scientist, got an email from a
colleague with the subject line,
“WAKE UP.”
“It said, ‘This gamma ray burst
has an interesting friend. . . . Buckle up,’ ” McEnery recalled.
Gamma-ray bursts are the most
energetic forms of light in the cosmos. Scientists had long predicted
that a short burst would be associated with a neutron-star merger.
That violent collision shoots jets of
radioactive matter into space, as
though someone had smashed
their palm on a tube of toothpaste
with holes at both ends.
“We were beside ourselves,”
McEnery said.
Alerts went out to LIGO collaborators at dozens of observatories
around the globe. LIGO gave astronomers a narrow map of the
sky to hunt for the source of the
cosmic violence. “It was critical to
know where to look,” said Edo
Berger of Harvard University’s
Center for Astrophysics. “If we
were just searching blindly across
the whole sky, I don’t think we
would have seen it.”
Ryan Foley, an astronomer at
the University of California at Santa Cruz who studies supernovas
with the Carnegie Institution’s
Swope Telescope, was walking
around an amusement park when
he got the urgent text from one of
his collaborators. He abandoned
his partner in front of the carousel,
jumped on a bike and pedaled
back to his office.
He and his colleagues were up
all night, first waiting for the sun
to set on the Swope Telescope in
Chile, then sorting through the
telescope’s images in search of a
“transient” — an object in the sky
that had not been there before.
In the ninth image, postdoctoral researcher Charlie Kilpatrick
saw it — a tiny new dot beside a
galaxy known as NGC 4993,
130 million light-years away.
“Charlie is the first person, as
far as we know, the first human to
have ever seen optical photons
from a gravitational wave event,”
Foley said.
The event was named for the
telescope that found it: Swope Supernova Survey 2017a.
Within 24 hours, it seemed as
though half the telescopes in the
world — and several more in space
— were tilted toward SSS2017a,
recalled Stefano Valenti, an astrophysicist at the University of California at Davis who took part in
the search. “We were calling colleagues to talk, saying, ‘I cannot
tell you why, but can you observe
this object?’ ” he said. “Everyone
was working together, sharing everything they had as soon as the
information was coming online.
. . . I think this one was the most
exciting week of my career.”
Researchers collected data
from the kilonova in every part of
the electromagnetic spectrum. In
the early hours the explosion appeared blue and featureless — the
light signature of a very young,
very hot new celestial body. But
unlike supernovas, which can linger in the sky for months, the
explosion turned red and faded.
By separating light from the collision into its component parts, scientists could distinguish the characteristic signals of heavy elements such as silver and gold
coalescing in the cooling cloud of
material. Wedding rings and uranium bombs are elemental echoes
of such merging neutron stars.
The fact that the signals arrived
so close together — just 1.7 seconds
elapsed between the first gravitational wave detection and the arrival of the gamma-ray burst —
also proves one of Einstein’s predictions: Gravitational waves
move at light speed.
“While I’m not surprised that
Einstein is right,” McEnery said,
“it’s always nice to see him pass
another test.”
Their results were announced
Monday in more than a dozen
papers in the journals Nature, Science and the Astrophysical Journal Letters. The capstone lists
roughly 3,500 authors, approaching the record set in 2015 by 5,154
Large Hadron Collider physicists
who estimated the mass of the
Higgs boson. If gravitational wave
research had already weakened
the stereotype of a lone astronomer genius, the dawn of multimessenger astrophysics dealt it a
fatal blow.
“From this point onward,” Cadonati said, “the more we want to
know, the more we need to work
together.”
This kilonova was so bright that
it could have been observed even
by amateurs with tiny telescopes.
In the future, LIGO will alert the
whole world to potential detections, allowing citizen scientists to
join professional astronomers in
the global search for light from the
universe’s most dramatic cataclysms.
Marcelle Soares-Santos, a staff
scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, said that
multi-messenger
astrophysics
promises to help solve major questions in cosmology. For years, scientists have puzzled over what is
known as the “Hubble constant,” a
number that describes the accelerating expansion of the universe.
Depending on how they calculate
it, researchers get different values
for this constant. Even just a dozen
measurements based on gravitational waves, she said, could give a
much better understanding of
how quickly everything in the universe is racing away from us.
This new era for astronomy
may also illuminate the natures of
dark energy, the mysterious force
that drives the universe’s expansion, and dark matter, a hypothetical substance that has mass (and
therefore should produce gravitational waves) but seems to emit no
electromagnetic energy. These
two forces are thought to make up
more than 95 percent of the mass
and energy in the universe — and
current physics cannot explain
them.
“We have so much to learn,”
Soares-Santos said. “This is an exciting time.”
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Puerto Ricans line up for water — at hazardous waste site
BY
A RELIS R . H ERNÁNDEZ
AND B RADY D ENNIS
dorado, puerto rico — Every
10 minutes or so, a truck or a van
pulled up to the exposed spigot of
an overgrown well, known as Maguayo #4, that sits not far from a
bustling expressway and around
the corner from a Krispy Kreme
doughnut shop.
Fencing around the area had
been torn open, and a red and white
“Peligro” sign, warning of danger,
lay hidden beneath debris and
dense vegetation. One after another,
people attached a hose to draw water for bathing, washing dishes and,
in some cases, drinking. They filled
buckets, jugs, soda bottles.
What many didn’t realize is that
the well is one of nearly a dozen
that are part of the Dorado
Groundwater Contamination Superfund site — designated last
year by the Environmental Protection Agency as among the nation’s
most toxic sites.
Past testing here has shown the
presence of tetrachloroethylene
and trichloroethylene, solvents
commonly used in industrial processes, which can cause health
problems including liver damage
and increased risk of cancer. The
EPA has yet to identify the cause of
groundwater contamination in
the wells, and local water systems
no longer draw from them.
But the aftermath of Hurricane
Maria has brought desperation in
many forms. In this corner of the
island, many residents still have no
reliable source of water and search
for access wherever they can.
It’s difficult to know just how
many people have sought water
from the Superfund site in the
weeks since the Category 4 hurricane walloped Puerto Rico and
crippled its infrastructure. The
central water authority continues
to depend on generators and some
limited electrical-grid power to
keep pumps working at plants
across the island. The government
said that as of Sunday, it had restored service to nearly 70 percent
of customers.
But for the families that live in
Dorado, nothing is yet flowing in
their homes. In a single hour on
Saturday, more than four families
arrived at the unsecured Maguayo
well to draw water. None was
aware of the potential dangers.
Several assumed that the well was
part of the “Supertubo” that carries water to greater San Juan,
about 20 miles to the east.
In the late morning, EPA officials arrived on the scene just as a
man and two children were topping off a 50-gallon container on
the back of his pickup truck. Andres, who declined to give his last
name, said he had been using the
water for bathing and had no idea
it might be contaminated.
The dozen officials, armed with
kits, gloves and other materials to
conduct tests, hastily reassembled
the broken chain-link fence near
the spigot and restored the “Dan-
ARELIS R. HERNANDEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
A man draws water from a well in Puerto Rico that is part of the
Dorado Groundwater Contamination Superfund site.
ger” sign.
Recent local testing showed
that contamination levels were
below legal thresholds, but EPA
spokesman Elias Rodriguez said
the agency remains concerned
about people drinking from wells
that are part of the site. Officials
said Sunday that data gathered in
2015 showed that some wells were
contaminated — exceeding standards for volatile organic chemicals — while others met drinkingwater standards. The entire area
was included in the Superfund site
boundaries as a “precautionary
measure” because groundwater
contamination can move over
time, the EPA said.
An agency statement said that
the results of the bacteria portion
of its testing should be available by
midweek and that its chemical
analysis should be completed by
the end of next week.
Residents unwittingly drawing
water from a Superfund site is
merely one example of Puerto
Rico’s dire lack of clean, reliable
sources of water. Government officials have said it could be months
before power is fully restored
across the island, which means
that it could take nearly as long to
get water flowing to all residents
in need. National Guard troops
and aid workers only recently began reaching the most far-flung
communities with bottled water
and water trucks.
The massive disruptions have
forced residents to forgo the basics
of modern plumbing and resort to
any means available to fill containers. Along Highway 10, which
cuts a jagged north-south route
through the center of Puerto Rico,
vehicles frequently line shoulders
of roads as drivers search for
spring water flowing from craggy
mountainsides.
In the mountainous municipality of Comerio, flooding from the
hurricane left residents cut off
from the central government and
outside aid. So locals used plastic
pipes to install a crude system to
reroute spring water to a clearing
where, one by one, people could
shower. Elsewhere, residents have
slogged regularly to creeks to fetch
water and to bathe.
With the lack of reliable water
has come increasing fear of disease.
Already, the island government
has identified four deaths believed
to have been caused by leptospirosis, a bacterial infection spread by
animal urine in the soil or groundwater. The deaths won’t be certified as “hurricane-related” unless
the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention confirms lab samples indicating that the victims
became infected by drinking or
having contact with contaminated water.
The health risks posed by water
from the Maguayo well probably
depend on the person, Rodriguez
said. Any hazards might be more
risky for vulnerable populations,
such as elderly people or pregnant
women.
Rusty Harris-Bishop, another
EPA spokesman, said government
officials only recently learned that
people were trying get water at
Superfund sites. In one case, a
local resident contacted the agency to request access to a well.
Harris-Bishop said the EPA began sending assessment teams
late last week to evaluate hazardous waste sites in Dorado, Hormigas and San German. After surveying those locations and two others,
the agency says it thinks residents
were able to access wells only at
the Dorado site, although officials
acknowledge that they have no
way to know how many people
carted away water before the site
was again secured on Saturday.
The EPA is working with the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency and the Army Corps of
Engineers to ensure that water
trucks are reaching nearby neighborhoods. “We are sensitive to the
suffering and needs of these communities,” Harris-Bishop said.
arelis.hernandez@washpost.com
brady.dennis@washpost.com
Dennis reported from Washington.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
Federal judge probes at intent behind latest travel ban during key hearing
AND
BY L YNH B UI
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
A federal judge on Monday
launched skeptical questions at
both government lawyers and
those challenging the latest iteration of President Trump’s travel
ban — probing at what government officials’ intent was in barring various types of people from
eight countries from coming to
the United States.
At a hearing in federal court in
Greenbelt, Md., U.S. District
Judge Theodore D. Chuang asked
government lawyers about the
extent of Trump’s involvement in
coming up with the latest ban
and what those opposed to the
measure felt the president could
do so it would pass legal muster.
“This isn’t something the president came up with on his own,
correct?” Chuang asked at one
point during the proceedings.
The hearing marked one of the
last opportunities for challengers
of the newest ban to make their
case that the judiciary should
block the measure before it fully
goes into effect Oct. 18. The
challenge was brought by advocacy groups including the International Refugee Assistance Project and Muslims who say they
will be negatively affected by the
ban.
The case in Maryland is critical, as Chuang blocked the last
version of Trump’s travel ban.
Those suing hope he will do so
again, though judges in Hawaii
and Washington, who have also
blocked previous versions of the
ban, are considering separate requests to intervene.
Trump’s latest travel ban, the
third iteration of the measure,
affects citizens of eight countries,
though some are more completely blocked from coming to the
United States than others.
For Syria and North Korea, the
directive blocks immigrants
wanting to relocate to the United
States and non-immigrants wishing to visit in some capacity. For
Iran, it blocks both immigrants
and non-immigrants, though it
exempts students and those participating in a cultural exchange.
The ban blocks people from
Chad, Libya and Yemen from
coming to the United States as
immigrants or on business or
tourist visas, and it blocks people
from Somalia from coming as
immigrants. The proclamation
names Venezuela, but it blocks
only certain government officials.
At the hearing in Maryland,
Chuang asked about the information used to develop the list of
banned countries and whether
he should consider Trump’s past
remarks about Muslims when
deciding whether to block the
executive order.
Deputy Attorney General
Hashim M. Mooppan stressed
that it was officials at the State
Department and Department of
Homeland Security who helped
craft the new directive, which he
asserted had “nothing to do with”
religion.
Challengers countered that the
measure was not as targeted as it
could be and that it was poisoned
by the president’s past comments
about wanting a ban on Muslims.
The only explanation for the latest ban was that “it was produced
of out desire to express animosity
towards Muslims and Islam,” said
lawyer Gadeir Abbas.
Legal analysts have said the
new measure is more defensible
than the previous versions, and
those wanting it blocked might
have a tougher time convincing a
judge to do so.
Chuang did not indicate when
he would issue a ruling.
lynh.bui@washpost.com
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
The World
American casino companies ready to roll in Japan
As government opens the door for ‘integrated’ gambling resorts, analysts and industry executives see ‘the next Macau’
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — American gambling
companies are falling over themselves to win favor in Japan,
where the government is preparing to allow casinos to open their
doors in flashy resorts to rival
Singapore and Macau.
Las Vegas Sands brought David Beckham, the British soccer
star and ambassador for the
casino company, to Tokyo this
month to talk about how much
he loves uni, or sea urchin, and
how much he would love to see
new sporting venues here. They
even put Eagles guitarist Joe
Walsh on stage at a showbizworthy news conference to lament the lack of top-notch performance venues in Japan.
Executives from Las Vegas
Sands and MGM Resorts have
repeatedly said they would each
invest as much as $10 billon in
Japan, while Lawrence Ho, president of Hong Kong-based Melco
Resorts and Entertainment, said
he would spend “whatever it
takes” to get a foothold in Japan.
“We’ve been trying to come
here for many years,” Robert G.
Goldstein, the president and
chief operating officer of Las
Vegas Sands, said in an interview
this month. “It’s got huge appeal
internationally. . . . It’s a very
large gambling opportunity.”
Casinos were illegal in Japan
until parliament passed the controversial Integrated Resort Promotion Law in December, and
they will be allowed only as part
of a wider resort that will have to
include a hotel, an international
conference hall and other entertainment facilities. Yokohama
and Osaka, Japan’s second- and
third-largest cities, are the most
likely locations for the first two
“integrated resorts,” once appropriate legislation is passed.
Yet many Japanese are concerned that social harm will
come with casinos. A poll by the
Jiji news agency conducted in
August found that two-thirds of
respondents were opposed to the
introduction of casinos, with
most worried about crime and
gambling addictions.
Pachinko, a noisy, pinball-like
slot-machine game with parlors
outside practically every train
station in the country, is already
associated with organized crime
and money laundering.
But Prime Minister Shinzo
Abe’s government argues that
casinos will help boost Japan’s
economy, which has been stuck
in a funk for two decades. Casinos are a central part of its goal to
increase the number of foreign
tourists from a record 24 million
last year to 40 million by 2020,
when Tokyo will host the Summer Olympics, and then to
60 million by 2030.
Analysts at Nomura, a Japanese investment bank, say that
the country’s gambling business
could be “significantly larger”
than Singapore’s $7 billion industry and that integrated resorts in
Japan could become the most
profitable in the world. They
expect the business could be
worth about $10 billion a year
after the resorts open in 2023.
But CLSA, a Hong Kong-based
brokerage, says it could be worth
Wildfires
kill 35 in
Portugal,
4 in Spain
A SSOCIATED P RESS
KIYOSHI OTA/BLOOMBERG NEWS
TOMOHIRO OHSUMI/BLOOMBERG NEWS
SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Lawrence Ho, president of Hong Kong-based Melco Resorts, speaks in February about plans for Japan. ABOVE LEFT: A roulette
wheel at a mock casino in Tokyo. ABOVE RIGHT: David Beckham with Las Vegas Sands President Robert Goldstein this month in Tokyo.
as much as $25 billion a year
once Japan has two integrated
resorts and 10 regional casinos.
That could make Japan “the
next Macau,” becoming a haven
not just for local customers but
also for gamblers from South
Korea and China, CLSA analysts
wrote in a research note.
American companies have
been aggressively preparing for
the new opportunity.
MGM Resorts hired Jason Hyland, a career diplomat who was
until August the United States’
deputy ambassador in Tokyo, as
its president in Japan.
“Japan can be a bigger market
than Las Vegas,” the chairman of
MGM
Resorts
International, James Murren, said at a seminar in Tokyo earlier this year.
Steve Wynn, the chief executive of Wynn Resorts, told the
Nikkei business newspaper in
August that Japan was a “per-
fect” market because of its size
and wealth.
Sheldon Adelson, the chairman of Las Vegas Sands, has
called Singapore, where Las Vegas Sands invested $6 billion in
the Marina Bay Sands resort, a
“warm-up” for Japan.
“I turned Singapore into a city
for conventions and shopping. [I
did] the same thing for Vegas,”
Adelson said during one of several trips to Japan this year,
suggesting he would do the same
here.
Adelson is a Republican backer who donated more than
$20 million to Donald Trump’s
presidential campaign. The Nikkei business newspaper reported
that President Trump asked Abe
during their meeting in February
whether he knew about Las Vegas Sands and MGM Resorts. Abe
had his assistant jot down the
companies’ names, according to
the newspaper.
On trips to Japan, Adelson visited the secretary general of the
ruling Liberal Democratic Party
in February and in September
met the governor and mayor of
Osaka.
There is still plenty of influencing to be done.
Gambling companies are concerned that the Japanese government will overregulate the industry. The government, for example, is considering limiting
the size of the gambling floor in
each resort to 161,500 square
feet, the same as in Singapore.
In meetings in Japan, Adelson
has said this would limit the
casinos’ profitability and therefore the amount of money his
company would invest, according to the Asahi newspaper.
Some critics are complaining
about a suggestion that Japanese
citizens would be required to
show their new, governmentissued identity cards and pay a
fee of as much as $100 to enter
casinos in Japan.
Among other proposed regulations: a ban on ATMs in the
casinos, and a requirement that
Japanese citizens will have to use
cash to buy chips, although foreign citizens will be allowed to
use credit cards.
Goldstein, of Las Vegas Sands,
said his company wants “intelligent regulation.” But for now,
gambling firms are so eager to set
up in Japan that they are not
likely to quibble.
“If we’re so fortunate that the
government will award us a license and tells us, ‘You’re going
here or there,’ we will be glad to
take it,” Goldstein said. “We’re
just very eager.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Yuki Oda contributed to this report.
lisbon — Late-season wildfires
that broke out over the weekend
in Portugal have killed at least 35
people, including a 1-month-old,
authorities said Monday, making
2017 by far the deadliest year on
record for forest blazes in the
country.
In neighboring Spain, wildfires have killed at least four
people and prompted the evacuation of thousands in the northwest region of Galicia, as the
remnants of winds from Hurricane Ophelia fanned the flames
along the Iberian Peninsula’s
Atlantic coast.
The fires returned to Portugal
four months after a summer
blaze claimed 64 lives in one
night. The year’s current total of
99 deaths is far higher than the
previous annual record of 25, in
1966.
A 1-month-old was among the
dead, the Civil Protection Agency
said Monday. The infant’s body
was found near Tabua, about 120
miles north of Lisbon. The parents’ bodies reportedly were
found nearby.
Civil
Protection
Agency
spokeswoman Patricia Gaspar
said the death toll could rise.
She said that 56 people were
injured, 16 of them seriously, and
that nine people were reported
missing in the blazes.
More than 5,300 firefighters
with more than 1,600 vehicles
were still battling the fires
through dense pine and eucalyptus forests Monday.
Portugal endures widespread
forest fires every summer. Most
are set deliberately, officials say,
and spread quickly because of
poor forest management, which
leaves debris that acts as fuel.
Emergency services recorded
523 wildfires on Sunday, the
highest number in a single day
this year and the highest on one
day in more than a decade. “You
don’t see that in any other country in the world,” Gaspar said.
A prolonged drought has
made the calamity worse this
year.
“We have all our firefighters
out there doing everything they
can,” said the country’s interior
minister, Constança Urbano de
Sousa, who is in charge of emergency services and has been the
target of criticism for her handling of the situation.
She said climate change has
added an additional challenge.
“Large-scale catastrophes are
now a reality all over the world,”
Urbano de Sousa said. That
means more effort has to be put
into preventive measures, she
said.
Spain’s prime minister focused on criminal intent and
said authorities were certain that
the fires were caused by arsonists.
“What we are seeing here
doesn’t happen accidentally. This
has been induced,” Mariano Rajoy, who is from Galicia, said
during a visit to a Galician fire
department.
DIGEST
IRELAND
AUSTRALIA
Hurricane Ophelia’s
remnants leave 3 dead
Assange is ‘tool’ of
Russia, Clinton says
The remnants of Hurricane
Ophelia slammed into Ireland
with wind gusts of up to 80 mph
on Monday, killing at least three
people, grounding planes,
shutting schools and causing
widespread power outages.
Tens of thousands of homes
were without power, and the
military was placed on standby.
Although Ophelia has been
downgraded to a post-tropical
cyclone, Ireland’s National
Emergency Coordination Group
on Severe Weather warned
that the storm remains
“unprecedented, with serious
life-threatening conditions.”
Wind warnings were in place
for Northern Ireland, parts of
Wales and western parts of
England.
About 130 flights were canceled
at Dublin Airport, while flights
also were grounded at Manchester
Airport in England. Both Ryanair
and Easy Jet canceled flights at
Belfast International Airport.
Several flights to British airports
were diverted.
Hillary Clinton has told an
Australian state broadcaster that
WikiLeaks founder Julian
Assange was a tool of Russia in his
release of hacked emails that hurt
the U.S. Democratic presidential
nominee’s campaign.
Clinton told the Australian
Broadcasting Corp. in an
interview broadcast Monday that
the Australian whistleblower had
“become a kind of nihilistic
opportunist who does the bidding
of a dictator,” Russian President
Vladimir Putin.
Assange is “a tool of Russian
intelligence, and if he’s such a . . .
martyr of free speech, why doesn’t
WikiLeaks ever publish anything
coming out of Russia?” she said.
Clinton was complaining about
WikiLeaks’ publication during the
2016 campaign of politically
damaging emails from the
Democratic National Committee.
Assange, holed up in Ecuador’s
embassy in London, hit back at
Clinton, tweeting that she is “not
a credible person.”
In the interview, Clinton
rejected reporter Sarah Ferguson’s
— Associated Press
GREG BAKER/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A man walks past a poster in Beijing featuring Chinese President
Xi Jinping with a slogan reading “Chinese Dream, People’s Dream.”
China is gearing up for the 19th Communist Party Congress, which
begins Wednesday and where Xi is expected to lay out new policy
initiatives and further consolidate his power as he begins his second
five-year term. The congress is held every five years.
proposition that Assange was
simply performing a journalist’s
role by publishing information
and said WikiLeaks is “practically
a fully owned subsidiary of
Russian intelligence.”
— Associated Press
ISRAEL
Antiaircraft battery
in Syria destroyed
The Israeli military said it
struck and destroyed an
antiaircraft battery deep in Syria
on Monday after it had opened fire
on Israeli jets flying over Lebanon
— a rare instance of Syrian forces
targeting Israeli planes since the
civil war began in 2011.
The strike came as Russia’s
defense minister was visiting
Israel. Moscow is a staunch ally of
the Syrian government.
Lt. Col. Jonathan Conricus, a
spokesman for the Israeli military,
said Israeli planes were on a
routine reconnaissance mission
near the Lebanese-Syrian border
when they came under fire. They
were not hit and returned to base
safely.
In response, Israel hit a Syrian
antiaircraft battery about
30 miles east of Damascus and
“incapacitated” it, Conricus said.
Antiaircraft fire has been
deployed before against Israeli
jets since 2011, but it is rare.
Israel has largely stayed out of
the fighting in neighboring Syria,
but it has carried out dozens of
airstrikes on alleged weapons
convoys bound for the Hezbollah
militia in Lebanon. It has also
occasionally carried out limited
reprisals along its frontier with
Syria in the Golan Heights, in
response to spillover from Syria’s
fighting.
The Syrian army denounced
Israel’s Monday strike as a hostile
act.
— Associated Press
7 killed in Egypt’s Sinai: Islamist
militants staged a two-pronged
assault in the largest city in
Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, lobbing
grenades and trading gunfire
with guards at an unused Coptic
church to distract from a bank
robbery across the street. By the
time the attack was over, seven
people were killed and 17 million
Egyptian pounds (about
$1 million) was reportedly stolen.
A day earlier, militants attacked
military checkpoints in a nearby
town, killing nine soldiers.
12 dead as boat with Rohingya
refugees capsizes: A boat
carrying Rohingya Muslims who
were fleeing Burma capsized in
the Bay of Bengal near a
Bangladeshi fishing village,
killing 12 people, including six
children, police said. Survivors
told officials that up to 65 people
were on board and that almost
half of them were children, police
said. Hundreds of thousands of
long-persecuted Rohingya have
fled Burma since Aug. 25.
— From news services
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Attack shows al-Shabab’s resilience
U.S. official: Scale of
Somali bombing ‘caught
everybody by surprise’
BY A LEX H ORTON
AND C AROL M ORELLO
The massive attack that rocked
a bustling Mogadishu street on
Saturday, killing 300, was a demonstration of resilience by
al-Shabab, an Islamist militant
group that has been battling
U.S.-backed forces.
The group frequently targets
public spaces in Somalia’s capital
with the goal of undermining the
central government’s legitimacy,
and to push back against its cooperation with the United States and
a coalition of African allies.
While U.S. officials and other
observers say Saturday’s attack
does not necessarily signal
al-Shabab’s resurgence, it does
highlight the group’s ability to absorb setbacks and survive to execute brazen attacks.
The militant group has experienced territorial, financial and recruitment losses since 2010, when
the United States and its coalition
began targeting its command
structure. But that has not prevented the group from massing to
attack military bases or coordinate bombings inside and outside
Somalia, said Seth G. Jones, director of defense policy at the Rand
Corp., a Pentagon-funded think
tank in Washington.
“Al-Shabab has areas where
they can operate relatively freely,”
Jones told The Washington Post,
including strongholds in southern
river valleys. It’s challenging terrain for ground troops to navigate,
and the dense foliage can obscure
drone surveillance.
Attacks against Somali troops
and those assigned to the African
Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM), a force numbering about
22,000, have grown more spectacular as al-Shabab’s territory has
shrunk, Jones concluded in a 2016
report on the counterterror campaign there.
In June 2016, for instance, 30
Ethiopian soldiers were killed —
along with 150 al-Shabab militants — in an attempt to overrun a
base some 200 miles north of Mogadishu.
The group has been dangerous
to U.S. troops, too. Navy SEAL Kyle
Milliken, a senior chief petty officer, was killed in May during an
mission described as “behind” Somali troops but later revealed as a
mission
shoulder-to-shoulder
with them.
As U.S. airstrikes have targeted
al-Shabab’s commanders and its
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A Somali man, severely wounded during Saturday’s attack in
Mogadishu, is carried to a Turkish military plane on Monday.
training camps, the group’s leaders have made security adjustments, Jones said. They rely less
on computers and cellphones,
whose transmissions can be
tracked.
The U.S. military presence in
Somalia is about 400 troops, with
approximately half in Mogadishu,
the Pentagon said Monday. Those
forces include Special Operations
troops to train Somali forces and
conventional personnel on hand
for logistical support, although
much of the focus has been collecting and handing off surveillance
and intelligence data to the Somalis.
Al-Shabab still controls many
rural areas in the south, including
the roads leading to cities and
towns. Even in Mogadishu, militants go around collecting “taxes”
from businesses to offset revenue
losses of seaside ports recaptured
by government forces.
AMISOM troops heading to
Baidoa, one of the largest cities in
Somalia, must often use aircraft to
get there rather than roads
primed for ambushes, said Abdi
Ismail Samatar, a Somalia analyst
and geography professor at the
University of Minnesota who also
serves on the board of the University of Mogadishu.
“They are fighting with a bunch
of guerrilla fighters, who are exceptionally mobile, who are working in a huge territory in which
there is no government, so they
are able to do what they want at a
time of their own choosing,” he
said.
A State Department official acknowledged the truck bomb
shows al-Shabab is capable of
staging attacks throughout the
country, but said the government
is making progress in helping Somalia transition from rule by warlords and clans to a federal government with a countrywide
reach.
“The magnitude of this attack
caught everybody by surprise,”
said the official, speaking on the
condition of anonymity under
State Department ground rules
for briefing reporters.
“As terrible as the individual
attack is, the fact is we don’t see
this every day now in Somalia.
This is extraordinary, and it
doesn’t change the overall positive
trajectory we’re seeing there.”
The State Department official
said the Somalis have thwarted a
number of planned attacks, and
defections have been encouraged
by the newly elected president, the
Somali American Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed. He noted the
latest bombing was condemned
by Sheikh Mukhtar Robow, a former al-Shabab leader who defected after the Trump administration
removed him from the mostwanted list of terrorists run by the
State Department’s “Rewards for
Justice” program.
“I wouldn’t characterize the
overall situation as the central
government is failing, or returning to a failed state,” the official
said. “Under the previous and current governments, we’ve seen
some pretty significant improvements.”
The United States over the past
six years has spent $1.5 billion on
humanitarian aid for victims of
drought and famine, and
$240 million on economic development aid, including good governance projects and building
schools and government buildings.
The United States also has a
diplomatic presence of sorts, although it is limited to the heavily
fortified Mogadishu airport where
Somali officials must travel to visit. The embassy officially is in Nairobi, a reflection of the dangerous
environment, although it has been
rotating diplomats on temporary
duty between Somalia and Kenya
until it can establish a full-time
embassy on the airport grounds.
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Catalonia ducks secession question
BY P AMELA R OLFE
AND J AMES M C A ULEY
madrid — The independenceminded Catalonia region tried
again Monday to dodge the question of whether it has declared a
formal break with Spain, calling
instead for talks and listing its
grievances against Madrid’s leaders.
The lack of clarity elicited a
terse and frustrated response
from Spain’s justice minister. “Not
valid,” Rafael Catalá said amid
warnings from federal authorities
that their patience was wearing
thin more than two weeks after
Catalonia backed secession in a
referendum.
Catalonia’s president, Carles
Puigdemont, has carefully avoided a specific declaration of independence — which could trigger
harsh measures by Spain, including a takeover of Catalonia’s security forces. Spain had given Puigdemont until Monday to clarify
the region’s status.
“The question was clear, but
the answer is not,” Catalá told
reporters.
Instead, Puidgdemont appeared to be trying to buy more
time.
In a letter to Spanish Prime
Minister Mariano Rajoy, Puigdemont declined to answer the
question, calling instead for two
months of dialogue and a halt to
what he called Spain’s “repression” of Catalan citizens and institutions.
Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría,
Spain’s deputy prime minister,
also rejected Puigdemont’s letter.
She called his appeal for dialogue
“not credible.” Any further conversation should take place in the
Spanish parliament, not between
a particular region and the central government, she said.
She gave Catalan authorities a
second deadline, Thursday, to return to obeying Spanish law.
In his response to Puigdemont
on Monday, Rajoy expressed
much of the same sentiment as
Sáenz de Santamaría.
“Your cries for dialogue in the
name of Catalonia are not credible, when you refuse to speak
with an important part of that
society through its legitimate representatives, who — as you have
said — hold fewer seats in parliament, but — as you have hidden —
correspond to a larger number of
citizens in terms of votes,” the
prime minister wrote in a letter
circulated in Spanish media.
Last week, Puigdemont presented the results of the Oct. 1
referendum in Catalonia, Spain’s
wealthiest region. He affirmed
Catalonia’s right to be an independent country, before immediately delaying the secession process to allow for dialogue.
Spain’s Constitutional Court,
meanwhile, declared the referendum illegal. Fewer than half of
Catalan residents participated in
the vote, but the vast majority of
those who did voted for independence.
“The suspension of the political
mandate which arose from the
polls on Oct. 1 shows our firm will
to find a solution and not confrontation,” Puigdemont wrote in the
four-page letter to Rajoy.
“Our proposal of dialogue is
sincere and honest,” he continued. “Thus, for the next two
months, our main objective is to
urge dialogue and that all those
international, Spanish and Catalan institutions and personalities
who have expressed their will to
open a path to negotiations have
the chance to explore it.”
The letter concluded, “With
good will, recognizing the problem and looking each other in the
face, I am sure we can find a path
to the solution.”
The letter arrived in Madrid
hours ahead of a scheduled appearance by four people before
the high court to face possible
charges of sedition in relation to
the referendum. Josep Lluís Trapero, head of the Catalan police
force, was among those in court.
His officers had declined to enforce a court order to prevent the
referendum.
On Monday afternoon, the high
court released Trapero but pro-
hibited him from leaving the
country and mandated another
court appearance in 15 days. Prosecutors had requested the much
harsher sentence of prison time
without bail. A second person was
released under similar conditions, while the remaining two
people — civic leaders of Catalonia’s pro-independence movement — were ordered jailed while
under investigation.
Rajoy had said he would begin
invoking Article 155 if Puigdemont did not “return to the legality of the Constitution.” Article 155,
known in Spain as the “nuclear
option,” allows wide-ranging
measures to uphold Spanish law
in a renegade region, including
assuming control of the police
force and holding elections.
In Spain, a growing number of
voices are calling for new elections in Catalonia to replace the
sitting government.
In Barcelona, the seat of the
Catalan government, the predominant view is still that the region
can achieve independence or
greater autonomy.
“My government’s priority is to
intensively seek the path to dialogue,” Puigdemont wrote in his
letter. “We want to talk, just as
strong democracies do, about the
existing problem that the majority of the Catalan people want to
continue the path as an independent country in the European
framework.”
How an independent Catalonia
would fit into a “European framework” remains an open question.
For the moment, officials
across the European Union have
mostly sided with Madrid, seeking to stave off a wave of separatist
movements in the already embattled 28-state bloc. While many
E.U. leaders have said that the
referendum is an internal Spanish matter to be settled by Spanish
authorities, other officials, notably in France, have said that their
governments would not recognize
a newly independent Catalonia.
james.mcauley@washpost.com
McAuley reported from Paris.
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RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
Bomb kills reporter in Malta who
covered island’s ‘Panama Papers’ link
ADDICTION IN AMERICA
A NATION RESPONDS
Wednesday, October 18
Streamed live from 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.
The Washington Post will bring together
policymakers, medical experts and industry
leaders to discuss how the nation is responding
to America’s opioid epidemic. Speakers will
discuss how the skyrocketing number of cases
of opioid abuse — and opioid-related deaths
— reflects a complex set of circumstances and
regulatory challenges that cross boundaries
between government and the medical industry,
and have consequences that reach far beyond
those sectors.
“Addiction in America: A Nation Responds” is
the latest program from Washington Post Live,
the newsroom’s live journalism platform.
BY
S TEPHEN C ALLEJA
valletta, malta — An investigative journalist in Malta who
exposed the island nation’s links
to offshore tax havens through
the leaked “Panama Papers” was
killed Monday when a bomb exploded in her car, the prime
minister said.
Daphne Caruana Galizia, 53,
had just driven away from her
home in Mosta, a large town on
Malta’s main island, when the
bomb went off, sending the vehicle’s wreckage spiraling over a
wall and into a field, Prime Minister Joseph Muscat said.
Muscat called it a “barbaric
attack” that also amounted to an
assault on freedom of expression.
He described Caruana Galizia as
“one of my harshest critics, on a
political and personal level,” as
he denounced her slaying.
One of the topics the veteran
reporter examined was what the
documents from the 2016 Panama Papers leak said about Malta.
She wrote that Muscat’s wife, the
country’s energy minister and
the government’s chief of staff,
had offshore holdings in Panama
to receive money from Azerbaijan.
Muscat and his wife, Michelle,
denied that they had companies
in Panama.
Caruana Galizia filed a police
report two weeks ago saying she
was receiving threats, law enforcement officials told Malta
news outlets Monday.
The slain journalist had been a
regular columnist for the Malta
Independent, writing twice
weekly for the newspaper since
1996. She also wrote a blog called
“Running Commentary,” which
was followed by many in Malta.
A half-hour before she was
killed, she posted to her website
an item about a libel claim that
the prime minister’s chief of staff
had brought against a former
opposition figure over comments
the latter made about corruption.
Caruana Galizia herself had
been sued for libel over articles
she wrote for her blog. Opposition leader Adrian Delia sued
over stories linking him to a
prostitution racket in London.
Economy Minister Chris Cardona
claimed libel when Caruana Galizia wrote that he visited a brothel
while in Germany on government business.
Monday evening’s parliament
session was scrapped, except for
briefings about the bombing given by Muscat and Delia, who
called the reporter’s slaying a
“political murder.”
Muscat said he had asked the
U.S. government and the FBI for
help investigating the bombing.
Caruana Galizia is survived by
her husband and three sons. One
son, Matthew, was on the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists team that won
the Pulitzer Prize for its work on
the Panama Papers scandal.
The leak exposed the identities
of rich and powerful people
around the world who allegedly
had offshore holdings in Panama.
Caruana Galizia’s family has
asked Malta’s courts to replace
the magistrate assigned to conduct the inquiry into the journalist’s death. The family said the
magistrate, Consuelo Scerri Herrera, “in her personal capacity,
had launched judicial procedures
against [Caruana Galizia] regarding comments she had written.”
Caruana Galizia for many
years was a harsh critic of Malta’s
Labor Party and government.
More recently she had expanded
her criticism to include the opposition Nationalist Party.
Her slaying drew swift denunciations in the European Union,
to which the tiny Mediterranean
nation belongs.
“Daphne played a vitally important role in unearthing serious allegations of money laundering and corruption in Malta,
including those involving senior
figures in the Maltese government,” said Sven Giegold, a member of the European Parliament.
The
Italian
newsweekly
L’Espresso, which has also written about alleged corruption
linked to Malta, said the reporter’s killing demonstrated that a
well-documented exposé “is perceived as a danger by the powerful and by organized crime.”
European Parliament President Antonio Tajani in a tweet
called Caruana Galizia a “tragic
example of a journalist who sacrificed her life to search for the
truth.”
— Associated Press
To watch the live stream or
see the full list of speakers:
wapo.st/wpaddiction
AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Richard Baum
Acting Director,
Office of National
Drug Control Policy
Sen. Maggie Hassan
(D-N.H.)
Iraqi forces cross an oil field as they approach Kirkuk weeks after a Kurdish vote for independence.
U.S. allies on opposite sides in Kirkuk
IRAQ FROM A1
Larry J. Merlo
President and
Chief Executive Officer,
CVS Health
Sen. Rob Portman
(R-Ohio)
Roger Krone
Chairman and
Chief Executive Officer,
Leidos
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“We’re not taking sides,” President Trump said at a news conference in the Rose Garden, adding
that the United States had a “very
good relationship” with the central government and with Kurds.
“We never should have been
there,” he said, referring to the
2003 invasion of Iraq, “but we’re
not taking sides.”
A Kurdish referendum on independence last month intensified a
decades-old dispute between the
two sides. The Iraqi government,
the United States, Turkey and
Iran opposed the vote. For Baghdad, it added urgency to a need to
reassert its claims to Kirkuk province, which has around 10 percent
of the country’s oil reserves.
A senior administration official in Washington said there was
no daylight between Trump’s “not
taking sides” comment and the
U.S. Embassy, which Monday
morning said it supported the
“peaceful reassertion” of the
Baghdad government’s authority
“in all disputed areas,” in line with
the constitution.
“The president and the embassy in Baghdad are saying the same
thing,” said the official, speaking
on the condition of anonymity
under White House ground rules.
“We support joint administration
between the central government
and the regional government.”
Conflict “will only serve the
interests of the enemies of Iraq —
including ISIS and the Iranian
regime,” the official said.
The skirmish between forces
that fought together to oust Islamic State militants from their
stronghold of Mosul presented a
major distraction for Iraqi forces,
which were due to begin an operation in the last pockets the insurgents control near the Syrian border.
Shortly after Trump spoke, the
Kurdistan government’s representative in Washington, Bayan
Sami Abdul Rahman, called the
U.S. position “bewildering,” and
she echoed Irbil’s charges that
Iran was already benefiting from
the upheaval.
Two men emblematic of
Iranian-backed militia influence
in Iraq stood alongside counterterrorism officers as the Iraqi flag
was raised in Kirkuk. One was
Hadi al-Amiri, the head of the
country’s powerful Badr Organization. The other, Abu Mahdi alMuhandis, has been designated
for sanctions by the U.S. Treasury
for his links to Kitaeb Hezbollah,
which the United States considers
a terrorist organization, and the
Islamic Revolutionary Guard
Corps, a powerful branch of the
Iranian military.
“How can you not take sides?”
Rahman said. “This is Iranianbacked militia, using American
weapons, to attack an ally of the
United States. I’m bewildered by
the U.S. government position. Not
just President Trump’s statement,
but statements from the [Defense
Department] and others, trying
to downplay what’s been happening in Kirkuk.”
The militias, she said, “have
Abram tanks, artillery, they have
deployed in their thousands.” She
and her government are particularly disappointed, she said, “in
light of what the administration
has been saying since Thursday,”
when Trump announced new
sanctions on the Revolutionary
Guard and described “Iran’s role
as a destabilizer in the Middle
East.”
Despite U.S. claims of efforts to
set up negotiations — and
Trump’s comments Monday —
Washington’s position before and
after the referendum has been
that the Kurds must yield to Baghdad, Rahman said. Iraqi Prime
Minister Haider al-Abadi “has decided to impose his will by force,”
she said. “We will counter this. We
will push back. The potential for
all-out war is there.”
“I hope we haven’t reached the
point of no return,” Rahman said.
“If we do, it will be catastrophic
for everyone,” including “the
United States and others who
have invested so much political
capital, as well as treasure and
blood,” in Iraq.
Although the Kurdish people
“do not want to be in that space,”
she said, “we are survivors.”
As well as highlighting the
deep rifts in Iraq, the confrontation has also exposed splits
among the Kurds. Kurdish factions were divided on whether to
allow in Iraqi troops or stand
their ground, with some Kurdish
fighters, known as peshmerga,
ordered to give up their posts.
The Iraqi government said it
“carefully planned and coordinated” the return of federal forces to
Kirkuk with local security forces
in advance. But it accused other
Kurdish forces from outside the
province of sending reinforcements to “harass and obstruct”
federal forces.
Some elements of Kurdistan’s
Patriotic Union party, or PUK,
whose forces dominate in the
area, agreed to withdraw in coordination with Baghdad. But the
ruling Kurdish Democratic Party,
or KDP, opposed a deal.
The general command of Kurdistan’s peshmerga slammed PUK
officials for a “major historic betrayal of Kurdistan” by handing
over positions, and the militia
vowed to fight.
The KDP-affiliated Kurdistan
Region Security Council said it
destroyed five U.S.-supplied
Humvees used in the advance by
Iraq’s popular mobilization units,
an umbrella group containing
Iranian-backed militias that fight
as part of Iraq’s security forces.
A video shared online showed
six bodies of what appeared to be
Kurdish peshmerga soldiers lying
by a roadside near Iraqi vehicles.
One wore the uniform of a lieutenant colonel.
“This is the result of disobedience of Masoud Barzani,” said the
Iraqi fighter who was filming,
referring to the leader of Iraqi
Kurdistan and the KDP.
A curfew was imposed on the
city Monday night as Iraqi forces
announced they had completed
their “first phase.”
Still in the hands of Kurds were
swaths of disputed territories in
other provinces.
loveday.morris@washpost.com
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
DeYoung reported from Washington.
Alex Horton in Washington
contributed to this report.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Mexicans not impressed with models of Trump’s wall
WALL FROM A1
wall prototypes are being built.
“This won’t change things much.”
Most of the Mexican reaction
to these prototypes ranges from
offended to blasé. Residents of
Tijuana and other border cities
have lived with various types of
American barriers for years, and
they are used to them. The existing fence here, built in the mid1990s, is roughly 10 feet tall and
made out of metal sheets from
helicopter landing pads left over
from the Vietnam War. A second
layer of more-modern steel-mesh
fence, 14 to 18 feet tall, stands
behind that.
Despite this seeming fortitude,
the two-ply system in San Diego
was “compromised” — cut open
with axes or motorized saws or
blowtorches — some 550 times
just in the last fiscal year, according to officials from U.S. Customs
and Border Protection, or CBP.
One irony of building these
brawny prototypes at this location is that San Diego has long
demonstrated the weakness of
walls. Nowhere is more famous
for its sophisticated border tunnels than this industrial sprawl
near the Otay Mesa border crossing. The drug lord Joaquín “El
Chapo” Guzmán, now imprisoned in New York, disrupted the
narcotics trade by building
“super-tunnels” here that were
dozens of feet deep, equipped
with elevators and ventilation
and lighting, to move vast
amounts of cocaine into California. Seven tunnels of various sizes
have been identified by the San
Diego sector of the Border Patrol
just this year.
The ground here, as one U.S.
official put it, “is like Swiss
cheese.”
Trump has pledged that the
border wall will stop illegal immigrants and drugs. CBP officials,
however, said the walls under
consideration would likely not go
deep enough to block large, sophisticated tunnels.
On the second day of prototype
construction, a worker for one of
the companies involved fell backward into what CBP spokesman
Ralph DeSio described as a “40foot-deep hole,” although this was
unrelated to drug tunnels and it
did not result in injuries. “It
wasn’t a good first step,” he said.
Since then, construction has
hummed along. By the end of last
week, portions of five of the eight
prototypes had been erected, deploying various formations of
concrete blocks and metal rods.
Each company has a 65-by-65foot patch of ground on which to
build its prototype.
The project manager asked the
companies not to hang advertisements on their samples. They are:
Caddell Construction (Montgomery, Ala.); ELTA North America
(Annapolis Junction, Md.); Fisher
Sand & Gravel (Tempe, Ariz.);
KWR Construction (Sierra Vista,
Ariz); Texas Sterling Construction (Houston); W.G. Yates &
Sons Construction (Philadelphia,
Miss.). Two of the companies are
building two prototypes.
“This is a very unique project,”
said the project manager, a CBP
official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was
not authorized to comment publicly, referring to the small workspace and the fact that the companies are building side by side.
“So, we have to rely on their
professionalism, good nature and
cooperation. And so far it’s been
really good.”
The prototypes are being funded by the Department of Homeland Security. Trump would need
congressional approval for funding before any of them could
become an actual wall. Even then,
CBP officials said they might not
simply choose one winner but
take aspects of different prototypes. Villareal, the head of the
San Diego sector, said he appreciated how Trump has taken an
interest in border security and
hopes the wall can cut down on
the 70 to 100 illegal immigrants
apprehended in his sector each
day.
“It’s still a very fluid border,” he
said.
The project has attracted
rubber-neckers but has not
sparked mass protests. San Diego
police had considered restricting
protesters to a designated “freespeech zone” near the construction site, but no large crowds
materialized.
The Mexican government, besides refusing to pay for the wall,
has not taken a stand against it,
saying such construction is the
sovereign right of the United
States. The faltering NAFTA
GUILLERMO ARIAS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
One of the eight prototypes of President Trump’s border wall is worked on near San Diego. Some of the
30-foot-tall sample barriers have extra-stout reinforced bases; others are topped with metal spikes.
trade talks are alarming top Mexican officials far more than the
wall.
“For me, they should make it
even taller,” said one Tijuana
municipal policeman who was
patrolling the border near the
prototypes site. “So the crazies,
like in Las Vegas, don’t come over
here. I’m serious. The danger is
over there. So many assassinations happen on your side.”
Many Mexicans have called the
wall an insult. Not the police
officer.
“What insult is there if it’s in
your country?” said the policeman, who spoke on the condition
of anonymity because he was not
authorized to speak publicly.
“What insults me is the government of Mexico, which doesn’t
care about its own people. This is
an insult. The money being
robbed that they are not spending on schools, on science.”
Since the project abuts Tijuana, residents on the Mexican side
have the best view of the construction. These neighborhoods,
such as Las Torres and Nido de
Las Aguilas, are poor and violent,
clusters of shanties along unpaved roads. Two burned-out
cars, torched within the past
month, were abandoned near the
fence.
Those cars were directly in
front of the home of César, a
60-year-old plant salesman who
spoke on the condition his last
name not be used. He has lived
there for 23 years and remembers
that so many people used to mill
around waiting to cross the border illegally that “it looked like a
market.”
The flow has slowed. He’s unsure why the United States needs
a new wall now.
“I think they should spend the
money on something more effective,” he said. “You’ll always see
migrants.”
Other residents take greater
offense at the project, which they
consider a concrete monument to
anti-immigrant fervor being
whipped up in the United States.
“The president over there, he
keeps insulting us, saying that
we’re the worst,” said Audelia
Ávila Rodríguez, 21, who works in
recycling and is the sister of
Kevin. “This wall is just dividing
families. It’s very ugly. It’s sad.”
joshua.partlow@washpost.com
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A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
Economy & Business
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D.C.’s pitch to Amazon focuses on 4 hot neighborhoods
Bid for online giant’s second headquarters includes a mix of public and private sites on both sides of the Anacostia
BY
J ONATHAN O ’ C ONNELL
In late 2015, Brian Kenner,
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser’s
deputy mayor for economic development, met Amazon.com
chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos at
the opening of a downtown office
for the online retailer’s Web services unit.
Ever the D.C. booster, Kenner
encouraged the tech mogul to do
more business in the city.
“I pitched Washington, D.C., as
a place to expand,” he recalled.
Little did Kenner know that
two years later he would join
legions of officials coast to coast
in bidding for an Amazon project
widely considered the biggest
economic development deal in
decades.
Amazon launched a bidding
war among North American cities last month when it announced that it plans to develop
a second headquarters of up to
8 million square feet — enough
to accommodate 50,000 workers.
At completion, a decade or more
from now, it would be 20 times
the size of the new headquarters
that General Electric is building
in Boston and 13 times the size of
the one that McDonald’s is building in Chicago.
The Washington area has advantages over other regions.
Kenner cited the city’s highly
educated workforce, public
transportation and booming
neighborhoods.
“What we will always be selling in Washington, D.C., is [that]
we are an urban location,” Kenner said. “We are an urban location with transportation and
amenities. And over the past
20 years or so, that is what people
in general — old and young,
black and white — have been
preferring, to move into or be
closely located in an urban center. So we think we feel like we
speak to not only where we are
D.C. GOVERNMENT
A rendering shows the area around Nationals Park in Southeast, one of the proposed D.C. sites for Amazon.com’s second headquarters.
now, but where the advantages
are going to be years from now.”
Bezos, the founder of Amazon,
also owns The Washington Post.
Last year, he bought the largest
home in the city for $23 million.
Amazon’s request for proposals
required that bidding cities have
airports with direct flights to
Washington.
From a real estate perspective,
at first blush the District does
not appear to fit the bill. Unlike
former industrial hubs such as
Chicago, Detroit or Baltimore,
there are no sprawling vacant
factories or plants to redevelop.
Unlike exurban locations, there
is nothing with 100 acres available — another Amazon require-
ment — to be offered. Indeed,
there is no single available property in the city that could accommodate 8 million square feet
without
significant
zoning
changes. Two large federal parcels along the Anacostia River,
RFK Stadium and Poplar Point,
both come with a catch. RFK is
on federal land dedicated for
sports and recreation. The District has not prepared Poplar
Point for development despite
controlling it for a decade.
So Bowser’s economic development team drilled down on
four neighborhoods that are already enjoying rapid growth and
assembled bids including a mix
of public and private sites in
partnership with developers. All
four offer access to public transit
and neighborhood amenities
that make them popular with
young, highly educated workers.
Since Amazon wants to begin
by occupying 500,000 square
feet, each location needs to have
an available office building or
one on the way to completion.
One proposal incorporates
properties on both sides of the
Anacostia. Much of the land is
around Nationals Park and the
new D.C. United stadium, set to
open next year at Buzzard Point,
along with some property across
the river in Anacostia. Many of
the buildings that Amazon
would occupy are already being
plotted by developers in Southeast and Southwest Washington.
Another proposal would incorporate parcels behind Union
Station, in NoMa and the area
around Union Market. It would
provide Amazon immediate access to Union Station and, for
bicyclists, the city’s Metropolitan
Branch Trail. Locating here
could accelerate the 3 millionsquare-foot Burnham Place development envisioned for a platform above the train tracks.
Two other proposals may require further shoehorning. The
third location envisions putting
8 million square feet completely
on Hill East, land the District
owns south of RFK Stadium
along the Anacostia. Some development has begun there, but
accommodating Amazon would
require
significant
zoning
changes and relocation of existing facilities.
A final proposal envisions developing a handful of occupied
sites in the U Street and Shaw
neighborhoods alongside Howard University. Among the proposed properties are home to
Howard University Hospital, the
Franklin D. Reeves Municipal
Center and the D.C. Housing
Finance Agency headquarters, at
815 Florida Ave. NW.
Washington officials are likely
to face hard questions in an
interview with Amazon executives. It has become one of the
most expensive housing markets
in the country, limiting how
much existing employers can
grow. The Metro system, while
still one of the strongest transit
systems in the nation, has suffered declines in service and in
ridership.
Kenner declined to disclose
what the District might offer the
company in financial incentives,
saying that those details would
be worked out after Amazon
expressed interest. Under Bowser (D), the District has been
aggressive in offering taxpayer
dollars to corporations, deals
that are coming under increasing scrutiny by critics. The District provided a $60 million incentive package to the Advisory
Board Co. to remain in the city in
2015.
Chicago, by comparison, typically does not use such incentives, and state rules prevent
them in Washington state, which
hasn’t stopped Amazon from
growing in Seattle.
Bids for the second headquarters are due Thursday, and the
company said it plans to make a
decision early next year.
jonathan.o’connell@washpost.com
Amid sex assault scandal, Weinstein Co. in talks to sell to Trump fundraiser
BY T HOMAS H EATH
AND M ICHAEL K RANISH
The Weinstein Company is in
talks with Colony Capital to sell all
or much of the besieged studio to
the private equity firm after the
movie company’s brand has been
blotted by accusations that former
co-chairman Harvey Weinstein
sexually harassed women over decades.
“We are pleased to invest in the
Weinstein Company and to help it
move forward,” Colony founder and
executive chairman Thomas J. Barrack Jr. said Monday.
Barrack is an intimate of President Trump’s who helped save the
Trump real estate empire in the
1990s and was the top fundraiser for
Trump’s presidential campaign. He
told The Washington Post in a story
published last week that he is still
close to Trump but is disappointed
in some of his rhetoric, saying, “He’s
better than this.”
Founded in 1991, Colony Capital
is the private equity arm of Colony
NorthStar and has extensive experience in the television and film industry since its acquisition of Miramax from Walt Disney Co. in 2010.
“We believe the company has
substantial value and growth potential, and we look forward to
working with the company’s critical
strategic distribution and production partners to help preserve and
create value for all stakeholders, including its employees,” Barrack, 70,
said in a statement. He declined an
interview request.
Weinstein, 65, who has been one
of the most powerful figures in Hollywood for decades, was fired by his
former company last week as reports of allegations of sexual harassment proliferated. Several film
stars, including Gwyneth Paltrow
and Angelina Jolie, accused Weinstein of sexually harassing them.
Weinstein founded his eponymous film company with his broth-
er Bob in 2005. Before that, the
Weinsteins founded Miramax, a
premier independent film studio.
It is difficult to put a dollar
amount on the value of the Weinstein Co. because it is privately held.
The 150-employee company has
had success in both television and
film. The studio makes movies such
as the lowbrow “Piranha 3-D” and
“Scary Movie 4,” but is best known
for its higher-quality films such as
“The Iron Lady,” starring Meryl
Streep, “The Reader,” and popular
moneymakers such as Oscar-winner “The King’s Speech” and “Silver
Linings Playbook.” The company
also produces the television show
“Project Runway,” which is in its
16th season and is hosted by supermodel Heidi Klum.
“I am sure Colony is getting it at
an amazing price,” said Eric Schiffer,
chairman of Los Angeles-based
Reputation Management Consultants. “Right now there is a radioactive element to anything Weinstein.
A lot of players on the financial side
won’t touch it.”
In making his investment in the
Weinstein Co. — in anticipation of a
possible purchase of all or part of its
assets — Barrack is following an
investment strategy that he has
used for years. He specializes in
finding distressed properties, investing in them and reselling them
at a large profit.
He also has experience in the
film business. After Weinstein’s
company sold Miramax to Disney
in 1993, Barrack and some partners
purchased Miramax in 2010. Barrack became chairman and helped
engineer one of the first deals that
licensed content to Netflix and other streaming services. That, in turn,
enabled Barrack’s company to sell
its Miramax stake to Qatari investors for what he said was a fourfold
profit.
Barrack’s company has also
worked “extensively” with the
Weinstein Co. under a joint venture
that began in 2013 in which they
produced content from Miramax’s
collection of films. At the time, Barrack on CNBC praised the storytelling “genius” of brothers Harvey and
Bob Weinstein.
Weinstein’s troubles have continued to grow, including accusations
that he raped women. Weinstein
said through a spokesman that any
sex he has had with women was
consensual.
New York City police said in a
statement that they are following
up on reports “indicating that there
may be additional victims of sex
offenses by Harvey Weinstein in
New York City” and are “conducting
a review to determine if any official
complaints have been received.”
Five board members of the Weinstein Co. have resigned. Goldman
Sachs said last week that it was
exploring options for its stake in the
entertainment company, which is a
relatively modest amount at less
than $1 million, according to re-
ports.
The studio has postponed the release until next year of its forthcoming film “The Current War,” a period
film about the rivalry between scientists/entrepreneurs Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse.
Bob Weinstein distanced himself
from his brother in a recent interview with the Hollywood Reporter,
saying he has been “in a waking
nightmare” since the allegations
surfaced. “My brother has caused
unconscionable suffering,” he said.
The Academy of Motion Picture
Arts and Sciences at an emergency
session over the weekend voted to
expel Weinstein from its organization over the sexual harassment and
rape accusations.
“We will help return the company to its rightful iconic position in
the independent film and television
industry,” Barrack said in a statement.
thomas.heath@washpost.com
michael.kranish@washpost.com
DIGEST
RETAIL
Efforts on hold to take
Nordstrom private
Nordstrom said Monday that a
founding family group had
suspended attempts to take the
department store operator
private because of difficulties in
arranging debt financing for its
bid ahead of the key holiday
shopping season.
Nordstrom shares dropped as
much as 7 percent as investors
were again reminded of the
challenges of the U.S. bricks-andmortar retail sector, which has
seen a record number of
bankruptcies this year amid
competition from e-commerce
firms such as Amazon.com and
off-price stores such as TJX.
(Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P.
Bezos owns The Washington
Post.)
Nordstrom said in June that
the family group, which owns
31.2 percent of the retailer, was
looking to take the company
private. But on Friday,
representatives of the group told
Nordstrom’s special board
committee handling the potential
deal that it had given up on those
efforts until the end of the year
because of difficulties obtaining
debt financing, according to a
Nordstrom regulatory filing.
— Reuters
VIDEO STREAMING
Netflix reports its best
third quarter ever
Netflix scored its best third
quarter on record, the video
streaming service said Monday,
its shows luring 4.45 million
customers abroad and 850,000 in
the United States.
They came at a cost. The
company is paying $6 billion for
programming in 2017 and said
Monday it will increase that by as
much as a third next year.
The company said it expects to
sign 5.05 million new customers
outside the United States in the
current fourth quarter, above the
4.66 million average of analysts’
projections. Domestically, the
company looks to come up light,
predicting 1.25 million new
subscribers, compared with
analysts’ projections of
1.63 million.
Third-quarter net income
more than doubled to
$130 million, or 29 cents a share,
the company said on its website.
office from hiring Wells Fargo as
an underwriter or investment
broker. The ban was imposed in
September 2016 and was set to
lapse after a year.
Revenue grew 30 percent to
$2.99 billion, beating estimates.
Netflix stock gained 1.6 percent
to $202.68 at the close in New
York on Monday.
— Bloomberg News
Sears said Monday that Bruce
PHARMACEUTICALS
Judge invalidates
Allergan patents
A federal judge invalidated
patents on Allergan’s dry-eye
medicine Restasis on the grounds
that the patents cover obvious
ideas, a decision that drove the
drugmaker’s shares down more
than 6 percent Monday.
Judge William Bryson issued
the ruling in federal court in
Marshall, Tex., in a long-standing
dispute between Allergan and
generic drugmakers led by Mylan
and Teva Pharmaceutical.
Allergan said it was
disappointed and plans to appeal
the ruling, which would enable
the generic drug companies to
sell their own versions of
Restasis.
The patents at issue were the
same ones Allergan transferred
to a Native American tribe in an
effort to protect them from
administrative review. The
ED JONES/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A child looks down the scope of a military sniper rifle at the Seoul
International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition on Monday.
company has said it will not
invoke the tribe’s sovereign
immunity in federal court.
— Bloomberg News
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Wells Fargo was barred by
California’s treasurer from being
hired by the state for another year
because of the bank’s fraudulent
account scandals. Treasurer John
Chiang on Monday said he
decided to leave the sanctions in
place against the bank, whose
reputation has suffered because
of revelations employees opened
bogus accounts in customers’
names to meet sales quotas.
Chiang’s decision will prevent his
Berkowitz, head of the retailer’s
second-biggest investor, resigned
from the board of directors less
than two years after he sought a
seat to help turn around the
struggling department store
chain. The decision by Berkowitz,
the head of investor fund
Fairholme Capital Management,
was not the result of a
disagreement over operations,
policy or practices, Sears said in a
statement. Fairholme’s
spokesman said the firm remains
a significant investor in Sears
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
10 a.m.: National Association of
Home Builders releases housing
market index for October.
4 p.m.: Treasury releases
international money flows data
for August.
Earnings: Goldman Sachs,
Johnson & Johnson, Morgan
Stanley, United Health Care.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
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day
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New car loan
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4:30 p.m. New York time.
Tesla stock dips after company fires ‘hundreds’ from headquarters, factory
P ETER H OLLEY
Washington Post, the company
said a similar number of “employee departures” occurred last
year. The company also noted
that the firings involved mostly
nonmanufacturing positions and
that some employees were given
bonuses and promotions after
this year’s review.
“Like all companies, Tesla conducts an annual performance
review during which a manager
and employee discuss the results
that were achieved, as well as
how those results were achieved,
during the performance period,”
the statement said.
“As with any company, especially one of over 33,000 employ-
ees, performance reviews also
occasionally result in employee
departures,” the statement added. “Tesla is continuing to grow
and hire new employees around
the world.”
The company declined to confirm how many employees had
been let go but said it plans to
backfill the vast majority of the
openings.
The San Jose Mercury News,
which first reported the firings,
said the departures included “engineers, managers and factory
workers.” Employees told the paper that they received “little or no
warnings” before the firings,
which reportedly targeted 400 to
700 employees, leading to “lowered morale through many departments.”
Juan Maldonado, a production
worker, told the paper that he
was fired last week after close to
four years at Tesla. The 48-yearold speculated that his dismissal
was the result of being late to
work on two occasions in recent
months.
“I’m going to try to find a job,”
he said.
The firings come during an
important period for the company that chief executive Elon
Musk has characterized as “production hell.” That production
surrounds the Model 3, the com-
Not ready to buy an iPhone 8? You’re not alone.
BY
H AYLEY T SUKAYAMA
We all know the drill: Every
year, Apple introduces a new
iPhone, and eager buyers rush to
pick it up.
At least, that’s how it normally
goes. But this year, the older
model iPhone 7 is enjoying a
sales bump while the new
iPhone 8 line isn’t flying off
shelves at the pace of its predecessors, according to an analyst
report on Monday.
The iPhone 7’s sales are stronger than they were for the
iPhone 6 when the iPhone 7
came out, according to the report by KeyBanc Capital Markets
analyst John Vinh. The report
was based on surveys from carrier stores.
Apple declined to comment on
the report.
At first blush, it seems odd
that an older phone would get a
sales boost when there’s a new
phone out. But it makes sense for
a few reasons. The survey results
indicate that more people are
interested in buying older
iPhones at a cheaper price than
in the past. The iPhone 7 just got
a price cut, which works for
people opting to pass on paying
more for the new iPhone 8
features, such as wireless charging or the upgraded camera.
The trend around the iPhone 7
appears to reflect a broader
notion that consumers aren’t
upgrading to the latest smartphone as frequently as they have
in the past, perhaps because
fewer must-have features are
being added to each generation.
Analysts have been signaling
this upgrade shift for years, as
growth in the smartphone market has slowed. AT&T reported
last week that it saw “nearly
900,000 fewer handset equipment upgrades” in its third quar-
pany’s first mass-market vehicle,
for which Musk has set an aggressive production schedule — one
the company has not kept pace
with.
Musk’s original goal was for
Tesla to produce 1,500 Model 3s
in the third quarter, a sizable
jump en route to increasing production to 20,000 vehicles per
month by the end of the year and
50,000 a month by the end of
next year.
But the company said earlier
this month that it had produced
only 260 of the 1,500 intended
sedans during that period, blaming production issues.
“Model 3 production was less
than anticipated due to production bottlenecks,” Tesla wrote in
an Oct. 2 investor letter. “Although the vast majority of manufacturing subsystems at both
our California car plant and our
Nevada Gigafactory are able to
operate at a high rate, a handful
have taken longer to activate
than expected.”
The company noted that there
are “no fundamental issues with
the Model 3 production or supply
chain” and said that company
officials understand “what needs
to be fixed.”
Tesla’s stock closed down
1.4 percent Monday at $350.60.
peter.holley@washpost.com
Enjoy the Breeze
in Your New
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$149/mo
PETER FOLEY/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE
Apple stores, such as this one in New York, have seen an increase in sales of the older model iPhone 7.
The iPhone 8 has the added challenge of sitting in the shadow
of the upcoming iPhone X, which comes out Nov. 3.
ter this year, compared with last
year.
The iPhone 8 also has the
added challenge of sitting in the
shadow of the upcoming iPhone
X, Vinh said. “Feedback from
stores indicates customers are
waiting to purchase the iPhone
X or to compare the iPhone X
before buying the iPhone 8,” he
wrote.
Apple used to release sales
numbers for the first weekend
that new phones went on the
market, but the company
stopped the practice with the
iPhone 7 in 2016. The firm told
the Wall Street Journal that
those numbers weren’t as relevant anymore, as its phones
often sell out — in other words,
sales were largely driven by how
many phones it could make
rather than how many people
wanted to buy. The company is
expected to give investors numbers on how the iPhone 8 and
iPhone 8 Plus are selling on Nov.
2, when it reports its latest
earnings.
What is clear, though, is that
Apple’s decision to launch a
premium phone above the
iPhone 8 and 8 Plus is shaking
up how consumers are looking at
new iPhones this fall.
Still, we won’t get a full picture of whether Apple fans want
to upgrade this time until the
iPhone X comes out Nov. 3 and
the full slate of smartphones are
on sale. For now, the slowing
iPhone 8 sales are just a trend to
flag, rather than cause for fullscale panic, analysts said.
“We view this trend as modestly worrisome,” Vinh wrote.
hayley.tsukayama@washpost.com
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BY
Tesla’s stock closed down
slightly Monday following news
over the weekend that it had fired
“hundreds of workers” in recent
days as a result of annual performance reviews.
While the firings come as the
company is experiencing significant production delays affecting
the Model 3, Tesla said the dismissals — which involved hundreds of employees, according to
some reports — were unrelated to
those delays and would have no
effect on the vehicle’s continued
rollout.
In a statement emailed to The
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
American Express case D.C. start-up incubator 1776 merges with Pa. firm
to be heard by high court
BY
BY
G REG S TOHR
The U.S. Supreme Court accepted a case that could roil the credit
card business, agreeing to consider reviving government allegations that American Express
thwarts competition by prohibiting merchants from steering customers to cards with lower fees.
A federal appeals court had
thrown out the lawsuit, saying the
U.S. government and 11 states
failed to prove that the American
Express rules harmed cardholders, as well as merchants.
The Supreme Court’s decision to
take the case offers new hope to
retailers trying to reduce the
$50 billion in fees they pay to credit
card companies each year. It’s a
boost for Discover Card Services,
which says the rules undercut its
ability to compete with American
Express.
The states asked the Supreme
Court to intervene, pointing to the
“astronomical number” of credit
card transactions each year —
22 billion totaling more than
$2 trillion in 2011, according to
court documents.
“Whether assessed from the
perspective of consumers or from
that of merchants, this case’s importance cannot be overstated,”
Ohio officials argued.
While the Justice Department
also sued American Express, it
didn’t join the appeal to the Supreme Court. The Trump administration said that, while the appeals
court’s ruling was wrong, the case
didn’t meet the Supreme Court’s
usual standards for review.
The justices will hear arguments early next year and rule by
June.
Antitrust enforcers accused
American Express of using its leverage over merchants to thwart
competition from cards that
would charge retailers lower fees.
American Express’s agreements
with retailers contain an “antisteering” provision that bars them
from doing anything to encourage
the use of competing cards, such
as offering discounts.
The Justice Department and
states said the effect was to thwart
rivals like Discover, which tried in
the 1990s to adopt a low-cost business model.
The lawsuits originally targeted
Visa and MasterCard over their
anti-steering policies as well.
Those two companies settled the
claims in 2010.
The case is Ohio v. American
Express.
— Bloomberg News
A ARON G REGG
District start-up 1776 has
merged with a Philadelphia-based
co-working space called Benjamin’s Desk, a company spokeswoman confirmed Monday, capping off a slew of executive departures and false starts for the fledgling tech incubator.
Evan Burfield, 1776’s chief executive, will cede leadership to Benjamin’s Desk co-executives Anthony Maher and Jennifer Maher,
who will become co-executives of
1776. The combined company will
be branded 1776 and function with
separate headquarters in Philadelphia and the District. The company’s venture fund will continue
to operate as a separate legal entity owned by 1776 investors.
“We believe that the expanded
1776 represents a next-generation
model for what incubators can be,
how they can help entrepreneurs
launch and scale, and how they
can serve their communities,”
Burfield said in an email. “Over
the coming months, we look forward to revealing more of that
expanded vision.” Burfield will
serve as executive chairman of the
combined company.
The Mahers, who are in-laws,
say they want to expand the incubator’s influence along the East
Coast. “We are focused on making
economic impact at every level,
from individual entrepreneurs to
city government to higher education institutions,” Anthony Maher
said.
Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The start-up incubator has
rarely offered details of its transactions, making it hard to determine whether the operation is
financially sustainable. Three
people familiar with 1776’s finances who spoke on the condition of
anonymity because they were not
authorized to speak on the record
told The Washington Post that
1776 struggled to stay cash-flow
positive after its first year as new
investments weighed heavily on
its books.
A person close to the deal who
was not authorized to discuss the
matter described it as a complicated stock merger in which shareholders of both companies hold
significant ownership interests in
the combined company, with current 1776 shareholders investing
new capital in the combined firm
as part of the deal. There was no
cash component, the person said.
News of a potential merger was
first reported in mid-September
by Glen Hellman, a business consultant and executive coach who
runs a tech blog.
The incubator was founded in
the District in 2013 with the help
of a $200,000 city government
grant, and it quickly attracted
funding from AOL co-founder
Steve Case and his wife, Jean. Under the terms of the grant, 1776
was required to stay in the District
for five years.
It was part of a broader effort by
then-Mayor Vincent C. Gray to
nurture technology companies in
the District. That push also included a $32.5 million tax break
awarded to LivingSocial, the oncehighflying daily-deals company
that ended up laying off hundreds
of staffers and being absorbed by
Groupon, its chief rival.
The goal of 1776 has been to help
fledgling tech companies build
businesses in regulated industries
such as health care, energy and
transportation, by leveraging the
city’s government institutions and
connections. Co-founder Donna
Harris used the term “regulatory
hacking” to refer to the building of
unique technology businesses
around government.
Some of 1776’s early alumni became mainstays of the District’s
start-up scene, but none became
the sort of job-creating juggernaut
Gray had in mind. A company
called Social Tables expanded to
an office of its own and hired more
than 100 employees after getting
its start at 1776. The transportation-focused RideScout app was
eventually bought by European
auto company Daimler.
The incubator soon started
reaching beyond Washington. It
launched an international “Challenge Cup” competition for startups, with $50,000 checks for the
winners. It recruited investors for
a $12.5 million venture fund to
make small investments in earlystage start-ups, but many of the
fund’s investments went to startups outside the D.C. area.
It tried to break into Silicon
Valley when it bought a San
Francisco-based incubator called
Hatters, only to divest its holdings
after two years. It branched out to
New York’s Brooklyn Navy Yard
last year, but that expansion plan
has been complicated by the departure of Rachel Haot, the former
New York City official hired to run
the Brooklyn location. She left the
firm in August. A 1776 spokeswoman said the company will continue its New York expansion after
the merger.
The incubator opened its first
international campus in Dubai
last summer, but last week Burfield declined to say whether 1776
would continue its Dubai operations after the merger.
Burfield’s decision to cede leadership to the Mahers means the
incubator’s executive leadership
team is based primarily in Philadelphia, where the Mahers live.
Jennifer Maher will split her time
between the two headquarters.
aaron.gregg@washpost.com
Bible museum
hopes to connect
with its visitors
MUSEUM FROM A1
floor after gleaming floor of exhibitions, there is very little Jesus.
This isn’t the evangelism that
the billionaire Green family first
promised a decade ago when they
set out to build a museum dedicated to Scripture. At the time, the
museum’s mission statement
promised to “bring to life the
living word of God . . . to inspire
confidence in the absolute authority” of the Bible, the book at
the institution’s center.
The approach today, while still
viewed with skepticism by some
scholars, appears to be more modest: “The museum has fence posts
— limits. It doesn’t overtly say the
Bible is good — that the Bible is
true,” said Steve Green, the Hobby
Lobby chief executive and chair of
the museum. “That’s not its role.
Its role is to present facts and let
people make their own decisions.”
Much has changed in the years
since the Greens began building
the museum. Their company became a byword not just for craft
supplies but also for a battle in the
Supreme Court against all forms
of mandatory contraception coverage for employees. The family’s
lightning-fast acquisition of
troves of historic artifacts wound
up in federal court, landing them
a $3 million fine for trafficking in
thousands of smuggled goods.
And Washington changed, too —
from a capital where white evangelical Christians felt they were
under attack to one where the
man they voted for in overwhelming numbers, President Trump, is
shaking up the halls of power just
blocks from the new museum.
In this new moment in America, the museum that is set to open
Nov. 17 has a simpler message for
the nation, a pitch that seems to
have more to do with capturing
the attention of a distracted populace than with saving souls. All
the museum asks about the Bible:
Just try reading it.
A shift toward neutrality
The museum, which will be
among the largest in a city chockfull of museums, presents broad,
sometimes abstract concepts
about the Bible, communicated
through cutting-edge technology
and immersive experiences.
Children’s arcade games about
“courage.” A sensory room with
images of animals, minor-key music and creaking boat sounds
meant to evoke the “chaos” on
board Noah’s Ark (a marked contrast from the Ark Encounter recently opened in Kentucky, which
presents a life-size literal vision of
Genesis). And many, many examples of the Bible’s effect on things
as diverse as calendar systems,
fashion and language — most presented without overt judgment
on whether that influence was
good or bad.
The point, staff members say, is
simply to engage an America that
is losing its connection with the
Bible.
“Our goal isn’t to give answers
but to arouse curiosity,” said Seth
Pollinger, a biblical scholar who is
the director of the 430,000square-foot museum’s content.
The nonprofit museum’s projects also include a high school
Bible curriculum that organizers
hope will be used in schools
around the world and a research
arm that invites scholars to study
Green’s massive collection of artifacts. Admission to the museum
will be free.
Mark Noll, one of the country’s
most prominent experts on American Christian history, served as
an adviser. He compared the Museum of the Bible to the Newseum, another huge private museum.
“Obviously the museum is
there to make people think better
or think kindly about the effects
of Scripture in U.S. history,” he
said. “But I did think they were
trying to be as nonpartisan as
they could.”
Some remain skeptical that the
museum’s viewpoint will be neutral. Steven Friesen, an officer at
the Society of Biblical Literature,
the largest association of biblical
scholars, said there is debate in
the academic community about
whether to do research involving
the Greens’ collection. He would
advise fellow scholars to steer
clear.
Friesen hasn’t seen the museum, but he believes from reading the website that its materials
subtly promote a singular version
of Scripture; indeed, the museum
mostly omits discussion about
how the Bible was compiled and
which religious traditions believe
which disputed books belong in
the Bible. Museum staffers say the
place for discussing issues such as
sexuality and abortion, which
aren’t mentioned in the exhibits,
might be at events hosted at the
museum; Friesen thinks those
events are meant to draw in influ-
Canadian plane maker
could avoid import tax
BY
A ARON G REGG
Canadian jet maker Bombardier announced Monday that it is
selling a controlling stake in its
100-to-150-seat C-series jetliner to
European manufacturer Airbus,
just weeks after the U.S. Commerce Department moved to impose 300 percent tariffs on the
plane. The companies also said
they will expand the plane’s production to a new facility in Mobile,
Ala., a move that could help it
avoid the import duty.
Executives from Airbus and
Bombardier touted the deal’s U.S.
job-creation potential.
“This is a win-win for everybody,” Airbus chief executive Tom
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
The children’s area at the Museum of the Bible, like the rest of the exhibit space, is designed to foster visitors’ curiosity about the Bible.
ential people to hear the Greens’
opinions on the culture wars.
“My guess is that they’ve
worked very hard at covering
what they would like to do, trying
to hide the agenda that is behind
the museum,” he said, defining
that agenda as the promotion of
their deep faith in the literal truth
of the Bible.
Led by evangelicals,
listening to everyone
The Bible has shaped cultures
from Africa to Asia, Muslim to
Mormon. But the 20-member
leadership of the museum is almost entirely white, male and
evangelical.
Grant Wacker, an expert on
Christian history, said that he
declined an invitation to join the
leadership team because he was
asked to sign a statement of faith.
Wacker said he considers himself
an evangelical Christian but that
the statement went too far for
him.
“It stressed, shall we say, factual accuracy [of the Bible] more
than I could endorse,” he said.
Instead, he agreed to be one of
the many scholars from diverse
religious traditions to weigh in on
drafts of some of the museum
displays. The leadership team
sought input repeatedly during
the three-year construction process from experts from Protestant,
Catholic, Jewish and secular
backgrounds.
Pollinger said that originally,
the museum planned to discuss
historical evidence that demonstrates proof of the stories in the
Enders said in a statement. “Not
only will this partnership secure
the C Series and its industrial operations in Canada, the U.K. and
China, but we also bring new jobs
to the U.S.”
The deal included no upfront
cash payment, a possible reflection of the plane’s enormous production costs. When the deal closes, Airbus will own just over half of
the C-series plane, Bombardier
will own 31 percent, and a Canadian state investment agency will
own the remaining 19 percent.
The combination significantly
complicates what had been a
Bible. Eventually, the team decided to drop that idea; instead, the
historical section documents the
Bible’s spread across the world,
and it even shows the Bible’s roots
in other ancient cultures, opening
the door to the suggestion that
biblical stories predate Judaism
and Christianity.
When the leaders sought input
from African American scholars,
they revised their panel on the
importance of the biblical Exodus
story, spirituals and black churches in fortifying the African American community during and after
slavery. With the input of Jewish
scholars, they added lines to the
script of a film to be shown at the
museum so it includes not just
Protestant biblical interpretation
but also more context about the
development of the rabbinical
Talmud.
The team dodged a host of
modern-day controversial topics
by ending its tapestry that illustrates U.S. history in 1963 with the
Rev. Martin Luther King’s “I Have
a Dream” speech (rich in Bible
verses).
Soothing divisions
in a troubled time
Housed in a former design center at Fourth and D streets SW, the
museum is built to awe from the
first moment visitors pass
through two 40-foot, 2.5-ton
bronze doors showing the text of
Genesis 1 — backward, in Latin.
The feeling inside is just as soaring, with much of the interior
made of imported Jerusalem
stone.
The museum could quickly become a popular draw for evangelical families — about one-quarter
of the U.S. population — for whom
the Bible is daily reading in many
homes. In a 2014 Pew Research
Center poll, 45 percent of Americans said they seldom or never
read Scripture, but 63 percent of
evangelicals said they read it at
least once a week.
Some conservative evangelicals might be frustrated with
parts of the museum, both in
what is and isn’t there. This museum doesn’t try to prove the
historical veracity of the Bible or
argue that Earth is about 6,000
years old, as the Creation Museum in Kentucky does. It devotes
a display to the Virgin Mary, a
biblical figure who evangelicals
say has been elevated too highly
by Catholics. “Some people are
going to walk up and say, ‘That’s
not the Bible,’ ” Pollinger said
about the historic paintings in the
museum that depict Mary as a
saint.
Jesus is also curiously not central to the museum’s presentation
of the biblical story. Visitors walk
through a multiroom saga of the
Old Testament, and they can visit
a re-creation of a 1st-century village in Galilee where actors will
tell them what the villagers think
of this controversial preacher Jesus. They can watch a movie
about John the Baptist. But the
story of Jesus’ crucifixion and
resurrection is almost absent.
The museum opens at a moment of fierce conflicts about religion — from Trump’s comments
about athletes kneeling during
the national anthem, to the battle
between conservative religious
rights and LGBT rights, to a host
of other sensitive issues. Pollinger
said many advisers to the museum were motivated by a desire
to soothe the supercharged climate around religion in American public life.
“Rather than fragment into
greater hostility, this is a time to
find out how we can work for the
good,” Pollinger said. “This is a
time to . . . find out how we can
learn from difference.”
The question for the museum
and its small army of diverse
advisers will be how well the stated goal of being nonsectarian can
be balanced with the history of
the museum’s leadership.
Mark DeMoss, a museum
board member and prominent
evangelical public relations executive, said people just need to get
in the door and see for themselves.
“I know no one person or two or
three people are responsible for
the story of how the Bible is being
told in this museum. It’s the product of dozens and dozens of people from a wide range of backgrounds,” he said. “The fact that it
is as broad and ecumenical and
nonsectarian as it is, I think there
will be criticism from the religious left and the religious right
— which would mean to me that
we probably got it just about
right.”
three-way trade dispute between
the United States, Canada and
Britain. With Airbus’s ownership
of the C-series aircraft, the dispute
now touches France, Germany
and Spain, where Airbus has a
significant presence.
The dispute started in May,
when Chicago-based aerospace
company Boeing asked the Commerce Department to investigate
allegations that Bombardier is selling the C-series plane in the United
States at an unfairly low price and
doing so with the help of illegal
government subsidies. Bombardier had earlier struck a deal to sell
75 C-series CS100 jets to Atlantabased Delta Air Lines.
In two rulings over the past few
weeks, the Commerce Department ruled in Boeing’s favor on
both counts and imposed a preliminary 300 percent tariff on
Bombardier planes. The International Trade Commission, a quasijudicial U.S. agency that has the
final say in such disputes, is expected to issue a final decision on
the matter in February.
Bombardier and Airbus started
discussing a potential sale in August, three months after Boeing
first filed its tariff petition with the
Commerce Department, an Airbus executive said Monday.
In its published reactions to
Airbus and Bombardier’s combination, Boeing sought to cast the
deal as a blatant attempt to circumvent U.S. trade law.
“This looks like a questionable
deal between two heavily statesubsidized competitors to skirt
the recent findings of the U.S. government,” a Boeing spokesman
said in a statement Monday. “Our
position remains that everyone
should play by the same rules for
free and fair trade to work.”
michelle.boorstein@washpost.com
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
sarah.bailey@washpost.com
aaron.gregg@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
SU
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
EPA chief orders agency to limit extent of settlements
BY
J ULIET E ILPERIN
Environmental
Protection
Agency Administrator Scott
Pruitt issued a directive on Monday to limit the extent to which
the EPA can reach legal agreements with groups suing to force
it to take regulatory action.
Ending the practice known as
“sue and settle” has long been a
top priority for conservatives
and business groups. In recent
years, especially under the
Obama administration, the EPA
and other agencies resolved litigation over delays in issuing
rules by agreeing to specific
timelines to act and reimbursing
plaintiffs’ attorney fees.
In a news briefing, Pruitt said
he was taking action to ensure
that consent decrees “are not
used in an abusive fashion to
subvert due process” and to exclude the public from weighing
in.
“It’s very important that we do
not get engaged in regulation
through litigation,” he said. “This
is something that is a long time
coming with respect to this agency.”
Pruitt said his action will not
bar the EPA from reaching settlements with outside litigants but
that he wanted to block any
agreements “changing a discretionary duty to a nondiscretionary duty.”
He said it also was important
to end the payout of attorney
fees, since such settlements have
“no prevailing party” and some
payments are part of informal
agreements that cannot be easily
tracked.
The directive will provide for
greater disclosure of potential
settlements by directing the EPA
to publish any notice of intent to
sue within 15 days of receiving it,
contacting states and any other
entities potentially affected by
such suits, and posting any proposed or modified consent decrees and settlements for a 30day public comment period.
It represents the latest example of how Pruitt is changing
federal policy he once challenged in court. In 2014, while
serving as Oklahoma’s attorney
general, he joined forces with
the Domestic Energy Producers
Alliance to file suit against the
Interior Department and U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service on the
grounds that they had used a
“sue and settle” strategy with an
environmental group to list several imperiled species.
But his push is part of a
broader effort by the Trump
administration to limit federal
funding to outside groups as part
of litigation. In June, Attorney
General Jeff Sessions issued a
memo to block payments to
third-party, not-for-profit groups
as part of environmental settlements. Instead of allowing defendants to fund environmental
measures as a way of meeting
their obligations for violating the
law, Sessions said, such penalties
should go to the U.S. treasury.
The attorney general is “keenly interested and supportive of
what we’re doing,” Pruitt said,
adding that “other agencies are
taking notice as well.”
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
EPA head Scott Pruitt wants to curb the practice known as “sue and settle” with outside groups.
Environmentalists on Monday
questioned Pruitt’s motivations.
“There’s a general hostility to
citizen enforcement of environmental laws, and it reflects the
fact that Pruitt doesn’t want
these laws enforced,” said Pat
Gallagher, legal director for the
Sierra Club.
The Sierra Club and government watchdog groups question
whether Pruitt’s directive — inspired by a memorandum that
Attorney General Edwin Meese
issued in 1986 and that in 1991
was codified in the Code of
Regulations — will have much
direct impact. The Clean Air Act
and other environmental laws
provide citizens and outside
groups broad latitude to sue the
EPA when it fails to meet statutory deadlines, and the judge
handling such cases typically determines the amount of legal fees
the government must pay as part
of any consent decree.
“That’s not his decision to
make,” John Walke, director of
the Natural Resources Defense
Council’s Clean Air Project, said
in an interview Monday. “A judge
can impose attorney fees when
an agency violates the law and
citizens file suit to hold the
government accountable.”
Pruitt emphasized that some
agreements the Obama administration reached with environmental groups, such as one
aimed at curbing regional haze,
were forged without input from
affected states. In that particular
case, he noted, North Dakota
sought to intervene but was
excluded. Nonetheless, the consent decree “imposed obligations” on North Dakota because
federal officials found the state’s
plan to control pollution insufficient.
“It’s like these groups have an
additional step in the process to
influence the policy,” said Daren
Bakst, a research fellow in agricultural policy at the Heritage
Foundation.
Bakst welcomed the idea of
barring payment of plaintiffs’
legal fees, saying, “You want to
eliminate the financial incentives for these groups to bring
these actions.”
The Government Accountability Office, which published a
2014 report on the EPA’s practice
of settling with outside groups,
found that the agreements it
examined had only “limited” impact on the agency’s rulemaking
process. In February, a GAO report on endangered species
found “settlement agreements
did not affect the substantive
basis or procedural rule-making
requirements” that agencies pursued.
Pruitt, who will brief conservatives on this and other policy
initiatives at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on Tuesday, said he was not closing the
door on settlements altogether.
In May, for example, the agency
struck a deal with a Canadian
company hoping to build a massive gold, copper and molybdenum mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay
watershed, which will allow it to
apply for federal permits.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
Lawmakers seek to restore DEA’s power to crack down on opioid distributors
world has a drug problem,” he
said. “We’re going to do something about it.”
Asked by a reporter whether he
would be declaring the epidemic
a national emergency, as he first
promised in August but has not
yet done, Trump said, “We’re going to be doing that next week.”
A presidential declaration
could allow the administration to
remove some bureaucratic barriers and waive some federal rules
governing how states and localities respond to the drug epidemic. One such rule restricts where
Medicaid recipients can receive
addiction treatment.
The president also said he had
not yet spoken with Marino about
the Post/“60 Minutes” report, but
if he determines that Marino’s
work was detrimental to the administration’s goal of combating
opioid addiction, “I will make a
change.”
On Monday, Democrats called
on Trump to quickly discard Marino in the wake of the report,
which detailed how a targeted
lobbying effort helped weaken
the Drug Enforcement Administration’s ability to go after drug
distributors, even as opioid-related deaths continue to rise.
Senate
Minority
Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said
nominating the Pennsylvania
lawmaker for drug czar “is like
putting the wolf in charge of the
henhouse. The American people
deserve someone totally committed to fighting the opioid crisis,
not someone who’s labored on
behalf of the drug industry.”
Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.)
said he was “horrified” to read
details of the investigation and
called for Trump to drop Marino
because “there’s no way that in
having the title of the drug czar
that you’ll be taken seriously or
effectively by anyone in West Virginia and the communities that
have been affected by this.”
Manchin told “CBS Evening
News” on Monday that the bill’s
intent was “camouflaged” so that
“all of us were fooled. All of us.
Nobody knew!” He added, “That
bill has to be retracted, has to be
repealed.”
Marino was first floated as a
potential DEA administrator last
spring but withdrew from consideration, citing a family illness.
The White House formally nominated him for the post in September. The Senate Judiciary Committee has yet to set a date for his
confirmation hearing because
Marino has not sent back answers
to a written questionnaire that all
nominees must complete before a
hearing, a spokesman said.
Members of the committee
didn’t immediately answer requests for comment on the nomination, or declined to comment.
Ultimately, Marino could be confirmed by the Senate with a simple majority vote.
Across Capitol Hill, congressional Democrats and at least one
Republican, Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.), announced plans to
address the report’s findings.
Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)
said Monday that she would introduce legislation to repeal the
Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of
2016. The law, she said, “has
significantly affected the government’s ability to crack down on
opioid distributors that are failing to meet their obligations and
endangering our communities.”
McCaskill, as the top Democrat
on the Senate Homeland Security
and Governmental Affairs Committee, has used her perch to
probe opioid manufacturers and
is pushing them for sales and
marketing materials, studies of
potential addictions, and whether the firms are donating to thirdparty advocacy groups that
champion their work. It was unclear Monday afternoon how
much support her bill would receive and whether it would be
taken up for a vote in the GOPcontrolled House and Senate.
Sen. Richard Blumenthal (DConn.) also called for Trump to
withdraw Marino’s nomination,
saying in an interview that “the
head of that office is supposed to
be a watchdog, not a lap dog. He
obviously is much more an industry representative than he is a
whistleblower or watchdog.”
“It will be ugly” if Trump continues with the nomination, Blumenthal said.
In the House, at least two Democrats — Reps. Gerald E. Connolly
(Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.)
— were working on bills that
would rescind the thresholds put
in place by Marino’s bill and give
the DEA more authority to suspend a distributor’s license. Sinema is partnering with Fitzpatrick.
Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.), an
original co-sponsor of Marino’s
legislation, said he supported the
bill on behalf of a small drug
distributor in Burlington, Vt.,
that had concerns about how the
DEA worked with drug companies. He called on the House
Oversight and Energy and Commerce committees to hold hearings on the legislation that would
include testimony from current
and former DEA officials.
One of Marino’s home-state
senators, Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr.
(D-Pa.), is withholding judgment
on Marino’s nomination, but a
spokesman for the senator said
that he believes the congressman
“should be asked to address this
matter.” Casey also believes that
the legislation Marino backed
“should be repealed immediately
and DEA’s authority to hold drug
distributors to tough standards
should be restored,” said spokesman John Rizzo.
Manchin, McCaskill and Casey
face reelection next year in rural
states that Trump won. Despite
their concerns, they did not op-
pose the legislation when it
passed in the Senate last year by
unanimous consent. McCaskill
was away from Congress for three
months for breast cancer treatment when the bill passed.
Manchin said in the Post interview that his aides responsible for
tracking drug policy had raised
concerns about Marino’s legislation as it worked its way through
Congress last year.
“They had questions and they
had concerns from the beginning,
but they were laid to rest by the
DEA. We’re going to find out how
that could happen and why,”
Manchin said.
As an alternative to Marino,
Manchin suggested that Trump
consider nominating Joseph T.
Rannazzisi to head the DEA. Rannazzisi ran the DEA division responsible for regulating the drug
industry and led a decade-long
campaign of aggressive enforcement until he was forced out of
the agency in 2015.
If Trump prefers to nominate a
partisan figure, “we can find a
Republican who has a passion
because of the devastation to
their own family. That won’t be
hard to find in America, I can
assure you that,” Manchin said.
Fallout from the investigation
also has spread to electoral politics. Rep. Marsha Blackburn (RTenn.), who is running for the
Senate in a state that has been hit
hard by the opioid crisis, is also
fielding attacks for being a lead
sponsor of Marino’s bill.
James Mackler, the Senate
race’s Democratic front-runner,
criticized Blackburn for her involvement, saying in a statement
late Sunday: “Tennesseans need a
senator that will stand up for
them rather than catering to special interests and corporate lobbyists.
“That Congresswoman Blackburn would champion legislation
like this while Tennesseans face
an opioid epidemic is all one
needs to know about her priorities,” he said.
In April 2016, a handful of
members of Congress, allied with
the nation’s major drug distributors, prevailed upon the DEA and
the Justice Department to agree
to the more industry-friendly legislation, undermining efforts to
stanch the flow of pain pills,
according to the Post/“60 Minutes” investigation. The DEA had
opposed the effort for years.
The law was the crowning
achievement of a multifaceted
campaign by the drug industry to
weaken aggressive DEA enforcement efforts against drug distribution companies that were supplying corrupt doctors and pharmacists who peddled narcotics to
the black market. The industry
worked behind the scenes with
lobbyists and key members of
Congress, pouring more than
$1 million into their election campaigns.
The chief advocate of the law
that hobbled the DEA was Marino, who spent years trying to
move it through Congress. It
passed after Sen. Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah) negotiated a final version with the DEA.
Hatch defended his support of
the legislation and Marino on
Monday, saying in a statement
that he “does not believe one
flawed report should derail a
nominee who has a long history
of fighting illegal drug use and of
helping individuals with chronic
conditions obtain treatment.”
“Let’s not ignore the full story
here in the rush toward easy
politics,” Hatch added.
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
scott.higham@washpost.com
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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letters@washpost.com
Send this extremist into retirement
EDITORIALS
‘Drug dealers in lab coats’
Government breakdowns contributed to a crippling of DEA enforcement against opioid distributors.
M
porters Scott Higham and Lenny Bernstein is appalling. They report that a DEA effort was undertaken in
the mid-2000s to target drug distribution companies
that were shipping unusually large volumes of opioids. For example, one midsize distributor had
shipped 20 million doses to pharmacies in West
Virginia over five years; 11 million doses went to one
county alone with a population of 25,000 people.
Some pharmacies in Florida were nothing more than
illicit drug dens, with streams of customers arriving
in vans from Appalachia. “Back home, each 30-pill
bottle of oxycodone was worth $900,” The Post reports. By going after the distributors, the DEA hoped
to stanch this deadly trade. The DEA brought at least
17 enforcement cases against 13 drug distributors and
one manufacturer under a hard-charging head of the
Office of Diversion Control, Joseph T. Rannazzisi.
Then the rules changed. The DEA originally could
freeze drug shipments that posed an “imminent
danger” to the community, giving the agency broad
authority to act. In 2014, the industry launched an
effort to slow enforcement by changing the standard.
One fight ends
but another flares
The legislation was sponsored by Rep. Tom Marino
(R-Pa.) and aided by former DEA officials who went
through the revolving door to help the drug companies. Some DEA officials pushed back; one wrote the
bill “is fixing a problem that doesn’t need fixing.” At
one point, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. spoke
out against the legislation, but over time, and after
Mr. Holder left office, it sailed through Congress by
unanimous consent and was signed by the president.
The new law requires the DEA to show that a company’s actions represent “a substantial likelihood of an
imminent threat,” a much higher threshold. Predictably, enforcement actions plummeted. Not a single
immediate suspension order has targeted a distributor or manufacturer since late 2015 at a time when
overdose deaths are skyrocketing.
All this adds up to disgraceful conduct. Congress
must put teeth back in DEA enforcement. President
Trump suggested Monday he will reexamine Mr. Marino’s nomination as drug czar. He should withdraw it,
and Mr. Marino instead should be held to account for
kneecapping the DEA’s opioid enforcement effort.
TOM TOLES
Tensions that have gone unaddressed
in Iraq could cause new conflict.
F
OR A year and more, Iraqi leaders and the
U.S.-led coalition that joined them to fight
the Islamic State ignored warnings that
unless cleavages among Iraq’s ethnic groups
over territory and political authority were addressed, a victory over the terrorists would be
followed by yet more civil conflict. Now, within
days of the fall of the last major Islamic State-held
Iraqi town, that fight may be beginning. A forceful
move by Iraqi troops and allied Shiite militias into
the city of Kirkuk on Sunday, accompanied by
scattered fighting with retreating Kurdish forces,
threatens to touch off a wider sectarian war.
The president of Iraq’s Kurdistan region, Masoud
Barzani, did much to provoke the intervention by
the Iraqi federal government of Haider al-Abadi.
Seeking to bolster his own political position,
Mr. Barzani insisted on staging a referendum on
independence last month despite Mr. Abadi’s
strong opposition and that of the United States,
Kurdistan’s closest ally. He then extended the vote
to areas in and around Kirkuk, even though they
are outside the Kurdistan autonomous region.
Kurdish forces now have been forced to yield key
positions in Kirkuk, including the airport, a
military base and several oil fields. In a sign of the
internal disarray that should have forestalled
Mr. Barzani’s referendum, some reports said that
Kurdish fighters under the control of a political
party opposed to him may have agreed to hand over
the sites without opposition. U.S. officials, for their
part, described the takeover as “coordinated movements, not attacks,” even though a number of
people were killed in combat in and around the city.
Much will now depend on whether Mr. Abadi’s
forces, and the Shiite militias under Iranian
command, press their advantage or pause to
negotiate. Kirkuk and its oil fields have long been
disputed territory; never-implemented provisions
of Iraq’s current constitution call for a referendum
on its future status. That is one of the key disputes
that Iraqi leaders dodged during the war against
the Islamic State, even though it was clear that it
The Oct. 13 editorial “Puerto Rico’s unacceptable
state” continued to promote the myth in the minds
of the public that our government has no other
immediate and urgent economic and social crisis
on its hands in the Caribbean. What of the U.S.
Virgin Islands? The dual-hurricane devastation of
the U.S. Virgin Islands has been erased from the
news as though it doesn’t exist.
Apparently, our president never got the word
about the U.S. Virgin Islands catastrophes during
his one-day quickie trip to Puerto Rico, where he
staged a shameful photo op in which he tossed paper towels, or when he insulted the mayor of
San Juan, questioned the efforts of the local people
and threatened to limit the aid they would receive.
The U.S. Virgin Islands’ tourism trade is its
critical revenue stream and job creator to support
its economy, and residents depend on shipments
from Puerto Rico as a source of food, medicine,
general merchandise and construction materials.
Its residents also fly the American flag, read The
Post and vote in local elections.
Reg Mitchell, Bethesda
The emissions aren’t equivalent
would surface immediately afterward.
Other unaddressed troubles are festering. The
Shiite-led government has done little to rebuild
majority-Sunni cities destroyed in the war, including Fallujah and Mosul, and nothing to delegate
more power to their leaders. The result is that
Iraqi Sunnis, many of whom supported or tolerated the Islamic State for sectarian reasons, may be
open to backing other Sunni militants, including
al-Qaeda.
Mr. Abadi has long promised to address the
country’s sectarian divisions and appears genuine-
against Muslims, though Justice Sonia Sotomayor
would have kept the decision in place.
The high court’s ruling didn’t touch a second case
challenging the ban’s prohibition on refugee entry
into the United States. But when that provision of the
second order expires in late October, it’s likely that the
justices will take the same approach.
This means that the groups fighting Mr. Trump’s
order will have to begin their battle against the third
ban before the district court judges who heard their
original complaints, instead of folding their challenge to the new order into the lawsuits already
before the Supreme Court. In fact, they’re doing so
now. And several new suits have been filed as well.
They have a harder argument to make. In part
because of the Supreme Court’s ruling, the new ban is
on stronger legal footing. It’s the result — at least on
paper — of interagency review, rather than the president’s whims. It includes two non-Muslim countries
and one country with a significant Christian popula-
ly willing to do so, but he has been hamstrung by
opposition from Shiite hard-liners with Iranian
backing. Kurdish moderates who believed the
region should repair its crumbling political system,
or negotiate with Baghdad, were steamrolled by
Mr. Barzani. The United States, which once worked
hard to broker sectarian deals in Iraq, walked away
from such hard work several years ago. Both the
Obama and Trump administrations have claimed
that the only U.S. interest in Iraq is destroying the
Islamic State. The consequences of that blinkered
view can now be clearly seen in Kirkuk.
tion. Despite the judiciary’s aggression in striking
down past iterations of the travel ban, judges may be
more hesitant this time to rule against the president,
who typically enjoys broad leeway in immigration
cases.
This does not make the travel ban any wiser or less
cruel. The latest version may be less obviously discriminatory against Muslims, but that doesn’t mean
that limiting travel from a jumble of countries —
including a close counterterrorism partner of the
United States — will have any benefit to Americans’
safety.
Many rulings against the earlier travel bans moved
out well ahead of settled law to swipe at Mr. Trump.
On the third round of this legal battle, the lower
courts have a chance to consider the president’s policy
with cooler heads. But whether the Trump administration can successfully defend the revised travel ban
in court is a separate question from whether the ban is
good policy. That much is clear: It isn’t.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Our Nationals treasure
How can the D.C. area ever thank the Lerners for
the joy they have brought to our region? The
Nationals team has been such a vital part of our lives
and our city. If it were not for the
Lerners, we would not be enjoying
such wonderful memories — even
with the disappointments. It is not
just the game but also the wonderful role models they bring to our
youths. The Nationals players are
perfect examples of professionalism, character and talent. We love
our team. While it hurts to lose, we
know it hurts the team more. We watched all the
games, even those played on the West Coast. We were
waving our red flags and thanking the players all the
way. Because of them, we look forward to heading to
A forgotten devastation
If the assertions Dan Balz made in his Oct. 15
Sunday Take column, “Trump overloads circuits in
governing by disruption,” are correct, why is President Trump’s governing style resonating with some
Americans? Are the vast majority of Trump supporters expecting innovation after the disruption?
Over the past two decades, disruptive innovation
has been discussed, debated and honed as a
management theory. In their 2015 Harvard Business
Review article “What is disruptive innovation?”
Clayton M. Christensen, Michael E. Raynor and
Rory McDonald argued that success is not the best
lens through which to examine disruption: “Some
disruptive innovations succeed; some don’t.”
Perhaps, during Mr. Trump’s time in office, he will
continue to govern by disruption and it will have the
unintended consequence of purging the leaders in
the House and Senate in 2018. It appears congressional leaders have bludgeoned their respective
caucuses into accepting legislative captivity and a
lack of innovation.
Mark M. Spradley, Chevy Chase
Lawsuits against the latest version might have less legal success, but that doesn’t make this good policy.
T
The Oct. 14 editorial “The real extremist in
Virginia politics” was right on target. I live in
Virginia’s 13th District and for far too many years
have been embarrassed by the fact that Del. Robert
G. Marshall (R-Prince William) represents my district in Richmond. I was surprised, however, that the
editorial failed to mention that in his
quarter-century as a delegate, it’s impossible to
identify a single piece of positive and successful
legislation from him, unless routine “commemoratives” are considered positive. The editorial also
could have noted that Mr. Marshall is so antiimmigration that in 2007 he refused to relinquish
the gavel of Virginia’s Commission on Immigration
despite having lost the chair of that group by a vote
of 16 to 3. The gavel — literally — had to be wrested
from his grip.
It’s time to send him into retirement.
Ed Nanas, Gainesville
Disruption and governance
Starting from scratch on the travel ban
HE SUPREME COURT last week dismissed a
suit against the second iteration of President
Trump’s ban on travel, which targeted six
majority-Muslim countries. The ruling signals a quiet end to a potentially explosive case — for
now. The legal fight against the travel ban grinds on,
with multiple challenges to the newest version of this
nonsensical policy working their way through the
courts.
By the ban’s own terms, its provisions barring entry
and immigration into the United States by citizens of
certain countries expired in late September.
Mr. Trump signed a revised proclamation — the third
version of the ban so far — to take its place. While the
travel ban’s challengers argued that the Supreme
Court could still hear their case even after the new
order, the court chose instead to dismiss the suit on
the grounds that the second ban was no longer in
place. The justices also threw out the lower court’s
ruling that the ban unconstitutionally discriminated
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
ULTIPLE, GLARING government breakdowns are documented in the revealing
investigation of the opioid-overdose epidemic by The Post and CBS’s “60 Minutes.”
The report exposed weakening federal enforcement
of drug distribution; corrosive industry lobbying that
crippled that enforcement; and a dysfunctional Congress and White House at a time when a debilitating
scourge swept the country.
At the core of the story is the Drug Enforcement
Administration, charged with making sure that prescription narcotics do not spill from the legitimate
supply chain into the underworld of drug abuse. A
DEA unit, the Office of Diversion Control, is supposed
to keep pills from being siphoned off by what one
former official calls “drug dealers in lab coats.” The
investigation revealed how this vital DEA enforcement mission was badly undercut in a bill supported
by the drug companies that passed Congress and was
signed by President Barack Obama last year without
sufficient scrutiny.
The breakdown of enforcement described by re-
. TUESDAY,
spring training and another year of the Nationals.
Jeanne and Clark Hamilton, Alexandria
Congratulations to Dan Steinberg for his Oct. 14 front-page
perspective about the Nationals’
heartbreaking loss, “D.C. is the
punchline. The joke isn’t funny
anymore.” He nailed it.
As I was leafing through the
main news section to get to Page A9
and the end of the article, I had a
horrifying thought: Now that the
season is over, I am going to have to start actually
reading those pages I’ve been skipping since the
season began half a year ago.
The Nationals team has
been such a vital part of
our lives and our city.
Teddy Klaus, Bethesda
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1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 (202) 334-6000
In his Oct. 12 op-ed, “Do automakers dream of
electric cars?,” George F. Will compared emissions
from conventional, internal-combustion-engine vehicles with those from electric cars. He wrote that
GM chief executive Mary Barra “foresees a fastunfolding future of ‘zero crashes’ (salvation
through software: Auto-crash fatality rates are
rising for the first time in years, and 94 percent of
crashes are caused by human error), ‘zero emissions’ (zero from tailpipes, much from smokestacks
in an all-electric future) and ‘zero congestion’ (with
more ride-hailing services and car-sharing fleets,
less individual car ownership and less urban land
devoted to parking lots).”
He seemed to imply that there are worrisome or
comparable emissions from each. The truth is that
electric power plants using fossil fuels are about
twice as efficient as internal combustion engine
vehicles and therefore produce about half the
emissions. Of course, there are also power plants,
such as hydroelectric, that don’t use fossil fuels and
produce no emissions. Electric vehicles are much
less polluting than conventional vehicles.
Morris Altschuler, Rockville
Good riddance and goodbye
Regarding the Oct. 13 news article “U.S. to exit
UNESCO, alleging bias against Israel”:
Stating “anti-Israel bias” is simplistic and disingenuous. On UNESCO’s board sit some of the worst
misogynist dictatorships and human rights violators,
including Algeria, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Oman,
Qatar and Sudan. They continue to hijack the United
Nations’ stated mandate, ignore their neighbors’ ills
and cover up the brutal destruction of ancient artifacts due to Islamic ideology, war and greed.
UNESCO remained silent when Hamas bulldozed
a World Heritage site in Gaza to build a terrorist
training camp. Silent when Muslim authorities in
Jerusalem bulldozed and removed layers of archaeological finds hidden underneath the Temple Mount
dating to the 8th and 7th centuries B.C., which
includes ancient Hebrew writings.
Israel treasures all archaeological finds regardless
of their Jewish, Christian or Muslim history. But
between 2009 and 2014, UNESCO adopted 46 resolutions against Israel, one against Syria and zero
against any other country in the world. To add more
insult, UNESCO continues to use this forum to adopt
resolutions to strip away Jewish connection to the
land of Judea/Samaria and Israel.
Why should the United States finance this nonsense?
Carol Borker, Livingston, N.J.
Letters can be sent to letters@washpost.com.
Submissions must be exclusive to The Post and should
include the writer’s address and day and evening
telephone numbers. Because of the volume of material we
receive, we are unable to acknowledge submissions;
writers whose letters are under consideration for
publication will be contacted.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
Why I thought twice
before saying #MeToo
BY ALYSSA ROSENBERG
W
MARY F. CALVERT/REUTERS
Former White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon speaks at the Value Voters Summit last week.
MICHAEL GERSON
The religious right’s
new direction
A
t the Family Research Council’s recent Values
Voter Summit, the religious right effectively
declared its conversion to Trumpism.
The president was received as a hero.
Stephen K. Bannon and Sebastian Gorka — both fired
from the White House, in part, for their extremism —
set the tone and agenda. “There is a time and season for
everything,” said Bannon. “And right now, it’s a season
for war against a GOP establishment.”
A time to live and a time to die. A time to plant and a
time to uproot. A time to mourn and a time to embrace
angry ethnonationalism and racial demagoguery. Yes, a
time to mourn.
There is no group in the United States less attached
to its own ideals or more eager for its own exploitation
than religious conservatives. Forget Augustine and
Aquinas, Wilberforce and Shaftesbury. For many years,
leaders of the religious right exactly conformed Christian social teaching to the contours of Fox News evening
programming. Now, according to Bannon, “economic
nationalism” is the “centerpiece of value voters.” I had
thought the centerpiece was a vision of human dignity
rooted in faith. But never mind. Evidently the Christian
approach to social justice is miraculously identical to
1930s Republican protectionism, isolationism and
nativism.
Do religious right leaders have any clue how foolish
they appear? Rather than confidently and persistently
representing a set of distinctive beliefs, they pant and
beg to be a part of someone else’s movement. In this
case, it is a movement that takes advantage of racial and
ethnic divisions and dehumanizes Muslims, migrants
and refugees. A movement that has cultivated ties to
alt-right leaders and flirted with white identity politics.
A movement that will eventually soil and discredit all
who are associated with it.
The religious right is making itself a pitiful appendage to this squalid agenda. If Christian conservatives
are loyal enough, Bannon promises that they can be
“the folks who saved the Judeo-Christian West.” All that
is required is to abandon the best of the Judeo-Christian
tradition: a belief in the inherent value and dignity of
every life.
This belief in human dignity leads to a certain moral
and political logic. It means that the primary mission of
Christians in public life is not to secure their own
interests or to defend their own identity. It is to seek a
society in which every person can flourish. This is the
definition of the common good — which is not truly
common unless it includes the suffering and powerless.
The common good is a neglected topic in our politics.
It is not identical to market forces, or to legal rules that
maximize individual autonomy. It is the result of
prudent public and private choices that strengthen
community — the seedbed of human flourishing — and
ensure the weak are valued and protected. The idea of
the common good emerged from religious sources, but
provides a broad, political common ground.
If there is a single reason that Republican health-care
reform has failed, it is because party leaders could not
make a credible case that the common good was being
served. Even if individual elements of the various plans
were rational, they did not add up to a more just,
generous and inclusive society.
Who would now identify conservative Christian
political engagement with the pursuit of the common
good? Rather, the religious right is an interest group
seeking preference and advancement from a strongman
— and rewarding him with loyal acceptance of his
priorities. The prophets have become clients. The
priests have become acolytes.
It is possible for Christian conservatives to support
the appointment of conservative judges without becoming a tribe of apologists and sycophants. It is
possible to selectively endorse elements of the administration’s agenda without becoming Bannon’s foot
soldiers.
There is more at stake here than bad politics. When
Christians ally their faith with bias and exclusion, they
are influencing how the public views Christianity itself.
They are associating the teachings of Jesus Christ — a
globalist when it came to the Great Commission — with
ethnonationalist ideology. This should be a sobering
prospect for any Christian. But few seem sobered.
Instead, the faithful give standing ovations to the
purveyors of division and prejudice.
When anyone or anything takes priority over the
faith, there is a good, strong religious word for it:
idolatry. And the word is unavoidable, as religious
conservatives carry their golden calf into Bannon’s
battles.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
CATHERINE RAMPELL
A tax plan that really helps the middle class
P
resident Trump campaigned on
helping the little guy. His latest tax
proposal, he says, is about helping
the middle guy.
“It’s a middle-class bill,” Trump promised an audience of truckers last week.
Other administration officials and
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) have
also claimed that their primary objective
in reconfiguring the tax code is to help the
middle class, not the wealthy.
Unfortunately, they seem to have gotten things backward.
In a preliminary analysis, the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center estimated that
80 percent of the proposed tax cuts would
go to the top 1 percent of earners over the
next decade. Meanwhile a quarter of
households in the middle quintile would
see their tax bills rise.
This should be no surprise, when you
consider what’s in the Republican framework.
It cuts the top personal income tax rate;
eliminates estate taxes, which currently
befall only estates worth at least $5.5 million; kills the alternative minimum tax;
and slashes rates on pass-through income. The White House has lately even
made the absurd claim that its enormous,
unfunded corporate rate cuts are primarily about helping the middle class.
On Monday, the president’s Council of
Economic Advisers released a report
claiming that corporate tax cuts would
boost the average household’s income by
at least $4,000. This estimate relies on a
series of assumptions that seem dubious at best, given other research (including one recently deleted paper by Treasury’s own staff economists).
All this made me wonder: What would
a tax plan that actually prioritizes the
middle class look like?
Not much like the one Republican leadership cooked up, but it could still include
elements appealing to both parties.
A real middle-class tax plan would
likely include a large expansion of the
earned income tax credit.
For decades the EITC has supplemented lower-income people’s pay through a
tax refund. It’s pro-work, because it increases the payoff from holding down a
job. It also meaningfully improves working families’ living standards.
Given these selling points, the EITC has
historically enjoyed support from both
Republicans and Democrats. In recent
years, both Ryan and President Barack
Obama proposed making it more generous to workers who don’t have custody of
a minor child.
Curiously, though, the current GOP
framework says not a peep about this
powerful tool.
Fortunately, there’s an (admittedly expensive) off-the-shelf policy available: a
Democratic plan to expand EITC eligibility up the wage ladder, to households
making as much as $76,000 depending on
family size. The legislation would also
roughly double the maximum size of the
EITC for working families and almost
sextuple it for childless workers.
These expansions are designed to help
middle-income workers “reclaim” the pay
they would have received had there not
been decades of wage stagnation, the
House bill’s primary sponsor, Rep. Ro
Khanna (D-Calif.), told me in a recent
interview.
Khanna also observed that expanding
the EITC is a much more direct way to
raise middle-class families’ earnings than
some Rube-Goldberg-like corporate taxcode machinations.
“Trump is saying he’s going to cut the
corporate tax rate in order to raise your
wages,” Khanna said. “I’m saying: Let’s
just raise your wages.”
We could also help middle-income fam-
ilies by expanding the child tax credit.
The GOP tax plan does include an
expansion of this credit, to be sure. But
what they’ve announced so far doesn’t do
much for the middle class.
That’s because the expansion appears
to be non-refundable (meaning it primarily helps higher-income filers), and it
mostly serves to offset the framework’s
elimination of personal exemptions, explains Tax Policy Center researcher Elaine
Maag.
Other more generous expansions would
be possible though, including a version
pushed by Republican Sens. Marco Rubio
(Fla.) and Mike Lee (Utah).
What about the corporate tax code?
There are some changes that could
arguably boost growth and productivity,
some of whose benefits could (ahem)
trickle down to workers. Cutting rates and
eliminating distortionary loopholes could
be helpful — which is why Democrats
previously said they’d support such a
plan.
Only, though, if the plan were revenue
neutral.
A revenue-negative plan most likely
hurts growth in the long run, as Obama’s
former chief economist Jason Furman
points out. More important, someone
eventually has to cover the cost of unfunded tax cuts through some future combination of higher taxes and lower spending.
Lower spending almost certainly would
disparately hurt lower- and middleincome families.
Which is why the best thing elected
officials can do to help the middle class
would be to make sure any promised
benefits are adequately funded. Which
would mean raising rather than cutting
tax revenue.
Something tells me that’s not what
Republicans have in mind here.
crampell@washpost.com
hen women and some men
started sharing their stories
of sexual harassment and
assault on social media using the hashtag #MeToo, it almost
didn’t occur to me to join in. Of course,
I’ve been sexually harassed, starting
when I was a freshman in high school
and continuing to the present day. As a
female journalist with a Twitter feed
and an easily accessible email address,
I’ve come to accept a stream of sexuallyinflected insults as an occupational
hazard. But when my Facebook and
Twitter feeds filled up with other people’s stories, I began to feel exhausted
by the prospect of sharing my own. I
don’t need the catharsis, not personally.
And while it would be wonderful to
change someone’s mind or open his or
her eyes, that’s just not enough. Not
anymore.
The impulse behind the #MeToo
hashtag is the same one that animates
so many of our bitterest debates today.
Those of us who know for sure that
sexual harassment is real because we’ve
experienced it are trying to convince
others who have been lucky enough not
to have the same experiences that those
experiences are, in fact, real. This can be
a crazy-making conversation. When
someone insists that you haven’t, in
fact, lived through what you’ve lived
through, it’s easy to vacillate between
rage at that person’s denial and destabilizing doubt. But it’s also an essential
conversation: Unless a lot of us can
agree on the basic fact that widespread
sexual harassment exists, we’re going to
have trouble moving on to the next, vital
phase — which involves figuring out
what to do about it.
And that’s where things get really
difficult. Consciousness-raising moments such as #MeToo; or previous
hashtags such as #YesAllWomen or
#WhatWereYouWearing; or Anita Hill’s
1991 testimony before Congress; or the
1971 “Rape Speak-out” organized by the
New York Radical Feminists, are opening salvos in the fights against sexual
harassment and sexual violence. But
they are entirely insufficient to end
these problems on their own.
Moments of new awareness have
often led to genuine improvements in
law and culture. Two 1979 court cases
helped advance the movement to treat
marital rape as a crime, rather than as
an assertion of a man’s ownership of his
wife. Hill’s testimony encouraged sexual
harassment victims to file complaints
with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and helped dissolve
opposition, including from the White
House, to a bill that helped those vic-
tims pursue damages, back pay and
reinstatement to their jobs if they had
been terminated. Time and time again,
brave women have opened space for
change, and time and time again, those
around them have made some progress.
They just haven’t made nearly enough.
Now, the moment created by the
alleged depredations of Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, Bill O’Reilly and even Donald Trump raises the
question of what we will do in this
generation. Will lawmakers crack down
on the practice of forcing employees
who come forward with sexual harassment allegations into confidential arbitration proceedings, rather than letting
them seek jury trials for their claims, as
Ailes tried to do after Gretchen Carlson
accused him of harassment? What
about the confidential financial settlements that Weinstein used to silence
accusers? These provisions are intended to prevent companies from the grievous exposure that the Weinstein Co. is
experiencing. But they also deny the
public a close look at the rot that eats
away at organizations that tolerate this
kind of behavior.
More narrowly, will the entertainment
industry end the practice of conducting
meetings in hotel suites? Will Weinstein,
who has been expelled from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
for his conduct, be the beginning of an
industry-wide house-cleaning? Or will
his downfall be a fig leaf for larger
inaction? What can Hollywood do to
assure that no producers, directors or
studio heads become so powerful that
their desire to prey on the most vulnerable players in the business is tolerated
as the cost of doing business?
And as daunting as these challenges
are, they don’t even get to the deeper
questions: How does someone such as
Weinstein convince himself that this is
normal, that this is fine, that “I’m used
to that” and therefore it must be all
right? At what point do people decide
that they can just take what they want?
And how can we stop them before they
get there?
I don’t know the answers to these
questions or the outcome of these legislative fights. But I do know that for
#MeToo to be worth it, the result can’t
just be that we make ourselves feel bad
by revisiting painful memories and
hearing stories that reveal the depth of
our own denial. All this pain needs to
turn into concrete action, or we’ll be
back here again in 20 or 30 years — and
the stories we tell then may be even
worse.
Alyssa Rosenberg’s politics and culture blog,
Act Four, appears online at
washingtonpost.com/opinions.
EUGENE ROBINSON
An abusive creep’s defense
C
onfronted with allegations of
serial sexual abuse and rape,
Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein’s instinct was to lie: “I
came of age in the ’60s and ’70s, when all
the rules about behavior and workplaces were different. That was the culture
then.”
No, it wasn’t.
The different-era defense was also
used by those who would excuse fugitive
director Roman Polanski’s confessed
1977 crime, drugging and having sex
with a 13-year-old girl. And those willing to forgive and forget the first 20 or
so of Bill Cosby’s alleged sexual assaults,
which took place during those scarlet
decades.
Blaming the 1960s and 1970s has
become the first refuge of abusive
creeps. But those of us who lived
through that time can recall — yes,
perhaps through a slight haze — that
“the culture” never approved of the
kinds of things Weinstein is accused of
doing.
That era was about personal liberation, the biggest component of which
involved women’s empowerment. The
sexual revolution gave women options
that had been forbidden to them, but it
never took away the option of rejecting
unwanted advances. And never did “the
culture” give men the moral right to use
money and power to coerce sexual
favors — or the legal right to commit
sexual assault.
That kind of ugly behavior is as old as
time. That it is now more likely to be
exposed, and condemned, is largely due
to the period of cultural upheaval and
change that Weinstein now wants to
blame.
Not everyone gets it. A word of advice
to any prominent figures thinking
about commenting on the Weinstein
scandal: If you plan on adding a “but on
the other hand . . .” clause, just don’t say
anything at all.
Don’t be like Woody Allen, who said
that “the whole Harvey Weinstein thing
is sad for everybody involved,” but then
went on to urge caution: “You also don’t
want it to lead to a witch hunt atmosphere, a Salem atmosphere, where every guy in an office who winks at a
woman is suddenly having to call a
lawyer to defend himself. That’s not
right either.”
Yeeesh. Begin with the sentiment
itself, which is insultingly obtuse. Allen
apparently thinks there is no conceivable office setting in which winking at a
female colleague would be inappropri-
ate. But that’s beside the point, since
WINKING IS NOT THE ISSUE. Is it
possible that Allen does not understand
the difference between winking and the
offenses Weinstein is accused of — and
denies — which include indecent exposure, sexual assault and rape?
Okay, maybe it’s possible. After all,
Allen saw no reason anyone might be
grossed out when he betrayed his longtime lover, Mia Farrow, by initiating a
sexual relationship with her daughter,
who at the time was too young to go into
a bar and have a drink.
Is there poetic justice in the fact that
it was Allen’s estranged son, journalist
Ronan Farrow, who reported and wrote
the New Yorker article revealing the
most explosive allegations against
Weinstein? Perhaps, but we digress.
Most of the reaction to Weinstein’s
pattern of horrible and allegedly unlawful behavior has been appropriate, if
belated. The number of women who
accuse him of misconduct — including
A-list stars such as Angelina Jolie and
Gwyneth Paltrow — has leapt from an
initial handful into dozens. We should
know by now, in these cases, that if there
are several victims, there are probably
many.
Did some women tolerate his disgusting advances because they knew he was
one of the most powerful men in the
movie business and had the power to
make, resurrect or end a career? Probably, and they shouldn’t have had to. The
way Weinstein treated women was apparently an open secret in Hollywood.
Worse, however, is the fact that coworkers and corporate officers at Miramax and the Weinstein Co. apparently
knew all about his proclivities. Not only
did they fail to stop him, they enabled
him to continue.
In some cases, Weinstein’s assistants
are accused of making his targets feel
comfortable with the idea of meeting
him in hotel rooms — then abandoning
them knowing what they would face.
Some victims were paid substantial
settlements, which people who worked
with Weinstein, including board members, must have known about. Weinstein was effectively granted impunity
because he brought in so much money
and so many Oscars. That’s another old
story; complicity and silence weren’t
invented in the ’60s and ’70s, either.
And by the way, you don’t have to be
“the father of daughters” to speak out. I
am the father of sons, and I’m angry and
appalled.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
A20
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
WHAT WE’RE BUILDING ISN’T
AS IMPORTANT AS THOSE
WE’RE BUILDING IT FOR.
Introducing MedStar Georgetown University Hospital’s new Medical/Surgical Pavilion.
Patients in and around Washington, D.C., deserve the very best. That’s why MedStar Georgetown
University Hospital is breaking ground on a new state-of-the-art facility—and elevating the delivery
of patient care. The new pavilion features 156 private rooms, 32 operating rooms and a brand-new
emergency department. Not only will this facility improve the lives of patients, but it will also further
enhance our partnership with Georgetown University in medical research and education. And it was
made possible through the collaboration and support of the University and our community members
and neighbors. Best of all, with the addition of the new Nancy and Harold Zirkin Heart & Vascular
Hospital at MedStar Washington Hospital Center, this new pavilion is another step toward our
mission of building the region’s most capable and connected health system.
BuildingMedicalExcellence.com
KLMNO
METRO
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
47° 57° 63° 55°
63°
Precip: 0%
Wind: N
4-8 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
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B
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
For historians, old
cameras and projectors
are just as important as
the films. B3
Dacha’s owners and
residents clash over a
prospective beer garden
on 14th Street. B3
Artist and writer Marian
Cannon Schlesinger
captured Washington and
beyond. B6
Death
penalty
sought in
Va. killing
MUSLIM TEEN WAS
ABDUCTED, RAPED
Nabra Hassanen’s death
sparked nationwide vigils
BY
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Civil War divisions reignited
A West Virginia county torn by 1864 battle is now fighting over a plaque honoring Confederate soldiers
BY J OE H EIM
IN CHARLES TOWN, W.VA.
T
he last significant Civil War battle in Jefferson County took place in August 1864 at
Smithfield Crossing, a five-day slog between
Union and Confederate forces that left some
300 casualties and neither side able to claim victory.
But now a new skirmish with ties to the Civil War is
brewing in the county seat, a picturesque town of
5,200 founded in 1786 by George Washington’s
youngest brother, Charles, that sits 63 miles from the
nation’s capital. It is being waged not with bullets and
bayonets, but with letters, public hearings and angry
Facebook posts that serve as another reminder that
the country has never fully erased the lines of division
and distrust of a war that ended 152 years ago.
The focus of this new dispute is the fate of a plaque
no larger than a cookie sheet that hangs next to the
entrance of the Jefferson County Courthouse.
It reads: 1861-1865 In honor and memory of the
Confederate soldiers of Jefferson County, who served
in the War Between the States. Erected by the Leetown
Chapter #231 United Daughters of the Confederacy.
Also on the plaque is the day of its placement:
Erected May 25, 1986.
Many visitors to the courthouse — there to conduct
business, handle legal matters, fill out marriage
licenses, vote — walk past the sign without ever
noticing it. Many, but not all.
A year ago, Linda Ballard and her friends, all black
“Our ancestors were
enslaved in Jefferson
County. I don’t care
where they put it, but
take it from the
entrance to the
courthouse.”
Linda Ballard
women in their 60s and 70s who grew up in the
county or live there now, took their granddaughters
on the John Brown tour of Charles Town. The tour
traces the last days of the abolitionist whose failed
effort to lead a slave rebellion in 1859 resulted in his
capture, trial in the Jefferson County Courthouse and
hanging a few blocks away.
As they entered the courthouse, the women noticed the plaque. It stopped them cold. They didn’t
understand why a tribute to soldiers from the side
fighting to preserve slavery had such a prominent
spot.
“We thought, ‘Well, why is this here? Why do we
have to walk past this sign on a public building?’ ”
Ballard remembered. “Our ancestors were enslaved
in Jefferson County. I don’t care where they put it, but
take it from the entrance to the courthouse.”
The women were struck that there was no plaque
honoring Union soldiers. Nor any acknowledgment
that enslaved people — their ancestors — were sold
and traded on those very courthouse steps. And why
was a plaque honoring Confederates on the building
that replaced the original courthouse, which was
shelled and destroyed by Confederate troops?
The date of the plaque also raised questions. Why,
the women wondered, had the Daughters of the
Confederacy waited 121 years after the war to place a
PLAQUE CONTINUED ON B2
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The Abolitionist Ale Works acknowledges the history of the John Brown raiders, who were convicted
and hanged in Charles Town in 1859. Linda Ballard is opposed to the location of the plaque. It hangs next to the entrance of the Jefferson
County Courthouse, where slaves were once sold. Peter Onoszko, Jefferson County Commission president, voted to keep the plaque.
J USTIN J OUVENAL
Fairfax County prosecutors will
pursue the death penalty against
the man accused in the high-profile killing of a
17-year-old
Muslim girl,
who was abducted as she
walked to her
mosque over
the summer,
authorities
said.
Torres
Fairfax
County Commonwealth’s Attorney Raymond F. Morrogh (D)
made the announcement Monday
after a Fairfax County grand jury
returned an eight-count indictment against 22-year-old Darwin
Martinez Torres for capital murder, rape and other charges in
connection with the slaying of
Nabra Hassanen of Reston, Va.
HASSANEN CONTINUED ON B2
Worries for
‘dreamers’
at D.C. area
colleges
At a Georgetown forum,
students urge Congress
to assist DACA recipients
BY
N ICK A NDERSON
Brenda Medrano-Frías arrived from Bolivia when she
was 3. Cristina Velasquez left
Venezuela at age 6, and Luis
Gonzalez crossed over from
Mexico at age 8. All three are
now pursuing a bachelor’s degree at schools in the Washington region.
They also are among the
hundreds of thousands of
young immigrants whose future is in limbo as Congress
debates offering them a reprieve after President Trump’s
decision to end an Obama-era
initiative that shielded certain
undocumented
immigrants
from deportation if they arrived as children.
On Monday, the three students joined college presidents
in a forum at Georgetown UniSTUDENTS CONTINUED ON B4
How one immigrant’s American Dream Virginia’s attorney general contest
was shattered by an IRS nightmare
grows heated in days before debate
The service
station along the
National Pike in
Maryland was an
immigrant’s
prized small
Petula
business. He was
Dvorak
the one in
overalls, his wife
ran the office.
Oh Suk Kwon, who left South
Korea for the United States in
1976, served as a fleet mechanic
in the U.S. Army. After four years
in the military, decades of
working in an electrical plant
and as an auto mechanic, after
raising the kids and seeing them
off to their adult lives, Kwon
finally bought a gas station in
Ellicott City in 2007. It meant
everything to him.
Just a few years after he
opened it, zealous government
investigators fishing for
criminals seized all of the
station’s money on a hunch —
and wiped the family out.
No, they weren’t money
launderers or terrorists or
mobsters or tax evaders. The
government found no evidence
of criminal activity.
But after the investigation
ended, after the gas station went
under and Kwon’s wife died
amid the stress of it all, after he
moved from his neighborhood in
shame and the Internal Revenue
Service changed its policy so no
other small business would get
steamrolled this way — the
agency won’t give Kwon his
money back.
That’s $59,117.47 the IRS is
holding on to.
As recently as August — the
last time Kwon, now 73, asked
for his money back — the IRS
said no.
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B5
Herring and Adams
release attack ads,
spar over health care
BY
P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN
The low-visibility Virginia attorney general’s race is increasingly heated, as the Republican
and Democrat push out ads attacking each other just days
ahead of their second and final
debate.
Incumbent Mark Herring, a
Democrat, and his Republican
challenger John Adams occupy
opposite ends of the political
spectrum, and their ads reflect
their partisan views as well as
their different ideas about the
role of attorney general.
Herring has gone after the
Trump administration’s policies,
challenging the constitutionality
of the president’s first immigration ban, joining with other attorneys general in suing the administration over its decision to end
federal subsidies to health insurers while also opposing the ad-
ministration’s move to end contraception coverage required by
the Affordable Care Act.
Herring also joined a lawsuit
that challenged Virginia’s ban on
same-sex marriage, a case made
moot by the decision by the U.S.
Supreme Court that gay Americans have the right to marry.
His campaign plans to focus on
health care in the final three
weeks, highlighting Adams’s opposition to Obamacare and Medicaid expansion, as well as Adams’s support for the Trump administration’s decision to allow
VIRGINIA CONTINUED ON B4
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
Civil War’s legacy hangs over a plaque honoring Confederate soldiers
PLAQUE FROM B1
tribute to Confederate soldiers?
Who approved it? And did it have
anything to do with 1986 being the
same year Martin Luther King Jr.
Day became a federal holiday?
The questions perturbed the
women, and so they vowed to act.
They considered asking the county for equal billing for Union
troops, or for a mention of the
courthouse as the site of slave
auctions. As they pondered what
to do, they witnessed bitter debates crop up across the nation
over the legacy of Confederate
statues and memorials.
And then Charlottesville happened. Racial violence ripped
through the Virginia town when
white supremacists and neo-Nazis marched Aug. 12 to protest the
planned removal of a Confederate
statue. In its aftermath, President
Trump’s declaration that blame
was due on both sides — the white
supremacists and those protesting them — sparked furor and
further rent a deeply divided
country. At stake was nothing
short of who decides what history
of the nation is told and how that
is done.
Three days after Charlottesville, the women wrote a letter to
the commissioners of Jefferson
County, where blacks make up
about 7 percent of the 56,000 residents, requesting that “the bronze
plaque sanctifying the Confederacy” be removed.
“It is impossible to enter the
courthouse to conduct business or
to even vote without being taunted by its presence,” they wrote.
“The plaque perpetuates division
at all levels on a wider scale.”
The six women — Ballard, Janet
Baylor, Sylvia Gregory, Gloria
Lindsey, Verdeana Lindsey and
Brenda McCray — asked for the
plaque to be taken down “without
fanfare.” They didn’t want to make
a big fuss. They just wanted the
commissioners to “do what was
just.”
They would be disappointed.
‘Small radical minority’
Peter Onoszko, president of the
five-member Jefferson County
Commission, didn’t hesitate to
put the women’s request before
his colleagues. Their letter was
presented for public discussion at
the commission’s Sept. 7 meeting.
That day it didn’t take long
before Ballard and the other women began to feel things would not
go their way. Onoszko talked
about America’s lengthy path
toward reconciliation after the
war and the “tortuous history” of
reconciliation between black and
white Americans. He cited progress in civil rights and achievements, including the election of a
black president and the prominent positions African Americans
had reached in the military and on
the Supreme Court.
But then Onoszko talked of the
“small radical minority among
both white and black Americans
who seek to undermine over a
century and a half of progress
toward reconciliation between regions of America and the races of
America, creating harmful division and discord among our people and threatening to destroy our
country.”
“This has absolutely got to
stop,” he said. “We are all Americans.”
The public followed Onoszko’s
lead during the open session.
“What we’re seeing today is a
deliberate attempt to divide us in
every way possible,” said Gary
Dungan, who is white and lives in
Jefferson County. “If they get their
way with this little plaque, they
will be back. And by they, I mean
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
the radical minority that Commissioner Onoszko referred to.
They’ll be back looking for something bigger. And it will never end
unless you end it here today.”
The women who wrote the letter sat stunned as they waited
their turn to speak. Two of the
women use canes. One requires an
oxygen tank. They do not feel like
radical minorities. They describe
themselves as “six concerned
American citizens.”
“Radical minorities? Where is
this coming from?” thought McCray. “We are all human beings,
we are not animals like they think
we are.”
When it was Ballard’s turn to
speak, she said the women were
present “because our ancestors
are not here to represent themselves.”
“We are hopeful,” she told the
commissioners, “that in the memory of the people that were enslaved here in Jefferson County
and of those who had the goal of
preserving the Union that that
plaque will be removed.”
Most residents that day spoke
in favor of keeping the plaque,
including some veterans who said
all veterans should be honored, no
matter which side they fought for
in the Civil War. One speaker said
it would be “Stalinesque” to remove the plaque.
When the discussion ended,
the commission’s four Republicans and one Democrat, all of
whom are white, voted 5 to 0 to
keep the plaque. Then they created a citizens committee to look
further into how forebears should
be remembered at the courthouse. But they changed their
minds, voting on Oct. 5 to scrap
the citizens committee.
The results are disappointing
to the women who asked for the
plaque’s removal. But not unexpected. They still want it gone.
And they still have questions
about how it ended up there.
Death penalty sought
in high-profile slaying
HASSANEN FROM B1
“You conform the charges to
what the evidence will show,” Morrogh said. “It is my intention to
seek the death penalty.”
Morrogh declined to discuss
the evidence that led to the indictments since the case is pending,
but it was the first time that authorities indicated that they believed Nabra was sexually assaulted in the June 18 attack.
In addition to the rape charge,
Torres is accused of abducting
Nabra with intent to defile and
object sexual penetration.
Fairfax County’s chief public de-
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artwork on the cover of this week’s
Health & Science section devoted to
women’s health?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
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TOP: A plaque erected in 1986 that honors Confederate soldiers is just feet from this entrance to
the Jefferson County Courthouse. MIDDLE: From left, Gloria Lindsey, Augustine Strother and
Linda Ballard, who oppose the plaque, walk outside the courthouse. ABOVE: The John Brown
tour of Charles Town traces the last days of the abolitionist whose failed effort to lead a slave
rebellion in 1859 resulted in his capture and trial in the Jefferson County Courthouse.
‘That’s just not our way’
Polly Wharton has some answers about the plaque’s origins.
Wharton was president of the
Leetown chapter of the Daughters
of the Confederacy in 1986 when
the plaque was placed on the
courthouse. The chapter has since
fender, Dawn Butorac, who is representing Torres, declined to comment. Nabra’s family also did not
immediately return a phone call.
Nabra’s killing sparked vigils
from coast to coast and spurred
concerns that she was targeted
because of her faith. Police and
prosecutors have said they turned
up no evidence that her slaying
was a hate crime.
The indictments come after a
tense preliminary hearing in the
case on Friday attended by about
250 of her supporters. The hearing
was temporarily delayed after
Nabra’s father yelled, “You killed
my daughter!” and lunged toward
disbanded, but Wharton, 74, remains a member of the national
group and lives just outside
Charles Town.
The plaque, she said in an interview, had nothing to do with the
Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. It
was conceived solely as a project
to honor ancestors of chapter
members. West Virginia was
formed during the Civil War when
it seceded from Virginia and was
eventually admitted into the
Union in 1863. But many residents
of the new state’s easternmost
panhandle, which includes Jefferson County, continued to support
and fight for the Confederacy.
“I’m sorry they’re upset about
it,” Wharton said. “We did not
mean to offend anybody at all
when we put it up there. People
say it refers to supporting slavery
and it does not. Our ancestors did
not have slaves and we do not
believe in slavery and we never
did. It really hurts our feelings
that they’re saying that.”
Wharton says the chapter got
an okay from the courthouse to
put up the plaque but doesn’t
recall if the County Commission
voted on it. She said she has not
been contacted by anyone from
the county about the plaque. Onoszko says the commission has not
been able to find a record of a vote
on it.
Though Wharton doesn’t want
the plaque taken down, she won’t
fight a decision to move it.
“I also read an article saying
that we were for the white extremists and we are not for that,” she
said. “We are not for all this fighting against the removal even if
they take it down. That’s just not
our way.”
Both sides in the controversy
agree that the battle over the small
plaque is symbolic. And they also
agree that it’s important.
In the Spirit of Jefferson, the
local newspaper founded in 1844,
the debate has played out in robust coverage, pointed editorials
and spirited posts on the paper’s
Facebook page.
“This issue has become a big
flash point,” said Robert Snyder,
the weekly paper’s publisher,
whose wife, Christine Snyder, is
the managing editor and principal reporter. “This is an area that
still lingers in the residue of the
Civil War.”
The paper has called for the
plaque’s removal, sparking some
backlash.
“There should be a plaque for
the est. 650,000 Americans killed
after Lincoln’s army invaded Virginia,” one resident wrote.
“This [is] all about tearing
America down so a small minority
of radicals can instill their version
of communism on us,” said another.
In an interview, Onoszko said
he wants to keep the plaque because “it’s reflective of what happened in the 1860s and also because it is reflective of the mood of
the local populace in 1986.”
And, he argued, the soldiers
honored by the plaque were fighting for each other, not for the
cause of slavery.
“The majority of whites living
in the South did not own slaves,”
he said. “A lot of slaveholders had
no more than three or four.”
For Ballard and her friends, the
problem is not that the plaque
exists, but that it is displayed on a
prominent public building that
serves as the governmental hub of
the county.
“What kind of message are you
sending?” she said. “We don’t have
any qualms about these people
honoring whoever they want. The
courthouse is not the place to do
it.”
joe.heim@washpost.com
Torres. The girl’s mother also
threw a shoe in the suspect’s direction.
When the proceedings resumed
about an hour later, Torres waived
the hearing, during which prosecutors would have presented evidence they have collected against
the defendant. That sent the case
to the grand jury.
After the hearing, dozens of
Nabra’s supporters rallied outside
the Fairfax County courthouse.
Many wore white “Justice for
Nabra” T-shirts and held signs
with a photo of her in a hijab.
Some said they believe her killing
was a hate crime.
Fairfax County police said the
incident began about 3:40 a.m. on
June 18, when police said Torres
drove up to Nabra and a group of
up to 15 teens as they were returning to the All Dulles Area Muslim
Society mosque in Sterling follow-
ing a meal.
It is a common practice at the
mosque for young people to mark
Ramadan by going out for a bite to
eat in the early morning hours
before the holy month’s fasts begin.
Torres got into an argument
with a teen on a bike, police said.
Torres then drove his red Pontiac over a curb and chased the
teens over a grassy area as they
fled, police said. They said Torres
caught up with the group in a
nearby parking lot and then got
out and chased them with a baseball bat.
A search warrant filed in the
case said one of the teens glanced
back and saw Torres standing over
Nabra, who was lying on the
ground. At some point, Torres hit
Nabra with the bat and then loaded her into his car, police said.
He drove Nabra to Loudoun
County, where he assaulted her
again, killed her and then dumped
her body in a pond near his Sterling apartment complex, police
said.
Torres then returned to the
scene of the abduction on Dranesville Road in Burke, where a teen
who was with Nabra alerted police
and Torres was stopped, according to the search warrant.
Torres, who was not wearing
shoes or a shirt, was taken into
custody at about 5:15 a.m. after
police found blood stains on the
door of his car and on the back
seat, according to the search warrant.
Torres later admitted his role in
Nabra’s slaying and led detectives
to her body, according to the
search warrant.
A week before Nabra’s killing, a
woman reported to Loudoun
County authorities that Torres had
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sexually assaulted her, said people
familiar with the case who spoke
on the condition of anonymity. But
she ultimately declined to pursue
charges.
A Fairfax County judge is scheduled to set a trial date for Torres on
Thursday.
Torres’s trial will be the first
death penalty case in Fairfax
County since 2011, when a Fairfax
County jury convicted Mark E.
Lawlor of bludgeoning Genevieve
Orange to death in her apartment
in the Seven Corners area in 2008.
Prince William County prosecutors are pursuing a capital
murder case against Ronald W.
Hamilton, a Pentagon information technology specialist accused
in 2016 of fatally shooting his wife
during an incident at their Woodbridge home and then killing a
responding rookie police officer.
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
For historians, old cameras and projectors are just as important as the films
In a roundabout
way, Adolf Hitler
and Emperor
Hirohito turned
Alan Lewis into a
nerd.
John
The Axis
Kelly's
leaders started
Washington World War II.
When that war
ended, a standard
piece of equipment at U.S.
military briefings was made
surplus. Bell & Howell movie
projectors started flooding
America’s schools, such as the
one Alan attended in Miami
Beach.
“It was a model like that that
first got me started as an AV
kid in the ninth grade,” Alan,
80, told me recently as we
stood near a Bell & Howell
projector in the living room of
his Northwest Washington
home. “School systems would
buy them up as they were able
to get back into AV after the
war.”
Said Alan: “I became a nerd,
before nerds were even
invented. The nerd kids were
the ones who ran the projectors
and set up the microphones in
the school auditorium.”
Frankly, Alan became doubly
nerdy. Not only did he push an
AV cart around in high school,
but he also grew up to become
an archivist, working for various
agencies and organizations to
collate and oversee their moving
image collections. Along the
way, he decided to collect
examples of the equipment that
regular Americans used to make
and show movies.
On a recent morning, I went
to Alan’s house to watch as
nearly 200 cameras and about
50 projectors were packed up by
Rachael Stoeltje and Andy
Uhrich of the Indiana
University Libraries Moving
Image Archive, the new home of
the Alan Lewis Collection.
There were 8mm, Super 8 and
16mm Kodaks, Bolexes,
Wittnauers, Canons, Yashicas
...
“That’s the first camera I
acquired, at a flea market in
Columbia, Maryland,” Alan said,
pointing out a Bell & Howell
camera once owned by a TV
newsman in Baltimore. It had a
sleek, 1950s sci-fi design, with
three lenses and viewfinders
that rotated like turrets.
“There’s still film in it,” Alan
said.
“Oh, there is?” said Rachael,
director of the Indiana
University archive. “Is it
exposed?”
“I believe it is,” Alan said.
“Well, we should process it,”
she said.
When most of us think of film
collections, we think of the film.
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Alan Lewis is seen in his Northwest Washington home with some
of his movie cameras. He recently donated nearly 200 cameras
and about 50 projectors to the Indiana University Libraries
Moving Image Archive.
Indiana University has plenty of
that, including the
Encyclopaedia Britannica
educational films we squirmed
through in school (“We’re
digitizing 1,500 of them now,
and we’re going to put them
online,” Rachael said) and
famed director John Ford’s
home movies (“They’re
gorgeous,” Rachael said). But
she thinks it’s important to
understand the machinery, too,
the Bell & Howell hardware to
the Kodachrome software.
“This technology documented
our country for so long,” she
said.
It’s the whirring box that
Uncle Bob raised to his eye
when Susie blew out her
birthday candles. It’s the
projector that later cast Susie
upon a screen set up in the
living room, the bright light
picking out the dust motes that
floated through the air.
Besides, home movies are hot
these days — not just our own,
but other families’. Why is that?
“You’re seeing everyday life
that isn’t in your Hollywood
movies,” Rachael said.
Alan’s father died when he
was 10 — “so I have very limited
memories of him,” he said. “But
my uncle, who was the family
film shooter, did capture some
scenes with my father in them.
Those are the only moving
images that I have of him other
than the stuff I remember about
him.”
Ever the archivist, Alan
convinced his cousins to donate
those home movies to a
university in Florida.
And what about you, Alan?
You have kids, now grown. Did
you record their first steps, first
day of school, senior prom?
“I was more an administrator
than I was a filmmaker,” he said
sheepishly. “I have four rolls,
two on regular 8mm and two on
Super 8. They are doublebagged in Ziploc bags, and
they’re in our freezer. VHS
copies were made a generation
ago.”
Rachael nodded approvingly.
“He’s properly archived them.
Colder and drier is better,
otherwise they start to
deteriorate. I’m pleased to hear
they’re double-bagged in your
freezer, Alan, but we should
digitize them for you.”
From another room came
Andy’s voice: “We’re going to
THE DISTRICT
Residents wanted bar’s
expected 600-person
capacity reduced to 200
R ACHEL C HASON
When Marge Allen and her
husband
moved
to
the
1400 block of S Street NW in
1988, they worried about vacant
homes and drug dealers.
These days, it is the prospect
of 600 beer-drinkers on the end
of the block north of Logan
Circle that makes them nervous.
Allen and about 30 neighbors
are fiercely protesting the possible arrival of an outpost of the
popular beer garden Dacha at
the corner of 14th and S streets
NW, which is currently a parking
lot. It is one of the few vacant
parcels in a corridor that has
been transformed over two decades into a vibrant strip of
restaurants, bars and shops.
The debate over Dacha has
underscored residents’ concerns
about development even as they
recognize that their property
values have benefited from the
business boom.
“We are at a tipping point,”
said Allen, 75, who retired from a
career in urban planning. “People will move on to another
neighborhood. We are trying to
preserve this vibrant place that
we worked to create.”
But Dmitri Chekaldin, who
opened Dacha’s Shaw location in
2013 with business partner Ilya
Alter, says Dacha would be a
“social amenity” where friends
and family could gather, and a
much-needed new option in a
neighborhood where lines for
bars and restaurants are increasingly long.
Chekaldin said his opponents,
who have distributed “No Dacha” signs throughout the neighborhood, have declined to consider concessions he and Alter
have proposed during nine
meetings with ANC commissioners and seem resistant to any
sort of large business on the
block.
“They want to create their
own suburbia, their own Falls
Church,” Chekaldin said.
The Logan Circle and U Street
Advisory Neighborhood Commission districts and a group of
nine neighbors protested Dacha’s request for a liquor license,
and 20 neighbors, including
some who filed the protest, testified earlier this month against
the beer garden at an Alcoholic
Beverage Control Board hearing
that lasted until 2 a.m.
Neighbors recognize that recent commercial development
along 14th Street has benefited
the neighborhood and increased
the value of their homes —
“there’s no doubt about it,” Allen
said.
She and her husband bought
their house for $280,000 in
1988, or nearly $600,000, adjusted for inflation today. She
estimates 20 percent of the
houses on the block were boarded up then, vacant following the
1968 riots that consumed much
Action!
Saturday is Home Movie Day,
when film buffs will gather at
museums around the world to
screen their family memories
and watch others’. Locally, it’s
happening at the National
Museum of African American
History and Culture.
Registration is required.
For information, visit
CenterForHomeMovies.org or
search “DC Home Movie Day”
on Facebook.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
L O C AL D I GE S T
Dacha owners, neighbors clash over
prospective beer garden on 14th Street
BY
need more bubble wrap.” The
dining room table was covered
with old projectors he was
carefully packing.
Andy is a film archivist and
trained projectionist. He has an
idea to set up dozens of
projectors around the
Bloomington campus and have
them all running
simultaneously.
“We would just show a variety
of stuff: home movies,
educational films, Hollywood
films,” Andy said. “It would be
like a snapshot of our collection
all at once.”
Alan listened.
“Where are you going to find
all the nerds?” he asked.
RACHEL CHASON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Dmitri Chekaldin is co-owner of Dacha in the District’s Shaw
neighborhood. A second location may open near Logan Circle.
of the 14th Street and U Street
corridors. Over the course of
nearly 30 years, Allen watched
the neighborhood transform.
The city now estimates their
home is worth $1,350,520, which
includes the value of a thirdstory addition.
The surge in property values
resulted from the investment of
time and money from neighbors
as much as from businesses,
Allen said.
In the early 1990s, she was
part of a group of neighbors that
patrolled the streets at night in
bright orange hats, calling police
about suspicious activity and
making themselves a presence
on the street to deter drug deals.
She said neighbors were some of
the first to open businesses nearby, including the home decor
shop Home Rule and Cork
Wine Bar.
“It was the investment of the
neighbors that made this community what it is, so of course it
is hurtful to hear we should go
move to the suburbs,” Allen said.
On the other side, Chekaldin,
42, who grew up in Perm in what
was then the Soviet Union and
came to the District 23 years ago
to study at George Washington
University, said he is offended by
online comments from longtime
neighbors that suggest he and
Alter are just “transitory young
people.”
On both sides, there is anger
and distrust.
“The owners did not negotiate
in good faith with us,” Allen said.
“The ANC commissioners did
not negotiate in good faith with
us,” Chekaldin said. “They never
intended to make a deal.”
ANC commissioner Jason Forman, who represents Logan Circle and led negotiations, said
residents and the Dacha owners
were never going to agree on the
size of the beer garden.
Dacha’s current location in
Shaw, which is 3,500 square feet,
has a 250-person capacity, Chekaldin said.
The new space on 14th Street
would be 7,000 square feet, with
a 3,000-square-foot restaurant/
bar, a 2,000-square-foot outdoor
beer garden and a 2,000-squarefoot enclosed sidewalk cafe. In
total, the business would serve a
maximum of 600 customers.
Forman said the residents he
represents wanted a limit of
200 people.
That would make it impossible to pay the lease on the land as
well as construction loans for
the $3 million building they plan
to construct, Chekaldin said.
Chekaldin said he agreed to
some concessions, including decreasing capacity in the outdoor
beer garden from 450 to 250,
having his staff pick up trash in
the immediate vicinity and opting against music for the sidewalk cafe.
Because the commissioners
chose to take the case to the
Alcoholic Beverage Control
Board, Dacha will not necessarily have to make those concessions if the board grants the
liquor license.
“They decided it was a zerosum game,” Chekaldin said.
“They are taking a gamble here.”
The board expects to decide
whether to approve, deny or
modify the application within
90 days, said spokeswoman Jessie Cornelius.
The board makes decisions on
licenses based their on impact
on peace, order and quiet, parking needs, safety, property values and whether “there is an
overconcentration of licensed
establishments,”
Cornelius
wrote in an email.
Many of the opponents seized
on the “overconcentration of
licensed establishments.”
“On a Friday or Saturday
night, it’s almost impossible to
walk on the sidewalk,” said David Conklin, who has lived in the
1400 block of S Street for 15 years
and never before felt the need to
protest a business. “We have an
overconcentration of the same
types of businesses.”
Whitney Fisler, a lawyer who
has lived in the neighborhood
for 41/2 years, said that “adding a
large venue will significantly
overconcentrate an already
overconcentrated area.”
Chekaldin, who brought a real
estate agent, two sound engineers and the ANC commissioner from the Shaw location to
speak in support of Dacha, said
that argument is “ridiculous.”
Anyone who has been on
14th Street and seen the lines at
bars and restaurants on the
weekends should realize the
strip needs more — not fewer —
businesses, he said.
rachel.chason@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Man is accused
of abducting teenager
A 21-year-old man who
claimed ties to the MS-13
street gang is accused of
abducting a teenage girl and
pulling a knife on people who
tried to help her after the two
fought in Virginia, authorities
said.
The incident began Sunday
about 2 a.m. on Danville Road
in Woodbridge, Prince William
County police said. A 16-yearold girl went to a party with
Roberto Medrano-Segovia, 21,
of no fixed address, who was
an acquaintance of hers.
At the party, the two fought,
verbally and then physically.
At one point, police said,
Medrano-Segovia displayed a
knife and said he was in the
street gang MS-13, according
to police.
Later, police said MedranoSegovia used a sharp
instrument to deflate three
tires on a vehicle that
belonged to a witness who had
tried to help the victim.
He and the victim argued
again. Then, police said,
witnesses saw MedranoSegovia “forcibly place” the
victim in a vehicle.
An Amber Alert was issued
for the teenage girl.
Authorities issued the alert,
saying they believed that she
was in “extreme danger.”
About 2 p.m. Sunday, police
said they found the victim,
along with Medrano-Segovia.
Medrano-Segovia was
arrested and faces charges
that include abduction and
gang participation.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Motorcyclist killed
in collision with truck
Police said Monday that
they are investigating a crash
in Virginia that killed a 38year-old motorcyclist over the
weekend.
On Saturday about
12:30 p.m., a 2008 Kawasaki
ZX-6 motorcycle was
traveling north on Richmond
Highway near Mims Street
when it collided with a 1998
Ford
F-150 turning left from
southbound Richmond
Highway, Fairfax County
police said. The truck’s
passenger side was hit by the
motorcycle, according to a
police statement.
The motorcyclist, Nathan
Lamont Reed of Lorton, was
taken to a hospital, where he
was pronounced dead. The
driver of the pickup truck was
not injured, according to the
statement.
It was unclear whether speed
or alcohol was a factor in the
collision, which remains under
investigation, police said.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
MARYLAND
2 dogs rescued from
Wheaton house fire
Two dogs were rescued from
a burning home Sunday in
Wheaton, officials said.
The fire broke out about
9:30 a.m. Sunday in the 1600
block of Glenallan Avenue
near Brookside Gardens.
The dogs were rescued by
firefighters, and one of the
animals was taken to a
veterinarian. The other dog
was reported to be fine. Four
adults and two children were
displaced as a result of the
fire, according to
Montgomery County fire
officials.
The fire is believed to have
started accidentally in the
kitchen and caused about
$60,000 worth of damage. It is
under investigation.
— Dana Hedgpeth
L O TTE R I E S
Results from Oct. 16
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
DC-4 (Sun.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Sun.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
2-4-6
3-3-4-0
5-3-6-3-7
1-1-7
1-1-9
8-3-2-8
7-2-7-1
8-9-1-4-2
6-1-1-0-4
Mid-Day Pick 3:
8-6-6
Mid-Day Pick 4:
0-9-1-0
Night/Pick 3 (Sun.):
6-3-8
Pick 3 (Mon.):
1-7-3
Pick 4 (Sun.):
8-1-0-7
Pick 4 (Mon.): 4-3-9-8
Multi-Match:
N/A
Match 5 (Sun.):
14-25-26-30-32 *34
Match 5 (Mon.):
5-16-23-32-38 *27
5 Card Cash:
7C-10H-2C-8D-5C
VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
MARYLAND
6-3-1
9-9-3-0
Cash-5:
Night/Pick-3 (Sun.):
Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Sun.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Cash-5 (Sun.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
1-2-21-23-24
7-8-5
9-8-9
8-9-4-1
0-4-0-8
1-3-20-25-29
4-16-20-22-25
MULTI-STATE GAMES
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
VIRGINIA
Helping hands stretch from Fairfax County elementary to storm-hit Houston
Lees Corner oversees
fundraising effort
among 32 schools
BY
DEBBIE TRUONG
In Hurricane Harvey’s aftermath, Roxie Vaughn and other
residents in her Houston-area
community went house to
house. They cut drywall from
homes and tore out carpet.
Vaughn and her son rescued
a family.
She posted images and video
of the effort to Facebook for
relatives to see.
“We still have lots of families
that are displaced, living in
hotels, with family,” said
Vaughn, a campus compliance
coordinator for an elementary
school in the Fort Bend Independent School District.
Thousands of miles east, the
images appeared on Anna
Knox’s Facebook page. Vaughn
and Knox, a special-education
teacher at Lees Corner Elementary School in Fairfax County,
share a mutual friend.
Struck by a desire to help,
Knox went to the principal at
Lees Corner, Bob D’Amato. Together, they coordinated a regional fundraising effort with
32 schools that, as of Monday,
had raised close to $13,400 for
students displaced from Juan
Seguin Elementary School
in Texas.
D’Amato said he didn’t want
the need in Houston to be
forgotten as the news cycle
moved on, consumed by coverage of hurricanes that struck
Florida and Puerto Rico and by
the mass shooting in Las Vegas.
“We’ve had all this other
world news and noise going on,”
he said. “We don’t want to forget
. . . Harvey and what those kids
and families are going to have to
continue to go through.”
With Vaughn’s help, D’Amato
and Knox identified Juan
Seguin Elementary — a racially
diverse school in Richmond,
Tex., where at least 25 languages
are spoken, said Mariolga Parra,
an assistant principal at Seguin.
Parra said she has progressed
through the stages of grief —
from anger to acceptance —
after the late-August hurricane.
Flooding damaged the homes
of a dozen staff members and, in
the wake of Harvey, Seguin
students were divided between
two campuses.
The most difficult aspect of
the transition, she said, is having the student body separated.
There’s a lost sense of identity
and unity.
“It’s been a journey,” she said.
“Everything’s different. Everything’s new.”
Parra couldn’t provide a dollar estimate of damage at the
school but said students will be
displaced long-term. The money raised in Fairfax will probably go toward purchasing carts
stocked with iPads — necessary
because one of the schools that
the students moved into was
built exclusively for wireless
technology.
Despite the difficulties, Parra
said the school has been blessed
with help from strangers and
community members who have
overwhelmed the school with
supplies.
It has been most difficult, she
said, for the adults at the school.
The children, she said, come to
class smiling and lift spirits.
“The kids have adapted beautifully. This kind of thing reminds you why you’re a teacher,” she said.
Fairfax isn’t alone in its efforts to help students and teachers in Texas.
Students at City Springs Elementary/Middle School in Baltimore drew the attention of
Ellen DeGeneres after raising
more than $1,000 and are
scheduled to appear on her
TV show.
debbie.truong@washpost.com
‘I am insanely worried. I’ve been here
since I was 3. This is all that I know.’
STUDENTS FROM B1
REUTERS AND BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mark Herring, left, and John Adams will meet on Friday for their second attorney general debate.
Polls give Herring slight edge in Va.
VIRGINIA FROM B1
employers to deny workers insurance coverage for contraceptives.
Adams, a politically conservative attorney who works at a
powerful Richmond law firm,
charges that Herring should stick
to the job of advising the General
Assembly and defending state
laws.
Adams said his personal beliefs — he is opposed to abortion,
same-sex marriage and requirements that employers provide
contraceptive coverage — will not
influence his decisions as attorney general.
“I think the attorney general
needs to defend the laws that the
citizens passed . . . not pick and
choose,” Adams told the Richmond Times-Dispatch editorial
board recently.
The candidates accuse each
other of misrepresenting their
positions.
But Mark Rozell, dean of the
George Mason University Schar
School of Policy and Government, said both men are simply
playing to their base, trying to
turn out their voters in what is
traditionally a low-turnout election.
Polls show that Herring holds a
narrow but consistent lead over
Adams, but many voters remain
undecided.
“It seems that the candidates
have all forgotten about appealing to the middle and mobilizing
the independent voters, which is
puzzling given that the Post/
Schar School poll showed the
Virginia electorate is about onethird independents,” Rozell said.
“Appealing to the independent
voter used to have a moderating
influence on campaigns. Now
that candidates play mostly to the
base, all restraint goes out the
window.”
The candidates will meet Friday morning at a Leesburg event
sponsored by the Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce, and
unlike their June 17 meeting, this
one could be bare-knuckled.
With just three weeks to go
before Election Day, each camp is
running both broadcast and digital attack ads. Herring’s latest,
released Monday, calls Adams’s
health-care stance “a disaster for
Virginia families . . . seniors
charged thousands more . . . denying coverage to thousands of
veterans, children and the disabled.”
The Adams campaign, meanwhile, “tweaked” an earlier ad
that targeted Herring for failing
to follow up a proposal by his
predecessor, Republican Ken
Cuccinelli II, who suggested setting aside money to build shelters
for victims of sex trafficking. The
new version removes disputed
details but charges that Herring
“put his friends ahead of the
needy, the vulnerable, victims.”
The Republican Attorneys
General Association has been the
single biggest donor to the Adams campaign so far, giving
$2.75 million.
The Adams campaign says
three-quarters of its ad spending
has been positive.
Entertain
in your
new
“Our strong fundraising allows
us to advertise statewide to introduce John, a first time candidate
for any office, to Virginia voters
and highlight what makes him
the best choice to be the next
Attorney General,” campaign
manager Nick Collette said in a
statement. “We also have the
resources to educate voters on
Herring’s dismal record as Attorney General — a record of pursuing his political agenda and ignoring the law.”
The Democratic Attorneys
General Association, Herring’s
top donor, has given more than
$1 million to Herring, and Michael Bloomberg’s Independence
USA PAC has contributed
$825,000 in the past two years.
Pro- and anti-gun groups are
also weighing into the race, with
the National Rifle Association
spending more than $600,000 on
anti-Herring ads this election
season, Zuckerman said. Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund,
an advocacy group funded by
Bloomberg, is supporting Herring with $300,000.
Both campaigns reported raising about $1.6 million in campaign contributions in September. The Herring campaign reported that it started October
with more than $2.5 million cash
on hand. Adams raised $1.6 million in September, and as of
Sept. 30, his campaign fund had
$251,000 cash on hand, but the
campaign said it added $1.6 million during the first two weeks of
October.
patricia.sullivan@washpost.com
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College, and Montgomery College. Together, those three public schools have more than
1,600 DACA students.
“I have a personal passion
for this,” George Mason President Ángel Cabrera said. “We
have to figure out a solution.”
That’s what Cristina Velasquez craves. A senior in
Georgetown’s School of Foreign
Service, the 23-year-old plans
to graduate in December with a
bachelor’s degree in international politics. Born in Caracas,
Venezuela, she flew with her
mother to Madison, Wis., in
2000 and eventually settled in
the Miami area.
She said she was unaware of
her problematic immigration
status until she was blocked as
a teenager from obtaining a
driver’s license. She graduated
from high school in 2012, with
stellar grades but unsure how
she would afford college.
“We were living in the shadows,” she recalled.
A few days after Velasquez’s
graduation, President Barack
Obama announced DACA. Velasquez said she took a gap
year, started at Miami Dade
College and later transferred to
Georgetown. Along the way,
she got DACA protection. It
will expire in 2019.
“The fact that my life is in
the hands of Congress is difficult,” she said.
She urged lawmakers: “Act
now.”
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are going to cooperate with
Republicans on an end-of-year
bill that does not include
DACA.”
Cardin met with a small
group of DACA beneficiaries
Monday at the University of
Maryland at College Park. He
said he was struck by their
talent and drive “to help this
country, in health care, in business, in economics.”
At the White House on Monday, Trump reiterated in a news
conference that he expects
Congress “should be able to do
something” for the dreamers,
while adding: “We do want the
wall.”
Georgetown University President John J. DeGioia urged
Congress to give the dreamers a
path to citizenship. “Each of
them belongs here,” DeGioia
said in the gathering on campus at Copley Hall. “Their
membership in our community
is not only welcome but vital.”
DeGioia estimated that 50 to
60 of the 18,500 students at the
Jesuit university are DACA
beneficiaries. One is Luis Gonzalez, 20, a junior double-majoring in American studies and
government who grew up undocumented in Orange County,
Calif. He is active in a campus
group called UndocuHoyas, a
reference to the school’s mascot.
Gonzalez told the forum that
DACA has been essential for his
peace of mind as a student,
giving him “the confidence and
security I had not had before.”
With DeGioia and Gonzalez
on Monday were the presidents
of George Mason University,
Northern Virginia Community
UP TO
SUNROOMS*
|
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Brenda Medrano-Frías, 19, is a student at Northern Virginia
Community College and serves as a student liaison with the
college’s leadership. As a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
program recipient, she has a work permit and pays in-state tuition.
SUNROOM
$
SUNROOMS
versity that sought to publicize
the plight of those who could
soon lose protection from the
program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
DACA, as it is known, is a major
issue on campuses nationwide.
“I am insanely worried,” Medrano-Frías said. “I’ve been
here since I was 3. This is all
that I know, as far back as I can
remember. This is it.”
Now 19, Medrano-Frías is a
second-year student at the
Woodbridge campus of Northern Virginia Community College and serves as a student
liaison with the college’s leadership. She hopes to transfer to
Georgetown to study government and philosophy. Eventually, she wants to be an
immigration lawyer.
“It’s a passion,” she said. “I’ve
lived through it myself.” DACA
protection enables her to have
a work permit and qualify for
in-state tuition.
Higher education leaders nationwide are mobilizing to advocate for students like these,
known as “dreamers,” as their
fate hangs in the balance on
Capitol Hill.
The Trump administration
announced Sept. 5 that it would
stop accepting applications for
the program and stop issuing
renewals for DACA beneficiaries, except for certain cases in
which requests were filed by
Oct. 5. The administration’s
action gave a six-month window for the Republican-led
Congress to act before work
permits would start to expire.
Trump has sent mixed signals, saying he wants to work
with Democrats on a deal to
help the dreamers but also
announcing this month a set of
hard-line immigration principles — including funding for a
U.S.-Mexico border wall — that
could jeopardize prospects for
a bill. Republicans have focused on border security.
House Judiciary Committee
Chairman
Bob
Goodlatte
(R-Va.) said last week that
Congress “cannot fix the DACA
problem without fixing all of
the issues that led to the underlying problem of illegal immigration in the first place.”
But Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin
(D-Md.) expressed optimism
that a deal will be settled by
year’s end. “It is likely that
Congress will respond,” he said.
“I don’t believe that Democrats
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
PETULA DVORAK
An immigrant’s IRS
nightmare has yet to end
DVORAK FROM B1
He’s heartbroken that the
country he loves is treating him
this way.
Kwon was 32 when he came to
the United States with his wife,
son and daughter. He
immediately enlisted in the
Army. “When I came to the
United States, I had to do
something for the country,” said
Kwon, who became a U.S.
citizen.
After four years and an
honorable discharge, he built his
life as a solid American. “My
whole life was work, work,
work,” he said.
His nightmare began in 2011,
when he found federal agents on
his doorstep. They accused him
of “structuring” — depositing
money in increments of less than
$10,000.
A 1970 law called the Bank
Secrecy Act requires banks to
report any transactions bigger
than $10,000. This is why
terrorist groups, organized
crime, money launderers, tax
cheats and other bad hombres
deposit their cash in chunks less
than $10,000. And it’s why banks
are supposed to report people
who make lots of cash deposits
in smaller amounts, because it
looks like they’re structuring
their deposits to evade scrutiny.
These deposits are a crime
only if they are done with the
intention of staying beneath the
radar. So the government has to
know what’s in your heart to
charge you. In lots of cases, the
bank deposits are a trail of bread
crumbs leading to bigger crimes.
That simply wasn’t the case
with Kwon. He paid all his taxes,
reported what had to be
reported.
“Of all the cases I have worked
on, this one stands out for me,”
said attorney Edward Griffin,
who is now fighting to help
Kwon get his money back. “ I
firmly believe that the
government did wrong in
choosing to prosecute Mr. Kwon
and seize his assets. There was
no good policy purpose for the
prosecution. They did it for
money, and they destroyed a
good and honest man. It is
EZ
shameful. Which is why I am
still fighting for him.”
The IRS wouldn’t comment on
Kwon’s specific case, but a
spokesman noted that he
pleaded guilty to the structuring
charge.
When Kwon opened the gas
station for business a decade
ago, the teller at his local bank
told him that deposits larger
than $10,000 require a lot of
paperwork, so she suggested he
deposit less cash, but more
frequently, he told me.
So he did that. This is all he
was guilty of. Lots of other smallbusiness owners operate the
same way.
But around 2011, fervent
investigations targeted scores of
small businesses in Maryland.
The best known of these was
South Mountain Creamery, the
Maryland farm that delivers
eggs, dairy and produce to
doorsteps throughout the D.C.
area.
When the creamery was
accused of structuring — farmer
Randy Sowers also said his bank
teller told him to keep the
deposits under $10,000 to cut
paperwork — the farm’s entire
operating budget was seized.
The government eventually
found out that the cows weren’t
drug mules and the chickens
weren’t gangsters and allowed
Sowers to sign a settlement
agreement to get back half of
B5
SU
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Oh Suk Kwon, a South Korean immigrant and U.S. Army veteran,
lost his gas station after the IRS took his money in an investigation.
about $60,000 that the IRS took.
Sowers did it because he needed
that money to keep the farm
going.
Another Maryland farmer,
Calvin Taylor, had about
$90,000 seized in 2011 after the
government snagged him in a
similar investigation. He
couldn’t take the time to fight
the charge, either, and agreed to
a settlement where the
government returned about
$41,000.
Kwon went one step further,
pleading guilty to the
technicality of a structuring
charge. Yes, he repeatedly
deposited less than $10,000
cash, he reasoned. And yes, he
did it to avoid paperwork. But
the courts didn’t see what was
missing in his heart — criminal
intent.
The guilty plea killed his
business, and he watched
helplessly as his wife battled
cancer and died. He still thinks
her death was hastened by their
legal troubles.
The farmers didn’t walk away
from the fight. Backed by the
libertarian Institute for Justice,
Sowers, Taylor and others
testified before Congress,
petitioned and fought for three
years to get their cash back. The
IRS changed its guidelines in
2014, saying it would seize assets
that came only from criminal
activity. And less than a year
later, the Justice Department
announced that it would follow
suit.
That should mean that Kwon
gets his money back, too, right?
Wrong.
Griffin petitioned the IRS and
Justice Department again this
summer, citing the 2014 change
and Kwon’s clean record.
But Kwon “has not provided
any additional information” in
his case, Claiborne Porter, the
Justice Department’s acting
principal deputy chief of money
laundering and asset recovery,
wrote in the latest response to
the remission request.
Even if the IRS finally
returned his $59,117.47, Kwon
said the damage can never be
undone.
It wouldn’t get him his gas
station back, it wouldn’t bring
his wife back and it wouldn’t get
him his honor back.
He was shamed, he said, when
his neighbors were interviewed
during the investigation.
“They saw me as Korean. As a
veteran,” he said. “They were
surprised to see me as a
criminal. I will never forget
that.”
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
THE DISTRICT
Man accused of damaging dozens of vehicles in Logan Circle condo garage
Police make arrest;
windows were broken,
but nothing was taken
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
The people who live at the
Iowa Condominium overlooking
Logan Circle awoke Monday to
find their underground garage a
crime scene: more than three
dozen cars with windows shat-
tered or cracked and police compiling a list of victims.
What many cannot understand is why nothing appears to
have been taken.
A police report lists 41 vehicles
as being damaged — 38 with
busted windows and three with
cracked glass.
“He just randomly hit cars,”
said Christopher With, 73, one of
the victims who lives in the
building in the 1300 block of 13th
Street NW. “There are some expensive cars that he totally
missed or didn’t try for. He tried
to get into my ’85 Honda, which
had nothing in it of value.”
D.C. police said they arrested
Lendale Christie, 36, of no fixed
address and charged him with
burglary and destruction of
property. A D.C. Superior Court
judge on Monday ordered Christie detained until a preliminary
hearing scheduled for Thursday.
His attorney declined to comment.
A police report credits an unnamed witness with notifying
authorities after seeing a man
inside the secured garage under
the building’s courtyard. He ran
when police arrived, according to
the report, and was arrested in an
alley a block away from the
seven-story building with 97 residences.
Police said they have video
surveillance of the suspect entering and exiting the garage but
declined to elaborate. Several
residents said they thought the
man sneaked in as another person exited or entered.
Judy M. Harrison, president of
the condominium association
board of directors, said a vehicle
she had rented was damaged. She
said she was awaiting answers
from the property managers as to
how the break-in was accomplished.
“We’re a strong group of people,” Harrison said. “I’m sure
we’ll continue to remind ourselves to practice good security
when we come in and out of the
building.”
Representatives of the property management company did not
return calls seeking comment.
With, who is retired from the
education department of the Na-
tional Gallery of Art, said someone broke into the garage and
damaged vehicles about a year
ago. In that case, he said, a
crowbar was used to pry open the
garage door. After that, residents
had cameras and other security
devices installed.
With said that this time, his
Honda’s doors were unlocked,
though it appears the person who
tried to break in didn’t notice.
“He tried to jimmy the glass out
of the frame,” With said. “He
could’ve just opened the door.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
MARYLAND
The ‘walking school bus’ has no wheels, but it keeps kids safe and active
Under adult supervision,
children head to and
from elementary
BY
T ALIA R ICHMAN
Moments after dismissal, hundreds of students pour outside
from the back doors of Frederick
Elementary School in Baltimore.
Some hop into waiting cars
while others begin the short walk
to rowhouses on nearby blocks.
But a small group of children
hangs back, forming a single-file
line against a chain-link fence,
and waits to be led home by
adults in what’s called a “walking
school bus” — which doesn’t actually involve a bus.
The idea is simple. Under adult
supervision, a group of kids walk
to and from school together
through southwest Baltimore’s
Mill Hill and Carrollton Ridge
neighborhoods while playing
games, singing songs and learning tips on crossing the street
safely.
It’s a more common practice in
suburban communities, but it’s
gaining popularity in Baltimore.
School officials say the walking
school bus helps neighborhood
children facing a longer walk to
school after the closure of the
underutilized Samuel F.B. Morse
Elementary school nearby.
Frederick and Samuel F.B.
Morse merged this year as part of
the 21st Century Schools program, a $1 billion initiative to
rebuild the city’s aging school
buildings. Frederick was one of
the first schools to benefit from
the massive investment. It reopened this year with $31 million
worth of renovations.
Capitalizing on the new
schools, the city is targeting areas
around those schools for improvements such as better sidewalks and tree planting.
Still, the closure of Samuel F.B.
Morse upset parents like Dannie
Stubbs. The neighborhood school
was a two-minute walk from his
Carrollton Ridge home, and he
could take his daughter My’asia
there each morning with plenty of
time for him to get to work.
Frederick is about a half-mile
further, along streets Stubbs
doesn’t want his 6-year-old
daughter walking alone, for fear
of criminal activity. The city
school system only provides yellow bus service to elementary
schoolers who live more than a
mile from their neighborhood
KARL MERTON FERRON/BALTIMORE SUN
Line leader Sononia Drake, right, walks backward while leading Frederick Elementary School students in southwest Baltimore back home
as part of the “walking school bus” program. The chaperon position is a paid, part-time job for local residents.
school.
But Stubbs and My’asia, his
first-grade daughter, have embraced the walking school bus.
“She gets to school happy, and
she gets home happy,” Stubbs
said.
Now she travels to school
alongside about 10 schoolmates.
As they snake along sidewalks,
the kids play I-Spy, Simon Says
and sing songs.
Three adult staff members
walk with the group, keeping an
eye out for cars or other potential
dangers. The staff doesn’t let the
students embark on their walk
until everyone’s shoes are tied —
they want to eliminate the risk of
tripping on loose laces.
Typically, such initiatives are
volunteer-based, with a rotating
cast of neighborhood parents acting as chaperons. In the Frederick
Elementary model, though, the
role is a paid, part-time job for
local residents, adding to the program’s professionalism and providing a small economic boost to
the community.
The Baltimore Curriculum
Project, which runs Frederick Elementary as a public charter
school, picks up the tab.
“The top concern of parents is
how kids would travel safely to
and from school,” said Larry
Schugam, the Curriculum Project’s executive vice president. “We
learned about walking school
buses and identified that as one of
the solutions.”
The walking school bus is beneficial for a variety of reasons,
said Marieannette Otero of the
Safe Routes to School National
Partnership. Not only can adult
supervisors ensure student safety, but it encourages physical activity, too, she said.
“The walking school bus lends
itself well to getting kids moving
and providing more safety,” Otero
said. “I hope we’re going to start
seeing it being replicated
throughout the city.”
Sabrina Wiggins, Frederick Elementary’s community liaison,
said her school’s walking bus is
the first she’s heard of that pays
its bus captains a stipend. Each
staff member must pass a background check and get trained on
basic pedestrian safety skills.
Their job doesn’t end when they
drop off students in the morning
— they join the children in the
cafeteria for breakfast and escort
some of them to their first classes.
“We’re not just here to walk
them back and forth,” Michael
Shumam, 33, said. “We’re here as
mentors as well.”
Thelma Terrell, 74, is retired
and has lived near Frederick for
almost her entire life. The $10.50
per hour she earns helps her pay
bills. She also loves being around
the children.
“You get attached to them,”
said Terrell, whom the kids refer
to as Mama T. “If a child had a bad
night, you can see if they’re somewhat disturbed in the morning.
You can give them inspiration to
know it’s going to be a good day.”
Sometimes they talk about difficult matters, too. As the students walk home, they’ll sometimes step over broken liquor
bottles, cigarette butts or drug
paraphernalia. The children occasionally have to swerve around
piles of dumped trash. And they
often pass in front of boarded-up
vacant homes.
“The kids know more than we
think they do,” Terrell said.
“They’ve very observant. We try
to make them aware of what they
need to avoid.”
Recently, though, the city has
taken steps to improve the route
Frederick students take to school.
Along the “bus” route, children
walk along recently repaired sidewalks, cross roads on freshly
painted crosswalks and step under newly planted trees.
The city has committed more
than $1 million to making such
improvements within a half-mile
radius of Frederick through its
INSPIRE Program. The idea is
that stronger schools lead to
stronger neighborhoods, and vice
versa.
The money has gone toward
demolition efforts, street resurfacing and tree planting, among
other improvements. City officials also have worked to clear out
common dumping spaces.
The upgrades are focused
mainly on areas the students see
and use when they walk to school.
There are plans to make similar improvements in each of the
neighborhoods immediately surrounding a 21st Century School.
Between 23 and 28 school buildings are expected to be rebuilt
under the program in coming
years.
“Each of these buildings represents tens of millions of dollars in
investments,” INSPIRE planner
Jennifer Leonard said. “We recognized there was a real opportunity to leverage that to make
other changes in the neighborhood, as well.”
The INSPIRE program is developing improvement plans for the
neighborhoods
surrounding
eight other 21st Century schools.
The idea is to focus on the
quarter-mile area around each of
the modernized buildings. The
limited geographic area will allow for specific, changes to be
made quickly and with concentrated impact, officials say.
“If we don’t make an effort
around this effort at this time,
we’ve really missed an opportunity,” Leonard said.
In many of their preliminary
plans for neighborhoods, the
planning department recommends communities implement a
walking school bus to ensure safe
travel to and from schools.
“It’s definitely picking up,” said
Wiggins, the community liaison
from Frederick Elementary. “I
think we’re going to start seeing a
lot of people using the walking
school bus soon.”
— Baltimore Sun
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MARIAN CANNON SCHLESINGER, 105
Artist, writer chronicled Washington and beyond
BY
E MILY L ANGER
Marian Cannon Schlesinger,
an artist and memoirist who
captured in pictures and words
her life at Harvard University
as a professor’s daughter, in
China as a traveling adventurer
in the 1930s, and in Washington as the wife of Kennedy aide
Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., died
Oct. 14 at her home in Cambridge, Mass. She was 105.
Her son Andrew Schlesinger
confirmed her death and said
he did not know the cause.
Mrs. Schlesinger spent most
of her life in Cambridge, where
she grew up the daughter of
two accomplished parents —
Walter Bradford Cannon, a
physiologist who was credited
with identifying the “fight or
flight” response of the nervous
system, and Cornelia James
Cannon, a novelist and advocate for women’s contraceptive
rights.
But in the 1960s, Mrs. Schlesinger became a visible presence in Washington, where her
husband served as special assistant and, it often was said,
“court philosopher,” to President John F. Kennedy. First
honored with the Pulitzer Prize
in history for his volume “The
Age of Jackson” (1945), Schlesinger later received the Pulitzer in biography or autobiography for “A Thousand Days”
(1965), about the Kennedy
White House.
Mrs. Schlesinger, who met
her husband at Harvard and
was married to him from 1940
until their divorce in 1970,
brandished a noticeable independent streak in politics given
her husband’s allegiance to
Kennedy. In 1960, when her
husband announced his support for Kennedy in the Democratic primary, Mrs. Schlesinger publicly declared that she
stood by another Democrat,
former Illinois governor Adlai
Stevenson II, whom she had
supported in previous elections.
The New York Times recounted in 1965 that Robert F.
Kennedy, the future president’s
brother, wrote to Schlesinger
inquiring: “Can’t you control
your own wife — or are you like
me?”
2016 PHOTO BY HEIDI LEGG
Writer and painter Marian Cannon Schlesinger had an insider’s
view of the Kennedy White House as the wife of Arthur M.
Schlesinger Jr. She described it as a “roller-coaster atmosphere.”
When Kennedy won the election, Mrs. Schlesinger opened
her Cambridge home to him as
he sought to assemble a team of
intellectuals for his administration. Her proximity to power
gave her a clear view of the
White House and how it
worked.
“There was a roller-coaster
atmosphere in those years,” she
wrote in her memoir “I Remember: A Life of Politics,
Painting and People” (2012).
“One felt that the administration reveled in crisis, and there
were plenty of crises, some
genuine and some invented for
their own sake.
“I had a curious feeling that
great decisions were made in
an almost frivolous way, like
the Bay of Pigs fiasco, which
from my remote perch seemed
to have been run by a bunch of
hubris-mad teenagers, mostly
Yale boys, who dominated the
Central Intelligence Agency
and who looked upon the Cuban enterprise and the catastrophe rather like a HarvardYale game they would win next
time.”
In Washington, Mrs. Schlesinger joined the capital’s social scene and became known
as a portraitist, particularly of
children of the city’s elite.
Later, she produced works documenting the textile mills that
for generations had fueled the
economy in her native New
England. She had recalled her
upbringing in an earlier written work, “Snatched From
Oblivion: A Cambridge Memoir” (1979).
Marian Cannon was born
Sept. 13, 1912, in Franklin, N.H.,
where her family summered.
She recalled her mother as a
“dynamic, humorous, tender,
irresistible force that held her
far-flung, idiosyncratic family
together.”
In 1930, the mother took her
daughters across Europe in a
used Cadillac. After Mrs. Schlesinger received a bachelor’s
degree in history from Radcliffe College in 1934, her mother arranged for the freshly
minted graduate to travel to
China to visit her sister Wilma
Cannon Fairbank, another accomplished Cannon daughter,
and her husband, the China
scholar John Fairbank.
Studying under a Chinese
artist, Mrs. Schlesinger documented her travels with paintings of sword dancers, fishing
boats and the Forbidden City.
Later, she published a children’s book, “San Bao and His
Adventures in Peking” (1939),
about a boy from the Chinese
countryside who visits Beijing
for the first time.
“San Bao’s world . . . has
passed away, and yet the story
is so vivid and so universal that
children will feel that it is
unfolding this very minute,”
Daria Donnelly, an editor for
the publication Commonweal,
wrote in a review years later.
“Schlesinger invokes the great
literary themes: country versus
city life and values, loss and
recovery, the adventures of two
buddies, and the courage
young people exhibit in facing
the unknown.”
Later travels to Guatemala
produced Mrs. Schlesinger’s
volume “Children of the Fiery
Mountain” (1940). Another
book was “Twins At Our House”
(1945), inspired by her experience as the mother of twins.
She returned to Cambridge
following her divorce. “After
seven years of glitzy, unreal
Washington and after thirty
years of marriage, I felt depressed and disoriented,” she
wrote. “What to do with the
rest of my life? It seemed to
loom ahead for decades, empty
and desolate.”
She found renewed vigor
through
friendships
with
neighbors including the chef
Julia Child and the economist
John Kenneth Galbraith, and in
her artwork, which she continued until shortly before her
death.
Arthur Schlesinger Jr. died
in 2007, and their daughter
Katharine Kinderman died in
2004. Mrs. Schlesinger’s survivors include three children,
Stephen Schlesinger and Christina Schlesinger, both of New
York City, and Andrew Schlesinger of Cambridge; three
grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren.
In 2013, at age 101, she spoke
to the Atlantic, offering her
advice to modern women.
“Well-taken-care-of women
who are well-educated, highly
intelligent, well-read — a woman who has all this quality, all
this talent, all this energy and
yet nowhere to put it — I don’t
know. I really feel very sorry for
them,” she said.
“I would start by saying you
can involve yourself in local
problems. There are all sorts of
things that have to be tended to
in the world.”
DEATH NOTICE
TAMAYO
EASLEY
ERNESTO TAMAYO
9/18/1971 ~ 10/17/ 2014
In memory of Ernesto Tamayo
" The Cuban Guitarist"
Three years ago today, the music stopped.
Your Friends
DEATH NOTICE
ALDERTON
WILLIAM C. ALDERTON
Passed away peacefully on Thursday, October 12, 2017, surrounded by his loving and
devoted family and friends. Bill is survived
by his wife, Debby; and children, James,
Jennifer (Lyle), Cash (Jenny), Neal (Vicki),
and Ashley (C.J.). He is also survived by 10
grandchildren and one great-grandchild, as
well as a host of other relatives and many,
many friends. Family will receive friends on
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at Oakdale
Emory Church in Olney, MD at 10 a.m., with
funeral service following at 11 a.m. In lieu
of flowers, gifts in memory of Bill may be
directed to support the Medical Intensive
Care Unit at the University of Maryland
Medical Center. Call for information at 410328-5770.
AMMONS
Passed away Monday, October 16, 2017 in
Reston Hospital. She was preceded in death
by her parents, Robert Lee Williamson and
Della McGhee Williamson. Mary is survived by
two sons, Mark Edward Ammons and William
Stamps Ammons; six siblings, Melvin Williamson, Elizabeth Williamson Arrington, Nan
Williamson Schaller (Bob), Della Williamson
Salotti (Don), Dennis Williamson (Linda) and
Walter Williamson; as well as numerous nieces
and nephews. She was predeceased by three
brothers, Robert (Jerry) Williamson, Lucius
(Sam) Williamson and Richard Williamson. The
viewing will be held at Adams-Green Funeral
Home, 721 Elden St., Herndon, VA 20170, on
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 from 5 to 8 p.m.
BECKLEY
On Saturday, October 14, 2017,
Elaine M. Beckley, 75, of Bethesda, MD. Beloved wife of the
late Joseph M. Beckley; loving
mother of Mike Beckley (Leigh), Jim Beckley
(Carey) and Marguerite Campbell (Rob);
grandmother of Colin, Lucy, James, Emma,
Teddy, Fritz and Josephine; sister of Bob
Suttle, Roberta Kring and Chris Hankla.
She was preceded in death by her sisters,
Louise LeBorne and Pauline Elcenko.
Memorial Mass will be held at St. Raphael
Catholic Church, 1513 Dunster Road,
Rockville, MD on Thursday, October 19,
2017 at 10:30 a.m. Inurnment will be held at
a later date at Arlington National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made in her name to Cure CP,
www.CureCP.org or to Haven of Lake and
Sumter Counties, www.HavenLakeSumter.
org. Please sign the family guestbook at:
www.DeVolFuneral.com
ARGENT STUDIO
is going on inside,” Robin Ault, a
member of the panel that selected
Mr. Argent’s piece for the site, told
the now-defunct Rocky Mountain
News in 2005.
Built with polymer concrete on
a shell of fiberglass molds, the
10,000-pound sculpture was designed with the help of computer
software, placing Mr. Argent at
the fore of a movement known as
digital sculpture.
Mr. Argent was on the board of
the Digital Stone Project, a nonprofit that supports artists trying
to use emerging technologies
such as robotic stone cutting. In
recent years, he used computeraided design software to create
sculptures with once-impractical
whorls, warps, swirls and bends.
Elsewhere in Denver was “Pillow Talk” (2001), a stack of marble
pillows carved with enough size
and skill that they could fit on
what might be called a Colorado
king-size bed. There was also, on
the campus of the university
where he taught, “Whispers”
(2002), a set of limestone columns
and benches carved in the shape
of lips. Sitting on a bench triggers
an audio recording of a lecture on
poetry, science or the theory of
rhetoric.
Mr. Argent seemed to have a
particular fascination with the
undulating shape of human lips,
drawing on them again for a granite sculpture, “Pieces Together”
(2014), at a hospital near Los Angeles. The lips were assembled in
the shape of puzzle pieces and
inspired by the mouths of local
residents whom Mr. Argent photographed and interviewed for
the project.
Much to his chagrin, Mr. Argent
said he remained known as “the
guy who does big animals.” He
designed “Leap” (2011) for Sacramento International Airport’s
Terminal B, creating an enormous
red glass rabbit suspended from
the ceiling mid-hop and headed
toward an oversize granite suitcase near the baggage claim.
He also returned to bears for “I
Am Here” (2014), creating a 13-ton
giant panda that appears to be
pulling itself onto the roof of a
shopping mall in Chengdu, China.
He said he turned down commissions for other massive animal
projects, including a 100-foot outdoor bear, that seemed to call for
more gimmick than art.
His most recent project, a
sculpture-filled plaza near San
Francisco’s City Hall, features an
undulating, 92-foot stainless steel
sculpture inspired by the Venus
de Milo. Just shorter than the
Statue of Liberty, the piece was
completed in May.
“I wanted to bring forth something that is like a genie in a
bottle,” he told the San Francisco
Chronicle in 2016. The design, he
said, was guided by the size of the
24-story buildings around the plaza. When the developer asked
whether Mr. Argent could make
his sculpture smaller, he recalled,
“I said no.”
Lawrence Nigel Argent was
PHYLLIS BRADY FORDHAM
Died peacefully of natural causes in her
home, surrounded by her daughters on
October 12, 2017 at the age of 81. She was a
beloved and devoted mother, grandmother,
sister, aunt, dear friend to many, mentor,
activist, feminist, poet, fearless adventurer,
lover of literature, the arts, gardening, and
travel. She was known and loved for her
boldness, intelligence, and wit.
She was born and raised in Philadelphia,
married at the age of 21, and became a
wife, mother to five daughters, and homemaker. She later moved to Maryland with
her family, first to Rockville and then to Glen
Echo. In her 30’s she pursued an education
and career, first earning a Bachelor’s degree
in social work and political science from
the University of Maryland, and a later
in life, a degree in English literature. She
served as councilwoman for the city of
Rockville, MD from 1976 to 1982, was a
mayoral and state senate candidate, and
later a sales and marketing professional in
the commercial real estate business. She
served as President of Peerless Rockville
historical society from 1974-1976, and as
editor of the Glen Echo town newspaper
as well as volunteer for at the Washington,
DC Building Museum and The Kennedy
Center. Her other pursuits included sailing,
fly fishing, riflery and being the life of any
party she hosted or attended. A funeral
mass will be held at Church of the Little
Flower in Bethesda on Friday, October 20
at 12 Noon. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to Doctors Without Borders.
GOOCH
POLLY PIERSON GOOCH
Sculptor who brought whimsy into public view
Artist Lawrence Argent became primarily known as a creator of
giant animals, including a huge, red glass rabbit in an airport.
FORDHAM
ELAINE M. BECKLEY
emily.langer@washpost.com
LAWRENCE ARGENT, 60
Lawrence Argent, a sculptor
whose monumental, brightly colored works — including a 40-foot
bear of lapis lazuli blue, perched
on its hind legs and peering inside
the Denver convention center —
brought a sense of lighthearted
wonder to public spaces on two
continents, died Oct. 4 at a hospital in Denver. He was 60.
The cause was cardiac arrest,
said David Hemsi, studio manager at Argent Studio.
Mr. Argent, a onetime medical
student in Australia who went on
to lead the sculpture program at
the University of Denver, spent
more than three decades creating
playful photographs, sculptures
and art installations, often featuring found objects and what Mr.
Argent called “an edge of humor.”
Hanging two blood-red street
sweeper brushes together, he
formed a testicular work he titled
“Cojones” (1999). Pairs of antique
women’s gloves, framed side by
side in polyester resin, created a
“Library of Applause” (1994), and
the birth of his sons inspired a
series of abstract, 250-pound
bronze and marble sculptures in
the shape of pacifiers.
Mr. Argent became best known
as a whimsical artist of the public
realm beginning with “I See What
You Mean,” erected just outside
the Colorado Convention Center
in 2005. Commonly known as “the
big blue bear,” the work has become an emblem of hip, 21st-century Denver, though its construction initially led some friends to
ask whether Mr. Argent was now
working for Disney.
Instead, he said, the idea arose
from a photo of a black bear looking inside someone’s window — a
relatively common occurrence in
Denver, where the animals sometimes rummage for food during
droughts — and a desire to play off
outsiders’ expectations of art in
Colorado, where depictions of
mountains and bears have become staples of Western kitsch.
It was also a tongue-in-cheek
comment on the nature of the
convention center itself, a building used less by local residents
than by out-of-towners who may
not venture far into the city. “This
represents people who live here
who are trying to figure out what
WILLIAM H. EASLEY
Of Mt. Rainier, MD, peacefully departed this
life on Saturday, October 7, 2017. Beloved
father of Ben Crews, William R. Easley (Donna)
and Ricky Easley (Nikki). He is also survived
by seven grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren; four siblings, Jean Campbell, Virginia
Willis (David), Mable Stephens and Viola “Betty”
Lawson; devoted friend, Josie; a host of nieces,
nephews, other relatives and friends. Viewing
will be held at 10 a.m. until time of service
at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 18, 2017,
at Second New St. Paul Baptist Church, 2400
Franklin St., NE, Washington, DC. 20018. Rev.
Nathaniel Benjamin, Jr., Pastor. Interment to
follow in Mt. Olive Apostolic Church Cemetery,
Halifax, VA 24558.
Arrangements by Ft. Lincoln Funeral Home.
MARY LEE WILLIAMSON AMMONS
BRANCH
H ARRISON S MITH
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
IN MEMORIAM
BONNIE RAE BRANCH
BY
. TUESDAY,
born in Essex, England, on Jan.
24, 1957, and raised in Melbourne,
Australia. His father was an architect who designed modernist
structures in Australia and Southeast Asia.
Mr. Argent initially studied to
become a doctor, and he worked
three years as a technician in an
operating room before finding
himself frustrated with what he
described as “the hierarchical nature of a hospital.”
He received a bachelor’s degree
in sculpture from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in
1983 and traveled to the United
States to receive a master’s degree,
which wasn’t offered in Australia
at the time. He graduated in 1986
from the Rinehart School of
Sculpture, part of the Maryland
Institute College of Art in Baltimore.
Mr. Argent joined the University of Denver in 1993 and was
named an emeritus professor earlier this year, as he stepped away
from teaching to focus on commissions and studio work.
His marriage to Anne Cashman
ended in divorce. Survivors include their two sons; a brother;
and a partner, Yazmina Abdul.
Mr. Argent said that his public
art projects, in contrast to some of
his studio work, were designed
toward accessibility while retaining a sense of mystery: Why was
the bear blue? Why was the rabbit
hopping toward a suitcase?
“Art can seem inaccessible,” he
told Colorado Homes & Lifestyles
magazine after completing his
signature blue bear. “I thought it
would be important to give people
a sense of confidence, that they
can participate in and understand
art. I want to undermine this
notion that art ought to be a
certain thing.”
Passed away on Thursday,
October 12, 2017. Daughter of
Grace McCormick and the late
Raymond McCormick, Sr. She
is survived by her devoted children, Stephanie (Ace) Todd and
Taurean (Janine) Branch; five
grandchildren, Raelen, Delanie,
London, Grace and Matthew; siblings, Beverly McCormick, Barbara (Charles) McCormickButler, Brenda (Reginald) Glasgow, Bridgette
McCormick, Bernadette (James) Mason, Rodney McCormick, Bernita (Percy) Turner and
Bernell (Brian) Champagne; a host of relatives
and friends. She was preceded in death by her
loving husband, Delaney Branch; brother, Raymond McCormick, Jr. and sister, Brenee Johnson. Family and friends will unite on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 from 9:30 a.m., until
time of service 10:30 a.m. at Lighthouse Baptist
Church, 3150 Middletown Rd., Waldorf, MD.
Interment following at Trinity Memorial Gardens, Waldorf, MD.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
Of Bethesda, MD and Washington, DC died
peacefully with family by her side on October
12, 2017, her 91st birthday. Preceded in death
by her husband, Ralph Gooch and son Ellis.
Survivors include son Everett (Nancy), daughter Ellen (Julie), granddaughter Katelyn, many
nieces and nephews and friends she called
family.
Services will be held October 21 at 2 p.m.
at Forest Hills of DC, 4901 Connecticut Ave.,
NW, Washington, DC. Obituary posted at
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
GOODWIN
BUSSIE
BYRON ANTHONY BUSSIE
Entered into eternal rest on Tuesday, October
10, 2017. Mr. Bussie will lie in state at Zion
Baptist Church, 4850 Blagden Avenue, NW
on Thursday, October 19 from 10 a.m. until
service at 11 a.m. Interment Heritage Memorial. www.stewartfuneralhome.com
CROTTS
LAWRENCE LEWIS CROTTS "Larry"
(Age 61)
Formerly of Viers Mill Village on Friday, October
13, 2017. He is survived by lifelong partner,
Debbie Knapp; daughter, Bonnie P. Pulise (Cris);
grandchildren, Sebastian, Maximus, Isabella,
and Cecelia; mother, Grace C. Crotts; and
siblings, Donna Stone (Richard), Gregory Crotts
(Linda) and Dennis Crotts (Mary). A memorial
services will be held on Wednesday, October
18, 2017 at 11 a.m., at the Keeney & Basford
Funeral Home, 106 E. Church St., Frederick,
MD. Deacon Mike Currens will officiate. Interment private. Please visit Mr. Crotts' online
memorial at:
www.keeneybasford.com
WILLIAM V. GOODWIN, JR.
On Sunday, October 15, 2017 of Charlotte
Hall, MD. Beloved husband of the late Teresa
E. Goodwin; father of William V., III, Daniel
L., Mark A., Christopher P. and Gregory F.
Goodwin, Teresa L. Fincham, Meredith A.
Quinn and Lisa M. Hood; brother of Dorothy
Thomasen; longtime companion of Marian
Cauble. Also survived by many loving grandchildren, great-grandchildren, one greatgreat-grandchild and numerous step-children
and step-grandchildren. Family and friends
are invited to William's Celebration of Life at
St. Columba Catholic Church, 7804 Livingston
Rd., Oxon Hill, MD 20745 on Wednesday,
October 18, 2017 from 10 a.m. until Mass of
Christian Burial at 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Online guest book is available
at
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
When the need
arises, let families
find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral
Services Directory, please
call paid Death Notices at
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CORRECTION
The Oct. 14 obituary for Mary
Lou Lamphere, a teacher and
volunteer, incorrectly reported
her date of death. She died July
23, not Aug. 22.
Because your loved one served proudly...
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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
STINGL
MORGAN
WIYGUL
HEDGMAN
McARTOR
DOROTHY G. HEDGMAN
JEAN DAVIS McARTOR (Age 88)
Entered into eternal rest on Friday, October
6, 2017. Survived by her loving companion,
James Walter Proctor; six children, Sheri Theresa Pittman, Linda Michelle Smalls, Rudolph Lee
Hedgman, Jr., Phillp Wayne Hedgman, Anita
LaRonda Smalls and Sean Dante Hedgman;
13 grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; six
great-great-grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends. Ms. Hedgman may be
viewed at STEWART FUNERAL HOME, 4001
Benning Rd., NE on Thursday, October 19 from
10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment
Resurrection Cemetery.
Died at Brookshire Nursing Home in Hillsborough, NC on Friday, October 13, 2017.
Jean was predeceased by her parents and
husband of 69 years, Robert C. McArtor.
Survivors are her children, Susan Bellinger
(Dwight) and Curt McArtor (Natalie); granddaughters, Samantha Bellinger-Cocuzza (Carl)
and Gwen Bellinger; and sister, Joyce Norton;
Visitation, 4 to 8 p.m., on Friday, October
20, service, 11 a.m., on Saturday, October
21 at Everly-Wheatley Funeral Home, 1500
W. Braddock Rd., Alexandria, VA. Interment
following at Mt. Comfort Cemetery. Memorials
may be made to Hospice or the charity of your
choice.
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O'ROURKE
PAULINE C. O'ROURKE (Age 90)
DEATH NOTICE
HUBBARD
LESLIE ANNE HUBBARD
(née Wrightson)
Passed away peacefully on Saturday, October 14, 2017 in Fredericksburg, VA. Leslie
was the spouse of 18 years to Dennis
M. Hubbard of Wheaton, MD. She was
preceded in death by her mother, Harriet
Dise Wrightson; father, Frank Powell
Wrightson, and brother, Alan Michael
Wrightson.
Leslie worked in food services facilities
design and recently moved from Gaithersburg, MD to Lake Anna, VA.
She is survived by her brother, Steven
Powell Wrightson (TJ Wrightson); sister
Mary Teresa "Terri" Wrightson (Susan
Johnson); and nieces and nephews: Carla
Hubbard, Paula Hubbard, Katie Wrightson, Jenna Hubbard, and Mark Wrightson
(Denise Wrightson).
Leslie always enjoyed socializing with her
many friends and family. She especially
enjoyed her time vacationing at Lake
Temagami in Northern Ontario, Canada,
as well as boating in Lake Anna with her
dear friends and family.
Services for Leslie will be held at a later
date yet to be determined. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be directed to
Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center in
Fredericksburg, VA or Montgomery Hospice of Montgomery County, Maryland.
On Saturday, October 14, 2017, of
Silver Spring, MD, passed away surrounded by family. Beloved wife
of the late Bill O'Rourke; mother of
Kevin O'Rourke, Mary Ann Capelle,
Maureen Sheffield, Eileen Polachek,
Dan O'Rourke, and Bill O'Rourke; sister of Walt
Coughlin, Jane Johnson, and the late Bernie
Coughlin and Betty Burke. She was much
loved by her 20 grandchildren and 22 greatgrandchildren. She lived in the Washington,
DC area for the last 70 years, originally from
Melrose, IA. Relatives and friends may call at
Collins Funeral Home, 500 University Boulevard
West, Silver Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), on
Thursday, October 19, 2017, from 7 to 9 p.m.
Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. John
the Evangelist Church, 10103 Georgia Avenue,
Silver Spring, MD, on Friday, October 20, 2017
at 11 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
SAAR
ALICE N. SAAR “Pat”
On Tuesday, October 10, 2017 of Rockville
MD, beloved wife of the late Willard A Saar,
mother of Willard M Saar, Douglas Saar and
Gretchen Triantos. She is also survived by
eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. A graduate of Elmira College in 1950,
she went on to have a successful career
as an enrolled agent giving tax advice,
hosting seminars and preparing returns
for businesses and individual clients until
2012, when she retired to take care of her
husband. An advocate for the homeless,
a long-time member of St Luke’s Lutheran
Church in Derwood, MD, she was a warm
loving person who enriched the countless
lives of others and lived every day of her
life to the fullest. Relatives and friends are
invited to attend a Memorial Celebration
Service to be held at 11 a.m., on Saturday,
November 4, 2017 at St. Luke's Lutheran
Church in Derwood, MD. Memorial contributions can be made in Alice’s memory to
Montgomery Hospice Casey House, 1355
Picard Drive, Suite 100, Rockville, MD
20850.
JOSEPHINE STINGL "Jo" (Age 92)
Long-time resident of McLean, VA and widow
of Lt. Cdr. Alfred L. Stingl, passed away on
Thursday, October 5, 2017.
The daughter of Walter and Mary (Dobek) Glod
and the fourth of nine children, Jo was born
August 5, 1925, in Woonsocket, RI. She earned
her Registered Nurse degree at Boston City
Hospital and then proudly served as a United
States Navy nurse. Jo later earned a Bachelor
of Science, Nursing degree from Marymount
University and continued her career as a supervisory nurse at the National Institute of Health
(NIH) in Bethesda, MD. She was a devoted
Catholic and parishioner of St. Luke Catholic
Church in McLean, since 1967.
Jo is survived by her children, Bonnie Wolf
(Tom), Sandra Stingl (Lawrence Lee), Daniel
Stingl (Angela), David Stingl and Christina
Stingl; eight grandchildren and one greatgrandchild; and three siblings, Elizabeth DePedro, Judith Chofay and Celia McQuade. She
was preceded in death by siblings, Albert
and John Glod, Helen Brambilla, Constance
Marquedant and Shirley Clark.
Visitation will be held at 10 a.m., on Saturday,
October 21, at St. Luke Catholic Church, 7001
Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA 22101, followed
by Mass of the Resurrection at 12 noon.
Interment Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date. In lieu of flowers, the family asks
that donations be made to the American Heart
Assn or the National Stroke Foundation.
STONE
FLORENCE RUTH CHADDER STONE
(Age 100)
Formerly of Takoma Park, MD. Died on
Wednesday, October 11, 2017. Born in
Peabody, MA, to British parents, John and
Edith Chadder. She was predeceased by
her husband, Francis. Florence is survived
by her children, David, Richard and Susan
(Robert); and grandchildren, Kelley (Jenn)
and Leo Spada. Memorial services will
be held on Wednesday, October 25 at
11 a.m., at the Guild Chapel at Asbury
Methodist Village, 211 Russell Avenue,
Gaithersburg, MD. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to
Silver Spring United Methodist Women,
8900 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, MD
20910.
SAWYER
LESLIE MORGAN "Deehart"
3/29/1931 ~ 10/17/2015
We will never stop loving you or missing you.
Your loving family
Lorna, Kahlita, Tony (Kim), Kheli (Hannibal),
Kwame II (Brittany), Charlise and Kobe
DEATH NOTICE
HENDERSON
SUSAN B. HUNN "Sue" (Age 66)
Of Manassas, VA on Saturday, October 14, 2017
at Manassas Health and Rehabilitation Center.
Daughter of the late Charles Heuston Hunn
and Grace Leona (Dumm) Hunn; sister of Mary
Lou (Hunn) Van Derlaske and Deborah (Hunn)
Milius. She is also survived by four nieces,
Kristin and Rebecca Van Derlaske and Joanna
and Megan Milius. Friends may call at FAIRFAX
MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME, 9902 Braddock
Rd., Fairfax, VA on Wednesday, October 18,
2017 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. and where
funeral services will be held on Thursday,
October 19, 2017 at 10 a.m. Interment to
follow at Fairfax Memorial Park. In addition
to flowers, contributions may also be made
to Toys for Tots or St. Joseph's Indian School.
www.fmfh.com
KERN
JEROME KERN
On Sunday, October 15, 2017, Dr.
JEROME
KERN,
Ph.D.
of
Charleston, SC, formerly of
Potomac, MD. Devoted father of
Melissa (Richard) Peters, Sheril
(John Hughes) Kern and David
Kern. Loving grandfather of Rachel and
Matthew Peters. Graveside funeral services
will be held on Tuesday, October 17, 2017,
1 p.m. at Judean Memorial Gardens, Olney,
MD. Shiva will be observed at the home of
Melissa and Richard Peters immediately after
the interment through Monday morning, with
minyans at 7:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the George Washington University Institute for Biomedical Sciences. Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
KOHLER
DONALD MALCOLM HENDERSON
"Donnie" was born on August 25, 1960 in
Alexandria, VA to the late Hester Henderson.
In 1979, Mr.Henderson began working at The
Washington Post in the maintenance department where he retired after 30 years of service.
Donald Henderson was a true angel on this
earth and was called back home to be with
the Lord on October 5, 2017. He is survived by
his three daughters, Sheryl Henderson of North
East, MD, Sonya Henderson of Glen Burnie, MD,
and Sabrina Henderson of Elkton, MD; siblings,
Deborah Henderson of Alexandria, VA and
Denise Dupree-Henderson of Warner Robins,
GA; former wife, Doris Henderson of Glen
Burnie, MD; best friend, Mr. John of Warner
Robins, GA. He will also be missed by his
pet/roll dog, Kino Henderson. There will be
no service. You are forever and truly loved.
On Tuesday, October 10, 2017, MARY LOUISE
SAWYER of Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife of
the late Edward Leigh Sawyer; loving mother
of Edward Leigh Sawyer, Jr.; adored sister of
Jeanette Miller, Donald Larson and the late
Robert N. Larson. She is also survived by a
host of relatives and friends. Friends may call
at the HINES-RINALDI FUNERAL HOME, 11800
New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD on
Wednesday, October 18 from 4 to 8 p.m. where
services will be held on Thursday, October 19
at 10 a.m. Interment Parklawn Memorial Park,
Rockville, MD. Please sign and view the family
guestbook at
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
During his 36-year tenure, he became one
of the most nationally and internationally
renowned hydrologists. He was a prominent pioneer in developing operational river
and flood forecasting techniques, and provided strong influence and leadership for
technical and program directions. In addition, he was instrumental in establishing
the Commission of Hydrology within the
United Nation’s World Meteorological Organization, and served as the Commission’s
first president.
To this day, an award named in Max’s
honor is given each year by the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
to recognize an individual for meritorious
service and for their sustained and distinguished accomplishments and contributions to the National Weather Service
Hydrologic Services Program. Max was
a member of The National Academy of
Engineering, The American Society of Civil
Engineers, and The American Meteorological Society.
He was a devoted husband, loving father,
and loyal friend. He will be deeply missed.
Services private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to the
National Academy of Engineering; American Society of Civil Engineers Foundation;
University of New Mexico; or the American
Geophysical Union.
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DEATH NOTICE
McCHESNEY
ALPERSTEIN
Fred had a distinguished professional life
which began with the practice of law at a
large firm in Washington, DC. He went on to
serve as the Associate Director for Policy and
Evaluation at the Federal Trade Commission
during the Reagan administration. The bulk
of his substantial career, spanning 35 years,
was as a professor of both law and economics at numerous universities, including
Northwestern where he was the James B.
Haddad Chair from 1999 to 2011, Cornell
from 1997 to 1999, Emory from 1983 to
1997, and, most recently, the University of
Miami School of Law where he was the de
la Cruz-Mentschikoff Endowed Chair in Law
and Economics.
SHARPE
CARIANN DE'NISE HITHON
CHARLES W. SHARPE, SR.
Officers and members of Felix
Lodge No. 3, F.& A.M. (PHA) are
notified of the death of PM
Charles W. Sharpe, Sr., a faithful
member of the Craft for 49 years.
Viewing will be held at 9:30 a.m.,
on Tuesday, October 17 at the First Baptist
Church of Highland Park, 6801 Sheriff Rd,
Hyattsville, MD 20785, with Masonic service at
10:30 a.m., followed by funeral at 11 a.m. The
Craft will assemble at 9:45 a.m., to perform
Last Sad Rites.
Ernest Mitchell, WM
Timothy McRae, P.M., Secy.
ETHAN ROSS ALPERSTEIN
12/09/1991-10/17/2002
15 years later the impact your life has had
on so many family members and friends
warms our hearts. Your legacy lives on. We
miss you each and every day, especially at
times of family celebrations and holidays.
That will never change.
Our beautiful and precious Ethan,
forever you will live in our hearts.
SMITH
Our beloved, Cariann transitioned to be in
the presence of her Lord and Savior Jesus
Christ on Sunday, October 8, 2017. On that
day the world lost a budding star because
in her short life Cariann left a lasting legacy.
She is survived by her parents, Cary J. Hithon
and Sherry A. Hithon; sister, Rachel Hithon;
godfather, Kenneth Trass; godmother, Erlene
Frances; a host of uncles, aunts, cousins and
friends. On Thursday, October 19, 2017, friends
may visit with the family from 10 a.m. until time
of funeral service at 11 a.m. at Woodstream
Church, 9800 Lottsford Rd., Bowie, MD.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
LITTLEJOHN
Officers and members of Sidney
Mudd Lodge #748 are hereby notified
of the passing of Willie J. Smith, Jr.
Elk service 11 a.m. on Wednesday,
October 18 at Greater Saint John
Cathedral, 11425 Old Marlboro Pike,
Upper Marlboro, MD., Viewing 10
a.m. to 11:50 a.m., Funeral 12 Noon.
James Sprowl, Exalted Ruler
Gary Barnett, Fin Secy
DAVIS
BETTIE L. LITTLEJOHN
CARRIE L. DAVIS (Age 92)
January 1, 1924 ~ October 17, 2016
Loving memories will always remain
in our hearts
Family and Friends
KONTZIAS
and wanted to pay back to his community
again and again. Contributions were made
to Children’s Hospital, Fairfax Hospital, The
McLean Chamber Orchestra, the Fairfax
Orchestra, and the McLean Volunteer Fire
Department. As the Fairfax Journal Editor
Tom Wuriu, wrote in his newspaper, we know
of no one who gave more to his community
in such a relatively short period of time.
GEORGE ZACHARY KONTZIAS
In 1963 George returned briefly to Sparta
where he met his wife Eleni, (Helen), and
returned to Canada. Due to the extremely
harsh Canadian winters, George, Stavros and
his brother in law Thanasi moved with their
families to Northern Virginia in 1969. With his
new found business experience he open his
first restaurant in Arlington, Virginia and soon
after opened another restaurant he named
Zachary's of McLean in 1975.
1975 was a particularly significant year in
the history of McLean as it was the year
the McLean Community Center was opened
after decades of effort. 1975 was also the
year George became an American citizen
which was one of the proudest moments
of his life. George and his wife Helen felt
a strong compelling obligation to give back
to their community after they found success
with their restaurants. Together they
launched the highly successful Greek Nights
Festival in conjunction with the McLean
Spring Day Festival consisting of food, music,
and dance, with all the proceeds going to the
local community.
George was a very rare individual, a man
who felt he owed a debt to his community
On Thursday, October
12, 2017 Fred Sanderson McChesney died
peacefully with family at
his side, in Washington,
DC. Beloved husband of
the late Sheila Elaine McChesney; loving
father of Madeleine Claire (Eduardo Patricio
Wisbrun), Mary Elizabeth (“Lizzy”), Robert
William, IV (Kristina Igorevna) and James
Edward; and grandfather of Thomas Daniel
and Nicolas Matthew Wisbrun.
Fred was the eldest of seven children and
was adored by his surviving siblings, Robert
William, III, S.J., Michael Joseph, William David
(Annie), Kathleen Marie (Brian Alpert), Marie
Louise (“Weed”) Forte (Greg) and Mary Woodchek (Eric). He was loved and admired by his
13 nieces and nephews.
When the need
arises, let families
find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
George Kontzias died peacefully surrounded
by his loving family on October 13, 2017.
Born in Skoura Sparta, Greece the youngest
of six children. With limited economic opportunities in Greece, George immigrated to
Montreal, Canada in 1954 right after high
school. George and his brother Stavros with a
tireless work ethic and ambition for success
went into the restaurant business in Canada.
FRED SANDERSON McCHESNEY
(Age 68)
Fred was born in Washington, DC, on November 19, 1948, the son of Robert William
McChesney, Jr. and the late Louise Sanderson
McChesney, and was raised in Montgomery
County, Maryland. He attended Our Lady
of Lourdes School in Bethesda, MD and
Holy Redeemer School in Kensington, MD
graduated from Our Lady of Good Counsel
High School in 1966 and the College of the
Holy Cross in 1970. Fred went on to earn his
J.D. from the University of Miami in 1978 and
his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of
Virginia in 1982.
WILLIE J. SMITH, JR. "Butch"
He was born in Lincolnville, KS on September 6, 1915. He attended the University of
New Mexico studying both engineering and
physics. After graduating in 1939, he went
to work for the US Weather Bureau. During
his first 15 years of service, he served
as a Research Scientist in the Hydrology
Programs of the Weather Service until 1951
when he was appointed Chief Hydrologist.
In 1972, he was appointed Director of the
Office of Hydrology, retiring in 1973.
He co-authored the well-known university
level hydrology texts, Applied Hydrology
and Hydrology for Engineers, which were
used both here and abroad. Applied Hydrology is said to be a book that provided the
foundation for the development of modern
hydrology.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
MAX ADAM KOHLER (Age 102)
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
HITHON
To be seen in the Funeral
Services Directory, please
call paid Death Notices at
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Max Kohler of Silver Spring, MD, passed
away on October 12, 2017. He is survived
by Estella, his loving wife of 78 years,
his three children, six grandchildren, nine
great-grandchildren and one great-greatgranddaughter.
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SUE WIYGUL
Much loved matriarch of our family and our
business, Wiygul Automotive Clinic, passed
away Sunday, October 15, 2017. She is survived by her sons, Oscar and Bill; daughter,
Elizabeth McLaughlin, along with their families
of 10 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her beloved
husband, Oscar Sr., and her eldest daughter,
Suzanne Crawley.
A celebration of life will be held at 7 p.m., on
Wednesday, October 18, at Fairfax Memorial
Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Rd. Fairfax, VA
22032. In lieu of flowers, the Wiygul family
suggest memorial contributions be made to
ALIVE! ALexandrians InVolved Ecumenically!
www.fmfh.com
George was very active in the local business
and professional associations, and the
McLean Chamber of Commerce. In 1984
George was honored as the Citizen of The
Year for his service and contributions to his
local community. His most treasured award
was when he was selected to receive the
Americanism Medal presented by the DAR,
The Daughters of the American Revolution,
sponsored by the Freedom Hills Chapter of
McLean. The award was established to honor
a naturalized American citizen who have
shown outstanding qualities of leadership,
trustworthiness, patriotism, and outstanding
service to the community. After 30 years
in the restaurant business George started a
successful commercial real estate development and management company in Northern
Virginia.
George was a member of AHEPA, The Laconian Society, and Promitheus. His love and
devotion to his church, St. Katherine, was
immeasurable. He loved people and was the
last one to leave Sunday’s after services
coffee hour. He had to greet and talk with
every parishioner.
George and his wife loved spending their
summers in Greece vacationing, and catching up with their old friends. Despite his
recent illness, he made the trip one final time
this past summer.
George Kontzias is survived by his beloved
wife Eleni, son Zachary, his sister Amalia,
sister in law Susan, Sandy, Evagelia, brother
in law Nick, and all his nieces and nephews
that he loved so very much.
A visitation will be held at National Memorial
Park 7482 Lee Highway, Falls Church, VA.
22042 on Sunday, October 15 from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Funeral services will be held on Monday
October 16 at 11 a.m. at St. Katherine Greek
Orthodox Church 3149 Glen Carlyn Rd. Falls
Church, Virginia 22041.
Contribution may be made to St. Katherine
Greek Orthodox Church, 3149 Glen Carlyn
Rd., Falls Church, Virginia 22041.
Peacefully entered into eternal rest on Friday,
October 6, 2017. Beloved wife of the late
Bernard O. Littlejohn, for over 61 years. Loving
mother of James Littlejohn (Doreen), Avis Bernadette Johnson (Oris), Tawana Littlejohn
(Annie); in-laws, Arlette Brown, Naomi and
Lewis Sorrell, Theodore Littlejohn (Ernestine),
Donnie and Mae Littlejohn, Frances Littlejohn,
Sabrina Littlejohn and Benjamin Hunter; Also
survived by grandchildren, great-grandchildren; nieces, nephews, cousins; and a host
of other relatives and friends. Visitation 9 a.m.
until time of service, 11 a.m., on Wednesday,
October 18 at Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church,
4611 Sheriff Rd., NE, Washington, DC 20019.
Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery.
Arrangements by Henry S. Washington & Sons.
A master storyteller, Fred drew from vast
life experiences to provide his material. He
was a world traveler with an ever-curious
intellect, a voracious reader, an avid baseball
fan, a music lover with encyclopedic knowledge of music of the 1950's and 1960's.
(His daughter Lizzy, a professional musician
known as Lissy Trullie, cites early memories
of spending hours listening to the “oldies”
with her dad as a source of inspiration). He
entertained, amused and delighted his family
at their frequent gatherings. He was a giant
personality and filled every room he entered.
Fred had a gregarious nature and was cherished by his many friends and colleagues.
His educational and professional endeavors
took him around the country and abroad. He
had a special love for France and was fluent
in French and German. Fred made lifelong,
loyal friends everywhere he went.
Professor McChesney’s primary teaching
and scholarly interests were in the fields
of antitrust, corporations, and law and economics, about which he wrote over one
hundred books, articles, monographs, and
other scholarly works published by leading
academic presses and journals.
Fred is perhaps best known for his groundbreaking work in the field of public choice
economics. Public choice economics, recognized with a Nobel Prize in economics
for one of its founders in 1986, argues that
political actors behave according to private
incentives instead of the public good. Fred
extended the literature in his 1997 Harvard
Press book, Money for Nothing: Politicians,
Rent Extraction and Political Extortion, arguing that politicians receive contributions and
other rewards not only for acting, but also for
threatening to act, and then not executing
on those threats. Hence the title of the
book. In the 1995 University of Chicago
Press Book, Causes and Consequences of
Antitrust: The Public Choice Perspective,
which Professor McChesney both edited and
contributed to, he used public-choice theory
to critique claims that antitrust laws serve
the public good and are thus vulnerable to
special interest groups like other laws.
He also wrote extensively on the importance
of providing rights to property, noting that
the failure to provide such rights historically
to Native Americans has been a significant
cause of their economic plight. His 2003
Princeton University press book, Property
Rights: Cooperation, Conflict and Law, is
an important contribution to property rights
literature.
Professor McChesney was noted for his
excellent teaching, received multiple awards
for his excellence in the classroom, and was
a mentor to many students during his long
academic career.
Visitation will be held Friday, November 10
from 4 to 7:30 p.m., at Holy Redeemer
Catholic Church, 9705 Summit Avenue, Kensington, MD 20895. There will be a Mass of
Christian Burial at Holy Redeemer Church on
Saturday November 11 at 10 a.m. Burial
arrangements are private.
In lieu in flowers, donations may be made
to the University of Miami School of Law in
memory of Fred S. McChesney, 1311 Miller
Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146.
Please view and sign the family's online
guestbook at
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
PARISI
REMEMBER
YOUR LOVED ONES
December 17, 2017
DIANNE ELIZABETH PARISI
(Age 69)
Passed away unexpectedly at her Bristow
home on Friday, October 13, 2017. She
was the beloved wife of Salvatore Parisi.
Born on October 15, 1947, Diane was the
dear daughter of the late Joseph and Doris
Thibodeau. She was raised and educated
in Rhode Island. She graduated from the
University of Rhode Island.
Dianne was a research analyst for many
years for the Central Intelligence Agency
(CIA) until her retirement. She enjoyed
working as a volunteer at the Prince William Hospital Thrift Center. When not
working, she found joy in reading, traveling
and the cherished times spent with family.
In addition to her husband, Salvatore, with
whom she shared 33 years of marriage,
she is survived by her daughters, Wendy
Aurentz (Craig) and Kristin Brittigan (Rob);
six grandchildren, Robbie, Zachary, Corey,
Kiersten, Renee and Hailey; and a sister,
Gail Bowers (Gary). She was predeceased
by her son, Brian.
The family will receive friends from 6 to 8
p.m., on Wednesday, October 18, at Pierce
Funeral Home in Manassas, VA. Diane’s
funeral service will be held at the funeral
home on Thursday, October 19 at 11 a.m.
TheWashington Post Magazine will publish
an Annual Commemorative Section.
Plan to be a part of this annual tradition!
RATES
$11.10 per Line
$150 B&W Photo
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DEADLINE
5 p.m.
Friday, November 17, 2017
For more information, please call:
202-334-4122 or 1-800-627-1150, ext. 4-4122
E-mail:
deathnotices@washpost.com
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Cool but sunny
There should be lots of sun and not a
whole lot of wind, which will help
temperatures near 60 to the low 60s
feel comfortable. Winds will be out
of the north about 5 mph. Expect a
second-straight clear, calm and cold night.
Temperatures fall fast after sunset, and overnight
lows range from the mid-30s in our colder areas
to the mid-40s downtown. A little frost can’t be
ruled out in colder locations.
Today
Sunnyl
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Wednesday
Sunny
Thursday
Mostly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Mostly sunny
Saturday
Mostly sunny
Sunday
Partly sunny
63° 47
71° 51
73° 53
74° 51
76° 55
76° 60
FEELS*: 67°
FEELS: 72°
FEELS: 74°
FEELS: 76°
FEELS: 78°
FEELS: 77°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 0%
P: 0%
P: 5%
P: 5%
P: 10%
WIND: N 4–8 mph
W: SSW 4–8 mph
W: SSW 6–12 mph
W: NW 6–12 mph
W: ESE 4–8 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Hagerstown
63/42
Baltimore
62/42
Dover
60/44
Washington
63/47
ACTUAL
FORECAST
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
73° 1:00 a.m.
60° 12:17 p.m.
68°/50°
89° 1897
30° 1876
70° 12:02 a.m.
58° 8:00 a.m.
68°/44°
85° 1989
30° 1986
71° 1:00 a.m.
58° 10:51 a.m.
67°/45°
90° 1897
30° 1876
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +7.7° yr. to date: +3.2°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Cape May
59/44
Annapolis
61/45
OCEAN: 72°
Charlottesville
66/40
Ocean City
60/42
OCEAN: 69°
Lexington
65/39
Richmond
63/41
Norfolk
62/50
Virginia Beach
61/51
Past 24 hours
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 70°
Kitty Hawk
63/56
OCEAN: 73°
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
High
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.10"
0.83"
1.77"
31.91"
31.89"
0.08"
1.48"
1.68"
36.23"
33.60"
0.10"
1.42"
1.76"
33.61"
33.64"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
4 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, morning frost, mostly sunny, chilly.
High 49–55. Wind north 4–8 mph. Tonight, mostly clear.
Low 33–40. Wind northwest 3–6 mph. Wednesday, sunny,
warmer. High 55–59. Wind southeast 3–6 mph. Thursday,
mostly sunny. High 59–63.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny, cool. High 58–62.
Wind northeast 7–14 mph. Tonight, mostly clear, chilly.
Low 42–51. Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Wednesday, sunny,
milder. High 64–68. Wind northeast 4–8 mph. Thursday,
mostly sunny. High 69–73.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, sunny, cool. Wind
northwest 5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility unrestricted. •
Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, sunny, cool. Wind north
7–14 knots. Waves a foot or less on the lower Potomac, 1–2 feet on
the Chesapeake. Visibility good.• River Stages: Today, the stage at
Little Falls will be around 3.0 feet, holding about steady Wednesday.
Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
F
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
61/47
Harrisburg
62/42
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
1:23 a.m.
6:47 a.m.
1:50 p.m.
7:13 p.m.
Annapolis
4:02 a.m.
10:17 a.m.
4:31 p.m.
10:33 p.m.
Ocean City
12:14 a.m.
6:17 a.m.
12:33 p.m.
6:39 p.m.
Norfolk
2:08 a.m.
8:25 a.m.
2:33 p.m.
8:48 p.m.
Point Lookout
6:32 a.m.
12:23 p.m.
6:48 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Chino, CA 100°
Low: Dillon, CO 8°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
58/37/s
76/50/s
38/26/pc
69/48/s
78/47/s
62/42/s
72/45/s
72/48/s
75/44/s
68/44/pc
57/47/s
62/51/pc
58/45/s
70/51/s
66/38/s
67/40/s
73/45/s
68/49/s
65/43/s
68/46/s
77/52/s
77/45/s
Tomorrow
69/44/s
77/51/pc
37/26/s
71/49/s
82/55/s
71/44/s
68/49/pc
74/50/s
62/35/pc
72/48/pc
69/54/s
67/53/s
67/51/s
76/58/s
73/42/s
71/42/s
72/38/s
69/51/s
69/48/s
71/51/s
83/57/s
75/42/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
70/49/s
68/45/s
84/60/pc
32/21/c
73/47/s
60/40/s
86/76/s
79/53/s
67/45/s
77/48/s
74/64/pc
70/49/s
87/64/s
72/46/s
91/68/pc
67/45/s
72/50/s
88/76/t
69/50/s
70/50/s
70/45/s
76/63/s
60/48/s
62/50/s
73/46/s
69/51/s
88/61/pc
30/14/sn
65/38/pc
72/46/s
87/76/pc
84/62/s
69/51/s
79/49/s
80/66/pc
73/50/s
87/62/s
78/48/s
85/64/s
71/49/s
76/52/s
86/76/pc
69/51/s
70/42/s
73/46/s
81/65/s
72/55/s
69/54/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
72/47/s
73/48/s
81/71/t
61/47/s
98/71/s
62/42/s
56/40/s
60/45/r
59/45/s
65/40/s
78/42/pc
63/41/s
84/47/pc
71/47/s
86/78/sh
71/45/pc
84/68/pc
75/52/pc
89/77/t
60/46/r
61/38/pc
62/46/pc
82/72/t
73/48/s
77/51/s
77/45/pc
83/70/pc
71/51/s
96/70/s
68/45/s
68/48/s
63/52/r
71/49/s
71/44/s
77/42/pc
70/45/s
85/49/pc
74/53/s
86/79/sh
72/47/s
79/66/s
67/53/pc
87/79/sh
60/51/r
53/49/r
69/47/s
87/72/pc
77/50/s
World
High: Buffalo Range, Zimbabwe 112°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –22°
Oct 19
New
Oct 27
First
Quarter
Nov 4
Full
Nov 10
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:19 a.m.
4:56 a.m.
5:37 a.m.
5:02 a.m.
7:55 a.m.
12:08 p.m.
Set
6:27 p.m.
5:41 p.m.
5:42 p.m.
5:23 p.m.
6:48 p.m.
9:40 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
74/53/c
Amsterdam
62/50/s
Athens
78/61/s
Auckland
62/55/pc
Baghdad
88/58/s
Bangkok
88/77/t
Beijing
64/53/c
Berlin
72/50/s
Bogota
70/47/c
Brussels
66/51/s
Buenos Aires
80/63/pc
Cairo
85/68/s
Caracas
79/69/pc
Copenhagen
61/51/pc
Dakar
89/79/s
Dublin
56/41/pc
Edinburgh
58/47/r
Frankfurt
69/48/s
Geneva
72/45/pc
Ham., Bermuda 80/75/r
Helsinki
53/44/r
Ho Chi Minh City 87/76/t
Tomorrow
75/53/pc
64/54/pc
79/57/pc
65/49/pc
87/58/s
86/76/t
58/47/c
67/49/pc
70/47/pc
68/54/pc
80/52/t
87/68/s
78/68/pc
58/50/pc
89/80/pc
55/50/r
54/49/sh
66/49/pc
68/49/pc
80/74/r
49/37/c
88/76/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
86/74/pc
95/64/s
69/57/s
75/57/s
74/45/s
81/42/s
87/80/t
94/79/s
86/77/t
68/60/pc
71/58/pc
61/53/pc
71/55/t
89/78/c
69/52/pc
58/45/pc
52/43/pc
92/77/pc
81/58/sh
95/69/s
55/38/r
59/42/pc
74/54/pc
72/46/pc
88/73/c
93/66/s
72/58/s
77/58/s
80/52/s
81/42/s
89/79/pc
90/77/t
85/77/t
68/60/pc
69/61/t
63/54/sh
61/50/t
89/78/t
74/54/pc
65/48/s
56/38/pc
93/78/pc
81/60/t
94/69/s
52/34/c
66/48/s
70/56/t
61/46/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
81/69/pc
99/69/s
73/52/pc
89/70/t
73/49/pc
75/44/pc
70/50/s
68/62/sh
90/79/pc
59/43/r
73/64/pc
81/76/sh
72/50/s
63/54/r
66/46/s
69/51/pc
70/53/pc
86/69/s
98/66/s
71/52/s
87/71/c
73/47/pc
72/42/pc
67/48/c
72/60/c
90/77/pc
51/35/c
74/63/pc
80/74/pc
68/50/s
63/55/pc
69/50/s
69/48/pc
69/50/pc
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
VIRGINIA
Loudoun Democrat steps up fundraising for challenge to Rep. Comstock
State Sen. Jennifer T. Wexton
(Loudoun) outraised her rivals for
the Democratic nomination to
challenge Rep. Barbara Comstock
(R) next year, while anti-human
trafficking activist Alison Friedman has the most cash on hand,
according to new campaign finance reports.
Wexton, the only elected official
in the Democratic nomination contest, raised the most in the reporting period that spanned July 1 to
Sept. 30, with $255,075. In the previous quarter, she had been behind
in fundraising for the race, with
$201,964.
The Northern Virginia district
could be among the nation’s most
competitive, and eight Democrats
are seeking their party’s nomination.
Hillary Clinton bested Trump in
the 10th District, which includes all
of Loudoun County and parts of
Fairfax and Prince William coun-
ties as well as all of Frederick and
Clarke counties to the west.
Wexton has $345,640 cash on
hand, which is in line with communications strategist Lindsey Davis
Stover’s war chest. Stover raised
$137,137 in the most recent quarter,
a drop from her previous quarterly
total of $306,351.
Army veteran Dan Helmer also
raised less this quarter, with
$163,139 compared with $365,721
previously, but has a healthy
$397,941 cash on hand.
In September, Helmer released a
video spoofing a “Top Gun” scene in
which he sang “You’ve Lost That
Centrist Feeling” to a Comstock
look-alike. The ad was widely derided and caught the attention of
comedian Stephen Colbert, who
aired it on “The Late Show” last
month. But Helmer’s campaign
spokeswoman said the attention
translated into a fundraising
bump.
Fundraising for Wexton, Stover
and Helmer, however, lags behind
that of Friedman, who has
$553,456 cash on hand. She raised
$241,857 in the most recent quarter
and $452,329 the one before — the
strongest showing among Democratic candidates in the District at
that time.
The nomination contest is still
months away, and Democrats say
fundraising and attention will pick
up after the Virginia governor’s
race in three weeks.
“It’s still very early,” said David
Wasserman, who analyzes House
races for the nonpartisan Cook Political Report, “and none of them
have even raised enough money to
go up on Washington, D.C., television for a week. There’s still a lot of
money they need to raise. At this
point, they’ve demonstrated that
they’re serious.”
And in terms of money, none has
caught up with Comstock, who is
seeking a third term.
She raised $447,993 in the latest
quarter, for a total of $1,328,294.
She has $985,348 cash on hand.
The congresswoman’s political
director, Ken Nunnenkamp, said
Democrats have spent more than
$20 million trying to defeat Comstock in three campaigns for state
delegate and two for Congress.
“Barbara’s always been underestimated and we don’t expect that to
change. Barbara’s always overperformed, and that won’t change either,” he said in a statement.
There are three other Democrats raising money to challenge
Comstock.
School founder Deep Sran has
$150,305 cash on hand and has lent
his campaign $62,698. Retired naval intelligence officer Dave Hanson has $8,506, and educator Kimberly Adams has $6,656.
Financial consultant Michael
Pomerleano filed paperwork apparently closing his campaign account, according to FEC records.
He did not return messages Monday.
Julia Biggins, a scientist from
Manassas, filed the paperwork to
run as a Democrat last week and
announced her candidacy on Facebook. Attempts to reach her were
unsuccessful.
Democrats will choose a method
of nomination — whether a staterun primary or a party-run caucus
— next month.
There’s still time for a self-funded candidate to emerge in the race
and shake things up, Wasserman,
the analyst, noted.
He pointed to an example from
Maryland: Wine magnate David
Trone who spent more than
$13 million in a Democratic primary in 2016 — and lost. He’s running again this year in a neighboring district.
Wasserman said Wexton is an
early favorite because of her institutional advantage, including endorsements from members of the
General Assembly and Democratic
Reps. Gerald E. Connolly and A.
Donald McEachin.
It also should help that Wexton
is a former prosecutor from Lou-
doun, where most of the district’s
Democrats live, he said.
Cook categorizes the race as a
toss-up largely because of voters’
distaste for Trump and their tendency to split their tickets — preferring candidates of one party for
president and the other for Congress.
“Most voters went to polls thinking Hillary Clinton would win,” he
said, referring to Comstock’s 6point win last year. “Now they are
open to voting for a Democrat as a
check on President Trump.”
Comstock has separated herself
from Trump. In May, she voted
against a House overhaul of the
Affordable Care Act, and she recently joined 18 GOP colleagues in
voting against a House budget resolution, which she said would hurt
federal workers, many of whom
live in her district.
Her Republican opponent, Shak
Hill, has raised $53,051 and has
$32,629 to spend.
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
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Style
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
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EZ
SU
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
THEATER REVIEW
CAROLYN HAX
KIDSPOST
A photographer’s new
book shares the stories
behind her pictures of
Michelle Obama. C2
What happens in heaven
stays in heaven: The
Almighty as a Vegas-style
comic in “Act of God.” C3
From bed to couch:
Therapy is the best bet to
stop a philandering father
from hurting others. C3
They’re out of their gourds
in California, where a
2,368-pound entry won
the Pumpkin Weigh-Off. C8
Is #MeToo
asking too
much from
survivors?
BY
A letter between unknown lovers slips from an old Paris guidebook, setting a filmmaker on a quest
A BBY O HLHEISER
When Kelly Lisenbee checked
Facebook on Sunday night, she
saw the same message repeated
by many of her friends: “If all the
women who have been sexually
harassed or assaulted wrote ‘Me
too’ as a status, we might give men
a sense of the magnitude of the
problem. #MeToo”
Her, too: Lisenbee, 32, a surgical technician in Oklahoma City,
was assaulted as a teenager. So
she copied and pasted the message as her own status before
going to bed. But at 2 a.m. she
woke, unable to get back to sleep,
she recalled later Monday. There
was more to say.
“I didn’t know he was going to
forcibly kiss me,” she wrote, in an
updated post. “I didn’t know he
was going to put his hand in my
jeans. . . . I didn’t know that after I
pushed him away and told him no
that he was going to tell all his
buddies that it happened anyway.”
Stories like hers exploded
across social media Sunday and
Monday, among women galvanized by the abuse and harassment allegations involving Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.
ME TOO CONTINUED ON C3
MICHAEL LAVINE
Gabrielle Union’s book includes
her account of being assaulted.
BOOK WORLD
Powerful
words from
Gabrielle
Union
BY CAROLE BURNS
Actress Gabrielle Union’s first
book is a lot more serious than its
title suggests. “We’re Going to Need
More Wine” does indeed include
the funny, true-life stories you
might expect from the glittering,
personable lead of BET’s “Being
Mary Jane,” but the strongest essays
in the collection, while told in the
same friend-to-friend style, are
searing and powerful: an account
of when she was raped at a Payless
shoe store in college, for example,
and an exploration of the challenges of raising black children in America today.
By phone from Cleveland, Union
spoke about these and other experiences she writes about in her book.
(This interview has been edited for
brevity and clarity.)
Henri and Betty:
A mystery d’amour
BY
R OXANNE R OBERTS
H
enri loved Betty, and Henri loved Monet. The rest is a mystery.
Like all good mysteries, this one features an elusive
woman, a love affair and a random stranger who gets swept
up in the story. But there’s no ending — yet.
In November 2015, Doug Block was packing for a 30thanniversary trip to Paris with his wife, Marjorie Silver. The New York
filmmaker pulled a used tourist guide from his bookshelf and threw it in
his luggage. On the last day of their trip, he grabbed the old copy of
“Pariswalks,” and out dropped a cream-colored envelope with “BETTY”
slashed across the front.
He turned over the envelope and took out a card. The cover featured an
impressionist painting of a woman sitting on the grass. He flipped the
card open.
MONET CONTINUED ON C2
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
These TV shows capture the dispirit of the grouchiest generation
BY
Q: You write very openly and
movingly about being raped at a
Payless shoe store when you were
in college. When and how did you
decide to be so open about this
experience?
A: It was sort of decided for me
when I was on a show that had a
story line about a serial rapist
preying on the people who worked
at a hospital. Over the course of
several weeks, I would look at the
script and I would just be locked in
terror, wondering if they were
going to write my character to be
raped next. And yet I worked with
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
PHOTOS FROM DOUG BLOCK
At the National Gallery of Art, documentarian Doug Block films a Monet
painting that plays a role in a mysterious love letter.
JESSICA BROOKS/FX
Pamela Adlon has demanding
daughters in “Better Things.”
AT&T AUDIENCE NETWORK
Ron Livingston is a recovering
alcoholic in “Loudermilk.”
H ANK S TUEVER
That blip of a generation
known as X, born roughly between 1964 and 1982 (including
yours truly), is accustomed to being overlooked. That’s always
been our chief gripe, but it’s also
been a blessing in disguise, allowing us to sit back and watch as
baby boomers and millennials
fight to the death.
Turn on your television, meanwhile, and Generation X seems to
be quietly having its day. Our
“Friends” and “Party of Five”
years are well behind us, but our
razory snark and cloudy-day cynicism are sometimes on competent display, inspired by our most
influential compatriots, including Tina Fey (born in 1970), Ryan
Murphy (1965), Dave Chappelle
(1973) and Louis C.K. (1967).
Betwixt and between the old
analog world and the digital one,
we play grown-ups now — doctors
or presidents or recently divorced
detectives. Most often we play
sitcom parents who stand as the
last defense between civil order
and the techno-narcissism that
awaits. Our spotlight is fading,
but it was never that bright to
begin with.
It is deeply satisfying, then, to
recommend two entertaining
dramedies — “Loudermilk” on DirecTV and “Better Things” on FX
— that feature main characters
who each offer unapologetic expressions of Generation X in a
state of grumpy, middle-aged dissatisfaction. Too many of TV’s
Gen-X characters are seen as icy,
hypercapable bosses (see 48-yearold Anne Heche as an intelligence
officer who remote-commands a
special-ops outfit in NBC’s “The
Brave”), working overtime to prevent chaos (50-year-old Kiefer
Sutherland as a conspiracyplagued U.S. president in ABC’s
“Designated Survivor”; 51-yearold Téa Leoni as an overworked
diplomat on CBS’s “Madam Secretary”; 40-year-old Kerry Washington as Olivia Pope in ABC’s
“Scandal”), or, once in a while,
serving as master manipulators
(48-year-old Christian Slater in
USA’s “Mr. Robot”).
What’s frequently missing is
the generation’s more subtle and
artful expressions of indecisive
lassitude — the built-in alienation, the lifelong romance with
ennui. I miss that about us. Lately
we seem adept but boring.
Peter Farrelly and Bobby
Mort’s bitterly funny “LouderNOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C4
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
DANNY MOLOSHOK/REUTERS
Rapper Macklemore went off
on the president Saturday.
KEVIN ALLEN
Macklemore’s
rap on Trump
Actress Laura Linney accepting
the “Will award” Sunday night.
THE SCENE
Macklemore to Eminem:
“Hold my beer.”
On Saturday, the Seattle
rapper led a sold-out crowd in a
feel-good musical tribute to
President Trump. Not. The
track, 2016’s “FDT Part 2,” has an
f-bomb laden hook that’s aimed
directly at the president.
According to a concertgoer,
the Phoenix crowd held their
middle fingers up while the
Grammy winner performed the
song, which includes the lyrics,
“How ’bout we stop selling
automatic guns, you got rich
’cause your daddy gave you
automatic funds.”
Just last week, rapper Eminem
released his own anti-Trump
rant at the BET Hip Hop Awards.
Who’s next?
Macklemore, who’s never been
shy about mixing business with
politics (we last saw him in the
District at the official Women’s
March on Washington), had a
message of inclusion and
acceptance for his fans on
Saturday night, according to Fox
News.
“We should be welcoming and
encouraging everyone to live the
American Dream,” Macklemore
told the crowd after performing
his 2012 hit “Same Love,” about
same-sex relationships.
The Shakespeare
Theatre honors
Linney at its gala
Those drummers dancing
their way down F Street this
weekend? Not just your run-ofthe-mill street performers. They
were the official pied pipers of
the Shakespeare Theatre
Company’s 10th-annual gala.
On Sunday night, the
company awarded stage and
screen actress Laura Linney the
William Shakespeare Award for
Classical Theatre, known as the
“Will award.” Linney, who stars
in the Netflix drama “Ozark,”
recently wrapped a stint on the
Great White Way, starring in the
Broadway revival of “The Little
Foxes.”
Nearly 600 boldfacers in
black tie began the night with a
champagne reception, followed
by the award ceremony and
performances at Sidney Harman
Hall. Then Batala, an all-female
Afro-Brazilian band, led guests
in their finery to dinner and
dancing at the National
Building Museum a few blocks
away.
AMANDA LUCIDON/THE WHITE HOUSE
Michelle Obama snuggled against the president during a White House video taping for the 2015 World Expo.
FLOTUS in focus for Amanda Lucidon
There are a ton of things a
photographer has to do to make a
great image: Get the perfect light,
find a killer composition, focus . . .
but for former White House
photographer Amanda Lucidon, the
most important one was just
showing up.
In a new book, “Chasing Light,”
Lucidon, whose primary job was to
chronicle first lady Michelle Obama,
said she lived in fear of arriving too
late, of getting left behind and
unable to do her job, which she
describes as “documenting the
presidency for history.” To make sure
her nightmare didn’t come true, she
writes, she adopted a mantra: “The
motorcade only waits for one person
. . . and it’s not you.”
Lucidon doesn’t seem to have
gotten left behind — the book is
packed with images of Michelle
Obama in public and private
moments, with her husband,
daughters, schoolchildren, visiting
dignitaries and celebrities, in
settings from the Great Wall of
China to the White House kitchen
garden.
In the book, the former freelance
photographer also offers some
insider recollections. For instance,
she writes about how one of the bestknown images of the Obamas’ White
House years — a candid photo of
Michelle Obama grinning like a
schoolgirl with her crush as she
snuggles next to the president while
he leans toward her — almost didn’t
happen. The picture was taken when
the couple was filming a taped video
segment, Lucidon remembers, and
she had time for only a single snap.
“It happened so quickly that I didn’t
have time to compose the image,”
she says.
In an interview Monday, Lucidon
said her book tour has put her in a
spot she’s not used to — in front of
the cameras. But since she’s the
subject now, we finally got to ask the
question that’s been burning since
we flipped through 200-plus pages of
Michelle Obama looking flawless:
Did the first lady ever really hate a
picture of herself ? Did the woman
ever have a bad hair day?
Lucidon laughed. “As White House
photographers, we were in a very
trusted role,” she said. “There was
never a time when we were told not
to take a photo.”
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Missive in Paris guidebook sends documentarian on trail of romantic mystery
like they have already called it
quits,” he says.
Then he showed the card to a
forensic analyst, who said that
there’s no actual proof of anything. Henri and Betty could be
lovers, or they could be husband
and wife. Maybe Henri and Betty
aren’t even their real names.
Everybody has an opinion, and
no one has any facts. “But the
whole fun of this is speculation,”
says Block.
MONET FROM C1
My Sweet Love, began the inscription. Will you look for me at
the Musee D’Orsay? I will be there
in soul and spirit, though not in
body. It is there that you will find
my love of Monet. It is there, my
love, that I hope you find me and
find such peace and beauty in a
city where I would like to be — with
you.
After the Mussee D’Orsay, go
have a café au lait at the street café
to the left.
I love you more than words can
tell, my sweet angel. You are the
source of my greatest joy.
Not going to Paris with you is so
hard. It is meant for two. It is a city
of love. Please keep me close to your
heart, every step of the way.
Enjoy, my love.
Avec Amor, Henri.
Who was Betty? Who was
Henri? Block turned to his wife.
“Where did we get this book?” he
asked.
And so an obsession was born.
B
T
lock, 64, is an award-winning
independent documentary
filmmaker who makes features about family, marriage and
other human foibles. He was in the
middle of a project about his fellow documentary filmmakers, but
the love letter haunted him.
And so he decided to make a
film about Henri and Betty. Or, to
be exact, his search for Henri and
Betty.
“It gave me a chance to play detective and solve a mystery that I felt
perhaps is unsolvable,” says Block.
“But I sensed that playing detective,
it would lead me down really interesting, intriguing paths.”
He began with the guidebook,
thinking that it must have originally belonged to Henri or Betty. It
was published in 1999 and had
been sitting on his bookshelf for
years. None of his friends could
remember lending it to him. Maybe he’d picked it up at a used
bookstore? The only thing he
could know for sure was that it
was purchased in 1999 or later.
He turned to the letter.
Block dismissed the idea that
Betty was a relative or a friend —
the words are too intimate, dripping with longing. He thinks that
the two were lovers, and the guidebook was a gift to her, the card
tucked inside as a surprise. This
may have been Betty’s first trip to
Paris, with Henri directing her to
visit the Musée d’Orsay and go to a
DOUG BLOCK
Among the theories about Henri, whose letter to Betty was found in a copy of the book “Pariswalks”:
He may have been sick or dying, and he may have been a fan of the Grateful Dead.
favorite cafe.
The filmmaker also believes
that “Henri” was probably a lovestruck affectation of Henry, and
that Henry was an American.
Block points to the misspellings of
“musée” in the second reference
and “amour” in the closing — mistakes that a native French speaker
would not have made. Based on
his poetic language and striking
penmanship, Henri was sophisticated, well-traveled and familiar
with Paris.
A handwriting expert looked at
the note and noticed the distinctive star-shaped “I” (which looks
more like an “A”) and concluded
that the author was brilliant but
very careful about what he said
and did. Betty was someone who
allowed Henri to release a heretofore unexpressed passion. “It was
like he opened his heart and this
flowed out,” the expert told Block.
Betty, on the other hand, is a
total enigma. No clues to her age,
her profession, her given name.
Elizabeth? Roberta? Since “Betty”
has fallen out of favor as a girl’s
nickname, she was probably born
no later than the 1960s.
Block consulted a detective,
who said that too many people had
handled the card and envelope
(which was never sealed) to obtain
usable fingerprints. The detective
recommended a psychic who had
assisted him on a few cases.
The psychic held the card and
started tearing up before he even
opened it. “ ‘This is really poignant,’ ” Block says the psychic
told him. “ ‘They really loved each
other so much.’ He thinks this
letter was early on in their relationship and they so wanted to be
together. But they couldn’t and
had to go back to their marriages.”
An archival researcher scanned
Henri’s handwriting and looked
for matches on the Internet, to no
avail.
A friend was convinced that
Henri was a serious Grateful Dead
fan. “I love you more than words
can tell,” he writes — a common
enough phrase, but more often
rendered as “I love you more than
words can say.”
That last word makes all the
difference: The former is a line
from the Dead’s “Brokedown Palace,” a lover’s farewell. Block’s
friend looked at the willows in the
picture (historically a symbol of
mourning) and said: “Oh my God!
He’s not only a Deadhead, he’s
either sick or dying. That’s why he
couldn’t go to Paris with her.”
Block thinks that this letter is a
farewell, too, but maybe just the
end of the romance. There’s no
reference to the future or of being
together again. “To me, this seems
here was one clue left: Henri
selected a blank notecard
with a Monet painting,
“Woman Seated Under the Willows,” on the cover. The back of the
card identifies the painting as
property of the National Gallery of
Art, which is one reason Block was
in Washington recently. Maybe if
he knew more about the art, he
could know more about Henri.
The curators allowed Block to
film the painting, one of more
than two dozen Monets in the
gallery’s collection. It’s a beautiful
landscape — shimmering, delicate, the colors more vibrant than
any image on a card can capture —
with a woman reading on the
banks of the Seine.
“There’s a wonderful softness
and curvaceous quality,” says Kimberly Jones, curator of 19th-century French paintings. “Your eye
kind of swoops and swirls as you
go around the canvas.”
There’s a love story behind the
painting, too. In 1877, Monet invited his longtime patron, Ernest Hoschedé, a department store magnate who went bankrupt, to live
with him and his family in
Vetheuil, 40 miles north of Paris.
Hoschedé brought his wife, Alice,
and their six children. It was all
very cozy. Perhaps too cozy.
Monet’s wife died in 1879, and
Hoschedé moved back to Paris to
rebuild his business, but Alice and
the children stayed with Monet.
Monet and Alice eventually married, and experts think that Alice
was the model for the woman under the willows, painted in 1880.
Originally, Block thought that
Henri lived or worked in Washington, because the painting is part of
the Chester Dale Collection and
cannot travel or be exhibited outside the museum. He also guessed
that Henri bought the notecard,
printed in 1996, in the gallery gift
shop.
But the dates don’t add up. The
painting has not been on public
view since 1993, and odds are that
Henri didn’t buy the card at the
museum at all.
Issued from 1996-2003, the image was part of a boxed set of 20
cards by Galison in New York,
featuring four of Monet’s works
from the National Gallery. According to Galison Chief Financial Officer Sam Minnitti, the firm sold
more than 160,000 boxes in museums, bookstores, gift and stationery shops all over the country.
Henri could have purchased the
notecards anywhere.
And despite his professed love
for Monet, maybe this particular
card held no hidden meaning.
Maybe he just liked the way it
looked.
“I think it says he’s romantic,”
Jones told Block. “There’s a wonderful frisson of possibility and
potential, which I think he may
have been responding to. There’s
this woman in this beautiful setting, and she’s waiting. She’s waiting for him.”
B
lock didn’t know any of this,
of course, during his anniversary trip to Paris. On Nov.
13, 2015, he and his wife spent the
day at the Musée d’Orsay. A few
hours later, terrorists attacked
and killed 130 people at a concert,
restaurants and cafes, and a soccer
stadium.
On their last day, the couple
decided to go for a long walk
through the now-hushed streets of
Paris. Block pulled out the guidebook, and out fell the envelope.
“Paris was in the same state
New York was in after 9/11: The
world will never be the same
again,” remembers Block. “It was
always the city of love, now it was
going to be associated with terrorism.” And so, he decided he needed
to make a film about love instead
of hate.
Maybe Henri and Betty are still
alive. Maybe someone will see the
love letter and recognize Henri’s
handwriting. Maybe someone
knows the end of the story.
But if he never solves the puzzle,
Block’s okay with that, too. His
film is really about love — love
found and love lost. It’s about why
couples stay together, and why
they part. It’s about the quest, not
the destination.
“I’ve come to realize I’m not
creating a literal depiction of
Henri and Betty,” he says. “I’m
creating an impressionistic portrait. And everybody I’m talking to
is creating the brushstrokes.”
roxanne.roberts@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
SU
Union and Coates: Same page, but di≠erent voices
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
that I was prepared emotionally,
mentally, spiritually, financially
even to share that. I didn’t know
what the consequences could be.
But when I saw the route the
questions were taking, I thought: I
could either answer these
silly, benign questions or I
could share with people a
very big piece of my soul
and perhaps help other
people.
such kind, compassionate people, I
realized that if they knew what had
happened to me, they just wouldn’t
do that to me. So having that
conversation with my coworkers — someone who
was not related to me,
who I was not paying for
therapy, who wasn’t
from my small town —
the idea of sharing that
information as a means
Q: Your writing style is very
of protection, that’s what
conversational, yet you
started it. Then once I
also quote people like
shared, others shared:
James Baldwin and W.E.B.
You know that happened WE’RE GOING
Du Bois. Why the variety of
to me; you know that
TO NEED MORE styles?
happened to my child,
A: We’re all a bit of a mix, I
WINE
my mother. In
think. In my life, certainly
Stories That
attempting to protect
I’ve been perceived as a mix
are Funny,
myself, I realized I was
of different identities and
Complicated
offering a bridge, a hand, and True
different voices. The quotes
to other people who
are there as a window into
By Gabrielle
wanted to share, or who
who I am, and to give a
Union
just needed to know,
deeper sense of what
Dey Street. 272
“Hey, I’m not alone.”
writers I’ve been inspired
pp. $26.99
Literally a week later, I
by, and what words
got my first cover for
specifically lent themselves
Savoy magazine, and during the
to my development as a human
whole interview, I knew I was
being. And I wanted to talk to as
sitting on information that could
many people as possible. If you
help a lot of people. I wasn’t sure
start using all of your SAT words,
you’re going to make people think
you’re pretentious, and they have
no clue what you’re talking about.
But I knew I was going to lose some
people who feel that unless you use
all your SAT words, you’re not
worthy of listening to. I try to talk
to people where they’re at.
Q: Your essay about talking to your
stepsons — with NBA star Dwyane
Wade — about how they’ll be
looked at suspiciously because
they’re black reminded me of TaNehisi Coates’s ideas about the
black body. Tell us about that essay.
A: I reference Coates’s book quite
a bit, and that was absolutely my
guide, especially when dealing
with my children’s educators. It’s
interesting now how some people
are finding Coates’s new book
problematic. Perhaps more
people are willing to see my
approach as not being as
combative. I also have the power
of a larger Instagram feed, and I
subscribe to a lot more silly things
in my downtime that I’m willing
to share on social media. Maybe
because I was in “Bring It On” —
people reference that all the time
— it’s just been received
differently. But I’m not really
saying anything different than
what he’s saying. It’s like instead
of buying Cracklin’ Oats, they
bought what they thought was
Lucky Charms, and there were
prizes in there they weren’t
anticipating, so it’s like slipping
nutrients into something they
thought was going to be more of a
guilty pleasure. And there are
people who don’t find me as
benign as others do, who see me
as very angry and very combative,
and perhaps with a hidden
agenda that somehow is deeper
than just wanting equity for the
children I’m raising.
Q: You’re writing as yourself here
— as opposed to playing a role. Are
there any elements of acting that
you brought to writing this book?
A: No. I wrote a lot of it as exercises
for my therapist. By the time I was
shaping it into essays, I was really
just dealing with my honest
thoughts, things that I hadn’t even
shared with my therapist because I
was afraid of judgment. I didn’t
plan on anyone ever seeing this.
bookworld@washpost.com
Carole Burns is the author of “The
Missing Woman and Other Stories.”
THEATER REVIEW
The Almighty shows a funny side in ‘An Act of God’
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
“An Act of God” is more like a
“A Riff From God,” a 75-minute
comedy stand-up set delivered
Vegas-style by the Lord. Its oneliners derive from “The Daily
Show With Jon Stewart” Emmy
winner David Javerbaum’s Twitter account @TheTweetOfGod
(3 million followers). Online, Javerbaum’s still got a million of ’em.
From Saturday: “I condemn
Harvey Weinstein as both God
and a heavenly father of daughters you can rape and marry if
you pay off their dads (Deut.
22:28-29).” Sunday: “I’m God, I
know all your thoughts and
prayers, and pretty much none of
them are with Somalia.”
The 2015 Broadway show
starred Jim Parsons (and Sean
Hayes last year) as the deity
dropping dry barbs about humanity’s reckless follies and nailing a central problem: We are
made in His wrathful image. In
some quarters this was greeted
as a redemptive flood of laughs;
in others, not so much. The
Eleanor Holdridge-directed incarnation at Signature Theatre’s
100-seat Ark theater certainly
looks immaculate, from its skyblue cloudscape to the pure
white suit worn by actor Tom
Story, whose body God is inhabiting.
But the show never hits a
graceful rhythm; it literally
breaks a wing flapping at
punchlines. Evan Casey and Jamie Smithson are the elaborately
costumed angels posing questions and thumbing through the
MARGOT SCHULMAN
Tom Story, center, plays the title role in Signature Theatre’s “An Act of God,” running through Nov. 26.
Bible. The skeptical Casey’s the
one who gets his plumage
cracked by an angry God.
Story wryly delivers the holy
shtick, which includes original
humans Adam and Steve (one
drawn from “a non-load-bearing
rib”) and a regret about not
entrusting the Garden of Eden to
lesbians, who would have been
more reliable. He has returned to
throw out the old commandments and lay down new laws —
for instance: “Thou shalt sepa-
rate me and state.”
Being winsome with a quick
temper somehow isn’t enough,
though, and the slick show feels
calculating and overproduced.
Javerbaum’s jokes only briefly act
like a play, and that’s when God
tells a rather dramatic story of
Jesus with classic father-son tensions. Story is excellent at this.
The rest of this ba-dum-bum
material cries out for more disarming comedy-club rapport.
But as Javerbaum’s God points
out, He tends to overdo, and to
work in mysterious ways.
Hashtag reveals extent
of sexual harassment
ME TOO FROM C1
On Twitter, the #MeToo hashtag
had been tweeted more than half a
million times as of Monday afternoon; more than 600,000 people
were talking about it on Facebook.
Celebrities such as Alyssa Milano
and Rosario Dawson helped to
amplify the hashtag on Sunday
afternoon, as thousands of women shared that they were victims
of harassment and assault. Some
contributed wrenching accounts
of romantic overtures by bosses,
catcalls from strangers and sexual
assault. Others simply chose to
write, “Me too,” offering no further details.
For Lisenbee, the online conversation was an epiphany. No
one talked about these things
when she was growing up in Broken Arrow, Okla., she said; now,
the messages on Facebook had
her thinking about a connection
between her assault and her subsequent struggles with her
weight.
“I’m just so glad that we’re talking about it,” she said in an interview. “I hope that it saves the next
generation of women.”
But for other women, the
#MeToo discussion is feeling all
too familiar.
Lucia Lorenzi saw #MeToo, and
she immediately felt tired. “Anyone else feeling like they’re
drowning in stories; their own or
others?,” she tweeted.
A postdoctoral student living in
Vancouver, Lorenzi noted that
this is not the first time women
have been sharing stories online
of their mistreatment by men.
Before #MeToo, there was #MyHarveyWeinstein. Before that,
there were others, all started by
women of color: #WhatWereYouWearing, #YouOkSis and #SurvivorPrivilege. Each asked women
who have experienced sexual harassment or assault to make themselves known, to reveal a part of
that story.
All these women, she notes, are
“taking on a portion of the work I
wish they didn’t have to do . . . so
that society can become ‘aware’ of
the problem,” Lorenzi wrote to
The Washington Post. Society, she
argues, should be plenty aware by
now.
Wagatwe Wanjuki, a social-media specialist for Daily Kos who
created the #SurvivorPrivilege
hashtag a few years ago, said she
respects that many of her friends
are feeling solidarity with the new
campaign. But “I just knew it
wouldn’t be empowering for me.”
So Wanjuki decided to write her
own post, explaining why she
won’t say “me, too.” One of her
reasons: “I know, deep down, it
won’t do anything. Men who need
a certain threshold of survivors
coming forward to ‘get it’ will
never get it.” More than 12,000
people shared her post.
As a campaign to show the
volume of women who have survived sexual harassment or assault, #MeToo has succeeded. The
question is: Will it actually change
anything?
Lisenbee believes she is seeing
things change, at least in her own
online communities, and among
the women she knows, where topics such as sexual assault and
harassment had not been discussed this way before. “The conversations are happening, that’s a
change,” she wrote to The Washington Post in a follow-up message. “If assaulters know that
men/women will no longer suffer
in silence, it could deter assaults.
Also, it could encourage those
who have been assaulted to seek
help.”
More important, she added, “if
“If assaulters know that
men/women will no
longer suffer in silence,
it could deter assaults.”
Kelly Lisenbee, a surgical technician
in Oklahoma City
this hashtag helps women relieve
themselves of the burden of carrying this around, then that is
enough.”
For Lorenzi, #MeToo remains
the latest of many hashtags that
asks a lot of survivors, without
producing the goals it seems to
inspire in its participants. But
that doesn’t mean it’s meaningless.
“It’s easy in this line of work to
be cynical about these kinds of
hashtags and the swell of press
they get for a week or two before
another perpetrator is exposed
and another hashtag takes off,”
she said. “I guess my hope would
be for those who are still choosing
to blame survivors to ask themselves why this thing keeps happening like clockwork.
“I don’t think #MeToo signals
some kind of ‘watershed moment,’
she added. “But I am hoping that it
serves as another link in the chain
to some concrete, systemic
change.”
abigail.ohlheiser@washpost.com
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
An Act of God, by David Javerbaum.
Directed by Eleanor Holdridge.
Scenic design, Daniel Conway;
costumes, Robert Croghan; lights,
Alberto Segarra; sound design, Ryan
Hickey. Through Nov. 26 at Signature
Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave.,
Arlington. Tickets $40-$104, subject
to change. Call 703-820-9771 or visit
sigtheatre.org.
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You can’t teach an old horndog new tricks
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Carolyn
Hax
Eldest: Prevention and helping
him change are different things.
You can help prevent a repeat,
if you so choose, by being honest
when you meet women he dates.
It wouldn’t be a boundary
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counseling, but only in an
attempt to win back my
stepmother, which didn’t work
so he stopped immediately.
When he originally revealed his
infidelities he offered
rationalizations that his
marriage had been rocky.
Neither of us has a particular
liking to therapy/counseling as a
solution. What can I do to help
him realize the goal of changing?
— Eldest Son
Hello, Carolyn:
I’m wondering the
best way to
confront my
father about his
behavior in
respect to women. I’m the 25year-old eldest of my father’s five
children. My sister and I were
conceived with my mother, who
left him some 20 years ago. His
actions precipitated it. He
remarried and had a son, now 13,
whom I love and know well.
In 2015, my father revealed he
had a 4-year-old child with a
mistress. This was obviously
devastating to my stepmother,
but she was extremely mature
and allowed the child (but not
the mistress) to visit and spend
time with his sibling. A year
later, my father reveals he has a
1-year-old WITH THE SAME
MISTRESS, meaning he knew
about the second when he
revealed the first. This was too
much, and now my father and
stepmother are careening
toward divorce. My stepmother
is an intelligent and successful
woman who deserves better.
My worry is that he will simply
find another woman and do the
same things again. I feel
compelled to try and prevent
this. How do I help him change?
— Eldest
0% Interest
for 60 months
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
violation to inquire, in friendly
get-to-know-you conversation,
whether she has met all five of
his kids and their three mothers.
Your impulse to “help him
change,” though, sets off
boundary alarms. Has he said he
wants to change? Asked for your
help?
You have standing, always, to
say how you feel. You can tell
your dad you’re embarrassed/
disappointed/[your word here]
by his actions. You can tell your
stepmother she has your support
and make the effort to be present
for your siblings.
You can also distance yourself
from your father based on his
lousy behavior.
Again — there are productive,
healthy options here. Jumping in
to try to fix your father isn’t one
of them.
Carolyn: I know he wants to
change because he told me so
directly. He went to marriage
Eldest Son: Do not make him
your project. He is his own
project, full stop.
One way you can help
appropriately is to call BS on his
excuses; if he really wants to
change, then he needs to own his
frailties in full. That means
counseling to fix himself vs.
salvage his status quo. That
means saying he cheated because
he lacked the courage and
maturity to face his failing
marriage, and used the
estrangement as permission for
self-indulgence.
How you feel about therapy is
irrelevant. You are you, he is he.
If you don’t see the clear border
there, then, um, please rethink
the aversion to therapy?
Furthermore, if a skilled pro
can help your father recognize
that he is making a child’s
decisions with a man’s body, then
please don’t stand in the way.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
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. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
10/17/17
7:00
7:30
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ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
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CABLE CHANNELS
ELIZABETH MORRIS/NETFLIX
Patton Oswalt: Annihilation (Netflix streaming) In this one-hour stand-up
special, the comedian talks about using humor to work through his grief
after the death of his wife.
NCIS (CBS at 8) Maria Bello
(“Goliath”) joins the cast.
Finding Your Roots (WETA and
MPT at 8) Ted Danson and Mary
Steenburgen (who are, thankfully,
still married outside of the “Curb
Your Enthusiasm” universe), learn
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H. Macy also explores his ancestry.
The Flash (CW at 8) Barry and Iris
try to work through their issues in
couple’s therapy.
Loudermilk (AT&T Audience
Network at 8:30) This 10-episode
dramedy, co-created by Peter
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(“Office Space”) as a cantankerous
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Gucci Mane & Keyshia Ka’oir: The
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RETURNING
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Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) David
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— Bethonie Butler
Leah Remini: Scientology
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◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
TV series ‘Loudermilk’ and ‘Better Things’ portray Generation X spot-on
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
milk,” a 10-episode dramedy premiering Tuesday on the DirecTV/
AT&T Audience Network, offers
an aged example of the species,
with Ron Livingston starring as
Sam Loudermilk, a 50-year-old
former rock critic and recovering
alcoholic who lives in the city
once regarded as the epitome of
Gen-X ethos (and pathos): Seattle.
Loudermilk supervises an Alcoholics Anonymous chapter that
meets at a Catholic church; at
night, he’s a janitor polishing
marble floors in office lobbies. He
shares a shabby but comfortable
apartment with his sponsor and
best friend, Ben (Will Sasso). Loudermilk resents technology and is
unmoved by the prevalent notion
that “GET OFF MY LAWN” is an
effective millennial retort to an
elder’s opinion. Lawn or no, he
happily takes on the preoccupied
busybodies who invade his slacker realm.
“You live in a world with other
people. Get your nose out of your
phone and you might see that,” he
tells a young woman who has
taken advantage of his dooropening courtesy and cut in front
of him in line at the coffee shop to
recite a long list of drink orders.
“Why are you getting coffee for
the whole office?” he continues.
“Have you never heard of Betty
Friedan? Gloria Steinem?”
“Maybe you need to be on medication,” she replies.
“I am on medication,” Loudermilk yells. “It’s called coffee, and I
can’t get it because I have to wait
for you to order for everyone in
your millennial clown car.”
I
f all you really want in life is to
watch a TV show about an old
man who willingly enters daily etiquette arguments with complete strangers, you can’t do
much better than 70-year-old Larry David’s constant harangues on
HBO’s recently revived “Curb
Your Enthusiasm.”
The misanthropy in “Loudermilk,” however, is more complex
than David’s irritating shtick, setting up a more meaningful story
arc about relationships, responsibilities and disappointment. How
fitting that the title role has gone
to Livingston, who is affectionately remembered for starring in the
1999 film “Office Space” as a
young man whose workplace futility leads to a liberating breakthrough — and an embezzlement
scheme. “Office Space’s” anarchic
takeaway, if there was one, was to
direct its middle finger at corporate culture, which was enthralling back then to underappreciat-
ed Gen-X worker bees, who enjoyed the sight of three men beating a laser printer to death.
With just enough wear and
wrinkles enhancing his boyish
sarcasm, Livingston gives a fine
performance as a man whose
sourness is an attribute. Kids, this
is what happens to the man who
can never stick to the sunny side
of the street — he becomes the
living ghost of old John Cusack
movies.
We soon discover that Loudermilk did find love, once, but he
lost it in an inebriated car crash.
Now four years sober, Loudermilk
is content to be a curmudgeon. He
brightens a bit at the arrival of an
attractive next-door neighbor
(Laura Mennell), but the real
change in his life comes when he
takes pity on a young addict,
Claire (Anja Savcic), who copes
with her father’s death through
drugs and alcohol.
All this, and still it’s a comedy.
Co-creator Farrelly, who with his
brother made a string of delightfully ill-mannered movies like
“Dumb & Dumber” and “There’s
Something About Mary,” has retained an essential (if risky) belief
that jokes about bestiality, substance abuse and people with disabilities (with disabled actors
playing those roles) can still be
funny when expertly handled —
and he’s not wrong about that.
Despite a number of tangential
shenanigans, “Loudermilk” remains resolutely focused on its
title character’s permanent condition, which is resonant of an old
Nirvana track: I hate myself and
want to die.
Loudermilk is old enough to
have improved on the sentiment.
He hates himself (and plenty others), but living sure beats the
alternative.
A
similarly beautiful grouchiness sets the tone for Pam-
ela Adlon’s “Better Things,”
currently in its superb second
season Thursday nights on FX.
In the tradition of nothingmeans-everything vignettes, the
show explores the believably exasperating life of Sam Fox (played
by 51-year-old Adlon), a single
mother of three demanding
daughters in Los Angeles. Sam,
who found early success as a child
actress, pieces together enough
bit parts, voice-overs and commercial work to eke out a comfortable living for her family, as
well as her mother, Phyllis (Celia
Imrie), who somewhat ungratefully occupies the guesthouse.
A few of “Better Things’ ” best
moments have also involved the
dreaded get-off-your-phone conflicts that seem mandatory when-
ever Gen-X tries to connect with
its Gen-Z offspring. In one memorable restaurant scene last season, Sam suggests that her tunedout teenager Max (Mikey Madison) go sit with the man at the
next table who is more interested
in his phone than his female companion. “You should sit over there
since you both don’t listen, and I
will sit here with [his] lovely
date.”
As cliche as it may seem, these
scenes are perhaps sending a necessary message to future historians: Not all of us fell quietly and
passively into the screen. Years
from now, Gen-X characters will
either look like all those cardiganwearing Silent Generation sitcom
dads bemoaning shaggy hair and
loud music, or we’ll look like concerned prophets of doom trying
to snap the world out of a trance.
Viewers of the show already
know that Sam is much more than
a nag. She cares deeply for her
daughters, who have been given a
modern upbringing that emphasizes independence and freethinking. Nevertheless, Sam’s
house is a claustrophobic swirl of
incessant emotional needs; if it’s
not an overblown crisis with one
of the kids, it’s Phyllis’s gradual
decline into dementia, which Imrie plays with puzzled perfection.
“Better Things” also deals with
the unlikelihood that Sam will
ever find a suitable mate — and
for a minute, I found myself wondering if she and Sam Loudermilk
might hit it off, if only they didn’t
live in different worlds on different networks. (Sam and Sam?
Probably not.)
In this week’s episode, Sam’s
anger boils over when, on a family
TV night, one of the girls callously
flips right past the sight of their
mother on the screen in a role. In
her tirade about feeling underappreciated, Sam asks her children
if they would even be able to think
of anything nice to say at her
funeral.
Considering it, the girls light
candles and offer eulogies to their
mother while she lies in the center of the room and pretends to be
the body in a casket.
I hate myself and want to die?
Hardly. But is it too much to ask
to be appreciated? To be noticed?
Getting older by the minute, Generation X may well go to its grave
still begging for just a little more
love.
hank.stuever@washpost.com
Loudermilk (30 minutes) premieres
Tuesday at 10:30 p.m. on DirecTV/
AT&T’s Audience Network.
Better Things (30 minutes) airs
Thursdays at 10 p.m. on FX.
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This wildly popular interactive comedy whodunit keeps
the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the suspects
and catch the killer. New clues and up to the minute
improvisation deliver “the most fun I ever had at the
Kennedy Center.” (Arch Campbell ABC News)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
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& get 25% off.
Use Code 270942.
DANCE
Mariinsky Ballet:
“La Bayadère”
Tonight -Saturday at 7:30
Saturday & Sunday at 1:30
Replete with forbidden love, shocking betrayal, and a
spectral voyage to the afterlife, this enchanting journey
to a fabled past radiates with colorful characters, vibrant
sets and costumes, and virtuosic moments. Petipa created
La Bayadère for the Mariinsky more than 140 years ago,
and this dazzling ballet continues to be "theirs" well into
the 21st century. Casting available at kennedy-center.org
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
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"An unbroken line of
arabesques that
stops the heart with
its grace"
—The Telegraph
(London)
16-2898
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
MOVIE DIRECTORY
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
DISTRICT
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience 12:25
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Experience (R) 6:00-8:55
CC: 12:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05-5:15
CC: 2:10-5:00-7:45-10:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
4:30-7:25-10:15
American Made (R) CC: 1:20-4:15- AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
7:10-9:55
8633 Colesville Road
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:30CC: 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
2:00-4:30-7:05-9:35
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Kansas City Confidential (1952)
1:00-3:45-6:30
(NR) 5:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Robbery (NR) 9:10
3:00-6:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:10It (R) CC: 9:50
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:50-4:40- 2:30-8:00
The Steel Trap (NR) 7:20
7:30-9:20
AMC Academy 8
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:156198 Greenbelt Road
4:05-6:45-10:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:30-2:30-4:00-5:00-6:30-7:30(!) 1:30-4:10-6:50
9:00-10:00
American Made (R) CC: (!) 2:00Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:10-4:10- 4:45-8:00
7:00-9:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D CC: 1:00-4:00-7:15
Experience (R) CC: 12:29-4:15-8:00 My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Professor Marston & the Wonder (!) 2:30-5:00-7:45
Women (R) CC: 1:45-4:30-7:10-9:45 Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
3:00-6:30-7:30
10:20
It (R) CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00
Brave (PG) 2:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:301:15-3:30-6:00-8:30
5:15-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: (!)
1:00-4:30
AMC Loews Uptown 1
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
MARYLAND
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 7:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 3:10 The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 1:00-3:35-6:10-8:45
AMC Mazza Gallerie
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:50-6:50-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
CC: 2:00-4:40-7:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: 12:30-3:15-6:00-8:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 2:30
1:50-4:30
It (R) CC: 6:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:30-4:1012:30-4:00
6:55-9:35
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 2:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
5:10-7:50
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:0012:35-3:00-5:30-8:00
7:00-9:45
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:30Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 9:00
4:20-7:10
Blade
Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:30Professor Marston & the Wonder
4:00-7:30
Women (R) CC: (!) 12:30-3:05AMC Columbia 14
5:40-8:15
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
(!) 7:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
Albert Einstein Planetarium - 11:30-2:05-4:35
National Air and Space Museum The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
6th Street and Independence Ave SW CC: (!) 11:20-2:00-4:50-7:40-10:25
American Made (R) CC: 11:25-2:10To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) 5:00-7:45-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- CC: 11:50-3:00-6:30-9:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 10:501:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
3:10-9:30
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Angelika Pop-Up
(!) 11:05-1:45-4:30-7:05-9:40
at Union Market
It (R) CC: 12:25-3:40-10:05
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
New Mexico Backcountry DiscovThe Mountain Between Us (PG-13) ery Route (NR) (!) 7:00
CC: 11:45-2:15-4:40-7:00
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:15-10:05
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Wind River (R) CC: 11:20AM
11:00-1:40-4:20-6:55-9:30
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
(NR) 7:30
So B. It (PG-13) 11:15-1:15-3:15-5:15 11:10-1:40-4:10-6:40-9:10
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:50The Pathological Optimist 1:304:40-7:30-10:20
3:30-5:30
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Avalon Theatre
Experience (R) (!) 11:15-2:455612 Connecticut Avenue
6:15-10:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 2:00- The Heart of Man (!) 7:00
4:45-7:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00-3:15- Women (R) (!) 10:50-1:25-4:255:30-8:00
7:20-10:10
Landmark
Blade Runner 2049 (R) (!) 12:10Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
4:10-8:10
807 V Street, NW
The Foreigner (R) (!) 10:50-1:304:20-7:10-10:05
American Made (R) CC: 12:152:45-5:10-7:35-10:00
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
CC: 1:30-4:30-7:15-10:00
Brave (PG) CC: 2:00-6:00
It (R) CC: 1:40-4:25-7:10-9:50
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:00-1:00- 11:30-2:05-4:40
3:15-7:00-7:30-9:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:00- CC: 2:20-5:00-7:40-10:20
3:30-4:15-7:00-10:00-10:15
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Landmark E Street Cinema
1:10-4:10-7:05-10:00
555 11th Street NW
American Made (R) CC: 2:10-5:00Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird 7:45-10:30
Hamilton CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:30 Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 11:50-3:15-6:30-9:40
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
It (R) CC: 7:10-10:15
12:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:45
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
11:40-2:15-4:50-7:25-10:00
Down The White House (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 1:55CC: 12:45-3:45
5:45-8:10-9:20
Human Flow (PG-13) CC: 1:30Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:05
4:45-8:15
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 1:45-4:55Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
7:35-10:20
1:05-4:05-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:10- Judwaa 2 (NR) 8:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
4:10-7:10-9:35
The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:15- 11:35-2:10-4:45-7:20-9:55
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
3:15-4:15-6:30-7:15-9:00-9:40
The Royal Opera House: The Magic 11:45-12:45-1:50-3:10-4:25-5:356:50-8:00-9:15-10:25
Flute (Die Zauberflöte) 7:00
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) (!) 12:10Landmark West End Cinema 3:20-6:40-9:50
2301 M Street NW
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:35Dolores (NR) 4:30
1:25-4:20-7:15-10:05
The Big Sick (R) CC: 1:30-4:15-7:30 Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Bending the Arc 2:15-4:45-7:15
Experience (R) CC: 12:00-3:30The King's Choice (Kongens nei) 7:00-10:30
(NR) 1:40-7:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC Women (R) CC: (!) 2:05-4:507:30-10:10
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:00- Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 4:35
Last Night 11:30AM
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
The Foreigner (R) (!) 3:40-9:10
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 Blood Money (!) 1:15-6:45
701 Seventh Street Northwest
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
1:00-4:25-7:30-10:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-7:00
It (R) 1:15-4:20-7:15-10:10
The Foreigner (R) 12:00-2:40-5:258:05-10:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-3:406:30-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
3:35-10:25
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR) 2:40
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
11:00-2:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:40-4:257:05-9:50
American Assassin (R) CC: 1:153:50-6:35-9:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
1:00-3:20-5:40-8:00-9:20-10:20
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:101:00-3:20
6:55-9:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Professor Marston & the Wonder
CC: 1:40-4:25-7:10-9:40
Women (R) CC: 1:50-4:45-7:20-9:55
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) CC:
CC: 12:30-3:30-6:25-9:35
1:00-5:30-7:55-10:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Landmark
1:15-3:45-6:30-9:00
Bethesda Row Cinema
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:307235 Woodmont Avenue
4:00-7:30
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
It (R) CC: 5:25
The Foreigner (R) CC: 2:00-4:45- Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 1:30-4:40-10:05
7:15-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:50Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
3:40-6:50-9:10
5:40-9:15
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 2:301:10-2:00-3:50-4:30-6:40-7:30-10:00
5:15-8:00
Lucky CC: 1:15-3:30-8:00-10:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
The Meyerowitz Stories (New and
1:00-3:15-5:30-7:45-9:30-10:00
Selected) 1:40-4:20-7:20-9:50
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
The Royal Opera House: The Magic
4:25-7:05
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:15- Flute (Die Zauberflöte) 7:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:45
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D 1:00-4:10-7:00-9:45
Experience (R) CC: 2:45-6:15-10:00 Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:20Brawl in Cell Block 99 2:15-8:30 4:00-5:30-7:10-9:40
Brave (PG) 2:00
Old Greenbelt Theatre
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Ctr 12
800 Shoppers Way
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:00-1:20-4:45-7:10-9:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 12:002:55-4:40-7:40-10:05
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
11:15-2:10-5:50-7:30-10:00
American Made (R) 11:40-1:555:15-7:35-10:35
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:05-1:15-3:25-4:35-7:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:10-1:50-4:55-7:55-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 9:15
It (R) 4:25-10:10
The Foreigner (R) 11:25-2:40-5:008:10-10:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:202:05-4:30-7:05-9:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:502:00-3:00-5:10-8:00-9:40
Marshall (PG-13) 11:45-2:20-5:057:45-9:20
The Florida Project (R) 11:55-2:255:35-7:25-8:20-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:254:50-8:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
2:30-5:55
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 12:40-3:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 11:35-2:15-5:407:20-9:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:3012:25-3:50-7:15
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:00-3:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:10-3:20-6:40-9:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:0011:30-2:30-3:00-6:00-9:30
It (R) 6:30-9:40
The Foreigner (R) 11:10-1:50-4:307:20-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:202:00-4:40-6:50-9:20-10:10
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017)
(NR) 7:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:307:00-10:20
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
11:20-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:10
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 10:501:40-4:20-7:10-10:00
American Made (R) 11:30-2:205:10-7:50-10:40
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
10:30-12:50-3:10-5:30-8:00-10:20
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:401:20-4:00-6:50-9:40
Marshall (PG-13) 11:10-2:10-5:007:40-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 10:20-1:00-3:407:00-9:30
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:20-4:20-9:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie 3D (PG)
1:50-7:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
11:05-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:15
American Made (R) 11:40-2:355:30-8:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:30-2:45-6:00-9:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:35-2:20-5:05-7:50-10:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:25-3:55
It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:10-10:15
The Foreigner (R) 10:55-1:50-4:507:45-10:40
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:00-3:456:35-9:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:203:00-5:40-8:20
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 11:10-2:355:35-8:40
Marshall (PG-13) 11:00-2:005:00-8:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
12:10-7:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:55-1:25AMC Loews
2:40-6:25-10:10
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Happy Death Day (PG-13) XD:
11115 Mall Circle
11:00-1:50-4:30-7:15-9:55
Brave (PG) (!) 2:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: 12:10-7:40
11:30-2:45-5:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:55
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
CC: 10:15-12:30-3:30-6:15-9:15
1591 West Nursery Road
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
CC: 11:45-3:15-6:45-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: 1:55-4:20-6:45
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
10:00-1:00-3:45-6:30-9:00
CC: 1:45-4:40-7:15-9:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
American Made (R) CC: 2:05-4:456:00-9:30
7:25-10:05
It (R) CC: 11:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 10:45CC: 1:00-4:05-7:10-10:15
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
1:20-4:00-6:30-9:05
10:30-1:15-4:15-7:00-9:45-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 1:00Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:002:00-3:00-4:30-6:30-8:00-10:00
1:45-4:45-7:45-10:30
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 (!) 8:00 It (R) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
129 Centerway
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 5:30-8:00
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10
629 Center Point Way
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:40-2:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
American Made (R) 11:55-2:204:50-7:20-9:50
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:25-2:40-4:55-7:10-9:25
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:35-2:55-5:157:35-9:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20-1:403:40-5:00-7:00-8:20-10:20
It (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:503:00-5:10-7:20-9:30
Home Again (PG-13) 3:05-7:40
Wind River (R) 12:40-5:15-9:50
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 12:15-2:40-5:057:30-9:55
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:00-2:25-5:00-7:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:45-3:50-7:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:004:30-8:00
It (R) 2:15-5:15-8:15
The Foreigner (R) 12:30-3:105:55-8:35
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:052:50-5:50-8:50
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 2:455:20-8:00-10:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:25-4:30-7:40-10:25
American Made (R) 1:20-4:357:50-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
3:20-6:30-9:50
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
2:55-5:30-8:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:45-7:30
It (R) 1:00-4:10-7:20-10:20
The Foreigner (R) 1:30-4:20-7:1010:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:004:40-7:10-9:45
Marshall (PG-13) 1:10-4:00-7:0010:10
The Heart of Man 7:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:155:00-8:45
A Question of Faith (PG) 1:10-3:506:40-9:30
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
1:00-3:40-10:25
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:00-4:20-7:15-10:10
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 3:106:30-9:35
American Made (R) 1:15-4:357:30-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:30-3:45-7:35-11:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:30-3:20-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:455:45-7:20-10:00-11:00
It (R) 1:05-4:20-7:35-10:50
The Foreigner (R) 12:00-2:40-5:258:15-11:00
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:35-4:257:15-10:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:153:15-5:40-8:10-10:55
mother! (R) 12:15
Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-4:107:00-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:354:45-8:30
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017)
(NR) 7:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:35
Regal Germantown Stadium 14
20000 Century Boulevard
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:304:00-6:30-9:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
2:00-4:45-7:45-10:30
American Made (R) 1:45-4:3010:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:00-3:15-6:30-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:00-4:00-6:45-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:15-7:008:15-10:45
It (R) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
The Foreigner (R) 1:45-4:45-7:3010:30
Flatliners (PG-13) 12:30-3:156:00-8:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:002:30-5:00-8:00-10:45
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:452:00-4:30-5:45-9:30
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017)
(NR) 7:00
Mersal (NR) 8:30
Mahanubhavudu (NR) 1:30-5:15
American Made (R) 12:50-3:456:30-9:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Regal Hyattsville Royale
12:30-3:30-6:15-9:00
Stadium 14
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:106505 America Blvd.
12:40-3:40-7:10-7:45-10:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:00- It (R) 1:20-4:30-7:30-10:30
3:45-6:45-9:30
The Foreigner (R) 1:30-4:20The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 7:00-9:45
1:30-4:15-7:00-10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:15American Made (R) 1:00-3:453:00-6:00-8:45
6:30-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:20Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 2:45-5:10-7:40-10:10
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:20My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
10:15
12:30-3:15-6:00-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:10Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00-4:05- 4:10-4:40-8:15
4:45-7:50-8:30
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:20
7710 Matapeake Business Dr
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
10:00
10:50-1:40
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:30-7:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:15CC: (!) 10:40-1:10-1:50-4:30-6:203:45-6:15-9:00
7:20-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-4:00Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
7:15-10:15
Professor Marston & the Wonder CC: 1:00-4:40-7:50-11:00
Women (R) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30 My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:30- 10:00-12:35-3:20-6:10-8:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!) 11:501:35-5:15-9:00
3:30-7:00-10:30
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
It (R) CC: 11:10-2:10-5:10-8:10-11:10
4:30-10:30
The Foreigner (R) Open Caption; CC:
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
10:15-11:30-2:20-4:10-5:00-6:5014716 Baltimore Avenue
7:40-9:40-10:20
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 10:10-12:5012:25-3:00-5:30-8:10
3:40-6:40-10:10
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:1012:45-3:35-6:30-9:30
6:30-9:20
American Made (R) 12:50-3:45A Question of Faith (PG) CC:
6:45-9:45
11:20-2:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) CC:
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:15
10:30-3:50-9:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!) 11:0012:10-2:40-5:10-7:45-10:15
2:30-6:00-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-4:15- Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
5:00-8:15
11:40-3:00-4:40-5:30-7:10-8:00It (R) 12:30-3:50-7:00-10:05
9:50-10:50
Flatliners (PG-13) 10:40
Marshall (PG-13) Open Caption; CC:
The Foreigner (R) 12:50-4:3010:20-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:40
7:30-10:30
iPic Pike & Rose
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:0011830 Grand Park Ave
1:15-3:45-7:15-9:15
The
LEGO
Ninjago Movie (PG) (!)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:0012:30-3:30
2:30-5:15-8:00-10:35
The
Mountain
Between Us (PG-13)
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:00(!) 1:00-4:30-8:00-11:15
10:00
American Made (R) (!) 11:30-2:45Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13 6:15-9:30
199 East Montgomery Ave
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) (!)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:00- 11:45-3:15-7:00-10:45
4:00-6:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) (!) 11:00The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 3:00-6:45-11:00
1:45-4:30-7:45-10:30
It (R) 6:30-10:00
American Made (R) 2:00-5:00The Foreigner (R) (!) 12:00-3:308:00-10:45
7:15-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Happy Death Day (PG-13) (!) 1:3012:30-3:30-6:45-10:00
4:45-7:45-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Marshall (PG-13) (!) 12:45-4:151:45-4:15-7:00-9:30
7:30-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:30-3:156:15-7:00-9:45-10:30
It (R) 12:45-3:45-7:15-10:30
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
The Foreigner (R) 1:45-4:30-7:152150 Clarendon Blvd.
10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:001:15-4:45
4:45-7:30-11:00
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:45-7:30- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 1:15-4:45-7:30-10:10
10:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
The Heart of Man 7:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:30- 1:30-4:15-7:10-10:00
American Made (R) CC: 1:45-4:304:00-7:30-9:00
7:20-10:20
City Of Rock (NR) 1:15-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Regal Waugh Chapel
CC:
1:30-3:45-7:15-10:00
Stadium 12 & IMAX
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
1419 South Main Chapel Way
2:15-4:00-6:45-9:20
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 7:40-10:10
12:10-2:00-4:35-7:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 1:15-3:30-5:45-8:00-10:20
12:40-3:45-6:45-9:35
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 6:45-9:30
12:20-3:25-6:30-9:45
AMC Hoffman Center 22
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:50
Brave
(PG) 2:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:40-4:25Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:306:15-9:50-10:20
4:15-8:15
It (R) 1:00-4:10-7:20-10:25
The Foreigner (R) 1:10-4:05-7:20- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
11:10-2:00-4:40-7:20
10:05
American Assassin (R) 1:45-4:45- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 11:05-1:40-4:20-7:10-9:50
7:40-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- American Made (R) CC: 11:252:15-5:00-7:40-10:20
3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) 1:20-4:15-7:30- Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
12:40-3:50-9:40
10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
CC: 12:15-3:40-7:00-10:05
2D Experience (R) 12:00-3:35It (R) CC: 11:45-3:15-6:30-9:45
7:10-10:50
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:50- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
1:05-3:40-6:20-9:05
8:00-9:25
New Mexico Backcountry DiscovRegal Westview
ery Route (NR) 7:00
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:455243 Buckeystown Pike
1:15-5:00-9:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:25
1:00-4:00-6:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 11:00-1:35-4:10-6:45-9:20
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:30-2:15Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 9:30 5:00-7:45-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) American Assassin (R) CC:
12:45-4:15-7:30-11:00
12:20-10:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
11:15-12:30-1:45-3:00-4:15-5:30American Made (R) 12:30-3:307:00-8:00-9:30-10:00-10:30
6:15-9:15
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:45- 4:30-7:15-10:15
5:45-7:30-11:15
The Heart of Man 7:00
It (R) 1:30-4:45-8:00-11:15
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:15-4:00Experience (R) CC: 11:00-2:307:00-10:00
6:15-9:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:15Professor Marston & the Wonder
3:15-6:30-9:15
Women (R) CC: 11:20-1:00-3:45The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:30-5:15- 6:40-9:15
8:15-11:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
3:30-7:30
2D Experience (R) 11:30-3:15'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
7:00-10:45
4:45-9:55
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:45- American Satan (R) 11:05-1:452:15-5:00-7:45-10:15
4:30-7:15-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 2:00Last Night 11:20-1:55-4:25-7:004:45-8:30-9:30
9:25
Marshall (PG-13) 12:30-3:45AMC Potomac Mills 18
7:15-10:30
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 1:15-4:30-7:15-10:00 The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
11:25-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
A Question of Faith (PG) 1:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
UA Snowden Square
CC: 11:40-2:20-5:00-7:45-10:25
Stadium 14
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
9161 Commerce Ctr Dr
12:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
12:25-3:10-6:00-8:30
11:30-2:05-4:35-7:05-9:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) American Made (R) CC: 11:201:00-3:50-6:45-9:30
2:15-5:00-7:50-10:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 12:10- Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:003:20-6:15-9:10
1:45-2:45-5:20-6:20-9:00-10:00
VIRGINIA
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:40
It (R) CC: 1:00-4:00-7:10-10:20
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:50-2:305:30-8:10-10:50
American Assassin (R) CC: 11:204:30-9:40
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 11:20-4:207:00-9:40
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:45-4:20-7:00-9:35
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:15-5:40-8:15-10:40
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) CC: 12:15-4:00-7:40
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:004:45-7:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 8:45
A Question of Faith (PG) CC: 3:30
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
2:00-7:10
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 1:20-4:00-6:35-9:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:452:15-4:40-7:15-9:45
Brave (PG) (!) 2:00-6:00
Tuesday, October 17, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: (!) 10:15-12:503:20-5:45-8:10-10:35
The Florida Project (R) CC: (!)
11:30-2:15-4:45-7:30-10:15
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:55-4:407:20-9:55
The Foreigner (R) 1:40-4:257:10-9:55
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 2:204:55-7:30-10:05
Bow Tie
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:30Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
5:00-7:30-10:15
11940 Market St
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:15The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
10:15
1:10-4:10
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:008:30-9:15
1:50-4:50-7:50-10:35
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 12:10- Regal Countryside Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
3:10-6:20-9:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:30-4:00
12:10-3:20-6:30-9:50
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:35-4:20
12:50-3:40-6:10-9:10
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:301:20-4:35-7:15-10:00
6:00-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:45-8:00
It (R) 6:40-10:00
American Made (R) 12:40-3:25The Foreigner (R) 1:40-4:40-7:40- 6:15-9:10
10:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:3012:35-3:30-6:45-10:00
4:30-7:30-10:15
It (R) 12:30-3:35-6:35-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:20- American Assassin (R) 6:10-9:05
AMC Shirlington 7
10:10
Arjun Reddy (NR) 1:05
2772 South Randolph St.
Professor Marston & the Wonder Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:25The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Women (R) 1:00-4:00-6:50-10:20 2:45-5:30-8:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30- Bareilly Ki Barfi (NR) 1:45-5:00-7:40
CC: (!) 1:40-4:15-7:00-10:00
7:00-10:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 12:15-3:102:00-4:50-7:40-10:25
6:05-9:20
Cinema Arts Theatre
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Chef (Hindi) (NR) 2:55-5:50-9:15
9650 Main St
4:00-10:00
Judwaa 2 (NR) 3:00-6:00-9:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: (!)
Raja The Great (NR) 6:00-8:00-9:00
9:40-12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:50
2:00-4:45-7:15-9:45
Jai Lava Kusa (NR) 3:15-6:30-9:55
American Made (R) CC: 9:45The Florida Project (R) (!) 1:45The Stray (PG) 12:50-3:05-5:15-7:30
12:05-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
3:15-4:30-6:15-7:30-9:15-10:15
Spyder (Tamil) (NR) 12:35
Blade
Runner
2049
(R)
CC:
9:45Professor Marston & the Wonder 1:00-4:15-7:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
Women (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:304:30-9:40
Victoria
&
Abdul
(PG-13)
CC:
9:507:30-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
12:10-2:30-4:55-7:20-9:35
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: (!) Lucky
Women (R) 12:30-3:10-6:05-9:00
CC:
10:00-12:00-2:00-4:001:00-7:00
Mahanubhavudu (NR) 12:20-3:206:00-8:00-9:50
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought 6:20-9:25
Punjab Nahi Jaungi 4:00-7:057850e Tysons Corner Center
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 9:55-12:15-2:25-4:45-7:10-9:20 10:00
Brave (PG) CC: 2:00
Bailaras (NR) 1:15-4:05-6:50-9:35
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
Mersal (NR) 6:00-9:30
11:20-1:50
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
CC: 10:40-1:40-4:20-7:10-10:15
21100 Dulles Town Circle
11:25-1:50-4:20-6:50
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
The
LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
4:30
11:45-2:20
11:20-2:05-4:40-7:20
American Made (R) CC: 10:30The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
American Made (R) 12:20-3:001:20-4:15-8:15-9:30
12:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
7:35
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Kingsman:
American Made (R) 1:30-4:30The
Golden
Circle
(R)
CC: 12:15-3:25-6:40-10:00
7:45-10:40
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: 12:10-3:15-7:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
My
Little
Pony:
The
Movie
(PG)
10:55-1:25-4:10-6:45-9:15
12:30-3:15-6:30-9:45
New Mexico Backcountry Discov- 11:50-2:20-4:55-7:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:45ery Route (NR) (!) 7:00
12:45-3:45-6:15-9:00
2:40-7:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 10:25- Happy
Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:302:05-5:35-9:10
7:00-10:00
1:55-3:10-4:15-5:30-7:00-8:00
It (R) CC: 1:10-7:45-10:50
It (R) 1:15-3:00-6:00-9:15
Marshall (PG-13) 11:30-2:10The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 10:50The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:30-5:154:50-7:30
1:30-4:15-6:55-9:40
Marston & the Wonder 8:00-10:45
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 4:40-10:10 Professor
Women (R) 11:55-2:25-5:00-7:45 Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:50Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
2:15-4:45-7:30-10:30
Blade
Runner
2049 (R) 12:0011:35-2:10-5:05-7:40-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-4:15-7:153:30-7:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) The
10:15
Foreigner
(R)
11:35-2:1510:25-12:05-1:00-2:30-3:30-4:55- 5:05-7:50
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
5:55-7:20-8:30-9:45-10:55
5:00-8:30
The Stray (PG) 11:40AM
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:45Blade
Runner
2049
(R)
12:00Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
1:35-4:25-7:15-10:05
3:30-7:05
4110 West Ox Road
The Heart of Man (!) 7:00
Manassas 4 Cinemas
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
8890 Mathis Ave.
2D Experience (R) 11:05-2:451:10-3:45
6:20-9:55
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Professor Marston & the Wonder 2:15-4:30-6:40-8:45
12:35-3:50-6:45-10:30
Women (R) CC: (!) 10:35-1:15-4:00- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:35 American Made (R) 12:55-3:55-9:50
7:25-9:50
American Made (R) 2:15-4:25Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
6:40-8:55
12:30-3:55-7:25-10:40
10:30-4:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:40- 4:15-7:30
12:05-2:40-5:15-7:50-10:25
7:15-10:55
It (R) 3:30-6:05-8:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:15-3:30AMC Worldgate 9
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 6:30-9:50
The Foreigner (R) 12:55-4:0013025 Worldgate Drive
6201 Multiplex Drive
7:35-10:20
Brave (PG) (!) 2:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:10The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 11:25-1:55-4:25-6:55-9:25
CC: 12:55-3:35-6:15-9:05
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 2:40-5:45-8:15-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) 12:00-2:50-5:10American Made (R) CC: 1:25-4:10- 11:00-1:40-4:35-7:15-10:10
8:00-10:50
6:50-9:30
American Made (R) 10:45-1:30The Heart of Man 7:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 4:15-7:10-9:55
CC: 12:10-3:20-6:40-9:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 10:20
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: 10:00-1:10-4:20-7:30-10:40
(NR) 7:00
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Outlaws (Crime City) (beomBlade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:00- 10:10-12:40-3:10-4:10-6:40
joi-do-si) (NR) 12:40-3:40-6:55-9:55
3:30-7:00-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:30Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
It (R) CC: 7:55
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 2:05-4:50- It (R) 10:25-1:45-4:50-7:55-11:00
22875 Brambleton Plaza
7:35-10:10
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:25-5:05- Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:30-3:45Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:45-10:25
6:00-8:15-10:30
12:40-3:00-5:20-7:45-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:00- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:15-4:05- 12:25-2:50-5:15-7:40-9:10-10:05
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
7:15-10:00
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 10:40-1:20- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 4:25 4:00-5:40
12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
American Made (R) 1:30-4:15Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - Judwaa 2 (NR) 10:05-1:05
Raja The Great (NR) 6:00-8:20-9:15 7:00-9:45
One Loudoun
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 2:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Mersal (NR) 7:20-10:55
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Rave Cinemas
10:00-12:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
It (R) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:45
11900 Palace Way
11:45AM
American Made (R) 11:10AM
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-2:004:10-5:40-7:45-8:30-9:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
10:55-1:40-4:25-7:20-10:00
10:15-1:05
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:00- Flatliners (PG-13) 12:15-3:005:45-8:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 1:50-4:40
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:30-5:1510:10-12:55
American Made (R) 11:30-2:158:00-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:30-12:25 4:55-7:50-10:35
The Foreigner (R) 10:00-1:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) American Assassin (R) 3:45-9:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:15
12:30-3:55-7:05-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) 3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
4:15-7:40-10:55
11:10-4:45
2D Experience (R) 11:45-3:20It (R) 2:45-6:45-10:00
It (R) 11:15-2:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:20Flatliners (PG-13) 11:05-2:00-4:35- 7:00-10:40
Wind River (R) 1:00-6:30
7:20-11:20
7:10-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:15-4:50
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:40Professor Marston & the Wonder
3:20-6:20-9:35
2:25-5:00-7:40-10:10
Women (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30American Made (R) 2:20-5:20American Assassin (R) 2:10
8:20-11:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:15- 10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
2:50-5:30-8:05-10:45
Regal Kingstowne
3:55-6:00-9:10
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 12:20-3:15
Stadium 16 & RPX
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 4:15
Raja The Great (NR) 6:10-8:00-9:30
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
The Foreigner (R) 4:25-8:00-11:05 Marshall (PG-13) 11:35-2:20-5:05- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 3:057:55-10:40
12:15-4:15-6:50
5:55-8:40-11:20
Professor Marston & the Wonder The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
The Godfather (R) 7:20
Women (R) 11:20-2:05-4:50-7:30- 1:25-4:05-6:45-10:05
10:05
Angelika Film Ctr Mosaic
American Made (R) 1:30-5:05Mersal (NR) 6:05-8:00-9:30
2911 District Ave
7:45-10:20
It
(R) XD: 12:40-4:15-7:25-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Happy
Death
Day
(PG-13)
XD:
12:45-3:50-7:15-10:20
1:50-4:30-10:20
11:25-1:55-4:30-7:15-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
American Made (R) CC: 12:30Regal Ballston Common
12:30-1:10-3:45-6:15
3:05-5:40-8:15-10:40
Stadium 12
It (R) 1:15-4:15-7:20-10:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
671 N. Glebe Road
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00-4:45CC: 10:10-1:15-4:20-10:40
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017) Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:15-4:30- 6:15-8:30
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:30-7:30(NR) 7:30
6:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 10:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:3011:45-3:15-7:00-10:30
1:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
3:20-6:05-9:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: (!)
American Made (R) 1:00-3:45Flatliners (PG-13) 12:55-4:0011:15-2:00-4:40-7:15-9:30
6:40-9:30
Goodbye Christopher Robin (!)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 7:10-9:45
Judwaa 2 (NR) 3:15-6:20-9:30
10:05-12:35-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:25 2:25-6:20-9:45
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:05-4:45- American Assassin (R) 10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:00Down The White House (PG-13)
6:40-9:55
CC: (!) 10:00-11:20
3:55-7:00-9:35
It (R) 1:05-4:00-7:15-10:15
Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-3:356:30-9:50
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 12:25-3:00-6:35-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:302:45-9:35-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:30-8:05-10:30
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:45-3:10-6:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:30-4:30-7:15-10:00
American Made (R) 2:00-4:507:40-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:15-4:456:45-8:15-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:40-3:45-6:50-10:10
It (R) 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30-1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40
The Foreigner (R) 1:50-5:00-7:4510:30
American Assassin (R) 12:50-3:306:30-9:10
Flatliners (PG-13) 9:00
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
2D Experience (R) 12:30-4:007:30-11:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:003:20-5:50-8:30-10:50
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 2:30-5:20-8:00-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 2:153:15-6:00-9:30
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:50-5:00-8:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:05-3:55-6:45-9:35
American Made (R) 1:40-4:457:35-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
1:00-4:10-7:20-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:15-4:30-7:30-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:302:00-4:00-4:30-5:30-7:30-9:009:55-10:30
It (R) 1:00-4:05-7:10-10:25
The Foreigner (R) 1:30-4:20-7:0510:00
American Assassin (R) 1:00-3:456:30-9:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:104:55-7:40-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 1:25-4:15-7:1510:10
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:002:30-6:00-7:00-9:30
True to the Game (R) 1:20-3:556:35-9:10
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) 1:354:25-7:25-10:05
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
(R) 7:00-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:40-3:20
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:55
American Made (R) 11:10-2:004:50-7:50-10:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:10-3:30-7:00-10:50
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:00-3:50-6:30-9:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:3012:00-3:40-6:50-7:20-11:00
It (R) 12:50-4:00-7:10-10:20
The Foreigner (R) 11:40-2:506:10-9:10
Flatliners (PG-13) 11:00-2:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:202:20-5:10-10:40
Marshall (PG-13) 11:50-3:006:00-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 3:1010:00-10:30
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017)
(NR) 7:00
Marshall (PG-13) 7:30
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:50-3:45-6:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:30-4:10-7:20-10:10
American Made (R) 1:10-3:506:30-9:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:10-3:10-6:10-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-7:00
It (R) 1:20-4:20-7:30-10:45
The Foreigner (R) 11:50-2:30-5:107:40-10:20
Flatliners (PG-13) 12:40-3:208:00-10:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Home Again (PG-13) 12:45-3:156:40-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:30-7:1510:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 12:20-3:00-5:30-8:1510:50
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
3:30-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-4:006:00-9:00-9:45
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) 6:00-8:55
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
12:00-4:50
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:202:35-4:35
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:001:45-3:30-5:15
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 7:30-9:45
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:40
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
7:15-9:50
HAVE YOU ACCOMPLISHED ANYTHING LATELY?
YES
WE HEAR YOU
GOT RID OF
NO
WHAT IF YOU
GOT RID OF
12 MONTHS
12 YEARS
WORTH OF STUFF AND SOLD
IT FOR DECENT CASH
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
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Or place your ad in Express, our daily commuter read, and reach 536,000 readers.
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054C 6x3.75
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
C5
RE
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
AJ72
A54
J752
10 5
EAST
9843
10 8 6 2
Q93
Q9
WEST
Q 10
J9
K 10 8 4
KJ872
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
K65
KQ73
A6
A643
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1 NT
Pass 2 2
Pass 3 NT
Opening lead — 7
EAST
Pass
All Pass
A
concept defenders must
understand is that of
keeping “parity”: saving equal
length as declarer in suits he
may use for tricks.
At today’s 3NT, South
ducks East’s queen of clubs,
wins the club return and
exits with a club, letting West
take his tricks — and obliging East to find discards. On
the third and fourth clubs,
dummy discards a heart and
a diamond.
East knows from the bidding that South had four
cards in hearts, and dummy
has four spades, so East
can’t spare a card in either
suit and must pitch two
diamonds. To unguard the
queen is unpleasant and
counterintuitive, but East
must keep parity in both
majors.
That is not the only issue
for the defense. If West takes
his last club, he “rectifies the
count” for a squeeze. East
can discard his queen of
diamonds, but when declarer
gets in, he will take the ace
of diamonds, squeezing East
in the majors. So at Trick
Five, West should lead the
queen of spades.
Against careful defense,
3NT is unmakeable.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K65KQ73
A6A643
The dealer, at your right,
opens one diamond. You
double, and your partner
cue-bids two diamonds. You
bid two hearts, and he tries
two spades. What do you
say?
ANSWER: After partner’s
strength-showing cue bid, his
bid of a new suit is forcing.
He does not promise more
than four cards in spades,
so you shouldn’t raise the
spades (yet). Bid three clubs
to continue the search for
your best game or slam.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
BIRTHDAY | OCTOBER 17
This year you draw
others’ opinions,
which are sometimes
unwanted. Consider
listening more carefully to
what people say. You could
become aware that someone
you have thought of as a friend
might no longer be. If you are
single, to keep this status you
will have to be determined. If
you are attached, the two of
you enjoy being very close,
wanting nothing more than
to be left alone together. You
feel cared about as you rarely
have before. A fellow Libra
understands how much you
value this bond.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
A matter involving a child or
creative project could drag you
down in the morning. Know
that you have the wherewithal
and strength to get past a
problem. Once you regain your
sense of humor, all will flow.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
A partner or associate might
feel somewhat down and
express those feelings.
Listen to this discussion,
which reveals even more
trepidations this person has.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You gain through being a good
listener. However, what you
are hearing doesn’t sit right
with you. You don’t even agree
with the suppositions on which
many of the other party’s
WEINGARTENS & CLARK thoughts are based on.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Speak your mind, yet use
sensitivity to make some of
your points easier to hear. A
problem could begin out of
nowhere if you aren’t careful.
Why let a hassle ruin your day?
A family member lets you know
how much he or she loves you.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Hold on to your wallet, or it
might walk off! You still might
experience a wobble in your
checkbook, perhaps even
provoked by you! Detach and
try to understand what is going
on. You have the power to
change your patterns.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You keep hitting a certain
roadblock. This time, try
another approach, and you’ll
discover how easily you can
hop right over this issue. Your
energy can be focused and
untethered.
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Much might be going on
behind the scenes. You have
stayed mum for a while, but
this behavior might have left
you feeling irrelevant, which
might not be true. Don’t be
surprised that suddenly you
cannot contain yourself any
longer.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Use care around finances.
You express some unusual
yet excellent ideas. You have
a strong sense of direction,
knowing whom to network
with or call. Be spontaneous,
yet use care with an angry or
overly assertive person.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Pressure builds; however,
your judgments about what
you need to do are the source
of this tension. Revisit these
judgments with the aid of a
helpful friend who views life
differently from you.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
In some context you could
be working against yourself.
No matter what you try to do,
you cannot convince a friend
or group of the rightness of a
plan. You might opt to head
down that path without the
support you want.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Bend some toward a friend
or loved one, especially if this
person has strong feelings
about a joint emotional or
financial situation. You could
find that what was meant
as a simple statement or a
difference of opinion could
turn into an argument.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
One-on-one relating
takes you down a new path.
However, first check in with
several different people you
respect to get their feedback.
What you are hearing could
be helpful in making a solid
decision.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
Hungry for some pumpkin pie? The largest ever baked
weighed a whopping 3,699 pounds and was 20 feet in
diameter. The bakers cut more than 4,000 slices for
visitors to the 2010 Pumpkinfest in New Bremen, Ohio!
The sunny and cool weather
is perfect for carving a
jack-o’-lantern outside.
We need your fall
weather art for our
forecast. Find out online
how to send it to us.
ILLUSTRATION BY CHLOE RICE, 7, RESTON
Colossal pumpkin carves out place in competition’s history
I
t didn’t set a world record,
but the winner of the 44th
World
Championship
Pumpkin Weigh-Off in Half
Moon Bay, California, was
the heaviest pumpkin in the
history of the competition.
A forklift hoisted the giant
pumpkin onto a scale last week
in downtown Half Moon Bay,
near San Francisco. It registered
2,363 pounds, making it the
seventh win for grower Joel Holland of Sumner, Washington.
Cindy Tobeck won the contest
last year with a pumpkin weighing 1,910 pounds. Tobeck
brought a beefier entry this year,
but its 2,002 pounds fell short of
Holland’s pumpkin.
Holland took home $16,541, or
$7 per pound, for his gigantic
gourd. But the coveted title of
world-record holder eluded him.
That honor goes to Mathias Willemijns of Belgium, whose 2016
European champion weighed a
whopping 2,624 pounds.
— Staff reports and news services
PHOTOS BY MARK RIGHTMIRE/ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joel Holland, center, waits for the start of the 44th World Championship Pumpkin Weigh-Off with his wife, Mari Lou. That giant pumpkin bulging out of the back of their
pickup turned out to be the heaviest in the competition’s history, earning Holland $16,541. But his 2,363-pound gourd fell about 260 pounds short of the world record.
LEFT: Holland celebrates after winning the competition, which is
held every October in Half Moon Bay, California. ABOVE: A
competitor’s pumpkin attracts the attention of people walking by.
RIGHT: Second-place winner Cindy Tobeck waves from atop her
2,002-pound pumpkin. Tobeck won first place in last year’s contest.
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Theater
accessory
5 Home of the
Pac-12’s Bruins
9 Ejects, as lava
14 Deflect,
with “off”
15 Chunk of bacon
16 Like most income
17 Leg-strengthening exercise
19 Prefix with violet
20 “Austin Powers”
genre
21 Bath rug
22 Retired Yankee
Jeter
23 Suitcase tie-on
25 Supermodel
Banks
26 Silent speech
syst.
28 Pig Latin
rejection
30 Advanced lit.
degrees
33 Something to
blow off or let off
35 Aviator’s military
branch
37 Actress Peeples
38 Spearheaded
40 Pat softly
41 Party host’s
bucketful
42 Altercation
broken up by
bouncers
45 More likely to be
on Santa’s good
list
47 Penny-__: trivial
48 In flight
50 Madrid mama
bear
51 Swim __: do one
full pool circuit
53 Penne or ziti
55 Rapids runners
57 Nervous
mannerism
58 Golden Arches
pork sandwich
62 Self-storage
rentals
63 Equitable
treatment ...
and what’s literally found in each
set of circles
65 Creepy
66 Like __ of
sunshine
67 All square
By Agnes Davidson and C.C. Burnikel
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
10/17/17
FRANK JERKE
68 Cleaned with
a broom
69 Country’s Lovett
70 Pants rear
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
18
24
DOWN
USMC onestripers
“As ye sow,
so shall ye __”
Sole
Email
attachment
format
Country with
an eagle on its
Great Seal: abbr.
Story’s high
point
Layered noodle
dish
Distract the
security guards
for, say
Book-lined room
Sicily’s capital
Big eater’s
fast-food
request, maybe
Used to be
Mt. Rushmore’s
state
Free (of)
Interval
25 Ruthless rulers
26 From Laos, e.g.
27 Get the woodburning stove
going
29 Help out
31 Capital of
Ghana
32 Observe
34 Woodcutter Baba
36 J. Edgar Hoover
Building org.
37 Pro hoops gp.
39 Global shipping
company
43 Sharpie feature
44 Horticultural art
46 Athletic
instructors
49 Spa beauty
treatment
52 Valuable
holding
54 Many corp. logos
55 Regrets
56 Once again
57 Giant in nonstick
pans
59 “Don’t miss it”
review
60 Swedish furniture
maker
61 Like knees when
squatting
64 Manhattan
whiskey
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
The German quintet Ensemble 4.1 performed Sunday afternoon at the Phillips Collection.
MUSIC REVIEW
What could be more inviting than
warm winds on a Sunday afternoon?
BY
R OBERT B ATTEY
The Phillips Collection’s fine
concert series continued Sunday
with a charming outing of
French music by Ensemble 4.1, a
German group formed in 2013
consisting of four woodwind
players and pianist Thomas
Hoppe. Hoppe, who dazzled at a
Kennedy Center concert with the
Atos Trio a few seasons ago,
provided an expressive, sophisticated grounding to every piece.
The first half was all Francis
Poulenc; the Clarinet Sonata, the
Élégie for Horn and Piano, and
the Trio for Oboe, Bassoon, and
Piano. The playing was at a high
international level, with precise
intonation from all concerned,
and detailed interpretive cohesion. The wind players performed standing up and moved
expressively but not annoyingly.
I was most impressed with the
powerful sonority of bassoonist
Christoph Knitt. One rarely
hears the instrument sing with
such resonance, and this was
Christoph Knitt was
most impressive. One
rarely hears the
bassoon sing with such
resonance.
particularly striking as he stood
(in the trio) on the left, with his
bell pointing away from the audience, the opposite of the standard arrangement. Fritz Pahlmann (horn) and Alexander
Glücksmann (clarinet) were
masters, as well. Jörg Schneider’s
musicianship was unassailable.
My only criticism of Hoppe is
that after horn Élégie, for which
he had to play at an orchestral
volume, he didn’t then scale the
sound back for the Trio.
After intermission, Ensemble
4.1 gave us a true rarity, a quintet
by Walter Gieseking. This quintessential German pianist made a
specialty of French music, and
this work, written when he was
24, is a melding of Debussy and
Karol Szymanowski, with strong
overtones of Strauss. It is a
substantial, assured and wellconstructed piece. The textures
were perhaps too much the same
— more dry, martial or angular
material would’ve helped — but
this was music of pith and beauty.
style@washpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
D.C. SPORTS BOG
COLLEGES
HIGH SCHOOLS
The numbers don’t lie: Redskins
running back Chris Thompson has
suddenly become one of the NFL’s
most efficient offensive players. D2
Maryland Athletic Director Kevin
Anderson will go on a six-month
sabbatical amid speculation about
his job security. D9
DeMatha is in unfamiliar territory
after consecutive losses, plus a new
set of top 20 rankings in our weekly
area football wrap-up. D10
Redskins
playing
to protect
the lead
Yankees
get well,
roll to win
in Game 3
Gruden not concerned
as big early advantages
turn into narrow results
YANKEES 8,
ASTROS 1
Sabathia, HRs help N.Y.
trim series deficit to 2-1
BY
BY
D AVE S HEININ
new york — Whatever strange
illness it was the New York
Yankees contracted in the muggy
air of Texas last week — one that
manifested itself in oodles of
strikeouts by their biggest sluggers, misplayed relays that
brought a tear to the eye of every
fungo-wielding coach in the land
and the general impression that
they were just a little less polished, a little less fortunate and a
little less championship-ready
than the Houston Astros — Yankee Stadium was where they
came to get well, get lucky and
get whole.
By the end of Game 3 of the
American League Championship
Series on Monday night, both the
Yankees and the series itself
appeared transformed. In a thorough and complete 8-1 drubbing
of the Astros, the Yankees fixed
all that ailed them and reduced
their series deficit to 2-1, with
Game 4 on Tuesday.
A bullpen that had been overtaxed all month got a muchneeded breather, thanks to the
blowout score and six scoreless
innings from 37-year-old lefthander CC Sabathia.
Aaron Judge, the Yankees’
massive right fielder, jolted himself out of a lengthy and whifffilled slump with a line-drive
homer that accounted for the
Yankees’ final three runs.
Things went so well for the
Yankees on this night, they even
got a hit from the designated
hitter spot for the first time this
ALCS CONTINUED ON D4
Baker’s future
with Nationals
doesn’t seem
so certain now
For five NBA veterans with flawed public perceptions, this is the season to . . .
shed labels
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
F
air or not, certain NBA players get stuck with labels. It could be anything
— me-first, or poor defensively, or injury-prone, or soft, or unable to win
when it matters most. Left unchecked, those reputations can come to
define entire careers. ¶ There is a time, though, before those labels become
permanently affixed to a guy. With enough evolution in a player’s game, it’s possible
to change perception. ¶ For five players, this season marks a chance for them to do
just that, with each entering a pivotal moment in his career. Depending on how this
year plays out, each man can confirm the narrative that’s been created around him,
or create a preferred reputation.
LABELS CONTINUED ON D8
NBA preview: A look at the Thunder, the league’s rising stars and awards predictions. D5-D8
PHOTO ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOE MOORE
chicago —
Dusty Baker is not
involved in the
National League
Championship
Series, not directly
Barry
at least. But his
Svrluga
name is here, on
the warning track
and around the batting cages in
the hours when the Chicago Cubs
and Los Angeles Dodgers warm
up. Tuesday night is Game 3 at
Wrigley Field. Wonder what I’ll
hear about the manager of the
Washington Nationals — or is
that former manager of the
Washington Nationals? — before
first pitch.
Because to this point, in the
days after the Nats’ traumatic
loss to the Cubs in the fifth game
of their NL Division Series, I’ve
heard it both ways.
It’s not his fault. You have to
bring him back.
He can’t get over the hump.
You have to choose someone else.
This wasn’t supposed to turn
out this way. In the middle of the
season, the Nationals and Baker
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D4
When the Washington
Wizards’ season ended in May,
Marcin Gortat walked away
seething. He hated suffering
another abrupt playoff exit.
He hated that another long
Jerry
year of sacrifice had gone
Brewer
stale. Most of all, he hated
that, after 10 years of
consistent effort and personal evolution to
compete in the current perimeter-driven
NBA, he was left questioning his worth.
“Nobody respects centers anymore,” Gortat
said that day, part of an epic rant that made
many speculate he wanted to be traded.
“Nobody looks at them as a valuable piece.”
Almost five months later, he sat in the
stands after a training camp practice with
one leg crossed and a fresh mohawk
decorating his dome. He laughed often. He
was ready to talk more deeply about what
had enraged him in the spring: the
underappreciated burden of the
conventional big man in today’s game.
The center position isn’t extinct, but its
traditional job description — focal point of
offense and defense, strong post game, spaceeating controller of the paint — has evolved.
So where does Gortat fit now? What about
his backup, Ian Mahinmi? The Wizards have
two true centers manning the position,
which is becoming rare. NBA rotations
typically now have an old-school big man and
a three-point-shooting tall dude substituting
for each other.
The elite centers play more like forwards,
handling the basketball, scoring from all over
and even directing the half-court offense. Or
they’re athletic marvels like DeAndre Jordan,
anchoring the defense and mostly catching
lobs on offense. But what about the rest?
Gortat, 33, is quietly a good model for how
a center can survive. Mahinmi, 30, has played
BREWER CONTINUED ON D7
76ers at Wizards Tomorrow, 7 p.m., NBC Sports Washington, ESPN
Game 4: Astros at Yankees
Today, 5 p.m., Fox Sports 1
Game 3: Dodgers at Cubs
Today, 9 p.m., TBS
Inside: Yasiel Puig just might have
his troubles “licked.” D4
If the Washington Redskins’
season was measured by fourthquarter theatrics, you’d have to
applaud their 3-2 campaign to
date.
In the past four games, Coach
Jay Gruden’s squad has jumped
out to double-digit leads — 13-0
over the Los Angeles Rams, 21-0
over the Oakland Raiders, 10-0
over the Kansas City Chiefs and
17-0 over the San Francisco 49ers
— only to let opponents back in
the contest three times.
On Sunday at FedEx Field, the
Redskins staged their latest thrill
ride — letting the winless 49ers
reel off 17 consecutive points behind a rookie quarterback who
had them in position for the upset
with 23 seconds to go — before
pulling off another escape act.
After the cheers subsided, it
was clear that the 26-24 victory
could easily have gone the other
way had it not been for Kendall
Fuller’s game-sealing interception and, before that, a dubious
offensive pass-interference call
that knocked the 49ers out of field
goal range.
The Redskins’ ability to keep
pulling off this high-wire acting
got considerably more complicated after the injuries from Sunday’s victory were assessed.
Rookie defensive end Jonathan
Allen, the team’s first-round draft
pick and most impactful frontline player, suffered a Lisfranc
sprain in his left foot and could
miss three to four weeks, Gruden
said. And that’s a decidedly optiREDSKINS CONTINUED ON D3
Redskins at Eagles
Monday, 8:30 p.m., ESPN
Niskanen
injury may
lead Caps
to talk trade
BY
Wizards’ old-school centers
fighting to earn respect in today’s NBA
L IZ C LARKE
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
philadelphia — During the
past two Stanley Cup-or-bust seasons, General Manager Brian
MacLellan did not hesitate to
make bold moves to best position
the Washington Capitals for a
championship. If he saw a hole in
the roster, he addressed it, parting with some high draft picks
and valued prospects in the process. But as that window closed
with another disappointing second-round playoff exit this past
spring, MacLellan did what he
could to open a new one by
re-signing some key players. The
goal of a Stanley Cup remained,
but the willingness to mortgage
the farm to perfect the roster
disappeared.
“We’re making decisions based
on now and in the future,” he said
earlier this month. “Last year, it
was, ‘What’s best for us now?
What can we do to max this out
and give our guys the best chance
to win?’ Now it’s more reserved.”
It is a subtle change in organizational philosophy, and it is
already being tested just six
games into this season. In the
press box at Wells Fargo Center
before Washington’s game in
Philadelphia on Saturday against
the Flyers, less than 24 hours
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D9
Maple Leafs at Capitals
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
D.C. SPORTS BOG
EARLY LEAD
At Miami,
Taylor’s
daughter
‘stole show’
No charges
will be filed
after camp
gone awry
D.C. SPORTS BOG
BY
Jackie said how ‘proud’
she is of her late father,
the former football star
BY
C INDY B OREN
Her public appearances have
been few since she was a toddler
standing at the front of her
father’s funeral. But now Jackie
Taylor, the daughter of the Washington Redskins’ Sean Taylor, is a
poised young girl and she was
the natural choice to speak on his
behalf as he was inducted into
the University of Miami Ring of
Honor on Friday.
“I’m so proud of how hard my
father worked to receive this
honor,” Jackie Taylor, 11, said,
with her mother proudly looking
on. “He took a lot of pride in his
career as a Hurricane.”
In 2003, Taylor was a consensus all-American, a finalist for
the Jim Thorpe Award and was
named the Big East defensive
player of the year. He was a
first-round draft pick by the
Redskins in 2004 and was beginning to cement his reputation as
a ferocious hitter when he was
shot to death in a home invasion
10 years ago this November.
Jackie Taylor was just 18
months old at the time of her
father’s death.
At Friday’s ceremony, her presence was poignant and, “she
stole the show,” according to
Michael Irvin. Judging by photos
of the event, there weren’t many
dry eyes in the house.
“SO proud of this young lady
Jackie who made her daddy
proud today accepting his honor
for him #SeanTaylor a true King,
gone too soon,” Ray Lewis, another inductee, tweeted.
Irvin, Lewis, Ed Reed and
Warren Sapp were the other
members inducted, though Reed
was not at the ceremony.
Miami’s football Ring of Honor now has 23 people in it.
In 2008, the Redskins posthumously added Taylor to their
Ring of Fame.
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
QUOTABLE
“I mean, let’s face it,
the Giants are coming
off a worse week than
Harvey Weinstein.”
AL MICHAELS,
NBC commentator, during Sunday
night’s game between the New York
Giants and Denver Broncos. Michaels
later apologized during the telecast
for being “a little flip.” (via Early Lead)
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins running back Chris Thompson is averaging 18.9 yards per catch this season, which ranks fifth in the NFL.
Thompson’s eye-catching numbers
BY
D AN S TEINBERG
Washington Redskins running back
Chris Thompson’s ridiculous five
weeks, by the numbers. Well, by some
numbers, anyhow. Maybe there are
more.
340: Receiving yards Thompson has
racked up through five games — more
than 100 receiving yards better than
anyone else on the Redskins. This is an
absurd total for a running back. In fact,
over the past 15 NFL seasons, only Matt
Forte had more receiving yards
through five games — and barely. (Forte
had 345 receiving yards in the first five
games of the 2011 season for the
Chicago Bears.)
1088: Receiving yards Thompson is
on pace for, which would make him
Washington’s only 1,000-yard receiver.
It would also make him the NFL’s first
running back to hit 1,000 receiving
yards in a season since Marshall Faulk
in 1999. Faulk, you might recall, is in
the Hall of Fame.
2: Times Thompson has topped 100
receiving yards through Washington’s
first five games. It makes him only the
second Redskins running back with
more than one 100-yard receiving game
in a season since 1960, joining Dick
James, who did it twice in 1962. In fact,
no Redskins running back since 1960
has more than two 100-yard receiving
games in his Washington career.
“I tell myself all game to just be a
spark,” Thompson said Sunday
afternoon. “That’s one thing I’m
reminding myself of throughout the
whole game. . . . That’s my thing: just be
a spark. I don’t care about getting glory,
getting the praise for it. I’m supposed to
be here and doing those things, and
when I don’t do ’em, I feel like I let my
guys down. So for me, it’s all about just
being that spark, being a difference
maker. You know, they pay me to do
that. So I’ve got to execute.”
9: Running backs who have had
multiple 100-yard receiving games in
Redskins running back is
one of the NFL’s most prolific
and efficient offensive players
the same season this century. Before
Thompson, no one had done it since
Darren Sproles for the New Orleans
Saints in 2012. The full list of backs with
multiple 100-yard receiving games in a
season this century: Thompson,
Sproles, Arian Foster, Reggie Bush,
Steven Jackson, LaDainian Tomlinson,
Priest Holmes, Faulk and Richie
Anderson.
12: That’s about how many Chris
Thompsons were randomly added to an
Instagram group chat this weekend.
Chris Marasheski, a student at
Kutztown State, created the group just
to irritate his roommate, one of the
Chris Thompsons in question. He chose
the other Chris Thompsons at random,
not realizing that one of them was an
NFL running back off to a career start.
“I was just adding as many Chris
Thompsons as possible,” Marasheski
told me.
Anyhow, Monday morning, the
Redskins running back joined in on the
conversation.
“Yo CT!” he wrote to the other Chris
Thompsons, who were predictably
excited.
“My roommate barged in the dorm
room, saying ‘YO CHRIS, CHRIS
THOMPSON ON THE REDSKINS
ANSWERED YOUR GROUPCHAT!”
Marasheski noted.
“Pretty cool to share a name with
such a good player and a guy who is so
personable and has a great sense of
humor,” wrote Chris Thompson, a 24year old Redskins fan from Richmond
who was randomly added to the Chris
Thompson chat, and who had already
decided that Chris Thompson was his
favorite player.
Chris Thompson — Marasheski’s
roommate Chris Thompson — is a diehard Eagles fan, as it turns out. But he
promptly traded for Chris Thompson
for his fantasy football team on
Monday.
18.9: Thompson’s yards-per-catch
figure thus far. It ranks fifth in the NFL
among qualified players. Thompson is
one of just seven players to average at
least 16.9 yards per catch. Four of the
others are elite wide receivers (Brandin
Cooks, T.Y. Hilton, Stefon Diggs and
DeSean Jackson.) Running backs aren’t
supposed to be in that company. (The
top two on the list are a pair of backup
tight ends: Carolina’s Ed Dickson and
Washington’s Vernon Davis.)
(Someone should do a blog post
about them.)
1055:
Receiving
yards
by
Washington’s four most lauded
receivers through the first five games
last season (Jordan Reed, Pierre
Garcon, DeSean Jackson and Jamison
Crowder). The four most lauded
receivers this season — Reed, Crowder,
Terrelle Pryor and Josh Doctson — have
combined for barely half as much
production: just 562 yards. But Kirk
Cousins is within 100 yards of his fivegame 2016 pace, and he has a higher
quarterback rating, despite this
massive drop-off from his perceived top
options. Thompson’s a massive part of
that.
Eight: NFL players this season with
at least four touchdowns and at least
500 yards from scrimmage. If you play
fantasy football, you know all these
names well: Le’Veon Bell, Leonard
Fournette, Melvin Gordon, Todd
Gurley, Jordan Howard, Kareem Hunt,
Carlos Hyde and Thompson. The first
seven names on that list all have at least
109 offensive touches. Thompson has
56.
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
It’s official: Pitino
is out at Louisville
Rick Pitino has been able to
roam the sidelines as Louisville’s
iconic men’s basketball coach,
even defiantly at times, holding
onto his job amid a series of
highly embarrassing missteps off
the court.
Things looked bleak this time
around, with a seemingly
inevitable departure looming in
the weeks since the latest scandal
became public. But even after the
school was linked to a federal
bribery investigation, no one
completely counted Pitino out.
Not until Monday.
The university had seen
enough and decided to finally cut
ties with the Hall of Famer.
The decision was unanimous.
Louisville’s Athletic
Association officially fired Pitino,
nearly three weeks after the
school acknowledged that his
program is being investigated as
part of a federal corruption probe.
The association, which
oversees Louisville’s sports
programs and is composed of
trustees, faculty, students and
administrators, voted
unanimously to oust the longtime
The images were disturbing in
the viral video, but no charges
will be filed in the case in which a
number of cheerleaders at a
Denver high school were forced
to do painful leg splits until they
cried out in pain.
Beth McCann, the Denver district attorney, acknowledged in
making the announcement Saturday that the video which was
widely shared in late August was
“painful to watch” but that the
evidence and interviews with a
number of people do “not support the filing of charges.”
McCann indicated that she
had spoken to parents of the
cheerleaders and described them
to Denver’s 9News as “disappointed.”
The Denver East High School
principal and athletic director
were forced out over cellphone
videos, taken during the first
week of cheer camp in June, that
showed eight cheerleaders being
pushed down into forced splits
as teammates hold their arms.
Ozell Williams, the newly hired
coach at the school, could be seen
pushing them down farther. An
independent investigation by the
Denver Public Schools showed
that Andy Mendelsberg, the
principal, misled administrators
about a cheerleaders’ injuries
and the existence of the videos.
Mendelsberg has retired and
Lisa Porter, an assistant principal who was acting as the athletic director, resigned. Five assistant principals were disciplined
and Williams was fired.
The allegations involve at least
eight girls, according to 9News
and one clip shows a 13-year-old
incoming freshman yelling
“please stop” nine times during a
span of 24 seconds while the
“forced splits” technique is used.
“There are differing opinions
regarding the use of this technique of cheerleading training,”
McCann wrote in her statement.
“While I believe the technique
should not be used, that is not
the standard of proof for a criminal case. Most of the cheerleading squad participated in the
technique that day, and there are
differing accounts of the circumstances.”
Williams, who was fired almost immediately after the initial report, denies that he was
endangering the cheerleaders.
An attorney for the parents of
two of the girls shown says the
families “continue to focus on
their daughters’ physical and
emotional healing. While the
families disagree with the decision of the Denver District Attorney’s Office, they appreciate the
kindness and genuine concern
demonstrated by DA Beth McCann through this difficult process,” Qusair Mohamedbhai said
in a statement to 9News.
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
MLB PLAYOFFS
DIG ES T
COLLEGES
C INDY B OREN
Cardinals coach following a board
meeting.
The decision was announced
after five hours of meetings.
Pitino, 65, has $44 million
remaining in salary and bonuses
in a contract extension through
the 2025-26 season. He was
scheduled to earn a base salary of
$5.1 million.
The move Monday officially
ended Pitino’s 16-year tenure with
the program, a run in which he
compiled a 416-143 record —
including 25-9 last season and
winning the 2013 NCAA
championship. But his success on
the court was tarnished by offcourt incidents.
PRO BASKETBALL
The San Antonio Spurs have
reached an agreement with
LaMarcus Aldridge, 32, on an
extension that will keep him
under contract for an additional
three years.
A person with knowledge of
the agreement told the Associated
Press that Aldridge will exercise
the $22 million player option on
his contract for the 2018-19
season. He will also get another
two years and $50 million tacked
onto the deal.
Aldridge averaged 17.3 points
and 7.3 rebounds a game last
season. . . .
Utah Jazz guard Dante Exum
will have surgery to repair a
separated left shoulder.
The surgery is scheduled for
Oct. 24 in Los Angeles and there is
no announced timeline for his
return.
Exum was injured in a
preseason game against the
Phoenix Suns on Oct. 6 when he
landed awkwardly on the floor.
The 2014 No. 5 overall pick was
hoping to have a career year as a
restricted free agent. Exum
averaged 6.2 points, 2.0 rebounds
and 1.7 assists last season. . . .
The Atlanta Hawks said point
guard Dennis Schroder is facing
undisclosed discipline for his role
in an incident that led to his
arrest last month on
misdemeanor battery charges.
The 24-year-old Schroder is the
top returning scorer on the
Hawks, averaging 17.9 points and
6.3 assists per game in his first
season as a starter. . . .
Katie Smith is the new coach
of the WNBA’s New York Liberty.
Smith has been an assistant
with the Liberty since she retired
as a player in 2013. She was
promoted to associate head coach
in 2016. The team announced that
she is taking over for Bill
Laimbeer, who served as the
Liberty’s coach from 2013 to ’17.
SOCCER
Tim Weah scored a hat trick as
the United States cruised past
Paraguay, 5-0, in New Delhi and
qualified for the quarterfinals of
the Under-17 World Cup.
Weah’s first goal was the only
score of the first half. Andrew
Carleton and captain Josh
Sargent were also on target in the
second to set up a quarterfinal
against England or Japan on
Saturday.
Germany also booked a place
in the last eight by defeating
Colombia, 4-0. Germany plays
Brazil or Honduras on Sunday. . . .
FIFA has confirmed the seven
highest-ranked nations joining
host Russia as top-seeded teams
in the World Cup finals draw.
France rose one place to No. 7
to edge out Spain, as defending
champion Germany heads an
unchanged top six.
After a busy qualifying
program last week, Brazil,
Portugal, Argentina, Belgium and
Poland are also top-seeded for the
Dec. 1 draw in Moscow.
FIFA uses October rankings to
decide all four seeding pots
despite nine places in the 32-team
World Cup finals lineup to be
decided in November.
5 p.m.
9 p.m.
ALCS, Game 4: Houston at New York Yankees » Fox Sports 1, WTEM (980 AM)
NLCS, Game 3: Los Angeles Dodgers at Chicago Cubs » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
NHL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Toronto at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Tampa Bay at New Jersey » NBC Sports Network
Montreal at San Jose » NBC Sports Network
NBA
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Boston at Cleveland » TNT
Houston at Golden State » TNT
TENNIS
6 a.m.
ATP: Stockholm, early-round play » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
FIFA U-17 World Cup: Iran vs. Mexico » Fox Sports 2
FIFA U-17 World Cup: England vs. Japan » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Champions League: Tottenham at Real Madrid » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Champion League: Napoli at Manchester City » Fox Sports 2
Russia is top-seeded for the
World Cup despite being ranked
No. 65. Chile at No. 9 is the
highest-ranked team eliminated
from the World Cup. The United
States is No. 27.
MISC.
Tiger Woods is swinging a
driver and his agent says doctors
have cleared him to practice
without limitations.
Still to be determined is when
Woods, 41, can play a tournament.
Mark Steinberg, his agent,
said Woods received a good
report from doctors who
performed fusion surgery on his
lower back in April. On Sunday,
Woods posted a video of him
hitting a driver. “Making
progress,” he tweeted.
Woods has not played since
withdrawing from the Dubai
Desert Classic on Feb. 3 because
of back spasms. He had his fourth
back surgery two months later. . . .
Kubrat Pulev has pulled out of
his world heavyweight title fight
against IBF and WBA champion
Anthony Joshua because of a
shoulder injury.
Joshua will now face Carlos
Takam, who is rated No. 3 by the
IBF. The fight will take place at
the original venue of Cardiff,
Wales, on Oct. 28.
— From news services
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
professional Football
Tennessee snaps its 11-game skid vs. Indianapolis
TITANS 36,
COLTS 22
BY
T ERESA M . W ALKER
nashville — Marcus Mariota
threw a 53-yard touchdown
pass to Taywan Taylor with 5:29
left, and the Tennessee Titans
beat the Indianapolis Colts, 3622, on Monday night to snap an
11-game skid tied for the NFL’s
longest active losing streak
against one team.
Mariota didn’t move around
much on a cool night after
missing a game with a strained
left hamstring, but he still man-
aged to throw for a season-high
306 yards. He completed each
of his three passes on the drive
that ended with Taylor’s tiebreaking score.
The Titans (3-3) also snapped
a two-game skid with the win.
Jacoby Brissett tried to rally
the Colts (2-4) to a second
straight overtime. But Titans
linebacker Wesley Woodyard
forced Brissett out of bounds
shy of the first-down marker on
fourth and inches with 2:19 left.
Coach Chuck Pagano lost his
challenge.
Derrick Henry then clinched
the win for Tennessee with a
72-yard touchdown run with 47
seconds left. Henry, the 2015
Heisman Trophy winner, finished with a career-high 131
yards on 19 carries. DeMarco
Murray also scored.
The Titans looked like the
NFL’s worst scoring defense in
the first half instead of Indianapolis, with Brissett directing
the Colts to a 13-9 halftime lead.
John Simon then intercepted
Mariota’s first pass of the third
quarter and returned it 26
yards for a touchdown.
But the Titans forced the
Colts to go three-and-out on
three of their first four drives of
the second half, and Avery
Williamson stripped tight end
Jack Doyle of the ball after a
catch.
Tennessee’s Ryan Succop set
an NFL record with his 47 th
consecutive successful kick inside 50 yards on a 48-yard field
goal in the first quarter.
Succop came into Monday
night’s game tied with Matt
Bryant, who connected on 46
straight field goals inside 50
yards between 2013 and 2015
for the Atlanta Falcons.
The kicker capped the Titans’
opening drive with his field
goal, taking the record to himself.
Succop’s current streak started in 2014, and he topped the
franchise record of 24 straight
set by Al Del Greco in 1995-96.
— Associated Press
T H E IN S IDER
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Allen out 3 to 4 weeks;
Norman nears return
While the Washington Redskins
will be without injured defensive
lineman Jonathan Allen next
week at Philadelphia, and
possibly for the next month,
Coach Jay Gruden said “there’s a
chance” cornerback Josh
Norman could soon return to the
lineup.
“But we’ll see,” Gruden said of
Norman, who fractured a rib in
the team’s Week 4 loss to Kansas
City and was inactive in Sunday’s
win over San Francisco. “That’s
up to the doctors and Josh [to]
see how he’s feeling. We don’t
want this thing to get reinjured
obviously. But if he can go, I’m
sure Josh will go.”
Gruden said Norman, who was
expected to miss as many as four
weeks, will increase his exercise
and running and will be
reevaluated again midweek.
While Norman would be a
welcome addition to a secondary
riddled with bumps and bruises,
the loss of Allen is a significant
blow upfront. Gruden said the
team’s first-round draft pick
could miss the next three to four
weeks after suffering a Lisfranc
foot injury in Sunday’s 26-24 win
over the 49ers.
Allen underwent an MRI exam
Monday and Gruden said the
rookie lineman would be
evaluated further but could miss
the next month, which includes
key division games against
Philadelphia and Dallas.
Allen suffered the foot injury
late in Sunday’s game and was
seen wearing a walking boot in
the locker room. Allen had
started all five of the Redskins’
games. He was credited with 10
total tackles and posted his first
NFL sack in Week 3 against the
Oakland Raiders.
Gruden also said the Redskins
would work out place kickers
this week, in case Dustin
Hopkins is unable to play at
Philadelphia next Monday.
Hopkins hit two field goals
Sunday — one from 48 yards and
another from 21 — but Gruden
said he suffered a right hip
rotator muscle sprain.
The Redskins’ fourth-year
kicker also missed an extra-point
attempt Sunday, so the injury
will allow Washington coaches to
at least see what other options
might be available. (Hopkins is 9
for 11 this year on field goal
attempts.)
There was other promising
news on the injury front. Gruden
said running back Rob Kelley
(ankle) and safety Deshazor
Everett (hamstring) are both
expected to practice after each
missed Sunday’s game. And
cornerback Bashaud Breeland’s
knee sprain might not be as bad
as initially feared. Breeland left
in the third quarter Sunday
against San Francisco and was
not able to return.
“I think Breeland’s always
been a fast healer. He’s like
Gumby,” Gruden said. “He took a
pretty big shot on that play. I
thought he was going to be out
for a little bit of time. But he
recovers quickly. We’ll see.”
— Rick Maese
NFL NOTES
Bridgewater gets
closer to return
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Teddy Bridgewater has been
cleared to rejoin the Minnesota
Vikings for practice, roughly 14
months after a dislocation and
multiple ligament tears in his left
knee put his leg and career at risk.
Coach Mike Zimmer said
Bridgewater will be eased back in
with the team beginning Wednesday. The 24-year-old quarterback
visited his surgeon Monday and
was given the green light to participate on the field, effectively ending a grueling rehabilitation over
the past year-plus. Bridgewater
tweeted a simple “thank you” after
getting the good news.
Bridgewater remains on the
physically unable to perform list.
The Vikings have three weeks to
evaluate him before having to decide whether to add him to the
active roster or place on him on
injured reserve.
PACKERS: Coach Mike McCarthy said quarterback Aaron
Rodgers will have surgery on his
broken right collarbone and that
his season could be over.
McCarthy said the two-time
NFL MVP would have surgery in
the near future. He added that
there is no timeline for his potential return.
“The key is to get Aaron healthy,
it’s not to develop a timeline,” McCarthy said.
Rodgers got hurt in the first
quarter of a 23-10 loss Sunday at
Minnesota.
Brett Hundley is now the starting quarterback. The Packers also
promoted third-stringer Joe Callahan from the practice squad to
become the backup quarterback.
RAIDERS: NaVorro Bowman
will make a short move following
his release last week from the San
Francisco 49ers, signing a oneyear, $3 million contract with
Oakland.
“It’s a refresher for me,” Bowman said after taking part in a
walkthrough with his new team.
“It’s a new picture, new scenery.
The guys are a special group of
guys. You can just see the talent
they have on the offensive side of
the ball. I’m excited to go out there
and play for an offense that is
eager to score points. I look forward to it.”
Bowman visited the Raiders on
Monday and then signed the deal
shortly after that, cancelling a
planned visit to the Dallas Cowboys. He went right into meetings
with the assistant coaches and
could be ready to play when the
Raiders (2-4) host first-place Kansas City on Thursday night.
BUCCANEERS: Jameis Winston has a sprained AC joint in his
throwing shoulder, an injury Tampa Bay is hoping will not cost him
any more playing time.
The third-year quarterback was
hurt during the first half of Sunday’s 38-33 loss at Arizona. X-rays
were negative, and Coach Dirk
Koetter said an MRI exam performed Monday revealed no structural damage.
Koetter said Winston has not
been ruled out for next Sunday’s
game at Buffalo. Winston has
started 37 consecutive games to
begin his career after entering the
NFL as the No. 1 pick in 2015.
49ERS: Defensive lineman
Arik Armstead broke his hand
during San Francisco’s loss at
Washington and will need surgery,
Coach Kyle Shanahan said.
Armstead, a first-round pick
out of Oregon in 2015, will miss
significant time for a second
straight season after having shoulder surgery that cost him the final
eight games of 2016. He may go on
injured reserve, where he would
join fellow defensive ends Tank
Carradine (ankle) and Ronald
Blair (wrist).
BILLS: Wide receiver Jordan
Matthews had the cast removed
from his broken right thumb,
though it remains uncertain when
the starter can begin practicing.
Coach Sean McDermott listed
Matthews as day-to-day as Buffalo
(3-2) held a brief practice upon
returning from its bye week.
McDermott said it was premature to determine whether Matthews would be cleared for practice this week or potentially play
against Tampa Bay on Sunday.
Matthews has missed one game
since a helmet struck and broke
his thumb during a 23-17 win at
Atlanta on Oct. 1.
Elliott hearing Tuesday
A person with direct knowledge
of the situation said attorneys for
Cowboys star Ezekiel Elliott are
set for an emergency hearing in
federal court in New York as they
try again to stop the running
back’s six-game suspension over
domestic violence allegations.
Elliott’s legal team filed a request for a temporary restraining
order Monday and will get a hearing Tuesday in the Southern District of New York, the person told
the Associated Press on condition
of anonymity because the filing
hadn’t been made public.
Last year’s NFL rushing leader
is suspended for Sunday’s game at
San Francisco after a federal appeals court overturned an injunction that had allowed him to play
this season.
The case is shifting to New York
because the 5th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in New Orleans ordered the dismissal of Elliott’s lawsuit in Texas. Elliott’s attorneys
have indicated they are still pursuing the case with the New Orleans
court.
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Professional Engineers since 1993
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins Coach Jay Gruden, here with 49ers counterpart Kyle Shanahan, said he saw no evidence that his team lacked intensity Sunday.
Redskins build big leads, then they’ve had to hold on
REDSKINS FROM D1
mistic outlook for an injury that
has sidelined other athletes for
months.
Place kicker Dustin Hopkins,
who has scored 39 of the Redskins’ 117 points this season, will
likely miss time with a strained
hip rotator muscle. The team is
expected to try out replacement
options this week.
The Redskins are already without starting cornerback Josh Norman, who fractured a rib in the
Oct. 2 loss at Kansas City. Gruden
said Norman will increase his
workload later this week and
didn’t rule him out for Monday
night’s road game against the
Philadelphia Eagles (5-1), the
class of the NFC East and owners
of the best record in the league.
It’s possible the Redskins could
have Bashaud Breeland, their other starting cornerback, for Monday’s game even after he suffered
what appeared to be a serious
knee injury in the win over the
49ers. Breeland was unable to put
weight on his left leg as he was
helped off the field Sunday, but
the injury was just a sprain,
Gruden said Monday.
In all likelihood, the Redskins
in the near term will be relying on
several young defensive backs, including cornerback Quinton
Dunbar and rookie safety Montae
Nicholson, who acquitted themselves well against the 49ers.
The Eagles, however, led by
second-year quarterback Carson
Wentz, pose a far greater challenge.
The 6-foot-5, 237-pound Wentz
was more than the Redskins’ defense could handle in a 30-17 season-opening loss at FedEx Field,
slipping from the grasp of wouldbe tacklers to keep plays alive and
throwing for 307 yards. In short,
it’s a terrible game for the Redskins to be missing Allen and to be
shorthanded at cornerback.
The Eagles are fifth in the NFL
in passing yards (1,504) and tied
for third in passing touchdowns
(13).
“They’re 5-1 for a reason, and
[Wentz] is a major part of that,”
Gruden said. “He has got a great
rapport with the receivers right
now. . . . So [cornerbacks] Fabian
[Moreau], [Quinton] Dunbar —
they’ll have to step up and play
well — [Joshua] Holsey, [Kendall]
Fuller.”
As for the Redskins’ habit for
letting opponents come back af-
ter bolting to double-digit leads,
Gruden said it’s not a pattern at all
but an assortment of things the
team could do better.
On defense, he cited an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty
on third and 10 at the end of the
half that gave San Francisco just
enough life to score its first touchdown.
And on offense, there were
third-down plays that went wanting during what Gruden called “a
little lull” in the third quarter, and
tight end Vernon Davis’s fumble
on the 44-yard line that led to the
49ers’ game-tying touchdown.
That said, Gruden said he saw
no evidence that the Redskins
lacked intensity on either side of
the ball.
“Obviously, you want to close
them out and put your foot on
their throat, but it doesn’t always
work out,” Gruden said. “They
have 46 guys on their team that
are trying not to allow that to
happen. They just made some
plays. We made some unfortunate
penalties and turnovers. The
turnover was huge. You’ve got the
ball at the 44-yard line, second
and three, instead they’ve got the
ball on your 2-yard line. It’s a huge
difference.”
While the 49ers’ defense forced
two turnovers, the Redskins got
just the one takeaway that ended
the game — significant, to be sure,
but they could have used a momentum-shifting turnover as San
Francisco was making its run.
Former Redskins quarterback
Joe Theismann, who follows the
team closely as a veteran NFL
analyst, sees no cause for alarm in
the fact that opponents keep
managing to chip away at early
leads. More than any pattern, he
sees it as reflective of the typical
ebb-and-flow in NFL games and
the parity in the league today.
“It’s sort of is indicative of how
close teams are,” Theismann said
in a telephone interview. “The
49ers lost four games by a total of
11 points [heading into Sunday’s
loss in Washington]. As much as
you’d like to say there are dominant teams in the NFL, parity, to
me, stands out more than anything.
“It’s the way the NFL is,” he
said. “Certainly, you’d like to say
you have a 17-point lead, and you
can turn it into a 24-point lead.
But you sort of protect yourself a
little bit. You don’t take as many
chances.”
liz.clarke@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
BASEBALL NOTES
Dodgers’ Puig just might
have his troubles licked
A SSOCIATED P RESS
When Yasiel Puig licks his bats,
Dodger Stadium laughs. When he
stands at the plate admiring a base
hit, the fans’ initial cheers hilariously morph into a group exhortation to “Go! Go!” — which he eventually does.
The Cuban outfielder’s entire
career has been a quest to learn
how to direct his prodigious talent
without losing the fundamental
joy he derives from the game.
Just 14 months ago, that quest
appeared to be over, at least in Los
Angeles. Puig had been demoted
to Class AAA Oklahoma City and
seemed unlikely to return to the
Dodgers amid frustration with his
consistency and discipline.
The Wild Horse just might have
it all figured out now, and L.A. is
thrilled to be along for a redemptive ride that’s going deep into
October.
“This is my best season,” said
the 26-year-old Puig, who is in his
fifth year in the majors. “I grew up
a little bit more. I’m going to home
plate for having fun, because I
know [if ] I hit nothing, I do nothing in the game, my teammates are
going to have my back.”
With his most consistent big
league campaign and a dynamite
start to the playoffs, Puig is a major
component of a team closing in on
the World Series after a 4-1 win over
the Chicago Cubs on Sunday night
to take a 2-0 lead in the National
League Championship Series.
Puig set career highs this season with 28 homers and 74 RBI
while playing his usual superb defense in right field and appearing
in a team-high 152 games. In the
postseason, he is 7 for 16 with five
walks and six RBI. He has already
surpassed his entire career postseason RBI total, capped by his
first playoff homer in Game 1
against Chicago.
Puig has made big plays in every
game this postseason for the unbeaten Dodgers, who resume the
NLCS at Wrigley Field on Tuesday
night. Once a shameless freeswinger, he drew three walks and
scored a run in Los Angeles’ 4-1
win in Game 2 on Sunday night.
And, oh yes, he licks pine tar
from his lumber for good luck,
flips his bats on seemingly minor
hits, plays right field with inimitable grace and kisses his hitting
coach on the cheek constantly.
Maddon defends relief choice
Manager Joe Maddon stood by
his decision not to use all-star
closer Wade Davis in the Cubs’ loss
to the Dodgers on Sunday night
and questioned the criticism coming his way.
Maddon insisted Monday that
Davis was only available for one
inning in a save situation. He dismissed the second-guessing, a day
after John Lackey gave up a threerun homer to Justin Turner in the
ninth inning to send Los Angeles
to the victory.
Pitching on consecutive days
for the first time in his 15-year
career, Lackey walked his first batter, Chris Taylor, on six pitches
after entering in the ninth with
two outs. Turner then ended the
game when he drove a 1-0 fastball
out to center field, setting off a
wild celebration and raising more
questions about Maddon’s handling of the bullpen.
Game 3 is Tuesday night at
Wrigley Field, with Yu Darvish
starting for the Dodgers and Kyle
Hendricks pitching for the Cubs.
Maddon said Davis was still
limited after a seven-out save in
Chicago’s wild Game 5 victory over
the Washington Nationals in their
NL Division Series.
“I don’t understand why that’s
difficult to understand,” he said.
“And furthermore, you have to
also understand it wasn’t the last
game of the year — or the secondto-the-last game of the year. It was
about winning eight more games.
All these things are factors.”
Auction canceled for ring
An official Cubs 2016 World Series ring that was offered for sale
on an auction website has been
taken off the market.
Leland’s Auctions said it removed the ring from auction at the
request of the Cubs and “due to a
contractual issue.” The team initially raised questions about the
ring’s authenticity. Cubs spokesman Julian Green later said the
team worked with Leland’s to verify the ring was genuine and given
to a scout.
Green said the Cubs have “identified the scout, who no longer
works for the ballclub.” . . .
Milwaukee Brewers minor
leaguer Julio Mendez has made
what the team calls a “remarkable
recovery” from a serious injury
after being hit in the chest by a
pitch.
Mendez was on life support for
more than three weeks after getting hit in a Rookie League game
Aug. 26 in Tempe, Ariz.
Brewers General Manager David Stearns said Mendez has taken
significant steps over the past few
weeks to the point where he is
performing many daily activities
with little assistance.
ABBIE PARR/GETTY IMAGES
Aaron Judge ended his slump with a three-run, fourth-inning homer during the Yankees’ 8-1 win over the Astros in Game 3 on Monday night.
Sabathia, HRs help Yankees cut ALCS deficit to 2-1
ALCS FROM D1
postseason — albeit on a dribbler
up the middle for an infield
single.
But nothing showed how far
fortune has swung in the Yankees’ direction in just one night
than the fateful, unsightly swing
Todd Frazier took in the bottom
of the second — the one that
proved to be the biggest of the
night.
On a 1-1 pitch from Charlie
Morton, with two outs and runners on first and second, Frazier
made a lunging, defensive hack
at a knee-high, 95-mph fastball
on the outside corner, of the sort
a batter makes with two strikes
with the intention of fouling it
off in hopes of getting a more
hittable offering on the next
pitch. So off-balance was Frazier,
his top hand came clear off the
bat midway through his swing.
As the ball headed on the fly
toward right field, Astros right
fielder Josh Reddick saw it and
actually started to rush in.
But this being Yankee Stadium, with its notoriously short
porch in right, and this being
2017, the year of the home run,
of course Frazier’s awkward
drive sailed and sailed until it
landed in the seats, a three-run
homer that gave the Yankees
their first lead of the series. As
Frazier, a New Jersey native who
grew up rooting for the Yankees,
circled the bases excitedly, Morton looked on with astonish-
ment.
According to Statcast measurements, Frazier’s blast had an
exit velocity of 100.5 mph and a
launch angle of 21 degrees —
which means nothing in the
abstract. Except that balls hit
with those vectors resulted in
home runs just 6 percent of the
time.
At that point, with a 3-0 lead,
Yankees Manager Joe Girardi
may have already made the mental calculation of innings and
outs to get the ball, and the lead,
to closer Aroldis Chapman. In
Sabathia’s start against the
Cleveland Indians five days earlier, in the decisive Game 5, he
gave the Yankees 13 outs, and
Girardi turned to David Robertson (eight outs) and Chapman
(six) for the rest.
But on Monday night, by the
time there was a need for a
reliever, the lead was eight and
the Yankees’ best arms — Chapman, Robertson and Chad Green
— could take the rest of the night
off. Right-handers Adam Warren
and Tommy Kahnle took care of
the remaining outs — although
Girardi’s plan to get Dellin Betances some low-leverage confidence, in hopes he can straighten
out his acute command problems, backfired when Betances
walked the only two batters he
faced in the ninth.
The Yankees’ five-run burst in
the fourth began with a mystifying play by Astros left fielder
Cameron Maybin, who strangely
pulled up on Greg Bird’s flyball
down the line and turned it into a
double, and it ended six batters
later with Judge clobbering a
93-mph fastball from reliever
Will Harris over the wall in left
for a three-run homer.
Like the Indians in the Division Series, the Astros had managed to hold down Judge, the AL
home run leader this season with
52, with a steady diet of breaking
balls, many of them off the plate.
After seeing breaking balls on
32 percent of pitches during the
regular season, that number was
up to 54 percent in the playoffs,
and Judge was not responding
well. A first-inning strikeout
against Morton on Monday, on a
cut fastball off the plate, was
Judge’s 20th in 32 postseason
at-bats to that point.
“Hopefully,” Girardi said before the game, “[the Astros]
starting making some mistakes
up.”
The 93-mph, belt-high fastball
that Harris threw Judge on a 2-2
count in the fourth would qualify
as that.
For his trust and loyalty, Girardi was rewarded with a dazzling
all-around game from Judge, the
presumptive AL rookie of the
year and possibly its most valuable player as well. He not only
smashed the home run that
turned the game into a rout, he
also contributed a pair of outstanding defensive plays, one at
the wall and one in shallow right
field, to rob the Astros of hits.
In the fourth inning, Judge
crashed hard into the right field
wall to run down Yuri Gurriel’s
drive. Judge, the 6-foot-7, 280pound slugger, came up slowly
but appeared to be okay. The
wall, meanwhile, was said to
have entered the concussion protocol.
The question with Sabathia
wasn’t whether he could give the
Yankees a solid start; it was
whether he could get deep into
the game. These days, Sabathia is
generally good for about five
innings or 75 pitches, whichever
comes first.
But on Monday, in part because of his own effectiveness
and in part because of the blowout score, Girardi left him in for
six and 99. After completing the
sixth — and becoming the first
pitcher his age to pitch at least
six scoreless innings in October
since Pedro Martinez in 2009 —
Sabathia came ambling off the
mound with a slow strut, barking
at Reddick, who had apparently
drawn Sabathia’s ire by slamming his helmet after a 1-3
putout.
For one night at least, the
Yankees were well again. They
were back in the series. They
were good and they were lucky.
They trotted around the bases
and strutted off the mound. It
was only one game, but the
Yankees looked like they had
beaten back whatever had been
ailing them.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
BARRY SVRLUGA
Baker’s future with Nats felt secure — until it didn’t
SVRLUGA FROM D1
HARRY HOW/GETTY IMAGES
Yasiel Puig is 7 for 16 with five walks and six RBI this postseason
for the Dodgers, who have a 2-0 lead on the Cubs in the NLCS.
301-637-3644
703-382-8488
had worked toward an extension
of his original two-year deal —
two years that resulted in two
division titles. But Baker
expressed some frustration about
not having the deal done to The
Washington Post’s Chelsea Janes,
and that story displeased the
ownership group of the Lerner
family, and negotiations
sputtered.
But in the week leading up to
the series with the Cubs, people
with knowledge of Baker’s future
said a deal would get done, and
that it didn’t depend on whether
the Nats advanced to the NLCS
for the first time in franchise
history. The club wanted Baker
back, so Baker would be back.
That may still be the case. But
the five games that transpired
since didn’t exactly help Baker’s
cause. He had Sammy Solis on
the mound in a key spot in
Game 3. He never once changed a
starting position player even
though the lineup entered the
fifth and decisive game hitting a
collective .130. He was part of a
bungled communications
process in delivering the message
to the public as to why co-ace
Stephen Strasburg would not
start Game 4, circumstances that
later changed. And in the fifth
game, he allowed slumping
catcher Matt Wieters to hit with
the bases loaded, while top righthanded pinch hitter Howie
Kendrick never appeared in the
game.
None of these are fireable
offenses, really. But Baker’s
contract is up, so it isn’t really
about firing him. It’s about
bringing him back.
There are so many arguments
that, at 68, he deserves a new
deal, and I’ve made them before.
Before Baker arrived, the Nats’
ship was listing under the
captaincy of Matt Williams.
Baker proved before he arrived in
Washington, and reinforced over
the past two seasons, that he
knows how to navigate the
waters of a 162-game season as
well as anyone. His players play
for him. He keeps them rested
and ready. He communicates.
They respond.
Plus, at some point, wouldn’t
the Nats want some consistency
in the dugout? Since the team
arrived in D.C. in 2005, no
manager has remained in place
for three full seasons. Frank
Robinson was let go at the end of
2006, Manny Acta was fired in
the middle of 2009, Jim
Riggleman quit in the middle of
2011; they didn’t bring back
Davey Johnson after 2013; and
Williams was fired after 2015.
Baker is the sixth manager in the
13 seasons since the Nats arrived.
Excluding interim skippers who
finished out a season, only Miami
has had more during that span
(though Seattle also has had six).
Miami and Washington are
fundamentally different
franchises: The Marlins have had
two winning seasons and never
reached the postseason during
that span. The Nats are coming
off their fourth division title in
six years — and are poised to
extend that streak in 2018,
whoever’s in the dugout.
But it’s also hard to ignore the
growing narrative about Baker in
the postseason. Wrapped inside
the ridiculousness of Thursday’s
9-8 loss to the Cubs is the fact
that Baker’s teams now have lost
the past 10 games in which they
have had a chance to wrap up a
series. Baker has managed 3,555
games in the regular season and
the playoffs. So is 10 a small
sample size? Maybe. The people
who argue that Baker should be
gone would tell you it’s the
sample that matters.
So what happens? Let’s read
some tea leaves.
We know that the Nationals
have never paid top dollar for
their manager. And while it’s
something of a tired story line
because Baker has those two
division titles in his pocket, we’re
forced to remember that the
Lerners will take a hard line on
negotiating with a candidate
because of what happened in the
fall of 2015. Then, the Nats
intended to hire Bud Black. Black
found the club’s initial offer
insulting. Negotiations broke
down, and Baker was back in the
picture.
Late in this season, it would
have seemed like Baker would
have the upper hand in
negotiations. Pittsburgh
extended its manager, Clint
Hurdle, for four years. Minnesota
extended its manager, Paul
Molitor, for three seasons. It
would seem as if the price for
Baker would go up.
But what if the Nats came back
to Baker and offered him two
more years, but at the same
$2 million salary he earned in his
first two? Would Baker consider
that an insult after two division
titles? Almost certainly.
Yet where would he have to
turn? This is supposed to be his
last job. Would he rather go pitch
himself to the Mets, Tigers, Red
Sox or Phillies than return to the
same dugout in the District,
knowing he has yet another
chance to win?
And where would the
Nationals turn if they can’t — or
choose not to — work out a deal
with Baker? Well, for a franchise
that has won division titles under
three different men, maybe it
doesn’t seem like it matters
much.
The sting from the loss to the
Cubs has not yet worn off. Yet
General Manager Mike Rizzo
prides himself on moving
forward quickly. This week,
moving forward either involves
Baker or it does not. Ask around,
and you’ll find people who are
absolutely certain one or the
other is the right answer.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
KLMNO
nba preview
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2017
.
PAGE D5
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LAYNE MURDOCH/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
THUNDEROUS ONE-MAN BAND
NOW HAS AN ENSEMBLE
Russell Westbrook was a triple-double machine last year. Now he leads a three-headed monster.
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
IN OKLAHOMA CITY
L
ast season, the Thunder resembled a traveling one-man show. Russell Westbrook’s solo act captivated the
NBA world as he became the first player since 1962 to average a triple-double for a season. For his efforts, he
won the league’s most valuable player award. ¶ What Westbrook’s tear didn’t do was lead Oklahoma City
back to contention in the wake of Kevin Durant’s departure the previous summer. Sure, the Thunder
made the playoffs when many thought it wouldn’t, but Oklahoma City was dismissed in five games in the
first round by the Houston Rockets. Westbrook’s individual greatness appeared to have taken the Thunder as far as
the team could go without more help. ¶ This summer, General Manager Sam Presti found some. In adding all-stars
Paul George and Carmelo Anthony, Oklahoma City suddenly has the firepower to again be a real factor in the Western
Conference. But those reinforcements arrive with obvious questions: How will three star players all accustomed to
leading their own teams be able to comfortably coexist? And can Westbrook give back some of the unprecedented
THUNDER CONTINUED ON D6
freedom and control he exerted over the franchise last season?
Who’s hot and who’s not?
A look at some rising stars and
others who are fading away. D6
Who’s got next?
Several players are in position to
join the league’s upper crust. D7
Who’s on top?
LeBron James could be MVP again
and other award predictions. D7
Who’s got something to prove?
Five veterans are looking to shed
labels that have dogged them. D8
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
NBA Preview
Porter among players on the rise
The top 100 players for
the 2017-18 NBA season
The Washington Post’s Tim
Bontemps surveyed the NBA and
ranked his top 100 players
according to their overall talent
level heading into the new season.
Raptors’ Valanciunas is in group with falling value due to injury, age and the changing NBA game
BY T I M BO NT E MPS
From year to year, we expect some variation in The Washington Post’s rankings of the Top 100 players in the NBA. ¶ Some guys
will have breakout seasons, shooting well up the list or, in some cases, breaking into it for the first time. At the other end of the
spectrum will be those who drop, due either to ineffectiveness, injury or the league simply shifting away from their specific skill
set. ¶ Here are those who climbed — and stumbled — the most from last season to now:
MOVIN’ UP
1. LeBron James
SF, Cleveland Cavaliers
2. Kevin Durant
SF, Golden State Warriors
Otto Porter Jr.
Nikola Jokic
Eric Gordon
Clint Capela
Gary Harris
SF, Washington Wizards
C, Denver Nuggets
SG, Houston Rockets
C, Houston Rockets
SG, Denver Nuggets
This year: 47
This year: 26
Last year: Not ranked
Last year: 74
Porter picked the perfect time to
have a breakout season, shooting
43.4 percent from three-point
range to help the Wizards to a third
playoff series victory in four
seasons. In the process, Porter
earned a max contract to solidify
the team’s core alongside John
Wall and Bradley Beal. Now the
Wizards hope Porter can continue
to improve as he moves into his
new deal, as the team looks to take
the next step and make it to the
Eastern Conference finals.
Going into last season, the Nuggets
were trying to figure out whether
Jokic or Jusuf Nurkic should be
their starting center. By the end of
the season, not only had he
claimed the starting job but Nurkic
had been traded to Portland. Jokic
is suddenly the foundation of
Denver’s plans moving forward. If
he can take steps defensively, he
can become a superstar.
This year: 49
This year: 61
This year: 66
Last year: Not ranked
Last year: Not ranked
Last year: Not ranked
Talent didn’t keep Gordon off this
list a year ago; availability did. After
missing significant chunks of all
five of his seasons in New Orleans,
Gordon played in 75 games for
Houston last season and was a
terrific complementary option
alongside James Harden, earning
sixth man of the year honors. With
Chris Paul in the fold this season,
he is a strong candidate to win the
award for a second straight time.
Gordon’s teammate also made a
leap up the list. Capela has
seamlessly settled into a vital part
of Houston’s system under uptempo-loving Coach Mike D’Antoni.
He should be a big beneficiary of
the arrival of Chris Paul, getting the
lobs Paul used to toss to DeAndre
Jordan in Los Angeles and Tyson
Chandler in New Orleans. The next
goal: getting his minutes up from
the mid-20s to around 30 per
game.
Harris really came into his own in
his third season, increasing his
field goal percentage to better than
50 percent and his three-point
percentage from 35.4 to 42. If he
can keep those numbers in the
same range, coupled with his
defensive ability, he’ll be a top
notch shooting guard for years to
come. Denver, realizing this, just
locked him up with a four-year, $84
million extension. The Nuggets’
core is coming together.
3. Kawhi Leonard
SF, San Antonio Spurs
TRENDING DOWN
4. Stephen Curry
PG, Golden State Warriors
5. Russell Westbrook
PG, Oklahoma City
Thunder
Jonas Valanciunas
Chandler Parsons
Pau Gasol
Zach Randolph
Rudy Gay
C, Toronto Raptors
SF, Memphis Grizzlies
C, San Antonio Spurs
PF, Sacramento Kings
SF, San Antonio Spurs
Last year: 58
Last year: 60
Last year: 61
This year: Not ranked
This year: Not ranked
This year: Not ranked
This year: Not ranked
The Grizzlies took a chance when
they gave Parsons a max contract
last summer despite the knee
issues he’d previously suffered.
Through one season in Memphis, it
looks like things won’t break in the
team’s favor (no pun intended).
Parsons was injured for much of
last season and terrible when he
was able to play. At this point, he
needs to prove he can become the
player he was before the knee
issues just to get back on the list —
let alone anywhere near where he
once was.
Gasol has had a wonderful career
and will certainly make it into the
Hall of Fame for both his NBA and
international contributions. But at
37 and having transitioned to a
bench role with the Spurs, he is no
longer an impact player.
Randolph completely flipped the
perception of himself around over
his several years in Memphis,
turning the Grizzlies into a
perennial Western Conference
playoff team and transforming
himself into a beloved veteran.
That era is over, though, and at 36
he has now become a role player.
He will get minutes in Sacramento,
but his bigger value is as a mentor
to the team’s young players.
This ranking comes down to not
trusting Gay’s return from an
Achilles’ tendon tear last season.
The history for guys trying to come
back from that injury is riddled with
failure, and with plenty of miles
already on his tires, Gay needs to
prove he can be the exception to
the rule when he tries to return this
season. If he can get back to where
he was health-wise, there’s plenty
to like about the idea of him playing
alongside Kawhi Leonard in Gregg
Popovich’s system.
Last year: 39
Last year: 47
This year: Not ranked
A 7-footer with offensive skills and
solid rebounding would have been
a central figure on any team two
decades ago, or even 10 years ago.
In today’s NBA, though, big guys
have to be able to either stretch the
floor or be elite defenders to reach
that level, and Valanciunas has
neither skill. He has become the
poster child for the direction the
league is headed — and how that’s
leaving some players behind.
More online
View the entire list at:
wapo.st/nba-top100-2017
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
George, Anthony provide Thunder considerable star power beyond Westbrook
THUNDER FROM D5
“Russ is still special. Carmelo
is still special. We’re all still
special,” George said this preseason. “That doesn’t change our
abilities. It’s just, now we don’t
have to have that burden of
having to do it every possession,
night in and night out, having
that pressure of doing it alone.
That’s the only thing that changes.
“We still want Russ to be in
attack mode. We want Russ to be
aggressive. We still want him to
look for his. Now he just has help
to help him get to his dribble
pull-up. He has help to get to his
mismatches.
“It just enhances what everyone does.”
That is certainly the idea. For
all of Westbrook’s regular season
brilliance — specifically, his heroics in clutch situations — the
Houston series starkly illustrated the limitations of what Oklahoma City was doing last season.
Westbrook finished the series
averaging a triple-double, but his
shooting percentages (38.8 percent overall and 26.5 percent
from three-point range) reinforced how predictable the
Thunder’s attack had become.
Predictability should no longer be an issue for Oklahoma
City. By adding two of the better
scorers in the league in George
and Anthony, the Thunder now
has the ability to offer the kind of
varied attack every coach desires.
Those options beg questions of
Coach Billy Donovan, about how
he’ll handle the rotation and how
he can find enough shots to keep
all three stars happy.
Everyone around the Thunder
is unanimous on one thing — the
goal is to keep at least one of the
team’s three stars on the court at
all times. That allows each of
them the chance to get the ball in
isolation, something all of them
have plenty of experience with.
Doing so, however, will require at
least one of Donovan’s stars to
change his normal rotation,
which the coach realizes requires
delicate management to ensure
everyone is on the same page.
“I want them to have some
ownership of that, as well, [and
make sure] that we work on this
together,” Donovan said. “That’s
part of the sacrifice part. But for
Russell and Carmelo and Paul, I
think they’re open-minded to
what’s going to work best.”
Regardless of exactly how it’s
executed, putting at least one of
the three stars on the court at all
times is the best move. While
Oklahoma City has a starting
lineup — the three stars, plus
defensive stalwarts Andre Roberson and Steven Adams — that
can compete with anyone, the
Thunder bench leaves much to
be desired. Raymond Felton is a
nice upgrade at backup point
guard, but the questions begin
there. The team’s top reserve big,
Patrick Patterson, did not play
this preseason with a knee injury.
The rest of the second unit is
filled with unproven question
marks. Expect Oklahoma City to
try to supplement the bench
throughout the season.
In the meantime, the focus
will be on the big names —
specifically Westbrook, who
made headlines during camp.
First, it was his health, as he
recovered from a platelet-rich
plasma injection in his left knee.
Then it was for agreeing to
remain with the Thunder for the
rest of his prime by signing his
five-year maximum contract extension late last month — doing
so on Durant’s birthday, of all
days.
In typical Westbrook fashion,
he has no interest in discussing
anything about what’s happening with the Thunder, including
his adjustment to playing alongside George and Anthony.
“We’re going to get it, man,”
Westbrook said. “I think one
thing for everybody to know,
especially you guys, you guys
keep asking about the chemistry
every damn day. We’re going to
get it together.
“It’s a season-long thing, and
it’s not going to happen overnight, and we’re going to get it
together. You can keep asking us
every day, but it’s not going to
change what’s going to happen.
We’re going to get it together.”
While Westbrook may not
have any interest in discussing
the questions surrounding the
Thunder, that doesn’t make them
go away. But he did do himself
and the team a huge favor by
pulling one massive conversation topic off the table: his future
in Oklahoma.
Entering camp, it was still an
open question whether Westbrook would ink the extension
after letting it sit unsigned for
three months. Now that he has,
Oklahoma City doesn’t have to
constantly hear about the possibility of Westbrook, George and
Anthony all leaving as free
agents in July.
With Westbrook locked up,
people around the league think
the likelihood of Anthony picking up his $27.9 million option
for next season went from a near
certainty to a lock, as it seems
unlikely he’ll get the same kind
of money on the open market as a
34-year-old free agent. To this
point, Anthony is saying all the
right things about his new home.
“I’m, like, born again a little
bit,” Anthony said this month. “I
feel like I’m in college again. It’s
like a college campus, and just
being around, and the city is kind
of that college feel and the energy, the joy that I have back with
the game of basketball, I can feel
it.
“I can feel it when I wake up. I
can feel it around the guys. I can
feel it when I’m out and about.
That energy is different. The
energy never lies and the vibes
never lies.”
With Westbrook and possibly
Anthony in the fold for next
season, the team hopes its
chances of retaining George have
increased, as well. Keeping all
three stars would be a dream
scenario for the Thunder, but it
would also be excessively expensive. Oklahoma City is staring at
a potential $140 million bill if all
three players return — which
would easily make next season’s
Thunder the most expensive
team in NBA history.
Even that kind of exorbitant
price, though, should not be a
roadblock to keeping this team
together. Sources have been adamant that the Thunder won’t
hesitate to run things back next
season, particularly when Anthony’s large expiring contract
would allow the team’s finances
to then return to something near
regular order the following year.
In an ironic twist, this was the
salary spike the Thunder was
expecting to deal with if Durant
chose to re-sign in Oklahoma
City; now that he’s gone, the plan
remains the same, albeit a year
later than anticipated.
Instead of orbiting around just
Westbrook and Durant, the team
now operates on an axis of Westbrook, George and Anthony, all of
whom have motivation this season. For Westbrook, it’s to prove
he can be more than just an
individual highlight reel. For
George and Anthony, it’s something else — to be back in the
mix, after both spent the past
three seasons mired in mediocrity or worse with the Indiana
Pacers and New York Knicks,
respectively.
“All three of us [have something to play for],” George said.
“All three of us are playing with
chips on our shoulders, all for
different reasons. [But] the main
reason is we’re not champions.
We’ve never been champions.
“So I’ve got a different chip on
my shoulder than those guys do,
but we’ve all got one, and I think
that’s what will make this trio all
the more special.”
That’s what the Thunder is
betting on after bringing this
cast together. A few months removed from Westbrook’s incomparable one-man show, this ensemble has a chance to make
noise deep into the spring —
potentially even challenging the
Golden State Warriors, which
seemed a distant dream after
Durant’s defection.
It’s just a matter of making the
pieces fit.
“I think if you talk to Paul and
Carmelo, I think they’ll both tell
you, ‘We need Russell to be
Russell,’ ” Donovan said. “We
need Paul to be Paul. We need
Carmelo to be Carmelo, in the
framework of what we are trying
to do and how they can complement each other.
“I think these guys are old
enough and smart enough to
realize there are certain things
we’re going to have to do to give
ourselves the best opportunity to
be the best version of ourselves.”
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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D7
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NBA Preview
List of potential breakout candidates includes Ball
The flashy Lakers point guard is one of 10 players who very well could crack next year’s top 100
BY T I M BO NT E MPS
The creation of The Washington Post’s rankings of the top 100 players in the NBA begs an obvious question: Who could join the
list next season? ¶ This year saw a handful of players make the jump, such as Otto Porter Jr. (No. 47), Eric Gordon (49) and
Clint Capela (61). Here are 10 players, in alphabetical order, who are unranked this year but might be in the mix next year:
Awards predictions
Most valuable player
1. LeBron James, F, Cleveland
Cavaliers
2. Kevin Durant, F, Golden State
Warriors
3. Giannis Antetokounmpo, F,
Milwaukee Bucks
4. James Harden, G, Houston
Rockets
5. John Wall, G, Washington
Wizards
Defensive player of the year
1. Rudy Gobert, C, Utah Jazz
2. Draymond Green, F, Golden
State Warriors
3. Kawhi Leonard, F, San Antonio
Spurs
Rookie of the year
1. Ben Simmons, F, Philadelphia
76ers
2. Dennis Smith Jr., G, Dallas
Mavericks
Lonzo Ball
PG, Los Angeles Lakers
There are clear issues with Ball’s
game. He needs to add strength,
improve his scoring and prove he
can defend at the NBA level. But it
doesn’t take long watching him to
see that his style of play is
infectious, drawing many
comparisons to future Hall of
Famer Jason Kidd. The Lakers will
be hoping he can develop into that
kind of player.
Jaylen Brown
SF, Boston Celtics
With the departures of Avery
Bradley and Jae Crowder in trades
this summer, the Celtics are likely
going to start Brown at shooting
guard between Kyrie Irving and
Gordon Hayward. On a team with
plenty of questions about shooting
and defense, the second-year Cal
product will be counted on to
provide both. Whether he does
could determine whether Boston
can live up to its preseason hype.
Markelle Fultz
PG, Philadelphia 76ers
The top overall pick in the 2017
NBA draft, Fultz (DeMatha)
displayed the exact kind of skill set
in college at Washington that the
Sixers need to pair with Ben
Simmons and Joel Embiid. While
Simmons is likely the de facto
“point guard,” Fultz should play a
role from Day 1 and have the ball in
his hands a lot. He will get every
opportunity to prove he was worth
trading up to acquire on draft night.
Aaron Gordon
PF, Orlando Magic
This is counting on Gordon playing
the position listed above — power
forward — after he has proven to be
ineffective at the small forward
spot. Gordon is an athletic freak
and showed why people have
thought power forward might be his
best position by playing well after a
full-time switch there last season.
Brandon Ingram
SF, Los Angeles Lakers
Ingram was arguably one of the
worst players in the NBA for much
of last season, struggling to make
an impact at either end. But he saw
an uptick in his numbers toward
the end of the season and has
come into training camp with a
boost in confidence and strong
public votes of confidence from
team leadership — including Magic
Johnson. Now he’ll get the chance
to prove that the confidence in him
was warranted as he enters the
season as the clear starter at small
forward.
3. Lonzo Ball, G, Los Angeles Lakers
Sixth man of the year
1. Eric Gordon, G, Houston Rockets
2. Marcus Smart, G, Boston Celtics
3. Tristan Thompson, C, Cleveland
Cavaliers
Most improved player
1. Myles Turner, C, Indiana Pacers
2. Aaron Gordon, F, Orlando Magic
3. Josh Richardson, G, Miami Heat
Coach of the year
1. Scott Brooks, Washington
Wizards
2. Quin Snyder, Utah Jazz
3. Erik Spoelstra, Miami Heat
All-NBA first team
Stephen Curry, G, Golden State
Warriors
James Harden, G, Houston Rockets
LeBron James, F, Cleveland
Cavaliers
Kevin Durant, F, Golden State
Warriors
Karl-Anthony Towns, C, Minnesota
Timberwolves
Stanley Johnson
SF, Detroit Pistons
After bursting onto the scene by
publicly challenging LeBron James
during Detroit’s loss to the
Cleveland Cavaliers in the first
round of the 2016 playoffs,
Johnson — like seemingly the rest
of the Pistons — took a step back in
Year 2. Now that Marcus Morris is
gone, Johnson will almost certainly
begin the season as a starter, and
Detroit is hoping he can begin to
turn some of his immense physical
gifts into consistent production.
Skal Labissiere
PF, Sacramento Kings
Two years ago, Labissiere entered
his freshman season at Kentucky
as a projected top-five pick — only
to struggle with the Wildcats and
almost fall out of the first round. He
showed that potential down the
stretch for Sacramento as a rookie,
averaging 10.8 points and six
rebounds in 25 games after the allstar break, as well as shooting
54 percent from the field and
37.5 percent from three-point
range. With a new era beginning
with the Kings, he should get every
opportunity to prove himself as a
long-term core piece this season.
Thon Maker
C, Milwaukee Bucks
For much of last season, Maker
was a token starter, playing a few
minutes to begin each half but
nothing else. That wasn’t the case
in the playoffs, though, as he
wound up playing bigger minutes
and making a real impact in a firstround loss to the Toronto Raptors.
Now entering his second season,
Maker should get more minutes
and the chance to grow into a
regular contributor.
Norman Powell
SF, Toronto Raptors
Powell agreed to a four-year,
$42 million extension this month
and will either be a starter or a
sixth man this season. Coach
Dwane Casey could choose to start
C.J. Miles instead, but regardless of
Powell’s role, he should approach
30 minutes per game. That should
give him the opportunity to prove
that what he has shown in smaller
samples holds up under heavier
minutes and scrutiny.
D’Angelo Russell
PG, Brooklyn Nets
Few players have needed a change
of scenery more than Russell did
after two very rocky seasons with
the Lakers. Now he finds himself
with the Nets — about the opposite,
in terms of pressure and attention,
from playing with the Lakers — and
with a coach in Kenny Atkinson
who runs a system perfectly suited
to Russell’s game. If he is unable to
live up to the expectations that
came with being the No. 2 overall
pick in 2015, it will be hard to place
the blame for that anywhere but on
him.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
All-NBA second team
Russell Westbrook, G, Oklahoma
City Thunder
John Wall, G, Washington Wizards
Giannis Antetokounmpo, F,
Milwaukee Bucks
Paul George, G, Oklahoma City
Thunder
Rudy Gobert, C, Utah Jazz
All-NBA third team
Chris Paul, G, Houston Rockets
Klay Thompson, G, Golden State
Warriors
Jimmy Butler, F, Minnesota
Timberwolves
Draymond Green, F, Golden State
Warriors
Nikola Jokic, C, Denver Nuggets
— Tim Bontemps
JERRY BREWER
Wizards’ Gortat, Mahinmi know all too well how the center position has changed
BREWER FROM D1
smaller roles throughout his
career, but when healthy, he has
been a good example, too.
Neither shoots three-pointers
nor plays high above the rim. But
both centers have the quickness
and foot speed to defend
adequately on the perimeter,
which is the top requirement of
any modern NBA big man
seeking to be more than a
situational player. And both have
come to understand the
importance of how the little
things — setting screens,
running to the rim, rebounding,
playing good team defense and
recognizing what they mean to
floor spacing even without
shooting long jumpers — can
add value to their roles.
“This is just how it is,” said the
6-foot-11 Gortat, who averaged
10.8 points and 10.4 rebounds
last season, making him one of
12 players to post a doubledouble in points and rebounds.
“I became that legit five-man
who sets screens, rolls to the
basket. In 11 years of my career, I
try to embrace that every freakin’
night, every freakin’ year.”
The perception of the center is
about to change. It’s a misguided
notion that the position doesn’t
matter anymore, and there is a
collection of young big men
capable of proving that. If Joel
Embiid can remain healthy, he
could redefine the position. Or
maybe Karl-Anthony Towns
beats him to it. There are plenty
of others: Anthony Davis, Rudy
Gobert, Nikola Jokic, Kristaps
Porzingis. Veterans such as
DeMarcus Cousins, Marc Gasol
and Hassan Whiteside still have
plenty of good years left, too.
And the 2018 NBA draft class is
expected to include some impact
post players, including potential
top-five picks Marvin Bagley III,
DeAndre Ayton and Mohamed
Bamba. Not every tall player
wants to be the next Kevin
Durant or Giannis
Antetokounmpo.
There are fewer centers like
Gortat, however. For all the
criticism he has received, he’s a
productive big man who accepts
his role. He likes to bang inside,
but he has adapted to the small
ball era. And when called upon,
he is capable of scoring 20
points.
Gortat and Mahinmi came
into the league at the same time.
They’re both entering their 11th
seasons. In 2007, they walked
into an NBA in which Dwight
Howard was the next big thing,
and the game still featured
plenty of teams that preferred to
play inside-out. Within five
seasons, that had changed
dramatically.
“All the stuff that changed, I
saw it happening right in front of
me,” the 6-11 Mahinmi said. “I’m
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Washington’s Marcin Gortat was one of only 12 players to
average a double-double in points and rebounds last season.
living it because the change
happened right in the middle of
my career.”
When Mahinmi arrived in San
Antonio, he remembers Coach
Gregg Popovich using the
defensive term “center field.” It
was meant to tell the big man
where to be during middle pickand-roll situations. If he heard
“center field,” Mahinmi knew to
wait at the free throw line. If the
Spurs called “center field” now,
they would give up 20 threepointers.
“Now it’s impossible to do that
because guys are too good of
shooters and guards are too
good,” Mahinmi said. “The game
is played so fast, if you just run
and sag back, you’re going to get
drilled.”
There are a variety of offensive
styles that centers can play right
now. But there are two absolute
skills they must all possess to
compete: defensive versatility
and a knack for setting screens.
Gortat, who tied for the league
lead in screen assists last season
(6.2) with Utah’s Rudy Gobert,
can make you tired just
describing the energy required
to do those things.
“Your endurance has to be to
run around, playing pick-androll defense, making sure the
point guard stays in front of you,
hedging, recovering and then
battling for rebounds,” Gortat
said. “Then you have to sprint
down the court and make the
court shrink so that your
shooters will be open. If they
don’t shoot the ball, then you’ve
got to come out of the paint, go
set a screen and roll down again,
all with maximum effort. Do this
three times up and down the
court in a game, and, whew, your
lungs are burning. And that’s
when the pass comes your way
on the roll, and you have to catch
the ball on the move and finish
in one fluid motion, with either
hand.”
No wonder Gortat gets upset
when he feels he is slighted
because he doesn’t shoot threepointers. The traditional center
is kind of like a left tackle in
football these days. When he
does his job, you don’t notice
him.
“It’s disrespectful to me when
I keep hearing about those guys
that, just because they can shoot
threes, they are better centers,”
Gortat said. “It’s complete
[expletive]. Because if you put
me and him straight up in the
post or in a game of one-on-one,
he ain’t going to win. I’m telling
you right now: He’s not going to
win.”
The Wizards make sure their
centers are appreciated. After
Gortat led the league in screen
assists last season, the team
acknowledged him, and point
guard John Wall spoke about the
meaning of Gortat’s
contributions.
Gortat grins at the memory.
As a new season begins, his
frustration has subsided. He has
had his value verified.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
D8
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nba preview
NATHANIEL S. BUTLER/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
JONATHAN BACHMAN/GETTY IMAGES
D’Angelo Russell:
Lottery bust
DeMarcus Cousins:
Not a winner
Why he got stuck with the label:
Two years ago, the Los Angeles
Lakers selected Russell No. 2
overall, making him the first in a
series of young players to bear the
mantle of replacing Kobe Bryant
as the face of the league’s most
glamorous franchise. But after a
rocky 24 months, including ups
and downs on and off the court,
Los Angeles flipped Russell to the
Brooklyn Nets in June in a salary
dump of Timofey Mozgov’s
contract.
How he can peel the label off
this season: When the trade to
Brooklyn was announced, it
appeared to be the perfect place
for Russell to land. Nets Coach
Kenny Atkinson is arguably the
best player development coach in
the league, and he runs a system
that is tailor-made for Russell’s
preferred style. And, unlike the
Lakers, the Nets are virtually
irrelevant in their massive media
market, allowing him to develop in
a pressure-free environment.
Earlier this preseason, Russell
attempted to spin everything he
went through in Los Angeles as
positive for his development.
“Yeah, definitely, it prepared me in
a major way to come straight to
New York and be who I am,” he
told reporters. “Just in general —
how to talk to [media], how to
carry myself, everything, on the
court and off the court. Getting
traded, you realize everything is a
business. . . . It’s a fresh start for
me, and I’m going to try to take
advantage of that.”
The Nets will be eager for him to
do so. This is a franchise that was
decimated by the infamous 2013
draft-night trade that brought Paul
Pierce and Kevin Garnett to
Brooklyn — a deal that cost the
Nets the rights to four first-round
picks over the following five years,
culminating with next summer’s
first-rounder, which Boston
dangled as the main piece of the
Kyrie Irving trade this summer.
Playing under Atkinson, and
alongside Jeremy Lin, should bring
out the best in Russell. If it
doesn’t, it will be time to start
wondering whether he will ever
live up to the lofty expectations
that accompanied his selection in
the draft.
Why he got stuck with the label:
Six-and-a-half years of dysfunction
in Sacramento. Cousins has been
durable and dependable in his
career, but that has translated only
into individual success (career
averages of 21.2 points and 10.8
rebounds, plus three all-star
appearances and two all-NBA
selections). It certainly can’t be
attributed to Cousins alone that
the Kings were a dumpster fire
during his entire tenure there,
given the amount of insanity that
surrounded the franchise. But
there’s little doubt that Cousins,
too, added to that insanity at times.
How he can peel the label off
this season: By getting an almostas-dysfunctional New Orleans
Pelicans team into the playoffs. In
some ways, it’s easy to feel
sympathy for Cousins, who went to
one of the few teams that has
rivaled Sacramento in chaos over
the last few years when the Kings
dealt him in February. Playing
alongside another elite big in
Anthony Davis, and with a quality
point guard in Jrue Holiday,
Cousins has a chance to push New
Orleans into the playoff picture in
the Western Conference. Doing so
would prevent him from moving
further up the all-time list of games
played without a playoff
appearance. Cousins enters this
season 11th on that list, but if he
stays healthy all season and New
Orleans doesn’t make the playoffs
— or he doesn’t get traded
elsewhere again midseason — he’ll
move into the top five.
“Everybody wants to win,” Cousins
said at the Pelicans’ media day last
month. “That’s everybody’s mindset. It’s not about any accolades.
It’s not about any stats. It’s about
winning. I mean, I think everybody
is at the point in their career where,
you know, they just want to win.”
Yes, Cousins can go elsewhere as a
free agent at the end of the
season, and perhaps then — if
things don’t work out in New
Orleans — he can go to a more
stable place and find the success
that’s eluded him thus far in his
career. But Cousins also has the
ability, despite everything else
happening in New Orleans, to pair
with Davis and lift the Pelicans into
the playoffs and relevancy in the
Western Conference. If he does,
the doubts about his ability to
contribute to winning basketball
will disappear.
Five players with labels to shed this season
MADDIE MEYER/GETTY IMAGES
Kyle Irving: Sidekick
Why he got stuck with the label: Through his first three
seasons in the NBA, Irving had no success on his own. Yes, he
was MVP of the 2014 All-Star Game in New Orleans, but his
Cleveland Cavaliers teams went 78-152 and didn’t come
close to winning a playoff series before LeBron James came
back to Ohio. While Irving was a tremendous sidekick to
James the past three seasons — including hitting one of the
biggest shots in NBA history to win the 2016 NBA title — his
trade request this summer to get away from playing next to
the game’s best player left many scratching their heads.
How he can peel the label off this season: It’s simple: If
Irving can lead the Celtics back to the Eastern Conference
finals and give James and the Cavaliers a real series — and
perhaps even beat them — any questions about his
leadership or his ability to be “The Man” on a contending
team will go away for good. Doing so, however, won’t be easy.
Irving is one of four new starters in Boston, and the Celtics
also are relying heavily on second-year forward Jaylen Brown
and rookie Jayson Tatum to immediately contribute. Then
there are Irving’s continually bizarre quotes, like this one he
gave reporters about going back to Cleveland for the season
opener:
“All the kind of energy behind it is created anywhere except
from me,” Irving said. “That’s pretty much it. It’s all created
from the excitement and the division of, let’s get it to be
Cleveland versus Boston. And I understand that. That’s what
makes basketball great. It’s what makes the NBA great.
“It makes your job great as well and all our jobs as well.
Because it’s all from literally two hoops and a basketball, so
the excitement is garnered over time. And I can even see that
it’s starting to brew up now. So it’s pretty exciting.”
No player will endure more scrutiny of his every move, and
every word, than Irving this season. That’s the life he chose by
asking to be dealt away from James to lead his own team.
Now he has to actually do it.
NATHANIEL S. BUTLER/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
Andrew Wiggins: One-dimensional
Why he got stuck with the label: When Wiggins
entered the NBA in 2014, he was viewed as a player
who would be a defensive stopper who could
contribute in a variety of ways but would struggle to
assert himself as a primary offensive weapon. In a
twist, the opposite has occurred. Wiggins is now an
excellent scorer, averaging 23.6 points per game last
season and becoming a league-average three-point
shooter, but he provides little to nothing in the other
areas of the game. Is he just a scorer? Or can he
become a complete player?
How he can peel the label off this season: Well,
for starters, he has to live up to the five-year,
$148 million max contract he signed with the
Minnesota Timberwolves last week. Wiggins won’t be
able to do that if he remains a scorer who offers little
else. Instead, he has to begin to utilize his elite
SAM FORENCICH/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
Chandler Parsons: Broken down
athleticism to impact the game in the many ways he
was supposed to be able to upon entering the league.
That’s certainly what his coach expects.
“He’s never satisfied. He wants to get better,” Tom
Thibodeau said after Wiggins signed the extension. “I
think he’s already demonstrated that to make the
progress that he’s already shown is impressive, but
as I mentioned, it’s scratching the surface. And now
we hope that it’ll continue to grow and it’ll translate
into wins.”
For Wiggins to live up to the contract he just signed,
he better be just scratching the surface. If this is the
player he remains — particularly when playing
alongside Karl-Anthony Towns and Jimmy Butler on a
team that’s supposed to become a contender — he
won’t make good on it.
Why he got stuck with the label: When the Memphis
Grizzlies signed Chandler Parsons to a four-year,
$94 million contract in July 2016, there was rationale
behind the move. A 6-foot-10 forward capable of playing
either forward spot and operating as both a spot-up
shooter and a playmaker, Parsons was the exact type of a
player Memphis has spent its entire run of success trying
to find. There was only one problem: The knee issues that
hampered Parsons in his final two seasons in Dallas
turned him into a shell of the player he used to be.
How he can peel the label off this season: Staying on
the court would be a good place to start. Parsons, who
turns 29 next week, has remained healthy during this
preseason, but at this point it is going to take a full year of
Parsons being both available and productive to begin to
turn around the narrative that has come to define him.
“You get paid a certain salary, you’re judged, and you’re
expected to perform at the highest level when you’re
getting paid at the highest level,” Parsons told ESPN last
month. “To put it simply, I didn’t last year. I truly believe it
was 95 percent injury. I don’t think I’ve lost my game or
lost a step.
“Just physically, I wasn’t there last year. I was a step slow, I
wasn’t athletic, I wasn’t fast. I wasn’t myself.”
The Grizzlies desperately need Parsons to be himself
again — heck, at this point, they just need him to be
available and competent. But if Memphis is going to
extend the primes of Marc Gasol and Mike Conley Jr. and
remain a competitive force in the West, it’s going to need
Parsons to produce. If not, this group’s window may have
already closed.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Maryland AD Anderson will go on six-month sabbatical
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
Maryland Athletic Director
Kevin Anderson will take a
six-month sabbatical, the school
announced Monday, amid intensifying speculation surrounding the administrator’s
job security. The move opens an
uncertain chapter for the
school’s athletic department.
The school’s announcement
comes about 48 hours after
several media reports said Anderson had been fired already,
which the school denied in a
brief statement.
Maryland Executive Athletic
Director Damon Evans will oversee the day-to-day operations of
the athletic department while
Anderson is on sabbatical. It
remains unclear whether Anderson will be back after six
months.
Anderson, 62, had not been in
his office since the end of September and had not appeared at
three consecutive Maryland
football games, including Saturday’s home game against Northwestern. In an email to athletic
department officials Monday,
Anderson cited his work in
monthly open forums with his
athletes — which he created in
2016 to address social and political issues — as the reason for
his sabbatical.
“This experience has led me
to consider where I want to
focus my energies at this point
in my career,” Anderson said in
the email, adding that he will
work on “various projects focusing on leadership development,
including work with a broad
coalition of groups focused on
issues of equity, student athlete
activism and inclusion in college athletics.”
Anderson, who earned a salary of $587,000 last year, did not
respond to further request to
comment Monday afternoon.
While it does not appear that
Anderson is dealing with personal matters, several reports
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kevin Anderson is taking a sabbatical amid speculation about his job security. On Saturday, the school denied reports that he had been fired.
Saturday cited his ongoing absence as being part of a fallingout with Maryland President
Wallace D. Loh over Anderson’s
interest in the athletic director
vacancy at California earlier
this fall.
That apparent friction came
just after Anderson and Loh in
August had acknowledged the
completion of the first phase of
the new Cole Field House, which
is being renovated into an indoor football facility and center
for sports medicine.
Anderson and the athletic
department still have considerable fundraising to secure after
the school announced this summer that the initial $155 million
price tag of the project increased by roughly 25 percent to
$196 million, with the athletic
department responsible for
$19 million of that cost.
Anderson, who is from San
Francisco and graduated from
San Francisco State, had also
reportedly expressed interest
when the athletic director posi-
tion at Cal became open in 2015.
In 2012, Anderson denied a
report linking him to the athletic director vacancy at Stanford,
where he served as an athletic
fundraiser from 1993 to 1995.
Evans has been in his post
since 2014. The former Georgia
athletic director was fired from
that job in July 2010 after he was
charged with DUI. Evans eventually received a second chance
when Maryland hired him as an
associate athletic director and
chief financial officer, and he
Washington is mulling options with Niskanen hurt
CAPITALS FROM D1
after top defenseman Matt Niskanen injured his hand against
the New Jersey Devils, MacLellan
was asked if he would consider a
trade to address the Capitals’
blue-line depth.
“I think we’re considering it,”
MacLellan said.
MacLellan then explained how
Washington will explore its internal options before taking that
step with the season still so
young and the situation not yet
dire. The Capitals’ defense — a
unit that helped Washington allow the fewest goals in the NHL
last season — took a considerable
hit this summer when Nate
Schmidt was swiped by the Vegas
Golden Knights in the expansion
draft and the team didn’t re-sign
unrestricted free agents Karl
Alzner or Kevin Shattenkirk. Evgeny Kuznetsov, Dmitry Orlov, Andre Burakovsky, Brett Connolly
and Philipp Grubauer were all
due new contracts in restricted
free agency, and those deals coupled with an extension for forward T.J. Oshie left Washington
without the salary cap space
needed to acquire another proven defenseman.
The Capitals instead turned to
their strong collection of young
blue-liners, prospects the team
expects will one day play significant roles on the NHL squad.
Washington now finds itself balancing the proper development
of those players with the need to
win games in the interim.
Niskanen’s injury undoubtedly complicates matters. He was
placed on long-term injured reserve Saturday, meaning he is not
eligible to play until a Nov. 7
game against the Buffalo Sabres
at the earliest. MacLellan said he
expects Niskanen to return to the
lineup around that date. Before
he got hurt, Niskanen was playing on Washington’s top defensive pairing, averaging more
than 23 minutes per game as he
faced opponents’ top goal scorers
and contributed to both the power-play and penalty-kill units.
Without him, the Capitals’
blue line has three experienced
defensemen in John Carlson, Orlov and Brooks Orpik. The team’s
other options on the roster are
Aaron Ness and Taylor Chorney,
who are 27 and 30, respectively,
and have bounced between
Washington and the American
Hockey League for most of their
careers, and two rookies in Christian Djoos and Madison Bowey,
who both made their NHL debuts
in the past week.
Before MacLellan makes a
move for another defenseman, he
wants to see what the team has in
Djoos, Bowey and the team’s
other young blue-liners. With
quickly became one of Anderson’s top lieutenants. Evans has
been the department’s top representative on all coaching contract negotiations.
“I want to sincerely express
my appreciation to President
Loh for the opportunity to lead
the athletics department and its
day-to-day operations at the
University of Maryland,” Evans
said in a statement. “We have a
strong foundation to build upon
— we have won the most championships in the Big Ten since
Kucherov’s pair of goals
carry Tampa to top spot
BY
ERIC HARTLINE/USA TODAY SPORTS
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
vs. Toronto Maple Leafs
Today
7 NBCSW
at Detroit Red Wings
Friday
7:30 NBCSW Plus
vs. Florida Panthers
Saturday
7:30 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM);
WFED (1500 AM)
both Djoos and Bowey in the
lineup on Saturday against the
Flyers, the Capitals lost, 8-2, but
MacLellan isn’t likely to make
any decisions based on one game
— the second leg of back-to-back
road games — and the struggles
in that rout extended far beyond
the rookies.
“You know, how are we going
to use Djoos? I don’t know yet,”
MacLellan said. “He’s been effective so far. We’ll see what Bowey
is here now. We’ll see how he
handles it and kind of get a sense
of where they fit into the whole
thing. I’d like to get [Jonas]
Siegenthaler up and take a look
at him, too. He played good at the
end of [training] camp. I’d like to
see him in a few games also.”
Washington’s plan was to ease
those players into the lineup.
Djoos made the team out of
training camp in part because he
would have been exposed to
waivers if he was sent down to
the AHL, meaning another team
could have swiped him. Bowey is
still waivers exempt, and he was
one of the last cuts from the
training camp roster. Unlike
Djoos, Bowey hasn’t had two full
seasons in the AHL; he only
played in 34 games for the Hershey Bears last season after a
skate blade lacerated a tendon in
his ankle.
MacLellan was happy with
how Bowey performed in training camp, and if the decision had
been based purely on that, the
22-year-old would have made the
opening-night roster. The Capitals had hoped Bowey would
start the season in the AHL and
get some more experience and
confidence before recalling him.
But the team needed another
right-handed shot after Niskanen’s injury, and that timeline
accelerated.
“You want to set your guys up
for success,” MacLellan said.
“You don’t want to just throw
them in. I mean, people think,
‘Oh, he’s good, just throw him
into the top four.’ What if he gets
crushed or his confidence gets
hurt playing against top players?
It’s going to be a struggle for a
little bit. There’s got to be a
progression.”
If the Capitals did explore a
trade, the most obvious partner
would be the Golden Knights,
who have nine active defensemen on the roster, meaning three
are scratched every game. With
an affordable $800,000 cap hit,
left-handed shot Griffin Reinhart
is seemingly the best fit, but the
2012 fourth overall pick also
represents something of a project having played in just 37
games since 2014. There’s no
guarantee he would bring stability to Washington’s defense. The
free agent options available — a
list that includes Jakub Kindl,
Roman Polak and Dennis Wideman — aren’t inspiring either.
But before the Capitals go
either route, expect them to take
a patient look at their internal
options.
“Our job is to identify the guys
we think are going to play, then
slowly integrate them into our
lineup,” MacLellan said. “Our
goal is by the end of the year to
have a better picture on our D,
not right now.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
NHL
LIGHTNING 3,
RED WINGS 2
The Caps want to see more of rookies Christian Djoos and Madison Bowey (22) before making a deal.
joining the conference in 2014
and have an academic profile we
are extremely proud of.”
Anderson took over for Debbie Yow in 2010 after serving six
years as athletic director at
Army. Over that time, he has
made three coaching hires within revenue programs and oversaw the school’s transition to
the Big Ten starting in 2012, a
lucrative move that has helped
bring new revenue streams to
an athletic department that has
long been hampered by financial struggle and was forced to
drop seven varsity sports in
2012 to counteract a multimillion dollar deficit.
A polarizing figure in College
Park, Anderson immediately
caused a stir when he fired
football coach Ralph Friedgen
in December 2010, replacing
him two weeks later with Randy
Edsall.
Anderson fired Edsall after
41/2 years in October 2015 and
replaced him with DJ Durkin.
Anderson’s other major coaching hire, men’s basketball Coach
Mark Turgeon, came after longtime coach Gary Williams retired in 2011.
There has been speculation
that the 72-year-old Williams,
who holds a fundraising role
within the athletic department,
might be a possible replacement
for Anderson as interim athletic
director. But a source close to
Williams said Saturday that
Williams has no interest in the
position. Anderson’s duties will
instead fall to Evans, who did
not mention Anderson in his
statement but ensured that
there would be no drop-off as
the department transitions to
his leadership.
“During this period, I will
continue to work in concert
with our institution as we collaborate with our tremendous
supporters, donors, cabinet, administrators, coaching staff and
student athletes,” Evans said.
N OAH T RISTER
detroit — Nikita Kucherov
scored his second goal of the
game with 18:13 remaining in the
third period, lifting the Tampa
Bay Lightning to a 3-2 victory
over the Detroit Red Wings on
Monday night.
Tyler Johnson also scored for
the Lightning, which has the
NHL’s top record after winning
its fourth game in a row. Justin
Abdelkader and Mike Green
scored in the second period to
help Detroit erase a 2-0 deficit,
but Kucherov broke the tie early
in the third with his seventh goal
of the season.
Kucherov reached out with one
hand on his stick and barely got a
piece of a loose puck in front of
the net, deflecting it under Jimmy
Howard and slowly into the net.
“Special player,” Lightning
Coach Jon Cooper said. “He didn’t
show up to Tampa in September.
He showed up in July. He was on
the ice four or five times a week
just working on his game, and
we’re reaping the benefits of
that.”
Kucherov had exactly one goal
in each of Tampa Bay’s first five
games this season, and he scored
two more Monday. He is second in
the league in goals, two behind
Washington’s Alex Ovechkin.
Johnson opened the scoring
with a shorthanded goal in the
first period, collecting the puck
near his own blue line and outskating Trevor Daley the other
way before beating Howard.
Kucherov scored on a power play
101 seconds later with a wrist shot
from the right circle.
Abdelkader’s goal came after
some extensive deliberation by
the officials. He was hooked from
behind by Victor Hedman on a
breakaway, but he was able to get
a shot off.
Andrei Vasilevskiy made the
save, and Abdelkader went sliding into him. Detroit’s Darren
Helm, who was trailing the play,
put the rebound into the net.
After a review, officials took the
goal away, ruling that Abdelkader
had interfered with the goalie
and Hedman was guilty of a
hooking penalty. After additional
discussion, Abdelkader was given
a penalty shot, which he converted.
— Associated Press
RICK OSENTOSKI/USA TODAY SPORTS
Lightning right wing Nikita Kucherov is congratulated by
teammates after netting his second goal in a win over Detroit.
Wake up to
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. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
high schools
FOOTBALL NOTES
Stags find themselves down, but they are hardly out of it
LE AD E R S
Despite two-game skid,
DeMatha still contends
Top rushers
A. Squire, Suitland
D. Marshall, Falls Church
A. Margiotta, Marshall
T. Rush, Annandale
J. Houston, Flint Hill
C. Garmon III, Champe
T. Baldwin, Broad Run
J. Johnson, Woodgrove
C. Oberman, Poolesville
L. Djieya, Wheaton
J. Mulatu, Lee
J. Farri, Northwest
D. Dupree, DuVal
E. Asante, Westfield
T. McKenzie, Bell
M. Salahuddin, H.D. Woodson
J. Hampton, Georgetown Prep
D. Harris, Loudoun County
B. Gonzales-Pinto, Marshall
S. Alston, South Lakes
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
— Joshua Needelman
62 for Sherwood
Sherwood scored two touchdowns on special teams Friday
against Northwood, but Warriors
Coach Chris Grier couldn’t deny
his offense’s dominance.
On a night when seven Montgomery County teams scored at
least 42 points, Sherwood proved
Grier’s theory that his offense has
improved versatility and depth in
a 62-8 win, the Warriors’ highest
mark in almost a year.
“We’ve kind of found our identity, I think, in the last three or four
weeks,” Grier said. “It’s pretty
much just trying to get our playmakers the ball in space. You hear
that a lot from coaches, but traditionally, we were a very run-heavy
team.”
That’s because Sherwood had
running back Travis Levy the past
few seasons. Last year’s Maryland
Gatorade player of the year led the
team with 1,809 rushing yards
and 29 touchdowns.
But with Levy now at Boston
College and quarterback Michael
Mbony becoming more comfort-
Top passers
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Trying to take down the Pumas
Jy’ir Ingram’s best efforts weren’t enough for Oxon Hill on Friday night vs. Wise. The top-ranked Pumas cruised, 58-14, to move to 7-0.
THE POST TOP 20
BY
D ILLON M ULLAN
With its overtime win at DeMatha, Good Counsel jumps back into the top 10. The Stags were the only ranked team to lose this past weekend
and drop to No. 14 ahead of a visit to No. 4 St. John’s.
Stone Bridge enters the top five for the first time this season. After consecutive losses in the Virginia 5A state championship, the Bulldogs
have yet to be tested this season.
In the bottom half of the rankings, Freedom-Woodbridge has been arguably the area’s most dominant team so far this season. The Eagles
have scored at least 40 points in all seven of their wins. On Sept. 29, they held five-star running back recruit Ricky Slade to negative yards
rushing. On Friday night, they beat previously undefeated Woodbridge by 27. This week, Freedom-Woodbridge jumps from No. 20 to No. 15.
The only new addition to this week’s rankings is Flint Hill, which joins the bubble following a 42-0 win over Bishop Ireton.
1. Wise (7-0) LR: 1
8. Good Counsel (5-2) LW: 13
15. Freedom-Woodbridge (7-0) LW: 20
Quinton Williams threw four touchdown
passes in the Pumas’ 58-14 win over Oxon
Hill. Wise is averaging 55 points a game
since its 15-13 victory over Calvert Hall five
weeks ago.
Next: Friday at Eleanor Roosevelt, 7 p.m.
After the Falcons tied the game on a 44-yard
touchdown catch by Sy’Veon Wilkerson, Latrele Palmer’s overtime touchdown run sealed
a 20-14 win at DeMatha.
Next: Friday vs. Carroll, 7 p.m.
Senior quarterback A.J. Felton accounted
for five touchdowns for the second straight
week in a 41-14 win over Woodbridge.
Next: Friday at Potomac, 7 p.m.
16. Friendship Collegiate (4-3) LR: 15
9. Spalding (4-2) LW: 9
After three straight losses, the Knights beat
Riverdale Baptist, 16-13, on Saturday.
Next: Saturday vs. Fort Hill, 12 p.m.
On senior day, the Eagles beat Carroll, 41-8,
to improve to 3-0 in the WCAC.
Next: Oct. 27 at Good Counsel, 7 p.m.
Junior quarterback Jayden Umbarger rushed
for nearly 200 yards as the Cavaliers beat
Calvert Hall, 34-17.
Next: Friday vs. St. Frances, 7 p.m.
3. Damascus (7-0) LR: 3
10. North Point (7-0) LR: 10
In their closest game since the season
opener, the Swarmin’ Hornets beat Watkins
Mill, 42-18.
Next: Friday at Walter Johnson, 6:30 p.m.
In a 35-0 win over St. Charles, the Eagles
allowed 72 yards of total offense for their third
shutout victory of the season.
Next: Friday vs. Leonardtown, 7 p.m.
4. St. John’s (4-2) LR: 4
11. C.H. Flowers (7-0) LR: 11
The Cadets led 28-0 after the first quarter of
a 49-0 win over McNamara for their first
shutout of the season.
Next: Friday vs. DeMatha, 7 p.m.
The Jaguars narrowly avoided a stunning
defeat to a Friendly team with one win but
picked up a 14-12 victory.
Next: Saturday vs. Suitland, 2 p.m.
5. Stone Bridge (7-0) LR: 6
12. Madison (6-2) LW: 12
Senior wide receiver Daniel Thompson had
his 12th touchdown catch of the year as the
Bulldogs pummeled Rock Ridge, 48-7.
Next: Friday at Tuscarora, 7 p.m.
The Warhawks did all of their scoring in the
first half of a 49-7 win over Chantilly.
Next: Oct. 27 vs. Oakton, 7 p.m.
Seven players had a rushing attempt as the
Cougars ran for 194 yards and three scores in
a 47-0 win over Einstein.
Next: Friday at Wheaton, 6:30 p.m.
13. South Lakes (6-1) LW: 14
20. Broad Run (7-0) LW: 19
Senior running back Albert Mensah carried
the ball 10 times for 81 yards and two touchdowns in a 44-0 win over Washington-Lee.
Next: Friday vs. McLean, 7 p.m.
Sophomore running back Tim Baldwin surpassed 1,000 rushing yards on the season as
the Spartans beat Parkdale, 44-6.
Next: Friday vs. Freedom-South Riding,
7 p.m.
2. Gonzaga (7-1) LR: 2
17. H.D. Woodson (5-2) LW: 16
Senior running back Mychale Salahuddin
ran for 155 yards and a touchdown on 10
carries as the Warriors beat Eastern, 32-0.
Next: Saturday vs. Dunbar, 6 p.m.
18. Bullis (6-0) LW: 17
Eric McKan carried the ball 21 times for 96
yards and a touchdown as the Bullis defense
dominated in a 21-6 win over Landon on
Saturday.
Next: Saturday at Episcopal, 2 p.m.
19. Quince Orchard (6-1) LW: 18
6. Westfield (7-0) LW: 7
Sophomore quarterback Noah Kim threw
for 238 yards and four touchdowns as the
Bulldogs beat Oakton, 34-14.
Next: Friday at Centreville, 7 p.m.
14. DeMatha (4-3) LR: 5
7. Centreville (6-1) LW: 8
The Wildcats did not play this past weekend
ahead of next week’s showdown with Westfield.
Next: Friday vs. Westfield, 7 p.m.
able in his second year starting in
Grier’s offense, the Warriors have
more balance.
Sherwood (6-1) hosts Paint
Branch (6-1) on Friday at 7 p.m.
— Callie Caplan
The Stags led late but dropped to 0-2 at home
in the WCAC after an overtime loss to Good
Counsel.
Next: Friday at St. John’s, 7 p.m.
West Potomac goes big
Here was the challenge for
Coach Jeremiah Ross this week:
His West Potomac team hadn’t
lost back-to-back games since October 2014. After tough games
against Centreville and T.C. Wil-
Dropped out: None
On the bubble: Northern (7-0), Tuscarora
(6-1), Sherwood (6-1), National Collegiate
(8-0), Broadneck (7-0), Flint Hill (6-0)
dillon.mullan@washpost.com
liams, how could he avoid making
history by dropping three
straight?
In a 47-6 win over Annandale
on Friday, the answer came in the
form of big plays. Wide receivers
Duran Etheredge and Deandre
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?"
FROM
TD
14
10
16
9
15
16
18
10
8
8
11
11
11
6
12
8
10
3
6
8
Webb each caught touchdown
passes of more than 40 yards
from quarterback Tanner Jones,
and the third of running back
Daiimon Cleveland’s three rushing scores went for 69 yards.
“It can be really hard for a high
G. Saylor, Wootton
T. Heltzel, Mount Vernon
A. Yenican, Stuart
N. Barts, Loudoun County
M. Tatum, Stone Bridge
T. Jarman, Dominion
K. Doyle, St. John's
B. Johnson, Heritage
R. St. John, Bell
D. Bonner, Quince Orchard
M. Janis, Churchill
M. Tull, South County
M. Byers, Hayfield
T. Ruffin, Springbrook
D. Rollins, Oxon Hill
P. Jones, Edison
B. Burton, Woodgrove
S. Davis, Broadneck
J. Forburger, Walter Johnson
T. Marchiando, Fairfax
Cmp-Att
140-223
74-137
94-154
108-186
65-115
90-136
75-123
94-183
68-130
66-95
96-143
77-127
77-120
68-131
73-111
61-104
84-118
71-111
67-102
118-179
Yds
2,384
1,597
1,580
1,475
1,470
1,466
1,378
1,336
1,318
1,293
1,183
1,163
1,126
1,092
1,078
1,077
1,034
1,028
1,021
1,017
TD
25
16
16
24
19
16
12
14
21
14
11
15
16
9
11
11
10
10
10
5
Top receivers
N. Miller, Wootton
E. Trent, Wootton
D. Thompson, Stone Bridge
E. Jeffries, Stuart
B. Castellano, Woodgrove
D. Newton, Mount Vernon
D. Spalding, South County
A. Diomande, Walter Johnson
N. Datis, Blair
D. Easley, Stuart
T. Wall, Yorktown
B. Cobbs, Hayfield
D. Alexander, Richard Montgomery
S. Alston, South Lakes
D. Patterson, Yorktown
J. Hardy, National Christian
D. Burke, Mount Vernon
B. McGonagle, Quince Orchard
G. Richardson, Dominion
G. Moore, Churchill
Rec Yds TD
54 1,008 12
52 933 8
29 837 12
46 782 6
56 743 8
31 670 7
30 647 8
27 568 6
40 559 6
24 546 8
35 529 7
39 507 9
20 492 6
19 474 8
20 453 8
17 452 7
14 448 4
18 446 7
18 444 7
23 428 3
school offense to put together a
12-, 14-play drive sometimes,”
Ross said. “Sometimes it’s easier
to just give your athletes the ball
in space and watch them make
something happen.”
The blowout win began with a
scoreless first quarter. But a 27point second not only assured a
bounce-back win for the Wolverines but also distanced the team
from what Ross is hoping will be
the worst stretch of their season.
“Week in, week out, we don’t get
a lot of breaks,” Ross said. “But we
need to take it one week at a time.”
— Michael Errigo
No respect?
National Collegiate, a public
charter school of roughly 300 students, doesn’t have the football
pedigree of some of the district’s
traditional powerhouses. Coming
off a 16-6 victory over KIPP on
Saturday, the 8-0 Panthers believe
they don’t get the respect their
record commands.
“It allows us to play with a chip
on our shoulders knowing that
we’re overlooked,” senior wide receiver Andre Ross Jr. said. “I think
that’s what makes us play to the
level that we’re playing on.”
Ross can relate on a personal
level. Despite his 6-foot-3 frame,
his 14-touchdown junior campaign and his 17 touchdowns so
far this season, he has only recently seen a spike in interest from
colleges.
“I go to a small school, but I feel
like I’m one of the best receivers in
D.C., and my stats don’t lie,” Ross
said. “It makes me play harder,
play with more passion, more
emotion.”
— Dan Roth
hss@washpost.com
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DeMatha has lost two straight
regular season games for the first
time in Coach Elijah Brooks’s seven-year tenure. But the Stags
shouldn’t be counted out in the
Washington Catholic Athletic
Conference. Just ask their rivals.
That the Stags have started
slow is noteworthy considering
recent history. DeMatha didn’t
lose a game last season, and it
dropped just one — a 24-14 defeat
to Gonzaga — in 2015. But WCAC
coaches are hardly ready to write
off the four-time defending conference champions.
“I’d put money down that DeMatha will still be in the championship,” Good Counsel Coach
Andy Stefanelli said.
“I don’t think it affects anything,” Gonzaga Coach Randy
Trivers said. “We’re talking about
the regular season.”
Nevertheless, there’s a sense of
urgency surrounding DeMatha,
which lost to Good Counsel, 20-14,
in overtime this past weekend after falling to Gonzaga, 26-20, a
week earlier.
Wide receiver Dominic Lyles
labeled the rest of the Stags’
games as “must-wins,” starting
with this weekend at St. John’s
(4-2). Sitting at 0-2 in the WCAC,
DeMatha (4-3) closes the regular
season with games against McNamara (0-7) and Carroll (3-4).
Yet even if the Cadets win this
weekend, it’s unlikely DeMatha
misses the cut as one of four teams
to qualify for the playoffs in the
six-team league. St. John’s, Gonzaga and Good Counsel are likely
to fill the other three spots.
During a team meeting Sunday,
Lyles said, Brooks faced his team
and urged his players not to panic.
The Stags might be in a hole, but
it’s not the first time they have
faced adversity.
Besides, there were glimpses of
greatness in the two losses. Lyles
attributed the Gonzaga loss to a
failure to start fast and the Good
Counsel loss to a failure to capitalize in the red zone.
“When your back is against the
wall, you must go to your instincts
and do what you do best,” Lyles
said. “And what DeMatha does
best is execute and effort.”
The Stags still have running
back Myles Miree. They still have
Lyles and defensive tackle Austin
Fontaine and a roster generally
considered the envy of the area.
“If DeMatha goes and wins every game in the postseason,” Trivers said, “then who really cares if
they lost two in a row in the
regular season?”
Att Yds
161 1,384
182 1,357
117 1,286
212 1,172
88 1,170
163 1,093
143 1,055
129 958
139 937
145 924
125 922
82 852
121 838
130 812
118 796
85 796
94 793
119 786
101 770
40 762
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D11
M2
scoreboard
FOOTBA LL
BASEBALL
HOCKEY
B AS K E TBALL
NFL
NFC individual leaders
MLB postseason
NHL
NBA
NFC
Through Sunday’s games
WILD CARD
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 5
Washington .................. 3
Dallas ............................ 2
N.Y. Giants .................... 1
L
1
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.600
.400
.167
PF
165
117
125
105
PA
122
113
132
132
SOUTH
W
Carolina ......................... 4
New Orleans ................. 3
Atlanta .......................... 3
Tampa Bay .................... 2
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.600
.400
PF
128
145
121
118
PA
122
116
109
121
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 4
Green Bay ..................... 4
Detroit .......................... 3
Chicago ......................... 2
L
2
2
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.667
.500
.333
PF
122
147
161
105
PA
103
135
149
148
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 4
Seattle .......................... 3
Arizona ......................... 3
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
2
3
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.500
.000
PF
179
110
119
113
PA
138
87
158
146
EAST
W
New England ................. 4
Buffalo .......................... 3
Miami ............................ 3
N.Y. Jets ....................... 3
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.600
.500
PF
172
89
61
109
PA
159
74
84
130
SOUTH
W
Tennessee ..................... 3
Jacksonville .................. 3
Houston ........................ 3
Indianapolis .................. 2
L
3
3
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.500
.500
.500
.333
PF
146
156
177
119
PA
164
110
147
195
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 4
Baltimore ...................... 3
Cincinnati ...................... 2
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
3
3
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.500
.400
.000
PF
118
114
84
94
PA
102
124
83
157
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 5
Denver ........................... 3
L.A. Chargers ................ 2
Oakland ......................... 2
L
1
2
4
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.600
.333
.333
PF
177
108
116
124
PA
130
97
131
126
AFC
Att
Palmer, ARI .................... 249
Wentz, PHL..................... 207
Goff, LA .......................... 185
Newton, CAR .................. 197
Manning, NYG ................ 221
Stafford, DET.................. 225
A. Rodgers, GBY ............. 193
M. Ryan, ATL .................. 170
Cousins, WAS................. 158
Brees, NOR ..................... 183
Com
154
126
111
127
148
136
128
112
105
126
Yds
1856
1584
1484
1476
1466
1428
1385
1357
1334
1321
TD
9
13
8
9
9
12
13
6
9
10
Int
6
3
3
8
5
4
3
6
2
2
Yds
521
495
393
390
360
354
353
342
284
247
Avg
4.2
4.2
3.7
5.6
4.2
4.8
4.5
3.8
4.2
2.9
LG
29
53
30
68
61
33
44
34
51
17
TD
4
4
2
1
4
2
5
1
2
0
Yds
489
465
434
405
395
371
371
367
363
340
Avg
12.9
11.1
13.2
11.9
17.2
13.7
14.3
14.7
10.1
18.9
LG
45
37
59
53
59t
41
43
34
45t
74
TD
0
3
0
4
4
3
1
0
2
2
Yds
261
138
72
70
83
124
61
113
60
75
Avg Long
23.7 88t
12.5 39
10.3 17
10.0 27
9.2
33
8.9
21
7.6
21
7.5
25
7.5
17
6.8
21
TD
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Yds
476
312
163
215
188
Avg LG
31.7 103t
26.0 39
23.3 28
21.5 61
20.9 30
TD
1
0
0
0
0
229
20.8
29
0
223
242
20.3
20.2
28
34
0
0
RUSHERS
Att
Gurley, LA ....................... 123
J. Howard, CHI ................ 118
E. Elliott, DAL ................. 105
Blount, PHL....................... 70
Hyde, SNF ......................... 86
Cook, MIN ......................... 74
D. Freeman, ATL............... 79
Abdullah, DET................... 90
Ingram, NOR ..................... 67
Stewart, CAR.................... 85
RECEIVERS
No
Thielen, MIN ..................... 38
Fitzgerald, ARI.................. 42
Garcon, SNF ...................... 33
Ertz, PHL........................... 34
S. Diggs, MIN.................... 23
Mi. Evans, TAM ................ 27
Benjamin, CAR.................. 26
Ju. Jones, ATL .................. 25
Tate, DET .......................... 36
C. Thompson, WAS........... 18
PUNT RETURNERS
THURSDAY’S RESULT
No
Agnew, DET ...................... 11
T. Taylor, SNF ................... 11
Reedy, TAM ........................ 7
A. Roberts, ATL .................. 7
Tr. Davis, GBY..................... 9
Cohen, CHI ........................ 14
Switzer, DAL ...................... 8
McCaffrey, CAR ................ 15
Ginn, NOR ........................... 8
Sherels, MIN..................... 11
Philadelphia 28, at Carolina 23
KICKOFF RETURNERS
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
No
P. Cooper, LA .................... 15
McKinnon, MIN................. 12
Switzer, DAL ...................... 7
A. Roberts, ATL ................ 10
Dw. Harris, NYG ................. 9
Deonte Thompson,
...... 11
CHI ..............................
Ke. Williams, ARI ............. 11
Bolden, SNF ...................... 12
Miami 20, at Atlanta 17
at Houston 33, Cleveland 17
New England 24, at N.Y. Jets 17
at Minnesota 23, Green Bay 10
Chicago 27, at Baltimore 24, OT
at Washington 26, San Francisco 24
at New Orleans 52, Detroit 38
L.A. Rams 27, at Jacksonville 17
at Arizona 38, Tampa Bay 33
L.A. Chargers 17, at Oakland 16
Pittsburgh 19, at Kansas City 13
N.Y. Giants 23, at Denver 10
BYES: Buffalo, Dallas, Seattle, Cincinnati
Tuesday, Oct. 3: New York 8, Minnesota 4
Wednesday, Oct. 4: Arizona 11, Colorado 8
QUARTERBACKS
KICKING
PAT
Zuerlein, LA ................... 18/18
Gano, CAR...................... 11/12
Gould, SNF......................... 8/9
Jak. Elliott, PHL............. 13/13
Lutz, NOR ...................... 16/16
Prater, DET .................... 15/15
Forbath, MIN ................. 11/13
M. Bryant, ATL .............. 13/13
Dawson, ARI .................. 11/11
Hopkins, WAS ............... 12/13
MONDAY’S RESULTS
at Tennessee 36, Indianapolis 22
THURSDAY’S GAME
Kansas City at Oakland, 8:25
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Baltimore at Minnesota, 1
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 1
New Orleans at Green Bay, 1
Tennessee at Cleveland, 1
N.Y. Jets at Miami, 1
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 1
Arizona vs L.A. Rams, in London, 1
Carolina at Chicago, 1
Dallas at San Francisco, 4:05
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 4:25
Seattle at N.Y. Giants, 4:25
Denver at L.A. Chargers, 4:25
Atlanta at New England, 8:30
BYES: Detroit, Houston
FG
17/18
15/16
15/16
12/14
11/14
10/12
11/12
10/11
10/14
9/11
LG
56
48
52
61
50
58
53
53
50
48
Pts
69
56
53
49
49
45
44
43
41
39
AFC individual leaders
Through Sunday’s games
QUARTERBACKS
Att
Brady, NE........................ 233
Al. Smith, KC .................. 192
Rivers, LAC ..................... 230
Roethlisberger, PIT ........ 220
McCown, NYJ.................. 194
D. Watson, HOU ............. 174
Siemian, DEN.................. 176
Dalton, CIN ..................... 159
Bortles, JAC.................... 170
Flacco, BAL ..................... 185
MONDAY’S GAME
Washington at Philadelphia, 8:30
Com
153
140
141
137
136
107
108
104
97
116
Yds
1959
1637
1633
1521
1374
1297
1264
1220
1068
1003
TD
13
12
10
7
7
15
8
7
8
4
Int
2
0
5
8
6
5
6
6
5
8
RUSHERS
Tennessee: FG Succop 48, 11:15.
Indianapolis: FG Vinatieri 36, 6:45.
Tennessee: FG Succop 32, :47.
Att
K. Hunt, KC ..................... 106
Fournette, JAC ............... 130
Bell, PIT .......................... 134
Ajayi, MIA....................... 102
L. Miller, HOU ................... 98
Gordon, LAC...................... 99
C.. Anderson, DEN ............ 82
A. Collins, BAL.................. 52
Gillislee, NE ...................... 79
Ja. Allen, BAL ................... 76
SECOND QUARTER
RECEIVERS
Indianapolis: Doyle 8 pass from Brissett (Vinatieri
kick), 10:54.
Tennessee: FG Succop 40, 4:10.
Indianapolis: FG Vinatieri 25, :14.
No
A. Brown, PIT.................... 48
A. Green, CIN .................... 32
Cooks, NE.......................... 24
T. Hilton, IND.................... 24
K. Allen, LAC..................... 33
Gronkowski, NE ................ 26
Kelce, KC........................... 33
T. Hill, KC .......................... 30
D. Hopkins, HOU ............... 37
Dem. Thomas, DEN........... 28
Titans 36, Colts 22
COLTS ...................................... 3
TITANS ..................................... 6
10
3
6
6
3 — 22
21 — 36
FIRST QUARTER
THIRD QUARTER
Indianapolis: Simon 26 interception return (kick failed),
13:50.
Tennessee: FG Succop 48, 9:43.
Tennessee: FG Succop 23, 4:35.
FOURTH QUARTER
Tennessee: Murray 3 run (Succop kick), 10:01.
Indianapolis: FG Vinatieri 52, 7:27.
Tennessee: Taylor 53 pass from Mariota (Succop kick),
5:29.
Tennessee: Henry 72 run (Succop kick), :47.
Attendance: 63,888.
COLTS
First Downs .......................................... 18
Total Net Yards ................................... 297
Rushes-Yards ................................. 20-85
Passing ................................................ 212
Punt Returns ....................................... 0-0
Kickoff Returns ............................... 5-157
Interceptions Ret. ............................. 1-26
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 21-37-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 0-0
Punts .............................................. 3-53.3
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 1-1
Penalties-Yards ................................ 5-51
Time Of Possession ......................... 24:07
TITANS
25
473
34-168
305
2-15
2-46
0-0
23-32-1
1-1
1-44.0
0-0
4-45
35:53
RUSHING
Indianapolis: Gore 10-49, Mack 2-18, Brissett 5-15,
Turbin 3-3.
Tennessee: Henry 19-131, Murray 12-40, Mariota 2-0,
D.Walker 1-(minus 3).
PASSING
Indianapolis: Brissett 21-37-0-212.
Tennessee: Mariota 23-32-1-306.
RECEIVING
Indianapolis: Doyle 7-50, Moncrief 5-67, Turbin 4-37,
Aiken 2-21, Gore 2-18, Hilton 1-19.
Tennessee: Decker 7-88, Matthews 4-69, Murray 4-47,
D.Walker 4-17, Taylor 2-61, Henry 1-14, J.Smith 1-10.
Avg
5.9
4.6
4.1
3.8
3.8
3.6
4.2
6.4
3.7
3.7
LG
69t
90t
27
20
19
21
40
50
16
37
TD
4
6
4
0
1
3
1
0
4
1
Yds
700
504
472
466
446
401
390
390
382
380
Avg
14.6
15.8
19.7
19.4
13.5
15.4
11.8
13.0
10.3
13.6
LG
51t
77t
54
63
50
53t
44
75t
34t
40
TD
2
3
2
1
1
4
2
2
6
0
No
Amendola, NE..................... 9
Campanaro, BAL............... 14
T. Hill, KC .......................... 11
Tate, BUF............................ 8
A. Jackson, TEN................ 11
McKenzie, DEN ................. 14
Ervin, HOU .......................... 8
Erickson, CIN .................... 20
J. Grant, MIA ...................... 9
Peppers, CLE..................... 17
Yds
132
193
139
96
128
139
60
139
61
109
Avg Long
14.7 40
13.8 77t
12.6 82t
12.0 40
11.6 46
9.9
31
7.5
21
7.0
26
6.8
14
6.4
25
TD
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
KICKOFF RETURNERS
No
Patterson, OAK .................. 9
A. Hunt, KC ......................... 8
Erickson, CIN ...................... 7
A. Jackson, TEN.................. 7
Bray, IND ............................ 8
D. Lewis, NE........................ 8
Rushing
Att
Thompson ............................... 36
Perine ...................................... 55
Kelley ...................................... 29
Cousins .................................... 19
M.Brown ................................... 8
Crowder ..................................... 1
Paul ........................................... 1
Team ..................................... 149
Opp. ....................................... 110
TD
9
9
6
Int Rtg
2 106.4
2 106.0
5 81.0
Yds Avg Lg
175 4.9 61t
166 3.0 12
131 4.5 21
103 5.4 18
29 3.6 11
11 11.0 11
-1 -1.0 -1
614 4.1 61t
440 4.0 32
Receiving
No. Yds
Thompson ............................... 18 340
Reed ........................................ 18 142
Crowder ................................... 17 121
Pryor ........................................ 16 209
Grant ....................................... 13 158
Davis ....................................... 11 225
Perine ........................................ 5 30
Doctson ..................................... 4 90
M.Brown ................................... 1 11
Quick ......................................... 1 11
Paul ........................................... 1 -3
Kelley ........................................ 0
0
Team ..................................... 105 1334
Opp. ....................................... 110 1244
Avg Lg
18.9 74
7.9 16
7.1 30
13.1 44t
12.2 34
20.5 69
6.0 16
22.5 52t
11.0 11
11.0 11
-3.0
0
0.0
0
12.7 74
11.3 69
TD
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
4
TD
2
0
0
1
2
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
9
6
Yds
278
226
184
154
162
156
Avg
30.9
28.2
26.3
22.0
20.2
19.5
LG
49
42
41
48
30
26
TD
0
0
0
0
0
0
KICKING
PAT
Gostkowski, NE ............. 17/18
Myers, JAC .................... 15/17
Fairbairn, HOU............... 15/17
Boswell, PIT................... 11/11
Succop, TEN................... 11/11
Catanzaro, NYJ.............. 10/10
Hauschka, BUF .................. 8/8
Tavecchio, OAK.............. 13/14
Tucker, BAL ................... 10/10
Butker, KC.......................... 6/6
McManus, DEN .............. 12/12
FG
13/14
11/15
10/10
11/13
11/12
11/13
11/12
9/9
10/12
10/11
8/13
LG
58
47
50
49
52
57
56
52
50
49
46
Pts
56
48
45
44
44
43
41
40
40
36
36
INTs
No. Yds TD Sacks
Fuller ....................... 2
3 0 Smith
Kerrigan .................. 1 24 1 Ioannidis
Foster ...................... 1 10 0 Kerrigan
Nicholson ................ 1
0 0 Allen
McClain
Galette
Hood
Swearinger
Team
5 37 1 Team
Opp.
2 15 0 Opp.
No.
4.5
3.5
3.5
1.0
1.0
0.5
0.5
0.5
15.0
8.0
Punting
No.
Way .................................... 21
Team .................................. 21
Opp. .................................... 24
In20
10
10
11
Avg.
44.6
44.6
45.0
Net
39.5
39.5
42.3
Scoring
TD XP-Att FG-Att
Hopkins .......................... 0 12-13
9-11
Thompson ...................... 4
0-0
0-0
Doctson .......................... 2
0-0
0-0
Grant .............................. 2
0-0
0-0
Cousins ........................... 1
0-0
0-0
Davis .............................. 1
0-0
0-0
Kerrigan ......................... 1
0-0
0-0
Perine ............................. 1
0-0
0-0
Pryor ............................... 1
0-0
0-0
Team ............................ 13 12-13
9-11
Opp. .............................. 12
9-10 10-12
S
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Pts
39
24
12
12
6
6
6
6
6
117
113
THURSDAY
No. 25 Memphis at Houston, 8
SATURDAY
No. 1 Alabama vs. Tennessee, 3:30
No. 2 Penn State vs. No. 19 Michigan, 7:30
No. 4 TCU vs. Kansas, 8
No. 5 Wisconsin vs. Maryland, Noon
No. 8 Miami vs. Syracuse, 3:30
No. 9 Oklahoma at Kansas State, 4
No. 10 Oklahoma State at Texas, Noon
No. 11 Southern Cal at No. 13 Notre Dame, 7:30
No. 14 Virginia Tech vs. North Carolina, 3:30
No. 15 Washington State vs. Colorado, 10:45
No. 16 South Florida at Tulane, 7
No. 18 Michigan State vs. Indiana, 3:30
No. 20 UCF at Navy, 3:30
No. 21 Auburn at Arkansas, 7:30
No. 23 West Virginia at Baylor, 8
No. 24 LSU at Mississippi, 7:15
James Madison (26)
North Dakota State
Jacksonville State
South Dakota
Wofford
Central Arkansas
Sam Houston State
Eastern Washington
Youngstown State
Richmond
North Carolina A&T
Western Illinois
South Dakota State
Samford
Elon
Villanova
Grambling State
New Hampshire
McNeese
Nicholls
Western Carolina
Northern Arizona
Weber State
Illinois State
Montana
Thursday, Oct. 5: Houston 8, Boston 2
Friday, Oct. 6: Houston 8, Boston 2
Sunday, Oct. 8: Boston 10, Houston 3
Monday, Oct. 9: Houston 5, Boston 4
NEW YORK 3, CLEVELAND 2
Thursday, Oct. 5: Cleveland 4, New York 0
Friday, Oct. 6: Cleveland 9, New York 8, 13 innings
Sunday, Oct. 8: New York 1, Cleveland 0
Monday, Oct. 9: New York 7, Cleveland 3
Wednesday, Oct. 11: New York 5, Cleveland 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE DIVISION SERIES
CHICAGO 3, WASHINGTON 2
OL PTS.
0
8
0
8
1
7
1
7
0
6
1
5
1
3
0
2
GF
16
21
20
23
21
15
7
13
GA
11
13
25
22
15
18
8
21
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay ...................... 5
Toronto ........................... 4
Ottawa ............................ 3
Detroit ............................ 4
Florida ............................. 2
Boston ............................. 2
Montreal ......................... 1
Buffalo ............................ 1
L
1
1
0
2
2
3
3
4
OL PTS.
0
10
0
8
2
8
0
8
0
4
0
4
1
3
1
3
GF
23
26
20
20
16
14
8
14
GA
18
19
10
15
15
18
17
23
CENTRAL
W
Chicago ........................... 4
Colorado .......................... 4
St. Louis .......................... 4
Winnipeg ........................ 3
Nashville ......................... 2
Minnesota ....................... 1
Dallas .............................. 2
L
1
2
2
2
2
1
3
OL PTS.
1
9
0
8
0
8
0
6
1
5
2
4
0
4
GF
25
19
18
16
14
15
11
GA
13
13
16
18
16
16
13
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................... 4
Vegas .............................. 4
Calgary ............................ 4
Anaheim ......................... 2
Vancouver ....................... 1
Edmonton ....................... 1
San Jose .......................... 1
Arizona ........................... 0
L
0
1
2
3
2
3
3
4
OL PTS.
1
9
0
8
0
8
1
5
1
3
0
2
0
2
1
1
GF
16
15
17
12
9
8
8
11
GA
9
11
17
17
14
14
14
22
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Friday, Oct. 6: Chicago 3, Washington 0
Saturday, Oct. 7: Washington 6, Chicago 3
Monday, Oct. 9: Chicago 2, Washington 1
Tuesday, Oct. 10: Washington at Chicago, ppd., rain
Wednesday, Oct. 11: Washington 5, Chicago 0
Thursday, Oct. 12: Chicago 9, Washington 8
LOS ANGELES 3, ARIZONA 0
Friday, Oct. 6: Los Angeles 9, Arizona 5
Saturday, Oct. 7: Los Angeles 8, Arizona 5
Monday, Oct. 9: Los Angeles 3, Arizona 1
AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
Best of seven
HOUSTON 2, NEW YORK 1
Friday, Oct. 13: Houston 2, New York 1
Saturday, Oct. 14: Houston 2, New York 1
Monday, Oct. 16: at New York 8, Houston 1
Tuesday, Oct. 17: Houston (Peacock 13-2 or McCullers
7-4) at New York (Gray 10-12), 5:08 (FS1)
Wednesday, Oct. 18: Houston at New York, 5:08 (FS1)
x-Friday, Oct. 20: New York at Houston, 8:08 (FS1)
x-Saturday, Oct. 21: New York at Houston, 8:08 (FS1)
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Vegas 3, Boston 1
Buffalo 3, Anaheim 1
Los Angeles 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
LOS ANGELES 2, CHICAGO 0
MONDAY’S RESULT
Saturday, Oct. 14: Los Angeles 5, Chicago 2
Sunday, Oct. 15: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 1
Tuesday, Oct. 17: Los Angeles (Darvish 10-12) at
Chicago (Hendricks (7-5), 9:08 (TBS)
Wednesday, Oct. 18: Los Angeles (Wood 16-3) at
Chicago (Arrieta (14-10), 9:08 (TBS)
x-Thursday, Oct. 19: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8:08 (TBS)
x-Saturday, Oct. 21: Chicago at Los Angeles, 4:08 or 8:08
(TBS)
x-Sunday, Oct. 22: Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:38 (TBS)
TUESDAY’S GAMES
WORLD SERIES
Best of seven
Game 1: Tuesday, Oct. 24
Game 2: Wednesday, Oct. 25
Game 3: Friday, Oct. 27
Game 4: Saturday, Oct. 28
Game 5: x-Sunday, Oct. 29
Game 6: x-Tuesday, Oct. 31
Game 7: x-Wednesday, Nov. 1
H
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
4
BI BB SO AVG
0 1 2 .091
1 1 1 .222
0 1 1 .417
0 0 1 .364
0 0 1 .222
0 1 0 .000
0 1 1 .000
0 1 0 .000
0 1 0
--0 1 0 .333
1 8 7
—
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf .......................3
Judge rf ..........................3
Gregorius ss...................4
Sanchez c .......................4
Bird 1b............................3
Castro 2b........................4
Hicks cf...........................4
Frazier 3b .......................2
Headley dh .....................3
TOTALS
30
R
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
2
1
8
H
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
7
BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 .200
3 1 2 .200
0 0 0 .167
0 0 0 .000
0 1 1 .300
0 0 1 .273
0 0 0 .182
3 1 0 .250
1 0 1 .167
7 3 6
—
HOUSTON ...................000
NEW YORK .................030
000 001 —
500 00X —
1
8
4
7
0
1
ASTROS AT YANKEES, 5:00
W-L
ERA
TEAM
0-0
0.00
0-0
10-12
3.55
12-16
TBD ( )
Gray (R)
Today's NL game
RECORD
6-0
6-0
5-1
6-0
6-0
5-1
5-1
5-2
3-3
4-2
7-0
5-1
4-2
4-2
5-1
4-3
5-1
4-2
5-1
5-2
5-2
4-2
4-2
4-2
5-2
PTS
650
624
589
575
539
516
470
467
389
388
382
366
315
259
243
223
217
191
189
127
125
102
90
79
58
Darvish (R)
Hendricks (R)
W-L
ERA
TEAM
10-12
3.88
15-17
7-5
3.03
14-12
Dodgers 4, Cubs 1
Late Sunday
CHICAGO
AB
Jay lf...............................4
Bryant 3b........................4
Rizzo 1b..........................3
Contreras c .....................4
Almora cf........................4
Russell ss .......................3
Heyward rf .....................3
Martin cf ........................0
Baez 2b...........................2
Lester p ..........................2
Zobrist rf ........................1
TOTALS
30
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
H
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
3
BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 .143
0 0 2 .125
0 0 2 .000
0 0 3 .125
0 0 1 .143
1 0 2 .167
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0
--0 1 1 .000
0 0 1 .500
0 0 0 .000
1 1 12
—
L.A.
AB
Taylor cf .........................3
Turner 3b........................4
Bellinger 1b ....................3
Hernandez lf...................1
Utley ph..........................1
Pederson lf .....................0
Forsythe 2b ....................3
Barnes c..........................4
Puig rf.............................1
Culberson ss...................3
Hill p ...............................1
Granderson ph-lf............2
Farmer ph.......................1
TOTALS
27
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
4
H
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
5
BI BB SO AVG
0 2 0 .286
4 1 0 .375
0 1 0 .429
0 1 0 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0
--0 1 1 .200
0 0 1 .000
0 3 1 .400
0 0 0 .400
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 1 .000
4 9 6
—
CHICAGO.....................000
L.A...............................000
010
010
000 —
003 —
1
4
3
5
0
0
PVS
1
2
3
4
5
6
t9
t9
8
13
11
17
7
18
20
14
19
12
21
23
25
24
16
15
NR
Others receiving votes: Stony Brook 50, Northern Iowa
49, Kennesaw State 40, N.C. Central 31, Monmouth 29,
The Citadel 22, Southern Utah 16, Delaware 13, Saint
Francis 10, Dartmouth 7, Alcorn State 5, Albany 4, SE
Louisiana 1.
L.A.
IP
Hill....................................5
Morrow ............................2
Fields ............................0.1
Watson .........................0.2
Jansen..............................1
H
3
0
0
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 1 8 1.80
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
WP: Jansen (1-0); LP: Duensing (0-1). Inherited runners-scored: Edwards 2-0, Lackey 1-1. HBP: Jansen
(Rizzo). WP: Hill. T: 3:20. A: 54,479 (56,000).
BOXING
Fight Schedule
THURSDAY
At Monte Carlo Resort and Casino, Las Vegas (ESPN),
Gabriel Rosado vs. Glen Tapia, 10, middleweights;
Alejandro Barrera vs. KeAndre Gibson, 10, welterweights.
SATURDAY
At SSE Arena, Belfast, Northern Ireland (NBO), Ryan
Burnett vs. Zhanat Zhakiyanov, 12, for Burnett’s IBF and
Zhakiyanov’s WBA Super World bantamweight titles; ;
Tommy Coyle vs. Tyrone McKenna, 12, super lightweights; James Tennyson vs. Darren Traynor, 12, for
WBA International super featherweight title.
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
CENTRAL
W
Chicago ........................................0
Cleveland .....................................0
Detroit .........................................0
Indiana .........................................0
Milwaukee ...................................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
SOUTHWEST
W
Dallas ...........................................0
Houston .......................................0
Memphis ......................................0
New Orleans ................................0
San Antonio .................................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
NORTHWEST
W
Denver..........................................0
Minnesota....................................0
Oklahoma City .............................0
Portland .......................................0
Utah .............................................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
PACIFIC
W
Golden State................................0
L.A. Clippers.................................0
L.A. Lakers ...................................0
Phoenix ........................................0
Sacramento .................................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Detroit at Washington, 7
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7
Boston at Philadelphia, 7
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 7
Portland at Indiana, 7
Orlando at Brooklyn, 7:30
Utah at Minnesota, 8
Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30
Golden State at New Orleans, 9:30
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10
Lightning 3, Red Wings 2
TAMPA BAY ............................ 2
DETROIT .................................. 0
0
2
1 —
0 —
FIRST PERIOD
ATP/WTA
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Johnson 3, 9:15 (sh). 2, Tampa
Bay, Kucherov 6 (Hedman, Stamkos), 10:56 (pp).
VTB KREMLIN CUP
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Detroit, Abdelkader 2, 2:30. 4, Detroit, Green
1 (Abdelkader, Tatar), 16:02.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 7 (Namestnikov,
Stamkos), 1:47.
SHOTS ON GOAL
NHL leaders
POINTS
PLAYER
GP
Nicklas Backstrom, Washington ............ 6
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ............ 6
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ................... 6
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia .................. 5
16 tied with 8 points
G A PTS
3 8 11
0 11 11
9 1 10
0 9
9
PLAYER
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................... 6
James Neal, Vegas
..... 5
Brandon Saad, Chicago ....................................... 6
Nikolaj Ehlers, Winnipeg .................................... 5
Filip Forsberg, Nashville .................................... 5
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay .............................. 5
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................... 5
T.J. Oshie, Washington ...................................... 6
Wayne Simmonds, Philadelphia ........................ 5
Mika Zibanejad N.Y. R, angers
..... 6
Dustin Brown, Los Angeles ................................ 5
Evander Kane, Buffalo ....................................... 6
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ................................. 5
Sonny Milano, Columbus .................................... 5
Jason Pominville, Buffalo .................................. 6
Chris Stewart, Minnesota .................................. 4
G
9
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
ASSISTS
PLAYER
GP
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ........................ 6
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia .............................. 5
Nicklas Backstrom, Washington ....................... 6
Will Butcher, New Jersey .................................. 5
Shayne Gostisbehere, Philadelphia ................... 5
Mike Green, Detroit ........................................... 5
Bryan Rust, Pittsburgh ...................................... 6
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ................................. 6
Ryan Hartman, Chicago ...................................... 6
Patrick Kane, Chicago ......................................... 6
Alex Killorn, Tampa Bay ..................................... 5
Artemi Panarin, Columbus ................................. 5
Alex Pietrangelo St., Louis
..... 6
Jaden Schwartz St., Louis
..... 6
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ............................. 5
P.K. Subban, Nashville ....................................... 5
A
11
9
8
8
8
8
7
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
POWER-PLAY GOALS
PLAYER
GP
Filip Forsberg, Nashville .................................... 5
Mika Zibanejad N.Y. R, angers
..... 6
T.J. Oshie, Washington ...................................... 6
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ........................................... 5
Wayne Simmonds, Philadelphia ........................ 5
Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh ................................. 6
Tyler Ennis, Minnesota ...................................... 4
Valtteri Filppula, Philadelphia ........................... 5
Scott Hartnell, Nashville ................................... 5
Nazem Kadri, Toronto ........................................ 5
Kevin Labanc, San Jose ...................................... 4
Vladislav NamestnikoTampa, Bay
..... 5
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................... 6
Vladimir Tarasenko St., Louis
..... 6
Chris Wideman, Ottawa ..................................... 5
Jason Zucker, Minnesota ................................... 4
James van Riemsdyk, Toronto ........................... 5
PP
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
POWER-PLAY ASSISTS
PLAYER
GP PPA
Nicklas Backstrom, Washington ....................... 6
5
Will Butcher, New Jersey .................................. 5
5
Shayne Gostisbehere, Philadelphia ................... 5
5
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia .............................. 5
5
Mike Green, Detroit ........................................... 5
4
P.K. Subban, Nashville ....................................... 5
4
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ................................. 6
3
Alex Killorn, Tampa Bay ..................................... 5
3
John Klingberg, Dallas ....................................... 5
3
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay .............................. 5
3
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ........................ 6
3
Kyle Palmieri, New Jersey ................................. 4
3
Alex Pietrangelo St., Louis
..... 6
3
Morgan Rielly, Toronto ...................................... 5
3
At Olympic Stadium in Moscow
Purse: Men: $745,940 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
MEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Borna Coric, Croatia, 6-3, 6-2; Yuki
Bhambri, India, def. Roman Safiullin, Russia, 6-2, 6-4;
Alexander Bublik, Kazakhstan, def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 6-3, 6-4.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, def. Donna Vekic,
Croatia, 6-0, 6-2; Alize Cornet, France, def. Ekaterina
Makarova, Russia, 6-3, 6-3; Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, def.
Christina McHale, United States, 7-6 (7-4), 6-3; Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Timea Babos, Hungary,
1-6, 7-6 (7-3), 6-4; Yulia Putintseva, Kazakhstan, def.
Olesya Pervushina, Russia, 7-5, 6-1.
PLUS/MINUS
PLAYER
GP
Bobby Ryan, Ottawa .......................................... 5
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ............................. 5
William Nylander, Toronto ................................ 5
Anton Stralman, Tampa Bay .............................. 5
Nikita Zaitsev, Toronto ...................................... 5
Derick Brassard, Ottawa .................................... 5
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................... 5
Patrik Nemeth, Colorado .................................... 6
Mark Stone, Ottawa ........................................... 5
+/9
8
8
8
8
7
7
7
7
T PTS
8
68
8
56
7
55
9
54
5
53
8
47
6
42
9
39
6
39
9
39
5
32
GF
72
54
61
68
51
51
50
44
50
38
30
GA
35
41
44
38
47
46
59
46
55
52
58
WESTERN
W
Vancouver ......................15
Seattle ...........................13
Portland .........................14
Sporting KC ....................12
Houston .........................12
San Jose .........................12
Dallas .............................10
Real Salt Lake ................12
Minnesota United ..........10
Colorado ...........................9
Los Angeles .....................8
L
11
9
11
8
10
14
10
15
17
18
17
T PTS
7
52
11
50
8
50
13
49
11
47
7
43
13
43
6
42
6
36
6
33
8
32
GF
49
49
58
39
54
36
43
47
45
31
44
GA
47
39
49
27
45
58
47
54
67
48
62
WEDNESDAY’S RESULT
Houston 2, Sporting KC 1
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Portland 4, D.C. United 0
Atlanta United FC 0, New York 0, tie
Chicago 3, Philadelphia 2
Columbus 1, Orlando City 0
New England 2, New York City FC 1
Toronto FC 1, Montreal 0
Colorado 1, Real Salt Lake 0
Houston 0, Sporting KC 0, tie
Los Angeles 3, Minnesota United 0
San Jose 1, Vancouver 1, tie
Seattle 4, Dallas 0
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
New York at D.C. United, 4
Chicago at Houston, 4
Colorado at Seattle, 4
Columbus at New York City FC, 4
Los Angeles at Dallas, 4
Minnesota United at San Jose, 4
New England at Montreal, 4
Orlando City at Philadelphia, 4
Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake, 4
Toronto FC at Atlanta United FC, 4
Vancouver at Portland, 4
Galaxy 3, Minnesota 0
Late Sunday
MINNESOTA
0
0
0
LOS ANGELES
2
1
3
First half: 1, Los Angeles, Alessandrini, 12 (Dos Santos),
11th minute. 2, Los Angeles, Dos Santos, 1 (Alessandrini), 22nd.
Second half: 3, Los Angeles, Alessandrini, 13 (Jones),
93rd.
Goalies: Minnesota, Bobby Shuttleworth; Los Angeles,
Clement Diop.
Yellow Cards: Thiesson, Minnesota, 44th; Warner, Minnesota, 77th; Ciani, Los Angeles, 83rd.
Minnesota, Bobby Shuttleworth; Michael Boxall, Marc
Burch, Francisco Calvo, Jerome Thiesson; Ibson, Ethan
Finlay (Johan Venegas, 78th), Collin Martin (Collen
Warner, 46th); Abu Danladi, Kevin Molino (Miguel
Ibarra, 46th), Christian Ramirez.
Los Angeles, Clement Diop; Michael Ciani, Ashley Cole,
Bradley Diallo, Dave Romney; Romain Alessandrini,
Emmanuel Boateng (Baggio Husidic, 76th), Giovani Dos
Santos (Jack McBean, 90th), Jonathan Dos Santos,
Jermaine Jones; Bradford Jamieson IV (Ariel Lassiter,
46th).
Seattle 4, Dallas 0
Late Sunday
DALLAS
0
0
0
SEATTLE
1
3
4
First half: 1, Seattle, Rodriguez, 2 (Dempsey), 31st
minute.
Second half: 2, Seattle, Bruin, 9, 64th. 3, Seattle, Bruin,
10, 67th. 4, Seattle, Neagle, 2 (Lodeiro), 92nd.
Goalies: Dallas, Jesse Gonzalez; Seattle, Stefan Frei.
Yellow Cards: Morales, Dallas, 8th.
Dallas, Jesse Gonzalez; Maynor Figueroa, Hernan Grana,
Atiba Harris, Matt Hedges; Kellyn Acosta, Michael
Barrios, Mauro Diaz (Roland Lamah, 70th), Carlos
Gruezo, Javier Morales (Maximiliano Urruti, 57th);
Tesho Akindele (Victor Ulloa, 78th).
Seattle, Stefan Frei; Kelvin Leerdam, Chad Marshall,
Roman Torres; Joevin Jones (Harry Shipp, 81st), Victor
Rodriguez (Lamar Neagle, 76th), Cristian Roldan,
Gustav Svensson (Nouhou Tolo, 23rd); Will Bruin, Clint
Dempsey, Nicolas Lodeiro.
Earthquakes 1 , Vancouver 1
Hans Podlipnik-Castillo, Chile, and A Vasilevski, Belarus,
def. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, and Andreas Seppi,
Italy, 6-2, 6-4; Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, and Igor
Zelenay, Slovakia, def. Thomas Fabbiano, Italy, and Dudi
Sela, Israel, 6-1, 7-6 (7-5); Evgeny Donskoy and Andrey
Kuznetsov, Russia, def. Konstantin Kravchuk and Andrey Rublev, Russia, 6-4, 6-3.
Late Sunday
WOMEN’S DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Nadiia Kichenok, Ukraine, and Anastasia Rodionova,
Australia, def. Irina Bara, Romania, and Chantal Skamlova, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-4; Ksenia Lykina and Polina Monova,
Russia, def. Anna Blinkova and Elena Rybakina, Russia,
6-2, 7-6 (7-5).
ATP
SAN JOSE
0
1
1
VANCOUVER
1
0
1
First half: 1, Vancouver, Reyna, 6 (Nerwinski), 29th
minute.
Second half: 2, San Jose, Qazaishvili, 5 (Wondolowski),
77th.
Goalies: San Jose, Andrew Tarbell; Vancouver, Stefan
Marinovic.
San Jose, Andrew Tarbell; Victor Bernardez, Kofi
Sarkodie; Darwin Ceren, Anibal Godoy, Jahmir Hyka,
Florian Jungwirth, Valeri Qazaishvili (Tommy Thompson, 88th), Shea Salinas; Danny Hoesen, Chris Wondolowski.
Vancouver, Stefan Marinovic; Jakob Nerwinski, Tim
Parker, Kendall Waston; Ali Ghazal, Marcel De Jong,
Brek Shea, Tony Tchani; Fredy Montero (Erik Hurtado,
85th), Yordy Reyna, Cristian Techera (Alphonso Davies,
71st).
EUROPEAN OPEN
At Lotto Arena in Antwerp, Belgium
Purse: $696,300 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
H I GH S C HOOLS
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Guido Pella, Argentina, 3-6,
7-5, 7-6 (10-8); Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Jared
Donaldson, United States, 7-6 (7-4), 6-4; Julien Benneteau, France, def. Nikoloz Basilashvili, Georgia, 6-4
retired; Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, def. Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, 4-6, 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 (7-2).
VOLLEYBALL
At Kungliga Tennishallen in Stockholm, Sweden
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Purse: $696,300 (WT250)
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
St. John’s def. School Without Walls (25-13, 25-7,
25-14)
Wilson def. Washington International (19-25, 25-6,
25-19, 25-14)
MARYLAND
Atholton def. Wilde Lake (25-21, 25-19, 29-27)
Eleanor Roosevelt def. C.H. Flowers (25-9, 25-10, 25-16)
Hammond def. Oakland Mills (25-12, 24-26, 25-16,
25-10)
Northwestern def. Laurel (25-23, 25-16, 20-25, 25-18)
River Hill def. Marriotts Ridge (18-25, 25-15, 27-25,
25-20)
VIRGINIA
Patriot def. Dominion (25-17, 25-15, 21-25, 25-23)
PRIVATE
St. Mary’s-Annapolis def. McDonogh (25-20, 25-19,
25-19)
DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
FIELD HOCKEY
Robin Haase, Netherlands, and Michael Venus, New
Zealand, def. Marcus Daniell, New Zealand, and Marcelo
Demoliner, Brazil, 6-2, 6-4; Jonathan Erlich, Israel, and
Nikola Mektic, Croatia, def. Marius Copil and Florin
Mergea, Romania, 5-7, 7-6 (7-3), 10-8; Marc Lopez and
Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def. Elias and Mikael Ymer,
Sweden, 6-4, 6-0.
MARYLAND
Broadneck 2, Chesapeake 1
Churchill 6, Wheaton 0
Clarksburg 4, Springbrook 0
Marriotts Ridge 4, Reservoir 2
Sherwood 4, Paint Branch 1
South River 5, Annapolis 0
Urbana 4, Quince Orchard 0
Whitman 1, Sherwood 0
VIRGINIA
Briar Woods 1, Tuscarora 0
Broad Run 3, Champe 1
Riverside 2, Loudoun County 1
VIRGINIA 6A McLean 1, Herndon 0
DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Fabrice Martin and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (4), France,
def. Roman Jebavy, Czech Republic, and Matwe Middelkoop, Netherlands, 6-4, 6-4.
STOCKHOLM OPEN
WTA
LUXEMBORG OPEN
At CK Sportcenter Kockelsheuer in Luxembourg
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Anett Kontaveit (3), Estonia, def. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, 6-0, 6-2; Elise Mertens (5), Belgium, def. Sara
Sorribes Tormo, Spain, 6-0, 6-2; Veronica Cepede Royg,
Paraguay, def. Sorana Cirstea (4), Romania, 7-5, 3-2
retired; Madison Brengle, United States, def. Lara
Arruabarrena, Spain, 6-2, 6-2; Beatriz Haddad Maia (7),
Brazil, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-3, 6-4; Carina
Witthoeft, Germany, def. Varvara Lepchenko (8), United
States, 7-6 (7-1), 2-6, 7-6 (7-1).
DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Anna-Lena Friedsam and Antonia Lottner, Germany, def.
Naomi Broady, Britain, and Eva Hrdinova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 2-6, 10-6; Lesley Kerkhove, Netherlands, and
Lidziya Marozava, Belarus, def. Madison Brengle, United
States, and Nicola Geuer, Germany, 6-2, 6-1.
TR AN S AC TI ONS
S
36
35
34
28
26
25
24
24
23
L
5
9
10
9
12
12
15
14
16
14
19
MEN’S DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
SHOTS
PLAYER
GP
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ........................................... 5
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................... 6
Evander Kane, Buffalo ....................................... 6
Alex Pietrangelo St., Louis
..... 6
Brandon Saad, Chicago ....................................... 6
Rick Nash N.Y. R, angers
..... 6
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh ...................................... 6
Kris Letang, Pittsburgh ...................................... 6
Mika Zibanejad N.Y. R, angers
..... 6
EASTERN
W
Toronto FC .....................20
New York City FC ...........16
Chicago ..........................16
Atlanta United FC ..........15
Columbus .......................16
New York .......................13
New England ..................12
Philadelphia ...................10
Montreal ........................11
Orlando City ...................10
D.C. United .......................9
TE N N I S
3
2
Through Sunday’s games
Today's AL game
L
0
0
0
0
0
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at Columbus, 7
Vancouver at Boston, 7
N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Nashville at Philadelphia, 7
New Jersey at Ottawa, 7:30
Edmonton at Chicago, 8:30
St. Louis at Colorado, 9
Carolina at Calgary, 9
Dallas at Arizona, 10
NEW YORK
IP
Sabathia ..........................6
Warren.............................2
Betances..........................0
Kahnle..............................1
WP: Sabathia (1-0); LP: Morton (0-1). Betances pitched
to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Harris
3-3, Kahnle 2-1. HBP: Morton (Gardner). WP: Harris. T:
3:25. A: 49,373 (49,642).
SOUTHEAST
W
Atlanta.........................................0
Charlotte......................................0
Miami...........................................0
Orlando ........................................0
Washington .................................0
Chicago at Toronto, 7:30
New York at Oklahoma City, 8
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
TAMPA BAY ............................ 8
11
7 — 26
DETROIT ................................ 10
12
9 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 1 of 5; Detroit 0 of
6. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 5-1-0 (31 shots-29
saves). Detroit, Howard 3-1-0 (26-23). A: 19,515
(20,000). T: 2:43.
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 4 5 0.00
0 0 1 1 0.00
1 1 2 0 0.00
0 0 1 1 0.00
GB
—
—
—
—
—
THURSDAY’S GAMES
E: Gregorius (1). LOB: Houston 11, New York 2. 2B: Bird
(1). HR: Frazier (1), off Morton; Judge (1), off Harris.
HOUSTON
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Morton..........................3.2 6 7 7 2 3 17.1
Harris............................0.1 1 1 1 0 0 27.0
McHugh ...........................4 0 0 0 1 3 0.00
H
3
0
0
1
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
Philadelphia at Washington, 7
Brooklyn at Indiana, 7
Charlotte at Detroit, 7
Miami at Orlando, 7
Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30
New Orleans at Memphis, 8
Atlanta at Dallas, 8:30
Denver at Utah, 9
Minnesota at San Antonio, 9:30
Houston at Sacramento, 10
Portland at Phoenix, 10
THURSDAY’S GAMES
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
L
0
0
0
0
0
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Toronto at Washington, 7
Florida at Philadelphia, 7
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Vancouver at Ottawa, 7:30
Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 7:30
Colorado at Nashville, 8
Columbus at Winnipeg, 8
Arizona at Dallas, 8:30
Carolina at Edmonton, 9
Buffalo at Vegas, 10
Montreal at San Jose, 10:30
Detroit at Toronto, 7:30
Chicago at St. Louis, 8
Montreal at Los Angeles, 10:30
HOUSTON
AB
Springer cf .....................4
Bregman 3b....................4
Altuve 2b........................4
Correa ss ........................4
Gurriel dh .......................4
Gattis c...........................3
Gonzalez 1b....................3
Reddick rf .......................2
Fisher ph ........................0
Maybin lf ........................3
TOTALS
31
ATLANTIC
W
Boston..........................................0
Brooklyn.......................................0
New York .....................................0
Philadelphia .................................0
Toronto ........................................0
Boston at Cleveland, 8
Houston at Golden State, 10:30
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Yankees 8, Astros 1
MLS
TUESDAY’S REGULAR SEASON GAMES
Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 2
Two outs when winning run scored.
LOB: Chicago 4, Los Angeles 8. 2B: Bellinger (1), Culberson (2). HR: Russell (1), off Hill; Turner (1), off Lackey.
CHICAGO
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Lester............................4.2 3 1 1 5 2 1.93
Edwards ........................1.1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00
Strop ................................1 0 0 0 1 0 0.00
Duensing.......................1.2 1 1 1 2 1 5.40
Lackey ..............................0 1 2 2 1 0 10.8
FCS TOP 25
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
HOUSTON 3, BOSTON 1
DODGERS AT CUBS, 9:00
TOP 25 SCHEDULE
Att Yds
158 1334
158 1334
179 1244
Best of five
L
1
1
2
2
2
3
1
5
GOALS
PUNT RETURNERS
NCAA
REDSKINS LEADERS
Passing
Cmp
Cousins ............... 105
Team ................... 105
Opp ...................... 110
Yds
630
596
550
391
372
356
347
335
290
281
AMERICAN LEAGUE DIVISION SERIES
METROPOLITAN
W
Columbus ........................ 4
New Jersey ..................... 4
Pittsburgh ....................... 3
Washington .................... 3
Philadelphia .................... 3
N.Y. Islanders ................. 2
Carolina ........................... 1
N.Y. Rangers ................... 1
S OC C E R
NBA
Utah Jazz: Waived F Joel Bolomboy.
WNBA
New York Liberty: Named Katie Smith coach.
BOYS’ FALL SOCCER
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Bell 5, Capital City Charter 0
MARYLAND
Gaithersburg 2, Rockville 0
Huntingtown 2, La Plata 1
Kennedy 5, Poolesville 0
Lackey 7, Westlake 0
Laurel 3, Bladensburg 2
Mount Hebron 7, Glenelg 0
Northwest 5, Springbrook 2
River Hill 4, Long Reach 1
Whitman 4, Damascus 0
PRIVATE
Indian Creek 4, Glenelg Country 1
Washington International 7, Edmund Burke 0
GIRLS’ FALL SOCCER
MARYLAND
Eleanor Roosevelt 11, Suitland 1
Huntingtown 4, La Plata 0
Laurel 4, Bladensburg 3
Magruder 2, Sherwood 1
North Point 1, McDonough 0
Northwest 10, Springbrook 1
Whitman 5, Damascus 1
Wootton 1, Bethesda-Chevy Chase 0
PRIVATE
Georgetown Day 2, Wilson 0
Hebrew Academy 4, Grace Brethren 0
Riverdale Baptist 4, Takoma Academy 0
LOC AL GOLF
NFL
Arizona Cardinals: Released LB Vontarrius Dora from the
practice squad. Signed DL Peli Anau to the practice
squad.
Green Bay Packers: Signed QB Joe Callahan from the
practice squad. Placed CB Quinten Rollins on injured
reserve.
COLLEGES
Louisville: Fired men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino.
Maryland: Announced athletic director Kevin Anderson
is taking a six-month sabbatical. Named athletic department executive director, chief financial officer and chief
operating officer Damon Evans acting athletic director.
Siena: Named Abigail Rehfuss women’s lacrosse coach.
PAINT BRANCH
Jack Dunn, Ray Prather and George Trujillo won the
senior men’s league with 87.
JEFFERSON DISTRICT
Fred Fulton won flight A with a net score of 31 and
Charles Peyton won flight B with a net score of 30. Dave
Sullivan was closest to the pin on hole No. 3 and George
Whitley on hole No. 7. Fred Fulton had the lowest gross
score with a 35.
HIDDEN CREEK
American Team defeats World Team, 20.5 to 19.5, in
annual Maloney Cup.
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851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6603 FREEPORT STREET
Riverdale, MD 20737
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH
J. MACFADYEN, Trustee(s), dated October 16, 2006, and
recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30152, folio 112, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FIVE (5) IN BLOCK LETTER "T" IN THE
SUBDIVISON KNOWN AS "SECTION 2, BEACON HEIGHTS,"
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW
30 AT PLAT 57 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND AND BEING BLADENSBURG
(2ND) ELECTION DISTRICT.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $17,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.25% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-24332)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
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1490
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851
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JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers
are needed to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Landover, Capital
Heights, Hyattsville
&
District Heights
C
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13006 SAINT GREGORY COURT
Bowie, MD 20721
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to SOUTHERN TITLE INSURANCE CORP,
Trustee(s), dated January 21, 2009, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 30672, folio 143, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT ONE HUNDRED
SIXTEEN (116) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT
EIGHT, SECTION 10, WOODMORE" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 146 AT PLAT 14 AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 13006 ST GREGORY COURT, BOWIE,
MD 20716
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $124,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.75% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-02546)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
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850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Howard Kaplan
Jill Kaplan
11300 Colebrook Terrace
Potomac, MD 20854
Defendant(s)
Case No. 433065V
12134005
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Bernadette Saunders
Courtney Sims
25 Pine Ridge Court, Unit 12-3
Germantown, MD 20874
Defendant(s)
Case No. 410924V
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NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 25th
day of September, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of
11300
Colebrook
Terrace,
Potomac, MD 20854, made and
reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 25th day of October,
2017, provided a copy of this
notice be inserted in a daily newspaper printed in said County, once
in each of three successive weeks
before the 25th day of October,
2017. The Report of Sale states
the amount of the foreclosure
sale price to be $701,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Oct 3, 10, 17, 2017
12134041
Notice is hereby given this 25th
day of September, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 25
Pine Ridge Court, Unit 12-3, Germantown, MD 20874, made and
reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 25th day of October,
2017, provided a copy of this
notice be inserted in a daily newspaper printed in said County, once
in each of three successive weeks
before the 25th day of October,
2017. The Report of Sale states
the amount of the foreclosure
sale price to be $189,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Oct 3, 10, 17, 2017
12134038
mypublicnotices.com/
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5510 RUXTON DRIVE
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CURRAN OR LAURA O SULLIVAN,
Trustee(s), dated April 25, 2007, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 29066, folio 351, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT TEN (10) BLOCK THREE (3), IN SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "BLOCK TWO AND PART OF BLOCKS ONE (1) AND THREE
(3) ADDITION TO LANHAM ACRES" AS PER PLAT RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK WWW NO. 46 FOLIO 65, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $5,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-22177)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
12130412
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Prince Georges County
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
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Pardo & Drazin, LLC
Russell S. Drazin, Attorney
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
Washington, DC 20015
202-223-7900
TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
1202 Decatur Street, NW, Washington, DC 20011
(Lot 0033 in Square 2921)
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust in
the original principal amount of $770,000.00 dated December
15, 2016 and recorded December 28, 2016 as Instrument
No. 2016135461 with the Recorder of Deeds of the District
of Columbia ("Land Records") from 1202 Decatur Street LLC,
as Grantor, to Daniel Huertas, as Trustee, for the benefit of DP
Capital LLC, as Beneficiary (“Deed of Trust”), default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and following the mailing
and recordation in the Land Records of an Affidavit of NonResidential Mortgage Foreclosure and a Notice of Foreclosure
Sale of Real Property or Condominium Unit, at the request of
the current noteholder, the Trustee will sell at public auction
at the office of Harvey West Auctioneers, Inc., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015, on
OCTOBER 24, 2017 AT 10:30 AM
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in the City of Washington, District of Columbia, known as 1202 Decatur Street, NW, Washington, DC 20019
(Lot 0033 in Square 2921), and more fully described in the
Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition, with no
warranty of any kind, and subject to conditions, restrictions,
agreements, liens, and encumbrances of record affecting the
same – except those encumbrances of record that are extinguished by operation of District of Columbia law by virtue of the
foreclosure of the Deed of Trust.
Purchaser will take title to the property subject to all taxes, water
and sewer charges, and other utility charges, if any. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the
date of sale forward. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $80,000.00 by cash or
cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser at the time and
place of sale. Purchaser shall settle within thirty (30) days of
sale. TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO
SETTLEMENT BY PURCHASER. Balance of the purchase price
to be paid in cash or certified funds at settlement. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money from the date of sale
to the date of settlement at the interest rate set forth in the
debt instrument secured by the Deed of Trust. Purchaser shall
be responsible for payment of all settlement costs.
The noteholder and its affiliates, if a bidder, shall not be required
to post a deposit or to pay interest.
In the event that purchaser does not settle as required for any
reason, purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, the
deposit shall be forfeited to the Trustee and all of the expenses
of this sale (including attorneys’ fees and full commission on
the gross sale price) shall be charged against and paid out of
the forfeited deposit. The Trustee may resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting
purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits
resulting from any resale of the property.
If the Trustee does not settle as set forth herein, the purchaser’s
sole remedy at law and in equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit and the sale shall be considered null and void and of
no effect whatsoever.
The Trustee reserves the right, in Trustee's sole discretion, to
reject any and all bids, to withdraw the property from sale at any
time before or at the auction, to extend the time to receive bids,
to waive or modify the deposit requirement, to waive or modify
the requirement that interest be paid on the unpaid purchase
money, and/or to extend the period of time for settlement.
Additional terms may be announced at the sale. The successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Trustee
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of
bidding.
Daniel Huertas, Trustee
69
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs,
V.
Troy E. Smith, et al.
Defendant(s).
Case No. CAEF16-25747
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 3rd
day of October, 2017, that the sale
of the property in this case, 6412
Halleck Street, District Heights,
Maryland 20747, reported by
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura
D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge,
Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson and Keith
M. Yacko, Substitute Trustees, be
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 3rd day of November,
2017 provided a copy of this Notice
be inserted in The Washington
Post, a newspaper published in
Prince George's County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 3rd
day of November, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $129,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison (#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive
Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Oct 17, 24, 31, 2017
12136941
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2017
AT 11:00 A.M.
Under and by virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, Assignment of Rents and Security Agreement from Ark of Safety
Christian Church, Inc., a/k/a Ark of Safety Christian Church to Fidelity
National Title Company, Trustee, for the benefit of Reliance Trust Company,
as Trustees for First Mortgage Bondholders dated March 29, 2005 and
recorded April 26, 2005 among the land records of Prince George’s
County, Maryland in Liber 21939, folio 547, as ultimately assigned to TMI
Trust Company, a Texas trust company, pursuant to Notice of Succession
and Assignment of the Deed of Trust recorded among the aforesaid land
records in Liber 37015, folio 375 (the “Deed of Trust”), default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the holder of the indebtedness secured
by the Deed of Trust having appointed Joseph F. Jackson and Genevieve
C. Bradley as substitute trustees pursuant to a Deed of Appointment
of Substitute Trustees dated June 22, 2017 and recorded among the
aforesaid land records in Book 39785, at page 33, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Prince George’s County, Duval Wing Entrance, 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland, 20772, on October 18, 2017 at 11:00 a.m., the real
estate (and personal property and improvements thereon) located at 9402
Marlboro Pike, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, and more particularly
described as follows:
PARCEL ONE:
Parcel lettered “B” as shown on that plat entitled “PARCELS A & B,
MELWOOD COMMERCIAL CENTER,” as per Plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book NLP 122 at Plat 47, among the Land Records of Prince
George’s County, Maryland.
Tax Account No. 15-1776012
PARCEL TWO:
Beginning for the same at a point lying in the northeasterly
right of way line of Marlboro Pike, 73.00 feet northeasterly from
base line station 104+ 08 03 as shown on the aforesaid plat
described above, and making a common front corner between
Parcel “B”, Melwood Commercial Center, as recorded among the
Land Records of Prince George’s County, Maryland (15th Election
District) in Plat Book N.L.P. 122 at Plat Number 47, and the land
of Paul L. Harris, et al., as recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records in Liber 5489 at folio 741; and thence running along said
right of way line,
1. 174.53 feet (corrected from the original deed description,
per ALTA Survey dated October 2, 2001) along the arc of a
curve deflecting to the left, having a radius of 3746.71 feet
and a long chord bearing distance of South 68 degrees 31
minutes 48 seconds East, 174.00 feet to a point marking the
common front corner between the aforesaid Parcel “B” described
above, and Parcel “A,” “Melwood Commercial Center” as shown
on the aforesaid plat; thence running through the aforesaid
Marlboro Pike, previously described, with line of division now
being established;
2. South 20 degrees 08 minutes 08 seconds West, 38.00 feet to a
point, thence
3. 153.23 feet (corrected from the original deed description, per
ALTA Survey dated October 2, 2001) along the arc of a curve
deflecting to the right, having a radius of 3784.71 feet and a long
chord bearing and distance of North 68 degrees 42 minutes and
24 seconds West, 153.22 feet to a point; thence
4. North 08 degrees 35 minutes 48 seconds West, 44.44 feet to
the point of beginning. Containing 6229 square feet or 0.1430 of
an acre of land.
Tax Account No.15-1726652
Parcels 1 and 2 are collectively known as 9402 Marlboro Pike,
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772.
The personal property to be sold consists of personal property and fixtures
(if any) owned by Ark of Safety Christian Church, Inc. and as described in
the Deed of Trust and actually located on the real property on the date
of sale. No representations or warranties are made as to the ownership,
existence or condition of any such personal property or fixtures, it being
the sole responsibility of the purchaser to make such determination.
The sale shall also be made subject to all encumbrances, rights,
reservations, conveyances, leases, conditions, easements, restrictive
covenants, and all recorded and unrecorded liens, if any, having priority
over the Deed of Trust, as they may lawfully affect the property. All loss
or damage to the property sold from and after the time of sale and before
settlement shall be at the risk of the successful bidder. Real estate taxes
and all other public charges and assessments shall be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale and the purchaser shall be responsible
for payment of such taxes and charges beginning on the date of sale.
All income and expenses to be adjusted for the month of settlement to
date of settlement, and purchaser to assume all expenses thereafter. The
Substitute Trustees shall be liable for only those security deposits, if any,
and such income, if any, as the Substitute Trustees may have in their
actual possession on the date of settlement. Cost of all documentary
stamps, grantor, recordation and transfer taxes, notary and examination
of title fees will be paid by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey the property as described above, the Purchaser's sole
remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of its deposit.
Upon such refund of the deposit to the purchaser, the sale shall be void
and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against
the Substitute Trustees, the lender or the other Beneficiaries (as defined
below).
The property will be sold (i) together with any and all improvements,
furniture, fixtures and equipment located on the property and not owned
by any tenant thereof; (ii) subject to and together with all recorded
easements, agreements, rights of way, charges, liens, mechanic's and
materialmen's liens, reservations, and other encumbrances, covenants,
restrictions and conditions affecting the property and not subordinate
to said Deed of Trust, if any, including without limitation, environmental
conditions (including wetlands, riparian rights, protected species), all
applicable federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations
affecting the property, and other matters which would be disclosed by an
accurate survey or inspection of the property; and (iii) subject to rights of
tenants not subordinate to said Deed of Trust, if any. No representation
or warranty, express or implied, is made as to whether any tenants,
subtenants or other parties in possession are actually in possession
and/or paying rent.
The property will be sold in "AS IS, WHERE IS" condition, without recourse.
The information contained herein as to the nature and description or
use of the property has been obtained from sources deemed reliable
and believed to be accurate when given; provided, however, neither
the Substitute Trustees nor the Noteholder, nor their respective agents,
successors and assigns (collectively, the "Beneficiaries") make any
representations or warranties, express or implied, with respect to the
property, or any tenancies or parties in possession, including without
limitation, the descriptions, use, dimensions, quantities, square footage,
parking, tenancies, structural integrity, physical condition, construction,
extent of construction, workmanship, materials, habitability, zoning,
environmental condition, or fitness for a particular use or merchantability
of all or any part of the property or the improvements located thereon.
TERMS OF SALE
12129395
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is convenient.
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SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
CASH. A bidder’s deposit equal to the lesser of ten percent (10%) of the
sale price or $75,000.00 (the “Deposit”) by certified or cashier’s check
may be required by the Trustees for such bid to be accepted. The
Trustees reserve the right to prequalify any bidder prior to the sale and/or
waive the requirement of the Deposit. Immediately after the sale, the
successful bidder shall execute and deliver a memorandum of sale with
the Substitute Trustees, copies of which shall be available for inspection
immediately prior to the sale, and shall deliver to the Substitute Trustees
the Deposit and the memorandum of sale. The balance of the purchase
price, together with interest at eight percent per annum from the date of
sale to the date of settlement, shall be paid by the Purchaser. Settlement
shall occur within thirty (30) days after the sale date, TIME BEING OF THE
ESSENCE with regard to the Purchaser’s obligation.
/s/ Joseph F. Jackson
Substitute Trustee
/s/ Genevieve C. Bradley
Substitute Trustee
1-800-753-POST
SF
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Joseph F. Jackson, Substitute Trustee
(703) 485-3535
8200 Greensboro Drive, Suite 820
McLean, Virginia 22102
October 3, 10, 17, 2017
12133875
Home delivery
is convenient.
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SF
Prince Georges County
SALE TO BE HELD AT THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY,
DUVAL WING ENTRANCE, 14735 MAIN STREET, UPPER MARLBORO, MARYLAND 20772
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
851
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF PROPERTY
LOCATED AT 9402 MARLBORO PIKE, UPPER MARLBORO, MARYLAND 20772
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
S0833-1 6x2
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
CLASSIFIED
D12
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
8"/5504&--*5
)&.&"/4
YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
NJMMJPOSFBEFSTDBSTIPQQFSTJODMVEFEttXBTIJOHUPOQPTUDPNDMBTTJmFEt0QFO0SQMBDFZPVSBEJO&YQSFTTPVSEBJMZDPNNVUFSSFBEBOESFBDISFBEFST
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6414 Gateway Boulevard
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated January
29, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34990, folio 081, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 19, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED THIRTY-ONE (31) AND THIRTY TWO (32),
IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWELVE (12), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "SECTION 1, DISTRICT HEIGHTS", AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK SDH
3, AT PLAT 21
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (51586)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7633 Greenleaf Road
Landover, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY,
Trustee(s), dated September 5, 2008, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 30015, folio 120, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
OCTOBER 26, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 32, BLOCK F, SECTION 1, OF PALMER PARK, AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 23 AT PLAT
65
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 2.245% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (50827)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5621 Fisher Road
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SHERIDAN TITLE, INC. , Trustee(s), dated April
4, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35866, folio 119, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 19, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVEN (7), IN BLOCK LETTERED "A", IN
TEMPLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK BB 10, FOLIO 56
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (27532)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10711 HEATHER GLEN WAY
Bowie, MD 20720
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LARRY RICE, Trustee(s), dated April 8, 2005,
and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 22369, folio 114, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 19, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT FORTY-TWO (42), IN BLOCK LETTERED "B", AS SHOWN
ON A PLAT ENTITLED, "HEATHER GLEN MANOR", AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 189 AT PAGE 56
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (52141)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
12134032 OCTOBER 3, 10, 17, 2017
OCTOBER 3, 10, 17, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
851
D13
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9429 Trevino Terrace
Laurel, MD 20708
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from JAMES
FRANCIS COWAN, dated August 21, 2002 and recorded in
Liber 16307, folio 398 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF15-37127; Tax
ID No.10-1076934 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $12,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 557784)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12133479
12133486
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 3, 10, 17, 2017
12133485
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
12135547
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13400 Colwyn Road
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to US BANK TRUST COMPANY, NA., Trustee(s),
dated December 17, 2007, and recorded among the Land
Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
29341, folio 141, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT
14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 26, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-ONE (21), IN BLOCK LETTERED
"N", IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT FOUR, SECTION
TWO, FOREST KNOLLS" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK WWW 46, AT PLAT NO. 42
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject
to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting same including any condominium and of HOA assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 7.85% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (451)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8814 Tall Cedar Lane
Clinton, MD 20735
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to BELTWAY TITLE & ABSTRACT INC. , Trustee(s),
dated October 21, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30108,
folio 655, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 19, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "LOTS 1 - 7, AND OUTLOTS 'A', 'B' AND 'C', TALL
CEDARS SUBDIVISION", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK PM 217, AT PLAT 23
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (6409)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1309 Asheville Road
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to WILLIAM H. POFFENBARGER, SR. , Trustee(s),
dated April 2, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35884, folio
156, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
NOVEMBER 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FIFTEEN (15) IN BLOCK LETTERED "C"
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "RITCHIE HEIGHTS" AS
PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK WWW 27 AT PLAT 26.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (48613)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4504 Weldon Drive
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated October
8, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30093, folio 050, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
NOVEMBER 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY (20), IN BLOCK LETTERED "J", IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT TWO, SECTION TWO,
ALLENWOOD ACRES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND IN THE PLAT BOOK WWW 49, AT PLAT 44.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (38750)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2511 Kent Town Place, Unit A
Landover, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated February
11, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35028, folio 335, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 19, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED JULY 31, 2013 IN LIBER 35028, FOLIO 335.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55160)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
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www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
12134344 OCTOBER 3, 10, 17, 2017
12133481 OCTOBER 17, 24, 31, 2017
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D14
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7525 Ingraham Street
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JACK ADAMS, Trustee(s), dated September
28, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23807, folio 35, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 19, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT (5) IN BLOCK 'A' IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"HAYWOOD'S ADDITION TO WEST LANHAM" AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK VJ 182 AT PLAT 82
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 5.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (17213)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 3, 10, 17, 2017
12133487
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7902 CROWS NEST COURT APARTMENT 31
Laurel, MD 20707
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CHALKLEY, Trustee(s), dated
February 9, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21652, folio
213, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT CERTAIN CONDOMINIUM SITUATED IN THE CITY
OF LAUREL, COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, STATE OF
MARYLAND, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 343 IN A CONDOMINIUM STYLED
"BRIDGEPORT CONDOMINIUM PHASE 4, AS PER PLATS
THERE OF RECORDED IN CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK NLP
136, BEGINNING AT PLAT 90 ET SEQ., AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS FOR THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
TAX/PARCEL ID: 10-1046366
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $14,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06802)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6507 Grafton Street
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JONATHAN S. BACH, ESQ. , Trustee(s), dated
May 9, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE OCTOBER 10, 17, 24,www.hwestauctions.com
2017
12132516
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34970, folio 475, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
SUITE 100
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND 20852
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
NOVEMBER 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM
KNOWN AS
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
9915 Worrell Avenue
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
Glenn Dale, MD 20769
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ECHOLS, PURSER AND GLENN, PLLC. ,
RECORDED July 15, 2013 IN LIBER 34970, FOLIO 475.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition Trustee(s), dated October 23, 2008, and recorded among the
without either express or implied warranty or representation, Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a in Liber 30592, folio 556, the holder of the indebtedness
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of ON,
NOVEMBER 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon
situated
in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL described as follows:
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
of the purchase price with interest at 3.53% per annum from RECORDED MAY 7, 2009 IN LIBER 30592, FOLIO 556.
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments without either express or implied warranty or representation,
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
association dues and assessments that may become due after construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merTitle examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to of the purchase price with interest at 5.5% per annum from
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
Trustee's File No. (50356)
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 17, 24, 31, 2017
12135170 purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (18322)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
COULD YOU
USE SOME
EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
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OCTOBER 17, 24, 31, 2017
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
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C054B 2x3
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the Classified section:
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KLMNO
12135160
LEGAL NOTICES
851
Prince Georges County
851
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3806 ENDERS LANE
Bowie, MD 20716
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to ANDREW VALENTINE, Trustee(s), dated
February 28, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27390, folio
112, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO HUNDRED-FIFTEEN (215), IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT - THIRTY-FOUR, COVINGTON", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK VJ 180 AT PLAT 88. SAID PROPERTY BEING
LOCATED IN THE 7TH ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $18,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-25860)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2200 OLSON STREET
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to FRIEDMAN & MAC FAYDEN PA, Trustee(s),
dated July 12, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26538,
folio 007, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FORTY-SIX (46), IN BLOCK LETTERED "F"
IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PARTS OF BLOCKS B AND F,
MARLOW HEIGHTS", PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 33
AT FOLIO 51, ONE OF THE LAND RECORDS OF THE SAID
STATE AND COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $23,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 8.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-05160)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H. Tschirgi,
Keith M. Yacko and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
851
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2017
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
19320 CROOM ROAD
Brandywine, MD 20613
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ROBERT C. FRANK JR, Trustee(s), dated August
12, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35200, folio 150, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND AS
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN A DEED RECORDED AT
DEED BOOK 35200, PAGE 145 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $25,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06616)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
12132893 OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
12132238
12132891
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
12405 KENSINGTON LANE
Bowie, MD 20715
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to NATIONS TITLE OF MARYLAND INC, Trustee(s),
dated January 23, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27245,
folio 314, MODIFIED JANUARY 27, 2015 IN LIBER 38680,
FOLIO 521 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 3 IN BLOCK 105
IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "KENILWORTH AT BELAIR,
SECTION 29", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK WWW 42 AT PLAT 84 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $26,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-26338)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4353 SOUTHERN AVENUE
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PATRICK J. FLANAGAN, Trustee(s), dated
November 21, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28980,
folio 003, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED SIXTEEN (16), TWENTY (20) AND TWENTYONE (21) IN BLOCK NUMBERED FIFTY-SIX (56), IN A
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS BRADBURY HEIGHTS, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK BDS 1 FOLIO 69, ONE
THE LAND RECORDS OF SAID STATE AND COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $27,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.975%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-22900)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H. Tschirgi,
Keith M. Yacko and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4805 RODGERS DRIVE
Clinton, MD 20735
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to RONALD S. DEUTCH, Trustee(s), dated
February 17, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25523, folio
591, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIX (6) IN BLOCK LETTERED "D" IN A
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION ONE TEMPLE HILLS
ESTATE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
CEC 91 AT PLAT 32 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-22945)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
12132899 OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
12134019 OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
12133900
Calvert County
853
190 Heather Road
Prince Frederick, MD 20678
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH J.
MACFADYEN, Trustee(s), dated March 1, 2007, and recorded
among the Land Records of CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 02985, folio 283, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE CALVERT COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT
175 MAIN ST, PRINCE FREDERICK, MD 20678 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CALVERT COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"FINAL PLAT, LOTS 1 & 2 AND PARCEL %U2018A%U2019,
HILLSIDE HAVEN", AS SHOWN PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK ABE 376 AT PLAT 733, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $23,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (16-04517)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris.
Thomas D. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson,
Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
Charles County
12134882
855
Charles County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4900 STOCKWELL PLACE
White Plains, MD 20695
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JOHN M. MERCER, Trustee(s), dated May
24, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 6349, folio 67, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured
thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE BREEZEWAY
BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA PLATA, MD
20646 ON,
OCTOBER 25, 2017 at 1:30PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED SEVENTEEN (17), IN BLOCK LETTERED "J', AS PER SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "RECORD PLAT 31 AND RECORD PLAT 33,
KINGSVIEW, SECTION 5A, SHEETS 1 OF 3 AND 3 OF 3",
AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK
RAD 54 AT 214 AND RAD 54 AT 215. BEING LOCATED IN THE
6TH ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $27,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.34% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (13-18593)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Jason L. Hamlin, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 2017
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
855
OPQRS
EZ
Calvert County
12134391
856
856
Frederick County
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
856
Frederick County
856
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
806 E. 16TH ST.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
208 SPRUCE CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
600 BUSHYTAIL DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated January
5, 2006 and recorded in Liber 5814, Folio 742 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $252,000.00
and a current interest rate of 2%, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 3, 2017 AT 10:47 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
December 10, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6847, Folio 427 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $240,000.00 and a current interest rate of 4.625%, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door,
100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
OCTOBER 27, 2017 AT 10:47 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
September 30, 2009 and recorded in Liber 7564, Folio 342 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $382,360.00 and a current interest rate of 5.875%, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door,
100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
OCTOBER 20, 2017 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 203589-1)
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 178685-1)
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $38,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 198801-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 17, Oct 24 & Oct 31
12135669
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 10, Oct 17 & Oct 24
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12133895
6506 SLEET CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
916 WALNUT ST.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 9, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6806, Folio 197 among the Land
Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of
$182,500.00 and a current interest rate of 4%, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
OCTOBER 27, 2017 AT 10:46 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $33,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 302153-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 17, Oct 24 & Oct 31
12135667
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
6809 KINGFISHER CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October
5, 2007 and recorded in Liber 7477, Folio 293 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $405,000.00
and a current interest rate of 3%, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 3, 2017 AT 10:45 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $40,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 183316-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 17, Oct 24 & Oct 31
12135665
Oct 3, Oct 10 & Oct 17
12132535
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated May 25,
2005 and recorded in Liber 5396, Folio 496 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $360,000.00
and a current interest rate of 6.5%, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St.,
Frederick, MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 3, 2017 AT 10:46 AM
Frederick County
856
D15
Frederick County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2729 PRICES DISTILLERY ROAD
Clarksburg, MD 20871
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VICKI L. PARRY, Trustee(s), dated April 27,
2007, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 6576, folio 0416, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
MD 21701 ON,
OCTOBER 18, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT 3 AS SHOWN ON A SUBDIVISION PLAT ENTITLED
"PRELIMINARY/FINAL PLAT LOTS 1-4, SECTION I, DISTILLERY MANOR, PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 50,
PAGE 180", AS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK 73, PAGE
107. SUBJECT TO COVENANTS OF RECORD.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $113,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of FREDERICK COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.5% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (16-19271)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Thomas
W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Erin M. August, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
KNOWN AS
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
848 GERONIMO DRIVE
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
Frederick, MD 21701
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 in the form of certified check,
Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH J. MAC
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
FADYEN, Trustee(s), dated April 25, 2006, and recorded among
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
6053, folio 0101, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W.
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
OCTOBER 18, 2017 at 10:00AM
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
follows:
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
LOT NUMBERED ELEVEN (11) AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTIpayable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
TLED "FINAL PLAT, SECTION 1B, PLAT 2, LOTS 5-11 & 57-64,
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
RIVER CREST", AS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
OF FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 68, PAGE
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
57. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS NO.
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
www.hwestauctions.com
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
848 GERONIMO DRIVE.
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
OCTOBER 3, 10, 17, 2017
12131423
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merfor any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 185907-1)
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
SALES
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
VALUABLE
FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
KNOWN AS
Oct 10, Oct 17 & Oct 24
12133894
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
4630 FELDSPAR ROAD
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $48,000.00 payable in certified
Middletown, MD 21769
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH J. MAC
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of FREDERICK COUNTY, FADYEN, Trustee(s), dated May 15, 2007, and recorded among
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on unpaid the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The 6613, folio 0401, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
Rockville, MD 20852
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
(301) 961-6555
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
7911 JUNIPER DR.
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
FREDERICK, MD 21702
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W.
December 5, 2008 and recorded in Liber 7136, Folio 568 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
of $202,329.00 and a current interest rate of 3.875%, default having
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door,
OCTOBER 18, 2017 at 10:00AM
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
OCTOBER 27, 2017 AT 10:45 AM
and
all
other
costs
incident
to
the
settlement
shall
be
borne
by
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner follows:
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of LOT FIVE HUNDRED NINETEEN (519) AS SHOWN ON A PLAT
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason, ENTITLED "CORRECTION PLAT, FINAL PLAT, SECTION V,
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are CREST MANOR ESTATES" AS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 in the form of certified check,
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for RECORDS OF FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall BOOK 35, PAGE 157.
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall without either express or implied warranty or representation,
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiand thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to post- tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateis responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
No. (16-07936)
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $46,500.00 payable in certified
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, and Gene Jung,
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
Substitute Trustees
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of FREDERICK COUNTY,
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.0% on unpaid
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall OCTOBER 3, 10, 17, 2017
12133407 property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 316600-1)
To place your legal notice in
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
SALES
the
Classified
section:
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
Call:
202-334-7007
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
Oct 10, Oct 17 & Oct 24
12133893
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
Enroll your Washington Post subscription
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
in Easy Pay and we’ll automatically charge
No. (17-06585)
your card when a payment is due–no fuss,
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
no hassle, no interruptions.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
LEGAL NOTICES
Easy Pay takes the stress out of your news.
(Well...some of it.)
S0833-2 6x3
853
WP 2x1
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2017
Democracy Dies in Darkness
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy or call 202-334-6100.
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 3, 10, 17, 2017
12131459
OPQRS
D16
872
Fairfax County
872
872
Fairfax County
872
Fairfax County
875
Fairfax County
877
Fauquier County
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2017
EZ
877
Spotsylvania County
Spotsylvania County
878
Stafford County
878
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
11295 MEADFIELD DRIVE,
BEALETON, VA 22712.
2929 Ashdown Forest Drive
Herndon, VA 20171
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated July 1, 2005, and recorded in Book
17496 at Page 2071 as Instrument Number 2005027227.006, of the Fairfax
County land records the undersigned Substitute Trustees, will offer for
sale at public auction on October 18, 2017 at 10:30 AM at the front of the
Fairfax County Circuit Court (Fairfax County Judicial Center, 4110 Chain
Bridge Road), at Fairfax, Virginia, the following property:
Lot 49, Section One (1), GREAT OAK as the same appears duly dedicated,
platted and recorded in Deed Book 13145 at Page 323, among the land
records of Fairfax County, Virginia.
AND BEING part of the property conveyed to Engle Homes/Virginia, Inc.,
a Florida corporation, by Deed dated December 8, 2002 and recorded on
December 10, 2002 in Deed Book 13715, Page 195, among the land records
of Fairfax County, Virginia.
Tax No.: 0163 15 0049
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit in the amount of ten
percent (10%) of the successful bid payable by cashier's/certified check
required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust.
Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. Balance of the
purchase price must be paid by cashier's check within 14 days from sale
date. Except for Virginia Grantor tax, all settlement costs and expenses
are purchaser's responsibility. Real estate taxes will be pro-rated to the
date of sale. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the
property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property
resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be
liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses
and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title for any
reason, purchaser's sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This
sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the
Deed of Trust including, but not limited to, determining whether prior to
sale a bankruptcy was filed; a forbearance, repayment or other agreement
was entered into; or the loan was reinstated or paid off. In any such event
this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return
of deposit without interest. This communication is from a debt collector.
Old Dominion Trustees, Inc., Substitute Trustees
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 787-7562
File No. 8207.81555
October 10, 17, 2017
Tax No.: 0591 29600024
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit in the amount of ten
percent (10%) of the successful bid payable by cashier's/certified check
required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust.
Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. Balance of the
purchase price must be paid by cashier's check within 14 days from sale
date. Except for Virginia Grantor tax, all settlement costs and expenses
are purchaser's responsibility. Real estate taxes will be pro-rated to the
date of sale. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the
property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property
resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be
liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses
and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title for any
reason, purchaser's sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This
sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the
Deed of Trust including, but not limited to, determining whether prior to
sale a bankruptcy was filed; a forbearance, repayment or other agreement
was entered into; or the loan was reinstated or paid off. In any such event
this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return
of deposit without interest. This communication is from a debt collector.
872
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
12409 BROWN FOX WAY,
RESTON, VA 20191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $620,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.500000% dated
February 13, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19120,
Page 2088, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 8, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0392 55 0028
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $370,750.00, with an annual
interest rate of 5.000000% dated
March 31, 2009, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 20411, Page 1106,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on November 8,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 025-2-17-0092
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 10, 17, 2017
12135197
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-247632.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 10, 17, 2017
12135151
Old Dominion Trustees, Inc., Substitute Trustees
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 787-7562
File No. 8207.81589
October 10, 17, 2017
12134648
Prince William County
873
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
15284 Waterwheel Terrace,
Woodbridge, VA 22191
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
January 29, 2016, and recorded at Instrument Number 201602030007209
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $182,761.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
November 17, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Land
situated in the County of Prince William in the State of VA
Lot 78, Section 1-A, Rippon Landing, as the same is duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 1099, at page 1203, among the Land Records
of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
872
12130945
872
Fairfax County
SF
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6709 SCOTTSWOOD STREET,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22315
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6010 CREEKSTONE LANE,
CENTREVILLE, VA 20120
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$488,000.00, with an annual interest rate of 4.000000% dated February 12, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 19130, Page 730,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on November 8,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 091212450095
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $276,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.375000% dated
January 26, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the County of
Fairfax as Deed Book 19084, Page
932, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the County of
Fairfax, on the courthouse steps
at the front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of Fairfax
located at 4110 Chain Bridge
Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 15, 2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-268975.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-258699.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 10, 17, 2017
12135560
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit in the amount of ten
percent (10%) of the successful bid payable by cashier's/certified check
required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust.
Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. Balance of the
purchase price must be paid by cashier's check within 14 days from sale
date. Except for Virginia Grantor tax, all settlement costs and expenses
are purchaser's responsibility. Real estate taxes will be pro-rated to the
date of sale. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the
property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property
resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be
liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses
and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title for any
reason, purchaser's sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This
sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the
Deed of Trust including, but not limited to, determining whether prior to
sale a bankruptcy was filed; a forbearance, repayment or other agreement
was entered into; or the loan was reinstated or paid off. In any such event
this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return
of deposit without interest. This communication is from a debt collector.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind.
October 17, 24, 2017
12134649
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
7754 LEGERE COURT,
MCLEAN, VA 22102
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 14-241261.
Tax No.: 025-3-06-0013
12134650
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated August 10, 2007, and recorded in
Book 19509 at Page 1604 as Instrument Number 2007023924011, of the
Fairfax County land records the undersigned Substitute Trustees, will offer
for sale at public auction on October 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM at the front
of the Fairfax County Circuit Court (Fairfax County Judicial Center, 4110
Chain Bridge Road), at Fairfax, Virginia, the following property:
All of those premises comprising Condominium Unit No. 3360-24 in
WOODBURN VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM, constituted and established under
Virginia Condominium Act, Chapter 4.2 of Title 55 of the Code of Virginia
(1950), as amended by a Declaration recorded on November 5, 1981 in Deed
Book 5607 at page 789, among the land records of Fairfax County, Virginia.
Oct 17, 24, 2017
12136851
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
7 Westwood Drive,
Fredericksburg, VA 22405
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
June 23, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200600022534 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $350,400.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, 9107 Judicial
Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia 22553 on:
November 6, 2017 at 11:30 AM
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
February 1, 2008, and recorded at Instrument Number LR080005763 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Stafford County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $457,500.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the
front steps of the Judicial Bldg, Circuit Court for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA on:
November 6, 2017 at 10:00 AM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain lot or parcel of real estate, together with all improvements thereon
and all rights and privileges thereto appurtenant, lying and being in
Chancellor Magisterial District, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, known and
described as Lot 102, Section 3A, Sheraton Hills South, as shown on
plat of subdivision made by Sullivan, Donahoe and Ingalls, dated May 29,
2001, revised August 10, 2001, and recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the
Circuit Court of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Plat File 8, Pages 332
through 334, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of
redemption by the Internal Revenue Service. The property will be sold
“AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND
SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of
way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust
to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of
the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to
the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received
in the office of the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15)
days of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire
deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale
and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, whether incurred prior to or after the sale,
and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In
the event taxes, any other public charges have been advanced, a credit
will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of
settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay the seller's attorneys at settlement,
a fee of $445.00 for review of the settlement documents.
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All
that certain lot or parcel of land with all rights and privileges thereto
appurtenant, situate, lying and being in Falmouth Magisterial District
Stafford County, Virginia, a short distance from the King’s Highway, and
opposite the lower part of the City of Fredericksburg, Virginia, being known
and described as Lot No. 3 in Block 26 of addition “A” to Section 2 of
Ferry Farms Development, as shown on plats and written consents to
recordation thereof embodying restrictive covenants, all duty recorded in
the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of Stafford County; Virginia, and as
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 17, 24 , 2017
October 17, 24, 2017
Oct 10, 17, 2017
877
12135191
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
2815 O'Connor Court,
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $70,300.00, dated May 26, 2006
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Document No. 200600019760, default
having occurred in the payment
of the Note thereby secured and
at the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on November 14,
2017 at 12:00 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 120, Section 2, Pelhams Crossing, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57228
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 16,17,18,19,20,2017 12136446
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
878
12134349
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
191 SMITHFIELD WAY,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 7, 2005, in
the original principal amount of
$414,096.41 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR050028960. The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
October 26, 2017 , at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL OF THE
FOLLOWING LAND LOCATED IN
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: LOT 117, SECTION
7C, PARK RIDGE, AS THE SAME
APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
29, AT PAGES 203-204 AND
RESERVED IN PLAT BOOK 30, AT
PAGES 25-27, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA. SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS,
RESERVATION,
EASEMENTS, COVENANTS, OIL, GAS OR
MINERAL RIGHTS OF RECORD, IF
ANY.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 2, 2013,
in the original principal amount
of $236,537.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 130019792. The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
November 9, 2017 , at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL
OF LAND, TOGETHER WITH ALL
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FALMOUTH-HARTWOOD MAGISTERIAL
DISTRICT, STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND KNOWN, NUMBERED
AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 912,
SECTION 4, OF ENGLAND RUN
NORTH, AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF
SUBDIVISION
RECORDED
IN
PM040000022, IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3200121.
Sept 26, Oct 3, 10, 17, 2017
12132123
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
Oct 10, 17, 2017
12135192
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PETWORTH 1 Furn rm, free cable/
int., nr Petw. Sta. $575/mo. all
utils incl. Shirley 202-723-1742
Rooms for Rent
NE DC Large Bedroom, no pets.
$700 includes utilities, Please Call
301-490-6410
MARYLAND
SF
SF
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain tract or parcel of real estate situate, lying and being in the George
Washington Magisterial District, Stafford County, Virginia, containing 5.74
acres, more or less, and being shown as Lot 2 on a plat of R. Wayne Farmer,
C.L.S., dated April 9, 1969, and duly recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the
Circuit Court of Stafford County, Virginia in Plat Book 4, Page 111, and as
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 17, 24, 2017
MARYLAND
Roommates
ROCKVILLE- Cln, furn. BR. Qn bed,kit.,
FR. TV, int. ft. porch, bk scrnd porch,
Util. incl. $675/mo. 301-424-8377
CAPITAL HEIGHTS / SEAT PLEASANTM pref to share house. $160 and up/
week. Good transp. 301-499-6323
SILVER SPRING - House to share,
furnished room, male pref, no smoking, near Sligo Creek Park & Venice
Ave. $750 utils incl. 240-462-3790
FT. WASHINGTON - Large furnished
room, carpet, cable TV/wifi, N/S.
$170/wk + $100 dep. 301-919-5150
HYATTSVILLE - 1 furnished BR $600
or negotiable. Avail now. utilities incl
and free cable. Quiet. 240-476-9245
HYATTSVILLE - Room for rent in SFH,
N/S. $550 + sec dep + shrd util.
240-481-4212
or
301-779-2426
LANHAM- 1BR in house $700.
Bsmt $850. All util incl. 7304
Galileo Way. Call 240-997-3826
LANHAM - room for rent. $700,
utilities included. Near train. Quiet
& clean. Call 240-667-2599
LAUREL-Rooms for rent, w-w carpet,
W/D, D/W, great loc, $585 or $650
(1/2BA incl). utils incl. 240-475-4072
OLNEY, MD - 2 blocks away from
Montgomery General Hospital
1 spac.room, private bath/pvt pkng
$750. All util incl Avail now . Near
trans. 240-602-3131
Roommates
ADELPHI - Basement room for rent.
Furnished. Quiet neighborhood.
1 person. Call 301-887-1788
237
260
Furniture
WALDORF, MD- Liv room furn & more!
exc cond. Leather/fabric set. $1K ea
set OBO. Mercedes 2005 Benz E320
98K mi. $8,799 OBO 202-553-7522
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
Merchandise Wanted
FREON WANTED—Old R-12 collecting
dust? We buy cylinders & cans of
R-12! EPA Certified. (312) 291-9169
www.RefrigerantFinders.com
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266
Will Come to you!
355
Garage Sales, VA
Virginia Beach—2405 Strawflower
Ct, 23453. 10/12/2017. 1999 Winnebago Minnie Winnie 619-981-7635
Moving Sale
1616 W St SE - 10/15 7AM-7PM chairs,
wooden furniture such as desks,
tables, evacuation cribs, toddler
cots, 202-678-2700
ANNANDALE, VA -3916 Malcolm Ct.
10/21 9AM- 3PM. Tools, Tool boxes,
Yard Equipment, Cars & Furniture.
416
Tickets, Wanted
REDSKINS, WIZARDS, CAPS
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
610
Dogs for Sale
Belgian Malinois Puppies - 9 weeks,
AKC, family, home protection, world
shenkin lines, vaccinated, $1500
571-643-2107
CHOCOLATE LAB PUPPIES - 9 weeks,
AKC, lovable healthy puppies, shots
and wormed, health cert. $575
610-857-1932
ENGLISH BULLDOGS, M's, AKC,
Fat, Sassy, Lots of Wrinkles, S
& W, Health Guaranteed, Family
Raised, $1800+, Call or Text For
More Info. rdy 10/14 240-925-1545
GERMAN SHEPHERD WORKING
LINE PUPPIES- 6 F's, blk & sable,
ready 10/16. vt chkd, UTD shts,
hlth guar., $1,800. World class
ped., AKC reg. 301-956-4635
SILVER SPRING- Lrg rm, priv BA, off st
parking, kit privileges, close to DT Sil
Spr, NS $550/m+ utils. 301-526-8204
SILVER SPRING/WHEATON-1 furn BR.
1/2 block to Metro subway. N/S.
N/P. Full house privlgs. Cable. $545
+ utils. Text/Call 410-916-8575
SILVER SPRING - Furnished, gorgeous 5 level home. Near metro &
shopping. Cable, internet, utilities
inc. Use of kitchen, living room,
patio, fireplace, W/D & rec room.
Avail now. $750/mo. 240-273-8547
JACK RUSSELL PUPS - Smooth,
Broken & rough NKC reg $800. S/W.
Ready now. Donna 301-751-0892
djackrussells@gmail.com
LAB PUPS- AKC, Yellow Females,
Ready 10/20. Deposit. S&W, health
guar. Convenient to I 95 VA.
$750. Call 804-994-3171
SHIH TZU POODLE MIX PUPS & TOY
POODLE PUPS- Shots, wormed, mother & father on premises. Mix 11 wks
old. Toys ready 10/14. 540-406-0740
Shihtzu Yorkie Morkie—PUPPY SALE
304-904-6289,Cash,CC,Easy Finance
wvpuppy.com 59 EastRd Martinsburg WV exit16E AcrossFromBigLots
SPRINGDALE - Female pref, furn.
BR avail now. Queen size bed.
$650/mo + $250 security deposit.
utils incl.N/S. Call 336-708-5657
TEMPLE HILLS- 23rd Pl. close to
trans/shops, quiet, clean, Lg lower
level, 2 rooms w/half BA, $200 dep,
$800/mo avail. Call 301-390-5608
VIRGINIA
Roommates
1370
ANNANDALE - Bedroom in Single
family home, Female preferred, Full
Bathroom. Exc. location. Util. incl.
Fios Internet. $645 703-256-2584
LORTON- Near Train station, bus line
& shopping center, shared bath
$600. Call 703-589-0117
You, too, could have
home delivery.
Rockville- 2 rms avail (MBR & Rec
rm), pvt BA. All amens/utils shared.
Pref Fem. $650 & $400. 240-793-6770
Firewood
FIREWOOD SALES, seasoned Oak,
$350/full cord. Delivered. NOVA.
Robert 703-424-4064 or 703-855-4691
12134607
BOWIE - Bsmt for rent $800 utils &
internet inc. Furn rooms $650 utils &
internet inc. No smkng. 301-350-4449
DERWOOD - Large room w/ pvt BA
for rent. $750+ $400 sec dep. Inc
utils & cable. Near Shady Grove
Metro & shopping. 240-386-9587
Gaithersburg
2,300
WAREHOUSE FOR RENT
3,280sf warehouse with office fitup, located off Shady Grove Road
and 270 (No Automotive)
Sam York
202-431-4612
MARYLAND
Roommates
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Female preferred
$550 dep. NS/NP. $550/mo utilities
included. 301-736-3217 after 4pm
Warehouse Space,
Rent
358
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
April 2, 2004, and recorded at Instrument Number LR040012801 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Stafford County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $304,000.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the
front steps of the Judicial Bldg, Circuit Court for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA on:
November 6, 2017 at 10:00 AM
Roommates
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3190511.
NE DC - Room for rent in pvt home,
quiet area, near Metro $500/mo
utilities included. 202-706-4248
Wake up to
home delivery.
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
240 Sandy Ridge Road,
Fredericksburg, VA 22405
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
10 JOPLIN COURT,
STAFFORD, VA 22554.
12134617
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
1-800-753-POST
SF
Business /
Entrepreneurial
Opportunities
INVESTOR WANTED- experienced
DC / VA contractor looking for
investor/partner to flip houses.
GREAT returns! 202-528-4600
HandymanMastersLLC.com
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
You know us for shopping, and
now Cars.com is the site for the
entire life of your car. So for
every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 10x5.25
FROM "NO
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated February 18, 2015,
in the original principal amount
of $198,400.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1478 at Page 2062 as Instrument
No. 2015-00001404 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on
November 9, 2017, at 12:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL OF LOT
72 IN SECTION THREE, PHASE TWO,
MEADFIELD SUBDIVISION, AS THE
SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED,
PLATTED AND RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 715 AT PAGE 1013, AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF FAUQUIER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3212011.
Membership is rewarding.
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S2930 10x3
872
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated May 8, 2007, and recorded in
Book 19323 at Page 1608 as Instrument Number 2007013805.001, of the
Fairfax County land records the undersigned Substitute Trustees, will offer
for sale at public auction on October 18, 2017 at 11:00 AM at the front
of the Fairfax County Circuit Court (Fairfax County Judicial Center, 4110
Chain Bridge Road), at Fairfax, Virginia, the following property:
Lot THIRTEEN (13), Section ONE (1), WEST OX CLUSTER, as the same appears
duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 5484 at page 1323
among the land records of Fairfax County, Virginia.
873
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3360 Woodburn Road, Unit 24
Annandale, VA 22003
Old Dominion Trustees, Inc., Substitute Trustees
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 787-7562
File No. 8207.81575
October 10, 17, 2017
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
11708 Fillmore Lane,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
TRUSTEE'S SALE
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2414 Cypress Green Lane
Herndon, VA 20171
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E1
EE
KLMNO
HEalth&Science
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2017
.
SECTION E
EZ
EE
THE WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUE
JULIA YELLOW FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
What can be
done about
hot flashes?
BY
Historical items
show how care
affected women
E RIN B LAKEMORE
T
hey strike at the most inopportune
times: During meetings, at dinner, in
bed. The face flushes, the heart races.
Fingers tingle and perspiration washes over
the body. They’re hot flashes, and for more
than 70 percent of women, they’re an inconvenient and sometimes unpleasant reality of
menopause.
So what’s the cause? Carolyn Crandall, a
professor of medicine at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine, has bad news: “We
don’t know the answer.”
The symptoms seem to begin in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain that helps
regulate body temperature. Hormonal
changes may cause the hypothalamus to tell
the body it’s really hot. As a result, the body
HOT FLASH CONTINUED ON E4
More questions about women’s health,
answered: E4, E5
BY
MORE ON WOMEN’S HEALTH
Midlife high blood pressure
and dementia. E3
Eye disorders
plague women
more than men
L IA K VATUM
‘W
hat are those?” I asked, pointing
to an instrument that appeared to
be a fork and a spoon joined with
handles. “Those are salad tongs,” deadpanned Mary Hyde, my guide through the
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists museum. I looked at her quizzically. “Just kidding,” she said. “That’s a lifter.
For a uterus.”
The lifter, also called a uterine elevating
forceps, is one of a variety of instruments
used when removing tissue, tumors or
polyps.
Nestled in the basement of ACOG’s Washington headquarters, where Hyde is senior
director of the resource center, the museum
opened in 2008. Its collection of about 4,500
objects takes you on a journey through the
history of the medical treatment of women.
There are pills and potions, including an
GYNECOLOGY CONTINUED ON E6
BY
ALSO INSIDE
A real-life ‘drain the swamp’ is
being reversed. E2
A dugout, possibly from the
1600s, surfaces after Irma. E2
What C. difficile is and why
you should protect yourself. E3
The story of Jews and
medicine in America. E3
M ARLENE C IMONS
A
t first, it felt like something was in
her eye. Then her eyes turned red,
watery and irritated. Her vision became blurry, and she found it difficult to
read. It was painful to fly, and to be in air
conditioning. Ilene Gipson, a scientist who
studies eye disorders, didn’t need a specialist to tell her what she had. “I knew what it
was,” she says.
Gipson had dry eye disease, an ailment
that occurs when the eye does not produce
enough tears, or when the tears evaporate
too quickly. It is the most common eye
problem that older women experience, and
it disproportionately affects women: more
than 3 million women vs. about 1.7 million
men, according to the American Academy
of Ophthalmology.
And it’s not the only one. Many eye
disorders — some of them quite serious —
VISION CONTINUED ON E4
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
S C I E NC E NE WS
Look what the hurricane uncovered in Florida:
A canoe whose wood may date to the 1600s
fort lauderdale, fla. — Re-
COURTESY OF EVERYDAY EXTINCTION
They don’t stay small forever
Shao Jian Feng, 26, holds a saltwater crocodile at his home on the outskirts of Beijing. “There are 23 crocodilian species in the world,” he
boasts. “We hope to collect all of them.” This juvenile specimen of the largest reptile in the world is 21/2 years old. When fully grown, it may be
20 feet long. In the wild, saltwater crocodiles are found mainly in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. This photo comes from Everyday
Extinction, a group of 25 photographers using Instagram to raise awareness of environmental problems.
searchers may be closer to figuring
out the origin of an old canoe that
surfaced after Hurricane Irma.
Using radiocarbon dating, archaeologists recently determined
that the wood used to create the
vessel may date to the 1600s.
“A find like this is always exciting, especially when it represents
something completely unlike the
types of canoes previously discovered,” said Paul N. Backhouse,
director of the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum at the Big Cypress Seminole
Indian Reservation.
The canoe probably “had quite
a biography during its life span,”
he said.
A photographer scouting for
damage after Irma made the discovery about 35 miles east of
Orlando, near the Kennedy Space
Center.
Randy “Shots” Lathrop said he
snapped a photo of the vessel
with his phone and texted it to a
friend who is an underwater archaeologist to make sure he had
found something of value.
State officials loaded it onto a
truck and took it to Tallahassee,
where officials are beginning a
process to make sure the canoe
doesn’t deteriorate further.
State officials said radiocarbon
dating showed there is a 50 percent chance that the canoe’s wood
dates to the 1600s. The paint and
wire nails found on it may reveal
that the canoe itself wasn’t built
until the 1800s or 1900s.
There’s a smaller chance the
canoe dates to between 1760 and
1818.
“The mystery is still not solved.
It’s only starting,” Lathrop said.
“I’d certainly like to learn more
about it.”
The canoe certainly has caught
the attention of the Seminole
Tribe of Florida, Backhouse said.
“The dating, construction and
other details of the canoe are
unusual and intriguing,” he said.
Sarah Revell, a spokeswoman
for the Florida Department of
State, won’t yet guess where it
came from.
“Until we do a more-thorough
analysis of the construction techniques and consult with the Seminole tribe and other tribes, we
can’t be sure at this time if the
canoe was associated with any
particular tribe,” she said.
Revell said the canoe is destined for a museum eventually.
“It could take a year or longer
to complete the preservation
process,” she said.
Although such canoes are rare,
a number of them have been
found across the state through
the decades.
“Florida has the highest concentration of dugout canoes in the
world,” Revell said. “We have more
than 400 documented dugout canoes in our state. Each canoe is
important, in that it adds to our
database and helps fill out the
picture of how people used these
canoes over thousands of years.”
Lathrop said he is thrilled he
was part of it all. “I’m glad we
could save it,” he said.
— Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel
‘Drain the swamp’ may not be an idea that floats
BY
B EN F INLEY
suffolk, va. — This is a story
about a future president who
tried to drain a swamp and about
government workers who are
making it wet again.
By returning the habitat to its
natural state, they just might
keep the Great Dismal Swamp
from heating up the planet.
It was a young George Washington, working as a surveyor
254 years ago, who saw profits in
the wetlands straddling the Virginia-North Carolina border.
The seemingly impenetrable
swamp had been dismissed as a
deadly morass where explorers
vanished and runaway slaves escaped. Today, scientists have discovered that the swamp’s peat
soil is a vital piece of the climatechange puzzle, able to either
contain or release a greenhouse
gas that causes global warming.
Washington and his fellow investors had slaves dig a ditch to
drain the spongy peat soil and
log the cypress and cedar trees.
Their rot-proof lumber was perfect for ship masts, roof shingles
and fence posts.
Washington never drained the
whole swamp, but loggers kept
plundering it for generations,
drying out the soil, altering the
habitat and making it more vulnerable to wildfires. What’s left
of it didn’t become a national
wildlife refuge until 1974.
Now the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to undo the
damage by gradually “rewetting” the swamp. Refuge manager Chris Lowie and his staff
are slowly raising the water
table in the swamp’s remaining
113,000 acres by capturing and
rechanneling rainfall in the
vast network of ditches that
scar the land. Aluminum pipes
and wooden boards now control water levels in about a third
of the refuge.
Just how wet the Dismal
should be — and where it should
be wet — may take years to
determine. Such decisions will
depend on goals for preserving
the swamp’s wildlife, the refuge’s
ultimate purpose. For example,
officials may try to grow more
native pines to support the precarious population of red-cockaded woodpeckers. These experts are taking careful steps,
trying to avoid doing more harm
to the altered landscape.
“It took 250 years to get to this
point,” Lowie said. “Maybe it’s
going to take another 50 to
understand the swamp.”
Such projects have become
more urgent as scientists pay
more attention to how peat
swamps affect climate change.
Peat soil consists of the partially decomposed twigs, leaves
and roots of plants that have
accumulated in wet conditions
over centuries. When this soil
dries and is exposed to oxygen,
microscopic organisms break
down the peat into carbon dioxide and release the greenhouse
gas.
“You simply put the lid back on
the pot by rewetting,” said Hans
Joosten, who leads the Depart-
RANDY "SHOTS" LATHROP
Radiocarbon dating shows that the wood in a canoe that surfaced
after Hurricane Irma may date to the 1600s.
S C I E NC E S C AN
ENVIRONMENT
Major libraries unite to explore the impact
that a warmer climate may have on the Arctic
PHOTOS BY STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Burned trunks of white cypress trees rise from the waters of the Great Dismal Swamp in Corapeake,
N.C. The U.S. government is trying to undo the damage from two centuries of logging at the swamp.
ABOVE: Refuge manager Chris Lowie surveys one of the few large
cypresses remaining in the swamp. LEFT: Lowie, foreground, talks
with volunteer Jim Seagraves during construction of a walkway.
ment of Peatland Studies and
Palaeoecology at Greifswald University in Germany.
Peat fires are also a major
concern because they send millions of tons of pollution into the
atmosphere. According to the
“It took 250 years to get
to this point. Maybe it’s
going to take another 50
to understand the
swamp.”
Chris Lowie, manager
of the Great Dismal Swamp
National Wildlife Refuge
U.S. Geological Survey, the last
two big fires at the Great Dismal
Swamp may have released 6.2
million metric tons of carbon
dioxide — more than the annual
output of a million cars.
Last year, the refuge agreed to
share rewetting research with
Sebangau National Park in Indo-
nesia, a country whose recent
peat fires briefly rivaled the carbon emissions of the entire U.S.
economy.
“What we’re learning is that
we’re not alone in this,” Lowie
said. “This is a worldwide issue.”
Judy Drexler, a USGS wetland
ecologist who has studied the
swamp, said rewetting should
reduce the risk of fires, stop the
peat soil from receding and enable it to store more carbon
instead of leaking it.
Drexler said scientists have
long known that peat bogs, when
dried out, can contribute to global warming. But only relatively
recently has the issue gained
attention, partly because of the
massive fires in places such as
Indonesia.
“It’s finally starting to get
traction,” she said.
The Great Dismal Swamp was
once 10 times as big as it is now,
covering a million acres. In 1728,
land surveyor William Byrd described its heart as a horrible
desert that “no beast or bird
approaches,” with woods so thick
that “friendly beams of the sun
can never penetrate them to
warm the earth.”
Today, nearly 150 miles of
ditches mar the landscape, but
nature remains. Driving through
the refuge recently, Lowie passed
a black bear cub that scampered
away in a blur. A bald eagle —
part of another comeback story
— soared above an open swath of
shallow water and trees left dead
by a fire that raged for months in
2011.
The thick stands of cypress
and cedar trees that Washington
spotted in the 1760s have mostly
given way to trees that grow in
drier conditions, such as red
maple and gum.
Still, the black peat soil is
healthy where the refuge has
managed to make it wet again.
Lowie proves it by grabbing a
dead tree branch and plunging it
slowly down, nearly two feet into
the moist soil.
Lowie knows the swamp will
never again resemble the place
Washington knew.
“But I can say we’re doing
great things,” he said. “Not just
for the Great Dismal Swamp, but
for the world.”
— Associated Press
The Arctic’s expanse of ice has
mesmerized humans for millennia — and now it is slowly disappearing.
What might that mean for humanity? For the next year, Arctic
Imagination, a multi-library collaboration, will search for answers with events, conversations,
readings and Web-based exhibitions.
The collective — its members
include the New York Public Library, the National Library of
Norway, the Royal Danish Library, the National Library of
Sweden, the Central Library of
Greenland and the Stockholm
Public Library — appropriately
skews Scandinavian. Its focus,
however, is international. That
makes sense: Arctic ice affects
ecosystems worldwide, and it
holds scientific and symbolic
meaning in art, culture and law
beyond Scandinavia.
In the past, the Arctic was seen
as a distant, ungovernable frontier, a place for adventure and
discovery. But as the ice melts, the
region has become uniquely vulnerable. That change presents
what the collective calls “an intellectual and artistic challenge.”
Arctic Imagination
New York Public Library, Dec. 5
To address that change, Arctic
Imagination has facilitated public talks with such figures as
avant-garde artist Laurie Anderson and hunter Lars Jeremiassen,
who helps monitor Arctic ice
using dog sleds.
On Dec. 5 at 7 p.m., Canadian
author, journalist and filmmaker
Naomi Klein will join journalist
Martin Breum at the New York
Public Library for Arctic Imagination’s next United States-based
event, a conversation about climate change and Arctic ice. Tickets for the discussion are $40,
and the event will be livestreamed on the library’s website.
Can’t head to New York or
Scandinavia to ponder the onceendless Arctic? You can join the
conversation without leaving
your laptop. The collective’s online “Polar Treasures” exhibition
features Arctic explorers’ vintage
diaries, old advertising images
that imagine the icy perils of the
North Pole, and more. Learn
more at arcticimagination.com.
— Erin Blakemore
NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY ARCHIVES
The “Castle” iceberg was photographed during an 1869 Arctic
expedition.
H E ALTH & S C I E NC E
Editor: Laura Helmuth • Assistant Editors: Kathy Lally, Margaret Shapiro
• Art Director: Alla Dreyvitser • Advertising Information: Ron Ulrich,
202-334-5289, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com • To contact us: Email:
health-science@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-5031 Mail: The
Washington Post, Health, 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
H EA LTH S CA N
Antibiotics can spawn nasty infections
BIOLOGY
Traveling abroad? You may want to watch
this series about parasitic killers. Or not.
After a family vacation in
Colombia, an American teenager returned home with a rash.
Doctors found the cause — maggots that were hatching and
eating her flesh. In all, 212 tiny
larvae were picked from her
head.
Her harrowing experience
and that of other Americans
who hosted foreign organisms
make up “Monsters Inside Me,”
an Animal Planet show whose
eighth season is getting underway.
The series is popular because
people respond with fear about
these invasive creatures, many
of which are parasites, said Dan
Riskin, a biologist who appears
in each episode. But parasites
deserve our respect, he said.
Half of the world’s organisms
are parasites, scientists have
estimated, and they have adapted remarkably well. For example, filarial worms — which
cause elephantiasis, a lymphatic disease characterized by enlargement of body parts — can
live in a human host eluding our
immune system and not causing symptoms for years.
Parasites such as the four
species of plasmodium that
cause malaria in humans infect
large populations worldwide
and kill hundreds of thousands
of people. Many parasitic diseases, such as dengue fever and
leprosy, are not common in developed countries, but others
exist in the United States. The
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention estimates that each
year, 1.1 million Americans are
infected with Trichomonas vaginalis, which causes the sexually
transmitted
disease
trichomoniasis. And 800,000
E3
EE
“Monsters Inside Me”
Animal Planet
people are infected each year
with Toxoplasma gondii, which
causes toxoplasmosis. Humans
get infected “by eating raw or
undercooked meat, or ingesting
food, soil or water contaminated by cat feces” containing the
parasite, according to the CDC.
Toxoplasmosis causes hundreds of deaths and thousands
of hospitalizations each year,
the agency stated.
“Monsters Inside Me” focuses on parasites that are not
often seen in the United States.
The past season featured Dirofilaria immitis, a parasitic
roundworm that infected a
woman’s eye, and Balamuthia
mandrillaris, an amoeba that
caused blindness, severe neurological symptoms and ultimately the death of a 6-year-old boy.
The parasites and other foreign organisms and objects are
presented as “criminals” in the
show, a biological “Law and
Order,” with physicians and the
patient trying to find them and
to devise a cure.
“Monsters Inside Me,” based
on real-life cases, serves as a
warning, Riskin said. Because
many parasites are uncommon
in the United States, Americans
aren’t as alert to their dangers
when they travel abroad. “Read
up on what you can catch in the
place you are visiting,” he advised. That might reduce your
chances of becoming infected
by a parasite, such as botfly
maggots inside your head, as
Riskin was during a trip to
Belize.
— Sofia Anjuman Ali
A
ntibiotics treat infections but can cause
them, too. In fact, a
study recently published in the Annals of
Internal Medicine documents an
alarming rise in the number of
hard-to-treat infections linked to
antibiotics.
After analyzing the medical
records of more than 38 million
hospital patients, University of
Pennsylvania researchers discovered that “multiply recurrent”
Clostridium difficile infections
increased by almost 200 percent
between 2001 and 2012. The rate
of standard, more easily treated
C. diff infections rose by 40
percent during that time.
C. diff bacteria cause dangerous inflammation, abdominal
cramping and severe diarrhea.
Each year in the United States,
they sicken an estimated 500,000
Americans and contribute to the
deaths of 29,000, according to
the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC).
How you get C. diff
Most people who develop a C.
diff infection are taking an antibiotic, or did so in the prior few
months. In addition to killing off
harmful bacteria, antibiotics destroy protective intestinal bacteria for up to several months. That
allows C. diff bacteria to take
hold and multiply.
And unless a hospital is scrupulous about sanitation, C. diff
can easily spread from one patient to the next via hospital staff
or equipment.
This new study shows that
once-reliable antibiotic treatments for C. diff infections are no
longer working in many cases.
More patients have persistent or
recurring diarrhea and other C.
diff symptoms for two months or
longer, even after being given
three or more courses of different
antibiotics.
One important contributor to
the increase in intractable C. diff
infections is probably the overuse of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones, says Clifford McDon-
CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION
An illustration depicts a Clostridium difficile bacillus, a common
cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea.
ald, associate director for science
in the division of health-care
quality promotion at the CDC.
These drugs, which include ciprofloxacin (Cipro and generic)
and levofloxacin (Levaquin and
generic), are known as broadspectrum antibiotics because
they target a wide variety of
bacteria. Because fluoroquinolones kill more of your body’s
“good” bacteria than more narrowly targeted drugs such as
penicillin, they leave you more
vulnerable to C. diff.
A recent study published in the
Lancet found that when British
hospitals cut back on prescribing
fluoroquinolones, the rate of C.
diff infections dropped by
80 percent.
Protect yourself
If you or a family member or
friend is in the hospital:
Ask why your doctor is recommending an antibiotic. CDC
research shows that about onethird of antibiotics given in the
hospital are not needed, or are
the wrong type — a broad-spectrum drug, for example, instead
of a more targeted one. If the
doctor suspects an infection, he
or she should do a rapid test, if
possible, to quickly pinpoint the
possible bacteria and prescribe
the most effective antibiotic at
the lowest dose.
Insist on hand-washing and
gloves. Wash your own hands
regularly with soap and water
and ask everyone who walks into
your room whether they’ve done
the same. (If they’re at your sink,
make sure they scrub for 40 to 60
seconds.) Check that health-care
providers put on new gloves
when conducting any physical
exams. Note that rubbing on
alcohol-based hand sanitizer
won’t destroy C. diff, according to
the CDC.
Bring bleach wipes. C. diff
and other bacteria can live for
weeks on surfaces such as bed
rails, doorknobs and television
remotes. Clean anything you
touch with a disinfectant wipe,
McDonald says.
Question the need for heartburn drugs. Hospital patients are
sometimes prescribed protonpump inhibitors such as esomeprazole (Nexium and generic)
and omeprazole (Prilosec and
generic) to prevent heartburn or
stomach bleeding. These can increase C. diff infection risks because they reduce levels of stomach acids that typically kill C. diff
bacteria.
Check for protective measures. Hospitals should order a C.
diff test for anyone who has
diarrhea (three loose stools within 24 hours), the CDC says. Anyone with diagnosed C. diff should
be in a single room, and healthcare providers should wear
gloves and gowns when treating
that patient.
Stay vigilant at home. You
may continue to be vulnerable to
a C. diff infection after you’re
released, so keep up the good
hygiene, McDonald advises. If
you develop signs of infection —
fever, diarrhea, abdominal pain,
nausea or loss of appetite —
contact your doctor right away.
© Copyright 2017, Consumer Reports Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
Q U I C K S TU D Y
Women with high blood pressure in middle age may be at elevated risk of dementia in later years
ANIMAL PLANET
A sandfly is among the “biological criminals” whose misdeeds are
portrayed on “Monsters Inside Me.”
The question
blood pressure’s link to dementia in men.
Why some people develop dementia and others do not often
remains unclear. Might blood
pressure play a role in this?
HISTORY
Exhibit shows how anti-Semitism led Jews
in America to create their own medical system
Chicken soup doesn’t just heal
the soul — it also heals the body.
The comforting concoction has
been shown to help reduce the
respiratory-tract inflammation
that goes with the common cold.
But that hot, healing soup is far
from the only Jewish contribution to health care.
Hepatitis B vaccine. Chemotherapy. Lasik. All were created
by Jewish Americans.
So it may come as a surprise
that, well into the 20th century,
American Jews faced significant
barriers to practicing medicine
and even receiving medical care.
Before World War II, for example,
many medical schools put strict
quotas on Jewish students.
“Beyond Chicken Soup: Jews
and Medicine in America,” an
exhibition at the Maltz Museum
of Jewish Heritage outside Cleveland, looks at the ways Jews in
America created their own
health-care system in response to
widespread discrimination.
As anti-Semitism threatened
American Jews, they sidestepped
the medical establishment, creating everything from medical
schools to hospitals to provide
much-needed care.
Beyond Chicken Soup:
Jews and Medicine in America
Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage
Beachwood, Ohio
One such hospital, Mount Sinai
in Cleveland, morphed from a facility focused on Jewish patients to
one where the poor could get care.
Although the hospital closed in
1996 — done in by the overwhelming cost of its mission — it lives on
as a charitable foundation focusing
on Jewish health. (The foundation
helped fund the exhibition, which
was created by the Jewish Museum
of Maryland with support from the
National Endowment for the Humanities.)
More than 200 items from
Mount Sinai Hospital and elsewhere tell the story of how Jews
used medicine to assimilate into
American society despite the odds
— and contribute to medicine along
the way.
The exhibition is locally focused,
but its story is national. It’s free
with admission to the museum,
which also tells other stories of
diversity and tolerance. Check it
out through April 8.
— Erin Blakemore
This study
The researchers analyzed data
on 5,646 adults, including blood
pressure readings taken when
most were in their early 30s and
again in their mid-40s. In a
15-year span after the participants were, on average, about 60
years old, 532 people were diagnosed with dementia. No correlation was found between early30s high blood pressure and
later-in-life dementia. However,
women who had high blood
pressure in their 40s were 65
percent more likely to develop
dementia than were those who
had normal blood pressure at
that age. The risk was even
higher — 73 percent — for women who developed high blood
pressure for the first time in their
40s, compared with those whose
blood pressure was normal in
both their 30s and 40s. For men,
no link was found between hypertension in either decade and
subsequent development of dementia.
Who may be affected?
Women who have high blood
pressure in their 40s. High blood
pressure can damage small blood
vessels in the brain, and previous
studies have found uncontrolled
high blood pressure late in life to
be a contributor to dementia. A
loss of memory and thinking
skills, affecting behavior and
making normal daily activities
difficult, are characteristics of
dementia, which affects more
women than men. Alzheimer’s is
the most common form of dementia.
Caveats
The study found an association between midlife high blood
pressure and development of
dementia but not absolute proof
that one caused the other.
Among study participants, more
men than women died, which
the researchers said may have
led to an underestimation of
ISTOCK
Operators standing by. Call for home delivery.
Find this study
Online Oct. 4 in Neurology
(neurology.org; click on “Ahead
of Print”)
Learn more
Information on dementia is
available
at
ninds.nih.gov
(search for “dementia: hope”).
Learn more about blood pressure at heart.org (click “conditions”).
— Linda Searing
The research described in Quick
Study comes from credible, peerreviewed journals.
ISTOCKPHOTO
free educational seminar
Custom Knee Replacements:
Who’s a Candidate?
The Sibley Institute of Bone &
Joint Health is pleased to present
an informative, free seminar on
Custom Knee Replacements:
Who’s a Candidate? with Marc
Connell, M.D. Dr. Connell is
a board-certified orthopaedic
surgeon who specializes in
sports medicine, arthroscopy and
joint replacement.
Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Sibley Memorial Hospital
Building A, Floor 1, Conference Room 2
5215 Loughboro Road, NW
Space is limited. Light refreshments will be
served and parking is free in the visitor parking
garage next to Building A. For a campus map,
visit Sibley.org and click on Maps & Directions.
Make your reservation today at:
Sibley.org or 202-660-6789
1-800-753-POST
SF
SIBLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL | 5255 LOUGHBORO ROAD, NW | WASHINGTON, DC 20016 | SIBLEY.ORG
E4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
women’s health
Questions about women’s health, answered
A RTICLES
BY
E RIN B LAKEMORE
I’m getting horrible hot flashes. What can I do about
them? Drugs may help, but that’s complicated.
HOT FLASH FROM E1
responds with such things as
sweating and dilated blood vessels
— reactions that usually occur
when the body is actually experiencing extreme heat.
But it’s not really clear what
triggers this process, how to stop it
and even whether a lack of estrogen, the female sex hormone that
declines in middle age, is its cause.
Women with a history of smoking, psychological conditions
such as depression and anxiety,
and high body mass indexes appear to be at higher risk, according
to research. There’s no telling how
long any particular woman will
experience hot flashes; on average, they last seven years — even
longer for African American women — and they may persist for a
lifetime.
Options for attempting to relieve hot-flash symptoms include
traditional hormone replacement
therapy, or HRT, and bioidentical
hormone therapy, which mimics
hormones produced by ovaries using plant or animal derivatives.
Self-management is another
approach, for which the National
Institute on Aging recommends
dressing in layers, carrying a portable fan, maintaining a healthy
weight and trying mindfulness
techniques to ease discomfort.
HRT was common until about
15 years ago, when a major trial
suggested it increased women’s
risk of heart disease and some
breast cancers.
But for a woman who can’t take
the heat, there’s no shame in compensating for the estrogen lost
during menopause. “She should
not feel bad,” says Crandall, who
ILLUSTRATIONS BY JULIA YELLOW
FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Are women’s heart attacks really that different from men’s?
Y
ou’ve seen it many times:
A man clutches at his
chest and buckles in agony. It’s what cardiologist Laxmi
Mehta calls “the Hollywood
heart attack.” But for women,
that stereotype can hurt more
than it helps. While chest pain is
the most common heart attack
symptom in women, it may not
be the first. As a result, heart
attacks are often harder to spot.
Women’s symptoms can be
subtle, such as extreme fatigue.
Some women experience an uncomfortable sense of squeezing
or burning in the chest or pressure in the lower chest or upper
abdomen. Others feel back pain,
experience nausea or vomiting,
feel dizzy or experience jaw or
neck pain.
Dramatic and unfamiliar
symptoms and pain that worsens on exertion and then slows
or stops when you do are worth
checking out, says Mehta, director of the Women’s Cardiovascular Health Program at Ohio
State University’s Wexner Medical Center. A sudden cold sweat
or severe abdominal pressure
are also reasons for concern. For
some women, heart attack signs
and symptoms may not take
place all at once. Rather, they
can build over time or begin as
long as a month before the
attack becomes evident.
Symptoms aren’t the only dif-
ference, Mehta says. Women can
experience classic heart attacks,
in which an artery is completely
blocked, but they typically experience partial blockages more
often than men. These partial
blockages are more difficult to
detect. Women are also more
likely to undergo a coronary
artery spasm, in which the heart
tightens and temporarily reduces blood flow into the beating
muscle.
But the biggest danger may be
a woman’s unwillingness to acknowledge a problem. Because
heart attacks are often perceived as “a guy thing,” Mehta
says, she finds that women often
don’t take their symptoms seriously, or prioritize other people’s well-being above their own.
Meanwhile, every minute with-
out treatment chips away at the
chances for a good outcome. “I
can only treat you if you show
up,” Mehta says.
Unfortunately, she says, some
health-care providers don’t recognize subtle symptoms in
women and don’t consider that
a heart attack might be happening. If you suspect a heart attack, she recommends, push for
answers even if your provider is
skeptical. “If someone is not well
versed in the uniqueness of females’ hearts, then you need to
advocate for yourself.”
Other differences between
men and women include disparities in who participates in cardiac rehabilitation — an estimated 80 percent of affected
women don’t receive the full
rehab they should get — and
women’s higher risk for complications, such as bleeding, shock
and stroke, during recovery. Researchers have more to learn, in
part because science has long
downplayed women’s symptoms.
“We know these differences
exist,” Mehta says. “But why
don’t we have enough research
on this uniqueness?” Meanwhile, heart disease is the No. 1
killer of women — and that’s a
risk no one can afford to ignore.
Learn more: heart.org (search
for “women and heart disease”).
health-science@washpost.com
adds that a woman is the only one
who can decide her symptoms are
distressing enough to warrant
hormone therapy. “And if her doctor’s not open to that discussion,
she needs to find another one.”
Not all bioidentical hormones
are created equal.
The Food and Drug Administration has approved some bioidentical hormones such as estradiol, which is chemically identical
to the estrogen produced by the
ovaries.
However, compounded bioidentical hormones — preparations that are custom-blended for
a patient, often based on saliva
and hormone tests that identify
purported hormonal deficiencies
— are not FDA-approved. According to the agency, there is not
enough credible evidence to support claims that they are safe or
effective, and because they are
mixed on a person-by-person basis in different doses and combinations, there’s no way to effec-
tively regulate them. Crandall recommends asking instead for FDAapproved hormones.
A recent study suggests that
five to seven years of traditional
hormone therapy may be safe —
for certain groups. The study
found that women who take HRT
for up to seven years had no greater mortality risk than women who
did not. This jibes with a position
statement by the North American
Menopause Society that treatment should be individualized.
Women younger than 60 who are
within 10 years of the onset of
menopause are more likely to benefit from traditional hormone
therapy.
It’s unclear whether HRT will
come back into fashion. Most
medical associations recommend
that women who choose it take the
lowest dose possible for the shortest time possible.
Learn more: womenshealth.
gov/menopause.
health-science@washpost.com
Pimples are for teenagers. So how come I’m still getting them?!
P
imples are a scourge of
teenage years, right? But
anyone who has looked in
the mirror and found an unwelcome zit in their 20s, 30s or even
later can tell you that clear skin
isn’t always one of adulthood’s
privileges.
A stray pimple — or ongoing
breakouts — aren’t unusual for
adult women, says Nada Elbuluk, a dermatologist and assistant professor at NYU Langone
Health. For many, they’re the
norm. A 2008 study found that
more than 50 percent of women
in their 20s, 35 percent of women in their 30s, 26 percent of
women in their 40s and 15 percent of women in their 50s
reported experiencing acne.
That’s more than men — thanks
in part, says Elbuluk, to hormones that influence oil production in women. (Teenage
boys are more likely to experience acne than teenage girls.)
Acne occurs when hair follicles get blocked by dead skin
cells or oil. Bacteria thrive in
clogged pores and when inflammation results, normally calm
skin can erupt into cysts, pimples and blackheads. Stress, hormonal irregularities, pregnancy,
menopause, genetics and some
dietary factors can spur breakouts. Other times, they just happen. “It’s often very frustrating,”
says Elbuluk. “There’s not really
any way to predict.”
Though adult acne can be a
holdover from the teen years, it
often differs from the breakouts
on teenage faces. Teens tend to
get acne in their “T zone” (across
the forehead, nose and upper
chin); adults usually get it in
what dermatologists call the “U
zone” (around the cheeks,
mouth and chin).
The hormonal acne that
women get tends to cluster
around the chin and jaw line.
And while teens tend to get
inflamed whitehead-type zits,
adult women are more likely to
experience bumps under the
skin. It’s unclear what accounts
for this difference. The menstrual cycle can cause acne, but so
can hormonal imbalances.
Women with acne have plenty
of treatment options, including
over-the-counter benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid, prescription options such as topical
creams, oral antibiotics and
birth control pills, and procedures such as chemical peels.
But think twice before heading to your medicine cabinet for
a “natural” remedy, Elbuluk
says. “I’ve had patients who
have tried lemon juice, apple
cider vinegar or various oils,”
she says. “But there’s no scientific data behind a lot of that stuff.”
Other purported remedies, such
as an iPhone app that claimed to
heal acne but was smacked
down by the Federal Trade Commission as essentially snake oil
in 2012, don’t do anything at all.
Elbuluk recommends you visit a board-certified dermatologist instead of turning your face
into a science experiment.
“Even a natural-seeming product can cause irritation to the
skin,” she says. Dermatologists
can usually help find a treatment you can afford, she adds,
and if the visit reveals an underlying health issue, your entire
body may thank you.
And don’t think you’re in the
clear once you hit menopause:
Some post-menopausal women
get acne, too.
Learn more: aad.org/public/
diseases/acne-and-rosacea/
adult-acne.
health-science@washpost.com
Many women have impaired vision. Most cases are preventable or correctable.
VISION FROM E1
seem to favor women over men.
“Women make up two-thirds of
the people who are visually impaired or blind in the world,” says
Janine Clayton, an ophthalmologist who heads the office of research on women’s health at the
National Institutes of Health.
“Most people would say, ‘That
can’t be the case in the United
States.’ But it is. Unfortunately,
we don’t know why.”
Blindness or vision impairment can disrupt quality of life,
affecting the ability to work, travel, care for one’s family, live independently and stay socially active. An estimated 2.7 million
American women older than 40
have low vision or are blind,
according to NIH’s National Eye
Institute (NEI). Yet an estimated
three-quarters of cases are preventable or correctable, according to Women’s Eye Health, an
educational organization of eye
disease researchers.
Women are especially prone to
dry eye disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, cataracts and Fuchs corneal
endothelial dystrophy, in which a
layer of cells on the inner part of
the cornea die, causing vision to
become cloudy or hazy. All except
dry eye can lead to blindness or
low vision.
Women with diabetes face an
elevated risk of developing eye
problems, among them diabetic
retinopathy, which causes the
blood vessels in the retina to bleed
or leak fluid. Pregnancy also can
prompt eye complications, such
as temporary swelling of the cornea, a condition that results from
increased fluid in the body.
Experts don’t know why wom-
en seem to be more vulnerable
than men to eye disorders. They
speculate hormones are involved
because many eye diseases occur
after menopause, dry eye in particular. But there is no evidence
that shows a link.
“Hormones probably play a
role somewhere in this incredibly
complex interconnection of molecules that we may never find,”
says Gipson, who studies ocular
surface diseases at Harvard’s
Schepens Eye Research Institute.
“But to try to sort it out is mindnumbing.”
Clayton agrees, noting that the
female hormone “estrogen is protective of the optic nerve,” although “it doesn’t prevent dry
eye,” and women who take postmenopausal hormones still experience a high rate of dry eye,
she says.
Experts point out that one reason women seem to suffer these
disorders in larger numbers than
men probably has to do with
longevity. Women live longer
than men, and many eye diseases
occur in older people. In the
United States in 2010, for example, 65 percent of AMD cases were
in women, compared with 35 percent in men, according to the NEI.
AMD causes damage to the macula, a small spot near the center of
the retina that is needed for
sharp, central vision.
Still, even adjusting for age still
leaves more women than men
suffering from AMD.
“The numbers [for AMD] are
huge for women,” says Emily
Chew, deputy clinical director at
the NEI and the primary investigator in studies that found taking
certain combinations of vitamins
slows the progression of AMD.
“Even if you adjust for age, you
still see a larger number of women.”
These vitamin combinations
are formulated specifically for
this purpose and are available
over-the-counter. However, experts recommend that people
take them only if their eye doctor
recommends it.
While the hormone connection
remains murky, other research
indicates that exercising, eating a
healthy diet and shunning smoking can help prevent certain eye
problems and that genes and vitamin D deficiency also may play a
role. Several studies looking at
the impact of diet and exercise on
AMD have found that women
who regularly worked out, didn’t
smoke, and ate lots of leafy green
and orange vegetables, fruit,
dairy, grains and legumes lowered their risk, while having a
genetic predisposition raised it.
There is also evidence that consuming fish full of omega-3 fatty
acids — salmon and tuna, for
example — at least three times a
week is protective against certain
eye diseases. (Pregnant women
are advised that exposure to mercury, which is present in certain
fish, can harm a developing fetus.)
Experts think women’s eye
problems may have some relationship to autoimmune diseases,
which also overwhelmingly strike
women. Inflammation, a hallmark of autoimmune disorders,
also shows up in many of these
eye conditions. One autoimmune
disease, in fact, Sjogren’s syndrome, is characterized by dryness of the mouth and the eyes,
often severe.
“The fact that women are very
much more susceptible to autoimmune diseases and dry eye may
mean they are more likely than
ISTOCK
“Women make up twothirds of the people who
are visually impaired or
blind in the world.”
Janine Clayton, an ophthalmologist
at the National Institutes of Health
men to develop inflammation in
response to eye injury — for example, drying of the surface of the
eye,” Gipson says.
Dry eye disease “is the most
common [eye] problem that older
women experience,” says Rachel
Bishop, chief of the NEI’s consult
services section. “Most eye doctors regard it as a nuisance condition. Dry eye merits a work-up
that it usually doesn’t get. Because it’s not something that
causes blindness or something a
doctor can take to surgery, it
doesn’t always get the attention it
deserves. But it’s not just a nuisance condition. It’s not as simple
as it sounds.”
Dry eye disease can be debilitating, according to Clayton of the
women’s health research office at
the National Institutes of Health.
“The cost of treating dry eye
annually in the United States is
$3.84 billion, including prescription drugs,” she says. “If you account for people not working,
that number goes up to $55 billion.”
It can be treated — but not
cured — by using artificial tears
or stronger prescription drops.
Sunglasses that have side shields
to block wind and dry air can
reduce symptoms in windy or dry
conditions.
“This is not a minor thing for
people who have it,” Clayton says.
“It makes you light-sensitive and
affects your ability to work at a
computer. You blink a lot. You
have to take more breaks. You
don’t want to go to movies where
you have to read subtitles. Because the wind dries out your
eyes, you can’t tolerate leisure
activities. Doctors often don’t
take it seriously, but it’s a real
disease that causes a real impact.”
Gipson agrees. She was lucky.
Her dry eye disease resolved on
its own several years ago, although she doesn’t know why.
This is unusual, as it is typically
chronic.
“During the period I had it, I
couldn’t go into an arid environment,” she recalls. “Flying was so
painful, I had to sit with a wet
cloth over my face. I’m also a
birdwatcher, and I had to wear
goggles with a moisture component to go birdwatching. I used
[over-the-counter] ointments to
protect the surface of my eyes
when I went to bed, which makes
you bleary-eyed, so you can’t do it
during the day. I thought I would
have to live with it for the rest of
my life.”
Women, older women in particular, should never ignore their
eyes — although many do, experts
say. Too often, they are so busy
caring for others that “they tend
to take care of themselves last,”
Clayton says. A thorough annual
eye exam for women is no less
important than a mammogram
or Pap smear, she adds.
“Eyes indicate overall general
health,” Clayton says. “The eye is
part of your entire body. It’s not a
separate system. Diseases that
affect your body — high blood
pressure, for example — can show
up in your eye. An ophthalmologist can diagnose a disease you
didn’t know you had by examining your eyes. A trip to the [eye]
doctor not only could save your
eyes, but your life.”
health-science@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E5
EE
women’s health
A RTICLES BY E RIN B LAKEMORE
Does breast-feeding really decrease a mother’s
risk of developing breast cancer?
F
or babies, the benefits of
breast-feeding are clear: a
stronger immune system,
reduced risk for some chronic
health conditions and a closer
bond with mom. But does breastfeeding also protect women
against breast cancer?
Nursing has been linked to a
reduced risk of breast cancer in
both pre- and post-menopausal
women. But, says Virginia Borges,
director of the University of Colorado Cancer Center’s young women’s breast cancer program, “it
gets complicated from here.”
Nursing a baby changes the
structure of the breast. Even after
breast-feeding ends, microscopic
changes in the milk-delivery system protect the breast against
precancerous cells, Borges says.
This effect is more common
among women who have nursed
more children or for longer periods than others.
The older a woman is when she
gives birth for the first time, the
more likely she is to get breast
cancer. But, Borges says, it’s not
that simple. “I would never want
a woman to decide to not have a
child because of anything related
to breast cancer.”
Breast-feeding may moderately offset the increased risk of
breast cancer associated with
pregnancy: Research has shown
that women who breast-feed can
cut their risk of some aggressive
breast cancers by up to 20 percent
relative to women who don’t
nurse.
One group of women, though,
doesn’t seem to experience the
same effects: African Americans.
ILLUSTRATIONS BY JULIA YELLOW
FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Should women older than 18
get the HPV vaccine?
A
bout half of American
teenagers have been vaccinated against the human
papillomavirus (HPV), the most
common sexually transmitted infection in the United States.
Should adult women follow suit?
Yes, says Lauri Markowitz, a
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention medical epidemiologist who has worked with the
advisory committee that makes
national vaccination recommendations. “Women 18 to 26 should
be vaccinated.”
There’s good reason to follow
that recommendation. According to the American Cancer Society, about 12,820 new cases of
cervical cancer will be diagnosed
in U.S. women this year and more
than 4,000 will die of the disease.
HPV is thought to be responsible
for more than 90 percent of all
cervical and anal cancers in men
and women. The virus also
causes vaginal, vulvar and throat
cancers and genital warts.
Although the majority of HPV
infections do not cause cancer —
most people with an infection
never show any symptoms, and
infections usually go away on
their own — some strains are
particularly dangerous. Gardasil
9, the newest HPV vaccine approved by the Food and Drug
Administration, protects against
nine such strains and, researchers say, may be able to prevent up
to 90 percent of cervical cancers.
(Older vaccines protect against
fewer strains of HPV.)
However, confusion about the
way HPV vaccines protect
against infection can deter some
women. Gardasil 9 is approved
for women up to age 26. Like
other vaccines, it spurs the
body’s immune system to defend
itself against a virus. The FDA
and CDC say the HPV vaccines
are safe and extremely effective:
HPV rates in women ages 14 to 19
years fell 64 percent within six
years of the vaccine’s introduction in the United States in the
mid-2000s and 34 percent in
women ages 20 to 24.
The vaccines are most effective if administered before a
woman becomes sexually active.
The longer a woman has been
sexually active and the more
partners she has had, the more
opportunities she has had to
become infected with an HPV
strain that overlaps with the
vaccine. If she is vaccinated at an
If a woman freezes her eggs,
will her future babies be normal?
I
older age, the vaccine may be less
effective in lowering her cancer
risk, Markowitz says. The vaccine can’t clear any HPV that has
taken hold; it can only prevent
future infection. So essentially if
you already have been exposed to
one of the strains it protects
against, it will be useless against
that strain.
That doesn’t mean it’s useless
to get vaccinated if you’re older
than the recommended age of 11
or 12, Markowitz says. “Your
chances of being protected are
decreasing, but you will still have
some protection,” she says. Although the likelihood that a
sexually active woman has been
infected with one of the strains
the vaccine protects against increases as a woman has more
partners, those who didn’t receive the vaccine at the recommended age are still urged to get
vaccinated to increase the odds
of protection.
Some insurance does not cover the vaccine for those older
than 18 — the shots can be costly,
though the manufacturer may
provide assistance — but it really
varies across the board.
The CDC recommends that
men up to age 21 have the vaccine
to protect against genital warts,
anal and throat cancers and other
conditions, and that men who
have sex with men who did not
get vaccinated before they were 21
get the vaccination up to age 26.
There is an effective way for
women, vaccinated or not, to
reduce their risk of cervical cancer: routine cervical cancer
screening. Pap smears are recommended every three years for
women between ages 21 and 65.
Bottom line: If you’re 26 or
younger, get the vaccine.
Learn more: cdc.gov/hpv/index.html.
Although white women experience breast cancer more often
after menopause than African
American women do, young African American women are more
likely than white women to face
aggressive, early-onset forms of
breast cancer.
Black women also breast-feed
less often. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, substantially fewer African American babies than white
babies are breast-fed. Breastfeeding a baby has been found to
be protective against both shortterm and longer-term health issues for mother and child. Black
women are more likely than others to face lack of support for
breast-feeding at work, may lack
community support and may
have cultural attitudes that influence them not to nurse. Hospitals
play a role, too: In 2014, the CDC
reported that hospitals with a
larger population of African
f you work at such places as
Google, Facebook and Apple, your health insurance
includes an unusual feature:
coverage for egg freezing. Oocyte preservation, touted as a
form of fertility insurance for
women who want to delay
childbearing, has grown in popularity since its “experimental”
label was removed in 2012. But
as it moves into the mainstream, is it really producing
healthy kids?
Absolutely, says Kate Devine,
a reproductive endocrinologist
and co-director of research at
the nation’s largest fertility center, Shady Grove Fertility, which
offers egg freezing. “The data
we have is quite reassuring”
about babies produced through
egg freezing, she says, “particularly for women for whom the
alternative might be not to have
a child from their own eggs.”
The procedure has been
around since the 1980s and has
gained popularity in recent
years as many millennials delay
parenthood. First, a woman’s
ovaries are stimulated using
hormones, then eggs are harvested from the ovaries. (If that
sounds similar to in vitro fertilization, or IVF, which is used
when a couple has had trouble
conceiving, it is.) The extracted
eggs are preserved in specialized vials either through a slowfreeze or a flash-freeze process.
The eggs are then stored in a
cryopreservation facility, or egg
bank. Once it’s time to use them,
they are thawed and fertilized
as in the IVF process, and then
inserted into the woman’s
womb.
Success is hardly guaranteed:
The American Society for Reproductive Medicine estimates
that between 2 and 12 percent of
frozen eggs yield a baby later.
Oocyte preservation allows
women to use eggs from a
younger version of themselves
— versions who, perhaps, haven’t yet had cancer treatment,
found a long-term partner or
been ready for pregnancy.
According to Devine, it’s best
for a woman to freeze her eggs
by the time she’s 35 years old to
ensure the highest rate of success.
So what about the babies
produced with frozen eggs? Because the technology is so new,
there isn’t a lot of data. There’s
no registry of births achieved
using frozen eggs, and very few
studies have focused on outcomes beyond pregnancy.
One 2009 study that tracked
900 babies born using frozen
eggs found no difference in the
rate of birth abnormalities compared with the rate for babies
born with fresh eggs. Most other studies have been much
smaller, tracking just a handful
of babies; they show outcomes
similar to babies born using
traditional IVF.
Tracking usually ends in infancy. Although Devine estimates that tens of thousands of
babies have been born using the
procedure, there’s no way of
knowing how they’re doing as
they grow up.
“Women really want to
know, ‘Am I going to have a baby
from my eggs if I freeze them?’ ”
Devine says.
Perhaps the better question
is “How will these babies fare
once they go home?”
Learn more: reproductivefacts.org (search for “egg freezing”).
health-science@washpost.com
health-science@washpost.com
American patients were less likely than others to promote breastfeeding.
So should you plan on nursing
to potentially stave off breast cancer? Absolutely, Borges says, but
“it takes two to tango.” Not every
woman or baby can successfully
nurse, and breast-feeding may
not be an option because of cultural, lifestyle and other factors.
If a woman isn’t able to breastfeed or chooses not to, lifestyle
choices could help stave off breast
cancer even without the protective effect of nursing. Things such
as moderating or eliminating alcohol and exercising are strongly
linked to protection against premenopausal breast cancers. And,
Borges says, there’s no reason to
think they can’t help protect
against breast cancers in younger
women, too.
Learn more: cdc.gov/cancer/
breast.
health-science@washpost.com
Should pre-menopausal women
be concerned about anemia?
P
regnant women and premenopausal women who
still get their periods are at
the highest risk of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia,
both of which can cause such
problems as fatigue and severe
neurological damage. But how
concerned should women in
general be?
Pretty concerned — especially
given the risks of full-blown anemia. Although most of the 5,200
Americans who die of the condition annually are women age 65
and older, iron-deficiency anemia in younger women can
cause pregnancy complications
and serious health problems including persistent fatigue and
even heart failure.
“Iron is generally fairly difficult to get rid of except by losing
blood or by having babies,” says
Nancy Berliner, chief of hematology at Brigham and Women’s
Hospital and deputy editor of
Blood, the medical journal of the
American Society of Hematology.
Menstruation and pregnancy
are the main causes of iron deficiency in women. The National
Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
says that 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency
anemia, and about half of all
pregnant women develop the
condition, at least temporarily.
“Babies are excellent at siphoning iron away from their
moms,” Berliner says. During
pregnancy, women’s bodies create more blood not just for themselves but also for their babies,
which can deplete their own iron
stores. But regular menstruation
and heavy periods — especially
the heavier flows experienced by
pre-menopausal women — also
take their toll.
If it’s not corrected, iron deficiency — low stores of iron — can
lead to iron-deficiency anemia,
in which red blood cells don’t
make enough hemoglobin, the
protein that carries oxygen
through the body. In addition to
fatigue and neurological issues,
the blood disorder can cause
dizziness, a rapid heartbeat, less
strength and cardiac complications.
Iron supplements can correct
deficiencies and iron-deficiency
anemia, but proceed with caution, doctors say. “I don’t recommend people self-medicating
with iron,” Berliner says. The
recommended daily allowance
of iron is 18 milligrams for women age 19 to 50, and more for
pregnant or lactating women.
While too little iron is not
good, too much can lead to overload and can increase a person’s
risk for such problems as heart
failure, liver disease, diabetes
and neurodegenerative conditions. Berliner recommends that
women ask their doctor for testing before pursuing supplementation.
Sometimes, eating more of
such foods as lean meat, chicken,
seafood, fortified cereal and
bread, nuts and beans can correct a deficiency. Iron supplements can be hard to stomach —
literally — because they can
cause an upset stomach or constipation. In cases where women
need supplementation but don’t
tolerate iron pills, physicians can
administer intravenous iron.
Even though iron deficiency is
the first stop on the road to
iron-deficiency
anemia,
it
doesn’t have to progress that far.
“If people are aware” of warning
signs and get tested for iron
deficiency, Berliner says, “they
can prevent the development of
severe symptoms.” So if you’re
fatigued, weak or pale, or you are
having shortness of breath or
problems concentrating, among
other symptoms, it’s worth asking your physician whether iron
deficiency may be the reason.
Learn more: hematology.org/
patients/anemia/iron-deficiency.aspx.
health-science@washpost.com
Why do some doctors refuse to give women IUDs?
W
hen women don’t want
to conceive a child,
many consider longterm birth control such as an
intrauterine device (IUD), which
can prevent pregnancy for up to
12 years, or a tubal ligation, a
permanent
procedure
that
blocks the fallopian tubes. But
not every doctor is on board with
those options. Why do some
refuse to provide those methods
of contraception?
In some cases, the justification
is medical: a current pregnancy,
significant risks from the anesthesia needed for a tubal ligation, or a uterine abnormality
that might make inserting an
IUD
dangerous.
However,
says Jen Gunter, a San Francisco
area OB/GYN, “there are really
very few medical reasons a woman can’t have an IUD.”
But some providers refuse to
insert IUDs because of miscon-
ceptions about their safety and
function, especially in women
who have not had children. A
2012 survey of medical providers
found that 30 percent mistakenly thought the devices are not
safe for women without children.
And many seem particularly reluctant to insert IUDs in adolescents. (Current practice guidelines say that adolescents and
women who have not had children are candidates for IUD
insertion.)
Another survey conducted in
2014 found that among the 4 percent of providers who didn’t perform any IUD insertions in the
past year, almost a quarter were
concerned that the IUDs are a
method of abortion. (They aren’t,
according to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: Although IUDs can prevent an egg from being fertilized,
they cannot disrupt the implanta-
tion of a fertilized egg.) Compared
with condom use, which fails 18
percent of the time, IUDs fail as
little as 0.2 percent of the time.
Contraceptive pills — the most
popular form of birth
control — involve putting hormones in
your body; they
fail about 9 percent of the time,
in some cases
because women
don’t take the
pill when they
are supposed to
do so.
Doctors’ hesitancy to provide IUDs
stems, in part, from lingering memories of the Dalkon
Shield, a device that was pulled
from the market in 1984 after
causing serious medical problems, including perforations and
scarring infections, in some
women. Today, though, IUDs are
considered safe, and more women want them than ever. According to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, IUD use
increased fivefold between
2002
and
2013.And
earlier
this year, Planned
Parenthood’s
president, Cecile Richards, told
CNN that demand for IUDs
increased substantially after
last November’s
election.
Nevertheless, Gunter says, she hears about
providers refusing to implant
IUDs “all the time.” She encourages women to advocate for
themselves if they meet resistance from their provider — or go
to another provider who recog-
nizes the devices’ merits.
Tubal ligations are trickier.
Sterilization — usually by tubal
ligation — is the second-mostpopular form of contraception in
the United States. However,
some women who get their tubes
tied regret their decision, especially those who have the procedure done at a young age.
Concern about those regrets, enthusiasm about IUDs, and the
general irreversibility of tubal
ligation cause providers such as
Gunter to challenge women who
think they want the procedure.
“It’s all in how you discuss it
with the patient,” she says.
“Sometimes surgeries require
more thinking beforehand. But I
would also expect that people
would present this in a kind,
non-patriarchal way.” Since tubal
ligation involves anesthesia and
surgery, it carries a degree of
risk. For some women, though,
especially those who have had
complications with IUDs, the
risk is worth it.
Ultimately, the decision to
move ahead with sterilization, an
IUD or another form of longterm contraception is a personal
one, doctors said, and patients
must find providers who can
help them reach their goals.
Beyond that Gunter has another suggestion: If you have a
long-term male partner, ask him
to get a vasectomy. Though far
less reversible than an IUD, the
procedure is cheaper than tubal
ligation and simpler to perform.”
It’s a minor outpatient surgical
procedure that involves no [general] anesthetic,” she says. And it
has no side effects for a woman —
aside from a serious conversation.
Learn more: cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/contraception.
health-science@washpost.com
E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 17 , 2017
women’s health
Birthing doll, specula, condoms: Not your typical museum
GYNECOLOGY FROM E1
herbal elixir from the 1940s
meant to help with “female
nerves” and “the change of life.”
There’s a 19th-century wishbonelike object that’s a precursor to
the modern intrauterine contraceptive device. It resembles a
giant screw with two prongs on
the end. While it was effective at
preventing pregnancy, it was
painful and caused infection.
There’s a modern copper one, too,
that’s effective for 10 years, as well
as a host of other forms of birth
control such as diaphragms, the
Today sponge and birth control
pills.
The museum is named for
Ralph W. Hale, a former executive
vice president of ACOG who had
an interest in history and a collection of artifacts related to his
profession. When I emailed him
asking what he felt were among
the most important innovations
in the specialty over time, he
pointed to something not even
specific to gynecology. Antibiotics, he wrote, were instrumental
in stopping sepsis, a major killer
of postpartum women. Along
with other medical advances, antibiotics helped decrease maternal deaths dramatically.
Now there are other changes:
The majority of first-year OB/
GYNs are women, according to
ACOG, although those older than
55 are mostly men.
The museum’s collection tells a
story that’s as much political as it
is scientific. It’s fascinating, horrifying and hopeful all at once.
Here’s a look at a dozen items
that have been central to the
specialty:
Forceps. Forceps were first
used during difficult deliveries to
save the lives of mother and child.
For a few decades in the early
20th century, mothers were given
a drug cocktail, including opioids, to induce “twilight sleep,”
and the child was frequently delivered using forceps. Forceps are
rarely used today. “Fewer and
fewer doctors are being instructed on the use of forceps today, so
the vacuum extractor is more
likely to be used in cases of
obstructed labor,” Hyde said in an
email. But, she added, “fewer
than 5 percent of deliveries in the
U.S. involve forceps or vacuum
extraction.”
Birth control pills. These
drugs, ubiquitous today, were approved by the Food and Drug
Administration in 1960. But some
states prohibited their use until a
U.S. Supreme Court decision in
1965 ruled that married couples
could decide for themselves. A
1972 case extended that right to
single people. Research on an oral
contraceptive for women began
in the 1950s, with initial work
supported by Margaret Sanger,
founder of the forerunner to
Planned Parenthood. According
to Hale, “It was researched, however, as a pill to increase fertility,”
which allowed scientists to raise
money without raising eyebrows.
Condoms. Rubber condoms
were first produced in the 1850s,
but evidence of condom use is
documented as far back as the
16th century, and some believe
condoms were used by ancient
cultures including the Egyptians
and Romans. For many years, due
to restrictive laws on birth control, condoms were advertised
and distributed only for disease
prevention. Latex versions appeared in the 1920s and have
PHOTOS BY CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
been the mainstay ever since.
They were given to American
soldiers in World War II for disease prevention and have remained popular as a prophylactic
and contraceptive.
Vibrators. “This is the one
that started our collection,” Hyde
says. A.C. Gilbert, who introduced
the Erector set in 1913 and made
the Polar Cub electric fan, also
sold a Polar Cub vibrator around
the same time. The first electromechanical vibrator was invented by 19th-century physician J.
Mortimer Granville.
For centuries, women had been
diagnosed with hysteria, a broad
term encompassing numerous
symptoms, including irritability
and anxiety. The treatment was to
bring the women to orgasm, and
the vibrator meant this would not
have to be done manually by
doctor or midwife. Once they
were commercially available, vibrators were billed vaguely as
personal
massagers.
“They
couldn’t say what they were really
for,” Hyde laughs. “This is America, you know?” Hysteria, or “hys-
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terical neurosis,” was finally deleted from the Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 1980.
Specula. The speculum was
invented in the mid-19th century
by J. Marion Sims, a surgeon
known as the father of modern
gynecology. The instrument
works by holding the walls of the
vagina open so that the cervix is
easily examined. During a routine
pelvic exam, cells from the cervix
are taken to test for abnormalities, and secretions are sampled
to test for infections. Sims is a
controversial figure. He was well
known for experimenting on enslaved women without their consent and without anesthesia. The
early-20th-century speculum on
display at the museum contains a
light whose cord could be
plugged into an electric lamp.
Tansy. Tansy is an herb that
was used as an abortifacient, a
substance that chemically induces an abortion. In the United
States, abortifacient use was
widespread — and its sale was big
business — until the early 19th
century. The first laws against the
sale of abortifacients were not
meant to prohibit their use or to
restrict abortion, but rather to
regulate substances that often
poisoned their users.
Practice doll. Billed as an
“obstetric teaching model,” the
museum’s doll, which is believed
to date from the late 19th or early
20th century, was used to teach
nursing and medical students
about childbirth. Made of leather,
it is probably stuffed with horse
hair and features movable limbs,
an umbilical cord and an attached placenta.
Lysol douche. During the
first part of the 20th century, a
great many concoctions were put
forth as douching agents for
women. “Boric acid. That brown
Lysol. Bleach, all kinds of disgusting stuff,” Hyde says. “And why do
you douche? Because someone
said you should.” Marketing materials suggest that products like
Lysol were meant to get rid of
“feminine odor,” but Andrea
Tone, writing in her book “Devices and Desires: A History of Contraceptives in America,” notes
that commercially produced
douches were, by 1940, the most
popular form of birth control for
women in the United States. Using Lysol as a douche frequently
caused inflammation and burns,
Items on display at the
museum of the American
College of Obstetricians
and Gynecologists
include, clockwise from
above left, an array of
birth control pills, a doll
that was used to teach
midwives, a speculum
with a cord that plugged
into a light socket and a
collection of condoms
from various decades.
Mary Hyde, senior
director of ACOG’s
resource center, says
that typical visitors to
the museum are
members of the
professional group, but
other people are also
welcome.
and as contraception it was completely ineffective.
Stilboestrol (diethylstilbestrol). This medication, known
informally as DES, is synthetic
estrogen that was primarily prescribed to prevent miscarriage
and premature labor. But it interfered with the endocrine system,
causing birth defects and other
problems. The drug was prescribed from 1938 to 1971.
Breast pump. While we generally think of breast pumps as a
means for a mother to continue
feeding her child breast milk
while she is working or doing
other activities without her baby,
the original breast pumps aided
mothers and babies having trouble with nursing the old-fashioned way. There have been several breast pump designs over the
years, including a manual pump
that resembles an old-school bicycle horn and another that required the woman to suck on a
length of attached hose. The VIM
Colby pump, on display at the
museum, is from the 1920s.
EPT
home pregnancy test.
While home pregnancy tests are
taken for granted today, their
availability is relatively recent.
The first commercially available
test, EPT (short for “early pregnancy test”) arrived in the late
1970s. The tests were revolutionary: A woman could find out
whether she was pregnant in the
privacy of her own home and at a
much earlier time than did previous tests, which had to be conducted in a lab. This allowed
earlier termination of the pregnancy or prenatal care and monitoring.
Fetoscope. “It’s like a handsfree phone, but it’s a hands-free
stethoscope,” Hyde says. The instrument is worn on the head,
with the bell of the scope in front.
The
DeLee-Hillis
obstetric
stethoscope was described first in
1917 by David Hillis, and again in
1922 by Joseph DeLee, his superior. (Hillis was the first to write
about the instrument, but DeLee
claimed to have been talking
about it for several years before
that.) The instrument, which
“gives easy and accurate control
of heart tones,” allowed physicians to monitor a baby’s heart
rate during labor. These days,
Electronic Fetal Monitoring is
commonly used.
Typical visitors to the museum
are ACOG members, according to
Hyde, but others are also welcome, provided they make an
appointment and explain the
purpose of their visit. The museum is at 409 12th St. SW in
Washington. The phone number
is 202-638-5577. The website is
acog.org.
health-science@washpost.com
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